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Sample records for 2df redshift survey

  1. An ANN Approach to Classification of Galaxy Spectra for the 2DF Galaxy Redshift Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folkes, S. R.; Lahav, O.; Maddox, S. J.

    We present a method for automated classification of galaxies with low signal-to-noise (S/N) spectra typical of redshift surveys. We develop spectral simulations based on the parameters for the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey, and with these simulations we investigate the technique of Principal Component Analysis when applied specifically to spectra of low S/N. We relate the objective principal components to features in the spectra and use a small number of components to successfully reconstruct the underlying signal from the low quality spectra. Using the principal components as input, we train an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) to classify the noisy simulated spectra into morphological classes, revealing the success of the classification against the observed bJ magnitude of the source, which we compare with alternative methods of classification. We find that more than 90% of our sample of normal galaxies are correctly classified into one of five broad morphological classes for simulations at bJ = 19.7. We also show the application of these methods to spectra from other sources.

  2. BLAST: THE REDSHIFT SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Eales, Stephen; Dye, Simon; Mauskopf, Philip; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Pascale, Enzo; Raymond, Gwenifer; Chapin, Edward L.; Halpern, Mark; Marsden, Gaelen; Scott, Douglas; Devlin, Mark J.; Rex, Marie; Semisch, Christopher; Truch, Matthew D. P.; Hughes, David H.; Netterfield, Calvin B.; Viero, Marco P.; Patanchon, Guillaume; Siana, Brian

    2009-12-20

    The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) has recently surveyed approx =8.7 deg{sup 2} centered on Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-South at 250, 350, and 500 mum. In Dye et al., we presented the catalog of sources detected at 5sigma in at least one band in this field and the probable counterparts to these sources in other wavebands. In this paper, we present the results of a redshift survey in which we succeeded in measuring redshifts for 82 of these counterparts. The spectra show that the BLAST counterparts are mostly star-forming galaxies but not extreme ones when compared to those found in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Roughly one quarter of the BLAST counterparts contain an active nucleus. We have used the spectroscopic redshifts to carry out a test of the ability of photometric redshift methods to estimate the redshifts of dusty galaxies, showing that the standard methods work well even when a galaxy contains a large amount of dust. We have also investigated the cases where there are two possible counterparts to the BLAST source, finding that in at least half of these there is evidence that the two galaxies are physically associated, either because they are interacting or because they are in the same large-scale structure. Finally, we have made the first direct measurements of the luminosity function in the three BLAST bands. We find strong evolution out to z = 1, in the sense that there is a large increase in the space density of the most luminous galaxies. We have also investigated the evolution of the dust-mass function, finding similar strong evolution in the space density of the galaxies with the largest dust masses, showing that the luminosity evolution seen in many wavebands is associated with an increase in the reservoir of interstellar matter in galaxies.

  3. Cosmology with photometric redshift surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, Chris; Bridle, Sarah

    2005-11-01

    We explore the utility of future photometric redshift imaging surveys for delineating the large-scale structure of the Universe, and assess the resulting constraints on the cosmological model. We perform the following two complementary types of analysis. (i) We quantify the statistical confidence and the accuracy with which such surveys will be able to detect and measure characteristic features in the clustering power spectrum such as the acoustic oscillations and the turnover, in a `model-independent' fashion. We show for example that a 10000-deg2 imaging survey with depth r= 22.5 and photometric redshift accuracy δz/(1 +z) = 0.03 will detect the acoustic oscillations with 99.9 per cent confidence, measuring the associated preferred cosmological scale with 2 per cent precision. Such a survey will also detect the turnover with 95 per cent confidence, determining the corresponding scale with 20 per cent accuracy. (ii) By assuming a Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model power spectrum we calculate the confidence with which a non-zero baryon fraction can be deduced from such future galaxy surveys. We quantify `wiggle detection' by calculating the number of standard deviations by which the baryon fraction is measured, after marginalizing over the shape parameter. This is typically a factor of 4 more significant (in terms of number of standard deviations) than the above `model-independent' result. For both analyses, we quantify the variation of the results with magnitude depth and photometric redshift precision, and discuss the prospects for obtaining the required performance with realistic future surveys. We conclude that the precision with which the clustering pattern may be inferred from future photometric redshift surveys will be competitive with contemporaneous spectroscopic redshift surveys, assuming that systematic effects can be controlled. We find that for equivalent wiggle detection power, a photometric redshift survey requires an area approximately 12[δz/(1 +z

  4. Southern Sky Redshift Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Da Costa, L.N.; Pellegrini, P.S.; Sargent, W.L.W.; Tonry, J.; Davis, M.

    1988-04-01

    The general characteristics of the space distribution of galaxies in the SSRS sample, covering the southern Galactic cap, are examined, and maps of the space distribution are presented. The sample consists of 2028 galaxies in an area of 1.75 sr with declination south of -17.5 deg and galactic latitude below -30 deg. The survey provides useful information on large-scale structure to a depth of 120/h Mpc. The galaxy distribution exhibits prominent filaments, sheets, and voids. Some large-scale structures are highly subclustered; others are much more diffuse. 21 references.

  5. The ESO Slice Project (ESP) redshift survey.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vettolani, G.; Zucca, E.; Cappi, A.; Merighi, R.; Mignoli, M.; Stirpe, G.; Zamorani, G.; MacGillivray, H.; Collins, C.; Balkowski, C.; Cayatte, V.; Maurogordato, S.; Proust, D.; Chincarini, G.; Guzzo, L.; Maccagni, D.; Scaramella, R.; Blanchard, A.; Ramella, M.

    The ESO Slice Project (ESP) is a galaxy redshift survey over about 30 square degrees, in a region near the South Galactic Pole. The survey is nearly complete to the limiting magnitude bj = 19.4 and consists of more than three thousands galaxies with reliable redshift determination.

  6. Photometric Redshifts in the IRAC Shallow Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Brodwin, M; Brown, M; Ashby, M; Bian, C; Brand, K; Dey, A; Eisenhardt, P; Eisenstein, D; Gonzalez, A; Huang, J; Kochanek, C; McKenzie, E; Pahre, M; Smith, H; Soifer, B; Stanford, S; Stern, D; Elston, R

    2006-06-13

    Accurate photometric redshifts are calculated for nearly 200,000 galaxies to a 4.5 micron flux limit of {approx} 13 {micro}Jy in the 8.5 deg{sup 2} Spitzer/IRAC Shallow survey. Using a hybrid photometric redshift algorithm incorporating both neural-net and template-fitting techniques, calibrated with over 15,000 spectroscopic redshifts, a redshift accuracy of {sigma} = 0.06 (1+z) is achieved for 95% of galaxies at 0 < z < 1.5. The accuracy is {sigma} = 0.12 (1 + z) for 95% of AGN at 0 < z < 3. Redshift probability functions, central to several ongoing studies of the galaxy population, are computed for the full sample. We demonstrate that these functions accurately represent the true redshift probability density, allowing the calculation of valid confidence intervals for all objects. These probability functions have already been used to successfully identify a population of Spitzer-selected high redshift (z > 1) galaxy clusters. We present one such spectroscopically confirmed cluster at = 1.24, ISCS J1434.2+3426. Finally, we present a measurement of the 4.5 {micro}m-selected galaxy redshift distribution.

  7. Cosmology with large galaxy redshift surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sodré, Laerte, Jr.

    2012-10-01

    Galaxy redshift surveys are a major tool to address the most challenging cosmological problems facing cosmology, like the nature of dark energy and properties dark matter. The same observations are useful for a much larger variety of scientific applications, from the study of small bodies in the solar system, to properties of tidal streams in the Milky Way halo, to galaxy formation and evolution. Here I briefly discuss what is a redshift survey and how it can be used to attack astrophysical and cosmological problems. I finish with a brief description of a new survey, the Javalambre Physics of the Accelerating Universe Astrophysical Survey (JPAS), which will use an innovative system of 56 filters to map ~ 8000 square degrees on the sky. JPAS photometric system, besides providing accurate photometric redshifts useful for cosmological parameter estimation, will deliver a low-resolution spectrum at each pixel on the sky, allowing for the first time an almost all-sky IFU science.

  8. Probing Cosmic Acceleration with Galaxy Redshift Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzzo, Luigi

    Redshift surveys of galaxies beyond the local Universe (z ≫ 0.1) are opening up new possibilities to understanding the observed acceleration of cosmic expansion, one of the greatest mysteries of modern science. Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations in the galaxy power spectrum (or correlation function), provide us with a standard rod to measure the expansion history H(z). At the same time, redshift-space distortions in the clustering pattern due to galaxy peculiar motions are a measure of the growth rate of structure f(z). The combination of these two quantities, allows us to distinguish whether cosmic acceleration is due to the existence of a "dark energy" in the cosmic budget, or rather requires a modification of General Relativity. These two radically alternative scenarios are degenerate when considering H(z) alone, as yielded, e.g. by the Hubble diagram of Type Ia supernovae. In this short review paper I will mostly concentrate on the latter measurement, whose potential importance in this context has been recently highlighted. Current results are consistent with the simplest GR-based cosmological constant scenario, but error bars are still large. Detailed forecasts show that next-generation deep surveys optimizing the combination of large volumes and good galaxy sampling will be able to use redshift distortions as a key tool to understand the physical origin of cosmic acceleration. Among these, I introduce the newly started VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS) at the ESO VLT, which is building at bar {z} ˜ 0.8 a sample comparable to the local 2dFGRS. Expectations from even larger surveys planned from space-borne observatories such as EUCLID will also be mentioned.

  9. Survey For Very High-Redshift Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemley, S.; MacAlpine, G.

    1997-12-01

    I will present the results from the deep, three color survey for very high redshift quasars. The survey involved direct imaging through Gunn gri filters using a 2048 x 2048 STIS ccd chip and Cerro Tololo's Curtis Scmidt Telescope. Quasar candidates in the range 4.0 < z < 5.4 were selected based on the detection of the Lyman alpha line and the strong drop in the spectrum blueward of this. Because of this response, quasars are clearly located away from the stellar locus on g - r vs. r - i diagrams. Quasar candidates in this redshift range have large values of g - r and small values of r - i. To confirm the candidates as quasars, the multi-fiber spectroscope Hydra, located on the WIYN telescope, was used. To date, spectral confirmation has been completed for ten degrees out of the approximately fifteen square degress of survey area. Several quasars were discovered, and I will present their spectra and information on the viability of this technique.

  10. A complete southern sky redshift survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Da Costa, L. Nicolaci; Geller, M. J.; Pellegrini, P. S.; Latham, D. W.; Fairall, A. P.; Marzke, R. O.; Willmer, C. N. A.; Huchra, J. P.; Calderon, J. H.; Ramella, M.

    1994-01-01

    We discuss a magnitude-limited redshift survey covering a region around the south Galactic pole (SSRS2). The survey includes 3592 galaxies and covers a region of 1.13 sr to a limiting m(sub B(0)) = 15.5, directly comparable to CfA2. Together, CfA2 and SSR2 cover more than a third of the sky. The northern and southern surveys are remarkably similar. Both contain voids with diameters as large as 5000 km/s. The southern survey contains the Southern Wall, similar to the northern Great Wall. The distributions of velocity dispersions for systems extracted from the SSRS2 and CfA2 surveys are also remarkably similar. For the SSRS2, an inhomogeneity-independent technique yields Schechter luminosity function parameters M(sup *) = -19.50 and alpha = -1.20 (H(sub O) = 100 h km/s/Mpc, h = 1 unless otherwise specified). The steep faint-end slope is probably attributable to bluer galaxies. By examining the normalized density fluctuations in the SSRS2 and CfA2 surveys, we suggest that the combined sample is not yet large enough to be 'fair.' There are large fluctuations in shells at 10,000 km/s.

  11. A redshift survey of IRAS galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Beverly J.; Kleinmann, S. G.; Huchra, J. P.; Low, F. J.

    1987-01-01

    Results are presented from a redshift survey of all 72 galaxies detected by IRAS in Band 3 at flux levels equal to or greater then 2 Jy. The luminosity function at the high luminosity end is proportional to L sup -2, however, a flattening was observed at the low luminosity end indicating that a single power law is not a good description of the entire luminosity function. Only three galaxies in the sample have emission line spectra indicative of AGN's, suggesting that, at least in nearby galaxies, unobscured nuclear activity is not a strong contributor to the far infrared flux. Comparisons between the selected IRAS galaxies and an optically complete sample taken from the CfA redshift survey show that they are more narrowly distributed than those optically selected, in the sence that the IRAS sample includes few galaxies of low absolute blue luminosity. It was also found that the space distributions of the two samples differ: the density enhancement or IRAS galaxies is only approx. 1/3 that of the optically selected galaxies in the core of the Coma cluster.

  12. Constraining inflation with future galaxy redshift surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zhiqi; Vernizzi, Filippo; Verde, Licia E-mail: liciaverde@icc.ub.edu

    2012-04-01

    With future galaxy surveys, a huge number of Fourier modes of the distribution of the large scale structures in the Universe will become available. These modes are complementary to those of the CMB and can be used to set constraints on models of the early universe, such as inflation. Using a MCMC analysis, we compare the power of the CMB with that of the combination of CMB and galaxy survey data, to constrain the power spectrum of primordial fluctuations generated during inflation. We base our analysis on the Planck satellite and a spectroscopic redshift survey with configuration parameters close to those of the Euclid mission as examples. We first consider models of slow-roll inflation, and show that the inclusion of large scale structure data improves the constraints by nearly halving the error bars on the scalar spectral index and its running. If we attempt to reconstruct the inflationary single-field potential, a similar conclusion can be reached on the parameters characterizing the potential. We then study models with features in the power spectrum. In particular, we consider ringing features produced by a break in the potential and oscillations such as in axion monodromy. Adding large scale structures improves the constraints on features by more than a factor of two. In axion monodromy we show that there are oscillations with small amplitude and frequency in momentum space that are undetected by CMB alone but can be measured by including galaxy surveys in the analysis.

  13. The power spectrum of galaxies in the 2dF 100k redshift survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tegmark, Max; Hamilton, Andrew J. S.; Xu, Yongzhong

    2002-10-01

    We compute the real-space power spectrum and the redshift-space distortions of galaxies in the 2dF 100k galaxy redshift survey using pseudo-Karhunen-Loève eigenmodes and the stochastic bias formalism. Our results agree well with those published by the 2dFGRS team, and have the added advantage of producing easy-to-interpret uncorrelated minimum-variance measurements of the galaxy-galaxy, galaxy-velocity and velocity-velocity power spectra in 27 k-bands, with narrow and well-behaved window functions in the range 0.01 h Mpc-1 < k < 0.8 h Mpc-1. We find no significant detection of baryonic wiggles, although our results are consistent with a standard flat ΩΛ= 0.7`concordance' model and previous tantalizing hints of baryonic oscillations. We measure the galaxy-matter correlation coefficient r > 0.4 and the redshift-distortion parameter β= 0.49 +/- 0.16 for r= 1 (β= 0.47 +/- 0.16 without finger-of-god compression). Since this is an apparent-magnitude limited sample, luminosity-dependent bias may cause a slight red-tilt in the power spectrum. A battery of systematic error tests indicate that the survey is not only impressive in size, but also unusually clean, free of systematic errors at the level to which our tests are sensitive. Our measurements and window functions are available at http://www.hep.upenn.edu/~max/2df.html together with the survey mask, radial selection function and uniform subsample of the survey that we have constructed.

  14. Redshift-space distortions in deep redshift surveys as a probe of the invisible Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzzo, Luigi; Le Fèvre, Olivier

    2010-06-01

    Massive redshift surveys of galaxies beyond the local Universe (i.e.z>0.3) provide an exhaustive probe of the observed acceleration of cosmic expansion. While they have the ability to measure the expansion history H(z) through Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations in the galaxy power spectrum, they can at the same time probe f(z) using the redshift-space distortions introduced in the observed clustering pattern by galaxy peculiar motions. Coupling these two measurements one can in principle distinguish whether cosmic acceleration is due to a new form of `dark energy' in the cosmic budget, or rather requires a modification of General Relativity. These two radically alternative scenarios are degenerate when considering H(z) alone, as yielded, e.g., by the Hubble diagram of Type Ia supernovae. We review our recent measurements of redshift distortions at z~ 1 based on the VIMOS VLT Deep Survey ``Wide'' data and discuss the revived interest on this technique in the context of dark energy. Current results are consistent with the simplest cosmological-constant scenario, but error bars are still too large to rule out alternative models. Forecasts based both on extensive simulations and Fisher-matrix computations, show that next-generation deep surveys optimizing the combination of large volumes and good galaxy sampling will be able to use redshift distortions as a key tool to understand the physical origin of cosmic acceleration. Among these, we introduce the newly started VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS) at the ESO VLT, which is building at ~0.8 a sample comparable to current local redshift surveys (105 redshifts in a volume 5×107 h-1 Mpc3). Finally, we provide an example of the exquisite accuracy that could be reached on measurements of redshift-space distortions (among many others), with a massive 20,000 deg2 near-infrared spectroscopic survey from space, as foreseen by the EUCLID mission for the ESA `Cosmic Vision' program.

  15. Mapping the Galaxy Color-Redshift Relation: Optimal Photometric Redshift Calibration Strategies for Cosmology Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, Daniel; Capak, Peter; Stern, Daniel; Ilbert, Olivier; Salvato, Mara; Schmidt, Samuel; Longo, Giuseppe; Rhodes, Jason; Paltani, Stephane; Mobasher, Bahram; Hoekstra, Henk; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Coupon, Jean; Steinhardt, Charles; Speagle, Josh; Faisst, Andreas; Kalinich, Adam; Brodwin, Mark; Brescia, Massimo; Cavuoti, Stefano

    2015-11-01

    Calibrating the photometric redshifts of ≳109 galaxies for upcoming weak lensing cosmology experiments is a major challenge for the astrophysics community. The path to obtaining the required spectroscopic redshifts for training and calibration is daunting, given the anticipated depths of the surveys and the difficulty in obtaining secure redshifts for some faint galaxy populations. Here we present an analysis of the problem based on the self-organizing map, a method of mapping the distribution of data in a high-dimensional space and projecting it onto a lower-dimensional representation. We apply this method to existing photometric data from the COSMOS survey selected to approximate the anticipated Euclid weak lensing sample, enabling us to robustly map the empirical distribution of galaxies in the multidimensional color space defined by the expected Euclid filters. Mapping this multicolor distribution lets us determine where—in galaxy color space—redshifts from current spectroscopic surveys exist and where they are systematically missing. Crucially, the method lets us determine whether a spectroscopic training sample is representative of the full photometric space occupied by the galaxies in a survey. We explore optimal sampling techniques and estimate the additional spectroscopy needed to map out the color-redshift relation, finding that sampling the galaxy distribution in color space in a systematic way can efficiently meet the calibration requirements. While the analysis presented here focuses on the Euclid survey, similar analysis can be applied to other surveys facing the same calibration challenge, such as DES, LSST, and WFIRST.

  16. MAPPING THE GALAXY COLOR–REDSHIFT RELATION: OPTIMAL PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFT CALIBRATION STRATEGIES FOR COSMOLOGY SURVEYS

    SciTech Connect

    Masters, Daniel; Steinhardt, Charles; Faisst, Andreas; Capak, Peter; Stern, Daniel; Rhodes, Jason; Ilbert, Olivier; Salvato, Mara; Schmidt, Samuel; Longo, Giuseppe; Paltani, Stephane; Coupon, Jean; Mobasher, Bahram; Hoekstra, Henk; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Speagle, Josh; Kalinich, Adam; Brodwin, Mark; Brescia, Massimo; Cavuoti, Stefano

    2015-11-01

    Calibrating the photometric redshifts of ≳10{sup 9} galaxies for upcoming weak lensing cosmology experiments is a major challenge for the astrophysics community. The path to obtaining the required spectroscopic redshifts for training and calibration is daunting, given the anticipated depths of the surveys and the difficulty in obtaining secure redshifts for some faint galaxy populations. Here we present an analysis of the problem based on the self-organizing map, a method of mapping the distribution of data in a high-dimensional space and projecting it onto a lower-dimensional representation. We apply this method to existing photometric data from the COSMOS survey selected to approximate the anticipated Euclid weak lensing sample, enabling us to robustly map the empirical distribution of galaxies in the multidimensional color space defined by the expected Euclid filters. Mapping this multicolor distribution lets us determine where—in galaxy color space—redshifts from current spectroscopic surveys exist and where they are systematically missing. Crucially, the method lets us determine whether a spectroscopic training sample is representative of the full photometric space occupied by the galaxies in a survey. We explore optimal sampling techniques and estimate the additional spectroscopy needed to map out the color–redshift relation, finding that sampling the galaxy distribution in color space in a systematic way can efficiently meet the calibration requirements. While the analysis presented here focuses on the Euclid survey, similar analysis can be applied to other surveys facing the same calibration challenge, such as DES, LSST, and WFIRST.

  17. SHELS: Complete Redshift Surveys of Two Widely Separated Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geller, Margaret J.; Hwang, Ho Seong; Dell'Antonio, Ian P.; Zahid, Harus Jabran; Kurtz, Michael J.; Fabricant, Daniel G.

    2016-05-01

    The Smithsonian Hectospec Lensing Survey (SHELS) is a complete redshift survey covering two well-separated fields (F1 and F2) of the Deep Lens Survey (DLS). Both fields are more than 94% complete to a Galactic extinction corrected R 0 = 20.2. Here, we describe the redshift survey of the F1 field centered at R.A.2000 = 00h53m25.ˢ3 and decl.2000 = 12°33‧55″ like F2, the F1 field covers ˜4 deg2. The redshift survey of the F1 field includes 9426 new galaxy redshifts measured with Hectospec on the MMT (published here). As a guide to future uses of the combined survey, we compare the mass metallicity relation and the distributions of D n 4000 as a function of stellar mass and redshift for the two fields. The mass-metallicity relations differ by an insignificant 1.6σ. For galaxies in the stellar mass range 1010-1011 M ⊙, the increase in the star-forming fraction with redshift is remarkably similar in the two fields. The seemingly surprising 31%-38% difference in the overall galaxy counts in F1 and F2 is probably consistent with the expected cosmic variance given the subtleties of the relative systematics in the two surveys. We also review the DLS cluster detections in the two fields: poorer photometric data for F1 precluded secure detection of the single massive cluster at z = 0.35 that we find in SHELS. Taken together, the two fields include 16,055 redshifts for galaxies with {R}0≤slant 20.2 and 20,754 redshifts for galaxies with R ≤ 20.6. These dense surveys in two well-separated fields provide a basis for future investigations of galaxy properties and large-scale structure.

  18. THE OPTICALLY UNBIASED GRB HOST (TOUGH) SURVEY. III. REDSHIFT DISTRIBUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Jakobsson, P.; Chapman, R.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; Hjorth, J.; Malesani, D.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Milvang-Jensen, B.; Tanvir, N. R.; Starling, R. L. C.; Letawe, G.

    2012-06-10

    We present 10 new gamma-ray burst (GRB) redshifts and another five redshift limits based on host galaxy spectroscopy obtained as part of a large program conducted at the Very Large Telescope (VLT). The redshifts span the range 0.345 {<=} z {approx}< 2.54. Three of our measurements revise incorrect values from the literature. The homogeneous host sample researched here consists of 69 hosts that originally had a redshift completeness of 55% (with 38 out of 69 hosts having redshifts considered secure). Our project, including VLT/X-shooter observations reported elsewhere, increases this fraction to 77% (53/69), making the survey the most comprehensive in terms of redshift completeness of any sample to the full Swift depth, analyzed to date. We present the cumulative redshift distribution and derive a conservative, yet small, associated uncertainty. We constrain the fraction of Swift GRBs at high redshift to a maximum of 14% (5%) for z > 6 (z > 7). The mean redshift of the host sample is assessed to be (z) {approx}> 2.2, with the 10 new redshifts reducing it significantly. Using this more complete sample, we confirm previous findings that the GRB rate at high redshift (z {approx}> 3) appears to be in excess of predictions based on assumptions that it should follow conventional determinations of the star formation history of the universe, combined with an estimate of its likely metallicity dependence. This suggests that either star formation at high redshifts has been significantly underestimated, for example, due to a dominant contribution from faint, undetected galaxies, or that GRB production is enhanced in the conditions of early star formation, beyond that usually ascribed to lower metallicity.

  19. Catastrophic photometric redshift errors: Weak-lensing survey requirements

    DOE PAGES

    Bernstein, Gary; Huterer, Dragan

    2010-01-11

    We study the sensitivity of weak lensing surveys to the effects of catastrophic redshift errors - cases where the true redshift is misestimated by a significant amount. To compute the biases in cosmological parameters, we adopt an efficient linearized analysis where the redshift errors are directly related to shifts in the weak lensing convergence power spectra. We estimate the number Nspec of unbiased spectroscopic redshifts needed to determine the catastrophic error rate well enough that biases in cosmological parameters are below statistical errors of weak lensing tomography. While the straightforward estimate of Nspec is ~106 we find that using onlymore » the photometric redshifts with z ≤ 2.5 leads to a drastic reduction in Nspec to ~ 30,000 while negligibly increasing statistical errors in dark energy parameters. Therefore, the size of spectroscopic survey needed to control catastrophic errors is similar to that previously deemed necessary to constrain the core of the zs – zp distribution. We also study the efficacy of the recent proposal to measure redshift errors by cross-correlation between the photo-z and spectroscopic samples. We find that this method requires ~ 10% a priori knowledge of the bias and stochasticity of the outlier population, and is also easily confounded by lensing magnification bias. In conclusion, the cross-correlation method is therefore unlikely to supplant the need for a complete spectroscopic redshift survey of the source population.« less

  20. The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey. Reconstruction of the redshift-space galaxy density field&

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granett, B. R.; Branchini, E.; Guzzo, L.; Abbas, U.; Adami, C.; Arnouts, S.; Bel, J.; Bolzonella, M.; Bottini, D.; Cappi, A.; Coupon, J.; Cucciati, O.; Davidzon, I.; De Lucia, G.; de la Torre, S.; Fritz, A.; Franzetti, P.; Fumana, M.; Garilli, B.; Ilbert, O.; Iovino, A.; Krywult, J.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Małek, K.; Marulli, F.; McCracken, H. J.; Polletta, M.; Pollo, A.; Scodeggio, M.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Tojeiro, R.; Vergani, D.; Zanichelli, A.; Burden, A.; Di Porto, C.; Marchetti, A.; Marinoni, C.; Mellier, Y.; Moutard, T.; Moscardini, L.; Nichol, R. C.; Peacock, J. A.; Percival, W. J.; Zamorani, G.

    2015-11-01

    Aims: Using the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS) we aim to jointly estimate the keyparameters that describe the galaxy density field and its spatial correlations in redshift space. Methods: We use the Bayesian formalism to jointly reconstruct the redshift-space galaxy density field, power spectrum, galaxy bias and galaxy luminosity function given the observations and survey selection function. The high-dimensional posterior distribution is explored using the Wiener filter within a Gibbs sampler. We validate the analysis using simulated catalogues and apply it to VIPERS data taking into consideration the inhomogeneous selection function. Results: We present joint constraints on the anisotropic power spectrum, and the bias and number density of red and blue galaxy classes in luminosity and redshift bins as well as the measurement covariances of these quantities. We find that the inferred galaxy bias and number density parameters are strongly correlated although they are only weakly correlated with the galaxy power spectrum. The power spectrum and redshift-space distortion parameters are in agreement with previous VIPERS results with the value of the growth rate fσ8 = 0.38 with 18% uncertainty at redshift 0.7. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  1. Correcting cosmological parameter biases for all redshift surveys induced by estimating and reweighting redshift distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, Markus Michael; Hoyle, Ben; Paech, Kerstin; Seitz, Stella

    2017-04-01

    Photometric redshift uncertainties are a major source of systematic error for ongoing and future photometric surveys. We study different sources of redshift error caused by choosing a suboptimal redshift histogram bin width and propose methods to resolve them. The selection of a too large bin width is shown to oversmooth small-scale structure of the radial distribution of galaxies. This systematic error can significantly shift cosmological parameter constraints by up to 6σ for the dark energy equation-of-state parameter w. Careful selection of bin width can reduce this systematic by a factor of up to 6 as compared with commonly used current binning approaches. We further discuss a generalized resampling method that can correct systematic and statistical errors in cosmological parameter constraints caused by uncertainties in the redshift distribution. This can be achieved without any prior assumptions about the shape of the distribution or the form of the redshift error. Our methodology allows photometric surveys to obtain unbiased cosmological parameter constraints using a minimum number of spectroscopic calibration data. For a DES-like galaxy clustering forecast, we obtain unbiased results with respect to errors caused by suboptimal histogram bin width selection, using only 5k representative spectroscopic calibration objects per tomographic redshift bin.

  2. EXTENDED PHOTOMETRY FOR THE DEEP2 GALAXY REDSHIFT SURVEY: A TESTBED FOR PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFT EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Daniel J.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Coil, Alison L.; Cooper, Michael C.; Gwyn, Stephen D. J. E-mail: janewman@pitt.edu E-mail: m.cooper@uci.edu

    2013-02-15

    This paper describes a new catalog that supplements the existing DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey photometric and spectroscopic catalogs with ugriz photometry from two other surveys: the Canada-France-Hawaii Legacy Survey (CFHTLS) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Each catalog is cross-matched by position on the sky in order to assign ugriz photometry to objects in the DEEP2 catalogs. We have recalibrated the CFHTLS photometry where it overlaps DEEP2 in order to provide a more uniform data set. We have also used this improved photometry to predict DEEP2 BRI photometry in regions where only poorer measurements were available previously. In addition, we have included improved astrometry tied to SDSS rather than USNO-A2.0 for all DEEP2 objects. In total this catalog contains {approx}27, 000 objects with full ugriz photometry as well as robust spectroscopic redshift measurements, 64% of which have r > 23. By combining the secure and accurate redshifts of the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey with ugriz photometry, we have created a catalog that can be used as an excellent testbed for future photo-z studies, including tests of algorithms for surveys such as LSST and DES.

  3. Galaxy clustering with photometric surveys using PDF redshift information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asorey, J.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Brunner, R. J.; Thaler, J.

    2016-06-01

    Photometric surveys produce large-area maps of the galaxy distribution, but with less accurate redshift information than is obtained from spectroscopic methods. Modern photometric redshift (photo-z) algorithms use galaxy magnitudes, or colours, that are obtained through multiband imaging to produce a probability density function (PDF) for each galaxy in the map. We used simulated data to study the effect of using different photo-z estimators to assign galaxies to redshift bins in order to compare their effects on angular clustering and galaxy bias measurements. We found that if we use the entire PDF, rather than a single-point (mean or mode) estimate, the deviations are less biased, especially when using narrow redshift bins. When the redshift bin widths are Δz = 0.1, the use of the entire PDF reduces the typical measurement bias from 5 per cent, when using single point estimates, to 3 per cent.

  4. Galaxy clustering with photometric surveys using PDF redshift information

    DOE PAGES

    Asorey, J.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; ...

    2016-03-28

    Here, photometric surveys produce large-area maps of the galaxy distribution, but with less accurate redshift information than is obtained from spectroscopic methods. Modern photometric redshift (photo-z) algorithms use galaxy magnitudes, or colors, that are obtained through multi-band imaging to produce a probability density function (PDF) for each galaxy in the map. We used simulated data to study the effect of using different photo-z estimators to assign galaxies to redshift bins in order to compare their effects on angular clustering and galaxy bias measurements. We found that if we use the entire PDF, rather than a single-point (mean or mode) estimate, the deviations are less biased, especially when using narrow redshift bins. When the redshift bin widths aremore » $$\\Delta z=0.1$$, the use of the entire PDF reduces the typical measurement bias from 5%, when using single point estimates, to 3%.« less

  5. Galaxy clustering with photometric surveys using PDF redshift information

    SciTech Connect

    Asorey, J.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Brunner, R. J.; Thaler, J.

    2016-03-28

    Here, photometric surveys produce large-area maps of the galaxy distribution, but with less accurate redshift information than is obtained from spectroscopic methods. Modern photometric redshift (photo-z) algorithms use galaxy magnitudes, or colors, that are obtained through multi-band imaging to produce a probability density function (PDF) for each galaxy in the map. We used simulated data to study the effect of using different photo-z estimators to assign galaxies to redshift bins in order to compare their effects on angular clustering and galaxy bias measurements. We found that if we use the entire PDF, rather than a single-point (mean or mode) estimate, the deviations are less biased, especially when using narrow redshift bins. When the redshift bin widths are $\\Delta z=0.1$, the use of the entire PDF reduces the typical measurement bias from 5%, when using single point estimates, to 3%.

  6. THE DEEP2 GALAXY REDSHIFT SURVEY: DESIGN, OBSERVATIONS, DATA REDUCTION, AND REDSHIFTS

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Jeffrey A.; Cooper, Michael C.; Davis, Marc; Faber, S. M.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Koo, David C.; Phillips, Andrew C.; Conroy, Charlie; Harker, Justin J.; Lai, Kamson; Dutton, Aaron A.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Gerke, Brian F.; Rosario, David J.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Willmer, C. N. A.; Yan Renbin; Kassin, Susan A.; Konidaris, N. P. E-mail: djm70@pitt.edu E-mail: mdavis@berkeley.edu E-mail: koo@ucolick.org E-mail: phillips@ucolick.org; and others

    2013-09-15

    We describe the design and data analysis of the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey, the densest and largest high-precision redshift survey of galaxies at z {approx} 1 completed to date. The survey was designed to conduct a comprehensive census of massive galaxies, their properties, environments, and large-scale structure down to absolute magnitude M{sub B} = -20 at z {approx} 1 via {approx}90 nights of observation on the Keck telescope. The survey covers an area of 2.8 deg{sup 2} divided into four separate fields observed to a limiting apparent magnitude of R{sub AB} = 24.1. Objects with z {approx}< 0.7 are readily identifiable using BRI photometry and rejected in three of the four DEEP2 fields, allowing galaxies with z > 0.7 to be targeted {approx}2.5 times more efficiently than in a purely magnitude-limited sample. Approximately 60% of eligible targets are chosen for spectroscopy, yielding nearly 53,000 spectra and more than 38,000 reliable redshift measurements. Most of the targets that fail to yield secure redshifts are blue objects that lie beyond z {approx} 1.45, where the [O II] 3727 A doublet lies in the infrared. The DEIMOS 1200 line mm{sup -1} grating used for the survey delivers high spectral resolution (R {approx} 6000), accurate and secure redshifts, and unique internal kinematic information. Extensive ancillary data are available in the DEEP2 fields, particularly in the Extended Groth Strip, which has evolved into one of the richest multiwavelength regions on the sky. This paper is intended as a handbook for users of the DEEP2 Data Release 4, which includes all DEEP2 spectra and redshifts, as well as for the DEEP2 DEIMOS data reduction pipelines. Extensive details are provided on object selection, mask design, biases in target selection and redshift measurements, the spec2d two-dimensional data-reduction pipeline, the spec1d automated redshift pipeline, and the zspec visual redshift verification process, along with examples of instrumental signatures or

  7. The DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey: Design, Observations, Data Reduction, and Redshifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Jeffrey A.; Cooper, Michael C.; Davis, Marc; Faber, S. M.; Coil, Alison L; Guhathakurta, Puraga; Koo, David C.; Phillips, Andrew C.; Conroy, Charlie; Dutton, Aaron A.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Gerke, Brian F.; Rosario, David J.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Wilmer, C. N. A.; Yan, Renbin; Harker, Justin J.; Kassin, Susan A.; Konidaris, N. P.; Lai, Kamson; Madgwick, Darren S.; Noeske, K. G.; Wirth, Gregory D.; Kirby, Evan N.; Lotz, Jennifer M.

    2013-01-01

    We describe the design and data analysis of the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey, the densest and largest high-precision redshift survey of galaxies at z approx. 1 completed to date. The survey was designed to conduct a comprehensive census of massive galaxies, their properties, environments, and large-scale structure down to absolute magnitude MB = -20 at z approx. 1 via approx.90 nights of observation on the Keck telescope. The survey covers an area of 2.8 Sq. deg divided into four separate fields observed to a limiting apparent magnitude of R(sub AB) = 24.1. Objects with z approx. < 0.7 are readily identifiable using BRI photometry and rejected in three of the four DEEP2 fields, allowing galaxies with z > 0.7 to be targeted approx. 2.5 times more efficiently than in a purely magnitude-limited sample. Approximately 60% of eligible targets are chosen for spectroscopy, yielding nearly 53,000 spectra and more than 38,000 reliable redshift measurements. Most of the targets that fail to yield secure redshifts are blue objects that lie beyond z approx. 1.45, where the [O ii] 3727 Ang. doublet lies in the infrared. The DEIMOS 1200 line mm(exp -1) grating used for the survey delivers high spectral resolution (R approx. 6000), accurate and secure redshifts, and unique internal kinematic information. Extensive ancillary data are available in the DEEP2 fields, particularly in the Extended Groth Strip, which has evolved into one of the richest multiwavelength regions on the sky. This paper is intended as a handbook for users of the DEEP2 Data Release 4, which includes all DEEP2 spectra and redshifts, as well as for the DEEP2 DEIMOS data reduction pipelines. Extensive details are provided on object selection, mask design, biases in target selection and redshift measurements, the spec2d two-dimensional data-reduction pipeline, the spec1d automated redshift pipeline, and the zspec visual redshift verification process, along with examples of instrumental signatures or other

  8. The DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey: Design, Observations, Data Reduction, and Redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Jeffrey A.; Cooper, Michael C.; Davis, Marc; Faber, S. M.; Coil, Alison L.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Koo, David C.; Phillips, Andrew C.; Conroy, Charlie; Dutton, Aaron A.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Gerke, Brian F.; Rosario, David J.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Willmer, C. N. A.; Yan, Renbin; Harker, Justin J.; Kassin, Susan A.; Konidaris, N. P.; Lai, Kamson; Madgwick, Darren S.; Noeske, K. G.; Wirth, Gregory D.; Connolly, A. J.; Kaiser, N.; Kirby, Evan N.; Lemaux, Brian C.; Lin, Lihwai; Lotz, Jennifer M.; Luppino, G. A.; Marinoni, C.; Matthews, Daniel J.; Metevier, Anne; Schiavon, Ricardo P.

    2013-09-01

    We describe the design and data analysis of the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey, the densest and largest high-precision redshift survey of galaxies at z ~ 1 completed to date. The survey was designed to conduct a comprehensive census of massive galaxies, their properties, environments, and large-scale structure down to absolute magnitude MB = -20 at z ~ 1 via ~90 nights of observation on the Keck telescope. The survey covers an area of 2.8 deg2 divided into four separate fields observed to a limiting apparent magnitude of R AB = 24.1. Objects with z <~ 0.7 are readily identifiable using BRI photometry and rejected in three of the four DEEP2 fields, allowing galaxies with z > 0.7 to be targeted ~2.5 times more efficiently than in a purely magnitude-limited sample. Approximately 60% of eligible targets are chosen for spectroscopy, yielding nearly 53,000 spectra and more than 38,000 reliable redshift measurements. Most of the targets that fail to yield secure redshifts are blue objects that lie beyond z ~ 1.45, where the [O II] 3727 Å doublet lies in the infrared. The DEIMOS 1200 line mm-1 grating used for the survey delivers high spectral resolution (R ~ 6000), accurate and secure redshifts, and unique internal kinematic information. Extensive ancillary data are available in the DEEP2 fields, particularly in the Extended Groth Strip, which has evolved into one of the richest multiwavelength regions on the sky. This paper is intended as a handbook for users of the DEEP2 Data Release 4, which includes all DEEP2 spectra and redshifts, as well as for the DEEP2 DEIMOS data reduction pipelines. Extensive details are provided on object selection, mask design, biases in target selection and redshift measurements, the spec2d two-dimensional data-reduction pipeline, the spec1d automated redshift pipeline, and the zspec visual redshift verification process, along with examples of instrumental signatures or other artifacts that in some cases remain after data reduction. Redshift

  9. Spectrophotometric Redshifts in the Faint Infrared Grism Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pharo, John; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James E.

    2016-06-01

    We have combined HST grism spectroscopy and deep broadband imaging to measure spectro-photometric redshifts (SPZs) of faint galaxies. Using a technique pioneered by Ryan et al. 2007, one can combine spectra and photometry to yield an SPZ that is more accurate than pure photometric redshifts, and can probe more deeply than ground-based spectroscopic redshifts. By taking mid-resolution spectra from the HST Faint Infrared Grism Survey (FIGS), SPZs can be found for measurements potentially down to 27th magnitude (the typical brightness of a dwarf galaxy at redshift ˜1.5). A galaxy’s redshift is vital for understanding its place in the growth and evolution of the universe. The measurement of high-accuracy SPZs for FIGS sources will improve the faint-end and high-redshift portions of the luminosity function, and make possible a robust analysis of the FIGS fields for signs of Large Scale Structure (LSS). The improved redshift and distance measurements allowed for the identification of a structure at z=0.83 in one of the FIGS fields.

  10. Spectral Confusion for Cosmological Surveys of Redshifted C II Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, A.; Dwek, E.; Moseley, S. H.

    2015-01-01

    Far-infrared cooling lines are ubiquitous features in the spectra of star-forming galaxies. Surveys of redshifted fine-structure lines provide a promising new tool to study structure formation and galactic evolution at redshifts including the epoch of reionization as well as the peak of star formation. Unlike neutral hydrogen surveys, where the 21 cm line is the only bright line, surveys of redshifted fine-structure lines suffer from confusion generated by line broadening, spectral overlap of different lines, and the crowding of sources with redshift. We use simulations to investigate the resulting spectral confusion and derive observing parameters to minimize these effects in pencilbeam surveys of redshifted far-IR line emission. We generate simulated spectra of the 17 brightest far-IR lines in galaxies, covering the 150-1300 µm wavelength region corresponding to redshifts 0 < z < 7, and develop a simple iterative algorithm that successfully identifies the 158 µm [C II] line and other lines. Although the [C II] line is a principal coolant for the interstellar medium, the assumption that the brightest observed lines in a given line of sight are always [C II] lines is a poor approximation to the simulated spectra once other lines are included. Blind line identification requires detection of fainter companion lines from the same host galaxies, driving survey sensitivity requirements. The observations require moderate spectral resolution 700 < R < 4000 with angular resolution between 20? and 10', sufficiently narrow to minimize confusion yet sufficiently large to include a statistically meaningful number of sources.

  11. SPECTRAL CONFUSION FOR COSMOLOGICAL SURVEYS OF REDSHIFTED C II EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Kogut, A.; Dwek, E.; Moseley, S. H.

    2015-06-20

    Far-infrared cooling lines are ubiquitous features in the spectra of star-forming galaxies. Surveys of redshifted fine-structure lines provide a promising new tool to study structure formation and galactic evolution at redshifts including the epoch of reionization as well as the peak of star formation. Unlike neutral hydrogen surveys, where the 21 cm line is the only bright line, surveys of redshifted fine-structure lines suffer from confusion generated by line broadening, spectral overlap of different lines, and the crowding of sources with redshift. We use simulations to investigate the resulting spectral confusion and derive observing parameters to minimize these effects in pencil-beam surveys of redshifted far-IR line emission. We generate simulated spectra of the 17 brightest far-IR lines in galaxies, covering the 150–1300 μm wavelength region corresponding to redshifts 0 < z < 7, and develop a simple iterative algorithm that successfully identifies the 158 μm [C ii] line and other lines. Although the [C ii] line is a principal coolant for the interstellar medium, the assumption that the brightest observed lines in a given line of sight are always [C ii] lines is a poor approximation to the simulated spectra once other lines are included. Blind line identification requires detection of fainter companion lines from the same host galaxies, driving survey sensitivity requirements. The observations require moderate spectral resolution 700 < R < 4000 with angular resolution between 20″ and 10′, sufficiently narrow to minimize confusion yet sufficiently large to include a statistically meaningful number of sources.

  12. Catastrophic photometric redshift errors: Weak-lensing survey requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, Gary; Huterer, Dragan

    2010-01-11

    We study the sensitivity of weak lensing surveys to the effects of catastrophic redshift errors - cases where the true redshift is misestimated by a significant amount. To compute the biases in cosmological parameters, we adopt an efficient linearized analysis where the redshift errors are directly related to shifts in the weak lensing convergence power spectra. We estimate the number Nspec of unbiased spectroscopic redshifts needed to determine the catastrophic error rate well enough that biases in cosmological parameters are below statistical errors of weak lensing tomography. While the straightforward estimate of Nspec is ~106 we find that using only the photometric redshifts with z ≤ 2.5 leads to a drastic reduction in Nspec to ~ 30,000 while negligibly increasing statistical errors in dark energy parameters. Therefore, the size of spectroscopic survey needed to control catastrophic errors is similar to that previously deemed necessary to constrain the core of the zs – zp distribution. We also study the efficacy of the recent proposal to measure redshift errors by cross-correlation between the photo-z and spectroscopic samples. We find that this method requires ~ 10% a priori knowledge of the bias and stochasticity of the outlier population, and is also easily confounded by lensing magnification bias. In conclusion, the cross-correlation method is therefore unlikely to supplant the need for a complete spectroscopic redshift survey of the source population.

  13. The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey: Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddox, Steve; 2DF Galaxy Redshift Survey Team; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Cannon, Russell; Cole, Shaun; Colless, Matthew; Collins, Chris; Couch, Warrick; Dalton, Gavin; Driver, Simon; Ellis, Richard; Efstathiou, George; Folkes, Simon; Frenk, Carlos; Glazebrook, Karl; Kaiser, Nick; Lahav, Ofer; Lumsden, Stuart; Peterson, Bruce; Peacock, John; Sutherland, Will; Taylor, Keith

    Spectroscopic observations for a new survey of 250 000 galaxy redshifts are underway, using the 2dF instrument at the AAT. The input galaxy catalogue and commissioning data are described. The first result from the preliminary data is a new estimate of the galaxy luminosity function at = 0.1.

  14. Probing neutrinos from Planck and forthcoming galaxy redshift surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi, Yoshitaka; Kadota, Kenji E-mail: kadota.kenji@f.nagoya-u.jp

    2014-01-01

    We investigate how much the constraints on the neutrino properties can be improved by combining the CMB, the photometric and spectroscopic galaxy redshift surveys which include the CMB lensing, galaxy lensing tomography, galaxy clustering and redshift space distortion observables. We pay a particular attention to the constraint on the neutrino mass in view of the forthcoming redshift surveys such as the Euclid satellite and the LSST survey along with the Planck CMB lensing measurements. Combining the transverse mode information from the angular power spectrum and the longitudinal mode information from the spectroscopic survey with the redshift space distortion measurements can determine the total neutrino mass with the projected error of O(0.02) eV. Our analysis fixes the mass splittings among the neutrino species to be consistent with the neutrino oscillation data, and we accordingly study the sensitivity of our parameter estimations on the minimal neutrino mass. The cosmological measurement of the total neutrino mass can distinguish between the normal and inverted mass hierarchy scenarios if the minimal neutrino mass ∼<0.005 eV with the predicted 1–σ uncertainties taken into account.

  15. The Redshift and Real-Space Correlation Functions from the ESP Galaxy Redshift Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzzo, Luigi; Bartlett, J. G.; Cappi, A.; Maurogordato, S.; Zucca, E.; Zamorani, G.; Balkowski, C.; Blanchard, A.; Cayatte, V.; Chincarini, G.; Collins, C.; Maccagni, D.; MacGillivray, H.; Merighi, R.; Mignoli, M.; Proust, D.; Ramella, M.; Scaramella, R.; Stirpe, G. M.; Vettolani, G.

    We discuss the behaviour of the redshift- and real-space correlation functions from the ESO Slice Project (ESP) galaxy redshift survey. xis for the whole survey is positive out to ~80hmpc, with a smooth break from a power law. By projecting xip, we recover the real-space correlation function xir, which below 10hmpc is reasonably well described by a power law xi(r) = (r/r_circ)^{-gamma}, with r_circ = 4.15^{+0.20}_{-0.21} h^{-1} Mpc and gamma = 1.67^{+0.07}_{-0.09}. The same analysis, applied to four volume-limited subsamples, evidences a small but significant growth of clustering with luminosity (r_circ varies from 3.4 to 5.2hmpc, when the luminosity threshold is increased from -18.5 to -20).

  16. Differentiating dark energy and modified gravity with galaxy redshift surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yun

    2008-05-01

    The observed cosmic acceleration today could be due to an unknown energy component (dark energy), or a modification to general relativity (modified gravity). If dark energy models and modified gravity models are required to predict the same cosmic expansion history H(z), they will predict different growth rates for cosmic large scale structure, fg(z). If gravity is not modified, the measured H(z) leads to a unique prediction for fg(z), fgH(z), if dark energy and dark matter are separate. Comparing fgH(z) with the measured fg(z) provides a transparent and straightforward test of gravity. We show that a simple χ2 test provides a general figure of merit for our ability to distinguish between dark energy and modified gravity given the measured H(z) and fg(z). We find that a magnitude-limited NIR galaxy redshift survey covering >10 000 (deg)2 and a redshift range of 0.5redshift-space distortions and the bias factor which describes how light traces mass. We show that if the H(z) data are fitted by both a DGP gravity model and an equivalent dark energy model that predict the same H(z), a survey area of 11 931 (deg)2 is required to rule out the DGP gravity model at the 99.99% confidence level. It is feasible for such a galaxy redshift survey to be carried out by the next generation space missions from NASA and ESA, and it will revolutionize our understanding of the universe by differentiating between dark energy and modified gravity.

  17. Accurate photometric redshifts for the CFHT legacy survey calibrated using the VIMOS VLT deep survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilbert, O.; Arnouts, S.; McCracken, H. J.; Bolzonella, M.; Bertin, E.; Le Fèvre, O.; Mellier, Y.; Zamorani, G.; Pellò, R.; Iovino, A.; Tresse, L.; Le Brun, V.; Bottini, D.; Garilli, B.; Maccagni, D.; Picat, J. P.; Scaramella, R.; Scodeggio, M.; Vettolani, G.; Zanichelli, A.; Adami, C.; Bardelli, S.; Cappi, A.; Charlot, S.; Ciliegi, P.; Contini, T.; Cucciati, O.; Foucaud, S.; Franzetti, P.; Gavignaud, I.; Guzzo, L.; Marano, B.; Marinoni, C.; Mazure, A.; Meneux, B.; Merighi, R.; Paltani, S.; Pollo, A.; Pozzetti, L.; Radovich, M.; Zucca, E.; Bondi, M.; Bongiorno, A.; Busarello, G.; de La Torre, S.; Gregorini, L.; Lamareille, F.; Mathez, G.; Merluzzi, P.; Ripepi, V.; Rizzo, D.; Vergani, D.

    2006-10-01

    Aims. We present and release photometric redshifts for a uniquely large and deep sample of 522286 objects with i'_AB≤ 25 in the Canada-France Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey (CFHTLS) "Deep Survey" fields D1, D2, D3, and D4, which cover a total effective area of 3.2 °^2. Methods: . We use 3241 spectroscopic redshifts with 0 ≤ z ≤ 5 from the VIMOS VLT Deep Survey (VVDS) as a calibration and training set to derive these photometric redshifts. Using the "Le Phare" photometric redshift code, we developed a robust calibration method based on an iterative zero-point refinement combined with a template optimisation procedure and the application of a Bayesian approach. This method removes systematic trends in the photometric redshifts and significantly reduces the fraction of catastrophic errors (by a factor of 2), a significant improvement over traditional methods. We use our unique spectroscopic sample to present a detailed assessment of the robustness of the photometric redshift sample. Results: . For a sample selected at i'_AB≤ 24, we reach a redshift accuracy of σΔ z/(1+z)=0.029 with η=3.8% of catastrophic errors (η is defined strictly as those objects with |Δ z|/(1+z) > 0.15). The reliability of our photometric redshifts decreases for faint objects: we find σΔ z/(1+z)=0.025, 0.034 and η=1.9%, 5.5% for samples selected at i'_AB=17.5-22.5 and 22.5-24 respectively. We find that the photometric redshifts of starburst galaxies are less reliable: although these galaxies represent only 22% of the spectroscopic sample, they are responsible for 50% of the catastrophic errors. An analysis as a function of redshift demonstrates that our photometric redshifts work best in the redshift range 0.2≤ z ≤ 1.5. We find an excellent agreement between the photometric and the VVDS spectroscopic redshift distributions at i'_AB≤ 24. Finally, we compare the redshift distributions of i' selected galaxies on the four CFHTLS deep fields, showing that cosmic variance is

  18. PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS FOR QUASARS IN MULTI-BAND SURVEYS

    SciTech Connect

    Brescia, M.; Mercurio, A.; Cavuoti, S.; Longo, G.; D'Abrusco, R.

    2013-08-01

    The Multi Layer Perceptron with Quasi Newton Algorithm (MLPQNA) is a machine learning method that can be used to cope with regression and classification problems on complex and massive data sets. In this paper, we give a formal description of the method and present the results of its application to the evaluation of photometric redshifts for quasars. The data set used for the experiment was obtained by merging four different surveys (Sloan Digital Sky Survey, GALEX, UKIDSS, and WISE), thus covering a wide range of wavelengths from the UV to the mid-infrared. The method is able (1) to achieve a very high accuracy, (2) to drastically reduce the number of outliers and catastrophic objects, and (3) to discriminate among parameters (or features) on the basis of their significance, so that the number of features used for training and analysis can be optimized in order to reduce both the computational demands and the effects of degeneracy. The best experiment, which makes use of a selected combination of parameters drawn from the four surveys, leads, in terms of {Delta}z{sub norm} (i.e., (z{sub spec} - z{sub phot})/(1 + z{sub spec})), to an average of {Delta}z{sub norm} = 0.004, a standard deviation of {sigma} = 0.069, and a median absolute deviation, MAD = 0.02, over the whole redshift range (i.e., z{sub spec} {<=} 3.6), defined by the four-survey cross-matched spectroscopic sample. The fraction of catastrophic outliers, i.e., of objects with photo-z deviating more than 2{sigma} from the spectroscopic value, is <3%, leading to {sigma} = 0.035 after their removal, over the same redshift range. The method is made available to the community through the DAMEWARE Web application.

  19. A Survey for Very High-Redshift Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemley, Shelley R.

    1995-12-01

    I have been conducting a deep, three color survey for very high redshift quasars and will present information on how my candidates, which are awaiting spectroscopic confirmation, have been selected. The survey involves direct imaging through Gunn gri filters using a 2048 x 2048 STIS ccd chip and Cerro Tololo's Curtis Scmidt Telescope. Quasar candidates in the range 4.2 < z < 5.4 have been selected based on the detection of the Lyman alpha line and the strong drop in the spectrum blueward of this. Because of this response, quasars are clearly located away from the stellar locus on g - r vs. r - i diagrams. Quasar candidates with z ~ 4.5 have large values of g - r and values of r - i near zero. The z>5 candidates have large r - i values and g - r values near zero. Before beginning the survey, test observations using this selection method were made of two known quasars with redshifts of 4.5 and 4.7. The quasars were successfully relocated by the technique and several candidates, which will also be observed for spectroscopic confirmation, were selected from those two fields. To date, 13 square degrees have been surveyed.

  20. Combining weak-lensing tomography and spectroscopic redshift surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Yan -Chuan; Bernstein, Gary

    2012-05-11

    Redshift space distortion (RSD) is a powerful way of measuring the growth of structure and testing General Relativity, but it is limited by cosmic variance and the degeneracy between galaxy bias b and the growth rate factor f. The cross-correlation of lensing shear with the galaxy density field can in principle measure b in a manner free from cosmic variance limits, breaking the f-b degeneracy and allowing inference of the matter power spectrum from the galaxy survey. We analyze the growth constraints from a realistic tomographic weak lensing photo-z survey combined with a spectroscopic galaxy redshift survey over the same sky area. For sky coverage fsky = 0.5, analysis of the transverse modes measures b to 2-3% accuracy per Δz = 0.1 bin at z < 1 when ~10 galaxies arcmin–2 are measured in the lensing survey and all halos with M > Mmin = 1013h–1M have spectra. For the gravitational growth parameter parameter γ (f = Ωγm), combining the lensing information with RSD analysis of non-transverse modes yields accuracy σ(γ) ≈ 0.01. Adding lensing information to the RSD survey improves \\sigma(\\gamma) by an amount equivalent to a 3x (10x) increase in RSD survey area when the spectroscopic survey extends down to halo mass 1013.5 (1014) h–1 M. We also find that the σ(γ) of overlapping surveys is equivalent to that of surveys 1.5-2 times larger if they are separated on the sky. This gain is greatest when the spectroscopic mass threshold is 1013 -1014 h–1 M, similar to LRG surveys. The gain of overlapping surveys is reduced for very deep or very shallow spectroscopic surveys, but any practical surveys are more powerful when overlapped than when separated. As a result, the gain of overlapped surveys is larger in the case when the primordial power spectrum normalization is

  1. Combining weak-lensing tomography and spectroscopic redshift surveys

    DOE PAGES

    Cai, Yan -Chuan; Bernstein, Gary

    2012-05-11

    Redshift space distortion (RSD) is a powerful way of measuring the growth of structure and testing General Relativity, but it is limited by cosmic variance and the degeneracy between galaxy bias b and the growth rate factor f. The cross-correlation of lensing shear with the galaxy density field can in principle measure b in a manner free from cosmic variance limits, breaking the f-b degeneracy and allowing inference of the matter power spectrum from the galaxy survey. We analyze the growth constraints from a realistic tomographic weak lensing photo-z survey combined with a spectroscopic galaxy redshift survey over the samemore » sky area. For sky coverage fsky = 0.5, analysis of the transverse modes measures b to 2-3% accuracy per Δz = 0.1 bin at z < 1 when ~10 galaxies arcmin–2 are measured in the lensing survey and all halos with M > Mmin = 1013h–1M⊙ have spectra. For the gravitational growth parameter parameter γ (f = Ωγm), combining the lensing information with RSD analysis of non-transverse modes yields accuracy σ(γ) ≈ 0.01. Adding lensing information to the RSD survey improves \\sigma(\\gamma) by an amount equivalent to a 3x (10x) increase in RSD survey area when the spectroscopic survey extends down to halo mass 1013.5 (1014) h–1 M⊙. We also find that the σ(γ) of overlapping surveys is equivalent to that of surveys 1.5-2 times larger if they are separated on the sky. This gain is greatest when the spectroscopic mass threshold is 1013 -1014 h–1 M⊙, similar to LRG surveys. The gain of overlapping surveys is reduced for very deep or very shallow spectroscopic surveys, but any practical surveys are more powerful when overlapped than when separated. As a result, the gain of overlapped surveys is larger in the case when the primordial power spectrum normalization is uncertain by > 0.5%.« less

  2. Spherical Harmonic Analysis of Redshift Space Distortions in the IRAS PSCZ Redshift Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadros, H.; Ballinger, W.; Heavens, A.; Taylor, A.; Efstathiou, G.; Saunders, W.; Frenk, C.; Keeble, O.; McMahon, R.; Maddox, S.; Oliver, S.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Sutherland, W.; White, S.

    We apply the formalism of spherical harmonic decomposition to the galaxy density field of the IRAS PSCz redshift survey. Taking into account the first order distortion of the galaxy pattern due to redshift coordinates, we have measured the degree of distortion, parameterised by the distortion parameter beta ~ Omega^{0.6}/b, using maximum likelihood methods. We simultaneously measure either the undistorted amplitude of perturbations in the galaxy distribution when a parameterised power spectrum is assumed, or the shape and amplitude of the real--space power spectrum if the band--power in a set of passbands is measured in a step--wise fashion. We find that in the case of a parameterised power spectrum beta=0.59 +/- 0.26 and the amplitude of the power at wavenumber k=0.1h{Mpc}^{-1} is Delta_{0.1}=0.48 +/- 0.04 (marginal errors). Freeing the shape of the power spectrum we find that beta=0.61 +/- 0.2, and Delta_{0.1}=0.48 +/- 0.04 (conditional errors).

  3. The power spectrum of the Point Source Catalogue redshift survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, W.; Tadros, H.; Efstathiou, G.; Frenk, C. S.; Keeble, O.; Maddox, S.; McMahon, R. G.; Oliver, S.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Saunders, W.; White, S. D. M.

    1999-09-01

    We measure the redshift-space power spectrum P(k) for the recently completed IRAS Point Source Catalogue (PSC) redshift survey, which contains 14 500 galaxies over 84 per cent of the sky with 60-μm flux >=0.6 Jy. Comparison with simulations shows that our estimated errors on P(k) are realistic, and that systematic errors resulting from the finite survey volume are small for wavenumbers k >~ 0.03 h Mpc^-1. At large scales our power spectrum is intermediate between those of the earlier QDOT and 1.2-Jy surveys, but with considerably smaller error bars; it falls slightly more steeply to smaller scales. We have fitted families of CDM-like models using the Peacock-Dodds formula for non-linear evolution; the results are somewhat sensitive to the assumed small-scale velocity dispersion σ_V. Assuming a realistic σ_V ~ 300 km s^-1 yields a shape parameter Γ ~ 0.25 and normalization bσ_8 ~ 0.75; if σ_V is as high as 600 km s^-1 then Γ = 0.5 is only marginally excluded. There is little evidence for any `preferred scale' in the power spectrum or non-Gaussian behaviour in the distribution of large-scale power.

  4. A faint galaxy redshift survey behind massive clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Frye, Brenda Louise

    1999-05-01

    This thesis is concerned with the gravitational lensing effect by massive galaxy clusters. We have explored a new technique for measuring galaxy masses and for detecting high-z galaxies by their optical colors. A redshift survey has been obtained at the Keck for a magnitude limited sample of objects (I<23) behind three clusters, A1689, A2390, and A2218 within a radius of 0.5M pc. For each cluster we see both a clear trend of increasing flux and redshift towards the center. This behavior is the result of image magnifications, such that at fixed redshift one sees further down the luminosity function. The gradient of this magnification is, unlike measurements of image distortion, sensitive to the mass profile, and found to depart strongly from a pure isothermal halo. We have found that V RI color selection can be used effectively as a discriminant for finding high-z galaxies behind clusters and present five 4.1 < z < 5.1 spectra which are of very high quality due to their high mean magnification of ~20, showing strong, visibly-saturated interstellar metal lines in some cases. We have also investigated the radio ring lens PKS 1830-211, locating the source and multiple images and detected molecular absorption at mm wavelengths. Broad molecular absorption of width 1/40kms is found toward the southwest component only, where surprisingly it does not reach the base of the continuum, which implies incomplete coverage of the SW component by molecular gas, despite the small projected size of the source, less than 1/8h pc at the absorption redshift.

  5. Spatial density fluctuations and selection effects in galaxy redshift surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Labini, Francesco Sylos; Tekhanovich, Daniil; Baryshev, Yurij V. E-mail: d.tekhanovich@spbu.ru

    2014-07-01

    One of the main problems of observational cosmology is to determine the range in which a reliable measurement of galaxy correlations is possible. This corresponds to determining the shape of the correlation function, its possible evolution with redshift and the size and amplitude of large scale structures. Different selection effects, inevitably entering in any observation, introduce important constraints in the measurement of correlations. In the context of galaxy redshift surveys selection effects can be caused by observational techniques and strategies and by implicit assumptions used in the data analysis. Generally all these effects are taken into account by using pair-counting algorithms to measure two-point correlations. We review these methods stressing that they are based on the a-priori assumption that galaxy distribution is spatially homogeneous inside a given sample. We show that, when this assumption is not satisfied by the data, results of the correlation analysis are affected by finite size effects. In order to quantify these effects, we introduce a new method based on the computation of the gradient of galaxy counts along tiny cylinders. We show, by using artificial homogeneous and inhomogeneous point distributions, that this method identifies redshift dependent selection effects and disentangles them from the presence of large scale density fluctuations. We then apply this new method to several redshift catalogs and we find evidence that galaxy distribution, in those samples where selection effects are small enough, is characterized by power-law correlations with exponent γ=0.9 up to 20 Mpc/h followed by a change of slope that, in the range 20–100 Mpc/h, corresponds to a power-law exponent γ=0.25. Whether a crossover to spatial uniformity occurs at ∼ 100 Mpc/h or larger scales cannot be clarified by the present data.

  6. The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey. Searching for cosmic voids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micheletti, D.; Iovino, A.; Hawken, A. J.; Granett, B. R.; Bolzonella, M.; Cappi, A.; Guzzo, L.; Abbas, U.; Adami, C.; Arnouts, S.; Bel, J.; Bottini, D.; Branchini, E.; Coupon, J.; Cucciati, O.; Davidzon, I.; De Lucia, G.; de la Torre, S.; Fritz, A.; Franzetti, P.; Fumana, M.; Garilli, B.; Ilbert, O.; Krywult, J.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Małek, K.; Marulli, F.; McCracken, H. J.; Polletta, M.; Pollo, A.; Schimd, C.; Scodeggio, M.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Tojeiro, R.; Vergani, D.; Zanichelli, A.; Burden, A.; Di Porto, C.; Marchetti, A.; Marinoni, C.; Mellier, Y.; Moutard, T.; Moscardini, L.; Nichol, R. C.; Peacock, J. A.; Percival, W. J.; Zamorani, G.

    2014-10-01

    Context. The characterisation of cosmic voids gives unique information about the large-scale distribution of galaxies, their evolution, and thecosmological model. Aims: We identify and characterise cosmic voids in the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS) at redshift 0.55 survey boundaries and internal gaps. We investigate the impact of systematic observational effects and validate the method against mock catalogues. We measure the void size distribution and the void-galaxy correlation function. Results: We construct a catalogue of voids in VIPERS. The distribution of voids is found to agree well with the distribution of voids found in mock catalogues. The void-galaxy correlation function shows indications of outflow velocity from the voids. The voids catalogue (Table 3) is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/570/A106

  7. THE 2MASS REDSHIFT SURVEY-DESCRIPTION AND DATA RELEASE

    SciTech Connect

    Huchra, John P.; Berlind, Perry; Calkins, Michael; Falco, Emilio; Mink, Jessica D.; Tokarz, Susan; Macri, Lucas M.; Masters, Karen L.; Jarrett, Thomas H.; Crook, Aidan C.; Cutri, Roc; Erdogdu, Pirin; Lahav, Ofer; George, Teddy; Hutcheson, Conrad M.; Mader, Jeff; Martimbeau, Nathalie; Schneider, Stephen; Skrutskie, Michael; Westover, Michael E-mail: karen.masters@port.ac.uk

    2012-04-01

    We present the results of the 2MASS Redshift Survey (2MRS), a ten-year project to map the full three-dimensional distribution of galaxies in the nearby universe. The Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) was completed in 2003 and its final data products, including an extended source catalog (XSC), are available online. The 2MASS XSC contains nearly a million galaxies with K{sub s} {<=} 13.5 mag and is essentially complete and mostly unaffected by interstellar extinction and stellar confusion down to a galactic latitude of |b| = 5 Degree-Sign for bright galaxies. Near-infrared wavelengths are sensitive to the old stellar populations that dominate galaxy masses, making 2MASS an excellent starting point to study the distribution of matter in the nearby universe. We selected a sample of 44,599 2MASS galaxies with K{sub s} {<=} 11.75 mag and |b| {>=} 5 Degree-Sign ({>=}8 Degree-Sign toward the Galactic bulge) as the input catalog for our survey. We obtained spectroscopic observations for 11,000 galaxies and used previously obtained velocities for the remainder of the sample to generate a redshift catalog that is 97.6% complete to well-defined limits and covers 91% of the sky. This provides an unprecedented census of galaxy (baryonic mass) concentrations within 300 Mpc. Earlier versions of our survey have been used in a number of publications that have studied the bulk motion of the Local Group, mapped the density and peculiar velocity fields out to 50 h{sup -1} Mpc, detected galaxy groups, and estimated the values of several cosmological parameters. Additionally, we present morphological types for a nearly complete sub-sample of 20,860 galaxies with K{sub s} {<=} 11.25 mag and |b| {>=} 10 Degree-Sign .

  8. A Photometric redshift galaxy catalog from the Red-Sequence Cluster Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Bau-Ching; Yee, H.K.C.; Lin, H.; Gladders, M.D.; /Carnegie Inst. Observ.

    2005-02-01

    The Red-Sequence Cluster Survey (RCS) provides a large and deep photometric catalog of galaxies in the z' and R{sub c} bands for 90 square degrees of sky, and supplemental V and B data have been obtained for 33.6 deg{sup 2}. They compile a photometric redshift catalog from these 4-band data by utilizing the empirical quadratic polynomial photometric redshift fitting technique in combination with CNOC2 and GOODS/HDF-N redshift data. The training set includes 4924 spectral redshifts. The resulting catalog contains more than one million galaxies with photometric redshifts < 1.5 and R{sub c} < 24, giving an rms scatter {delta}({Delta}z) < 0.06 within the redshift range 0.2 < z < 0.5 and {sigma}({Delta}z) < 0.11 for galaxies at 0.0 < z < 1.5. They describe the empirical quadratic polynomial photometric redshift fitting technique which they use to determine the relation between red-shift and photometry. A kd-tree algorithm is used to divide up the sample to improve the accuracy of the catalog. They also present a method for estimating the photometric redshift error for individual galaxies. They show that the redshift distribution of the sample is in excellent agreement with smaller and much deeper photometric and spectroscopic redshift surveys.

  9. THE DEEP3 GALAXY REDSHIFT SURVEY: KECK/DEIMOS SPECTROSCOPY IN THE GOODS-N FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Michael C.; Aird, James A.; Coil, Alison L. E-mail: acoil@ucsd.edu

    2011-03-15

    We present the results of spectroscopic observations in the GOODS-N field completed using DEIMOS on the Keck II telescope as part of the DEEP3 Galaxy Redshift Survey. Observations of 370 unique targets down to a limiting magnitude of R {sub AB} = 24.4 yielded 156 secure redshifts. In addition to redshift information, we provide sky-subtracted one- and two-dimensional spectra of each target. Observations were conducted following the procedures of the Team Keck Redshift Survey (TKRS), thereby producing spectra that augment the TKRS sample while maintaining the uniformity of its spectral database.

  10. Lensing convergence and the neutrino mass scale in galaxy redshift surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardona, Wilmar; Durrer, Ruth; Kunz, Martin; Montanari, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate the importance of including the lensing contribution in galaxy clustering analyses with large galaxy redshift surveys. It is well known that radial cross-correlations between different redshift bins of galaxy surveys are dominated by lensing. But we show here that also neglecting lensing in the autocorrelations within one bin severely biases cosmological parameter estimation with redshift surveys. It leads to significant shifts for several cosmological parameters, most notably the scalar spectral index and the neutrino mass scale. Especially the latter parameter is one of the main targets of future galaxy surveys.

  11. Large-scale structure in the Southern Sky Redshift Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Changbom; Gott, J. R., III; Da Costa, L. N.

    1992-01-01

    The power spectrum from the Southern Sky Redshift Survey and the CfA samples are measured in order to explore the amplitude of fluctuation in the galaxy density. At lambda of less than or equal to 30/h Mpc the observed power spectrum is quite consistent with the standard CDM model. At larger scales the data indicate an excess of power over the standard CDM model. The observed power spectrum from these optical galaxy samples is in good agreement with that drawn from the sparsely sampled IRAS galaxies. The shape of the power spectrum is also studied by examining the relation between the genus per unit volume and the smoothing length. It is found that, over Gaussian smoothing scales from 6 to 14/h Mpc, the power spectrum has a slope of about -1. The topology of the galaxy density field is studied by measuring the shift of the genus curve from the Gaussian case. Over all smoothing scales studied, the observed genus curves are consistent with a random phase distribution of the galaxy density field, as predicted by the inflationary scenarios.

  12. Galaxy Groups in the 2Mass Redshift Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yi; Yang, Xiaohu; Shi, Feng; Mo, H. J.; Tweed, Dylan; Wang, Huiyuan; Zhang, Youcai; Li, Shijie; Lim, S. H.

    2016-11-01

    A galaxy group catalog is constructed from the 2MASS Redshift Survey (2MRS) with the use of a halo-based group finder. The halo mass associated with a group is estimated using a “GAP” method based on the luminosity of the central galaxy and its gap with other member galaxies. Tests using mock samples show that this method is reliable, particularly for poor systems containing only a few members. On average, 80% of all the groups have completeness \\gt 0.8, and about 65% of the groups have zero contamination. Halo masses are estimated with a typical uncertainty of ∼ 0.35 {dex}. The application of the group finder to the 2MRS gives 29,904 groups from a total of 43,246 galaxies at z≤slant 0.08, with 5286 groups having two or more members. Some basic properties of this group catalog is presented, and comparisons are made with other group catalogs in overlap regions. With a depth to z∼ 0.08 and uniformly covering about 91% of the whole sky, this group catalog provides a useful database to study galaxies in the local cosmic web, and to reconstruct the mass distribution in the local universe.

  13. Getting leverage on inflation with a large photometric redshift survey

    SciTech Connect

    Basse, Tobias; Hannestad, Steen; Hamann, Jan; Wong, Yvonne Y.Y. E-mail: jan.hamann@cern.ch E-mail: yvonne.y.wong@unsw.edu.au

    2015-06-01

    We assess the potential of a future large-volume photometric redshift survey to constrain observational inflationary parameters using three large-scale structure observables: the angular shear and galaxy power spectra, and the cluster mass function measured through weak lensing. When used in combination with Planck-like CMB measurements, we find that the spectral index n{sub s} can be constrained to a 1 σ precision of up to 0.0025. The sensitivity to the running of the spectral index can potentially improve to 0.0017, roughly a factor of five better than the present 1σ constraint from Planck and auxiliary CMB data, allowing us to test the assumptions of the slow-roll scenario with unprecedented accuracy. Interestingly, neither CMB+shear nor CMB+galaxy nor CMB+clusters alone can achieve this level of sensitivity; it is the combined power of all three probes that conspires to break the different parameter degeneracies inherent in each type of observations. We make our forecast software publicly available via download or upon request from the authors.

  14. Effective theory of dark energy at redshift survey scales

    SciTech Connect

    Gleyzes, Jérôme; Mancarella, Michele; Vernizzi, Filippo; Langlois, David E-mail: langlois@apc.univ-paris7.fr E-mail: filippo.vernizzi@cea.fr

    2016-02-01

    We explore the phenomenological consequences of general late-time modifications of gravity in the quasi-static approximation, in the case where cold dark matter is non-minimally coupled to the gravitational sector. Assuming spectroscopic and photometric surveys with configuration parameters similar to those of the Euclid mission, we derive constraints on our effective description from three observables: the galaxy power spectrum in redshift space, tomographic weak-lensing shear power spectrum and the correlation spectrum between the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect and the galaxy distribution. In particular, with ΛCDM as fiducial model and a specific choice for the time dependence of our effective functions, we perform a Fisher matrix analysis and find that the unmarginalized 68% CL errors on the parameters describing the modifications of gravity are of order σ∼10{sup −2}–10{sup −3}. We also consider two other fiducial models. A nonminimal coupling of CDM enhances the effects of modified gravity and reduces the above statistical errors accordingly. In all cases, we find that the parameters are highly degenerate, which prevents the inversion of the Fisher matrices. Some of these degeneracies can be broken by combining all three observational probes.

  15. THE 2dF REDSHIFT SURVEY. I. PHYSICAL ASSOCIATION AND PERIODICITY IN QUASAR FAMILIES

    SciTech Connect

    Fulton, C. C.; Arp, H. C. E-mail: arp@mpa-garching.mpg.de

    2012-08-01

    We have tested for physical association of candidate companion quasars with putative parent galaxies by virtue of Karlsson periodicity in quasar redshifts. We examined galaxies from the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS) and quasars from the 2dF Quasar Redshift Survey (2QZ) in the two declination strips (at declinations 0 Degree-Sign and -30 Degree-Sign ) covered by the 2QZ, first filtering out galaxies and quasars using the respective survey masks and observation qualities as described, and using only quasars with z {>=} 0.5 to avoid the redshift region of mixed galaxies and quasars. Around each galaxy, quasars are detected as physically associated with a putative parent galaxy if their respective redshifts conform to empirically derived constraints based on an ejection hypothesis. We ran Monte Carlo control trials against the pure physical associations by replacing the actual redshifts of the candidate companion quasars with quasar redshifts drawn randomly from each respective right ascension hour. The constraints are grouping of quasar redshifts and Karlsson periodicity of quasar redshifts.

  16. The topology of the IRAS Point Source Catalogue Redshift Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canavezes, A.; Springel, V.; Oliver, S. J.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Keeble, O.; White, S. D. M.; Saunders, W.; Efstathiou, G.; Frenk, C. S.; McMahon, R. G.; Maddox, S.; Sutherland, W.; Tadros, H.

    1998-07-01

    We investigate the topology of the new Point Source Catalogue Redshift Survey (PSCz) of IRAS galaxies by means of the genus statistic. The survey maps the local Universe with approximately 15 000 galaxies over 84.1 per cent of the sky, and provides an unprecedented number of resolution elements for the topological analysis. For comparison with the PSCz data we also examine the genus of large N-body simulations of four variants of the cold dark matter (CDM) cosmogony. The simulations are part of the Virgo project to simulate the formation of structure in the Universe. We assume that the statistical properties of the galaxy distribution can be identified with those of the dark matter particles in the simulations. We extend the standard genus analysis by examining the influence of sampling noise on the genus curve and introducing a statistic able to quantify the amount of phase correlation present in the density field, the amplitude drop of the genus compared to a Gaussian field with identical power spectrum. The results for PSCz are consistent with the hypothesis of random-phase initial conditions. In particular, no strong phase correlation is detected on scales ranging from 10 to 32 h^-1 Mpc, whereas there is a positive detection of phase correlation at smaller scales. Among the simulations, phase correlations are detected in all models at small scales, albeit with different strengths. When scaled to a common normalization, the amplitude drop depends primarily on the shape of the power spectrum. We find that the constant-bias standard CDM model can be ruled out at high significance, because the shape of its power spectrum is not consistent with PSCz. The other CDM models with more large-scale power all fit the PSCz data almost equally well, with a slight preference for a high-density tauCDM model.

  17. The ESO Slice Project (ESP) galaxy redshift survey. IV. A discussion of systematic biases in galaxy redshift determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappi, A.; Zamorani, G.; Zucca, E.; Vettolani, G.; Merighi, R.; Mignoli, M.; Stirpe, G. M.; Collins, C.; Guzzo, L.; Chincarini, G.; Maccagni, D.; Balkowski, C.; Cayatte, V.; Maurogordato, S.; Proust, D.; Bardelli, S.; Ramella, M.; Scaramella, R.; Blanchard, A.; MacGillivray, H.

    1998-08-01

    We present a detailed discussion of the redshift errors associated to the ESO Slice Project measurements. For a subsample of 742 galaxies with redshifts determined both from the absorption lines (Vabs) and from the emission lines (Vemi), we find an average difference =~ +100 km/s. We find that a similar effect is present in another, deeper redshift survey, the Durham/Anglo-Australian Telescope faint galaxy redshift survey (Broadhurst et al. 1988), while is absent in surveys at brighter magnitude limits. We have investigated in detail many possible sources of such a discrepancy, and we can exclude possible zero-point shifts or calibration problems. We have detected and measured systematic velocity differences produced by the different templates used in the cross-correlation. We conclude that such differences can in principle explain the effect, but in this case the non-trivial implication would be that the best-fitting template does not necessarily give the best velocity estimate. As we do not have any a priori reason to select a template different from the best-fitting one, we did not apply any correction to the ESO Slice Project velocities. However, as for a small number of galaxies the effect is so large that it is likely to have a physical explanation, we have also taken into account the possibility that the discrepancy can be partly real: in this case, it might help to understand the role of gas outflows in the process of galaxy evolution. In view of the future large spectroscopic surveys, we stress the importance of using different templates and making them publicly available, in order to assess the amplitude of systematic effects, and to allow a direct comparison of different catalogues. based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile.

  18. An Open-Source Galaxy Redshift Survey Simulator for next-generation Large Scale Structure Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seijak, Uros

    Galaxy redshift surveys produce three-dimensional maps of the galaxy distribution. On large scales these maps trace the underlying matter fluctuations in a relatively simple manner, so that the properties of the primordial fluctuations along with the overall expansion history and growth of perturbations can be extracted. The BAO standard ruler method to measure the expansion history of the universe using galaxy redshift surveys is thought to be robust to observational artifacts and understood theoretically with high precision. These same surveys can offer a host of additional information, including a measurement of the growth rate of large scale structure through redshift space distortions, the possibility of measuring the sum of neutrino masses, tighter constraints on the expansion history through the Alcock-Paczynski effect, and constraints on the scale-dependence and non-Gaussianity of the primordial fluctuations. Extracting this broadband clustering information hinges on both our ability to minimize and subtract observational systematics to the observed galaxy power spectrum, and our ability to model the broadband behavior of the observed galaxy power spectrum with exquisite precision. Rapid development on both fronts is required to capitalize on WFIRST's data set. We propose to develop an open-source computational toolbox that will propel development in both areas by connecting large scale structure modeling and instrument and survey modeling with the statistical inference process. We will use the proposed simulator to both tailor perturbation theory and fully non-linear models of the broadband clustering of WFIRST galaxies and discover novel observables in the non-linear regime that are robust to observational systematics and able to distinguish between a wide range of spatial and dynamic biasing models for the WFIRST galaxy redshift survey sources. We have demonstrated the utility of this approach in a pilot study of the SDSS-III BOSS galaxies, in which we

  19. The Redshift Distribution of Dusty Star-forming Galaxies from the SPT Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strandet, M. L.; Weiss, A.; Vieira, J. D.; de Breuck, C.; Aguirre, J. E.; Aravena, M.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Béthermin, M.; Bradford, C. M.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chapman, S. C.; Crawford, T. M.; Everett, W.; Fassnacht, C. D.; Furstenau, R. M.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Greve, T. R.; Gullberg, B.; Hezaveh, Y.; Kamenetzky, J. R.; Litke, K.; Ma, J.; Malkan, M.; Marrone, D. P.; Menten, K. M.; Murphy, E. J.; Nadolski, A.; Rotermund, K. M.; Spilker, J. S.; Stark, A. A.; Welikala, N.

    2016-05-01

    We use the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in Cycle 1 to determine spectroscopic redshifts of high-redshift dusty star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) selected by their 1.4 mm continuum emission in the South Pole Telescope (SPT) survey. We present ALMA 3 mm spectral scans between 84 and 114 GHz for 15 galaxies and targeted ALMA 1 mm observations for an additional eight sources. Our observations yield 30 new line detections from CO, [C i], [N ii], H2O and NH3. We further present Atacama Pathfinder Experiment [C ii] and CO mid-J observations for seven sources for which only a single line was detected in spectral-scan data from ALMA Cycle 0 or Cycle 1. We combine the new observations with previously published and new millimeter/submillimeter line and photometric data of the SPT-selected DSFGs to study their redshift distribution. The combined data yield 39 spectroscopic redshifts from molecular lines, a success rate of >85%. Our sample represents the largest data set of its kind today and has the highest spectroscopic completeness among all redshift surveys of high-z DSFGs. The median of the redshift distribution is z = 3.9 ± 0.4, and the highest-redshift source in our sample is at z = 5.8. We discuss how the selection of our sources affects the redshift distribution, focusing on source brightness, selection wavelength, and strong gravitational lensing. We correct for the effect of gravitational lensing and find the redshift distribution for 1.4 mm selected sources with a median redshift of z = 3.1 ± 0.3. Comparing to redshift distributions selected at shorter wavelengths from the literature, we show that selection wavelength affects the shape of the redshift distribution.

  20. The ESO Slice Project (ESP) galaxy redshift survey. VII. The redshift and real-space correlation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzzo, L.; Bartlett, J. G.; Cappi, A.; Maurogordato, S.; Zucca, E.; Zamorani, G.; Balkowski, C.; Blanchard, A.; Cayatte, V.; Chincarini, G.; Collins, C. A.; Maccagni, D.; MacGillivray, H.; Merighi, R.; Mignoli, M.; Proust, D.; Ramella, M.; Scaramella, R.; Stirpe, G. M.; Vettolani, G.

    2000-03-01

    We present analyses of the two-point correlation properties of the ESO Slice Project (ESP) galaxy redshift survey, both in redshift and real space. From the redshift-space correlation function $xi (r) i(s) we are able to trace positive clustering out to separations as large as 50 h^{-1} Mpc, after which xi (r) i(s) smoothly breaks down, crossing the zero value between 60 and 80 h^{-1} Mpc. This is best seen from the whole magnitude-limited redshift catalogue, using the J_3 miniμm-variance weighting estimator. xi (r) i(s) is reasonably well described by a shallow power law with \\gamma\\sim 1.5 between 3 and 50 h^{-1} Mpc, while on smaller scales (0.2-2 h^{-1} Mpc) it has a shallower slope (\\gamma\\sim 1). This flattening is shown to be mostly due to the redshift-space damping produced by virialized structures, and is less evident when volume-limited samples of the survey are analysed. We examine the full effect of redshift-space distortions by computing the two-dimensional correlation function xi (r) i(r_p,\\pi) , from which we project out the real-space xi (r) i(r) below 10 h^{-1} Mpc. This function is well described by a power-law model (r/r_o)^{-\\gamma}, with r_o=4.15^{+0.20}_{-0.21} h^{-1} Mpc and \\gamma=1.67^{+0.07}_{-0.09} for the whole magnitude-limited catalogue. Comparison to other redshift surveys shows a consistent picture in which galaxy clustering remains positive out to separations of 50 h^{-1} Mpc or larger, in substantial agreement with the results obtained from angular surveys like the APM and EDSGC. Also the shape of the two-point correlation function is remarkably unanimous among these data sets, in all cases requiring more power on scales larger than 5 h^{-1} Mpc (a `shoulder'), with respect to a simple extrapolation of the canonical xi (r) i(r) =(r/5)^{-1.8}. The analysis of xi (r) i(s) for volume-limited subsamples with different luminosity shows evidence of luminosity segregation only for the most luminous sample with Mb_J <= -20.5. For

  1. Spectroscopic failures in photometric redshift calibration: cosmological biases and survey requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Cunha, Carlos E.; Huterer, Dragan; Lin, Huan; Busha, Michael T.; Wechsler, Risa H.

    2014-10-11

    We use N-body-spectro-photometric simulations to investigate the impact of incompleteness and incorrect redshifts in spectroscopic surveys to photometric redshift training and calibration and the resulting effects on cosmological parameter estimation from weak lensing shear-shear correlations. The photometry of the simulations is modeled after the upcoming Dark Energy Survey and the spectroscopy is based on a low/intermediate resolution spectrograph with wavelength coverage of 5500{\\AA} < {\\lambda} < 9500{\\AA}. The principal systematic errors that such a spectroscopic follow-up encounters are incompleteness (inability to obtain spectroscopic redshifts for certain galaxies) and wrong redshifts. Encouragingly, we find that a neural network-based approach can effectively describe the spectroscopic incompleteness in terms of the galaxies' colors, so that the spectroscopic selection can be applied to the photometric sample. Hence, we find that spectroscopic incompleteness yields no appreciable biases to cosmology, although the statistical constraints degrade somewhat because the photometric survey has to be culled to match the spectroscopic selection. Unfortunately, wrong redshifts have a more severe impact: the cosmological biases are intolerable if more than a percent of the spectroscopic redshifts are incorrect. Moreover, we find that incorrect redshifts can also substantially degrade the accuracy of training set based photo-z estimators. The main problem is the difficulty of obtaining redshifts, either spectroscopically or photometrically, for objects at z > 1.3. We discuss several approaches for reducing the cosmological biases, in particular finding that photo-z error estimators can reduce biases appreciably.

  2. Spectroscopic CCD surveys for quasars at large redshift. 3: The Palomar Transit Grism Survey catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Donald P.; Schmidt, Maarten; Gunn, James E.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reports the initial results of the Palomar Transit Grism Survey (PTGS). The PTGS was designed to produce a sample of z greater than 2.7 quasars that were identified by well-defined selection criteria. The survey consists of six narrow (approximately equal to 8.5 min wide) strips of sky; the total effective area is 61.47 sq deg. Low-resolution slitless spectra, covering the wavelength range from 4400 to 7500 A, were obtained for approximately 600 000 objects. The wavelength- and flux-calibrated spectra were searched for emission lines with an automatic software algorithm. A total to 1655 emission features in the grism data satisfied our signal-to-noise ratio and equivalent width selection criteria; subsequent slit spectroscopy of the candidates confirmed the existence of 1052 lines (928 different objects). Six groups of emission lines were detected in the survey: Lyman alpha + N V, C IV, C III1, Mg II, H Beta + (O III), and H alpha + (S II). More than two-thirds of the candidates are low-redshift (z less than 0.45) emission-line galaxies; ninety objects are high-redshift quasars (z greater than 2.7) detected via their Lyman alpha + N V emission lines. The survey contains three previously unknown quasars brighter than 17th magnitude; all three have redshifts of approximately equal to 1.3. In this paper we present the observational properties of the survey, the algorithms used to select the emission-line candidates, and the catalog of emission-line objects.

  3. Spectroscopic CCD surveys for quasars at large redshift. II - A Pfuei transit survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Maarten; Schneider, Donald P.; Gunn, James E.

    1986-01-01

    A CCD transit survey has been carried out with the 200 in. telescope of a strip of sky 5 arcmin wide and 9 hr long. Direct images and slitless spectra of over 43,000 objects were obtained on two successive nights. An automatic search for emission lines of given minimum equivalent width and signal-to-noise ratio yielded 52 candidate sources. Slit spectra revealed that 24 were emission-line galaxies with z less than 0.4 and eight were quasars with 2 between 1.00 and 2.76. The number of quasars detect agrees with that predicted from luminosity function models for z less than 2.9. The models also indicate that between 30 and 62 quasars with z less than 2.9 should have been found in this survey, but none were detected. This result reconfirms that there is a redshift cutoff near or below redshift three. The apparent conflict of this measurement with the known existence of dozens of quasars with redshifts larger than three is discussed.

  4. SHELS: A complete galaxy redshift survey with R ≤ 20.6

    SciTech Connect

    Geller, Margaret J.; Hwang, Ho Seong; Fabricant, Daniel G.; Kurtz, Michael J.; Dell'Antonio, Ian P.; Zahid, Harus Jabran E-mail: hhwang@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: mkurtz@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: jabran@ifa.hawaii.edu

    2014-08-01

    The SHELS (Smithsonian Hectospec Lensing Survey) is a complete redshift survey covering two well-separated fields (F1 and F2) of the Deep Lens Survey to a limiting R = 20.6. Here we describe the redshift survey of the F2 field (R.A.{sub 2000} = 09{sup h}19{sup m}32.4 and decl.{sub 2000} = +30°00'00''). The survey includes 16,294 new redshifts measured with the Hectospec on the MMT. The resulting survey of the 4 deg{sup 2} F2 field is 95% complete to R = 20.6, currently the densest survey to this magnitude limit. The median survey redshift is z = 0.3; the survey provides a view of structure in the range 0.1 ≲ z ≲ 0.6. An animation displays the large-scale structure in the survey region. We provide a redshift, spectral index D {sub n}4000, and stellar mass for each galaxy in the survey. We also provide a metallicity for each galaxy in the range 0.2 survey, we examine the behavior of the index D {sub n}4000 as a function of galaxy luminosity, stellar mass, and redshift. The known evolutionary and stellar mass dependent properties of the galaxy population are cleanly evident in the data. We also show that the mass-metallicity relation previously determined from these data is robust to the analysis approach.

  5. THE PRISM MULTI-OBJECT SURVEY (PRIMUS). II. DATA REDUCTION AND REDSHIFT FITTING

    SciTech Connect

    Cool, Richard J.; Moustakas, John; Blanton, Michael R.; Hogg, David W.; Burles, Scott M.; Coil, Alison L.; Aird, James; Mendez, Alexander J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Wong, Kenneth C.; Zhu, Guangtun; Bernstein, Rebecca A.

    2013-04-20

    The PRIsm MUlti-object Survey (PRIMUS) is a spectroscopic galaxy redshift survey to z {approx} 1 completed with a low-dispersion prism and slitmasks allowing for simultaneous observations of {approx}2500 objects over 0.18 deg{sup 2}. The final PRIMUS catalog includes {approx}130,000 robust redshifts over 9.1 deg{sup 2}. In this paper, we summarize the PRIMUS observational strategy and present the data reduction details used to measure redshifts, redshift precision, and survey completeness. The survey motivation, observational techniques, fields, target selection, slitmask design, and observations are presented in Coil et al. Comparisons to existing higher-resolution spectroscopic measurements show a typical precision of {sigma}{sub z}/(1 + z) = 0.005. PRIMUS, both in area and number of redshifts, is the largest faint galaxy redshift survey completed to date and is allowing for precise measurements of the relationship between active galactic nuclei and their hosts, the effects of environment on galaxy evolution, and the build up of galactic systems over the latter half of cosmic history.

  6. High-Redshift Quasars Found in Sloan Digital Sky Survey Commissioning Data

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, X.; Strauss, M.A.; Schneider, D.P.; Gunn, J.E.; Lupton, R.H.; Yanny, B.; Anderson, S.F.; Anderson, J.E. Jr.; Annis, J.; Bahcall, N.A.; Bakken, J.A.; Bastian, S.; Berman, E.; Boroski, W.N.; Briegel, C.; Briggs, J.W.; Brinkmann, J.; Carr, M.A.; Colestock, P.L.; Connolly, A.J.; Crocker, J.H.; Csabai, I. |; Davis, J.E.; and others

    1999-07-01

    We present photometric and spectroscopic observations of 15 high-redshift quasars (z{gt}3.6) discovered from {approximately}140 deg{sup 2} of five-color ({ital u}{prime}, {ital g}{prime}, {ital r}{prime}, {ital i}{prime}, and {ital z}{prime}) imaging data taken by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) during its commissioning phase. The quasars are selected by their distinctive colors in SDSS multicolor space. Four of the quasars have redshifts higher than 4.6 (z=4.63, 4.75, 4.90, and 5.00, the latter being the highest redshift quasar yet known). In addition, two previously known z{gt}4 objects were recovered from the data. The quasars all have i{sup *} {lt}20 and have luminosities comparable to that of 3C 273. The spectra of the quasars have similar features (strong, broad emission lines and substantial absorption blueward of the Ly{alpha} emission line) seen in previously known high-redshift quasars. Although the photometric accuracy and image quality fail to meet the final survey requirements, our success rate for identifying high-redshift quasars (17 quasars from 27 candidates) is much higher than that of previous multicolor surveys. However, the numbers of high-redshift quasars found is in close accord with the number density inferred from previous surveys. {copyright} {ital {copyright} 1999.} {ital The American Astronomical Society}

  7. THE NEXT GENERATION VIRGO CLUSTER SURVEY. XV. THE PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFT ESTIMATION FOR BACKGROUND SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Raichoor, A.; Mei, S.; Huertas-Company, M.; Licitra, R.; Erben, T.; Hildebrandt, H.; Ilbert, O.; Boissier, S.; Boselli, A.; Ball, N. M.; Côté, P.; Ferrarese, L.; Gwyn, S. D. J.; Kavelaars, J. J.; Chen, Y.-T.; Cuillandre, J.-C.; Duc, P. A.; Guhathakurta, P.; and others

    2014-12-20

    The Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS) is an optical imaging survey covering 104 deg{sup 2} centered on the Virgo cluster. Currently, the complete survey area has been observed in the u*giz bands and one third in the r band. We present the photometric redshift estimation for the NGVS background sources. After a dedicated data reduction, we perform accurate photometry, with special attention to precise color measurements through point-spread function homogenization. We then estimate the photometric redshifts with the Le Phare and BPZ codes. We add a new prior that extends to i {sub AB} = 12.5 mag. When using the u* griz bands, our photometric redshifts for 15.5 mag ≤ i ≲ 23 mag or z {sub phot} ≲ 1 galaxies have a bias |Δz| < 0.02, less than 5% outliers, a scatter σ{sub outl.rej.}, and an individual error on z {sub phot} that increases with magnitude (from 0.02 to 0.05 and from 0.03 to 0.10, respectively). When using the u*giz bands over the same magnitude and redshift range, the lack of the r band increases the uncertainties in the 0.3 ≲ z {sub phot} ≲ 0.8 range (–0.05 < Δz < –0.02, σ{sub outl.rej} ∼ 0.06, 10%-15% outliers, and z {sub phot.err.} ∼ 0.15). We also present a joint analysis of the photometric redshift accuracy as a function of redshift and magnitude. We assess the quality of our photometric redshifts by comparison to spectroscopic samples and by verifying that the angular auto- and cross-correlation function w(θ) of the entire NGVS photometric redshift sample across redshift bins is in agreement with the expectations.

  8. The Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey. XV. The Photometric Redshift Estimation for Background Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raichoor, A.; Mei, S.; Erben, T.; Hildebrandt, H.; Huertas-Company, M.; Ilbert, O.; Licitra, R.; Ball, N. M.; Boissier, S.; Boselli, A.; Chen, Y.-T.; Côté, P.; Cuillandre, J.-C.; Duc, P. A.; Durrell, P. R.; Ferrarese, L.; Guhathakurta, P.; Gwyn, S. D. J.; Kavelaars, J. J.; Lançon, A.; Liu, C.; MacArthur, L. A.; Muller, M.; Muñoz, R. P.; Peng, E. W.; Puzia, T. H.; Sawicki, M.; Toloba, E.; Van Waerbeke, L.; Woods, D.; Zhang, H.

    2014-12-01

    The Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS) is an optical imaging survey covering 104 deg2 centered on the Virgo cluster. Currently, the complete survey area has been observed in the u*giz bands and one third in the r band. We present the photometric redshift estimation for the NGVS background sources. After a dedicated data reduction, we perform accurate photometry, with special attention to precise color measurements through point-spread function homogenization. We then estimate the photometric redshifts with the Le Phare and BPZ codes. We add a new prior that extends to i AB = 12.5 mag. When using the u* griz bands, our photometric redshifts for 15.5 mag <= i <~ 23 mag or z phot <~ 1 galaxies have a bias |Δz| < 0.02, less than 5% outliers, a scatter σoutl.rej., and an individual error on z phot that increases with magnitude (from 0.02 to 0.05 and from 0.03 to 0.10, respectively). When using the u*giz bands over the same magnitude and redshift range, the lack of the r band increases the uncertainties in the 0.3 <~ z phot <~ 0.8 range (-0.05 < Δz < -0.02, σoutl.rej ~ 0.06, 10%-15% outliers, and z phot.err. ~ 0.15). We also present a joint analysis of the photometric redshift accuracy as a function of redshift and magnitude. We assess the quality of our photometric redshifts by comparison to spectroscopic samples and by verifying that the angular auto- and cross-correlation function w(θ) of the entire NGVS photometric redshift sample across redshift bins is in agreement with the expectations.

  9. A blind green bank telescope millimeter-wave survey for redshifted molecular absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Kanekar, N.; Gupta, A.; Carilli, C. L.; Stocke, J. T.; Willett, K. W.

    2014-02-10

    We present the methodology for 'blind' millimeter-wave surveys for redshifted molecular absorption in the CO/HCO{sup +} rotational lines. The frequency range 30-50 GHz appears optimal for such surveys, providing sensitivity to absorbers at z ≳ 0.85. It is critical that the survey is 'blind', i.e., based on a radio-selected sample, including sources without known redshifts. We also report results from the first large survey of this kind, using the Q-band receiver on the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) to search for molecular absorption toward 36 sources, 3 without known redshifts, over the frequency range 39.6-49.5 GHz. The GBT survey has a total redshift path of Δz ≈ 24, mostly at 0.81 < z < 1.91, and a sensitivity sufficient to detect equivalent H{sub 2} column densities ≳ 3 × 10{sup 21} cm{sup –2} in absorption at 5σ significance (using CO-to-H{sub 2} and HCO{sup +}-to-H{sub 2} conversion factors of the Milky Way). The survey yielded no confirmed detections of molecular absorption, yielding the 2σ upper limit n(z = 1.2) < 0.15 on the redshift number density of molecular gas at column densities N(H{sub 2}) ≳ 3 × 10{sup 21} cm{sup –2}.

  10. A Blind Green Bank Telescope Millimeter-wave Survey for Redshifted Molecular Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanekar, N.; Gupta, A.; Carilli, C. L.; Stocke, J. T.; Willett, K. W.

    2014-02-01

    We present the methodology for "blind" millimeter-wave surveys for redshifted molecular absorption in the CO/HCO+ rotational lines. The frequency range 30-50 GHz appears optimal for such surveys, providing sensitivity to absorbers at z >~ 0.85. It is critical that the survey is "blind," i.e., based on a radio-selected sample, including sources without known redshifts. We also report results from the first large survey of this kind, using the Q-band receiver on the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) to search for molecular absorption toward 36 sources, 3 without known redshifts, over the frequency range 39.6-49.5 GHz. The GBT survey has a total redshift path of Δz ≈ 24, mostly at 0.81 < z < 1.91, and a sensitivity sufficient to detect equivalent H2 column densities >~ 3 × 1021 cm-2 in absorption at 5σ significance (using CO-to-H2 and HCO+-to-H2 conversion factors of the Milky Way). The survey yielded no confirmed detections of molecular absorption, yielding the 2σ upper limit n(z = 1.2) < 0.15 on the redshift number density of molecular gas at column densities N(H2) >~ 3 × 1021 cm-2.

  11. The CfA redshift survey - Data for the NGP + 30 zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huchra, John P.; Geller, Margaret J.; De Lapparent, Valerie; Corwin, Harold G., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Redshifts and morphological types are presented for a complete sample of 1093 galaxies with m(pg) less than or equal to 15.5 mag in a 6-deg-wide strip crossing the north Galactic pole. Also presented are redshifts for an additional 92 fainter galaxies in the same strip. Outside of the core of the Coma Cluster, both early- and late-type galaxies trace essentially the same structures in redshift space. Thinner slices illustrate the small velocity dispersion perpendicular to the surfaces in the survey.

  12. First results from the ESO Slice Project (ESP) galaxy redshift survey.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zucca, E.; Vettolani, G.; Cappi, A.; Merighi, R.; Mignoli, M.; Stirpe, G.; Zamorani, G.; MacGillivray, H.; Collins, C.; Balkowski, C.; Alimi, J.; Cayatte, V.; Felenbok, P.; Maurogordato, S.; Proust, D.; Chincarini, G.; Guzzo, L.; Maccagni, D.; Scaramella, R.; Blanchard, A.; Ramella, M.

    1997-12-01

    The ESO Slice Project (ESP) is a galaxy redshift survey initiated as an ESO Key-Project over about 30 square degrees, in a region near the South Galactic Pole. The limiting magnitude is bJ = 19.4. The observations were completed in October 1994 and all the obtained data were reduced, providing 3348 galaxy redshifts. The authors present some preliminary results concerning the large scale galaxy distribution and the luminosity function.

  13. Omega from the anisotropy of the redshift correlation function in the IRAS 2 Jansky survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, A. J. S.

    1993-01-01

    Peculiar velocities distort the correlation function of galaxies in redshift space. In the linear regime, the distortion has a characteristic quadrupole plus hexadecapole form, with amplitude depending on the cosmological density parameter Omega. I report here measurements of the anisotropy of the correlation function in the IRAS 2 Jy redshift survey. The inferred value of Omega is Omega = 0.5 + 0.5 or - 0.25.

  14. THE REDSHIFT DISTRIBUTION OF GIANT ARCS IN THE SLOAN GIANT ARCS SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Bayliss, Matthew B.; Gladders, Michael D.; Koester, Benjamin P.; Oguri, Masamune; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Sharon, Keren; Dahle, Haakon

    2011-01-20

    We measure the redshift distribution of a sample of 28 giant arcs discovered as a part of the Sloan Giant Arcs Survey. Gemini/GMOS-North spectroscopy provides precise redshifts for 24 arcs, and 'redshift desert' constrains for the remaining 4 arcs. This is a direct measurement of the redshift distribution of a uniformly selected sample of bright giant arcs, which is an observable that can be used to inform efforts to predict giant arc statistics. Our primary giant arc sample has a median redshift z = 1.821 and nearly two-thirds of the arcs, 64%, are sources at z {approx}> 1.4, indicating that the population of background sources that are strongly lensed into bright giant arcs resides primarily at high redshift. We also analyze the distribution of redshifts for 19 secondary strongly lensed background sources that are not visually apparent in Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging, but were identified in deeper follow-up imaging of the lensing cluster fields. Our redshift sample for the secondary sources is not spectroscopically complete, but combining it with our primary giant arc sample suggests that a large fraction of all background galaxies that are strongly lensed by foreground clusters reside at z {approx}> 1.4. Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests indicate that our well-selected, spectroscopically complete primary giant arc redshift sample can be reproduced with a model distribution that is constructed from a combination of results from studies of strong-lensing clusters in numerical simulations and observational constraints on the galaxy luminosity function.

  15. On the recovery of the local group motion from galaxy redshift surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Nusser, Adi; Davis, Marc; Branchini, Enzo E-mail: mdavis@berkeley.edu

    2014-06-20

    There is an ∼150 km s{sup –1} discrepancy between the measured motion of the Local Group (LG) of galaxies with respect to the cosmic microwave background and the linear theory prediction based on the gravitational force field of the large-scale structure in full-sky redshift surveys. We perform a variety of tests which show that the LG motion cannot be recovered to better than 150-200 km s{sup –1} in amplitude and within ≈10° in direction. The tests rely on catalogs of mock galaxies identified in the Millennium simulation using semi-analytic galaxy formation models. We compare these results to the K{sub s} = 11.75 Two-Mass Galaxy Redshift Survey, which provides the deepest and most complete all-sky spatial distribution of galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts available thus far. In our analysis, we use a new concise relation for deriving the LG motion and bulk flow from the true distribution of galaxies in redshift space. Our results show that the main source of uncertainty is the small effective depth of surveys like the Two-Mass Redshift Survey (2MRS), which prevents a proper sampling of the large-scale structure beyond ∼100 h {sup –1} Mpc. Deeper redshift surveys are needed to reach the 'convergence scale' of ≈250 h {sup –1} Mpc in a ΛCDM universe. Deeper surveys would also mitigate the impact of the 'Kaiser rocket' which, in a survey like 2MRS, remains a significant source of uncertainty. Thanks to the quiet and moderate density environment of the LG, purely dynamical uncertainties of the linear predictions are subdominant at the level of ∼90 km s{sup –1}. Finally, we show that deviations from linear galaxy biasing and shot noise errors provide a minor contribution to the total error budget.

  16. On the Recovery of the Local Group Motion from Galaxy Redshift Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nusser, Adi; Davis, Marc; Branchini, Enzo

    2014-06-01

    There is an ~150 km s-1 discrepancy between the measured motion of the Local Group (LG) of galaxies with respect to the cosmic microwave background and the linear theory prediction based on the gravitational force field of the large-scale structure in full-sky redshift surveys. We perform a variety of tests which show that the LG motion cannot be recovered to better than 150-200 km s-1 in amplitude and within ≈10° in direction. The tests rely on catalogs of mock galaxies identified in the Millennium simulation using semi-analytic galaxy formation models. We compare these results to the Ks = 11.75 Two-Mass Galaxy Redshift Survey, which provides the deepest and most complete all-sky spatial distribution of galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts available thus far. In our analysis, we use a new concise relation for deriving the LG motion and bulk flow from the true distribution of galaxies in redshift space. Our results show that the main source of uncertainty is the small effective depth of surveys like the Two-Mass Redshift Survey (2MRS), which prevents a proper sampling of the large-scale structure beyond ~100 h -1 Mpc. Deeper redshift surveys are needed to reach the "convergence scale" of ≈250 h -1 Mpc in a ΛCDM universe. Deeper surveys would also mitigate the impact of the "Kaiser rocket" which, in a survey like 2MRS, remains a significant source of uncertainty. Thanks to the quiet and moderate density environment of the LG, purely dynamical uncertainties of the linear predictions are subdominant at the level of ~90 km s-1. Finally, we show that deviations from linear galaxy biasing and shot noise errors provide a minor contribution to the total error budget.

  17. Using Gamma Regression for Photometric Redshifts of Survey Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, J.; de Souza, R. S.; Krone-Martins, A.; Cameron, E.; Ishida, E. E. O.; Hilbe, J.

    Machine learning techniques offer a plethora of opportunities in tackling big data within the astronomical community. We present the set of Generalized Linear Models as a fast alternative for determining photometric redshifts of galaxies, a set of tools not commonly applied within astronomy, despite being widely used in other professions. With this technique, we achieve catastrophic outlier rates of the order of ˜ 1%, that can be achieved in a matter of seconds on large datasets of size ˜ 1,000,000. To make these techniques easily accessible to the astronomical community, we developed a set of libraries and tools that are publicly available.

  18. The Micro-Arcsecond Scintillation-Induced Variability (MASIV) Survey III. Optical Identifications and New Redshifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pursimo, Tapio; Ojha, Roopesh; Jauncey, David L.; Rickett, Barney J.; Dutka, Michael S.; Koay, Jun Yi; Lovell, James E. J.; Bignall, Hayley E.; Kedziora-Chudczer, Lucyna; Macquart, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Intraday variability (IDV) of the radio emission from active galactic nuclei is now known to be predominantly due to interstellar scintillation (ISS). The MASIV (The Microarcsecond Scintillation Induced Variability) survey of 443 at spectrum sources revealed that the IDV is related to the radio flux density and redshift. A study of the physical properties of these sources has been severely handicapped by the absence of reliable redshift measurements for many of these objects. This paper presents 79 new redshifts and a critical evaluation of 233 redshifts obtained from the literature. We classify spectroscopic identifications based on emission line properties, finding that 78% of the sources have broad emission lines and are mainly FSRQs. About 16% are weak lined objects, chiefly BL Lacs, and the remaining 6% are narrow line objects. The gross properties (redshift, spectroscopic class) of the MASIV sample are similar to those of other blazar surveys. However, the extreme compactness implied by ISS favors FSRQs and BL Lacs in the MASIV sample as these are the most compact object classes. We confirm that the level of IDV depends on the 5 GHz flux density for all optical spectral types. We find that BL Lac objects tend to be more variable than broad line quasars. The level of ISS decreases substantially above a redshift of about two. The decrease is found to be generally consistent with ISS expected for beamed emission from a jet that is limited to a fixed maximum brightness temperature in the source rest frame.

  19. Calan Tololo Survey: Bright Quasars at High Redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maza, Jose; Ruiz, Maria Teresa; Gonzalez, Luis E.; Wischnjewsky, Marina

    An objective prism survey has been started at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory using the thin UV prism (1,360 Å/mm at Hγ and 1,740 Å/mm at Hβ) on the Curtis Schmidt telescope. Unfiltered baked IIIaJ plates exposed 90 minutes have been obtained for 163 fields. Unwiden spectra taken in good seeing reach B ≅ 19. This survey is an extension of the original Tololo survey (Smith 1975; Smith, Aguirre and Zemelman 1986).

  20. Photometric Redshifts for the Dark Energy Survey and VISTA and Implications for Large Scale Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Banerji, Manda; Abdalla, Filipe B.; Lahav, Ofer; Lin, Huan; /Fermilab

    2007-11-01

    We conduct a detailed analysis of the photometric redshift requirements for the proposed Dark Energy Survey (DES) using two sets of mock galaxy simulations and an artificial neural network code-ANNz. In particular, we examine how optical photometry in the DES grizY bands can be complemented with near infra-red photometry from the planned VISTA Hemisphere Survey (VHS) in the JHK{sub s} bands in order to improve the photometric redshift estimate by a factor of two at z > 1. We draw attention to the effects of galaxy formation scenarios such as reddening on the photo-z estimate and using our neural network code, calculate A{sub v} for these reddened galaxies. We also look at the impact of using different training sets when calculating photometric redshifts. In particular, we find that using the ongoing DEEP2 and VVDS-Deep spectroscopic surveys to calibrate photometric redshifts for DES, will prove effective. However we need to be aware of uncertainties in the photometric redshift bias that arise when using different training sets as these will translate into errors in the dark energy equation of state parameter, w. Furthermore, we show that the neural network error estimate on the photometric redshift may be used to remove outliers from our samples before any kind of cosmological analysis, in particular for large-scale structure experiments. By removing all galaxies with a 1{sigma} photo-z scatter greater than 0.1 from our DES+VHS sample, we can constrain the galaxy power spectrum out to a redshift of 2 and reduce the fractional error on this power spectrum by {approx}15-20% compared to using the entire catalogue.

  1. CLUSTER LENSING PROFILES DERIVED FROM A REDSHIFT ENHANCEMENT OF MAGNIFIED BOSS-SURVEY GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Coupon, Jean; Umetsu, Keiichi; Broadhurst, Tom

    2013-07-20

    We report the first detection of a redshift-depth enhancement of background galaxies magnified by foreground clusters. Using 300,000 BOSS survey galaxies with accurate spectroscopic redshifts, we measure their mean redshift depth behind four large samples of optically selected clusters from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) surveys, totaling 5000-15,000 clusters. A clear trend of increasing mean redshift toward the cluster centers is found, averaged over each of the four cluster samples. In addition, we find similar but noisier behavior for an independent X-ray sample of 158 clusters lying in the foreground of the current BOSS sky area. By adopting the mass-richness relationships appropriate for each survey, we compare our results with theoretical predictions for each of the four SDSS cluster catalogs. The radial form of this redshift enhancement is well fitted by a richness-to-mass weighted composite Navarro-Frenk-White profile with an effective mass ranging between M{sub 200} {approx} 1.4-1.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} M{sub Sun} for the optically detected cluster samples, and M{sub 200} {approx} 5.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} M{sub Sun} for the X-ray sample. This lensing detection helps to establish the credibility of these SDSS cluster surveys, and provides a normalization for their respective mass-richness relations. In the context of the upcoming bigBOSS, Subaru Prime Focus Spectrograph, and EUCLID-NISP spectroscopic surveys, this method represents an independent means of deriving the masses of cluster samples for examining the cosmological evolution, and provides a relatively clean consistency check of weak-lensing measurements, free from the systematic limitations of shear calibration.

  2. Peculiar velocity decomposition, redshift space distortion, and velocity reconstruction in redshift surveys. II. Dark matter velocity statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Pengjie; Jing, Yipeng; Lin, Weipeng; Pan, Jun

    2013-11-01

    Massive spectroscopic redshift surveys open a promising window to accurately measure peculiar velocity at cosmological distances through redshift space distortion (RSD). In Paper I Zhang et al. [Phys. Rev. D 87, 063526 (2013)] of this series of work, we proposed decomposing peculiar velocity into three eigenmodes (vδ, vS, and vB) in order to facilitate the RSD modeling and peculiar velocity reconstruction. In the current paper we measure the dark matter RSD-related statistics of the velocity eigenmodes through a set of N-body simulations. These statistics include the velocity power spectra, correlation functions, one-point probability distribution functions, cumulants, and the damping functions describing the Finger of God effect. We have carried out a number of tests to quantify possible numerical artifacts in these measurements and have confirmed that these numerical artifacts are under control. Our major findings are as follows: (1) The power spectrum measurement shows that these velocity components have distinctly different spatial distribution and redshift evolution, consistent with predictions in Paper I. In particular, we measure the window function W˜(k,z). W˜ describes the impact of nonlinear evolution on the vδ-density relation. We confirm that the approximation W˜=1 can induce a significant systematic error of O(10%) in RSD cosmology. We demonstrate that W˜ can be accurately described by a simple fitting formula with one or two free parameters. (2) The correlation function measurement shows that the correlation length is O(100), O(10), and O(1)Mpc for vδ, vS, and vB, respectively. These correlation lengths determine where we can treat the velocity fields as spatially uncorrelated. Hence, they are important properties in RSD modeling. (3) The velocity probability distribution functions and cumulants quantify non-Gaussianities of the velocity fields. We confirm speculation in Paper I that vδ is largely Gaussian, but with non-negligible non

  3. The Advanced Camera for Surveys General Catalog: A High Redshift Galaxy Morphology Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, Roger; Newman, J.; Cooper, M.; Stern, D.; Moustakas, L.; Davis, M.

    2009-05-01

    We use publicly available data obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope to construct the ACS General Catalog (ACS-GC). The ACS-GC includes over 370,000 astronomical sources (stars + galaxies) derived from the AEGIS, COSMOS, GEMS, and GOODS surveys. We include publicly available redshifts from the DEEP2, COMBO-17, TKRS, PEARS and zCOSMOS surveys to supply redshifts for a considerable fraction ( 52%) of the imaging sample. GALAPAGOS was used to construct photometric (SExtractor) and morphological (GALFIT) catalogs. The morphological analysis assumes a single Sersic model for each object to derive quantitative structural parameters. Galaxy Zoo will measure visual morphologies for 200,000 of these galaxies. The ACS-GC includes color images, GALFIT residual images, a galaxy atlas, and a photometry + morphology + redshift catalog. We use these data to investigate the size-redshift relationship for both early and late-type galaxies out to z 1. The entire data set will be made publicly available through the NASA Extragalactic Database (NED) and LEVEL5.

  4. Cosmology with photometric weak lensing surveys: Constraints with redshift tomography of convergence peaks and moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petri, Andrea; May, Morgan; Haiman, Zoltán

    2016-09-01

    Weak gravitational lensing is becoming a mature technique for constraining cosmological parameters, and future surveys will be able to constrain the dark energy equation of state w . When analyzing galaxy surveys, redshift information has proven to be a valuable addition to angular shear correlations. We forecast parameter constraints on the triplet (Ωm,w ,σ8) for a LSST-like photometric galaxy survey, using tomography of the shear-shear power spectrum, convergence peak counts and higher convergence moments. We find that redshift tomography with the power spectrum reduces the area of the 1 σ confidence interval in (Ωm,w ) space by a factor of 8 with respect to the case of the single highest redshift bin. We also find that adding non-Gaussian information from the peak counts and higher-order moments of the convergence field and its spatial derivatives further reduces the constrained area in (Ωm,w ) by factors of 3 and 4, respectively. When we add cosmic microwave background parameter priors from Planck to our analysis, tomography improves power spectrum constraints by a factor of 3. Adding moments yields an improvement by an additional factor of 2, and adding both moments and peaks improves by almost a factor of 3 over power spectrum tomography alone. We evaluate the effect of uncorrected systematic photometric redshift errors on the parameter constraints. We find that different statistics lead to different bias directions in parameter space, suggesting the possibility of eliminating this bias via self-calibration.

  5. Measuring cosmic velocities with 21 cm intensity mapping and galaxy redshift survey cross-correlation dipoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Alex; Bonvin, Camille

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the feasibility of measuring the effects of peculiar velocities in large-scale structure using the dipole of the redshift-space cross-correlation function. We combine number counts of galaxies with brightness-temperature fluctuations from 21 cm intensity mapping, demonstrating that the dipole may be measured at modest significance (≲2 σ ) by combining the upcoming radio survey Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment with the future redshift surveys of Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) and Euclid. More significant measurements (≲10 σ ) will be possible by combining intensity maps from the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) with these of DESI or Euclid, and an even higher significance measurement (≲100 σ ) may be made by combining observables completely internally to the SKA. We account for effects such as contamination by wide-angle terms, interferometer noise and beams in the intensity maps, nonlinear enhancements to the power spectrum, stacking multiple populations, sensitivity to the magnification slope, and the possibility that number counts and intensity maps probe the same tracers. We also derive a new expression for the covariance matrix of multitracer redshift-space correlation function estimators with arbitrary orientation weights, which may be useful for upcoming surveys aiming at measuring redshift-space clustering with multiple tracers.

  6. THE SLOAN BRIGHT ARCS SURVEY: FOUR STRONGLY LENSED GALAXIES WITH REDSHIFT > 2

    SciTech Connect

    Diehl, H. Thomas; Allam, Sahar S.; Annis, James; Buckley-Geer, Elizabeth J.; Frieman, Joshua A.; Kubik, Donna; Kubo, Jeffrey M.; Lin Huan; Tucker, Douglas; West, Anderson

    2009-12-10

    We report the discovery of four very bright, strongly lensed galaxies found via systematic searches for arcs in Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 5 and 6. These were followed up with spectroscopy and imaging data from the Astrophysical Research Consortium 3.5 m telescope at Apache Point Observatory and found to have redshift z > 2.0. With isophotal magnitudes r = 19.2-20.4 and 3'' diameter magnitudes r = 20.0-20.6, these systems are some of the brightest and highest surface brightness lensed galaxies known in this redshift range. In addition to the magnitudes and redshifts, we present estimates of the Einstein radii, which range from 5.''0 to 12.''7, and use those to derive the enclosed masses of the lensing galaxies.

  7. Spectral Evolution in High Redshift Quasars from the Final Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Trey W.; Vivek, M.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Anderson, Scott F.; Bautista, Julian; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brandt, William N.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Green, Paul; Harris, David W.; Kamble, Vikrant; McGreer, Ian D.; Merloni, Andrea; Myers, Adam; Oravetz, Daniel; Pan, Kaike; Pâris, Isabelle; Schneider, Donald P.; Simmons, Audrey; Suzuki, Nao

    2016-12-01

    We report on the diversity in quasar spectra from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. After filtering the spectra to mitigate selection effects and Malmquist bias associated with a nearly flux-limited sample, we create high signal-to-noise ratio composite spectra from 58,656 quasars (2.1≤slant z≤slant 3.5), binned by luminosity, spectral index, and redshift. With these composite spectra, we confirm the traditional Baldwin effect (BE, i.e., the anti-correlation of C iv equivalent width (EW) and luminosity) that follows the relation {W}λ \\propto {L}{β w} with slope {β }w=-0.35+/- 0.004, -0.35 ± 0.005, and -0.41 ± 0.005 for z = 2.25, 2.46, and 2.84, respectively. In addition to the redshift evolution in the slope of the BE, we find redshift evolution in average quasar spectral features at fixed luminosity. The spectroscopic signature of the redshift evolution is correlated at 98% with the signature of varying luminosity, indicating that they arise from the same physical mechanism. At a fixed luminosity, the average C iv FWHM decreases with increasing redshift and is anti-correlated with C iv EW. The spectroscopic signature associated with C iv FWHM suggests that the trends in luminosity and redshift are likely caused by a superposition of effects that are related to black hole mass and Eddington ratio. The redshift evolution is the consequence of a changing balance between these two quantities as quasars evolve toward a population with lower typical accretion rates at a given black hole mass.

  8. The Herschel Multi-Tiered Extragalactic Survey: SPIRE-mm Photometric Redshifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roseboom, I. G.; Ivison, R. J.; Greve, T. R.; Amblard, A.; Arumugam, V.; Auld, R.; Aussel, H.; Bethermin, M.; Blain, A.; Block, J.; Boselli, A.; Brisbin, D.; Buat, V.; Burgarella, D.; Castro-Rodriquez, N.; Cava, A.; Chanial, P.; Chapin, E.; Chapman, S.; Clements, D. L.; Conley, A.; Conversi, L.; Dowell, C. D.; Dunlop, J. S.; Dwek, E.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the potential of submm-mm and submm-mm-radio photometric redshifts using a sample of mm-selected sources as seen at 250, 350 and 500 micron by the SPIRE instrument on Herschel. From a sample of 63 previously identified mm sources with reliable radio identifications in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey North and Lockman Hole North fields, 46 (73 per cent) are found to have detections in at least one SPIRE band. We explore the observed submm/mm color evolution with redshift, finding that the colors of mm sources are adequately described by a modified blackbody with constant optical depth Tau = (Nu/nu(sub 0))(exp Beta), where Beta = +1.8 and nu(sub 0) = c/100 micron. We find a tight correlation between dust temperature and IR luminosity. Using a single model of the dust temperature and IR luminosity relation, we derive photometric redshift estimates for the 46 SPIRE-detected mm sources. Testing against the 22 sources with known spectroscopic or good quality optical/near-IR photometric redshifts, we find submm/mm photometric redshifts offer a redshift accuracy of (absolute value of Delta sub (z))/(1 + z) = 0.16 (absolute value of Delta sub (z)) = 0.51). Including constraints from the radio-far-IR correlation, the accuracy is improved to (absolute value of Delta sub (z))/(1 + z) = 0.14 (((absolute value of Delta sub (z))) = 0.45). We estimate the redshift distribution of mm-selected sources finding a significant excess at Z > 3 when compared to approx 8S0 micron selected samples.

  9. The Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey High Redshift Search for Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strolger, L.-G.; Riess, A. G.; Dahlen, T.; GOODS SN Searchers; HHZS Team

    2003-05-01

    We have recently concluded the Hubble Higher-z Supernova Team's search for high redshift supernovae in conjunction with the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS). Using the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS), we have surveyed ˜170 sq. arcmin fields about the CDF-S and HSF-N on five epochs each, with ˜45 day baselines. These deep observations have allowed us to discover ˜40 supernovae in the range of 0.2redshift SNe using Keck and the VLT. With the ACS grism, and novel color-magnitude-redshift methods, we have been able to classify higher redshift events too faint to be spectroscopically identified from the ground. Type Ia supernova (SNe Ia) observations at /line{z}˜=0.5 provide the only direct evidence for an accelerating Universe. Using a sample of SNe Ia harvested from this survey, we will report elsewhere (Riess et al 2003; in preparation) a direct test of this measurement by looking for cosmic deceleration at z>=1. A cosmic evolution of SN Ia luminosity or ``grey dust'' would cause SNe Ia to be systematically fainter at higher-z and thus show a different sign and shape on the Hubble diagram. We are also investigating the rate of SNe at /line{z}˜=0.8-1.0, the relation to the local rates, comparisons of host environments to low redshift host environments, and the implications of each to SN progenitors, star formation rate history, and possibly to cosmology.

  10. New quasar surveys with WIRO: Searching for high redshift (z~6) quasar candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haze Nunez, Evan; Bassett, Neil; Deam, Sophie; Dixon, Don; Griffith, Emily; Harvey, William Bradford; Lee, Daniel; Lyke, Bradley; Parziale, Ryan; Witherspoon, Catherine; Myers, Adam D.; Findlay, Joseph; Kobulnicky, Henry A.; Dale, Daniel A.

    2017-01-01

    High redshift quasars (z~6) are of great interest to fundamental astronomy due to the information they hold about the early universe. With their low number density in the sky, however, they are elusive objects. Reported here is our search for these high redshift quasars using the Wyoming Infrared Observatory (WIRO) 2.3m telescope. We search for potential candidates that have been detected by surveys such as WISE, which have been mostly redshifted out of the optical. The main emission feature of these quasars (the Lyman-Alpha line at ~1216 Angstroms rest-frame) would be redshifted to the z-band or beyond. This means that the quasars should have very low levels of i-band flux. These objects are known as i-dropouts. By imaging the quasars in the i-band and running photometric analysis on our fields, candidates can be identified or rejected by whether or not they appear in our fields. We also provide an analysis of the colors of our candidate high-redshift quasars.This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under REU grant AST1560461

  11. Five New High-Redshift Quasar Lenses from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Inada, Naohisa; Oguri, Masamune; Shin, Min-Su; Kayo, Issha; Strauss, Michael A.; Morokuma, Tomoki; Schneider, Donald P.; Becker, Robert H.; Bahcall, Neta A.; York, Donald G.

    2008-09-08

    We report the discovery of five gravitationally lensed quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). All five systems are selected as two-image lensed quasar candidates from a sample of high-redshift (z > 2.2) SDSS quasars. We confirmed their lensing nature with additional imaging and spectroscopic observations. The new systems are SDSS J0819+5356 (source redshift z{sub s} = 2.237, lens redshift z{sub l} = 0.294, and image separation {theta} = 4.04 inch), SDSS J1254+2235 (z{sub s} = 3.626, {theta} = 1.56 inch), SDSS J1258+1657 (z{sub s} = 2.702, {theta} = 1.28 inch), SDSS J1339+1310 (z{sub s} = 2.243, {theta} = 1.69 cin), and SDSS J1400+3134 (z{sub s} = 3.317, {theta} = 1.74 inch). We estimate the lens redshifts of the latter four systems to be z{sub l} = 0.4-0.6 from the colors and magnitudes of the lensing galaxies. We find that the image configurations of all systems are well reproduced by standard mass models. Although these lenses will not be included in our statistical sample of z{sub s} < 2.2 lenses, they expand the number of lensed quasars which can be used for high-redshift galaxy and quasar studies.

  12. The ESO Slice Project (ESP) galaxy redshift survey. I. Description and first results.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vettolani, G.; Zucca, E.; Zamorani, G.; Cappi, A.; Merighi, R.; Mignoli, M.; Stirpe, G. M.; MacGillivray, H.; Collins, C.; Balkowski, C.; Cayatte, V.; Maurogordato, S.; Proust, D.; Chincarini, G.; Guzzo, L.; Maccagni, D.; Scaramella, R.; Blanchard, A.; Ramella, M.

    1997-09-01

    The ESO Slice Project (ESP) is a galaxy redshift survey we have recently completed as an ESO Key-Project. The ESP covers 23.3 square degrees in a region close to the South Galactic Pole. The survey is nearly complete (85%) to the limiting magnitude b_J_=19.4 and consists of 3342 galaxies with reliable redshift determination. In this paper, the first in a series that will present the results of the ESP survey, we describe the main characteristics of the survey and briefly discuss the properties of the galaxy sample. From a preliminary spectral analysis of a large sub-sample of 2550 galaxies we find that the fraction of actively star-forming galaxies increases from a few percent for the brightest galaxies up to about 40% for the galaxies fainter than M=-16.5+5logh . The most outstanding feature in the ESP redshift distribution is a very significant peak at z=~0.1. The detection of similar peaks, at the same distance, in other surveys in the same region of the sky, suggests the presence of a large bidimensional structure perpendicular to the line of sight. The minimum size of this structure would be of the order of 100x50h^-1^Mpc , comparable with the size of the Great Wall.

  13. Will kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich measurements enhance the science return from galaxy redshift surveys?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, Naonori S.; Okumura, Teppei; Spergel, David N.

    2017-01-01

    Yes. Future CMB experiments such as Advanced ACTPol and CMB-S4 should achieve measurements with S/N of > 0.1 for the typical host halo of galaxies in redshift surveys. These measurements will provide complementary measurements of the growth rate of large scale structure f and the expansion rate of the Universe H to galaxy clustering measurements. This paper emphasizes that there is significant information in the anisotropy of the relative pairwise kSZ measurements. We expand the relative pairwise kSZ power spectrum in Legendre polynomials and consider up to its octopole. Assuming that the noise in the filtered maps is uncorrelated between the positions of galaxies in the survey, we derive a simple analytic form for the power spectrum covariance of the relative pairwise kSZ temperature in redshift space. While many previous studies have assumed optimistically that the optical depth of the galaxies τT in the survey is known, we marginalize over τT, to compute constraints on the growth rate f and the expansion rate H. For realistic survey parameters, we find that combining kSZ and galaxy redshift survey data reduces the marginalized 1-σ errors on H and f to ~50-70% compared to the galaxy-only analysis.

  14. The 2-degree Field Lensing Survey: photometric redshifts from a large new training sample to r < 19.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, C.; Johnson, A. S.; Bilicki, M.; Blake, C.; Amon, A.; Erben, T.; Glazebrook, K.; Heymans, C.; Hildebrandt, H.; Joudaki, S.; Klaes, D.; Kuijken, K.; Lidman, C.; Marin, F.; Parkinson, D.; Poole, G.

    2017-04-01

    We present a new training set for estimating empirical photometric redshifts of galaxies, which was created as part of the 2-degree Field Lensing Survey project. This training set is located in a ∼700 deg2 area of the Kilo-Degree-Survey South field and is randomly selected and nearly complete at r < 19.5. We investigate the photometric redshift performance obtained with ugriz photometry from VST-ATLAS and W1/W2 from WISE, based on several empirical and template methods. The best redshift errors are obtained with kernel-density estimation (KDE), as are the lowest biases, which are consistent with zero within statistical noise. The 68th percentiles of the redshift scatter for magnitude-limited samples at r < (15.5, 17.5, 19.5) are (0.014, 0.017, 0.028). In this magnitude range, there are no known ambiguities in the colour-redshift map, consistent with a small rate of redshift outliers. In the fainter regime, the KDE method produces p(z) estimates per galaxy that represent unbiased and accurate redshift frequency expectations. The p(z) sum over any subsample is consistent with the true redshift frequency plus Poisson noise. Further improvements in redshift precision at r < 20 would mostly be expected from filter sets with narrower passbands to increase the sensitivity of colours to small changes in redshift.

  15. Photometric redshift analysis in the Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, C.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Lin, H.; Miquel, R.; Abdalla, F. B.; Amara, A.; Banerji, M.; Bonnett, C.; Brunner, R.; Capozzi, D.; Carnero, A.; Castander, F. J.; da Costa, L. A. N.; Cunha, C.; Fausti, A.; Gerdes, D.; Greisel, N.; Gschwend, J.; Hartley, W.; Jouvel, S.; Lahav, O.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; Marti, P.; Ogando, R. L. C.; Ostrovski, F.; Pellegrini, P.; Rau, M. M.; Sadeh, I.; Seitz, S.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Sypniewski, A.; de Vicente, J.; Abbot, T.; Allam, S. S.; Atlee, D.; Bernstein, G.; Bernstein, J. P.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D.; Childress, M. J.; Davis, T.; DePoy, D. L.; Dey, A.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Doel, P.; Estrada, J.; Evrard, A.; Fernandez, E.; Finley, D.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Glazebrook, K.; Honscheid, K.; Kim, A.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lidman, C.; Makler, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Nichol, R. C.; Roodman, A.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B. X.; Sako, M.; Scalzo, R.; Smith, R. C.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Tucker, D. L.; Uddin, S. A.; Valdes, F.; Walker, A.; Yuan, F.; Zuntz, J.

    2014-10-08

    We present results from a study of the photometric redshift performance of the Dark Energy Survey (DES), using the early data from a Science Verification period of observations in late 2012 and early 2013 that provided science-quality images for almost 200 sq. deg. at the nominal depth of the survey. We assess the photometric redshift (photo-z) performance using about 15 000 galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts available from other surveys. These galaxies are used, in different configurations, as a calibration sample, and photo-z's are obtained and studied using most of the existing photo-z codes. A weighting method in a multidimensional colour–magnitude space is applied to the spectroscopic sample in order to evaluate the photo-z performance with sets that mimic the full DES photometric sample, which is on average significantly deeper than the calibration sample due to the limited depth of spectroscopic surveys. Empirical photo-z methods using, for instance, artificial neural networks or random forests, yield the best performance in the tests, achieving core photo-z resolutions σ68 ~ 0.08. Moreover, the results from most of the codes, including template-fitting methods, comfortably meet the DES requirements on photo-z performance, therefore, providing an excellent precedent for future DES data sets.

  16. Photometric redshift analysis in the Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, C.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Lin, H.; Miquel, R.; Abdalla, F. B.; Amara, A.; Banerji, M.; Bonnett, C.; Brunner, R.; Capozzi, D.; Carnero, A.; Castander, F. J.; da Costa, L. A. N.; Cunha, C.; Fausti, A.; Gerdes, D.; Greisel, N.; Gschwend, J.; Hartley, W.; Jouvel, S.; Lahav, O.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; Martí, P.; Ogando, R. L. C.; Ostrovski, F.; Pellegrini, P.; Rau, M. M.; Sadeh, I.; Seitz, S.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Sypniewski, A.; de Vicente, J.; Abbot, T.; Allam, S. S.; Atlee, D.; Bernstein, G.; Bernstein, J. P.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D.; Childress, M. J.; Davis, T.; DePoy, D. L.; Dey, A.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Doel, P.; Estrada, J.; Evrard, A.; Fernández, E.; Finley, D.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Glazebrook, K.; Honscheid, K.; Kim, A.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lidman, C.; Makler, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Nichol, R. C.; Roodman, A.; Sánchez, E.; Santiago, B. X.; Sako, M.; Scalzo, R.; Smith, R. C.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Tucker, D. L.; Uddin, S. A.; Valdés, F.; Walker, A.; Yuan, F.; Zuntz, J.

    2014-12-01

    We present results from a study of the photometric redshift performance of the Dark Energy Survey (DES), using the early data from a Science Verification period of observations in late 2012 and early 2013 that provided science-quality images for almost 200 sq. deg. at the nominal depth of the survey. We assess the photometric redshift (photo-z) performance using about 15 000 galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts available from other surveys. These galaxies are used, in different configurations, as a calibration sample, and photo-z's are obtained and studied using most of the existing photo-z codes. A weighting method in a multidimensional colour-magnitude space is applied to the spectroscopic sample in order to evaluate the photo-z performance with sets that mimic the full DES photometric sample, which is on average significantly deeper than the calibration sample due to the limited depth of spectroscopic surveys. Empirical photo-z methods using, for instance, artificial neural networks or random forests, yield the best performance in the tests, achieving core photo-z resolutions σ68 ˜ 0.08. Moreover, the results from most of the codes, including template-fitting methods, comfortably meet the DES requirements on photo-z performance, therefore, providing an excellent precedent for future DES data sets.

  17. CFHTLenS and RCSLenS: testing photometric redshift distributions using angular cross-correlations with spectroscopic galaxy surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, A.; Heymans, C.; Blake, C.; Hildebrandt, H.; Duncan, C. A. J.; Erben, T.; Nakajima, R.; Van Waerbeke, L.; Viola, M.

    2016-12-01

    We determine the accuracy of galaxy redshift distributions as estimated from photometric redshift probability distributions p(z). Our method utilizes measurements of the angular cross-correlation between photometric galaxies and an overlapping sample of galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts. We describe the redshift leakage from a galaxy photometric redshift bin j into a spectroscopic redshift bin i using the sum of the p(z) for the galaxies residing in bin j. We can then predict the angular cross-correlation between photometric and spectroscopic galaxies due to intrinsic galaxy clustering when i ≠ j as a function of the measured angular cross-correlation when i = j. We also account for enhanced clustering arising from lensing magnification using a halo model. The comparison of this prediction with the measured signal provides a consistency check on the validity of using the summed p(z) to determine galaxy redshift distributions in cosmological analyses, as advocated by the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS). We present an analysis of the photometric redshifts measured by CFHTLenS, which overlaps the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). We also analyse the Red-sequence Cluster Lensing Survey, which overlaps both BOSS and the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey. We find that the summed p(z) from both surveys are generally biased with respect to the true underlying distributions. If unaccounted for, this bias would lead to errors in cosmological parameter estimation from CFHTLenS by less than ˜4 per cent. For photometric redshift bins which spatially overlap in 3D with our spectroscopic sample, we determine redshift bias corrections which can be used in future cosmological analyses that rely on accurate galaxy redshift distributions.

  18. High-Redshift Clusters form NVSS: The TexOx Cluster (TOC) Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Croft, S; Rawlings, S; Hill, G J

    2003-02-11

    The TexOx Cluster (TOC) Survey uses overdensities of radiosources in the NVSS to trace clusters of galaxies. The links between radiosources and rich environments make this a powerful way to find clusters which may potentially be overlooked by other selection techniques. By including constraints from optical surveys, TOC is an extremely efficient way to find clusters at high redshift. One such field, TOC J0233.3+3021, contains at least one galaxy cluster (at z {approx} 1.4) and has been detected using the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect. Even in targeted deep optical observations, however, distinguishing the cluster galaxies from the background is difficult, especially given the tendency of TOC to select fields containing multiple structures at different redshifts.

  19. The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS). Star formation history of passive red galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siudek, M.; Małek, K.; Scodeggio, M.; Garilli, B.; Pollo, A.; Haines, C. P.; Fritz, A.; Bolzonella, M.; de la Torre, S.; Granett, B. R.; Guzzo, L.; Abbas, U.; Adami, C.; Bottini, D.; Cappi, A.; Cucciati, O.; De Lucia, G.; Davidzon, I.; Franzetti, P.; Iovino, A.; Krywult, J.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Marchetti, A.; Marulli, F.; Polletta, M.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Tojeiro, R.; Vergani, D.; Zanichelli, A.; Arnouts, S.; Bel, J.; Branchini, E.; Ilbert, O.; Gargiulo, A.; Moscardini, L.; Takeuchi, T. T.; Zamorani, G.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: We trace the evolution and the star formation history of passive red galaxies, using a subset of the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS). The detailed spectral analysis of stellar populations of intermediate-redshift passive red galaxies allows the build up of their stellar content to be followed over the last 8 billion years. Methods: We extracted a sample of passive red galaxies in the redshift range 0.4 survey. The sample was selected using an evolving cut in the rest-frame U-V color distribution and additional cuts that ensured high quality. The spectra of passive red galaxies were stacked in narrow bins of stellar mass and redshift. We use the stacked spectra to measure the 4000 Å break (D4000) and the Hδ Lick index (HδA) with high precision. These spectral features are used as indicators of the star formation history of passive red galaxies. We compare the results with a grid of synthetic spectra to constrain the star formation epochs of these galaxies. We characterize the formation redshift-stellar mass relation for intermediate-redshift passive red galaxies. Results: We find that at z 1 stellar populations in low-mass passive red galaxies are younger than in high-mass passive red galaxies, similar to what is observed at the present epoch. Over the full analyzed redshift range 0.4 < z < 1.0 and stellar mass range 10 < log (Mstar/M⊙) < 12, the D4000 index increases with redshift, while HδA gets lower. This implies that the stellar populations are getting older with increasing stellar mass. Comparison to the spectra of passive red galaxies in the SDSS survey (z 0.2) shows that the shape of the relations of D4000 and HδA with stellar mass has not changed significantly with redshift. Assuming a single burst formation, this implies that high-mass passive red galaxies formed their stars at zform 1.7, while low-mass galaxies formed their main stellar populations

  20. Probabilistic Selection of High-redshift Quasars with Subaru/Hyper Suprime-Cam Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onoue, Masafusa

    High-redshift quasars are an important probe of the distant Universe. They enable observational studies of the early growth of supermassive blackholes, cosmic reionization, chemical enrichment of host galaxies, and so on. Through pioneering optical and near-infrared wide-area surveys such as the SDSS and the VIKING Survey, about one hundred quasars have been found at z > 6 (e.g., Fan et al. (2006b), Venemans et al. (2013)). However, its current small sample size and the fact that most of them are the most luminous (M 1450 <~ -24) population in this epoch prevents one from constraining statistics on high-redshift quasars, namely quasar luminosity function (QLF), and redshift evolution of IGM neutral fraction. Thus, discovery of large number of z > 6 quasars, especially low-luminous or z > 7 quasars, is highly desired for further understanding of the early universe. We are now starting a new ground-breaking survey of high-redshift (z > 6) quasars using the exquisite imaging data provided by the Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) Subaru Strategic Program (SSP) Survey. Thanks to its extremely wide coverage and its high sensitivity thorough five optical bands (1,400 deg2 to the depth of r ~ 26 in HSC-Wide layer), it is one of the most powerful contemporary surveys that makes it possible for us to increase the number of z > 6 quasars by almost an order of magnitude, i.e., 300 at z ~ 6 and 50 at z ~ 7, based on the current estimate of the QLF at z > 6 by Willott et al. (2010b). One of the biggest challenges in z > 6 quasar candidate selection is contamination of Galactic brown dwarfs, which have the same point-like appearance as and similarly red colors to the quasars. To overcome this issue and maximize the selection efficiency, we apply a double-layered approach to the HSC survey products, namely combination of two probabilistic selections: SED-fitting and Bayesian selection. In particular, we have developed a template SED fitting method optimized to high-redshift quasars

  1. THE EGNoG SURVEY: MOLECULAR GAS IN INTERMEDIATE-REDSHIFT STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Bauermeister, A.; Blitz, L.; Wright, M.; Bolatto, A.; Teuben, P.; Bureau, M.; Leroy, A.; Ostriker, E.; Wong, T.

    2013-05-10

    We present the Evolution of molecular Gas in Normal Galaxies (EGNoG) survey, an observational study of molecular gas in 31 star-forming galaxies from z = 0.05 to z = 0.5, with stellar masses of (4-30) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} and star formation rates of 4-100 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. This survey probes a relatively un-observed redshift range in which the molecular gas content of galaxies is expected to have evolved significantly. To trace the molecular gas in the EGNoG galaxies, we observe the CO(J = 1 {yields} 0) and CO(J = 3 {yields} 2) rotational lines using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA). We detect 24 of 31 galaxies and present resolved maps of 10 galaxies in the lower redshift portion of the survey. We use a bimodal prescription for the CO to molecular gas conversion factor, based on specific star formation rate, and compare the EGNoG galaxies to a large sample of galaxies assembled from the literature. We find an average molecular gas depletion time of 0.76 {+-} 0.54 Gyr for normal galaxies and 0.06 {+-} 0.04 Gyr for starburst galaxies. We calculate an average molecular gas fraction of 7%-20% at the intermediate redshifts probed by the EGNoG survey. By expressing the molecular gas fraction in terms of the specific star formation rate and molecular gas depletion time (using typical values), we also calculate the expected evolution of the molecular gas fraction with redshift. The predicted behavior agrees well with the significant evolution observed from z {approx} 2.5 to today.

  2. The DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey: The Voronoi-Delaunay Method Catalog of Galaxy Groups

    SciTech Connect

    Gerke, Brian F.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Davis, Marc; Marinoni, Christian; Yan, Renbin; Coil, Alison L.; Conroy, Charlie; Cooper, Michael C.; Faber, S.M.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Kaiser, Nick; Koo, David C.; Phillips, Andrew C.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; /Maryland U.

    2012-02-14

    We use the first 25% of the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey spectroscopic data to identify groups and clusters of galaxies in redshift space. The data set contains 8370 galaxies with confirmed redshifts in the range 0.7 {<=} z {<=} 1.4, over one square degree on the sky. Groups are identified using an algorithm (the Voronoi-Delaunay Method) that has been shown to accurately reproduce the statistics of groups in simulated DEEP2-like samples. We optimize this algorithm for the DEEP2 survey by applying it to realistic mock galaxy catalogs and assessing the results using a stringent set of criteria for measuring group-finding success, which we develop and describe in detail here. We find in particular that the group-finder can successfully identify {approx}78% of real groups and that {approx}79% of the galaxies that are true members of groups can be identified as such. Conversely, we estimate that {approx}55% of the groups we find can be definitively identified with real groups and that {approx}46% of the galaxies we place into groups are interloper field galaxies. Most importantly, we find that it is possible to measure the distribution of groups in redshift and velocity dispersion, n({sigma}, z), to an accuracy limited by cosmic variance, for dispersions greater than 350 km s{sup -1}. We anticipate that such measurements will allow strong constraints to be placed on the equation of state of the dark energy in the future. Finally, we present the first DEEP2 group catalog, which assigns 32% of the galaxies to 899 distinct groups with two or more members, 153 of which have velocity dispersions above 350 km s{sup -1}. We provide locations, redshifts and properties for this high-dispersion subsample. This catalog represents the largest sample to date of spectroscopically detected groups at z {approx} 1.

  3. THE POPULATION OF HIGH-REDSHIFT ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN THE CHANDRA-COSMOS SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Civano, F.; Elvis, M.; Hao, H.; Brusa, M.; Comastri, A.; Zamorani, G.; Gilli, R.; Mignoli, M.; Salvato, M.; Capak, P.; Kakazu, Y.; Masters, D.; Fiore, F.; Ikeda, H.; Kartaltepe, J. S.; Miyaji, T.; Puccetti, S.; Shankar, F.; Silverman, J.; Vignali, C.

    2011-11-10

    We present the high-redshift (3 Survey. The sample comprises 81 X-ray-detected sources with available spectroscopic (31) and photometric (50) redshifts plus 20 sources with a formal z{sub phot} < 3 but with a broad photometric redshift probability distribution, such that z{sub phot} + 1{sigma} > 3. Eighty-one sources are selected in the 0.5-2 keV band, fourteen are selected in the 2-10 keV and six in the 0.5-10 keV bands. We sample the high-luminosity (log L{sub (2-10keV)} > 44.15 erg s{sup -1}) space density up to z {approx} 5 and a fainter luminosity range (43.5 erg s{sup -1} < log L{sub (2-10keV)} < 44.15 erg s{sup -1}) than previous studies, up to z = 3.5. We weighted the contribution to the number counts and the space density of the sources with photometric redshift by using their probability of being at z > 3. We find that the space density of high-luminosity AGNs declines exponentially at all the redshifts, confirming the trend observed for optically selected quasars. At lower luminosity, the measured space density is not conclusive, and a larger sample of faint sources is needed. Comparisons with optical luminosity functions and black hole formation models are presented together with prospects for future surveys.

  4. The ESO Slice Project (ESP) galaxy redshift survey. III. The sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vettolani, G.; Zucca, E.; Merighi, R.; Mignoli, M.; Proust, D.; Zamorani, G.; Cappi, A.; Guzzo, L.; Maccagni, D.; Ramella, M.; Stirpe, G. M.; Blanchard, A.; Cayatte, V.; Collins, C.; MacGillivray, H.; Maurogordato, S.; Scaramella, R.; Balkowski, C.; Chincarini, G.; Felenbok, P.

    1998-06-01

    The ESO Slice Project (ESP) is a galaxy redshift survey extending over about 23 square degrees, in a region near the South Galactic Pole. The survey is ~ 85% complete to the limiting magnitude b_J=19.4 and consists of 3342 galaxies with redshift determination. The ESP survey is intermediate between shallow, wide angle samples and very deep, one-dimensional pencil beams; the spanned volume is ~ 5 \\ 10(4) \\htre at the sensitivity peak (z ~ 0.1). In this paper we present the description of the observations and of the data reduction, the ESP redshift catalogue and the analysis of the quality of the velocity determinations. based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile. Table 3 is only available (and Table 2 is also available) in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/Abstract.html

  5. The VIMOS VLT Deep Survey. Public release of 1599 redshifts to IAB≤24 across the Chandra Deep Field South

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Fèvre, O.; Vettolani, G.; Paltani, S.; Tresse, L.; Zamorani, G.; Le Brun, V.; Moreau, C.; Bottini, D.; Maccagni, D.; Picat, J. P.; Scaramella, R.; Scodeggio, M.; Zanichelli, A.; Adami, C.; Arnouts, S.; Bardelli, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Cappi, A.; Charlot, S.; Contini, T.; Foucaud, S.; Franzetti, P.; Garilli, B.; Gavignaud, I.; Guzzo, L.; Ilbert, O.; Iovino, A.; McCracken, H. J.; Mancini, D.; Marano, B.; Marinoni, C.; Mathez, G.; Mazure, A.; Meneux, B.; Merighi, R.; Pellò, R.; Pollo, A.; Pozzetti, L.; Radovich, M.; Zucca, E.; Arnaboldi, M.; Bondi, M.; Bongiorno, A.; Busarello, G.; Ciliegi, P.; Gregorini, L.; Mellier, Y.; Merluzzi, P.; Ripepi, V.; Rizzo, D.

    2004-12-01

    This paper presents the VIMOS VLT Deep Survey around the Chandra Deep Field South (CDFS). We have measured 1599 new redshifts with VIMOS on the European Observatory Very Large Telescope - UT3, in an area 21 × 21.6 arcmin2, including 784 redshifts in the Hubble Space Telescope - Advanced Camera for Surveys GOODS area. 30% of all objects with IAB=24 have been observed independently of magnitude, indicating that the sample is purely magnitude limited. We have reached an unprecedented completeness level of 84% in terms of the ratio of secure measurements vs. observed objects, while 95% of all objects have a redshift measurement. A total of 1452 galaxies, 139 stars, 8 QSOs have a redshift identification, 141 of these being unsecure measurements. The redshift distribution down to IAB=24 is peaked at a median redshift z=0.73, with a significant high redshift tail extending up to ˜4. Several high density peaks in the distribution of galaxies are identified. In particular, the strong peak at z=0.735 contains more than 130 galaxies in a velocity range ±2000 km s-1 distributed all across the transverse ˜20 h-1 Mpc of the survey. We are releasing all redshifts to the community, along with the cross identification with HST-ACS GOODS sources on the CENCOS database environment http://cencosw.oamp.fr. The data presented in this paper has been obtained with the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope, Paranal, Chile.

  6. Cosmology with photometric weak lensing surveys: Constraints with redshift tomography of convergence peaks and moments

    SciTech Connect

    Petri, Andrea; May, Morgan; Haiman, Zoltán

    2016-09-30

    Weak gravitational lensing is becoming a mature technique for constraining cosmological parameters, and future surveys will be able to constrain the dark energy equation of state w. When analyzing galaxy surveys, redshift information has proven to be a valuable addition to angular shear correlations. We forecast parameter constraints on the triplet (Ωm,w,σ8) for a LSST-like photometric galaxy survey, using tomography of the shear-shear power spectrum, convergence peak counts and higher convergence moments. Here we find that redshift tomography with the power spectrum reduces the area of the 1σ confidence interval in (Ωm,w) space by a factor of 8 with respect to the case of the single highest redshift bin. We also find that adding non-Gaussian information from the peak counts and higher-order moments of the convergence field and its spatial derivatives further reduces the constrained area in (Ωm,w) by factors of 3 and 4, respectively. When we add cosmic microwave background parameter priors from Planck to our analysis, tomography improves power spectrum constraints by a factor of 3. Adding moments yields an improvement by an additional factor of 2, and adding both moments and peaks improves by almost a factor of 3 over power spectrum tomography alone. We evaluate the effect of uncorrected systematic photometric redshift errors on the parameter constraints. In conclusion, we find that different statistics lead to different bias directions in parameter space, suggesting the possibility of eliminating this bias via self-calibration.

  7. Cosmology with photometric weak lensing surveys: Constraints with redshift tomography of convergence peaks and moments

    DOE PAGES

    Petri, Andrea; May, Morgan; Haiman, Zoltán

    2016-09-30

    Weak gravitational lensing is becoming a mature technique for constraining cosmological parameters, and future surveys will be able to constrain the dark energy equation of state w. When analyzing galaxy surveys, redshift information has proven to be a valuable addition to angular shear correlations. We forecast parameter constraints on the triplet (Ωm,w,σ8) for a LSST-like photometric galaxy survey, using tomography of the shear-shear power spectrum, convergence peak counts and higher convergence moments. Here we find that redshift tomography with the power spectrum reduces the area of the 1σ confidence interval in (Ωm,w) space by a factor of 8 with respectmore » to the case of the single highest redshift bin. We also find that adding non-Gaussian information from the peak counts and higher-order moments of the convergence field and its spatial derivatives further reduces the constrained area in (Ωm,w) by factors of 3 and 4, respectively. When we add cosmic microwave background parameter priors from Planck to our analysis, tomography improves power spectrum constraints by a factor of 3. Adding moments yields an improvement by an additional factor of 2, and adding both moments and peaks improves by almost a factor of 3 over power spectrum tomography alone. We evaluate the effect of uncorrected systematic photometric redshift errors on the parameter constraints. In conclusion, we find that different statistics lead to different bias directions in parameter space, suggesting the possibility of eliminating this bias via self-calibration.« less

  8. RED-SEQUENCE GALAXIES AT HIGH REDSHIFT BY THE COMBO-17+4 SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Nicol, Marie-Helene; Meisenheimer, Klaus; Wolf, Christian; Tapken, Christian E-mail: meise@mpia.de E-mail: ctapken@aip.de

    2011-01-20

    We investigate the evolution of the galaxy population since redshift 2 with a focus on the color bimodality and mass density of the red sequence. We obtain precise and reliable photometric redshifts up to z = 2 by supplementing the optical survey COMBO-17 with observations in four near-infrared bands on 0.2 deg{sup 2} of the COMBO-17 A901-field. Our results are based on an H-band-selected catalog of 10,692 galaxies complete to H = 21fm7. We measure the rest-frame color (U{sub 280}-V) of each galaxy, which across the redshift range of our interest requires no extrapolation and is robust against moderate redshift errors by staying clear of the 4000 A break. We measure the color-magnitude relation of the red sequence as a function of look-back time from the peak in a color-error-weighted histogram, and thus trace the galaxy bimodality out to z {approx_equal} 1.65. The (U{sub 280}-V) of the red sequence is found to evolve almost linearly with look-back time. At high redshift, we find massive galaxies in both the red and the blue population. Red-sequence galaxies with log M{sub *}/M{sub sun}>11 increase in mass density by a factor of {approx}4 from z {approx} 2 to 1 and remain nearly constant at z < 1. However, some galaxies as massive as log M{sub *}/M{sub sun} = 11.5 are already in place at z {approx} 2.

  9. THE TEAM KECK REDSHIFT SURVEY 2: MOSFIRE SPECTROSCOPY OF THE GOODS-NORTH FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Wirth, Gregory D.; Kassis, Marc; Lyke, Jim; Rizzi, Luca; Campbell, Randy; Goodrich, Robert W.; Trump, Jonathan R.; Barro, Guillermo; Guo, Yicheng; Koo, David C.; Liu, Fengshan; Faber, S. M.

    2015-11-15

    We present the Team Keck Redshift Survey 2 (TKRS2), a near-infrared spectral observing program targeting selected galaxies within the CANDELS subsection of the GOODS-North Field. The TKRS2 program exploits the unique capabilities of the Multi-Object Spectrometer For Infra-Red Exploration (MOSFIRE), which entered service on the Keck I telescope in 2012 and contributes substantially to the study of galaxy spectral features at redshifts inaccessible to optical spectrographs. The TKRS2 project targets 97 galaxies drawn from samples that include z ≈ 2 emission-line galaxies with features observable in the JHK bands as well as lower-redshift targets with features in the Y band. We present a detailed measurement of MOSFIRE’s sensitivity as a function of wavelength, including the effects of telluric features across the YJHK filters. The largest utility of our survey is in providing rest-frame-optical emission lines for z > 1 galaxies, and we demonstrate that the ratios of strong, optical emission lines of z ≈ 2 galaxies suggest the presence of either higher N/O abundances than are found in z ≈ 0 galaxies or low-metallicity gas ionized by an active galactic nucleus. We have released all TKRS2 data products into the public domain to allow researchers access to representative raw and reduced MOSFIRE spectra.

  10. Cosmology with clustering anisotropies: disentangling dynamic and geometric distortions in galaxy redshift surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marulli, Federico; Bianchi, Davide; Branchini, Enzo; Guzzo, Luigi; Moscardini, Lauro; Angulo, Raul E.

    2012-11-01

    We investigate the impact of different observational effects affecting a precise and accurate measurement of the growth rate of fluctuations from the anisotropy of clustering in galaxy redshift surveys. We focus here on redshift measurement errors, on the reconstruction of the underlying real-space clustering and, most importantly, on the apparent degeneracy existing with the geometrical distortions induced by the cosmology-dependent conversion of redshifts into distances. We use a suite of mock catalogues extracted from large N-body simulations, focusing on the analysis of intermediate, mildly non-linear scales (r < 50 h-1 Mpc) and apply the standard 'dispersion model' to fit the anisotropy of the observed correlation function ξ(r⊥, r∥) . We first verify that redshift errors up to δz ˜ 0.2 per cent (i.e. σz ˜ 0.002 at z = 1) have a negligible impact on the precision with which the specific growth rate β can be measured. Larger redshift errors introduce a positive systematic error, which can be alleviated by adopting a Gaussian distribution function of pairwise velocities. This is, in any case, smaller than the systematic error of up to 10 per cent due to the limitations of the dispersion model, which is studied in a separate paper. We then show that 50 per cent of the statistical error budget on β depends on the deprojection procedure through which the real-space correlation function, needed for the modelling process, is obtained. Finally, we demonstrate that the degeneracy with geometric distortions can in fact be circumvented. This is obtained through a modified version of the Alcock-Paczynski test in redshift space, which successfully recovers the correct cosmology by searching for the solution that optimizes the description of dynamical redshift distortions. For a flat cosmology, we obtain largely independent, robust constraints on β and on the mass density parameter, ΩM. In a volume of 2.4 (h-1 Gpc)3, the correct ΩM is obtained with ˜12 per

  11. Large Scale Structures in the Las Campanas Redshift Survey and in Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, V.; Doroshkevich, A. G.; Retzlaff, J.; Turchaninov, V.

    1999-06-01

    The large supercluster structures obvious in recent galaxy redshift surveys are quantified using an one-dimensional cluster analysis (core sampling) and a three-dimensional cluster analysis based on the minimal spanning tree. The comparison with the LCRS reveals promising stable results. At a mean overdensity of about ten, the supercluster systems form huge wall-like structures comprising about 40% of all galaxies. The overdense clusters have a low mean transverse velocity dispersion of about 400 km/s, i.e. they look quite narrow in redshift space. We performed N-body simulations with large box sizes for six cosmological scenarios. The quantitative analysis shows that the observed structures can be understood best in low density models with Ω_m <= 0.5 with or without a cosmological constant.

  12. The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS). Hierarchical scaling and biasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappi, A.; Marulli, F.; Bel, J.; Cucciati, O.; Branchini, E.; de la Torre, S.; Moscardini, L.; Bolzonella, M.; Guzzo, L.; Abbas, U.; Adami, C.; Arnouts, S.; Bottini, D.; Coupon, J.; Davidzon, I.; De Lucia, G.; Fritz, A.; Franzetti, P.; Fumana, M.; Garilli, B.; Granett, B. R.; Ilbert, O.; Iovino, A.; Krywult, J.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Małek, K.; McCracken, H. J.; Paioro, L.; Polletta, M.; Pollo, A.; Scodeggio, M.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Tojeiro, R.; Vergani, D.; Zanichelli, A.; Burden, A.; Di Porto, C.; Marchetti, A.; Marinoni, C.; Mellier, Y.; Nichol, R. C.; Peacock, J. A.; Percival, W. J.; Phleps, S.; Schimd, C.; Schlagenhaufer, H.; Wolk, M.; Zamorani, G.

    2015-07-01

    Aims: Building on the two-point correlation function analyses of the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS), we investigate the higher-order correlation properties of the same galaxy samples to test the hierarchical scaling hypothesis at z ~ 1 and the dependence on galaxy luminosity, stellar mass, and redshift. With this work we also aim to assess possible deviations from the linearity of galaxy bias independently from a previously performed analysis of our survey. Methods: We have measured the count probability distribution function in spherical cells of varying radii (3 ≤ R ≤ 10 h-1 Mpc), deriving σ8g (the galaxy rms at 8 h-1 Mpc), the volume-averaged two-, three-, and four-point correlation functions and the normalized skewness S3g and kurtosis S4g for different volume-limited subsamples, covering the following ranges: -19.5 ≤ MB(z = 1.1) - 5log (h) ≤ -21.0 in absolute magnitude, 9.0 ≤ log (M∗/M⊙h-2) ≤ 11.0 in stellar mass, and 0.5 ≤ z< 1.1 in redshift. Results: We have performed the first measurement of high-order correlation functions at z ~ 1 in a spectroscopic redshift survey. Our main results are the following. 1) The hierarchical scaling between the volume-averaged two- and three-point and two- and four-point correlation functions holds throughout the whole range of scale and redshift we could test. 2) We do not find a significant dependence of S3g on luminosity (below z = 0.9 the value of S3g decreases with luminosity, but only at 1σ-level). 3) We do not detect a significant dependence of S3g and S4g on scale, except beyond z ~ 0.9, where S3g and S4g have higher values on large scales (R ≥ 10 h-1 Mpc): this increase is mainly due to one of the two CFHTLS Wide Fields observed by VIPERS and can be explained as a consequence of sample variance, consistently with our analysis of mock catalogs. 4) We do not detect a significant evolution of S3g and S4g with redshift (apart from the increase of their values with scale in the

  13. See Change: the Supernova Sample from the Supernova Cosmology Project High Redshift Cluster Supernova Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayden, Brian; Perlmutter, Saul; Boone, Kyle; Nordin, Jakob; Rubin, David; Lidman, Chris; Deustua, Susana E.; Fruchter, Andrew S.; Aldering, Greg Scott; Brodwin, Mark; Cunha, Carlos E.; Eisenhardt, Peter R.; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Jee, James; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Hoekstra, Henk; Santos, Joana; Stanford, S. Adam; Stern, Daniel; Fassbender, Rene; Richard, Johan; Rosati, Piero; Wechsler, Risa H.; Muzzin, Adam; Willis, Jon; Boehringer, Hans; Gladders, Michael; Goobar, Ariel; Amanullah, Rahman; Hook, Isobel; Huterer, Dragan; Huang, Xiaosheng; Kim, Alex G.; Kowalski, Marek; Linder, Eric; Pain, Reynald; Saunders, Clare; Suzuki, Nao; Barbary, Kyle H.; Rykoff, Eli S.; Meyers, Joshua; Spadafora, Anthony L.; Sofiatti, Caroline; Wilson, Gillian; Rozo, Eduardo; Hilton, Matt; Ruiz-Lapuente, Pilar; Luther, Kyle; Yen, Mike; Fagrelius, Parker; Dixon, Samantha; Williams, Steven

    2017-01-01

    The Supernova Cosmology Project has finished executing a large (174 orbits, cycles 22-23) Hubble Space Telescope program, which has measured ~30 type Ia Supernovae above z~1 in the highest-redshift, most massive galaxy clusters known to date. Our SN Ia sample closely matches our pre-survey predictions; this sample will improve the constraint by a factor of 3 on the Dark Energy equation of state above z~1, allowing an unprecedented probe of Dark Energy time variation. When combined with the improved cluster mass calibration from gravitational lensing provided by the deep WFC3-IR observations of the clusters, See Change will triple the Dark Energy Task Force Figure of Merit. With the primary observing campaign completed, we present the preliminary supernova sample and our path forward to the supernova cosmology results. We also compare the number of SNe Ia discovered in each cluster with our pre-survey expectations based on cluster mass and SFR estimates. Our extensive HST and ground-based campaign has already produced unique results; we have confirmed several of the highest redshift cluster members known to date, confirmed the redshift of one of the most massive galaxy clusters at z~1.2 expected across the entire sky, and characterized one of the most extreme starburst environments yet known in a z~1.7 cluster. We have also discovered a lensed SN Ia at z=2.22 magnified by a factor of ~2.7, which is the highest spectroscopic redshift SN Ia currently known.

  14. ACS Grism Parallel Survey of Emission- line Galaxies at Redshift z Apl 7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Lin

    2002-07-01

    We propose an ACS grism parallel survey to search for emission-line galaxies toward 50 random lines of sight over the redshift interval 0 < z Apl 7. We request ACS parallel observations of duration more than one orbit at high galactic latitude to identify 300 HAlpha emission-line galaxies at 0.2 Apl z Apl 0.5, 720 O IILambda3727 emission-line galaxies at 0.3 Apl z Apl 1.68, and Apg 1000 Ly-alpha emission-line galaxies at 3 Apl z Apl 7 with total emission line flux f Apg 2* 10^-17 ergs s^-1 cm^-2 over 578 arcmin^2. We will obtain direct images with the F814W and F606W filters and dispersed images with the WFC/G800L grism at each position. The direct images will serve to provide a zeroth order model both for wavelength calibration of the extracted 1D spectra and for determining extraction apertures of the corresponding dispersed images. The primary scientific objectives are as follows: {1} We will establish a uniform sample of HAlpha and O II emission-line galaxies at z<1.7 in order to obtain accurate measurements of co-moving star formation rate density versus redshift over this redshift range. {2} We will study the spatial and statistical distribution of star formation rate intensity in individual galaxies using the spatially resolved emission-line morphology in the grism images. And {3} we will study high-redshift universe using Ly-alpha emitting galaxies identified at z Apl 7 in the survey. The data will be available to the community immediately as they are obtained.

  15. COMPARING DENSE GALAXY CLUSTER REDSHIFT SURVEYS WITH WEAK-LENSING MAPS

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Ho Seong; Geller, Margaret J.; Zahid, H. Jabran; Diaferio, Antonaldo; Rines, Kenneth J. E-mail: mgeller@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: diaferio@ph.unito.it

    2014-12-20

    We use dense redshift surveys of nine galaxy clusters at z ∼ 0.2 to compare the galaxy distribution in each system with the projected matter distribution from weak lensing. By combining 2087 new MMT/Hectospec redshifts and the data in the literature, we construct spectroscopic samples within the region of weak-lensing maps of high (70%-89%) and uniform completeness. With these dense redshift surveys, we construct galaxy number density maps using several galaxy subsamples. The shape of the main cluster concentration in the weak-lensing maps is similar to the global morphology of the number density maps based on cluster members alone, mainly dominated by red members. We cross-correlate the galaxy number density maps with the weak-lensing maps. The cross-correlation signal when we include foreground and background galaxies at 0.5z {sub cl} < z < 2z {sub cl} is 10%-23% larger than for cluster members alone at the cluster virial radius. The excess can be as high as 30% depending on the cluster. Cross-correlating the galaxy number density and weak-lensing maps suggests that superimposed structures close to the cluster in redshift space contribute more significantly to the excess cross-correlation signal than unrelated large-scale structure along the line of sight. Interestingly, the weak-lensing mass profiles are not well constrained for the clusters with the largest cross-correlation signal excesses (>20% for A383, A689, and A750). The fractional excess in the cross-correlation signal including foreground and background structures could be a useful proxy for assessing the reliability of weak-lensing cluster mass estimates.

  16. A comparison of the PSCz and Stromlo-APM redshift surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaborne, M. D.; Sutherland, W.; Tadros, H.; Efstathiou, G.; Frenk, C. S.; Keeble, O.; Maddox, S.; McMahon, R. G.; Oliver, S.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Saunders, W.; White, S. D. M.

    1999-10-01

    We present a direct comparison of the clustering properties of two redshift surveys covering a common volume of space: the recently completed IRAS Point Source Catalogue redshift survey (PSCz) containing 14 500 galaxies with a limiting flux of 0.6Jy at 60μm, and the optical Stromlo-APM survey containing 1787 galaxies in a region of 4300deg^2 in the south Galactic cap. We use three methods to compare the clustering properties: the counts-in-cells comparison of Efstathiou, the two-point cross-correlation function, and the Tegmark `null-buster' test. We find that the Stromlo variances are systematically higher than those of PSCz, as expected owing to the deficit of early-type galaxies in IRAS samples. However, we find that the differences between the cell counts are consistent with a linear bias between the two surveys, with a relative bias parameter b_rel=b_Stromlob_PSCz~1.3, which appears approximately scale-independent. The correlation coefficient R between optical and IRAS densities on scales ~20h^-1Mpc is R>=0.72 at 95per cent confidence limit, placing limits on types of `stochastic bias' that affect optical and IRAS galaxies differently.

  17. THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY CO-ADD: A GALAXY PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFT CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Reis, Ribamar R. R.; Soares-Santos, Marcelle; Annis, James; Dodelson, Scott; Hao Jiangang; Johnston, David; Kubo, Jeffrey; Lin Huan; Seo, Hee-Jong; Simet, Melanie

    2012-03-01

    We present and describe a catalog of galaxy photometric redshifts (photo-z) for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Co-add Data. We use the artificial neural network (ANN) technique to calculate the photo-z and the nearest neighbor error method to estimate photo-z errors for {approx}13 million objects classified as galaxies in the co-add with r < 24.5. The photo-z and photo-z error estimators are trained and validated on a sample of {approx}83,000 galaxies that have SDSS photometry and spectroscopic redshifts measured by the SDSS Data Release 7 (DR7), the Canadian Network for Observational Cosmology Field Galaxy Survey, the Deep Extragalactic Evolutionary Probe Data Release 3, the VIsible imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph-Very Large Telescope Deep Survey, and the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey. For the best ANN methods we have tried, we find that 68% of the galaxies in the validation set have a photo-z error smaller than {sigma}{sub 68} = 0.031. After presenting our results and quality tests, we provide a short guide for users accessing the public data.

  18. Gravitational redshift of galaxies in clusters from the sloan digital sky survey and the Baryon Oscillation spectroscopic survey.

    PubMed

    Sadeh, Iftach; Feng, Low Lerh; Lahav, Ofer

    2015-02-20

    The gravitational redshift effect allows one to directly probe the gravitational potential in clusters of galaxies. Following up on Wojtak et al. [Nature (London) 477, 567 (2011)], we present a new measurement. We take advantage of new data from the tenth data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. We compare the spectroscopic redshift of the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) with that of galaxies at the outskirts of clusters, using a sample with an average cluster mass of 1014M⊙. We find that these galaxies have an average relative redshift of -11  km/s compared with that of BCGs, with a standard deviation of +7 and -5  km/s. Our measurement is consistent with that of Wojtak et al. [Nature (London) 477, 567 (2011)]. However, our derived standard deviation is larger, as we take into account various systematic effects, beyond the size of the data set. The result is in good agreement with the predictions from general relativity.

  19. A DATA-DRIVEN MODEL FOR SPECTRA: FINDING DOUBLE REDSHIFTS IN THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Tsalmantza, P.; Hogg, David W.

    2012-07-10

    We present a data-driven method-heteroscedastic matrix factorization, a kind of probabilistic factor analysis-for modeling or performing dimensionality reduction on observed spectra or other high-dimensional data with known but non-uniform observational uncertainties. The method uses an iterative inverse-variance-weighted least-squares minimization procedure to generate a best set of basis functions. The method is similar to principal components analysis (PCA), but with the substantial advantage that it uses measurement uncertainties in a responsible way and accounts naturally for poorly measured and missing data; it models the variance in the noise-deconvolved data space. A regularization can be applied, in the form of a smoothness prior (inspired by Gaussian processes) or a non-negative constraint, without making the method prohibitively slow. Because the method optimizes a justified scalar (related to the likelihood), the basis provides a better fit to the data in a probabilistic sense than any PCA basis. We test the method on Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectra, concentrating on spectra known to contain two redshift components: these are spectra of gravitational lens candidates and massive black hole binaries. We apply a hypothesis test to compare one-redshift and two-redshift models for these spectra, utilizing the data-driven model trained on a random subset of all SDSS spectra. This test confirms 129 of the 131 lens candidates in our sample and all of the known binary candidates, and turns up very few false positives.

  20. Photometric Redshifts for the Large-Area Stripe 82X Multiwavelength Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasnim Ananna, Tonima; Salvato, Mara; Urry, C. Megan; LaMassa, Stephanie M.; STRIPE 82X

    2016-06-01

    The Stripe 82X survey currently includes 6000 X-ray sources in 31.3 square degrees of XMM-Newton and Chandra X-ray coverage, most of which are AGN. Using a maximum-likelihood approach, we identified optical and infrared counterparts in the SDSS, VHS K-band and WISE W1-band catalogs. 1200 objects which had different best associations in different catalogs were checked by eye. Our most recent paper provided the multiwavelength catalogs for this sample. More than 1000 counterparts have spectroscopic redshifts, either from SDSS spectroscopy or our own follow-up program. Using the extensive multiwavelength data in this field, we provide photometric redshift estimates for most of the remaining sources, which are 80-90% accurate according to the training set. Our sample has a large number of candidates that are very faint in optical and bright in IR. We expect a large fraction of these objects to be the obscured AGN sample we need to complete the census on black hole growth at a range of redshifts.

  1. THE AzTEC/SMA INTERFEROMETRIC IMAGING SURVEY OF SUBMILLIMETER-SELECTED HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Younger, Joshua D.; Fazio, Giovanni G.; Huang Jiasheng; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Gurwell, Mark A.; Petitpas, Glen R.; Wilner, David J.; Yun, Min S.; Wilson, Grant W.; Scott, Kimberly S.; Austermann, Jason; Perera, Thushara; Peck, Alison B.; Hughes, David H.; Aretxaga, Itziar; Kim, Sungeun; Lowenthal, James D.

    2009-10-10

    We present results from a continuing interferometric survey of high-redshift submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) with the Submillimeter Array, including high-resolution (beam size approx2 arcsec) imaging of eight additional AzTEC 1.1 mm selected sources in the COSMOS field, for which we obtain six reliable (peak signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) >5 or peak S/N >4 with multiwavelength counterparts within the beam) and two moderate significance (peak S/N >4) detections. When combined with previous detections, this yields an unbiased sample of millimeter-selected SMGs with complete interferometric follow up. With this sample in hand, we (1) empirically confirm the radio-submillimeter association, (2) examine the submillimeter morphology-including the nature of SMGs with multiple radio counterparts and constraints on the physical scale of the far infrared-of the sample, and (3) find additional evidence for a population of extremely luminous, radio-dim SMGs that peaks at higher redshift than previous, radio-selected samples. In particular, the presence of such a population of high-redshift sources has important consequences for models of galaxy formation-which struggle to account for such objects even under liberal assumptions-and dust production models given the limited time since the big bang.

  2. The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey: luminosity dependence of galaxy clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norberg, Peder; Baugh, Carlton M.; Hawkins, Ed; Maddox, Steve; Peacock, John A.; Cole, Shaun; Frenk, Carlos S.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Bridges, Terry; Cannon, Russell; Colless, Matthew; Collins, Chris; Couch, Warrick; Dalton, Gavin; De Propris, Roberto; Driver, Simon P.; Efstathiou, George; Ellis, Richard S.; Glazebrook, Karl; Jackson, Carole; Lahav, Ofer; Lewis, Ian; Lumsden, Stuart; Madgwick, Darren; Peterson, Bruce A.; Sutherland, Will; Taylor, Keith

    2001-11-01

    We investigate the dependence of the strength of galaxy clustering on intrinsic luminosity using the Anglo-Australian two degree field galaxy redshift survey (2dFGRS). The 2dFGRS is over an order of magnitude larger than previous redshift surveys used to address this issue. We measure the projected two-point correlation function of galaxies in a series of volume-limited samples. The projected correlation function is free from any distortion of the clustering pattern induced by peculiar motions and is well described by a power law in pair separation over the range 0.1<(r/h-1Mpc)<10. The clustering of L*(MbJ-5log10h=-19.7) galaxies in real space is well-fitted by a correlation length r0=4.9+/-0.3h-1Mpc and power-law slope γ=1.71+/-0.06. The clustering amplitude increases slowly with absolute magnitude for galaxies fainter than M*, but rises more strongly at higher luminosities. At low luminosities, our results agree with measurements from the Southern Sky Redshift Survey 2 by Benoist et al. However, we find a weaker dependence of clustering strength on luminosity at the highest luminosities. The correlation function amplitude increases by a factor of 4.0 between MbJ-5log10h=-18 and -22.5, and the most luminous galaxies are 3.0 times more strongly clustered than L* galaxies. The power-law slope of the correlation function shows remarkably little variation for samples spanning a factor of 20 in luminosity. Our measurements are in very good agreement with the predictions of the hierarchical galaxy formation models of Benson et al.

  3. Clustering of High Redshift (z>2.9) Quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yue; Strauss, Michael A.; Oguri, Masamune; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Fan, Xiaohui; Richards, Gordon T.; Hall, Patrick B.; Schneider, Donald P.; Szalay, Alexander S.; Thakar, Anirudda R.; Berk, Daniel E.Vanden; Anderson, Scott F.; Bahcall, Neta A.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2006-11-30

    We study the two-point correlation function of a uniformly selected sample of 4,428 optically selected luminous quasars with redshift 2.9 {le} z {le} 5.4 selected over 4041 deg{sup 2} from the Fifth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We fit a power-law to the projected correlation function w{sub p}(r{sub p}) to marginalize over redshift space distortions and redshift errors. For a real-space correlation function of the form {zeta}(r) = (r/r{sub 0}){sup -{gamma}}, the fitted parameters in comoving coordinates are r{sub 0} = 15.2 {+-} 2.7 h{sup -1} Mpc and {gamma} = 2.0 {+-} 0.3, over a scale range 4 {le} r{sub p} {le} 150 h{sup -1} Mpc. Thus high-redshift quasars are appreciably more strongly clustered than their z {approx} 1.5 counterparts, which have a comoving clustering length r{sub 0} {approx} 6.5 h{sup -1} Mpc. Dividing our sample into two redshift bins: 2.9 {le} z {le} 3.5 and z {ge} 3.5, and assuming a power-law index {gamma} = 2.0, we find a correlation length of r{sub 0} = 16.9 {+-} 1.7 h{sup -1} Mpc for the former, and r{sub 0} = 24.3 {+-} 2.4 h{sup -1} Mpc for the latter. Strong clustering at high redshift indicates that quasars are found in very massive, and therefore highly biased, halos. Following Martini & Weinberg, we relate the clustering strength and quasar number density to the quasar lifetimes and duty cycle. Using the Sheth & Tormen halo mass function, the quasar lifetime is estimated to lie in the range 4 {approx} 50 Myr for quasars with 2.9 {le} z {le} 3.5; and 30 {approx} 600 Myr for quasars with z {ge} 3.5. The corresponding duty cycles are 0.004 {approx} 0.05 for the lower redshift bin and 0.03 {approx} 0.6 for the higher redshift bin. The minimum mass of halos in which these quasars reside is 2-3 x 10{sup 12} h{sup -1} M{sub {circle_dot}} for quasars with 2.9 {le} z {le} 3.5 and 4-6 x 10{sup 12} h{sup -1} M{sub {circle_dot}} for quasars with z {ge} 3.5; the effective bias factor b{sub eff} increases with redshift, e.g., b

  4. The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS) . Galaxy clustering and redshift-space distortions at z ≃ 0.8 in the first data release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Torre, S.; Guzzo, L.; Peacock, J. A.; Branchini, E.; Iovino, A.; Granett, B. R.; Abbas, U.; Adami, C.; Arnouts, S.; Bel, J.; Bolzonella, M.; Bottini, D.; Cappi, A.; Coupon, J.; Cucciati, O.; Davidzon, I.; De Lucia, G.; Fritz, A.; Franzetti, P.; Fumana, M.; Garilli, B.; Ilbert, O.; Krywult, J.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Małek, K.; Marulli, F.; McCracken, H. J.; Moscardini, L.; Paioro, L.; Percival, W. J.; Polletta, M.; Pollo, A.; Schlagenhaufer, H.; Scodeggio, M.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Tojeiro, R.; Vergani, D.; Zanichelli, A.; Burden, A.; Di Porto, C.; Marchetti, A.; Marinoni, C.; Mellier, Y.; Monaco, P.; Nichol, R. C.; Phleps, S.; Wolk, M.; Zamorani, G.

    2013-09-01

    We present the general real- and redshift-space clustering properties of galaxies as measured in the first data release of the VIPERS survey. VIPERS is a large redshift survey designed to probe in detail the distant Universe and its large-scale structure at 0.5 < z < 1.2. We describe in this analysis the global properties of the sample and discuss the survey completeness and associated corrections. This sample allows us to measure the galaxy clustering with an unprecedented accuracy at these redshifts. From the redshift-space distortions observed in the galaxy clustering pattern we provide a first measurement of the growth rate of structure at z = 0.8: fσ8 = 0.47 ± 0.08. This is completely consistent with the predictions of standard cosmological models based on Einstein gravity, although this measurement alone does not discriminate between different gravity models. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Cerro Paranal, Chile, using the Very Large Telescope under programmes 182.A-0886 and partly 070.A-9007. Also based on observations obtained with MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint project of CFHT and CEA/DAPNIA, at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) of France, and the University of Hawaii. This work is based in part on data products produced at TERAPIX and the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre as part of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey, a collaborative project of NRC and CNRS. The VIPERS web site is http://www.vipers.inaf.it/

  5. VLP - High-Redshift AGNs and the X-SERVS Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, W.

    2016-06-01

    In the first part of this talk, I will review how X-ray observations of high-redshift AGNs at z = 4-7 have played a critical role in understanding their basic demographics as well as their physical processes; e.g., accretion rates, jet emission, X-ray absorption by nuclear material and winds. Since 2000, XMM-Newton and Chandra have provided new X-ray detections for more than 120 such objects, and well-defined samples of z > 4 AGNs now allow reliable basic X-ray population studies. I will point out key remaining areas of uncertainty, highlighting where further XMM-Newton and Chandra observations can advance understanding. I will then describe the X-SERVS project which aims to go ``beyond COSMOS'' via a 12 deg^2 survey of three prime sky regions: W-CDF-S, XMM-LSS, and ELAIS-S1. The X-SERVS survey will allow outstanding studies of the detected AGNs and groups/clusters by powerfully leveraging multiple intensive radio-to-UV surveys: ATLAS/HerMES/SERVS/VIDEO/DES/HSC/PS1MD/VOICE/CSI/PRIMUS. We aim to dramatically advance studies of SMBH growth across the full range of cosmic environments, links between SMBH accretion and star formation, exceptional AGNs at high redshifts, protoclusters, etc. The targeted X-SERVS fields will have extraordinary legacy value as MOONS massive spectroscopy fields, prime ALMA fields, and DES/LSST deep-drilling fields.

  6. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping Project: Biases in z > 1.46 Redshifts Due to Quasar Diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denney, K. D.; Horne, Keith; Brandt, W. N.; Grier, C. J.; Ho, Luis C.; Peterson, B. M.; Trump, J. R.; Ge, J.

    2016-12-01

    We use the coadded spectra of 32 epochs of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Reverberation Mapping Project observations of 482 quasars with z > 1.46 to highlight systematic biases in the SDSS- and Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS)-pipeline redshifts due to the natural diversity of quasar properties. We investigate the characteristics of this bias by comparing the BOSS-pipeline redshifts to an estimate from the centroid of He ii λ1640. He ii has a low equivalent width but is often well-defined in high-S/N spectra, does not suffer from self-absorption, and has a narrow component which, when present (the case for about half of our sources), produces a redshift estimate that, on average, is consistent with that determined from [O ii] to within the He ii and [O ii] centroid measurement uncertainties. The large redshift differences of ˜1000 km s-1, on average, between the BOSS-pipeline and He ii-centroid redshifts, suggest there are significant biases in a portion of BOSS quasar redshift measurements. Adopting the He ii-based redshifts shows that C iv does not exhibit a ubiquitous blueshift for all quasars, given the precision probed by our measurements. Instead, we find a distribution of C iv-centroid blueshifts across our sample, with a dynamic range that (i) is wider than that previously reported for this line, and (ii) spans C iv centroids from those consistent with the systemic redshift to those with significant blueshifts of thousands of kilometers per second. These results have significant implications for measurement and use of high-redshift quasar properties and redshifts, and studies based thereon.

  7. A redshift survey of IRAS galaxies. V - The acceleration on the Local Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strauss, Michael A.; Yahil, Amos; Davis, Marc; Huchra, John P.; Fisher, Karl

    1992-01-01

    The acceleration on the Local Group is calculated based on a full-sky redshift survey of 5288 galaxies detected by IRAS. A formalism is developed to compute the distribution function of the IRAS acceleration for a given power spectrum of initial perturbations. The computed acceleration on the Local Group points 18-28 deg from the direction of the Local Group peculiar velocity vector. The data suggest that the CMB dipole is indeed due to the motion of the Local Group, that this motion is gravitationally induced, and that the distribution of IRAS galaxies on large scales is related to that of dark matter by a simple linear biasing model.

  8. A REDSHIFT SURVEY OF HERSCHEL FAR-INFRARED SELECTED STARBURSTS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR OBSCURED STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, C. M.; Budynkiewicz, J.; Berta, S.; Lutz, D.; Magnelli, B.; Bethermin, M.; Le Floc'h, E.; Magdis, G.; Burgarella, D.; Chapin, E.; Chapman, S. C.; Clements, D. L.; Conley, A.; Conselice, C. J.; Cooray, A.; Farrah, D.; Hatziminaoglou, E.; Ivison, R. J.; and others

    2012-12-20

    We present Keck spectroscopic observations and redshifts for a sample of 767 Herschel-SPIRE selected galaxies (HSGs) at 250, 350, and 500 {mu}m, taken with the Keck I Low Resolution Imaging Spectrometer and the Keck II DEep Imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph. The redshift distribution of these SPIRE sources from the Herschel Multitiered Extragalactic Survey peaks at z = 0.85, with 731 sources at z < 2 and a tail of sources out to z {approx} 5. We measure more significant disagreement between photometric and spectroscopic redshifts (({Delta}z/(1 + z{sub spec})) = 0.29) than is seen in non-infrared selected samples, likely due to enhanced star formation rates and dust obscuration in infrared-selected galaxies. The infrared data are used to directly measure integrated infrared luminosities and dust temperatures independent of radio or 24 {mu}m flux densities. By probing the dust spectral energy distribution (SED) at its peak, we estimate that the vast majority (72%-83%) of z < 2 Herschel-selected galaxies would drop out of traditional submillimeter surveys at 0.85-1 mm. We find that dust temperature traces infrared luminosity, due in part to the SPIRE wavelength selection biases, and partially from physical effects. As a result, we measure no significant trend in SPIRE color with redshift; if dust temperature were independent of luminosity or redshift, a trend in SPIRE color would be expected. Composite infrared SEDs are constructed as a function of infrared luminosity, showing the increase in dust temperature with luminosity, and subtle change in near-infrared and mid-infrared spectral properties. Moderate evolution in the far-infrared (FIR)/radio correlation is measured for this partially radio-selected sample, with q{sub IR}{proportional_to}(1 + z){sup -0.30{+-}0.02} at z < 2. We estimate the luminosity function and implied star formation rate density contribution of HSGs at z < 1.6 and find overall agreement with work based on 24 {mu}m extrapolations of the LIRG

  9. Constraining galaxy cluster temperatures and redshifts with eROSITA survey data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borm, K.; Reiprich, T. H.; Mohammed, I.; Lovisari, L.

    2014-07-01

    Context. The nature of dark energy is imprinted in the large-scale structure of the Universe and thus in the mass and redshift distribution of galaxy clusters. The upcoming eROSITA instrument will exploit this method of probing dark energy by detecting ~100 000 clusters of galaxies in X-rays. Aims: For a precise cosmological analysis the various galaxy cluster properties need to be measured with high precision and accuracy. To predict these characteristics of eROSITA galaxy clusters and to optimise optical follow-up observations, we estimate the precision and the accuracy with which eROSITA will be able to determine galaxy cluster temperatures and redshifts from X-ray spectra. Additionally, we present the total number of clusters for which these two properties will be available from the eROSITA survey directly. Methods: We simulate the spectra of galaxy clusters for a variety of different cluster masses and redshifts while taking into account the X-ray background as well as the instrumental response. An emission model is then fit to these spectra to recover the cluster temperature and redshift. The number of clusters with precise properties is then based on the convolution of the above fit results with the galaxy cluster mass function and an assumed eROSITA selection function. Results: During its four years of all-sky surveys, eROSITA will determine cluster temperatures with relative uncertainties of ΔT/T ≲ 10% at the 68%-confidence level for clusters up to redshifts of z ~ 0.16 which corresponds to ~1670 new clusters with precise properties. Redshift information itself will become available with a precision of Δz/ (1 + z) ≲ 10% for clusters up to z ~ 0.45. Additionally, we estimate how the number of clusters with precise properties increases with a deepening of the exposure. For the above clusters, the fraction of catastrophic failures in the fit is below 20% and in most cases it is even much smaller. Furthermore, the biases in the best-fit temperatures as

  10. A deep redshift survey of field galaxies. Comments on the reality of the Butcher-Oemler effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koo, David C.; Kron, Richard G.

    1987-01-01

    A spectroscopic survey of over 400 field galaxies has been completed in three fields for which we have deep UBVI photographic photometry. The galaxies typically range from B=20 to 22 and possess redshifts z from 0.1 to 0.5 that are often quite spiky in distribution. Little, if any, luminosity evolution is observed up to redshifts z approx 0.5. By such redshifts, however, an unexpectedly large fraction of luminous galaxies has very blue intrinsic colors that suggest extensive star formation; in contrast, the reddest galaxies still have colors that match those of present-day ellipticals.

  11. EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES IN THE PEARS SURVEY: PROBING THE STELLAR POPULATIONS AT MODERATE REDSHIFT

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreras, Ignacio; Pasquali, Anna; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James; Cohen, Seth; Windhorst, Rogier; Pirzkal, Nor; Grogin, Norman; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Panagia, Nino; Lisker, Thorsten; Daddi, Emanuele; Hathi, Nimish P.

    2009-11-20

    Using Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) slitless grism spectra from the PEARS program, we study the stellar populations of morphologically selected early-type galaxies in the GOODS North and South fields. The sample-extracted from a visual classification of the (v2.0) HST/ACS images and restricted to redshifts z > 0.4-comprises 228 galaxies (i {sub F775W} < 24 mag, AB) out to z approx< 1.3 over 320 arcmin{sup 2}, with a median redshift z {sub M} = 0.75. This work significantly increases our previous sample from the GRAPES survey in the HUDF (18 galaxies over approx11 arcmin{sup 2}). The grism data allow us to separate the sample into 'red' and 'blue' spectra, with the latter comprising 15% of the total. Three different grids of models parameterizing the star formation history are used to fit the low-resolution spectra. Over the redshift range of the sample-corresponding to a cosmic age between 5 and 10 Gyr-we find a strong correlation between stellar mass and average age, whereas the spread of ages (defined by the root mean square of the distribution) is roughly approx1 Gyr and independent of stellar mass. The best-fit parameters suggest that it is the formation epoch and not the formation timescale that best correlates with mass in early-type galaxies. This result-along with the recently observed lack of evolution of the number density of massive galaxies-motivates the need for a channel of (massive) galaxy formation bypassing any phase in the blue cloud, as suggested by the simulations of Dekel et al.

  12. The Team Keck Redshift Survey 2: MOSFIRE Spectroscopy of the GOODS-North Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirth, Gregory D.; Trump, Jonathan R.; Barro, Guillermo; Guo, Yicheng; Koo, David C.; Liu, Fengshan; Kassis, Marc; Lyke, Jim; Rizzi, Luca; Campbell, Randy; Goodrich, Robert W.; Faber, S. M.

    2015-11-01

    We present the Team Keck Redshift Survey 2 (TKRS2), a near-infrared spectral observing program targeting selected galaxies within the CANDELS subsection of the GOODS-North Field. The TKRS2 program exploits the unique capabilities of the Multi-Object Spectrometer For Infra-Red Exploration (MOSFIRE), which entered service on the Keck I telescope in 2012 and contributes substantially to the study of galaxy spectral features at redshifts inaccessible to optical spectrographs. The TKRS2 project targets 97 galaxies drawn from samples that include z ≈ 2 emission-line galaxies with features observable in the JHK bands as well as lower-redshift targets with features in the Y band. We present a detailed measurement of MOSFIRE’s sensitivity as a function of wavelength, including the effects of telluric features across the YJHK filters. The largest utility of our survey is in providing rest-frame-optical emission lines for z > 1 galaxies, and we demonstrate that the ratios of strong, optical emission lines of z ≈ 2 galaxies suggest the presence of either higher N/O abundances than are found in z ≈ 0 galaxies or low-metallicity gas ionized by an active galactic nucleus. We have released all TKRS2 data products into the public domain to allow researchers access to representative raw and reduced MOSFIRE spectra. Based in part on data obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which operates as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation made the Observatory possible.

  13. Investigating the Local and High Redshift Universe With Deep Survey Data and Ground-Based Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, Daniel Charles

    Large multiwavelength surveys are now driving the frontiers of astronomical research. I describe results from my work using data from two large astronomical surveys: the Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS), which has obtained deep photometric and spectroscopic data on two square degrees of the sky using many of the most powerful telescopes in the world, and the WFC3 Infrared Spectroscopic Parallels (WISP) Survey, which uses the highly sensitive slitless spectroscopic capability of the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 to detect star-forming galaxies over most of the universe's history. First I describe my work on the evolution of the high-redshift quasar luminosity function, an important observational quantity constraining the growth of the supermassive black holes in the early universe. I show that the number density of faint quasars declines rapidly above z ˜ 3. This result is discussed in the context of cosmic reionization and the coevolution of galaxies and their central black holes. Next I present results of a multi-year campaign of near-infrared spectroscopy with FIRE, a world-class near-infrared spectrometer on the Magellan Baade 6.5 meter telescope in Chile, targeting emission-line galaxies at z ˜ 2 discovered with the Hubble Space Telescope. Our results showed that the typical emission-line galaxy at this redshift has low-metallicity, low dust obscuration, high ionization parameter, and little evidence for significant active galactic nucleus (AGN) contribution to the emission lines. We also find evidence that high redshift star-forming galaxies have enhanced nitrogen abundances. This result has interesting implications for the nature of the star formation in such galaxies -- in particular, it could mean that a large fraction of such galaxies harbor substantial populations of Wolf-Rayet stars, which are massive, evolved stars ejecting large amounts of enriched matter into the interstellar medium. Finally, I will discuss the discovery of three

  14. Redshift Survey of Galaxies around a Selected Sample of Compact Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Carvalho, Reinaldo R.; Ribeiro, André L. B.; Capelato, Hugo V.; Zepf, Stephen E.

    We report the results of a spectroscopic survey of faint galaxies in the regions surrounding Hickson compact groups. Our sample is composed of 17 groups within 9000 km s-1. The spectra were taken at the prime focus of the Tololo 4 m telescope, using the ARGUS fiber-fed spectrograph. From these observations, redshifts were determined for the faint galaxies previously identified by de Carvalho, Ribeiro, & Zepf in the surroundings of the groups. Statistical methods were applied to the resultant catalog in order to determine the kinematical structure of each group. This analysis confirms the idea that the Hickson sample of compact groups contains a wide variety of projection and dynamical configurations. Our results demonstrate the necessity of new spectroscopic surveys around compact groups in order to assess their complete velocity distribution.

  15. The SDSS-IV Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: The Clustering of Luminous Red Galaxies Using Photometric Redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Abhishek; SDSS-IV/eBOSS

    2017-01-01

    SDSS-IV/eBOSS survey will allow a ˜1% measurement of the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) scale and a 4.0%Redshift Space Distortion (RSD) measurement using a relatively uniform set of luminous, early-type galaxies in the redshift range 0.6 < z < 1. In this talk, I will present the 3D real space clustering of a sample of ~600,000 LRGs measured by the SDSS/eBOSS, using photometric redshifts. These galaxies have accurate photometric redshifts with an average error of z = 0.028. These LRGs range from redshift z = 0.6 to 1.0 over 10,000 deg2 of the sky, making it the largest volume ever used for galaxy clustering measurements. We measure the angular clusteringpower spectrum in different redshift slices and use well-calibrated redshift distributions to combine these into a high precision 3D real space clustering. i will present an evidence for BAO in the 2-point correlation function. The detection of BAO also allows the measurement of the comoving distance to z = 1.0. Traditionally, spectroscopic redshifts are used to estimate distances to the galaxies and, in turn, to measuregalaxy clustering. However, acquiring spectroscopic redshifts is a time consuming and expensive process even with modern multi-fiber spectrographs. Although photometric redshifts are less accurate, they are signicantly easier to obtain, and for a constant amount of time, one can image both wider areas and deeper volumes than would be possible with spectroscopy, allowing one to probe both larger scales and larger volumes. The ability to make precise clustering measurements with photometric data has been well demonstrated by Padmanabhan et al. (2007).

  16. Statistical and systematic errors in redshift-space distortion measurements from large surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, D.; Guzzo, L.; Branchini, E.; Majerotto, E.; de la Torre, S.; Marulli, F.; Moscardini, L.; Angulo, R. E.

    2012-12-01

    We investigate the impact of statistical and systematic errors on measurements of linear redshift-space distortions (RSD) in future cosmological surveys by analysing large catalogues of dark matter haloes from the baryonic acoustic oscillation simulations at the Institute for Computational Cosmology. These allow us to estimate the dependence of errors on typical survey properties, as volume, galaxy density and mass (i.e. bias factor) of the adopted tracer. We find that measures of the specific growth rate β = f/b using the Hamilton/Kaiser harmonic expansion of the redshift-space correlation function ξ(rp, π) on scales larger than 3 h-1 Mpc are typically underestimated by up to 10 per cent for galaxy-sized haloes. This is significantly larger than the corresponding statistical errors, which amount to a few per cent, indicating the importance of non-linear improvements to the Kaiser model, to obtain accurate measurements of the growth rate. The systematic error shows a diminishing trend with increasing bias value (i.e. mass) of the haloes considered. We compare the amplitude and trends of statistical errors as a function of survey parameters to predictions obtained with the Fisher information matrix technique. This is what is usually adopted to produce RSD forecasts, based on the Feldman-Kaiser-Peacock prescription for the errors on the power spectrum. We show that this produces parameter errors fairly similar to the standard deviations from the halo catalogues, provided it is applied to strictly linear scales in Fourier space (k<0.2 h Mpc-1). Finally, we combine our measurements to define and calibrate an accurate scaling formula for the relative error on β as a function of the same parameters, which closely matches the simulation results in all explored regimes. This provides a handy and plausibly more realistic alternative to the Fisher matrix approach, to quickly and accurately predict statistical errors on RSD expected from future surveys.

  17. Spectroscopic identification of a redshift 1.55 supernova host galaxy from the Subaru Deep Field Supernova Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederiksen, Teddy F.; Graur, Or; Hjorth, Jens; Maoz, Dan; Poznanski, Dovi

    2014-03-01

    Context. The Subaru Deep Field (SDF) Supernova Survey discovered ten Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) in the redshift range 1.5 < z < 2.0, determined solely from photometric redshifts of the host galaxies. However, photometric redshifts might be biased, and the SN sample could be contaminated by active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Aims: We aim to obtain the first robust redshift measurement and classification of a z > 1.5 SDF SN Ia host galaxy candidate. Methods: We use the X-shooter (U-to-K-band) spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope to allow the detection of different emission lines in a wide spectral range. Results: We measure a spectroscopic redshift of 1.54563 ± 0.00027 of hSDF0705.25, consistent with its photometric redshift of 1.552 ± 0.018. From the strong emission-line spectrum we rule out AGN activity, thereby confirming the optical transient as a SN. The host galaxy follows the fundamental metallicity relation showing that the properties of this high-redshift SN Ia host galaxy is similar to other field galaxies. Conclusions: Spectroscopic confirmation of additional SDF SN hosts would be required to confirm the cosmic SN rate evolution measured in the SDF. Based on observations made with ESO telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under program ID 089.A-0739.

  18. An HST/COS Survey of the Low-redshift Intergalactic Medium. I. Survey, Methodology, and Overall Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danforth, Charles W.; Keeney, Brian A.; Tilton, Evan M.; Shull, J. Michael; Stocke, John T.; Stevans, Matthew; Pieri, Matthew M.; Savage, Blair D.; France, Kevin; Syphers, David; Smith, Britton D.; Green, James C.; Froning, Cynthia; Penton, Steven V.; Osterman, Steven N.

    2016-02-01

    We use high-quality, medium-resolution Hubble Space Telescope/Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (HST/COS) observations of 82 UV-bright active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at redshifts zAGN < 0.85 to construct the largest survey of the low-redshift intergalactic medium (IGM) to date: 5138 individual extragalactic absorption lines in H i and 25 different metal-ion species grouped into 2611 distinct redshift systems at zabs < 0.75 covering total redshift pathlengths ΔzH i = 21.7 and ΔzO vi = 14.5. Our semi-automated line-finding and measurement technique renders the catalog as objectively defined as possible. The cumulative column density distribution of H i systems can be parametrized d{ N }(\\gt N)/{dz} = {C}14{(N/{10}14{{cm}}-2)}-(β -1), with C14 = 25 ± 1 and β = 1.65 ± 0.02. This distribution is seen to evolve both in amplitude, {C}14\\propto {(1+z)}2.3+/- 0.1, and slope β(z) = 1.75-0.31 z for z ≤ 0.47. We observe metal lines in 418 systems, and find that the fraction of IGM absorbers detected in metals is strongly dependent on {N}{{H}{{I}}}. The distribution of O vi absorbers appears to evolve in the same sense as the Lyα forest. We calculate contributions to Ωb from different components of the low-z IGM and determine the Lyα decrement as a function of redshift. IGM absorbers are analyzed via a two-point correlation function in velocity space. We find substantial clustering of H i absorbers on scales of Δv = 50-300 km s-1 with no significant clustering at Δv ≳ 1000 km s-1. Splitting the sample into strong and weak absorbers, we see that most of the clustering occurs in strong, NH i ≳ 1013.5 cm-2, metal-bearing IGM systems. The full catalog of absorption lines and fully reduced spectra is available via the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST) as a high-level science product at http://archive.stsci.edu/prepds/igm/. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained from the data archive at the Space Telescope Science

  19. The ESO Slice Project (ESP) galaxy redshift survey. II. The luminosity function and mean galaxy density.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zucca, E.; Zamorani, G.; Vettolani, G.; Cappi, A.; Merighi, R.; Mignoli, M.; Stirpe, G. M.; MacGillivray, H.; Collins, C.; Balkowski, C.; Cayatte, V.; Maurogordato, S.; Proust, D.; Chincarini, G.; Guzzo, L.; Maccagni, D.; Scaramella, R.; Blanchard, A.; Ramella, M.

    1997-10-01

    The ESO Slice Project (ESP) is a galaxy redshift survey we have recently completed as an ESO Key-Project over about 23 square degrees, in a region near the South Galactic Pole. The survey is nearly complete to the limiting magnitude b_J_=19.4 and consists of 3342 galaxies with reliable redshift determination. The ESP survey is intermediate between shallow, wide angle samples and very deep, one-dimensional pencil beams: spanning a volume of ~5x10^4^h^-3^Mpc^3^ at the sensitivity peak (z~0.1), it provides an accurate determination of the "local" luminosity function and the mean galaxy density. We find that, although a Schechter function (with α=-1.22, M^*^_bJ_=-19.61+5logh and φ^*^=0.020h^3^/Mpc^3^) is an acceptable representation of the luminosity function over the entire range of magnitudes (M_bJ_<=-12.4+5logh), our data suggest the presence of a steepening of the luminosity function for M_bJ_>=-17+5logh. Such a steepening at the faint end of the luminosity function, well fitted by a power law with slope β~-1.6, is almost completely due to galaxies with emission lines: in fact, dividing our galaxies into two samples, i.e. galaxies with and without emission lines, we find significant differences in their luminosity functions. In particular, galaxies with emission lines show a significantly steeper slope and a fainter M^*^. The amplitude and the α and M^*^ parameters of our luminosity function are in good agreement with those of the AUTOFIB redshift survey (Ellis et al. 1996). Vice-versa, our amplitude is significantly higher, by a factor ~1.6 at M~M^*^, than that found for both the Stromlo-APM (Loveday et al. 1992) and the Las Campanas (Lin et al. 1996) redshift surveys. Also the faint end slope of our luminosity function is significantly steeper than that found in these two surveys. The galaxy number density for M_bJ_<=-16+5logh is well determined (n{bar}=0.08+/-0.015h^3^/Mpc^3^). Its estimate for M_bJ_<=-12.4+5logh is more uncertain, ranging from n{bar}=0.28h

  20. Redshift-Distance Survey of Early-Type Galaxies. I. Sample Selection, Properties, and Completeness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Costa, L. N.; Bernardi, M.; Alonso, M. V.; Wegner, G.; Willmer, C. N. A.; Pellegrini, P. S.; Rité, C.; Maia, M. A. G.

    2000-07-01

    This is the first in a series of papers describing the recently completed all-sky redshift-distance survey of Early-type NEARby galaxies (ENEAR) carried out for peculiar velocity analysis. The sample is divided into two parts and consists of 1607 elliptical and lenticular galaxies with cz<=7000 km s-1 and with blue magnitudes brighter than mB=14.5 (ENEARm) and of galaxies in clusters (ENEARc). Galaxy distances based on the Dn-σ and fundamental plane (FP) relations are now available for 1359 and 1107 ENEARm galaxies, respectively, with roughly 80% based on new data gathered by our group. The Dn-σ and FP template distance relations are derived by combining 569 and 431 galaxies in 28 clusters, respectively, of which about 60% are based on our new measurements. To date the ENEAR survey has accumulated 2200 R-band images yielding photometric parameters for 1398 galaxies and 2300 spectra yielding 1745 measurements of central velocity dispersions and spectral line indices for 1210 galaxies. In addition, there are some 1834 spectra of early-type galaxies available in the Southern Sky Redshift Survey (SSRS+SSRS2) database, out of which roughly 800 galaxies yield high-quality measurements of velocity dispersions and spectral line indices, bringing the total number of galaxies with available spectral information to about 2000. Combined with measurements publicly available, a catalog has been assembled comprising ~4500 measurements of central velocity dispersions for about 2800 galaxies, ~3700 measurements of photometric parameters for about 2000 galaxies, and distances for about 1900 galaxies. This extensive database provides information on galaxies with multiple observations from different telescope/instrument configurations and from different authors. These overlapping data are used to derive relations to transform all available measurements into a common system, thereby ensuring the homogeneity of the database. The ENEARm redshift-distance survey extends the earlier work

  1. Detecting the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect with high-redshift 21-cm surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raccanelli, Alvise; Kovetz, Ely; Dai, Liang; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the possibility of detecting the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect by cross-correlating 21-cm surveys at high redshifts with galaxies in a way similar to the usual CMB-galaxy cross-correlation. The high-redshift 21-cm signal is dominated by CMB photons that travel freely without interacting with the intervening matter, and hence its late-time ISW signature should correlate extremely well with that of the CMB at its peak frequencies. Using the 21-cm temperature brightness instead of the CMB would thus be a further check of the detection of the ISW effect, measured by different instruments at different frequencies and suffering from different systematics. We also study the ISW effect on the photons that are scattered by HI clouds. We show that a detection of the unscattered photons is achievable with planned radio arrays, while one using scattered photons will require advanced radio interferometers, either an extended version of the planned Square Kilometre Array or futuristic experiments such as a lunar radio array.

  2. Spectroscopic Determination of the Low Redshift Type Ia Supernova Rate from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Krughoff, K. S.; Connolly, Andrew J.; Frieman, Joshua; SubbaRao, Mark; Kilper, Gary; Schneider, Donald P.

    2011-04-10

    Supernova rates are directly coupled to high mass stellar birth and evolution. As such, they are one of the few direct measures of the history of cosmic stellar evolution. In this paper we describe an probabilistic technique for identifying supernovae within spectroscopic samples of galaxies. We present a study of 52 type Ia supernovae ranging in age from -14 days to +40 days extracted from a parent sample of \\simeq 50,000 spectra from the SDSS DR5. We find a Supernova Rate (SNR) of 0.472^{+0.048}_{-0.039}(Systematic)^{+0.081}_{-0.071}(Statistical)SNu at a redshift of = 0.1. This value is higher than other values at low redshift at the 1{\\sigma}, but is consistent at the 3{\\sigma} level. The 52 supernova candidates used in this study comprise the third largest sample of supernovae used in a type Ia rate determination to date. In this paper we demonstrate the potential for the described approach for detecting supernovae in future spectroscopic surveys.

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: LESS photometric redshift survey (Wardlow+, 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wardlow, J. L.; Smail, I.; Coppin, K. E. K.; Alexander, D. M.; Brandt, W. N.; Danielson, A. L. R.; Luo, B.; Swinbank, A. M.; Walter, F.; Weiss, A.; Xue, Y. Q.; Zibetti, S.; Bertoldi, F.; Biggs, A. D.; Chapman, S. C.; Dannerbauer, H.; Dunlop, J. S.; Gawiser, E.; Ivison, R. J.; Knudsen, K. K.; Kovacs, A.; Lacey, C. G.; Menten, K. M.; Padilla, N.; Rix, H.-W.; van der Werf, P. P.

    2012-02-01

    SMGs typically have faint optical and near-IR counterparts (e.g. Ivison et al. 2002MNRAS.337....1I), so we require deep photometry for accurate photometric redshift estimates. The ECDF-S was chosen for this survey because it is an exceptionally well-studied field and as such we are able to utilize data from extensive archival imaging and spectroscopic surveys. For completeness and uniformity, we only consider surveys that cover a large fraction of the ECDF-S rather than the smaller and deeper central Chandra Deep Field-South (CDF-S) region. Therefore, we utilize the MUltiwavelength Survey by Yale-Chile (MUSYC; Gawiser et al. 2006, Cat. J/ApJS/162/1) near-IR survey for U- to K-band imaging (Taylor et al. 2009, Cat. J/ApJS/183/295), and the Spitzer IRAC/MUSYC Public Legacy in ECDF-S (SIMPLE) imaging for Spitzer IRAC data (Damen et al. 2011, cat. J/ApJ/727/1). We also include U-band data from the deep GOODS/VIMOS imaging survey of the CDF-S (Nonino et al. 2009ApJS..183..244N); although this covers only ~60 per cent of LESS SMGs, it is valuable for galaxies that are undetected at short wavelengths in the shallower MUSYC survey. In addition, we have carried out deep near-IR observations in the J and Ks bands with the HAWK-I at the ESO-VLT (ID: 082.A-0890, PI: N. Padilla). (2 data files).

  4. Mapping the Galaxy Color-Redshift Relation: Optimal Photo-z Calibration Strategies for Cosmology Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, Daniel C.; Capak, Peter L.; Stern, Daniel; Rhodes, Jason; Mobasher, Bahram; Schmidt, Samuel; Steinhardt, Charles L.; Faisst, Andreas; Speagle, Josh S.

    2016-01-01

    A primary objective of the upcoming dark energy surveys LSST, Euclid, and WFIRST is to map the 3D distribution of matter over a significant fraction of the universe via the weak lensing cosmic shear field. Doing so will require accurate distance estimates to billions of faint galaxies, meaning that photo-z's will be essential for the ultimate scientific success of these missions. Because galaxy colors drive photo-z estimates, spectroscopic calibration samples must at least be representative in color. Here we present a technique, based on the self-organizing map (Kohonen 1990), to map the empirical distribution of galaxies in the high-dimensional color space of a given survey. We apply the technique to Euclid-like data for ~131k galaxies from the COSMOS survey, allowing us to determine where - in galaxy color space - spectroscopic coverage exists and where it is systematically missing. We show that the mapping technique lets us develop efficient spectroscopic sampling strategies to measure the color-redshift relation by focusing effort on poorly constrained regions of multicolor space. We discuss the nature of the galaxies in un-sampled regions of galaxy color space, and show that a fiducial survey with Keck (making use of LRIS, DEIMOS, and MOSFIRE) could meet the Euclid calibration requirements in ~40 nights of observing.

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: KMOS AGN Survey at High redshift (KASHz) (Harrison+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, C. M.; Alexander, D. M.; Mullaney, J. R.; Stott, J. P.; Swinbank, A. M.; Arumugam, V.; Bauer, F. E.; Bower, R. G.; Bunker, A. J.; Sharples, R. M.

    2016-08-01

    KASHz is designed to ultimately obtain spatially resolved emission-line kinematics of ~(100-200) high-redshift (z~0.6-3.6) AGN. For our target selection we make use of deep X-ray surveys performed in extragalactic fields (COSMOS, see Scoville et al., 2007, Cat. J/ApJS/171/1; CDF-S, see Giacconi et al. 2001ApJ...551..624G and Xue et al., 2011, Cat. J/ApJS/195/10 (CDFS); UDS, SXDS: see Furusawa et al. 2008, Cat. J/ApJS/176/1 (UDS) and SSA22, see Steidel et al. 1998ApJ...492..428S). (1 data file).

  6. Superclusters of galaxies from the 2dF redshift survey. 2. Comparison with simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Einasto, Jaan; Einasto, M.; Saar, E.; Tago, E.; Liivamagi, L.J.; Joeveer, M.J; Suhhonenko, I.; Hutsi, G.; Jaaniste, J.; Heinamaki, P.; Muller, V.; Knebe, A.; Tucker, D.; /Fermilab

    2006-04-01

    We investigate properties of superclusters of galaxies found on the basis of the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey, and compare them with properties of superclusters from the Millennium Simulation.We study the dependence of various characteristics of superclusters on their distance from the observer, on their total luminosity, and on their multiplicity. The multiplicity is defined by the number of Density Field (DF) clusters in superclusters. Using the multiplicity we divide superclusters into four richness classes: poor, medium, rich and extremely rich.We show that superclusters are asymmetrical and have multi-branching filamentary structure, with the degree of asymmetry and filamentarity being higher for the more luminous and richer superclusters. The comparison of real superclusters with Millennium superclusters shows that most properties of simulated superclusters agree very well with real data, the main differences being in the luminosity and multiplicity distributions.

  7. The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS): spectral classification through principal component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, A.; Granett, B. R.; Guzzo, L.; Fritz, A.; Garilli, B.; Scodeggio, M.; Abbas, U.; Adami, C.; Arnouts, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Bottini, D.; Cappi, A.; Coupon, J.; Cucciati, O.; De Lucia, G.; de la Torre, S.; Franzetti, P.; Fumana, M.; Ilbert, O.; Iovino, A.; Krywult, J.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fevre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Malek, K.; Marulli, F.; McCracken, H. J.; Meneux, B.; Paioro, L.; Polletta, M.; Pollo, A.; Schlagenhaufer, H.; Tasca, L.; Tojeiro, R.; Vergani, D.; Zanichelli, A.; Bel, J.; Bersanelli, M.; Blaizot, J.; Branchini, E.; Burden, A.; Davidzon, I.; Di Porto, C.; Guennou, L.; Marinoni, C.; Mellier, Y.; Moscardini, L.; Nichol, R. C.; Peacock, J. A.; Percival, W. J.; Phleps, S.; Schimd, C.; Wolk, M.; Zamorani, G.

    2013-01-01

    We develop a Principal Component Analysis aimed at classifying a subset of 27 350 spectra of galaxies in the range 0.4 < z < 1.0 collected by the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS). We apply an iterative algorithm to simultaneously repair parts of spectra affected by noise and/or sky residuals, and reconstruct gaps due to rest-frame transformation, and obtain a set of orthogonal spectral templates that span the diversity of galaxy types. By taking the three most significant components, we find that we can describe the whole sample without contamination from noise. We produce a catalogue of eigencoefficients and template spectra that will be part of future VIPERS data releases. Our templates effectively condense the spectral information into two coefficients that can be related to the age and star formation rate of the galaxies. We examine the spectrophotometric types in this space and identify early, intermediate, late and starburst galaxies.

  8. The VLT LBG Redshift Survey - I. Clustering and dynamics of ≈1000 galaxies at z≈ 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielby, R. M.; Shanks, T.; Weilbacher, P. M.; Infante, L.; Crighton, N. H. M.; Bornancini, C.; Bouché, N.; Héraudeau, P.; Lambas, D. G.; Lowenthal, J.; Minniti, D.; Padilla, N.; Petitjean, P.; Theuns, T.

    2011-06-01

    We present the initial imaging and spectroscopic data acquired as part of the Very Large Telescope (VLT) VIMOS Lyman-break galaxy Survey. UBR (or UBVI) imaging covers five ≈36 × 36 arcmin2 fields centred on bright z > 3 quasi-stellar objects (QSOs), allowing ≈21 000 2 < z < 3.5 galaxy candidates to be selected using the Lyman-break technique. We performed spectroscopic follow-up using VLT VIMOS, measuring redshifts for 1020 z > 2 Lyman-break galaxies and 10 z > 2 QSOs from a total of 19 VIMOS pointings. From the galaxy spectra, we observe a 625 ± 510 km s-1 velocity offset between the interstellar absorption and Lyman α emission-line redshifts, consistent with previous results. Using the photometric and spectroscopic catalogues, we have analysed the galaxy clustering at z≈ 3. The angular correlation function, w(θ), is well fitted by a double power law with clustering scalelength, r0= 3.19+0.32-0.54 h-1 Mpc and slope γ= 2.45 for r < 1 h-1 Mpc and r0= 4.37+0.43-0.55 h-1 Mpc with γ= 1.61 ± 0.15 at larger scales. Using the redshift sample we estimate the semiprojected correlation function, wp(σ), and, for a γ= 1.8 power law, find r0= 3.67+0.23-0.24 h-1 Mpc for the VLT sample and r0= 3.98+0.14-0.15 h-1 Mpc for a combined VLT+Keck sample. From ξ(s) and ξ(σ, π), and assuming the above ξ(r) models, we find that the combined VLT and Keck surveys require a galaxy pairwise velocity dispersion of ≈700 km s-1, higher than ≈400 km s-1 assumed by previous authors. We also measure a value for the gravitational growth rate parameter of β(z= 3) = 0.48 ± 0.17, again higher than that previously found and implying a low value for the bias of b= 2.06+1.1-0.5. This value is consistent with the galaxy clustering amplitude which gives b= 2.22 ± 0.16, assuming the standard cosmology, implying that the evolution of the gravitational growth rate is also consistent with Einstein gravity. Finally, we have compared our Lyman-break galaxy clustering amplitudes with

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Team Keck Redshift Survey 2 (TKRS2) (Wirth+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirth, G. D.; Trump, J. R.; Barro, G.; Guo, Y.; Koo, D. C.; Liu, F.; Kassis, M.; Lyke, J.; Rizzi, L.; Campbell, R.; Goodrich, R. W.; Faber, S. M.

    2016-04-01

    We present the Team Keck Redshift Survey 2 (TKRS2), a spectroscopic survey of 97 distant galaxies exploiting the capabilities of the Multi-Object Spectrometer For Infra-Red Exploration (MOSFIRE) on the Keck I telescope at the W. M. Keck Observatory. MOSFIRE features a 2048*2048 pixel HAWAII-2RG HgCdTe detector array from Teledyne Imaging Sensors that couples high quantum efficiency with low noise and low dark current. The operating range of 0.97-2.41μm covers the YJHK infrared passbands, with wavelength coverage of 0.97-1.12μm in Y, 1.15-1.35μm in J, 1.47-1.80μm in H, and 1.95-2.40μm in K. The resolving power for the default slit width of 0.7" is R=3380 in Y, 3310 in J, 3660 in H, and 3620 in K, corresponding to full-width-half-maximum (FWHM) spectral resolutions of 3.1Å in Y, 3.7Å in J, 4.4Å in H, and 6.0Å in K. Our survey targets the south-central region of the GOODS-North survey field (Giavalisco et al. 2004, cat. II/261). We employed MOSFIRE to acquire spectra in the GOODS-North field over a series of partial nights spanning the period from 2012 November to 2013 May. We present the results of our survey in Table3 and on the website (http://arcoiris.ucsc.edu/TKRS2/) devoted to the survey. (1 data file).

  10. Observations of Mg II Absorption near z ~ 1 Galaxies Selected from the DEEP2 Redshift Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovegrove, Elizabeth; Simcoe, Robert A.

    2011-10-01

    We study the frequency of Mg II absorption in the outer halos of galaxies at z = 0.6-1.4 (with median z = 0.87), using new spectra obtained of 10 background quasars with galaxy impact parameters of b < 100 kpc. The quasar sight lines were selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR6 QSO catalog based on proximity to galaxies in the DEEP2 redshift survey. In addition to the 10 small impact systems, we examine 40 additional galaxies at 100 kpc < b < 500 kpc serendipitously located in the same fields. We detect Mg II absorbers with equivalent width Wr = 0.15-1.0 Å, though not all absorbers correlate with DEEP galaxies. We find five unique absorbers within Δv = 500 km s-1 and b < 100 kpc of a DEEP galaxy; this small sample contains both early- and late-type galaxies and has no obvious trends with star formation rate. No Mg II is detected more than 100 kpc from galaxies; inside this radius the covering fraction scales with impact parameter and galaxy luminosity in a very similar fashion to samples studied at lower redshift. In all but one case, when Mg II is detected without a spectroscopically confirmed galaxy, there exists a plausible photometric candidate which was excluded because of slit collision or apparent magnitude. We do not detect any strong absorbers with Wr > 1.0 Å, consistent with other samples of galaxy-selected Mg II systems. We speculate that Mg II systems with 0.3 < Wr < 1.0 trace old relic material from galactic outflows and/or the halo assembly process, and that in contrast, systems with large Wr are more likely to reflect the more recent star-forming history of their associated galaxies. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  11. Percolation galaxy groups and clusters in the sdss redshift survey: identification, catalogs, and the multiplicity function

    SciTech Connect

    Berlind, Andreas A.; Frieman, Joshua A.; Weinberg, David H.; Blanton, Michael R.; Warren, Michael S.; Abazajian, Kevork; Scranton, Ryan; Hogg, David W.; Scoccimarro, Roman; Bahcall, Neta A.; Brinkmann, J.; Gott, J.Richard, III; Kleinman, S.J.; Krzesinski, J.; Lee, Brian C.; Miller, Christopher J.; Nitta, Atsuko; Schneider, Donald P.; Tucker, Douglas L.; Zehavi, Idit; /CCPP, New York /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr. /Ohio State U., Dept. Astron. /Los Alamos /Pittsburgh U. /Princeton U. /Subaru Telescope /Apache Point Observ. /Mt. Suhora Observ., Cracow /LBL, Berkeley /Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs. /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys. /Fermilab /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ. /Case Western Reserve U.

    2006-01-01

    We identify galaxy groups and clusters in volume-limited samples of the SDSS redshift survey, using a redshift-space friends-of-friends algorithm. We optimize the friends-of-friends linking lengths to recover galaxy systems that occupy the same dark matter halos, using a set of mock catalogs created by populating halos of N-body simulations with galaxies. Extensive tests with these mock catalogs show that no combination of perpendicular and line-of-sight linking lengths is able to yield groups and clusters that simultaneously recover the true halo multiplicity function, projected size distribution, and velocity dispersion. We adopt a linking length combination that yields, for galaxy groups with ten or more members: a group multiplicity function that is unbiased with respect to the true halo multiplicity function; an unbiased median relation between the multiplicities of groups and their associated halos; a spurious group fraction of less than {approx}1%; a halo completeness of more than {approx}97%; the correct projected size distribution as a function of multiplicity; and a velocity dispersion distribution that is {approx}20% too low at all multiplicities. These results hold over a range of mock catalogs that use different input recipes of populating halos with galaxies. We apply our group-finding algorithm to the SDSS data and obtain three group and cluster catalogs for three volume-limited samples that cover 3495.1 square degrees on the sky. We correct for incompleteness caused by fiber collisions and survey edges, and obtain measurements of the group multiplicity function, with errors calculated from realistic mock catalogs. These multiplicity function measurements provide a key constraint on the relation between galaxy populations and dark matter halos.

  12. Redshift-Distance Survey of Early-Type Galaxies. I. The ENEARc Cluster Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardi, M.; Alonso, M. V.; da Costa, L. N.; Willmer, C. N. A.; Wegner, G.; Pellegrini, P. S.; Rité, C.; Maia, M. A. G.

    2002-06-01

    This paper presents data on the ENEARc subsample of the larger ENEAR survey of nearby early-type galaxies. The ENEARc galaxies belong to clusters and were specifically chosen to be used for the construction of a Dn-σ template. The ENEARc sample includes new measurements of spectroscopic and photometric parameters (redshift, velocity dispersion, line index Mg2, and the angular diameter dn), as well as data from the literature. New spectroscopic data are given for 229 cluster early-type galaxies, and new photometry is presented for 348 objects. Repeat and overlap observations with external data sets are used to construct a final merged catalog consisting of 640 early-type galaxies in 28 clusters. Objective criteria, based on catalogs of groups of galaxies derived from complete redshift surveys of the nearby universe, are used to assign galaxies to clusters. In a companion paper, these data are used to construct the template Dn-σ distance relation for early-type galaxies, which has been used to estimate galaxy distances and derive peculiar velocities for the ENEAR all-sky sample. Based on observations at Complejo Astronomico El Leoncito, operated under agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas de la República Argentina and the National Universities of La Plata, Córdoba, and San Juan; Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, National Optical Astronomical Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation; the European Southern Observatory (ESO), partially under the ESO-ON agreement; the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory; the Observatório do Pico dos Dias, operated by the Laboratório Nacional de Astrofísica and the MDM Observatory at Kitt Peak.

  13. The ESO slice project (ESP) galaxy redshift survey VI. Groups of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramella, M.; Zamorani, G.; Zucca, E.; Stirpe, G. M.; Vettolani, G.; Balkowski, C.; Blanchard, A.; Cappi, A.; Cayatte, V.; Chincarini, G.; Collins, C.; Guzzo, L.; MacGillivray, H.; Maccagni, D.; Maurogordato, S.; Merighi, R.; Mignoli, M.; Pisani, A.; Proust, D.; Scaramella, R.

    1999-02-01

    In this paper we identify objectively and analyze groups of galaxies in the recently completed ESP survey (23(h) 23(m) <= alpha_ {1950} <= 01(h) 20(m) and 22(h) 30(m) <= alpha_ {1950} <= 22(h) 52(m) ; -40(o) 45' <= delta_ {1950} <= -39(o) 45'). We find 231 groups above the number overdensity threshold delta rho /rho =80 in the redshift range 5000 km s(-1) <= cz <= 60000 km s(-1). These groups contain 1250 members, 40.5% of the 3085 ESP galaxies within the same cz range. The median velocity dispersion (corrected for measurement errors and computed at the redshift of the group) is sigma_ {ESP,median} = 194 km s(-1). We show that our result is reliable in spite of the particular geometry of the ESP survey (two rows of tangent circular fields of radius theta = 15 arcmin), which causes most systems to be only partially surveyed. In general, we find that the properties of ESP groups are consistent with those of groups in shallower (and wider) catalogs (e.g. CfA2N and SSRS2). As in shallower catalogs, ESP groups trace very well the geometry of the large scale structure. Our results are of particular interest because the depth of the ESP survey allows us to sample group properties over a large number of structures. We also compare luminosity function and spectral properties of galaxies that are members of groups with those of isolated galaxies. We find that galaxies in groups have a brighter M(*) with respect to non-member galaxies; the slope alpha is the same, within the errors, in the two cases. We find that 34% (467/1360) of ESP galaxies with detectable emission lines are members of groups. The fraction of galaxies without detectable emission lines in groups is significantly higher: 45% (783/1725). More generally, we find a gradual decrease of the fraction of emission line galaxies among members of systems of increasing richness. This result confirms that the morphology-density relation found for clusters also extends toward systems of lower density. Based on

  14. VLA observations of unidentified Leiden-Berkeley Deep-Survey sources - Luminosity and redshift dependence of spectral properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapahi, Vijay K.; Kulkarni, Vasant K.

    1990-01-01

    VLA observations of a complete subset of the Leiden-Berkeley Deep Survey sources that have S(1.4 GHz) greater than 10 mJy and are not optically identified down to F=22 mag are reported. By comparing the spectral and structural properties of the sources with samples from the literature, an attempt was made to disentangle the luminosity and redshift dependence of the spectral indices of extended emission in radio galaxies and of the incidence of compact steep-spectrum sources. It is found that the fraction of compact sources among those with a steep spectrum is related primarily to redshift, being much larger at high redshifts for sources of similar radio luminosity. Only a weak and marginally significant dependence of spectral indices of the extended sources on luminosity and redshift is found in samples selected at 1.4 and 2.7 GHz. It is pointed out that the much stronger correlation of spectral indices with luminosity may be arising partly from spectral curvature, and partly due to the preferential inclusion of very steep-spectrum sources from high redshift in low-frequency surveys.

  15. The 2dF galaxy redshift survey: clustering properties of radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magliocchetti, Manuela; Maddox, Steve J.; Hawkins, Ed; Peacock, John A.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Bridges, Terry; Cannon, Russell; Cole, Shaun; Colless, Matthew; Collins, Chris; Couch, Warrick; Dalton, Gavin; de Propris, Roberto; Driver, Simon P.; Efstathiou, George; Ellis, Richard S.; Frenk, Carlos S.; Glazebrook, Karl; Jackson, Carole A.; Jones, Bryn; Lahav, Ofer; Lewis, Ian; Lumsden, Stuart; Norberg, Peder; Peterson, Bruce A.; Sutherland, Will; Taylor, Keith; 2dFGRS Team

    2004-06-01

    The clustering properties of local, S1.4 GHz>= 1 mJy, radio sources are investigated for a sample of 820 objects drawn from the joint use of the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at 20 cm (FIRST) and 2dF Galaxy Redshift surveys. To this aim, we present 271 new bJ<= 19.45 spectroscopic counterparts of FIRST radio sources to be added to those already introduced in our previous paper. The two-point correlation function for the local radio population is found to be entirely consistent with estimates obtained for the whole sample of 2dFGRS galaxies. From measurements of the redshift-space correlation function ξ(s) we derive a redshift-space clustering length s0= 10.7+0.8-0.7 Mpc, while from the projected correlation function Ξ(rT) we estimate the parameters of the real-space correlation function ξ(r) = (r/r0)-γ, r0= 6.7+0.9-1.1 Mpc and γ= 1.6 +/- 0.1, where h= 0.7 is assumed. Different results are instead obtained if we only consider sources that present signatures of active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity in their spectra. These objects are shown to be very strongly correlated, with r0= 10.9+1.0-1.2 Mpc and γ= 2 +/- 0.1, a steeper slope than has been claimed in other recent works. No difference is found in the clustering properties of radio-AGNs of different radio luminosity. Comparisons with models for ξ(r) show that AGN-fuelled sources reside in dark matter haloes more massive than ~1013.4 Msolar, higher than the corresponding figure for radio-quiet quasi-stellar objects. This value can be converted into a minimum black hole mass associated with radio-loud, AGN-fuelled objects of MminBH~ 109 Msolar. The above results then suggest - at least for relatively faint radio objects - the existence of a threshold black hole mass associated with the onset of significant radio activity such as that of radio-loud AGNs; however, once the activity is triggered, there appears to be no evidence for a connection between black hole mass and level of radio output.

  16. The Radio luminosity Function of Radio-Loud Quasars from the 7C Redshift Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willott, Chris J.; Rawlings, Steve; Blundell, Katherine M.; Lacy, Mark

    1998-01-01

    We present a complete sample of 24 radio-loud quasars (RLQs) from the new 7C Redshift Survey. Every quasar with a low-frequency (151 MHz) radio flux-density S(sub 151) > 0.5 Jy in two regions of the sky covering 0.013 sr is included; 23 of these have sufficient extended flux to meet the selection criteria, 18 of these have steep radio spectra (hereafter denoted as SSQs). The key advantage of this sample over most samples of RLQs is the lack of an optical magnitude limit. By combining the 7C and 3CRR samples, we have investigated the properties of RLQs as a function of redshift z and radio luminosity L(sub 151). We derive the radio luminosity function (RLF) of RLQs and find that the data are well fitted by a single power-law with slope alpha(sub 1) = 1.9 +/- 0.1 (for H(sub 0) = 50 km/s.Mpc, OMEGA(sub M) = 1, OMEGA(sub DELTA) = 0). We find that there must be a break in the RLQ RLF at log(sub 10)(L(sub 151)/W Hz.sr) approximately < or = 27, in order for the models to be consistent with the 7C and 6C source counts. The z-dependence of the RLF follows a one-tailed gaussian which peaks at z = 1.7 +/- 0.2. We find no evidence for a decline in the co-moving space density of RLQs at higher redshifts. A positive correlation between the radio and optical luminosities of SSQs is observed, confirming a result of Serjeant. We are able to rule out this correlation being due to selection effects or biases in our combined sample. The radio-optical correlation and best-fit model RLF enable us to estimate the distribution of optical magnitudes of quasars in samples selected at low radio frequencies, We con- clude that for samples with S(sub 151) approximately < or = 1 Jy one must use optical data significantly deeper than the POSS-I limit (R approximately equal 20), in order to avoid severe incompleteness.

  17. Photometric properties of intermediate-redshift Type Ia supernovae observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey

    DOE PAGES

    Takanashi, N.; Doi, M.; Yasuda, N.; ...

    2016-12-06

    We have analyzed multi-band light curves of 328 intermediate redshift (0.05 <= z < 0.24) type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey (SDSS-II SN Survey). The multi-band light curves were parameterized by using the Multi-band Stretch Method, which can simply parameterize light curve shapes and peak brightness without dust extinction models. We found that most of the SNe Ia which appeared in red host galaxies (u - r > 2.5) don't have a broad light curve width and the SNe Ia which appeared in blue host galaxies (u - r < 2.0) havemore » a variety of light curve widths. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test shows that the colour distribution of SNe Ia appeared in red / blue host galaxies is different (significance level of 99.9%). We also investigate the extinction law of host galaxy dust. As a result, we find the value of Rv derived from SNe Ia with medium light curve width is consistent with the standard Galactic value. On the other hand, the value of Rv derived from SNe Ia that appeared in red host galaxies becomes significantly smaller. Furthermore, these results indicate that there may be two types of SNe Ia with different intrinsic colours, and they are obscured by host galaxy dust with two different properties.« less

  18. Photometric properties of intermediate-redshift Type Ia supernovae observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Takanashi, N.; Doi, M.; Yasuda, N.; Kuncarayakti, H.; Konishi, K.; Schneider, D. P.; Cinabro, D.; Marriner, J.

    2016-12-06

    We have analyzed multi-band light curves of 328 intermediate redshift (0.05 <= z < 0.24) type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey (SDSS-II SN Survey). The multi-band light curves were parameterized by using the Multi-band Stretch Method, which can simply parameterize light curve shapes and peak brightness without dust extinction models. We found that most of the SNe Ia which appeared in red host galaxies (u - r > 2.5) don't have a broad light curve width and the SNe Ia which appeared in blue host galaxies (u - r < 2.0) have a variety of light curve widths. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test shows that the colour distribution of SNe Ia appeared in red / blue host galaxies is different (significance level of 99.9%). We also investigate the extinction law of host galaxy dust. As a result, we find the value of Rv derived from SNe Ia with medium light curve width is consistent with the standard Galactic value. On the other hand, the value of Rv derived from SNe Ia that appeared in red host galaxies becomes significantly smaller. Furthermore, these results indicate that there may be two types of SNe Ia with different intrinsic colours, and they are obscured by host galaxy dust with two different properties.

  19. Superlarge-scale structure in the Durham/UKST Galaxy Redshift Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doroshkevich, Andrei G.; Fong, Richard; McCracken, Henry J.; Ratcliffe, Andrew; Shanks, Tom; Turchaninov, Victor I.

    2000-07-01

    Several `great walls' are clearly visible in the Durham/UKST Galaxy Redshift Survey (DURS). We make a statistical study of this superlarge-scale structure (SLSS) by applying our core sampling, cluster, inertia tensor and minimal-spanning-tree analyses to the DURS. The results in the main support similar results from the complementary Las Campañas Redshift Survey (LCRS); the DURS is a fully three-dimensional, though shallower, survey, whilst the LCRS was carried out in six thin wedges of space. Because of the one-in-three sparse sampling used for DURS, the galaxy filaments of large-scale structure (LSS) are less clear here; the mean separation of ~25h-1Mpc for the richer filaments is consistent with the LCRS result, but the poorer filaments are not seen in the DURS. In contrast, the analysis clearly picks out SLSS and we find, as with the LCRS, that ~50 per cent of the galaxies lie within the SLSS in regions with overdensities of 5-10 times the mean galaxy density. It quantitatively demonstrates that SLSS is a major component of large-scale structure in the Universe. The SLSS is also confirmed as having statistical parameters similar to those for a sheet-like object, albeit a very irregular one with a highly inhomogeneous inner structure. The `mean-free path', or average separation between SLSS structures, is found to be Ds~50h-1Mpc. The inertia tensor analysis gives mean lengths, widths and thicknesses of ~20-40, 10 and 5h-1Mpc, respectively, for the clusters of SLSS. In particular, the largest great wall in the DURS is found to have a length of ~75h-1Mpc. Unlike the LCRS, the cluster mass function for the three-dimensional DURS has a high mass `tail' such a `tail' would constitute a quantitative signature for the presence of great walls. Finally, theoretical considerations would suggest that the results support arguments for the large-scale biasing of galaxies with respect to dark matter.

  20. The Luminosity Function and Mean Galaxy Density from the ESP Galaxy Redshift Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zucca, Elena; Zamorani, G.; Vettolani, G.; Cappi, A.; Merighi, R.; Mignoli, M.; Stirpe, G. M.; MacGillivray, H.; Collins, C.; Balkowski, C.; Cayatte, V.; Maurogordato, S.; Proust, D.; Chincarini, G.; Guzzo, L.; Maccagni, D.; Scaramella, R.; Blanchard, A.; Ramella, M.

    We summarise the main results obtained over the last two years by the ESO Slice Project (ESP) redshift survey, concerning the luminosity function and mean density of galaxies, and their implications for the galaxy number counts at bright magnitudes. The bj-band luminosity function is characterised by a steep faint-end, which raises above a "global" Schechter fit for M_bj > -17 + 5log(h) and is well described by a power-law with slope ~ -1.6. This steepening is mostly produced by galaxies with emission lines, with a clear trend for galaxies with larger [OII] equivalent widths to show a steeper faint end (and a fainter M*). The normalization of the luminosity function is about a factor of 1.6 higher that that from the Stromlo-APM survey. We find that, in fact, the mean density can be seen to increase out to ~140/h Mpc. If we take this into account when computing the expected cumulative number counts from the observed luminosity function, we are able to reproduce the observed steep counts at bright (bj<17) magnitudes very accurately.

  1. ESTIMATING PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS OF QUASARS VIA THE k-NEAREST NEIGHBOR APPROACH BASED ON LARGE SURVEY DATABASES

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yanxia; Ma He; Peng Nanbo; Zhao Yongheng; Wu Xuebing

    2013-08-01

    We apply one of the lazy learning methods, the k-nearest neighbor (kNN) algorithm, to estimate the photometric redshifts of quasars based on various data sets from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS), and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE; the SDSS sample, the SDSS-UKIDSS sample, the SDSS-WISE sample, and the SDSS-UKIDSS-WISE sample). The influence of the k value and different input patterns on the performance of kNN is discussed. kNN performs best when k is different with a special input pattern for a special data set. The best result belongs to the SDSS-UKIDSS-WISE sample. The experimental results generally show that the more information from more bands, the better performance of photometric redshift estimation with kNN. The results also demonstrate that kNN using multiband data can effectively solve the catastrophic failure of photometric redshift estimation, which is met by many machine learning methods. Compared with the performance of various other methods of estimating the photometric redshifts of quasars, kNN based on KD-Tree shows superiority, exhibiting the best accuracy.

  2. The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS). Never mind the gaps: comparing techniques to restore homogeneous sky coverage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucciati, O.; Granett, B. R.; Branchini, E.; Marulli, F.; Iovino, A.; Moscardini, L.; Bel, J.; Cappi, A.; Peacock, J. A.; de la Torre, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Guzzo, L.; Polletta, M.; Fritz, A.; Adami, C.; Bottini, D.; Coupon, J.; Davidzon, I.; Franzetti, P.; Fumana, M.; Garilli, B.; Krywult, J.; Małek, K.; Paioro, L.; Pollo, A.; Scodeggio, M.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Vergani, D.; Zanichelli, A.; Di Porto, C.; Zamorani, G.

    2014-05-01

    Aims: Non-uniform sampling and gaps in sky coverage are common in galaxy redshift surveys, but these effects can degrade galaxy counts-in-cells measurements and density estimates. We carry out a comparative study of methods that aim to fill the gaps to correct for the systematic effects. Our study is motivated by the analysis of the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS), a flux-limited survey at iAB < 22.5 consisting of single-pass observations with the VLT Visible Multi-Object Spectrograph (VIMOS) with gaps representing 25% of the surveyed area and an averagesampling rate of 35%. However, our findings are generally applicable to other redshift surveys with similar observing strategies. Methods: We applied two algorithms that use photometric redshift information and assign redshifts to galaxies based upon the spectroscopic redshifts of the nearest neighbours. We compared these methods with two Bayesian methods, the Wiener filter and the Poisson-Lognormal filter. Using galaxy mock catalogues we quantified the accuracy and precision of the counts-in-cells measurements on scales of R = 5 h-1 Mpc and 8 h-1 Mpc after applying each of these methods. We further investigated how these methods perform to account for other sources of uncertainty typical of spectroscopic surveys, such as the spectroscopic redshift error and the sparse, inhomogeneous sampling rate. We analysed each of these sources separately, then all together in a mock catalogue that mimicks the full observational strategy of a VIPERS-like survey. Results: In a survey such as VIPERS, the errors in counts-in-cells measurements on R < 10 h-1 Mpc scales are dominated by the sparseness of the sample due to the single-pass observing strategy. All methods under-predict the counts in high-density regions by 20-35%, depending on the cell size, method, and underlying overdensity. This systematic bias is similar to random errors. No method outperforms the others: differences are not large, and methods

  3. Self-calibration of photometric redshift scatter in weak-lensing surveys

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Pengjie; Pen, Ue -Li; Bernstein, Gary

    2010-06-11

    Photo-z errors, especially catastrophic errors, are a major uncertainty for precision weak lensing cosmology. We find that the shear-(galaxy number) density and density-density cross correlation measurements between photo-z bins, available from the same lensing surveys, contain valuable information for self-calibration of the scattering probabilities between the true-z and photo-z bins. The self-calibration technique we propose does not rely on cosmological priors nor parameterization of the photo-z probability distribution function, and preserves all of the cosmological information available from shear-shear measurement. We estimate the calibration accuracy through the Fisher matrix formalism. We find that, for advanced lensing surveys such as themore » planned stage IV surveys, the rate of photo-z outliers can be determined with statistical uncertainties of 0.01-1% for z < 2 galaxies. Among the several sources of calibration error that we identify and investigate, the galaxy distribution bias is likely the most dominant systematic error, whereby photo-z outliers have different redshift distributions and/or bias than non-outliers from the same bin. This bias affects all photo-z calibration techniques based on correlation measurements. As a result, galaxy bias variations of O(0.1) produce biases in photo-z outlier rates similar to the statistical errors of our method, so this galaxy distribution bias may bias the reconstructed scatters at several-σ level, but is unlikely to completely invalidate the self-calibration technique.« less

  4. Self-calibration of photometric redshift scatter in weak-lensing surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Pengjie; Pen, Ue -Li; Bernstein, Gary

    2010-06-11

    Photo-z errors, especially catastrophic errors, are a major uncertainty for precision weak lensing cosmology. We find that the shear-(galaxy number) density and density-density cross correlation measurements between photo-z bins, available from the same lensing surveys, contain valuable information for self-calibration of the scattering probabilities between the true-z and photo-z bins. The self-calibration technique we propose does not rely on cosmological priors nor parameterization of the photo-z probability distribution function, and preserves all of the cosmological information available from shear-shear measurement. We estimate the calibration accuracy through the Fisher matrix formalism. We find that, for advanced lensing surveys such as the planned stage IV surveys, the rate of photo-z outliers can be determined with statistical uncertainties of 0.01-1% for z < 2 galaxies. Among the several sources of calibration error that we identify and investigate, the galaxy distribution bias is likely the most dominant systematic error, whereby photo-z outliers have different redshift distributions and/or bias than non-outliers from the same bin. This bias affects all photo-z calibration techniques based on correlation measurements. As a result, galaxy bias variations of O(0.1) produce biases in photo-z outlier rates similar to the statistical errors of our method, so this galaxy distribution bias may bias the reconstructed scatters at several-σ level, but is unlikely to completely invalidate the self-calibration technique.

  5. High-Redshift Quasars Found in Sloan Digital Sky Survey Commissioning Data. II. The Spring Equatorial Stripe

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Xiaohui; Strauss, Michael A.; Schneider, Donald P.; Gunn, James E.; Lupton, Robert H.; Anderson, Scott F.; Voges, Wolfgang; Margon, Bruce; Annis, James; Bahcall, Neta A.

    2000-01-01

    This is the second paper in a series aimed at finding high-redshift quasars from five-color (u{sup '} g{sup '} r{sup '} i{sup '} z{sup '}) imaging data taken along the Celestial Equator by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) during its commissioning phase. In this paper, we present 22 high-redshift quasars (z>3.6) discovered from {approx}250 deg2 of data in the spring Equatorial Stripe, plus photometry for two previously known high-redshift quasars in the same region of the sky. Our success rate in identifying high-redshift quasars is 68%. Five of the newly discovered quasars have redshifts higher than 4.6 (z=4.62, 4.69, 4.70, 4.92, and 5.03). All the quasars have i{sup *} <20.2 with absolute magnitude - 28.8

  6. The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS). PCA-based automatic cleaning and reconstruction of survey spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, A.; Garilli, B.; Granett, B. R.; Guzzo, L.; Iovino, A.; Scodeggio, M.; Bolzonella, M.; de la Torre, S.; Abbas, U.; Adami, C.; Bottini, D.; Cappi, A.; Cucciati, O.; Davidzon, I.; Franzetti, P.; Fritz, A.; Krywult, J.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Małek, K.; Marulli, F.; Polletta, M.; Pollo, A.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Tojeiro, R.; Vergani, D.; Zanichelli, A.; Arnouts, S.; Bel, J.; Branchini, E.; Coupon, J.; De Lucia, G.; Ilbert, O.; Moutard, T.; Moscardini, L.; Zamorani, G.

    2017-03-01

    Context. Identifying spurious reduction artefacts in galaxy spectra is a challenge for large surveys. Aims: We present an algorithm for identifying and repairing spurious residual features in sky-subtracted galaxy spectra by using data from the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS) as a test case. Methods: The algorithm uses principal component analysis (PCA) applied to the galaxy spectra in the observed frame to identify sky line residuals imprinted at characteristic wavelengths. We further model the galaxy spectra in the rest-frame using PCA to estimate the most probable continuum in the corrupted spectral regions, which are then repaired. Results: We apply the method to 90 000 spectra from the VIPERS survey and compare the results with a subset for which careful editing was performed by hand. We find that the automatic technique reproduces the time-consuming manual cleaning in a uniform and objective manner across a large data sample. The mask data products produced in this work are released together with the VIPERS second public data release (PDR-2). based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Cerro Paranal, Chile, using the Very Large Telescope under programs 182.A-0886 and partly 070.A-9007. Also based on observations obtained with MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint project of CFHT and CEA/DAPNIA at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), that is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) of France, and the University of Hawaii. This work is based in part on data products produced at TERAPIX and the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre as part of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey, which is a collaborative project of NRC and CNRS. The VIPERS web site is http://www.vipers.inaf.it/.

  7. Photometric properties of intermediate-redshift Type Ia supernovae observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takanashi, N.; Doi, M.; Yasuda, N.; Kuncarayakti, H.; Konishi, K.; Schneider, D. P.; Cinabro, D.; Marriner, J.

    2017-02-01

    We have analysed multiband light curves of 328 intermediate-redshift (0.05 ≤ z < 0.24) Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey. The multiband light curves were parametrized by using the multiband stretch method, which can simply parametrize light-curve shapes and peak brightness without dust extinction models. We found that most of the SNe Ia that appeared in red host galaxies (u - r > 2.5) do not have a broad light-curve width and the SNe Ia that appeared in blue host galaxies (u - r < 2.0) have a variety of light-curve widths. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test shows that the colour distribution of SNe Ia appearing in red/blue host galaxies is different (a significance level of 99.9 per cent). We also investigate the extinction law of host galaxy dust. As a result, we find that the value of Rv derived from SNe Ia with medium light-curve widths is consistent with the standard Galactic value, whereas the value of Rv derived from SNe Ia that appear in red host galaxies becomes significantly smaller. These results indicate that there may be two types of SNe Ia with different intrinsic colours, and that they are obscured by host galaxy dust with two different properties.

  8. Apples to apples A2 - I. Realistic galaxy simulated catalogues and photometric redshift predictions for next-generation surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ascaso, B.; Mei, S.; Benítez, N.

    2015-11-01

    We present new mock catalogues for two of the largest Stage IV next-generation surveys in the optical and infrared: Large Synoptic Sky Telescope (LSST) and Euclid, based on an N-body simulation+semi-analytical cone with a posterior modification with PHOTREAL. This technique modifies the original photometry by using an empirical library of spectral templates to make it more realistic. The reliability of the catalogues is confirmed by comparing the obtained colour-magnitude relation, the luminosity and mass function and the angular correlation function with those of real data. Consistent comparisons between the expected photometric redshifts for different surveys are also provided. Very deep near-infrared surveys such as Euclid will provide very good performance (Δz/(1 + z) ˜ 0.025-0.053) down to H ˜ 24 AB mag and up to z ˜ 3 depending on the optical observations available from the ground, whereas extremely deep optical surveys such as LSST will obtain an overall lower photometric redshift resolution (Δz/(1 + z) ˜ 0.045) down to i ˜ 27.5 AB mag, being considerably improved (Δz/(1 + z) ˜ 0.035) if we restrict the sample down to i ˜ 24 AB mag. Those numbers can be substantially upgraded by selecting a subsample of galaxies with the best quality photometric redshifts. We finally discuss the impact that these surveys will have for the community in terms of photometric redshift legacy. This is the first of a series of papers where we set a framework for comparability between mock catalogues and observations with a particular focus on cluster surveys. The Euclid and LSST mocks are made publicly available.

  9. Galaxy Clustering in the Completed SDSS Redshift Survey: The Dependence on Color and Luminosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zehavi, Idit; Zheng, Zheng; Weinberg, David H.; Blanton, Michael R.; Bahcall, Neta A.; Berlind, Andreas A.; Brinkmann, Jon; Frieman, Joshua A.; Gunn, James E.; Lupton, Robert H.; Nichol, Robert C.; Percival, Will J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Skibba, Ramin A.; Strauss, Michael A.; Tegmark, Max; York, Donald G.

    2011-07-01

    We measure the luminosity and color dependence of galaxy clustering in the largest-ever galaxy redshift survey, the main galaxy sample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Seventh Data Release. We focus on the projected correlation function wp (rp ) of volume-limited samples, extracted from the parent sample of ~700,000 galaxies over 8000 deg2, extending up to redshift of 0.25. We interpret our measurements using halo occupation distribution (HOD) modeling assuming a ΛCDM cosmology (inflationary cold dark matter with a cosmological constant). The amplitude of wp (rp ) grows slowly with luminosity for L < L * and increases sharply at higher luminosities, with a large-scale bias factor b(> L) × (σ8/0.8) = 1.06 + 0.21(L/L *)1.12, where L is the sample luminosity threshold. At fixed luminosity, redder galaxies exhibit a higher amplitude and steeper correlation function, a steady trend that runs through the "blue cloud" and "green valley" and continues across the "red sequence." The cross-correlation of red and blue galaxies is close to the geometric mean of their autocorrelations, dropping slightly below at rp < 1 h -1 Mpc. The luminosity trends for the red and blue galaxy populations separately are strikingly different. Blue galaxies show a slow but steady increase of clustering strength with luminosity, with nearly constant shape of wp (rp ). The large-scale clustering of red galaxies shows little luminosity dependence until a sharp increase at L > 4 L *, but the lowest luminosity red galaxies (0.04-0.25 L *) show very strong clustering on small scales (rp < 2 h -1 Mpc). Most of the observed trends can be naturally understood within the ΛCDM+HOD framework. The growth of wp (rp ) for higher luminosity galaxies reflects an overall shift in the mass scale of their host dark matter halos, in particular an increase in the minimum host halo mass M min. The mass at which a halo has, on average, one satellite galaxy brighter than L is M 1 ≈ 17 M min(L) over most of the

  10. The Carnegie-Spitzer-IMACS redshift survey of galaxy evolution since z = 1.5. I. Description and methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Kelson, Daniel D.; Williams, Rik J.; Dressler, Alan; McCarthy, Patrick J.; Shectman, Stephen A.; Mulchaey, John S.; Villanueva, Edward V.; Crane, Jeffrey D.; Quadri, Ryan F.

    2014-03-10

    We describe the Carnegie-Spitzer-IMACS (CSI) Survey, a wide-field, near-IR selected spectrophotometric redshift survey with the Inamori Magellan Areal Camera and Spectrograph (IMACS) on Magellan-Baade. By defining a flux-limited sample of galaxies in Spitzer Infrared Array Camera 3.6 μm imaging of SWIRE fields, the CSI Survey efficiently traces the stellar mass of average galaxies to z ∼ 1.5. This first paper provides an overview of the survey selection, observations, processing of the photometry and spectrophotometry. We also describe the processing of the data: new methods of fitting synthetic templates of spectral energy distributions are used to derive redshifts, stellar masses, emission line luminosities, and coarse information on recent star formation. Our unique methodology for analyzing low-dispersion spectra taken with multilayer prisms in IMACS, combined with panchromatic photometry from the ultraviolet to the IR, has yielded high-quality redshifts for 43,347 galaxies in our first 5.3 deg{sup 2} of the SWIRE XMM-LSS field. We use three different approaches to estimate our redshift errors and find robust agreement. Over the full range of 3.6 μm fluxes of our selection, we find typical redshift uncertainties of σ {sub z}/(1 + z) ≲ 0.015. In comparisons with previously published spectroscopic redshifts we find scatters of σ {sub z}/(1 + z) = 0.011 for galaxies at 0.7 ≤ z ≤ 0.9, and σ {sub z}/(1 + z) = 0.014 for galaxies at 0.9 ≤ z ≤ 1.2. For galaxies brighter and fainter than i = 23 mag, we find σ {sub z}/(1 + z) = 0.008 and σ {sub z}/(1 + z) = 0.022, respectively. Notably, our low-dispersion spectroscopy and analysis yields comparable redshift uncertainties and success rates for both red and blue galaxies, largely eliminating color-based systematics that can seriously bias observed dependencies of galaxy evolution on environment.

  11. SIS Mixer Design for a Broadband Millimeter Spectrometer Suitable for Rapid Line Surveys and Redshift Determinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, F.; Sumner, M.; Zmuidzinas, J.; Hu, R.; LeDuc, H.; Harris, A.; Miller, D.

    2004-01-01

    We present some detail of the waveguide probe and SIS mixer chip designs for a low-noise 180-300 GHz double- sideband receiver with an instantaneous RF bandwidth of 24 GHz. The receiver's single SIS junction is excited by a broadband, fixed-tuned waveguide probe on a silicon substrate. The IF output is coupled to a 6-18 GHz MMIC low- noise preamplifier. Following further amplification, the output is processed by an array of 4 GHz, 128-channel analog autocorrelation spectrometers (WASP 11). The single-sideband receiver noise temperature goal of 70 Kelvin will provide a prototype instrument capable of rapid line surveys and of relatively efficient carbon monoxide (CO) emission line searches of distant, dusty galaxies. The latter application's goal is to determine redshifts by measuring the frequencies of CO line emissions from the star-forming regions dominating the submillimeter brightness of these galaxies. Construction of the receiver has begun; lab testing should begin in the fall. Demonstration of the receiver on the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) telescope should begin in spring 2003.

  12. The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey: spectral types and luminosity functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folkes, Simon; Ronen, Shai; Price, Ian; Lahav, Ofer; Colless, Matthew; Maddox, Steve; Deeley, Kathryn; Glazebrook, Karl; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Cannon, Russell; Cole, Shaun; Collins, Chris; Couch, Warrick; Driver, Simon P.; Dalton, Gavin; Efstathiou, George; Ellis, Richard S.; Frenk, Carlos S.; Kaiser, Nick; Lewis, Ian; Lumsden, Stuart; Peacock, John; Peterson, Bruce A.; Sutherland, Will; Taylor, Keith

    1999-09-01

    We describe the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS) and the current status of the observations. In this exploratory paper, we apply a principal component analysis to a preliminary sample of 5869 galaxy spectra and use the two most significant components to split the sample into five spectral classes. These classes are defined by considering visual classifications of a subset of the 2dF spectra, and also by comparison with high-quality spectra of local galaxies. We calculate a luminosity function for each of the different classes and find that later-type galaxies have a fainter characteristic magnitude, and a steeper faint-end slope. For the whole sample we find M*=-19.7 (for Ω=1, H_0=100kms^-1Mpc^-1), α=-1.3, φ*=0.017. For class 1 (`early-type') we find M*=-19.6, α=-0.7, while for class 5 (`late-type') we find M*=-19.0, α=-1.7. The derived 2dF luminosity functions agree well with other recent luminosity function estimates.

  13. The richness dependence of galaxy cluster correlations: results from a redshift survey of rich APM clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, R. A. C.; Dalton, G. B.; Efstathiou, G.; Sutherland, W. J.; Maddox, S. J.

    1997-10-01

    We analyse the spatial clustering properties of a new catalogue of very rich galaxy clusters with newly measured redshifts selected from the APM Galaxy Survey. These clusters are of comparable richness and space density to Abell richness class≯1 clusters, but selected using an objective algorithm from a catalogue demonstrably free of artificial inhomogeneities. Evaluation of the two-point correlation function xi_cc(r) for the full sample and for richer subsamples reveals that the correlation amplitude is consistent with that measured for lower richness APM clusters and X-ray selected clusters. We apply a maximum likelihood estimator to find the best-fitting slope and amplitude of a power-law fit to xi_cc(r), and to estimate the correlation length r_0 [the value of r at which xi_cc(r) is equal to unity]. For clusters with a mean space density of 1.6x10^-6 h^3 Mpc^-3 (equivalent to the space density of Abell richness≯2 clusters), we find r_0=21.3^+11.1_-9.3 h^-1 Mpc (95 per cent confidence limits). This is consistent with the weak richness dependence of xi_cc(r) expected in Gaussian models of structure formation. In particular, the amplitude of xi_cc(r) at all richnesses matches that of xi_cc(r) for clusters selected in N-body simulations of a low-density cold dark matter model.

  14. Galaxy groups in the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey: luminosity and mass statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, H. J.; Zandivarez, A.; Merchán, M. E.; Domínguez, M. J. L.

    2002-12-01

    Several statistics are applied to groups and galaxies in groups in the 2° Field Galaxy Redshift Survey. First, we estimate the luminosity functions for different subsets of galaxies in groups. The results are well fitted by a Schechter function with parameters M*- 5 log (h) =-19.90 +/- 0.03 and α=-1.13 +/- 0.02 for all galaxies in groups, which is quite consistent with the results of Norberg et al. for field galaxies. When considering the four different spectral types defined by Madgwick et al. we find that the characteristic magnitude is typically brighter than in the field. We also observe a steeper value, α=-0.76 +/- 0.03, of the faint end slope for low star-forming galaxies when compared with the corresponding field value. This steepening is more conspicuous, α=-1.10 +/- 0.06, for those galaxies in more massive groups than that obtained in the lower-mass subset, . Secondly, we compute group total luminosities using the prescriptions of Moore, Frenk & White. We define a flux-limited group sample using a new statistical tool developed by Rauzy. The resulting group sample is used to determine the group luminosity function and we find a good agreement with previous determinations and semi-analytical models. Finally, the group mass function for the flux-limited sample is derived. An excellent agreement is obtained when comparing our determination with analytical predictions over two orders of magnitude in mass.

  15. Large-scale galaxy distribution in the Las Campanas Redshift Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doroshkevich, A. G.; Tucker, D. L.; Fong, R.; Turchaninov, V.; Lin, H.

    2001-04-01

    We make use of three-dimensional clustering analysis, inertia tensor methods, and the minimal spanning tree technique to estimate some physical and statistical characteristics of the large-scale galaxy distribution and, in particular, of the sample of overdense regions seen in the Las Campanas Redshift Survey (LCRS). Our investigation provides additional evidence for a network of structures found in our core sampling analysis of the LCRS: a system of rich sheet-like structures, which in turn surround large underdense regions criss-crossed by a variety of filamentary structures. We find that the overdense regions contain ~40-50 per cent of LCRS galaxies and have proper sizes similar to those of nearby superclusters. The formation of such structures can be roughly described as a non-linear compression of protowalls of typical cross-sectional size ~20-25h-1Mpc this scale is ~5 times the conventional value for the onset of non-linear clustering - to wit, r0, the autocorrelation length for galaxies. The comparison with available simulations and theoretical estimates shows that the formation of structure elements with parameters similar to those observed is presently possible only in low-density cosmological models, Ωmh~0.2-0.3, with a suitable large-scale bias between galaxies and dark matter.

  16. The High-Redshift Quasar Luminosity Function from Multi-Epoch Imaging Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AlSayyad, Yusra

    Upcoming time-domain imaging surveys such as the LSST will detect over a million high-redshift z > 4 quasars, making complete spectroscopic followup unfeasible. Statistical estimates such as luminosity functions and clustering measurements will require purely photometric methods for classifying quasars, estimating redshifts and estimating selection functions. We validate these methods and constrain the optical, type I quasar luminosity function (QLF) at 3.75 < z < 4.5 for -27.5 < M1450 3.75) and constraint on the characteristic luminosity (M*1450 = -26.7) from a single, uniformly-selected survey at z 4. We used the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) repeated imaging of the 275 sq. deg. equatorial region of the sky (-50 < R.A. < +60; -1.26 < Dec. < +1.26), known as Stripe 82, to select a statistical sample of z 4 quasars. We extracted 40 million lightcurves from the imaging using forced photometry on all u, g, r, i, z epochs at the positions of sources detected on a deep i-band co-add. We developed a classification method based on photometric information alone (colors and variability metrics derived from these new multi-band lightcurves), which we validated with a spectroscopically complete 55 sq. deg. sub-region augmented with 102 new spectroscopic observations of quasars at z > 3.4 with i < 22.5. We demonstrate that selection functions for ensemble classifiers can be estimated by building generative models of empirical distributions of quasars previously selected with a diverse set of selection criteria. The z 4 QLF contributes to our understanding of supermassive black hole growth and cosmic reionization of both H I and He II which likely began at z 4 as a result of hard UV emissivity from quasars. The resulting QLF measurement is consistent with the previous lower number densities reported from deep, narrow-field surveys (COSMOS); it is not consistent with higher number densities reported from the NDWFS-DLS and CANDELS GOODS-S fields. In the context of recent 2

  17. Machine-learning-based photometric redshifts for galaxies of the ESO Kilo-Degree Survey data release 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavuoti, S.; Brescia, M.; Tortora, C.; Longo, G.; Napolitano, N. R.; Radovich, M.; Barbera, F. La; Capaccioli, M.; de Jong, J. T. A.; Getman, F.; Grado, A.; Paolillo, M.

    2015-09-01

    We have estimated photometric redshifts (zphot) for more than 1.1 million galaxies of the public European Southern Observatory (ESO) Kilo-Degree Survey (KiDS) data release 2. KiDS is an optical wide-field imaging survey carried out with the Very Large Telescope (VLT) Survey Telescope (VST) and the OmegaCAM camera, which aims to tackle open questions in cosmology and galaxy evolution, such as the origin of dark energy and the channel of galaxy mass growth. We present a catalogue of photometric redshifts obtained using the Multi-Layer Perceptron with Quasi-Newton Algorithm (MLPQNA) model, provided within the framework of the DAta Mining and Exploration Web Application REsource (DAMEWARE). These photometric redshifts are based on a spectroscopic knowledge base that was obtained by merging spectroscopic data sets from the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) data release 2 and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III) data release 9. The overall 1σ uncertainty on Δz = (zspec - zphot)/(1 + zspec) is ˜0.03, with a very small average bias of ˜0.001, a normalized median absolute deviation of ˜0.02 and a fraction of catastrophic outliers (|Δz| > 0.15) of ˜0.4 per cent.

  18. The ESO Slice Project [ESP] galaxy redshift survey. V. Evidence for a D=3 sample dimensionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaramella, R.; Guzzo, L.; Zamorani, G.; Zucca, E.; Balkowski, C.; Blanchard, A.; Cappi, A.; Cayatte, V.; Chincarini, G.; Collins, C.; Fiorani, A.; Maccagni, D.; MacGillivray, H.; Maurogordato, S.; Merighi, R.; Mignoli, M.; Proust, D.; Ramella, M.; Stirpe, G. M.; Vettolani, G.

    1998-06-01

    The issue of the approximate isotropy and homogeneity of the observable universe is one of the major topics in modern Cosmology: the common use of the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker [FWR] metric relies on these assumptions. Therefore, results conflicting with the ``canonical'' picture would be of the utmost importance. In a number of recent papers it has been suggested that strong evidence of a fractal distribution with dimension D =~ 2 exists in several samples, including Abell clusters [ACO] and galaxies from the ESO Slice Project redshift survey [ESP]. Here we report the results of an independent analysis of the radial density run, N(survey (z la 0.2) is such to cause noticeable effects according to different choices of k-corrections, and this adds some additional uncertainty in the results. However, we find that for a variety of volume limited samples the dimensionality of the ESP sample is D ~ 3, and the value D = 2 is always excluded at the level of at least five (bootstrap) standard deviations. The only way in which we reproduce D ~ 2 is by both unphysically ignoring the galaxy k-correction and using Euclidean rather than FRW cosmological distances. In the cluster case the problems related to the choice of metrics and k-correction are much lessened, and we find that ACO clusters have DACO = 3.07 +/- 0.18 and DACO = 2.93 +/- 0.15 for richness class R >= 1 and R >= 0, respectively. Therefore D=2 is excluded with high significance also for the cluster data. based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile.

  19. Analytic photometric redshift estimator for Type Ia supernovae from the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yun; Gjergo, E.; Kuhlmann, S.

    2015-08-01

    Accurate and precise photometric redshifts (photo-zs) of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) can enable the use of SNe Ia, measured only with photometry, to probe cosmology. This dramatically increases the science return of supernova surveys planned for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). In this paper we describe a significantly improved version of the simple analytic photo-z estimator proposed by Wang and further developed by Wang, Narayan & Wood-Vasey. We apply it to 55 422 simulated SNe Ia generated using the SNANA package with the LSST filters. We find that the estimated errors on the photo-zs, σ _{z_phot}/(1+z_phot), can be used as filters to produce a set of photo-zs that have high precision, accuracy, and purity. Using SN Ia colours as well as SN Ia peak magnitude in the i band, we obtain a set of photo-zs with 2 per cent accuracy (with σ(zphot - zspec)/(1 + zspec) = 0.02), a bias in zphot (the mean of zphot - zspec) of -9 × 10-5, and an outlier fraction (with |(zphot - zspec)/(1 + zspec)| > 0.1) of 0.23 per cent, with the requirement that σ _{z_phot}/(1+z_phot)<0.01. Using the SN Ia colours only, we obtain a set of photo-zs with similar quality by requiring that σ _{z_phot}/(1+z_phot)<0.007; this leads to a set of photo-zs with 2 per cent accuracy, a bias in zphot of 5.9 × 10-4, and an outlier fraction of 0.32 per cent.

  20. The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS). Environmental effects shaping the galaxy stellar mass function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidzon, I.; Cucciati, O.; Bolzonella, M.; De Lucia, G.; Zamorani, G.; Arnouts, S.; Moutard, T.; Ilbert, O.; Garilli, B.; Scodeggio, M.; Guzzo, L.; Abbas, U.; Adami, C.; Bel, J.; Bottini, D.; Branchini, E.; Cappi, A.; Coupon, J.; de la Torre, S.; Di Porto, C.; Fritz, A.; Franzetti, P.; Fumana, M.; Granett, B. R.; Guennou, L.; Iovino, A.; Krywult, J.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Małek, K.; Marulli, F.; McCracken, H. J.; Mellier, Y.; Moscardini, L.; Polletta, M.; Pollo, A.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Tojeiro, R.; Vergani, D.; Zanichelli, A.

    2016-02-01

    We exploit the first public data release of VIPERS to investigate environmental effects in the evolution of galaxies between z ~ 0.5 and 0.9. The large number of spectroscopic redshifts (more than 50 000) over an area of about 10 deg2 provides a galaxy sample with high statistical power. The accurate redshift measurements (σz = 0.00047(1 + zspec)) allow us to robustly isolate galaxies living in the lowest and highest density environments (δ< 0.7 and δ> 4, respectively) as defined in terms of spatial 3D density contrast δ. We estimate the stellar mass function of galaxies residing in these two environments and constrain the high-mass end (ℳ ≳ 1011 ℳ⊙) with unprecedented precision. We find that the galaxy stellar mass function in the densest regions has a different shape than was measured at low densities, with an enhancement of massive galaxies and a hint of a flatter (less negative) slope at z< 0.8. We normalise each mass function to the comoving volume occupied by the corresponding environment and relate estimates from different redshift bins. We observe an evolution of the stellar mass function of VIPERS galaxies in high densities, while the low-density one is nearly constant. We compare these results to semi-analytical models and find consistent environmental signatures in the simulated stellar mass functions. We discuss how the halo mass function and fraction of central/satellite galaxies depend on the environments considered, making intrinsic and environmental properties of galaxies physically coupled, hence difficult to disentangle. The evolution of our low-density regions is described well by the formalism introduced by Peng et al. (2010, ApJ, 721, 193), and is consistent with the idea that galaxies become progressively passive because of internal physical processes. The same formalism could also describe the evolution of the mass function in the high density regions, but only if a significant contribution from dry mergers is considered. Based on

  1. H{alpha} EQUIVALENT WIDTHS FROM THE 3D-HST SURVEY: EVOLUTION WITH REDSHIFT AND DEPENDENCE ON STELLAR MASS

    SciTech Connect

    Fumagalli, Mattia; Patel, Shannon G.; Franx, Marijn; Labbe, Ivo; Brammer, Gabriel; Van Dokkum, Pieter; Lundgren, Britt; Momcheva, Ivelina; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Nelson, Erica; Da Cunha, Elisabete; Rix, Hans-Walter; Schmidt, Kasper B.; Kriek, Mariska

    2012-10-01

    We investigate the evolution of the H{alpha} equivalent width, EW(H{alpha}), with redshift and its dependence on stellar mass, using the first data from the 3D-HST survey, a large spectroscopic Treasury program with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3. Combining our H{alpha} measurements of 854 galaxies at 0.8 < z < 1.5 with those of ground-based surveys at lower and higher redshift, we can consistently determine the evolution of the EW(H{alpha}) distribution from z = 0 to z = 2.2. We find that at all masses the characteristic EW(H{alpha}) is decreasing toward the present epoch, and that at each redshift the EW(H{alpha}) is lower for high-mass galaxies. We find EW(H{alpha}) {approx}(1 + z){sup 1.8} with little mass dependence. Qualitatively, this measurement is a model-independent confirmation of the evolution of star-forming galaxies with redshift. A quantitative conversion of EW(H{alpha}) to specific star formation rate (sSFR) is model dependent because of differential reddening corrections between the continuum and the Balmer lines. The observed EW(H{alpha}) can be reproduced with the characteristic evolutionary history for galaxies, whose star formation rises with cosmic time to z {approx} 2.5 and then decreases to z = 0. This implies that EW(H{alpha}) rises to 400 A at z = 8. The sSFR evolves faster than EW(H{alpha}), as the mass-to-light ratio also evolves with redshift. We find that the sSFR evolves as (1 + z){sup 3.2}, nearly independent of mass, consistent with previous reddening insensitive estimates. We confirm previous results that the observed slope of the sSFR-z relation is steeper than the one predicted by models, but models and observations agree in finding little mass dependence.

  2. Using cross correlations to calibrate lensing source redshift distributions: Improving cosmological constraints from upcoming weak lensing surveys

    SciTech Connect

    De Putter, Roland; Doré, Olivier; Das, Sudeep

    2014-01-10

    Cross correlations between the galaxy number density in a lensing source sample and that in an overlapping spectroscopic sample can in principle be used to calibrate the lensing source redshift distribution. In this paper, we study in detail to what extent this cross-correlation method can mitigate the loss of cosmological information in upcoming weak lensing surveys (combined with a cosmic microwave background prior) due to lack of knowledge of the source distribution. We consider a scenario where photometric redshifts are available and find that, unless the photometric redshift distribution p(z {sub ph}|z) is calibrated very accurately a priori (bias and scatter known to ∼0.002 for, e.g., EUCLID), the additional constraint on p(z {sub ph}|z) from the cross-correlation technique to a large extent restores the cosmological information originally lost due to the uncertainty in dn/dz(z). Considering only the gain in photo-z accuracy and not the additional cosmological information, enhancements of the dark energy figure of merit of up to a factor of four (40) can be achieved for a SuMIRe-like (EUCLID-like) combination of lensing and redshift surveys, where SuMIRe stands for Subaru Measurement of Images and Redshifts). However, the success of the method is strongly sensitive to our knowledge of the galaxy bias evolution in the source sample and we find that a percent level bias prior is needed to optimize the gains from the cross-correlation method (i.e., to approach the cosmology constraints attainable if the bias was known exactly).

  3. The KMOS Redshift One Spectroscopic Survey (KROSS): the Tully-Fisher relation at z ˜ 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiley, Alfred L.; Stott, John P.; Swinbank, A. M.; Bureau, Martin; Harrison, Chris M.; Bower, Richard; Johnson, Helen L.; Bunker, Andrew J.; Jarvis, Matt J.; Magdis, Georgios; Sharples, Ray; Smail, Ian; Sobral, David; Best, Philip

    2016-07-01

    We present the stellar mass (M*), and K-corrected K-band absolute magnitude (MK) Tully-Fisher relations (TFRs) for subsamples of the 584 galaxies spatially resolved in H α emission by the KMOS Redshift One Spectroscopic Survey (KROSS). We model the velocity field of each of the KROSS galaxies and extract a rotation velocity, V80 at a radius equal to the major axis of an ellipse containing 80 per cent of the total integrated H α flux. The large sample size of KROSS allowed us to select 210 galaxies with well-measured rotation speeds. We extract from this sample a further 56 galaxies that are rotationally supported, using the stringent criterion V80/σ > 3, where σ is the flux weighted average velocity dispersion. We find the MK and M* TFRs for this subsample to be MK / {mag}= (-7.3 ± 0.9) × [(log (V_{80}/{km s^{-1}})-2.25]- 23.4 ± 0.2, and log (M_{{ast }} / M_{{⊙}})= (4.7 ± 0.4) × [(log (V_{80}/{km s^{-1}}) - 2.25] + 10.0 ± 0.3, respectively. We find an evolution of the M* TFR zero-point of -0.41 ± 0.08 dex over the last ˜8 billion years. However, we measure no evolution in the MK TFR zero-point over the same period. We conclude that rotationally supported galaxies of a given dynamical mass had less stellar mass at z ˜ 1 than the present day, yet emitted the same amounts of K-band light. The ability of KROSS to differentiate, using integral field spectroscopy with KMOS, between those galaxies that are rotationally supported and those that are not explains why our findings are at odds with previous studies without the same capabilities.

  4. The Herschel Multi-Tiered Extragalactic Survey: SPIRE-mm Photometric Redshifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roseboom, I. G.; Ivison, R. J.; Greve, T. R.; Amblard, A.; Arumugam, V.; Auld, R.; Aussel, H.; Bethermin, M.; Blain, A.; Bock, J.; Boselli, A.; Brisbin, D.; Buat, V.; Burgarella, D.; Castro-Rodriguez, N.; Cava, A.; Chanial, P.; Chapin, E.; Chapman, S.; Clements, D. L.; Conley, A.; Conversi, L.; Cooray, A.; Dowell, C. D.; Dwek, E.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the potential of submm-mm and submm-mm-radio photometric red-shifts using a sample of mm-selected sources as seen at 250, 350 and 500 micrometers by the SPIRE instrument on Herschel. From a sample of 63 previously identified mm-sources with reliable radio identifications in the GOODS-N and Lockman Hole North fields 46 (73 per cent) are found to have detections in at least one SPIRE band. We explore the observed submm/mm colour evolution with redshift, finding that the colours of mm-sources are adequately described by a modified blackbody with constant optical depth Tau = (nu/nu(0))beta where beta = +1.8 and nu(0) = c/100 micrometers. We find a tight correlation between dust temperature and IR luminosity. Using a single model of the dust temperature and IR luminosity relation we derive photometric redshift estimates for the 46 SPIRE detected mm-sources. Testing against the 22 sources with known spectroscopic, or good quality optical/near-IR photometric, redshifts we find submm/mm photometric redshifts offer a redshift accuracy of |delta z|/(1+z) = 0.16 (less than |delta z| greater than = 0.51). Including constraints from the radio-far IR correlation the accuracy is improved to |delta z|/(1 + z) = 0.15 (less than |delta z| greater than = 0.45). We estimate the redshift distribution of mm-selected sources finding a significant excess at z greater than 3 when compared to 850 micrometer selected samples.

  5. The VIPERS Multi-Lambda Survey. I. UV and near-IR observations, multi-colour catalogues, and photometric redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moutard, T.; Arnouts, S.; Ilbert, O.; Coupon, J.; Hudelot, P.; Vibert, D.; Comte, V.; Conseil, S.; Davidzon, I.; Guzzo, L.; Llebaria, A.; Martin, C.; McCracken, H. J.; Milliard, B.; Morrison, G.; Schiminovich, D.; Treyer, M.; Van Werbaeke, L.

    2016-05-01

    We present observations collected in the CFHTLS-VIPERS region in the ultraviolet with the GALEX satellite (far- and near-ultraviolet channels) and in the near-infrared with the CFHT/WIRCam camera (Ks band) over an area of 22 and 27 deg2, respectively. The depth of the photometry was optimised to measure the physical properties (e.g., star formation rate, stellar masses) of all the galaxies in the VIPERS spectroscopic survey. The large volume explored by VIPERS will enable a unique investigation of the relationship between the galaxy properties and their environment (density field and cosmic web) at high redshift (0.5 ≤ z ≤ 1.2). In this paper, we present the observations, the data reductions, and the build-up of the multi-colour catalogues. The CFHTLS-T0007 (gri-χ2) images are used as reference to detect and measure the Ks-band photometry, while the T0007 u∗-selected sources are used as priors to perform the GALEX photometry based on a dedicated software (EMphot). Our final sample reaches NUVAB ~ 25 (at 5σ) and KAB ~ 22 (at 3σ). The large spectroscopic sample (~51 000 spectroscopic redshifts) allows us to highlight the robustness of our star/galaxy separation and the reliability of our photometric redshifts with a typical accuracy of σz ≤ 0.04 and a fraction of catastrophic failures η ≤ 2% down to i ~ 23. We present various tests on the Ks-band completeness and photometric redshift accuracy by comparing our results with existing overlapping deep photometric catalogues. Finally, we discuss the BzK sample of passive and active galaxies at high redshift and the evolution of galaxy morphology in the (NUV-r) vs. (r-Ks) diagram at low redshift (z ≤ 0.25) based on the high image quality of the CFHTLS. The catalogue is available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/590/A102The images, catalogues, and photometric redshifts for 1.5 million sources (down to NUV

  6. Gemini Spectroscopy of Supernovae from the Supernova Legacy Survey: Improving High-Redshift Supernova Selection and Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, D. A.; Sullivan, M.; Perrett, K.; Bronder, T. J.; Hook, I. M.; Astier, P.; Aubourg, E.; Balam, D.; Basa, S.; Carlberg, R. G.; Fabbro, S.; Fouchez, D.; Guy, J.; Lafoux, H.; Neill, J. D.; Pain, R.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Pritchet, C. J.; Regnault, N.; Rich, J.; Taillet, R.; Knop, R.; McMahon, R. G.; Perlmutter, S.; Walton, N. A.

    2005-12-01

    We present new techniques for improving the efficiency of supernova (SN) classification at high redshift using 64 candidates observed at Gemini North and South during the first year of the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS). The SNLS is an ongoing 5 year project with the goal of measuring the equation of state of dark energy by discovering and following over 700 high-redshift SNe Ia using data from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey. We achieve an improvement in the SN Ia spectroscopic confirmation rate: at Gemini 71% of candidates are now confirmed as SNe Ia, compared to 54% using the methods of previous surveys. This is despite the comparatively high redshift of this sample, in which the median SN Ia redshift is z=0.81 (0.155<=z<=1.01). These improvements were realized because we use the unprecedented color coverage and light curve sampling of the SNLS to predict whether a candidate is a SN Ia and to estimate its redshift, before obtaining a spectrum, using a new technique called the ``SN photo-z.'' In addition, we have improved techniques for galaxy subtraction and SN template χ2 fitting, allowing us to identify candidates even when they are only 15% as bright as the host galaxy. The largest impediment to SN identification is found to be host galaxy contamination of the spectrum-when the SN was at least as bright as the underlying host galaxy the target was identified more than 90% of the time. However, even SNe in bright host galaxies can be easily identified in good seeing conditions. When the image quality was better than 0.55", the candidate was identified 88% of the time. Over the 5 year course of the survey, using the selection techniques presented here, we will be able to add ~170 more confirmed SNe Ia than would be possible using previous methods. APC, 11 Place Marcelin Berthelot, 75231 Paris Cedex 05, France. DSM/DAPNIA, CEA/Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex, France.

  7. A Redshift Survey of IRAS Galaxies. II. Methods for Determining Self-consistent Velocity and Density Fields: Erratum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahil, Amos; Strauss, Michael A.; Davis, Marc; Huchra, John P.

    1991-11-01

    In the paper, "A Redshift Survey of IRAS Galaxies. II. Methods for Determining Self-consistent Velocity and Density Fields" by Amos Yahil, Michael A. Strauss, Marc Davis, and John P. Huchra (ApJ, 372,380 [1991]), Figures 14 and 15 were presented out of order, with their legends reversed. Thus, the figure at the bottom of page 391 is Figure 15, and should have the legend: "Fig. 15.-As in Fig. 13, for the method 3 results." The figure at the top of page 392 is Figure 14, and should have the legend: "Fig. 14.-Plot in Galactic coordinates of the quantity V_diff_ for galaxies within 3000 km s^-1^ of the LG. The symbol size is proportional to V_diff_ - 400 km s^-1^, which measures the deviation of the redshift- distance relation along the line of sight to that galaxy from pure Hubble flow."

  8. Spectroscopic Determination of the Low-redshift Type Ia Supernova Rate from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krughoff, K. Simon; Connolly, Andrew J.; Frieman, Joshua; SubbaRao, Mark; Kilper, Gary; Schneider, Donald P.

    2011-04-01

    Supernova rates (SNRs) are directly coupled to high-mass stellar birth and evolution. As such, they are one of the few direct measures of the history of cosmic stellar evolution. In this paper, we describe a probabilistic technique for identifying supernovae within spectroscopic samples of galaxies. We present a study of 52 Type Ia supernovae ranging in age from -14 days to +40 days extracted from a parent sample of ~350,000 spectra from the SDSS DR5. We find an SNR of 0.472+0.048 -0.039(Systematic)+0.081 -0.071(Statistical)SNu at a redshift of langzrang = 0.1. This value is higher than other values at low redshift at the 1σ level, but is consistent at the 3σ level. In this paper, we demonstrate the potential for the described approach to detect supernovae in future spectroscopic surveys.

  9. The ALMA Spectroscopic Survey in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field: Molecular Gas Reservoirs in High-redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decarli, Roberto; Walter, Fabian; Aravena, Manuel; Carilli, Chris; Bouwens, Rychard; da Cunha, Elisabete; Daddi, Emanuele; Elbaz, David; Riechers, Dominik; Smail, Ian; Swinbank, Mark; Weiss, Axel; Bacon, Roland; Bauer, Franz; Bell, Eric F.; Bertoldi, Frank; Chapman, Scott; Colina, Luis; Cortes, Paulo C.; Cox, Pierre; Gónzalez-López, Jorge; Inami, Hanae; Ivison, Rob; Hodge, Jacqueline; Karim, Alex; Magnelli, Benjamin; Ota, Kazuaki; Popping, Gergö; Rix, Hans-Walter; Sargent, Mark; van der Wel, Arjen; van der Werf, Paul

    2016-12-01

    We study the molecular gas properties of high-z galaxies observed in the ALMA Spectroscopic Survey (ASPECS) that targets an ˜1 arcmin2 region in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (UDF), a blind survey of CO emission (tracing molecular gas) in the 3 and 1 mm bands. Of a total of 1302 galaxies in the field, 56 have spectroscopic redshifts and correspondingly well-defined physical properties. Among these, 11 have infrared luminosities {L}{IR}\\gt {10}11 {L}⊙ , i.e., a detection in CO emission was expected. Out of these, 7 are detected at various significance in CO, and 4 are undetected in CO emission. In the CO-detected sources, we find CO excitation conditions that are lower than those typically found in starburst/sub-mm galaxy/QSO environments. We use the CO luminosities (including limits for non-detections) to derive molecular gas masses. We discuss our findings in the context of previous molecular gas observations at high redshift (star formation law, gas depletion times, gas fractions): the CO-detected galaxies in the UDF tend to reside on the low-{L}{IR} envelope of the scatter in the {L}{IR}{--}{L}{CO}\\prime relation, but exceptions exist. For the CO-detected sources, we find an average depletion time of ˜1 Gyr, with significant scatter. The average molecular-to-stellar mass ratio ({M}{{H}2}/M *) is consistent with earlier measurements of main-sequence galaxies at these redshifts, and again shows large variations among sources. In some cases, we also measure dust continuum emission. On average, the dust-based estimates of the molecular gas are a factor ˜2-5× smaller than those based on CO. When we account for detections as well as non-detections, we find large diversity in the molecular gas properties of the high-redshift galaxies covered by ASPECS.

  10. Redshift distributions of galaxies in the Dark Energy Survey Science Verification shear catalogue and implications for weak lensing

    DOE PAGES

    Bonnett, C.; Troxel, M. A.; Hartley, W.; ...

    2016-08-30

    Here we present photometric redshift estimates for galaxies used in the weak lensing analysis of the Dark Energy Survey Science Verification (DES SV) data. Four model- or machine learning-based photometric redshift methods—annz2, bpz calibrated against BCC-Ufig simulations, skynet, and tpz—are analyzed. For training, calibration, and testing of these methods, we construct a catalogue of spectroscopically confirmed galaxies matched against DES SV data. The performance of the methods is evaluated against the matched spectroscopic catalogue, focusing on metrics relevant for weak lensing analyses, with additional validation against COSMOS photo-z’s. From the galaxies in the DES SV shear catalogue, which have meanmore » redshift 0.72±0.01 over the range 0.38 of approximately 3%. This shift is within the one sigma statistical errors on σ8 for the DES SV shear catalogue. We further study the potential impact of systematic differences on the critical surface density, Σcrit, finding levels of bias safely less than the statistical power of DES SV data. In conclusion, we recommend a final Gaussian prior for the photo-z bias in the mean of n(z) of width 0.05 for each of the three tomographic bins, and show that this is a sufficient bias model for the corresponding cosmology analysis.« less

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SHELS: redshift survey of the F1 DLS field (Geller+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geller, M. J.; Hwang, H. S.; Dell'Antonio, I. P.; Zahid, H. J.; Kurtz, M. J.; Fabricant, D. G.

    2016-07-01

    The Smithsonian Hectospec Lensing Survey (SHELS) redshift survey covers two 4deg2 fields originally selected as part of the Deep Lens Survey (DLS; Wittman et al. 2006ApJ...643..128W). We used the 300-fiber Hectospec instrument on the MMT to acquire spectroscopy for galaxy candidates typically brighter than R=20.6. We observed the F1 field (centered at RA=00:53:25.3 and DEC=12:33:55 (J2000)) in queue mode during dark runs in four periods: 2005 October 24-28; 2006 October 17-November 22; 2012 October 10-December 10; 2014 September 26-November 28. The wavelength range covered by Hectospec in the observer's frame is 3700-9100Å with a resolution of ~5Å. See section 2.2 for further explanations. (4 data files).

  12. The VLT LBG Redshift Survey - III. The clustering and dynamics of Lyman-break galaxies at z ˜ 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielby, R.; Hill, M. D.; Shanks, T.; Crighton, N. H. M.; Infante, L.; Bornancini, C. G.; Francke, H.; Héraudeau, P.; Lambas, D. G.; Metcalfe, N.; Minniti, D.; Padilla, N.; Theuns, T.; Tummuangpak, P.; Weilbacher, P.

    2013-03-01

    We present a catalogue of 2135 galaxy redshifts from the VLT LBG Redshift Survey (VLRS), a spectroscopic survey of z ≈ 3 galaxies in wide fields centred on background quasi-stellar objects. We have used deep optical imaging to select galaxies via the Lyman-break technique. Spectroscopy of the Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs) was then made using the Very Large Telescope (VLT) Visible Multi-Object Spectrograph (VIMOS) instrument, giving a mean redshift of z = 2.79. We analyse the clustering properties of the VLRS sample and also of the VLRS sample combined with the smaller area Keck-based survey of Steidel et al. From the semiprojected correlation function, wp(σ), for the VLRS and combined surveys, we find that the results are well fit with a single power-law model, with clustering scale lengths of r0 = 3.46 ± 0.41 and 3.83 ± 0.24 h-1 Mpc, respectively. We note that the corresponding combined ξ(r) slope is flatter than for local galaxies at γ = 1.5-1.6 rather than γ = 1.8. This flat slope is confirmed by the z-space correlation function, ξ(s), and in the range 10 < s < 100 h-1 Mpc the VLRS shows an ≈2.5σ excess over the Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) linear prediction. This excess may be consistent with recent evidence for non-Gaussianity in clustering results at z ≈ 1. We then analyse the LBG z-space distortions using the 2D correlation function, ξ(σ, π), finding for the combined sample a large-scale infall parameter of β = 0.38 ± 0.19 and a velocity dispersion of sqrt{< w_z^2rangle }=420^{+140}_{-160} km s^{-1}. Based on our measured β, we are able to determine the gravitational growth rate, finding a value of f(z = 3) = 0.99 ± 0.50 (or fσ8 = 0.26 ± 0.13), which is the highest redshift measurement of the growth rate via galaxy clustering and is consistent with ΛCDM. Finally, we constrain the mean halo mass for the LBG population, finding that the VLRS and combined sample suggest mean halo masses of log(MDM/M⊙) = 11.57 ± 0.15 and 11.73 ± 0

  13. Measurements of CO Redshifts with Z-Spec for Lensed Submillimeter Galaxies Discovered in the H-ATLAS Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupu, R. E.; Scott, K. S.; Aguirre, J. E.; Aretxaga, I.; Auld, R.; Barton, E.; Beelen, A.; Bertoldi, F.; Bock, J. J.; Bonfield, D.; Bradford, C. M.; Buttiglione, S.; Cava, A.; Clements, D. L.; Cooke, J.; Cooray, A.; Dannerbauer, H.; Dariush, A.; De Zotti, G.; Dunne, L.; Dye, S.; Eales, S.; Frayer, D.; Fritz, J.; Glenn, J.; Hughes, D. H.; Ibar, E.; Ivison, R. J.; Jarvis, M. J.; Kamenetzky, J.; Kim, S.; Lagache, G.; Leeuw, L.; Maddox, S.; Maloney, P. R.; Matsuhara, H.; Murphy, E. J.; Naylor, B. J.; Negrello, M.; Nguyen, H.; Omont, A.; Pascale, E.; Pohlen, M.; Rigby, E.; Rodighiero, G.; Serjeant, S.; Smith, D.; Temi, P.; Thompson, M.; Valtchanov, I.; Verma, A.; Vieira, J. D.; Zmuidzinas, J.

    2012-10-01

    We present new observations from Z-Spec, a broadband 185-305 GHz spectrometer, of five submillimeter bright lensed sources selected from the Herschel-Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey science demonstration phase catalog. We construct a redshift-finding algorithm using combinations of the signal to noise of all the lines falling in the Z-Spec bandpass to determine redshifts with high confidence, even in cases where the signal to noise in individual lines is low. We measure the dust continuum in all sources and secure CO redshifts for four out of five (z ~ 1.5-3). In one source, SDP.17, we tentatively identify two independent redshifts and a water line, confirmed at z = 2.308. Our sources have properties characteristic of dusty starburst galaxies, with magnification-corrected star formation rates of 102 - 3 M ⊙ yr-1. Lower limits for the dust masses (~ a few 108 M ⊙) and spatial extents (~1 kpc equivalent radius) are derived from the continuum spectral energy distributions, corresponding to dust temperatures between 54 and 69 K. In the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) approximation, we derive relatively low CO excitation temperatures (lsim 100 K) and optical depths (τ <~ 1). Performing a non-LTE excitation analysis using RADEX, we find that the CO lines measured by Z-Spec (from J = 4 → 3 to 10 → 9, depending on the galaxy) localize the best solutions to either a high-temperature/low-density region or a low/temperature/high-density region near the LTE solution, with the optical depth varying accordingly. Observations of additional CO lines, CO(1-0) in particular, are needed to constrain the non-LTE models.

  14. Redshift distributions of galaxies in the Dark Energy Survey Science Verification shear catalogue and implications for weak lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnett, C.; Troxel, M. A.; Hartley, W.; Amara, A.; Leistedt, B.; Becker, M. R.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bridle, S. L.; Bruderer, C.; Busha, M. T.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Childress, M. J.; Castander, F. J.; Chang, C.; Crocce, M.; Davis, T. M.; Eifler, T. F.; Frieman, J.; Gangkofner, C.; Gaztanaga, E.; Glazebrook, K.; Gruen, D.; Kacprzak, T.; King, A.; Kwan, J.; Lahav, O.; Lewis, G.; Lidman, C.; Lin, H.; MacCrann, N.; Miquel, R.; O'Neill, C. R.; Palmese, A.; Peiris, H. V.; Refregier, A.; Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sadeh, I.; Sánchez, C.; Sheldon, E.; Uddin, S.; Wechsler, R. H.; Zuntz, J.; Abbott, T.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Armstrong, R.; Banerji, M.; Bauer, A. H.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carretero, J.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Fausti Neto, A.; Fernandez, E.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Gerdes, D. W.; Gruendl, R. A.; Honscheid, K.; Jain, B.; James, D. J.; Jarvis, M.; Kim, A. G.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Li, T. S.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; March, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; Melchior, P.; Miller, C. J.; Neilsen, E.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Reil, K.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, D.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.; Dark Energy Survey Collaboration

    2016-08-01

    We present photometric redshift estimates for galaxies used in the weak lensing analysis of the Dark Energy Survey Science Verification (DES SV) data. Four model- or machine learning-based photometric redshift methods—annz2, bpz calibrated against BCC-Ufig simulations, skynet, and tpz—are analyzed. For training, calibration, and testing of these methods, we construct a catalogue of spectroscopically confirmed galaxies matched against DES SV data. The performance of the methods is evaluated against the matched spectroscopic catalogue, focusing on metrics relevant for weak lensing analyses, with additional validation against COSMOS photo-z 's. From the galaxies in the DES SV shear catalogue, which have mean redshift 0.72 ±0.01 over the range 0.3 redshift distributions through to their impact on cosmological parameters estimated with cosmic shear, and find that they cause shifts in the value of σ8 of approximately 3%. This shift is within the one sigma statistical errors on σ8 for the DES SV shear catalogue. We further study the potential impact of systematic differences on the critical surface density, Σcrit , finding levels of bias safely less than the statistical power of DES SV data. We recommend a final Gaussian prior for the photo-z bias in the mean of n (z ) of width 0.05 for each of the three tomographic bins, and show that this is a sufficient bias model for the corresponding cosmology analysis.

  15. MEASUREMENTS OF CO REDSHIFTS WITH Z-SPEC FOR LENSED SUBMILLIMETER GALAXIES DISCOVERED IN THE H-ATLAS SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Lupu, R. E.; Scott, K. S.; Aguirre, J. E.; Aretxaga, I.; Auld, R.; Dariush, A.; Barton, E.; Cooke, J.; Cooray, A.; Beelen, A.; Bertoldi, F.; Bock, J. J.; Bradford, C. M.; Bonfield, D.; Buttiglione, S.; De Zotti, G.; Cava, A.; Dannerbauer, H.; and others

    2012-10-01

    We present new observations from Z-Spec, a broadband 185-305 GHz spectrometer, of five submillimeter bright lensed sources selected from the Herschel-Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey science demonstration phase catalog. We construct a redshift-finding algorithm using combinations of the signal to noise of all the lines falling in the Z-Spec bandpass to determine redshifts with high confidence, even in cases where the signal to noise in individual lines is low. We measure the dust continuum in all sources and secure CO redshifts for four out of five (z {approx} 1.5-3). In one source, SDP.17, we tentatively identify two independent redshifts and a water line, confirmed at z = 2.308. Our sources have properties characteristic of dusty starburst galaxies, with magnification-corrected star formation rates of 10{sup 2-3} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. Lower limits for the dust masses ({approx} a few 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun }) and spatial extents ({approx}1 kpc equivalent radius) are derived from the continuum spectral energy distributions, corresponding to dust temperatures between 54 and 69 K. In the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) approximation, we derive relatively low CO excitation temperatures ({approx}< 100 K) and optical depths ({tau} {approx}< 1). Performing a non-LTE excitation analysis using RADEX, we find that the CO lines measured by Z-Spec (from J = 4 {yields} 3 to 10 {yields} 9, depending on the galaxy) localize the best solutions to either a high-temperature/low-density region or a low/temperature/high-density region near the LTE solution, with the optical depth varying accordingly. Observations of additional CO lines, CO(1-0) in particular, are needed to constrain the non-LTE models.

  16. Redshift distributions of galaxies in the Dark Energy Survey Science Verification shear catalogue and implications for weak lensing

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnett, C.; Troxel, M. A.; Hartley, W.; Amara, A.; Leistedt, B.; Becker, M. R.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bridle, S. L.; Bruderer, C.; Busha, M. T.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Childress, M. J.; Castander, F. J.; Chang, C.; Crocce, M.; Davis, T. M.; Eifler, T. F.; Frieman, J.; Gangkofner, C.; Gaztanaga, E.; Glazebrook, K.; Gruen, D.; Kacprzak, T.; King, A.; Kwan, J.; Lahav, O.; Lewis, G.; Lidman, C.; Lin, H.; MacCrann, N.; Miquel, R.; O’Neill, C. R.; Palmese, A.; Peiris, H. V.; Refregier, A.; Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sadeh, I.; Sánchez, C.; Sheldon, E.; Uddin, S.; Wechsler, R. H.; Zuntz, J.; Abbott, T.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Armstrong, R.; Banerji, M.; Bauer, A. H.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carretero, J.; Cunha, C. E.; D’Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Fausti Neto, A.; Fernandez, E.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Gerdes, D. W.; Gruendl, R. A.; Honscheid, K.; Jain, B.; James, D. J.; Jarvis, M.; Kim, A. G.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Li, T. S.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; March, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; Melchior, P.; Miller, C. J.; Neilsen, E.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Reil, K.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, D.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.

    2016-08-30

    Here we present photometric redshift estimates for galaxies used in the weak lensing analysis of the Dark Energy Survey Science Verification (DES SV) data. Four model- or machine learning-based photometric redshift methods—annz2, bpz calibrated against BCC-Ufig simulations, skynet, and tpz—are analyzed. For training, calibration, and testing of these methods, we construct a catalogue of spectroscopically confirmed galaxies matched against DES SV data. The performance of the methods is evaluated against the matched spectroscopic catalogue, focusing on metrics relevant for weak lensing analyses, with additional validation against COSMOS photo-z’s. From the galaxies in the DES SV shear catalogue, which have mean redshift 0.72±0.01 over the range 0.3redshift distributions through to their impact on cosmological parameters estimated with cosmic shear, and find that they cause shifts in the value of σ8 of approximately 3%. This shift is within the one sigma statistical errors on σ8 for the DES SV shear catalogue. We further study the potential impact of systematic differences on the critical surface density, Σcrit, finding levels of bias safely less than the statistical power of DES SV data. In conclusion, we recommend a final Gaussian prior for the photo-z bias in the mean of n(z) of width 0.05 for each of the three tomographic bins, and show that this is a sufficient bias model for the corresponding cosmology analysis.

  17. The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS). The coevolution of galaxy morphology and colour to z 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krywult, J.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Pollo, A.; Vergani, D.; Bolzonella, M.; Davidzon, I.; Iovino, A.; Gargiulo, A.; Haines, C. P.; Scodeggio, M.; Guzzo, L.; Zamorani, G.; Garilli, B.; Granett, B. R.; de la Torre, S.; Abbas, U.; Adami, C.; Bottini, D.; Cappi, A.; Cucciati, O.; Franzetti, P.; Fritz, A.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Małek, K.; Marulli, F.; Polletta, M.; Tojeiro, R.; Zanichelli, A.; Arnouts, S.; Bel, J.; Branchini, E.; Coupon, J.; De Lucia, G.; Ilbert, O.; McCracken, H. J.; Moscardini, L.; Takeuchi, T. T.

    2017-02-01

    Context. The study of the separation of galaxy types into different classes that share the same characteristics, and of the evolution of the specific parameters used in the classification are fundamental for understanding galaxy evolution. Aims: We explore the evolution of the statistical distribution of galaxy morphological properties and colours combining high-quality imaging data from the CFHT Legacy Survey with the large number of redshifts and extended photometry from the VIPERS survey. Methods: Galaxy structural parameters were combined with absolute magnitudes, colours and redshifts in order to trace evolution in a multi-parameter space. Using a new method we analysed the combination of colours and structural parameters of early- and late-type galaxies in luminosity-redshift space. Results: We find that both the rest-frame colour distributions in the (U-B) vs. (B-V) plane and the Sérsic index distributions are well fitted by a sum of two Gaussians, with a remarkable consistency of red-spheroidal and blue-disky galaxy populations, over the explored redshift (0.5 < z < 1) and luminosity (-1.5 < B-B∗ < 1.0) ranges. The combination of the rest-frame colour and Sérsic index as a function of redshift and luminosity allows us to present the structure of both galaxy types and their evolution. We find that early-type galaxies display only a slow change in their concentrations after z = 1. Their high concentrations were already established at z 1 and depend much more strongly on their luminosity than redshift. In contrast, late-type galaxies clearly become more concentrated with cosmic time with only little evolution in colour, which remains dependent mainly on their luminosity. Conclusions: The combination of rest-frame colours and Sérsic index as a function of redshift and luminosity leads to a precise statistical description of the structure of galaxies and their evolution. Additionally, the proposed method provides a robust way to split galaxies into early

  18. Adjusting the Adjusted X[superscript 2]/df Ratio Statistic for Dichotomous Item Response Theory Analyses: Does the Model Fit?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tay, Louis; Drasgow, Fritz

    2012-01-01

    Two Monte Carlo simulation studies investigated the effectiveness of the mean adjusted X[superscript 2]/df statistic proposed by Drasgow and colleagues and, because of problems with the method, a new approach for assessing the goodness of fit of an item response theory model was developed. It has been previously recommended that mean adjusted…

  19. Evolution of the real-space correlation function from next generation cluster surveys. Recovering the real-space correlation function from photometric redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridhar, Srivatsan; Maurogordato, Sophie; Benoist, Christophe; Cappi, Alberto; Marulli, Federico

    2017-03-01

    Context. The next generation of galaxy surveys will provide cluster catalogues probing an unprecedented range of scales, redshifts, and masses with large statistics. Their analysis should therefore enable us to probe the spatial distribution of clusters with high accuracy and derive tighter constraints on the cosmological parameters and the dark energy equation of state. However, for the majority of these surveys, redshifts of individual galaxies will be mostly estimated by multiband photometry which implies non-negligible errors in redshift resulting in potential difficulties in recovering the real-space clustering. Aims: We investigate to which accuracy it is possible to recover the real-space two-point correlation function of galaxy clusters from cluster catalogues based on photometric redshifts, and test our ability to detect and measure the redshift and mass evolution of the correlation length r0 and of the bias parameter b(M,z) as a function of the uncertainty on the cluster redshift estimate. Methods: We calculate the correlation function for cluster sub-samples covering various mass and redshift bins selected from a 500 deg2 light-cone limited to H < 24. In order to simulate the distribution of clusters in photometric redshift space, we assign to each cluster a redshift randomly extracted from a Gaussian distribution having a mean equal to the cluster cosmological redshift and a dispersion equal to σz. The dispersion is varied in the range σ(z=0)=\\frac{σz{1+z_c} = 0.005,0.010,0.030} and 0.050, in order to cover the typical values expected in forthcoming surveys. The correlation function in real-space is then computed through estimation and deprojection of wp(rp). Four mass ranges (from Mhalo > 2 × 1013h-1M⊙ to Mhalo > 2 × 1014h-1M⊙) and six redshift slices covering the redshift range [0, 2] are investigated, first using cosmological redshifts and then for the four photometric redshift configurations. Results: From the analysis of the light-cone in

  20. The Role of Environment in Shaping Galaxy Evolution at High Redshift: Insights from the SpARCS Cluster Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Gillian

    2015-08-01

    Between z = 2 and z = 1, the main progenitors of present-day massive clusters undergo rapid collapse, and cluster members transform from active star-forming to quiescent galaxies. The SpARCS survey is one of the largest surveys designed to detect clusters of galaxies at z> 1, and has discovered hundreds of Spitzer IR-selected clusters.I will present results from GCLASS, a 25-night Gemini/GMOS spectroscopic follow-up survey of ten of the most massive SpARCS clusters at z~1, and explain what we are learning about quenching and stellar mass assembly of galaxies in these, the densest of environments, relative to the field population. I will explain how predictions and observations of the stellar mass growth of Brightest Cluster Galaxies, previously controversially divergent, are now coming into agreement, and discuss the evidence for the relative importance of mergers versus in-situ star formation in driving this stellar mass growth as a function of redshift.I will also present a sample of newly-confirmed clusters at z~2 for which we have HST spectroscopy and imaging, and have been targeting with Keck/MOSFIRE. I will conclude by discussing GOGREEN and DEEPDRILL, two new large surveys approved by Gemini & Spitzer, designed to study the effects of environment at lower stellar mass and at higher redshift, respectively. Collectively, these powerful new surveys are beginning to allow us to place constraints on the location and timescale of quenching and, in concert with both hydro-simulations and semi-analytic models, identify the complex role of environment in shaping galaxy evolution over cosmic time.

  1. The zCOSMOS redshift survey: evolution of the light in bulges and discs since z ~ 0.8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasca, L. A. M.; Tresse, L.; Le Fèvre, O.; Ilbert, O.; Lilly, S. J.; Zamorani, G.; López-Sanjuan, C.; Ho, L. C.; Bardelli, S.; Cattaneo, A.; Cucciati, O.; Farrah, D.; Iovino, A.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Liu, C. T.; Massey, R.; Renzini, A.; Taniguchi, Y.; Welikala, N.; Zucca, E.; Carollo, C. M.; Contini, T.; Kneib, J.-P.; Mainieri, V.; Scodeggio, M.; Bolzonella, M.; Bongiorno, A.; Caputi, K.; de la Torre, S.; Franzetti, P.; Garilli, B.; Guzzo, L.; Kampczyk, P.; Knobel, C.; Kovač, K.; Lamareille, F.; Le Borgne, J.-F.; Le Brun, V.; Maier, C.; Mignoli, M.; Pello, R.; Peng, Y.; Perez Montero, E.; Rich, R. M.; Tanaka, M.; Vergani, D.; Bordoloi, R.; Cappi, A.; Cimatti, A.; Coppa, G.; McCracken, H. J.; Moresco, M.; Pozzetti, L.; Sanders, D.; Sheth, K.

    2014-04-01

    We studied the chronology of galactic bulge and disc formation by analysing the relative contributions of these components to the B-band rest-frame luminosity density at different epochs. We present the first estimate of the evolution of the fraction of rest-frame B-band light in galactic bulges and discs since redshift z ∼ 0.8. We performed a bulge-to-disc decomposition of HST/ACS images of 3266 galaxies in the zCOSMOS-bright survey with spectroscopic redshifts in the range 0.7 ≤ z ≤ 0.9. We find that the fraction of B-band light in bulges and discs is (26 ± 4)% and (74 ± 4)%, respectively. When compared with rest-frame B-band measurements of galaxies in the local Universe in the same mass range (109 M⊙ ⪉ M ⪉ 1011.5 M_{⊙}), we find that the B-band light in discs decreases by 30% from z ∼ 0.7-0.9 to z ∼ 0, while the light from the bulge increases by 30% over the same period of time. We interpret this evolution as the consequence of star formation and mass assembly processes, as well as morphological transformation, which gradually shift stars formed at half the age of the Universe from star-forming late-type/irregular galaxies to earlier types and ultimately into spheroids. Based on observations obtained at the European Southern Observatory (ESO) Very Large Telescope (VLT), Paranal, Chile, as part of the Large Program 175.A-0839 (the zCOSMOS Spectroscopic Redshift Survey).

  2. The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS). On the recovery of the count-in-cell probability distribution function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bel, J.; Branchini, E.; Di Porto, C.; Cucciati, O.; Granett, B. R.; Iovino, A.; de la Torre, S.; Marinoni, C.; Guzzo, L.; Moscardini, L.; Cappi, A.; Abbas, U.; Adami, C.; Arnouts, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Bottini, D.; Coupon, J.; Davidzon, I.; De Lucia, G.; Fritz, A.; Franzetti, P.; Fumana, M.; Garilli, B.; Ilbert, O.; Krywult, J.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Małek, K.; Marulli, F.; McCracken, H. J.; Paioro, L.; Polletta, M.; Pollo, A.; Schlagenhaufer, H.; Scodeggio, M.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Tojeiro, R.; Vergani, D.; Zanichelli, A.; Burden, A.; Marchetti, A.; Mellier, Y.; Nichol, R. C.; Peacock, J. A.; Percival, W. J.; Phleps, S.; Wolk, M.

    2016-04-01

    We compare three methods to measure the count-in-cell probability density function of galaxies in a spectroscopic redshift survey. From this comparison we found that, when the sampling is low (the average number of object per cell is around unity), it is necessary to use a parametric method to model the galaxy distribution. We used a set of mock catalogues of VIPERS to verify if we were able to reconstruct the cell-count probability distribution once the observational strategy is applied. We find that, in the simulated catalogues, the probability distribution of galaxies is better represented by a Gamma expansion than a skewed log-normal distribution. Finally, we correct the cell-count probability distribution function from the angular selection effect of the VIMOS instrument and study the redshift and absolute magnitude dependency of the underlying galaxy density function in VIPERS from redshift 0.5 to 1.1. We found a very weak evolution of the probability density distribution function and that it is well approximated by a Gamma distribution, independently of the chosen tracers. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Cerro Paranal, Chile, using the Very Large Telescope under programmes 182.A-0886 and partly 070.A-9007. Also based on observations obtained with MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint project of CFHT and CEA/DAPNIA, at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) of France, and the University of Hawaii. This work is based in part on data products produced at TERAPIX and the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre as part of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey, a collaborative project of NRC and CNRS. The VIPERS web site is http://www.vipers.inaf.it/

  3. The VIMOS Ultra-Deep Survey: ~10 000 galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts to study galaxy assembly at early epochs 2 < z ≃ 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Fèvre, O.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Cassata, P.; Garilli, B.; Le Brun, V.; Maccagni, D.; Pentericci, L.; Thomas, R.; Vanzella, E.; Zamorani, G.; Zucca, E.; Amorin, R.; Bardelli, S.; Capak, P.; Cassarà, L.; Castellano, M.; Cimatti, A.; Cuby, J. G.; Cucciati, O.; de la Torre, S.; Durkalec, A.; Fontana, A.; Giavalisco, M.; Grazian, A.; Hathi, N. P.; Ilbert, O.; Lemaux, B. C.; Moreau, C.; Paltani, S.; Ribeiro, B.; Salvato, M.; Schaerer, D.; Scodeggio, M.; Sommariva, V.; Talia, M.; Taniguchi, Y.; Tresse, L.; Vergani, D.; Wang, P. W.; Charlot, S.; Contini, T.; Fotopoulou, S.; López-Sanjuan, C.; Mellier, Y.; Scoville, N.

    2015-04-01

    We present the VIMOS Ultra Deep Survey (VUDS), a spectroscopic redshift survey of ~10 000 very faint galaxies to study the main phase of galaxy assembly in 2 < z ≃ 6. The survey covers 1 deg2 in three separate fields: COSMOS, ECDFS, and VVDS-02h, with the selection of targets based on an inclusive combination of photometric redshifts and colour properties. Spectra covering 3650 < λ < 9350 Å are obtained with VIMOS on the ESO-VLT with integration times of 14h. Here we present the survey strategy, target selection, data processing, and the redshift measurement process with an emphasis on the specific methods used to adapt to this high-redshift range. We discuss the spectra quality and redshift reliability and derive a success rate in redshift measurement of 91%, or 74% by limiting the dataset to the most reliable measurements, down to a limiting magnitude iAB = 25. Measurements are performed all the way down to iAB = 27. The mean redshift of the main sample is z ~ 3 and extends over a broad redshift range mainly in 2 < z < 6. At 3 < z < 5, the galaxies cover a wide range of luminosities -23 < MNUV < -20.5, stellar mass 109M⊙ < M∗ < 1011M⊙, and star formation rates 1M⊙/yr < SFR < 103M⊙/yr. We discuss the spectral properties of galaxies using individual as well asstacked spectra. The comparison between spectroscopic and photometric redshifts as well as colour selection demonstrate the effectiveness of our selection scheme. From about ~ 90% of the data analysed so far, we expect to assemble >6000 galaxies with reliable spectroscopic redshifts in 2 < z < 6 when complete. This makes the VUDS the largest survey at these redshifts and offers the opportunity for unprecedented studies of the star-forming galaxy population and its distribution in large-scale structures during the main phase of galaxy assembly. Based on data obtained with the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope, Paranal, Chile, under Large Program 185.A-0791.Staged releases of the

  4. A far-infrared spectroscopic survey of intermediate redshift (ultra) luminous infrared galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Magdis, Georgios E.; Rigopoulou, D.; Hopwood, R.; Clements, D.; Huang, J.-S.; Farrah, D.; Pearson, C.; Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Bock, J. J.; Cooray, A.; Griffin, M. J.; Oliver, S.; Perez Fournon, I.; Riechers, D.; Swinyard, B. M.; Thatte, N.; Scott, D.; Valtchanov, I.; Vaccari, M.

    2014-11-20

    We present Herschel far-IR photometry and spectroscopy as well as ground-based CO observations of an intermediate redshift (0.21 ≤ z ≤ 0.88) sample of Herschel-selected (ultra)-luminous infrared galaxies (L {sub IR} > 10{sup 11.5} L {sub ☉}). With these measurements, we trace the dust continuum, far-IR atomic line emission, in particular [C II] 157.7 μm, as well as the molecular gas of z ∼ 0.3 luminous and ultraluminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs and ULIRGs) and perform a detailed investigation of the interstellar medium of the population. We find that the majority of Herschel-selected intermediate redshift (U)LIRGs have L {sub C} {sub II}/L {sub FIR} ratios that are a factor of about 10 higher than that of local ULIRGs and comparable to that of local normal and high-z star-forming galaxies. Using our sample to bridge local and high-z [C II] observations, we find that the majority of galaxies at all redshifts and all luminosities follow an L {sub C} {sub II}–L {sub FIR} relation with a slope of unity, from which local ULIRGs and high- z active-galactic-nucleus-dominated sources are clear outliers. We also confirm that the strong anti-correlation between the L {sub C} {sub II}/L {sub FIR} ratio and the far-IR color L {sub 60}/L {sub 100} observed in the local universe holds over a broad range of redshifts and luminosities, in the sense that warmer sources exhibit lower L {sub C} {sub II}/L {sub FIR} at any epoch. Intermediate redshift ULIRGs are also characterized by large molecular gas reservoirs and by lower star formation efficiencies compared to that of local ULIRGs. The high L {sub C} {sub II}/L {sub FIR} ratios, the moderate star formation efficiencies (L {sub IR}/L{sub CO}{sup ′} or L {sub IR}/M{sub H{sub 2}}), and the relatively low dust temperatures of our sample (which are also common characteristics of high-z star-forming galaxies with ULIRG-like luminosities) indicate that the evolution of the physical properties of (U)LIRGs between the

  5. Unsupervised self-organized mapping: a versatile empirical tool for object selection, classification and redshift estimation in large surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geach, James E.

    2012-01-01

    We present an application of unsupervised machine learning - the self-organized map (SOM) - as a tool for visualizing, exploring and mining the catalogues of large astronomical surveys. Self-organization culminates in a low-resolution representation of the 'topology' of a parameter volume, and this can be exploited in various ways pertinent to astronomy. Using data from the Cosmological Evolution Survey (COSMOS), we demonstrate two key astronomical applications of the SOM: (i) object classification and selection, using galaxies with active galactic nuclei as an example, and (ii) photometric redshift estimation, illustrating how SOMs can be used as totally empirical predictive tools. With a training set of ˜3800 galaxies with zspec≤ 1, we achieve photometric redshift accuracies competitive with other (mainly template fitting) techniques that use a similar number of photometric bands [σ(Δz) = 0.03 with a ˜2 per cent outlier rate when using u* band to 8 ?m photometry]. We also test the SOM as a photo-z tool using the PHoto-z Accuracy Testing (PHAT) synthetic catalogue of Hildebrandt et al., which compares several different photo-z codes using a common input/training set. We find that the SOM can deliver accuracies that are competitive with many of the established template fitting and empirical methods. This technique is not without clear limitations, which are discussed, but we suggest it could be a powerful tool in the era of extremely large -'petabyte'- data bases where efficient data mining is a paramount concern.

  6. Luminosity and redshift dependence of the covering factor of active galactic nuclei viewed with WISE and Sloan digital sky survey

    SciTech Connect

    Toba, Y.; Matsuhara, H.; Oyabu, S.; Malkan, M. A.; Gandhi, P.; Nakagawa, T.; Isobe, N.; Shirahata, M.; Oi, N.; Takita, S.; Yano, K.; Ohyama, Y.; Yamauchi, C.

    2014-06-10

    In this work, we investigate the dependence of the covering factor (CF) of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) on the mid-infrared (MIR) luminosity and the redshift. We constructed 12 and 22 μm luminosity functions (LFs) at 0.006 ≤z ≤ 0.3 using Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) data. Combining the WISE catalog with Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectroscopic data, we selected 223,982 galaxies at 12 μm and 25,721 galaxies at 22 μm for spectroscopic classification. We then identified 16,355 AGNs at 12 μm and 4683 AGNs at 22 μm by their optical emission lines and cataloged classifications in the SDSS. Following that, we estimated the CF as the fraction of Type 2 AGN in all AGNs whose MIR emissions are dominated by the active nucleus (not their host galaxies) based on their MIR colors. We found that the CF decreased with increasing MIR luminosity, regardless of the choice of Type 2 AGN classification criteria, and the CF did not change significantly with redshift for z ≤ 0.2. Furthermore, we carried out various tests to determine the influence of selection bias and confirmed that similar dependences exist, even when taking these uncertainties into account. The luminosity dependence of the CF can be explained by the receding torus model, but the 'modified' receding torus model gives a slightly better fit, as suggested by Simpson.

  7. The two-point correlation function for groups of galaxies in the Center for Astrophysics redshift survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramella, Massimo; Geller, Margaret J.; Huchra, John P.

    1990-01-01

    The large-scale distribution of groups of galaxies selected from complete slices of the CfA redshift survey extension is examined. The survey is used to reexamine the contribution of group members to the galaxy correlation function. The relationship between the correlation function for groups and those calculated for rich clusters is discussed, and the results for groups are examined as an extension of the relation between correlation function amplitude and richness. The group correlation function indicates that groups and individual galaxies are equivalent tracers of the large-scale matter distribution. The distribution of group centers is equivalent to random sampling of the galaxy distribution. The amplitude of the correlation function for groups is consistent with an extrapolation of the amplitude-richness relation for clusters. The amplitude scaled by the mean intersystem separation is also consistent with results for richer clusters.

  8. The Redshift One LDSS-3 Emission line Survey (ROLES): survey method and z ~ 1 mass-dependent star formation rate density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbank, David G.; Balogh, Michael L.; Glazebrook, Karl; Bower, Richard G.; Baldry, I. K.; Davies, G. T.; Hau, G. K. T.; Li, I. H.; McCarthy, P.

    2010-07-01

    Motivated by suggestions of `cosmic downsizing', in which the dominant contribution to the cosmic star formation rate density (SFRD) proceeds from higher to lower mass galaxies with increasing cosmic time, we describe the design and implementation of the Redshift One LDSS3 Emission line Survey (ROLES). This survey is designed to probe low-mass, z ~ 1 galaxies directly for the first time with spectroscopy. ROLES is a K-selected (22.5 < KAB < 24.0) survey for dwarf galaxies [8.5 <~ log(M*/Msolar) <~ 9.5] at 0.89 < z < 1.15 drawn from two extremely deep fields [Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-S (GOODS-S) and MS1054-Faint Infra-Red Extragalactic Survey]. Using the [OII]λ3727 emission line, we obtain redshifts and star formation rates (SFRs) for star-forming galaxies down to a limit of ~0.3Msolaryr-1. We present the [OII] luminosity function measured in ROLES and find a faint-end slope of αfaint ~ -1.5, similar to that measured at z ~ 0.1 in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. By combining ROLES with higher mass surveys (Gemini Deep Deep Survey and European Southern Observatory GOOD-S public spectroscopy) we measure the SFRD as a function of stellar mass using [OII] (with and without various empirical corrections) and using spectral energy distribution fitting to obtain the SFR from the rest-frame UV luminosity for galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts. Our best estimate of the corrected [OII] SFRD and UV SFRD both independently show that the SFRD evolves equally for galaxies of all masses between z ~ 1 and z ~ 0.1. The exact evolution in normalization depends on the indicator used, with the [OII]-based estimate showing a change of a factor of ~2.6 and the UV-based estimate a factor of ~6. We discuss possible reasons for the discrepancy in normalization between the indicators, but note that the magnitude of this uncertainty is comparable to the discrepancy between indicators seen in other z ~ 1 works. Our result that the shape of the SFRD as a function of stellar

  9. MEASURING THE ULTIMATE HALO MASS OF GALAXY CLUSTERS: REDSHIFTS AND MASS PROFILES FROM THE HECTOSPEC CLUSTER SURVEY (HeCS)

    SciTech Connect

    Rines, Kenneth; Geller, Margaret J.; Kurtz, Michael J.; Diaferio, Antonaldo E-mail: diaferio@ph.unito.it

    2013-04-10

    The infall regions of galaxy clusters represent the largest gravitationally bound structures in a {Lambda}CDM universe. Measuring cluster mass profiles into the infall regions provides an estimate of the ultimate mass of these halos. We use the caustic technique to measure cluster mass profiles from galaxy redshifts obtained with the Hectospec Cluster Survey (HeCS), an extensive spectroscopic survey of galaxy clusters with MMT/Hectospec. We survey 58 clusters selected by X-ray flux at 0.1 < z < 0.3. The survey includes 22,680 unique MMT/Hectospec redshifts for individual galaxies; 10,145 of these galaxies are cluster members. For each cluster, we acquired high signal-to-noise spectra for {approx}200 cluster members and a comparable number of foreground/background galaxies. The cluster members trace out infall patterns around the clusters. The members define a very narrow red sequence. We demonstrate that the determination of velocity dispersion is insensitive to the inclusion of bluer members (a small fraction of the cluster population). We apply the caustic technique to define membership and estimate the mass profiles to large radii. The ultimate halo mass of clusters (the mass that remains bound in the far future of a {Lambda}CDM universe) is on average (1.99 {+-} 0.11)M{sub 200}, a new observational cosmological test in essential agreement with simulations. Summed profiles binned in M{sub 200} and in L{sub X} demonstrate that the predicted Navarro-Frenk-White form of the density profile is a remarkably good representation of the data in agreement with weak lensing results extending to large radius. The concentration of these summed profiles is also consistent with theoretical predictions.

  10. THE CANADA-FRANCE HIGH-z QUASAR SURVEY: NINE NEW QUASARS AND THE LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AT REDSHIFT 6

    SciTech Connect

    Willott, Chris J.; Crampton, David; Hutchings, John B.; Schade, David; Delorme, Philippe; Reyle, Celine; Albert, Loic; Bergeron, Jacqueline; Omont, Alain; Delfosse, Xavier; Forveille, Thierry; McLure, Ross J.

    2010-03-15

    We present discovery imaging and spectroscopy for nine new z {approx} 6 quasars found in the Canada-France High-z Quasar Survey (CFHQS) bringing the total number of CFHQS quasars to 19. By combining the CFHQS with the more luminous Sloan Digital Sky Survey sample, we are able to derive the quasar luminosity function from a sample of 40 quasars at redshifts 5.74 < z < 6.42. Our binned luminosity function shows a slightly lower normalization and flatter slope than found in previous work. The binned data also suggest a break in the luminosity function at M {sub 1450} {approx} -25. A double power-law maximum likelihood fit to the data is consistent with the binned results. The luminosity function is strongly constrained (1{sigma} uncertainty <0.1 dex) over the range -27.5 < M {sub 1450} < -24.7. The best-fit parameters are {phi}(M*{sub 1450}) = 1.14 x 10{sup -8} Mpc{sup -3} mag{sup -1}, break magnitude M*{sub 1450} = -25.13, and bright end slope {beta} = -2.81. However, the covariance between {beta} and M*{sub 1450} prevents strong constraints being placed on either parameter. For a break magnitude in the range -26 < M*{sub 1450} < -24, we find -3.8 < {beta} < -2.3 at 95% confidence. We calculate the z = 6 quasar intergalactic ionizing flux and show it is between 20 and 100 times lower than that necessary for reionization. Finally, we use the luminosity function to predict how many higher redshift quasars may be discovered in future near-IR imaging surveys.

  11. Type-Ia Supernova Rates to Redshift 2.4 from Clash: The Cluster Lensing and Supernova Survey with Hubble

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graur, O.; Rodney, S. A.; Maoz, D.; Riess, A. G.; Jha, S. W.; Postman, M.; Dahlen, T.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; McCully, C.; Patel, B.; Strolger, L.-G.; Benitez, N.; Coe, D.; Jouvel, S.; Medezinski, E.; Molino, A.; Nonino, M.; Bradley, L.; Koehemoer, A.; Balestra, I.; Cenko, S. B.; Clubb, K. I.; Dickinson, M. E.; Filippenko, A. V.; Frederiksen, T. F.; Garnavich, P.; Hjorth, J.; Jones, D. O.; Leibundgut, B.; Matheson, T.; Mobasher, B.; Rosati, P.; Silverman, J. M.; U., V.; Jedruszczuk, K.

    2014-01-01

    We present the supernova (SN) sample and Type-Ia SN (SN Ia) rates from the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH). Using the Advanced Camera for Surveys and the Wide Field Camera 3 on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), we have imaged 25 galaxy-cluster fields and parallel fields of non-cluster galaxies. We report a sample of 27 SNe discovered in the parallel fields. Of these SNe, approximately 13 are classified as SN Ia candidates, including four SN Ia candidates at redshifts z greater than 1.2.We measure volumetric SN Ia rates to redshift 1.8 and add the first upper limit on the SN Ia rate in the range z greater than 1.8 and less than 2.4. The results are consistent with the rates measured by the HST/ GOODS and Subaru Deep Field SN surveys.We model these results together with previous measurements at z less than 1 from the literature. The best-fitting SN Ia delay-time distribution (DTD; the distribution of times that elapse between a short burst of star formation and subsequent SN Ia explosions) is a power law with an index of 1.00 (+0.06(0.09))/(-0.06(0.10)) (statistical) (+0.12/-0.08) (systematic), where the statistical uncertainty is a result of the 68% and 95% (in parentheses) statistical uncertainties reported for the various SN Ia rates (from this work and from the literature), and the systematic uncertainty reflects the range of possible cosmic star-formation histories. We also test DTD models produced by an assortment of published binary population synthesis (BPS) simulations. The shapes of all BPS double-degenerate DTDs are consistent with the volumetric SN Ia measurements, when the DTD models are scaled up by factors of 3-9. In contrast, all BPS single-degenerate DTDs are ruled out by the measurements at greater than 99% significance level.

  12. The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey: power-spectrum analysis of the final data set and cosmological implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Shaun; Percival, Will J.; Peacock, John A.; Norberg, Peder; Baugh, Carlton M.; Frenk, Carlos S.; Baldry, Ivan; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Bridges, Terry; Cannon, Russell; Colless, Matthew; Collins, Chris; Couch, Warrick; Cross, Nicholas J. G.; Dalton, Gavin; Eke, Vincent R.; De Propris, Roberto; Driver, Simon P.; Efstathiou, George; Ellis, Richard S.; Glazebrook, Karl; Jackson, Carole; Jenkins, Adrian; Lahav, Ofer; Lewis, Ian; Lumsden, Stuart; Maddox, Steve; Madgwick, Darren; Peterson, Bruce A.; Sutherland, Will; Taylor, Keith

    2005-09-01

    We present a power-spectrum analysis of the final 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS), employing a direct Fourier method. The sample used comprises 221414 galaxies with measured redshifts. We investigate in detail the modelling of the sample selection, improving on previous treatments in a number of respects. A new angular mask is derived, based on revisions to the photometric calibration. The redshift selection function is determined by dividing the survey according to rest-frame colour, and deducing a self-consistent treatment of k-corrections and evolution for each population. The covariance matrix for the power-spectrum estimates is determined using two different approaches to the construction of mock surveys, which are used to demonstrate that the input cosmological model can be correctly recovered. We discuss in detail the possible differences between the galaxy and mass power spectra, and treat these using simulations, analytic models and a hybrid empirical approach. Based on these investigations, we are confident that the 2dFGRS power spectrum can be used to infer the matter content of the universe. On large scales, our estimated power spectrum shows evidence for the `baryon oscillations' that are predicted in cold dark matter (CDM) models. Fitting to a CDM model, assuming a primordial ns= 1 spectrum, h= 0.72 and negligible neutrino mass, the preferred parameters are Ωmh= 0.168 +/- 0.016 and a baryon fraction Ωb/Ωm= 0.185 +/- 0.046 (1σ errors). The value of Ωmh is 1σ lower than the 0.20 +/- 0.03 in our 2001 analysis of the partially complete 2dFGRS. This shift is largely due to the signal from the newly sampled regions of space, rather than the refinements in the treatment of observational selection. This analysis therefore implies a density significantly below the standard Ωm= 0.3: in combination with cosmic microwave background (CMB) data from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP), we infer Ωm= 0.231 +/- 0.021.

  13. Constraint on the cosmological f(R) model from the multipole power spectrum of the SDSS luminous red galaxy sample and prospects for a future redshift survey

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Nakamura, Gen; Narikawa, Tatsuya; Sato, Takahiro; Huetsi, Gert

    2010-05-15

    A constraint on the viable f(R) model is investigated by confronting theoretical predictions with the multipole power spectrum of the luminous red galaxy sample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, data release 7. We obtain a constraint on the Compton wavelength parameter of the f(R) model on the scales of cosmological large-scale structure. A prospect of constraining the Compton wavelength parameter with a future redshift survey is also investigated. The usefulness of the redshift-space distortion for testing the gravity theory on cosmological scales is demonstrated.

  14. The Discovery of a High-Redshift Quasar without Emission Lines from Sloan Digital Sky Survey Commissioning Data.

    PubMed

    Fan; Strauss; Gunn; Lupton; Carilli; Rupen; Schmidt; Moustakas; Davis; Annis; Bahcall; Brinkmann; Brunner; Csabai; Doi; Fukugita; Heckman; Hennessy; Hindsley; Ivezic; Knapp; Lamb; Munn; Pauls; Pier; Rockosi; Schneider; Szalay; Tucker; York

    1999-12-01

    We report observations of a luminous unresolved object at redshift z=4.62, with a featureless optical spectrum redward of the Lyalpha forest region, discovered from Sloan Digital Sky Survey commissioning data. The redshift is determined by the onset of the Lyalpha forest at lambda approximately 6800 Å and a Lyman limit system at lambda=5120 Å. A strong Lyalpha absorption system with weak metal absorption lines at z=4.58 is also identified in the spectrum. The object has a continuum absolute magnitude of -26.6 at 1450 Å in the rest frame (h0=0.5, q0=0.5) and therefore cannot be an ordinary galaxy. It shows no radio emission (the 3 sigma upper limit of its flux at 6 cm is 60 µJy), indicating a radio-to-optical flux ratio at least as small as that of the radio-weakest BL Lacertae objects known. It is also not linearly polarized to a 3 sigma upper limit of 4% in the observed I band. Therefore, it is either the most distant BL Lac object known to date, with very weak radio emission, or a new type of unbeamed quasar, whose broad emission line region is very weak or absent.

  15. THE OPTICALLY UNBIASED GRB HOST (TOUGH) SURVEY. V. VLT/X-SHOOTER EMISSION-LINE REDSHIFTS FOR SWIFT GRBs AT z {approx} 2

    SciTech Connect

    Kruehler, Thomas; Malesani, Daniele; Milvang-Jensen, Bo; Fynbo, Johan P. U.; Hjorth, Jens; Sparre, Martin; Watson, Darach J.; Jakobsson, Pall; Levan, Andrew J.; Tanvir, Nial R.

    2012-10-10

    We present simultaneous optical and near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy of 19 Swift {gamma}-ray burst (GRB) host galaxies observed with the VLT/X-shooter with the aim of measuring their redshifts. Galaxies were selected from The Optically Unbiased GRB Host (TOUGH) survey (15 of the 19 galaxies) or because they hosted GRBs without a bright optical afterglow. Here we provide emission-line redshifts for 13 of the observed galaxies with brightnesses between F606W > 27 mag and R = 22.9 mag (median R-tilde =24.6 mag). The median redshift is z-tilde =2.1 for all hosts and z-tilde =2.3 for the TOUGH hosts. Our new data significantly improve the redshift completeness of the TOUGH survey, which now stands at 77% (53 out of 69 GRBs). They furthermore provide accurate redshifts for nine prototype dark GRBs (e.g., GRB 071021 at z = 2.452 and GRB 080207 at z = 2.086), which are exemplary of GRBs where redshifts are challenging to obtain via afterglow spectroscopy. This establishes X-shooter spectroscopy as an efficient tool for redshift determination of faint, star-forming, high-redshift galaxies such as GRB hosts. It is hence a further step toward removing the bias in GRB samples that is caused by optically dark events, and provides the basis for a better understanding of the conditions in which GRBs form. The distribution of column densities as measured from X-ray data (N{sub H,X}), for example, is closely related to the darkness of the afterglow and skewed toward low N{sub H,X} values in samples that are dominated by bursts with bright optical afterglows.

  16. A multi-wavelength study of the IRAS Deep Survey galaxy sample. I. Optical observations. The redshift distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Della Valle, A.; Mazzei, P.; Bettoni, D.; Aussel, H.; de Zotti, G.

    2006-08-01

    Context: The IRAS Deep Survey (IDS) of the North Ecliptic Pole region remains one of the deepest complete far-infrared-selected galaxy samples available. ISOCAM observations in the LW3 filter (12-18 μm) of 3.2 arcmin × 3.2 arcmin fields centered on the nominal positions of 94 out of the 98 IDS sources yielding 116 ISOCAM detections. The resulting sample has allowed us to assess the source reliability, identify confusion effects, and pinpoint optical counterparts. Aims: To fully exploit the potential of this sample for investigating galaxy evolution, we carried out optical observations of candidate identifications to 100 out of the 116 ISOCAM sources. Methods: Optical imaging was acquired for 88 galaxies in 54 IDS fields: 44 galaxies were imaged in both the B- and the R-band, 33 only in the R-band, and 11 only in the B-band. These observations aimed at extending the MIR/FIR spectral energy distribution to the optical region and achieving morphological information. In addition, spectra were obtained for 65 IDS fields, 20 of which had not been observed before. Redshifts were measured for the 85 galaxies found within the positional error circles of 77 ISOCAM sources detected in those IDS fields. Results: These observations allowed us to acquire spectroscopic redshifts of all counterparts that until now lacked them, so that, in combination with the results by Ashby et al. (1996), we now have redshifts for all IDS/ISOCAM galaxies in the field and, in particular, for the complete sub-sample of IDS galaxies defined by Mazzei et al. (2001). Conclusions: In several cases we find evidence of multiple galaxies with very close redshifts within the error circles around ISOCAM positions, hinting at an important role for interactions in triggering the star formation activity. Although the z distribution of the complete sub-sample has a tail extending up to z≃ 0.37, our results are inconsistent with the extreme cosmological evolution advocated by some models.

  17. The DEEP2 galaxy redshift survey: the evolution of the blue fraction in groups and the field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerke, Brian F.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Faber, S. M.; Cooper, Michael C.; Croton, Darren J.; Davis, Marc; Willmer, Christopher N. A.; Yan, Renbin; Coil, Alison L.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Koo, David C.; Weiner, Benjamin J.

    2007-04-01

    We explore the behaviour of the blue galaxy fraction over the redshift range 0.75 <= z <= 1.3 in the DEEP2 Survey, both for field galaxies and for galaxies in groups. The primary aim is to determine the role that groups play in driving the evolution of galaxy colour at high z. In pursuing this aim, it is essential to define a galaxy sample that does not suffer from redshift-dependent selection effects in colour-magnitude space. We develop four such samples for this study: at all redshifts considered, each one is complete in colour-magnitude space, and the selection also accounts for evolution in the galaxy luminosity function. These samples will also be useful for future evolutionary studies in DEEP2. The colour segregation observed between local group and field samples is already in place at z ~ 1: DEEP2 groups have a significantly lower blue fraction than the field. At fixed z, there is also a correlation between blue fraction and galaxy magnitude, such that brighter galaxies are more likely to be red, both in groups and in the field. In addition, there is a negative correlation between blue fraction and group richness. In terms of evolution, the blue fraction in groups and the field remains roughly constant from z = 0.75 to 1, but beyond this redshift the blue fraction in groups rises rapidly with z, and the group and field blue fractions become indistinguishable at z ~ 1.3. Careful tests indicate that this effect does not arise from known systematic or selection effects. To further ensure the robustness of this result, we build on previous mock DEEP2 catalogues to develop mock catalogues that reproduce the colour-overdensity relation observed in DEEP2 and use these to test our methods. The convergence between the group and field blue fractions at z ~ 1.3 implies that DEEP2 galaxy groups only became efficient at quenching star formation at z ~ 2; this result is broadly consistent with other recent observations and with current models of galaxy evolution and

  18. Microwave spectra of O2-HF and O2-DF: Hyperfine interactions and global fitting with infrared data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shenghai; Sedo, Galen; Grumstrup, Erik M.; Leopold, Kenneth R.

    2007-11-01

    Spectra of the open shell complexes O2-HF and O2-DF were recorded using Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. A complete analysis of the hyperfine structure and a global fit including microwave and infrared frequencies [W. M. Fawzy, C. M. Lovejoy, D. J. Nesbitt, and J. T. Hougen, J. Chem. Phys. 117, 693 (2002)] are reported. The Fermi contact interaction between the electron and nuclear spins, the electron spin-nuclear spin dipolar interaction, the nuclear spin-nuclear spin dipolar interaction, and the nuclear electric quadrupole interaction (for O2-DF) were considered in the analysis. The correspondence between the magnetic hyperfine constants and the two nuclei of the H(D)F is unambiguously established. In both O2-HF and O2-DF, the Fermi contact parameter is larger for the fluorine than for the hydrogen, while for the nuclear spin-electron spin dipolar hyperfine constants, the reverse is true. The effective angle between the HF bond and the a axis of the complex, determined from the nuclear spin-nuclear spin interaction constant, is 38(4)°. The same angle for the DF complex, derived from the deuterium nuclear quadrupole coupling constant, is 31(4)°.

  19. Star formation trends in high-redshift galaxy surveys: the elephant or the tail?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stringer, Martin; Cole, Shaun; Frenk, Carlos S.; Stark, Daniel P.

    2011-07-01

    Star formation rate and accumulated stellar mass are two fundamental physical quantities that describe the evolutionary state of a forming galaxy. Two recent attempts to determine the relationship between these quantities, by interpreting a sample of star-forming galaxies at redshift of z˜ 4, have led to opposite conclusions. Using a model galaxy population, we investigate possible causes for this discrepancy and conclude that minor errors in the conversion from observables to physical quantities can lead to a major misrepresentation when applied without awareness of sample selection. We also investigate, in a general way, the physical origin of the correlation between star formation rate and stellar mass within the hierarchical galaxy formation theory.

  20. THE NEWFIRM MEDIUM-BAND SURVEY: PHOTOMETRIC CATALOGS, REDSHIFTS, AND THE BIMODAL COLOR DISTRIBUTION OF GALAXIES OUT TO z {approx} 3

    SciTech Connect

    Whitaker, Katherine E.; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Brammer, Gabriel; Muzzin, Adam; Bezanson, Rachel; Lee, Kyoung-Soo; Lundgren, Britt; Nelson, Erica J.; Tal, Tomer; Wake, David A.; Labbe, Ivo; Williams, Rik J.; Kriek, Mariska; Marchesini, Danilo; Quadri, Ryan F.; Franx, Marijn; Illingworth, Garth D.

    2011-07-10

    We present deep near-IR (NIR) medium-bandwidth photometry over the wavelength range 1-1.8 {mu}m in the All-wavelength Extended Groth strip International Survey (AEGIS) and Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) fields. The observations were carried out using the NOAO Extremely Wide-Field Infrared Imager (NEWFIRM) on the Mayall 4 m Telescope on Kitt Peak as part of the NEWFIRM Medium-Band Survey (NMBS), an NOAO survey program. In this paper, we describe the full details of the observations, data reduction, and photometry for the survey. We also present a public K-selected photometric catalog, along with accurate photometric redshifts. The redshifts are computed with 37 (20) filters in the COSMOS (AEGIS) fields, combining the NIR medium-bandwidth data with existing UV (Galaxy Evolution Explorer), visible and NIR (Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope and Subaru Telescope), and mid-IR (Spitzer/IRAC) imaging. We find excellent agreement with publicly available spectroscopic redshifts, with {sigma}{sub z}/(1 + z) {approx} 1%-2% for {approx}4000 galaxies at z = 0-3. The NMBS catalogs contain {approx}13,000 galaxies at z > 1.5 with accurate photometric redshifts and rest-frame colors. Due to the increased spectral resolution obtained with the five NIR medium-band filters, the median 68% confidence intervals of the photometric redshifts of both quiescent and star-forming galaxies are a factor of about two times smaller when comparing catalogs with medium-band NIR photometry to NIR broadband photometry. We show evidence for a clear bimodal color distribution between quiescent and star-forming galaxies that persists to z {approx} 3, a higher redshift than has been probed so far.

  1. The Role of Groups in the Evolution of Galaxies at Intermediate Redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulchaey, John

    2003-07-01

    Groups are the most common environment experienced by galaxies, yet they remain the least studied. The tidal fields and dynamical friction encountered by galaxies in groups probably holds the key to understanding the role of environment in driving the evolution of galaxies since z ~ 1. To study the evolution of galaxies in the group environment, we propose the first unbiased HST study of groups at moderate redshifts. Unlike previous HST group samples, that relied on radio or X-ray properties, our kinematically selected sample is drawn from a large redshift survey and is not biased towards unusually dense groups. HST imaging is essential to determine the morphology of galaxies in these systems and contrast this with the properties of galaxies in denser and more evolved groups and rich clusters at these epochs. HST data are also required to adequately compare the properties of groups at intermediate redshifts with local group samples derived from the 2df and Sloan surveys. We will combine the HST images with deep ground-based observations to study how morphologies and stellar populations of galaxies in groups have evolved in time. These observations are key to understanding the decline in the volume averaged star formation rate in the universe.

  2. MAPPING THE GALACTIC HALO WITH BLUE HORIZONTAL BRANCH STARS FROM THE TWO-DEGREE FIELD QUASAR REDSHIFT SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    De Propris, Roberto; Harrison, Craig D.; Mares, Peter J.

    2010-08-20

    We use 666 blue horizontal branch stars from the 2Qz Redshift Survey to map the Galactic halo in four dimensions (position, distance, and velocity). We find that the halo extends to at least 100 kpc in Galactocentric distance, and obeys a single power-law density profile of index {approx}-2.5 in two different directions separated by about 150{sup 0} on the sky. This suggests that the halo is spherical. Our map shows no large kinematically coherent structures (streams, clouds, or plumes) and appears homogeneous. However, we find that at least 20% of the stars in the halo reside in substructures and that these substructures are dynamically young. The velocity dispersion profile of the halo appears to increase toward large radii while the stellar velocity distribution is non-Gaussian beyond 60 kpc. We argue that the outer halo consists of a multitude of low luminosity overlapping tidal streams from recently accreted objects.

  3. Errata: A Wide-Field Multicolor Survey for High-Redshift Quasars, Z >= 2.2. III. The Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Stephen J.; Hewett, Paul C.; Osmer, Patrick S.

    1995-01-01

    In the paper "A Wide-Field Multicolor Survey for High-Redshift Quasars, z >= 2.2. III. The Luminosity Function" by Stephen. Warren, Paul C. Hewett and Patrick S. Osmer (ApJ, 421,412 [1994]), two equations should be corrected: On page 419, column one, line 11, the expression following the words "the error,, should have an opening parenthesis just before the integral sign, to read: [{SIGMA} 1/({integral} ρ(z)dV_a_)^2^]^1/2^. On page 421, equation (15) is missing the asterisk (*) in the M_c_^*^ term just prior to (β + 1); that is, the exponent in the second term the denominator should read: 0.4(M_c_ - M_c_^*^)(β + 1). The authors wish to draw these errors to the attention of any readers who will be using the expression and equation.

  4. The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS). Ωm0 from the galaxy clustering ratio measured at z ~ 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bel, J.; Marinoni, C.; Granett, B. R.; Guzzo, L.; Peacock, J. A.; Branchini, E.; Cucciati, O.; de la Torre, S.; Iovino, A.; Percival, W. J.; Steigerwald, H.; Abbas, U.; Adami, C.; Arnouts, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Bottini, D.; Cappi, A.; Coupon, J.; Davidzon, I.; De Lucia, G.; Fritz, A.; Franzetti, P.; Fumana, M.; Garilli, B.; Ilbert, O.; Krywult, J.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Małek, K.; Marulli, F.; McCracken, H. J.; Paioro, L.; Polletta, M.; Pollo, A.; Schlagenhaufer, H.; Scodeggio, M.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Tojeiro, R.; Vergani, D.; Zanichelli, A.; Burden, A.; Di Porto, C.; Marchetti, A.; Mellier, Y.; Moscardini, L.; Nichol, R. C.; Phleps, S.; Wolk, M.; Zamorani, G.

    2014-03-01

    We use a sample of about 22 000 galaxies at 0.65 < z < 1.2 from the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS) Public Data Release 1 (PDR-1) catalogue, to constrain the cosmological model through a measurement of the galaxy clustering ratio ηg,R. This statistic has favourable properties, which is defined as the ratio of two quantities characterizing the smoothed density field in spheres of a given radius R: the value of its correlation function on a multiple of this scale, ξ(nR), and its variance σ2(R). For sufficiently large values of R, this is a universal number, which captures 2-point clustering information independently of the linear bias and linear redshift-space distortions of the specific galaxy tracers. In this paper, we discuss how to extend the application of ηg,R to quasi-linear scales and how to control and remove observational selection effects, which are typical of redshift surveys as VIPERS, in detail. We verify the accuracy and efficiency of these procedures using mock catalogues that match the survey selection process. These results show the robustness of ηg,R to non-linearities and observational effects, which is related to its very definition as a ratio of quantities that are similarly affected. At an effective redshift z = 0.93, we measured the value ηg,R(15) = 0.141 ± 0.013 at R = 5h-1 Mpc. Within a flat ΛCDM cosmology and by including the best available priors on H0, ns and baryon density, we obtain a matter density parameter at the current epoch Ωm,0 = 0.270-0.025+0.029. In addition to the great precision achieved on our estimation of Ωm using VIPERS PDR-1, this result is remarkable because it appears to be in good agreement with a recent estimate at z ≃ 0.3, which was obtained by applying the same technique to the SDSS-LRG catalogue. It, therefore, supports the robustness of the present analysis. Moreover, the combination of these two measurements at z ~ 0.3 and z ~ 0.9 provides us with a very precise estimate of Ωm,0

  5. The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS). A support vector machine classification of galaxies, stars, and AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Małek, K.; Solarz, A.; Pollo, A.; Fritz, A.; Garilli, B.; Scodeggio, M.; Iovino, A.; Granett, B. R.; Abbas, U.; Adami, C.; Arnouts, S.; Bel, J.; Bolzonella, M.; Bottini, D.; Branchini, E.; Cappi, A.; Coupon, J.; Cucciati, O.; Davidzon, I.; De Lucia, G.; de la Torre, S.; Franzetti, P.; Fumana, M.; Guzzo, L.; Ilbert, O.; Krywult, J.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fevre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Marulli, F.; McCracken, H. J.; Paioro, L.; Polletta, M.; Schlagenhaufer, H.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Tojeiro, R.; Vergani, D.; Zanichelli, A.; Burden, A.; Di Porto, C.; Marchetti, A.; Marinoni, C.; Mellier, Y.; Moscardini, L.; Nichol, R. C.; Peacock, J. A.; Percival, W. J.; Phleps, S.; Wolk, M.; Zamorani, G.

    2013-09-01

    Aims: The aim of this work is to develop a comprehensive method for classifying sources in large sky surveys and to apply the techniques to the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS). Using the optical (u∗,g',r',i') and near-infrared (NIR) data (z', Ks), we develop a classifier, based on broad-band photometry, for identifying stars, active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and galaxies, thereby improving the purity of the VIPERS sample. Methods: Support vector machine (SVM) supervised learning algorithms allow the automatic classification of objects into two or more classes based on a multidimensional parameter space. In this work, we tailored the SVM to classifying stars, AGNs, and galaxies and applied this classification to the VIPERS data. We trained the SVM using spectroscopically confirmed sources from the VIPERS and VVDS surveys. Results: We tested two SVM classifiers and concluded that including NIR data can significantly improve the efficiency of the classifier. The self-check of the best optical + NIR classifier has shown 97% accuracy in the classification of galaxies, 97% for stars, and 95% for AGNs in the 5-dimensional colour space. In the test of VIPERS sources with 99% redshift confidence, the classifier gives an accuracy equal to 94% for galaxies, 93% for stars, and 82% for AGNs. The method was applied to sources with low-quality spectra to verify their classification, hence increasing the security of measurements for almost 4900 objects. Conclusions: We conclude that the SVM algorithm trained on a carefully selected sample of galaxies, AGNs, and stars outperforms simple colour-colour selection methods and can be regarded as a very efficient classification method particularly suitable for modern large surveys. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Cerro Paranal, Chile, using the Very Large Telescope under programme 182.A-0886 and partly 070.A-9007. Also based on observations obtained with MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint

  6. The ALMA Redshift 4 Survey (AR4S). I. The massive end of the z = 4 main sequence of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, C.; Pannella, M.; Leiton, R.; Elbaz, D.; Wang, T.; Okumura, K.; Labbé, I.

    2017-03-01

    We introduce the ALMA Redshift 4 Survey (AR4S), a systematic ALMA survey of all the known galaxies with stellar mass (M∗) larger than 5 × 1010M⊙ at 3.5 redshifts, which is proof that the main sequence of star-forming galaxies was already in place at z = 4, at least among massive galaxies. These new constraints on the properties of the main sequence are in good agreement with the latest predictions from numerical simulations, and suggest that the bulk of star formation in galaxies is driven by the same mechanism from z = 4 to the present day, that is, over at least 90% of the cosmic history. We also discuss the consequences of our results on the population of early quiescent galaxies. This paper is part of a series that will employ these new ALMA observations to explore the star formation and dust properties of the massive end of the z = 4 galaxy population.

  7. The Rate of Core Collapse Supernovae to Redshift 2.5 from the CANDELS and CLASH Supernova Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strolger, Louis-Gregory; Dahlen, Tomas; Rodney, Steven A.; Graur, Or; Riess, Adam G.; McCully, Curtis; Ravindranath, Swara; Mobasher, Bahram; Shahady, A. Kristin

    2015-11-01

    The Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey and Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble multi-cycle treasury programs with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) have provided new opportunities to probe the rate of core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) at high redshift, now extending to z≈ 2.5. Here we use a sample of approximately 44 CCSNe to determine volumetric rates, RCC, in six redshift bins in the range 0.1\\lt z\\lt 2.5. Together with rates from our previous HST program, and rates from the literature, we trace a more complete history of {R}{CC}(z), with {R}{CC}=0.72+/- 0.06 yr-1 Mpc-3 10-4{h}703 at z\\lt 0.08, and increasing to {3.7}-1.6+3.1 yr-1 Mpc-3 10-4{h}703 to z≈ 2.0. The statistical precision in each bin is several factors better than than the systematic error, with significant contributions from host extinction, and average peak absolute magnitudes of the assumed luminosity functions for CCSN types. Assuming negligible time delays from stellar formation to explosion, we find these composite CCSN rates to be in excellent agreement with cosmic star formation rate density (SFRs) derived largely from dust-corrected rest-frame UV emission, with a scaling factor of k=0.0091+/- 0.0017 {M}⊙ -1, and inconsistent (to \\gt 95% confidence) with SFRs from IR luminous galaxies, or with SFR models that include simple evolution in the initial mass function over time. This scaling factor is expected if the fraction of the IMF contributing to CCSN progenitors is in the 8-50 M⊙ range. It is not supportive, however, of an upper mass limit for progenitors at \\lt 20 {M}⊙ .

  8. REDSHIFTS, SAMPLE PURITY, AND BCG POSITIONS FOR THE GALAXY CLUSTER CATALOG FROM THE FIRST 720 SQUARE DEGREES OF THE SOUTH POLE TELESCOPE SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Song, J.; Zenteno, A.; Desai, S.; Bazin, G.; Stalder, B.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bayliss, M.; Bleem, L. E.; Benson, B. A.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; Aird, K. A.; Armstrong, R.; Bertin, E.; Brodwin, M.; Cho, H. M.; Clocchiatti, A.; De Haan, T.; and others

    2012-12-10

    We present the results of the ground- and space-based optical and near-infrared (NIR) follow-up of 224 galaxy cluster candidates detected with the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect in the 720 deg{sup 2} of the South Pole Telescope (SPT) survey completed in the 2008 and 2009 observing seasons. We use the optical/NIR data to establish whether each candidate is associated with an overdensity of galaxies and to estimate the cluster redshift. Most photometric redshifts are derived through a combination of three different cluster redshift estimators using red-sequence galaxies, resulting in an accuracy of {Delta}z/(1 + z) = 0.017, determined through comparison with a subsample of 57 clusters for which we have spectroscopic redshifts. We successfully measure redshifts for 158 systems and present redshift lower limits for the remaining candidates. The redshift distribution of the confirmed clusters extends to z = 1.35 with a median of z{sub med} = 0.57. Approximately 18% of the sample with measured redshifts lies at z > 0.8. We estimate a lower limit to the purity of this SPT SZ-selected sample by assuming that all unconfirmed clusters are noise fluctuations in the SPT data. We show that the cumulative purity at detection significance {xi} > 5({xi} > 4.5) is {>=}95% ({>=}70%). We present the red brightest cluster galaxy (rBCG) positions for the sample and examine the offsets between the SPT candidate position and the rBCG. The radial distribution of offsets is similar to that seen in X-ray-selected cluster samples, providing no evidence that SZ-selected cluster samples include a different fraction of recent mergers from X-ray-selected cluster samples.

  9. The VIMOS VLT deep survey. First epoch VVDS-deep survey: 11 564 spectra with 17.5 ≤ IAB ≤ 24, and the redshift distribution over 0 ≤ z ≤ 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Fèvre, O.; Vettolani, G.; Garilli, B.; Tresse, L.; Bottini, D.; Le Brun, V.; Maccagni, D.; Picat, J. P.; Scaramella, R.; Scodeggio, M.; Zanichelli, A.; Adami, C.; Arnaboldi, M.; Arnouts, S.; Bardelli, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Cappi, A.; Charlot, S.; Ciliegi, P.; Contini, T.; Foucaud, S.; Franzetti, P.; Gavignaud, I.; Guzzo, L.; Ilbert, O.; Iovino, A.; McCracken, H. J.; Marano, B.; Marinoni, C.; Mathez, G.; Mazure, A.; Meneux, B.; Merighi, R.; Paltani, S.; Pellò, R.; Pollo, A.; Pozzetti, L.; Radovich, M.; Zamorani, G.; Zucca, E.; Bondi, M.; Bongiorno, A.; Busarello, G.; Lamareille, F.; Mellier, Y.; Merluzzi, P.; Ripepi, V.; Rizzo, D.

    2005-09-01

    This paper presents the “First Epoch” sample from the VIMOS VLT Deep Survey (VVDS). The VVDS goals, observations, data reduction with the VIPGI pipeline and redshift measurement scheme with KBRED are discussed. Data have been obtained with the VIsible Multi Object Spectrograph (VIMOS) on the ESO-VLT UT3, allowing us to observe ≃600 slits simultaneously at a spectral resolution R≃230. A total of 11 564 objects have been observed in the VVDS-02h and VVDS-CDFS “Deep” fields over a total area of 0.61 deg^2, selected solely on the basis of apparent magnitude 17.5 ≤ IAB ≤ 24. The VVDS efficiently covers the redshift range 0 < z ≤ 5. It is successfully going through the “redshift desert” 1.5redshift measurement, 836 objects are stars, 90 objects are AGN, and a redshift could not be measured for 961 objects. There are 1065 galaxies with a measured redshift z≥1.4. When considering only the primary spectroscopic targets, the survey reaches a redshift measurement completeness of 78% overall (93% including less reliable flag 1 objects), with a spatial sampling of the population of galaxies of ~25% and ~30% in the VVDS-02h and VVDS-CDFS respectively. The redshift accuracy measured from repeated observations with VIMOS and comparison to other surveys is ~276 km s-1. From this sample we are able to present for the first time the redshift distribution of a magnitude-limited spectroscopic sample down to IAB=24. The redshift distribution N(z) has a median of z=0.62, z=0.65, z=0.70, and z=0.76, for magnitude-limited samples with IAB≤22.5, 23.0, 23.5 and 24.0 respectively. A high redshift tail above redshift 2 and up to redshift 5 becomes readily apparent for IAB>23.5, probing the bright star-forming population of galaxies. This sample provides an unprecedented dataset to study galaxy evolution over ~90% of the life of the

  10. A redshift survey of the strong-lensing cluster ABELL 383

    SciTech Connect

    Geller, Margaret J.; Hwang, Ho Seong; Kurtz, Michael J.; Diaferio, Antonaldo; Coe, Dan; Rines, Kenneth J. E-mail: hhwang@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: diaferio@ph.unito.it E-mail: kenneth.rines@wwu.edu

    2014-03-01

    Abell 383 is a famous rich cluster (z = 0.1887) imaged extensively as a basis for intensive strong- and weak-lensing studies. Nonetheless, there are few spectroscopic observations. We enable dynamical analyses by measuring 2360 new redshifts for galaxies with r {sub Petro} ≤ 20.5 and within 50' of the Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG; R.A.{sub 2000} = 42.°014125, decl.{sub 2000} = –03.°529228). We apply the caustic technique to identify 275 cluster members within 7 h {sup –1} Mpc of the hierarchical cluster center. The BCG lies within –11 ± 110 km s{sup –1} and 21 ± 56 h {sup –1} kpc of the hierarchical cluster center; the velocity dispersion profile of the BCG appears to be an extension of the velocity dispersion profile based on cluster members. The distribution of cluster members on the sky corresponds impressively with the weak-lensing contours of Okabe et al. especially when the impact of foreground and background structure is included. The values of R {sub 200} = 1.22 ± 0.01 h {sup –1} Mpc and M {sub 200} = (5.07 ± 0.09) × 10{sup 14} h {sup –1} M {sub ☉} obtained by application of the caustic technique agree well with recent completely independent lensing measures. The caustic estimate extends direct measurement of the cluster mass profile to a radius of ∼5 h {sup –1} Mpc.

  11. Weakening gravity on redshift-survey scales with kinetic matter mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Amico, Guido; Huang, Zhiqi; Mancarella, Michele; Vernizzi, Filippo

    2017-02-01

    We explore general scalar-tensor models in the presence of a kinetic mixing between matter and the scalar field, which we call Kinetic Matter Mixing. In the frame where gravity is de-mixed from the scalar this is due to disformal couplings of matter species to the gravitational sector, with disformal coefficients that depend on the gradient of the scalar field. In the frame where matter is minimally coupled, it originates from the so-called beyond Horndeski quadratic Lagrangian. We extend the Effective Theory of Interacting Dark Energy by allowing disformal coupling coefficients to depend on the gradient of the scalar field as well. In this very general approach, we derive the conditions to avoid ghost and gradient instabilities and we define Kinetic Matter Mixing independently of the frame metric used to described the action. We study its phenomenological consequences for a ΛCDM background evolution, first analytically on small scales. Then, we compute the matter power spectrum and the angular spectra of the CMB anisotropies and the CMB lensing potential, on all scales. We employ the public version of COOP, a numerical Einstein-Boltzmann solver that implements very general scalar-tensor modifications of gravity. Rather uniquely, Kinetic Matter Mixing weakens gravity on short scales, predicting a lower σ8 with respect to the ΛCDM case. We propose this as a possible solution to the tension between the CMB best-fit model and low-redshift observables.

  12. Cluster Mass Calibration at High Redshift: HST Weak Lensing Analysis of 13 Distant Galaxy Clusters from the South Pole Telescope Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Schrabback, T.; et al.

    2016-11-11

    We present an HST/ACS weak gravitational lensing analysis of 13 massive high-redshift (z_median=0.88) galaxy clusters discovered in the South Pole Telescope (SPT) Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Survey. This study is part of a larger campaign that aims to robustly calibrate mass-observable scaling relations over a wide range in redshift to enable improved cosmological constraints from the SPT cluster sample. We introduce new strategies to ensure that systematics in the lensing analysis do not degrade constraints on cluster scaling relations significantly. First, we efficiently remove cluster members from the source sample by selecting very blue galaxies in V-I colour. Our estimate of the source redshift distribution is based on CANDELS data, where we carefully mimic the source selection criteria of the cluster fields. We apply a statistical correction for systematic photometric redshift errors as derived from Hubble Ultra Deep Field data and verified through spatial cross-correlations. We account for the impact of lensing magnification on the source redshift distribution, finding that this is particularly relevant for shallower surveys. Finally, we account for biases in the mass modelling caused by miscentring and uncertainties in the mass-concentration relation using simulations. In combination with temperature estimates from Chandra we constrain the normalisation of the mass-temperature scaling relation ln(E(z) M_500c/10^14 M_sun)=A+1.5 ln(kT/7.2keV) to A=1.81^{+0.24}_{-0.14}(stat.) +/- 0.09(sys.), consistent with self-similar redshift evolution when compared to lower redshift samples. Additionally, the lensing data constrain the average concentration of the clusters to c_200c=5.6^{+3.7}_{-1.8}.

  13. Measurements of the Rate of Type Ia Supernovae at Redshift z < ~0.3 from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Dilday, Benjamin; Smith, Mathew; Bassett, Bruce; Becker, Andrew; Bender, Ralf; Castander, Francisco; Cinabro, David; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Frieman, Joshua A.; Galbany, Lluis; Garnavich, Peter M.; /Notre Dame U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Stockholm U.

    2010-01-01

    We present a measurement of the volumetric Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) rate based on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey. The adopted sample of supernovae (SNe) includes 516 SNe Ia at redshift z {approx}< 0.3, of which 270 (52%) are spectroscopically identified as SNe Ia. The remaining 246 SNe Ia were identified through their light curves; 113 of these objects have spectroscopic redshifts from spectra of their host galaxy, and 133 have photometric redshifts estimated from the SN light curves. Based on consideration of 87 spectroscopically confirmed non-Ia SNe discovered by the SDSS-II SN Survey, we estimate that 2.04{sub -0.95}{sup +1.61}% of the photometric SNe Ia may be misidentified. The sample of SNe Ia used in this measurement represents an order of magnitude increase in the statistics for SN Ia rate measurements in the redshift range covered by the SDSS-II Supernova Survey. If we assume a SN Ia rate that is constant at low redshift (z < 0.15), then the SN observations can be used to infer a value of the SN rate of r{sub V} = (2.69{sub -0.30-0.01}{sup +0.34+0.21}) x 10{sup -5} SNe yr{sup -1} Mpc{sup -3} (H{sub 0}/(70 km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1})){sup 3} at a mean redshift of {approx} 0.12, based on 79 SNe Ia of which 72 are spectroscopically confirmed. However, the large sample of SNe Ia included in this study allows us to place constraints on the redshift dependence of the SN Ia rate based on the SDSS-II Supernova Survey data alone. Fitting a power-law model of the SN rate evolution, r{sub V} (z) = A{sub p} x ((1+z)/(1+z{sub 0})){sup {nu}}, over the redshift range 0.0 < z < 0.3 with z{sub 0} = 0.21, results in A{sub p} = (3.43{sub -0.15}{sup +0.15}) x 10{sup -5} SNe yr{sup -1} Mpc{sup -3} (H{sub 0}/(70 km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1})){sup 3} and {nu} = 2.04{sub -0.89}{sup +0.90}.

  14. The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS). Measuring non-linear galaxy bias at z ~ 0.8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Porto, C.; Branchini, E.; Bel, J.; Marulli, F.; Bolzonella, M.; Cucciati, O.; de la Torre, S.; Granett, B. R.; Guzzo, L.; Marinoni, C.; Moscardini, L.; Abbas, U.; Adami, C.; Arnouts, S.; Bottini, D.; Cappi, A.; Coupon, J.; Davidzon, I.; De Lucia, G.; Fritz, A.; Franzetti, P.; Fumana, M.; Garilli, B.; Ilbert, O.; Iovino, A.; Krywult, J.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Małek, K.; McCracken, H. J.; Paioro, L.; Polletta, M.; Pollo, A.; Scodeggio, M.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Tojeiro, R.; Vergani, D.; Zanichelli, A.; Burden, A.; Marchetti, A.; Martizzi, D.; Mellier, Y.; Nichol, R. C.; Peacock, J. A.; Percival, W. J.; Viel, M.; Wolk, M.; Zamorani, G.

    2016-10-01

    Aims: We use the first release of the VImos Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey of galaxies (VIPERS) of ~50 000 objects to measure the biasing relation between galaxies and mass in the redshift range z = [ 0.5,1.1 ]. Methods: We estimate the 1-point distribution function [PDF] of VIPERS galaxies from counts in cells and, assuming a model for the mass PDF, we infer their mean bias relation. The reconstruction of the bias relation is performed through a novel method that accounts for Poisson noise, redshift distortions, inhomogeneous sky coverage. and other selection effects. With this procedure we constrain galaxy bias and its deviations from linearity down to scales as small as 4 h-1 Mpc and out to z = 1.1. Results: We detect small (up to 2%) but statistically significant (up to 3σ) deviations from linear bias. The mean biasing function is close to linear in regions above the mean density. The mean slope of the biasing relation is a proxy to the linear bias parameter. This slope increases with luminosity, which is in agreement with results of previous analyses. We detect a strong bias evolution only for z> 0.9, which is in agreement with some, but not all, previous studies. We also detect a significant increase of the bias with the scale, from 4 to 8 h-1 Mpc , now seen for the first time out to z = 1. The amplitude of non-linearity depends on redshift, luminosity, and scale, but no clear trend is detected. Owing to the large cosmic volume probed by VIPERS, we find that the mismatch between the previous estimates of bias at z ~ 1 from zCOSMOS and VVDS-Deep galaxy samples is fully accounted for by cosmic variance. Conclusions: The results of our work confirm the importance of going beyond the over-simplistic linear bias hypothesis showing that non-linearities can be accurately measured through the applications of the appropriate statistical tools to existing datasets like VIPERS. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile

  15. The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey: correlation with the ROSAT-ESO flux-limited X-ray galaxy cluster survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, Matt; Collins, Chris; De Propris, Roberto; Baldry, Ivan K.; Baugh, Carlton M.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Bridges, Terry; Cannon, Russell; Cole, Shaun; Colless, Matthew; Couch, Warrick J.; Dalton, Gavin B.; Driver, Simon P.; Efstathiou, George; Ellis, Richard S.; Frenk, Carlos S.; Glazebrook, Karl; Jackson, Carole A.; Lahav, Ofer; Lewis, Ian; Lumsden, Stuart; Maddox, Steve J.; Madgwick, Darren; Norberg, Peder; Peacock, John A.; Peterson, Bruce A.; Sutherland, Will; Taylor, Keith

    2005-10-01

    The ROSAT-European Southern Observatory (ESO) flux-limited X-ray (REFLEX) galaxy cluster survey and the Two-degree Field Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS), respectively, comprise the largest, homogeneous X-ray selected cluster catalogue and completed galaxy redshift survey. In this work, we combine these two outstanding data sets in order to study the effect of the large-scale cluster environment, as traced by X-ray luminosity, on the properties of the cluster member galaxies. We measure the LX-σr relation from the correlated data set and find it to be consistent with recent results found in the literature. Using a sample of 19 clusters with LX>= 0.36 × 1044 erg s-1 in the 0.1-2.4 keV band, and 49 clusters with lower X-ray luminosity, we find that the fraction of early spectral type (η<=-1.4), passively evolving galaxies is significantly higher in the high-LX sample within R200. We extend the investigation to include composite bJ cluster luminosity functions, and find that the characteristic magnitude of the Schechter-function fit to the early-type luminosity function is fainter for the high-LX sample compared to the low-LX sample (ΔM*= 0.58 +/- 0.14). This seems to be driven by a deficit of such galaxies with MbJ~-21. In contrast, we find no significant differences between the luminosity functions of star-forming, late-type galaxies. We believe these results are consistent with a scenario in which the high-LX clusters are more dynamically evolved systems than the low-LX clusters.

  16. The bispectrum of galaxies from high-redshift galaxy surveys: Primordial non-Gaussianity and non-linear galaxy bias

    SciTech Connect

    Sefusatti, Emiliano; Komatsu, Eiichiro; /Texas U., Astron. Dept.

    2007-05-01

    The greatest challenge in the interpretation of galaxy clustering data from any surveys is galaxy bias. Using a simple Fisher matrix analysis, we show that the bispectrum provides an excellent determination of linear and non-linear bias parameters of intermediate and high-z galaxies, when all measurable triangle configurations down to mildly non-linear scales, where perturbation theory is still valid, are included. The bispectrum is also a powerful probe of primordial non-Gaussianity. The planned galaxy surveys at z {approx}> 2 should yield constraints on non-Gaussian parameters, f{sub NL}{sup loc.} and f{sub NL}{sup eq.}, that are comparable to, or even better than, those from CMB experiments. We study how these constraints improve with volume, redshift range, as well as the number density of galaxies. Finally we show that a halo occupation distribution may be used to improve these constraints further by lifting degeneracies between gravity, bias, and primordial non-Gaussianity.

  17. IMPROVED MOCK GALAXY CATALOGS FOR THE DEEP2 GALAXY REDSHIFT SURVEY FROM SUBHALO ABUNDANCE AND ENVIRONMENT MATCHING

    SciTech Connect

    Gerke, Brian F.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Behroozi, Peter S.; Yan, Renbin; Coil, Alison L.

    2013-09-15

    We develop empirical methods for modeling the galaxy population and populating cosmological N-body simulations with mock galaxies according to the observed properties of galaxies in survey data. We use these techniques to produce a new set of mock catalogs for the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey based on the output of the high-resolution Bolshoi simulation, as well as two other simulations with different cosmological parameters, all of which we release for public use. The mock-catalog creation technique uses subhalo abundance matching to assign galaxy luminosities to simulated dark-matter halos. It then adds color information to the resulting mock galaxies in a manner that depends on the local galaxy density, in order to reproduce the measured color-environment relation in the data. In the course of constructing the catalogs, we test various models for including scatter in the relation between halo mass and galaxy luminosity, within the abundance-matching framework. We find that there is no constant-scatter model that can simultaneously reproduce both the luminosity function and the autocorrelation function of DEEP2. This result has implications for galaxy-formation theory, and it restricts the range of contexts in which the mock catalogs can be usefully applied. Nevertheless, careful comparisons show that our new mock catalogs accurately reproduce a wide range of the other properties of the DEEP2 catalog, suggesting that they can be used to gain a detailed understanding of various selection effects in DEEP2.

  18. HerMES: a search for high-redshift dusty galaxies in the HerMES Large Mode Survey - catalogue, number counts and early results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asboth, V.; Conley, A.; Sayers, J.; Béthermin, M.; Chapman, S. C.; Clements, D. L.; Cooray, A.; Dannerbauer, H.; Farrah, D.; Glenn, J.; Golwala, S. R.; Halpern, M.; Ibar, E.; Ivison, R. J.; Maloney, P. R.; Marques-Chaves, R.; Martinez-Navajas, P. I.; Oliver, S. J.; Pérez-Fournon, I.; Riechers, D. A.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Scott, Douglas; Siegel, S. R.; Vieira, J. D.; Viero, M.; Wang, L.; Wardlow, J.; Wheeler, J.

    2016-10-01

    Selecting sources with rising flux densities towards longer wavelengths from Herschel/Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) maps is an efficient way to produce a catalogue rich in high-redshift (z > 4) dusty star-forming galaxies. The effectiveness of this approach has already been confirmed by spectroscopic follow-up observations, but the previously available catalogues made this way are limited by small survey areas. Here we apply a map-based search method to 274 deg2 of the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES) Large Mode Survey and create a catalogue of 477 objects with SPIRE flux densities S500 > S350 > S250 and a 5σ cut-off S500 > 52 mJy. From this catalogue we determine that the total number of these `red' sources is at least an order of magnitude higher than predicted by galaxy evolution models. These results are in agreement with previous findings in smaller HerMES fields; however, due to our significantly larger sample size we are also able to investigate the shape of the red source counts for the first time. We have obtained spectroscopic redshift measurements for two of our sources using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array. The redshifts z = 5.1 and 3.8 confirm that with our selection method we can indeed find high-redshift dusty star-forming galaxies.

  19. Mass calibration of galaxy clusters at redshift 0.1-1.0 using weak lensing in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe 82 co-add

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesner, Matthew P.; Lin, Huan; Soares-Santos, Marcelle

    2015-09-01

    We present galaxy cluster mass-richness relations found in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe 82 co-add using clusters found using a Voronoi tessellation cluster finder. These relations were found using stacked weak lensing shear observed in a large sample of galaxy clusters. These mass-richness relations are presented for four redshift bins, 0.1 < z ≤ 0.4, 0.4 < z ≤ 0.7, 0.7 < z ≤ 1.0 and 0.1 < z ≤ 1.0. We describe the sample of galaxy clusters and explain how these clusters were found using a Voronoi tessellation cluster finder. We fit a Navarro-Frenk-White profile to the stacked weak lensing shear signal in redshift and richness bins in order to measure virial mass (M200). We describe several effects that can bias weak lensing measurements, including photometric redshift bias, the effect of the central BCG, halo miscentering, photometric redshift uncertainty and foreground galaxy contamination. We present mass-richness relations using richness measure NVT with each of these effects considered separately as well as considered altogether. We also examine redshift evolution of the mass-richness relation. As a result, we present measurements of the mass coefficient (M200|20) and the power-law slope (α) for power-law fits to the mass and richness values in each of the redshift bins. We find values of the mass coefficient of 8.49 ± 0.526, 14.1 ± 1.78, 30.2 ± 8.74 and 9.23 ± 0.525 × 1013 h-1 M⊙ for each of the four redshift bins, respectively. We find values of the power-law slope of 0.905 ± 0.0585, 0.948 ± 0.100, 1.33 ± 0.260 and 0.883 ± 0.0500, respectively.

  20. The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS): galaxy segregation inside filaments at z ≃ 0.7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malavasi, N.; Arnouts, S.; Vibert, D.; de la Torre, S.; Moutard, T.; Pichon, C.; Davidzon, I.; Kraljic, K.; Bolzonella, M.; Guzzo, L.; Garilli, B.; Scodeggio, M.; Granett, B. R.; Abbas, U.; Adami, C.; Bottini, D.; Cappi, A.; Cucciati, O.; Franzetti, P.; Fritz, A.; Iovino, A.; Krywult, J.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Małek, K.; Marulli, F.; Polletta, M.; Pollo, A.; Tasca, L.; Tojeiro, R.; Vergani, D.; Zanichelli, A.; Bel, J.; Branchini, E.; Coupon, J.; De Lucia, G.; Dubois, Y.; Hawken, A.; Ilbert, O.; Laigle, C.; Moscardini, L.; Sousbie, T.; Treyer, M.; Zamorani, G.

    2017-03-01

    We present the first quantitative detection of large-scale filamentary structure at z ≃ 0.7 in the large cosmological volume probed by the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS). We use simulations to show the capability of VIPERS to recover robust topological features in the galaxy distribution, in particular the filamentary network. We then investigate how galaxies with different stellar masses and stellar activities are distributed around the filaments, and find a significant segregation, with the most massive or quiescent galaxies being closer to the filament axis than less massive or active galaxies. The signal persists even after downweighting the contribution of peak regions. Our results suggest that massive and quiescent galaxies assemble their stellar mass through successive mergers during their migration along filaments towards the nodes of the cosmic web. On the other hand, low-mass star-forming galaxies prefer the outer edge of filaments, a vorticity-rich region dominated by smooth accretion, as predicted by the recent spin alignment theory. This emphasizes the role of large-scale cosmic flows in shaping galaxy properties.

  1. Identifications of The Most Luminous, Highest-Redshift Objects Discovered by WISE (Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benford, Dominic; Stanford, Adam; Jarrett, Tom; Yan, Lin; Eisenhardt, Peter; Lonsdale, Carol; Wright, Ned; Tsai, Chao-Wei; Blain, Andrew; Cutri, Roc

    2010-08-01

    We request 4 nights to obtain KPNO/FLAMINGOS near-IR photometry and spectroscopy follow-up observations of a sample of extremely luminous, z > 1 galaxy candidates selected from WISE, a new NASA mission which is in the process of surveying the whole sky at 3.4,4.6,12 and 22 (micron) in 6 months (Jan-July 2010). The candidates are selected to have mid-IR colors indicating starburst-dominated spectra at redshifts of z=1.2 - 3, but are 100 times more luminous than local ULIRGs with L_FIR > 10^14 L_⊙, called extreme hyperluminous infrared galaxies (eHyLIRGs). In combination with the WISE mid-infrared photometry, the near-IR photometric and spectroscopic observations will allow us to distinguish high-z targets from local red populations, determine the luminosity, and further study the star formation activity from hydrogen recombination lines, extinction toward the star formation regions, and SED modeling on the stellar population of these galaxies.

  2. Bright Galaxies at Hubble's Detection Frontier: The redshift z~9-10 BoRG pure-parallel survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trenti, Michele

    2014-10-01

    Hubble/WFC3 observations transformed our view of early galaxy formation by building reliable samples of galaxies out to redshift z 8, 700 Myr after the Big Bang and hinting at a dramatic evolution in properties at yet earlier times. From z 8 to z 10 { 200Myr} the luminosity density seems to decrease by a factor ten, but bright galaxies may remain relatively common, based on the four z>9 objects detected so far with m_AB<27. To investigate this apparent conundrum, and study the formation of the most massive and luminous galaxies at 500 Myr without being affected by cosmic variance, we propose a random-pointing survey to detect 20+/-5 galaxies at z 9-10 as faint as m_AB=27.1 {5-sigma} at zero prime orbit cost. This request builds on our successful Cycle 17 & 19 Brightest of Reionizing Galaxies {BoRG} Survey, which found the largest sample of L>L* galaxies at z 8. BoRG[z8] demonstrated, by adding constraints from the Ultra Deep Field {UDF}, that the luminosity function follows a Schechter form, as at lower z, but with a steeper faint-end slope, leading to a photon production sufficient to complete reionization. BoRG[z9-10] will similarly complement the UDF and Frontier Fields datasets by imaging 550 arcmin^2 over 120 sightlines in five WFC3 bands {F350LP, F105W, F125W, F140W, F160W}. Besides twenty new catches at z>9, we will double {from 60 to 120} the number of bright z 8 galaxies within reach of spectroscopy, to tighten constraints on Ly-alpha emission and reionization obtained by our BoRG@Keck follow-up. This new public dataset will reveal the connection between massive dark matter halos and formation of first galaxies, and create a legacy of rare targets for JWST

  3. Spectral properties and the effect on redshift cut-off of compact active galactic nuclei from the AT20G survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhetri, R.; Ekers, R. D.; Mahony, E. K.; Jones, P. A.; Massardi, M.; Ricci, R.; Sadler, E. M.

    2012-05-01

    Spectral index has been traditionally used to separate extragalactic radio sources into compact and extended populations, with the spectral transition placed variably between -0.4 and -0.6. We use high angular resolution data, measured from visibility of sources at the longest baseline of 4500 m of the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA), for the Australia Telescope 20 GHz (AT20G) survey to obtain angular size information for over 94 per cent of AT20G sources. We confirm the previous AT20G result that due to the high survey frequency of 20 GHz, the source population is strongly dominated by compact sources (79 per cent). At 0.15-arcsec angular resolution limit, we show a very strong correlation between the compact and extended sources with flat and steep-spectrum sources respectively for spectral indices obtained between 1 and 5 GHz. Thus, we provide a firm physical basis for the traditional spectral classification into flat and steep-spectrum sources to select compact and extended sources. We find that for spectral indices between 1 and 5 GHz, the cut-offs at -0.4 and -0.5 are quite similar to the optimum cut-off of -0.46 and, hence, recommend the continued use of -0.5 for future studies. We use the recently published redshift data to study the effect of spectral curvature on the redshift cut-off of compact active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Using spectral indices at different frequencies, we correct for the redshift effect and also produce rest-frame frequency spectra for compact sources for redshifts up to z˜ 5. We show that the spectra of most compact sources are flat to ˜30 GHz and then start to steepen. At higher frequencies, the spectra of both compact and extended sources are steep, so the use of spectral index does not separate the compact and extended source populations as well as in lower frequencies. We also find that due to spectral steepening at high frequencies, surveys of compact sources at higher frequencies (ν > 5 GHz) will have redshift cut

  4. The Richness Dependence of Galaxy Cluster Correlations: Results From A Redshift Survey Of Rich APM Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croft, R. A. C.; Dalton, G. B.; Efstathiou, G.; Sutherland, W. J.; Maddox, S. J.

    1997-01-01

    We analyze the spatial clustering properties of a new catalog of very rich galaxy clusters selected from the APM Galaxy Survey. These clusters are of comparable richness and space density to Abell Richness Class greater than or equal to 1 clusters, but selected using an objective algorithm from a catalog demonstrably free of artificial inhomogeneities. Evaluation of the two-point correlation function xi(sub cc)(r) for the full sample and for richer subsamples reveals that the correlation amplitude is consistent with that measured for lower richness APM clusters and X-ray selected clusters. We apply a maximum likelihood estimator to find the best fitting slope and amplitude of a power law fit to x(sub cc)(r), and to estimate the correlation length r(sub 0) (the value of r at which xi(sub cc)(r) is equal to unity). For clusters with a mean space density of 1.6 x 10(exp -6) h(exp 3) MpC(exp -3) (equivalent to the space density of Abell Richness greater than or equal to 2 clusters), we find r(sub 0) = 21.3(+11.1/-9.3) h(exp -1) Mpc (95% confidence limits). This is consistent with the weak richness dependence of xi(sub cc)(r) expected in Gaussian models of structure formation. In particular, the amplitude of xi(sub cc)(r) at all richnesses matches that of xi(sub cc)(r) for clusters selected in N-Body simulations of a low density Cold Dark Matter model.

  5. A New Determination of the High Redshift Type Ia Supernova Rateswith the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsova, N.; Barbary, K.; Connolly, B.; Kim, A.G.; Pain, R.; Roe, N.A.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Dawson, K.; Doi, M.; Fadeyev, V.; Fruchter, A.S.; Gibbons, R.; Goldhaber, G.; Goober, A.; Gude, A.; Knop,R.A.; Kowalski, M.; Lidman, C.; Morokuma, T.; Meyers, J.; Perlmutter, S.; Rubin, D.; Schlegel, D.J.; Spadafora, A.L.; Stanishev, V.; Strovink, M.; Suzuki, N.; Wang, L.; Yasuda, N.

    2007-10-01

    We present a new measurement of the volumetric rate of Type Ia supernova up to a redshift of 1.7, using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) GOODS data combined with an additional HST dataset covering the North GOODS field collected in 2004. We employ a novel technique that does not require spectroscopic data for identifying Type Ia supernovae (although spectroscopic measurements of redshifts are used for over half the sample); instead we employ a Bayesian approach using only photometric data to calculate the probability that an object is a Type Ia supernova. This Bayesian technique can easily be modified to incorporate improved priors on supernova properties, and it is well-suited for future high-statistics supernovae searches in which spectroscopic follow up of all candidates will be impractical. Here, the method is validated on both ground- and space-based supernova data having some spectroscopic follow up. We combine our volumetric rate measurements with low redshift supernova data, and fit to a number of possible models for the evolution of the Type Ia supernova rate as a function of redshift. The data do not distinguish between a flat rate at redshift > 0.5 and a previously proposed model, in which the Type Ia rate peaks at redshift {approx} 1 due to a significant delay from star-formation to the supernova explosion. Except for the highest redshifts, where the signal to noise ratio is generally too low to apply this technique, this approach yields smaller or comparable uncertainties than previous work.

  6. The COS-Halos Survey: Metallicities in the Low-redshift Circumgalactic Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prochaska, J. Xavier; Werk, Jessica K.; Worseck, Gábor; Tripp, Todd M.; Tumlinson, Jason; Burchett, Joseph N.; Fox, Andrew J.; Fumagalli, Michele; Lehner, Nicolas; Peeples, Molly S.; Tejos, Nicolas

    2017-03-01

    We analyze new far-ultraviolet spectra of 13 quasars from the z∼ 0.2 COS-Halos survey that cover the H i Lyman limit of 14 circumgalactic medium (CGM) systems. These data yield precise estimates or more constraining limits than previous COS-Halos measurements on the H i column densities {N}{{H}{{I}}}. We then apply a Monte-Carlo Markov chain approach on 32 systems from COS-Halos to estimate the metallicity of the cool (T∼ {10}4 K) CGM gas that gives rise to low-ionization state metal lines, under the assumption of photoionization equilibrium with the extragalactic UV background. The principle results are: (1) the CGM of field L* galaxies exhibits a declining H i surface density with impact parameter {R}\\perp (at > 99.5 % confidence), (2) the transmission of ionizing radiation through CGM gas alone is 70 ± 7% (3) the metallicity distribution function of the cool CGM is unimodal with a median of {10}-0.51 {Z}ȯ and a 95% interval ≈ 1/50 {Z}ȯ to > 3 {Z}ȯ ; the incidence of metal-poor (< 1/100 {Z}ȯ ) gas is low, implying any such gas discovered along quasar sightlines is typically unrelated to L* galaxies; (4) we find an unexpected increase in gas metallicity with declining {N}{{H}{{I}}} (at > 99.9 % confidence) and, therefore, also with increasing {R}\\perp ; the high metallicity at large radii implies early enrichment; and (5) a non-parametric estimate of the cool CGM gas mass is {M}{CGM}{cool}=(9.2+/- 4.3)× {10}10 {M}ȯ , which together with new mass estimates for the hot CGM may resolve the galactic missing baryons problem. Future analyses of halo gas should focus on the underlying astrophysics governing the CGM, rather than processes that simply expel the medium from the halo. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with

  7. A Deep Survey of Low-Redshift Absorbers and Their Connections with Galaxies: Probing the Roles of Dwarfs, Satellites, and Large-Scale Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchett, Joseph

    2014-10-01

    In the not-too-distant past, the study of galaxy evolution neglected the vast interface between the stars in a galaxy and intergalactic space except for the dynamical effects of dark matter. Thanks to QSO absorption line spectroscopy and the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph {COS}, the circumgalactic medium {CGM} has come into sharp focus as a rich ecosystem playing a vital role in the evolution of the host galaxy. However, attributing the gas detected in absorption with host dwarf galaxies detected in optical surveys around the sightline becomes very difficult very quickly with increasing redshift. In addition, both targeted UV spectroscopy and ground-based galaxy surveys are resource intensive, which complicates compiling large, statistically robust samples of very-low-redshift absorber/galaxy pairs. We propose a CGM study of unprecedented statistical power by exploiting the vast number of sightlines in the HST/COS archive located within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey {SDSS} footprint to compile an estimated sample of 586 absorbers at z<0.015. This very-low-redshift criterion enables spectroscopic completeness down to L<0.01 L* galaxies in publicly available optical imaging and spectroscopy.Our survey is uniquely poised to address the following questions: {1} What is the role of dwarf galaxies that would be undetectable at higher redshift in giving rise to the gas detected in QSO spectroscopy? {2} How does galaxy environment and large-scale structure affect the CGM and what are the implications for environmental quenching of star formation? {3} How efficiently do feedback mechanisms expel metal-enriched gas to great distances into the galaxy halo and into the IGM?

  8. The Star Formation History of BCGs to z = 1.8 from the SpARCS/SWIRE Survey: Evidence for Significant In Situ Star Formation at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Tracy M. A.; Muzzin, Adam; Noble, Allison; Bonaventura, Nina; Geach, James; Hezevah, Yashar; Lidman, Chris; Wilson, Gillian; Yee, H. K. C.; Surace, Jason; Shupe, David

    2015-12-01

    We present the results of an MIPS-24 μm study of the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) of 535 high-redshift galaxy clusters. The clusters are drawn from the Spitzer Adaptation of the Red-Sequence Cluster Survey, which effectively provides a sample selected on total stellar mass, over 0.2 < z < 1.8 within the Spitzer Wide-Area Infrared Extragalactic (SWIRE) Survey fields. Twenty percent, or 106 clusters, have spectroscopically confirmed redshifts, and the rest have redshifts estimated from the color of their red sequence. A comparison with the public SWIRE images detects 125 individual BCGs at 24 μm ≳ 100 μJy, or 23%. The luminosity-limited detection rate of BCGs in similar richness clusters (Ngal > 12) increases rapidly with redshift. Above z ∼ 1, an average of ∼20% of the sample have 24 μm inferred infrared luminosities of LIR > 1012 L⊙, while the fraction below z ∼ 1 exhibiting such luminosities is <1%. The Spitzer-IRAC colors indicate the bulk of the 24 μm detected population is predominantly powered by star formation, with only 7/125 galaxies lying within the color region inhabited by active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Simple arguments limit the star formation activity to several hundred million years and this may therefore be indicative of the timescale for AGN feedback to halt the star formation. Below redshift z ∼ 1, there is not enough star formation to significantly contribute to the overall stellar mass of the BCG population, and therefore BCG growth is likely dominated by dry mergers. Above z ∼ 1, however, the inferred star formation would double the stellar mass of the BCGs and is comparable to the mass assembly predicted by simulations through dry mergers. We cannot yet constrain the process driving the star formation for the overall sample, though a single object studied in detail is consistent with a gas-rich merger.

  9. A direct probe of cosmological power spectra of the peculiar velocity field and the gravitational lensing magnification from photometric redshift surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Nusser, Adi; Feix, Martin; Branchini, Enzo E-mail: branchin@fis.uniroma3.it

    2013-01-01

    The cosmological peculiar velocity field (deviations from the pure Hubble flow) of matter carries significant information on dark energy, dark matter and the underlying theory of gravity on large scales. Peculiar motions of galaxies introduce systematic deviations between the observed galaxy redshifts z and the corresponding cosmological redshifts z{sub c{sub o{sub s}}}. A novel method for estimating the angular power spectrum of the peculiar velocity field based on observations of galaxy redshifts and apparent magnitudes m (or equivalently fluxes) is presented. This method exploits the fact that a mean relation between z{sub c{sub o{sub s}}} and m of galaxies can be derived from all galaxies in a redshift-magnitude survey. Given a galaxy magnitude, it is shown that the z{sub c{sub o{sub s}}}(m) relation yields its cosmological redshift with a 1σ error of σ{sub z} ∼ 0.3 for a survey like Euclid ( ∼ 10{sup 9} galaxies at z∼<2), and can be used to constrain the angular power spectrum of z−z{sub c{sub o{sub s}}}(m) with a high signal-to-noise ratio. At large angular separations corresponding to l∼<15, we obtain significant constraints on the power spectrum of the peculiar velocity field. At 15∼

  10. Baryon cycling in the low-redshift circumgalactic medium: a comparison of simulations to the COS-Halos survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Amanda Brady; Werk, Jessica K.; Davé, Romeel; Tumlinson, Jason; Bordoloi, Rongmon; Katz, Neal; Kollmeier, Juna A.; Oppenheimer, Benjamin D.; Peeples, Molly S.; Prochaska, Jason X.; Weinberg, David H.

    2016-06-01

    We analyse the low-redshift (z ≈ 0.2) circumgalactic medium (CGM) by comparing absorption-line data from the COS-Halos survey to absorption around a matched galaxy sample from two cosmological hydrodynamic simulations. The models include different prescriptions for galactic outflows, namely hybrid energy/momentum driven wind (ezw), and constant winds (cw). We compare equivalent widths, covering factors, ion ratios, and kinematics. Both wind models show generally ≲ 1σ agreement with these observations for H I and certain low-ionization metal lines, but poorer agreement with higher ionization metal lines including Si III and O VI that are well observed by COS-Halos. This suggests that both models predict too much cool, metal-enriched gas and not enough hot gas, and / or that metals are not sufficiently mixed. This may reflect our model assumption of ejecting outflows as cool and unmixing gas. Our ezw simulation includes a heuristic prescription to quench massive galaxies by superheating interstellar medium gas. This produces low-ionization absorption broadly consistent with observations, but substantial O VI absorption inconsistent with data, suggesting that gas around quenched galaxies in the real Universe does not cool. At impact parameters of ≲ 50 kpc, recycling winds dominate the absorption of low ions and even H I, while O VI generally arises from metals ejected ≳ 1 Gyr ago. The similarity between the wind models is surprising, since they differ substantially in the amount and phase distribution of halo gas. We show that this similarity owes mainly to our comparison at fixed stellar (not halo) mass, suggesting that CGM properties are more closely tied to galaxy's stellar (versus halo) mass.

  11. THE MULTIWAVELENGTH SURVEY BY YALE-CHILE (MUSYC): DEEP MEDIUM-BAND OPTICAL IMAGING AND HIGH-QUALITY 32-BAND PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS IN THE ECDF-S

    SciTech Connect

    Cardamone, Carolin N.; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Urry, C. Megan; Brammer, Gabriel; Taniguchi, Yoshi; Gawiser, Eric; Bond, Nicholas; Taylor, Edward; Damen, Maaike; Treister, Ezequiel; Cobb, Bethany E.; Schawinski, Kevin; Lira, Paulina; Murayama, Takashi; Saito, Tomoki; Sumikawa, Kentaro

    2010-08-15

    We present deep optical 18-medium-band photometry from the Subaru telescope over the {approx}30' x 30' Extended Chandra Deep Field-South, as part of the Multiwavelength Survey by Yale-Chile (MUSYC). This field has a wealth of ground- and space-based ancillary data, and contains the GOODS-South field and the Hubble Ultra Deep Field. We combine the Subaru imaging with existing UBVRIzJHK and Spitzer IRAC images to create a uniform catalog. Detecting sources in the MUSYC 'BVR' image we find {approx}40,000 galaxies with R {sub AB} < 25.3, the median 5{sigma} limit of the 18 medium bands. Photometric redshifts are determined using the EAzY code and compared to {approx}2000 spectroscopic redshifts in this field. The medium-band filters provide very accurate redshifts for the (bright) subset of galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts, particularly at 0.1 < z < 1.2 and at z {approx}> 3.5. For 0.1 < z < 1.2, we find a 1{sigma} scatter in {Delta}z/(1 + z) of 0.007, similar to results obtained with a similar filter set in the COSMOS field. As a demonstration of the data quality, we show that the red sequence and blue cloud can be cleanly identified in rest-frame color-magnitude diagrams at 0.1 < z < 1.2. We find that {approx}20% of the red sequence galaxies show evidence of dust emission at longer rest-frame wavelengths. The reduced images, photometric catalog, and photometric redshifts are provided through the public MUSYC Web site.

  12. Mass calibration of galaxy clusters at redshift 0.1–1.0 using weak lensing in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe 82 co-add

    SciTech Connect

    Wiesner, Matthew P.; Lin, Huan; Soares-Santos, Marcelle

    2015-07-08

    We present galaxy cluster mass–richness relations found in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe 82 co-add using clusters found using a Voronoi tessellation cluster finder. These relations were found using stacked weak lensing shear observed in a large sample of galaxy clusters. These mass–richness relations are presented for four redshift bins, 0.1 < z ≤ 0.4, 0.4 < z ≤ 0.7, 0.7 < z ≤ 1.0 and 0.1 < z ≤ 1.0. We describe the sample of galaxy clusters and explain how these clusters were found using a Voronoi tessellation cluster finder. We fit a Navarro-Frenk-White profile to the stacked weak lensing shear signal in redshift and richness bins in order to measure virial mass (M200). We describe several effects that can bias weak lensing measurements, including photometric redshift bias, the effect of the central BCG, halo miscentering, photometric redshift uncertainty and foreground galaxy contamination. We present mass–richness relations using richness measure NVT with each of these effects considered separately as well as considered altogether. We also examine redshift evolution of the mass–richness relation. As a result, we present measurements of the mass coefficient (M200|20) and the power-law slope (α) for power-law fits to the mass and richness values in each of the redshift bins. We find values of the mass coefficient of 8.49 ± 0.526, 14.1 ± 1.78, 30.2 ± 8.74 and 9.23 ± 0.525 × 1013 h–1 M for each of the four redshift bins, respectively. As a result, we find values of the power-law slope of 0.905 ± 0.0585, 0.948 ± 0.100, 1.33 ± 0.260 and 0.883 ± 0.0500, respectively.

  13. Mass calibration of galaxy clusters at redshift 0.1–1.0 using weak lensing in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe 82 co-add

    DOE PAGES

    Wiesner, Matthew P.; Lin, Huan; Soares-Santos, Marcelle

    2015-07-08

    We present galaxy cluster mass–richness relations found in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe 82 co-add using clusters found using a Voronoi tessellation cluster finder. These relations were found using stacked weak lensing shear observed in a large sample of galaxy clusters. These mass–richness relations are presented for four redshift bins, 0.1 < z ≤ 0.4, 0.4 < z ≤ 0.7, 0.7 < z ≤ 1.0 and 0.1 < z ≤ 1.0. We describe the sample of galaxy clusters and explain how these clusters were found using a Voronoi tessellation cluster finder. We fit a Navarro-Frenk-White profile to the stackedmore » weak lensing shear signal in redshift and richness bins in order to measure virial mass (M200). We describe several effects that can bias weak lensing measurements, including photometric redshift bias, the effect of the central BCG, halo miscentering, photometric redshift uncertainty and foreground galaxy contamination. We present mass–richness relations using richness measure NVT with each of these effects considered separately as well as considered altogether. We also examine redshift evolution of the mass–richness relation. As a result, we present measurements of the mass coefficient (M200|20) and the power-law slope (α) for power-law fits to the mass and richness values in each of the redshift bins. We find values of the mass coefficient of 8.49 ± 0.526, 14.1 ± 1.78, 30.2 ± 8.74 and 9.23 ± 0.525 × 1013 h–1 M⊙ for each of the four redshift bins, respectively. As a result, we find values of the power-law slope of 0.905 ± 0.0585, 0.948 ± 0.100, 1.33 ± 0.260 and 0.883 ± 0.0500, respectively.« less

  14. The 3D-HST Survey: Hubble Space Telescope WFC3/G141 Grism Spectra, Redshifts, and Emission Line Measurements for ~ 100,000 Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momcheva, Ivelina G.; Brammer, Gabriel B.; van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Nelson, Erica J.; Fumagalli, Mattia; Maseda, Michael V.; Leja, Joel; Franx, Marijn; Rix, Hans-Walter; Bezanson, Rachel; Da Cunha, Elisabete; Dickey, Claire; Förster Schreiber, Natascha M.; Illingworth, Garth; Kriek, Mariska; Labbé, Ivo; Ulf Lange, Johannes; Lundgren, Britt F.; Magee, Daniel; Marchesini, Danilo; Oesch, Pascal; Pacifici, Camilla; Patel, Shannon G.; Price, Sedona; Tal, Tomer; Wake, David A.; van der Wel, Arjen; Wuyts, Stijn

    2016-08-01

    We present reduced data and data products from the 3D-HST survey, a 248-orbit HST Treasury program. The survey obtained WFC3 G141 grism spectroscopy in four of the five CANDELS fields: AEGIS, COSMOS, GOODS-S, and UDS, along with WFC3 H 140 imaging, parallel ACS G800L spectroscopy, and parallel I 814 imaging. In a previous paper, we presented photometric catalogs in these four fields and in GOODS-N, the fifth CANDELS field. Here we describe and present the WFC3 G141 spectroscopic data, again augmented with data from GO-1600 in GOODS-N (PI: B. Weiner). We developed software to automatically and optimally extract interlaced two-dimensional (2D) and one-dimensional (1D) spectra for all objects in the Skelton et al. (2014) photometric catalogs. The 2D spectra and the multi-band photometry were fit simultaneously to determine redshifts and emission line strengths, taking the morphology of the galaxies explicitly into account. The resulting catalog has redshifts and line strengths (where available) for 22,548 unique objects down to {{JH}}{IR}≤slant 24 (79,609 unique objects down to {{JH}}{IR}≤slant 26). Of these, 5459 galaxies are at z\\gt 1.5 and 9621 are at 0.7\\lt z\\lt 1.5, where Hα falls in the G141 wavelength coverage. The typical redshift error for {{JH}}{IR}≤slant 24 galaxies is {σ }z≈ 0.003× (1+z), i.e., one native WFC3 pixel. The 3σ limit for emission line fluxes of point sources is 2.1× {10}-17 erg s-1 cm-2. All 2D and 1D spectra, as well as redshifts, line fluxes, and other derived parameters, are publicly available.18

  15. First Simultaneous Detection of Lyman-alpha Emission and Lyman Break from a Galaxy at Redshift 7.51 from Faint Infrared Grism Survey (FIGS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilvi, Vithal; Pirzkal, Norbert; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Rhoads, James E.; Windhorst, Rogier A.; Grogin, Norman A.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Ryan, Russell E.; Christensen, Lise; Hathi, Nimish P.; Pharo, John; Joshi, Bhavin; Yang, Huan; Gronwall, Caryl; Cimatti, Andrea; Walsh, J.; O'Connell, Robert W.; Straughn, Amber; Östlin, Göran; Rothberg, Barry; Livermore, Rachael C.; Hibon, Pascale; Gardner, Jonathan P.; FIGS Team

    2017-01-01

    Galaxies at high-redshifts provide a powerful tool to probe cosmic dawn, and therefore it is crucial to reliably identify these galaxies. Here, we present an unambiguous and first simultaneous detection of a Lyman-alpha line and a Lyman break from a galaxy (FIGS_GN1_1292) at z=7.51, observed in the Faint Infrared Grism Survey (FIGS: PI Mlahotra). FIGS is currently the most sensitive G102 grism survey, with 160-orbit depth equally distributed in four different fields in GOODS-N and GOODS-S. FIGS_GN1_1292 is detected independently in multiple position angles, and has a Lyman-alpha line flux of 1.06e-17 erg/s/cm^2, nearly a factor of four higher than in the archival MOSFIRE spectroscopic observations. This higher flux in the grism data is consistent with other recent observations implying that ground-based near-infrared spectroscopy may underestimate the total emission line fluxes, and if confirmed, can have strong implications for reionization studies that are based on ground-based Lyman-alpha measurements. The successful detection of continuum in such a high-redshift galaxy demonstrates the sensitivity of the FIGS survey, and the capability of grism spectroscopy to study the epoch of reionization using upcoming missions like the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST).

  16. Comparison of the VIMOS-VLT Deep Survey with the Munich semi-analytical model. I. Magnitude counts, redshift distribution, colour bimodality, and galaxy clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Torre, S.; Meneux, B.; De Lucia, G.; Blaizot, J.; Le Fèvre, O.; Garilli, B.; Cucciati, O.; Mellier, Y.; Pollo, A.; Abbas, U.; Bottini, D.; Le Brun, V.; Maccagni, D.; Scodeggio, M.; Tresse, L.; Vettolani, G.; Zanichelli, A.; Adami, C.; Arnouts, S.; Bardelli, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Cappi, A.; Charlot, S.; Ciliegi, P.; Contini, T.; Foucaud, S.; Franzetti, P.; Gavignaud, I.; Guzzo, L.; Ilbert, O.; Iovino, A.; McCracken, H. J.; Marinoni, C.; Mazure, A.; Merighi, R.; Paltani, S.; Pelló, R.; Pozzetti, L.; Vergani, D.; Zamorani, G.; Zucca, E.

    2011-01-01

    Aims: This paper presents a detailed comparison between high-redshift observations from the VIMOS-VLT Deep Survey (VVDS) and predictions from the Munich semi-analytical model of galaxy formation. In particular, we focus this analysis on the magnitude, redshift, and colour distributions of galaxies, as well as their clustering properties. Methods: We constructed 100 quasi-independent mock catalogues, using the output of the semi-analytical model presented in De Lucia & Blaizot (2007, MNRAS, 375, 2). We then applied the same observational selection function of the VVDS-Deep survey, so as to carry out a fair comparison between models and observations. Results: We find that the semi-analytical model reproduces well the magnitude counts in the optical bands. It tends, however, to overpredict the abundance of faint red galaxies, in particular in the i' and z' bands. Model galaxies exhibit a colour bimodality that is only in qualitative agreement with the data. In particular, we find that the model tends to overpredict the number of red galaxies at low redshift and of blue galaxies at all redshifts probed by VVDS-Deep observations, although a large fraction of the bluest observed galaxies is absent from the model. In addition, the model overpredicts by about 14 per cent the number of galaxies observed at 0.2 < z < 1 with IAB < 24. When comparing the galaxy clustering properties, we find that model galaxies are more strongly clustered than observed ones at all redshift from z = 0.2 to z = 2, with the difference being less significant above z ≃ 1. When splitting the samples into red and blue galaxies, we find that the observed clustering of blue galaxies is well reproduced by the model, while red model galaxies are much more clustered than observed ones, being principally responsible for the strong global clustering found in the model. Conclusions: Our results show that the discrepancies between Munich semi-analytical model predictions and VVDS-Deep observations

  17. Spectroscopy of clusters in the ESO distant cluster survey (EDisCS). II.. Redshifts, velocity dispersions, and substructure for clusters in the last 15 fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milvang-Jensen, B.; Noll, S.; Halliday, C.; Poggianti, B. M.; Jablonka, P.; Aragón-Salamanca, A.; Saglia, R. P.; Nowak, N.; von der Linden, A.; De Lucia, G.; Pelló, R.; Moustakas, J.; Poirier, S.; Bamford, S. P.; Clowe, D. I.; Dalcanton, J. J.; Rudnick, G. H.; Simard, L.; White, S. D. M.; Zaritsky, D.

    2008-05-01

    Aims: We present spectroscopic observations of galaxies in 15 survey fields as part of the ESO Distant Cluster Survey (EDisCS). We determine the redshifts and velocity dispersions of the galaxy clusters located in these fields, and we test for possible substructure in the clusters. Methods: We obtained multi-object mask spectroscopy using the FORS2 instrument at the VLT. We reduced the data with particular attention to the sky subtraction. We implemented the method of Kelson for performing sky subtraction prior to any rebinning/interpolation of the data. From the measured galaxy redshifts, we determine cluster velocity dispersions using the biweight estimator and test for possible substructure in the clusters using the Dressler-Shectman test. Results: The method of subtracting the sky prior to any rebinning/interpolation of the data delivers photon-noise-limited results, whereas the traditional method of subtracting the sky after the data have been rebinned/interpolated results in substantially larger noise for spectra from tilted slits. Redshifts for individual galaxies are presented and redshifts and velocity dispersions are presented for 21 galaxy clusters. For the 9 clusters with at least 20 spectroscopically confirmed members, we present the statistical significance of the presence of substructure obtained from the Dressler-Shectman test, and substructure is detected in two of the clusters. Conclusions: Together with data from our previous paper, spectroscopy and spectroscopic velocity dispersions are now available for 26 EDisCS clusters with redshifts in the range 0.40-0.96 and velocity dispersions in the range 166 km s-1-1080 km s-1. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile, as part of large programme 166.A-0162 (the ESO Distant Cluster Survey). Full Table 4 is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/482/419

  18. THE STAR FORMATION HISTORY OF BCGs TO z = 1.8 FROM THE SpARCS/SWIRE SURVEY: EVIDENCE FOR SIGNIFICANT IN SITU STAR FORMATION AT HIGH REDSHIFT

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, Tracy M. A.; Bonaventura, Nina; Muzzin, Adam; Noble, Allison; Yee, H. K. C.; Geach, James; Hezevah, Yashar; Lidman, Chris; Wilson, Gillian; Surace, Jason

    2015-12-01

    We present the results of an MIPS-24 μm study of the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) of 535 high-redshift galaxy clusters. The clusters are drawn from the Spitzer Adaptation of the Red-Sequence Cluster Survey, which effectively provides a sample selected on total stellar mass, over 0.2 < z < 1.8 within the Spitzer Wide-Area Infrared Extragalactic (SWIRE) Survey fields. Twenty percent, or 106 clusters, have spectroscopically confirmed redshifts, and the rest have redshifts estimated from the color of their red sequence. A comparison with the public SWIRE images detects 125 individual BCGs at 24 μm ≳ 100 μJy, or 23%. The luminosity-limited detection rate of BCGs in similar richness clusters (N{sub gal} > 12) increases rapidly with redshift. Above z ∼ 1, an average of ∼20% of the sample have 24 μm inferred infrared luminosities of L{sub IR} > 10{sup 12} L{sub ⊙}, while the fraction below z ∼ 1 exhibiting such luminosities is <1%. The Spitzer-IRAC colors indicate the bulk of the 24 μm detected population is predominantly powered by star formation, with only 7/125 galaxies lying within the color region inhabited by active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Simple arguments limit the star formation activity to several hundred million years and this may therefore be indicative of the timescale for AGN feedback to halt the star formation. Below redshift z ∼ 1, there is not enough star formation to significantly contribute to the overall stellar mass of the BCG population, and therefore BCG growth is likely dominated by dry mergers. Above z ∼ 1, however, the inferred star formation would double the stellar mass of the BCGs and is comparable to the mass assembly predicted by simulations through dry mergers. We cannot yet constrain the process driving the star formation for the overall sample, though a single object studied in detail is consistent with a gas-rich merger.

  19. Photometric redshifts for the NGVS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raichoor, A.; Mei, S.; Erben, T.; Hildebrandt, H.; Huertas-Company, M.; Ilbert, O.; Licitra, R.; Ball, N. M.; Boissier, S.; Boselli, A.; Chen, Y.-T.; Côté, P.; Cuillandre, J.-C.; Duc, P. A.; Durrell, P. R.; Ferrarese, L.; Guhathakurta, P.; Gwyn, S. D. J.; Kavelaars, J. J.; Lancon, A.; Liu, C.; MacArthur, L. A.; Muller, M.; Muñoz, R. P.; Peng, E. W.; Puzia, T. H.; Sawicki, M.; Toloba, E.; Van Waerbeke, L.; Woods, D.; Zhang, H.

    2014-12-01

    We present the photometric redshift catalog for the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS), a 104 deg^2 optical imaging survey centered on the Virgo cluster in the u^*, g, r ,i, z bandpasses at point source depth of 25-26 ABmag. It already is the new optical reference survey for the study of the Virgo cluster, and will be also used for multiple ancillary programs. To obtain photometric redshifts, we perform accurate photometry, through the PSF-homogenization of our data. We then estimate the photometric redshifts using Le Phare and BPZ codes, adding a new prior extended down to i_{AB}=12.5 mag. We assess the accuracy of our photometric redshifts as a function of magnitude and redshift using ˜80,000 spectroscopic redshifts from public surveys. For i_{AB} < 23 mag or z_{phot} < 1 galaxies, we obtain photometric redshifts with |bias| < 0.02, a scatter increasing with magnitude (from 0.02 to 0.05), and less than 5% outliers.

  20. A Survey of Luminous High-redshift Quasars with SDSS and WISE. II. the Bright End of the Quasar Luminosity Function at z ≈ 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jinyi; Wang, Feige; Wu, Xue-Bing; Fan, Xiaohui; McGreer, Ian D.; Bian, Fuyan; Yi, Weimin; Yang, Qian; Ai, Yanli; Dong, Xiaoyi; Zuo, Wenwen; Green, Richard; Jiang, Linhua; Wang, Shu; Wang, Ran; Yue, Minghao

    2016-09-01

    This is the second paper in a series on a new luminous z ˜ 5 quasar survey using optical and near-infrared colors. Here we present a new determination of the bright end of the quasar luminosity function (QLF) at z ˜ 5. Combining our 45 new quasars with previously known quasars that satisfy our selections, we construct the largest uniform luminous z ˜ 5 quasar sample to date, with 99 quasars in the range of 4.7 ≤ z < 5.4 and -29 < M 1450 ≤ -26.8, within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) footprint. We use a modified 1/V a method including flux limit correction to derive a binned QLF, and we model the parametric QLF using maximum likelihood estimation. With the faint-end slope of the QLF fixed as α = -2.03 from previous deeper samples, the best fit of our QLF gives a flatter bright end slope β = -3.58 ± 0.24 and a fainter break magnitude {M}1450* = -26.98 ± 0.23 than previous studies at similar redshift. Combined with previous work at lower and higher redshifts, our result is consistent with a luminosity evolution and density evolution model. Using the best-fit QLF, the contribution of quasars to the ionizing background at z ˜ 5 is found to be 18%-45% with a clumping factor C of 2-5. Our sample suggests an evolution of radio loud fraction with optical luminosity but no obvious evolution with redshift.

  1. The Vimos VLT Deep Survey. Stellar mass segregation and large-scale galaxy environment in the redshift range 0.2 < z < 1.4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scodeggio, M.; Vergani, D.; Cucciati, O.; Iovino, A.; Franzetti, P.; Garilli, B.; Lamareille, F.; Bolzonella, M.; Pozzetti, L.; Abbas, U.; Marinoni, C.; Contini, T.; Bottini, D.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Scaramella, R.; Tresse, L.; Vettolani, G.; Zanichelli, A.; Adami, C.; Arnouts, S.; Bardelli, S.; Cappi, A.; Charlot, S.; Ciliegi, P.; Foucaud, S.; Gavignaud, I.; Guzzo, L.; Ilbert, O.; McCracken, H. J.; Marano, B.; Mazure, A.; Meneux, B.; Merighi, R.; Paltani, S.; Pellò, R.; Pollo, A.; Radovich, M.; Zamorani, G.; Zucca, E.; Bondi, M.; Bongiorno, A.; Brinchmann, J.; de La Torre, S.; de Ravel, L.; Gregorini, L.; Memeo, P.; Perez-Montero, E.; Mellier, Y.; Temporin, S.; Walcher, C. J.

    2009-07-01

    Context: Hierarchical models of galaxy formation predict that the properties of a dark matter halo depend on the large-scale environment surrounding the halo. As a result of this correlation, we expect massive haloes to be present in larger number in overdense regions than in underdense ones. Given that a correlation exists between a galaxy stellar mass and the hosting dark matter halo mass, the segregation in dark matter halo mass should then result in a segregation in the distribution of stellar mass in the galaxy population. Aims: In this work we study the distribution of galaxy stellar mass and rest-frame optical color as a function of the large-scale galaxy distribution using the VLT VIMOS Deep Survey sample, in order to verify the presence of segregation in the properties of the galaxy population. Methods: We use VVDS redshift measurements and multi-band photometric data to derive estimates of the stellar mass, rest-frame optical color, and of the large-scale galaxy density, on a scale of approximately 8 Mpc, for a sample of 5619 galaxies in the redshift range 0.2redshift interval covered by our sample, such that the median value of the mass distribution is larger and the rest-frame optical color is redder in regions of high galaxy density. The amplitude of the mass segregation changes little with redshift, at least in the high stellar mass regime that we can uniformly sample over the 0.2 < z < 1.4 redshift interval. The color segregation, instead, decreases significantly for z > 0.7. However, when we consider only galaxies in narrow bins of stellar mass, in order to exclude the effects of stellar mass segregation on galaxy properties, we no longer observe any significant color segregation. Based on data obtained with the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope, Paranal, Chile, program 070.A-9007(A), and on data obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope

  2. VIMOS Ultra-Deep Survey (VUDS): IGM transmission towards galaxies with 2.5 < z < 5.5 and the colour selection of high-redshift galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, R.; Le Fèvre, O.; Le Brun, V.; Cassata, P.; Garilli, B.; Lemaux, B. C.; Maccagni, D.; Pentericci, L.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Zamorani, G.; Zucca, E.; Amorin, R.; Bardelli, S.; Cassarà, L.; Castellano, M.; Cimatti, A.; Cucciati, O.; Durkalec, A.; Fontana, A.; Giavalisco, M.; Grazian, A.; Hathi, N. P.; Ilbert, O.; Paltani, S.; Pforr, J.; Ribeiro, B.; Schaerer, D.; Scodeggio, M.; Sommariva, V.; Talia, M.; Tresse, L.; Vanzella, E.; Vergani, D.; Capak, P.; Charlot, S.; Contini, T.; Cuby, J. G.; de la Torre, S.; Dunlop, J.; Fotopoulou, S.; Koekemoer, A.; López-Sanjuan, C.; Mellier, Y.; Salvato, M.; Scoville, N.; Taniguchi, Y.; Wang, P. W.

    2017-01-01

    The observed UV rest-frame spectra of distant galaxies are the result of their intrinsic emission combined with absorption along the line of sight produced by the inter-galactic medium (IGM). Here we analyse the evolution of the mean IGM transmission Tr(Lyα) and its dispersion along the line of sight for 2127 galaxies with 2.5 < z < 5.5 in the VIMOS Ultra Deep Survey (VUDS). We fitted model spectra combined with a range of IGM transmission to the galaxy spectra using the spectral fitting algorithm GOSSIP+. We used these fits to derive the mean IGM transmission towards each galaxy for several redshift slices from z = 2.5 to z = 5.5. We found that the mean IGM transmission defined as Tr(Lyα) = e- τ (with τ as the HI optical depth) is 79%, 69%, 59%, 55%, and 46% at redshifts 2.75, 3.22, 3.70, 4.23, and 4.77, respectively. We compared these results to measurements obtained from quasar lines of sight and found that the IGM transmission towards galaxies is in excellent agreement with quasar values up to redshift z 4. We found tentative evidence for a higher IGM transmission at z ≥ 4 compared to results from QSOs, but a degeneracy between dust extinction and IGM prevents us from firmly concluding whether the internal dust extinction for star-forming galaxies at z > 4 takes a mean value significantly in excess of E(B-V) > 0.15. Most importantly, we found a large dispersion of IGM transmission along the lines of sight towards distant galaxies with 68% of the distribution within 10 to 17% of the median value in δz = 0.5 bins, similar to what is found on the lines of sight towards QSOs. We demonstrate that taking this broad range of IGM transmission into account is important when selecting high-redshift galaxies based on their colour properties (e.g. LBG or photometric redshiftselection) because failing to do so causes a significant incompleteness in selecting high-redshift galaxy populations. We finally discuss the observed IGM properties and speculate that the broad

  3. The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS). A precise measurement of the galaxy stellar mass function and the abundance of massive galaxies at redshifts 0.5 < z < 1.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidzon, I.; Bolzonella, M.; Coupon, J.; Ilbert, O.; Arnouts, S.; de la Torre, S.; Fritz, A.; De Lucia, G.; Iovino, A.; Granett, B. R.; Zamorani, G.; Guzzo, L.; Abbas, U.; Adami, C.; Bel, J.; Bottini, D.; Branchini, E.; Cappi, A.; Cucciati, O.; Franzetti, P.; Fumana, M.; Garilli, B.; Krywult, J.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Małek, K.; Marulli, F.; McCracken, H. J.; Paioro, L.; Peacock, J. A.; Polletta, M.; Pollo, A.; Schlagenhaufer, H.; Scodeggio, M.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Tojeiro, R.; Vergani, D.; Zanichelli, A.; Burden, A.; Di Porto, C.; Marchetti, A.; Marinoni, C.; Mellier, Y.; Moscardini, L.; Moutard, T.; Nichol, R. C.; Percival, W. J.; Phleps, S.; Wolk, M.

    2013-10-01

    We measure the evolution of the galaxy stellar mass function from z = 1.3 to z = 0.5 using the first 53 608 redshifts of the ongoing VIMOS Public Extragalactic Survey (VIPERS). Thanks to its large volume and depth, VIPERS provides a detailed picture of the galaxy distribution at z ≃ 0.8, when the Universe was ≃7 Gyr old. We carefully estimate the uncertainties and systematic effects associated with the SED fitting procedure used to derive galaxy stellar masses. We estimate the galaxy stellar mass function at several epochs between z = 0.5 and 1.3, discussing the amount of cosmic variance affecting our estimate in detail. We find that Poisson noise and cosmic variance of the galaxy mass function in the VIPERS survey are comparable to the statistical uncertainties of large surveys in the local universe. VIPERS data allow us to determine with unprecedented accuracy the high-mass tail of the galaxy stellar mass function, which includes a significant number of galaxies that are too rare to detect with any of the past spectroscopic surveys. At the epochs sampled by VIPERS, massive galaxies had already assembled most of their stellar mass. We compare our results with both previous observations and theoretical models. We apply a photometric classification in the (U - V) rest-frame colour to compute the mass function of blue and red galaxies, finding evidence for the evolution of their contribution to the total number density budget: the transition mass above which red galaxies dominate is found to be about 1010.4 ℳ⊙ at z ≃ 0.55, and it evolves proportionally to (1 + z)3. We are able to separately trace the evolution of the number density of blue and red galaxies with masses above 1011.4 ℳ⊙, in a mass range barely studied in previous work. We find that for such high masses, red galaxies show a milder evolution with redshift, when compared to objects at lower masses. At the same time, we detect a population of similarly massive blue galaxies, which are no

  4. The KMOS AGN Survey at High redshift (KASHz): the prevalence and drivers of ionized outflows in the host galaxies of X-ray AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, C. M.; Alexander, D. M.; Mullaney, J. R.; Stott, J. P.; Swinbank, A. M.; Arumugam, V.; Bauer, F. E.; Bower, R. G.; Bunker, A. J.; Sharples, R. M.

    2016-02-01

    We present the first results from the KMOS (K-band Multi-Object Spectrograph) AGN (active galactic nuclei) Survey at High redshift (KASHz), a VLT/KMOS integral-field spectroscopic (IFS) survey of z ≳ 0.6 AGN. We present galaxy-integrated spectra of 89 X-ray AGN (L2-10 keV = 1042-1045 erg s-1), for which we observed [O III] (z ≈ 1.1-1.7) or Hα emission (z ≈ 0.6-1.1). The targets have X-ray luminosities representative of the parent AGN population and we explore the emission-line luminosities as a function of X-ray luminosity. For the [O III] targets, ≈50 per cent have ionized gas velocities indicative of gas that is dominated by outflows and/or highly turbulent material (i.e. overall line widths ≳600 km s-1). The most luminous half (i.e. LX > 6 × 1043 erg s-1) have a ≳2 times higher incidence of such velocities. On the basis of our results, we find no evidence that X-ray obscured AGN are more likely to host extreme kinematics than unobscured AGN. Our KASHz sample has a distribution of gas velocities that is consistent with a luminosity-matched sample of z < 0.4 AGN. This implies little evolution in the prevalence of ionized outflows, for a fixed AGN luminosity, despite an order-of-magnitude decrease in average star formation rates over this redshift range. Furthermore, we compare our Hα targets to a redshift-matched sample of star-forming galaxies and despite a similar distribution of Hα luminosities and likely star formation rates, we find extreme ionized gas velocities are up to ≈10 times more prevalent in the AGN-host galaxies. Our results reveal a high prevalence of extreme ionized gas velocities in high-luminosity X-ray AGN and imply that the most powerful ionized outflows in high-redshift galaxies are driven by AGN activity.

  5. The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS) . Luminosity and stellar mass dependence of galaxy clustering at 0.5 < z < 1.1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marulli, F.; Bolzonella, M.; Branchini, E.; Davidzon, I.; de la Torre, S.; Granett, B. R.; Guzzo, L.; Iovino, A.; Moscardini, L.; Pollo, A.; Abbas, U.; Adami, C.; Arnouts, S.; Bel, J.; Bottini, D.; Cappi, A.; Coupon, J.; Cucciati, O.; De Lucia, G.; Fritz, A.; Franzetti, P.; Fumana, M.; Garilli, B.; Ilbert, O.; Krywult, J.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Małek, K.; McCracken, H. J.; Paioro, L.; Polletta, M.; Schlagenhaufer, H.; Scodeggio, M.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Tojeiro, R.; Vergani, D.; Zanichelli, A.; Burden, A.; Di Porto, C.; Marchetti, A.; Marinoni, C.; Mellier, Y.; Nichol, R. C.; Peacock, J. A.; Percival, W. J.; Phleps, S.; Wolk, M.; Zamorani, G.

    2013-09-01

    Aims: We investigate the dependence of galaxy clustering on luminosity and stellar mass in the redshift range 0.5 < z < 1.1, using the first ~ 55 000 redshifts from the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS). Methods: We measured the redshift-space two-point correlation functions (2PCF), ξ(s) and ξ(rp,π) , and the projected correlation function, wp(rp), in samples covering different ranges of B-band absolute magnitudes and stellar masses. We considered both threshold and binned galaxy samples, with median B-band absolute magnitudes - 21.6 ≲ MB - 5log (h) ≲ - 19.5 and median stellar masses 9.8 ≲ log (M⋆ [h-2 M⊙]) ≲ 10.7. We assessed the real-space clustering in the data from the projected correlation function, which we model as a power law in the range 0.2 < rp [h-1 Mpc ] < 20. Finally, we estimated the galaxy bias as a function of luminosity, stellar mass, and redshift, assuming a flat Λ cold dark matter model to derive the dark matter 2PCF. Results: We provide the best-fit parameters of the power-law model assumed for the real-space 2PCF - the correlation length, r0, and the slope, γ - as well as the linear bias parameter, as a function of the B-band absolute magnitude, stellar mass, and redshift. We confirm and provide the tightest constraints on the dependence of clustering on luminosity at 0.5 < z < 1.1. We prove the complexity of comparing the clustering dependence on stellar mass from samples that are originally flux-limited and discuss the possible origin of the observed discrepancies. Overall, our measurements provide stronger constraints on galaxy formation models, which are now required to match, in addition to local observations, the clustering evolution measured by VIPERS galaxies between z = 0.5 and z = 1.1 for a broad range of luminosities and stellar masses. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile, under programmes 182.A-0886 (LP) at the Very Large Telescope, and also based on

  6. Twenty-Three High-Redshift Supernovae from the Institute for Astronomy Deep Survey: Doubling the Supernova Sample at z > 0.7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barris, Brian J.; Tonry, John L.; Blondin, Stéphane; Challis, Peter; Chornock, Ryan; Clocchiatti, Alejandro; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Garnavich, Peter; Holland, Stephen T.; Jha, Saurabh; Kirshner, Robert P.; Krisciunas, Kevin; Leibundgut, Bruno; Li, Weidong; Matheson, Thomas; Miknaitis, Gajus; Riess, Adam G.; Schmidt, Brian P.; Smith, R. Chris; Sollerman, Jesper; Spyromilio, Jason; Stubbs, Christopher W.; Suntzeff, Nicholas B.; Aussel, Hervé; Chambers, K. C.; Connelley, M. S.; Donovan, D.; Henry, J. Patrick; Kaiser, Nick; Liu, Michael C.; Martín, Eduardo L.; Wainscoat, Richard J.

    2004-02-01

    We present photometric and spectroscopic observations of 23 high-redshift supernovae (SNe) spanning a range of z=0.34-1.03, nine of which are unambiguously classified as Type Ia. These SNe were discovered during the IfA Deep Survey, which began in 2001 September and observed a total of 2.5 deg2 to a depth of approximately m~25-26 in RIZ over 9-17 visits, typically every 1-3 weeks for nearly 5 months, with additional observations continuing until 2002 April. We give a brief description of the survey motivations, observational strategy, and reduction process. This sample of 23 high-redshift SNe includes 15 at z>=0.7, doubling the published number of objects at these redshifts, and indicates that the evidence for acceleration of the universe is not due to a systematic effect proportional to redshift. In combination with the recent compilation of Tonry et al. (2003), we calculate cosmological parameter density contours that are consistent with the flat universe indicated by the cosmic microwave background (Spergel et al. 2003). Adopting the constraint that Ωtotal=1.0, we obtain best-fit values of (Ωm,ΩΛ)=(0.33,0.67) using 22 SNe from this survey augmented by the literature compilation. We show that using the empty-beam model for gravitational lensing does not eliminate the need for ΩΛ>0. Experience from this survey indicates great potential for similar large-scale surveys while also revealing the limitations of performing surveys for z>1 SNe from the ground. CFHT: Based in part on observations obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), which is operated by the National Research Council of Canada, the Institut National des Science de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France, and the University of Hawaii. CTIO: Based in part on observations taken at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory. Keck: Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership

  7. The KMOS Redshift One Spectroscopic Survey (KROSS): dynamical properties, gas and dark matter fractions of typical z ˜ 1 star-forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stott, John P.; Swinbank, A. M.; Johnson, Helen L.; Tiley, Alfie; Magdis, Georgios; Bower, Richard; Bunker, Andrew J.; Bureau, Martin; Harrison, Chris M.; Jarvis, Matt J.; Sharples, Ray; Smail, Ian; Sobral, David; Best, Philip; Cirasuolo, Michele

    2016-04-01

    The KMOS Redshift One Spectroscopic Survey (KROSS) is an ESO-guaranteed time survey of 795 typical star-forming galaxies in the redshift range z = 0.8-1.0 with the KMOS instrument on the Very Large Telescope. In this paper, we present resolved kinematics and star formation rates for 584 z ˜ 1 galaxies. This constitutes the largest near-infrared Integral Field Unit survey of galaxies at z ˜ 1 to date. We demonstrate the success of our selection criteria with 90 per cent of our targets found to be H α emitters, of which 81 per cent are spatially resolved. The fraction of the resolved KROSS sample with dynamics dominated by ordered rotation is found to be 83 ± 5 per cent. However, when compared with local samples these are turbulent discs with high gas to baryonic mass fractions, ˜35 per cent, and the majority are consistent with being marginally unstable (Toomre Q ˜ 1). There is no strong correlation between galaxy averaged velocity dispersion and the total star formation rate, suggesting that feedback from star formation is not the origin of the elevated turbulence. We postulate that it is the ubiquity of high (likely molecular) gas fractions and the associated gravitational instabilities that drive the elevated star formation rates in these typical z ˜ 1 galaxies, leading to the 10-fold enhanced star formation rate density. Finally, by comparing the gas masses obtained from inverting the star formation law with the dynamical and stellar masses, we infer an average dark matter to total mass fraction within 2.2re (9.5 kpc) of 65 ± 12 per cent, in agreement with the results from hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy formation.

  8. The Deep2 Galaxy Redshift Survey: Mean Ages and Metallicities ofRed Field Galaxies at Z ~; 0.9 from Stacked Keck/Deimos Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Faber, S.M.; Konidaris, Nicholas; Graves,Genevieve; Willmer, Christopher N.A.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Coil, AlisonL.; Cooper, Michael C.; Davis, Marc; Harker, Justin; Koo, David C.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Yan, Renbin

    2006-10-19

    As part of the DEEP2 galaxy redshift survey, we analyze absorption line strengths in stacked Keck/DEIMOS spectra of red field galaxies with weak to no emission lines, at redshifts 0.7 {approx}< z {approx}< 1. Comparison with models of stellar population synthesis shows that red galaxies at z {approx} 0:9 have mean luminosity-weighted ages of the order of only 1 Gyr and at least solar metallicities. These ages cannot be reconciled with a scenario where all stars evolved passively after forming at very high z. Rather, a significant fraction of stars can be no more than 1 Gyr old, which means that some star formation in the stacked populations continued to at least z {approx} 1:2. Furthermore, a comparison of these distant galaxies with a local SDSS sample, using stellar populations synthesis models, shows that the drop in the equivalent width of H{delta} from z {approx} 0:9 to 0.1 is less than predicted by passively evolving models. This admits of two interpretations: either each individual galaxy experiences continuing low-level star formation, or the red-sequence galaxy population from z {approx} 0:9 to 0.1 is continually being added to by new galaxies with younger stars.

  9. A Determination of the Intergalactic Redshift Dependent UV-Optical-NIR Photon Density Using Deep Galaxy Survey Data and the Gamma-ray Opacity of the Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, Floyd W.; Malkan, Matthew A.; Scully, Sean T.

    2012-01-01

    We calculate the intensity and photon spectrum of the intergalactic background light (IBL) as a function of redshift using an approach based on observational data obtained in many different wavelength bands from local to deep galaxy surveys. This allows us to obtain an empirical determination of the IBL and to quantify its observationally based uncertainties. Using our results on the IBL, we then place 68% confidence upper and lower limits on the opacity of the universe to gamma-rays, free of the theoretical assumptions that were needed for past calculations. We compare our results with measurements of the extragalactic background light and upper limits obtained from observations made by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope.

  10. The Subaru FMOS Galaxy Redshift Survey (FastSound): The Mass-Metallicity Relation and the Fundamental Metallicity Relation at z˜1.4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabe, K.; Ohta, K.; Akiyama, M.; Tamura, N.; Iwamuro, F.; Totani, T.; Dalton, G.; Bunker, A.; FastSound Team

    2016-10-01

    We present results from a large NIR spectroscopic survey (FastSound) with Subaru/FMOS, consisting of ˜4,000 galaxies at z˜1.4 with significant Hα detection. The resulting mass-metallicity relation generally agrees with those obtained previously in a similar redshift range to our sample. No clear dependence on the mass-metallicity relation on star-formation rate is found, which is not in agreement with the extrapolation of the local fundamental metallicity relation. We estimate the nitrogen-to-oxygen abundance ratio (N/O) from the N2S2 index, and find that the N/O in galaxies at z˜1.4 is significantly higher than the local values at a fixed metallicity and stellar mass. The metallicity derived by using the N2 method calibrated in the local universe decreases by ˜0.2 dex if we correct the N/O enhancement.

  11. Optimal redshift weighting for redshift-space distortions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggeri, Rossana; Percival, Will J.; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Zhu, Fangzhou; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Wang, Yuting

    2017-01-01

    The low-statistical errors on cosmological parameters promised by future galaxy surveys will only be realized with the development of new, fast, analysis methods that reduce potential systematic problems to low levels. We present an efficient method for measuring the evolution of the growth of structure using redshift-space distortions (RSDs), that removes the need to make measurements in redshift shells. We provide sets of galaxy-weights that cover a wide range in redshift, but are optimized to provide differential information about cosmological evolution. These are derived to optimally measure the coefficients of a parametrization of the redshift-dependent matter density, which provides a framework to measure deviations from the concordance ΛCDM cosmology, allowing for deviations in both geometric and/or growth. We test the robustness of the weights by comparing with alternative schemes and investigate the impact of galaxy bias. We extend the results to measure the combined anisotropic baryon acoustic oscillation and RSD signals.

  12. Upper bound of 0.28 eV on neutrino masses from the largest photometric redshift survey.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Shaun A; Abdalla, Filipe B; Lahav, Ofer

    2010-07-16

    We present a new limit of ∑m(v) ≤ 0.28 (95% CL) on the sum of the neutrino masses assuming a flat ΛCDM cosmology. This relaxes slightly to ∑m(ν) ≤ 0.34 and ∑m(v) ≤ 0.47 when quasinonlinear scales are removed and w≠ -1, respectively. These are derived from a new photometric catalogue of over 700,000 luminous red galaxies (MegaZ DR7) with a volume of 3.3  (Gpc h(-1))(3) and redshift range 0.45 < z < 0.65. The data are combined with WMAP 5-year CMB, baryon acoustic oscillations, supernovae, and a Hubble Space Telescope prior on h. When combined with WMAP these data are as constraining as adding all supernovae and baryon oscillation data available. The upper limit is one of the tightest constraints on the neutrino from cosmology or particle physics. Further, if these bounds hold, they all predict that current-to-next generation neutrino experiments, such as KATRIN, are unlikely to obtain a detection.

  13. A CHANDRA SNAPSHOT SURVEY FOR 3C RADIO GALAXIES WITH REDSHIFTS BETWEEN 0.3 AND 0.5

    SciTech Connect

    Massaro, F.; Harris, D. E.; Paggi, A.; Tremblay, G. R.; Liuzzo, E.; Bonafede, A.

    2013-05-01

    This paper contains an analysis of short Chandra observations of 19 3C sources with redshifts between 0.3 and 0.5 not previously observed in the X-rays. This sample is part of a project to obtain Chandra data for all of the extragalactic sources in the 3C catalog. Nuclear X-ray intensities as well as any X-ray emission associated with radio jet knots, hotspots, or lobes have been measured in three energy bands: soft, medium, and hard. Standard X-ray spectral analysis for the four brightest nuclei has also been performed. X-ray emission was detected for all the nuclei of the radio sources in the current sample with the exception of 3C 435A. There is one compact steep spectrum source while all the others are FR II radio galaxies. X-ray emission from two galaxy clusters (3C 19 and 3C 320), from six hotspots in four radio galaxies (3C 16, 3C 19, 3C 268.2, 3C 313), and extended X-ray emission on kiloparsec scales in 3C 187 and 3C 313, has been detected.

  14. The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS). An unprecedented view of galaxies and large-scale structure at 0.5 < z < 1.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzzo, L.; Scodeggio, M.; Garilli, B.; Granett, B. R.; Fritz, A.; Abbas, U.; Adami, C.; Arnouts, S.; Bel, J.; Bolzonella, M.; Bottini, D.; Branchini, E.; Cappi, A.; Coupon, J.; Cucciati, O.; Davidzon, I.; De Lucia, G.; de la Torre, S.; Franzetti, P.; Fumana, M.; Hudelot, P.; Ilbert, O.; Iovino, A.; Krywult, J.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Małek, K.; Marulli, F.; McCracken, H. J.; Paioro, L.; Peacock, J. A.; Polletta, M.; Pollo, A.; Schlagenhaufer, H.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Tojeiro, R.; Vergani, D.; Zamorani, G.; Zanichelli, A.; Burden, A.; Di Porto, C.; Marchetti, A.; Marinoni, C.; Mellier, Y.; Moscardini, L.; Nichol, R. C.; Percival, W. J.; Phleps, S.; Wolk, M.

    2014-06-01

    We describe the construction and general features of VIPERS, the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey. This ESO Large Programme is using the Very Large Telescope with the aim of building a spectroscopic sample of ~ 100 000 galaxies with iAB< 22.5 and 0.5 survey covers a total area of ~ 24 deg2 within the CFHTLS-Wide W1 and W4 fields. VIPERS is designed to address a broad range of problems in large-scale structure and galaxy evolution, thanks to a unique combination of volume (~ 5 × 107h-3 Mpc3) and sampling rate (~ 40%), comparable to state-of-the-art surveys of the local Universe, together with extensive multi-band optical and near-infrared photometry. Here we present the survey design, the selection of the source catalogue and the development of the spectroscopic observations. We discuss in detail the overall selection function that results from the combination of the different constituents of the project. This includes the masks arising from the parent photometric sample and the spectroscopic instrumental footprint, together with the weights needed to account for the sampling and the success rates of the observations. Using the catalogue of 53 608 galaxy redshifts composing the forthcoming VIPERS Public Data Release 1 (PDR-1), we provide a first assessment of the quality of the spectroscopic data. The stellar contamination is found to be only 3.2%, endorsing the quality of the star-galaxy separation process and fully confirming the original estimates based on the VVDS data, which also indicate a galaxy incompleteness from this process of only 1.4%. Using a set of 1215 repeated observations, we estimate an rms redshift error σz/ (1 + z) = 4.7 × 10-4 and calibrate the internal spectral quality grading. Benefiting from the combination of size and detailed sampling of this dataset, we conclude by presenting a map showing in unprecedented detail the large-scale distribution of galaxies between 5 and 8 billion years ago. Based on observations

  15. The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS):. A quiescent formation of massive red-sequence galaxies over the past 9 Gyr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, A.; Scodeggio, M.; Ilbert, O.; Bolzonella, M.; Davidzon, I.; Coupon, J.; Garilli, B.; Guzzo, L.; Zamorani, G.; Abbas, U.; Adami, C.; Arnouts, S.; Bel, J.; Bottini, D.; Branchini, E.; Cappi, A.; Cucciati, O.; De Lucia, G.; de la Torre, S.; Franzetti, P.; Fumana, M.; Granett, B. R.; Iovino, A.; Krywult, J.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Małek, K.; Marulli, F.; McCracken, H. J.; Paioro, L.; Polletta, M.; Pollo, A.; Schlagenhaufer, H.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Tojeiro, R.; Vergani, D.; Zanichelli, A.; Burden, A.; Di Porto, C.; Marchetti, A.; Marinoni, C.; Mellier, Y.; Moscardini, L.; Nichol, R. C.; Peacock, J. A.; Percival, W. J.; Phleps, S.; Wolk, M.

    2014-03-01

    We explore the evolution of the colour-magnitude relation (CMR) and luminosity function (LF) at 0.4 < z < 1.3 from the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS) using ~45 000 galaxies with precise spectroscopic redshifts down to i'AB < 22.5 over ~10.32 deg2 in two fields. From z = 0.5 to z = 1.3 the LF and CMR are well defined for different galaxy populations and M*B evolves by ~1.04(1.09) ± 0.06(0.10) mag for the total (red) galaxy sample. We compare different criteria for selecting early-type galaxies: (1) a fixed cut in rest-frame (U - V) colours, (2) an evolving cut in (U - V) colours, (3) a rest-frame (NUV - r') - (r' - K) colour selection, and (4) a spectral-energy-distribution classification. The completeness and contamination varies for the different methods and with redshift, but regardless of the method we measure a consistent evolution of the red-sequence (RS). Between 0.4 < z < 1.3 we find a moderate evolution of the RS intercept of Δ(U - V) = 0.28 ± 0.14 mag, favouring exponentially declining star formation (SF) histories with SF truncation at 1.7 ≤ z ≤ 2.3. Together with the rise in the number density of red galaxies by 0.64 dex since z = 1, this suggests a rapid build-up of massive galaxies (M⋆ > 1011 M⊙) and expeditious RS formation over a short period of ~1.5 Gyr starting before z = 1. This is supported by the detection of ongoing SF in early-type galaxies at 0.9 < z < 1.0, in contrast with the quiescent red stellar populations of early-type galaxies at 0.5 < z < 0.6. There is an increase in the observed CMR scatter with redshift, which is two times larger than observed in galaxy clusters and at variance with theoretical model predictions. We discuss possible physical mechanisms that support the observed evolution of the red galaxy population. Our findings point out that massive galaxies have experienced a sharp SF quenching at z ~ 1 with only limited additional merging. In contrast, less-massive galaxies experience a mix of SF

  16. THE XMM CLUSTER SURVEY: THE BUILD-UP OF STELLAR MASS IN BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES AT HIGH REDSHIFT

    SciTech Connect

    Stott, J. P.; Collins, C. A.; Hilton, M.; Capozzi, D.; Sahlen, M.; Lloyd-Davies, E.; Hosmer, M.; Liddle, A. R.; Mehrtens, N.; Romer, A. K.; Miller, C. J.; Stanford, S. A.; Viana, P. T. P.; Davidson, M.; Hoyle, B.; Kay, S. T.; Nichol, R. C.

    2010-07-20

    We present deep J- and K{sub s} -band photometry of 20 high redshift galaxy clusters between z = 0.8 and1.5, 19 of which are observed with the MOIRCS instrument on the Subaru telescope. By using near-infrared light as a proxy for stellar mass we find the surprising result that the average stellar mass of Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs) has remained constant at {approx}9 x 10{sup 11} M {sub sun} since z {approx} 1.5. We investigate the effect on this result of differing star formation histories generated by three well-known and independent stellar population codes and find it to be robust for reasonable, physically motivated choices of age and metallicity. By performing Monte Carlo simulations we find that the result is unaffected by any correlation between BCG mass and cluster mass in either the observed or model clusters. The large stellar masses imply that the assemblage of these galaxies took place at the same time as the initial burst of star formation. This result leads us to conclude that dry merging has had little effect on the average stellar mass of BCGs over the last 9-10 Gyr in stark contrast to the predictions of semi-analytic models, based on the hierarchical merging of dark matter halos, which predict a more protracted mass build-up over a Hubble time. However, we discuss that there is potential for reconciliation between observation and theory if there is a significant growth of material in the intracluster light over the same period.

  17. Redshift-space distortions.

    PubMed

    Percival, Will J; Samushia, Lado; Ross, Ashley J; Shapiro, Charles; Raccanelli, Alvise

    2011-12-28

    Comparing measurements of redshift-space distortions (RSDs) with geometrical observations of the expansion of the Universe offers tremendous potential for testing general relativity on very large scales. The basic linear theory of RSDs in the distant-observer limit has been known for 25 years and the effect has been conclusively observed in numerous galaxy surveys. The next generation of galaxy survey will observe many millions of galaxies over volumes of many tens of Gpc(3). They will provide RSD measurements of such exquisite precision that we will have to carefully analyse and correct for many systematic deviations from this simple picture in order to fully exploit the statistical precision obtained. We review RSD theory and show how ubiquitous RSDs actually are, and then consider a number of potential systematic effects, shamelessly highlighting recent work in which we have been involved. This review ends by looking ahead to the future surveys that will make the next generation of RSD measurements.

  18. The large scale structure of the Universe revealed with high redshift emission-line galaxies: implications for future surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonino Orsi, Alvaro

    2015-08-01

    Nebular emission in galaxies trace their star-formation activity within the last 10 Myr or so. Hence, these objects are typically found in the outskirts of massive clusters, where otherwise environmental effects can effectively stop the star formation process. In this talk I discuss the nature of emission-line galaxies (ELGs) and its implications for their clustering properties. To account for the relevant physical ingredients that produce nebular emission, I combine semi-analytical models of galaxy formation with a radiative transfer code of Ly-alpha photons, and the photoionzation and shock code MAPPINGS-III. As a result, the clustering strength of ELGs is found to correlate weakly with the line luminosities. Also, their 2-d clustering displays a weak finger-of-god effect, and the clustering in linear scales is affected by assembly bias. I review the impact of the nature of this galaxy population for future spectroscopic large surveys targeting ELGs to extract cosmological results. In particular, I present forecasts for the ELG population in J-PAS, an 8000 deg^2 survey with 54 narrow-band filters covering the optical range, expected to start in 2016.

  19. The XXL survey. V. Detection of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect of the redshift 1.9 galaxy cluster XLSSU J021744.1–034536 with CARMA

    SciTech Connect

    Mantz, A. B.; Abdulla, Z.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Leitch, E. M.; Greer, C. H.; Marrone, D. P.; Muchovej, S.; Adami, C.; Birkinshaw, M.; Bremer, M.; Giles, P.; Maughan, B.; Clerc, N.; Horellou, C.; Pacaud, F.; Pierre, M.; Willis, J.

    2014-10-20

    We report the detection of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect of galaxy cluster XLSSU J021744.1–034536, using 30 GHz Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) data. This cluster was discovered via its extended X-ray emission in the XMM- Newton Large Scale Structure survey, the precursor to the XXL survey. It has a photometrically determined redshift z=1.91{sub −0.21}{sup +0.19}, making it among the most distant clusters known, and nominally the most distant for which the SZ effect has been measured. The spherically integrated Comptonization is Y {sub 500} = (3.0 ± 0.4) × 10{sup –12}, a measurement that is relatively insensitive to assumptions regarding the size and redshift of the cluster, as well as the background cosmology. Using a variety of locally calibrated cluster scaling relations extrapolated to z ∼ 2, we estimate a mass M {sub 500} ∼ (1-2) × 10{sup 14} M {sub ☉} from the X-ray flux and SZ signal. The measured properties of this cluster are in good agreement with the extrapolation of an X-ray luminosity-SZ effect scaling relation calibrated from clusters discovered by the South Pole Telescope at higher masses and lower redshifts. The full XXL-CARMA sample will provide a more complete, multi-wavelength census of distant clusters in order to robustly extend the calibration of cluster scaling relations to these high redshifts.

  20. Spectral properties of galaxies in the Stromlo-APM redshift survey: clues on the local star-forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tresse, L.; Maddox, S. J.; Loveday, J.

    We analyse emission-line properties of the bj-selected Stromlo-APM spectra ( = 0.05). Because this is a representative sample, we can study the global spectral properties of the local galaxy population. We classify spectra according to their H_alpha emission, which is closely related to massive star formation. This study gives a comparative local point for analysis of more distant surveys. We show that in the local universe, faint, small galaxies are dominated by star formation activity, while bright, large galaxies are more quiescent. Obviously this picture of the local universe is quite different from the distant one, where bright galaxies appear to show a rapidly-increasing activity back in time.

  1. Precision Photometric Redshifts for Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capak, Peter

    The growth of structure as measured by weak lensing has been identified as one of the most sensitive probes of dark energy and dark matter, and is one of the three key dark energy experiments proposed for WFIRST. However, the weak lensing measurement depends strongly on robust photometric redshifts, and is highly sensitive to systematic biases in these redshift estimates. Several methods have been proposed to remove systematic biases based on spectroscopic samples and spatial clustering, but none has been demonstrated to perform at the level required for WFIRST. Making the problem more challenging, at least two independent methods must be developed: one to correct the systematic errors, and another to verify the correction and quantify residual error. Here we propose to develop an informed calibration of the color-redshift relation that will minimize the number of spectroscopic redshifts needed for machine learning algorithms and produce accurate Bayesian priors for template fitting algorithms. The proposed method uses our current knowledge of galaxies and galaxy evolution from existing deep surveys to parameterize where in the WFIRST color space the photometric redshifts are well understood, and where they are not. First, we will develop a method to map from the WFIRST N-dimensional color space to redshift. This will determine which regions of color space map to redshift in a well-behaved way, and which have a more complex behavior. We will make use of the fact that higher-dimensional data (narrower band passes, more sensitive data, and larger spectral coverage) are available in select areas of the sky to determine how much uncertainty exists in WFIRST color regions. Finally, we will develop a statistical method to determine how many spectroscopic redshifts are needed in each cell of WFIRST color space to accurately map from color to redshift, and which color space cells should be excised from the weak lensing analysis due to redshift degeneracy. In addition to

  2. THE COS-HALOS SURVEY: AN EMPIRICAL DESCRIPTION OF METAL-LINE ABSORPTION IN THE LOW-REDSHIFT CIRCUMGALACTIC MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Werk, Jessica K.; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Tripp, Todd M.; O'Meara, John M.; Peeples, Molly S.

    2013-02-15

    We present the equivalent width and column density measurements for low and intermediate ionization states of the circumgalactic medium (CGM) surrounding 44 low-z, L Almost-Equal-To L* galaxies drawn from the COS-Halos survey. These measurements are derived from far-UV transitions observed in HST/COS and Keck/HIRES spectra of background quasars within an impact parameter R < 160 kpc to the targeted galaxies. The data show significant metal-line absorption for 33 of the 44 galaxies, including quiescent systems, revealing the common occurrence of a cool (T Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} K), metal-enriched CGM. The detection rates and column densities derived for these metal lines decrease with increasing impact parameter, a trend we interpret as a declining metal surface density profile for the CGM. A comparison of the relative column densities of adjacent ionization states indicates that the gas is predominantly ionized. The large surface density in metals demands a large reservoir of metals and gas in the cool CGM (very conservatively, M {sup cool} {sub CGM} > 10{sup 9} M {sub Sun }), which likely traces a distinct density and/or temperature regime from the highly ionized CGM traced by O{sup +5} absorption. The large dispersion in absorption strengths (including non-detections) suggests that the cool CGM traces a wide range of densities or a mix of local ionizing conditions. Lastly, the kinematics inferred from the metal-line profiles are consistent with the cool CGM being bound to the dark matter halos hosting the galaxies; this gas may serve as fuel for future star formation. Future work will leverage this data set to provide estimates on the mass, metallicity, dynamics, and origin of the cool CGM in low-z, L* galaxies.

  3. An HST/COS legacy survey of intervening Si III absorption in the extended gaseous halos of low-redshift galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, P.; Wakker, B. P.; Fechner, C.; Herenz, P.; Tepper-García, T.; Fox, A. J.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: Doubly ionized silicon (Si iii) is a powerful tracer of diffuse ionized gas inside and outside of galaxies. It can be observed in the local Universe in ultraviolet (UV) absorption against bright extragalactic background sources. We here present an extensive study of intervening Si iii-selected absorbers and study the properties of the warm circumgalactic medium (CGM) around low-redshift (z ≤ 0.1) galaxies. Methods: We analyzed the UV absorption spectra of 303 extragalactic background sources, as obtained with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) on-board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). We developed a geometrical model for the absorption-cross section of the CGM around the local galaxy population and compared the observed Si iii absorption statistics with predictions provided by the model. We also compared redshifts and positions of the absorbers with those of ~64 000 galaxies using archival galaxy-survey data to investigate the relation between intervening Si iii absorbers and the CGM. Results: Along a total redshift path of Δz ≈ 24, we identify 69 intervening Si iii systems that all show associated absorption from other low and high ions (e.g., H i, Si ii, Si iv, C ii, C iv). We derive a bias-corrected number density of dN/dz(Si iii)= 2.5 ± 0.4 for absorbers with column densities log N(Si iii) > 12.2, which is ~3 times the number density of strong Mg ii systems at z = 0. This number density matches the expected cross section of a Si iii absorbing CGM around the local galaxy population with a mean covering fraction of ⟨ fc ⟩ = 0.69. For the majority (~60 percent) of the absorbers, we identify possible host galaxies within 300 km s-1 of the absorbers and derive impact parameters ρ < 200 kpc, demonstrating that the spatial distributions of Si iii absorbers and galaxies are highly correlated. Conclusions: Our study indicates that the majority of Si iii-selected absorbers in our sample trace the CGM of nearby galaxies within their virial radii at a

  4. High redshift radio galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarthy, Patrick J.

    1993-01-01

    High redshift galaxies that host powerful radio sources are examined. An overview is presented of the content of radio surveys: 3CR and 3CRR, 4C and 4C/USS, B2/1 Jy, MG, MRC/1Jy, Parkes/PSR, B3, and ESO Key-Project. Narrow-line radio galaxies in the visible and UV, the source of ionization and excitation of the emission lines, emission-line luminosities, morphology of the line-emitting gas, physical properties and energetics, kinematics of the line-emitting gas, and implications from the emission lines are discussed. The morphologies and environments of the host galaxies, the alignment effect, and spectral energy distributions and ages are also examined.

  5. Real-time cosmography with redshift derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, C. J. A. P.; Martinelli, M.; Calabrese, E.; Ramos, M. P. L. P.

    2016-08-01

    The drift in the redshift of objects passively following the cosmological expansion has long been recognized as a key model-independent probe of cosmology. Here, we study the cosmological relevance of measurements of time or redshift derivatives of this drift, arguing that the combination of first and second redshift derivatives is a powerful test of the Λ CDM cosmological model. In particular, the latter can be obtained numerically from a set of measurements of the drift at different redshifts. We show that, in the low-redshift limit, a measurement of the derivative of the drift can provide a constraint on the jerk parameter, which is j =1 for flat Λ CDM , while generically j ≠1 for other models. We emphasize that such a measurement is well within the reach of the ELT-HIRES and SKA Phase 2 array surveys.

  6. Clustering-based redshift estimation: application to VIPERS/CFHTLS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scottez, V.; Mellier, Y.; Granett, B. R.; Moutard, T.; Kilbinger, M.; Scodeggio, M.; Garilli, B.; Bolzonella, M.; de la Torre, S.; Guzzo, L.; Abbas, U.; Adami, C.; Arnouts, S.; Bottini, D.; Branchini, E.; Cappi, A.; Cucciati, O.; Davidzon, I.; Fritz, A.; Franzetti, P.; Iovino, A.; Krywult, J.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Małek, K.; Marulli, F.; Polletta, M.; Pollo, A.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Tojeiro, R.; Vergani, D.; Zanichelli, A.; Bel, J.; Coupon, J.; De Lucia, G.; Ilbert, O.; McCracken, H. J.; Moscardini, L.

    2016-10-01

    We explore the accuracy of the clustering-based redshift estimation proposed by Ménard et al. when applied to VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS) and Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey (CFHTLS) real data. This method enables us to reconstruct redshift distributions from measurement of the angular clustering of objects using a set of secure spectroscopic redshifts. We use state-of-the-art spectroscopic measurements with iAB < 22.5 from the VIPERS as reference population to infer the redshift distribution of galaxies from the CFHTLS T0007 release. VIPERS provides a nearly representative sample to a flux limit of iAB < 22.5 at a redshift of >0.5 which allows us to test the accuracy of the clustering-based redshift distributions. We show that this method enables us to reproduce the true mean colour-redshift relation when both populations have the same magnitude limit. We also show that this technique allows the inference of redshift distributions for a population fainter than the reference and we give an estimate of the colour-redshift mapping in this case. This last point is of great interest for future large-redshift surveys which require a complete faint spectroscopic sample.

  7. Galaxies at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, F. E.

    2014-10-01

    Recent years have seen tremendous progress in finding and charactering star-forming galaxies at high redshifts across the electromagnetic spectrum, giving us a more complete picture of how galaxies evolve, both in terms of their stellar and gas content, as well as the growth of their central supermassive black holes. A wealth of studies now demonstrate that star formation peaked at roughly half the age of the Universe and drops precariously as we look back to very early times, and that their central monsters apparently growth with them. At the highest-redshifts, we are pushing the boundaries via deep surveys at optical, X-ray, radio wavelengths, and more recently using gamma-ray bursts. I will review some of our accomplishments and failures. Telescope have enabled Lyman break galaxies to be robustly identified, but the UV luminosity function and star formation rate density of this population at z = 6 - 8 seems to be much lower than at z = 2 - 4. High escape fractions and a large contribution from faint galaxies below our current detection limits would be required for star-forming galaxies to reionize the Universe. We have also found that these galaxies have blue rest-frame UV colours, which might indicate lower dust extinction at z > 5. There has been some spectroscopic confirmation of these Lyman break galaxies through Lyman-α emission, but the fraction of galaxies where we see this line drops at z > 7, perhaps due to the onset of the Gunn-Peterson effect (where the IGM is opaque to Lyman-α).

  8. A SURVEY OF METAL LINES AT HIGH REDSHIFT. II. SDSS ABSORPTION LINE STUDIES-O VI LINE DENSITY, SPACE DENSITY, AND GAS METALLICITY AT z{sub abs} {approx} 3.0

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, S.; Mathur, S.; Pieri, M.; York, D. G.

    2010-09-15

    We have analyzed a large data set of O VI absorber candidates found in the spectra of 3702 Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) quasars, focusing on a subsample of 387 active galactic nuclei sight lines with an average S/N {>=}5.0, allowing for the detection of absorbers above a rest-frame equivalent width limit of W{sub r} {>=} 0.19 A for the O VI 1032 A component. Accounting for random interlopers mimicking an O VI doublet, we derive for the first time a secure lower limit for the redshift number density {Delta}N/{Delta}z for redshifts z{sub abs} {>=} 2.8. With extensive Monte Carlo simulations, we quantify the losses of absorbers due to blending with the ubiquitous Ly{alpha} forest lines and estimate the success rate of retrieving each individual candidate as a function of its redshift, the emission redshift of the quasar, the strength of the absorber, and the measured signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of the spectrum by modeling typical Lyman forest spectra. These correction factors allow us to derive the 'incompleteness and S/N-corrected' redshift number densities of O VI absorbers: {Delta}N{sub O{sub VI,c}}/{Delta}z{sub c} (2.8 < z < 3.2) = 4.6 {+-} 0.3, {Delta}N{sub O{sub VI,c}}/{Delta}z{sub c} (3.2 < z < 3.6) = 6.7 {+-} 0.8, and {Delta}N{sub O{sub VI,c}}/{Delta}z{sub c} (3.6 < z < 4.0) = 8.4 {+-} 2.9. We can place a secure lower limit for the contribution of O VI to the closure mass density at the redshifts probed here: {Omega}{sub O{sub VI}}(2.8 < z < 3.2) {>=} 1.9 x 10{sup -8} h {sup -1}. We show that the strong lines we probe account for over 65% of the mass in the O VI absorbers; the weak absorbers, while dominant in line number density, do not contribute significantly to the mass density. Making a conservative assumption about the ionization fraction, O{sub VI}/O, and adopting the Anders and Grevesse solar abundance values, we derive the mean metallicity of the gas probed in our search: {zeta}(2.8 < z < 3.2) {>=} 3.6 x 10{sup -4} h, in good agreement with other

  9. The DAFT/FADA survey. I.Photometric redshifts along lines of sight to clusters in the z=[0.4,0.9] interval

    SciTech Connect

    Guennou, L.; Adami, C.; Ulmer, M.P.; LeBrun, V.; Durret, F.; Johnston, D.; Ilbert, O.; Clowe, D.; Gavazzi, R.; Murphy, K.; Schrabback, T.; /Leiden Observ. /Fermilab

    2010-08-01

    As a contribution to the understanding of the dark energy concept, the Dark energy American French Team (DAFT, in French FADA) has started a large project to characterize statistically high redshift galaxy clusters, infer cosmological constraints from Weak Lensing Tomography, and understand biases relevant for constraining dark energy and cluster physics in future cluster and cosmological experiments. Aims. The purpose of this paper is to establish the basis of reference for the photo-z determination used in all our subsequent papers, including weak lensing tomography studies. This project is based on a sample of 91 high redshift (z {ge} 0.4), massive ({approx}> 3 x 10{sup 14} M{sub {circle_dot}}) clusters with existing HST imaging, for which we are presently performing complementary multi-wavelength imaging. This allows us in particular to estimate spectral types and determine accurate photometric redshifts for galaxies along the lines of sight to the first ten clusters for which all the required data are available down to a limit of I{sub AB} = 24./24.5 with the LePhare software. The accuracy in redshift is of the order of 0.05 for the range 0.2 {le} z {le} 1.5. We verified that the technique applied to obtain photometric redshifts works well by comparing our results to with previous works. In clusters, photo-z accuracy is degraded for bright absolute magnitudes and for the latest and earliest type galaxies. The photo-z accuracy also only slightly varies as a function of the spectral type for field galaxies. As a consequence, we find evidence for an environmental dependence of the photo-z accuracy, interpreted as the standard used Spectral Energy Distributions being not very well suited to cluster galaxies. Finally, we modeled the LCDCS 0504 mass with the strong arcs detected along this line of sight.

  10. An ALMA survey of submillimeter galaxies in the extended Chandra deep field south: The redshift distribution and evolution of submillimeter galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J. M.; Swinbank, A. M.; Smail, Ian; Alexander, D. M.; Danielson, A. L. R.; Thomson, A. P.; Brandt, W. N.; Bertoldi, F.; Karim, A.; De Breuck, C.; Chapman, S. C.; Coppin, K. E. K.; Da Cunha, E.; Hodge, J. A.; Schinnerer, E.; Dannerbauer, H.; Greve, T. R.; Ivison, R. J.; Knudsen, K. K.; Poggianti, B. M.; and others

    2014-06-20

    We present the first photometric redshift distribution for a large sample of 870 μm submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) with robust identifications based on observations with ALMA. In our analysis we consider 96 SMGs in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South, 77 of which have 4-19 band photometry. We model the SEDs for these 77 SMGs, deriving a median photometric redshift of z {sub phot} = 2.3 ± 0.1. The remaining 19 SMGs have insufficient photometry to derive photometric redshifts, but a stacking analysis of Herschel observations confirms they are not spurious. Assuming that these SMGs have an absolute H-band magnitude distribution comparable to that of a complete sample of z ∼ 1-2 SMGs, we demonstrate that they lie at slightly higher redshifts, raising the median redshift for SMGs to z {sub phot} = 2.5 ± 0.2. Critically we show that the proportion of galaxies undergoing an SMG-like phase at z ≥ 3 is at most 35% ± 5% of the total population. We derive a median stellar mass of M {sub *} = (8 ± 1) × 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉}, although there are systematic uncertainties of up to 5 × for individual sources. Assuming that the star formation activity in SMGs has a timescale of ∼100 Myr, we show that their descendants at z ∼ 0 would have a space density and M{sub H} distribution that are in good agreement with those of local ellipticals. In addition, the inferred mass-weighted ages of the local ellipticals broadly agree with the look-back times of the SMG events. Taken together, these results are consistent with a simple model that identifies SMGs as events that form most of the stars seen in the majority of luminous elliptical galaxies at the present day.

  11. The FourStar Galaxy Evolution Survey (ZFOURGE): Ultraviolet to Far-infrared Catalogs, Medium-bandwidth Photometric Redshifts with Improved Accuracy, Stellar Masses, and Confirmation of Quiescent Galaxies to z ˜ 3.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straatman, Caroline M. S.; Spitler, Lee R.; Quadri, Ryan F.; Labbé, Ivo; Glazebrook, Karl; Persson, S. Eric; Papovich, Casey; Tran, Kim-Vy H.; Brammer, Gabriel B.; Cowley, Michael; Tomczak, Adam; Nanayakkara, Themiya; Alcorn, Leo; Allen, Rebecca; Broussard, Adam; van Dokkum, Pieter; Forrest, Ben; van Houdt, Josha; Kacprzak, Glenn G.; Kawinwanichakij, Lalitwadee; Kelson, Daniel D.; Lee, Janice; McCarthy, Patrick J.; Mehrtens, Nicola; Monson, Andrew; Murphy, David; Rees, Glen; Tilvi, Vithal; Whitaker, Katherine E.

    2016-10-01

    The FourStar galaxy evolution survey (ZFOURGE) is a 45 night legacy program with the FourStar near-infrared camera on Magellan and one of the most sensitive surveys to date. ZFOURGE covers a total of 400 arcmin2 in cosmic fields CDFS, COSMOS and UDS, overlapping CANDELS. We present photometric catalogs comprising >70,000 galaxies, selected from ultradeep K s -band detection images (25.5-26.5 AB mag, 5σ, total), and >80% complete to K s < 25.3-25.9 AB. We use 5 near-IR medium-bandwidth filters (J 1, J 2, J 3, H s , H l ) as well as broad-band K s at 1.05-2.16 μm to 25-26 AB at a seeing of ˜0.″5. Each field has ancillary imaging in 26-40 filters at 0.3-8 μm. We derive photometric redshifts and stellar population properties. Comparing with spectroscopic redshifts indicates a photometric redshift uncertainty σ z = 0.010, 0.009, and 0.011 in CDFS, COSMOS, and UDS. As spectroscopic samples are often biased toward bright and blue sources, we also inspect the photometric redshift differences between close pairs of galaxies, finding σ z,pairs = 0.01-0.02 at 1 < z < 2.5. We quantify how σ z,pairs depends on redshift, magnitude, spectral energy distribution type, and the inclusion of FourStar medium bands. σ z,pairs is smallest for bright, blue star-forming samples, while red star-forming galaxies have the worst σ z,pairs. Including FourStar medium bands reduces σ z,pairs by 50% at 1.5 < z < 2.5. We calculate star formation rates (SFRs) based on ultraviolet and ultradeep far-IR Spitzer/MIPS and Herschel/PACS data. We derive rest-frame U - V and V - J colors, and illustrate how these correlate with specific SFR and dust emission to z = 3.5. We confirm the existence of quiescent galaxies at z ˜ 3, demonstrating their SFRs are suppressed by > ×15. This paper contains data gathered with the 6.5 meter Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas observatory, Chile

  12. Galaxies at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Fournon, I.; Balcells, M.; Moreno-Insertis, F.; Sánchez, F.

    2010-08-01

    Participants; Group photograph; Preface; Acknowledgements; 1. Galaxy formation and evolution: recent progress R. Ellis; 2. Galaxies at high redshift M. Dickinson; 3. High-redshift galaxies: the far-infrared and sub-millimeter view A. Franceschini; 4. Quasar absorption lines J. Bechtold; 5. Stellar population synthesis models at low and high redshift G. Bruzual A.; 6. Elliptical galaxies K. C. Freeman; 7. Disk galaxies K. C. Freeman; 8. Dark matter in disk galaxies K. C. Freeman.

  13. Photometric Redshifts: 50 Years After

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budavári, Tamás

    2012-03-01

    Almost half a century has passed since Baum [1] first applied a novel method to a handful of galaxies. Using the mean spectral energy distribution (SED) of six bright ellipticals in the Virgo cluster, he could accurately estimate the redshifts of other clusters in a comparison that we today call SED fitting or, more generally, photometric redshifts. Owing to the expansion of the Universe, galaxies farther away appear to be redder. Their observed colors are a combination of this redshift and their intrinsic properties. Thanks to the latest detector technology, today we can undertake deep, multicolor surveys to probe statistically meaningful volumes. The yield of photometry in terms of the number of sources is over two orders of magnitude higher than what is achievable by (the more accurate) spectroscopic follow-ups. To exploit the information in the photometric data themselves, several new methods have been developed over the years. One particular successful example is the estimation of photometric redshifts. Baum's motivation for using photometric measurements instead of spectroscopy was the same back then as ours is now: to push the analyses to uncharted territories. His original idea has grown into a research area of its own, which is more important now than ever before. In this chapter, we look at some of the recent advancements of the field. In Section 15.2 we briefly highlight some of the original ideas and the current state of the art in estimating the photometric redshifts. Section 15.3 introduces a Bayesian framework for discussing the traditional methods within a unified context; it explicitly enumerates and identifies their (missing) ingredients. Section 15.4 aims to plant seeds for new ideas for future directions, and Section 15.5 offers some concluding remarks.

  14. A new method to search for high-redshift clusters using photometric redshifts

    SciTech Connect

    Castignani, G.; Celotti, A.; Chiaberge, M.; Norman, C.

    2014-09-10

    We describe a new method (Poisson probability method, PPM) to search for high-redshift galaxy clusters and groups by using photometric redshift information and galaxy number counts. The method relies on Poisson statistics and is primarily introduced to search for megaparsec-scale environments around a specific beacon. The PPM is tailored to both the properties of the FR I radio galaxies in the Chiaberge et al. sample, which are selected within the COSMOS survey, and to the specific data set used. We test the efficiency of our method of searching for cluster candidates against simulations. Two different approaches are adopted. (1) We use two z ∼ 1 X-ray detected cluster candidates found in the COSMOS survey and we shift them to higher redshift up to z = 2. We find that the PPM detects the cluster candidates up to z = 1.5, and it correctly estimates both the redshift and size of the two clusters. (2) We simulate spherically symmetric clusters of different size and richness, and we locate them at different redshifts (i.e., z = 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0) in the COSMOS field. We find that the PPM detects the simulated clusters within the considered redshift range with a statistical 1σ redshift accuracy of ∼0.05. The PPM is an efficient alternative method for high-redshift cluster searches that may also be applied to both present and future wide field surveys such as SDSS Stripe 82, LSST, and Euclid. Accurate photometric redshifts and a survey depth similar or better than that of COSMOS (e.g., I < 25) are required.

  15. CONSTRAINING SOURCE REDSHIFT DISTRIBUTIONS WITH GRAVITATIONAL LENSING

    SciTech Connect

    Wittman, D.; Dawson, W. A.

    2012-09-10

    We introduce a new method for constraining the redshift distribution of a set of galaxies, using weak gravitational lensing shear. Instead of using observed shears and redshifts to constrain cosmological parameters, we ask how well the shears around clusters can constrain the redshifts, assuming fixed cosmological parameters. This provides a check on photometric redshifts, independent of source spectral energy distribution properties and therefore free of confounding factors such as misidentification of spectral breaks. We find that {approx}40 massive ({sigma}{sub v} = 1200 km s{sup -1}) cluster lenses are sufficient to determine the fraction of sources in each of six coarse redshift bins to {approx}11%, given weak (20%) priors on the masses of the highest-redshift lenses, tight (5%) priors on the masses of the lowest-redshift lenses, and only modest (20%-50%) priors on calibration and evolution effects. Additional massive lenses drive down uncertainties as N{sub lens}{sup -1/2}, but the improvement slows as one is forced to use lenses further down the mass function. Future large surveys contain enough clusters to reach 1% precision in the bin fractions if the tight lens-mass priors can be maintained for large samples of lenses. In practice this will be difficult to achieve, but the method may be valuable as a complement to other more precise methods because it is based on different physics and therefore has different systematic errors.

  16. Dusty Galaxies at the Highest Redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, David L.; Greenslade, Josh; Riechers, Dominik A.; Wardlow, Julie; Pérez-Fournon, Ismael

    The use of red colour as the basis for selecting candidate high redshift dusty galaxies from surveys made with Herschel has proved highly successful. The highest redshift such object, HFLS3, lies at z = 6.34 and numerous other sources have been found. Spectroscopic followup confirms that most of these lie at z > 4. These sources are found in such numbers that they represent a challenge to current models of galaxy evolution. We also examine the prospects for finding dusty galaxies at still higher redshifts. These would not appear in the SPIRE surveys from Herschel but would be detected in longer wavelength, submm, surveys. Several such `SPIRE-dropouts' have been found and are now subject to followup observations.

  17. The VIMOS VLT Deep Survey: star formation rate density of Lyα emitters from a sample of 217 galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts 2 ≤ z ≤ 6.6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassata, P.; Le Fèvre, O.; Garilli, B.; Maccagni, D.; Le Brun, V.; Scodeggio, M.; Tresse, L.; Ilbert, O.; Zamorani, G.; Cucciati, O.; Contini, T.; Bielby, R.; Mellier, Y.; McCracken, H. J.; Pollo, A.; Zanichelli, A.; Bardelli, S.; Cappi, A.; Pozzetti, L.; Vergani, D.; Zucca, E.

    2011-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this work is to study the contribution of the Lyα emitters to the star formation rate density (SFRD) of the Universe in the interval 2 < z < 6.6. Methods: We assembled a sample of 217 Lyα emitters (LAE) from the Vimos-VLT Deep Survey (VVDS) with secure spectroscopic redshifts in the redshift range 2surveyed with the VVDS-Deep and the 3.3 arcmin2 from the VVDS Ultra-Deep survey, and 84 are targeted identifications in the 0.62 deg2 surveyed with the VVDS-DEEP and 0.16 deg2 from the Ultra-Deep survey. Among the serendipitous targets we estimate that 90% of the emission lines are most probably Lyα, while the remaining 10% could be either [OII]3727 or Lyα. We computed the luminosity function (LF) and derived the star-formation rate density using this sample of LAE. Results: The VVDS-LAE sample reaches faint line fluxes F(Lyα) = 1.5 × 10-18 erg/s/cm2 (corresponding to L(Lyα) ~ 1041 erg/s at z ~ 3), allows the faint-end slope of the luminosity function to be constrained to α ~ -1.6 ± 0.12 at redshift z ~ 2.5 and to α ~ -1.78-0.120.10 at redshift ~4, placing trends found in previous LAE studies on firm statistical grounds, and indicating that sub-L_* LAE (LLy-α ⪉ 1042.5 erg/s) contribute significantly to the SFRD. The projected number density and volume density of faint LAE in 2 ≤ z ≤ 6.6 with F > 1.5 × 10-18 erg/s/cm2 are 33 galaxies/arcmin2 and ~4 × 10-2 Mpc-3, respectively. We find that the observed luminosity function (LF) of LAEs does not evolve from z = 2 to z = 6. This implies that, after correction for the redshift-dependent IGM absorption, the intrinsic luminosity function must have evolved significantly over 3 Gyr. The SFRD from LAE contributes around 20% of the SFRD at z = 2-3, while the LAE appear to be the dominant source of star formation producing ionizing photons in the

  18. Properties of the redshift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tifft, William G.; Cocke, W. J.

    1990-01-01

    Central to any analysis of dynamical systems, or large scale motion, is the interpretation of redshifts of galaxies as classical Doppler velocity shifts. This is a testable assumption and for many years evidence has accumulated that is inconsistent with the assumption. Here, the authors review recent evidence suggesting systematic radial dependence and temporal variation of redshifts.

  19. Exploring the SDSS photometric galaxies with clustering redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Mubdi; Mendez, Alexander J.; Ménard, Brice; Scranton, Ryan; Schmidt, Samuel J.; Morrison, Christopher B.; Budavári, Tamás

    2016-07-01

    We apply clustering-based redshift inference to all extended sources from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometric catalogue, down to magnitude r = 22. We map the relationships between colours and redshift, without assumption of the sources' spectral energy distributions (SEDs). We identify and locate star-forming quiescent galaxies, and active galactic nuclei, as well as colour changes due to spectral features, such as the 4000 Å break, redshifting through specific filters. Our mapping is globally in good agreement with colour-redshift tracks computed with SED templates, but reveals informative differences, such as the need for a lower fraction of M-type stars in certain templates. We compare our clustering-redshift estimates to photometric redshifts and find these two independent estimators to be in good agreement at each limiting magnitude considered. Finally, we present the global clustering-redshift distribution of all Sloan extended sources, showing objects up to z ˜ 0.8. While the overall shape agrees with that inferred from photometric redshifts, the clustering-redshift technique results in a smoother distribution, with no indication of structure in redshift space suggested by the photometric-redshift estimates (likely artefacts imprinted by their spectroscopic training set). We also infer a higher fraction of high-redshift objects. The mapping between the four observed colours and redshift can be used to estimate the redshift probability distribution function of individual galaxies. This work is an initial step towards producing a general mapping between redshift and all available observables in the photometric space, including brightness, size, concentration, and ellipticity.

  20. Cosmological constraints from Sunyaev-Zeldovich cluster counts: An approach to account for missing redshifts

    SciTech Connect

    Bonaldi, A.; Battye, R. A.; Brown, M. L.

    2014-05-10

    The accumulation of redshifts provides a significant observational bottleneck when using galaxy cluster surveys to constrain cosmological parameters. We propose a simple method to allow the use of samples where there is a fraction of the redshifts that are not known. The simplest assumption is that the missing redshifts are randomly extracted from the catalog, but the method also allows one to take into account known selection effects in the accumulation of redshifts. We quantify the reduction in statistical precision of cosmological parameter constraints as a function of the fraction of missing redshifts for simulated surveys, and also investigate the impact of making an incorrect assumption for the distribution of missing redshifts.

  1. HIGH-REDSHIFT COOL-CORE GALAXY CLUSTERS DETECTED VIA THE SUNYAEV-ZEL'DOVICH EFFECT IN THE SOUTH POLE TELESCOPE SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Semler, D. R.; Suhada, R.; Bazin, G.; Bocquet, S.; Desai, S.; Aird, K. A.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bayliss, M.; Bautz, M.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; Brodwin, M.; Cho, H. M.; Clocchiatti, A.; De Haan, T.; Dobbs, M. A.; and others

    2012-12-20

    We report the first investigation of cool-core properties of galaxy clusters selected via their Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect. We use 13 galaxy clusters uniformly selected from 178 deg{sup 2} observed with the South Pole Telescope (SPT) and followed up by the Chandra X-ray Observatory. They form an approximately mass-limited sample (>3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} M{sub Sun} h {sup -1}{sub 70}) spanning redshifts 0.3 < z < 1.1. Using previously published X-ray-selected cluster samples, we compare two proxies of cool-core strength: surface brightness concentration (c{sub SB}) and cuspiness ({alpha}). We find that c{sub SB} is better constrained. We measure c{sub SB} for the SPT sample and find several new z > 0.5 cool-core clusters, including two strong cool cores. This rules out the hypothesis that there are no z > 0.5 clusters that qualify as strong cool cores at the 5.4{sigma} level. The fraction of strong cool-core clusters in the SPT sample in this redshift regime is between 7% and 56% (95% confidence). Although the SPT selection function is significantly different from the X-ray samples, the high-z c{sub SB} distribution for the SPT sample is statistically consistent with that of X-ray-selected samples at both low and high redshifts. The cool-core strength is inversely correlated with the offset between the brightest cluster galaxy and the X-ray centroid, providing evidence that the dynamical state affects the cool-core strength of the cluster. Larger SZ-selected samples will be crucial in understanding the evolution of cluster cool cores over cosmic time.

  2. The SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey: the EGS deep field - I. Deep number counts and the redshift distribution of the recovered cosmic infrared background at 450 and 850 μ m

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavala, J. A.; Aretxaga, I.; Geach, J. E.; Hughes, D. H.; Birkinshaw, M.; Chapin, E.; Chapman, S.; Chen, Chian-Chou; Clements, D. L.; Dunlop, J. S.; Farrah, D.; Ivison, R. J.; Jenness, T.; Michałowski, M. J.; Robson, E. I.; Scott, Douglas; Simpson, J.; Spaans, M.; van der Werf, P.

    2017-01-01

    We present deep observations at 450 and 850 μm in the Extended Groth Strip field taken with the SCUBA-2 camera mounted on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope as part of the deep SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey (S2CLS), achieving a central instrumental depth of σ450 = 1.2 mJy beam-1 and σ850 = 0.2 mJy beam-1. We detect 57 sources at 450 μm and 90 at 850 μm with signal-to-noise ratio >3.5 over ˜70 arcmin2. From these detections, we derive the number counts at flux densities S450 > 4.0 mJy and S850 > 0.9 mJy, which represent the deepest number counts at these wavelengths derived using directly extracted sources from only blank-field observations with a single-dish telescope. Our measurements smoothly connect the gap between previous shallower blank-field single-dish observations and deep interferometric ALMA results. We estimate the contribution of our SCUBA-2 detected galaxies to the cosmic infrared background (CIB), as well as the contribution of 24 μm-selected galaxies through a stacking technique, which add a total of 0.26 ± 0.03 and 0.07 ± 0.01 MJy sr-1, at 450 and 850 μm, respectively. These surface brightnesses correspond to 60 ± 20 and 50 ± 20 per cent of the total CIB measurements, where the errors are dominated by those of the total CIB. Using the photometric redshifts of the 24 μm-selected sample and the redshift distributions of the submillimetre galaxies, we find that the redshift distribution of the recovered CIB is different at each wavelength, with a peak at z ˜ 1 for 450 μm and at z ˜ 2 for 850 μm, consistent with previous observations and theoretical models.

  3. THE OBSERVATIONS OF REDSHIFT EVOLUTION IN LARGE-SCALE ENVIRONMENTS (ORELSE) SURVEY. I. THE SURVEY DESIGN AND FIRST RESULTS ON CL 0023+0423 AT z = 0.84 AND RX J1821.6+6827 AT z = 0.82

    SciTech Connect

    Lubin, L. M.; Lemaux, B. C.; Kocevski, D. D.; Gal, R. R.; Squires, G. K.

    2009-06-15

    We present the Observations of Redshift Evolution in Large-Scale Environments (ORELSE) Survey, a systematic search for structure on scales greater than 10 h {sup -1} {sub 70} Mpc around 20 well-known clusters at redshifts of 0.6 < z < 1.3. The goal of the survey is to examine a statistical sample of dynamically active clusters and large-scale structures in order to quantify galaxy properties over the full range of local and global environments. We describe the survey design, the cluster sample, and our extensive observational data covering at least 25' around each target cluster. We use adaptively smoothed red galaxy density maps from our wide-field optical imaging to identify candidate groups/clusters and intermediate-density large-scale filaments/walls in each cluster field. Because photometric techniques (such as photometric redshifts, statistical overdensities, and richness estimates) can be highly uncertain, the crucial component of this survey is the unprecedented amount of spectroscopic coverage. We are using the wide-field, multiobject spectroscopic capabilities of the Deep Multiobject Imaging Spectrograph to obtain 100-200+ confirmed cluster members in each field. Our survey has already discovered the Cl 1604 supercluster at z {approx} 0.9, a structure which contains at least eight groups and clusters and spans 13 Mpc x 100 Mpc. Here, we present the results on the large-scale environments of two additional clusters, Cl 0023+0423 at z = 0.84 and RX J1821.6+6827 at z = 0.82, which highlight the diversity of global properties at these redshifts. The optically selected Cl 0023+0423 is a four-way group-group merger with constituent groups having measured velocity dispersions between 206 and 479 km s{sup -1}. The galaxy population is dominated by blue, star-forming galaxies, with 80% of the confirmed members showing [O II] emission. The strength of the H{delta} line in a composite spectrum of 138 members indicates a substantial contribution from recent

  4. The Observations of Redshift Evolution in Large-Scale Environments (ORELSE) Survey. I. The Survey Design and First Results on CL 0023+0423 at z = 0.84 and RX J1821.6+6827 at z = 0.82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubin, L. M.; Gal, R. R.; Lemaux, B. C.; Kocevski, D. D.; Squires, G. K.

    2009-06-01

    We present the Observations of Redshift Evolution in Large-Scale Environments (ORELSE) Survey, a systematic search for structure on scales greater than 10 h -1 70 Mpc around 20 well-known clusters at redshifts of 0.6 < z < 1.3. The goal of the survey is to examine a statistical sample of dynamically active clusters and large-scale structures in order to quantify galaxy properties over the full range of local and global environments. We describe the survey design, the cluster sample, and our extensive observational data covering at least 25' around each target cluster. We use adaptively smoothed red galaxy density maps from our wide-field optical imaging to identify candidate groups/clusters and intermediate-density large-scale filaments/walls in each cluster field. Because photometric techniques (such as photometric redshifts, statistical overdensities, and richness estimates) can be highly uncertain, the crucial component of this survey is the unprecedented amount of spectroscopic coverage. We are using the wide-field, multiobject spectroscopic capabilities of the Deep Multiobject Imaging Spectrograph to obtain 100-200+ confirmed cluster members in each field. Our survey has already discovered the Cl 1604 supercluster at z ≈ 0.9, a structure which contains at least eight groups and clusters and spans 13 Mpc × 100 Mpc. Here, we present the results on the large-scale environments of two additional clusters, Cl 0023+0423 at z = 0.84 and RX J1821.6+6827 at z = 0.82, which highlight the diversity of global properties at these redshifts. The optically selected Cl 0023+0423 is a four-way group-group merger with constituent groups having measured velocity dispersions between 206 and 479 km s-1. The galaxy population is dominated by blue, star-forming galaxies, with 80% of the confirmed members showing [O II] emission. The strength of the Hδ line in a composite spectrum of 138 members indicates a substantial contribution from recent starbursts to the overall galaxy

  5. High Redshift Quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elvis, Martin S.

    1996-01-01

    The report for this period includes three papers: 'Associated Absorption at Low and High Redshift'; 'Strong X-ray Absorption in a Broad Absorption Line Quasar: PHL5200'; and 'ASCA and ROSAT X-ray Spectra of High-Redshift Radio-Loud Quasars'. The first gives examples from both low and high redshift for combining information on absorbing material in active galactic nuclei from both x-ray and the UV. The second presents ASCA observations of the z = 1.98 prototype broad absorption line quasar (BALQSO): PHL 5200, detected with both the solid-state imaging spectrometers and the gas imaging spectometers. The third paper presents results on the x-ray properties of 9 high-redshift radio-loud quasars observed by ASCA and ROSAT, including ASCA observations of S5 0014+81 (z = 3.38) and S5 0836+71 (z = 2.17) and ROSAT observations of PKS 2126-158.

  6. MARZ: Redshifting Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinton, Samuel

    2016-05-01

    MARZ analyzes objects and produces high quality spectroscopic redshift measurements. Spectra not matched correctly by the automatic algorithm can be redshifted manually by cycling automatic results, manual template comparison, or marking spectral features. The software has an intuitive interface and powerful automatic matching capabilities on spectra, and can be run interactively or from the command line, and runs as a Web application. MARZ can be run on a local server; it is also available for use on a public server.

  7. Photometric Redshifts of Galaxies in COSMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobasher, B.; Capak, P.; Scoville, N. Z.; Dahlen, T.; Salvato, M.; Aussel, H.; Thompson, D. J.; Feldmann, R.; Tasca, L.; Le Fevre, O.; Lilly, S.; Carollo, C. M.; Kartaltepe, J. S.; McCracken, H.; Mould, J.; Renzini, A.; Sanders, D. B.; Shopbell, P. L.; Taniguchi, Y.; Ajiki, M.; Shioya, Y.; Contini, T.; Giavalisco, M.; Ilbert, O.; Iovino, A.; Le Brun, V.; Mainieri, V.; Mignoli, M.; Scodeggio, M.

    2007-09-01

    We present photometric redshifts for the COSMOS survey derived from a new code, optimized to yield accurate and reliable redshifts and spectral types of galaxies down to faint magnitudes and redshifts out to z~1.2. The technique uses χ2 template fitting, combined with luminosity function priors and with the option to estimate the internal extinction [or E(B-V)]. The median most probable redshift, best-fit spectral type and reddening, absolute magnitude, and stellar mass are derived in addition to the full redshift probability distributions. Using simulations with sampling and noise similar to those in COSMOS, the accuracy and reliability is estimated for the photometric redshifts as a function of the magnitude limits of the sample, S/N ratios, and the number of bands used. We find from the simulations that the ratio of derived 95% confidence interval in the χ2 probability distribution to the estimated photometric redshift (D95) can be used to identify and exclude the catastrophic failures in the photometric redshift estimates. To evaluate the reliability of the photometric redshifts, we compare the derived redshifts with high-reliability spectroscopic redshifts for a sample of 868 normal galaxies with z<1.2 from zCOSMOS. Considering different scenarios, depending on using prior, no prior, and/or extinction, we compare the photometric and spectroscopic redshifts for this sample. The rms scatter between the estimated photometric redshifts and known spectroscopic redshifts is σ(Δ(z))=0.031, where Δ(z)=(zphot-zspec)/(1+zspec) with a small fraction of outliers (<2.5%) [outliers are defined as objects with Δ(z)>3σ(Δ(z)), where σ(Δ(z)) is the rms scatter in Δ(z)]. We also find good agreement [σ(Δ(z))=0.10] between photometric and spectroscopic redshifts for type II AGNs. We compare results from our photometric redshift procedure with three other independent codes and find them in excellent agreement. We show preliminary results, based on photometric redshifts

  8. Plasma Redshift Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brynjolfsson, Ari

    2011-04-01

    The newly discovered plasma redshift cross section explains a long range of phenomena; including the cosmological redshift, and the intrinsic redshift of Sun, stars, galaxies and quasars. It explains the beautiful black body spectrum of the CMB, and it predicts correctly: a) the observed XRB, b) the magnitude redshift relation for supernovae, and c) the surface- brightness-redshift relation for galaxies. There is no need for Big Bang, Inflation, Dark Energy, Dark Matter, Accelerated Expansion, and Black Holes. The universe is quasi-static and can renew itself forever (for details, see: http://www.plasmaredshift.org). There is no cosmic time dilation. In intergalactic space, the average electron temperature is T = 2.7 million K, and the average electron density is N = 0.0002 per cubic cm. Plasma redshift is derived theoretically from conventional axioms of physics by using more accurate methods than those conventionally used. The main difference is: 1) the proper inclusion of the dielectric constant, 2) more exact calculations of imaginary part of the dielectric constant, and as required 3) a quantum mechanical treatment of the interactions.

  9. The Muenster Redshift Project - Automated redshift measurements from low-dispersion objective prism Schmidt plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuecker, Peter

    A three-dimensional galaxy survey at faint magnitudes and over large volumes of space was carried out as part of the Muenster Redshift Project. Three different methods were used to enhance the reliability of the redshifts measured from objective prison plates: the correlation method, the least-squares method, and the break method where continuous breaks are identified directly. The redshift errors of the individual methods turn out to be 0.007 (correlation), 0.011 (direct identification), and 0.016 (least squares). Using the method described in the paper, it is possible to obtain about 6000 galaxy redshifts from one objective prism plate at high galactic latitudes for objects with m(J) less than 20.

  10. Photometric Redshift Techniques in Big-data Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan-Xia; Zhao, Yong-Heng

    Photometric data increase with large survey projects running. The huge volume of data influences the means and methods to deal with them. As such, the techniques of photometric redshift estimation based on photometric data must be developed and improved.

  11. CHARACTERIZING AND PROPAGATING MODELING UNCERTAINTIES IN PHOTOMETRICALLY DERIVED REDSHIFT DISTRIBUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Abrahamse, Augusta; Knox, Lloyd; Schmidt, Samuel; Thorman, Paul; Anthony Tyson, J.; Zhan Hu

    2011-06-10

    The uncertainty in the redshift distributions of galaxies has a significant potential impact on the cosmological parameter values inferred from multi-band imaging surveys. The accuracy of the photometric redshifts measured in these surveys depends not only on the quality of the flux data, but also on a number of modeling assumptions that enter into both the training set and spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting methods of photometric redshift estimation. In this work we focus on the latter, considering two types of modeling uncertainties: uncertainties in the SED template set and uncertainties in the magnitude and type priors used in a Bayesian photometric redshift estimation method. We find that SED template selection effects dominate over magnitude prior errors. We introduce a method for parameterizing the resulting ignorance of the redshift distributions, and for propagating these uncertainties to uncertainties in cosmological parameters.

  12. The Luminosity Functions of Low Redshift Field and Cluster Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgensen, I.; Hill, G. J.; Bergmann, M. P.; Elston, R.; Vanden Berk, D.; Jurcevic, J. S.

    1999-12-01

    We present a comparison of the luminosity functions for low redshift field and cluster galaxies. The luminosity functions are established for field galaxies in UBVRI, and for galaxies in the Coma cluster in UBRI. The field galaxy sample is drawn from The Texas Deep Sky Survey (TDSS) of a 2.1 by 2.1 sq. deg. area around the North Galactic Pole. More than 40000 objects have been detected in our survey of this area. We have obtained spectra of approximately 700 galaxies, making the redshift information complete to a total R magnitude of 18.5 mag. We have surveyed the central square degree of the Coma cluster in UBRI. Approximately 16000 objects have been detected in our survey. We have obtained spectra for 220 galaxies in the area with no previous measurements. Together with published data these observations make the redshift information complete for galaxies brighter than a total R magnitude of 17.5. A total of 480 members of the cluster have measured redshifts, while 180 background and foreground galaxies in the field have measured redshifts. The accurate determination of the luminosity functions for low redshift galaxies is important for the interpretation of luminosity functions established for higher redshift galaxies, both in clusters and in the field. This research was supported in part by NASA through grant number HF-01073.01.94A to IJ from the Space Telescope Science Institute.

  13. Probing the sparse tails of redshift distributions with Voronoi tessellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granett, B. R.

    2017-01-01

    We introduce an empirical galaxy photometric redshift algorithm based upon the Voronoi tessellation density estimator in the space of redshift and photometric parameters. Our aim is to use sparse survey datasets to estimate the full shape of the redshift distribution that is defined by the degeneracies in galaxy photometric properties and redshift. We describe the algorithm implementation and provide a proof of concept using the first public data release from the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS PDR-1). We validate the method by comparing against the standard empirical redshift distribution code Trees for Photo-Z (TPZ) on both mock and real data. We find that the Voronoi tessellation algorithm accurately recovers the full shape of the redshift distribution quantified by its second moment and inferred redshift confidence intervals. The analysis allows us to properly account for galaxies in the tails of the distributions that would otherwise be classified as catastrophic outliers. The source code is publicly available at http://bitbucket.org/bengranett/tailz.

  14. MARZ: Manual and automatic redshifting software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinton, S. R.; Davis, Tamara M.; Lidman, C.; Glazebrook, K.; Lewis, G. F.

    2016-04-01

    The Australian Dark Energy Survey (OzDES) is a 100-night spectroscopic survey underway on the Anglo-Australian Telescope using the fibre-fed 2-degree-field (2dF) spectrograph. We have developed a new redshifting application MARZ with greater usability, flexibility, and the capacity to analyse a wider range of object types than the RUNZ software package previously used for redshifting spectra from 2dF. MARZ is an open-source, client-based, Javascript web-application which provides an intuitive interface and powerful automatic matching capabilities on spectra generated from the AAOmega spectrograph to produce high quality spectroscopic redshift measurements. The software can be run interactively or via the command line, and is easily adaptable to other instruments and pipelines if conforming to the current FITS file standard is not possible. Behind the scenes, a modified version of the AUTOZ cross-correlation algorithm is used to match input spectra against a variety of stellar and galaxy templates, and automatic matching performance for OzDES spectra has increased from 54% (RUNZ) to 91% (MARZ). Spectra not matched correctly by the automatic algorithm can be easily redshifted manually by cycling automatic results, manual template comparison, or marking spectral features.

  15. A Determination of the Intergalactic Redshift Dependent UV-Optical-NIR Photon Density Using Deep Galaxy Survey Data and the Gamma-Ray Opacity of the Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, Floyd W.

    2012-01-01

    We calculate the intensity and photon spectrum of the intergalactic background light (IBL) as a function of red shift using an approach based on observational data obtained at in different wavelength bands from local to deep galaxy surveys. Our empirically based approach allows us, for the firs.t time, to obtain a completely model independent determination of the IBL and to quantify its uncertainties. Using our results on the IBL, we then place upper and lower limits on the opacity of the universe to gamma-rays, independent of previous constraints.

  16. High Redshift GRBs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil; Cannizzo, John K.

    2012-01-01

    The Swift mission has opened a new, high redshift window on the universe. In this review we provide an overview of gamma-ray burst (GRB) science, describe the Swift mission, discuss high-z GRBs and tools for high-z studies, and look forward at future capabilities. A new mission concept - Lobster - is described that would monitor the X-ray sky at order of magnitude higher sensitivity than current missions.

  17. On the gravitational redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Klaus; Dwivedi, Bhola N.

    2014-08-01

    The study of the gravitational redshift-a relative wavelength increase of ≈2×10-6 was predicted for solar radiation by Einstein in 1908-is still an important subject in modern physics. In a dispute whether or not atom interferometry experiments can be employed for gravitational redshift measurements, two research teams have recently disagreed on the physical cause of the shift. Regardless of any discussion on the interferometer aspect-we find that both groups of authors miss the important point that the ratio of gravitational to the electrostatic forces is generally very small. For instance, the ratio of the gravitational force acting on an electron in a hydrogen atom situated in the Sun’s photosphere to the electrostatic force between the proton and the electron in such an atom is approximately 3×10-21. A comparison of this ratio with the predicted and observed solar redshift indicates a discrepancy of many orders of magnitude. With Einstein’s early assumption that the frequencies of spectral lines depend only on the generating ions themselves as starting point, we show that a solution can be formulated based on a two-step process in analogy with Fermi’s treatment of the Doppler effect. It provides a sequence of physical processes in line with the conservation of energy and momentum resulting in the observed shift and does not employ a geometric description. The gravitational field affects the release of the photon and not the atomic transition. The control parameter is the speed of light. The atomic emission is then contrasted with the gravitational redshift of matter-antimatter annihilation events.

  18. High redshift blazars .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghisellini, G.

    Blazars are sources whose jet is pointing at us. Since their jets are relativistic, the flux is greatly amplified in the direction of motion, making blazars the most powerful persistent objects in the Universe. This is true at all frequencies, but especially where their spectrum peaks. Although the spectrum of moderate powerful sources peaks in the ˜GeV range, extremely powerful sources at high redshifts peak in the ˜MeV band. This implies that the hard X-ray band is the optimal one to find powerful blazars beyond a redshift of ˜4. First indications strongly suggest that powerful high-z blazars harbor the most massive and active early black holes, exceeding a billion solar masses. Since for each detected blazars there must exist hundreds of similar, but misaligned, sources, the search for high-z blazars is becoming competitive with the search of early massive black holes using radio-quiet quasars. Finding how the two populations of black holes (one in jetted sources, the other in radio-quiet objects) evolve in redshift will shed light on the growth of the most massive black holes and possibly on the feedback between the central engine and the rest of the host galaxy.

  19. Photometric Redshift Biases from Galaxy Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, C. Jonathan; Bernstein, Gary

    2010-04-01

    Proposed cosmological surveys will make use of photometric redshifts of galaxies that are significantly fainter than any complete spectroscopic redshift surveys that exist to train the photo-z methods. We investigate the photo-z biases that result from known differences between the faint and bright populations: a rise in active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity toward higher redshift, and a metallicity difference between intrinsically luminous and faint early-type galaxies. We find that even very small mismatches between the mean photometric target and the training set can induce photo-z biases large enough to corrupt derived cosmological parameters significantly. Our results suggest that a metallicity shift of ∼0.003 dex in an old population, or contamination of any galaxy spectrum with ∼0.2% AGN flux, is sufficient to induce a 10-3 bias in photo-z. These results highlight the danger in extrapolating the behavior of bright galaxies to a fainter population, and the desirability of a spectroscopic training set that spans all of the characteristics of the photo-z targets, i.e., extending to the 25th mag or fainter galaxies that will be used in future surveys.

  20. The number density of quiescent compact galaxies at intermediate redshift

    SciTech Connect

    Damjanov, Ivana; Hwang, Ho Seong; Geller, Margaret J.; Chilingarian, Igor

    2014-09-20

    Massive compact systems at 0.2 < z < 0.6 are the missing link between the predominantly compact population of massive quiescent galaxies at high redshift and their analogs and relics in the local volume. The evolution in number density of these extreme objects over cosmic time is the crucial constraining factor for the models of massive galaxy assembly. We select a large sample of ∼200 intermediate-redshift massive compacts from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) spectroscopy by identifying point-like Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometric sources with spectroscopic signatures of evolved redshifted galaxies. A subset of our targets have publicly available high-resolution ground-based images that we use to augment the dynamical and stellar population properties of these systems by their structural parameters. We confirm that all BOSS compact candidates are as compact as their high-redshift massive counterparts and less than half the size of similarly massive systems at z ∼ 0. We use the completeness-corrected numbers of BOSS compacts to compute lower limits on their number densities in narrow redshift bins spanning the range of our sample. The abundance of extremely dense quiescent galaxies at 0.2 < z < 0.6 is in excellent agreement with the number densities of these systems at high redshift. Our lower limits support the models of massive galaxy assembly through a series of minor mergers over the redshift range 0 < z < 2.

  1. The Number Density of Quiescent Compact Galaxies at Intermediate Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damjanov, Ivana; Hwang, Ho Seong; Geller, Margaret J.; Chilingarian, Igor

    2014-09-01

    Massive compact systems at 0.2 < z < 0.6 are the missing link between the predominantly compact population of massive quiescent galaxies at high redshift and their analogs and relics in the local volume. The evolution in number density of these extreme objects over cosmic time is the crucial constraining factor for the models of massive galaxy assembly. We select a large sample of ~200 intermediate-redshift massive compacts from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) spectroscopy by identifying point-like Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometric sources with spectroscopic signatures of evolved redshifted galaxies. A subset of our targets have publicly available high-resolution ground-based images that we use to augment the dynamical and stellar population properties of these systems by their structural parameters. We confirm that all BOSS compact candidates are as compact as their high-redshift massive counterparts and less than half the size of similarly massive systems at z ~ 0. We use the completeness-corrected numbers of BOSS compacts to compute lower limits on their number densities in narrow redshift bins spanning the range of our sample. The abundance of extremely dense quiescent galaxies at 0.2 < z < 0.6 is in excellent agreement with the number densities of these systems at high redshift. Our lower limits support the models of massive galaxy assembly through a series of minor mergers over the redshift range 0 < z < 2.

  2. Quasar redshifts: the intrinsic component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Peter M.

    2016-09-01

    The large observed redshift of quasars has suggested large cosmological distances and a corresponding enormous energy output to explain the brightness or luminosity as seen at earth. Alternative or complementary sources of redshift have not been identified by the astronomical community. This study examines one possible source of additional redshift: an intrinsic component based on the plasma characteristics of high temperature and high electron density which are believed to be present.

  3. Theoretical investigation on the bond dissociation enthalpies of phenolic compounds extracted from Artocarpus altilis using ONIOM(ROB3LYP/6-311++G(2df,2p):PM6) method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thong, Nguyen Minh; Duong, Tran; Pham, Linh Thuy; Nam, Pham Cam

    2014-10-01

    Theoretical calculations have been performed to predict the antioxidant property of phenolic compounds extracted from Artocarpus altilis. The Osbnd H bond dissociation enthalpy (BDE), ionization energy (IE), and proton dissociation enthalpy (PDE) of the phenolic compounds have been computed. The ONIOM(ROB3LYP/6-311++G(2df,2p):PM6) method is able to provide reliable evaluation for the BDE(Osbnd H) in phenolic compounds. An important property of antioxidants is determined via the BDE(Osbnd H) of those compounds extracted from A. altilis. Based on the BDE(Osbnd H), compound 12 is considered as a potential antioxidant with the estimated BDE value of 77.3 kcal/mol in the gas phase.

  4. Intermediate Redshift Galaxy Clusters from DPOSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, P. A. A.

    2003-06-01

    In this thesis we discuss the selection of intermediate redshift galaxy cluster candidates based on the Digitized Second Palomar Observatory Sky Survey (DPOSS). Clusters are detected using the best DPOSS plates based on seeing and limiting magnitude. The search is further restricted to high galactic latitudes (|b| > 50 °), where stellar contamination is mild and nearly uniform. The input galaxy catalogs used for this search are limited to r = 21.1. The cluster selection is based on two techniques, the adaptive kernel and the voronoi tesselation methods. The final combined catalog contains ~ 10,000 candidates over ~ 2,700 square degrees, with ~ 0.30 and ~ 40 (Ngals is a richness estimate we provide). Rich clusters are detected down to z ~ 0.5. This cluster catalog is a supplement to the previous DPOSS catalogs, being the largest resource of rich clusters in this redshift range to date. In order to optimize the detection algorithms and estimate the contamination and completeness rates, we perform a large number of simulations for both catalogs. Redshift and richness estimates are also provided for all candidates in the two catalogs. As a by-product we present a comparison between the DPOSS and SDSS surveys. This comparison is used to estimate the DPOSS detection limits. Some of the projects to be developed in the future are also discussed.

  5. Morphologies at High Redshift from Galaxy Zoo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, Karen; Melvin, Tom; Simmons, Brooke; Willett, Kyle; Lintott, Chris

    2015-08-01

    I will present results from Galaxy Zoo classification of galaxies observed in public observed frame optical HST surveys (e.g. COSMOS, GOODS) as well as in observed frame NIR with (ie. CANDELS). Early science results from these classifications have investigated the changing bar fraction in disc galaxies as a function of redshift (to z~1 in Melvin et al. 2014; and at z>1 in Simmons et al. 2015), as well as how the morphologies of galaxies on the red sequence have been changing since z~1 (Melvin et al. in prep.). These unique dataset of quantitative visual classifications for high redshift galaxies will be made public in forthcoming publications (planned as Willett et al. for Galaxy Zoo Hubble, and Simmons et al. for Galaxy Zoo CANDELS).

  6. The High-Redshift Clustering of Photometrically Selected Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timlin, John

    2017-01-01

    We present the data from the Spitzer IRAC Equatorial Survey (SpIES) along with our first high-redshift (2.9survey covering ~100 square degrees of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82 (S82) field. The SpIES field is optimally located to overlap with the optical data from SDSS and to complement the area of the pre-existing Spitzer data from the Spitzer-HETDEX Exploratory Large-area (SHELA) survey, which adds ~30 square degrees of infrared coverage on S82. Additionally, SpIES probes magnitudes significantly fainter than WISE; depth which is crucial to detect faint, high-redshift quasars. Using the infrared data from SpIES and SHELA, and the deep optical data from SDSS, we employ the multi-dimensional Bayesian selection algorithm outlined in Richards et al. 2015 to identify ~5000 high-redshift quasar candidates in this field. We then combine these candidates with spectroscopically confirmed high-redshift quasars and measure the redshift space correlation function and the projected correlation function. Finally, using these results, we compute the linear bias to try to constrain quasar feedback models akin to those in Hopkins et al. 2007.

  7. Photometric redshifts for the SDSS Data Release 12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Róbert; Dobos, László; Budavári, Tamás; Szalay, Alexander S.; Csabai, István

    2016-08-01

    We present the methodology and data behind the photometric redshift data base of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 12. We adopt a hybrid technique, empirically estimating the redshift via local regression on a spectroscopic training set, then fitting a spectrum template to obtain K-corrections and absolute magnitudes. The SDSS spectroscopic catalogue was augmented with data from other, publicly available spectroscopic surveys to mitigate target selection effects. The training set is comprised of 1976 978 galaxies, and extends up to redshift z ≈ 0.8, with a useful coverage of up to z ≈ 0.6. We provide photometric redshifts and realistic error estimates for the 208 474 076 galaxies of the SDSS primary photometric catalogue. We achieve an average bias of overline{Δ z_{norm}} = {5.84 × 10^{-5}}, a standard deviation of σ(Δznorm) = 0.0205, and a 3σ outlier rate of Po = 4.11 per cent when cross-validating on our training set. The published redshift error estimates and photometric error classes enable the selection of galaxies with high-quality photometric redshifts. We also provide a supplementary error map that allows additional, sophisticated filtering of the data.

  8. Improving Photometric Redshifts for Hyper Suprime-Cam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speagle, Josh S.; Leauthaud, Alexie; Eisenstein, Daniel; Bundy, Kevin; Capak, Peter L.; Leistedt, Boris; Masters, Daniel C.; Mortlock, Daniel; Peiris, Hiranya; HSC Photo-z Team; HSC Weak Lensing Team

    2017-01-01

    Deriving accurate photometric redshift (photo-z) probability distribution functions (PDFs) are crucial science components for current and upcoming large-scale surveys. We outline how rigorous Bayesian inference and machine learning can be combined to quickly derive joint photo-z PDFs to individual galaxies and their parent populations. Using the first 170 deg^2 of data from the ongoing Hyper Suprime-Cam survey, we demonstrate our method is able to generate accurate predictions and reliable credible intervals over ~370k high-quality redshifts. We then use galaxy-galaxy lensing to empirically validate our predicted photo-z's over ~14M objects, finding a robust signal.

  9. Probabilistic Photometric Redshifts in the Era of Petascale Astronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Carrasco Kind, Matias

    2014-01-01

    With the growth of large photometric surveys, accurately estimating photometric redshifts, preferably as a probability density function (PDF), and fully understanding the implicit systematic uncertainties in this process has become increasingly important. These surveys are expected to obtain images of billions of distinct galaxies. As a result, storing and analyzing all of these photometric redshift PDFs will be non-trivial, and this challenge becomes even more severe if a survey plans to compute and store multiple different PDFs. In this thesis, we have developed an end-to-end framework that will compute accurate and robust photometric redshift PDFs for massive data sets by using two new, state-of-the-art machine learning techniques that are based on a random forest and a random atlas, respectively. By using data from several photometric surveys, we demonstrate the applicability of these new techniques, and we demonstrate that our new approach is among the best techniques currently available. We also show how different techniques can be combined by using novel Bayesian techniques to improve the photometric redshift precision to unprecedented levels while also presenting new approaches to better identify outliers. In addition, our framework provides supplementary information regarding the data being analyzed, including unbiased estimates of the accuracy of the technique without resorting to a validation data set, identification of poor photometric redshift areas within the parameter space occupied by the spectroscopic training data, and a quantification of the relative importance of the variables used during the estimation process. Furthermore, we present a new approach to represent and store photometric redshift PDFs by using a sparse representation with outstanding compression and reconstruction capabilities. We also demonstrate how this framework can also be directly incorporated into cosmological analyses. The new techniques presented in this thesis are crucial

  10. Relativistic redshifts in quasar broad lines

    SciTech Connect

    Tremaine, Scott; Shen, Yue; Liu, Xin; Loeb, Abraham E-mail: yshen@obs.carnegiescience.edu E-mail: aloeb@cfa.harvard.edu

    2014-10-10

    The broad emission lines commonly seen in quasar spectra have velocity widths of a few percent of the speed of light, so special- and general-relativistic effects have a significant influence on the line profile. We have determined the redshift of the broad Hβ line in the quasar rest frame (determined from the core component of the [O III] line) for over 20,000 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 quasar catalog. The mean redshift as a function of line width is approximately consistent with the relativistic redshift that is expected if the line originates in a randomly oriented Keplerian disk that is obscured when the inclination of the disk to the line of sight exceeds ∼30°-45°, consistent with simple active galactic nucleus unification schemes. This result also implies that the net line-of-sight inflow/outflow velocities in the broad-line region are much less than the Keplerian velocity when averaged over a large sample of quasars with a given line width.

  11. High-Redshift Astrophysics Using Every Photon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breysse, Patrick; Kovetz, Ely; Rahman, Mubdi; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Large galaxy surveys have dramatically improved our understanding of the complex processes which govern gas dynamics and star formation in the nearby universe. However, we know far less about the most distant galaxies, as existing high-redshift observations can only detect the very brightest sources. Intensity mapping surveys provide a promising tool to access this poorly-studied population. By observing emission lines with low angular resolution, these surveys can make use of every photon in a target line to study faint emitters which are inaccessible using traditional techniques. With upcoming carbon monoxide experiments in mind, I will demonstrate how an intensity map can be used to measure the luminosity function of a galaxy population, and in turn how these measurements will allow us to place robust constraints on the cosmic star formation history. I will then show how cross-correlating CO isotopologue lines will make it possible to study gas dynamics within the earliest galaxies in unprecedented detail.

  12. Definitive test of the Rh = ct universe using redshift drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melia, Fulvio

    2016-11-01

    The redshift drift of objects moving in the Hubble flow has been proposed as a powerful model-independent probe of the underlying cosmology. A measurement of the first- and second-order redshift derivatives appears to be well within the reach of upcoming surveys using as the Extremely Large Telescope high resolution spectrometer (ELT-HIRES) and the Square Kilometer Phase 2 Array (SKA). Here we show that an unambiguous prediction of the Rh = ct cosmology is zero drift at all redshifts, contrasting sharply with all other models in which the expansion rate is variable. For example, multiyear monitoring of sources at redshift z = 5 with the ELT-HIRES is expected to show a velocity shift Δv = -15 cm s-1 yr-1 due to the redshift drift in Planck ΛCDM, while Δv = 0 cm s-1 yr-1 in Rh = ct. With an anticipated ELT-HIRES measurement error of ±5 cm s-1 yr-1 after 5 yr, these upcoming redshift drift measurements might therefore be able to differentiate between Rh = ct and Planck ΛCDM at ˜3σ, assuming that any possible source evolution is well understood. Such a result would provide the strongest evidence yet in favour of the Rh = ct cosmology. With a 20-yr baseline, these observations could favour one of these models over the other at better than 5σ.

  13. Very high redshift radio galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    van Breugel, W.J.M., LLNL

    1997-12-01

    High redshift radio galaxies (HzRGs) provide unique targets for the study of the formation and evolution of massive galaxies and galaxy clusters at very high redshifts. We discuss how efficient HzRG samples ae selected, the evidence for strong morphological evolution at near-infracd wavelengths, and for jet-induced star formation in the z = 3 800 HzRG 4C41 17

  14. PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS OF SUBMILLIMETER GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Chakrabarti, Sukanya; Magnelli, Benjamin; Lutz, Dieter; Berta, Stefano; Popesso, Paola; McKee, Christopher F.; Pozzi, Francesca

    2013-08-20

    We use the photometric redshift method of Chakrabarti and McKee to infer photometric redshifts of submillimeter galaxies with far-IR (FIR) Herschel data obtained as part of the PACS Evolutionary Probe program. For the sample with spectroscopic redshifts, we demonstrate the validity of this method over a large range of redshifts (4 {approx}> z {approx}> 0.3) and luminosities, finding an average accuracy in (1 + z{sub phot})/(1 + z{sub spec}) of 10%. Thus, this method is more accurate than other FIR photometric redshift methods. This method is different from typical FIR photometric methods in deriving redshifts from the light-to-gas mass (L/M) ratio of infrared-bright galaxies inferred from the FIR spectral energy distribution, rather than dust temperatures. To assess the dependence of our photometric redshift method on the data in this sample, we contrast the average accuracy of our method when we use PACS data, versus SPIRE data, versus both PACS and SPIRE data. We also discuss potential selection effects that may affect the Herschel sample. Once the redshift is derived, we can determine physical properties of infrared-bright galaxies, including the temperature variation within the dust envelope, luminosity, mass, and surface density. We use data from the GOODS-S field to calculate the star formation rate density (SFRD) of submillimeter bright sources detected by AzTEC and PACS. The AzTEC-PACS sources, which have a threshold 850 {mu}m flux {approx}> 5 mJy, contribute 15% of the SFRD from all ultraluminous infrared galaxies (L{sub IR} {approx}> 10{sup 12} L{sub Sun }), and 3% of the total SFRD at z {approx} 2.

  15. Photometric Redshifts of Submillimeter Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, Sukanya; Magnelli, Benjamin; McKee, Christopher F.; Lutz, Dieter; Berta, Stefano; Popesso, Paola; Pozzi, Francesca

    2013-08-01

    We use the photometric redshift method of Chakrabarti & McKee to infer photometric redshifts of submillimeter galaxies with far-IR (FIR) Herschel data obtained as part of the PACS Evolutionary Probe program. For the sample with spectroscopic redshifts, we demonstrate the validity of this method over a large range of redshifts (4 >~ z >~ 0.3) and luminosities, finding an average accuracy in (1 + z phot)/(1 + z spec) of 10%. Thus, this method is more accurate than other FIR photometric redshift methods. This method is different from typical FIR photometric methods in deriving redshifts from the light-to-gas mass (L/M) ratio of infrared-bright galaxies inferred from the FIR spectral energy distribution, rather than dust temperatures. To assess the dependence of our photometric redshift method on the data in this sample, we contrast the average accuracy of our method when we use PACS data, versus SPIRE data, versus both PACS and SPIRE data. We also discuss potential selection effects that may affect the Herschel sample. Once the redshift is derived, we can determine physical properties of infrared-bright galaxies, including the temperature variation within the dust envelope, luminosity, mass, and surface density. We use data from the GOODS-S field to calculate the star formation rate density (SFRD) of submillimeter bright sources detected by AzTEC and PACS. The AzTEC-PACS sources, which have a threshold 850 μm flux >~ 5 mJy, contribute 15% of the SFRD from all ultraluminous infrared galaxies (L IR >~ 1012 L ⊙), and 3% of the total SFRD at z ~ 2.

  16. A sparse Gaussian process framework for photometric redshift estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almosallam, Ibrahim A.; Lindsay, Sam N.; Jarvis, Matt J.; Roberts, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate photometric redshifts are a lynchpin for many future experiments to pin down the cosmological model and for studies of galaxy evolution. In this study, a novel sparse regression framework for photometric redshift estimation is presented. Synthetic data set simulating the Euclid survey and real data from SDSS DR12 are used to train and test the proposed models. We show that approaches which include careful data preparation and model design offer a significant improvement in comparison with several competing machine learning algorithms. Standard implementations of most regression algorithms use the minimization of the sum of squared errors as the objective function. For redshift inference, this induces a bias in the posterior mean of the output distribution, which can be problematic. In this paper, we directly minimize the target metric Δz = (zs - zp)/(1 + zs) and address the bias problem via a distribution-based weighting scheme, incorporated as part of the optimization objective. The results are compared with other machine learning algorithms in the field such as artificial neural networks (ANN), Gaussian processes (GPs) and sparse GPs. The proposed framework reaches a mean absolute Δz = 0.0026(1 + zs), over the redshift range of 0 ≤ zs ≤ 2 on the simulated data, and Δz = 0.0178(1 + zs) over the entire redshift range on the SDSS DR12 survey, outperforming the standard ANNz used in the literature. We also investigate how the relative size of the training sample affects the photometric redshift accuracy. We find that a training sample of >30 per cent of total sample size, provides little additional constraint on the photometric redshifts, and note that our GP formalism strongly outperforms ANNz in the sparse data regime for the simulated data set.

  17. Finding high-redshift voids using Lyman α forest tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Casey W.; Font-Ribera, Andreu; White, Martin; Lee, Khee-Gan

    2015-11-01

    We present a new method of finding cosmic voids using tomographic maps of Lyα forest flux. We identify cosmological voids with radii of 2-12 h-1 Mpc in a large N-body simulation at z = 2.5, and characterize the signal of the high-redshift voids in density and Lyα forest flux. The void properties are similar to what has been found at lower redshifts, but they are smaller and have steeper radial density profiles. Similarly to what has been found for low-redshift voids, the radial velocity profiles have little scatter and agree very well with the linear theory prediction. We run the same void finder on an ideal Lyα flux field and tomographic reconstructions at various spatial samplings. We compare the tomographic map void catalogues to the density void catalogue and find good agreement even with modest-sized voids (r > 6 h-1 Mpc). Using our simple void-finding method, the configuration of the ongoing COSMOS Lyman Alpha Mapping And Tomography Observations (CLAMATO) survey covering 1 deg2 would provide a sample of about 100 high-redshift voids. We also provide void-finding forecasts for larger area surveys, and discuss how these void samples can be used to test modified gravity models, study high-redshift void galaxies, and to make an Alcock-Paczynski measurement. To aid future work in this area, we provide public access to our simulation products, catalogues, and sample tomographic flux maps.

  18. Redshift weights for baryon acoustic oscillations: application to mock galaxy catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Fangzhou; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; White, Martin; Ross, Ashley J.; Zhao, Gongbo

    2016-09-01

    Large redshift surveys capable of measuring the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) signal have proven to be an effective way of measuring the distance-redshift relation in cosmology. Building off the work in Zhu et al., we develop a technique to directly constrain the distance-redshift relation from BAO measurements without splitting the sample into redshift bins. We apply the redshift weighting technique in Zhu et al. to the clustering of galaxies from 1000 Quick particle mesh (QPM) mock simulations after reconstruction and achieve a 0.75 per cent measurement of the angular diameter distance DA at z = 0.64 and the same precision for Hubble parameter H at z = 0.29. These QPM mock catalogues mimic the clustering and noise level of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey Data Release 12 (DR12). We compress the correlation functions in the redshift direction on to a set of weighted correlation functions. These estimators give unbiased DA and H measurements across the entire redshift range of the combined sample. We demonstrate the effectiveness of redshift weighting in improving the distance and Hubble parameter estimates. Instead of measuring at a single `effective' redshift as in traditional analyses, we report our DA and H measurements at all redshifts. The measured fractional error of DA ranges from 1.53 per cent at z = 0.2 to 0.75 per cent at z = 0.64. The fractional error of H ranges from 0.75 per cent at z = 0.29 to 2.45 per cent at z = 0.7. Our measurements are consistent with a Fisher forecast to within 10-20 per cent depending on the pivot redshift. We further show the results are robust against the choice of fiducial cosmologies, galaxy bias models, and redshift-space distortions streaming parameters.

  19. Simultaneous constraints on cosmology and photometric redshift bias from weak lensing and galaxy clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuroff, S.; Troxel, M. A.; Bridle, S. L.; Zuntz, J.; MacCrann, N.; Krause, E.; Eifler, T.; Kirk, D.

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the expected cosmological constraints from a combination of cosmic shear and large-scale galaxy clustering using realistic photometric redshift distributions. Introducing a systematic bias in the lensing distributions (of 0.05 in redshift) produces a >2σ bias in the recovered matter power spectrum amplitude and dark energy equation of state for preliminary Stage III surveys. We demonstrate that cosmological error can be largely removed by marginalizing over biases in the assumed weak-lensing redshift distributions. Furthermore, the cosmological constraining power is retained despite removing much of the information on the lensing redshift biases. This finding relies upon high-quality redshift estimates for the clustering sample, but does not require spectroscopy. All galaxies in this analysis can thus be assumed to come from a single photometric survey. We show that this internal constraint on redshift biases arises from complementary degeneracy directions between cosmic shear and the combination of galaxy clustering and shear-density cross-correlations. Finally we examine a case where the assumed redshift distributions differ from the truth by more than a simple uniform bias. We find that the effectiveness of this self-calibration method will depend on the survey details and the nature of the uncertainties on the estimated redshift distributions.

  20. Reconstructing the galaxy density field with photometric redshifts. I. Methodology and validation on stellar mass functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malavasi, N.; Pozzetti, L.; Cucciati, O.; Bardelli, S.; Cimatti, A.

    2016-01-01

    Context. Measuring environment for large numbers of galaxies in the distant Universe is an open problem in astrophysics, as environment is important in determining many properties of galaxies during their formation and evolution. In order to measure galaxy environments, we need galaxy positions and redshifts. Photometric redshifts are more easily available for large numbers of galaxies, but at the price of larger uncertainties than spectroscopic redshifts. Aims: We study how photometric redshifts affect the measurement of galaxy environment and how the reconstruction of the density field may limit an analysis of the galaxy stellar mass function (GSMF) in different environments. Methods: Through the use of mock galaxy catalogues, we measured galaxy environment with a fixed aperture method, using each galaxy's true and photometric redshifts. We varied the parameters defining the fixed aperture volume and explored different configurations. We also used photometric redshifts with different uncertainties to simulate the case of various surveys. We then computed GSMF of the mock galaxy catalogues as a function of redshift and environment to see how the environmental estimate based on photometric redshifts affects their analysis. Results: We found that the most extreme environments can be reconstructed in a fairly accurate way only when using high-precision photometric redshifts with σΔz/ (1 + z) ≲ 0.01, with a fraction ≥ 60 ÷ 80% of galaxies placed in the correct density quartile and a contamination of ≤10% by opposite quartile interlopers. A length of the volume in the radial direction comparable to the ±1.5σ error of photometric redshifts and a fixed aperture radius of a size similar to the physical scale of the studied environment grant a better reconstruction than other volume configurations. When using this kind of an estimate of the density field, we found that any difference between the starting GSMF (divided accordingly to the true galaxy environment

  1. Radio-loud high-redshift protogalaxy canidates in Bootes

    SciTech Connect

    Croft, S; van Breugel, W; Brown, M J; de Vries, W; Dey, A; Eisenhardt, P; Jannuzi, B; Rottgering, H; Stanford, S A; Stern, D; Willner, S P

    2007-07-20

    We used the Near Infrared Camera (NIRC) on Keck I to obtain K{sub s}-band images of four candidate high-redshift radio galaxies selected using optical and radio data in the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey in Bootes. Our targets have 1.4 GHz radio flux densities greater than 1 mJy, but are undetected in the optical. Spectral energy distribution fitting suggests that three of these objects are at z > 3, with radio luminosities near the FR-I/FR-II break. The other has photometric redshift z{sub phot} = 1.2, but may in fact be at higher redshift. Two of the four objects exhibit diffuse morphologies in K{sub s}-band, suggesting that they are still in the process of forming.

  2. Photometric redshift techniques of quasars in big-data era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanxia

    2015-08-01

    With the availability of the huge amounts of data from ground- and space-based large multiband photometric surveys, photometric redshifts provide an estimate for the distance of an astronomical object and have become a crucial tool for extragalactic astronomy and cosmology. Various phtometric redshift approaches are in bloom. Their performance and efficiency not only depend on completeness and quality of data, but also on the volume of data. The increase of data volume lead to different choice of techniques. We present various data mining methods used for photometric redshift estimation of quasars and compare their advantages and disadvantages. In the big-data era, the methods fit for large-scale data are in great requirement.

  3. Powerful Quasar Outflows at High Redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aljanahi, Sara; Robert Scott Barrows

    2017-01-01

    Powerful quasar outflows can be driven by radiation pressure or radio jets, and they are capable of effecting the evolution of their host galaxies, particularly at high-redshifts (z~2)) when the quasar density peaks. We present a multi-wavelength analysis of 131 quasar outflows at high-redshifts (0.8Survey (SDSS) based on double peaked narrow emission lines. Our goal is to understand the mechanisms driving the outflows, their impact on the host galaxies, and their environments. We find that a subsample of 32 are detected by FIRST with 21 of them showing evidence for extended radio emission that suggests the outflows may be driven by the mechanical energy of radio jets in up to one-third of the sample. For the remaining two thirds of the sample, radiation pressure from the accretion disk is likely the driving mechanism. For those sources, we use the spatial information from long-slit spectra to estimate the energy of the outflowing gas, finding that one hundredth of the quasar energy is coupled with the energy being emitted by the radiation pressure from the accretion disk. Three of the quasars are found in the Hubble Space Telescope archives, with two of them showing clear signs of galaxy interactions/mergers, and a fraction of 0.4 show evidence of interactions from SDSS imaging. These combined results suggests that galaxy interactions may be the triggers of enhanced accretion onto the nuclear supermassive black holes of this sample, with the corresponding enhanced radiation pressure driving the outflows. Furthermore, the high-redshift nature of this sample has pushed the systematic study of quasar outflows closer to the epoch in which quasar feedback is likely to have been important in galaxy evolution.

  4. Unveiling high redshift structures with Planck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welikala, Niraj

    2012-07-01

    The Planck satellite, with its large wavelength coverage and all-sky survey, has a unique potential of systematically detecting the brightest and rarest submillimetre sources on the sky. We present an original method based on a combination of Planck and IRAS data which we use to select the most luminous submillimetre high-redshift (z>1-2) cold sources over the sky. The majority of these sources are either individual, strongly lensed galaxies, or represent the combined emission of several submillimetre galaxies within the large beam of Planck. The latter includes, in particular, rapidly growing galaxy groups and clusters. We demonstrate our selection method on the first 5 confirmations that include a newly discovered over-density of 5 submillimetre-bright sources which has been confirmed with Herschel/SPIRE observations and followed up with ground-based observations including VLT/XSHOOTER spectroscopy. Using Planck, we also unveil the nature of 107 high-redshift dusty, lensed submillimetre galaxies that have been previously observed over 940 square degrees by the South Pole Telescope (SPT). We stack these galaxies in the Planck maps, obtaining mean SEDs for both the bright (SPT flux F _{220 GHz} > 20 mJy) and faint (F _{220 GHz} < 20 mJy) galaxy populations. These SEDs and the derived mean redshifts suggest that the bright and faint sources belong to the same population of submillimetre galaxies. Stacking the lensed submillimetre galaxies in Planck also enables us to probe the z~1 environments around the foreground lenses and we obtain estimates of their clustering. Finally, we use the stacks to extrapolate SPT source counts to the Planck HFI frequencies, thereby estimating the contribution of the SPT sources at 220 GHz to the galaxy number counts at 353 and 545 GHz.

  5. A Model-independent Photometric Redshift Estimator for Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yun

    2007-01-01

    The use of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) as cosmological standard candles is fundamental in modern observational cosmology. In this Letter, we derive a simple empirical photometric redshift estimator for SNe Ia using a training set of SNe Ia with multiband (griz) light curves and spectroscopic redshifts obtained by the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS). This estimator is analytical and model-independent it does not use spectral templates. We use all the available SNe Ia from SNLS with near-maximum photometry in griz (a total of 40 SNe Ia) to train and test our photometric redshift estimator. The difference between the estimated redshifts zphot and the spectroscopic redshifts zspec, (zphot-zspec)/(1+zspec), has rms dispersions of 0.031 for 20 SNe Ia used in the training set, and 0.050 for 20 SNe Ia not used in the training set. The dispersion is of the same order of magnitude as the flux uncertainties at peak brightness for the SNe Ia. There are no outliers. This photometric redshift estimator should significantly enhance the ability of observers to accurately target high-redshift SNe Ia for spectroscopy in ongoing surveys. It will also dramatically boost the cosmological impact of very large future supernova surveys, such as those planned for the Advanced Liquid-mirror Probe for Astrophysics, Cosmology, and Asteroids (ALPACA) and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST).

  6. The Galileo solar redshift experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krisher, Timothy P.; Morabito, David D.; Anderson, John D.

    1993-04-01

    From the October 1989 launch to the first December 1990 earth gravity assist, we regularly obtained frequency measurements of the spacecraft clock - an ultrastable crystal oscillator (USO) supplied by Frequency Electronics, Inc. The solar gravitational redshift in frequency was readily detectable, and because of the unique variations in heliocentric distance we could separate the general relativistic effects from the USO's intrinsic frequency variations. We have verified the total frequency shift predicted by general relativity to 0.5 percent accuracy, and the solar gravitational redshift to 1 percent accuracy.

  7. Predicting the High Redshift Galaxy Population for JWST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Zoey; Benson, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope will be launched in Oct 2018 with the goal of observing galaxies in the redshift range of z = 10 - 15. As redshift increases, the age of the Universe decreases, allowing us to study objects formed only a few hundred million years after the Big Bang. This will provide a valuable opportunity to test and improve current galaxy formation theory by comparing predictions for mass, luminosity, and number density to the observed data. We have made testable predictions with the semi-analytical galaxy formation model Galacticus. The code uses Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods to determine viable sets of model parameters that match current astronomical data. The resulting constrained model was then set to match the specifications of the JWST Ultra Deep Field Imaging Survey. Predictions utilizing up to 100 viable parameter sets were calculated, allowing us to assess the uncertainty in current theoretical expectations. We predict that the planned UDF will be able to observe a significant number of objects past redshift z > 9 but nothing at redshift z > 11. In order to detect these faint objects at redshifts z = 11-15 we need to increase exposure time by at least a factor of 1.66.

  8. Measurement of A Redshift-space Power Spectrum for BOSS Galaxies and the Growth Rate at Redshift 0.57

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhigang; Jing, Y. P.; Zhang, Pengjie; Cheng, Dalong

    2016-12-01

    We present a measurement of the two-dimensional (2D) redshift-space power spectrum for the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey Data Release 11 CMASS galaxies in the northern Galactic cap based on the method developed by Jing & Börner. In this method, we first measure the 2D redshift-space correlation function and obtain the 2D power spectrum based on Fourier transform of the correlation function. The method is tested with an N-body mock galaxy catalog, which demonstrates that the method can yield an accurate and unbiased measurement of the redshift-space power spectrum given that the input 2D correlation function is correct. Compared with previous measurements in literature that are usually based on direct Fourier transform in redshift space, our method has the advantages that the window function and shot noise are fully corrected. Thus, our measurement can facilitate a direct comparison with the theoretical predictions. Our 2D power spectrum, by construction, can reproduce the 2D correlation function, and it can reproduce, for example, the 2D power spectrum of Beutler et al. accurately if ours is convolved with the window function they provided. We then develop a method to measure the structure growth rate, by separating the anisotropic redshift-space power spectrum from the isotropic real-space power spectrum. We have carefully corrected for the nonlinearities in the mapping from real space to redshift space, according to the theoretical model of Zhang et al. Finally, we obtain the measurement of structure growth rate f({z}{eff})σ 8({z}{eff}) = 0.438 ± 0.037 at the effective redshift {z}{eff} = 0.57. The result is useful for constraining cosmological parameters. The measurements of the 2D power spectrum will be released soon.

  9. Narrowband selected high-redshift galaxy candidates contaminated by lower redshift [OIII] ultra-strong emitter line galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pénin, Aurélie; Cuby, Jean-Gabriel; Clément, Benjamin; Hibon, Pascale; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Cassata, Paolo; Ilbert, Olivier

    2015-05-01

    Context. Lyman-break galaxies (LBG) and narrowband (NB) surveys have been successful at detecting large samples of high-redshift galaxies. Both methods are subject to contamination from low-redshift interlopers. Aims: Our aim is to investigate the nature of low-redshift interlopers in NB Lyman-α emitters (LAE) searches. Methods: From previous HAWK-I NB imaging at z ~ 7.7, we identify three objects that would have been selected as high-redshift LAEs had our optical data been one magnitude shallower (but still one to two magnitudes fainter than the near infrared data). We follow up these objects in spectroscopy with X-Shooter at the VLT. Results: Despite low quality data due to bad weather conditions, for each of the three objects we identify one, and only one emission line, in the spectra of the objects that we identify as the [OIII]5007 Å line. From this result, combined with spectral energy density fitting and tests based on line ratios of several populations of galaxies, we infer that the three objects are ultra-strong line emitters at redshifts ~1.1. Conclusions: From this work and the literature we remark that the [OIII] line appears to be a common source of contamination in high-redshift LBG and LAE samples and we suggest that efforts be made to characterize with high accuracy the [OIII] luminosity function out to redshift ~3 or higher. Based on observations made with ESO telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under programmes ID 385.A-1025(A) and 181.A-0485.

  10. Can Selforganizing Maps Accurately Predict Photometric Redshifts?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Way, Michael J.; Klose, Christian

    2012-01-01

    We present an unsupervised machine-learning approach that can be employed for estimating photometric redshifts. The proposed method is based on a vector quantization called the self-organizing-map (SOM) approach. A variety of photometrically derived input values were utilized from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey's main galaxy sample, luminous red galaxy, and quasar samples, along with the PHAT0 data set from the Photo-z Accuracy Testing project. Regression results obtained with this new approach were evaluated in terms of root-mean-square error (RMSE) to estimate the accuracy of the photometric redshift estimates. The results demonstrate competitive RMSE and outlier percentages when compared with several other popular approaches, such as artificial neural networks and Gaussian process regression. SOM RMSE results (using delta(z) = z(sub phot) - z(sub spec)) are 0.023 for the main galaxy sample, 0.027 for the luminous red galaxy sample, 0.418 for quasars, and 0.022 for PHAT0 synthetic data. The results demonstrate that there are nonunique solutions for estimating SOM RMSEs. Further research is needed in order to find more robust estimation techniques using SOMs, but the results herein are a positive indication of their capabilities when compared with other well-known methods

  11. Photometric redshifts and clustering of emission line galaxies selected jointly by DES and eBOSS

    SciTech Connect

    Jouvel, S.; et al.

    2015-09-23

    We present the results of the first test plates of the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. This paper focuses on the emission line galaxies (ELG) population targetted from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) photometry. We analyse the success rate, efficiency, redshift distribution, and clustering properties of the targets. From the 9000 spectroscopic redshifts targetted, 4600 have been selected from the DES photometry. The total success rate for redshifts between 0.6 and 1.2 is 71\\% and 68\\% respectively for a bright and faint, on average more distant, samples including redshifts measured from a single strong emission line. We find a mean redshift of 0.8 and 0.87, with 15 and 13\\% of unknown redshifts respectively for the bright and faint samples. In the redshift range 0.6redshifts, the mean redshift for the bright and faint sample is 0.85 and 0.9 respectively. Star contamination is lower than 2\\%. We measure a galaxy bias averaged on scales of 1 and 10~Mpc/h of 1.72 \\pm 0.1 for the bright sample and of 1.78 \\pm 0.12 for the faint sample. The error on the galaxy bias have been obtained propagating the errors in the correlation function to the fitted parameters. This redshift evolution for the galaxy bias is in agreement with theoretical expectations for a galaxy population with MB-5\\log h < -21.0. We note that biasing is derived from the galaxy clustering relative to a model for the mass fluctuations. We investigate the quality of the DES photometric redshifts and find that the outlier fraction can be reduced using a comparison between template fitting and neural network, or using a random forest algorithm.

  12. The universe at moderate redshift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    1992-01-01

    The Final Report on the universe at moderate redshift covering the period from 1 Mar. 1988 to 28 Feb. 1991 is presented. Areas of research included: galaxy formation and large-scale structure; intergalactic medium and background radiation fields; quasar statistics and evolution; and gravitational lenses.

  13. Analytic halo approach to the bispectrum of galaxies in redshift space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Nan, Yue; Hikage, Chiaki

    2017-02-01

    We present an analytic formula for the galaxy bispectrum in redshift space on the basis of the halo approach description with the halo occupation distribution of central galaxies and satellite galaxies. This work is an extension of a previous work on the galaxy power spectrum, which illuminated the significant contribution of satellite galaxies to the higher multipole spectrum through the nonlinear redshift space distortions of their random motions. Behaviors of the multipoles of the bispectrum are compared with results of numerical simulations assuming a halo occupation distribution of the low-redshift (LOWZ) sample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) III baryon oscillation spectroscopic survey (BOSS) survey. Also presented are analytic approximate formulas for the multipoles of the bispectrum, which is useful to understanding their characteristic properties. We demonstrate that the Fingers of God effect is quite important for the higher multipoles of the bispectrum in redshift space, depending on the halo occupation distribution parameters.

  14. Rapid modelling of the redshift-space power spectrum multipoles for a masked density field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, M. J.; Peacock, J. A.; Taylor, A. N.; de la Torre, S.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we reformulate the forward modelling of the redshift-space power spectrum multipole moments for a masked density field, as encountered in galaxy redshift surveys. Exploiting the symmetries of the redshift-space correlation function, we provide a masked-field generalization of the Hankel transform relation between the multipole moments in real and Fourier space. Using this result, we detail how a likelihood analysis requiring computation for a broad range of desired P(k) models may be executed 103-104 times faster than with other common approaches, together with significant gains in spectral resolution. We present a concrete application to the complex angular geometry of the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey PDR-1 release and discuss the validity of this technique for finite-angle surveys.

  15. Simulating high-redshift galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvaterra, Ruben; Ferrara, Andrea; Dayal, Pratika

    2011-06-01

    Recent observations have gathered a considerable sample of high-redshift galaxy candidates and determined the evolution of their luminosity function (LF). To interpret these findings, we use cosmological SPH simulations including, in addition to standard physical processes, a detailed treatment of the Pop III-Pop II transition in early objects. The simulated high-z galaxies match remarkably well the amplitude and slope of the observed LF in the redshift range 5 < z < 10. The LF shifts towards fainter luminosities with increasing redshift, while its faint-end slope keeps an almost constant value, α≈-2. The stellar populations of high-z galaxies have ages of 100-300 (40-130) Myr at z= 5 (z= 7-8), implying an early (z > 9.4) start of their star formation activity; the specific star formation rate is almost independent of galactic stellar mass. These objects are enriched rapidly with metals and galaxies identified by HST/WFC3 (?) show metallicities ≈0.1 Z⊙ even at z= 7-8. Most of the simulated galaxies at z≈ 7 (noticeably the smallest ones) are virtually dust-free, and none of them has an extinction larger than E(B-V) = 0.01. The bulk (50 per cent) of the ionizing photons is produced by objects populating the faint end of the LF (?), which JWST will resolve up to z= 7.3. Pop III stars continue to form essentially at all redshifts; however, at z= 6 (z= 10) the contribution of Pop III stars to the total galactic luminosity is always less than 5 per cent for ? (?). The typical high-z galaxies closely resemble the GRB host galaxy population observed at lower redshifts, strongly encouraging the use of GRBs to detect the first galaxies.

  16. GALAXY CLUSTERS AT HIGH REDSHIFT AND EVOLUTION OF BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Z. L.; Han, J. L.

    2011-06-10

    Identification of high-redshift clusters is important for studies of cosmology and cluster evolution. Using photometric redshifts of galaxies, we identify 631 clusters from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) wide field, 202 clusters from the CFHT deep field, 187 clusters from the Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) field, and 737 clusters from the Spitzer Wide-area InfraRed Extragalactic Survey (SWIRE) field. The redshifts of these clusters are in the range 0.1 {approx}< z {approx}< 1.6. Merging these cluster samples gives 1644 clusters in the four survey fields, of which 1088 are newly identified and more than half are from the large SWIRE field. Among 228 clusters of z {>=} 1, 191 clusters are newly identified, and most of them from the SWIRE field. With this large sample of high-redshift clusters, we study the color evolution of the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). The r' - z' and r{sup +} - m{sub 3.6{mu}m} colors of the BCGs are consistent with a stellar population synthesis model in which the BCGs are formed at redshift z{sub f} {>=} 2 and evolved passively. The g' - z' and B - m{sub 3.6{mu}m} colors of the BCGs at redshifts z > 0.8 are systematically bluer than the passive evolution model for galaxies formed at z{sub f} {approx} 2, indicating star formation in high-redshift BCGs.

  17. Compact quiescent galaxies at intermediate redshifts {sup ,}

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Li-Yen; Stockton, Alan; Shih, Hsin-Yi

    2014-12-01

    From several searches of the area common to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope Infrared Deep Sky Survey, we have selected 22 luminous galaxies between z ∼ 0.4 and z ∼ 0.9 that have colors and sizes similar to those of the compact quiescent galaxies at z > 2. By exploring structural parameters and stellar populations, we found that most of these galaxies actually formed most of their stars at z < 2 and are generally less compact than those found at z > 2. Several of these young objects are disk-like or possibly prolate. This lines up with several previous studies that found that massive quiescent galaxies at high redshifts often have disk-like morphologies. If these galaxies were to be confirmed to be disk-like, their formation mechanism must be able to account for both compactness and disks. On the other hand, if these galaxies were to be confirmed to be prolate, the fact that prolate galaxies do not exist in the local universe would indicate that galaxy formation mechanisms have evolved over cosmic time. We also found five galaxies forming over 80% of their stellar masses at z > 2. Three of these galaxies appear to have been modified to have spheroid-like morphologies, in agreement with the scenario of 'inside-out' buildup of massive galaxies. The remaining galaxies, SDSS J014355.21+133451.4 and SDSS J115836.93+021535.1, have truly old stellar populations and disk-like morphologies. These two objects would be good candidates for nearly unmodified compact quiescent galaxies from high redshifts that are worth future study.

  18. Predicting the Redshift 2 H-Alpha Luminosity Function Using [OIII] Emission Line Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Vihang; Scarlata, Claudia; Colbert, James W.; Dai, Y. S.; Dressler, Alan; Henry, Alaina; Malkan, Matt; Rafelski, Marc; Siana, Brian; Teplitz, Harry I.; Bagley, Micaela; Beck, Melanie; Ross, Nathaniel R.; Rutkowski, Michael; Wang, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Upcoming space-based surveys such as Euclid and WFIRST-AFTA plan to measure Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations (BAOs) in order to study dark energy. These surveys will use IR slitless grism spectroscopy to measure redshifts of a large number of galaxies over a significant redshift range. In this paper, we use the WFC3 Infrared Spectroscopic Parallel Survey (WISP) to estimate the expected number of H-alpha emitters observable by these future surveys. WISP is an ongoing Hubble Space Telescope slitless spectroscopic survey, covering the 0.8 - 1.65 micrometers wavelength range and allowing the detection of H-alpha emitters up to z approximately equal to 1.5 and [OIII] emitters to z approximately equal to 2.3. We derive the H-alpha-[OIII] bivariate line luminosity function for WISP galaxies at z approximately equal to 1 using a maximum likelihood estimator that properly accounts for uncertainties in line luminosity measurement, and demonstrate how it can be used to derive the H-alpha luminosity function from exclusively fitting [OIII] data. Using the z approximately equal to 2 [OIII] line luminosity function, and assuming that the relation between H-alpha and [OIII] luminosity does not change significantly over the redshift range, we predict the H-alpha number counts at z approximately equal to 2 - the upper end of the redshift range of interest for the future surveys. For the redshift range 0.7 less than z less than 2, we expect approximately 3000 galaxies per sq deg for a flux limit of 3 x 10(exp -16) ergs per sec per sq cm (the proposed depth of Euclid galaxy redshift survey) and approximately 20,000 galaxies per sq deg for a flux limit of approximately 10(exp -16) ergs per sec per sq cm (the baseline depth of WFIRST galaxy redshift survey).

  19. Photometric Properties of the Most Massive High-Redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Brant; Li, Yuexing; Cox, Thomas J.; Hernquist, Lars; Hopkins, Philip F.

    2007-09-01

    We calculate the observable properties of the most massive high-redshift galaxies in the hierarchical formation scenario where stellar spheroid and supermassive black hole growth are fueled by gas-rich mergers. Combining high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations of the hierarchical formation of a z~6 quasar, stellar population synthesis models, template active galactic nucleus (AGN) spectra, prescriptions for interstellar and intergalactic absorption, and the response of modern telescopes, the photometric evolution of galaxies destined to host z~6 quasars is modeled at redshifts z~4-14. These massive galaxies, with enormous stellar masses of M*~1011.5-1012 Msolar and star formation rates of SFR~103-104 Msolar yr-1 at z>~7, satisfy a variety of photometric selection criteria based on Lyman break techniques, including V-band dropouts at z>~5, i-band dropouts at z>~6, and z-band dropouts at z>~7. The observability of the most massive high-redshift galaxies is assessed and compared with a wide range of existing and proposed photometric surveys, including the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS)/Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF), National Optical Astronomy Observatory Deep Wide-Field Survey (NDWFS), UKIRT Infared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS), Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) Shallow Survey, Ultradeep Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA), Dark Universe Explorer (DUNE), Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System (Pan-STARRS), Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), and Supernova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP). Massive stellar spheroids descended from z~6 quasars will likely be detected at z~4 by existing surveys, but owing to their low number densities the discovery of quasar progenitor galaxies at z>7 will likely require future surveys of large portions of the sky (>~0.5%) at wavelengths λ>~1 μm. The detection of rare, starbursting, massive galaxies at redshifts z>~6 would provide support for the

  20. Precision Cosmology with a New Probabilistic Photometric Redshifts Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco Kind, Matias; Brunner, R. J.

    2013-06-01

    A complete understanding of both dark energy and dark matter remains one of most important challenges in astrophysics today. Recent theoretical and numerical computations have made important progress in quantifying the role of these dark components on the formation and evolution of galaxies through cosmic time, but observational verification of these predictions and the development of new, more stringent constraints has not kept pace. It is in this context that, photometric redshifts have become more important with the growth of large imaging surveys, such as DES and LSST, that have been designed to address this issue. But their basic implementation has not changed significantly from their original development, as most techniques provide a single photometric redshift estimate and an associated error for the an extragalactic source. In this work, we present a unique and powerful solution that leverages the full information contained in the photometric data to address this cosmological challenge with a new approach that provides accurate photometric redshift probability density functions (PDF) for galaxies. This new approach, which scales efficiently to massive data, efficiently combines standard template fitting techniques with powerful machine learning methods. Included in this framework is our recently developed technique entitled Trees for PhotoZ (TPZ); a new, robust, parallel photometric redshift code that uses prediction trees and random forests to generate photo-z PDFs in a reliable and fast manner. In addition, our approach also provides ancillary information about the internal structure of the data, including the relative importance of variables used during the redshift estimation, an identification of areas in the training sample that provide poor predictions, and an accurate outlier rejection method. We will also present current results of this approach on a variety of datasets and discuss, by using specific examples, how the full photo-z PDF can be

  1. High-redshift galaxy populations.

    PubMed

    Hu, Esther M; Cowie, Lennox L

    2006-04-27

    We now see many galaxies as they were only 800 million years after the Big Bang, and that limit may soon be exceeded when wide-field infrared detectors are widely available. Multi-wavelength studies show that there was relatively little star formation at very early times and that star formation was at its maximum at about half the age of the Universe. A small number of high-redshift objects have been found by targeting X-ray and radio sources and most recently, gamma-ray bursts. The gamma-ray burst sources may provide a way to reach even higher-redshift galaxies in the future, and to probe the first generation of stars.

  2. Cosmology from High Redshift Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnavich, Peter

    The discovery of a correlation between the light curve shape and intrinsic b rightness has made Type Ia supernovae exceptionally accurate distance indicators out to cosmologically interesting redshifts. Ground-based searches and follow-up as well as Hubble S pace Telescope observations of Type Ia supernovae have produced a significant number of object s with redshifts between 0.3 and 1.0. The distant SNe, when combined with a local samp le analyzed in the same way, provide reliable constraints on the deceleration and age of th e Universe. Early this year, an analysis of a handful of Type Ia events indicated that the deceleration was too small for gravitating matter alone to make a flat Universe. A larger sa mple of supernovae gives the surprising result that the Universe is accelerating, implying the exi stence of a cosmological constant or some other exotic form of energy. The success of this research has depended on the development of algorithms and software to register, scale and subtract CCD images taken weeks apart and to search for var iable objects. A good fraction of the point-sources identified are asteroids, variable stars, or AGN, so spectra are needed to confirm the identification as a Type Ia supernova and obt ain a redshift. The best candidates are followed photometrically to construct light curves. The steps to transform the observed light curves into cosmologically interestin g results will also be described.

  3. Determining spectroscopic redshifts by using k nearest neighbor regression. I. Description of method and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kügler, S. D.; Polsterer, K.; Hoecker, M.

    2015-04-01

    Context. In astronomy, new approaches to process and analyze the exponentially increasing amount of data are inevitable. For spectra, such as in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectral database, usually templates of well-known classes are used for classification. In case the fitting of a template fails, wrong spectral properties (e.g. redshift) are derived. Validation of the derived properties is the key to understand the caveats of the template-based method. Aims: In this paper we present a method for statistically computing the redshift z based on a similarity approach. This allows us to determine redshifts in spectra for emission and absorption features without using any predefined model. Additionally, we show how to determine the redshift based on single features. As a consequence we are, for example, able to filter objects that show multiple redshift components. Methods: The redshift calculation is performed by comparing predefined regions in the spectra and individually applying a nearest neighbor regression model to each predefined emission and absorption region. Results: The choice of the model parameters controls the quality and the completeness of the redshifts. For ≈90% of the analyzed 16 000 spectra of our reference and test sample, a certain redshift can be computed that is comparable to the completeness of SDSS (96%). The redshift calculation yields a precision for every individually tested feature that is comparable to the overall precision of the redshifts of SDSS. Using the new method to compute redshifts, we could also identify 14 spectra with a significant shift between emission and absorption or between emission and emission lines. The results already show the immense power of this simple machine-learning approach for investigating huge databases such as the SDSS.

  4. Mass-size relation at high redshift in different environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaye, L.; Huertas-Company, M.; Mei, S.

    2012-12-01

    We study cluster early-type galaxies (ETGs) from the HAWK-I cluster survey in the redshift range 0.8

  5. Close companions to two high-redshift quasars

    SciTech Connect

    McGreer, Ian D.; Fan, Xiaohui; Bian, Fuyan; Strauss, Michael A.; Haiman, Zoltàn; Richards, Gordon T.; Jiang, Linhua; Schneider, Donald P.

    2014-10-01

    We report the serendipitous discoveries of companion galaxies to two high-redshift quasars. SDSS J025617.7+001904 is a z = 4.79 quasar included in our recent survey of faint quasars in the SDSS Stripe 82 region. The initial MMT slit spectroscopy shows excess Lyα emission extending well beyond the quasar's light profile. Further imaging and spectroscopy with LBT/MODS1 confirms the presence of a bright galaxy (i {sub AB} = 23.6) located 2'' (12 kpc projected) from the quasar with strong Lyα emission (EW{sub 0} ≈ 100 Å) at the redshift of the quasar, as well as faint continuum. The second quasar, CFHQS J005006.6+344522 (z = 6.25), is included in our recent HST SNAP survey of z ∼ 6 quasars searching for evidence of gravitational lensing. Deep imaging with ACS and WFC3 confirms an optical dropout ∼4.5 mag fainter than the quasar (Y {sub AB} = 25) at a separation of 0.''9. The red i {sub 775} – Y {sub 105} color of the galaxy and its proximity to the quasar (5 kpc projected if at the quasar redshift) strongly favor an association with the quasar. Although it is much fainter than the quasar, it is remarkably bright when compared to field galaxies at this redshift, while showing no evidence for lensing. Both systems may represent late-stage mergers of two massive galaxies, with the observed light for one dominated by powerful ongoing star formation and for the other by rapid black hole growth. Observations of close companions are rare; if major mergers are primarily responsible for high-redshift quasar fueling then the phase when progenitor galaxies can be observed as bright companions is relatively short.

  6. A WFC3 Grism Emission Line Redshift Catalog in the GOODS-South Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Aaron M.; Kocevski, Dale D.; Trump, Jonathan R.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Hathi, Nimish P.; Barro, Guillermo; Dahlen, Tomas; Faber, Sandra M.; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Fontana, Adriano; Ferguson, Henry C.; Grogin, Norman A.; Grützbauch, Ruth; Guo, Yicheng; Hsu, Li-Ting; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Koo, David C.; Mobasher, Bahram; Pforr, Janine; Salvato, Mara; Wiklind, Tommy; Wuyts, Stijn

    2015-06-01

    We combine Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Wide Field Camera3 (WFC3) imaging and G141 grism observations from the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) and 3D-HST surveys to produce a catalog of grism spectroscopic redshifts for galaxies in the CANDELS/GOODS-South field. The WFC3/G141 grism spectra cover a wavelength range of 1.1≤slant λ ≤slant 1.7 μm with a resolving power of R∼ 130 for point sources, thus providing rest-frame optical spectra for galaxies out to z∼ 3.5. The catalog is selected in the H-band (F160W) and includes both galaxies with and without previously published spectroscopic redshifts. Grism spectra are extracted for all H-band detected galaxies with H ≤slant 24 and a CANDELS photometric redshift {{z}phot}≥slant 0.6. The resulting spectra are visually inspected to identify emission lines, and redshifts are determined using cross-correlation with empirical spectral templates. To establish the accuracy of our redshifts, we compare our results against high-quality spectroscopic redshifts from the literature. Using a sample of 411 control galaxies, this analysis yields a precision of {{σ }NMAD}=0.0028 for the grism-derived redshifts, which is consistent with the accuracy reported by the 3D-HST team. Our final catalog covers an area of 153 arcmin2 and contains 1019 redshifts for galaxies in GOODS-S. Roughly 60% (608/1019) of these redshifts are for galaxies with no previously published spectroscopic redshift. These new redshifts span a range of 0.677≤slant z≤slant 3.456 and have a median redshift of z = 1.282. The catalog contains a total of 234 new redshifts for galaxies at z\\gt 1.5. In addition, we present 20 galaxy pair candidates identified for the first time using the grism redshifts in our catalog, including four new galaxy pairs at z∼ 2, nearly doubling the number of such pairs previously identified.

  7. Baryon acoustic oscillations in 2D: Modeling redshift-space power spectrum from perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Taruya, Atsushi; Nishimichi, Takahiro; Saito, Shun

    2010-09-15

    We present an improved prescription for the matter power spectrum in redshift space taking proper account of both nonlinear gravitational clustering and redshift distortion, which are of particular importance for accurately modeling baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs). Contrary to the models of redshift distortion phenomenologically introduced but frequently used in the literature, the new model includes the corrections arising from the nonlinear coupling between the density and velocity fields associated with two competitive effects of redshift distortion, i.e., Kaiser and Finger-of-God effects. Based on the improved treatment of perturbation theory for gravitational clustering, we compare our model predictions with the monopole and quadrupole power spectra of N-body simulations, and an excellent agreement is achieved over the scales of BAOs. Potential impacts on constraining dark energy and modified gravity from the redshift-space power spectrum are also investigated based on the Fisher-matrix formalism, particularly focusing on the measurements of the Hubble parameter, angular diameter distance, and growth rate for structure formation. We find that the existing phenomenological models of redshift distortion produce a systematic error on measurements of the angular diameter distance and Hubble parameter by 1%-2%, and the growth-rate parameter by {approx}5%, which would become non-negligible for future galaxy surveys. Correctly modeling redshift distortion is thus essential, and the new prescription for the redshift-space power spectrum including the nonlinear corrections can be used as an accurate theoretical template for anisotropic BAOs.

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: OmegaWINGS local clusters of galaxies redshifts (Moretti+, 2017)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretti, A.; Gullieuszik, M.; Poggianti, B.; Paccagnella, A.; Couch, W. J.; Vulcani, B.; Bettoni, D.; Fritz, J.; Cava, A.; Fasaano, G.; D'Onofrio, M.; Omizzolo, A.

    2017-02-01

    Redshifts, magnitude/radial completeness, and memberships are given for the 17985 galaxies observed as part of the OmegaWINGS survey of local clusters of galaxies over 1 square degree. Redshifts have been measured using both absorption and emission lines features. The sample magnitude completeness is 80% at V=20. Thanks to the observing strategy, the radial completeness turned out to be relatively constant (90%) within the AAOmega field of view. The success rate in measuring redshifts is 95%, at all radii. Cluster members are flagged 1 or 2, depending on the cluster structure/secondary structure, and 0 if they are not cluster members. (1 data file).

  9. DUST ATTENUATION IN HIGH REDSHIFT GALAXIES: 'DIAMONDS IN THE SKY'

    SciTech Connect

    Scoville, Nick; Capak, Peter; Steinhardt, Charles; Faisst, Andreas; Kakazu, Yuko; Li, Gongjie

    2015-02-20

    We use observed optical to near-infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 266 galaxies in the COSMOS survey to derive the wavelength dependence of the dust attenuation at high redshift. All of the galaxies have spectroscopic redshifts in the range z = 2-6.5. The presence of the C IV absorption feature, indicating that the rest-frame UV-optical SED is dominated by OB stars, is used to select objects for which the intrinsic, unattenuated spectrum has a well-established shape. Comparison of this intrinsic spectrum with the observed broadband photometric SED then permits derivation of the wavelength dependence of the dust attenuation. The derived dust attenuation curve is similar in overall shape to the Calzetti curve for local starburst galaxies. We also see the 2175 Å bump feature which is present in the Milky Way and Large Magellanic Cloud extinction curves but not seen in the Calzetti curve. The bump feature is commonly attributed to graphite or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. No significant dependence is seen with redshift between sub-samples at z = 2-4 and z = 4-6.5. The 'extinction' curve obtained here provides a firm basis for color and extinction corrections of high redshift galaxy photometry.

  10. A Catalog of Candidate High-redshift Blazars for GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Arias, Tersi M.; /SLAC /San Francisco State U.

    2006-09-27

    High-redshift blazars are promising candidates for detection by the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST). GLAST, expected to be launched in the Fall of 2007, is a high-energy gamma-ray observatory designed for making observations of celestial gamma-ray sources in the energy band extending from 10 MeV to more than 200 GeV. It is estimated that GLAST will find several thousand blazars. The motivations for measuring the gamma-ray emission from distant blazars include the study of the high-energy emission processes occurring in these sources and an indirect measurement of the extragalactic background light. In anticipation of the launch of GLAST we have compiled a catalog of candidate high-redshift blazars. The criteria for sources chosen for the catalog were: high radio emission, high redshift, and a flat radio spectrum. A preliminary list of 307 radio sources brighter than 70mJy with a redshift z {ge} 2.5 was acquired using data from the NASA Extragalactic Database. Flux measurements of each source were obtained at two or more radio frequencies from surveys and catalogs to calculate their radio spectral indices {alpha}. The sources with a flat-radio spectrum ({alpha} {le} 0.5) were selected for the catalog, and the final catalog includes about 200 sources.

  11. UV Spectroscopy of Type Ia Supernovae at Low- andHigh-Redshift

    SciTech Connect

    Nugent, Peter

    2005-04-20

    In the past three years two separate programs were initiated to study the restframe UV properties of Type Ia Supernovae. The low-redshift study was carried out using several ground-based facilities coupled with HST/STIS observations. The high-redshift program is an offshoot of the CFHT Legacy Survey and uses Keck/LRIS to obtain spectra. Here we present the preliminary results from each program and their implications for current cosmology measurements.

  12. IMPROVED PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS WITH SURFACE LUMINOSITY PRIORS

    SciTech Connect

    Xia Lifang; Cohen, Seth; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James; Grogin, Norman; Windhorst, Rogier A.; Hathi, Nimish P.; Pirzkal, Nor; Xu Chun

    2009-07-15

    We apply Bayesian statistics with prior probabilities of galaxy surface luminosity (SL) to improve photometric redshifts. We apply the method to a sample of 1266 galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts in the GOODS North and South fields at 0.1 {approx}< z {approx}< 2.0. We start with spectrophotometric redshifts (SPZs) based on Probing Evolution and Reionization Spectroscopically grism spectra, which cover a wavelength range of 6000-9000 A, combined with (U)BViz(JHK) broadband photometry in the GOODS fields. The accuracy of SPZ redshifts is estimated to be {sigma}({delta}(z)) = 0.035 with an systematic offset of -0.026, where {delta}(z) = {delta}z/(1 + z), for galaxies in redshift range of 0.5 {approx}< z {approx}< 1.25. The addition of the SL prior probability helps break the degeneracy of SPZ redshifts between low redshift 4000 A break galaxies and high-redshift Lyman break galaxies which are mostly catastrophic outliers. For the 1138 galaxies at z {approx}< 1.6, the fraction of galaxies with redshift deviation {delta}(z)>0.2 is reduced from 15.0% to 10.4%, while the rms scatter of the fractional redshift error does not change much.

  13. Identifying Ionized Regions in Noisy Redshifted 21 cm Data Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malloy, Matthew; Lidz, Adam

    2013-04-01

    One of the most promising approaches for studying reionization is to use the redshifted 21 cm line. Early generations of redshifted 21 cm surveys will not, however, have the sensitivity to make detailed maps of the reionization process, and will instead focus on statistical measurements. Here, we show that it may nonetheless be possible to directly identify ionized regions in upcoming data sets by applying suitable filters to the noisy data. The locations of prominent minima in the filtered data correspond well with the positions of ionized regions. In particular, we corrupt semi-numeric simulations of the redshifted 21 cm signal during reionization with thermal noise at the level expected for a 500 antenna tile version of the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), and mimic the degrading effects of foreground cleaning. Using a matched filter technique, we find that the MWA should be able to directly identify ionized regions despite the large thermal noise. In a plausible fiducial model in which ~20% of the volume of the universe is neutral at z ~ 7, we find that a 500-tile MWA may directly identify as many as ~150 ionized regions in a 6 MHz portion of its survey volume and roughly determine the size of each of these regions. This may, in turn, allow interesting multi-wavelength follow-up observations, comparing galaxy properties inside and outside of ionized regions. We discuss how the optimal configuration of radio antenna tiles for detecting ionized regions with a matched filter technique differs from the optimal design for measuring power spectra. These considerations have potentially important implications for the design of future redshifted 21 cm surveys.

  14. Data-driven, Interpretable Photometric Redshifts Trained on Heterogeneous and Unrepresentative Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leistedt, Boris; Hogg, David W.

    2017-03-01

    We present a new method for inferring photometric redshifts in deep galaxy and quasar surveys, based on a data-driven model of latent spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and a physical model of photometric fluxes as a function of redshift. This conceptually novel approach combines the advantages of both machine learning methods and template fitting methods by building template SEDs directly from the spectroscopic training data. This is made computationally tractable with Gaussian processes operating in flux–redshift space, encoding the physics of redshifts and the projection of galaxy SEDs onto photometric bandpasses. This method alleviates the need to acquire representative training data or to construct detailed galaxy SED models; it requires only that the photometric bandpasses and calibrations be known or have parameterized unknowns. The training data can consist of a combination of spectroscopic and deep many-band photometric data with reliable redshifts, which do not need to entirely spatially overlap with the target survey of interest or even involve the same photometric bands. We showcase the method on the i-magnitude-selected, spectroscopically confirmed galaxies in the COSMOS field. The model is trained on the deepest bands (from SUBARU and HST) and photometric redshifts are derived using the shallower SDSS optical bands only. We demonstrate that we obtain accurate redshift point estimates and probability distributions despite the training and target sets having very different redshift distributions, noise properties, and even photometric bands. Our model can also be used to predict missing photometric fluxes or to simulate populations of galaxies with realistic fluxes and redshifts, for example.

  15. The SDSS Coadd: A Galaxy Photometric Redshift Catalog

    SciTech Connect

    Reis, Ribamar R.R.; Soares-Santos, Marcelle; Annis, James; Dodelson, Scott; Hao, Jiangang; Johnston, David; Kubo, Jeffrey; Lin, Huan; Seo, Hee-Jong; Simet, Melanie; /Chicago U.

    2011-11-01

    We present and describe a catalog of galaxy photometric redshifts (photo-z's) for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Coadd Data. We use the Artificial Neural Network (ANN) technique to calculate photo-z's and the Nearest Neighbor Error (NNE) method to estimate photo-z errors for {approx} 13 million objects classified as galaxies in the coadd with r < 24.5. The photo-z and photo-z error estimators are trained and validated on a sample of {approx} 89, 000 galaxies that have SDSS photometry and spectroscopic redshifts measured by the SDSS Data Release 7 (DR7), the Canadian Network for Observational Cosmology Field Galaxy Survey (CNOC2), the Deep Extragalactic Evolutionary Probe Data Release 3(DEEP2 DR3), the SDSS-III's Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), the Visible imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph - Very Large Telescope Deep Survey (VVDS) and the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey. For the best ANN methods we have tried, we find that 68% of the galaxies in the validation set have a photo-z error smaller than {sigma}{sub 68} = 0.036. After presenting our results and quality tests, we provide a short guide for users accessing the public data.

  16. 2dFLenS and KiDS: determining source redshift distributions with cross-correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Andrew; Blake, Chris; Amon, Alexandra; Erben, Thomas; Glazebrook, Karl; Harnois-Deraps, Joachim; Heymans, Catherine; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Joudaki, Shahab; Klaes, Dominik; Kuijken, Konrad; Lidman, Chris; Marin, Felipe A.; McFarland, John; Morrison, Christopher B.; Parkinson, David; Poole, Gregory B.; Radovich, Mario; Wolf, Christian

    2017-03-01

    We develop a statistical estimator to infer the redshift probability distribution of a photometric sample of galaxies from its angular cross-correlation in redshift bins with an overlapping spectroscopic sample. This estimator is a minimum-variance weighted quadratic function of the data: a quadratic estimator. This extends and modifies the methodology presented by McQuinn & White. The derived source redshift distribution is degenerate with the source galaxy bias, which must be constrained via additional assumptions. We apply this estimator to constrain source galaxy redshift distributions in the Kilo-Degree imaging survey through cross-correlation with the spectroscopic 2-degree Field Lensing Survey, presenting results first as a binned step-wise distribution in the range z < 0.8, and then building a continuous distribution using a Gaussian process model. We demonstrate the robustness of our methodology using mock catalogues constructed from N-body simulations, and comparisons with other techniques for inferring the redshift distribution.

  17. SPECTROSCOPIC REDSHIFTS OF GALAXIES WITHIN THE FRONTIER FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Ebeling, Harald; Ma, Cheng-Jiun; Barrett, Elizabeth

    2014-04-01

    We present a catalog of 1921 spectroscopic redshifts measured in the fields of the massive galaxy clusters MACSJ0416.1–2403 (z = 0.397), MACSJ0717.5+3745 (z = 0.546), and MACSJ1149.5+2223 (z = 0.544), i.e., three of the four clusters selected by Space Telescope Science Institute as the targets of the Frontier Fields (FFs) initiative for studies of the distant Universe via gravitational lensing. Compiled in the course of the Massive Cluster Survey project (MACS) that detected the FF clusters, this catalog is provided to the community for three purposes: (1) to allow the identification of cluster members for studies of the galaxy population of these extreme systems, (2) to facilitate the removal of unlensed galaxies and thus reduce shear dilution in weak-lensing analyses, and (3) to improve the calibration of photometric redshifts based on both ground- and spacebased observations of the FF clusters.

  18. Galaxy Redshifts from Discrete Optimization of Correlation Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Benjamin C. G.; Budavári, Tamás; Basu, Amitabh; Rahman, Mubdi

    2016-12-01

    We propose a new method of constraining the redshifts of individual extragalactic sources based on celestial coordinates and their ensemble statistics. Techniques from integer linear programming (ILP) are utilized to optimize simultaneously for the angular two-point cross- and autocorrelation functions. Our novel formalism introduced here not only transforms the otherwise hopelessly expensive, brute-force combinatorial search into a linear system with integer constraints but also is readily implementable in off-the-shelf solvers. We adopt Gurobi, a commercial optimization solver, and use Python to build the cost function dynamically. The preliminary results on simulated data show potential for future applications to sky surveys by complementing and enhancing photometric redshift estimators. Our approach is the first application of ILP to astronomical analysis.

  19. Local Analogs for High-redshift Galaxies: Resembling the Physical Conditions of the Interstellar Medium in High-redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Fuyan; Kewley, Lisa J.; Dopita, Michael A.; Juneau, Stephanie

    2016-05-01

    We present a sample of local analogs for high-redshift galaxies selected in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The physical conditions of the interstellar medium (ISM) in these local analogs resemble those in high-redshift galaxies. These galaxies are selected based on their positions in the [O iii]/Hβ versus [N ii]/Hα nebular emission-line diagnostic diagram. We show that these local analogs share similar physical properties with high-redshift galaxies, including high specific star formation rates (sSFRs), flat UV continuums, and compact galaxy sizes. In particular, the ionization parameters and electron densities in these analogs are comparable to those in z ≃ 2-3 galaxies, but higher than those in normal SDSS galaxies by ≃0.6 dex and ≃0.9 dex, respectively. The mass-metallicity relation (MZR) in these local analogs shows -0.2 dex offset from that in SDSS star-forming galaxies at the low-mass end, which is consistent with the MZR of the z˜ 2{--}3 galaxies. We compare the local analogs in this study with those in other studies, including Lyman break analogs (LBA) and green pea (GP) galaxies. The analogs in this study share a similar star formation surface density with LBAs, but the ionization parameters and electron density in our analogs are higher than those in LBAs by factors of 1.5 and 3, respectively. The analogs in this study have comparable ionization parameters and electron densities to the GP galaxies, but our method can select galaxies in a wider redshift range. We find the high sSFR and SFR surface density can increase the electron density and ionization parameters, but still cannot fully explain the difference in ISM condition between nearby galaxies and the local analogs/high-redshift galaxies.

  20. Lyman Break Analogs: Constraints on the Formation of Extreme Starbursts at Low and High Redshift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goncalves, Thiago S.; Overzier, Roderik; Basu-Zych, Antara; Martin, D. Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Lyman Break Analogs (LBAs), characterized by high far-UV luminosities and surface brightnesses as detected by GALEX, are intensely star-forming galaxies in the low-redshift universe (z approximately equal to 0.2), with star formation rates reaching up to 50 times that of the Milky Way. These objects present metallicities, morphologies and other physical properties similar to higher redshift Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs), motivating the detailed study of LBAs as local laboratories of this high-redshift galaxy population. We present results from our recent integral-field spectroscopy survey of LBAs with Keck/OSIRIS, which shows that these galaxies have the same nebular gas kinematic properties as high-redshift LBGs. We argue that such kinematic studies alone are not an appropriate diagnostic to rule out merger events as the trigger for the observed starburst. Comparison between the kinematic analysis and morphological indices from HST imaging illustrates the difficulties of properly identifying (minor or major) merger events, with no clear correlation between the results using either of the two methods. Artificial redshifting of our data indicates that this problem becomes even worse at high redshift due to surface brightness dimming and resolution loss. Whether mergers could generate the observed kinematic properties is strongly dependent on gas fractions in these galaxies. We present preliminary results of a CARMA survey for LBAs and discuss the implications of the inferred molecular gas masses for formation models.

  1. Omega from the anisotropy of the redshift correlation function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, A. J. S.

    1993-01-01

    Peculiar velocities distort the correlation function of galaxies observed in redshift space. In the large scale, linear regime, the distortion takes a characteristic quadrupole plus hexadecapole form, with the amplitude of the distortion depending on the cosmological density parameter omega. Preliminary measurements are reported here of the harmonics of the correlation function in the CfA, SSRS, and IRAS 2 Jansky redshift surveys. The observed behavior of the harmonics agrees qualitatively with the predictions of linear theory on large scales in every survey. However, real anisotropy in the galaxy distribution induces large fluctuations in samples which do not yet probe a sufficiently fair volume of the Universe. In the CfA 14.5 sample in particular, the Great Wall induces a large negative quadrupole, which taken at face value implies an unrealistically large omega 20. The IRAS 2 Jy survey, which covers a substantially larger volume than the optical surveys and is less affected by fingers-of-god, yields a more reliable and believable value, omega = 0.5 sup +.5 sub -.25.

  2. Element abundances at high redshift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, David M.; Welty, D. E.; York, D. G.

    1989-01-01

    Abundances of Si(+), S(+), Cr(+), Mn(+), Fe(_), and Zn(+) are considered for two absorption-line systems in the spectrum of the QSO PKS 0528 - 250. Zinc and sulfur are underabundant, relative to H, by a factor of 10 compared to their solar and Galactic interstellar abundances. The silicon-, chromium-, iron-, and nickel-to-hydrogen ratios are less than the solar values and comparable to the local interstellar ratios. A straightforward interpretation is that nucleosynthesis in these high-redshift systems has led to only about one-tenth as much heavy production as in the gas clouds around the sun, and that the amount of the observed underabundances attributable to grain depletion is small. The dust-to-gas ratio in these clouds is less than 8 percent of the Galactic value.

  3. Diffractive corrections to the cosmological redshift formula

    SciTech Connect

    Hochberg, D.; Kephart, T.W. )

    1991-05-20

    We calculate the exact frequency redshift for fields coupled to gravity in Robertson-Walker backgrounds. The exact redshift factorizes and is proportional to the naive Doppler shift times a term representing diffractive effects. These diffractive corrections can be large for field modes with wavelengths on the order of the horizon size. Implications for cosmological density perturbations are discussed.

  4. CuBANz: Photometric redshift estimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samui, Saumyadip; Pal, Shanoli Samui

    2016-09-01

    CuBANz is a photometric redshift estimator code for high redshift galaxies that uses the back propagation neural network along with clustering of the training set, making it very efficient. The training set is divided into several self learning clusters with galaxies having similar photometric properties and spectroscopic redshifts within a given span. The clustering algorithm uses the color information (i.e. u-g, g-r etc.) rather than the apparent magnitudes at various photometric bands, as the photometric redshift is more sensitive to the flux differences between different bands rather than the actual values. The clustering method enables accurate determination of the redshifts. CuBANz considers uncertainty in the photometric measurements as well as uncertainty in the neural network training. The code is written in C.

  5. Apparent clustering of intermediate-redshift galaxies as a probe of dark energy.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Takahiko; Szalay, Alexander S

    2003-01-17

    We show that the apparent redshift-space clustering of galaxies in the redshift range of 0.2-0.4 provides surprisingly useful constraints on dark-energy components in the Universe, because of the right balance between the density of objects and the survey depth. We apply Fisher matrix analysis to the luminous red galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, as a concrete example. Possible degeneracies in the evolution of the equation of state and the other cosmological parameters are clarified.

  6. The kinematic component of the cosmological redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chodorowski, Michał J.

    2011-05-01

    It is widely believed that the cosmological redshift is not a Doppler shift. However, Bunn & Hogg have recently pointed out that to solve this problem properly, one has to transport parallelly the velocity four-vector of a distant galaxy to the observer's position. Performing such a transport along the null geodesic of photons arriving from the galaxy, they found that the cosmological redshift is purely kinematic. Here we argue that one should rather transport the velocity four-vector along the geodesic connecting the points of intersection of the world-lines of the galaxy and the observer with the hypersurface of constant cosmic time. We find that the resulting relation between the transported velocity and the redshift of arriving photons is not given by a relativistic Doppler formula. Instead, for small redshifts it coincides with the well-known non-relativistic decomposition of the redshift into a Doppler (kinematic) component and a gravitational one. We perform such a decomposition for arbitrary large redshifts and derive a formula for the kinematic component of the cosmological redshift, valid for any Friedman-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) cosmology. In particular, in a universe with Ωm= 0.24 and ΩΛ= 0.76, a quasar at a redshift 6, at the time of emission of photons reaching us today had the recession velocity v= 0.997c. This can be contrasted with v= 0.96c, had the redshift been entirely kinematic. Thus, for recession velocities of such high-redshift sources, the effect of deceleration of the early Universe clearly prevails over the effect of its relatively recent acceleration. Last but not the least, we show that the so-called proper recession velocities of galaxies, commonly used in cosmology, are in fact radial components of the galaxies' four-velocity vectors. As such, they can indeed attain superluminal values, but should not be regarded as real velocities.

  7. Redshift Measurement and Spectral Classification for eBOSS Galaxies with the redmonster Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchinson, Timothy A.; Bolton, Adam S.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Bailey, Stephen; Bautista, Julian E.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Conroy, Charlie; Guy, Julien; Myers, Adam D.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Prakash, Abhishek; Carnero-Rosell, Aurelio; Seo, Hee-Jong; Tojeiro, Rita; Vivek, M.; Ben Zhu, Guangtun

    2016-12-01

    We describe the redmonster automated redshift measurement and spectral classification software designed for the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV (SDSS-IV). We describe the algorithms, the template standard and requirements, and the newly developed galaxy templates to be used on eBOSS spectra. We present results from testing on early data from eBOSS, where we have found a 90.5% automated redshift and spectral classification success rate for the luminous red galaxy sample (redshifts 0.6 ≲ z ≲ 1.0). The redmonster performance meets the eBOSS cosmology requirements for redshift classification and catastrophic failures and represents a significant improvement over the previous pipeline. We describe the empirical processes used to determine the optimum number of additive polynomial terms in our models and an acceptable {{Δ }}{χ }r2 threshold for declaring statistical confidence. Statistical errors on redshift measurement due to photon shot noise are assessed, and we find typical values of a few tens of km s-1. An investigation of redshift differences in repeat observations scaled by error estimates yields a distribution with a Gaussian mean and standard deviation of μ ˜ 0.01 and σ ˜ 0.65, respectively, suggesting the reported statistical redshift uncertainties are over-estimated by ˜54%. We assess the effects of object magnitude, signal-to-noise ratio, fiber number, and fiber head location on the pipeline’s redshift success rate. Finally, we describe directions of ongoing development.

  8. Radio Selected Clusters of Galaxies at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wing, Joshua; Blanton, Elizabeth

    2010-08-01

    Previous studies have shown that three-component radio sources exhibiting some degree of bending between components are likely to be found in galaxy clusters. Often this radio emission is associated with a cD type galaxy at the center of a cluster. We have cross-correlated the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) with samples selected from the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty Centimeters (FIRST) catalog and measured the richness of the cluster environments surrounding three- component sources exhibiting both bent and straight lobes. This has lead to the discovery and classification of a large number of galaxy clusters out to a redshift of z ~ 0.5. For both bent- and straight- lobed sources without an optical counterpart it is likely that the radio emission is associated with a galaxy fainter than m_r=22 (the limiting magnitude of the SDSS) and at a redshift higher than z~0.8. We propose to observe a small sub-sample of these sources with the FLAMINGOS instrument on the Mayall 4-m telescope in an attempt to discover if these sources are located in high redshift (z≳0.8) galaxy clusters. In our visually-selected bent radio source sample, 78% of sources with counterparts in the SDSS are associated with clusters.

  9. Thermodynamics Insights for the Redshift Drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ming-Jian; Liu, Wen-Biao

    2015-01-01

    The secular redshift drift is a potential measurement to directly probe the cosmic expansion. Previous study on the redshift drift mainly focused on the model-dependent simulation. Apparently, the physical insights on the redshift drift are very necessary. So in this paper, it is investigated using thermodynamics on the apparent, Hubble and event horizons. Thermodynamics could analytically present the model-independent upper bounds of redshift drift. For specific assumption on the cosmological parameters, we find that the thermodynamics bounds are nearly one order of magnitude larger than the expectation in standard ΛCDM model. We then examine ten observed redshift drift from Green Bank Telescope at redshift 0.09 < z < 0.69, and find that these observational results are inconsistent with the thermodynamics. The size of the errorbars on these measurements is about three orders of magnitude larger than the effect of thermodynamical bounds for the redshift drift. Obviously, we have not yet hit any instrumental systematics at the shift level of 1m s-1 yr-1.

  10. Impacts of satellite galaxies on the redshift-space distortions

    SciTech Connect

    Hikage, Chiaki; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro E-mail: kazuhiro@hiroshima-u.ac.jp

    2013-08-01

    We study the impacts of the satellite galaxies on the redshift-space distortions. In our multipole power spectrum analysis of the luminous red galaxies (LRGs) samples of the Sloan digital sky survey (SDSS), we have clearly detected the non-zero signature of the hexadecapole and tetrahexadecapole spectrum, which almost disappears in the power spectrum with the sample of the brightest LRGs only. We thus demonstrate that the satellite LRGs in multiple systems make a significant contribution to the multipole power spectrum though its fraction is small. The behavior can be understood by a simple halo model, in which the one-halo term, describing the Finger of God (FoG) effect from the satellite galaxies, makes the dominant contribution to the higher multipole spectra. We demonstrate that the small-scale information of higher multipole spectrum is useful for calibrating the satellite FoG effect and improves the measurement of the cosmic growth rate dramatically. We further demonstrate that the fiber collision in the galaxy survey influences the one-halo term and the higher multipole spectra, because the number of satellite galaxies in the halo occupation distribution (HOD) is changed. We also discuss about the impact of satellite galaxies on future high-redshift surveys targeting the H-alpha emitters.

  11. Close Companions to Two High-redshift Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGreer, Ian D.; Fan, Xiaohui; Strauss, Michael A.; Haiman, Zoltàn; Richards, Gordon T.; Jiang, Linhua; Bian, Fuyan; Schneider, Donald P.

    2014-10-01

    We report the serendipitous discoveries of companion galaxies to two high-redshift quasars. SDSS J025617.7+001904 is a z = 4.79 quasar included in our recent survey of faint quasars in the SDSS Stripe 82 region. The initial MMT slit spectroscopy shows excess Lyα emission extending well beyond the quasar's light profile. Further imaging and spectroscopy with LBT/MODS1 confirms the presence of a bright galaxy (i AB = 23.6) located 2'' (12 kpc projected) from the quasar with strong Lyα emission (EW0 ≈ 100 Å) at the redshift of the quasar, as well as faint continuum. The second quasar, CFHQS J005006.6+344522 (z = 6.25), is included in our recent HST SNAP survey of z ~ 6 quasars searching for evidence of gravitational lensing. Deep imaging with ACS and WFC3 confirms an optical dropout ~4.5 mag fainter than the quasar (Y AB = 25) at a separation of 0.''9. The red i 775 - Y 105 color of the galaxy and its proximity to the quasar (5 kpc projected if at the quasar redshift) strongly favor an association with the quasar. Although it is much fainter than the quasar, it is remarkably bright when compared to field galaxies at this redshift, while showing no evidence for lensing. Both systems may represent late-stage mergers of two massive galaxies, with the observed light for one dominated by powerful ongoing star formation and for the other by rapid black hole growth. Observations of close companions are rare; if major mergers are primarily responsible for high-redshift quasar fueling then the phase when progenitor galaxies can be observed as bright companions is relatively short. Based in part on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with programs #12184 and #12493. Observations were also made with the LBT and MMT.

  12. O I and Ca II Observations in Intermediate Redshift Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Aldama, Mary Loli; Dultzin, Deborah; Marziani, Paola; Sulentic, Jack W.; Bressan, Alessandro; Chen, Yang; Stirpe, Giovanna M.

    2015-03-01

    We present an unprecedented spectroscopic survey of the Ca II triplet + O i for a sample of 14 luminous (-26≳ {{M}V}≳ -29), intermediate redshift (0.85 ≲ z ≲ 1.65) quasars. The Infrared Spectrometer and Array Camera spectrometer on the ESO Very Large Telescope allowed us to cover the Ca II near-infrared spectral region redshifted into the H and K windows. We describe in detail our data analysis which enabled us to detect Ca II triplet emission in all 14 sources (with the possible exception of HE0048-2804) and to retrieve accurate line widths and fluxes of the triplet and O i λ8446. The new measurements show trends consistent with previous lower-z observations, indicating that Ca II and optical Fe II emission are probably closely related. The ratio between the Ca II triplet and the optical Fe II blend at λ4570 Å is apparently systematically larger in our intermediate redshift sample relative to a low-z control sample. Even if this result needs a larger sample for adequate interpretation, higher Ca II/optical Fe II should be associated with recent episodes of star formation in intermediate redshift quasars and, at least in part, explain the apparent correlation of Ca II triplet equivalent width with z and L. The Ca II triplet measures yield significant constraints on the emitting region density and ionization parameter, implying Ca II triplet emission from log {{n}H} ≳ 11 [cm-3] and ionization parameter log U≲ -1.5. The line width and intensity ratios suggest properties consistent with emission from the outer part of a high-density broad line region (a line emitting accretion disk?). Based on observations collected at the European Organization for Astronomical Research in the southern hemisphere, Chile, under programme ID 085.B-0158(A).

  13. TWO SNe Ia AT REDSHIFT ∼2: IMPROVED CLASSIFICATION AND REDSHIFT DETERMINATION WITH MEDIUM-BAND INFRARED IMAGING

    SciTech Connect

    Rodney, Steven A.; Riess, Adam G.; Jones, David O.; Scolnic, Daniel M.; Hemmati, Shoubaneh; Mobasher, Bahram; Molino, Alberto; McCully, Curtis; Strolger, Louis-Gregory; Casertano, Stefano; Graur, Or; Hayden, Brian

    2015-11-15

    We present two supernovae (SNe) discovered with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey, an HST multi-cycle treasury program. We classify both objects as SNe Ia and find redshifts of z = 1.80 ± 0.02 and 2.26{sup +0.02}{sub −0.10}, the latter of which is the highest redshift SN Ia yet seen. Using light curve fitting we determine luminosity distances and find that both objects are consistent with a standard ΛCDM cosmological model. These SNe were observed using the HST Wide Field Camera 3 infrared detector, with imaging in both wide- and medium-band filters. We demonstrate that the classification and redshift estimates are significantly improved by the inclusion of single-epoch medium-band observations. This medium-band imaging approximates a very low resolution spectrum (λ/Δλ ≲ 100) which can isolate broad spectral absorption features that differentiate SNe Ia from their most common core collapse cousins. This medium-band method is also insensitive to dust extinction and (unlike grism spectroscopy) it is not affected by contamination from the SN host galaxy or other nearby sources. As such, it can provide a more efficient—though less precise—alternative to IR spectroscopy for high-z SNe.

  14. Two SNe Ia at Redshift ˜2: Improved Classification and Redshift Determination with Medium-band Infrared Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodney, Steven A.; Riess, Adam G.; Scolnic, Daniel M.; Jones, David O.; Hemmati, Shoubaneh; Molino, Alberto; McCully, Curtis; Mobasher, Bahram; Strolger, Louis-Gregory; Graur, Or; Hayden, Brian; Casertano, Stefano

    2015-11-01

    We present two supernovae (SNe) discovered with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey, an HST multi-cycle treasury program. We classify both objects as SNe Ia and find redshifts of z = 1.80 ± 0.02 and 2.26+0.02-0.10, the latter of which is the highest redshift SN Ia yet seen. Using light curve fitting we determine luminosity distances and find that both objects are consistent with a standard ΛCDM cosmological model. These SNe were observed using the HST Wide Field Camera 3 infrared detector, with imaging in both wide- and medium-band filters. We demonstrate that the classification and redshift estimates are significantly improved by the inclusion of single-epoch medium-band observations. This medium-band imaging approximates a very low resolution spectrum (λ/Δλ ≲ 100) which can isolate broad spectral absorption features that differentiate SNe Ia from their most common core collapse cousins. This medium-band method is also insensitive to dust extinction and (unlike grism spectroscopy) it is not affected by contamination from the SN host galaxy or other nearby sources. As such, it can provide a more efficient—though less precise—alternative to IR spectroscopy for high-z SNe.

  15. Moderate resolution spectrophotometry of high redshift quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Donald P.; Schmidt, Maarten; Gunn, James E.

    1991-01-01

    A uniform set of photometry and high signal-to-noise moderate resolution spectroscopy of 33 quasars with redshifts larger than 3.1 is presented. The sample consists of 17 newly discovered quasars (two with redshifts in excess of 4.4) and 16 sources drawn from the literature. The objects in this sample have r magnitudes between 17.4 and 21.4; their luminosities range from -28.8 to -24.9. Three of the 33 objects are broad absorption line quasars. A number of possible high redshift damped Ly-alpha systems were found.

  16. High-redshift Fermi blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghisellini, G.; Tagliaferri, G.; Foschini, L.; Ghirlanda, G.; Tavecchio, F.; Della Ceca, R.; Haardt, F.; Volonteri, M.; Gehrels, N.

    2011-02-01

    With the release of the first-year Fermi catalogue, the number of blazars detected above 100 MeV lying at high redshift has been largely increased. There are 28 blazars at z > 2 in the `clean' sample. All of them are flat spectrum radio quasars. We study and model their overall spectral energy distribution in order to find the physical parameters of the jet-emitting region, and for all of them, we estimate their black hole masses and accretion rates. We then compare the jet with the accretion disc properties, setting these sources in the broader context of all the other bright γ-ray or hard X-ray blazars. We confirm that the jet power correlates with the accretion luminosity. We find that the high-energy emission peak shifts to smaller frequencies as the observed luminosity increases, according to the blazar sequence, making the hard X-ray band the most suitable for searching the most-luminous and distant blazars.

  17. Probing the accelerating Universe with redshift-space distortions in VIPERS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Torre, Sylvain

    2016-10-01

    We present the first measurement of the growth rate of structure at z=0.8. It has been obtained from the redshift-space distortions observed in the galaxy clustering pattern in the VIMOS Public Redshift survey (VIPERS) first data release. VIPERS is a large galaxy redshift survey probing the large-scale structure at 0.5 < z < 1.2 with an unprecedented accuracy. This measurement represents a new reference in the distant Universe, which has been poorly explored until now. We obtain σ8 = 0.47 +/- 0.08 at z = 0.8 that is consistent with the predictions of standard cosmological models based on Einstein gravity. This measurement alone is however not accurate enough to allow the detection of possible deviations from standard gravity.

  18. Segue: A Spectroscopic Survey of 240,000 Stars With g = 14-20

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    footprint; (2) SN Ia (Frieman et al. 2008): a well-calibrated, systematic survey for 200 intermediate redshift (0.1 < z < 0.4) type Ia supernovae ...filling an important gap in redshift coverage, and anchoring the calibrations of higher redshift supernova surveys; and (3) Sloan Extension for Galactic

  19. Infrared-faint radio sources are at high redshifts. Spectroscopic redshift determination of infrared-faint radio sources using the Very Large Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzog, A.; Middelberg, E.; Norris, R. P.; Sharp, R.; Spitler, L. R.; Parker, Q. A.

    2014-07-01

    Context. Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are characterised by relatively high radio flux densities and associated faint or even absent infrared and optical counterparts. The resulting extremely high radio-to-infrared flux density ratios up to several thousands were previously known only for high-redshift radio galaxies (HzRGs), suggesting a link between the two classes of object. However, the optical and infrared faintness of IFRS makes their study difficult. Prior to this work, no redshift was known for any IFRS in the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey (ATLAS) fields which would help to put IFRS in the context of other classes of object, especially of HzRGs. Aims: This work aims at measuring the first redshifts of IFRS in the ATLAS fields. Furthermore, we test the hypothesis that IFRS are similar to HzRGs, that they are higher-redshift or dust-obscured versions of these massive galaxies. Methods: A sample of IFRS was spectroscopically observed using the Focal Reducer and Low Dispersion Spectrograph 2 (FORS2) at the Very Large Telescope (VLT). The data were calibrated based on the Image Reduction and Analysis Facility (IRAF) and redshifts extracted from the final spectra, where possible. This information was then used to calculate rest-frame luminosities, and to perform the first spectral energy distribution modelling of IFRS based on redshifts. Results: We found redshifts of 1.84, 2.13, and 2.76, for three IFRS, confirming the suggested high-redshift character of this class of object. These redshifts and the resulting luminosities show IFRS to be similar to HzRGs, supporting our hypothesis. We found further evidence that fainter IFRS are at even higher redshifts. Conclusions: Considering the similarities between IFRS and HzRGs substantiated in this work, the detection of IFRS, which have a significantly higher sky density than HzRGs, increases the number of active galactic nuclei in the early universe and adds to the problems of explaining the formation of

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Imperial IRAS-FSC redshift catalogue (IIFSCz) (Wang+, 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Rowan-Robinson, M.

    2010-04-01

    We present a new catalogue, the Imperial IRAS-FSC Redshift Catalogue (IIFSCz), of 60303 galaxies selected at 60um from the IRAS Faint Source Catalogue (FSC). The IIFSCz consists of accurate position, optical, near-infrared and/or radio identifications, spectroscopic redshift (if available) or photometric redshift (if possible), predicted far-infrared (FIR) and submillimetre (submm) fluxes ranging from 12 to 1380um based upon the best-fitting infrared template. About 55% of the galaxies in the IIFSCz have spectroscopic redshifts, and a further 20% have photometric redshifts obtained through either the training set or the template-fitting method. For S(60)>0.36Jy, the 90% completeness limit of the FSC, 90% of the sources have either spectroscopic or photometric redshifts. Scientific applications of the IIFSCz include validation of current and forthcoming infrared and submm/mm surveys such as AKARI, Planck and Herschel, follow-up studies of rare source populations, large-scale structure and galaxy bias, local multiwavelength luminosity functions and source counts. The catalogue is publicly available at http://astro.imperial.ac.uk/~mrr/fss/. (2 data files).

  1. Redshift differences of galaxies in nearby groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, E. R.

    1975-01-01

    It is reported that galaxies in nearby groups exhibit anomalous nonvelocity redshifts. In this discussion, (1) four classes of nearby groups of galacies are analyzed, and no significant nonvelocity redshift effect is found; and (2) it is pointed out that transverse velocities (i.e., velocities transverse to the line of sight of the main galaxy, or center of mass) contribute components to the redshift measurements of companion galaxies. The redshifts of galaxies in nearby groups of appreciable angular size are considerably affected by these velocity projection effects. The transverse velocity contributions average out in rich, isotropic groups, and also in large samples of irregular groups of low membership, as in the four classes referred to in (1), but can introduce apparent discrepancies in small samples (as studied by Arp) of nearby groups of low membership.

  2. Deep redshift topological lensing: strategies for the T3 candidate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roukema, Boudewijn F.; France, Martin J.; Kazimierczak, Tomasz A.; Buchert, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The 3-torus (T3) Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker model better fits the nearly zero large-scale two-point auto-correlation of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) cosmic microwave background sky maps than the infinite flat model. The T3 model's parameters, recently found using an optimal cross-correlation method on WMAP data, imply approximately equal-redshift topological lensing at redshifts z ˜ 6, the redshift range of the upcoming generation of new instruments and telescopes. We investigate observational strategies that can reject the T3 solution for a given region of parameter space of physical assumptions, or provide good candidate topologically lensed galaxy pairs for detailed spectroscopic followup. T3 holonomies are applied to (i) existing z ˜ 6 observations and (ii) simulated observations, creating multiply connected catalogues. Corresponding simply connected catalogues are generated. The simulated observational strategies are motivated by the matched discs principle. Each catalogue is analysed using a successive filter method and collecting matched quadruples. Quadruple statistics between the multiply and simply connected catalogues are compared. The expected rejection of the hypothesis, or detection of candidate topologically lensed galaxies, is possible at a significance of 5 per cent for a pair of T3 axis-centred northern and southern surveys if photometric redshift accuracy is σ(zphot) ≲ 0.01 for a pair of nearly complete 100 deg2 surveys with a total of ≳500 galaxies over 4.3 < z < 6.6, or for a pair of 196 deg2 surveys with ≳400 galaxies and σ(zphot) ≲ 0.02 over 4 < z < 7. Dropping the maximum time interval in a pair from Δt = 1 h-1 Gyr to Δt = 0.1 h-1 Gyr requires σ(zphot) ≲ 0.005 or σ(zphot) ≲ 0.01, respectively. Millions of z ˜ 6 galaxies will be observed over fields of these sizes during the coming decades, implying much stronger constraints. The question is not if the hypothesis will be rejected or confirmed

  3. Astronomical redshifts of highly ionized regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Peter M.

    2014-07-01

    Astronomical or cosmological redshifts are an observable property of extragalactic objects and have historically been wholly attributed to the recessional velocity of that object. The question of other, or intrinsic, components of the redshift has been highly controversial since it was first proposed. This paper investigates one theoretical source of intrinsic redshift that has been identified. The highly ionized regions of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) and Quasi-Stellar Objects (QSO) are, by definition, plasmas. All plasmas have electromagnetic scattering characteristics that could contribute to the observed redshift. To investigate this possibility, one region of a generalized AGN was selected, the so called Broad Line Region (BLR). Even though unresolvable with current instrumentation, physical estimates of this region have been published for years in the astronomical literature. These data, selected and then averaged, are used to construct an overall model that is consistent with the published data to within an order of magnitude. The model is then subjected to a theoretical scattering investigation. The results suggest that intrinsic redshifts, derivable from the characteristics of the ambient plasma, may indeed contribute to the overall observed redshift of these objects.

  4. Spatial Homogeneity and Redshift--Distance Laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicoll, J. F.; Segal, I. E.

    1982-06-01

    Spatial homogeneity in the radial direction of low-redshift galaxies is subjected to Kafka-Schmidt V/Vm tests using well-documented samples. Homogeneity is consistent with the assumption of the Lundmark (quadratic redshift-distance) law, but large deviations from homogeneity are implied by the assumption of the Hubble (linear redshift-distance) law. These deviations are similar to what would be expected on the basis of the Lundmark law. Luminosity functions are obtained for each law by a nonparametric statistically optimal method that removes the observational cutoff bias in complete samples. Although the Hubble law correlation of absolute magnitude with redshift is reduced considerably by elimination of the bias, computer simulations show that its bias-free value is nevertheless at a satistically quite significant level, indicating the self-inconsistency of the law. The corresponding Lundmark law correlations are quite satisfactory satistically. The regression of redshift on magnitude also involves radial spatial homogeneity and, according to R. Soneira, has slope determining the redshift-magnitude exponent independently of the luminosity function. We have, however, rigorously proved the material dependence of the regression on this function and here exemplify our treatment by using the bias-free functions indicated, with results consistent with the foregoing argument.

  5. Improved photometric redshifts via enhanced estimates of system response, galaxy templates and magnitude priors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Samuel J.; Thorman, Paul

    2013-05-01

    Wide, deep photometric surveys require robust photometric redshift estimates (photo-zs) for studies of large-scale structure. These estimates depend critically on accurate photometry. We describe the improvements to the photometric calibration and the photo-z estimates in the Deep Lens Survey (DLS) from correcting three of the inputs to the photo-z calculation: the system response as a function of wavelength, the spectral energy distribution templates and template prior probabilities as a function of magnitude. We model the system response with a physical model of the MOSAIC camera's CCD, which corrects a 0.1 mag discrepancy in the colours of type M2 and later stars relative to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey z photometry. We provide our estimated z response function for the use of other surveys that used MOSAIC before its recent detector upgrade. The improved throughput curve, template set and Bayesian prior lead to general improvement in the predicted photometric redshifts, including a 20 per cent reduction in photo-z scatter at low redshift and a reduction of the bias by a factor of more than 2 at high redshift. This paper serves as both a photo-z data release description for DLS and a guide for testing the quality of photometry and resulting photo-zs generally.

  6. A cooperative approach among methods for photometric redshifts estimation: an application to KiDS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavuoti, S.; Tortora, C.; Brescia, M.; Longo, G.; Radovich, M.; Napolitano, N. R.; Amaro, V.; Vellucci, C.; La Barbera, F.; Getman, F.; Grado, A.

    2017-04-01

    Photometric redshifts (photo-z) are fundamental in galaxy surveys to address different topics, from gravitational lensing and dark matter distribution to galaxy evolution. The Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS), i.e. the European Southern Observatory (ESO) public survey on the VLT Survey Telescope (VST), provides the unprecedented opportunity to exploit a large galaxy data set with an exceptional image quality and depth in the optical wavebands. Using a KiDS subset of about 25000 galaxies with measured spectroscopic redshifts, we have derived photo-z using (i) three different empirical methods based on supervised machine learning; (ii) the Bayesian photometric redshift model (or BPZ); and (iii) a classical spectral energy distribution (SED) template fitting procedure (LE PHARE). We confirm that, in the regions of the photometric parameter space properly sampled by the spectroscopic templates, machine learning methods provide better redshift estimates, with a lower scatter and a smaller fraction of outliers. SED fitting techniques, however, provide useful information on the galaxy spectral type, which can be effectively used to constrain systematic errors and to better characterize potential catastrophic outliers. Such classification is then used to specialize the training of regression machine learning models, by demonstrating that a hybrid approach, involving SED fitting and machine learning in a single collaborative framework, can be effectively used to improve the accuracy of photo-z estimates.

  7. The MOSDEF Survey: Metallicity Dependence of PAH Emission at High Redshift and Implications for 24 μm Inferred IR Luminosities and Star Formation Rates at z ∼ 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivaei, Irene; Reddy, Naveen A.; Shapley, Alice E.; Siana, Brian; Kriek, Mariska; Mobasher, Bahram; Coil, Alison L.; Freeman, William R.; Sanders, Ryan L.; Price, Sedona H.; Azadi, Mojegan; Zick, Tom

    2017-03-01

    We present results on the variation of 7.7 μm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission in galaxies spanning a wide range in metallicity at z ∼ 2. For this analysis, we use rest-frame optical spectra of 476 galaxies at 1.37 ≤ z ≤ 2.61 from the MOSFIRE Deep Evolution Field (MOSDEF) survey to infer metallicities and ionization states. Spitzer/MIPS 24 μm and Herschel/PACS 100 and 160 μm observations are used to derive rest-frame 7.7 μm luminosities ({L}7.7) and total IR luminosities ({L}{IR}), respectively. We find significant trends between the ratio of {L}7.7 to {L}{IR} (and to dust-corrected star formation rate [SFR]) and both metallicity and [O iii]/[O ii] ({{{O}}}32) emission line ratio. The latter is an empirical proxy for the ionization parameter. These trends indicate a paucity of PAH emission in low-metallicity environments with harder and more intense radiation fields. Additionally, {L}7.7/{L}{IR} is significantly lower in the youngest quartile of our sample (ages of ≲500 Myr) compared to older galaxies, which may be a result of the delayed production of PAHs by AGB stars. The relative strength of {L}7.7 to {L}{IR} is also lower by a factor of ∼2 for galaxies with masses {M}* < {10}10 {M}ȯ , compared to the more massive ones. We demonstrate that commonly used conversions of {L}7.7 (or 24 μm flux density, f 24) to {L}{IR} underestimate the IR luminosity by more than a factor of 2 at {M}* ∼ {10}9.6{--10.0} {M}ȯ . We adopt a mass-dependent conversion of {L}7.7 to {L}{IR} with {L}7.7/{L}{IR} = 0.09 and 0.22 for {M}* ≤slant {10}10 and > {10}10 {M}ȯ , respectively. Based on the new scaling, the SFR–M * relation has a shallower slope than previously derived. Our results also suggest a higher IR luminosity density at z ∼ 2 than previously measured, corresponding to a ∼30% increase in the SFR density.

  8. A Search for Moderate-redshift Survivors from the Population of Luminous Compact Passive Galaxies at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockton, Alan; Shih, Hsin-Yi; Larson, Kirsten; Mann, Andrew W.

    2014-01-01

    From a search of a ~2400 deg2 region covered by both the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey databases, we have attempted to identify galaxies at z ~ 0.5 that are consistent with their being essentially unmodified examples of the luminous passive compact galaxies found at z ~ 2.5. After isolating good candidates via deeper imaging, we further refine the sample with Keck moderate-resolution spectroscopy and laser guide star adaptive-optics imaging. For four of the five galaxies that so far remain after passing through this sieve, we analyze plausible star-formation histories based on our spectra in order to identify galaxies that may have survived with little modification from the population formed at high redshift. We find two galaxies that are consistent with having formed >~ 95% of their mass at z > 5. We attempt to estimate masses both from our stellar population determinations and from velocity dispersions. Given the high frequency of small axial ratios, both in our small sample and among samples found at high redshifts, we tentatively suggest that some of the more extreme examples of passive compact galaxies may have prolate morphologies. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  9. A search for moderate-redshift survivors from the population of luminous compact passive galaxies at high redshift

    SciTech Connect

    Stockton, Alan; Shih, Hsin-Yi; Larson, Kirsten; Mann, Andrew W. E-mail: hsshih@ifa.hawaii.edu E-mail: amann@ifa.hawaii.edu

    2014-01-10

    From a search of a ∼2400 deg{sup 2} region covered by both the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey databases, we have attempted to identify galaxies at z ∼ 0.5 that are consistent with their being essentially unmodified examples of the luminous passive compact galaxies found at z ∼ 2.5. After isolating good candidates via deeper imaging, we further refine the sample with Keck moderate-resolution spectroscopy and laser guide star adaptive-optics imaging. For four of the five galaxies that so far remain after passing through this sieve, we analyze plausible star-formation histories based on our spectra in order to identify galaxies that may have survived with little modification from the population formed at high redshift. We find two galaxies that are consistent with having formed ≳ 95% of their mass at z > 5. We attempt to estimate masses both from our stellar population determinations and from velocity dispersions. Given the high frequency of small axial ratios, both in our small sample and among samples found at high redshifts, we tentatively suggest that some of the more extreme examples of passive compact galaxies may have prolate morphologies.

  10. Spectra of High-Redshift Type Ia Supernovae and a Comparison withtheir Low-Redshift Counterparts

    SciTech Connect

    Hook, I.M.; Howell, D.A.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Burns,M.S.; Conley, A.; Deustua, S.E.; Ellis, R.; Fabbro, S.; Fadeyev, V.; Folatelli, G.; Garavini, G.; Gibbons, R.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D.E.; Kim, A.G.; Knop, R.A.; Kowalski, M.; Lidman, C.; Nobili, S.; Nugent, P.E.; Pain, R.; Pennypacker, C.R.; Perlmutter, S.; Ruiz-Lapuente,P.; Sainton, G.; Schaefer, B.E.; Smith, E.; Spadafora, A.L.; Stanishev,V.; Thomas, R.C.; Walton, N.A.; Wang, L.; Wood-Vasey, W.M.

    2005-07-20

    We present spectra for 14 high-redshift (0.17 < z < 0.83) supernovae, which were discovered by the Supernova Cosmology Project as part of a campaign to measure cosmological parameters. The spectra are used to determine the redshift and classify the supernova type, essential information if the supernovae are to be used for cosmological studies. Redshifts were derived either from the spectrum of the host galaxy or from the spectrum of the supernova itself. We present evidence that these supernovae are of Type Ia by matching to spectra of nearby supernovae. We find that the dates of the spectra relative to maximum light determined from this fitting process are consistent with the dates determined from the photometric light curves, and moreover the spectral time-sequence for SNe Type Ia at low and high redshift is indistinguishable. We also show that the expansion velocities measured from blueshifted Ca H&K are consistent with those measured for low-redshift Type Ia supernovae. From these first-level quantitative comparisons we find no evidence for evolution in SNIa properties between these low- and high-redshift samples. Thus even though our samples may not be complete, we conclude that there is a population of SNe Ia at high redshift whose spectral properties match those at low redshift.

  11. ASSOCIATIONS OF HIGH-REDSHIFT QUASI-STELLAR OBJECTS WITH ACTIVE, LOW-REDSHIFT SPIRAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Burbidge, G.; Napier, W. M. E-mail: smawmn@cardiff.ac.u

    2009-11-20

    Following the discovery in the 1960s of radio and optical QSOs it was found that some of them lie very close to low-redshift (z <= 0.01) spiral galaxies with separations of approx<2 arcmin. These were discovered both serendipitously by many observers, and systematically by Arp. They are some of the brightest QSOs in radio and optical wavelengths and are very rare. We have carried out a new statistical analysis of most of those galaxy-QSO pairs and find that the configurations have high statistical significance. We show that gravitational microlensing due to stars or other dark objects in the halos of the galaxies apparently cannot account for the excess. Sampling or identification bias likewise seems unable to explain it. Following this up we selected all approx4000 QSOs with g <= 18 from a catalog of confirmed QSOs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and compared them with various subsets of galaxies from the RC 3 galaxy catalog. In contrast to the earlier results, no significant excess of such QSOs was found around these galaxies. Possible reasons for the discrepancy are discussed.

  12. Simulating redshift-space distortions for galaxy pairs with wide angular separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raccanelli, Alvise; Samushia, Lado; Percival, Will J.

    2010-12-01

    The analysis of redshift-space distortions (RSD) within galaxy surveys provides constraints on the amplitude of peculiar velocities induced by structure growth, thereby allowing tests of General Relativity on extremely large scales. The next generation of galaxy redshift surveys, such as the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey and the Euclid experiment, will survey galaxies out to z= 2, over 10 000-20 000 deg2. In such surveys, galaxy pairs with large comoving separation will preferentially have a wide angular separation. In standard plane-parallel theory the displacements of galaxy positions due to RSD are assumed to be parallel for all galaxies, but this assumption will break down for wide-angle pairs. Szalay, Matsubara & Landy, Szapudi, and Papai & Szapudi provided a methodology, based on tripolar spherical harmonics expansion, for computing the redshift-space correlation function for all angular galaxy pair separations. In this paper, we introduce a new procedure for analysing wide-angle effects in numerical simulations. We are able to separate, demonstrate and fit each of the effects described by the wide-angle RSD theory. Our analysis highlights some of the nuances of dealing with wide-angle pairs and shows that the effects are not negligible even for relatively small angles. This analysis will help to ensure the full exploitation of future surveys for RSD measurements, which are currently confined to pair separations less than ˜80 h-1 Mpc out to z≃ 0.5.

  13. MSE velocity survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimd, C.; Courtois, H.; Koda, J.

    2015-12-01

    A huge velocity survey based on the Maunakea Spectroscopic Explorer facility (MSE) is proposed, aiming at investigating the structure and dynamics of the cosmic web over 3π steradians up to ˜1 Gpc and at unprecedented spatial resolution, its relationship with the galaxy formation process, and the bias between galaxies and dark matter during the last three billions years. The cross-correlation of velocity and density fields will further allow the probe any deviation from General Relativity by measuring the the linear-growth rate of cosmic structures at precision competitive with high-redshift spectroscopic redshift surveys.

  14. AGES: THE AGN AND GALAXY EVOLUTION SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Kochanek, C. S.; Eisenstein, D. J.; Caldwell, N.; Jones, C.; Murray, S. S.; Forman, W. R.; Green, P.; Cool, R. J.; Assef, R. J.; Eisenhardt, P.; Stern, D.; Jannuzi, B. T.; Dey, A.; Brown, M. J. I.; Gonzalez, A. H.

    2012-05-01

    The AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey (AGES) is a redshift survey covering, in its standard fields, 7.7 deg{sup 2} of the Booetes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey. The final sample consists of 23,745 redshifts. There are well-defined galaxy samples in 10 bands (the B{sub W} , R, I, J, K, IRAC 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 {mu}m, and MIPS 24 {mu}m bands) to a limiting magnitude of I < 20 mag for spectroscopy. For these galaxies, we obtained 18,163 redshifts from a sample of 35,200 galaxies, where random sparse sampling was used to define statistically complete sub-samples in all 10 photometric bands. The median galaxy redshift is 0.31, and 90% of the redshifts are in the range 0.085 < z < 0.66. Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) were selected as radio, X-ray, IRAC mid-IR, and MIPS 24 {mu}m sources to fainter limiting magnitudes (I < 22.5 mag for point sources). Redshifts were obtained for 4764 quasars and galaxies with AGN signatures, with 2926, 1718, 605, 119, and 13 above redshifts of 0.5, 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. We detail all the AGES selection procedures and present the complete spectroscopic redshift catalogs and spectral energy distribution decompositions. Photometric redshift estimates are provided for all sources in the AGES samples.

  15. SCUBA Observations of High Redshift Radio Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Reuland, M; Rottgering, H; van Breugel, W

    2003-03-11

    High redshift radio galaxies (HzRGs) are key targets for studies of the formation and evolution of massive galaxies.The role of dust in these processes is uncertain. We have therefore observed the dust continuum emission from a sample of z > 3 radio galaxies with the SCUBA bolometer array. We confirm and strengthen the result found by Archibald et al. (1), that HzRGs are massive starforming systems and that submillimeter detection rate appears to be primarily a strong function of redshift. We also observed HzRG-candidates that have so far eluded spectroscopic redshift determination. Four of these have been detected, and provide evidence that they may be extremely obscured radio galaxies, possibly in an early stage of their evolution.

  16. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): colour- and luminosity-dependent clustering from calibrated photometric redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christodoulou, L.; Eminian, C.; Loveday, J.; Norberg, P.; Baldry, I. K.; Hurley, P. D.; Driver, S. P.; Bamford, S. P.; Hopkins, A. M.; Liske, J.; Peacock, J. A.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Brough, S.; Cameron, E.; Conselice, C. J.; Croom, S. M.; Frenk, C. S.; Gunawardhana, M.; Jones, D. H.; Kelvin, L. S.; Kuijken, K.; Nichol, R. C.; Parkinson, H.; Pimbblet, K. A.; Popescu, C. C.; Prescott, M.; Robotham, A. S. G.; Sharp, R. G.; Sutherland, W. J.; Taylor, E. N.; Thomas, D.; Tuffs, R. J.; van Kampen, E.; Wijesinghe, D.

    2012-09-01

    We measure the two-point angular correlation function of a sample of 4289 223 galaxies with r < 19.4 mag from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) as a function of photometric redshift, absolute magnitude and colour down to Mr - 5 log h = -14 mag. Photometric redshifts are estimated from ugriz model magnitudes and two Petrosian radii using the artificial neural network package ANNz, taking advantage of the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) spectroscopic sample as our training set. These photometric redshifts are then used to determine absolute magnitudes and colours. For all our samples, we estimate the underlying redshift and absolute magnitude distributions using Monte Carlo resampling. These redshift distributions are used in Limber's equation to obtain spatial correlation function parameters from power-law fits to the angular correlation function. We confirm an increase in clustering strength for sub-L* red galaxies compared with ˜L* red galaxies at small scales in all redshift bins, whereas for the blue population the correlation length is almost independent of luminosity for ˜L* galaxies and fainter. A linear relation between relative bias and log luminosity is found to hold down to luminosities L ˜ 0.03L*. We find that the redshift dependence of the bias of the L* population can be described by the passive evolution model of Tegmark & Peebles. A visual inspection of a random sample from our r < 19.4 sample of SDSS galaxies reveals that about 10 per cent are spurious, with a higher contamination rate towards very faint absolute magnitudes due to over-deblended nearby galaxies. We correct for this contamination in our clustering analysis.

  17. THE FIRST HIGH-REDSHIFT QUASAR FROM Pan-STARRS

    SciTech Connect

    Morganson, Eric; De Rosa, Gisella; Decarli, Roberto; Walter, Fabian; Rix, Hans-Walter; Chambers, Ken; Burgett, William; Flewelling, Heather; Hodapp, Klaus; Kaiser, Nick; Magnier, Eugene; Sweeney, Bill; Waters, Christopher; McGreer, Ian; Fan, Xiaohui; Greiner, Jochen; Price, Paul

    2012-06-15

    We present the discovery of the first high-redshift (z > 5.7) quasar from the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System 1 (Pan-STARRS1 or PS1). This quasar was initially detected as an i{sub P1} dropout in PS1, confirmed photometrically with the SAO Wide-field InfraRed Camera at Arizona's Multiple Mirror Telescope (MMT) and the Gamma-Ray Burst Optical/Near-Infrared Detector at the MPG 2.2 m telescope in La Silla. The quasar was verified spectroscopically with the MMT Spectrograph, Red Channel and the Cassegrain Twin Spectrograph at the Calar Alto 3.5 m telescope. Its near-infrared spectrum was taken at the Large Binocular Telescope Observatory (LBT) with the LBT Near-Infrared Spectroscopic Utility with Camera and Integral Field Unit for Extragalactic Research. It has a redshift of 5.73, an AB z{sub P1} magnitude of 19.4, a luminosity of 3.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 47} erg s{sup -1}, and a black hole mass of 6.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }. It is a broad absorption line quasar with a prominent Ly{beta} peak and a very blue continuum spectrum. This quasar is the first result from the PS1 high-redshift quasar search that is projected to discover more than 100 i{sub P1} dropout quasars and could potentially find more than 10 z{sub P1} dropout (z > 6.8) quasars.

  18. Stars and gas in high redshift galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettini, Max

    Recent advances in instrumentation and observing techniques have made it possible to begin to study in detail the stellar populations and the interstellar media of galaxies at redshift z=3, when the universe was still in its "teen years". In keeping with the theme of this conference, I show how our knowledge of local star-forming regions can be applied directly to these distant galaxies to deduce their ages, metallicities, initial mass function, and masses. I also discuss areas where current limitations in stellar astrophysics have a direct bearing on the interpretation of the data being gathered, at an ever increasing rate, on the high redshift universe.

  19. GLAST observation of high-redshift GRBs

    SciTech Connect

    Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Longo, Francesco; Barbiellini, Guido; Calura, Francesco; Matteucci, Francesca; Omodei, Nicola

    2007-07-12

    We compare predicted Type Ib/c supernova (SNIb/c) rates with the observed long-duration Gamma-Ray-Burst (GRB) rates both locally and as a function of redshift, by assuming different star formation histories in galaxies of different morphological types. Due to the high star formation in spheroids at high redshift, we predict a large number of GRBs beyond z > 7. Moreover, based on our studies and on the current LAT performance, an estimate of the detection possibility of this burst population is presented.

  20. A luminous quasar at a redshift of z = 7.085.

    PubMed

    Mortlock, Daniel J; Warren, Stephen J; Venemans, Bram P; Patel, Mitesh; Hewett, Paul C; McMahon, Richard G; Simpson, Chris; Theuns, Tom; Gonzáles-Solares, Eduardo A; Adamson, Andy; Dye, Simon; Hambly, Nigel C; Hirst, Paul; Irwin, Mike J; Kuiper, Ernst; Lawrence, Andy; Röttgering, Huub J A

    2011-06-29

    The intergalactic medium was not completely reionized until approximately a billion years after the Big Bang, as revealed by observations of quasars with redshifts of less than 6.5. It has been difficult to probe to higher redshifts, however, because quasars have historically been identified in optical surveys, which are insensitive to sources at redshifts exceeding 6.5. Here we report observations of a quasar (ULAS J112001.48+064124.3) at a redshift of 7.085, which is 0.77 billion years after the Big Bang. ULAS J1120+0641 has a luminosity of 6.3 × 10(13)L(⊙) and hosts a black hole with a mass of 2 × 10(9)M(⊙) (where L(⊙) and M(⊙) are the luminosity and mass of the Sun). The measured radius of the ionized near zone around ULAS J1120+0641 is 1.9 megaparsecs, a factor of three smaller than is typical for quasars at redshifts between 6.0 and 6.4. The near-zone transmission profile is consistent with a Lyα damping wing, suggesting that the neutral fraction of the intergalactic medium in front of ULAS J1120+0641 exceeded 0.1.

  1. Real- and redshift-space halo clustering in f(R) cosmologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnalte-Mur, Pablo; Hellwing, Wojciech A.; Norberg, Peder

    2017-01-01

    We present two-point correlation function statistics of the mass and the halos in the chameleon f(R) modified gravity scenario using a series of large volume N-body simulations. Three distinct variations of f(R) are considered (F4, F5 and F6) and compared to a fiducial ΛCDM model in the redshift range z ∈ [0, 1]. We find that the matter clustering is indistinguishable for all models except for F4, which shows a significantly steeper slope. The ratio of the redshift- to real-space correlation function at scales >20 h-1 Mpc agrees with the linear General Relativity (GR) Kaiser formula for the viable f(R) models considered. We consider three halo populations characterized by spatial abundances comparable to that of luminous red galaxies (LRGs) and galaxy clusters. The redshift-space halo correlation functions of F4 and F5 deviate significantly from ΛCDM at intermediate and high redshift, as the f(R) halo bias is smaller or equal to that of the ΛCDM case. Finally we introduce a new model independent clustering statistic to distinguish f(R) from GR: the relative halo clustering ratio - R. The sampling required to adequately reduce the scatter in R will be available with the advent of the next generation galaxy redshift surveys. This will foster a prospective avenue to obtain largely model-independent cosmological constraints on this class of modified gravity models.

  2. A distortion of very-high-redshift galaxy number counts by gravitational lensing.

    PubMed

    Wyithe, J Stuart B; Yan, Haojing; Windhorst, Rogier A; Mao, Shude

    2011-01-13

    The observed number counts of high-redshift galaxy candidates have been used to build up a statistical description of star-forming activity at redshift z ≳ 7, when galaxies reionized the Universe. Standard models predict that a high incidence of gravitational lensing will probably distort measurements of flux and number of these earliest galaxies. The raw probability of this happening has been estimated to be ∼0.5 per cent (refs 11, 12), but can be larger owing to observational biases. Here we report that gravitational lensing is likely to dominate the observed properties of galaxies with redshifts of z ≳ 12, when the instrumental limiting magnitude is expected to be brighter than the characteristic magnitude of the galaxy sample. The number counts could be modified by an order of magnitude, with most galaxies being part of multiply imaged systems, located less than 1 arcsec from brighter foreground galaxies at z ≈ 2. This lens-induced association of high-redshift and foreground galaxies has perhaps already been observed among a sample of galaxy candidates identified at z ≈ 10.6. Future surveys will need to be designed to account for a significant gravitational lensing bias in high-redshift galaxy samples.

  3. In the neighbourhood of Tame Monsters. A study of galaxies near low-redshift quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villarroel, B.

    2012-06-01

    Context. The impact of quasars on their galaxy neighbours is an important factor in the understanding of galaxy evolution models. Aims: The aim of this work is to characterize the intermediate-scale environments of quasars at low redshift (z < 0.2) with the most statistically complete sample to date using the seventh data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Methods: We have used 305 quasar-galaxy associations with spectroscopically measured redshifts within the projected distance range of 350 kpc, to calculate how surface densities of galaxies, colors, degree of ionization, dust extinction and star-formation rates change as a function of the distance to our quasar sample. We also identify the companion active galactic nuclei from our main galaxy sample and calculate surface density for different galaxy types. We have done this in three different quasar-galaxy redshift difference ranges |Δz| < 0.001, 0.006, and 0.012. Results: Our results suggest that there is a significant increase of the surface density of blue neighbours around our low-redshift quasar sample that is steeper than around non-active field galaxies of the same luminosity and redshift range. This may indicate that quasar formation is accomplished via a merging scenario. No significant changes in star formation rate, dust extinction, degree of ionization or color as a function of distance from the quasars was observed. We could not observe any direct effects from quasars on the their companion galaxies.

  4. Cosmological constraints from the redshift dependence of the Alcock-Paczynski test: galaxy density gradient field

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiao-Dong; Park, Changbom; Forero-Romero, J. E.; Kim, Juhan E-mail: cbp@kias.re.kr E-mail: kjhan@kias.re.kr

    2014-12-01

    We propose a method based on the redshift dependence of the Alcock-Paczynski (AP) test to measure the expansion history of the universe. It uses the isotropy of the galaxy density gradient field to constrain cosmological parameters. If the density parameter Ω {sub m} or the dark energy equation of state w are incorrectly chosen, the