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Sample records for 2h spin relaxation

  1. Anisotropic sup 2 H NMR spin-lattice relaxation in L sub. alpha. -phase cerebroside bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Speyer, J.B.; Weber, R.T.; Gupta, S.K.D.; Griffin, R.G. )

    1989-12-12

    A series of {sup 2}H NMR inversion recovery experiments in the L{sub {alpha}} phase of the cerebroside N-palmitoylgalactosylsphingosine (NPGS) have been performed. In these liquid crystalline lipid bilayers the authors have observed substantial anisotropy in the spin-lattice relaxation of the CD{sub 2} groups in the acyl chains. The form and magnitude of the anisotropy varies with position in the chain, being positive in the upper region, decreasing to zero at the 4-position, and reversing sign at the lower chain positions. It is also shown that addition of cholesterol to the bilayer results in profound changes in the anisotropy. These observations are accounted for by a simple motional model of discrete hops among nine sites, which result from the coupling of two modes of motion - long-axis rotational diffusion and guache-trans isomerization. This model is employed in quantitative simulations of the spectral line shapes and permits determination of site populations and motional rates. These results, plus preliminary results in sphingomyelin and lecithin bilayers,illustrate the utility of T{sub 1} anisotropy measurements as a probe of dynamics in L{sub {alpha}}-phase bilayers.

  2. Spin flop relaxation in the quasi-1d Heisenberg antiferromagnet CsMnBr 3 · 2H 2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirwa, M.; Top, J.; Flokstra, J.

    1983-12-01

    The relaxation phenomena associated with the antiferromagnetic to spin-flop phase transition in the quasi one dimensional Heisenberg antiferromagnet CsMnBr 3 · 2H 2O have been determined in the temperature range 1.6-4.2 K using an automatic frequency-sweeping SQUID susceptometer. Below Tλ = 2.17 K the relaxation rate τ -1 displays an exponential temperature dependence given by τ-1 = ω0 exp(- E/ kT) where ω0 = 2.48 × 10 4 s -1 and E/ k = 3.62 K, the activation energy of the relaxation process. Above Tλ broadened absorption curves and flattened Argand diagrams are observed. The ratio K1/ K2 (=0.22 ± 0.02) of the orthorhombic anisotropy constants and a weak power-law temperature dependence of the critical spin-flop field Hcr were determined.

  3. Resonance local phonon mode and electron spin-lattice relaxation of formate-type free radicals studied by electron spin echo in Cd(HCOO)2·2H2O crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, S. K.; Goslar, J.

    2015-07-01

    The results of X-band electron spin resonance (ESR) and electron spin echo (ESE) measurements for free radicals generated in Cd(HCOO)2·2H2O single crystal are presented. From ESR spectra analysis the radicals were identified as \\text{CO}2- after x-ray irradiation and as HOCO after γ-ray irradiation. The room temperature g-factors are: g|| = 1.9969 and g⊥ = 2.0024 for \\text{CO}2- and g1 = 2.0087, g2 = 2.0029 and g3 = 1.9960 for HOCO. Axial g-tensor symmetry for \\text{CO}2- is due to fast reorientation of the radical molecule around the g||-axis. Assignment of HOCO is confirmed by hyperfine splitting (Amax = 0.4 mT) from a single distant proton. Spin lattice relaxation rate was determined from ESE measurements in temperature range 4-250 K. Both radicals relax via local resonance mode lying within acoustic phonon branch. The existing theories of electron spin-lattice relaxation via local resonance mode are critically reviewed and compared with experimental data. A new approximation is proposed giving local mode energy \\hbar {ωR} = 56 cm-1 for \\text{CO}2- and \\hbar {ωR} = 44 cm-1 for the HOCO-radical.

  4. Spin relaxation in disordered media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzheparov, F. S.

    2011-10-01

    A review is given on theoretical grounds and typical experimental appearances of spin dynamics and relaxation in solids containing randomly distributed nuclear and/or electronic spins. Brief content is as follows. Disordered and magnetically diluted systems. General outlines of the spin transport theory. Random walks in disordered systems (RWDS). Observable values in phase spin relaxation, free induction decay (FID). Interrelation of longitudinal and transversal relaxation related to dynamics of occupancies and phases. Occupation number representation for equations of motion. Continuum media approximation and inapplicability of moment expansions. Long-range transitions vs percolation theory. Concentration expansion as a general constructive basis for analytical methods. Scaling properties of propagators. Singular point. Dynamical and kinematical memory in RWDS. Ways of regrouping of concentration expansions. CTRW and semi-phenomenology. Coherent medium approximation for nuclear relaxation via paramagnetic impurities. Combining of memory functions and cumulant expansions for calculation of FID. Path integral representations for RWDS. Numerical simulations of RWDS. Spin dynamics in magnetically diluted systems with low Zeeman and medium low dipole temperatures. Cluster expansions, regularization of dipole interactions and spectral dynamics.

  5. Molecular dynamics in paramagnetic materials as studied by magic-angle spinning 2H NMR spectra.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Motohiro; Suzuki, You; Endo, Kazunaka; Murakami, Miwa; Tansho, Masataka; Shimizu, Tadashi

    2007-12-20

    A magic-angle spinning (MAS) 2H NMR experiment was applied to study the molecular motion in paramagnetic compounds. The temperature dependences of 2H MAS NMR spectra were measured for paramagnetic [M(H2O)6][SiF6] (M=Ni2+, Mn2+, Co2+) and diamagnetic [Zn(H2O)6][SiF6]. The paramagnetic compounds exhibited an asymmetric line shape in 2H MAS NMR spectra because of the electron-nuclear dipolar coupling. The drastic changes in the shape of spinning sideband patterns and in the line width of spinning sidebands due to the 180 degrees flip of water molecules and the reorientation of [M(H2O)6]2+ about its C3 axis were observed. In the paramagnetic compounds, paramagnetic spin-spin relaxation and anisotropic g-factor result in additional linebroadening of each of the spinning sidebands. The spectral simulation of MAS 2H NMR, including the effects of paramagnetic shift and anisotropic spin-spin relaxation due to electron-nuclear dipolar coupling and anisotropic g-factor, was performed for several molecular motions. Information about molecular motions in the dynamic range of 10(2) s(-1)2H MAS NMR spectra when these paramagnetic effects are taken into account. PMID:18027914

  6. Spin relaxation in metallic ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, L.

    2011-02-01

    The Elliott theory of spin relaxation in metals and semiconductors is extended to metallic ferromagnets. Our treatment is based on the two-current model of Fert, Campbell, and Jaoul. The d→s electron-scattering process involved in spin relaxation is the inverse of the s→d process responsible for the anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR). As a result, spin-relaxation rate 1/τsr and AMR Δρ are given by similar formulas, and are in a constant ratio if scattering is by solute atoms. Our treatment applies to nickel- and cobalt-based alloys which do not have spin-up 3d states at the Fermi level. This category includes many of the technologically important magnetic materials. And we show how to modify the theory to apply it to bcc iron-based alloys. We also treat the case of Permalloy Ni80Fe20 at finite temperature or in thin-film form, where several kinds of scatterers exist. Predicted values of 1/τsr and Δρ are plotted versus resistivity of the sample. These predictions are compared to values of 1/τsr and Δρ derived from ferromagnetic-resonance and AMR experiments in Permalloy.

  7. 129Xe spin relaxation in frozen xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, R. J.; Gatzke, M.; Fox, David C.; Cates, G. D.; Happer, W.

    1999-04-01

    We discuss the longitudinal spin relaxation of 129Xe nuclei in frozen xenon. Over a large range of temperatures and magnetic fields, the dominant spin-lattice relaxation mechanism is shown to be nuclear spin-flip Raman scattering of lattice phonons. Two closely related interactions couple the lattice phonons to the spins of 129Xe nuclei: (1) the nuclear spin-rotation interaction between nearest-neighbor atoms, and (2) the paramagnetic antishielding of the externally applied field at the site of 129Xe nuclei by the electrons of neighboring Xe atoms. We show that relaxation rates can be predicted by using measured chemical shifts of gaseous and condensed xenon. The predicted relaxation rates are in good agreement with measurements. We outline a simple way to estimate the spin-rotation coupling and paramagnetic antishielding in terms of the small perturbations of the outermost electron orbitals of one xenon atom due to a neighboring atom.

  8. Site-resolved 2H relaxation experiments in solid materials by global line-shape analysis of MAS NMR spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindh, E. L.; Stilbs, P.; Furó, I.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate a way one can achieve good spectral resolution in 2H MAS NMR experiments. The goal is to be able to distinguish between and study sites in various deuterated materials with small chemical shift dispersion. We show that the 2H MAS NMR spectra recorded during a spin-relaxation experiment are amenable to spectral decomposition because of the different evolution of spectral components during the relaxation delay. We verify that the results are robust by global least-square fitting of the spectral series both under the assumption of specific line shapes and without such assumptions (COmponent-REsolved spectroscopy, CORE). In addition, we investigate the reliability of the developed protocol by analyzing spectra simulated with different combinations of spectral parameters. The performance is demonstrated in a model material of deuterated poly(methacrylic acid) that contains two 2H spin populations with similar chemical shifts but different quadrupole splittings. In 2H-exchanged cellulose containing two 2H spin populations with very similar chemical shifts and quadrupole splittings, the method provides new site-selective information about the molecular dynamics.

  9. Site-resolved (2)H relaxation experiments in solid materials by global line-shape analysis of MAS NMR spectra.

    PubMed

    Lindh, E L; Stilbs, P; Furó, I

    2016-07-01

    We investigate a way one can achieve good spectral resolution in (2)H MAS NMR experiments. The goal is to be able to distinguish between and study sites in various deuterated materials with small chemical shift dispersion. We show that the (2)H MAS NMR spectra recorded during a spin-relaxation experiment are amenable to spectral decomposition because of the different evolution of spectral components during the relaxation delay. We verify that the results are robust by global least-square fitting of the spectral series both under the assumption of specific line shapes and without such assumptions (COmponent-REsolved spectroscopy, CORE). In addition, we investigate the reliability of the developed protocol by analyzing spectra simulated with different combinations of spectral parameters. The performance is demonstrated in a model material of deuterated poly(methacrylic acid) that contains two (2)H spin populations with similar chemical shifts but different quadrupole splittings. In (2)H-exchanged cellulose containing two (2)H spin populations with very similar chemical shifts and quadrupole splittings, the method provides new site-selective information about the molecular dynamics. PMID:27152833

  10. Spin-orbit coupling and spin relaxation in phosphorene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurpas, Marcin; Gmitra, Martin; Fabian, Jaroslav

    We employ first principles density functional theory calculations to study intrinsic and extrinsic spin-orbit coupling in monolayer phosphorene. We also extract the spin-mixing amplitudes of the Bloch wave functions to give realistic estimates of the Elliott-Yafet spin relaxation rate. The most remarkable result is the striking anisotropy in both spin-orbit coupling and spin relaxation rates, which could be tested experimentally in spin injection experiments. We also identify spin hot spots in the electronic structure of phosphorene at accidental bands anticrossings. We compare the Elliott-Yafet with Dyakonov-Perel spin relaxation times, obtained from extrinsic couplings in an applied electric field. We also compare the results in phosphorene with those of black phosphorous. This work is supported by the DFG SPP 1538, SFB 689, and by the EU Seventh Framework Programme under Grant Agreement No. 604391 Graphene Flagship.

  11. Doppler effect induced spin relaxation boom.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xinyu; Huang, Peihao; Hu, Xuedong

    2016-01-01

    We study an electron spin qubit confined in a moving quantum dot (QD), with our attention on both spin relaxation, and the product of spin relaxation, the emitted phonons. We find that Doppler effect leads to several interesting phenomena. In particular, spin relaxation rate peaks when the QD motion is in the transonic regime, which we term a spin relaxation boom in analogy to the classical sonic boom. This peak indicates that a moving spin qubit may have even lower relaxation rate than a static qubit, pointing at the possibility of coherence-preserving transport for a spin qubit. We also find that the emitted phonons become strongly directional and narrow in their frequency range as the qubit reaches the supersonic regime, similar to Cherenkov radiation. In other words, fast moving excited spin qubits can act as a source of non-classical phonons. Compared to classical Cherenkov radiation, we show that quantum dot confinement produces a small but important correction on the Cherenkov angle. Taking together, these results have important implications to both spin-based quantum information processing and coherent phonon dynamics in semiconductor nanostructures. PMID:26996253

  12. Doppler effect induced spin relaxation boom

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xinyu; Huang, Peihao; Hu, Xuedong

    2016-01-01

    We study an electron spin qubit confined in a moving quantum dot (QD), with our attention on both spin relaxation, and the product of spin relaxation, the emitted phonons. We find that Doppler effect leads to several interesting phenomena. In particular, spin relaxation rate peaks when the QD motion is in the transonic regime, which we term a spin relaxation boom in analogy to the classical sonic boom. This peak indicates that a moving spin qubit may have even lower relaxation rate than a static qubit, pointing at the possibility of coherence-preserving transport for a spin qubit. We also find that the emitted phonons become strongly directional and narrow in their frequency range as the qubit reaches the supersonic regime, similar to Cherenkov radiation. In other words, fast moving excited spin qubits can act as a source of non-classical phonons. Compared to classical Cherenkov radiation, we show that quantum dot confinement produces a small but important correction on the Cherenkov angle. Taking together, these results have important implications to both spin-based quantum information processing and coherent phonon dynamics in semiconductor nanostructures. PMID:26996253

  13. Doppler effect induced spin relaxation boom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xinyu; Huang, Peihao; Hu, Xuedong

    2016-03-01

    We study an electron spin qubit confined in a moving quantum dot (QD), with our attention on both spin relaxation, and the product of spin relaxation, the emitted phonons. We find that Doppler effect leads to several interesting phenomena. In particular, spin relaxation rate peaks when the QD motion is in the transonic regime, which we term a spin relaxation boom in analogy to the classical sonic boom. This peak indicates that a moving spin qubit may have even lower relaxation rate than a static qubit, pointing at the possibility of coherence-preserving transport for a spin qubit. We also find that the emitted phonons become strongly directional and narrow in their frequency range as the qubit reaches the supersonic regime, similar to Cherenkov radiation. In other words, fast moving excited spin qubits can act as a source of non-classical phonons. Compared to classical Cherenkov radiation, we show that quantum dot confinement produces a small but important correction on the Cherenkov angle. Taking together, these results have important implications to both spin-based quantum information processing and coherent phonon dynamics in semiconductor nanostructures.

  14. Nuclear spin relaxation of polycrystalline 129 xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuelson, Gary Lee, Jr.

    Through spin exchange optical pumping, it is possible to achieve upwards of 30% nuclear spin polarization in 129Xe with an NMR signal enhancement of some 5 orders of magnitude over typical thermal signals. Hyperpolarized 129Xe has thus found application in several leading-edge technologies. At 1 T and 4.2 K, the characteristic relaxation time of enriched polycrystalline 129Xe (86% 129Xe, 0.1% 131Xe) is well over 200 hrs, sufficient for long-term storage and transport. Longitudinal nuclear spin relaxation of 129Xe at more convenient fields from 1 to 200 G is studied in detail. Significant structure in relaxation times vs. magnetic field is seen; the most prominent new finding being a sharp local long-time T 1 maximum of 1000 mins at ≈3 G. Such structure has not been observed in previous measurements of natural Xe. Below temperatures of 10 K, relaxation can be attributed to cross relaxation with 131Xe, mediated by spin diffusion. Measurements of 129Xe relaxation as a function of magnetic field, temperature and Xe isotopic content are reported and compared with expected theoretical behaviors. It is seen that the characteristic nuclear spin relaxation of enriched 129Xe at 4.2 K is nonexponential at these low fields. For fields between 10 G and 200 G, these nonexponential relaxation curves can be fit well with a specific spin diffusion model. Below 10 G no such fit is possible and thus quantum mechanical details of the coupling between 129Xe, 131Xe and the bulk lattice are considered. These findings support the hypothesis that cross relaxation with 131Xe is indeed a dominant actor in the nuclear spin relaxation of polycrystalline 129 Xe at such low fields and low temperatures.

  15. Controlling spin relaxation with a cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bienfait, Audrey; Pla, Jarryd; Kubo, Yuimaru; Zhou, Xin; Stern, Michael; Lo, Cheuk; Weis, Christopher; Schenkel, Thomas; Vion, Denis; Esteve, Daniel; Morton, John; Bertet, Patrice

    Spontaneous emission of radiation is one of the fundamental relaxation mechanisms for a quantum system. For spins, however, it is negligible compared to non-radiative relaxation processes due to their weak coupling to the electromagnetic field. In 1946, Purcell realized that spontaneous emission is strongly enhanced when the quantum system is placed in a resonant cavity - an effect now used to control the lifetime of systems with an electrical dipole. Here, by coupling donor spins in silicon to a high quality factor superconducting microwave cavity of small mode volume, we reach the regime where spontaneous emission constitutes the dominant spin relaxation channel. The relaxation rate is increased by three orders of magnitude when the spins are tuned to the cavity resonance, showing it can be engineered and controlled on-demand. Our results provide a novel way to initialize any spin into its ground state, with applications in magnetic resonance and quantum information processing. They also show for the first time an alteration of spin dynamics by quantum fluctuations, a step towards the coherent magnetic coupling of a spin to microwave photons.

  16. Controlling spin relaxation with a cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bienfait, A.; Pla, J. J.; Kubo, Y.; Zhou, X.; Stern, M.; Lo, C. C.; Weis, C. D.; Schenkel, T.; Vion, D.; Esteve, D.; Morton, J. J. L.; Bertet, P.

    2016-03-01

    Spontaneous emission of radiation is one of the fundamental mechanisms by which an excited quantum system returns to equilibrium. For spins, however, spontaneous emission is generally negligible compared to other non-radiative relaxation processes because of the weak coupling between the magnetic dipole and the electromagnetic field. In 1946, Purcell realized that the rate of spontaneous emission can be greatly enhanced by placing the quantum system in a resonant cavity. This effect has since been used extensively to control the lifetime of atoms and semiconducting heterostructures coupled to microwave or optical cavities, and is essential for the realization of high-efficiency single-photon sources. Here we report the application of this idea to spins in solids. By coupling donor spins in silicon to a superconducting microwave cavity with a high quality factor and a small mode volume, we reach the regime in which spontaneous emission constitutes the dominant mechanism of spin relaxation. The relaxation rate is increased by three orders of magnitude as the spins are tuned to the cavity resonance, demonstrating that energy relaxation can be controlled on demand. Our results provide a general way to initialize spin systems into their ground state and therefore have applications in magnetic resonance and quantum information processing. They also demonstrate that the coupling between the magnetic dipole of a spin and the electromagnetic field can be enhanced up to the point at which quantum fluctuations have a marked effect on the spin dynamics; as such, they represent an important step towards the coherent magnetic coupling of individual spins to microwave photons.

  17. Controlling spin relaxation with a cavity.

    PubMed

    Bienfait, A; Pla, J J; Kubo, Y; Zhou, X; Stern, M; Lo, C C; Weis, C D; Schenkel, T; Vion, D; Esteve, D; Morton, J J L; Bertet, P

    2016-03-01

    Spontaneous emission of radiation is one of the fundamental mechanisms by which an excited quantum system returns to equilibrium. For spins, however, spontaneous emission is generally negligible compared to other non-radiative relaxation processes because of the weak coupling between the magnetic dipole and the electromagnetic field. In 1946, Purcell realized that the rate of spontaneous emission can be greatly enhanced by placing the quantum system in a resonant cavity. This effect has since been used extensively to control the lifetime of atoms and semiconducting heterostructures coupled to microwave or optical cavities, and is essential for the realization of high-efficiency single-photon sources. Here we report the application of this idea to spins in solids. By coupling donor spins in silicon to a superconducting microwave cavity with a high quality factor and a small mode volume, we reach the regime in which spontaneous emission constitutes the dominant mechanism of spin relaxation. The relaxation rate is increased by three orders of magnitude as the spins are tuned to the cavity resonance, demonstrating that energy relaxation can be controlled on demand. Our results provide a general way to initialize spin systems into their ground state and therefore have applications in magnetic resonance and quantum information processing. They also demonstrate that the coupling between the magnetic dipole of a spin and the electromagnetic field can be enhanced up to the point at which quantum fluctuations have a marked effect on the spin dynamics; as such, they represent an important step towards the coherent magnetic coupling of individual spins to microwave photons. PMID:26878235

  18. Theory of spin relaxation at metallic interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belashchenko, K. D.; Kovalev, Alexey A.; van Schilfgaarde, Mark

    Spin-flip scattering at metallic interfaces affects transport phenomena in nanostructures, such as magnetoresistance, spin injection, spin pumping, and spin torques. It has been characterized for many material combinations by an empirical parameter δ, which is obtained by matching magnetoresistance data for multilayers to the Valet-Fert model [J. Bass and W. P. Pratt, J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 19, 183201 (2007)]. However, the relation of the parameter δ to the scattering properties of the interface remains unclear. Here we establish this relation using the scattering theory approach and confirm it using a generalization of the magnetoelectronic circuit theory, which includes interfacial spin relaxation. The results of first-principles calculations of spin-flip scattering at the Cu/Pd and Cu/Pt interfaces are found to be in reasonable agreement with experimental data. Supported by NSF Grant DMR-1308751.

  19. Magnetic relaxation of high spin magnetic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Nie

    The magnetic relaxation phenomena in Mn12 and the physics underlining these experiment results are investigated in this dissertation. We give a review on currently available theories to account for the spin or paramagnetic relaxation occurring in this system. Density matrix formalism is used to investigate the general problem of a system interacting with a bath of thermal equilibrium phonons, which gives a set of rate equations. Numerical solutions to the rate equations are also carried out. Finally comparisons between the theory and the experimentals are made to show the merits and deficiencies of the theoretical approach that we have adopted.

  20. NMR relaxation in multipolar AX systems under spin locking conditions.

    PubMed

    Kaikkonen, A; Kowalewski, J

    1999-12-01

    A relaxation matrix has been calculated for a multipolar AX spin system under the on-resonance spin-locking condition. Auto- and cross-correlation terms between dipolar, quadrupolar, and CSA interactions are considered. It is shown that the spin-lock leads to many relaxation pathways being blocked, resulting in a considerably simplified relaxation network. The presence of spectral densities at zero frequency, associated with locked nuclei, allows efficient relaxation also in the absence of fast molecular motions. PMID:10579956

  1. Critical fluctuations in DOPC/DPPC-d62/cholesterol mixtures: 2H magnetic resonance and relaxation.

    PubMed

    Davis, James H; Ziani, Latifa; Schmidt, Miranda L

    2013-07-28

    Static and magic angle spinning (MAS) (2)H nuclear magnetic resonance experiments have been performed on a series of multilamellar dispersions of di-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine/di-palmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine-d62/cholesterol in water to investigate the compositional fluctuations which occur in the region of the line of critical points for this ternary system. The strong dependence of the MAS line widths on temperature, sample composition, and spinning rate provides a direct measure of the magnitude of the fluctuations in the (2)H quadrupolar Hamiltonian. These data are analyzed in terms of models for critical fluctuations in composition leading to a value for the critical index for the correlation length, ν(c) = 0.628, consistent with a three dimensional Ising model. PMID:23902029

  2. Spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation in porous media: A generalized two site relaxation model

    SciTech Connect

    Su, M.Y.; Nalcioglu, O. . Dept. of Radiological Sciences)

    1993-10-15

    The T[sub 1] and T[sub 2] relaxation times in porous media have been greatly used in the field of petrophysics and biology. The relaxation behavior can be used as a fingerprint of a system, or can provide information on some other parameters which cannot be easily measured. In this paper, the authors investigate the behavior of the T[sub 1] and T[sub 2] relaxation in two types of media, (1) an object consisting of closely packed glass beads and (2) a column of gel beads. They assume a generalized two site relaxation process for both of the objects. This model assumes that the spins in the medium are under two different relaxation modes and the two modes are in fast exchange with each other. The results confirm that the generalized two site relaxation model is applicable for both types of porous media. A possible explanation for the relaxation mechanism is also discussed.

  3. Water interactions with varying molecular states of bovine casein: 2H NMR relaxation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kumosinski, T.F.; Pessen, H.; Prestrelski, S.J.; Farrell, H.M. Jr.

    1987-09-01

    The caseins occur in milk as spherical colloidal complexes of protein and salts with an average diameter of 1200 A, the casein micelles. Removal of Ca2+ is thought to result in their dissociation into smaller protein complexes stabilized by hydrophobic interactions and called submicelles. Whether these submicelles actually occur within the micelles as discrete particles interconnected by calcium phosphate salt bridges has been the subject of much controversy. A variety of physical measurements have shown that casein micelles contain an inordinately high amount of trapped water (2 to 7 g H/sub 2/O/g protein). With this in mind it was of interest to determine if NMR relaxation measurements could detect the presence of this trapped water within the micelles, and to evaluate whether it is a continuum with picosecond correlation times or is associated in part with discrete submicellar structures with nanosecond motions. For this purpose the variations in /sup 2/H NMR longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates of water with protein concentration were determined for bovine casein at various temperatures, under both submicellar and micellar conditions. D/sub 2/O was used instead of H/sub 2/O to eliminate cross-relaxation effects. From the protein concentration dependence of the relaxation rates, the second virial coefficient of the protein was obtained by nonlinear regression analysis. Using either an isotropic tumbling or an intermediate asymmetry model, degrees of hydration, v, and correlation times, tau c, were calculated for the caseins; from the latter parameter the Stokes radius, r, was obtained. Next, estimates of molecular weights were obtained from r and the partial specific volume. Values were in the range of those published from other methodologies for the submicelles.

  4. Electron spin relaxation in carbon nanotubes: Dyakonov-Perel mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, Yuriy; Zavada, John; Kim, Ki Wook

    2010-03-01

    The long standing problem of unaccountable short spin relaxation in carbon nanotubes (CNT) meets a disclosure in terms of curvature-mediated spin-orbital interaction that leads to spin fluctuating precession analogous to Dyakonov-Perel mechanism. Strong anisotropy imposed by arbitrary directed magnetic field has been taken into account in terms of extended Bloch equations. Especially, stationary spin current through CNT can be controlled by spin-flip processes with relaxation time as less as 150 ps, the rate of transversal polarization (i.e. decoherence) runs up to 1/(70 ps) at room temperature while spin interference of the electrons related to different valleys can be responsible for shorter spin dephasing. Dependencies of spin-relaxation parameters on magnetic field strength and orientation, CNT curvature and chirality have been analyzed.

  5. Spin relaxation of iron in mixed state hemoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Wajnberg, E; Kalinowski, H J; Bemski, G; Helman, J S

    1986-01-01

    In hemoproteins the relaxation mechanism of iron is Orbach for high spin (HS) and Raman for low spin (LS). We found that in met-hemoglobin and met-myoglobin, under conditions in which the two spin states coexist, both the HS and the LS states relax to the lattice through Orbach-like processes. Alos, very short (approximately 1 ns) and temperature independent transverse relaxation times T2 were estimated. This may result from the unusual electronic structure of mixed states hemoproteins that allows thermal equilibrium and interconversion of the spin states. PMID:3013333

  6. Spin relaxation characteristics in Ag nanowire covered with various oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karube, S.; Idzuchi, H.; Kondou, K.; Fukuma, Y.; Otani, Y.

    2015-09-01

    We have studied spin relaxation characteristics in a Ag nanowire covered with various oxide layers of Bi2O3, Al2O3, HfO2, MgO, or AgOx by using non-local spin valve structures. The spin-flip probability, a ratio of momentum relaxation time to spin relaxation time at 10 K, exhibits a gradual increase with an atomic number of the oxide constituent elements, Mg, Al, Ag, and Hf. Surprisingly, the Bi2O3 capping was found to increase the probability by an order of magnitude compared with other oxide layers. This finding suggests the presence of an additional spin relaxation mechanism such as Rashba effect at the Ag/Bi2O3 interface, which cannot be explained by the simple Elliott-Yafet mechanism via phonon, impurity, and surface scatterings. The Ag/Bi2O3 interface may provide functionality as a spin to charge interconversion layer.

  7. Spin-spin relaxation in magnetically dilute crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzheparov, F. S.; Lvov, D. V.; Veretennikov, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance is examined in paramagnetic systems with a small concentration of spins. The free induction signal (FIS) and resonance line shape function (LSF) are calculated. The theory is based on the introduction of an auxiliary system where one spin does not have a flip-flop interaction with the surroundings. The FIS is calculated for this spin using the Anderson-Weiss-Kubo theory and its memory function is used to construct the memory of the main system. The needed numerical coefficients are obtained from expansions of the FIS in terms of the concentration. Here the polarization transport in magnetically dilute systems is taken into account for the first time. This is shown to lead to significant slowing down of the decay in the FIS for times longer than the phase relaxation time. Existing experimental data are compared with theoretical models. Satisfactory agreement is obtained for the description of the central part of the LSF after an additional experimentally observed broadening is introduced in the theory. Data on the amplitude and position of the sideband peaks from the different experiments are not in good agreement with one another or with the theory.

  8. Spin Relaxation Resonances due to the Spin-Axis Interaction in Dense Rubidium and Cesium Vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, C. J.; Levron, D.; Happer, W.; Kadlecek, S.; Chann, B.; Anderson, L. W.; Walker, T. G.

    2000-11-01

    Resonances in the magnetic decoupling curves for the spin relaxation of dense alkali-metal vapors prove that much of the relaxation is due to the spin-axis interaction in triplet dimers. Initial estimates of the spin-axis coupling coefficients for the dimers (likely accurate to a factor of 2) are \\|λ\\|/h = 290 MHz for Rb; 2500 MHz for Cs.

  9. PREFACE: Muon spin rotation, relaxation or resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heffner, Robert H.; Nagamine, Kanetada

    2004-10-01

    To a particle physicist a muon is a member of the lepton family, a heavy electron possessing a mass of about 1/9 that of a proton and a spin of 1/2, which interacts with surrounding atoms and molecules electromagnetically. Since its discovery in 1937, the muon has been put to many uses, from tests of special relativity to deep inelastic scattering, from studies of nuclei to tests of weak interactions and quantum electrodynamics, and most recently, as a radiographic tool to see inside heavy objects and volcanoes. In 1957 Richard Garwin and collaborators, while conducting experiments at the Columbia University cyclotron to search for parity violation, discovered that spin-polarized muons injected into materials might be useful to probe internal magnetic fields. This eventually gave birth to the modern field of muSR, which stands for muon spin rotation, relaxation or resonance, and is the subject of this special issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter. Muons are produced in accelerators when high energy protons (generally >500 MeV) strike a target like graphite, producing pions which subsequently decay into muons. Most experiments carried out today use relatively low-energy (~4 MeV), positively-charged muons coming from pions decaying at rest in the skin of the production target. These muons have 100% spin polarization, a range in typical materials of about 180 mg cm-2, and are ideal for experiments in condensed matter physics and chemistry. Negatively-charged muons are also occasionally used to study such things as muonic atoms and muon-catalysed fusion. The muSR technique provides a local probe of internal magnetic fields and is highly complementary to inelastic neutron scattering and nuclear magnetic resonance, for example. There are four primary muSR facilities in the world today: ISIS (Didcot, UK), KEK (Tsukuba, Japan), PSI (Villigen, Switzerland) and TRIUMF (Vancouver, Canada), serving about 500 researchers world-wide. A new facility, JPARC (Tokai, Japan

  10. PREFACE: Muon spin rotation, relaxation or resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heffner, Robert H.; Nagamine, Kanetada

    2004-10-01

    To a particle physicist a muon is a member of the lepton family, a heavy electron possessing a mass of about 1/9 that of a proton and a spin of 1/2, which interacts with surrounding atoms and molecules electromagnetically. Since its discovery in 1937, the muon has been put to many uses, from tests of special relativity to deep inelastic scattering, from studies of nuclei to tests of weak interactions and quantum electrodynamics, and most recently, as a radiographic tool to see inside heavy objects and volcanoes. In 1957 Richard Garwin and collaborators, while conducting experiments at the Columbia University cyclotron to search for parity violation, discovered that spin-polarized muons injected into materials might be useful to probe internal magnetic fields. This eventually gave birth to the modern field of muSR, which stands for muon spin rotation, relaxation or resonance, and is the subject of this special issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter. Muons are produced in accelerators when high energy protons (generally >500 MeV) strike a target like graphite, producing pions which subsequently decay into muons. Most experiments carried out today use relatively low-energy (~4 MeV), positively-charged muons coming from pions decaying at rest in the skin of the production target. These muons have 100% spin polarization, a range in typical materials of about 180 mg cm-2, and are ideal for experiments in condensed matter physics and chemistry. Negatively-charged muons are also occasionally used to study such things as muonic atoms and muon-catalysed fusion. The muSR technique provides a local probe of internal magnetic fields and is highly complementary to inelastic neutron scattering and nuclear magnetic resonance, for example. There are four primary muSR facilities in the world today: ISIS (Didcot, UK), KEK (Tsukuba, Japan), PSI (Villigen, Switzerland) and TRIUMF (Vancouver, Canada), serving about 500 researchers world-wide. A new facility, JPARC (Tokai, Japan

  11. Is spin lattice relaxation time independent of species?

    PubMed

    Akber, S F

    1996-08-01

    It has been suggested that the spin lattice relaxation time is independent of species. It was further stated that, from a nuclear magnetic resonance standpoint, the human muscle is similar to rat muscle and to pig muscle, etc. However, it is observed that, in normal liver and kidney of human, rat, dog, rabbit and hamster, spin lattice relaxation time varies in different species as a function of percentage of body-weight of the organ. The result shows that spin lattice relaxation time is different in different species because of the organ weight which in turn dictates the metabolism in an individual species. PMID:8869924

  12. Anisotropy-Driven Spin Relaxation in Germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pengke; Li, Jing; Qing, Lan; Dery, Hanan; Appelbaum, Ian

    2013-12-01

    A unique spin depolarization mechanism, induced by the presence of g-factor anisotropy and intervalley scattering, is revealed by spin-transport measurements on long-distance germanium devices in a magnetic field longitudinal to the initial spin orientation. The confluence of electron-phonon scattering (leading to Elliott-Yafet spin flips) and this previously unobserved physics enables the extraction of spin lifetime solely from spin-valve measurements, without spin precession, and in a regime of substantial electric-field-generated carrier heating. We find spin lifetimes in Ge up to several hundreds of nanoseconds at low temperature, far beyond any other available experimental results.

  13. Spin relaxation via exchange with donor impurity-bound electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelbaum, Ian

    In the Bir-Aronov-Pikus depolarization process affecting conduction electrons in p-type cubic semiconductors, spin relaxation is driven by exchange with short-lived valence band hole states. We have identified an analogous spin relaxation mechanism in nominally undoped silicon at low temperatures, when many electrons are bound to dilute dopant ion potentials. Inelastic scattering with externally injected conduction electrons accelerated by electric fields can excite transitions into highly spin-orbit-mixed bound excited states, driving strong spin relaxation of the conduction electrons via exchange interaction. We reveal the consequences of this spin depolarization mechanism both below and above the impact ionization threshold, where conventional charge and spin transport are restored. Based upon: Lan Qing, Jing Li, Ian Appelbaum, and Hanan Dery, Phys Rev. B 91, 241405(R) (2015). We acknowledge support from NSF, DTRA, and ONR.

  14. Phonon mediated spin relaxation in a moving quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xinyu; Huang, Peihao; Hu, Xuedong

    2015-03-01

    We study decoherence of an electron spin qubit that is being transported in a moving quantum dot. Our focus is on spin relaxation due to phonon noise through the spin-orbit interaction. We find that the effective magnetic field caused by the motion of the electron can either enhance or suppress spin relaxation depending on the angle between the moving direction and the external magnetic field. At low external magnetic field (BAlt 0 . 5 T), the suppression effect can be significant, which indicates that a moving quantum dot can maintain spin coherence better than a static dot. We also find that the spin relaxation rate is not a monotonically increasing function of the applied magnetic field when the motion of the electron is taken into account. We thank financial support by US ARO and NSF PIF.

  15. Progress in Understanding Alkali-Alkali Spin Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Christopher J.; Happer, William; Chann, Bien; Kadlecek, Stephen; Anderson, L. W.; Walker, Thad G.

    2000-06-01

    In extensive experiments we have shown that a spin interaction with a relatively long correlation time causes much of the spin relaxation in very dense alkali-metal vapors. The spin relaxation is affected by the pressure of the helium or nitrogen buffer gas, although there is little dependence at pressures above one atmosphere. There are substantial differences in the relaxation rates for different isotopes of the same element, for example ^87Rb and ^85Rb. We have completed extensive modeling of how singlet and triplet dimers and doublet trimers of the alkali-metal atoms could cause spin relaxation in dense alkali-metal vapors. In the case of doublet trimers or triplet dimers, we assume the main coupling to the nuclear spins is through the Fermi Contact interaction with the unpaired electrons. Spin loss to the rotation of the molecule is assumed to occur through the electronic spin-rotation and spin-axis (dipole-dipole) interactions for the triplet dimers. For the singlet dimers, we assume that the nuclear spins couple directly to the rotational angular momentum of the molecule through the electric quadrupole interaction. We account for all of the total nuclear spin states that occur for the dimers and trimers. We have also considered the possibility that the collisional breakup and formation rates of the dimers or trimers could saturate with increasing buffer gas pressure. Such saturation occurs in many other unimolecular reactions and is often ascribed to breakup through activated states.

  16. Spin Relaxation in Materials Lacking Coherent Charge Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, Nicholas

    2015-03-01

    As semiconductor spintronics research extends to materials beyond intrinsic or lightly doped semiconductors (e. g. organic materials, amorphous semiconductors, and impurity bands), the need is readily apparent for new theories of spin relaxation that encompass highly disordered materials, where charge transport is incoherent. We describe a broadly applicable theory of spin relaxation in materials with incoherent charge transport. The theory is based on continuous-time-random-walk theory and can incorporate many different relaxation mechanisms. We focus primarily on spin relaxation caused by spin-orbit and hyperfine effects in conjunction with carrier hopping. Analytic and numerical results from the theory are compared in various regimes with Monte Carlo simulations. Three different systems were examined: a polymer (MEH-PPV), amorphous silicon, and heavily doped n-GaAs. In the organic and amorphous systems, we predict spin relaxation and spin diffusion dependences on temperature and disorder for three different mechanisms (hyperfine, hopping-induced spin-orbit, and intra-site spin relaxation). The resulting unique experimental signatures predicted by the theory for each mechanism in these disordered systems provide a prescription for determining the dominant spin relaxation mechanism. We find our theory to be in agreement with available measurements in these materials. We also predict that large disorder modifies certain mechanisms to be algebraic instead of exponential in time. Our results should assist in evaluating the suitability of various disordered materials for spintronic devices. All work done in collaboration with Michael E. Flatté. Timothy Peterson and Paul Crowell collaborated as well on the n-GaAs study. This work was supported by an ARO MURI and by C-SPIN, one of six centers of STARnet, a Semiconductor Research Corporation program, sponsored by MARCO and DARPA.

  17. Difference between nuclear spin relaxation and ionic conductivity relaxation in superionic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngai, K. L.

    1993-04-01

    Tatsumisago, Angell, and Martin [J. Chem. Phys. 97, 6968 (1992)] have compared conductivity relaxation data and 7Li nuclear spin lattice relaxation (SLR) data measured on a lithium chloroborate glass and found pronounced differences in the most probable relaxation times. The electrical conductivity relaxation (ECR) time, τ*σ, at some temperature occurs on a time scale shorter by some two orders of magnitude than the 7Li spin lattice relaxation correlation time, τ*s, and has a significantly lower activation energy. SLR and ECR monitor the motions of ions through different dynamic variables and correlation functions. Using this fact and the coupling model, I am able to explain quantitatively all aspects of the difference between SLR and ECR, and to establish relations between their different relaxation characteristics. The large difference between the observed activation energies of SLR and ECR alone should have implications on the validity of any proposed theory of the dynamics of ionic transport.

  18. Anisotropic nuclear spin relaxation in single-crystal xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzma, N. N.; Babich, D.; Happer, W.

    2002-04-01

    We extend the theory of longitudinal spin relaxation of 129Xe nuclei in frozen xenon to the case of single-crystal samples, where the relaxation rate depends on the direction of the applied magnetic field with respect to the crystalline axes. For sufficiently large magnetic fields, the relaxation is dominated by spin-flip Raman scattering of lattice phonons. Two closely related interactions couple the lattice phonons to the spins of 129Xe nuclei: the nuclear spin-rotation interaction between nearest-neighbor atoms, which leads to an isotropic, field-independent relaxation rate, and the paramagnetic antishielding of the externally applied field at the site of 129Xe nuclei by the electrons of neighboring Xe atoms. The latter interaction, also known as the chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) interaction, leads to an anisotropic relaxation rate proportional to the square of the applied field. This mechanism dominates spin relaxation at fields of the order of the Debye field BD=kBTD/μB=82 T.

  19. Electron spin relaxation in cryptochrome-based magnetoreception.

    PubMed

    Kattnig, Daniel R; Solov'yov, Ilia A; Hore, P J

    2016-05-14

    The magnetic compass sense of migratory birds is thought to rely on magnetically sensitive radical pairs formed photochemically in cryptochrome proteins in the retina. An important requirement of this hypothesis is that electron spin relaxation is slow enough for the Earth's magnetic field to have a significant effect on the coherent spin dynamics of the radicals. It is generally assumed that evolutionary pressure has led to protection of the electron spins from irreversible loss of coherence in order that the underlying quantum dynamics can survive in a noisy biological environment. Here, we address this question for a structurally characterized model cryptochrome expected to share many properties with the putative avian receptor protein. To this end we combine all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, Bloch-Redfield relaxation theory and spin dynamics calculations to assess the effects of spin relaxation on the performance of the protein as a compass sensor. Both flavin-tryptophan and flavin-Z˙ radical pairs are studied (Z˙ is a radical with no hyperfine interactions). Relaxation is considered to arise from modulation of hyperfine interactions by librational motions of the radicals and fluctuations in certain dihedral angles. For Arabidopsis thaliana cryptochrome 1 (AtCry1) we find that spin relaxation implies optimal radical pair lifetimes of the order of microseconds, and that flavin-Z˙ pairs are less affected by relaxation than flavin-tryptophan pairs. Our results also demonstrate that spin relaxation in isolated AtCry1 is incompatible with the long coherence times that have been postulated to explain the disruption of the avian magnetic compass sense by weak radiofrequency magnetic fields. We conclude that a cryptochrome sensor in vivo would have to differ dynamically, if not structurally, from isolated AtCry1. Our results clearly mark the limits of the current hypothesis and lead to a better understanding of the operation of radical pair magnetic sensors

  20. Spin-spin coupling in the HD molecule determined from 1H and 2H NMR experiments in the gas-phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbacz, Piotr

    2014-10-01

    The indirect spin-spin coupling of hydrogen deuteride, J(D, H), was determined from a series of 1H and 2H NMR spectra acquired at various densities of gaseous solvents (He, Ar, CO2, and N2O). The analysis of these spectra shows that accurate determination of J(D, H) from this experimental data requires careful examination of the effects of nuclear relaxation and of HD-solvent gas interactions on hydrogen deuteride line shapes. Particularly, it was found that the first-order corrections of the peak-to-peak separations between HD multiplet peaks due to weak van der Waals interactions are proportional to solvent gas density, while these corrections for nuclear relaxation of the proton and the deuteron are proportional to the second power of the inverse of the gas density. Analysis of the data indicates that J(D, H), obtained by correcting for the effects of nuclear relaxation and intermolecular interactions, is 43.136(7) Hz at 300 K.

  1. Local Spin Relaxation within the Random Heisenberg Chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbrych, J.; Kokalj, J.; Prelovšek, P.

    2013-10-01

    Finite-temperature local dynamical spin correlations Snn(ω) are studied numerically within the random spin-1/2 antiferromagnetic Heisenberg chain. The aim is to explain measured NMR spin-lattice relaxation times in BaCu2(Si0.5Ge0.5)2O7, which is the realization of a random spin chain. In agreement with experiments we find that the distribution of relaxation times within the model shows a very large span similar to the stretched-exponential form. The distribution is strongly reduced with increasing T, but stays finite also in the high-T limit. Anomalous dynamical correlations can be associated with the random singlet concept but not directly with static quantities. Our results also reveal the crucial role of the spin anisotropy (interaction), since the behavior is in contrast with the ones for the XX model, where we do not find any significant T dependence of the distribution.

  2. Spin Quantum Kinetics in Relaxation and Transport of Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Han-Chieh; Mou, Chung-Yu; Lyon, Stephen A.

    2007-03-01

    Generalized Kadanoff-Baym Equation (GKBE) with spin degree of freedom is firstly presented and its theoretical framework of applications, which aims to semiconductor quantum kinetics in femtosecond and nanometer scales, demonstrated. The GKBE was constructed by Green functions thermally averaging Pauli equation of motion with using Langreth theorem. As applied for relaxation, Kadanoff-Baym ansatz was made and carrier-carrier scattering (CCS) with random-phase approximation considered. The derivation can simulate an evolution of excited carriers spreading via CCS, buildup of magnetic field by Rashba effect and formation of spin relaxation, where energy non-conserving event and memory effect are figured out. For transport, retarded Green functions were retrieved from spin Dyson equation as an input for GKBE with the presence of electron-phonon (impurity) interaction. The part is useful for spin Hall effect in precisely estimating spin current and accumulation in nanostructures or ballistic regime.

  3. Nuclear Spin Conversion in CH4: A Multichannel Relaxation Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Cacciani, Patrice; Cosléou, Jean; Khelkhal, Mohamed; Čermák, Peter; Puzzarini, Cristina

    2016-01-21

    Experiments on nuclear spin interconversion of ortho, para, and meta nuclear spin isomers of the methane molecule have been undertaken in gas phase and cryomatrices. Only the latter environment has led to the observation of the nuclear spin conversion. In this study, a quantitative explanation is given for the first time by considering the coupling of three relaxation paths: meta ⇔ para, meta ⇔ ortho, and ortho ⇔ para. The global evolution of the three populations of spin isomers is thus described by two characteristic times, which have been calculated using the best values of the energy levels for the vibrational ground state, of the intramolecular magnetic interactions, and of the collisional relaxation rates, and for different pressure and temperature conditions. Such calculations also provide an indication for the proper choice of reliable scenarios for experimental separation of the spin isomers of methane. PMID:26681482

  4. Spin relaxation characteristics in Ag nanowire covered with various oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Karube, S.; Idzuchi, H.; Otani, Y.; Kondou, K.; Fukuma, Y.

    2015-09-21

    We have studied spin relaxation characteristics in a Ag nanowire covered with various oxide layers of Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, HfO{sub 2}, MgO, or AgO{sub x} by using non-local spin valve structures. The spin-flip probability, a ratio of momentum relaxation time to spin relaxation time at 10 K, exhibits a gradual increase with an atomic number of the oxide constituent elements, Mg, Al, Ag, and Hf. Surprisingly, the Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} capping was found to increase the probability by an order of magnitude compared with other oxide layers. This finding suggests the presence of an additional spin relaxation mechanism such as Rashba effect at the Ag/Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface, which cannot be explained by the simple Elliott-Yafet mechanism via phonon, impurity, and surface scatterings. The Ag/Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface may provide functionality as a spin to charge interconversion layer.

  5. Spin relaxation via exchange with donor impurity-bound electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing, Lan; Li, Jing; Appelbaum, Ian; Dery, Hanan

    2015-06-01

    At low temperatures, electrons in semiconductors are bound to shallow donor impurity ions, neutralizing their charge in equilibrium. Inelastic scattering of other externally injected conduction electrons accelerated by electric fields can excite transitions within the manifold of these localized states. Promotion of the bound electron into highly spin-orbit-mixed excited states drives a strong spin relaxation of the conduction electrons via exchange interactions, reminiscent of the Bir-Aronov-Pikus process where exchange occurs with valence band hole states. Through low-temperature experiments with silicon spin transport devices and complementary theory, we reveal the consequences of this spin depolarization mechanism both below and above the impact ionization threshold.

  6. Large spin relaxation rates in trapped submerged-shell atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, Colin B.; Au, Yat Shan; Doret, S. Charles; Doyle, John M.; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2010-01-15

    Spin relaxation due to atom-atom collisions is measured for magnetically trapped erbium and thulium atoms at a temperature near 500 mK. The rate constants for Er-Er and Tm-Tm collisions are 3.0x10{sup -10} and 1.1x10{sup -10} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1}, respectively, 2-3 orders of magnitude larger than those observed for highly magnetic S-state atoms. This is strong evidence for an additional, dominant, spin relaxation mechanism, electronic interaction anisotropy, in collisions between these 'submerged-shell,' Lnot =0 atoms. These large spin relaxation rates imply that evaporative cooling of these atoms in a magnetic trap will be highly inefficient.

  7. The Elliott-Yafet theory of spin relaxation generalized for large spin-orbit coupling

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, Annamária; Szolnoki, Lénard; Simon, Ferenc

    2016-01-01

    We generalize the Elliott-Yafet (EY) theory of spin relaxation in metals with inversion symmetry for the case of large spin-orbit coupling (SOC). The EY theory treats the SOC to the lowest order but this approach breaks down for metals of heavy elements (such as e.g. caesium or gold), where the SOC energy is comparable to the relevant band-band separation energies. The generalized theory is presented for a four-band model system without band dispersion, where analytic formulae are attainable for arbitrary SOC for the relation between the momentum- and spin-relaxation rates. As an extended description, we also consider an empirical pseudopotential approximation where SOC is deduced from the band potential (apart from an empirical scaling constant) and the spin-relaxation rate can be obtained numerically. Both approaches recover the usual EY theory for weak SOC and give that the spin-relaxation rate approaches the momentum-relaxation rate in the limit of strong SOC. We argue that this limit is realized in gold by analyzing spin relaxation data. A calculation of the g-factor shows that the empirical Elliott-relation, which links the g-factor and spin-relaxation rate, is retained even for strong SOC. PMID:26943483

  8. The Elliott-Yafet theory of spin relaxation generalized for large spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, Annamária; Szolnoki, Lénard; Simon, Ferenc

    2016-03-01

    We generalize the Elliott-Yafet (EY) theory of spin relaxation in metals with inversion symmetry for the case of large spin-orbit coupling (SOC). The EY theory treats the SOC to the lowest order but this approach breaks down for metals of heavy elements (such as e.g. caesium or gold), where the SOC energy is comparable to the relevant band-band separation energies. The generalized theory is presented for a four-band model system without band dispersion, where analytic formulae are attainable for arbitrary SOC for the relation between the momentum- and spin-relaxation rates. As an extended description, we also consider an empirical pseudopotential approximation where SOC is deduced from the band potential (apart from an empirical scaling constant) and the spin-relaxation rate can be obtained numerically. Both approaches recover the usual EY theory for weak SOC and give that the spin-relaxation rate approaches the momentum-relaxation rate in the limit of strong SOC. We argue that this limit is realized in gold by analyzing spin relaxation data. A calculation of the g-factor shows that the empirical Elliott-relation, which links the g-factor and spin-relaxation rate, is retained even for strong SOC.

  9. YTTRIUM-89 NMR: A POSSIBLE SPIN RELAXATION PROBE FOR STUDYING METAL ION INTERACTIONS WITH ORGANIC LIGANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The spin-lattice relaxation mechanisms for aqueous and dimethyl sulfoxide solutions of Y(NO3)3 have been found to be mainly spin-rotation and dipolar relaxation with solvent protons, unlike most heavy spin=1/2 metal ions which are relaxed mainly by spin-rotation and chemical shif...

  10. Spin relaxation and spin Hall transport in 5d transition-metal ultrathin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Nguyen H.; Mavropoulos, Phivos; Zimmermann, Bernd; Bauer, David S. G.; Blügel, Stefan; Mokrousov, Yuriy

    2014-08-01

    The spin relaxation induced by the Elliott-Yafet mechanism and the extrinsic spin Hall conductivity due to the skew scattering are investigated in 5d transition-metal ultrathin films with self-adatom impurities as scatterers. The values of the Elliott-Yafet parameter and of the spin-flip relaxation rate reveal a correlation with each other that is in agreement with the Elliott approximation. At 10-layer thickness, the spin-flip relaxation time in 5d transition-metal films is quantitatively reported about few hundred nanoseconds at atomic percent. This time scale is one and two orders of magnitude shorter than the values in Au and Cu thin films, respectively. The anisotropy effect of the Elliott-Yafet parameter and of the spin-flip relaxation rate with respect to the direction of the spin-quantization axis in relation to the crystallographic axes is also analyzed. We find that the anisotropy of the spin-flip relaxation rate is enhanced due to the Rashba surface states on the Fermi surface, reaching values as high as 97% in 10-layer Hf(0001) film or 71% in 10-layer W(110) film. Finally, the spin Hall conductivity as well as the spin Hall angle due to the skew scattering off self-adatom impurities are calculated using the Boltzmann approach. Our calculations employ a relativistic version of the first-principles full-potential Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker Green function method.

  11. Spin-axis relaxation in spin-exchange collisions of alkali-metal atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadlecek, S.; Walker, T.; Walter, D. K.; Erickson, C.; Happer, W.

    2001-05-01

    We present calculations of spin-relaxation rates of alkali-metal atoms due to the spin-axis interaction acting in binary collisions between the atoms. We show that for the high-temperature conditions of interest here, the spin-relaxation rates calculated with classical-path trajectories are nearly the same as those calculated with the distorted-wave Born approximation. We compare these calculations to recent experiments that used magnetic decoupling to isolate spin relaxation due to binary collisions from that due to the formation of triplet van der Waals molecules. The values of the spin-axis coupling coefficients deduced from measurements of binary collision rates are consistent with those deduced from molecular decoupling experiments, and follow a physically plausible scaling law for the spin-axis coupling coefficients.

  12. Kinetics of spin relaxation in quantum wires and channels: Boundary spin echo and formation of a persistent spin helix

    SciTech Connect

    Slipko, Valeriy A.; Pershin, Yuriy V.

    2011-10-15

    In this paper we use a spin kinetic equation to study spin-polarization dynamics in one-dimensional (1D) wires and 2D channels. The spin kinetic equation is valid in both diffusive and ballistic spin transport regimes and therefore is more general than the usual spin drift-diffusion equations. In particular, we demonstrate that in infinite 1D wires with Rashba spin-orbit interaction the exponential spin-relaxation decay can be modulated by an oscillating function. In the case of spin relaxation in finite length 1D wires, it is shown that an initially homogeneous spin polarization spontaneously transforms into a persistent spin helix. We find that a propagating spin-polarization profile reflects from a system boundary and returns back to its initial position similarly to the reflectance of sound waves from an obstacle. The Green's function of the spin kinetic equation is derived for both finite and infinite 1D systems. Moreover, we demonstrate explicitly that the spin relaxation in specifically oriented 2D channels with Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions of equal strength occurs similarly to that in 1D wires of finite length. Finally, a simple transformation mapping 1D spin kinetic equation into the Klein-Gordon equation with an imaginary mass is found thus establishing an interesting connection between semiconductor spintronics and relativistic quantum mechanics.

  13. Potential energy surface for C2H4I2+ dissociation including spin-orbit effects

    SciTech Connect

    Siebert, Matthew R.; Aquino, Adelia J.; De Jong, Wibe A.; Granucci, Giovanni; Hase, William L.

    2012-10-24

    Previous experiments [Baer, et al. J. Phys. Chem. A 116, 2833 (2012)] have studied the dissociation of 1,2-diiodoethane radical cation (C2H4I2+•) and found a one-dimensional distribution of translational energy; an odd finding considering most product relative translational energy distributions are two-dimensional. The goal of this study is to obtain an accurate understanding of the potential energy surface (PES) topology for the unimolecular decomposition reaction C2H4I2+• - C2H4I+ + I•. This is done through comparison of many single-reference electronic structure methods, coupled-cluster single point (energy) calculations, and multi-reference calculations used to quantify spin-orbit (SO) coupling effects. We find that the structure of the C2H4I2+• reactant has a substantial effect on the role of SO coupling on the reaction energy. Both the BHandH and MP2 theories with an ECP/6-31++G** basis set, and without SO coupling corrections, provide accurate models for the reaction energetics. MP2 theory gives an unsymmetric structure with different C-I bond lengths, resulting in a SO energy for C2H4I2+• similar to that for the product I-atom and a negligible SO correction to the reaction energy. In contrast, DFT gives a symmetric structure for C2H4I2+•, similar to that of the neutral C2H4I2 parent, resulting in a substantial SO correction and increasing the reaction energy by 6.0-6.5 kcal/mol. Also, we find that for this system single point energy calculations are inaccurate, since a small change in geometry can lead to a large change in energy.

  14. Mechanisms of relaxation and spin decoherence in nanomagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Tol, Johan

    Relaxation in spin systems is of great interest with respect to various possible applications like quantum information processing and storage, spintronics, and dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP). The implementation of high frequencies and fields is crucial in the study of systems with large zero-field splitting or large interactions, as for example molecular magnets and low dimensional magnetic materials. Here we will focus on the implementation of pulsed Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (ERP) at multiple frequencies of 10, 95, 120, 240, and 336 GHz, and the relaxation and decoherence processes as a function of magnetic field and temperature. Firstly, at higher frequencies the direct single-phonon spin-lattice relaxation (SLR) is considerably enhanced, and will more often than not be the dominant relaxation mechanism at low temperatures, and can be much faster than at lower fields and frequencies. In principle the measurement of the SLR rates as a function of the frequency provides a means to map the phonon density of states. Secondly, the high electron spin polarization at high fields has a strong influence on the spin fluctuations in relatively concentrated spin systems, and the contribution of the electron-electron dipolar interactions to the coherence rate can be partially quenched at low temperatures. This not only allows the study of relatively concentrated spin systems by pulsed EPR (as for example magnetic nanoparticles and molecular magnets), it enables the separation of the contribution of the fluctuations of the electron spin system from other decoherence mechanisms. Besides choice of temperature and field, several strategies in sample design, pulse sequences, or clock transitions can be employed to extend the coherence time in nanomagnets. A review will be given of the decoherence mechanisms with an attempt at a quantitative comparison of experimental rates with theory.

  15. Spin Relaxation in Kondo Lattice Systems with Anisotropic Kondo Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belov, S. I.; Kutuzov, A. S.

    2016-04-01

    We study the influence of the Kondo effect on the spin relaxation in systems with anisotropic Kondo interaction at temperatures both high and low as compared with the static magnetic field. In the absence of the Kondo effect, the electron spin resonance linewidth is not narrowed in the whole temperature range due to the high anisotropy of the Kondo interaction. The Kondo effect leads to the universal energy scale, which regulates the temperature and magnetic field dependence of different kinetic coefficients and results in a mutual cancelation of their singular parts in a collective spin mode.

  16. Spin relaxation mechanism in graphene spin valves with Al2O3 and MgO tunnel barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amamou, Walid; Lin, Zhisheng; van Baren, Jeremiah; Shi, Jing; Kawakami, Roland

    Contact induced spin relaxation in graphene lateral spin valves is one of major limiting factors for obtaining long spin lifetimes in graphene. There are various spin relaxation mechanisms, including spin absorption, interfacial spin scattering, and fringe field effects, which may account for the observed short spin lifetimes. One possible solution is to introduce a tunnel barrier between graphene and the ferromagnetic electrode, which should reduce contact induced spin relaxation and allow for longer spin lifetimes. We study the spin relaxation mechanisms in our graphene spin valves with two different types of tunnel barriers, aluminum oxide and MgO/TiO2 using the standard non-local measurement geometry. To extract the spin lifetime from Hanle spin precession data, we perform fits based on Bloch equation models that include the effects of spin absorption into the magnetic contacts. We observe a strong dependence of the extracted spin lifetime on the resistance-area (RA) product of the contacts. To understand the role of spin absorption, we compare these results to fits obtained using Hanle models that do not take spin absorption into account. Analysis shows that spin absorption might not be the dominant source of contact induced spin relaxation for graphene spin valves with sputtered Al2O3 and MgO/TiO2 barriers. Interfacial spin-flip scattering or spin dephasing resulting from local magnetostatic fields due to contact roughness are likely to be more important. C-SPIN, ONR.

  17. Spin relaxation through Kondo scattering in Cu/Py lateral spin valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batley, J. T.; Rosamond, M. C.; Ali, M.; Linfield, E. H.; Burnell, G.; Hickey, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    The temperature dependence of the spin diffusion length typically reflects the scattering mechanism responsible for spin relaxation. Within nonmagnetic metals it is reasonable to expect the Elliot-Yafet mechanism to play a role and thus the temperature dependence of the spin diffusion length might be inversely proportional to resistivity. In lateral spin valves, measurements have found that at low temperatures the spin diffusion length unexpectedly decreases. By measuring the transport properties of lateral Py/Cu/Py spin valves, fabricated from Cu with magnetic impurities of <1 ppm and ˜4 ppm, we extract a spin diffusion length which shows this suppression below 30 K only in the presence of the Kondo effect. We have calculated the spin-relaxation rate and isolated the contribution from magnetic impurities. We find the spin-flip probability of a magnetic impurity to be 34%. Our analysis demonstrates the dominant role of Kondo scattering in spin relaxation, even in low concentrations of order 1 ppm, and hence illustrates its importance to the reduction in spin diffusion length observed by ourselves and others.

  18. Observation of extremely long spin relaxation times in an organic nanowire spin valve.

    PubMed

    Pramanik, S; Stefanita, C-G; Patibandla, S; Bandyopadhyay, S; Garre, K; Harth, N; Cahay, M

    2007-04-01

    Organic semiconductors that are pi-conjugated are emerging as an important platform for 'spintronics', which purports to harness the spin degree of freedom of a charge carrier to store, process and/or communicate information. Here, we report the study of an organic nanowire spin valve device, 50 nm in diameter, consisting of a trilayer of ferromagnetic cobalt, an organic, Alq3, and ferromagnetic nickel. The measured spin relaxation time in the organic is found to be exceptionally long-between a few milliseconds and a second-and it is relatively temperature independent up to 100 K. Our experimental observations strongly suggest that the primary spin relaxation mechanism in the organic is the Elliott-Yafet mode, in which the spin relaxes whenever a carrier scatters and its velocity changes. PMID:18654265

  19. NMR spin relaxation rates in the Heisenberg bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes, Tiago; Curro, Nicholas; Scalettar, Richard; Paiva, Thereza; Dos Santos, Raimundo R.

    One of the striking features of heavy fermions is the fact that in the vicinity of a quantum phase transition these systems exhibit the breakdown of Fermi-liquid behavior and superconductivity. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) expirements play an important role in the study of these phenomena. Measurements of NMR spin relaxation rates and Knight shift, for instance, can be used to probe the electronic spin susceptibility of these systems. Here we studied the NMR response of the Heisenberg bilayer model. In this model, it is well known that the increase of the interplane coupling between the planes, Jperp, supresses the antiferromagnetic order at a quantum critical point (QCP). We use stochastic series expansion (SSE) and the maximum-entropy analytic continuation method to calculate the NMR spin lattice relaxation rate 1 /T1 and the spin echo decay 1 /T2 G as function of Jperp. The spin echo decay, T2 G increases for small Jperp, due to the increase of the order parameter, and then vanishes abruptly in the QCP. The effects of Jperp dilution disorder in the QCP and the relaxation rates are also discussed. This research was supported by the NNSA Grant Number DE-NA 0002908, and Ciência sem fronteiras program/CNPQ.

  20. Fast Nuclear Spin Relaxation in Hyperpolarized Solid 129Xe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzma, N. N.; Patton, B.; Raman, K.; Happer, W.

    2002-04-01

    We report extensive new measurements of the longitudinal relaxation time T1 of 129Xe nuclear spins in solid xenon. For temperatures T<120 K and magnetic fields B>0.05 T, we found T1 on the order of hours, in good agreement with previous measurements and with the predicted phonon-scattering limit for the spin-rotation interaction. For T>120 K, our new data show that T1 can be much shorter than the phonon scattering limit. For B = 0.06 T, a field often used to accumulate hyperpolarized xenon, T1 is ~6 s near the Xe melting point Tm = 161.4 K. From T = 50 K to Tm, the new data are in excellent agreement with the theoretical prediction that the relaxation is due to (i) modulation of the spin-rotation interaction by phonons, and (ii) modulation of the dipole-dipole interaction by vacancy diffusion.

  1. Nuclear-spin-lattice relaxation in rhenium metal

    SciTech Connect

    Dimitropoulos, C.; Bucher, J.P.; Borsa, F.; Corti, M.

    1989-04-01

    Nuclear-spin-lattice relaxation measurements are presented for /sup 187/Re in Re metal as a function of temperature. The relaxation transition probabilities were extracted from the nuclear magnetization recovery curves both in high magnetic field (H/sub 0/ = 8 T) nuclear-magnetic-resonance experiments and in nuclear-quadrupole-resonance (H/sub 0/ = 0) experiments. It is found that the dominant relaxation mechanisms is due to magnetic rather then quadrupolar hyperfine interaction with W/sub M/ = 1.32 T. The data are analyzed in terms of the electronic structure of Re metal. The analysis confirms that Re is a ''weakly enhanced'' transition metal with a nuclear relaxation rate dominated by the s-contact hyperfine interaction.

  2. Non-adiabatic spin-transfer torque independent of the spin relaxation rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyoung-Whan; Lee, Kyung-Jin; Lee, Hyun-Woo; Stiles, Mark

    Non-adiabatic spin-transfer torques play an important role in magnetization dynamics. For example, they determine current-induced magnetic domain wall velocity. A well-known mechanism for non-adiabatic spin-transfer torques arises from spin relaxation and is directly proportional to the spin relaxation rate. Here we report mechanism that is independent of the spin relaxation rate. This mechanism is related to the recently reported intrinsic damping-like spin-orbit torque, which is proportional to an electric field but is independent of the conductivity, and hence the scattering rate. Likewise, the mechanism we report is independent of the scattering rate. It originates from the effective spin-orbit coupling that arises in systems with magnetic textures as we previously reported for related processes. In this work, we demonstrate the existence of such a spin-transfer torque, which is a contribution to the non-adiabatic spin-transfer torque and is independent of scattering rates. We also demonstrate that the magnitude of this torque can be much larger than other mechanisms for non-adiabatic spin-transfer torques, and may be the dominant contribution in some systems.

  3. Ultrafast Relaxation Dynamics of the Ethylene Cation C2H4(.).

    PubMed

    Ludwig, André; Liberatore, Elisa; Herrmann, Jens; Kasmi, Lamia; López-Tarifa, Pablo; Gallmann, Lukas; Rothlisberger, Ursula; Keller, Ursula; Lucchini, Matteo

    2016-05-19

    We present a combined experimental and computational study of the relaxation dynamics of the ethylene cation. In the experiment, we apply an extreme-ultraviolet-pump/infrared-probe scheme that permits us to resolve time scales on the order of 10 fs. The photoionization of ethylene followed by an infrared (IR) probe pulse leads to a rich structure in the fragment ion yields reflecting the fast response of the molecule and its nuclei. The temporal resolution of our setup enables us to pinpoint an upper bound of the previously defined ethylene-ethylidene isomerization time to 30 ± 3 fs. Time-dependent density functional based trajectory surface hopping simulations show that internal relaxation between the first excited states and the ground state occurs via three different conical intersections. This relaxation unfolds on femtosecond time scales and can be probed by ultrashort IR pulses. Through this probe mechanism, we demonstrate a route to optical control of the important dissociation pathways leading to separation of H or H2. PMID:27139223

  4. Spin Relaxation in Hyperpolarized He-3 Fermi Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanton, Liam; Bedell, Kevin

    2004-03-01

    In the past few years, attention has been drawn towards the hyperpolarized gases of Xenon-129 and Helium-3 isotopes. Medical research has explored the possibilities of using these isotopes for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lungs in both human and animal test subjects. Because the atoms of hyperpolarized gas are forced into a specific spin state, the MRI signal is enhanced. While the spin relaxation times of Helium-3 can be calculated in the high and low temperature limits, there exists no exact analytic solution for intermediate temperatures. The intention of this research was to numerically connect these limits with an accurate approximation. To do this, various analytic and numerical methods were used to reduce the spin relaxation time to a function of temperature, chemical potential, and particle number. Additional numerical methods were then used to calculate the chemical potential of Helium-3. The data show that a minimum occurs in the spin relaxation time at the order of the Fermi temperature, after which the classical limit is rapidly approached. These computational results seem to coincide with those expected.

  5. Calculation of spin-lattice relaxation during pulsed spin locking in solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, W.-K.; Burum, D. P.; Elleman, D. D.

    1978-01-01

    The spin-lattice relaxation time has been calculated for dipolar solids in the case where the spins are locked by an RF pulse sequence with pulses of arbitrary angle and finite width. Expressions are given for the homonuclear case in general and for the heteronuclear case in the delta-function limit. The results for the homonuclear case are experimentally confirmed using solid C6F12. The analysis shows that for small pulse angles, at which the direct spin heating effect is known to be small, the relaxation behavior will be identical to the CW irradiation case.

  6. Capturing fast relaxing spins with SWIFT adiabatic rotating frame spin-lattice relaxation (T1ρ ) mapping.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Nissi, M J; Idiyatullin, D; Michaeli, S; Garwood, M; Ellermann, J

    2016-04-01

    Rotating frame spin-lattice relaxation, with the characteristic time constant T1ρ , provides a means to access motion-restricted (slow) spin dynamics in MRI. As a result of their restricted motion, these spins are sometimes characterized by a short transverse relaxation time constant T2 and thus can be difficult to detect directly with conventional image acquisition techniques. Here, we introduce an approach for three-dimensional adiabatic T1ρ mapping based on a magnetization-prepared sweep imaging with Fourier transformation (MP-SWIFT) sequence, which captures signal from almost all water spin populations, including the extremely fast relaxing pool. A semi-analytical procedure for T1ρ mapping is described. Experiments on phantoms and musculoskeletal tissue specimens (tendon, articular and epiphyseal cartilages) were performed at 9.4 T for both the MP-SWIFT and fast spin echo (FSE) read outs. In the phantom with liquids having fast molecular tumbling and a single-valued T1ρ time constant, the measured T1ρ values obtained with MP-SWIFT and FSE were similar. Conversely, in normal musculoskeletal tissues, T1ρ values measured with MP-SWIFT were much shorter than the values obtained with FSE. Studies of biological tissue specimens demonstrated that T1ρ -weighted SWIFT provides higher contrast between normal and diseased tissues relative to conventional acquisitions. Adiabatic T1ρ mapping with SWIFT readout captures contributions from the otherwise undetected fast relaxing spins, allowing more informative T1ρ measurements of normal and diseased states. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26811973

  7. Quench dynamics and relaxation in isolated integrable quantum spin chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essler, Fabian H. L.; Fagotti, Maurizio

    2016-06-01

    We review the dynamics after quantum quenches in integrable quantum spin chains. We give a pedagogical introduction to relaxation in isolated quantum systems, and discuss the description of the steady state by (generalized) Gibbs ensembles. We then turn to general features in the time evolution of local observables after the quench, using a simple model of free fermions as an example. In the second part we present an overview of recent progress in describing quench dynamics in two key paradigms for quantum integrable models, the transverse field Ising chain and the anisotropic spin-1/2 Heisenberg chain.

  8. Nuclear spin relaxation of {sup 129}Xe due to persistent xenon dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Berry-Pusey, B. N.; Anger, B. C.; Laicher, G.; Saam, B.

    2006-12-15

    We have measured longitudinal nuclear relaxation rates of {sup 129}Xe in Xe-N{sub 2} mixtures at densities below 0.5 amagats in a magnetic field of 8.0 T. We find that intrinsic spin relaxation in this regime is principally due to fluctuations in the intramolecular spin-rotation (SR) and chemical-shift-anisotropy (CSA) interactions, mediated by the formation of {sup 129}Xe-Xe persistent dimers. Our results are consistent with previous work done in one case at much lower applied fields where the CSA interaction is negligible and in another case at much higher gas densities where transient xenon dimers mediate the interactions. We have verified that a large applied field suppresses the persistent-dimer mechanism, consistent with standard relaxation theory, allowing us to measure room-temperature gas-phase relaxation times T{sub 1} for {sup 129}Xe greater than 25 h at 8.0 T. These data also yield a maximum possible low-field T{sub 1} for pure xenon gas at room temperature of 5.45{+-}0.2 h. The coupling strengths for the SR and CSA interactions that we extract are in fair agreement with estimates based both on previous experimental work and on ab initio calculations. Our results have potential implications for the production and storage of large quantities of hyperpolarized {sup 129}Xe for use in various applications.

  9. Hyperpolarized nanodiamond with long spin-relaxation times

    PubMed Central

    Rej, Ewa; Gaebel, Torsten; Boele, Thomas; Waddington, David E.J.; Reilly, David J.

    2015-01-01

    The use of hyperpolarized agents in magnetic resonance, such as 13C-labelled compounds, enables powerful new imaging and detection modalities that stem from a 10,000-fold boost in signal. A major challenge for the future of the hyperpolarization technique is the inherently short spin-relaxation times, typically <60 s for 13C liquid-state compounds, which limit the time that the signal remains boosted. Here we demonstrate that 1.1% natural abundance 13C spins in synthetic nanodiamond can be hyperpolarized at cryogenic and room temperature without the use of free radicals, and, owing to their solid-state environment, exhibit relaxation times exceeding 1 h. Combined with the already established applications of nanodiamonds in the life sciences as inexpensive fluorescent markers and non-cytotoxic substrates for gene and drug delivery, these results extend the theranostic capabilities of nanoscale diamonds into the domain of hyperpolarized magnetic resonance. PMID:26450570

  10. Hyperpolarized nanodiamond with long spin-relaxation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rej, Ewa; Gaebel, Torsten; Boele, Thomas; Waddington, David E. J.; Reilly, David J.

    2015-10-01

    The use of hyperpolarized agents in magnetic resonance, such as 13C-labelled compounds, enables powerful new imaging and detection modalities that stem from a 10,000-fold boost in signal. A major challenge for the future of the hyperpolarization technique is the inherently short spin-relaxation times, typically <60 s for 13C liquid-state compounds, which limit the time that the signal remains boosted. Here we demonstrate that 1.1% natural abundance 13C spins in synthetic nanodiamond can be hyperpolarized at cryogenic and room temperature without the use of free radicals, and, owing to their solid-state environment, exhibit relaxation times exceeding 1 h. Combined with the already established applications of nanodiamonds in the life sciences as inexpensive fluorescent markers and non-cytotoxic substrates for gene and drug delivery, these results extend the theranostic capabilities of nanoscale diamonds into the domain of hyperpolarized magnetic resonance.

  11. RNF20-SNF2H Pathway of Chromatin Relaxation in DNA Double-Strand Break Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Akihiro; Komatsu, Kenshi

    2015-01-01

    Rapid progress in the study on the association of histone modifications with chromatin remodeling factors has broadened our understanding of chromatin dynamics in DNA transactions. In DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair, the well-known mark of histones is the phosphorylation of the H2A variant, H2AX, which has been used as a surrogate marker of DSBs. The ubiquitylation of histone H2B by RNF20 E3 ligase was recently found to be a DNA damage-induced histone modification. This modification is required for DSB repair and regulated by a distinctive pathway from that of histone H2AX phosphorylation. Moreover, the connection between H2B ubiquitylation and the chromatin remodeling activity of SNF2H has been elucidated. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of RNF20-mediated processes and the molecular link to H2AX-mediated processes during DSB repair. PMID:26184323

  12. Spin-flip reactions of Zr + C2H6 researched by relativistic density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yi; Chen, Xian-Yang; Qiu, Yi-Xiang; Wang, Shu-Guang

    2013-09-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) with relativistic corrections of zero-order regular approximation (ZORA) has been applied to explore the reaction mechanisms of ethane dehydrogenation by Zr atom with triplet and singlet spin-states. Among the complicated minimum energy reaction path, the available states involves three transition states (TS), and four stationary states (1) to (4) and one intersystem crossing with spin-flip (marked by -->): (3) Zr + C 2 H 6 → (3) Zr-CH 3 -CH 3 ((3)1) → (3)TS 1/2 → (3) ZrH-CH 2 -CH 3 ((3)2) → (3) TS 2/3 --> (1) ZrH2-CH2 = CH2 ((1) 3) → (1) TS 3/4 → (1) ZrH 3 -CH = CH 2 ((1)4). The minimum energy crossing point is determined with the help of the DFT fractional-occupation-number (FON) approach. The spin inversion leads the reaction pathway transferring from the triplet potential energy surface (PES) to the singlet's accompanying with the activation of the second C-H bond. The overall reaction is calculated to be exothermic by about 231 kJ mol(-1). Frequency and NBO analysis are also applied to confirm with the experimental observed data. PMID:23851999

  13. Spin relaxation through Kondo scattering in Cu/Py lateral spin valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batley, J. T.; Rosaond, M. C.; Ali, M.; Linfield, E. H.; Burnell, G.; Hickey, B. J.

    Within non-magnetic metals it is reasonable to expect the Elliot-Yafet mechanism to govern spin-relaxation and thus the temperature dependence of the spin diffusion length might be inversely proportional to resistivity. However, in lateral spin valves, measurements have found that at low temperatures the spin diffusion length unexpectedly decreases. We have fabricated lateral spin valves from Cu with different concentrations of magnetic impurities. Through temperature dependent charge and spin transport measurements we present clear evidence linking the presence of the Kondo effect within Cu to the suppression of the spin diffusion length below 30 K. We have calculated the spin-relaxation rate and isolated the contribution from magnetic impurities. At very low temperatures electron-electron interactions play a more prominent role in the Kondo effect. Well below the Kondo temperature a strong-coupling regime exists, where the moments become screened and the magnetic dephasing rate is reduced. We also investigate the effect of this low temperature regime (>1 K) on a pure spin current. This work shows the dominant role of Kondo scattering, even in low concentrations of order 1 ppm, within pure spin transport.

  14. Search for exotic spin-dependent interactions with a spin-exchange relaxation-free magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, P.-H.; Kim, Y. J.; Savukov, I.

    2016-08-01

    We propose a novel experimental approach to explore exotic spin-dependent interactions using a spin-exchange relaxation-free (SERF) magnetometer, the most sensitive noncryogenic magnetic-field sensor. This approach studies the interactions between optically polarized electron spins located inside a vapor cell of the SERF magnetometer and unpolarized or polarized particles of external solid-state objects. The coupling of spin-dependent interactions to the polarized electron spins of the magnetometer induces the tilt of the electron spins, which can be detected with high sensitivity by a probe laser beam similarly as an external magnetic field. We estimate that by moving unpolarized or polarized objects next to the SERF Rb vapor cell, the experimental limit to the spin-dependent interactions can be significantly improved over existing experiments, and new limits on the coupling strengths can be set in the interaction range below 10-2 m .

  15. Spin relaxation in bilayer graphene: the role of electron-electron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katiyar, Saurabh; Ghosh, Bahniman; Salimath, Akshay Kumar

    2016-02-01

    This paper investigates the influence of electron-electron scattering on spin relaxation length in bilayer graphene using semiclassical Monte Carlo simulation. Both D'yakonov-P'erel and Elliot-Yafet mechanisms are considered for spin relaxation. It is shown that spin relaxation length decreases by 17 % at 300 K on including electron-electron scattering. The reason of this variation in spin relaxation length is that the ensemble spin is modified upon an e-e collision, and also e-e scattering rate is greater than phonon scattering rate which causes change in spin transport profile.

  16. Spin-flip relaxation via optical phonon scattering in quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zi-Wu; Liu, Lei; Li, Shu-Shen

    2013-12-14

    Based on the spin-orbit coupling admixture mechanism, we theoretically investigate the spin-flip relaxation via optical phonon scattering in quantum dots by considering the effect of lattice relaxation due to the electron-acoustic phonon deformation potential coupling. The relaxation rate displays a cusp-like structure (or a spin hot spot) that becomes more clearly with increasing temperature. We also calculate the relaxation rate of the spin-conserving process, which follows a Gaussian form and is several orders of magnitude larger than that of spin-flip process. Moreover, we find that the relaxation rate displays the oscillatory behavior due to the interplay effects between the magnetic and spatial confinement for the spin-flip process not for the spin-conserving process. The trends of increasing and decreasing temperature dependence of the relaxation rates for two relaxation processes are obtained in the present model.

  17. Water proton spin saturation affects measured protein backbone 15 N spin relaxation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kang; Tjandra, Nico

    2011-12-01

    Protein backbone 15N NMR spin relaxation rates are useful in characterizing the protein dynamics and structures. To observe the protein nuclear-spin resonances a pulse sequence has to include a water suppression scheme. There are two commonly employed methods, saturating or dephasing the water spins with pulse field gradients and keeping them unperturbed with flip-back pulses. Here different water suppression methods were incorporated into pulse sequences to measure 15N longitudinal T1 and transversal rotating-frame T1ρ spin relaxation. Unexpectedly the 15N T1 relaxation time constants varied significantly with the choice of water suppression method. For a 25-kDa Escherichiacoli. glutamine binding protein (GlnBP) the T1 values acquired with the pulse sequence containing a water dephasing gradient are on average 20% longer than the ones obtained using a pulse sequence containing the water flip-back pulse. In contrast the two T1ρ data sets are correlated without an apparent offset. The average T1 difference was reduced to 12% when the experimental recycle delay was doubled, while the average T1 values from the flip-back measurements were nearly unchanged. Analysis of spectral signal to noise ratios ( s/ n) showed the apparent slower 15N relaxation obtained with the water dephasing experiment originated from the differences in 1H N recovery for each relaxation time point. This in turn offset signal reduction from 15N relaxation decay. The artifact becomes noticeable when the measured 15N relaxation time constant is comparable to recycle delay, e.g., the 15N T1 of medium to large proteins. The 15N relaxation rates measured with either water suppression schemes yield reasonable fits to the structure. However, data from the saturated scheme results in significantly lower Model-Free order parameters (< S2> = 0.81) than the non-saturated ones (< S2> = 0.88), indicating such order parameters may be previously underestimated.

  18. Nonlinear effects in spin relaxation of cavity polaritons

    SciTech Connect

    Solnyshkov, D. D.; Shelykh, I. A. Glazov, M. M.; Malpuech, G.; Amand, T.; Renucci, P.; Marie, X.; Kavokin, A. V.

    2007-09-15

    We present the general kinetic formalism for the description of spin and energy relaxation of the cavity polaritons in the framework of the Born-Markov approximation. All essential mechanisms of polariton redistribution in reciprocal space together with the final state bosonic stimulation are taken into account from our point of view. The developed theory is applied to describe our experimental results on the polarization dynamics obtained in the polariton parametric amplifier geometry (pumping at the so-called magic angle). Under circular pumping, we show that the spin relaxation time is strongly dependent on the detuning between the exciton and cavity mode energies mainly because of the influence of the detuning on the coupling strength between the photon-like part of the exciton-polariton lower dispersion branch and the reservoir of uncoupled exciton states. In the negative detuning case we find a very long spin relaxation time of about 300 ps. In the case of excitation by a linearly polarized light, we have experimentally confirmed that the anisotropy of the polariton-polariton interaction is responsible for the build-up of the cross-linear polarization of the signal. In the spontaneous regime the polarization degree of the signal is -8% but it can reach -65% in the stimulated regime. The long-living linear polarization observed at zero detuning indicates that the reservoir is formed by excitons localized at the anisotropic islands oriented along the crystallographic axes. Finally, under elliptical pumping, we have directly measured in the time domain and modeled the effect of self-induced Larmor precession, i.e., the rotation of the linear polarization of a state about an effective magnetic field proportional to the projection of the total spin of exciton-polaritons in the cavity on its growth axis.

  19. The spin-temperature theory of dynamic nuclear polarization and nuclear spin-lattice relaxation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byvik, C. E.; Wollan, D. S.

    1974-01-01

    A detailed derivation of the equations governing dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and nuclear spin lattice relaxation by use of the spin temperature theory has been carried to second order in a perturbation expansion of the density matrix. Nuclear spin diffusion in the rapid diffusion limit and the effects of the coupling of the electron dipole-dipole reservoir (EDDR) with the nuclear spins are incorporated. The complete expression for the dynamic nuclear polarization has been derived and then examined in detail for the limit of well resolved solid effect transitions. Exactly at the solid effect transition peaks, the conventional solid-effect DNP results are obtained, but with EDDR effects on the nuclear relaxation and DNP leakage factor included. Explicit EDDR contributions to DNP are discussed, and a new DNP effect is predicted.

  20. Spin-orbit induced two-electron spin relaxation in double quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borhani, Massoud; Hu, Xuedong

    2011-03-01

    We study the spin decay of two electrons confined in a double quantum dots via the spin-orbit interaction and acoustic phonons. We have obtained a generic form for the spin Hamiltonian for two electrons confined in (elliptic) harmonic potentials in doubles dots and in the presence of an arbitrary applied magnetic field. Our focus is on the interdot bias regime where singlet-triplet splitting is small, in contrast to the spin-blockade regime. Our results clarify the spin-orbit mediated two-spin relaxation in lateral/nanowire quantum dots, particularly when the confining potentials are different in each dot. We thank support by NSA/LPS thorugh ARO.

  1. Nuclear Spin Relaxation Characteristic of Submonolayer He Films in Nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushita, Taku; Kawai, Ryosuke; Kuze, Atsushi; Hieda, Mitsunori; Wada, Nobuo

    2014-04-01

    In order to obtain information on dynamics of helium films in the nondegenerate fluid region, we have performed a pulsed-NMR experiment at 3.29 MHz on He films adsorbed in straight 2.4 nm channels of FSM silicates down to 0.54 K. In general, the spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation times and were explained in terms of the two-dimensional Bloembergen-Purcell-Pound model for dipolar relaxation. Temperature dependences of in submonolayer He films show a minimum, indicating that the dipolar-field correlation time is about s. The temperature of the minimum monotonically lowers with increasing coverage, suggesting that He adatoms become more mobile at higher coverages. The low-dimensional property of He adatoms is observed as the separation of and above where . On the other hand, several features specific to films in the nanochannel geometry were also found. Especially, the temperature dependence of becomes very small just below and shows a shoulder at lower temperatures. This anomaly has not been observed in He adsorbed in wider pores or on flat surfaces, so that it is considered to be characteristic of He films confined in narrow channels with a diameter of a few nm.

  2. Unexpected suppression of spin-lattice relaxation via high magnetic field in a high-spin iron(iii) complex.

    PubMed

    Zadrozny, Joseph M; Graham, Michael J; Krzyaniak, Matthew D; Wasielewski, Michael R; Freedman, Danna E

    2016-08-01

    A counterintuitive three-order of magnitude slowing of the spin-lattice relaxation rate is observed in a high spin qubit at high magnetic field via multifrequency pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance measurements. PMID:27463410

  3. Relaxation times of the two-phonon processes with spin-flip and spin-conserving in quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zi-Wu; Liu, Lei; Li, Shu-Shen

    2014-04-07

    We perform a theoretical investigation on the two-phonon processes of the spin-flip and spin-conserving relaxation in quantum dots in the frame of the Huang-Rhys' lattice relaxation model. We find that the relaxation time of the spin-flip is two orders of magnitude longer than that of the spin-conserving, which is in agreement with previous experimental measurements. Moreover, the opposite variational trends of the relaxation time as a function of the energy separation for two-phonon processes are obtained in different temperature regime. The relaxation times display the oscillatory behaviors at the demarcation point with increasing magnetic field, where the energy separation matches the optical phonon energy and results in the optical phonon resonance. These results are useful in understanding the intraband levels' relaxation in quantum dots and could be helpful in designing photoelectric and spin-memory devices.

  4. Theory of the ac spin valve effect: a new method to measure spin relaxation time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochan, Denis; Gmitra, Martin; Fabian, Jaroslav

    2012-02-01

    Parallel (P) and antiparallel (AP) configurations of FNF junctions have, in a dc regime, different resistivities (RAP>RP), giving rise to the giant magnetoresistance (GMR) effect, which can be explained within the spin injection drift-diffusion model. We extend the model to include ac phenomena and predict new spin dynamical phenomenon; the resonant amplification and depletion of spin accumulation in the P and AP configurations, respectively. As the major new effect, the spin valve magnetoimpedance of the FNF junction oscillates with the driving ac frequency, which leads to negative GMR effect (|ZAP|<|ZP|). We show that from the spin-valve oscillation periods, measured all electrically in the GHz regime, the spin relaxation times could be extracted without any magnetic field and sample size changes (contrary to other techniques). For thin tunnel junctions the ac signal becomes pure Lorentzian, also enabling one to obtain the spin relaxation time of the N region from the signal width. This work, was published in Physical Review Letters,10, 176604 (2011).

  5. Resonant spin amplification in nanostructures with anisotropic spin relaxation and spread of the electronic g factor

    SciTech Connect

    Glazov, M. M. Ivchenko, E. L.

    2008-08-15

    Spin dynamics of electrons in semiconductors and structures with quantum wells under conditions where pumping and probing are performed in the form of a periodical series of pulses is theoretically studied. It is shown that, at a fixed delay between the pump and probe pulses, the signal of spin amplification as a function of the magnetic field consists of a series of narrow peaks conditioned by commensurability of the period of spin precession and pulse repetition interval. In the case of anisotropic spin relaxation, the peak centered at the zero magnetic field is suppressed compared with the neighboring peaks. The role of inhomogeneous broadening of the frequency of the Larmor precession in the formation of the spin amplification signal is analyzed.

  6. A fast determination method for transverse relaxation of spin-exchange-relaxation-free magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Jixi Qian, Zheng; Fang, Jiancheng

    2015-04-15

    We propose a fast and accurate determination method for transverse relaxation of the spin-exchange-relaxation-free (SERF) magnetometer. This method is based on the measurement of magnetic resonance linewidth via a chirped magnetic field excitation and the amplitude spectrum analysis. Compared with the frequency sweeping via separate sinusoidal excitation, our method can realize linewidth determination within only few seconds and meanwhile obtain good frequency resolution. Therefore, it can avoid the drift error in long term measurement and improve the accuracy of the determination. As the magnetic resonance frequency of the SERF magnetometer is very low, we include the effect of the negative resonance frequency caused by the chirp and achieve the coefficient of determination of the fitting results better than 0.998 with 95% confidence bounds to the theoretical equation. The experimental results are in good agreement with our theoretical analysis.

  7. Contact induced spin relaxation in graphene spin valves with Al2O3 and MgO tunnel barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amamou, Walid; Lin, Zhisheng; van Baren, Jeremiah; Turkyilmaz, Serol; Shi, Jing; Kawakami, Roland K.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate spin relaxation in graphene by systematically comparing the roles of spin absorption, other contact-induced effects (e.g., fringe fields), and bulk spin relaxation for graphene spin valves with MgO barriers, Al2O3 barriers, and transparent contacts. We obtain effective spin lifetimes by fitting the Hanle spin precession data with two models that include or exclude the effect of spin absorption. Results indicate that additional contact-induced spin relaxation other than spin absorption dominates the contact effect. For tunneling contacts, we find reasonable agreement between the two models with median discrepancy of ˜20% for MgO and ˜10% for Al2O3.

  8. Microwave Amplitude Modulation Technique to Measure Spin-Lattice (T 1) and Spin-Spin (T 2) Relaxation Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Sushil K.

    The measurement of very short spin-lattice, or longitudinal, relaxation (SLR) times (i.e., 10-10 < T 1 < 10-6 s) is of great importance today for the study of relaxation processes. Recent case studies include, for example, glasses doped with paramagnetic ions (Vergnoux et al., 1996; Zinsou et al., 1996), amorphous Si (dangling bonds) and copper-chromium-tin spinel (Cr3+) (Misra, 1998), and polymer resins doped with rare-earth ions (Pescia et al., 1999a; Pescia et al. 1999b). The ability to measure such fast SLR data on amorphous Si and copper-chromium-tin spinel led to an understanding of the role of exchange interaction in affecting spin-lattice relaxation, while the data on polymer resins doped with rare-earth ions provided evidence of spin-fracton relaxation (Pescia et al., 1999a, b). But such fast SLR times are not measurable by the most commonly used techniques of saturation- and inversion-recovery (Poole, 1982; Alger, 1968), which only measure spin-lattice relaxation times longer than 10-6 s. A summary of relevant experimental data is presented in Table 1.

  9. The Spin-Lattice Relaxation of Hyperpolarized 89Y Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jindal, Ashish; Lumata, Lloyd; Xing, Yixun; Merritt, Matthew; Zhao, Piyu; Malloy, Craig; Sherry, Dean; Kovacs, Zoltan

    2011-03-01

    The low sensitivity of NMR can be overcome by dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP). However, a limitation to the use of hyperpolarized materials is the signal decay due to T1 relaxation. Among NMR-active nuclei, 89 Y is potentially valuable in medical imaging because in chelated form, pH-sensitive agents can be developed. 89 Y also offers many attractive features -- 100 % abundance, a 1/2 spin, and a long T1 , up to 10 min. Yet, developing new 89 Y complexes with even longer T1 values is desirable. Designing such complexes relies upon understanding the mechanism(s) responsible for T1 relaxation. We report an approach to hyperpolarized T1 measurements that enabled an analysis of relaxation mechanisms by selective deuteration of the ligand backbone, the solvent or both. Hyperpolarized 89 Y -- DTPA, DOTA, EDTA, and deuterated EDTA complexes were studied. Results suggest that substitution of low-gamma nuclei on the ligand backbone as opposed to that of the solvent most effectively increase the 89 Y T1 . These results are encouraging for in vivo applications as the presence of bound water may not dramatically affect the T1 .

  10. Sub-Shot-Noise Magnetometry with a Correlated Spin-Relaxation Dominated Alkali-Metal Vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Kominis, I. K.

    2008-02-22

    Spin noise sets fundamental limits to the precision of measurements using spin-polarized atomic vapors, such as performed with sensitive atomic magnetometers. Spin squeezing offers the possibility to extend the measurement precision beyond the standard quantum limit of uncorrelated atoms. Contrary to current understanding, we show that, even in the presence of spin relaxation, spin squeezing can lead to a significant reduction of spin noise, and hence an increase in magnetometric sensitivity, for a long measurement time. This is the case when correlated spin relaxation due to binary alkali-atom collisions dominates independently acting decoherence processes, a situation realized in thermal high atom-density magnetometers and clocks.

  11. Kinetic equations for hopping transport and spin relaxation in a random magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumilin, A. V.; Kabanov, V. V.

    2015-07-01

    We derive the kinetic equations for a hopping transport that take into account an electron spin and the possibility of double occupation. In the Ohmic regime, the equations are reduced to the generalized Miller-Abrahams resistor network. We apply these equations to the problem of the magnetic moment relaxation due to the interaction with the random hyperfine fields. It is shown that in a wide range of parameters the relaxation rate is governed by the hops with the similar rates as spin precession frequency. It is demonstrated that at the large time scale spin relaxation is nonexponential. We argue that the nonexponential relaxation of the magnetic moment is related to the spin of electrons in the slow-relaxing traps. Interestingly, the traps can significantly influence the spin relaxation in the infinite conducting cluster at large times.

  12. Staggered-spin contribution to nuclear spin-lattice relaxation in two-leg antiferromagnetic spin-12 ladders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, D. A.; Lee, Patrick A.

    1999-02-01

    We study the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T1 in the two-leg antiferromagnetic spin-1/2 Heisenberg ladder. More specifically, we consider the contribution to 1/T1 from the processes with momentum transfer (π,π). In the limit of weak coupling between the two chains, this contribution is of activation type with gap 2Δ at low temperatures (Δ is the spin gap), but crosses over to a slowly decaying temperature dependence at the crossover temperature T~Δ. This crossover possibly explains the recent high-temperature NMR results on ladder-containing cuprates by Imai et al.

  13. Long-lived Spin Relaxation and Spin Coherence of Electrons in Monolayer MoS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Luyi

    Monolayer MoS2 and related transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are direct-gap semiconductors in which strong spin-orbit coupling and a lack of structural inversion symmetry give rise to new coupled spin-valley physics. Although robust spin and valley degrees of freedom have been inferred from polarized photoluminescence (PL) studies of excitons, PL timescales are necessarily constrained by short (3-100 ps) electron-hole recombination. Direct probes of spin/valley dynamics of resident carriers in electron (or hole)-doped TMDs, which may persist long after recombination ceases, are still at an early stage. Here we directly measure the coupled spin-valley dynamics of resident electrons in n-type monolayer MoS2 using optical Kerr-rotation spectroscopy, and reveal very long spin lifetimes exceeding 3ns at 5K (orders of magnitude longer than typical exciton lifetimes). In contrast with conventional III-V or II-VI semiconductors, spin relaxation accelerates rapidly in small transverse magnetic fields. This suggests a novel mechanism of electron spin dephasing in monolayer TMDs, driven by rapidly-fluctuating internal spin-orbit fields due to fast intervalley scattering. Additionally, a small but very long-lived oscillatory signal is observed, indicating spin coherence of localized states. These studies provide direct insight into the physics underpinning the spin and valley dynamics of electrons in monolayer TMDs. In collaboration with S.A. Crooker & N.A. Sinitsyn (Los Alamos), W. Chen, J. Yuan, J. Zhang & J. Lou (Rice University), K.M. McCreary & B.T. Jonker (Naval Research Lab), and supported by the Los Alamos LDRD program.

  14. Spin relaxation in hole-doped transition metal dichalcogenides with the crystal defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habe, Tetsuro; Koshino, Mikito

    We theoretically investigate the electronic spin relaxation effect in the hole-doped monolayer and bilayer transition-metal dichalcogenides in the presence of the crystal defects. We simulate lattice vacancies in the multi-orbital tight-binding model obtained by the first-principle method and actually estimate the spin relaxation rate by using the tight-binding model. In the monolayer, the spin-relaxation time is found to be much longer than the momentum relaxation time, and this is attributed to the fact that the spin hybridization in the band structure is suppressed by the mirror reflection symmetry. The bilayer TMD has a much shorter spin relaxation time in contrast because of the stronger spin hybridization due to the absence of the mirror symmetry.

  15. Crystal structure, NMR study, dielectric relaxation and AC conductivity of a new compound [Cd3(SCN)2Br6(C2H9N2)2]n

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saidi, K.; Kamoun, S.; Ayedi, H. Ferid; Arous, M.

    2013-11-01

    The crystal structure, the 13C NMR spectroscopy and the complex impedance have been carried out on [Cd3(SCN)2Br6(C2H9N2)2]n. Crystal structure shows a 2D polymeric network built up of two crystallographically independent cadmium atoms with two different octahedral coordinations. This compound exhibits a phase transition at (T=355±2 K) which has been characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-rays powder diffraction, AC conductivity and dielectric measurements. Examination of 13C CP/MAS line shapes shows indirect spin-spin coupling (14N and 13C) with a dipolar coupling constant of 1339 Hz. The AC conductivity of this compound has been carried out in the temperature range 325-376 K and the frequency range from 10-2 Hz to 10 MHz. The impedance data were well fitted to two equivalent electrical circuits. The results of the modulus study reveal the presence of two distinct relaxation processes. One, at low frequency side, is thermally activated due to the ionic conduction of the crystal and the other, at higher frequency side, gradually disappears when temperature reaches 355 K which is attributed to the localized dipoles in the crystal. Moreover, the temperature dependence of DC-conductivity in both phases follows the Arrhenius law and the frequency dependence of σ(ω,T) follows Jonscher's universal law. The near values of activation energies obtained from the conductivity data and impedance confirm that the transport is through the ion hopping mechanism.

  16. Full relaxation matrix analysis of apparent cross-correlated relaxation rates in four-spin systems.

    PubMed

    Vögeli, Beat

    2013-01-01

    Cross-correlated relaxation (CCR) rates are an established tool for the extraction of relative bond orientations in biomolecules in solution. CCR between dipolar interactions in four-spin systems is a particularly well-suited mechanism. In this paper, a simple approach to analyze systematic experimental errors is formulated in a subspace of the complete four-spin Hilbert space. It is shown that, contrary to the common assumption, the secular approximation of the relaxation matrix is marginal for the most prominent spin systems. With the main focus on the model protein GB3 at room temperature, it is shown that the apparent experimental CCR rates have errors between -12% and +4% for molecules with a molecular tumbling time of 3.5 ns. Although depending on the specific pulse sequence used, the following rule-of-thumb can be established: Judged by absolute values, the errors for H(α)-C(α)/H(α)-C(α), H(N)-N/C(α)-C', H(N)-N/C(γ)-C(β) and H(N)-N/H(β)-C(β) CCR rates can safely be neglected. However, errors for H(N)-N/H(N)-N and H(N)-N/H(α)-C(α) CCR rates are on the order of 0.1-0.3s(-1) and must be considered. Tabulated correction factors may be used for their extraction. If larger systems are studied, in most cases the errors cannot be neglected anymore. On the other hand, well-calibrated pulses can safely be assumed to be perfect. PMID:23207177

  17. Davisson-Germer Prize Talk¯Spin Relaxation in Optical Pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Happer, William

    2000-06-01

    This talk will review the role of spin relaxation in optically pumped gaseous systems. Such systems have turned out to have important applications in many areas -- most recently in the production of hyperpolarized He-3 and Xe-129 gases for magnetic resonance imaging of human lungs. Systems of practical interest always have very slowly relaxing spins that permit large quantities (liter-atmospheres at room temperature) of spins to be polarized to many tens of percent and stored for hours. Some of the spin-relaxation physics is reasonably well understood, for example: the optical pumping itself, the trapping of resonant radiation and its control by quenching gases, the establishment of a spin temperature by spin-exchange collisions or by the optical pumping, the transfer of angular momentum between spin systems in spin-exchange collisions, the slowing down of electronic spin relaxation because of the angular momentum stored in the nuclear spins, gas-phase relaxation due to sudden binary collisions or three-body collisions where molecules are formed, wall interactions, and interactions with inhomogeneous magnetic fields. There are also some important relaxation mechanisms that are still not well understood. The analysis of relaxation in these systems provides many instructive, real-world applications of angular momentum algebra and density matrices.

  18. Magnetic Spin Relaxation Probed with Sweep Speed Dependent Coercivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gredig, Thomas; Byrne, Matthew

    The magnetic spin relaxation of finite-length iron chains has been investigated in iron phthalocyanine thin films by means of sweep speed dependence on magnetic coercivity. The Fe(II) ions are embedded in a carbon matrix and molecules self-assemble during vacuum sublimation, so that the Fe(II) cores form well-separated chains of 1.3 nm and tunable chain lengths within the polycrystalline thin film. The average length of the chains is controlled through deposition variables and ranges from 30 nm to 300 nm. The coercivity strongly increases with chain length in this regime. This may be an interesting experimental realization of a low-dimensional finite-sized Ising model. The coercivity dependence on chain length and sweep speed is described with an Ising model based on Glauber dynamics. Research support from NSF under Grant DMR 0847552.

  19. Hole spin relaxation in InAs/GaAs quantum dot molecules.

    PubMed

    Segarra, C; Climente, J I; Rajadell, F; Planelles, J

    2015-10-21

    We calculate the spin-orbit induced hole spin relaxation between Zeeman sublevels of vertically stacked InAs quantum dots. The widely used Luttinger-Kohn Hamiltonian, which considers coupling of heavy- and light-holes, reveals that hole spin lifetimes (T1) of molecular states significantly exceed those of single quantum dot states. However, this effect can be overcome when cubic Dresselhaus spin-orbit interaction is strong. Misalignment of the dots along the stacking direction is also found to be an important source of spin relaxation. PMID:26418483

  20. Impurities and electron spin relaxations in nanodiamonds studied by multi-frequency electron spin resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Franklin; Takahashi, Susumu

    2014-03-01

    Nano-sized diamond or nanodiamond is a fascinating material for potential applications of fluorescence imaging and magnetic sensing of biological systems via nitrogen-vacancy defect centers in diamonds. Sensitivity of the magnetic sensing strongly depends on coupling to surrounding environmental noises, thus understanding of the environment is critical to realize the application. In the present study, we employ multi-frequency (X-band, 115 GHz and 230 GHz) continuous-wave (cw) and pulsed electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy to investigate impurity contents and spin relaxation properties in various sizes of nanodiamonds. Spectra taken with our home-built 230/115 GHz cw/pulsed ESR spectrometer shows presence of two major impurity contents; single substitutional nitrogen impurities (P1) also common in bulk diamonds and paramagnetic impurities (denoted as X) unique to nanodiamonds. The ESR measurement also shows a strong dependence of the population ratio between P1 and X on particle size. Furthermore, we will discuss the nature of spin-lattice relaxation time T1 of nanodiamonds studied by pulsed ESR measurements at X-band, 115 GHz and 230 GHz.

  1. Strain-induced reduction of surface roughness dominated spin relaxation in MOSFETs

    SciTech Connect

    Osintsev, Dmitri; Stanojevic, Zlatan; Baumgartner, Oskar; Sverdlov, Viktor; Selberherr, Siegfried

    2013-12-04

    Semiconductor spintronics is a rapidly developing field with large impact on microelectronics. Using spin may help to reduce power consumption and increase computational speed. Silicon is perfectly suited for spin-based applications. It is characterized by a weak spin-orbit interaction which should result in a long spin lifetime. However, recent experiments indicate the lifetime is greatly reduced in gated structures. Thus, understanding the peculiarities of the spin-orbit effects on the subband structure and details of the spin propagation in surface layers and thin silicon films is urgently needed. We investigate the contribution of the spin-orbit interaction to the equivalent valley splitting and calculate the spin relaxation matrix elements by using a perturbative k ⋅p approach. We demonstrate that applying uniaxial stress along the [110] direction may considerably suppress electron spin relaxation in silicon surface layers and thin films.

  2. Re-examination of the Elliott-Yafet spin-relaxation mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baral, Alexander; Vollmar, Svenja; Kaltenborn, Steffen; Schneider, Hans Christian

    2016-02-01

    We analyze spin-dependent carrier dynamics due to incoherent electron-phonon scattering, which is commonly referred to as Elliott-Yafet (EY) spin-relaxation mechanism. For this mechanism one usually distinguishes two contributions: (1) from the spin-diagonal electrostatic interaction together with spin-mixing in the wave functions, which is often called the Elliott contribution, and (2) the phonon-modulated spin-orbit interaction, which is often called the Yafet or Overhauser contribution. By computing the reduced electronic density matrix, we improve Yafet’s original calculation, which neglects the spin-mixing in the single-particle states for the determination of the ensemble spin. The important novel quantity in our calculation is a torque operator that determines the spin dynamics due to incoherent scattering. The contribution (1) to this torque vanishes exactly. From this general result, we derive a modified expression for the EY spin relaxation time for Kramers degenerate bands.

  3. Electron Spin Relaxation of Hole and Electron Polarons in π-Conjugated Porphyrin Arrays: Spintronic Implications.

    PubMed

    Rawson, Jeff; Angiolillo, Paul J; Frail, Paul R; Goodenough, Isabella; Therien, Michael J

    2015-06-18

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopic line shape analysis and continuous-wave (CW) progressive microwave power saturation experiments are used to probe the relaxation behavior and the relaxation times of charged excitations (hole and electron polarons) in meso-to-meso ethyne-bridged (porphinato)zinc(II) oligomers (PZnn compounds), which can serve as models for the relevant states generated upon spin injection. The observed ESR line shapes for the PZnn hole polaron ([PZnn](+•)) and electron polaron ([PZnn](-•)) states evolve from Gaussian to more Lorentzian as the oligomer length increases from 1.9 to 7.5 nm, with solution-phase [PZnn](+•) and [PZnn](-•) spin-spin (T2) and spin-lattice (T1) relaxation times at 298 K ranging, respectively, from 40 to 230 ns and 0.2 to 2.3 μs. Notably, these very long relaxation times are preserved in thick films of these species. Because the magnitudes of spin-spin and spin-lattice relaxation times are vital metrics for spin dephasing in quantum computing or for spin-polarized transport in magnetoresistive structures, these results, coupled with the established wire-like transport behavior across metal-dithiol-PZnn-metal junctions, present meso-to-meso ethyne-bridged multiporphyrin systems as leading candidates for ambient-temperature organic spintronic applications. PMID:25697578

  4. Molecular Level Insights on Collagen-Polyphenols Interaction Using Spin-Relaxation and Saturation Transfer Difference NMR.

    PubMed

    Reddy, R Ravikanth; Phani Kumar, Bandaru V N; Shanmugam, Ganesh; Madhan, Balaraman; Mandal, Asit B

    2015-11-01

    Interaction of small molecules with collagen has far reaching consequences in biological and industrial processes. The interaction between collagen and selected polyphenols, viz., gallic acid (GA), pyrogallol (PG), catechin (CA), and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), has been investigated by various solution NMR measurements, viz., (1)H and (13)C chemical shifts (δH and δC), (1)H nonselective spin-lattice relaxation times (T1NS) and selective spin-lattice relaxation times (T1SEL), as well as spin-spin relaxation times (T2). Furthermore, we have employed saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR method to monitor the site of GA, CA, PG, and EGCG which are in close proximity to collagen. It is found that -COOH group of GA provides an important contribution for the interaction of GA with collagen, as evidenced from (13)C analysis, while PG, which is devoid of -COOH group in comparison to GA, does not show any significant interaction with collagen. STD NMR data indicates that the resonances of A-ring (H2', H5' and H6') and C-ring (H6 and H8) protons of CA, and A-ring (H2' and H6'), C-ring (H6 and H8), and D-ring (H2″and H6″) protons of EGCG persist in the spectra, demonstrating that these protons are in spatial proximity to collagen, which is further validated by independent proton spin-relaxation measurement and analysis. The selective (1)H T1 measurements of polyphenols in the presence of protein at various concentrations have enabled us to determine their binding affinities with collagen. EGCG exhibits high binding affinity with collagen followed by CA, GA, and PG. Further, NMR results propose that presence of gallic acid moiety in a small molecule increases its affinity with collagen. Our experimental findings provide molecular insights on the binding of collagen and plant polyphenols. PMID:26447653

  5. Spin Relaxation of an Impurity Polaron in a Parabolic Quantum Dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi-Xin

    2015-01-01

    We have studied theoretically the spin relaxation of an impurity polaron, which arises from the electron interactions with the longitudinal optical phonon between the sublevel Zeeman splitting of the ground-state, by employing a variational method for a parabolic quantum dot (QD). In fact, this process occurs by the absorption of a deformation potential acoustic phonon. With Rashba spin-orbit coupling, the expression of the spin relaxation rate of an impurity polaron as functions of the radius of QD, the Lande factor parameter, the magnetic field adjusting length has been derived. Results of the numerical calculation show that the spin relaxation rate decreases with increasing the radius of QD and enlarges with increasing the magnetic field adjusting length when the magnetic field adjusting length . In addition, we find that the spin relaxation rate is an increasing function of the Lande factor parameter.

  6. Confined acoustic phonon-mediated spin relaxation in a twodimensional quantum dot in the presence of perpendicular magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardanyan, K. A.; Vartanian, A. L.; Stepanyan, A. G.; Kirakosyan, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    The spin-relaxation time due to the electron-acoustic phonon scattering in GaAs quantum dots is studied after the exact diagonalization of the electron Hamiltonian with the spin-orbit coupling. It has been shown that in comparison with flexural phonons, the electron coupling with the dilatational phonons causes 3 orders faster spin relaxation. We have found that the relaxation rate of the spin-flip is an order of magnitude smaller than that of the spin- conserving.

  7. Picosecond spin relaxation in low-temperature-grown GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Uemura, M.; Honda, K.; Yasue, Y.; Tackeuchi, A.; Lu, S. L.; Dai, P.

    2014-03-24

    The spin relaxation process of low-temperature-grown GaAs is investigated by spin-dependent pump and probe reflectance measurements with a sub-picosecond time resolution. Two very short carrier lifetimes of 2.0 ps and 28 ps, which can be attributed to nonradiative recombinations related to defects, are observed at 10 K. The observed spin polarization shows double exponential decay with spin relaxation times of 46.2 ps (8.0 ps) and 509 ps (60 ps) at 10 K (200 K). The observed picosecond spin relaxation, which is considerably shorter than that of conventional GaAs, indicates the strong relevance of the Elliott-Yafet process as the spin relaxation mechanism. For the first (second) spin relaxation component, the temperature and carrier density dependences of the spin relaxation time indicate that the Bir-Aronov-Pikus process is also effective at temperatures between 10 K and 77 K, and that the D'yakonov-Perel’ process is effective between 125 K (77 K) and 200 K.

  8. A unified theory of spin-relaxation due to spin-orbit coupling in metals and semiconductors

    PubMed Central

    Boross, Péter; Dóra, Balázs; Kiss, Annamária; Simon, Ferenc

    2013-01-01

    Spintronics is an emerging paradigm with the aim to replace conventional electronics by using electron spins as information carriers. Its utility relies on the magnitude of the spin-relaxation, which is dominated by spin-orbit coupling (SOC). Yet, SOC induced spin-relaxation in metals and semiconductors is discussed for the seemingly orthogonal cases when inversion symmetry is retained or broken by the so-called Elliott-Yafet and D'yakonov-Perel' spin-relaxation mechanisms, respectively. We unify the two theories on general grounds for a generic two-band system containing intra- and inter-band SOC. While the previously known limiting cases are recovered, we also identify parameter domains when a crossover occurs between them, i.e. when an inversion symmetry broken state evolves from a D'yakonov-Perel' to an Elliott-Yafet type of spin-relaxation and conversely for a state with inversional symmetry. This provides an ultimate link between the two mechanisms of spin-relaxation. PMID:24252975

  9. A study of molecular dynamics and freezing phase transition in tissues by proton spin relaxation.

    PubMed Central

    Rustgi, S N; Peemoeller, H; Thompson, R T; Kydon, D W; Pintar, M M

    1978-01-01

    Muscle, spleen, and kidney tissues from 4-wk-old C57 black mice were studied by proton magnetic resonance. Spin-lattice relaxation times at high fields and in the rotating frame, as well as the spin-spin relaxation times, are reported as a function of temperature in the liquid and frozen phase. Motions of large molecules and of water molecules and their changes at the freezing phase transition are studied. The shortcomings of the two-state fast-exchange relaxation model are discussed. PMID:667294

  10. Electron spin-lattice relaxation of nitroxyl radicals in temperature ranges that span glassy solutions to low-viscosity liquids.

    PubMed

    Sato, Hideo; Bottle, Steven E; Blinco, James P; Micallef, Aaron S; Eaton, Gareth R; Eaton, Sandra S

    2008-03-01

    Electron spin-lattice relaxation rates, 1/T1, at X-band of nitroxyl radicals (4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-oxyl, 4-oxo-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-oxyl, 3-carbamoyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidin-1-oxyl and 3-carbamoyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolin-1-oxyl) in glass-forming solvents (decalin, glycerol, 3-methylpentane, o-terphenyl, 1-propanol, sorbitol, sucrose octaacetate, and 1:1 water:glycerol) at temperatures between 100 and 300K were measured by long-pulse saturation recovery to investigate the relaxation processes in slow-to-fast tumbling regimes. A subset of samples was also studied at lower temperatures or at Q-band. Tumbling correlation times were calculated from continuous wave lineshapes. Temperature dependence and isotope substitution (2H and 15N) were used to distinguish the contributions of various processes. Below about 100K relaxation is dominated by the Raman process. At higher temperatures, but below the glass transition temperature, a local mode process makes significant contributions. Above the glass transition temperature, increased rates of molecular tumbling modulate nuclear hyperfine and g anisotropy. The contribution from spin rotation is very small. Relaxation rates at X-band and Q-band are similar. The dependence of 1/T1 on tumbling correlation times fits better with the Cole-Davidson spectral density function than with the Bloembergen-Purcell-Pound model. PMID:18166493

  11. Nuclear Spin Relaxation and Molecular Interactions of a Novel Triazolium-Based Ionic Liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Jesse J; Schneider, Yanika; Kail, Brian W; Luebke, David R; Nulwala, Hunaid; Damodaran, Krishnan

    2013-04-11

    Nuclear spin relaxation, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) techniques are used to determine supramolecular arrangement of 3-methyl-1-octyl-4-phenyl-1H-triazol-1,2,3-ium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide [OMPhTz][Tf{sub 2}N], an example of a triazolium-based ionic liquid. The results obtained showed first-order thermodynamic dependence for nuclear spin relaxation of the anion. First-order relaxation dependence is interpreted as through-bond dipolar relaxation. Greater than first-order dependence was found in the aliphatic protons, aromatic carbons (including nearest neighbors), and carbons at the end of the aliphatic tail. Greater than first order thermodynamic dependence of spin relaxation rates is interpreted as relaxation resulting from at least one mechanism additional to through-bond dipolar relaxation. In rigid portions of the cation, an additional spin relaxation mechanism is attributed to anisotropic effects, while greater than first order thermodynamic dependence of the octyl side chain’s spin relaxation rates is attributed to cation–cation interactions. Little interaction between the anion and the cation was observed by spin relaxation studies or by ESI-MS. No extended supramolecular structure was observed in this study, which was further supported by MS and SAXS. nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE) factors are used in conjunction with spin–lattice relaxation time (T{sub 1}) measurements to calculate rotational correlation times for C–H bonds (the time it takes for the vector represented by the bond between the two atoms to rotate by one radian). The rotational correlation times are used to represent segmental reorientation dynamics of the cation. A combination of techniques is used to determine the segmental interactions and dynamics of this example of a triazolium-based ionic liquid.

  12. Spin-lattice relaxation of heavy spin-1/2 nuclei in diamagnetic solids: A Raman process mediated by spin-rotation interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega, Alexander J.; Beckmann, Peter A.; Bai, Shi; Dybowski, Cecil

    2006-12-01

    We present a theory for the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation of heavy spin-1/2 nuclei in solids, which explains within an order of magnitude the unexpectedly effective lead and thallium nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rates observed in the ionic solids lead molybdate, lead chloride, lead nitrate, thallium nitrate, thallium nitrite, and thallium perchlorate. The observed rates are proportional to the square of the temperature and are independent of magnetic field. This rules out all known mechanisms usually employed to model nuclear spin relaxation in lighter spin-1/2 nuclei. The relaxation is caused by a Raman process involving the interactions between nuclear spins and lattice vibrations via a fluctuating spin-rotation magnetic field. The model places an emphasis on the time dependence of the angular velocity of pairs of adjacent atoms rather than on their angular momentum. Thus the spin-rotation interaction is characterized not in the traditional manner by a spin-rotation constant but by a related physical parameter, the magnetorotation constant, which relates the local magnetic field generated by spin rotation to an angular velocity. Our semiclassical relaxation model involves a frequency-mode description of the spectral density that can directly be related to the mean-square amplitudes and mode densities of lattice vibrations in the Debye model.

  13. Observations of exciton and carrier spin relaxation in Be doped p-type GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Asaka, Naohiro; Harasawa, Ryo; Tackeuchi, Atsushi; Lu, Shulong; Dai, Pan

    2014-03-17

    We have investigated the exciton and carrier spin relaxation in Be-doped p-type GaAs. Time-resolved spin-dependent photoluminescence (PL) measurements revealed spin relaxation behaviors between 10 and 100 K. Two PL peaks were observed at 1.511 eV (peak 1) and 1.497 eV (peak 2) at 10 K, and are attributed to the recombination of excitons bound to neutral Be acceptors (peak 1) and the band-to-acceptor transition (peak 2). The spin relaxation times of both PL peaks were measured to be 1.3–3.1 ns at 10–100 K, and found to originate from common electron spin relaxation. The observed existence of a carrier density dependence of the spin relaxation time at 10–77 K indicates that the Bir-Aronov-Pikus process is the dominant spin relaxation mechanism.

  14. Spin Relaxation in III-V Semiconductors in various systems: Contribution of Electron-Electron Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogan, Fatih; Kesserwan, Hasan; Manchon, Aurelien

    2015-03-01

    In spintronics, most of the phenomena that we are interested happen at very fast time scales and are rich in structure in time domain. Our understanding, on the other hand, is mostly based on energy domain calculations. Many of the theoretical tools use approximations and simplifications that can be perceived as oversimplifications. We compare the structure, material, carrier density and temperature dependence of spin relaxation time in n-doped III-V semiconductors using Elliot-Yafet (EY) and D'yakanov-Perel'(DP) with real time analysis using kinetic spin Bloch equations (KSBE). The EY and DP theories fail to capture details as the system investigated is varied. KSBE, on the other hand, incorporates all relaxation sources as well as electron-electron interaction which modifies the spin relaxation time in a non-linear way. Since el-el interaction is very fast (~ fs) and spin-conserving, it is usually ignored in the analysis of spin relaxation. Our results indicate that electron-electron interaction cannot be neglected and its interplay with the other (spin and momentum) relaxation mechanisms (electron-impurity and electron-phonon scattering) dramatically alters the resulting spin dynamics. We use each interaction explicitly to investigate how, in the presence of others, each relaxation source behaves. We use GaAs and GaN for zinc-blend structure, and GaN and AlN for the wurtzite structure.

  15. Anisotropy of spin-orbit induced electron spin relaxation in [001] and [111] grown GaAs quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segarra, C.; Planelles, J.; Climente, J. I.; Rajadell, F.

    2015-03-01

    We report a systematic study of the spin relaxation anisotropy between single electron Zeeman sublevels in three-dimensional cuboidal GaAs quantum dots (QDs). The QDs are subject to an in-plane magnetic field. As the field orientation varies, the relaxation rate oscillates periodically, showing ‘magic’ angles where the relaxation rate is suppressed by several orders of magnitude. This behavior is found in QDs with different shapes, heights, crystallographic orientations and external fields. The origin of these angles can be traced back to the symmetries of the spin admixing terms of the Hamiltonian. Our results evidence that cubic Dresselhaus terms play an important role in determining the spin relaxation anisotropy, which can induce deviations of the ‘magic’ angles from the crystallographic directions reported in recent experiments (P Scarlino et al 2014 Phys. Rev. Lett. 113 256802).

  16. Nuclear magnetic relaxation by the dipolar EMOR mechanism: Three-spin systems.

    PubMed

    Chang, Zhiwei; Halle, Bertil

    2016-07-21

    In aqueous systems with immobilized macromolecules, including biological tissue, the longitudinal spin relaxation of water protons is primarily induced by exchange-mediated orientational randomization (EMOR) of intra- and intermolecular magnetic dipole-dipole couplings. Starting from the stochastic Liouville equation, we have developed a non-perturbative theory that can describe relaxation by the dipolar EMOR mechanism over the full range of exchange rates, dipole couplings, and Larmor frequencies. Here, we implement the general dipolar EMOR theory for a macromolecule-bound three-spin system, where one, two, or all three spins exchange with the bulk solution phase. In contrast to the previously studied two-spin system with a single dipole coupling, there are now three dipole couplings, so relaxation is affected by distinct correlations as well as by self-correlations. Moreover, relaxation can now couple the magnetizations with three-spin modes and, in the presence of a static dipole coupling, with two-spin modes. As a result of this complexity, three secondary dispersion steps with different physical origins can appear in the longitudinal relaxation dispersion profile, in addition to the primary dispersion step at the Larmor frequency matching the exchange rate. Furthermore, and in contrast to the two-spin system, longitudinal relaxation can be significantly affected by chemical shifts and by the odd-valued ("imaginary") part of the spectral density function. We anticipate that the detailed studies of two-spin and three-spin systems that have now been completed will provide the foundation for developing an approximate multi-spin dipolar EMOR theory sufficiently accurate and computationally efficient to allow quantitative molecular-level interpretation of frequency-dependent water-proton longitudinal relaxation data from biophysical model systems and soft biological tissue. PMID:27448879

  17. Nuclear magnetic relaxation by the dipolar EMOR mechanism: Three-spin systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Zhiwei; Halle, Bertil

    2016-07-01

    In aqueous systems with immobilized macromolecules, including biological tissue, the longitudinal spin relaxation of water protons is primarily induced by exchange-mediated orientational randomization (EMOR) of intra- and intermolecular magnetic dipole-dipole couplings. Starting from the stochastic Liouville equation, we have developed a non-perturbative theory that can describe relaxation by the dipolar EMOR mechanism over the full range of exchange rates, dipole couplings, and Larmor frequencies. Here, we implement the general dipolar EMOR theory for a macromolecule-bound three-spin system, where one, two, or all three spins exchange with the bulk solution phase. In contrast to the previously studied two-spin system with a single dipole coupling, there are now three dipole couplings, so relaxation is affected by distinct correlations as well as by self-correlations. Moreover, relaxation can now couple the magnetizations with three-spin modes and, in the presence of a static dipole coupling, with two-spin modes. As a result of this complexity, three secondary dispersion steps with different physical origins can appear in the longitudinal relaxation dispersion profile, in addition to the primary dispersion step at the Larmor frequency matching the exchange rate. Furthermore, and in contrast to the two-spin system, longitudinal relaxation can be significantly affected by chemical shifts and by the odd-valued ("imaginary") part of the spectral density function. We anticipate that the detailed studies of two-spin and three-spin systems that have now been completed will provide the foundation for developing an approximate multi-spin dipolar EMOR theory sufficiently accurate and computationally efficient to allow quantitative molecular-level interpretation of frequency-dependent water-proton longitudinal relaxation data from biophysical model systems and soft biological tissue.

  18. Spin relaxation measurements using first-harmonic out-of-phase absorption EPR signals.

    PubMed

    Livshits, V A; Páli, T; Marsh, D

    1998-09-01

    The dependence on spin-lattice (T1) relaxation of the first-harmonic absorption EPR signal (V'1) detected in phase quadrature with the Zeeman modulation has been investigated both theoretically and experimentally for nitroxide spin labels. Spectral simulations were performed by iterative solution of the Bloch equations that contained explicitly both the modulation and microwave magnetic fields (T. Páli, V. A. Livshits, and D. Marsh, 1996, J. Magn. Reson. B 113, 151-159). It was found that, of the various non-linear EPR displays, the first-harmonic out-of-phase V'1-signal, recorded under conditions of partial saturation of the microwave absorption, is particularly favorable for determining spin-lattice relaxation enhancements because of its superior signal intensity and relative insensitivity to spin-spin (T2) relaxation. By varying the Zeeman modulation frequency it is also possible to tune the optimum sensitivity of the V'1-signal to different ranges of the T1-relaxation time. A Zeeman modulation frequency of 25 kHz appears to be particularly suited to spin label applications. Calibrations are given for the dependence on T1-relaxation time of both the amplitude and the second integral of the V'1-signal recorded under standard conditions. Experiments on different spin labels in solution and in membranes demonstrate the practical usable sensitivity of the V'1-signal, even at modulation frequencies of 25 kHz, and these are used to investigate the dependence on microwave field intensity, in comparison with theoretical predictions. The practicable sensitivity to spin-lattice relaxation enhancements is demonstrated experimentally for a spin-labeled membrane system in the presence of paramagnetic ions. The first-harmonic out-of-phase V'1-signal appears to be the non-linear CW EPR method of choice for determining T1-relaxation enhancements in spin-labeled systems. PMID:9740736

  19. Anomalous D'yakonov-Perel' spin relaxation in semiconductor quantum wells under a strong magnetic field in the Voigt configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Y.; Yu, T.; Wu, M. W.

    2013-06-01

    We report an anomalous scaling of the D’yakonov-Perel’ spin relaxation with the momentum relaxation in semiconductor quantum wells under a strong magnetic field in the Voigt configuration. We focus on the case in which the external magnetic field is perpendicular to the spin-orbit-coupling-induced effective magnetic field and its magnitude is much larger than the latter one. It is found that the longitudinal spin relaxation time is proportional to the momentum relaxation time even in the strong-scattering limit, indicating that the D’yakonov-Perel’ spin relaxation demonstrates Elliott-Yafet-like behavior. Moreover, the transverse spin relaxation time is proportional (inversely proportional) to the momentum relaxation time in the strong- (weak-) scattering limit, both in the opposite trends against the well-established conventional D’yakonov-Perel’ spin relaxation behaviors. We further demonstrate that all the above anomalous scaling relations come from the unique form of the effective inhomogeneous broadening.

  20. Two-eletron spin relaxation in double quantum dots and P donors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chia-Wei; Borhani, Massoud; Hu, Xuedong

    2011-03-01

    We study singlet-triplet relaxation of two electrons confined in a double quantum dot or bound to P donors in Silicon. Hyperfine interaction of the electrons with the host/phosphorus nuclei, in combination with the electron-phonon interaction, leads to relaxation of the triplet states. We calculate the triplet relaxation rates in the presence of an applied magnetic field. This relaxation mechanism affects, for example, the resonance peaks in current Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) experiments on P-dimers. Moreover, the estimated time scales for the spin decay put an upper bound on the gate pulses needed to perform fault-tolerant two-qubit operations in spin-based quantum computers. We have found the optimal regimes, which mitigate this relaxation mechanism, yet permit sufficiently fast two-qubit operations. We thank support by NSA/LPS thorugh ARO.

  1. β -detected NMR spin relaxation in a thin film heterostructure of ferromagnetic EuO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacFarlane, W. A.; Song, Q.; Ingle, N. J. C.; Chow, K. H.; Egilmez, M.; Fan, I.; Hossain, M. D.; Kiefl, R. F.; Levy, C. D. P.; Morris, G. D.; Parolin, T. J.; Pearson, M. R.; Saadaoui, H.; Salman, Z.; Wang, D.

    2015-08-01

    We present β -detected NMR measurements of the spin-lattice relaxation of +8Li implanted into an epitaxial heterostructure based on a 100 nm thick film of ferromagnetic (FM) EuO as a function of temperature through its FM transition. In the FM state, the spin-lattice relaxation rate follows the same temperature dependence, determined by magnon scattering mechanisms, observed in the bulk by 153Eu NMR, but above 40 K, the signal is wiped out. We also find that +8Li stopped in material adjacent to the magnetic layer exhibits spin relaxation related to the critical slowing of the Eu spins. A particularly strong relaxation in the Au overlayer suggests an unusual strong nonlocal coupling mechanism to 8Li in the metal.

  2. Local spin dynamics at low temperature in the slowly relaxing molecular chain [Dy(hfac)3{NIT(C6H4OPh)}]: A μ+ spin relaxation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arosio, Paolo; Corti, Maurizio; Mariani, Manuel; Orsini, Francesco; Bogani, Lapo; Caneschi, Andrea; Lago, Jorge; Lascialfari, Alessandro

    2015-05-01

    The spin dynamics of the molecular magnetic chain [Dy(hfac)3{NIT(C6H4OPh)}] were investigated by means of the Muon Spin Relaxation (μ+SR) technique. This system consists of a magnetic lattice of alternating Dy(III) ions and radical spins, and exhibits single-chain-magnet behavior. The magnetic properties of [Dy(hfac)3{NIT(C6H4OPh)}] have been studied by measuring the magnetization vs. temperature at different applied magnetic fields (H = 5, 3500, and 16500 Oe) and by performing μ+SR experiments vs. temperature in zero field and in a longitudinal applied magnetic field H = 3500 Oe. The muon asymmetry P(t) was fitted by the sum of three components, two stretched-exponential decays with fast and intermediate relaxation times, and a third slow exponential decay. The temperature dependence of the spin dynamics has been determined by analyzing the muon longitudinal relaxation rate λinterm(T), associated with the intermediate relaxing component. The experimental λinterm(T) data were fitted with a corrected phenomenological Bloembergen-Purcell-Pound law by using a distribution of thermally activated correlation times, which average to τ = τ0 exp(Δ/kBT), corresponding to a distribution of energy barriers Δ. The correlation times can be associated with the spin freezing that occurs when the system condenses in the ground state.

  3. Probing the Nuclear Spin-Lattice Relaxation Time at the Nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagenaar, J. J. T.; den Haan, A. M. J.; de Voogd, J. M.; Bossoni, L.; de Jong, T. A.; de Wit, M.; Bastiaans, K. M.; Thoen, D. J.; Endo, A.; Klapwijk, T. M.; Zaanen, J.; Oosterkamp, T. H.

    2016-07-01

    Nuclear spin-lattice relaxation times are measured on copper using magnetic-resonance force microscopy performed at temperatures down to 42 mK. The low temperature is verified by comparison with the Korringa relation. Measuring spin-lattice relaxation times locally at very low temperatures opens up the possibility to measure the magnetic properties of inhomogeneous electron systems realized in oxide interfaces, topological insulators, and other strongly correlated electron systems such as high-Tc superconductors.

  4. Modeling spin transport in electrostatically-gated lateral-channel silicon devices: Role of interfacial spin relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Appelbaum, Ian

    2011-10-01

    Using a two-dimensional finite-differences scheme to model spin transport in silicon devices with lateral geometry, we simulate the effects of spin relaxation at interfacial boundaries, i.e., the exposed top surface and at an electrostatically-controlled backgate with a SiO2 dielectric. These gate-voltage-dependent simulations are compared to previous experimental results and show that strong spin relaxation, due to extrinsic effects, yields a Si/SiO2 interfacial spin lifetime of ≈1ns, orders of magnitude lower than lifetimes in the bulk Si. Relaxation at the top surface plays no substantial role. Hall effect measurements on ballistically injected electrons gated in the transport channel yield the carrier mobility directly and suggest that this reduction in spin lifetime is only partially due to enhanced interfacial momentum scattering, which induces random spin flips as in the Elliott effect. Therefore, other extrinsic mechanisms, such as those caused by paramagnetic defects should also be considered in order to explain the dramatic enhancement in spin relaxation at the gate interface over bulk values.

  5. Generation of spin-polarized currents via cross-relaxation with dynamically pumped paramagnetic impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Meriles, Carlos A.; Doherty, Marcus W.

    2014-07-14

    Key to future spintronics and spin-based information processing technologies is the generation, manipulation, and detection of spin polarization in a solid state platform. Here, we theoretically explore an alternative route to spin injection via the use of dynamically polarized nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond. We focus on the geometry where carriers and NV centers are confined to proximate, parallel layers and use a “trap-and-release” model to calculate the spin cross-relaxation probabilities between the charge carriers and neighboring NV centers. We identify near-unity regimes of carrier polarization depending on the NV spin state, applied magnetic field, and carrier g-factor. In particular, we find that unlike holes, electron spins are distinctively robust against spin-lattice relaxation by other, unpolarized paramagnetic centers. Further, the polarization process is only weakly dependent on the carrier hopping dynamics, which makes this approach potentially applicable over a broad range of temperatures.

  6. Study of the ferroelastic phase transition in the tetraethylammonium compound [N(C2H5)4]2ZnBr4 by magic-angle spinning and static NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Ae Ran

    2016-03-01

    The ferroelastic phase transition of tetraethylammonium compound [N(C2H5)4]2ZnBr4 at the phase transition temperature (TC) = 283 K was characterized by magic-angle spinning (MAS) and static nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and confirmed by optical polarizing spectroscopy. The structural geometry near TC was studied in terms of the chemical shifts and the spin-lattice relaxation times T1ρ in the rotating frame for 1H MAS NMR and 13C cross-polarization (CP)/MAS NMR. The two inequivalent ethyl groups were distinguishable in the 13C NMR spectrum, and the T1ρ results indicate that they undergo tumbling motion above TC in a coupled manner. From the 14N NMR results, the two nitrogen nuclei in the N(C2H5)4+ ions were distinguishable above TC, and the splitting in the spectra below TC was related to the ferroelastic domains with different orientations.

  7. Generalized extended Navier-Stokes theory: multiscale spin relaxation in molecular fluids.

    PubMed

    Hansen, J S

    2013-09-01

    This paper studies the relaxation of the molecular spin angular velocity in the framework of generalized extended Navier-Stokes theory. Using molecular dynamics simulations, it is shown that for uncharged diatomic molecules the relaxation time decreases with increasing molecular moment of inertia per unit mass. In the regime of large moment of inertia the fast relaxation is wave-vector independent and dominated by the coupling between spin and the fluid streaming velocity, whereas for small inertia the relaxation is slow and spin diffusion plays a significant role. The fast wave-vector-independent relaxation is also observed for highly packed systems. The transverse and longitudinal spin modes have, to a good approximation, identical relaxation, indicating that the longitudinal and transverse spin viscosities have same value. The relaxation is also shown to be isomorphic invariant. Finally, the effect of the coupling in the zero frequency and wave-vector limit is quantified by a characteristic length scale; if the system dimension is comparable to this length the coupling must be included into the fluid dynamical description. It is found that the length scale is independent of moment of inertia but dependent on the state point. PMID:24125208

  8. Spin dynamics and relaxation in graphene dictated by electron-hole puddles.

    PubMed

    Van Tuan, Dinh; Ortmann, Frank; Cummings, Aron W; Soriano, David; Roche, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of spin dynamics and relaxation mechanisms in clean graphene, and the upper time and length scales on which spin devices can operate, are prerequisites to realizing graphene-based spintronic technologies. Here we theoretically reveal the nature of fundamental spin relaxation mechanisms in clean graphene on different substrates with Rashba spin-orbit fields as low as a few tens of μeV. Spin lifetimes ranging from 50 picoseconds up to several nanoseconds are found to be dictated by substrate-induced electron-hole characteristics. A crossover in the spin relaxation mechanism from a Dyakonov-Perel type for SiO2 substrates to a broadening-induced dephasing for hBN substrates is described. The energy dependence of spin lifetimes, their ratio for spins pointing out-of-plane and in-plane, and the scaling with disorder provide a global picture about spin dynamics and relaxation in ultraclean graphene in the presence of electron-hole puddles. PMID:26876333

  9. Spin dynamics and relaxation in graphene dictated by electron-hole puddles

    PubMed Central

    Van Tuan, Dinh; Ortmann, Frank; Cummings, Aron W.; Soriano, David; Roche, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of spin dynamics and relaxation mechanisms in clean graphene, and the upper time and length scales on which spin devices can operate, are prerequisites to realizing graphene-based spintronic technologies. Here we theoretically reveal the nature of fundamental spin relaxation mechanisms in clean graphene on different substrates with Rashba spin-orbit fields as low as a few tens of μeV. Spin lifetimes ranging from 50 picoseconds up to several nanoseconds are found to be dictated by substrate-induced electron-hole characteristics. A crossover in the spin relaxation mechanism from a Dyakonov-Perel type for SiO2 substrates to a broadening-induced dephasing for hBN substrates is described. The energy dependence of spin lifetimes, their ratio for spins pointing out-of-plane and in-plane, and the scaling with disorder provide a global picture about spin dynamics and relaxation in ultraclean graphene in the presence of electron-hole puddles. PMID:26876333

  10. Spin dynamics and relaxation in graphene dictated by electron-hole puddles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Tuan, Dinh; Ortmann, Frank; Cummings, Aron W.; Soriano, David; Roche, Stephan

    2016-02-01

    The understanding of spin dynamics and relaxation mechanisms in clean graphene, and the upper time and length scales on which spin devices can operate, are prerequisites to realizing graphene-based spintronic technologies. Here we theoretically reveal the nature of fundamental spin relaxation mechanisms in clean graphene on different substrates with Rashba spin-orbit fields as low as a few tens of μeV. Spin lifetimes ranging from 50 picoseconds up to several nanoseconds are found to be dictated by substrate-induced electron-hole characteristics. A crossover in the spin relaxation mechanism from a Dyakonov-Perel type for SiO2 substrates to a broadening-induced dephasing for hBN substrates is described. The energy dependence of spin lifetimes, their ratio for spins pointing out-of-plane and in-plane, and the scaling with disorder provide a global picture about spin dynamics and relaxation in ultraclean graphene in the presence of electron-hole puddles.

  11. Electron spin relaxation can enhance the performance of a cryptochrome-based magnetic compass sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kattnig, Daniel R.; Sowa, Jakub K.; Solov'yov, Ilia A.; Hore, P. J.

    2016-06-01

    The radical pair model of the avian magnetoreceptor relies on long-lived electron spin coherence. Dephasing, resulting from interactions of the spins with their fluctuating environment, is generally assumed to degrade the sensitivity of this compass to the direction of the Earth's magnetic field. Here we argue that certain spin relaxation mechanisms can enhance its performance. We focus on the flavin–tryptophan radical pair in cryptochrome, currently the only candidate magnetoreceptor molecule. Correlation functions for fluctuations in the distance between the two radicals in Arabidopsis thaliana cryptochrome 1 were obtained from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and used to calculate the spin relaxation caused by modulation of the exchange and dipolar interactions. We find that intermediate spin relaxation rates afford substantial enhancements in the sensitivity of the reaction yields to an Earth-strength magnetic field. Supported by calculations using toy radical pair models, we argue that these enhancements could be consistent with the molecular dynamics and magnetic interactions in avian cryptochromes.

  12. Carrier spin relaxation in GaInNAsSb/GaNAsSb/GaAs quantum well

    SciTech Connect

    Asami, T.; Nosho, H.; Tackeuchi, A.; Li, L. H.; Harmand, J. C.; Lu, S. L.

    2011-12-23

    We have investigated the carrier spin relaxation in GaInNAsSb/GaNAsSb/GaAs quantum well (QW) by time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) measurement. The sample consists of an 8-nm-thick GaIn{sub 0.36}N{sub 0.006}AsSb{sub 0.015} well, 5-nm-thick GaN{sub 0.01}AsSb{sub 0.11} intermediate barriers and 100-nm-thick GaAs barriers grown by molecular beam epitaxy on a GaAs(100) substrate. The spin relaxation time and recombination lifetime at 10 K are measured to be 228 ps and 151 ps, respectively. As a reference, we have also obtained a spin relaxation time of 125 ps and a recombination lifetime of 63 ps for GaInNAs/GaNAs/GaAs QW. This result shows that crystal quality is slightly improved by adding Sb, although these short carrier lifetimes mainly originate from a nonradiative recombination. These spin relaxation times are longer than the 36 ps spin relaxation time of InGaAs/InP QWs and shorter than the 2 ns spin relaxation time of GaInNAs/GaAs QW.

  13. Magnetic relaxation due to spin pumping in thick ferromagnetic films in contact with normal metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezende, S. M.; Rodríguez-Suárez, R. L.; Azevedo, A.

    2013-07-01

    Spin pumping is the most important magnetic relaxation channel in ultrathin ferromagnetic layers in contact with normal metals (NMs). Recent experiments indicate that in thick films of insulating yttrium iron garnet (YIG) there is a large broadening of the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) lines with deposition of a thin Pt layer which cannot be explained by the known damping processes. Here we present a detailed study of the magnetic relaxation due to spin pumping in bilayers made of a ferromagnetic material (FM) and a NM. Two alternative approaches are used to calculate the transverse and longitudinal relaxation rates used in the Bloch-Bloembergen formulation of damping. In one we consider that the dynamic exchange coupling at the interface transfers magnetic relaxation from the heavily damped conduction electron spins in the NM layer to the magnetization of the FM layer while the other utilizes spin currents and the concept of the spin-mixing conductance at the interface. While in thin FM films, the relaxation rates vary with the inverse of the FM layer thickness; in thick films, they become independent of the thickness because in the FM/NM structure the FMR excitation has a surface mode character. Regardless of the thickness range the longitudinal relaxation rate is twice the transverse rate resulting in damping of the magnetization with constant amplitude characterizing a Gilbert process. The enhanced spin-pumping damping explains the experimental observations in YIG/Pt bilayers.

  14. Spin Relaxation in InP and Strained InP Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salimath, Akshaykumar; Ghosh, Bahniman

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we employ semiclassical Monte Carlo approach to study spin polarized transport in InP and strained InP nanowires on GaAs substrate. Due to higher spin relaxation lengths, InP is being researched as suitable III-V material for spintronics related applications. Spin relaxation in InP channel is as a result of D'yakonov-Perel (DP) relaxation and Elliott-Yafet (EY) relaxation. We have considered injection polarization along z-direction and the magnitude of ensemble averaged spin variation is studied along the x-direction i.e., along transport direction. The effect of strain on various scattering rates and spin relaxation length is studied. We then present the effect of variation of nanowire width on spin relaxation length for the case of both strained and unstrained InP nanowire. The wire cross-section is varied between 4 × 4 nm2 and 10 × 10 nm2.

  15. Anisotropic collective motion contributes to nuclear spin relaxation in crystalline proteins.

    PubMed

    Lewandowski, Józef R; Sein, Julien; Blackledge, Martin; Emsley, Lyndon

    2010-02-01

    A model for calculating the influence of anisotropic collective motions on NMR relaxation rates in crystalline proteins is presented. We show that small-amplitude (<10 degrees ) fluctuations may lead to substantial contributions to the (15)N spin-lattice relaxation rates and propose that the effect of domain motions should be included in solid-state NMR analyses of protein dynamics. PMID:19916496

  16. Application of muon spin relaxation experiment to the mixed state superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Inui, M. ); Harshman, D.R. )

    1991-05-09

    We discuss the use of muon spin relaxation ({mu}{sup +}SR) technique to study the mixed state of superconductors. Besides the application for static vortex configurations, we argue that large vortex motion can manifest itself as a narrowed time-averaged field distribution, which in turn results in a smaller relaxation rate. A static but disordered vortex configuration can also reduce the relaxation. We summarize these arguments. 7 refs.

  17. Review of spin and orbital relaxation in silicon quantum dot qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahan, Charles; Joynt, Robert

    2010-03-01

    We give updated results for orbital and spin relaxation times in single-spin, silicon quantum dots. We find marked differences from donor-confined electrons and GaAs quantum dots. The dominant spin qubit 1/T1 relaxation rates are due to inversion asymmetry-induced spin-orbit mixing and are found to have a dependence proportional to the seventh power of the magnetic field, in contrast to both the P:Si donor qubit and GaAs quantum dot situations (for different reasons). Recent results have suggested that a Dresselhaus-like spin-orbit mixing contribution is nonzero and indeed can exceed that of the Rashba contribution for parameter regimes of interest. We include contributions from both terms to the spin relaxation rate with the latest estimates of their quantitative contributions. Other relaxation mechanisms, including those inherited from the bulk and from spin-valley mixing, are calculated to be smaller in most situations. Results for relaxation rates of other excited states are also given. We relate our results to current and future experiments and discuss implications for future quantum computer architectures in silicon.

  18. Heteronuclear transverse and longitudinal relaxation in AX4 spin systems: Application to 15N relaxations in 15NH4+

    PubMed Central

    Werbeck, Nicolas D.; Hansen, D. Flemming

    2014-01-01

    The equations that describe the time-evolution of transverse and longitudinal 15N magnetisations in tetrahedral ammonium ions, 15NH4+, are derived from the Bloch-Wangsness-Redfield density operator relaxation theory. It is assumed that the relaxation of the spin-states is dominated by (1) the intra-molecular 15N–1H and 1H–1H dipole–dipole interactions and (2) interactions of the ammonium protons with remote spins, which also include the contribution to the relaxations that arise from the exchange of the ammonium protons with the bulk solvent. The dipole–dipole cross-correlated relaxation mechanisms between each of the 15N–1H and 1H–1H interactions are explicitly taken into account in the derivations. An application to 15N-ammonium bound to a 41 kDa domain of the protein DnaK is presented, where a comparison between experiments and simulations show that the ammonium ion rotates rapidly within its binding site with a local correlation time shorter than approximately 1 ns. The theoretical framework provided here forms the basis for further investigations of dynamics of AX4 spin systems, with ammonium ions in solution and bound to proteins of particular interest. PMID:25128779

  19. Revisiting spin-lattice relaxation time measurements for dilute spins in high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Riqiang; Li, Jun; Cui, Jingyu; Peng, Xinhua

    2016-07-01

    Numerous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of spin-lattice relaxation times (T1S) for dilute spins such as 13C have led to investigations of the motional dynamics of individual functional groups in solid materials. In this work, we revisit the Solomon equations and analyze how the heteronuclear cross relaxation between the dilute S (e.g. 13C) and abundant I (e.g. 1H) spins affects the measured T1S values in solid-state NMR in the absence of 1H saturation during the recovery time. It is found theoretically that at the beginning of the S spin magnetization recovery, the existence of non-equilibrium I magnetization introduces the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect onto the recovery of the S spin magnetization and confirmed experimentally that such a heteronuclear cross relaxation effect results in the recovery overshoot phenomena for the dilute spins when T1S is on the same order of T1H, leading to inaccurate measurements of the T1S values. Even when T1S is ten times larger than T1H, the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect on the measured T1S values is still noticeable. Furthermore, this cross relaxation effect on recovery trajectory of the S spins can be manipulated and even suppressed by preparing the initial I and S magnetization, so as to obtain the accurate T1S values. A sample of natural abundance L-isoleucine powder has been used to demonstrate the T1S measurements and their corresponding measured T1C values under various experimental conditions.

  20. Revisiting spin-lattice relaxation time measurements for dilute spins in high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fu, Riqiang; Li, Jun; Cui, Jingyu; Peng, Xinhua

    2016-07-01

    Numerous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of spin-lattice relaxation times (T1S) for dilute spins such as (13)C have led to investigations of the motional dynamics of individual functional groups in solid materials. In this work, we revisit the Solomon equations and analyze how the heteronuclear cross relaxation between the dilute S (e.g. (13)C) and abundant I (e.g. (1)H) spins affects the measured T1S values in solid-state NMR in the absence of (1)H saturation during the recovery time. It is found theoretically that at the beginning of the S spin magnetization recovery, the existence of non-equilibrium I magnetization introduces the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect onto the recovery of the S spin magnetization and confirmed experimentally that such a heteronuclear cross relaxation effect results in the recovery overshoot phenomena for the dilute spins when T1S is on the same order of T1H, leading to inaccurate measurements of the T1S values. Even when T1S is ten times larger than T1H, the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect on the measured T1S values is still noticeable. Furthermore, this cross relaxation effect on recovery trajectory of the S spins can be manipulated and even suppressed by preparing the initial I and S magnetization, so as to obtain the accurate T1S values. A sample of natural abundance l-isoleucine powder has been used to demonstrate the T1S measurements and their corresponding measured T1C values under various experimental conditions. PMID:27187211

  1. Spin relaxation in graphene with self-assembled cobalt porphyrin molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omar, S.; Gurram, M.; Vera-Marun, I. J.; Zhang, X.; Huisman, E. H.; Kaverzin, A.; Feringa, B. L.; van Wees, B. J.

    2015-09-01

    In graphene spintronics, interaction of localized magnetic moments with the electron spins paves a new way to explore the underlying spin-relaxation mechanism. A self-assembled layer of organic cobalt porphyrin (CoPP) molecules on graphene provides a desired platform for such studies via the magnetic moments of porphyrin-bound cobalt atoms. In this work a study of spin-transport properties of graphene spin-valve devices functionalized with such CoPP molecules as a function of temperature via nonlocal spin-valve and Hanle spin-precession measurements is reported. For the functionalized (molecular) devices, we observe a decrease in the spin-relaxation time τs even up to 50%, which could be an indication of enhanced spin-flip scattering of the electron spins in graphene in the presence of the molecular magnetic moments. The effect of the molecular layer is masked for low-quality samples (low mobility), possibly due to dominance of Elliot-Yafet-type spin relaxation mechanisms.

  2. The eigenmode perspective of NMR spin relaxation in proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, Yury E.; Meirovitch, Eva

    2013-12-01

    We developed in recent years the two-body (protein and probe) coupled-rotator slowly relaxing local structure (SRLS) approach for elucidating protein dynamics from NMR spin relaxation. So far we used as descriptors the set of physical parameters that enter the SRLS model. They include the global (protein-related) diffusion tensor, D1, the local (probe-related) diffusion tensor, D2, and the local coupling/ordering potential, u. As common in analyzes based on mesoscopic dynamic models, these parameters have been determined with data-fitting techniques. In this study, we describe structural dynamics in terms of the eigenmodes comprising the SRLS time correlation functions (TCFs) generated by using the best-fit parameters as input to the Smoluchowski equation. An eigenmode is a weighted exponential with decay constant given by an eigenvalue of the Smoluchowski operator, and weighting factor determined by the corresponding eigenvector. Obviously, both quantities depend on the SRLS parameters as determined by the SRLS model. Unlike the set of best-fit parameters, the eigenmodes represent patterns of motion of the probe-protein system. The following new information is obtained for the typical probe, the 15N-1H bond. Two eigenmodes, associated with the protein and the probe, dominate when the time scale separation is large (i.e., D2 ≫ D1), the tensorial properties are simple, and the local potential is either very strong or very weak. When the potential exceeds these limits while the remaining conditions are preserved, new eigenmodes arise. The multi-exponentiality of the TCFs is associated in this case with the restricted nature of the local motion. When the time scale separation is no longer large, the rotational degrees of freedom of the protein and the probe become statistically dependent (coupled dynamically). The multi-exponentiality of the TCFs is associated in this case with the restricted nature of both the local and the global motion. The effects of local

  3. The eigenmode perspective of NMR spin relaxation in proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, Yury E. E-mail: eva.meirovitch@biu.ac.il; Meirovitch, Eva E-mail: eva.meirovitch@biu.ac.il

    2013-12-14

    We developed in recent years the two-body (protein and probe) coupled-rotator slowly relaxing local structure (SRLS) approach for elucidating protein dynamics from NMR spin relaxation. So far we used as descriptors the set of physical parameters that enter the SRLS model. They include the global (protein-related) diffusion tensor, D{sub 1}, the local (probe-related) diffusion tensor, D{sub 2}, and the local coupling/ordering potential, u. As common in analyzes based on mesoscopic dynamic models, these parameters have been determined with data-fitting techniques. In this study, we describe structural dynamics in terms of the eigenmodes comprising the SRLS time correlation functions (TCFs) generated by using the best-fit parameters as input to the Smoluchowski equation. An eigenmode is a weighted exponential with decay constant given by an eigenvalue of the Smoluchowski operator, and weighting factor determined by the corresponding eigenvector. Obviously, both quantities depend on the SRLS parameters as determined by the SRLS model. Unlike the set of best-fit parameters, the eigenmodes represent patterns of motion of the probe-protein system. The following new information is obtained for the typical probe, the {sup 15}N−{sup 1}H bond. Two eigenmodes, associated with the protein and the probe, dominate when the time scale separation is large (i.e., D{sub 2} ≫ D{sub 1}), the tensorial properties are simple, and the local potential is either very strong or very weak. When the potential exceeds these limits while the remaining conditions are preserved, new eigenmodes arise. The multi-exponentiality of the TCFs is associated in this case with the restricted nature of the local motion. When the time scale separation is no longer large, the rotational degrees of freedom of the protein and the probe become statistically dependent (coupled dynamically). The multi-exponentiality of the TCFs is associated in this case with the restricted nature of both the local and the

  4. Study of spatial spin-modulated structures by Mössbauer spectroscopy using SpectrRelax

    SciTech Connect

    Matsnev, Mikhail E. Rusakov, Vyacheslav S.

    2014-10-27

    SpectrRelax is an application for analysis and fitting of absorption and emission Mössbauer spectra. It includes a large selection of static and relaxation spectrum models, and allows fitting and searching for optimal model parameters. Recently, we have added new models for Mössbauer spectra of nuclides in spatial spin modulated structures. In these structures, spin density or direction changes in a periodic way along a single direction, and this wave is incommensurate with the underlying lattice. The models include Spin/Charge density wave, where the shape of this wave is represented as a sum of odd harmonics, Anharmonic spin modulation where the spin direction has a cycloidal type modulation, and a Spiral-like spin structure, in which magnetic moments rotate in a plane perpendicular to the wave propagation vector, forming a spiral.

  5. Electron spin relaxation in two polymorphic structures of GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Nam Lyong

    2015-03-01

    The relaxation process of electron spin in systems of electrons interacting with piezoelectric deformation phonons that are mediated through spin-orbit interactions was interpreted from a microscopic point of view using the formula for the electron spin relaxation times derived by a projection-reduction method. The electron spin relaxation times in two polymorphic structures of GaN were calculated. The piezoelectric material constant for the wurtzite structure obtained by a comparison with a previously reported experimental result was {{P}pe}=1.5 × {{10}29} eV {{m}-1}. The temperature and magnetic field dependence of the relaxation times for both wurtzite and zinc-blende structures were similar, but the relaxation times in zinc-blende GaN were smaller and decreased more rapidly with increasing temperature and magnetic field than that in wurtzite GaN. This study also showed that the electron spin relaxation for wurtzite GaN at low density could be explained by the Elliot-Yafet process but not for zinc-blende GaN in the metallic regime.

  6. High field 207Pb spin-lattice relaxation in solid lead nitrate and lead molybdate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Castro, Peter J.; Maher, Christopher A.; Vold, Robert L.; Hoatson, Gina L.

    2008-02-01

    Spin-lattice relaxation rates of lead have been measured at 17.6T (156.9MHz) as a function of temperature in polycrystalline lead nitrate and lead molybdate. Comparing the results with relaxation rates measured at lower fields, it is found that at high fields and low temperature, chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) makes small but observable contributions to lead relaxation in both materials. At 17.6T and 200K, CSA accounts for about 15% of the observed relaxation rate. Above 300K, the dominant relaxation mechanism even at 17.6T is an indirect Raman process involving modulation of the Pb207 spin-rotation tensor, as first proposed by Grutzner et al. [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 123, 7094 (2001)] and later treated theoretically in more detail by Vega et al. [Phys. Rev. B 74, 214420 (2006)]. The improved signal to noise ratio at high fields makes it possible to quantify relaxation time anisotropy by analyzing saturation-recovery functions for individual frequencies on the powder pattern line shape. No orientation dependence is found for the spin-lattice relaxation rate of either material. It is argued from examination of the appropriate theoretical expressions, derived here for the first time, that the lack of observable relaxation time anisotropy is probably a general feature of this indirect Raman mechanism.

  7. Crystal structure, NMR study, dc-conductivity and dielectric relaxation studies of a new compound [C2H10N2]Cd(SCN)2Cl2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saidi, K.; Kamoun, S.; Ayedi, H. F.; Gargouri, M.

    2012-06-01

    The crystal structure, the solid NMR spectroscopy and the complex impedance study have been carried out on [C2H10N2]CdCl2(SCN)2. Characterization by single crystal X-ray crystallography shows that the cadmium atoms have à 2N2S2Cl hexa-coordination sphere, exhibiting pseudo-octahedral geometry. The cadmium atoms are bridged by two thiocyanate ions generating 1-D polymeric-chains. These chains are themselves interconnected by means of N-H…Cl(NCS) hydrogen bonds originating from the organic cation [(NH3)2(CH2)2]2+. 111Cd isotropic chemical shifts span a range of 268ppm. The cadmium atom exhibits multiplets that result from 111Cd-14N spin-spin coupling. Examination of 111Cd and 13C MAS line shapes shows direct measurement of the indirect spin-spin coupling constant 2J(111Cd, 14N) = 105Hz and the dipolar coupling constant of 1381Hz . Impedance spectroscopy measurements of [C2H10N2]CdCl2(SCN)2 have been studied from 209Hz to 5 MHz over the temperature range 300-370 K. The Cole-Cole (Z" versus Z') plots are fitted to two equivalent circuits models. The formalism of complex permittivity and impedance were employed to analyze the experimental data. The dc conductivity follows the Arrhenius relation with an activation energy Ea = 0.54 (3) eV.

  8. Hyperfine-induced spin relaxation of a diffusively moving carrier in low dimensions: Implications for spin transport in organic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mkhitaryan, V. V.; Dobrovitski, V. V.

    2015-08-01

    The hyperfine coupling between the spin of a charge carrier and the nuclear spin bath is a predominant channel for the carrier spin relaxation in many organic semiconductors. We theoretically investigate the hyperfine-induced spin relaxation of a carrier performing a random walk on a d -dimensional regular lattice, in a transport regime typical for organic semiconductors. We show that in d =1 and 2, the time dependence of the space-integrated spin polarization P (t ) is dominated by a superexponential decay, crossing over to a stretched-exponential tail at long times. The faster decay is attributed to multiple self-intersections (returns) of the random-walk trajectories, which occur more often in lower dimensions. We also show, analytically and numerically, that the returns lead to sensitivity of P (t ) to external electric and magnetic fields, and this sensitivity strongly depends on dimensionality of the system (d =1 versus d =3 ). Furthermore, we investigate in detail the coordinate dependence of the time-integrated spin polarization σ (r ) , which can be probed in the spin-transport experiments with spin-polarized electrodes. We demonstrate that, while σ (r ) is essentially exponential, the effect of multiple self-intersections can be identified in transport measurements from the strong dependence of the spin-decay length on the external magnetic and electric fields.

  9. Hyperfine-induced spin relaxation of a diffusively moving carrier in low dimensions: Implications for spin transport in organic semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Mkhitaryan, V. V.; Dobrovitski, V. V.

    2015-08-24

    The hyperfine coupling between the spin of a charge carrier and the nuclear spin bath is a predominant channel for the carrier spin relaxation in many organic semiconductors. We theoretically investigate the hyperfine-induced spin relaxation of a carrier performing a random walk on a d-dimensional regular lattice, in a transport regime typical for organic semiconductors. We show that in d=1 and 2, the time dependence of the space-integrated spin polarization P(t) is dominated by a superexponential decay, crossing over to a stretched-exponential tail at long times. The faster decay is attributed to multiple self-intersections (returns) of the random-walk trajectories, which occur more often in lower dimensions. We also show, analytically and numerically, that the returns lead to sensitivity of P(t) to external electric and magnetic fields, and this sensitivity strongly depends on dimensionality of the system (d=1 versus d=3). We investigate in detail the coordinate dependence of the time-integrated spin polarization σ(r), which can be probed in the spin-transport experiments with spin-polarized electrodes. We also demonstrate that, while σ(r) is essentially exponential, the effect of multiple self-intersections can be identified in transport measurements from the strong dependence of the spin-decay length on the external magnetic and electric fields.

  10. Hyperfine-induced spin relaxation of a diffusively moving carrier in low dimensions: Implications for spin transport in organic semiconductors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mkhitaryan, V. V.; Dobrovitski, V. V.

    2015-08-24

    The hyperfine coupling between the spin of a charge carrier and the nuclear spin bath is a predominant channel for the carrier spin relaxation in many organic semiconductors. We theoretically investigate the hyperfine-induced spin relaxation of a carrier performing a random walk on a d-dimensional regular lattice, in a transport regime typical for organic semiconductors. We show that in d=1 and 2, the time dependence of the space-integrated spin polarization P(t) is dominated by a superexponential decay, crossing over to a stretched-exponential tail at long times. The faster decay is attributed to multiple self-intersections (returns) of the random-walk trajectories, whichmore » occur more often in lower dimensions. We also show, analytically and numerically, that the returns lead to sensitivity of P(t) to external electric and magnetic fields, and this sensitivity strongly depends on dimensionality of the system (d=1 versus d=3). We investigate in detail the coordinate dependence of the time-integrated spin polarization σ(r), which can be probed in the spin-transport experiments with spin-polarized electrodes. We also demonstrate that, while σ(r) is essentially exponential, the effect of multiple self-intersections can be identified in transport measurements from the strong dependence of the spin-decay length on the external magnetic and electric fields.« less

  11. Spin relaxation of a diffusively moving carrier in a random hyperfine field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roundy, R. C.; Raikh, M. E.

    2014-11-01

    Relaxation, , of the average spin of a carrier in a course of hops over sites hosting random hyperfine fields is studied theoretically. In low dimensions, d =1 ,2 , the decay of average spin with time is nonexponential at all times. The origin of the effect is that for d =1 ,2 a typical random-walk trajectory exhibits numerous self-intersections. Multiple visits of the carrier to the same site accelerates the relaxation since the corresponding partial rotations of spin during these visits add up. Another consequence of self-intersections of the random-walk trajectories is that, in all dimensions, the average, , becomes sensitive to a weak magnetic field directed along z . Our analytical predictions are complemented by the numerical simulations of . The scenario of acceleration of spin relaxation due to returns applies also to the non-Markovian decoherence of a qubit surrounded by multiple fluctuators.

  12. Cross-Correlation Effects Involving Curie Spin Relaxation in Methyl Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhu, P. K.; Mandal, Pravat K.; Müller, Norbert

    2002-03-01

    Cross-correlation effects arising in methyl protons due to the simultaneous presence of dipole-dipole, chemical shift anisotropy, and Curie spin relaxation mechanisms in paramagnetic systems are analyzed. We assess the potential of obtaining structural constraints from the cross-correlation of Curie spin relaxation with dipolar relaxation mechanisms among methyl proton spins. By theoretical analysis and numerical simulations we characterize the transfer functions describing the interconversion processes of different ranks of multispin order. The time dependence of these processes contains a new type of structural information, the orientation of the methyl C3-axis with respect to the electron center. Experimental confirmation is found for selected methyl groups in low spin Fe3+ sperm whale myoglobin.

  13. Bethe lattice approach and relaxation dynamics study of spin-crossover materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oke, Toussaint Djidjoho; Hontinfinde, Félix; Boukheddaden, Kamel

    2015-07-01

    Dynamical properties of Prussian blue analogs and spin-crossover materials are investigated in the framework of a Blume-Emery-Griffiths (BEG) spin-1 model, where states ±1 and 0 represent the high-spin (HS) state and the low-spin state, respectively. The quadrupolar interaction depends on the temperature in the form . Magnetic interactions are controlled by a factor such that for (), magnetic ordering is not expected. The model is exactly solved using the Bethe lattice approach for the equilibrium properties. The results are closer to those calculated by numerical simulations with suitable Arrhenius-type transition rates. The study of relaxation processes of non-equilibrium HS states revealed one-step nonlinear sigmoidal relaxation curves of the HS fraction at low temperatures. We found that increasing the magnetic interactions leads to the appearance of a plateau in the thermal hysteresis as well as in the relaxation curves of the HS fraction at low temperature.

  14. Nuclear spin relaxation studies of the spin-rotation interaction of C-13 in CO in various buffer gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jameson, C. J.; Jameson, A. K.; Buchi, K.

    1986-07-01

    Nuclear spin-lattice relaxation times have been measured for C-13 in (C-13)(O-16) in pure CO gas and in CO in Ar, Kr, Xe, N2, O2, HCl, CH4, SF6 gases as a function of temperature. The experimental procedure is described, and typical data for C-13 in pure CO at several temperatures are shown along with the temperature dependence of C-13 in (C13)(O-16) in various gases. The relaxation is completely dominated by the spin-rotation mechanism, so that empirical values of the cross sections for the CO rotational angular momentum transfer are obtained as a function of temperature.

  15. Dynamical theory of spin noise and relaxation: Prospects for real-time NMR measurements.

    PubMed

    Field, Timothy R

    2014-11-01

    Recent developments in theoretical aspects of spin noise and relaxation and their interrelationship reveal a modified spin density, distinct from the density matrix, as the necessary object to describe fluctuations in spin systems. These fluctuations are to be viewed as an intrinsic quantum mechanical property of such systems immersed in random magnetic environments and are observed as "spin noise" in the absence of any radio frequency excitation. With the prospect of ultrafast digitization, the role of spin noise in real-time parameter extraction for (NMR) spin systems, and the advantage over standard techniques, is of essential importance, especially for systems containing a small number of spins. In this article we outline prospects for harnessing the recent dynamical theory in terms of spin-noise measurement, with attention to real-time properties. PMID:25493776

  16. Long-lived nanosecond spin relaxation and spin coherence of electrons in monolayer MoS2 and WS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Luyi; Sinitsyn, Nikolai A.; Chen, Weibing; Yuan, Jiangtan; Zhang, Jing; Lou, Jun; Crooker, Scott A.

    2015-10-01

    The recently discovered monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) provide a fertile playground to explore new coupled spin-valley physics. Although robust spin and valley degrees of freedom are inferred from polarized photoluminescence (PL) experiments, PL timescales are necessarily constrained by short-lived (3-100 ps) electron-hole recombination. Direct probes of spin/valley polarization dynamics of resident carriers in electron (or hole)-doped TMDCs, which may persist long after recombination ceases, are at an early stage. Here we directly measure the coupled spin-valley dynamics in electron-doped MoS2 and WS2 monolayers using optical Kerr spectroscopy, and reveal very long electron spin lifetimes, exceeding 3 ns at 5 K (two to three orders of magnitude longer than typical exciton recombination times). In contrast with conventional III-V or II-VI semiconductors, spin relaxation accelerates rapidly in small transverse magnetic fields. Supported by a model of coupled spin-valley dynamics, these results indicate a novel mechanism of itinerant electron spin dephasing in the rapidly fluctuating internal spin-orbit field in TMDCs, driven by fast inter-valley scattering. Additionally, a long-lived spin coherence is observed at lower energies, commensurate with localized states. These studies provide insight into the physics underpinning spin and valley dynamics of resident electrons in atomically thin TMDCs.

  17. Ultra-fast photo-carrier relaxation in Mott insulators with short-range spin correlations.

    PubMed

    Eckstein, Martin; Werner, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Ultra-fast spectroscopy can reveal the interplay of charges with low energy degrees of freedom, which underlies the rich physics of correlated materials. As a potential glue for superconductivity, spin fluctuations in Mott insulators are of particular interest. A theoretical description of the coupled spin and charge degrees of freedom is challenging, because magnetic order is often only short-lived and short-ranged. In this work we theoretically investigate how the spin-charge interactions influence the relaxation of a two-dimensional Mott-Hubbard insulator after photo-excitation. We use a nonequilibrium variant of the dynamical cluster approximation, which, in contrast to single-site dynamical mean-field theory, captures the effect of short-range correlations. The relaxation time is found to scale with the strength of the nearest-neighbor spin correlations, and can be 10-20 fs in the cuprates. Increasing the temperature or excitation density decreases the spin correlations and thus implies longer relaxation times. This may help to distinguish the effect of spin-fluctuations on the charge relaxation from the influence of other bosonic modes in the solid. PMID:26883536

  18. Ultra-fast photo-carrier relaxation in Mott insulators with short-range spin correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckstein, Martin; Werner, Philipp

    2016-02-01

    Ultra-fast spectroscopy can reveal the interplay of charges with low energy degrees of freedom, which underlies the rich physics of correlated materials. As a potential glue for superconductivity, spin fluctuations in Mott insulators are of particular interest. A theoretical description of the coupled spin and charge degrees of freedom is challenging, because magnetic order is often only short-lived and short-ranged. In this work we theoretically investigate how the spin-charge interactions influence the relaxation of a two-dimensional Mott-Hubbard insulator after photo-excitation. We use a nonequilibrium variant of the dynamical cluster approximation, which, in contrast to single-site dynamical mean-field theory, captures the effect of short-range correlations. The relaxation time is found to scale with the strength of the nearest-neighbor spin correlations, and can be 10-20 fs in the cuprates. Increasing the temperature or excitation density decreases the spin correlations and thus implies longer relaxation times. This may help to distinguish the effect of spin-fluctuations on the charge relaxation from the influence of other bosonic modes in the solid.

  19. Suppression of spin-exchange relaxation in tilted magnetic fields within the geophysical range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholtes, Theo; Pustelny, Szymon; Fritzsche, Stephan; Schultze, Volkmar; Stolz, Ronny; Meyer, Hans-Georg

    2016-07-01

    We present a detailed experimental and theoretical study on the relaxation of spin coherence due to the spin-exchange mechanism arising in the electronic ground states of alkali-metal vapor atoms. As opposed to the well-explored formation of a stretched state in a longitudinal geometry (magnetic field parallel to the laser propagation direction) we employ adapted hyperfine-selective optical pumping in order to suppress spin-exchange relaxation. By comparing measurements of the intrinsic relaxation rate of the spin coherence in the ground state of cesium atoms with detailed density-matrix simulations we show that the relaxation due to spin-exchange collisions can be reduced substantially even in a tilted magnetic field of geomagnetic strength, the major application case of scalar magnetic surveying. This explains the observed striking improvement in sensitivity and further deepens the understanding of the light-narrowed Mx magnetometer, which was presented recently. Additionally, new avenues for investigating the dynamics in alkali-metal atoms governed by the spin-exchange interaction and interacting with arbitrary external fields open up.

  20. Ultra-fast photo-carrier relaxation in Mott insulators with short-range spin correlations

    PubMed Central

    Eckstein, Martin; Werner, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Ultra-fast spectroscopy can reveal the interplay of charges with low energy degrees of freedom, which underlies the rich physics of correlated materials. As a potential glue for superconductivity, spin fluctuations in Mott insulators are of particular interest. A theoretical description of the coupled spin and charge degrees of freedom is challenging, because magnetic order is often only short-lived and short-ranged. In this work we theoretically investigate how the spin-charge interactions influence the relaxation of a two-dimensional Mott-Hubbard insulator after photo-excitation. We use a nonequilibrium variant of the dynamical cluster approximation, which, in contrast to single-site dynamical mean-field theory, captures the effect of short-range correlations. The relaxation time is found to scale with the strength of the nearest-neighbor spin correlations, and can be 10–20 fs in the cuprates. Increasing the temperature or excitation density decreases the spin correlations and thus implies longer relaxation times. This may help to distinguish the effect of spin-fluctuations on the charge relaxation from the influence of other bosonic modes in the solid. PMID:26883536

  1. Temperature dependence of enhanced spin relaxation time in metallic nanoparticles: Experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koda, T.; Mitani, S.; Takahashi, S.; Mizuguchi, M.; Sato, K.; Konno, T. J.; Maekawa, S.; Takanashi, K.

    2016-02-01

    We study the enhanced spin relaxation time of Au nanoparticles in nanopillar-shaped double-barrier junction devices with a stacked Fe/MgO/Au-nanoparticle/MgO/Fe structure. The size of Au nanoparticles located in a current path is deduced from a transmission electron micrograph and the Coulomb blockade behavior in the current-voltage characteristics of the devices. A finite tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) is observed above a critical current and is attributable to spin accumulation in Au nanoparticles. Based on a simple model of TMR due to spin accumulation in a nanoparticle, the spin relaxation time τs is estimated from the magnitude of the critical current. The temperature and bias-voltage region where TMR appears are determined from systematic observations, showing that the appearance of TMR is not associated with the Coulomb blockade but with spin accumulation. We find that the obtained τs is anomalously extended (˜800 ns) at low temperatures and abruptly decreases above a critical temperature. Interestingly, the critical temperature strongly depends on the size of the Au nanoparticles and is much lower than the effective temperature corresponding to the discrete energy spacing. A theoretical analysis for the spin relaxation of electrons with discrete energy levels shows that not only the anomalously extended spin relaxation time, but also the strong temperature dependence of τs arise from the broadening of discrete energy levels due to coupling with phonons in the surrounding matrix. Numerical calculations using reasonable parameter values well reproduce the observed temperature and size dependence of the spin relaxation time in Au nanoparticles.

  2. Theoretical study of spin relaxation in a carbon nanotube quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezanson, Brian; Hu, Xuedong

    2008-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes offer an attractive environment for coherent spin manipulation due to the small population of nuclear spins and weak spin-orbit interaction. While a couple of specific spin relaxation mechanisms have been investigated theoretically[1][2], there is still no comprehensive study of spin lifetimes in carbon nanotubes. In the present study we calculate the spin decay rate for electrons in gate-defined quantum dots on carbon nanotubes due to the spin-orbit and electron-phonon interactions. More specifically, we explore effects of magnetic field strength and orientation, tube diameter and chirality, and confinement. [1] Y. G. Semenov, K. W. Kim, G. J. Iafrate, Phys. Rev. B 75, 045429 (2007) [2] K. M. Borysenko, Y. G. Semenov, K. W. Kim, J. M. Zavada, arXiv 0710.3382 (2007)

  3. Influence of the ligand field on slow magnetization relaxation versus spin crossover in mononuclear cobalt complexes.

    PubMed

    Habib, Fatemah; Luca, Oana R; Vieru, Veacheslav; Shiddiq, Muhandis; Korobkov, Ilia; Gorelsky, Serge I; Takase, Michael K; Chibotaru, Liviu F; Hill, Stephen; Crabtree, Robert H; Murugesu, Muralee

    2013-10-18

    The electronic and magnetic properties of the complexes [Co(terpy)Cl2 ] (1), [Co(terpy)(NCS)2 ] (2), and [Co(terpy)2 ](NCS)2 (3) were investigated. The coordination environment around Co(II) in 1 and 2 leads to a high-spin complex at low temperature and single-molecule magnet properties with multiple relaxation pathways. Changing the ligand field and geometry with an additional terpy ligand leads to spin-crossover behavior in 3 with a gradual transition from high spin to low spin. PMID:24009214

  4. Effect of surfactant and solvent on spin-lattice relaxation dynamics of magnetic nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Sourav; Chen, Hsiang-Yun; Chen, Tai-Yen; Hsia, Chih-Hao; Son, Dong Hee

    2013-04-25

    The effect of varying the surfactant and solvent medium on the dynamics of spin-lattice relaxation in photoexcited Fe3O4 nanocrystals has been investigated by measuring the time-dependent magnetization employing pump-probe transient Faraday rotation technique. The variation of the surfactants having surface-binding functional groups modified not only the static magnetization but also the dynamics of the recovery of the magnetization occurring via spin-lattice relaxation in the photoexcited Fe3O4 nanocrystals. The variation of the polarity and size of the solvent molecules can also influence the spin-lattice relaxation dynamics. However, the effect is limited to the nanocrystals having sufficiently permeable surfactant layer, where the small solvent molecules (e.g., water) can access the surface and dynamically modify the ligand field on the surface. PMID:23003213

  5. Nuclear Spin relaxation mediated by Fermi-edge electrons in n-type GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotur, M.; Dzhioev, R. I.; Kavokin, K. V.; Korenev, V. L.; Namozov, B. R.; Pak, P. E.; Kusrayev, Yu. G.

    2014-03-01

    A method based on the optical orientation technique was developed to measure the nuclear-spin lattice relaxation time T 1 in semiconductors. It was applied to bulk n-type GaAs, where T 1 was measured after switching off the optical excitation in magnetic fields from 400 to 1200 G at low (< 30 K) temperatures. The spin-lattice relaxation of nuclei in the studied sample with n D = 9 × 1016 cm-3 was found to be determined by hyperfine scattering of itinerant electrons (Korringa mechanism) which predicts invariability of T 1 with the change in magnetic field and linear dependence of the relaxation rate on temperature. This result extends the experimentally verified applicability of the Korringa relaxation law in degenerate semiconductors, previously studied in strong magnetic fields (several Tesla), to the moderate field range.

  6. Resonant Scattering off Magnetic Impurities in Graphene: Mechanism for Ultrafast Spin Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochan, D.; Gmitra, M.; Fabian, J.

    We give a tutorial account of our recently proposed mechanism for spin relaxation based on spin-flip resonant scattering off local magnetic moments. The mechanism is rather general, working in any material with a resonant local moment, but we believe that its particular niche is graphene, whose measured spin relaxation time is 100-1000 ps. Conventional spin-orbit coupling based mechanisms (Elliott-Yafet or Dyakonov-Perel) would require large concentrations (1000 ppm) of impurities to explain this. Our mechanism needs only 1 ppm of resonant local moments, as these act as local spin hot spots: the resonant scatterers do not appear to substantially affect graphene's measured resistivity, but are dominating spin relaxation. In principle, the local moments can come from a variety of sources. Most likely would be organic molecule adsorbants or metallic adatoms. As the representative model, particularly suited for a tutorial, we consider hydrogen adatoms which are theoretically and experimentally demonstrated to yield local magnetic moments when chemisorbed on graphene. We introduce the scattering formalism and apply it to graphene, to obtain the T-matrix and spin-flip scattering rates using the generalized Fermi golden rule.

  7. Exchange-Driven Spin Relaxation in Ferromagnet-Oxide-Semiconductor Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Yu-Sheng; Chiu, Yi-Hsin; Harmon, N. J.; Odenthal, Patrick; Sheffield, Matthew; Chilcote, Michael; Kawakami, R. K.; Flatté, M. E.; Johnston-Halperin, E.

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate that electron spin relaxation in GaAs in the proximity of a Fe /MgO layer is dominated by interaction with an exchange-driven hyperfine field at temperatures below 60 K. Temperature-dependent spin-resolved optical pump-probe spectroscopy reveals a strong correlation of the electron spin relaxation with carrier freeze-out, in quantitative agreement with a theoretical interpretation that at low temperatures the free-carrier spin lifetime is dominated by inhomogeneity in the local hyperfine field due to carrier localization. As the regime of large nuclear inhomogeneity is accessible in these heterostructures for magnetic fields <3 kG , inferences from this result resolve a long-standing and contentious dispute concerning the origin of spin relaxation in GaAs at low temperature when a magnetic field is present. Further, this improved fundamental understanding clarifies the importance of future experiments probing the time-dependent exchange interaction at a ferromagnet-semiconductor interface and its consequences for spin dissipation and transport during spin pumping.

  8. Coupled nuclear spin relaxation and internal rotations in magnesium fluosilicate hexahydrate.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Utton, D. B.; Tsang, T.

    1972-01-01

    Both proton and fluorine nuclear spin-lattice relaxations have been studied by the 180- to 90-deg pulse method in magnesium fluosilicate hexahydrate at 25 and 13 MHz over the temperature range from 170 to 350 K. Observed nonexponential behavior of the nuclear magnetic relaxation is explained by internal rotations of the doubly charged negative fluosilicate ions and doubly charged positive magnesium hexahydrate ions.

  9. Main chain and side chain dynamics of a heme protein: 15N and 2H NMR relaxation studies of R. capsulatus ferrocytochrome c2.

    PubMed

    Flynn, P F; Bieber Urbauer, R J; Zhang, H; Lee, A L; Wand, A J

    2001-06-01

    A detailed characterization of the main chain and side chain dynamics in R. capsulatus ferrocytochrome c(2) derived from (2)H NMR relaxation of methyl group resonances is presented. (15)N relaxation measurements confirm earlier results indicating that R. capsulatus ferrocytochrome c(2) exhibits minor rotational anisotropy in solution. The current study is focused on the use of deuterium relaxation in side chain methyl groups, which has been shown to provide a detailed and accurate measure of internal dynamics. Results obtained indicate that the side chains of ferrocytochrome c(2) exhibit a wide range of motional amplitudes, but are more rigid than generally found in the interior of nonprosthetic group bearing globular proteins. This unusual rigidity is ascribed to the interactions of the protein with the large heme prosthetic group. This observation has significant implications for the potential of the heme-protein interface to modulate the redox properties of the protein and also points to the need for great precision in the design and engineering of heme proteins. PMID:11380250

  10. Properties of the low-spin high-spin interface during the relaxation of spin-crossover materials, investigated through an electro-elastic model

    SciTech Connect

    Slimani, A.; Boukheddaden, K. Varret, F.; Nishino, M.; CREST, JST, 4-1-8 Honcho Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 ; Miyashita, S.; Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo

    2013-11-21

    The present work is devoted to the spatio-temporal investigations of spin-crossover lattices during their thermal relaxation from high- to low-spin state. The analysis is performed using Monte Carlo simulations on a distortable 2D lattice the sites of which are occupied by high-spin (HS) or low-spin (LS) atoms. The lattice is circular in shape and the HS to LS transformation results in single domain nucleation followed by growth and propagation processes. The evolution of the LS:HS interface is monitored during the relaxation process, through the mapping of spin states, displacement fields, local stresses, and elastic energy. The results show a curved interface, the curvature of which is reversed at the mid-transformation. The local stresses and elastic energy peak at the vicinity of the HS:LS interface, with sizeable dependence upon the position along the front line which evidences the edge effects.

  11. Multiwavelength study of RX J2015.6+3711: a magnetic cataclysmic variable with a 2-h spin period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coti Zelati, F.; Rea, N.; Campana, S.; de Martino, D.; Papitto, A.; Safi-Harb, S.; Torres, D. F.

    2016-02-01

    The X-ray source RX J2015.6+3711 was discovered by ROSAT in 1996 and recently proposed to be a cataclysmic variable (CV). Here, we report on an XMM-Newton observation of RX J2015.6+3711 performed in 2014, where we detected a coherent X-ray modulation at a period of 7196 ± 11 s and discovered other significant (>6σ) small-amplitude periodicities which we interpret as the CV spin period and the sidebands of a possible ˜12-h periodicity, respectively. The 0.3-10 keV spectrum can be described by a power law (Γ = 1.15 ± 0.04) with a complex absorption pattern, a broad emission feature at 6.60 ± 0.01 keV, and an unabsorbed flux of (3.16 ± 0.05) × 10-12 erg cm-2 s-1. We observed a significant spectral variability along the spin phase, which can be ascribed mainly to changes in the density of a partial absorber and the power law normalization. Archival X-ray observations carried out by the Chandra satellite, and two simultaneous X-ray and UV/optical pointings with Swift, revealed a gradual fading of the source in the soft X-rays over the last 13 yr, and a rather stable X-ray-to-optical flux ratio (FX/FV ≈ 1.4-1.7). Based on all these properties, we identify this source with a magnetic CV, most probably of the intermediate polar type. The 2-h spin period makes RX J2015.6+3711, the second slowest rotator of the class, after RX J0524+4244 (`Paloma'; Pspin ˜ 2.3 h). Although we cannot unambiguously establish the true orbital period with these observations, RX J2015.6+3711 appears to be a key system in the evolution of magnetic CVs.

  12. Achievement of high nuclear spin polarization using lanthanides as low-temperature NMR relaxation agents.

    PubMed

    Peat, David T; Horsewill, Anthony J; Köckenberger, Walter; Perez Linde, Angel J; Gadian, David G; Owers-Bradley, John R

    2013-05-28

    Many approaches are now available for achieving high levels of nuclear spin polarization. One of these methods is based on the notion that as the temperature is reduced, the equilibrium nuclear polarization will increase, according to the Boltzmann distribution. The main problem with this approach is the length of time it may take to approach thermal equilibrium at low temperatures, since nuclear relaxation times (characterized by the spin-lattice relaxation time T1) can become very long. Here, we show, by means of relaxation time measurements of frozen solutions, that selected lanthanide ions, in the form of their chelates with DTPA, can act as effective relaxation agents at low temperatures. Differential effects are seen with the different lanthanides that were tested, holmium and dysprosium showing highest relaxivity, while gadolinium is ineffective at temperatures of 20 K and below. These observations are consistent with the known electron-spin relaxation time characteristics of these lanthanides. The maximum relaxivity occurs at around 10 K for Ho-DTPA and 20 K for Dy-DTPA. Moreover, these two agents show only modest relaxivity at room temperature, and can thus be regarded as relaxation switches. We conclude that these agents can speed up solid state NMR experiments by reducing the T1 values of the relevant nuclei, and hence increasing the rate at which data can be acquired. They could also be of value in the context of a simple low-cost method of achieving several-hundred-fold improvements in polarization for experiments in which samples are pre-polarized at low temperatures, then rewarmed and dissolved immediately prior to analysis. PMID:23588269

  13. Spin-spin cross relaxation and spin-Hamiltonian spectroscopy by optical pumping of Pr/sup 3+/:LaF/sub 3/

    SciTech Connect

    Lukac, M.; Otto, F.W.; Hahn, E.L.

    1989-02-01

    We report the observation of an anticrossing in solid-state laser spectroscopy produced by cross relaxation. Spin-spin cross relaxation between the /sup 141/Pr- and /sup 19/F-spin reservoirs in Pr/sup 3+/:LaF/sub 3/ and its influence on the /sup 141/Pr NMR spectrum is detected by means of optical pumping. The technique employed combines optical pumping and hole burning with either external magnetic field sweep or rf resonance saturation in order to produce slow transient changes in resonant laser transmission. At a certain value of the external Zeeman field, where the energy-level splittings of Pr and F spins match, a level repulsion and discontinuity of the Pr/sup 3+/ NMR lines is observed. This effect is interpreted as the ''anticrossing'' of the combined Pr-F spin-spin reservoir energy states. The Zeeman-quadrupole-Hamiltonian spectrum of the hyperfine optical ground states of Pr/sup 3+/:LaF/sub 3/ is mapped out over a wide range of Zeeman magnetic fields. A new scheme is proposed for dynamic polarization of nuclei by means of optical pumping, based on resonant cross relaxation between rare spins and spin reservoirs.

  14. Spin relaxation in a hole-doped transition-metal dichalcogenide monolayer and bilayer with crystal defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habe, Tetsuro; Koshino, Mikito

    2016-02-01

    We study the electronic spin relaxation effect in the hole-doped monolayer and bilayer transition-metal dichalcogenide in the presence of the crystal defects. We consider realistic models of the lattice vacancy and actually estimate the spin relaxation rate using the multi-orbital tight-binding model. In the monolayer, the spin-relaxation time is found to be extremely long compared to the momentum relaxation time, and this is attributed to the fact that the spin hybridization in the band structure is suppressed by the mirror reflection symmetry. The bilayer TMD has a much shorter spin relaxation time in contrast, and this is attributed to stronger spin hybridization due to the absence of the mirror symmetry.

  15. NMR longitudinal relaxation enhancement in metal halides by heteronuclear polarization exchange during magic-angle spinning.

    PubMed

    Shmyreva, Anna A; Safdari, Majid; Furó, István; Dvinskikh, Sergey V

    2016-06-14

    Orders of magnitude decrease of (207)Pb and (199)Hg NMR longitudinal relaxation times T1 upon magic-angle-spinning (MAS) are observed and systematically investigated in solid lead and mercury halides MeX2 (Me = Pb, Hg and X = Cl, Br, I). In lead(ii) halides, the most dramatic decrease of T1 relative to that in a static sample is in PbI2, while it is smaller but still significant in PbBr2, and not detectable in PbCl2. The effect is magnetic-field dependent but independent of the spinning speed in the range 200-15 000 Hz. The observed relaxation enhancement is explained by laboratory-frame heteronuclear polarization exchange due to crossing between energy levels of spin-1/2 metal nuclei and adjacent quadrupolar-spin halogen nuclei. The enhancement effect is also present in lead-containing organometal halide perovskites. Our results demonstrate that in affected samples, it is the relaxation data recorded under non-spinning conditions that characterize the local properties at the metal sites. A practical advantage of fast relaxation at slow MAS is that spectral shapes with orientational chemical shift anisotropy information well retained can be acquired within a shorter experimental time. PMID:27306000

  16. NMR longitudinal relaxation enhancement in metal halides by heteronuclear polarization exchange during magic-angle spinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shmyreva, Anna A.; Safdari, Majid; Furó, István; Dvinskikh, Sergey V.

    2016-06-01

    Orders of magnitude decrease of 207Pb and 199Hg NMR longitudinal relaxation times T1 upon magic-angle-spinning (MAS) are observed and systematically investigated in solid lead and mercury halides MeX2 (Me = Pb, Hg and X = Cl, Br, I). In lead(ii) halides, the most dramatic decrease of T1 relative to that in a static sample is in PbI2, while it is smaller but still significant in PbBr2, and not detectable in PbCl2. The effect is magnetic-field dependent but independent of the spinning speed in the range 200-15 000 Hz. The observed relaxation enhancement is explained by laboratory-frame heteronuclear polarization exchange due to crossing between energy levels of spin-1/2 metal nuclei and adjacent quadrupolar-spin halogen nuclei. The enhancement effect is also present in lead-containing organometal halide perovskites. Our results demonstrate that in affected samples, it is the relaxation data recorded under non-spinning conditions that characterize the local properties at the metal sites. A practical advantage of fast relaxation at slow MAS is that spectral shapes with orientational chemical shift anisotropy information well retained can be acquired within a shorter experimental time.

  17. Matrix-assisted relaxation in Fe(phen)2(NCS)2 spin-crossover microparticles, experimental and theoretical investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enachescu, Cristian; Tanasa, Radu; Stancu, Alexandru; Tissot, Antoine; Laisney, Jérôme; Boillot, Marie-Laure

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we present the influence of the embedding matrix on the relaxation of Fe(phen)2(NCS)2 (phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) spin-transition microparticles as revealed by experiments and provide an explanation within the framework of an elastic model based on a Monte-Carlo method. Experiments show that the shape of the high-spin → low-spin relaxation curves is drastically changed when the particles are dispersed in glycerol. This effect was considered in the model by means of interactions between the microparticles and the matrix. A faster start of the relaxation for microparticles embedded in glycerol is due to an initial positive local pressure acting on the edge spin-crossover molecules from the matrix side. This local pressure diminishes and eventually becomes negative during relaxation, as an effect of the decrease of the volume of spin-crossover microparticles from high-spin to low-spin.

  18. Spin-lattice relaxation of laser-polarized xenon in human blood.

    PubMed

    Wolber, J; Cherubini, A; Dzik-Jurasz, A S; Leach, M O; Bifone, A

    1999-03-30

    The nuclear spin polarization of 129Xe can be enhanced by several orders of magnitude by using optical pumping techniques. The increased sensitivity of xenon NMR has allowed imaging of lungs as well as other in vivo applications. The most critical parameter for efficient delivery of laser-polarized xenon to blood and tissues is the spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) of xenon in blood. In this work, the relaxation of laser-polarized xenon in human blood is measured in vitro as a function of blood oxygenation. Interactions with dissolved oxygen and with deoxyhemoglobin are found to contribute to the spin-lattice relaxation time of 129Xe in blood, the latter interaction having greater effect. Consequently, relaxation times of 129Xe in deoxygenated blood are shorter than in oxygenated blood. In samples with oxygenation equivalent to arterial and venous blood, the 129Xe T1s at 37 degrees C and a magnetic field of 1.5 T were 6.4 s +/- 0.5 s and 4.0 s +/- 0.4 s, respectively. The 129Xe spin-lattice relaxation time in blood decreases at lower temperatures, but the ratio of T1 in oxygenated blood to that in deoxygenated blood is the same at 37 degrees C and 25 degrees C. A competing ligand has been used to show that xenon binding to albumin contributes to the 129Xe spin-lattice relaxation in blood plasma. This technique is promising for the study of xenon interactions with macromolecules. PMID:10097094

  19. Phase separation, clustering, and fractal characteristics in glass: A magic-angle-spinning NMR spin-lattice relaxation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, S.; Stebbins, J. F.

    1994-07-01

    A comparative study of the 29Si spin-lattice relaxation behavior (induced by trace amounts of paramagnetic dopants in the glass) in phase-separated Li2Si4O9 and monophasic Li2Si2O5 and Na2Si2O5 glasses has been made in order to understand the nature of clustering and the resulting intermediate-range ordering. Optically clear tetrasilicate and disilicate glasses were prepared with 500 to 2000 ppm of Gd2O3, a paramagnetic dopant. The constituent structural units (Q3 and Q4 species) in all tetrasilicate glasses show strong differential relaxation following a power-law behavior. This is due to preferential partitioning of Gd3+ into the lower silica (Q3-rich) regions of these glasses, indicating the presence of Q species clusters too small to produce optical opalescence (a few nm to perhaps tens of nm). Preliminary results on 6Li spin-lattice relaxation in these glasses support this hypothesis. Differential relaxation becomes more pronounced on annealing due to growth of such clusters. No such differential relaxation was observed in the monophase disilicate glasses. For spin-lattice relaxation induced by direct dipolar coupling to paramagnetic ions, the recovery of magnetization is proportional to time as M(t)~tα where α is a function of the dimensionality D of mass distribution of the constituent Q species around the Gd3+ paramagnetic centers in the glass. For tetrasilicate glasses D~=2.62+/-0.22 and the system behaves as a mass fractal up to a length scale of 2 to 3 nm. D is thus equal to, within error, the theoretical value of 2.6 for an infinite percolation cluster of one type of Q species in another. For disilicate glasses, D~=3.06+/-0.18 which indicates a three-dimensional (and thus nonfractal) mass distribution of the constituent Q species over the same length scale.

  20. Nuclear magnetic relaxation induced by exchange-mediated orientational randomization: Longitudinal relaxation dispersion for a dipole-coupled spin-1/2 pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Zhiwei; Halle, Bertil

    2013-10-01

    In complex biological or colloidal samples, magnetic relaxation dispersion (MRD) experiments using the field-cycling technique can characterize molecular motions on time scales ranging from nanoseconds to microseconds, provided that a rigorous theory of nuclear spin relaxation is available. In gels, cross-linked proteins, and biological tissues, where an immobilized macromolecular component coexists with a mobile solvent phase, nuclear spins residing in solvent (or cosolvent) species relax predominantly via exchange-mediated orientational randomization (EMOR) of anisotropic nuclear (electric quadrupole or magnetic dipole) couplings. The physical or chemical exchange processes that dominate the MRD typically occur on a time scale of microseconds or longer, where the conventional perturbation theory of spin relaxation breaks down. There is thus a need for a more general relaxation theory. Such a theory, based on the stochastic Liouville equation (SLE) for the EMOR mechanism, is available for a single quadrupolar spin I = 1. Here, we present the corresponding theory for a dipole-coupled spin-1/2 pair. To our knowledge, this is the first treatment of dipolar MRD outside the motional-narrowing regime. Based on an analytical solution of the spatial part of the SLE, we show how the integral longitudinal relaxation rate can be computed efficiently. Both like and unlike spins, with selective or non-selective excitation, are treated. For the experimentally important dilute regime, where only a small fraction of the spin pairs are immobilized, we obtain simple analytical expressions for the auto-relaxation and cross-relaxation rates which generalize the well-known Solomon equations. These generalized results will be useful in biophysical studies, e.g., of intermittent protein dynamics. In addition, they represent a first step towards a rigorous theory of water 1H relaxation in biological tissues, which is a prerequisite for unravelling the molecular basis of soft

  1. Knight shift and spin relaxation in the single band 2D Hubbard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblanc, James; Chen, Xi; Gull, Emanuel

    We study in detail the roles of spin and charge fluctuations in the single band 2D Hubbard model. Using dynamical mean field theory and cluster extensions such as the dynamical cluster approximation (DCA), we compute the full two particle susceptibilities in the spin and charge representations. By performing analytic continuations we obtain the temperature and doping dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation (T1- 1) and knight shift in the 2D Hubbard model relevant to NMR results on doped cuprates and connect these to RPA results in weak coupling limits.

  2. Muon spin relaxation studies of the interplay between magnetism and superconductivity in heavy fermion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heffner, R. H.

    The interplay between magnetism and superconductivity in heavy fermion systems is discussed and the role of muon spin relaxation in elucidating these properties is emphasized. Relevant properties of all six heavy fermion superconductors are briefly surveyed and instances where superconductivity and magnetism compete, coexist, and couple with one another are pointed out. Current theoretical concepts underlying these phenomena are highlighted.

  3. Muon spin relaxation studies of the interplay between magnetism and superconductivity in heavy fermion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Heffner, R.H.

    1993-10-01

    The interplay between magnetism and superconductivity in heavy fermion systems is discussed and the role of muon spin relaxation in elucidating these properties is emphasized. Relevant properties of all six heavy fermion superconductors are briefly surveyed and instances where superconductivity and magnetism compete, coexist and couple with one another are pointed out. Current theoretical concepts underlying these phenomena are highlighted.

  4. Application to Rat Lung of the Extended Rorschach-Hazlewood Model of Spin-Lattice Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackmann, Andreas; Ailion, David C.; Ganesan, Krishnamurthy; Goodrich, K. Craig; Chen, Songhua; Laicher, Gernot; Cutillo, Antonio G.

    1996-02-01

    The spin-lattice relaxation timeT1was measured in excised degassed (airless) rat lungs over the frequency range 6.7 to 80.5 MHz. The observed frequency dependence was fitted successfully to the water-biopolymer cross-relaxation theory proposed by H. E. Rorschach and C. F. Hazlewood (RH) [J. Magn. Reson.70,79 (1986)]. The rotating frame spin-lattice relaxation timeT1ρwas also measured in rat lung fragments over the frequency range 0.56 to 5.6 kHz, and the observed frequency dependence was explained with an extension of the RH model. The agreement between the theory and the experimental data in both cases is good.

  5. Knight shift and nuclear spin relaxation in Fe/n -GaAs heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christie, K. D.; Geppert, C. C.; Patel, S. J.; Hu, Q. O.; Palmstrøm, C. J.; Crowell, P. A.

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the dynamically polarized nuclear spin system in Fe/n -GaAs heterostructures using the response of the electron-spin system to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in lateral spin-valve devices. The hyperfine interaction is known to act more strongly on donor-bound electron states than on those in the conduction band. We provide a quantitative model of the temperature dependence of the occupation of donor sites. With this model we calculate the ratios of the hyperfine and quadrupolar nuclear relaxation rates of each isotope. For all temperatures measured, quadrupolar relaxation limits the spatial extent of nuclear spin polarization to within a Bohr radius of the donor sites and is directly responsible for the isotope dependence of the measured NMR signal amplitude. The hyperfine interaction is also responsible for the 2 kHz Knight shift of the nuclear resonance frequency that is measured as a function of the electron-spin accumulation. The Knight shift is shown to provide a measurement of the electron-spin polarization that agrees qualitatively with standard spin transport measurements.

  6. NMR paramagnetic relaxation of the spin 2 complex Mn(III)TSPP: a unique mechanism.

    PubMed

    Schaefle, Nathaniel; Sharp, Robert

    2005-04-21

    The S = 2 complex, manganese(III) meso-tetra(4-sulfonatophenyl)porphine chloride (Mn(III)TSPP) is a highly efficient relaxation agent with respect to water protons and has been studied extensively as a possible MRI contrast agent. The NMR relaxation mechanism has several unique aspects, key among which is the unusual role of zero-field splitting (zfs) interactions and the effect of these interactions on the electron spin dynamics. The principal determinant of the shape of the R1 magnetic relaxation dispersion (MRD) profile is the tetragonal 4th-order zfs tensor component, B4(4), which splits the levels of the m(S) = +/-2 non-Kramers doublet. When the splitting due to B4(4) exceeds the Zeeman splitting, the matrix elements of (S(z)) are driven into coherent oscillation, with the result that the NMR paramagnetic relaxation enhancement is suppressed. To confirm the fundamental aspects of this mechanism, proton R1 MRD data have been collected on polyacrylamide gel samples in which Mn(III)TSPP is reorientationally immobilized. Solute immobilization suppresses time-dependence in the electron spin Hamiltonian that is caused by Brownian motion, simplifying the theoretical analysis. Simultaneous fits of both gel and solution data were achieved using a single set of parameters, all of which were known or tightly constrained from prior experiments except the 4th-order zfs parameter, B4(4), and the electron spin relaxation times, which were found to differ in the m(S) = +/-1 and m(S) = +/-2 doublet manifolds. In liquid samples, but not in the gels, the B4(4)-induced splitting of the m(S) = +/-2 non-Kramers doublet is partially collapsed due to Brownian motion. This phenomenon affects the magnitudes of both B4(4) and electron spin relaxation times in the liquid samples. PMID:16833659

  7. Classical spin glass system in external field with taking into account relaxation effects

    SciTech Connect

    Gevorkyan, A. S. Abajyan, H. G.

    2013-08-15

    We study statistical properties of disordered spin systems under the influence of an external field with taking into account relaxation effects. For description of system the spatial 1D Heisenberg spin-glass Hamiltonian is used. In addition, we suppose that interactions occur between nearest-neighboring spins and they are random. Exact solutions which define angular configuration of the spin in nodes were obtained from the equations of stationary points of Hamiltonian and the corresponding conditions for the energy local minimum. On the basis of these recurrent solutions an effective parallel algorithm is developed for simulation of stabile spin-chains of an arbitrary length. It is shown that by way of an independent order of N{sup 2} numerical simulations (where N is number of spin in each chain) it is possible to generate ensemble of spin-chains, which is completely ergodic which is equivalent to full self-averaging of spin-chains' vector polarization. Distributions of different parameters (energy, average polarization by coordinates, and spin-spin interaction constant) of unperturbed system are calculated. In particular, analytically is proved and numerically is shown, that for the Heisenberg nearest-neighboring Hamiltonian model, the distribution of spin-spin interaction constants as opposed to widely used Gauss-Edwards-Anderson distribution satisfies Levy alpha-stable distribution law. This distribution is nonanalytic function and does not have variance. In the work we have in detail studied critical properties of an ensemble depending on value of external field parameters (from amplitude and frequency) and have shown that even at weak external fields the spin-glass systemis strongly frustrated. It is shown that frustrations have fractal behavior, they are selfsimilar and do not disappear at scale decreasing of area. By the numerical computation is shown that the average polarization of spin-glass on a different coordinates can have values which can lead to

  8. Electron spin echo of Cu(2+) in the triglycine sulfate crystal family (TGS, TGSe, TGFB): electron spin-lattice relaxation, Debye temperature and spin-phonon coupling.

    PubMed

    Lijewski, S; Goslar, J; Hoffmann, S K

    2006-07-01

    The electron spin-lattice relaxation of Cu(2+) has been studied by the electron spin echo technique in the temperature range 4.2-115 K in triglycine sulfate (TGS) family crystals. Assuming that the relaxation is due to Raman relaxation processes the Debye temperature Θ(D) was determined as 190 K for TGS, 168 K for triglycine selenate (TGSe) and 179 K for triglycine fluoroberyllate (TGFB). We also calculated the Θ(D) values from the sound velocities derived from available elastic constants. The elastic Debye temperatures were found as 348 K for TGS, 288 K for TGSe and 372 K for TGFB. The results shown good agreement with specific heat data for TGS. The elastic Θ(D) are considerably larger than those determined from the Raman spin-lattice relaxation. The possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed. We propose to use a modified expression describing two-phonon Raman relaxation with a single variable only (Θ(D)) after elimination of the sound velocity. Moreover, we show that the relaxation data can be fitted using the elastic Debye temperature value as a constant with an additional relaxation process contributing at low temperatures. This mechanism can be related to a local mode of the Cu(2+) defect in the host lattice. Electron paramagnetic resonance g-factors and hyperfine splitting were analysed in terms of the molecular orbital theory and the d-orbital energies and covalency factors of the Cu(gly)(2) complexes were found. Using the structural data and calculated orbital energies the spin-phonon coupling matrix element of the second-order Raman process was calculated as 553 cm(-1) for TGS, 742 cm(-1) for TGSe and 569 cm(-1) for TGFB. PMID:21690828

  9. Muon Spin Relaxation Evidence for the U(1) Quantum Spin-Liquid Ground State in the Triangular Antiferromagnet YbMgGaO_{4}.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuesheng; Adroja, Devashibhai; Biswas, Pabitra K; Baker, Peter J; Zhang, Qian; Liu, Juanjuan; Tsirlin, Alexander A; Gegenwart, Philipp; Zhang, Qingming

    2016-08-26

    Muon spin relaxation (μSR) experiments on single crystals of the structurally perfect triangular antiferromagnet YbMgGaO_{4} indicate the absence of both static long-range magnetic order and spin freezing down to 0.048 K in a zero field. Below 0.4 K, the μ^{+} spin relaxation rates, which are proportional to the dynamic correlation function of the Yb^{3+} spins, exhibit temperature-independent plateaus. All these μSR results unequivocally support the formation of a gapless U(1) quantum spin liquid ground state in the triangular antiferromagnet YbMgGaO_{4}. PMID:27610879

  10. Characterisation and application of ultra-high spin clusters as magnetic resonance relaxation agents.

    PubMed

    Guthausen, Gisela; Machado, Julyana R; Luy, Burkhard; Baniodeh, Amer; Powell, Annie K; Krämer, Steffen; Ranzinger, Florian; Herrling, Maria P; Lackner, Susanne; Horn, Harald

    2015-03-21

    In Magnetic Resonance Tomography (MRT) image contrast can be improved by adding paramagnetic relaxation agents such as lanthanide ions. Here we report on the use of highly paramagnetic isostructural Fe(III)/4f coordination clusters with a [Fe10Ln10] core to enhance relaxation. Measurements were performed over the range of (1)H Larmor frequencies of 10 MHz to 1.4 GHz in order to determine the relevant parameters for longitudinal and transverse relaxivities. Variation of the lanthanide ion allows differentiation of relaxation contributions from electronic states and molecular dynamics. We find that the transverse relaxivities increase with field, whereas the longitudinal relaxivities depend on the nature of the lanthanide. In addition, the Gd(III) analogue was selected in particular to test the interaction with tissue observed using MRT. Studies on biofilms used in waste water treatment reveal that the behaviour of the high-spin clusters is different from what is observed for common relaxation agents with respect to the penetration into the biofilms. The Fe10Gd10 cluster adheres to the surface of the biofilm better than the commercial agent Gadovist. PMID:25670214

  11. Spin-lattice relaxation and the calculation of gain, pump power, and noise temperature in ruby

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, J. R.

    1989-01-01

    The use of a quantitative analysis of the dominant source of relaxation in ruby spin systems to make predictions of key maser amplifier parameters is described. The spin-lattice Hamiltonian which describes the interaction of the electron spins with the thermal vibrations of the surrounding lattice is obtained from the literature. Taking into account the vibrational anisotropy of ruby, Fermi's rule is used to calculate the spin transition rates between the maser energy levels. The spin population rate equations are solved for the spin transition relaxation times, and a comparison with previous calculations is made. Predictions of ruby gain, inversion ratio, and noise temperature as a function of physical temperature are made for 8.4-GHz and 32-GHz maser pumping schemes. The theory predicts that ruby oriented at 90 deg will have approximately 50 percent higher gain in dB and slightly lower noise temperature than a 54.7-deg ruby at 32 GHz (assuming pump saturation). A specific calculation relating pump power to inversion ratio is given for a single channel of the 32-GHz reflected wave maser.

  12. Role of contact resistance in the effective spin relaxation rate in graphene spin valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stecklein, Gordon; Anugrah, Yoska; Li, Jing; Koester, Steven J.; Crowell, Paul

    Recent experiments (Maassen et al., PRB 86 235408 (2012), Idzuchi et al., PRB 91 241407(R) (2015)) have identified the role of finite contact resistances in determining the spin lifetime in graphene based on Hanle measurements of lateral spin valves. We have investigated this effect in spin valves fabricated using Co/AlOx tunnel barriers and graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition. By carrying out non-local spin valve and Hanle measurements over a wide range of gate voltages, we observe a variation in the spin signal that can be explained by the role of the contacts. Using the measured interface resistance, we quantify the degree of contact-induced spin sinking as the ratio of the contact resistance to the channel spin resistance and show that the variation in spin signal is explained by variation in this spin sinking parameter. By properly accounting for the effect of the contact resistance, we measure a spin lifetime that varies between 150-500 picoseconds. This work was supported by NSF ECCS-1124831, the NRI NEB program, and C-SPIN, a SRC STARNET center sponsored by MARCO and DARPA.

  13. Detecting the Majorana fermion surface state of ^3He-B through spin relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Suk Bum; Zhang, Shoucheng

    2010-03-01

    The concept of the Majorana fermion has been postulated more than eighty years ago; however, this elusive particle has never been observed in nature. The non-local character of the Majorana fermion can be useful for topological quantum computation. Recently, it has been shown that the 3He-B phase is a time-reversal invariant topological superfluid, with a single component of gapless Majorana fermion state localized on the surface. Such a Majorana surface state contains half the degrees of freedom of the single Dirac surface state recently observed in topological insulators. We show here that the Majorana surface state can be detected through an electron spin relaxation experiment. The Majorana nature of the surface state can be revealed though the striking angular dependence of the relaxation time on the magnetic field direction, 1/T1sin^2 θ where θ is the angle between the magnetic field and the surface normal. The temperature dependence of the spin relaxation rate can reveal the gapless linear dispersion of the Majorana surface state. We propose a spin relaxation experiment setup where we inject an electron inside a nano- sized bubble below the helium liquid surface.

  14. Microviscosity of human erythrocytes studied using hypophosphite two-spin order relaxation.

    PubMed Central

    Price, W S; Perng, B C; Tsai, C L; Hwang, L P

    1992-01-01

    A new 31P NMR method is used to probe the cytoplasmic viscosity of human erythrocytes. The method is based on observing two-spin order relaxation of the 31P atom of the hypophosphite ion. This method is superior to our previous method, using the longitudinal relaxation time of the ion, because random field effects such as intermolecular dipole-dipole relaxation can be separated from intramolecular relaxation. This allows a more accurate determination of the effective reorientational correlation time from the measured intramolecular relaxation because it is now unaffected by random field effects. The new method also provides a means by which to estimate the random field effects. Both two-spin order and proton-decoupled T1 measurements were conducted on hypophosphite in water solutions at various temperatures, glycerol solutions of various viscosities, and in erythrocyte samples of various cell volumes. The results show that the effective reorientational correlation time of the hypophosphite ion varies from 7.2 to 15.2 ps in the cytoplasm of cells ranging in volume from 102 to 56 fl cells. PMID:1504239

  15. Deuterium off-resonance rotating frame spin-lattice relaxation of macromolecular bound ligands.

    PubMed Central

    Rydzewski, J M; Schleich, T

    1996-01-01

    Deuterated 3-trimethylsilylpropionic acid binding to bovine serum albumin was used as a model system to examine the feasibility and limitations of using the deuterium off-resonance rotating frame spin-lattice relaxation experiment for the study of equilibrium ligand-binding behavior to proteins. The results of this study demonstrate that the rotational-diffusion behavior of the bound species can be monitored directly, i.e., the observed correlation time of the ligand in the presence of a protein is approximately equal to the correlation time of the ligand in the bound state, provided that the fraction of bound ligand is at least 0.20. The presence of local ligand motion and/or chemical exchange contributions to relaxation in the bound state was inferred from the observation that the correlation time of the bound ligand was somewhat smaller than the correlation time characterizing the overall tumbling of the protein. An approximate value for the fraction of bound ligand was obtained from off-resonance relaxation experiments when supplemental spin-lattice or transverse relaxation times were employed in the analysis. Incorporation of local motion effects for the bound species into the theoretical relaxation formalism enabled the evaluation of an order parameter and an effective correlation time, which in conjunction with a wobbling in a cone model, provided additional information about ligand motion in the bound state. PMID:8785304

  16. Frequency dependence of electron spin-lattice relaxation for semiquinones in alcohol solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elajaili, Hanan B.; Biller, Joshua R.; Eaton, Sandra S.; Eaton, Gareth R.

    2014-10-01

    The spin-lattice relaxation rates at 293 K for three anionic semiquinones (2,5-di-t-butyl-1,4-benzosemiquinone, 2,6-di-t-butyl-1,4-benzosemiquinone, and 2,3,5,6-tetramethoxy-1,4-benzosemiquinone) were studied at up to 8 frequencies between 250 MHz and 34 GHz in ethanol or methanol solution containing high concentrations of OH-. The relaxation rates are about a factor of 2 faster at lower frequencies than at 9 or 34 GHz. However, in perdeuterated alcohols the relaxation rates exhibit little frequency dependence, which demonstrates that the dominant frequency-dependent contribution to relaxation is modulation of dipolar interactions with solvent nuclei. The relaxation rates were modeled as the sum of two frequency-independent contributions (spin rotation and a local mode) and two frequency-dependent contributions (modulation of dipolar interaction with solvent nuclei and a much smaller contribution from modulation of g anisotropy). The correlation time for modulation of the interaction with solvent nuclei is longer than the tumbling correlation time of the semiquinone and is consistent with hydrogen bonding of the alcohol to the oxygen atoms of the semiquinones.

  17. An approximate analytical expression for the nuclear quadrupole transverse relaxation rate of half-integer spins in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Gang

    2016-08-01

    The nuclear quadrupole transverse relaxation process of half-integer spins in liquid samples is known to exhibit multi-exponential behaviors. Within the framework of Redfield's relaxation theory, exact analytical expressions for describing such a process exist only for spin-3/2 nuclei. As a result, analyses of nuclear quadrupole transverse relaxation data for half-integer quadrupolar nuclei with spin >3/2 must rely on numerical diagonalization of the Redfield relaxation matrix over the entire motional range. In this work we propose an approximate analytical expression that can be used to analyze nuclear quadrupole transverse relaxation data of any half-integer spin in liquids over the entire motional range. The proposed equation yields results that are in excellent agreement with the exact numerical calculations.

  18. An approximate analytical expression for the nuclear quadrupole transverse relaxation rate of half-integer spins in liquids.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gang

    2016-08-01

    The nuclear quadrupole transverse relaxation process of half-integer spins in liquid samples is known to exhibit multi-exponential behaviors. Within the framework of Redfield's relaxation theory, exact analytical expressions for describing such a process exist only for spin-3/2 nuclei. As a result, analyses of nuclear quadrupole transverse relaxation data for half-integer quadrupolar nuclei with spin >3/2 must rely on numerical diagonalization of the Redfield relaxation matrix over the entire motional range. In this work we propose an approximate analytical expression that can be used to analyze nuclear quadrupole transverse relaxation data of any half-integer spin in liquids over the entire motional range. The proposed equation yields results that are in excellent agreement with the exact numerical calculations. PMID:27343483

  19. /sup 1/H and /sup 13/C spin-lattice relaxation in gaseous benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Folkendt, M.M.; Weiss-Lopez, B.E.; True, N.S.

    1988-08-25

    The nuclear spin-lattice relaxation time, T/sub 1/, measured for benzene protons at densities between 0.81 and 54.4 mol/m/sup 3/ (15 and 980 Torr) at 381 K exhibits a characteristic nonlinear density dependence. Analysis of the density-dependent T/sub 1/ data yields a spin-rotation coupling constant, C/sub eff/, of /vert bar/182.6 (0.4)/vert bar/ Hz and an angular momentum reorientation cross section, sigma, of 131 (1) /Angstrom//sup 2/. The /sup 13/C spin-lattice relaxation time of singly labeled /sup 13/C benzene is a linear function of density over the density range 1.07-75.12 mol/m/sup 3/ (20-1330 Torr). /sup 13/C T/sub 1/ values are shorter than /sup 1/H T/sub 1/ values by a factor of ca. 100 at comparable densities. The nuclear Overhauser enhancement factor, /eta/, is 0.0 /plus minus/ 0.02 at densities between 11 and 85.3 mol/m/sup 3/ (200 and 1500 Torr), demonstrating that dipole-dipole relaxation is relatively inefficient in this region. The spin-rotation coupling constant, C/sub eff/, for /sup 13/C nuclei in benzene is estimated to be /vert bar/1602 (68)/vert bar/ Hz.

  20. Spin and Time-Reversal Symmetries of Superconducting Electron Pairs Probed by the Muon Spin Rotation and Relaxation Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higemoto, Wataru; Aoki, Yuji; MacLaughlin, Douglas E.

    2016-09-01

    Unconventional superconductivity based on the strong correlation of electrons is one of the central issues of solid-state physics. Although many experimental techniques are appropriate for investigating unconventional superconductivity, a complete perspective has not been established yet. The symmetries of electron pairs are crucial properties for understanding the essential state of unconventional superconductivity. In this review, we discuss the investigation of the time-reversal and spin symmetries of superconducting electron pairs using the muon spin rotation and relaxation technique. By detecting a spontaneous magnetic field under zero field and/or the temperature dependence of the muon Knight shift in the superconducting phase, the time-reversal symmetry and spin parity of electron pairs have been determined for several unconventional superconductors.

  1. Rotating frame relaxation during adiabatic pulses vs. conventional spin lock: simulations and experimental results at 4 T.

    PubMed

    Mangia, Silvia; Liimatainen, Timo; Garwood, Michael; Michaeli, Shalom

    2009-10-01

    Spin relaxation taking place during radiofrequency (RF) irradiation can be assessed by measuring the longitudinal and transverse rotating frame relaxation rate constants (R(1rho) and R(2rho)). These relaxation parameters can be altered by utilizing different settings of the RF irradiation, thus providing a useful tool to generate contrast in MRI. In this work, we investigate the dependencies of R(1rho) and R(2rho) due to dipolar interactions and anisochronous exchange (i.e., exchange between spins with different chemical shift deltaomega not equal0) on the properties of conventional spin-lock and adiabatic pulses, with particular emphasis on the latter ones which were not fully described previously. The results of simulations based on relaxation theory provide a foundation for formulating practical considerations for in vivo applications of rotating frame relaxation methods. Rotating frame relaxation measurements obtained from phantoms and from the human brain at 4 T are presented to confirm the theoretical predictions. PMID:19559559

  2. Rotating frame relaxation during adiabatic pulses versus conventional spin-lock: simulations and experimental results at 4T

    PubMed Central

    Mangia, Silvia; Liimatainen, Timo; Garwood, Michael; Michaeli, Shalom

    2009-01-01

    Spin relaxation taking place during radiofrequency (RF) irradiation can be assessed by measuring the longitudinal and transverse rotating frame relaxation rate constants (R1ρ and R2ρ). These relaxation parameters can be altered by utilizing different settings of the RF irradiation, thus providing a useful tool to generate contrast in MRI. In this work we investigate the dependencies of R1ρ and R2ρ due to dipolar interactions and anisochronous exchange (i.e., exchange between spins with different chemical shift δω≠0) on the properties of conventional spin-lock and adiabatic pulses, with particular emphasis on the latter ones which were not fully described previously. The results of simulations based on relaxation theory provide a foundation for formulating practical considerations for in vivo applications of rotating frame relaxation methods. Rotating frame relaxation measurements obtained from phantoms and from the human brain at 4T are presented to confirm the theoretical predictions. PMID:19559559

  3. Qubit Control Limited by Spin-Lattice Relaxation in a Nuclear Spin-Free Iron(III) Complex.

    PubMed

    Zadrozny, Joseph M; Freedman, Danna E

    2015-12-21

    High-spin transition metal complexes are of interest as candidates for quantum information processing owing to the tunability of the pairs of MS levels for use as quantum bits (qubits). Thus, the design of high-spin systems that afford qubits with stable superposition states is of primary importance. Nuclear spins are a potent instigator of superposition instability; thus, we probed the Ph4P(+) salt of the nuclear spin-free complex [Fe(C5O5)3](3-) (1) to see if long-lived superpositions were possible in such a system. Continuous-wave and pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopic measurements reveal a strong EPR transition at X-band that can be utilized as a qubit. However, at 5 K the coherent lifetime, T2, for this resonance is 721(3) ns and decreases rapidly with increasing temperature. Simultaneously, the spin-lattice relaxation time is extremely short, 11.33(1) μs, at 5 K, and also rapidly decreases with increasing temperature. The coincidence of these two temperature-dependent data sets suggests that T2 in 1 is strongly limited by the short T1. Importantly, these results highlight the need for new design parameters in pursuit of high-spin species with appreciable coherence times. PMID:26650962

  4. Effects of spin diffusion on electron spin relaxation time measured with a time-resolved microscopic photoluminescence technique

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Kazuhiro Kawaguchi, Hitoshi

    2015-02-07

    We performed measurements at room temperature for a GaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum well grown on GaAs(110) using a time-resolved microscopic photoluminescence (micro-PL) technique to find what effects spin diffusion had on the measured electron spin relaxation time, τ{sub s}, and developed a method of estimating the spin diffusion coefficient, D{sub s}, using the measured data and the coupled drift-diffusion equations for spin polarized electrons. The spatial nonuniformities of τ{sub s} and the initial degree of electron spin polarization caused by the pump intensity distribution inside the focal spot were taken into account to explain the dependence of τ{sub s} on the measured spot size, i.e., a longer τ{sub s} for a smaller spot size. We estimated D{sub s} as ∼100 cm{sup 2}/s, which is similar to a value reported in the literature. We also provided a qualitative understanding on how spin diffusion lengthens τ{sub s} in micro-PL measurements.

  5. An inversion-relaxation approach for sampling stationary points of spin model Hamiltonians

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, Ciaran; Mehta, Dhagash; Wales, David J.

    2014-05-21

    Sampling the stationary points of a complicated potential energy landscape is a challenging problem. Here, we introduce a sampling method based on relaxation from stationary points of the highest index of the Hessian matrix. We illustrate how this approach can find all the stationary points for potentials or Hamiltonians bounded from above, which includes a large class of important spin models, and we show that it is far more efficient than previous methods. For potentials unbounded from above, the relaxation part of the method is still efficient in finding minima and transition states, which are usually the primary focus of attention for atomistic systems.

  6. Nuclear magnetic relaxation by the dipolar EMOR mechanism: General theory with applications to two-spin systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Zhiwei; Halle, Bertil

    2016-02-01

    In aqueous systems with immobilized macromolecules, including biological tissue, the longitudinal spin relaxation of water protons is primarily induced by exchange-mediated orientational randomization (EMOR) of intra- and intermolecular magnetic dipole-dipole couplings. We have embarked on a systematic program to develop, from the stochastic Liouville equation, a general and rigorous theory that can describe relaxation by the dipolar EMOR mechanism over the full range of exchange rates, dipole coupling strengths, and Larmor frequencies. Here, we present a general theoretical framework applicable to spin systems of arbitrary size with symmetric or asymmetric exchange. So far, the dipolar EMOR theory is only available for a two-spin system with symmetric exchange. Asymmetric exchange, when the spin system is fragmented by the exchange, introduces new and unexpected phenomena. Notably, the anisotropic dipole couplings of non-exchanging spins break the axial symmetry in spin Liouville space, thereby opening up new relaxation channels in the locally anisotropic sites, including longitudinal-transverse cross relaxation. Such cross-mode relaxation operates only at low fields; at higher fields it becomes nonsecular, leading to an unusual inverted relaxation dispersion that splits the extreme-narrowing regime into two sub-regimes. The general dipolar EMOR theory is illustrated here by a detailed analysis of the asymmetric two-spin case, for which we present relaxation dispersion profiles over a wide range of conditions as well as analytical results for integral relaxation rates and time-dependent spin modes in the zero-field and motional-narrowing regimes. The general theoretical framework presented here will enable a quantitative analysis of frequency-dependent water-proton longitudinal relaxation in model systems with immobilized macromolecules and, ultimately, will provide a rigorous link between relaxation-based magnetic resonance image contrast and molecular parameters.

  7. Measuring spin relaxation with standard pulse sequences in the singlet-triplet basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keevers, T. L.; McCamey, D. R.

    2015-08-01

    Pulsed electrically and optically-detected magnetic resonance are extremely sensitive to changes in the permutation symmetry of weakly-coupled spin pairs, and are well-suited for investigating devices with a small number of spins. However, the change in observable from conventional electron spin resonance modifies the results of standard inductively-detected pulse sequences which are routinely used to obtain phase coherence and lifetimes. Whilst these effects have been discussed for single-pulse experiments, their role in multi-pulse sequences is less clear. Here, we investigate this effect in Hahn echo and inversion-recovery sequences, and show a second set of narrower echoes are produced that distort measurement outcomes. We demonstrate that phase cycling is able to deconvolve the additional echo signals, allowing spin relaxation times to be reliably extracted.

  8. Magnetic Slowing Down of Spin Relaxation due to Binary Collisions of Alkali-Metal Atoms with Buffer-Gas Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, D. K.; Griffith, W. M.; Happer, W.

    2002-03-01

    We report the first studies of magnetic decoupling of the spin relaxation of alkali-metal atoms due to binary collisions with buffer gases. When binary collisions are the dominant relaxation mechanism, the relaxation and its magnetic decoupling are well described by the S-damping rate ΓSD due to the spin-rotation interaction γN˙S, the spin exchange rate ΓEX for collisions between alkali atoms, and a new ``Carver rate'' ΓC, due to the pressure-shift interaction δAİS, which can substantially broaden the magnetic decoupling curve while having no influence on the zero-field rates.

  9. Observation of the vortex lattice melting by NMR spin-lattice relaxation in the mixed state

    SciTech Connect

    Bulaevskii, L.N.; Hammel, P.C.; Vinokur, V.M.

    1994-01-01

    For anisotropic layered superconductors the effect of moving vortices on the nuclear spin magnetization is calculated. Current is supposed to flow along layers, and applied magnetic field is tilted with respect to c-axis. In the solid phase the motion of the vortex lattice produces an alternating magnetic field perpendicular to the applied field which causes the decay of the spin-echo amplitude. This decay rate will display an array of peaks as a function of frequency. In the liquid phase this alternating field contribute to the longitudinal relaxation rate W{sub 1} which has a single peak.

  10. Intrinsic spin and momentum relaxation in organic single-crystalline semiconductors probed by ESR and Hall measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsurumi, Junto; Häusermann, Roger; Watanabe, Shun; Mitsui, Chikahiko; Okamoto, Toshihiro; Matsui, Hiroyuki; Takeya, Jun

    Spin and charge momentum relaxation mechanism has been argued among organic semiconductors with various methods, devices, and materials. However, little is known in organic single-crystalline semiconductors because it has been hard to obtain an ideal organic crystal with an excellent crystallinity and controllability required for accurate measurements. By using more than 1-inch sized single crystals which are fabricated via contentious edge-casting method developed by our group, we have successfully demonstrated a simultaneous determination of spin and momentum relaxation time for gate-induced charges of 3,11-didecyldinaphtho[2,3- d:2',3'- d']benzo[1,2- b:4,5- b']dithiophene, by combining electron spin resonance (ESR) and Hall effect measurements. The obtained temperature dependences of spin and momentum relaxation times are in good agreement in terms of power law with a factor of approximately -2. It is concluded that Elliott-Yafet spin relaxation mechanism can be dominant at room temperature regime (200 - 300 K). Probing characteristic time scales such as spin-lattice, spin-spin, and momentum relaxation times, demonstrated in the present work, would be a powerful tool to elucidate fundamental spin and charge transport mechanisms. We acknowledge the New Energy and Industrial Technology Developing Organization (NEDO) for financial support.

  11. Suppression of Raman electron spin relaxation of radicals in crystals. Comparison of Cu2+ and free radical relaxation in triglycine sulfate and Tutton salt single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, S. K.; Goslar, J.; Lijewski, S.

    2011-08-01

    Electron spin-lattice relaxation was measured by the electron spin echo method in a broad temperature range above 4.2 K for Cu2+ ions and free radicals produced by ionizing radiation in triglycine sulfate (TGS) and Tutton salt (NH4)2Zn(SO4)2 ṡ 6H2O crystals. Localization of the paramagnetic centres in the crystal unit cells was determined from continuous wave electron paramagnetic resonance spectra. Various spin relaxation processes and mechanisms are outlined. Cu2+ ions relax fast via two-phonon Raman processes in both crystals involving the whole phonon spectrum of the host lattice. This relaxation is slightly slower for TGS where Cu2+ ions are in the interstitial position. The ordinary Raman processes do not contribute to the radical relaxation which relaxes via the local phonon mode. The local mode lies within the acoustic phonon band for radicals in TGS but within the optical phonon range in (NH4)2Zn(SO4)2 ṡ 6H2O. In the latter the cross-relaxation was considered. A lack of phonons around the radical molecules suggested a local crystal amorphisation produced by x- or γ-rays.

  12. Suppression of Raman electron spin relaxation of radicals in crystals. Comparison of Cu2+ and free radical relaxation in triglycine sulfate and Tutton salt single crystals.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, S K; Goslar, J; Lijewski, S

    2011-08-31

    Electron spin-lattice relaxation was measured by the electron spin echo method in a broad temperature range above 4.2 K for Cu(2+) ions and free radicals produced by ionizing radiation in triglycine sulfate (TGS) and Tutton salt (NH4)(2)Zn(SO4)2 ⋅ 6H2O crystals. Localization of the paramagnetic centres in the crystal unit cells was determined from continuous wave electron paramagnetic resonance spectra. Various spin relaxation processes and mechanisms are outlined. Cu(2+) ions relax fast via two-phonon Raman processes in both crystals involving the whole phonon spectrum of the host lattice. This relaxation is slightly slower for TGS where Cu(2+) ions are in the interstitial position. The ordinary Raman processes do not contribute to the radical relaxation which relaxes via the local phonon mode. The local mode lies within the acoustic phonon band for radicals in TGS but within the optical phonon range in (NH4)(2)Zn(SO4)2 ⋅ 6H2O. In the latter the cross-relaxation was considered. A lack of phonons around the radical molecules suggested a local crystal amorphisation produced by x- or γ-rays. PMID:21841228

  13. Electron tunneling in lithium-ammonia solutions probed by frequency-dependent electron spin relaxation studies.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Kiminori; Lodge, Matthew T J; Harmer, Jeffrey; Freed, Jack H; Edwards, Peter P

    2012-06-01

    Electron transfer or quantum tunneling dynamics for excess or solvated electrons in dilute lithium-ammonia solutions have been studied by pulse electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy at both X- (9.7 GHz) and W-band (94 GHz) frequencies. The electron spin-lattice (T(1)) and spin-spin (T(2)) relaxation data indicate an extremely fast transfer or quantum tunneling rate of the solvated electron in these solutions which serves to modulate the hyperfine (Fermi-contact) interaction with nitrogen nuclei in the solvation shells of ammonia molecules surrounding the localized, solvated electron. The donor and acceptor states of the solvated electron in these solutions are the initial and final electron solvation sites found before, and after, the transfer or tunneling process. To interpret and model our electron spin relaxation data from the two observation EPR frequencies requires a consideration of a multiexponential correlation function. The electron transfer or tunneling process that we monitor through the correlation time of the nitrogen Fermi-contact interaction has a time scale of (1-10) × 10(-12) s over a temperature range 230-290 K in our most dilute solution of lithium in ammonia. Two types of electron-solvent interaction mechanisms are proposed to account for our experimental findings. The dominant electron spin relaxation mechanism results from an electron tunneling process characterized by a variable donor-acceptor distance or range (consistent with such a rapidly fluctuating liquid structure) in which the solvent shell that ultimately accepts the transferring electron is formed from random, thermal fluctuations of the liquid structure in, and around, a natural hole or Bjerrum-like defect vacancy in the liquid. Following transfer and capture of the tunneling electron, further solvent-cage relaxation with a time scale of ∼10(-13) s results in a minor contribution to the electron spin relaxation times. This investigation illustrates the great

  14. Electron Spin Relaxation Rates for Semiquinones between 25 and 295 K in Glass-Forming Solvents

    PubMed Central

    Kathirvelu, Velavan; Sato, Hideo; Eaton, Sandra S.; Eaton, Gareth R.

    2009-01-01

    Electron spin lattice relaxation rates for five semiquinones (2,5-di-t-butyl-1,4-benzosemiquinone, 2,5-di-t-amyl-1,4-benzosemiquinone, 2,5-di-phenyl-1,4-benzosemiquinone, 2,6-di-t-butyl-1,4-benzosemiquinone, tetrahydroxy-1,4-benzosemiquione) were studied by long-pulse saturation recovery EPR in 1:4 glycerol:ethanol, 1:1 glycerol:ethanol, and triethanolamine between 25 and 295 K. Although the dominant process changes with temperature, relaxation rates vary smoothly with temperature, even near the glass transition temperatures, and could be modeled as the sum of contributions that have the temperature dependence that is predicted for the direct, Raman, local mode and tumbling dependent processes. At 85 K, which is in a temperature range where the Raman process dominates, relaxation rates along the gxx (g~2.006) and gyy (g~2.005) axes are about 2.7 to 1.5 times faster than along the gzz axis (g = 2.0023). In highly viscous triethanolamine, contributions from tumbling-dependent processes are negligible. At temperatures above 100 K relaxation rates in triethanolamine are unchanged between X-band (9.5 GHz) and Q-band (34 GHz), so the process that dominates in this temperature interval was assigned as a local mode rather than a thermally-activated process. Because the largest proton hyperfine couplings are only 2.2 G, spin rotation makes a larger contribution than tumbling-dependent modulation of hyperfine anisotropy. Since g anisotropy is small, tumbling dependent modulation of g anisotropy make a smaller contribution than spin rotation at X-band. Although there was negligible impact of methyl rotation on T1, rotation of t-butyl or t-amyl methyl groups enhances spin echo dephasing between 85 and 150 K. PMID:19223213

  15. Nuclear Magnetic Spin-Noise and Unusual Relaxation of Oxygen-17 in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendet-Taicher, Eli

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have evolved into widely used techniques, providing diagnostic power in medicine and material sciences due to their high precision and non-invasive nature. Due to the small population differences between spin energy states, a significant sensitivity problem for NMR arises. The low sensitivity of NMR is probably its greatest limitation for applications to biological systems. An alternative probe tuning strategy based on the spin-noise response for application in standard one-dimensional and common high-resolution multidimensional standard biomolecular NMR experiments has shown an increase of up to 50% signal-to-noise (SNR) in one-dimensional NMR experiments and an increase of up to 22% in multi-dimensional ones. The method requires the adjustment of the optimal tuning condition, which may be offset by several hundreds kHz from the conventional tuning settings using the noise response of the water protons as an indicator. This work is described in the first part of the thesis (chapters 2--3). The second part (Chapter 4) of the thesis deals with anomalous oxygen-17 NMR relaxation behavior in water. Oxygen-17 (17O), which has spin of 5/2 and a natural abundance of 0.0373% possesses an electric quadrupole moment. Spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation occur by the quadrupole interaction, while the J-coupling to 1H spins and exchange are deciding factors. T1 and T2 of 17O in water have been previously measured over a large range of temperatures. The spin-spin relaxation times of 17O as a function of temperature show an anomalous behaviour, expressed by a local maximum at the temperature of maximum density (TMD) of water. It is shown that the same anomalous behaviour shifts to the respective temperatures of maximum density for H2O/D2O solutions with different compositions and salt concentrations. This phenomenon can be correlated to the pH dependency of T2 of 17O in water, and water proton exchange rates

  16. Numerical study of spin relaxation by thermal fluctuation: Effect of shape anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K. J.; Park, N. Y.; Lee, T. D.

    2001-06-01

    Effects of the shape anisotropy on the thermally activated spin relaxation have been investigated using the stochastic Landau{endash}Lifshitz{endash}Gilbert equation. The relaxation times of a noninteracting particle and a thin film were compared with each other. In a noninteracting particle, the relaxation time largely increased with the shape anisotropy when the damping constant was smaller than a certain critical value. In this study, the critical damping constant was 0.02. However, the effect of the shape anisotropy on the energy barrier was negligible in a thin film. All of these results can be explained from the effect of magnetostatic interaction that is enhanced by precession motion at low damping constant. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  17. Ion distribution in copper exchanged zeolites by using Si-29 spin lattice relaxation analysis.

    PubMed

    Palamara, Joseph; Seidel, Karsten; Moini, Ahmad; Prasad, Subramanian

    2016-06-01

    Transition metal-containing zeolites, particularly those with smaller pore size, have found extensive application in the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of environmental pollutants containing nitrogen oxides. We report these zeolites have dramatically faster silicon-29 (Si-29) spin lattice relaxation times (T1) compared to their sodium-containing counterparts. Paramagnetic doping allows one to acquire Si-29 MAS spectra in the order of tens of seconds without significantly affecting the spectral resolution. Moreover, relaxation times depend on the method of preparation and the next-nearest neighbor silicon Qn(mAl) sites, where n=4 and m=0-4, respectively. A clear trend is noted between the effectiveness of Cu exchange and the Si-29 NMR relaxation times. It is anticipated that the availability of this tool, and the enhanced understanding of the nature of the active sites, will provide the means for designing improved SCR catalysts. PMID:27055207

  18. Spatial and vectorial characterization of thermal relaxation using the spin-stand imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tse, C.; Mircea, D. I.; Mayergoyz, I. D.; Andrei, P.; Krafft, C.

    2002-05-01

    The spatial and vectorial characterization of thermal relaxation of recorded magnetization patterns by using the spin-stand imaging technique [I. D. Mayergoyz et al., J. Appl. Phys. 87, 6824 (2000); 89, 6772 (2001)] is reported. In order to obtain such characterization, a recorded track is scanned at successive instants of time over periods of 70 hours. As a result, the spatial distributions of the read-back voltages (that constitute the "raw" images of the track) are consecutively collected. The images of the vectorial magnetization are then reconstructed and local magnetization relaxation rates are subsequently evaluated. It is demonstrated that the spatially inhomogeneous and vectorial nature of thermal relaxation of recorded patterns may result in temporal track broadening. It is found that this temporal track broadening is more pronounced for disks with higher coercivities.

  19. Ion distribution in copper exchanged zeolites by using Si-29 spin lattice relaxation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palamara, Joseph; Seidel, Karsten; Moini, Ahmad; Prasad, Subramanian

    2016-06-01

    Transition metal-containing zeolites, particularly those with smaller pore size, have found extensive application in the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of environmental pollutants containing nitrogen oxides. We report these zeolites have dramatically faster silicon-29 (Si-29) spin lattice relaxation times (T1) compared to their sodium-containing counterparts. Paramagnetic doping allows one to acquire Si-29 MAS spectra in the order of tens of seconds without significantly affecting the spectral resolution. Moreover, relaxation times depend on the method of preparation and the next-nearest neighbor silicon Qn(mAl) sites, where n = 4 and m = 0-4, respectively. A clear trend is noted between the effectiveness of Cu exchange and the Si-29 NMR relaxation times. It is anticipated that the availability of this tool, and the enhanced understanding of the nature of the active sites, will provide the means for designing improved SCR catalysts.

  20. A cascade through spin states in the ultrafast haem relaxation of met-myoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Consani, Cristina; Auböck, Gerald; Bräm, Olivier; Mourik, Frank van; Chergui, Majed

    2014-01-14

    We report on a study of the early relaxation processes of met-Myoglobin in aqueous solution, using a combination of ultrafast broadband fluorescence detection and transient absorption with a broad UV-visible continuum probe at different pump energies. Reconstruction of the spectra of the transient species unravels the details of the haem photocycle in the absence of photolysis. Besides identifying a branching in the ultrafast relaxation of the haem, we show clear evidence for an electronic character of the intermediates, contrary to the commonly accepted idea that the early time relaxation of the haem is only due to cooling. The decay back to the ground state proceeds partially as a cascade through iron spin states, which seems to be a general characteristic of haem systems.

  1. ESR lineshape and 1H spin-lattice relaxation dispersion in propylene glycol solutions of nitroxide radicals - Joint analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruk, D.; Hoffmann, S. K.; Goslar, J.; Lijewski, S.; Kubica-Misztal, A.; Korpała, A.; Oglodek, I.; Kowalewski, J.; Rössler, E. A.; Moscicki, J.

    2013-12-01

    Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectroscopy and Nuclear Magnetic Relaxation Dispersion (NMRD) experiments are reported for propylene glycol solutions of the nitroxide radical: 4-oxo-TEMPO-d16 containing 15N and 14N isotopes. The NMRD experiments refer to 1H spin-lattice relaxation measurements in a broad frequency range (10 kHz-20 MHz). A joint analysis of the ESR and NMRD data is performed. The ESR lineshapes give access to the nitrogen hyperfine tensor components and the rotational correlation time of the paramagnetic molecule. The NMRD data are interpreted in terms of the theory of paramagnetic relaxation enhancement in solutions of nitroxide radicals, recently presented by Kruk et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 138, 124506 (2013)]. The theory includes the effect of the electron spin relaxation on the 1H relaxation of the solvent. The 1H relaxation is caused by dipole-dipole interactions between the electron spin of the radical and the proton spins of the solvent molecules. These interactions are modulated by three dynamic processes: relative translational dynamics of the involved molecules, molecular rotation, and electron spin relaxation. The sensitivity to rotation originates from the non-central positions of the interacting spin in the molecules. The electronic relaxation is assumed to stem from the electron spin-nitrogen spin hyperfine coupling, modulated by rotation of the radical molecule. For the interpretation of the NMRD data, we use the nitrogen hyperfine coupling tensor obtained from ESR and fit the other relevant parameters. The consistency of the unified analysis of ESR and NMRD, evaluated by the agreement between the rotational correlation times obtained from ESR and NMRD, respectively, and the agreement of the translation diffusion coefficients with literature values obtained for pure propylene glycol, is demonstrated to be satisfactory.

  2. Anisotropy of spin-spin and spin-lattice relaxation times in liquids entrapped in nanocavities: Application to MRI study of biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furman, Gregory B.; Goren, Shaul D.; Meerovich, Victor M.; Sokolovsky, Vladimir L.

    2016-02-01

    Spin-spin and spin-lattice relaxations in liquid or gas entrapped in nanosized ellipsoidal cavities with different orientation ordering are theoretically investigated. The model is flexible in order to be applied to explain experimental results in cavities with various forms, from very prolate up to oblate ones, and different degree of ordering of nanocavities. In the framework of the considered model, the dipole-dipole interaction is determined by a single coupling constant, which depends on the form, size, and orientation of the cavity and number of nuclear spins in the cavity. It was shown that the transverse and longitudinal relaxation rates differently depend on the angle between the external magnetic field and cavity main axis. The calculation results for the local dipolar field, transverse and longitudinal relaxation times explain the angular dependencies observed in MRI experiments with biological objects: cartilage and tendon. Microstructure of these tissues can be characterized by the standard deviation of the Gaussian distribution of fibril orientations. The comparison of the theoretical and experimental results shows that the value of the standard deviation obtained at the matching of the calculation to experimental results can be used as a parameter characterizing the disorder in the biological sample.

  3. Anisotropy of spin-spin and spin-lattice relaxation times in liquids entrapped in nanocavities: Application to MRI study of biological systems.

    PubMed

    Furman, Gregory B; Goren, Shaul D; Meerovich, Victor M; Sokolovsky, Vladimir L

    2016-02-01

    Spin-spin and spin-lattice relaxations in liquid or gas entrapped in nanosized ellipsoidal cavities with different orientation ordering are theoretically investigated. The model is flexible in order to be applied to explain experimental results in cavities with various forms, from very prolate up to oblate ones, and different degree of ordering of nanocavities. In the framework of the considered model, the dipole-dipole interaction is determined by a single coupling constant, which depends on the form, size, and orientation of the cavity and number of nuclear spins in the cavity. It was shown that the transverse and longitudinal relaxation rates differently depend on the angle between the external magnetic field and cavity main axis. The calculation results for the local dipolar field, transverse and longitudinal relaxation times explain the angular dependencies observed in MRI experiments with biological objects: cartilage and tendon. Microstructure of these tissues can be characterized by the standard deviation of the Gaussian distribution of fibril orientations. The comparison of the theoretical and experimental results shows that the value of the standard deviation obtained at the matching of the calculation to experimental results can be used as a parameter characterizing the disorder in the biological sample. PMID:26773529

  4. On improving the speed and reliability of T2-relaxation-under-spin-tagging (TRUST) MRI.

    PubMed

    Xu, Feng; Uh, Jinsoo; Liu, Peiying; Lu, Hanzhang

    2012-07-01

    A T(2) -relaxation-under-spin-tagging technique was recently developed to estimate cerebral blood oxygenation, providing potentials for noninvasive assessment of the brain's oxygen consumption. A limitation of the current sequence is the need for long repetition time, as shorter repetition time causes an over-estimation in blood R(2). This study proposes a postsaturation T(2)-relaxation-under-spin-tagging by placing a nonselective 90° pulse after the signal acquisition to reset magnetization in the whole brain. This scheme was found to eliminate estimation bias at a slight cost of precision. To improve the precision, echo time of the sequence was optimized and it was found that a modest echo time shortening of 3.4 ms can reduce the estimation error by 49%. We recommend the use of postsaturation T(2)-relaxation-under-spin-tagging sequence with a repetition time of 3000 ms and a echo time of 3.6 ms, which allows the determination of global venous oxygenation with scan duration of 1 min 12 s and an estimation precision of ± 1% (in units of oxygen saturation percentage). PMID:22127845

  5. Electron spin relaxation time in (110) InGaAs/InAlAs quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Yokota, Nobuhide; Yasuda, Yusuke; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Kawaguchi, Hitoshi

    2014-07-14

    Electron spin relaxation time τ{sub s} in InGaAs/InAlAs quantum wells (QWs) grown on (110) and (100) InP substrates was investigated by pump-probe transmission measurements. Similar τ{sub s} of 0.83–1.0 ns were measured at room temperature for all the measured (110) and (100) QWs, indicating suppression of the D'yakonov-Perel' spin relaxation mechanism in (110) QWs is not effective in InGaAs/InAlAs QWs as opposed to GaAs/AlGaAs QWs. Contribution of the Bir-Aronov-Pikus mechanism dominant in (110) GaAs/AlGaAs QWs was found to be small in both the (110) and (100) InGaAs/InAlAs QWs from the weak dependences of τ{sub s} on pump intensity at room temperature. These results suggest that the spin relaxation mechanism dominant in InGaAs/InAlAs QWs at a temperature higher than 200 K is the Elliott-Yafet mechanism independent of the crystal orientation among the above three major mechanisms.

  6. Spin relaxation of radicals in cryptochrome and its role in avian magnetoreception.

    PubMed

    Worster, Susannah; Kattnig, Daniel R; Hore, P J

    2016-07-21

    Long-lived spin coherence and rotationally ordered radical pairs have previously been identified as key requirements for the radical pair mechanism of the avian magnetic compass sense. Both criteria are hard to meet in a biological environment, where thermal motion of the radicals creates dynamic disorder and drives efficient spin relaxation. This has long been cited as a major stumbling block of the radical pair hypothesis. Here we combine Redfield relaxation theory with analytical solutions to a rotational diffusion equation to assess the impact of restricted rotational motion of the radicals on the operation of the compass. The effects of such motions are first investigated generally in small, model systems and are then critically examined in the magnetically sensitive flavin-tryptophan radical pair that is formed photochemically in the proposed magnetoreceptor protein, cryptochrome. We conclude that relaxation is slowest when rotational motion of the radicals within the protein is fast and highly constrained; that in a regime of slow relaxation, the motional averaging of hyperfine interactions has the potential to improve the sensitivity of the compass; and that consideration of motional effects can significantly alter the design criteria for an optimal compass. In addition, we demonstrate that motion of the flavin radical is likely to be compatible with its role as a component of a functioning radical-pair compass, whereas the motion of the tryptophan radical is less ideal, unless it is particularly fast. PMID:27448908

  7. [Polychromatic kinetics of conformational and spin relaxation of reduced intermediates of myoglobin].

    PubMed

    Prusakov, V E; Parak, F; Chekunaev, N I; Gol'danski', I

    1996-01-01

    Moessbauer spectroscopy was used to study the relaxation of a non-equilibrium myoglobin state produced at 77 K by reduction of metmyoglobin Fe(III) with thermalized electrons. The intermediate is characterized with the metMb (r) conformation of the protein globule and a low spin heme Fe(II) with a water molecule on the sixth coordination site. The intermediate is stable at 77 K but relaxes with increasing temperature into equilibrium deoxymyoglobin with dissociation of the bond Fe(II)-H2O and the transition of the Iron into the high spin state. In the temperature range 147-195 K the relaxation kinetics is nonexponential in time and can be described in terms of the polychromatic kinetics. A fitting of the kinetics data supposing a gamma-distribution of activation enthalpies of the relaxation shows a shift and a narrowing of the distribution at T > 180 K. The effect of structural rearrangements and equilibrium conformational fluctuations in the protein on the shape of the observed barrier distribution is discussed. PMID:9011200

  8. Spin relaxation of radicals in cryptochrome and its role in avian magnetoreception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worster, Susannah; Kattnig, Daniel R.; Hore, P. J.

    2016-07-01

    Long-lived spin coherence and rotationally ordered radical pairs have previously been identified as key requirements for the radical pair mechanism of the avian magnetic compass sense. Both criteria are hard to meet in a biological environment, where thermal motion of the radicals creates dynamic disorder and drives efficient spin relaxation. This has long been cited as a major stumbling block of the radical pair hypothesis. Here we combine Redfield relaxation theory with analytical solutions to a rotational diffusion equation to assess the impact of restricted rotational motion of the radicals on the operation of the compass. The effects of such motions are first investigated generally in small, model systems and are then critically examined in the magnetically sensitive flavin-tryptophan radical pair that is formed photochemically in the proposed magnetoreceptor protein, cryptochrome. We conclude that relaxation is slowest when rotational motion of the radicals within the protein is fast and highly constrained; that in a regime of slow relaxation, the motional averaging of hyperfine interactions has the potential to improve the sensitivity of the compass; and that consideration of motional effects can significantly alter the design criteria for an optimal compass. In addition, we demonstrate that motion of the flavin radical is likely to be compatible with its role as a component of a functioning radical-pair compass, whereas the motion of the tryptophan radical is less ideal, unless it is particularly fast.

  9. Probing the formation and evolution of comets via nuclear spin temperatures of C_2H_6, CH_3OH, CH_4, NH_3, and H_2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villanueva, G.; Mumma, M.; Bonev, B.; DiSanti, M.; Paganini, L.; Magee-Sauer, K.; Gibb, E.

    2014-07-01

    Comets are true remnants of our primordial Solar System, and provide unique clues to its formation and evolution, including the delivery of organics and water to our planet. A key indicator stored in the molecular structure of the nuclear ices is the spin temperature (T_{spin}), derived from spin-isomeric ratios (R_{spin}, e.g., ortho/para). At the time when cometary ices formed, the prevailing temperature defined the relative abundance of the different spin-isomeric species, and herewith R_{spin} and T_{spin} are normally treated as ''remnant thermometers'' probing the formation environments of cometary molecules. Radiative and collisional transitions between the ortho and para states are strongly forbidden and herewith this indicator is preserved over time. Most of our knowledge of this indicator comes from the measurements of the ortho-para ratios in water and NH_2 (a proxy for ammonia), suggesting a common T_{spin} near 30 K. This information is based on a restricted sample of comets, and the measurements are particularly sensitive to the molecular modeling technique and adopted spectral database. Here, we present new methodologies for extracting spin temperatures from ethane (C_2H_6), methane (CH_4), and methanol (CH_3OH), and advanced new models for ortho/para water (H_2O) and ammonia (NH_3). Our H_2O analysis is based on the most complete fluorescence radiative-transfer model to date, which incorporates 1,200 million transitions including those originating from high-energy levels that are activated in comets via a non-resonant cascade. In a similar fashion, we developed non-resonant fluorescence models for NH_3 and HCN, and quantum-band models for the ν_7 band of C_2H_6 and ν_3 band of CH_3OH. All models respect spin-symmetry non-conversion radiative rules, and make use of a realistic solar spectrum for the computation of fluorescence pumps. We applied these new methods to derive spin-isomeric ratios for H_2O, CH_4, C_2H_6, CH_3OH, and NH_3 from three high

  10. Microsecond protein dynamics measured by 13Calpha rotating-frame spin relaxation.

    PubMed

    Lundström, Patrik; Akke, Mikael

    2005-09-01

    NMR spin relaxation in the rotating frame (R1rho) is a unique method for atomic-resolution characterization of conformational (chemical) exchange processes occurring on the microsecond timescale. We present a rotating-frame 13C(alpha) relaxation dispersion experiment for measuring conformational dynamics in uniformly 13C-labeled proteins. The experiment was validated by using the E140Q mutant of the C-terminal fragment of calmodulin, which exhibits significant conformational exchange between two major conformations, as gauged from previous 15N and 1H relaxation studies. Consistent with previous work, the present 13C(alpha) R1rho experiment detects conformational-exchange dynamics throughout the protein. The average correlation time of =25+/-8 micros is in excellent agreement with those determined previously from 1H and 15N R1rho relaxation data: =19+/-7 and 21+/-3 micros, respectively. The extracted chemical-shift differences between the exchanging states reveal significant fluctuations in dihedral angles within single regions of Ramachandran phi-psi space, that were not identified from the 1H and 15N relaxation data. The present results underscore the advantage of using several types of nuclei to probe exchange dynamics in biomolecules. PMID:16028301

  11. Effects of Off-Resonance Irradiation, Cross-Relaxation, and Chemical Exchange on Steady-State Magnetization and Effective Spin-Lattice Relaxation Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kingsley, Peter B.; Monahan, W. Gordon

    2000-04-01

    In the presence of an off-resonance radiofrequency field, recovery of longitudinal magnetization to a steady state is not purely monoexponential. Under reasonable conditions with zero initial magnetization, recovery is nearly exponential and an effective relaxation rate constant R1eff = 1/T1eff can be obtained. Exact and approximate formulas for R1eff and steady-state magnetization are derived from the Bloch equations for spins undergoing cross-relaxation and chemical exchange between two sites in the presence of an off-resonance radiofrequency field. The relaxation formulas require that the magnetization of one spin is constant, but not necessarily zero, while the other spin relaxes. Extension to three sites with one radiofrequency field is explained. The special cases of off-resonance effects alone and with cross-relaxation or chemical exchange, cross-relaxation alone, and chemical exchange alone are compared. The inaccuracy in saturation transfer measurements of exchange rate constants by published formulas is discussed for the creatine kinase reaction.

  12. Spin relaxation of conduction electrons by inelastic scattering with neutral donors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing, Lan; Dery, Hanan; Li, Jing; Appelbaum, Ian

    2015-03-01

    At low temperatures in n-doped semiconductors, a significant fraction of shallow donor sites are occupied by electrons, neutralizing the impurity core charge in equilibrium. Inelastic scattering by externally-injected conduction electrons accelerated by electric fields can excite transitions within the manifold of these localized states. Promotion into highly spin-mixed excited states results in spin relaxation that couples strongly to the conduction electrons by exchange interaction. Through experiments with silicon spin transport devices and complementary theory, we reveal the consequences of this previously unknown depolarization mechanism both below and above the impact ionization threshold and into the ``deep inelastic'' regime. This work is supported by NSF under Contracts ECCS-1231570 and ECCS-1231855, by DTRA under Contract HDTRA1-13-1-0013, and by ONR under Contract N000141410317.

  13. The Search for Magnetic Order in delta-Pu metal using muon spin relaxation

    SciTech Connect

    Heffner, R; Ohishi, K; Fluss, M; Morris, G; MacLaughlin, D; Shu, L; Chung, B; McCall, S; Bauer, E; Sarrao, J; Ito, T; Higemoto, W

    2006-10-16

    We review results from previous muon spin relaxation ({mu}SR) measurements in applied fields of H{sub 0} = 0 and 0.25 T which established an upper limit for the ordered or disordered frozen spin moment above T = 4 K in {delta}-Pu (4.3 at. % Ga) of {micro}{sub ord} {le} 10{sup -3} {mu}{sub B}. In addition, we present new data in H{sub 0} = 0.25 T and 2 T applied field on a highly annealed {delta}-Pu (4.3 at. % Ga) sample. Neither the muon Knight shift (H{sub 0} = 2 T) nor the inhomogeneous linewidths in the new sample show appreciable temperature dependence below about T = 60 K, also consistent with no spin freezing. Recent theoretical arguments advanced to explain these results are mentioned.

  14. General theoretical/computational tool for interpreting NMR spin relaxation in proteins.

    PubMed

    Zerbetto, Mirco; Polimeno, Antonino; Meirovitch, Eva

    2009-10-15

    We developed in recent years the slowly relaxing local structure (SRLS) approach for analyzing NMR spin relaxation in proteins. SRLS is a two-body coupled rotator model which accounts rigorously for mode-coupling between the global motion of the protein and the local motion of the spin-bearing probe and allows for general properties of the second rank tensors involved. We showed that a general tool of data analysis requires both capabilities. Several important functionalities were missing in our previous implementations of SRLS in data fitting schemes, and in some important cases, the calculations were tedious. Here we present a general implementation which allows for asymmetric local and global diffusion tensors, distinct local ordering and local diffusion frames, and features a rhombic local potential which includes Wigner matrix element terms of ranks 2 and 4. A recently developed hydrodynamics-based approach for calculating global diffusion tensors has been incorporated into the data-fitting scheme. The computational efficiency of the latter has been increased significantly through object-oriented programming within the scope of the C++ programming language, and code parallelization. A convenient graphical user interface is provided. Currently autocorrelated (15)N spin relaxation data can be analyzed effectively. Adaptation to any autocorrelated and cross-correlated relaxation analysis is straightforward. New physical insight is gleaned on largely preserved local structure in solution, even in chain segments which experience slow local motion. Prospects associated with improved dynamic models, and new applications made possible by the current implementation of SRLS, are delineated. PMID:19775101

  15. Cooling overall spin temperature: Protein NMR experiments optimized for longitudinal relaxation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deschamps, Michaël; Campbell, Iain D.

    2006-02-01

    In experiments performed on protonated proteins at high fields, 80% of the NMR spectrometer time is spent waiting for the 1H atoms to recover their polarization after recording the free induction decay. Selective excitation of a fraction of the protons in a large molecule has previously been shown to lead to faster longitudinal relaxation for the selected protons [K. Pervushin, B. Vögeli, A. Eletsky, Longitudinal 1H relaxation optimization in TROSY NMR spectroscopy, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 124 (2002) 12898-12902; P. Schanda, B. Brutscher, Very fast two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy for real-time investigation of dynamic events in proteins on the time scale of seconds, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 127 (2005) 8014-8015; H.S. Attreya, T. Szyperski, G-matrix Fourier transform NMR spectroscopy for complete protein resonance assignment, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 101 (2004) 9642-9647]. The pool of non-selected protons acts as a "thermal bath" and spin-diffusion processes ("flip-flop" transitions) channel the excess energy from the excited pool to the non-selected protons in regions of the molecule where other relaxation processes can dissipate the excess energy. We present here a sensitivity enhanced HSQC sequence (COST-HSQC), based on one selective E-BURP pulse, which can be used on protonated 15N enriched proteins (with or without 13C isotopic enrichment). This experiment is compared to a gradient sensitivity enhanced HSQC with a water flip-back pulse (the water flip-back pulse quenches the spin diffusion between 1H N and 1H α spins). This experiment is shown to have significant advantages in some circumstances. Some observed limitations, namely sample overheating with short recovery delays and complex longitudinal relaxation behaviour are discussed and analysed.

  16. Cooling overall spin temperature: protein NMR experiments optimized for longitudinal relaxation effects.

    PubMed

    Deschamps, Michaël; Campbell, Iain D

    2006-02-01

    In experiments performed on protonated proteins at high fields, 80% of the NMR spectrometer time is spent waiting for the (1)H atoms to recover their polarization after recording the free induction decay. Selective excitation of a fraction of the protons in a large molecule has previously been shown to lead to faster longitudinal relaxation for the selected protons [K. Pervushin, B. Vögeli, A. Eletsky, Longitudinal (1)H relaxation optimization in TROSY NMR spectroscopy, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 124 (2002) 12898-12902; P. Schanda, B. Brutscher, Very fast two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy for real-time investigation of dynamic events in proteins on the time scale of seconds, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 127 (2005) 8014-8015; H.S. Attreya, T. Szyperski, G-matrix Fourier transform NMR spectroscopy for complete protein resonance assignment, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 101 (2004) 9642-9647]. The pool of non-selected protons acts as a "thermal bath" and spin-diffusion processes ("flip-flop" transitions) channel the excess energy from the excited pool to the non-selected protons in regions of the molecule where other relaxation processes can dissipate the excess energy. We present here a sensitivity enhanced HSQC sequence (COST-HSQC), based on one selective E-BURP pulse, which can be used on protonated (15)N enriched proteins (with or without (13)C isotopic enrichment). This experiment is compared to a gradient sensitivity enhanced HSQC with a water flip-back pulse (the water flip-back pulse quenches the spin diffusion between (1)H(N) and (1)H(alpha) spins). This experiment is shown to have significant advantages in some circumstances. Some observed limitations, namely sample overheating with short recovery delays and complex longitudinal relaxation behaviour are discussed and analysed. PMID:16249110

  17. Spin-lattice relaxation within a dimerized Ising chain in a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Erdem, Rıza E-mail: rerdem29@hotmail.com; Gülpınar, Gül; Yalçın, Orhan; Pawlak, Andrzej

    2014-07-21

    A qualitative study of the spin-lattice relaxation within a dimerized Ising chain in a magnetic field is presented. We have first determined the time dependence of the deviation of the lattice distortion parameter δΔ from the equilibrium state within framework of a technique combining the statistical equilibrium theory based on the transfer matrix method and the linear theory of irreversible thermodynamics. We have shown that the time dependence of the lattice distortion parameter is characterized by a single time constant (τ) which diverges around the critical point in both dimerized (Δ≠0) and uniform (Δ=0) phase regions. When the temperature and magnetic field are fixed to certain values, the time τ depends only on exchange coupling between the spins. It is a characteristic time associated with the long wavelength fluctuations of distortion. We have also taken into account the effects of spatial fluctuations on the relaxation time using the full Landau-Ginzburg free energy functional. We have found an explicit expression for the relaxation time as a function of temperature, coupling constant and wave vector (q) and shown that the critical mode corresponds to the case q=0. Finally, our results are found to be in good qualitative agreement with the results obtained in recent experimental study on synchrotron x-ray scattering and muon spin relaxation in diluted material Cu{sub 1−y}Mg{sub y}GeO{sub 3} where the composition y is very close to 0.0209. These results can be considered as natural extensions of some previous works on static aspects of the problem.

  18. Spin-lattice relaxation of the methyl group protons in solids revisited: Damped quantum rotation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymański, S.

    2012-07-01

    Proton spin-lattice relaxation of the methyl group in solids had been one of the most thoroughly addressed theoretical problems in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, considered at different levels of sophistication. For systems with substantial quantum tunneling effects, several quantum mechanical treatments were reported, although in practical applications the quantum models were always augmented with or replaced by the classical jump model. However, the latter has recently proved invalid in the description of NMR line shape effects in variable-temperature spectra of hindered methyl groups, while the competing theory of damped quantum rotation (DQR) was shown to be adequate. In this work, the spin-lattice relaxation issue for the methyl protons is readdressed using the latter theory. The main outcome is that, while the existing formulas for the relaxation rates remain unchanged, the crucial parameter entering them, the correlation time of the relevant random process, need to be reinterpreted. It proves to be the inverse of one of the two quantum-rate constants entering the DQR model, neither of which, when taken separately, can be related to the jump process. It can be identified with one describing the life-time broadening of the tunnel peaks in inelastic neutron scattering (INS) spectra of the methyl groups. Such a relationship between the relaxation and INS effects was reported from another laboratory long ago, but only for the low-temperature limit where thermal population of the excited torsional levels of the methyl group can be neglected. The whole spectrum of cases encountered in practical relaxation studies on protonated methyl groups is addressed for the first time. Preliminary experimental confirmation of this novel approach is reported, based on already published NMR data for a single crystal of methylmalonic acid. The once extensively debated issues of quenching of the coherent tunneling and of the classical limit in the dynamics of the

  19. Controlling the relaxation of propagating spin waves in yttrium iron garnet/Pt bilayers with thermal gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunha, R. O.; Padrón-Hernández, E.; Azevedo, A.; Rezende, S. M.

    2013-05-01

    The spin currents generated by thermal gradients through the spin Seebeck effect (SSE) are usually detected by the voltage generated in a normal metal by means of the inverse spin Hall effect. Here, we present a detailed account of an experimental investigation of the action of spin currents due to SSE on the relaxation rate of spin waves. Propagating spin-wave packets with a frequency in the range of 1-2 GHz are launched in film strips of single-crystal yttrium iron garnet, Y3Fe5O12 (YIG) while a thermal gradient is applied across the thickness in the so-called longitudinal SSE configuration. No change in damping is observed in bare YIG films. However, if the YIG film is covered with an ultrathin platinum layer, we observe a striking change in the amplitude of the detected spin-wave pulses. Depending on the sign of the gradient, the spin-wave relaxation rate can be increased or decreased, leading in the latter case to an apparent amplification. The change in the relaxation rate is attributed to the action of a spin current generated in the YIG film by the SSE while the role of the Pt layer is to supply or absorb the flow of spins.

  20. The T1 ρ13C spin-lattice relaxation time of helical polyguanidines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, A. R.; Stewart, J. R.; Novak, B. M.

    1999-03-01

    The solid state dynamics of three helical polyguanidines differing only in their stereochemistry was investigated by 13C CP/MAS NMR. From these studies, the structures of the polyguanidines were confirmed, and the 13C spin-lattice relaxation times in the rotating frame were measured. The relaxation times of all the polyguanidines indicated that they undergo fast motions, i.e. motions on the fast side of the T1 ρ minimum. The main chain carbon of polyguanidine I-( R/ S), with equal amounts of ( R) and ( S) chiral side chains, has higher activation energy, 10.7 kJ/mol, than the analogous polymers with enantiomerically pure side chains ( I-( R) and I-( S)), 5.1 kJ/mol.

  1. Nuclear quadrupole spin-lattice relaxation due to molecular reorientations in crystals with orientational disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meriles, C. A.; Pérez, S. C.; Brunetti, A. H.

    1997-08-01

    p-chloronitrobenzene (PCNB) and p-chlorobromobenzene (PCBB) crystallize in the centrosymmetric space group P21/c with two molecules per unit cell. The space lattice will have an equal number of points with molecules facing in opposite directions. As a consequence, these compounds exhibit an orientational rigid disorder. In this work, we have measured the temperature dependence of the chlorine nuclear quadrupole spin-lattice relaxation time (T1), linewidth, and resonance frequency for both compounds for temperatures higher than 80 K. Both compounds exhibit an inhomogeneously broadened line shape and a "normal" Bayer-type temperature dependence of the resonance frequency. The analysis focuses on the identification of the dominant relaxation process at high temperatures (T>240 K in PCNB and T>260 K in PCBB). It is shown that T1(T) reflects the existence of 180° molecular reorientations through a modulation of the crystalline contribution to the electric field gradient.

  2. A resonance enhancement of the phase relaxation in the electron spin echo of nitroxide covalently attached to cytochrome c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilczer, W.; Goslar, J.; Gramza, M.; Hoffmann, S. K.; Blicharski, W.; Osyczka, A.; Turyna, B.; Froncisz, W.

    1995-12-01

    The spin lattice T1 and phase memory TM relaxation times were measured by an electron spin echo technique for the nitroxide spin label attached covalently to horse heart cytochrome c below 80 K for oxidized (Fe 3+) and reduced (Fe 2+) samples. T1 decreases on heating and below 10 K is governed by the direct relaxation process for the reduced sample. The spin-lattice relaxation is enhanced by a cross-relaxation to Fe 3+ in an oxidized sample. In the TM temperature dependence an unusual deep minimum appears at about 25 K. This resonance type effect which vanishes completely for the reduced sample is due to a coupling to the Fe 3+ spins. The spin-lattice relaxation rate of Fe 3+ is comparable to the TM of nitroxide at low temperature producing a minimum in TM when the Ti value corresponds to the spin packet width of excited spins.

  3. Spin dynamics and relaxation in graphene nanoribbons: electron spin resonance probing.

    PubMed

    Rao, Singamaneni S; Stesmans, Andre; van Tol, Johan; Kosynkin, Dmitry V; Higginbotham-Duque, A; Lu, Wei; Sinitskii, Alexander; Tour, James M

    2012-09-25

    Here we report the results of a multifrequency (~9, 20, 34, 239.2, and 336 GHz) variable-temperature continuous wave (cw) and X-band (~9 GHz) pulse electron spin resonance (ESR) measurement performed at cryogenic temperatures on potassium split graphene nanoribbons (GNRs). Important experimental findings include the following: (a) The multifrequency cw ESR data infer the presence of only carbon-related paramagnetic nonbonding states, at any measured temperature, with the g value independent of microwave frequency and temperature. (b) A linear broadening of the ESR signal as a function of microwave frequency is noticed. The observed linear frequency dependence of ESR signal width points to a distribution of g factors causing the non-Lorentzian line shape, and the g broadening contribution is found to be very small. (c) The ESR process is found to be characterized by slow and fast components, whose temperature dependences could be well described by a tunneling level state model. This work not only could help in advancing the present fundamental understanding on the edge spin (or magnetic)-based properties of GNRs but also pave the way to GNR-based spin devices. PMID:22901098

  4. Electron spin-lattice relaxation of low-symmetry Ni{sup 2+} centers in LiF

    SciTech Connect

    Azamat, D. V. Dejneka, A.; Jastrabik, L.; Lančok, J.; Badalyan, A. G.

    2014-06-23

    The spin-lattice relaxation times of charge-compensated Ni{sup 2+} centers in LiF single crystals were measured using the electron spin echo technique. An analysis of the results revealed a very high relaxation rate with a linear dependence on temperature within the intermediate temperature range of 5–15 K. This acceleration of the relaxation rate was found to be due to the inhomogeneous distribution of Ni{sup 2+} ions in the LiF lattice. It seems that the effective cross-relaxation mechanism through the exchange-coupled clusters of Ni{sup 2+} ions can play a dominant role. Two-phonon Raman type relaxation dominates at higher temperatures involving the Debye phonon spectrum of the LiF lattice.

  5. Magnetocardiography with a modular spin-exchange relaxation free atomic magnetometer array

    PubMed Central

    Wyllie, R; Kauer, M; Smetana, G S; Wakai, R T; Walker, T G

    2012-01-01

    We present a portable four-channel atomic magnetometer array operating in the spin exchange relaxation-free regime. The magnetometer array has several design features intended to maximize its suitability for biomagnetic measurement, specifically foetal magnetocardiography, such as a compact modular design and fibre coupled lasers. The modular design allows the independent positioning and orientation of each magnetometer. Using this array in a magnetically shielded room, we acquire adult magnetocadiograms. These measurements were taken with a 6–11 fT Hz−1/2 single-channel baseline sensitivity that is consistent with the independently measured noise level of the magnetically shielded room. PMID:22504066

  6. Local isotropic diffusion approximation for coupled internal and overall molecular motions in NMR spin relaxation.

    PubMed

    Gill, Michelle L; Palmer, Arthur G

    2014-09-25

    The present work demonstrates that NMR spin relaxation rate constants for molecules interconverting between states with different diffusion tensors can be modeled theoretically by combining orientational correlation functions for exchanging spherical molecules with locally isotropic approximations for the diffusion anisotropic tensors. The resulting expressions are validated by comparison with correlation functions obtained by Monte Carlo simulations and are accurate for moderate degrees of diffusion anisotropy typically encountered in investigations of globular proteins. The results are complementary to an elegant, but more complex, formalism that is accurate for all degrees of diffusion anisotropy [Ryabov, Y.; Clore, G. M.; Schwieters, C. D. J. Chem. Phys. 2012, 136, 034108]. PMID:25167331

  7. Magnetocardiography with a modular spin-exchange relaxation-free atomic magnetometer array.

    PubMed

    Wyllie, R; Kauer, M; Smetana, G S; Wakai, R T; Walker, T G

    2012-05-01

    We present a portable four-channel atomic magnetometer array operating in the spin-exchange relaxation-free regime. The magnetometer array has several design features intended to maximize its suitability for biomagnetic measurement, specifically foetal magnetocardiography, such as a compact modular design and fibre-coupled lasers. The modular design allows the independent positioning and orientation of each magnetometer. Using this array in a magnetically shielded room, we acquire adult magnetocadiograms. These measurements were taken with a 6-11 fT Hz(-1/2) single-channel baseline sensitivity that is consistent with the independently measured noise level of the magnetically shielded room. PMID:22504066

  8. Auxiliary matrix formalism for interaction representation transformations, optimal control, and spin relaxation theories

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, D. L.; Kuprov, Ilya

    2015-08-28

    Auxiliary matrix exponential method is used to derive simple and numerically efficient general expressions for the following, historically rather cumbersome, and hard to compute, theoretical methods: (1) average Hamiltonian theory following interaction representation transformations; (2) Bloch-Redfield-Wangsness theory of nuclear and electron relaxation; (3) gradient ascent pulse engineering version of quantum optimal control theory. In the context of spin dynamics, the auxiliary matrix exponential method is more efficient than methods based on matrix factorizations and also exhibits more favourable complexity scaling with the dimension of the Hamiltonian matrix.

  9. Solid state proton spin relaxation and methyl and t-butyl reorientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckmann, Peter A.; Al-Hallaq, Hania A.; Fry, Anne M.; Plofker, Amy L.; Roe, Brian A.; Weiss, Jessica A.

    1994-01-01

    We have measured the temperature T and Larmor frequency ω/2π dependence of the proton spin-lattice relaxation rate R in solid 1-hydroxy-2,4,6-tri-butylbenzene. The data is interpreted in terms of the rotational motion of the t-butyl groups and their constituent methyl groups. Our data is much more extensive than a previous report [J. Yamauchi and C. A. McDowell, J. Chem. Phys. 75, 1051 (1981)] resulting in a revised dynamical model and considerably larger rotational barriers. Interesting thermal history effects are discussed.

  10. A continued fraction resummation form of bath relaxation effect in the spin-boson model

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Zhihao; Tang, Zhoufei; Wu, Jianlan; Mukamel, Shaul; Cao, Jianshu

    2015-02-28

    In the spin-boson model, a continued fraction form is proposed to systematically resum high-order quantum kinetic expansion (QKE) rate kernels, accounting for the bath relaxation effect beyond the second-order perturbation. In particular, the analytical expression of the sixth-order QKE rate kernel is derived for resummation. With higher-order correction terms systematically extracted from higher-order rate kernels, the resummed quantum kinetic expansion approach in the continued fraction form extends the Pade approximation and can fully recover the exact quantum dynamics as the expansion order increases.

  11. Spin-orbit relaxation of Br ((2)P(sub 1/2))

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, R. O.; Katapski, S. M.; Perram, G. P.; Roh, W. B.; Tate, R. F.

    Pulsed and steady-state photolysis experiments have been conducted to determine the rate coefficients for collisional deactivation of the spin-orbit excited state atomic bromine, Br ((2)P(sub 1/2)). Pulsed lifetime studies for quenching by Br2 and CO2 established absolute rate coefficients at room temperature of k(sub Br2) = 1.2 +/- 10(exp -12) and k(sub CO2) = 1.5 +/- 0.3 x 10(exp -11)/cc/molecule-s. Steady-state photolysis methods were used to determine the quenching rates for the rare gases, N2, O2, H2, D2, NO, NO2, N2O, SF6, CF4, CH4, CO, CO2, COS, SO2, H2S, HBr, HCl, and HI relative to that for Br2.

  12. Interrelated emission and spin-spin relaxation feature mediated by VO+ defects in Gd2O3 nanorods subjected to swift ion impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazarika, Samiran; Mohanta, Dambarudhar

    2016-04-01

    We report on the manifestation and interconnected photoluminescence and electron paramagnetic resonance responses in gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) nanorods subjected to 80 MeV carbon ion irradiation. On increasing the irradiation fluence between 1 × 1011 and 3 × 1012 ions/cm2, the emission associated with neutral oxygen vacancies (VOx), positioned at ~350 nm, undergoes a steady increase compared to that associated with singly charged vacancies (VO+), located at ~414 nm. The enhancement of spin-spin relaxation time (τss) is ascribed to a substantial changeover from VO+ to VOx defects with irradiation, the former being recognized as the major contributor to paramagnetic centres. Interconnected luminescence and spin-spin relaxation could provide insight for making advanced nanophosphors and spin valve elements.

  13. Hyperfine-induced spin relaxation of a hopping carrier: implications for spin transport in 1-D vs 3-D organic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mkhitaryan, Vagharsh; Dobrovitski, Viatcheslav; 0 Team

    2015-03-01

    The hyperfine coupling of a carrier spin to a nuclear spin bath is a predominant channel for the carrier spin relaxation in organic semiconductors. We investigate the hyperfine-induced spin relaxation of a carrier performing a random walk on a d-dimensional regular lattice theoretically, in a transport regime typical for organic semiconductors. We show that in d = 1 and d = 2 the time dependence of spin polarization, P (t) , is dominated by a superexponential decay, crossing over to an exponential tail at long times. The faster decay is attributed to multiple self-intersections (returns) of the random walk trajectories, which occur more often in lower dimensions. We also show, analytically and numerically, that the returns lead to sensitivity of P (t) to external electric and magnetic fields, and this sensitivity strongly depends on dimensionality of the system (d = 1 vs. d = 3). Furthermore, we consider the coordinate dependence of spin polarization, σ (r) , in a hypothetic lateral or vertical organic spin-valve device. We demonstrate that, while σ (r) is essentially exponential, the effect of multiple self-intersections can be identified in transport measurements from the specific field-dependence of spin relaxation length. This work was supported by the Department of Energy-Basic Energy Sciences under Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358.

  14. Density functional study of graphene antidot lattices: Roles of geometrical relaxation and spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fürst, Joachim A.; Pedersen, Thomas G.; Brandbyge, Mads; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2009-09-01

    Graphene sheets with regular perforations, dubbed as antidot lattices, have theoretically been predicted to have a number of interesting properties. Their recent experimental realization with lattice constants below 100 nanometers stresses the urgency of a thorough understanding of their electronic properties. In this work, we perform calculations of the band structure for various hydrogen-passivated hole geometries using both spin-polarized density functional theory (DFT) and DFT based tight-binding (DFTB) and address the importance of relaxation of the structures using either method or a combination thereof. We find from DFT that all structures investigated have band gaps ranging from 0.2 to 1.5 eV. Band gap sizes and general trends are well captured by DFTB with band gaps agreeing within about 0.2 eV even for very small structures. A combination of the two methods is found to offer a good trade-off between computational cost and accuracy. Both methods predict nondegenerate midgap states for certain antidot hole symmetries. The inclusion of spin results in a spin-splitting of these states as well as magnetic moments obeying the Lieb theorem. The local-spin texture of both magnetic and nonmagnetic symmetries is addressed.

  15. Asymmetric recombination and electron spin relaxation in the semiclassical theory of radical pair reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Alan M.; Manolopoulos, David E.; Hore, P. J.

    2014-07-01

    We describe how the semiclassical theory of radical pair recombination reactions recently introduced by two of us [D. E. Manolopoulos and P. J. Hore, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 124106 (2013)] can be generalised to allow for different singlet and triplet recombination rates. This is a non-trivial generalisation because when the recombination rates are different the recombination process is dynamically coupled to the coherent electron spin dynamics of the radical pair. Furthermore, because the recombination operator is a two-electron operator, it is no longer sufficient simply to consider the two electrons as classical vectors: one has to consider the complete set of 16 two-electron spin operators as independent classical variables. The resulting semiclassical theory is first validated by comparison with exact quantum mechanical results for a model radical pair containing 12 nuclear spins. It is then used to shed light on the spin dynamics of a carotenoid-porphyrin-fullerene triad containing considerably more nuclear spins which has recently been used to establish a "proof of principle" for the operation of a chemical compass [K. Maeda, K. B. Henbest, F. Cintolesi, I. Kuprov, C. T. Rodgers, P. A. Liddell, D. Gust, C. R. Timmel, and P. J. Hore, Nature (London) 453, 387 (2008)]. We find in particular that the intriguing biphasic behaviour that has been observed in the effect of an Earth-strength magnetic field on the time-dependent survival probability of the photo-excited C.+PF.- radical pair arises from a delicate balance between its asymmetric recombination and the relaxation of the electron spin in the carotenoid radical.

  16. Asymmetric recombination and electron spin relaxation in the semiclassical theory of radical pair reactions.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Alan M; Manolopoulos, David E; Hore, P J

    2014-07-28

    We describe how the semiclassical theory of radical pair recombination reactions recently introduced by two of us [D. E. Manolopoulos and P. J. Hore, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 124106 (2013)] can be generalised to allow for different singlet and triplet recombination rates. This is a non-trivial generalisation because when the recombination rates are different the recombination process is dynamically coupled to the coherent electron spin dynamics of the radical pair. Furthermore, because the recombination operator is a two-electron operator, it is no longer sufficient simply to consider the two electrons as classical vectors: one has to consider the complete set of 16 two-electron spin operators as independent classical variables. The resulting semiclassical theory is first validated by comparison with exact quantum mechanical results for a model radical pair containing 12 nuclear spins. It is then used to shed light on the spin dynamics of a carotenoid-porphyrin-fullerene triad containing considerably more nuclear spins which has recently been used to establish a "proof of principle" for the operation of a chemical compass [K. Maeda, K. B. Henbest, F. Cintolesi, I. Kuprov, C. T. Rodgers, P. A. Liddell, D. Gust, C. R. Timmel, and P. J. Hore, Nature (London) 453, 387 (2008)]. We find in particular that the intriguing biphasic behaviour that has been observed in the effect of an Earth-strength magnetic field on the time-dependent survival probability of the photo-excited C(·+)PF(·-) radical pair arises from a delicate balance between its asymmetric recombination and the relaxation of the electron spin in the carotenoid radical. PMID:25084885

  17. Asymmetric recombination and electron spin relaxation in the semiclassical theory of radical pair reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Alan M.; Manolopoulos, David E.; Hore, P. J.

    2014-07-28

    We describe how the semiclassical theory of radical pair recombination reactions recently introduced by two of us [D. E. Manolopoulos and P. J. Hore, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 124106 (2013)] can be generalised to allow for different singlet and triplet recombination rates. This is a non-trivial generalisation because when the recombination rates are different the recombination process is dynamically coupled to the coherent electron spin dynamics of the radical pair. Furthermore, because the recombination operator is a two-electron operator, it is no longer sufficient simply to consider the two electrons as classical vectors: one has to consider the complete set of 16 two-electron spin operators as independent classical variables. The resulting semiclassical theory is first validated by comparison with exact quantum mechanical results for a model radical pair containing 12 nuclear spins. It is then used to shed light on the spin dynamics of a carotenoid-porphyrin-fullerene triad containing considerably more nuclear spins which has recently been used to establish a “proof of principle” for the operation of a chemical compass [K. Maeda, K. B. Henbest, F. Cintolesi, I. Kuprov, C. T. Rodgers, P. A. Liddell, D. Gust, C. R. Timmel, and P. J. Hore, Nature (London) 453, 387 (2008)]. We find in particular that the intriguing biphasic behaviour that has been observed in the effect of an Earth-strength magnetic field on the time-dependent survival probability of the photo-excited C{sup ·+}PF{sup ·−} radical pair arises from a delicate balance between its asymmetric recombination and the relaxation of the electron spin in the carotenoid radical.

  18. Membrane fluidity profiles as deduced by saturation-recovery EPR measurements of spin-lattice relaxation times of spin labels

    PubMed Central

    Mainali, Laxman; Feix, Jimmy B.; Hyde, James S.; Subczynski, Witold K.

    2011-01-01

    There are no easily obtainable EPR spectral parameters for lipid spin labels that describe profiles of membrane fluidity. The order parameter, which is most often used as a measure of membrane fluidity, describes the amplitude of wobbling motion of alkyl chains relative to the membrane normal and does not contain explicitly time or velocity. Thus, this parameter can be considered as nondynamic. The spin-lattice relaxation rate (T−11) obtained from saturation-recovery EPR measurements of lipid spin labels in deoxygenated samples depends primarily on the rotational correlation time of the nitroxide moiety within the lipid bilayer. Thus, T−11 can be used as a convenient quantitative measure of membrane fluidity that reflects local membrane dynamics. T−11 profiles obtained for 1-palmitoyl-2-(n-doxylstearoyl)phosphatidylcholine (n-PC) spin labels in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) membranes with and without 50 mol% cholesterol are presented in parallel with profiles of the rotational diffusion coefficient, R⊥, obtained from simulation of EPR spectra using Freed's model. These profiles are compared with profiles of the order parameter obtained directly from EPR spectra and with profiles of the order parameter obtained from simulation of EPR spectra. It is shown that T−11 and R⊥ profiles reveal changes in membrane fluidity that depend on the motional properties of the lipid alkyl chain. We find that cholesterol has a rigidifying effect only to the depth occupied by the rigid steroid ring structure and a fluidizing effect at deeper locations. These effects cannot be differentiated by profiles of the order parameter. All profiles in this study were obtained at X-band (9.5 GHz). PMID:21868272

  19. Spin relaxation measurements using first-harmonic out-of-phase absorption EPR signals: rotational motion effects.

    PubMed

    Livshits, V A; Marsh, D

    2000-07-01

    A recent survey of nonlinear continuous-wave (CW) EPR methods revealed that the first-harmonic absorption EPR signal, detected 90 degrees out of phase with respect to the Zeeman modulation (V(1)(')-EPR), is the most appropriate for determining spin-lattice relaxation enhancements of spin labels (V. A. Livshits, T. Páli, and D. Marsh, 1998, J. Magn. Reson. 134, 113-123). The sensitivity of such V(1)(')-EPR spectra to molecular rotational motion is investigated here by spectral simulations for nitroxyl spin labels, over the entire range of rotational correlation times. Determination of the effective spin-lattice relaxation times is less dependent on rotational mobility than for other nonlinear CW EPR methods, especially at a Zeeman modulation frequency of 25 kHz which is particularly appropriate for spin labels. This relative insensitivity to molecular motion further enhances the usefulness of the V(1)(')-EPR method. Calibrations of the out-of-phase to in-phase spectral intensity (and amplitude) ratios are given as a function of spin-lattice relaxation time, for the full range of spin-label rotational correlation times. Experimental measurements on spin labels in the slow, intermediate, and fast motional regimes of molecular rotation are used to test and validate the method. PMID:10873499

  20. Temperature dependent product yields for the spin forbidden singlet channel of the C(3P) + C2H2 reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickson, Kevin M.; Loison, Jean-Christophe; Wakelam, Valentine

    2016-08-01

    The atomic hydrogen formation channels of the C + C2H2 reaction have been investigated using a continuous supersonic flow reactor over the 52-296 K temperature range. H-atoms were detected directly at 121.567 nm by vacuum ultraviolet laser induced fluorescence. Absolute H-atom yields were determined by comparison with the H-atom signal generated by the C + C2H4 reaction. The product yields agree with earlier crossed beam experiments employing universal detection methods. Incorporating these branching ratios in a gas-grain model of dense interstellar clouds increases the c-C3H abundance. This reaction is a minor source of C3-containing molecules in the present simulations.

  1. Longitudinal relaxation in dipole-coupled homonuclear three-spin systems: Distinct correlations and odd spectral densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Zhiwei; Halle, Bertil

    2015-12-01

    A system of three dipole-coupled spins exhibits a surprisingly intricate relaxation behavior. Following Hubbard's pioneering 1958 study, many authors have investigated different aspects of this problem. Nevertheless, on revisiting this classic relaxation problem, we obtain several new results, some of which are at variance with conventional wisdom. Most notably from a fundamental point of view, we find that the odd-valued spectral density function influences longitudinal relaxation. We also show that the effective longitudinal relaxation rate for a non-isochronous three-spin system can exhibit an unusual inverted dispersion step. To clarify these and other issues, we present a comprehensive theoretical treatment of longitudinal relaxation in a three-spin system of arbitrary geometry and with arbitrary rotational dynamics. By using the Liouville-space formulation of Bloch-Wangsness-Redfield theory and a basis of irreducible spherical tensor operators, we show that the number of relaxation components in the different cases can be deduced from symmetry arguments. For the isochronous case, we present the relaxation matrix in analytical form, whereas, for the non-isochronous case, we employ a computationally efficient approach based on the stochastic Liouville equation.

  2. Longitudinal relaxation in dipole-coupled homonuclear three-spin systems: Distinct correlations and odd spectral densities

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Zhiwei; Halle, Bertil

    2015-12-21

    A system of three dipole-coupled spins exhibits a surprisingly intricate relaxation behavior. Following Hubbard’s pioneering 1958 study, many authors have investigated different aspects of this problem. Nevertheless, on revisiting this classic relaxation problem, we obtain several new results, some of which are at variance with conventional wisdom. Most notably from a fundamental point of view, we find that the odd-valued spectral density function influences longitudinal relaxation. We also show that the effective longitudinal relaxation rate for a non-isochronous three-spin system can exhibit an unusual inverted dispersion step. To clarify these and other issues, we present a comprehensive theoretical treatment of longitudinal relaxation in a three-spin system of arbitrary geometry and with arbitrary rotational dynamics. By using the Liouville-space formulation of Bloch-Wangsness-Redfield theory and a basis of irreducible spherical tensor operators, we show that the number of relaxation components in the different cases can be deduced from symmetry arguments. For the isochronous case, we present the relaxation matrix in analytical form, whereas, for the non-isochronous case, we employ a computationally efficient approach based on the stochastic Liouville equation.

  3. Unconventional superconductivity in Y5Rh6Sn18 probed by muon spin relaxation.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Amitava; Adroja, Devashibhai; Kase, Naoki; Hillier, Adrian; Akimitsu, Jun; Strydom, Andre

    2015-01-01

    Conventional superconductors are robust diamagnets that expel magnetic fields through the Meissner effect. It would therefore be unexpected if a superconducting ground state would support spontaneous magnetics fields. Such broken time-reversal symmetry states have been suggested for the high-temperature superconductors, but their identification remains experimentally controversial. We present magnetization, heat capacity, zero field and transverse field muon spin relaxation experiments on the recently discovered caged type superconductor Y5Rh6Sn18 ( TC= 3.0 K). The electronic heat capacity of Y5Rh6Sn18 shows a T(3) dependence below Tc indicating an anisotropic superconducting gap with a point node. This result is in sharp contrast to that observed in the isostructural Lu5Rh6Sn18 which is a strong coupling s-wave superconductor. The temperature dependence of the deduced superfluid in density Y5Rh6Sn18 is consistent with a BCS s-wave gap function, while the zero-field muon spin relaxation measurements strongly evidences unconventional superconductivity through a spontaneous appearance of an internal magnetic field below the superconducting transition temperature, signifying that the superconducting state is categorized by the broken time-reversal symmetry. PMID:26286229

  4. Unconventional superconductivity in Y5Rh6Sn18 probed by muon spin relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Amitava; Adroja, Devashibhai; Kase, Naoki; Hillier, Adrian; Akimitsu, Jun; Strydom, Andre

    2015-08-01

    Conventional superconductors are robust diamagnets that expel magnetic fields through the Meissner effect. It would therefore be unexpected if a superconducting ground state would support spontaneous magnetics fields. Such broken time-reversal symmetry states have been suggested for the high—temperature superconductors, but their identification remains experimentally controversial. We present magnetization, heat capacity, zero field and transverse field muon spin relaxation experiments on the recently discovered caged type superconductor Y5Rh6Sn18 ( TC= 3.0 K). The electronic heat capacity of Y5Rh6Sn18 shows a T3 dependence below Tc indicating an anisotropic superconducting gap with a point node. This result is in sharp contrast to that observed in the isostructural Lu5Rh6Sn18 which is a strong coupling s—wave superconductor. The temperature dependence of the deduced superfluid in density Y5Rh6Sn18 is consistent with a BCS s—wave gap function, while the zero-field muon spin relaxation measurements strongly evidences unconventional superconductivity through a spontaneous appearance of an internal magnetic field below the superconducting transition temperature, signifying that the superconducting state is categorized by the broken time-reversal symmetry.

  5. Unconventional superconductivity in Y5Rh6Sn18 probed by muon spin relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Amitava; Adroja, Devashibhai; Kase, Naoki; Hillier, Adrian; Akimitsu, Jun; Strydom, Andre

    2015-01-01

    Conventional superconductors are robust diamagnets that expel magnetic fields through the Meissner effect. It would therefore be unexpected if a superconducting ground state would support spontaneous magnetics fields. Such broken time-reversal symmetry states have been suggested for the high—temperature superconductors, but their identification remains experimentally controversial. We present magnetization, heat capacity, zero field and transverse field muon spin relaxation experiments on the recently discovered caged type superconductor Y5Rh6Sn18 ( TC= 3.0 K). The electronic heat capacity of Y5Rh6Sn18 shows a T3 dependence below Tc indicating an anisotropic superconducting gap with a point node. This result is in sharp contrast to that observed in the isostructural Lu5Rh6Sn18 which is a strong coupling s—wave superconductor. The temperature dependence of the deduced superfluid in density Y5Rh6Sn18 is consistent with a BCS s—wave gap function, while the zero-field muon spin relaxation measurements strongly evidences unconventional superconductivity through a spontaneous appearance of an internal magnetic field below the superconducting transition temperature, signifying that the superconducting state is categorized by the broken time-reversal symmetry. PMID:26286229

  6. Higher triplet state of fullerene C{sub 70} revealed by electron spin relaxation

    SciTech Connect

    Uvarov, Mikhail N.; Behrends, Jan; Kulik, Leonid V.

    2015-12-28

    Spin-lattice relaxation times T{sub 1} of photoexcited triplets {sup 3}C{sub 70} in glassy decalin were obtained from electron spin echo inversion recovery dependences. In the range 30–100 K, the temperature dependence of T{sub 1} was fitted by the Arrhenius law with an activation energy of 172 cm{sup −1}. This indicates that the dominant relaxation process of {sup 3}C{sub 70} is described by an Orbach-Aminov mechanism involving the higher triplet state t{sub 2} which lies 172 cm{sup −1} above the lowest triplet state t{sub 1}. Chemical modification of C{sub 70} fullerene not only decreases the intrinsic triplet lifetime by about ten times but also increases T{sub 1} by several orders of magnitude. The reason for this is the presence of a low-lying excited triplet state in {sup 3}C{sub 70} and its absence in triplet C{sub 70} derivatives. The presence of the higher triplet state in C{sub 70} is in good agreement with the previous results from phosphorescence spectroscopy.

  7. Zero-field spin relaxation of the positive muon in copper

    SciTech Connect

    Clawson, C.W.

    1982-07-01

    The spin relaxation of the ..mu../sup +/ in high purity single crystal and polycrystalline copper has been measured at temperatures between 0.5/sup 0/K and 5.2/sup 0/K by the zero-field ..mu../sup +/SR technique. In both types of sample the experiments show a temperature independent dipolar width ..delta../sub z/ = 0.389 +- 0.003 ..mu..s/sup -1/ and a hopping rate decreasing from approx. 0.5 ..mu..s/sup -1/ at 0.5/sup 0/K to approx. 0.05 ..mu..s/sup -1/ above 5/sup 0/K. This is the first direct proof of a dynamic effect in the low temperature ..mu../sup +/ spin relaxation in copper. The relationship between the zero-field and transverse-field dipolar widths is discussed, and the measured zero-field width is found to be approx. 10% larger than expected based on the known transverse-field widths. A new ..mu../sup +/SR spectrometer has been constructed and used in this work. The spectrometer and the associated beam lines and data acquisition facilities are discussed.

  8. Mechanism of nuclear spin-lattice relaxation and its field dependence for ultraslow atomic motion

    SciTech Connect

    Mefed, A. E.

    2008-10-15

    The contribution of ultraslow self-diffusion of polycrystalline benzene molecules to the spin-lattice relaxation of protons is studied as a function of effective magnetic field H{sub 2} in a doubly rotating frame (DRF). Proton relaxation time T{sub 1{rho}}{sub {rho}} is measured by direct recording of NMR in a rotating frame (RF). The effective fields have a 'magic' orientation corresponding to angles arccos(1/{radical}3) in the RF and {pi}/2 in the DRF so that the secular part of the dipole-dipole interactions of protons is suppressed in two orders of perturbation theory, while the nonsecular part becomes predominant. It is found that the diffusion contribution of benzene molecules to proton relaxation time T{sub 1{rho}}{sub {rho}} is a linear function of the square of field H{sub 2} and exhibits all peculiarities typical of the model of strong collisions generalized to only fluctuating nonsecular dipole interactions in fields exceeding the local field. This means that the model can also be employed in the given conditions. It is shown that perfect agreement with such a dependence can also be obtained in the model of weak collisions if we take into account the concept of the locally effective quantization field, whose magnitude and direction are controlled by the vector sum of field H{sub 2}, and the nonsecular local field perpendicular to it.

  9. Far-from-Equilibrium Field Theory of Many-Body Quantum Spin Systems: Prethermalization and Relaxation of Spin Spiral States in Three Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babadi, Mehrtash; Demler, Eugene; Knap, Michael

    2015-10-01

    We study theoretically the far-from-equilibrium relaxation dynamics of spin spiral states in the three-dimensional isotropic Heisenberg model. The investigated problem serves as an archetype for understanding quantum dynamics of isolated many-body systems in the vicinity of a spontaneously broken continuous symmetry. We present a field-theoretical formalism that systematically improves on the mean field for describing the real-time quantum dynamics of generic spin-1 /2 systems. This is achieved by mapping spins to Majorana fermions followed by a 1 /N expansion of the resulting two-particle-irreducible effective action. Our analysis reveals rich fluctuation-induced relaxation dynamics in the unitary evolution of spin spiral states. In particular, we find the sudden appearance of long-lived prethermalized plateaus with diverging lifetimes as the spiral winding is tuned toward the thermodynamically stable ferro- or antiferromagnetic phases. The emerging prethermalized states are characterized by different bosonic modes being thermally populated at different effective temperatures and by a hierarchical relaxation process reminiscent of glassy systems. Spin-spin correlators found by solving the nonequilibrium Bethe-Salpeter equation provide further insight into the dynamic formation of correlations, the fate of unstable collective modes, and the emergence of fluctuation-dissipation relations. Our predictions can be verified experimentally using recent realizations of spin spiral states with ultracold atoms in a quantum gas microscope [S. Hild et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 147205 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.147205].

  10. Coexisting static magnetic ordering and superconductivity in CeCu2.1Si2 found by muon spin relaxation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uemura, Y. J.; Kossler, W. J.; Yu, X. H.; Schone, H. E.; Kempton, J. R.; Stronach, C. E.; Barth, S.; Gygax, F. N.; Hitti, B.; Schenck, A.

    1988-01-01

    Zero- and longitudinal-field muon spin relaxation measurements on a heavy fermion system CeCu2.1 Si2 have revealed an onset of static magnetic ordering below T(M) approximately 0.8 K, which coexists with superconductivity below T(c) = 0.7 K. The line shapes of the observed muon spin depolarization functions suggest an ordering in either spin glass or incommensurate spin-density-wave state, with a small averaged static moment of the order of 0.1 micro-B per formula unit at T approaches 0.

  11. Calculation of the transport properties of carbon dioxide. III. Volume viscosity, depolarized Rayleigh scattering, and nuclear spin relaxation.

    PubMed

    Bock, Steffen; Bich, Eckard; Vogel, Eckhard; Dickinson, Alan S; Vesovic, Velisa

    2004-09-01

    Transport properties of pure carbon dioxide have been calculated from the intermolecular potential using the classical trajectory method. Results are reported in the dilute-gas limit for volume viscosity, depolarized Rayleigh scattering, and nuclear spin relaxation for temperatures ranging from 200 to 1000 K. Three recent carbon dioxide potential energy hypersurfaces have been investigated. Calculated values for the rotational collision number for all three intermolecular surfaces are consistent with the measurements and indicate that the temperature dependence of the Brau-Jonkman correlation is not applicable for carbon dioxide. The results for the depolarized Rayleigh scattering cross section and the nuclear spin relaxation cross section show that calculated values for the generally more successful potentials differ from the observations by 9% at about 290 K, although agreement is obtained for nuclear spin relaxation at about 400 K. PMID:15332957

  12. Theory of nuclear spin-lattice relaxation in La2CuO4 at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokol, A.; Gagliano, E.; Bacci, S.

    1993-06-01

    The nuclear-spin-lattice relaxation in La2CuO4 is reexamined in connection with the recent measurements of the NQR relaxation rate for temperatures up to 900 K [T. Imai, C. P. Slichter, K. Yoshimura, and K. Kosuge, Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 1002 (1993)]. We use an approach based on the exact diagonalization for the Heisenberg model to calculate the short-wavelength contribution to the relaxation rate in the high-temperature region, T>~J/2. It is shown that the spin diffusion accounts for approximately 10% of the total relaxation rate at 900 K and would beome dominant for T>J. The calculated 1/T1 is in good agreement with the experiment both in terms of the absolute value and temperature dependence.

  13. Pb207 spin-lattice relaxation in solid PbMoO4 and PbCl2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckmann, Peter A.; Bai, Shi; Vega, Alexander J.; Dybowski, Cecil

    2006-12-01

    We have measured the Pb207 nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate R as a function of temperature T at two nuclear magnetic resonance frequencies ω0 in the ionic solids lead molybdate (PbMoO4) and lead chloride (PbCl2) . R is unexpectedly large, proportional to T2 , and independent of ω0 . Taken together with previous work in lead nitrate [Pb(NO3)2] , these results show that the relaxation does not depend on the nature or rotational motion of the counterion, particularly since the counterion in lead chloride is a single chlorine atom. The theory that explains the observed relaxation rate is reviewed. A second-order Raman process dominates the observed relaxation process. It involves the modulation of the spin-rotation interaction by the lattice vibrations.

  14. Spin-Wave Resonance and Relaxation in CoFeB/Cr Superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yu; Cevher, Zehra; Ren, Yuhang; Imrane, Hassan; Sun, Nian X.

    2009-03-01

    We investigated the magnetic anisotropic properties and the spin wave relaxation in ten periods of CoFeB/Cr/CoFeB films grown on seed layers of Cu (˜ 5 nm) with Co : Fe : B composition ratio as 2:2:1. The measurements were taken in samples with 50-angstrom layers of CoFeB using both the time-resolved pump-probe magneto-optical sampling and the ferromagnetic resonance techniques. The thickness of the Cr interlayers ranges from 4-angstrom to 40-angstrom for investigating the mechanisms of interlayer coupling and exchange interactions. Both the acoustic branch and the optical branch in spin wave resonance spectra are identified. We determine the magnetic anisotropic parameters by measuring spin wave frequency as a function of external magnetic field in the time domain and by orthogonally rotating the field aligned axis with respect to the spectral field in the frequency domain. Moreover, we estimate the intrinsic Gilbert damping for the in-plane magnetization orientation. When the interlayer coupling is weaker, the damping increases significantly.

  15. Magnetic anisotropy and spin wave relaxation in CoFe/PtMn/CoFe trilayer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Y. H.; Wu, C.; Gong, Y.; Pettiford, C.; Sun, N. X.

    2009-04-01

    We investigated the magnetic anisotropic properties and the spin wave relaxation in trilayer films of CoFe/PtMn/CoFe grown on the seed layer Ru or NiFeCr with CoFe compositions being Co-16 at. % Fe. The measurements were taken in samples with the ferromagnetic layers of CoFe varying from 10 to 500 Å by the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) technique. The magnetic anisotropic parameters were investigated by rotating the field aligned axis with respect to the spectral field in the configurations of both in plane and out of plane. We determine the effective in-plane anisotropy field of ˜0.005 T, the uniaxial out-of-plane anisotropy of ˜-0.3 T, and the exchange stiffness D of ˜512 meV Å2. Moreover, spin wave damping was estimated by analyzing the FMR linewidth and line shape as a function of the angle between the external field and easy axis and as a function of the thickness of the CoFe layers. We identify an extrinsic contribution of the damping parameter dominated by two-magnon scattering in addition to the intrinsic Gilbert term with a damping parameter, α =0.012. Further, we reveal that a significant linewidth broadening could also be caused by the overlap of the surface and the uniform spin wave excitations. The FMR lines show a strong dependence of the surface anisotropy contribution of free energy in trilayer films.

  16. Room-temperature electron spin relaxation of nitroxides immobilized in trehalose: Effect of substituents adjacent to NO-group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzhelev, Andrey A.; Strizhakov, Rodion K.; Krumkacheva, Olesya A.; Polienko, Yuliya F.; Morozov, Denis A.; Shevelev, Georgiy Yu.; Pyshnyi, Dmitrii V.; Kirilyuk, Igor A.; Fedin, Matvey V.; Bagryanskaya, Elena G.

    2016-05-01

    Trehalose has been recently promoted as efficient immobilizer of biomolecules for room-temperature EPR studies, including distance measurements between attached nitroxide spin labels. Generally, the structure of nitroxide influences the electron spin relaxation times, being crucial parameters for room-temperature pulse EPR measurements. Therefore, in this work we investigated a series of nitroxides with different substituents adjacent to NO-moiety including spirocyclohexane, spirocyclopentane, tetraethyl and tetramethyl groups. Electron spin relaxation times (T1, Tm) of these radicals immobilized in trehalose were measured at room temperature at X- and Q-bands (9/34 GHz). In addition, a comparison was made with the corresponding relaxation times in nitroxide-labeled DNA immobilized in trehalose. In all cases phase memory times Tm were close to 700 ns and did not essentially depend on structure of substituents. Comparison of temperature dependences of Tm at T = 80-300 K shows that the benefit of spirocyclohexane substituents well-known at medium temperatures (∼100-180 K) becomes negligible at 300 K. Therefore, unless there are specific interactions between spin labels and biomolecules, the room-temperature value of Tm in trehalose is weakly dependent on the structure of substituents adjacent to NO-moiety of nitroxide. The issues of specific interactions and stability of nitroxide labels in biological media might be more important for room temperature pulsed dipolar EPR than differences in intrinsic spin relaxation of radicals.

  17. New technique for single-scan T1 measurements using solid echoes. [for spin-lattice relaxation time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burum, D. P.; Elleman, D. D.; Rhim, W. K.

    1978-01-01

    A simple technique for single-scan T1 measurements in solids is proposed and analyzed for single exponential spin-lattice relaxation. In this technique, the direct spin heating caused by the sampling process is significantly reduced in comparison with conventional techniques by utilizing the 'solid echo' to refocus the magnetization. The applicability of this technique to both the solid and liquid phases is demonstrated.

  18. Optical Transient-Grating Measurements of Spin Diffusion andRelaxation in a Two-Dimensional Electron Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Christopher P.

    2005-12-15

    Spin diffusion in n-GaAs quantum wells, as measured by our optical transient-grating technique, is strongly suppressed relative to that of charge. Over a broad range of temperatures and dopings, the suppression of Ds relative to Dc agrees quantitatively with the prediction of ''spin Coulomb dra'' theory, which takes into account the exchange of spin in electron-electron collisions. Moreover, the spin-diffusion length, Ls, is a nearly constant 1 micrometer over the same range of T and n, despite Ds's varying by nearly two orders of magnitude. This constancy supports the D'yakonov-Perel'-Kachorovskii model of spin relaxation through interrupted precessional dephasing in the spin-orbit field.

  19. Study of the operation temperature in the spin-exchange relaxation free magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Jiancheng; Li, Rujie Duan, Lihong; Chen, Yao; Quan, Wei

    2015-07-15

    We study the influence of the cell temperature on the sensitivity of the spin-exchange relaxation free (SERF) magnetometer and analyze the possibility of operating at a low temperature. Utilizing a 25 × 25 × 25 mm{sup 3} Cs vapor cell with a heating temperature of 85 {sup ∘}C, which is almost half of the value of potassium, we obtain a linewidth of 1.37 Hz and achieve a magnetic field sensitivity of 55 fT/Hz{sup 1/2} in a single channel. Theoretical analysis shows that fundamental sensitivity limits of this device with an active volume of 1 cm{sup 3} could approach 1 fT/Hz{sup 1/2}. Taking advantage of the higher saturated vapor pressure, SERF magnetometer based on Cs opens up the possibility for low cost and portable sensors and is particularly appropriate for lower temperature applications.

  20. Study of the operation temperature in the spin-exchange relaxation free magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jiancheng; Li, Rujie; Duan, Lihong; Chen, Yao; Quan, Wei

    2015-07-01

    We study the influence of the cell temperature on the sensitivity of the spin-exchange relaxation free (SERF) magnetometer and analyze the possibility of operating at a low temperature. Utilizing a 25 × 25 × 25 mm(3) Cs vapor cell with a heating temperature of 85 °C, which is almost half of the value of potassium, we obtain a linewidth of 1.37 Hz and achieve a magnetic field sensitivity of 55 fT/Hz(1/2) in a single channel. Theoretical analysis shows that fundamental sensitivity limits of this device with an active volume of 1 cm(3) could approach 1 fT/Hz(1/2). Taking advantage of the higher saturated vapor pressure, SERF magnetometer based on Cs opens up the possibility for low cost and portable sensors and is particularly appropriate for lower temperature applications. PMID:26233365

  1. Room-Temperature Electron Spin Relaxation of Triarylmethyl Radicals at the X- and Q-Bands.

    PubMed

    Kuzhelev, Andrey A; Trukhin, Dmitry V; Krumkacheva, Olesya A; Strizhakov, Rodion K; Rogozhnikova, Olga Yu; Troitskaya, Tatiana I; Fedin, Matvey V; Tormyshev, Victor M; Bagryanskaya, Elena G

    2015-10-29

    Triarylmethyl radicals (trityls, TAMs) represent a relatively new class of spin labels. The long relaxation of trityls at room temperature in liquid solutions makes them a promising alternative for traditional nitroxides. In this work we have synthesized a series of TAMs including perdeuterated Finland trityl (D36 form), mono-, di-, and triester derivatives of Finland-D36 trityl, the deuterated form of OX63, the dodeca-n-butyl homologue of Finland trityl, and triamide derivatives of Finland trityl with primary and secondary amines attached. We have studied room-temperature relaxation properties of these TAMs in liquids using pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) at two microwave frequency bands. We have found the clear dependence of phase memory time (Tm ∼ T2) on the magnetic field: room-temperature Tm values are ∼1.5-2.5 times smaller at the Q-band (34 GHz, 1.2 T) than at the X-band (9 GHz, 0.3 T). This trend is ascribed to the contribution from g-anisotropy that is negligible at lower magnetic fields but comes into play at the Q-band. In agreement with this, the difference between T1 and Tm becomes more pronounced at the Q-band than at the X-band due to increased contributions from incomplete motional averaging of g-anisotropy. Linear dependence of (1/Tm - 1/T1) on viscosity implies that g-anisotropy is modulated by rotational motion of the trityl radical. On the basis of the analysis of previous data and results of the present work, we conclude that, in the general situation where the spin label is at least partly mobile, the X-band is most suitable for application of trityls for room-temperature pulsed EPR distance measurements. PMID:26001103

  2. Transverse spin relaxation and diffusion-constant measurements of spin-polarized 129Xe nuclei in the presence of a magnetic field gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaohu; Chen, Chang; Qu, Tianliang; Yang, Kaiyong; Luo, Hui

    2016-04-01

    The presence of a magnetic field gradient in a sample cell containing spin-polarized 129Xe atoms will cause an increased relaxation rate. We measured the transverse spin relaxation time of 129Xe verse the applied magnetic field gradient and the cell temperature. We then compared the different transverse spin relaxation behavior of dual isotopes of xenon (129Xe and 131Xe) due to magnetic field gradient in the same cell. The experiment results show the residual magnetic field gradient can be measured and compensated by applying a negative magnetic gradient in the sample cell. The transverse spin relaxation time of 129Xe could be increased 2–7 times longer when applying an appropriate magnetic field gradient. The experiment results can also be used to determine the diffusion constant of 129Xe in H2 and N2 to be 0.4 ± 0.26 cm2/sec and 0.12 ± 0.02 cm2/sec. The results are close with theoretical calculation.

  3. Transverse spin relaxation and diffusion-constant measurements of spin-polarized 129Xe nuclei in the presence of a magnetic field gradient.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaohu; Chen, Chang; Qu, Tianliang; Yang, Kaiyong; Luo, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The presence of a magnetic field gradient in a sample cell containing spin-polarized (129)Xe atoms will cause an increased relaxation rate. We measured the transverse spin relaxation time of (129)Xe verse the applied magnetic field gradient and the cell temperature. We then compared the different transverse spin relaxation behavior of dual isotopes of xenon ((129)Xe and (131)Xe) due to magnetic field gradient in the same cell. The experiment results show the residual magnetic field gradient can be measured and compensated by applying a negative magnetic gradient in the sample cell. The transverse spin relaxation time of (129)Xe could be increased 2-7 times longer when applying an appropriate magnetic field gradient. The experiment results can also be used to determine the diffusion constant of (129)Xe in H2 and N2 to be 0.4 ± 0.26 cm(2)/sec and 0.12 ± 0.02 cm(2)/sec. The results are close with theoretical calculation. PMID:27049237

  4. Transverse spin relaxation and diffusion-constant measurements of spin-polarized 129Xe nuclei in the presence of a magnetic field gradient

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaohu; Chen, Chang; Qu, Tianliang; Yang, Kaiyong; Luo, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The presence of a magnetic field gradient in a sample cell containing spin-polarized 129Xe atoms will cause an increased relaxation rate. We measured the transverse spin relaxation time of 129Xe verse the applied magnetic field gradient and the cell temperature. We then compared the different transverse spin relaxation behavior of dual isotopes of xenon (129Xe and 131Xe) due to magnetic field gradient in the same cell. The experiment results show the residual magnetic field gradient can be measured and compensated by applying a negative magnetic gradient in the sample cell. The transverse spin relaxation time of 129Xe could be increased 2–7 times longer when applying an appropriate magnetic field gradient. The experiment results can also be used to determine the diffusion constant of 129Xe in H2 and N2 to be 0.4 ± 0.26 cm2/sec and 0.12 ± 0.02 cm2/sec. The results are close with theoretical calculation. PMID:27049237

  5. Distribution of Pico- and Nanosecond Motions in Disordered Proteins from Nuclear Spin Relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Shahid N.; Charlier, Cyril; Augustyniak, Rafal; Salvi, Nicola; Déjean, Victoire; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Lequin, Olivier; Pelupessy, Philippe; Ferrage, Fabien

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins and intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) are ubiquitous in the eukaryotic proteome. The description and understanding of their conformational properties require the development of new experimental, computational, and theoretical approaches. Here, we use nuclear spin relaxation to investigate the distribution of timescales of motions in an IDR from picoseconds to nanoseconds. Nitrogen-15 relaxation rates have been measured at five magnetic fields, ranging from 9.4 to 23.5 T (400–1000 MHz for protons). This exceptional wealth of data allowed us to map the spectral density function for the motions of backbone NH pairs in the partially disordered transcription factor Engrailed at 11 different frequencies. We introduce an approach called interpretation of motions by a projection onto an array of correlation times (IMPACT), which focuses on an array of six correlation times with intervals that are equidistant on a logarithmic scale between 21 ps and 21 ns. The distribution of motions in Engrailed varies smoothly along the protein sequence and is multimodal for most residues, with a prevalence of motions around 1 ns in the IDR. We show that IMPACT often provides better quantitative agreement with experimental data than conventional model-free or extended model-free analyses with two or three correlation times. We introduce a graphical representation that offers a convenient platform for a qualitative discussion of dynamics. Even when relaxation data are only acquired at three magnetic fields that are readily accessible, the IMPACT analysis gives a satisfactory characterization of spectral density functions, thus opening the way to a broad use of this approach. PMID:26331256

  6. Importance of cross-correlated relaxation in the spectra of simple organofluorine compounds: Spectral complexity of A3B3X spin systems compared to ABX spin systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alemany, Lawrence B.; Malloy, Thomas B.; Nunes, Megan M.; Zaibaq, Nicholas G.

    2012-09-01

    In a continuation of our initial investigation of the complex 13C and 19F spectra exhibited by two simple organofluorine compounds, additional organofluorine compounds expected to exhibit a wide range of spectral complexity were studied. Spectral simulations are critical for analyzing the more complex spin systems, in particular, A3B3X and A6B3X. Cross-correlated relaxation is commonly observed; examples of 13Csbnd 19F cross-correlated relaxation are shown with the signals for each nucleus exhibiting unequal relaxation rates. Higher order effects are particularly noticeable in the spectra of perfluoro-t-butyl alcohol because of a large 4JFF value in the (13CF3)(12CF3)212COH isotopomer. The many additional transitions in an A3B3X spin system compared to an ABX spin system result in much more complex 19F (A3 and B3) and 13C (X) spectra, even though only three types of nuclei are involved in each spin system. The corresponding protio compounds typically constitute a much simpler A3M3X spin system because the long-range nJHH coupling (n ⩾ 4) is much smaller than the corresponding long-range nJFF coupling. Spectra previously published for ethane-1-13C (A3B3X) and hexafluoroethane-1-13C (A3M3X) are notable exceptions and are discussed.

  7. Determination of Spin-Lattice Relaxation of Time Using (Super 13)C NMR: An Undergraduate Physical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gasyna, Zbigniew L.; Jurkiewicz, Antoni

    2004-01-01

    An experiment designed for the physical chemistry laboratory where (super 13)C NMR is applied to determine the spin-lattice relaxation time for carbon atoms in n-hexanol is proposed. It is concluded that students learn the principles and concepts of NMR spectroscopy as well as dynamic NMR experiments.

  8. An NMR thermometer for cryogenic magic-angle spinning NMR: The spin-lattice relaxation of 127I in cesium iodide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Riddhiman; Concistrè, Maria; Johannessen, Ole G.; Beckett, Peter; Denning, Mark; Carravetta, Marina; al-Mosawi, Maitham; Beduz, Carlo; Yang, Yifeng; Levitt, Malcolm H.

    2011-10-01

    The accurate temperature measurement of solid samples under magic-angle spinning (MAS) is difficult in the cryogenic regime. It has been demonstrated by Thurber et al. (J. Magn. Reson., 196 (2009) 84-87) [10] that the temperature dependent spin-lattice relaxation time constant of 79Br in KBr powder can be useful for measuring sample temperature under MAS over a wide temperature range (20-296 K). However the value of T1 exceeds 3 min at temperatures below 20 K, which is inconveniently long. In this communication, we show that the spin-lattice relaxation time constant of 127I in CsI powder can be used to accurately measure sample temperature under MAS within a reasonable experimental time down to 10 K.

  9. The spin relaxation of nitrogen donors in 6H SiC crystals as studied by the electron spin echo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savchenko, D.; Shanina, B.; Kalabukhova, E.; Pöppl, A.; Lančok, J.; Mokhov, E.

    2016-04-01

    We present the detailed study of the spin kinetics of the nitrogen (N) donor electrons in 6H SiC wafers grown by the Lely method and by the sublimation "sandwich method" (SSM) with a donor concentration of about 1017 cm-3 at T = 10-40 K. The donor electrons of the N donors substituting quasi-cubic "k1" and "k2" sites (Nk1,k2) in both types of the samples revealed the similar temperature dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation rate (T1-1), which was described by the direct one-phonon and two-phonon processes induced by the acoustic phonons proportional to T and to T9, respectively. The character of the temperature dependence of the T1-1 for the donor electrons of N substituting hexagonal ("h") site (Nh) in both types of 6H SiC samples indicates that the donor electrons relax through the fast-relaxing centers by means of the cross-relaxation process. The observed enhancement of the phase memory relaxation rate (Tm-1) with the temperature increase for the Nh donors in both types of the samples, as well as for the Nk1,k2 donors in Lely grown 6H SiC, was explained by the growth of the free electron concentration with the temperature increase and their exchange scattering at the N donor centers. The observed significant shortening of the phase memory relaxation time Tm for the Nk1,k2 donors in the SSM grown sample with the temperature lowering is caused by hopping motion of the electrons between the occupied and unoccupied states of the N donors at Nh and Nk1,k2 sites. The impact of the N donor pairs, triads, distant donor pairs formed in n-type 6H SiC wafers on the spin relaxation times was discussed.

  10. PREFACE: 13th International Conference on Muon Spin Rotation, Relaxation and Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-12-01

    The 13th International Conference on Muon Spin Rotation, Relaxation and Resonance (μSR2014) organized by the Laboratory for Muon Spin Spectroscopy, Paul Scherrer Institute in collaboration with the University of Zurich and the University of Fribourg, was held in Grindelwald, Switzerland from 1st to 6th June 2014. The conference provided a forum for researchers from around the world with interests in the applications of μSR to study a wide range of topics including condensed matter physics, materials and molecular sciences, chemistry and biology. Polarized muons provide a unique and versatile probe of matter, enabling studies at the atomic level of electronic structure and dynamics in a wide range of systems. The conference was the thirteenth in a series, which began in Rorschach in 1978 and it took place for the third time in Switzerland. The previous conferences were held in Cancun, Mexico (2011), Tsukuba, Japan (2008), Oxford, UK (2005), Williamsburg, USA (2002), Les Diablerets, Switzerland (1999), Nikko, Japan (1996), Maui, USA (1993), Oxford, UK (1990), Uppsala, Sweden (1986), Shimoda, Japan (1983), Vancouver, Canada (1980), and Rorschach, Switzerland (1978). These conference proceedings contain 67 refereed publications from presentations covering magnetism, superconductivity, chemistry, semiconductors, biophysics and techniques. The conference logo, displayed in the front pages of these proceedings, represents both the location of μSR2014 in the Alps and the muon-spin rotation technique. The silhouette represents the famous local mountains Eiger, Mönch and Jungfrau as drawn by the Swiss painter Ferdinand Hodler and the apple with arrow is at the same time a citation of the Wilhelm Tell legend and a remembrance of the key role played by the muon spin and the asymmetric muon decay (which for the highest positron energy has an apple like shape). More than 160 participants (including 32 registered as students and 13 as accompanying persons) from 19 countries

  11. Extension of the Rorschach-Hazlewood Theoretical Model for Spin-Lattice Relaxation in Biological Systems to Low Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackmann, Andreas; Ailion, David C.; Ganesan, Krishnamurthy; Laicher, Gernot; Goodrich, K. Craig; Cutillo, Antonio G.

    1996-02-01

    The water-biopolymer cross-relaxation model, proposed by H. E. Rorschach and C. F. Hazlewood (RH) [J. Magn. Reson.70,79 (1986)], explains the Larmor frequency dependence ofT1in many biological systems. However, the RH theory fails at low Larmor frequencies. In this paper, a more general version of the RH theory has been developed. This theory is valid at all frequencies. Use of the new expression for the spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/T1), earlier published experimental data in H2O/D2O bovine serum albumin, which had been measured over a wide frequency range (10 kHz to 100 MHz), were fitted over the entire frequency range. The agreement between theory and the experimental data is excellent. Theoretical expressions for the rotating-frame spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/T1ρ) were also obtained.

  12. Raman spin lattice relaxation time and Debye temperature studies of Cr in ammonium cobalt sulphate hexahydrate single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravi, S.; Subramanian, P.

    2007-08-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) of Cr doped in (NH4)Co(SO4)·6H2O single crystal has been studied using Q band EPR spectrometer to find spin lattice relaxation time (SLRT) (T1). The observation of resolved chromium spectra at room temperature has been interpreted in terms of random modulation of interaction between trivalent chromium and divalent cobalt ions by SLRT of cobalt ions. The relaxation time of the host is found to be 6.95×10s using Mitsuma theory and 9.85×10s using Misra et al. approach at room temperature (300 K). Debye temperature of the host lattice is evaluated using electron spin lattice relaxation processes. It is found that the Debye temperature of the host is 110 K.

  13. Determination of transverse relaxation rates in systems with scalar-coupled spins: The role of antiphase coherences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segawa, Takuya F.; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2013-12-01

    Homogeneous line-widths that arise from transverse relaxation tend to be masked by B0 field inhomogeneity and by multiplets due to homonuclear J-couplings. Besides well-known spin-locking sequences that lead to signals that decay with a rate R1ρ without any modulations, alternative experiments allow one to determine the transverse relaxation rates R2 in systems with scalar-coupled spins. We evaluate three recent strategies by experiment and simulation: (i) moderate-amplitude SITCOM-CPMG sequences (Dittmer and Bodenhausen, 2006 [2]), (ii) multiple-quantum filtered (MQF) sequences (Barrère et al., 2011 [4]) and (iii) PROJECT sequences (Aguilar et al., 2012 [5]). Experiments where the J-evolution is suppressed by spin-locking measure the pure relaxation rate R2(Ix) of an in-phase component. Experiments based on J-refocusing yield a mixture of in-phase rates R2(Ix) and antiphase rates R2(2IySz), where the latter are usually faster than the former. Moderate-amplitude SITCOM-CPMG and PROJECT methods can be applied to systems with many coupled spins, but applications of MQF sequences are limited to two-spin systems since modulations in larger systems can only partly be suppressed.

  14. Spin and phase relaxation dynamics in GaN and GaN/AlGaN quantum wells (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallart, Mathieu; Ziegler, Marc; Hönerlage, Bernd H.; Gilliot, Pierre; Feltin, Eric; Carlin, Jean-François; Butté, Raphaël.; Grandjean, Nicolas

    2015-09-01

    By performing time-resolved optical non-degenerate pump-probe experiments, we study the relaxation dynamics of spin-polarized excitons in wurtzite epitaxial GaN and in nitride nanostructures. Those materials are indeed promising candidates for spintronic applications because of their weak spin-orbit coupling and large exciton binding energy (~ 17 meV and ~ 26meV in bulk GaN, respectively). In epilayers, we show that the high density of dislocations increases dramatically the spin relaxation of electrons and holes through the defect assisted Elliott-Yafet mechanism. That makes the exciton dephasing time very short. In high quality GaN/AlGaN quantum wells, both the exciton-spin lifetime S and the exciton dephasing-time T2 were determined via pump-probe spectroscopy using polarized laser pulses and time-resolved four wave-mixing experiments. The evolution of both quantities with temperature shows that spin relaxation occurs in the motional narrowing regime up to 80 K. Above this threshold, the thermal energy becomes large enough for excitons to escape from the QW. Such measurements demonstrate that GaN-based heterostructures can reach a very high degree of control that was previously mostly restricted to conventional III-V semiconductors and more specifically to the arsenide family.

  15. THE EFFECTS OF PARAMAGNETIC RELAXATION REAGENTS ON 15N SPIN RELAXATION AND THE USE OF GD(DPM)3 AS A NITROGEN-15 NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE SPIN LABEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Electron-nuclear relaxation times (T(1) sup e's) for (15)N and (13)C in natural abundance are measured for a series of amines of a wide range of pK(a)s using four paramagnetic relaxation reagents that are soluable in organic solutions. Cr(acac)3 and Cr(dpm)3 are seen to affect th...

  16. Epigenetic changes encompassing the IGF2/H19 locus associated with relaxation of IGF2 imprinting and silencing of H19 in Wilms tumor.

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, T; Sullivan, M J; Ogawa, O; Reeve, A E

    1995-01-01

    In most tissues IGF2 is expressed from the paternal allele while H19 is expressed from the maternal allele. We have previously shown that in some Wilms tumors the maternal IGF2 imprint is relaxed such that the gene is expressed biallelically. We have now investigated this subset of tumors further and found that biallelic expression of IGF2 was associated with undetectable or very low levels of H19 expression. The relaxation of IGF2 imprinting in Wilms tumors also involved a concomitant reversal in the patterns of DNA methylation of the maternally inherited IGF2 and H19 alleles. Furthermore, the only specific methylation changes that occurred in tumors with relaxation of IGF2 imprinting were solely restricted to the maternal IGF2 and H19 alleles. These data suggest that there has been an acquisition of a paternal epigenotype in these tumors as the result of a pathologic disruption in the normal imprinting of the IGF2 and H19 genes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7534414

  17. Theory of NMR 1 /T1 relaxation in a quantum spin nematic in an applied magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smerald, Andrew; Shannon, Nic

    2016-05-01

    There is now strong theoretical evidence that a wide range of frustrated magnets should support quantum spin-nematic order in an applied magnetic field. Nonetheless, the fact that spin-nematic order does not break time-reversal symmetry makes it very difficult to detect in experiment. In this article, we continue the theme begun in Phys. Rev. B 88, 184430 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevB.88.184430, of exploring how spin-nematic order reveals itself in the spectrum of spin excitations. Building on an earlier analysis of inelastic neutron scattering [Phys. Rev. B 91, 174402 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevB.91.174402], we show how the NMR 1 /T1 relaxation rate could be used to identify a spin-nematic state in an applied magnetic field. We emphasize the characteristic universal features of 1 /T1 using a symmetry-based description of the spin-nematic order parameter and its fluctuations. Turning to the specific case of spin-1/2 frustrated ferromagnets, we show that the signal from competing spin-wave excitations can be suppressed through a judicious choice of nuclear site and field direction. As a worked example, we show how 31P NMR in the square lattice frustrated ferromagnet BaCdVO (PO4)2 is sensitive to spin-nematic order.

  18. Local spin dynamics at low temperature in the slowly relaxing molecular chain [Dy(hfac)3(NIT(C6H4OPh))]: A μ{sup +} spin relaxation study

    SciTech Connect

    Arosio, Paolo Orsini, Francesco; Corti, Maurizio; Mariani, Manuel; Bogani, Lapo; Caneschi, Andrea; Lago, Jorge; Lascialfari, Alessandro

    2015-05-07

    The spin dynamics of the molecular magnetic chain [Dy(hfac){sub 3}(NIT(C{sub 6}H{sub 4}OPh))] were investigated by means of the Muon Spin Relaxation (μ{sup +}SR) technique. This system consists of a magnetic lattice of alternating Dy(III) ions and radical spins, and exhibits single-chain-magnet behavior. The magnetic properties of [Dy(hfac){sub 3}(NIT(C{sub 6}H{sub 4}OPh))] have been studied by measuring the magnetization vs. temperature at different applied magnetic fields (H = 5, 3500, and 16500 Oe) and by performing μ{sup +}SR experiments vs. temperature in zero field and in a longitudinal applied magnetic field H = 3500 Oe. The muon asymmetry P(t) was fitted by the sum of three components, two stretched-exponential decays with fast and intermediate relaxation times, and a third slow exponential decay. The temperature dependence of the spin dynamics has been determined by analyzing the muon longitudinal relaxation rate λ{sub interm}(T), associated with the intermediate relaxing component. The experimental λ{sub interm}(T) data were fitted with a corrected phenomenological Bloembergen-Purcell-Pound law by using a distribution of thermally activated correlation times, which average to τ = τ{sub 0} exp(Δ/k{sub B}T), corresponding to a distribution of energy barriers Δ. The correlation times can be associated with the spin freezing that occurs when the system condenses in the ground state.

  19. Spin-lattice relaxation study of the methyl proton dynamics in solid 9,10-dimethyltriptycene (DMT).

    PubMed

    Piślewski, N; Tritt-Goc, J; Bielejewski, M; Rachocki, A; Ratajczyk, T; Szymański, S

    2009-06-01

    Proton spin-lattice relaxation studies are performed for powder samples of 9,10-dimethyltriptycene (DMT) and its isotopomer DMT-d(12) in which all the non-methyl protons in the molecule are replaced by deuterons. The relaxation data are interpreted in terms of the conventional relaxation theory based on the random jump model in which the Pauli correlations between the relevant spin and torsional states are discarded. The Arrhenius activation energies, obtained from the relaxation data, 25.3 and 24.8 kJ mol(-1) for DMT and DMT-d(12), respectively, are very high as for the methyl groups. The validity of the jump model in the present case is considered from the perspective of Haupt theory in which the Pauli principle is explicitly invoked. To this purpose, the dynamic quantities entering the Haupt model are reinterpreted in the spirit of the damped quantum rotation (DQR) approach introduced recently for the purpose of NMR lineshape studies of hindered molecular rotators. Theoretical modelling of the relevant methyl group dynamics, based on the DQR theory, was performed. From these calculations it is inferred that direct assessments of the torsional barrier heights, based on the Arrhenius activation energies extracted from relaxation data, should be treated with caution. PMID:19181490

  20. Thermal decomposition of [Co(en)3][Fe(CN)6]∙ 2H2O: Topotactic dehydration process, valence and spin exchange mechanism elucidation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Prussian blue analogues represent well-known and extensively studied group of coordination species which has many remarkable applications due to their ion-exchange, electron transfer or magnetic properties. Among them, Co-Fe Prussian blue analogues have been extensively studied due to the photoinduced magnetization. Surprisingly, their suitability as precursors for solid-state synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles is almost unexplored. In this paper, the mechanism of thermal decomposition of [Co(en)3][Fe(CN)6] ∙∙ 2H2O (1a) is elucidated, including the topotactic dehydration, valence and spins exchange mechanisms suggestion and the formation of a mixture of CoFe2O4-Co3O4 (3:1) as final products of thermal degradation. Results The course of thermal decomposition of 1a in air atmosphere up to 600°C was monitored by TG/DSC techniques, 57Fe Mössbauer and IR spectroscopy. As first, the topotactic dehydration of 1a to the hemihydrate [Co(en)3][Fe(CN)6] ∙∙ 1/2H2O (1b) occurred with preserving the single-crystal character as was confirmed by the X-ray diffraction analysis. The consequent thermal decomposition proceeded in further four stages including intermediates varying in valence and spin states of both transition metal ions in their structures, i.e. [FeII(en)2(μ-NC)CoIII(CN)4], FeIII(NH2CH2CH3)2(μ-NC)2CoII(CN)3] and FeIII[CoII(CN)5], which were suggested mainly from 57Fe Mössbauer, IR spectral and elemental analyses data. Thermal decomposition was completed at 400°C when superparamagnetic phases of CoFe2O4 and Co3O4 in the molar ratio of 3:1 were formed. During further temperature increase (450 and 600°C), the ongoing crystallization process gave a new ferromagnetic phase attributed to the CoFe2O4-Co3O4 nanocomposite particles. Their formation was confirmed by XRD and TEM analyses. In-field (5 K / 5 T) Mössbauer spectrum revealed canting of Fe(III) spin in almost fully inverse spinel structure of CoFe2O4. Conclusions It has been found

  1. Effects of diffusion in magnetically inhomogeneous media on rotating frame spin-lattice relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spear, John T.; Gore, John C.

    2014-12-01

    In an aqueous medium containing magnetic inhomogeneities, diffusion amongst the intrinsic susceptibility gradients contributes to the relaxation rate R1ρ of water protons to a degree that depends on the magnitude of the local field variations ΔBz, the geometry of the perturbers inducing these fields, and the rate of diffusion of water, D. This contribution can be reduced by using stronger locking fields, leading to a dispersion in R1ρ that can be analyzed to derive quantitative characteristics of the material. A theoretical expression was recently derived to describe these effects for the case of sinusoidal local field variations of a well-defined spatial frequency q. To evaluate the degree to which this dispersion may be extended to more realistic field patterns, finite difference Bloch-McConnell simulations were performed with a variety of three-dimensional structures to reveal how simple geometries affect the dispersion of spin-locking measurements. Dispersions were fit to the recently derived expression to obtain an estimate of the correlation time of the field variations experienced by the spins, and from this the mean squared gradient and an effective spatial frequency were obtained to describe the fields. This effective spatial frequency was shown to vary directly with the second moment of the spatial frequency power spectrum of the ΔBz field, which is a measure of the average spatial dimension of the field variations. These results suggest the theory may be more generally applied to more complex media to derive useful descriptors of the nature of field inhomogeneities. The simulation results also confirm that such diffusion effects disperse over a range of locking fields of lower amplitude than typical chemical exchange effects, and should be detectable in a variety of magnetically inhomogeneous media including regions of dense microvasculature within biological tissues.

  2. Resonantly enhanced spin-lattice relaxation of Mn2 + ions in diluted magnetic (Zn,Mn)Se/(Zn,Be)Se quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debus, J.; Ivanov, V. Yu.; Ryabchenko, S. M.; Yakovlev, D. R.; Maksimov, A. A.; Semenov, Yu. G.; Braukmann, D.; Rautert, J.; Löw, U.; Godlewski, M.; Waag, A.; Bayer, M.

    2016-05-01

    The dynamics of spin-lattice relaxation in the magnetic Mn2 + ion system of (Zn,Mn)Se/(Zn,Be)Se quantum-well structures are studied using optical methods. Pronounced cusps are found in the giant Zeeman shift of the quantum-well exciton photoluminescence at specific magnetic fields below 10 T, when the Mn spin system is heated by photogenerated carriers. The spin-lattice relaxation time of the Mn ions is resonantly accelerated at the cusp magnetic fields. Our theoretical analysis demonstrates that a cusp occurs at a spin-level mixing of single Mn2 + ions and a quick-relaxing cluster of nearest-neighbor Mn ions, which can be described as intrinsic cross-relaxation resonance within the Mn spin system.

  3. Spin Liquid State in the 3D Frustrated Antiferromagnet PbCuTe_{2}O_{6}: NMR and Muon Spin Relaxation Studies.

    PubMed

    Khuntia, P; Bert, F; Mendels, P; Koteswararao, B; Mahajan, A V; Baenitz, M; Chou, F C; Baines, C; Amato, A; Furukawa, Y

    2016-03-11

    PbCuTe_{2}O_{6} is a rare example of a spin liquid candidate featuring a three-dimensional magnetic lattice. Strong geometric frustration arises from the dominant antiferromagnetic interaction that generates a hyperkagome network of Cu^{2+} ions although additional interactions enhance the magnetic lattice connectivity. Through a combination of magnetization measurements and local probe investigations by NMR and muon spin relaxation down to 20 mK, we provide robust evidence for the absence of magnetic freezing in the ground state. The local spin susceptibility probed by the NMR shift hardly deviates from the macroscopic one down to 1 K pointing to a homogeneous magnetic system with a low defect concentration. The saturation of the NMR shift and the sublinear power law temperature (T) evolution of the 1/T_{1} NMR relaxation rate at low T point to a nonsinglet ground state favoring a gapless fermionic description of the magnetic excitations. Below 1 K a pronounced slowing down of the spin dynamics is witnessed, which may signal a reconstruction of spinon Fermi surface. Nonetheless, the compound remains in a fluctuating spin liquid state down to the lowest temperature of the present investigation. PMID:27015508

  4. Spin liquid state in the 3D frustrated antiferromagnet PbCuTe2O6: NMR and muon spin relaxation studies

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Khuntia, P.; Bert, F.; Mendels, P.; Koteswararao, B.; Mahajan, A. V.; Baenitz, M.; Chou, F. C.; Baines, C.; Amato, A.; Furukawa, Y.

    2016-03-11

    In this study, PbCuTe2O6 is a rare example of a spin liquid candidate featuring a three-dimensional magnetic lattice. Strong geometric frustration arises from the dominant antiferromagnetic interaction that generates a hyperkagome network of Cu2+ ions although additional interactions enhance the magnetic lattice connectivity. Through a combination of magnetization measurements and local probe investigations by NMR and muon spin relaxation down to 20 mK, we provide robust evidence for the absence of magnetic freezing in the ground state. The local spin susceptibility probed by the NMR shift hardly deviates from the macroscopic one down to 1 K pointing to a homogeneousmore » magnetic system with a low defect concentration. The saturation of the NMR shift and the sublinear power law temperature (T) evolution of the 1/T1 NMR relaxation rate at low T point to a nonsinglet ground state favoring a gapless fermionic description of the magnetic excitations. Below 1 K a pronounced slowing down of the spin dynamics is witnessed, which may signal a reconstruction of spinon Fermi surface. Nonetheless, the compound remains in a fluctuating spin liquid state down to the lowest temperature of the present investigation.« less

  5. Spin Liquid State in the 3D Frustrated Antiferromagnet PbCuTe2 O6 : NMR and Muon Spin Relaxation Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khuntia, P.; Bert, F.; Mendels, P.; Koteswararao, B.; Mahajan, A. V.; Baenitz, M.; Chou, F. C.; Baines, C.; Amato, A.; Furukawa, Y.

    2016-03-01

    PbCuTe2O6 is a rare example of a spin liquid candidate featuring a three-dimensional magnetic lattice. Strong geometric frustration arises from the dominant antiferromagnetic interaction that generates a hyperkagome network of Cu2 + ions although additional interactions enhance the magnetic lattice connectivity. Through a combination of magnetization measurements and local probe investigations by NMR and muon spin relaxation down to 20 mK, we provide robust evidence for the absence of magnetic freezing in the ground state. The local spin susceptibility probed by the NMR shift hardly deviates from the macroscopic one down to 1 K pointing to a homogeneous magnetic system with a low defect concentration. The saturation of the NMR shift and the sublinear power law temperature (T ) evolution of the 1 /T1 NMR relaxation rate at low T point to a nonsinglet ground state favoring a gapless fermionic description of the magnetic excitations. Below 1 K a pronounced slowing down of the spin dynamics is witnessed, which may signal a reconstruction of spinon Fermi surface. Nonetheless, the compound remains in a fluctuating spin liquid state down to the lowest temperature of the present investigation.

  6. Phase-coherent transport and spin relaxation in InAs nanowires grown by molecule beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L. B.; Guo, J. K.; Kang, N. E-mail: hqxu@pku.edu.cn; Li, Sen; Fan, Dingxun; Pan, Dong; Zhao, Jianhua; Xu, H. Q. E-mail: hqxu@pku.edu.cn

    2015-04-27

    We report low-temperature magnetotransport studies of individual InAs nanowires grown by molecule beam epitaxy. At low magnetic fields, the magnetoconductance characteristics exhibit a crossover between weak antilocalization and weak localization by changing either the gate voltage or the temperature. The observed crossover behavior can be well described in terms of relative scales of the transport characteristic lengths extracted based on the quasi-one-dimensional theory of weak localization in the presence of spin-orbit interaction. The spin relaxation length extracted from the magnetoconductance data is found to be in the range of 80–100 nm, indicating the presence of strong spin-orbit coupling in the InAs nanowires. Moreover, the amplitude of universal conductance fluctuations in the nanowires is found to be suppressed at low temperatures due to the presence of strong spin-orbit scattering.

  7. Protein docking using an ensemble of spin labels optimized by intra-molecular paramagnetic relaxation enhancement.

    PubMed

    Schilder, Jesika; Liu, Wei-Min; Kumar, Pravin; Overhand, Mark; Huber, Martina; Ubbink, Marcellus

    2016-02-17

    Paramagnetic NMR is a useful technique to study proteins and protein complexes and the use of paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) for this purpose has become wide-spread. PREs are commonly generated using paramagnetic spin labels (SLs) that contain an unpaired electron in the form of a nitroxide radical, with 1-oxyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-2,5-dihydropyrrol-3-ylmethyl methane thiosulfonate (MTSL) being the most popular tag. The inherent flexibility of the SL causes sampling of several conformations in solution, which can be problematic as over- or underestimation of the spatial distribution of the unpaired electron in structural calculations will lead to errors in the distance restraints. We investigated the effect of this mobility on the accuracy of protein-protein docking calculations using intermolecular PRE data by comparing MTSL and the less mobile 3-methanesulfonilthiomethyl-4-(pyridin-3-yl)-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-2,5-dihydro-1H-pyrrol-1-yloxyl (pyMTSL) on the dynamic complex of cytochrome c and cytochrome c peroxidase. No significant differences were found between the two SLs. Docking was performed using either single or multiple conformers and either fixed or flexible SLs. It was found that mobility of the SLs is the limiting factor for obtaining accurate solutions. Optimization of SL conformer orientations using intra-molecular PRE improves the accuracy of docking. PMID:26356049

  8. Spin-exchange relaxation-free magnetometer with nearly parallel pump and probe beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaulanov, Todor; Savukov, Igor; Kim, Young Jin

    2016-05-01

    We constructed a spin-exchange relaxation-free (SERF) magnetometer with a small angle between the pump and probe beams facilitating a multi-channel design with a flat pancake cell. This configuration provides almost complete overlap of the beams in the cell, and prevents the pump beam from entering the probe detection channel. By coupling the lasers in multi-mode fibers, without an optical isolator or field modulation, we demonstrate a sensitivity of 10 f T/\\sqrt{\\text{Hz}} for frequencies between 10 Hz and 100 Hz. In addition to the experimental study of sensitivity, we present a theoretical analysis of SERF magnetometer response to magnetic fields for small-angle and parallel-beam configurations, and show that at optimal DC offset fields the magnetometer response is comparable to that in the orthogonal-beam configuration. Based on the analysis, we also derive fundamental and probe-limited sensitivities for the arbitrary non-orthogonal geometry. The expected practical and fundamental sensitivities are of the same order as those in the orthogonal geometry. We anticipate that our design will be useful for magnetoencephalography (MEG) and magnetocardiography (MCG) applications.

  9. a Spin Relaxation Model for the Moessbauer Spectra of Barium Tin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irwin, George Michael

    The stochastic relaxation theory of Anderson and Sack is applied to the Mossbauer spectra of seven samples of BaSn_{rm x}Ti _{rm 2-x}Fe _4O_{11} with compositions x = 0.0, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1.2, 1.6, and 2.0. The spectra were obtained at room temperature and in the temperature range 20 K to 170 K. The broad, low temperature spectra were analysed using least square fitting to a simple model for Fe^{3+} in which the ionic moment is subject to a molecular field and a perpendicular random field which induces transitions between spin states. The resulting fits rival the results of analyses on similar systems using static hyperfine field distributions while requiring only two free parameters to mimic the temperature dependence of the spectral lineshapes. The results verify a magnetic double transition in the sample with x = 0.0 which disappears as Sn is added, but suggests that the samples with x = 1.2, 1.6, and 2.0 also show a double transition that has not been observed using other methods.

  10. The Peculiarities of the NMR Spin-Lattice Relaxation in Proton Exchanged LINBO_{3}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vertegel, Igor; Chesnokov, Eugeny; Ovcharenko, Alexander; Vertegel, Ivan

    2013-06-01

    The temperature dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation time T_{1} of Li^{7} nuclei in the temperature range (170-430 K) was investigated in LiNbO_{3} polycrystalline samples: the clean and annealed ones in a hydrogen environment at temperature around 1000° C. The anomaly in the temperature dependence of T_{1} was found in range 300-340 K for both pure and annealed crystals. The reduction of the time T_{1} in the annealed lithium niobate crystal is caused by the creation of point defects (F^{+} or F-centers), with the dominant F-centers contribution. An increase in the activation energy in the annealed crystal can be explained by the following. It is known for the pure lithium niobate that an oscillation of lithium occurs in a symmetrical potential consisting of three wells. Formation of the oxygen vacancies in the annealed crystals is accompanied with extrinsic protons occupation of the vacancies. It leads to the symmetry violation and causes an i ncrease of the activation barrier.

  11. Suppression of vapor cell temperature error for spin-exchange-relaxation-free magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Jixi Qian, Zheng; Fang, Jiancheng; Quan, Wei

    2015-08-15

    This paper presents a method to reduce the vapor cell temperature error of the spin-exchange-relaxation-free (SERF) magnetometer. The fluctuation of cell temperature can induce variations of the optical rotation angle, resulting in a scale factor error of the SERF magnetometer. In order to suppress this error, we employ the variation of the probe beam absorption to offset the variation of the optical rotation angle. The theoretical discussion of our method indicates that the scale factor error introduced by the fluctuation of the cell temperature could be suppressed by setting the optical depth close to one. In our experiment, we adjust the probe frequency to obtain various optical depths and then measure the variation of scale factor with respect to the corresponding cell temperature changes. Our experimental results show a good agreement with our theoretical analysis. Under our experimental condition, the error has been reduced significantly compared with those when the probe wavelength is adjusted to maximize the probe signal. The cost of this method is the reduction of the scale factor of the magnetometer. However, according to our analysis, it only has minor effect on the sensitivity under proper operating parameters.

  12. Spin-exchange relaxation-free magnetometer with nearly parallel pump and probe beams

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Karaulanov, Todor; Savukov, Igor; Kim, Young Jin

    2016-03-22

    We constructed a spin-exchange relaxation-free (SERF) magnetometer with a small angle between the pump and probe beams facilitating a multi-channel design with a flat pancake cell. This configuration provides almost complete overlap of the beams in the cell, and prevents the pump beam from entering the probe detection channel. By coupling the lasers in multi-mode fibers, without an optical isolator or field modulation, we demonstrate a sensitivity of 10 fTmore » $$/\\sqrt{\\text{Hz}}$$ for frequencies between 10 Hz and 100 Hz. In addition to the experimental study of sensitivity, we present a theoretical analysis of SERF magnetometer response to magnetic fields for small-angle and parallel-beam configurations, and show that at optimal DC offset fields the magnetometer response is comparable to that in the orthogonal-beam configuration. Based on the analysis, we also derive fundamental and probe-limited sensitivities for the arbitrary non-orthogonal geometry. The expected practical and fundamental sensitivities are of the same order as those in the orthogonal geometry. As a result, we anticipate that our design will be useful for magnetoencephalography (MEG) and magnetocardiography (MCG) applications.« less

  13. Long-lived nanosecond spin relaxation and spin coherence of electrons in monolayer MoS2 and WS2

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yang, Luyi; Sinitsyn, Nikolai A.; Chen, Weibing; Yuan, Jiangtan; Zhang, Jing; Lou, Jun; Crooker, Scott  A.

    2015-08-03

    The recently discovered monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) provide a fertile playground to explore new coupled spin–valley physics. Although robust spin and valley degrees of freedom are inferred from polarized photoluminescence (PL) experiments PL timescales are necessarily constrained by short-lived (3–100 ps) electron–hole recombination9, 10. Direct probes of spin/valley polarization dynamics of resident carriers in electron (or hole)-doped TMDCs, which may persist long after recombination ceases, are at an early stage. Here we directly measure the coupled spin–valley dynamics in electron-doped MoS2 and WS2 monolayers using optical Kerr spectroscopy, and reveal very long electron spin lifetimes, exceeding 3 ns atmore » 5 K (2-3 orders of magnitude longer than typical exciton recombination times). In contrast with conventional III–V or II–VI semiconductors, spin relaxation accelerates rapidly in small transverse magnetic fields. Supported by a model of coupled spin–valley dynamics, these results indicate a novel mechanism of itinerant electron spin dephasing in the rapidly fluctuating internal spin–orbit field in TMDCs, driven by fast inter-valley scattering. Additionally, a long-lived spin coherence is observed at lower energies, commensurate with localized states. These studies provide insight into the physics underpinning spin and valley dynamics of resident electrons in atomically thin TMDCs.« less

  14. Long-lived nanosecond spin relaxation and spin coherence of electrons in monolayer MoS2 and WS2

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Luyi; Sinitsyn, Nikolai A.; Chen, Weibing; Yuan, Jiangtan; Zhang, Jing; Lou, Jun; Crooker, Scott  A.

    2015-08-03

    The recently discovered monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) provide a fertile playground to explore new coupled spin–valley physics. Although robust spin and valley degrees of freedom are inferred from polarized photoluminescence (PL) experiments PL timescales are necessarily constrained by short-lived (3–100 ps) electron–hole recombination9, 10. Direct probes of spin/valley polarization dynamics of resident carriers in electron (or hole)-doped TMDCs, which may persist long after recombination ceases, are at an early stage. Here we directly measure the coupled spin–valley dynamics in electron-doped MoS2 and WS2 monolayers using optical Kerr spectroscopy, and reveal very long electron spin lifetimes, exceeding 3 ns at 5 K (2-3 orders of magnitude longer than typical exciton recombination times). In contrast with conventional III–V or II–VI semiconductors, spin relaxation accelerates rapidly in small transverse magnetic fields. Supported by a model of coupled spin–valley dynamics, these results indicate a novel mechanism of itinerant electron spin dephasing in the rapidly fluctuating internal spin–orbit field in TMDCs, driven by fast inter-valley scattering. Additionally, a long-lived spin coherence is observed at lower energies, commensurate with localized states. These studies provide insight into the physics underpinning spin and valley dynamics of resident electrons in atomically thin TMDCs.

  15. Measurement of electron spin-lattice relaxation times in radical doped butanol samples at 1 K using the NEDOR method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, C.; Herick, J.; Berlin, A.; Meyer, W.; Reicherz, G.

    2012-12-01

    The electron spin-lattice relaxation time (T1e) of TEMPO- and trityl-doped butanol samples at 2.5 T and temperatures between 0.95 K and 2.17 K was studied by pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) using the nuclear-electron double resonance (NEDOR) method. This method is based on the idea to measure the NMR lineshift produced by the local field of paramagnetic impurities, whose polarization can be manipulated. This is of technical advantage as measurements can be performed under conditions typically used for the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) process - in our case 2.5 T and temperatures around 1 K - where a direct measurement on the electronic spins would be far more complicated to perform. As T1e is a crucial parameter determining the overall efficiency of DNP, the effect of the radical type, its spin concentration, the temperature and the oxygen content on T1e has been investigated. For radical concentrations as used in DNP (several 1019 spins/cm3) the relaxation rate (T1e-1) has shown a linear dependence on the paramagnetic electron concentration for both radicals investigated. Experiments with perdeuterated and ordinary butanol have given no indication for any influence of the host materials isotopes. The measured temperature dependence has shown an exponential characteristic. It is further observed that the oxygen content in the butanol samples has a considerable effect on the electron relaxation time and thus influences the nuclear relaxation time and polarization rate during the DNP. The experiments also show a variation in the NMR linewidth, leading to comparable time constants as determined by the lineshift. NEDOR measurements were also performed on irradiated, crystal grains of 6LiD. These samples exhibited a linewidth behavior similar to that of the cylindrically shaped butanol samples.

  16. PREFACE: 13th International Conference on Muon Spin Rotation, Relaxation and Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-12-01

    The 13th International Conference on Muon Spin Rotation, Relaxation and Resonance (μSR2014) organized by the Laboratory for Muon Spin Spectroscopy, Paul Scherrer Institute in collaboration with the University of Zurich and the University of Fribourg, was held in Grindelwald, Switzerland from 1st to 6th June 2014. The conference provided a forum for researchers from around the world with interests in the applications of μSR to study a wide range of topics including condensed matter physics, materials and molecular sciences, chemistry and biology. Polarized muons provide a unique and versatile probe of matter, enabling studies at the atomic level of electronic structure and dynamics in a wide range of systems. The conference was the thirteenth in a series, which began in Rorschach in 1978 and it took place for the third time in Switzerland. The previous conferences were held in Cancun, Mexico (2011), Tsukuba, Japan (2008), Oxford, UK (2005), Williamsburg, USA (2002), Les Diablerets, Switzerland (1999), Nikko, Japan (1996), Maui, USA (1993), Oxford, UK (1990), Uppsala, Sweden (1986), Shimoda, Japan (1983), Vancouver, Canada (1980), and Rorschach, Switzerland (1978). These conference proceedings contain 67 refereed publications from presentations covering magnetism, superconductivity, chemistry, semiconductors, biophysics and techniques. The conference logo, displayed in the front pages of these proceedings, represents both the location of μSR2014 in the Alps and the muon-spin rotation technique. The silhouette represents the famous local mountains Eiger, Mönch and Jungfrau as drawn by the Swiss painter Ferdinand Hodler and the apple with arrow is at the same time a citation of the Wilhelm Tell legend and a remembrance of the key role played by the muon spin and the asymmetric muon decay (which for the highest positron energy has an apple like shape). More than 160 participants (including 32 registered as students and 13 as accompanying persons) from 19 countries

  17. Rotational dynamics in supercooled water from nuclear spin relaxation and molecular simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qvist, Johan; Mattea, Carlos; Sunde, Erik P.; Halle, Bertil

    2012-05-01

    Structural dynamics in liquid water slow down dramatically in the supercooled regime. To shed further light on the origin of this super-Arrhenius temperature dependence, we report high-precision 17O and 2H NMR relaxation data for H2O and D2O, respectively, down to 37 K below the equilibrium freezing point. With the aid of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we provide a detailed analysis of the rotational motions probed by the NMR experiments. The NMR-derived rotational correlation time τR is the integral of a time correlation function (TCF) that, after a subpicosecond librational decay, can be described as a sum of two exponentials. Using a coarse-graining algorithm to map the MD trajectory on a continuous-time random walk (CTRW) in angular space, we show that the slowest TCF component can be attributed to large-angle molecular jumps. The mean jump angle is ˜48° at all temperatures and the waiting time distribution is non-exponential, implying dynamical heterogeneity. We have previously used an analogous CTRW model to analyze quasielastic neutron scattering data from supercooled water. Although the translational and rotational waiting times are of similar magnitude, most translational jumps are not synchronized with a rotational jump of the same molecule. The rotational waiting time has a stronger temperature dependence than the translation one, consistent with the strong increase of the experimentally derived product τR DT at low temperatures. The present CTRW jump model is related to, but differs in essential ways from the extended jump model proposed by Laage and co-workers. Our analysis traces the super-Arrhenius temperature dependence of τR to the rotational waiting time. We present arguments against interpreting this temperature dependence in terms of mode-coupling theory or in terms of mixture models of water structure.

  18. Rotational dynamics in supercooled water from nuclear spin relaxation and molecular simulations.

    PubMed

    Qvist, Johan; Mattea, Carlos; Sunde, Erik P; Halle, Bertil

    2012-05-28

    Structural dynamics in liquid water slow down dramatically in the supercooled regime. To shed further light on the origin of this super-Arrhenius temperature dependence, we report high-precision (17)O and (2)H NMR relaxation data for H(2)O and D(2)O, respectively, down to 37 K below the equilibrium freezing point. With the aid of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we provide a detailed analysis of the rotational motions probed by the NMR experiments. The NMR-derived rotational correlation time τ(R) is the integral of a time correlation function (TCF) that, after a subpicosecond librational decay, can be described as a sum of two exponentials. Using a coarse-graining algorithm to map the MD trajectory on a continuous-time random walk (CTRW) in angular space, we show that the slowest TCF component can be attributed to large-angle molecular jumps. The mean jump angle is ∼48° at all temperatures and the waiting time distribution is non-exponential, implying dynamical heterogeneity. We have previously used an analogous CTRW model to analyze quasielastic neutron scattering data from supercooled water. Although the translational and rotational waiting times are of similar magnitude, most translational jumps are not synchronized with a rotational jump of the same molecule. The rotational waiting time has a stronger temperature dependence than the translation one, consistent with the strong increase of the experimentally derived product τ(R) D(T) at low temperatures. The present CTRW jump model is related to, but differs in essential ways from the extended jump model proposed by Laage and co-workers. Our analysis traces the super-Arrhenius temperature dependence of τ(R) to the rotational waiting time. We present arguments against interpreting this temperature dependence in terms of mode-coupling theory or in terms of mixture models of water structure. PMID:22667569

  19. The T1 ρ13C spin-lattice relaxation time of interpenetrating networks by solid state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Ae Ran; Schueneman, G. T.; Novak, B. M.

    1999-02-01

    Poly (2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) and poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) interpenetrated with 5% SiO 2 (PHEMA-IPN) were studied by 13C CP/MAS NMR. From these results, the structure of two polymers were verified by 13C NMR. Spin-lattice relaxation times for the polymer carbons in the rotating frame, T1 ρ, have been measured as a function of temperature. The T1 ρ spin-lattice relaxation times of the α-quarternary and carbonyl in the PHEMA and PHEMA-IPN undergo slow motions, i.e., motions on the slow side of the T1 ρ minimum, while those of the 1-,2-, β-methylene, and 3-methyl undergo fast motions, i.e., motions on the fast side of the T1 ρ minimum. From these T1 ρ spin-lattice relaxation times, we discuss the mobility, the correlation time, and activation energy for the PHEMA and PHEMA-IPN, respectively. The activation energies for the PHEMA-IPN were found to be generally higher than those of PHEMA. The higher activation energy for the side-chain 2-methylene in the PHEMA-IPN is attributed to bonding between the SiO 2 and the hydroxyl group of the PHEMA.

  20. NMR spin relaxation in proteins: The patterns of motion that dissipate power to the bath

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, Yury E. E-mail: yuryeshapiro@gmail.com; Meirovitch, Eva E-mail: yuryeshapiro@gmail.com

    2014-04-21

    We developed in recent years the two-body coupled-rotator slowly relaxing local structure (SRLS) approach for the analysis of NMR relaxation in proteins. The two bodies/rotators are the protein (diffusion tensor D{sub 1}) and the spin-bearing probe, e.g., the {sup 15}N−{sup 1}H bond (diffusion tensor, D{sub 2}), coupled by a local potential (u). A Smoluchowski equation is solved to yield the generic time correlation functions (TCFs), which are sums of weighted exponentials (eigenmodes). By Fourier transformation one obtains the generic spectral density functions (SDFs) which underlie the experimental relaxation parameters. The typical paradigm is to characterize structural dynamics in terms of the best-fit values of D{sub 1}, D{sub 2}, and u. Additional approaches we pursued employ the SRLS TCFs, SDFs, or eigenmodes as descriptors. In this study we develop yet another perspective. We consider the SDF as function of the angular velocity associated with the fluctuating fields underlying NMR relaxation. A parameter called j-fraction, which represents the relative contribution of eigenmode, i, to a given value of the SDF function at a specific frequency, ω, is defined. j-fraction profiles of the dominant eigenmodes are derived for 0 ≤ ω ≤ 10{sup 12} rad/s. They reveal which patterns of motion actuate power dissipation at given ω-values, what are their rates, and what is their relative contribution. Simulations are carried out to determine the effect of timescale separation, D{sub 1}/D{sub 2}, axial potential strength, and local diffusion axiality. For D{sub 1}/D{sub 2} ≤ 0.01 and strong local potential of 15 k{sub B}T, power is dissipated by global diffusion, renormalized (by the strong potential) local diffusion, and probe diffusion on the surface of a cone (to be called cone diffusion). For D{sub 1}/D{sub 2} = 0.1, power is dissipated by mixed eigenmodes largely of a global-diffusion-type or cone-diffusion-type, and a nearly bare renormalized

  1. Phospholipid bilayer relaxation dynamics as revealed by the pulsed electron-electron double resonance of spin labels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syryamina, V. N.; Dzuba, S. A.

    2012-10-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy in the form of pulsed electron-electron double resonance (ELDOR) was applied to 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) phospholipid bilayers containing lipids that were spin-labeled at different carbon positions along the lipid acyl chain. Pulsed ELDOR detects motionally induced spin flips of nitrogen nuclei in the nitroxide spin labels, which manifests itself as magnetization transfer (MT) in the nitroxide EPR spectrum. The MT effect was observed over a wide temperature range (100-225 K) on a microsecond time scale. In line with a previous study on molecular glasses [N. P. Isaev and S. A. Dzuba, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 094508 (2011), 10.1063/1.3633241], the motions that induce MT effect were suggested to have the same nature as those in dielectric secondary (β) Johari-Goldstein fast relaxation. The results were compared with literature dielectric relaxation data for POPC bilayers, revealing some common features. Molecular motions resulting in MT are faster for deeper spin labels in the membrane interior. The addition of cholesterol to the bilayer suppresses the lipid motions near the steroid nucleus and accelerates the lipid motions beyond the steroid nucleus, in the bilayer interior. This finding was attributed to the lipid acyl chains being more ordered near the steroid nucleus and less ordered in the bilayer interior. The motions are absent in dry lipids, indicating that the motions are determined by intermolecular interactions in the bilayer.

  2. Lattice dynamics, phase transitions and spin relaxation in [Fe(C5H5)2] PF6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herber, R. H.; Felner, I.; Nowik, I.

    2016-12-01

    The organometallic compound ferrocenium hexafluorophosphate, [Fe(C5H5)2] PF6, has been studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy in the past, mainly to determine the crystal structure at high temperatures. Here we present studies at 95 K to 305 K and analyze the spectra in terms of spin relaxation theory which yields accurately the hyperfine interaction parameters and the spin-spin and spin-lattice relaxation rates in this paramagnetic compound. The spectral area under the resonance curve yields the recoil free fraction and thus the mean square of the vibration amplitude . One observes a large discontinuity in the slope of versus T at ˜210 K, indicative of a phase transition. The analysis of the spectra proves that the quadrupole interaction is small but certainly negative, ½e2qQ = -0.12(2) mm/s, and causes the asymmetry observed in the spectra. The detailed analysis yields also, for the first time, the fluctuating effective magnetic hyperfine field, H eff = 180(50) kOe.

  3. Measuring nanopore size from the spin-lattice relaxation of CF4 gas

    PubMed Central

    Kuethe, Dean O.; Montaño, Rebecca; Pietraß, Tanja

    2007-01-01

    The NMR 19F spin-lattice relaxation time constant T1 for CF4 gas is dominated by spin–rotation interaction, which is mediated by the molecular collision frequency. When confined to pores of approximately the same size or smaller than the bulk gas mean free path, additional collisions of molecules with the pore walls should substantially change T1. To develop a method for measuring the surface/volume ratio S/V by measuring how T1 changes with confinement, we prepared samples of known S/V from fumed silica of known mass-specific surface area and compressed to varying degrees into cylinders of known volume. We then measured T1 for CF4 in these samples at varying pressures, and developed mathematical models for the change in T1 to fit the data. Even though CF4 has a critical temperature below room temperature, we found that its density in pores was greater than that of the bulk gas and that it was necessary to take this absorption into account. We modeled adsorption in two ways, by assuming that the gas condenses on the pore walls, and by assuming that gas in a region near the wall is denser than the bulk gas because of a simplified attractive potential. Both models suggested the same two-parameter formula, to which we added a third parameter to successfully fit the data and thus achieved a rapid, precise way to measure S/V from the increase in T1 due to confinement in pores. PMID:17400493

  4. ESR lineshape and {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation dispersion in propylene glycol solutions of nitroxide radicals – Joint analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kruk, D.; Hoffmann, S. K.; Goslar, J.; Lijewski, S.; Kubica-Misztal, A.; Korpała, A.; Oglodek, I.; Moscicki, J.; Kowalewski, J.; Rössler, E. A.

    2013-12-28

    Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectroscopy and Nuclear Magnetic Relaxation Dispersion (NMRD) experiments are reported for propylene glycol solutions of the nitroxide radical: 4-oxo-TEMPO-d{sub 16} containing {sup 15}N and {sup 14}N isotopes. The NMRD experiments refer to {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation measurements in a broad frequency range (10 kHz–20 MHz). A joint analysis of the ESR and NMRD data is performed. The ESR lineshapes give access to the nitrogen hyperfine tensor components and the rotational correlation time of the paramagnetic molecule. The NMRD data are interpreted in terms of the theory of paramagnetic relaxation enhancement in solutions of nitroxide radicals, recently presented by Kruk et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 138, 124506 (2013)]. The theory includes the effect of the electron spin relaxation on the {sup 1}H relaxation of the solvent. The {sup 1}H relaxation is caused by dipole-dipole interactions between the electron spin of the radical and the proton spins of the solvent molecules. These interactions are modulated by three dynamic processes: relative translational dynamics of the involved molecules, molecular rotation, and electron spin relaxation. The sensitivity to rotation originates from the non-central positions of the interacting spin in the molecules. The electronic relaxation is assumed to stem from the electron spin–nitrogen spin hyperfine coupling, modulated by rotation of the radical molecule. For the interpretation of the NMRD data, we use the nitrogen hyperfine coupling tensor obtained from ESR and fit the other relevant parameters. The consistency of the unified analysis of ESR and NMRD, evaluated by the agreement between the rotational correlation times obtained from ESR and NMRD, respectively, and the agreement of the translation diffusion coefficients with literature values obtained for pure propylene glycol, is demonstrated to be satisfactory.

  5. Static magnetic ordering of CeCu2.1Si2 found by muon spin relaxation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uemura, Y. J.; Kossler, W. J.; Yu, X. H.; Schone, H. E.; Kempton, J. R.; Stronach, C. E.; Barth, S.; Gygax, F. N.; Hitti, B.; Schenck, A.

    1988-01-01

    Zero- and longitudinal-field muon spin relaxation measurements on a polycrystal sample of a heavy fermion superconductor CeCu2.1 Si2 (T(c) = 0.7 K) have revealed an onset of static magnetic ordering below T approximately 0.8 K. The line shapes of the observed spectra in zero field indicate a wide distribution of static random local fields at muon sites, suggesting that the ordering is either spin glass or incommensurate spin-density-wave state. The observed width of the random local field at T = 0.05 K corresponds to a small averaged static moment of the order of 0.1 micro-B per formula unit.

  6. Low-relaxation spin waves in laser-molecular-beam epitaxy grown nanosized yttrium iron garnet films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutsev, L. V.; Korovin, A. M.; Bursian, V. E.; Gastev, S. V.; Fedorov, V. V.; Suturin, S. M.; Sokolov, N. S.

    2016-05-01

    Synthesis of nanosized yttrium iron garnet (Y3Fe5O12, YIG) films followed by the study of ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) and spin wave propagation in these films is reported. The YIG films were grown on gadolinium gallium garnet substrates by laser molecular beam epitaxy. It has been shown that spin waves propagating in YIG deposited at 700 °C have low damping. At the frequency of 3.29 GHz, the spin-wave damping parameter is less than 3.6 × 10-5. Magnetic inhomogeneities of the YIG films give the main contribution to the FMR linewidth. The contribution of the relaxation processes to the FMR linewidth is as low as 1.2%.

  7. Cross-Correlated Relaxation of Dipolar Coupling and Chemical-Shift Anisotropy in Magic-Angle Spinning R1ρ NMR Measurements: Application to Protein Backbone Dynamics Measurements.

    PubMed

    Kurauskas, Vilius; Weber, Emmanuelle; Hessel, Audrey; Ayala, Isabel; Marion, Dominique; Schanda, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Transverse relaxation rate measurements in magic-angle spinning solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance provide information about molecular motions occurring on nanosecond-to-millisecond (ns-ms) time scales. The measurement of heteronuclear ((13)C, (15)N) relaxation rate constants in the presence of a spin-lock radiofrequency field (R1ρ relaxation) provides access to such motions, and an increasing number of studies involving R1ρ relaxation in proteins have been reported. However, two factors that influence the observed relaxation rate constants have so far been neglected, namely, (1) the role of CSA/dipolar cross-correlated relaxation (CCR) and (2) the impact of fast proton spin flips (i.e., proton spin diffusion and relaxation). We show that CSA/D CCR in R1ρ experiments is measurable and that the CCR rate constant depends on ns-ms motions; it can thus provide insight into dynamics. We find that proton spin diffusion attenuates this CCR due to its decoupling effect on the doublet components. For measurements of dynamics, the use of R1ρ rate constants has practical advantages over the use of CCR rates, and this article reveals factors that have so far been disregarded and which are important for accurate measurements and interpretation. PMID:27500976

  8. Spin-lattice relaxation of coupled metal-radical spin-dimers in proteins: application to Fe(2+)-cofactor (Q(A)(-.), Q(B)(-.), phi(-.)) dimers in reaction centers from photosynthetic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Calvo, Rafael; Isaacson, Roger A; Abresch, Edward C; Okamura, Melvin Y; Feher, George

    2002-01-01

    The spin-lattice relaxation times (T(1)) for the reduced quinone acceptors Q(A)(-.) and Q(B)(-.), and the intermediate pheophytin acceptor phi(-.), were measured in native photosynthetic reaction centers (RC) containing a high spin Fe(2+) (S = 2) and in RCs in which Fe(2+) was replaced by diamagnetic Zn(2+). From these data, the contribution of the Fe(2+) to the spin-lattice relaxation of the cofactors was determined. To relate the spin-lattice relaxation rate to the spin-spin interaction between the Fe(2+) and the cofactors, we developed a spin-dimer model that takes into account the zero field splitting and the rhombicity of the Fe(2+) ion. The relaxation mechanism of the spin-dimer involves a two-phonon process that couples the fast relaxing Fe(2+) spin to the cofactor spin. The process is analogous to the one proposed by R. Orbach (Proc. R. Soc. A. (Lond.). 264:458-484) for rare earth ions. The spin-spin interactions are, in general, composed of exchange and dipolar contributions. For the spin dimers studied in this work the exchange interaction, J(o), is predominant. The values of J(o) for Q(A)(-.)Fe(2+), Q(B)(-.)Fe(2+), and phi(-.)Fe(2+) were determined to be (in kelvin) -0.58, -0.92, and -1.3 x 10(-3), respectively. The |J(o)| of the various cofactors (obtained in this work and those of others) could be fitted with the relation exp(-beta(J)d), where d is the distance between cofactor spins and beta(J) had a value of (0.66-0.86) A(-1). The relation between J(o) and the matrix element |V(ij)|(2) involved in electron transfer rates is discussed. PMID:12414679

  9. Spin-lattice relaxation of coupled metal-radical spin-dimers in proteins: application to Fe(2+)-cofactor (Q(A)(-.), Q(B)(-.), phi(-.)) dimers in reaction centers from photosynthetic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Rafael; Isaacson, Roger A; Abresch, Edward C; Okamura, Melvin Y; Feher, George

    2002-11-01

    The spin-lattice relaxation times (T(1)) for the reduced quinone acceptors Q(A)(-.) and Q(B)(-.), and the intermediate pheophytin acceptor phi(-.), were measured in native photosynthetic reaction centers (RC) containing a high spin Fe(2+) (S = 2) and in RCs in which Fe(2+) was replaced by diamagnetic Zn(2+). From these data, the contribution of the Fe(2+) to the spin-lattice relaxation of the cofactors was determined. To relate the spin-lattice relaxation rate to the spin-spin interaction between the Fe(2+) and the cofactors, we developed a spin-dimer model that takes into account the zero field splitting and the rhombicity of the Fe(2+) ion. The relaxation mechanism of the spin-dimer involves a two-phonon process that couples the fast relaxing Fe(2+) spin to the cofactor spin. The process is analogous to the one proposed by R. Orbach (Proc. R. Soc. A. (Lond.). 264:458-484) for rare earth ions. The spin-spin interactions are, in general, composed of exchange and dipolar contributions. For the spin dimers studied in this work the exchange interaction, J(o), is predominant. The values of J(o) for Q(A)(-.)Fe(2+), Q(B)(-.)Fe(2+), and phi(-.)Fe(2+) were determined to be (in kelvin) -0.58, -0.92, and -1.3 x 10(-3), respectively. The |J(o)| of the various cofactors (obtained in this work and those of others) could be fitted with the relation exp(-beta(J)d), where d is the distance between cofactor spins and beta(J) had a value of (0.66-0.86) A(-1). The relation between J(o) and the matrix element |V(ij)|(2) involved in electron transfer rates is discussed. PMID:12414679

  10. Eighty-Eight Percent Directional Guiding of Spin Currents with 90 μm Relaxation Length in Bilayer Graphene Using Carrier Drift.

    PubMed

    Ingla-Aynés, Josep; Meijerink, Rick J; Wees, Bart J van

    2016-08-10

    Electrical control of spin signals and long distance spin transport are major requirements in the field of spin electronics. Here, we report the efficient guiding of spin currents at room temperature in high mobility hexagonal boron nitride encapsulated bilayer graphene using carrier drift. Our experiments, together with modeling, show that the spin relaxation length, that is 7.7 μm at zero bias, can be tuned from 0.6 to 90 μm when applying a DC current of ∓90 μA, respectively. Our results also show that we are able to direct spin currents to either side of a spin injection contact. Eighty-eight percent of the injected spins flows to the left when Idc = -90 μA and eighty-two percent flows to the right when the drift current is reversed. These results show the potential of carrier drift for spin-based logic operations and devices. PMID:27399228

  11. Measurement of spin-exchange and relaxation parameters for polarizing {sup 21}Ne with K and Rb

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Rajat K.; Romalis, Michael V.

    2010-04-15

    Hyperpolarized K-{sup 3}He comagnetometers have been used for tests of fundamental physics and inertial rotation sensing. These experiments will demonstrate increased sensitivity if the {sup 3}He buffer gas is replaced with {sup 21}Ne. We measure the parameters necessary to realize implementation of an alkali-metal-{sup 21}Ne comagnetometer for two promising alkali-metal species, Rb and K. The spin-exchange rate constant for K with {sup 21}Ne and Rb with {sup 21}Ne are measured using two different methods. We also make the first measurement of the K-{sup 21}Ne contact spin interaction. Measurements for the Rb-{sup 21}Ne contact spin interaction, as well as the spin-destruction coefficients for {sup 21}Ne with both alkali-metal species are consistent with previous measurements. Additionally the quadrupolar spin-relaxation rate of {sup 21}Ne is measured. Finally, the feasibility of utilizing polarized {sup 21}Ne for operation in a comagnetometer is discussed.

  12. A triarylmethyl spin label for long-range distance measurement at physiological temperatures using T1 relaxation enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhongyu; Bridges, Michael D.; López, Carlos J.; Rogozhnikova, Olga Yu.; Trukhin, Dmitry V.; Brooks, Evan K.; Tormyshev, Victor; Halpern, Howard J.; Hubbell, Wayne L.

    2016-08-01

    Site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) in combination with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy has become an important tool for measuring distances in proteins on the order of a few nm. For this purpose pairs of spin labels, most commonly nitroxides, are site-selectively introduced into the protein. Recent efforts to develop new spin labels are focused on tailoring the intrinsic properties of the label to either extend the upper limit of measurable distances at physiological temperature, or to provide a unique spectral lineshape so that selective pairwise distances can be measured in a protein or complex containing multiple spin label species. Triarylmethyl (TAM) radicals are the foundation for a new class of spin labels that promise to provide both capabilities. Here we report a new methanethiosulfonate derivative of a TAM radical that reacts rapidly and selectively with an engineered cysteine residue to generate a TAM containing side chain (TAM1) in high yield. With a TAM1 residue and Cu2+ bound to an engineered Cu2+ binding site, enhanced T1 relaxation of TAM should enable measurement of interspin distances up to 50 Å at physiological temperature. To achieve favorable TAM1-labeled protein concentrations without aggregation, proteins are tethered to a solid support either site-selectively using an unnatural amino acid or via native lysine residues. The methodology is general and readily extendable to complex systems, including membrane proteins.

  13. Mapping membrane protein backbone dynamics: a comparison of site-directed spin labeling with NMR 15N-relaxation measurements.

    PubMed

    Lo, Ryan H; Kroncke, Brett M; Solomon, Tsega L; Columbus, Linda

    2014-10-01

    The ability to detect nanosecond backbone dynamics with site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) in soluble proteins has been well established. However, for membrane proteins, the nitroxide appears to have more interactions with the protein surface, potentially hindering the sensitivity to backbone motions. To determine whether membrane protein backbone dynamics could be mapped with SDSL, a nitroxide was introduced at 55 independent sites in a model polytopic membrane protein, TM0026. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectral parameters were compared with NMR (15)N-relaxation data. Sequential scans revealed backbone dynamics with the same trends observed for the R1 relaxation rate, suggesting that nitroxide dynamics remain coupled to the backbone on membrane proteins. PMID:25296323

  14. Nuclear Spin Symmetry Conservation and Relaxation in Water (1H216O) Studied by Cavity Ring-Down (CRD) Spectroscopy of Supersonic Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manca Tanner, Carine; Quack, Martin; Schmidiger, David

    2013-10-01

    We report high resolution near-infrared laser spectra of water seeded in a supersonic jet expansion of argon probed by cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) in the R branch of the 2-3 band (above 7500 cm-1) at several effective temperatures T < 30 K. Our goal is to study nuclear spin symmetry conservation and relaxation. For low mole fractions of water in the gas mixture, we obtained the lowest rotational temperatures and observed nuclear spin symmetry conservation, in agreement with theoretical expectation for inelastic collisions of isolated H2O molecules with Ar and similar to a previous series of experiments with other small molecules in supersonic jet expansions. However, for the highest mole fractions of water, which we used (xH2O < 1.6%), we obtained slightly higher rotational temperatures and observed nuclear spin symmetry relaxation, which cannot be explained by the intramolecular quantum relaxation mechanism in the monomer H2O. The nuclear spin symmetry relaxation observed is, indeed, seen to be related to the formation of water clusters at the early stage of the supersonic jet expansion. Under these conditions, two mechanisms can contribute to nuclear spin symmetry relaxation. The results are discussed in relation to claims of the stability of nuclear spin isomers of H2O in the condensed phase and briefly also to astrophysical spectroscopy.

  15. Relaxation time determinations by progressive saturation EPR: effects of molecular motion and Zeeman modulation for spin labels.

    PubMed

    Livshits, V A; Páli, T; Marsh, D

    1998-07-01

    The EPR spectra of nitroxide spin labels have been simulated as a function of microwave field, H1, taking into account both magnetic field modulation and molecular rotation. It is found that the saturation of the second integral, S, of the first harmonic in-phase absorption spectrum is approximated by that predicted for slow-passage conditions, that is, S approximately H1/1 + PH21, in all cases. This result is independent of the degree of inhomogeneous broadening. In general, the fitting parameter, P, depends not only on the T1 and T2 relaxation times, but also on the rate of molecular reorientation and on the modulation frequency. Calibrations for determining the relaxation times are established from the simulations. For a given modulation frequency and molecular reorientation rate, the parameter obtained by fitting the saturation curves is given by 1/P = a + 1/gamma2eT1 . Teff2, where Teff2 is the effective T2. For molecular reorientation frequencies in the range 2 x 10(7)-2 x 10(8) s-1, Teff2 is dominated by the molecular dynamics and is only weakly dependent on the intrinsic T02, allowing a direct estimation of T1. For reorientation frequencies outside this range, the (T1T2) product may be determined from the calibrations. The method is applied to determining relaxation times for spin labels undergoing different rates of rotational reorientation in a variety of environments, including those of biological relevance, and is verified experimentally by the relaxation rate enhancements induced by paramagnetic ions. PMID:9654471

  16. Relaxation and coherent oscillations in the spin dynamics of II-VI diluted magnetic quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungar, F.; Cygorek, M.; Tamborenea, P. I.; Axt, V. M.

    2015-10-01

    We study theoretically the ultrafast spin dynamics of II-VI diluted magnetic quantum wells in the presence of spin-orbit interaction. We extend a recent study where it was shown that the spin-orbit interaction and the exchange sd coupling in bulk and quantum wells can compete resulting in qualitatively new dynamics when they act simultaneously. We concentrate on Hg1-x-yMnxCdyTe quantum wells, which have a highly tunable Rashba spin-orbit coupling. Our calculations use a recently developed formalism which incorporates electronic correlations originating from the exchange sd-coupling. We find that the dependence of electronic spin oscillations on the excess energy changes qualitatively depending on whether or not the spin-orbit interaction dominates or is of comparable strength with the sd interaction.

  17. Design and commissioning of a high magnetic field muon spin relaxation spectrometer at the ISIS pulsed neutron and muon source.

    PubMed

    Lord, J S; McKenzie, I; Baker, P J; Blundell, S J; Cottrell, S P; Giblin, S R; Good, J; Hillier, A D; Holsman, B H; King, P J C; Lancaster, T; Mitchell, R; Nightingale, J B; Owczarkowski, M; Poli, S; Pratt, F L; Rhodes, N J; Scheuermann, R; Salman, Z

    2011-07-01

    The high magnetic field (HiFi) muon instrument at the ISIS pulsed neutron and muon source is a state-of-the-art spectrometer designed to provide applied magnetic fields up to 5 T for muon studies of condensed matter and molecular systems. The spectrometer is optimised for time-differential muon spin relaxation studies at a pulsed muon source. We describe the challenges involved in its design and construction, detailing, in particular, the magnet and detector performance. Commissioning experiments have been conducted and the results are presented to demonstrate the scientific capabilities of the new instrument. PMID:21806196

  18. NMR spin-lattice relaxation time T(1) of thin films obtained by magnetic resonance force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Saun, Seung-Bo; Won, Soonho; Kwon, Sungmin; Lee, Soonchil

    2015-05-01

    We obtained the NMR spectrum and the spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) for thin film samples by magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM). The samples were CaF2 thin films which were 50 nm and 150 nm thick. T1 was measured at 18 K using a cyclic adiabatic inversion method at a fixed frequency. A comparison of the bulk and two thin films showed that T1 becomes shorter as the film thickness decreases. To make the comparison as accurate as possible, all three samples were loaded onto different beams of a multi-cantilever array and measured in the same experimental environment. PMID:25828244

  19. NMR spin-lattice relaxation time T1 of thin films obtained by magnetic resonance force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saun, Seung-Bo; Won, Soonho; Kwon, Sungmin; Lee, Soonchil

    2015-05-01

    We obtained the NMR spectrum and the spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) for thin film samples by magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM). The samples were CaF2 thin films which were 50 nm and 150 nm thick. T1 was measured at 18 K using a cyclic adiabatic inversion method at a fixed frequency. A comparison of the bulk and two thin films showed that T1 becomes shorter as the film thickness decreases. To make the comparison as accurate as possible, all three samples were loaded onto different beams of a multi-cantilever array and measured in the same experimental environment.

  20. Design and commissioning of a high magnetic field muon spin relaxation spectrometer at the ISIS pulsed neutron and muon source

    SciTech Connect

    Lord, J. S.; McKenzie, I.; Baker, P. J.; Cottrell, S. P.; Giblin, S. R.; Hillier, A. D.; Holsman, B. H.; King, P. J. C.; Nightingale, J. B.; Pratt, F. L.; Rhodes, N. J.; Blundell, S. J.; Lancaster, T.; Good, J.; Mitchell, R.; Owczarkowski, M.; Poli, S.; Scheuermann, R.; Salman, Z.

    2011-07-15

    The high magnetic field (HiFi) muon instrument at the ISIS pulsed neutron and muon source is a state-of-the-art spectrometer designed to provide applied magnetic fields up to 5 T for muon studies of condensed matter and molecular systems. The spectrometer is optimised for time-differential muon spin relaxation studies at a pulsed muon source. We describe the challenges involved in its design and construction, detailing, in particular, the magnet and detector performance. Commissioning experiments have been conducted and the results are presented to demonstrate the scientific capabilities of the new instrument.

  1. Spin relaxation in graphene nanoribbons in the presence of substrate surface roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaghazardi, Zahra; Touski, Shoeib Babaee; Pourfath, Mahdi; Faez, Rahim

    2016-08-01

    In this work, spin transport in corrugated armchair graphene nanoribbons (AGNRs) is studied. We survey combined effects of spin-orbit interaction and surface roughness, employing the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism and multi-orbitals tight-binding model. Rough substrate surfaces have been statistically generated and the hopping parameters are modulated based on the bending and distance of corrugated carbon atoms. The effects of surface roughness parameters, such as roughness amplitude and correlation length, on spin transport in AGNRs are studied. The increase of surface roughness amplitude results in the coupling of σ and π bands in neighboring atoms, leading to larger spin flipping rate and therefore reduction of the spin-polarization, whereas a longer correlation length makes AGNR surface smoother and increases spin-polarization. Moreover, spin diffusion length of carriers is extracted and its dependency on the roughness parameters is investigated. In agreement with experimental data, the spin diffusion length for various substrate ranges between 2 and 340 μm. Our results indicate the importance of surface roughness on spin-transport in graphene.

  2. Study of the Ground State Properties of LiHoxY1-xF4 Using Muon Spin Relaxation

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Jose A.; Aczel, Adam A.; Carlo, Jeremy; Dunsiger, Sarah; Macdougall, Gregory J; Russo, Peter L.; Savici, Andrei T; Uemura, Yasutomo J.; Wiebe, Christopher; Luke, Graeme M.

    2010-09-01

    LiHoxY1-xF4 is an insulator where the magnetic Ho3+ ions have an Ising character and interact mainly through magnetic dipolar fields. We used the muon spin relaxation technique to study the nature of its ground state for samples with x 0.25. In contrast with some previous works, we did not find canonical spin glass behavior down to 15 mK. Instead, below 300 mK we observed temperature-independent dynamic magnetism characterized by a single correlation time. The 300 mK energy scale corresponds to the Ho3+ hyperfine interaction strength, suggesting that this interaction may be involved in the dynamic behavior of the system.

  3. A fast field-cycling device for high-resolution NMR: Design and application to spin relaxation and hyperpolarization experiments.

    PubMed

    Kiryutin, Alexey S; Pravdivtsev, Andrey N; Ivanov, Konstantin L; Grishin, Yuri A; Vieth, Hans-Martin; Yurkovskaya, Alexandra V

    2016-02-01

    A device for performing fast magnetic field-cycling NMR experiments is described. A key feature of this setup is that it combines fast switching of the external magnetic field and high-resolution NMR detection. The field-cycling method is based on precise mechanical positioning of the NMR probe with the mounted sample in the inhomogeneous fringe field of the spectrometer magnet. The device enables field variation over several decades (from 100μT up to 7T) within less than 0.3s; progress in NMR probe design provides NMR linewidths of about 10(-3)ppm. The experimental method is very versatile and enables site-specific studies of spin relaxation (NMRD, LLSs) and spin hyperpolarization (DNP, CIDNP, and SABRE) at variable magnetic field and at variable temperature. Experimental examples of such studies are demonstrated; advantages of the experimental method are described and existing challenges in the field are outlined. PMID:26773525

  4. A fast field-cycling device for high-resolution NMR: Design and application to spin relaxation and hyperpolarization experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiryutin, Alexey S.; Pravdivtsev, Andrey N.; Ivanov, Konstantin L.; Grishin, Yuri A.; Vieth, Hans-Martin; Yurkovskaya, Alexandra V.

    2016-02-01

    A device for performing fast magnetic field-cycling NMR experiments is described. A key feature of this setup is that it combines fast switching of the external magnetic field and high-resolution NMR detection. The field-cycling method is based on precise mechanical positioning of the NMR probe with the mounted sample in the inhomogeneous fringe field of the spectrometer magnet. The device enables field variation over several decades (from 100 μT up to 7 T) within less than 0.3 s; progress in NMR probe design provides NMR linewidths of about 10-3 ppm. The experimental method is very versatile and enables site-specific studies of spin relaxation (NMRD, LLSs) and spin hyperpolarization (DNP, CIDNP, and SABRE) at variable magnetic field and at variable temperature. Experimental examples of such studies are demonstrated; advantages of the experimental method are described and existing challenges in the field are outlined.

  5. Nuclear spin-lattice relaxation at field-induced level crossings in a Cr8F8 pivalate single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Shoji

    2016-01-01

    We construct a microscopic theory for the proton spin-lattice relaxation-rate 1 / T1 measurements around field-induced level crossings in a single crystal of the trivalent chromium ion wheel complex [Cr8F8(OOCtBu)16] at sufficiently low temperatures [E. Micotti et al., Phys. Rev. B 72 (2005) 020405(R)]. Exactly diagonalizing a well-equipped spin Hamiltonian for the individual clusters and giving further consideration to their possible interactions, we reveal the mechanism of 1 / T1 being single-peaked normally at the first level crossing but double-peaked intriguingly around the second level crossing. We wipe out the doubt about poor crystallization and find out a solution-intramolecular alternating Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction combined with intermolecular coupling of antiferromagnetic character, each of which is so weak as several tens of mK in magnitude.

  6. The spatial effect of protein deuteration on nitroxide spin-label relaxation: Implications for EPR distance measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Mkami, Hassane; Ward, Richard; Bowman, Andrew; Owen-Hughes, Tom; Norman, David G.

    2014-11-01

    Pulsed electron-electron double resonance (PELDOR) coupled with site-directed spin labeling is a powerful technique for the elucidation of protein or nucleic acid, macromolecular structure and interactions. The intrinsic high sensitivity of electron paramagnetic resonance enables measurement on small quantities of bio-macromolecules, however short relaxation times impose a limit on the sensitivity and size of distances that can be measured using this technique. The persistence of the electron spin-echo, in the PELDOR experiment, is one of the most crucial limitations to distance measurement. At a temperature of around 50 K one of the predominant factors affecting persistence of an echo, and as such, the sensitivity and measurable distance between spin labels, is the electron spin echo dephasing time (Tm). It has become normal practice to use deuterated solvents to extend Tm and recently it has been demonstrated that deuteration of the underlying protein significantly extends Tm. Here we examine the spatial effect of segmental deuteration of the underlying protein, and also explore the concentration and temperature dependence of highly deuterated systems.

  7. Spin-lattice relaxation of {sup 113}Cd and {sup 19}F nuclear spins in the crystal lattice of CdF{sub 2} semiconductor crystals with DX centers

    SciTech Connect

    Kazanskii, S. A.; Warren, W. W.; Ryskin, A. I.

    2009-08-15

    Temperature dependences of spin-lattice relaxation rates of the {sup 113}Cd and {sup 19}F lattice nuclei in the CdF{sub 2} semiconductor crystals containing bistable In and Ga impurity centers show that the relaxation mechanisms in the CdF{sub 2}:In and CdF{sub 2}:Ga crystals are different. The basic mechanism of spin-lattice relaxation of the {sup 113}Cd nuclei in the CdF{sub 2}:In crystal is the scalar contact's interaction of nuclear spins with spins of mobile charge carriers of the conduction band. In the CdF{sub 2}:Ga crystal, relaxation of the {sup 113}Cd nuclei is controlled by the contact interaction with electrons moving within a narrow band of impurity states. The same mechanism is apparently responsible for relaxation of the {sup 19}F nuclei in this crystal. In the CdF{sub 2}:In crystal, the {sup 19}F nuclei relax by the dipole-dipole interaction with electron spins localized at the hydrogen-like orbits of shallow donors.

  8. Fermi surfaces, spin-mixing parameter, and colossal anisotropy of spin relaxation in transition metals from ab initio theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Bernd; Mavropoulos, Phivos; Long, Nguyen H.; Gerhorst, Christian-Roman; Blügel, Stefan; Mokrousov, Yuriy

    2016-04-01

    The Fermi surfaces and Elliott-Yafet spin-mixing parameter (EYP) of several elemental metals are studied by ab initio calculations. We focus first on the anisotropy of the EYP as a function of the direction of the spin-quantization axis [B. Zimmermann et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 236603 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.109.236603]. We analyze in detail the origin of the gigantic anisotropy in 5 d hcp metals as compared to 5 d cubic metals by band structure calculations and discuss the stability of our results against an applied magnetic field. We further present calculations of light (4 d and 3 d ) hcp crystals, where we find a huge increase of the EYP anisotropy, reaching colossal values as large as 6000 % in hcp Ti. We attribute these findings to the reduced strength of spin-orbit coupling, which promotes the anisotropic spin-flip hot loops at the Fermi surface. In order to conduct these investigations, we developed an adapted tetrahedron-based method for the precise calculation of Fermi surfaces of complicated shape and accurate Fermi-surface integrals within the full-potential relativistic Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker Green function method.

  9. Relaxation-based distance measurements between a nitroxide and a lanthanide spin label

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäger, H.; Koch, A.; Maus, V.; Spiess, H. W.; Jeschke, G.

    2008-10-01

    Distance measurements by electron paramagnetic resonance techniques between labels attached to biomacromolecules provide structural information on systems that cannot be crystallized or are too large to be characterized by NMR methods. However, existing techniques are limited in their distance range and sensitivity. It is anticipated by theoretical considerations that these limits could be extended by measuring the enhancement of longitudinal relaxation of a nitroxide label due to a lanthanide complex label at cryogenic temperatures. The relaxivity of the dysprosium complex with the macrocyclic ligand DOTA can be determined without direct measurements of longitudinal relaxation rates of the lanthanide and without recourse to model compounds with well defined distance by analyzing the dependence of relaxation enhancement on either temperature or concentration in homogeneous glassy frozen solutions. Relaxivities determined by the two calibration techniques are in satisfying agreement with each other. Error sources for both techniques are examined. A distance of about 2.7 nm is measured in a model compound of the type nitroxide-spacer-lanthanide complex and is found in good agreement with the distance in a modeled structure. Theoretical considerations suggest that an increase of the upper distance limit requires measurements at lower fields and temperatures.

  10. Muon spin relaxation study of misfit-layered cobalt dioxide [CaOH]1.16RS[CoO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Månsson, Martin; Ikedo, Yutaka; Nozaki, Hiroshi; Sugiyama, Jun; Russo, Peter L.; Andreica, Daniel; Shizuya, Mitsuyuki; Isobe, Masaaki; Takayama-Muromachi, Eiji

    2010-02-01

    In order to clarify the nature of a possible magnetic phase transition at Tm=13 K for the misfit layered cobalt dioxide with a double rocksalt (RS-) type block, [Ca 0.85OH] 1.16RS[CoO 2], we have measured the muon spin rotation and relaxation ( μ+SR) spectra in the temperature ( T) range between 1.8 and 20 K. All μ+SR parameters, such as the dipolar interaction frequency ( f) due to the formation of μ+-OH, its asymmetry ( A) and relaxation rate ( σ), are found to be independent of T both above and below T. This is a clear indication that the transition at T is not due to magnetic order but has a structural and/or electronic origin. In addition, we have been able to determine the muon stopping site for this misfit layered compound. It is found to be located within the CaOH blocking layers, where the muon and OH-group form a water-like Hμ+O unit as indicated by a very slow oscillation in the zero-field relaxation spectrum.

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance-paramagnetic relaxation enhancements: Influence of spatial quantization of the electron spin when the zero-field splitting energy is larger than the Zeeman energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abernathy, S. M.; Miller, J. C.; Lohr, L. L.; Sharp, R. R.

    1998-09-01

    Dissolved paramagnetic ions generally provide an efficient mechanism for the relaxation of nuclear spins in solution, a phenomenon called the nuclear magnetic resonance-paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (NMR-PRE). Metal ions with electron spins S⩾1 exhibit rich NMR relaxation phenomena originating in the properties of the zero-field splitting (zfs) interaction, which vanishes for spin-1/2 ions but which is nonzero for S⩾1 ions in site symmetry lower than cubic. For S⩾1 ions in the vicinity of the zfs-limit, i.e., at magnetic-field strengths low enough that the zfs energy exceeds the Zeeman energy, the NMR-PRE depends strongly on the detailed structure of the electron spin energy levels as well as on the spatial quantization of the spin motion. It is shown theoretically and experimentally that the NMR-PRE produced by integer spins can be influenced strongly by the small intradoublet zero-field splittings, i.e., the splittings between the components of the non-Kramers doublets, which are produced by noncylindrical components of the crystal field potential. These small splittings produce relatively low-frequency oscillations in the dipolar field associated with (the spin component along the molecule-fixed ẑ axis). These motions decouple the nuclear spin from the electron spin, thereby depressing, in some cases very strongly, the NMR-PRE. The presence of a relatively small Zeeman field, comparable in magnitude to the intradoublet spacing but small compared to the larger interdoublet zfs splittings, causes a major change in the spin wave functions which has profound effects on the motions of the electron spin. When the Zeeman energy exceeds the small zfs splitting, the oscillatory motion of damps out, with the result that the electron spin couples more effectively to the nuclear spin, providing a more efficient NMR relaxation pathway. NMR-PRE data are presented for the S=1 complex Ni(II)(o-pda)2Cl2 (o-pda=ortho-phenylenediamine) which confirm the

  12. Magnetic field induced anisotropy of 139La spin-lattice relaxation rates in stripe ordered La1.875Ba0.125CuO4

    DOE PAGESBeta

    S. -H. Baek; Gu, G. D.; Utz, Y.; Hucker, M.; Buchner, B.; Grafe, H. -J.

    2015-10-26

    We report 139La nuclear magnetic resonance studies performed on a La1.875Ba0.125CuO4 single crystal. The data show that the structural phase transitions (high-temperature tetragonal → low-temperature orthorhombic → low-temperature tetragonal phase) are of the displacive type in this material. The 139La spin-lattice relaxation rate T–11 sharply upturns at the charge-ordering temperature TCO = 54 K, indicating that charge order triggers the slowing down of spin fluctuations. Detailed temperature and field dependencies of the T–11 below the spin-ordering temperature TSO=40 K reveal the development of enhanced spin fluctuations in the spin-ordered state for H ∥ [001], which are completely suppressed for largemore » fields along the CuO2 planes. Lastly, our results shed light on the unusual spin fluctuations in the charge and spin stripe ordered lanthanum cuprates.« less

  13. Magnetic field induced anisotropy of 139La spin-lattice relaxation rates in stripe ordered La1.875Ba0.125CuO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, S.-H.; Utz, Y.; Hücker, M.; Gu, G. D.; Büchner, B.; Grafe, H.-J.

    2015-10-01

    We report 139La nuclear magnetic resonance studies performed on a La1.875Ba0.125CuO4 single crystal. The data show that the structural phase transitions (high-temperature tetragonal→low-temperature orthorhombic→low-temperature tetragonal phase) are of the displacive type in this material. The 139La spin-lattice relaxation rate T1-1 sharply upturns at the charge-ordering temperature TCO=54 K, indicating that charge order triggers the slowing down of spin fluctuations. Detailed temperature and field dependencies of the T1-1 below the spin-ordering temperature TSO=40 K reveal the development of enhanced spin fluctuations in the spin-ordered state for H ∥[001 ] , which are completely suppressed for large fields along the CuO2 planes. Our results shed light on the unusual spin fluctuations in the charge and spin stripe ordered lanthanum cuprates.

  14. Relaxation after quantum quenches in the spin-1/2 Heisenberg XXZ chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagotti, Maurizio; Collura, Mario; Essler, Fabian H. L.; Calabrese, Pasquale

    2014-03-01

    We consider the time evolution after quantum quenches in the spin-1/2 Heisenberg XXZ quantum spin chain with Ising-type anisotropy. The time evolution of short-distance spin-spin correlation functions is studied by numerical tensor network techniques for a variety of initial states, including Néel and Majumdar-Ghosh states and the ground state of the XXZ chain at large values of the anisotropy. The various correlators appear to approach stationary values, which are found to be in good agreement with the results of exact calculations of stationary expectation values in appropriate generalized Gibbs ensembles. In particular, our analysis shows how symmetries of the post-quench Hamiltonian that are broken by particular initial states are restored at late times.

  15. Impact of artificial lateral quantum confinement on exciton-spin relaxation in a two-dimensional GaAs electronic system

    SciTech Connect

    Kiba, Takayuki Murayama, Akihiro; Tanaka, Toru; Tamura, Yosuke; Higo, Akio; Thomas, Cedric; Samukawa, Seiji

    2014-10-15

    We demonstrate the effect of artificial lateral quantum confinement on exciton-spin relaxation in a GaAs electronic system. GaAs nanodisks (NDs) were fabricated from a quantum well (QW) by top-down nanotechnology using neutral-beam etching aided by protein-engineered bio-nano-templates. The exciton-spin relaxation time was 1.4 ns due to ND formation, significantly extended compared to 0.44 ns for the original QW, which is attributed to weakening of the hole-state mixing in addition to freezing of the carrier momentum. The temperature dependence of the spin-relaxation time depends on the ND thickness, reflecting the degree of quantum confinement.

  16. Calculation of the electron spin relaxation times in InSb and InAs by the projection-reduction method

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Nam Lyong

    2014-12-07

    The electron spin relaxation times in a system of electrons interacting with piezoelectric phonons mediated through spin-orbit interactions were calculated using the formula derived from the projection-reduction method. The results showed that the temperature and magnetic field dependence of the relaxation times in InSb and InAs were similar. The piezoelectric material constants obtained by a comparison with the reported experimental result were P{sub pe}=4.0×10{sup 22} eV/m for InSb and P{sub pe}=1.2×10{sup 23} eV/m for InAs. The result also showed that the relaxation of the electron spin by the Elliot-Yafet process is more relevant for InSb than InAs at a low density.

  17. Calculation of the electron spin relaxation times in InSb and InAs by the projection-reduction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Nam Lyong

    2014-12-01

    The electron spin relaxation times in a system of electrons interacting with piezoelectric phonons mediated through spin-orbit interactions were calculated using the formula derived from the projection-reduction method. The results showed that the temperature and magnetic field dependence of the relaxation times in InSb and InAs were similar. The piezoelectric material constants obtained by a comparison with the reported experimental result were Ppe=4.0 ×1022 eV/m for InSb and Ppe=1.2 ×1023 eV/m for InAs. The result also showed that the relaxation of the electron spin by the Elliot-Yafet process is more relevant for InSb than InAs at a low density.

  18. Calculation of the transport and relaxation properties of methane. II. Thermal conductivity, thermomagnetic effects, volume viscosity, and nuclear-spin relaxation.

    PubMed

    Hellmann, Robert; Bich, Eckard; Vogel, Eckhard; Dickinson, Alan S; Vesovic, Velisa

    2009-03-28

    Transport properties of pure methane have been calculated in the rigid-rotor approximation using the recently proposed intermolecular potential energy hypersurface [R. Hellmann et al., J. Chem. Phys. 128, 214303 (2008)] and the classical-trajectory method. Results are reported in the dilute-gas limit for the temperature range of 80-1500 K. The calculated thermal conductivity values are in very good agreement with the measured data and correlations. In the temperature range of 310-480 K the calculated values underestimate the best experimental data by 0.5%-1.0%. We suggest that the calculated values are more accurate, especially at low and high temperatures, than the currently available correlations based on the experimental data. Our results also agree well with measurements of thermal transpiration and of the thermomagnetic coefficients. We have shown that although the dominant contribution to the thermomagnetic coefficients comes from the Wjj polarization in the spherical approximation, the contribution of a second polarization, Wj, cannot be neglected nor can a full description of the Wjj polarization. The majority of the volume viscosity measurements around room temperature are consistent with the calculated values but this is not the case at high and low temperatures. However, for nuclear-spin relaxation the calculated values consistently exceed the measurements, which are mutually consistent within a few percent. PMID:19334832

  19. Properties of the manganese(II) binding site in ternary complexes of Mnter dot ADP and Mnter dot ATP with chloroplast coupling factor 1: Magnetic field dependence of solvent sup 1 H and sup 2 H NMR relaxation rates

    SciTech Connect

    Haddy, A.E.; Frasch, W.D.; Sharp, R.R. )

    1989-05-02

    The influence of the binding of ADP and ATP on the high-affinity Mn(II) binding site of chloroplast coupling factor 1 (CF{sub 1}) was studied by analysis of field-dependent solvent proton and deuteron spin-lattice relaxation data. In order to characterize metal-nucleotide complexes of CF{sub 1} under conditions similar to those of the NMR experiments, the enzyme was analyzed for bound nucleotides and Mn(II) after incubation with AdN and MnCl{sub 2} and removal of labile ligands by extensive gel filtration chromatography. In the field-dependent NMR experiments, the Mn(II) binding site of CF{sub 1} was studied for three mole ratios of added Mn(II) to CF{sub 1}, 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5, in the presence of an excess of either ADP or ATP. The results were extrapolated to zero Mn(II) concentration to characterize the environment of the first Mn(II) binding site of Cf{sub 1}. In the presence of both adenine nucleotides, pronounced changes in the Mn(II) environment relative to that in Mn(II)-CF{sub 1} were evident; the local relaxation rate maxima were more pronounced and shifted to higher field strengths, and the relaxation rate per bound Mn(II) increased at all field strengths. Analysis of the data revealed that the number of exchangeable water molecules liganded to bound Mn(II) increased from one in the binary Mn(II)-CF{sub 1} complex to three and two in the ternary Mn(II)-ADP-CF{sub 1} and Mn(II)-ATP-CF{sub 1} complexes, respectively; these results suggest that a water ligand to bound Mn(II) in the Mn(II)-ADP-CF{sub 1} complex is replaced by the {gamma}-phosphate of ATP in the Mn(II)-ATP-CF{sub 1} complex. A binding model is presented to account for these observations.

  20. Ligand protons in a frozen solution of copper histidine relax via a T1e-driven three-spin mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoll, S.; Epel, B.; Vega, S.; Goldfarb, D.

    2007-10-01

    Davies electron-nuclear double resonance spectra can exhibit strong asymmetries for long mixing times, short repetition times, and large thermal polarizations. These asymmetries can be used to determine nuclear relaxation rates in paramagnetic systems. Measurements of frozen solutions of copper(L-histidine)2 reveal a strong field dependence of the relaxation rates of the protons in the histidine ligand, increasing from low (g‖) to high (g⊥) field. It is shown that this can be attributed to a concentration-dependent T1e-driven relaxation process involving strongly mixed states of three spins: the histidine proton, the Cu(II) electron spin of the same complex, and another distant electron spin with a resonance frequency differing from the spectrometer frequency approximately by the proton Larmor frequency. The protons relax more efficiently in the g⊥ region, since the number of distant electrons able to participate in this relaxation mechanism is higher than in the g‖ region. Analytical expressions for the associated nuclear polarization decay rate Teen-1 are developed and Monte Carlo simulations are carried out, reproducing both the field and the concentration dependences of the nuclear relaxation.

  1. Finding the true spin-lattice relaxation time for half-integral nuclei with non-zero quadrupole couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yesinowski, James P.

    2015-03-01

    Measuring true spin-lattice relaxation times T1 of half-integral quadrupolar nuclei having non-zero nuclear quadrupole coupling constants (NQCCs) presents challenges due to the presence of satellite-transitions (STs) that may lie outside the excitation bandwidth of the central transition (CT). This leads to complications in establishing well-defined initial conditions for the population differences in these multi-level systems. In addition, experiments involving magic-angle spinning (MAS) can introduce spin exchange due to zero-crossings of the ST and CT (or possibly rotational resonance recoupling in the case of multiple sites) and greatly altered initial conditions as well. An extensive comparison of pulse sequences that have been previously used to measure T1 in such systems is reported, using the 71Ga (I = 3/2) NMR of a Ge-doped h-GaN n-type semiconductor sample as the test case. The T1 values were measured at the peak maximum of the Knight shift distribution. Analytical expressions for magnetization-recovery of the CT appropriate to the pulse sequences tested were used, involving contributions from both a magnetic relaxation mechanism (rate constant W) and a quadrupolar one (rate constants W1 and W2, approximately equal in this case). An asynchronous train of high-power saturating pulses under MAS that is able to completely saturate both CT and STs is found to be the most reliable and accurate method for obtaining the "true T1", defined here as (2W + 2W1,2)-1. All other methods studied yielded poor agreement with this "true T1" value or even resulted in gross errors, for reasons that are analyzed in detail. These methods involved a synchronous train of saturating pulses under MAS, an inversion-recovery sequence under MAS or static conditions, and a saturating comb of pulses on a static sample. Although the present results were obtained on a sample where the magnetic relaxation mechanism dominated the quadrupolar one, the asynchronous saturating pulse train

  2. Rotation of Lipids in Membranes: Molecular Dynamics Simulation, 31P Spin-Lattice Relaxation, and Rigid-Body Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Klauda, Jeffery B.; Roberts, Mary F.; Redfield, Alfred G.; Brooks, Bernard R.; Pastor, Richard W.

    2008-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations and 31P-NMR spin-lattice (\\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{pmc} \\usepackage[Euler]{upgreek} \\pagestyle{empty} \\oddsidemargin -1.0in \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}R_{1}\\end{equation*}\\end{document}) relaxation rates from 0.022 to 21.1 T of fluid phase dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine bilayers are compared. Agreement between experiment and direct prediction from simulation indicates that the dominant slow relaxation (correlation) times of the dipolar and chemical shift anisotropy spin-lattice relaxation are ∼10 ns and 3 ns, respectively. Overall reorientation of the lipid body, consisting of the phosphorus, glycerol, and acyl chains, is well described within a rigid-body model. Wobble, with \\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{pmc} \\usepackage[Euler]{upgreek} \\pagestyle{empty} \\oddsidemargin -1.0in \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}D_{{\\bot}}=\\end{equation*}\\end{document} 1–2 × 108 s−1, is the primary component of the 10 ns relaxation; this timescale is consistent with the tumbling of a lipid-sized cylinder in a medium with the viscosity of liquid hexadecane. The value for \\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{pmc} \\usepackage[Euler]{upgreek} \\pagestyle{empty} \\oddsidemargin -1.0in \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}D_{{\\Vert}},\\end{equation*}\\end{document} the diffusion constant for rotation about the long axis of the lipid body, is difficult to determine precisely because of averaging by fast motions and wobble; it is tentatively estimated to be 1 × 107 s−1. The resulting D‖/D⊥

  3. Electron Spin-Lattice Relaxation in Two Heme Iron and Two Blue-Copper Proteins at Liquid Helium Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thayer, Bradley Denton

    1990-01-01

    The relaxation rates in frozen aqueous solutions of whale ferri-myoglobin azide, bovine ferri-hemoglobin azide, cupric azurin (P. aeruginosa) and cupric spinach plastocyanin were measured at 9.5 GHz using the pulse-saturation recovery method. Measurements covered a temperature range of 1.4 K to as high as 22 K, with corresponding relaxation rates up to 10^5/sec. Improvements in the equipment and the methods of analysis have enabled more stringent tests of the temperature dependence of the rates. In particular, several models proposed in the literature to explain the anomalous temperature dependence of the Raman rates in proteins are shown to be insufficient, including two fractal models. In addition, it is shown that any model based exclusively on the protein structure fails due to the diversity of the data under various solvent conditions. A general functional form consistent with a crossover in the vibrational properties is proposed instead, similar to the localization crossover in amorphous materials. The effect on the relaxation rate of several cosolvents and solutes is also examined. The effect on the direct process is much more pronounced than on the Raman region. The differences are shown to be consistent with changes in the velocity of sound at room temperature caused by the addition of cosolvents and solutes. Finally, the EPR recovery form is analyzed. We propose that the deviations in the recovery from an exponential form are due to a distribution of relaxation rates. The source of the distribution is most likely sample heating in the lower temperatures and a distribution of conformations frozen in near the paramagnetic site in the higher temperatures. It is not likely that it is caused by spin-spin interactions. The exact form of the distribution is unclear, but the most successful functional form for the recoveries is a stretched exponential with an exponent ranging from 0.5 to 1.0. However, a simple exponential fit to a limited portion of the recovery

  4. Impact of Chlorine Substitution on Spin Lattice Relaxation of Triarylmethyl and 1,4-Benzosemiquinone Radicals in Glass-forming Solvents between 25 and 295 K

    PubMed Central

    Kathirvelu, Velavan; Eaton, Gareth R.; Eaton, Sandra S.

    2009-01-01

    Spin-lattice relaxation rates measured by long-pulse saturation recovery in glassy solvents for chlorinated aromatic radicals: perchlorotriphenylmethyl radical, 2,5-dichloro-3,6-dihydroxy-1,4-benzosemiquinone, and tetrachloro-1,4-benzosemiquinone, were compared with relaxation rates for non-chlorinated analogs. The impact of the quadrupolar chlorines is small, and less than the effects of changing the rigidity of the glass. The temperature dependence of relaxation rates below the glass transition temperature could be modeled as the sum of contributions from the direct, Raman, and local mode processes. PMID:20126423

  5. Proton spin-lattice relaxation in silkworm cocoons: physisorbed water and serine side-chain motions.

    PubMed

    Geppi, Marco; Mollica, Giulia; Borsacchi, Silvia; Cappellozza, Silvia

    2010-03-01

    The molecular dynamic behavior of silkworm cocoons produced by a single Bombyx mori strain was investigated by means of high- and low-resolution solid-state NMR experiments. Cocoons with different moisture content were prepared to study the effects of physisorbed water on their molecular dynamics in the MHz regime, which was probed through the measurement of (1)H T(1) relaxation times at 25 MHz in the 25-95 degrees C temperature range. The water content of the different samples was determined from the analysis of (1)H free-induction decays. In addition to the rotation of methyl groups, mostly from alanine, and to the reorientation of physisorbed water molecules, already identified in previous works as relaxation sinks, the reorientation of serine side-chains was here found to contribute to (1)H T(1) above room temperature. The analysis of the trends of (1)H T(1) versus temperature was carried out in terms of semiempirical models describing the three main motional processes, and indicated that methyl rotation, water reorientation and serine side-chain motions are the most efficient relaxation mechanisms below 0 degrees C, between 0 and 60 degrees C, and above 60 degrees C, respectively. The activation energies were found to decrease passing from serine to water to methyl motions. PMID:20136080

  6. Magnetic phase diagram of La2 -xSrxCoO4 revised using muon-spin relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, R. C.; Xiao, F.; Lancaster, T.; De Renzi, R.; Allodi, G.; Bordignon, S.; Freeman, P. G.; Pratt, F. L.; Giblin, S. R.; Möller, J. S.; Blundell, S. J.; Boothroyd, A. T.; Prabhakaran, D.

    2016-04-01

    We report the results of a muon-spin relaxation (μ SR ) investigation of La2 -xSrxCoO4 , an antiferromagnetic insulating series which has been shown to support charge ordered and magnetic stripe phases and an hourglass magnetic excitation spectrum. We present a revised magnetic phase diagram, which shows that the suppression of the magnetic ordering temperature is highly sensitive to small concentrations of holes. Distinct behavior within an intermediate x range (0.2 ≤x ≲0.6 ) suggests that the putative stripe ordered phase extends to lower x than previously thought. Further charge doping (0.67 ≤x ≤0.9 ) prevents magnetic ordering for T ≳1.5 K .

  7. Off-resonance rotating frame spin-lattice NMR relaxation studies of phosphorus metabolite rotational diffusion in bovine lens homogenates

    SciTech Connect

    Caines, G.H.; Schleich, T.; Morgan, C.F. ); Farnsworth, P.N. )

    1990-08-21

    The rotational diffusion behavior of phosphorus metabolites present in calf lens cortical and nuclear homogenates was investigated by the NMR technique of {sup 31}P off-resonance rotating frame spin-lattice relaxation as a means of assessing the occurrence and extent of phosphorus metabolite-lens protein interactions. {sup 31}P NMR spectra of calf lens homogenates were obtained at 10 and 18{degree}C at 7.05 T. Effective rotational correlation times ({tau}{sub 0,eff}) for the major phosphorus metabolites present in cortical and nuclear bovine calf lens homogenates were derived from nonlinear least-squares analysis of R vs {omega}{sub e} data with the assumption of isotropic reorientational motion. Intramolecular dipole-dipole ({sup 1}H-{sup 31}P, {sup 31}P-{sup 31}P), chemical shift anisotropy (CSA), and solvent (water) translational intermolecular dipole-dipole ({sup 1}H-{sup 31}P) relaxation contributions were assumed in the analyses. A fast-exchange model between free and bound forms, was employed in the analysis of the metabolite R vs {omega}{sub e} curves to yield the fraction of free (unbound) metabolite ({Theta}{sub free}). The results of this study establish the occurrence of significant temperature-dependent (above and below the cold cataract phase transition temperature) binding of ATP (cortex) and PME (nucleus) and p{sub i} (nucleus) in calf lens.

  8. Diffusive behavior in LiMPO4 with M=Fe, Co, Ni probed by muon-spin relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, Jun; Nozaki, Hiroshi; Harada, Masashi; Kamazawa, Kazuya; Ikedo, Yutaka; Miyake, Yasuhiro; Ofer, Oren; Månsson, Martin; Ansaldo, Eduardo J.; Chow, Kim H.; Kobayashi, Genki; Kanno, Ryoji

    2012-02-01

    In order to study the diffusive nature of lithium transition-metal phospho-olivines, we measured muon-spin relaxation (μ+SR) spectra for the polycrystalline LiMPO4 samples with M=Mn, Fe, Co, or Ni in the temperature range between 50 and 500 K. The μ+SR spectra under zero applied field are strongly affected by the magnetic moments of the 3d electrons in the M2+ ions so that, for LiMnPO4, it was difficult to detect the relaxation change caused by the diffusion due to the large Mn2+(S=5/2) moments. However, diffusive behavior was clearly observed via the relaxation due to nuclear dipolar fields above ˜150 K for LiFePO4, LiCoPO4, and LiNiPO4 as S decreased from 2 to 1. From the temperature dependence of the nuclear field fluctuation rate, self-diffusion coefficients of Li+ ions (DLi) at 300 K and its activation energy (Ea) were estimated, respectively, as ˜3.6(2)×10-10 cm2/s and Ea=0.10(2) eV for LiFePO4, ˜1.6(1)×10-10 cm2/s and Ea=0.10(1) eV for LiCoPO4, and ˜2.7(4)×10-10 cm2/s and Ea=0.17(2) eV for LiNiPO4, assuming that the diffusing Li+ ions jump between the regular site and interstitial sites.

  9. Enhancement of spin relaxation in an FeDy2 Fe coordination cluster by magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Peng, Guo; Mereacre, Valeriu; Kostakis, George E; Wolny, Juliusz A; Schünemann, Volker; Powell, Annie K

    2014-09-22

    Two [FeLn2 Fe(μ3 -OH)2 (teg)2 (N3 )2 (C6 H5 COO)4 ] compounds (where Ln=Y(III) and Dy(III) ; teg=triethylene glycol anion) have been synthesized and studied using SQUID and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The magnetic measurements on both compounds indicate dominant antiferromagnetic interactions between the metal centers. Analysis of the (57) Fe Mössbauer spectra complement the ac magnetic susceptibility measurements, which show how a static magnetic field can quench the slow relaxation of magnetization generated by the anisotropic Dy(III) ions. PMID:25197018

  10. Fermi-level pinning, charge transfer, and relaxation of spin-momentum locking at metal contacts to topological insulators

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Spataru, Catalin D.; Léonard, François

    2014-08-13

    Topological insulators are of interest for many applications in electronics and optoelectronics, but harnessing their unique properties requires detailed understanding and control of charge injection at electrical contacts. Here we present large-scale ab initio calculations of the electronic properties of Au, Ni, Pt, Pd, and graphene contacts to Bi2Se3. We show that regardless of the metal, the Fermi level is located in the conduction band, leading to n-type Ohmic contact to the first quintuplet. Furthermore, we find strong charge transfer and band-bending in the first few quintuplets, with no Schottky barrier for charge injection even when the topoplogical insulator ismore » undoped. Our calculations indicate that Au and graphene leave the spin-momentum locking mostly unaltered, but on the other hand, Ni, Pd, and Pt strongly hybridize with Bi2Se3 and relax spin-momentum locking. In conclusion, our results indicate that judicious choice of the contact metal is essential to reveal the unique surface features of topological insulators.« less

  11. Fermi-level pinning, charge transfer, and relaxation of spin-momentum locking at metal contacts to topological insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Spataru, Catalin D.; Léonard, François

    2014-08-13

    Topological insulators are of interest for many applications in electronics and optoelectronics, but harnessing their unique properties requires detailed understanding and control of charge injection at electrical contacts. Here we present large-scale ab initio calculations of the electronic properties of Au, Ni, Pt, Pd, and graphene contacts to Bi2Se3. We show that regardless of the metal, the Fermi level is located in the conduction band, leading to n-type Ohmic contact to the first quintuplet. Furthermore, we find strong charge transfer and band-bending in the first few quintuplets, with no Schottky barrier for charge injection even when the topoplogical insulator is undoped. Our calculations indicate that Au and graphene leave the spin-momentum locking mostly unaltered, but on the other hand, Ni, Pd, and Pt strongly hybridize with Bi2Se3 and relax spin-momentum locking. In conclusion, our results indicate that judicious choice of the contact metal is essential to reveal the unique surface features of topological insulators.

  12. Studies of a Large Odd-Numbered Odd-Electron Metal Ring: Inelastic Neutron Scattering and Muon Spin Relaxation Spectroscopy of Cr8 Mn.

    PubMed

    Baker, Michael L; Lancaster, Tom; Chiesa, Alessandro; Amoretti, Giuseppe; Baker, Peter J; Barker, Claire; Blundell, Stephen J; Carretta, Stefano; Collison, David; Güdel, Hans U; Guidi, Tatiana; McInnes, Eric J L; Möller, Johannes S; Mutka, Hannu; Ollivier, Jacques; Pratt, Francis L; Santini, Paolo; Tuna, Floriana; Tregenna-Piggott, Philip L W; Vitorica-Yrezabal, Iñigo J; Timco, Grigore A; Winpenny, Richard E P

    2016-01-26

    The spin dynamics of Cr8 Mn, a nine-membered antiferromagnetic (AF) molecular nanomagnet, are investigated. Cr8 Mn is a rare example of a large odd-membered AF ring, and has an odd-number of 3d-electrons present. Odd-membered AF rings are unusual and of interest due to the presence of competing exchange interactions that result in frustrated-spin ground states. The chemical synthesis and structures of two Cr8 Mn variants that differ only in their crystal packing are reported. Evidence of spin frustration is investigated by inelastic neutron scattering (INS) and muon spin relaxation spectroscopy (μSR). From INS studies we accurately determine an appropriate microscopic spin Hamiltonian and we show that μSR is sensitive to the ground-spin-state crossing from S=1/2 to S=3/2 in Cr8 Mn. The estimated width of the muon asymmetry resonance is consistent with the presence of an avoided crossing. The investigation of the internal spin structure of the ground state, through the analysis of spin-pair correlations and scalar-spin chirality, shows a non-collinear spin structure that fluctuates between non-planar states of opposite chiralities. PMID:26748964

  13. Magnetic field penetration depth of La(1.85)Sr(0.15)CuO4 measured by muon spin relaxation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kossler, W. J.; Kempton, J. R.; Yu, X. H.; Schone, H. E.; Uemura, Y. J.

    1987-01-01

    Muon-spin-relaxation measurements have been performed on a high-Tc superconductor La(1.85)Sr(0.15)CuO4. In an external transverse magnetic field of 500 G, a magnetic field penetration depth of 2000 A at T = 10 K has been determined from the muon-spin-relaxation rate which increased with decreasing temperature below Tc. From this depth and the Pauli susceptibility, the superconducting carrier density is estimated at 3 x 10 to the 21st per cu cm. The zero-field relaxation rates above and below Tc were equal, which suggests that the superconducting state in this sample is not associated with detectable static magnetic ordering.

  14. SRLS analysis of 15N spin relaxation from E. coli ribonuclease HI: the tensorial perspective.

    PubMed

    Meirovitch, Eva; Shapiro, Yury E; Zerbetto, Mirco; Polimeno, Antonino

    2012-01-19

    15N–H relaxation parameters from ribonuclease HI (RNase H), acquired in previous work at magnetic fields of 14.1 and 18.8 T, and at 300 K, are analyzed with the mode-coupling slowly relaxing local structure (SRLS) approach. In accordance with standard theoretical treatments of restricted motions, SRLS approaches N-H bond dynamics from a tensorial perspective. As shown previously, a physically adequate description of this phenomenon has to account for the asymmetry of the local spatial restrictions. So far, we used rhombic local ordering tensors; this is straightforward but computationally demanding. Here, we propose substantiating the asymmetry of the local spatial restrictions in terms of tilted axial local ordering (S) and local diffusion (D2) tensors. Although less straightforward, this description provides physically sound structural and dynamic information and is efficient computationally. We find that the local order parameter, S(0)2, is on average 0.89 (0.84, and may be as small as 0.6) for the secondary structure elements (loops). The main local ordering axis deviates from the C(i-1)α-C(i)α axis by less than 6°. At 300 K, D(2,perpendicular) is virtually the same as the global diffusion rate, D1 = 1.8 × 10(7) s(-1). The correlation time 1/6D(2,parallel) ranges from 3-125 (208-344) ps for the secondary structure elements (loops) and is on average 125 ps for the C-terminal segment. The main local diffusion axis deviates from the N-H bond by less than 2° (10°) for the secondary structure elements (loops). An effective data-fitting protocol, which leads in most cases to unambiguous results with limited uncertainty, has been devised. A physically sound and computationally effective methodology for analyzing 15N relaxation in proteins, that provides a new picture of N–H bond structural dynamics in proteins, has been set forth. PMID:22126306

  15. Radical ions with nearly degenerate ground state: correlation between the rate of spin-lattice relaxation and the structure of adiabatic potential energy surface.

    PubMed

    Borovkov, V I; Beregovaya, I V; Shchegoleva, L N; Potashov, P A; Bagryansky, V A; Molin, Y N

    2012-09-14

    Paramagnetic spin-lattice relaxation (SLR) in radical cations (RCs) of the cycloalkane series in liquid solution was studied and analyzed from the point of view of the correlation between the relaxation rate and the structure of the adiabatic potential energy surface (PES) of the RCs. SLR rates in the RCs formed in x-ray irradiated n-hexane solutions of the cycloalkanes studied were measured with the method of time-resolved magnetic field effect in the recombination fluorescence of spin-correlated radical ion pairs. Temperature and, for some cycloalkanes, magnetic field dependences of the relaxation rate were determined. It was found that the conventional Redfield theory of the paramagnetic relaxation as applied to the results on cyclohexane RC, gave a value of about 0.2 ps for the correlation time of the perturbation together with an unrealistically high value of 0.1 T in field units for the matrix element of the relaxation transition. The PES structure was obtained with the DFT quantum-chemical calculations. It was found that for all of the cycloalkanes RCs considered, including low symmetric alkyl-substituted ones, the adiabatic PESes were surfaces of pseudorotation due to avoided crossing. In the RCs studied, a correlation between the SLR rate and the calculated barrier height to the pseudorotation was revealed. For RCs with a higher relaxation rate, the apparent activation energies for the SLR were similar to the calculated heights of the barrier. To rationalize the data obtained it was assumed that the vibronic states degeneracy, which is specific for Jahn-Teller active cyclohexane RC, was approximately kept in the RCs of substituted cycloalkanes for the vibronic states with the energies above and close to the barrier height to the pseudorotation. It was proposed that the effective spin-lattice relaxation in a radical with nearly degenerate low-lying vibronic states originated from stochastic crossings of the vibronic levels that occur due to fluctuations of

  16. Frequency Dependence of Electron Spin Relaxation Times in Aqueous Solution for a Nitronyl Nitroxide Radical and Per-deuterated-Tempone between 250 MHz and 34 GHz

    PubMed Central

    Biller, Joshua R.; Meyer, Virginia M.; Elajaili, Hanan; Rosen, Gerald M.; Eaton, Sandra S.; Eaton, Gareth R.

    2012-01-01

    Electron spin relaxation times of perdeuterated tempone (PDT) 1 and of a nitronyl nitroxide 2-(4-carboxy-phenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-3-oxide-1-oxyl) 2 in aqueous solution at room temperature were measured by 2-pulse electron spin echo (T2) or 3-pulse inversion recovery (T1) in the frequency range of 250 MHz to 34 GHz. At 9 GHz values of T1 measured by long-pulse saturation recovery were in good agreement with values determined by inversion recovery. Below 9 GHz for 1 and below 1.5 GHz for 2, T1~ T2, as expected in the fast tumbling regime. At higher frequencies T2 was shorter than T1 due to incomplete motional averaging of g and A anisotropy. The frequency dependence of 1/T1 is modeled as the sum of spin rotation, modulation of g and A-anisotropy, and a thermally-activated process that has maximum contribution at about 1.5 GHz. The spin lattice relaxation times for the nitronyl nitroxide were longer than for PDT by a factor of about 2 at 34 GHz, decreasing to about a factor of 1.5 at 250 MHz. The rotational correlation times, τR are calculated to be 9 ps for 1 and about 25 ps for 2. The longer spin lattice relaxation times for 2 than for 1 at 9 and 34 GHz are due predominantly to smaller contributions from spin rotation that arise from slower tumbling. The smaller nitrogen hyperfine couplings for the nitronyl 2 than for 1 decrease the contribution to relaxation due to modulation of A anisotropy. However, at lower frequencies the slower tumbling of 2 results in a larger value of ωτR (ω is the resonance frequency) and larger values of the spectral density function, which enhances the contribution from modulation of anisotropic interactions for 2 to a greater extent than for 1. PMID:23123770

  17. Frequency dependence of electron spin relaxation times in aqueous solution for a nitronyl nitroxide radical and perdeuterated-tempone between 250 MHz and 34 GHz.

    PubMed

    Biller, Joshua R; Meyer, Virginia M; Elajaili, Hanan; Rosen, Gerald M; Eaton, Sandra S; Eaton, Gareth R

    2012-12-01

    Electron spin relaxation times of perdeuterated tempone (PDT) 1 and of a nitronyl nitroxide (2-(4-carboxy-phenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-3-oxide-1-oxyl) 2 in aqueous solution at room temperature were measured by 2-pulse electron spin echo (T(2)) or 3-pulse inversion recovery (T(1)) in the frequency range of 250 MHz to 34 GHz. At 9 GHz values of T(1) measured by long-pulse saturation recovery were in good agreement with values determined by inversion recovery. Below 9 GHz for 1 and below 1.5 GHz for 2,T(1)~T(2), as expected in the fast tumbling regime. At higher frequencies T(2) was shorter than T(1) due to incomplete motional averaging of g and A anisotropy. The frequency dependence of 1/T(1) is modeled as the sum of spin rotation, modulation of g and A-anisotropy, and a thermally-activated process that has maximum contribution at about 1.5 GHz. The spin lattice relaxation times for the nitronyl nitroxide were longer than for PDT by a factor of about 2 at 34 GHz, decreasing to about a factor of 1.5 at 250 MHz. The rotational correlation times, τ(R) are calculated to be 9 ps for 1 and about 25 ps for 2. The longer spin lattice relaxation times for 2 than for 1 at 9 and 34 GHz are due predominantly to smaller contributions from spin rotation that arise from slower tumbling. The smaller nitrogen hyperfine couplings for the nitronyl 2 than for 1 decrease the contribution to relaxation due to modulation of A anisotropy. However, at lower frequencies the slower tumbling of 2 results in a larger value of ωτ(R) (ω is the resonance frequency) and larger values of the spectral density function, which enhances the contribution from modulation of anisotropic interactions for 2 to a greater extent than for 1. PMID:23123770

  18. Spin-State Effects on the Thermal Dihydrogen Release from Solid-State [MH(η(2)-H 2)dppe2](+) (M = Fe, Ru, Os) Organometallic Complexes for Hydrogen Storage Applications.

    PubMed

    Abrecht, David G; Muñoz, Jorge A; Smith, Hillary L; Fultz, Brent

    2014-01-30

    Mössbauer spectroscopy, experimental thermodynamic measurements, and computational studies were performed to investigate the properties of molecular hydrogen binding to the organometallic fragments [MHdppe2](+) (M = Fe, Ru, Os; dppe =1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane) to form the dihydrogen complex fragments [MH(η(2)-H2)dppe2](+). Mössbauer spectroscopy showed that the dehydrogenated complex [FeHdppe2](+) adopts a geometry consistent with the triplet spin state, transitioning to a singlet state complex upon addition of the dihydrogen molecule in a manner similar to the previously studied dinitrogen complexes. From simulations, this spin transition behavior was found to be responsible for the strong binding behavior experimentally observed in the iron complex. Spin-singlet to spin-singlet transitions were found to exhibit thermodynamics consistent with the 5d > 3d > 4d binding trend observed for other transition metal dihydrogen complexes. Finally, the method for distinguishing between dihydrogen and dihydride complexes based on partial quadrupole splittings observed in Mössbauer spectra was confirmed, providing a tool for further characterization of these unique species for Mössbauer active compounds. PMID:24803973

  19. Spin-State Effects on the Thermal Dihydrogen Release from Solid-State [MH(η2-H2)dppe2]+ (M = Fe, Ru, Os) Organometallic Complexes for Hydrogen Storage Applications

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mössbauer spectroscopy, experimental thermodynamic measurements, and computational studies were performed to investigate the properties of molecular hydrogen binding to the organometallic fragments [MHdppe2]+ (M = Fe, Ru, Os; dppe =1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane) to form the dihydrogen complex fragments [MH(η2-H2)dppe2]+. Mössbauer spectroscopy showed that the dehydrogenated complex [FeHdppe2]+ adopts a geometry consistent with the triplet spin state, transitioning to a singlet state complex upon addition of the dihydrogen molecule in a manner similar to the previously studied dinitrogen complexes. From simulations, this spin transition behavior was found to be responsible for the strong binding behavior experimentally observed in the iron complex. Spin-singlet to spin-singlet transitions were found to exhibit thermodynamics consistent with the 5d > 3d > 4d binding trend observed for other transition metal dihydrogen complexes. Finally, the method for distinguishing between dihydrogen and dihydride complexes based on partial quadrupole splittings observed in Mössbauer spectra was confirmed, providing a tool for further characterization of these unique species for Mössbauer active compounds. PMID:24803973

  20. Slow spin relaxation induced by magnetic field in [NdCo(bpdo)(H2O)4(CN)6]⋅3H2O.

    PubMed

    Vrábel, P; Orendáč, M; Orendáčová, A; Čižmár, E; Tarasenko, R; Zvyagin, S; Wosnitza, J; Prokleška, J; Sechovský, V; Pavlík, V; Gao, S

    2013-05-01

    We report on a comprehensive investigation of the magnetic properties of [NdCo(bpdo)(H2O)4(CN)6]⋅3H2O (bpdo=4, 4'-bipyridine-N,N'-dioxide) by use of electron paramagnetic resonance, magnetization, specific heat and susceptibility measurements. The studied material was identified as a magnet with an effective spin S = 1/2 and a weak exchange interaction J/kB = 25 mK. The ac susceptibility studies conducted at audio frequencies and at temperatures from 1.8 to 9 K revealed that the application of a static magnetic field induces a slow spin relaxation. It is suggested that the relaxation in the magnetic field appears due to an Orbach-like process between the two lowest doublet energy states of the magnetic Nd(3+) ion. The appearance of the slow relaxation in a magnetic field cannot be associated with a resonant phonon trapping. The obtained results suggest that the relaxation is influenced by nuclear spin driven quantum tunnelling which is suppressed by external magnetic field. PMID:23587762

  1. Electron spin-lattice relaxation of the (4Fe-4S) ferredoxin from B. stearothermophilus. Comparison with other iron proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, Patrick; Gayda, Jean-Pierre; Rao, K. Krishna

    1982-05-01

    The temperature dependence of the electron spin-lattice relaxation time T1 of the (4Fe-4S) ferredoxin from Bacillus stearothermophilus is studied in the range 1.2 to 40 K. This dependence is similar to that observed for the (2Fe-2S) ferredoxin from Spirulina maxima and can be interpreted with the same relaxation processes [J.P. Gayda, P. Bertrand, A. Deville, C. More, G. Roger, J.F. Gibson, and R. Cammack, Biochim. Biophys. Acta 581, 15 (1979)]. In particular, between 4 and 15 K, the data are well fitted by a second-order Raman process involving three-dimensional phonons, with a Debye temperature of about 60 K (45 cm-1). This would give an estimation of the highest frequency of the vibrations which can propagate through the three-dimensional proteinic medium. In the highest temperature range (T≳30 K) the results are interpreted with an Orbach process involving an excited level of energy 120 cm-1. This process could be induced by the localized vibrations of the active site. Finally, these results are compared to those recently reported for some hemoproteins [H.J. Stapleton, J.P. Allen, C.P. Flynn, D.G. Stinson, and S.R. Kurtz, Phys. Rev. Lett. 45, 1456 (1980)]. Below 15 K, the temperature dependence of T1 for these samples is similar to that observed for the iron-sulfur proteins and may be interpreted in the same way. Our interpretation is compared to the fractal model proposed by Stapleton et al.

  2. One-Shot Measurement of Spin-Lattice Relaxation Times in the Off-Resonance Rotating Frame of Reference with Applications to Breast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairbanks, Ethan Jefferson

    1994-01-01

    Off-resonance spin locking makes use of the novel relaxation time T_{1rho} ^{rm off}, which may be useful in characterizing breast disease. Knowledge of T _{rm 1rho}^{rm off} is essential for optimization of spin -locking imaging methods. The purpose of this work was to develop an optimal imaging technique for in vivo measurement of T_{rm 1rho}^ {rm off}. Measurement of T _{1rho}^{rm off } using conventional methods requires long exam times which are not suitable for patients. Exam time may be shortened by utilizing a one-shot method developed by Look and Locker, making in vivo measurements possible. The imaging method consisted of a 180^circ inversion pulse followed by a series of small-angle alpha pulses to tip a portion of the longitudinal magnetization into the transverse plane for readout. During each relaxation interval (between alpha pulses), a spin-locking pulse was applied off-resonance to achieve T_ {1rho}^{rm off} relaxation. The value of T_{rm 1rho}^{rm off} was then determined using a three-parameter non-linear least-squares fitting procedure. Values of T_ {1rho}^{rm off} were measured for normal and pathologic breast tissues at several resonant offsets. These measurements revealed that image contrast can be manipulated by altering the resonant offset of the spin-locking pulse. Whereas T _1 relaxation times were nearly identical for normal and cancerous tissues, T_{1 rho}^{rm off} relaxation times differed significantly. These results may be useful in improving image contrast in magnetic resonance imaging.

  3. In situ magnetic compensation for potassium spin-exchange relaxation-free magnetometer considering probe beam pumping effect

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Jiancheng; Wang, Tao Quan, Wei; Yuan, Heng; Li, Yang; Zhang, Hong; Zou, Sheng

    2014-06-15

    A novel method to compensate the residual magnetic field for an atomic magnetometer consisting of two perpendicular beams of polarizations was demonstrated in this paper. The method can realize magnetic compensation in the case where the pumping rate of the probe beam cannot be ignored. In the experiment, the probe beam is always linearly polarized, whereas, the probe beam contains a residual circular component due to the imperfection of the polarizer, which leads to the pumping effect of the probe beam. A simulation of the probe beam's optical rotation and pumping rate was demonstrated. At the optimized points, the wavelength of the probe beam was optimized to achieve the largest optical rotation. Although, there is a small circular component in the linearly polarized probe beam, the pumping rate of the probe beam was non-negligible at the optimized wavelength which if ignored would lead to inaccuracies in the magnetic field compensation. Therefore, the dynamic equation of spin evolution was solved by considering the pumping effect of the probe beam. Based on the quasi-static solution, a novel magnetic compensation method was proposed, which contains two main steps: (1) the non-pumping compensation and (2) the sequence compensation with a very specific sequence. After these two main steps, a three-axis in situ magnetic compensation was achieved. The compensation method was suitable to design closed-loop spin-exchange relaxation-free magnetometer. By a combination of the magnetic compensation and the optimization, the magnetic field sensitivity was approximately 4 fT/Hz{sup 1/2}, which was mainly dominated by the noise of the magnetic shield.

  4. Spin-orbit relaxation kinetics of Br(4 2P1/2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Ray O.; Perram, Glen P.; Roh, Won B.

    1996-05-01

    Pulsed and steady-state photolysis techniques have been employed to measure the rate coefficients for collisional deactivation of the spin-orbit excited state of atomic bromine, Br(4 2P1/2). Pulsed lifetime studies for quenching by Br2 and CO2 yielded absolute rate coefficients at room temperature of kBr2=1.2±0.1×10-12 and kCO2=1.5±0.3×10-11 cm3/molecule s. The rate coefficients for quenching by rare gases, N2, O2, NO, NO2, N2O, CO, CO2, COS, SO2, SF6, CF4, CH4, H2S, H2, D2, HBr, HCl, and HI, relative to that for Br2 were determined in a steady-state photolysis experiment. Correlation of the deactivation probabilities with energy defect for the case of electronic-to-vibrational energy transfer is demonstrated.

  5. Phase relaxed localized excitation pulses for inner volume fast spin echo imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hajnal, Joseph V.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To design multidimensional spatially selective radiofrequency (RF) pulses for inner volume imaging (IVI) with three‐dimensional (3D) fast spin echo (FSE) sequences. Enhanced background suppression is achieved by exploiting particular signal properties of FSE sequences. Theory and Methods The CPMG condition dictates that echo amplitudes will rapidly decrease if a 90° phase difference between excitation and refocusing pulses is not present, and refocusing flip angles are not precisely 180°. This mechanism is proposed as a means for generating additional background suppression for spatially selective excitation, by biasing residual excitation errors toward violating the CPMG condition. 3D RF pulses were designed using this method with a 3D spherical spiral trajectory, under‐sampled by factor 5.6 for an eight‐channel PTx system, at 3 Tesla. Results 3D‐FSE IVI with pulse durations of approximately 12 ms was demonstrated in phantoms and for T2‐weighted brain imaging in vivo. Good image quality was obtained, with mean background suppression factors of 103 and 82 ± 6 in phantoms and in vivo, respectively. Conclusion Inner Volume Imaging with 3D‐FSE has been demonstrated in vivo with tailored 3D‐RF pulses. The proposed design methods are also applicable to 2D pulses. Magn Reson Med 76:848–861, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine PMID:26451691

  6. Studies of a Large Odd‐Numbered Odd‐Electron Metal Ring: Inelastic Neutron Scattering and Muon Spin Relaxation Spectroscopy of Cr8Mn

    PubMed Central

    Lancaster, Tom; Chiesa, Alessandro; Amoretti, Giuseppe; Baker, Peter J.; Barker, Claire; Carretta, Stefano; Collison, David; Güdel, Hans U.; Guidi, Tatiana; McInnes, Eric J. L.; Möller, Johannes S.; Mutka, Hannu; Ollivier, Jacques; Pratt, Francis L.; Santini, Paolo; Tuna, Floriana; Tregenna‐Piggott, Philip L. W.; Vitorica‐Yrezabal, Iñigo J.; Timco, Grigore A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The spin dynamics of Cr8Mn, a nine‐membered antiferromagnetic (AF) molecular nanomagnet, are investigated. Cr8Mn is a rare example of a large odd‐membered AF ring, and has an odd‐number of 3d‐electrons present. Odd‐membered AF rings are unusual and of interest due to the presence of competing exchange interactions that result in frustrated‐spin ground states. The chemical synthesis and structures of two Cr8Mn variants that differ only in their crystal packing are reported. Evidence of spin frustration is investigated by inelastic neutron scattering (INS) and muon spin relaxation spectroscopy (μSR). From INS studies we accurately determine an appropriate microscopic spin Hamiltonian and we show that μSR is sensitive to the ground‐spin‐state crossing from S=1/2 to S=3/2 in Cr8Mn. The estimated width of the muon asymmetry resonance is consistent with the presence of an avoided crossing. The investigation of the internal spin structure of the ground state, through the analysis of spin‐pair correlations and scalar‐spin chirality, shows a non‐collinear spin structure that fluctuates between non‐planar states of opposite chiralities. PMID:26748964

  7. Safety Report - Experiments 999 and 891 Muon Spin Relaxation in Pu and Pu-based Heavy Fermion Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Fluss, M; Heffner, R; Morris, G

    2004-04-23

    Experiment E999 proposes to carry out conventional muon spin relaxation ({mu}SR) measurements on solid samples of plutonium and plutonium alloys. Experiment 891 will be involved with {mu}SR experiments on PuCoGa{sub 5} and related Pu-based superconductors. Other than a dedicated cryostat to be provided by Los Alamos and a pumping station provided by Livermore, the experiments will use existing {mu}SR User Facility spectrometers and associated equipment such as detectors and electronics. The main topics of this report are therefore (1) the passivation of the samples with a polymer coating, (2) the design, fabrication and testing of a sealed titanium sample secondary encapsulation cell, (3) the transport of samples to and from TRIUMF and (4) the related on-site procedures for the safe handling of the encapsulated samples. Because both E999 and E891 share the same equipment and Pu-safety related issues, we are submitting a single safety report for both experiments.

  8. Muon Spin Relaxation Studies of Zn-Substitution Effects in High-{ital T{sub {ital c}}} Cuprate Superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Nachumi, B.; Keren, A.; Kojima, K.; Larkin, M.; Luke, G.M.; Merrin, J.; Tchernyshoev, O.; Uemura, Y.J.; Ichikawa, N.; Goto, M.; Uchida, S.

    1996-12-01

    We have performed transverse-field muon spin relaxation measurements of the Zn-substituted cuprate high-{ital T}{sub {ital c}} superconductors: La{sub 2{minus}{ital x}}Sr{sub {ital x}}(Cu{sub 1{minus}{ital y}}Zn{sub {ital y}})O{sub 4} and YBa{sub 2}(Cu{sub 1{minus}{ital y}}Zn{sub {ital y}}){sub 3}O{sub 6.63}. The superconducting carrier density/effective mass {ital n}{sub {ital s}}/{ital m}{sup *} ratio at {ital T}{r_arrow}0 decreases with increasing Zn concentration, in a manner consistent with our {open_quote}{open_quote}swiss cheese{close_quote}{close_quote} model in which charge carriers within an area {pi}{xi}{sub {ital ab}}{sup 2} around each Zn are excluded from the superfluid. We discuss this result in the context of Bose condensation, pair localization, and pair breaking. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  9. Rotating-frame spin-lattice relaxation time imaging by radio-frequency field gradients: visualization of strained crosslinked natural rubbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaumette, H.; Grandclaude, D.; Canet, D.

    2003-08-01

    NMR imaging by radio-frequency field gradients ( B1 gradients) is especially convenient for heterogeneous samples and/or in the case of relatively short transverse relaxation times. The method has been combined with the application of two spin-lock periods of different duration so as to produce rotating-frame spin-lattice relaxation time ( T1 ρ) images. In the case of natural rubber samples with different crosslink densities, such images are not only characteristic of the crosslink density but also reveal the way in which the material has been stressed. The strained parts can be visualized either directly or through histograms showing the T1 ρ distribution over the whole sample.

  10. Spin-orbit corrected potential energy surface features for the I ((2)P(3/2)) + H2O → HI + OH forward and reverse reactions.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yanjun; Gu, Jiande; Guo, Yundong; Zhang, Meiling; Xie, Yaoming; Schaefer, Henry F

    2014-02-14

    Using the CCSD(T) method with relativistic correlation consistent basis sets up to cc-pVQZ-PP, the entrance complex, transition state, and exit complex for the endothermic reaction I + H2O → HI + OH have been studied. The vibrational frequencies and the zero-point vibrational energies of the five stationary points for the title reaction are reported and compared with the limited available experimental results. Opposite to the valence isoelectronic F + H2O system, but similar to the Cl + H2O and Br + H2O reactions, the I + H2O reaction is endothermic, in this case by 46 kcal mol(-1). After the zero-point vibrational energy and spin-orbit coupling corrections, the endothermic reaction energy is predicted to be 48 kcal mol(-1), which agrees well with experimental values. For the reverse reaction HI + OH → I + H2O the transition state lies below the reactants, consistent with the experimental negative temperature dependence for the rate constants. PMID:24382520

  11. Rapid solid-state NMR of deuterated proteins by interleaved cross-polarization from 1H and 2H nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjerring, Morten; Paaske, Berit; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Akbey, Ümit; Nielsen, Niels Chr.

    2012-01-01

    We present a novel sampling strategy, interleaving acquisition of multiple NMR spectra by exploiting initial polarization subsequently from 1H and 2H spins, taking advantage of their different T1 relaxation times. Different 1H- and 2H-polarization based spectra are in this way simultaneously recorded improving either information content or sensitivity by adding spectra. The so-called Relaxation-optimized Acquisition of Proton Interleaved with Deuterium (RAPID) 1H → 13C/ 2H → 13C CP/MAS multiple-acquisition method is demonstrated by 1D and 2D experiments using a uniformly 2H, 15N, 13C-labeled α-spectrin SH3 domain sample with all or 30% back-exchanged labile 2H to 1H. It is demonstrated how 1D 13C CP/MAS or 2D 13C- 13C correlation spectra initialized with polarization from either 1H or 2H may be recorded simultaneously with flexibility to be added or used individually for spectral editing. It is also shown how 2D 13C- 13C correlation spectra may be recorded interleaved with 2H- 13C correlation spectra to obtain 13C- 13C correlations along with information about dynamics from 2H sideband patterns.

  12. The long-term post-outburst spin down and flux relaxation of magnetar swift J1822.3–1606

    SciTech Connect

    Scholz, P.; Kaspi, V. M.; Cumming, A.

    2014-05-01

    The magnetar Swift J1822.3–1606 entered an outburst phase in 2011 July. Previous X-ray studies of its post-outburst rotational evolution yielded inconsistent measurements of the spin-inferred magnetic field. Here we present the timing behavior and flux relaxation from over two years of Swift, RXTE, and Chandra observations following the outburst. We find that the ambiguity in previous timing solutions was due to enhanced spin down that resembles an exponential recovery following a glitch at the outburst onset. After fitting out the effects of the recovery, we measure a long-term spin-down rate of ν-dot =(−3.0 ± 0.3)×10{sup −16} s{sup –2} which implies a dipolar magnetic field of 1.35 × 10{sup 13} G, lower than all previous estimates for this source. We also consider the post-outburst flux evolution, and fit it with both empirical and crustal cooling models. We discuss the flux relaxation in the context of both crustal cooling and magnetospheric relaxation models.

  13. Elastic and anelastic relaxations accompanying magnetic ordering and spin-flop transitions in hematite, Fe2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oravova, Lucie; Zhang, Zhiying; Church, Nathan; Harrison, Richard J.; Howard, Christopher J.; Carpenter, Michael A.

    2013-03-01

    Hematite, Fe2O3, provides in principle a model system for multiferroic (ferromagnetic/ferroelastic) behavior at low levels of strain coupling. The elastic and anelastic behavior associated with magnetic phase transitions in a natural polycrystalline sample have therefore been studied by resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) in the temperature range from 11 to 1072 K. Small changes in softening and attenuation are interpreted in terms of weak but significant coupling of symmetry-breaking and non-symmetry-breaking strains with magnetic order parameters in the structural sequence R\\overline{3}c{1}^{\\prime}\\rightarrow C 2/c\\rightarrow R\\overline{3}c. The R\\overline{3}c{1}^{\\prime}\\rightarrow C 2/c transition at TN = 946 ± 1 K is an example of a multiferroic transition which has both ferromagnetic (from canting of antiferromagnetically ordered spin moments) and ferroelastic (rhombohedral → monoclinic) character. By analogy with the improper ferroelastic transition in Pb3(PO4)2, W and W‧ ferroelastic twin walls which are also 60° and 120° magnetic domain walls should develop. These have been tentatively identified from microstructures reported in the literature. The very low attenuation in the stability field of the C2/c structure in the polycrystalline sample used in the present study, in comparison with the strong acoustic dissipation reported for single crystal samples, implies, however, that the individual grains each consist of a single ferroelastic domain or that the twin walls are strongly pinned by grain boundaries. This absence of attenuation allows an intrinsic loss mechanism associated with the transition point to be seen and interpreted in terms of local coupling of shear strains with fluctuations which have relaxation times in the vicinity of ˜10-8 s. The first order C 2/c\\rightarrow R\\overline{3}c (Morin) transition occurs through a temperature interval of coexisting phases but the absence of an acoustic loss peak suggests that the

  14. Transitions between quantum states of the spin-soliton structure in molecular magnets [Mn{( R/ S)- pn}]2[Mn{( R/ S)- pn}2(H2O)][Cr(CN)6]2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgunov, R. B.; Kirman, M. V.; Talantsev, A. D.

    2015-08-01

    A series of jumps of the magnetic moment (up to five jumps) with an amplitude of 1-10% of the saturation magnetization has been observed upon demagnetizing the molecular magnet [Mn{( R/ S)- pn}]2[Mn{( R/ S)- pn}2(H2O)][Cr(CN)6]2 in a narrow region of magnetic fields close to the coercive force. A decrease in the temperature leads to an increase in the critical magnetic field, which corresponds to the onset of the series of demagnetization jumps. The obtained experimental data agree with theoretical predictions on jump-like transitions between the magnetization curves upon attaining critical magnetic fields caused by the energy quantization of spin solitons.

  15. 1H and 19F spin-lattice relaxation and CH3 or CF3 reorientation in molecular solids containing both H and F atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckmann, Peter A.; Rheingold, Arnold L.

    2016-04-01

    The dynamics of methyl (CH3) and fluoromethyl (CF3) groups in organic molecular (van der Waals) solids can be exploited to survey their local environments. We report solid state 1H and 19F spin-lattice relaxation experiments in polycrystalline 3-trifluoromethoxycinnamic acid, along with an X-ray diffraction determination of the molecular and crystal structure, to investigate the intramolecular and intermolecular interactions that determine the properties that characterize the CF3 reorientation. The molecule is of no particular interest; it simply provides a motionless backbone (on the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) time scale) to investigate CF3 reorientation occurring on the NMR time scale. The effects of 19F-19F and 19F-1H spin-spin dipolar interactions on the complicated nonexponential NMR relaxation provide independent inputs into determining a model for CF3 reorientation. As such, these experiments provide much more information than when only one spin species (usually 1H) is present. In Sec. IV, which can be read immediately after the Introduction without reading the rest of the paper, we compare the barrier to CH3 and CF3 reorientation in seven organic solids and separate this barrier into intramolecular and intermolecular components.

  16. Geometric Magnetic Frustration in Li3Mg2OsO6 Studied with Muon Spin Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlo, J. P.; Derakhshan, S.; Greedan, J. E.

    Geometric frustration manifests when the spatial arrangement of ions inhibits magnetic order. Typically associated with antiferromagnetically (AF)-correlated moments on triangular or tetrahedral lattices, frustration occurs in a variety of structures and systems, resulting in rich phase diagrams and exotic ground states. As a window to exotic physics revealed by the cancellation of normally dominant interactions, the research community has taken great interest in frustrated systems. One family of recent interest are the rock-salt ordered oxides A5BO6, in which the B sites are occupied by magnetic ions comprising a network of interlocked tetrahedra, and nonmagnetic ions on the A sites control the B oxidation state through charge neutrality. Here we will discuss studies of Li3Mg2OsO6 using muon spin relaxation (μSR), a highly sensitive local probe of magnetism. Previous studies of this family included Li5OsO6, which exhibits AF order below 50K with minimal evidence for frustration, and Li4MgReO6, which exhibits glassy magnetism. Li3Mg2RuO6, meanwhile, exhibits long-range AF, with the ordering temperature suppressed by frustration. But its isoelectronic twin, Li3Mg2OsO6 (5d3 vs. 4d3) exhibits very different behavior, revealed by μSR to be a glassy ground state below 12K. Understanding why such similar systems exhibit diverse ground-state behavior is key to understanding the nature of geometric magnetic frustration. Financial support from the Research Corporation for Science Advancement.

  17. (77)Se nuclear spin-lattice relaxation in binary Ge-Se glasses: insights into floppy versus rigid behavior of structural units.

    PubMed

    Sen, Sabyasachi; Kaseman, Derrick C; Hung, Ivan; Gan, Zhehong

    2015-04-30

    The mechanism of (77)Se nuclear spin-lattice relaxation is investigated in binary Ge-Se glasses. The (77)Se nuclides in Se-Se-Se chain sites relax faster via dipolar coupling fluctuation compared to those in Ge-Se-Ge sites shared by GeSe4 tetrahedra that relax slower via the fluctuation of the chemical shift anisotropy. The relaxation rate for the Se-Se-Se sites decreases markedly with increasing magnetic field, whereas that for the Ge-Se-Ge sites displays no appreciable dependence on the magnetic field such that the extent of differential relaxation between the two Se environments becomes small at high fields on the order of 19.6 T. The corresponding dynamical correlation time is three orders of magnitude shorter (∼10(-9) s) for the Se-Se-Se sites, compared to that for the Ge-Se-Ge sites (∼10(-6) s). The large decoupling in the time scale between these Se environments provides direct experimental support to the commonly made assumption that the selenium chains are mechanically floppy, and the interconnected GeSe4 tetrahedra form the rigid elements in the selenide glass structure. PMID:25848959

  18. 2H NMR studies of supercooled and glassy aspirin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, R.; Nowaczyk, A.; Geil, B.; Bohmer, R.

    2007-11-01

    Acetyl salicylic acid, deuterated at the methyl group, was investigated using 2H-NMR in its supercooled and glassy states. Just above the glass transition temperature the molecular reorientations were studied using stimulated-echo spectroscopy and demonstrated a large degree of similarity with other glass formers. Deep in the glassy phase the NMR spectra look similar to those reported for the crystal [A. Detken, P. Focke, H. Zimmermann, U. Haeberlen, Z. Olejniczak, Z. T. Lalowicz, Z. Naturforsch. A 50 (1995) 95] and below 20 K they are indicative for rotational tunneling with a relatively large tunneling frequency. Measurements of the spin-lattice relaxation times for temperatures below 150 K reveal a broad distribution of correlation times in the glass. The dominant energy barrier characterizing the slow-down of the methyl group is significantly smaller than the well defined barrier in the crystal.

  19. (19)F spin-lattice relaxation of perfluoropolyethers: Dependence on temperature and magnetic field strength (7.0-14.1T).

    PubMed

    Kadayakkara, Deepak K; Damodaran, Krishnan; Hitchens, T Kevin; Bulte, Jeff W M; Ahrens, Eric T

    2014-05-01

    Fluorine ((19)F) MRI of perfluorocarbon-labeled cells has become a powerful technique to track the migration and accumulation of cells in living organisms. It is common to label cells for (19)F MRI with nanoemulsions of perfluoropolyethers that contain a large number of chemically equivalent fluorine atoms. Understanding the mechanisms of (19)F nuclear relaxation, and in particular the spin-lattice relaxation of these molecules, is critical to improving experimental sensitivity. To date, the temperature and magnetic field strength dependence of spin-lattice relaxation rate constant (R1) for perfluoropolyethers has not been described in detail. In this study, we evaluated the R1 of linear perfluoropolyether (PFPE) and cyclic perfluoro-15-crown-5 ether (PCE) at three magnetic field strengths (7.0, 9.4, and 14.1T) and at temperatures ranging from 256-323K. Our results show that R1 of perfluoropolyethers is dominated by dipole-dipole interactions and chemical shift anisotropy. R1 increased with magnetic field strength for both PCE and PFPE. In the temperature range studied, PCE was in the fast motion regime (ωτc<1) at all field strengths, but for PFPE, R1 passed through a maximum, from which the rotational correlation time was estimated. The importance of these measurements for the rational design of new (19)F MRI agents and methods is discussed. PMID:24594752

  20. 19F Spin-lattice Relaxation of Perfluoropolyethers: Dependence on Temperature and Magnetic Field Strength (7.0-14.1T)

    PubMed Central

    Kadayakkara, Deepak K.; Damodaran, Krishnan; Hitchens, T. Kevin; Bulte, Jeff W.M.; Ahrens, Eric T.

    2014-01-01

    Fluorine (19F) MRI of perfluorocarbon labeled cells has become a powerful technique to track the migration and accumulation of cells in living organisms. It is common to label cells for 19F MRI with nanoemulsions of perfluoropolyethers that contain a large number of chemically equivalent fluorine atoms. Understanding the mechanisms of 19F nuclear relaxation, and in particular the spin-lattice relaxation of these molecules, is critical to improving experimental sensitivity. To date, the temperature and magnetic field strength dependence of spin-lattice relaxation rate constant (R1) for perfluoropolyethers has not been described in detail. In this study, we evaluated R1 of linear perfluoropolyether (PFPE) and cyclic perfluoro-15-crown-5 ether (PCE) at three magnetic field strengths (7.0, 9.4, and 14.1 T) and at temperatures ranging from 256-323K. Our results show that R1 of perfluoropolyethers is dominated by dipole-dipole interactions and chemical shift anisotropy. R1 increased with magnetic field strength for both PCE and PFPE. In the temperature range studied, PCE was in the fast motion regime (ωτc < 1) at all field strengths, but for PFPE, R1 passed through a maximum, from which the rotational correlation time was estimated. The importance of these measurements for the rational design of new 19F MRI agents and methods is discussed. PMID:24594752

  1. 19F spin-lattice relaxation of perfluoropolyethers: Dependence on temperature and magnetic field strength (7.0-14.1 T)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadayakkara, Deepak K.; Damodaran, Krishnan; Hitchens, T. Kevin; Bulte, Jeff W. M.; Ahrens, Eric T.

    2014-05-01

    Fluorine (19F) MRI of perfluorocarbon-labeled cells has become a powerful technique to track the migration and accumulation of cells in living organisms. It is common to label cells for 19F MRI with nanoemulsions of perfluoropolyethers that contain a large number of chemically equivalent fluorine atoms. Understanding the mechanisms of 19F nuclear relaxation, and in particular the spin-lattice relaxation of these molecules, is critical to improving experimental sensitivity. To date, the temperature and magnetic field strength dependence of spin-lattice relaxation rate constant (R1) for perfluoropolyethers has not been described in detail. In this study, we evaluated the R1 of linear perfluoropolyether (PFPE) and cyclic perfluoro-15-crown-5 ether (PCE) at three magnetic field strengths (7.0, 9.4, and 14.1 T) and at temperatures ranging from 256-323 K. Our results show that R1 of perfluoropolyethers is dominated by dipole-dipole interactions and chemical shift anisotropy. R1 increased with magnetic field strength for both PCE and PFPE. In the temperature range studied, PCE was in the fast motion regime (ωτc < 1) at all field strengths, but for PFPE, R1 passed through a maximum, from which the rotational correlation time was estimated. The importance of these measurements for the rational design of new 19F MRI agents and methods is discussed.

  2. 2H and 133Cs nuclear magnetic resonance study of Cs3D(SO4)2 single crystals in laboratory and rotating frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Ae Ran; Kim, Sun Ha; Jeong, Se-Young

    2013-01-01

    To understand the physical properties of Cs3D(SO4)2 single crystals, in which deuterium replaces hydrogen, the temperature dependence of the NMR spectrum and the spin-lattice relaxation times in the laboratory frame, T1, and in the rotating frame, T1ρ, for 2H and 133Cs are investigated using Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry. Our results for the 2H and 133Cs relaxation times provide no evidence of a phase transition. The strong temperature dependence of the 2H resonance lines is associated with deformation of the H(SO4)2- tetrahedra. Further, T1 and T1ρ for the 2H and 133Cs nuclei are governed by different mechanisms, which we discuss in terms of fast and slow motion.

  3. {sup 13}C spin-lattice relaxation and molecular dynamics of C{sub 60} in 1,2-dichlorobenzene-d{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Shang, X.; Fisher, L.A.; Rodriguez, A.A.

    1996-03-14

    We have measured the {sup 13}C spin-lattice relaxation rate of C{sub 60} in 1,2-dichlorobenzene-d{sub 4} and have found that the spin rotation (SR) mechanism contributes significantly to the overall relaxation process. The magnitude of SR was found to be smaller than in the solid phase but consistent with quantities projected for C{sub 60} in toluene-d{sub 8}. These observations indicate that solvent effects play a critical role in determining the magnitude of the spin rotation contribution. Reorientational correlation times were also obtained experimentally and show that C{sub 60} is undergoing rapid rotational motion in this solvent. The activation energy for this mode of motion was found to be 7.71 kJ/mol. Several theoretical models were employed in an attempt at characterizing the rotational behavior of the title molecule. Of these theories, the Gierer-Wirtz model proved superior in duplicating our experimental findings. The close agreement suggests that 1,2-dichlorobenzene-d{sub 4} provides a discrete environment rather than a continuous one. Our study further indicates that C{sub 60} reorients in the `slip` limit where solute-solvent interactions are at a minimum. 21 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. LETTER TO THE EDITOR: A muon-spin relaxation (µSR) study of the geometrically frustrated magnets Gd3Ga5O12 and ZnCr2O4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, I. M.; Blundell, S. J.; Pratt, F. L.; Husmann, A.; Steer, C. A.; Coldea, A. I.; Hayes, W.; Ward, R. C. C.

    2002-02-01

    We present the results of muon-spin-relaxation experiments for two materials which show geometric frustration. ZnCr2O4 has a spinel structure with S = 3/2 spins on a lattice of corner-sharing tetrahedra. Our experiments show that a local magnetic field which is quasi-static on the muon timescale develops below Tc = 12.5 K, a transition which has been associated with a three-dimensional analogue of the spin-Peierls transition. In contrast, Gd3Ga5O12 has a garnet structure with S = 3/2 spins arranged on interpenetrating triangular sublattices. In this material the muon data exhibit a temperature-dependent spin-relaxation rate indicative of slow spin fluctuations. We discuss these differing behaviours and relate them to the underlying physics in the two materials.

  5. A carbon-13 NMR spin-lattice relaxation study of the molecular conformation of the nootropic drug 2-oxopyrrolidin-1-ylacetamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldo, M.; Grassi, A.; Guidoni, L.; Nicolini, M.; Pappalardo, G. C.; Viti, V.

    The spin-lattice relaxation times ( T1) of carbon-13 resonances of the drug 2-oxopyrrolidin- 1-ylacetamide ( 2OPYAC) were determined in CDCl 3 + DMSO and H 2O solutions to investigate the internal conformational flexibility. The measured T1s for the hydrogen-bearing carbon atoms of the 2-pyrrolidone ring fragment were diagnostic of a rigid conformation with respect to the acetamide linked moiety. The model of anisotropic reorientation of a rigid body was used to analyse the measured relaxation data in terms of a single conformation. Owing to the small number of T1 data available the fitting procedure for each of the possible conformations failed. The structure corresponding to the rigid conformation was therefore considered to be the one that is strongly stabilized by internal hydrogen bonding as predicted on the basis of theoretical MO ab initio quantum chemical calculations.

  6. Tuning of the hole spin relaxation time in single self-assembled In{sub 1−x}Ga{sub x}As/GaAs quantum dots by electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Hai; Guo, Guang-Can; He, Lixin

    2014-11-28

    We investigate the electric field tuning of the phonon-assisted hole spin relaxation in single self-assembled In{sub 1−x}Ga{sub x}As/GaAs quantum dots (QDs), using an atomistic empirical pseudopotential method. We find that the electric field along the growth direction can tune the hole spin relaxation time for more than one order of magnitude. The electric field can prolong or shorten the hole spin lifetime and the tuning shows an asymmetry in terms of the field direction. The asymmetry is more pronounced for the taller dot. The results show that the electric field is an effective way to tune the hole spin-relaxation in self-assembled QDs.

  7. Unconventional Superconductivity in La7Ir3 Revealed by Muon Spin Relaxation: Introducing a New Family of Noncentrosymmetric Superconductor That Breaks Time-Reversal Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, J. A. T.; Singh, D.; Thamizhavel, A.; Hillier, A. D.; Lees, M. R.; Balakrishnan, G.; Paul, D. McK.; Singh, R. P.

    2015-12-01

    The superconductivity of the noncentrosymmetric compound La7 Ir3 is investigated using muon spin rotation and relaxation. Zero-field measurements reveal the presence of spontaneous static or quasistatic magnetic fields below the superconducting transition temperature Tc=2.25 K —a clear indication that the superconducting state breaks time-reversal symmetry. Furthermore, transverse-field rotation measurements suggest that the superconducting gap is isotropic and that the pairing symmetry of the superconducting electrons is predominantly s wave with an enhanced binding strength. The results indicate that the superconductivity in La7 Ir3 may be unconventional and paves the way for further studies of this family of materials.

  8. Effect of the strong relaxer cobalt on the parallel and perpendicular pumping spin-wave instability threshold of LiTi ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuanr, Bijoy K.

    1996-10-01

    Room temperature data on the parallel and perpendicular pumping instability threshold at 9.4 GHz, using a reflection-type microwave spectrometer, are reported for a series of polycrystalline LiTi ferrites substituted with the strong relaxing ion cobalt. The experimental instability threshold results show strong variation with cobalt substitution. The experimental butterfly curves are reproduced theoretically from the revised pore-scattering model, taking into account the k dependence of the spin-wave linewidth from a trial function: ΔHk = A + BΔHk( p) + Ck.

  9. On-site monitoring of atomic density number for an all-optical atomic magnetometer based on atomic spin exchange relaxation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Zou, Sheng; Chen, Xiyuan; Ding, Ming; Shan, Guangcun; Hu, Zhaohui; Quan, Wei

    2016-07-25

    We present a method for monitoring the atomic density number on site based on atomic spin exchange relaxation. When the spin polarization P ≪ 1, the atomic density numbers could be estimated by measuring magnetic resonance linewidth in an applied DC magnetic field by using an all-optical atomic magnetometer. The density measurement results showed that the experimental results the theoretical predictions had a good consistency in the investigated temperature range from 413 K to 463 K, while, the experimental results were approximately 1.5 ∼ 2 times less than the theoretical predictions estimated from the saturated vapor pressure curve. These deviations were mainly induced by the radiative heat transfer efficiency, which inevitably leaded to a lower temperature in cell than the setting temperature. PMID:27464172

  10. Relaxation-Compensated Difference Spin Diffusion NMR for Detecting 13C-13C Long-Range Correlations in Proteins and Polysaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tuo; Williams, Jonathan K.; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus; Hong, Mei

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of long-range distances remains a challenge in solid-state NMR structure determination of biological macromolecules. In 2D and 3D correlation spectra of uniformly 13C-labeled biomolecules, inter-residue, inter-segmental, and intermolecular 13C-13C cross peaks that provide important long-range distance constraints for three-dimensional structures often overlap with short-range cross peaks that only reflect the covalent structure of the molecule. It is therefore desirable to develop new approaches to obtain spectra containing only long-range cross peaks. Here we show that a relaxation-compensated modification of the commonly used 2D 1H-driven spin diffusion (PDSD) experiment allows the clean detection of such long-range cross peaks. By adding a z-filter to keep the total z-period of the experiment constant, we compensate for 13C T1 relaxation. As a result, the difference spectrum between a long- and a scaled short-mixing time spectrum show only long-range correlation signals. We show that one- and two-bond cross peaks equalize within a few tens of milliseconds. Within ~200 ms, the intensity equilibrates within an amino acid residue and a monosaccharide to a value that reflects the number of spins in the local network. With T1 relaxation compensation, at longer mixing times, inter-residue and inter-segmental cross peaks increase in intensity whereas intra-segmental cross-peak intensities remain unchanged relative to each other and can all be subtracted out. Without relaxation compensation, the difference 2D spectra exhibit both negative and positive intensities due to heterogeneous T1 relaxation in most biomolecules, which can cause peak cancellation. We demonstrate this relaxation-compensated difference PDSD approach on amino acids, monosaccharides, a crystalline model peptide, a membrane-bound peptide and a plant cell wall sample. The resulting difference spectra yield clean multi-bond, inter-residue and intermolecular correlation peaks, which are

  11. Molecular determinants for drug-receptor interactions. 8. Anisotropic and internal motions in morphine, nalorphine, oxymorphone, naloxone and naltrexone in aqueous solution by carbon-13 NMR spin-lattice relaxation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassi, Antonio; Perly, Bruno; Pappalardo, Giuseppe C.

    1989-02-01

    Carbon-13 NMR spin-lattice relaxation times ( T1) were measured for morphine, oxymorphone, nalorphine, naloxone and naltrexone as hydrochloride salts in 2H 2O solution. The data refer to the molecules in the N-equatorial configuration. The experimental T1 values were interpreted using a model of anisotropic reorientation of a rigid body with superimposed internal motions of the flexible N-methyl, N-methyl-allyl and N-methyl-cyclopropyl fragments. The calculated internal motional rates were found to markedly decrease on passing from agonists to mixed (nalorphine) and pure (naloxone, naltrexone) antagonists. For these latter the observed trend of the internal flexibility about NC and CC bonds of the N-substituents is discussed in terms of a correlation with their relative antagonistic potencies. In fact, such an evidence of decreasing internal conformational dynamics in the order nalorphine, naloxone, naltrexone, appeared interestingly in line with the "two-state" model of opiate receptor operation mode proposed by Snyder.

  12. Lattice sites, charge states and spin-lattice relaxation of Fe ions in 57Mn+ implanted GaN and AlN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masenda, H.; Naidoo, D.; Bharuth-Ram, K.; Gunnlaugsson, H. P.; Johnston, K.; Mantovan, R.; Mølholt, T. E.; Ncube, M.; Shayestehaminzadeh, S.; Gíslason, H. P.; Langouche, G.; Ólafsson, S.; Weyer, G.

    2016-03-01

    The lattice sites, valence states, resulting magnetic behaviour and spin-lattice relaxation of Fe ions in GaN and AlN were investigated by emission Mössbauer spectroscopy following the implantation of radioactive 57Mn+ ions at ISOLDE/CERN. Angle dependent measurements performed at room temperature on the 14.4 keV γ-rays from the 57Fe Mössbauer state (populated from the 57Mn β- decay) reveal that the majority of the Fe ions are in the 2+ valence state nearly substituting the Ga and Al cations, and/or associated with vacancy type defects. Emission Mössbauer spectroscopy experiments conducted over a temperature range of 100-800 K show the presence of magnetically split sextets in the "wings" of the spectra for both materials. The temperature dependence of the sextets relates these spectral features to paramagnetic Fe3+ with rather slow spin-lattice relaxation rates which follow a T2 temperature dependence characteristic of a two-phonon Raman process.

  13. Polymer dynamics near the surface and in the bulk of poly(tetrafluoroethylene) probed by zero-field muon-spin-relaxation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, Iain; Salman, Zaher; Giblin, Sean R.; Han, Yun Yu; Leach, Gary W.; Morenzoni, Elvezio; Prokscha, Thomas; Suter, Andreas

    2014-02-01

    The results of many experiments on polymers such as polystyrene indicate that the polymer chains near a free surface exhibit enhanced dynamics when compared with the bulk. We have investigated whether this is the case for poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) by using zero-field muon-spin-relaxation spectroscopy to characterize a local probe, the F-Mu+-F state, which forms when spin-polarized positive muons are implanted in PTFE. Low-energy muons (implantation energies from 2.0 to 23.0 keV) were used to study the F-Mu+-F state between ˜23 and 191 nm from the free surface of PTFE. Measurements were also made with surface muons (4.1 MeV) where the mean implantation depth is on the order of ˜0.6 mm. The relaxation rate of the F-Mu+-F state up to ˜150 K was found to be significantly higher for muons implanted at 2.0 keV than for higher implantation energies, which suggests that the polymer chains in a region on the order of a few tens of nanometers from the free surface are more mobile than those in the bulk.

  14. Polymer dynamics near the surface and in the bulk of poly(tetrafluoroethylene) probed by zero-field muon-spin-relaxation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Iain; Salman, Zaher; Giblin, Sean R; Han, Yun Yu; Leach, Gary W; Morenzoni, Elvezio; Prokscha, Thomas; Suter, Andreas

    2014-02-01

    The results of many experiments on polymers such as polystyrene indicate that the polymer chains near a free surface exhibit enhanced dynamics when compared with the bulk. We have investigated whether this is the case for poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) by using zero-field muon-spin-relaxation spectroscopy to characterize a local probe, the F-Mu(+)-F state, which forms when spin-polarized positive muons are implanted in PTFE. Low-energy muons (implantation energies from 2.0 to 23.0 keV) were used to study the F-Mu(+)-F state between ∼ 23 and 191 nm from the free surface of PTFE. Measurements were also made with surface muons (4.1 MeV) where the mean implantation depth is on the order of ∼ 0.6 mm. The relaxation rate of the F-Mu(+)-F state up to ∼ 150 K was found to be significantly higher for muons implanted at 2.0 keV than for higher implantation energies, which suggests that the polymer chains in a region on the order of a few tens of nanometers from the free surface are more mobile than those in the bulk. PMID:25353500

  15. Muon spin relaxation study of the Cu spin dynamics in electron-doped high- Tc superconductor Pr0.86LaCe0.14Cu1-yZnyO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risdiana; Adachi, T.; Oki, N.; Koike, Y.; Suzuki, T.; Watanabe, I.

    2010-07-01

    Muon-spin-relaxation (μSR) measurements have been performed for the partially Zn-substituted electron-doped high- Tc superconductor Pr0.86LaCe0.14Cu1-yZnyO4+α-δ with y=0-0.05 and the reduced oxygen content δ=0-0.09 , in order to investigate nonmagnetic Zn-impurity effects on the Cu-spin dynamics. For all the measured samples with 0.01≤δ≤0.09 , it has been found that a fast depolarization of muon spins is observed below 100 K due to the effect of Pr3+ moments and that the μSR time spectrum in the long-time region above 5μsec increases with decreasing temperature at low temperatures below 30 K possibly due to slowing down of the Cu-spin fluctuations assisted by Pr3+ moments. No Zn-induced slowing down of the Cu-spin fluctuations has been observed for moderately oxygen-reduced samples with 0.04≤δ≤0.09 , which is very different from the μSR results of La2-xSrxCu1-yZnyO4 . The possible reason may be that there are no dynamical stripe correlations of spins and electrons in the electron-doped high- Tc cuprates or that the effect of Pr3+ moments on the μSR spectra is stronger than that of a small amount of Zn impurities.

  16. Is the manifestation of the local dynamics in the spin-lattice NMR relaxation in dendrimers sensitive to excluded volume interactions?

    PubMed

    Shavykin, Oleg V; Neelov, Igor M; Darinskii, Anatolii A

    2016-09-21

    The effect of excluded volume (EV) interactions on the manifestation of the local dynamics in the spin-lattice NMR relaxation in dendrimers has been studied by using Brownian dynamics simulations. The study was motivated by the theory developed by Markelov et al., [J. Chem. Phys., 2014, 140, 244904] for a Gaussian dendrimer model without EV interactions. The theory connects the experimentally observed dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T(1)H on the location of NMR active groups with the restricted flexibility (semiflexibility) of dendrimers. Semiflexibility was introduced through the correlations between the orientations of different segments. However, these correlations exist even in flexible dendrimer models with EV interactions. We have simulated coarse-grained flexible and semiflexible dendrimer models with and without EV interactions. Every dendrimer segment consisted of two rigid bonds. Semiflexibility was introduced through a potential which restricts the fluctuations of angles between neighboring bonds but does not change orientational correlations in the EV model as compared to the flexible case. The frequency dependence of the reduced 1/T(1)H(ωH) for segments and bonds belonging to different dendrimer shells was calculated. It was shown that the main effect of EV interactions consists of a much stronger contribution of the overall dendrimer rotation to the dynamics of dendrimer segments as compared to phantom models. After the exclusion of this contribution the manifestation of internal dynamics in spin-lattice NMR relaxation appears to be practically insensitive to EV interactions. For the flexible models, the position ωmax of the peak of the modified 1/T(1)H(ωH) does not depend on the shell number. For semiflexible models, the maximum of 1/T(1)H(ωH) for internal segments or bonds shifts to lower frequencies as compared to outer ones. The dependence of ωmax on the number of dendrimer shells appears to be universal for segments and

  17. Unconventional Superconductivity in La(7)Ir(3) Revealed by Muon Spin Relaxation: Introducing a New Family of Noncentrosymmetric Superconductor That Breaks Time-Reversal Symmetry.

    PubMed

    Barker, J A T; Singh, D; Thamizhavel, A; Hillier, A D; Lees, M R; Balakrishnan, G; Paul, D McK; Singh, R P

    2015-12-31

    The superconductivity of the noncentrosymmetric compound La(7)Ir(3) is investigated using muon spin rotation and relaxation. Zero-field measurements reveal the presence of spontaneous static or quasistatic magnetic fields below the superconducting transition temperature T(c)=2.25  K-a clear indication that the superconducting state breaks time-reversal symmetry. Furthermore, transverse-field rotation measurements suggest that the superconducting gap is isotropic and that the pairing symmetry of the superconducting electrons is predominantly s wave with an enhanced binding strength. The results indicate that the superconductivity in La(7)Ir(3) may be unconventional and paves the way for further studies of this family of materials. PMID:26765016

  18. 57Fe-labeled octamethylferrocenium tetrafluoroborate. X-ray crystal structures of conformational isomers, hyperfine interactions, and spin-lattice relaxation by Moessbauer spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schottenberger, Herwig; Wurst, Klaus; Griesser, Ulrich J; Jetti, Ram K R; Laus, Gerhard; Herber, Rolfe H; Nowik, Israel

    2005-05-11

    X-ray structure determinations of two different single crystals of octamethylferrocenium tetrafluoroborate (OMFc(+)BF(4)(-)) revealed conformational polymorphism with ligand twist angles of 180 degrees and 108 degrees , respectively. Their concomitant occurrence could be explained by the small lattice energy difference of 3.2 kJ mol(-1). Temperature-dependent Moessbauer spectroscopy of (57)Fe-labeled OMFc(+)BF(4)(-) over the range 90 < T < 370 K did not show the anomalous sudden increase in the motion of the metal atom as observed in neutral OMFc. Broadened absorption curves characteristic of relaxation spectra were obtained with an isomer shift of 0.466(6) mm s(-1) at 90 K. The temperature dependence of the isomer shift corresponded to an effective vibrating mass of 79 +/- 10 Da and, in conjunction with the temperature dependence of the recoil-free fraction, to a Moessbauer lattice temperature of 89 K. The spin relaxation rate could be better described by an Orbach rather than a Raman process. At 400 K, a reversible solid-solid transition to a plastic crystalline mesophase was noted. PMID:15869302

  19. Muon-spin relaxation study of the double perovskite insulators Sr2 BOsO6 (B  =  Fe, Y, ln).

    PubMed

    Williams, R C; Xiao, F; Thomas, I O; Clark, S J; Lancaster, T; Cornish, G A; Blundell, S J; Hayes, W; Paul, A K; Felser, C; Jansen, M

    2016-02-24

    We present the results of zero-field muon-spin relaxation measurements made on the double perovskite insulators Sr2 BOsO6 (B = Fe,Y, In). Spontaneous muon-spin precession indicative of quasistatic long range magnetic ordering is observed in Sr2FeOsO6 within the AF1 antiferromagnetic phase for temperatures below [Formula: see text] K. Upon cooling below T2≈67 K the oscillations cease to be resolvable owing to the coexistence of the AF1 and AF2 phases, which leads to a broader range of internal magnetic fields. Using density functional calculations we identify a candidate muon stopping site within the unit cell, which dipole field simulations show to be consistent with the proposed magnetic structure. The possibility of incommensurate magnetic ordering is discussed for temperatures below TN = 53 K and 25 K for Sr2YOsO6 and Sr2InOsO6, respectively. PMID:26807612

  20. Muon-spin relaxation study of the double perovskite insulators Sr2 BOsO6 (B  =  Fe, Y, ln)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, R. C.; Xiao, F.; Thomas, I. O.; Clark, S. J.; Lancaster, T.; Cornish, G. A.; Blundell, S. J.; Hayes, W.; Paul, A. K.; Felser, C.; Jansen, M.

    2016-02-01

    We present the results of zero-field muon-spin relaxation measurements made on the double perovskite insulators Sr2 BOsO6 (B=\\text{Fe},\\text{Y},\\text{In} ). Spontaneous muon-spin precession indicative of quasistatic long range magnetic ordering is observed in Sr2FeOsO6 within the AF1 antiferromagnetic phase for temperatures below {{T}\\text{N}}=135+/- 2 K. Upon cooling below {{T}2}≈ 67 K the oscillations cease to be resolvable owing to the coexistence of the AF1 and AF2 phases, which leads to a broader range of internal magnetic fields. Using density functional calculations we identify a candidate muon stopping site within the unit cell, which dipole field simulations show to be consistent with the proposed magnetic structure. The possibility of incommensurate magnetic ordering is discussed for temperatures below {{T}\\text{N}}=53 K and 25 K for Sr2YOsO6 and Sr2InOsO6, respectively.

  1. On the Lorentzian versus Gaussian Character of Time-Domain Spin-Echo Signals from the Brain as Sampled via Gradient-Echoes: Implications for Quantitative Transverse Relaxation Studies

    PubMed Central

    Mulkern, Robert V.; Balasubramanian, Mukund; Mitsouras, Dimitrios

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether Lorentzian or Gaussian intra-voxel frequency distributions are better suited for modeling data acquired with gradient-echo sampling of single spin-echoes for the simultaneous characterization of irreversible and reversible relaxation rates. Clinical studies (e.g., of brain iron deposition) using such acquisition schemes have typically assumed Lorentzian distributions. Theory and Methods Theoretical expressions of the time-domain spin-echo signal for intra-voxel Lorentzian and Gaussian distributions were used to fit data from a human brain scanned at both 1.5T and 3T, resulting in maps of irreversible and reversible relaxation rates for each model. The relative merits of the Lorentzian versus Gaussian model were compared via quality of fit considerations. Results Lorentzian fits were equivalent to Gaussian fits primarily in regions of the brain where irreversible relaxation dominated. In the multiple brain regions where reversible relaxation effects become prominent, however, Gaussian fits were clearly superior. Conclusion The widespread assumption that a Lorentzian distribution is suitable for quantitative transverse relaxation studies of the brain should be reconsidered, particularly at 3T and higher field strengths as reversible relaxation effects become more prominent. Gaussian distributions offer alternate fits of experimental data that should prove quite useful in general. PMID:25078089

  2. Investigation of the spin-lattice relaxation of 13CO and 13CO2 adsorbed in the metal-organic frameworks Cu3(btc)2 and Cu3-xZnx(btc)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gul-E-Noor, Farhana; Michel, Dieter; Krautscheid, Harald; Haase, Jürgen; Bertmer, Marko

    2013-07-01

    The 13C nuclear spin-lattice relaxation time of 13CO and 13CO2 molecules adsorbed in the metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) Cu2.97Zn0.03(btc)2 and Cu3(btc)2 is investigated over a wide range of temperatures at resonance frequencies of 75.468 and 188.62 MHz. In all cases a mono-exponential relaxation is observed, and the 13C spin-lattice relaxation times (T1) reveal minima within the temperature range of the measurements and both frequencies. This allows us to carry out a more detailed analysis of the 13C spin relaxation data and to consider the influence due to the spectral functions of the thermal motion. In a model-free discussion of the temperature dependence of the ratios T1 (T)/T1,min we observe a motional mechanism that can be described by a single correlation time. In relation to the discussion of the relaxation mechanisms this can be understood in terms of dominating translational motion with mean jump distance being larger than the minimum distances between neighboring adsorption sites in the MOFs. A more detailed discussion of the jump-like motion observed here might be carried out on the basis of self-diffusion coefficients. From the present spin relaxation measurements activation energies for the local motion of the adsorbed molecules in the MOFs can be estimated to be 3.3 kJ/mol and 2.2 kJ/mol, for CO and CO2 molecules, respectively. Finally, our findings are compared with our recent results derived from the 13C line shape analysis.

  3. Systematic variation of magnetic-field penetration depth in high-Tc superconductors studied by muon-spin relaxation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uemura, Y. J.; Emery, V. J.; Moodenbaugh, A. R.; Suenaga, M.; Johnston, D. C.

    1988-01-01

    The muon relaxation rate (sigma) was measured in the high critical temperature superconductors YBa2Cu3O(x) for x = 6.66, 6.95, 7.0, and La1.85 SrO.15 CuO4 in transverse external magnetic fields 1 is approximately 4 kG. A simple relation is found which connects the transition temperature T(c), the magnetic field penetration depth lambda(L), the carrier concentration n(s) and the effective mass m* as T(c) varies as sigma which varies as 1/lambda(L) squared which varies as n(s)/m*. The linear dependence T(c) varies as n(s)/m* suggests a high energy scale for the coupling between superconducting carriers.

  4. Systematic variation of magnetic-field penetration depth in high-T(c) superconductors studied by muon spin relaxation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uemura, Y. J.; Emery, V. J.; Moodenbaugh, A. R.; Suenaga, M.; Johnston, D. C.; Jacobson, A. J.; Lewandowski, J. T.; Brewer, J. H.; Kiefl, R. F.; Kreitzman, S. R.

    1988-01-01

    The muon relaxation rate (sigma) was measured in the high critical temperature superconductors YBa2Cu3O(x) for x = 6.66, 6.95, 7.0, and La1.85 Sr0.15 CuO4 in transverse external magnetic fields 1 is approximately 4kG. A simple relation is found which connects the transition temperature T(c), the magnetic field penetration depth lambda(L), the carrier concentration n(s) and the effective mass m* as T(c) varies as sigma which varies as 1/lambda(L) squared which varies as n(s)/m*. The linear dependence T(c) varies as n(s)/m* suggests a high energy scale for the coupling between superconducting carriers.

  5. Optimizations of spin-exchange relaxation-free magnetometer based on potassium and rubidium hybrid optical pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Jiancheng; Wang, Tao Li, Yang; Zhang, Hong; Zou, Sheng

    2014-12-15

    The hybrid optical pumping atomic magnetometers have not realized its theoretical sensitivity, the optimization is critical for optimal performance. The optimizations proposed in this paper are suitable for hybrid optical pumping atomic magnetometer, which contains two alkali species. To optimize the parameters, the dynamic equations of spin evolution with two alkali species were solved, whose steady-state solution is used to optimize the parameters. The demand of the power of the pump beam is large for hybrid optical pumping. Moreover, the sensitivity of the hybrid optical pumping magnetometer increases with the increase of the power density of the pump beam. The density ratio between the two alkali species is especially important for hybrid optical pumping magnetometer. A simple expression for optimizing the density ratio is proposed in this paper, which can help to determine the mole faction of the alkali atoms in fabricating the hybrid cell before the cell is sealed. The spin-exchange rate between the two alkali species is proportional to the saturated density of the alkali vapor, which is highly dependent on the temperature of the cell. Consequently, the sensitivity of the hybrid optical pumping magnetometer is dependent on the temperature of the cell. We proposed the thermal optimization of the hybrid cell for a hybrid optical pumping magnetometer, which can improve the sensitivity especially when the power of the pump beam is low. With these optimizations, a sensitivity of approximately 5 fT/Hz{sup 1/2} is achieved with gradiometer arrangement.

  6. Muon-spin-relaxation and inelastic neutron scattering investigations of the caged-type Kondo semimetals: CeT2Al10 (T = Fe, Ru and Os)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adroja, D. T.; Hillier, A. D.; Muro, Y.; Takabatake, T.; Strydom, A. M.; Bhattacharyya, A.; Daoud-Aladin, A.; Taylor, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    Recently, Ce-based caged-type compounds with the general formula CeT2Al10 (T = Fe, Ru and Os) have generated considerable interest due to the Kondo semiconducting paramagnetic ground state (down to 40 mK) observed in CeFe2Al10 and anomalously high magnetic ordering temperature with spin gap formation at low temperatures in Kondo semimetals CeRu2Al10 and CeOs2Al10. The formation of long-range magnetic ordering out of the Kondo semiconducting/semimetallic state itself is extraordinary and these are the first examples of this enigmatic coexistence of electronic ground states. These compounds also exhibit strong anisotropy in magnetic and transport properties, which has been explained on the basis of single-ion crystal electric field anisotropy in the presence of strongly anisotropic hybridization between localized 4f-electron and conduction electrons. Furthermore, they also exhibit a remarkable modification of magnetic and transport properties with doping on Ce, or T or Al sites. In this article, we briefly discuss the bulk properties of these compounds, giving a detailed discussion on our muon-spin-relaxation (μSR) investigations and inelastic neutron scattering (INS) results. We present the μSR and the INS results of Ce(Ru1-xFex)2Al10 and CeOs2Al10 as well as the μSR results of NdFe2Al10, NdOs2Al10 and YFe2Al10 for comparison. The zero-field μSR spectra clearly reveal coherent two-frequency oscillations at low temperatures in CeT2Al10 (T = Ru and Os) and Ce(Ru1-xFex)2Al10 (x = 0.3-0.5), which confirms the long-range magnetic ordering with a reduced moment of the Ce. On the other hand, the μSR spectra of Ce(Ru1-xFex)2Al10 (x = 0.8 and 1) down to 1.2 and 0.04 K, respectively, exhibit a temperature independent Kubo-Toyabe (KT) term confirming a paramagnetic ground state. INS measurements on CeT2Al10 (T = Ru and Os) exhibit sharp inelastic excitations at 8 and 11 meV at 5 K due to an opening of a gap in the spin excitation spectrum. A spin gap of 8-12 meV at 7 K

  7. Shortening spin-lattice relaxation using a copper-chelated lipid at low-temperatures - A magic angle spinning solid-state NMR study on a membrane-bound protein.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kazutoshi; Caporini, Marc A; Im, Sangchoul; Waskell, Lucy; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2013-12-01

    Inherent low sensitivity of NMR spectroscopy has been a major disadvantage, especially to study biomolecules like membrane proteins. Recent studies have successfully demonstrated the advantages of performing solid-state NMR experiments at very low and ultralow temperatures to enhance the sensitivity. However, the long spin-lattice relaxation time, T1, at very low temperatures is a major limitation. To overcome this difficulty, we demonstrate the use of a copper-chelated lipid for magic angle spinning solid-state NMR measurements on cytochrome-b5 reconstituted in multilamellar vesicles. Our results on multilamellar vesicles containing as small as 0.5mol% of a copper-chelated lipid can significantly shorten T1 of protons, which can be used to considerably reduce the data collection time or to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio. We also monitored the effect of slow cooling on the resolution and sensitivity of (13)C and (15)N signals from the protein and (13)C signals from lipids. PMID:24246881

  8. Shortening Spin-lattice Relaxation Using a Copper-Chelated lipid at Low-Temperatures – A Magic Angle Spinning Solid-State NMR Study on a Membrane-Bound Protein

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Kazutoshi; Caporini, Marc; Im, Sangchoul; Waskell, Lucy; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2013-01-01

    Inherent low sensitivity of NMR spectroscopy has been a major disadvantage, especially to study biomolecules like membrane proteins. Recent studies have successfully demonstrated the advantages of performing solid-state NMR experiments at very low and ultralow temperatures to enhance the sensitivity. However, the long spin-lattice relaxation time, T1, at very low temperatures is a major limitation. To overcome this difficulty, we demonstrate the use of a copper-chelated lipid for magic angle spinning solid-state NMR measurements on cytochrome-b5 reconstituted in multilamellar vesicles. Our results on multilamellar vesicles containing as small as 0.5 mole % of a copper-chelated lipid can significantly shorten T1 of protons, which can be used to considerably reduce the data collection time or to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio. We also monitored the effect of slow cooling on the resolution and sensitivity of 13C and 15N signals from the protein and 13C signals from lipids. PMID:24246881

  9. Molecular interactions in the ionic liquid emim acetate and water binary mixtures probed via NMR spin relaxation and exchange spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Allen, Jesse J; Bowser, Sage R; Damodaran, Krishnan

    2014-05-01

    Interactions of ionic liquids (ILs) with water are of great interest for many potential IL applications. 1-Ethyl-3-methylimidazolium (emim) acetate, in particular, has shown interesting interactions with water including hydrogen bonding and even chemical exchange. Previous studies have shown the unusual behavior of emim acetate when in the presence of 0.43 mole fraction of water, and a combination of NMR techniques is used herein to investigate the emim acetate-water system and the unusual behavior at 0.43 mole fraction of water. NMR relaxometry techniques are used to describe the effects of water on the molecular motion and interactions of emim acetate with water. A discontinuity is seen in nuclear relaxation behavior at the concentration of 0.43 mole fraction of water, and this is attributed to the formation of a hydrogen bonded network. EXSY measurements are used to determine the exchange rates between the H2 emim proton and water, which show a complex dependence on the concentration of the mixture. The findings support and expand our previous results, which suggested the presence of an extended hydrogen bonding network in the emim acetate-water system at concentrations close to 0.50 mole fraction of H2O. PMID:24654003

  10. Nuclear Spin Lattice Relaxation and Conductivity Studies of the Non-Arrhenius Conductivity Behavior in Lithium Fast Ion Conducting Sulfide Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin Michael Meyer

    2003-05-31

    As time progresses, the world is using up more of the planet's natural resources. Without technological advances, the day will eventually arrive when these natural resources will no longer be sufficient to supply all of the energy needs. As a result, society is seeing a push for the development of alternative fuel sources such as wind power, solar power, fuel cells, and etc. These pursuits are even occurring in the state of Iowa with increasing social pressure to incorporate larger percentages of ethanol in gasoline. Consumers are increasingly demanding that energy sources be more powerful, more durable, and, ultimately, more cost efficient. Fast Ionic Conducting (FIC) glasses are a material that offers great potential for the development of new batteries and/or fuel cells to help inspire the energy density of battery power supplies. This dissertation probes the mechanisms by which ions conduct in these glasses. A variety of different experimental techniques give a better understanding of the interesting materials science taking place within these systems. This dissertation discusses Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) techniques performed on FIC glasses over the past few years. These NMR results have been complimented with other measurement techniques, primarily impedance spectroscopy, to develop models that describe the mechanisms by which ionic conduction takes place and the dependence of the ion dynamics on the local structure of the glass. The aim of these measurements was to probe the cause of a non-Arrhenius behavior of the conductivity which has been seen at high temperatures in the silver thio-borosilicate glasses. One aspect that will be addressed is if this behavior is unique to silver containing fast ion conducting glasses. more specifically, this study will determine if a non-Arrhenius correlation time, {tau}, can be observed in the Nuclear Spin Lattice Relaxation (NSLR) measurements. If so, then can this behavior be modeled with a new single distribution

  11. A general approach to the electronic spin relaxation of Gd(III) complexes in solutions. Monte Carlo simulations beyond the Redfield limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rast, S.; Fries, P. H.; Belorizky, E.; Borel, A.; Helm, L.; Merbach, A. E.

    2001-10-01

    The time correlation functions of the electronic spin components of a metal ion without orbital degeneracy in solution are computed. The approach is based on the numerical solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for a stochastic perturbing Hamiltonian which is simulated by a Monte Carlo algorithm using discrete time steps. The perturbing Hamiltonian is quite general, including the superposition of both the static mean crystal field contribution in the molecular frame and the usual transient ligand field term. The Hamiltonian of the static crystal field can involve the terms of all orders, which are invariant under the local group of the average geometry of the complex. In the laboratory frame, the random rotation of the complex is the only source of modulation of this Hamiltonian, whereas an additional Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process is needed to describe the time fluctuations of the Hamiltonian of the transient crystal field. A numerical procedure for computing the electronic paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra is proposed and discussed. For the [Gd(H2O)8]3+ octa-aqua ion and the [Gd(DOTA)(H2O)]- complex [DOTA=1,4,7,10-tetrakis(carboxymethyl)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclo dodecane] in water, the predictions of the Redfield relaxation theory are compared with those of the Monte Carlo approach. The Redfield approximation is shown to be accurate for all temperatures and for electronic resonance frequencies at and above X-band, justifying the previous interpretations of EPR spectra. At lower frequencies the transverse and longitudinal relaxation functions derived from the Redfield approximation display significantly faster decays than the corresponding simulated functions. The practical interest of this simulation approach is underlined.

  12. Muon Spin Relaxation and Neutron Diffraction Studies of Cluster-Glass States in Sr1‑xLaxRuO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Ikuto; Fujimura, Kenji; Watanabe, Isao; Avdeev, Maxim; Tenya, Kenichi; Yokoyama, Makoto

    2016-05-01

    To clarify the magnetic properties of cluster-glass states in Sr1-xLaxRuO3 (0.3 <= x <= 0.5), we report herein the results of muon spin relaxation (muSR) and neutron powder diffraction measurements. The muSR experiments showed that magnetic clusters start developing well above the peak temperature T^* in the ac susceptibility. The volume fraction of the magnetically ordered region increases continuously with decreasing temperature, showing no anomaly at T^*, and reaches nearly 100% at the lowest temperature. The temperature variation of the volume fraction is essentially independent of the La concentration in the x range presently investigated, although the dc magnetization is significantly suppressed with increasing x. Neutron powder diffraction experiments revealed that the ground state for x = 0.3 is a long-range ferromagnetic ordered state. These results indicate that, with decreasing temperature, cluster-glass states in Sr1-xLaxRuO3 gradually develop into long-range ferromagnetic ordered states with decreasing temperature, and that the magnetic ordering process differs strikingly from that expected for a conventional second-order ferromagnetic transition.

  13. Distribution of glass transition temperatures Tg in polystyrene thin films as revealed by low-energy muon spin relaxation: A comparison with neutron reflectivity results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanaya, Toshiji; Ogawa, Hiroki; Kishimoto, Mizuki; Inoue, Rintaro; Suter, Andreas; Prokscha, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    In a previous paper [Phys. Rev. E 83, 021801 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevE.83.021801] we performed neutron reflectivity (NR) measurements on a five-layer polystyrene (PS) thin film consisting of alternatively stacked deuterated polystyrene (dPS) and hydrogenated polystyrene (hPS) layers (dPS/hPS/dPS/hPS/dPS, ˜100 nm thick) on a Si substrate to reveal the distribution of Tg along the depth direction. Information on the Tg distribution is very useful to understand the interesting but unusual properties of polymer thin films. However, one problem that we have to clarify is if there are effects of deuterium labeling on Tg or not. To tackle the problem we performed low-energy muon spin relaxation (μ SR ) measurements on the above-mentioned deuterium-labeled five-layer PS thin film as well as dPS and hPS single-layer thin films ˜100 nm thick as a function of muon implantation energy. It was found that the deuterium labeling had no significant effects on the Tg distribution, guaranteeing that we can safely discuss the unusual thin film properties based on the Tg distribution revealed by NR on the deuterium-labeled thin films. In addition, the μ SR result suggested that the higher Tg near the Si substrate is due to the strong orientation of phenyl rings.

  14. Distribution of glass transition temperatures Tg in polystyrene thin films as revealed by low-energy muon spin relaxation: A comparison with neutron reflectivity results.

    PubMed

    Kanaya, Toshiji; Ogawa, Hiroki; Kishimoto, Mizuki; Inoue, Rintaro; Suter, Andreas; Prokscha, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    In a previous paper [Phys. Rev. E 83, 021801 (2011)] we performed neutron reflectivity (NR) measurements on a five-layer polystyrene (PS) thin film consisting of alternatively stacked deuterated polystyrene (dPS) and hydrogenated polystyrene (hPS) layers (dPS/hPS/dPS/hPS/dPS, ∼100 nm thick) on a Si substrate to reveal the distribution of Tg along the depth direction. Information on the Tg distribution is very useful to understand the interesting but unusual properties of polymer thin films. However, one problem that we have to clarify is if there are effects of deuterium labeling on Tg or not. To tackle the problem we performed low-energy muon spin relaxation (μSR) measurements on the above-mentioned deuterium-labeled five-layer PS thin film as well as dPS and hPS single-layer thin films ∼100 nm thick as a function of muon implantation energy. It was found that the deuterium labeling had no significant effects on the Tg distribution, guaranteeing that we can safely discuss the unusual thin film properties based on the Tg distribution revealed by NR on the deuterium-labeled thin films. In addition, the μSR result suggested that the higher Tg near the Si substrate is due to the strong orientation of phenyl rings. PMID:26382423

  15. 35Cl NQR frequency and spin lattice relaxation time in 3,4-dichlorophenol as a function of pressure and temperature.

    PubMed

    Ramu, L; Ramesh, K P; Chandramani, R

    2013-01-01

    The pressure dependences of (35)Cl nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) frequency, temperature and pressure variation of spin lattice relaxation time (T(1)) were investigated in 3,4-dichlorophenol. T(1) was measured in the temperature range 77-300 K. Furthermore, the NQR frequency and T(1) for these compounds were measured as a function of pressure up to 5 kbar at 300 K. The temperature dependence of the average torsional lifetimes of the molecules and the transition probabilities W(1) and W(2) for the Δm = ±1 and Δm = ±2 transitions were also obtained. A nonlinear variation of NQR frequency with pressure has been observed and the pressure coefficients were observed to be positive. A thermodynamic analysis of the data was carried out to determine the constant volume temperature coefficients of the NQR frequency. An attempt is made to compare the torsional frequencies evaluated from NQR data with those obtained by IR spectra. On selecting the appropriate mode from IR spectra, a good agreement with torsional frequency obtained from NQR data is observed. The previously mentioned approach is a good illustration of the supplementary nature of the data from IR studies, in relation to NQR studies of compounds in solid state. PMID:23161529

  16. Inhomogeneous 1H NMR spin-lattice relaxation in the organic superconductor kappa-(BEDT-TTF)2Cu[N(CN)2]Br

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gezo, Joseph Christopher

    The two-dimensional superconductors based on the organic molecule "ET" have been an active area of research since their discovery over two decades ago. The member of this family with the highest critical temperature, kappa-(ET)2Cu[N(CN)2]Br ( Tc=11.7 K), has seen renewed interest since the observation of an anomalous Nernst signal by Nam et al in 2007 [51]. A similar effect was seen earlier by Ong's group in some of the high-temperature cuprate superconductors by [78,84]. This is interpreted to be evidence of a picture of superconductivity in which the resistive transition is driven by thermal fluctuations in the phase of the superconducting order parameter. Below Tc, these fluctuations take the form of bound vortex-antivortex pairs that have no long-range effect on the phase. At Tc, they undergo a Kosterlitz-Thouless unbinding transition; the unbound vortices destroy long-range phase coherence. Previously reported proton NMR measurements on this material have shown a high sensitivity to vortex motion, but reported no interesting behavior above the phase transition [15,25,42]. In this thesis, we revisit the 1H NMR properties of kappa-(ET)2Cu[N(CN)2]Br, paying specific attention to the spin-lattice relaxation, to look for some fingerprint of the phenomenon observed by Nam et al.

  17. Complex dynamics of 1.3.5-trimethylbenzene-2.4.6-D3 studied by proton spin-lattice NMR relaxation and second moment of NMR line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hołderna-Natkaniec, K.; Latanowicz, L.; Medycki, W.; Świergiel, J.; Natkaniec, I.

    2015-02-01

    Molecular dynamics of a solid 1.3.5-trimethylbenzene-2.4.6-D3 in phase I is studied on the basis of the proton T1 (24.7 MHz and 15 MHz) relaxation time measurements and the proton second moment of NMR line, M2. The measurements of the T1 were performed for temperatures from 20 to 167 K, while those of the second moment M2 from 23 to 220 K. The phase I was accurately prepared. The obtained second moment, M2 values were correlated with those based on T1 relaxation time measurements. The proton spin pairs of the methyl groups perform a complex motion being a resultant of two components characterized by the correlation times τ3T and τ3H, referring to the tunneling and over the barrier jumps in a triple potential. For τ3H the Arrhenius temperature dependence was assumed, while for τ3T - the Schrödinger one. The jumps over the barrier causes a minimum in T1 (24.7 MHz) at temperature about 35 K. The high temperatures slope of this minimum permits evaluation of the activation energy as EH=2.0 kJ/mol. The relaxation time T1 is temperature independent in the lowest temperature regime. This indicates that tunnelling correlation time assumes a constant value of about 1.3·10-10 s according to the Schrödinger equation (τ3T ≈ τ03T e B√{EH } at lowest temperatures). The tunneling jumps of methyl protons reduce M2 from the rigid lattice value 22.6 G2 to the value 5.7 G2 at zero Kelvin temperature. The second reduction to the value 1.41 G2 at 4.5-7 K is due to C3 jumps over the barrier. According to the Schrödinger equation the tunnelling jumps ceases above Ttun temperature where the thermal energy is equal to the activation energy. The Ttun equals 43.8 K (from T1 data fit, EH=2.0 kJ/mol) or 35 K (from M2 data fit, EH=1.47 kJ/mol). The second moment assumes again the value 5.7 G2 above Ttun temperature. The tunneling splitting, ωT, was estimated equal 2.47 GHz as best fit parameter from the T1 fit. The symmetrical T1 minimum indicates the same value of ωT for the all

  18. Deuterium dynamics in the icosahedral and amorphous phases of the Ti40Zr40Ni20 hydrogen-absorbing alloy studied by 2H NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gradišek, A.; Kocjan, A.; McGuiness, P. J.; Apih, T.; Kim, Hae Jin; Dolinšek, J.

    2008-11-01

    The Ti40Zr40Ni20 hydrogen-absorbing alloy was prepared in the icosahedral and amorphous phases by controlling the rotation speed of the melt-spinning method of sample preparation, and the deuterium dynamics was investigated by 2H NMR dynamic lineshape and spin-lattice relaxation. The results were analysed by the lineshape and relaxation models that assume deuterium thermally activated hopping within a manifold of different chemical environments. The observed 8% larger activation energy for the deuterium hopping over the interstitial sites and the 10% larger static spectrum width of the amorphous phase, as compared to the icosahedral phase, can be accounted for by the larger deuterium content of the investigated amorphous sample. From the deuterium dynamics point of view, the icosahedral phase is not special with respect to the amorphous modification of the same material.

  19. Magnetic field induced anisotropy of 139La spin-lattice relaxation rates in stripe ordered La1.875Ba0.125CuO4

    SciTech Connect

    S. -H. Baek; Gu, G. D.; Utz, Y.; Hucker, M.; Buchner, B.; Grafe, H. -J.

    2015-10-26

    We report 139La nuclear magnetic resonance studies performed on a La1.875Ba0.125CuO4 single crystal. The data show that the structural phase transitions (high-temperature tetragonal → low-temperature orthorhombic → low-temperature tetragonal phase) are of the displacive type in this material. The 139La spin-lattice relaxation rate T–11 sharply upturns at the charge-ordering temperature TCO = 54 K, indicating that charge order triggers the slowing down of spin fluctuations. Detailed temperature and field dependencies of the T–11 below the spin-ordering temperature TSO=40 K reveal the development of enhanced spin fluctuations in the spin-ordered state for H ∥ [001], which are completely suppressed for large fields along the CuO2 planes. Lastly, our results shed light on the unusual spin fluctuations in the charge and spin stripe ordered lanthanum cuprates.

  20. Flexibility at a glycosidic linkage revealed by molecular dynamics, stochastic modeling, and (13)C NMR spin relaxation: conformational preferences of α-L-Rhap-α-(1 → 2)-α-L-Rhap-OMe in water and dimethyl sulfoxide solutions.

    PubMed

    Pendrill, Robert; Engström, Olof; Volpato, Andrea; Zerbetto, Mirco; Polimeno, Antonino; Widmalm, Göran

    2016-01-28

    The monosaccharide L-rhamnose is common in bacterial polysaccharides and the disaccharide α-L-Rhap-α-(1 → 2)-α-L-Rhap-OMe represents a structural model for a part of Shigella flexneri O-antigen polysaccharides. Utilization of [1'-(13)C]-site-specific labeling in the anomeric position at the glycosidic linkage between the two sugar residues facilitated the determination of transglycosidic NMR (3)JCH and (3)JCC coupling constants. Based on these spin-spin couplings the major state and the conformational distribution could be determined with respect to the ψ torsion angle, which changed between water and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as solvents, a finding mirrored by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with explicit solvent molecules. The (13)C NMR spin relaxation parameters T1, T2, and heteronuclear NOE of the probe were measured for the disaccharide in DMSO-d6 at two magnetic field strengths, with standard deviations ≤1%. The combination of MD simulation and a stochastic description based on the diffusive chain model resulted in excellent agreement between calculated and experimentally observed (13)C relaxation parameters, with an average error of <2%. The coupling between the global reorientation of the molecule and the local motion of the spin probe is deemed essential if reproduction of NMR relaxation parameters should succeed, since decoupling of the two modes of motion results in significantly worse agreement. Calculation of (13)C relaxation parameters based on the correlation functions obtained directly from the MD simulation of the solute molecule in DMSO as solvent showed satisfactory agreement with errors on the order of 10% or less. PMID:26741055

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of the ferroelastic phase transition of order-disorder type in [N(C2H5)4]2CdCl4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Ae Ran; Kim, Min Soo; Lim, Kye-Young

    2016-08-01

    This study uses nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques to examine the detailed changes in [N(C2H5)4]2CdCl4 around its phase transition at the temperature TC = 284 K. The chemical shifts and spin-lattice relaxation times in the rotating frame (T1ρ) were determined from 1H magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR and 13C cross-polarization (CP)/MAS NMR spectra. The two sets of inequivalent 1H and 13C nuclei in CH3 and CH2 were distinguished. A ferroelastic phase transition was observed at TC, without structural symmetry change. The phase transition is mainly attributed to the orientational ordering of the [N(C2H5)4]+ cations, and the spectral splitting at low temperature is associated with different ferroelastic domains.

  2. Stretched-exponential relaxation in the three-dimensional short-range Ising spin-glass Cu0.5Co0.5Cl2-FeCl3 graphite bi-intercalation compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Itsuko S.; Suzuki, Masatsugu

    2008-12-01

    Cu0.5Co0.5Cl2-FeCl3 graphite bi-intercalation compound is a three-dimensional short-range spin glass with a spin freezing temperature TSG (=3.92±0.11K) . The time evolution of the zero-field-cooled magnetization MZFC(t) has been measured under various combinations of wait time (tw) , temperature (T) , temperature shift (ΔT) , and magnetic field (H) . The relaxation rate SZFC(t) [=(1/H)dMZFC(t)/dlnt] shows a peak at a peak time tcr . The shape of SZFC(t) in the vicinity of tcr is well described by stretched exponential relaxation (SER). The SER exponent b and the SER relaxation time τSER are determined as a function of tw , T , H , and ΔT . The value of b at T=TSG is nearly equal to 0.3. There is a correlation between τSER and 1/b , irrespective of the values of tw , T , H , and ΔT . These features can be well explained in terms of a simple relaxation model for glassy dynamics.

  3. Molecular organization of cytochrome c2 near the binding domain of cytochrome bc1 studied by electron spin-lattice relaxation enhancement.

    PubMed

    Pietras, Rafał; Sarewicz, Marcin; Osyczka, Artur

    2014-06-19

    Measurements of specific interactions between proteins are challenging. In redox systems, interactions involve surfaces near the attachment sites of cofactors engaged in interprotein electron transfer (ET). Here we analyzed binding of cytochrome c2 to cytochrome bc1 by measuring paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) of spin label (SL) attached to cytochrome c2. PRE was exclusively induced by the iron atom of heme c1 of cytochrome bc1, which guaranteed that only the configurations with SL to heme c1 distances up to ∼30 Å were detected. Changes in PRE were used to qualitatively and quantitatively characterize the binding. Our data suggest that at low ionic strength and under an excess of cytochrome c2 over cytochrome bc1, several cytochrome c2 molecules gather near the binding domain forming a "cloud" of molecules. When the cytochrome bc1 concentration increases, the cloud disperses to populate additional available binding domains. An increase in ionic strength weakens the attractive forces and the average distance between cytochrome c2 and cytochrome bc1 increases. The spatial arrangement of the protein complex at various ionic strengths is different. Above 150 mM NaCl the lifetime of the complexes becomes so short that they are undetectable. All together the results indicate that cytochrome c2 molecules, over the range of salt concentration encompassing physiological ionic strength, do not form stable, long-lived complexes but rather constantly collide with the surface of cytochrome bc1 and ET takes place coincidentally with one of these collisions. PMID:24845964

  4. Dodecylphosphocholine micelles as a membrane-like environment: new results from NMR relaxation and paramagnetic relaxation enhancement analysis.

    PubMed

    Beswick, V; Guerois, R; Cordier-Ochsenbein, F; Coïc, Y M; Tam, H D; Tostain, J; Noël, J P; Sanson, A; Neumann, J M

    1999-01-01

    To further examine to what extent a dodecyl-phosphocholine (DPC) micelle mimics a phosphatidylcholine bilayer environment, we performed 13C, 2H, and 31P NMR relaxation measurements. Our data show that the dynamic behavior of DPC phosphocholine groups at low temperature (12 degrees C) corresponds to that of a phosphatidylcholine interface at high temperature (51 degrees C). In the presence of helical peptides, a PMP1 fragment, or an annexin fragment, the DPC local dynamics are not affected whereas the DPC aggregation number is increased to match an appropriate area/volume ratio for accommodating the bound peptides. We also show that quantitative measurements of paramagnetic relaxation enhancements induced by small amounts of spin-labeled phospholipids on peptide proton signals provide a meaningful insight on the location of both PMP1 and annexin fragments in DPC micelles. The paramagnetic contributions to the relaxation were extracted from intra-residue cross-peaks of NOESY spectra for both peptides. The location of each peptide in the micelles was found consistent with the corresponding relaxation data. As illustrated by the study of the PMP1 fragment, paramagnetic relaxation data also allow us to supply the missing medium-range NOEs and therefore to complete a standard conformational analysis of peptides in micelles. PMID:9933923

  5. Fast Li ion dynamics in the solid electrolyte Li7 P3 S11 as probed by (6,7) Li NMR spin-lattice relaxation.

    PubMed

    Wohlmuth, Dominik; Epp, Viktor; Wilkening, Martin

    2015-08-24

    The development of safe and long-lasting all-solid-state batteries with high energy density requires a thorough characterization of ion dynamics in solid electrolytes. Commonly, conductivity spectroscopy is used to study ion transport; much less frequently, however, atomic-scale methods such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) are employed. Here, we studied long-range as well as short-range Li ion dynamics in the glass-ceramic Li7 P3 S11 . Li(+) diffusivity was probed by using a combination of different NMR techniques; the results are compared with those obtained from electrical conductivity measurements. Our NMR relaxometry data clearly reveal a very high Li(+) diffusivity, which is reflected in a so-called diffusion-induced (6) Li NMR spin-lattice relaxation peak showing up at temperatures as low as 313 K. At this temperature, the mean residence time between two successful Li jumps is in the order of 3×10(8) s(-1) , which corresponds to a Li(+) ion conductivity in the order of 10(-4) to 10(-3) S cm(-1) . Such a value is in perfect agreement with expectations for the crystalline but metastable glass ceramic Li7 P3 S11 . In contrast to conductivity measurements, NMR analysis reveals a range of activation energies with values ranging from 0.17 to 0.26 eV, characterizing Li diffusivity in the bulk. In our case, through-going Li ion transport, when probed by using macroscopic conductivity spectroscopy, however, seems to be influenced by blocking grain boundaries including, for example, amorphous regions surrounding the Li7 P3 S11 crystallites. As a result of this, long-range ion transport as seen by impedance spectroscopy is governed by an activation energy of approximately 0.38 eV. The findings emphasize how surface and grain boundary effects can drastically affect long-range ionic conduction. If we are to succeed in solid-state battery technology, such effects have to be brought under control by, for example, sophisticated densification or through the preparation

  6. Influence of interface relaxation on passivation kinetics in H2 of coordination Pb defects at the (111)Si/SiO2 interface revealed by electron spin resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stesmans, A.

    2002-08-01

    Electron spin resonance studies have been carried out on the isothermal passivation kinetics in 1 atm molecular H2 of trivalent Si traps (Pbs;Si3Triple_BondSi(sup [round bullet, filled])) at the interface of thermal (111)/Si/SiO2 as a function of oxidation temperature Tox in the range 250-1100 degC. Interpretation within the generalized simple thermal (GST) passivation model, based on first-order interaction kinetics, reveals a distinct increase in spread sigmaEf in the activation energy for passivation Ef with decreasing Tox (approx3 times in the covered Tox window), while the other key kinetic parameters (Ef, preexponential factor) remain essentially unchanged. The variation in sigmaEf is ascribed to differently relaxed interfacial stress, affecting the spread in Pb defect morphology. In a second analytic part, the impact of the variation in Ef, and correlatively in the activation energy Ed for PbH dissociation, on Pb-hydrogen interaction kinetics is assessed within the GST-based full interaction scheme, describing parallel competing action of passivation and dissociation. In particular, the passivation behavior in 1 atm H2 of an initially exhaustively depassivated Pb system, is analyzed exposing, as a major result, that growing spreads sigmaEf, sigmaEd result in a drastic reduction in passivation efficiency (drop by four orders of magnitude for a threefold increase in sigmaEf). For sigmaEf/Ef[greater, similar]20%, the Pb system cannot be inactivated beyond the 90% level, incompatible with device quality requirements. Heating time/temperature vs spread conditions for optimum passivation in H2 have been established, and the technological impact of altering sigmaEf, sigmaEd is discussed. At film edges and trench corners, which are vulnerable local regions of exces stress, and hence enhanced sigmaEf, sigmaEd, an edge defeat effect with respect to passivation is exposed. Within the relentless scaling of Si-based integrated circuit devices, the growing relative impact

  7. Evolution of Slow Magnetic Relaxation: from Diamagnetic Matrix Y(OH)CO3 to Dy(0.06)Y(0.94)(OH)CO3 with High Spin-Reversal Barrier and Blocking Temperature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiang; Chen, Yan-Cong; Lai, Jia-Jun; Wu, Zi-Hao; Wang, Long-Fei; Li, Quan-Wen; Huang, Guo-Zhang; Jia, Jian-Hua; Tong, Ming-Liang

    2016-03-21

    A stable Dy(III)-dispersed compound with single-molecule magnet behavior, Dy(0.06)Y(0.94)(OH)CO3, was isolated by a general strategy targeted at the doping of paramagnetic Dy(3+) into a diamagnetic 3D inorganic network of Y(OH)CO3. The single-ion origin of slow magnetic relaxation was gradually released as variations of the dysprosium/yttrium ratio and finally gave a relatively large spin-reversal barrier around 200 K and high hysteresis temperature of 8 K. This study opens up new opportunities to investigate the slow magnetic relaxation and magnetostructural correlation by choosing a suitable inorganic architecture with strong axial anisotropy. PMID:26959174

  8. Interaction Study of an Amorphous Solid Dispersion of Cyclosporin A in Poly-Alpha-Cyclodextrin with Model Membranes by 1H-, 2H-, 31P-NMR and Electron Spin Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Debouzy, Jean-Claude; Bourbon, Fréderic; Lahiani-Skiba, Malika; Skiba, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    The properties of an amorphous solid dispersion of cyclosporine A (ASD) prepared with the copolymer alpha cyclodextrin (POLYA) and cyclosporine A (CYSP) were investigated by 1H-NMR in solution and its membrane interactions were studied by 1H-NMR in small unilamellar vesicles and by 31P 2H NMR in phospholipidic dispersions of DMPC (dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine) in comparison with those of POLYA and CYSP alone. 1H-NMR chemical shift variations showed that CYSP really interacts with POLYA, with possible adduct formation, dispersion in the solid matrix of the POLYA, and also complex formation. A coarse approach to the latter mechanism was tested using the continuous variations method, indicating an apparent 1 : 1 stoichiometry. Calculations gave an apparent association constant of log Ka = 4.5. A study of the interactions with phospholipidic dispersions of DMPC showed that only limited interactions occurred at the polar head group level (31P). Conversely, by comparison with the expected chain rigidification induced by CYSP, POLYA induced an increase in the fluidity of the layer while ASD formation led to these effects almost being overcome at 298 K. At higher temperature, while the effect of CYSP seems to vanish, a resulting global increase in chain fluidity was found in the presence of ASD. PMID:24883210

  9. Effects of spin-lock field direction on the quantitative measurement of spin-lattice relaxation time constant in the rotating frame (T1ρ) in a clinical MRI system

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, Seonghwan; Gao, Jia-Hong

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether the direction of spin-lock field, either parallel or antiparallel to the rotating magnetization, has any effect on the spin-lock MRI signal and further on the quantitative measurement of T1ρ, in a clinical 3 T MRI system. Methods: The effects of inverted spin-lock field direction were investigated by acquiring a series of spin-lock MRI signals for an American College of Radiology MRI phantom, while the spin-lock field direction was switched between the parallel and antiparallel directions. The acquisition was performed for different spin-locking methods (i.e., for the single- and dual-field spin-locking methods) and for different levels of clinically feasible spin-lock field strength, ranging from 100 to 500 Hz, while the spin-lock duration was varied in the range from 0 to 100 ms. Results: When the spin-lock field was inverted into the antiparallel direction, the rate of MRI signal decay was altered and the T1ρ value, when compared to the value for the parallel field, was clearly different. Different degrees of such direction-dependency were observed for different spin-lock field strengths. In addition, the dependency was much smaller when the parallel and the antiparallel fields are mixed together in the dual-field method. Conclusions: The spin-lock field direction could impact the MRI signal and further the T1ρ measurement in a clinical MRI system.

  10. Spin generation by strong inhomogeneous electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkler, Ilya; Engel, Hans-Andreas; Rashba, Emmanuel; Halperin, Bertrand

    2007-03-01

    Motivated by recent experiments [1], we propose a model with extrinsic spin-orbit interaction, where an inhomogeneous electric field E in the x-y plane can give rise, through nonlinear effects, to a spin polarization with non-zero sz, away from the sample boundaries. The field E induces a spin current js^z= z x(αjc+βE), where jc=σE is the charge current, and the two terms represent,respectively, the skew scattering and side-jump contributions. [2]. The coefficients α and β are assumed to be E- independent, but conductivity σ is field dependent. We find the spin density sz by solving the equation for spin diffusion and relaxation with a source term ∇.js^z. For sufficiently low fields, jc is linear in E, and the source term vanishes, implying that sz=0 away from the edges. However, for large fields, σ varies with E. Solving the diffusion equation in a T-shaped geometry, where the electric current propagates along the main channel, we find spin accumulation near the entrance of the side channel, similar to experimental findings [1]. Also, we present a toy model where spin accumulation away from the boundary results from a nonlinear and anisotropic conductivity. [1] V. Sih, et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 096605 (2006). [2] H.-A. Engel, B.I. Halperin, E.I.Rashba, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 166605 (2005).

  11. Solid state {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation and isolated-molecule and cluster electronic structure calculations in organic molecular solids: The relationship between structure and methyl group and t-butyl group rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xianlong E-mail: pbeckman@brynmawr.edu; Mallory, Frank B.; Mallory, Clelia W.; Odhner, Hosanna R.; Beckmann, Peter A. E-mail: pbeckman@brynmawr.edu

    2014-05-21

    We report ab initio density functional theory electronic structure calculations of rotational barriers for t-butyl groups and their constituent methyl groups both in the isolated molecules and in central molecules in clusters built from the X-ray structure in four t-butyl aromatic compounds. The X-ray structures have been reported previously. We also report and interpret the temperature dependence of the solid state {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spin-lattice relaxation rate at 8.50, 22.5, and 53.0 MHz in one of the four compounds. Such experiments for the other three have been reported previously. We compare the computed barriers for methyl group and t-butyl group rotation in a central target molecule in the cluster with the activation energies determined from fitting the {sup 1}H NMR spin-lattice relaxation data. We formulate a dynamical model for the superposition of t-butyl group rotation and the rotation of the t-butyl group's constituent methyl groups. The four compounds are 2,7-di-t-butylpyrene, 1,4-di-t-butylbenzene, 2,6-di-t-butylnaphthalene, and 3-t-butylchrysene. We comment on the unusual ground state orientation of the t-butyl groups in the crystal of the pyrene and we comment on the unusually high rotational barrier of these t-butyl groups.

  12. Solid state 1H spin-lattice relaxation and isolated-molecule and cluster electronic structure calculations in organic molecular solids: The relationship between structure and methyl group and t-butyl group rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xianlong; Mallory, Frank B.; Mallory, Clelia W.; Odhner, Hosanna R.; Beckmann, Peter A.

    2014-05-01

    We report ab initio density functional theory electronic structure calculations of rotational barriers for t-butyl groups and their constituent methyl groups both in the isolated molecules and in central molecules in clusters built from the X-ray structure in four t-butyl aromatic compounds. The X-ray structures have been reported previously. We also report and interpret the temperature dependence of the solid state 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spin-lattice relaxation rate at 8.50, 22.5, and 53.0 MHz in one of the four compounds. Such experiments for the other three have been reported previously. We compare the computed barriers for methyl group and t-butyl group rotation in a central target molecule in the cluster with the activation energies determined from fitting the 1H NMR spin-lattice relaxation data. We formulate a dynamical model for the superposition of t-butyl group rotation and the rotation of the t-butyl group's constituent methyl groups. The four compounds are 2,7-di-t-butylpyrene, 1,4-di-t-butylbenzene, 2,6-di-t-butylnaphthalene, and 3-t-butylchrysene. We comment on the unusual ground state orientation of the t-butyl groups in the crystal of the pyrene and we comment on the unusually high rotational barrier of these t-butyl groups.

  13. Effect of H bond removal and changes in the position of the iron-sulphur head domain on the spin-lattice relaxation properties of the [2Fe-2S](2+) Rieske cluster in cytochrome bc(1).

    PubMed

    Sarewicz, Marcin; Dutka, Małgorzata; Pietras, Rafał; Borek, Arkadiusz; Osyczka, Artur

    2015-10-14

    Here, comparative electron spin-lattice relaxation studies of the 2Fe-2S iron-sulphur (Fe-S) cluster embedded in a large membrane protein complex - cytochrome bc1 - are reported. Structural modifications of the local environment alone (mutations S158A and Y160W removing specific H bonds between Fe-S and amino acid side chains) or in combination with changes in global protein conformation (mutations/inhibitors changing the position of the Fe-S binding domain within the protein complex) resulted in different redox potentials as well as g-, g-strain and the relaxation rates (T1(-1)) for the Fe-S cluster. The relaxation rates for T < 25 K were measured directly by inversion recovery, while for T > 60 K they were deduced from simulation of continuous wave EPR spectra of the cluster using a model that included anisotropy of Lorentzian broadening. In all cases, the relaxation rate involved contributions from direct, second-order Raman and Orbach processes, each dominating over different temperature ranges. The analysis of T1(-1) (T) over the range 5-120 K yielded the values of the Orbach energy (EOrb), Debye temperature θD and Raman process efficiency CRam for each variant of the protein. As the Orbach energy was generally higher for mutants S158A and Y160W, compared to wild-type protein (WT), it is suggested that H bond removal influences the geometry leading to increased strength of antiferromagnetic coupling between two Fe ions of the cluster. While θD was similar for all variants (∼107 K), the efficiency of the Raman process generally depends on the spin-orbit coupling that is lower for S158A and Y160W mutants, when compared to the WT. However, in several cases CRam did not only correlate with spin-orbit coupling but was also influenced by other factors - possibly the modification of protein rigidity and therefore the vibrational modes around the Fe-S cluster that change upon the movement of the iron-sulphur head domain. PMID:26355649

  14. Effect of chirality on domain wall dynamics in molecular ferrimagnet [MnII(HL-pn)(H2O)][MnIII(CN)6]·2H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushenok, F.; Koplak, O.; Morgunov, R.

    2011-11-01

    In this paper we distinguish the contributions of switching, slide, creep and Debye relaxation modes of the domain wall dynamics to the low-frequency magnetic properties of chiral and racemic [MnII(HL-pn)(H2O)][MnIII(CN)6]·2H2O molecular ferrimagnets. We demonstrate that crystal and spin chirality affects the characteristic transition temperatures between different modes. In chiral crystals, transitions to the creep and Debye relaxation modes were observed at T = 7 K and 5 K, whereas in racemic crystals the same transitions occurred at higher temperatures T = 13 K and 9 K, respectively. Difference of the Peierls relief in chiral and racemic crystals is a possible reason of the chirality effect on the domain walls dynamics.

  15. Relaxed Intensity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramey, Kyle

    2004-01-01

    Relaxed intensity refers to a professional philosophy, demeanor, and way of life. It is the key to being an effective educational leader. To be successful one must be relaxed, which means managing stress efficiently, having fun, and enjoying work. Intensity allows one to get the job done and accomplish certain tasks or goals. Educational leaders…

  16. Molecular dynamics of spider dragline silk fiber investigated by 2H MAS NMR.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiangyan; Holland, Gregory P; Yarger, Jeffery L

    2015-03-01

    The molecular dynamics of the proteins that comprise spider dragline silk were investigated with solid-state (2)H magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR line shape and spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) analysis. The experiments were performed on (2)H/(13)C/(15)N-enriched N. clavipes dragline silk fibers. The silk protein side-chain and backbone dynamics were probed for Ala-rich regions (β-sheet and 31-helical domains) in both native (dry) and supercontracted (wet) spider silk. In native (dry) silk fibers, the side chains in all Ala containing regions undergo similar fast methyl rotations (>10(9) s(-1)), while the backbone remains essentially static (<10(2) s(-1)). When the silk is wet and supercontracted, the presence of water initiates fast side-chain and backbone motions for a fraction of the β-sheet region and 31-helicies. β-Sheet subregion 1 ascribed to the poly(Ala) core exhibits slower dynamics, while β-sheet subregion 2 present in the interfacial, primarily poly(Gly-Ala) region that links the β-sheets to disordered 31-helical motifs, exhibits faster motions when the silk is supercontracted. Particularly notable is the observation of microsecond backbone motions for β-sheet subregion 2 and 31-helicies. It is proposed that these microsecond backbone motions lead to hydrogen-bond disruption in β-sheet subregion 2 and helps to explain the decrease in silk stiffness when the silk is wet and supercontracted. In addition, water mobilizes and softens 31-helical motifs, contributing to the increased extensibility observed when the silk is in a supercontracted state. The present study provides critical insight into the supercontraction mechanism and corresponding changes in mechanical properties observed for spider dragline silks. PMID:25619304

  17. Effect of chirality on the dynamics of domain walls in the molecular ferrimagnet [MnII(H L-pn)(H2O)][MnIII(CN)6] · 2H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushenok, F. B.; Morgunov, R. B.; Koplak, O. V.; Kirman, M. V.

    2012-04-01

    The contributions from modes of switching, sliding, creep, and Debye relaxation of pinned domain walls to the low-frequency magnetic properties of the chiral and racemic molecular ferrimagnets [MnII(H L-pn)(H2O)][MnIII(CN)6] · 2H2O have been separated. It has been found that the chirality of the atomic and spin structures affects the temperatures of the transitions from the sliding mode to the creep mode and from the creep mode to the mode of Debye relaxation. In the chiral crystals, transitions to the creep and Debye relaxation modes have been observed at temperatures T = 7 and 5 K, respectively. In the racemic crystals, these transitions have been observed at temperatures T = 13 and 9 K, respectively, all other factors being equal.

  18. Electrical spin injection and detection of spin precession in room temperature bulk GaN lateral spin valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Aniruddha; Baten, Md Zunaid; Bhattacharya, Pallab

    2016-01-01

    We report the measurement of diffusive electronic spin transport characteristics in an epitaxial wurtzite GaN lateral spin valve at room temperature. Hanle spin precession and non-local spin accumulation measurements have been performed with the spin valves fabricated with FeCo/MgO spin contacts. Electron spin relaxation length and spin-flip lifetime of 176 nm and 37 ps, respectively, are derived from analysis of results obtained from four-terminal Hanle spin precession measurements at 300 K. The role of dislocations and defects in bulk GaN has also been examined in the context of electronic spin relaxation dynamics.

  19. Study on ethyl groups with two different orientations in [N(C2H5)4]2CuBr4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Ae Ran

    2016-06-01

    The crystal structure and phase transition temperature of [N(C2H5)4]2CuBr4 are studied using X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC); measurements revealed a tetragonal structure and the two phase transition temperatures TC of 204 K and 255.5 K. The structural geometry near TC is discussed in terms of the chemical shifts for 1H magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and 13C cross-polarization (CP)/MAS NMR. The two inequivalent ethyl groups are distinguishable by the 13C NMR spectrum. The molecular motions are discussed in terms of the spin-lattice relaxation times T1ρ in the rotating frame for 1H MAS NMR and 13C CP/MAS NMR. The T1ρ results reveal that the ethyl groups undergo tumbling motion, and furthermore that the ethyl groups are highly mobile.

  20. Li self-diffusion in garnet-type Li7La3Zr2O12 as probed directly by diffusion-induced Li7 spin-lattice relaxation NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, A.; Narayanan, S.; Spencer, L.; Goward, G.; Thangadurai, V.; Wilkening, M.

    2011-03-01

    Li self-diffusion in garnet-type Li7La3Zr2O12, crystallizing with tetragonal symmetry at room temperature, is measured by temperature-variable Li7 spin-spin as well as spin-lattice relaxation (SLR) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The SLR NMR rates which were recorded in both the laboratory and the rotating frame of reference pass through characteristic diffusion-induced rate peaks allowing for the direct determination of Li jump rates τ-1, which can be directly converted into self-diffusion coefficients Dsd. The NMR results are compared with those obtained from electrical impedance spectroscopy measurements carried out in a large temperature and wide frequency range. Taken together, the long-range diffusion process, being mainly responsible for ionic conduction at ambient temperature, is characterized by an activation energy of approximately 0.5 eV, with τ0-1≈1×1014 s-1 being the pre-exponential factor of the underlying Arrhenius relation.

  1. (1)H and (19)F spin-lattice relaxation and CH3 or CF3 reorientation in molecular solids containing both H and F atoms.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, Peter A; Rheingold, Arnold L

    2016-04-21

    The dynamics of methyl (CH3) and fluoromethyl (CF3) groups in organic molecular (van der Waals) solids can be exploited to survey their local environments. We report solid state (1)H and (19)F spin-lattice relaxationexperiments in polycrystalline 3-trifluoromethoxycinnamic acid, along with an X-ray diffraction determination of the molecular and crystal structure, to investigate the intramolecular and intermolecular interactions that determine the properties that characterize the CF3 reorientation. The molecule is of no particular interest; it simply provides a motionless backbone (on the nuclear magnetic resonance(NMR) time scale) to investigate CF3 reorientation occurring on the NMR time scale. The effects of (19)F-(19)F and (19)F-(1)H spin-spin dipolar interactions on the complicated nonexponential NMRrelaxation provide independent inputs into determining a model for CF3 reorientation. As such, these experiments provide much more information than when only one spin species (usually (1)H) is present. In Sec. IV, which can be read immediately after the Introduction without reading the rest of the paper, we compare the barrier to CH3 and CF3 reorientation in seven organic solids and separate this barrier into intramolecular and intermolecular components. PMID:27389221

  2. Modified Jeener solid-echo pulse sequences for the measurement of the proton dipolar spin-lattice relaxation time (T1D) of tissue solid-like macromolecular components.

    PubMed

    Yang, H; Schleich, T

    1994-11-01

    Modified Jeener solid-echo pulse sequences are proposed for the measurement of the proton dipolar spin-lattice relaxation time, T1D, of motionally restricted (solid-like) components in the presence of mobile molecular species, such as encountered in biological tissue. A phase-cycled composite-pulse sequence was used for detection of the dipolar signal and cancellation of the Zeeman signal. A homospoil gradient pulse was added to the Jeener echo pulse sequence to enhance dephasing of the transverse magnetization components of mobile species, thereby aiding in elimination of the Zeeman signal during dipolar signal acquisition. A modified Jeener echo sequence incorporating water suppression is also proposed as a means to further depress the Zeeman signal arising from mobile components. The modified Jeener echo sequences were successfully used for the measurement of proton T1D values of solid 2,6-dimethylphenol and Sephadex gels of differing degrees of cross linking and hydration. PMID:7531583

  3. Nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate in electron-doped Pr 0.91 LaCe 0.09 CuO 4 - y : Constraint on the gap symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Guo-meng

    2011-09-01

    We present numerical calculations of the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation (R) rate in the superconducting state of pure indium and slightly underdoped n-type cuprate Pr 0.91LaCe 0.09CuO 4 - y. By properly taking into account electron-phonon coupling, our calculated R for the conventional s-wave superconductor, indium, is in quantitative agreement the experimental data with a clear Hebel-Slichter peak. In contrast, the absence of the Hebel-Slichter peak in the R data of Pr 0.91LaCe 0.09CuO 4 - y can be explained by either d-wave or highly anisotropic s-wave gap symmetry. Thus, the absence of the Hebel-Slichter peak does not necessarily argue against an s-wave gap symmetry in this electron-doped cuprate.

  4. Study of the fast photoswitching of spin crossover nanoparticles outside and inside their thermal hysteresis loop

    SciTech Connect

    Galle, G.; Degert, J.; Freysz, E.; Etrillard, C.; Letard, J.-F.; Guillaume, F.

    2013-02-11

    We have studied the low spin to high spin phase transition induced by nanosecond laser pulses outside and within the thermal hysteresis loop of the [Fe(Htrz){sub 2} trz](BF{sub 4}){sub 2}-H{sub 2}O spin crossover nanoparticles. We demonstrate that, whatever the temperature of the compound, the photo-switching is achieved in less than 12.5 ns. Outside the hysteresis loop, the photo-induced high spin state remains up to 100 {mu}s and then relaxes. Within the thermal hysteresis loop, the photo-induced high spin state remains as long as the temperature of the sample is kept within the thermal loop. A Raman study indicates that the photo-switching can be completed using single laser pulse excitation.

  5. Theory of nuclear magnetic relaxation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcconnell, J.

    1983-01-01

    A theory of nuclear magnetic interaction is based on the study of the stochastic rotation operator. The theory is applied explicitly to relaxation by anisotropic chemical shift and to spin-rotational interactions. It is applicable also to dipole-dipole and quadrupole interactions.

  6. Relaxation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Environ Corporation's relaxation system is built around a body lounge, a kind of super easy chair that incorporates sensory devices. Computer controlled enclosure provides filtered ionized air to create a feeling of invigoration, enhanced by mood changing aromas. Occupant is also surrounded by multidimensional audio and the lighting is programmed to change colors, patterns, and intensity periodically. These and other sensory stimulators are designed to provide an environment in which the learning process is stimulated, because research has proven that while an individual is in a deep state of relaxation, the mind is more receptive to new information.

  7. Relaxation times estimation in MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baselice, Fabio; Caivano, Rocchina; Cammarota, Aldo; Ferraioli, Giampaolo; Pascazio, Vito

    2014-03-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging is a very powerful techniques for soft tissue diagnosis. At the present, the clinical evaluation is mainly conducted exploiting the amplitude of the recorded MR image which, in some specific cases, is modified by using contrast enhancements. Nevertheless, spin-lattice (T1) and spin-spin (T2) relaxation times can play an important role in many pathology diagnosis, such as cancer, Alzheimer or Parkinson diseases. Different algorithms for relaxation time estimation have been proposed in literature. In particular, the two most adopted approaches are based on Least Squares (LS) and on Maximum Likelihood (ML) techniques. As the amplitude noise is not zero mean, the first one produces a biased estimator, while the ML is unbiased but at the cost of high computational effort. Recently the attention has been focused on the estimation in the complex, instead of the amplitude, domain. The advantage of working with real and imaginary decomposition of the available data is mainly the possibility of achieving higher quality estimations. Moreover, the zero mean complex noise makes the Least Square estimation unbiased, achieving low computational times. First results of complex domain relaxation times estimation on real datasets are presented. In particular, a patient with an occipital lesion has been imaged on a 3.0T scanner. Globally, the evaluation of relaxation times allow us to establish a more precise topography of biologically active foci, also with respect to contrast enhanced images.

  8. Order and dynamics in mixtures of membrane glucolipids from Acholeplasma laidlawii studied by sup 2 H NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Eriksson, P.O.; Rilfors, L.; Lundberg, A.; Lindblom, G.; Wieslander, A. )

    1991-05-21

    The two dominant glucolipids in Acholeplasma laidlawii, viz., 1,2-diacyl-3-O-({alpha}-D-glucopyranosyl)-sn-glycerol (MGlcDG) and 1,2-diacyl-3-O-({alpha}-D-glucopyranosyl-(1{yields}2)-O-{alpha}-D-glucopyranosyl)-sn-glycerol (DGlcDG), have markedly different phase behavior. MGlcDG has an ability to form nonlamellar phases, whereas DGlcDG only forms lamellar phases. For maintenance of a stable lipid bilayer, the polar headgroup composition in A. laidlawii is metabolically regulated in vivo, in response to changes in the growth conditions. To investigate the mechanism behind the lipid regulation the authors have here studied bilayers of mixtures of unsaturated MGlcDG and DGlcDG, containing a small fraction of biosynthetically incorporated per-deuterated palmitic acid, with {sup 2}H NMR. The order-parameter profile of the acyl chains and an apparent transverse spin relaxation rate (R{sub 2}) were determined from dePaked quadrupole-echo spectra. The variation of order with lipid composition is rationalized from simple packing constraints. The relaxation data indicate the presence of slow reorientational motions, such as collective bilayer fluctuations and/or lipid lateral diffusion over a curved bilayer surface. The variation of acyl-chain order and bilayer curvature and/or fluctuations with sample composition are discussed in relation to the tendency of MGlcDG to form nonlamellar phases in vitro and in relation to the lipid regulation in vivo.

  9. Spin transport in non-magnetic nano-structures induced by non-local spin injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idzuchi, Hiroshi; Fukuma, Yasuhiro; Otani, YoshiChika

    2015-04-01

    We review our recent achievements on optimization of spin injection from ferromagnetic into non-magnetic metals and characterization of spin transport properties in the non-magnetic nano-structures. We have realized the efficient spin injection by solving spin resistance mismatch problem in spin diffusion process across the interface between ferromagnetic and nonmagnetic metals. We analyzed temperature dependent spin relaxation length and time in Ag within the framework of the Elliot-Yafet mechanism based on spin-orbit interaction and momentum relaxation. The spin relaxation length in a light metal Mg is found comparable to that of Ag due to its peculiar electronic band structure in which so called spin-hotspots dramatically enhance spin relaxation. Spin relaxation properties in various metals are also quantitatively discussed. We employed commonly used Hanle effect measurements to characterize spin relaxation of spin current and reexamined both theoretically and experimentally the effect of spin absorption at the interface. The affected spatial profile of chemical potential due to the longitudinal and transverse spin absorption results in the broadened Hanle curve. All the Hanle curves both in metallic and semi-conductive materials including graphene fall into the universal scaling plot. Anatomy of spin injection properties of the junction and spin transport properties in non-magnetic metal is shown in tables.

  10. Cooperative spin decoherence in finite spin chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, Fernando; Fernandez-Rossier, Joaquin

    2014-03-01

    Overcoming the problem of relaxation and decoherence of magnetic nanostructures is one of the mayor goals in magnetic data storage. Although spin chains with as few as 12 magnetic atoms have revealed stability in cryogenic conditions, understanding the mechanism leading to these effects is essential for the engineered of stable structures. Here we consider the problem of spin decoherence and relaxation of finite size quantum spin chains due to elastic and spin conserving interactions with an electron gas. Specifically, we consider how the decoherence (T2) and relaxation (T1) times between the two degenerate ground states of a chain of N coupled spins compares with the one of an isolated spin in the same environment. We find that the spin decoherence time of Ising chains can be either enhanced or suppressed depending on the matching between the Fermi wavelength 2 π /kF and the inter-spin distance a. In particular, we find that depending on the values of kF a , it can show, for certain values that depends on the dimensionality of the electron gas, a cooperative enhancement proportional to N2 of the decoherence, analogous to super radiance decay of atom ensembles, or a suppression.

  11. Active site substitution A82W improves the regioselectivity of steroid hydroxylation by cytochrome P450 BM3 mutants as rationalized by spin relaxation nuclear magnetic resonance studies.

    PubMed

    Rea, V; Kolkman, A J; Vottero, E; Stronks, E J; Ampt, K A M; Honing, M; Vermeulen, N P E; Wijmenga, S S; Commandeur, J N M

    2012-01-24

    Cytochrome P450 BM3 from Bacillus megaterium is a monooxygenase with great potential for biotechnological applications. In this paper, we present engineered drug-metabolizing P450 BM3 mutants as a novel tool for regioselective hydroxylation of steroids at position 16β. In particular, we show that by replacing alanine at position 82 with a tryptophan in P450 BM3 mutants M01 and M11, the selectivity toward 16β-hydroxylation for both testosterone and norethisterone was strongly increased. The A82W mutation led to a ≤42-fold increase in V(max) for 16β-hydroxylation of these steroids. Moreover, this mutation improves the coupling efficiency of the enzyme, which might be explained by a more efficient exclusion of water from the active site. The substrate affinity for testosterone increased at least 9-fold in M11 with tryptophan at position 82. A change in the orientation of testosterone in the M11 A82W mutant as compared to the orientation in M11 was observed by T(1) paramagnetic relaxation nuclear magnetic resonance. Testosterone is oriented in M11 with both the A- and D-ring protons closest to the heme iron. Substituting alanine at position 82 with tryptophan results in increased A-ring proton-iron distances, consistent with the relative decrease in the level of A-ring hydroxylation at position 2β. PMID:22208729

  12. Structural plasticity and Mg2+ binding properties of RNase P P4 from combined analysis of NMR residual dipolar couplings and motionally decoupled spin relaxation.

    PubMed

    Getz, Melissa M; Andrews, Andy J; Fierke, Carol A; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M

    2007-02-01

    The P4 helix is an essential element of ribonuclease P (RNase P) that is believed to bind catalytically important metals. Here, we applied a combination of NMR residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) and a recently introduced domain-elongation strategy for measuring "motionally decoupled" relaxation data to characterize the structural dynamics of the P4 helix from Bacillus subtilis RNase P. In the absence of divalent ions, the two P4 helical domains undergo small amplitude (approximately 13 degrees) collective motions about an average interhelical angle of 10 degrees. The highly conserved U7 bulge and helical residue C8, which are proposed to be important for substrate recognition and metal binding, are locally mobile at pico- to nanosecond timescales and together form the pivot point for the collective domain motions. Chemical shift mapping reveals significant association of Mg2+ ions at the P4 major groove near the flexible pivot point at residues (A5, G22, G23) previously identified to bind catalytically important metals. The Mg2+ ions do not, however, significantly alter the structure or dynamics of P4. Analysis of results in the context of available X-ray structures of the RNA component of RNase P and structural models that include the pre-tRNA substrate suggest that the internal motions observed in P4 likely facilitate adaptive changes in conformation that take place during folding and substrate recognition, possibly aided by interactions with Mg2+ ions. Our results add to a growing view supporting the existence of functionally important internal motions in RNA occurring at nanosecond timescales. PMID:17194721

  13. 2H 2O quadrupolar splitting used to measure water exchange in erythrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchel, Philip W.; Naumann, Christoph

    2008-05-01

    The 2H NMR resonance from HDO (D = 2H) in human red blood cells (RBCs) suspended in gelatin that was held stretched in a special apparatus was distinct from the two signals that were symmetrically arranged on either side of it, which were assigned to extracellular HDO. The large extracellular splitting is due to the interaction of the electric quadrupole moment of the 2H nuclei with the electric field gradient tensor of the stretched, partially aligned gelatin. Lack of resolved splitting of the intracellular resonance indicated greatly diminished or absent ordering of the HDO inside RBCs. The separate resonances enabled the application of a saturation transfer method to estimate the rate constants of transmembrane exchange of water in RBCs. However both the theory and the practical applications needed modifications because even in the absence of RBCs the HDO resonances were maximally suppressed when the saturating radio-frequency radiation was applied exactly at the central frequency between the two resonances of the quadrupolar HDO doublet. More statistically robust estimates of the exchange rate constants were obtained by applying two-dimensional exchange spectroscopy (2D EXSY), with back-transformation analysis. A monotonic dependence of the estimates of the efflux rate constants on the mixing time, tmix, used in the 2D EXSY experiment were seen. Extrapolation to tmix = 0, gave an estimate of the efflux rate constant at 15 °C of 31.5 ± 2.2 s -1 while at 25 °C it was ˜50 s -1. These values are close to, but less than, those estimated by an NMR relaxation-enhancement method that uses Mn 2+ doping of the extracellular medium. The basis for this difference is thought to include the high viscosity of the extracellular gel. At the abstract level of quantum mechanics we have used the quadrupolar Hamiltonian to provide chemical shift separation between signals from spin populations across cell membranes; this is the first time, to our knowledge, that this has been

  14. Inelastic spin depolarization spectroscopy in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Appelbaum, Ian

    2013-07-01

    In ballistic injection spin transport devices, a tunnel junction emitter bias voltage determines the energy at which spin-polarized hot electrons cross a Schottky barrier into the conduction band of a semiconductor collector. Fast energy relaxation via phonon emission restores equilibrium for subsequent transport at the band edge. Through an analysis incorporating voltage-dependent measurement of magnetocurrent polarization in silicon spin transport devices along with magnetic-tunnel- and spin-valve-transistor configurations, the contribution to total spin depolarization caused by this inelastic scattering in the presence of spin-orbit interaction is quantified. From the shape of this spectroscopy, it is found that all measured spin depolarization can be accounted for solely by considering spin relaxation during bulk transport in quasi-equilibrium near the conduction band edge; the relaxation of initial spin state is irrelevant to the spin-dependent device characteristics.

  15. Hydration of DNA by tritiated water and isotope distribution: a study by /sup 1/H, /sup 2/H, and /sup 3/H NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur-De Vre, R.; Grimee-Declerck, R.; Lejeune, P.; Bertinchamps, A.J.

    1982-06-01

    The hydration layer of DNA (0.75%) in tritiated water represents 3.5% of solvent /sup 3/HHO. The combined effects of temperature (-6 to -40/sup 0/C) and H/sub 2/O//sup 2/H/sub 2/O solvent composition on the spin-lattice relaxation times of water protons and deuterons suggest selective distribution of isotopes in the hydration layer. The ''hydration isotope'' effect and the localization of tritiated water molecules in the hydration layer of DNA have important implications in describing the radiobiological effects of tritiated water because the initial molecular damage caused by /sup 3/HHO (internal radiation source) localizes close to /sup 3/H due to the short range and low energy of /sup 3/H ..beta.. rays.

  16. Emergent spin electromagnetism induced by magnetization textures in the presence of spin-orbit interaction (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Tatara, Gen; Nakabayashi, Noriyuki

    2014-05-07

    Emergent electromagnetic field which couples to electron's spin in ferromagnetic metals is theoretically studied. Rashba spin-orbit interaction induces spin electromagnetic field which is in the linear order in gradient of magnetization texture. The Rashba-induced effective electric and magnetic fields satisfy in the absence of spin relaxation the Maxwell's equations as in the charge-based electromagnetism. When spin relaxation is taken into account besides spin dynamics, a monopole current emerges generating spin motive force via the Faraday's induction law. The monopole is expected to play an important role in spin-charge conversion and in the integration of spintronics into electronics.

  17. Theoretical kinetics of O + C2H4

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, Xiaohu; Jasper, Ahren W.; Zádor, Judit; Miller, James A.; Klippenstein, Stephen J.

    2016-06-01

    The reaction of atomic oxygen with ethylene is a fundamental oxidation step in combustion and is prototypical of reactions in which oxygen adds to double bonds. For 3O+C2H4 and for this class of reactions generally, decomposition of the initial adduct via spin-allowed reaction channels on the triplet surface competes with intersystem crossing (ISC) and a set of spin-forbidden reaction channels on the ground-state singlet surface. The two surfaces share some bimolecular products but feature different intermediates, pathways, and transition states. In addition, the overall product branching is therefore a sensitive function of the ISC rate. The 3O+C2H4 reaction has beenmore » extensively studied, but previous experimental work has not provided detailed branching information at elevated temperatures, while previous theoretical studies have employed empirical treatments of ISC. Here we predict the kinetics of 3O+C2H4 using an ab initio transition state theory based master equation (AITSTME) approach that includes an a priori description of ISC. Specifically, the ISC rate is calculated using Landau–Zener statistical theory, consideration of the four lowest-energy electronic states, and a direct classical trajectory study of the product branching immediately after ISC. The present theoretical results are largely in good agreement with existing low-temperature experimental kinetics and molecular beam studies. Good agreement is also found with past theoretical work, with the notable exception of the predicted product branching at elevated temperatures. Above ~1000 K, we predict CH2CHO+H and CH2+CH2O as the major products, which differs from the room temperature preference for CH3+HCO (which is assumed to remain at higher temperatures in some models) and from the prediction of a previous detailed master equation study.« less

  18. μSR studies on the response of spin dynamics to applying or removing magnetic field—Typical Ising spin glass Fe0.50Mn0.50TiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torikai, Eiko; Ito, Atsuko; Watanabe, Isao; Nagamine, Kanetada

    2006-03-01

    One of the distinguishing properties of spin glass (SG) systems is a long-time relaxation of magnetization below the SG transition temperature. Motivated by the interests on how the microscopic spin dynamics is related to the macroscopic behavior of spin system in the SG state, we have performed the μSR measurement for a typical Ising SG system Fe 0.50Mn 0.50TiO 3 under various experimental conditions. We also pay attention to how the spin dynamics responds to a sudden change of magnetic fields. Thus, we have discussed the spin dynamics of SG system which had not been detected before our μSR measurement. For example, we have shown that the switching-off of a magnetic field at the field-cooled state makes the spin fluctuations faster. Moreover, such spin fluctuations have shown to remain faster at least up to the order of 2 h, although the thermoremanent magnetization decays dramatically within 2 h.

  19. Phase transitions in semidefinite relaxations

    PubMed Central

    Javanmard, Adel; Montanari, Andrea; Ricci-Tersenghi, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Statistical inference problems arising within signal processing, data mining, and machine learning naturally give rise to hard combinatorial optimization problems. These problems become intractable when the dimensionality of the data is large, as is often the case for modern datasets. A popular idea is to construct convex relaxations of these combinatorial problems, which can be solved efficiently for large-scale datasets. Semidefinite programming (SDP) relaxations are among the most powerful methods in this family and are surprisingly well suited for a broad range of problems where data take the form of matrices or graphs. It has been observed several times that when the statistical noise is small enough, SDP relaxations correctly detect the underlying combinatorial structures. In this paper we develop asymptotic predictions for several detection thresholds, as well as for the estimation error above these thresholds. We study some classical SDP relaxations for statistical problems motivated by graph synchronization and community detection in networks. We map these optimization problems to statistical mechanics models with vector spins and use nonrigorous techniques from statistical mechanics to characterize the corresponding phase transitions. Our results clarify the effectiveness of SDP relaxations in solving high-dimensional statistical problems. PMID:27001856

  20. Phase transitions in semidefinite relaxations.

    PubMed

    Javanmard, Adel; Montanari, Andrea; Ricci-Tersenghi, Federico

    2016-04-19

    Statistical inference problems arising within signal processing, data mining, and machine learning naturally give rise to hard combinatorial optimization problems. These problems become intractable when the dimensionality of the data is large, as is often the case for modern datasets. A popular idea is to construct convex relaxations of these combinatorial problems, which can be solved efficiently for large-scale datasets. Semidefinite programming (SDP) relaxations are among the most powerful methods in this family and are surprisingly well suited for a broad range of problems where data take the form of matrices or graphs. It has been observed several times that when the statistical noise is small enough, SDP relaxations correctly detect the underlying combinatorial structures. In this paper we develop asymptotic predictions for several detection thresholds, as well as for the estimation error above these thresholds. We study some classical SDP relaxations for statistical problems motivated by graph synchronization and community detection in networks. We map these optimization problems to statistical mechanics models with vector spins and use nonrigorous techniques from statistical mechanics to characterize the corresponding phase transitions. Our results clarify the effectiveness of SDP relaxations in solving high-dimensional statistical problems. PMID:27001856

  1. 1H NMR relaxation in urea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, R. E.; Bacher, Alfred D.; Dybowski, C.

    2007-11-01

    Proton NMR spin-lattice relaxation times T1 were measured for urea as a function of temperature. An activation energy of 46.3 ± 4.7 kJ/mol was extracted and compared with the range of 38-65 kJ/mol previously reported in the literature as measured by different magnetic resonance techniques. In addition, proton NMR spin-lattice relaxation times in the rotating frame T1 ρ were measured as a function of temperature. These measurements provide acquisition conditions for the 13C and 15N CP/MAS spectra of pure urea in the crystalline phase.

  2. Natural abundance high-resolution solid state 2 H NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliev, Abil E.; Harris, Kenneth D. M.; Apperley, David C.

    1994-08-01

    We report for the first time an approach for natural abundance solid state 2 H NMR spectroscopy involving magic angle sample spinning (MAS), high-power 1 H decoupling (HPPD) and 1 H- 2 H cross polarization (CP). Taking tetrakis(trimethylsilyl)silane (TTMSS), adamantane, 1-chloroadamantane, hexamethylbenzene (HMB), 2,2-dimethyl-1,3-propanediol (DMPD) and 2-hydroxymethyl-2-methyl-1,3-propanediol (HMPD) as examples, it has been shown that the combination of HPPD and MAS can be applied readily to study rotator phase solids, allowing isotropic peaks arising from chemically inequivalent 2 H nuclei to be resolved. For natural abundance samples of TTMSS and chloroadamantane, it has been shown that 2 H CP/HPPD/MAS NMR experiments, involving polarization transfer from 1 H to 2 H, may provide considerable sensitivity enhancement in comparison with single pulse experiments.

  3. Natural abundance high-resolution solid state 2 H NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliev, Abil E.; Harris, Kenneth D. M.; Apperley, David C.

    1994-08-01

    We report for the first time an approach for natural abundance solid state 2H NMR spectroscopy involving magic angle sample spinning (MAS), high-power 1H decoupling (HPPD) and 1H- 2H cross polarization (CP). Taking tetrakis(trimethylsilyl)silane (TTMSS), adamantane, 1-chloroadamantane, hexamethylbenzene (HMB), 2,2-dimethyl-1,3-propanediol (DMPD) and 2-hydroxymethyl-2-methyl-1,3-propanediol (HMPD) as examples, it has been shown that the combination of HPPD and MAS can be applied readily to study rotator phase solids, allowing isotropic peaks arising from chemically inequivalent 2H nuclei to be resolved. For natural abundance samples of TTMSS and chloroadamantane, it has been shown that 2H CP/HPPD/MAS NMR experiments, involving polarization transfer from 1H to 2H, may provide considerable sensitivity enhancement in comparison with single pulse experiments.

  4. Breathing and Relaxation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Top Doctors in the Nation Departments & Divisions Home Health Insights Stress & Relaxation Breathing and Relaxation Breathing and Relaxation Make ... Management Assess Your Stress Coping Strategies Identifying ... & Programs Health Insights Doctors & Departments Research & Science Education & Training Make ...

  5. Amplification of Spin Waves by Thermal Spin-Transfer Torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padrón-Hernández, E.; Azevedo, A.; Rezende, S. M.

    2011-11-01

    We observe amplification of spin-wave packets propagating along a film of single-crystal yttrium iron garnet subject to a transverse temperature gradient. The spin waves are excited and detected with standard techniques used in magnetostatic microwave delay lines in the 1-2 GHz frequency range. The amplification is attributed to the action of a thermal spin-transfer torque acting on the magnetization that opposes the relaxation and which is created by spin currents generated through the spin-Seebeck effect. The experimental data are interpreted with a spin-wave model that gives an amplification gain in very good agreement with the data.

  6. Relaxation Assessment with Varied Structured Milieu (RELAX).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassel, Russell N.; Cassel, Susie L.

    1983-01-01

    Describes Relaxation Assessment with Varied Structured Milieu (RELAX), a clinical program designed to assess the degree to which an individual is able to demonstrate self-control for overall general relaxation. The program is designed for use with the Cassel Biosensors biofeedback equipment. (JAC)

  7. 1H relaxation enhancement induced by nanoparticles in solutions: influence of magnetic properties and diffusion.

    PubMed

    Kruk, D; Korpała, A; Taheri, S Mehdizadeh; Kozłowski, A; Förster, S; Rössler, E A

    2014-05-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles that induce nuclear relaxation are the most promising materials to enhance the sensitivity in Magnetic Resonance Imaging. In order to provide a comprehensive understanding of the magnetic field dependence of the relaxation enhancement in solutions, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (1)H spin-lattice relaxation for decalin and toluene solutions of various Fe2O3 nanoparticles was investigated. The relaxation experiments were performed in a frequency range of 10 kHz-20 MHz by applying Field Cycling method, and in the temperature range of 257-298 K, using nanoparticles differing in size and shape: spherical--5 nm diameter, cubic--6.5 nm diameter, and cubic--9 nm diameter. The relaxation dispersion data were interpreted in terms of a theory of nuclear relaxation induced by magnetic crystals in solution. The approach was tested with respect to its applicability depending on the magnetic characteristics of the nanocrystals and the time-scale of translational diffusion of the solvent. The role of Curie relaxation and the contributions to the overall (1)H spin-lattice relaxation associated with the electronic spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation was thoroughly discussed. It was demonstrated that the approach leads to consistent results providing information on the magnetic (electronic) properties of the nanocrystals, i.e., effective electron spin and relaxation times. In addition, features of the (1)H spin-lattice relaxation resulting from the electronic properties of the crystals and the solvent diffusion were explained. PMID:24811643

  8. Joule heating in spin Hall geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Tomohiro

    2016-07-01

    The theoretical formula for the entropy production rate in the presence of spin current is derived using the spin-dependent transport equation and thermodynamics. This theory is applicable regardless of the source of the spin current, for example, an electric field, a temperature gradient, or the Hall effect. It reproduces the result in a previous work on the dissipation formula when the relaxation time approximation is applied to the spin relaxation rate. By using the developed theory, it is found that the dissipation in the spin Hall geometry has a contribution proportional to the square of the spin Hall angle.

  9. Physical and Structural Characterization of Imidazolium-Based Organic-Inorganic Hybrid: (C3N2H5)2[CoCl4].

    PubMed

    Piecha-Bisiorek, Anna; Bieńko, Alina; Jakubas, Ryszard; Boča, Roman; Weselski, Marek; Kinzhybalo, Vasyl; Pietraszko, Adam; Wojciechowska, Martyna; Medycki, Wojciech; Kruk, Danuta

    2016-03-31

    (C3N2H5)2[CoCl4] (ICC) was characterized in a wide temperature range by the single-crystal X-ray diffraction method. Differential scanning calorimetry revealed two structural phase transitions: continuous at 245.5 K (from phase I to II) and a discontinuous one at 234/237 K (cooling/heating) (II → III). ICC adopts monoclinic space groups C2/c and P21/c in phase (I) and (III), respectively. The intermediate phase (II) appears to be incommensurately modulated. Dynamic properties of polycrystalline ICC were studied by means of dielectric spectroscopy and proton magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR). The presence of a low frequency dielectric relaxation process in phase III reflects libration motion of the imidazolium cations. The temperature dependence of the (1)H spin-lattice relaxation time indicated two motional processes with similar activation energies that are by about an order of magnitude smaller than the activation energy obtained from dielectric studies. There are no abrupt changes in the (1)H relaxation time at the phase transitions indicating that the dynamics of the imidazolium rings gradually varies with temperature; that is, it does not change suddenly at the phase transition. Negative values of the Weiss constant and the intermolecular exchange parameter were obtained, confirming the presence of a weak antiferromagnetic interaction between the nearest cobalt centers. Moreover, the magnitude of zero field splitting was determined. The AC susceptibility measurements show that a slow magnetic relaxation is induced by small external magnetic field. PMID:26959833

  10. Strain dependent electron spin dynamics in bulk cubic GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, A.; Buß, J. H.; Hägele, D.; Rudolph, J.; Schupp, T.; Zado, A.; As, D. J.

    2015-03-07

    The electron spin dynamics under variable uniaxial strain is investigated in bulk cubic GaN by time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr-rotation spectroscopy. Spin relaxation is found to be approximately independent of the applied strain, in complete agreement with estimates for Dyakonov-Perel spin relaxation. Our findings clearly exclude strain-induced relaxation as an effective mechanism for spin relaxation in cubic GaN.

  11. Manipulation of spin transport in graphene by surface chemical doping.

    PubMed

    Pi, K; Han, Wei; McCreary, K M; Swartz, A G; Li, Yan; Kawakami, R K

    2010-05-01

    The effects of surface chemical doping on spin transport in graphene are investigated by performing nonlocal measurements in ultrahigh vacuum while depositing gold adsorbates. We demonstrate manipulation of the gate-dependent nonlocal spin signal as a function of gold coverage. We discover that charged impurity scattering is not the dominant mechanism for spin relaxation in graphene, despite its importance for momentum scattering. Finally, unexpected enhancements of the spin lifetime illustrate the complex nature of spin relaxation in graphene. PMID:20482203

  12. Enhancement of Paramagnetic Relaxation by Photoexcited Gold Nanorods

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Tao; Wamer, Wayne G.; Subczynski, Witold K.; Hou, Shuai; Wu, Xiaochun; Yin, Jun-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy was used to investigate the switchable, light-dependent effects of gold nanorods (GNRs) on paramagnetic properties of nitroxide spin probes. The photoexcited GNRs enhanced the spin-spin and spin-lattice relaxations of nitroxide spin probes. It was shown that molecular oxygen plays the key role in this process. Our results demonstrate that ESR is a powerful tool for investigating the events following photoexcitation of GNRs. The novel light-controlled effects observed for GNRs on paramagnetic properties and activities of surrounding molecules have a number of significant applications where oxygen sensing and oxygen activity is important. PMID:27071507

  13. One dimensional 1H, 2H and 3H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, A. J.; Astrakharchik, G. E.; Vranješ Markić, L.; Boronat, J.

    2016-05-01

    The ground-state properties of one-dimensional electron-spin-polarized hydrogen 1H, deuterium 2H, and tritium 3H are obtained by means of quantum Monte Carlo methods. The equations of state of the three isotopes are calculated for a wide range of linear densities. The pair correlation function and the static structure factor are obtained and interpreted within the framework of the Luttinger liquid theory. We report the density dependence of the Luttinger parameter and use it to identify different physical regimes: Bogoliubov Bose gas, super-Tonks–Girardeau gas, and quasi-crystal regimes for bosons; repulsive, attractive Fermi gas, and quasi-crystal regimes for fermions. We find that the tritium isotope is the one with the richest behavior. Our results show unambiguously the relevant role of the isotope mass in the properties of this quantum system.

  14. Room temperature manipulation of long lifetime spins in metallic-like carbon nanospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Náfrádi, Bálint; Choucair, Mohammad; Dinse, Klaus-Peter; Forró, László

    2016-07-01

    The time-window for processing electron spin information (spintronics) in solid-state quantum electronic devices is determined by the spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation times of electrons. Minimizing the effects of spin-orbit coupling and the local magnetic contributions of neighbouring atoms on spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation times at room temperature remain substantial challenges to practical spintronics. Here we report conduction electron spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation times of 175 ns at 300 K in 37+/-7 nm carbon spheres, which is remarkably long for any conducting solid-state material of comparable size. Following the observation of spin polarization by electron spin resonance, we control the quantum state of the electron spin by applying short bursts of an oscillating magnetic field and observe coherent oscillations of the spin state. These results demonstrate the feasibility of operating electron spins in conducting carbon nanospheres as quantum bits at room temperature.

  15. Variations in the Nature of Triple Bonds: The N2, HCN, and HC2H Series.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lu T; Dunning, Thom H

    2016-07-01

    The inertness of molecular nitrogen and the reactivity of acetylene suggest there are significant variations in the nature of triple bonds. To understand these differences, we performed generalized valence bond as well as more accurate electronic structure calculations on three molecules with putative triple bonds: N2, HCN, and HC2H. The calculations predict that the triple bond in HC2H is quite different from the triple bond in N2, with HCN being an intermediate case but closer to N2 than HC2H. The triple bond in N2 is a traditional triple bond with the spins of the electrons in the bonding orbital pairs predominantly singlet coupled in the GVB wave function (92%). In HC2H, however, there is a substantial amount of residual CH(a(4)Σ(-)) fragment coupling in the triple bond at its equilibrium geometry with the contribution of the perfect pairing spin function dropping to 82% (77% in a full valence GVB calculation). This difference in the nature of the triple bond in N2 and HC2H may well be responsible for the differences in the reactivities of N2 and HC2H. PMID:27299373

  16. Comet Bursting Through Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Seth A.; Scheeres, D. J.

    2012-10-01

    Comets may be excited and occupy non-principal axis (complex) rotation states for a large fraction of their lifetimes. Many comet nuclei have been identified or are suspected to occupy non-principal axis (complex) rotation [Belton 2005, etc.] as well as have evolving rotation rates [Belton 2011, etc.]. Comet orbits drive these rotation states through cycles of excitation due to surface jets and relaxation due to time variable internal stresses that dissipate energy in the anelastic comet interior. Furthermore, relaxation from complex rotation can increase the loads along the symmetry axis of prolate comets. These loads stretch the body along the symmetry axis and may be the cause of the characteristic ``bowling pin’’ shape and eventually may lead to failure. This is an alternative model for comet bursting. Each cycle deposits only a small amount of energy and stress along the axis, but this process is repeated every orbit during which jets are activated. Our model for the evolution of comet nuclei includes torques due to a number of discrete jets located on the surface based on Neishtadt et al. [2002]. The model also includes internal dissipation using an approach developed by Sharma et al. [2005] and Vokrouhlicky et al. [2009]. These equations are averaged over the instantaneous spin state and the heliocentric orbit so the long-term evolution of the comet can be determined. We determine that even after the inclusion of internal dissipation there still exist non-principal axis equilibrium states for certain jet geometries. For ranges of dissipation factors and jet geometries, prolate comets are found to occupy states that have time variable internal loads over long time periods. These periodic loadings along the symmetry axis may lead to ``necking’’ as the body extends along the axis to release the stress and eventually disruption.

  17. [Fluorescent and Magnetic Relaxation Switch Immunosensor for the Detecting Foodborne Pathogen Salmonella enterica in Water Samples].

    PubMed

    Wang, Song-bai; Zhang, Yan; An, Wen-ting; Wei, Yan-li; Wang, Yu; Shuang, Shao-min

    2015-11-01

    Fluoroimmunoassay based on quantum dots (QDs) and magnetic relaxation switch (MRS) immunoassay based on superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SMN) were constructed to detect Salmonella enterica (S. enterica) in water samples. In fluoroimmunoassay, magnetic beads was conjugated with S. enterica capture antibody (MB-Ab2) to enrich S. enterica from sample solution, then the QDs was conjugated with the S. enterica detection antibody (QDs-Ab1) to detect S. enterica based on sandwich immunoassay format. And the fluorescence intensity is positive related to the bacteria concentration of the sample. Results showed that the limit of detection (LOD) of this method was 102 cfu · mL⁻¹ and analysis time was 2 h. In MRS assay, magnetic nanoparticle-antibody conjugate (MN-Ab1) can switch their dispersed and aggregated state in the presence of the target. This state of change can modulate the spin-spin relaxation time (T₂) of the neighboring water molecule. The change in T₂(ΔT₂) positively correlates with the amount of the target in the sample. Thus, AT can be used as a detection signal in MRS immunosensors. Results showed that LOD of MRS sensor for S. enterica was 10³ cfu · mL⁻¹ and analysis time was 0.5 h. Two methods were compared in terms of advantages and disadvantages in detecting S. enterica. PMID:26978918

  18. Dissociative recombination of N2H+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, S. Fonseca; Ngassam, V.; Orel, A. E.; Larson, Å.

    2016-08-01

    The direct and indirect mechanisms of dissociative recombination of N2H+ are theoretically studied. At low energies, the electron capture is found to be driven by recombination into bound Rydberg states, while at collision energies above 0.1 eV, the direct capture and dissociation along electronic resonant states becomes important. Electron-scattering calculations using the complex Kohn variational method are performed to obtain the scattering matrix as well as energy positions and autoionization widths of resonant states. Potential-energy surfaces of electronic bound states of N2H and N2H+ are computed using structure calculations with the multireference configuration interaction method. The cross section for the indirect mechanism is calculated using a vibrational frame transformation of the elements of the scattering matrix at energies just above the ionization threshold. Here vibrational excitations of the ionic core from v =0 to v =1 and v =2 for all three normal modes are considered and autoionization is neglected. The cross section for the direct dissociation along electronic resonant states is computed with wave-packet calculations using the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree method, where all three internal degrees of freedom are considered. The calculated cross sections are compared to measurements.

  19. 2H NMR study of phase transition and hydrogen dynamics in hydrogen bonded organic antiferroelectric 55DMBP-H2ca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asaji, Tetsuo; Hara, Masamichi; Fujimori, Hiroki; Hagiwara, Shoko

    2016-12-01

    Hydrogen dynamics in one-dimensional hydrogen bonded organic antiferroelectric, co-crystal of 5,5'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine (55DMBP) and chloranilic acid (H2ca), was investigated by use of 2H high resolution solid-state NMR. The two types of hydrogen bonds O-H …N and N+-H … O - in the antiferroelectric phase were clearly observed as the splitting of the side band of the 2H MAS NMR spectra of the acid-proton deuterated compound 55DMBP-D 2ca. The temperature dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation time was measured of the N+-H and O-H deuterons, respectively. It was suggested that the motion of the O-H deuteron is already in the antiferroelectric phase in the fast-motion regime in the NMR time scale, while that of the N+-H deuteron is a slow motion. In the high-temperature paraelectric phase, the both deuterons become equivalent and the fast motion of the deuterons in the NMR time scale is taking place with the activation energy of 7.9 kJ mol-1.

  20. Excited States of Nucleic Acids Probed by Proton Relaxation Dispersion NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Juen, Michael Andreas; Wunderlich, Christoph Hermann; Nußbaumer, Felix; Tollinger, Martin; Kontaxis, Georg; Konrat, Robert; Hansen, D Flemming; Kreutz, Christoph

    2016-09-19

    In this work an improved stable isotope labeling protocol for nucleic acids is introduced. The novel building blocks eliminate/minimize homonuclear (13) C and (1) H scalar couplings thus allowing proton relaxation dispersion (RD) experiments to report accurately on the chemical exchange of nucleic acids. Using site-specific (2) H and (13) C labeling, spin topologies are introduced into DNA and RNA that make (1) H relaxation dispersion experiments applicable in a straightforward manner. The novel RNA/DNA building blocks were successfully incorporated into two nucleic acids. The A-site RNA was previously shown to undergo a two site exchange process in the micro- to millisecond time regime. Using proton relaxation dispersion experiments the exchange parameters determined earlier could be recapitulated, thus validating the proposed approach. We further investigated the dynamics of the cTAR DNA, a DNA transcript that is involved in the viral replication cycle of HIV-1. Again, an exchange process could be characterized and quantified. This shows the general applicablility of the novel labeling scheme for (1) H RD experiments of nucleic acids. PMID:27533469