Science.gov

Sample records for 2mass calibration scan

  1. SDSS J14584479+3720215: A BENCHMARK JHK{sub S} BLAZAR LIGHT CURVE FROM THE 2MASS CALIBRATION SCANS

    SciTech Connect

    Davenport, James R. A.; Ruan, John J.; Becker, Andrew C.; Macleod, Chelsea L.; Cutri, Roc M.

    2015-04-10

    Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are well-known to exhibit flux variability across a wide range of wavelength regimes, but the precise origin of the variability at different wavelengths remains unclear. To investigate the relatively unexplored near-IR (NIR) variability of the most luminous AGNs, we conduct a search for variability using well sampled JHK{sub s}-band light curves from the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) calibration fields. Our sample includes 27 known quasars with an average of 924 epochs of observation over three years, as well as one spectroscopically confirmed blazar (SDSS J14584479+3720215) with 1972 epochs of data. This is the best-sampled NIR photometric blazar light curve to date, and it exhibits correlated, stochastic variability that we characterize with continuous auto-regressive moving average (CARMA) models. None of the other 26 known quasars had detectable variability in the 2MASS bands above the photometric uncertainty. A blind search of the 2MASS calibration field light curves for active galactic nucleus (AGN) candidates based on fitting CARMA(1,0) models (damped-random walk) uncovered only seven candidates. All seven were young stellar objects within the ρ Ophiuchus star forming region, five with previous X-ray detections. A significant γ-ray detection (5σ) for the known blazar using 4.5 yr of Fermi photon data is also found. We suggest that strong NIR variability of blazars, such as seen for SDSS J14584479+3720215, can be used as an efficient method of identifying previously unidentified γ-ray blazars, with low contamination from other AGNs.

  2. Near-infrared Variability in the 2MASS Calibration Fields: A Search for Planetary Transit Candidates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plavchan, Peter; Jura, M.; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Cutri, Roc M.; Gallagher, S. C.

    2008-01-01

    The Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) photometric calibration observations cover approximately 6 square degrees on the sky in 35 'calibration fields,' each sampled in nominal photometric conditions between 562 and 3692 times during the 4 years of the 2MASS mission. We compile a catalog of variables from the calibration observations to search for M dwarfs transited by extrasolar planets. We present our methods for measuring periodic and nonperiodic flux variability. From 7554 sources with apparent K(sub s) magnitudes between 5.6 and 16.1, we identify 247 variables, including extragalactic variables and 23 periodic variables. We have discovered three M dwarf eclipsing systems, including two candidates for transiting extrasolar planets.

  3. Auroral meridian scanning photometer calibration using Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackel, Brian J.; Unick, Craig; Creutzberg, Fokke; Baker, Greg; Davis, Eric; Donovan, Eric F.; Connors, Martin; Wilson, Cody; Little, Jarrett; Greffen, M.; McGuffin, Neil

    2016-10-01

    Observations of astronomical sources provide information that can significantly enhance the utility of auroral data for scientific studies. This report presents results obtained by using Jupiter for field cross calibration of four multispectral auroral meridian scanning photometers during the 2011-2015 Northern Hemisphere winters. Seasonal average optical field-of-view and local orientation estimates are obtained with uncertainties of 0.01 and 0.1°, respectively. Estimates of absolute sensitivity are repeatable to roughly 5 % from one month to the next, while the relative response between different wavelength channels is stable to better than 1 %. Astronomical field calibrations and darkroom calibration differences are on the order of 10 %. Atmospheric variability is the primary source of uncertainty; this may be reduced with complementary data from co-located instruments.

  4. Scan pointing calibration for the Mariner Mars 1971 spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Havens, W. F.; Jaivin, G. I.; Pace, G. D.; Virzi, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    The methods used to calibrate the pointing direction of the Mars 71 spacecraft scan platform are described. Accurate calibration was required to meet the pointing accuracy requirements of the scientific instruments mounted on the platform. A detailed ground calibration was combined with an in-flight calibration utilizing narrow angle television pictures of stars. Results of these calibrations are summarized.

  5. Calibration of line-scan cameras for precision measurement.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bo; Zhu, Jigui; Yang, Linghui; Yang, Shourui; Niu, Zhiyuan

    2016-09-01

    Calibration of line-scan cameras for precision measurement should have large calibration volume and be flexible in the actual measurement field. In this paper, we present a high-precision calibration method. Instead of using a large 3D pattern, we use a small planar pattern and a precalibrated matrix camera to obtain plenty of points with a suitable distribution, which would ensure the precision of the calibration results. The matrix camera removes the necessity of precise adjustment and movement and links the line-scan camera to the world easily, both of which enhance flexibility in the measurement field. The method has been verified by experiments. The experimental results demonstrated that the proposed method gives a practical solution to calibrate line scan cameras for precision measurement.

  6. Calibration analysis for a multi-channel infrared scanning radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walden, H.; Hurley, E. J.; Korb, C. L.

    1977-01-01

    A procedure for calibrating an infrared scanning spectroradiometer by a computerized parametric error analysis technique was developed. The uncertainties in the radiometric measurements of scene radiance and (for the case of a blackbody scene) temperature due to possible uncertainties in the calibration target temperature, calibration target emissivity, and instrument temperature were calculated for a range of uncertainty levels in the parameters, as well as for a gamut of scent temperatures corresponding to a given spectral channel. This technique is applicable to the radiometric calibration of any infrared radiometer. It was applied specifically to the Cloud-Top Scanning (C.T.S) Radiometer, a three-channel instrument designed for aircraftborne cloud radiance measurements in the 6.75 and 11.5 micron thermal emission spectral regions.

  7. Line-defect calibration for line-scanning projection display.

    PubMed

    An, Seungdo; Song, Jonghyeong; Lapchuk, Anatoliy; Yurlov, Victor; Ryu, Seung-Won; Kim, Eungju; Yun, Sang Kyeong

    2009-09-14

    A method of line-defect calibration for line-scanning projection display is developed to accomplish acceptable display uniformity. The line scanning display uses a line modulating imaging and scanning device to construct a two-dimensional image. The inherent line-defects in an imaging device and optical lenses are the most fatal performance-degrading factor that should be overcome to reach the basic display uniformity level. Since the human eye recognizes line defects very easily, a method that perfectly removes line defects is required. Most line imaging devices are diffractive optical devices that require a coherent light source. This particular requirement makes the calibration method of sequential single pixel measurement and correction insufficient to take out the line defects distributed on screen due to optical crosstalk. In this report, we present a calibration method using a recursively converging algorithm that successfully transforms the unacceptable line-defected images into a uniform display image.

  8. Self-calibrating lateral scanning white-light interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Munteanu, Florin

    2010-04-20

    Lateral scanning white-light interferometry represents an attractive alternative to the standard white-light interferometry. Its main advantage over the latter procedure consists in the ability to scan large samples continuously, without the need of a cumbersome stitching procedure. Presently, the main drawback in the path of large-scale industrial acceptance of this method is the need for careful calibration of the tilt angle prior to each measurement. A novel self-calibration approach is presented. Using the data acquired during the normal scanning process, the need of an initial tilt angle calibration is eliminated and on-the-fly system adjustments for the best signal-to-noise ratio can be performed without an increase in the measurement time dictated by recalibration.

  9. Design and calibration of a vacuum compatible scanning tunneling microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abel, Phillip B.

    1990-01-01

    A vacuum compatible scanning tunneling microscope was designed and built, capable of imaging solid surfaces with atomic resolution. The single piezoelectric tube design is compact, and makes use of sample mounting stubs standard to a commercially available surface analysis system. Image collection and display is computer controlled, allowing storage of images for further analysis. Calibration results from atomic scale images are presented.

  10. The Herschel-PACS photometer calibration. Point-source flux calibration for scan maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balog, Zoltan; Müller, Thomas; Nielbock, Markus; Altieri, Bruno; Klaas, Ulrich; Blommaert, Joris; Linz, Hendrik; Lutz, Dieter; Moór, Attila; Billot, Nicolas; Sauvage, Marc; Okumura, Koryo

    2014-07-01

    This paper provides an overview of the PACS photometer flux calibration concept, in particular for the principal observation mode, the scan map. The absolute flux calibration is tied to the photospheric models of five fiducial stellar standards ( α Boo, α Cet, α Tau, β And, γ Dra). The data processing steps to arrive at a consistent and homogeneous calibration are outlined. In the current state the relative photometric accuracy is ˜2 % in all bands. Starting from the present calibration status, the characterization and correction for instrumental effects affecting the relative calibration accuracy is described and an outlook for the final achievable calibration numbers is given. After including all the correction for the instrumental effects, the relative photometric calibration accuracy (repeatability) will be as good as 0.5 % in the blue and green band and 2 % in the red band. This excellent calibration starts to reveal possible inconsistencies between the models of the K-type and the M-type stellar calibrators. The absolute calibration accuracy is therefore mainly limited by the 5 % uncertainty of the celestial standard models in all three bands. The PACS bolometer response was extremely stable over the entire Herschel mission and a single, time-independent response calibration file is sufficient for the processing and calibration of the science observations. The dedicated measurements of the internal calibration sources were needed only to characterize secondary effects. No aging effects of the bolometer or the filters have been found. Also, we found no signs of filter leaks. The PACS photometric system is very well characterized with a constant energy spectrum νF ν = λF λ = const as a reference. Colour corrections for a wide range of sources SEDs are determined and tabulated.

  11. A Laser Sheet Self-Calibration Method for Scanning PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knutsen, Anna N.; Dawson, James R.; Lawson, John M.; Worth, Nicholas A.

    2016-11-01

    A laser sheet self-calibration method for scanning PIV has been developed to replace the current laser sheet calibration, which is complex, time consuming and very sensitive to misalignment of the optics or cameras during experiments. The new calibration method is simpler, faster and crucially more robust. The concept behind the method is to traverse a laser sheet through the measurement volume, take a series of images from two different views, and calculate the global 3D particle locations. This information is used to find the real space coordinates of the measurement volume and the orientation and width of the laser sheets. The spatial location of the particles is found by object matching and triangulation. The light intensity in the laser sheet has an approximately Gaussian shape, and the illumination of one particle which will be illuminated multiple times during the scan will thus vary as the sheet is scanned across the measurement volume. The thickness of the laser sheet is calculated by identifying the variation of illumination of the particles during a scan and fitting this to a Gaussian shaped curve, while the orientation is found using a least square fit. The accuracy of the new method will be presented with respect to both synthetic and experimental data.

  12. Calibration technology in application of robot-laser scanning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, YongJie; Yin, ShiBin; Zhu, JiGui

    2012-11-01

    A system composed of laser sensor and 6-DOF industrial robot is proposed to obtain complete three-dimensional (3-D) information of the object surface. Suitable for the different combining ways of laser sensor and robot, a new method to calibrate the position and pose between sensor and robot is presented. By using a standard sphere with known radius as a reference tool, the rotation and translation matrices between the laser sensor and robot are computed, respectively in two steps, so that many unstable factors introduced in conventional optimization methods can be avoided. The experimental results show that the accuracy of the proposed calibration method can be achieved up to 0.062 mm. The calibration method is also implemented into the automated robot scanning system to reconstruct a car door panel.

  13. An optical scan-calibration system in scanning near-field optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yunliang; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Keyi

    2009-11-01

    Scanning Probe Microscopes(SPM) use piezoelectric actuators to generate the scans. But the nonlinearities inherent in the piezoelectric actuators limit the usefulness of the instruments in precision metrology. This paper describes a simple optical beam displacement sensor that is used to accurately measure the (x,y) position of a piezoelectric tube scanner used in Scanning Near-field Optical Microscope(SNOM). As the nonlinearities is too complex to make up a simple math model, this paper use the Artificial neural network to Calibrate the nonlinearities.

  14. High Accuracy Wavelength Calibration For A Scanning Visible Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Filippo Scotti and Ronald Bell

    2010-07-29

    Spectroscopic applications for plasma velocity measurements often require wavelength accuracies ≤ 0.2Â. An automated calibration for a scanning spectrometer has been developed to achieve a high wavelength accuracy overr the visible spectrum, stable over time and environmental conditions, without the need to recalibrate after each grating movement. The method fits all relevant spectrometer paraameters using multiple calibration spectra. With a steping-motor controlled sine-drive, accuracies of ~0.025 Â have been demonstrated. With the addition of high resolution (0.075 aresec) optical encoder on the grading stage, greater precision (~0.005 Â) is possible, allowing absolute velocity measurements with ~0.3 km/s. This level of precision requires monitoring of atmospheric temperature and pressure and of grating bulk temperature to correct for changes in the refractive index of air and the groove density, respectively.

  15. The StarScan Plate Measuring Machine: Overview and Calibrations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-28

    negligible, and we measure here the accuracy of the x, y-table coordinates of StarScan. In the following we refer to these sets of measures as m1c and m2c ...BETWEEN TWO SETS OF DATA, DCP IS CALIBRATION PLATE, M1C AND M2C ARE THE SETS 1 AND 2 OF MEASURES OF CENTRAL DOTS, AND 000 TO 270 INDICATE THE...ORIENTATION OF A MEASURE. SEE TEXT FOR MORE DETAILS. Result number Data set 1 Data set 2 Model rms x (μm) rms y (μm) 1 DCP m1c 000 DCP m2c 000 linear 0.31 0.20

  16. Calibration improvements to electronically scanned pressure systems and preliminary statistical assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everhart, Joel L.

    1996-01-01

    Orifice-to-orifice inconsistencies in data acquired with an electronically-scanned pressure system at the beginning of a wind tunnel experiment forced modifications to the standard, instrument calibration procedures. These modifications included a large increase in the number of calibration points which would allow a critical examination of the calibration curve-fit process, and a subsequent post-test reduction of the pressure data. Evaluation of these data has resulted in an improved functional representation of the pressure-voltage signature for electronically-scanned pressures sensors, which can reduce the errors due to calibration curve fit to under 0.10 percent of reading compared to the manufacturer specified 0.10 percent of full scale. Application of the improved calibration function allows a more rational selection of the calibration set-point pressures. These pressures should be adjusted to achieve a voltage output which matches the physical shape of the pressure-voltage signature of the sensor. This process is conducted in lieu of the more traditional approach where a calibration pressure is specified and the resulting sensor voltage is recorded. The fifteen calibrations acquired over the two-week duration of the wind tunnel test were further used to perform a preliminary, statistical assessment of the variation in the calibration process. The results allowed the estimation of the bias uncertainty for a single instrument calibration; and, they form the precursor for more extensive and more controlled studies in the laboratory.

  17. Cross-ratio-based line scan camera calibration using a planar pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dongdong; Wen, Gongjian; Qiu, Shaohua

    2016-01-01

    A flexible new technique is proposed to calibrate the geometric model of line scan cameras. In this technique, the line scan camera is rigidly coupled to a calibrated frame camera to establish a pair of stereo cameras. The linear displacements and rotation angles between the two cameras are fixed but unknown. This technique only requires the pair of stereo cameras to observe a specially designed planar pattern shown at a few (at least two) different orientations. At each orientation, a stereo pair is obtained including a linear array image and a frame image. Radial distortion of the line scan camera is modeled. The calibration scheme includes two stages. First, point correspondences are established from the pattern geometry and the projective invariance of cross-ratio. Second, with a two-step calibration procedure, the intrinsic parameters of the line scan camera are recovered from several stereo pairs together with the rigid transform parameters between the pair of stereo cameras. Both computer simulation and real data experiments are conducted to test the precision and robustness of the calibration algorithm, and very good calibration results have been obtained. Compared with classical techniques which use three-dimensional calibration objects or controllable moving platforms, our technique is affordable and flexible in close-range photogrammetric applications.

  18. Calibration for single multi-mode fiber digital scanning microscopy imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Zhe; Liu, Guodong; Liu, Bingguo; Gan, Yu; Zhuang, Zhitao; Chen, Fengdong

    2015-11-01

    Single multimode fiber (MMF) digital scanning imaging system is a development tendency of modern endoscope. We concentrate on the calibration method of the imaging system. Calibration method comprises two processes, forming scanning focused spots and calibrating the couple factors varied with positions. Adaptive parallel coordinate algorithm (APC) is adopted to form the focused spots at the multimode fiber (MMF) output. Compare with other algorithm, APC contains many merits, i.e. rapid speed, small amount calculations and no iterations. The ratio of the optics power captured by MMF to the intensity of the focused spots is called couple factor. We setup the calibration experimental system to form the scanning focused spots and calculate the couple factors for different object positions. The experimental result the couple factor is higher in the center than the edge.

  19. Calibration of the spin-scan ozone imager aboard the dynamics Explorer 1 satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bressette, Walter E.; Keating, Gerald M.; Young, David F.

    1987-01-01

    The calibration technique, which contains the calibrated backscattered radiance values necessary for performing the calibrations, is presented. The calibration constants for September to October 1981 to determine total columnar ozone from the Spin-Scan Ozone Imager (SOI), which is a part of the auroral imaging instrumentation aboard the Dynamics Explorer 1 Satellite, are provided. The precision of the SOI-derived total columnar ozone is estimated to be better than 2.4 percent. Linear regression analysis was used to calculate correlation coefficients between total columnar ozone obtained from Dobson ground stations and SOI which indicate that the SOI total columnar ozone determination is equally accurate for clear or cloudy weather conditions.

  20. A pipette-based calibration system for fast-scan cyclic voltammetry with fast response times.

    PubMed

    Ramsson, Eric S

    2016-01-01

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) is an electrochemical technique that utilizes the oxidation and/or reduction of an analyte of interest to infer rapid changes in concentrations. In order to calibrate the resulting oxidative or reductive current, known concentrations of an analyte must be introduced under controlled settings. Here, I describe a simple and cost-effective method, using a Petri dish and pipettes, for the calibration of carbon fiber microelectrodes (CFMs) using FSCV.

  1. Design and calibration of a scanning tunneling microscope for large machined surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Grigg, D.A.; Russell, P.E.; Dow, T.A.

    1988-12-01

    During the last year the large sample STM has been designed, built and used for the observation of several different samples. Calibration of the scanner for prope dimensional interpretation of surface features has been a chief concern, as well as corrections for non-linear effects such as hysteresis during scans. Several procedures used in calibration and correction of piezoelectric scanners used in the laboratorys STMs are described.

  2. Bore-Sight Calibration of Multiple Laser Range Finders for Kinematic 3D Laser Scanning Systems.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jaehoon; Kim, Jeonghyun; Yoon, Sanghyun; Kim, Sangmin; Cho, Hyoungsig; Kim, Changjae; Heo, Joon

    2015-05-04

    The Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM) technique has been used for autonomous navigation of mobile systems; now, its applications have been extended to 3D data acquisition of indoor environments. In order to reconstruct 3D scenes of indoor space, the kinematic 3D laser scanning system, developed herein, carries three laser range finders (LRFs): one is mounted horizontally for system-position correction and the other two are mounted vertically to collect 3D point-cloud data of the surrounding environment along the system's trajectory. However, the kinematic laser scanning results can be impaired by errors resulting from sensor misalignment. In the present study, the bore-sight calibration of multiple LRF sensors was performed using a specially designed double-deck calibration facility, which is composed of two half-circle-shaped aluminum frames. Moreover, in order to automatically achieve point-to-point correspondences between a scan point and the target center, a V-shaped target was designed as well. The bore-sight calibration parameters were estimated by a constrained least squares method, which iteratively minimizes the weighted sum of squares of residuals while constraining some highly-correlated parameters. The calibration performance was analyzed by means of a correlation matrix. After calibration, the visual inspection of mapped data and residual calculation confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed calibration approach.

  3. Bore-Sight Calibration of Multiple Laser Range Finders for Kinematic 3D Laser Scanning Systems

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jaehoon; Kim, Jeonghyun; Yoon, Sanghyun; Kim, Sangmin; Cho, Hyoungsig; Kim, Changjae; Heo, Joon

    2015-01-01

    The Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM) technique has been used for autonomous navigation of mobile systems; now, its applications have been extended to 3D data acquisition of indoor environments. In order to reconstruct 3D scenes of indoor space, the kinematic 3D laser scanning system, developed herein, carries three laser range finders (LRFs): one is mounted horizontally for system-position correction and the other two are mounted vertically to collect 3D point-cloud data of the surrounding environment along the system’s trajectory. However, the kinematic laser scanning results can be impaired by errors resulting from sensor misalignment. In the present study, the bore-sight calibration of multiple LRF sensors was performed using a specially designed double-deck calibration facility, which is composed of two half-circle-shaped aluminum frames. Moreover, in order to automatically achieve point-to-point correspondences between a scan point and the target center, a V-shaped target was designed as well. The bore-sight calibration parameters were estimated by a constrained least squares method, which iteratively minimizes the weighted sum of squares of residuals while constraining some highly-correlated parameters. The calibration performance was analyzed by means of a correlation matrix. After calibration, the visual inspection of mapped data and residual calculation confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed calibration approach. PMID:25946627

  4. Scanning Electron Microscope Calibration Using a Multi-Image Non-Linear Minimization Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Le; Marchand, Éric

    2015-04-01

    A scanning electron microscope (SEM) calibrating approach based on non-linear minimization procedure is presented in this article. A part of this article has been published in IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), 2014. . Both the intrinsic parameters and the extrinsic parameters estimations are achieved simultaneously by minimizing the registration error. The proposed approach considers multi-images of a multi-scale calibration pattern view from different positions and orientations. Since the projection geometry of the scanning electron microscope is different from that of a classical optical sensor, the perspective projection model and the parallel projection model are considered and compared with distortion models. Experiments are realized by varying the position and the orientation of a multi-scale chessboard calibration pattern from 300× to 10,000×. The experimental results show the efficiency and the accuracy of this approach.

  5. Cryogenic Pressure Calibrator for Wide Temperature Electronically Scanned (ESP) Pressure Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faulcon, Nettie D.

    2001-01-01

    Electronically scanned pressure (ESP) modules have been developed that can operate in ambient and in cryogenic environments, particularly Langley's National Transonic Facility (NTF). Because they can operate directly in a cryogenic environment, their use eliminates many of the operational problems associated with using conventional modules at low temperatures. To ensure the accuracy of these new instruments, calibration was conducted in a laboratory simulating the environmental conditions of NTF. This paper discusses the calibration process by means of the simulation laboratory, the system inputs and outputs and the analysis of the calibration data. Calibration results of module M4, a wide temperature ESP module with 16 ports and a pressure range of +/- 4 psid are given.

  6. Electrode calibration with a microfluidic flow cell for fast-scan cyclic voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Sinkala, Elly; McCutcheon, James E; Schuck, Matthew J; Schmidt, Eric; Roitman, Mitchell F; Eddington, David T

    2012-07-07

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) is a common analytical electrochemistry tool used to measure chemical species. It has recently been adapted for measurement of neurotransmitters such as dopamine in awake and behaving animals (in vivo). Electrode calibration is an essential step in FSCV to relate observed current to concentration of a chemical species. However, existing methods require multiple components, which reduce the ease of calibrations. To this end, a microfluidic flow cell (μFC) was developed as a simple device to switch between buffer and buffer with a known concentration of the analyte of interest--in this case dopamine--in a microfluidic Y-channel. The ability to quickly switch solutions yielded electrode calibrations with faster rise times and that were more stable at peak current values. The μFC reduced the number of external electrical components and produced linear calibrations over a range of concentrations. To demonstrate this, an electrode calibrated with the μFC was used in FSCV recordings from a rat during the delivery of food reward--a stimulus that reliably evokes a brief increase in current due to the oxidation of dopamine. Using the linear calibration, dopamine concentrations were determined from the current responses evoked during the behavioral task. The μFC is able to easily and quickly calibrate FSCV electrode responses to chemical species for both in vitro and in vivo experiments.

  7. Space-based infrared scanning sensor LOS determination and calibration using star observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun; Xu, Zhan; An, Wei; Deng, Xin-Pu; Yang, Jun-Gang

    2015-10-01

    This paper provides a novel methodology for removing sensor bias from a space based infrared (IR) system (SBIRS) through the use of stars detected in the background field of the sensor. Space based IR system uses the LOS (line of sight) of target for target location. LOS determination and calibration is the key precondition of accurate location and tracking of targets in Space based IR system and the LOS calibration of scanning sensor is one of the difficulties. The subsequent changes of sensor bias are not been taking into account in the conventional LOS determination and calibration process. Based on the analysis of the imaging process of scanning sensor, a theoretical model based on the estimation of bias angles using star observation is proposed. By establishing the process model of the bias angles and the observation model of stars, using an extended Kalman filter (EKF) to estimate the bias angles, and then calibrating the sensor LOS. Time domain simulations results indicate that the proposed method has a high precision and smooth performance for sensor LOS determination and calibration. The timeliness and precision of target tracking process in the space based infrared (IR) tracking system could be met with the proposed algorithm.

  8. A TECHNIQUE FOR PRIMARY BEAM CALIBRATION OF DRIFT-SCANNING, WIDE-FIELD ANTENNA ELEMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Pober, Jonathan C.; Parsons, Aaron R.; Jacobs, Daniel C.; Aguirre, James E.; Moore, David F.; Bradley, Richard F.; Parashare, Chaitali R.; Carilli, Chris L.; Gugliucci, Nicole E.

    2012-02-15

    We present a new technique for calibrating the primary beam of a wide-field, drift-scanning antenna element. Drift-scan observing is not compatible with standard beam calibration routines, and the situation is further complicated by difficult-to-parameterize beam shapes and, at low frequencies, the sparsity of accurate source spectra to use as calibrators. We overcome these challenges by building up an interrelated network of source 'crossing points'-locations where the primary beam is sampled by multiple sources. Using the single assumption that a beam has 180 Degree-Sign rotational symmetry, we can achieve significant beam coverage with only a few tens of sources. The resulting network of crossing points allows us to solve for both a beam model and source flux densities referenced to a single calibrator source, circumventing the need for a large sample of well-characterized calibrators. We illustrate the method with actual and simulated observations from the Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization.

  9. A wire scanning based method for geometric calibration of high resolution CT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ruijie; Li, Guang; Gu, Ning; Chen, Gong; Luo, Shouhua

    2015-03-01

    This paper is about geometric calibration of the high resolution CT (Computed Tomography) system. Geometric calibration refers to the estimation of a set of parameters that describe the geometry of the CT system. Such parameters are so important that a little error of them will degrade the reconstruction images seriously, so more accurate geometric parameters are needed in the higher-resolution CT systems. But conventional calibration methods are not accurate enough for the current high resolution CT system whose resolution can reach sub-micrometer or even tens of nanometers. In this paper, we propose a new calibration method which has higher accuracy and it is based on the optimization theory. The superiority of this method is that we build a new cost function which sets up a relationship between the geometrical parameters and the binary reconstruction image of a thin wire. When the geometrical parameters are accurate, the cost function reaches its maximum value. In the experiment, we scanned a thin wire as the calibration data and a thin bamboo stick as the validation data to verify the correctness of the proposed method. Comparing with the image reconstructed with the geometric parameters calculated by using the conventional calibration method, the image reconstructed with the parameters calculated by our method has less geometric artifacts, so it can verify that our method can get more accurate geometric calibration parameters. Although we calculated only one geometric parameter in this paper, the geometric artifacts are still eliminated significantly. And this method can be easily generalized to all the geometrical parameters calibration in fan-beam or cone-beam CT systems.

  10. Use of naturally available reference targets to calibrate airborne laser scanning intensity data.

    PubMed

    Vain, Ants; Kaasalainen, Sanna; Pyysalo, Ulla; Krooks, Anssi; Litkey, Paula

    2009-01-01

    We have studied the possibility of calibrating airborne laser scanning (ALS) intensity data, using land targets typically available in urban areas. For this purpose, a test area around Espoonlahti Harbor, Espoo, Finland, for which a long time series of ALS campaigns is available, was selected. Different target samples (beach sand, concrete, asphalt, different types of gravel) were collected and measured in the laboratory. Using tarps, which have certain backscattering properties, the natural samples were calibrated and studied, taking into account the atmospheric effect, incidence angle and flying height. Using data from different flights and altitudes, a time series for the natural samples was generated. Studying the stability of the samples, we could obtain information on the most ideal types of natural targets for ALS radiometric calibration. Using the selected natural samples as reference, the ALS points of typical land targets were calibrated again and examined. Results showed the need for more accurate ground reference data, before using natural samples in ALS intensity data calibration. Also, the NIR camera-based field system was used for collecting ground reference data. This system proved to be a good means for collecting in situ reference data, especially for targets with inhomogeneous surface reflection properties.

  11. Use of Naturally Available Reference Targets to Calibrate Airborne Laser Scanning Intensity Data

    PubMed Central

    Vain, Ants; Kaasalainen, Sanna; Pyysalo, Ulla; Krooks, Anssi; Litkey, Paula

    2009-01-01

    We have studied the possibility of calibrating airborne laser scanning (ALS) intensity data, using land targets typically available in urban areas. For this purpose, a test area around Espoonlahti Harbor, Espoo, Finland, for which a long time series of ALS campaigns is available, was selected. Different target samples (beach sand, concrete, asphalt, different types of gravel) were collected and measured in the laboratory. Using tarps, which have certain backscattering properties, the natural samples were calibrated and studied, taking into account the atmospheric effect, incidence angle and flying height. Using data from different flights and altitudes, a time series for the natural samples was generated. Studying the stability of the samples, we could obtain information on the most ideal types of natural targets for ALS radiometric calibration. Using the selected natural samples as reference, the ALS points of typical land targets were calibrated again and examined. Results showed the need for more accurate ground reference data, before using natural samples in ALS intensity data calibration. Also, the NIR camera-based field system was used for collecting ground reference data. This system proved to be a good means for collecting in situ reference data, especially for targets with inhomogeneous surface reflection properties. PMID:22574045

  12. Design and calibration of a scanning force microscope for friction, adhesion, and contact potential studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koleske, D. D.; Lee, G. U.; Gans, B. I.; Lee, K. P.; DiLella, D. P.; Wahl, K. J.; Barger, W. R.; Whitman, L. J.; Colton, R. J.

    1995-09-01

    We present the design and calibration of a scanning force microscope which can be used to study friction, adhesion, and contact potential differences between the cantilever tip and surface. The microscope uses a modular design where the laser, cantilever/sample holder, reflecting mirror, and detector are mounted directly on an optical table. The laser, reflecting mirror, and detector are mounted on translation and rotation stages. With this design the components can be rearranged to calibrate the Z piezo motion as a function of applied voltage. Using the detector micrometers, the detector response (voltage-to-distance relationship) can be determined after each series of measurements. The cantilever/sample holder is constructed such that the components are material matched and thermally compensated from a common reference point. This design feature minimizes thermal drift of the instrument. The instrument can be used in a contact scanning mode where both normal and lateral deflections of the cantilever are measured. In addition, the instrument can be used in frictional force studies, force curve mapping of the surface, and contact potential measurements. We present examples of each, including a detailed account of the instrument design and calibration.

  13. Ultrasound probe and needle-guide calibration for robotic ultrasound scanning and needle targeting.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chunwoo; Chang, Doyoung; Petrisor, Doru; Chirikjian, Gregory; Han, Misop; Stoianovici, Dan

    2013-06-01

    Image-to-robot registration is a typical step for robotic image-guided interventions. If the imaging device uses a portable imaging probe that is held by a robot, this registration is constant and has been commonly named probe calibration. The same applies to probes tracked by a position measurement device. We report a calibration method for 2-D ultrasound probes using robotic manipulation and a planar calibration rig. Moreover, a needle guide that is attached to the probe is also calibrated for ultrasound-guided needle targeting. The method is applied to a transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) probe for robot-assisted prostate biopsy. Validation experiments include TRUS-guided needle targeting accuracy tests. This paper outlines the entire process from the calibration to image-guided targeting. Freehand TRUS-guided prostate biopsy is the primary method of diagnosing prostate cancer, with over 1.2 million procedures performed annually in the U.S. alone. However, freehand biopsy is a highly challenging procedure with subjective quality control. As such, biopsy devices are emerging to assist the physician. Here, we present a method that uses robotic TRUS manipulation. A 2-D TRUS probe is supported by a 4-degree-of-freedom robot. The robot performs ultrasound scanning, enabling 3-D reconstructions. Based on the images, the robot orients a needle guide on target for biopsy. The biopsy is acquired manually through the guide. In vitro tests showed that the 3-D images were geometrically accurate, and an image-based needle targeting accuracy was 1.55 mm. These validate the probe calibration presented and the overall robotic system for needle targeting. Targeting accuracy is sufficient for targeting small, clinically significant prostatic cancer lesions, but actual in vivo targeting will include additional error components that will have to be determined.

  14. Calibration Design and Assessment of the Airborne Conical Scanning Millimeterwave Imaging Radiometer (CoSMIR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piepmeier, J. R.; Racette, P.; Walker, D. K.; Randa, J.; Krebs, Carolyn A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The airborne Conical Scanning Millimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer (CoSMIR) will provide measurements useful for atmospheric studies and satellite calibration and validation (cal/val). Designed to match the tropospheric sounding channels of the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program QMSP) Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS), the CoSMIR consists of four radiometers operating at 50-54 (3 channels - 50.3, 52.8, and 53.6), 91.655 (dual polarization), 150.0, and 193.31 (3 channels 11, 13, and 16.6) GHz. The design of CoSMIR was primarily driven by its intended initial use as an SSMIS cal/val sensor. In particular, three design features were directly affected by this requirement: frequency planning, calibration target design, and the mechanical gimbals. An initial calibration assessment of CoSMIR was performed to determine any needed improvements. We used a combination of laboratory and field measurements to do this. Laboratory measurements included comparisons to a liquid nitrogen standard, IF amplifier and diode linearity tests, LO leakage and reflection testing, and antenna to calibration target coupling tests. Results of these tests will be reported. We also performed a satellite underflight under DM SP F-15 and have compared CoSMIR imagery to SSM/T-2 and SSM/I imagery. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  15. An efficient protocol for radiochromic film dosimetry combining calibration and measurement in a single scan

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, David; Micke, Andre; Yu Xiang; Chan, Maria F.

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: Radiochromic film provides dose measurement at high spatial resolution, but often is not preferred for routine evaluation of patient-specific intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans owing to ease-of-use factors. The authors have established an efficient protocol that combines calibration and measurement in a single scan and enables measurement results to be obtained in less than 30 min. This avoids complications due to postexposure changes in radiochromic film that delay the completion of a measurement, often for up to 24 h, in commonly used methods. In addition, the protocol addresses the accuracy and integrity of the measurement by eliminating environmental and interscan variability issues. Methods: The authors collected dose-response data from six production lots of Gafchromic EBT3 film and three production lots of EBT2 film at doses up to 480 cGy. In this work, the authors used seven different scanners of two different models-Epson 10000XL and V700; postexposure times before scanning from 30 min to 9 days; ambient temperatures for scanning spanning 11 Degree-Sign C; and two film orientations. Scanning was in 48-bit RGB format at 72 dpi resolution. Dose evaluation was conducted using a triple-channel dosimetry method. To evaluate the measurement protocol, patient specific IMRT and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans were exposed onto EBT3 films on a Varian Trilogy Linac. Film scanning was done following the protocol under a number of different conditions and the dose maps were analyzed to demonstrate the equivalence of results. Results: The results indicated that the dose-response data could be fit by a set of related rational functions leading to the description of a generic calibration curve. A simplified dosimetry protocol was established where dose-response data for a specific film lot, scanner, and scanning conditions could be derived from two films exposed to known doses. In most cases only one calibrated exposure was required

  16. High-precision calibration of a Scanning-Probe Microscope (SPM) for manufacturing applications

    SciTech Connect

    Chernoff, D.A.; Lohr, J.D.; Hansen, D.; Lines, M.

    1996-12-31

    For ordinary SPM (Scanning Probe Microscope) work, accuracy of XYZ length measurements of about 5% is acceptable. This is accomplished by periodic calibration checks (and adjustments, if required). Measurement of critical dimensions such as feature width and spacing on integrated circuits of compact discs requires much higher accuracy. For example, the new DVD (digital video disc) standard calls for a mean track pitch of 740 nm with a maximum allowable jitter (range) of 30 nm. To achieve a range of 30 nm, the standard deviation should be 10 nm or less. According to the gage-maker`s rule, the measurement tool should be 4x more precise than the object being measured, so we need a standard deviation of 2.5 nm. This report describes the combined use of a new type of calibration standard and new software to meet these requirements.

  17. Modeling and de-embedding the interferometric scanning microwave microscopy by means of dopant profile calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Michalas, L. Marcelli, R.; Wang, F.; Brillard, C.; Theron, D.

    2015-11-30

    This paper presents the full modeling and a methodology for de-embedding the interferometric scanning microwave microscopy measurements by means of dopant profile calibration. A Si calibration sample with different boron-doping level areas is used to that end. The analysis of the experimentally obtained S{sub 11} amplitudes based on the proposed model confirms the validity of the methodology. As a specific finding, changes in the tip radius between new and used tips have been clearly identified, leading to values for the effective tip radius in the range of 45 nm to 85 nm, respectively. Experimental results are also discussed in terms of the effective area concept, taking into consideration details related to the nature of tip-to-sample interaction.

  18. A High Speed Calibration Method for Laser Positioner by Constant Velocity Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Hiroyuki

    This paper describes a high speed calibration method for laser positioner by scanning work area under constant velocity. Laser positioner consists of sinusoidal laser encoder, DC motor and the controller. The encoder has diffraction grating scale and laser optics. It generates sine and cosine outputs according to the travel distance. Qualities of the scale and the optics contribute to the fluctuation of output signal amplitude, DC offset and relative phase. First, the controller collects the output data under constant velocity of 4 samples per 1 sine wave length. The parameter can be estimated by simplified discrete Fourier transform method. Calibration data are collected every quarter sine wave length over all positioner work area. The result is stored in the table then referred by the controller in real time operation. Experiment results are also reported for HDD servo track writer application.

  19. Thickness determination of biological samples with a zeta-calibrated scanning tunneling microscope.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z H; Hartmann, T; Baumeister, W; Guckenberger, R

    1990-01-01

    A single-tube scanning tunneling microscope has been zeta-calibrated by using atomic steps of crystalline gold and was used for measuring the thickness of two biological samples, metal-coated as well as uncoated. The hexagonal surface layer of the bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans with an open network-type structure shows thickness values that are strongly influenced by the substrate and the preparation method. In contrast, the thickness of the purple membrane of Halobacterium halobium with its densely packed less-corrugated structure exhibits very little variation in thickness in coated preparations and the values obtained are in good agreement with x-ray data. Images PMID:2251276

  20. A novel target LOS calibration method for IR scanning sensor based on control points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Yong-Hong; An, Wei; Zhang, Yin-Sheng; Zhang, Tao

    2012-12-01

    Space based IR system uses the information of target LOS (line of sight) for target location. Recent researches show that the measuring precision of target LOS is usually determined by measuring precision of platform's position and attitude, and deformation of sensor etc. Most methods for improving target location precision are either through improving platform's position and attitude measuring precision or through calib rating the whole image obtained by IR sensor. With the development of measuring technology, it is harder to make a further improvement on the measuring precision of position and attitude of the platform and the expansion of the sensor view make calibrat ion of the whole image with a larger computation cost. In this paper, a method using control points to calibrate target LOS was proposed. Based on the analysis of the imaging process of the scanning sensor of space based IR system, this paper established a modify model of target LOS based on control points, used a bias filter to estimate the bias value of sensor boresight, and finally achieved the mission of target LOS calibrat ion. Different from the traditional calibration method of remote sensing image, the proposed method only made a correct ion on the LOS of suspicious target, but not established the accurate relationship between the all pixels and their real location, and has a similar calibration performance, but more lower computational complexity.

  1. Nanoscale calibration of n-type ZnO staircase structures by scanning capacitance microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Laurent, J.; Chauveau, J. M.; Sallet, V.; Jomard, F.; Brémond, G.

    2015-11-01

    Cross-sectional scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM) was performed on n-type ZnO multi-layer structures homoepitaxially grown by molecular beam epitaxy method. Highly contrasted SCM signals were obtained between the ZnO layers with different Ga densities. Through comparison with dopant depth profiles from secondary ion mass spectroscopy measurement, it is demonstrated that SCM is able to distinguish carrier concentrations at all levels of the samples (from 2 × 1017 cm-3 to 3 × 1020 cm-3). The good agreement of the results from the two techniques indicates that SCM can be a useful tool for two dimensional carrier profiling at nanoscale for ZnO nanostructure development. As an example, residual carrier concentration inside the non-intentionally doped buffer layer was estimated to be around 2 × 1016 cm-3 through calibration analysis.

  2. WE-G-18A-02: Calibration-Free Combined KV/MV Short Scan CBCT

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, M; Loo, B; Bazalova, M; Fahrig, R; Star-Lack, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To combine orthogonal kilo-voltage (kV) and Mega-voltage (MV) projection data for short scan cone-beam CT to reduce imaging time on current radiation treatment systems, using a calibration-free gain correction method. Methods: Combining two orthogonal projection data sets for kV and MV imaging hardware can reduce the scan angle to as small as 110° (90°+fan) such that the total scan time is ∼18 seconds, or within a breath hold. To obtain an accurate reconstruction, the MV projection data is first linearly corrected using linear regression using the redundant data from the start and end of the sinogram, and then the combined data is reconstructed using the FDK method. To correct for the different changes of attenuation coefficients in kV/MV between soft tissue and bone, the forward projection of the segmented bone and soft tissue from the first reconstruction in the redundant region are added to the linear regression model. The MV data is corrected again using the additional information from the segmented image, and combined with kV for a second FDK reconstruction. We simulated polychromatic 120 kVp (conventional a-Si EPID with CsI) and 2.5 MVp (prototype high-DQE MV detector) projection data with Poisson noise using the XCAT phantom. The gain correction and combined kV/MV short scan reconstructions were tested with head and thorax cases, and simple contrast-to-noise ratio measurements were made in a low-contrast pattern in the head. Results: The FDK reconstruction using the proposed gain correction method can effectively reduce artifacts caused by the differences of attenuation coefficients in the kV/MV data. The CNRs of the short scans for kV, MV, and kV/MV are 5.0, 2.6 and 3.4 respectively. The proposed gain correction method also works with truncated projections. Conclusion: A novel gain correction and reconstruction method was developed to generate short scan CBCT from orthogonal kV/MV projections. This work is supported by NIH Grant 5R01CA138426-05.

  3. Low-Cost 3D Laser Scanning in Air or Water Using Self-Calibrating Structured Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleier, M.; Nüchter, A.

    2017-02-01

    In-situ calibration of structured light scanners in underwater environments is time-consuming and complicated. This paper presents a self-calibrating line laser scanning system, which enables the creation of dense 3D models with a single fixed camera and a freely moving hand-held cross line laser projector. The proposed approach exploits geometric constraints, such as coplanarities, to recover the depth information and is applicable without any prior knowledge of the position and orientation of the laser projector. By employing an off-the-shelf underwater camera and a waterproof housing with high power line lasers an affordable 3D scanning solution can be built. In experiments the performance of the proposed technique is studied and compared with 3D reconstruction using explicit calibration. We demonstrate that the scanning system can be applied to above-the-water as well as underwater scenes.

  4. Mapping of local-scale flooding on vegetated floodplains from radiometrically calibrated airborne laser scanning data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinowski, Radosław; Höfle, Bernhard; König, Kristina; Groom, Geoffrey; Schwanghart, Wolfgang; Heckrath, Goswin

    2014-05-01

    The agricultural use of riverine lowlands is often dependent on complex hydrological regimes including localized flooding. Knowledge about spatio-temporal inundation patterns enables a better understanding of the state of agricultural areas in lowlands and provides valuable and objective information on land suitability for land use administration and environmental planning. Data from Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS), also referred to as LiDAR, have become one of the most important sources of elevation data during the last two decades. Recently, geometric and radiometric attributes of ALS have also been explored for analysing the extent of water surfaces. Thus, the main objective of this work is to develop a method for mapping the spatial extent of floodplain inundation by means of remote sensing data. Our study focusses on analysing floodwaters partly covered by some vegetation, which is a major challenge in flood mapping. We hypothesize that ALS data due to its high sampling density and high rate of canopy penetration can effectively be used for floodwater detection in such areas. This research utilizes full-waveform ALS data with an average point density of 20 points/m2 obtained for an area of ca. 8 km2 of the Nørreå River valley in Jutland, Denmark. The study area is characterised by the presence of improved or semi-improved grasslands (meadows and pasture), few arable fields, irregularly scattered group of trees and bushes, and an extensive ditch network. Our approach is based on an inspection of properties of single laser points with regard to water vs. vegetation coverage within the laser footprint, which is compared with very detailed field reference data. Exploratory analysis and classification of ALS data were preceded by radiometric calibration of point cloud data, utilizing in situ measurements of reference targets reflectance. The resulting calibration derivatives provide very stable estimates of surface characteristics and are used as the main input in

  5. Sensitivity calibration procedures in optical-CT scanning of BANG®3 polymer gel dosimeters

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Y.; Wuu, Cheng-Shie; Maryanski, Marek J.

    2010-01-01

    The dose response of the BANG®3 polymer gel dosimeter (MGS Research Inc., Madison, CT) was studied using the OCTOPUS™ laser CT scanner (MGS Research Inc., Madison, CT). Six 17 cm diameter and 12 cm high Barex cylinders, and 18 small glass vials were used to house the gel. The gel phantoms were irradiated with 6 and 10 MV photons, as well as 12 and 16 MeV electrons using a Varian Clinac 2100EX. Three calibration methods were used to obtain the dose response curves: (a) Optical density measurements on the 18 glass vials irradiated with graded doses from 0 to 4 Gy using 6 or 10 MV large field irradiations; (b) optical-CT scanning of Barex cylinders irradiated with graded doses (0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2 Gy) from four adjacent 4×4 cm2 photon fields or 6×6 cm2 electron fields; and (c) percent depth dose (PDD) comparison of optical-CT scans with ion chamber measurements for 6×6 cm2, 12 and 16 MeV electron fields. The dose response of the BANG®3 gel was found to be linear and energy independent within the uncertainties of the experimental methods (about 3%). The slopes of the linearly fitted dose response curves (dose sensitivities) from the four field irradiations (0.0752±3%, 0.0756±3%, 0.0767±3%, and 0.0759±3% cm−1 Gy−1) and the PDD matching methods (0.0768±3% and 0.0761±3% cm−1 Gy−1) agree within 2.2%, indicating a good reproducibility of the gel dose response within phantoms of the same geometry. The dose sensitivities from the glass vial approach are different from those of the cylindrical Barex phantoms by more than 30%, owing probably to the difference in temperature inside the two types of phantoms during gel formation and irradiation, and possible oxygen contamination of the glass vial walls. The dose response curve obtained from the PDD matching approach with 16 MeV electron field was used to calibrate the gel phantom irradiated with the 12 MeV, 6×6 cm2 electron field. Three-dimensional dose distributions from the gel measurement and the Eclipse

  6. Calibration of tip and sample temperature of a scanning tunneling microscope using a superconductive sample

    SciTech Connect

    Stocker, Matthias; Pfeifer, Holger; Koslowski, Berndt

    2014-05-15

    The temperature of the electrodes is a crucial parameter in virtually all tunneling experiments. The temperature not only controls the thermodynamic state of the electrodes but also causes thermal broadening, which limits the energy resolution. Unfortunately, the construction of many scanning tunneling microscopes inherits a weak thermal link between tip and sample in order to make one side movable. Such, the temperature of that electrode is badly defined. Here, the authors present a procedure to calibrate the tip temperature by very simple means. The authors use a superconducting sample (Nb) and a standard tip made from W. Due to the asymmetry in the density of states of the superconductor (SC)—normal metal (NM) tunneling junction, the SC temperature controls predominantly the density of states while the NM controls the thermal smearing. By numerically simulating the I-V curves and numerically optimizing the tip temperature and the SC gap width, the tip temperature can be accurately deduced if the sample temperature is known or measureable. In our case, the temperature dependence of the SC gap may serve as a temperature sensor, leading to an accurate NM temperature even if the SC temperature is unknown.

  7. Nanoscale calibration of n-type ZnO staircase structures by scanning capacitance microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L. Laurent, J.; Brémond, G.; Chauveau, J. M.; Sallet, V.; Jomard, F.

    2015-11-09

    Cross-sectional scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM) was performed on n-type ZnO multi-layer structures homoepitaxially grown by molecular beam epitaxy method. Highly contrasted SCM signals were obtained between the ZnO layers with different Ga densities. Through comparison with dopant depth profiles from secondary ion mass spectroscopy measurement, it is demonstrated that SCM is able to distinguish carrier concentrations at all levels of the samples (from 2 × 10{sup 17 }cm{sup −3} to 3 × 10{sup 20 }cm{sup −3}). The good agreement of the results from the two techniques indicates that SCM can be a useful tool for two dimensional carrier profiling at nanoscale for ZnO nanostructure development. As an example, residual carrier concentration inside the non-intentionally doped buffer layer was estimated to be around 2 × 10{sup 16 }cm{sup −3} through calibration analysis.

  8. Application of TZERO calibrated modulated temperature differential scanning calorimetry to characterize model protein formulations.

    PubMed

    Badkar, Aniket; Yohannes, Paulos; Banga, Ajay

    2006-02-17

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using T(ZERO) modulated temperature differential scanning calorimetry (MDSC) as a novel technique to characterize protein solutions using lysozyme as a model protein and IgG as a model monoclonal antibody. MDSC involves the application of modulated heating program, along with the standard heating program that enables the separation of overlapping thermal transitions. Although characterization of unfolding transitions for protein solutions requires the application of high sensitive DSC, separation of overlapping transitions like aggregation and other exothermic events may be possible only by use of MDSC. A newer T(ZERO) calibrated MDSC model from TA instruments that has improved sensitivity than previous models was used. MDSC analysis showed total, reversing and non-reversing heat flow signals. Total heat flow signals showed a combination of melting endotherms and overlapping exothermic events. Under the operating conditions used, the melting endotherms were seen in reversing heat flow signal while the exothermic events were seen in non-reversing heat flow signal. This enabled the separation of overlapping thermal transitions, improved data analysis and decreased baseline noise. MDSC was used here for characterization of lysozyme solutions, but its feasibility for characterizing therapeutic protein solutions needs further assessment.

  9. Noncontact method for calibration of lateral forces in scanning force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Kyle; Cheng, Peng; Vezenov, Dmitri

    2011-04-19

    This paper describes a noncontact calibration procedure for lateral force microscopy in air and liquids. The procedure is based on the observation that the sensitivity of a force microscope may be calibrated using the raw thermal noise spectrum of the cantilever and its known spring constant, which can be found from the same uncalibrated thermal noise spectrum using Sader's method (Rev. Sci. Instrum.1999, 70, 3967-3969). In addition to the power spectrum of the cantilever thermal noise, this noncontact calibration method only requires knowledge of the plan view dimensions of the cantilever that could be measured using an optical microscope. This method is suitable for in situ force calibration even in viscous fluids through a two-step calibration procedure, where the cantilever thermal spectra are captured both in air and in the desired liquid. The lateral calibration performed with the thermal noise technique agrees well with sensitivity values obtained by the wedge calibration procedure. The approach examined in this paper allows for complete calibration of normal and lateral forces without contacting the surface, eliminating the possibility for any tip damage or contamination during calibration.

  10. Model Robust Calibration: Method and Application to Electronically-Scanned Pressure Transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Eric L.; Starnes, B. Alden; Birch, Jeffery B.; Mays, James E.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the application of a recently developed statistical regression method to the controlled instrument calibration problem. The statistical method of Model Robust Regression (MRR), developed by Mays, Birch, and Starnes, is shown to improve instrument calibration by reducing the reliance of the calibration on a predetermined parametric (e.g. polynomial, exponential, logarithmic) model. This is accomplished by allowing fits from the predetermined parametric model to be augmented by a certain portion of a fit to the residuals from the initial regression using a nonparametric (locally parametric) regression technique. The method is demonstrated for the absolute scale calibration of silicon-based pressure transducers.

  11. A comprehensive uncertainty analysis and method of geometric calibration for a circular scanning airborne lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonsalves, Michael Oliver

    This dissertation describes an automated technique for ascertaining the values of the geometric calibration parameters of an airborne lidar. A least squares approach is employed that adjusts the point cloud to a single planar surface which could be either a narrow airport runway or a dynamic sea surface. Going beyond the customary three boresight angles, the proposed adjustment can determine up to eleven calibration parameters to a precision that renders a negligible contribution to the point cloud's positional uncertainty. Presently under development is the Coastal Zone Mapping and Imaging Lidar (CZMIL), which, unlike most contemporary systems that use oscillating mirrors to reflect the beam, will use a circular spinning prism to refract the laser in the desired direction. This departure from the traditional scanner presents the potential for internal geometric misalignments not previously experienced. Rather than relying on past calibration practices (like requiring data be acquired over a pitched-roof), a more robust method of calibration is established which does not depend on the presence of any cultural features. To develop this new method of calibration, the laser point positioning equation for this lidar was developed first. The system was then simulated in the MATLAB environment. Using these artificial datasets, the behavior of each geometric parameter iii was systematically manipulated, understood and calibrated, while an optimal flight strategy for the calibration acquisition was simultaneously developed. Finally, the total propagated uncertainty (TPU) of the point cloud was determined using a propagation of variances. Using this TPU module, the strength of the calibration solution was assessed. For example, four flight lines each of 20 seconds in duration contained sufficient information to determine the calibration parameters to such a degree of confidence that their contribution to the final point cloud uncertainty was only 0.012m in the horizontal

  12. Hot-spot detection and calibration of a scanning thermal probe with a noise thermometry gold wire sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaitas, Angelo; Wolgast, Steven; Covington, Elizabeth; Kurdak, Cagliyan

    2013-02-01

    Measuring the temperature profile of a nanoscale sample using scanning thermal microscopy is challenging due to a scanning probe's non-uniform heating. In order to address this challenge, we have developed a calibration sample consisting of a 1-μm wide gold wire, which can be heated electrically by a small bias current. The Joule heating in the calibration sample wire is characterized using noise thermometry. A thermal probe was scanned in contact over the gold wire and measured temperature changes as small as 0.4 K, corresponding to 17 ppm changes in probe resistance. The non-uniformity of the probe's temperature profile during a typical scan necessitated the introduction of a temperature conversion factor, η, which is defined as the ratio of the average temperature change of the probe with respect to the temperature change of the substrate. The conversion factor was calculated to be 0.035 ± 0.007. Finite element analysis simulations indicate a strong correlation between thermal probe sensitivity and probe tip curvature, suggesting that the sensitivity of the thermal probe can be improved by increasing the probe tip curvature, though at the expense of the spatial resolution provided by sharper tips. Simulations also indicate that a bow-tie metallization design could yield an additional 5- to 7-fold increase in sensitivity.

  13. A new scanning system for alpha decay events as calibration sources for range-energy relation in nuclear emulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, J.; Kinbara, S.; Mishina, A.; Nakazawa, K.; Soe, M. K.; Theint, A. M. M.; Tint, K. T.

    2017-03-01

    A new scanning system named "Vertex picker" has been developed to rapid collect alpha decay events, which are calibration sources for the range-energy relation in nuclear emulsion. A computer-controlled optical microscope scans emulsion layers exhaustively, and a high-speed and high-resolution camera takes their micrographs. A dedicated image processing picks out vertex-like shapes. Practical operations of alpha decay search were demonstrated by emulsion sheets of the KEK-PS E373 experiment. Alpha decays of nearly 28 events were detected in eye-check work on a PC monitor per hour. This yield is nearly 20 times more effective than that by the conventional eye-scan method. The speed and quality is acceptable for the coming new experiment, J-PARC E07.

  14. SCAN+

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth Krebs, John Svoboda

    2009-11-01

    SCAN+ is a software application specifically designed to control the positioning of a gamma spectrometer by a two dimensional translation system above spent fuel bundles located in a sealed spent fuel cask. The gamma spectrometer collects gamma spectrum information for the purpose of spent fuel cask fuel loading verification. SCAN+ performs manual and automatic gamma spectrometer positioning functions as-well-as exercising control of the gamma spectrometer data acquisitioning functions. Cask configuration files are used to determine the positions of spent fuel bundles. Cask scanning files are used to determine the desired scan paths for scanning a spent fuel cask allowing for automatic unattended cask scanning that may take several hours.

  15. Thermal conductivity calibration for hot wire based dc scanning thermal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefèvre, Stéphane; Volz, Sebastian; Saulnier, Jean-Bernard; Fuentes, Catherine; Trannoy, Nathalie

    2003-04-01

    Thermal conductivity characterization with nanoscale spatial resolution can be performed by contact probe techniques only. The technique based on a hot anemometer wire probe mounted in an atomic force microscope is now a standard setup. However, no rigorous calibration procedure is provided so far in basic dc mode. While in contact with the sample surface, the electrical current I injected into the probe is controlled so that electrical resistance or the wire temperature is maintained by the Joule effect. The variation in current is assumed to be linearly related to the heat flux lost towards the sample and traditional calibration is carried out by relating the thermal conductivity of a set of samples to the measured current I. We provide analytical and numerical thermal modeling of the tip and sample to estimate the key heat transfer in a conductivity calibration procedure. A simple calibration expression is established that provides thermal conductivity as a function of the probe current or voltage measured. Finally, experimental data allow us to determine the unknown quantities of the parametric form obtained, i.e., the mean tip-sample contact radius and conductance.

  16. CALIBRATION OF A VERTICAL-SCAN LONG TRACE PROFILER AT MSFC.

    SciTech Connect

    GUBAREV,M.; KESTER,T.; TAKACS,P.Z.

    2001-07-31

    The long trace profiler (LTP) is the instrument of choice for the surface figure measurement of grazing incidence mirrors. The modification of conventional LTP, the vertical-scan LTP, capable of measuring the surface figure of replicated shell mirrors is now in operation at Marshall Space Flight Center. A few sources of systematic error for vertical-scan LTP are discussed. Status of systematic error reduction is reported.

  17. Research on position calibration method in infrared scanning temperature measurement system of rotary kiln

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Shao-sheng; You, Chang-hui; Guo, Zhong-yuan; Cheng, Ya-jun; Yu, Liang-bing

    2016-11-01

    Aiming at the large error in the equal-interval locating method, a precise position calibration method is proposed. The proposed method improves the location measurement accuracy by introducing some feature temperature points to divide the rotary kiln into several segments, then the equal-interval locating method was applied to each segment, ultimately, a position calibration data more closing to the actual situation was got. The feature temperature points can be selected from the temperature points of kiln tyres or the highest temperature point and so on. Taking the practical application into consideration, the best result is obtained, when four feature temperature points was introduced to divide the rotary kiln into five segments. The experiment result shows that compared with the equal-interval method, the accuracy of the proposed method has raised about 5.6 times when four feature temperature points is used.

  18. Calibration-free imaging through a multicore fiber using speckle scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Stasio, Nicolino; Moser, Christophe; Psaltis, Demetri

    2016-07-01

    The images produced by multicore endoscopes are pixelated, and their resolution is limited by the core-to-core spacing. Lenses can be used to improve the resolution, but this reduces the field of view proportionally. Lensless endoscopy through multicore fibers can be achieved by using wavefront shaping techniques. This requires a calibration step, and the conformation of the fiber must remain constant over time. Here we demonstrate that, without a calibration step and in the presence of core-to-core coupling, we can obtain fluorescence images with a resolution better than the core-to-core spacing. This is accomplished by taking advantage of the memory effect present in these kinds of fibers.

  19. Dancing the tight rope on the nanoscale--Calibrating a heat flux sensor of a scanning thermal microscope.

    PubMed

    Kloppstech, K; Könne, N; Worbes, L; Hellmann, D; Kittel, A

    2015-11-01

    We report on a precise in situ procedure to calibrate the heat flux sensor of a near-field scanning thermal microscope. This sensitive thermal measurement is based on 1ω modulation technique and utilizes a hot wire method to build an accessible and controllable heat reservoir. This reservoir is coupled thermally by near-field interactions to our probe. Thus, the sensor's conversion relation V(th)(Q(GS)*) can be precisely determined. V(th) is the thermopower generated in the sensor's coaxial thermocouple and Q(GS)* is the thermal flux from reservoir through the sensor. We analyze our method with Gaussian error calculus with an error estimate on all involved quantities. The overall relative uncertainty of the calibration procedure is evaluated to be about 8% for the measured conversion constant, i.e., (2.40 ± 0.19) μV/μW. Furthermore, we determine the sensor's thermal resistance to be about 0.21 K/μW and find the thermal resistance of the near-field mediated coupling at a distance between calibration standard and sensor of about 250 pm to be 53 K/μW.

  20. Calibrated complex impedance of CHO cells and E. coli bacteria at GHz frequencies using scanning microwave microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuca, Silviu-Sorin; Badino, Giorgio; Gramse, Georg; Brinciotti, Enrico; Kasper, Manuel; Oh, Yoo Jin; Zhu, Rong; Rankl, Christian; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Kienberger, Ferry

    2016-04-01

    The application of scanning microwave microscopy (SMM) to extract calibrated electrical properties of cells and bacteria in air is presented. From the S 11 images, after calibration, complex impedance and admittance images of Chinese hamster ovary cells and E. coli bacteria deposited on a silicon substrate have been obtained. The broadband capabilities of SMM have been used to characterize the bio-samples between 2 GHz and 20 GHz. The resulting calibrated cell and bacteria admittance at 19 GHz were Y cell = 185 μS + j285 μS and Y bacteria = 3 μS + j20 μS, respectively. A combined circuitry-3D finite element method EMPro model has been developed and used to investigate the frequency response of the complex impedance and admittance of the SMM setup. Based on a proposed parallel resistance-capacitance model, the equivalent conductance and parallel capacitance of the cells and bacteria were obtained from the SMM images. The influence of humidity and frequency on the cell conductance was experimentally studied. To compare the cell conductance with bulk water properties, we measured the imaginary part of the bulk water loss with a dielectric probe kit in the same frequency range resulting in a high level of agreement.

  1. Calibrated complex impedance of CHO cells and E. coli bacteria at GHz frequencies using scanning microwave microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tuca, Silviu-Sorin; Badino, Giorgio; Gramse, Georg; Brinciotti, Enrico; Kasper, Manuel; Oh, Yoo Jin; Zhu, Rong; Rankl, Christian; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Kienberger, Ferry

    2016-04-01

    The application of scanning microwave microscopy (SMM) to extract calibrated electrical properties of cells and bacteria in air is presented. From the S 11 images, after calibration, complex impedance and admittance images of Chinese hamster ovary cells and E. coli bacteria deposited on a silicon substrate have been obtained. The broadband capabilities of SMM have been used to characterize the bio-samples between 2 GHz and 20 GHz. The resulting calibrated cell and bacteria admittance at 19 GHz were Y cell = 185 μS + j285 μS and Y bacteria = 3 μS + j20 μS, respectively. A combined circuitry-3D finite element method EMPro model has been developed and used to investigate the frequency response of the complex impedance and admittance of the SMM setup. Based on a proposed parallel resistance-capacitance model, the equivalent conductance and parallel capacitance of the cells and bacteria were obtained from the SMM images. The influence of humidity and frequency on the cell conductance was experimentally studied. To compare the cell conductance with bulk water properties, we measured the imaginary part of the bulk water loss with a dielectric probe kit in the same frequency range resulting in a high level of agreement.

  2. Dancing the tight rope on the nanoscale—Calibrating a heat flux sensor of a scanning thermal microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kloppstech, K.; Könne, N.; Worbes, L.; Hellmann, D.; Kittel, A.

    2015-11-01

    We report on a precise in situ procedure to calibrate the heat flux sensor of a near-field scanning thermal microscope. This sensitive thermal measurement is based on 1ω modulation technique and utilizes a hot wire method to build an accessible and controllable heat reservoir. This reservoir is coupled thermally by near-field interactions to our probe. Thus, the sensor's conversion relation V th ( QGS ∗ ) can be precisely determined. Vth is the thermopower generated in the sensor's coaxial thermocouple and QGS ∗ is the thermal flux from reservoir through the sensor. We analyze our method with Gaussian error calculus with an error estimate on all involved quantities. The overall relative uncertainty of the calibration procedure is evaluated to be about 8% for the measured conversion constant, i.e., (2.40 ± 0.19) μV/μW. Furthermore, we determine the sensor's thermal resistance to be about 0.21 K/μW and find the thermal resistance of the near-field mediated coupling at a distance between calibration standard and sensor of about 250 pm to be 53 K/μW.

  3. Calibration-free B-scan images produced by master/slave optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Bradu, Adrian; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh

    2014-02-01

    We report on a novel method to produce B-scan images in spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). The method proceeds in two steps. In the first step, using a mirror in the sample arm of the interferometer, channelled spectra are acquired for different values of the optical path difference (OPD) and stored as masks. In the second step, the mirror is replaced with an object and the captured channelled spectrum is correlated with each mask, providing the interference strength from the OPD value used to collect the respective mask. Such a procedure does not require data organized in equal frequency slots, and therefore there is no need for resampling as practiced in the conventional fast Fourier transform (FFT)-based SD-OCT technology. We show that the sensitivity drop-off versus OPD and the quality of B-scan images of the novel method are similar to those obtained in the conventional FFT-based SD-OCT, using spectral data linearly organized in frequency.

  4. Thermal conductivity measurements of high and low thermal conductivity films using a scanning hot probe method in the 3ω mode and novel calibration strategies.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Adam A; Muñoz Rojo, Miguel; Abad, Begoña; Perez, Jaime Andrés; Maiz, Jon; Schomacker, Jason; Martín-Gonzalez, Marisol; Borca-Tasciuc, Diana-Andra; Borca-Tasciuc, Theodorian

    2015-10-07

    This work discusses measurement of thermal conductivity (k) of films using a scanning hot probe method in the 3ω mode and investigates the calibration of thermal contact parameters, specifically the thermal contact resistance (R(th)C) and thermal exchange radius (b) using reference samples with different thermal conductivities. R(th)C and b were found to have constant values (with b = 2.8 ± 0.3 μm and R(th)C = 44,927 ± 7820 K W(-1)) for samples with thermal conductivity values ranging from 0.36 W K(-1) m(-1) to 1.1 W K(-1) m(-1). An independent strategy for the calibration of contact parameters was developed and validated for samples in this range of thermal conductivity, using a reference sample with a previously measured Seebeck coefficient and thermal conductivity. The results were found to agree with the calibration performed using multiple samples of known thermal conductivity between 0.36 and 1.1 W K(-1) m(-1). However, for samples in the range between 16.2 W K(-1) m(-1) and 53.7 W K(-1) m(-1), calibration experiments showed the contact parameters to have considerably different values: R(th)C = 40,191 ± 1532 K W(-1) and b = 428 ± 24 nm. Finally, this work demonstrates that using these calibration procedures, measurements of both highly conductive and thermally insulating films on substrates can be performed, as the measured values obtained were within 1-20% (for low k) and 5-31% (for high k) of independent measurements and/or literature reports. Thermal conductivity results are presented for a SiGe film on a glass substrate, Te film on a glass substrate, polymer films (doped with Fe nano-particles and undoped) on a glass substrate, and Au film on a Si substrate.

  5. Calibration Transfer Between a Bench Scanning and a Submersible Diode Array Spectrophotometer for In Situ Wastewater Quality Monitoring in Sewer Systems.

    PubMed

    Brito, Rita S; Pinheiro, Helena M; Ferreira, Filipa; Matos, José S; Pinheiro, Alexandre; Lourenço, Nídia D

    2016-03-01

    Online monitoring programs based on spectroscopy have a high application potential for the detection of hazardous wastewater discharges in sewer systems. Wastewater hydraulics poses a challenge for in situ spectroscopy, especially when the system includes storm water connections leading to rapid changes in water depth, velocity, and in the water quality matrix. Thus, there is a need to optimize and fix the location of in situ instruments, limiting their availability for calibration. In this context, the development of calibration models on bench spectrophotometers to estimate wastewater quality parameters from spectra acquired with in situ instruments could be very useful. However, spectra contain information not only from the samples, but also from the spectrophotometer generally invalidating this approach. The use of calibration transfer methods is a promising solution to this problem. In this study, calibration models were developed using interval partial least squares (iPLS), for the estimation of total suspended solids (TSS) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) in sewage from Ultraviolet-visible spectra acquired in a bench scanning spectrophotometer. The feasibility of calibration transfer to a submersible, diode array equipment, to be subsequently operated in situ, was assessed using three procedures: slope and bias correction (SBC); single wavelength standardization (SWS) on mean spectra; and local centering (LC). The results showed that SBC was the most adequate for the available data, adding insignificant error to the base model estimates. Single wavelength standardization was a close second best, potentially more robust, and independent of the base iPLS model. Local centering was shown to be inadequate for the samples and instruments used.

  6. Gridded affine transformation and rubber-sheeting algorithm with FORTRAN progra for calibrating scanned hydrographic survey maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doytsher, Yerahmiel; Hall, John K.

    1997-08-01

    A FORTRAN program is presented for transforming from digitized pixel locations in a scanned map to actual geographic coordinates based upon an affine transformation with rubber-sheeting corrections applied to the digitized nx by ny node grid. The program was developed and successfully applied to over four hundred hydrographic fairsheets and sounding charts from which depth soundings were being read. In addition to correcting for the effects of copying and scanning, the transformations can directly extract geographic coordinates with minimal error from large-scale maps using geographic projections such as Mercator, Gnomonic, and Lambert Conformal.

  7. SU-D-18C-02: Feasibility of Using a Short ASL Scan for Calibrating Cerebral Blood Flow Obtained From DSC-MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, P; Chang, T; Huang, K; Yeh, C; Chien, C; Wai, Y; Lee, T; Liu, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of using a short arterial spin labeling (ASL) scan for calibrating the dynamic susceptibility contrast- (DSC-) MRI in a group of patients with internal carotid artery stenosis. Methods: Six patients with unilateral ICA stenosis enrolled in the study on a 3T clinical MRI scanner. The ASL-cerebral blood flow (-CBF) maps were calculated by averaging different number of dynamic points (N=1-45) acquired by using a Q2TIPS sequence. For DSC perfusion analysis, arterial input function was selected to derive the relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) map and the delay (Tmax) map. Patient-specific CF was calculated from the mean ASL- and DSC-CBF obtained from three different masks: (1)Tmax< 3s, (2)combined gray matter mask with mask 1, (3)mask 2 with large vessels removed. One CF value was created for each number of averages by using each of the three masks for calibrating the DSC-CBF map. The CF value of the largest number of averages (NL=45) was used to determine the acceptable range(< 10%, <15%, and <20%) of CF values corresponding to the minimally acceptable number of average (NS) for each patient. Results: Comparing DSC CBF maps corrected by CF values of NL (CBFL) in ACA, MCA and PCA territories, all masks resulted in smaller CBF on the ipsilateral side than the contralateral side of the MCA territory(p<.05). The values obtained from mask 1 were significantly different than the mask 3(p<.05). Using mask 3, the medium values of Ns were 4(<10%), 2(<15%) and 2(<20%), with the worst case scenario (maximum Ns) of 25, 4, and 4, respectively. Conclusion: This study found that reliable calibration of DSC-CBF can be achieved from a short pulsed ASL scan. We suggested use a mask based on the Tmax threshold, the inclusion of gray matter only and the exclusion of large vessels for performing the calibration.

  8. Calibration of non-contact ultrasound as an online sensor for wood characterization: Effects of temperature, moisture, and scanning direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vun, R. Y.; Hoover, K.; Janowiak, J.; Bhardwaj, M.

    2008-01-01

    Numerous handheld moisture meters are available for measuring moisture levels of wood and building materials for a vast range of quality control and moisture diagnosis applications. However, many methods currently available require physical contact of a probe with the test material to operate. The contact requirement of such devices has limited applications for these purposes. There is a tremendous demand for dynamic online quality assessment of in-process materials for moisture content (MC) measurements. In this paper, a non-destructive non-contact ultrasound technology was used to evaluate the effects of increasing temperature in two MC levels and of increasing MC in lumber. The results show that the ultrasonic absolute transmittance and velocity parameters are directly correlated very well (R2≥0.87) with temperature for the two moisture levels in wood. At constant temperature, however, the velocity is inversely correlated with MC. It was also found that the distribution of MC along the length is marginally insignificant to both ultrasonic measurements. The transmittance measurement along the orthogonal thickness direction is insignificant above the fiber saturation MC; similarly, the velocity measurement is marginally insignificant. The study concludes a positive correlation and a good fit for this technology to advance into the development of an automated device for determining wood moisture levels, which will in turn be used to control the dynamics of wood drying/sterilization processes. Further calibration research is recommended to ascertain the constraints and limitations of the technology to specific wood species and dimension.

  9. The benefit of 3D laser scanning technology in the generation and calibration of FEM models for health assessment of concrete structures.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hao; Xu, Xiangyang; Neumann, Ingo

    2014-11-19

    Terrestrial laser scanning technology (TLS) is a new technique for quickly getting three-dimensional information. In this paper we research the health assessment of concrete structures with a Finite Element Method (FEM) model based on TLS. The goal focuses on the benefits of 3D TLS in the generation and calibration of FEM models, in order to build a convenient, efficient and intelligent model which can be widely used for the detection and assessment of bridges, buildings, subways and other objects. After comparing the finite element simulation with surface-based measurement data from TLS, the FEM model is determined to be acceptable with an error of less than 5%. The benefit of TLS lies mainly in the possibility of a surface-based validation of results predicted by the FEM model.

  10. Thermal conductivity measurements of high and low thermal conductivity films using a scanning hot probe method in the 3ω mode and novel calibration strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Adam A.; Muñoz Rojo, Miguel; Abad, Begoña; Perez, Jaime Andrés; Maiz, Jon; Schomacker, Jason; Martín-Gonzalez, Marisol; Borca-Tasciuc, Diana-Andra; Borca-Tasciuc, Theodorian

    2015-09-01

    This work discusses measurement of thermal conductivity (k) of films using a scanning hot probe method in the 3ω mode and investigates the calibration of thermal contact parameters, specifically the thermal contact resistance (RthC) and thermal exchange radius (b) using reference samples with different thermal conductivities. RthC and b were found to have constant values (with b = 2.8 +/- 0.3 μm and Rthc = 44 927 +/- 7820 K W-1) for samples with thermal conductivity values ranging from 0.36 W K-1 m-1 to 1.1 W K-1 m-1. An independent strategy for the calibration of contact parameters was developed and validated for samples in this range of thermal conductivity, using a reference sample with a previously measured Seebeck coefficient and thermal conductivity. The results were found to agree with the calibration performed using multiple samples of known thermal conductivity between 0.36 and 1.1 W K-1 m-1. However, for samples in the range between 16.2 W K-1 m-1 and 53.7 W K-1 m-1, calibration experiments showed the contact parameters to have considerably different values: Rthc = 40 191 +/- 1532 K W-1 and b = 428 +/- 24 nm. Finally, this work demonstrates that using these calibration procedures, measurements of both highly conductive and thermally insulating films on substrates can be performed, as the measured values obtained were within 1-20% (for low k) and 5-31% (for high k) of independent measurements and/or literature reports. Thermal conductivity results are presented for a SiGe film on a glass substrate, Te film on a glass substrate, polymer films (doped with Fe nano-particles and undoped) on a glass substrate, and Au film on a Si substrate.This work discusses measurement of thermal conductivity (k) of films using a scanning hot probe method in the 3ω mode and investigates the calibration of thermal contact parameters, specifically the thermal contact resistance (RthC) and thermal exchange radius (b) using reference samples with different thermal

  11. Suomi NPP/JPSS Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS): Calibration Validation With The Aircraft Based Scanning High-resolution Interferometer Sounder (S-HIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, J. K.; Revercomb, H. E.; Tobin, D.; Knuteson, R. O.; Best, F. A.; Adler, D. A.; Pettersen, C.; Garcia, R. K.; Gero, P.

    2013-12-01

    To better accommodate climate change monitoring and improved weather forecasting, there is an established need for higher accuracy and more refined error characterization of radiance measurements from space and the corresponding geophysical products. This need has led to emphasizing direct tests of on-orbit performance, referred to as validation. Currently, validation typically involves (1) collecting high quality reference data from airborne and/or ground-based instruments during the satellite overpass, and (2) a detailed comparison between the satellite-based radiance measurements and the corresponding high quality reference data. Additionally, for future missions technology advancements at the University of Wisconsin Space Science and Engineering Center (UW-SSEC) have led to the development of an on-orbit absolute radiance reference utilizing miniature phase change cells to provide direct on-orbit traceability to International Standards (SI). The detailed comparison between the satellite-based radiance measurements and the corresponding measurements made from a high-altitude aircraft must account for instrument noise and scene variations, as well as differences in instrument observation altitudes, view angles, spatial footprints, and spectral response. Most importantly, for the calibration validation process to be both accurate and repeatable the reference data instrument must be extremely well characterized and understood, carefully maintained, and accurately calibrated, with traceability to absolute standards. The Scanning High-resolution Interferometer Sounder (S-HIS) meets and exceeds these requirements and has proven to do so on multiple airborne platforms, each with significantly different instrument operating environments. The Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) on Suomi NPP, launched 28 October 2011, is designed to give scientists more refined information about Earth's atmosphere and improve weather forecasts and our understanding of climate. CrIS is an

  12. Auto-calibrated scanning-angle prism-type total internal reflection microscopy for nanometer-precision axial position determination and optional variable-illumination-depth pseudo total internal reflection microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Fang, Ning; Sun, Wei

    2015-04-21

    A method, apparatus, and system for improved VA-TIRFM microscopy. The method comprises automatically controlled calibration of one or more laser sources by precise control of presentation of each laser relative a sample for small incremental changes of incident angle over a range of critical TIR angles. The calibration then allows precise scanning of the sample for any of those calibrated angles for higher and more accurate resolution, and better reconstruction of the scans for super resolution reconstruction of the sample. Optionally the system can be controlled for incident angles of the excitation laser at sub-critical angles for pseudo TIRFM. Optionally both above-critical angle and sub critical angle measurements can be accomplished with the same system.

  13. SUMS calibration test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, G.

    1982-01-01

    Calibration was performed on the shuttle upper atmosphere mass spectrometer (SUMS). The results of the calibration and the as run test procedures are presented. The output data is described, and engineering data conversion factors, tables and curves, and calibration on instrument gauges are included. Static calibration results which include: instrument sensitive versus external pressure for N2 and O2, data from each scan of calibration, data plots from N2 and O2, and sensitivity of SUMS at inlet for N2 and O2, and ratios of 14/28 for nitrogen and 16/32 for oxygen are given.

  14. ALTEA calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaconte, V.; Altea Team

    The ALTEA project is aimed at studying the possible functional damages to the Central Nervous System (CNS) due to particle radiation in space environment. The project is an international and multi-disciplinary collaboration. The ALTEA facility is an helmet-shaped device that will study concurrently the passage of cosmic radiation through the brain, the functional status of the visual system and the electrophysiological dynamics of the cortical activity. The basic instrumentation is composed by six active particle telescopes, one ElectroEncephaloGraph (EEG), a visual stimulator and a pushbutton. The telescopes are able to detect the passage of each particle measuring its energy, trajectory and released energy into the brain and identifying nuclear species. The EEG and the Visual Stimulator are able to measure the functional status of the visual system, the cortical electrophysiological activity, and to look for a correlation between incident particles, brain activity and Light Flash perceptions. These basic instruments can be used separately or in any combination, permitting several different experiments. ALTEA is scheduled to fly in the International Space Station (ISS) in November, 15th 2004. In this paper the calibration of the Flight Model of the silicon telescopes (Silicon Detector Units - SDUs) will be shown. These measures have been taken at the GSI heavy ion accelerator in Darmstadt. First calibration has been taken out in November 2003 on the SDU-FM1 using C nuclei at different energies: 100, 150, 400 and 600 Mev/n. We performed a complete beam scan of the SDU-FM1 to check functionality and homogeneity of all strips of silicon detector planes, for each beam energy we collected data to achieve good statistics and finally we put two different thickness of Aluminium and Plexiglas in front of the detector in order to study fragmentations. This test has been carried out with a Test Equipment to simulate the Digital Acquisition Unit (DAU). We are scheduled to

  15. Real-time calibration-free C-scan images of the eye fundus using Master Slave swept source optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradu, Adrian; Kapinchev, Konstantin; Barnes, Fred; Garway-Heath, David F.; Rajendram, Ranjan; Keane, Pearce; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2015-03-01

    Recently, we introduced a novel Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) method, termed as Master Slave OCT (MS-OCT), specialized for delivering en-face images. This method uses principles of spectral domain interfereometry in two stages. MS-OCT operates like a time domain OCT, selecting only signals from a chosen depth only while scanning the laser beam across the eye. Time domain OCT allows real time production of an en-face image, although relatively slowly. As a major advance, the Master Slave method allows collection of signals from any number of depths, as required by the user. The tremendous advantage in terms of parallel provision of data from numerous depths could not be fully employed by using multi core processors only. The data processing required to generate images at multiple depths simultaneously is not achievable with commodity multicore processors only. We compare here the major improvement in processing and display, brought about by using graphic cards. We demonstrate images obtained with a swept source at 100 kHz (which determines an acquisition time [Ta] for a frame of 200×200 pixels2 of Ta =1.6 s). By the end of the acquired frame being scanned, using our computing capacity, 4 simultaneous en-face images could be created in T = 0.8 s. We demonstrate that by using graphic cards, 32 en-face images can be displayed in Td 0.3 s. Other faster swept source engines can be used with no difference in terms of Td. With 32 images (or more), volumes can be created for 3D display, using en-face images, as opposed to the current technology where volumes are created using cross section OCT images.

  16. The FIRST-2MASS Red Quasar Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Glikman, E; Helfand, D J; White, R L; Becker, R H; Gregg, M D; Lacy, M

    2007-06-28

    Combining radio observations with optical and infrared color selection--demonstrated in our pilot study to be an efficient selection algorithm for finding red quasars--we have obtained optical and infrared spectroscopy for 120 objects in a complete sample of 156 candidates from a sky area of 2716 square degrees. Consistent with our initial results, we find our selection criteria--J-K > 1.7,R-K > 4.0--yield a {approx} 50% success rate for discovering quasars substantially redder than those found in optical surveys. Comparison with UVX- and optical color-selected samples shows that {approx}> 10% of the quasars are missed in a magnitude-limited survey. Simultaneous two-frequency radio observations for part of the sample indicate that a synchrotron continuum component is ruled out as a significant contributor to reddening the quasars spectra. We go on to estimate extinctions for our objects assuming their red colors are caused by dust. Continuum fits and Balmer decrements suggest E(B-V) values ranging from near zero to 2.5 magnitudes. Correcting the K-band magnitudes for these extinctions, we find that for K {le} 14.0, red quasars make up between 25% and 60% of the underlying quasar population; owing to the incompleteness of the 2MASS survey at fainter K-band magnitudes, we can only set a lower limit to the radio-detected red quasar population of > 20-30%.

  17. Calibrated Radiometer for Background Scanning - CARABAS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-11-01

    THE REMOTE JOYSTI color 0,7 print " 2 " color 7,0 print " DEFINE MEASUREMENT POINTS BY USE OF THE KEYBORD CURSo color 0,7 print " 3 " color 7,0 print...34 COORDINATES THROUGH THE KEYBORD " VS = "m vhile VS <> ŕ" and V$ <> Ŗ" and V$ <> ŗ" VS - INKEY$ vend if V$ " Ŗ" then goto 23 ele8if V$ - ŗ" then

  18. Calibration of Viking imaging system pointing, image extraction, and optical navigation measure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breckenridge, W. G.; Fowler, J. W.; Morgan, E. M.

    1977-01-01

    Pointing control and knowledge accuracy of Viking Orbiter science instruments is controlled by the scan platform. Calibration of the scan platform and the imaging system was accomplished through mathematical models. The calibration procedure and results obtained for the two Viking spacecraft are described. Included are both ground and in-flight scan platform calibrations, and the additional calibrations unique to optical navigation.

  19. Spectral calibration for convex grating imaging spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jiankang; Chen, Xinhua; Ji, Yiqun; Chen, Yuheng; Shen, Weimin

    2013-12-01

    Spectral calibration of imaging spectrometer plays an important role for acquiring target accurate spectrum. There are two spectral calibration types in essence, the wavelength scanning and characteristic line sampling. Only the calibrated pixel is used for the wavelength scanning methods and he spectral response function (SRF) is constructed by the calibrated pixel itself. The different wavelength can be generated by the monochromator. The SRF is constructed by adjacent pixels of the calibrated one for the characteristic line sampling methods. And the pixels are illuminated by the narrow spectrum line and the center wavelength of the spectral line is exactly known. The calibration result comes from scanning method is precise, but it takes much time and data to deal with. The wavelength scanning method cannot be used in field or space environment. The characteristic line sampling method is simple, but the calibration precision is not easy to confirm. The standard spectroscopic lamp is used to calibrate our manufactured convex grating imaging spectrometer which has Offner concentric structure and can supply high resolution and uniform spectral signal. Gaussian fitting algorithm is used to determine the center position and the Full-Width-Half-Maximum(FWHM)of the characteristic spectrum line. The central wavelengths and FWHMs of spectral pixels are calibrated by cubic polynomial fitting. By setting a fitting error thresh hold and abandoning the maximum deviation point, an optimization calculation is achieved. The integrated calibration experiment equipment for spectral calibration is developed to enhance calibration efficiency. The spectral calibration result comes from spectral lamp method are verified by monochromator wavelength scanning calibration technique. The result shows that spectral calibration uncertainty of FWHM and center wavelength are both less than 0.08nm, or 5.2% of spectral FWHM.

  20. Nuclear Scans

    MedlinePlus

    Nuclear scans use radioactive substances to see structures and functions inside your body. They use a special ... images. Most scans take 20 to 45 minutes. Nuclear scans can help doctors diagnose many conditions, including ...

  1. WBC scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the body. It is a type of nuclear scan . How the Test is Performed Blood will ... radiation. Due to the slight radiation exposure, most nuclear scans (including WBC scan) are not recommended for ...

  2. Liver scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... Nuclear scan - technetium; Nuclear scan - liver or spleen Images Liver scan References Lidofsky S. Jaundice. In: Feldman M, ... urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows ...

  3. PET scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... may have an allergic reaction to the tracer material. Some people have pain, redness, or swelling at ... with diabetes. Most PET scans are now performed along with a CT scan. This combination scan ...

  4. STIS Calibration Pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulbert, S.; Hodge, P.; Lindler, D.; Shaw, R.; Goudfrooij, P.; Katsanis, R.; Keener, S.; McGrath, M.; Bohlin, R.; Baum, S.

    1997-05-01

    Routine calibration of STIS observations in the HST data pipeline is performed by the CALSTIS task. CALSTIS can: subtract the over-scan region and a bias image from CCD observations; remove cosmic ray features from CCD observations; correct global nonlinearities for MAMA observations; subtract a dark image; and, apply flat field corrections. In the case of spectral data, CALSTIS can also: assign a wavelength to each pixel; apply a heliocentric correction to the wavelengths; convert counts to absolute flux; process the automatically generated spectral calibration lamp observations to improve the wavelength solution; rectify two-dimensional (longslit) spectra; subtract interorder and sky background; and, extract one-dimensional spectra. CALSTIS differs in significant ways from the current HST calibration tasks. The new code is written in ANSI C and makes use of a new C interface to IRAF. The input data, reference data, and output calibrated data are all in FITS format, using IMAGE or BINTABLE extensions. Error estimates are computed and include contributions from the reference images. The entire calibration can be performed by one task, but many steps can also be performed individually.

  5. Anemometer calibrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bate, T.; Calkins, D. E.; Price, P.; Veikins, O.

    1971-01-01

    Calibrator generates accurate flow velocities over wide range of gas pressure, temperature, and composition. Both pressure and flow velocity can be maintained within 0.25 percent. Instrument is essentially closed loop hydraulic system containing positive displacement drive.

  6. 21 CFR 882.1925 - Ultrasonic scanner calibration test block.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ultrasonic scanner calibration test block. 882... Ultrasonic scanner calibration test block. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic scanner calibration test block is a block of material with known properties used to calibrate ultrasonic scanning devices (e.g.,...

  7. 21 CFR 882.1925 - Ultrasonic scanner calibration test block.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ultrasonic scanner calibration test block. 882... Ultrasonic scanner calibration test block. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic scanner calibration test block is a block of material with known properties used to calibrate ultrasonic scanning devices (e.g.,...

  8. Calibration of dual-frequency SAR ocean imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasischke, E. S.; Larson, R. W.; Lyzenga, D. R.

    1986-01-01

    A calibration procedure for digital aircraft SAR imagery is presented. Techniques to utilize internal and external calibration references are discussed. Examples of calibrated intensity scans from an oceanographic test site are presented. The relationship of the aircraft SAR calibration procedure to future spaceborne SAR systems is discussed.

  9. Antenna Calibration and Measurement Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochblatt, David J.; Cortes, Manuel Vazquez

    2012-01-01

    A document describes the Antenna Calibration & Measurement Equipment (ACME) system that will provide the Deep Space Network (DSN) with instrumentation enabling a trained RF engineer at each complex to perform antenna calibration measurements and to generate antenna calibration data. This data includes continuous-scan auto-bore-based data acquisition with all-sky data gathering in support of 4th order pointing model generation requirements. Other data includes antenna subreflector focus, system noise temperature and tipping curves, antenna efficiency, reports system linearity, and instrument calibration. The ACME system design is based on the on-the-fly (OTF) mapping technique and architecture. ACME has contributed to the improved RF performance of the DSN by approximately a factor of two. It improved the pointing performances of the DSN antennas and productivity of its personnel and calibration engineers.

  10. Calibration Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurz, Peter; Balogh, Andre; Coffey, Victoria; Dichter, Bronislaw K.; Kasprzak, Wayne T.; Lazarus, Alan J.; Lennartsson, Walter; McFadden, James P.

    Calibration and characterization of particle instruments with supporting flight electronics is necessary for the correct interpretation of the returned data. Generally speaking, the instrument will always return a measurement value (typically in form of a digital number), for example a count rate, for the measurement of an external quantity, which could be an ambient neutral gas density, an ion composition (species measured and amount), or electron density. The returned values are used then to derive parameters associated with the distribution such as temperature, bulk flow speed, differential energy flux and others. With the calibration of the instrument the direct relationship between the external quantity and the returned measurement value has to be established so that the data recorded during flight can be correctly interpreted. While calibration and characterization of an instrument are usually done in ground-based laboratories prior to integration of the instrument in the spacecraft, it can also be done in space.

  11. Thematic Mapper. Volume 1: Calibration report flight model, LANDSAT 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooley, R. C.; Lansing, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    The calibration of the Flight 1 Model Thematic Mapper is discussed. Spectral response, scan profile, coherent noise, line spread profiles and white light leaks, square wave response, radiometric calibration, and commands and telemetry are specifically addressed.

  12. Image Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peay, Christopher S.; Palacios, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Calibrate_Image calibrates images obtained from focal plane arrays so that the output image more accurately represents the observed scene. The function takes as input a degraded image along with a flat field image and a dark frame image produced by the focal plane array and outputs a corrected image. The three most prominent sources of image degradation are corrected for: dark current accumulation, gain non-uniformity across the focal plane array, and hot and/or dead pixels in the array. In the corrected output image the dark current is subtracted, the gain variation is equalized, and values for hot and dead pixels are estimated, using bicubic interpolation techniques.

  13. Bone Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mayo Clinic Staff A bone scan is a nuclear imaging test that helps diagnose and track several ... you're nursing. A bone scan is a nuclear imaging procedure. In nuclear imaging, tiny amounts of ...

  14. CT Scans

    MedlinePlus

    ... cross-sectional pictures of your body. Doctors use CT scans to look for Broken bones Cancers Blood clots Signs of heart disease Internal bleeding During a CT scan, you lie still on a table. The table ...

  15. SAR antenna calibration techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carver, K. R.; Newell, A. C.

    1978-01-01

    Calibration of SAR antennas requires a measurement of gain, elevation and azimuth pattern shape, boresight error, cross-polarization levels, and phase vs. angle and frequency. For spaceborne SAR antennas of SEASAT size operating at C-band or higher, some of these measurements can become extremely difficult using conventional far-field antenna test ranges. Near-field scanning techniques offer an alternative approach and for C-band or X-band SARs, give much improved accuracy and precision as compared to that obtainable with a far-field approach.

  16. SNLS calibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regnault, N.

    2015-08-01

    The Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey (CFHTLS) is a massive imaging survey, conducted between 2003 and 2008, with the MegaCam instrument, mounted on the CFHT-3.6-m telescope. With a 1 degree wide focal plane, made of 36 2048 × 4612 sensors totalling 340 megapixels, MegaCam was at the time the largest imager on the sky. The Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS) uses the cadenced observations of the 4 deg2 wide "DEEP" layer of the CFHTLS to search and follow-up Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) and study the acceleration of the cosmic expansion. The reduction and calibration of the CFHTLS/SNLS datasets has posed a series of challenges. In what follows, we give a brief account of the photometric calibration work that has been performed on the SNLS data over the last decade.

  17. Renal scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... and urinate often to help remove the radioactive material from the body. How to Prepare for the Test Tell your health care provider if you take ... drink additional fluids before the scan. How the Test will ... into the vein. However, you will not feel the radioactive material. The scanning table may be hard and cold. ...

  18. THE 2MASS REDSHIFT SURVEY-DESCRIPTION AND DATA RELEASE

    SciTech Connect

    Huchra, John P.; Berlind, Perry; Calkins, Michael; Falco, Emilio; Mink, Jessica D.; Tokarz, Susan; Macri, Lucas M.; Masters, Karen L.; Jarrett, Thomas H.; Crook, Aidan C.; Cutri, Roc; Erdogdu, Pirin; Lahav, Ofer; George, Teddy; Hutcheson, Conrad M.; Mader, Jeff; Martimbeau, Nathalie; Schneider, Stephen; Skrutskie, Michael; Westover, Michael E-mail: karen.masters@port.ac.uk

    2012-04-01

    We present the results of the 2MASS Redshift Survey (2MRS), a ten-year project to map the full three-dimensional distribution of galaxies in the nearby universe. The Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) was completed in 2003 and its final data products, including an extended source catalog (XSC), are available online. The 2MASS XSC contains nearly a million galaxies with K{sub s} {<=} 13.5 mag and is essentially complete and mostly unaffected by interstellar extinction and stellar confusion down to a galactic latitude of |b| = 5 Degree-Sign for bright galaxies. Near-infrared wavelengths are sensitive to the old stellar populations that dominate galaxy masses, making 2MASS an excellent starting point to study the distribution of matter in the nearby universe. We selected a sample of 44,599 2MASS galaxies with K{sub s} {<=} 11.75 mag and |b| {>=} 5 Degree-Sign ({>=}8 Degree-Sign toward the Galactic bulge) as the input catalog for our survey. We obtained spectroscopic observations for 11,000 galaxies and used previously obtained velocities for the remainder of the sample to generate a redshift catalog that is 97.6% complete to well-defined limits and covers 91% of the sky. This provides an unprecedented census of galaxy (baryonic mass) concentrations within 300 Mpc. Earlier versions of our survey have been used in a number of publications that have studied the bulk motion of the Local Group, mapped the density and peculiar velocity fields out to 50 h{sup -1} Mpc, detected galaxy groups, and estimated the values of several cosmological parameters. Additionally, we present morphological types for a nearly complete sub-sample of 20,860 galaxies with K{sub s} {<=} 11.25 mag and |b| {>=} 10 Degree-Sign .

  19. MULTI-WAVELENGTH CHARACTERIZATION OF STELLAR FLARES ON LOW-MASS STARS USING SDSS AND 2MASS TIME-DOMAIN SURVEYS

    SciTech Connect

    Davenport, James R. A.; Becker, Andrew C.; Kowalski, Adam F.; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Schmidt, Sarah J.; Hilton, Eric J.; Sesar, Branimir; Cutri, Roc

    2012-03-20

    We present the first rates of flares from M dwarf stars in both red optical and near-infrared (NIR) filters. We have studied {approx}50,000 M dwarfs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82 area and 1321 M dwarfs from the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) Calibration Scan Point Source Working Database that overlap SDSS imaging fields. We assign photometric spectral types from M0 to M6 using (r - i) and (i - z) colors for every star in our sample. Stripe 82 stars each have 50-100 epochs of data, while 2MASS Calibration stars have {approx}1900 epochs. From these data we estimate the observed rates and theoretical detection thresholds for flares in eight photometric bands as a function of spectral type. Optical flare rates are found to be in agreement with previous studies, while the frequency per hour of NIR flare detections is found to be more than two orders of magnitude lower. An excess of small-amplitude flux increases in all bands exhibits a power-law distribution, which we interpret as the result of flares below our detection thresholds. In order to investigate the recovery efficiency for flares in each filter, we extend a two-component flare model into the NIR. Quiescent M0-M6 spectral templates were used with the model to predict the photometric response of flares from u to K{sub s} . We determine that red optical filters are sensitive to flares with u-band amplitudes {approx}>2 mag, and NIR filters to flares with {Delta}u {approx}> 4.5 mag. Our model predicts that M0 stars have the best color contrast for J-band detections, but M4-M6 stars should yield the highest rate of NIR flares with amplitudes of {Delta}J {>=} 0.01 mag. Characterizing flare rates and photometric variations at longer wavelengths is important for predicting the signatures of M dwarf variability in next-generation surveys, and we discuss their impact on surveys such as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.

  20. CCD UBV(RI)C and 2MASS photometry of seven open clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akkaya Oralhan, {İ.; Michel, R.

    Fundamental astrophysical parameters have been derived for Be 45, Be 55, Di 07, Feib 01, Ki 02, NGC 457 and NGC 1548 open clusters (OCs) using CCD U BV (RI)_C photometric data and PPMXL database. CCD U BV (RI)_C photometric data observed with the 84 cm telescope at the San Pedro Mártir National Astronomical Observatory (SPMO), México. The cluster members and field stars in the cluster regions have separated through their Proper Motion (PM) vector point diagrams. We have used JH{Ks} photometry of 2MASS data taken from PPMXL catalogue to have stellar Radial Density Profile (RDP) and determine limit radius of these seven clusters. Five different Color-Magnitude diagrams ane one color-color diagram have been used together with Padova isochrones and intrinsic-colour calibrations to obtain reddenings, metallicities, distance moduli, and ages for these seven clusters.

  1. Gallium scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... material called gallium and is a type of nuclear medicine exam. A related test is gallium scan ... Brown ML, Forstrom LA, et al. Society of nuclear medicine procedure guideline for gallium scintigraphy in inflammation. ...

  2. CT Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... exposing your baby to radiation. Reactions to contrast material In certain cases, your doctor may recommend you ... for a few hours before your scan Contrast material A special dye called a contrast material is ...

  3. The 2MASS-selected Flat Galaxy Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitronova, S. N.; Karachentsev, I. D.; Karachentseva, V. E.; Jarrett, T. H.; Kudrya, Yu. N.

    An all-sky catalog of 18020 disc-like galaxies is presented. The galaxies are selected from the Extended Source Catalog of the Two Micron All-Sky Survey (XSC 2MASS) basing on their 2MASS axial ratio a/b ≥ 3. The Catalog contains data on magnitudes of a galaxy in the J, H, KS bands, its axial ratio, positional angle, index of luminosity concentration, as well as identification of the galaxy with the LEDA and the NED databases. Unlike the available optical catalogs, the new 2MFGC catalog seems to be more suitable to study cosmic streaming on a scale of z <~ 0.1. The dipole moment of distribution of the bright (K < 11m) 2MFGC objects (l = 227°, b = 41° or SGL = 90°, SGB = -43°) lies within statistical errors (±15°) in the direction of the IRAS dipole and the optical RFGC dipole.

  4. Traceable Pyrgeometer Calibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Dooraghi, Mike; Kutchenreiter, Mark; Reda, Ibrahim; Habte, Aron; Sengupta, Manajit; Andreas, Afshin; Newman, Martina

    2016-05-02

    This poster presents the development, implementation, and operation of the Broadband Outdoor Radiometer Calibrations (BORCAL) Longwave (LW) system at the Southern Great Plains Radiometric Calibration Facility for the calibration of pyrgeometers that provide traceability to the World Infrared Standard Group.

  5. Calibration of sound calibrators: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milhomem, T. A. B.; Soares, Z. M. D.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents an overview of calibration of sound calibrators. Initially, traditional calibration methods are presented. Following, the international standard IEC 60942 is discussed emphasizing parameters, target measurement uncertainty and criteria for conformance to the requirements of the standard. Last, Regional Metrology Organizations comparisons are summarized.

  6. Precision Cosmology with the 2MASS Clustering Dipole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilicki, Maciej; Chodorowski, Michał Hellwing, Wojciech; Jarrett, Thomas; Mamon, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Comparison of peculiar velocities of galaxies with their gravitational accelerations (induced by the density field) is one of the methods to constrain the redshift distortion parameter β = Ω _m^{0.55} /b, where Ωm is the non-relativistic matter density parameter and b is the linear bias. In particular, one can use the motion of the Local Group (LG) for that purpose. Its peculiar velocity is known from the dipole component of the cosmic microwave background, whereas its acceleration can be estimated with the use of an all-sky galaxy catalog, from the so-called clustering dipole. At the moment, the biggest dataset of that kind is the Two Micron All Sky Survey Extended Source Catalog (2MASS XSC) containing almost 1 million galaxies and complete up to 300 Mpc/h. We applied 2MASS data to measure LG acceleration and used two methods to estimate the beta parameter. Both of them yield β ≃ 0.4 with an error of several per cent, which is the most precise determination of this parameter from the clustering dipole to date.

  7. Calibration analysis software for the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stramaglia, Maria Elena

    2016-07-01

    The calibration of the ATLAS Pixel Detector at LHC fulfils two main purposes: to tune the front-end configuration parameters for establishing the best operational settings and to measure the tuning performance through a subset of scans. An analysis framework has been set up in order to take actions on the detector given the outcome of a calibration scan (e.g. to create a mask for disabling noisy pixels). The software framework to control all aspects of the Pixel Detector scans and analyses is called calibration console. The introduction of a new layer, equipped with new FE-I4 chips, required an update of the console architecture. It now handles scans and scan analyses applied together to chips with different characteristics. An overview of the newly developed calibration analysis software will be presented, together with some preliminary results.

  8. Calibrating page sized Gafchromic EBT3 films

    SciTech Connect

    Crijns, W.; Maes, F.; Heide, U. A. van der; Van den Heuvel, F.

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: The purpose is the development of a novel calibration method for dosimetry with Gafchromic EBT3 films. The method should be applicable for pretreatment verification of volumetric modulated arc, and intensity modulated radiotherapy. Because the exposed area on film can be large for such treatments, lateral scan errors must be taken into account. The correction for the lateral scan effect is obtained from the calibration data itself. Methods: In this work, the film measurements were modeled using their relative scan values (Transmittance, T). Inside the transmittance domain a linear combination and a parabolic lateral scan correction described the observed transmittance values. The linear combination model, combined a monomer transmittance state (T{sub 0}) and a polymer transmittance state (T{sub {infinity}}) of the film. The dose domain was associated with the observed effects in the transmittance domain through a rational calibration function. On the calibration film only simple static fields were applied and page sized films were used for calibration and measurements (treatment verification). Four different calibration setups were considered and compared with respect to dose estimation accuracy. The first (I) used a calibration table from 32 regions of interest (ROIs) spread on 4 calibration films, the second (II) used 16 ROIs spread on 2 calibration films, the third (III), and fourth (IV) used 8 ROIs spread on a single calibration film. The calibration tables of the setups I, II, and IV contained eight dose levels delivered to different positions on the films, while for setup III only four dose levels were applied. Validation was performed by irradiating film strips with known doses at two different time points over the course of a week. Accuracy of the dose response and the lateral effect correction was estimated using the dose difference and the root mean squared error (RMSE), respectively. Results: A calibration based on two films was the optimal

  9. Optical spectroscopic and 2MASS measurements of Stephenson Halpha stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maheswar, G.; Manoj, P.; Bhatt, H. C.

    2003-05-01

    We present the results of spectroscopic observations for 52 objects from the list of Halpha emission stars of Stephenson (\\cite{Ste86}). Out of six known T Tauri stars observed, five showed Halpha in emission and in one (StHa 40), Halpha changed from being in absorption to emission over a period of two years, accompanied by photometric and spectral type variability. We confirm the T Tauri nature of one Stephenson object (StHa 48) on the basis of the presence of Halpha and Hbeta in emission, Li I lambda6708 in absorption, infrared excess and X-ray emission. Among the 52 objects observed, there were other emission line objects: 1 Ke star, 1 BQ[ ] star, 2 galaxies and 2 Be stars. We present a higher-resolution spectrum of StHa 62 showing permitted and forbidden lines in emission typical of BQ[ ] stars. Twenty five out of 30 newly observed objects failed to show Halpha in emission. We also present 2MASS observations for 112 StHa objects. We suggest three Stephenson objects (StHa 52, 125 and 129) to be YSOs on the basis of 2MASS, IRAS and ROSAT observations. These and all other known YSOs amongst StHa stars are found in regions of star-forming clouds in Taurus, Orion and Ophiuchus. YSOs at high galactic latitudes in other parts of the sky are therefore rare. Table 2 is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/402/963

  10. MODIS In-flight Calibration Methodologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiong, X.; Barnes, W.

    2004-01-01

    MODIS is a key instrument for the NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) currently operating on the Terra spacecraft launched in December 1999 and Aqua spacecraft launched in May 2002. It is a cross-track scanning radiometer, making measurements over a wide field of view in 36 spectral bands with wavelengths from 0.41 to 14.5 micrometers and providing calibrated data products for science and research communities in their studies of the Earth s system of land, oceans, and atmosphere. A complete suite of on-board calibrators (OBC) have been designed for the instruments in-flight calibration and characterization, including a solar diffuser (SD) and solar diffuser stability monitor (SDSM) system for the radiometric calibration of the 20 reflective solar bands (RSB), a blackbody (BB) for the radiometric calibration of the 16 thermal emissive bands (TEB), and a spectro-radiometric calibration assembly (SRCA) for the spatial (all bands) and spectral (RSB only) characterization. This paper discusses MODIS in-flight Cali bration methodologies of using its on-board calibrators. Challenging issues and examples of tracking and correcting instrument on-orbit response changes are presented, including SD degradation (20% at 412nm, 12% at 466nm, and 7% at 530nm over four and a half years) and response versus scan angle changes (10%, 4%, and 1% differences between beginning of the scan and end of the scan at 412nm, 466nm, and 530nm) in the VIS spectral region. Current instrument performance and lessons learned are also provided.

  11. Improving self-calibration.

    PubMed

    Enßlin, Torsten A; Junklewitz, Henrik; Winderling, Lars; Greiner, Maksim; Selig, Marco

    2014-10-01

    Response calibration is the process of inferring how much the measured data depend on the signal one is interested in. It is essential for any quantitative signal estimation on the basis of the data. Here, we investigate self-calibration methods for linear signal measurements and linear dependence of the response on the calibration parameters. The common practice is to augment an external calibration solution using a known reference signal with an internal calibration on the unknown measurement signal itself. Contemporary self-calibration schemes try to find a self-consistent solution for signal and calibration by exploiting redundancies in the measurements. This can be understood in terms of maximizing the joint probability of signal and calibration. However, the full uncertainty structure of this joint probability around its maximum is thereby not taken into account by these schemes. Therefore, better schemes, in sense of minimal square error, can be designed by accounting for asymmetries in the uncertainty of signal and calibration. We argue that at least a systematic correction of the common self-calibration scheme should be applied in many measurement situations in order to properly treat uncertainties of the signal on which one calibrates. Otherwise, the calibration solutions suffer from a systematic bias, which consequently distorts the signal reconstruction. Furthermore, we argue that nonparametric, signal-to-noise filtered calibration should provide more accurate reconstructions than the common bin averages and provide a new, improved self-calibration scheme. We illustrate our findings with a simplistic numerical example.

  12. Calibration of pneumotachographs using a calibrated syringe.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yongquan; Turner, Martin J; Yem, Johnny S; Baker, A Barry

    2003-08-01

    Pneumotachograph require frequent calibration. Constant-flow methods allow polynomial calibration curves to be derived but are time consuming. The iterative syringe stroke technique is moderately efficient but results in discontinuous conductance arrays. This study investigated the derivation of first-, second-, and third-order polynomial calibration curves from 6 to 50 strokes of a calibration syringe. We used multiple linear regression to derive first-, second-, and third-order polynomial coefficients from two sets of 6-50 syringe strokes. In part A, peak flows did not exceed the specified linear range of the pneumotachograph, whereas flows in part B peaked at 160% of the maximum linear range. Conductance arrays were derived from the same data sets by using a published algorithm. Volume errors of the calibration strokes and of separate sets of 70 validation strokes (part A) and 140 validation strokes (part B) were calculated by using the polynomials and conductance arrays. Second- and third-order polynomials derived from 10 calibration strokes achieved volume variability equal to or better than conductance arrays derived from 50 strokes. We found that evaluation of conductance arrays using the calibration syringe strokes yields falsely low volume variances. We conclude that accurate polynomial curves can be derived from as few as 10 syringe strokes, and the new polynomial calibration method is substantially more time efficient than previously published conductance methods.

  13. Head CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    Brain CT; Cranial CT; CT scan - skull; CT scan - head; CT scan - orbits; CT scan - sinuses; Computed tomography - cranial; CAT scan - brain ... conditions: Birth (congenital) defect of the head or brain Brain infection Brain tumor Buildup of fluid inside ...

  14. Calibration plan for the sea and land surface temperature radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David L.; Nightingale, Tim J.; Mortimer, Hugh; Middleton, Kevin; Edeson, Ruben; Cox, Caroline V.; Mutlow, Chris T.; Maddison, Brian J.

    2013-10-01

    The Sea and Land Surface Temperature Radiometer (SLSTR) to be flown on ESA's Sentinel-3 mission is a multichannel scanning radiometer that will continue the 21-year datasets of the Along Track Scanning Radiometer (ATSR) series. As its name implies, measurements from SLSTR will be used to retrieve global sea surface temperatures to an uncertainty of <0.3K traced to international standards. To achieve these low uncertainties requires an end to end instrument calibration strategy that includes pre-launch calibration at subsystem and instrument level, on-board calibration systems and sustained post launch activities. The authors describe the preparations for the pre-launch calibration activities including the spectral response, instrument level alignment tests, solar and infrared radiometric calibration. A purpose built calibration rig has been designed and built at RAL space that will accommodate the SLSTR instrument, infrared calibration sources and alignment equipment. The calibration rig has been commissioned and results of these tests will be presented. Finally the authors will present the planning for the on-orbit monitoring and calibration activities to ensure that calibration is maintained. These activities include vicarious calibration techniques that have been developed through previous missions, and the deployment of ship-borne radiometers.

  15. Galaxy Groups in the 2Mass Redshift Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yi; Yang, Xiaohu; Shi, Feng; Mo, H. J.; Tweed, Dylan; Wang, Huiyuan; Zhang, Youcai; Li, Shijie; Lim, S. H.

    2016-11-01

    A galaxy group catalog is constructed from the 2MASS Redshift Survey (2MRS) with the use of a halo-based group finder. The halo mass associated with a group is estimated using a “GAP” method based on the luminosity of the central galaxy and its gap with other member galaxies. Tests using mock samples show that this method is reliable, particularly for poor systems containing only a few members. On average, 80% of all the groups have completeness \\gt 0.8, and about 65% of the groups have zero contamination. Halo masses are estimated with a typical uncertainty of ∼ 0.35 {dex}. The application of the group finder to the 2MRS gives 29,904 groups from a total of 43,246 galaxies at z≤slant 0.08, with 5286 groups having two or more members. Some basic properties of this group catalog is presented, and comparisons are made with other group catalogs in overlap regions. With a depth to z∼ 0.08 and uniformly covering about 91% of the whole sky, this group catalog provides a useful database to study galaxies in the local cosmic web, and to reconstruct the mass distribution in the local universe.

  16. 2MASS analytical study of four open cluster candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisht, D.; Yadav, R. K. S.; Durgapal, A. K.

    2017-04-01

    The astrophysical parameters of four poorly studied open star clusters namely Teutsch 126, Teutsch 54, Teutsch 61 and Czernik 3, have been estimated using the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) database. The stellar density distributions and color-magnitude diagrams are used to determine their structural parameters (cluster center, cluster radius, core radius, tidal radius, Galactocenteric coordinates and the distance from the Galactic plane). We have also derived age, color excesses, total mass, relaxation time, luminosity and mass function for each clusters. The mass function slopes for these clusters are derived as 1.59 ± 0.62, 1.31 ± 0.60, 1.22 ± 0.75 and 1.62 ± 0.56 for Teutsch 126, Teutsch 54, Teutsch 61 and Czernik 3 respectively. These values are very close with the Salpeter value (x = 1.35) within the errors. The effect of mass-segregation are observed in the clusters Teutsch 126 and Teutsch 61. Estimated values of dynamical relaxation time are less than age of the clusters under study. This concludes that these objects are dynamically relaxed. The possible reason for relaxation may be due to the dynamical evolution or imprint of star formation or both.

  17. A Galactic Plane relative extinction map from 2MASS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froebrich, D.; Ray, T. P.; Murphy, G. C.; Scholz, A.

    2005-03-01

    We present three 14 400 square degree relative extinction maps of the Galactic Plane (|b| < 20°) obtained from 2MASS using accumulative star counts (Wolf diagrams). This method is independent of the colour of the stars and the variation of extinction with wavelength. Stars were counted in 3.5 × 3.5 boxes, every 20.1° × 1° surrounding fields were chosen for reference, hence the maps represent local extinction enhancements and ignore any contribution from the ISM or very large clouds. Data reduction was performed on a Beowulf-type cluster (in approximately 120 hours). Such a cluster is ideal for this type of work as areas of the sky can be independently processed in parallel. We studied how extinction depends on wavelength in all of the high extinction regions detected and within selected dark clouds. On average a power law opacity index (β) of 1.0 to 1.8 in the NIR was deduced. The index however differed significantly from region to region and even within individual dark clouds. That said, generally it was found to be constant, or to increase, with wavelength within a particular region.

  18. Analytical multicollimator camera calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tayman, W.P.

    1978-01-01

    Calibration with the U.S. Geological survey multicollimator determines the calibrated focal length, the point of symmetry, the radial distortion referred to the point of symmetry, and the asymmetric characteristiecs of the camera lens. For this project, two cameras were calibrated, a Zeiss RMK A 15/23 and a Wild RC 8. Four test exposures were made with each camera. Results are tabulated for each exposure and averaged for each set. Copies of the standard USGS calibration reports are included. ?? 1978.

  19. ORNL calibrations facility

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, C.D.; Gupton, E.D.; Lane, B.H.; Miller, J.H.; Nichols, S.W.

    1982-08-01

    The ORNL Calibrations Facility is operated by the Instrumentation Group of the Industrial Safety and Applied Health Physics Division. Its primary purpose is to maintain radiation calibration standards for calibration of ORNL health physics instruments and personnel dosimeters. This report includes a discussion of the radioactive sources and ancillary equipment in use and a step-by-step procedure for calibration of those survey instruments and personnel dosimeters in routine use at ORNL.

  20. Leg CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - leg; Computed axial tomography scan - leg; Computed tomography scan - leg; CT scan - leg ... scanners can perform the exam without stopping.) A computer creates separate images of the body area, called ...

  1. Arm CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - arm; Computed axial tomography scan - arm; Computed tomography scan - arm; CT scan - arm ... scanners can perform the exam without stopping.) A computer creates separate images of the arm area, called ...

  2. Monitoring Persistence in WFC3/IR after scanned grism observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbi, Elena

    2013-10-01

    This is a calibration program designed to put full frame IR darks exposures immediately following ALL visits with WFC3/IR spatially scanned spectra. This will allow us to measure the persistence and its early decay characteristics.

  3. SAR calibration technology review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, J. L.; Larson, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) calibration technology including a general description of the primary calibration techniques and some of the factors which affect the performance of calibrated SAR systems are reviewed. The use of reference reflectors for measurement of the total system transfer function along with an on-board calibration signal generator for monitoring the temporal variations of the receiver to processor output is a practical approach for SAR calibration. However, preliminary error analysis and previous experimental measurements indicate that reflectivity measurement accuracies of better than 3 dB will be difficult to achieve. This is not adequate for many applications and, therefore, improved end-to-end SAR calibration techniques are required.

  4. Inversion Recovery with Embedded Self-Calibration (IRES)

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Ek T.; Riederer, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    With self-calibrated parallel acquisition, the calibration data used to characterize coil response are acquired within the actual, parallel scan. Although this eliminates the need for a separate calibration scan, it reduces the net acceleration factor of the parallel scan. Furthermore, this reduction gets worse at higher accelerations. A method is described for 3D inversion recovery gradient-echo imaging in which calibration is incorporated into the sequence but with no loss of net acceleration. This is done by acquiring the calibration data using very small (≤4°) tip angle acquisitions during the delay interval after acquisition of the accelerated imaging data. The technique is studied at 3T with simulation, phantom and in vivo experiments using both image space-based and k-space-based parallel reconstruction methods. At nominal acceleration factors of three and four, the newly described Inversion Recovery with Embedded Self-calibration (IRES) method can retain effective acceleration with comparable SNR and contrast to standard self-calibration. At a net 2D acceleration factor of four, IRES can achieve higher SNR than standard self-calibration having a nominal acceleration factor of six but the same acquisition time. PMID:19365864

  5. A microprocessor controlled pressure scanning system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. C.

    1976-01-01

    A microprocessor-based controller and data logger for pressure scanning systems is described. The microcomputer positions and manages data from as many as four 48-port electro-mechanical pressure scanners. The maximum scanning rate is 80 pressure measurements per second (20 ports per second on each of four scanners). The system features on-line calibration, position-directed data storage, and once-per-scan display in engineering units of data from a selected port. The system is designed to be interfaced to a facility computer through a shared memory. System hardware and software are described. Factors affecting measurement error in this type of system are also discussed.

  6. MODIS On-orbit Calibration: Key Issues and Approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiong, Xian-Xiong; Sun, J.; Chiang, K.; Che, N.; Barnes, W.

    2004-01-01

    MODIS, one of the key instruments for the NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS), is currently operating on both the Terra and Aqua spacecraft making continuous observations in 36 spectral bands from 0.4 to 14.4 micrometers. A complete suite of on-board calibrators (OBC) have been designed for the instruments' on-orbit calibration and characterization, including a solar diffuser (SD) and solar diffuser stability monitor (SDSM) system for the radiometric calibration of the 20 reflective solar bands (RSB), a blackbody (BB) for the radiometric calibration of the 16 thermal emissive bands (TEZB), and a spectro-radiometric calibration assembly (SRCA) for the sensors' spatial and spectral characterization. The task of continuously performing high quality on-orbit calibration and characterization of all 36 spectral bands with a total of 490 detectors located on four focal plane assemblies is extremely challenging. The use of a large two-sided paddle wheel scan mirror with a +/- 55 deg scan angle range and a retractable pinhole attenuation screen in front of the SD panel for calibrating the high gain bands have resulted in additional unanticipated complexity. In this paper, we describe some of the key issues in the Terra and Aqua MODIS on-orbit calibration and characterization, and discuss the methods developed to solve these problems or to reduce their impact on the Level 1B calibration algorithms. Instrument performance and current issues are also presented.

  7. Transfer Function Calibration Using AN a2 Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupie, Olivia

    1996-07-01

    This proposal acquires FGS TRANS mode scans on asingle star (HD89309) for use in the reference star transfer scanlibrary. These reference scans are crucial calibrations used in theanalysis of the transfer scans of multiple systems.The binary has been studied by Otto Franz and is a puresingle star. This star has been selected to replace areference star which has subsequently shown indications ofduplicity.

  8. A spectrum scanning Stokes polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baur, T. G.; House, L. L.; Hull, H. K.

    1980-02-01

    A photoelectric polarimeter for measuring line profiles in all four Stokes parameters has been built and operates on the SPO 40 cm coronagraph in a joint project with Sacramento Peak Observatory. A description of the optical and electronic systems and the calibration scheme is presented. Performance parameters determined from observations are also given. The polarimeter package consisting of a pair of KDP's, a quarter wave plate, and a polarizing beam splitter is located at the prime focus of the coronagraph. Modulation of the KDP's encodes polarization information into intensity signals that are electronically detected. The scanning of the spectrum, accomplished by rotating the grating, permits Stokes line profiles to be recorded on magnetic tape for processing. The instrument can be used to scan any line from 3900 to 7000 A with a spectral resolution of 0.01 A. Polarizations as small as 0.001% are detectable. The polarimeter and observing system are computer controlled.

  9. Photogrammetric camera calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tayman, W.P.; Ziemann, H.

    1984-01-01

    Section 2 (Calibration) of the document "Recommended Procedures for Calibrating Photogrammetric Cameras and Related Optical Tests" from the International Archives of Photogrammetry, Vol. XIII, Part 4, is reviewed in the light of recent practical work, and suggestions for changes are made. These suggestions are intended as a basis for a further discussion. ?? 1984.

  10. OLI Radiometric Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markham, Brian; Morfitt, Ron; Kvaran, Geir; Biggar, Stuart; Leisso, Nathan; Czapla-Myers, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    Goals: (1) Present an overview of the pre-launch radiance, reflectance & uniformity calibration of the Operational Land Imager (OLI) (1a) Transfer to orbit/heliostat (1b) Linearity (2) Discuss on-orbit plans for radiance, reflectance and uniformity calibration of the OLI

  11. Calibration facility safety plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fastie, W. G.

    1971-01-01

    A set of requirements is presented to insure the highest practical standard of safety for the Apollo 17 Calibration Facility in terms of identifying all critical or catastrophic type hazard areas. Plans for either counteracting or eliminating these areas are presented. All functional operations in calibrating the ultraviolet spectrometer and the testing of its components are described.

  12. Sandia WIPP calibration traceability

    SciTech Connect

    Schuhen, M.D.; Dean, T.A.

    1996-05-01

    This report summarizes the work performed to establish calibration traceability for the instrumentation used by Sandia National Laboratories at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) during testing from 1980-1985. Identifying the calibration traceability is an important part of establishing a pedigree for the data and is part of the qualification of existing data. In general, the requirement states that the calibration of Measuring and Test equipment must have a valid relationship to nationally recognized standards or the basis for the calibration must be documented. Sandia recognized that just establishing calibration traceability would not necessarily mean that all QA requirements were met during the certification of test instrumentation. To address this concern, the assessment was expanded to include various activities.

  13. Effects of switch leakages upon Nimbus-7 SMMR calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Daesoo; Kim, Seung T.

    1988-01-01

    A calibration model for the Nimbus 7 Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) is studied. This model not only removes major drawbacks of the current calibration model but also helps in the understanding of the performance degradation of the aging instrument. The current Nimbus 7 SMMR calibration algorithm was derived without considering the interference effect between the two orthogonally polarized signals merging at a ferrite polarization selector switch. The resulting calibrated brightness temperatures, considered as a function of scan angle, are not symmetric around scan angle = 0. However, neither the origin of the asymmetry nor the manner in which the two orthogonal components are mixed has been fully understood. The new calibration model proposed incorporates all the leakage factors associated with the ferrite switches along the signal paths. The resulting calibration equations clarify how the orthogonal components of surface brightness are coupled at radiometers. As a consequence, the origin of the asymmetry is clearly identified and explained. In addition, the feasibility of absolute calibration using in-orbit data is discussed.

  14. GOSAT lunar calibration in two year operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiomi, K.; Hashiguchi, T.; Kataoka, F.; Higuchi, R.

    2011-12-01

    The Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT) is a Japanese mission to monitor greenhouse gases such as CO_{2} and CH_{4} from space. The GOSAT carries the Fourier Transform Spectrometer (TANSO-FTS) and the Cloud and Aerosol Imager (TANSO-CAI). The FTS has 3 polarized SWIR narrow bands, which are 0.76, 1.6 and 2.0 microns and TIR wide band from 5.5 to 14.3 microns. The FTS observes globally with grid points of 10 km FOV by separate pointing. The CAI is carried 4 radiometers of 0.38, 0.67, 0.87, and 1.60 microns with high spatial resolution of 0.5-1.5 km and wide swath of 1000 km. The GOSAT observes the full moon for the radiometric calibration of the FTS SWIR bands and the CAI by the lunar calibration operation every year. Bottom of the satellite installed the sensors is oriented to the moon before moon rise of the satellite. The initial lunar calibration on orbit just after the launch was operated on March 11 and April 9, 2009. Every year calibrations were operated on April for continuous annual trend and July for corresponding to the Railroad Valley calibration and validation field campaign. In 3rd year operation, the specification of lunar calibration is optimized to observe in phase angle around 7 degrees to avoid the opposition surge and use the lunar model in good accuracy and brightest target. The FTS observes the moon by 0.6 IFOV. The FTS carries a high-resolution monitoring camera for checking the observation target. The moon position in the FTS IFOV is confirmed by the camera image. The CAI observes the moon by 12 pixels of Band 1-3, by 4 pixels of Band 4. The CAI scans the moon in 2 reciprocations with constant scan speed. This presentation shows the sensitivity study using the GOSAT lunar observation in two year operation.

  15. Knee CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - knee; Computed axial tomography scan - knee; Computed tomography scan - knee ... scanners can perform the exam without stopping.) A computer makes several images of the body area. These ...

  16. HIDA Scan (Cholescintigraphy)

    MedlinePlus

    HIDA scan Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff A hepatobiliary (HIDA) scan is an imaging procedure used to diagnose ... the liver, gallbladder and bile ducts. For a HIDA scan, also known as cholescintigraphy and hepatobiliary scintigraphy, ...

  17. Lumbar spine CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - lumbar spine; Computed axial tomography scan - lumbar spine; Computed tomography scan - lumbar spine; CT - lower back ... stopping.) A computer creates separate images of the spine area, called slices. These images can be stored, ...

  18. Coronary Calcium Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... Scan Coronary Calcium Scan Related Topics Angina Atherosclerosis Coronary Heart Disease Electrocardiogram Heart Attack Send a link to NHLBI ... calcium, or calcifications, are a sign of atherosclerosis, coronary heart disease, or coronary microvascular disease. A coronary calcium scan ...

  19. Simple Parametric Model for Intensity Calibration of Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brasunas, J.; Mamoutkine, A.; Gorius, N.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate intensity calibration of a linear Fourier-transform spectrometer typically requires the unknown science target and the two calibration targets to be acquired under identical conditions. We present a simple model suitable for vector calibration that enables accurate calibration via adjustments of measured spectral amplitudes and phases when these three targets are recorded at different detector or optics temperatures. Our model makes calibration more accurate both by minimizing biases due to changing instrument temperatures that are always present at some level and by decreasing estimate variance through incorporating larger averages of science and calibration interferogram scans.

  20. Compact radiometric microwave calibrator

    SciTech Connect

    Fixsen, D. J.; Wollack, E. J.; Kogut, A.; Limon, M.; Mirel, P.; Singal, J.; Fixsen, S. M.

    2006-06-15

    The calibration methods for the ARCADE II instrument are described and the accuracy estimated. The Steelcast coated aluminum cones which comprise the calibrator have a low reflection while maintaining 94% of the absorber volume within 5 mK of the base temperature (modeled). The calibrator demonstrates an absorber with the active part less than one wavelength thick and only marginally larger than the mouth of the largest horn and yet black (less than -40 dB or 0.01% reflection) over five octaves in frequency.

  1. Dynamic Pressure Calibration Standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutte, P. C.; Cate, K. H.; Young, S. D.

    1986-01-01

    Vibrating columns of fluid used to calibrate transducers. Dynamic pressure calibration standard developed for calibrating flush diaphragm-mounted pressure transducers. Pressures up to 20 kPa (3 psi) accurately generated over frequency range of 50 to 1,800 Hz. System includes two conically shaped aluminum columns one 5 cm (2 in.) high for low pressures and another 11 cm (4.3 in.) high for higher pressures, each filled with viscous fluid. Each column mounted on armature of vibration exciter, which imparts sinusoidally varying acceleration to fluid column. Signal noise low, and waveform highly dependent on quality of drive signal in vibration exciter.

  2. DIRBE External Calibrator (DEC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyatt, Clair L.; Thurgood, V. Alan; Allred, Glenn D.

    1987-01-01

    Under NASA Contract No. NAS5-28185, the Center for Space Engineering at Utah State University has produced a calibration instrument for the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE). DIRBE is one of the instruments aboard the Cosmic Background Experiment Observatory (COBE). The calibration instrument is referred to as the DEC (Dirbe External Calibrator). DEC produces a steerable, infrared beam of controlled spectral content and intensity and with selectable point source or diffuse source characteristics, that can be directed into the DIRBE to map fields and determine response characteristics. This report discusses the design of the DEC instrument, its operation and characteristics, and provides an analysis of the systems capabilities and performance.

  3. Airdata Measurement and Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haering, Edward A., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    This memorandum provides a brief introduction to airdata measurement and calibration. Readers will learn about typical test objectives, quantities to measure, and flight maneuvers and operations for calibration. The memorandum informs readers about tower-flyby, trailing cone, pacer, radar-tracking, and dynamic airdata calibration maneuvers. Readers will also begin to understand how some data analysis considerations and special airdata cases, including high-angle-of-attack flight, high-speed flight, and nonobtrusive sensors are handled. This memorandum is not intended to be all inclusive; this paper contains extensive reference and bibliography sections.

  4. Lidar Calibration Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappalardo, Gelsomina; Freudenthaler, Volker; Nicolae, Doina; Mona, Lucia; Belegante, Livio; D'Amico, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the newly established Lidar Calibration Centre, a distributed infrastructure in Europe, whose goal is to offer services for complete characterization and calibration of lidars and ceilometers. Mobile reference lidars, laboratories for testing and characterization of optics and electronics, facilities for inspection and debugging of instruments, as well as for training in good practices are open to users from the scientific community, operational services and private sector. The Lidar Calibration Centre offers support for trans-national access through the EC HORIZON2020 project ACTRIS-2.

  5. Calibration Fixture For Anemometer Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Charles R.; Nagel, Robert T.

    1993-01-01

    Fixture facilitates calibration of three-dimensional sideflow thermal anemometer probes. With fixture, probe oriented at number of angles throughout its design range. Readings calibrated as function of orientation in airflow. Calibration repeatable and verifiable.

  6. Characterizations of the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) scanning radiometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Robert B., III; Barkstrom, Bruce R.; Avis, Lee M.; Halyo, Nesim; Gibson, Michael A.

    1989-01-01

    NASA's Earth Radiation Budget Experiment employs the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite and the NOAA 9 and 10 spacecraft to obtain absolute measurements of incoming solar radiation, shortwave earth-reflected solar radiation, and longwave earth-emitted radiation, using both scanning and nonscanning radiometers. Each of the three remote-sensing spacecraft carry narrow FOV scanning radiometers whose detection sensors are thermistor bolometers. Attention is presently given to the calibration models and methods employed in characterizing the scanning radiometers' output signals; the design features of the scanners and flight calibration systems are presented.

  7. The GPM Common Calibrated Brightness Temperature Product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stout, John; Berg, Wesley; Huffman, George; Kummerow, Chris; Stocker, Erich

    2005-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) project will provide a core satellite carrying the GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) and will use microwave observations from a constellation of other satellites. Each partner with a satellite in the constellation will have a calibration that meets their own requirements and will decide on the format to archive their brightness temperature (Tb) record in GPM. However, GPM multi-sensor precipitation algorithms need to input intercalibrated Tb's in order to avoid differences among sensors introducing artifacts into the longer term climate record of precipitation. The GPM Common Calibrated Brightness Temperature Product is intended to address this problem by providing intercalibrated Tb data, called "Tc" data, where the "c" stands for common. The precipitation algorithms require a Tc file format that is both generic and flexible enough to accommodate the different passive microwave instruments. The format will provide detailed information on the processing history in order to allow future researchers to have a record of what was done. The format will be simple, including the main items of scan time, latitude, longitude, and Tc. It will also provide spacecraft orientation, spacecraft location, orbit, and instrument scan type (cross-track or conical). Another simplification is to store data in real numbers, avoiding the ambiguity of scaled data. Finally, units and descriptions will be provided in the product. The format is built on the concept of a swath, which is a series of scans that have common geolocation and common scan geometry. Scan geometry includes pixels per scan, sensor orientation, scan type, and incidence angles. The Tc algorithm and data format are being tested using the pre-GPM Precipitation Processing System (PPS) software to generate formats and 1/0 routines. In the test, data from SSM/I, TMI, AMSR-E, and WindSat are being processed and written as Tc products.

  8. Roundness calibration standard

    DOEpatents

    Burrus, Brice M.

    1984-01-01

    A roundness calibration standard is provided with a first arc constituting the major portion of a circle and a second arc lying between the remainder of the circle and the chord extending between the ends of said first arc.

  9. Traceable Pyrgeometer Calibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Dooraghi, Mike; Kutchenreiter, Mark; Reda, Ibrahim; Habte, Aron; Sengupta, Manajit; Andreas, Afshin; Newman, Martina; Webb, Craig

    2016-05-02

    This presentation provides a high-level overview of the progress on the Broadband Outdoor Radiometer Calibrations for all shortwave and longwave radiometers that are deployed by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program.

  10. Absolute Radiometric Calibration of EUNIS-06

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. J.; Rabin, D. M.; Kent, B. J.; Paustian, W.

    2007-01-01

    The Extreme-Ultraviolet Normal-Incidence Spectrometer (EUNIS) is a soundingrocket payload that obtains imaged high-resolution spectra of individual solar features, providing information about the Sun's corona and upper transition region. Shortly after its successful initial flight last year, a complete end-to-end calibration was carried out to determine the instrument's absolute radiometric response over its Longwave bandpass of 300 - 370A. The measurements were done at the Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in England, using the same vacuum facility and EUV radiation source used in the pre-flight calibrations of both SOHO/CDS and Hinode/EIS, as well as in three post-flight calibrations of our SERTS sounding rocket payload, the precursor to EUNIS. The unique radiation source provided by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) had been calibrated to an absolute accuracy of 7% (l-sigma) at 12 wavelengths covering our bandpass directly against the Berlin electron storage ring BESSY, which is itself a primary radiometric source standard. Scans of the EUNIS aperture were made to determine the instrument's absolute spectral sensitivity to +- 25%, considering all sources of error, and demonstrate that EUNIS-06 was the most sensitive solar E W spectrometer yet flown. The results will be matched against prior calibrations which relied on combining measurements of individual optical components, and on comparisons with theoretically predicted 'insensitive' line ratios. Coordinated observations were made during the EUNIS-06 flight by SOHO/CDS and EIT that will allow re-calibrations of those instruments as well. In addition, future EUNIS flights will provide similar calibration updates for TRACE, Hinode/EIS, and STEREO/SECCHI/EUVI.

  11. Calibration Tests of Industrial and Scientific CCD Cameras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shortis, M. R.; Burner, A. W.; Snow, W. L.; Goad, W. K.

    1991-01-01

    Small format, medium resolution CCD cameras are at present widely used for industrial metrology applications. Large format, high resolution CCD cameras are primarily in use for scientific applications, but in due course should increase both the range of applications and the object space accuracy achievable by close range measurement. Slow scan, cooled scientific CCD cameras provide the additional benefit of additional quantisation levels which enables improved radiometric resolution. The calibration of all types of CCD cameras is necessary in order to characterize the geometry of the sensors and lenses. A number of different types of CCD cameras have been calibrated a the NASA Langley Research Center using self calibration and a small test object. The results of these calibration tests will be described, with particular emphasis on the differences between standard CCD video cameras and scientific slow scan CCD cameras.

  12. Phased Array Radiometer Calibration Using a Radiated Noise Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, Karthik; Limaye, Ashutoch S.; Laymon, Charles A.; Meyer, Paul J.

    2010-01-01

    Electronic beam steering capability of phased array antenna systems offer significant advantages when used in real aperture imaging radiometers. The sensitivity of such systems is limited by the ability to accurately calibrate variations in the antenna circuit characteristics. Passive antenna systems, which require mechanical rotation to scan the beam, have stable characteristics and the noise figure of the antenna can be characterized with knowledge of its physical temperature [1],[2]. Phased array antenna systems provide the ability to electronically steer the beam in any desired direction. Such antennas make use of active components (amplifiers, phase shifters) to provide electronic scanning capability while maintaining a low antenna noise figure. The gain fluctuations in the active components can be significant, resulting in substantial calibration difficulties [3]. In this paper, we introduce two novel calibration techniques that provide an end-to-end calibration of a real-aperture, phased array radiometer system. Empirical data will be shown to illustrate the performance of both methods.

  13. Drift-insensitive distributed calibration of probe microscope scanner in nanometer range: Virtual mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapshin, Rostislav V.

    2016-08-01

    A method of distributed calibration of a probe microscope scanner is suggested. The main idea consists in a search for a net of local calibration coefficients (LCCs) in the process of automatic measurement of a standard surface, whereby each point of the movement space of the scanner can be characterized by a unique set of scale factors. Feature-oriented scanning (FOS) methodology is used as a basis for implementation of the distributed calibration permitting to exclude in situ the negative influence of thermal drift, creep and hysteresis on the obtained results. Possessing the calibration database enables correcting in one procedure all the spatial systematic distortions caused by nonlinearity, nonorthogonality and spurious crosstalk couplings of the microscope scanner piezomanipulators. To provide high precision of spatial measurements in nanometer range, the calibration is carried out using natural standards - constants of crystal lattice. One of the useful modes of the developed calibration method is a virtual mode. In the virtual mode, instead of measurement of a real surface of the standard, the calibration program makes a surface image "measurement" of the standard, which was obtained earlier using conventional raster scanning. The application of the virtual mode permits simulation of the calibration process and detail analysis of raster distortions occurring in both conventional and counter surface scanning. Moreover, the mode allows to estimate the thermal drift and the creep velocities acting while surface scanning. Virtual calibration makes possible automatic characterization of a surface by the method of scanning probe microscopy (SPM).

  14. Absolute Radiometric Calibration of ALS Intensity Data: Effects on Accuracy and Target Classification

    PubMed Central

    Kaasalainen, Sanna; Pyysalo, Ulla; Krooks, Anssi; Vain, Ants; Kukko, Antero; Hyyppä, Juha; Kaasalainen, Mikko

    2011-01-01

    Radiometric calibration of airborne laser scanning (ALS) intensity data aims at retrieving a value related to the target scattering properties, which is independent on the instrument or flight parameters. The aim of a calibration procedure is also to be able to compare results from different flights and instruments, but practical applications are sparsely available, and the performance of calibration methods for this purpose needs to be further assessed. We have studied the radiometric calibration with data from three separate flights and two different instruments using external calibration targets. We find that the intensity data from different flights and instruments can be compared to each other only after a radiometric calibration process using separate calibration targets carefully selected for each flight. The calibration is also necessary for target classification purposes, such as separating vegetation from sand using intensity data from different flights. The classification results are meaningful only for calibrated intensity data. PMID:22346660

  15. Integrated calibration sphere and calibration step fixture for improved coordinate measurement machine calibration

    DOEpatents

    Clifford, Harry J [Los Alamos, NM

    2011-03-22

    A method and apparatus for mounting a calibration sphere to a calibration fixture for Coordinate Measurement Machine (CMM) calibration and qualification is described, decreasing the time required for such qualification, thus allowing the CMM to be used more productively. A number of embodiments are disclosed that allow for new and retrofit manufacture to perform as integrated calibration sphere and calibration fixture devices. This invention renders unnecessary the removal of a calibration sphere prior to CMM measurement of calibration features on calibration fixtures, thereby greatly reducing the time spent qualifying a CMM.

  16. The 2MASS Tully-Fisher Survey: Mapping the mass in the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, T.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Masters, K.; Springob, C.; Macri, L.; Koribalski, B.; Jones, H.; Jarrett, T.

    2013-02-01

    The 2MASS Tully-Fisher Survey (2MTF) aims to measure Tully-Fisher (TF) distances for all bright, inclined spirals in the 2MASS Redshift Survey (2MRS) using high-quality HI widths and 2MASS photometry. Compared with previous peculiar-velocity surveys, the 2MTF survey provides more accurate width measurements and more uniform sky coverage, combining observations with the Green Bank, Arecibo, and Parkes telescopes. With this new redshift-independent distance database, we will significantly improve our understanding of the mass distribution in the local Universe.

  17. New in-situ, non-intrusive calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zunino, Heather; Adrian, Ronald; Ding, Liuyang; Prestridge, Kathy

    2014-11-01

    Tomographic particle image velocimetry (PIV) experiments require precise and accurate camera calibration. Standard techniques make assumptions about hard-to-measure camera parameters (i.e. optical axis angle, distortions, etc.)-reducing the calibration accuracy. Additionally, vibrations and slight movements after calibration may cause significant errors-particularly for tomographic PIV. These problems are exacerbated when a calibration target cannot be placed within the test section. A new PIV camera calibration method has been developed to permit precise calibration without placing a calibration target inside the test section or scanning the target over a volume. The method is capable of correcting for dynamic calibration changes occurring between PIV laser pulses. A transparent calibration plate with fine marks on both sides is positioned on the test section window. Dual-plane mapping makes it possible to determine a mapping function containing both position and angular direction of central rays from particles. From this information, central rays can be traced into the test section with high accuracy. Image distortion by the lens and refraction at various air-glass-liquid interfaces are accounted for, and no information about the position or angle of the camera(s) is required.

  18. GTC Photometric Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Cesare, M. A.; Hammersley, P. L.; Rodriguez Espinosa, J. M.

    2006-06-01

    We are currently developing the calibration programme for GTC using techniques similar to the ones use for the space telescope calibration (Hammersley et al. 1998, A&AS, 128, 207; Cohen et al. 1999, AJ, 117, 1864). We are planning to produce a catalogue with calibration stars which are suitable for a 10-m telescope. These sources will be not variable, non binary and do not have infrared excesses if they are to be used in the infrared. The GTC science instruments require photometric calibration between 0.35 and 2.5 microns. The instruments are: OSIRIS (Optical System for Imaging low Resolution Integrated Spectroscopy), ELMER and EMIR (Espectrógrafo Multiobjeto Infrarrojo) and the Acquisition and Guiding boxes (Di Césare, Hammersley, & Rodriguez Espinosa 2005, RevMexAA Ser. Conf., 24, 231). The catalogue will consist of 30 star fields distributed in all of North Hemisphere. We will use fields containing sources over the range 12 to 22 magnitude, and spanning a wide range of spectral types (A to M) for the visible and near infrared. In the poster we will show the method used for selecting these fields and we will present the analysis of the data on the first calibration fields observed.

  19. Polarimetric Palsar Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touzi, R.; Shimada, M.

    2008-11-01

    Polarimetric PALSAR system parameters are assessed using data sets collected over various calibration sites. The data collected over the Amazonian forest permits validating the zero Faraday rotation hypotheses near the equator. The analysis of the Amazonian forest data and the response of the corner reflectors deployed during the PALSAR acquisitions lead to the conclusion that the antenna is highly isolated (better than -35 dB). Theses results are confirmed using data collected over the Sweden and Ottawa calibration sites. The 5-m height trihedrals deployed in the Sweden calibration site by the Chalmers University of technology permits accurate measurement of antenna parameters, and detection of 2-3 degree Faraday rotation during day acquisition, whereas no Faraday rotation was noted during night acquisition. Small Faraday rotation angles (2-3 degree) have been measured using acquisitions over the DLR Oberpfaffenhofen and the Ottawa calibration sites. The presence of small but still significant Faraday rotation (2-3 degree) induces a CR return at the cross-polarization HV and VH that should not be interpreted as the actual antenna cross-talk. PALSAR antenna is highly isolated (better than -35 dB), and diagonal antenna distortion matrices (with zero cross-talk terms) can be used for accurate calibration of PALSAR polarimetric data.

  20. Psychophysical contrast calibration

    PubMed Central

    To, Long; Woods, Russell L; Goldstein, Robert B; Peli, Eli

    2013-01-01

    Electronic displays and computer systems offer numerous advantages for clinical vision testing. Laboratory and clinical measurements of various functions and in particular of (letter) contrast sensitivity require accurately calibrated display contrast. In the laboratory this is achieved using expensive light meters. We developed and evaluated a novel method that uses only psychophysical responses of a person with normal vision to calibrate the luminance contrast of displays for experimental and clinical applications. Our method combines psychophysical techniques (1) for detection (and thus elimination or reduction) of display saturating nonlinearities; (2) for luminance (gamma function) estimation and linearization without use of a photometer; and (3) to measure without a photometer the luminance ratios of the display’s three color channels that are used in a bit-stealing procedure to expand the luminance resolution of the display. Using a photometer we verified that the calibration achieved with this procedure is accurate for both LCD and CRT displays enabling testing of letter contrast sensitivity to 0.5%. Our visual calibration procedure enables clinical, internet and home implementation and calibration verification of electronic contrast testing. PMID:23643843

  1. Calibration Under Uncertainty.

    SciTech Connect

    Swiler, Laura Painton; Trucano, Timothy Guy

    2005-03-01

    This report is a white paper summarizing the literature and different approaches to the problem of calibrating computer model parameters in the face of model uncertainty. Model calibration is often formulated as finding the parameters that minimize the squared difference between the model-computed data (the predicted data) and the actual experimental data. This approach does not allow for explicit treatment of uncertainty or error in the model itself: the model is considered the %22true%22 deterministic representation of reality. While this approach does have utility, it is far from an accurate mathematical treatment of the true model calibration problem in which both the computed data and experimental data have error bars. This year, we examined methods to perform calibration accounting for the error in both the computer model and the data, as well as improving our understanding of its meaning for model predictability. We call this approach Calibration under Uncertainty (CUU). This talk presents our current thinking on CUU. We outline some current approaches in the literature, and discuss the Bayesian approach to CUU in detail.

  2. Galaxy Detection in 2MASS: Global Expectations and Results from Several Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chester, T.; Jarrett, T.

    1995-01-01

    An alogorithm has been developed and used to find galaxies in the 2MASS data. It uses the central surface brightness and measured size to discriminate galaxies from the much larger stellar population.

  3. Effects of switch leakages upon Nimbus-7 SMMR calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Daesoo; Kim, Seung T.

    1988-01-01

    A calibration model for the Nimbus-7 Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) is studied. This model not only removes major drawbacks of the current calibration model but also helps us understand the performance degradation of the aging instrument. The current Nimbus-7 SMMR calibration algorithm was derived without considering the interference effect between the two orthogonally polarized signals merging at a ferrite polarization selector switch. The resulting calibrated brightness temperatures, considered as a function of scan angle phi, are not symmetric around phi=0. However, neither the origin of the asymmetry nor the manner in which the two orthogonal components are mixed is fully understood. The proposed calibration model incorporates all the leakage factors associated with the ferrite switches along the signal paths. The resulting calibration equations clarify how the orthogonal components of surface brightness are coupled at radiometers. As a consequence, the origin of the asymmetry is clearly identified and explained. In addition, the feasibility of absolute calibration using in-orbit data is discussed.

  4. Cross-calibration of liquid and solid QCT calibration standards: corrections to the UCSF normative data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faulkner, K. G.; Gluer, C. C.; Grampp, S.; Genant, H. K.

    1993-01-01

    Quantitative computed tomography (QCT) has been shown to be a precise and sensitive method for evaluating spinal bone mineral density (BMD) and skeletal response to aging and therapy. Precise and accurate determination of BMD using QCT requires a calibration standard to compensate for and reduce the effects of beam-hardening artifacts and scanner drift. The first standards were based on dipotassium hydrogen phosphate (K2HPO4) solutions. Recently, several manufacturers have developed stable solid calibration standards based on calcium hydroxyapatite (CHA) in water-equivalent plastic. Due to differences in attenuating properties of the liquid and solid standards, the calibrated BMD values obtained with each system do not agree. In order to compare and interpret the results obtained on both systems, cross-calibration measurements were performed in phantoms and patients using the University of California San Francisco (UCSF) liquid standard and the Image Analysis (IA) solid standard on the UCSF GE 9800 CT scanner. From the phantom measurements, a highly linear relationship was found between the liquid- and solid-calibrated BMD values. No influence on the cross-calibration due to simulated variations in body size or vertebral fat content was seen, though a significant difference in the cross-calibration was observed between scans acquired at 80 and 140 kVp. From the patient measurements, a linear relationship between the liquid (UCSF) and solid (IA) calibrated values was derived for GE 9800 CT scanners at 80 kVp (IA = [1.15 x UCSF] - 7.32).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  5. Calibrating historical IR sensors using GEO and AVHRR infrared tropical mean calibration models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarino, Benjamin; Doelling, David R.; Minnis, Patrick; Gopalan, Arun; Haney, Conor; Bhatt, Rajendra

    2014-09-01

    Long-term, remote-sensing-based climate data records (CDRs) are highly dependent on having consistent, wellcalibrated satellite instrument measurements of the Earth's radiant energy. Therefore, by making historical satellite calibrations consistent with those of today's imagers, the Earth-observing community can benefit from a CDR that spans a minimum of 30 years. Most operational meteorological satellites rely on an onboard blackbody and space looks to provide on-orbit IR calibration, but neither target is traceable to absolute standards. The IR channels can also be affected by ice on the detector window, angle dependency of the scan mirror emissivity, stray-light, and detector-to-detector striping. Being able to quantify and correct such degradations would mean IR data from any satellite imager could contribute to a CDR. Recent efforts have focused on utilizing well-calibrated modern hyper-spectral sensors to intercalibrate concurrent operational IR imagers to a single reference. In order to consistently calibrate both historical and current IR imagers to the same reference, however, another strategy is needed. Large, well-characterized tropical-domain Earth targets have the potential of providing an Earth-view reference accuracy of within 0.5 K. To that effort, NASA Langley is developing an IR tropical mean calibration model in order to calibrate historical Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) instruments. Using Meteosat-9 (Met-9) as a reference, empirical models are built based on spatially/temporally binned Met-9 and AVHRR tropical IR brightness temperatures. By demonstrating the stability of the Met-9 tropical models, NOAA-18 AVHRR can be calibrated to Met-9 by matching the AVHRR monthly histogram averages with the Met-9 model. This method is validated with ray-matched AVHRR and Met-9 bias difference time series. Establishing the validity of this empirical model will allow for the calibration of historical AVHRR sensors to within 0.5 K, and

  6. Calibrating Historical IR Sensors Using GEO, and AVHRR Infrared Tropical Mean Calibration Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarino, Benjamin; Doelling, David R.; Minnis, Patrick; Gopalan, Arun; Haney, Conor; Bhatt, Rajendra

    2014-01-01

    Long-term, remote-sensing-based climate data records (CDRs) are highly dependent on having consistent, wellcalibrated satellite instrument measurements of the Earth's radiant energy. Therefore, by making historical satellite calibrations consistent with those of today's imagers, the Earth-observing community can benefit from a CDR that spans a minimum of 30 years. Most operational meteorological satellites rely on an onboard blackbody and space looks to provide on-orbit IR calibration, but neither target is traceable to absolute standards. The IR channels can also be affected by ice on the detector window, angle dependency of the scan mirror emissivity, stray-light, and detector-to-detector striping. Being able to quantify and correct such degradations would mean IR data from any satellite imager could contribute to a CDR. Recent efforts have focused on utilizing well-calibrated modern hyper-spectral sensors to intercalibrate concurrent operational IR imagers to a single reference. In order to consistently calibrate both historical and current IR imagers to the same reference, however, another strategy is needed. Large, well-characterized tropical-domain Earth targets have the potential of providing an Earth-view reference accuracy of within 0.5 K. To that effort, NASA Langley is developing an IR tropical mean calibration model in order to calibrate historical Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) instruments. Using Meteosat-9 (Met-9) as a reference, empirical models are built based on spatially/temporally binned Met-9 and AVHRR tropical IR brightness temperatures. By demonstrating the stability of the Met-9 tropical models, NOAA-18 AVHRR can be calibrated to Met-9 by matching the AVHRR monthly histogram averages with the Met-9 model. This method is validated with ray-matched AVHRR and Met-9 biasdifference time series. Establishing the validity of this empirical model will allow for the calibration of historical AVHRR sensors to within 0.5 K, and thereby

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Extended red(dened) regions in 2MASS (Frieswijk+, 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frieswijk, W. W. F.; Shipman, R. F.

    2010-04-01

    Basic parameters of 2909 extended red regions in the outer Galactic plane (1320 at 60" and 1589 at 90" resolution). The sources have been extracted from the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS, Cat. ). For each source Galactic coordinates, total number of resolution cells, linear extend in longitude and latitude and number of 2MASS point sources are given. The calculated reliability of the sources is >99.9%. (1 data file).

  8. BATSE spectroscopy detector calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, D.; Ford, L.; Matteson, J.; Lestrade, J. P.; Teegarden, B.; Schaefer, B.; Cline, T.; Briggs, M.; Paciesas, W.; Pendleton, G.

    1992-01-01

    We describe the channel-to-energy calibration of the Spectroscopy Detectors of the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO). These detectors consist of NaI(TI) crystals viewed by photomultiplier tubes whose output in turn is measured by a pulse height analyzer. The calibration of these detectors has been complicated by frequent gain changes and by nonlinearities specific to the BATSE detectors. Nonlinearities in the light output from the NaI crystal and in the pulse height analyzer are shifted relative to each other by changes in the gain of the photomultiplier tube. We present the analytical model which is the basis of our calibration methodology, and outline how the empirical coefficients in this approach were determined. We also describe the complications peculiar to the Spectroscopy Detectors, and how our understanding of the detectors' operation led us to a solution to these problems.

  9. Calibration Systems Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, Tanya L.; Broocks, Bryan T.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2006-02-01

    The Calibration Systems project at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is aimed towards developing and demonstrating compact Quantum Cascade (QC) laser-based calibration systems for infrared imaging systems. These on-board systems will improve the calibration technology for passive sensors, which enable stand-off detection for the proliferation or use of weapons of mass destruction, by replacing on-board blackbodies with QC laser-based systems. This alternative technology can minimize the impact on instrument size and weight while improving the quality of instruments for a variety of missions. The potential of replacing flight blackbodies is made feasible by the high output, stability, and repeatability of the QC laser spectral radiance.

  10. TA489A calibrator: SANDUS

    SciTech Connect

    LeBlanc, R.

    1987-08-01

    The TA489A Calibrator, designed to operate in the MA164 Digital Data Acquisition System, is used to calibrate up to 128 analog-to-digital recording channels. The TA489A calibrates using a dc Voltage Source or any of several special calibration modes. Calibration schemes are stored in the TA489A memory and are initiated locally or remotely through a Command Link.

  11. Iterative Magnetometer Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sedlak, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an iterative method for three-axis magnetometer (TAM) calibration that makes use of three existing utilities recently incorporated into the attitude ground support system used at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The method combines attitude-independent and attitude-dependent calibration algorithms with a new spinning spacecraft Kalman filter to solve for biases, scale factors, nonorthogonal corrections to the alignment, and the orthogonal sensor alignment. The method is particularly well-suited to spin-stabilized spacecraft, but may also be useful for three-axis stabilized missions given sufficient data to provide observability.

  12. RBC nuclear scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003835.htm RBC nuclear scan To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. An RBC nuclear scan uses small amounts of radioactive material to ...

  13. Heart PET scan

    MedlinePlus

    Heart nuclear medicine scan; Heart positron emission tomography; Myocardial PET scan ... Udelson JE, Dilsizian V, Bonow RO. Nuclear cardiology. In: Mann DL, ... A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  14. Abdominal CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    Computed tomography scan - abdomen; CT scan - abdomen; CT abdomen and pelvis ... 2016:chap 133. Radiologyinfo.org. Computed tomography (CT) - abdomen and pelvis. Updated June 16, 2016. www.radiologyinfo. ...

  15. Bone density scan (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... bone the higher the risk of fractures. A bone scan, along with a patient's medical history, is a ... and whether any preventative treatment is needed. A bone density scan has the advantage of being painless and exposing ...

  16. Cardiac CT Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... CT Scan Related Topics Aneurysm Coronary Calcium Scan Coronary Heart Disease Heart Attack Pulmonary Embolism Send a link to ... imaging test can help doctors detect or evaluate coronary heart disease, calcium buildup in the coronary arteries, problems with ...

  17. Automatic online spectral calibration of Fourier-domain OCT for robotic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xuan; Balicki, Marcin; Taylor, Russell H.; Kang, Jin U.

    2011-03-01

    We present a new automatic spectral calibration (ASC) method for spectral Domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Our ASC method calibrates the spectral mapping of the spectrometer in SD-OCT, and does not require external calibrating light source or a commercial spectral analyzer. The ASC method simultaneously calibrates the physical pixel spacing of the A-scan in static and dynamic environments. Experimental results show that the proposed ASC method can provide satisfactory calibration for SD-OCT to achieve high axial resolution and high ranging accuracy, without increasing hardware complexity.

  18. Multipurpose binocular scanning apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, F. R.; Parker, G. L.

    1969-01-01

    Optical gimballing apparatus directs narrow fields of view throughout solid angle approaching 4 pi steradians. Image rotation produced by scanning can be eliminated or altered by gear trains directly linked to the scanning drive assembly. It provides the basis for a binocular scanning capability.

  19. Calibrating Communication Competencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surges Tatum, Donna

    2016-11-01

    The Many-faceted Rasch measurement model is used in the creation of a diagnostic instrument by which communication competencies can be calibrated, the severity of observers/raters can be determined, the ability of speakers measured, and comparisons made between various groups.

  20. TWSTFT Link Calibration Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    Serrano, G. Brunetti (2013) Relative Calibration of the Time Transfer Link between CERN and LNGS for Precise Neutrino Time of Flight Measurements. Proc...Esteban, M. Pallavicini, Va. Pettiti, C. Plantard, A. Razeto (2012) Measurement of CNGS Muon Neutrinos Speed with Borexino: INRIM and ROA Contribution

  1. Computerized tomography calibrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, Herbert P. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A set of interchangeable pieces comprising a computerized tomography calibrator, and a method of use thereof, permits focusing of a computerized tomographic (CT) system. The interchangeable pieces include a plurality of nestable, generally planar mother rings, adapted for the receipt of planar inserts of predetermined sizes, and of predetermined material densities. The inserts further define openings therein for receipt of plural sub-inserts. All pieces are of known sizes and densities, permitting the assembling of different configurations of materials of known sizes and combinations of densities, for calibration (i.e., focusing) of a computerized tomographic system through variation of operating variables thereof. Rather than serving as a phanton, which is intended to be representative of a particular workpiece to be tested, the set of interchangeable pieces permits simple and easy standardized calibration of a CT system. The calibrator and its related method of use further includes use of air or of particular fluids for filling various openings, as part of a selected configuration of the set of pieces.

  2. Optical detector calibrator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strobel, James P. (Inventor); Moerk, John S. (Inventor); Youngquist, Robert C. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An optical detector calibrator system simulates a source of optical radiation to which a detector to be calibrated is responsive. A light source selected to emit radiation in a range of wavelengths corresponding to the spectral signature of the source is disposed within a housing containing a microprocessor for controlling the light source and other system elements. An adjustable iris and a multiple aperture filter wheel are provided for controlling the intensity of radiation emitted from the housing by the light source to adjust the simulated distance between the light source and the detector to be calibrated. The geared iris has an aperture whose size is adjustable by means of a first stepper motor controlled by the microprocessor. The multiple aperture filter wheel contains neutral density filters of different attenuation levels which are selectively positioned in the path of the emitted radiation by a second stepper motor that is also controlled by the microprocessor. An operator can select a number of detector tests including range, maximum and minimum sensitivity, and basic functionality. During the range test, the geared iris and filter wheel are repeatedly adjusted by the microprocessor as necessary to simulate an incrementally increasing simulated source distance. A light source calibration subsystem is incorporated in the system which insures that the intensity of the light source is maintained at a constant level over time.

  3. Improved Regression Calibration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skrondal, Anders; Kuha, Jouni

    2012-01-01

    The likelihood for generalized linear models with covariate measurement error cannot in general be expressed in closed form, which makes maximum likelihood estimation taxing. A popular alternative is regression calibration which is computationally efficient at the cost of inconsistent estimation. We propose an improved regression calibration…

  4. Commodity-Free Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Commodity-free calibration is a reaction rate calibration technique that does not require the addition of any commodities. This technique is a specific form of the reaction rate technique, where all of the necessary reactants, other than the sample being analyzed, are either inherent in the analyzing system or specifically added or provided to the system for a reason other than calibration. After introduction, the component of interest is exposed to other reactants or flow paths already present in the system. The instrument detector records one of the following to determine the rate of reaction: the increase in the response of the reaction product, a decrease in the signal of the analyte response, or a decrease in the signal from the inherent reactant. With this data, the initial concentration of the analyte is calculated. This type of system can analyze and calibrate simultaneously, reduce the risk of false positives and exposure to toxic vapors, and improve accuracy. Moreover, having an excess of the reactant already present in the system eliminates the need to add commodities, which further reduces cost, logistic problems, and potential contamination. Also, the calculations involved can be simplified by comparison to those of the reaction rate technique. We conducted tests with hypergols as an initial investigation into the feasiblility of the technique.

  5. NVLAP calibration laboratory program

    SciTech Connect

    Cigler, J.L.

    1993-12-31

    This paper presents an overview of the progress up to April 1993 in the development of the Calibration Laboratories Accreditation Program within the framework of the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).

  6. Simplified Vicarious Radiometric Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanley, Thomas; Ryan, Robert; Holekamp, Kara; Pagnutti, Mary

    2010-01-01

    A measurement-based radiance estimation approach for vicarious radiometric calibration of spaceborne multispectral remote sensing systems has been developed. This simplified process eliminates the use of radiative transfer codes and reduces the number of atmospheric assumptions required to perform sensor calibrations. Like prior approaches, the simplified method involves the collection of ground truth data coincident with the overpass of the remote sensing system being calibrated, but this approach differs from the prior techniques in both the nature of the data collected and the manner in which the data are processed. In traditional vicarious radiometric calibration, ground truth data are gathered using ground-viewing spectroradiometers and one or more sun photometer( s), among other instruments, located at a ground target area. The measured data from the ground-based instruments are used in radiative transfer models to estimate the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) target radiances at the time of satellite overpass. These TOA radiances are compared with the satellite sensor readings to radiometrically calibrate the sensor. Traditional vicarious radiometric calibration methods require that an atmospheric model be defined such that the ground-based observations of solar transmission and diffuse-to-global ratios are in close agreement with the radiative transfer code estimation of these parameters. This process is labor-intensive and complex, and can be prone to errors. The errors can be compounded because of approximations in the model and inaccurate assumptions about the radiative coupling between the atmosphere and the terrain. The errors can increase the uncertainty of the TOA radiance estimates used to perform the radiometric calibration. In comparison, the simplified approach does not use atmospheric radiative transfer models and involves fewer assumptions concerning the radiative transfer properties of the atmosphere. This new technique uses two neighboring uniform

  7. Mercury CEM Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani; Susan S. Sorini

    2007-03-31

    The Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) which was published in the Federal Register on May 18, 2005, requires that calibration of mercury continuous emissions monitors (CEMs) be performed with NIST-traceable standards. Western Research Institute (WRI) is working closely with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to facilitate the development of the experimental criteria for a NIST traceability protocol for dynamic elemental mercury vapor generators. The traceability protocol will be written by EPA. Traceability will be based on the actual analysis of the output of each calibration unit at several concentration levels ranging from about 2-40 ug/m{sup 3}, and this analysis will be directly traceable to analyses by NIST using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry (ID ICP/MS) through a chain of analyses linking the calibration unit in the power plant to the NIST ID ICP/MS. Prior to this project, NIST did not provide a recommended mercury vapor pressure equation or list mercury vapor pressure in its vapor pressure database. The NIST Physical and Chemical Properties Division in Boulder, Colorado was subcontracted under this project to study the issue in detail and to recommend a mercury vapor pressure equation that the vendors of mercury vapor pressure calibration units can use to calculate the elemental mercury vapor concentration in an equilibrium chamber at a particular temperature. As part of this study, a preliminary evaluation of calibration units from five vendors was made. The work was performed by NIST in Gaithersburg, MD and Joe Rovani from WRI who traveled to NIST as a Visiting Scientist.

  8. MODIS Solar Calibration Simulation Assisted Refinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waluschka, Eugene; Xiaoxiong, Xiong; Guenther, Bruce; Barnes, William; Moyer, David; Salomonson, Vincent V.

    2004-01-01

    A detailed optical radiometric model has been created of the MODIS instruments solar calibration process. This model takes into account the orientation and distance of the spacecraft with respect to the sun, the correlated motions of the scan mirror and the sun, all of the optical elements, the detector locations on the visible and near IR focal planes, the solar diffuser and the attenuation screen with all of its hundreds of pinholes. An efficient computational scheme, takes into account all of these factors and has produced results which reproduce the observed time dependent intensity variations on the two focal planes with considerable fidelity. This agreement between predictions and observations, has given insight to the causes of some small time dependent variations and how to incorporate them into the overall calibration scheme. The radiometric model is described and modeled and actual measurements are presented and compared.

  9. Transmission electron microscope calibration methods for critical dimension standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orji, Ndubuisi G.; Dixson, Ronald G.; Garcia-Gutierrez, Domingo I.; Bunday, Benjamin D.; Bishop, Michael; Cresswell, Michael W.; Allen, Richard A.; Allgair, John A.

    2016-10-01

    One of the key challenges in critical dimension (CD) metrology is finding suitable dimensional calibration standards. The transmission electron microscope (TEM), which produces lattice-resolved images having scale traceability to the SI (International System of Units) definition of length through an atomic lattice constant, has gained wide usage in different areas of CD calibration. One such area is critical dimension atomic force microscope (CD-AFM) tip width calibration. To properly calibrate CD-AFM tip widths, errors in the calibration process must be quantified. Although the use of TEM for CD-AFM tip width calibration has been around for about a decade, there is still confusion on what should be considered in the uncertainty analysis. We characterized CD-AFM tip-width samples using high-resolution TEM and high angle annular dark field scanning TEM and two CD-AFMs that are implemented as reference measurement systems. The results are used to outline how to develop a rigorous uncertainty estimate for TEM/CD-AFM calibration, and to compare how information from the two electron microscopy modes are applied to practical CD-AFM measurements. The results also represent a separate validation of previous TEM/CD-AFM calibration. Excellent agreement was observed.

  10. Performance of automatic scanning microscope for nuclear emulsion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güler, A. Murat; Altınok, Özgür

    2015-12-01

    The impressive improvements in scanning technology and methods let nuclear emulsion to be used as a target in recent large experiments. We report the performance of an automatic scanning microscope for nuclear emulsion experiments. After successful calibration and alignment of the system, we have reached 99% tracking efficiency for the minimum ionizing tracks that penetrating through the emulsions films. The automatic scanning system is successfully used for the scanning of emulsion films in the OPERA experiment and plan to use for the next generation of nuclear emulsion experiments.

  11. Performance of automatic scanning microscope for nuclear emulsion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Güler, A. Murat; Altınok, Özgür

    2015-12-31

    The impressive improvements in scanning technology and methods let nuclear emulsion to be used as a target in recent large experiments. We report the performance of an automatic scanning microscope for nuclear emulsion experiments. After successful calibration and alignment of the system, we have reached 99% tracking efficiency for the minimum ionizing tracks that penetrating through the emulsions films. The automatic scanning system is successfully used for the scanning of emulsion films in the OPERA experiment and plan to use for the next generation of nuclear emulsion experiments.

  12. An Overview of Suomi NPP VIIRS Calibration Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, James J.; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Barnes, Robert A.; Patt, Frederick S.; Sun, Junqiang; Chiang, Kwofu

    2012-01-01

    The first Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument was successfully launched on-board the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) spacecraft on October 28, 2011. Suomi NPP VIIRS observations are made in 22 spectral bands, from the visible (VIS) to the long-wave infrared (LWIR), and are used to produce 22 Environmental Data Records (EDRs) with a broad range of scientific applications. The quality of these VIIRS EDRs strongly depends on the quality of its calibrated and geo-located Sensor Date Records (SDRs). Built with a strong heritage to the NASA's EOS MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument, the VIIRS is calibrated on-orbit using a similar set of on-board calibrators (OBC), including a solar diffuser (SD) and solar diffuser stability monitor (SDSM) system for the reflective solar bands (RSB) and a blackbody (BB) for the thermal emissive bands (TEB). On-orbit maneuvers of the SNPP spacecraft provide additional calibration and characterization data from the VIIRS instrument which cannot be obtained pre-launch and are required to produce the highest quality SDRs. These include multi-orbit yaw maneuvers for the characterization of SD and SDSM screen transmission, quasi-monthly roll maneuvers to acquire lunar observations to track sensor degradation in the visible through shortwave infrared, and a driven pitch-over maneuver to acquire multiple scans of deep space to determine TEB response versus scan angle (RVS). This paper pro-vides an overview of these three SNPP calibration maneuvers. Discussions are focused on their potential calibration and science benefits, pre-launch planning activities, and on-orbit scheduling and implementation strategies. Results from calibration maneuvers performed during the Intensive Calibration and Validation (ICV) period for the VIIRS sensor are illustrated. Also presented in this paper are lessons learned regarding the implementation of calibration spacecraft maneuvers on follow

  13. Visible/infrared radiometric calibration station

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, D.A.; Maier, W.B. II; Bender, S.C.; Holland, R.F.; Michaud, F.D.; Luettgen, A.L.; Christensen, R.W.; O`Brian, T.R.

    1994-07-01

    We have begun construction of a visible/infrared radiometric calibration station that will allow for absolute calibration of optical and IR remote sensing instruments with clear apertures less than 16 inches in diameter in a vacuum environment. The calibration station broadband sources will be calibrated at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and allow for traceable absolute radiometric calibration to within {plus_minus}3% in the visible and near IR (0.4--2.5 {mu}m), and less than {plus_minus}1% in the infrared, up to 12 {mu}m. Capabilities for placing diffraction limited images or for sensor full-field flooding will exist. The facility will also include the calibration of polarization and spectral effects, spatial resolution, field of view performance, and wavefront characterization. The configuration of the vacuum calibration station consists of an off-axis 21 inch, f/3.2, parabolic collimator with a scanning fold flat in collimated space. The sources are placed, via mechanisms to be described, at the focal plane of the off-axis parabola. Vacuum system pressure will be in the 10{sup {minus}6} Torr range. The broadband white-light source is a custom design by LANL with guidance from Labsphere Inc. The continuous operating radiance of the integrating sphere will be from 0.0--0.006 W/cm{sup 2}/Sr/{mu}m (upper level quoted for {approximately}500 nm wavelength). The blackbody source is also custom designed at LANL with guidance from NIST. The blackbody temperature will be controllable between 250--350{degrees}K. Both of the above sources have 4.1 inch apertures with estimated radiometric instability at less than 1%. The designs of each of these units will be described. The monochromator and interferometer light sources are outside the vacuum, but all optical relay and beam shaping optics are enclosed within the vacuum calibration station. These sources are described, as well as the methodology for alignment and characterization.

  14. Rapid frequency scan EPR.

    PubMed

    Tseitlin, Mark; Rinard, George A; Quine, Richard W; Eaton, Sandra S; Eaton, Gareth R

    2011-08-01

    In rapid frequency scan EPR with triangular scans, sufficient time must be allowed to insure that the magnetization in the x, y plane decays to baseline at the end of the scan, which typically is about 5T(2) after the spins are excited. To permit relaxation of signals excited toward the extremes of the scan the total scan time required may be much longer than 5T(2). However, with periodic, saw-tooth excitation, the slow-scan EPR spectrum can be recovered by Fourier deconvolution of data recorded with a total scan period of 5T(2), even if some spins are excited later in the scan. This scan time is similar to polyphase excitation methods. The peak power required for either polyphase excitation or rapid frequency scans is substantially smaller than for pulsed EPR. The use of an arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) and cross loop resonator facilitated implementation of the rapid frequency scan experiments reported here. The use of constant continuous low B(1), periodic excitation waveform, and constant external magnetic field is similar to polyphase excitation, but could be implemented without the AWG that is required for polyphase excitation.

  15. Rapid Frequency Scan EPR

    PubMed Central

    Tseitlin, Mark; Rinard, George A.; Quine, Richard W.; Eaton, Sandra S.; Eaton, Gareth R.

    2011-01-01

    In rapid frequency scan EPR with triangular scans, sufficient time must be allowed to insure that the magnetization in the x,y plane decays to baseline at the end of the scan, which typically is about 5 T2 after the spins are excited. To permit relaxation of signals excited toward the extremes of the scan the total scan time required may be much longer than 5 T2. However, with periodic, saw-tooth excitation, the slow-scan EPR spectrum can be recovered by Fourier deconvolution of data recorded with a total scan period of 5 T2, even if some spins are excited later in the scan. This scan time is similar to polyphase excitation methods. The peak power required for either polyphase excitation or rapid frequency scans is substantially smaller than for pulsed EPR. The use of an arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) and cross loop resonator facilitated implementation of the rapid frequency scan experiments reported here. The use of constant continuous low B1, periodic excitation waveform, and constant external magnetic field is similar to polyphase excitation, but could be implemented without the AWG that is required for polyphase excitation. PMID:21664848

  16. The establishment and use of the point source catalog database of the 2MASS near infrared survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Y. F.; Shan, H. G.; Cheng, D.

    2003-02-01

    The 2MASS near infrared survey project is introduced briefly. The 2MASS point sources catalog (2MASS PSC) database and the network query system are established by using the PHP Hypertext Preprocessor and MySQL database server. By using the system, one can not only query information of sources listed in the catalog, but also draw the plots related. Moreover, after the 2MASS data are diagnosed , some research fields which can be benefited from this database are suggested.

  17. Mercury Calibration System

    SciTech Connect

    John Schabron; Eric Kalberer; Joseph Rovani; Mark Sanderson; Ryan Boysen; William Schuster

    2009-03-11

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Performance Specification 12 in the Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) states that a mercury CEM must be calibrated with National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST)-traceable standards. In early 2009, a NIST traceable standard for elemental mercury CEM calibration still does not exist. Despite the vacature of CAMR by a Federal appeals court in early 2008, a NIST traceable standard is still needed for whatever regulation is implemented in the future. Thermo Fisher is a major vendor providing complete integrated mercury continuous emissions monitoring (CEM) systems to the industry. WRI is participating with EPA, EPRI, NIST, and Thermo Fisher towards the development of the criteria that will be used in the traceability protocols to be issued by EPA. An initial draft of an elemental mercury calibration traceability protocol was distributed for comment to the participating research groups and vendors on a limited basis in early May 2007. In August 2007, EPA issued an interim traceability protocol for elemental mercury calibrators. Various working drafts of the new interim traceability protocols were distributed in late 2008 and early 2009 to participants in the Mercury Standards Working Committee project. The protocols include sections on qualification and certification. The qualification section describes in general terms tests that must be conducted by the calibrator vendors to demonstrate that their calibration equipment meets the minimum requirements to be established by EPA for use in CAMR monitoring. Variables to be examined include linearity, ambient temperature, back pressure, ambient pressure, line voltage, and effects of shipping. None of the procedures were described in detail in the draft interim documents; however they describe what EPA would like to eventually develop. WRI is providing the data and results to EPA for use in developing revised experimental procedures and realistic acceptance criteria based on

  18. Line-scanning, stage scanning confocal microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carucci, John A.; Stevenson, Mary; Gareau, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    We created a line-scanning, stage scanning confocal microscope as part of a new procedure: video assisted micrographic surgery (VAMS). The need for rapid pathological assessment of the tissue on the surface of skin excisions very large since there are 3.5 million new skin cancers diagnosed annually in the United States. The new design presented here is a confocal microscope without any scanning optics. Instead, a line is focused in space and the sample, which is flattened, is physically translated such that the line scans across its face in a direction perpendicular to the line its self. The line is 6mm long and the stage is capable of scanning 50 mm, hence the field of view is quite large. The theoretical diffraction-limited resolution is 0.7um lateral and 3.7um axial. However, in this preliminary report, we present initial results that are a factor of 5-7 poorer in resolution. The results are encouraging because they demonstrate that the linear array detector measures sufficient signal from fluorescently labeled tissue and also demonstrate the large field of view achievable with VAMS.

  19. FGS1r LOS and Transfer Scan Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelan, Edmund

    2012-10-01

    This proposal uses the new "MLOS" scan capability to obtain the data needed to support the full two-dimensional calibration of FGS Transfer mode observations. The well isolated verified point source star HD209458 is used for the F583W calibration, while the well isolated bright point source star HD 132058 {Beta Lupi} is used for the F5ND calibration. In addition to the MLOS observations, each visit will include TRANS mode exposures to obtain updated S-curves for these two filters.

  20. Corrections to the MODIS Aqua Calibration Derived From MODIS Aqua Ocean Color Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meister, Gerhard; Franz, Bryan Alden

    2013-01-01

    Ocean color products such as, e.g., chlorophyll-a concentration, can be derived from the top-of-atmosphere radiances measured by imaging sensors on earth-orbiting satellites. There are currently three National Aeronautics and Space Administration sensors in orbit capable of providing ocean color products. One of these sensors is the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Aqua satellite, whose ocean color products are currently the most widely used of the three. A recent improvement to the MODIS calibration methodology has used land targets to improve the calibration accuracy. This study evaluates the new calibration methodology and describes further calibration improvements that are built upon the new methodology by including ocean measurements in the form of global temporally averaged water-leaving reflectance measurements. The calibration improvements presented here mainly modify the calibration at the scan edges, taking advantage of the good performance of the land target trending in the center of the scan.

  1. Simple laser vision sensor calibration for surface profiling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Nabah, Bassam A.; ElSoussi, Adnane O.; Al Alami, Abed ElRahman K.

    2016-09-01

    Due to the relatively large structures in the Oil and Gas industry, original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) have been implementing custom-designed laser vision sensor (LVS) surface profiling systems as part of quality control in their manufacturing processes. The rough manufacturing environment and the continuous movement and misalignment of these custom-designed tools adversely affect the accuracy of laser-based vision surface profiling applications. Accordingly, Oil and Gas businesses have been raising the demand from the OEMs to implement practical and robust LVS calibration techniques prior to running any visual inspections. This effort introduces an LVS calibration technique representing a simplified version of two known calibration techniques, which are commonly implemented to obtain a calibrated LVS system for surface profiling applications. Both calibration techniques are implemented virtually and experimentally to scan simulated and three-dimensional (3D) printed features of known profiles, respectively. Scanned data is transformed from the camera frame to points in the world coordinate system and compared with the input profiles to validate the introduced calibration technique capability against the more complex approach and preliminarily assess the measurement technique for weld profiling applications. Moreover, the sensitivity to stand-off distances is analyzed to illustrate the practicality of the presented technique.

  2. Calibration approach and plan for the sea and land surface temperature radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David L.; Nightingale, Tim J.; Mortimer, Hugh; Middleton, Kevin; Edeson, Ruben; Cox, Caroline V.; Mutlow, Chris T.; Maddison, Brian J.; Coppo, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The sea and land surface temperature radiometer (SLSTR) to be flown on the European Space Agency's (ESA) Sentinel-3 mission is a multichannel scanning radiometer that will continue the 21 year dataset of the along-track scanning radiometer (ATSR) series. As its name implies, measurements from SLSTR will be used to retrieve global sea surface temperatures to an uncertainty of <0.3 K traced to international standards. To achieve, these low uncertainties require an end-to-end instrument calibration strategy that includes prelaunch calibration at subsystem and instrument level, on-board calibration systems, and sustained postlaunch activities. The authors describe the preparations for the prelaunch calibration activities, including the spectral response, the instrument level alignment tests, and the solar and infrared radiometric calibrations. A purpose built calibration rig has been designed and built at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory space department (RAL Space) that will accommodate the SLSTR instrument, the infrared calibration sources, and the alignment equipment. The calibration rig has been commissioned and results of these tests will be presented. Finally, the authors will present the planning for the on-orbit monitoring and calibration activities to ensure that the calibration is maintained. These activities include vicarious calibration techniques that have been developed through previous missions and the deployment of ship-borne radiometers.

  3. GOSAT lunar calibration in three years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiomi, K.; Hashiguchi, T.; Kataoka, F.; Higuchi, R.

    2012-12-01

    The Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT) is a Japanese mission to monitor greenhouse gases such as CO2 and CH4 from space. The GOSAT carries the Fourier Transform Spectrometer (TANSO-FTS) and the Cloud and Aerosol Imager (TANSO-CAI). The FTS has 3 polarized SWIR narrow bands, which are 0.76, 1.6 and 2.0 microns and TIR wide band from 5.5 to 14.3 microns. The FTS observes globally with grid points of 10 km FOV by separate pointing. The CAI is carried 4 radiometers of 0.38, 0.67, 0.87, and 1.60 microns with high spatial resolution of 0.5-1.5 km and wide swath of 1000 km. The GOSAT observes the full moon for the radiometric calibration of the FTS SWIR bands and the CAI by the lunar calibration operation every year. Bottom of the satellite installed the sensors is oriented to the moon before moon rise of the satellite. The initial lunar calibration on orbit just after the launch was operated on March 11 and April 9, 2009. Every year calibrations were operated on April for continuous annual trend and July for corresponding to the Railroad Valley calibration and validation field campaign. Since 3rd year operation, lunar calibration has been planned to observe in phase angle around 7 degrees to avoid the opposition surge and use the lunar albedo model in good accuracy and brightest target. However, we lost the lunar full disk entirely within the field of view of the FTS because of the pointing mirror offset issue. Since this year, it has been planned to add the offset from the latest geometric evaluation result. Perfect dataset were obtained in 2012. The FTS observes the moon by 0.6 IFOV. The FTS carries a high-resolution monitoring camera for checking the observation target. The moon position in the FTS IFOV is confirmed by the camera image. The CAI observes the moon by 12 pixels of Band 1-3, by 4 pixels of Band 4. The CAI scans the moon in 2 reciprocations with constant scan speed. This presentation shows the sensitivity study using the GOSAT lunar observation

  4. Geometry of the LMC Disk: Results from MACHO and 2MASS

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolaev, S; Drake, A; Keller, S; Cook, K; Dalal, N; Griest, K; Welch, D; Kanbur, S

    2003-11-04

    We have cross-correlated MACHO LMC Cepheids with 2MASS Second Incremental Release Catalog. The resulting database is considerably larger than the set of OGLE Cepheids in the LMC bar, and has significantly better areal coverage, allowing more accurate determination of LMC geometry. Random-phase correction is applied to 2MASS J, H, and Ks magnitudes, using the knowledge of V-band light curve and the ephemeris of 2MASS observations, to produce mean magnitudes. The improvement of phase-corrected PL relations over random-phase PL relations is clearly demonstrated. Reddening is estimated for each star individually, further improving the accuracy of the method. The orientation parameters of the LMC are derived by a Maximum Likelihood approach which solves for viewing angles and PL coefficients simultaneously, providing an unbiased estimation. The results of the analysis are used to place limits on warping of the LMC disk. Implications for the microlensing optical depth are also discussed.

  5. Investigating 2MASS J06593158-0405277: AN FUor Burst in a Triple System?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caratti o Garatti, A.; Garcia Lopez, R.; Ray, T. P.; Eislöffel, J.; Stecklum, B.; Scholz, A.; Kraus, S.; Weigelt, G.; Kreplin, A.; Shenavrin, V.

    2015-06-01

    FUor outbursts in young stellar objects are the most dramatic events among episodic accretion phenomena. The origin of these bursts is not clear: disk instabilities and/or disk perturbations by an external body being the most viable hypotheses. Here, we report our Very Large Telescope/SINFONI high angular resolution AO-assisted observations of 2MASS J06593158-0405277, which is undergoing a recently discovered FUor outburst. Our observations reveal the presence of an extended disk-like structure around the FUor, a very low-mass companion (2MASS J06593158-0405277B) at ∼100 AU in projection, and, possibly, a third closer companion at ∼11 AU. These sources appear to be young, displaying accretion signatures. Assuming the components are physically linked, 2MASS J06593158-0405277 would then be one of the very few triple systems observed in FUors.

  6. Phase calibration generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sigman, E. H.

    1988-01-01

    A phase calibration system was developed for the Deep Space Stations to generate reference microwave comb tones which are mixed in with signals received by the antenna. These reference tones are used to remove drifts of the station's receiving system from the detected data. This phase calibration system includes a cable stabilizer which transfers a 20 MHz reference signal from the control room to the antenna cone. The cable stabilizer compensates for delay changes in the long cable which connects its control room subassembly to its antenna cone subassembly in such a way that the 20 MHz is transferred to the cone with no significant degradation of the hydrogen maser atomic clock stability. The 20 MHz reference is used by the comb generator and is also available for use as a reference for receiver LO's in the cone.

  7. Pipeline Calibration for STIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodge, P. E.; Hulbert, S. J.; Lindler, D.; Busko, I.; Hsu, J.-C.; Baum, S.; McGrath, M.; Goudfrooij, P.; Shaw, R.; Katsanis, R.; Keener, S.; Bohlin, R.

    The CALSTIS program for calibration of Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph data in the OPUS pipeline differs in several significant ways from calibration for earlier HST instruments, such as the use of FITS format, computation of error estimates, and association of related exposures. Several steps are now done in the pipeline that previously had to be done off-line by the user, such as cosmic ray rejection and extraction of 1-D spectra. Although the program is linked with IRAF for image and table I/O, it is written in ANSI C rather than SPP, which should make the code more accessible. FITS extension I/O makes use of the new IRAF FITS kernel for images and the HEASARC FITSIO package for tables.

  8. MIRO Calibration Switch Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suchman, Jason; Salinas, Yuki; Kubo, Holly

    2001-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory has designed, analyzed, built, and tested a calibration switch mechanism for the MIRO instrument on the ROSETTA spacecraft. MIRO is the Microwave Instrument for the Rosetta Orbiter; this instrument hopes to investigate the origin of the solar system by studying the origin of comets. Specifically, the instrument will be the first to use submillimeter and millimeter wave heterodyne receivers to remotely examine the P-54 Wirtanen comet. In order to calibrate the instrument, it needs to view a hot and cold target. The purpose of the mechanism is to divert the instrument's field of view from the hot target, to the cold target, and then back into space. This cycle is to be repeated every 30 minutes for the duration of the 1.5 year mission. The paper describes the development of the mechanism, as well as analysis and testing techniques.

  9. Calibrated vapor generator source

    DOEpatents

    Davies, J.P.; Larson, R.A.; Goodrich, L.D.; Hall, H.J.; Stoddard, B.D.; Davis, S.G.; Kaser, T.G.; Conrad, F.J.

    1995-09-26

    A portable vapor generator is disclosed that can provide a controlled source of chemical vapors, such as, narcotic or explosive vapors. This source can be used to test and calibrate various types of vapor detection systems by providing a known amount of vapors to the system. The vapor generator is calibrated using a reference ion mobility spectrometer. A method of providing this vapor is described, as follows: explosive or narcotic is deposited on quartz wool, placed in a chamber that can be heated or cooled (depending on the vapor pressure of the material) to control the concentration of vapors in the reservoir. A controlled flow of air is pulsed over the quartz wool releasing a preset quantity of vapors at the outlet. 10 figs.

  10. Calibrated vapor generator source

    DOEpatents

    Davies, John P.; Larson, Ronald A.; Goodrich, Lorenzo D.; Hall, Harold J.; Stoddard, Billy D.; Davis, Sean G.; Kaser, Timothy G.; Conrad, Frank J.

    1995-01-01

    A portable vapor generator is disclosed that can provide a controlled source of chemical vapors, such as, narcotic or explosive vapors. This source can be used to test and calibrate various types of vapor detection systems by providing a known amount of vapors to the system. The vapor generator is calibrated using a reference ion mobility spectrometer. A method of providing this vapor is described, as follows: explosive or narcotic is deposited on quartz wool, placed in a chamber that can be heated or cooled (depending on the vapor pressure of the material) to control the concentration of vapors in the reservoir. A controlled flow of air is pulsed over the quartz wool releasing a preset quantity of vapors at the outlet.

  11. Calibration of Germanium Resistance Thermometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladner, D.; Urban, E.; Mason, F. C.

    1987-01-01

    Largely completed thermometer-calibration cryostat and probe allows six germanium resistance thermometers to be calibrated at one time at superfluid-helium temperatures. In experiments involving several such thermometers, use of this calibration apparatus results in substantial cost savings. Cryostat maintains temperature less than 2.17 K through controlled evaporation and removal of liquid helium from Dewar. Probe holds thermometers to be calibrated and applies small amount of heat as needed to maintain precise temperature below 2.17 K.

  12. Fast calibration of gas flowmeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisle, R. V.; Wilson, T. L.

    1981-01-01

    Digital unit automates calibration sequence using calculator IC and programmable read-only memory to solve calibration equations. Infrared sensors start and stop calibration sequence. Instrument calibrates mass flowmeters or rotameters where flow measurement is based on mass or volume. This automatic control reduces operator time by 80 percent. Solid-state components are very reliable, and digital character allows system accuracy to be determined primarily by accuracy of transducers.

  13. Calibrated Properties Model

    SciTech Connect

    H. H. Liu

    2003-02-14

    This report has documented the methodologies and the data used for developing rock property sets for three infiltration maps. Model calibration is necessary to obtain parameter values appropriate for the scale of the process being modeled. Although some hydrogeologic property data (prior information) are available, these data cannot be directly used to predict flow and transport processes because they were measured on scales smaller than those characterizing property distributions in models used for the prediction. Since model calibrations were done directly on the scales of interest, the upscaling issue was automatically considered. On the other hand, joint use of data and the prior information in inversions can further increase the reliability of the developed parameters compared with those for the prior information. Rock parameter sets were developed for both the mountain and drift scales because of the scale-dependent behavior of fracture permeability. Note that these parameter sets, except those for faults, were determined using the 1-D simulations. Therefore, they cannot be directly used for modeling lateral flow because of perched water in the unsaturated zone (UZ) of Yucca Mountain. Further calibration may be needed for two- and three-dimensional modeling studies. As discussed above in Section 6.4, uncertainties for these calibrated properties are difficult to accurately determine, because of the inaccuracy of simplified methods for this complex problem or the extremely large computational expense of more rigorous methods. One estimate of uncertainty that may be useful to investigators using these properties is the uncertainty used for the prior information. In most cases, the inversions did not change the properties very much with respect to the prior information. The Output DTNs (including the input and output files for all runs) from this study are given in Section 9.4.

  14. Calibration of hydrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorefice, Salvatore; Malengo, Andrea

    2006-10-01

    After a brief description of the different methods employed in periodic calibration of hydrometers used in most cases to measure the density of liquids in the range between 500 kg m-3 and 2000 kg m-3, particular emphasis is given to the multipoint procedure based on hydrostatic weighing, known as well as Cuckow's method. The features of the calibration apparatus and the procedure used at the INRiM (formerly IMGC-CNR) density laboratory have been considered to assess all relevant contributions involved in the calibration of different kinds of hydrometers. The uncertainty is strongly dependent on the kind of hydrometer; in particular, the results highlight the importance of the density of the reference buoyant liquid, the temperature of calibration and the skill of operator in the reading of the scale in the whole assessment of the uncertainty. It is also interesting to realize that for high-resolution hydrometers (division of 0.1 kg m-3), the uncertainty contribution of the density of the reference liquid is the main source of the total uncertainty, but its importance falls under about 50% for hydrometers with a division of 0.5 kg m-3 and becomes somewhat negligible for hydrometers with a division of 1 kg m-3, for which the reading uncertainty is the predominant part of the total uncertainty. At present the best INRiM result is obtained with commercially available hydrometers having a scale division of 0.1 kg m-3, for which the relative uncertainty is about 12 × 10-6.

  15. Mesoscale hybrid calibration artifact

    DOEpatents

    Tran, Hy D.; Claudet, Andre A.; Oliver, Andrew D.

    2010-09-07

    A mesoscale calibration artifact, also called a hybrid artifact, suitable for hybrid dimensional measurement and the method for make the artifact. The hybrid artifact has structural characteristics that make it suitable for dimensional measurement in both vision-based systems and touch-probe-based systems. The hybrid artifact employs the intersection of bulk-micromachined planes to fabricate edges that are sharp to the nanometer level and intersecting planes with crystal-lattice-defined angles.

  16. Calibration Chamber Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-30

    penetrometers of different designs, (iii) the effect of rod friction, (iv) the effect of discontinuous operation, and (v) sensing an interface between two sand...layers. Other test results on two designs of 10 cm2 Fugro penetrometers, each with a different position of friction sleeve, assisted in the selection...at different stages in the penetration of a specimen. The calibration tests had the prime purpose of establishing correlations between the penetration

  17. TIME CALIBRATED OSCILLOSCOPE SWEEP

    DOEpatents

    Owren, H.M.; Johnson, B.M.; Smith, V.L.

    1958-04-22

    The time calibrator of an electric signal displayed on an oscilloscope is described. In contrast to the conventional technique of using time-calibrated divisions on the face of the oscilloscope, this invention provides means for directly superimposing equal time spaced markers upon a signal displayed upon an oscilloscope. More explicitly, the present invention includes generally a generator for developing a linear saw-tooth voltage and a circuit for combining a high-frequency sinusoidal voltage of a suitable amplitude and frequency with the saw-tooth voltage to produce a resultant sweep deflection voltage having a wave shape which is substantially linear with respect to time between equal time spaced incremental plateau regions occurring once each cycle of the sinusoidal voltage. The foregoing sweep voltage when applied to the horizontal deflection plates in combination with a signal to be observed applied to the vertical deflection plates of a cathode ray oscilloscope produces an image on the viewing screen which is essentially a display of the signal to be observed with respect to time. Intensified spots, or certain other conspicuous indications corresponding to the equal time spaced plateau regions of said sweep voltage, appear superimposed upon said displayed signal, which indications are therefore suitable for direct time calibration purposes.

  18. Calibrated Properties Model

    SciTech Connect

    T. Ghezzehej

    2004-10-04

    The purpose of this model report is to document the calibrated properties model that provides calibrated property sets for unsaturated zone (UZ) flow and transport process models (UZ models). The calibration of the property sets is performed through inverse modeling. This work followed, and was planned in, ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Sections 1.2.6 and 2.1.1.6). Direct inputs to this model report were derived from the following upstream analysis and model reports: ''Analysis of Hydrologic Properties Data'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170038]); ''Development of Numerical Grids for UZ Flow and Transport Modeling'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169855]); ''Simulation of Net Infiltration for Present-Day and Potential Future Climates'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170007]); ''Geologic Framework Model'' (GFM2000) (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170029]). Additionally, this model report incorporates errata of the previous version and closure of the Key Technical Issue agreement TSPAI 3.26 (Section 6.2.2 and Appendix B), and it is revised for improved transparency.

  19. Radiation calibration targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Several prominent features of Mars Pathfinder and surrounding terrain are seen in this image, taken by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder on July 4 (Sol 1), the spacecraft's first day on the Red Planet. Portions of a lander petal are at the lower part of the image. At the left, the mechanism for the high-gain antenna can be seen. The dark area along the right side of the image represents a portion of the low-gain antenna. The radiation calibration target is at the right. The calibration target is made up of a number of materials with well-characterized colors. The known colors of the calibration targets allow scientists to determine the true colors of the rocks and soils of Mars. Three bull's-eye rings provide a wide range of brightness for the camera, similar to a photographer's grayscale chart. In the middle of the bull's-eye is a 5-inch tall post that casts a shadow, which is distorted in this image due to its location with respect to the lander camera.

    A large rock is located at the near center of the image. Smaller rocks and areas of soil are strewn across the Martian terrain up to the horizon line.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

  20. Internet-Based Calibration of a Multifunction Calibrator

    SciTech Connect

    BUNTING BACA,LISA A.; DUDA JR.,LEONARD E.; WALKER,RUSSELL M.; OLDHAM,NILE; PARKER,MARK

    2000-12-19

    A new way of providing calibration services is evolving which employs the Internet to expand present capabilities and make the calibration process more interactive. Sandia National Laboratories and the National Institute of Standards and Technology are collaborating to set up and demonstrate a remote calibration of multijunction calibrators using this Internet-based technique that is becoming known as e-calibration. This paper describes the measurement philosophy and the Internet resources that can provide real-time audio/video/data exchange, consultation and training, as well as web-accessible test procedures, software and calibration reports. The communication system utilizes commercial hardware and software that should be easy to integrate into most calibration laboratories.

  1. Internet-based calibration of a multifunction calibrator

    SciTech Connect

    BUNTING BACA,LISA A.; DUDA JR.,LEONARD E.; WALKER,RUSSELL M.; OLDHAM,NILE; PARKER,MARK

    2000-04-17

    A new way of providing calibration services is evolving which employs the Internet to expand present capabilities and make the calibration process more interactive. Sandia National Laboratories and the National Institute of Standards and Technology are collaborating to set up and demonstrate a remote calibration of multifunction calibrators using this Internet-based technique that is becoming known as e-calibration. This paper describes the measurement philosophy and the Internet resources that can provide real-time audio/video/data exchange, consultation and training, as well as web-accessible test procedures, software and calibration reports. The communication system utilizes commercial hardware and software that should be easy to integrate into most calibration laboratories.

  2. Radionucleotide scanning in osteomyelitis

    SciTech Connect

    Sachs, W.; Kanat, I.O.

    1986-07-01

    Radionucleotide bone scanning can be an excellent adjunct to the standard radiograph and clinical findings in the diagnosis of osteomyelitis. Bone scans have the ability to detect osteomyelitis far in advance of the standard radiograph. The sequential use of technetium and gallium has been useful in differentiating cellulitis and osteomyelitis. Serial scanning with technetium and gallium may be used to monitor the response of osteomyelitis to antibiotic therapy.

  3. Standardless atom counting in scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    LeBeau, James M; Findlay, Scott D; Allen, Leslie J; Stemmer, Susanne

    2010-11-10

    We demonstrate that high-angle annular dark-field imaging in scanning transmission electron microscopy allows for quantification of the number and location of all atoms in a three-dimensional, crystalline, arbitrarily shaped specimen without the need for a calibration standard. We show that the method also provides for an approach to directly measure the finite effective source size of a scanning transmission electron microscope.

  4. Primary calibration in acoustics metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacelar Milhomem, T. A.; Defilippo Soares, Z. M.

    2015-01-01

    SI unit in acoustics is realized by the reciprocity calibrations of laboratory standard microphones in pressure field, free field and diffuse field. Calibrations in pressure field and in free field are already consolidated and the Inmetro already done them. Calibration in diffuse field is not yet consolidated, however, some national metrology institutes, including Inmetro, are conducting researches on this subject. This paper presents the reciprocity calibration, the results of Inmetro in recent key comparisons and the research that is being developed for the implementation of reciprocity calibration in diffuse field.

  5. Calibration of triaxial fluxgate gradiometer

    SciTech Connect

    Vcelak, Jan

    2006-04-15

    The description of simple and fast calibration procedures used for double-probe triaxial fluxgate gradiometer is provided in this paper. The calibration procedure consists of three basic steps. In the first step both probes are calibrated independently in order to reach constant total field reading in every position. Both probes are numerically aligned in the second step in order that the gradient reading is zero in homogenous magnetic field. The third step consists of periodic drift calibration during measurement. The results and detailed description of each calibration step are presented and discussed in the paper. The gradiometer is finally verified during the detection of the metal object in the measuring grid.

  6. Mercury CEM Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    John Schabron; Joseph Rovani; Mark Sanderson

    2008-02-29

    Mercury continuous emissions monitoring systems (CEMS) are being implemented in over 800 coal-fired power plant stacks. The power industry desires to conduct at least a full year of monitoring before the formal monitoring and reporting requirement begins on January 1, 2009. It is important for the industry to have available reliable, turnkey equipment from CEM vendors. Western Research Institute (WRI) is working closely with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to facilitate the development of the experimental criteria for a NIST traceability protocol for dynamic elemental mercury vapor generators. The generators are used to calibrate mercury CEMs at power plant sites. The Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) which was published in the Federal Register on May 18, 2005 requires that calibration be performed with NIST-traceable standards (Federal Register 2007). Traceability procedures will be defined by EPA. An initial draft traceability protocol was issued by EPA in May 2007 for comment. In August 2007, EPA issued an interim traceability protocol for elemental mercury generators (EPA 2007). The protocol is based on the actual analysis of the output of each calibration unit at several concentration levels ranging initially from about 2-40 {micro}g/m{sup 3} elemental mercury, and in the future down to 0.2 {micro}g/m{sup 3}, and this analysis will be directly traceable to analyses by NIST. The document is divided into two separate sections. The first deals with the qualification of generators by the vendors for use in mercury CEM calibration. The second describes the procedure that the vendors must use to certify the generator models that meet the qualification specifications. The NIST traceable certification is performance based, traceable to analysis using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry performed by NIST in Gaithersburg, MD. The

  7. Common Calibration Source for Monitoring Long-term Ozone Trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowalewski, Matthew

    2004-01-01

    Accurate long-term satellite measurements are crucial for monitoring the recovery of the ozone layer. The slow pace of the recovery and limited lifetimes of satellite monitoring instruments demands that datasets from multiple observation systems be combined to provide the long-term accuracy needed. A fundamental component of accurately monitoring long-term trends is the calibration of these various instruments. NASA s Radiometric Calibration and Development Facility at the Goddard Space Flight Center has provided resources to minimize calibration biases between multiple instruments through the use of a common calibration source and standardized procedures traceable to national standards. The Facility s 50 cm barium sulfate integrating sphere has been used as a common calibration source for both US and international satellite instruments, including the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS), Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet 2 (SBUV/2) instruments, Shuttle SBUV (SSBUV), Ozone Mapping Instrument (OMI), Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) (ESA), Scanning Imaging SpectroMeter for Atmospheric ChartographY (SCIAMACHY) (ESA), and others. We will discuss the advantages of using a common calibration source and its effects on long-term ozone data sets. In addition, sphere calibration results from various instruments will be presented to demonstrate the accuracy of the long-term characterization of the source itself.

  8. Bone scanning in otolaryngology.

    PubMed

    Noyek, A M

    1979-09-01

    Modern radionuclide bone scanning has introduced a new concept in physiologic and anatomic diagnostic imaging to general medicine. As otolaryngologists must diagnose and treat disease in relation to the bony and/or cartilaginous supporting structures of the neurocranium and upper airway, this modality should be included in the otolaryngologist's diagnostic armamentarium. It is the purpose of this manuscript to study the specific applications of bone scanning to our specialty at this time, based on clinical experience over the past three years. This thesis describes the development of bone scanning in general (history of nuclear medicine and nuclear physics; history of bone scanning in particular). General concepts in nuclear medicine are then presented; these include a discussion of nuclear semantics, principles of radioactive emmissions, the properties 99mTc as a radionuclide, and the tracer principle. On the basis of these general concepts, specific concepts in bone scanning are then brought forth. The physiology of bone and the action of the bone scan agents is presented. Further discussion considers the availability and production of the bone scan agent, patient factors, the gamma camera, the triphasic bone scan and the ultimate diagnostic principle of the bone scan. Clinical applications of bone scanning in otolaryngology are then presented in three sections. Proven areas of application include the evaluation of malignant tumors of the head and neck, the diagnosis of temporomandibular joint disorders, the diagnosis of facial fractures, the evaluation of osteomyelitis, nuclear medicine imaging of the larynx, and the assessment of systemic disease. Areas of adjunctive or supplementary value are also noted, such as diagnostic imaging of meningioma. Finally, areas of marginal value in the application of bone scanning are described.

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Fornax Cluster Spectroscopic Survey 2MASS galaxies (Morris+ 2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, R. A. H.; Phillipps, S.; Jones, J. B.; Drinkwater, M. J.; Gregg, M. D.; Couch, W. J.; Parker, Q. A.; Smith, R. M.

    2007-09-01

    We present two tables, the results of matching the Fornax Cluster Spectroscopic Survey (FCSS) both with the 2MASS extended source catalogue (XSC) and the 2MASS point source catalogue (PSC, Cat. II/246). The 2MASS 2nd release data described in Jarrett et al. (2000AJ....119.2498J) is used in this paper. xsc-fcss.dat contains 114 extended objects in a circle of radius 1degree centred on NGC1399, 84 are matched in the FCSS itself using a positional error of 3", 28 are in the brighter FLAIR sample of Drinkwater et al. (2001ApJ...548L.139D) and two are 15th magnitude galaxies in the Ferguson (1989AJ.....98..367F, Cat. ) Fornax Cluster Catalogue (FCC). psc-fcss.dat contains objects that are in the 2MASS PSC and also in the FCSS again using a positional error of 3". Objects with cz of less than 900km/s are removed as are objects which are also in the extended sample above to leave a sample of 228 confirmed galaxies. (2 data files).

  10. FU Ori-type outburst of 2MASS J06593158-0405277

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maehara, Hiroyuki; Kojima, Tadashi; Fujii, Mitsugu

    2014-11-01

    We report the discovery of an FU Ori-type outburst of 2MASS J06593158-0405277. The outburst was discovered by T. Kojima from the survey image obtained with a 85mm f/2.8 lens and Canon EOS 60D DSLR camera on 2014-11-03.821 UT at mag 11.0.

  11. Near-IR photometric monitoring of FU Ori Type Object 2MASS J06593158-0405277

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varricatt, W. P.; Carroll, T.; Moore, E.; Benigni, S.

    2015-05-01

    Maehara, Kojima, and Fujii (ATel #6770) discovered a recent FU Ori-type outburst in 2MASS J06593158-0405277. High resolution spectroscopic follow up by Hillenbrand (ATel #6797) confirmed its FU Ori nature, and discovered P-Cygni profile for H alpha line and blue-shifted absorption for other hydrogen lines.

  12. A variable acceleration calibration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Thomas H.

    2011-12-01

    A variable acceleration calibration system that applies loads using gravitational and centripetal acceleration serves as an alternative, efficient and cost effective method for calibrating internal wind tunnel force balances. Two proof-of-concept variable acceleration calibration systems are designed, fabricated and tested. The NASA UT-36 force balance served as the test balance for the calibration experiments. The variable acceleration calibration systems are shown to be capable of performing three component calibration experiments with an approximate applied load error on the order of 1% of the full scale calibration loads. Sources of error are indentified using experimental design methods and a propagation of uncertainty analysis. Three types of uncertainty are indentified for the systems and are attributed to prediction error, calibration error and pure error. Angular velocity uncertainty is shown to be the largest indentified source of prediction error. The calibration uncertainties using a production variable acceleration based system are shown to be potentially equivalent to current methods. The production quality system can be realized using lighter materials and a more precise instrumentation. Further research is needed to account for balance deflection, forcing effects due to vibration, and large tare loads. A gyroscope measurement technique is shown to be capable of resolving the balance deflection angle calculation. Long term research objectives include a demonstration of a six degree of freedom calibration, and a large capacity balance calibration.

  13. Automatic force balance calibration system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferris, Alice T. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A system for automatically calibrating force balances is provided. The invention uses a reference balance aligned with the balance being calibrated to provide superior accuracy while minimizing the time required to complete the calibration. The reference balance and the test balance are rigidly attached together with closely aligned moment centers. Loads placed on the system equally effect each balance, and the differences in the readings of the two balances can be used to generate the calibration matrix for the test balance. Since the accuracy of the test calibration is determined by the accuracy of the reference balance and current technology allows for reference balances to be calibrated to within .+-.0.05%, the entire system has an accuracy of a .+-.0.2%. The entire apparatus is relatively small and can be mounted on a movable base for easy transport between test locations. The system can also accept a wide variety of reference balances, thus allowing calibration under diverse load and size requirements.

  14. Self-Calibrating Pressure Transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lueck, Dale E. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A self-calibrating pressure transducer is disclosed. The device uses an embedded zirconia membrane which pumps a determined quantity of oxygen into the device. The associated pressure can be determined, and thus, the transducer pressure readings can be calibrated. The zirconia membrane obtains oxygen .from the surrounding environment when possible. Otherwise, an oxygen reservoir or other source is utilized. In another embodiment, a reversible fuel cell assembly is used to pump oxygen and hydrogen into the system. Since a known amount of gas is pumped across the cell, the pressure produced can be determined, and thus, the device can be calibrated. An isolation valve system is used to allow the device to be calibrated in situ. Calibration is optionally automated so that calibration can be continuously monitored. The device is preferably a fully integrated MEMS device. Since the device can be calibrated without removing it from the process, reductions in costs and down time are realized.

  15. Star-galaxy separation strategies for WISE-2MASS all-sky infrared galaxy catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovács, András; Szapudi, István

    2015-04-01

    We combine photometric information of the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) and Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) all-sky infrared data bases, and demonstrate how to produce clean and complete galaxy catalogues for future analyses. Adding 2MASS colours to WISE photometry improves star-galaxy separation efficiency substantially at the expense of losing a small fraction of the galaxies. We find that 93 per cent of the WISE objects within W1 < 15.2 mag have a 2MASS match, and that a class of supervised machine learning algorithms, support vector machines (SVM), are efficient classifiers of objects in our multicolour data set. We constructed a training set from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey PhotoObj table with known star-galaxy separation, and determined redshift distribution of our sample from the Galaxy and Mass Assembly spectroscopic survey. Varying the combination of photometric parameters input into our algorithm we show that W1WISE - J2MASS is a simple and effective star-galaxy separator, capable of producing results comparable to the multidimensional SVM classification. We present a detailed description of our star-galaxy separation methods, and characterize the robustness of our tools in terms of contamination, completeness, and accuracy. We explore systematics of the full sky WISE-2MASS galaxy map, such as contamination from moon glow. We show that the homogeneity of the full sky galaxy map is improved by an additional J2MASS < 16.5 mag flux limit. The all-sky galaxy catalogue we present in this paper covers 21 200 deg2 with dusty regions masked out, and has an estimated stellar contamination of 1.2 per cent and completeness of 70.1 per cent among 2.4 million galaxies with zmed ≈ 0.14. WISE-2MASS galaxy maps with well controlled stellar contamination will be useful for spatial statistical analyses, including cross-correlations with other cosmological random fields, such as the cosmic microwave background. The same techniques also yield a

  16. A calibrated atomic force microscope using an orthogonal scanner and a calibrated laser interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong-Yeon; Kim, Dong-Min; Gweon, Dae-Gab; Park, Jinwon

    2007-02-01

    A compact and two-dimensional atomic force microscope (AFM) using an orthogonal sample scanner, a calibrated homodyne laser interferometer and a commercial AFM head was developed for use in the nano-metrology field. The x and y position of the sample with respect to the tip are acquired by using the laser interferometer in the open-loop state, when each z data point of the AFM head is taken. The sample scanner, which has a motion amplifying mechanism was designed to move a sample up to 100 μm × 100 μm in orthogonal way, which means less crosstalk between axes. Moreover, the rotational errors between axes are measured to ensure the accuracy of the calibrated AFM within the full scanning range. The conventional homodyne laser interferometer was used to measure the x and y displacements of the sample and compensated via an X-ray interferometer to reduce the nonlinearity of the optical interferometer. The repeatability of the calibrated AFM was measured to sub-nanometers within a few hundred nanometers scanning range.

  17. [Laser-based radiometric calibration].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-gang; Zheng, Yu-quan

    2014-12-01

    Increasingly higher demands are put forward to spectral radiometric calibration accuracy and the development of new tunable laser based spectral radiometric calibration technology is promoted, along with the development of studies of terrestrial remote sensing, aeronautical and astronautical remote sensing, plasma physics, quantitative spectroscopy, etc. Internationally a number of national metrology scientific research institutes have built tunable laser based spectral radiometric calibration facilities in succession, which are traceable to cryogenic radiometers and have low uncertainties for spectral responsivity calibration and characterization of detectors and remote sensing instruments in the UK, the USA, Germany, etc. Among them, the facility for spectral irradiance and radiance responsivity calibrations using uniform sources (SIRCCUS) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in the USA and the Tunable Lasers in Photometry (TULIP) facility at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Germany have more representatives. Compared with lamp-monochromator systems, laser based spectral radiometric calibrations have many advantages, such as narrow spectral bandwidth, high wavelength accuracy, low calibration uncertainty and so on for radiometric calibration applications. In this paper, the development of laser-based spectral radiometric calibration and structures and performances of laser-based radiometric calibration facilities represented by the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) in the UK, NIST and PTB are presented, technical advantages of laser-based spectral radiometric calibration are analyzed, and applications of this technology are further discussed. Laser-based spectral radiometric calibration facilities can be widely used in important system-level radiometric calibration measurements with high accuracy, including radiance temperature, radiance and irradiance calibrations for space remote sensing instruments, and promote the

  18. Calibration of Synthetic Photometry Using DA White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holberg, J. B.; Bergeron, P.

    2005-12-01

    We have calibrated four major ground-based photometric systems with respect to the Hubble Space Telescope absolute flux scale, which is defined by Vega and four fundamental DA white dwarfs. These photometric systems include the Johnson-Kron-Cousins UBVRI, the Stromgren uvby filters, the 2MASS JHKs and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey ugriz filters. Synthetic magnitudes are calculated from model white dwarf spectra folded through the published filter response functions, these magnitudes in turn are absolutely calibrated with respect to the HST flux scale. Effective zero magnitude fluxes and zero point offsets of each system are determined. In order to verify the external observational consistency as well as to demonstrate the applicability of these definitions, the synthetic magnitudes are compared with the respective observed magnitudes of larger sets of DA white dwarfs that have well determined effective temperatures and surface gravities and which span a wide range in both of these parameters.

  19. Uncertainty and Dimensional Calibrations

    PubMed Central

    Doiron, Ted; Stoup, John

    1997-01-01

    The calculation of uncertainty for a measurement is an effort to set reasonable bounds for the measurement result according to standardized rules. Since every measurement produces only an estimate of the answer, the primary requisite of an uncertainty statement is to inform the reader of how sure the writer is that the answer is in a certain range. This report explains how we have implemented these rules for dimensional calibrations of nine different types of gages: gage blocks, gage wires, ring gages, gage balls, roundness standards, optical flats indexing tables, angle blocks, and sieves. PMID:27805114

  20. Transient Calorimeter Calibration System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-03-01

    can withstand the high heat flux levels encountered during calibration. 3 d. The verification of absorptivity of a colloidal graphite coat- ing used...CC4-)Ŕ ýz- ix w- Vj m ~ CL 4) > r- 4-) r-)W *. M 0 0 a 4) u.) . CJ C4) Lfl 𔃺 4%. C6 0) 0 ~ 4 -0 E 36 The colloidal graphite remains the most...before and after exposure. Such tests performed with the colloidal graphite coating yielded no apparent change in absorptivity up through 5 kW/cm2 . In

  1. White Dwarf Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colina, Luis

    1994-01-01

    As a result of last November calibration workshop, all parties agreed that the HST should be switched to the WD basis for absolute fluxes. This proposal implements that decision. A measurement of the absolute sensitivity of the FOS detectors will be performed using theoretical pure hydrogen model atmosphere calculations for three white dwarfs. The high resolution gratings will be used in the 1 arcsec aperture. A four stage peakup of the standard star provides centering in the aperture. Observations are requested for fall 94 with repeated observations about two months after.

  2. Uncertainty and Dimensional Calibrations.

    PubMed

    Doiron, Ted; Stoup, John

    1997-01-01

    The calculation of uncertainty for a measurement is an effort to set reasonable bounds for the measurement result according to standardized rules. Since every measurement produces only an estimate of the answer, the primary requisite of an uncertainty statement is to inform the reader of how sure the writer is that the answer is in a certain range. This report explains how we have implemented these rules for dimensional calibrations of nine different types of gages: gage blocks, gage wires, ring gages, gage balls, roundness standards, optical flats indexing tables, angle blocks, and sieves.

  3. Dynamic Torque Calibration Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agronin, Michael L.; Marchetto, Carl A.

    1989-01-01

    Proposed dynamic torque calibration unit (DTCU) measures torque in rotary actuator components such as motors, bearings, gear trains, and flex couplings. Unique because designed specifically for testing components under low rates. Measures torque in device under test during controlled steady rotation or oscillation. Rotor oriented vertically, supported by upper angular-contact bearing and lower radial-contact bearing that floats axially to prevent thermal expansion from loading bearings. High-load capacity air bearing available to replace ball bearings when higher load capacity or reduction in rate noise required.

  4. Bayesian calibration for forensic age estimation.

    PubMed

    Ferrante, Luigi; Skrami, Edlira; Gesuita, Rosaria; Cameriere, Roberto

    2015-05-10

    Forensic medicine is increasingly called upon to assess the age of individuals. Forensic age estimation is mostly required in relation to illegal immigration and identification of bodies or skeletal remains. A variety of age estimation methods are based on dental samples and use of regression models, where the age of an individual is predicted by morphological tooth changes that take place over time. From the medico-legal point of view, regression models, with age as the dependent random variable entail that age tends to be overestimated in the young and underestimated in the old. To overcome this bias, we describe a new full Bayesian calibration method (asymmetric Laplace Bayesian calibration) for forensic age estimation that uses asymmetric Laplace distribution as the probability model. The method was compared with three existing approaches (two Bayesian and a classical method) using simulated data. Although its accuracy was comparable with that of the other methods, the asymmetric Laplace Bayesian calibration appears to be significantly more reliable and robust in case of misspecification of the probability model. The proposed method was also applied to a real dataset of values of the pulp chamber of the right lower premolar measured on x-ray scans of individuals of known age.

  5. Calibrating the Prominence Magnetometer (ProMag)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Lewis; Casini, R.

    2013-07-01

    The Prominence Magnetometer (ProMag) is a dual-channel, dual-beam, slit-scanning, full Stokes spectro-polarimeter designed by the High Altitude Observatory at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (HAO/NCAR) for the study of the magnetism of solar prominences and filaments. It was deployed in August 2009 at the 40 cm coronagraph of the Evans Solar Facility (ESF) of the National Solar Observatory on Sacramento Peak (NSO/SP). In its standard mode of operation it acquires spectro-polarimetric maps of solar targets simultaneously in the two chromospheric lines of He I at 587.6 nm and 1083.0 nm. Since August 2011 ProMag has operated in “patrol mode” with a dedicated observer. We aim to routinely measure the vector magnetic field in prominences. The electro-optic modulator and polarization analyzer are integrated into a single mechanical unit located at the coude feed of the telescope. This location was necessary for proper co-alignment of the dual beams, but complicates the precise polarimeter calibration necessary to achieve the sensitivity required for prominence measurements (< 10^-3). At this sensitivity, small variations in optical alignment can become significant. We present a calibration method for ProMag, using a polarizer and retarder at coronagraph prime focus. Calibrations are recorded before and after observations. We discuss the success of this method and its limitations.

  6. Submicron calibration strategy for CD control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chain, Elizabeth E.; Kulkens, Loma; Harris, Thomas A.

    1996-09-01

    In the modern semiconductor processing facility CD (critical dimension) measurements on 200-mm diameter wafers proceed in a fully automated mode requiring only wafer loading, measurement recipe loading, and a 'run' command for processing. To provide effective metrology support to this facility the scope of CD measurement automation has been extended to the entire metrology scheme, from job file generation to CD measurement and data collection. Upon completion of all sample measurements, data is uploaded to the factory's data collection software system via a SECS II interface, eliminating the requirement of manual data entry. This paper presents the methodology used to perform calibration of the automated CD metrology scanning electron microscope (SEM) for sub-0.5 micrometer process control. A commercially available SEM pitch standard, traceable to JQA (Japan Quality Assurance) has been characterized and incorporated into a standard, automated calibration procedure performed as part of the regular tool qualification. This standard contains lines with pitch on order of 0.240 micrometer over a 4 mm2 area and is useful at low accelerating voltage. Since the low accelerating voltage CD measurement SEM has assumed an important role in modern semiconductor process control, we investigate the use and performance of the standard in a representative instrument. Evaluation of this reference by SEM CD measurements shows suitable performance for submicron dimension calibration.

  7. Artifacts for Calibration of Submicron Width Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunthaner, Frank; Grunthaner, Paula; Bryson, Charles, III

    2003-01-01

    Artifacts that are fabricated with the help of molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) are undergoing development for use as dimensional calibration standards with submicron widths. Such standards are needed for calibrating instruments (principally, scanning electron microscopes and scanning probe microscopes) for measuring the widths of features in advanced integrated circuits. Dimensional calibration standards fabricated by an older process that involves lithography and etching of trenches in (110) surfaces of single-crystal silicon are generally reproducible to within dimensional tolerances of about 15 nm. It is anticipated that when the artifacts of the present type are fully developed, their critical dimensions will be reproducible to within 1 nm. These artifacts are expected to find increasing use in the semiconductor-device and integrated- circuit industries as the width tolerances on semiconductor devices shrink to a few nanometers during the next few years. Unlike in the older process, one does not rely on lithography and etching to define the critical dimensions. Instead, one relies on the inherent smoothness and flatness of MBE layers deposited under controlled conditions and defines the critical dimensions as the thicknesses of such layers. An artifact of the present type is fabricated in two stages (see figure): In the first stage, a multilayer epitaxial wafer is grown on a very flat substrate. In the second stage, the wafer is cleaved to expose the layers, then the exposed layers are differentially etched (taking advantage of large differences between the etch rates of the different epitaxial layer materials). The resulting structure includes narrow and well-defined trenches and a shelf with thicknesses determined by the thicknesses of the epitaxial layers from which they were etched. Eventually, it should be possible to add a third fabrication stage in which durable, electronically inert artifacts could be replicated in diamondlike carbon from a master made by

  8. Huffman and linear scanning methods with statistical language models.

    PubMed

    Roark, Brian; Fried-Oken, Melanie; Gibbons, Chris

    2015-03-01

    Current scanning access methods for text generation in AAC devices are limited to relatively few options, most notably row/column variations within a matrix. We present Huffman scanning, a new method for applying statistical language models to binary-switch, static-grid typing AAC interfaces, and compare it to other scanning options under a variety of conditions. We present results for 16 adults without disabilities and one 36-year-old man with locked-in syndrome who presents with complex communication needs and uses AAC scanning devices for writing. Huffman scanning with a statistical language model yielded significant typing speedups for the 16 participants without disabilities versus any of the other methods tested, including two row/column scanning methods. A similar pattern of results was found with the individual with locked-in syndrome. Interestingly, faster typing speeds were obtained with Huffman scanning using a more leisurely scan rate than relatively fast individually calibrated scan rates. Overall, the results reported here demonstrate great promise for the usability of Huffman scanning as a faster alternative to row/column scanning.

  9. A Simple Accelerometer Calibrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salam, R. A.; Islamy, M. R. F.; Munir, M. M.; Latief, H.; Irsyam, M.; Khairurrijal

    2016-08-01

    High possibility of earthquake could lead to the high number of victims caused by it. It also can cause other hazards such as tsunami, landslide, etc. In that case it requires a system that can examine the earthquake occurrence. Some possible system to detect earthquake is by creating a vibration sensor system using accelerometer. However, the output of the system is usually put in the form of acceleration data. Therefore, a calibrator system for accelerometer to sense the vibration is needed. In this study, a simple accelerometer calibrator has been developed using 12 V DC motor, optocoupler, Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) and AVR 328 microcontroller as controller system. The system uses the Pulse Wave Modulation (PWM) form microcontroller to control the motor rotational speed as response to vibration frequency. The frequency of vibration was read by optocoupler and then those data was used as feedback to the system. The results show that the systems could control the rotational speed and the vibration frequencies in accordance with the defined PWM.

  10. Chapter 25: Finding and Exploring Merging Pairs of Galaxies in 2MASS Using the NVO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allam, S. S.; Tucker, D. L.; Kent, S.; Gee, P.; Loh, Y.-S.; Puerari, I.; Smith, J. A.

    Interacting/merging galaxies are among the most beautiful and fascinating of galaxy systems. These systems are major sites of enhanced star formation (Allam 1998, Lambas et al. 2003). Ultra Luminous InfraRed Galaxies (ULIRGs) have been shown to be associated with mergers and merger remnants (Sanders & Mirabel 1996, Genzel et al. 2001, Pihlström 2005, Conselice 2006). Until now most catalogs of merging pairs have been selected using optical data (e.g. Vorontsov-Velyaminov 1959, 1977, Karachentsev 1972, Barton et al. 2000, Patton et al. 2002, Allam et al. 2004; which is based upon the SDSS). Since optical emission is strongly associated with star formation (via, e.g. OB associations in the blue and Hα in the red), most current catalogs of merging pairs have an inherent bias towards systems with high star formation rates. Observations in the near infrared (NIR) more faithfully trace the underlying stellar mass distribution of galaxies, since most of the stellar mass of galaxies is tied up in low-mass, red dwarfs. Also, the NIR is less affected than the optical by absorption by interstellar dust grains. Therefore, a catalog of merging pairs extracted from the 2MASS eXtended Source Catalog (XSC; Jarrett et al. 2000) would provide an interesting new "massselected" sample of merging pairs. Furthermore, a merging-pairs catalog based upon the 2MASS XSC would be the first large, homogeneous, and truly all-sky catalog of such galaxy systems based upon modern detector technology. Using a very different selection algorithm, Xu et al. (2004), found 19 close galaxy pairs in a combined 2MASS/2dF catalog in the southern sky. During the National Virtual Observatory (NVO) Summer School 2005, Allam et al. (2005) performed a pilot study by downloading 2MASS XSC data for a 125 sq. deg (2.5 deg times 50 deg) region of sky using the NVO Open SkyQuery tool. With this set of extended 2MASS objects, we used modified Karachentsev (1972) criteria to extract merging pairs of galaxies. We

  11. Precision Spectrophotometric Calibration System for Dark Energy Instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Schubnell, Michael S.

    2015-06-30

    For this research we build a precision calibration system and carried out measurements to demonstrate the precision that can be achieved with a high precision spectrometric calibration system. It was shown that the system is capable of providing a complete spectrophotometric calibration at the sub-pixel level. The calibration system uses a fast, high precision monochromator that can quickly and efficiently scan over an instrument’s entire spectral range with a spectral line width of less than 0.01 nm corresponding to a fraction of a pixel on the CCD. The system was extensively evaluated in the laboratory. Our research showed that a complete spectrophotometric calibration standard for spectroscopic survey instruments such as DESI is possible. The monochromator precision and repeatability to a small fraction of the DESI spectrograph LSF was demonstrated with re-initialization on every scan and thermal drift compensation by locking to multiple external line sources. A projector system that mimics telescope aperture for point source at infinity was demonstrated.

  12. Resonant scanning mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, John; Newman, Mike; Gutierrez, Homero; Hoffman, Charlie; Quakenbush, Tim; Waldeck, Dan; Leone, Christopher; Ostaszewski, Miro

    2014-10-01

    Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. developed a Resonant Scanning Mechanism (RSM) capable of combining a 250- Hz resonant scan about one axis with a two-hertz triangular scan about the orthogonal axis. The RSM enables a rapid, high-density scan over a significant field of regard (FOR) while minimizing size, weight, and power requirements. The azimuth scan axis is bearing mounted allowing for 30° of mechanical travel, while the resonant elevation axis is flexure and spring mounted with five degrees of mechanical travel. Pointing-knowledge error during quiescent static pointing at room temperature across the full range is better than 100 μrad RMS per axis. The compact design of the RSM, roughly the size of a soda can, makes it an ideal mechanism for use on low-altitude aircraft and unmanned aerial vehicles. Unique aspects of the opto-mechanical design include i) resonant springs which allow for a high-frequency scan axis with low power consumption; and ii) an independent lower-frequency scan axis allowing for a wide FOR. The pointing control system operates each axis independently and employs i) a position loop for the azimuth axis; and ii) a unique combination of parallel frequency and amplitude control loops for the elevation axis. All control and pointing algorithms are hosted on a 200-MHz microcontroller with 516 KB of RAM on a compact 3"×4" digital controller, also of Ball design.

  13. Quadrature phase interferometer used to calibrate dial indicator calibrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shau-Chi; Liou, Huay-Chung; Peng, Gwo-Sheng; Lu, Ming-Feng

    2001-10-01

    To calibrate dial indicators, gage blocks or dial indicator calibrators are usually used. For better accuracy and resolution, interferometers are used to calibrate dial indicator calibrators. Systematic errors of laser interferometers can be classified into three categories of intrinsic errors, environment errors and installation errors. Intrinsic errors include laser wavelength error, electronic error and optics nonlinearity. In order to achieve nanometer accuracy, minimizing intrinsic error is crucial. In this paper, we will address the problems of minimizing the optics nonlinearity error and describe the discrete-time signal processing method to minimize the electronic error, nonlinearity error and drift by simply using quadrature phase interferometer for nanometer accuracy and linearity.

  14. NASA Metrology and Calibration, 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The proceedings of the fourth annual NASA Metrology and Calibration Workshop are presented. This workshop covered (1) review and assessment of NASA metrology and calibration activities by NASA Headquarters, (2) results of audits by the Office of Inspector General, (3) review of a proposed NASA Equipment Management System, (4) current and planned field center activities, (5) National Bureau of Standards (NBS) calibration services for NASA, (6) review of NBS's Precision Measurement and Test Equipment Project activities, (7) NASA instrument loan pool operations at two centers, (8) mobile cart calibration systems at two centers, (9) calibration intervals and decals, (10) NASA Calibration Capabilities Catalog, and (11) development of plans and objectives for FY 1981. Several papers in this proceedings are slide presentations only.

  15. Electrically scanning microwave radiometer for Nimbus E

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    An electronically scanning microwave radiometer system has been designed, developed, and tested for measurement of meteorological, geomorphological and oceanographic parameters from NASA/GSFC's Nimbus E satellite. The system is a completely integrated radiometer designed to measure the microwave brightness temperature of the earth and its atmosphere at a microwave frequency of 19.35 GHz. Calibration and environmental testing of the system have successfully demonstrated its ability to perform accurate measurements in a satellite environment. The successful launch and data acquisition of the Nimbus 5 (formerly Nimbus E) gives further demonstration to its achievement.

  16. Next generation along track scanning radiometer - SLSTR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frerick, J.; Nieke, J.; Mavrocordatos, C.; Berruti, B.; Donlon, C.; Cosi, M.; Engel, W.; Bianchi, S.; Smith, Dave

    2012-10-01

    Since 1991, along track scanning radiometers (A)ATSR have been flown on a series of satellite platforms. These instruments use an along-track scanning design that provides two views of the same earth target through different atmospheric paths. Dual-view multispectral measurements can be used to derive an accurate atmospheric correction when retrieving geophysical parameters such as Sea Surface Temperature (SST). In addition, the (A)ATSR family of instruments use actively cooled detector systems and two precision calibration blackbody targets to maintain and manage on-board calibration. Visible channel calibration is implemented using a solar diffuser viewed once per orbit. As a consequence of these design features, resulting data derived from (A)ATSR instruments is both accurate and well characterized. After 10 years of Service the ENVISAT platform was lost in early 2012 asnd AATSR operations stopped. The Global Monitoring for Environment and Security (GMES) Sentinel-3 "Sea Land Surface Temperature Radiometer" (SLSTR) instrument is the successor to the AATSR family of instruments and is expected to launch in April 2014. The challenge for SLSTR is to develop and deliver a new instrument with identical or improved performance to that of the (A)ATSR family. The SLSTR design builds on the heritage features of the (A)ATSR with important extensions to address GMES requirements. SLSTR maintains the main instrument principles (along-track scanning, a two point infrared on-board radiometric calibration, actively cooled detectors, solar diffuser). The design also includes more spectral channels including additional bands at 1.3 and 2.2 μm providing enhanced cloud detection, dedicated fire channels, an increase of dual view swath from 500 to 740 km, an increase in the nadir swath of 1400 km. The increase in swath has led to, a new optical front-end design incorporating two rotating scan mirrors (with encoders to provide pointing knowledge) and an innovative flip mechanism to

  17. Simultaneous in-flight calibrations of the Galileo science platform and attitude control subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, J. Y.; Hayati, S. A.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents a design metholodology and simulation study results for a combined star scanner-gyro-scan platform in-flight calibration for the dual spin Galileo spacecraft. The design process involves three separate parts: the construction of an error model, development of the calibration model, and the selection of the appropriate estimation technique. The major innovative contribution lies in the development of the first two parts which are unique to the Galileo design. A unified procedure has been developed to allow simultaneous calibration of the three subsystems. However, provisions are also made in the software to calibrate each subsystem separately when the necessary a priori information is available.

  18. The use of thematic mapper simulator calibration data for assessment of data quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, M. L.

    1980-01-01

    In flight calibration data collected from the thematic mapper simulator (TMS) were used to assess the quality of Earth scan data. The following results are indicated: (1) based on limited samples, individual TMS channels have noise which varies from channel to channel, but remains constant within a channel; (2) short term variations of more than 5% in the average values of calibration source responses indicate problems; and (3) absolute radiometric calibration is unlikely to be meaningful in a temporal sense due to single point calibration methods used.

  19. Calibration of longwavelength exotech model 20-C spectroradiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, R.; Robinson, B.; Silva, L.

    1978-01-01

    A brief description of the Exotech model 20-C field spectroradiometer which measures the spectral radiance of a target in the wavelength ranges 0.37 to 2.5 microns (short wavelength unit), 2.8 to 5.6 microns and 7.0 to 14 microns (long wavelength unit) is given. Wavelength calibration of long wavelength unit was done by knowing the strong, sharp and accurately known absorption bands of polystyrene, atmospheric carbon dioxide and methyl cyclohexane (liquid) in the infrared wavelength region. The spectral radiance calibration was done by recording spectral scans of the hot and the cold blackbodies and assuming that spectral radiance varies linearly with the signal.

  20. Internal Water Vapor Photoacoustic Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.

    2009-01-01

    Water vapor absorption is ubiquitous in the infrared wavelength range where photoacoustic trace gas detectors operate. This technique allows for discontinuous wavelength tuning by temperature-jumping a laser diode from one range to another within a time span suitable for photoacoustic calibration. The use of an internal calibration eliminates the need for external calibrated reference gases. Commercial applications include an improvement of photoacoustic spectrometers in all fields of use.

  1. Nuclear Heart Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... into your blood and travels to your heart. Nuclear heart scans use single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) or cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) to detect the energy from the tracer to make pictures of your ...

  2. Slow Scan Telemedicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Originally developed under contract for NASA by Ball Bros. Research Corporation for acquiring visual information from lunar and planetary spacecraft, system uses standard closed circuit camera connected to a device called a scan converter, which slows the stream of images to match an audio circuit, such as a telephone line. Transmitted to its destination, the image is reconverted by another scan converter and displayed on a monitor. In addition to assist scans, technique allows transmission of x-rays, nuclear scans, ultrasonic imagery, thermograms, electrocardiograms or live views of patient. Also allows conferencing and consultation among medical centers, general practitioners, specialists and disease control centers. Commercialized by Colorado Video, Inc., major employment is in business and industry for teleconferencing, cable TV news, transmission of scientific/engineering data, security, information retrieval, insurance claim adjustment, instructional programs, and remote viewing of advertising layouts, real estate, construction sites or products.

  3. Photothermal imaging scanning microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Chinn, Diane; Stolz, Christopher J.; Wu, Zhouling; Huber, Robert; Weinzapfel, Carolyn

    2006-07-11

    Photothermal Imaging Scanning Microscopy produces a rapid, thermal-based, non-destructive characterization apparatus. Also, a photothermal characterization method of surface and subsurface features includes micron and nanoscale spatial resolution of meter-sized optical materials.

  4. Thoracic spine CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... Narrowing of the spine ( spinal stenosis ) Scoliosis Tumor Risks Risks of CT scans include: Exposure to radiation ... urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows ...

  5. Brain PET scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tell the difference between Parkinson disease and other movement disorders Several PET scans may be taken to determine ... identify where the seizures start in your brain Movement disorders (such as Parkinson disease )

  6. Cervical MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... magnetic resonance imaging) scan uses energy from strong magnets to create pictures of the part of the ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  7. Leg MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... resonance imaging) scan of the leg uses strong magnets to create pictures of the leg. This may ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  8. Arm MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... arm MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan uses strong magnets to create pictures of the upper and lower ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  9. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... A thyroid scan is a type of nuclear medicine imaging. The radioactive iodine uptake test (RAIU) is ... thyroid function, but does not involve imaging. Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging that uses ...

  10. Pediatric CT Scans

    Cancer.gov

    The Radiation Epidemiology Branch and collaborators have initiated a retrospective cohort study to evaluate the relationship between radiation exposure from CT scans conducted during childhood and adolescence and the subsequent development of cancer.

  11. Fiber-Scanned Microdisplays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crossman-Bosworth, Janet; Seibel, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Helmet- and head-mounted display systems, denoted fiber-scanned microdisplays, have been proposed to provide information in an "augmented reality" format (meaning that the information would be optically overlaid on the user's field of view).

  12. Neural networks for calibration tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur

    1993-01-01

    Artificial neural networks are suitable for performing pattern-to-pattern calibrations. These calibrations are potentially useful for facilities operations in aeronautics, the control of optical alignment, and the like. Computed tomography is compared with neural net calibration tomography for estimating density from its x-ray transform. X-ray transforms are measured, for example, in diffuse-illumination, holographic interferometry of fluids. Computed tomography and neural net calibration tomography are shown to have comparable performance for a 10 degree viewing cone and 29 interferograms within that cone. The system of tomography discussed is proposed as a relevant test of neural networks and other parallel processors intended for using flow visualization data.

  13. Radiance calibration of spherical integrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclean, James T.; Guenther, Bruce W.

    1989-01-01

    Techniques for improving the knowledge of the radiance of large area spherical and hemispherical integrating energy sources have been investigated. Such sources are used to calibrate numerous aircraft and spacecraft remote sensing instruments. Comparisons are made between using a standard source based calibration method and a quantum efficient detector (QED) based calibration method. The uncertainty involved in transferring the calibrated values of the point source standard lamp to the extended source is estimated to be 5 to 10 percent. The use of the QED allows an improvement in the uncertainty to 1 to 2 percent for the measurement of absolute radiance from a spherical integrator source.

  14. Atmospheric optical calibration system

    DOEpatents

    Hulstrom, R.L.; Cannon, T.W.

    1988-10-25

    An atmospheric optical calibration system is provided to compare actual atmospheric optical conditions to standard atmospheric optical conditions on the basis of aerosol optical depth, relative air mass, and diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio. An indicator can show the extent to which the actual conditions vary from standard conditions. Aerosol scattering and absorption properties, diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio, and precipitable water vapor determined on a real-time basis for optical and pressure measurements are also used to generate a computer spectral model and for correcting actual performance response of a photovoltaic device to standard atmospheric optical condition response on a real-time basis as the device is being tested in actual outdoor conditions. 7 figs.

  15. Atmospheric optical calibration system

    DOEpatents

    Hulstrom, Roland L.; Cannon, Theodore W.

    1988-01-01

    An atmospheric optical calibration system is provided to compare actual atmospheric optical conditions to standard atmospheric optical conditions on the basis of aerosol optical depth, relative air mass, and diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio. An indicator can show the extent to which the actual conditions vary from standard conditions. Aerosol scattering and absorption properties, diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio, and precipitable water vapor determined on a real-time basis for optical and pressure measurements are also used to generate a computer spectral model and for correcting actual performance response of a photovoltaic device to standard atmospheric optical condition response on a real-time basis as the device is being tested in actual outdoor conditions.

  16. Inspection system calibration methods

    DOEpatents

    Deason, Vance A.; Telschow, Kenneth L.

    2004-12-28

    An inspection system calibration method includes producing two sideband signals of a first wavefront; interfering the two sideband signals in a photorefractive material, producing an output signal therefrom having a frequency and a magnitude; and producing a phase modulated operational signal having a frequency different from the output signal frequency, a magnitude, and a phase modulation amplitude. The method includes determining a ratio of the operational signal magnitude to the output signal magnitude, determining a ratio of a 1st order Bessel function of the operational signal phase modulation amplitude to a 0th order Bessel function of the operational signal phase modulation amplitude, and comparing the magnitude ratio to the Bessel function ratio.

  17. Quality Management and Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkus, Henk G.

    Good specification of a product’s performance requires adequate characterization of relevant properties. Particulate products are usually characterized by some PSD, shape or porosity parameter(s). For proper characterization, adequate sampling, dispersion, and measurement procedures should be available or developed and skilful personnel should use appropriate, well-calibrated/qualified equipment. The characterization should be executed, in agreement with customers, in a wellorganized laboratory. All related aspects should be laid down in a quality handbook. The laboratory should provide proof for its capability to perform the characterization of stated products and/or reference materials within stated confidence limits. This can be done either by internal validation and audits or by external GLP accreditation.

  18. TOD to TTP calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijl, Piet; Reynolds, Joseph P.; Vos, Wouter K.; Hogervorst, Maarten A.; Fanning, Jonathan D.

    2011-05-01

    The TTP (Targeting Task Performance) metric, developed at NVESD, is the current standard US Army model to predict EO/IR Target Acquisition performance. This model however does not have a corresponding lab or field test to empirically assess the performance of a camera system. The TOD (Triangle Orientation Discrimination) method, developed at TNO in The Netherlands, provides such a measurement. In this study, we make a direct comparison between TOD performance for a range of sensors and the extensive historical US observer performance database built to develop and calibrate the TTP metric. The US perception data were collected doing an identification task by military personnel on a standard 12 target, 12 aspect tactical vehicle image set that was processed through simulated sensors for which the most fundamental sensor parameters such as blur, sampling, spatial and temporal noise were varied. In the present study, we measured TOD sensor performance using exactly the same sensors processing a set of TOD triangle test patterns. The study shows that good overall agreement is obtained when the ratio between target characteristic size and TOD test pattern size at threshold equals 6.3. Note that this number is purely based on empirical data without any intermediate modeling. The calibration of the TOD to the TTP is highly beneficial to the sensor modeling and testing community for a variety of reasons. These include: i) a connection between requirement specification and acceptance testing, and ii) a very efficient method to quickly validate or extend the TTP range prediction model to new systems and tasks.

  19. Multiple Reflector Scanning Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Bing

    Narrow beamwidth antenna systems are important to remote sensing applications and point-to-point communication systems. In many applications the main beam of the antenna radiation pattern must be scannable over a region of space. Scanning by mechanically skewing the entire antenna assembly is difficult and in many situations is unacceptable. Performance during scan is, of course, also very important. Traditional reflector systems employing the well-focused paraboloidal -shaped main reflector accomplish scan by motion of a few feeds, or by phase steering a focal plane feed array. Such scanning systems can experience significant gain loss. Traditional reflecting systems with a spherical main reflector have low aperture efficiency and poor side lobe and cross polarization performance. This dissertation introduces a new approach to the design of scanning spherical reflector systems, in which the performance weaknesses of high cross polarization and high side lobe levels are avoided. Moreover, the low aperture utilization common in spherical reflectors is overcome. As an improvement to this new spherical main reflector configuration, a flat mirror reflector is introduced to minimize the mechanical difficulties to scan the main beam. In addition to the reflector system design, reflector antenna performance evaluation is also important. The temperature resolution issue important for earth observation radiometer antennas is studied, and a new method to evaluate and optimize such temperature resolution is introduced.

  20. Wide scanning spherical antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Bing (Inventor); Stutzman, Warren L. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A novel method for calculating the surface shapes for subreflectors in a suboptic assembly of a tri-reflector spherical antenna system is introduced, modeled from a generalization of Galindo-Israel's method of solving partial differential equations to correct for spherical aberration and provide uniform feed to aperture mapping. In a first embodiment, the suboptic assembly moves as a single unit to achieve scan while the main reflector remains stationary. A feed horn is tilted during scan to maintain the illuminated area on the main spherical reflector fixed throughout the scan thereby eliminating the need to oversize the main spherical reflector. In an alternate embodiment, both the main spherical reflector and the suboptic assembly are fixed. A flat mirror is used to create a virtual image of the suboptic assembly. Scan is achieved by rotating the mirror about the spherical center of the main reflector. The feed horn is tilted during scan to maintain the illuminated area on the main spherical reflector fixed throughout the scan.

  1. Preliminary design study. Shuttle modular scanning spectroradiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Fundamental concepts on which to base a detailed design for a Shuttle Modular Scanning Spectroradiometer were developed, and a preliminary design is presented. The recommended design features modularity and flexibility. It includes a 75-cm f/1.7-telescope assembly in an all-reflective Schmidt configuration, a solid state scan system (pushbroom) with high resolution over a 15 deg field of view, and ten detector channels covering the spectral range from 0.45 to 12.5 micrometers. It uses charge transfer device techniques to accommodate a large number of detector elements for earth observation measurements. Methods for in-flight radiometric calibration, for image motion compensation, and for data processing are described. Recommendations for ground support equipment are included, and interfaces with the shuttle orbiter vehicle are illustrated.

  2. Scanning thermal plumes. [from power plant condensers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarpace, F. L.; Madding, R. P.; Green, T., III

    1974-01-01

    In order to study the behavior and effects of thermal plumes associated with the condenser cooling of power plants, thermal line scans are periodically made from aircraft over all power plants along the Wisconsin shore of Lake Michigan. Simultaneous ground truth is also gathered with a radiometer. Some sequential imagery has been obtained for periods up to two hours to study short term variations in the surface temperature of the plume. The article concentrates on the techniques used to analyze thermal scanner data for a single power plant which was studied intensively. The calibration methods, temperature dependence of the thermal scanner, and calculation of the modulation transfer function for the scanner are treated. It is concluded that obtaining quantitative surface-temperature data from thermal scanning is a nontrivial task. Accuracies up to plus or minus 0.1 C are attainable.

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Gaia-ESO Survey iDR4 calibrators (Pancino+, 2017)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pancino, E.; Lardo, C.; Altavilla, G.; Marinoni, S.; Ragaini, S.; Cocozza, G.; Bellazzini, M.; Sabbi, E.; Zoccali, M.; Donati, P.; Heiter, U.; Koposov, S. E.; Blomme, R.; Morel, T.; Simon-Diaz, S.; Lobel, A.; Soubiran, C.; Montalban, J.; Valentini, M.; Casey, A. R.; Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Jofre, P.; Worley, C. C.; Magrini, L.; Hourihane, A.; Francois, P.; Feltzing, S.; Gilmore, G.; Randich, S.; Asplund, M.; Bonifacio, P.; Drew, J. E.; Jeffries, R. D.; Micela, G.; Vallenari, A.; Alfaro, E. J.; Allende Prieto, C.; Babusiaux, C.; Bensby, T.; Bragaglia, A.; Flaccomio, E.; Hambly, N.; Korn, A. J.; Lanzafame, A. C.; Smiljanic, R.; van Eck, S.; Walton, N. A.; Bayo, A.; Carraro, G.; Costado, M. T.; Damiani, F.; Edvardsson, B.; Franciosini, E.; Frasca, A.; Lewis, J.; Monaco, L.; Morbidelli, L.; Prisinzano, L.; Sacco, G. G.; Sbordone, L.; Sousa, S. G.; Zaggia, S.; Koch, A.; Gaia-ESO Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    List of GES iDR4 calibrators. It can be used to select the iDR4 calibrators from the upcoming ESO Phase 3 public release. The columns contain: the GES unique identifier of each star (the CName), based on the object sexagesimal coordinates; the calibration type, which can be GC or OC for clusters, RV for radial velocity standards, BM for benchmark stars, or CR for CoRoT targets; the field name; and the 2MASS J and K magnitudes, when available. (1 data file).

  4. Principal Component Noise Filtering for NAST-I Radiometric Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Jialin; Smith, William L., Sr.

    2011-01-01

    The National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) Airborne Sounder Testbed- Interferometer (NAST-I) instrument is a high-resolution scanning interferometer that measures emitted thermal radiation between 3.3 and 18 microns. The NAST-I radiometric calibration is achieved using internal blackbody calibration references at ambient and hot temperatures. In this paper, we introduce a refined calibration technique that utilizes a principal component (PC) noise filter to compensate for instrument distortions and artifacts, therefore, further improve the absolute radiometric calibration accuracy. To test the procedure and estimate the PC filter noise performance, we form dependent and independent test samples using odd and even sets of blackbody spectra. To determine the optimal number of eigenvectors, the PC filter algorithm is applied to both dependent and independent blackbody spectra with a varying number of eigenvectors. The optimal number of PCs is selected so that the total root-mean-square (RMS) error is minimized. To estimate the filter noise performance, we examine four different scenarios: apply PC filtering to both dependent and independent datasets, apply PC filtering to dependent calibration data only, apply PC filtering to independent data only, and no PC filters. The independent blackbody radiances are predicted for each case and comparisons are made. The results show significant reduction in noise in the final calibrated radiances with the implementation of the PC filtering algorithm.

  5. Improvements of VIIRS and MODIS Solar Diffuser and Lunar Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Butler, James J.; Lei, Ning; Sun, Junqiang; Fulbright, Jon; Wang, Zhipeng; McIntire, Jeff; Angal, Amit Avinash

    2013-01-01

    Both VIIRS and MODIS instruments use solar diffuser (SD) and lunar observations to calibrate their reflective solar bands (RSB). A solar diffuser stability monitor (SDSM) is used to track the SD on-orbit degradation. On-orbit observations have shown similar wavelength-dependent SD degradation (larger at shorter VIS wavelengths) and SDSM detector response degradation (larger at longer NIR wavelengths) for both VIIRS and MODIS instruments. In general, the MODIS scan mirror has experienced more degradation in the VIS spectral region whereas the VIIRS rotating telescope assembly (RTA) mirrors have seen more degradation in the NIR and SWIR spectral region. Because of this wavelength dependent mirror degradation, the sensor's relative spectral response (RSR) needs to be modulated. Due to differences between the solar and lunar spectral irradiance, the modulated RSR could have different effects on the SD and lunar calibration. In this paper, we identify various factors that should be considered for the improvements of VIIRS and MODIS solar and lunar calibration and examine their potential impact. Specifically, we will characterize and assess the calibration impact due to SD and SDSM attenuation screen transmission (uncertainty), SD BRF uncertainty and onorbit degradation, SDSM detector response degradation, and modulated RSR resulting from the sensor's optics degradation. Also illustrated and discussed in this paper are the calibration strategies implemented in the VIIRS and MODIS SD and lunar calibrations and efforts that could be made for future improvements.

  6. Hand-Eye Calibration in Visually-Guided Robot Grinding.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Long; Xie, He; Zhang, Gang; Yan, Si-Jie; Yin, Zhou-Ping

    2016-11-01

    Visually-guided robot grinding is a novel and promising automation technique for blade manufacturing. One common problem encountered in robot grinding is hand-eye calibration, which establishes the pose relationship between the end effector (hand) and the scanning sensor (eye). This paper proposes a new calibration approach for robot belt grinding. The main contribution of this paper is its consideration of both joint parameter errors and pose parameter errors in a hand-eye calibration equation. The objective function of the hand-eye calibration is built and solved, from which 30 compensated values (corresponding to 24 joint parameters and six pose parameters) are easily calculated in a closed solution. The proposed approach is economic and simple because only a criterion sphere is used to calculate the calibration parameters, avoiding the need for an expensive and complicated tracking process using a laser tracker. The effectiveness of this method is verified using a calibration experiment and a blade grinding experiment. The code used in this approach is attached in the Appendix.

  7. A new polarimetric active radar calibrator and calibration technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jianguo; Xu, Xiaojian

    2015-10-01

    Polarimetric active radar calibrator (PARC) is one of the most important calibrators with high radar cross section (RCS) for polarimetry measurement. In this paper, a new double-antenna polarimetric active radar calibrator (DPARC) is proposed, which consists of two rotatable antennas with wideband electromagnetic polarization filters (EMPF) to achieve lower cross-polarization for transmission and reception. With two antennas which are rotatable around the radar line of sight (LOS), the DPARC provides a variety of standard polarimetric scattering matrices (PSM) through the rotation combination of receiving and transmitting polarization, which are useful for polarimatric calibration in different applications. In addition, a technique based on Fourier analysis is proposed for calibration processing. Numerical simulation results are presented to demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed DPARC and processing technique.

  8. Challenging Issues for On-orbit Calibration in the VIS and NIR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiong, X.; Waluschka, E.; Salomonson, V. V.; Wolfe, R.; Barnes, W.; Guenther, B.

    2004-01-01

    On-orbit calibration of Earth-observing sensors in the VIS and NIR spectral regions is usually performed using the sensors on-board devices such as internal lamp(s) or solar diffuser plate(s) to provide calibration parameters. For sensors with no (or with less reliable) on-board calibrators, lunar calibration or ground validation approaches are often used. Each of these has its own set of problems that need to be fully addressed in order to support high quality on-orbit calibration and characterization. Some science products, such as Ocean color, may impose more stringent requirements that demand greater calibration precision. This paper uses MODIS as an example to illustrate challenging issues involved in VIS and NIR on-orbit calibration. It focuses on the solar diffuser (SD) calibration approach, including the effects due to SD BRF, SD attenuation screen(s), and earthshine. The impact of optics (solar diffuser and scan mirror) on-orbit degradation, including changes in the sensor s response versus scan angle (RVS), on the calibration and subsequent data quality is also discussed.

  9. BXS Re-calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, J; /SLAC

    2010-11-24

    Early in the commissioning it was noticed by Cecile Limborg that the calibration of the BXS spectrometer magnet seemed to be different from the strength of the BX01/BX02 magnets. First the BX01/BX02 currents were adjusted to 135 MeV and the beam energy was adjusted to make the horizontal orbit flat. Then BX01/BX02 magnets were switched off and BXS was adjusted to make the horizontal orbit in the spectrometer line flat, without changing the energy of the beam. The result was that about 140-141 MeV were required on the BXS magnet. This measurement was repeated several times by others with the same results. It was not clear what was causing the error: magnet strength or layout. A position error of about 19 mm of the BXS magnet could explain the difference. Because there was a significant misalignment of the vacuum chamber in the BXS line, the alignment of the whole spectrometer line was checked. The vacuum chamber was corrected, but the magnets were found to be in the proper alignment. So we were left with one (or conceivably two) magnet calibration errors. Because BXS is a wedged shaped magnet, the bend angle depends on the horizontal position of the incoming beam. As mentioned, an offset of the beam position of 19 mm would increase or decrease the bend angle roughly by the ratio of 135/141. The figure of 19 mm is special and caused a considerable confusion during the design and measurement of the BXS magnet. This is best illustrated in Figure 1 which was taken out of the BXS Traveler document. The distance between the horizontal midplanes of the poles and the apex of the beam path was chosen to be 19 mm so the beam is close to the good field region throughout its entire path. Thus it seemed possible that there was an error that resulted in the beam not being on this trajectory, or conversely, that the magnetic measurements were done on the wrong trajectory and the magnet was then mis-calibrated. Mechanical measurements of the vacuum chamber made in the tunnel

  10. Calibration of the ARID robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Keith L

    1992-01-01

    The author has formulated a new, general model for specifying the kinematic properties of serial manipulators. The new model kinematic parameters do not suffer discontinuities when nominally parallel adjacent axes deviate from exact parallelism. From this new theory the author develops a first-order, lumped-parameter, calibration-model for the ARID manipulator. Next, the author develops a calibration methodology for the ARID based on visual and acoustic sensing. A sensor platform, consisting of a camera and four sonars attached to the ARID end frame, performs calibration measurements. A calibration measurement consists of processing one visual frame of an accurately placed calibration image and recording four acoustic range measurements. A minimum of two measurement protocols determine the kinematics calibration-model of the ARID for a particular region: assuming the joint displacements are accurately measured, the calibration surface is planar, and the kinematic parameters do not vary rapidly in the region. No theoretical or practical limitations appear to contra-indicate the feasibility of the calibration method developed here.

  11. Side looking radar calibration study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, W. D.

    1975-01-01

    Calibration of an airborne sidelooking radar is accomplished by the use of a model that relates the radar parameters to the physical mapping situation. Topics discussed include: characteristics of the transmitters; the antennas; target absorption and reradiation; the receiver and map making or radar data processing; and the calibration process.

  12. TIME CALIBRATED OSCILLOSCOPE SWEEP CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Smith, V.L.; Carstensen, H.K.

    1959-11-24

    An improved time calibrated sweep circuit is presented, which extends the range of usefulness of conventional oscilloscopes as utilized for time calibrated display applications in accordance with U. S. Patent No. 2,832,002. Principal novelty resides in the provision of a pair of separate signal paths, each of which is phase and amplitude adjustable, to connect a high-frequency calibration oscillator to the output of a sawtooth generator also connected to the respective horizontal deflection plates of an oscilloscope cathode ray tube. The amplitude and phase of the calibration oscillator signals in the two signal paths are adjusted to balance out feedthrough currents capacitively coupled at high frequencies of the calibration oscillator from each horizontal deflection plate to the vertical plates of the cathode ray tube.

  13. Calibration of platinum resistance thermometers.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinclair, D. H.; Terbeek, H. G.; Malone, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    Results of five years experience in calibrating about 1000 commercial platinum resistance thermometers (PRT) are reported. These PRT were relatively small and rugged, with ice-point resistances from 200 to 5000 ohms. Calibrations normalized in terms of resistance-difference ratios (Cragoe Z function) were found to be remarkably uniform for five of six different types of PRT tested, and to agree very closely with normalized calibrations of the primary reference standard type PRT. The Z function normalization cancels residual resistances which are not temperature dependent and simplifies interpolation between calibration points when the quality of a given type of PRT has been established in terms of uniform values of the Z function. Measurements at five or six well spaced base-point temperatures with Z interpolation will suffice to calibrate a PRT accurately from 4 to 900 K.

  14. The Advanced LIGO photon calibrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karki, S.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Kandhasamy, S.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, T. D.; Anders, E. H.; Berliner, J.; Betzwieser, J.; Cahillane, C.; Canete, L.; Conley, C.; Daveloza, H. P.; De Lillo, N.; Gleason, J. R.; Goetz, E.; Izumi, K.; Kissel, J. S.; Mendell, G.; Quetschke, V.; Rodruck, M.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Schwinberg, P. B.; Sottile, A.; Wade, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; West, M.; Savage, R. L.

    2016-11-01

    The two interferometers of the Laser Interferometry Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) recently detected gravitational waves from the mergers of binary black hole systems. Accurate calibration of the output of these detectors was crucial for the observation of these events and the extraction of parameters of the sources. The principal tools used to calibrate the responses of the second-generation (Advanced) LIGO detectors to gravitational waves are systems based on radiation pressure and referred to as photon calibrators. These systems, which were completely redesigned for Advanced LIGO, include several significant upgrades that enable them to meet the calibration requirements of second-generation gravitational wave detectors in the new era of gravitational-wave astronomy. We report on the design, implementation, and operation of these Advanced LIGO photon calibrators that are currently providing fiducial displacements on the order of 1 0-18m /√{Hz } with accuracy and precision of better than 1%.

  15. Femtosecond scanning tunneling microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, A.J.; Donati, G.P.; Rodriguez, G.; Gosnell, T.R.; Trugman, S.A.; Some, D.I.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). By combining scanning tunneling microscopy with ultrafast optical techniques we have developed a novel tool to probe phenomena on atomic time and length scales. We have built and characterized an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope in terms of temporal resolution, sensitivity and dynamic range. Using a novel photoconductive low-temperature-grown GaAs tip, we have achieved a temporal resolution of 1.5 picoseconds and a spatial resolution of 10 nanometers. This scanning tunneling microscope has both cryogenic and ultra-high vacuum capabilities, enabling the study of a wide range of important scientific problems.

  16. Vector generator scan converter

    DOEpatents

    Moore, J.M.; Leighton, J.F.

    1988-02-05

    High printing speeds for graphics data are achieved with a laser printer by transmitting compressed graphics data from a main processor over an I/O channel to a vector generator scan converter which reconstructs a full graphics image for input to the laser printer through a raster data input port. The vector generator scan converter includes a microprocessor with associated microcode memory containing a microcode instruction set, a working memory for storing compressed data, vector generator hardware for drawing a full graphic image from vector parameters calculated by the microprocessor, image buffer memory for storing the reconstructed graphics image and an output scanner for reading the graphics image data and inputting the data to the printer. The vector generator scan converter eliminates the bottleneck created by the I/O channel for transmitting graphics data from the main processor to the laser printer, and increases printer speed up to thirty fold. 7 figs.

  17. Vector generator scan converter

    DOEpatents

    Moore, James M.; Leighton, James F.

    1990-01-01

    High printing speeds for graphics data are achieved with a laser printer by transmitting compressed graphics data from a main processor over an I/O (input/output) channel to a vector generator scan converter which reconstructs a full graphics image for input to the laser printer through a raster data input port. The vector generator scan converter includes a microprocessor with associated microcode memory containing a microcode instruction set, a working memory for storing compressed data, vector generator hardward for drawing a full graphic image from vector parameters calculated by the microprocessor, image buffer memory for storing the reconstructed graphics image and an output scanner for reading the graphics image data and inputting the data to the printer. The vector generator scan converter eliminates the bottleneck created by the I/O channel for transmitting graphics data from the main processor to the laser printer, and increases printer speed up to thirty fold.

  18. A calibrated Franklin chimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonta, Igor; Williams, Earle

    1994-05-01

    Benjamin Franklin devised a simple yet intriguing device to measure electrification in the atmosphere during conditions of foul weather. He constructed a system of bells, one of which was attached to a conductor that was suspended vertically above his house. The device is illustrated in a well-known painting of Franklin (Cohen, 1985). The elevated conductor acquired a potential due to the electric field in the atmosphere and caused a brass ball to oscillate between two bells. The purpose of this study is to extend Franklin's idea by constructing a set of 'chimes' which will operate both in fair and in foul weather conditions. In addition, a mathematical relationship will be established between the frequency of oscillation of a metallic sphere in a simplified geometry and the potential on one plate due to the electrification of the atmosphere. Thus it will be possible to calibrate the 'Franklin Chimes' and to obtain a nearly instantaneous measurement of the potential of the elevated conductor in both fair and foul weather conditions.

  19. Diode calibration manual

    SciTech Connect

    Brunk, J.L.

    1989-09-01

    This procedure is not for the faint of heart. It is a time consuming, complex series of journeys through advanced GAMANAL and the vagueness of analyzer electronics. A knowledge of TRIX AC, DLTV, and IMP on the Octopus system and DSCOPE, PE2, and Symphony on a PC class machine is required. Be aware that the example in this document is a condensation of information that takes up four feet of shelf space. In the attempt to convert the nomenclature of the 7600 version of GAMANAL to that of the CRAY version, there will be confusion with some of the terms used. The 7600 versions relied on punched cards to a great extent where the CRAY version doesn't use them at all. In order not to introduce a new set of nomenclature, I have changed the reference from card to card image. I hope that this will cause the least impact on the vernacular and cause the least amount of confusion possible. This document is a rewritten update of an unpublished document by Bob Wikkerink in 1980. His document was the only written record of the procedures needed to calibrate the Environmental Sciences Low Level Counting Facility. This document updates and expands this information.

  20. PROSPECT: Optical Calibration System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinh, Ken; Prospect Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The Precision Reactor Oscillation and SPECTrum Experiment (PROSPECT), is a short baseline, reactor neutrino experiment which focuses on measurements of the flux and energy spectrum of antineutrinos emitted from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Using these measurements, PROSPECT will probe for eV-scale sterile neutrinos while making a high precision measurement of the U-235 antineutrino spectrum. PROSPECT contains two phases; the first phase consists of a mobile detector near the reactor core while the second phase adds a larger fixed detector further from the core. The PROSPECT Phase 1 detector consists of a 2ton optically segmented liquid scintillator with each segment read-out by two photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The PMTs are calibrated with a photon source generated by a nanosecond pulsed laser. In this project, we developed a plan to determine the effectiveness of a 450nm fiber-pigtailed diode laser as it coupled with several modules including an optical fiber splitter, an optical diffuser, and an attenuator. The project tested for the system ability to deliver light uniformly to each of the cells in the detector. We will present the design and result of this project as well as discuss how it will be implemented in PROSPECT.

  1. Calibration procedure for a laser triangulation scanner with uncertainty evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genta, Gianfranco; Minetola, Paolo; Barbato, Giulio

    2016-11-01

    Most of low cost 3D scanning devices that are nowadays available on the market are sold without a user calibration procedure to correct measurement errors related to changes in environmental conditions. In addition, there is no specific international standard defining a procedure to check the performance of a 3D scanner along time. This paper aims at detailing a thorough methodology to calibrate a 3D scanner and assess its measurement uncertainty. The proposed procedure is based on the use of a reference ball plate and applied to a triangulation laser scanner. Experimental results show that the metrological performance of the instrument can be greatly improved by the application of the calibration procedure that corrects systematic errors and reduces the device's measurement uncertainty.

  2. The New Approach to Camera Calibration - GCPs or TLS Data?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markiewicz, J.; Podlasiak, P.; Kowalczyk, M.; Zawieska, D.

    2016-06-01

    Camera calibration is one of the basic photogrammetric tasks responsible for the quality of processed products. The majority of calibration is performed with a specially designed test field or during the self-calibration process. The research presented in this paper aims to answer the question of whether it is necessary to use control points designed in the standard way for determination of camera interior orientation parameters. Data from close-range laser scanning can be used as an alternative. The experiments shown in this work demonstrate the potential of laser measurements, since the number of points that may be involved in the calculation is much larger than that of commonly used ground control points. The problem which still exists is the correct and automatic identification of object details in the image, taken with a tested camera, as well as in the data set registered with the laser scanner.

  3. Characterization of radiometric calibration of LANDSAT-4 TM reflective bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, J. L.; Abrams, R. B.; Ball, D. L.; Leung, K. C.

    1984-01-01

    Prelaunch and postlaunch internal calibrator, image, and background data is to characterize the radiometric performance of the LANDSAT-4 TM and to recommend improved procedures for radiometric calibration. All but two channels (band 2, channel 4; band 5, channel 3) behave normally. Gain changes relative to a postlaunch reference for channels within a band vary within 0.5 percent as a group. Instrument gain for channels in the cold focal plane oscillates. Noise in background and image data ranges from 0.5 to 1.7 counts. Average differences in forward and reverse image data indicate a need for separate calibration processing of forward and reverse scans. Precision is improved by increasing the pulse integration width from 31 to 41 minor frames, depending on the band.

  4. Adaptive Optical Scanning Holography

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, P. W. M.; Poon, Ting-Chung; Liu, J.-P.

    2016-01-01

    Optical Scanning Holography (OSH) is a powerful technique that employs a single-pixel sensor and a row-by-row scanning mechanism to capture the hologram of a wide-view, three-dimensional object. However, the time required to acquire a hologram with OSH is rather lengthy. In this paper, we propose an enhanced framework, which is referred to as Adaptive OSH (AOSH), to shorten the holographic recording process. We have demonstrated that the AOSH method is capable of decreasing the acquisition time by up to an order of magnitude, while preserving the content of the hologram favorably. PMID:26916866

  5. Adaptive Optical Scanning Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, P. W. M.; Poon, Ting-Chung; Liu, J.-P.

    2016-02-01

    Optical Scanning Holography (OSH) is a powerful technique that employs a single-pixel sensor and a row-by-row scanning mechanism to capture the hologram of a wide-view, three-dimensional object. However, the time required to acquire a hologram with OSH is rather lengthy. In this paper, we propose an enhanced framework, which is referred to as Adaptive OSH (AOSH), to shorten the holographic recording process. We have demonstrated that the AOSH method is capable of decreasing the acquisition time by up to an order of magnitude, while preserving the content of the hologram favorably.

  6. Scanning computed confocal imager

    DOEpatents

    George, John S.

    2000-03-14

    There is provided a confocal imager comprising a light source emitting a light, with a light modulator in optical communication with the light source for varying the spatial and temporal pattern of the light. A beam splitter receives the scanned light and direct the scanned light onto a target and pass light reflected from the target to a video capturing device for receiving the reflected light and transferring a digital image of the reflected light to a computer for creating a virtual aperture and outputting the digital image. In a transmissive mode of operation the invention omits the beam splitter means and captures light passed through the target.

  7. Mercury Continuous Emmission Monitor Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    John Schabron; Eric Kalberer; Ryan Boysen; William Schuster; Joseph Rovani

    2009-03-12

    Mercury continuous emissions monitoring systems (CEMs) are being implemented in over 800 coal-fired power plant stacks throughput the U.S. Western Research Institute (WRI) is working closely with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to facilitate the development of the experimental criteria for a NIST traceability protocol for dynamic elemental mercury vapor calibrators/generators. These devices are used to calibrate mercury CEMs at power plant sites. The Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) which was published in the Federal Register on May 18, 2005 and vacated by a Federal appeals court in early 2008 required that calibration be performed with NIST-traceable standards. Despite the vacature, mercury emissions regulations in the future will require NIST traceable calibration standards, and EPA does not want to interrupt the effort towards developing NIST traceability protocols. The traceability procedures will be defined by EPA. An initial draft traceability protocol was issued by EPA in May 2007 for comment. In August 2007, EPA issued a conceptual interim traceability protocol for elemental mercury calibrators. The protocol is based on the actual analysis of the output of each calibration unit at several concentration levels ranging initially from about 2-40 {micro}g/m{sup 3} elemental mercury, and in the future down to 0.2 {micro}g/m{sup 3}, and this analysis will be directly traceable to analyses by NIST. The EPA traceability protocol document is divided into two separate sections. The first deals with the qualification of calibrator models by the vendors for use in mercury CEM calibration. The second describes the procedure that the vendors must use to certify the calibrators that meet the qualification specifications. The NIST traceable certification is performance based, traceable to analysis using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma

  8. Detection of Radio Emission from the Hyperactive L Dwarf 2MASS J13153094-2649513AB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgasser, Adam J.; Melis, Carl; Zauderer, B. Ashley; Berger, Edo

    2013-01-01

    We report the detection of radio emission from the unusually active L5e + T7 binary 2MASS J13153094-2649513AB made with the Australian Telescope Compact Array. Observations at 5.5 GHz reveal an unresolved source with a continuum flux of 370 ± 50 μJy, corresponding to a radio luminosity of L rad = νL ν = (9 ± 3)×1023 erg s-1 and log10 L rad/L bol = -5.44 ± 0.22. No detection is made at 9.0 GHz to a 5σ limit of 290 μJy, consistent with a power-law spectrum S νvpropν-α with α >~ 0.5. The emission is quiescent, with no evidence of variability or bursts over three hours of observation, and no measurable polarization (V/I < 34%). 2MASS J1315-2649AB is one of the most radio-luminous ultracool dwarfs detected in quiescent emission to date, comparable in strength to other cool sources detected in outburst. Its detection indicates no decline in radio flux through the mid-L dwarfs. It is unique among L dwarfs in having strong and persistent Hα and radio emission, indicating the coexistence of a cool, neutral photosphere (low electron density) and a highly active chromosphere (high electron density and active heating). These traits, coupled with the system's mature age and substellar secondary, make 2MASS J1315-2649AB an important test for proposed radio emission mechanisms in ultracool dwarfs.

  9. A study of RV in Galactic O stars from the 2MASS catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patriarchi, P.; Morbidelli, L.; Perinotto, M.

    2003-11-01

    We present new measurements of the interstellar reddening parameter RV=AV/E(B-V) towards 185 O stars, using J, H, Ks photometry from the 2MASS project. The results are combined with data from the literature of 95 stars where RV has been derived with the same technique, 22 of which in common with our present sample from the 2MASS project catalogue. The average RV from these 258 O stars is of 3.19 +/- 0.50. All objects whose RV departs from this value by more than 2 sigma have been recognized. Ten objects have RV higher than this value and two lower. It is found that anomalous RV can scarcely be associated with anomalies in the general interstellar medium, e.g. with different behaviour in different spiral arms. They are clearly linked to local cloud effect. In the Cygnus region RV values follow the behaviour of the general interstellar medium, while in the Carina arm, in spite of the relatively larger distance, local cloud effects prevail. An explanation for this is suggested. The relatively few stars of our sample whose Hipparcos parallaxes are reliable, are found to have distances systematically smaller than the distances derived by the spectroscopic parallaxes. We argue that this effect is consistent with the recently claimed discovery of grey extinction towards OB stars. This publication makes use of data products from the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS), which is a joint project of the University of Massachusetts and the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center/California Institute of Technology, funded by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the National Science Foundation. Tables 1 and 2 are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/410/905

  10. Determination of elemental impurities in plastic calibration standards using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    McIntyre, D.; Ayyalasomayajula, K.; Jain, J.; Singh, J.; Yu-Yueh, F.

    2012-01-01

    Dual-energy computed tomography (CT) scanning is a rapidly emerging imaging technique employed in nondestructive evaluation of various materials. CT has been used for characterizing rocks and visualizing multiphase flow through rocks for over 25 years. The most common technique for dual-energy CT scanning relies on homogeneous calibration standards to produce the most accurate decoupled data. However, the use of calibration standards with impurities increases the probability of error in the reconstructed data and results in poor rock characterization. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy was used to determine impurity concentration in a set of commercially purchased calibration standards used in dual-energy scanning for material identification with coal samples. Two calibration models were developed by using univariate calibration with the internal ratio method and multiple linear regression. Seven elements (Al, Fe, Mg, Na, Ni, Sr, and Ti) were examined in five different samples containing varying amounts of each ion to compare calibration from univariate data analysis and from multivariate data analysis. The contaminant concentrations were also measured by a commercially available inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy instrument, and the data were used as a reference in developing calibration curves for a modified version of the single linear regression model and the multiple linear regression model.

  11. Efficient Selection and Classification of Infrared Excess Emission Stars Based on AKARI and 2MASS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jinzeng; Huang, Yafang

    2015-08-01

    The selection of young stellar objects (YSOs) based on excessive emission in the infrared is easily contaminated by post-main-sequence stars and various types of emission line stars with similar properties. We define here stringent criteria for an efficient selection and classification of stellar sources with infrared excess emission based on combined 2MASS and AKARI colors. First of all, bright dwarfs and giants with known spectral types were selected from the Hipparcos Catalogue and cross-identified with the 2MASS and AKARI Point Source Catalogues to produce the main-sequence and the post-main-sequence tracks, which appear as expected as tight tracks with very small dispersion. However, several of the main-sequence stars indicate excess emission in the color space. Further investigations based on the SIMBAD data help to clarify their nature as classical Be stars, which are found to be located in a well isolated region on each of the color-color (C-C) diagrams. Several kinds of contaminants were then removed based on their distribution on the C-C diagrams. A test sample of Herbig Ae/Be stars and classical T Tauri stars were cross-identified with the 2MASS and AKARI catalogs to define the loci of YSOs with different masses on the C-C diagrams. Well classified Class I and Class II sources were taken as a second test sample to discriminate between various types of YSOs at possibly different evolutionary stages. This helped to define the loci of different types of YSOs and a set of criteria for selecting YSOs based on their colors in the near- and mid-infrared. Candidate YSOs toward IC 1396 indicating excess emission in the near-infrared were employed to verify the validity of the new source selection criteria defined based on C-C diagrams compiled with the 2MASS and AKARI data. Optical spectroscopy and spectral energy distributions of the IC 1396 sample yield a clear identification of the YSOs and further confirm the criteria defined for exploring the nature and

  12. Efficient Selection and Classification of Infrared Excess Emission Stars Based on AKARI and 2MASS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ya Fang; Zeng Li, Jin; Rector, Travis A.; Mallamaci, Carlos C.

    2013-05-01

    The selection of young stellar objects (YSOs) based on excess emission in the infrared is easily contaminated by post-main-sequence stars and various types of emission line stars with similar properties. We define in this paper stringent criteria for an efficient selection and classification of stellar sources with infrared excess emission based on combined Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) and AKARI colors. First of all, bright dwarfs and giants with known spectral types were selected from the Hipparcos Catalogue and cross-identified with the 2MASS and AKARI Point Source Catalogues to produce the main-sequence and the post-main-sequence tracks, which appear as expected as tight tracks with very small dispersion. However, several of the main-sequence stars indicate excess emission in the color space. Further investigations based on the SIMBAD data help to clarify their nature as classical Be stars, which are found to be located in a well isolated region on each of the color-color (C-C) diagrams. Several kinds of contaminants were then removed based on their distribution in the C-C diagrams. A test sample of Herbig Ae/Be stars and classical T Tauri stars were cross-identified with the 2MASS and AKARI catalogs to define the loci of YSOs with different masses on the C-C diagrams. Well classified Class I and Class II sources were taken as a second test sample to discriminate between various types of YSOs at possibly different evolutionary stages. This helped to define the loci of different types of YSOs and a set of criteria for selecting YSOs based on their colors in the near- and mid-infrared. Candidate YSOs toward IC 1396 indicating excess emission in the near-infrared were employed to verify the validity of the new source selection criteria defined based on C-C diagrams compiled with the 2MASS and AKARI data. Optical spectroscopy and spectral energy distributions of the IC 1396 sample yield a clear identification of the YSOs and further confirm the criteria defined

  13. The newly discovered eclipsing cataclysmic star 2MASS J16211735 + 4412541 and its peculiarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjurkchieva, Diana P.; Popov, Velimir A.; Vasileva, Doroteya L.; Petrov, Nikola I.

    2017-04-01

    We present our observations of the newly discovered, eclipsing cataclysmic star 2MASS J16211735 + 4412541 carried out two weeks after its outburst at the beginning of June 2016. Its main peculiarity is the big increasing of eclipse depth during outburst. We qualitatively modelled the folded light curves at quiescence and outburst in order to explain the reason for increase of the primary luminosity about two hundred times. The light curve fits revealed that such an effect can be reproduced by a flat disc whose radius and temperature are several times bigger than those of the primary at quiescence.

  14. Stent optical inspection system calibration and performance.

    PubMed

    Bermudez, Carlos; Laguarta, Ferran; Cadevall, Cristina; Matilla, Aitor; Ibañez, Sergi; Artigas, Roger

    2017-03-20

    Implantable medical devices, such as stents, have to be inspected 100% so no defective ones are implanted into a human body. In this paper, a novel optical stent inspection system is presented. By the combination of a high numerical aperture microscope, a triple illumination system, a rotational stage, and a CMOS camera, unrolled sections of the outer and inner surfaces of the stent are obtained with high resolution at high speed with a line-scan approach. In this paper, a comparison between the conventional microscope image formation and this new approach is shown. A calibration process and the investigation of the error sources that lead to inaccuracies of the critical dimension measurements are presented.

  15. Terahertz Ray System Calibration and Material Characterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiou, Chien-Ping; Blackshire, James L.; Thompson, R. Bruce

    2009-03-01

    Recently, terahertz ray imaging has emerged as one of the most promising new NDE techniques, and new systems are being developed for applications. In this work, we conducted system calibration on a new time-domain spectroscopy system, and then utilized this system to characterize glass-fiber composite plates and polyimide resin disks. Extensive experimental measurements in thru-transmission mode were made to map out the T-ray beam pattern in free space as well as to scan these two test materials. Material properties such as index of fraction and absorption coefficient are of the primary interest. Both results were shown in good agreement with known data. Using these characterized material properties, we also demonstrated accurate modeling of the T-ray signal propagating through the polyimide resin disk.

  16. Free-standing graphene by scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Song, F Q; Li, Z Y; Wang, Z W; He, L; Han, M; Wang, G H

    2010-11-01

    Free-standing graphene sheets have been imaged by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). We show that the discrete numbers of graphene layers enable an accurate calibration of STEM intensity to be performed over an extended thickness and with single atomic layer sensitivity. We have applied this calibration to carbon nanoparticles with complex structures. This leads to the direct and accurate measurement of the electron mean free path. Here, we demonstrate potentials using graphene sheets as a novel mass standard in STEM-based mass spectrometry.

  17. Ultrafast scanning probe microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Shimon; Chemla, Daniel S.; Ogletree, D. Frank; Botkin, David

    1995-01-01

    An ultrafast scanning probe microscopy method for achieving subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of an observation sample. In one embodiment of the present claimed invention, a single short optical pulse is generated and is split into first and second pulses. One of the pulses is delayed using variable time delay means. The first pulse is then directed at an observation sample located proximate to the probe of a scanning probe microscope. The scanning probe microscope produces probe-sample signals indicative of the response of the probe to characteristics of the sample. The second pulse is used to modulate the probe of the scanning probe microscope. The time delay between the first and second pulses is then varied. The probe-sample response signal is recorded at each of the various time delays created between the first and second pulses. The probe-sample response signal is then plotted as a function of time delay to produce a cross-correlation of the probe sample response. In so doing, the present invention provides simultaneous subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of the sample.

  18. Teaching the SCANS Competencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Labor, Washington, DC. Secretary's Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills.

    SCANS (the Secretary's Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills) provides definitions of the knowledge students and workers need for workplace success and methods for applying these principles in communities throughout the United States. This document contains six articles that give education and training practitioners practical suggestions for…

  19. SCANS: The Missing Link.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price-Machado, Donna

    Three specific classroom techniques for teaching vocational English as a Second Language to adults are discussed. They are three items on the SCANS (Secretary's Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills) list of "easy things" to do to integrate workplace basics into the classroom, designed to encourage a student-focused classroom. They…

  20. The Organizational Scan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tosti, Donald; Jackson, Stephanie D.

    1997-01-01

    Performance technologists like quick, cheap analysis that is rigorous and comprehensive. This article presents the organization scan model which makes successful compromises between the technologist's obligation to be rigorous and comprehensive and the sponsor's obligation to save money and time. Includes "Societal Bottom Line: Measurable…

  1. Gallbladder radionuclide scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... please enable JavaScript. Gallbladder radionuclide scan is a test that uses radioactive material to check gallbladder function. It is also used ... for bile duct blockage or leak. How the Test is Performed ... called a gamma emitting tracer into a vein. This material collects mostly in the liver. It will then ...

  2. Ultrafast scanning probe microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, S.; Chemla, D.S.; Ogletree, D.F.; Botkin, D.

    1995-05-16

    An ultrafast scanning probe microscopy method is described for achieving subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of an observation sample. In one embodiment of the present claimed invention, a single short optical pulse is generated and is split into first and second pulses. One of the pulses is delayed using variable time delay means. The first pulse is then directed at an observation sample located proximate to the probe of a scanning probe microscope. The scanning probe microscope produces probe-sample signals indicative of the response of the probe to characteristics of the sample. The second pulse is used to modulate the probe of the scanning probe microscope. The time delay between the first and second pulses is then varied. The probe-sample response signal is recorded at each of the various time delays created between the first and second pulses. The probe-sample response signal is then plotted as a function of time delay to produce a cross-correlation of the probe sample response. In so doing, the present invention provides simultaneous subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of the sample. 6 Figs.

  3. Calibration of the National Ecological Observatory Network's Airborne Imaging Spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leisso, N.; Kampe, T. U.; Karpowicz, B. M.

    2014-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is currently under construction by the National Science Foundation. NEON is designed to collect data on the causes and responses to change in the observed ecosystem. The observatory will combine site data collected by terrestrial, instrumental, and aquatic observation systems with airborne remote sensing data. The Airborne Observation Platform (AOP) is designed to collect high-resolution aerial imagery, waveform and discrete LiDAR, and high-fidelity imaging spectroscopic data over the NEON sites annually at or near peak-greenness. Three individual airborne sensor packages will be installed in leased Twin Otter aircraft and used to the collect the NEON sites as NEON enters operations. A key driver to the derived remote sensing data products is the calibration of the imaging spectrometers. This is essential to the overall NEON mission to detect changes in the collected ecosystems over the 30-year expected lifetime. The NEON Imaging Spectrometer (NIS) is a Visible and Shortwave Infrared (VSWIR) grating spectrometer designed by NASA JPL. Spectroscopic data is collected at 5-nm intervals from 380-2500-nm. A single 480 by 640 pixel HgCdTe Focal Plane Array collects dispersed light from a grating tuned for efficiency across the solar-reflective utilized in a push-broom configuration. Primary calibration of the NIS consists of the characterizing the FPA behavior, spectral calibration, and radiometric calibration. To this end, NEON is constructing a Sensor Test Facility to calibrate the NEON sensors. This work discusses the initial NIS laboratory calibration and verification using vicarious calibration techniques during operations. Laboratory spectral calibration is based on well-defined emission lines in conjunction with a scanning monochromator to define the individual spectral response functions. A NIST traceable FEL bulb is used to radiometrically calibrate the imaging spectrometer. An On-board Calibration (OBC) system

  4. Radiometric calibration status of Landsat-7 and Landsat-5

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barsi, J.A.; Markham, B.L.; Helder, D.L.; Chander, G.

    2007-01-01

    Launched in April 1999, Landsat-7 ETM+ continues to acquire data globally. The Scan Line Corrector in failure in 2003 has affected ground coverage and the recent switch to Bumper Mode operations in April 2007 has degraded the internal geometric accuracy of the data, but the radiometry has been unaffected. The best of the three on-board calibrators for the reflective bands, the Full Aperture Solar Calibrator, has indicated slow changes in the ETM+, but this is believed to be due to contamination on the panel rather then instrument degradation. The Internal Calibrator lamp 2, though it has not been used regularly throughout the whole mission, indicates smaller changes than the FASC since 2003. The changes indicated by lamp 2 are only statistically significant in band 1, circa 0.3% per year, and may be lamp as opposed to instrument degradations. Regular observations of desert targets in the Saharan and Arabian deserts indicate the no change in the ETM+ reflective band response, though the uncertainty is larger and does not preclude the small changes indicated by lamp 2. The thermal band continues to be stable and well-calibrated since an offset error was corrected in late-2000. Launched in 1984, Landsat-5 TM also continues to acquire global data; though without the benefit of an on-board recorder, data can only be acquired where a ground station is within range. Historically, the calibration of the TM reflective bands has used an onboard calibration system with multiple lamps. The calibration procedure for the TM reflective bands was updated in 2003 based on the best estimate at the time, using only one of the three lamps and a cross-calibration with Landsat-7 ETM+. Since then, the Saharan desert sites have been used to validate this calibration model. Problems were found with the lamp based model of up to 13% in band 1. Using the Saharan data, a new model was developed and implemented in the US processing system in April 2007. The TM thermal band was found to have a

  5. AVHRR calibration approach that uses ray-matching, invariant desert, and deep convective cloud techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morstad, D.; Doelling, D. R.; Scarino, B.; Gopalan, A.; Bhatt, R.; Minnis, P.

    2010-12-01

    The Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) record spans over 30 years and provides a unique opportunity for long-term climate studies. The precision of these climate studies is largely reliant on the consistent absolute calibration of the AVHRR visible data. Currently, AVHRR visible sensors lack onboard calibration and must be vicariously monitored to assure stability over time. AVHRR onboard the NOAA satellites are on a degrading sun-synchronous orbit where the solar zenith angle continuously increases through time. The ray-matching technique can be used to transfer the calibration of a well-calibrated sensor, such as MODIS that employs a solar diffuser, to an un-calibrated sensor, such as AVHRR. In order to transfer the MODIS calibration to AVHRR, existing GEO satellites will be used as a transfer medium. Successive GEO to AVHRR transfers and AVHRR to GEO transfers will be used to maintain a consistent absolute calibration throughout the AVHRR record. To ensure the absolute calibration is accurately transferred, differences in the spectral response functions between each sensor can be removed using ENVISAT Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Cartography (SCIAMACHY) hyperspectral data and spectral band adjustment factors. The temporal trends in the absolute calibration of AVHRR and GEO can be validated using pseudo-invariant test sites as well as deep convective cloud targets. This presentation will show examples of ray-matching, spectral band adjustment, DCC, and desert trending techniques and highlight the initial results for lifetime calibration of AVHRR onboard NOAA 16 and NOAA18.

  6. The Flux Calibration of Gaia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pancino, E.

    2016-05-01

    The Gaia mission is described, along with its scientific potential and its updated science perfomances. Although it is often described as a self-calibrated mission, Gaia still needs to tie part of its measurements to external scales (or to convert them in physical units). A detailed decription of the Gaia spectro-photometric standard stars survey is provided, along with a short description of the Gaia calibration model. The model requires a grid of approximately 200 stars, calibrated to a few percent with respect to Vega, and covering different spectral types.

  7. The SDSS-2MASS-WISE 10-dimensional stellar colour locus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenport, James R. A.; Ivezić, Željko; Becker, Andrew C.; Ruan, John J.; Hunt-Walker, Nicholas M.; Covey, Kevin R.; Lewis, Alexia R.; AlSayyad, Yusra; Anderson, Lauren M.

    2014-06-01

    We present the fiducial main-sequence stellar locus traced by 10 photometric colours observed by Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS), and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Median colours are determined using 1052 793 stars with r-band extinction less than 0.125. We use this locus to measure the dust extinction curve relative to the r band, which is consistent with previous measurements in the SDSS and 2MASS bands. The WISE band extinction coefficients are larger than predicted by standard extinction models. Using 13 lines of sight, we find variations in the extinction curve in H, Ks, and WISE bandpasses. Relative extinction decreases towards Galactic anticentre, in agreement with prior studies. Relative extinction increases with Galactic latitude, in contrast to previous observations. This indicates a universal mid-IR extinction law does not exist due to variations in dust grain size and chemistry with Galactocentric position. A preliminary search for outliers due to warm circumstellar dust is also presented, using stars with high signal-to-noise ratio in the W3 band. We find 199 such outliers, identified by excess emission in Ks - W3. Inspection of SDSS images for these outliers reveals a large number of contaminants due to nearby galaxies. Six sources appear to be genuine dust candidates, yielding a fraction of systems with infrared excess of 0.12 ± 0.05 per cent.

  8. The IC 5146 star forming complex and its surroundings with 2MASS, WISE and Spitzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, N. A.; Bonatto, C.; Bica, E.

    2016-02-01

    Throughout the last decade sensitive infrared observations obtained by the Spitzer Space Telescope significantly increased the known population of YSOs associated with nearby molecular clouds. With such a census recent studies have characterized pre-main sequence stars (PMS) and determined parameters from different wavelengths. Given the restricted Spitzer coverage of some of these clouds, relative to their extended regions, these YSO populations may represent a limited view of star formation in these regions. We are taking advantage of mid-infrared observations from the NASA Wide Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), which provides an all sky view and therefore full coverage of the nearby clouds, to assess the degree to which their currently known YSO population may be representative of a more complete population. We extend the well established classification method of the Spitzer Legacy teams to archived WISE observations. We have adopted 2MASS photometry as a "standard catalogue" for comparisons. Besides the massive embedded cluster IC 5146 we provide a multiband view of five new embedded clusters in its surroundings that we discovered with WISE. In short, the analysis involves the following for the presently studied cluster sample: (i) extraction of 2MASS/WISE/Spitzer photometry in a wide circular region; (ii) field-star decontamination to enhance the intrinsic Colour-magnitude diagram (CMD) morphology (essential for a proper derivation of reddening, age, and distance from the Sun); and (iii) construction of Colour-magnitude filters, for more contrasted stellar radial density profiles (RDPs).

  9. Luminosity Classification of Potential M Dwarf Stars Selected using 2MASS and Tycho2 Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Justin R.; Humphrey, N.; Briggs, A.; Parrell, A.; Robertson, T.

    2008-03-01

    A sample of possible red dwarf stars selected using photometric criteria from the 2MASS catalog and proper motion data from the TYCHO2 catalog has been investigated to evaluate the effectiveness of the selection process. Program stars have been identified using the J-H and H-K two color diagram to identify potential red dwarf stars. Those stars having Tycho2 proper motions in excess of 0.050 arcsec/yr were included in the sample. Intermediate-band CaH photometry and Kron-Cousins R and I photometry have been obtained using the SARA (Southeastern Association for Research in Astronomy) Telescope. The SARA photometric data were used to determine luminosity classes for program stars. The addition of proper motion data in program star selection has significantly improved the selection of red dwarf stars using 2MASS data. This study used data collected with the SARA Telescope and was funded by grants from the Indiana Space Grant Consortium and Ball State University.

  10. Calibrating Laser Gas Measurements by Use of Natural CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, Chris

    2003-01-01

    An improved method of calibration has been devised for instruments that utilize tunable lasers to measure the absorption spectra of atmospheric gases in order to determine the relative abundances of the gases. In this method, CO2 in the atmosphere is used as a natural calibration standard. Unlike in one prior calibration method, it is not necessary to perform calibration measurements in advance of use of the instrument and to risk deterioration of accuracy with time during use. Unlike in another prior calibration method, it is not necessary to include a calibration gas standard (and the attendant additional hardware) in the instrument and to interrupt the acquisition of atmospheric data to perform calibration measurements. In the operation of an instrument of this type, the beam from a tunable diode laser or a tunable quantum-cascade laser is directed along a path through the atmosphere, the laser is made to scan in wavelength over an infrared spectral region that contains one or two absorption spectral lines of a gas of interest, and the transmission (and, thereby, the absorption) of the beam is measured. The concentration of the gas of interest can then be calculated from the observed depth of the absorption line(s), given the temperature, pressure, and path length. CO2 is nearly ideal as a natural calibration gas for the following reasons: CO2 has numerous rotation/vibration infrared spectral lines, many of which are near absorption lines of other gases. The concentration of CO2 relative to the concentrations of the major constituents of the atmosphere is well known and varies slowly and by a small enough amount to be considered constant for calibration in the present context. Hence, absorption-spectral measurements of the concentrations of gases of interest can be normalized to the concentrations of CO2. Because at least one CO2 calibration line is present in every spectral scan of the laser during absorption measurements, the atmospheric CO2 serves

  11. Calibration of Laser Beam Direction for Inner Diameter Measuring Device

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tongyu; Wang, Zhong; Wu, Zhengang; Li, Xingqiang; Wang, Lei; Liu, Changjie

    2017-01-01

    The laser triangulation method is one of the most advanced methods for large inner diameter measurement. Our research group proposed a kind of inner diameter measuring device that is principally composed of three laser displacement sensors known to be fixed in the same plane measurement position. It is necessary to calibrate the direction of the laser beams that are emitted by laser displacement sensors because they do not meet the theoretical model accurately. For the purpose of calibrating the direction of laser beams, a calibration method and mathematical model were proposed. The inner diameter measuring device is equipped with the spindle of the machine tool. The laser beams rotate and translate in the plane and constitute the rotary rays which are driven to scan the inner surface of the ring gauge. The direction calibration of the laser beams can be completed by the sensors’ distance information and corresponding data processing method. The corresponding error sources are analyzed and the validity of the method is verified. After the calibration, the measurement error of the inner diameter measuring device reduced from ±25 μm to ±15 μm and the relative error was not more than 0.011%. PMID:28165432

  12. Calibration of Laser Beam Direction for Inner Diameter Measuring Device.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tongyu; Wang, Zhong; Wu, Zhengang; Li, Xingqiang; Wang, Lei; Liu, Changjie

    2017-02-05

    The laser triangulation method is one of the most advanced methods for large inner diameter measurement. Our research group proposed a kind of inner diameter measuring device that is principally composed of three laser displacement sensors known to be fixed in the same plane measurement position. It is necessary to calibrate the direction of the laser beams that are emitted by laser displacement sensors because they do not meet the theoretical model accurately. For the purpose of calibrating the direction of laser beams, a calibration method and mathematical model were proposed. The inner diameter measuring device is equipped with the spindle of the machine tool. The laser beams rotate and translate in the plane and constitute the rotary rays which are driven to scan the inner surface of the ring gauge. The direction calibration of the laser beams can be completed by the sensors' distance information and corresponding data processing method. The corresponding error sources are analyzed and the validity of the method is verified. After the calibration, the measurement error of the inner diameter measuring device reduced from ± 25 μ m to ± 15 μ m and the relative error was not more than 0.011%.

  13. Fixture For Calibrating Pressure Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, George C., Jr.; Vasquez, Peter; Horsley, Lewis A.; Bowman, John T.; Zumbrun, Henry N.; Eves, John W.

    1994-01-01

    Fixture in form of specially designed clamshell housing enables in situ calibration of pressure transducer mounted in body of pressure probe in wind tunnel. Includes two metal half shells machined with necks and matching cavities, when put together, define larger neck and cavity accommodating probe. Probe secured to bottom half shell by use of clamp before installing top half shell: necessary to follow sequence to protect probe during assembly. Clamshell calibration fixture attached to pressure probe in few minutes, making it possible to calibrate pressure transducer at convenient times. Calibrations performed before and after wind-tunnel runs each day, between runs in event of delays or suspected malfunctions, and essentially any other time, without having to remove probe from wind tunnel.

  14. Bone scanning in clinical practice

    SciTech Connect

    Fogelman, I. )

    1987-01-01

    The topics covered in this book include the history of bone scanning, mechanisms of uptake of diphosphonate in bone, the normal bone scan, and the role of bone scanning in clinical practice. The aim of this book is to provide a source of reference relating to bone scan imaging for all those who are interested in the skeleton.

  15. 40 CFR 1065.310 - Torque calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... range. Oscillate or rotate the dynamometer during calibration to reduce frictional static hysteresis... during calibration to reduce frictional static hysteresis. In this case, the reference torque...

  16. 40 CFR 1065.310 - Torque calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... range. Oscillate or rotate the dynamometer during calibration to reduce frictional static hysteresis... during calibration to reduce frictional static hysteresis. In this case, the reference torque...

  17. Rotary mode system initial instrument calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Johns, B.R.

    1994-10-01

    The attached report contains the vendor calibration procedures used for the initial instrument calibration of the rotary core sampling equipment. The procedures are from approved vendor information files.

  18. Bayesian Calibration of Microsimulation Models.

    PubMed

    Rutter, Carolyn M; Miglioretti, Diana L; Savarino, James E

    2009-12-01

    Microsimulation models that describe disease processes synthesize information from multiple sources and can be used to estimate the effects of screening and treatment on cancer incidence and mortality at a population level. These models are characterized by simulation of individual event histories for an idealized population of interest. Microsimulation models are complex and invariably include parameters that are not well informed by existing data. Therefore, a key component of model development is the choice of parameter values. Microsimulation model parameter values are selected to reproduce expected or known results though the process of model calibration. Calibration may be done by perturbing model parameters one at a time or by using a search algorithm. As an alternative, we propose a Bayesian method to calibrate microsimulation models that uses Markov chain Monte Carlo. We show that this approach converges to the target distribution and use a simulation study to demonstrate its finite-sample performance. Although computationally intensive, this approach has several advantages over previously proposed methods, including the use of statistical criteria to select parameter values, simultaneous calibration of multiple parameters to multiple data sources, incorporation of information via prior distributions, description of parameter identifiability, and the ability to obtain interval estimates of model parameters. We develop a microsimulation model for colorectal cancer and use our proposed method to calibrate model parameters. The microsimulation model provides a good fit to the calibration data. We find evidence that some parameters are identified primarily through prior distributions. Our results underscore the need to incorporate multiple sources of variability (i.e., due to calibration data, unknown parameters, and estimated parameters and predicted values) when calibrating and applying microsimulation models.

  19. Practical Study of Psychrometer Calibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kentved, Anders Bonde; Heinonen, Martti; Hudoklin, Domen

    2012-09-01

    Psychrometers remain the most widely used instruments for controlling the humidity in climatic test chambers, yet the calibration of these instruments is particularly challenging. Psychrometer calibrations require careful consideration of influence variables such as the fitting and cleanliness of the wick, the effect of the calibration chamber on the air flow past the sensors, on radiation incident on the sensors, and on the dissipation heat from the built-in fan (if included). In addition, uncertainty requirements for calibration of such psychrometers are typically around 1 %rh to 2 %rh, i.e., close to the best calibration and measurement uncertainties (CMCs) claimed by national metrology institutes (NMIs). As well as their role in supporting CMCs, inter-comparisons provide a good test-ground to ensure all influence variables are controlled or otherwise accounted for in the uncertainty budget. This paper presents the results of a comparison of psychrometer calibrations performed by the NMIs in Denmark, Slovenia, and Finland. The comparison was carried out under EURAMET Project No. 1033 with the aim to investigate the equivalence of psychrometer calibrations performed at the highest level and to gather practical experience to be used in similar comparisons in the future. An aspirated electro-psychrometer was used for the comparison, and calibrations were carried out in the range from 15 %rh to 93 %rh in a temperature range from 15 °C to 70 °C. While the results show good agreement at high relative humidity, significant differences at low relative humidity are reported. It is suggested that the differences are caused by a combination of psychrometer wick contamination and a difference in the wick-wetting methods used by the participant laboratories.

  20. Infrasound Sensor Calibration and Response

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    functions with faster rise times. SUMMARY We have documented past work on the determination of the calibration constant of the LANL infrasound sensor...Monitoring Technologies 735 Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection of information is estimated...National Laboratory ( LANL ) has operated an infrasound sensor calibration chamber that operates over a frequency range of 0.02 to 4 Hz. This chamber has

  1. Blackbody comparator for thermocouple calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Ojanen, M.; Hahtela, O. M.; Heinonen, M.

    2013-09-11

    MIKES is developing a measurement set-up for calibrating thermocouples in the temperature range 960 °C - 1500 °C. The calibration method is based on direct comparison of thermocouples and radiation thermometers. We have designed a graphite blackbody comparator cell, which is operated in a horizontal single-zone tube furnace. The cell includes two blackbody cavities for radiation temperature measurements. The cavities have openings on opposite sides of the cell, allowing simultaneous measurement with two radiation thermometers. The design of the comparator allows three thermocouples to be calibrated simultaneously. The thermocouples to be calibrated are inserted in thermometer wells around one of the measurement cavities. We characterize the blackbody comparator in terms of repeatability, temperature distribution and emissivity. Finally, we validate the uncertainty analysis by comparing calibration results obtained for type B and S thermocouples to the calibration results reported by Technical Research Institute of Sweden (SP), and MIKES. The agreement in the temperature range 1000 °C - 1500 °C is within 0.90 °C, the average deviation being 0.17 °C.

  2. Optical scanning holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, Ting-Chung; Doh, Kyu B.; Schilling, Bradley W.; Wu, Ming H.; Shinoda, Kazunori K.; Suzuki, Yoshiji

    1995-03-01

    We first review a newly developed 3D imaging technique called optical scanning holography (OSH), and discuss recording and reconstruction of a point object using the principle of OSH. We then derive 3D holographic magnification, using three points configured as a 3D object. Finally, we demonstrated 3D imaging capability of OSH by holographically recording two planar objects at different depths and reconstructing the hologram digitally.

  3. Fly-scan ptychography

    DOE PAGES

    Huang, Xiaojing; Lauer, Kenneth; Clark, Jesse N.; ...

    2015-03-13

    We report an experimental ptychography measurement performed in fly-scan mode. With a visible-light laser source, we demonstrate a 5-fold reduction of data acquisition time. By including multiple mutually incoherent modes into the incident illumination, high quality images were successfully reconstructed from blurry diffraction patterns. This approach significantly increases the throughput of ptychography, especially for three-dimensional applications and the visualization of dynamic systems.

  4. Scanning micro-sclerometer

    DOEpatents

    Oliver, Warren C.; Blau, Peter J.

    1994-01-01

    A scanning micro-sclerometer measures changes in contact stiffness and correlates these changes to characteristics of a scratch. A known force is applied to a contact junction between two bodies and a technique employing an oscillating force is used to generate the contact stiffness between the two bodies. As the two bodies slide relative to each other, the contact stiffness changes. The change is measured to characterize the scratch.

  5. Scanning micro-sclerometer

    DOEpatents

    Oliver, W.C.; Blau, P.J.

    1994-11-01

    A scanning micro-sclerometer measures changes in contact stiffness and correlates these changes to characteristics of a scratch. A known force is applied to a contact junction between two bodies and a technique employing an oscillating force is used to generate the contact stiffness between the two bodies. As the two bodies slide relative to each other, the contact stiffness changes. The change is measured to characterize the scratch. 2 figs.

  6. Forensic Scanning Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeley, R. H.

    1983-03-01

    The scanning electron microscope equipped with an x-ray spectrometer is a versatile instrument which has many uses in the investigation of crime and preparation of scientific evidence for the courts. Major applications include microscopy and analysis of very small fragments of paint, glass and other materials which may link an individual with a scene of crime, identification of firearms residues and examination of questioned documents. Although simultaneous observation and chemical analysis of the sample is the most important feature of the instrument, other modes of operation such as cathodoluminescence spectrometry, backscattered electron imaging and direct x-ray excitation are also exploited. Marks on two bullets or cartridge cases can be compared directly by sequential scanning with a single beam or electronic linkage of two instruments. Particles of primer residue deposited on the skin and clothing when a gun is fired can be collected on adhesive tape and identified by their morphology and elemental composition. It is also possible to differentiate between the primer residues of different types of ammunition. Bullets may be identified from the small fragments left behind as they pass through the body tissues. In the examination of questioned documents the scanning electron microscope is used to establish the order in which two intersecting ink lines were written and to detect traces of chemical markers added to the security inks on official documents.

  7. Scanning ultrafast electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ding-Shyue; Mohammed, Omar F; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2010-08-24

    Progress has been made in the development of four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy, which enables space-time imaging of structural dynamics in the condensed phase. In ultrafast electron microscopy, the electrons are accelerated, typically to 200 keV, and the microscope operates in the transmission mode. Here, we report the development of scanning ultrafast electron microscopy using a field-emission-source configuration. Scanning of pulses is made in the single-electron mode, for which the pulse contains at most one or a few electrons, thus achieving imaging without the space-charge effect between electrons, and still in ten(s) of seconds. For imaging, the secondary electrons from surface structures are detected, as demonstrated here for material surfaces and biological specimens. By recording backscattered electrons, diffraction patterns from single crystals were also obtained. Scanning pulsed-electron microscopy with the acquired spatiotemporal resolutions, and its efficient heat-dissipation feature, is now poised to provide in situ 4D imaging and with environmental capability.

  8. Synthetic holography based on scanning microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Donato, A.; Farina, M.

    2015-11-01

    Synthetic optical holography (SOH) is an imaging technique, introduced in scanning microscopy to record amplitude and phase of a scattered field from a sample. In this paper, it is described a novel implementation of SOH through a lens-free low-coherence system, based on a scanning optical microcavity. This technique combines the low-coherence properties of the source with the mutual interference of scattered waves and the resonant behavior of a micro-cavity, in order to realize a high sensitive imaging system. Micro-cavity is compact and realized by approaching a cleaved optical fiber to the sample. The scanning system works in an open-loop configuration without the need for a reference wave, usually required in interferometric systems. Measurements were performed over calibration samples and a lateral resolution of about 1 μm is achieved by means of an optical fiber with a Numerical Aperture (NA) equal to 0.1 and a Mode Field Diameter (MDF) of 5.6 μm.

  9. INFORMATION ON THE MILKY WAY FROM THE 2MASS ALL SKY STAR COUNT: BIMODAL COLOR DISTRIBUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Chan-Kao; Lai, Shao-Yu; Peng, Ting-Hung; Ko, Chung-Ming E-mail: cmko@astro.ncu.edu.tw

    2012-11-10

    The J - K{sub s} color distributions (CDs) with a bin size of 0.05 mag has been carried out for the entire Milky Way using the Two Micron All Sky Survey Point Source Catalog (2MASS PSC). The CDs are bimodal, with a red peak at 0.8 < J - K{sub s} < 0.85 and a blue peak at 0.3 < J - K{sub s} < 0.4. The colors of the red peak are more or less the same for the whole sky, but those of the blue peak depend on Galactic latitude (J - K{sub s} {approx} 0.35 at low Galactic latitudes and 0.35 < J - K{sub s} < 0.4 for other sky areas). The blue peak dominates the bimodal CDs at low Galactic latitudes and becomes comparable with the red peak in other sky regions. In order to explain the bimodal distribution and the global trend shown by the all-sky 2MASS CDs, we assemble an empirical Hertzsprung-Russell (H-R) diagram, which is composed of observational-based near-infrared H-R diagrams and color-magnitude diagrams, and incorporate a Milky Way model. In the empirical H-R diagram, the main-sequence turn-off for stars in the thin disk is relatively bluer, (J - K{sub s} ){sub 0} = 0.31, compared with that of the thick disk which is (J - K{sub s} ){sub 0} = 0.39. The age of the thin/thick disk is roughly estimated to be around 4-5/8-9 Gyr according to the color-age relation of the main-sequence turn-off. In general, the 2MASS CDs can be treated as a tool to measure the age of the stellar population of the Milky Way in a statistical manner and to our knowledge it is the first attempt to do so.

  10. Scanning probe microscope simulator for the assessment of noise in scanning probe microscopy controllers

    SciTech Connect

    Wutscher, T.; Niebauer, J.; Giessibl, F. J.

    2013-07-15

    We present an electronic circuit that allows to calibrate and troubleshoot scanning probe microscopy (SPM) controllers with respect to their noise performance. The control signal in an SPM is typically highly nonlinear—the tunneling current in scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) varies exponentially with distance. The exponential current-versus-voltage characteristics of diodes allow to model the current dependence in STM. Additional inputs allow to simulate the effects of external perturbations and the reactions of the control electronics. We characterized the noise performance of the feedback controller using the apparent topography roughness of recorded images. For a comparison of different STM controllers, an optimal gain parameter was determined by exploring settling times through a rectangular perturbation signal. We used the circuit to directly compare the performance of two types of SPM controllers used in our laboratory.

  11. Scanning probe microscope simulator for the assessment of noise in scanning probe microscopy controllers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wutscher, T.; Niebauer, J.; Giessibl, F. J.

    2013-07-01

    We present an electronic circuit that allows to calibrate and troubleshoot scanning probe microscopy (SPM) controllers with respect to their noise performance. The control signal in an SPM is typically highly nonlinear—the tunneling current in scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) varies exponentially with distance. The exponential current-versus-voltage characteristics of diodes allow to model the current dependence in STM. Additional inputs allow to simulate the effects of external perturbations and the reactions of the control electronics. We characterized the noise performance of the feedback controller using the apparent topography roughness of recorded images. For a comparison of different STM controllers, an optimal gain parameter was determined by exploring settling times through a rectangular perturbation signal. We used the circuit to directly compare the performance of two types of SPM controllers used in our laboratory.

  12. Comments on ''Accuracy of Raman lidar water vapor calibration and its applicability to long-term measurements''

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteman, David N.; Venable, Demetrius; Landulfo, Eduardo

    2011-05-20

    In a recent publication, Leblanc and McDermid [Appl. Opt., 47, 5592 (2008)]APOPAI0003-693510.1364/AO.47.005592 proposed a hybrid calibration technique for Raman water vapor lidar involving a tungsten lamp and radiosondes. Measurements made with the lidar telescope viewing the calibration lamp were used to stabilize the lidar calibration determined by comparison with radiosonde. The technique provided a significantly more stable calibration constant than radiosondes used alone. The technique involves the use of a calibration lamp in a fixed position in front of the lidar receiver aperture. We examine this configuration and find that such a configuration likely does not properly sample the full lidar system optical efficiency. While the technique is a useful addition to the use of radiosondes alone for lidar calibration, it is important to understand the scenarios under which it will not provide an accurate quantification of system optical efficiency changes. We offer examples of these scenarios. Scanning of the full telescope aperture with the calibration lamp can circumvent most of these limitations. Based on the work done to date, it seems likely that the use of multiple calibration lamps in different fixed positions in front of the telescope may provide sufficient redundancy for long-term calibration needs. Further full-aperture scanning experiments, performed over an extended period of time, are needed to determine a ''best practice'' for the use of multiple calibration lamps in the hybrid technique.

  13. 2MASS photometry and kinematical studies of open cluster NGC 188

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsanhoury, W. H.; Haroon, A. A.; Chupina, N. V.; Vereshchagin, S. V.; Sariya, Devesh P.; Yadav, R. K. S.; Jiang, Ing-Guey

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we present our results for the photometric and kinematical studies of old open cluster NGC 188. We determined various astrophysical parameters like limited radius, core and tidal radii, distance, luminosity and mass functions, total mass, relaxation time etc. for the cluster using 2MASS catalog. We obtained the cluster's distance from the Sun as 1721 ± 41 pc and log (age)= 9.85 ± 0.05 at Solar metallicity. The relaxation time of the cluster is smaller than the estimated cluster age which suggests that the cluster is dynamically relaxed. Our results agree with the values mentioned in the literature. We also determined the clusters apex coordinates as (281°.88, -44∘ .76) using AD-diagram method. Other kinematical parameters like space velocity components, cluster center and elements of Solar motion etc. have also been computed.

  14. Weather satellite picture receiving stations, APT digital scan converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vermillion, C. H.; Kamowski, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    The automatic picture transmission digital scan converter is used at ground stations to convert signals received from scanning radiometers to data compatible with ground equipment designed to receive signals from vidicons aboard operational meteorological satellites. Information necessary to understand the circuit theory, functional operation, general construction and calibration of the converter is provided. Brief and detailed descriptions of each of the individual circuits are included, accompanied by a schematic diagram contained at the end of each circuit description. Listings of integral parts and testing equipment required as well as an overall wiring diagram are included. This unit will enable the user to readily accept and process weather photographs from the operational meteorological satellites.

  15. Discovery of an X-Ray-emitting Contact Binary System 2MASS J11201034-2201340

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chin-Ping; Yang, Ting-Chang; Chou, Yi; Liu, L.; Qian, S.-B.; Hui, C. Y.; Kong, Albert K. H.; Lin, L. C. C.; Tam, P. H. T.; Li, K. L.; Ngeow, Chow-Choong; Chen, W. P.; Ip, Wing-Huen

    2016-06-01

    We report the detection of orbital modulation, a model solution, and the X-ray properties of a newly discovered contact binary, Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) J11201034-2201340. We serendipitously found this X-ray point source outside the error ellipse when searching for possible X-ray counterparts of γ-ray millisecond pulsars among the unidentified objects detected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. The optical counterpart of the X-ray source (unrelated to the γ-ray source) was then identified using archival databases. The long-term Catalina Real-Time Transient Survey detected a precise signal with a period of P=0.28876208(56) days. A follow-up observation made by the Super Light Telescope of Lulin Observatory revealed the binary nature of the object. Utilizing archived photometric data of multi-band surveys, we construct the spectral energy distribution (SED), which is well fit by a K2V spectral template. The fitting result of the orbital profile using the Wilson-Devinney code suggests that 2MASS J11201034-2201340 is a short-period A-type contact binary and the more massive component has a cool spot. The X-ray emission was first noted in observations made by Swift, and then further confirmed and characterized by an XMM-Newton observation. The X-ray spectrum can be described by a power law or thermal Bremsstrahlung. Unfortunately, we could not observe significant X-ray orbital modulation. Finally, according to the SED, this system is estimated to be 690 pc from Earth with a calculated X-ray intensity of (0.7-1.5)× {10}30 erg s-1, which is in the expected range of an X-ray emitting contact binary.

  16. Supervoids in the WISE-2MASS catalogue imprinting cold spots in the cosmic microwave background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finelli, F.; García-Bellido, J.; Kovács, A.; Paci, F.; Szapudi, I.

    2016-01-01

    The Cold Spot (CS) is a clear feature in the cosmic microwave background (CMB); it could be of primordial origin, or caused by a intervening structure along the line of sight. We identified a large projected underdensity in the recently constructed WISE-2MASS all-sky infrared galaxy catalogue aligned with the CS direction at (l, b) ≈ (209°, -57°). It has an angular size of tens of degrees, and shows a ˜20 per cent galaxy underdensity in the centre. Moreover, we find another large underdensity in the projected WISE-2MASS galaxy map at (l, b) ≈ (101°, 46°) (hereafter Draco supervoid), also aligned with a CMB decrement, although less significant than that of the CS direction. Motivated by these findings, we develop spherically symmetric Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi (LTB) compensated void models to explain the observed CMB decrements with these two underdensities, or `supervoids'. Within our perturbative treatment of the LTB voids, we find that the integrated Sachs-Wolfe and Riess-Sciama effects due to the Draco supervoid can account for the CMB decrement observed in the same direction. On the contrary, the extremely deep CMB decrement in the CS direction is more difficult to explain by the presence of the CS supervoid only. Nevertheless, the probability of a random alignment between the CS and the corresponding supervoid is disfavoured, and thus its contribution as a secondary anisotropy cannot be neglected. We comment on how the approximations used in this paper, in particular the assumption of spherical symmetry, could change quantitatively our conclusions and might provide a better explanation for the CMB CS.

  17. A SEARCH FOR HIGH PROPER MOTION T DWARFS WITH Pan-STARRS1 + 2MASS + WISE

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Michael C.; Deacon, Niall R.; Magnier, Eugene A.; Aller, Kimberly M.; Bowler, Brendan P.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Hodapp, K. W.; Kaiser, N.; Kudritzki, R.-P.; Morgan, J. S.; Tonry, J. L.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Dupuy, Trent J.; Redstone, Joshua; Goldman, Bertrand; Price, P. A.

    2011-10-20

    We have searched {approx}8200 deg{sup 2} for high proper motion ({approx}0.''5-2.''7 year{sup -1}) T dwarfs by combining first-epoch data from the Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) 3{pi} Survey, the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) All-Sky Point Source Catalog, and the WISE Preliminary Data Release. We identified two high proper motion objects with the very red (W1 - W2) colors characteristic of T dwarfs, one being the known T7.5 dwarf GJ 570D. Near-IR spectroscopy of the other object (PSO J043.5395+02.3995 {identical_to} WISEP J025409.45+022359.1) reveals a spectral type of T8, leading to a photometric distance of 7.2 {+-} 0.7 pc. The 2.''56 year{sup -1} proper motion of PSO J043.5+02 is the second highest among field T dwarfs, corresponding to a tangential velocity of 87 {+-} 8 km s{sup -1}. According to the Besancon galaxy model, this velocity indicates that its galactic membership is probably in the thin disk, with the thick disk an unlikely possibility. Such membership is in accord with the near-IR spectrum, which points to a surface gravity (age) and metallicity typical of the field population. We combine 2MASS, Sloan Digital Sky Survey, WISE, and PS1 astrometry to derive a preliminary parallax of 171 {+-} 45 mas (5.8{sup +2.0} {sub -1.2} pc), the first such measurement using PS1 data. The proximity and brightness of PSO J043.5+02 will facilitate future characterization of its atmosphere, variability, multiplicity, distance, and kinematics. The modest number of candidates from our search suggests that the immediate ({approx}10 pc) solar neighborhood does not contain a large reservoir of undiscovered T dwarfs earlier than about T8.

  18. Potential Nearby M Dwarf Stars Selected from the 2MASS Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Thomas H.; Thompson, Dayna L.

    2016-01-01

    Potential nearby red dwarf stars have been selected from the 2MASS catalogs using assumptions about apparent magnitudes and colors. Candidate stars in this study are north of the celestial equator and have been restricted to galactic latitudes greater than 20 degrees from the galactic plane to permit subsequent aperture photometry with small telescopes. Stars with close companions have also been eliminated. Most probable M giant stars were eliminated using the (J-H) - (H-K) two-color diagram. Proper motions were obtained from the USNO-B catalog. Additional potential M giant stars were eliminated by removing stars with very low proper motions. Known nearby stars were removed from the list and stars with proper motions greater than 0.175 arcsec yr-1 were also removed, since such stars will likely be studied in other programs devoted to stars of known proper motion. Photometric parallaxes for the candidate stars were computed using 2MASS photometry and stars having average photometric distances of 25 pc or less were retained. A sample of 121 stars was produced. These stars are being observed using Kron-Cousins R, I and CaH photometry. To date about 75% of the program stars have been observed. All are confirmed dwarf stars and about 50% have distances of 25 pc or less based on photometric parallaxes using Kron-Cousins photometry.This publication makes use of data products from the Two Micron All Sky Survey and the U.S. Naval Observatory B1.0 Catalog. Services and products provided by the Strasbourg Astronomical Data Center (CDS) and US Virtual Astronomical Observatory (VAO) were used in processing the data. Observations have been obtained using the telescopes of the Southeastern Association for Research in Astronomy (SARA).

  19. Calibration issues for neutron diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Sadler, G.J.; Adams, J.M.; Barnes, C.W.

    1997-12-01

    The performance of diagnostic systems are limited by their weakest constituents, including their calibration issues. Neutron diagnostics are notorious for problems encountered while determining their absolute calibrations, due mainly to the nature of the neutron transport problem. In order to facilitate the determination of an accurate and precise calibration, the diagnostic design should be such as to minimize the scattered neutron flux. ITER will use a comprehensive set of neutron diagnostics--comprising radial and vertical neutron cameras, neutron spectrometers, a neutron activation system and internal and external fission chambers--to provide accurate measurements of fusion power and power densities as a function of time. The calibration of such an important diagnostic system merits careful consideration. Some thoughts have already been given to this subject during the conceptual design phase in relation to the time-integrated neutron activation and time-dependent neutron yield monitors. However, no overall calibration strategy has been worked out so far. This paper represents a first attempt to address this vital issue. Experience gained from present large tokamaks (JET, TFTR and JT60U) and proposals for ITER are reviewed. The need to use a 14-MeV neutron generator as opposed to radioactive sources for in-situ calibration of D-T diagnostics will be stressed. It is clear that the overall absolute determination of fusion power will have to rely on a combination of nuclear measuring techniques, for which the provision of accurate and independent calibrations will constitute an ongoing process as ITER moves from one phase of operation to the next.

  20. TA-55 Hot CMM Calibration Tolerance Analysis (U)

    SciTech Connect

    Montano, Joshua D.

    2012-06-12

    The Hot Coordinate Measuring Machine (CMM), a Brown and Sharpe Xcel 765, has specifications listed by the manufacture of 4.5 + L/250 {micro}m for volumetric performance, 3.5 {micro}m for probing and 4.5 {micro}m for scanning. An upgrade was performed on the machine increasing its performance capability. This document reviews calibration data gathered after the upgrade over a five year period (2005-2010) and recommends a new specification of 3.0 + L/250 {micro}m for size, 3.3 {micro}m for probing, and 4.3 {micro}m for scanning. The new equations are an approximate 30% increase in accuracy for size and approximately 5% increase for probing and scanning.

  1. Multi-channel scanning SQUID microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Su-Young

    I designed, fabricated, assembled, and tested an 8-channel high- Tc scanning SQUID system. I started by modifying an existing single-channel 77 K high-Tc scanning SQUID microscope into a multi-channel system with the goal of reducing the scanning time and improving the spatial resolution by increasing the signal-to-noise ratio S/N. I modified the window assembly, SQUID chip assembly, cold-finger, and vacuum connector. The main concerns for the multi-channel system design were to reduce interaction between channels, to optimize the use of the inside space of the dewar for more than 50 shielded wires, and to achieve good spatial resolution. In the completed system, I obtained the transfer function and the dynamic range (phimax ˜ 11phi0) for each SQUID. At 1kHz, the slew rate is about 3000 phi0/s. I also found that the white noise level varies from 5 muphi0/Hz1/2 to 20 muphi 0/Hz1/2 depending on the SQUID. A new data acquisition program was written that triggered on position and collects data from up to eight SQUIDS. To generate a single image from the multichannel system, I calibrated the tilt of the xy-stage and z-stage manually, rearranged the scanned data by cutting overlapping parts, and determined the applied field by multiplying by the mutual inductance matrix. I found that I could reduce scanning time and improve the image quality by doing so. In addition, I have analyzed and observed the effect of position noise on magnetic field images and used these results to find the position noise in my scanning SQUID microscope. My analysis reveals the relationship between spatial resolution and position noise and that my system was dominated by position noise under typical operating conditions. I found that the smaller the sensor-sample separation, the greater the effect of position noise is on the total effective magnetic field noise and on spatial resolution. By averaging several scans, I found that I could reduce position noise and that the spatial resolution can

  2. Waveguide Calibrator for Multi-Element Probe Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sommerfeldt, Scott D.; Blotter, Jonathan D.

    2007-01-01

    A calibrator, referred to as the spider design, can be used to calibrate probes incorporating multiple acoustic sensing elements. The application is an acoustic energy density probe, although the calibrator can be used for other types of acoustic probes. The calibrator relies on the use of acoustic waveguide technology to produce the same acoustic field at each of the sensing elements. As a result, the sensing elements can be separated from each other, but still calibrated through use of the acoustic waveguides. Standard calibration techniques involve placement of an individual microphone into a small cavity with a known, uniform pressure to perform the calibration. If a cavity is manufactured with sufficient size to insert the energy density probe, it has been found that a uniform pressure field can only be created at very low frequencies, due to the size of the probe. The size of the energy density probe prevents one from having the same pressure at each microphone in a cavity, due to the wave effects. The "spider" design probe is effective in calibrating multiple microphones separated from each other. The spider design ensures that the same wave effects exist for each microphone, each with an indivdual sound path. The calibrator s speaker is mounted at one end of a 14-cm-long and 4.1-cm diameter small plane-wave tube. This length was chosen so that the first evanescent cross mode of the plane-wave tube would be attenuated by about 90 dB, thus leaving just the plane wave at the termination plane of the tube. The tube terminates with a small, acrylic plate with five holes placed symmetrically about the axis of the speaker. Four ports are included for the four microphones on the probe. The fifth port is included for the pre-calibrated reference microphone. The ports in the acrylic plate are in turn connected to the probe sensing elements via flexible PVC tubes. These five tubes are the same length, so the acoustic wave effects are the same in each tube. The

  3. Toward consistent radiometric calibration of the NOAA AVHRR visible and near-infrared data record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, Rajendra; Doelling, David R.; Scarino, Benjamin R.; Gopalan, Arun; Haney, Conor O.

    2015-09-01

    The 35-year Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) satellite-instrument data record is critical for studying decadal climate change, provided that the AVHRR sensors are consistently calibrated. Owing to the lack of onboard calibration capability, the AVHRR data need to be adjusted using vicarious approaches. One of the greatest challenges hampering these vicarious calibration techniques, however, is the degrading orbits of the NOAA satellites that house the instruments, or, more specifically, the fact that the satellites eventually drift into a terminator orbit several years after launch. This paper presents a uniform sensor calibration approach for the AVHRR visible (VIS) and nearinfrared (NIR) records using specifically designed NOAA-16 AVHRR-based, top-of-atmosphere (TOA) calibration models that take into account orbit degradation. These models are based on multiple invariant Earth targets, including Saharan deserts, polar ice scenes, and tropical deep-convective clouds. All invariant targets are referenced to the Aqua- MODIS Collection-6 calibration via transfer of the Aqua-MODIS calibration to NOAA-16 AVHRR using simultaneous nadir overpass (SNO) comparisons over the North Pole. A spectral band adjustment factor, based on SCanning Imaging Absorption SpectroMeter for Atmospheric CartograpHY (SCIAMACHY) spectral radiances, is used to account for the spectrally-induced biases caused by the spectral response function (SRF) differences of the AVHRR and MODIS sensors. Validation of the AVHRR Earth target calibration is performed by comparisons with contemporary MODIS SNOs. Calibration consistency between Earth targets validates the historical AVHRR record.

  4. Scanning radiographic apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, R.D.

    1980-04-01

    Visual display of dental, medical or other radiographic images is realized with an x-ray tube in which an electron beam is scanned through an x-y raster pattern on a broad anode plate, the scanning being synchronized with the x-y sweep signals of a cathode ray tube display and the intensity signal for the display being derived from a small x-ray detector which receives x-rays that have passed through the subject to be imaged. Positioning and support of the detector are provided for by disposing the detector in a probe which may be attached to the x-ray tube at any of a plurality of different locations and by providing a plurality of such probes of different configuration in order to change focal length, to accommodate to different detector placements relative to the subject, to enhance patient comfort and to enable production of both periapical images and wider angle pantomographic images. High image definition with reduced radiation dosage is provided for by a lead glass collimator situated between the x-ray tube and subject and having a large number of spaced-apart minute radiation transmissive passages convergent on the position of the detector. Releasable mounting means enable changes of collimator in conjunction with changes of the probe to change focal length. A control circuit modifies the x-y sweep signals applied to the x-ray tube and modulates electron beam energy and current in order to correct for image distortions and other undesirable effects which can otherwise be present in a scanning x-ray system.

  5. Enabling technologies for robot assisted ultrasound tomography: system setup and calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aalamifar, Fereshteh; Khurana, Rishabh; Cheng, Alexis; Taylor, Russell H.; Iordachita, Iulian; Boctor, Emad M.

    2014-04-01

    In this study, we are proposing a robot-assisted ultrasound tomography system that can offer soft tissue tomographic imaging and deeper or faster scan of the anatomy. This system consists of a robot-held ultrasound probe that tracks the position of another freehand probe, trying to align with it. One of the major challenges is achieving proper alignment of the two ultrasound probes. To enable proper alignment, two ultrasound calibrations and one hand-eye calibration are required. However, the system functionality and design is such that the ultrasound calibrations have become a challenge. In this paper, after providing an overview of the proposed robotic ultrasound tomography system, we focus on the calibrations problem. The results of the calibrations show a point reconstruction precision of a few millimeters for the current prototype, and the two images have at least 50% overlap visually; confirming the feasibility of such a system relying on accurate probe alignments.

  6. 21 CFR 868.6400 - Calibration gas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calibration gas. 868.6400 Section 868.6400 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous § 868.6400 Calibration gas. (a) Identification. A calibration gas is a device consisting of a container of gas of known concentration intended to calibrate...

  7. 21 CFR 868.6400 - Calibration gas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calibration gas. 868.6400 Section 868.6400 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous § 868.6400 Calibration gas. (a) Identification. A calibration gas is a device consisting of a container of gas of known concentration intended to calibrate...

  8. 21 CFR 868.6400 - Calibration gas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calibration gas. 868.6400 Section 868.6400 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous § 868.6400 Calibration gas. (a) Identification. A calibration gas is a device consisting of a container of gas of known concentration intended to calibrate...

  9. 21 CFR 868.6400 - Calibration gas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calibration gas. 868.6400 Section 868.6400 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous § 868.6400 Calibration gas. (a) Identification. A calibration gas is a device consisting of a container of gas of known concentration intended to calibrate...

  10. 21 CFR 868.6400 - Calibration gas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calibration gas. 868.6400 Section 868.6400 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous § 868.6400 Calibration gas. (a) Identification. A calibration gas is a device consisting of a container of gas of known concentration intended to calibrate...

  11. FTIR Calibration Methods and Issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perron, Gaetan

    Over the past 10 years, several space-borne FTIR missions were launched for atmospheric research, environmental monitoring and meteorology. One can think of the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) launched by the European Space Agency, the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) launched by the Canadian Space Agency, the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) launched by NASA and the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) launched by Eumetsat in Europe. Others are near to be launched, namely the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) from the Integrated Program Of- fice in the United States and the Thermal And Near infrared Sensor for carbon Observation (TANSO) from the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency. Moreover, several missions under definition foresee the use of this technology as sensor, e.g. Meteosat Third Generation (MTG), Eumetsat Polar System (EPS) and the Premier mission, one of the six candidates of the next ESA Earth Explorer Core Mission. In order to produce good quality products, calibration is essential. Calibrated data is the output of three main sub-systems that are tightly coupled: the instrument, the calibration targets and the level 1B processor. Calibration requirements must be carefully defined and propagated to each sub-system. Often, they are carried out by different parties which add to the complexity. Under budget and schedule pressure, some aspects are sometimes neglected and jeopardized final quality. For space-borne FTIR, level 1B outputs are spectra that are radiometrically, spectrally calibrated and geolocated. Radiometric calibration means to assign an intensity value in units to the y-axis. Spectral calibration means to assign to the x-axis the proper frequency value in units. Finally, geolocated means to assign a target position over the earth geoid i.e. longitude, latitude and altitude. This paper will present calibration methods and issues related to space-borne FTIR missions, e.g. two

  12. Controlled Scanning Probe Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruskell, Todd G.; Sarid, Dror; Workman, Richard K.; Pyle, Jason L.

    1997-03-01

    A method for real-time monitoring of the quality and quantity of silicon oxide grown on silicon using conducting-tip scanning probe lithography has been developed. The sub-picoampere tip-sample currents measured during lithography in ambient conditions are shown to be proportional to the amount of silicon oxide being grown. In addition, we have demonstrated the ability to control the composition of the grown material by altering the lithographic environment. Silicon nitride growth is shown to result from lithography on silicon samples in an environment of annhydrous ammonia.

  13. Battery scanning system

    SciTech Connect

    Dieu, L.F.

    1984-11-20

    A battery scanning system which is capable of monitoring and displaying the voltage of each cell in a battery or upon command provides the cell voltage distribution by displaying the cell number and voltage value of highest and lowest cell. The system has a digital logic system, display, input switches for operator generated variables, an alarm, relays, relay selection gates, an optically coupled isolation amplifier, power source and an analog-digital converter. The optically coupled analog amplifier electrically isolates the system from the battery so that large voltage offsets will not adversely affect the automatic measuring of the cells.

  14. Scanning Quantum Dot Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Christian; Green, Matthew F. B.; Leinen, Philipp; Deilmann, Thorsten; Krüger, Peter; Rohlfing, Michael; Temirov, Ruslan; Tautz, F. Stefan

    2015-07-01

    We introduce a scanning probe technique that enables three-dimensional imaging of local electrostatic potential fields with subnanometer resolution. Registering single electron charging events of a molecular quantum dot attached to the tip of an atomic force microscope operated at 5 K, equipped with a qPlus tuning fork, we image the quadrupole field of a single molecule. To demonstrate quantitative measurements, we investigate the dipole field of a single metal adatom adsorbed on a metal surface. We show that because of its high sensitivity the technique can probe electrostatic potentials at large distances from their sources, which should allow for the imaging of samples with increased surface roughness.

  15. Real Scan Evolution.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-02-01

    Computer Image Generation Visual Simulation Computer Graphics Al gortthm Geometric Model tng 1%ABSTRACT (C.tla. -mm. .00n ad N ue-e""V ONd Ofmi* OF 61"knsee...envtronments. modeled as a single valued el evatYo fnction of horizontal location. The objecttve of the development was to analyze the feasibility of a real...generator capable of creating complex Imagery .in real time? Is the solution amenable to efficient off-lne modeling of complex environments? The Real Scan

  16. High-precision efficiency calibration of a high-purity co-axial germanium detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blank, B.; Souin, J.; Ascher, P.; Audirac, L.; Canchel, G.; Gerbaux, M.; Grévy, S.; Giovinazzo, J.; Guérin, H.; Nieto, T. Kurtukian; Matea, I.; Bouzomita, H.; Delahaye, P.; Grinyer, G. F.; Thomas, J. C.

    2015-03-01

    A high-purity co-axial germanium detector has been calibrated in efficiency to a precision of about 0.15% over a wide energy range. High-precision scans of the detector crystal and γ-ray source measurements have been compared to Monte-Carlo simulations to adjust the dimensions of a detector model. For this purpose, standard calibration sources and short-lived online sources have been used. The resulting efficiency calibration reaches the precision needed e.g. for branching ratio measurements of super-allowed β decays for tests of the weak-interaction standard model.

  17. Summary of AXAF calibration requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellogg, E.

    1993-01-01

    The following summarizes requirements on the High Resolution Mirror Assembly (HRMA) and HRMA/SI calibration. The lists of calibration measurements assume that the HRMA meets the CTT requirement that the XRCF test environment shall have not more than a 10 percent effect on the encircled energy in 1 arcsec and that it can be calibrated to 1 percent. This implies that the offloading scheme has been implemented in the HRMA. It should be remembered that there are additional calibrations needed for: aspect system; tracking; gyros; other parts of the PCAS; spacecraft timing and checks on timing accuracy for all SIs after integration in the spacecraft; ficucial lights and periscope; alignments; optical metrology data: lengths and diameters with errors on mirror elements and optical interferometer data on surface figure; and throughput and imaging stability test: an end-to-end test that can be used after the XRCF to verify that the x-ray throughput and imaging quality have not been degraded. The tables presented give a summary of the integration times for HRMA and HRMA/SI calibration.

  18. Internal to external wavelength calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Kailash C.

    1999-01-01

    The spectra of Hen 1357 (the Stingray nebula) were used to check the internal to external wavelength calibration of the STIS first order CCD modes. The radial velocity of the Stingray nebula is known to high accuracy (< 1 km/sec) and the line with of the nebular line is very narrow (< 8 km/sec for the integrated nebula). Thus the observations of the Stingray nebula are ideal to check the internal to external wavelength calibration of the first order modes. The observations were taken in G430L and G750M modes using a 52 x 0.05 arcsec slit covering the wavelength range 2900 to 5700 A and 6295 to 6867 A, respectively. The observed wavelength range includes many nebular emission lines. The wavelengths of the nebular lines derived using the pipeline internal wavelength calibration were compared with the wavelengths derived from other ground based observations. In all cases, the wavelength match between the two is of the same order as the accuracy to which the line center can be measured. These results imply that there is no significant offset between the internal and external wavelength calibrations for these modes. The HDF-S QSO observations were also used for this test both for the first order and the Echelle modes. The results of the HDF-S QSO observations further confirm the above finding for the first order modes, and imply that there is no significant offset between the internal and external wavelength calibration for the Echelle modes.

  19. Scans Solo: A One-Person Environmental Scanning Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clagett, Craig A.

    An effective environmental scan will improve the quality of community college planning and decision making by alerting institutional leaders to the challenges and opportunities in the environment. Scanning can be done in three ways: (1) establishing a scanning committee to gather and synthesize information to guide planning; (2) sponsoring a…

  20. Free motion scanning system

    DOEpatents

    Sword, Charles K.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to an ultrasonic scanner system and method for the imaging of a part system, the scanner comprising: a probe assembly spaced apart from the surface of the part including at least two tracking signals for emitting radiation and a transmitter for emitting ultrasonic waves onto a surface in order to induce at least a portion of the waves to be reflected from the part, at least one detector for receiving the radiation wherein the detector is positioned to receive the radiation from the tracking signals, an analyzer for recognizing a three-dimensional location of the tracking signals based on the emitted radiation, a differential converter for generating an output signal representative of the waveform of the reflected waves, and a device such as a computer for relating said tracking signal location with the output signal and projecting an image of the resulting data. The scanner and method are particularly useful to acquire ultrasonic inspection data by scanning the probe over a complex part surface in an arbitrary scanning pattern.

  1. Ultrafast scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Botkin, D.A. |

    1995-09-01

    I have developed an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope (USTM) based on uniting stroboscopic methods of ultrafast optics and scanned probe microscopy to obtain nanometer spatial resolution and sub-picosecond temporal resolution. USTM increases the achievable time resolution of a STM by more than 6 orders of magnitude; this should enable exploration of mesoscopic and nanometer size systems on time scales corresponding to the period or decay of fundamental excitations. USTM consists of a photoconductive switch with subpicosecond response time in series with the tip of a STM. An optical pulse from a modelocked laser activates the switch to create a gate for the tunneling current, while a second laser pulse on the sample initiates a dynamic process which affects the tunneling current. By sending a large sequence of identical pulse pairs and measuring the average tunnel current as a function of the relative time delay between the pulses in each pair, one can map the time evolution of the surface process. USTM was used to measure the broadband response of the STM`s atomic size tunnel barrier in frequencies from tens to hundreds of GHz. The USTM signal amplitude decays linearly with the tunnel junction conductance, so the spatial resolution of the time-resolved signal is comparable to that of a conventional STM. Geometrical capacitance of the junction does not appear to play an important role in the measurement, but a capacitive effect intimately related to tunneling contributes to the measured signals and may limit the ultimate resolution of the USTM.

  2. An integrated approach to monitoring the calibration stability of operational dual-polarization radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaccarono, Mattia; Bechini, Renzo; Chandrasekar, Chandra V.; Cremonini, Roberto; Cassardo, Claudio

    2016-11-01

    The stability of weather radar calibration is a mandatory aspect for quantitative applications, such as rainfall estimation, short-term weather prediction and initialization of numerical atmospheric and hydrological models. Over the years, calibration monitoring techniques based on external sources have been developed, specifically calibration using the Sun and calibration based on ground clutter returns. In this paper, these two techniques are integrated and complemented with a self-consistency procedure and an intercalibration technique. The aim of the integrated approach is to implement a robust method for online monitoring, able to detect significant changes in the radar calibration. The physical consistency of polarimetric radar observables is exploited using the self-consistency approach, based on the expected correspondence between dual-polarization power and phase measurements in rain. This technique allows a reference absolute value to be provided for the radar calibration, from which eventual deviations may be detected using the other procedures. In particular, the ground clutter calibration is implemented on both polarization channels (horizontal and vertical) for each radar scan, allowing the polarimetric variables to be monitored and hardware failures to promptly be recognized. The Sun calibration allows monitoring the calibration and sensitivity of the radar receiver, in addition to the antenna pointing accuracy. It is applied using observations collected during the standard operational scans but requires long integration times (several days) in order to accumulate a sufficient amount of useful data. Finally, an intercalibration technique is developed and performed to compare colocated measurements collected in rain by two radars in overlapping regions. The integrated approach is performed on the C-band weather radar network in northwestern Italy, during July-October 2014. The set of methods considered appears suitable to establish an online tool to

  3. Slate characterization using 3D laser scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, M.; Taboada, J.; Martínez, J.; Matías, J. M.; Vilán, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    Quality control is a necessary component of the slate slab manufacturing process so as to evaluate defects as defined by the current standard for slate. Quality control has traditionally been performed manually by an expert in the field, with the consequent human subjectivity. We studied the feasibility of using a 3D laser scanner to measure slate slabs and analyze possible defects that would lead to the rejection of slabs for particular industrial processes. The application requires slate characterization to be performed in real time and thereby requires a short computation time. We describe an optimized calibration method based on Tsai's approach that reduces calculation complexity and cost in this key 3D laser scanning stage. Configured and implemented for slate slab characterization, the system produces the required information in real time during the production process.

  4. Earth Observing Scanning Polarimeter (EOSP), phase B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Evaluations performed during a Phase B study directed towards defining an optimal design for the Earth Observing Scanning Polarimeter (EOSP) instrument is summarized. An overview of the experiment approach is included which provides a summary of the scientific objectives, the background of the measurement approach, and the measurement method. In the instrumentation section, details of the design are discussed starting with the key instrument features required to accomplish the scientific objectives and a system characterization in terms of the Stokes vector/Mueller matrix formalism. This is followed by a detailing of the instrument design concept, the design of the individual elements of the system, the predicted performance, and a summary of appropriate instrument testing and calibration. The selected design makes use of key features of predecessor polarimeters and is fully compatible with the Earth Observing System spacecraft requirements.

  5. Global standardization of scanning probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Daisuke; Itoh, Hiroshi; Ichimura, Shingo; Kurosawa, Tomizo

    2007-02-01

    Recent efforts to achieve global standardization of scanning probe microscopy (SPM) including noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM), especially through the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and related research, are surveyed. Since the unification of terminology for SPM is a prerequisite for standardization, it should have the first priority, followed by the unification of data management and treatment, which will enable access to and processing of SPM data collected by different types of instrument. Among the various SPM analytical methods, the dimensional metrology of SPM is regarded to be the first priority for standardization. This requires solving two basic problems: calibrating the x, y, and z coordinate axes with traceability to the SI unit of length, and eliminating the morphological artefacts caused by the shape of the probe tip. Pre-standardization efforts on restoring distorted images and characterizing the tip shape during use are discussed.

  6. Engineering considerations in anemometer calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meserole, L. T.

    The increased usage of portable anemometers has marked the need for better calibration quality. Efforts being made to achieve correlation between some US Department of Defense laboratories are described. A wind tunnel developed by the Navy Primary Standards Laboratory was used to calibrate 12 models of hot-wire anemometers and 13 models of vane anemometers. The latter category consisted of swinging-vane, mechanical rotating-vane, electrical rotating-vane, torsional-vane anemometers. Stable instruments such as the rotating-vane and electrical rotating-vane types were found to be fairly capable of comparing calibrations made by different facilities. However, greater accuracy and cost-efficiency would be achieved with fewer top-notch facilities as opposed to having a greater number of facilities but with minimum accuracy.

  7. Double Compton scatter telescope calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayton, B.; Simone, J.; Green, M.; Long, J.; Zanrosso, E.; Zych, A. D.; White, R. S.

    1981-01-01

    Calibration techniques for a medium energy gamma ray telescope are described. Gain calibration using Compton edge spectra involves comparisons of pulse height spectra with spectra simulated by a Monte Carlo computer code which includes Compton scattering and pair production, plural scattering and variable energy resolution, and cell size. The telescope considered comprises 56 cells of liquid scintillator in four size groups, with a total liquid volume of 325 l; each cell has its own photomultiplier tube. Energy and angular resolutions and the PMT gain calibration procedure are verified with double scatter data for monoenergetic gamma rays at a known location. Detection probabilities for any cell combination in the two telescope arrays are calculated per steradian as a function of the scattering for a number of different energies with a Van de Graaff accelerator.

  8. Self-calibrating multiplexer circuit

    DOEpatents

    Wahl, Chris P.

    1997-01-01

    A time domain multiplexer system with automatic determination of acceptable multiplexer output limits, error determination, or correction is comprised of a time domain multiplexer, a computer, a constant current source capable of at least three distinct current levels, and two series resistances employed for calibration and testing. A two point linear calibration curve defining acceptable multiplexer voltage limits may be defined by the computer by determining the voltage output of the multiplexer to very accurately known input signals developed from predetermined current levels across the series resistances. Drift in the multiplexer may be detected by the computer when the output voltage limits, expected during normal operation, are exceeded, or the relationship defined by the calibration curve is invalidated.

  9. Landsat-7 ETM+ On-Orbit Radiometric Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markham, Brian L.; Kaita, Ed; Miller, Jeff; Barsi, Julia; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    As of July, 2000 the Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) sensor on Landsat-7 has been operating on-orbit for about 15 months. The ETM+ images the Earth in has eight spectral bands in the visible, near-infrared (IR), short wavelength infrared (SWIR), and thermal portions of the spectrum. Three on-board calibration systems are available for the reflective bands: (1) the Internal Calibrator (IC), (2) the Partial Aperture Solar Calibrator (PASC), and (3) the Full Aperture Solar Calibrator (FASC). The Internal Calibrator also provides the thermal band calibration. Several investigators on the Landsat science team are also regularly performing vicarious calibrations. The internal calibrator, which during much of the pre-launch testing and early on-orbit check out period, showed up to 15% variability with time, has since stabilized as the instrument has assumed a regular schedule of operations and is now typically showing only a few percent variation with time, mostly associated with warm-up. The PASC has been the most variable of the sources: the response to the PASC has increased by as much as 50% is some bands and is oscillating with time, perhaps due to contamination. The FASC has been the most stable of the sources: mid scan response to the FASC diffuser have varied from -4%/yr for band 4 (0.83 microns) to -2%/yr for band 1 (0.49 microns) to +1%/yr for band 7 (2.2 microns). These decreases in response in bands 1-4 would have been about half as large if measured on the right (west) side of the panel and about twice as large if measured on the left side of the panel. The current interpretation is that the FASC diffuser panel is changing non-uniformly in its reflectance characteristics. Vicarious ground measurements have generally been consistent with the pre-launch measurements of the instrument responsivity and have not shown evidence of a change in responsivity with time. The FASC, IC, and vicarious results suggest the instrument has not changed by more than two

  10. Stereo vision based hand-held laser scanning system design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Hanwei; Xu, Jun; Wang, Jinming

    2011-11-01

    Although 3D scanning system is used more and more broadly in many fields, such computer animate, computer aided design, digital museums, and so on, a convenient scanning device is expansive for most people to afford. In another hand, imaging devices are becoming cheaper, a stereo vision system with two video cameras cost little. In this paper, a hand held laser scanning system is design based on stereo vision principle. The two video cameras are fixed tighter, and are all calibrated in advance. The scanned object attached with some coded markers is in front of the stereo system, and can be changed its position and direction freely upon the need of scanning. When scanning, the operator swept a line laser source, and projected it on the object. At the same time, the stereo vision system captured the projected lines, and reconstructed their 3D shapes. The code markers are used to translate the coordinate system between scanned points under different view. Two methods are used to get more accurate results. One is to use NURBS curves to interpolate the sections of the laser lines to obtain accurate central points, and a thin plate spline is used to approximate the central points, and so, an exact laser central line is got, which guards an accurate correspondence between tow cameras. Another way is to incorporate the constraint of laser swept plane on the reconstructed 3D curves by a PCA (Principle Component Analysis) algorithm, and more accurate results are obtained. Some examples are given to verify the system.

  11. Pulmonary ventilation/perfusion scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... JavaScript. A pulmonary ventilation/perfusion scan involves two nuclear scan tests to measure breathing (ventilation) and circulation ( ... In: Mettler FA, Guiberteau MJ, eds. Essentials of Nuclear Medicine Imaging . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; ...

  12. Method for calibrating mass spectrometers

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Gordon A [Benton City, WA; Brands, Michael D [Richland, WA; Bruce, James E [Schwenksville, PA; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana [Richland, WA; Smith, Richard D [Richland, WA

    2002-12-24

    A method whereby a mass spectra generated by a mass spectrometer is calibrated by shifting the parameters used by the spectrometer to assign masses to the spectra in a manner which reconciles the signal of ions within the spectra having equal mass but differing charge states, or by reconciling ions having known differences in mass to relative values consistent with those known differences. In this manner, the mass spectrometer is calibrated without the need for standards while allowing the generation of a highly accurate mass spectra by the instrument.

  13. Instrument Calibration and Certification Procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, R. Wesley

    2016-05-31

    The Amptec 640SL-2 is a 4-wire Kelvin failsafe resistance meter, designed to reliably use very low-test currents for its resistance measurements. The 640SL-1 is a 2-wire version, designed to support customers using the Reynolds Industries type 311 connector. For both versions, a passive (analog) dual function DC Milliameter/Voltmeter allows the user to verify the actual 640SL output current level and the open circuit voltage on the test leads. This procedure includes tests of essential performance parameters. Any malfunction noticed during calibration, whether specifically tested for or not, shall be corrected before calibration continues or is completed.

  14. Mariner 9 television calibration - Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herkenhoff, Ken E.; Soderblom, Laurence A.; Murray, Bruce C.; Danielson, G. Edward

    1988-01-01

    Mariner 9 TV data from the 1971-1972 encounter with Mars, which contain good synoptic coverage of of the planet as well as the highest-resolution images thus far obtained for the south polar region, can lead to more accurate photometric analysis if subjected to improved processing methods. While calibration errors are rather greater than those of the Viking Orbiter cameras, both calibration data and processing software applicable to an improvement program have become available through the USGS's Planetary Image Cartography System.

  15. Rotational scanning atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ulčinas, A; Vaitekonis, Š

    2017-03-10

    A non-raster scanning technique for atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging which combines rotational and translational motion is presented. The use of rotational motion for the fast scan axis allows us to significantly increase the scanning speed while imaging a large area (diameter > 30 μm). An image reconstruction algorithm and the factors influencing the resolution of the technique are discussed. The experimental results show the potential of the rotational scanning technique for high-throughput large area AFM investigation.

  16. Rotational scanning atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulčinas, A.; Vaitekonis, Š.

    2017-03-01

    A non-raster scanning technique for atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging which combines rotational and translational motion is presented. The use of rotational motion for the fast scan axis allows us to significantly increase the scanning speed while imaging a large area (diameter > 30 μm). An image reconstruction algorithm and the factors influencing the resolution of the technique are discussed. The experimental results show the potential of the rotational scanning technique for high-throughput large area AFM investigation.

  17. 2MASS J22560844+5954299: the newly discovered cataclysmic star with the deepest eclipse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjurkchieva, D.; Khruzina, T.; Dimitrov, D.; Groebel, R.; Ibryamov, S.; Nikolov, G.

    2015-12-01

    Context. The SW Sex stars are assumed to represent a distinguished stage in cataclysmic variable (CV) evolution, making it especially important to study them. Aims: We discovered a new cataclysmic star and carried out prolonged and precise photometric observations, as well as medium-resolution spectral observations. Modelling these data allowed us to determine the physical parameters and to establish its peculiarities. Methods: To obtain a light curve solution we used model whose emission sources are a white dwarf surrounded by an accretion disk with a hot spot, a gaseous stream near the disk's lateral side, and a secondary star filling its Roche lobe. The obtained physical parameters are compared with those of other SW Sex-subtype stars. Results: The newly discovered cataclysmic variable 2MASS J22560844+5954299 shows the deepest eclipse amongst the known nova-like stars. It was reproduced by totally covering a very luminous accretion disk by a red secondary component. The temperature distribution of the disk is flatter than that of steady-state disk. The target is unusual with the combination of a low mass ratio q ~ 1.0 (considerably below the limit q = 1.2 of stable mass transfer of CVs) and an M-star secondary. The intensity of the observed three emission lines, Hα, He 5875, and He 6678, sharply increases around phase 0.0, accompanied by a Doppler jump to the shorter wavelength. The absence of eclipses of the emission lines and their single-peaked profiles means that they originate mainly in a vertically extended hot-spot halo. The emission Hα line reveals S-wave wavelength shifts with semi-amplitude of around 210 km s-1 and phase lag of 0.03. Conclusions: The non-steady-state emission of the luminous accretion disk of 2MASS J22560844+5954299 was attributed to the low viscosity of the disk matter caused by its unusually high temperature. The star shows all spectral properties of an SW Sex variable apart from the 0.5 central absorption. Based on data collected

  18. Evaluation of Multiple-Sampling Function used with a Microtek flatbed scanner for Radiation Dosimetry Calibration of EBT2 Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Liyun; Ho, Sheng-Yow; Ding, Hueisch-Jy; Hwang, Ing-Ming; Chen, Pang-Yu; Lee, Tsair-Fwu

    2016-10-01

    The radiochromic EBT2 film is a widely used quality assurance device for radiation therapy. This study evaluated the film calibration performance of the multiple-sampling function, a function of the ScanWizard Pro scanning software provided by the manufacturer, when used with Microtek 9800XL plus (9800XL+) flatbed scanner. By using the PDD method, each one of the eight EBT2 films, four delivered by 290 monitor unit (MU) and four by 88 MU via 6-MV photon beams, was tightly sandwiched in a 303-cm3 water equivalent polystyrene phantom prior to irradiation. Before and after irradiation, all films were scanned using the Microtek 9800XL+ scanner with five different modes of the multiple-sampling function, which could generate the image with the averaged result of multiple-sampling. The net optical densities (netOD) on the beam central axis of film were assigned to corresponding depth doses for calibration. For each sampling mode with either delivered MU, the depth-dose uncertainty of a single film from repeated scans and that of a single scan of the four films were analyzed. Finally, the calibration error and the combined calibration uncertainty between film determined depth-doses and delivered depth-doses were calculated and evaluated for each sampling mode. All standard deviations and the calibration error were demonstrated to be unrelated to the number of sampling lines. The calibration error of the 2-line and 16-line mode was within 3 cGy and better than that of the other modes. The combined uncertainty of the 2-line mode was the lowest, which was generally less than 6 cGy except for the delivered dose around 100 cGy. The evaluation described herein revealed that the EBT2 film calibrated with the 2-line mode has relatively lower error, scanning time and combined uncertianty. Therefore, it is recommended for routine EBT2 film calibration and verification of treatment plans.

  19. The Scanning Process: Getting Started.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renfro, William L.; Morrison, James L.

    1983-01-01

    Scanning the external environment will become more essential to colleges in the coming decade. Developing an environmental scanning system can identify important emerging issues that may constitute either threats or opportunities. The organizational features of a mature scanning process are described. (MLW)

  20. Scan Angle Dependence Of Radiance Recorded By The NOAA-AVHRR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duggin, M. J.; Piwinski, D.; Whitehead, V.; Ryland, G.

    1983-08-01

    NOAA-AVHRR data is being used to monitor global vegetation type and condition and to study various environmental factors in addition to performance of meteorological functions. The AVHRR instrument has +/-54° as a maximum scan angle limits and it is necessary to be aware of the effects of sun-target-sensor geometry at extreme scan angles to be able to properly interpret the satellite images. In order to interpret the images for vegetation type and condition analysis it is necessary to calibrate back to the nadir view position. Both simulation studies and empirical investigations with digital scanner data have been performed in order to sufficiently understand the effects of scan angle and sun angle, as well as the effects of atmospheric scattering, to eventually perform adequate calibrations. Not suprisingly, the effects are large and studies are continuing to provide improved calibrations. It is the results of these investigations which we describe in this paper.

  1. Kinect Fusion improvement using depth camera calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagliari, D.; Menna, F.; Roncella, R.; Remondino, F.; Pinto, L.

    2014-06-01

    Scene's 3D modelling, gesture recognition and motion tracking are fields in rapid and continuous development which have caused growing demand on interactivity in video-game and e-entertainment market. Starting from the idea of creating a sensor that allows users to play without having to hold any remote controller, the Microsoft Kinect device was created. The Kinect has always attract researchers in different fields, from robotics to Computer Vision (CV) and biomedical engineering as well as third-party communities that have released several Software Development Kit (SDK) versions for Kinect in order to use it not only as a game device but as measurement system. Microsoft Kinect Fusion control libraries (firstly released in March 2013) allow using the device as a 3D scanning and produce meshed polygonal of a static scene just moving the Kinect around. A drawback of this sensor is the geometric quality of the delivered data and the low repeatability. For this reason the authors carried out some investigation in order to evaluate the accuracy and repeatability of the depth measured delivered by the Kinect. The paper will present a throughout calibration analysis of the Kinect imaging sensor, with the aim of establishing the accuracy and precision of the delivered information: a straightforward calibration of the depth sensor in presented and then the 3D data are correct accordingly. Integrating the depth correction algorithm and correcting the IR camera interior and exterior orientation parameters, the Fusion Libraries are corrected and a new reconstruction software is created to produce more accurate models.

  2. A scanning cavity microscope

    PubMed Central

    Mader, Matthias; Reichel, Jakob; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Hunger, David

    2015-01-01

    Imaging the optical properties of individual nanosystems beyond fluorescence can provide a wealth of information. However, the minute signals for absorption and dispersion are challenging to observe, and only specialized techniques requiring sophisticated noise rejection are available. Here we use signal enhancement in a high-finesse scanning optical microcavity to demonstrate ultra-sensitive imaging. Harnessing multiple interactions of probe light with a sample within an optical resonator, we achieve a 1,700-fold signal enhancement compared with diffraction-limited microscopy. We demonstrate quantitative imaging of the extinction cross-section of gold nanoparticles with a sensitivity less than 1 nm2; we show a method to improve the spatial resolution potentially below the diffraction limit by using higher order cavity modes, and we present measurements of the birefringence and extinction contrast of gold nanorods. The demonstrated simultaneous enhancement of absorptive and dispersive signals promises intriguing potential for optical studies of nanomaterials, molecules and biological nanosystems. PMID:26105690

  3. Fetal cardiac scanning today.

    PubMed

    Allan, Lindsey

    2010-07-01

    The ability to examine the structure of the fetal heart in real-time started over 30 years ago now. The field has seen very great advances since then, both in terms of technical improvements in ultrasound equipment and in dissemination of operator skills. A great deal has been learnt about normal cardiac function in the human fetus throughout gestation and how it is affected by pathologies of pregnancy. There is increasing recognition of abnormal heart structure during routine obstetric scanning, allowing referral for specialist diagnosis and counselling. It is now possible to make accurate diagnosis of cardiac malformations as early as 12 weeks of gestation. Early diagnosis of a major cardiac malformation in the fetus can provide the parents with a comprehensive prognosis, enabling them to make the most informed choice about the management of the pregnancy.

  4. Telescopic horizon scanning.

    PubMed

    Koenderink, Jan

    2014-12-20

    The problem of "distortionless" viewing with terrestrial telescopic systems (mainly "binoculars") remains problematic. The so called "globe effect" is only partially counteracted in modern designs. Theories addressing the phenomenon have never reached definitive closure. In this paper, we show that exact distortionless viewing with terrestrial telescopic systems is not possible in general, but that it is in principle possible in-very frequent in battle field and marine applications-the case of horizon scanning. However, this involves cylindrical optical elements. For opto-electronic systems, a full solution is more readily feasible. The solution involves a novel interpretation of the relevant constraints and objectives. For final design decisions, it is not necessary to rely on a corpus of psychophysical (or ergonomic) data, although one has to decide whether the instrument is intended as an extension of the eye or as a "pictorial" device.

  5. Scanning the periphery.

    PubMed

    Day, George S; Schoemaker, Paul J H

    2005-11-01

    Companies often face new rivals, technologies, regulations, and other environmental changes that seem to come out of left field. How can they see these changes sooner and capitalize on them? Such changes often begin as weak signals on what the authors call the periphery, or the blurry zone at the edge of an organization's vision. As with human peripheral vision, these signals are difficult to see and interpret but can be vital to success or survival. Unfortunately, most companies lack a systematic method for determining where on the periphery they should be looking, how to interpret the weak signals they see, and how to allocate limited scanning resources. This article provides such a method-a question-based framework for helping companies scan the periphery more efficiently and effectively. The framework divides questions into three categories: learning from the past (What have been our past blind spots? What instructive analogies do other industries offer? Who in the industry is skilled at picking up weak signals and acting on them?); evaluating the present (What important signals are we rationalizing away? What are our mavericks, outliers, complainers, and defectors telling us? What are our peripheral customers and competitors really thinking?); and envisioning the future (What future surprises could really hurt or help us? What emerging technologies could change the game? Is there an unthinkable scenario that might disrupt our business?). Answering these questions is a good first step toward anticipating problems or opportunities that may appear on the business horizon. The article concludes with a self-test that companies can use to assess their need and capability for peripheral vision.

  6. Development of a primary angular shock calibration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jun

    2008-06-01

    Primary angular shock calibration system is developed by Changcheng Institute of Metrology & Measurement (CIMM). It uses brushless servo motor driving the air bearing system to generate rotational angle, angular velocity and angular acceleration. Both grating and heterodyne laser interferometer with diffraction grating is used to measure the angular movement, which are traceable to the International System of Units (SI). It can be used to calibrate angular transducers, i.e. angular accelerometer, angular velocity transducer, and rotational angle transducer to obtain sensitivity by angular shock or other kinds of excitation. Heterodyne laser interferometer with diffraction grating is successfully used in the measurement of angular acceleration. The method of using grating and scanning heads measure angular acceleration is developed. One characteristic of this system is that it could generate different kind of excitation signals, which include half sine, trapezoidal, sinusoidal, etc. and it can work as a high performance rate table to generate constant angular velocity. The preliminary test shows the uncertainty in calibrating angular accelerometer should be better than 2%. This paper introduces the mechanic system, control system and measurement system of the angular shock calibration system.

  7. The Progenitor of the FUor-Type Young Eruptive Star 2MASS J06593158-0405277

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kóspál, Á.; Ábrahám, P.; Moór, A.; Haas, M.; Chini, R.; Hackstein, M.

    2015-03-01

    Only a dozen confirmed FU Orionis-type young outbursting stars (FUors) are known today; this explains the interest in the recent FUor eruption of 2MASS J06593158-0405277. Its outburst and expected decline will be subject to numerous studies in the future. Almost equally important for the understanding of the eruption mechanism, however, is the physical characterization of the FUor’s precursor. Here we analyze unpublished archival data and summarize—and partly revise—all relevant photometry from optical to submillimeter wavelengths. Our analysis implies that the FUor is possibly associated with eight T Tauri star candidates and a strong Class 0 source. Adopting a distance of 450 pc for the FUor, we derive a quiescent bolometric luminosity and temperature of {{L}bol} = 4.8 L ⊙ and {{T}bol} = 1190 K, typical for young Class II sources. The central star has a temperature of {{T}eff} = 4000 K, a mass of 0.75 M ⊙ , and an age of about 6 × 105 yr. The SED implies a circumstellar mass of 0.01-0.06 M ⊙ , and the system is surrounded by a faint infrared nebulosity. Our results provide an almost complete picture of a FUor progenitor, supporting the interpretation of future post-outburst studies. Based on observations made with the Herschel Space Observatory. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  8. Image distortion and its correction in linear galvanometric mirrors-based laser-scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenbo; Wu, Zhenguo; Zeng, Haishan

    2015-05-01

    To simplify imaging focusing and calibration tasks, a laser-scanning microscope needs to scan at a moderate frame rate. The inertia of a galvanometric scanner leads to time delays when following external commands, which subsequently introduces image distortions that deteriorate as scan frequency increases. Sinusoidal and triangular waveforms were examined as fast axis driving patterns. The interplay among driving pattern, frequency, sampling rate, phase shift, linear scanning range, and their effect on reconstructed images was discussed. Utilizing position feedback from the linear galvo scanners, the effect of response time could be automatically compensated in real time. Precompensated triangular driving waveform offered the least amount of image distortion.

  9. Ultrasonic Calibration Wire Test Phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Lehman, S K; Fisher, K A; Werve, M; Chambers, D H

    2004-09-24

    We designed and built a phantom consisting of vertical wires maintained under tension to be used as an ultrasonic test, calibration, and reconstruction object for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory annular array scanner. We provide a description of the phantom, present example data sets, preliminary reconstructions, example metadata, and MATLAB codes to read the data.

  10. Practical intraoperative stereo camera calibration.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Philip; Bergeles, Christos; Darzi, Ara; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Many of the currently available stereo endoscopes employed during minimally invasive surgical procedures have shallow depths of field. Consequently, focus settings are adjusted from time to time in order to achieve the best view of the operative workspace. Invalidating any prior calibration procedure, this presents a significant problem for image guidance applications as they typically rely on the calibrated camera parameters for a variety of geometric tasks, including triangulation, registration and scene reconstruction. While recalibration can be performed intraoperatively, this invariably results in a major disruption to workflow, and can be seen to represent a genuine barrier to the widespread adoption of image guidance technologies. The novel solution described herein constructs a model of the stereo endoscope across the continuum of focus settings, thereby reducing the number of degrees of freedom to one, such that a single view of reference geometry will determine the calibration uniquely. No special hardware or access to proprietary interfaces is required, and the method is ready for evaluation during human cases. A thorough quantitative analysis indicates that the resulting intrinsic and extrinsic parameters lead to calibrations as accurate as those derived from multiple pattern views.

  11. Calibrator for microflow delivery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinozzi, Franco; Bini, Fabiano; Cappa, Paolo

    2005-01-01

    An apparatus for calibrating the fluid flow rate down to 3×10-2ml/h is proposed, based on the volumetric pump working principle. Constant flow rate is assured by means of the constant speed at which the plunger of a laboratory syringe is moved. To test effectiveness of the system, a flow sensor, composed by a differential pressure transducer and a needle was calibrated and afterward utilized for characterizing a clinical drug infusion device. The proposed apparatus showed a full scale (FS) uncertainty approximately equal to 3.5% over a range of 6 ml/h. The calibration range starts at 3×10-2ml/h with a 1 ml syringe and at 3×10-3ml/h with a 0.1 ml syringe. The minimum detectable signal (evaluated at 6 dB SNR) was equal to about 1.4×10-2ml/h by using a syringe of 1 ml. The outcomes of the adopted procedure allowed a characterization of the performance of an infusion pump, without the need of the usual but somewhat cumbersome gravimetric calibration standard. Moreover, some issues about the expected resolution and uncertainty, depending on the characteristics of the system, is also reported.

  12. Autonomous Attitude Sensor Calibration (ASCAL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Chariya; Rowe, John; Mueller, Karl; Ziyad, Nigel

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, an approach to increase the degree of autonomy of flight software is proposed. We describe an enhancement of the Attitude Determination and Control System by augmenting it with self-calibration capability. Conventional attitude estimation and control algorithms are combined with higher level decision making and machine learning algorithms in order to deal with the uncertainty and complexity of the problem.

  13. Calibration of a proton beam energy monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Moyers, M. F.; Coutrakon, G. B.; Ghebremedhin, A.; Shahnazi, K.; Koss, P.; Sanders, E.

    2007-06-15

    Delivery of therapeutic proton beams requires an absolute energy accuracy of {+-}0.64 to 0.27 MeV for patch fields and a relative energy accuracy of {+-}0.10 to 0.25 MeV for tailoring the depth dose distribution using the energy stacking technique. Achromatic switchyard tunes, which lead to better stability of the beam incident onto the patient, unfortunately limit the ability of switchyard magnet tesla meters to verify the correct beam energy within the tolerances listed above. A new monitor to measure the proton energy before each pulse is transported through the switchyard has been installed into a proton synchrotron. The purpose of this monitor is to correct and/or inhibit beam delivery when the measured beam energy is outside of the tolerances for treatment. The monitor calculates the beam energy using data from two frequency and eight beam position monitors that measure the revolution frequency of the proton bunches and the effective offset of the orbit from the nominal radius of the synchrotron. The new energy monitor has been calibrated by measuring the range of the beam through water and comparing with published range-energy tables for various energies. A relationship between depth dose curves and range-energy tables was first determined using Monte Carlo simulations of particle transport and energy deposition. To reduce the uncertainties associated with typical scanning water phantoms, a new technique was devised in which the beam energy was scanned while fixed thickness water tanks were sandwiched between two fixed parallel plate ionization chambers. Using a multitude of tank sizes, several energies were tested to determine the nominal accelerator orbit radius. After calibration, the energy reported by the control system matched the energy derived by range measurements to better than 0.72 MeV for all nine energies tested between 40 and 255 MeV with an average difference of -0.33 MeV. A study of different combinations of revolution frequency and radial

  14. A calibration method of the multi-channel imaging lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Weiming; Liu, Jun; Shu, Rong

    2014-06-01

    We design a kind of imaging LiDAR with sixteen channels, which consists of a fiber laser source, dual scanning galvanometers, range measurement circuits and information processing circuits etc. The image LiDAR provides sixteen range measurements for one laser shot and the distance accuracy of each channel is about 4cm. This paper provides a calibrate method to correct point cloud images captured with the multi-channel LiDAR. The method needs to construct different slanted planes to cover the imaging field, and establish precise plane equations in the known ground coordinates, then fit planes with point clouds data and calculate correction parameters of all channels through the error model. The image accuracy is better than 5cm processed by this calibration method.

  15. Scanning Tunneling Optical Resonance Microscopy Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Lau, Janis E.; Jenkins, Phillip P.; Castro, Stephanie L.; Tin, Padetha; Wilt, David M.; Pal, Anna Maria; Fahey, Stephen D.

    2004-01-01

    The ability to determine the in situ optoelectronic properties of semiconductor materials has become especially important as the size of device architectures has decreased and the development of complex microsystems has increased. Scanning Tunneling Optical Resonance Microscopy, or STORM, can interrogate the optical bandgap as a function of its position within a semiconductor micro-structure. This technique uses a tunable solidstate titanium-sapphire laser whose output is "chopped" using a spatial light modulator and is coupled by a fiber-optic connector to a scanning tunneling microscope in order to illuminate the tip-sample junction. The photoenhanced portion of the tunneling current is spectroscopically measured using a lock-in technique. The capabilities of this technique were verified using semiconductor microstructure calibration standards that were grown by organometallic vapor-phase epitaxy. Bandgaps characterized by STORM measurements were found to be in good agreement with the bulk values determined by transmission spectroscopy and photoluminescence and with the theoretical values that were based on x-ray diffraction results.

  16. Performance of MODIS Thermal Emissive Bands On-orbit Calibration Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Chang, T.

    2009-01-01

    Two nearly identical copies of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) are currently operated on-board the Terra and Aqua spacecrafts, launched in December 1999 and May 2002, respectively. Together, they have produced an unprecedented amount of science data products, which are widely used for the studies of changes in the Earth's system of land, oceans, and atmosphere. MODIS is a cross-track scanning radiometer, which uses a two-sided scan mirror and collects data continuously over a wide scan angle range (+/-55 degree relative to the instrument nadir) each scan of 1.47 seconds. It has 36 spectral bands with wavelengths ranging from visible (VIS) to long-wave infrared (LWIR). MODIS bands 1-19 and 26 are the reflective solar bands (RSB) and bands 20-25 and 27-36 are the thermal emissive bands (TEB). MODIS was developed and designed with improvements made over its heritage sensors (such as AVHRR and Landsat) and, in particular, with more stringent calibration requirements. Because of this, MODIS was built with a set of state-of-art on-board calibrators (OBC), which include a solar diffuser (SD), a solar diffuser stability monitor (SDSM), a blackbody (BB), a spectroradiometric calibration assembly (SRCA), and a space view (SV) port. With the exception of view angle differences, MODIS OBC measurements and the Earth View (EV) observations are made via the same optical path. MODIS TEB have a total of 160 individual TEB detectors (10 per band), which are located on two cold focal plane assemblies (CFPA). For nominal on-orbit operation, the CFPA temperature is controlled at 83K via a passive radiative cooler. For the TEB, the calibration requirements at specified typical scene radiances are less than or equal to 1% with an exception for the fire detection (low gain) band. MODIS TEB on-orbit calibration is performed on a scan-by-scan basis using a quadratic calibration algorithm, and data collected from sensor responses to the onboard BB and SV. The BB

  17. Earth observing scanning polarimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Travis, Larry

    1993-01-01

    Climate forcing by tropospheric aerosols is receiving increased attention because of the realization that the climate effects may be large, while our knowledge of global aerosol characteristics and temporal changes is very poor. Tropospheric aerosols cause a direct radiative forcing due simply to their scattering and absorption of solar radiation, as well as an indirect effect as cloud condensation nuclei which can modify the shortwave reflectivity of clouds. Sulfate aerosols tend to increase planetary albedo through both the direct and indirect effects; a cooling due to anthropogenic sulfate aerosols has been estimated of order 1 W/sq m, noting that this is similar in magnitude to the present anthropogenic greenhouse gas warming. Other aerosols, including those from biomass burning and wind-blown desert dust are also of potential climatic importance. At present, the only global monitoring of tropospheric aerosols is a NOAA operational product, aerosol optical thickness, obtained using channel-1 (0.58-0.68 mu m) radiances from the AVHRR. With this single channel radiance data, one must use an approach which is based on the inferred excess of reflected radiance owing to scattering by the aerosols over that expected from theoretical calculations. This approach is suited only for situations where the surface has a low albedo that is well known a priori. Thus, the NOAA operational product is restricted to coverage over the ocean at AVHRR scan angles well away from sun glint, and aerosol changes are subject to confusion with changes caused by either optically thin or subpixel clouds. Because optically thin aerosols have only a small effect on the radiance, accurate measurements for optical thickness less than 0.1 (which is a typical background level) are precluded. Moreover, some of the largest and most important aerosol changes are expected over land. The Earth Observing Scanning Polarimeter (EOSP) instrument, based upon design heritage and analysis techniques

  18. M Dwarfs From The SDSS, 2MASS and WISE Surveys: Identification, Characterisation and Unresolved Ultracool Companionship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Neil James

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this thesis is to use a cross-match between WISE, 2MASS and SDSS to identify a large sample of M dwarfs. Through the careful characterisation and quality control of these M dwarfs I aim to identify rare systems (i.e. unresolved UCD companions, young M dwarfs, late M dwarfs and M dwarfs with common proper motion companions). Locating ultracool companions to M dwarfs is important for constraining low-mass formation models, the measurement of substellar dynamical masses and radii, and for testing ultracool evolutionary models. This is done by using an optimised method for identifying M dwarfs which may have unresolved ultracool companions. To do this I construct a catalogue of 440 694 M dwarf candidates, from WISE, 2MASS and SDSS, based on optical- and near-infrared colours and reduced proper motion. With strict reddening, photometric and quality constraints I isolate a sub-sample of 36 898 M dwarfs and search for possible mid-infrared M dwarf + ultracool dwarf candidates by comparing M dwarfs which have similar optical/near-infrared colours (chosen for their sensitivity to effective temperature and metallicity). I present 1 082 M dwarf + ultracool dwarf candidates for follow-up. Using simulated ultracool dwarf companions to M dwarfs, I estimate that the occurrence of unresolved ultracool companions amongst my M dwarf + ultracool dwarf candidates should be at least four times the average for my full M dwarf catalogue. I discuss yields of candidates based on my simulations. The possible contamination and bias from misidentified M dwarfs is then discussed, from chance alignments with other M dwarfs and UCDs, from chance alignments with giant stars, from chance alignments with galaxies, and from blended systems (via visual inspection). I then use optical spectra from LAMOST to spectral type a subset of my M dwarf + ultracool dwarf candidates. These candidates need confirming as true M dwarf + ultracool dwarf systems thus I present a new method I developed to

  19. Status of the MODIS Level 1B Algorithms and Calibration Tables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiong, X; Salomonson, V V; Kuyper, J; Tan, L; Chiang, K; Sun, J; Barnes, W L

    2005-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) makes observations using 36 spectral bands with wavelengths from 0.41 to 14.4 m and nadir spatial resolutions of 0.25km, 0.5km, and 1km. It is currently operating onboard the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) Terra and Aqua satellites, launched in December 1999 and May 2002, respectively. The MODIS Level 1B (L1B) program converts the sensor's on-orbit responses in digital numbers to radiometrically calibrated and geo-located data products for the duration of each mission. Its primary data products are top of the atmosphere (TOA) reflectance factors for the sensor's reflective solar bands (RSB) and TOA spectral radiances for the thermal emissive bands (TEB). The L1B algorithms perform the TEB calibration on a scan-by-scan basis using the sensor's response to the on-board blackbody (BB) and other parameters which are stored in Lookup Tables (LUTs). The RSB calibration coefficients are processed offline and regularly updated through LUTs. In this paper we provide a brief description of the MODIS L1B calibration algorithms and associated LUTs with emphasis on their recent improvements and updates developed for the MODIS collection 5 processing. We will also discuss sensor on-orbit calibration and performance issues that are critical to maintaining L1B data product quality, such as changes in the sensor's response versus scan-angle.

  20. LANL Robotic Vessel Scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Webber, Nels W.

    2015-11-25

    Los Alamos National Laboratory in J-1 DARHT Operations Group uses 6ft spherical vessels to contain hazardous materials produced in a hydrodynamic experiment. These contaminated vessels must be analyzed by means of a worker entering the vessel to locate, measure, and document every penetration mark on the vessel. If the worker can be replaced by a highly automated robotic system with a high precision scanner, it will eliminate the risks to the worker and provide management with an accurate 3D model of the vessel presenting the existing damage with the flexibility to manipulate the model for better and more in-depth assessment.The project was successful in meeting the primary goal of installing an automated system which scanned a 6ft vessel with an elapsed time of 45 minutes. This robotic system reduces the total time for the original scope of work by 75 minutes and results in excellent data accumulation and transmission to the 3D model imaging program.

  1. Differential scanning calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Spink, Charles H

    2008-01-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) has emerged as a powerful experimental technique for determining thermodynamic properties of biomacromolecules. The ability to monitor unfolding or phase transitions in proteins, polynucleotides, and lipid assemblies has not only provided data on thermodynamic stability for these important molecules, but also made it possible to examine the details of unfolding processes and to analyze the characteristics of intermediate states involved in the melting of biopolymers. The recent improvements in DSC instrumentation and software have generated new opportunities for the study of the effects of structure and changes in environment on the behavior of proteins, nucleic acids, and lipids. This review presents some of the details of application of DSC to the examination of the unfolding of biomolecules. After a brief introduction to DSC instrumentation used for the study of thermal transitions, the methods for obtaining basic thermodynamic information from the DSC curve are presented. Then, using DNA unfolding as an example, methods for the analysis of the melting transition are presented that allow deconvolution of the DSC curves to determine more subtle characteristics of the intermediate states involved in unfolding. Two types of transitions are presented for analysis, the first example being the unfolding of two large synthetic polynucleotides, which display high cooperativity in the melting process. The second example shows the application of DSC for the study of the unfolding of a simple hairpin oligonucleotide. Details of the data analysis are presented in a simple spreadsheet format.

  2. GPR scan assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, Abbas M.; Salah, Hany; Massoud, Usama; Fouad, Mona; Abdel-Hafez, Mahmoud

    2015-06-01

    Mekaad Radwan monument is situated in the neighborhood of Bab Zuweila in the historical Cairo, Egypt. It was constructed at the middle XVII century (1635 AD). The building has a rectangle shape plan (13 × 6 m) with the longitudinal sides approximately WNW-ESE. It comprises three storages namely; the ground floor; the opened floor (RADWAN Bench) and the living floor with a total elevation of 15 m above the street level. The building suffers from severe deterioration phenomena with patterns of damage which have occurred over time. These deterioration and damages could be attributed to foundation problems, subsoil water and also to the earthquake that affected the entire Greater Cairo area in October 1992. Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) scan was accomplished against the walls of the opened floor (RADWAN Bench) to evaluate the hazard impact on the walls textures and integrity. The results showed an anomalous feature through the southern wall of RADWAN Bench. A mathematical model has been simulated to confirm the obtained anomaly and the model response exhibited a good matching with the outlined anomaly.

  3. Variable stars in the VVV globular clusters. I. 2MASS-GC 02 and Terzan 10

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso-García, Javier; Dékány, István; Catelan, Márcio; Ramos, Rodrigo Contreras; Gran, Felipe; Leyton, Paul; Minniti, Dante; Amigo, Pía E-mail: idekany@astro.puc.cl E-mail: rcontrer@astro.puc.cl E-mail: pia.amigo@uv.cl E-mail: dante@astrofisica.cl

    2015-03-01

    The VISTA Variables in the Vía Láctea (VVV) ESO Public Survey is opening a new window to study inner Galactic globular clusters (GCs) using their variable stars. These GCs have been neglected in the past due to the difficulties caused by the presence of elevated extinction and high field stellar densities in their lines of sight. However, the discovery and study of any present variables in these clusters, especially RR Lyrae stars, can help to greatly improve the accuracy of their physical parameters. It can also help to shed some light on the questions raised by the intriguing Oosterhoff dichotomy in the Galactic GC system. In a series of papers we plan to explore variable stars in the GCs falling inside the field of the VVV survey. In this first paper, we search for and study the variables present in two highly reddened, moderately metal-poor, faint, inner Galactic GCs: 2MASS-GC 02 and Terzan 10. We report the discovery of sizable populations of RR Lyrae stars in both GCs. We use near-infrared period–luminosity relations to determine the color excess of each RR Lyrae star, from which we obtain both accurate distances to the GCs and the ratios of the selective-to-total extinction in their directions. We find the extinction toward both clusters to be elevated, non-standard, and highly differential. We also find both clusters to be closer to the Galactic center than previously thought, with Terzan 10 being on the far side of the Galactic bulge. Finally, we discuss their Oosterhoff properties, and conclude that both clusters stand out from the dichotomy followed by most Galactic GCs.

  4. Area scanning vision inspection system by using mirror control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Sang Y.; Min, Sungwook; Yang, Wonyoung

    2001-02-01

    12 As the pressure increases to deliver vision products with faster speed while inspection higher resolution at lower cost, the area scanning vision inspection system can be one of the good solutions. To inspect large area with high resolution, the conventional vision system requires moving either camera or the target, therefore, the system suffers low speed and high cost due to the requirements of mechanical moving system or higher resolution camera. Because there are only tiny mirror angle movements required to change the field of view, the XY mirror controlled area scanning vision system is able to capture random area images with high speed. Elimination of external precise moving mechanism is another benefit of the mirror control. The image distortion due to the lens and the mirror system shall be automatically compensated right after each image captured so that the absolute coordination can be calculated in real- time. Motorized focusing system is used for the large area inspection, so that the proper focusing achieved for the variable working distance between lens and targets by the synchronization to the mirror scanning system. By using XY mirror controlled area scanning vision inspection system, fast and economic system can be integrated while no vibration induced and smaller space required. This paper describes the principle of the area scanning method, optical effects of the scanning, position calibration method, inspection flows and some of implementation results.

  5. Calibration Plans for the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bidwell, S. W.; Flaming, G. M.; Adams, W. J.; Everett, D. F.; Mendelsohn, C. R.; Smith, E. A.; Turk, J.

    2002-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) is an international effort led by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) of the U.S.A. and the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) for the purpose of improving research into the global water and energy cycle. GPM will improve climate, weather, and hydrological forecasts through more frequent and more accurate measurement of precipitation world-wide. Comprised of U.S. domestic and international partners, GPM will incorporate and assimilate data streams from many spacecraft with varied orbital characteristics and instrument capabilities. Two of the satellites will be provided directly by GPM, the core satellite and a constellation member. The core satellite, at the heart of GPM, is scheduled for launch in November 2007. The core will carry a conical scanning microwave radiometer, the GPM Microwave Imager (GMI), and a two-frequency cross-track-scanning radar, the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR). The passive microwave channels and the two radar frequencies of the core are carefully chosen for investigating the varying character of precipitation over ocean and land, and from the tropics to the high-latitudes. The DPR will enable microphysical characterization and three-dimensional profiling of precipitation. The GPM-provided constellation spacecraft will carry a GMI radiometer identical to that on the core spacecraft. This paper presents calibration plans for the GPM, including on-board instrument calibration, external calibration methods, and the role of ground validation. Particular emphasis is on plans for inter-satellite calibration of the GPM constellation. With its Unique instrument capabilities, the core spacecraft will serve as a calibration transfer standard to the GPM constellation. In particular the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar aboard the core will check the accuracy of retrievals from the GMI radiometer and will enable improvement of the radiometer retrievals

  6. A step-height standard for surface profiler calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Takacs, P.Z.; Li, M.X.O.; Furenlid, K.; Church, E.L.

    1993-09-01

    We report on the design and fabrication of an all-silicon test pattern that is very useful for assessing the performance of all types of profiling instruments. We present examples of results obtained from applying this method to various kinds of profiling instruments, including a WYKO TOPO 3D system, Microamp Promap 512 profilers, a ZYGO Maxim 3-D system, and scanning probe AFM systems. We also present the results from a measurement of the BRDF of the step with a TMA CASI scatterometer to show the utility of the step as a potential calibration standard for scattered light measuring instruments.

  7. Optimization by Smoothed Bandpass Calibration in Radio Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameno, S.; Yamaki, H.; Mizuno, I.; Beppu, H.; Imai, H.; Kuno, N.; Akashi, T.

    2013-10-01

    We have developed the Smoothed Bandpass Calibration (SBC) method and the best suitable scan pattern to optimize radio spectroscopic observations. Adequate spectral smoothing is applied to the spectrum toward OFF-source blank sky adjacent to a target source direction for the purpose of bandpass correction. Because the smoothing process reduces noise, the integration time for OFF-source scans can be reduced keeping the signal-to-noise ratio. Since the smoothing is not applied to ON-source scans, the spectral resolution for line features is kept. An optimal smoothing window is determined by bandpass flatness evaluated by Spectral Allan Variance (SAV). An efficient scan pattern is designed to the OFF-source scans within the bandpass stability timescale estimated by Time-based Allan Variance (TAV). We have tested the SBC using the digital spectrometer, SAM45, on the Nobeyama 45-m telescope. The optimal smoothing windows were determined as 501, 28, 18, and 4 ch for bandwidths of 2000, 500, 125, and 15.6 MHz, respectively. The optimal scan pattern was designed as sequences of [60-s ON + 10-s OFF] and [48-s ON + 16-s OFF] scan pairs for narrow and wide bandwidth, respectively. The noise level with the SBC was reduced by factors of 1.8 and 1.3 compared with the conventional method. We also found sporadic instability (bursts) in the total power and spectra in IF during the test observations. Although the bursts significantly distorts the resultant spectra, we found a solution to cancel the spectral variation by decomposing them into static and burst components. This solution can be a hint to ease spectral flagging processes and to bring better efficiency in integration time.

  8. Proxy-to-proxy calibration: increasing the temporal resolution of quantitative climate reconstructions.

    PubMed

    von Gunten, Lucien; D'Andrea, William J; Bradley, Raymond S; Huang, Yongsong

    2012-01-01

    High-resolution paleoclimate reconstructions are often restricted by the difficulties of sampling geologic archives in great detail and the analytical costs of processing large numbers of samples. Using sediments from Lake Braya Sø, Greenland, we introduce a new method that provides a quantitative high-resolution paleoclimate record by combining measurements of the alkenone unsaturation index (U37(K)) with non-destructive scanning reflectance spectroscopic measurements in the visible range (VIS-RS). The proxy-to-proxy (PTP) method exploits two distinct calibrations: the in situ calibration of U37(K) to lake water temperature and the calibration of scanning VIS-RS data to down core U37(K) data. Using this approach, we produced a quantitative temperature record that is longer and has 5 times higher sampling resolution than the original U37(K) time series, thereby allowing detection of temperature variability in frequency bands characteristic of the AMO over the past 7,000 years.

  9. Proxy-to-proxy calibration: Increasing the temporal resolution of quantitative climate reconstructions

    PubMed Central

    von Gunten, Lucien; D'Andrea, William J.; Bradley, Raymond S.; Huang, Yongsong

    2012-01-01

    High-resolution paleoclimate reconstructions are often restricted by the difficulties of sampling geologic archives in great detail and the analytical costs of processing large numbers of samples. Using sediments from Lake Braya Sø, Greenland, we introduce a new method that provides a quantitative high-resolution paleoclimate record by combining measurements of the alkenone unsaturation index () with non-destructive scanning reflectance spectroscopic measurements in the visible range (VIS-RS). The proxy-to-proxy (PTP) method exploits two distinct calibrations: the in situ calibration of to lake water temperature and the calibration of scanning VIS-RS data to down core data. Using this approach, we produced a quantitative temperature record that is longer and has 5 times higher sampling resolution than the original time series, thereby allowing detection of temperature variability in frequency bands characteristic of the AMO over the past 7,000 years. PMID:22934132

  10. Automated Attitude Sensor Calibration: Progress and Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sedlak, Joseph; Hashmall, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes ongoing work a NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center to improve the quality of spacecraft attitude sensor calibration and reduce costs by automating parts of the calibration process. The new calibration software can autonomously preview data quality over a given time span, select a subset of the data for processing, perform the requested calibration, and output a report. This level of automation is currently being implemented for two specific applications: inertial reference unit (IRU) calibration and sensor alignment calibration. The IRU calibration utility makes use of a sequential version of the Davenport algorithm. This utility has been successfully tested with simulated and actual flight data. The alignment calibration is still in the early testing stage. Both utilities will be incorporated into the institutional attitude ground support system.

  11. Recent Infrasound Calibration Activity at Los Alamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitaker, R. W.; Marcillo, O. E.

    2014-12-01

    Absolute infrasound sensor calibration is necessary for estimating source sizes from measured waveforms. This can be an important function in treaty monitoring. The Los Alamos infrasound calibration chamber is capable of absolute calibration. Early in 2014 the Los Alamos infrasound calibration chamber resumed operations in its new location after an unplanned move two years earlier. The chamber has two sources of calibration signals. The first is the original mechanical piston, and the second is a CLD Dynamics Model 316 electro-mechanical unit that can be digitally controlled and provide a richer set of calibration options. During 2008-2010 a number of upgrades were incorporated for improved operation and recording. In this poster we give an overview of recent chamber work on sensor calibrations, calibration with the CLD unit, some measurements with different porous hoses and work with impulse sources.

  12. Attitude Sensor and Gyro Calibration for Messenger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Shaughnessy, Daniel; Pittelkau, Mark E.

    2007-01-01

    The Redundant Inertial Measurement Unit Attitude Determination/Calibration (RADICAL(TM)) filter was used to estimate star tracker and gyro calibration parameters using MESSENGER telemetry data from three calibration events. We present an overview of the MESSENGER attitude sensors and their configuration is given, the calibration maneuvers are described, the results are compared with previous calibrations, and variations and trends in the estimated calibration parameters are examined. The warm restart and covariance bump features of the RADICAL(TM) filter were used to estimate calibration parameters from two disjoint telemetry streams. Results show that the calibration parameters converge faster with much less transient variation during convergence than when the filter is cold-started at the start of each telemetry stream.

  13. Thermal Targets for Satellite Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Villa-Aleman, E.

    2001-01-10

    The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) is currently calibrating the Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI) satellite sponsored by the Department of Energy. The MTI imager is a research and development project with 15 wavebands in the visible, near-infrared, short-wave infrared, mid-wave infrared and long-wave infrared spectral regions. A plethora of targets with known temperatures such as power plant heated lakes, volcano lava vents, desert playas and aluminized Mylar tarps are being used in the validation of the five thermal bands of the MTI satellite. SRTC efforts in the production of ''cold targets'' with aluminized Mylar tarps will be described. Visible and thermal imagery and wavelength dependent radiance measurements of the calibration targets will be presented.

  14. Calibration and control in haemoglobinometry.

    PubMed

    van Assendelft, O W; Horton, B R; Parvin, R M

    1990-01-01

    In assigning values to fresh blood specimens used for calibrating automated blood cell analysers, haemoglobin concentration should be determined by the ICSH recommended hemiglobincyanide (HiCN) method. Errors in the reference method may be caused by inadequate blood collection, e.g. incorrect anticoagulation; inadequate dilution, e.g. use of inadequately calibrated pipettes; incomplete conversion of haemoglobins to HiCN, e.g. insufficient time for reactions to come to completion; during measurement, e.g. due to turbidity of the HiCN solution to be measured; or by transcription error. Readily available commercial reagent systems and secondary standards are compared with ICSH standards as to their compliance with these standards.

  15. Spinning angle optical calibration apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Beer, Stephen K.; Pratt, II, Harold R.

    1991-01-01

    An optical calibration apparatus is provided for calibrating and reproducing spinning angles in cross-polarization, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. An illuminated magnifying apparatus enables optical setting an accurate reproducing of spinning "magic angles" in cross-polarization, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy experiments. A reference mark scribed on an edge of a spinning angle test sample holder is illuminated by a light source and viewed through a magnifying scope. When the "magic angle" of a sample material used as a standard is attained by varying the angular position of the sample holder, the coordinate position of the reference mark relative to a graduation or graduations on a reticle in the magnifying scope is noted. Thereafter, the spinning "magic angle" of a test material having similar nuclear properties to the standard is attained by returning the sample holder back to the originally noted coordinate position.

  16. Continuous scanning mode for ptychography

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Jesse N.; Huang, Xiaojing; Harder, Ross; Robinson, Ian K.

    2014-10-15

    We outline how ptychographic imaging can be performed without the need for discrete scan positions. Through an idealized experiment, we demonstrate how a discrete-position scan regime can be replaced with a continuously scanned one with suitable modification of the reconstruction scheme based on coherent modes. The impact of this is that acquisition times can be reduced, significantly aiding ptychographic imaging with x rays, electrons, or visible light.

  17. Continuous scanning mode for ptychography

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Jesse N.; Huang, Xiaojing; Harder, Ross J.; Robinson, Ian K.

    2014-01-01

    Here, we outline how ptychographic imaging can be performed without the need for discrete scan positions. Through an idealized experiment, we demonstrate how a discrete-position scan regime can be replaced with a continuously scanned one with suitable modification of the reconstruction scheme based on coherent modes. Furthermore, the impact of this is that acquisition times can be reduced, significantly aiding ptychographic imaging with x rays, electrons, or visible light.

  18. A Careful Consideration of the Calibration Concept

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, S. D.; Estler, W. T.; Doiron, T.; Eberhardt, K. R.; Levenson, M. S.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a detailed discussion of the technical aspects of the calibration process with emphasis on the definition of the measurand, the conditions under which the calibration results are valid, and the subsequent use of the calibration results in measurement uncertainty statements. The concepts of measurement uncertainty, error, systematic error, and reproducibility are also addressed as they pertain to the calibration process. PMID:27500027

  19. Automated Camera Array Fine Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clouse, Daniel; Padgett, Curtis; Ansar, Adnan; Cheng, Yang

    2008-01-01

    Using aerial imagery, the JPL FineCalibration (JPL FineCal) software automatically tunes a set of existing CAHVOR camera models for an array of cameras. The software finds matching features in the overlap region between images from adjacent cameras, and uses these features to refine the camera models. It is not necessary to take special imagery of a known target and no surveying is required. JPL FineCal was developed for use with an aerial, persistent surveillance platform.

  20. Nonlinear Observers for Gyro Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thienel, Julie; Sanner, Robert M.

    2003-01-01

    Nonlinear observers for gyro calibration are presented. The first observer estimates a constant gyro bias. The second observer estimates scale factor errors. The third observer estimates the gyro alignment for three orthogonal gyros. The convergence properties of all three observers are discussed. Additionally, all three observers are coupled with a nonlinear control algorithm. The stability of each of the resulting closed loop systems is analyzed. Simulated test results are presented for each system.

  1. ASCAL: Autonomous Attitude Sensor Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Chariya; Rowe, John; Mueller, Karl; Ziyad, Nigel

    1999-01-01

    Abstract In this paper, an approach to increase the degree of autonomy of flight software is proposed. We describe an enhancement of the Attitude Determination and Control System by augmenting it with self-calibration capability. Conventional attitude estimation and control algorithms are combined with higher level decision making and machine learning algorithms in order to deal with the uncertainty and complexity of the problem.

  2. Calibration Fixture For Welding Robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holly, Krisztina J.

    1990-01-01

    Compact, lightweight device used in any position or orientation. Calibration fixture designed for use on robotic gas/tungsten-arc welding torch equipped with vision-based seam-tracking system. Through optics in hollow torch cylinder, video camera obtains image of weld, viewing along line of sight coaxial with welding electrode. Attaches to welding-torch cylinder in place of gas cup normally attached in use. By use of longer or shorter extension tube, fixture accommodates welding electrode of unusual length.

  3. Calibrating thermal behavior of electronics

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Parida, Pritish R.; Schultz, Mark D.

    2017-01-03

    A method includes determining a relationship between indirect thermal data for a processor and a measured temperature associated with the processor, during a calibration process, obtaining the indirect thermal data for the processor during actual operation of the processor, and determining an actual significant temperature associated with the processor during the actual operation using the indirect thermal data for the processor during actual operation of the processor and the relationship.

  4. Calibrating thermal behavior of electronics

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Parida, Pritish R.; Schultz, Mark D.

    2016-05-31

    A method includes determining a relationship between indirect thermal data for a processor and a measured temperature associated with the processor, during a calibration process, obtaining the indirect thermal data for the processor during actual operation of the processor, and determining an actual significant temperature associated with the processor during the actual operation using the indirect thermal data for the processor during actual operation of the processor and the relationship.

  5. Unassisted 3D camera calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanassov, Kalin; Ramachandra, Vikas; Nash, James; Goma, Sergio R.

    2012-03-01

    With the rapid growth of 3D technology, 3D image capture has become a critical part of the 3D feature set on mobile phones. 3D image quality is affected by the scene geometry as well as on-the-device processing. An automatic 3D system usually assumes known camera poses accomplished by factory calibration using a special chart. In real life settings, pose parameters estimated by factory calibration can be negatively impacted by movements of the lens barrel due to shaking, focusing, or camera drop. If any of these factors displaces the optical axes of either or both cameras, vertical disparity might exceed the maximum tolerable margin and the 3D user may experience eye strain or headaches. To make 3D capture more practical, one needs to consider unassisted (on arbitrary scenes) calibration. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that relies on detection and matching of keypoints between left and right images. Frames containing erroneous matches, along with frames with insufficiently rich keypoint constellations, are detected and discarded. Roll, pitch yaw , and scale differences between left and right frames are then estimated. The algorithm performance is evaluated in terms of the remaining vertical disparity as compared to the maximum tolerable vertical disparity.

  6. Model Calibration in Watershed Hydrology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yilmaz, Koray K.; Vrugt, Jasper A.; Gupta, Hoshin V.; Sorooshian, Soroosh

    2009-01-01

    Hydrologic models use relatively simple mathematical equations to conceptualize and aggregate the complex, spatially distributed, and highly interrelated water, energy, and vegetation processes in a watershed. A consequence of process aggregation is that the model parameters often do not represent directly measurable entities and must, therefore, be estimated using measurements of the system inputs and outputs. During this process, known as model calibration, the parameters are adjusted so that the behavior of the model approximates, as closely and consistently as possible, the observed response of the hydrologic system over some historical period of time. This Chapter reviews the current state-of-the-art of model calibration in watershed hydrology with special emphasis on our own contributions in the last few decades. We discuss the historical background that has led to current perspectives, and review different approaches for manual and automatic single- and multi-objective parameter estimation. In particular, we highlight the recent developments in the calibration of distributed hydrologic models using parameter dimensionality reduction sampling, parameter regularization and parallel computing.

  7. Variability among polysulphone calibration curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casale, G. R.; Borra, M.; Colosimo, A.; Colucci, M.; Militello, A.; Siani, A. M.; Sisto, R.

    2006-09-01

    Within an epidemiological study regarding the correlation between skin pathologies and personal ultraviolet (UV) exposure due to solar radiation, 14 field campaigns using polysulphone (PS) dosemeters were carried out at three different Italian sites (urban, semi-rural and rural) in every season of the year. A polysulphone calibration curve for each field experiment was obtained by measuring the ambient UV dose under almost clear sky conditions and the corresponding change in the PS film absorbance, prior and post exposure. Ambient UV doses were measured by well-calibrated broad-band radiometers and by electronic dosemeters. The dose-response relation was represented by the typical best fit to a third-degree polynomial and it was parameterized by a coefficient multiplying a cubic polynomial function. It was observed that the fit curves differed from each other in the coefficient only. It was assessed that the multiplying coefficient was affected by the solar UV spectrum at the Earth's surface whilst the polynomial factor depended on the photoinduced reaction of the polysulphone film. The mismatch between the polysulphone spectral curve and the CIE erythemal action spectrum was responsible for the variability among polysulphone calibration curves. The variability of the coefficient was related to the total ozone amount and the solar zenith angle. A mathematical explanation of such a parameterization was also discussed.

  8. Nonlinear Observers for Gyro Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thienel, Julie; Sanner, Robert M.

    2003-01-01

    High precision estimation and control algorithms, to achieve unprecedented levels of pointing accuracy, will be required to support future formation flying missions such as interferometry missions. Achieving high pointing accuracy requires precise knowledge of the spacecraft rotation rate. Typically, the rotation rate is measured by a gyro. The measured rates can be corrupted by errors in alignment and scale factor, gyro biases, and noise. In this work, we present nonlinear observers for gyro calibration. Nonlinear observers are superior to extended or pseudo-linear Kalman filter type approaches for large errors and global stability. Three nonlinear gyro calibration observers are developed. The first observer estimates a constant gyro bias. The second observer estimates scale factor errors. The third observer estimates the gyro alignment for three orthogonal gyros. The convergence properties of all three observers are discussed. Additionally, all three observers are coupled with a nonlinear control algorithm. The stability of each of the resulting closed loop systems is analyzed. The observers are then combined, and the gyro calibration parameters are estimated simultaneously. The stability of the combined observers is addressed, as well as the stability of the resulting closed loop systems. Simulated test results are presented for each scenario. Finally, the nonlinear observers are compared to a pseudo-linear Kalman filter.

  9. PACS photometer calibration block analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moór, A.; Müller, T. G.; Kiss, C.; Balog, Z.; Billot, N.; Marton, G.

    2014-07-01

    The absolute stability of the PACS bolometer response over the entire mission lifetime without applying any corrections is about 0.5 % (standard deviation) or about 8 % peak-to-peak. This fantastic stability allows us to calibrate all scientific measurements by a fixed and time-independent response file, without using any information from the PACS internal calibration sources. However, the analysis of calibration block observations revealed clear correlations of the internal source signals with the evaporator temperature and a signal drift during the first half hour after the cooler recycling. These effects are small, but can be seen in repeated measurements of standard stars. From our analysis we established corrections for both effects which push the stability of the PACS bolometer response to about 0.2 % (stdev) or 2 % in the blue, 3 % in the green and 5 % in the red channel (peak-to-peak). After both corrections we still see a correlation of the signals with PACS FPU temperatures, possibly caused by parasitic heat influences via the Kevlar wires which connect the bolometers with the PACS Focal Plane Unit. No aging effect or degradation of the photometric system during the mission lifetime has been found.

  10. Calibration of CCD detector after damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudka, A. P.

    2015-11-01

    An Xcalibur X-ray diffractometer with a Sapphire 3 CCD detector (Rigaku Oxford Diffraction) has been calibrated to remove damage effects. Visual proof of the validity of the detector calibration map is obtained for the first time. The calibration has significantly improved the reliability of the structural data on Ba3TaFe3Si2O14 single crystal.

  11. Standard Leak Calibration Facility software system

    SciTech Connect

    McClain, S.K.

    1989-06-01

    A Standard Leak Calibration Facility Software System has been developed and implemented for controlling, and running a standard Leak Calibration Facility. Primary capabilities provided by the software system include computer control of the vacuum system, automatic leak calibration, and data acquisition, manipulation, and storage.

  12. Achieving calibration cost savings through data analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Shull, A.H.; Clark, J.P.

    1993-12-31

    Air displacement type pipettes have been used effectively at the Savannah River Site (SRS) since the mid-1980`s when they replaced expensive glass microliter pipettes. A paper presented at the 1987 INMM Annual Meeting by John P. Clark detailed the implementation at SRS. At that time, calibration frequency and required documentation were established according to regulatory and standard practice requirements. Pipettes are still being used at SRS in compliance with NQA-1-12, ``Control of Measuring and Test Equipment (M and TE)`` requirements, which includes defined calibration intervals and 5-year calibration record retention. A recent analysis of the pipette calibration historical data indicated that pipettes were rarely out of calibration when they were checked. In other words, calibration checks were being performed too frequently. As a result, pipette calibration frequencies were decreased, with the potential accompanying annual cost savings of over $30,000 in reduced labor and materials. Concurrently, the number of calibration check replicates was increased to prevent statistical errors in calibration check decision making. The benefits derived in the pipette calibration example are applicable to any M and TE where calibration history data are maintained and where analysis indicates excessive calibration checks. Details of the data analysis and cost savings are presented in the paper.

  13. 14 CFR 33.85 - Calibration tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Calibration tests. 33.85 Section 33.85... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.85 Calibration tests. (a) Each engine must be subjected to those calibration tests necessary to establish its power characteristics and...

  14. 14 CFR 33.85 - Calibration tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Calibration tests. 33.85 Section 33.85... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.85 Calibration tests. (a) Each engine must be subjected to those calibration tests necessary to establish its power characteristics and...

  15. 14 CFR 33.85 - Calibration tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Calibration tests. 33.85 Section 33.85... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.85 Calibration tests. (a) Each engine must be subjected to those calibration tests necessary to establish its power characteristics and...

  16. 14 CFR 33.45 - Calibration tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Calibration tests. 33.45 Section 33.45... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Reciprocating Aircraft Engines § 33.45 Calibration tests. (a) Each engine must be subjected to the calibration tests necessary to establish its power characteristics...

  17. 14 CFR 33.45 - Calibration tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Calibration tests. 33.45 Section 33.45... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Reciprocating Aircraft Engines § 33.45 Calibration tests. (a) Each engine must be subjected to the calibration tests necessary to establish its power characteristics...

  18. 14 CFR 33.45 - Calibration tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Calibration tests. 33.45 Section 33.45... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Reciprocating Aircraft Engines § 33.45 Calibration tests. (a) Each engine must be subjected to the calibration tests necessary to establish its power characteristics...

  19. MODIS Radiometric Calibration and Uncertainty Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Chiang, Vincent; Sun, Junqiang; Wu, Aisheng

    2011-01-01

    Since launch, Terra and Aqua MODIS have collected more than II and 9 years of datasets for comprehensive studies of the Earth's land, ocean, and atmospheric properties. MODIS observations are made in 36 spectral bands: 20 reflective solar bands (RSB) and 16 thermal emissive bands (TEB). Compared to its heritage sensors, MODIS was developed with very stringent calibration and uncertainty requirements. As a result, MODIS was designed and built with a set of state of the art on-board calibrators (OBC), which allow key sensor performance parameters and on-orbit calibration coefficients to be monitored and updated if necessary. In terms of its calibration traceability, MODIS RSB calibration is reflectance based using an on-board solar diffuser (SD) and the TEB calibration is radiance based using an on-board blackbody (BB). In addition to on-orbit calibration coefficients derived from its OBC, calibration parameters determined from sensor pre-launch calibration and characterization are used in both the RSB and TEB calibration and retrieval algorithms. This paper provides a brief description of MODIS calibration methodologies and discusses details of its on-orbit calibration uncertainties. It assesses uncertainty contributions from individual components and differences between Terra and Aqua MODIS due to their design characteristics and on-orbit periormance. Also discussed in this paper is the use of MODIS LIB uncertainty index CUI) product.

  20. Calibration and Confidence: Where to next?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hattie, John

    2013-01-01

    One of the key feedback questions is "where to next?" and this article provides some directions as to where to next for research based on a review of the five articles in this special issue. The directions relate to the critical importance of calibration, the multidimensionality of calibration, the relation of calibration to self-regulation…

  1. 2MASS J05162881+2607387: A New Low-mass Double-lined Eclipsing Binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayless, Amanda J.; Orosz, Jerome A.

    2006-11-01

    We show that the star known as 2MASS J05162881+2607387 (hereafter J0516) is a double-lined eclipsing binary with nearly identical low-mass components. The spectroscopic elements derived from 18 spectra obtained with the High Resolution Spectrograph on the Hobby-Eberly Telescope during the fall of 2005 are K1=88.45+/-0.48 and K2=90.43+/-0.60 km s-1, resulting in a mass ratio of q=K1/K2=0.978+/-0.018 and minimum masses of M1sin3i=0.775+/-0.016 Msolar and M2sin3i=0.759+/-0.012 Msolar, respectively. We have extensive differential photometry of J0516 obtained over several nights between 2004 January and March (epoch 1) and between 2004 October and 2005 January plus 2006 January (epoch 2) using the 1 m telescope at the Mount Laguna Observatory. The source was roughly 0.1 mag brighter in all three bandpasses during epoch 1 when compared to epoch 2. Also, phased light curves from epoch 1 show considerable out-of-eclipse variability, presumably due to bright spots on one or both stars. In contrast, the phased light curves from epoch 2 show little out-of-eclipse variability. The light curves from epoch 2 and the radial velocity curves were analyzed using our ELC code with updated model atmospheres for low-mass stars. We find the following: M1=0.787+/-0.012 Msolar, R1=0.788+/-0.015 Rsolar, M2=0.770+/-0.009 Msolar, and R2=0.817+/-0.010 Rsolar. The stars in J0516 have radii that are significantly larger than model predictions for their masses, similar to what is seen in a handful of other well-studied low-mass double-lined eclipsing binaries. We compiled all recent mass and radius determinations from low-mass binaries and determine an empirical mass-radius relation of the form R(Rsolar)=0.0324+0.9343M(Msolar)+0.0374M2(Msolar). Based on observations obtained with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope, which is a joint project of the University of Texas at Austin, the Pennsylvania State University, Stanford University, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, and Georg

  2. The new FUor candidate V960 Mon (2MASS J06593158-0405277) still retains at high brightness level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semkov, E.

    2015-09-01

    We report results from BVRI optical observations of the recently discovered FUor candidate V960 Mon (2MASS J06593158-0405277). The object was discovered by Maehara, Kojima and Fujii (ATEL #6770) and confirmed as a FUor candidate by the follow observations (ATEL #6797, #6838, #6862, #6901, #7025, #7578).

  3. Thermal imaging of the FU Ori type object 2MASS J06593158-0405277 = V960 Mon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varricatt, W. P.; Kerr, T. H.; Carroll, T.; Moore, E.; Milne, P.

    2015-10-01

    A FU Ori-type outburst of 2MASS J06593158-0405277 (V960 Mon) was discovered by Maehara, Kojima and Fujii (ATel #6770). Further observational studies (ATel #6797, #6838, #6862, #6901, #7025, #7578) and archival data research (Jurdana- & #138;epi & #263; & Munari, 2016, NewA, 43, 87) confirmed the FU Ori nature of this object.

  4. Accurate size measurement of monosize calibration spheres by differential mobility analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mulholland, George W.; Fernandez, Marco

    1998-11-24

    A differential mobility analyzer was used to measure the mean particle size of three monosize suspensions of polystyrene spheres in water. Key features of the experiment to minimize the uncertainty in the results include developing a recirculating flow to ensure equal flows into and out of the classifier, an accurate divider circuit for calibrating the electrode voltage, and use of the 100.7 nm NIST SRM for calibrating the flow of the classifier. The measured average sizes and expanded uncertainties with a coverage factor of 2 are 92.4 nm{+-}1.1 nm, 126.9 nm{+-}1.4 nm, and 217.7 nm{+-}3.4 nm. These calibration sizes were characterized by NIST to improve the calibration of scanning surface inspection systems.

  5. Cross calibration of ocean-color bands from moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer on Terra platform.

    PubMed

    Kwiatkowska, Ewa J; Franz, Bryan A; Meister, Gerhard; McClain, Charles R; Xiong, Xiaoxiong

    2008-12-20

    Ocean-color applications require maximum uncertainties in blue-wavelength water-leaving radiances in oligotrophic ocean of approximately 5%. Water-leaving radiances from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Terra satellite, however, exhibit temporal drift of the order of 15% as well as sensor changes in response versus scan and polarization sensitivity, which cannot be tracked by onboard calibrators. This paper introduces an instrument characterization approach that uses Earth-view data as a calibration source. The approach models the top of the atmosphere signal over ocean that the instrument is expected to measure, including its polarization, with water-leaving radiances coming from another well-calibrated global sensor. The cross calibration allows for significant improvement in derived MODIS-Terra ocean-color products, with largest changes in the blue wavelengths.

  6. Langley method of calibrating UV filter radiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slusser, James; Gibson, James; Bigelow, David; Kolinski, Donald; Disterhoft, Patrick; Lantz, Kathleen; Beaubien, Arthur

    2000-02-01

    The Langley method of calibrating UV multifilter shadow band radiometers (UV-MFRSR) is explored in this paper. This method has several advantages over the traditional standard lamp calibrations: the Sun is a free, universally available, and very constant source, and nearly continual automated field calibrations can be made. Although 20 or so Langley events are required for an accurate calibration, the radiometer remains in the field during calibration. Difficulties arise as a result of changing ozone optical depth during the Langley event and the breakdown of the Beer-Lambert law over the finite filter band pass since optical depth changes rapidly with wavelength. The Langley calibration of the radiometers depends critically upon the spectral characterization of each channel and on the wavelength and absolute calibration of the extraterrestrial spectrum used. Results of Langley calibrations for two UV-MFRSRs at Mauna Loa, Hawaii were compared to calibrations using two National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) traceable lamps. The objectives of this study were to compare Langley calibration factors with those from standard lamps and to compare field-of-view effects. The two radiometers were run simultaneously: one on a Sun tracker and the other in the conventional shadow-band configuration. Both radiometers were calibrated with two secondary 1000 W lamp, and later, the spectral response functions of the channels were measured. The ratio of Langley to lamp calibration factors for the seven channels from 300 nm to 368 nm using the shadow-band configuration ranged from 0.988 to 1.070. The estimated uncertainty in accuracy of the Langley calibrations ranged from ±3.8% at 300 nm to ±2.1% at 368 nm. For all channels calibrated with Central Ultraviolet Calibration Facility (CUCF) lamps the estimated uncertainty was ±2.5% for all channels.

  7. Limits on the Secular Drift of the TMI Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilheit, T. T.; Farrar, S.; Jones, L.; Santos-Garcia, A.

    2012-12-01

    hard to conceive of a calibration drift that would differ significantly across the channels. It also seems unlikely that TMI and Windsat are drifting synchronously. Thus we can place an upper limit of 0.01K/year on the calibration drift of the TMI. This value may be reduced with future refinement and the contributions of the other X-CAL teams. References Biswas, S.K., S. Farrar, K. Gopalan, A Santos-Garcia, L. Jones and S. Bilanow (2012), "Inter-Calibration of Microwave Radiometer Brightness Temperatures for the Global Precipitation Measurement Mission" to be published in TGRS. Wilheit, T., 2012 "Comparing Calibrations of Similar Conically-Scanning Window-Channel Microwave Radiometers" to be published in TGRS.

  8. MODIS and SeaWIFS on-orbit lunar calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sun, Jielun; Eplee, R.E.; Xiong, X.; Stone, T.; Meister, G.; McClain, C.R.

    2008-01-01

    The Moon plays an important role in the radiometric stability monitoring of the NASA Earth Observing System's (EOS) remote sensors. The MODIS and SeaWIFS are two of the key instruments for NASA's EOS missions. The MODIS Protoflight Model (PFM) on-board the Terra spacecraft and the MODIS Flight Model 1 (FM1) on-board the Aqua spacecraft were launched on December 18, 1999 and May 4, 2002, respectively. They view the Moon through the Space View (SV) port approximately once a month to monitor the long-term radiometric stability of their Reflective Solar Bands (RSB). SeaWIFS was launched on-board the OrbView-2 spacecraft on August 1, 1997. The SeaWiFS lunar calibrations are obtained once a month at a nominal phase angle of 7??. The lunar irradiance observed by these instruments depends on the viewing geometry. The USGS photometric model of the Moon (the ROLO model) has been developed to provide the geometric corrections for the lunar observations. For MODIS, the lunar view responses with corrections for the viewing geometry are used to track the gain change for its reflective solar bands (RSB). They trend the system response degradation at the Angle Of Incidence (AOI) of sensor's SV port. With both the lunar observation and the on-board Solar Diffuser (SD) calibration, it is shown that the MODIS system response degradation is wavelength, mirror side, and AOI dependent. Time-dependent Response Versus Scan angle (RVS) Look-Up Tables (LUT) are applied in MODIS RSB calibration and lunar observations play a key role in RVS derivation. The corrections provided by the RVS in the Terra and Aqua MODIS data from the 412 nm band are as large as 16% and 13%, respectively. For SeaWIFS lunar calibrations, the spacecraft is pitched across the Moon so that the instrument views the Moon near nadir through the same optical path as it views the Earth. The SeaWiFS system gain changes for its eight bands are calibrated using the geometrically-corrected lunar observations. The radiometric

  9. Multiple-Objective Stepwise Calibration Using Luca

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hay, Lauren E.; Umemoto, Makiko

    2007-01-01

    This report documents Luca (Let us calibrate), a multiple-objective, stepwise, automated procedure for hydrologic model calibration and the associated graphical user interface (GUI). Luca is a wizard-style user-friendly GUI that provides an easy systematic way of building and executing a calibration procedure. The calibration procedure uses the Shuffled Complex Evolution global search algorithm to calibrate any model compiled with the U.S. Geological Survey's Modular Modeling System. This process assures that intermediate and final states of the model are simulated consistently with measured values.

  10. Lung Ventilation/Perfusion Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... Scan Lung VQ Scan Related Topics Arrhythmia Cough Deep Vein Thrombosis Pulmonary Embolism Send a link to NHLBI to someone by ... this topic. Related reading Chest X Ray Cough Deep Vein Thrombosis Pulmonary Embolism Rate This Content: Updated: December 9, 2016 Twitter ...

  11. Spectral phase-based automatic calibration scheme for swept source-based optical coherence tomography systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratheesh, K. M.; Seah, L. K.; Murukeshan, V. M.

    2016-11-01

    The automatic calibration in Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) systems allows for high resolution imaging with precise depth ranging functionality in many complex imaging scenarios, such as microsurgery. However, the accuracy and speed of the existing automatic schemes are limited due to the functional approximations and iterative operations used in their procedures. In this paper, we present a new real-time automatic calibration scheme for swept source-based optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) systems. The proposed automatic calibration can be performed during scanning operation and does not require an auxiliary interferometer for calibration signal generation and an additional channel for its acquisition. The proposed method makes use of the spectral component corresponding to the sample surface reflection as the calibration signal. The spectral phase function representing the non-linear sweeping characteristic of the frequency-swept laser source is determined from the calibration signal. The phase linearization with improved accuracy is achieved by normalization and rescaling of the obtained phase function. The fractional-time indices corresponding to the equidistantly spaced phase intervals are estimated directly from the resampling function and are used to resample the OCT signals. The proposed approach allows for precise calibration irrespective of the path length variation induced by the non-planar topography of the sample or galvo scanning. The conceived idea was illustrated using an in-house-developed SS-OCT system by considering the specular reflection from a mirror and other test samples. It was shown that the proposed method provides high-performance calibration in terms of axial resolution and sensitivity without increasing computational and hardware complexity.

  12. An interchangeable scanning Hall probe/scanning SQUID microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Chiu-Chun; Lin, Hui-Ting; Wu, Sing-Lin; Chen, Tse-Jun; Wang, M. J.; Ling, D. C.; Chi, C. C.; Chen, Jeng-Chung

    2014-08-15

    We have constructed a scanning probe microscope for magnetic imaging, which can function as a scanning Hall probe microscope (SHPM) and as a scanning SQUID microscope (SSM). The scanning scheme, applicable to SHPM and SSM, consists of a mechanical positioning (sub) micron-XY stage and a flexible direct contact to the sample without a feedback control system for the Z-axis. With the interchangeable capability of operating two distinct scanning modes, our microscope can incorporate the advantageous functionalities of the SHPM and SSM with large scan range up to millimeter, high spatial resolution (⩽4 μm), and high field sensitivity in a wide range of temperature (4.2 K-300 K) and magnetic field (10{sup −7} T-1 T). To demonstrate the capabilities of the system, we present magnetic images scanned with SHPM and SSM, including a RbFeB magnet and a nickel grid pattern at room temperature, surface magnetic domain structures of a La{sub 2/3}Ca{sub 1/3}MnO{sub 3} thin film at 77 K, and superconducting vortices in a striped niobium film at 4.2 K.

  13. On-Line Wavelength Calibration of Pulsed Laser for CO2 Differential Absorption LIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Chengzhi; Ma, Xin; Han, Ge; Liang, Ailin; Gong, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Differential absorption lidar (DIAL) remote sensing is a promising technology for atmospheric CO2 detection. However, stringent wavelength accuracy and stability are required in DIAL system. Accurate on-line wavelength calibration is a crucial procedure for retrieving atmospheric CO2 concentration using the DIAL, particularly when pulsed lasers are adopted in the system. Large fluctuations in the intensities of a pulsed laser pose a great challenge for accurate on-line wavelength calibration. In this paper, a wavelength calibration strategy based on multi-wavelength scanning (MWS) was proposed for accurate on-line wavelength calibration of a pulsed laser for CO2 detection. The MWS conducted segmented sampling across the CO2 absorption line with appropriate number of points and range of widths by using a tunable laser. Complete absorption line of CO2 can be obtained through a curve fitting. Then, the on-line wavelength can be easily found at the peak of the absorption line. Furthermore, another algorithm called the energy matching was introduced in the MWS to eliminate the backlash error of tunable lasers during the process of on-line wavelength calibration. Finally, a series of tests was conducted to elevate the calibration precision of MWS. Analysis of tests demonstrated that the MWS proposed in this paper could calibrate the on-line wavelength of pulsed laser accurately and steadily.

  14. The value of brain scanning

    PubMed Central

    Riddoch, D.; Drolc, Z.

    1972-01-01

    Over a 3-year period, 667 brain scans were performed, of which the results in 632 have been analysed. Positive scans were found in 68% of 204 cerebral tumours. There was a high rate of detection of meningiomas and malignant gliomas. Scanning was less helpful in visualizing slowly growing gliomas, and those tumours situated in the mid-line or posterior fossa. Metastases occupied an intermediate position. Positive scans occurred in a proportion of patients following acute cerebro-vascular accidents, and in a few other miscellaneous disorders. Virtually all patients with transient cerebral ischaemia, migraine, epilepsy and presenile dementia had normal brain scans. The value and limitations of this investigation have been discussed. PMID:5076491

  15. Muon Energy Calibration of the MINOS Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Miyagawa, Paul S.

    2004-01-01

    MINOS is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment designed to search for conclusive evidence of neutrino oscillations and to measure the oscillation parameters precisely. MINOS comprises two iron tracking calorimeters located at Fermilab and Soudan. The Calibration Detector at CERN is a third MINOS detector used as part of the detector response calibration programme. A correct energy calibration between these detectors is crucial for the accurate measurement of oscillation parameters. This thesis presents a calibration developed to produce a uniform response within a detector using cosmic muons. Reconstruction of tracks in cosmic ray data is discussed. This data is utilized to calculate calibration constants for each readout channel of the Calibration Detector. These constants have an average statistical error of 1.8%. The consistency of the constants is demonstrated both within a single run and between runs separated by a few days. Results are presented from applying the calibration to test beam particles measured by the Calibration Detector. The responses are calibrated to within 1.8% systematic error. The potential impact of the calibration on the measurement of oscillation parameters by MINOS is also investigated. Applying the calibration reduces the errors in the measured parameters by ~ 10%, which is equivalent to increasing the amount of data by 20%.

  16. Radiometric calibration updates to the Landsat collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micijevic, Esad; Haque, Md. Obaidul; Mishra, Nischal

    2016-09-01

    The Landsat Project is planning to implement a new collection management strategy for Landsat products generated at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center. The goal of the initiative is to identify a collection of consistently geolocated and radiometrically calibrated images across the entire Landsat archive that is readily suitable for time-series analyses. In order to perform an accurate land change analysis, the data from all Landsat sensors must be on the same radiometric scale. Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) is calibrated to a radiance standard and all previous sensors are cross-calibrated to its radiometric scale. Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) is calibrated to both radiance and reflectance standards independently. The Landsat 8 OLI reflectance calibration is considered to be most accurate. To improve radiometric calibration accuracy of historical data, Landsat 1-7 sensors also need to be cross-calibrated to the OLI reflectance scale. Results of that effort, as well as other calibration updates including the absolute and relative radiometric calibration and saturated pixel replacement for Landsat 8 OLI and absolute calibration for Landsat 4 and 5 Thematic Mappers (TM), will be implemented into Landsat products during the archive reprocessing campaign planned within the new collection management strategy. This paper reports on the planned radiometric calibration updates to the solar reflective bands of the new Landsat collection.

  17. Calibration of X-Ray Observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; L'Dell, Stephen L.

    2011-01-01

    Accurate calibration of x-ray observatories has proved an elusive goal. Inaccuracies and inconsistencies amongst on-ground measurements, differences between on-ground and in-space performance, in-space performance changes, and the absence of cosmic calibration standards whose physics we truly understand have precluded absolute calibration better than several percent and relative spectral calibration better than a few percent. The philosophy "the model is the calibration" relies upon a complete high-fidelity model of performance and an accurate verification and calibration of this model. As high-resolution x-ray spectroscopy begins to play a more important role in astrophysics, additional issues in accurately calibrating at high spectral resolution become more evident. Here we review the challenges of accurately calibrating the absolute and relative response of x-ray observatories. On-ground x-ray testing by itself is unlikely to achieve a high-accuracy calibration of in-space performance, especially when the performance changes with time. Nonetheless, it remains an essential tool in verifying functionality and in characterizing and verifying the performance model. In the absence of verified cosmic calibration sources, we also discuss the notion of an artificial, in-space x-ray calibration standard. 6th

  18. Laser Calibration of an Impact Disdrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, John E.; Kasparis, Takis; Metzger, Philip T.; Jones, W. Linwood

    2014-01-01

    A practical approach to developing an operational low-cost disdrometer hinges on implementing an effective in situ adaptive calibration strategy. This calibration strategy lowers the cost of the device and provides a method to guarantee continued automatic calibration. In previous work, a collocated tipping bucket rain gauge was utilized to provide a calibration signal to the disdrometer's digital signal processing software. Rainfall rate is proportional to the 11/3 moment of the drop size distribution (a 7/2 moment can also be assumed, depending on the choice of terminal velocity relationship). In the previous case, the disdrometer calibration was characterized and weighted to the 11/3 moment of the drop size distribution (DSD). Optical extinction by rainfall is proportional to the 2nd moment of the DSD. Using visible laser light as a means to focus and generate an auxiliary calibration signal, the adaptive calibration processing is significantly improved.

  19. Multi-Axis Accelerometer Calibration System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finley, Tom; Parker, Peter

    2010-01-01

    A low-cost, portable, and simplified system has been developed that is suitable for in-situ calibration and/or evaluation of multi-axis inertial measurement instruments. This system overcomes facility restrictions and maintains or improves the calibration quality for users of accelerometer-based instruments with applications in avionics, experimental wind tunnel research, and force balance calibration applications. The apparatus quickly and easily positions a multi-axis accelerometer system into a precisely known orientation suitable for in-situ quality checks and calibration. In addition, the system incorporates powerful and sophisticated statistical methods, known as response surface methodology and statistical quality control. These methods improve calibration quality, reduce calibration time, and allow for increased calibration frequency, which enables the monitoring of instrument stability over time.

  20. MODIS Instrument Operation and Calibration Improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiong, X.; Angal, A.; Madhavan, S.; Link, D.; Geng, X.; Wenny, B.; Wu, A.; Chen, H.; Salomonson, V.

    2014-01-01

    Terra and Aqua MODIS have successfully operated for over 14 and 12 years since their respective launches in 1999 and 2002. The MODIS on-orbit calibration is performed using a set of on-board calibrators, which include a solar diffuser for calibrating the reflective solar bands (RSB) and a blackbody for the thermal emissive bands (TEB). On-orbit changes in the sensor responses as well as key performance parameters are monitored using the measurements of these on-board calibrators. This paper provides an overview of MODIS on-orbit operation and calibration activities, and instrument long-term performance. It presents a brief summary of the calibration enhancements made in the latest MODIS data collection 6 (C6). Future improvements in the MODIS calibration and their potential applications to the S-NPP VIIRS are also discussed.

  1. Verification of L-band SAR calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, R. W.; Jackson, P. L.; Kasischke, E.

    1985-01-01

    Absolute calibration of a digital L-band SAR system to an accuracy of better than 3 dB has been verified. This was accomplished with a calibration signal generator that produces the phase history of a point target. This signal relates calibration values to various SAR data sets. Values of radar cross-section (RCS) of reference reflectors were obtained using a derived calibration relationship for the L-band channel on the ERIM/CCRS X-C-L SAR system. Calibrated RCS values were compared to known RCS values of each reference reflector for verification and to obtain an error estimate. The calibration was based on the radar response to 21 calibrated reference reflectors.

  2. Bidirectional Reflectance Factors used in Lidar Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haner, David A.; Menzies, Robert T.

    1998-01-01

    Many atmospheric remote sensing applications of infrared lidar systems require that the backscatter signal be radiometrically calibrated. These systems are usually monostatic, consequently the reflected radiance from hard targets used in calibration will include the diffuse and the retroreflectance characteristics of the material. Radiometers which are part of orbiting sensors frequently contain onboard calibration subsystems. The onboard calibrator often utilizes onboard reflectance panels which are deployed at particular orbital locations to use the reflected sun light to calibrate the radiometers. To meet the need for correlative calibration of these remote sensing techniques a physically derived model could be used to extend the angular range and to improve the angular resolution of the measured reflectance properties of the calibration materials. A modified version of the B. Hake and E. Wells model has been adapted and will be described.

  3. Adaptive optics for confocal laser scanning microscopy with adjustable pinhole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Han Woong; van Royen, Martin E.; van Cappellen, Wiggert A.; Houtsmuller, Adriaan B.; Verhaegen, Michel; Schitter, Georg

    2016-04-01

    The pinhole plays an important role in confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) for adaptive optics (AO) as well as in imaging, where the size of the pinhole denotes a trade-off between out-of-focus rejection and wavefront distortion. This contribution proposes an AO system for a commercial CLSM with an adjustable square pinhole to cope with such a trade-off. The proposed adjustable pinhole enables to calibrate the AO system and to evaluate the imaging performance. Experimental results with fluorescence beads on the coverslip and at a depth of 40 μm in the human hepatocellular carcinoma cell spheroid demonstrate that the proposed AO system can improve the image quality by the proposed calibration method. The proposed pinhole intensity ratio also indicates the image improvement by the AO correction in intensity as well as resolution.

  4. On the feasibility of water calorimetry with scanned proton radiation.

    PubMed

    Sassowsky, M; Pedroni, E

    2005-11-21

    Water calorimetry is considered to be the most direct primary method to realize the physical quantity gray for absorbed dose to water. The Swiss Federal Office of Metrology and Accreditation (METAS) has routinely operated a water calorimeter as primary standard for photon radiation since 2001. Nowadays, cancer therapy with proton radiation has become increasingly important and is a well established method. In the framework of the ProScan project conducted by the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), the spot-scanning technique is prepared for the subsequent application in hospitals, and adjusted to the recent findings of clinical research. In the absence of primary standards for proton radiation, the metrological traceability is assured by calibrating secondary standards in 60Co radiation and correcting with calculated beam quality correction factors. It is internationally recognized that the development of primary standards for proton radiation is highly desirable. In a common project of PSI and METAS, it is investigated whether a modified version of the water calorimeter in operation at METAS is suitable as primary standard for scanned proton radiation. A feasibility study has been conducted to investigate the linear energy transfer (LET) dependence of the heat defect and the influence of the time and space structure of the scanned beam on the homogeneity and stability of the temperature field in the water calorimeter. Simulations are validated against experimental data of the existing calorimeter used with photon radiation and extended to scanned proton radiation.

  5. A semi-automatic 3D laser scan system design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Hanwei; Pan, Ming; Zhang, Xiangwei

    2009-11-01

    Digital 3D models are now used everywhere, from traditional fields of industrial design, artistic design, to heritage conservation. Although laser scan is very useful to get densely samples of the objects, nowadays, such an instrument is expensive and always need to be connected to a computer with stable power supply, which prevent it from usage for fieldworks. In this paper, a new semi-automatic 3D laser scan method is proposed using two line laser sources. The planes projected from the laser sources are orthogonal, one of which is fixed relative to the camera, and the other can be rotated along a settled axis. Before scanning, the system must be calibrated, from which the parameters of the camera, the position of the fixed laser plane and the settled axis are introduced. In scanning process, the fixed laser plane and the camera form a conventional structured light system, and the 3d positions of the intersection curves of the fixed laser plane with the object can be computed. The other laser plane is rotated manually or mechanically, and its position can be determined from the cross point intersecting with the fixed laser plane on the object, so the coordinates of sweeping points can be obtained. The new system can be used without a computer (The data can be processed later), which make it suitable for fieldworks. A scanning case is given in the end.

  6. NASA metrology and calibration, 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Th sixteenth annual workshop of NASA's Metrology and Calibration Working Group was held April 20-22, 1993. The goals of the Working Group are to provide Agencywide standardization of individual metrology programs, where appropriate; to promote cooperation and exchange of information within NASA, with other Government agencies, and with industry; to serve as the primary Agency interface with the National Institute of Standards and Technology; and to encourage formal quality control techniques such as Measurement Assurance Programs. These proceedings contain unedited reports and presentations from the workshop and are provided for information only.

  7. AFFTC Standard Airspeed Calibration Procedures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    25x0UIXQXQ Results of groundLpeed course calibration are normally pre- sented in the following plots: 1. .AvP vs Vi Ŗ. All vs V ic 3. AMPC vs Mic .4...8217Average AfPeavgpo, tion correction AM /AH 10-5 per and figure V 9 PC PC feet . fu V AYpc" x q3 @ , Average position avg corred ion (AM @ AMPC /AVPC...instrument error 0 M ic From and 0), Mach number p Chart 8.5 in reference’l (AFTR 6273) (DO AMPPacer poqition error calibra- Pc tion at9 S( AMpc /’,HpC)p

  8. Absolute calibration of optical tweezers

    SciTech Connect

    Viana, N.B.; Mazolli, A.; Maia Neto, P.A.; Nussenzveig, H.M.; Rocha, M.S.; Mesquita, O.N.

    2006-03-27

    As a step toward absolute calibration of optical tweezers, a first-principles theory of trapping forces with no adjustable parameters, corrected for spherical aberration, is experimentally tested. Employing two very different setups, we find generally very good agreement for the transverse trap stiffness as a function of microsphere radius for a broad range of radii, including the values employed in practice, and at different sample chamber depths. The domain of validity of the WKB ('geometrical optics') approximation to the theory is verified. Theoretical predictions for the trapping threshold, peak position, depth variation, multiple equilibria, and 'jump' effects are also confirmed.

  9. Calibrated feedback for laser diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, P.G.

    1986-04-22

    A method is described of calibrating the feedback output from the feedback light detector of the laser diode of an optical disk drive of a laser light pen which consists of mounting a first and a second resistor in a laser light pen; connecting the first resistor between the feedback light detector and ground; connecting the second resistor between the feedback light detector and a feedback output; operating the laser diode to produce a predetermined light power output; adjusting the resistance of the first resistor to produce a predetermined voltage at the feedback output; and adjusting the resistance of the second resistor to produce a predetermined impedance at the feedback output.

  10. Calibration of a practical haemoglobinometer.

    PubMed

    Kwant, G; Oeseburg, B; Zwart, A; Zijlstra, W G

    1987-01-01

    A practical instrument for routine haemoglobinometry (HemoCue) was compared with the reference haemiglobincyanide (methaemoglobincyanide (HiCN] method. The precision of the routine method was adequate, but a systematic error of about -3.5% was found. As this resulted from errors in the procedure for coupling the haemoglobinometer read-out to the reference HiCN method, we drew up an improved calibration procedure for practical haemoglobinometers to ensure comparability of results with the reference method. After recalibration according to these rules, the HemoCue system proved to be accurate to within +/- 1.5%.

  11. Flight Calibration of the LROC Narrow Angle Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humm, D. C.; Tschimmel, M.; Brylow, S. M.; Mahanti, P.; Tran, T. N.; Braden, S. E.; Wiseman, S.; Danton, J.; Eliason, E. M.; Robinson, M. S.

    2016-04-01

    Characterization and calibration are vital for instrument commanding and image interpretation in remote sensing. The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera Narrow Angle Camera (LROC NAC) takes 500 Mpixel greyscale images of lunar scenes at 0.5 meters/pixel. It uses two nominally identical line scan cameras for a larger crosstrack field of view. Stray light, spatial crosstalk, and nonlinearity were characterized using flight images of the Earth and the lunar limb. These are important for imaging shadowed craters, studying ˜1 meter size objects, and photometry respectively. Background, nonlinearity, and flatfield corrections have been implemented in the calibration pipeline. An eight-column pattern in the background is corrected. The detector is linear for DN = 600--2000 but a signal-dependent additive correction is required and applied for DN<600. A predictive model of detector temperature and dark level was developed to command dark level offset. This avoids images with a cutoff at DN=0 and minimizes quantization error in companding. Absolute radiometric calibration is derived from comparison of NAC images with ground-based images taken with the Robotic Lunar Observatory (ROLO) at much lower spatial resolution but with the same photometric angles.

  12. Miniaturized hyperspectral imager calibration and UAV flight campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saari, Heikki; Pölönen, Ilkka; Salo, Heikki; Honkavaara, Eija; Hakala, Teemu; Holmlund, Christer; Mäkynen, Jussi; Mannila, Rami; Antila, Tapani; Akujärvi, Altti

    2013-10-01

    VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland has developed Tunable Fabry-Perot Interferometer (FPI) based miniaturized hyperspectral imager which can be operated from light weight Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV). The concept of the hyperspectral imager has been published in the SPIE Proc. 7474, 8174 and 8374. This instrument requires dedicated laboratory and on-board calibration procedures which are described. During summer 2012 extensive UAV Hyperspectral imaging campaigns in the wavelength range 400 - 900 nm at resolution range 10 - 40 nm @ FWHM were performed to study forest inventory, crop biomass and nitrogen distributions and environmental status of natural water applications. The instrument includes spectral band limiting filters which can be used for the on-board wavelength scale calibration by scanning the FPI pass band center wavelength through the low and high edge of the operational wavelength band. The procedure and results of the calibration tests will be presented. A short summary of the performed extensive UAV imaging campaign during summer 2012 will be presented.

  13. Degradation of MODIS Optics and its Reflective Solar Bands Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiong, X.; Sun, J.; Esposito, J.; Pan, C.; Xiong, S.; Guenther, B.; Barnes, W. L.; Degnan, John (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) has 36 spectral bands with wavelength ranging from 0.41 micron to 14.5 micron and spatial resolution between 0.25, 0.5, and 1.0 km at Nadir. Its ProtoFlight Model (PFM) on the NASA EOS Terra spacecraft has been providing global coverage of the Land, Ocean, and Atmosphere for the science community since the instrument opened its Nadir door on 24 February 2000. The MODIS optical system consists of a 2-sided paddle wheel scan mirror, a fold mirror, a primary mirror, and other aft optics. The sensor's 20 reflective solar bands from 0.41 to 2.1 micron are calibrated on-orbit by a solar diffuser (SD) and a solar diffuser stability monitor (SDSM). In addition to SD, degradation of the MODIS optics in the reflective solar bands has been observed, including variations in degradation between the two sides of the MODIS scan mirror. During MODIS first year of on-orbit operation, the overall degradations at the shortest wavelength (0.41 micron) are about 3% for SD, and in excess of 10% for the MODIS system. In this paper, we will present our degradation analysis results and discuss their impact on the reflective solar bands' on-orbit calibration.

  14. Active Well Coincidence Counter measurements of enriched uranium fuel assemblies in scanning and stationary modes

    SciTech Connect

    Krick, M.S.; Cowder, L. ); Maltsev, V.; Chernikov, A.; Mokeenko, P.; D'yadkov, K.; Ivanov, V. Nuclear Power Plant, Zarechnyy ); Lagattu, A.; Lopatin, Y.; Czock, K.; Rundquist, D.; Pedraza, L. )

    1991-01-01

    Enriched uranium fuel assemblies were measured with an Active Well Coincidence Counter (AWCC) at the Beloyarskaya Nuclear Power Plant. Special AWCC inserts, electronics, and software were used. Stationary and scanning measurements were performed to establish calibrations and performance specifications for the assay of {sup 235}U and {sub 235}U/cm for BN600 fuel. 6 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Nimbus-7 scanning multichannel microwave radiometer /SMMR/ in-orbit performance appraisal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloersen, P.; Cavalieri, D. J.; Gatlin, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    Calibration and processing techniques enacted during first year of operation of the Nimbus-7 scanning multichannel microwave radiometer (SMMR) are described. It was found that in-orbit calibration was necessary, as was fine-tuning of the geophysical parameter retrieval parameters to account for anomalies such as lower-than-expected polarization differences in ocean radiances. Phase shifts in the scan angles were corrected in order to avoid polarization mixing. Calibration constants to eliminate cross-talk and phase shift effects were established for radiation reflected from the earth, then averaged over data from 300 orbits to fit points on a sine curve to better than 0.2 K accuracy. An iterative approach was determined to be necessary due to signal anomalies caused by antenna dish oscillations. Global ocean and atmosphere parameters used to construct a radiation model of ten latitude bands are presented for use in radiation transfer equations.

  16. Re-scan confocal microscopy: scanning twice for better resolution

    PubMed Central

    De Luca, Giulia M.R.; Breedijk, Ronald M.P.; Brandt, Rick A.J.; Zeelenberg, Christiaan H.C.; de Jong, Babette E.; Timmermans, Wendy; Azar, Leila Nahidi; Hoebe, Ron A.; Stallinga, Sjoerd; Manders, Erik M.M.

    2013-01-01

    We present a new super-resolution technique, Re-scan Confocal Microscopy (RCM), based on standard confocal microscopy extended with an optical (re-scanning) unit that projects the image directly on a CCD-camera. This new microscope has improved lateral resolution and strongly improved sensitivity while maintaining the sectioning capability of a standard confocal microscope. This simple technology is typically useful for biological applications where the combination high-resolution and high-sensitivity is required. PMID:24298422

  17. Calibration of the Rapid Scan Particle Detector Mounted in the SCATHA Satellite.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-07-18

    44:172. 7. Iglesias , G.E., and McGarity, J.O. (1971) Channel electron multiplier efficiency for protons of 0.2-10 keV, Rev. Sci. Inst. 42:1728. ,L 8...Nuclear Collisions for 0. l- to 1000-MeV Protons, Rep. AFWL-TR-65-150, AFWL, Kirtland AFB, New Mexico . 26 /I, U’ - - MM*M I IO II straggling in the...using laboratory simulated ominidirectional electron beams, Rev. Sdi. Inst. 44:172. 7. Iglesias , G. E., and McGarity, J. 0. (1971) Channel electron

  18. 3D Scan Systems Integration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    AGENCY USE ONLY (Leave Blank) 2. REPORT DATE 5 Feb 98 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 3D Scan Systems Integration REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED...2-89) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39-1 298-102 [ EDO QUALITY W3PECTEDI DLA-ARN Final Report for US Defense Logistics Agency on DDFG-T2/P3: 3D...SCAN SYSTEMS INTEGRATION Contract Number SPO100-95-D-1014 Contractor Ohio University Delivery Order # 0001 Delivery Order Title 3D Scan Systems

  19. Circular Scan Streak Tube Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nevin, S.

    1980-01-01

    A streak tube having circular scan was designed, built and tested. Continuous circular scan, easily derived from out of phase sine waves applied to the conventional deflection plates, permits the timing of pulses traveling long baselines. At the tube's output a circular array of 720 elements is scanned to provide 30 to 40 picosecond resolution. Initial difficulties with electron bombarded silicon arrays were circumvented by using microchannel plates within the streak tube to provide the needed electronic amplification and digital sensitivity and coupling the 720 element arrays to the electron beam by means of a phosphor on a fiber optics. Two ceramic body tubes with S-20 photocathodes were tested and delivered.

  20. Self-calibrating modulation ellipsometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducharme, Stephen; Machlab, Hassanayn; Snyder, Paul G.; Woollam, John A.; Synowicki, Ron A.

    1996-10-01

    A new self-calibrating modulation ellipsometer (SCME) has demonstrated outstanding accuracy, utility, reliability, and speed. The ellipsometer is well suited to in-situ monitoring of surface degradation, film growth or etching, and quality control. The design incorporates several novel features including: (1) full self calibration, (2) high speed, (3) high accuracy, (4) high signal-to-noise ratio, (5) compactness, (6) reliability, and (7) no moving parts. The design is portable, can be fully automated, and is suitable for use in remote and harsh environments. A complete prototype instrument incorporates all optical components, mechanical mounts with flexible configuration options, custom electronic components, signal acquisition, computer control, data analysis, and a user interface, all integrated into a self-contained, user-friendly, system. It operates at fixed wavelength and incidence angle, though both can be changed by the operator in a few minutes as desired. Quantitative testing verified the absolute accuracy and suitability for monitoring real-time in-situ film growth and etching.