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Sample records for 2h nmr relaxation

  1. Water interactions with varying molecular states of bovine casein: 2H NMR relaxation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kumosinski, T.F.; Pessen, H.; Prestrelski, S.J.; Farrell, H.M. Jr.

    1987-09-01

    The caseins occur in milk as spherical colloidal complexes of protein and salts with an average diameter of 1200 A, the casein micelles. Removal of Ca2+ is thought to result in their dissociation into smaller protein complexes stabilized by hydrophobic interactions and called submicelles. Whether these submicelles actually occur within the micelles as discrete particles interconnected by calcium phosphate salt bridges has been the subject of much controversy. A variety of physical measurements have shown that casein micelles contain an inordinately high amount of trapped water (2 to 7 g H/sub 2/O/g protein). With this in mind it was of interest to determine if NMR relaxation measurements could detect the presence of this trapped water within the micelles, and to evaluate whether it is a continuum with picosecond correlation times or is associated in part with discrete submicellar structures with nanosecond motions. For this purpose the variations in /sup 2/H NMR longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates of water with protein concentration were determined for bovine casein at various temperatures, under both submicellar and micellar conditions. D/sub 2/O was used instead of H/sub 2/O to eliminate cross-relaxation effects. From the protein concentration dependence of the relaxation rates, the second virial coefficient of the protein was obtained by nonlinear regression analysis. Using either an isotropic tumbling or an intermediate asymmetry model, degrees of hydration, v, and correlation times, tau c, were calculated for the caseins; from the latter parameter the Stokes radius, r, was obtained. Next, estimates of molecular weights were obtained from r and the partial specific volume. Values were in the range of those published from other methodologies for the submicelles.

  2. Backbone motions in a crystalline protein from field-dependent 2H-NMR relaxation and line-shape analysis.

    PubMed

    Mack, J W; Usha, M G; Long, J; Griffin, R G; Wittebort, R J

    2000-01-01

    We have used 2H-nmr to study backbone dynamics of the 2H-labeled, slowly exchanging amide sites of fully hydrated, crystalline hen egg white lysozyme. Order parameters are determined from the residual quadrupole coupling and values increase from S2 = 0.85 at 290 K to S2 = 0.94 at 200 K. Dynamical rates are determined from spin-lattice relaxation at three nmr frequencies (38.8, 61.5, and 76.7 MHz). The approach used here is thus distinct from solution nmr studies where dynamical amplitudes and rates are both determined from relaxation measurements. At temperatures below 250 K, relaxation is independent of the nmr frequency indicating that backbone motions are fast compared to the nmr frequencies. However, as the temperature is increased above 250 K, relaxation is significantly more efficient at the lowest frequency, which shows, in addition, the presence of motions that are slow compared to the nmr frequencies. Using the values of S2 determined from the residual quadrupole coupling and a model-free relaxation formalism that allows for fast and slow internal motions, we conclude that these slow motions have correlation times in the range of 0.1 to 1.0 microsecond and are effectively frozen out at 250 K where fast motions of the amide planes with approximately 15 ps effective correlation times and 9 degrees rms amplitudes dominate relaxation. The fast internal motions increase slightly in amplitude as the temperature rises toward 290 K, but the correlation time, as is also observed in solution nmr studies of RNase H, is approximately constant. These findings are consistent with hypotheses of dynamic glass transitions in hydrated proteins arising from temperature-dependent damping of harmonic modes of motion above the transition point.

  3. Site-resolved 2H relaxation experiments in solid materials by global line-shape analysis of MAS NMR spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindh, E. L.; Stilbs, P.; Furó, I.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate a way one can achieve good spectral resolution in 2H MAS NMR experiments. The goal is to be able to distinguish between and study sites in various deuterated materials with small chemical shift dispersion. We show that the 2H MAS NMR spectra recorded during a spin-relaxation experiment are amenable to spectral decomposition because of the different evolution of spectral components during the relaxation delay. We verify that the results are robust by global least-square fitting of the spectral series both under the assumption of specific line shapes and without such assumptions (COmponent-REsolved spectroscopy, CORE). In addition, we investigate the reliability of the developed protocol by analyzing spectra simulated with different combinations of spectral parameters. The performance is demonstrated in a model material of deuterated poly(methacrylic acid) that contains two 2H spin populations with similar chemical shifts but different quadrupole splittings. In 2H-exchanged cellulose containing two 2H spin populations with very similar chemical shifts and quadrupole splittings, the method provides new site-selective information about the molecular dynamics.

  4. Crystal structure, NMR study, dielectric relaxation and AC conductivity of a new compound [Cd3(SCN)2Br6(C2H9N2)2]n

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saidi, K.; Kamoun, S.; Ayedi, H. Ferid; Arous, M.

    2013-11-01

    The crystal structure, the 13C NMR spectroscopy and the complex impedance have been carried out on [Cd3(SCN)2Br6(C2H9N2)2]n. Crystal structure shows a 2D polymeric network built up of two crystallographically independent cadmium atoms with two different octahedral coordinations. This compound exhibits a phase transition at (T=355±2 K) which has been characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-rays powder diffraction, AC conductivity and dielectric measurements. Examination of 13C CP/MAS line shapes shows indirect spin-spin coupling (14N and 13C) with a dipolar coupling constant of 1339 Hz. The AC conductivity of this compound has been carried out in the temperature range 325-376 K and the frequency range from 10-2 Hz to 10 MHz. The impedance data were well fitted to two equivalent electrical circuits. The results of the modulus study reveal the presence of two distinct relaxation processes. One, at low frequency side, is thermally activated due to the ionic conduction of the crystal and the other, at higher frequency side, gradually disappears when temperature reaches 355 K which is attributed to the localized dipoles in the crystal. Moreover, the temperature dependence of DC-conductivity in both phases follows the Arrhenius law and the frequency dependence of σ(ω,T) follows Jonscher's universal law. The near values of activation energies obtained from the conductivity data and impedance confirm that the transport is through the ion hopping mechanism.

  5. 2H NMR studies of supercooled and glassy aspirin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, R.; Nowaczyk, A.; Geil, B.; Bohmer, R.

    2007-11-01

    Acetyl salicylic acid, deuterated at the methyl group, was investigated using 2H-NMR in its supercooled and glassy states. Just above the glass transition temperature the molecular reorientations were studied using stimulated-echo spectroscopy and demonstrated a large degree of similarity with other glass formers. Deep in the glassy phase the NMR spectra look similar to those reported for the crystal [A. Detken, P. Focke, H. Zimmermann, U. Haeberlen, Z. Olejniczak, Z. T. Lalowicz, Z. Naturforsch. A 50 (1995) 95] and below 20 K they are indicative for rotational tunneling with a relatively large tunneling frequency. Measurements of the spin-lattice relaxation times for temperatures below 150 K reveal a broad distribution of correlation times in the glass. The dominant energy barrier characterizing the slow-down of the methyl group is significantly smaller than the well defined barrier in the crystal.

  6. (2) H and (139) La NMR Spectroscopy in Aqueous Solutions at Geochemical Pressures.

    PubMed

    Ochoa, Gerardo; Pilgrim, Corey D; Martin, Michele N; Colla, Christopher A; Klavins, Peter; Augustine, Matthew P; Casey, William H

    2015-12-14

    Nuclear spin relaxation rates of (2) H and (139) La in LaCl3 +(2) H2 O and La(ClO4 )3 +(2) H2 O solutions were determined as a function of pressure in order to demonstrate a new NMR probe designed for solution spectroscopy at geochemical pressures. The (2) H longitudinal relaxation rates (T1 ) vary linearly to 1.6 GPa, consistent with previous work at lower pressures. The (139) La T1 values vary both with solution chemistry and pressure, but converge with pressure, suggesting that the combined effects of increased viscosity and enhanced rates of ligand exchange control relaxation. This simple NMR probe design allows experiments on aqueous solutions to pressures corresponding roughly to those at the base of the Earth's continental crust. PMID:26404025

  7. 2H NMR studies of glycerol dynamics in protein matrices.

    PubMed

    Herbers, C R; Sauer, D; Vogel, M

    2012-03-28

    We use (2)H NMR spectroscopy to investigate the rotational motion of glycerol molecules in matrices provided by the connective tissue proteins elastin and collagen. Analyzing spin-lattice relaxation, line-shape properties, and stimulated-echo decays, we determine the rates and geometries of the motion as a function of temperature and composition. It is found that embedding glycerol in an elastin matrix leads to a mild slowdown of glycerol reorientation at low temperatures and glycerol concentrations, while the effect vanishes at ambient temperatures or high solvent content. Furthermore, it is observed that the nonexponential character of the rotational correlation functions is much more prominent in the elastin matrix than in the bulk liquid. Results from spin-lattice relaxation and line shape measurements indicate that, in the mixed systems, the strong nonexponentiality is in large part due to the existence of distributions of correlation times, which are broader on the long-time flank and, hence, more symmetric than in the neat system. Stimulated-echo analysis of slow glycerol dynamics reveals that, when elastin is added, the mechanism for the reorientation crosses over from small-angle jump dynamics to large-angle jump dynamics and the geometry of the motion changes from isotropic to anisotropic. The results are discussed against the background of present and previous findings for glycerol and water dynamics in various protein matrices and compared with observations for other dynamically highly asymmetric mixtures so as to ascertain in which way the viscous freezing of a fast component in the matrix of a slow component differs from the glassy slowdown in neat supercooled liquids. PMID:22462878

  8. 2H NMR studies of glycerol dynamics in protein matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbers, C. R.; Sauer, D.; Vogel, M.

    2012-03-01

    We use 2H NMR spectroscopy to investigate the rotational motion of glycerol molecules in matrices provided by the connective tissue proteins elastin and collagen. Analyzing spin-lattice relaxation, line-shape properties, and stimulated-echo decays, we determine the rates and geometries of the motion as a function of temperature and composition. It is found that embedding glycerol in an elastin matrix leads to a mild slowdown of glycerol reorientation at low temperatures and glycerol concentrations, while the effect vanishes at ambient temperatures or high solvent content. Furthermore, it is observed that the nonexponential character of the rotational correlation functions is much more prominent in the elastin matrix than in the bulk liquid. Results from spin-lattice relaxation and line shape measurements indicate that, in the mixed systems, the strong nonexponentiality is in large part due to the existence of distributions of correlation times, which are broader on the long-time flank and, hence, more symmetric than in the neat system. Stimulated-echo analysis of slow glycerol dynamics reveals that, when elastin is added, the mechanism for the reorientation crosses over from small-angle jump dynamics to large-angle jump dynamics and the geometry of the motion changes from isotropic to anisotropic. The results are discussed against the background of present and previous findings for glycerol and water dynamics in various protein matrices and compared with observations for other dynamically highly asymmetric mixtures so as to ascertain in which way the viscous freezing of a fast component in the matrix of a slow component differs from the glassy slowdown in neat supercooled liquids.

  9. sup 2 H NMR study of molecular dynamics and organization in the system C sub 12 E sub 4 -water

    SciTech Connect

    Henriksson, U. ); Jonstroemer, M.; Olsson, U.; Soederman, O. ); Klose, G. )

    1991-05-02

    A sample containing 20 wt % of the nonionic surfactant tetraethylene glycol dodecyl ether (C{sub 12}E{sub 4}), specifically deuterated in the {alpha}-position, was investigated with {sup 2}H NMR relaxation in H{sub 2}O. From the frequency dependence of the longitudinal relaxation rate in the Larmor frequency range 2-55 MHz, it was concluded that the solution contains rodlike micelles. A slow motion in the microsecond time scale, as determined from the transverse relaxation rate, was interpreted taking the flexibility of the rodlike micelles explicitly into account.

  10. 2Q NMR of 2H2O ordering at solid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivokhizhina, Tatiana V.; Wittebort, R. J.

    2014-06-01

    Solvent ordering at an interface can be studied by multiple-quantum NMR. Quantitative studies of 2H2O ordering require clean double-quantum (2Q) filtration and an analysis of 2Q buildup curves that accounts for relaxation and, if randomly oriented samples are used, the distribution of residual couplings. A pulse sequence with absorption mode detection is extended for separating coherences by order and measuring relaxation times such as the 2Q filtered T2. Coherence separation is used to verify 2Q filtration and the 2Q filtered T2 is required to extract the coupling from the 2Q buildup curve when it is unresolved. With our analysis, the coupling extracted from the buildup curve in 2H2O hydrated collagen was equivalent to the resolved coupling measured in the usual 1D experiment and the 2Q to 1Q signal ratio was in accord with theory. Application to buildup curves from 2H2O hydrated elastin, which has an unresolved coupling, revealed a large increase in the 2Q signal upon mechanical stretch that is due to an increase in the ordered water fraction while changes in the residual coupling and T2 are small.

  11. Double and zero quantum filtered 2H NMR analysis of D2O in intervertebral disc tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooms, Kristopher J.; Vega, Alexander J.; Polenova, Tatyana; Cannella, Marco; Marcolongo, Michele

    2015-09-01

    The analysis of double and zero quantum filtered 2H NMR spectra obtained from D2O perfused in the nucleus pulposus of human intervertebral disc tissue samples is reported. Fitting the spectra with a three-site model allows for residual quadrupolar couplings and T2 relaxation times to be measured. The analysis reveals changes in both the couplings and relaxation times as the tissue begins to show signs of degradation. The full analysis demonstrates that information about tissue hydration, water collagen interactions, and sample heterogeneity can be obtained and used to better understand the biochemical differences between healthy and degraded tissue.

  12. Elucidating proline dynamics in spider dragline silk fibre using 2H-13C HETCOR MAS NMR.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiangyan; Yarger, Jeffery L; Holland, Gregory P

    2014-05-14

    (2)H-(13)C HETCOR MAS NMR is performed on (2)H/(13)C/(15)N-Pro enriched A. aurantia dragline silk. Proline dynamics are extracted from (2)H NMR line shapes and T1 in a site-specific manner to elucidate the backbone and side chain molecular dynamics for the MaSp2 GPGXX β-turn regions for spider dragline silk in the dry and wet, supercontracted states.

  13. Measuring the Longitudinal NMR Relaxation Rates of Fast Relaxing Nuclei Using a Signal Eliminating Relaxation Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, D. Flemming; Led, Jens J.

    2001-08-01

    A new experiment for selective determination of the relaxation rates of fast relaxing NMR signals is presented. The experiment is derived from the conventional inversion recovery experiment by substituting the 180° inversion pulse of this experiment with a signal eliminating relaxation filter (SERF) consisting of three 180° pulses separated by two variable delays, Δ1 and Δ2. The SERF experiment allows a selective suppression of signals with relaxation rates below a given limit while monitoring the relaxation of faster relaxing signals. The experiment was tested on a sample of 20% oxidized plastocyanin from Anabaena variabilis, where the fast exchange of an electron between the reduced (diamagnetic) and the oxidized (paramagnetic) form results in a series of average signals with widely different relaxation rates. To ensure an optimum extraction of information from the experimental data, the relaxation rates were obtained from the SERF experiment by a simultaneous analysis of all the FIDs of the experiment using a fast linear prediction model method developed previously. The reliability of the relaxation rates obtained from the SERF experiment was confirmed by a comparison of the rates with the corresponding rates obtained from a conventional inversion recovery experiment.

  14. Measuring the longitudinal NMR relaxation rates of fast relaxing nuclei using a signal eliminating relaxation filter.

    PubMed

    Hansen, D F; Led, J J

    2001-08-01

    A new experiment for selective determination of the relaxation rates of fast relaxing NMR signals is presented. The experiment is derived from the conventional inversion recovery experiment by substituting the 180 degrees inversion pulse of this experiment with a signal eliminating relaxation filter (SERF) consisting of three 180 degrees pulses separated by two variable delays, Delta1 and Delta2. The SERF experiment allows a selective suppression of signals with relaxation rates below a given limit while monitoring the relaxation of faster relaxing signals. The experiment was tested on a sample of 20% oxidized plastocyanin from Anabaena variabilis, where the fast exchange of an electron between the reduced (diamagnetic) and the oxidized (paramagnetic) form results in a series of average signals with widely different relaxation rates. To ensure an optimum extraction of information from the experimental data, the relaxation rates were obtained from the SERF experiment by a simultaneous analysis of all the FIDs of the experiment using a fast linear prediction model method developed previously. The reliability of the relaxation rates obtained from the SERF experiment was confirmed by a comparison of the rates with the corresponding rates obtained from a conventional inversion recovery experiment.

  15. Measurement of regional cerebral blood flow in cat brain using intracarotid 2H2O and 2H NMR imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Detre, J.A.; Subramanian, V.H.; Mitchell, M.D.; Smith, D.S.; Kobayashi, A.; Zaman, A.; Leigh, J.S. Jr. )

    1990-05-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured in cat brain in vivo at 2.7 T using 2H NMR to monitor the washout of deuterated saline injected into both carotid arteries via the lingual arteries. In anesthetized cats, global CBF varied directly with PaCO{sub 2} over a range of 20-50 mm Hg, and the corresponding global CBF values ranged from 25 to 125 ml.100 g-1.min-1. Regional CBF was measured in a 1-cm axial section of cat brain using intracarotid deuterated saline and gradient-echo 2H NMR imaging. Blood flow images with a maximum pixel resolution of 0.3 x 0.3 x 1.0 cm were generated from the deuterium signal washout at each pixel. Image derived values for CBF agreed well with other determinations, and decreased significantly with hypocapnia.

  16. High-resolution solid-state 2H NMR spectroscopy of polymorphs of glycine.

    PubMed

    Aliev, Abil E; Mann, Sam E; Rahman, Aisha S; McMillan, Paul F; Corà, Furio; Iuga, Dinu; Hughes, Colan E; Harris, Kenneth D M

    2011-11-10

    High-resolution solid-state (2)H MAS NMR studies of the α and γ polymorphs of fully deuterated glycine (glycine-d(5)) are reported. Analysis of spinning sideband patterns is used to determine the (2)H quadrupole interaction parameters, and is shown to yield good agreement with the corresponding parameters determined from single-crystal (2)H NMR measurements (the maximum deviation in quadrupole coupling constants determined from these two approaches is only 1%). From analysis of simulated (2)H MAS NMR sideband patterns as a function of reorientational jump frequency (κ) for the -N(+)D(3) group in glycine-d(5), the experimentally observed differences in the (2)H MAS NMR spectrum for the -N(+)D(3) deutrons in the α and γ polymorphs is attributed to differences in the rate of reorientation of the -N(+)D(3) group. These simulations show severe broadening of the (2)H MAS NMR signal in the intermediate motion regime, suggesting that deuterons undergoing reorientational motions at rates in the range κ ≈ 10(4)-10(6) s(-1) are likely to be undetectable in (2)H MAS NMR measurements for materials with natural isotopic abundances. The (1)H NMR chemical shifts for the α and γ polymorphs of glycine have been determined from the (2)H MAS NMR results, taking into account the known second-order shift. Further quantum mechanical calculations of (2)H quadrupole interaction parameters and (1)H chemical shifts reveal the structural dependence of these parameters in the two polymorphs and suggest that the existence of two short intermolecular C-H···O contacts for one of the H atoms of the >CH(2) group in the α polymorph have a significant influence on the (2)H quadrupole coupling and (1)H chemical shift for this site. PMID:21939265

  17. Natural-abundance solid-state 2H NMR spectroscopy at high magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Aliev, Abil E; Mann, Sam E; Iuga, Dinu; Hughes, Colan E; Harris, Kenneth D M

    2011-06-01

    High-resolution solid-state (2)H NMR spectroscopy provides a method for measuring (1)H NMR chemical shifts in solids and is advantageous over the direct measurement of high-resolution solid-state (1)H NMR spectra, as it requires only the application of routine magic angle sample spinning (MAS) and routine (1)H decoupling methods, in contrast to the requirement for complex pulse sequences for homonuclear (1)H decoupling and ultrafast MAS in the case of high-resolution solid-state (1)H NMR. However, a significant obstacle to the routine application of high-resolution solid-state (2)H NMR is the very low natural abundance of (2)H, with the consequent problem of inherently low sensitivity. Here, we explore the feasibility of measuring (2)H MAS NMR spectra of various solids with natural isotopic abundances at high magnetic field (850 MHz), focusing on samples of amino acids, peptides, collagen, and various organic solids. The results show that high-resolution solid-state (2)H NMR can be used successfully to measure isotropic (1)H chemical shifts in favorable cases, particularly for mobile functional groups, such as methyl and -N(+)H(3) groups, and in some cases phenyl groups. Furthermore, we demonstrate that routine (2)H MAS NMR measurements can be exploited for assessing the relative dynamics of different functional groups in a molecule and for assessing whole-molecule motions in the solid state. The magnitude and field-dependence of second-order shifts due to the (2)H quadrupole interaction are also investigated, on the basis of analysis of simulated and experimental (1)H and (2)H MAS NMR spectra of fully deuterated and selectively deuterated samples of the α polymorph of glycine at two different magnetic field strengths.

  18. Revisiting NMR composite pulses for broadband 2H excitation

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Ming; Roopchand, Rabia; Mananga, Eugene S.; Amoureux, Jean-Paul; Chen, Qun; Boutis, Gregory S.; Hu, Bingwen

    2014-01-01

    Quadrupolar echo NMR spectroscopy of static solids often requires RF excitation that covers spectral widths exceeding 100 kHz, which is difficult to obtain due to instrumental limitations. In this work we revisit four well-known composite pulses (COM-I, II, III and IV) for broadband excitation in deuterium quadrupolar echo spectroscopy. These composite pulses are combined with several phase cycling schemes that were previously shown to decrease finite pulse width distortions in deuterium solid-echo experiments performed with two single pulses. The simulations and experiments show that COM-II and IV composite pulses combined with an 8-step phase cycling aid in achieving broadband excitation with limited pulse width distortions. PMID:25583576

  19. Sensitivity of proton NMR relaxation times in a HTPB based polyurethane elastomer to thermo-oxidative aging.

    SciTech Connect

    Assink, Roger Alan; Mowery, Daniel Michael; Celina, Mathias Christopher

    2004-09-01

    Solid-state {sup 1}H NMR relaxometry studies were conducted on a hydroxy-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) based polyurethane elastomer thermo-oxidatively aged at 80 C. The {sup 1}H T{sub 1}, T{sub 2}, and T{sub 1{rho}} relaxation times of samples thermally aged for various periods of time were determined as a function of NMR measurement temperature. The response of each measurement was calculated from a best-fit linear function of the relaxation time vs. aging time. It was found that the T{sub 2,H} and T{sub 1{rho},H} relaxation times exhibited the largest response to thermal degradation, whereas T{sub 1,H} showed minimal change. All of the NMR relaxation measurements on solid samples showed significantly less sensitivity to thermal aging than the T{sub 2,H} relaxation times of solvent-swollen samples.

  20. Selective {sup 2}H and {sup 13}C labeling in NMR analysis of solution protein structure and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    LeMaster, D.M.

    1994-12-01

    Preparation of samples bearing combined isotope enrichment patterns has played a central role in the recent advances in NMR analysis of proteins in solution. In particular, uniform {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N enrichment has made it possible to apply heteronuclear multidimensional correlation experiments for the mainchain assignments of proteins larger than 30 KDa. In contrast, selective labeling approaches can offer advantages in terms of the directedness of the information provided, such as chirality and residue type assignments, as well as through enhancements in resolution and sensitivity that result from editing the spectral complexity, the relaxation pathways and the scalar coupling networks. In addition, the combination of selective {sup 13}C and {sup 2}H enrichment can greatly facilitate the determination of heteronuclear relaxation behavior.

  1. Solution deuterium NMR quadrupolar relaxation study of heme mobility in myoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.D.; La Mar, G.N.; Smith, K.M.; Parish, D.W.; Langry, K.C. )

    1989-01-18

    NMR spectroscopy has been used to monitor the quadrupolar relaxation and motional dynamics of {sup 2}H selectively incorporated into skeletal and side chain positions of the heme in sperm whale myoglobin. The hyperfine shifts of the heme resonances in paramagnetic states of myoglobin allow resolution of the signals of interest, and paramagnetic contributions to the observed line widths are shown to be insignificant. The {sup 2}H line widths for the skeletal positions of deuterohemin-reconstituted myoglobin yield a correlation time identical with that of overall protein tumbling (9 ns at 30{degree}C) and hence reflect an immobile heme group. The {sup 2}H NMR line widths of heme methyl groups exhibit motional narrowing indicative of very rapid internal rotation. Hence the methyl rotation is effectively decoupled from the overall protein tumbling, and the residual quadrupolar line width can be used directly to determine the protein tumbling rate. The {sup 2}H NMR lines from heme vinyl groups were found narrower than those from the heme skeleton. However, the range of quadrupolar coupling constants for sp{sup 2} hybridized C-{sup 2}H bonds does not permit an unequivocal interpretation in terms of mobility. 48 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Probing perturbation of bovine lung surfactant extracts by albumin using DSC and 2H-NMR.

    PubMed

    Nag, Kaushik; Keough, Kevin M W; Morrow, Michael R

    2006-05-15

    Lung surfactant (LS), a lipid-protein mixture, forms films at the lung air-water interface and prevents alveolar collapse at end expiration. In lung disease and injury, the surface activity of LS is inhibited by leakage of serum proteins such as albumin into the alveolar hypophase. Multilamellar vesicular dispersions of a clinically used replacement, bovine lipid extract surfactant (BLES), to which (2% by weight) chain-perdeuterated dipalmitoylphosphatidycholine (DPPG mixtures-d(62)) had been added, were studied using deuterium-NMR spectroscopy ((2)H-NMR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). DSC scans of BLES showed a broad gel to liquid-crystalline phase transition between 10-35 degrees C, with a temperature of maximum heat flow (T(max)) around 27 degrees C. Incorporation of the DPPC-d(62) into BLES-reconstituted vesicles did not alter the T(max) or the transition range as observed by DSC or the hydrocarbon stretching modes of the lipids observed using infrared spectroscopy. Transition enthalpy change and (2)H-NMR order parameter profiles were not significantly altered by addition of calcium and cholesterol to BLES. (2)H-NMR spectra of the DPPC-d(62) probes in these samples were characteristic of a single average lipid environment at all temperatures. This suggested either continuous ordering of the bilayer through the transition during cooling or averaging of the DPPC-d(62) environment by rapid diffusion between small domains on a short timescale relative to that characteristic of the (2)H-NMR experiment. Addition of 10% by weight of soluble bovine serum albumin (1:0.1, BLES/albumin, dry wt/wt) broadened the transition slightly and resulted in the superposition of (2)H-NMR spectral features characteristic of coexisting fluid and ordered phases. This suggests the persistence of phase-separated domains throughout the transition regime (5-35 degrees C) of BLES with albumin. The study suggests albumin can cause segregation of protein bound-lipid domains in

  3. Probing Perturbation of Bovine Lung Surfactant Extracts by Albumin using DSC and 2H-NMR

    PubMed Central

    Nag, Kaushik; Keough, Kevin M. W.; Morrow, Michael R.

    2006-01-01

    Lung surfactant (LS), a lipid-protein mixture, forms films at the lung air-water interface and prevents alveolar collapse at end expiration. In lung disease and injury, the surface activity of LS is inhibited by leakage of serum proteins such as albumin into the alveolar hypophase. Multilamellar vesicular dispersions of a clinically used replacement, bovine lipid extract surfactant (BLES), to which (2% by weight) chain-perdeuterated dipalmitoylphosphatidycholine (DPPG mixtures-d62) had been added, were studied using deuterium-NMR spectroscopy (2H-NMR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). DSC scans of BLES showed a broad gel to liquid-crystalline phase transition between 10–35°C, with a temperature of maximum heat flow (Tmax) around 27°C. Incorporation of the DPPC-d62 into BLES-reconstituted vesicles did not alter the Tmax or the transition range as observed by DSC or the hydrocarbon stretching modes of the lipids observed using infrared spectroscopy. Transition enthalpy change and 2H-NMR order parameter profiles were not significantly altered by addition of calcium and cholesterol to BLES. 2H-NMR spectra of the DPPC-d62 probes in these samples were characteristic of a single average lipid environment at all temperatures. This suggested either continuous ordering of the bilayer through the transition during cooling or averaging of the DPPC-d62 environment by rapid diffusion between small domains on a short timescale relative to that characteristic of the 2H-NMR experiment. Addition of 10% by weight of soluble bovine serum albumin (1:0.1, BLES/albumin, dry wt/wt) broadened the transition slightly and resulted in the superposition of 2H-NMR spectral features characteristic of coexisting fluid and ordered phases. This suggests the persistence of phase-separated domains throughout the transition regime (5–35°C) of BLES with albumin. The study suggests albumin can cause segregation of protein bound-lipid domains in surfactant at NMR timescales (10−5 s

  4. Microscale simulations of NMR relaxation in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohnke, Oliver; Klitzsch, Norbert

    2010-05-01

    In petrophysical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), the measured relaxation signals originate from the fluid filled pore space. Hence, in rocks or sediments the water content directly corresponds to the initial amplitude of the recorded NMR relaxation signals. The relaxation rate (longitudinal/transversal decay time T1, T2) is sensitive to pore sizes and physiochemical properties of rock-fluid interfaces (surface relaxivity), as well as the concentration of paramagnetic ions in the fluid phases (bulk relaxivity). In the subproject A2 of the TR32 we aim at improving the basic understanding of these processes at the pore scale and thereby advancing the interpretation of NMR data by reducing the application of restrictive approximated interpretation schemes, e.g. for deriving pore size distributions, connectivity or permeability. In this respect we numerically simulate NMR relaxation data at the micro sale to study the impact of physical and hydrological parameters such as internal field gradients or pore connectivities on NMR signals. Joint numerical simulations of the NMR relaxation behavior (Bloch equations) in the presence of internal gradients (Ampere's law) and fluid flow (Navier-Stokes) on a pore scale dimension have been implemented in a finite element (FE) model using Comsol Multiphysics. Processes governing the time and spatial behavior of the nuclear magnetization density in a porous medium are diffusion and surface interactions at the rock-fluid interface. Based on Fick's law of diffusive motion Brownstein and Tarr (1979) introduced differential equations that describe the relaxation behavior of the Spin magnetization in single isolated pores and derived analytical solutions for simple geometries, i.e. spherical, cylindrical and planar. However, by numerically solving these equations in a general way using a FE algorithm this approach can be applied to study and simulate coupled complex pore systems, e.g. derived from computer tomography (CT

  5. Microscale simulations of NMR relaxation in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohnke, O.; Klitzsch, N.; Clauser, C.

    2009-12-01

    In petrophysical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), the measured relaxation signals originate from the fluid filled pore space. Hence, in rocks or sediments the water content directly corresponds to the initial amplitude of the recorded NMR relaxation signals. The relaxation rate (longitudinal/transversal decay time T1, T2) is sensitive to pore sizes and physiochemical properties of rock-fluid interfaces (surface relaxivity), as well as the concentration of paramagnetic ions in the fluid phases (bulk relaxivity). We aim at improving the basic understanding of these processes at the pore scale and thereby advancing the interpretation of NMR data by reducing the application of restrictive approximated interpretation schemes, e.g. for deriving pore size distributions, connectivity or permeability. In this respect we numerically simulate NMR relaxation data at the micro sale to study the impact of physical and hydrological parameters such as internal field gradients or pore connectivities on NMR signals. Joint numerical simulations of the NMR relaxation behavior (Bloch equations) in the presence of internal gradients (Ampere’s law) and fluid flow (Navier-Stokes) on a pore scale dimension have been implemented in a finite element (FE) model using Comsol Multiphysics. Processes governing the time and spatial behavior of the nuclear magnetization density in a porous medium are diffusion and surface interactions at the rock-fluid interface. Based on Fick's law of diffusive motion Brownstein and Tarr (1979) introduced differential equations that describe the relaxation behavior of the Spin magnetization in single isolated pores and derived analytical solutions for simple geometries, i.e. spherical, cylindrical and planar. However, by numerically solving these equations in a general way using a FE algorithm this approach can be applied to study and simulate coupled complex pore systems, e.g. derived from computer tomography (CT). In this respect substantial

  6. NMR spin relaxation rates in the Heisenberg bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes, Tiago; Curro, Nicholas; Scalettar, Richard; Paiva, Thereza; Dos Santos, Raimundo R.

    One of the striking features of heavy fermions is the fact that in the vicinity of a quantum phase transition these systems exhibit the breakdown of Fermi-liquid behavior and superconductivity. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) expirements play an important role in the study of these phenomena. Measurements of NMR spin relaxation rates and Knight shift, for instance, can be used to probe the electronic spin susceptibility of these systems. Here we studied the NMR response of the Heisenberg bilayer model. In this model, it is well known that the increase of the interplane coupling between the planes, Jperp, supresses the antiferromagnetic order at a quantum critical point (QCP). We use stochastic series expansion (SSE) and the maximum-entropy analytic continuation method to calculate the NMR spin lattice relaxation rate 1 /T1 and the spin echo decay 1 /T2 G as function of Jperp. The spin echo decay, T2 G increases for small Jperp, due to the increase of the order parameter, and then vanishes abruptly in the QCP. The effects of Jperp dilution disorder in the QCP and the relaxation rates are also discussed. This research was supported by the NNSA Grant Number DE-NA 0002908, and Ciência sem fronteiras program/CNPQ.

  7. (129)Xe NMR Relaxation-Based Macromolecular Sensing.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Muller D; Dao, Phuong; Jeong, Keunhong; Slack, Clancy C; Vassiliou, Christophoros C; Finbloom, Joel A; Francis, Matthew B; Wemmer, David E; Pines, Alexander

    2016-08-10

    We report a (129)Xe NMR relaxation-based sensing approach that exploits changes in the bulk xenon relaxation rate induced by slowed tumbling of a cryptophane-based sensor upon target binding. The amplification afforded by detection of the bulk dissolved xenon allows sensitive detection of targets. The sensor comprises a xenon-binding cryptophane cage, a target interaction element, and a metal chelating agent. Xenon associated with the target-bound cryptophane cage is rapidly relaxed and then detected after exchange with the bulk. Here we show that large macromolecular targets increase the rotational correlation time of xenon, increasing its relaxation rate. Upon binding of a biotin-containing sensor to avidin at 1.5 μM concentration, the free xenon T2 is reduced by a factor of 4. PMID:27472048

  8. NMR resonance splitting of urea in stretched hydrogels: proton exchange and (1)H/(2)H isotopologues.

    PubMed

    Kuchel, Philip W; Naumann, Christoph; Chapman, Bogdan E; Shishmarev, Dmitry; Håkansson, Pär; Bacskay, George; Hush, Noel S

    2014-10-01

    Urea at ∼12 M in concentrated gelatin gel, that was stretched, gave (1)H and (2)H NMR spectral splitting patterns that varied in a predictable way with changes in the relative proportions of (1)H2O and (2)H2O in the medium. This required consideration of the combinatorics of the two amide groups in urea that have a total of four protonation/deuteration sites giving rise to 16 different isotopologues, if all the atoms were separately identifiable. The rate constant that characterized the exchange of the protons with water was estimated by back-transformation analysis of 2D-EXSY spectra. There was no (1)H NMR spectral evidence that the chiral gelatin medium had caused in-equivalence in the protons bonded to each amide nitrogen atom. The spectral splitting patterns in (1)H and (2)H NMR spectra were accounted for by intra-molecular scalar and dipolar interactions, and quadrupolar interactions with the electric field gradients of the gelatin matrix, respectively.

  9. NMR resonance splitting of urea in stretched hydrogels: proton exchange and (1)H/(2)H isotopologues.

    PubMed

    Kuchel, Philip W; Naumann, Christoph; Chapman, Bogdan E; Shishmarev, Dmitry; Håkansson, Pär; Bacskay, George; Hush, Noel S

    2014-10-01

    Urea at ∼12 M in concentrated gelatin gel, that was stretched, gave (1)H and (2)H NMR spectral splitting patterns that varied in a predictable way with changes in the relative proportions of (1)H2O and (2)H2O in the medium. This required consideration of the combinatorics of the two amide groups in urea that have a total of four protonation/deuteration sites giving rise to 16 different isotopologues, if all the atoms were separately identifiable. The rate constant that characterized the exchange of the protons with water was estimated by back-transformation analysis of 2D-EXSY spectra. There was no (1)H NMR spectral evidence that the chiral gelatin medium had caused in-equivalence in the protons bonded to each amide nitrogen atom. The spectral splitting patterns in (1)H and (2)H NMR spectra were accounted for by intra-molecular scalar and dipolar interactions, and quadrupolar interactions with the electric field gradients of the gelatin matrix, respectively. PMID:25241007

  10. NMR relaxation rate and the libron energy of solid hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugawara, K.; Woollam, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    By taking the rotational relaxation of orthohydrogen (o-H2) in solid hydrogen into account, the authors have theoretically investigated the longitudinal NMR spin lattice relaxation rate of o-H2. The rate is characterized by an anomalous maximum, as a function of temperature, at temperatures close to the mean libron energy of o-H2. Application of the theory for o-H2 concentrations between 42% and 75% reveals a nearly concentration-independent mean libron energy equivalent to about 1 K. This qualitatively and quantitatively contradicts the conclusions of other theories, but agrees with recent experiments.

  11. 1H and 2H NMR studies of water in work-free wheat flour doughs.

    PubMed

    d'Avignon, D A; Hung, C C; Pagel, M T; Hart, B; Bretthorst, G L; Ackerman, J J

    1991-01-01

    Proton and deuterium NMR relaxation methods were used to characterize water compartmentalization and hydration in work-free wheat flour doughs. Transverse (spin-spin) relaxation measurements define three motionally unique water compartments in the work-free dough preparations. The apparent occupancy fraction and relative mobility of each water domain are found to be functions of moisture content, temperature, and flour type. Additionally, the number of relaxation-resolved water compartments and their characteristic relaxation rate constants are found to depend critically on both moisture content and the interpulse-delay employed for the multi-pulse relaxation experiments. Under controlled experimental conditions, dynamics between the three water compartments can be observed to be consistent with the onset of flour hydration. The most notable observation during the initial period of hydration is a loss of "free" or "loosely bound" water to environments characterized by less mobility. Freezing studies show that hard wheat doughs have slightly less amorphous, non-freezable water than do soft wheat flour doughs prepared under similar conditions. PMID:1746346

  12. NMR relaxation studies in doped poly-3-methylthiophene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, K. Jugeshwar; Clark, W. G.; Gaidos, G.; Reyes, A. P.; Kuhns, P.; Thompson, J. D.; Menon, R.; Ramesh, K. P.

    2015-05-01

    NMR relaxation rates (1 /T1 ), magnetic susceptibility, and electrical conductivity studies in doped poly-3-methylthiophene are reported in this paper. The magnetic susceptibility data show the contributions from both Pauli and Curie spins, with the size of the Pauli term depending strongly on the doping level. Proton and fluorine NMR relaxation rates have been studied as a function of temperature (3-300 K) and field (for protons at 0.9, 9.0, 16.4, and 23.4 T, and for fluorine at 9.0 T). The temperature dependence of T1 is classified into three regimes: (a) For T <(g μBB /2 kB ) , the relaxation mechanism follows a modified Korringa relation due to electron-electron interactions and disorder. 1H - T1 is due to the electron-nuclear dipolar interaction in addition to the contact term. (b) For the intermediate temperature range (g μBB /2 kB ) relaxation mechanism is via spin diffusion to the paramagnetic centers. (c) In the high-temperature regime and at low Larmor frequency the relaxation follows the modified Bloembergen, Purcell, and Pound model. T1 data analysis has been carried out in light of these models depending upon the temperature and frequency range of study. Fluorine relaxation data have been analyzed and attributed to the P F6 reorientation. The cross relaxation among the 1H and 19F nuclei has been observed in the entire temperature range suggesting the role of magnetic dipolar interaction modulated by the reorientation of the symmetric molecular subgroups. The data analysis shows that the enhancement in the Korringa ratio is greater in a less conducting sample. Intra- and interchain hopping of charge carriers is found to be a dominant relaxation mechanism at low temperature. Frequency dependence of T1-1 on temperature shows that at low temperature [T <(g μBB /2 kB ) ] the system shows three dimensions and changes to quasi one dimension at

  13. Natural abundance 2H-ERETIC-NMR authentication of the origin of methyl salicylate.

    PubMed

    Le Grand, Flore; George, Gerard; Akoka, Serge

    2005-06-29

    Methyl salicylate is a compound currently used in the creation of many flavors. It can be obtained by synthesis or from two natural sources: essential oil of wintergreen and essential oil of sweet birch bark. Deuterium site-specific natural isotope abundance (A(i)) determination by NMR spectroscopy with the method of reference ERETIC ((2)H-ERETIC-NMR) has been applied to this compound. A(i) measurements have been performed on 19 samples of methyl salicylate from different origins, natural/synthetic and commercial/extracted. This study demonstrates that appropriate treatment performed on the data allows discrimination between synthetic and natural samples. Moreover, the representation of intramolecular ratios R(6/5) as a function of R(3/2) distinguishes between synthetics, wintergreen oils, and sweet birch bark oils.

  14. Slow recrystallization of tripalmitoylglycerol from MCT oil observed by 2H NMR.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kevin W; Smith, Paul R; Furó, István; Pettersson, Erik Thyboll; Cain, Fred W; Favre, Loek; Talbot, Geoff

    2007-10-17

    The crystallization and recrystallization of fats have a significant impact on the properties and quality of many food products. While crystallization has been the subject of a number of studies using pure triacylglycerols (TAG), recrystallization in similarly pure systems is rarely studied. In this work, perdeuterated tripalmitoylglycerol ( (2)H-PPP) was dissolved in medium chain triacylglycerol oil (MCT) to yield a saturated solution. The solution was heated to cause partial melting of the solid and dissolution of the molten fraction of (2)H-PPP in MCT and was then cooled to the original temperature to induce recrystallization from the supersaturated solution. (2)H NMR was used to monitor the disappearance of (2)H-PPP from the solution and showed that recrystallization occurred in two steps. The first step was rapid, taking place over a few minutes, and accounted for more than two-thirds of the total recrystallization. The second step was much slower, taking place over a remarkably long timescale of hours to days. It is proposed that dissolution occurs from all parts of the crystals, leaving an etched and pitted surface. The first step of crystallization is the infilling of these pits, while the second step is the continued growth on the smoothed crystal faces.

  15. Tacrine derivatives-acetylcholinesterase interaction: 1H NMR relaxation study.

    PubMed

    Delfini, Maurizio; Di Cocco, Maria Enrica; Piccioni, Fabiana; Porcelli, Fernando; Borioni, Anna; Rodomonte, Andrea; Del Giudice, Maria Rosaria

    2007-06-01

    Two acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors structurally related to Tacrine, 6-methoxytacrine (1a) and 9-heptylamino-6-methoxytacrine (1b), and their interaction with Electrophorus Electricus AChE were investigated. The complete assignment of the 1H and 13C NMR spectra of 1a and 1b was performed by mono-dimensional and homo- and hetero-correlated two-dimensional NMR experiments. This study was undertaken to elucidate the interaction modes between AChE and 1a and 1b in solution, using NMR. The interaction between the two inhibitors and AChE was studied by the analysis of the motional parameters non-selective and selective spin-lattice relaxation times, thereby allowing the motional state of 1a and 1b, both free and bound with AChE, to be defined. The relaxation data pointed out the ligands molecular moiety most involved in the binding with AChE. The relevant ligand/enzyme interaction constants were also evaluated for both compounds and resulted to be 859 and 5412M(-1) for 1a and1b, respectively.

  16. Investigation of multiaxial molecular dynamics by 2H MAS NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, J H; Hoatson, G L; Vold, R L

    1998-11-01

    The technique of 2H MAS NMR spectroscopy is presented for the investigation of multiaxial molecular dynamics. To evaluate the effects of discrete random reorientation a Lie algebraic formalism based on the stochastic Liouville-von Neumann equation is developed. The solution to the stochastic Liouville-von Neumann equation is obtained both in the presence and absence of rf irradiation. This allows effects of molecular dynamics to be evaluated during rf pulses and extends the applicability of the formalism to arbitrary multiple pulse experiments. Theoretical methods are presented for the description of multiaxial dynamics with particular emphasis on the application of vector parameters to represent molecular rotations. Numerical time and powder integration algorithms are presented that are both efficient and easy to implement computationally. The applicability of 2H MAS NMR spectroscopy for investigating molecular dynamics is evaluated from theoretical spectra. To demonstrate the potential of the technique the dynamics of thiourea-2H4 is investigated experimentally. From a series of variable temperature MAS and quadrupole echo spectra it has been found that the dynamics can be described by composite rotation about the CS and CN bonds. Both experiments are sensitive to the fast CS rotation which is shown to be described by the Arrhenius parameters E(CS) = 46.4 +/- 2.3 kJ mol(-1) and ln(A(CS))= 32.6 +/- 0.9. The MAS experiment represents a significant improvement by simultaneously allowing the dynamics of the slow CN rotation to be fully characterized in terms of E(CN) = 56.3 +/- 3.4 kJ mol(-1) and ln(A(CN)) = 25.3 +/- 1.1. PMID:9875600

  17. NMR Relaxation in Systems with Magnetic Nanoparticles: A Temperature Study

    PubMed Central

    Issa, Bashar; Obaidat, Ihab M.; Hejasee, Rola H.; Qadri, Shahnaz; Haik, Yousef

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To measure and model NMR relaxation enhancement due to the presence of Gd substituted Zn-Mn ferrite magnetic nanoparticles at different temperatures. Materials and Methods Relaxation rates were measured at 1.5 T using FSE sequences in samples of agarose gel doped with uncoated and polyethylene glycol (PEG) coated Mn0.5Zn0.5Gd0.02Fe1.98O4 nanoparticles over the temperature range 8 to 58°C. Physical characterization of the magnetic nanoparticles synthesized using chemical co-precipitation included scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma (ICP), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and magnetometry. Results Relaxivity (in s−1 mM−1 Fe) for the uncoated and coated particles, respectively, increased as follows: from 2.5 to 3.2 and 0.4 to 0.7 for T1, while for T2 it increased from 162.3 to 253.7 and 59.7 to 82.2 over the temperature range 8 to 58°C. T2 data was fitted to the echo limited motional regime using one fitting parameter that reflects the degree of agglomeration of particles into a cluster. This parameter was found to increase linearly with temperature and was larger for the PEG coated particles than the uncoated ones. Conclusion The increase of 1/T2 with temperature is modeled successfully using echo limited motional regime where both diffusion of the protons and nanoparticle cluster size increase with temperature. Both transverse and longitudinal relaxation efficiencies are reduced by PEG coating at all temperatures. If prediction of relaxation rates under different particle concentrations and operating temperatures is possible then the use of MNP in temperature monitoring and hyperthermia applications may be achieved. PMID:23720101

  18. Determination of orientational order parameters from 2H NMR spectra of magnetically partially oriented lipid bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Schäfer, H; Mädler, B; Sternin, E

    1998-01-01

    The partial orientation of multilamellar vesicles (MLVs) in high magnetic fields is known to affect the shape of 2H NMR spectra. There are numerical methods for extracting either the orientational order parameters of lipid molecules for a random distribution of domain orientations in the sample, or the distribution of orientations for a known set of spectral anisotropies. A first attempt at determining the orientational order parameters in the presence of an unknown nonrandom distribution of orientations is presented. The numerical method is based on the Tikhonov regularization algorithm. It is tested using simulated partially oriented spectra. An experimental spectrum of a phospholipid-ether mixture in water is analyzed as an example. The experimental spectrum is consistent with an ellipsoidal shape of MLVs with a ratio of semiaxes of approximately 3.4. PMID:9533713

  19. Deriving NMR surface relaxivities, pore size distributions and water retention curves by NMR relaxation experiments on partially de-saturated rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohnke, O.; Nordlund, C. L.; Klitzsch, N.

    2013-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a method used over a wide field of geophysical applications to non-destructively determine transport and storage properties of rocks and soils. In NMR relaxometry signal amplitudes correspond directly to the rock's fluid (water, oil) content. On the other hand the NMR relaxation behavior, i.e. the longitudinal (T1) and transverse (T2) NMR relaxation times, can be used to derive pore sizes and permeability as it is linearly linked to the pore's surface-to-volume-ratio and physiochemical properties of the rock-fluid interface by the surface relaxivity ρ_s This parameter, however, is dependent on the type and mineral constituents of the investigated rock sample and thus has to be determined and calibrated prior to estimating pore sizes from NMR relaxometry measurements. Frequently used methods to derive surface relaxivity to calibrate NMR pore sizes comprise mercury injection, pulsed field gradients (PFG-NMR) or grain size analysis. This study introduces an alternative approach to jointly estimate NMR surface relaxivity and pore radii distributions using NMR relaxation data obtained from partially de-saturated rocks. In this, inverse modeling is carried on a linked Young Laplace equation for capillary bundles and the Brownstein and Tarr equations. Subsequently, this approach is used to predict water retention curves of the investigated rocks. The method was tested and validated on simulated and laboratory transverse NMR data. Calculated inverse models are generally in a good agreement with results obtained from mercury injection and drainage measurements. Left: Measured and predicted water retention (pF) curves. Center: NMR relaxometry data, fit and error. Right: Mercury injection data (HgPor, dashed line) and jointly derived pore radii distributions and surface relaxivity by joint inverse modelling

  20. Characterizing RNA Excited States Using NMR Relaxation Dispersion.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yi; Kellogg, Dawn; Kimsey, Isaac J; Sathyamoorthy, Bharathwaj; Stein, Zachary W; McBrairty, Mitchell; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M

    2015-01-01

    Changes in RNA secondary structure play fundamental roles in the cellular functions of a growing number of noncoding RNAs. This chapter describes NMR-based approaches for characterizing microsecond-to-millisecond changes in RNA secondary structure that are directed toward short-lived and low-populated species often referred to as "excited states." Compared to larger scale changes in RNA secondary structure, transitions toward excited states do not require assistance from chaperones, are often orders of magnitude faster, and are localized to a small number of nearby base pairs in and around noncanonical motifs. Here, we describe a procedure for characterizing RNA excited states using off-resonance R1ρ NMR relaxation dispersion utilizing low-to-high spin-lock fields (25-3000 Hz). R1ρ NMR relaxation dispersion experiments are used to measure carbon and nitrogen chemical shifts in base and sugar moieties of the excited state. The chemical shift data are then interpreted with the aid of secondary structure prediction to infer potential excited states that feature alternative secondary structures. Candidate structures are then tested by using mutations, single-atom substitutions, or by changing physiochemical conditions, such as pH and temperature, to either stabilize or destabilize the candidate excited state. The resulting chemical shifts of the mutants or under different physiochemical conditions are then compared to those of the ground and excited states. Application is illustrated with a focus on the transactivation response element from the human immune deficiency virus type 1, which exists in dynamic equilibrium with at least two distinct excited states. PMID:26068737

  1. Characterizing RNA Excited States using NMR Relaxation Dispersion

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yi; Kellogg, Dawn; Kimsey, Isaac J; Sathyamoorthy, Bharathwaj; Stein, Zachary W; McBrairty, Mitchell; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.

    2016-01-01

    Changes in RNA secondary structure play fundamental roles in the cellular functions of a growing number of non-coding RNAs. This chapter describes NMR-based approaches for characterizing microsecond-to-millisecond changes in RNA secondary structure that are directed toward short-lived and low-populated species often referred to as “excited states”. Compared to larger-scale changes in RNA secondary structure, transitions towards excited states do not require assistance from chaperones, are often orders of magnitude faster, and are localized to a small number of nearby base pairs in and around non-canonical motifs. Here we describe a procedure for characterizing RNA excited states using off-resonance R1ρ NMR relaxation dispersion utilizing low-to-high spin-lock fields (25–3000 Hz). R1ρ NMR relaxation dispersion experiments are used to measure carbon and nitrogen chemical shifts in base and sugar moieties of the excited state. The chemical shift data is then interpreted with the aid of secondary structure prediction to infer potential excited states that feature alternative secondary structures. Candidate structures are then tested by using mutations, single-atom substitutions, or by changing physiochemical conditions, such as pH and temperature, to either stabilize or destabilize the candidate excited state. The resulting chemical shifts of the mutants or under different physiochemical conditions are then compared to those of the ground and excited state. Application is illustrated with a focus on the transactivation response element (TAR) from the human immune deficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), which exists in dynamic equilibrium with at least two distinct excited states. PMID:26068737

  2. Characterizing RNA Excited States Using NMR Relaxation Dispersion.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yi; Kellogg, Dawn; Kimsey, Isaac J; Sathyamoorthy, Bharathwaj; Stein, Zachary W; McBrairty, Mitchell; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M

    2015-01-01

    Changes in RNA secondary structure play fundamental roles in the cellular functions of a growing number of noncoding RNAs. This chapter describes NMR-based approaches for characterizing microsecond-to-millisecond changes in RNA secondary structure that are directed toward short-lived and low-populated species often referred to as "excited states." Compared to larger scale changes in RNA secondary structure, transitions toward excited states do not require assistance from chaperones, are often orders of magnitude faster, and are localized to a small number of nearby base pairs in and around noncanonical motifs. Here, we describe a procedure for characterizing RNA excited states using off-resonance R1ρ NMR relaxation dispersion utilizing low-to-high spin-lock fields (25-3000 Hz). R1ρ NMR relaxation dispersion experiments are used to measure carbon and nitrogen chemical shifts in base and sugar moieties of the excited state. The chemical shift data are then interpreted with the aid of secondary structure prediction to infer potential excited states that feature alternative secondary structures. Candidate structures are then tested by using mutations, single-atom substitutions, or by changing physiochemical conditions, such as pH and temperature, to either stabilize or destabilize the candidate excited state. The resulting chemical shifts of the mutants or under different physiochemical conditions are then compared to those of the ground and excited states. Application is illustrated with a focus on the transactivation response element from the human immune deficiency virus type 1, which exists in dynamic equilibrium with at least two distinct excited states.

  3. Nuclear Spin-Lattice Relaxation Times from Continuous Wave NMR Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wooten, Jan B.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    The experiment described, suitable for undergraduate physical chemistry laboratories, illustrates the general principles of relaxation and introduces the nmr concepts of saturation and spin-inversion. (BB)

  4. Diffusion MRI/NMR magnetization equations with relaxation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de, Dilip; Daniel, Simon

    2012-10-01

    Bloch-Torrey diffusion magnetization equation ignores relaxation effects of magnetization. Relaxation times are important in any diffusion magnetization studies of perfusion in tissues(Brain and heart specially). Bloch-Torrey equation cannot therefore describe diffusion magnetization in a real-life situation where relaxation effects play a key role, characteristics of tissues under examination. This paper describes derivations of two equations for each of the y and z component diffusion NMR/MRI magnetization (separately) in a rotating frame of reference, where rf B1 field is applied along x direction and bias magnetic field(Bo) is along z direction. The two equations are expected to further advance the science & technology of Diffusion MRI(DMRI) and diffusion functional MRI(DFMRI). These two techniques are becoming increasingly important in the study and treatment of neurological disorders, especially for the management of patients with acute stroke. It is rapidly becoming a standard for white matter disorders, as diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can reveal abnormalities in white matter fibre structure and provide models of brain connectivity.

  5. Backbone dynamics of barstar: a (15)N NMR relaxation study.

    PubMed

    Sahu, S C; Bhuyan, A K; Majumdar, A; Udgaonkar, J B

    2000-12-01

    Backbone dynamics of uniformly (15)N-labeled barstar have been studied at 32 degrees C, pH 6.7, by using (15)N relaxation data obtained from proton-detected 2D (1)H-(15)N NMR spectroscopy. (15)N spin-lattice relaxation rate constants (R(1)), spin-spin relaxation rate constants (R(2)), and steady-state heteronuclear (1)H-(15)N NOEs have been determined for 69 of the 86 (excluding two prolines and the N-terminal residue) backbone amide (15)N at a magnetic field strength of 14.1 Tesla. The primary relaxation data have been analyzed by using the model-free formalism of molecular dynamics, using both isotropic and axially symmetric diffusion of the molecule, to determine the overall rotational correlation time (tau(m)), the generalized order parameter (S(2)), the effective correlation time for internal motions (tau(e)), and NH exchange broadening contributions (R(ex)) for each residue. As per the axially symmetric diffusion, the ratio of diffusion rates about the unique and perpendicular axes (D( parallel)/D( perpendicular)) is 0.82 +/- 0.03. The two results have only marginal differences. The relaxation data have also been used to map reduced spectral densities for the NH vectors of these residues at three frequencies: 0, omega(H), and omega(N), where omega(H),(N) are proton and nitrogen Larmor frequencies. The value of tau(m) obtained from model-free analysis of the relaxation data is 5.2 ns. The reduced spectral density analysis, however, yields a value of 5.7 ns. The tau(m) determined here is different from that calculated previously from time-resolved fluorescence data (4.1 ns). The order parameter ranges from 0.68 to 0.98, with an average value of 0.85 +/- 0.02. A comparison of the order parameters with the X-ray B-factors for the backbone nitrogens of wild-type barstar does not show any considerable correlation. Model-free analysis of the relaxation data for seven residues required the inclusion of an exchange broadening term, the magnitude of which ranges from 2

  6. Study of the ferroelastic phase transition in the tetraethylammonium compound [N(C2H5)4]2ZnBr4 by magic-angle spinning and static NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Ae Ran

    2016-03-01

    The ferroelastic phase transition of tetraethylammonium compound [N(C2H5)4]2ZnBr4 at the phase transition temperature (TC) = 283 K was characterized by magic-angle spinning (MAS) and static nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and confirmed by optical polarizing spectroscopy. The structural geometry near TC was studied in terms of the chemical shifts and the spin-lattice relaxation times T1ρ in the rotating frame for 1H MAS NMR and 13C cross-polarization (CP)/MAS NMR. The two inequivalent ethyl groups were distinguishable in the 13C NMR spectrum, and the T1ρ results indicate that they undergo tumbling motion above TC in a coupled manner. From the 14N NMR results, the two nitrogen nuclei in the N(C2H5)4+ ions were distinguishable above TC, and the splitting in the spectra below TC was related to the ferroelastic domains with different orientations.

  7. 2H NMR study of phase transition and hydrogen dynamics in hydrogen bonded organic antiferroelectric 55DMBP-H2ca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asaji, Tetsuo; Hara, Masamichi; Fujimori, Hiroki; Hagiwara, Shoko

    2016-12-01

    Hydrogen dynamics in one-dimensional hydrogen bonded organic antiferroelectric, co-crystal of 5,5'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine (55DMBP) and chloranilic acid (H2ca), was investigated by use of 2H high resolution solid-state NMR. The two types of hydrogen bonds O-H …N and N+-H … O - in the antiferroelectric phase were clearly observed as the splitting of the side band of the 2H MAS NMR spectra of the acid-proton deuterated compound 55DMBP-D 2ca. The temperature dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation time was measured of the N+-H and O-H deuterons, respectively. It was suggested that the motion of the O-H deuteron is already in the antiferroelectric phase in the fast-motion regime in the NMR time scale, while that of the N+-H deuteron is a slow motion. In the high-temperature paraelectric phase, the both deuterons become equivalent and the fast motion of the deuterons in the NMR time scale is taking place with the activation energy of 7.9 kJ mol-1.

  8. Local structure and molecular motions in imidazolium hydrogen malonate crystal as studied by 2H and 13C NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, M.; Chizuwa, M.; Umiyama, T.; Kumagai, Y.; Miyatou, T.; Ohashi, R.; Ida, T.; Tansho, M.; Shimizu, T.

    2015-04-01

    The local structure and molecular motion of the imidazolium hydrogen malonate crystal were investigated using solid-state 2H and 13C NMR. The imidazolium ion undergoes isotropic rotation, which is correlated with a defect in the crystal, as observed by 2H NMR broadline spectra above 263 K. A 180∘ flip of the imidazolium ion in the regular site was observed from 2H NMR quadrupole Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (QCPMG) spectra. The Grotthuss mechanism was accompanied by a 180∘ flip of the imidazolium ion in regular sites. Moreover, the proton transfer associated with the imidazolium ion of the defective crystal is important for proton conductivity of the imidazolium hydrogen malonate crystal.

  9. The time correlation function perspective of NMR relaxation in proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, Yury E.; Meirovitch, Eva

    2013-08-01

    We applied over a decade ago the two-body coupled-rotator slowly relaxing local structure (SRLS) approach to NMR relaxation in proteins. One rotator is the globally moving protein and the other rotator is the locally moving probe (spin-bearing moiety, typically the 15N-1H bond). So far we applied SRLS to 15N-H relaxation from seven different proteins within the scope of the commonly used data-fitting paradigm. Here, we solve the SRLS Smoluchowski equation using typical best-fit parameters as input, to obtain the corresponding generic time correlation functions (TCFs). The following new information is obtained. For actual rhombic local ordering and main ordering axis pointing along C_{i - 1}^α - C_i^α, the measurable TCF is dominated by the (K,K') = (-2,2), (2,2), and (0,2) components (K is the order of the rank 2 local ordering tensor), determined largely by the local motion. Global diffusion axiality affects the analysis significantly when the ratio between the parallel and perpendicular components exceeds approximately 1.5. Local diffusion axiality has a large and intricate effect on the analysis. Mode-coupling becomes important when the ratio between the global and local motional rates falls below 0.01. The traditional method of analysis - model-free (MF) - represents a simple limit of SRLS. The conditions under which the MF and SRLS TCFs are the same are specified. The validity ranges of wobble-in-a-cone and rotation on the surface of a cone as local motions are determined. The evolution of the intricate Smoluchowski operator from the simple diffusion operator for a sphere reorienting in isotropic medium is delineated. This highlights the fact that SRLS is an extension of the established stochastic theories for treating restricted motions. This study lays the groundwork for TCF-based comparison between mesoscopic SRLS and atomistic molecular dynamics.

  10. Detection of Anisotropy in Cartilage Using 2H Double-Quantum-Filtered NMR-Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharf, Y.; Eliav, U.; Shinar, H.; Navon, G.

    Double-quantum-filtered (DQF) NMR spectroscopy of I = 1 spin systems is a diagnostic tool for the detection of anisotropy in macroscopically disordered systems. For deuterium, this method reveals the presence of a residual quadrupolar interaction for D 2O in bovine nasal cartilage. This tissue is not macroscopically ordered and the quadrupolar splitting is not resolved. Fitting the calculated spectral lineshapes to the experimental results was possible only when a distribution of the residual quadrupolar interaction, omega(q), was assumed. The series of DQF lineshapes obtained for different creation times in the DQF experiment could be fitted using a single set of three parameters: the average residual quadrupolar interaction overlineω q/2π = 110 Hz, its standard deviation Δω q/2π = 73 Hz, and the transverse relaxation rate of 63 s -1. Separate deuterium DQF measurements for the constituents of the cartilage, collagen, and chondroitin sulfate indicated that the DQF spectra of cartilage are the result of anisotropic motion of D 2O due to binding to the fibrous collagen in the tissue.

  11. Interaction of antiaggregant molecule ajoene with membranes. An ESR and 1H, 2H, 31P-NMR study.

    PubMed

    Debouzy, J C; Neumann, J M; Hervé, M; Daveloose, D; Viret, J; Apitz-Castro, R

    1989-01-01

    The structure of ajoene, a molecule extracted from garlic, has been studied by 1H-NMR and its interaction with model membranes by 1H-, 2H-, 31-P-NMR and ESR experiments. This study clearly shows that the ajoene molecule is located deep in the layer and is close to the interlayer medium. Moreover while NMR experiments show that the membrane structure is only slightly affected by the presence of ajoene, ESR experiments reveal significant modifications in phospholipid dynamics. This interaction, observed before with the phenothiazine derivative, promazine, results in an increase of the membrane fluidity in its hydrophobic part and could be related to clinical properties of ajoene.

  12. Orientational order, molecular organization, and dynamics in mixtures of bent-core and rod-shaped mesogens: a 2H NMR study.

    PubMed

    Calucci, Lucia; Fodor-Csorba, Katalin; Forte, Claudia; Geppi, Marco

    2011-01-27

    Mixtures of a bent-core mesogen (ClPbis10BB) and a calamitic mesogen (6OO8), showing a nematic phase over the entire compositional range and one or two smectic phases (namely, SmA, SmC, or SmC(A)) below the nematic one over a wide concentration range, were investigated by means of (2)H NMR spectroscopy, exploiting selectively deuterated isotopomers of both mesogens. The analysis of (2)H NMR spectra recorded in the liquid crystalline phases on several representative mixtures gave information on the orientational order properties and the molecular organization within the phases as well as on the alignment properties upon application of a magnetic field. On the other hand, the analysis of (2)H longitudinal relaxation times (T(1Z) and T(1Q)) in 6OO8-d(2)/ClPbis10BB mixtures and pure 6OO8-d(2) allowed the influence of the bent-core mesogen on the dynamics of the calamitic one to be highlighted.

  13. Spin-Lattice Relaxation Times in 1H NMR Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wink, Donald J.

    1989-01-01

    Discussed are the mechanisms of nuclear magnetic relaxation, and applications of relaxation times. The measurement of spin-lattice relaxations is reviewed. It is stressed that sophisticated techniques such as these are becoming more important to the working chemist. (CW)

  14. Dynamics of an integral membrane peptide: a deuterium NMR relaxation study of gramicidin.

    PubMed Central

    Prosser, R S; Davis, J H

    1994-01-01

    Solid state deuterium (2H) NMR inversion-recovery and Jeener-Broekaert relaxation experiments were performed on oriented multilamellar dispersions consisting of 1,2-dilauroyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine and 2H exchange-labeled gramicidin D, at a lipid to protein molar ratio (L/P) of 15:1, in order to study the dynamics of the channel conformation of the peptide in a liquid crystalline phase. Our dynamic model for the whole body motions of the peptide includes diffusion of the peptide around its helix axis and a wobbling diffusion around a second axis perpendicular to the local bilayer normal in a simple Maier-Saupe mean field potential. This anisotropic diffusion is characterized by the correlation times, tau R parallel and tau R perpendicular. Aligning the bilayer normal perpendicular to the magnetic field and graphing the relaxation rate, 1/T1Z, as a function of (1-S2N-2H), where S2N-2H represents the orientational order parameter, wer were able to estimate the correlation time, tau R parallel, for rotational diffusion. Although in the quadrupolar splitting, which varies as (3 cos2 theta D-1), has in general two possible solutions to theta D in the range 0 < or = theta D < or = 90 degrees, the 1/T1Z vs. (1-S2N-2H) curve can be used to determine a single value of theta D in this range. Thus, the 1/T1Z vs. (1-S2N-2H) profile can be used both to define the axial diffusion rate and to remove potential structural ambiguities in the splittings. The T1Z anisotropy permits us to solve for the two correlation times (tau R parallel = 6.8 x 10(-9) s and tau R perpendicular = 6 x 10(-6) s). The simulated parameters were corroborated by a Jeener-Broekaert experiment where the bilayer normal was parallel to the principal magnetic field. At this orientation the ratio, J2(2 omega 0)/J1(omega 0) was obtained in order to estimate the strength of the restoring potential in a model-independent fashion. This measurement yields the rms angle, 1/2 (= 16 +/- 2 degrees at

  15. Deuterium NMR of Val1. (2-2H)Ala3. gramicidin A in oriented DMPC bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Hing, A.W.; Adams, S.P.; Silbert, D.F.; Norberg, R.E. )

    1990-05-01

    Deuterium NMR is used to study the selectively labeled Val1...(2-2H)Ala3...gramicidin A molecule to investigate the structure and dynamics of the C alpha-2H bond in the Ala3 residue of gramicidin. Val1...(2-2H)Ala3...gramicidin A is synthesized, purified, and characterized and then incorporated into oriented bilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine sandwiched between glass coverslips. Phosphorus NMR line shapes obtained from this sample are consistent with the presence of the bilayer phase and indicate that no nonbilayer phases are present in significant amounts. Deuterium NMR line shapes obtained from this sample indicate that the motional axis of the gramicidin Ala3 residue is parallel to the coverslip normal, that the distribution of motional axis orientations has a width of 2 degrees, and that only one major conformational and dynamical state of the Ala3 C alpha-2H bond is observed on the NMR time scale. Furthermore, the Ala3 C alpha-2H bond angle relative to the motional axis is 19-20 degrees if fast axial rotation is assumed to be the only motion present but is less than or equal to 19-20 degrees in the absence of such an assumption. This result indicates that various double-stranded, helical dimer models are very unlikely to represent the structure of gramicidin in the sample studied but that the single-stranded, beta 6.3 helical dimer models are consistent with the experimental data. However, a definitive distinction between the left-handed, single-stranded, beta 6.3 helical dimer model and the right-handed, single-stranded, beta 6.3 helical dimer model cannot be made on the basis of the experimental data obtained in this study.

  16. /sup 2/H-NMR studies of hypocotyl cell walls of germinating beams supplied with perdeuterated myo-inositol

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, K.; Wallace, J.C.; MacKay, A.L.; Balza, F.; Taylor, I.E.P.

    1987-04-01

    When myo-(2-/sup 3/H) inositol (MI) was supplied to bean seeds by imbibition, only uronic acid, arabinose and xylose residues of cell wall polysaccharides were labeled. To study the structural mobility of the uronic acid- and/or pentose-rich polysaccharides in cell wall using /sup 2/H-NMR, the authors supplied perdeuterated MI with (2-/sup 3/H) MI to germinating bean seeds. Perdeuterated MI was prepared by the /sup 1/H-/sup 2/H exchange reaction of MI in deuterium oxide with Raney nickel. During the exchange reaction, extensive epimerization occurred and at least 6 inositol epimers in addition to MI were identified in the reaction mixture of GC/MS. The perdeuterated MI was completely resolved from other inositol epimers and purified by anion-exchange chromatography using Dowex 1 (borate form) and by crystallization. The /sup 2/H-NMR analysis resolved the /sup 2/H-labeled hypocotyl cell walls into two components (rigid and mobile components). They also report the distribution of /sup 2/H and /sup 3/H from perdeuterated and (2-/sup 3/H) MI in the cell wall sugar residues.

  17. On the microscopic fluctuations driving the NMR relaxation of quadrupolar ions in water.

    PubMed

    Carof, Antoine; Salanne, Mathieu; Charpentier, Thibault; Rotenberg, Benjamin

    2015-11-21

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) relaxation is sensitive to the local structure and dynamics around the probed nuclei. The Electric Field Gradient (EFG) is the key microscopic quantity to understand the NMR relaxation of quadrupolar ions, such as (7)Li(+), (23)Na(+), (25)Mg(2+), (35)Cl(-), (39)K(+), or (133)Cs(+). Using molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate the statistical and dynamical properties of the EFG experienced by alkaline, alkaline Earth, and chloride ions at infinite dilution in water. Specifically, we analyze the effect of the ionic charge and size on the distribution of the EFG tensor and on the multi-step decay of its auto-correlation function. The main contribution to the NMR relaxation time arises from the slowest mode, with a characteristic time on the picosecond time scale. The first solvation shell of the ion plays a dominant role in the fluctuations of the EFG, all the more that the ion radius is small and its charge is large. We propose an analysis based on a simplified charge distribution around the ion, which demonstrates that the auto-correlation of the EFG, hence the NMR relaxation time, reflects primarily the collective translational motion of water molecules in the first solvation shell of the cations. Our findings provide a microscopic route to the quantitative interpretation of NMR relaxation measurements and open the way to the design of improved analytical theories for NMR relaxation for small ionic solutes, which should focus on water density fluctuations around the ion. PMID:26590539

  18. Spin-spin coupling in the HD molecule determined from 1H and 2H NMR experiments in the gas-phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbacz, Piotr

    2014-10-01

    The indirect spin-spin coupling of hydrogen deuteride, J(D, H), was determined from a series of 1H and 2H NMR spectra acquired at various densities of gaseous solvents (He, Ar, CO2, and N2O). The analysis of these spectra shows that accurate determination of J(D, H) from this experimental data requires careful examination of the effects of nuclear relaxation and of HD-solvent gas interactions on hydrogen deuteride line shapes. Particularly, it was found that the first-order corrections of the peak-to-peak separations between HD multiplet peaks due to weak van der Waals interactions are proportional to solvent gas density, while these corrections for nuclear relaxation of the proton and the deuteron are proportional to the second power of the inverse of the gas density. Analysis of the data indicates that J(D, H), obtained by correcting for the effects of nuclear relaxation and intermolecular interactions, is 43.136(7) Hz at 300 K.

  19. Molecular Level Insights on Collagen-Polyphenols Interaction Using Spin-Relaxation and Saturation Transfer Difference NMR.

    PubMed

    Reddy, R Ravikanth; Phani Kumar, Bandaru V N; Shanmugam, Ganesh; Madhan, Balaraman; Mandal, Asit B

    2015-11-01

    Interaction of small molecules with collagen has far reaching consequences in biological and industrial processes. The interaction between collagen and selected polyphenols, viz., gallic acid (GA), pyrogallol (PG), catechin (CA), and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), has been investigated by various solution NMR measurements, viz., (1)H and (13)C chemical shifts (δH and δC), (1)H nonselective spin-lattice relaxation times (T1NS) and selective spin-lattice relaxation times (T1SEL), as well as spin-spin relaxation times (T2). Furthermore, we have employed saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR method to monitor the site of GA, CA, PG, and EGCG which are in close proximity to collagen. It is found that -COOH group of GA provides an important contribution for the interaction of GA with collagen, as evidenced from (13)C analysis, while PG, which is devoid of -COOH group in comparison to GA, does not show any significant interaction with collagen. STD NMR data indicates that the resonances of A-ring (H2', H5' and H6') and C-ring (H6 and H8) protons of CA, and A-ring (H2' and H6'), C-ring (H6 and H8), and D-ring (H2″and H6″) protons of EGCG persist in the spectra, demonstrating that these protons are in spatial proximity to collagen, which is further validated by independent proton spin-relaxation measurement and analysis. The selective (1)H T1 measurements of polyphenols in the presence of protein at various concentrations have enabled us to determine their binding affinities with collagen. EGCG exhibits high binding affinity with collagen followed by CA, GA, and PG. Further, NMR results propose that presence of gallic acid moiety in a small molecule increases its affinity with collagen. Our experimental findings provide molecular insights on the binding of collagen and plant polyphenols. PMID:26447653

  20. Impact of Internal Magnetic Field Gradients on the NMR Relaxation Time Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grombacher, D. J.; Fay, E. L.; Knight, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    We explore the impact of internal magnetic field gradients, which arise due to the presence of a magnetic susceptibility contrast between grains and the pore fluid, on the relaxation time distribution. Relaxation times provide powerful insight into the pore geometry. This link to pore geometry relies on the fast-diffusion assumption, where relaxation is controlled by the pore surface and each pore is treated as isolated and is described by a single relaxation time. This allows the relaxation time distribution to be interpreted as a pore size distribution. However, internal gradients can complicate this interpretation by providing an additional relaxation mechanism impacting the decay. We present both synthetic and laboratory studies investigating the impact of internal gradients on the relaxation time distribution. A COMSOL multiphysics package is employed to determine the magnetic field's spatial distribution across the pore space, and to simulate the pore's NMR relaxation. The NMR simulation accounts for both surface relaxation, and relaxation related to internal gradients. We observe that as the influence of internal gradients increases, through either greater magnetic susceptibility contrasts or the use of longer echo times, the shape of the relaxation time distribution is altered. In these cases, relaxation within a single pore is no longer described by a single characteristic relaxation time, instead requiring multiple relaxation times to capture the time-dependent behavior. As a result, the relaxation time distribution is broadened and shifted to faster relaxation times. Laboratory results, performed for several samples sieved to ensure narrow grain size distributions and with varying magnitudes of magnetic susceptibility contrasts, exhibit similar trends to those observed in the synthetic studies. These results have significant implications for the interpretation of relaxation data to obtain pore size distributions, and the derived estimates of hydraulic

  1. Difference-NMR techniques for selection of components on the basis of relaxation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Douglas J.; de Azevedo, Eduardo R.; Bonagamba, Tito J.

    2003-05-01

    This work describes a numerical methodology to obtain more efficient relaxation filters to selectively retain or remove components based on relaxation times. The procedure uses linear combinations of spectra with various recycle or filter delays to obtain components that are both quantitative and pure. Modulation profiles are calculated assuming exponential relaxation behavior. The method is general and can be applied to a wide range of solution or solid-state NMR experiments including direct-polarization (DP), or filtered cross-polarization (CP) spectra. 13C NMR experiments on isotactic poly(1-butene) and dimethyl sulfone showed the utility of the technique for selectively suppressing peaks.

  2. Curie-type paramagnetic NMR relaxation in the aqueous solution of Ni(II).

    PubMed

    Mareš, Jiří; Hanni, Matti; Lantto, Perttu; Lounila, Juhani; Vaara, Juha

    2014-04-21

    Ni(2+)(aq) has been used for many decades as a model system for paramagnetic nuclear magnetic resonance (pNMR) relaxation studies. More recently, its magnetic properties and also nuclear magnetic relaxation rates have been studied computationally. We have calculated electron paramagnetic resonance and NMR parameters using quantum-mechanical (QM) computation of molecular dynamics snapshots, obtained using a polarizable empirical force field. Statistical averages of hyperfine coupling, g- and zero-field splitting tensors, as well as the pNMR shielding terms, are compared to the available experimental and computational data. In accordance with our previous work, the isotropic hyperfine coupling as well as nuclear shielding values agree well with experimental measurements for the (17)O nuclei of water molecules in the first solvation shell of the nickel ion, whereas larger deviations are found for (1)H centers. We report, for the first time, the Curie-type contribution to the pNMR relaxation rate using QM calculations together with Redfield relaxation theory. The Curie relaxation mechanism is analogous to chemical shift anisotropy relaxation, well-known in diamagnetic NMR. Due to the predominance of other types of paramagnetic relaxation mechanisms for this system, it is possible to extract the Curie term only computationally. The Curie mechanism alone would result in around 16 and 20 s(-1) of relaxation rates (R1 and R2 respectively) for the (1)H nuclei of water molecules bonded to the Ni(2+) center, in a magnetic field of 11.7 T. The corresponding (17)O relaxation rates are around 33 and 38 s(-1). We also report the Curie contribution to the relaxation rate for molecules beyond the first solvation shell in a 1 M solution of Ni(2+) in water.

  3. Muon spin relaxation study of Zr(H2PO4)(PO4).2H2O.

    PubMed

    Clayden, Nigel J; Cottrell, Stephen P

    2006-07-14

    Muon spin relaxation has been used to study the muon dynamics in the layered zirconium phosphate Zr(H(2)PO(4))(PO(4)).2H(2)O as a function of temperature. Radiofrequency decoupling was used to establish the origin of the local dipolar field as coupling with (1)H spins. Muons were trapped at two sites, one identified as HMuO and the other consistent with PO-Mu on the basis of their zero-field second moments. Although a small decrease in the local nuclear dipolar field was seen with temperature, the muons remained essentially static over the temperature range 20-300 K.

  4. Grasping hydrogen adsorption and dynamics in metal-organic frameworks using (2)H solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Lucier, Bryan E G; Zhang, Yue; Lee, Kelly J; Lu, Yuanjun; Huang, Yining

    2016-06-18

    Record greenhouse gas emissions have spurred the search for clean energy sources such as hydrogen (H2) fuel cells. Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are promising H2 adsorption and storage media, but knowledge of H2 dynamics and adsorption strengths in these materials is lacking. Variable-temperature (VT) (2)H solid-state NMR (SSNMR) experiments targeting (2)H2 gas (i.e., D2) shed light on D2 adsorption and dynamics within six representative MOFs: UiO-66, M-MOF-74 (M = Zn, Mg, Ni), and α-M3(COOH)6 (M = Mg, Zn). D2 binding is relatively strong in Mg-MOF-74, Ni-MOF-74, α-Mg3(COOH)6, and α-Zn3(COOH)6, giving rise to broad (2)H SSNMR powder patterns. In contrast, D2 adsorption is weaker in UiO-66 and Zn-MOF-74, as evidenced by the narrow (2)H resonances that correspond to rapid reorientation of the D2 molecules. Employing (2)H SSNMR experiments in this fashion holds great promise for the correlation of MOF structural features and functional groups/metal centers to H2 dynamics and host-guest interactions. PMID:27181834

  5. RNF20-SNF2H Pathway of Chromatin Relaxation in DNA Double-Strand Break Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Akihiro; Komatsu, Kenshi

    2015-01-01

    Rapid progress in the study on the association of histone modifications with chromatin remodeling factors has broadened our understanding of chromatin dynamics in DNA transactions. In DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair, the well-known mark of histones is the phosphorylation of the H2A variant, H2AX, which has been used as a surrogate marker of DSBs. The ubiquitylation of histone H2B by RNF20 E3 ligase was recently found to be a DNA damage-induced histone modification. This modification is required for DSB repair and regulated by a distinctive pathway from that of histone H2AX phosphorylation. Moreover, the connection between H2B ubiquitylation and the chromatin remodeling activity of SNF2H has been elucidated. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of RNF20-mediated processes and the molecular link to H2AX-mediated processes during DSB repair. PMID:26184323

  6. Effect of Paramagnetic Ions on NMR Relaxation of Fluids at Solid Surfaces

    PubMed

    Foley; Farooqui; Kleinberg

    1996-11-01

    Proton NMR longitudinal and transverse relaxation times of water-saturated powder packs have been measured. The powders were a series of synthetic calcium silicates with known concentrations of iron or manganese paramagnetic ions. The rate of water proton relaxation has been found to be linearly proportional to the concentration of paramagnetic ion. The constant of proportionality is used to determine the electron relaxation time of ions at the fluid-solid interface. A substantial relaxivity is found in the absence of paramagnetic ions. Thus the oxide surface itself is an unexpectedly good relaxer of fluid-borne nuclear spins. The results answer some long-standing questions connected with the NMR properties of fluid-saturated sedimentary rocks.

  7. A novel analysis for the NMR magic sandwich echo in polymers: application to the α-relaxation in polybutadiene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieruccini, Marco; Sturniolo, Simone; Corti, Maurizio; Rigamonti, Attilio

    2015-11-01

    On the basis of a method to describe the relaxation dynamics in an ensemble of spin pairs, an analytical expression is derived for the magic sandwich echo refocusing efficiency of 1H-NMR signals from systems where dipolar interaction dominates. At the sake of illustration the method is applied to the analysis of the α-relaxation in poly(butadiene). The Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann behaviour of the central relaxation rates, derived by fitting the refocusing efficiency as a function of the temperature, follows very well independent measurements performed with stimulated echo 2H-NMR experiments. Comparison with literature data worked out by broad band dielectric spectroscopy also shows very good agreement. In the framework of an Havriliak-Negami representation of the distribution of correlation times, information about width and asymmetry of the frequency profile is also provided by the analysis. This novel method is believed to represent a suitable path to extract basic information on the motional distribution in a variety of similar systems.

  8. NMR relaxation study of crosslinked cis-1,4-polybutadiene

    SciTech Connect

    Munie, G.C.; Jonas, J.; Rowland, T.J.

    1980-01-01

    Proton relaxation measurements have been used to investigate the effects of crosslinking on the segmental motion in cis-1,4-polybutadiene samples. The temperature dependence of proton spin-lattice relaxation time T/sub 1/ and spin-spin relaxation time T/sub 2/ at 60 and 24.3 MHz is reported in cis-1,4-polybutadiene (PB) samples with different crosslink density including uncrosslinked PB and samples with 140, 40, and 14 repeat units between crosslinks. In addition, spin-lattice relaxation times in rotating coordinate frame, T/sub 1p/, have also been determined. The relaxation data are interpreted in terms of the effects of crosslinks on segmental chain motions. Because of their sensitivity to low-frequency motion, T/sub 2/ data are of major interest. At temperatures well above the T/sub 1/ minimum the small T/sub 2/ temperature dependence resembles solidlike behavior reflecting the nonzero averaging of dipolar interactions due to anisotropic motion of the chain segments between crosslinks. The magnitude of T/sub 2/ at 60/sup 0/C is found to be proportional to the average mass between crosslinks.

  9. NMR and dielectric studies of hydrated collagen and elastin: Evidence for a delocalized secondary relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lusceac, Sorin A.; Rosenstihl, Markus; Vogel, Michael; Gainaru, Catalin; Fillmer, Ariane; Böhmer, Roland

    2011-01-01

    Using a combination of dielectric spectroscopy and solid-state deuteron NMR, the hydration water dynamics of connective tissue proteins is studied at sub-ambient temperatures. In this range, the water dynamics follows an Arrhenius law. A scaling analysis of dielectric losses, 'two-phase' NMR spectra, and spin-lattice relaxation times consistently yield evidence for a Gaussian distribution of energy barriers. With the dielectric data as input, random-walk simulations of a large-angle, quasi-isotropic water reorientation provide an approximate description of stimulated-echo data on hydrated elastin. This secondary process takes place in an essentially rigid energy landscape, but in contrast to typical {\\beta}-relaxations it is quasi-isotropic and delocalized. The delocalization is inferred from previous NMR diffusometry experiments. To emphasize the distinction from conventional {\\beta}-processes, for aqueous systems such a matrix-decoupled relaxation was termed a {\

  10. 13C, 2h NMR studies of structural and dynamical modifications of glucose-exposed porcine aortic elastin.

    PubMed

    Silverstein, Moshe C; Bilici, Kübra; Morgan, Steven W; Wang, Yunjie; Zhang, Yanhang; Boutis, Gregory S

    2015-04-01

    Elastin, the principal component of the elastic fiber of the extracellular matrix, imparts to vertebrate tissues remarkable resilience and longevity. This work focuses on elucidating dynamical and structural modifications of porcine aortic elastin exposed to glucose by solid-state NMR spectroscopic and relaxation methodologies. Results from macroscopic stress-strain tests are also presented and indicate that glucose-treated elastin is mechanically stiffer than the same tissue without glucose treatment. These measurements show a large hysteresis in the stress-strain behavior of glucose-treated elastin-a well-known signature of viscoelasticity. Two-dimensional relaxation NMR methods were used to investigate the correlation time, distribution, and population of water in these samples. Differences are observed between the relative populations of water, whereas the measured correlation times of tumbling motion of water across the samples were similar. (13)C magic-angle-spinning NMR methods were applied to investigate structural and dynamical modifications after glucose treatment. Although some overall structure is preserved, the process of glucose exposure results in more heterogeneous structures and slower mobility. The correlation times of tumbling motion of the (13)C-(1)H internuclear vectors in the glucose-treated sample are larger than in untreated samples, pointing to their more rigid structure. The (13)C cross-polarization spectra reveal a notably increased α-helical character in the alanine motifs after glucose exposure. Results from molecular dynamics simulations are provided that add further insight into dynamical and structural changes of a short repeat, [VPGVG]5, an alanine pentamer, desmosine, and isodesmosine sites with and without glucose. The simulations point to changes in the entropic and energetic contributions in the retractive forces of VPGVG and AAAAA motifs. The most notable change is the increase of the energetic contribution in the retractive

  11. 13C, 2H NMR Studies of Structural and Dynamical Modifications of Glucose-Exposed Porcine Aortic Elastin

    PubMed Central

    Silverstein, Moshe C.; Bilici, Kübra; Morgan, Steven W.; Wang, Yunjie; Zhang, Yanhang; Boutis, Gregory S.

    2015-01-01

    Elastin, the principal component of the elastic fiber of the extracellular matrix, imparts to vertebrate tissues remarkable resilience and longevity. This work focuses on elucidating dynamical and structural modifications of porcine aortic elastin exposed to glucose by solid-state NMR spectroscopic and relaxation methodologies. Results from macroscopic stress-strain tests are also presented and indicate that glucose-treated elastin is mechanically stiffer than the same tissue without glucose treatment. These measurements show a large hysteresis in the stress-strain behavior of glucose-treated elastin—a well-known signature of viscoelasticity. Two-dimensional relaxation NMR methods were used to investigate the correlation time, distribution, and population of water in these samples. Differences are observed between the relative populations of water, whereas the measured correlation times of tumbling motion of water across the samples were similar. 13C magic-angle-spinning NMR methods were applied to investigate structural and dynamical modifications after glucose treatment. Although some overall structure is preserved, the process of glucose exposure results in more heterogeneous structures and slower mobility. The correlation times of tumbling motion of the 13C-1H internuclear vectors in the glucose-treated sample are larger than in untreated samples, pointing to their more rigid structure. The 13C cross-polarization spectra reveal a notably increased α-helical character in the alanine motifs after glucose exposure. Results from molecular dynamics simulations are provided that add further insight into dynamical and structural changes of a short repeat, [VPGVG]5, an alanine pentamer, desmosine, and isodesmosine sites with and without glucose. The simulations point to changes in the entropic and energetic contributions in the retractive forces of VPGVG and AAAAA motifs. The most notable change is the increase of the energetic contribution in the retractive force

  12. On the microscopic fluctuations driving the NMR relaxation of quadrupolar ions in water

    SciTech Connect

    Carof, Antoine; Salanne, Mathieu; Rotenberg, Benjamin; Charpentier, Thibault

    2015-11-21

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) relaxation is sensitive to the local structure and dynamics around the probed nuclei. The Electric Field Gradient (EFG) is the key microscopic quantity to understand the NMR relaxation of quadrupolar ions, such as {sup 7}Li{sup +}, {sup 23}Na{sup +}, {sup 25}Mg{sup 2+}, {sup 35}Cl{sup −}, {sup 39}K{sup +}, or {sup 133}Cs{sup +}. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate the statistical and dynamical properties of the EFG experienced by alkaline, alkaline Earth, and chloride ions at infinite dilution in water. Specifically, we analyze the effect of the ionic charge and size on the distribution of the EFG tensor and on the multi-step decay of its auto-correlation function. The main contribution to the NMR relaxation time arises from the slowest mode, with a characteristic time on the picosecond time scale. The first solvation shell of the ion plays a dominant role in the fluctuations of the EFG, all the more that the ion radius is small and its charge is large. We propose an analysis based on a simplified charge distribution around the ion, which demonstrates that the auto-correlation of the EFG, hence the NMR relaxation time, reflects primarily the collective translational motion of water molecules in the first solvation shell of the cations. Our findings provide a microscopic route to the quantitative interpretation of NMR relaxation measurements and open the way to the design of improved analytical theories for NMR relaxation for small ionic solutes, which should focus on water density fluctuations around the ion.

  13. Solid State 2H NMR Analysis of Furanose Ring Dynamics in DNA Containing Uracil

    PubMed Central

    Kinde-Carson, Monica N.; Ferguson, Crystal; Oyler, Nathan A.; Harbison, Gerard S.; Meints, Gary A.

    2010-01-01

    DNA damage has been implicated in numerous human diseases, particularly cancer, and the aging process. Single-base lesions, such as uracil, in DNA can be cytotoxic or mutagenic and are recognized by a DNA glycosylase during the process of base excision repair. Increased dynamic properties in lesion-containing DNAs have been suggested to assist recognition and specificity. Deuterium solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) has been used to directly observe local dynamics of the furanose ring within a uracil: adenine (U:A) base pair and compared to a normal thymine:adenine (T:A) base pair. Quadrupole echo lineshapes, ⟨T1Z⟩, and ⟨T2e⟩ relaxation data were collected, and computer modeling was performed. The results indicate that the relaxation times are identical within the experimental error, the solid lineshapes are essentially indistinguishable above the noise level, and our lineshapes are best fit with a model that does not have significant local motions. Therefore, U:A base pair furanose rings appear to have essentially identical dynamic properties as a normal T:A base pair, and the local dynamics of the furanose ring are unlikely to be the sole arbiter for uracil recognition and specificity in U:A base pairs. PMID:20151717

  14. 2H NMR study of 2D melting and dynamic behaviour of CDCl3 confined in ACF nanospace.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Takahiro; Omichi, Hiroaki; Chen, Yu; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Kubota, Osamu; Miyakubo, Keisuke; Eguchi, Taro

    2010-08-28

    Two-dimensional melting of trichloromethane (chloroform) confined in activated carbon fibre was investigated using differential thermal analysis and (2)H NMR techniques. Differential thermal analysis revealed a thermal anomaly with an endothermic peak at 269 K, which was distributed from 250 K to 287 K on the heating direction. This anomaly was also observed upon cooling at the same temperature. Furthermore, (2)H NMR revealed that slow motion such as molecular hopping and/or diffusion of CDCl(3) in ACF affected the spectral line width. The temperature dependence (Arrhenius plot) of the spectral line width showed an inflection point at 227 K. The activation energy of molecular motion of CDCl(3) in ACF was 4 kJ mol(-1) at temperatures greater than 227 K and 7.7 kJ mol(-1) at temperatures less than 227 K. Reduction of the activation energy suggests that the average intermolecular distance between CDCl(3) molecules enlarges above the inflection point. The difference of activation energy (3.7 kJ mol(-1)) is close to the enthalpy of fusion in typical plastic crystals. These results reveal that the thermal anomaly and the transition of dynamic process correspond respectively to melting of CHCl(3) in ACF and the pre-melting phenomenon.

  15. Spin Gap and Luttinger Liquid Description of the NMR Relaxation in Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dóra, Balázs; Gulácsi, Miklós; Simon, Ferenc; Kuzmany, Hans

    2007-10-01

    Recent NMR experiments by Singer et al. [Singer , Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 236403 (2005).PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.95.236403] showed a deviation from Fermi-liquid behavior in carbon nanotubes with an energy gap evident at low temperatures. Here, a comprehensive theory for the magnetic field and temperature dependent NMR C13 spin-lattice relaxation is given in the framework of the Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid. The low temperature properties are governed by a gapped relaxation due to a spin gap (˜30K), which crosses over smoothly to the Luttinger liquid behavior with increasing temperature.

  16. Investigation of wettability by NMR microscopy and spin-lattice relaxation

    SciTech Connect

    Doughty, D.A.; Tomutsa, Liviu

    1993-11-01

    The wettability of reservoir rock has an important impact on the efficiency of oil recovery processes and the distribution of oil and water within the reservoir. One of the potentially useful tools for wettability measurements is nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and spin-lattice relaxation. More recently using NMR microscopy NIPER has developed the capability of imaging one- and two-phase fluid systems in reservoir rock at resolutions to 25 microns. Effects seen in the images of fluids within the pore space of rocks near the rock grain surfaces hinted at the possibility of using NMR microscopy to map the wettability variations at grain sites within the pore space. Investigations were begun using NMR microscopy and spin-lattice relaxation time measurements on rock/fluid systems and on well-defined fractional wet model systems to study these effects. Relaxation data has been modelled using the stretched exponential relationship recently introduced. Comparisons of the NMR microscopy results of the model system with the rock results indicate that the observed effects probably do not reflect actual wettability variations within the pore space. The results of the relaxation time measurements reveal that even in the simple model studied, the behavior of two phases is somewhat ambiguous and much more complex and requires more study.

  17. Sensitivity enhancement and low-field spin relaxation in singlet NMR.

    PubMed

    Bocan, Jiri; Pileio, Giuseppe; Levitt, Malcolm H

    2012-12-14

    The singlet states of nuclear spin-1/2 pairs often display extended lifetimes that can be an order of magnitude longer than conventional relaxation times. We show that, in favourable circumstances, acquisition of the NMR signal during an extended multiple spin-echo train, followed by suitable data processing, enhances the signal-to-noise ratio of singlet NMR by up to an order of magnitude. The achievable enhancement depends on the transverse relaxation time constant, the magnetic field inhomogeneity, and the acceptable degradation in digital spectral resolution. We use the combination of singlet NMR and multiple spin-echo data acquisition to study the low-field nuclear relaxation processes of (15)N-labelled nitrous oxide ((15)N(2)O) in solution. A general relaxation theory for coupled 2-spin-1/2 systems in low magnetic field is developed. Experimental trajectories of the nuclear spin observables are compared with theoretical expressions, including dipole-dipole and spin-rotation relaxation mechanisms. The estimated values of the spin-rotation tensors are compared with previous estimations from NMR and molecular beam electric resonance.

  18. Hydration properties of regioselectively etherified celluloses monitored by 2H and 13C solid-state MAS NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Flemming H; Schöbitz, Michael; Schaller, Jens

    2012-06-20

    The hydration properties of 2,3-O-hydroxypropylcellulose (HPC) and 2,3-O-hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC) were analyzed by multi-nuclear solid-state MAS NMR spectroscopy. By 13C single-pulse (SP) MAS and cross-polarization (CP) MAS NMR, differences between the immobile regions and all parts of the polysaccharides were detected as a function of hydration. Complementary information about the water environments was observed by 2H MAS NMR. By this approach it was demonstrated that side chains in 2,3-O-HPC and 2,3-O-HEC were easier to hydrate than the cellulose backbone. Furthermore the motion of water was more restricted (slower) in 2,3-O-HPC than in 2,3-O-HEC. For both polysaccharides the hydration could be explained by a two-step process: in step one increased ordering of the immobile regions occurs after which the entire polymer is hydrated in step two.

  19. Improved Characterization of Healthy and Malignant Tissue by NMR Line-Shape Relaxation Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Peemoeller, H.; Shenoy, R.K.; Pintar, M.M.; Kydon, D.W.; Inch, W.R.

    1982-01-01

    We performed a relaxation-line-shape correlation NMR experiment on muscle, liver, kidney, and spleen tissues of healthy mice and of mouse tumor tissue. In each tissue studied, five spin groups were resolved and characterized by their relaxation parameters. We report a previously uncharacterized semi-solid spin group and discuss briefly the value of this method for the identification of malignant tissues. PMID:7104438

  20. Challenging lanthanide relaxation theory: erbium and thulium complexes that show NMR relaxation rates faster than dysprosium and terbium analogues.

    PubMed

    Funk, Alexander M; Harvey, Peter; Finney, Katie-Louise N A; Fox, Mark A; Kenwright, Alan M; Rogers, Nicola J; Senanayake, P Kanthi; Parker, David

    2015-07-01

    Measurements of the proton NMR paramagnetic relaxation rates for several series of isostructural lanthanide(III) complexes have been performed in aqueous solution over the field range 1.0 to 16.5 Tesla. The field dependence has been modeled using Bloch-Redfield-Wangsness theory, allowing values for the electronic relaxation time, Tle and the magnetic susceptibility, μeff, to be estimated. Anomalous relaxation rate profiles were obtained, notably for erbium and thulium complexes of low symmetry 8-coordinate aza-phosphinate complexes. Such behaviour challenges accepted theory and can be interpreted in terms of changes in Tle values that are a function of the transient ligand field induced by solvent collision and vary considerably between Ln(3+) ions, along with magnetic susceptibilities that deviate significantly from free-ion values. PMID:26051749

  1. Metabolism of excess methionine in the liver of intact rat: an in vivo /sup 2/H NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    London, R.E.; Gabel, S.A.; Funk, A.

    1987-11-03

    L-Methionine is the most toxic amino acid if supplied in excess, and the metabolic basis for this toxicity has been extensively studied, with varying conclusions. It is demonstrated here that in vivo /sup 2/H NMR spectroscopy provides a useful approach to the study of the hepatic metabolism of methionine in the anesthetized rat. Resonances corresponding to administered L-(methyl-/sup 2/H/sub 3/)methionine, and to the transmethylation product sarcosine, are observed during the first 10-min period after an intravenous injection of the labeled methionine, and the time dependence has been followed for a period of 5 h. A third resonance, assigned to the N-trimethyl groups of carnitine, phosphorylcholine, and other metabolites, becomes observable several hours after administration of the deuteriated methionine. In addition, there is a small increase in the intensity of the HDO resonance over the period of the study, which is interpreted to reflect the ultimate oxidation of the labeled sarcosine methyl group via mitochondrial sarcosine dehydrogenase. Additional small /sup 2/H resonances assigned to N/sup 1/-methylhistidine and creatine could be observed in perchloric acid extracts of the livers of rats treated with the deuteriated methionine. Inhibition of the flux through the transmethylation pathway is observed in the rat pretreated with the S-ethyl analogue of methionine, ethionine. These data provide strong support for the importance of glycine transmethylation in the catabolism of excess methionine.

  2. Ultra-low-field NMR relaxation and diffusion measurements using an optical magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Ganssle, Paul J; Shin, Hyun D; Seltzer, Scott J; Bajaj, Vikram S; Ledbetter, Micah P; Budker, Dmitry; Knappe, Svenja; Kitching, John; Pines, Alexander

    2014-09-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry and diffusometry are important tools for the characterization of heterogeneous materials and porous media, with applications including medical imaging, food characterization and oil-well logging. These methods can be extremely effective in applications where high-resolution NMR is either unnecessary, impractical, or both, as is the case in the emerging field of portable chemical characterization. Here, we present a proof-of-concept experiment demonstrating the use of high-sensitivity optical magnetometers as detectors for ultra-low-field NMR relaxation and diffusion measurements.

  3. NMR relaxation induced by iron oxide particles: testing theoretical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gossuin, Y.; Orlando, T.; Basini, M.; Henrard, D.; Lascialfari, A.; Mattea, C.; Stapf, S.; Vuong, Q. L.

    2016-04-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide particles find their main application as contrast agents for cellular and molecular magnetic resonance imaging. The contrast they bring is due to the shortening of the transverse relaxation time T 2 of water protons. In order to understand their influence on proton relaxation, different theoretical relaxation models have been developed, each of them presenting a certain validity domain, which depends on the particle characteristics and proton dynamics. The validation of these models is crucial since they allow for predicting the ideal particle characteristics for obtaining the best contrast but also because the fitting of T 1 experimental data by the theory constitutes an interesting tool for the characterization of the nanoparticles. In this work, T 2 of suspensions of iron oxide particles in different solvents and at different temperatures, corresponding to different proton diffusion properties, were measured and were compared to the three main theoretical models (the motional averaging regime, the static dephasing regime, and the partial refocusing model) with good qualitative agreement. However, a real quantitative agreement was not observed, probably because of the complexity of these nanoparticulate systems. The Roch theory, developed in the motional averaging regime (MAR), was also successfully used to fit T 1 nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) profiles, even outside the MAR validity range, and provided a good estimate of the particle size. On the other hand, the simultaneous fitting of T 1 and T 2 NMRD profiles by the theory was impossible, and this occurrence constitutes a clear limitation of the Roch model. Finally, the theory was shown to satisfactorily fit the deuterium T 1 NMRD profile of superparamagnetic particle suspensions in heavy water.

  4. NMR relaxation induced by iron oxide particles: testing theoretical models.

    PubMed

    Gossuin, Y; Orlando, T; Basini, M; Henrard, D; Lascialfari, A; Mattea, C; Stapf, S; Vuong, Q L

    2016-04-15

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide particles find their main application as contrast agents for cellular and molecular magnetic resonance imaging. The contrast they bring is due to the shortening of the transverse relaxation time T 2 of water protons. In order to understand their influence on proton relaxation, different theoretical relaxation models have been developed, each of them presenting a certain validity domain, which depends on the particle characteristics and proton dynamics. The validation of these models is crucial since they allow for predicting the ideal particle characteristics for obtaining the best contrast but also because the fitting of T 1 experimental data by the theory constitutes an interesting tool for the characterization of the nanoparticles. In this work, T 2 of suspensions of iron oxide particles in different solvents and at different temperatures, corresponding to different proton diffusion properties, were measured and were compared to the three main theoretical models (the motional averaging regime, the static dephasing regime, and the partial refocusing model) with good qualitative agreement. However, a real quantitative agreement was not observed, probably because of the complexity of these nanoparticulate systems. The Roch theory, developed in the motional averaging regime (MAR), was also successfully used to fit T 1 nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) profiles, even outside the MAR validity range, and provided a good estimate of the particle size. On the other hand, the simultaneous fitting of T 1 and T 2 NMRD profiles by the theory was impossible, and this occurrence constitutes a clear limitation of the Roch model. Finally, the theory was shown to satisfactorily fit the deuterium T 1 NMRD profile of superparamagnetic particle suspensions in heavy water.

  5. NMR relaxation induced by iron oxide particles: testing theoretical models.

    PubMed

    Gossuin, Y; Orlando, T; Basini, M; Henrard, D; Lascialfari, A; Mattea, C; Stapf, S; Vuong, Q L

    2016-04-15

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide particles find their main application as contrast agents for cellular and molecular magnetic resonance imaging. The contrast they bring is due to the shortening of the transverse relaxation time T 2 of water protons. In order to understand their influence on proton relaxation, different theoretical relaxation models have been developed, each of them presenting a certain validity domain, which depends on the particle characteristics and proton dynamics. The validation of these models is crucial since they allow for predicting the ideal particle characteristics for obtaining the best contrast but also because the fitting of T 1 experimental data by the theory constitutes an interesting tool for the characterization of the nanoparticles. In this work, T 2 of suspensions of iron oxide particles in different solvents and at different temperatures, corresponding to different proton diffusion properties, were measured and were compared to the three main theoretical models (the motional averaging regime, the static dephasing regime, and the partial refocusing model) with good qualitative agreement. However, a real quantitative agreement was not observed, probably because of the complexity of these nanoparticulate systems. The Roch theory, developed in the motional averaging regime (MAR), was also successfully used to fit T 1 nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) profiles, even outside the MAR validity range, and provided a good estimate of the particle size. On the other hand, the simultaneous fitting of T 1 and T 2 NMRD profiles by the theory was impossible, and this occurrence constitutes a clear limitation of the Roch model. Finally, the theory was shown to satisfactorily fit the deuterium T 1 NMRD profile of superparamagnetic particle suspensions in heavy water. PMID:26933908

  6. Proton zero-quantum 2D NMR of 2-propenenitrile aligned by an electric field. Determination of the 2H and 14N quadrupole coupling constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruessink, B. H.; De Kanter, F. J. J.; MaClean, C.

    Zero-quantum NMR, selectively detected by 2D NMR, is applied to observe small 1H- 1H dipolar couplings in a polar liquid partially oriented by a strong electric field. The normal (single-quantum) 1H spectrum is severely broadened, which prevents the observation of small couplings. The results from the zero-quantum proton spectrum are used to calculate the 2H and 14N quadrupole coupling constants of 2-deutero-2-propenenitrile from the 2H and 14N NMR spectra.

  7. Relaxation dynamics in the frustrated Cr9 antiferromagnetic ring probed by NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garlatti, E.; Bordignon, S.; Carretta, S.; Allodi, G.; Amoretti, G.; De Renzi, R.; Lascialfari, A.; Furukawa, Y.; Timco, G. A.; Woolfson, R.; Winpenny, R. E. P.; Santini, P.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the magnetic properties and the phonon-induced relaxation dynamics of the first regular Cr9 antiferromagnetic (AF) ring, which represents a prototype frustrated AF ring. Geometrical frustration in Cr9 yields an energy spectrum with twofold degenerate low-lying levels and a low-spin ground state. The electronic relaxation dynamics is probed by 1H -NMR through the temperature dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation rate 1 /T1 . We develop a microscopic model that reproduces 1 /T1(T ) curves, taking also into account the wipeout effect. By interpreting these measurements we determine the spin-phonon coupling strength and we investigate the decay of the cluster magnetization due to the spin-phonon interaction. We find that at very low temperatures, the relaxation is characterized by a single dominating Arrhenius-type relaxation process, whereas several relevant processes emerge at higher temperatures. In addition, we calculate the temperature and magnetic field dependence of level lifetimes.

  8. Anomalous NMR relaxation in cartilage matrix components and native cartilage: Fractional-order models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magin, Richard L.; Li, Weiguo; Pilar Velasco, M.; Trujillo, Juan; Reiter, David A.; Morgenstern, Ashley; Spencer, Richard G.

    2011-06-01

    We present a fractional-order extension of the Bloch equations to describe anomalous NMR relaxation phenomena ( T1 and T2). The model has solutions in the form of Mittag-Leffler and stretched exponential functions that generalize conventional exponential relaxation. Such functions have been shown by others to be useful for describing dielectric and viscoelastic relaxation in complex, heterogeneous materials. Here, we apply these fractional-order T1 and T2 relaxation models to experiments performed at 9.4 and 11.7 Tesla on type I collagen gels, chondroitin sulfate mixtures, and to bovine nasal cartilage (BNC), a largely isotropic and homogeneous form of cartilage. The results show that the fractional-order analysis captures important features of NMR relaxation that are typically described by multi-exponential decay models. We find that the T2 relaxation of BNC can be described in a unique way by a single fractional-order parameter ( α), in contrast to the lack of uniqueness of multi-exponential fits in the realistic setting of a finite signal-to-noise ratio. No anomalous behavior of T1 was observed in BNC. In the single-component gels, for T2 measurements, increasing the concentration of the largest components of cartilage matrix, collagen and chondroitin sulfate, results in a decrease in α, reflecting a more restricted aqueous environment. The quality of the curve fits obtained using Mittag-Leffler and stretched exponential functions are in some cases superior to those obtained using mono- and bi-exponential models. In both gels and BNC, α appears to account for micro-structural complexity in the setting of an altered distribution of relaxation times. This work suggests the utility of fractional-order models to describe T2 NMR relaxation processes in biological tissues.

  9. Nanoscale coordination polymers exhibiting luminescence properties and NMR relaxivity.

    PubMed

    Chelebaeva, Elena; Larionova, Joulia; Guari, Yannick; Ferreira, Rute A S; Carlos, Luis D; Trifonov, Alexander A; Kalaivani, Thangavel; Lascialfari, Alessandro; Guérin, Christian; Molvinger, Karine; Datas, Lucien; Maynadier, Marie; Gary-Bobo, Magali; Garcia, Marcel

    2011-03-01

    This article presents the first example of ultra-small (3-4 nm) magneto-luminescent cyano-bridged coordination polymer nanoparticles Ln0.33(3+)Gdx3+/[Mo(CN)8]3- (Ln=Eu (x=0.34), Tb (x=0.35)) enwrapped by a natural biocompatible polymer chitosan. The aqueous colloidal solutions of these nanoparticles present a luminescence characteristic of the corresponding lanthanides (5D0→7F0-4 (Eu3+) or the 5D4→7F6-2 (Tb3+)) under UV excitation and a green luminescence of the chitosan shell under excitation in the visible region. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) efficiency, i.e. the nuclear relaxivity, measurements performed for Ln0.33(3+)Gdx3+/[Mo(CN)8]3- nanoparticles show r1p and r2p relaxivities slightly higher than or comparable to the ones of the commercial paramagnetic compounds Gd-DTPA® or Omniscan® indicating that our samples may potentially be considered as a positive contrast agent for MRI. The in vitro studies performed on these nanoparticles show that they maybe internalized into human cancer and normal cells and well detected by fluorescence at the single cell level. They present high stability even at low pH and lack of cytotoxicity both in human cancer and normal cells.

  10. NMR permeability estimators in `chalk' carbonate rocks obtained under different relaxation times and MICP size scalings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios, Edmilson Helton; Figueiredo, Irineu; Moss, Adam Keith; Pritchard, Timothy Neil; Glassborow, Brent Anthony; Domingues, Ana Beatriz Guedes; Azeredo, Rodrigo Bagueira de Vasconcellos

    2016-07-01

    The effect of the selection of different nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation times for permeability estimation is investigated for a set of fully brine-saturated rocks acquired from Cretaceous carbonate reservoirs in the North Sea and Middle East. Estimators that are obtained from the relaxation times based on the Pythagorean means are compared with estimators that are obtained from the relaxation times based on the concept of a cumulative saturation cut-off. Select portions of the longitudinal (T1) and transverse (T2) relaxation-time distributions are systematically evaluated by applying various cut-offs, analogous to the Winland-Pittman approach for mercury injection capillary pressure (MICP) curves. Finally, different approaches to matching the NMR and MICP distributions using different mean-based scaling factors are validated based on the performance of the related size-scaled estimators. The good results that were obtained demonstrate possible alternatives to the commonly adopted logarithmic mean estimator and reinforce the importance of NMR-MICP integration to improving carbonate permeability estimates.

  11. NMR permeability estimators in 'chalk' carbonate rocks obtained under different relaxation times and MICP size scalings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios, Edmilson Helton; Figueiredo, Irineu; Moss, Adam Keith; Pritchard, Timothy Neil; Glassborow, Brent Anthony; Guedes Domingues, Ana Beatriz; Bagueira de Vasconcellos Azeredo, Rodrigo

    2016-07-01

    The effect of the selection of different nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation times for permeability estimation is investigated for a set of fully brine-saturated rocks acquired from Cretaceous carbonate reservoirs in the North Sea and Middle East. Estimators that are obtained from the relaxation times based on the Pythagorean means are compared with estimators that are obtained from the relaxation times based on the concept of a cumulative saturation cut-off. Select portions of the longitudinal (T1) and transverse (T2) relaxation-time distributions are systematically evaluated by applying various cut-offs, analogous to the Winland-Pittman approach for mercury injection capillary pressure (MICP) curves. Finally, different approaches to matching the NMR and MICP distributions using different mean-based scaling factors are validated based on the performance of the related size-scaled estimators. The good results that were obtained demonstrate possible alternatives to the commonly adopted logarithmic mean estimator and reinforce the importance of NMR-MICP integration to improving carbonate permeability estimates.

  12. 1H NMR Relaxation Investigation of Inhibitors Interacting with Torpedo californica Acetylcholinesterase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delfini, Maurizio; Gianferri, Raffaella; Dubbini, Veronica; Manetti, Cesare; Gaggelli, Elena; Valensin, Gianni

    2000-05-01

    Two naphthyridines interacting with Torpedo californica acetylcholinesterase (AChE) were investigated. 1H NMR spectra were recorded and nonselective, selective, and double-selective spin-lattice relaxation rates were measured. The enhancement of selective relaxation rates could be titrated by different ligand concentrations at constant AChE (yielding 0.22 and 1.53 mM for the dissociation constants) and was providing evidence of a diverse mode of interaction. The double-selective relaxation rates were used to evaluate the motional correlation times of bound ligands at 34.9 and 36.5 ns at 300 K. Selective relaxation rates of bound inhibitors could be interpreted also in terms of dipole-dipole interactions with protons in the enzyme active site.

  13. Dependence on chain length of NMR relaxation times in mixtures of alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freed, Denise E.

    2007-05-01

    Many naturally occurring fluids, such as crude oils, consist of a very large number of components. It is often of interest to determine the composition of the fluids in situ. Diffusion coefficients and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation times can be measured in situ and depend on the size of the molecules. It has been shown [D. E. Freed et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 067602 (2005)] that the diffusion coefficient of each component in a mixture of alkanes follows a scaling law in the chain length of that molecule and in the mean chain length of the mixture, and these relations were used to determine the chain length distribution of crude oils from NMR diffusion measurements. In this paper, the behavior of NMR relaxation times in mixtures of chain molecules is addressed. The author explains why one would expect scaling laws for the transverse and longitudinal relaxation times of mixtures of short chain molecules and mixtures of alkanes, in particular. It is shown how the power law dependence on the chain length can be calculated from the scaling laws for the translational diffusion coefficients. The author fits the literature data for NMR relaxation in binary mixtures of alkanes and finds that its dependence on chain length agrees with the theory. Lastly, it is shown how the scaling laws in the chain length and the mean chain length can be used to determine the chain length distribution in crude oils that are high in saturates. A good fit is obtained between the NMR-derived chain length distributions and the ones from gas chromatography.

  14. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure. Progress report, April 1, 1992--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1992-09-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. Four major areas of inquiry are being pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups that determine the reactivity of coals. Special attention is being paid to methods that are compatible with the very high magic angle sample spinning rates needed for operation at the high magnetic field strengths available today. Polarization inversion methods utilizing the difference in heat capacities of small groups of spins are particularly promising. Methods combining proton-proton spin diffusion with {sup 13}C CPMAS readout are being developed to determine the connectivity of functional groups in coals in a high sensitivity relay type of experiment. Additional work is aimed at delineating the role of methyl group rotation in the proton NMR relaxation behavior of coals.

  15. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure. Progress report, January 1, 1992--March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1992-07-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. Four major areas of inquiry are being pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups that determine the reactivity of coals. Special attention is being paid to methods that are compatible with the very high magic angle sample spinning rates needed for operation at the high magnetic field strengths available today. Polarization inversion methods utilizing the difference in heat capacities of small groups of spins are particularly promising. Methods combining proton-proton spin diffusion with {sup 13}C CPMAS readout are being developed to determine the connectivity of functional groups in coals in a high sensitivity relay type of experiment. Additional work is aimed at delineating the role of methyl group rotation in the proton NMR relaxation behavior of coals.

  16. Heteronuclear Cross-Relaxation Effects in the NMR Spectroscopy of Hyperpolarized Targets

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Kevin J.; Lupulescu, Adonis; Frydman, Lucio

    2016-01-01

    Dissolution DNP enables high-sensitivity solution phase NMR experiments on long-lived nuclear spin species such as 15N and 13C. This report explores certain features arising in solution-state 1H NMR, upon polarizing low-γ nuclear species. Following solid state hyperpolarization of both 13C and 1H, solution-phase 1H NMR experiments on dissolved samples revealed transient effects whereby peaks arising from protons bonded to the naturally-occurring 13C nuclei, appeared larger than the typically dominant 12C-bonded 1H resonances. This enhancement of the satellite-peaks was examined in detail, with respect to a variety of mechanisms that could potentially originate it. Both two- and three-spin phenomena active in the solid state could lead to this kind of effect; still, experimental observations revealed that the enhancement originates from 13C→1H polarization transfer processes active in the liquid state. Kinetic equations based on modified heteronuclear cross-relaxation models were examined, and found to describe well the distinct patterns of growth and decay shown by the 13C-bound 1H NMR satellite resonances. The dynamics of these novel cross-relaxation phenomena were determined, and their potential usefulness as tools for investigating hyperpolarized ensembles and for obtaining enhanced-sensitivity 1H NMR traces, is explored. PMID:24403222

  17. Differential scanning calorimetry and /sup 2/H NMR studies of the phase behavior of gramicidin-phosphatidylcholine mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Morrow, M.R.; Davis, J.H.

    1988-03-22

    The extents of two-phase coexistence in the phase diagrams of mixtures of gramicidin with 1,2-bis(perdeuteriopalmitoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC-d62) and with 1,2-bis(perdeuteriomyristoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC-d54) mixtures have been explored with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance (/sup 2/H NMR). For both systems, increased gramicidin content causes a decrease in transition enthalpy and a broadening of the peak in excess heat capacity at the transition. In DMPC-d54-based mixtures, the broadening is roughly symmetric about the pure lipid transition temperature. Addition of gramicidin to DPPC-d62 extends the excess heat capacity peak on the low-temperature side, resulting in a slightly asymmetric scan. Deuterium NMR spectra showing a superposition of gel and liquid-crystalline components, observed for both mixtures, indicate the presence of two-phase coexistence. For the DPPC-d62-based mixtures, two-phase coexistence is restricted to an approximately 2 degrees C temperature range below the pure transition temperature. For DMPC-d54-based mixtures, the region of two-phase coexistence is even narrower. For both mixtures, beyond a gramicidin mole fraction of 2%, distinct gel and liquid-crystal contributions to the spectra cannot be distinguished. Along with the broad featureless nature of the DSC scan in this region, this is taken to indicate that the transition has been replaced by a continuous phase change. These results are consistent with the existence of a closed two-phase region having a critical concentration of gramicidin below 2 mol%.

  18. Orientation and dynamics of benzyl alcohol and benzyl alkyl ethers dissolved in nematic lyotropic liquid crystals. 2H NMR and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Ahumada, H; Montecinos, R; Tieleman, D P; Weiss-López, B E

    2005-08-01

    Most drugs have to cross cell membranes to reach their final target. A better understanding of the distribution, interactions, and dynamics of biologically active molecules in model bilayers is of fundamental importance in understanding drug functioning and design. 2H NMR quadrupole splittings (delta nu(Q)) and longitudinal relaxation times (T1) from the aromatic ring of benzyl alcohol-d5 (C0), a commonly used anesthetic, and a series of linear alkyl benzyl-d5 ethers with chain lengths from 1 to 12 carbon atoms (C1-C12), were measured. The molecules were dissolved in a nematic discotic lyotropic liquid crystal solution made of tetradecyltrimethylammonium chloride (TTAC)/decanol (DeOH)/NaCl/H2O. Values of delta nu(Q) and T1 from 1,1-dideuteriodecanol (15% enriched) and DHO (H2O with 0.2% D2O) were also measured. Delta nu(Q) of DeOH and DHO remained constant throughout the series. The value of delta nu(Q) of the para position of the ring (delta nu(p)) in C1 is 30% smaller than the delta nu(p) of C0. This is attributed to the existence of an H-bond between the alcohol hydroxyl proton and the solvent, which influences the average orientation of the ring. The relaxation data show that T1o,m is always longer than T1p and both decrease with the increase in alkyl chain length. Molecular dynamics simulations of the experimentally studied systems were performed. The aggregate was represented as a bilayer. The distribution, average orientation, and order parameters of the aromatic ring of the guest molecules in the bilayer were examined. Rotational correlation functions of all the C-D bonds and the OH bond from H2O were evaluated, allowing an estimate of the correlation times and T1. According to these results all spins relax in extreme narrowing conditions, except DeOH. Experimental and calculated T1 values differ at most by a factor of 3. However, the order of magnitude and the observed trends are well reproduced by the calculations. The aromatic ring of C0 possesses a

  19. NMR relaxation investigation of the native corn starch structure with plasticizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cioica, N.; Fechete, R.; Cota, C.; Nagy, E. M.; David, L.; Cozar, O.

    2013-07-01

    The influences of starch, glycerol and water ratios on the structure, morphology and dynamics of starch polymer chains were investigated by NMR relaxation method. The 1H NMR CPMG echo decays and saturation recovery build-up curves were recorded and analyzed using the UPIN algorithm in order to get the spin-spin T2 and spin-lattice T1 relaxation times distributions. Significant differences between the CPMG curves were observed for native starch and the formulas in which water is added, whether these have or not glycerol in composition. For the formula which contains both plasticizers (water and glycerol), the CPMG curves decay slowly, indicating the presence of more mobile components.

  20. The generalized Phillips-Twomey method for NMR relaxation time inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yang; Xiao, Lizhi; Zhang, Yi; Xie, Qingming

    2016-10-01

    The inversion of NMR relaxation time involves the Fredholm integral equation of the first kind. Due to its ill-posedness, numerical solutions to this type of equations are often found much less accurate and bear little resemblance to the true solution. There has been a strong interest in finding a well-posed method for this ill-posed problem since 1950s. In this paper, we prove the existence, the uniqueness, the stability and the convergence of the generalized Phillips-Twomey regularization method for solving this type of equations. Numerical simulations and core analyses arising from NMR transverse relaxation time inversion are conducted to show the effectiveness of the generalized Phillips-Twomey method. Both the simulation results and the core analyses agree well with the model and the realities.

  1. NMR measurement of oil shale magnetic relaxation at high magnetic field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seymour, Joseph D.; Washburn, Kathryn E.; Kirkland, Catherine M.; Vogt, Sarah J.; Birdwell, Justin E.; Codd, Sarah L.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) at low field is used extensively to provide porosity and pore-size distributions in reservoir rocks. For unconventional resources, due to low porosity and permeability of the samples, much of the signal exists at very short T2 relaxation times. In addition, the organic content of many shales will also produce signal at short relaxation times. Despite recent improvements in low-field technology, limitations still exist that make it difficult to account for all hydrogen-rich constituents in very tight rocks, such as shales. The short pulses and dead times along with stronger gradients available when using high-field NMR equipment provides a more complete measurement of hydrogen-bearing phases due to the ability to probe shorter T2 relaxation times (-5 sec) than can be examined using low-field equipment. Access to these shorter T2 times allows for confirmation of partially resolved peaks observed in low-field NMR data that have been attributed to solid organic phases in oil shales. High-field (300 MHz or 7 T) NMR measurements of spin-spin T2 and spin-lattice T1 magnetic relaxation of raw and artificially matured oil shales have potential to provide data complementary to low field (2 MHz or 0.05T) measurements. Measurements of high-field T2 and T1-T2 correlations are presented. These data can be interpreted in terms of organic matter phases and mineral-bound water known to be present in the shale samples, as confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and show distributions of hydrogen-bearing phases present in the shales that are similar to those observed in low field measurements.

  2. Longitudinal-relaxation-enhanced NMR experiments for the study of nucleic acids in solution.

    PubMed

    Farjon, Jonathan; Boisbouvier, Jérôme; Schanda, Paul; Pardi, Arthur; Simorre, Jean-Pierre; Brutscher, Bernhard

    2009-06-24

    Atomic-resolution information on the structure and dynamics of nucleic acids is essential for a better understanding of the mechanistic basis of many cellular processes. NMR spectroscopy is a powerful method for studying the structure and dynamics of nucleic acids; however, solution NMR studies are currently limited to relatively small nucleic acids at high concentrations. Thus, technological and methodological improvements that increase the experimental sensitivity and spectral resolution of NMR spectroscopy are required for studies of larger nucleic acids or protein-nucleic acid complexes. Here we introduce a series of imino-proton-detected NMR experiments that yield an over 2-fold increase in sensitivity compared to conventional pulse schemes. These methods can be applied to the detection of base pair interactions, RNA-ligand titration experiments, measurement of residual dipolar (15)N-(1)H couplings, and direct measurements of conformational transitions. These NMR experiments employ longitudinal spin relaxation enhancement techniques that have proven useful in protein NMR spectroscopy. The performance of these new experiments is demonstrated for a 10 kDa TAR-TAR*(GA) RNA kissing complex and a 26 kDa tRNA.

  3. Effect of divalent cations on the structure of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylcholine/phosphatidylglycerol bilayers: An 2H-NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Zidovetzki, R.; Atiya, A.W.; De Boeck, H. )

    1989-01-01

    The interactions of CaCl2 or MgCl2 with multilamellar phospholipid bilayers were studied by 2H-NMR. Two model membrane systems were used: (1) dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayers and (2) bilayers composed of a mixture of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol at a molar ratio of 5:1. Addition of 0.25 M CaCl2 to DPPC bilayers resulted in significant uniform increase of the order parameters of the lipid side chains; the effect of 0.25 M MgCl2 was insignificant. Both phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol components of the mixed bilayers were affected by the presence of 0.25 M CaCl2 and, to a much smaller degree, by MgCl2. The addition of Ca2+ induced significantly larger increase of the order parameters of the phosphatidylcholine component. The results are consistent with the long-range effects of Ca2+ binding on the packing of the lipid membranes.

  4. Achievement of high nuclear spin polarization using lanthanides as low-temperature NMR relaxation agents.

    PubMed

    Peat, David T; Horsewill, Anthony J; Köckenberger, Walter; Perez Linde, Angel J; Gadian, David G; Owers-Bradley, John R

    2013-05-28

    Many approaches are now available for achieving high levels of nuclear spin polarization. One of these methods is based on the notion that as the temperature is reduced, the equilibrium nuclear polarization will increase, according to the Boltzmann distribution. The main problem with this approach is the length of time it may take to approach thermal equilibrium at low temperatures, since nuclear relaxation times (characterized by the spin-lattice relaxation time T1) can become very long. Here, we show, by means of relaxation time measurements of frozen solutions, that selected lanthanide ions, in the form of their chelates with DTPA, can act as effective relaxation agents at low temperatures. Differential effects are seen with the different lanthanides that were tested, holmium and dysprosium showing highest relaxivity, while gadolinium is ineffective at temperatures of 20 K and below. These observations are consistent with the known electron-spin relaxation time characteristics of these lanthanides. The maximum relaxivity occurs at around 10 K for Ho-DTPA and 20 K for Dy-DTPA. Moreover, these two agents show only modest relaxivity at room temperature, and can thus be regarded as relaxation switches. We conclude that these agents can speed up solid state NMR experiments by reducing the T1 values of the relevant nuclei, and hence increasing the rate at which data can be acquired. They could also be of value in the context of a simple low-cost method of achieving several-hundred-fold improvements in polarization for experiments in which samples are pre-polarized at low temperatures, then rewarmed and dissolved immediately prior to analysis.

  5. Ultrafast NMR T1 Relaxation Measurements: Probing Molecular Properties in Real Time

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Pieter E. S.; Donovan, Kevin J.; Szekely, Or; Baias, Maria; Frydman, Lucio

    2016-01-01

    The longitudinal relaxation properties of NMR active nuclei carry useful information about the site-specific chemical environments and about the mobility of molecular fragments. Molecular mobility is in turn a key parameter reporting both on stable properties like size, as well as on dynamic ones such as transient interactions and irreversible aggregation. In order to fully investigate the latter, a fast sampling of the relaxation parameters of transiently formed molecular species may be needed. Nevertheless, the acquisition of longitudinal relaxation data is typically slow, being limited by the requirement that the time for which the nucleus relaxes be varied incrementally until a complete build-up curve is generated. Recently a number of single-shot inversion recovery methods have been developed capable of alleviating this need; still, these may be challenged by either spectral resolution restrictions or when coping with very fast relaxing nuclei. Here we present a new experiment to measure the T1s of multiple nuclear spins that experience fast longitudinal relaxation, while retaining full high-resolution chemical shift information. Good agreement is observed between T1s measured with conventional means and T1s measured using the new technique. The method is applied to the real time investigation of the reaction between D-xylose and sodium borate, which is in turn elucidated with the aid of ancillary ultrafast and conventional 2D TOCSY measurements. PMID:23878001

  6. Dynamic NMR of low-sensitivity fast-relaxing nuclei: (17)O NMR and DFT study of acetoxysilanes.

    PubMed

    Fusaro, Luca; Mameli, Giulia; Mocci, Francesca; Luhmer, Michel; Cerioni, Giovanni

    2012-02-01

    (17)O NMR is not routinely used for structure characterization, and kinetic studies of fluxional organic compounds are seldom undertaken because poor sensitivity and fast quadrupole relaxation are frequently regarded as intractable issues. This work shows how, nowadays, quantitative (17)O dynamic NMR studies on small organic molecules are feasible without enrichment being needed. It reports on acetoxysilanes, a class of fluxional compounds whose structure and dynamics were to be clarified. Natural abundance (17)O NMR spectra were recorded over a wide range of temperatures using standard instrumentation. The analysis relies on simple linewidth measurements and directly provides the activation parameters. The activation enthalpy is found to decrease with increasing number of acetoxy groups bound to silicon. Density functional theory calculations properly predict this trend and show that a single oxygen atom of the acetoxy group is bound to silicon, excluding chelation as binding mode, and that the dynamic process involves the shift of the silicon atom between the two oxygen atoms of the acetoxy group.

  7. Rotational Dynamics in Ionic Liquids from NMR Relaxation Experiments and Simulations: Benzene and 1-Ethyl-3-Methylimidazolium.

    PubMed

    Rumble, Christopher A; Kaintz, Anne; Yadav, Sharad K; Conway, Brian; Araque, Juan C; Baker, Gary A; Margulis, Claudio; Maroncelli, Mark

    2016-09-01

    Temperature-dependent (2)H longitudinal spin relaxation times (T1) of dilute benzene-d6 in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([Im41][BF4]) and two deuterated variants of the 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium cation (Im21(+)-d1 and Im21(+)-d6) in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([Im21][Tf2N]), measured at multiple Larmor frequencies, were used to probe rotational dynamics in ionic liquids. Rotational correlation times significantly faster than predicted by slip hydrodynamic calculations were observed for both solutes. Molecular dynamics simulations of these systems enabled extraction of more information about the rotational dynamics from the NMR data than rotation times alone. The multifrequency (2)H T1(T) data could be fit to within uncertainties over a broad region about the T1 minimum using models of the relevant rotational time correlation functions and their viscosity/temperature dependence derived from simulation. Such simulation-guided fitting provided confidence in the semiquantitative accuracy of the simulation models and enabled interpretation of NMR measurements to higher viscosities than previously possible. Simulations of the benzene system were therefore used to explore the nature of solute rotation in ionic liquids and how it might differ from rotation in conventional solvents. Whereas "spinning" about the C6 axis of benzene senses similarly weak solvent friction in both types of solvents, "tumbling" (rotations about in-plane axes) differs significantly in conventional solvents and ionic liquids. In the sluggish environment provided by ionic liquids, orientational caging and the presence of rare but influential large-amplitude (180°) jumps about in-plane axes lead to rotations being markedly nondiffusive, especially below room temperature. PMID:27509215

  8. Measurement of longitudinal relaxation times in crowded 1H NMR spectra using one- and two-dimensional maximum quantum (MAXY) NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Maili; Ye, Chaohui; Farrant, R. Duncan; Nicholson, Jeremy K.; Lindon, John C.

    Methods for measuring longitudinal relaxation times of protons in heavily overlapped 1H NMR spectra are introduced and exemplified using a solution of cholesteryl acetate. The methods are based on 1-dimensional and 2-dimensional maximum quantum NMR spectroscopy (MAXY), which makes possible the selective detection of CH, CH2 and CH31H NMR resonances. A modification of the BIRD pulse sequence to achieve selective inversion of protons bonded to either 12C or 13C is given. The approach should find application in studies of molecular dynamics where isotopic enrichment is not possible and the level of available sample dictates the use of 1H NMR spectroscopy.

  9. NMR relaxation study of water dynamics in superparamagnetic iron-oxide-loaded vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Wen; Hsieh, Chu-Jung; Lin, Chao-Min; Hwang, Dennis W.

    2013-02-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles have been introduced as contrast agents for clinical applications in magnetic resonance imaging. Recently, SPIO has been also used for tracking cells. However, NMR relaxation of water molecules behaves differently in a SPIO solution and SPIO-loaded cells. In this study, we used water-in-oil-in-water double emulsions to mimic cellular environments. The MR relaxation induced by the SPIO-loaded vesicles and SPIO solution indicates that T2* is sensitive to the iron concentration alone, and the behavior was very similar in both SPIO-loaded vesicles and SPIO solution. However, T2 relaxation of water in SPIO-loaded vesicles was faster than that in a SPIO solution. In addition, the contribution of water inside and outside the vesicles was clarified by replacing H2O with D2O, and water inside the vesicles was found to cause a nonlinear iron concentration dependency. The studied dilution revealed that vesicle aggregation undergoes a structural transition upon dilution by a certain amount of water. R2* relaxation is sensitive to this structural change and shows an obvious nonlinear iron concentration dependency when the SPIO loading is sufficiently high. Random walk simulations demonstrated that in the assumed model, the vesicles aggregate structures causing the differences between R2* and R2 relaxation of water in vesicles in the presence of SPIO particles.

  10. Temperature dependence of proton NMR relaxation times at earth's magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedbalski, Peter; Kiswandhi, Andhika; Parish, Christopher; Ferguson, Sarah; Cervantes, Eduardo; Oomen, Anisha; Krishnan, Anagha; Goyal, Aayush; Lumata, Lloyd

    The theoretical description of relaxation processes for protons, well established and experimentally verified at conventional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) fields, has remained untested at low fields despite significant advances in low field NMR technology. In this study, proton spin-lattice relaxation (T1) times in pure water and water doped with varying concentrations of the paramagnetic agent copper chloride have been measured from 6 to 92oC at earth's magnetic field (1700 Hz). Results show a linear increase of T1 with temperature for each of the samples studied. Increasing the concentration of the copper chloride greatly reduced T1 and reduced dependence on temperature. The consistency of the results with theory is an important confirmation of past results, while the ability of an ultra-low field NMR system to do contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is promising for future applicability to low-cost medical imaging and chemical identification. This work is supported by US Dept of Defense Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0048 and the Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant No. AT-1877.

  11. Boron-11 NMR of borocaptate: relaxation and in vivo detection in melanoma-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Bendel, P; Frantz, A; Zilberstein, J; Kabalka, G W; Salomon, Y

    1998-03-01

    Longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates for the 11B resonances in sodium borocaptate (BSH) at varying concentrations were measured in undiluted horse serum in a 4.7 Tesla field. The results could be fit by a model that assumes fast exchange of the BSH molecule between a free and a bound state, using values of 0.77+/-0.7 MHz for the 11B quadrupole coupling constant and (6.3+/-0.9) x 10(-9) s for the rotational correlation time in the bound state. These results were used as a basis for assessing the requirements and limitations of quantitative determination of BSH concentrations in vivo, using 11B NMR. Surface coil 11B NMR spectroscopy was performed on a total of 14 mice injected with BSH. Some of the animals (n=9) had implanted M2R melanoma tumors grown to various sizes in the rear thigh, in which case the surface coil was placed against the tumor, whereas for the other animals (without tumor), the coil was placed against the rear thigh muscle. NMR spectra were acquired under fully relaxed conditions. The spectra were quantitated by peak integration; apparent absolute BSH concentrations were derived by comparison with spectra from a phantom with known BSH concentration, using extrapolation of the time-domain data to zero preacquisition delay. The results indicate significantly higher 11B BSH signal intensities in tumors, compared with muscle tissue, whereas the uptake and clearance kinetics were similar.

  12. Plastic ice in confined geometry: the evidence from neutron diffraction and NMR relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webber, J. Beau W.; Dore, John C.; Strange, John H.; Anderson, Ross; Tohidi, Bahman

    2007-10-01

    Neutron diffraction and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation studies have been made of water/ice in mesoporous SBA-15 silica with ordered structures of cylindrical mesopores with a pore diameter ~8.6 nm, over the temperature range 180-300 K. Both measurements show similar depressed freezing and melting points due to the Gibb-Thomson effect. The neutron diffraction measurements for fully filled pores show, in addition to cubic and hexagonal crystalline ice, the presence of a disordered water/ice component extending a further 50-80 K, down to around or below 200 K. NMR relaxation measurements over the same temperature range show a free induction decay that is partly Gaussian and characteristic of brittle ice but that also exhibits a longer exponential relaxation component. An argument has been made (Liu et al 2006 J. Phys:. Condens. Matter 18 10009-28 Webber et al 2007 Magn. Reson. Imag. 25 533-6) to suggest that this is an observation of ice in a plastic or rotationally mobile state, and that there is a fully reversible inter-conversion between brittle and plastic states of ice as the temperature is lowered or raised. More recent detailed NMR measurements are also discussed that allow the extraction of activation enthalpies and an estimate to be made of the equilibrium thickness, as a function of temperature, if the the assumption is made that the plastic component is in the form of a layer at the silica interface. The two different techniques suggest a maximum layer thickness of about 1.0-1.5 nm.

  13. Microscopic insights into the NMR relaxation-based protein conformational entropy meter.

    PubMed

    Kasinath, Vignesh; Sharp, Kim A; Wand, A Joshua

    2013-10-01

    Conformational entropy is a potentially important thermodynamic parameter contributing to protein function. Quantitative measures of conformational entropy are necessary for an understanding of its role but have been difficult to obtain. An empirical method that utilizes changes in conformational dynamics as a proxy for changes in conformational entropy has recently been introduced. Here we probe the microscopic origins of the link between conformational dynamics and conformational entropy using molecular dynamics simulations. Simulation of seven proteins gave an excellent correlation with measures of side-chain motion derived from NMR relaxation. The simulations show that the motion of methyl-bearing side chains are sufficiently coupled to that of other side chains to serve as excellent reporters of the overall side-chain conformational entropy. These results tend to validate the use of experimentally accessible measures of methyl motion--the NMR-derived generalized order parameters--as a proxy from which to derive changes in protein conformational entropy.

  14. Requirements on paramagnetic relaxation enhancement data for membrane protein structure determination by NMR.

    PubMed

    Gottstein, Daniel; Reckel, Sina; Dötsch, Volker; Güntert, Peter

    2012-06-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structure calculations of the α-helical integral membrane proteins DsbB, GlpG, and halorhodopsin show that distance restraints from paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) can provide sufficient structural information to determine their structure with an accuracy of about 1.5 Å in the absence of other long-range conformational restraints. Our systematic study with simulated NMR data shows that about one spin label per transmembrane helix is necessary for obtaining enough PRE distance restraints to exclude wrong topologies, such as pseudo mirror images, if only limited other NMR restraints are available. Consequently, an experimentally realistic amount of PRE data enables α-helical membrane protein structure determinations that would not be feasible with the very limited amount of conventional NOESY data normally available for these systems. These findings are in line with our recent first de novo NMR structure determination of a heptahelical integral membrane protein, proteorhodopsin, that relied extensively on PRE data.

  15. Structural fidelity and NMR relaxation analysis in a prototype RNA hairpin.

    PubMed

    Giambaşu, George M; York, Darrin M; Case, David A

    2015-05-01

    RNA hairpins are widespread and very stable motifs that contribute decisively to RNA folding and biological function. The GTP1G2C3A4C5U6U7C8G9G10U11G12C13C14 construct (with a central UUCG tetraloop) has been extensively studied by solution NMR, and offers and excellent opportunity to evaluate the structure and dynamical description afforded by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Here, we compare average structural parameters and NMR relaxation rates estimated from a series of multiple independent explicit solvent MD simulations using the two most recent RNA AMBER force fields (ff99 and ff10). Predicted overall tumbling times are ∼20% faster than those inferred from analysis of NMR data and follow the same trend when temperature and ionic strength is varied. The Watson-Crick stem and the "canonical" UUCG loop structure are maintained in most simulations including the characteristic syn conformation along the glycosidic bond of G9, although some key hydrogen bonds in the loop are partially disrupted. Our analysis pinpoints G9-G10 backbone conformations as a locus of discrepancies between experiment and simulation. In general the results for the more recent force-field parameters (ff10) are closer to experiment than those for the older ones (ff99). This work provides a comprehensive and detailed comparison of state of the art MD simulations against a wide variety of solution NMR measurements.

  16. Solvent dependence of rotational anisotropy and molecular geometry as probed by NMR cross-relaxation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, O.; Mutzenhardt, P.; Joly, J. P.; Canet, D.

    2002-05-01

    A medium size and rigid molecule (2,3-naphto-1,3-dioxole) has been selected for this study because full anisotropic reorientation is expected and because its symmetry elements dictate the orientation of the rotation-diffusion tensor. NMR measurements include direct cross-relaxation rates (which yield the three rotation-diffusion coefficients by assuming the length of CH bonds) and remote cross-relaxation rates (which, by using these rotation-diffusion coefficients, yield distances between a given carbon and remote protons). Two different solvents have been used: carbon disulfide and dimethyl sulfoxide. In both solvents, the same type of reorientation anisotropy is observed although with different ratios of rotation-diffusion coefficient values, presumably due to specific intermolecular interactions undergone by the dioxole ring. This would also explain geometrical variations at the level of this moiety.

  17. Local isotropic diffusion approximation for coupled internal and overall molecular motions in NMR spin relaxation.

    PubMed

    Gill, Michelle L; Palmer, Arthur G

    2014-09-25

    The present work demonstrates that NMR spin relaxation rate constants for molecules interconverting between states with different diffusion tensors can be modeled theoretically by combining orientational correlation functions for exchanging spherical molecules with locally isotropic approximations for the diffusion anisotropic tensors. The resulting expressions are validated by comparison with correlation functions obtained by Monte Carlo simulations and are accurate for moderate degrees of diffusion anisotropy typically encountered in investigations of globular proteins. The results are complementary to an elegant, but more complex, formalism that is accurate for all degrees of diffusion anisotropy [Ryabov, Y.; Clore, G. M.; Schwieters, C. D. J. Chem. Phys. 2012, 136, 034108].

  18. High resolution NMR study of T{sub 1} magnetic relaxation dispersion. IV. Proton relaxation in amino acids and Met-enkephalin pentapeptide

    SciTech Connect

    Pravdivtsev, Andrey N.; Yurkovskaya, Alexandra V.; Ivanov, Konstantin L.; Vieth, Hans-Martin

    2014-10-21

    Nuclear Magnetic Relaxation Dispersion (NMRD) of protons was studied in the pentapeptide Met-enkephalin and the amino acids, which constitute it. Experiments were run by using high-resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) in combination with fast field-cycling, thus enabling measuring NMRD curves for all individual protons. As in earlier works, Papers I–III, pronounced effects of intramolecular scalar spin-spin interactions, J-couplings, on spin relaxation were found. Notably, at low fields J-couplings tend to equalize the apparent relaxation rates within networks of coupled protons. In Met-enkephalin, in contrast to the free amino acids, there is a sharp increase in the proton T{sub 1}-relaxation times at high fields due to the changes in the regime of molecular motion. The experimental data are in good agreement with theory. From modelling the relaxation experiments we were able to determine motional correlation times of different residues in Met-enkephalin with atomic resolution. This allows us to draw conclusions about preferential conformation of the pentapeptide in solution, which is also in agreement with data from two-dimensional NMR experiments (rotating frame Overhauser effect spectroscopy). Altogether, our study demonstrates that high-resolution NMR studies of magnetic field-dependent relaxation allow one to probe molecular mobility in biomolecules with atomic resolution.

  19. The effects of bone on proton NMR relaxation times of surrounding liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, C. A.; Genant, H. K.; Dunham, J. S.

    1986-01-01

    Preliminary attempts by our group at UCSF to assess fat content of vertebral marrow in the lumbar spine using relaxation time information demonstrated that the presence of trabecular bone affects relaxation times. The objective of this work was a thorough study of the effects of bone on NMR relaxation characteristics of surrounding liquids. Trabecular bone from autopsy specimens was ground up and sifted into a series of powders with graded densities ranging from 0.3 gm/cc to 0.8 gm/cc. Each powder was placed first in n-saline and then in cottonseed oil. With spectroscopy, spin-lattice relaxation times (T1) and effective spin-spin relaxation times (T2*) were measured for each liquid in each bone powder. As bone density and surface to volume ratio increased, T1 decreased faster for saline than for oil. T2* decreased significantly for both water and oil as the surface to volume ratio increased. It was concluded that effects of water on T1 could be explained by a surface interaction at the bone/liquid interface, which restricted rotational and translational motion of nearby molecules. The T1s of oil were not affected since oil molecules are nonpolar, do not participate in significant intermolecular hydrogen bonding, and therefore would not be expected to interact strongly with the bone surface. Effects on T2* could be explained by local magnetic field inhomogeneities created by discontinuous magnetic susceptibility near the bone surface. These preliminary results suggest that water in contact with trabecular bone in vivo will exhibit shortened relaxation times.

  20. NMR longitudinal relaxation enhancement in metal halides by heteronuclear polarization exchange during magic-angle spinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shmyreva, Anna A.; Safdari, Majid; Furó, István; Dvinskikh, Sergey V.

    2016-06-01

    Orders of magnitude decrease of 207Pb and 199Hg NMR longitudinal relaxation times T1 upon magic-angle-spinning (MAS) are observed and systematically investigated in solid lead and mercury halides MeX2 (Me = Pb, Hg and X = Cl, Br, I). In lead(ii) halides, the most dramatic decrease of T1 relative to that in a static sample is in PbI2, while it is smaller but still significant in PbBr2, and not detectable in PbCl2. The effect is magnetic-field dependent but independent of the spinning speed in the range 200-15 000 Hz. The observed relaxation enhancement is explained by laboratory-frame heteronuclear polarization exchange due to crossing between energy levels of spin-1/2 metal nuclei and adjacent quadrupolar-spin halogen nuclei. The enhancement effect is also present in lead-containing organometal halide perovskites. Our results demonstrate that in affected samples, it is the relaxation data recorded under non-spinning conditions that characterize the local properties at the metal sites. A practical advantage of fast relaxation at slow MAS is that spectral shapes with orientational chemical shift anisotropy information well retained can be acquired within a shorter experimental time.

  1. NMR longitudinal relaxation enhancement in metal halides by heteronuclear polarization exchange during magic-angle spinning.

    PubMed

    Shmyreva, Anna A; Safdari, Majid; Furó, István; Dvinskikh, Sergey V

    2016-06-14

    Orders of magnitude decrease of (207)Pb and (199)Hg NMR longitudinal relaxation times T1 upon magic-angle-spinning (MAS) are observed and systematically investigated in solid lead and mercury halides MeX2 (Me = Pb, Hg and X = Cl, Br, I). In lead(ii) halides, the most dramatic decrease of T1 relative to that in a static sample is in PbI2, while it is smaller but still significant in PbBr2, and not detectable in PbCl2. The effect is magnetic-field dependent but independent of the spinning speed in the range 200-15 000 Hz. The observed relaxation enhancement is explained by laboratory-frame heteronuclear polarization exchange due to crossing between energy levels of spin-1/2 metal nuclei and adjacent quadrupolar-spin halogen nuclei. The enhancement effect is also present in lead-containing organometal halide perovskites. Our results demonstrate that in affected samples, it is the relaxation data recorded under non-spinning conditions that characterize the local properties at the metal sites. A practical advantage of fast relaxation at slow MAS is that spectral shapes with orientational chemical shift anisotropy information well retained can be acquired within a shorter experimental time.

  2. High temperature reaction kinetics of CN(v = 0) with C2H4 and C2H6 and vibrational relaxation of CN(v = 1) with Ar and He.

    PubMed

    Saidani, Ghassen; Kalugina, Yulia; Gardez, Aline; Biennier, Ludovic; Georges, Robert; Lique, François

    2013-03-28

    The investigation of the chemical complexity of hot environments, ranging from combustion flames to circumstellar envelopes of evolved stars, relies on the determination of the reaction kinetics and product branching ratio. We have designed a chemical reactor for the exploration of high temperature chemistry. This apparatus is employed in the present study to measure the reaction kinetics of the CN radical with C2H4 and C2H6 over the 300-1200 K temperature range. In our setup and in some environments, the CN radical is partially produced in a vibrationally excited state, before relaxing by collision with the surrounding gas. We complement the experimental kinetic studies of hydrocarbons reactions with CN(v = 0) with a theoretical study of vibrational relaxation of CN(v = 1) by He and Ar atoms, the main collisional partners in our apparatus. Calculations are carried out to determine the collisional elastic and inelastic cross sections versus the kinetic energy as well as the corresponding vibrationally elastic and inelastic rate coefficients. The results are compared with empirical calculations and with a few experimental observations. The range of validity of the empirical model is discussed and potential applications sketched.

  3. Orientational ordering of a banana-shaped solute molecule in a nematic calamitic solvent by {sup 2}H-NMR spectroscopy: An indication of glasslike behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Cinacchi, Giorgio; Domenici, Valentina

    2006-09-15

    The Saupe ordering matrix of a banana-shaped mesogenic molecule as a solute in a common nematic calamitic solvent has been determined by {sup 2}H-NMR spectroscopy as a function of temperature. The temperature dependence of the Saupe ordering matrix element associated with the principal molecular axis is consistent with a glassy behavior in the reorientational motion of this particular solute molecule. The Haller expression, appropriately modified, provides a good fit to the experimental data.

  4. Effects of pH and cholesterol on DMPA membranes: a solid state 2H- and 31P-NMR study.

    PubMed Central

    Pott, T; Maillet, J C; Dufourc, E J

    1995-01-01

    The effect of pH and cholesterol on the dimyristoylphosphatidic acid (DMPA) model membrane system has been investigated by solid state 2H- and 31P-NMR. It has been shown that each of the three protonation states of the DMPA molecule corresponds to a 31P-NMR powder pattern with characteristic delta sigma values; this implies additionally that the proton exchange on the membrane surface is slow on the NMR time scale (millisecond range). Under these conditions, the 2H-labeled lipid chains sense only one magnetic environment, indicating that the three spectra detected by 31P-NMR are related to charge-dependent local dynamics or orientations of the phosphate headgroup or both. Chain ordering in the fluid phase is also found to depend weakly on the charge at the interface. In addition, it has also been found that the first pK of the DMPA membrane is modified by changes in the lipid lateral packing (gel or fluid phases or in the presence of cholesterol) in contrast to the second pK. The incorporation of 30 mol% cholesterol affects the phosphatidic acid bilayer in a way similar to what has been reported for phosphatidylcholine/cholesterol membranes, but to an extent comparable to 10-20 mol % sterol in phosphatidylcholines. However, the orientation and molecular order parameter of cholesterol in DMPA are similar to those found in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine. PMID:8580333

  5. Selective photochemistry at stereogenic metal and ligand centers of cis-[Ru(diphosphine)2(H)2]: preparative, NMR, solid state, and laser flash studies.

    PubMed

    Câmpian, Marius V; Perutz, Robin N; Procacci, Barbara; Thatcher, Robert J; Torres, Olga; Whitwood, Adrian C

    2012-02-22

    Three ruthenium complexes Λ-[cis-Ru((R,R)-Me-BPE)(2)(H)(2)] Λ-R,R-Ru1H(2), Δ-[cis-Ru((S,S)-Me-DuPHOS)(2)(H)(2)] Δ-S,S-Ru2H(2), and Λ-[cis-Ru((R,R)-Me-DuPHOS)(2)(H)(2)] Λ-R,R-Ru2H(2) (1 = (Me-BPE)(2), 2 = (Me-DuPHOS)(2)) were characterized by multinuclear NMR and CD spectroscopy in solution and by X-ray crystallography. The chiral ligands allow the full control of stereochemistry and enable mechanistic studies not otherwise available. Oxidative addition of E-H bonds (E = H, B, Si, C) was studied by steady state and laser flash photolysis in the presence of substrates. Steady state photolysis shows formation of single products with one stereoisomer. Solid state structures and circular dichroism spectra reveal a change in configuration at ruthenium for some Δ-S,S-Ru2H(2)/Λ-R,R-Ru2H(2) photoproducts from Λ to Δ (or vice versa) while the configuration for Λ-R,R-Ru1H(2) products remains unchanged as Λ. The X-ray structure of silyl hydride photoproducts suggests a residual H(1)···Si(1) interaction for Δ-[cis-Ru((R,R)-Me-DuPHOS)(2)(Et(2)SiH)(H)] and Δ-[cis-Ru((R,R)-Me-DuPHOS)(2)(PhSiH(2))(H)] but not for their Ru(R,R-BPE)(2) analogues. Molecular structures were also determined for Λ-[cis-Ru((R,R)-Me-BPE)(2)(Bpin)(H)], Λ-[Ru((S,S)-Me-DuPHOS)(2)(η(2)-C(2)H(4))], Δ-[Ru((R,R)-Me-DuPHOS)(2)(η(2)-C(2)H(4))], and trans-[Ru((R,R)-Me-DuPHOS)(2)(C(6)F(5))(H)]. In situ laser photolysis in the presence of p-H(2) generates hyperpolarized NMR spectra because of magnetically inequivalent hydrides; these experiments and low temperature photolysis with D(2) reveal that the loss of hydride ligands is concerted. The reaction intermediates [Ru(DuPHOS)(2)] and [Ru(BPE)(2)] were detected by laser flash photolysis and have spectra consistent with approximate square-planar Ru(0) structures. The rates of their reactions with H(2), D(2), HBpin, and PhSiH(3) were measured by transient kinetics. Rate constants are significantly faster for [Ru(BPE)(2)] than for [Ru(DuPHOS)(2

  6. Determining pore length scales and pore surface relaxivity of rock cores by internal magnetic fields modulation at 2MHz NMR.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huabing; Nogueira d'Eurydice, Marcel; Obruchkov, Sergei; Galvosas, Petrik

    2014-09-01

    Pore length scales and pore surface relaxivities of rock cores with different lithologies were studied on a 2MHz Rock Core Analyzer. To determine the pore length scales of the rock cores, the high eigenmodes of spin bearing molecules satisfying the diffusion equation were detected with optimized encoding periods in the presence of internal magnetic fields Bin. The results were confirmed using a 64MHz NMR system, which supports the feasibility of high eigenmode detection at fields as low as 2MHz. Furthermore, this methodology was combined with relaxometry measurements to a two-dimensional experiment, which provides correlation between pore length and relaxation time. This techniques also yields information on the surface relaxivity of the rock cores. The estimated surface relaxivities were then compared to the results using an independent NMR method.

  7. The interaction of cannabinoid receptor agonists, CP55940 and WIN55212-2 with membranes using solid state 2H NMR

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xiaoyu; Pavlopoulos, Spiro; Yang, De-Ping; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2013-01-01

    Two key commonly used cannabinergic agonists, CP55940 and WIN55212-2, are investigated for their effects on the lipid membrane bilayer using 2H solid state NMR, and the results are compared with our earlier work with delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC). To study the effects of these ligands we used hydrated bilayers of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) deuterated at the 2′ and 16′ positions of both acyl chains with deuterium atoms serving as probes for the dynamic and phase changes at the membrane interface and at the bilayer center respectively. All three cannabinergic ligands lower the phospholipid membrane phase transition temperature, increase the lipid sn-2 chain order parameter at the membrane interface and decrease the order at the center of the bilayer. Our studies show that the cannabinoid ligands induce lateral phase separation in the lipid membrane at physiological temperatures. During the lipid membrane phase transition, the cooperative dynamic process whereby the C-2H segments at the interface and center of the bilayer spontaneously reach the fast exchange regime (2H NMR timescale) is distinctively modulated by the two cannabinoids. Specifically, CP55940 is slightly more efficient at inducing liquid crystalline-type 2H NMR spectral features at the membrane interface compared to WIN55212-2. In contrast, WIN55212-2 has a far superior ability to induce liquid crystalline-type spectral features at the center of the bilayer, and it increases the order parameter of the sn-1 chain in addition to the sn-2 chain of the lipids. These observations suggest the cannabinoid ligands may influence lipid membrane domain formations and there may be contributions to their cannabinergic activities through lipid membrane microdomain related mechanisms. Our work demonstrates that experimental design strategies utilizing specifically deuterium labeled lipids yield more detailed insights concerning the properties of lipid bilayers. PMID:21129361

  8. General order parameter based correlation analysis of protein backbone motions between experimental NMR relaxation measurements and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing; Shi, Chaowei; Yu, Lu; Zhang, Longhua; Xiong, Ying; Tian, Changlin

    2015-02-13

    Internal backbone dynamic motions are essential for different protein functions and occur on a wide range of time scales, from femtoseconds to seconds. Molecular dynamic (MD) simulations and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin relaxation measurements are valuable tools to gain access to fast (nanosecond) internal motions. However, there exist few reports on correlation analysis between MD and NMR relaxation data. Here, backbone relaxation measurements of (15)N-labeled SH3 (Src homology 3) domain proteins in aqueous buffer were used to generate general order parameters (S(2)) using a model-free approach. Simultaneously, 80 ns MD simulations of SH3 domain proteins in a defined hydrated box at neutral pH were conducted and the general order parameters (S(2)) were derived from the MD trajectory. Correlation analysis using the Gromos force field indicated that S(2) values from NMR relaxation measurements and MD simulations were significantly different. MD simulations were performed on models with different charge states for three histidine residues, and with different water models, which were SPC (simple point charge) water model and SPC/E (extended simple point charge) water model. S(2) parameters from MD simulations with charges for all three histidines and with the SPC/E water model correlated well with S(2) calculated from the experimental NMR relaxation measurements, in a site-specific manner.

  9. Synthesis, structure and NMR characterization of a new monomeric aluminophosphate [ dl-Co(en) 3] 2[Al(HPO 4) 2(H 1.5PO 4) 2(H 2PO 4) 2](H 3PO 4) 4 containing four different types of monophosphates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peng; Li, Jiyang; Xu, Jun; Duan, Fangzheng; Deng, Feng; Xu, Ruren

    2009-03-01

    A new zero-dimensional (0D) aluminophosphate monomer [ dl-Co(en) 3] 2[Al(HPO 4) 2(H 1.5PO 4) 2(H 2PO 4) 2](H 3PO 4) 4 (designated AlPO-CJ38) with Al/P ratio of 1/6 has been solvothermally prepared by using racemic cobalt complex dl-Co(en) 3Cl 3 as the template. The Al atom is octahedrally linked to six P atoms via bridging oxygen atoms, forming a unique [Al(HPO 4) 2(H 1.5PO 4) 2(H 2PO 4) 2] 6- monomer. Notably, there exists intramolecular symmetrical O⋯H⋯O bonds, which results in pseudo-4-rings stabilized by the strong H-bonding interactions. The structure is also featured by the existence of four different types of monophosphates that have been confirmed by 31P NMR and 1H NMR spectra. The crystal data are as follows: AlPO-CJ38, [ dl-Co(en) 3] 2[Al(HPO 4) 2(H 1.5PO 4) 2(H 2PO 4) 2](H 3PO 4) 4, M = 1476.33, monoclinic, C2/ c (No. 15), a = 36.028(7) Å, b = 8.9877(18) Å, c = 16.006(3) Å, β = 100.68(3)°, U = 5093.2(18) Å 3,Z = 4, R1 = 0.0509 ( I > 2 σ( I)) and wR2 = 0.1074 (all data). CCDC number 689491.

  10. General theoretical/computational tool for interpreting NMR spin relaxation in proteins.

    PubMed

    Zerbetto, Mirco; Polimeno, Antonino; Meirovitch, Eva

    2009-10-15

    We developed in recent years the slowly relaxing local structure (SRLS) approach for analyzing NMR spin relaxation in proteins. SRLS is a two-body coupled rotator model which accounts rigorously for mode-coupling between the global motion of the protein and the local motion of the spin-bearing probe and allows for general properties of the second rank tensors involved. We showed that a general tool of data analysis requires both capabilities. Several important functionalities were missing in our previous implementations of SRLS in data fitting schemes, and in some important cases, the calculations were tedious. Here we present a general implementation which allows for asymmetric local and global diffusion tensors, distinct local ordering and local diffusion frames, and features a rhombic local potential which includes Wigner matrix element terms of ranks 2 and 4. A recently developed hydrodynamics-based approach for calculating global diffusion tensors has been incorporated into the data-fitting scheme. The computational efficiency of the latter has been increased significantly through object-oriented programming within the scope of the C++ programming language, and code parallelization. A convenient graphical user interface is provided. Currently autocorrelated (15)N spin relaxation data can be analyzed effectively. Adaptation to any autocorrelated and cross-correlated relaxation analysis is straightforward. New physical insight is gleaned on largely preserved local structure in solution, even in chain segments which experience slow local motion. Prospects associated with improved dynamic models, and new applications made possible by the current implementation of SRLS, are delineated. PMID:19775101

  11. Excited States of Nucleic Acids Probed by Proton Relaxation Dispersion NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Juen, Michael Andreas; Wunderlich, Christoph Hermann; Nußbaumer, Felix; Tollinger, Martin; Kontaxis, Georg; Konrat, Robert; Hansen, D Flemming; Kreutz, Christoph

    2016-09-19

    In this work an improved stable isotope labeling protocol for nucleic acids is introduced. The novel building blocks eliminate/minimize homonuclear (13) C and (1) H scalar couplings thus allowing proton relaxation dispersion (RD) experiments to report accurately on the chemical exchange of nucleic acids. Using site-specific (2) H and (13) C labeling, spin topologies are introduced into DNA and RNA that make (1) H relaxation dispersion experiments applicable in a straightforward manner. The novel RNA/DNA building blocks were successfully incorporated into two nucleic acids. The A-site RNA was previously shown to undergo a two site exchange process in the micro- to millisecond time regime. Using proton relaxation dispersion experiments the exchange parameters determined earlier could be recapitulated, thus validating the proposed approach. We further investigated the dynamics of the cTAR DNA, a DNA transcript that is involved in the viral replication cycle of HIV-1. Again, an exchange process could be characterized and quantified. This shows the general applicablility of the novel labeling scheme for (1) H RD experiments of nucleic acids.

  12. Excited States of Nucleic Acids Probed by Proton Relaxation Dispersion NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Juen, Michael Andreas; Wunderlich, Christoph Hermann; Nußbaumer, Felix; Tollinger, Martin; Kontaxis, Georg; Konrat, Robert; Hansen, D Flemming; Kreutz, Christoph

    2016-09-19

    In this work an improved stable isotope labeling protocol for nucleic acids is introduced. The novel building blocks eliminate/minimize homonuclear (13) C and (1) H scalar couplings thus allowing proton relaxation dispersion (RD) experiments to report accurately on the chemical exchange of nucleic acids. Using site-specific (2) H and (13) C labeling, spin topologies are introduced into DNA and RNA that make (1) H relaxation dispersion experiments applicable in a straightforward manner. The novel RNA/DNA building blocks were successfully incorporated into two nucleic acids. The A-site RNA was previously shown to undergo a two site exchange process in the micro- to millisecond time regime. Using proton relaxation dispersion experiments the exchange parameters determined earlier could be recapitulated, thus validating the proposed approach. We further investigated the dynamics of the cTAR DNA, a DNA transcript that is involved in the viral replication cycle of HIV-1. Again, an exchange process could be characterized and quantified. This shows the general applicablility of the novel labeling scheme for (1) H RD experiments of nucleic acids. PMID:27533469

  13. Changes in Porcine Muscle Water Characteristics during Growth—An in Vitro Low-Field NMR Relaxation Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertram, Hanne Christine; Rasmussen, Marianne; Busk, Hans; Oksbjerg, Niels; Karlsson, Anders Hans; Andersen, Henrik Jørgen

    2002-08-01

    This study investigates the effects of developmental stage and muscle type on the mobility and distribution of water within skeletal muscles, using low-field 1H-NMR transverse relaxation measurements in vitro on four different porcine muscles ( M. longissimus dorsi, M. semitendinosus, M. biceps femoris, M. vastus intermedius) from a total of 48 pigs slaughtered at various weight classes between 25 kg and 150 kg. Principal component analysis (PCA) revealed effects of both slaughter weight and muscle type on the transverse relaxation decay. Independent of developmental stage and muscle type, distributed exponential analysis of the NMR T 2 relaxation data imparted the existence of three distinct water populations, T 2b, T 21, and T 22, with relaxation times of approximately 1-10, 45-120, and 200-500 ms, respectively. The most profound change during muscle growth was a shift toward faster relaxation in the intermediate time constant, T 21. It decreased by approx. 24% in all four muscle types during the period from 25 to 150 kg live weight. Determination of dry matter, fat, and protein content in the muscles showed that the changes in relaxation time of the intermediate time constant, T 21, during growth should be ascribed mainly to a change in protein content, as the protein content explained 77% of the variation in the T 21 time constant. Partial least squares (PLS) regression revealed validated correlations in the region of 0.58 to 0.77 between NMR transverse relaxation data and muscle development for all the four muscle types, which indicates that NMR relaxation measurements may be used in the prediction of muscle developmental stage.

  14. Short hydrogen bonds in salts of dicarboxylic acids; structural correlations from solid-state 13C and 2H NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalsbeek, Nicoline; Schaumburg, Kjeld; Larsen, Sine

    1993-10-01

    Solid-state 13C and 2H NMR spectra are found to very suitable for characterizing the short Osbnd H...O hydrogen bonds observed in acid salts of dicarboxylic acids. The majority of the investigated compounds are acid salts of malonic, succinic and tartaric acid with monovalent cations derived from alkali metals and small aliphatic amines. They include systems with symmetric and asymmetric hydrogen bonds. Accurate structural information about their geometry is available from low-temperature X-ray diffraction data. The 13C chemical shifts of the C atoms in the different carboxy groups display a linear variation with the absolute difference between the two Csbnd O bond lengths. Theoretical ab initio calculations for model systems showed that the nuclear quadrupole coupling constant NQCC for 2H increases with increasing asymmetry of the hydrogen-bonded system. NQCC values for 2H in the short symmetric hydrogen-bonded systems are in the range 53-59 kHz compared with the larger values of up to 166kHz found in systems with longer asymmetric hydrogen bonds. The 2H NQCC values display a perfect linear dependence on the asymmetry of the hydrogen bond. 2H NQCC decreases with decreasing temperature in the symmetric hydrogen bonds showing that the corresponding potential has a single well.

  15. Selective Detection of Biexponential Relaxation in Isotropic Solutions by Mixed Coherence Filtering NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Hitoshi; Takeuchi, Johane; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Seo, Yoshiteru; Tasaki, Akira; Erata, Tomoki

    1998-11-01

    This is a trial to simplize sequences to get the relaxation functionf31(t), which is usually detected by the double- or triple-quantum filtered (DQF or TQF) NMR in an isotropic phase. The results indicate that only two phase cycling is needed to get thef31(t) function, which shows the advantage ofS/N(signal-to-noise ratio) in a minimum acquisition time. The filtering of coherence levels in the creation time need not be limited to double- or triple-quantum coherences. An87Rb signal from a 4% (w/w) agar powder in 500-mMRbCl solution is recorded at 130.9 MHz as a Larmor frequency using a Bruker MSL 400 spectrometer.

  16. Dynamical theory of spin noise and relaxation: Prospects for real-time NMR measurements.

    PubMed

    Field, Timothy R

    2014-11-01

    Recent developments in theoretical aspects of spin noise and relaxation and their interrelationship reveal a modified spin density, distinct from the density matrix, as the necessary object to describe fluctuations in spin systems. These fluctuations are to be viewed as an intrinsic quantum mechanical property of such systems immersed in random magnetic environments and are observed as "spin noise" in the absence of any radio frequency excitation. With the prospect of ultrafast digitization, the role of spin noise in real-time parameter extraction for (NMR) spin systems, and the advantage over standard techniques, is of essential importance, especially for systems containing a small number of spins. In this article we outline prospects for harnessing the recent dynamical theory in terms of spin-noise measurement, with attention to real-time properties.

  17. General order parameter based correlation analysis of protein backbone motions between experimental NMR relaxation measurements and molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Qing; Shi, Chaowei; Yu, Lu; Zhang, Longhua; Xiong, Ying; Tian, Changlin

    2015-02-13

    Internal backbone dynamic motions are essential for different protein functions and occur on a wide range of time scales, from femtoseconds to seconds. Molecular dynamic (MD) simulations and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin relaxation measurements are valuable tools to gain access to fast (nanosecond) internal motions. However, there exist few reports on correlation analysis between MD and NMR relaxation data. Here, backbone relaxation measurements of {sup 15}N-labeled SH3 (Src homology 3) domain proteins in aqueous buffer were used to generate general order parameters (S{sup 2}) using a model-free approach. Simultaneously, 80 ns MD simulations of SH3 domain proteins in a defined hydrated box at neutral pH were conducted and the general order parameters (S{sup 2}) were derived from the MD trajectory. Correlation analysis using the Gromos force field indicated that S{sup 2} values from NMR relaxation measurements and MD simulations were significantly different. MD simulations were performed on models with different charge states for three histidine residues, and with different water models, which were SPC (simple point charge) water model and SPC/E (extended simple point charge) water model. S{sup 2} parameters from MD simulations with charges for all three histidines and with the SPC/E water model correlated well with S{sup 2} calculated from the experimental NMR relaxation measurements, in a site-specific manner. - Highlights: • Correlation analysis between NMR relaxation measurements and MD simulations. • General order parameter (S{sup 2}) as common reference between the two methods. • Different protein dynamics with different Histidine charge states in neutral pH. • Different protein dynamics with different water models.

  18. Interdomain orientation of cardiac troponin C characterized by paramagnetic relaxation enhancement NMR reveals a compact state.

    PubMed

    Cordina, Nicole M; Liew, Chu Kong; Gell, David A; Fajer, Piotr G; Mackay, Joel P; Brown, Louise J

    2012-09-01

    Cardiac troponin C (cTnC) is the calcium binding subunit of the troponin complex that triggers the thin filament response to calcium influx into the sarcomere. cTnC consists of two globular EF-hand domains (termed the N- and C-domains) connected by a flexible linker. While the conformation of each domain of cTnC has been thoroughly characterized through NMR studies involving either the isolated N-domain (N-cTnC) or C-domain (C-cTnC), little attention has been paid to the range of interdomain orientations possible in full-length cTnC that arises as a consequence of the flexibility of the domain linker. Flexibility in the domain linker of cTnC is essential for effective regulatory function of troponin. We have therefore utilized paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) NMR to assess the interdomain orientation of cTnC. Ensemble fitting of our interdomain PRE measurements reveals that isolated cTnC has considerable interdomain flexibility and preferentially adopts a bent conformation in solution, with a defined range of relative domain orientations.

  19. Interdomain orientation of cardiac Troponin C characterized by paramagnetic relaxation enhancement NMR reveals a compact state

    PubMed Central

    Cordina, Nicole M; Liew, Chu Kong; Gell, David A; Fajer, Piotr G; Mackay, Joel P; Brown, Louise J

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac troponin C (cTnC) is the calcium binding subunit of the troponin complex that triggers the thin filament response to calcium influx into the sarcomere. cTnC consists of two globular EF-hand domains (termed the N- and C-domains) connected by a flexible linker. While the conformation of each domain of cTnC has been thoroughly characterized through NMR studies involving either the isolated N-domain (N-cTnC) or C-domain (C-cTnC), little attention has been paid to the range of interdomain orientations possible in full-length cTnC that arises as a consequence of the flexibility of the domain linker. Flexibility in the domain linker of cTnC is essential for effective regulatory function of troponin. We have therefore utilized paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) NMR to assess the interdomain orientation of cTnC. Ensemble fitting of our interdomain PRE measurements reveals that isolated cTnC has considerable interdomain flexibility and preferentially adopts a bent conformation in solution, with a defined range of relative domain orientations. PMID:22811351

  20. Rotational jumps of the tyrosine side chain in crystalline enkephalin. /sup 2/H NMR line shapes for aromatic ring motion in solids

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, D.N.; Wittebort, R.J.; Griffin, R.G.; Meirovitch, E.; Stimson, E.R.; Meinwald, Y.C.; Freed, J.H.; Scheraga, H.A.

    1981-12-30

    Deuterium NMR spectra of polycrystalline (tyrosine-3,5-/sup 2/H/sub 2/)(Leu/sup 5/)enkephalin show that the aromatic tyrosyl ring of this pentapeptide is executing 180/sup 0/ flips about the C/sup ..beta../-C/sup ..gamma../ axis in the solid state. Specifically, the axially symmetric powder pattern observed at low temperature collapses to an axially asymmetric pattern with eta approx. = 0.6 at high temperature. Computer simulation of the NMR line shapes, which account for spectral distortions induced by the quadrupole echo technique, indicate that at room temperature the flipping rate is approximately 5 x 10/sup 4/ s/sup -1/ and that it increases to about 10/sup 6/ s/sup -1/ at 101 /sup 0/C.

  1. Diffusion dependence of proton NMR relaxation rates in the presence of ferritin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boss, Michael; Hammel, P. Chris

    2009-03-01

    Ferritin is the predominant iron-storage protein in living organisms. It may serve as an indicator of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's. Measuring brain ferritin concentration non-invasively via MRI could enable better diagnoses and treatments of such diseases. Quantitative MRI determination of the ferritin concentration requires an understanding of the NMR relaxation mechanisms of hydrogen protons in the presence of ferritin. In aqueous solutions, ferritin enhances the transverse relaxation rate (R2) of the protons. This is thought to occur due to a diffusive mechanism, where protons diffusing near ferritin pass through a region of elevated magnetic field, and a chemical exchange mechanism, where protons bind to the protein for a period of time, experiencing an even higher magnetic field. These two mechanisms exhibit different dependencies on the self-diffusion coefficient of the protons. By adding glycerol to aqueous solutions, we control the self-diffusion of protons. We measure the R2 of protons in ferritin-containing binary mixtures of water and glycerol using CPMG sequences, and compare the experimental results to theoretical predictions of diffusion dependence in order to distinguish the relative importance of the mechanisms.

  2. Sensitivity and resolution of two-dimensional NMR diffusion-relaxation measurements.

    PubMed

    Kausik, Ravinath; Hürlimann, Martin D

    2016-09-01

    The performance of 2D NMR diffusion-relaxation measurements for fluid typing applications is analyzed. In particular, we delineate the region in the diffusion - relaxation plane that can be determined with a given gradient strength and homogeneity, and compare the performance of the single and double echo encoding with the stimulated echo diffusion encoding. We show that the diffusion editing based approach is able to determine the diffusion coefficient only if the relaxation time T2 exceeds a cutoff value T2,cutoff, that scales like T2,cutoff∝g(-2/3)D(-1/3). For stimulated echo encoding, the optimal diffusion encoding times (Td and δ), that provide the best diffusion sensitivity, rely only on the T1/T2 ratios and not on the diffusion coefficients of the fluids or the applied gradient strengths. Irrespective of T1, for high enough gradients (i.e. when γ(2)g(2)DT2(3)>10(2)), the Hahn echo based encoding is superior to encoding based on the stimulated echo. For weaker gradients, the stimulated echo is superior only if the T1/T2 ratio is much larger than 1. For single component systems, the diffusion sensitivity is not adversely impacted by the uniformity of the gradients and the diffusion distributions can be well measured. The presence of non-uniform gradients can affect the determination of the diffusion distributions when you have two fluids of comparable T2. In such situations the effective single component diffusion coefficient is always closer to the geometric mean diffusion coefficient of the two fluids. PMID:27389638

  3. Sensitivity and resolution of two-dimensional NMR diffusion-relaxation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kausik, Ravinath; Hürlimann, Martin D.

    2016-09-01

    The performance of 2D NMR diffusion-relaxation measurements for fluid typing applications is analyzed. In particular, we delineate the region in the diffusion - relaxation plane that can be determined with a given gradient strength and homogeneity, and compare the performance of the single and double echo encoding with the stimulated echo diffusion encoding. We show that the diffusion editing based approach is able to determine the diffusion coefficient only if the relaxation time T2 exceeds a cutoff value T2,cutoff , that scales like T2,cutoff ∝g - 2 / 3D - 1 / 3 . For stimulated echo encoding, the optimal diffusion encoding times (Td and δ), that provide the best diffusion sensitivity, rely only on the T1 /T2 ratios and not on the diffusion coefficients of the fluids or the applied gradient strengths. Irrespective of T1 , for high enough gradients (i.e. when γ2g2 DT23 >102), the Hahn echo based encoding is superior to encoding based on the stimulated echo. For weaker gradients, the stimulated echo is superior only if the T1 /T2 ratio is much larger than 1. For single component systems, the diffusion sensitivity is not adversely impacted by the uniformity of the gradients and the diffusion distributions can be well measured. The presence of non-uniform gradients can affect the determination of the diffusion distributions when you have two fluids of comparable T2 . In such situations the effective single component diffusion coefficient is always closer to the geometric mean diffusion coefficient of the two fluids.

  4. Interaction of lafutidine in binding to human serum albumin in gastric ulcer therapy: STD-NMR, WaterLOGSY-NMR, NMR relaxation times, Tr-NOESY, molecule docking, and spectroscopic studies.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongqin; Huang, Yanmei; He, Jiawei; Li, Shanshan; Tang, Bin; Li, Hui

    2016-09-15

    In this study, lafutidine (LAF) was used as a model compound to investigate the binding mechanism between antiulcer drugs and human serum albumin (HSA) through various techniques, including STD-NMR, WaterLOGSY-NMR, (1)H NMR relaxation times, tr-NOESY, molecule docking calculation, FT-IR spectroscopy, and CD spectroscopy. The analyses of STD-NMR, which derived relative STD (%) intensities, and WaterLOGSY-NMR, determined that LAF bound to HSA. In particular, the pyridyl group of LAF was in close contact with HSA binding pocket, whereas furyl group had a secondary binding. Competitive STD-NMR and WaterLOGSY-NMR experiments, with warifarin and ibuprofen as site-selective probes, indicated that LAF preferentially bound to site II in the hydrophobic subdomains IIIA of HSA. The bound conformation of LAF at the HSA binding site was further elucidated by transferred NOE effect (tr-NOESY) experiment. Relaxation experiments provided quantitative information about the relationship between the affinity and structure of LAF. The molecule docking simulations conducted with AutoDock and the restraints derived from STD results led to three-dimensional models that were consistent with the NMR spectroscopic data. The presence of hydrophobic forces and hydrogen interactions was also determined. Additionally, FT-IR and CD spectroscopies showed that LAF induced secondary structure changes of HSA.

  5. Frequency-switching inversion-recovery for severely hyperfine-shifted NMR: evidence of asymmetric electron relaxation in high-spin Co(II).

    PubMed

    Riley, Erin A; Petros, Amy K; Smith, Karen Ann; Gibney, Brian R; Tierney, David L

    2006-12-11

    A new method for reliably measuring longitudinal relaxation rates for severely hyperfine-shifted NMR signals in aqueous solutions is presented. The method is illustrated for a well-defined cobalt tetracysteinate, with relevance to cobalt-substituted metalloproteins. The relaxation measurements are indicative of asymmetric electronic relaxation of the high-spin Co(II) ion.

  6. H2O and Cation Structure and Dynamics in Expandable Clays: 2H and 39K NMR Investigations of Hectorite

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, Geoffrey M.; Bish, David L.; Kirkpatrick, Robert J.

    2008-04-24

    The dynamic behavior of H2O and ionic species in two- and three-dimensional confinement plays a variety of important roles in processes such as ion transport and adsorption, water storage in hostile environments, dissolution/precipitation reactions in aqueous environments, and the swelling of smectite clays (low charge 2:1 type phyllosilicates with expandable interlayers). Historically, the structure and dynamics of ions and water in confined spaces and at solid-fluid interfaces have been difficult to characterize on the molecular scale, but the continued evolution of molecular modeling, neutron scattering, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has permitted ever more detailed theoretical and experimental investigations, particularly regarding the special case of H2O in the two-dimensional, nanometer-scale interlayer space of phyllosilicates.

  7. Relationship between the crystallization rates of amorphous nifedipine, phenobarbital, and flopropione, and their molecular mobility as measured by their enthalpy relaxation and (1)H NMR relaxation times.

    PubMed

    Aso, Y; Yoshioka, S; Kojima, S

    2000-03-01

    Isothermal crystallization of amorphous nifedipine, phenobarbital, and flopropione was studied at temperatures above and below their glass transition temperatures (T(g)). A sharp decrease in the crystallization rate with decreasing temperature was observed for phenobarbital and flopropione, such that no crystallization was observed at temperatures 20-30 degrees C lower than their T(g) within ordinary experimental time periods. In contrast, the crystallization rate of nifedipine decreased moderately with decreasing temperature, and considerable crystallization was observed at 40 degrees C below its T(g) within 4 months. The molecular mobility of these amorphous drugs was assessed by enthalpy relaxation and (1)H-NMR relaxation measurements. The enthalpy relaxation time of nifedipine was smaller than that of phenobarbital or flopropinone at the same T - T(g) values, suggesting higher molecular mobility of nifedipine. The spin-lattice relaxation time in the rotating frame (T(1rho)) decreased markedly at temperature above T(g). The slope of the Arrhenius type plot of the T(1rho) for nifedipine protons changed at about 10 degrees C below the T(g), whereas the slope for phenobarbital protons became discontinuous at about 10 degrees C above the T(g). Even at temperatures below its T(g), the spin-spin relaxation process of nifedipine could be described by the sum of its Gaussian relaxation, which is characteristic of solid protons, and its Lorentzian relaxation, which is characteristic of protons with higher mobility. In contrast, no Lorentzian relaxation was observed for phenobarbital or flopropione at temperatures below their T(g). These results also suggest that nifedipine has higher molecular mobility than phenobarbital and flopropione at temperatures below T(g). The faster crystallization of nifedipine than that of phenobarbital or flopropione observed at temperatures below its T(g) may be partly ascribed to its higher molecular mobility at these temperatures.

  8. Paramagnetic NMR Relaxation and Molecular Mechanics Studies of Chloroperoxidase-Indole Complex: Insights into the Mechanism of Chloroperoxidase-Catalyzed Regioselective Oxidation of Indole

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui; He, Qinghao; Chatfield, David; Wang, Xiaotang

    2013-01-01

    To unravel the mechanism of CPO-catalyzed regioselective oxidation of indole, the structure of the CPO-indole complex was studied using NMR relaxation measurements and computational techniques. The dissociation constant (KD) of the CPO-indole complex was calculated to be approximately 21 mM. The distances (r) between protons of indole and the heme iron calculated from NMR relaxation measurements and molecular docking revealed that the pyrrole ring of indole is oriented toward the heme with its 2-H pointing directly at the heme iron. Both KD and r values are independent of pH in the range of 3.0–6.5. The stability and structure of the CPO-indole complex are also independent of the concentration of chloride/iodide ion. Molecular docking suggests the formation of a hydrogen bond between the N–H of indole and the carboxyl O of Glu 183 in the binding of indole to CPO. Simulated annealing of the CPO-indole complex using r values from NMR experiments as distance restraints reveals that the van der Waals interactions were much stronger than the Coulomb interactions in indole binding to CPO, indicating that the association of indole with CPO is primarily governed by hydrophobic rather than electrostatic interactions. This work provides the first experimental and theoretical evidence for the long-sought mechanism that leads to the “unexpected” regioselectivity of CPO-catalyzed oxidation of indole. The structure of the CPO-indole complex will serve as a lighthouse in guiding the design of CPO mutants with tailor-made activities for biotechnological applications. PMID:23634952

  9. Increasing the sensitivity of NMR diffusion measurements by paramagnetic longitudinal relaxation enhancement, with application to ribosome–nascent chain complexes

    PubMed Central

    Cassaignau, Anaïs M. E.; Cabrita, Lisa D.

    2016-01-01

    The translational diffusion of macromolecules can be examined non-invasively by stimulated echo (STE) NMR experiments to accurately determine their molecular sizes. These measurements can be important probes of intermolecular interactions and protein folding and unfolding, and are crucial in monitoring the integrity of large macromolecular assemblies such as ribosome–nascent chain complexes (RNCs). However, NMR studies of these complexes can be severely constrained by their slow tumbling, low solubility (with maximum concentrations of up to 10 μM), and short lifetimes resulting in weak signal, and therefore continuing improvements in experimental sensitivity are essential. Here we explore the use of the paramagnetic longitudinal relaxation enhancement (PLRE) agent NiDO2A on the sensitivity of 15N XSTE and SORDID heteronuclear STE experiments, which can be used to monitor the integrity of these unstable complexes. We exploit the dependence of the PLRE effect on the gyromagnetic ratio and electronic relaxation time to accelerate recovery of 1H magnetization without adversely affecting storage on Nz during diffusion delays or introducing significant transverse relaxation line broadening. By applying the longitudinal relaxation-optimized SORDID pulse sequence together with NiDO2A to 70S Escherichia coli ribosomes and RNCs, NMR diffusion sensitivity enhancements of up to 4.5-fold relative to XSTE are achieved, alongside ~1.9-fold improvements in two-dimensional NMR sensitivity, without compromising the sample integrity. We anticipate these results will significantly advance the use of NMR to probe dynamic regions of ribosomes and other large, unstable macromolecular assemblies. PMID:26253948

  10. Capturing Guest Dynamics in Metal-Organic Framework CPO-27-M (M = Mg, Zn) by (2)H Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jun; Sinelnikov, Regina; Huang, Yining

    2016-06-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are promising porous materials for gas separation and storage as well as sensing. In particular, a series of isostructural MOFs with coordinately unsaturated metal centers, namely, CPO-27-M or M-MOF-74 (M = Mg, Zn, Mn, Fe, Ni, Co, Cu), have shown exceptional adsorption capacity and selectivity compared to those of classical MOFs that contain only fully coordinated metal sites. Although it is widely accepted that the interaction between guest molecules and exposed metal centers is responsible for good selectivity and large maximum uptake, the investigation of such guest-metal interaction is very challenging because adsorbed molecules are usually disordered in the pores and undergo rapid thermal motions. (2)H solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy is one of the most extensively used techniques for capturing guest dynamics in porous materials. In this work, variable-temperature (2)H wide-line SSNMR experiments were performed on CPO-27-M (M = Mg, Zn) loaded with four prototypical guest molecules: D2O, CD3CN, acetone-d6, and C6D6. The results indicate that different guest molecules possess distinct dynamic behaviors inside the channel of CPO-27-M. For a given guest molecule, its dynamic behavior also depends on the nature of the metal centers. The binding strength of guest molecules is discussed on the basis of the (2)H SSNMR data.

  11. Unraveling the complexity of protein backbone dynamics with combined (13)C and (15)N solid-state NMR relaxation measurements.

    PubMed

    Lamley, Jonathan M; Lougher, Matthew J; Sass, Hans Juergen; Rogowski, Marco; Grzesiek, Stephan; Lewandowski, Józef R

    2015-09-14

    Typically, protein dynamics involve a complex hierarchy of motions occurring on different time scales between conformations separated by a range of different energy barriers. NMR relaxation can in principle provide a site-specific picture of both the time scales and amplitudes of these motions, but independent relaxation rates sensitive to fluctuations in different time scale ranges are required to obtain a faithful representation of the underlying dynamic complexity. This is especially pertinent for relaxation measurements in the solid state, which report on dynamics in a broader window of time scales by more than 3 orders of magnitudes compared to solution NMR relaxation. To aid in unraveling the intricacies of biomolecular dynamics we introduce (13)C spin-lattice relaxation in the rotating frame (R1ρ) as a probe of backbone nanosecond-microsecond motions in proteins in the solid state. We present measurements of (13)C'R1ρ rates in fully protonated crystalline protein GB1 at 600 and 850 MHz (1)H Larmor frequencies and compare them to (13)C'R1, (15)N R1 and R1ρ measured under the same conditions. The addition of carbon relaxation data to the model free analysis of nitrogen relaxation data leads to greatly improved characterization of time scales of protein backbone motions, minimizing the occurrence of fitting artifacts that may be present when (15)N data is used alone. We also discuss how internal motions characterized by different time scales contribute to (15)N and (13)C relaxation rates in the solid state and solution state, leading to fundamental differences between them, as well as phenomena such as underestimation of picosecond-range motions in the solid state and nanosecond-range motions in solution.

  12. Hyperpolarized 13C NMR lifetimes in the liquid-state: relating structures and T1 relaxation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parish, Christopher; Niedbalski, Peter; Hashami, Zohreh; Fidelino, Leila; Kovacs, Zoltan; Lumata, Lloyd

    Among the various attempts to solve the insensitivity problem in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), the physics-based technique dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is probably the most successful method of hyperpolarization or amplifying NMR signals. Using this technique, liquid-state NMR signal enhancements of several thousand-fold are expected for low-gamma nuclei such as carbon-13. The lifetimes of these hyperpolarized 13C NMR signals are directly related to their 13C spin-lattice relaxation times T1. Depending upon the 13C isotopic location, the lifetimes of hyperpolarized 13C compounds can range from a few seconds to minutes. In this study, we have investigated the hyperpolarized 13C NMR lifetimes of several 13C compounds with various chemical structures from glucose, acetate, citric acid, naphthalene to tetramethylallene and their deuterated analogs at 9.4 T and 25 deg C. Our results show that the 13C T1s of these compounds can range from a few seconds to more than 60 s at this field. Correlations between the chemical structures and T1 relaxation times will be discussed and corresponding implications of these results on 13C DNP experiments will be revealed. US Dept of Defense Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0048 and Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant No. AT-1877.

  13. Tracing bacterial metabolism using multi-nuclear (1H, 2H, and 13C) Solid State NMR: Realizing an Idea Initiated by James Scott

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cody, G.; Fogel, M. L.; Jin, K.; Griffen, P.; Steele, A.; Wang, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Approximately 6 years ago, while at the Geophysical Laboratory, James Scott became interested in the application of Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy to study bacterial metabolism. As often happens, other experiments intervened and the NMR experiments were not pursued. We have revisited Jame's question and find that using a multi-nuclear approach (1H, 2H, and 13C Solid State NMR) on laboratory cell culture has some distinct advantages. Our experiments involved batch cultures of E. coli (MG1655) harvested at stationary phase. In all experiments the growth medium consisted of MOPS medium for enterobacteria, where the substrate is glucose. In one set of experiments, 10 % of the water was D2O; in another 10 % of the glucose was per-deuterated. The control experiment used both water and glucose at natural isotopic abundance. A kill control of dead E. coli immersed in pure D2O for an extended period exhibited no deuterium incorporation. In both deuterium enriched experiments, considerable incorporation of deuterium into E. coli's biomolecular constituents was detected via 2H Solid State NMR. In the case of the D2O enriched experiment, 58 % of the incorporated deuterium is observed in a sharp peak at a frequency of 0.31 ppm, consistent with D incorporation in the cell membrane lipids, the remainder is observed in a broad peak at a higher frequency (centered at 5.4 ppm, but spanning out to beyond 10 ppm) that is consistent with D incorporation into predominantly DNA and RNA. In the case of the D-glucose experiments, 61 % of the deuterium is observed in a sharp resonance peak at 0.34 ppm, also consistent with D incorporation into membrane lipids, the remainder of the D is observed at a broad resonance peak centered at 4.3 ppm, consistent with D enrichment in glycogen. Deuterium abundance in the E. coli cells grown in 10 % D2O is nearly 2X greater than that grown with 10 % D-glucose. Very subtle differences are observed in both the 1H and 13C solid

  14. Bone tissue and porous media: common features and differences studied by NMR relaxation.

    PubMed

    Fantazzini, Paola; Brown, Robert James Sidford; Borgia, Giulio Cesare

    2003-01-01

    Despite significant differences between bone tissues and other porous media such as oilfield rocks, there are common features as well as differences in the response of NMR relaxation measurements to the internal structures of the materials. Internal surfaces contribute to both transverse (T2) and longitudinal (T1) relaxation of pore fluids, and in both cases the effects depend on, among other things, local surface-to-volume ratio (S/V). In both cases variations in local S/V can lead to distributions of relaxation times, sometimes over decades. As in rocks, it is useful to take bone data under different conditions of cleaning, saturation, and desaturation. T1 and T2 distributions are computed using UPEN. In trabecular bone it is easy to see differences in dimensions of intertrabecular spaces in samples that have been de-fatted and saturated with water, with longer T1 and T2 for larger pores. Both T1 and T2 distributions for these water-saturated samples are bimodal, separating or partly separating inter- and intratrabecular water. The T1 peak times have a ratio of from 10 to 30, depending on pore size, but for the smaller separations the distributions may not have deep minima. The T2 peak times have ratios of over 1000, with intratrabecular water represented by large peaks at a fraction of a ms, which we can observe only by single spin echoes. CPMG data show peaks at about a second, tapering down to small amplitudes by a ms. In all samples the free induction decay (FID) from an inversion-recovery (IR) T1 measurement shows an approximately Gaussian (solid-like) component, exp[-1/2 (T/TGC), with TGC approximately 11.7+/-0.7 micros (GC for "Gaussian Component"), and a liquid-like component (LLC) with initially simple-exponential decay at the rate-average time T(2-FID) for the first 100 micros. Averaging and smoothing procedures are adopted to derive T(2-FID) as a function of IR time and to get T1 distributions for both the GC and the LLC. It appears that contact with

  15. Temperature dependence of the NMR relaxation rate 1 /T1 for quantum spin chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupont, Maxime; Capponi, Sylvain; Laflorencie, Nicolas

    2016-10-01

    We present results of numerical simulations performed on one-dimensional spin chains in order to extract the so-called relaxation rate 1 /T1 accessible through NMR experiments. Building on numerical tensor network methods using the matrix product states formalism, we can follow the nontrivial crossover occurring in critical chains between the high-temperature diffusive classical regime and the low-temperature response described by the Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid (TLL) theory, for which analytical expressions are known. In order to compare analytics and numerics, we focus on a generic spin-1 /2 X X Z chain which is a paradigm of gapless TLL, as well as a more realistic spin-1 anisotropic chain, modeling the DTN material, which can be either in a trivial gapped phase or in a TLL regime induced by an external magnetic field. Thus, by monitoring the finite temperature crossover, we provide quantitative limits on the range of validity of TLL theory, that will be useful when interpreting experiments on quasi-one-dimensional materials.

  16. Conformation switching of AIM2 PYD domain revealed by NMR relaxation and MD simulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haobo; Yang, Lijiang; Niu, Xiaogang

    2016-04-29

    Protein absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2) is a double-strand DNA (ds DNA) sensor mainly located in cytoplasm of cell. It includes one N terminal PYD domain and one C terminal HIN domain. When the ds DNA such as DNA viruses and bacteria entered cytoplasm, the HIN domain of AIM2 will recognize and bind to DNA, and the PYD domain will bind to ASC protein which will result in the formation of AIM2 inflammasome. Three AIM2 PYD domain structures have been solved, but every structure yields a unique conformation around the α3 helix region. To understand why different AIM2 PYD structures show different conformations in this region, we use NMR relaxation techniques to study the backbone dynamics of mouse AIM2 PYD domain and perform molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on both mouse and human AIM2 PYD structures. Our results indicate that this region is highly flexible in both mouse and human AIM2 PYD domains, and the PYD domain may exist as a conformation ensemble in solution. Different environment makes the population vary among pre-existing conformational substrates of the ensemble, which may be the reason why different AIM2 PYD structures were observed under different conditions. Further docking analysis reveals that the conformation switching may be important for the autoinhibition of the AIM2 protein.

  17. NMR Relaxation and Diffusion in Polymerized Microemulsions of HEMA and MMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Meerwall, E.; Chandran, S.; Slivka, J.; Lopina, S.; Cheung, M.

    2002-10-01

    In an effort to develop a class of materials for use in controlled drug delivery via implantation, we have used proton NMR T2 relaxation and pulsed-field-gradient diffusion (D) measurements to study bicontinuous microemulsions formed with methyl methacrylate (MMA) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA), polymerized and crosslinked with 4 wt. percent ethylene glycol dimethacrylate, in the presence of water containing ten percent surfactant, either the inert sodium alkyl sulfate or the polymerizable TREM-LF-40. Measurements were made at 50 deg. C over the full two-phase range (e. g., 30 to 96 percent aqueous, depending on HEMA/MMA ratio). We identify a trimodal T2 spectrum with components attributable to the semi-glassy network, adsorbed surfactant and ingested water, and the interstitial aqueous phase. In the latter, two distinct D rates are due to free water and dissolved surfactant; specimens are permeable to both. Component intensity ratios are non-monotonic in aqueous content. Results suggest a wide range of pore sizes and complex interactions between the mobile molecules and the network surfaces, pores, and swellable bulk. Surfactant reactivity seems to play a minor role. Results of other characterizations complement and support these findings.

  18. Mapping membrane protein backbone dynamics: a comparison of site-directed spin labeling with NMR 15N-relaxation measurements.

    PubMed

    Lo, Ryan H; Kroncke, Brett M; Solomon, Tsega L; Columbus, Linda

    2014-10-01

    The ability to detect nanosecond backbone dynamics with site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) in soluble proteins has been well established. However, for membrane proteins, the nitroxide appears to have more interactions with the protein surface, potentially hindering the sensitivity to backbone motions. To determine whether membrane protein backbone dynamics could be mapped with SDSL, a nitroxide was introduced at 55 independent sites in a model polytopic membrane protein, TM0026. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectral parameters were compared with NMR (15)N-relaxation data. Sequential scans revealed backbone dynamics with the same trends observed for the R1 relaxation rate, suggesting that nitroxide dynamics remain coupled to the backbone on membrane proteins.

  19. Effect of Saturated Very Long-Chain Fatty Acids on the Organization of Lipid Membranes: A Study Combining (2)H NMR Spectroscopy and Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Paz Ramos, Adrian; Lagüe, Patrick; Lamoureux, Guillaume; Lafleur, Michel

    2016-07-21

    Little is known about the interaction of very long-chain saturated fatty acids (VLCFAs) with biological membranes. However, this could play an important role on interleaflet interactions and signal transduction mechanisms in cells. The aim of this work is to determine how VLCFA structurally adapts in fluid phospholipid bilayers, since both species must exhibit a significant hydrophobic mismatch. The membrane organization has been described by means of (2)H NMR and molecular dynamics simulations. Our results show that the protonation state affects the position and order of free fatty acids (FFAs) in phospholipid membranes. It was shown that the protonated FFA-C24 carboxyl group is located slightly under the POPC head group and therefore its acyl chain can interact with the lipids of the opposite leaflet. This interdigitation of the end of the acyl chain causes a second plateau observed in SC-D profiles, a very unusual feature in lipid systems. PMID:27351151

  20. Formation of Al2H7- anions--indirect evidence of volatile AlH3 on sodium alanate using solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Felderhoff, Michael; Zibrowius, Bodo

    2011-10-14

    After more than a decade of intense research on NaAlH(4) doped with transition metals as hydrogen storage material, the actual mechanism of the decomposition and rehydrogenation reaction is still unclear. Early on, monomeric AlH(3) was named as a possible transport shuttle for aluminium, but never observed experimentally. Here we report for the first time the trapping of volatile AlH(3) produced during the decomposition of undoped NaAlH(4) by an adduct of sodium alanate and crown ether. The resulting Al(2)H(7)(-) anion was identified by solid-state (27)Al NMR spectroscopy. Based on this indirect evidence of volatile alane, we present a simple description of the processes occurring during the reversible dehydrogenation of NaAlH(4). PMID:21879065

  1. The investigation of membrane binding by amphibian peptide agonists of CCK2R using (31)P and (2)H solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Patrick J; Separovic, Frances; Bowie, John H

    2014-05-01

    It has been proposed that some neuropeptides may be anchored to the cell membranes prior to attaching to the adjacent active sites of transmembrane receptors. The three amphibian skin neuropeptides signiferin 1 [RLCIPYIIPC(OH)] (smooth muscle active and immunomodulator), riparin 1.1 [[RLCIPVIFPC(OH)] (immunomodulator) and rothein 1 [SVSNIPESIGF(OH)] (immunomodulator) act via CCK2 transmembrane receptors. A combination of (31)P and (2)H solid state NMR studies of each of these three peptides in eukaryotic phospholipid models at 25°C shows that rothein 1 does not interact with the membrane at all. In contrast, both of the cyclic disulfides signiferin 1 and riparin 1.1 interact with phospholipid head groups and partially penetrate into the upper leaflet of the model bilayer, but to different extents. These interactions are not sufficiently effective to cause disruption of the lipid bilayer since the peptides are not antimicrobial, anticancer, antifungal nor active against enveloped viruses. PMID:24582625

  2. Effect of Sterol Structure on Chain Ordering of an Unsaturated Phospholipid: A 2H-NMR Study of POPC/Sterol Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaghaghi, Mehran; Thewalt, Jenifer; Zuckermann, Martin

    2012-10-01

    The physical properties of biological membranes are considerably altered by the presence of sterols. In particular, sterols help to maintain the integrity of the cell by adjusting the fluidity of the plasma membrane. Cholesterol is in addition an important component of lipid rafts which are hypothesized to compartmentalize the cell membrane surface thereby making it possible for certain proteins to function. Using 2H-NMR spectroscopy, we studied the effect of a series of different sterols on the chain ordering of POPC, an unsaturated phospholipid present in eukaryotic cell membranes. We were able to assigned specific roles to the structural differences between the sterols by comparing the manner in which they affect the average lipid chain conformation of POPC.

  3. Hydration of DNA by tritiated water and isotope distribution: a study by /sup 1/H, /sup 2/H, and /sup 3/H NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur-De Vre, R.; Grimee-Declerck, R.; Lejeune, P.; Bertinchamps, A.J.

    1982-06-01

    The hydration layer of DNA (0.75%) in tritiated water represents 3.5% of solvent /sup 3/HHO. The combined effects of temperature (-6 to -40/sup 0/C) and H/sub 2/O//sup 2/H/sub 2/O solvent composition on the spin-lattice relaxation times of water protons and deuterons suggest selective distribution of isotopes in the hydration layer. The ''hydration isotope'' effect and the localization of tritiated water molecules in the hydration layer of DNA have important implications in describing the radiobiological effects of tritiated water because the initial molecular damage caused by /sup 3/HHO (internal radiation source) localizes close to /sup 3/H due to the short range and low energy of /sup 3/H ..beta.. rays.

  4. Interpretation of NMR Relaxation as a Tool for Characterising the Adsorption Strength of Liquids inside Porous Materials

    PubMed Central

    D'Agostino, Carmine; Mitchell, Jonathan; Mantle, Michael D; Gladden, Lynn F

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation times are shown to provide a unique probe of adsorbate–adsorbent interactions in liquid-saturated porous materials. A short theoretical analysis is presented, which shows that the ratio of the longitudinal to transverse relaxation times (T1/T2) is related to an adsorbate–adsorbent interaction energy, and we introduce a quantitative metric esurf (based on the relaxation time ratio) characterising the strength of this surface interaction. We then consider the interaction of water with a range of oxide surfaces (TiO2 anatase, TiO2 rutile, γ-Al2O3, SiO2, θ-Al2O3 and ZrO2) and show that esurf correlates with the strongest adsorption sites present, as determined by temperature programmed desorption (TPD). Thus we demonstrate that NMR relaxation measurements have a direct physical interpretation in terms of the characterisation of activation energy of desorption from the surface. Further, for a series of chemically similar solid materials, in this case a range of oxide materials, for which at least two calibration values are obtainable by TPD, the esurf parameter yields a direct estimate of the maximum activation energy of desorption from the surface. The results suggest that T1/T2 measurements may become a useful addition to the methods available to characterise liquid-phase adsorption in porous materials. The particular motivation for this work is to characterise adsorbate–surface interactions in liquid-phase catalysis. PMID:25146237

  5. Structure and dynamics of the aliphatic cholesterol side chain in membranes as studied by (2)H NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Alexander; Scheidt, Holger A; Baek, Dong Jae; Bittman, Robert; Huster, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Cholesterol is an evolutionarily highly optimized molecule particularly known for its ability to condense the phospholipids in cellular membranes. Until recently, the accompanying increase in the chain order of the surrounding phospholipids was attributed to the planar and rigid tetracyclic ring structure of cholesterol. However, detailed investigations of cholesterol's aliphatic side chain demonstrated that this side chain is responsible for approximately half of the condensation effect. Therefore, we investigated the structure and dynamics of the aliphatic side chain of cholesterol using (2)H solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and microsecond timescale all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in four different model membranes: POPC, DPPC, PSM, and POPC/PSM (1 : 1 mol/mol) and at three different temperatures: 5 °C, 37 °C, and 50 °C. A cholesterol variant, in which 11 hydrogens of the aliphatic side chain were exchanged for deuterium, was used and the respective (2)H NMR spectra confirmed the axially asymmetric rotational diffusion of cholesterol in DPPC and PSM. Furthermore, NMR spectra indicated that some hydrogens showed an unexpected magnetic inequivalency. This finding was confirmed by all-atom molecular dynamics simulations and detailed analysis revealed that the hydrogens of the methylene groups at C22, C23, and C24 are magnetically inequivalent. This inequivalency is caused by steric clashes of the aliphatic side chain with the ring structure of cholesterol as well as the branched C21 methyl group. These excluded volume effects result in reduced conformational flexibility of the aliphatic side chain of cholesterol and explain its high order (order parameter of 0.78 for chain motions) and large contribution to the condensation effect. Additionally, the motional pattern of the side chain becomes highly anisotropic such that it shows larger fluctuations perpendicular to the ring plane of cholesterol with a biaxiality of the

  6. Backbone dynamics of the oligomerization domain of p53 determined from 15N NMR relaxation measurements.

    PubMed

    Clubb, R T; Omichinski, J G; Sakaguchi, K; Appella, E; Gronenborn, A M; Clore, G M

    1995-05-01

    The backbone dynamics of the tetrameric p53 oligomerization domain (residues 319-360) have been investigated by two-dimensional inverse detected heteronuclear 1H-15N NMR spectroscopy at 500 and 600 MHz. 15N T1, T2, and heteronuclear NOEs were measured for 39 of 40 non-proline backbone NH vectors at both field strengths. The overall correlation time for the tetramer, calculated from the T1/T2 ratios, was found to be 14.8 ns at 35 degrees C. The correlation times and amplitudes of the internal motions were extracted from the relaxation data using the model-free formalism (Lipari G, Szabo A, 1982, J Am Chem Soc 104:4546-4559). The internal dynamics of the structural core of the p53 oligomerization domain are uniform and fairly rigid, with residues 327-354 exhibiting an average generalized order parameter (S2) of 0.88 +/- 0.08. The N- and C-termini exhibit substantial mobility and are unstructured in the solution structure of p53. Residues located at the N- and C-termini, in the beta-sheet, in the turn between the alpha-helix and beta-sheet, and at the C-terminal end of the alpha-helix display two distinct internal motions that are faster than the overall correlation time. Fast internal motions (< or = 20 ps) are within the extreme narrowing limit and are of uniform amplitude. The slower motions (0.6-2.2 ns) are outside the extreme narrowing limit and vary in amplitude.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7663341

  7. Revisiting spin-lattice relaxation time measurements for dilute spins in high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fu, Riqiang; Li, Jun; Cui, Jingyu; Peng, Xinhua

    2016-07-01

    Numerous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of spin-lattice relaxation times (T1S) for dilute spins such as (13)C have led to investigations of the motional dynamics of individual functional groups in solid materials. In this work, we revisit the Solomon equations and analyze how the heteronuclear cross relaxation between the dilute S (e.g. (13)C) and abundant I (e.g. (1)H) spins affects the measured T1S values in solid-state NMR in the absence of (1)H saturation during the recovery time. It is found theoretically that at the beginning of the S spin magnetization recovery, the existence of non-equilibrium I magnetization introduces the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect onto the recovery of the S spin magnetization and confirmed experimentally that such a heteronuclear cross relaxation effect results in the recovery overshoot phenomena for the dilute spins when T1S is on the same order of T1H, leading to inaccurate measurements of the T1S values. Even when T1S is ten times larger than T1H, the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect on the measured T1S values is still noticeable. Furthermore, this cross relaxation effect on recovery trajectory of the S spins can be manipulated and even suppressed by preparing the initial I and S magnetization, so as to obtain the accurate T1S values. A sample of natural abundance l-isoleucine powder has been used to demonstrate the T1S measurements and their corresponding measured T1C values under various experimental conditions. PMID:27187211

  8. Revisiting spin-lattice relaxation time measurements for dilute spins in high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fu, Riqiang; Li, Jun; Cui, Jingyu; Peng, Xinhua

    2016-07-01

    Numerous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of spin-lattice relaxation times (T1S) for dilute spins such as (13)C have led to investigations of the motional dynamics of individual functional groups in solid materials. In this work, we revisit the Solomon equations and analyze how the heteronuclear cross relaxation between the dilute S (e.g. (13)C) and abundant I (e.g. (1)H) spins affects the measured T1S values in solid-state NMR in the absence of (1)H saturation during the recovery time. It is found theoretically that at the beginning of the S spin magnetization recovery, the existence of non-equilibrium I magnetization introduces the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect onto the recovery of the S spin magnetization and confirmed experimentally that such a heteronuclear cross relaxation effect results in the recovery overshoot phenomena for the dilute spins when T1S is on the same order of T1H, leading to inaccurate measurements of the T1S values. Even when T1S is ten times larger than T1H, the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect on the measured T1S values is still noticeable. Furthermore, this cross relaxation effect on recovery trajectory of the S spins can be manipulated and even suppressed by preparing the initial I and S magnetization, so as to obtain the accurate T1S values. A sample of natural abundance l-isoleucine powder has been used to demonstrate the T1S measurements and their corresponding measured T1C values under various experimental conditions.

  9. Revisiting spin-lattice relaxation time measurements for dilute spins in high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Riqiang; Li, Jun; Cui, Jingyu; Peng, Xinhua

    2016-07-01

    Numerous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of spin-lattice relaxation times (T1S) for dilute spins such as 13C have led to investigations of the motional dynamics of individual functional groups in solid materials. In this work, we revisit the Solomon equations and analyze how the heteronuclear cross relaxation between the dilute S (e.g. 13C) and abundant I (e.g. 1H) spins affects the measured T1S values in solid-state NMR in the absence of 1H saturation during the recovery time. It is found theoretically that at the beginning of the S spin magnetization recovery, the existence of non-equilibrium I magnetization introduces the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect onto the recovery of the S spin magnetization and confirmed experimentally that such a heteronuclear cross relaxation effect results in the recovery overshoot phenomena for the dilute spins when T1S is on the same order of T1H, leading to inaccurate measurements of the T1S values. Even when T1S is ten times larger than T1H, the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect on the measured T1S values is still noticeable. Furthermore, this cross relaxation effect on recovery trajectory of the S spins can be manipulated and even suppressed by preparing the initial I and S magnetization, so as to obtain the accurate T1S values. A sample of natural abundance L-isoleucine powder has been used to demonstrate the T1S measurements and their corresponding measured T1C values under various experimental conditions.

  10. A new NMR method for determining the particle thickness in nanocomposites, using T2,H-selective X{1H} recoupling.

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Rohr, K; Rawal, A; Fang, X-W

    2007-02-01

    A new nuclear magnetic resonance approach for characterizing the thickness of phosphate, silicate, carbonate, and other nanoparticles in organic-inorganic nanocomposites is presented. The particle thickness is probed using the strongly distant-dependent dipolar couplings between the abundant protons in the organic phase and X nuclei (31P, 29Si, 13C, 27Al, 23Na, etc.) in the inorganic phase. This approach requires pulse sequences with heteronuclear dephasing only by the polymer or surface protons that experience strong homonuclear interactions, but not by dispersed OH or water protons in the inorganic phase, which have long transverse relaxation times T2,H. This goal is achieved by heteronuclear recoupling with dephasing by strong homonuclear interactions of protons (HARDSHIP). The pulse sequence alternates heteronuclear recoupling for approximately 0.15 ms with periods of homonuclear dipolar dephasing that are flanked by canceling 90 degrees pulses. The heteronuclear evolution of the long-T2,H protons is refocused within two recoupling periods, so that 1H spin diffusion cannot significantly dephase these coherences. For the short-T2,H protons of a relatively immobile organic matrix, the heteronuclear dephasing rate depends simply on the heteronuclear second moment. Homonuclear interactions do not affect the dephasing, even though no homonuclear decoupling is applied, because long-range 1H-X dipolar couplings approximately commute with short-range 1H-1H couplings, and heteronuclear recoupling periods are relatively short. This is shown in a detailed analysis based on interaction representations. The algorithm for simulating the dephasing data is described. The new method is demonstrated on a clay-polymer nanocomposite, diamond nanocrystals with protonated surfaces, and the bioapatite-collagen nanocomposite in bone, as well as pure clay and hydroxyapatite. The diameters of the nanoparticles in these materials range between 1 and 5 nm. Simulations show that spherical

  11. Fluxionality and Isomerism of the Bis(dihydrogen) Complex RuH(2)(H(2))(2)(PCy(3))(2): INS, NMR, and Theoretical Studies.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Venancio; Sabo-Etienne, Sylviane; Chaudret, Bruno; Thoburn, John; Ulrich, Stefan; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich; Eckert, Juergen; Barthelat, Jean-Claude; Hussein, Khansaa; Marsden, Colin J.

    1998-07-13

    To study the fluxionality of the bis(dihydrogen) complex RuH(2)(H(2))(2)(PCy(3))(2) (1), NMR spectra were recorded in Freons (mixture of CDCl(3), CDFCl(2), and CDF(2)Cl). 1 was found to remain fluxional at all temperatures, but the presence of CDCl(3) necessary for its solubilization induces its transformation into, first, RuHCl(H(2))(2)(PCy(3))(2) (3) and the new ruthenium(IV) dihydride RuH(2)Cl(2)(PCy(3))(2) (4). 4 is produced selectively in pure CDCl(3) but reacts further to give a mixture of chloro complexes. 4 was isolated from the reaction of 1 with aqueous HCl in Et(2)O and shows a fluxional process attributed to the interconversion between two symmetrical isomers. The activation parameters of this process were obtained by (1)H NMR line shape analysis, as well as those corresponding to the exchange between 3 and free dihydrogen. The fluxionality of the dihydrogen-hydride system is also evident at a much faster time scale than that of NMR studies in the inelastic neutron scattering observations of the rotation of the dihydrogen ligands. The geometries and relative energies of several isomers of complexes 1, 3, and 4 were studied using density functional theory (DFT) and MP2 methods, together with a few coupled-cluster (CCSD(T)) calculations. In contrast to what might have been expected, the two hydrides and the two H(2) units of 1 lie in the same plane, due to the attractive "cis effect" created by the hydrides. The two H(2) ligands adopt cis positions in the lowest-energy isomer. Rotation of the two dihydrogen ligands has been analyzed using DFT calculations. A slight preference for a C(2) conrotatory pathway has been found with a calculated barrier in good agreement with the experimental INS value. Two low-energy isomers of 4 have been characterized computationally, both of which have C(2)(v)() symmetry, consistent with the solution NMR spectra. PMID:11670430

  12. Acceleration of Natural-Abundance Solid-State MAS NMR Measurements on Bone by Paramagnetic Relaxation from Gadolinium-DTPA

    PubMed Central

    Mroue, Kamal H.; Zhang, Rongchun; Zhu, Peizhi; McNerny, Erin; Kohn, David H.; Morris, Michael D.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2014-01-01

    Reducing the data collection time without affecting the signal intensity and spectral resolution is one of the major challenges for the widespread application of multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, especially in experiments conducted on complex heterogeneous biological systems such as bone. In most of these experiments, the NMR data collection time is ultimately governed by the proton spin-lattice relaxation times (T1). For over two decades, gadolinium(III)-DTPA (Gd-DTPA, DTPA = Diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid) has been one of the most widely used contrast-enhancement agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, we demonstrate that Gd-DTPA can also be effectively used to enhance the longitudinal relaxation rates of protons in solid-state NMR experiments conducted on bone without significant line-broadening and chemical-shift-perturbation side effects. Using bovine cortical bone samples incubated in different concentrations of Gd-DTPA complex, the 1H T1 values were calculated from data collected by 1H spin-inversion recovery method detected in natural-abundance 13C cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) NMR experiments. Our results reveal that the 1H T1 values can be successfully reduced by a factor of 3.5 using as low as 10 mM Gd-DTPA without reducing the spectral resolution and thus enabling faster data acquisition of the 13C CPMAS spectra. These results obtained from 13C-detected CPMAS experiments were further confirmed using 1H-detected ultrafast MAS experiments on Gd-DTPA doped bone samples. This approach considerably improves the signal-to-noise ratio per unit time of NMR experiments applied to bone samples by reducing the experimental time required to acquire the same number of scans. PMID:24881032

  13. Rapid and simple determination of T1 relaxation times in time-domain NMR by Continuous Wave Free Precession sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moraes, Tiago Bueno; Monaretto, Tatiana; Colnago, Luiz Alberto

    2016-09-01

    Longitudinal (T1) and transverse (T2) relaxation times have been widely used in time-domain NMR (TD-NMR) to determine several physicochemical properties of petroleum, polymers, and food products. The measurement of T2 through the CPMG pulse sequence has been used in most of these applications because it denotes a rapid, robust method. On the other hand, T1 has been occasionally used in TD-NMR due to the long measurement time required to collect multiple points along the T1 relaxation curve. Recently, several rapid methods to measure T1 have been proposed. Those methods based upon single shot, known as Continuous Wave Free Precession (CWFP) pulse sequences, have been employed in the simultaneous measurement of T1 and T2 in a rapid fashion. However, these sequences can be used exclusively in instrument featuring short dead time because the magnitude of the signal at thermal equilibrium is required. In this paper, we demonstrate that a special CWFP sequence with a low flip angle can be a simple and rapid method to measure T1 regardless of instruments dead time. Experimental results confirmed that the method called CWFP-T1 may be used to measure both single T1 value and T1 distribution in heterogeneous samples. Therefore, CWFP-T1 sequence can be a feasible alternative to CPMG in the determination of physicochemical properties, particularly in processes where fast protocols are requested such as industrial applications.

  14. Rapid and simple determination of T1 relaxation times in time-domain NMR by Continuous Wave Free Precession sequence.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Tiago Bueno; Monaretto, Tatiana; Colnago, Luiz Alberto

    2016-09-01

    Longitudinal (T1) and transverse (T2) relaxation times have been widely used in time-domain NMR (TD-NMR) to determine several physicochemical properties of petroleum, polymers, and food products. The measurement of T2 through the CPMG pulse sequence has been used in most of these applications because it denotes a rapid, robust method. On the other hand, T1 has been occasionally used in TD-NMR due to the long measurement time required to collect multiple points along the T1 relaxation curve. Recently, several rapid methods to measure T1 have been proposed. Those methods based upon single shot, known as Continuous Wave Free Precession (CWFP) pulse sequences, have been employed in the simultaneous measurement of T1 and T2 in a rapid fashion. However, these sequences can be used exclusively in instrument featuring short dead time because the magnitude of the signal at thermal equilibrium is required. In this paper, we demonstrate that a special CWFP sequence with a low flip angle can be a simple and rapid method to measure T1 regardless of instruments dead time. Experimental results confirmed that the method called CWFP-T1 may be used to measure both single T1 value and T1 distribution in heterogeneous samples. Therefore, CWFP-T1 sequence can be a feasible alternative to CPMG in the determination of physicochemical properties, particularly in processes where fast protocols are requested such as industrial applications. PMID:27376553

  15. Significance of the direct relaxation process in the low-energy spin dynamics of a one-dimensional ferrimagnet NiCu(C 7H 6N 2O 6)(H 2O) 3·2H 2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, S.

    2000-11-01

    In response to recent nuclear magnetic resonance measurements on a ferrimagnetic chain compound NiCu(C 7H 6N 2O 6)(H 2O) 3·2H 2O [Solid State Commun. 113 (2000) 433], we calculate the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/ T1 in terms of a modified spin-wave theory. Emphasizing that the dominant relaxation mechanism arises from the direct (single-magnon) process rather than the Raman (two-magnon) one, we explain the observed temperature and applied-field dependences of 1/ T1. Ferrimagnetic relaxation phenomena are generally discussed and novel ferrimagnets with extremely slow dynamics are predicted.

  16. Biosynthesis of a specifically deuteriated diunsaturated fatty acid (18:2/sub. delta. 6,9/) for /sup 2/H NMR membrane studies

    SciTech Connect

    Baenziger, J.E.; Smith, I.C.P.; Hill, R.J.

    1987-12-15

    A unique procedure for the biosynthesis and subsequent isolation of a series of specifically deuteriated cis,cis-octadeca-6,9-dienoic acids has been developed. An auxotroph of Tetrahymena, which lacks ..delta..9 and ..delta..12 desaturase activity, is supplemented with specifically deuteriated oleic acid and converts it to the corresponding deuteriated cis,cis-octadeca-6,9-dienoic acid, 18:2/sup ..delta..6,9/. The deuteriated fatty acid is subsequently isolated by argentation chromatography and HPLC. To demonstrate the utility of the procedure, we describe here the biosynthesis of cis,cis-octadeca-6,9-dienoic acid deuteriated at positions 9 and 10. Gas and thin-layer chromatography of the isolated fatty acid showed that it was greater than 99% pure while /sup 13/C NMR and mass spectrometry of the O-(trimethylsilyl) derivative confirmed that the 18-carbon fatty acid contains two double bonds located at positions 6 and 9. The yield, from an 11-L culture, was typically 100 mg of which 35% was found to be deuteriated at both the 9- and 10-positions. The deuteriated fatty acid was esterified to 1-hexadecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, and aqueous, multilamellar dispersions of the lipid were studied by /sup 2/H NMR. Each spectrum consists of two overlapping powder patterns and therefore yields two quadrupolar splittings. Over a temperature range of 0 to 40/sup 0/C, one splitting decreases from 6.6 to 1.8 kHz while other increases from 4.5 to 5.3 kHz. The magnitudes of the two splittings are equivalent between 10 and 15/sup 0/ C. The values of the splittings, and their response to temperature, differ significantly from those of the corresponding deuteriated oleic acid in microbial membranes and in bilayers of 1-hexadecanoyl-2-cis-octadec-9-enoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC).

  17. Nuclear Spin Relaxation Times for Methane-Helium ``Slush'' at 4 MHz using Pulsed NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamida, J. A.; Sullivan, N. S.

    2006-09-01

    We report measurements of the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation times (T1) and spin-spin relaxation times (T2) for small grains of methane suspended in liquid helium (methane-helium "slush") for temperatures 2 Krelaxation rate 1/T2 is consistent with internal diffusion as opposed to surface scattering, which has been shown to be dominant for hydrogen-helium "slush". The most interesting feature observed for methane-helium mixtures is the existence of three different time scales for samples aged at 4.2 K. The possible origins of this distribution of relaxation times are discussed.

  18. Analysis of 31P MAS NMR spectra and transversal relaxation of bacteriophage M13 and tobacco mosaic virus.

    PubMed Central

    Magusin, P C; Hemminga, M A

    1994-01-01

    Phosphorus magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra and transversal relaxation of M13 and TMV are analyzed by use of a model, which includes both local backbone motions of the encapsulated nucleic acid molecules and overall rotational diffusion of the rod-shaped virions about their length axis. Backbone motions influence the sideband intensities by causing a fast restricted reorientation of the phosphodiesters. To evaluate their influence on the observed sideband patterns, we extend the model that we used previously to analyze nonspinning 31P NMR lineshapes (Magusin, P.C.M.M., and M. A. Hemminga. 1993a. Biophys. J. 64:1861-1868) to magic angle spinning NMR experiments. Backbone motions also influence the conformation of the phosphodiesters, causing conformational averaging of the isotropic chemical shift, which offers a possible explanation for the various linewidths of the centerband and the sidebands observed for M13 gels under various conditions. The change of the experimental lineshape of M13 as a function of temperature and hydration is interpreted in terms of fast restricted fluctuation of the dihedral angles between the POC and the OCH planes on both sides of the 31P nucleus in the nucleic acid backbone. Backbone motions also seem to be the main cause of transversal relaxation measured at spinning rates of 4 kHz or higher. At spinning rates less than 2 kHz, transversal relaxation is significantly faster. This effect is assigned to slow, overall rotation of the rod-shaped M13 phage about its length axis. Equations are derived to simulate the observed dependence of T2e on the spinning rate. PMID:8038391

  19. The dark energy of proteins comes to light: conformational entropy and its role in protein function revealed by NMR relaxation.

    PubMed

    Wand, A Joshua

    2013-02-01

    Historically it has been virtually impossible to experimentally determine the contribution of residual protein entropy to fundamental protein activities such as the binding of ligands. Recent progress has illuminated the possibility of employing NMR relaxation methods to quantitatively determine the role of changes in conformational entropy in molecular recognition by proteins. The method rests on using fast internal protein dynamics as a proxy. Initial results reveal a large and variable role for conformational entropy in the binding of ligands by proteins. Such a role for conformational entropy in molecular recognition has significant implications for enzymology, signal transduction, allosteric regulation and the development of protein-directed pharmaceuticals. PMID:23246280

  20. Off-resonance rotating frame spin-lattice NMR relaxation studies of phosphorus metabolite rotational diffusion in bovine lens homogenates

    SciTech Connect

    Caines, G.H.; Schleich, T.; Morgan, C.F. ); Farnsworth, P.N. )

    1990-08-21

    The rotational diffusion behavior of phosphorus metabolites present in calf lens cortical and nuclear homogenates was investigated by the NMR technique of {sup 31}P off-resonance rotating frame spin-lattice relaxation as a means of assessing the occurrence and extent of phosphorus metabolite-lens protein interactions. {sup 31}P NMR spectra of calf lens homogenates were obtained at 10 and 18{degree}C at 7.05 T. Effective rotational correlation times ({tau}{sub 0,eff}) for the major phosphorus metabolites present in cortical and nuclear bovine calf lens homogenates were derived from nonlinear least-squares analysis of R vs {omega}{sub e} data with the assumption of isotropic reorientational motion. Intramolecular dipole-dipole ({sup 1}H-{sup 31}P, {sup 31}P-{sup 31}P), chemical shift anisotropy (CSA), and solvent (water) translational intermolecular dipole-dipole ({sup 1}H-{sup 31}P) relaxation contributions were assumed in the analyses. A fast-exchange model between free and bound forms, was employed in the analysis of the metabolite R vs {omega}{sub e} curves to yield the fraction of free (unbound) metabolite ({Theta}{sub free}). The results of this study establish the occurrence of significant temperature-dependent (above and below the cold cataract phase transition temperature) binding of ATP (cortex) and PME (nucleus) and p{sub i} (nucleus) in calf lens.

  1. Spectral density mapping at multiple magnetic fields suitable for 13C NMR relaxation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadeřávek, Pavel; Zapletal, Vojtěch; Fiala, Radovan; Srb, Pavel; Padrta, Petr; Přecechtělová, Jana Pavlíková; Šoltésová, Mária; Kowalewski, Jozef; Widmalm, Göran; Chmelík, Josef; Sklenář, Vladimír; Žídek, Lukáš

    2016-05-01

    Standard spectral density mapping protocols, well suited for the analysis of 15N relaxation rates, introduce significant systematic errors when applied to 13C relaxation data, especially if the dynamics is dominated by motions with short correlation times (small molecules, dynamic residues of macromolecules). A possibility to improve the accuracy by employing cross-correlated relaxation rates and on measurements taken at several magnetic fields has been examined. A suite of protocols for analyzing such data has been developed and their performance tested. Applicability of the proposed protocols is documented in two case studies, spectral density mapping of a uniformly labeled RNA hairpin and of a selectively labeled disaccharide exhibiting highly anisotropic tumbling. Combination of auto- and cross-correlated relaxation data acquired at three magnetic fields was applied in the former case in order to separate effects of fast motions and conformational or chemical exchange. An approach using auto-correlated relaxation rates acquired at five magnetic fields, applicable to anisotropically moving molecules, was used in the latter case. The results were compared with a more advanced analysis of data obtained by interpolation of auto-correlated relaxation rates measured at seven magnetic fields, and with the spectral density mapping of cross-correlated relaxation rates. The results showed that sufficiently accurate values of auto- and cross-correlated spectral density functions at zero and 13C frequencies can be obtained from data acquired at three magnetic fields for uniformly 13C -labeled molecules with a moderate anisotropy of the rotational diffusion tensor. Analysis of auto-correlated relaxation rates at five magnetic fields represents an alternative for molecules undergoing highly anisotropic motions.

  2. 2H NMR and 13C-IRMS analyses of acetic acid from vinegar, 18O-IRMS analysis of water in vinegar: international collaborative study report.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Freddy; Jamin, Eric

    2009-09-01

    An international collaborative study of isotopic methods applied to control the authenticity of vinegar was organized in order to support the recognition of these procedures as official methods. The determination of the 2H/1H ratio of the methyl site of acetic acid by SNIF-NMR (site-specific natural isotopic fractionation-nuclear magnetic resonance) and the determination of the 13C/12C ratio, by IRMS (isotope ratio mass spectrometry) provide complementary information to characterize the botanical origin of acetic acid and to detect adulterations of vinegar using synthetic acetic acid. Both methods use the same initial steps to recover pure acetic acid from vinegar. In the case of wine vinegar, the determination of the 18O/16O ratio of water by IRMS allows to differentiate wine vinegar from vinegars made from dried grapes. The same set of vinegar samples was used to validate these three determinations. The precision parameters of the method for measuring delta13C (carbon isotopic deviation) were found to be similar to the values previously obtained for similar methods applied to wine ethanol or sugars extracted from fruit juices: the average repeatability (r) was 0.45 per thousand, and the average reproducibility (R) was 0.91 per thousand. As expected from previous in-house study of the uncertainties, the precision parameters of the method for measuring the 2H/1H ratio of the methyl site were found to be slightly higher than the values previously obtained for similar methods applied to wine ethanol or fermentation ethanol in fruit juices: the average repeatability was 1.34 ppm, and the average reproducibility was 1.62 ppm. This precision is still significantly smaller than the differences between various acetic acid sources (delta13C and delta18O) and allows a satisfactory discrimination of vinegar types. The precision parameters of the method for measuring delta18O were found to be similar to the values previously obtained for other methods applied to wine and

  3. Effect of magnetic field and iron content on NMR proton relaxation of liver, spleen and brain tissues.

    PubMed

    Hocq, Aline; Luhmer, Michel; Saussez, Sven; Louryan, Stéphane; Gillis, Pierre; Gossuin, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Iron accumulation is observed in liver and spleen during hemochromatosis and important neurodegenerative diseases involve iron overload in brain. Storage of iron is ensured by ferritin, which contains a magnetic core. It causes a darkening on T2 -weighted MR images. This work aims at improving the understanding of the NMR relaxation of iron-loaded human tissues, which is necessary to develop protocols of iron content measurements by MRI. Relaxation times measurements on brain, liver and spleen samples were realized at different magnetic fields. Iron content was determined by atomic emission spectroscopy. For all samples, the longitudinal relaxation rate (1/T1 ) of tissue protons decreases with the magnetic field up to 1 T, independently of iron content, while their transverse relaxation rate (1/T2 ) strongly increases with the field, either linearly or quadratically, or a combination thereof. The extent of the inter-echo time dependence of 1/T2 also varies according to the sample. A combination of theoretical models is necessary to describe the relaxation of iron-containing tissues. This can be due to the presence, inside tissues, of ferritin clusters of different sizes and densities. When considering all samples, a correlation (r(2)  = 0.6) between 1/T1 and iron concentration is observed at 7.0 T. In contrast the correlation between 1/T2 and iron content is poor, even at high field (r(2)  = 0.14 at 7.0 T). Our results show that MRI methods based on T1 or T2 measurements will easily detect an iron overloading at high magnetic field, but will not provide an accurate quantification of tissue iron content at low iron concentrations. PMID:24954138

  4. Re-evaluation of the model-free analysis of fast internal motion in proteins using NMR relaxation.

    PubMed

    Frederick, Kendra King; Sharp, Kim A; Warischalk, Nicholas; Wand, A Joshua

    2008-09-25

    NMR spin relaxation retains a central role in the characterization of the fast internal motion of proteins and their complexes. Knowledge of the distribution and amplitude of the motion of amino acid side chains is critical for the interpretation of the dynamical proxy for the residual conformational entropy of proteins, which can potentially significantly contribute to the entropy of protein function. A popular treatment of NMR relaxation phenomena in macromolecules dissolved in liquids is the so-called model-free approach of Lipari and Szabo. The robustness of the mode-free approach has recently been strongly criticized and the remarkable range and structural context of the internal motion of proteins, characterized by such NMR relaxation techniques, attributed to artifacts arising from the model-free treatment, particularly with respect to the symmetry of the underlying motion. We develop an objective quantification of both spatial and temporal asymmetry of motion and re-examine the foundation of the model-free treatment. Concerns regarding the robustness of the model-free approach to asymmetric motion appear to be generally unwarranted. The generalized order parameter is robustly recovered. The sensitivity of the model-free treatment to asymmetric motion is restricted to the effective correlation time, which is by definition a normalized quantity and not a true time constant and therefore of much less interest in this context. With renewed confidence in the model-free approach, we then examine the microscopic distribution of side chain motion in the complex between calcium-saturated calmodulin and the calmodulin-binding domain of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase. Deuterium relaxation is used to characterize the motion of methyl groups in the complex. A remarkable range of Lipari-Szabo model-free generalized order parameters are seen with little correlation with basic structural parameters such as the depth of burial. These results are contrasted with the

  5. {sup 139}La NMR in lanthanum manganites: Indication of the presence of magnetic polarons from spectra and nuclear relaxations

    SciTech Connect

    Allodi, G.; De Renzi, R.; Guidi, G.

    1998-01-01

    We present {sup 139}La NMR experiments on five powder samples of lanthanum manganites, with a Mn{sup 4+} concentration ranging from the antiferromagnetic-insulator (AFM) to the ferromagnetic-conducting (FM) region of the phase diagram. We measure a positive hyperfine coupling C=0.13 T/{mu}{sub B}. A signal from nuclei in a FM environment is present at all compositions, as evidenced by a hyperfine frequency in zero-field experiments, by a positive hyperfine shift in NMR experiments below T{sub c}, and by a paramagnetic frequency shift following Curie-Weiss law. A signal from nuclei in an AFM environment is identified by a similar negative intercept Curie-Weiss law. The NMR spectra reveal a large temperature dependent fraction of static spin defects below T{sub c} in the FM domains. Nuclear relaxation indicates that the FM regions are influenced by diffusing, AFM-correlated excitations, while the AFM regions probe spin fluctuations from diffusing, FM correlated excitations. These results are interpreted in terms of electronic inhomogeneities due to the presence of a magnetic small polaron. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  6. Effects of hydrophobic treatments of stone on pore water studied by continuous distribution analysis of NMR relaxation times.

    PubMed

    Appolonia, L; Borgia, G C; Bortolotti, V; Brown, R J; Fantazzini, P; Rezzaro, G

    2001-01-01

    The effects of protective hydrophobic products applied to porous media such as stone or mortar vary greatly with the product, the porous medium, and the mode of application. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) measurements on fluids in the pore spaces of both treated and untreated samples can give information on the contact of the fluid with the internal surfaces, which is affected by all the above factors. Continuous distributions of relaxation times T(1) and T(2) of water in the pores of both synthetic and natural porous media were obtained before and after hydrophobic treatment. The synthetic porous media are ceramic filter materials characterized by narrow distributions of pore dimensions and show that the treatment does not produce large changes in the relaxation times of the water. For three travertine samples most of a long relaxation time component, presumably from the largest pores, remains after treatment, while the amplitude of an intermediate component is greatly reduced. For three pudding-stone samples, treatment leads to a substantial loss from the long component and an even greater loss from the intermediate component. PMID:11445343

  7. Mineralogical controls on NMR rock surface relaxivity: A case study of the Fontainebleau Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livo, Kurt

    Pore size distribution is derived from nuclear magnetic resonance, but is scaled by surface relaxivity. While nuclear magnetic resonance studies generally focus on the difficulty of determining pore size distribution in unconventional shale reservoirs, there is a lack of discussion concerning pure quartz sandstones. Long surface relaxivity causes complications analyzing nuclear magnetic resonance data for pore size distribution determination. Currently, I am unaware of research that addresses the complicated pore size distribution determination in long relaxing, pure sandstone formations, which is essential to accurate downhole petrophysical modeling. The Fontainebleau sandstone is well known for its homogenous mineralogical makeup and wide range of porosity and permeability. The Hibernia sandstone exhibits a similar mineralogy and is characterized by a similar and porosity-permeability range to the Fontainebleau sandstones, but with a significantly higher portion of clay minerals (1-6%). I present systematic petrophysical properties such as porosity, pore size distribution from nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation times, permeability, and volumetric magnetic susceptibility to aide in characterization of the Fontainebleau sandstone. Analysis of collected nuclear magnetic resonance data is then compared to other petrophysical studies from literature such as helium porosity and permeability, magnetic susceptibility, and electrical conductivity. I find that the lack of impurities on the grain surfaces of pure quartz samples imparts a lower surface relaxivity as compared to clay containing sandstones and makes nuclear magnetic resonance analysis more complex. Thus, inverted nuclear magnetic resonance data from cleaner outcrop samples incorrectly models pore size distribution without accounting for wider surface relaxivity variation and is improperly used when characterizing the Fontainebleau sandstone. This is further supported by evidence from less

  8. Very short NMR relaxation times of anions in ionic liquids: New pulse sequence to eliminate the acoustic ringing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimavicius, Vytautas; Gdaniec, Zofia; Balevicius, Vytautas

    2014-11-01

    NMR relaxation processes of anions were studied in two neat imidazolium-based room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) 1-decyl-3-methyl-imidazolium bromide- and chloride. The spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxations of 81Br and 35Cl nuclei were found to be extremely fast due to very strong quadrupolar interactions. The determined relaxation rates are comparable with those observed in the solids or in some critical organic solute/water/salt systems. In order to eliminate the acoustic ringing of the probe-head during relaxation times measurements the novel pulse sequence has been devised. It is based on the conventional inversion recovery pulse sequence, however, instead of the last 90° pulse the subsequence of three 90° pulses applied along axes to fulfill the phase cycling condition is used. Using this pulse sequence it was possible to measure T1 for both studied nuclei. The viscosity measurements have been carried out and the rotational correlation times were calculated. The effective 35Cl quadrupolar coupling constant was found to be almost one order lower than that for 81Br, i.e. 1.8 MHz and 16.0 MHz, respectively. Taking into account the facts that the ratio of (Q(35Cl)/Q(81Br))2 ≈ 0.1 and EFG tensors on the anions are quite similar, analogous structural organizations are expected for both RTILs. The observed T1/T2 (1.27-1.44) ratios were found to be not sufficiently high to confirm the presence of long-living (on the time scale of ⩾10-8 s) mesoscopic structures or heterogeneities in the studied neat ionic liquids.

  9. NMR relaxation and exchange in metal-organic frameworks for surface area screening

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, JJ; Mason, JA; Bloch, ED; Gygi, D; Long, JR; Reimer, JA

    2015-03-15

    We describe a robust screening technique that correlates the surface area of metal organic frameworks to the proton T-2 relaxation behavior of imbibed solvent at low field (13 MHz). In frameworks with small pore sizes (<1 nm) or strong solvent-framework interactions, diffusional exchange between the pore-confined and inter-particle solvent populations remains slow compared to the T-2 of the pore-confined solvent, allowing for a direct porosity analysis of the T-2 spectrum obtained from Laplace inversions. Increases in framework pore-size (>1 nm) lead to corresponding increases in the rate of solvent exchange, as confirmed by T-2 relaxation exchange (REXSY) experiments; increases in the pore size also increases the T-2 of the pore-confined solvent. The combination of these two effects results in comparable rates of relaxation and exchange, which precludes the direct analysis of Laplace inversions. Thus, two- and three-site kinetics models were applied to extract porosity from relaxation decays, thereby improving the utility of the porosity screening tool. (C) 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Nuclear magnetic relaxation in the ferrimagnetic chain compound NiCu(C7H6N2O6)(H2O)3·2H2O : three-magnon scattering?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, Hiromitsu; Yamamoto, Shoji

    2004-12-01

    Recent proton spin-lattice relaxation-time (T1) measurements on the ferrimagnetic chain compound NiCu(C7H6N2O6)(H2O)3·2H2O are explained by an elaborately modified spin-wave theory. We give strong evidence of the major contribution to 1/T1 being made by the three-magnon scattering rather than the Raman scattering.

  11. Slow motions in microcrystalline proteins as observed by MAS-dependent 15N rotating-frame NMR relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krushelnitsky, Alexey; Zinkevich, Tatiana; Reif, Bernd; Saalwächter, Kay

    2014-11-01

    15N NMR relaxation rate R1ρ measurements reveal that a substantial fraction of residues in the microcrystalline chicken alpha-spectrin SH3 domain protein undergoes dynamics in the μs-ms timescale range. On the basis of a comparison of 2D site-resolved with 1D integrated 15N spectral intensities, we demonstrate that the significant fraction of broad signals in the 2D spectrum exhibits the most pronounced slow mobility. We show that 15N R1ρ's in proton-diluted protein samples are practically free from the coherent spin-spin contribution even at low MAS rates, and thus can be analysed quantitatively. Moderate MAS rates (10-30 kHz) can be more advantageous in comparison with the rates >50-60 kHz when slow dynamics are to be identified and quantified by means of R1ρ experiments.

  12. Single-crystal XRD and solid-state NMR structural resolution of a layered fluorinated gallium phosphate: RbGa3(PO4)(2)(HPO4)F4·C5N2H16·2H2O (MIL-145).

    PubMed

    Martineau, Charlotte; Loiseau, Thierry; Beitone, Lionel; Férey, Gérard; Bouchevreau, Boris; Taulelle, Francis

    2013-01-14

    A new two-dimensional fluorinated gallium phosphate RbGa(3)(PO(4))(2)(HPO(4))F(4)·C(5)N(2)H(16)·2H(2)O (MIL-145) has been hydrothermally synthesized (180 °C for 36 h) in the presence of 1,5-diaminopentane and rubidium fluoride. Its structural model has been determined by means of single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The structure contains corrugated infinite ribbons of GaO(3)F(3) and GaO(4)F(2) octahedra linked through edge- and corner-sharing mode via fluoride anions. These chains are then connected to each other via phosphate groups to create a layered network delimiting 6-ring channels trapping rubidium cations. The inorganic sheets are intercalated by diprotonated 1,5-diaminopentane and water molecules, ensuring the three-dimensional cohesion via hydrogen bond scheme. (1)H, (13)C, (15)N and (87)Rb solid-state NMR spectra show the presence of two inequivalent amines as well as two Rb cations, confirming the choice of the space group, which was ambiguous from the diffraction data. (71)Ga NMR spectra, acquired at several magnetic fields, contain two different sets of Ga signals, corresponding to the two types of gallium environments in the structure. One-dimensional (19)F and (31)P and (19)F-(31)P two-dimensional NMR experiments have been recorded, which are in full agreement with the proposed structural model. Finally, possible assignments of the (19)F and (31)P resonances to the crystallographic sites in RbGa(3)(PO(4))(2)(HPO(4))F(4)·C(5)N(2)H(16)·2H(2)O have been determined by comparing adjacency matrices build-up from 2D NMR correlation spectra and from the structural data. PMID:23069866

  13. The Frequency-Dependence of the NMR Longitudinal Relaxation Rate, T(1)(-1), of Water in Cysts of the Brine Shrimp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egan, Thomas F.

    The NMR spin-lattice relaxation rate, T(,1)(' -1), of water is independent of the Larmor frequency, (omega)/2(pi), in the normal rf range. However, T(,1)('-1) of intracellular water in biological systems, which accounts for as much as 80% of the cell mass, is frequency-dependent. This indicates that the NMR properties of water in the cellular environment are influenced by long-correlation time processes due to the interaction of water with proteins and other macromolecular constituents of the cell. In this research, the relaxation rate T(,1)(' -1) of water in the Artemia (brine shrimp) cyst is examined as a function of: (1) the proton NMR Larmor frequency for .01 <= (omega)/2(pi) <= 500 MHz, (2) different cyst hydration levels from 0.12 to 1.25 grams water/gram dry solid, (3) temperatures of 22C and 5C. The frequency-dependence of T(,1)('-1) is interpreted in terms of a two-phase exchange model. One water phase is similar to pure water and contributes a small constant relaxation rate. The second phase is water closely associated with the surfaces of large molecules and termed "hydration water". A polymer-dynamics relaxation mechanism, which treats fluctuations of long-chain molecules in aqueous solution, has been proposed by Rorschach and Hazlewood to explain the relaxation in this second water phase. In one limit, this mechanism predicts a frequency-dependent relaxation rate proportional to (omega)('- 1/2). This particular dependence has previously been observed in other NMR studies on biological systems and is also observed in this study for Artemia cysts between 10 and 500 MHz. At lower Larmor frequencies, below 1 MHz, the relaxation rates of water in brine shrimp cysts are influenced by additional relexation mechanisms; translational diffusion of hydration water is one possibility.

  14. Theory of NMR 1 /T1 relaxation in a quantum spin nematic in an applied magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smerald, Andrew; Shannon, Nic

    2016-05-01

    There is now strong theoretical evidence that a wide range of frustrated magnets should support quantum spin-nematic order in an applied magnetic field. Nonetheless, the fact that spin-nematic order does not break time-reversal symmetry makes it very difficult to detect in experiment. In this article, we continue the theme begun in Phys. Rev. B 88, 184430 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevB.88.184430, of exploring how spin-nematic order reveals itself in the spectrum of spin excitations. Building on an earlier analysis of inelastic neutron scattering [Phys. Rev. B 91, 174402 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevB.91.174402], we show how the NMR 1 /T1 relaxation rate could be used to identify a spin-nematic state in an applied magnetic field. We emphasize the characteristic universal features of 1 /T1 using a symmetry-based description of the spin-nematic order parameter and its fluctuations. Turning to the specific case of spin-1/2 frustrated ferromagnets, we show that the signal from competing spin-wave excitations can be suppressed through a judicious choice of nuclear site and field direction. As a worked example, we show how 31P NMR in the square lattice frustrated ferromagnet BaCdVO (PO4)2 is sensitive to spin-nematic order.

  15. Molecular interactions in the ionic liquid emim acetate and water binary mixtures probed via NMR spin relaxation and exchange spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Allen, Jesse J; Bowser, Sage R; Damodaran, Krishnan

    2014-05-01

    Interactions of ionic liquids (ILs) with water are of great interest for many potential IL applications. 1-Ethyl-3-methylimidazolium (emim) acetate, in particular, has shown interesting interactions with water including hydrogen bonding and even chemical exchange. Previous studies have shown the unusual behavior of emim acetate when in the presence of 0.43 mole fraction of water, and a combination of NMR techniques is used herein to investigate the emim acetate-water system and the unusual behavior at 0.43 mole fraction of water. NMR relaxometry techniques are used to describe the effects of water on the molecular motion and interactions of emim acetate with water. A discontinuity is seen in nuclear relaxation behavior at the concentration of 0.43 mole fraction of water, and this is attributed to the formation of a hydrogen bonded network. EXSY measurements are used to determine the exchange rates between the H2 emim proton and water, which show a complex dependence on the concentration of the mixture. The findings support and expand our previous results, which suggested the presence of an extended hydrogen bonding network in the emim acetate-water system at concentrations close to 0.50 mole fraction of H2O. PMID:24654003

  16. 2H nuclear magnetic resonance study of deuterated water dynamics in perfluorosulfonic acid ionomer Nafion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jun Hee; Lee, Kyu Won; Lee, Cheol Eui

    2016-11-01

    We have employed deuteron nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in order to study the dynamics of the deuterated water (D2O) molecules introduced into a perfluorosulfonic acid ionomer Nafion (NR-211) film. According to the 2H NMR spectral analysis, the deuterated water molecules at low temperatures occupied either relatively rigid or mobile sites up to the temperature TM=240 K where all the deuterated water molecules became mobile. The temperature-dependent NMR linewidths sensitively reflected the motional narrowing of the rigid and mobile sites, and the NMR chemical shift reflected significant changes in the hydrogen bonds of the deuterated water. While a slow- to fast-limit motional transition was manifested at TM in the laboratory-frame NMR spin-lattice relaxation, the rotating-frame spin-lattice relaxation indicated no bulk liquid water state down to 200 K.

  17. Observation of the Second-Order Quadrupolar Interaction as a Dominating NMR Relaxation Mechanism in Liquids: The Ultraslow Regime of Motion.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jiahui; Terskikh, Victor; Wu, Gang

    2016-09-01

    We report variable-temperature (VT) (17)O NMR spectra of [5-(17)O]-d-glucose in an aqueous solution and in glycerol at 14.1 and 21.1 T. The VT (17)O NMR data cover a wide range of motion for which the molecular rotational correlation time (τc) of glucose changes more than 5 orders of magnitude. The observed line width of the (17)O NMR signal for [5-(17)O]-d-glucose displays a maximum at ω0τc ≈ 1 and a minimum at ω0τc ≈ 150, where ω0 is the angular Larmor frequency of (17)O. Under the ultraslow motion condition (i.e., ω0τc > 150), the line width of the observed (17)O NMR signal increases drastically with τc, suggesting that the second-order quadrupolar interaction becomes the predominant relaxation mechanism. While this relaxation mechanism has long been predicted by theory, the current study reports the first experimental observation of such a phenomenon. The implications of this new relaxation mechanism on the spectral resolution limit in liquid-state NMR spectroscopy for half-integer spins are discussed. PMID:27525537

  18. Observation of the vortex lattice melting by NMR spin-lattice relaxation in the mixed state

    SciTech Connect

    Bulaevskii, L.N.; Hammel, P.C.; Vinokur, V.M.

    1994-01-01

    For anisotropic layered superconductors the effect of moving vortices on the nuclear spin magnetization is calculated. Current is supposed to flow along layers, and applied magnetic field is tilted with respect to c-axis. In the solid phase the motion of the vortex lattice produces an alternating magnetic field perpendicular to the applied field which causes the decay of the spin-echo amplitude. This decay rate will display an array of peaks as a function of frequency. In the liquid phase this alternating field contribute to the longitudinal relaxation rate W{sub 1} which has a single peak.

  19. Temperature dependence of the NMR spin-lattice relaxation rate for spin-1/2 chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coira, E.; Barmettler, P.; Giamarchi, T.; Kollath, C.

    2016-10-01

    We use recent developments in the framework of a time-dependent matrix product state method to compute the nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation rate 1 /T1 for spin-1/2 chains under magnetic field and for different Hamiltonians (XXX, XXZ, isotropically dimerized). We compute numerically the temperature dependence of the 1 /T1 . We consider both gapped and gapless phases, and also the proximity of quantum critical points. At temperatures much lower than the typical exchange energy scale, our results are in excellent agreement with analytical results, such as the ones derived from the Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid (TLL) theory and bosonization, which are valid in this regime. We also cover the regime for which the temperature T is comparable to the exchange coupling. In this case analytical theories are not appropriate, but this regime is relevant for various new compounds with exchange couplings in the range of tens of Kelvin. For the gapped phases, either the fully polarized phase for spin chains or the low-magnetic-field phase for the dimerized systems, we find an exponential decrease in Δ /(kBT ) of the relaxation time and can compute the gap Δ . Close to the quantum critical point our results are in good agreement with the scaling behavior based on the existence of free excitations.

  20. Structure and dynamics of water in tendon from NMR relaxation measurements.

    PubMed Central

    Peto, S; Gillis, P; Henri, V P

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic relaxation times were measured in collagen tissue when varying the orientation of the fiber with respect to the static field. T1 was found to be only slightly dependent on theta, the fiber-to-field angle, but T2 was very sensitive to the orientation, with a maximum value at the magic angle. The transverse decay curves were multiexponential. Their deconvolution displayed four components; the ones that decayed most slowly were almost independent of theta, but the two fastest ones showed a strong angular dependence that was interpreted with a cross-relaxation model. Quadrupolar dips were visible in the 1/T1 dispersion curves. These dips were independent of theta, so that the magnetization transfer could also be assumed to be independent of the fiber orientation. Finally, each component was assigned to a fraction of protons localized in the macromolecular structure and characterized by particular dynamics. The model of Woessner was applied to the water molecules tightly bound into the macromolecules, which resulted in a dynamical description of this water fraction. This description is compatible with the two-sites model of Ramachandran based on x-ray diffraction and with the extensive studies of Berendsen. However, the important indications obtained from the deconvolution lead to a less static representation of the tissue. PMID:2297563

  1. Utility of NMR T2 distributions, connection with capillary pressure, clay effect, and determination of the surface relaxivity parameter rho 2.

    PubMed

    Kleinberg, R L

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance magnetization decays are now used routinely to determine reservoir properties of economic significance to the oil and gas industry. Although individual features of relaxation time distributions are subject to degradation in the presence of measurement noise, integrated and average measures of those distributions are remarkably stable. Properties such as porosity, producible porosity, hydraulic permeability, and the capillary pressure curve can be measured rapidly and continuously. Laboratory comparisons of NMR T2 distributions with two different capillary pressure measurements enable the surface relaxivity parameter rho 2 to be determined for sandstones. Comparison with relaxivities of synthetic materials having well-defined surface areas strongly suggests that the NMR-effective internal surface area of rocks is closely connected with the hydraulic radius, and, surprisingly, is not greatly affected by the presence of clay, which dominates the pore space surface are as measured by gas adsorption.

  2. Second order rate constants for intramolecular conversions: Application to gas-phase NMR relaxation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, S. H.; Lazaar, K. I.

    1983-09-01

    The usually quoted expression for the second order rate constant, for a unimolecular reaction at the low pressure limit, is valid only for strictly irreversible processes. Its application to isomerization reactions (which are to some extent reversible) is demonstrably in error; corrected expressions have been published. Attention is directed to intramolecular conversions over low barriers, for which the inappropriateness of the unidirectional expression becomes obvious. For such isomerizations we propose a model which incorporates only operationally observable states, so that an essential conceptual ambiguity is avoided. Use of this model is illustrated for the syn⇄anti conversions of methyl nitrite, derived from a gas phase NMR coalescence curve (Mc:Tc). The present data suggest that during isomerization the alkyl nitrites may not be completely ergodic on a time scale of 10-9 s. A regional phase-space model is proposed which has the appropriate formalism to account for this behavior.

  3. Backbone dynamics of free barnase and its complex with barstar determined by 15N NMR relaxation study.

    PubMed

    Sahu, S C; Bhuyan, A K; Udgaonkar, J B; Hosur, R V

    2000-10-01

    Backbone dynamics of uniformly 15N-labeled free barnase and its complex with unlabelled barstar have been studied at 40 degrees C, pH 6.6, using 15N relaxation data obtained from proton-detected 2D [1H]-15N NMR spectroscopy. 15N spin-lattice relaxation rate constants (R1), spin-spin relaxation rate constants (R2), and steady-state heteronuclear [1H]-15N NOEs have been measured at a magnetic field strength of 14.1 Tesla for 91 residues of free barnase and for 90 residues out of a total of 106 in the complex (excluding three prolines and the N-terminal residue) backbone amide 15N sites of barnase. The primary relaxation data for both the cases have been analyzed in the framework of the model-free formalism using both isotropic and axially symmetric models of the rotational diffusion tensor. As per the latter, the overall rotational correlation times (tau(m)) are 5.0 and 9.5 ns for the free and complexed barnase, respectively. The average order parameter is found to be 0.80 for free barnase and 0.86 for the complex. However, the changes are not uniform along the backbone and for about 5 residues near the binding interface there is actually a significant decrease in the order parameters on complex formation. These residues are not involved in the actual binding. For the residues where the order parameter increases, the magnitudes vary significantly. It is observed that the complex has much less internal mobility, compared to free barnase. From the changes in the order parameters, the entropic contribution of NH bond vector motion to the free energy of complex formation has been calculated. It is apparent that these motion's cause significant unfavorable contributions and therefore must be compensated by many other favorable contributions to effect tight complex formation. The observed variations in the motion and their different locations with regard to the binding interface may have important implications for remote effects and regulation of the enzyme action. PMID

  4. Effect of superconducting fluctuations on the NMR relaxation rate of high-Tc superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Appel, J. ); Fay, D.; Kautz, C. )

    1994-06-01

    The effect of superconducting order parameter fluctuations on the nuclear-spin relaxation rate, 1/T[sub 1], is studied for clean two-dimensional systems by calculating the three Maki-Thomson-type diagrams which represent the lowest-order fluctuation contributions to the transverse susceptibility. For Gaussian fluctuations and for temperatures near the mean field transition temperature, T[sub c0], we employ a weak-coupling theory in which the pair-fluctuation propagator can also include pair-breaking effects. We also go beyond the Gaussian theory and take into account the interactions between Cooper-pair fluctuations corresponding to the fourth-order Ginzburg Landau fluctuation terms. We compare our results with previous results in the dirty limit and in 3D. We obtain a pronounced peak in 1/T[sub 1] at Tc and briefly discuss possible reasons why this peak is not observed. 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Epigenetic changes encompassing the IGF2/H19 locus associated with relaxation of IGF2 imprinting and silencing of H19 in Wilms tumor.

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, T; Sullivan, M J; Ogawa, O; Reeve, A E

    1995-01-01

    In most tissues IGF2 is expressed from the paternal allele while H19 is expressed from the maternal allele. We have previously shown that in some Wilms tumors the maternal IGF2 imprint is relaxed such that the gene is expressed biallelically. We have now investigated this subset of tumors further and found that biallelic expression of IGF2 was associated with undetectable or very low levels of H19 expression. The relaxation of IGF2 imprinting in Wilms tumors also involved a concomitant reversal in the patterns of DNA methylation of the maternally inherited IGF2 and H19 alleles. Furthermore, the only specific methylation changes that occurred in tumors with relaxation of IGF2 imprinting were solely restricted to the maternal IGF2 and H19 alleles. These data suggest that there has been an acquisition of a paternal epigenotype in these tumors as the result of a pathologic disruption in the normal imprinting of the IGF2 and H19 genes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7534414

  6. The physical basis of model-free analysis of NMR relaxation data from proteins and complex fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halle, Bertil

    2009-12-01

    NMR relaxation experiments have provided a wealth of information about molecular motions in macromolecules and ordered fluids. Even though a rigorous theory of spin relaxation is available, the complexity of the investigated systems often makes the interpretation of limited datasets challenging and ambiguous. To allow physically meaningful information to be extracted from the data without commitment to detailed dynamical models, several versions of a model-free (MF) approach to data analysis have been developed. During the past 2 decades, the MF approach has been used in the vast majority of all NMR relaxation studies of internal motions in proteins and other macromolecules, and it has also played an important role in studies of colloidal systems. Although the MF approach has been almost universally adopted, substantial disagreement remains about its physical foundations and range of validity. It is our aim here to clarify these issues. To this end, we first present rigorous derivations of the three well-known MF formulas for the time correlation function relevant for isotropic solutions. These derivations are more general than the original ones, thereby substantially extending the range of validity of the MF approach. We point out several common misconceptions and explain the physical significance of the approximations involved. In particular, we discuss symmetry requirements and the dynamical decoupling approximation that plays a key role in the MF approach. We also derive a new MF formula, applicable to anisotropic fluids and solids, including microcrystalline protein samples. The so-called slowly relaxing local structure (SRLS) model has been advanced as an alternative to the MF approach that does not require dynamical decoupling of internal and global motions. To resolve the existing controversy about the relative merits of the SRLS model and the MF approach, we formulate and solve a planar version of the SRLS model. The analytical solution of this model

  7. The physical basis of model-free analysis of NMR relaxation data from proteins and complex fluids.

    PubMed

    Halle, Bertil

    2009-12-14

    NMR relaxation experiments have provided a wealth of information about molecular motions in macromolecules and ordered fluids. Even though a rigorous theory of spin relaxation is available, the complexity of the investigated systems often makes the interpretation of limited datasets challenging and ambiguous. To allow physically meaningful information to be extracted from the data without commitment to detailed dynamical models, several versions of a model-free (MF) approach to data analysis have been developed. During the past 2 decades, the MF approach has been used in the vast majority of all NMR relaxation studies of internal motions in proteins and other macromolecules, and it has also played an important role in studies of colloidal systems. Although the MF approach has been almost universally adopted, substantial disagreement remains about its physical foundations and range of validity. It is our aim here to clarify these issues. To this end, we first present rigorous derivations of the three well-known MF formulas for the time correlation function relevant for isotropic solutions. These derivations are more general than the original ones, thereby substantially extending the range of validity of the MF approach. We point out several common misconceptions and explain the physical significance of the approximations involved. In particular, we discuss symmetry requirements and the dynamical decoupling approximation that plays a key role in the MF approach. We also derive a new MF formula, applicable to anisotropic fluids and solids, including microcrystalline protein samples. The so-called slowly relaxing local structure (SRLS) model has been advanced as an alternative to the MF approach that does not require dynamical decoupling of internal and global motions. To resolve the existing controversy about the relative merits of the SRLS model and the MF approach, we formulate and solve a planar version of the SRLS model. The analytical solution of this model

  8. Adaptive truncation of matrix decompositions and efficient estimation of NMR relaxation distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teal, Paul D.; Eccles, Craig

    2015-04-01

    The two most successful methods of estimating the distribution of nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation times from two dimensional data are data compression followed by application of the Butler-Reeds-Dawson algorithm, and a primal-dual interior point method using preconditioned conjugate gradient. Both of these methods have previously been presented using a truncated singular value decomposition of matrices representing the exponential kernel. In this paper it is shown that other matrix factorizations are applicable to each of these algorithms, and that these illustrate the different fundamental principles behind the operation of the algorithms. These are the rank-revealing QR (RRQR) factorization and the LDL factorization with diagonal pivoting, also known as the Bunch-Kaufman-Parlett factorization. It is shown that both algorithms can be improved by adaptation of the truncation as the optimization process progresses, improving the accuracy as the optimal value is approached. A variation on the interior method viz, the use of barrier function instead of the primal-dual approach, is found to offer considerable improvement in terms of speed and reliability. A third type of algorithm, related to the algorithm known as Fast iterative shrinkage-thresholding algorithm, is applied to the problem. This method can be efficiently formulated without the use of a matrix decomposition.

  9. Analysis of internal motions of interleukin-13 variant associated with severe bronchial asthma using {sup 15}N NMR relaxation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Yuichiro; Ohkuri, Takatoshi; Takeda, Chika; Kuroki, Ryota; Izuhara, Kenji; Imoto, Taiji; Ueda, Tadashi . E-mail: ueda@phar.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    2007-06-22

    The single nucleotide polymorphism interleukin-13 (IL-13) R110Q is associated with severe bronchial asthma because its lower affinity leads to the augmentation of local IL-13 concentration, resulting in an increase in the signal transduction via IL-13R. Since the mutation site does not directly bind to IL-13R{alpha}2, we carried out NMR relaxation analyses of the wild-type IL-13 and IL-13-R110Q in order to examine whether the R110Q mutation affects the internal motions in IL-13 molecules. The results showed that the internal motion in the micro- to millisecond time scale on helix D, which is suggested to be important for the interaction between IL-13 and IL-13R{alpha}2, is increased in IL-13-R110Q compared with that in the wild-type IL-13. It therefore appears that the difference in the internal motions on helix D between the wild-type IL-13 and IL-13-R110Q may be involved in their affinity differences with IL-13R{alpha}2.

  10. Direct measurement of agonist binding to genetically engineered peptides of the acetylcholine receptor by selective T sub 1 NMR relaxation

    SciTech Connect

    Fraenkel, Y.; Navon, G. ); Aronheim, A.; Gershoni, J.M. )

    1990-03-13

    Interactions of four ligands of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor with genetically engineered peptides have been studied by NMR. A recombinant cholinergic binding site was prepared as a fusion protein between a truncated form of the bacterial protein trpE and a peptide corresponding to the sequence {alpha}184-200 from the Torpedo californica receptor. This construct binds {alpha}-bungarotoxin while the trpE protein alone does not, and thus serves as a negative control. In this study agonist binding to {alpha}184-200 is demonstrated by monitoring the T{sub 1} relaxation of the ligand's protons in the presence and absence of the recombinant binding site. This binding is specific as it can be competed with {alpha}-bungarotoxin. Quantitative analyses of such competitions yielded the concentration of binding sites, which corresponded to 3.3% and 16.5% of the total protein, for partially purified and affinity-purified {alpha}184-200 constructs, respectively. The K{sub D} values for the binding of acetylcholine, nicotine, d-tubocurarine, and gallamine to the affinity-purified construct were 1.4, 1.4, 0.20, and 0.21 mM, respectively, while K{sub D}'s with the nontoxin binding protein were all above 10 mM. Thus, this is a direct demonstration that the toxin binding domain {alpha}184-200 may comprise a major component of the cholinergic agonist site.

  11. Interactions and exchange of CO2 and H2O in coals: an investigation by low-field NMR relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaoxiao; Yao, Yanbin; Liu, Dameng; Elsworth, Derek; Pan, Zhejun

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms by which CO2 and water interact in coal remain unclear and these are key questions for understanding ECBM processes and defining the long-term behaviour of injected CO2. In our experiments, we injected helium/CO2 to displace water in eight water-saturated samples. We used low-field NMR relaxation to investigate CO2 and water interactions in these coals across a variety of time-scales. The injection of helium did not change the T2 spectra of the coals. In contrast, the T2 spectra peaks of micro-capillary water gradually decreased and those of macro-capillary and bulk water increased with time after the injection of CO2. We assume that the CO2 diffuses through and/or dissolves into the capillary water to access the coal matrix interior, which promotes desorption of water molecules from the surfaces of coal micropores and mesopores. The replaced water mass is mainly related to the Langmuir adsorption volume of CO2 and increases as the CO2 adsorption capacity increases. Other factors, such as mineral composition, temperature and pressure, also influence the effective exchange between water and CO2. Finally, we built a quantified model to evaluate the efficiency of water replacement by CO2 injection with respect to temperature and pressure. PMID:26817784

  12. Nuclear spin relaxation times in hydrogen-helium and methane-helium slush at 4 MHz using pulsed NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamida, J. A.

    2005-03-01

    We compare the nuclear spin-lattice and nuclear spin-spin relaxation times observed for small grains of hydrogen suspended in liquid helium (hydrogen-helium ``slush'') with that of methane-helium ``slush.'' The transport properties of these ``slush'' materials are critical to NASA's goal of realizing atomic propellant designs for future spacecraft. Atoms of active propellants are stored cryogenically in a host matrix such as hydrogen (H2) or methane (CH4) to prevent recombination while liquid helium is ideal for holding the host matrix and for easy transportation. The host matrix must therefore be stable in liquid helium. We find that for hydrogen ``slush,'' NMR rate is consistent with scattering at grain boundaries due to the large electric quadrupole moment of hydrogen; on the other hand the ``slush'' rate for methane is consistent with internal diffusion as opposed to surface scattering. We conclude that for atomic propellants, methane is a better host than hydrogen because grains of methane are better isolated from the helium bath.

  13. Interactions and exchange of CO2 and H2O in coals: an investigation by low-field NMR relaxation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoxiao; Yao, Yanbin; Liu, Dameng; Elsworth, Derek; Pan, Zhejun

    2016-01-28

    The mechanisms by which CO2 and water interact in coal remain unclear and these are key questions for understanding ECBM processes and defining the long-term behaviour of injected CO2. In our experiments, we injected helium/CO2 to displace water in eight water-saturated samples. We used low-field NMR relaxation to investigate CO2 and water interactions in these coals across a variety of time-scales. The injection of helium did not change the T2 spectra of the coals. In contrast, the T2 spectra peaks of micro-capillary water gradually decreased and those of macro-capillary and bulk water increased with time after the injection of CO2. We assume that the CO2 diffuses through and/or dissolves into the capillary water to access the coal matrix interior, which promotes desorption of water molecules from the surfaces of coal micropores and mesopores. The replaced water mass is mainly related to the Langmuir adsorption volume of CO2 and increases as the CO2 adsorption capacity increases. Other factors, such as mineral composition, temperature and pressure, also influence the effective exchange between water and CO2. Finally, we built a quantified model to evaluate the efficiency of water replacement by CO2 injection with respect to temperature and pressure.

  14. Interaction Study of an Amorphous Solid Dispersion of Cyclosporin A in Poly-Alpha-Cyclodextrin with Model Membranes by 1H-, 2H-, 31P-NMR and Electron Spin Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Debouzy, Jean-Claude; Bourbon, Fréderic; Lahiani-Skiba, Malika; Skiba, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    The properties of an amorphous solid dispersion of cyclosporine A (ASD) prepared with the copolymer alpha cyclodextrin (POLYA) and cyclosporine A (CYSP) were investigated by 1H-NMR in solution and its membrane interactions were studied by 1H-NMR in small unilamellar vesicles and by 31P 2H NMR in phospholipidic dispersions of DMPC (dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine) in comparison with those of POLYA and CYSP alone. 1H-NMR chemical shift variations showed that CYSP really interacts with POLYA, with possible adduct formation, dispersion in the solid matrix of the POLYA, and also complex formation. A coarse approach to the latter mechanism was tested using the continuous variations method, indicating an apparent 1 : 1 stoichiometry. Calculations gave an apparent association constant of log Ka = 4.5. A study of the interactions with phospholipidic dispersions of DMPC showed that only limited interactions occurred at the polar head group level (31P). Conversely, by comparison with the expected chain rigidification induced by CYSP, POLYA induced an increase in the fluidity of the layer while ASD formation led to these effects almost being overcome at 298 K. At higher temperature, while the effect of CYSP seems to vanish, a resulting global increase in chain fluidity was found in the presence of ASD. PMID:24883210

  15. Effect of gel firmness at cutting time, pH, and temperature on rennet coagulation and syneresis: an in situ 1H NMR relaxation study.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Christian Lyndgaard; Rinnan, Asmund; Engelsen, Søren Balling; Janhøj, Thomas; Micklander, Elisabeth; Andersen, Ulf; van den Berg, Frans

    2010-01-13

    The objective of this study was to monitor rennet-induced milk gel formation and mechanically induced gel syneresis in situ by low-field NMR. pH, temperature, and gel firmness at cutting time were varied in a factorial design. The new curve-fitting method Doubleslicing revealed that during coagulation two proton populations with distinct transverse relaxation times (T2,1=181, T2,2=465 ms) were present in fractions (f1=98.9%, f2=1.1%). Mechanical cutting of the gel in the NMR tube induced macrosyneresis, which led to the appearance of an additional proton population (T2,3=1500-2200 ms) identified as whey. On the basis of NMR quantification of whey water the syneresis rate was calculated and found to be significantly dependent on pH and temperature.

  16. Spin Liquid State in the 3D Frustrated Antiferromagnet PbCuTe_{2}O_{6}: NMR and Muon Spin Relaxation Studies.

    PubMed

    Khuntia, P; Bert, F; Mendels, P; Koteswararao, B; Mahajan, A V; Baenitz, M; Chou, F C; Baines, C; Amato, A; Furukawa, Y

    2016-03-11

    PbCuTe_{2}O_{6} is a rare example of a spin liquid candidate featuring a three-dimensional magnetic lattice. Strong geometric frustration arises from the dominant antiferromagnetic interaction that generates a hyperkagome network of Cu^{2+} ions although additional interactions enhance the magnetic lattice connectivity. Through a combination of magnetization measurements and local probe investigations by NMR and muon spin relaxation down to 20 mK, we provide robust evidence for the absence of magnetic freezing in the ground state. The local spin susceptibility probed by the NMR shift hardly deviates from the macroscopic one down to 1 K pointing to a homogeneous magnetic system with a low defect concentration. The saturation of the NMR shift and the sublinear power law temperature (T) evolution of the 1/T_{1} NMR relaxation rate at low T point to a nonsinglet ground state favoring a gapless fermionic description of the magnetic excitations. Below 1 K a pronounced slowing down of the spin dynamics is witnessed, which may signal a reconstruction of spinon Fermi surface. Nonetheless, the compound remains in a fluctuating spin liquid state down to the lowest temperature of the present investigation. PMID:27015508

  17. Spin liquid state in the 3D frustrated antiferromagnet PbCuTe2O6: NMR and muon spin relaxation studies

    DOE PAGES

    Khuntia, P.; Bert, F.; Mendels, P.; Koteswararao, B.; Mahajan, A. V.; Baenitz, M.; Chou, F. C.; Baines, C.; Amato, A.; Furukawa, Y.

    2016-03-11

    In this study, PbCuTe2O6 is a rare example of a spin liquid candidate featuring a three-dimensional magnetic lattice. Strong geometric frustration arises from the dominant antiferromagnetic interaction that generates a hyperkagome network of Cu2+ ions although additional interactions enhance the magnetic lattice connectivity. Through a combination of magnetization measurements and local probe investigations by NMR and muon spin relaxation down to 20 mK, we provide robust evidence for the absence of magnetic freezing in the ground state. The local spin susceptibility probed by the NMR shift hardly deviates from the macroscopic one down to 1 K pointing to a homogeneousmore » magnetic system with a low defect concentration. The saturation of the NMR shift and the sublinear power law temperature (T) evolution of the 1/T1 NMR relaxation rate at low T point to a nonsinglet ground state favoring a gapless fermionic description of the magnetic excitations. Below 1 K a pronounced slowing down of the spin dynamics is witnessed, which may signal a reconstruction of spinon Fermi surface. Nonetheless, the compound remains in a fluctuating spin liquid state down to the lowest temperature of the present investigation.« less

  18. Spin Liquid State in the 3D Frustrated Antiferromagnet PbCuTe_{2}O_{6}: NMR and Muon Spin Relaxation Studies.

    PubMed

    Khuntia, P; Bert, F; Mendels, P; Koteswararao, B; Mahajan, A V; Baenitz, M; Chou, F C; Baines, C; Amato, A; Furukawa, Y

    2016-03-11

    PbCuTe_{2}O_{6} is a rare example of a spin liquid candidate featuring a three-dimensional magnetic lattice. Strong geometric frustration arises from the dominant antiferromagnetic interaction that generates a hyperkagome network of Cu^{2+} ions although additional interactions enhance the magnetic lattice connectivity. Through a combination of magnetization measurements and local probe investigations by NMR and muon spin relaxation down to 20 mK, we provide robust evidence for the absence of magnetic freezing in the ground state. The local spin susceptibility probed by the NMR shift hardly deviates from the macroscopic one down to 1 K pointing to a homogeneous magnetic system with a low defect concentration. The saturation of the NMR shift and the sublinear power law temperature (T) evolution of the 1/T_{1} NMR relaxation rate at low T point to a nonsinglet ground state favoring a gapless fermionic description of the magnetic excitations. Below 1 K a pronounced slowing down of the spin dynamics is witnessed, which may signal a reconstruction of spinon Fermi surface. Nonetheless, the compound remains in a fluctuating spin liquid state down to the lowest temperature of the present investigation.

  19. ¹³C solid-state NMR analysis of the most common pharmaceutical excipients used in solid drug formulations Part II: CP kinetics and relaxation analysis.

    PubMed

    Pisklak, Dariusz Maciej; Zielińska-Pisklak, Monika; Szeleszczuk, Łukasz; Wawer, Iwona

    2016-04-15

    Excipients used in the solid drug formulations differ in their NMR relaxation and (13)C cross-polarization (CP) kinetics parameters. Therefore, experimental parameters like contact time of cross-polarization and repetition time have a major impact on the registered solid state NMR spectra and in consequence on the results of the NMR analysis. In this work the CP kinetics and relaxation of the most common pharmaceutical excipients: anhydrous α-lactose, α-lactose monohydrate, mannitol, sucrose, sorbitol, sodium starch glycolate type A and B, starch of different origin, microcrystalline cellulose, hypromellose, ethylcellulose, methylcellulose, hydroxyethylcellulose, sodium alginate, magnesium stearate, sodium laurilsulfate and Kollidon(®) were analyzed. The studied excipients differ significantly in their optimum repetition time (from 5 s to 1200 s) and T(1ρ)(I) parameters (from 2 ms to 73 ms). The practical use of those differences in the excipients composition analysis was demonstrated on the example of commercially available tablets containing indapamide as an API. The information presented in this article will help to choose the correct acquisition parameters and also will save the time and effort needed for their optimization in the NMR analysis of the solid drug formulations.

  20. ¹³C solid-state NMR analysis of the most common pharmaceutical excipients used in solid drug formulations Part II: CP kinetics and relaxation analysis.

    PubMed

    Pisklak, Dariusz Maciej; Zielińska-Pisklak, Monika; Szeleszczuk, Łukasz; Wawer, Iwona

    2016-04-15

    Excipients used in the solid drug formulations differ in their NMR relaxation and (13)C cross-polarization (CP) kinetics parameters. Therefore, experimental parameters like contact time of cross-polarization and repetition time have a major impact on the registered solid state NMR spectra and in consequence on the results of the NMR analysis. In this work the CP kinetics and relaxation of the most common pharmaceutical excipients: anhydrous α-lactose, α-lactose monohydrate, mannitol, sucrose, sorbitol, sodium starch glycolate type A and B, starch of different origin, microcrystalline cellulose, hypromellose, ethylcellulose, methylcellulose, hydroxyethylcellulose, sodium alginate, magnesium stearate, sodium laurilsulfate and Kollidon(®) were analyzed. The studied excipients differ significantly in their optimum repetition time (from 5 s to 1200 s) and T(1ρ)(I) parameters (from 2 ms to 73 ms). The practical use of those differences in the excipients composition analysis was demonstrated on the example of commercially available tablets containing indapamide as an API. The information presented in this article will help to choose the correct acquisition parameters and also will save the time and effort needed for their optimization in the NMR analysis of the solid drug formulations. PMID:26836362

  1. Interpretation of combined 2H SNIF/NMR and 13C SIRA/MS analyses of fruit juices to detect added sugar.

    PubMed

    Martin, G G; Hanote, V; Lees, M; Martin, Y L

    1996-01-01

    The site-specific natural isotopic fractionation studied by nuclear magnetic resonance (SNIF/NMR) method measures site-specific isotope contents in a variety of organic compounds by deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. This technique, together with SIRA/MS (stable isotope ratio analysis/mass spectrometry) provides a powerful tool for food authentication and characterization. By using the ethanol resulting from sugar fermentation as a molecular probe, SNIF/NMR (deuterium) and SIRA/MS (13C) have been used together for authentication of fruit juices. The influence of deuterium content of the fermentation water on the isotopic parameters is shown and a means for normalizing the results is proposed. A large number of authentic juices have been analyzed to define the variation of isotopic ratios in natural juices. On the basis of these data, a set of rules was designed to enable interpretation of isotopic parameters in terms of possible adulteration of fruit juices by sugar addition. Results of analyses of Florida orange juice are presented. Orange juice samples from Brazil and Israel are included as 2 extreme cases. Assignment limits for a sample of orange juice of unknown origin also are given. These assignment limits are also provided for apple and grapefruit juices.

  2. NMR relaxation study of the phase transitions and relaxation mechanisms of the alums MCr(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}.12H{sub 2}O (M=Rb and Cs) single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Ae Ran; Paik, Younkee; Lim, Kye-Young

    2011-06-15

    The physical properties and phase transition mechanisms of MCr(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}.12H{sub 2}O (M=Rb and Cs) single crystals have been investigated. The phase transition temperatures, NMR spectra, and the spin-lattice relaxation times T{sub 1} of the {sup 87}Rb and {sup 133}Cs nuclei in the two crystals were determined using DSC and FT NMR spectroscopy. The resonance lines and relaxation times of the {sup 87}Rb and {sup 133}Cs nuclei undergo significant changes at the phase transition temperatures. The sudden changes in the splitting of the Rb and Cs resonance lines are attributed to changes in the local symmetry of their sites, and the changes in the temperature dependences of T{sub 1} are related to variations in the symmetry of the octahedra of water molecules surrounding Rb{sup +} and Cs{sup +}. We also compared these {sup 87}Rb and {sup 133}Cs NMR results with those obtained for the trivalent cations Cr and Al in MCr(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}.12H{sub 2}O and MAl(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}.12H{sub 2}O crystals. - Graphical Abstract: The physical properties and phase transition mechanisms of MCr(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}.12H{sub 2}O (M=Rb, Cs, and NH{sub 4}) single crystals have been investigated. Highlights: > The physical properties and phase transition mechanisms of MCr(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}.12H{sub 2}O (M=Rb and Cs) crystals {yields} The NMR spectra and the spin-lattice relaxation times T{sub 1} of the {sup 87}Rb and {sup 133}Cs nuclei in the two crystals {yields} The variations in the symmetry of the octahedra of water molecules surrounding Rb{sup +} and Cs{sup +}.

  3. Effects of osmotic manipulation of intracellular hydration of HeLa S-3 cells on their proton NMR relaxation times.

    PubMed

    Wheatley, D N; Rimmington, J E; Foster, M A

    1990-01-01

    Pellets of HeLa from suspension cultured cells in isotonic medium (300 mosmolar) were introduced into a Bruker CXP100 NMR spectrophotometer at 80 mHz within 5 min of the start of centrifugation. T1 and T2 times were measured within a total elapsed time of 20-25 min at 80 mHz and 37 degrees C, and averaged 1430 msec and 120 msec, respectively. Extrapolation to zero extracellular space gave a corrected T1 of 1370 msec. For cells collected after 10 min in hypotonic medium (down to 30 mosmolar) increased proton density correlated well with increased cell water content, but relaxation times did not rise in proportion to that predicted for the entry of "bulk" water (T1 of 4700 msec), except when swelling approached lysis point. Cells partially dehydrated by 10 min in hypertonic medium of up to 1500 mosmolar have also been analyzed, but once again the shortening of T1 was not proportional to the loss of "free" (bulk phase) water. At the upper limit of hypertonic treatment, lacunae or vacuoles of a watery nature separated within the cytomatrix, preventing maximum dehydration. The relationship of cell water to T1 is complex over the whole range of tonicity that HeLa S-3 cells tolerate. The data indicate, however, that hypotonically induced water probably has an average T1 time considerably lower than bulk phase water. In contrast, raising the total extracellular volume with medium had precisely the predicted effect on T1 time, further strengthening the case that water taken up by cell acquires a shorter T1 time. Cells adapting to hypotonic conditions oscillated in size and water content over 2-3 hr before returning to near their initial volume. Under these circumstances, T1 oscillated in the same way but with a reduced amplitude, consistent with the above findings.

  4. Structural, vibrational, electronic, NMR, NLO and reactivity analyses of (3Z)-3-(2-oxo-2-phenylethylidene)-1,3-dihydro-2H-indol-2-one (OPEDI) by ab initio HF and DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Sridevi, C; Velraj, G

    2013-04-15

    This study represents the vibrational, electronic, NMR, NLO, reactivity and structural aspects of (3Z)-3-(2-oxo-2-phenylethylidene)-1,3-dihydro-2H-indol-2-one (OPEDI). A detailed interpretation of the FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV and NMR spectra were reported. Theoretical calculations were performed by ab initio HF and density functional theory (DFT)/B3LYP method using 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets. The most preferred Z isomer (cis-configuration) was confirmed through PES scan studies. The vibrational wavenumbers and potential energy distribution (PED) of various normal modes were calculated. The lower frontier orbital energy gap and high dipole moment of OPEDI illustrates the high reactivity. The stability and charge delocalization of the molecule was studied by natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. OPEDI exhibited good nonlinear optical activity and was 13 times greater than that of urea. Molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) was carried out for predicting the reactive sites. The NMR results indicated that the observed chemical shifts depend not only on the structure of the molecule being studied, but also on the solvent used.

  5. Twist, tilt, and orientational order at the nematic to twist-bend nematic phase transition of 1″,9″-bis(4-cyanobiphenyl-4'-yl) nonane: A dielectric, 2H NMR, and calorimetric study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robles-Hernández, Beatriz; Sebastián, Nerea; de la Fuente, M. Rosario; López, David O.; Diez-Berart, Sergio; Salud, Josep; Ros, M. Blanca; Dunmur, David A.; Luckhurst, Geoffrey R.; Timimi, Bakir A.

    2015-12-01

    The nature of the nematic-nematic phase transition in the liquid crystal dimer 1″,9″-bis(4-cyanobiphenyl-4'-yl) nonane (CB9CB) has been investigated using techniques of calorimetry, dynamic dielectric response measurements, and 2H NMR spectroscopy. The experimental results for CB9CB show that, like the shorter homologue CB7CB, the studied material exhibits a normal nematic phase, which on cooling undergoes a transition to the twist-bend nematic phase (NTB), a uniaxial nematic phase, promoted by the average bent molecular shape, in which the director tilts and precesses describing a conical helix. Modulated differential scanning calorimetry has been used to analyze the nature of the NTB-N phase transition, which is found to be weakly first order, but close to tricritical. Additionally broadband dielectric spectroscopy and 2H magnetic resonance studies have revealed information on the structural characteristics of the recently discovered twist-bend nematic phase. Analysis of the dynamic dielectric response in both nematic phases has provided an estimate of the conical angle of the heliconical structure for the NTB phase. Capacitance measurements of the electric-field realignment of the director in initially planar aligned cells have yielded values for the splay and bend elastic constants in the high temperature nematic phase. The bend elastic constant is small and decreases with decreasing temperature as the twist-bend phase is approached. This behavior is expected theoretically and has been observed in materials that form the twist-bend nematic phase. 2H NMR measurements characterize the chiral helical twist identified in the twist-bend nematic phase and also allow the determination of the temperature dependence of the conical angle and the orientational order parameter with respect to the director.

  6. Twist, tilt, and orientational order at the nematic to twist-bend nematic phase transition of 1″,9″-bis(4-cyanobiphenyl-4'-yl) nonane: A dielectric, (2)H NMR, and calorimetric study.

    PubMed

    Robles-Hernández, Beatriz; Sebastián, Nerea; de la Fuente, M Rosario; López, David O; Diez-Berart, Sergio; Salud, Josep; Ros, M Blanca; Dunmur, David A; Luckhurst, Geoffrey R; Timimi, Bakir A

    2015-12-01

    The nature of the nematic-nematic phase transition in the liquid crystal dimer 1″,9″-bis(4-cyanobiphenyl-4'-yl) nonane (CB9CB) has been investigated using techniques of calorimetry, dynamic dielectric response measurements, and (2)H NMR spectroscopy. The experimental results for CB9CB show that, like the shorter homologue CB7CB, the studied material exhibits a normal nematic phase, which on cooling undergoes a transition to the twist-bend nematic phase (N(TB)), a uniaxial nematic phase, promoted by the average bent molecular shape, in which the director tilts and precesses describing a conical helix. Modulated differential scanning calorimetry has been used to analyze the nature of the N(TB)-N phase transition, which is found to be weakly first order, but close to tricritical. Additionally broadband dielectric spectroscopy and (2)H magnetic resonance studies have revealed information on the structural characteristics of the recently discovered twist-bend nematic phase. Analysis of the dynamic dielectric response in both nematic phases has provided an estimate of the conical angle of the heliconical structure for the N(TB) phase. Capacitance measurements of the electric-field realignment of the director in initially planar aligned cells have yielded values for the splay and bend elastic constants in the high temperature nematic phase. The bend elastic constant is small and decreases with decreasing temperature as the twist-bend phase is approached. This behavior is expected theoretically and has been observed in materials that form the twist-bend nematic phase. (2)H NMR measurements characterize the chiral helical twist identified in the twist-bend nematic phase and also allow the determination of the temperature dependence of the conical angle and the orientational order parameter with respect to the director.

  7. Effects of T2-relaxation in MAS NMR spectra of the satellite transitions for quadrupolar nuclei: a 27Al MAS and single-crystal NMR study of alum KAl(SO 4) 2 · 12H 2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Morten Daugaard; Jakobsen, Hans J.; Skibsted, Jørgen

    2005-04-01

    Asymmetries in the manifold of spinning sidebands (ssbs) from the satellite transitions have been observed in variable-temperature 27Al MAS NMR spectra of alum (KAl(SO 4) 2 · 12H 2O), recorded in the temperature range from -76 to 92 °C. The asymmetries decrease with increasing temperature and reflect the fact that the ssbs exhibit systematically different linewidths for different spectral regions of the manifold. From spin-echo 27Al NMR experiments on a single-crystal of alum, it is demonstrated that these variations in linewidth originate from differences in transverse ( T2) relaxation times for the two inner ( m = 1/2 ↔ m = 3/2 and m = -1/2 ↔ m = -3/2) and correspondingly for the two outer ( m = 3/2 ↔ m = 5/2 and m = -3/2 ↔ m = -5/2) satellite transitions. T2 relaxation times in the range 0.5-3.5 ms are observed for the individual satellite transitions at -50 °C and 7.05 T, whereas the corresponding T1 relaxation times, determined from similar saturation-recovery 27Al NMR experiments, are almost constant ( T1 = 0.07-0.10 s) for the individual satellite transitions. The variation in T2 values for the individual 27Al satellite transitions for alum is justified by a simple theoretical approach which considers the cross-correlation of the local fluctuating fields from the quadrupolar coupling and the heteronuclear ( 27Al- 1H) dipolar interaction on the T2 relaxation times for the individual transitions. This approach and the observed differences in T2 values indicate that a single random motional process modulates both the quadrupolar and heteronuclear dipolar interactions for 27Al in alum at low temperatures.

  8. Action of melittin on the DPPC-cholesterol liquid-ordered phase: a solid state 2H-and 31P-NMR study.

    PubMed Central

    Pott, T; Dufourc, E J

    1995-01-01

    Solid-state deuterium and phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance studies of deuterium-labeled beta--[2,2',3,4,4',6-2H6]-cholesterol and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine have been undertaken to monitor the action of melittin on model membranes containing 30 mol% cholesterol, both at the molecular and macroscopic level. Cholesterol totally inhibits the toxin-triggered formation of large unilamellar vesicles and strongly restricts the appearance of small discs. The latter remain stable over a wide temperature range (20-60 degrees C) because of an increase in their cholesterol content as the temperature increases. This process is related to a constant disc hydrophobic thickness of approximately 29 A. The system, when not in the form of discs, appears to be composed of very large vesicles on which melittin promotes magnetically induced ellipsoidal deformation. This deformation is the greatest when the maximum of discs is observed. A model to describe both the disc formation and stability is proposed. PMID:7756559

  9. Dynamics in supercooled polyalcohols: Primary and secondary relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döß, A.; Paluch, M.; Sillescu, H.; Hinze, G.

    2002-10-01

    We have studied details of the molecular dynamics in a series of pure polyalcohols by means of dielectric spectroscopy and 2H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). From glycerol to threitol, xylitol and sorbitol a systematic change in the dynamics of the primary and secondary relaxation is found. With increasing molecular weight and fragility an increase in the width of the α-peak is observed. Details of the molecular reorientation process responsible for the α-relaxation were exploited by two-dimensional NMR experiments. It is found that in the same sequence of polyalcohols the appearance of the secondary relaxation changes gradually from a wing type scenario to a pronounced β-peak. From NMR experiments using selectively deuterated samples the molecular origin of the secondary relaxation could be elucidated in more detail.

  10. Coupled changes between lipid order and polypeptide conformation at the membrane surface. A sup 2 H NMR and Raman study of polylysine-phosphatidic acid systems

    SciTech Connect

    Laroche, G.; Pezolet, M. ); Dufourc, E.J.; Dufourcq, J. )

    1990-07-10

    Thermotropism and segmental chain order parameters of sn-2-perdeuteriated dimyristoylphosphatidic acid (DMPA)-water dispersions, with and without poly(L-lysine) (PLL) of different molecular weights, have been investigated by solid-state deuterium NMR spectroscopy. The segmental chain order parameter profile of this negatively charged lipid is similar to that already found for other lipids. Addition of long PLL increases the temperature, {Tc}, of the lipid gel-to-fluid phase transition, whereas short PLL has practically no effect on {Tc}. In the fluid phase both varieties of PLL increase the plateau character of segmental order parameters up to carbon position 10. At the same reduced temperature, long PLL more significantly increases the segmental ordering, especially at the methyl terminal position. This leads to the conclusion that polar head-group capping and charge neutralization by PLL induce severe changes in lipid chain ordering, even down to the bilayer core. The structure of PLL bound to the lipid bilayer surface was monitored by Raman spectroscopy, following the amide I bands. Results show that the lipid gel-to-fluid phase transition triggers a conformational transition from ordered {beta}-sheet to random structure of short PLL, while it does not affect the strongly stabilized {beta}-sheet structure of long PLL. It is concluded that both short and long PLL can efficiently cap and neutralize lipid head groups, whatever their structure, and that peptide length is a key parameter in whether lipids or peptides are the driving force in conformationally coupled changes of both partners in the membrane.

  11. Another challenge to paramagnetic relaxation theory: a study of paramagnetic proton NMR relaxation in closely related series of pyridine-derivatised dysprosium complexes.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Nicola J; Finney, Katie-Louise N A; Senanayake, P Kanthi; Parker, David

    2016-02-14

    Measurements of the relaxation rate behaviour of two series of dysprosium complexes have been performed in solution, over the field range 1.0 to 16.5 Tesla. The field dependence has been modelled using Bloch-Redfield-Wangsness theory, allowing estimates of the electronic relaxation time, T1e, and the size of the magnetic susceptibility, μeff, to be made. Changes in relaxation rate of the order of 50% at higher fields were measured, following variation of the para-substituent in the single pyridine donor. The magnetic susceptibilities deviated unexpectedly from the free-ion values for certain derivatives in each series examined, in a manner that was independent of the electron-releasing/withdrawing ability of the pyridine substituent, suggesting that the polarisability of just one pyridine donor in octadenate ligands can play a significant role in defining the magnetic susceptibility anisotropy. PMID:26792243

  12. Another challenge to paramagnetic relaxation theory: a study of paramagnetic proton NMR relaxation in closely related series of pyridine-derivatised dysprosium complexes.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Nicola J; Finney, Katie-Louise N A; Senanayake, P Kanthi; Parker, David

    2016-02-14

    Measurements of the relaxation rate behaviour of two series of dysprosium complexes have been performed in solution, over the field range 1.0 to 16.5 Tesla. The field dependence has been modelled using Bloch-Redfield-Wangsness theory, allowing estimates of the electronic relaxation time, T1e, and the size of the magnetic susceptibility, μeff, to be made. Changes in relaxation rate of the order of 50% at higher fields were measured, following variation of the para-substituent in the single pyridine donor. The magnetic susceptibilities deviated unexpectedly from the free-ion values for certain derivatives in each series examined, in a manner that was independent of the electron-releasing/withdrawing ability of the pyridine substituent, suggesting that the polarisability of just one pyridine donor in octadenate ligands can play a significant role in defining the magnetic susceptibility anisotropy.

  13. Is the manifestation of the local dynamics in the spin-lattice NMR relaxation in dendrimers sensitive to excluded volume interactions?

    PubMed

    Shavykin, Oleg V; Neelov, Igor M; Darinskii, Anatolii A

    2016-09-21

    The effect of excluded volume (EV) interactions on the manifestation of the local dynamics in the spin-lattice NMR relaxation in dendrimers has been studied by using Brownian dynamics simulations. The study was motivated by the theory developed by Markelov et al., [J. Chem. Phys., 2014, 140, 244904] for a Gaussian dendrimer model without EV interactions. The theory connects the experimentally observed dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T(1)H on the location of NMR active groups with the restricted flexibility (semiflexibility) of dendrimers. Semiflexibility was introduced through the correlations between the orientations of different segments. However, these correlations exist even in flexible dendrimer models with EV interactions. We have simulated coarse-grained flexible and semiflexible dendrimer models with and without EV interactions. Every dendrimer segment consisted of two rigid bonds. Semiflexibility was introduced through a potential which restricts the fluctuations of angles between neighboring bonds but does not change orientational correlations in the EV model as compared to the flexible case. The frequency dependence of the reduced 1/T(1)H(ωH) for segments and bonds belonging to different dendrimer shells was calculated. It was shown that the main effect of EV interactions consists of a much stronger contribution of the overall dendrimer rotation to the dynamics of dendrimer segments as compared to phantom models. After the exclusion of this contribution the manifestation of internal dynamics in spin-lattice NMR relaxation appears to be practically insensitive to EV interactions. For the flexible models, the position ωmax of the peak of the modified 1/T(1)H(ωH) does not depend on the shell number. For semiflexible models, the maximum of 1/T(1)H(ωH) for internal segments or bonds shifts to lower frequencies as compared to outer ones. The dependence of ωmax on the number of dendrimer shells appears to be universal for segments and

  14. Carbon-13 NMR relaxation study of molecular dynamics and organization of sodium poly(styrenesulfonate) and dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide aggregates in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Zhisheng; Wasylishen, R.E.; Kwak, J.C.T. )

    1990-01-25

    Aqueous solutions of aggregates of sodium poly(styrenesulfonate) (PSS) and dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) have been studied by {sup 13}C NMR relaxation measurements at 8.48 T. The relaxation data are interpreted by use of a two-step model. Correlation times for fast motion and order parameters have been calculated as a function of carbon position on the alkyl chain of DTAB in the PSS-DTAB aggregates. A micellar solution of DTAB is also studied for comparison. Slightly larger order parameters are observed for the surfactant alkyl chain (except the last three carbons C10, C11, and C12) in the PSS-DTAB aggregates compared with those in DTAB micelles. On the other hand, for the carbons near the headgroup of DTAB, the correlation times for fast motion in the PSS-DTAB aggregates are much longer than those in the DTAB micelles.

  15. Feasibility of high-resolution one-dimensional relaxation imaging at low magnetic field using a single-sided NMR scanner applied to articular cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rössler, Erik; Mattea, Carlos; Stapf, Siegfried

    2015-02-01

    Low field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance increases the contrast of the longitudinal relaxation rate in many biological tissues; one prominent example is hyaline articular cartilage. In order to take advantage of this increased contrast and to profile the depth-dependent variations, high resolution parameter measurements are carried out which can be of critical importance in an early diagnosis of cartilage diseases such as osteoarthritis. However, the maximum achievable spatial resolution of parameter profiles is limited by factors such as sensor geometry, sample curvature, and diffusion limitation. In this work, we report on high-resolution single-sided NMR scanner measurements with a commercial device, and quantify these limitations. The highest achievable spatial resolution on the used profiler, and the lateral dimension of the sensitive volume were determined. Since articular cartilage samples are usually bent, we also focus on averaging effects inside the horizontally aligned sensitive volume and their impact on the relaxation profiles. Taking these critical parameters into consideration, depth-dependent relaxation time profiles with the maximum achievable vertical resolution of 20 μm are discussed, and are correlated with diffusion coefficient profiles in hyaline articular cartilage in order to reconstruct T2 maps from the diffusion-weighted CPMG decays of apparent relaxation rates.

  16. Strategy for the study of paramagnetic proteins with slow electronic relaxation rates by nmr spectroscopy: application to oxidized human [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin.

    PubMed

    Machonkin, Timothy E; Westler, William M; Markley, John L

    2004-05-01

    NMR studies of paramagnetic proteins are hampered by the rapid relaxation of nuclei near the paramagnetic center, which prevents the application of conventional methods to investigations of the most interesting regions of such molecules. This problem is particularly acute in systems with slow electronic relaxation rates. We present a strategy that can be used with a protein with slow electronic relaxation to identify and assign resonances from nuclei near the paramagnetic center. Oxidized human [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin (adrenodoxin) was used to test the approach. The strategy involves six steps: (1) NMR signals from (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N nuclei unaffected or minimally affected by paramagnetic effects are assigned by standard multinuclear two- and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) spectroscopic methods with protein samples labeled uniformly with (13)C and (15)N. (2) The very broad, hyperfine-shifted signals from carbons in the residues that ligate the metal center are classified by amino acid and atom type by selective (13)C labeling and one-dimensional (1D) (13)C NMR spectroscopy. (3) Spin systems involving carbons near the paramagnetic center that are broadened but not hyperfine-shifted are elucidated by (13)C[(13)C] constant time correlation spectroscopy (CT-COSY). (4) Signals from amide nitrogens affected by the paramagnetic center are assigned to amino acid type by selective (15)N labeling and 1D (15)N NMR spectroscopy. (5) Sequence-specific assignments of these carbon and nitrogen signals are determined by 1D (13)C[(15)N] difference decoupling experiments. (6) Signals from (1)H nuclei in these spin systems are assigned by paramagnetic-optimized 2D and 3D (1)H[(13)C] experiments. For oxidized human ferredoxin, this strategy led to assignments (to amino acid and atom type) for 88% of the carbons in the [2Fe-2S] cluster-binding loops (residues 43-58 and 89-94). These included complete carbon spin-system assignments for eight of the 22 residues and partial assignments for

  17. Long-range Li+ dynamics in the lithium argyrodite Li7PSe6 as probed by rotating-frame spin-lattice relaxation NMR.

    PubMed

    Epp, V; Gün, O; Deiseroth, H-J; Wilkening, M

    2013-05-21

    Lithium-rich argyrodites belong to a relatively new group of fast ion conducting solids. They might serve as powerful electrolytes in all-solid-state lithium-ion batteries being, from a medium-term point of view, the key technology when safe energy storage systems have to be developed. Spin-lattice relaxation (SLR) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements carried out in the rotating frame of reference turned out to be the method of choice to study Li dynamics in argyrodites. When plotted as a function of the inverse temperature, the SLR rates log10(R1ρ) reveal an asymmetric diffusion-induced rate peak. The rate peak contains information on the Li jump rate, the activation energy of the hopping process as well as correlation effects. In particular, considering the high-temperature flank of the SLR NMR rate peak recorded in the rotating frame of reference, an activation energy of approximately 0.49 eV is found. This value represents long-range lithium jump diffusion in crystalline Li7PSe6. As an example, at 325 K the Li jump rate determined from SLR NMR is in the order of 1.4 × 10(5) s(-1). The pronounced asymmetry of the rate peak R1ρ(1/T) points to correlated Li motion. It is comparable to that which is typically found for structurally disordered materials showing a broad range of correlation times.

  18. Molecular determinants for drug-receptor interactions. 8. Anisotropic and internal motions in morphine, nalorphine, oxymorphone, naloxone and naltrexone in aqueous solution by carbon-13 NMR spin-lattice relaxation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassi, Antonio; Perly, Bruno; Pappalardo, Giuseppe C.

    1989-02-01

    Carbon-13 NMR spin-lattice relaxation times ( T1) were measured for morphine, oxymorphone, nalorphine, naloxone and naltrexone as hydrochloride salts in 2H 2O solution. The data refer to the molecules in the N-equatorial configuration. The experimental T1 values were interpreted using a model of anisotropic reorientation of a rigid body with superimposed internal motions of the flexible N-methyl, N-methyl-allyl and N-methyl-cyclopropyl fragments. The calculated internal motional rates were found to markedly decrease on passing from agonists to mixed (nalorphine) and pure (naloxone, naltrexone) antagonists. For these latter the observed trend of the internal flexibility about NC and CC bonds of the N-substituents is discussed in terms of a correlation with their relative antagonistic potencies. In fact, such an evidence of decreasing internal conformational dynamics in the order nalorphine, naloxone, naltrexone, appeared interestingly in line with the "two-state" model of opiate receptor operation mode proposed by Snyder.

  19. A 300 MHz and 600 MHz proton NMR study of a 12 base pair restriction fragment: investigation of structure by relaxation measurements.

    PubMed Central

    Early, T A; Kearns, D R; Hillen, W; Wells, R D

    1980-01-01

    The 1H NMR spectrum of a 12 base pair DNA restriction fragment has been measured at 300 and 600 MHz and resonances from over 70 protons are individually resolved. Relaxation rate measurements have been carried out at 300 MHz and compared with the theoretical predictions obtained using an isotropic rigid rotor model with coordinates derived from a Dreiding model of DNA. The model gives results that are in excellent agreement with experiment for most protons when a 7 nsec rotational correlation time is used, although agreement is improved for certain base protons by using a shorter correlation time for the sugar group, or by increasing the sugar-base interproton distances. A comparison of non-selective and selective spin-lattice relaxation rates for carbon bound protons indicates that there is extensive spin diffusion even in this short DNA fragment. Examination of the spin-spin relaxation rates for the same type of proton on different base pairs reveals little sequence effect on conformation. PMID:6258152

  20. Cross-validation of the structure of a transiently formed and low populated FF domain folding intermediate determined by relaxation dispersion NMR and CS-Rosetta.

    PubMed

    Barette, Julia; Velyvis, Algirdas; Religa, Tomasz L; Korzhnev, Dmitry M; Kay, Lewis E

    2012-06-14

    We have recently reported the atomic resolution structure of a low populated and transiently formed on-pathway folding intermediate of the FF domain from human HYPA/FBP11 [Korzhnev, D. M.; Religa, T. L.; Banachewicz, W.; Fersht, A. R.; Kay, L.E. Science 2011, 329, 1312-1316]. The structure was determined on the basis of backbone chemical shift and bond vector orientation restraints of the invisible intermediate state measured using relaxation dispersion nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy that were subsequently input into the database structure determination program, CS-Rosetta. As a cross-validation of the structure so produced, we present here the solution structure of a mimic of the folding intermediate that is highly populated in solution, obtained from the wild-type domain by mutagenesis that destabilizes the native state. The relaxation dispersion/CS-Rosetta structures of the intermediate are within 2 Å of those of the mimic, with the nonnative interactions in the intermediate also observed in the mimic. This strongly confirms the structure of the FF domain folding intermediate, in particular, and validates the use of relaxation dispersion derived restraints in structural studies of invisible excited states, in general.

  1. Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study of the NMR Relaxation of Xenon-131 Dissolved in 1,3-Dioxane and 1,4-Dioxane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhmer, M.; Reisse, J.

    The experimental NMR relaxation study of Xe-131 dissolved in 1,3-dioxane and 1,4-dioxane indicates that the intermolecular quadrupole relaxation mechanism is equally as efficient in both solvents even if 1,3-dioxane is a dipolar molecule while 1,4-dioxane is not. In order to interpret this observation, molecular-dynamics simulations were performed for model systems of xenon gas dissolved in 1,3-dioxane and 1,4-dioxane. The simulations were able to satisfactorily reproduce various experimental data for each system and, in perfect agreement with the experiment, yielded the same 131Xe quadrupole relaxation rate in both solvents. This result was obtained assuming an electrostatic origin of the electric-field gradient, and therefore validates this explanation. In 1,4-dioxane, the overwhelming part of the fluctuating electric-field gradient experienced by the xenon nucleus is due to the quadrupole moment of the solvent molecules. In 1,3-dioxane, the dipole moment is responsible for approximately half the value of the amplitude of the electric-field-gradient fluctuations only. Contributions at least up to the octopole moment are important and, consequently, the correlation time characterizing the electric-field-gradient fluctuations in 1,3-dioxane is significantly shorter than the dipolar correlation time and is found to be similar to the correlation time value in 1,4-dioxane. The relaxation rate of 131Xe in dioxanes is compared to the value in other solvents including cyclohexane, and comments are made on the general concept of polarity.

  2. Is the manifestation of the local dynamics in the spin-lattice NMR relaxation in dendrimers sensitive to excluded volume interactions?

    PubMed

    Shavykin, Oleg V; Neelov, Igor M; Darinskii, Anatolii A

    2016-09-21

    The effect of excluded volume (EV) interactions on the manifestation of the local dynamics in the spin-lattice NMR relaxation in dendrimers has been studied by using Brownian dynamics simulations. The study was motivated by the theory developed by Markelov et al., [J. Chem. Phys., 2014, 140, 244904] for a Gaussian dendrimer model without EV interactions. The theory connects the experimentally observed dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T(1)H on the location of NMR active groups with the restricted flexibility (semiflexibility) of dendrimers. Semiflexibility was introduced through the correlations between the orientations of different segments. However, these correlations exist even in flexible dendrimer models with EV interactions. We have simulated coarse-grained flexible and semiflexible dendrimer models with and without EV interactions. Every dendrimer segment consisted of two rigid bonds. Semiflexibility was introduced through a potential which restricts the fluctuations of angles between neighboring bonds but does not change orientational correlations in the EV model as compared to the flexible case. The frequency dependence of the reduced 1/T(1)H(ωH) for segments and bonds belonging to different dendrimer shells was calculated. It was shown that the main effect of EV interactions consists of a much stronger contribution of the overall dendrimer rotation to the dynamics of dendrimer segments as compared to phantom models. After the exclusion of this contribution the manifestation of internal dynamics in spin-lattice NMR relaxation appears to be practically insensitive to EV interactions. For the flexible models, the position ωmax of the peak of the modified 1/T(1)H(ωH) does not depend on the shell number. For semiflexible models, the maximum of 1/T(1)H(ωH) for internal segments or bonds shifts to lower frequencies as compared to outer ones. The dependence of ωmax on the number of dendrimer shells appears to be universal for segments and

  3. Solution NMR Structure Determination of Polytopic α-Helical Membrane Proteins: A Guide to Spin Label Paramagnetic Relaxation Enhancement Restraints.

    PubMed

    Columbus, Linda; Kroncke, Brett

    2015-01-01

    Solution nuclear magnetic resonance structures of polytopic α-helical membrane proteins require additional restraints beyond the traditional Nuclear Overhauser Effect (NOE) restraints. Several methods have been developed and this review focuses on paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE). Important aspects of spin labeling, PRE measurements, structure calculations, and structural quality are discussed.

  4. 11B and 27Al NMR spin-lattice relaxation and Knight shift of Mg1-xAlxB2: Evidence for an anisotropic Fermi surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papavassiliou, G.; Pissas, M.; Karayanni, M.; Fardis, M.; Koutandos, S.; Prassides, K.

    2002-10-01

    We report a detailed study of the 11B and 27Al NMR spin-lattice relaxation rates (1/T1) and the 27Al Knight shift (K) in Mg1-xAlxB2, 0<=x<=1. The evolution of (1/T1T) and K with x is in excellent agreement with the prediction of ab initio calculations of a highly anisotropic Fermi surface, consisting mainly of hole-type two-dimensional (2D) cylindrical sheets from bonding 2px,y boron orbitals. The density of states at the Fermi level also decreases sharply on Al doping and the 2D sheets collapse at x~0.55, where the superconducting phase disappears.

  5. H-1 Relaxation Times of Metabolites in Biological Samples Obtained with Nondestructive Ex-vivo Slow-MAS NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Wind, Robert A.; Rommereim, Donald N.

    2006-03-01

    Methods suitable for measuring 1H relaxation times such as T1, T2 and T1p, in small sized biological objects including live cells, excised organs and tissues, oil seeds etc., were developed in this work. This was achieved by combining inversion-recovery, spin-echo, or spin lock segment with the phase-adjusted spinning sideband (PASS) technique that was applied at slow sample spinning rate. Here, 2D-PASS was used to produce a high-resolution 1H spectrum free from the magnetic susceptibility broadening so that the relaxation parameters of individual metabolite can be determined. Because of the slow spinning employed, tissue and cell damage due to sample spinning is minimized. The methodologies were demonstrated by measuring 1H T1, T2 and T1p of metabolites in excised rat livers and sesame seeds at spinning rates of as low as 40 Hz.

  6. A multinuclear NMR relaxation study of the interaction of divalent metal ions with L-aspartic acid.

    PubMed

    Khazaeli, S; Viola, R E

    1984-09-01

    Carbon-13 spin-lattice relaxation times, T1, have been measured for aqueous solutions of L-aspartic acid, L-alanine, O-phospho-L-serine, and 2-mercapto-L-succinic acid in the presence of the paramagnetic metal ions, Cu2+ and Mn2+, and Mg2+ as a diamagnetic control, at ambient temperature and neutral pH. Nitrogen-15, oxygen-17 and proton relaxation times were also obtained for L-aspartic acid and phosphorus-31 relaxation times for O-phospho-L-serine under similar conditions. The structures of these complexes in solution were determined from the various metal ion-nuclei distances calculated from the paramagnetically-induced relaxation. These results indicate that the Cu2+ interaction with L-aspartic acid is through alpha-amino and beta-carboxyl groups while Mn2+ coordinates most strongly through alpha- and beta-carboxyl groups, with the possibility of a weak interaction through the amino group. An examination of the coordination of these divalent metal ions to an analog of L-aspartic acid in which the beta-carboxyl group is replaced by a phosphate group (O-phospho-L-serine) indicated that Cu2+ coordination is now probably through the alpha-amino and phosphate groups, while this analog is a monodentate ligand for Mn2+ coordinating through the phosphate group. Removal of the beta-carboxyl group (L-alanine) also results in Cu2+ coordination through the alpha-carboxyl and alpha-amino groups, and the same ligand interactions are observed with Mn2+. Replacement of the alpha-amino group of L-aspartic acid with an -SH group (2-mercapto-L-succinate) is sufficient to eliminate any specific coordination with either Cu2+ or Mn2+. PMID:6491655

  7. Magnetic hyperthermia efficiency and (1)H-NMR relaxation properties of iron oxide/paclitaxel-loaded PLGA nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ruggiero, Maria R; Crich, Simonetta Geninatti; Sieni, Elisabetta; Sgarbossa, Paolo; Forzan, Michele; Cavallari, Eleonora; Stefania, Rachele; Dughiero, Fabrizio; Aime, Silvio

    2016-07-15

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe-NPs) can be exploited in biomedicine as agents for magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) treatments and as contrast enhancers in magnetic resonance imaging. New, oleate-covered, iron oxide particles have been prepared either by co-precipitation or thermal decomposition methods and incorporated into poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles (PLGA-Fe-NPs) to improve their biocompatibility and in vivo stability. Moreover, the PLGA-Fe-NPs have been loaded with paclitaxel to pursue an MFH-triggered drug release. Remarkably, it has been found that the nanoparticle formulations are characterized by peculiar (1)H nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) profiles that directly correlate with their heating potential when exposed to an alternating magnetic field. By prolonging the magnetic field exposure to 30 min, a significant drug release was observed for PLGA-Fe-NPs in the case of the larger-sized magnetic nanoparticles. Furthermore, the immobilization of lipophilic Fe-NPs in PLGA-NPs also made it possible to maintain Néel relaxation as the dominant relaxation contribution in the presence of large iron oxide cores (diameters of 15-20 nm), with the advantage of preserving their efficiency when they are entrapped in the intracellular environment. The results reported herein show that NMRD profiles are a useful tool for anticipating the heating capabilities of Fe-NPs designed for MFH applications. PMID:27265726

  8. Magnetic hyperthermia efficiency and 1H-NMR relaxation properties of iron oxide/paclitaxel-loaded PLGA nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggiero, Maria R.; Geninatti Crich, Simonetta; Sieni, Elisabetta; Sgarbossa, Paolo; Forzan, Michele; Cavallari, Eleonora; Stefania, Rachele; Dughiero, Fabrizio; Aime, Silvio

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe-NPs) can be exploited in biomedicine as agents for magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) treatments and as contrast enhancers in magnetic resonance imaging. New, oleate-covered, iron oxide particles have been prepared either by co-precipitation or thermal decomposition methods and incorporated into poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles (PLGA-Fe-NPs) to improve their biocompatibility and in vivo stability. Moreover, the PLGA-Fe-NPs have been loaded with paclitaxel to pursue an MFH-triggered drug release. Remarkably, it has been found that the nanoparticle formulations are characterized by peculiar 1H nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) profiles that directly correlate with their heating potential when exposed to an alternating magnetic field. By prolonging the magnetic field exposure to 30 min, a significant drug release was observed for PLGA-Fe-NPs in the case of the larger-sized magnetic nanoparticles. Furthermore, the immobilization of lipophilic Fe-NPs in PLGA-NPs also made it possible to maintain Néel relaxation as the dominant relaxation contribution in the presence of large iron oxide cores (diameters of 15-20 nm), with the advantage of preserving their efficiency when they are entrapped in the intracellular environment. The results reported herein show that NMRD profiles are a useful tool for anticipating the heating capabilities of Fe-NPs designed for MFH applications.

  9. Magnetic hyperthermia efficiency and 1H-NMR relaxation properties of iron oxide/paclitaxel-loaded PLGA nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggiero, Maria R.; Geninatti Crich, Simonetta; Sieni, Elisabetta; Sgarbossa, Paolo; Forzan, Michele; Cavallari, Eleonora; Stefania, Rachele; Dughiero, Fabrizio; Aime, Silvio

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe-NPs) can be exploited in biomedicine as agents for magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) treatments and as contrast enhancers in magnetic resonance imaging. New, oleate-covered, iron oxide particles have been prepared either by co-precipitation or thermal decomposition methods and incorporated into poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles (PLGA-Fe-NPs) to improve their biocompatibility and in vivo stability. Moreover, the PLGA-Fe-NPs have been loaded with paclitaxel to pursue an MFH-triggered drug release. Remarkably, it has been found that the nanoparticle formulations are characterized by peculiar 1H nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) profiles that directly correlate with their heating potential when exposed to an alternating magnetic field. By prolonging the magnetic field exposure to 30 min, a significant drug release was observed for PLGA-Fe-NPs in the case of the larger-sized magnetic nanoparticles. Furthermore, the immobilization of lipophilic Fe-NPs in PLGA-NPs also made it possible to maintain Néel relaxation as the dominant relaxation contribution in the presence of large iron oxide cores (diameters of 15–20 nm), with the advantage of preserving their efficiency when they are entrapped in the intracellular environment. The results reported herein show that NMRD profiles are a useful tool for anticipating the heating capabilities of Fe-NPs designed for MFH applications.

  10. Fast Li ion dynamics in the solid electrolyte Li7 P3 S11 as probed by (6,7) Li NMR spin-lattice relaxation.

    PubMed

    Wohlmuth, Dominik; Epp, Viktor; Wilkening, Martin

    2015-08-24

    The development of safe and long-lasting all-solid-state batteries with high energy density requires a thorough characterization of ion dynamics in solid electrolytes. Commonly, conductivity spectroscopy is used to study ion transport; much less frequently, however, atomic-scale methods such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) are employed. Here, we studied long-range as well as short-range Li ion dynamics in the glass-ceramic Li7 P3 S11 . Li(+) diffusivity was probed by using a combination of different NMR techniques; the results are compared with those obtained from electrical conductivity measurements. Our NMR relaxometry data clearly reveal a very high Li(+) diffusivity, which is reflected in a so-called diffusion-induced (6) Li NMR spin-lattice relaxation peak showing up at temperatures as low as 313 K. At this temperature, the mean residence time between two successful Li jumps is in the order of 3×10(8) s(-1) , which corresponds to a Li(+) ion conductivity in the order of 10(-4) to 10(-3) S cm(-1) . Such a value is in perfect agreement with expectations for the crystalline but metastable glass ceramic Li7 P3 S11 . In contrast to conductivity measurements, NMR analysis reveals a range of activation energies with values ranging from 0.17 to 0.26 eV, characterizing Li diffusivity in the bulk. In our case, through-going Li ion transport, when probed by using macroscopic conductivity spectroscopy, however, seems to be influenced by blocking grain boundaries including, for example, amorphous regions surrounding the Li7 P3 S11 crystallites. As a result of this, long-range ion transport as seen by impedance spectroscopy is governed by an activation energy of approximately 0.38 eV. The findings emphasize how surface and grain boundary effects can drastically affect long-range ionic conduction. If we are to succeed in solid-state battery technology, such effects have to be brought under control by, for example, sophisticated densification or through the preparation

  11. Conformational stability and thermal pathways of relaxation in triclosan (antibacterial/excipient/contaminant) in solid-state: combined spectroscopic ((1)H NMR) and computational (periodic DFT) study.

    PubMed

    Latosińska, Jolanta Natalia; Latosińska, Magdalena; Tomczak, Marzena Agnieszka; Medycki, Wojciech

    2015-05-21

    The mechanism of molecular dynamics in the antibacterial/antifungal agent, triclosan (5-chloro-2-(2',4'-dichlorophenoxy)-phenol), in solid state was studied by (1)H NMR spectroscopy and periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Temperature dependencies of the proton spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) in the ranges 86-293 and 90-250 K (at 15 and 24.667 MHz, respectively) and the second moment (M2) of the (1)H NMR resonant line in the range 103-300 K were measured. Two minima in the temperature dependence of T1 revealed a classical Arrhenius governed activation processes. The low temperature shallow minimum T1(T) of 71 s at 115 K, 15 MHz, which shifts with frequency, was assigned to classical hindered jumps of hydroxyl group around OC axis and with respect to a 5-chloro-2-phenol ring. The activation energy of this motion estimated on the basis of the fit of the theoretical model to the experimental points is 9.68 kJ/mol. The pointed high temperature minimum T1(T) of 59 s at 190 K, 15 MHz, which also shifts with frequency, was assigned to the small angle librations by Θlib= ± 9° between two positions of equilibrium differing in energy by 7.42 kJ/mol. The activation energy of this motion estimated on the basis of the fit of the theoretical model to the experimental points is 31.1 kJ/mol. Both motions result in a negligible reduction in the (1)H NMR line second moment, thus the second moment delivers an irrelevant description of the molecular motions in triclosan.

  12. Effective Forces Between Diamagnetic and Paramagnetic Ions in D 2 O at Low and Moderate Ionic Strengths: An NMR Relaxation Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacco, A.; Belorizky, E.; Jeannin, M.; Gorecki, W.; Fries, P. H.

    1997-09-01

    The dynamical behaviour of several pairs of dissociated, attractive and repulsive, ions is investigated in aqueous solutions for ionic strengths up to 1 mol l^{-1}. The experimental information is provided by the NMR longitudinal relaxation rates of the protons on the diamagnetic ions. The ionic solutions were chosen so that the main relaxation mechanism of these protons is due to the time fluctuations of their dipolar magnetic coupling with the electronic spins on the paramagnetic ions. This coupling strongly depends on the ion-ion potential of mean force (PMF) and on the ion self-diffusion coefficients. The interionic spatial correlations and the associated PMF are derived from a new approximation of the integral equations of the statistical mechanics of liquids. This formalism, which treats all the ions as discrete particles, rests on the infinite dilution PMF of the various ion pairs. It mixes a Born-Oppenheimer theory at infinite dilution with a sort of McMillan-Mayer approximation to take the ionic concentration into account. It goes beyond the Debye-Hückel screening theory, in which a continuous screening charge distribution approximates the effects of the discrete surrounding ions. It is related to the concept of the local dielectric constants which replace the usual macroscopic dielectric constant and depend on the interionic distances. The self-diffusion coefficients of the diamagnetic ions were measured by the NMR pulsed magnetic field gradient (PMFG) techniques applied to the resonant protons. In paramagnetic solutions, where several protonated species coexist, special caution is required and this is discussed in detail. For all the investigated solutions the theory well accounts for the observed variation of the NMR relaxation as a function of the ion charges, of the ionic strength and of the NMR proton resonance frequency. The relaxation results predicted by the new approximation of the ion-ion PMF are compared with those derived from the simple

  13. 31P NMR relaxation of cortical bone mineral at multiple magnetic field strengths and levels of demineralization.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Alan C; Wright, Alexander C; Wehrli, Suzanne L; Ong, Henry H; Li, Cheng; Wehrli, Felix W

    2013-09-01

    Recent work has shown that solid-state (1) H and (31) P MRI can provide detailed insight into bone matrix and mineral properties, thereby potentially enabling differentiation of osteoporosis from osteomalacia. However, (31) P MRI of bone mineral is hampered by unfavorable relaxation properties. Hence, accurate knowledge of these properties is critical to optimizing MRI of bone phosphorus. In this work, (31) P MRI signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was predicted on the basis of T1 and T2 * (effective transverse relaxation time) measured in lamb bone at six field strengths (1.5-11.7 T) and subsequently verified by 3D ultra-short echo-time and zero echo-time imaging. Further, T1 was measured in deuterium-exchanged bone and partially demineralized bone. (31) P T2 * was found to decrease from 220.3 ± 4.3 µs to 98.0 ± 1.4 µs from 1.5 to 11.7 T, and T1 to increase from 12.8 ± 0.5 s to 97.3 ± 6.4 s. Deuteron substitution of exchangeable water showed that 76% of the (31) P longitudinal relaxation rate is due to (1) H-(31) P dipolar interactions. Lastly, hypomineralization was found to decrease T1, which may have implications for (31) P MRI based mineralization density quantification. Despite the steep decrease in the T2 */T1 ratio, SNR should increase with field strength as B0 (0.4) for sample-dominated noise and as B0 (1.1) for coil-dominated noise. This was confirmed by imaging experiments. PMID:23505120

  14. Surface effects and dipolar correlations of confined and constrained liquids investigated by NMR relaxation experiments and computer simulations.

    PubMed

    Grinberg, F; Kimmich, R

    2001-01-01

    Local order and molecular dynamics of liquids near surfaces strongly deviate from the behavior in the bulk. This in particular refers to liquid crystals above the bulk isotropization temperature. Transverse relaxation data of 5CB examined in porous glasses with different pore sizes are reported. A strong pore size effect was found. For the interpretation, a simple diffusion-adsorption computer simulation was carried out. Molecules can diffuse from the isotropic bulk part of the pore fluid to the ordered surface layer and vice versa. The residual dipolar correlation function is characterized by a slowly decaying tail owing to repeated returns of molecules to the surface. At each return the molecular orientation correlation is recovered as far as the surface sites visited have orientations correlated to the initial site. That is, molecular orientation is controlled by the "reorientation mediated by translational displacement" process considered in previous papers.

  15. Spin-echo methods for the determination of 31P transverse relaxation times of the ATP NMR signals in vivo.

    PubMed

    Straubinger, K; Jung, W I; Bunse, M; Lutz, O; Küper, K; Dietze, G

    1994-01-01

    31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) examinations of the calf muscles of healthy volunteers were performed to determine T2 of the coupled ATP signals by use of the Hahn spin-echo and the frequency-selective spin-echo method. Additional measurements with the J-coupling refocused double echo are presented. The most reliable determination of T2 relaxation times is possible with the frequency-selective spin echo. The other methods yield substantially wrong results. Theoretical explanations are given how J-coupling and pulse-angle deviations affect the signals and therefore the T2 determinations. The calculations for a weakly coupled homonuclear AX spin system are shown because they demonstrate most of the relevant facts. In addition, some important results for a homonuclear AMX spin system, which the ATP is considered to be, are given.

  16. Complex mechanism of relaxation in solid chloroxylenol (antibacterial/antifungal agent) studied by ¹H NMR spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations.

    PubMed

    Latosińska, Jolanta Natalia; Latosińska, Magdalena; Tomczak, Marzena Agnieszka; Medycki, Wojciech

    2014-03-27

    Molecular relaxation in antibacterial/antifungal agent: chloroxylenol (4-chloro-3,5-dimethylphenol, PCMX) in the solid state was studied by the (1)H NMR and quantum chemistry calculations. The temperature dependencies of the proton spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) in the ranges 15-273 K (at 24.667 MHz), 77-295 K (at 15 MHz), and 112-291 K at 90 MHz and the second moment (M2) of (1)H NMR resonant line in the range 106-380 K were measured. The two minima in the temperature dependence of T1 revealed two activation processes, whereas the M2 dependence in the studied range was quite flat and revealed the only significant reduction at 380 K. The low temperature part of T1(T) dependence indicated the occurrence of two processes characteristic of methyl bearing solids; the quantum mechanics governed incoherent tunneling (responsible for the low temperature flattening of T1) and the classical Arrhenius dependence governed hindered rotation (related to the wide low temperature minimum of 0.066 s at 57 K, 24.667 MHz). The 2D potential energy surface obtained using DFT/B3LYP/6-311++G(2d,p) calculations revealed the inequivalence of methyl groups and the lack of their interplay/coupling. The activation energies of classical hindered rotation are 3.35 and 2.5 kJ/mol, whereas temperatures at which the proton tunneling T(tun) finally ceases are 52 and 63 K, for inequivalent methyl groups. C(p)(T) required for the estimation of T(tun) was calculated purely theoretically on the basis of the Einstein and Debye models of specific heat and 51 modes of atomic vibrations, 4 internal rotations, and 3 torsions calculated by DFT. The -CH3 motion (tunneling and classical) results in the reduction in the (1)H NMR line second moment from 17.3 G(2) (rigid) to approximately 11.05 G(2). The pointed high temperature minimum T1(T) of 0.109 s at 89 K, 24.667 MHz, which shifts with frequency, was assigned to small-angle libration jumps, by the Θ2 = ±15° between two positions of equilibrium. The

  17. Temperature Dependence of NMR Relaxation Times of Nucleoside Triphosphates and Inorganic Phosphate in the Isolated Perfused Rat Liver. Effect on Pi Compartmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufour, Sylvie; Thiaudière, Eric; Vidal, Giovanni; Gallis, Jean-Louis; Rousse, Nicole; Canioni, Paul

    1996-11-01

    The effect of temperature on31P NMR spectra from isolated perfused rat livers was studied at 9.4 T. Relaxation times (T1andT2) of nucleoside triphosphates (NTP) and inorganic phosphate (Pi) were determined at 37, 25, 15, and 4°C. Under hypothermic conditions, an unexpected apparent line sharpening in the Pi spectral region and a clear emergence of an additional Pi resonance were observed. This additional signal was assigned to mitochondrial Pi.T1values obtained for cytosolic and mitochondrial Pi at 4°C were 1.14 ± 0.24 s (n= 5) and 0.71 ± 0.18 s (n= 5), respectively. No significant mitochondrial contribution to the Pi resonance was observed at 37°C. Quantification of Pi and NTP liver contents at 37 and 4°C was performed by comparing the perfused liver spectrum and the corresponding perchloric acid extract spectrum. Under experimental conditions of low external Pi (0.12 mM), it was concluded that intracellular Pi was completely NMR-visible at 4 and 37°C. The observation of the mitochondrial Pi signal at 4°C was well explained by an increase in the Pi level within the matrix, in response to the mitochondrial swelling induced by hypothermia, as observed by electron microscopy.T2values for the cytosolic Pi at 37 and 4°C were 17 ± 4 ms (n= 8) and 22 ± 4 ms (n= 10), respectively. Comparison with measured linewidths indicated that line broadening for the main phosphorylated metabolites-including matrix Pi-was the result ofB0field inhomogeneity. The additional broadening of the cytosolic Pi resonance at 4 and 37°C was attributed to pH heterogeneity within the liver.

  18. Adiabatic fast passage application in solid state NMR study of cross relaxation and molecular dynamics in heteronuclear systems.

    PubMed

    Baranowski, M; Woźniak-Braszak, A; Jurga, K

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the benefits of using fast adiabatic passage for the study of molecular dynamics in the solid state heteronuclear systems in the laboratory frame. A homemade pulse spectrometer operating at the frequency of 30.2MHz and 28.411MHz for protons and fluorines, respectively, has been enhanced with microcontroller direct digital synthesizer DDS controller [1-4]. This work briefly describes how to construct a low-cost and easy-to-assemble adiabatic extension set for homemade and commercial spectrometers based on recently very popular Arduino shields. The described set was designed for fast adiabatic generation. Timing and synchronization problems are discussed. The cross-relaxation experiments with different initial states of the two spin systems have been performed. Contrary to our previous work [5] where the steady-state NOE experiments were conducted now proton spins (1)H are polarized in the magnetic field B0 while fluorine spins (19)F are perturbed by selective saturation for a short time and then the system is allowed to evolve for a period in the absence of a saturating field. The adiabatic passage application leads to a reversal of magnetization of fluorine spins and increases the amplitude of the signal. PMID:26705906

  19. Structure and Dynamics of Ribosomal Protein L12: An Ensemble Model Based on SAXS and NMR Relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Bernadó, Pau; Modig, Kristofer; Grela, Przemysław; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Tchorzewski, Marek; Pons, Miquel; Akke, Mikael

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Ribosomal protein L12 is a two-domain protein that forms dimers mediated by its N-terminal domains. A 20-residue linker separates the N- and C-terminal domains. This linker results in a three-lobe topology with significant flexibility, known to be critical for efficient translation. Here we present an ensemble model of spatial distributions and correlation times for the domain reorientations of L12 that reconciles experimental data from small-angle x-ray scattering and nuclear magnetic resonance. We generated an ensemble of L12 conformations in which the structure of each domain is fixed but the domain orientations are variable. The ensemble reproduces the small-angle x-ray scattering data and the optimized correlation times of its reorientational eigenmodes fit the 15N relaxation data. The ensemble model reveals intrinsic conformational properties of L12 that help explain its function on the ribosome. The two C-terminal domains sample a large volume and extend further away from the ribosome anchor than expected for a random-chain linker, indicating that the flexible linker has residual order. Furthermore, the distances between each C-terminal domain and the anchor are anticorrelated, indicating that one of them is more retracted on average. We speculate that these properties promote the function of L12 to recruit translation factors and control their activity on the ribosome. PMID:20483347

  20. Adiabatic fast passage application in solid state NMR study of cross relaxation and molecular dynamics in heteronuclear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranowski, M.; Woźniak-Braszak, A.; Jurga, K.

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the benefits of using fast adiabatic passage for the study of molecular dynamics in the solid state heteronuclear systems in the laboratory frame. A homemade pulse spectrometer operating at the frequency of 30.2 MHz and 28.411 MHz for protons and fluorines, respectively, has been enhanced with microcontroller direct digital synthesizer DDS controller [1-4]. This work briefly describes how to construct a low-cost and easy-to-assemble adiabatic extension set for homemade and commercial spectrometers based on recently very popular Arduino shields. The described set was designed for fast adiabatic generation. Timing and synchronization problems are discussed. The cross-relaxation experiments with different initial states of the two spin systems have been performed. Contrary to our previous work [5] where the steady-state NOE experiments were conducted now proton spins 1H are polarized in the magnetic field B0 while fluorine spins 19F are perturbed by selective saturation for a short time and then the system is allowed to evolve for a period in the absence of a saturating field. The adiabatic passage application leads to a reversal of magnetization of fluorine spins and increases the amplitude of the signal.

  1. Adiabatic fast passage application in solid state NMR study of cross relaxation and molecular dynamics in heteronuclear systems.

    PubMed

    Baranowski, M; Woźniak-Braszak, A; Jurga, K

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the benefits of using fast adiabatic passage for the study of molecular dynamics in the solid state heteronuclear systems in the laboratory frame. A homemade pulse spectrometer operating at the frequency of 30.2MHz and 28.411MHz for protons and fluorines, respectively, has been enhanced with microcontroller direct digital synthesizer DDS controller [1-4]. This work briefly describes how to construct a low-cost and easy-to-assemble adiabatic extension set for homemade and commercial spectrometers based on recently very popular Arduino shields. The described set was designed for fast adiabatic generation. Timing and synchronization problems are discussed. The cross-relaxation experiments with different initial states of the two spin systems have been performed. Contrary to our previous work [5] where the steady-state NOE experiments were conducted now proton spins (1)H are polarized in the magnetic field B0 while fluorine spins (19)F are perturbed by selective saturation for a short time and then the system is allowed to evolve for a period in the absence of a saturating field. The adiabatic passage application leads to a reversal of magnetization of fluorine spins and increases the amplitude of the signal.

  2. Reducing the inversion degree of MnFe2O4 nanoparticles through synthesis to enhance magnetization: evaluation of their (1)H NMR relaxation and heating efficiency.

    PubMed

    Vamvakidis, K; Katsikini, M; Sakellari, D; Paloura, E C; Kalogirou, O; Dendrinou-Samara, C

    2014-09-01

    Manganese ferrite (MnFe2O4) nanoparticles of identical size (9 nm) and with different inversion degrees were synthesized under solvothermal conditions as a candidate theranostic system. In this facile approach, a long-chain amine, oleylamine, was utilized as a reducing and surface-functionalizing agent. The synthesized nanoparticles were shown to have a cubic-spinel structure as characterized by TEM and XRD patterns. Control over their inversion degree was achieved by a simple change of manganese precursor from Mn(acac)2 to Mn(acac)3. The variation in the inversion degree is ascribed to the partial oxidation of Mn(2+) to Mn(3+), as was evidenced by X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy at both the Fe and Mn K-edges. The reduction of the inversion degree from 0.42 to 0.22 is close to the corresponding bulk value of 0.20 and led to elevated magnetization (65.7 emu g(-1)), in contrast to the Néel temperature, which was decreased owing to the weaker superexchange interactions between the tetrahedral and octahedral sites within the spinel structure. In order to evaluate the performance of these nanoprobes as a possible bifunctional targeting system, the (1)H NMR relaxation of the samples was tested together with their specific loss power under an alternating magnetic field as a function of concentration. The hydrophobic as prepared MnFe2O4 nanoparticles converted to hydrophilic nanoparticles with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). The MnFe2O4 nanoparticles, well-dispersed in aqueous media, were shown to have r2 relaxivity of up to 345.5 mM(-1) s(-1) and heat release of up to 286 W g(-1), demonstrating their potential use for bioapplications. PMID:25014470

  3. The solution structure of motilin from NMR distance constraints, distance geometry, molecular dynamics, and an iterative full relaxation matrix refinement.

    PubMed

    Edmondson, S; Khan, N; Shriver, J; Zdunek, J; Gräslund, A

    1991-11-26

    A model of the structure of the 22 amino acid residue gastrointestinal peptide hormone motilin in 30% hexafluoro-2-propanol has been obtained by using distance constraints obtained from two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser enhancements. A set of initial structures have been generated by using the distance geometry program DIANA, and 10 of these structures have been refined by using restrained molecular dynamics (AMBER). The resulting structures are virtually indistinguishable in terms of constraint violations and energies and display less than 0.5-A root mean square deviations (RMSD) of the backbone atom positions from Tyr7 to Lys20. A comparison of back-calculated and experimental NOE intensities indicates that RMSD's are not the best indicators of the goodness of fit or of the precision with which the structure is defined. The structure was further refined by fitting the experimental NOE data using an iterative full relaxation matrix analysis. The mean error between the observed and calculated backbone NOE intensities for the final refined structure was 0.23 for the full length of the molecule, 0.18 for the region from Glu9 to Lys20, and 0.29 for the region from Phe1 to Gly8. R factors for the same regions were 0.27, 0.19, and 0.43, respectively. All of the NOE-determined structures consistently display an alpha-helix which extends from Glu9 to Lys20. Considerable lack of definition of structure exists at the amino and carboxyl ends of the molecule and also in the vicinity of Thr6-Tyr7-Gly8. A tendency to form a wide turn appears to exist over the sequence Pro3-Ile4-Phe5-Thr6, but the structure in this region is not well defined by the NOE data.

  4. High-resolution NMR field-cycling device for full-range relaxation and structural studies of biopolymers on a shared commercial instrument.

    PubMed

    Redfield, Alfred G

    2012-02-01

    Improvements are described in a shuttling field-cycling device (Redfield in Magn Reson Chem 41:753-768, 2003), designed to allow widespread access to this useful technique by configuring it as a removable module to a commercial 500 MHz NMR instrument. The main improvements described here, leading to greater versatility, high reliability and simple construction, include: shuttling provided by a linear motor driven by an integrated-control servomotor; provision of automated bucking magnets to allow fast two-stage cycling to nearly zero field; and overall control by a microprocessor. A brief review of history and publications that have used the system is followed by a discussion of topics related to such a device including discussion of some future applications. A description of new aspects of the shuttling device follows. The minimum round trip time to 1T and above is less than 0.25 s and to 0.002 T is 0.36 s. Commercial probes are used and sensitivity is that of the host spectrometer reduced only by relaxation during travel. A key element is development of a linkage that prevents vibration of the linear motor from reaching the probe.

  5. Study on ethyl groups with two different orientations in [N(C2H5)4]2CuBr4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Ae Ran

    2016-06-01

    The crystal structure and phase transition temperature of [N(C2H5)4]2CuBr4 are studied using X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC); measurements revealed a tetragonal structure and the two phase transition temperatures TC of 204 K and 255.5 K. The structural geometry near TC is discussed in terms of the chemical shifts for 1H magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and 13C cross-polarization (CP)/MAS NMR. The two inequivalent ethyl groups are distinguishable by the 13C NMR spectrum. The molecular motions are discussed in terms of the spin-lattice relaxation times T1ρ in the rotating frame for 1H MAS NMR and 13C CP/MAS NMR. The T1ρ results reveal that the ethyl groups undergo tumbling motion, and furthermore that the ethyl groups are highly mobile.

  6. From Strong to Fragile Glass Formers: Secondary Relaxation in Polyalcohols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döß, A.; Paluch, M.; Sillescu, H.; Hinze, G.

    2002-03-01

    We have studied details of the molecular origin of slow secondary relaxation near Tg in a series of neat polyalcohols by means of dielectric spectroscopy and 2H NMR. From glycerol to threitol, xylitol, and sorbitol the appearance of the secondary relaxation changes gradually from a wing-type scenario to a pronounced β peak. It is found that in sorbitol the dynamics of the whole molecule contributes equally to the β process, while in glycerol the hydrogen bond forming OH groups remain rather rigid compared to the hydrogens bonded to the carbon skeleton.

  7. Solution structure of a DNA decamer containing the antiviral drug ganciclovir: combined use of NMR, restrained molecular dynamics, and full relaxation matrix refinement.

    PubMed

    Foti, M; Marshalko, S; Schurter, E; Kumar, S; Beardsley, G P; Schweitzer, B I

    1997-05-01

    The nucleoside analog 9-[(1,3-dihydroxy-2-propoxy)methyl]guanine (ganciclovir, DHPG) is an antiviral drug that is used in the treatment of a variety of herpes viruses in immunocompromised patients and in a gene therapy protocol that has shown promising activity for the treatment of cancer. To probe the structural effects of ganciclovir when incorporated into DNA, we determined and compared the solution structure of a modified ganciclovir-containing decamer duplex [d(CTG)(ganciclovir)d(ATCCAG)]2 and a control duplex d[(CTGGATCCAG)]2 using nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. 1H and 31P resonances in both duplexes were assigned using a combination of 2-D 1H and 31P NMR experiments. Proton-proton distances determined from NOESY data and dihedral angles determined from DQF-COSY data were used in restrained molecular dynamics simulations starting from canonical A- and B-form DNA models. Both the control and ganciclovir sets of simulations converged to B-type structures. These structures were subjected to full relaxation matrix refinement to produce final structures that were in excellent agreement with the observed NOE intensities. Examination of the final ganciclovir-containing structures reveals that the base of the ganciclovir residue is hydrogen bonded to its complementary dC and is stacked in the helix; in fact, the base of ganciclovir exhibits increased stacking with the 5' base relative to the control. Interestingly, some of the most significant distortions in the structures occur 3' to the lesion site, including a noticeable kink in the sugar-phosphate backbone at this position. Further examination reveals that the backbone conformation, sugar pucker, and glycosidic torsion angle of the residue 3' to the lesion site all indicate an A-type conformation at this position. A possible correlation of these structural findings with results obtained from earlier biochemical studies will be discussed.

  8. Solution structure of a DNA decamer containing the antiviral drug ganciclovir: combined use of NMR, restrained molecular dynamics, and full relaxation matrix refinement.

    PubMed

    Foti, M; Marshalko, S; Schurter, E; Kumar, S; Beardsley, G P; Schweitzer, B I

    1997-05-01

    The nucleoside analog 9-[(1,3-dihydroxy-2-propoxy)methyl]guanine (ganciclovir, DHPG) is an antiviral drug that is used in the treatment of a variety of herpes viruses in immunocompromised patients and in a gene therapy protocol that has shown promising activity for the treatment of cancer. To probe the structural effects of ganciclovir when incorporated into DNA, we determined and compared the solution structure of a modified ganciclovir-containing decamer duplex [d(CTG)(ganciclovir)d(ATCCAG)]2 and a control duplex d[(CTGGATCCAG)]2 using nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. 1H and 31P resonances in both duplexes were assigned using a combination of 2-D 1H and 31P NMR experiments. Proton-proton distances determined from NOESY data and dihedral angles determined from DQF-COSY data were used in restrained molecular dynamics simulations starting from canonical A- and B-form DNA models. Both the control and ganciclovir sets of simulations converged to B-type structures. These structures were subjected to full relaxation matrix refinement to produce final structures that were in excellent agreement with the observed NOE intensities. Examination of the final ganciclovir-containing structures reveals that the base of the ganciclovir residue is hydrogen bonded to its complementary dC and is stacked in the helix; in fact, the base of ganciclovir exhibits increased stacking with the 5' base relative to the control. Interestingly, some of the most significant distortions in the structures occur 3' to the lesion site, including a noticeable kink in the sugar-phosphate backbone at this position. Further examination reveals that the backbone conformation, sugar pucker, and glycosidic torsion angle of the residue 3' to the lesion site all indicate an A-type conformation at this position. A possible correlation of these structural findings with results obtained from earlier biochemical studies will be discussed. PMID:9154915

  9. Site-specific protonation kinetics of acidic side chains in proteins determined by pH-dependent carboxyl (13)C NMR relaxation.

    PubMed

    Wallerstein, Johan; Weininger, Ulrich; Khan, M Ashhar I; Linse, Sara; Akke, Mikael

    2015-03-01

    Proton-transfer dynamics plays a critical role in many biochemical processes, such as proton pumping across membranes and enzyme catalysis. The large majority of enzymes utilize acid-base catalysis and proton-transfer mechanisms, where the rates of proton transfer can be rate limiting for the overall reaction. However, measurement of proton-exchange kinetics for individual side-chain carboxyl groups in proteins has been achieved in only a handful of cases, which typically have involved comparative analysis of mutant proteins in the context of reaction network modeling. Here we describe an approach to determine site-specific protonation and deprotonation rate constants (kon and koff, respectively) of carboxyl side chains, based on (13)C NMR relaxation measurements as a function of pH. We validated the method using an extensively studied model system, the B1 domain of protein G, for which we measured rate constants koff in the range (0.1-3) × 10(6) s(-1) and kon in the range (0.6-300) × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1), which correspond to acid-base equilibrium dissociation constants (Ka) in excellent agreement with previous results determined by chemical shift titrations. Our results further reveal a linear free-energy relationship between log kon and pKa, which provides information on the free-energy landscape of the protonation reaction, showing that the variability among residues in these parameters arises primarily from the extent of charge stabilization of the deprotonated state by the protein environment. We find that side-chain carboxyls with extreme values of koff or kon are involved in hydrogen bonding, thus providing a mechanistic explanation for the observed stabilization of the protonated or deprotonated state.

  10. 13C-NMR off-resonance rotating frame spin-lattice relaxation studies of bovine lens gamma-crystallin self association: effect of 'macromolecular crowding'.

    PubMed

    Stevens, A; Wang, S X; Caines, G H; Schleich, T

    1995-01-01

    The NMR technique of 13C off-resonance rotating frame spin-lattice relaxation, which provides an accurate assessment of the effective rotational correlation time (tau 0, eff) for macromolecular rotational diffusion, was applied to the study of gamma-crystallin association as a function of protein concentration and temperature. Values of the effective rotational correlation time for gamma-crystallin rotational diffusion were obtained at moderate to high protein concentrations (80-350 mg/ml) and at temperatures above, and below, the cold cataract phase transition temperature. With increasing concentration gamma-crystallin was observed to increasingly associate as reflected by larger values of tau 0, eff Decreasing temperature in the range of 35 to 22 degrees C was found to result in no change in the temperature corrected value of tau 0, eff at a gamma-crystallin concentration of 80 mg/ml, whereas at temperatures of 18 degrees C or below, this parameter was approx. twofold larger, suggesting the occurrence of a well defined phase transition, which correlated well with the cold cataract phase transition temperature. At higher protein concentrations, by contrast, tau 0, eff (temperature corrected) was found to increase by approx. 1.6- to 2-times in the temperature interval 35 degrees C to 22 degrees C, a result consistent with the dependence of the cold cataract phase transition temperature on gamma-crystallin concentration. Analysis of intensity ratio dispersion curves, using an assumed model of isodesmic association, permitted the estimation of the association constant characterizing the aggregation under particular conditions of concentration and temperature. The significant increase in the value of the association constant with moderate increases in protein concentration was rationalized by invoking the effect of 'macromolecular crowding'. The results obtained in this study suggest that in the intact lens, where high protein concentrations prevail, gamma

  11. Study of structural and dynamic characteristics of copper(II) amino acid complexes in solutions by combined EPR and NMR relaxation methods.

    PubMed

    Bukharov, Mikhail S; Shtyrlin, Valery G; Mukhtarov, Anvar Sh; Mamin, Georgy V; Stapf, Siegfried; Mattea, Carlos; Krutikov, Alexander A; Il'in, Alexander N; Serov, Nikita Yu

    2014-05-28

    Structural features and dynamical behaviour of the copper(ii) bis-complexes with glycine, d-alanine, d-valine, l-serine, l-aspartic acid, l-glutamic acid, l-lysine, l-proline, and sarcosine were studied by combined EPR and NMR relaxation methods. The cis and trans isomers were unambiguously assigned and characterized by EPR data. It was found that addition of a salt background has an influence on the cis-trans isomer equilibrium in favour of the formation of the cis isomer. By comparison of NMRD, DFT computations, and structural data it was shown that only one water molecule is coordinated in the axial position of these complexes. The increased exchange rates of this molecule found for Cu(l-Asp)2(2-), Cu(l-Glu)2(2-), Cu(l-LysH)2(2+), and Cu(l-Pro)2 were attributed to its pushing out by side chain groups of the ligands. By simulation of NMRD profiles an increase of lifetimes of the copper(ii) 2nd coordination sphere water molecules was revealed in the presence of additional carboxylic, alcoholic, or ammonium groups of the ligands, as well as the pyrrolidine ring of proline. The very short lifetimes of the 2nd coordination sphere water molecules (4-13 ps at 298 K) were explained in terms of the Frank-Wen structural model by the existence of cavities which draw in quickly enough water molecules from the 2nd coordination sphere.

  12. Study of structural and dynamic characteristics of copper(II) amino acid complexes in solutions by combined EPR and NMR relaxation methods.

    PubMed

    Bukharov, Mikhail S; Shtyrlin, Valery G; Mukhtarov, Anvar Sh; Mamin, Georgy V; Stapf, Siegfried; Mattea, Carlos; Krutikov, Alexander A; Il'in, Alexander N; Serov, Nikita Yu

    2014-05-28

    Structural features and dynamical behaviour of the copper(ii) bis-complexes with glycine, d-alanine, d-valine, l-serine, l-aspartic acid, l-glutamic acid, l-lysine, l-proline, and sarcosine were studied by combined EPR and NMR relaxation methods. The cis and trans isomers were unambiguously assigned and characterized by EPR data. It was found that addition of a salt background has an influence on the cis-trans isomer equilibrium in favour of the formation of the cis isomer. By comparison of NMRD, DFT computations, and structural data it was shown that only one water molecule is coordinated in the axial position of these complexes. The increased exchange rates of this molecule found for Cu(l-Asp)2(2-), Cu(l-Glu)2(2-), Cu(l-LysH)2(2+), and Cu(l-Pro)2 were attributed to its pushing out by side chain groups of the ligands. By simulation of NMRD profiles an increase of lifetimes of the copper(ii) 2nd coordination sphere water molecules was revealed in the presence of additional carboxylic, alcoholic, or ammonium groups of the ligands, as well as the pyrrolidine ring of proline. The very short lifetimes of the 2nd coordination sphere water molecules (4-13 ps at 298 K) were explained in terms of the Frank-Wen structural model by the existence of cavities which draw in quickly enough water molecules from the 2nd coordination sphere. PMID:24722622

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of the ferroelastic phase transition of order-disorder type in [N(C2H5)4]2CdCl4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Ae Ran; Kim, Min Soo; Lim, Kye-Young

    2016-08-01

    This study uses nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques to examine the detailed changes in [N(C2H5)4]2CdCl4 around its phase transition at the temperature TC = 284 K. The chemical shifts and spin-lattice relaxation times in the rotating frame (T1ρ) were determined from 1H magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR and 13C cross-polarization (CP)/MAS NMR spectra. The two sets of inequivalent 1H and 13C nuclei in CH3 and CH2 were distinguished. A ferroelastic phase transition was observed at TC, without structural symmetry change. The phase transition is mainly attributed to the orientational ordering of the [N(C2H5)4]+ cations, and the spectral splitting at low temperature is associated with different ferroelastic domains.

  14. Perspectives of Deuteron Field-Cycling NMR Relaxometry for Probing Molecular Dynamics in Soft Matter.

    PubMed

    Flämig, M; Becher, M; Hofmann, M; Körber, T; Kresse, B; Privalov, A F; Willner, L; Kruk, D; Fujara, F; Rössler, E A

    2016-08-11

    Due to the single-particle character of the quadrupolar interaction in molecular systems, (2)H NMR poses a unique method for probing reorientational dynamics. Spin-lattice relaxation gives access to the spectral density, and its frequency dependency can be monitored by field-cycling (FC) techniques. However, most FC NMR studies employ (1)H; the use of (2)H is still rare. We report on the application of (2)H FC NMR for investigating the dynamics in molecular liquids and polymers. Commercial as well as home-built relaxometers are employed accessing a frequency range from 30 Hz to 6 MHz. Due to low gyromagnetic ratio, high coupling constants, and finite FC switching times, current (2)H FC NMR does not reach the dispersion region in liquids (toluene and glycerol), yet good agreement with the results from conventional high-field (HF) relaxation studies is demonstrated. The pronounced difference at low frequencies between (2)H and (1)H FC NMR data shows the relevance of intermolecular relaxation in the case of (1)H NMR. In the case of the polymers polybutadiene and poly(ethylene-alt-propylene), very similar relaxation dispersion is observed and attributed to Rouse and entanglement dynamics. Combination with HF (2)H relaxation data via applying frequency-temperature superposition allows the reconstruction of the full spectral density reflecting both polymer as well as glassy dynamics. Transformation into the time domain yields the reorientational correlation function C2(t) extending over nine decades in time with a long-time power law, C2(t) ∝ t(-0.45±0.05), which does not conform to the prediction of the tube-reptation model, for which ∝ t(-0.25) is expected. Entanglement sets in below C2(t = τe) ≅ S(2) = 0.001, where τe is the entanglement time and S the corresponding order parameter. Finally, we discuss the future prospects of the (2)H FC NMR technique. PMID:27420118

  15. Flexibility at a glycosidic linkage revealed by molecular dynamics, stochastic modeling, and (13)C NMR spin relaxation: conformational preferences of α-L-Rhap-α-(1 → 2)-α-L-Rhap-OMe in water and dimethyl sulfoxide solutions.

    PubMed

    Pendrill, Robert; Engström, Olof; Volpato, Andrea; Zerbetto, Mirco; Polimeno, Antonino; Widmalm, Göran

    2016-01-28

    The monosaccharide L-rhamnose is common in bacterial polysaccharides and the disaccharide α-L-Rhap-α-(1 → 2)-α-L-Rhap-OMe represents a structural model for a part of Shigella flexneri O-antigen polysaccharides. Utilization of [1'-(13)C]-site-specific labeling in the anomeric position at the glycosidic linkage between the two sugar residues facilitated the determination of transglycosidic NMR (3)JCH and (3)JCC coupling constants. Based on these spin-spin couplings the major state and the conformational distribution could be determined with respect to the ψ torsion angle, which changed between water and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as solvents, a finding mirrored by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with explicit solvent molecules. The (13)C NMR spin relaxation parameters T1, T2, and heteronuclear NOE of the probe were measured for the disaccharide in DMSO-d6 at two magnetic field strengths, with standard deviations ≤1%. The combination of MD simulation and a stochastic description based on the diffusive chain model resulted in excellent agreement between calculated and experimentally observed (13)C relaxation parameters, with an average error of <2%. The coupling between the global reorientation of the molecule and the local motion of the spin probe is deemed essential if reproduction of NMR relaxation parameters should succeed, since decoupling of the two modes of motion results in significantly worse agreement. Calculation of (13)C relaxation parameters based on the correlation functions obtained directly from the MD simulation of the solute molecule in DMSO as solvent showed satisfactory agreement with errors on the order of 10% or less. PMID:26741055

  16. Site-specific protein backbone and side-chain NMR chemical shift and relaxation analysis of human vinexin SH3 domain using a genetically encoded {sup 15}N/{sup 19}F-labeled unnatural amino acid

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Pan; Xi, Zhaoyong; Wang, Hu; Shi, Chaowei; Xiong, Ying; Tian, Changlin

    2010-11-19

    Research highlights: {yields} Chemical synthesis of {sup 15}N/{sup 19}F-trifluomethyl phenylalanine. {yields} Site-specific incorporation of {sup 15}N/{sup 19}F-trifluomethyl phenylalanine to SH3. {yields} Site-specific backbone and side chain chemical shift and relaxation analysis. {yields} Different internal motions at different sites of SH3 domain upon ligand binding. -- Abstract: SH3 is a ubiquitous domain mediating protein-protein interactions. Recent solution NMR structural studies have shown that a proline-rich peptide is capable of binding to the human vinexin SH3 domain. Here, an orthogonal amber tRNA/tRNA synthetase pair for {sup 15}N/{sup 19}F-trifluoromethyl-phenylalanine ({sup 15}N/{sup 19}F-tfmF) has been applied to achieve site-specific labeling of SH3 at three different sites. One-dimensional solution NMR spectra of backbone amide ({sup 15}N){sup 1}H and side-chain {sup 19}F were obtained for SH3 with three different site-specific labels. Site-specific backbone amide ({sup 15}N){sup 1}H and side-chain {sup 19}F chemical shift and relaxation analysis of SH3 in the absence or presence of a peptide ligand demonstrated different internal motions upon ligand binding at the three different sites. This site-specific NMR analysis might be very useful for studying large-sized proteins or protein complexes.

  17. /sup 2/H nuclear magnetic resonance of exchange-labeled gramicidin in an oriented lyotropic nematic phase

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.H.

    1988-01-12

    Lyotropic nematic liquid-crystalline phases, such as that formed by potassium laurate/decanol/KCl/water, are found to accept readily large amphiphilic solute molecules. Since these phases spontaneously orient in high magnetic fields, it becomes possible to obtain NMR spectra of biologically interesting solutes in an oriented axially symmetric environment. The amide hydrogens of the peptide backbone of gramicidin D (Dubos) were exchanged for deuterium, and the gramicidin was incorporated into a lyotropic nematic phase made with deuteriated buffer in place of water. /sup 2/H NMR spectra of oriented, exchange-labeled gramicidin were then obtained. The strong water signal from the deuteriated buffer was eliminated by using selective excitation and a polynomial subtraction procedure. The /sup 2/H NMR spectra at high temperature consist of twelve major quadrupolar doublets. The splittings observed are largely independent of temperature, suggesting a highly rigid backbone structure. Two of the doublets, which are chemically shifted relative to the others, show stronger temperature dependence. These two probably arise from the exchangeable amino hydrogens on the tryptophan indole moieties of the peptide. While we cannot yet assign all of the doublets, the spectra and nuclear magnetic relaxation data are consistent with a rigid slightly distorted ..beta../sub LD//sup 6.3/ helix undergoing axially symmetric reorientation about the director of the liquid-crystalline phase. The correlation time for the axially symmetric reorientation is determined by relaxation measurements to be about 10/sup -7/s.

  18. Cross-Correlated Relaxation of Dipolar Coupling and Chemical-Shift Anisotropy in Magic-Angle Spinning R1ρ NMR Measurements: Application to Protein Backbone Dynamics Measurements.

    PubMed

    Kurauskas, Vilius; Weber, Emmanuelle; Hessel, Audrey; Ayala, Isabel; Marion, Dominique; Schanda, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Transverse relaxation rate measurements in magic-angle spinning solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance provide information about molecular motions occurring on nanosecond-to-millisecond (ns-ms) time scales. The measurement of heteronuclear ((13)C, (15)N) relaxation rate constants in the presence of a spin-lock radiofrequency field (R1ρ relaxation) provides access to such motions, and an increasing number of studies involving R1ρ relaxation in proteins have been reported. However, two factors that influence the observed relaxation rate constants have so far been neglected, namely, (1) the role of CSA/dipolar cross-correlated relaxation (CCR) and (2) the impact of fast proton spin flips (i.e., proton spin diffusion and relaxation). We show that CSA/D CCR in R1ρ experiments is measurable and that the CCR rate constant depends on ns-ms motions; it can thus provide insight into dynamics. We find that proton spin diffusion attenuates this CCR due to its decoupling effect on the doublet components. For measurements of dynamics, the use of R1ρ rate constants has practical advantages over the use of CCR rates, and this article reveals factors that have so far been disregarded and which are important for accurate measurements and interpretation. PMID:27500976

  19. Cross-Correlated Relaxation of Dipolar Coupling and Chemical-Shift Anisotropy in Magic-Angle Spinning R1ρ NMR Measurements: Application to Protein Backbone Dynamics Measurements.

    PubMed

    Kurauskas, Vilius; Weber, Emmanuelle; Hessel, Audrey; Ayala, Isabel; Marion, Dominique; Schanda, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Transverse relaxation rate measurements in magic-angle spinning solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance provide information about molecular motions occurring on nanosecond-to-millisecond (ns-ms) time scales. The measurement of heteronuclear ((13)C, (15)N) relaxation rate constants in the presence of a spin-lock radiofrequency field (R1ρ relaxation) provides access to such motions, and an increasing number of studies involving R1ρ relaxation in proteins have been reported. However, two factors that influence the observed relaxation rate constants have so far been neglected, namely, (1) the role of CSA/dipolar cross-correlated relaxation (CCR) and (2) the impact of fast proton spin flips (i.e., proton spin diffusion and relaxation). We show that CSA/D CCR in R1ρ experiments is measurable and that the CCR rate constant depends on ns-ms motions; it can thus provide insight into dynamics. We find that proton spin diffusion attenuates this CCR due to its decoupling effect on the doublet components. For measurements of dynamics, the use of R1ρ rate constants has practical advantages over the use of CCR rates, and this article reveals factors that have so far been disregarded and which are important for accurate measurements and interpretation.

  20. Relaxation times of spin states of all ranks and orders of quadrupolar nuclei estimated from NMR z-spectra: Markov chain Monte Carlo analysis applied to 7Li+ and 23Na+ in stretched hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Kuchel, Philip W; Naumann, Christoph; Puckeridge, Max; Chapman, Bogdan E; Szekely, David

    2011-09-01

    The NMR z-spectra of 7Li+ and 23Na+ in stretched hydrogels contain five minima, or critical values, with a sharp "dagger" on the central dip. The mathematical representation of such z-spectra from spin-3/2 nuclei contains nine distinct (the total is 15 but there is redundancy of the ±order-numbers) relaxation rate constants that are unique for each of the spin states, up to rank 3, order 3. We present an approach to multiple-parameter-value estimation that exploits the high level of separability of the effects of each of the relaxation rate constants on the features of the z-spectrum. The Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method is computationally demanding but it yielded statistically robust estimates (low coefficients of variation) of the parameter values. We describe the implementation of the MCMC analysis (in the present context) and posit that it can obviate the need for using multiple-quantum filtered RF-pulse sequences to estimate all relaxation rate constants/times under experimentally favorable, but readily achievable, circumstances.

  1. Magnetic Field-Independent ^17O and ^63, 65Cu Normal State Spin Lattice Relaxation as Inferred by ^17O T2 NMR up to 28 T in YBa_2Cu_3O_7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrovic, V. F.; Bachman, H. N.; Halperin, W. P.

    1998-03-01

    ^17O spin-spin relaxation NMR (T_2) is a powerful probe of vortex fluctuations in high Tc cuprates.(H. N. Bachman et al)., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc., 41, 467 (1996). It is important to understand the normal state T2 relaxation in order to extract the vortex field fluctuations.^1,(C. H. Recchia et al)., Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 3543 (1997). The study of T2 in YBCO has shown that, in the normal state, copper and oxygen spin fluctuations (T1 processes) dominate the time scales for T_2, the spin-echo height decay. Thus, measurements of T2 as a function of magnetic field are an indicator of ^17O and ^63, 65Cu T1 behavior. We report new T2 measurements taken in the normal state from 3.2 T up to 28.2 T in which the spin-spin relaxation rate is observed to be completely field independent. By comparison with the predicted spin echo height decay given by the Gaussian Phase Approximation model we show that T1 of ^63, 65Cu and ^17O must not deviate from their published low-field values, within experimental error, over the entire magnetic field range. Work at Northwestern University is supported by the NSF (DMR 91-20000) through the Science and Technology Center for Superconductivity. The NHMFL is supported through the NSF and the state of Florida.

  2. Comparative analysis the binding affinity of mycophenolic sodium and meprednisone with human serum albumin: Insight by NMR relaxation data and docking simulation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaoli; He, Jiawei; Yan, Jin; Wang, Qing; Li, Hui

    2016-03-25

    Mycophenolic sodium is an immunosuppressive agent that is always combined administration with corticosteroid in clinical practice. Considering the distribution and side-effect of the drug may change when co-administrated drug exist, this paper comparatively analyzed the binding ability of mycophenolic sodium and meprednisone toward human serum albumin by nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation data and docking simulation. The nuclear magnetic resonance approach was based on the analysis of proton selective and non-selective relaxation rate enhancement of the ligand in the absence and presence of macromolecules. The contribution of the bound ligand fraction to the observed relaxation rate in relation to protein concentration allowed the calculation of the affinity index. This approach allowed the comparison of the binding affinity of mycophenolic sodium and meprednisone. Molecular modeling was operated to simulate the binding model of ligand and albumin through Autodock 4.2.5. Competitive binding of mycophenolic sodium and meprednisone was further conducted through fluorescence spectroscopy. PMID:26892221

  3. Pulsed NMRON relaxation measurements and thermometric NMR in the quasi-2 dimensional femomagnet: Mn(COOCH 3) 2·4H 2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Gros, M.; Kotlicld, A.; Turrell, B. G.

    1990-08-01

    The measurement of the field dependence of the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation time of 54Mn in the two manganese sites in the quasi-2 dimensional ferromagnet Mn(COOCH 3) 2·4H 20 obtained by the pulsed NMRON technique is reported. This technique allows the observation in low fields of the higher frequency resonance which previously could not be measured by CW methods. The anomaly in the 54Mn relaxation time observed in the 55Mn level crossing regime is discussed, and the thermometric observation of the field dependence and lice width of the resonance lines from the abundant 55Mn spin systems is reported and related to the 54Mn spin-lattice relaxation behavior.

  4. Solid-State NMR Study of Paramagnetic Bis(alaninato-κ(2)N,O)copper(II) and Bis(1-amino(cyclo)alkane-1-carboxylato-κ(2)N,O)copper(II) Complexes: Reflection of Stereoisomerism and Molecular Mobility in (13)C and (2)H Fast Magic Angle Spinning Spectra.

    PubMed

    Szalontai, Gábor; Csonka, Róbert; Speier, Gábor; Kaizer, József; Sabolović, Jasmina

    2015-05-18

    Solid-state stereochemistry and mobility of paramagnetic copper(II) complexes formed by aliphatic amino acids (l-alanine, d,l-alanine, 1-amino-2-methyl-alanine) and 1-amino(cyclo)alkane-1-carboxylic acids (alkane = propane, butane, pentane, hexane) as bidentate ligands has been studied by (13)C and (2)H solid-state fast magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy. We examined the prospective method to characterize solid-state paramagnetic compounds in a routine way. Both (13)C and (2)H MAS spectra can distinguish d,l and l,l diastereomers of natural and polydeuterated bis([Dn]alaninato)copper(II) (n = 0, 2, 8) complexes with axial and/or equatorial methyl positions (conformations) primarily due to different Fermi-contact (FC) contributions. The three-bond hyperfine couplings clearly show Karplus-like dependence on the torsional angles which turned out to be a useful assignment aid. Density functional theory calculations of the FC term and crystal structures were also used to aid the final assignments. The correlations obtained for bis(alaninato-κ(2)N,O)copper(II) complexes were successfully used to characterize other complexes. The usefulness of the (2)H MAS spectra of the deuterated complexes was underlined. Even the spectra of the easily exchangeable amine protons contained essential stereochemical information. In the case of a dimer structure of bis(1-aminohexane-1-carboxylato-κ(2)N,O)copper(II) both the (13)C and (2)H resolutions were good enough to confirm the presence of the cis and trans forms in the asymmetric unit. With regard to the internal solid-state motions in the crystal lattice, the obtained quadrupolar tensor parameters were similar for the d,l- and l,l-alaninato isomers and also for the cis-trans forms suggesting similar crystal packing effects, static amine deuterons involved in hydrogen bonding, and fast rotating methyl groups.

  5. Operation of a 500 MHz high temperature superconducting NMR: towards an NMR spectrometer operating beyond 1 GHz.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Y; Nakagome, H; Tennmei, K; Hamada, M; Yoshikawa, M; Otsuka, A; Hosono, M; Kiyoshi, T; Takahashi, M; Yamazaki, T; Maeda, H

    2010-04-01

    We have begun a project to develop an NMR spectrometer that operates at frequencies beyond 1 GHz (magnetic field strength in excess of 23.5 T) using a high temperature superconductor (HTS) innermost coil. As the first step, we developed a 500 MHz NMR with a Bi-2223 HTS innermost coil, which was operated in external current mode. The temporal magnetic field change of the NMR magnet after the coil charge was dominated by (i) the field fluctuation due to a DC power supply and (ii) relaxation in the screening current in the HTS tape conductor; effect (i) was stabilized by the 2H field-frequency lock system, while effect (ii) decreased with time due to relaxation of the screening current induced in the HTS coil and reached 10(-8)(0.01 ppm)/h on the 20th day after the coil charge, which was as small as the persistent current mode of the NMR magnet. The 1D (1)H NMR spectra obtained by the 500 MHz LTS/HTS magnet were nearly equivalent to those obtained by the LTS NMR magnet. The 2D-NOESY, 3D-HNCO and 3D-HNCACB spectra were achieved for ubiquitin by the 500 MHz LTS/HTS magnet; their quality was closely equivalent to that achieved by a conventional LTS NMR. Based on the results of numerical simulation, the effects of screening current-induced magnetic field changes are predicted to be harmless for the 1.03 GHz NMR magnet system.

  6. Operation of a 500 MHz high temperature superconducting NMR: towards an NMR spectrometer operating beyond 1 GHz.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Y; Nakagome, H; Tennmei, K; Hamada, M; Yoshikawa, M; Otsuka, A; Hosono, M; Kiyoshi, T; Takahashi, M; Yamazaki, T; Maeda, H

    2010-04-01

    We have begun a project to develop an NMR spectrometer that operates at frequencies beyond 1 GHz (magnetic field strength in excess of 23.5 T) using a high temperature superconductor (HTS) innermost coil. As the first step, we developed a 500 MHz NMR with a Bi-2223 HTS innermost coil, which was operated in external current mode. The temporal magnetic field change of the NMR magnet after the coil charge was dominated by (i) the field fluctuation due to a DC power supply and (ii) relaxation in the screening current in the HTS tape conductor; effect (i) was stabilized by the 2H field-frequency lock system, while effect (ii) decreased with time due to relaxation of the screening current induced in the HTS coil and reached 10(-8)(0.01 ppm)/h on the 20th day after the coil charge, which was as small as the persistent current mode of the NMR magnet. The 1D (1)H NMR spectra obtained by the 500 MHz LTS/HTS magnet were nearly equivalent to those obtained by the LTS NMR magnet. The 2D-NOESY, 3D-HNCO and 3D-HNCACB spectra were achieved for ubiquitin by the 500 MHz LTS/HTS magnet; their quality was closely equivalent to that achieved by a conventional LTS NMR. Based on the results of numerical simulation, the effects of screening current-induced magnetic field changes are predicted to be harmless for the 1.03 GHz NMR magnet system. PMID:20149698

  7. NMR T{sub 1} relaxation time measurements and calculations with translational and rotational components for liquid electrolytes containing LiBF{sub 4} and propylene carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, P. M. Voice, A. M. Ward, I. M.

    2013-12-07

    Longitudinal relaxation (T{sub 1}) measurements of {sup 19}F, {sup 7}Li, and {sup 1}H in propylene carbonate/LiBF{sub 4} liquid electrolytes are reported. Comparison of T{sub 1} values with those for the transverse relaxation time (T{sub 2}) confirm that the measurements are in the high temperature (low correlation time) limit of the T{sub 1} minimum. Using data from pulsed field gradient measurements of self-diffusion coefficients and measurements of solution viscosity measured elsewhere, it is concluded that although in general there are contributions to T{sub 1} from both translational and rotational motions. For the lithium ions, this is mainly translational, and for the fluorine ions mainly rotational.

  8. Oxygen Mapping within Healthy and Acutely Infarcted Brain Tissue in Humans Using the NMR Relaxation of Lipids: A Proof-Of-Concept Translational Study.

    PubMed

    Colliez, Florence; Safronova, Marta M; Magat, Julie; Joudiou, Nicolas; Peeters, André P; Jordan, Bénédicte F; Gallez, Bernard; Duprez, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    The clinical applicability of brain oxygenation mapping using the MOBILE (Mapping of Oxygen By Imaging Lipids relaxation Enhancement) magnetic resonance (MR) technique was assessed in the clinical setting of normal brain and of acute cerebral ischemia as a founding proof-of-concept translational study. Changes in the oxygenation level within healthy brain tissue can be detected by analyzing the spin-lattice proton relaxation ('Global T1' combining water and lipid protons) because of the paramagnetic properties of molecular oxygen. It was hypothesized that selective measurement of the relaxation of the lipid protons ('Lipids T1') would result in enhanced sensitivity of pO2 mapping because of higher solubility of oxygen in lipids than in water, and this was demonstrated in pre-clinical models using the MOBILE technique. In the present study, 12 healthy volunteers and eight patients with acute (48-72 hours) brain infarction were examined with the same clinical 3T MR system. Both Lipids R1 (R1 = 1/T1) and Global R1 were significantly different in the infarcted area and the contralateral unaffected brain tissue, with a higher statistical significance for Lipids R1 (median difference: 0.408 s-1; p<0.0001) than for Global R1 (median difference: 0.154 s-1; p = 0.027). Both Lipids R1 and Global R1 values in the unaffected contralateral brain tissue of stroke patients were not significantly different from the R1 values calculated in the brain tissue of healthy volunteers. The main limitations of the present prototypic version of the MOBILE sequence are the long acquisition time (4 min), hampering robustness of data in uncooperative patients, and a 2 mm slice thickness precluding accurate measurements in small infarcts because of partial volume averaging effects. PMID:26267901

  9. Dynamical structure of paramagnetic [M(H2O)6][SiF6] (M = Fe2+,Ni2+) crystal studied by means of 2H nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, M.; Iijima, T.; Suhara, M.

    2000-08-01

    The temperature dependences of the 2H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra and the spin-lattice relaxation time T1 were measured for [Ni(H2O)6][SiF6] and [Fe(H2O)6][SiF6]. The motional modes for both compounds were discussed on the basis of the spectral simulation. The temperature variations of the 2H NMR spectra at high temperatures could be explained by three-site jumps of [Ni(H2O)6]2+ about the C3 axis for [Ni(H2O)6][SiF6]. For [Fe(H2O)6][SiF6], however, six-site jumps of [Fe(H2O)6]2+ about the C3 axis were found to be most probable form of motion at high temperatures. At low temperatures, the 2H NMR spectra of both compounds could be explained by 180° flips of the water molecule. The 2H NMR T1 was dominated by the fluctuations of the electric field gradient caused by the molecular motion and of the magnetic interaction between the 2H nucleus and the unpaired electron spin in the metal ion. T1 was analysed in terms of the motional modes predicted from the spectral simulation. The activation energies, the jumping rates at infinite temperature for each form of motion and the quadrupole interaction parameters (e2Qq/h,η) were obtained from the 2H NMR spectra and T1. The conclusions from the spectral simulation are in good agreement with the results for T1. These results suggest that [Fe(H2O)6][SiF6] possesses dynamic disorder structure in the high-temperature phase.

  10. PEG Coating Reduces NMR Relaxivity of Mn0.5Zn0.5Gd0.02Fe1.98O4 Hyperthermia Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Issa, Bashar; Qadri, Shahnaz; Obaidat, Ihab M.; Bowtell, Richard W.; Haik, Yousef

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To investigate both T1 and T2 MR relaxation enhancement of Gd substituted Zn-Mn ferrite magnetic nanoparticles. Both uncoated and polyethylene glycol (PEG) coated particles were used. Materials and Methods Chemical co-precipitation was used to synthesize particles in the form Mn0.5Zn0.5Gd0.02Fe1.98O4 suitable for hyperthermia applications. Physical characterization of the magnetic nanoparticles included SEM, TEM, ICP, and SQUID. T1 and T2 measurements were performed at 1.5 T. Results The saturation magnetization was 12.86 emu/g while the particle’s magnetic moment was 1.86 × 10−19 J/T. The particle size increased due to coating, while 1/T1 and 1/T2 relaxivities (26 °C) decreased from 2.5 to 0.7 and from 201.3 to 76.6 s−1 mM−1, respectively at a magnetic field 1.5 T. Conclusion The reduction in both 1/T1 and 1/T2 is attributed to increased distance of closest approach between the protons and the magnetic core caused by the shielding provided by the high molecular weight PEG. 1/T2 data is compared to existing theoretical models using a modified radius that takes into account both possible agglomeration of the particles and increased inter-particle separation induced by PEG coating. PMID:21928382

  11. Asymmetric simultaneous phase-inversion cross-polarization in solid-state MAS NMR: Relaxing selective polarization transfer condition between two dilute spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhengfeng; Fu, Riqiang; Li, Jianping; Yang, Jun

    2014-05-01

    Double cross polarization (DCP) has been widely used for heteronuclear polarization transfer between 13C and 15N in solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR. However, DCP is such sensitive to experimental settings that small variations or deviations in RF fields would deteriorate its efficiency. Here, we report on asymmetric simultaneous phase-inversion cross polarization (referred as aSPICP) for selective polarization transfer between low-γ 13C and 15N spins. We have demonstrated through simulations and experiments using biological solids that the asymmetric duration in the simultaneous phase-inversion cross polarization scheme leads to efficient polarization transfer between 13C and 15N even with large chemical shift anisotropies in the presence of B1 field variations or mismatch of the Hartmann-Hahn conditions. This could be very useful in the aspect of long-duration experiments for membrane protein studies at high fields.

  12. Enhanced NMR Relaxation of Tomonaga-Luttinger Liquids and the Magnitude of the Carbon Hyperfine Coupling in Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, A.; Pályi, A.; Ihara, Y.; Wzietek, P.; Simon, P.; Alloul, H.; Zólyomi, V.; Koltai, J.; Kürti, J.; Dóra, B.; Simon, F.

    2011-10-01

    Recent transport measurements [Churchill et al. Nature Phys.NPAHAX1745-2473 5, 321 (2009)10.1038/nphys1247] found a surprisingly large, 2-3 orders of magnitude larger than usual C13 hyperfine coupling (HFC) in C13 enriched single-wall carbon nanotubes. We formulate the theory of the nuclear relaxation time in the framework of the Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid theory to enable the determination of the HFC from recent data by Ihara et al. [Europhys. Lett. 90, 17 004 (2010)EULEEJ0295-507510.1209/0295-5075/90/17004]. Though we find that 1/T1 is orders of magnitude enhanced with respect to a Fermi-liquid behavior, the HFC has its usual, small value. Then, we reexamine the theoretical description used to extract the HFC from transport experiments and show that similar features could be obtained with HFC-independent system parameters.

  13. High-field 1H T1 and T2 NMR relaxation time measurements of H2O in homeopathic preparations of quartz, sulfur, and copper sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgartner, Stephan; Wolf, Martin; Skrabal, Peter; Bangerter, Felix; Heusser, Peter; Thurneysen, André; Wolf, Ursula

    2009-09-01

    Quantitative meta-analyses of randomized clinical trials investigating the specific therapeutic efficacy of homeopathic remedies yielded statistically significant differences compared to placebo. Since the remedies used contained mostly only very low concentrations of pharmacologically active compounds, these effects cannot be accounted for within the framework of current pharmacology. Theories to explain clinical effects of homeopathic remedies are partially based upon changes in diluent structure. To investigate the latter, we measured for the first time high-field (600/500 MHz) 1H T1 and T2 nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation times of H2O in homeopathic preparations with concurrent contamination control by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Homeopathic preparations of quartz (10 c-30 c, n = 21, corresponding to iterative dilutions of 100-10-100-30), sulfur (13 x-30 x, n = 18, 10-13-10-30), and copper sulfate (11 c-30 c, n = 20, 100-11-100-30) were compared to n = 10 independent controls each (analogously agitated dilution medium) in randomized and blinded experiments. In none of the samples, the concentration of any element analyzed by ICP-MS exceeded 10 ppb. In the first measurement series (600 MHz), there was a significant increase in T1 for all samples as a function of time, and there were no significant differences between homeopathic potencies and controls. In the second measurement series (500 MHz) 1 year after preparation, we observed statistically significant increased T1 relaxation times for homeopathic sulfur preparations compared to controls. Fifteen out of 18 correlations between sample triplicates were higher for controls than for homeopathic preparations. No conclusive explanation for these phenomena can be given at present. Possible hypotheses involve differential leaching from the measurement vessel walls or a change in water molecule dynamics, i.e., in rotational correlation time and/or diffusion. Homeopathic preparations

  14. Superoxygenated Water as an Experimental Sample for NMR Relaxometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nestle, Nikolaus; Dakkouri, Marwan; Rauscher, Hubert

    2004-01-01

    The increase in NMR relaxation rates as a result of dissolved paramagnetic species on the sample of superoxygenated drinking water is demonstrated. It is concluded that oxygen content in NMR samples is an important issue and can give rise to various problems in the interpretation of both spectroscopic and NMR imaging or relaxation experiments.

  15. Ion hopping in crystalline and glassy spodumene LiAl Si2 O6 : 7Li spin-lattice relaxation and 7Li echo NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, F.; Rier, C.; Böhmer, R.; Franke, W.; Heitjans, P.

    2005-09-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to study polycrystalline β -spodumene (β-LiAlSi2O6) as well as glassy specimens with the same chemical composition. Li7 spin-lattice relaxation measurements were carried out in a broad temperature range and for several Larmor frequencies. In addition to a pronounced rate maximum at high temperatures, stemming from the long-range Li motion in these aluminosilicates, we found a weak maximum in the crystalline modification near 120K . The latter result confirms the existence of a local double-well structure in which the Li ions reside. The ionic motion was also monitored by solid- and stimulated-echo spectra as well as by the decay of the Jeener-Broekaert echo. Under conditions which are discussed in detail, the latter is a direct measure of the hopping correlation function. For the glass this function was found to decay faster and more stretched than that of the crystal at a given temperature. Furthermore, the relevant barriers against the high-temperature long-range Li motion are larger in the crystal as compared to the glass.

  16. Ultra-wideline solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schurko, Robert W

    2013-09-17

    Although solid-state NMR (SSNMR) provides rich information about molecular structure and dynamics, the small spin population differences between pairs of spin states that give rise to NMR transitions make it an inherently insensitive spectroscopic technique in terms of signal acquisition. Scientists have continuously addressed this issue via improvements in NMR hardware and probes, increases in the strength of the magnetic field, and the development of innovative pulse sequences and acquisition methodologies. As a result, researchers can now study NMR-active nuclides previously thought to be unobservable or too unreceptive for routine examination via SSNMR. Several factors can make it extremely challenging to detect signal or acquire spectra using SSNMR: (i) low gyromagnetic ratios (i.e., low Larmor frequencies), (ii) low natural abundances or dilution of the nuclide of interest (e.g., metal nuclides in proteins or in organometallic catalysts supported on silica), (iii) inconvenient relaxation characteristics (e.g., very long longitudinal or very short transverse relaxation times), and/or (iv) extremely broad powder patterns arising from large anisotropic NMR interactions. Our research group has been particularly interested in efficient acquisition of broad NMR powder patterns for a variety of spin-1/2 and quadrupolar (spin > 1/2) nuclides. Traditionally, researchers have used the term "wideline" NMR to refer to experiments yielding broad (1)H and (2)H SSNMR spectra ranging from tens of kHz to ∼250 kHz in breadth. With modern FT NMR hardware, uniform excitation in these spectral ranges is relatively easy, allowing for the acquisition of high quality spectra. However, spectra that range in breadth from ca. 250 kHz to tens of MHz cannot be uniformly excited with conventional, high-power rectangular pulses. Rather, researchers must apply special methodologies to acquire such spectra, which have inherently low S/N because the signal intensity is spread across such

  17. The spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman and NMR), NCA, Fukui function analysis first order hyperpolarizability, TGA of 6-chloro-3,4dihydro-2H-1,2,4-benzothiazine-7-sulphonamide1,1-dioxide by ab initio HF and Density Functional method.

    PubMed

    Elamurugu Porchelvi, E; Muthu, S

    2014-04-01

    The Fourier-Transform Infrared and Fourier-Transform Raman spectra of 6-Chloro-3,4dihydro-2H-1,2,4-benzothiazine-7sulphonamide1,1-dioxide(6CDBSD) was recorded in the region 4000-450cm(-1) and 4000-100cm(-1)respectively. Quantum chemical calculations of energies, geometrical structure and vibrational wave numbers of 6CDBSD were carried out by HF and DFT (B3LYP) method with 6-31G (d,p) basis set. The difference between the observed and scaled wavenumber value of most of the fundamentals is very small. The assignments of the vibrational spectra have been carried out with the aid of normal coordinate analysis (NCA) following the scaled quantum mechanical force field methodology (SQMFF). The linear polariazability (α) and the first order hyperpolarizability (βtot) values of the investigated molecule have been computed using HF and DFT with 6-31G (d,p) basis set. Stability of the molecule arising from hyper conjugative interaction and charge delocalization has been analyzed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. The (1)H and (13)C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of the molecules were calculated using the Gauge-Invariant Atomic orbital (GIAO) method, confirms with the experimental values. The calculated HOMO and LUMO energies also confirm that charge transfer occurs within the molecule. Thermal stability of 6CDBSD was studied by thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA). Next Fukui functions was calculated to identify changes in the reactivity of molecule. Finally molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) and other molecular properties were performed.

  18. Macroscopic orientation effects in broadline NMR-spectra of model membranes at high magnetic field strength: A method preventing such effects.

    PubMed

    Brumm, T; Möps, A; Dolainsky, C; Brückner, S; Bayerl, T M

    1992-04-01

    The partial orientation of multilamellar vesicles (MLV) in high magnetic fields has been studied and a method to prevent such effects is herewith proposed. The orientation effect was measured with (2)H-, (31)P-NMR and electron microscopy on MLVs of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine with 30 mol% cholesterol. We present the first freeze-etch electron microscopy data obtained from MLV samples that were frozen directly in the NMR magnet at a field strength of 9.4 Tesla. These experiments clearly show that the MLVs adopt an ellipsoidal (but not a cylindrical) shape in the magnetic field. Best fit (31)P-NMR lineshape calculations assuming an ellipsoidal distribution of molecular director axes to the experimentally obtained spectra provide a quantitative measure of the average semiaxis ratio of the ellipsoidal MLVs and its change with temperature. The application of so-called spherical supported vesicles (SSV) is found to prevent any partial orientation effects so that undistorted NMR powder pattern of the bilayer can be measured independently of magnetic field strength and temperature.The usefulness of SSVs is further demonstrated by a direct comparison of spectral data such as (31)P-and (2)H-NMR lineshapes and relaxation times as well as (2)H-NMR dePaked spectra obtained for both model systems. These experiments show that spectral data obtained from partially oriented MLVs are not unambiguous to interpret, in particular, if an external parameter such as temperature is varied.

  19. Physical properties of single phospholipid bilayers adsorbed to micro glass beads. A new vesicular model system studied by 2H-nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Bayerl, T M; Bloom, M

    1990-08-01

    Spherical supported vesicles (SSVs), a new model system consisting of single dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayers adsorbed to spherical glass beads with a narrow size distribution, were prepared at two different sizes (0.5 and 1.5 microns) and their physical properties were studied by deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance (2H-NMR). Such SSV samples can be prepared at any desired size between 0.3 and 10 microns. The 2H-NMR measurements provide evidence for a strong dependence of the spectra and the transverse relaxation times on the curvature of the SSVs in a diameter range between 0.5 and 1.5 microns. For larger SSVs (1.5 microns diameter) their powder spectra and their calculated oriented spectra are similar to those obtained for multilamellar dispersions of DMPC-d54. The lineshape of the smaller SSVs exhibits a temperature dependence which is not found in multilamellar samples. The SSVs are stable in the liquid crystalline phase over days but irreversibly change to multilamellar vesicles in the gel state. The average thickness of the water layer between the single bilayer and the glass bead surface was estimated by 1H-NMR to e 17 +/- 5 A.

  20. Physical properties of single phospholipid bilayers adsorbed to micro glass beads. A new vesicular model system studied by 2H-nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed Central

    Bayerl, T M; Bloom, M

    1990-01-01

    Spherical supported vesicles (SSVs), a new model system consisting of single dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayers adsorbed to spherical glass beads with a narrow size distribution, were prepared at two different sizes (0.5 and 1.5 microns) and their physical properties were studied by deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance (2H-NMR). Such SSV samples can be prepared at any desired size between 0.3 and 10 microns. The 2H-NMR measurements provide evidence for a strong dependence of the spectra and the transverse relaxation times on the curvature of the SSVs in a diameter range between 0.5 and 1.5 microns. For larger SSVs (1.5 microns diameter) their powder spectra and their calculated oriented spectra are similar to those obtained for multilamellar dispersions of DMPC-d54. The lineshape of the smaller SSVs exhibits a temperature dependence which is not found in multilamellar samples. The SSVs are stable in the liquid crystalline phase over days but irreversibly change to multilamellar vesicles in the gel state. The average thickness of the water layer between the single bilayer and the glass bead surface was estimated by 1H-NMR to e 17 +/- 5 A. PMID:2207243

  1. Soils, Pores, and NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohlmeier, Andreas; Haber-Pohlmeier, Sabina; Haber, Agnes; Sucre, Oscar; Stingaciu, Laura; Stapf, Siegfried; Blümich, Bernhard

    2010-05-01

    Within Cluster A, Partial Project A1, the pore space exploration by means of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) plays a central role. NMR is especially convenient since it probes directly the state and dynamics of the substance of interest: water. First, NMR is applied as relaxometry, where the degree of saturation but also the pore geometry controls the NMR signature of natural porous systems. Examples are presented where soil samples from the Selhausen, Merzenhausen (silt loams), and Kaldenkirchen (sandy loam) test sites are investigated by means of Fast Field Cycling Relaxometry at different degrees of saturation. From the change of the relaxation time distributions with decreasing water content and by comparison with conventional water retention curves we conclude that the fraction of immobile water is characterized by T1 < 5 ms. Moreover, the dependence of the relaxation rate on magnetic field strength allows the identification of 2D diffusion at the interfaces as the mechanism which governs the relaxation process (Pohlmeier et al. 2009). T2 relaxation curves are frequently measured for the rapid characterization of soils by means of the CPMG echo train. Basically, they contain the same information about the pore systems like T1 curves, since mostly the overall relaxation is dominated by surface relaxivity and the surface/volume ratio of the pores. However, one must be aware that T2 relaxation is additionally affected by diffusion in internal gradients, and this can be overcome by using sufficiently short echo times and low magnetic fields (Stingaciu et al. 2009). Second, the logic continuation of conventional relaxation measurements is the 2-dimensional experiment, where prior to the final detection of the CPMG echo train an encoding period is applied. This can be T1-encoding by an inversion pulse, or T2 encoding by a sequence of 90 and 180° pulses. During the following evolution time the separately encoded signals can mix and this reveals information about

  2. Hunting for hydrogen: random structure searching and prediction of NMR parameters of hydrous wadsleyite† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Further information on the structures generated by AIRSS, alternative structural models, supercell calculations, total enthalpies of all computed structures and further information on 1H/2H NMR parameters. Example input and all raw output files from AIRSS and CASTEP NMR calculations are also included. See DOI: 10.1039/c6cp01529h Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Robert F.; McKay, David; Pickard, Chris J.; Berry, Andrew J.; Griffin, John M.

    2016-01-01

    The structural chemistry of materials containing low levels of nonstoichiometric hydrogen is difficult to determine, and producing structural models is challenging where hydrogen has no fixed crystallographic site. Here we demonstrate a computational approach employing ab initio random structure searching (AIRSS) to generate a series of candidate structures for hydrous wadsleyite (β-Mg2SiO4 with 1.6 wt% H2O), a high-pressure mineral proposed as a repository for water in the Earth's transition zone. Aligning with previous experimental work, we solely consider models with Mg3 (over Mg1, Mg2 or Si) vacancies. We adapt the AIRSS method by starting with anhydrous wadsleyite, removing a single Mg2+ and randomly placing two H+ in a unit cell model, generating 819 candidate structures. 103 geometries were then subjected to more accurate optimisation under periodic DFT. Using this approach, we find the most favourable hydration mechanism involves protonation of two O1 sites around the Mg3 vacancy. The formation of silanol groups on O3 or O4 sites (with loss of stable O1–H hydroxyls) coincides with an increase in total enthalpy. Importantly, the approach we employ allows observables such as NMR parameters to be computed for each structure. We consider hydrous wadsleyite (∼1.6 wt%) to be dominated by protonated O1 sites, with O3/O4–H silanol groups present as defects, a model that maps well onto experimental studies at higher levels of hydration (J. M. Griffin et al., Chem. Sci., 2013, 4, 1523). The AIRSS approach adopted herein provides the crucial link between atomic-scale structure and experimental studies. PMID:27020937

  3. NMR characterization of membrane protein-detergent micelle solutions by use of microcoil equipment.

    PubMed

    Stanczak, Pawel; Horst, Reto; Serrano, Pedro; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2009-12-30

    Using microcoil NMR technology, the uniformly (2)H,(15)N-labeled integral membrane protein OmpX, and the phosphocholine derivative detergent Fos-10 (n-decylphosphocholine), we investigated solutions of mixed protein-detergent micelles to determine the influence of the detergent concentration on the NMR spectra of the protein. In a first step, we identified key parameters that influence the composition of the micelle solutions, which resulted in a new protocol for the preparation of well-defined concentrated protein solutions. This led to the observation that high-quality 2D [(15)N,(1)H]-transverse relaxation-optimized spectroscopy (TROSY) spectra of OmpX reconstituted in mixed micelles with Fos-10 were obtained only in a limited range of detergent concentrations. Outside of this range from about 90-180 mM, we observed a significant decrease of the average peak intensity. Relaxation-optimized NMR measurements of the rotational and translational diffusion coefficients of the OmpX/Fos-10 mixed micelles, D(r) and D(t), respectively, then showed that the stoichiometry and the effective hydrodynamic radius of the protein-containing micelles are not significantly affected by high Fos-10 concentrations and that the deterioration of NMR spectra is due to the increased viscosity at high detergent concentrations. The paper thus provides a basis for refined guidelines on the preparation of integral membrane proteins for structural studies.

  4. Synthesis, structural characterization, and solid-state NMR spectroscopy of [Ga(phen)(H{sub 1.5}PO{sub 4}){sub 2}].H{sub 2}O and [Ga(phen)(HPO{sub 4})(H{sub 2}PO{sub 4})].1.5H{sub 2}O (phen=1, 10-phenanthroline), two organic-inorganic hybrid compounds with 1-D chain structures

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, W.-J.; Chang, P.-C.; Kao, H.-M.; Lii, K.-H. . E-mail: liikh@cc.ncu.edu.tw

    2005-12-15

    Two new organic-inorganic hybrid compounds, [Ga(phen)(H{sub 1.5}PO{sub 4}){sub 2}].H{sub 2}O (1) and [Ga(phen)(HPO{sub 4})(H{sub 2}PO{sub 4})].1.5H{sub 2}O (2) (phen=1,10-phenanthroline), have been synthesized by hydrothermal methods and structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Their structures consist of 1-D chains of strictly alternating GaO{sub 4}N{sub 2} octahedra and phosphate tetrahedra. The phen ligands in both compounds bind in a bidentate fashion to the gallium atoms and the 1-D structures extend into 3-D supramolecular arrays via {pi}-{pi} stacking interactions of phen ligands and hydrogen bonds. {sup 2}H MAS NMR spectroscopy was applied to study the deuterated sample of 1 which contains very short hydrogen bonds with an O-O distance of 2.406(2) A. Crystal data for 1: monoclinic, space group C2/c (No. 15), a=11.077(1) A, b=21.496(2) A, c=7.9989(7) A, {beta}=127.211(2){sup o}, and Z=4. The crystal symmetry is the same for 2 as for 1 except a=27.555(2) A, b=6.3501(5) A, c=21.327(2) A, {beta}=122.498(1){sup o}, and Z=8.

  5. 2H 2O quadrupolar splitting used to measure water exchange in erythrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchel, Philip W.; Naumann, Christoph

    2008-05-01

    The 2H NMR resonance from HDO (D = 2H) in human red blood cells (RBCs) suspended in gelatin that was held stretched in a special apparatus was distinct from the two signals that were symmetrically arranged on either side of it, which were assigned to extracellular HDO. The large extracellular splitting is due to the interaction of the electric quadrupole moment of the 2H nuclei with the electric field gradient tensor of the stretched, partially aligned gelatin. Lack of resolved splitting of the intracellular resonance indicated greatly diminished or absent ordering of the HDO inside RBCs. The separate resonances enabled the application of a saturation transfer method to estimate the rate constants of transmembrane exchange of water in RBCs. However both the theory and the practical applications needed modifications because even in the absence of RBCs the HDO resonances were maximally suppressed when the saturating radio-frequency radiation was applied exactly at the central frequency between the two resonances of the quadrupolar HDO doublet. More statistically robust estimates of the exchange rate constants were obtained by applying two-dimensional exchange spectroscopy (2D EXSY), with back-transformation analysis. A monotonic dependence of the estimates of the efflux rate constants on the mixing time, tmix, used in the 2D EXSY experiment were seen. Extrapolation to tmix = 0, gave an estimate of the efflux rate constant at 15 °C of 31.5 ± 2.2 s -1 while at 25 °C it was ˜50 s -1. These values are close to, but less than, those estimated by an NMR relaxation-enhancement method that uses Mn 2+ doping of the extracellular medium. The basis for this difference is thought to include the high viscosity of the extracellular gel. At the abstract level of quantum mechanics we have used the quadrupolar Hamiltonian to provide chemical shift separation between signals from spin populations across cell membranes; this is the first time, to our knowledge, that this has been

  6. Distinguishing bicontinuous lipid cubic phases from isotropic membrane morphologies using (31)P solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu; Yao, Hongwei; Hong, Mei

    2015-04-16

    Nonlamellar lipid membranes are frequently induced by proteins that fuse, bend, and cut membranes. Understanding the mechanism of action of these proteins requires the elucidation of the membrane morphologies that they induce. While hexagonal phases and lamellar phases are readily identified by their characteristic solid-state NMR line shapes, bicontinuous lipid cubic phases are more difficult to discern, since the static NMR spectra of cubic-phase lipids consist of an isotropic (31)P or (2)H peak, indistinguishable from the spectra of isotropic membrane morphologies such as micelles and small vesicles. To date, small-angle X-ray scattering is the only method to identify bicontinuous lipid cubic phases. To explore unique NMR signatures of lipid cubic phases, we first describe the orientation distribution of lipid molecules in cubic phases and simulate the static (31)P chemical shift line shapes of oriented cubic-phase membranes in the limit of slow lateral diffusion. We then show that (31)P T2 relaxation times differ significantly between isotropic micelles and cubic-phase membranes: the latter exhibit 2 orders of magnitude shorter T2 relaxation times. These differences are explained by the different time scales of lipid lateral diffusion on the cubic-phase surface versus the time scales of micelle tumbling. Using this relaxation NMR approach, we investigated a DOPE membrane containing the transmembrane domain (TMD) of a viral fusion protein. The static (31)P spectrum of DOPE shows an isotropic peak, whose T2 relaxation times correspond to that of a cubic phase. Thus, the viral fusion protein TMD induces negative Gaussian curvature, which is an intrinsic characteristic of cubic phases, to the DOPE membrane. This curvature induction has important implications to the mechanism of virus-cell fusion. This study establishes a simple NMR diagnostic probe of lipid cubic phases, which is expected to be useful for studying many protein-induced membrane remodeling phenomena

  7. Petrophysical applications of NMR imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Rothwell, W.P.; Vinegar, H.J.

    1985-12-01

    A system for obtaining high-resolution NMR images of oil field cores is described. Separate proton density and T/sub 2/ relaxation images are obtained to distinguish spatial variations of fluid-filled porosity and the physical nature of the pores. Results are presented for typical sandstones.

  8. NMR characterization of shocked quartz

    SciTech Connect

    Boslough, M.B.; Cygan, R.T.; Assink, R.A.; Kirkpatrick, R.J.

    1994-03-01

    We have characterized experimentally and naturally-shocked quartz (both synthetic and natural samples) by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Relaxation analysis of experimentally-shocked samples provides a means for quantitative characterization of the amorphous/disordered silica component NMR spectra demonstrate that magnetization in both the amorphous and crystalline components follows power-law behavior as a function of recycle time. This observation is consistent with the relaxation of nuclear spins by paramagnetic impurities. A fractal dimension can be extracted from the power-law exponent associated with each phase, and relative abundances can be extracted from integrated intensities of deconvolved peaks. NMR spectroscopy of naturally-shocked sandstone from Meteor Crater, Arizona (USA) led to the discovery of a new amorphous hydroxylated silica phase. Solid state NMR spectra of both experimentally and naturally shocked quartz were unexpectedly rich in microstructural information, especially when combined with relaxation analysis and cross-polarization studies. We suggest solid state NMR as a potentially useful tool for examining shock-induced microstructural changes in other inorganic compounds, with possible implications for shock processing of structural ceramics.

  9. Water absorption in mortar determined by NMR.

    PubMed

    Pel, L; Hazrati, K; Kopinga, K; Marchand, J

    1998-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) offers the possibility to determine moisture profiles in porous building materials. Moreover, the relaxation of the nuclear magnetic resonance signal can provide additional information on the water distribution in the microstructure. For mortar, it is shown that the transverse relaxation yields information on the distribution of water in the gel pores and capillary pores. Moisture profiles and relaxation were measured during water absorption. The effect of the drying treatment on the microstructure and the water absorption was investigated.

  10. Advanced NMR characterization of zeolite catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, L. B.

    1985-04-01

    The program discussed in this report is a two-year two-phase joint UOP-University of Illinois study of the application of improved high resolution solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques to the characterization of zeolite catalysts. During the first phase of this program very pure, and in some cases isotopically enriched faujasites will be prepared and studied by magic angle sample spinning NMR (MASS NMR) and variable engine sample spinning NMR (VASS NMR) on 500 and 360 MHz (proton frequency) NMR spectrometers. The NMR techniques that will be emphasized are the measurement and analysis of the (17)O NMR properties, (27)Al NMR intensity quantitation, and (27)Al and (29)Si NMR relaxation rates. During the second phase of this program these NMR techniques will be used to study the effects of impurity concentration, dealumination treatments and cation exchange on the NMR properties of faujasites. The initial emphasis of this program during Phase I is on the preparation and measurement of the NMR properties of (17)O enriched Na-Y faujasties.

  11. sup 31 P and sup 1 H NMR studies of the structure of enzyme-bound substrate complexes of lobster muscle arginine kinase: Relaxation measurements with Mn(II) and Co(II)

    SciTech Connect

    Jarori, G.K.; Ray, B.D.; Rao, B.D.N. )

    1989-11-28

    The paramagnetic effects of Mn(II) and Co(II) on the spin-lattice relaxation rates of {sup 31}P nuclei of ATP and ADP and of Mn(II) on the spin-lattice relaxation rate of the {delta} protons of arginine bound to arginine kinase from lobster tail muscle have been measured. Temperature variation of {sup 31}P relaxation rates in E-MnADP and E-MnATP yields activation energies ({Delta}E) in the range 6-10 kcal/mol. Thus, the {sup 31}P relaxation rates in these complexes are exchange limited and cannot provide structural information. However, the relaxation rates in E-CoADP and E-CoATP exhibit frequency dependence and {Delta}E values in the range 1-2 kcal/mol; i.e., these rates depend upon {sup 31}P-Co(II) distances. These distances were calculated to be in the range 3.2-4.5 {angstrom}, appropriate for direct coordination between Co(II) and the phosphoryl groups. The paramagnetic effect of Mn(II) on the {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation rate of the {delta} protons of arginine in the E-MnADP-Arg complex was also measured at three frequencies. From the frequency dependence of the relaxation rate an effective {tau}{sub C} of 0.6 ns has also been calculated, which is most likely to be the electron spin relaxation rate ({tau}{sub S1}) for Mn(II) in this complex. The distance estimated on the basis of the reciprocal sixth root of the average relaxation rate of the {delta} protons was 10.9 {plus minus} 0.3 {angstrom}.

  12. Relaxation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Environ Corporation's relaxation system is built around a body lounge, a kind of super easy chair that incorporates sensory devices. Computer controlled enclosure provides filtered ionized air to create a feeling of invigoration, enhanced by mood changing aromas. Occupant is also surrounded by multidimensional audio and the lighting is programmed to change colors, patterns, and intensity periodically. These and other sensory stimulators are designed to provide an environment in which the learning process is stimulated, because research has proven that while an individual is in a deep state of relaxation, the mind is more receptive to new information.

  13. NMR mechanisms in gel dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiner, L. J.

    2009-05-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance was critical to the development of gel dosimetry, as it established the potential for three dimensional dosimetry with chemical dosimeter systems through magnetic resonance imaging [1]. In the last two decades MRI has served as the gold standard for imaging, while NMR relaxometry has played an important role in the development and understanding of the behaviour of new gel dosimetry systems. Therefore, an appreciation of the relaxation mechanisms determining the NMR behaviour of irradiated gel dosimeters is important for a full comprehension of a considerable component of the literature on gel dosimetry. A number of excellent papers have presented this important theory, this brief review will highlight some of the salient points made previously [1-5]. The spin relaxation of gel dosimeters (which determines the dose dependence in most conventional MR imaging) is determined principally by the protons on water molecules in the system. These water protons exist in different environments, or groups (see Figure 1): on bulk water, on water hydrating the chemical species that are being modified under irradiation, and on water hydrating the gel matrix used to spatially stabilize the dosimeter (e.g., gelatin, agarose, etc). The spin relaxation depends on the inherent relaxation rate of each spin group, that is, on the relaxation rate which would be observed for the specific group if it were isolated. Also, the different water environments are not isolated from each other, and the observed relaxation rate also depends on the rate of exchange of magnetization between the groups, and on the fraction of protons in each group. In fact, the water exchanges quickly between the environments, so that relaxation is in what is usually termed the fast exchange regime. In the limit of fast exchange, the relaxation of the water protons is well characterized by a single exponential and hence by a single apparent relaxation rate. In irradiated gel dosimeters this

  14. Achievement of 1020MHz NMR.

    PubMed

    Hashi, Kenjiro; Ohki, Shinobu; Matsumoto, Shinji; Nishijima, Gen; Goto, Atsushi; Deguchi, Kenzo; Yamada, Kazuhiko; Noguchi, Takashi; Sakai, Shuji; Takahashi, Masato; Yanagisawa, Yoshinori; Iguchi, Seiya; Yamazaki, Toshio; Maeda, Hideaki; Tanaka, Ryoji; Nemoto, Takahiro; Suematsu, Hiroto; Miki, Takashi; Saito, Kazuyoshi; Shimizu, Tadashi

    2015-07-01

    We have successfully developed a 1020MHz (24.0T) NMR magnet, establishing the world's highest magnetic field in high resolution NMR superconducting magnets. The magnet is a series connection of LTS (low-Tc superconductors NbTi and Nb3Sn) outer coils and an HTS (high-Tc superconductor, Bi-2223) innermost coil, being operated at superfluid liquid helium temperature such as around 1.8K and in a driven-mode by an external DC power supply. The drift of the magnetic field was initially ±0.8ppm/10h without the (2)H lock operation; it was then stabilized to be less than 1ppb/10h by using an NMR internal lock operation. The full-width at half maximum of a (1)H spectrum taken for 1% CHCl3 in acetone-d6 was as low as 0.7Hz (0.7ppb), which was sufficient for solution NMR. On the contrary, the temporal field stability under the external lock operation for solid-state NMR was 170ppb/10h, sufficient for NMR measurements for quadrupolar nuclei such as (17)O; a (17)O NMR measurement for labeled tri-peptide clearly demonstrated the effect of high magnetic field on solid-state NMR spectra. PMID:25978708

  15. An NMR study on the mechanisms of freezing and melting of water confined in spherically mesoporous silicas SBA-16.

    PubMed

    Miyatou, Tatsuya; Ohashi, Ryutaro; Ida, Tomonori; Kittaka, Shigeharu; Mizuno, Motohiro

    2016-07-21

    Thermodynamic and dynamic properties of water confined in mesoporous silica glass SBA-16 were investigated by DSC, and (1,2)H NMR spectroscopy and (2)H NMR spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) as a function of pore size. SBA-16 possesses the main spherical pores, interconnecting channels and micropores (corona). Water in the characteristic spherical pores of SBA-16 freezes at the homogeneous nucleation temperature of water. Between room and freezing temperatures, the correlation time of the isotropic rotation of water in the pores of SBA-16 followed the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann (VFT) relation, which reflects the formation and growth of clusters of fragile water for changing to the strong water. The vitrification of water in micropores around 200 K was observed by (2)H NMR. Above 200 K, the correlation time of the rotation of water in micropores exhibited non-Arrhenius behavior, which is correlated with the gradual decrease in the mobility of water due to the growth of hydrogen bonding, forming low density water before vitrification. After vitrification, the activation energy of the rotation of water in micropores was 25-33 kJ mol(-1), which was similar to that in ice Ih for all samples. The freedom of cluster formation and water rotation increased with the increasing the pore size. PMID:27346613

  16. Hydration water dynamics in bovine serum albumin at low temperatures as studied by deuterium solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyatou, Tatsuya; Araya, Takashi; Ohashi, Ryutaro; Ida, Tomonori; Mizuno, Motohiro

    2016-10-01

    Solid state 2H NMR was used to investigate changes in the structure and dynamics of hydration waters of bovine serum albumin (BSA) due to glass transitions. The 2H NMR spectra were separated into fast and slow components based on differences in spin-lattice relaxation time T1. The fast components corresponded to water molecules interacting with protein while the slow components were the water molecules similar to bulk water and deuterons of the protein backbone. Simulation analysis of the 2H NMR spectra of the fast components was used to assess the mode and rate of motions of hydration waters around the protein. At low temperatures, the water molecules underwent a 180° flip and slow reorientation in the tetrahedral sites. The distribution of the rate of the 180° flip and the D-O-D angle of water molecules were clarified. The distribution of the D-O-D angle of water molecules spread with decreasing temperature. The marked slowing down in the reorientation of water molecules was observed at a glass transition of around 200 K, which is linked to the disordered region of the protein. In contrast, the 180° flip of water molecules occurred frequently, even below 200 K. A freeze of the 180° flip of water molecules was observed around the glass transition temperature of 110 K, where primary hydrate water formed a direct hydrogen bond with the protein, making it perfectly immobile.

  17. An NMR study on the mechanisms of freezing and melting of water confined in spherically mesoporous silicas SBA-16.

    PubMed

    Miyatou, Tatsuya; Ohashi, Ryutaro; Ida, Tomonori; Kittaka, Shigeharu; Mizuno, Motohiro

    2016-07-21

    Thermodynamic and dynamic properties of water confined in mesoporous silica glass SBA-16 were investigated by DSC, and (1,2)H NMR spectroscopy and (2)H NMR spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) as a function of pore size. SBA-16 possesses the main spherical pores, interconnecting channels and micropores (corona). Water in the characteristic spherical pores of SBA-16 freezes at the homogeneous nucleation temperature of water. Between room and freezing temperatures, the correlation time of the isotropic rotation of water in the pores of SBA-16 followed the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann (VFT) relation, which reflects the formation and growth of clusters of fragile water for changing to the strong water. The vitrification of water in micropores around 200 K was observed by (2)H NMR. Above 200 K, the correlation time of the rotation of water in micropores exhibited non-Arrhenius behavior, which is correlated with the gradual decrease in the mobility of water due to the growth of hydrogen bonding, forming low density water before vitrification. After vitrification, the activation energy of the rotation of water in micropores was 25-33 kJ mol(-1), which was similar to that in ice Ih for all samples. The freedom of cluster formation and water rotation increased with the increasing the pore size.

  18. Dynamics of [C{sub 3}H{sub 5}N{sub 2}]{sub 6}[Bi{sub 4}Br{sub 18}] by means of {sup 1}H NMR relaxometry and quadrupole relaxation enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Masierak, W.; Florek-Wojciechowska, M.; Oglodek, I.; Jakubas, R.; Privalov, A. F.; Kresse, B.; Fujara, F.; Kruk, D.

    2015-05-28

    {sup 1}H spin-lattice field cycling relaxation dispersion experiments in the intermediate phase II of the solid [C{sub 3}H{sub 5}N{sub 2}]{sub 6}[Bi{sub 4}Br{sub 18}] are presented. Two motional processes have been identified from the {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation dispersion profiles and quantitatively described. It has been concluded that these processes are associated with anisotropic reorientations of the imidazolium ring, characterized by correlation times of the order of 10{sup −8} s-10{sup −9} s and of about 10{sup −5} s. Moreover, quadrupole relaxation enhancement (QRE) effects originating from slowly fluctuating {sup 1}H-{sup 14}N dipolar interactions have been observed. From the positions of the relaxation maxima, the quadrupole coupling parameters for the {sup 14}N nuclei in [C{sub 3}H{sub 5}N{sub 2}]{sub 6}[Bi{sub 4}Br{sub 18}] have been determined. The {sup 1}H-{sup 14}N relaxation contribution associated with the slow dynamics has been described in terms of a theory of QRE [Kruk et al., Solid State Nucl. Magn. Reson. 40, 114 (2011)] based on the stochastic Liouville equation. The shape of the QRE maxima (often referred to as “quadrupole peaks”) has been consistently reproduced for the correlation time describing the slow dynamics and the determined quadrupole coupling parameters.

  19. In situ determination of surface relaxivities for unconsolidated sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duschl, Markus; Galvosas, Petrik; Brox, Timothy I.; Pohlmeier, Andreas; Vereecken, Harry

    2015-08-01

    NMR relaxometry has developed into a method for rapid pore-size determination of natural porous media. Nevertheless, it is prone to uncertainties because of unknown surface relaxivities which depend mainly on the chemical composition of the pore walls as well as on the interfacial dynamics of the pore fluid. The classical approach for the determination of surface relaxivities is the scaling of NMR relaxation times by surface to volume ratios measured by gas adsorption or mercury intrusion. However, it is preferable that a method for the determination of average pore sizes uses the same substance, water, as probe molecule for both relaxometry and surface to volume measurements. One should also ensure that in both experiments the dynamics of the probe molecule takes place on similar length scales, which are in the order of some microns. Therefore, we employed NMR diffusion measurements with different observation times using bipolar pulsed field gradients and applied them to unconsolidated sediments (two purified sands, two natural sands, and one soil). The evaluation by Mitra's short-time model for diffusion in restricted environments yielded information about the surface to volume ratios which is independent of relaxation mechanisms. We point out that methods based on NMR diffusometry yield pore dimensions and surface relaxivities consistent with a pore space as sampled by native pore fluids via the diffusion process. This opens a way to calibrate NMR relaxation measurements with other NMR techniques, providing information about the pore-size distribution of natural porous media directly from relaxometry.

  20. NMR characterization of membrane protein–detergent micelle solutions using microcoil equipment

    PubMed Central

    Stanczak, Pawel; Horst, Reto; Serrano, Pedro; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2010-01-01

    Using microcoil NMR technology, the uniformly 2H,15N-labeled integral membrane protein OmpX and the phosphocholine derivative detergent Fos-10 (n-decylphosphocholine), we investigated solutions of mixed protein–detergent micelles to determine the influence of the detergent concentration on the NMR spectra of the protein. In a first step, we identified key parameters that influence the composition of the micelle solutions, which resulted in a new protocol for the preparation of well-defined concentrated protein solutions. This led to the observation that high-quality 2D [15N,1H]-TROSY spectra of OmpX reconstituted in mixed micelles with Fos-10 were obtained only in a limited range of detergent concentrations. Outside of this range from about 90 mM to 180 mM, we observed a significant decrease of the average peak intensity. Relaxation-optimized NMR measurements of the rotational and translational diffusion coefficients of the OmpX/Fos-10 mixed micelles, Dr and Dt, respectively, then showed that the stoichiometry and the effective hydrodynamic radius of the protein-containing micelles are not significantly affected by high Fos-10 concentrations, and that the deterioration of NMR spectra is due to the increased viscosity at high detergent concentrations. The paper thus provides a basis for refined guidelines on the preparation of integral membrane proteins for structural studies. PMID:19950959

  1. Correlated fluorine diffusion and ionic conduction in the nanocrystalline F(-) solid electrolyte Ba(0.6)La(0.4)F(2.4)-(19)F T1(ρ) NMR relaxation vs. conductivity measurements.

    PubMed

    Preishuber-Pflügl, F; Bottke, P; Pregartner, V; Bitschnau, B; Wilkening, M

    2014-05-28

    Chemical reactions induced by mechanical treatment may give access to new compounds whose properties are governed by chemical metastability, defects introduced and the size effects present. Their interplay may lead to nanocrystalline ceramics with enhanced transport properties being useful to act as solid electrolytes. Here, the introduction of large amounts of La into the cubic structure of BaF2 served as such an example. The ion transport properties in terms of dc-conductivity values of the F(-) anion conductor Ba1-xLaxF2+x (here with x = 0.4) considerably exceed those of pure, nanocrystalline BaF2. So far, there is only little knowledge about activation energies and jump rates of the elementary hopping processes. Here, we took advantage of both impedance spectroscopy and (19)F NMR relaxometry to get to the bottom of ion jump diffusion proceeding on short-range and long-range length scales in Ba0.6La0.4F2.4. While macroscopic transport is governed by an activation energy of 0.55 to 0.59 eV, the elementary steps of hopping seen by NMR are characterised by much smaller activation energies. Fortunately, we were able to deduce an F(-) self-diffusion coefficient by the application of spin-locking NMR relaxometry.

  2. Bioagent detection using miniaturized NMR and nanoparticle amplification : final LDRD report.

    SciTech Connect

    Clewett, C. F. M.; Adams, David Price; Fan, Hongyou; Williams, John D.; Sillerud, Laurel O.; Alam, Todd Michael; Aldophi, Natalie L. (New Mexico Resonance, Albuquerque, NM); McDowell, Andrew F.

    2006-11-01

    This LDRD program was directed towards the development of a portable micro-nuclear magnetic resonance ({micro}-NMR) spectrometer for the detection of bioagents via induced amplification of solvent relaxation based on superparamagnetic nanoparticles. The first component of this research was the fabrication and testing of two different micro-coil ({micro}-coil) platforms: namely a planar spiral NMR {micro}-coil and a cylindrical solenoid NMR {micro}-coil. These fabrication techniques are described along with the testing of the NMR performance for the individual coils. The NMR relaxivity for a series of water soluble FeMn oxide nanoparticles was also determined to explore the influence of the nanoparticle size on the observed NMR relaxation properties. In addition, The use of commercially produced superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) for amplification via NMR based relaxation mechanisms was also demonstrated, with the lower detection limit in number of SPIONs per nanoliter (nL) being determined.

  3. NMR investigations of molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Arthur

    2011-03-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful experimental approach for characterizing protein conformational dynamics on multiple time scales. The insights obtained from NMR studies are complemented and by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, which provide full atomistic details of protein dynamics. Homologous mesophilic (E. coli) and thermophilic (T. thermophilus) ribonuclease H (RNase H) enzymes serve to illustrate how changes in protein sequence and structure that affect conformational dynamic processes can be monitored and characterized by joint analysis of NMR spectroscopy and MD simulations. A Gly residue inserted within a putative hinge between helices B and C is conserved among thermophilic RNases H, but absent in mesophilic RNases H. Experimental spin relaxation measurements show that the dynamic properties of T. thermophilus RNase H are recapitulated in E. coli RNase H by insertion of a Gly residue between helices B and C. Additional specific intramolecular interactions that modulate backbone and sidechain dynamical properties of the Gly-rich loop and of the conserved Trp residue flanking the Gly insertion site have been identified using MD simulations and subsequently confirmed by NMR spin relaxation measurements. These results emphasize the importance of hydrogen bonds and local steric interactions in restricting conformational fluctuations, and the absence of such interactions in allowing conformational adaptation to substrate binding.

  4. NMR spectroscopy of some electrolyte solutions to 1.9 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoa, Gerardo; Colla, Christopher A.; Klavins, Peter; Augustine, Matthew P.; Casey, William H.

    2016-11-01

    Nuclear-magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of CsCl and LaCl3 in D2O/H2O solutions were collected up to pressures of 1.9 GPa using a new NMR probe design that considerably extends the pressure range available for geochemical experiments. The longitudinal-relaxation times (T1) for 2H compare well with those reported in the previous studies of Lee et al. (1974), who examined lower pressures, and indicate that the probe functions properly. In some experiments, 133Cs and 1H NMR spectra could be taken on solutions to pressures well beyond the nominal freezing pressure of D2O or H2O to form Ice VI (near 0.9 GPa). Freezing to form the high-pressure ice is kinetically slow on an experimental time scale (minutes to hours). The data indicate that the electrolyte concentrations increase the freezing pressure of the solution. This result means that solution NMR spectra can be collected at pressures that are nearly twice the nominal freezing pressure of pure D2O or H2O. Pulsed-magnetic-field-gradient NMR methods are used to independently measure the self-diffusion coefficient of H2O in these solutions, which yields estimates of solution viscosity via the Stokes-Einstein relation. The increased viscosity accounts for the pressure variation of T1 values as rates of molecular tumbling are affected. Accounting for such changes is essential if NMR spectral line widths are used to infer pressure-enhanced rates of geochemical reactions, such as interconversion of aqueous complexes.

  5. Synthesis of [2H7]indatraline.

    PubMed

    Allmendinger, L; Wanner, K T

    2014-11-01

    Deuterium-labelled indatraline was synthesized in high efficiency employing a Friedel-Crafts alkylation of [(2)H6]benzene with (E)-3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)acrylic acid as a key step. The desired labelling of the final compound was ascertained in two ways, by incorporation of [(2)H6]benzene in the target molecule and additionally by deuterium transfer to the non-deuterated aryl moiety of the Friedel-Crafts alkylation product from [(2)H6]benzene, the latter thus serving as reagent and solvent. PMID:25382822

  6. Scalar operators in solid-state NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Boqin

    1991-11-01

    Selectivity and resolution of solid-state NMR spectra are determined by dispersion of local magnetic fields originating from relaxation effects and orientation-dependent resonant frequencies of spin nuclei. Theoretically, the orientation-dependent resonant frequencies can be represented by a set of irreducible tensors. Among these tensors, only zero rank tensors (scalar operators) are capable of providing high resolution NMR spectra. This thesis presents a series of new developments in high resolution solid-state NMR concerning the reconstruction of various scalar operators motion in solid C{sub 60} is analyzed.

  7. NMR studies of structure and dynamics of liquid molecules confined in extended nanospaces.

    PubMed

    Tsukahara, Takehiko; Mizutani, Wataru; Mawatari, Kazuma; Kitamori, Takehiko

    2009-08-01

    We fabricated an NMR cell equipped with 10-100 nm scale spaces on a glass substrate (called extended nanospaces), and investigated molecular structure and dynamics of water confined in the extended nanospaces by (1)H NMR chemical shift (delta(H)) and (1)H and (2)H NMR spin-lattice relaxation rate ((1)H- and (2)H-1/T(1)), (1)H NMR spin-spin relaxation rate ((1)H-1/T(2)), and (1)H NMR rotating-frame spin-lattice relaxation rate ((1)H-1/T(1rho)) measurements of H(2)O and (2)H(2)O. The delta(H) and (1)H- and (2)H-1/T(1) results showed that size-confinement produces slower translational motions and higher proton mobility of water, but does not affect the hydrogen-bonding structure and rotational motions. Such unique phenomena appeared in the space size of 40 to 800 nm. However, the (1)H-1/T(1) value at 40 nm was still different from that in 4 nm porous nanomaterial, because translational and rotational motions were inhibited for H(2)O molecules in the nanomaterial. By examining temperature- and deuterium-dependence of the (1)H-1/T(1) values, the molecular translational motions of the confined water were found to be controlled by protonic diffusion invoking a proton hopping pathway between adjacent water rather than hydrodynamic translational diffusion. Furthermore, we clarified that proton exchange between adjacent water molecules in extended nanospaces could be enhanced by the chemical exchange of protons between water and SiOH groups on glass surfaces, ( identical with SiO(-)...H(+)...H(2)O) + H(2)O --> triple bond SiO(-) + (H(3)O(+) + H(2)O) --> triple bond SiO(-) + (H(2)O + H(3)O(+)), based on (1)H-1/T(2) measurements. An enhancement of proton exchange rate of water due to the reduction of space sizes was verified from the results of (1)H-1/T(1rho) values, and the rate of water in the 100 nm sized spaces is larger by a factor of more than ten from that of bulk water. Such size-confinement effects were distinctly observed for hydrogen-bond solvents with strong proton

  8. Breathing and Relaxation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Top Doctors in the Nation Departments & Divisions Home Health Insights Stress & Relaxation Breathing and Relaxation Breathing and Relaxation Make ... Management Assess Your Stress Coping Strategies Identifying ... & Programs Health Insights Doctors & Departments Research & Science Education & Training Make ...

  9. Relaxation Assessment with Varied Structured Milieu (RELAX).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassel, Russell N.; Cassel, Susie L.

    1983-01-01

    Describes Relaxation Assessment with Varied Structured Milieu (RELAX), a clinical program designed to assess the degree to which an individual is able to demonstrate self-control for overall general relaxation. The program is designed for use with the Cassel Biosensors biofeedback equipment. (JAC)

  10. Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging

    SciTech Connect

    Hirasaki, George J.; Mohanty, Kishore K.

    2003-02-10

    The objective of this project was to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions that are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. The advances made in the understanding of NMR fluid properties are summarized in a chapter written for an AAPG book on NMR well logging. This includes live oils, viscous oils, natural gas mixtures, and the relation between relaxation time and diffusivity.

  11. NMR phase noise in bitter magnets.

    PubMed

    Sigmund, E E; Calder, E S; Thomas, G W; Mitrović, V F; Bachman, H N; Halperin, W P; Kuhns, P L; Reyes, A P

    2001-02-01

    We have studied the temporal instability of a high field resistive Bitter magnet through nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). This instability leads to transverse spin decoherence in repeated and accumulated NMR experiments as is normally performed during signal averaging. We demonstrate this effect via Hahn echo and Carr--Purcell--Meiboom--Gill (CPMG) transverse relaxation experiments in a 23-T resistive magnet. Quantitative analysis was found to be consistent with separate measurements of the magnetic field frequency fluctuation spectrum, as well as with independent NMR experiments performed in a magnetic field with a controlled instability. Finally, the CPMG sequence with short pulse delays is shown to be successful in recovering the intrinsic spin--spin relaxation even in the presence of magnetic field temporal instability.

  12. Novel electrolytes for use in new and improved batteries: An NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, Marc B.

    This thesis focuses on the use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in order to study materials for use as electrolytes in batteries. The details of four projects are described in this thesis as well as a brief theoretical background of NMR. Structural and dynamics properties were determined using several NMR techniques such as static, MAS, PFG diffusion, and relaxation to understand microscopic and macroscopic properties of the materials described within. Nuclei investigate were 1H, 2H, 7Li, 13C, 19F, 23Na, and 27Al. The first project focuses on an exciting new material to be used as a solid electrolyte membrane. T. The second project focuses on the dynamics of ionic liquid-solvent mixtures and their comparison to molecular dynamics computer simulations. The third project involves a solvent-free film containing NaTFSI salt mixed in to PEO for use in sodium-ion batteries. This final project focuses on a composite electrolyte consisting of a ceramic and solid: LiI:PEO:LiAlO2.

  13. Advanced NMR-based techniques for pore structure analysis of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.

    1991-01-01

    One of the main problems in coal utilization is the inability to properly characterize its complex pore structure. We propose to investigate the dependence of the common NMR parameters such as chemical shifts and relaxation times of several different nuclei and compounds on the pore structure of model microporous solids, carbons, and coals. In particular, we will study the interaction between several small molecules ({sup 129}Xe, {sup 3}He, {sup 2}H{sub 2}, {sup 14}N{sub 2}, {sup 14}NH{sub 3}, {sup 15}N{sub 2}, {sup 13}CH{sub 4}, {sup 13}CO{sub 2}) and the pore surfaces in coals. These molecules have been selected for their chemical and physical properties.

  14. Spatially selective heteronuclear multiple-quantum coherence (HMQC) spectroscopy for bio-molecular NMR studies

    PubMed Central

    Sathyamoorthy, Bharathwaj; Parish, David M.; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Xiao, Rong; Szyperski, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Spatially selective heteronuclear multiple-quantum coherence (SS HMQC) NMR spectroscopy was devised for solution studies of proteins. Due to ‘time-staggered’ acquisition of free induction decays (FIDs) in different slices, SS HMQC allows one to employ long delays for longitudinal nuclear spin relaxation at high repetition rates for the acquisition of the FIDs. To also achieve high intrinsic sensitivity, SS HMQC was implemented by combing a single spatially selective 1H excitation pulse with non-selective 1H 180° pulses. High-quality spectra could be obtained within 66 seconds for a 7.6 kDa uniformly 13C,15N-labeled protein, and within 45 and 90 seconds for, respectively, two uniformly 2H,13C,15N-labeled but isoleucine, leucine and valine methyl group protonated proteins with molecular weights of 7.5 and 43 kDa. PMID:24789578

  15. Determination of the solution-bound conformation of an amino acid binding protein by NMR paramagnetic relaxation enhancement: use of a single flexible paramagnetic probe with improved estimation of its sampling space.

    PubMed

    Bermejo, Guillermo A; Strub, Marie-Paule; Ho, Chien; Tjandra, Nico

    2009-07-15

    We demonstrate the feasibility of elucidating the bound ("closed") conformation of a periplasmic binding protein, the glutamine-binding protein (GlnBP), in solution, using paramagnetic relaxation enhancements (PREs) arising from a single paramagnetic group. GlnBP consists of two globular domains connected by a hinge. Using the ligand-free ("open") conformation as a starting point, conjoined rigid-body/torsion-angle simulated annealing calculations were performed using backbone (1)H(N)-PREs as a major source of distance information. Paramagnetic probe flexibility was accounted for via a multiple-conformer representation. A conventional approach where the entire PRE data set is enforced at once during simulated annealing yielded poor results due to inappropriate conformational sampling of the probe. On the other hand, significant improvements in coordinate accuracy were obtained by estimating the probe sampling space prior to structure calculation. Such sampling is achieved by refining the ensemble of probe conformers with intradomain PREs only, keeping the protein backbone fixed in the open form. Subsequently, while constraining the probe to the previously found conformations, the domains are allowed to move relative to each other under the influence of the non-intradomain PREs, giving the hinge region torsional degrees of freedom. Thus, by partitioning the protocol into "probe sampling" and "backbone sampling" stages, structures significantly closer to the X-ray structure of ligand-bound GlnBP were obtained.

  16. Synthesis and Stereochemical Assignment of Crypto-Optically Active (2) H6 -Neopentane.

    PubMed

    Masarwa, Ahmad; Gerbig, Dennis; Oskar, Liron; Loewenstein, Aharon; Reisenauer, Hans Peter; Lesot, Philippe; Schreiner, Peter R; Marek, Ilan

    2015-10-26

    The determination of the absolute configuration of chiral molecules is at the heart of asymmetric synthesis. Here we probe the spectroscopic limits for chiral discrimination with NMR spectroscopy in chiral aligned media and with vibrational circular dichroism spectroscopy of the sixfold-deuterated chiral neopentane. The study of this compound presents formidable challenges since its stereogenicity is only due to small mass differences. For this purpose, we selectively prepared both enantiomers of (2) H6 -1 through a concise synthesis utilizing multifunctional intermediates. While NMR spectroscopy in chiral aligned media could be used to characterize the precursors to (2) H6 -1, the final assignment could only be accomplished with VCD spectroscopy, despite the fleetingly small dichroic properties of 1. Both enantiomers were assigned by matching the VCD spectra with those computed with density functional theory. PMID:26480341

  17. Synthesis and Stereochemical Assignment of Crypto-Optically Active (2) H6 -Neopentane.

    PubMed

    Masarwa, Ahmad; Gerbig, Dennis; Oskar, Liron; Loewenstein, Aharon; Reisenauer, Hans Peter; Lesot, Philippe; Schreiner, Peter R; Marek, Ilan

    2015-10-26

    The determination of the absolute configuration of chiral molecules is at the heart of asymmetric synthesis. Here we probe the spectroscopic limits for chiral discrimination with NMR spectroscopy in chiral aligned media and with vibrational circular dichroism spectroscopy of the sixfold-deuterated chiral neopentane. The study of this compound presents formidable challenges since its stereogenicity is only due to small mass differences. For this purpose, we selectively prepared both enantiomers of (2) H6 -1 through a concise synthesis utilizing multifunctional intermediates. While NMR spectroscopy in chiral aligned media could be used to characterize the precursors to (2) H6 -1, the final assignment could only be accomplished with VCD spectroscopy, despite the fleetingly small dichroic properties of 1. Both enantiomers were assigned by matching the VCD spectra with those computed with density functional theory.

  18. Enzyme dynamics from NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Arthur G

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: Biological activities of enzymes, including regulation or coordination of mechanistic stages preceding or following the chemical step, may depend upon kinetic or equilibrium changes in protein conformations. Exchange of more open or flexible conformational states with more closed or constrained states can influence inhibition, allosteric regulation, substrate recognition, formation of the Michaelis complex, side reactions, and product release. NMR spectroscopy has long been applied to the study of conformational dynamic processes in enzymes because these phenomena can be characterized over multiple time scales with atomic site resolution. Laboratory-frame spin-relaxation measurements, sensitive to reorientational motions on picosecond-nanosecond time scales, and rotating-frame relaxation-dispersion measurements, sensitive to chemical exchange processes on microsecond-millisecond time scales, provide information on both conformational distributions and kinetics. This Account reviews NMR spin relaxation studies of the enzymes ribonuclease HI from mesophilic (Escherichia coli) and thermophilic (Thermus thermophilus) bacteria, E. coli AlkB, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae triosephosphate isomerase to illustrate the contributions of conformational flexibility and dynamics to diverse steps in enzyme mechanism. Spin relaxation measurements and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the bacterial ribonuclease H enzymes show that the handle region, one of three loop regions that interact with substrates, interconverts between two conformations. Comparison of these conformations with the structure of the complex between Homo sapiens ribonuclease H and a DNA:RNA substrate suggests that the more closed state is inhibitory to binding. The large population of the closed conformation in T. thermophilus ribonuclease H contributes to the increased Michaelis constant compared with the E. coli enzyme. NMR spin relaxation and fluorescence spectroscopy have characterized a

  19. Enzyme Dynamics from NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Conspectus Biological activities of enzymes, including regulation or coordination of mechanistic stages preceding or following the chemical step, may depend upon kinetic or equilibrium changes in protein conformations. Exchange of more open or flexible conformational states with more closed or constrained states can influence inhibition, allosteric regulation, substrate recognition, formation of the Michaelis complex, side reactions, and product release. NMR spectroscopy has long been applied to the study of conformational dynamic processes in enzymes because these phenomena can be characterized over multiple time scales with atomic site resolution. Laboratory-frame spin-relaxation measurements, sensitive to reorientational motions on picosecond–nanosecond time scales, and rotating-frame relaxation-dispersion measurements, sensitive to chemical exchange processes on microsecond–millisecond time scales, provide information on both conformational distributions and kinetics. This Account reviews NMR spin relaxation studies of the enzymes ribonuclease HI from mesophilic (Escherichia coli) and thermophilic (Thermus thermophilus) bacteria, E. coli AlkB, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae triosephosphate isomerase to illustrate the contributions of conformational flexibility and dynamics to diverse steps in enzyme mechanism. Spin relaxation measurements and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the bacterial ribonuclease H enzymes show that the handle region, one of three loop regions that interact with substrates, interconverts between two conformations. Comparison of these conformations with the structure of the complex between Homo sapiens ribonuclease H and a DNA:RNA substrate suggests that the more closed state is inhibitory to binding. The large population of the closed conformation in T. thermophilus ribonuclease H contributes to the increased Michaelis constant compared with the E. coli enzyme. NMR spin relaxation and fluorescence spectroscopy have characterized a

  20. Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging

    SciTech Connect

    George J. Hirasaki; Kishore K. Mohanty

    2005-09-05

    The objective of this report is to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions that are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. The advances made in the understanding of NMR fluid properties are summarized in a chapter written for an AAPG book on NMR well logging. This includes live oils, viscous oils, natural gas mixtures, and the relation between relaxation time and diffusivity. Oil based drilling fluids can have an adverse effect on NMR well logging if it alters the wettability of the formation. The effect of various surfactants on wettability and surface relaxivity are evaluated for silica sand. The relation between the relaxation time and diffusivity distinguishes the response of brine, oil, and gas in a NMR well log. A new NMR pulse sequence in the presence of a field gradient and a new inversion technique enables the T{sub 2} and diffusivity distributions to be displayed as a two-dimensional map. The objectives of pore morphology and rock characterization are to identify vug connectivity by using X-ray CT scan, and to improve NMR permeability correlation. Improved estimation of permeability from NMR response is possible by using estimated tortuosity as a parameter to interpolate between two existing permeability models.

  1. Dissociative recombination of N2H+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, S. Fonseca; Ngassam, V.; Orel, A. E.; Larson, Å.

    2016-08-01

    The direct and indirect mechanisms of dissociative recombination of N2H+ are theoretically studied. At low energies, the electron capture is found to be driven by recombination into bound Rydberg states, while at collision energies above 0.1 eV, the direct capture and dissociation along electronic resonant states becomes important. Electron-scattering calculations using the complex Kohn variational method are performed to obtain the scattering matrix as well as energy positions and autoionization widths of resonant states. Potential-energy surfaces of electronic bound states of N2H and N2H+ are computed using structure calculations with the multireference configuration interaction method. The cross section for the indirect mechanism is calculated using a vibrational frame transformation of the elements of the scattering matrix at energies just above the ionization threshold. Here vibrational excitations of the ionic core from v =0 to v =1 and v =2 for all three normal modes are considered and autoionization is neglected. The cross section for the direct dissociation along electronic resonant states is computed with wave-packet calculations using the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree method, where all three internal degrees of freedom are considered. The calculated cross sections are compared to measurements.

  2. NMR-based dynamics of free glycosaminoglycans in solution.

    PubMed

    Pomin, Vitor H

    2014-08-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) comprise a special class of complex carbohydrates endowed with numerous biological functions. Most of these functions are regulated by conformational arrangements or dynamical properties of GAGs in solution. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a powerful technique used for dynamic analyses. Spin relaxation, scalar couplings, chemical shifts and nuclear Overhauser effect resonances are the commonest NMR parameters utilized in such analyses. Computational molecular dynamics are also very often employed in conjunction with, or restrained by, the NMR dataset. This report aims at describing the major NMR-based information available so far concerning the dynamical properties of free GAGs in solution.

  3. Protein-ice interaction of an antifreeze protein observed with solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Siemer, Ansgar B; Huang, Kuo-Ying; McDermott, Ann E

    2010-10-12

    NMR on frozen solutions is an ideal method to study fundamental questions of macromolecular hydration, because the hydration shell of many biomolecules does not freeze together with bulk solvent. In the present study, we present previously undescribed NMR methods to study the interactions of proteins with their hydration shell and the ice lattice in frozen solution. We applied these methods to compare solvent interaction of an ice-binding type III antifreeze protein (AFP III) and ubiquitin a non-ice-binding protein in frozen solution. We measured (1)H-(1)H cross-saturation and cross-relaxation to provide evidence for a molecular contact surface between ice and AFP III at moderate freezing temperatures of -35 °C. This phenomenon is potentially unique for AFPs because ubiquitin shows no such cross relaxation or cross saturation with ice. On the other hand, we detected liquid hydration water and strong water-AFP III and water-ubiquitin cross peaks in frozen solution using relaxation filtered (2)H and HETCOR spectra with additional (1)H-(1)H mixing. These results are consistent with the idea that ubiquitin is surrounded by a hydration shell, which separates it from the bulk ice. For AFP III, the water cross peaks indicate that only a portion of its hydration shell (i.e., at the ice-binding surface) is in contact with the ice lattice. The rest of AFP III's hydration shell behaves similarly to the hydration shell of non-ice-interacting proteins such as ubiquitin and does not freeze together with the bulk water.

  4. Solid-state NMR studies of the dynamics and structure of mouse keratin intermediate filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, J.W.; Torchia, D.A.; Steinert, P.M.

    1988-07-26

    The molecular dynamics and structural organization of mouse epidermal keratin intermediate filaments (IF) have been studied via solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments performed on IF labeled both in vivo and in vitro with isotopically enriched amino acids. As a probe of the organization of the peripheral glycine-rich end domains of the IF, carbon-13 NMR experiments have been performed on subfilamentous forms (prekeratin) and on IF reassembled in vitro that had been labeled with either (1-/sup 13/C)glycine or (2-/sup 13/C)glycine, as more than 90% of the glycines of the keratins are located in the end domains. Measurements of carbon relaxation times, nuclear Overhauser enhancements, and signal intensities show that the motions of the peptide backbone in the end domains are effectively isotropic. These results indicate that the end domains of IF are remarkably flexible and have little or no structural order. To probe the structural organization of the coiled-coil rod domains of the IF, separate samples of native keratin IF, raised in primary tissue culture, were labeled with L-(1-/sup 13/C)leucine, L-(/sup 2/H/sub 10/)leucine, or L-(2,3,3-/sup 2/H/sub 3/)leucine, as greater than 90% of the leucyl residues of the keratin IF types studied are located in the coiled coils which form the central core of IF. Deuterium NMR experiments performed on IF labeled with deuteriated leucines indeed reveal a marked degree of peptide backbone rigidity within the coiled coils, confirming the initial conclusions of the carbon-13 data. These data, demonstrating relative peptide backbone rigidity yet side-chain flexibility, are interpreted to mean that the coiled coils of these keratin IF are not tightly packed together but rather form a somewhat looser structure which permits a significant degree of side-chain mobility.

  5. Novel application of NMR relaxometry in studies of diffusion in virgin rape oil.

    PubMed

    Rachocki, A; Tritt-Goc, J

    2014-01-01

    Field cycling (FC) proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) relaxometry was applied to study the dynamics of rape oil molecules. The spin-lattice relaxation data, measured in the frequency range from 0.01 to 30 MHz, were analysed by applying relaxation theory combined with the force-free-hard-sphere (FFHS) diffusion model. In the low frequency range, the relaxation was dominated by the translational diffusion contribution. Therefore, the diffusion coefficient of rape oil was determined from a linear dependence of the (1)H NMR relaxation dispersion drawn as a function of the square root of Larmor frequency. The results are consistent with those obtained from the pulse gradient spin echo (PGSE) NMR method. To estimate the density of oil protons, a parameter required to derive the diffusion coefficient from NMR relaxometry, a single point imaging (SPI) NMR experiment was proposed.

  6. Copper-catalysed asymmetric allylic alkylation of alkylzirconocenes to racemic 3,6-dihydro-2H-pyrans

    PubMed Central

    Rideau, Emeline

    2015-01-01

    Summary Asymmetric allylic alkylation is a powerful reaction that allows the enantioselective formation of C–C bonds. Here we describe the asymmetric alkylation of alkylzirconium species to racemic 3,6-dihydro-2H-pyrans. Two systems were examined: 3-chloro-3,6-dihydro-2H-pyran using linear optimization (45–93% ee, up to 33% yield, 5 examples) and 3,6-dihydro-2H-pyran-3-yl diethyl phosphate with the assistance of a design of experiments statistical approach (83% ee, 12% yield). 1H NMR spectroscopy was used to gain insight into the reaction mechanisms. PMID:26734091

  7. Synthesis Of [2h, 13c] And [2h3, 13c]Methyl Aryl Sulfides

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Alvarez, Marc A.; Silks, III, Louis A.; Unkefer, Clifford J.

    2004-03-30

    The present invention is directed to labeled compounds, [.sup.2 H.sub.1, .sup.13 C], [.sup.2 H.sub.2, .sup.13 C] and [.sup.2 H.sub.3, .sup.13 C]methyl aryl sulfides wherein the .sup.13 C methyl group attached to the sulfur of the sulfide includes exactly one, two or three deuterium atoms and the aryl group is selected from the group consisting of 1-naphthyl, substituted 1-naphthyl, 2-naphthyl, substituted 2-naphthyl, and phenyl groups with the structure ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4, and R.sub.5 are each independently, hydrogen, a C.sub.1 -C.sub.4 lower alkyl, a halogen, an amino group from the group consisting of NH.sub.2, NHR and NRR' where R and R' are each a C.sub.1 -C.sub.4 lower alkyl, a phenyl, or an alkoxy group. The present invention is also directed to processes of preparing [.sup.2 H.sub.1, .sup.13 C], [.sup.2 H.sub.2,.sup.13 C] and [.sup.2 H.sub.3, .sup.13 C]methyl aryl sulfides wherein the .sup.13 C methyl group attached to the sulfur of the sulfide includes exactly one, two or three deuterium atoms. The present invention is also directed to the labeled compounds of [.sup.2 H.sub.1, .sup.13 C]methyl iodide and [.sup.2 H.sub.2, .sup.13 C]methyl iodide.

  8. Quantitative evaluation of porous media wettability using NMR relaxometry.

    PubMed

    Fleury, M; Deflandre, F

    2003-01-01

    We propose a new method to determine wettability indices from NMR relaxometry. The new method uses the sensitivity of low field NMR relaxometry to the fluid distribution in oil-water saturated porous media. The model is based on the existence of a surface relaxivity for both oil and water, allowing the determination of the amount of surface wetted either by oil or by water. The proposed NMR wettability index requires the measurement of relaxation time distribution at four different saturation states. At the irreducible water saturation, we determine the dominant relaxation time of oil in the presence of a small amount of water, and at the oil residual saturation, we determine the dominant relaxation time of water in the presence of a small amount of oil. At 100% water and 100% oil saturation, we determine the surface relaxivity ratio. The interaction of oil with the surface is also evidenced by the comparison of the spin-lattice (T1) and spin-locking (T1rho) relaxation times. The new NMR index agrees with standard wettability measurements based on drainage-imbibition capillary pressure curves (USBM test) in the range [-0.3-1]. PMID:12850740

  9. Synthesis of stereospecifically deuterated desoxypodophyllotoxins and 1H-nmr assignment of desoxypodophyllotoxin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pullockaran, A. J.; Kingston, D. G.; Lewis, N. G.

    1989-01-01

    [4 beta- 2H1]Desoxypodophyllotoxin [3], [4 alpha- 2H1]desoxypodophyllotoxin [4], and [4, 4- 2 H2]desoxypodophyllotoxin [9] were prepared from podophyllotoxin [1] via its chloride [5]. A complete assignment of the 1H-nmr spectrum of desoxypodophyllotoxin [2] was made on the basis of the spectra of the deuterated compounds [3] and [4].

  10. Thz Spectroscopy of D_2H^+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shanshan; Pearson, John; Amano, Takayoshi

    2015-06-01

    Pure rotational transitions of D_2H^+ observed by high-resolution spectroscopy have been limited so far to the J = 110-101 transition at 691.7 GHz, J=220-211 at 1.370 THz, and J=111-000 at 1.477 THz. As this ion is a light asymmetric-top molecule, spectroscopic characterization and prediction of other rotational transition frequencies are not straightforward. In this presentation, we extended the measurements up to 2 THz by using the JPL frequency multiplier chains, and observed three new THz lines and re-measured the three known transitions. D_2H^+ was generated in an extended negative glow discharge cell cooled to liquid nitrogen temperature. Six rotational transition frequencies together with the combination differences derived from three fundamental bands were subject to least square analysis to determine the molecular constants. New THz measurements are definitely useful for better characterization of spectroscopic properties. The improved molecular constants provide better predictions of other unobserved rotational transitions. T. Hirao and T. Amano, Ap. J.,597, L85 (2003) K. M. Evenson et al cited by O. L. Polyansky and A. R. W. McKellar, J. Chem. Phys., 92, 4039 (1990) O. Asvany et al, Phys. Rev. Lett., 100, 233004 (2008)

  11. Detection of C2H4 Neptune from ISO/PHT-S Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulz, B.; Encrenaz, Th.; Bezard, B.; Romani, P. N.; Lellouch, E.; Atreya, S. K.

    1999-01-01

    The 6-12 micrometer spectrum of Neptune has been recorded with the PHT-S instrument of the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) at a resolution of 0.095 micrometer. In addition to the emissions of CH4, CH3D and C2H6 previously identified, the spectrum shows the first firm identification of ethylene C2H4. The inferred column density above the 0.2-mbar level is in the range (1.1 - 3) x 10(exp 14) molecules/cm. To produce this low amount, previous photochemical models invoked rapid mixing between the source and sink regions of C2H4. We show that this requirement can be relaxed if recent laboratory measurements of CH4 photolysis branching ratios at Lyman alpha are used.

  12. Internal dynamics of DNA - a solid state deuterium NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Wen-Chang.

    1989-01-01

    In this dissertation, solid state {sup 2}H NMR spectroscopy has been used to investigate the dynamics of the sodium salt oligonucleotide, (d(CGCGAATTCGCG)){sub 2}, which contains the Eco R1 binding site. Deuterium quadrupole echo line shape and spin-lattice relaxation times were obtained as a function of hydration on three different deuterated samples. In the first sample, (d{sub 12}-(d(CG*CG*A*A*TTCG*CG*)){sub 2}), the C8 proton of all purine in the self-complementary dodecamer were exchanged for deuterons. Specifically labeled thymidine (C6 deuterated) was also synthetically incorporated at the seventh position (counting 5{prime} to 3{prime}) in the sequence (d{sub 2}-(d(CGCGAAT*TCGCG)){sub 2}). In the third sample the C2{double prime} position of the furanose ring of adenosine at the fifth and sixth positions in the same sequence (d{sub 4}-(d(CGCGA*A*TTCGCG)){sub 2}) was deuterium labeled. The static quadrupole coupling constant (e{sup 2}qQ/h) and asymmetry parameter ({eta}) were obtained through the analysis of appropriative motional models from the corresponding monomers studies.

  13. Microwave-assisted synthesis of novel 2H-chromene derivatives bearing phenylthiazolidinones and their biological activity assessment.

    PubMed

    El Azab, Islam H; Youssef, Mohamed M; Amin, Mahmoud A

    2014-01-01

    6-Hydroxy-2-oxo-2H-chromene-4-carbaldehyde (2), 6-chloro-2-oxo-2H-chromene-4-carbaldehyde (3) and 6-hydrazinyl-4-methyl-2H-chromen-2-one (5) were prepared as single-pharmacophore motif key intermediates. Compounds 2, 3 and 5 were incorporated in a series of multicomponent reactions (MCRs), under microwave assistance as well as conventional chemical synthesis processes, to afford a series of three and/or four-pharmacophoric-motif conjugates 8a,b, 11, 13, 16, 17, 19 and 20 in good yields. The newly synthesized compounds were characterized by IR, NMR, 13C-NMR, MS and elemental analyses. Finally the synthesized compounds have been screened for their biological activity whereupon they exhibited remarkable antimicrobial activity on different classes of bacteria and the fungus. PMID:25432014

  14. Hydrostatic pressure-induced conformational changes in phosphatidylcholine headgroups: a 2H NMR study.

    PubMed Central

    Bonev, B B; Morrow, M R

    1995-01-01

    The effects of pressure and temperature on 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine headgroup conformations were examined using deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance. Isothermal compression was found to produce a decrease in the choline alpha deuteron quadrupole splitting and increases in the choline beta and gamma deuteron quadrupole splittings. A similar counterdirectional change, seen in the presence of positive surface charge, has been attributed to tilting of the headgroup away from the bilayer surface in response to the torque exerted on the phosphocholine dipole by positive surface charges. The direction of the change in headgroup deuteron quadrupole splitting is consistent with the pressure-induced reduction in area per lipid in the liquid crystalline phase, which can be inferred from the ordering of phospholipid acyl chains under comparable conditions. The temperature dependences of the headgroup deuteron quadrupole splittings were also examined. It was found that at elevated pressure, the alpha splitting was insensitive to temperature, whereas the beta and gamma splittings decreased. The response of the beta deuteron splitting to temperature was found to be weaker at elevated pressure than at ambient pressure. PMID:8527666

  15. Hydrostatic pressure-induced conformational changes in phosphatidylcholine headgroups: a 2H NMR study.

    PubMed

    Bonev, B B; Morrow, M R

    1995-08-01

    The effects of pressure and temperature on 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine headgroup conformations were examined using deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance. Isothermal compression was found to produce a decrease in the choline alpha deuteron quadrupole splitting and increases in the choline beta and gamma deuteron quadrupole splittings. A similar counterdirectional change, seen in the presence of positive surface charge, has been attributed to tilting of the headgroup away from the bilayer surface in response to the torque exerted on the phosphocholine dipole by positive surface charges. The direction of the change in headgroup deuteron quadrupole splitting is consistent with the pressure-induced reduction in area per lipid in the liquid crystalline phase, which can be inferred from the ordering of phospholipid acyl chains under comparable conditions. The temperature dependences of the headgroup deuteron quadrupole splittings were also examined. It was found that at elevated pressure, the alpha splitting was insensitive to temperature, whereas the beta and gamma splittings decreased. The response of the beta deuteron splitting to temperature was found to be weaker at elevated pressure than at ambient pressure. PMID:8527666

  16. Study of aging of silicone rubber biomaterials with NMR.

    PubMed

    Pfleiderer, B; Xu, P; Ackerman, J L; Garrido, L

    1995-09-01

    Multinuclear nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy (29Si, 13C, 1H) is used to characterize the aging process of silicone rubber-based biomaterials in a rat model. 1H NMR relaxation measurements (spin-lattice, T1, and spin-spin, T2, relaxation times) were performed to better understand the molecular dynamics of polysiloxane chains in implants. After 1 year of implantation in animals, changes in the 1H T2 relaxation times and the NMR spectra were observed in polydimethylsiloxane, Silastic sheets and chin implants, while these measurements remain unchanged in finger joints. Very small amounts of fat were detected in all types of silicone rubber implants at the end of the implantation period. This work shows that free silicone migrates from the implants to adjacent tissues and distant sites, such as spleen or liver, and is chemically modified.

  17. NMR of fd coat protein.

    PubMed

    Cross, T A; Opella, S J

    1979-01-01

    The conformations of the major coat protein of a filamentous bacteriophage can be described by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the protein and the virus. The NMR experiments involve detection of the 13C and 1H nuclei of the coat protein. Both the 13C and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra show that regions of the polypeptide chain have substantially more motion than a typical globular protein. The fd coat protein was purified by gel chromatography of the SDA solubilized virus. Natural abundance 13C NMR spectra at 38 MHz resolve all of the nonprotonated aromatic carbons from the three phenylalanines, two tyrosines, and one tryptophan of the coat protein. The alpha carbons of the coat protein show at least two different classes of relaxation behavior, indicative of substantial variation in the motion of the backbone carbons in contrast to the rigidity of the alpha carbons of globular proteins. The 1H spectrum at 360 MHz shows all of the aromatic carbons and many of the amide protons. Titration of a 1H spectra gives the pKas for the tyrosines.

  18. NMR studies of nucleic acid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.

    2014-01-01

    Nucleic acid structures have to satisfy two diametrically opposite requirements; on one hand they have to adopt well-defined 3D structures that can be specifically recognized by proteins; on the other hand, their structures must be sufficiently flexible to undergo very large conformational changes that are required during key biochemical processes, including replication, transcription, and translation. How do nucleic acids introduce flexibility into their 3D structure without losing biological specificity? Here, I describe the development and application of NMR spectroscopic techniques in my laboratory for characterizing the dynamic properties of nucleic acids that tightly integrate a broad set of NMR measurements, including residual dipolar couplings, spin relaxation, and relaxation dispersion with sample engineering and computational approaches. This approach allowed us to obtain fundamental new insights into directional flexibility in nucleic acids that enable their structures to change in a very specific functional manner. PMID:24149218

  19. 13C solid-state NMR analysis of heterogeneous structure of beeswax in native state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameda, Tsunenori

    2005-12-01

    I investigated the molecular structure of natural wax from Japanese bees (Apis cerana japonica) in its native state (neither purified nor recrystallized) by 13C and 1H solid-state NMR. Two strong 13C peaks at 32.9 and 34.0 ppm were attributed to signals from internal-chain methylene carbons [int-(CH2)] in two types of crystal form. The peak at 32.9 ppm was assigned to an orthorhombic crystal form, and that at 34.0 ppm was assigned to a triclinic or monoclinic form. In both crystalline regions, bi-exponential decay of 13C spin-lattice relaxation [T1(C)] for the crystalline peaks due to chain diffusion was observed. 1H spin-lattice relaxation [T1(H)] values for protons of the CH3 group and for int-(CH2) in the crystalline and amorphous regions were identical; this was interpreted as being due to averaging of the T1(H) relaxation rates via spin diffusion. In contrast, although the T_{{1}_{\\rho}}(H) decay curves for protons of the CH3 group and for int-(CH2) in the amorphous and orthorhombic forms were almost identical, those of the triclinic or monoclinic forms were different. This unhomogeneous character of T_{{1}_{\\rho}}(H) was interpreted as resulting from differences in the molecular composition of each crystal form. Moreover, two components with long and short 1H spin-spin relaxation [T2(H)] values, arising from the mobile and rigid phases, respectively, were observed at above about -30 °C.

  20. Relaxation dynamics of the Fe₈ molecular nanomagnet as probed by nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Carretta, S; Bianchi, A; Santini, P; Amoretti, G

    2010-05-28

    The relaxation dynamics in molecular nanomagnets can be probed by measurements of NMR 1/T(1). By modelling magnetoelastic interactions, we theoretically investigate the behaviour of the prototype Fe(8) nanomagnet. The results of our model are in agreement with AC susceptibility and recent NMR measurements.

  1. Pore structure characterization of catalyst supports via low field NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.; Glaves, C.L.; Gallegos, D.P.; Brinker, C.J.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper, the application of low-field NMR to both surface area and pore structure analysis of catalyst supports will be presented. Low-field (20 MHz) spin-lattice relaxation (T/sub 1/) experiments are performed on fluids contained in alumina and silica catalyst supports. Pore size distributions (PSD) calculated from these NMR experiments are compared to those obtained from mercury porosimetry and nitrogen condensation. 18 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Some specific features of the NMR study of fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davydov, V. V.

    2016-07-01

    Some specific features of studying fluid flows with a NMR spectrometer are considered. The consideration of these features in the NMR spectrometer design makes it possible to determine the relative concentrations of paramagnetic ions and measure the longitudinal and transverse relaxation times ( T 1 and T 2, respectively) in fluid flows with an error no larger than 0.5%. This approach allows one to completely avoid errors in determining the state of a fluid from measured relaxation constants T 1 and T 2, which is especially urgent when working with medical suspensions and biological solutions. The results of an experimental study of fluid flows are presented.

  3. Application of a quantum cascade laser for time-resolved, in situ probing of CH4/H2 and C2H2/H2 gas mixtures during microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of diamond.

    PubMed

    Cheesman, A; Smith, J A; Ashfold, M N R; Langford, N; Wright, S; Duxbury, G

    2006-03-01

    First illustrations of the utility of pulsed quantum cascade lasers for in situ probing of the chemistry prevailing in microwave plasma activated hydrocarbon/Ar/H2 gas mixtures used for diamond thin film growth are reported. CH4 and C2H2 molecules, and their interconversion, have been monitored by line-of-sight single pass absorption methods, as a function of process conditions (e.g., choice of input hydrocarbon (CH4 or C2H2), hydrocarbon mole fraction, total gas pressure, and applied microwave power). The observed trends can be rationalized, qualitatively, within the framework of the previously reported modeling of the gas-phase chemistry prevailing in hot filament activated hydrocarbon/H2 gas mixtures (Ashfold et al. Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2001, 3, 3471). Column densities of vibrationally excited C2H2(v5=1) molecules at low input carbon fractions are shown to be far higher than expected on the basis of local thermodynamic equilibrium. The presence of vibrationally excited C2H2 molecules (C2H2(double dagger)) can be attributed to the exothermicity of the C2H3 + H <==> C2H2 + H2 elementary reaction within the overall multistep CH4 --> C2H2 conversion. Diagnostic methods that sample just C2H2(v=0) molecules thus run the risk of underestimating total C2H2 column densities in hydrocarbon/H2 mixtures operated under conditions where the production rate of C2H2(double dagger) molecules exceeds their vibrational relaxation (and thermal equilibration) rates.

  4. Rotational dynamics in supercooled water from nuclear spin relaxation and molecular simulations.

    PubMed

    Qvist, Johan; Mattea, Carlos; Sunde, Erik P; Halle, Bertil

    2012-05-28

    Structural dynamics in liquid water slow down dramatically in the supercooled regime. To shed further light on the origin of this super-Arrhenius temperature dependence, we report high-precision (17)O and (2)H NMR relaxation data for H(2)O and D(2)O, respectively, down to 37 K below the equilibrium freezing point. With the aid of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we provide a detailed analysis of the rotational motions probed by the NMR experiments. The NMR-derived rotational correlation time τ(R) is the integral of a time correlation function (TCF) that, after a subpicosecond librational decay, can be described as a sum of two exponentials. Using a coarse-graining algorithm to map the MD trajectory on a continuous-time random walk (CTRW) in angular space, we show that the slowest TCF component can be attributed to large-angle molecular jumps. The mean jump angle is ∼48° at all temperatures and the waiting time distribution is non-exponential, implying dynamical heterogeneity. We have previously used an analogous CTRW model to analyze quasielastic neutron scattering data from supercooled water. Although the translational and rotational waiting times are of similar magnitude, most translational jumps are not synchronized with a rotational jump of the same molecule. The rotational waiting time has a stronger temperature dependence than the translation one, consistent with the strong increase of the experimentally derived product τ(R) D(T) at low temperatures. The present CTRW jump model is related to, but differs in essential ways from the extended jump model proposed by Laage and co-workers. Our analysis traces the super-Arrhenius temperature dependence of τ(R) to the rotational waiting time. We present arguments against interpreting this temperature dependence in terms of mode-coupling theory or in terms of mixture models of water structure. PMID:22667569

  5. Resin Dynamics Contributes to the NMR Line Broadening of Organic Molecules Grafted onto a Polystyrene Resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippens, Guy; Chessari, Gianni; Wieruszeski, Jean-Michel

    2002-06-01

    Despite the use of high resolution magic angle spinning NMR, the NMR linewidth of anchored molecules on the commonly used Merrifield solid phase resins remains larger than that of the corresponding molecules in solution. We investigate the different mechanisms that might be at the origin of this line broadening. Experimentally, we use the CPMG method to determine the 15N relaxation times of a tethered tripeptide and show that the slow resin dynamics significantly contributes to the transverse relaxation.

  6. Deuterium NMR investigation of backbone dynamics in the synthetic oligonucleotide (d(CGCGAATTCGCG)) sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, T.M.; Orban, J.; Drobny, G.P. )

    1991-09-24

    Backbone dynamics in the (5{prime},5{prime}{minus}{sup 2}H{sub 2})2{prime}-deoxythymidine labeled duplex dodecamer (d-(CGCGSAAT{star}T{star}TCGCG)){sub 2} have been investigated by solid-state {sup 2}H NMR. Quadrupolar echo line shapes, spin-lattice relaxation, and quadrupolar echo decay ties were obtained over hydration levels ranging from W {equals} 0.0 to 25.2 (moles of H{sub 2}O/mole of nucleotide). Variation of the line shape with changing hydration level was analyzed by using models employed in previous investigations of dodecamer base and sugar dynamics. Both fast local motions and a slower helix motion were present within the oligonucleotide. The fast motion was modeled as a four-site libration whose amplitude increased with hydration level. The root mean square amplitude of this librational model was 2-6{degree} larger than the amplitude observed in either the furanose ring or base labeled material for the entire range of hydration levels investigated. The observed line shape was inconsistent with a rapid three-site trans-gauche isomerization. A slow motion about the helix axis was observed at low water levels and increased in rate and amplitude with hydration. This motional model is in agreement with previous oligonucleotide studies.

  7. Deuterium incorporation in biomass cell wall components by NMR analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Foston, Marcus B; McGaughey, Joseph; O'Neill, Hugh Michael; Evans, Barbara R; Ragauskas, Arthur J

    2012-01-01

    A commercially available deuterated kale sample was analyzed for deuterium incorporation by ionic liquid solution 2H and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). This protocol was found to effectively measure the percent deuterium incorporation at 33%, comparable to the 31% value determined by combustion. The solution NMR technique also suggested by a qualitative analysis that deuterium is preferentially incorporated into the carbohydrate components of the kale sample.

  8. NMR analysis of biodiesel

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biodiesel is usually analyzed by the various methods called for in standards such as ASTM D6751 and EN 14214. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is not one of these methods. However, NMR, with 1H-NMR commonly applied, can be useful in a variety of applications related to biodiesel. These include monit...

  9. Relaxation selective pulses in fast relaxing systems.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Christopher J; Lu, Wei; Walls, Jamie D

    2014-05-01

    In this work, the selectivity or sharpness of the saturation profiles for relaxation selective pulses (R^rsps) that suppress magnetization possessing relaxation times of T2=T2(rsp) and T1=αT2 for α∈12,∞ was optimized. Along with sharpening the selectivity of the R^rsps, the selective saturation of these pulses was also optimized to be robust to both B0 and B1 inhomogeneities. Frequency-swept hyperbolic secant and adiabatic time-optimal saturation pulse inputs were found to work best in the optimizations, and the pulse lengths required to selectivity saturate the magnetization were always found to be less than the inversion recovery delay, T1ln(2). The selectivity of the optimized relaxation selective pulses was experimentally demonstrated in aqueous solutions with varying concentrations of the paramagnetic species, [Mn(+2)], and for use in solvent suppression. Finally, the "rotational" properties of spin relaxation were explored along with an analytical derivation of adiabatic time-optimal saturation pulses. PMID:24631803

  10. A review of blind source separation in NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Toumi, Ichrak; Caldarelli, Stefano; Torrésani, Bruno

    2014-08-01

    Fourier transform is the data processing naturally associated to most NMR experiments. Notable exceptions are Pulse Field Gradient and relaxation analysis, the structure of which is only partially suitable for FT. With the revamp of NMR of complex mixtures, fueled by analytical challenges such as metabolomics, alternative and more apt mathematical methods for data processing have been sought, with the aim of decomposing the NMR signal into simpler bits. Blind source separation is a very broad definition regrouping several classes of mathematical methods for complex signal decomposition that use no hypothesis on the form of the data. Developed outside NMR, these algorithms have been increasingly tested on spectra of mixtures. In this review, we shall provide an historical overview of the application of blind source separation methodologies to NMR, including methods specifically designed for the specificity of this spectroscopy. PMID:25142734

  11. Ultrafast multidimensional Laplace NMR for a rapid and sensitive chemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Ahola, Susanna; Zhivonitko, Vladimir V; Mankinen, Otto; Zhang, Guannan; Kantola, Anu M; Chen, Hsueh-Ying; Hilty, Christian; Koptyug, Igor V; Telkki, Ville-Veikko

    2015-09-18

    Traditional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy relies on the versatile chemical information conveyed by spectra. To complement conventional NMR, Laplace NMR explores diffusion and relaxation phenomena to reveal details on molecular motions. Under a broad concept of ultrafast multidimensional Laplace NMR, here we introduce an ultrafast diffusion-relaxation correlation experiment enhancing the resolution and information content of corresponding 1D experiments as well as reducing the experiment time by one to two orders of magnitude or more as compared with its conventional 2D counterpart. We demonstrate that the method allows one to distinguish identical molecules in different physical environments and provides chemical resolution missing in NMR spectra. Although the sensitivity of the new method is reduced due to spatial encoding, the single-scan approach enables one to use hyperpolarized substances to boost the sensitivity by several orders of magnitude, significantly enhancing the overall sensitivity of multidimensional Laplace NMR.

  12. Ultrafast multidimensional Laplace NMR for a rapid and sensitive chemical analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ahola, Susanna; Zhivonitko, Vladimir V; Mankinen, Otto; Zhang, Guannan; Kantola, Anu M.; Chen, Hsueh-Ying; Hilty, Christian; Koptyug, Igor V.; Telkki, Ville-Veikko

    2015-01-01

    Traditional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy relies on the versatile chemical information conveyed by spectra. To complement conventional NMR, Laplace NMR explores diffusion and relaxation phenomena to reveal details on molecular motions. Under a broad concept of ultrafast multidimensional Laplace NMR, here we introduce an ultrafast diffusion-relaxation correlation experiment enhancing the resolution and information content of corresponding 1D experiments as well as reducing the experiment time by one to two orders of magnitude or more as compared with its conventional 2D counterpart. We demonstrate that the method allows one to distinguish identical molecules in different physical environments and provides chemical resolution missing in NMR spectra. Although the sensitivity of the new method is reduced due to spatial encoding, the single-scan approach enables one to use hyperpolarized substances to boost the sensitivity by several orders of magnitude, significantly enhancing the overall sensitivity of multidimensional Laplace NMR. PMID:26381101

  13. Ultrafast multidimensional Laplace NMR for a rapid and sensitive chemical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahola, Susanna; Zhivonitko, Vladimir V.; Mankinen, Otto; Zhang, Guannan; Kantola, Anu M.; Chen, Hsueh-Ying; Hilty, Christian; Koptyug, Igor V.; Telkki, Ville-Veikko

    2015-09-01

    Traditional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy relies on the versatile chemical information conveyed by spectra. To complement conventional NMR, Laplace NMR explores diffusion and relaxation phenomena to reveal details on molecular motions. Under a broad concept of ultrafast multidimensional Laplace NMR, here we introduce an ultrafast diffusion-relaxation correlation experiment enhancing the resolution and information content of corresponding 1D experiments as well as reducing the experiment time by one to two orders of magnitude or more as compared with its conventional 2D counterpart. We demonstrate that the method allows one to distinguish identical molecules in different physical environments and provides chemical resolution missing in NMR spectra. Although the sensitivity of the new method is reduced due to spatial encoding, the single-scan approach enables one to use hyperpolarized substances to boost the sensitivity by several orders of magnitude, significantly enhancing the overall sensitivity of multidimensional Laplace NMR.

  14. Using an NMR Spectrometer to Do Magnetic Resonance Imaging: An Undergraduate Physical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinmetz, Wayne E.; Maher, M. Cyrus

    2007-01-01

    A conventional Fourier-transform NMR spectrometer with a triple-axis gradient probe can function as a MRI imager. In this experiment students gain hands-on experience with MRI while they learn about important principles underlying the practice of NMR, such as gradients, multi-dimensional spectroscopy, and relaxation. Students image a biological…

  15. NMR methodologies in the analysis of blueberries.

    PubMed

    Capitani, Donatella; Sobolev, Anatoly P; Delfini, Maurizio; Vista, Silvia; Antiochia, Riccarda; Proietti, Noemi; Bubici, Salvatore; Ferrante, Gianni; Carradori, Simone; De Salvador, Flavio Roberto; Mannina, Luisa

    2014-06-01

    An NMR analytical protocol based on complementary high and low field measurements is proposed for blueberry characterization. Untargeted NMR metabolite profiling of blueberries aqueous and organic extracts as well as targeted NMR analysis focused on anthocyanins and other phenols are reported. Bligh-Dyer and microwave-assisted extractions were carried out and compared showing a better recovery of lipidic fraction in the case of microwave procedure. Water-soluble metabolites belonging to different classes such as sugars, amino acids, organic acids, and phenolic compounds, as well as metabolites soluble in organic solvent such as triglycerides, sterols, and fatty acids, were identified. Five anthocyanins (malvidin-3-glucoside, malvidin-3-galactoside, delphinidin-3-glucoside, delphinidin-3-galactoside, and petunidin-3-glucoside) and 3-O-α-l-rhamnopyranosyl quercetin were identified in solid phase extract. The water status of fresh and withered blueberries was monitored by portable NMR and fast-field cycling NMR. (1) H depth profiles, T2 transverse relaxation times and dispersion profiles were found to be sensitive to the withering.

  16. Relaxation Mechanisms in Hyperpolarized Polycrystalline ^129Xe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuelson, G.; Su, T.; Saam, B.

    2002-10-01

    Through spin exchange with optically polarized Rb vapor, it is possible to achieve upwards of 30% nuclear spin polarization in ^129Xe and a corresponding NMR signal some 5 orders of magnitude stronger than typical thermally polarized ^129Xe. Due to such a strong signal, hyperpolarized ^129Xe is being used for several leading-edge technologies (eg. biochemical spectroscopy, MRI, and polarization transfer). We have measured the nuclear spin relaxation rate of polycrystalline hyperpolarized ^129Xe at 77K (well below the freezing point of 160K) in a magnetic field of only a few Gauss and have observed that the hyperpolarization completely survives the freezing process. Furthermore, in this regime we have observed non-exponential spin relaxation that depends strongly on magnetic field, isotopic concentration (between ^129Xe and ^131Xe) and differences in crystallite formation. We present a simple spin-diffusion model that fits and explains the features of the data. Our results agree with the hypothesis that at low fields and temperatures the dominant spin relaxation mechanism is cross-relaxation with ^131Xe on the surface of the crystallites (Gatzke, et al., PRL b70, 690 (1993)).

  17. Photo-induced reactions in the ion-molecule complex Mg+-OCNC2H5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ju-Long; Liu, Haichuan; Han, Ke-Li; Yang, Shihe

    2003-06-01

    Ion-molecule complexes of magnesium cation with ethyl isocyanate were produced in a laser-ablation supersonic expansion nozzle source. Photo-induced reactions in the 1:1 complexes have been studied in the spectral range of 230-410 nm. Photodissociation mass spectrometry revealed the persistent product Mg+ from nonreactive quenching throughout the entire wavelength range. As for the reactive channels, the photoproducts, Mg+OCN and C2H5+, were produced only in the blue absorption band of the complex with low yields. The action spectrum of Mg+(OCNC2H5) consists of two pronounced peaks on the red and blue sides of the Mg+ 32P←32S atomic transition. The ground state geometry of Mg+-OCNC2H5 was fully optimized at B3LYP/6-31+G** level by using GAUSSIAN 98 package. The calculated absorption spectrum of the complex using the optimized structure of its ground state agrees well with the observed action spectrum. Photofragment branching fractions of the products are almost independent of the photolysis photon energy for the 3Px,y,z excitations. The very low branching ratio of reactive products to nonreactive fragment suggests that evaporation is the main relaxation pathway in the photo-induced reactions of Mg+(OCNC2H5).

  18. ECG gated NMR-CT for cardiovascular diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Nishikawa, J.; Ohtake, T.; Machida, K.; Iio, M.; Yoshimoto, N.; Sugimoto, T.

    1985-05-01

    The authors have been applying ECG gated NMR-CT to mainly patients with myocardial infarction (MI), and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Thirteen patients with MI, 8 with HCM and 5 without any heart diseases were studied by ECG gated NMR imaging (spin-echo technique, TR: depends on patient heart rate, TE: 35 and 70 msec.) with 0.35 T superconducting magnet. On NMR images (MRI), the authors examined the wall thickness, wall motion and T/sub 2/ relaxation time in the area of diseased myocardium. The lesions of old MI were depicted as the area of thin wall and T/sub 2/ relaxation time of those lesions were similar to the area of non-infarcted myocardium. The lesions of recent MI (up to 3.5 months from the recent attack) were shown as the same wall thickness as the non-infarcted myocardium and the area of prolonged T/sub 2/ relaxation time compared with that of non-infarcted myocardium. MRI demonstrated diffusely thick myocardium in all patients with HCM. T/sub 2/ relaxation time of the areas of HCM was almost the same as that of normal myocardium, and it's difference among each ventricular wall in patients with HCM was not statistically significant. The authors conclude that ECG gated NMR-CT offers 3-D morphological information of the heart without any contrast material nor radioisotopes. ECG gated MRI provides the useful informations to diagnose MI, especially in the differential diagnosis between old and recent MI.

  19. Pore geometry information via pulsed field gradient NMR.

    PubMed

    Lucas, A J; Gibbs, S J; Peyron, M; Pierens, G K; Hall, L D; Stewart, R C; Phelps, D W

    1994-01-01

    Studies of echo attenuation at long diffusion times in pulsed field gradient NMR experiments on a variety of rock core samples are interpreted in the light of recent theoretical analysis of the effect of pore geometry and surface relaxation. This study is motivated by the need to test the applicability of that theory to real rock systems.

  20. NMR Microscopy - Micron-Level Resolution.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwok, Wing-Chi Edmund

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has been developed into a powerful and widely used diagnostic tool since the invention of techniques using linear magnetic field gradients in 1973. The variety of imaging contrasts obtainable in MRI, such as spin density, relaxation times and flow rate, gives MRI a significant advantage over other imaging techniques. For common diagnostic applications, image resolutions have been in the order of millimeters with slice thicknesses in centimeters. For many research applications, however, resolutions in the order of tens of microns or smaller are needed. NMR Imaging in these high resolution disciplines is known as NMR microscopy. Compared with conventional microscopy, NMR microscopy has the advantage of being non-invasive and non-destructive. The major obstacles of NMR microscopy are low signal-to-noise ratio and effects due to spin diffusion. To overcome these difficulties, more sensitive RF probes and very high magnetic field gradients have to be used. The most effective way to increase sensitivity is to build smaller probes. Microscope probes of different designs have been built and evaluated. Magnetic field gradient coils that can produce linear field gradients up to 450 Gauss/cm were also assembled. In addition, since microscope probes often employ remote capacitors for RF tuning, the associated signal loss in the transmission line was studied. Imaging experiments have been carried out in a 2.1 Tesla small bore superconducting magnet using the typical two-dimensional spin warp imaging technique. Images have been acquired for both biological and non-biological samples. The highest resolution was obtained in an image of a nerve bundle from the spinal cord of a racoon and has an in-plane resolution of 4 microns. These experiments have demonstrated the potential application of NMR microscopy to pathological research, nervous system study and non -destructive testings of materials. One way to further improve NMR microscopy is

  1. Structural characterization, thermal, dielectric, vibrational properties and molecular motions in [C{sub 3}N{sub 2}H{sub 5}]{sub 6}[Bi{sub 4}Br{sub 18}

    SciTech Connect

    Piecha, A.; Jakubas, R.; Pietraszko, A.; Baran, J.; Medycki, W.; Kruk, D.

    2009-11-15

    [C{sub 3}N{sub 2}H{sub 5}]{sub 6}[Bi{sub 4}Br{sub 18}] has been synthesized and characterized by the X-ray (at 293 and 110 K), calorimetric, dilatometric and dielectric measurements. At room temperature it crystallizes in the monoclinic space group, C2/m. A crystal structure consists of disordered imidazolium cations and ordered discrete tetramers of [Bi{sub 4}Br{sub 18}]{sup 6-}. This compound reveals a rich polymorphism in a solid state. It undergoes three solid-solid phase transitions: from phase I to II at 426/423 K (heating-cooling), II->III at 227 K and III->IV at 219.5/219 K. A clear dielectric relaxation process is found in the room temperature phase II. Infrared studies of the polycrystalline [C{sub 3}N{sub 2}H{sub 5}]{sub 6}[Bi{sub 4}Br{sub 18}] showed that the nu(N-H), delta(ring) and delta(C-H) modes of the imidazolium cations appeared to be very sensitive to the IV->III phase transition. {sup 1}H NMR measurements confirmed a key role of the imidazolium cations in the phase transitions mechanisms at low temperatures. - [C{sub 3}N{sub 2}H{sub 5}]{sub 6}[Bi{sub 4}Br{sub 18}] has been synthesized and characterized by the X-ray (at 293 and 110 K), calorimetric, dilatometric and dielectric measurements. A crystal structure consists of disordered imidazolium cations and ordered discrete tetramers of [Bi{sub 4}Br{sub 18}]{sup 6-}.

  2. Rate Coefficients of C2H with C2H4, C2H6, and H2 from 150 to 359 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opansky, Brian J.; Leone, Stephen R.

    1996-01-01

    Rate coefficients for the reactions C2H with C2H4, C2H6, and H2 are measured over the temperature range 150-359 K using transient infrared laser absorption spectroscopy. The ethynyl radical is formed by photolysis of C2H2 with a pulsed excimer laser at 193 nm, and its transient absorption is monitored with a color center laser on the Q(sub 11)(9) line of the A(sup 2) Pi-Chi(sup 2) Sigma transition at 3593.68 cm(exp -1). Over the experimental temperature range 150-359 K the rate constants of C2H with C2H4, C2H6, and H2 can be fitted to the Arrhenius expressions k(sub C2H4) = (7.8 +/- 0.6) x 10(exp -11) exp[(134 +/- 44)/T], k(sub C2H6) = (3.5 +/- 0.3) x 10(exp -11) exp[(2.9 +/- 16)/T], and k(sub H2) = (1.2 +/- 0.3) x 10(exp -11) exp[(-998 +/- 57)]/T cm(exp 3) molecule(exp -1) sec(exp -1). The data for C2H with C2H4 and C2H6 indicate a negligible activation energy to product formation shown by the mild negative temperature dependence of both reactions. When the H2 data are plotted together with the most recent high-temperature results from 295 to 854 K, a slight curvature is observed. The H2 data can be fit to the non-Arrhenius form k(sub H2) = 9.2 x 10(exp -18) T(sup 2.17 +/- 0.50) exp[(-478 +/- 165)/T] cm(exp 3) molecules(exp -1) sec(exp -1). The curvature in the Arrhenius plot is discussed in terms of both quantum mechanical tunneling of the H atom from H2 to the C2H radical and bending mode contributions to the partition function.

  3. [Main relaxation techniques].

    PubMed

    Mateos Rodilla, Juana

    2002-11-01

    After having provided a detailed explanation on what relaxation consists of (see Rev. Rol Enf 2002; 25(9):582-586), the author presents a recap of the major known relaxation techniques including progressive muscular therapy, yoga stretching exercises, breathing techniques, therapeutic massages, meditation,... emphasizing the theoretical basis and practical experience as a function of each technique; each person ought to adopt those techniques which are most appropriate.

  4. An XPS investigation of the interaction of CH 4, C 2H 2, C 2H 4 and C 2H 6 with a barium surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhoeven, J. A. Th.; Van Doveren, H.

    1982-12-01

    The generation and pumping of hydrocarbon gases by a barium getter layer in electronic vacuum devices has been investigated by characterizing a barium film in an ultra high vacuum equipment by means of XPS before, during and after exposures to respectively CH 4, C 2H 2, C 2H 4 and C 2H 6. The reaction conditions (temperatures and pretreatment of the surface, background pressure and exposure doses) closely resemble those in electronic vacuum devices. The probability that a barium layer will react with CH 4 and C 2H 6 was below the detection limit. C 2H 2 and C 2H 4 give rise to the formation of barium carbide compounds and with a high reaction probability. In addition, the interaction with C 2H 2 reveals the formation of carbon-containing surface complexes. Investigations by means of XPS on the C Is spectral features show the presence of at least two groups of carbon-containing surface complexes, which behave differently in response to moderate heating and to an exposure to water vapour. In cases where oxygen is present at the surface, oxygen-containing (hydro) carbon adsorbates are present too. XPS observations of the behaviour of these surface complexes show similarities with reaction steps in the mechanisms proposed for the hydrogenation of CO in the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis of hydrocarbons. Low-pressure hydrogenation of these adsorbates containing hydrocarbons and oxygen can led to the formation of hydrocarbon gases in electronic vacuum devices.

  5. Quantitation of methadone enantiomers in humans using stable isotope-labeled (2H3)-, (2H5)-, and (2H8)Methadone

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, K.; Hachey, D.L.; Kreek, M.J.; Irving, C.S.; Klein, P.D.

    1982-01-01

    A new technique for simultaneous stereoselective kinetic studies of methadone enantiomers was developed using three deuterium-labeled forms of methadone and GLC-chemical-ionization mass spectrometry. A racemic mixture (1:1) of (R)-(-)-(2H5)methadone (l-form) and (S)-(R)-(2H3)methadone (d-form) was administered orally in place of a single daily dose of unlabeled (+/-)-(2H0)methadone in long-term maintenance patients. Racemic (+/-)-(2H8)methadone was used as an internal standard for the simultaneous quantitation of (2H0)-, (2H3)-, and (2H5)methadone in plasma and urine. A newly developed extraction procedure, using a short, disposable C18 reversed-phase cartridge and improved chemical-ionization procedures employing ammonia gas, resulted in significant reduction of the background impurities contributing to the ions used for isotopic abundance measurements. These improvements enabled the measurement of labeled plasma methadone levels for 120 hr following a single dose. This methodology was applied to the study of methadone kinetics in two patients; in both patients, the analgesically active l-enantiomer of the drug had a longer plasma elimination half-life and a smaller area under the plasma disappearance curve than did the inactive d-form.

  6. NMR CHARACTERIZATIONS OF PROPERTIES OF HETEROGENEOUS MEDIA

    SciTech Connect

    C.T. Philip Chang; Changho Choi; Jeromy T. Hollenshead; Rudi Michalak; Jack Phan; Ramon Saavedra; John C. Slattery; Jinsoo Uh; Randi Valestrand; A. Ted Watson; Song Xue

    2005-01-01

    A critical and long-standing need within the petroleum industry is the specification of suitable petrophysical properties for mathematical simulation of fluid flow in petroleum reservoirs (i.e., reservoir characterization). The development of accurate reservoir characterizations is extremely challenging. Property variations may be described on many scales, and the information available from measurements reflect different scales. In fact, experiments on laboratory core samples, well-log data, well-test data, and reservoir-production data all represent information potentially valuable to reservoir characterization, yet they all reflect information about spatial variations of properties at different scales. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) provide enormous potential for developing new descriptions and understandings of heterogeneous media. NMR has the rare capability to probe permeable media non-invasively, with spatial resolution, and it provides unique information about molecular motions and interactions that are sensitive to morphology. NMR well-logging provides the best opportunity ever to resolve permeability distributions within petroleum reservoirs. We develop MRI methods to determine, for the first time, spatially resolved distributions of porosity and permeability within permeable media samples that approach the intrinsic scale: the finest resolution of these macroscopic properties possible. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the permeability is actually resolved at a scale smaller than the sample. In order to do this, we have developed a robust method to determine of relaxation distributions from NMR experiments and a novel implementation and analysis of MRI experiments to determine the amount of fluid corresponding to imaging regions, which are in turn used to determine porosity and saturation distributions. We have developed a novel MRI experiment to determine velocity distributions within flowing experiments, and

  7. Advanced NMR-based techniques for pore structure analysis of coal. Quarterly report No. 7, April 1, 1993--June 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.

    1993-09-01

    One of the main problems in coal utilization is the inability to properly characterize its complex pore structure. Coals typically have micro/ultramicro pores but they also exhibit meso and macroporosity. Conventional pore size techniques (adsorption/condensation, mercury porosimetry) are limited because of this broad pore size range, microporosity, reactive nature of coal, samples must be completely dried, and network/percolation effects. Small angle scattering is limited because it probes both open and closed pores. Although one would not expect any single technique to provide a satisfactory description of a coal`s structure, it is apparent that better techniques are necessary. Small angle scattering could be improved by combining scattering and adsorption measurements. Also, the measurement of NMR parameters of various gas phase and adsorbed phase NMR active probes can provide pore structure information. We will investigate the dependence of the common NMR parameters such as chemical shifts and relaxation times of several different nuclei and compounds on the pore structure of model microporous solids, carbons, and coals. In particular, we will study the interaction between several small molecules ({sup 129}Xe, {sup 3}He, {sup 2}H{sub 2},{sup 14}N{sub 2}, {sup 14}NH{sub 3}, {sup 15}N{sub 2},{sup 13}CH{sub 4}, {sup 13}CO{sub 2}) and the pore surfaces in coals.

  8. Advanced NMR-based techniques for pore structure analysis of coal. Quarterly report No. 6, January 1, 1993--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.

    1993-08-01

    One of the main problems in coal utilization is the inability to properly characterize its complex pore structure. Coals typically have micro/ultra-micro pores but they also exhibit meso and macroporosity. Conventional pore size techniques (adsorption/condensation, mercury porosimetry) are limited because of this broad pore size range, microporosity, reactive nature of coal, samples must be completely dried, and network/percolation effects. Small angle scattering is limited because it probes both open and closed pores. Although one would not expect any single technique to provide a satisfactory description of a coal`s structure, it is apparent that better techniques are necessary. Small angle scattering could be improved by combining scattering and adsorption measurements. Also, the measurement of NMR parameters of various gas phase and adsorbed phase NMR active probes can provide pore structure information. We will investigate the dependence of the common NMR parameters such as chemical shifts and relaxation times of several different nuclei and compounds on the pore structure of model microporous solids, carbons, and coals. In particular, we will study the interaction between several small molecules ({sup 129}Xe, {sup 3}He, {sup 2}H{sub 2}, {sup 14}N{sub 2},{sup 14}NH{sub 3}, {sup 15}N{sup 2}, {sup 13}CH{sub 4}, {sup 13}CO{sub 2}) and the pore surfaces in coals.

  9. Solid-state NMR investigations of peptide-lipid interactions of the transmembrane domain of a plant-derived protein, Hcf106.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Liu, Lishan; Maltsev, Sergey; Lorigan, Gary A; Dabney-Smith, Carole

    2013-01-01

    The chloroplast twin arginine translocation system transports highly folded precursor proteins across the thylakoid using the protonmotive force as its only energy source. Hcf106 and another thylakoid protein, cpTatC compose the precursor receptor complex. Hcf106 is predicted to contain a single amino terminal transmembrane domain (TMD) followed by a Pro-Gly hinge, an amphipathic α-helix, and a loosely structured carboxyl terminus. Hcf106 has been shown biochemically to insert spontaneously into thylakoid membranes; however, how this occurs is not understood. To investigate how Hcf106 inserts itself into the membrane unassisted, solid-state NMR spectroscopy was used to investigate the membrane activity of the TMD. A synthetic peptide of the Hcf106 TMD was incorporated into multilamellar vesicles made of 100% 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-phosphocholine (POPC) or 85%:15% ratio with monogalactosyl diacylglycerol (POPC/MGDG) to probe peptide-lipid interaction. Solid-state (31)P NMR and (2)H NMR spectroscopic techniques were used to reveal peptide perturbations of the phospholipid membranes. Changes in spectral lineshape, chemical shift anisotropy width, (31)P T1 relaxation time and SCD order parameters demonstrated that the Hcf106 TMD peptide interacted with the phospholipids. Furthermore, the comparison between POPC and POPC/MGDG multilamellar vesicles indicated that lipid bilayer composition affected the peptide-lipid interaction with the peptide interacting preferentially with vesicles that more closely mimic the thylakoid.

  10. Whole-core analysis by sup 13 C NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H.J.; Tutunjian, P.N. ); Edelstein, W.A.; Roemer, P.B. )

    1991-06-01

    This paper reports on a whole-core nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) system that was used to obtain natural abundance {sup 13}C spectra. The system enables rapid, nondestructive measurements of bulk volume of movable oil, aliphatic/aromatic ratio, oil viscosity, and organic vs. carbonate carbon. {sup 13}C NMR can be used in cores where the {sup 1}H NMR spectrum is too broad to resolve oil and water resonances separately. A 5 1/4-in. {sup 13}C/{sup 1}H NMR coil was installed on a General Electric (GE) CSI-2T NMR imager/spectrometer. With a 4-in.-OD whole core, good {sup 13}C signal/noise ratio (SNR) is obtained within minutes, while {sup 1}H spectra are obtained in seconds. NMR measurements have been made of the {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H density of crude oils with a wide range of API gravities. For light- and medium-gravity oils, the {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H signal per unit volume is constant within about 3.5%. For heavy crudes, the {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H density measured by NMR is reduced by the shortening of spin-spin relaxation time. {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H NMR spin-lattice relaxation times were measured on a suite of Cannon viscosity standards, crude oils (4 to 60{degrees} API), and alkanes (C{sub 5} through C{sub 16}) with viscosities at 77{degrees}F ranging from 0.5 cp to 2.5 {times} 10{sup 7} cp. The {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H relaxation times show a similar correlation with viscosity from which oil viscosity can be estimated accurately for viscosities up to 100 cp. The {sup 13}C surface relaxation rate for oils on water-wet rocks is very low. Nonproton decoupled {sup 13}C NMR is shown to be insensitive to kerogen; thus, {sup 13}C NMR measures only the movable hydrocarbon content of the cores. In carbonates, the {sup 13}C spectrum also contains a carbonate powder pattern useful in quantifying inorganic carbon and distinguishing organic from carbonate carbon.

  11. Advanced NMR-based techniques for pore structure analysis of coal. Quarterly report No. 1, September 1, 1991--November 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.

    1991-12-31

    One of the main problems in coal utilization is the inability to properly characterize its complex pore structure. We propose to investigate the dependence of the common NMR parameters such as chemical shifts and relaxation times of several different nuclei and compounds on the pore structure of model microporous solids, carbons, and coals. In particular, we will study the interaction between several small molecules ({sup 129}Xe, {sup 3}He, {sup 2}H{sub 2}, {sup 14}N{sub 2}, {sup 14}NH{sub 3}, {sup 15}N{sub 2}, {sup 13}CH{sub 4}, {sup 13}CO{sub 2}) and the pore surfaces in coals. These molecules have been selected for their chemical and physical properties.

  12. High resolution deuterium NMR studies of bacterial metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Aguayo, J.B.; Gamcsik, M.P.; Dick, J.D.

    1988-12-25

    High resolution deuterium NMR spectra were obtained from suspensions of five bacterial strains: Escherichia coli, Clostridium perfringens, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, and Staphylococcus aureus. Deuterium-labeled D-glucose at C-1, C-2, and C-6 was used to monitor dynamically anaerobic metabolism. The flux of glucose through the various bacterial metabolic pathways could be determined by following the disappearance of glucose and the appearance of the major end products in the 2H NMR spectrum. The presence of both labeled and unlabeled metabolites could be detected using 1H NMR spectroscopy since the proton resonances in the labeled species are shifted upfield due to an isotopic chemical shift effect. The 1H-1H scalar coupling observed in both the 2H and 1H NMR spectra was used to assign definitively the resonances of labeled species. An increase in the intensity of natural abundance deuterium signal of water can be used to monitor pathways in which a deuteron is lost from the labeled metabolite. The steps in which label loss can occur are outlined, and the influence these processes have on the ability of 2H NMR spectroscopy to monitor metabolism are assessed.

  13. An introduction to NMR-based approaches for measuring protein dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Kleckner, Ian R; Foster, Mark P

    2010-01-01

    Proteins are inherently flexible at ambient temperature. At equilibrium, they are characterized by a set of conformations that undergo continuous exchange within a hierarchy of spatial and temporal scales ranging from nanometers to micrometers and femtoseconds to hours. Dynamic properties of proteins are essential for describing the structural bases of their biological functions including catalysis, binding, regulation and cellular structure. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy represents a powerful technique for measuring these essential features of proteins. Here we provide an introduction to NMR-based approaches for studying protein dynamics, highlighting eight distinct methods with recent examples, contextualized within a common experimental and analytical framework. The selected methods are (1) Real-time NMR, (2) Exchange spectroscopy, (3) Lineshape analysis, (4) CPMG relaxation dispersion, (5) Rotating frame relaxation dispersion, (6) Nuclear spin relaxation, (7) Residual dipolar coupling, (8) Paramagnetic relaxation enhancement. PMID:21059410

  14. Solid state 13C NMR investigation of impact of annealing in lyophilized glasses.

    PubMed

    Luthra, Suman A; Pikal, Michael J; Utz, Marcel

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of annealing on molecular mobility in lyophilized glasses, composed of a saccharide excipient and a small concentration of aspartame as a model "drug." Changes in molecular dynamics during annealing were monitored through carbon ((13)C) T(1) and T(1 rho) nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation times of the aspartame and the saccharides. Two different saccharides were studied, sucrose and trehalose. The local mobility of the aspartame guest was found to correlate closely with the overall structural relaxation monitored through calorimetric methods in the aspartame: sucrose formulation. In general terms, annealing leads to longer NMR relaxation times, indicating a slowing of the local dynamics. By contrast, annealing had only a minimal effect on the NMR relaxation times in aspartame: trehalose. Specificity of solid state NMR in detecting molecular mobility in guest and host molecules showed that sucrose provided a homogenous matrix for the guest drug as compared to the trehalose.

  15. Synthesis Of [2h, 13c]M [2h2m 13c], And [2h3,, 13c] Methyl Aryl Sulfones And Sulfoxides

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Alvarez, Marc A.; Silks, III, Louis A.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Schmidt, Jurgen G.

    2004-07-20

    The present invention is directed to labeled compounds, [.sup.2 H.sub.1, .sup.13 C], [.sup.2 H.sub.2, .sup.13 C] and [.sup.2 H.sub.3, .sup.13 C]methyl aryl sulfones and [.sup.2 H.sub.1, .sup.13 C], [.sup.2 H.sub.2, .sup.13 C] and [.sup.2 H.sub.3, .sup.13 C]methyl aryl sulfoxides, wherein the .sup.13 C methyl group attached to the sulfur of the sulfone or sulfoxide includes exactly one, two or three deuterium atoms and the aryl group is selected from the group consisting of 1-naphthyl, substituted 1-naphthyl, 2-naphthyl, substituted 2-naphthyl, and phenyl groups with the structure: ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4 and R.sub.5 are each independently, hydrogen, a C.sub.1 -C.sub.4 lower alkyl, a halogen, an amino group from the group consisting of NH.sub.2, NHR and NRR' where R and R' are each a C.sub.1 -C.sub.4 lower alkyl, a phenyl, or an alkoxy group. The present invention is also directed to processes of preparing methyl aryl sulfones and methyl aryl sulfoxides.

  16. Rapid measurement of multidimensional 1H solid-state NMR spectra at ultra-fast MAS frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Yue Qi; Malon, Michal; Martineau, Charlotte; Taulelle, Francis; Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2014-02-01

    A novel method to realize rapid repetition of 1H NMR experiments at ultra-fast MAS frequencies is demonstrated. The ultra-fast MAS at 110 kHz slows the 1H-1H spin diffusion, leading to variations of 1H T1 relaxation times from atom to atom within a molecule. The different relaxation behavior is averaged by applying 1H-1H recoupling during relaxation delay even at ultra-fast MAS, reducing the optimal relaxation delay to maximize the signal to noise ratio. The way to determine optimal relaxation delay for arbitrary relaxation curve is shown. The reduction of optimal relaxation delay by radio-frequency driven recoupling (RFDR) was demonstrated on powder samples of glycine and ethenzamide with one and multi-dimensional NMR measurements.

  17. Ligand-induced substrate steering and reshaping of [Ag2(H)](+) scaffold for selective CO2 extrusion from formic acid.

    PubMed

    Zavras, Athanasios; Khairallah, George N; Krstić, Marjan; Girod, Marion; Daly, Steven; Antoine, Rodolphe; Maitre, Philippe; Mulder, Roger J; Alexander, Stefanie-Ann; Bonačić-Koutecký, Vlasta; Dugourd, Philippe; O'Hair, Richard A J

    2016-01-01

    Metalloenzymes preorganize the reaction environment to steer substrate(s) along the required reaction coordinate. Here, we show that phosphine ligands selectively facilitate protonation of binuclear silver hydride cations, [LAg2(H)](+) by optimizing the geometry of the active site. This is a key step in the selective, catalysed extrusion of carbon dioxide from formic acid, HO2CH, with important applications (for example, hydrogen storage). Gas-phase ion-molecule reactions, collision-induced dissociation (CID), infrared and ultraviolet action spectroscopy and computational chemistry link structure to reactivity and mechanism. [Ag2(H)](+) and [Ph3PAg2(H)](+) react with formic acid yielding Lewis adducts, while [(Ph3P)2Ag2(H)](+) is unreactive. Using bis(diphenylphosphino)methane (dppm) reshapes the geometry of the binuclear Ag2(H)(+) scaffold, triggering reactivity towards formic acid, to produce [dppmAg2(O2CH)](+) and H2. Decarboxylation of [dppmAg2(O2CH)](+) via CID regenerates [dppmAg2(H)](+). These gas-phase insights inspired variable temperature NMR studies that show CO2 and H2 production at 70 °C from solutions containing dppm, AgBF4, NaO2CH and HO2CH. PMID:27265868

  18. Ligand-induced substrate steering and reshaping of [Ag2(H)]+ scaffold for selective CO2 extrusion from formic acid

    PubMed Central

    Zavras, Athanasios; Khairallah, George N.; Krstić, Marjan; Girod, Marion; Daly, Steven; Antoine, Rodolphe; Maitre, Philippe; Mulder, Roger J.; Alexander, Stefanie-Ann; Bonačić-Koutecký, Vlasta; Dugourd, Philippe; O'Hair, Richard A. J.

    2016-01-01

    Metalloenzymes preorganize the reaction environment to steer substrate(s) along the required reaction coordinate. Here, we show that phosphine ligands selectively facilitate protonation of binuclear silver hydride cations, [LAg2(H)]+ by optimizing the geometry of the active site. This is a key step in the selective, catalysed extrusion of carbon dioxide from formic acid, HO2CH, with important applications (for example, hydrogen storage). Gas-phase ion-molecule reactions, collision-induced dissociation (CID), infrared and ultraviolet action spectroscopy and computational chemistry link structure to reactivity and mechanism. [Ag2(H)]+ and [Ph3PAg2(H)]+ react with formic acid yielding Lewis adducts, while [(Ph3P)2Ag2(H)]+ is unreactive. Using bis(diphenylphosphino)methane (dppm) reshapes the geometry of the binuclear Ag2(H)+ scaffold, triggering reactivity towards formic acid, to produce [dppmAg2(O2CH)]+ and H2. Decarboxylation of [dppmAg2(O2CH)]+ via CID regenerates [dppmAg2(H)]+. These gas-phase insights inspired variable temperature NMR studies that show CO2 and H2 production at 70 °C from solutions containing dppm, AgBF4, NaO2CH and HO2CH. PMID:27265868

  19. Osmium(IV) complexes with 1H- and 2H-indazoles: tautomer identity versus spectroscopic properties and antiproliferative activity.

    PubMed

    Büchel, Gabriel E; Stepanenko, Iryna N; Hejl, Michaela; Jakupec, Michael A; Keppler, Bernhard K; Heffeter, Petra; Berger, Walter; Arion, Vladimir B

    2012-08-01

    A one-pot synthesis of osmium(IV) complexes with two different tautomers of indazole, 1H-indazole and 2H-indazole, namely (H(2)ind)[Os(IV)Cl(5)(2H-ind)] (1) and (H(2)ind)[Os(IV)Cl(5)(1H-ind)] (2) is reported. Both compounds have been comprehensively characterized by NMR spectroscopy, ESI (electrospray ionization) mass spectrometry, electronic absorption spectroscopy, IR spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and tested for antiproliferative activity in vitro in three human cancer cell lines, CH1 (ovarian carcinoma), A549 (non-small cell lung cancer) and SW480 (colon carcinoma), as well as in vivo in a Hep3B SCID mouse xeno-transplantation model. 2H-Indazole tautomer stabilization in 1 has been confirmed by X-ray diffraction.

  20. Osmium(IV) complexes with 1H- and 2H-indazoles: Tautomer identity versus spectroscopic properties and antiproliferative activity

    PubMed Central

    Büchel, Gabriel E.; Stepanenko, Iryna N.; Hejl, Michaela; Jakupec, Michael A.; Keppler, Bernhard K.; Heffeter, Petra; Berger, Walter; Arion, Vladimir B.

    2012-01-01

    A one-pot synthesis of osmium(IV) complexes with two different tautomers of indazole, 1H-indazole and 2H-indazole, namely (H2ind)[OsIVCl5(2H-ind)] (1) and (H2ind)[OsIVCl5(1H-ind)] (2) is reported. Both compounds have been comprehensively characterized by NMR spectroscopy, ESI (electrospray ionization) mass spectrometry, electronic absorption spectroscopy, IR spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and tested for antiproliferative activity in vitro in three human cancer cell lines, CH1 (ovarian carcinoma), A549 (non-small cell lung cancer) and SW480 (colon carcinoma), as well as in vivo in a Hep3B SCID mouse xeno-transplantation model. 2H-Indazole tautomer stabilization in 1 has been confirmed by X-ray diffraction. PMID:22687494

  1. Some nitrogen-14 NMR studies in solids

    SciTech Connect

    Pratum, T.K.

    1983-11-01

    The first order quadrupolar perturbation of the /sup 14/N NMR spectrum yields information regarding the static and dynamic properties of the surrounding electronic environment. Signal to noise problems caused by long /sup 14/N longitudinal relaxation times (T/sub 1/) and small equilibrium polarizations are reduced by rotating frame cross polarization (CP) experiments between /sup 14/N and /sup 1/H. Using quadrupolar echo and CP techniques, the /sup 14/N quadrupolar coupling constants (e/sup 2/qQ/h) and asymmetry parameters (eta) have been obtained for a variety of tetraalkylammonium compounds by observation of their quadrupolar powder patterns at various temperatures. For choline chloride and iodide the /sup 14/N NMR powder patterns exhibit the effects of anisotropic molecular motion, while choline bromide spectra show no such effects.

  2. Lectures on pulsed NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Pines, A.

    1986-09-01

    These lectures discuss some recent developments in pulsed NMR, emphasizing fundamental principles with selected illustrative applications. Major topics covered include multiple-quantum spectroscopy, spin decoupling, the interaction of spins with a quantized field, adiabatic rapid passage, spin temperature and statistics of cross-polarization, coherent averaging, and zero field NMR. 55 figs.

  3. Lectures on pulsed NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Pines, A.

    1988-08-01

    These lectures discuss some recent developments in pulsed NMR, emphasizing fundamental principles with selected illustrative applications. Major topics covered include multiple-quantum spectroscopy, spin decoupling, the interaction of spins with a quantized field, adiabatic rapid passage, spin temperature and statistics of cross-polarization, coherent averaging, and zero field NMR. 32 refs., 56 figs.

  4. NMR logging apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Walsh, David O; Turner, Peter

    2014-05-27

    Technologies including NMR logging apparatus and methods are disclosed. Example NMR logging apparatus may include surface instrumentation and one or more downhole probes configured to fit within an earth borehole. The surface instrumentation may comprise a power amplifier, which may be coupled to the downhole probes via one or more transmission lines, and a controller configured to cause the power amplifier to generate a NMR activating pulse or sequence of pulses. Impedance matching means may be configured to match an output impedance of the power amplifier through a transmission line to a load impedance of a downhole probe. Methods may include deploying the various elements of disclosed NMR logging apparatus and using the apparatus to perform NMR measurements.

  5. NMR studies of metalloproteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongyan; Sun, Hongzhe

    2012-01-01

    Metalloproteins represent a large share of the proteomes, with the intrinsic metal ions providing catalytic, regulatory, and structural roles critical to protein functions. Structural characterization of metalloproteins and identification of metal coordination features including numbers and types of ligands and metal-ligand geometry, and mapping the structural and dynamic changes upon metal binding are significant for understanding biological functions of metalloproteins. NMR spectroscopy has long been used as an invaluable tool for structure and dynamic studies of macromolecules. Here we focus on the application of NMR spectroscopy in characterization of metalloproteins, including structural studies and identification of metal coordination spheres by hetero-/homo-nuclear metal NMR spectroscopy. Paramagnetic NMR as well as (13)C directly detected protonless NMR spectroscopy will also be addressed for application to paramagnetic metalloproteins. Moreover, these techniques offer great potential for studies of other non-metal binding macromolecules.

  6. NMR applications to low porosity carbonate stones.

    PubMed

    Alesiani, M; Capuani, S; Maraviglia, B

    2003-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate NMR applications to porous materials widely employed in artistic and historical monuments and largely studied in the Cultural Heritage conservation field. Carrara marble, Candoglia marble and travertine samples were studied and data from relaxation times measurements were compared. Very interesting results from treated samples are reported and explained under the structure related spin lattice relaxation time point of view. Images of Carrara marble aged sample (XIX century), coming from the Florence Cathedral obtained for short absorption time of water by capillary rise and for relatively small thickness slices together show the fluid's spatial distribution within the stone. Comparative images showing untreated sample with the treated ones were obtained suggesting very useful applications for the determination of treatment effectiveness. PMID:14559345

  7. A NMR characterisation of a banded sandstone.

    PubMed

    Bolam, A C; Packer, K J

    1998-01-01

    1H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements have been carried out on a banded sandstone to investigate the effects of structural inhomogeneities on the fluid dynamics of the sample as a whole. The results obtained from average propagator measurements (the probability of a displacement z in a time delta or P delta (z)) using pulsed-field-gradient techniques have been compared to those obtained from a study of a homogeneous sandstone. Relaxation has been used to derive the pore sizes for the differing bands and have been found to correlate with flow velocities within the bands.

  8. NMR methods in combinatorial chemistry.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, M J; Wareing, J R

    1998-06-01

    The use of NMR spectroscopy in combinatorial chemistry has provided a versatile tool for monitoring combinatorial chemistry reactions and for assessing ligand-receptor interactions. The application of magic angle spinning NMR is widespread and has allowed structure determination to be performed on compounds attached to solid supports. A variety of two-dimensional NMR techniques have been applied to enhance the usability of the magic angle spinning NMR data. New developments for solution NMR analysis include high performance liquid chromatography, NMR, mass spectroscopy and flow NMR. NMR based methods currently being investigated may prove valuable as compound screening tools.

  9. DFT 2H quadrupolar coupling constants of ruthenium complexes: a good probe of the coordination of hydrides in conjuction with experiments.

    PubMed

    del Rosal, Iker; Gutmann, Torsten; Maron, Laurent; Jolibois, Franck; Chaudret, Bruno; Walaszek, Bernadeta; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich; Poteau, Romuald; Buntkowsky, Gerd

    2009-07-21

    Transition metal (TM) hydrides are of great interest in chemistry because of their reactivity and their potential as catalysts for hydrogenation reactions. 2H solid-state NMR can be used in order to get information about the local environment of hydrogen atoms, and more particularly the coordination mode of hydrides in such complexes. In this work we will show that it is possible to establish at the level of density functional theory (DFT) a viable methodological strategy that allows the determination of 2H NMR parameters, namely the quadrupolar coupling constant (C(Q)) respectively the quadrupolar splitting (deltanuQ) and the asymmetry parameter (etaQ). The reliability of the method (B3PW91-DFT) and basis set effects have been first evaluated for simple organic compounds (benzene and fluorene). A good correlation between experimental and theoretical values is systematically obtained if the large basis set cc-pVTZ is used for the computations. 2H NMR properties of five mononuclear ruthenium complexes (namely Cp*RuD3(PPh3), Tp*RuD(THT)2, Tp*RuD(D2)(THT) and Tp*RuD(D2)2 and RuD2(D2)2(PCy3)2) which exhibit different ligands and hydrides involved in different coordination modes (terminal-H or eta2-H2), have been calculated and compared to previous experimental data. The results obtained are in excellent agreement with experiments. Although 2H NMR spectra are not always easy to analyze, assistance by quantum chemistry calculations allows unambiguous assignment of the signals of such spectra. As far as experiments can be achieved at very low temperatures in order to avoid dynamic effects, this hybrid theoretical/experimental tool may give useful insights in the context of the characterization of ruthenium surfaces or nanoparticles with solid-state NMR. PMID:19842483

  10. BOOK REVIEW: NMR Imaging of Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blümich, Bernhard

    2003-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of materials is a field of increasing importance. Applications extend from fundamental science like the characterization of fluid transport in porous rock, catalyst pellets and hemodialysers into various fields of engineering for process optimization and product quality control. While the results of MRI imaging are being appreciated by a growing community, the methods of imaging are far more diverse for materials applications than for medical imaging of human beings. Blümich has delivered the first book in this field. It was published in hardback three years ago and is now offered as a paperback for nearly half the price. The text provides an introduction to MRI imaging of materials covering solid-state NMR spectroscopy, imaging methods for liquid and solid samples, and unusual MRI in terms of specialized approaches to spatial resolution such as an MRI surface scanner. The book represents an excellent and thorough treatment which will help to grow research in materials MRI. Blümich developed the treatise over many years for his research students, graduates in chemistry, physics and engineering. But it may also be useful for medical students looking for a less formal discussion of solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The structure of this book is easy to perceive. The first three chapters cover an introduction, the fundamentals and methods of solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The book starts at the ground level where no previous knowledge about NMR is assumed. Chapter 4 discusses a wide variety of transformations beyond the Fourier transformation. In particular, the Hadamard transformation and the 'wavelet' transformation are missing from most related books. This chapter also includes a description of noise-correlation spectroscopy, which promises the imaging of large objects without the need for extremely powerful radio-frequency transmitters. Chapters 5 and 6 cover basic imaging methods. The following chapter about the use of relaxation and

  11. Thermodynamics and 2H NMR study on the insertion of small quinones into a discotic nematic lyotropic liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Bahamonde-Padilla, Víctor Eduardo; López-Cascales, José Javier; Araya-Maturana, Ramiro; Martínez-Cifuentes, Maximiliano; Weiss López, Boris Enrique

    2014-05-19

    A detailed description of the distribution, interaction, and dynamics of molecules with biological activity dissolved in a hydrophobic bilayer, a simple model of a biological membrane, provides valuable information for a better understanding of drug functioning, which can be very useful in drug design. Here we present an (2)H NMR and molecular dynamics study on the insertion, distribution, interactions, and thermodynamics of two biologically active molecules, 9,10-dihydroxy-4,4-dimethyl-1,4,5,8-tetrahydroanthracen-1-one (HQ), with anticancer activity, and 4,4-dimethyl-1,4,5,8,9,10-hexahydroanthracen-1,9,10-trione (Q) a fungicide, dissolved in a nematic discotic lyotropic liquid crystal (ndllc) composed of sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS), decanol (DecOH) and Na2 SO4 in water. (2)H NMR quadrupole splittings (ΔνQ ) and longitudinal relaxation times (T1) from HQ-d6, Q-d4, DecOH-α-d2, partially deuterated water, and SDS-d25 were measured and several molecular dynamics trajectories were also calculated. In particular, ΔG, ΔH, and ΔS profiles for the process of both molecules crossing the bilayer were estimated. It was evidenced that the insertion of both molecules into the aggregate is a spontaneous process, and the molecules are mainly distributed in the internal side of the interface. Addition of HQ or Q decreased the mobility of all aggregate components, but this effect was more pronounced for HQ. The rotational correlation time of Q allowed an estimate of 5.3 cP for the microviscosity inside the ndllc aggregate, in the order of previously measured values in similar environments. Both guest molecules display similar free-energy profiles for the process of crossing the bilayer, with a calculated barrier height of 25 and 36 kJ mol(-1) for HQ and Q, respectively.

  12. NMR shielding calculations across the periodic table: diamagnetic uranium compounds. 2. Ligand and metal NMR.

    PubMed

    Schreckenbach, Georg

    2002-12-16

    In this and a previous article (J. Phys. Chem. A 2000, 104, 8244), the range of application for relativistic density functional theory (DFT) is extended to the calculation of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shieldings and chemical shifts in diamagnetic actinide compounds. Two relativistic DFT methods are used, ZORA ("zeroth-order regular approximation") and the quasirelativistic (QR) method. In the given second paper, NMR shieldings and chemical shifts are calculated and discussed for a wide range of compounds. The molecules studied comprise uranyl complexes, [UO(2)L(n)](+/-)(q); UF(6); inorganic UF(6) derivatives, UF(6-n)Cl(n), n = 0-6; and organometallic UF(6) derivatives, UF(6-n)(OCH(3))(n), n = 0-5. Uranyl complexes include [UO(2)F(4)](2-), [UO(2)Cl(4)](2-), [UO(2)(OH)(4)](2-), [UO(2)(CO(3))(3)](4-), and [UO(2)(H(2)O)(5)](2+). For the ligand NMR, moderate (e.g., (19)F NMR chemical shifts in UF(6-n)Cl(n)) to excellent agreement [e.g., (19)F chemical shift tensor in UF(6) or (1)H NMR in UF(6-n)(OCH(3))(n)] has been found between theory and experiment. The methods have been used to calculate the experimentally unknown (235)U NMR chemical shifts. A large chemical shift range of at least 21,000 ppm has been predicted for the (235)U nucleus. ZORA spin-orbit appears to be the most accurate method for predicting actinide metal chemical shifts. Trends in the (235)U NMR chemical shifts of UF(6-n)L(n) molecules are analyzed and explained in terms of the calculated electronic structure. It is argued that the energy separation and interaction between occupied and virtual orbitals with f-character are the determining factors.

  13. In situ fluid typing and quantification with 1D and 2D NMR logging.

    PubMed

    Sun, Boqin

    2007-05-01

    In situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) fluid typing has recently gained momentum due to data acquisition and inversion algorithm enhancement of NMR logging tools. T(2) distributions derived from NMR logging contain information on bulk fluids and pore size distributions. However, the accuracy of fluid typing is greatly overshadowed by the overlap between T(2) peaks arising from different fluids with similar apparent T(2) relaxation times. Nevertheless, the shapes of T(2) distributions from different fluid components are often different and can be predetermined. Inversion with predetermined T(2) distributions allows us to perform fluid component decomposition to yield individual fluid volume ratios. Another effective method for in situ fluid typing is two-dimensional (2D) NMR logging, which results in proton population distribution as a function of T(2) relaxation time and fluid diffusion coefficient (or T(1) relaxation time). Since diffusion coefficients (or T(1) relaxation time) for different fluid components can be very different, it is relatively easy to separate oil (especially heavy oil) from water signal in a 2D NMR map and to perform accurate fluid typing. Combining NMR logging with resistivity and/or neutron/density logs provides a third method for in situ fluid typing. We shall describe these techniques with field examples. PMID:17466778

  14. Quadrupolar relaxation of hyperpolarized krypton-83 as a probe for surfaces.

    PubMed

    Stupic, Karl F; Cleveland, Zackary I; Pavlovskaya, Galina E; Meersmann, Thomas

    2006-02-01

    This work reports the first systematic study of relaxation experienced by the hyperpolarized (hp) noble gas isotope (83)Kr (I=9/2) in contact with surfaces. The spin-lattice relaxation of (83)Kr is found to depend strongly on the chemical composition of the surfaces in the vicinity of the gas. This effect is caused by quadrupolar interactions during brief periods of surface adsorption that are the dominating source of longitudinal spin relaxation in the (83)Kr atoms. Simple model systems of closest packed glass beads with uniform but variable bead sizes are used for the relaxation measurements. The observed relaxation rates depend strongly on the chemical treatment of the glass surfaces and on the surface to volume ratio. Hp (83)Kr NMR relaxation measurements of porous polymers with pore sizes of 70-250 microm demonstrate the potential use of this new technique for material sciences applications.

  15. Robust determination of surface relaxivity from nuclear magnetic resonance DT(2) measurements.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhi-Xiang; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a powerful tool to probe into geological materials such as hydrocarbon reservoir rocks and groundwater aquifers. It is unique in its ability to obtain in situ the fluid type and the pore size distributions (PSD). The T1 and T2 relaxation times are closely related to the pore geometry through the parameter called surface relaxivity. This parameter is critical for converting the relaxation time distribution into the PSD and so is key to accurately predicting permeability. The conventional way to determine the surface relaxivity ρ2 had required independent laboratory measurements of the pore size. Recently Zielinski et al. proposed a restricted diffusion model to extract the surface relaxivity from the NMR diffusion-T2 relaxation (DT2) measurement. Although this method significantly improved the ability to directly extract surface relaxivity from a pure NMR measurement, there are inconsistencies with their model and it relies on a number of preset parameters. Here we propose an improved signal model to incorporate a scalable LT and extend their method to extract the surface relaxivity based on analyzing multiple DT2 maps with varied diffusion observation time. With multiple diffusion observation times, the apparent diffusion coefficient correctly describes the restricted diffusion behavior in samples with wide PSDs, and the new method does not require predetermined parameters, such as the bulk diffusion coefficient and tortuosity. Laboratory experiments on glass beads packs with the beads diameter ranging from 50 μm to 500 μm are used to validate the new method. The extracted diffusion parameters are consistent with their known values and the determined surface relaxivity ρ2 agrees with the expected value within ±7%. This method is further successfully applied on a Berea sandstone core and yields surface relaxivity ρ2 consistent with the literature.

  16. Robust determination of surface relaxivity from nuclear magnetic resonance DT2 measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Zhi-Xiang; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a powerful tool to probe into geological materials such as hydrocarbon reservoir rocks and groundwater aquifers. It is unique in its ability to obtain in situ the fluid type and the pore size distributions (PSD). The T1 and T2 relaxation times are closely related to the pore geometry through the parameter called surface relaxivity. This parameter is critical for converting the relaxation time distribution into the PSD and so is key to accurately predicting permeability. The conventional way to determine the surface relaxivity ρ2 had required independent laboratory measurements of the pore size. Recently Zielinski et al. proposed a restricted diffusion model to extract the surface relaxivity from the NMR diffusion-T2 relaxation (DT2) measurement. Although this method significantly improved the ability to directly extract surface relaxivity from a pure NMR measurement, there are inconsistencies with their model and it relies on a number of preset parameters. Here we propose an improved signal model to incorporate a scalable LT and extend their method to extract the surface relaxivity based on analyzing multiple DT2 maps with varied diffusion observation time. With multiple diffusion observation times, the apparent diffusion coefficient correctly describes the restricted diffusion behavior in samples with wide PSDs, and the new method does not require predetermined parameters, such as the bulk diffusion coefficient and tortuosity. Laboratory experiments on glass beads packs with the beads diameter ranging from 50 μm to 500 μm are used to validate the new method. The extracted diffusion parameters are consistent with their known values and the determined surface relaxivity ρ2 agrees with the expected value within ±7%. This method is further successfully applied on a Berea sandstone core and yields surface relaxivity ρ2 consistent with the literature.

  17. Robust determination of surface relaxivity from nuclear magnetic resonance DT(2) measurements.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhi-Xiang; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a powerful tool to probe into geological materials such as hydrocarbon reservoir rocks and groundwater aquifers. It is unique in its ability to obtain in situ the fluid type and the pore size distributions (PSD). The T1 and T2 relaxation times are closely related to the pore geometry through the parameter called surface relaxivity. This parameter is critical for converting the relaxation time distribution into the PSD and so is key to accurately predicting permeability. The conventional way to determine the surface relaxivity ρ2 had required independent laboratory measurements of the pore size. Recently Zielinski et al. proposed a restricted diffusion model to extract the surface relaxivity from the NMR diffusion-T2 relaxation (DT2) measurement. Although this method significantly improved the ability to directly extract surface relaxivity from a pure NMR measurement, there are inconsistencies with their model and it relies on a number of preset parameters. Here we propose an improved signal model to incorporate a scalable LT and extend their method to extract the surface relaxivity based on analyzing multiple DT2 maps with varied diffusion observation time. With multiple diffusion observation times, the apparent diffusion coefficient correctly describes the restricted diffusion behavior in samples with wide PSDs, and the new method does not require predetermined parameters, such as the bulk diffusion coefficient and tortuosity. Laboratory experiments on glass beads packs with the beads diameter ranging from 50 μm to 500 μm are used to validate the new method. The extracted diffusion parameters are consistent with their known values and the determined surface relaxivity ρ2 agrees with the expected value within ±7%. This method is further successfully applied on a Berea sandstone core and yields surface relaxivity ρ2 consistent with the literature. PMID:26340435

  18. Temperature and pressure dependent rate coefficients for the reaction of C2H4 + HO2 on the C2H4O2H potential energy surface.

    PubMed

    Guo, JunJiang; Xu, JiaQi; Li, ZeRong; Tan, NingXin; Li, XiangYuan

    2015-04-01

    The potential energy surface (PES) for reaction C2H4 + HO2 was examined by using the quantum chemical methods. All rates were determined computationally using the CBS-QB3 composite method combined with conventional transition state theory(TST), variational transition-state theory (VTST) and Rice-Ramsberger-Kassel-Marcus/master-equation (RRKM/ME) theory. The geometries optimization and the vibrational frequency analysis of reactants, transition states, and products were performed at the B3LYP/CBSB7 level. The composite CBS-QB3 method was applied for energy calculations. The major product channel of reaction C2H4 + HO2 is the formation C2H4O2H via an OH(···)π complex with 3.7 kcal/mol binding energy which exhibits negative-temperature dependence. We further investigated the reactions related to this complex, which were ignored in previous studies. Thermochemical properties of the species involved in the reactions were determined using the CBS-QB3 method, and enthalpies of formation of species were compared with literature values. The calculated rate constants are in good agreement with those available from literature and given in modified Arrhenius equation form, which are serviceable in combustion modeling of hydrocarbons. Finally, in order to illustrate the effect for low-temperature ignition of our new rate constants, we have implemented them into the existing mechanisms, which can predict ethylene ignition in a shock tube with better performance.

  19. Temperature and pressure dependent rate coefficients for the reaction of C2H4 + HO2 on the C2H4O2H potential energy surface.

    PubMed

    Guo, JunJiang; Xu, JiaQi; Li, ZeRong; Tan, NingXin; Li, XiangYuan

    2015-04-01

    The potential energy surface (PES) for reaction C2H4 + HO2 was examined by using the quantum chemical methods. All rates were determined computationally using the CBS-QB3 composite method combined with conventional transition state theory(TST), variational transition-state theory (VTST) and Rice-Ramsberger-Kassel-Marcus/master-equation (RRKM/ME) theory. The geometries optimization and the vibrational frequency analysis of reactants, transition states, and products were performed at the B3LYP/CBSB7 level. The composite CBS-QB3 method was applied for energy calculations. The major product channel of reaction C2H4 + HO2 is the formation C2H4O2H via an OH(···)π complex with 3.7 kcal/mol binding energy which exhibits negative-temperature dependence. We further investigated the reactions related to this complex, which were ignored in previous studies. Thermochemical properties of the species involved in the reactions were determined using the CBS-QB3 method, and enthalpies of formation of species were compared with literature values. The calculated rate constants are in good agreement with those available from literature and given in modified Arrhenius equation form, which are serviceable in combustion modeling of hydrocarbons. Finally, in order to illustrate the effect for low-temperature ignition of our new rate constants, we have implemented them into the existing mechanisms, which can predict ethylene ignition in a shock tube with better performance. PMID:25774424

  20. Coaxial probe for nuclear magnetic resonance diffusion and relaxation correlation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yiqiao; Hürlimann, Martin; Mandal, Soumyajit; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2014-02-01

    A coaxial nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe is built to measure diffusion and relaxation properties of liquid samples. In particular, we demonstrate the acquisition of two-dimensional (2D) distribution functions (T1-T2 and diffusion-T2), essential for fluids characterization. The compact design holds promise for miniaturization, thus enabling the measurement of molecular diffusion that is inaccessible to conventional micro-NMR setups. Potential applications range from crude oil characterization to biomolecular screening and detections.

  1. Pure shift NMR.

    PubMed

    Zangger, Klaus

    2015-04-01

    Although scalar-coupling provides important structural information, the resulting signal splittings significantly reduce the resolution of NMR spectra. Limited resolution is a particular problem in proton NMR experiments, resulting in part from the limited proton chemical shift range (∼10 ppm) but even more from the splittings due to scalar coupling to nearby protons. "Pure shift" NMR spectroscopy (also known as broadband homonuclear decoupling) has been developed for disentangling overlapped proton NMR spectra. The resulting spectra are considerably simplified as they consist of single lines, reminiscent of proton-decoupled C-13 spectra at natural abundance, with no multiplet structure. The different approaches to obtaining pure shift spectra are reviewed here and several applications presented. Pure shift spectra are especially useful for highly overlapped proton spectra, as found for example in reaction mixtures, natural products and biomacromolecules.

  2. Ultrafast Multidimensional Laplace NMR Using a Single-Sided Magnet.

    PubMed

    King, Jared N; Lee, Vanessa J; Ahola, Susanna; Telkki, Ville-Veikko; Meldrum, Tyler

    2016-04-11

    Laplace NMR (LNMR) consists of relaxation and diffusion measurements providing detailed information about molecular motion and interaction. Here we demonstrate that ultrafast single- and multidimensional LNMR experiments, based on spatial encoding, are viable with low-field, single-sided magnets with an inhomogeneous magnetic field. This approach shortens the experiment time by one to two orders of magnitude relative to traditional experiments, and increases the sensitivity per unit time by a factor of three. The reduction of time required to collect multidimensional data opens significant prospects for mobile chemical analysis using NMR. Particularly tantalizing is future use of hyperpolarization to increase sensitivity by orders of magnitude, allowed by single-scan approach.

  3. Relaxation: mapping an uncharted world.

    PubMed

    Smith, J C; Amutio, A; Anderson, J P; Aria, L A

    1996-03-01

    Nine hundred and forty practitioners of massage, abbreviated progressive muscle relaxation (PMR), yoga stretching, breathing, imagery meditation, and various combination treatments described their technique experiences on an 82-item wordlist. Factor analysis yielded 10 interpretable relaxation categories: Joyful Affects and Appraisals (Joyful), Distant, Calm, Aware, Prayerful, Accepted, Untroubled, Limp, Silent, and Mystery The relaxation response and cognitive/somatic specificity models predict Calm and Limp, which account for only 5.5% of the variance of relaxation experience. Unlike much of previous relaxation research, we found important technique differences. PMR and massage are associated with Distant and Limp; yoga stretching, breathing, and meditation with Aware; meditation with Prayerful and all techniques except PMR with Joyful. Results are consistent with cognitive-behavioral relaxation theory and have implications for relaxation theory, treatment, training, assessment, and research. We close with a revised model of relaxation that posits three global dimensions; tension-relief, passive disengagement, and passive engagement.

  4. Hair Dye and Hair Relaxers

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Hair Dye and Hair Relaxers Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... products. If you have a bad reaction to hair dyes and relaxers, you should: Stop using the ...

  5. NMR structure of a lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase provides insight into copper binding, protein dynamics, and substrate interactions

    PubMed Central

    Aachmann, Finn L.; Sørlie, Morten; Skjåk-Bræk, Gudmund; Eijsink, Vincent G. H.; Vaaje-Kolstad, Gustav

    2012-01-01

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases currently classified as carbohydrate binding module family 33 (CBM33) and glycoside hydrolase family 61 (GH61) are likely to play important roles in future biorefining. However, the molecular basis of their unprecedented catalytic activity remains largely unknown. We have used NMR techniques and isothermal titration calorimetry to address structural and functional aspects of CBP21, a chitin-active CBM33. NMR structural and relaxation studies showed that CBP21 is a compact and rigid molecule, and the only exception is the catalytic metal binding site. NMR data further showed that His28 and His114 in the catalytic center bind a variety of divalent metal ions with a clear preference for Cu2+ (Kd = 55 nM; from isothermal titration calorimetry) and higher preference for Cu1+ (Kd ∼ 1 nM; from the experimentally determined redox potential for CBP21-Cu2+ of 275 mV using a thermodynamic cycle). Strong binding of Cu1+ was also reflected in a reduction in the pKa values of the histidines by 3.6 and 2.2 pH units, respectively. Cyanide, a mimic of molecular oxygen, was found to bind to the metal ion only. These data support a model where copper is reduced on the enzyme by an externally provided electron and followed by oxygen binding and activation by internal electron transfer. Interactions of CBP21 with a crystalline substrate were mapped in a 2H/1H exchange experiment, which showed that substrate binding involves an extended planar binding surface, including the metal binding site. Such a planar catalytic surface seems well-suited to interact with crystalline substrates. PMID:23112164

  6. Heterozygous FA2H mutations in autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Widespread abnormalities in white matter development are frequently reported in cases of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and could be involved in the disconnectivity suggested in these disorders. Homozygous mutations in the gene coding for fatty-acid 2-hydroxylase (FA2H), an enzyme involved in myelin synthesis, are associated with complex leukodystrophies, but little is known about the functional impact of heterozygous FA2H mutations. We hypothesized that rare deleterious heterozygous mutations of FA2H might constitute risk factors for ASD. Methods We searched deleterious mutations affecting FA2H, by genotyping 1256 independent patients with ASD genotyped using Genome Wide SNP arrays, and also by sequencing in independent set of 186 subjects with ASD and 353 controls. We then explored the impact of the identified mutations by measuring FA2H enzymatic activity and expression, in transfected COS7 cells. Results One heterozygous deletion within 16q22.3-q23.1 including FA2H was observed in two siblings who share symptoms of autism and severe cognitive impairment, axial T2-FLAIR weighted MRI posterior periventricular white matter lesions. Also, two rare non-synonymous mutations (R113W and R113Q) were reported. Although predictive models suggested that R113W should be a deleterious, we did not find that FA2H activity was affected by expression of the R113W mutation in cultured COS cells. Conclusions While our results do not support a major role for FA2H coding variants in ASD, a screening of other genes related to myelin synthesis would allow us to better understand the role of non-neuronal elements in ASD susceptibility. PMID:24299421

  7. NMR assessment on bone simulated under microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Q.; Qin, Y.

    Introduction Microgravity-induced bone loss has been suggested to be similar to disuse-osteoporosis on Earth which constitutes a challenging public health problem No current non-destructive method can provide the microstructural changes in bone particularly on cortical bone Recently the authors have applied low field nuclear magnetic resonance NMR spin-spin relaxation technique and computational analysis method to determine the porosity pore size distribution and microdamage of cortical bone 1-3 The studies by the authors have shown that this technology can be used to characterize microstructural changes as well as bone water distribution bound and mobile water changes of weightless treated simulating a microgravity condition turkey and mouse cortical bone We further determinate that the NMR spin-spin relaxation time T 2 spectrum derived parameters can be used as descriptions of bone quality e g matrix water distribution and porosity size distributions and alone or in combination with current techniques bone mineral density measurements more accurately predict bone mechanical properties Methods underline Bone sample preparation Two kinds of animal samples were collected and prepared for designed experiments from SUNY Cortical bones of the mid-diaphyses of the ulnae of 1-year-old male turkeys were dissected from freshly slaughtered animals Eight samples were categorized from normal or control and four samples were 4-week disuse treated by functionally isolated osteotomies disuse A total of 12

  8. Assessment of Bone Microstructural Changes by NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Qingwen; Wang, Xiaodu

    2008-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that age related increases in bone porosity without significant changes in bone mineral density (BMD) (without bone microstructural information) result in a decrease in bone strength. Bone fracture toughness is also significantly correlated to changes in porosity, microarchitecture, collagen integrity, microdamage, and water distribution, all of which are measures of bone quality. Unfortunately, current technology does not allow the non-destructive and non-invasive detection of bone water distribution or other measures of bone quality including microporosity. On the other hand, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) proton spin-spin (T2) relaxation time measurements and computational analytical method have been used to determine microstructural characteristics of various types of fluid filled porous materials. The study in here is to demonstrate that non-destructive and non-invasive NMR proton spin-spin (T2) relaxation techniques has been developed and applied to quantify the porosity, pore size distribution and water distribution in human cortical bone. This new bone microstructural information can then be used as descriptions of bone quality and, along or in combination with existing method (BMD) to more accurately assess bone fracture risk, and the results could help doctors and researchers to detect osteoporosis and other conditions related to weak bones in persons.

  9. Dynamic 1H NMR Studies of Schiff Base Derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köylü, M. Z.; Ekinci, A.; Böyükata, M.; Temel, H.

    2016-01-01

    The spin-lattice relaxation time T 1 and the spin-spin relaxation time T 2 of two Schiff base derivatives, N,N'-ethylenebis(salicylidene)-1,2-diaminoethane (H2L1) and N,N'-ethylenebis (salicylidene)-1,3-diaminopropane (H2L2), in DMSO-d6 solvent were studied as a function of temperature in the range of 20-50°C using a Bruker Avance 400.132 MHz 1H NMR spectrometer. Based on the activation energy ( E a) and correlation time (τc), we believe that the Schiff base derivatives perform a molecular tumbling motion.

  10. Relaxation phenomena in disordered systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciortino, F.; Tartaglia, P.

    1997-02-01

    In this article we discuss how the assumptions of self-similarity imposed on the distribution of independently relaxing modes, as well as on their amplitude and characteristic times, manifest in the global relaxation phenomena. We also review recent applications of such approach to the description of relaxation phenomena in microemulsions and molecular glasses.

  11. A Comparison of Relaxation Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Doris B.

    Some researchers argue that all relaxation techniques produce a single relaxation response while others support a specific-effects hypothesis which suggests that progressive relaxation affects the musculoskeletal system and that guided imagery affects cognitive changes. Autogenics is considered a technique which is both somatic and cognitive. This…

  12. C2H observations toward the Orion Bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, Z.; Ossenkopf, V.; Van der Tak, F. F. S.; Faure, A.; Makai, Z.; Bergin, E. A.

    2015-06-01

    Context. The ethynyl radical (C2H) is one of the first radicals to be detected in the interstellar medium. Its higher rotational transitions have recently become available with the Herschel Space Observatory. Aims: We aim to constrain the physical parameters of the C2H emitting gas toward the Orion Bar. Methods: We analyze the C2H line intensities measured toward the Orion Bar CO+ Peak and Herschel/HIFI maps of C2H, CH, and HCO+ and a NANTEN map of [Ci]. We interpret the observed C2H emission using the combination of Herschel/HIFI and NANTEN data with radiative transfer and PDR models. Results: Five rotational transitions of C2H (from N = 6-5 up to N = 10-9) have been detected in the HIFI frequency range toward the CO+ peak of the Orion Bar. Based on the five detected C2H transitions, a single component rotational diagram analysis gives a rotation temperature of ~64 K and a beam-averaged C2H column density of 4 × 1013 cm-2. The rotational diagram is also consistent with a two-component fit, resulting in rotation temperatures of 43 ± 0.2 K and 123 ± 21 K and in beam-averaged column densities of ~8.3 × 1013 cm-2 and ~2.3 × 1013 cm-2 for the three lower-N and for the three higher-N transitions, respectively. The measured five rotational transitions cannot be explained by any single parameter model. According to a non-LTE model, most of the C2H column density produces the lower-N C2H transitions and traces a warm (Tkin ~ 100-150 K) and dense (n(H2) ~ 105-106 cm-3) gas. A small fraction of the C2H column density is required to reproduce the intensity of the highest-N transitions (N = 9-8 and N = 10-9) originating in a high-density (n(H2) ~5 × 106 cm-3) hot (Tkin ~ 400 K) gas. The total beam-averaged C2H column density in the model is 1014 cm-2. A comparison of the spatial distribution of C2H to those of CH, HCO+, and [Ci] shows the best correlation with CH. Conclusions: Both the non-LTE radiative transfer model and a simple PDR model representing the Orion Bar

  13. NMR and SIP properties of partially saturated porous silica glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiens, E.; Klitzsch, N.; Mohnke, O.; Clauser, C.

    2009-04-01

    The signal responses of both, spectral induced polarization (SIP) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) are sensitive to the inner surfaces of the water filled porous media. Therefore both methods are well suited to noninvasively determine hydrological relevant parameters such as the pore radii distributions or hydraulic permeability of fully and partially saturated rocks and soils. NMR exploits the relaxation of the magnetization of fluids in the pore space of porous medium. In SIP the frequency dependence of the complex resistivity is determined, which mainly arises from the polarization of charges at the fluid matrix interface. In this work we study the dependence of NMR and SIP signals on the inner structure of fully and partially saturated artificial porous silica glasses (VitraPOR). The samples are characterized by an accurately defined pore space with well known pore radii distributions and surface properties. The mean pore sizes of the investigated samples range from 1.0µm to 250µm. Laboratory NMR saturation recovery (T1) and CPMG (T2) measurements have been carried out using a 3.91 MHz NMR spectrometer. SIP measurements were conducted in an extended frequency range from 1mHz - 1MHz using four point and two point configurations for low and high frequencies ranges, respectively. A homogeneous partial saturation down to 1 vol. % has been realized by applying a uniform negative pressure gradient to the samples at each desaturation step. Additionally the corresponding pf curves have been recorded and evaluated. On the basis of the results from these experiments and corresponding numerical pore scale simulations of NMR relaxation (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance; see also Mohnke et al SSS23) and SIP (see also Volkmann et al MPRG7) we aim at an interpretation scheme for combined NMR and SIP measurements in order to assess structure, state and thus transport properties of fully and partially saturated soils.

  14. Quantitative analysis of protein-ligand interactions by NMR.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Ayako; Konuma, Tsuyoshi; Yanaka, Saeko; Sugase, Kenji

    2016-08-01

    Protein-ligand interactions have been commonly studied through static structures of the protein-ligand complex. Recently, however, there has been increasing interest in investigating the dynamics of protein-ligand interactions both for fundamental understanding of the underlying mechanisms and for drug development. NMR is a versatile and powerful tool, especially because it provides site-specific quantitative information. NMR has widely been used to determine the dissociation constant (KD), in particular, for relatively weak interactions. The simplest NMR method is a chemical-shift titration experiment, in which the chemical-shift changes of a protein in response to ligand titration are measured. There are other quantitative NMR methods, but they mostly apply only to interactions in the fast-exchange regime. These methods derive the dissociation constant from population-averaged NMR quantities of the free and bound states of a protein or ligand. In contrast, the recent advent of new relaxation-based experiments, including R2 relaxation dispersion and ZZ-exchange, has enabled us to obtain kinetic information on protein-ligand interactions in the intermediate- and slow-exchange regimes. Based on R2 dispersion or ZZ-exchange, methods that can determine the association rate, kon, dissociation rate, koff, and KD have been developed. In these approaches, R2 dispersion or ZZ-exchange curves are measured for multiple samples with different protein and/or ligand concentration ratios, and the relaxation data are fitted to theoretical kinetic models. It is critical to choose an appropriate kinetic model, such as the two- or three-state exchange model, to derive the correct kinetic information. The R2 dispersion and ZZ-exchange methods are suitable for the analysis of protein-ligand interactions with a micromolar or sub-micromolar dissociation constant but not for very weak interactions, which are typical in very fast exchange. This contrasts with the NMR methods that are used

  15. The source of NMR-detected motional anisotropy of water in blood vessel walls.

    PubMed Central

    Sharf, Y; Knubovets, T; Dayan, D; Hirshberg, A; Akselrod, S; Navon, G

    1997-01-01

    2H Double quantum-filtered (DQF) NMR spectroscopy of deuterated water is sensitive to the presence of order in biological systems. This is because the only nuclei that are detected are those with residual quadrupolar interactions due to their anisotropic motion. In the present study, samples of aorta, coronary and carotid arteries, and vena cava were studied in parallel by 2H DQF NMR and by light microscopy. The average quadrupolar splitting, calculated from the NMR data, varies considerably among the different blood vessels, with high reproducibility for each type of vessel. Polarization microscopy examinations using collagen-specific staining with picrosirius red, have shown a variety of color profiles for the different blood vessels. These reflect different physical modes of aggregation (packing and thickness) of collagen fibers. A correlation was found between the NMR parameters and the color profiles of the picrosirius red-stained sections. Treating the blood vessels with 90% formic acid resulted in the elimination of the 2H DQF NMR signal. Histological analysis demonstrated a complete degradation of collagen and muscle, whereas the elastin filaments were preserved. Evidence is given that the 2H DQF NMR signal is dominated by the contribution of water molecules interacting with the collagen fibers. Images FIGURE 3 PMID:9284287

  16. NMR Studies of Cartilage Dynamics, Diffusion, Degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huster, Daniel; Schiller, Jurgen; Naji, Lama; Kaufmann Jorn; Arnold, Klaus

    An increasing number of people is suffering from rheumatic diseases, and, therefore, methods of early diagnosis of joint degeneration are urgently required. For their establishment, however, an improved knowledge about the molecular organisation of cartilage would be helpful. Cartilage consists of three main components: Water, collagen and chondroitin sulfate (CS) that is (together with further polysaccharides and proteins) a major constituent of the proteoglycans of cartilage. 1H and 13C MAS (magic-angle spinning) NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) opened new perspectives for the study of the macromolecular components in cartilage. We have primarily studied the mobilities of CS and collagen in bovine nasal and pig articular cartilage (that differ significantly in their collagen/polysaccharide content) by measuring 13C NMR relaxation times as well as the corresponding 13C CP (cross polarisation) MAS NMR spectra. These data clearly indicate that the mobility of cartilage macromolecules is broadly distributed from almost completely rigid (collagen) to highly mobile (polysaccharides), which lends cartilage its mechanical strength and shock-absorbing properties.

  17. NMR Studies of Dynamic Biomolecular Conformational Ensembles

    PubMed Central

    Torchia, Dennis A.

    2015-01-01

    Multidimensional heteronuclear NMR approaches can provide nearly complete sequential signal assignments of isotopically enriched biomolecules. The availability of assignments together with measurements of spin relaxation rates, residual spin interactions, J-couplings and chemical shifts provides information at atomic resolution about internal dynamics on timescales ranging from ps to ms, both in solution and in the solid state. However, due to the complexity of biomolecules, it is not possible to extract a unique atomic-resolution description of biomolecular motions even from extensive NMR data when many conformations are sampled on multiple timescales. For this reason, powerful computational approaches are increasingly applied to large NMR data sets to elucidate conformational ensembles sampled by biomolecules. In the past decade, considerable attention has been directed at an important class of biomolecules that function by binding to a wide variety of target molecules. Questions of current interest are: “Does the free biomolecule sample a conformational ensemble that encompasses the conformations found when it binds to various targets; and if so, on what time scale is the ensemble sampled?” This article reviews recent efforts to answer these questions, with a focus on comparing ensembles obtained for the same biomolecules by different investigators. A detailed comparison of results obtained is provided for three biomolecules: ubiquitin, calmodulin and the HIV-1 trans-activation response RNA. PMID:25669739

  18. Experimental identification of diffusive coupling using 2D NMR.

    PubMed

    Song, Y-Q; Carneiro, G; Schwartz, L M; Johnson, D L

    2014-12-01

    Spin relaxation based nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods have been used extensively to determine pore size distributions in a variety of materials. This approach is based on the assumption that each pore is in the fast diffusion limit but that diffusion between pores can be neglected. However, in complex materials these assumptions may be violated and the relaxation time distribution is not easily interpreted. We present a 2D NMR technique and an associated data analysis that allow us to work directly with the time dependent experimental data without Laplace inversion to identify the signature of diffusive coupling between different pores. Measurements on microporous glass beads and numerical simulations are used to illustrate the technique. PMID:25526135

  19. sup 2 H Nuclear magnetic resonance of the gramicidin A backbone in a phospholipid bilayer

    SciTech Connect

    Prosser, R.S.; Davis, J.H. ); Dahlquist, F.W.; Lindorfer, M.A. )

    1991-05-14

    Solid-state {sup 2}H NMR spectroscopy has been employed to study the channel conformation of gramicidin A (GA) in unoriented 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) multilayers. Quadrupolar echo spectra were obtained at 44{degree}C and 53{degree}C, from gramicidin A labels in which the proton attached to the {alpha} carbon of residue 3,4,5,10,12, or 14 was replaced with deuterium. Because of the nearly axially symmetric electric field gradient tensor, the quadrupolar splittings obtained from an unoriented multilamellar dispersion of DMPC and singly labeled GA directly yield unambiguous orientational constraints on the C-{sup 2}H bonds. The authors conclude that the helix sense of the channel conformation of GA is right-handed. Assuming that the dominant motions are fast axial diffusion of the gramicidin molecule and reorientation of the diffusion axis with respect to the local bilayer normal, then the theoretical splittings may all be scaled down by a constant motional narrowing factor.

  20. Affordable uniform isotope labeling with (2)H, (13)C and (15)N in insect cells.

    PubMed

    Sitarska, Agnieszka; Skora, Lukasz; Klopp, Julia; Roest, Susan; Fernández, César; Shrestha, Binesh; Gossert, Alvar D

    2015-06-01

    For a wide range of proteins of high interest, the major obstacle for NMR studies is the lack of an affordable eukaryotic expression system for isotope labeling. Here, a simple and affordable protocol is presented to produce uniform labeled proteins in the most prevalent eukaryotic expression system for structural biology, namely Spodoptera frugiperda insect cells. Incorporation levels of 80% can be achieved for (15)N and (13)C with yields comparable to expression in full media. For (2)H,(15)N and (2)H,(13)C,(15)N labeling, incorporation is only slightly lower with 75 and 73%, respectively, and yields are typically twofold reduced. The media were optimized for isotope incorporation, reproducibility, simplicity and cost. High isotope incorporation levels for all labeling patterns are achieved by using labeled algal amino acid extracts and exploiting well-known biochemical pathways. The final formulation consists of just five commercially available components, at costs 12-fold lower than labeling media from vendors. The approach was applied to several cytosolic and secreted target proteins. PMID:25929326

  1. Meridional Variations of C2H2 and C2H6 in Jupiter's Atmosphere from Cassini CIRS Infrared Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, C. A.; Achterberg, R. K.; Conrath, B. J.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Fouchet, T.; Parrish, P. D.; Romani, P. N.; Abbas, M.; LeClair, A.; Strobel, D.

    2004-01-01

    Hydrocarbons such as acetylene (C2H2) and ethane (C2H6) are important tracers in Jupiter's atmosphere, constraining our models of the chemical and dynamical processes. However, our knowledge of the vertical and meridional variations of their abundances has remained sparse. During the flyby of the Cassini spacecraft in December 2000, the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) instrument was used to map the spatial variation of emissions from 10-1400 cm(sup -1) (1000-7 microns). In this paper we analyze a zonally-averaged set of CIRS spectra taken at the highest (0.5 cm(sup -1)) resolution, to infer atmospheric temperatures in the stratosphere at 0.5-20 mbar via the v4 band of CH4, and in the troposphere at 150-400 mbar, via the H2 absorption at 600-800 cm(sup -1). Simultaneously, we retrieve the abundances of C2H2 and C2H6 via the v5 and vg bands respectively. Tropospheric absorption and stratospheric emission are highly anti-correlated at the CIRS resolution, introducing a non-uniqueness into the retrievals, such that vertical gradient and column abundance cannot both be found without additional constraints. Assuming profile gradients from photochemical calculations, we show that the column abundance of C2H2 decreases sharply towards the poles by a factor approximately 4, while C2H6 is unchanged in the north and increasing in the south, by a factor approximately 1.8. An explanation for the meridional trends is proposed in terms of a combination of photochemistry and dynamics. Poleward, the decreasing UV flux is predicted to decrease the abundances of C2H2 and C2H6 by factors 2.7 and 3.5 respectively at a latitude 70 deg. However, the lifetime of C2H6 in the stratosphere (5 x 10(exp 9)) is much longer than the dynamical timescale for meridional motions inferred from SL-9 debris (5 x 10(exp 8 s)), and therefore the constant or rising abundance towards high latitudes likely indicates that meridional mixing dominates over photochemical effects. For C2H2, the opposite

  2. NMR imaging microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-10-01

    In the past several years, proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging has become an established technique in diagnostic medicine and biomedical research. Although much of the work in this field has been directed toward development of whole-body imagers, James Aguayo, Stephen Blackband, and Joseph Schoeninger of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine working with Markus Hintermann and Mark Mattingly of Bruker Medical Instruments, recently developed a small-bore NMR microscope with sufficient resolution to image a single African clawed toad cell (Nature 1986, 322, 190-91). This improved resolution should lead to increased use of NMR imaging for chemical, as well as biological or physiological, applications. The future of NMR microscopy, like that of many other newly emerging techniques, is ripe with possibilities. Because of its high cost, however, it is likely to remain primarily a research tool for some time. ''It's like having a camera,'' says Smith. ''You've got a way to look at things at very fine levels, and people are going to find lots of uses for it. But it is a very expensive technique - it costs $100,000 to add imaging capability once you have a high-resolution NMR, which itself is at least a $300,000 instrument. If it can answer even a few questions that can't be answered any other way, though, it may be well worth the cost.''

  3. Ultralow field NMR spectrometer with an atomic magnetometer near room temperature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guobin; Li, Xiaofeng; Sun, Xianping; Feng, Jiwen; Ye, Chaohui; Zhou, Xin

    2013-12-01

    We present a Cs atomic magnetometer with a sensitivity of 150fT/Hz(1/2) operating near room temperature. The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal of 125μL tap water was detected at an ultralow magnetic field down to 47nT, with the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the NMR signal approaching 50 after eight averages. Relaxivity experiments with a Gd(DTPA) contrast agent in zero field were performed, in order to show the magnetometer's ability to measure spin-lattice relaxation time with high accuracy. This demonstrates the feasibility of an ultralow field NMR spectrometer based on a Cs atomic magnetometer, which has a low working temperature, short data acquisition time and high sensitivity. This kind of NMR spectrometer has great potential in applications such as chemical analysis and magnetic relaxometry detection in ultralow or zero fields.

  4. Development and Characterization of NMR Measurements for Polymer Gel Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwong, Zachary; Whitney, Heather

    2012-03-01

    Polymer gel dosimeters are systems of water, gelatin, and monomers which form polymers upon irradiation. The gelatin matrix retains dose distribution in 3D form, facilitating truly integrated measurements of complex dose plans for radiation therapy. Polymer gels have two proton pools coupled by exchange: free solvent protons and bound polymerized macromolecular protons. Measuring magnetization transfer (MT) and relaxation affords useful insights into particle rigidity and chemical exchange effects on relaxation in polymer gels. Polymer gel dose response has been previously quantified with several techniques, most often in terms of MRI parameters, usually at field strengths of 1.5 T and below. The research described here investigates the dose response of a revised MAGIC gel dosimeter via both high-field imaging and simpler nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. This includes both transverse and longitudinal relaxation rates (R2 and R1) and quantitative MT parameters. We investigated estimating polymer molecular weight for a given applied dose using the Rouse model and R2 data from the imaging study. Finally, we began development of NMR methods for studying dose response, requiring adaption of NMR experiments to accommodate for radiation damping.

  5. Progressive muscle relaxation, yoga stretching, and ABC relaxation theory.

    PubMed

    Ghoncheh, Shahyad; Smith, Jonathan C

    2004-01-01

    This study compared the psychological effects of progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) and yoga stretching (hatha) exercises. Forty participants were randomly divided into two groups and taught PMR or yoga stretching exercises. Both groups practiced once a week for five weeks and were given the Smith Relaxation States Inventory before and after each session. As hypothesized, practitioners of PMR displayed higher levels of relaxation states (R-States) Physical Relaxation and Disengagement at Week 4 and higher levels of Mental Quiet and Joy as a posttraining aftereffect at Week 5. Contrary to what was hypothesized, groups did not display different levels of R-States Energized or Aware. Results suggest the value of supplementing traditional somatic conceptualizations of relaxation with the psychological approach embodied in ABC relaxation theory. Clinical and research implications are discussed.

  6. High-pressure low-field 1H NMR relaxometry in nanoporous materials.

    PubMed

    Horch, Carsten; Schlayer, Stefan; Stallmach, Frank

    2014-03-01

    A low-field NMR sensor with NdFeB permanent magnets (B0=118 mT) and a pressure cell made of PEEK (4 cm outer diameter) were designed for (1)H relaxation time studies of adsorbed molecules at pressures of up to 300 bar. The system was used to investigate methane uptake of microporous metal-organic frameworks and nanoporous activated carbon. T2 relaxation time distribution of pure methane and of methane under co-adsorption of carbon dioxide show that the host-guest interaction lead to a relaxation time contrasts, which may be used to distinguish between the gas phase and the different adsorbed phases of methane. Adsorption isotherms, exchange of methane between adsorbent particles and the surrounding gas phase, successive displacement of methane from adsorption sites by co-adsorption of carbon dioxide and CO2/CH4 adsorption separation factors were determined from the observed NMR relaxation time distributions.

  7. Synthesis of aromatic (13)C/(2)H-α-ketoacid precursors to be used in selective phenylalanine and tyrosine protein labelling.

    PubMed

    Lichtenecker, R J

    2014-10-14

    Recent progress in protein NMR spectroscopy revealed aromatic residues to be valuable information sources for performing structure and motion analysis of high molecular weight proteins. However, the applied NMR experiments require tailored isotope labelling patterns in order to regulate spin-relaxation pathways and optimize magnetization transfer. We introduced a methodology to use α-ketoacids as metabolic amino acid precursors in cell-based overexpression of phenylalanine and/or tyrosine labelled proteins in a recent publication, which we have now developed further by providing synthetic routes to access the corresponding side-chain labelled precursors. The target compounds allow for selective introduction of (13)C-(1)H spin systems in a highly deuterated chemical environment and feature alternating (12)C-(13)C-(12)C ring-patterns. The resulting isotope distribution is especially suited to render straightforward (13)C spin relaxation experiments possible, which provide insight into the dynamic properties of the corresponding labelled proteins.

  8. Dual Species NMR Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Joshua; Korver, Anna; Thrasher, Daniel; Walker, Thad

    2016-05-01

    We present progress towards a dual species nuclear magnetic oscillator using synchronous spin exchange optical pumping. By applying the bias field as a sequence of alkali 2 π pulses, we generate alkali polarization transverse to the bias field. The alkali polarization is then modulated at the noble gas resonance so that through spin exchange collisions the noble gas becomes polarized. This novel method of NMR suppresses the alkali field frequency shift by at least a factor of 2500 as compared to longitudinal NMR. We will present details of the apparatus and measurements of dual species co-magnetometry using this method. Research supported by the NSF and Northrop-Grumman Corp.

  9. Covariance mapping of two-photon double core hole states in C 2 H 2 and C 2 H 6 produced by an x-ray free electron laser

    DOE PAGES

    Mucke, M; Zhaunerchyk, V; Frasinski, L J; Squibb, R J; Siano, M; Eland, J H D; Linusson, P; Salén, P; Meulen, P v d; Thomas, R D; et al

    2015-07-01

    Few-photon ionization and relaxation processes in acetylene (C2H2) and ethane (C2H6) were investigated at the linac coherent light source x-ray free electron laser (FEL) at SLAC, Stanford using a highly efficient multi-particle correlation spectroscopy technique based on a magnetic bottle. The analysis method of covariance mapping has been applied and enhanced, allowing us to identify electron pairs associated with double core hole (DCH) production and competing multiple ionization processes including Auger decay sequences. The experimental technique and the analysis procedure are discussed in the light of earlier investigations of DCH studies carried out at the same FEL and at thirdmore » generation synchrotron radiation sources. In particular, we demonstrate the capability of the covariance mapping technique to disentangle the formation of molecular DCH states which is barely feasible with conventional electron spectroscopy methods.« less

  10. NMR Approach to the Dynamic Screening Effect in Highly Entangled Polymers: Polyethylene Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen Addad, J. P.; Guillermo, A.; Lartigue, C.

    1995-05-01

    The transverse magnetic relaxation of protons linked to entangled polyethylene oxide chains is shown to be strongly related to the existence of a mean entanglement spacing. This is reflected by the residual spin-spin interaction which results from nonisotropic rotations of monomeric units. This standard NMR parameter is derived from a specific treatment of the relaxation; it is shown to be both independent of the chain molecular weight and proportional to the polymer concentration as expected from viscoelastic measurements.

  11. Meridional Variations of C2H2 and C2H6 in Jupiter's Atmosphere from Cassini CIRS Infrared Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, C. A.; Achterberg, R. K.; Conrath, B. J.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Fouchet, T.; Parrish, P. D.; Abbas, M.; LeClaire, A.; Romani, P. N.; Simon-Miller, A. A.

    2004-01-01

    The abundances of hydrocarbons such as acetylene (C2H2) and ethane (C2H6) in Jupiter's atmosphere are important physical quantities, constraining our models of the chemical and dynamical processes. However, our knowledge of these quantities and their vertical and latitudinal variations has remained sparse. The flyby of the Cassini spacecraft with Jupiter at the end of 2000 provided an excellent opportunity to observe the infrared spectrum with the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) instrument, mapping the spatial variation of emissions from 10-1400 cm-1. CIRS spectra taken at the highest resolution (0.5 cm-1) in early December 2000 have been analysed to infer atmospheric temperatures in the stratosphere at 0.5-20 mbar via the v4 of CH4, and in the troposphere at 100-400 mbar, via the hydrogen collision-induced continuum absorption at 600-800 cm. Simultaneously, we have searched for meridional abundance variations in C2H2 and C2H6 via the v5 and vg bands respectively. Tropospheric absorption and stratospheric emission are highly anti-correlated at the CIM resolution, introducing a non-uniqueness into the retrievals, which means that vertical gradient and column abundance cannot be simultaneously found without additional constraints. If we assume the profile shapes from photochemical model calculations, we show that the column abundance of C2H2 must decrease sharply towards the poles, while C2H6 is constant or slightly increasing. The relevance of these results to current photochemical and dynamical knowledge of Jupiter's atmosphere is discussed.

  12. Evaluation of an electrochemical N2/H2 gas separator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, R. D.; Wynveen, R. A.; Carlson, J. N.

    1973-01-01

    A program was successfully completed to evaluate an electrochemical nitrogen/hydrogen (N2/H2) separator for use in a spacecraft nitrogen (N2) generator. Based on the technical data obtained a N2/H2 separator subsystem consisting of an organic polymer gas permeator first stage and an electrochemical second and third stage was estimated to have the lowest total spared equivalent weight, 257 kg (566 lb), for a 15 lb/day N2 generation rate. A pre-design analysis of the electrochemical N2/H2 separator revealed that its use as a first stage resulted in too high a power requirement to be competitive with the organic polymer membrane and the palladium-silver membrane separation methods. As a result, program emphasis was placed on evaluating the electrochemical. A parametric test program characterized cell performance and established second- and third-stage electrochemical N2/H2 separator operating conditions. A design verification test was completed on the second and third stages. The second stage was then successfully endurance tested for 200 hours.

  13. NMR imaging of fluid dynamics in reservoir core.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, B A; Yamanashi, W S

    1988-01-01

    A medical NMR imaging instrument has been modified to image water and oil in reservoir rocks by the construction of a new receiving coil. Both oil and water inside the core produced readily detectable proton NMR signals, while the rock matrix produced no signal. Because of similar T2 NMR relaxation times, the water was doped with a paramagnetic ion, Mn+2, to reduce its T2 relaxation time. This procedure enhanced the separation between the oil and water phases in the resulting images. Sequential measurements, as water imbibed into one end and oil was expelled from the other end of a core plug, produced a series of images which showed the dynamics of the fluids. For water-wet Berea Sandstone a flood front was readily observed, but some of the oil was apparently left behind in small, isolated pockets which were larger than individual pores. After several additional pore volumes of water flowed through the plug the NMR image indicated a homogeneous distribution of oil. The amount of residual oil, as determined from the ratio of NMR intensities, closely approximated the residual oil saturation of fully flooded Berea samples measured by Dean-Stark extraction. A Berea sandstone core treated to make it partially oil-wet, did not show a definitive flood front, but appeared to channel the water around the perimeter of the core plug. The relative ease with which these images were made indicates that NMR imaging can be a useful technique to follow the dynamics of oil and water through a core plug for a variety of production processes.

  14. Synthesis and antifungal activity of 2H-1,4-benzoxazin-3(4H)-one derivatives.

    PubMed

    Śmist, Małgorzata; Kwiecień, Halina; Krawczyk, Maria

    2016-01-01

    A series of 2-alkyl-2H-1,4-benzoxazin-3(4H)-ones (4a-l) was easily synthesized by two-step process involving O-alkylation of 2-nitrophenols with methyl 2-bromoalkanoates and next "green" catalytic reductive cyclization of the obtained 2-nitro ester intermediates (3a-l). Further, 6,7-dibromo (5a-c) and N-acetyl (6) derivatives were prepared by bromination and acetylation of unsubstituted 2-alkyl-2H-1,4-benzoxazin-3(4H)-ones (4a-c). The novel compounds (3a-l, 4d-l, 5a-c and 6) were fully characterized by spectroscopic methods (MS, (1)H and (13)C NMR). 2-Alkyl-2H-1,4-benzoxazin-3(4H)-ones (4a-l, 5a-c and 6) were screened for antifungal activity. Preliminary assays were performed using two methods: in vitro against seven phytopathogenic fungi-Botrytis cinerea, Phythophtora cactorum, Rhizoctonia solani, Phoma betae, Fusarium culmorum, Fusarium oxysporum and Alternaria alternata-and in vivo against barley powdery mildew Blumeria graminis. The tested compounds displayed moderate to good antifungal activity at high concentration (200 mg L(-1)). The most potent compounds were 2-ethyl-2H-1,4-benzoxazin-3(4H)-one (4a), 2-ethyl-7-fluoro-2H-1,4-benzoxazin-3(4H)-one (4g) and 4-acetyl-2-ethyl-2H-1,4-benzoxazin-3(4H)-one (6), which completely inhibited the mycelial growth of seven agricultural fungi at the concentration of 200 mg L(-1) in the in vitro tests. Moreover, 2-ethyl-2H-1,4-benzoxazin-3(4H)-one (4a) and 4-acetyl-2-ethyl-2H-1,4-benzoxazin-3(4H)-one (6) were also screened for antifungal activity at concentrations of 100 mg L(-1) and 20 mg L(-1). In the concentration of 100 mg L(-1), the N-acetyl derivative (6) completely inhibited the growth of three strains of fungi (F. culmorum, P. cactorum and R. solani), while 2-ethyl-2H-1,4-benzoxazin-3(4H)-one (4a) completely inhibited only R. solani strain. At the concentration of 20 mg L(-1), compound 6 showed good activity only against P. cactorum strain (72%). PMID:26963527

  15. Modern NMR Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jelinski, Lynn W.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses direct chemical information that can be obtained from modern nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods, concentrating on the types of problems that can be solved. Shows how selected methods provide information about polymers, bipolymers, biochemistry, small organic molecules, inorganic compounds, and compounds oriented in a magnetic…

  16. The Spin-Lattice Relaxation of Hyperpolarized 89Y Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jindal, Ashish; Lumata, Lloyd; Xing, Yixun; Merritt, Matthew; Zhao, Piyu; Malloy, Craig; Sherry, Dean; Kovacs, Zoltan

    2011-03-01

    The low sensitivity of NMR can be overcome by dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP). However, a limitation to the use of hyperpolarized materials is the signal decay due to T1 relaxation. Among NMR-active nuclei, 89 Y is potentially valuable in medical imaging because in chelated form, pH-sensitive agents can be developed. 89 Y also offers many attractive features -- 100 % abundance, a 1/2 spin, and a long T1 , up to 10 min. Yet, developing new 89 Y complexes with even longer T1 values is desirable. Designing such complexes relies upon understanding the mechanism(s) responsible for T1 relaxation. We report an approach to hyperpolarized T1 measurements that enabled an analysis of relaxation mechanisms by selective deuteration of the ligand backbone, the solvent or both. Hyperpolarized 89 Y -- DTPA, DOTA, EDTA, and deuterated EDTA complexes were studied. Results suggest that substitution of low-gamma nuclei on the ligand backbone as opposed to that of the solvent most effectively increase the 89 Y T1 . These results are encouraging for in vivo applications as the presence of bound water may not dramatically affect the T1 .

  17. [Death in a relaxation tank].

    PubMed

    Rupp, Wolf; Simon, Karl-Heinz; Bohnert, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Complete relaxation can be achieved by floating in a darkened, sound-proof relaxation tank filled with salinated water kept at body temperature. Under these conditions, meditation exercises up to self-hypnosis may lead to deep relaxation with physical and mental revitalization. A user manipulated his tank, presumably to completely cut off all optical and acoustic stimuli and accidentally also covered the ventilation hole. The man was found dead in his relaxation tank. The findings suggested lack of oxygen as the cause of death.

  18. Topological constraints on magnetic relaxation.

    PubMed

    Yeates, A R; Hornig, G; Wilmot-Smith, A L

    2010-08-20

    The final state of turbulent magnetic relaxation in a reversed field pinch is well explained by Taylor's hypothesis. However, recent resistive-magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the relaxation of braided solar coronal loops have led to relaxed fields far from the Taylor state, despite the conservation of helicity. We point out the existence of an additional topological invariant in any flux tube with a nonzero field: the topological degree of the field line mapping. We conjecture that this constrains the relaxation, explaining why only one of three example simulations reaches the Taylor state. PMID:20868104

  19. Molecular hydrogen complexes of the transition metals. 2. Evidence for a new complex, Mo(CO) (dppe)/sub 2/(H/sub 2/), and for solution equilibrium between dihydrogen and dihydride forms, M-eta/sup 2/-H/sub 2/ in equilibrium H-M-H, in W(CO)/sub 3/(PR/sub 3/)/sub 2/(H/sub 2/)

    SciTech Connect

    Kubas, G.J.; Ryan, R.R.; Wrobleski, D.A.

    1986-03-19

    Coordination of molecular hydrogen to transition metals is now firmly established, initially in the stable, structurally characterized complexes M(CO)/sub 3/(PR/sub 3/)/sub 2/(eta/sup 2/-H/sub 2/) (M = Mo, W; R = Cy, i-Pr), then in low-temperature stable Cr(CO)/sub 5/(H/sub 2/), and recently in IrH(H/sub 2/)(PPh/sub 3/)/sub 2/(C/sub 13/H/sub 8/N))SbF/sub 6/, (IrH/sub 2/(H/sub 2/)/sub 2/L/sub 2/)/sup +/, and (FeH(H/sub 2/)(dppe)/sub 2/)BF/sub 4/. In order to better define the steric and electronic requirements for H/sub 2/ to bind in molecular fashion rather than being cleaved to hydride ligands, reported here is new stable H/sub 2/ complex, Mo(CO)(dppe)/sub 2/(H/sub 2/) (dppe = diphenylphosphinoethane). Also, NMR evidence is presented for a dynamic equilibrium between the H/sub 2/ complex W(CO)/sub 3/(P-i-Pr/sub 3/)/sub 2/(eta/sup 2/-H/sub 2/), and an apparent dihydride complex, WH/sub 2/(CO)/sub 3/)P-i-Pr/sub 3/)/sub 2/, derived by oxidative addition of the H/sub 2/ ligand. 16 references, 2 figures.

  20. Relaxation Techniques for Trauma.

    PubMed

    Scotland-Coogan, Diane; Davis, Erin

    2016-01-01

    Physiological symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) manifest as increased arousal and reactivity seen as anger outburst, irritability, reckless behavior with no concern for consequences, hypervigilance, sleep disturbance, and problems with focus (American Psychiatric Association, 2013 ). In seeking the most beneficial treatment for PTSD, consideration must be given to the anxiety response. Relaxation techniques are shown to help address the physiological manifestations of prolonged stress. The techniques addressed by the authors in this article include mindfulness, deep breathing, yoga, and meditation. By utilizing these techniques traditional therapies can be complemented. In addition, those who are averse to the traditional evidence-based practices or for those who have tried traditional therapies without success; these alternative interventions may assist in lessening physiological manifestations of PTSD. Future research studies assessing the benefits of these treatment modalities are warranted to provide empirical evidence to support the efficacy of these treatments. PMID:27119722

  1. Comet Bursting Through Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Seth A.; Scheeres, D. J.

    2012-10-01

    Comets may be excited and occupy non-principal axis (complex) rotation states for a large fraction of their lifetimes. Many comet nuclei have been identified or are suspected to occupy non-principal axis (complex) rotation [Belton 2005, etc.] as well as have evolving rotation rates [Belton 2011, etc.]. Comet orbits drive these rotation states through cycles of excitation due to surface jets and relaxation due to time variable internal stresses that dissipate energy in the anelastic comet interior. Furthermore, relaxation from complex rotation can increase the loads along the symmetry axis of prolate comets. These loads stretch the body along the symmetry axis and may be the cause of the characteristic ``bowling pin’’ shape and eventually may lead to failure. This is an alternative model for comet bursting. Each cycle deposits only a small amount of energy and stress along the axis, but this process is repeated every orbit during which jets are activated. Our model for the evolution of comet nuclei includes torques due to a number of discrete jets located on the surface based on Neishtadt et al. [2002]. The model also includes internal dissipation using an approach developed by Sharma et al. [2005] and Vokrouhlicky et al. [2009]. These equations are averaged over the instantaneous spin state and the heliocentric orbit so the long-term evolution of the comet can be determined. We determine that even after the inclusion of internal dissipation there still exist non-principal axis equilibrium states for certain jet geometries. For ranges of dissipation factors and jet geometries, prolate comets are found to occupy states that have time variable internal loads over long time periods. These periodic loadings along the symmetry axis may lead to ``necking’’ as the body extends along the axis to release the stress and eventually disruption.

  2. The infrared spectra of C2H4(+) and C2H3 trapped in solid neon.

    PubMed

    Jacox, Marilyn E; Thompson, Warren E

    2011-02-14

    When a mixture of ethylene in a large excess of neon is codeposited at 4.3 K with a beam of neon atoms that have been excited in a microwave discharge, two groups of product absorptions appear in the infrared spectrum of the deposit. Similar studies using C(2)H(4)-1-(13)C and C(2)D(4) aid in product identification. The first group of absorptions arises from a cation product which possesses two identical carbon atoms, giving the first infrared identification of two fundamentals of C(2)H(4)(+) and three of C(2)D(4)(+), as well as a tentative identification of ν(9) of C(2)H(4)(+). The positions of these absorptions are consistent with the results of density functional calculations and of earlier photoelectron studies. All of the members of the second group of product absorptions possess two inequivalent carbon atoms. They are assigned to the vinyl radical, C(2)H(3), and to C(2)D(3), in agreement with other recent infrared assignments for those species.

  3. Observations of CH4, C2H6, and C2H2 in the stratosphere of Jupiter.

    PubMed

    Sada, P V; Bjoraker, G L; Jennings, D E; McCabe, G H; Romani, P N

    1998-12-01

    We have performed high-resolution spectral observations at mid-infrared wavelengths of CH4 (8.14 micrometers), C2H6 (12.16 micrometers), and C2H2 (13.45 micrometers) on Jupiter. These emission features probe the stratosphere of the planet and provide information on the carbon-based photochemical processes taking place in that region of the atmosphere. The observations were performed using our cryogenic echelle spectrometer CELESTE, in conjunction with the McMath-Pierce 1.5-m solar telescope between November 1994 and February 1995. We used the methane observations to derive the temperature profile of the jovian atmosphere in the 1-10 mbar region of the stratosphere. This profile was then used in conjunction with height-dependent mixing ratios of each hydrocarbon to determine global abundances for ethane and acetylene. The resulting mixing ratios are 3.9(+1.9)(-1.3) x 10(-6) for C2H6 (5 mbar pressure level), and 2.3 +/- 0.5 x 10(-8) for C2H2 (8 mbar pressure level), where the quoted uncertainties are derived from model variations in the temperature profile which match the methane observation uncertainties. PMID:11878354

  4. Search for the isomers of C2H3NO and C2H3NS in the Interstellar Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etim, Emmanuel; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Das, Ankan; Gorai, Prasanta; Arunan, Elangannan

    2016-07-01

    With about 40% of all the known interstellar and circumstellar molecules having their isomeric analogues as known astromolecules, isomerism remains one of the leading themes in interstellar chemistry. In this regard, the recent detection of methyl isocyanate (with a number of isomeric analogues) in the Sgr B2(N) giant molecular cloud opens a new window for the possible astronomical detection of other C_2H_3NO isomers. The present work looks at the possibility of detecting other isomers of methyl isocyanate by considering different factors such as thermodynamic stability of the different isomers with respect to the Energy, Stability and Abundance (ESA) relationship, effect of interstellar hydrogen bonding with respect to the formation these isomers on the surface of the interstellar dust grains, possible formation routes for these isomers, spectroscopic parameters for potential astromolecules among these isomers, chemical modeling among other studies. The same studies are repeated for the C_2H_3NS isomers which are the isoelectroninc analogues of the C_2H_3NO isomers taking into account the unique chemistry of S and O-containing interstellar molecular species. Among the C_2H_3NS isomers, methyl isothiocyanate remains the most potential candidate for astronomical observation.

  5. A practical tutorial to set up NMR diffusometry equipment: application to liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Cifelli, M

    2014-10-01

    NMR diffusometry is nowadays a well-established and powerful technique to investigate molecular translation in fluid materials. Standard NMR diffusometry approaches are based on pulsed field gradients generated by specific hardware and specially designed NMR probes. Here, we present an alternative set-up that exploits the static gradient present in the fringe field of any commercial superconducting magnet. This stray field diffusometry technique can be particularly useful to study diffusional processes in fast-relaxing and slow-diffusing systems, such as thermotropic liquid crystals, ionic liquids and polymer melts. PMID:25042779

  6. Direct measurements of protein backbone 15N spin relaxation rates from peak line-width using a fully-relaxed Accordion 3D HNCO experiment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kang; Tjandra, Nico

    2009-03-01

    Protein backbone (15)N spin relaxation rates measured by solution NMR provide useful dynamic information with a site-specific resolution. The conventional method is to record a series of 2D (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectra with varied relaxation delays, and derive relaxation rate from the following curve fitting on the resonance intensities. Proteins with poorly resolved spectra often require several 3D HNCO spectra to be collected on a (15)N/(13)C double labeled protein sample. In order to reduce the relaxation dimension Carr et al. (P.A. Carr, D.A. Fearing, A.G. Palmer, 3D accordion spectroscopy for measuring N-15 and (CO)-Carbon-13 relaxation rates in poorly resolved NMR spectra, J. Magn. Reson. 132 (1998) 25-33) employed an Accordion type HNCO pulse sequence to obtain (15)N or (13)C T(1) relaxation rates by numerical fitting of the relaxation interfered free induction decay (FID) data. To avoid intensive analysis of the time domain data, we propose a modified protocol to measure (15)N T(1) and T(2) relaxation rates from easily obtained line-widths in an Accordion HNCO spectrum. Both T(1) and T(2) relaxation could be simultaneously convoluted into the constant-time evolution periods of (13)C' and (15)N, respectively. The relaxation delay was allowed to reach at least 3 x T(1) or 3 x T(2) so that the signal was substantially decayed by the end of the FID, and the resulting peak full-width at half height (FWHH) could be directly used to calculate relaxation rate. When applied to the 76-residue Ubiquitin and the 226-residue glutamine-binding protein (GlnBP), this method yielded T(1) and T(2) values deviating on average by 4-6% and 5-7%, respectively, from the measurements based on the conventional 2D method. In comparison, the conventional methods possessed intrinsic error ranges of 2-4% for T(1) and 3-6% for T(2). In addition to comparable accuracy, the fully-relaxed Accordion HNCO method presented here allowed measurements of relaxation rates for resonances unresolved in

  7. High-resolution NMR of hydrogen in organic solids by DNP enhanced natural abundance deuterium spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rossini, Aaron J; Schlagnitweit, Judith; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate that high field (9.4 T) dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at cryogenic (∼100 K) sample temperatures enables the rapid acquisition of natural abundance (1)H-(2)H cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) solid-state NMR spectra of organic solids. Spectra were obtained by impregnating substrates with a solution of the stable DNP polarizing agent TEKPol in tetrachloroethane. Tetrachloroethane is a non-solvent for the solids, and the unmodified substrates are then polarized through spin diffusion. High quality natural abundance (2)H CPMAS spectra of histidine hydrochloride monohydrate, glycylglycine and theophylline were acquired in less than 2h, providing direct access to hydrogen chemical shifts and quadrupolar couplings. The spectral resolution of the (2)H solid-state NMR spectra is comparable to that of (1)H spectra obtained with state of the art homonuclear decoupling techniques.

  8. High-resolution NMR of hydrogen in organic solids by DNP enhanced natural abundance deuterium spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossini, Aaron J.; Schlagnitweit, Judith; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate that high field (9.4 T) dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at cryogenic (∼100 K) sample temperatures enables the rapid acquisition of natural abundance 1H-2H cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) solid-state NMR spectra of organic solids. Spectra were obtained by impregnating substrates with a solution of the stable DNP polarizing agent TEKPol in tetrachloroethane. Tetrachloroethane is a non-solvent for the solids, and the unmodified substrates are then polarized through spin diffusion. High quality natural abundance 2H CPMAS spectra of histidine hydrochloride monohydrate, glycylglycine and theophylline were acquired in less than 2 h, providing direct access to hydrogen chemical shifts and quadrupolar couplings. The spectral resolution of the 2H solid-state NMR spectra is comparable to that of 1H spectra obtained with state of the art homonuclear decoupling techniques.

  9. Refractive index and birefringence of 2H silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    The refractive indices of 2H SiC were measured over the wavelength range 435.8 to 650.9 nm by the method of minimum deviation. At the wavelength lambda = 546.1 nm, the ordinary index n sub 0 was 2.6480 and the extraordinary index n sub e was 2.7237. The estimated error (standard deviation) in the measured values is 0.0006 for n sub 0 and 0.0009 for n sub e. The experimental data were curve fitted to the Cauchy equation for the index of refraction as a function of wavelength. The birefringence of 2H SiC was found to vary from 0.0719 at lambda = 650.9 nm to 0.0846 at lambda = 435.8 nm.

  10. Solution NMR structure of a designed metalloprotein and complementary molecular dynamics refinement.

    PubMed

    Calhoun, Jennifer R; Liu, Weixia; Spiegel, Katrin; Dal Peraro, Matteo; Klein, Michael L; Valentine, Kathleen G; Wand, A Joshua; DeGrado, William F

    2008-02-01

    We report the solution NMR structure of a designed dimetal-binding protein, di-Zn(II) DFsc, along with a secondary refinement step employing molecular dynamics techniques. Calculation of the initial NMR structural ensemble by standard methods led to distortions in the metal-ligand geometries at the active site. Unrestrained molecular dynamics using a nonbonded force field for the metal shell, followed by quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical dynamics of DFsc, were used to relax local frustrations at the dimetal site that were apparent in the initial NMR structure and provide a more realistic description of the structure. The MD model is consistent with NMR restraints, and in good agreement with the structural and functional properties expected for DF proteins. This work demonstrates that NMR structures of metalloproteins can be further refined using classical and first-principles molecular dynamics methods in the presence of explicit solvent to provide otherwise unavailable insight into the geometry of the metal center.

  11. Charge transfer in energetic Li^2+ - H collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancev, I.

    2008-07-01

    The total cross sections for charge transfer in Li^2+ - H collisions have been calculated, using the four-body first Born approximation with correct boundary conditions (CB1-4B) and four-body continuum distorted wave method (CDW-4B) in the energy range 10 - 5000 keV/amu. Present results call for additional experimental data at higher impact energies than presently available.

  12. Thermodynamic properties of solid C2H4

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Shao-mu; Eyring, Henry

    1979-01-01

    The significant structures procedure of liquids has been used to calculate the thermodynamic properties of solid C2H4. Two degeneracy terms were used to describe the behavior in the vicinities of the two phase transitions. The calculated entropy and specific heat agree well with experimental results from a few kelvins to the melting point. Less satisfactory agreement is obtained for compressibility and thermal expansion coefficients. This simple model represents surprisingly well the phase transitions in the solid state. PMID:16592659

  13. C(2)H(4) metabolism in morning glory flowers.

    PubMed

    Beyer, E M; Sundin, O

    1978-06-01

    Flowers of Ipomoea tricolor Cav. (cv. Heavenly Blue) were cut at various stages of development and evaluated for their ability to metabolize ethylene. Freshly cut buds or flowers were treated in glass containers for 8 hours with 6 mul/liter of highly purified (14)C(2)H(4). Following removal of dissolved (14)C(2)H(4), radioactivity was determined for the different flower tissues and trappd CO(2). (14)C(2)H(4) oxidation to (14)CO(2) and tissue incorporation occurred at very low to nondetectable levels 2 to 3 days prior to flower opening. About 1 day prior to full bloom, just at the time when mature buds become responsive to ethylene (Kende and Hanson, Plant Physiol 1976, 57: 523-527), there was a dramatic increase in the capacity of the buds to oxidize (14)C(2)H(4) to (14)CO(2). This activity continued to increase until the flower was fully opened reaching a peak activity of 2,500 dpm per three flowers per 8 hours. It then declined as the flower closed and rapidly senesced. A similar but smaller peak occurred in tissue incorporation and it was followed by a second peak during late flower senescence. This first peak in tissue incorporation and the dramatic peak in ethylene oxidation slightly preceded a large peak of natural ethylene production which accompanied flower senescence. The ethylene metabolism observed was clearly dependent on cellular metabolism and did not involve microorganisms since heat killing destroyed this activity and badly contaminated heat-killed flowers were unable to metabolize ethylene.

  14. A study of phenylalanine side-chain dynamics in surface-adsorbed peptides using solid-state deuterium NMR and rotamer library statistics.

    PubMed

    Li, Kun; Emani, Prashant S; Ash, Jason; Groves, Michael; Drobny, Gary P

    2014-08-13

    Extracellular matrix proteins adsorbed onto mineral surfaces exist in a unique environment where the structure and dynamics of the protein can be altered profoundly. To further elucidate how the mineral surface impacts molecular properties, we perform a comparative study of the dynamics of nonpolar side chains within the mineral-recognition domain of the biomineralization protein salivary statherin adsorbed onto its native hydroxyapatite (HAP) mineral surface versus the dynamics displayed by the native protein in the hydrated solid state. Specifically, the dynamics of phenylalanine side chains (viz., F7 and F14) located in the surface-adsorbed 15-amino acid HAP-recognition fragment (SN15: DpSpSEEKFLRRIGRFG) are studied using deuterium magic angle spinning ((2)H MAS) line shape and spin-lattice relaxation measurements. (2)H NMR MAS spectra and T1 relaxation times obtained from the deuterated phenylalanine side chains in free and HAP-adsorbed SN15 are fitted to models where the side chains are assumed to exchange between rotameric states and where the exchange rates and a priori rotameric state populations are varied iteratively. In condensed proteins, phenylalanine side-chain dynamics are dominated by 180° flips of the phenyl ring, i.e., the "π flip". However, for both F7 and F14, the number of exchanging side-chain rotameric states increases in the HAP-bound complex relative to the unbound solid sample, indicating that increased dynamic freedom accompanies introduction of the protein into the biofilm state. The observed rotameric exchange dynamics in the HAP-bound complex are on the order of 5-6 × 10(6) s(-1), as determined from the deuterium MAS line shapes. The dynamics in the HAP-bound complex are also shown to have some solution-like behavioral characteristics, with some interesting deviations from rotameric library statistics.

  15. Following Metabolism in Living Microorganisms by Hyperpolarized (1)H NMR.

    PubMed

    Dzien, Piotr; Fages, Anne; Jona, Ghil; Brindle, Kevin M; Schwaiger, Markus; Frydman, Lucio

    2016-09-21

    Dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (dDNP) is used to enhance the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), enabling monitoring of metabolism and specific enzymatic reactions in vivo. dDNP involves rapid sample dissolution and transfer to a spectrometer/scanner for subsequent signal detection. So far, most biologically oriented dDNP studies have relied on hyperpolarizing long-lived nuclear spin species such as (13)C in small molecules. While advantages could also arise from observing hyperpolarized (1)H, short relaxation times limit the utility of prepolarizing this sensitive but fast relaxing nucleus. Recently, it has been reported that (1)H NMR peaks in solution-phase experiments could be hyperpolarized by spontaneous magnetization transfers from bound (13)C nuclei following dDNP. This work demonstrates the potential of this sensitivity-enhancing approach to probe the enzymatic process that could not be suitably resolved by (13)C dDNP MR. Here we measured, in microorganisms, the action of pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) and pyruvate formate lyase (PFL)-enzymes that catalyze the decarboxylation of pyruvate to form acetaldehyde and formate, respectively. While (13)C NMR did not possess the resolution to distinguish the starting pyruvate precursor from the carbonyl resonances in the resulting products, these processes could be monitored by (1)H NMR at 500 MHz. These observations were possible in both yeast and bacteria in minute-long kinetic measurements where the hyperpolarized (13)C enhanced, via (13)C → (1)H cross-relaxation, the signals of protons binding to the (13)C over the course of enzymatic reactions. In addition to these spontaneous heteronuclear enhancement experiments, single-shot acquisitions based on J-driven (13)C → (1)H polarization transfers were also carried out. These resulted in higher signal enhancements of the (1)H resonances but were not suitable for multishot kinetic studies. The potential of these (1)H-based approaches for

  16. Recovering Invisible Signals by Two-Field NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cousin, Samuel F; Kadeřávek, Pavel; Haddou, Baptiste; Charlier, Cyril; Marquardsen, Thorsten; Tyburn, Jean-Max; Bovier, Pierre-Alain; Engelke, Frank; Maas, Werner; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Pelupessy, Philippe; Ferrage, Fabien

    2016-08-16

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies have benefited tremendously from the steady increase in the strength of magnetic fields. Spectacular improvements in both sensitivity and resolution have enabled the investigation of molecular systems of rising complexity. At very high fields, this progress may be jeopardized by line broadening, which is due to chemical exchange or relaxation by chemical shift anisotropy. In this work, we introduce a two-field NMR spectrometer designed for both excitation and observation of nuclear spins in two distinct magnetic fields in a single experiment. NMR spectra of several small molecules as well as a protein were obtained, with two dimensions acquired at vastly different magnetic fields. Resonances of exchanging groups that are broadened beyond recognition at high field can be sharpened to narrow peaks in the low-field dimension. Two-field NMR spectroscopy enables the measurement of chemical shifts at optimal fields and the study of molecular systems that suffer from internal dynamics, and opens new avenues for NMR spectroscopy at very high magnetic fields.

  17. Live cell NMR.

    PubMed

    Freedberg, Darón I; Selenko, Philipp

    2014-01-01

    Ever since scientists realized that cells are the basic building blocks of all life, they have been developing tools to look inside them to reveal the architectures and mechanisms that define their biological functions. Whereas "looking into cells" is typically said in reference to optical microscopy, high-resolution in-cell and on-cell nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a powerful method that offers exciting new possibilities for structural and functional studies in and on live cells. In contrast to conventional imaging techniques, in- and on-cell NMR methods do not provide spatial information on cellular biomolecules. Instead, they enable atomic-resolution insights into the native cell states of proteins, nucleic acids, glycans, and lipids. Here we review recent advances and developments in both fields and discuss emerging concepts that have been delineated with these methods.

  18. Estimation of water retention parameters from nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation time distributions

    PubMed Central

    Costabel, Stephan; Yaramanci, Ugur

    2013-01-01

    [1] For characterizing water flow in the vadose zone, the water retention curve (WRC) of the soil must be known. Because conventional WRC measurements demand much time and effort in the laboratory, alternative methods with shortened measurement duration are desired. The WRC can be estimated, for instance, from the cumulative pore size distribution (PSD) of the investigated material. Geophysical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry have successfully been applied to recover PSDs of sandstones and limestones. It is therefore expected that the multiexponential analysis of the NMR signal from water-saturated loose sediments leads to a reliable estimation of the WRC. We propose an approach to estimate the WRC using the cumulative NMR relaxation time distribution and approximate it with the well-known van-Genuchten (VG) model. Thereby, the VG parameter n, which controls the curvature of the WRC, is of particular interest, because it is the essential parameter to predict the relative hydraulic conductivity. The NMR curves are calibrated with only two conventional WRC measurements, first, to determine the residual water content and, second, to define a fixed point that relates the relaxation time to a corresponding capillary pressure. We test our approach with natural and artificial soil samples and compare the NMR-based results to WRC measurements using a pressure plate apparatus and to WRC predictions from the software ROSETTA. We found that for sandy soils n can reliably be estimated with NMR, whereas for samples with clay and silt contents higher than 10% the estimation fails. This is the case when the hydraulic properties of the soil are mainly controlled by the pore constrictions. For such samples, the sensitivity of the NMR method for the pore bodies hampers a plausible WRC estimation. Citation: Costabel, S., and U. Yaramanci (2013), Estimation of water retention parameters from nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation time distributions, Water

  19. The distribution of ND2H in LDN 1689N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerin, M.; Lis, D. C.; Philipp, S.; Güsten, R.; Roueff, E.; Reveret, V.

    2006-08-01

    Aims.Finding tracers of the innermost regions of prestellar cores is important for understanding their chemical and dynamical evolution before the onset of gravitational collapse. While classical molecular tracers, such as CO and CS, have been shown to be strongly depleted in cold, dense gas by condensation on grain mantles, it has been a subject of discussion to what extent nitrogen-bearing species, such as ammonia, are affected by this process. As deuterium fractionation is efficient in cold, dense gas, deuterated species are excellent tracers of prestellar cores. A comparison of the spatial distribution of neutral and ionized deuterated species with the dust continuum emission can thus provide important insights into the physical and chemical structure of such regions. Methods: .We study the spatial distribution of the ground-state 335.5 GHz line of ND2H in LDN 1689N, using APEX, and compare it with the distribution of the DCO+(3-2) line, as well as the 350 μm dust continuum emission observed with the SHARC II bolometer camera at CSO. Results: .While the distribution of the ND2H emission in LDN 1689N is generally similar to that of the 350 μm dust continuum emission, the peak of the ND2H emission is offset by ~10'' to the East from the dust continuum and DCO+ emission peak. ND2H and ND3 share the same spatial distribution. The observed offset between the ND2H and DCO+ emission is consistent with the hypothesis that the deuterium peak in LDN 1689N is an interaction region between the outflow shock from IRAS 16293-2422 and the dense ambient gas. We detect the J = 4 → 3 line of H13CO+ at 346.998 GHz in the image side band serendipitously. This line shows the same spatial distribution as DCO+(3-2), and peaks close to the 350 μm emission maximum which provides further support for the shock interaction scenario.

  20. NMR Studies of Peroxidases.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veitch, Nigel Charles

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. Peroxidases are a haem-containing group of enzymes with a wide diversity of function within biological systems. While a common characteristic is the ability to catalyse the conversion of hydrogen peroxide to water, it is the accompanying processes of hormone synthesis and degradation which have generated such a high level of interest. However, information at the molecular level is limited to a single well-resolved crystal structure, that of yeast cytochrome c peroxidase. This thesis presents a strategy for the investigation of peroxidase structure and function based on proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, a technique which has the ability to address aspects of both protein structure and protein dynamics in solution. The application of one- and two-dimensional NMR techniques has been developed in the context of plant peroxidases, notably the isoenzyme HRP-C derived from the horseradish root. Characterisation of the proton NMR spectra of HRP -C in resting and ligated states provided new information enabling the structure of the binding site for aromatic donor molecules, such as indole-3-propionic, ferulic and benzhydroxamic acids, to be resolved. In order to overcome difficulties encountered with a protein of the complexity of peroxidase, additional information was obtained from chemical shift parameters and the use of peroxidase variants produced by site-directed mutagenesis. A comparative study using NMR spectroscopy was undertaken for wild-type recombinant HRP-C expressed in Escherichia coli, and two protein variants with substitutions made to residues located on the distal side of the haem pocket, Phe41 to Val and Arg38 to Lys. NMR analyses of a plant peroxidase from barley grains and the fungal peroxidase from Coprinus cinereus were also successful using methods conceived with HRP-C. Examination of three specifically constructed recombinant protein variants of C. cinereus

  1. The NMR phased array.

    PubMed

    Roemer, P B; Edelstein, W A; Hayes, C E; Souza, S P; Mueller, O M

    1990-11-01

    We describe methods for simultaneously acquiring and subsequently combining data from a multitude of closely positioned NMR receiving coils. The approach is conceptually similar to phased array radar and ultrasound and hence we call our techniques the "NMR phased array." The NMR phased array offers the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and resolution of a small surface coil over fields-of-view (FOV) normally associated with body imaging with no increase in imaging time. The NMR phased array can be applied to both imaging and spectroscopy for all pulse sequences. The problematic interactions among nearby surface coils is eliminated (a) by overlapping adjacent coils to give zero mutual inductance, hence zero interaction, and (b) by attaching low input impedance preamplifiers to all coils, thus eliminating interference among next nearest and more distant neighbors. We derive an algorithm for combining the data from the phased array elements to yield an image with optimum SNR. Other techniques which are easier to implement at the cost of lower SNR are explored. Phased array imaging is demonstrated with high resolution (512 x 512, 48-cm FOV, and 32-cm FOV) spin-echo images of the thoracic and lumbar spine. Data were acquired from four-element linear spine arrays, the first made of 12-cm square coils and the second made of 8-cm square coils. When compared with images from a single 15 x 30-cm rectangular coil and identical imaging parameters, the phased array yields a 2X and 3X higher SNR at the depth of the spine (approximately 7 cm). PMID:2266841

  2. NMR imaging of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H.J.; Rothwell, W.P.

    1988-03-01

    A method for obtaining at least one petrophysical property of a porous material containing therein at least one preselected fluid, is described, comprising: NMR imaging the material to generate signals dependent upon both M(0) and T/sub 1/ and M(0) and T/sub 2/, generating separate M(0), T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/ images from the signals, and determining at least one petrophysical property from at least one of the images.

  3. NMR Methods, Applications and Trends for Groundwater Evaluation and Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, D. O.; Grunewald, E. D.

    2011-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements have a tremendous potential for improving groundwater characterization, as they provide direct detection and measurement of groundwater and unique information about pore-scale properties. NMR measurements, commonly used in chemistry and medicine, are utilized in geophysical investigations through non-invasive surface NMR (SNMR) or downhole NMR logging measurements. Our recent and ongoing research has focused on improving the performance and interpretation of NMR field measurements for groundwater characterization. Engineering advancements have addressed several key technical challenges associated with SNMR measurements. Susceptibility of SNMR measurements to environmental noise has been dramatically reduced through the development of multi-channel acquisition hardware and noise-cancellation software. Multi-channel instrumentation (up to 12 channels) has also enabled more efficient 2D and 3D imaging. Previous limitations in measuring NMR signals from water in silt, clay and magnetic geology have been addressed by shortening the instrument dead-time from 40 ms to 4 ms, and increasing the power output. Improved pulse sequences have been developed to more accurately estimate NMR relaxation times and their distributions, which are sensitive to pore size distributions. Cumulatively, these advancements have vastly expanded the range of environments in which SNMR measurements can be obtained, enabling detection of groundwater in smaller pores, in magnetic geology, in the unsaturated zone, and nearby to infrastructure (presented here in case studies). NMR logging can provide high-resolution estimates of bound and mobile water content and pore size distributions. While NMR logging has been utilized in oil and gas applications for decades, its use in groundwater investigations has been limited by the large size and high cost of oilfield NMR logging tools and services. Recently, engineering efforts funded by the US Department of

  4. Local Spin Relaxation within the Random Heisenberg Chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbrych, J.; Kokalj, J.; Prelovšek, P.

    2013-10-01

    Finite-temperature local dynamical spin correlations Snn(ω) are studied numerically within the random spin-1/2 antiferromagnetic Heisenberg chain. The aim is to explain measured NMR spin-lattice relaxation times in BaCu2(Si0.5Ge0.5)2O7, which is the realization of a random spin chain. In agreement with experiments we find that the distribution of relaxation times within the model shows a very large span similar to the stretched-exponential form. The distribution is strongly reduced with increasing T, but stays finite also in the high-T limit. Anomalous dynamical correlations can be associated with the random singlet concept but not directly with static quantities. Our results also reveal the crucial role of the spin anisotropy (interaction), since the behavior is in contrast with the ones for the XX model, where we do not find any significant T dependence of the distribution.

  5. Proton magnetic relaxation and internal rotations in tetramethylammonium cadmium chloride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, T.; Utton, D. B.

    1976-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and relaxation studies of the proton spin-lattice relaxation time (PSLRT) and proton second moment (PSM) are reported. Tetramethylammonium cadmium chloride (TMCC) was selected as a diamagnetic member of the isomorphic series, and hence proton data relate directly to the motion of the tetramethylammonium ion in the absence of paramagnetic ions. In the model adopted, the correlation time for hindered motion of one of the methyl groups differs from that of the other three groups in the low-temperature phase below 104 K. PSLRT and PSM values agree closely with experimental data with this model. Crystallographic phase transitions in TMCC occur at 104 K and 119 K according to the PSLRT measurements. Dipolar interactions between adjacent protons account for the PSLR rates below 104 K.

  6. The origin of biexponential T2 relaxation in muscle water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, W. C.; LeBlanc, A. D.; Jhingran, S. G.

    1993-01-01

    Two theories have been proposed to explain the multiexponential transverse relaxation of muscle water protons: "anatomical" and "chemical" compartmentation. In an attempt to obtain evidence to support one or the other of these two theories, interstitial and intracellular macromolecular preparations were studied and compared with rat muscle tissue by proton NMR transverse relaxation (T2) measurements. All macromolecule preparations displayed monoexponential T2 decay. Membrane alteration with DMSO/glycerin did not eliminate the biexponential T2 decay of muscle tissue. Maceration converted biexponential T2 decay of muscle tissue to single exponential decay. It is concluded that the observed two component exponential T2 decay of muscle represents anatomical compartmentation of tissue water, probably intracellular versus extracellular.

  7. The rate of the reaction between C2H and C2H2 at interstellar temperatures.

    PubMed

    Herbst, E; Woon, D E

    1997-11-01

    The reaction between the radical C2H and the stable hydrocarbon C2H2 is one of the simplest neutral-neutral hydrocarbon reactions in chemical models of dense interstellar clouds and carbon-rich circumstellar shells. Although known to be rapid at temperatures > or = 300 K, the reaction has yet to be studied at lower temperatures. We present here ab initio calculations of the potential surface for this reaction and dynamical calculations to determine its rate at low temperature. Despite a small potential barrier in the exit channel, the calculated rate is large, showing that this reaction and, most probably, more complex analogs contribute to the formation of complex organic molecules in low-temperature sources.

  8. The rate of the reaction between C2H and C2H2 at interstellar temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbst, E.; Woon, D. E.

    1997-01-01

    The reaction between the radical C2H and the stable hydrocarbon C2H2 is one of the simplest neutral-neutral hydrocarbon reactions in chemical models of dense interstellar clouds and carbon-rich circumstellar shells. Although known to be rapid at temperatures > or = 300 K, the reaction has yet to be studied at lower temperatures. We present here ab initio calculations of the potential surface for this reaction and dynamical calculations to determine its rate at low temperature. Despite a small potential barrier in the exit channel, the calculated rate is large, showing that this reaction and, most probably, more complex analogs contribute to the formation of complex organic molecules in low-temperature sources.

  9. Rapid proton-detected NMR assignment for proteins with fast magic angle spinning.

    PubMed

    Barbet-Massin, Emeline; Pell, Andrew J; Retel, Joren S; Andreas, Loren B; Jaudzems, Kristaps; Franks, W Trent; Nieuwkoop, Andrew J; Hiller, Matthias; Higman, Victoria; Guerry, Paul; Bertarello, Andrea; Knight, Michael J; Felletti, Michele; Le Marchand, Tanguy; Kotelovica, Svetlana; Akopjana, Inara; Tars, Kaspars; Stoppini, Monica; Bellotti, Vittorio; Bolognesi, Martino; Ricagno, Stefano; Chou, James J; Griffin, Robert G; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon; Herrmann, Torsten; Pintacuda, Guido

    2014-09-01

    Using a set of six (1)H-detected triple-resonance NMR experiments, we establish a method for sequence-specific backbone resonance assignment of magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of 5-30 kDa proteins. The approach relies on perdeuteration, amide (2)H/(1)H exchange, high magnetic fields, and high-spinning frequencies (ωr/2π ≥ 60 kHz) and yields high-quality NMR data, enabling the use of automated analysis. The method is validated with five examples of proteins in different condensed states, including two microcrystalline proteins, a sedimented virus capsid, and two membrane-embedded systems. In comparison to contemporary (13)C/(15)N-based methods, this approach facilitates and accelerates the MAS NMR assignment process, shortening the spectral acquisition times and enabling the use of unsupervised state-of-the-art computational data analysis protocols originally developed for solution NMR.

  10. NMR study of magnetism and superparamagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Shaojie

    The research described in this dissertation is concerned with two different types of magnetic materials. Both types of systems involve competing interactions between transition metal ions. New approaches involving magnetic resonance in the large hyperfine fields at nuclear sites have been developed. The interactions responsible for the properties that have been investigated in the materials studied are geometric frustration in an insulator and ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic interactions in a metal alloy. Further details are given below. The extended kagome frustrated system YBaCo4O7 has 2D kagome and triangular lattices of Co ions stacked along the c-axis. Antiferromagnetic (AF) ordering accompanied by a structural transition has been reported in the literature. From a zero field (ZF) NMR single crystal rotation experiment, we have obtained the Co spin configurations for both the kagome and triangular layers. A 'spin-flop' configuration between the spins on the kagome layer and the spins on the triangular layer is indicated by our results. Our NMR findings are compared with neutron scattering results for this intriguing frustrated AF spin system. The non-stoichiometric oxygenated sister compound YBaCo4O7.1 has application potential for oxygen storage. While, its' magnetic properties are quite different from those of the stoichiometric compound, in spite of their similar structures of alternating kagome and triangular Co layers. Various techniques, including ZF NMR have been used to investigate the spin dynamics and spin configuration in a single crystal of YBaCo4O7.1. A magnetic transition at 80 K is observed, which is interpreted as the freezing out of spins in the triangular layers. At low temperatures (below 50 K), the spin dynamics persists and a fraction of spins in the kagome layers form a viscous spin liquid. Below 10 K, a glass-like spin structure forms and a large distribution of spin correlation times are suggested by nuclear spin lattice relaxation

  11. Nuclear magnetic relaxation studies of semiconductor nanocrystals and solids

    SciTech Connect

    Sachleben, J. R.

    1993-09-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals, small biomolecules, and {sup 13}C enriched solids were studied through the relaxation in NMR spectra. Surface structure of semiconductor nanocrystals (CdS) was deduced from high resolution {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C liquid state spectra of thiophenol ligands on the nanocrystal surfaces. The surface coverage by thiophenol was found to be low, being 5.6 and 26% for nanocrystal radii of 11.8 and 19.2 {angstrom}. Internal motion is estimated to be slow with a correlation time > 10{sup {minus}8} s{sup {minus}1}. The surface thiophenol ligands react to form a dithiophenol when the nanocrystals were subjected to O{sub 2} and ultraviolet. A method for measuring {sup 14}N-{sup 1}H J-couplings is demonstrated on pyridine and the peptide oxytocin; selective 2D T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} experiments are presented for measuring relaxation times in crowded spectra with overlapping peaks in 1D, but relaxation effects interfere. Possibility of carbon-carbon cross relaxation in {sup 13}C enriched solids is demonstrated by experiments on zinc acetate and L-alanine.