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Sample records for 2mass jhk photometry

  1. JHK photometry of selected Trojan and Hilda asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Dale W.; Johnson, Paul E.; Buckingham, William L.; Shorthill, Richard W.

    1992-01-01

    No entirely satisfactory match has been established between the present JHK photometry of selected Hilda and Trojan asteroids and photometry for both main belt asteroids and laboratory samples. It is noted that while the leading Trojans and Hildas exhibit similar and homogeneous JHK colors, the trailing Trojans appear to be more heterogeneous. Charcoal and magnetite provide the best match in terms of JHK colors.

  2. Eos, Koronis, and Maria Family Asteroids: Infrared (JHK) Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veeder, Glenn J.; Matson, Dennis L.; Owensby, Pamela D.; Gradie, Jonathan C.; Bell, Jeffrey F.; Tedesco, Edward F.

    1995-01-01

    Infrared photometry at 1.2, 1.6, and 2.2 micrometer (JHK) is reported for 56 asteroids in the Eos, Koronis and, Maria dynamical families. These data are consistent with similar surface composition for all of the asteroids of each family. The infrared colors within each family cluster in the region observed for the S taxonomic class, but Eos asteroids may belong to a separable K class. Asteroid 243 Ida, which was observed by the Galileo spacecraft, is a typical member of the Koronis family. The average infrared colors of the Maria family are slightly redder than those of the Eos and Koronis families.

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: JHK photometry around IRAS 09149-4743 (Ortiz+, 2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, R.; Roman-Lopes, A.; Abraham, Z.

    2006-10-01

    Table 2 contains positions and JHK photometry of a set of infrared sources, situated in two crowded areas of the stellar cluster associated with IRAS 09149-4743. All measurements were carried out with the infrared camera "CamIV", as described in Sect. 3 of the paper. (1 data file).

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: JHK photometry in 2 star-forming regions (Anandarao+, 2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anandarao, B. G.; Venkata Raman, V.; Ghosh, S. K.; Ojha, D. K.; Kumar, M. S. N.

    2009-05-01

    Subarcsec resolution JHK photometry was performed at UKIRT during 2005 July 17 on the two objects under excellent seeing conditions (~0.5arcsec) using the UFTI (HAWAII- 1 1024x1024 ) camera. The radio continuum observations in the 1.280-GHz frequency band (with a bandwidth of 16MHz) were made on 2003 August 1 at the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT), operated by National Centre for Radio Astrophysics (NCRA), Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR) near Pune (India). (3 data files).

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: JHK photometry of Galactic center stars (Ruelas-Mayorga+ 1993)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruelas-Mayorga, R. A.; Teague, P. F.

    1997-06-01

    We present K-counts and JHK detailed photometry for a number of stars with K<=+9.0 in three clear regions near the galactic centre. These regions are all located approximately at l~0.0 and at latitudes b~-3.5,-4.0 and 4.5 respectively. Their Cumulative Counts Functions (CCF's) are formed, and with the aid of an exponential disk model for the Galaxy they are separated into disk and bulge CCF. As for the case in Baade's Window (BW) (Ruelas-Mayorga & Teague, 1992A&AS...95..379R) the disk is dominant at bright magnitudes whereas the bulge dominates at the faint end of the CCF. The slope of the bulge CCF is steeper than that for the disk in all three cases corroborating the result obtained for BW. The two colour JHK diagram and the K vs J-K diagram for the three regions show that the stellar population in these areas is similar to that studied in BW by us and by Frogel & Whitford (1987ApJ...320..199F). An average value of E(J-K)~0.42mag for the reddening is obtained, which is somewhat larger than that found for BW (0.27). Finally it is shown that at K<=+9.0, the disk population may be accounted for by those sources with J-K<=+1.6 whereas the bulge population presents values for J-K in excess of +1.6. (2 data files).

  6. NEAR-INFRARED (JHK) PHOTOMETRY OF 131 NORTHERN GALACTIC CLASSICAL CEPHEIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Monson, Andrew J.; Pierce, Michael J.

    2011-03-15

    Near-infrared photometric measurements for 131 Northern Galactic Cepheids are presented. The Cepheid light curves are sampled with an average of 22 measurements per star fully covering the phase of each Cepheid. The J, H, and K light curves for each Cepheid were uniformly interpolated to find the intensity mean magnitudes within each band. The results are consistent within {+-}1% for 26 stars in common with previous studies. This paper is the first in a projected series of two papers which will provide additional fundamental data for Cepheids in the Galaxy, namely, NIR photometry and line-of-sight extinction. In the course of this project, 93 additional variables were fortuitously observed within the Cepheid program fields, 82 of which have previously not been identified.

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: JHK photometry of 1203 variables in ONC (Rice+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, T. S.; Reipurth, B.; Wolk, S. J.; Vaz, L. P.; Cross, N. J. G.

    2016-04-01

    Our data comprise J, H, K observations of a 0.9°*0.9° field toward the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC) that were taken with the Wide Field Camera (WFCAM) instrument on the 3.8m UKIRT, which sits atop Mauna Kea, HI at 4194m elevation. Observations have been taken on 120 nights between 2006 October and 2009 April over three observing seasons: 2006 October 26-2007 April 21, 2007 November 21-2007 December 2, and 2008 November 8-2009 April 7. We monitored ~15000 stars down to J~20 using the WFCAM instrument, and have extracted 1203 significantly variable stars from our data. The observations came from UKIRT/WFCAM programmes U/06B/H54, U/07B/H60B, and U/09A/H33 and were combined into a single WFCAM Science Archive (WSA) combined programme WSERV5. The data in this paper come from the data release WSERV5v20120208, and can be accessed at http://surveys.roe.ac.uk/wsa. The coordinates, SIMBAD cross-matched names, median WFCAM photometry, Spitzer photometry, and evolutionary classes of all 1203 variables are listed in Table2. In Tables 4 and 5, we show the variability statistics, including derived color slopes, for all periodic and nonperiodic stars in our data set, respectively. We identify long-term periodic stars in Table6. In Table7 we list the four newly discovered eclipsing binaries and their basic data, together with nine other eclipsing binaries that fall within our WFCAM field. (5 data files).

  8. High-precision 2MASS JHK{sub s} light curves and other data for RR Lyrae star SDSS J015450 + 001501: Strong constraints for nonlinear pulsation models

    SciTech Connect

    Szabó, Róbert; Ivezić, Željko; Kiss, László L.; Kolláth, Zoltán; Jones, Lynne; Becker, Andrew C.; Davenport, James R. A.; Sesar, Branimir; Cutri, Roc M.

    2014-01-01

    We present and discuss an extensive data set for the non-Blazhko ab-type RR Lyrae star SDSS J015450+001501, including optical Sloan Digital Sky Survey ugriz light curves and spectroscopic data, LINEAR and Catalina Sky Survey unfiltered optical light curves, and infrared Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) JHK{sub s} and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer W1 and W2 light curves. Most notable is that light curves obtained by 2MASS include close to 9000 photometric measures collected over 3.3 yr and provide an exceedingly precise view of near-infrared variability. These data demonstrate that static atmosphere models are insufficient to explain multiband photometric light-curve behavior and present strong constraints for nonlinear pulsation models for RR Lyrae stars. It is a challenge to modelers to produce theoretical light curves that can explain data presented here, which we make publicly available.

  9. Intrinsic colour indices of Be stars obtained from 2MASS photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegner, W.

    2015-02-01

    This paper is based on 2MASS photometry (JHK_s magnitudes) of 1172 Be stars. The observed mean intrinsic colours have been derived with aid of two-colour diagrams for Be stars of luminosity classes Ie-IIe, IIIe and IVe-Ve. The obtained results are the first determinations of their intrinsic colours in the astronomical literature. The smoothed infrared colours are compared with those obtained for ``normal'' B stars. Several two-colour diagrams and plots of observed and smoothed intrinsic colour versus spectral type of luminosity classes Ie-IIe, IIIe and IVe-Ve are presented. Generally the determined infrared intrinsic colours of Be stars (V-J)_0, (V-H)_0, and (V-K_s)_o differ substantially from those of ``normal'' B stars. It is found that the intrinsic colours of B stars are generally bluer than Be stars of corresponding spectral type and luminosity class. The mean absolute visual magnitude M_v of 528 Be stars for luminosity classes Iae, Ibe-Iabe, IIe, IIIe and IVe-Ve is derived from HIPPARCOS parallaxes. The M_v calibration is compared with the existing ones. The Be stars are generally brighter than ``normal'' B stars of corresponding spectral types.

  10. New 2MASS Near-infrared Photometry for Globular Clusters in M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Song; Ma, Jun; Wu, Zhenyu; Zhou, Xu

    2014-07-01

    We present Two Micron All Sky Survey JHK s photometry for 913 star clusters and candidates in the field of M31, which are selected from the latest Revised Bologna Catalog of M31 globular clusters (GCs) and candidates. The photometric measurements in this paper supplement this catalog, and provide the most comprehensive and homogeneous photometric catalog for M31 GCs in the JHK s bandpasses. In general, our photometry is consistent with previous measurements. The globular cluster luminosity function (GCLF) peaks for the confirmed GCs derived by fitting a t 5 distribution using the maximum likelihood method are J_0 = 15.348_{-0.208}^{+0.206}, H_0 = 14.703_{-0.180}^{+0.176}, and {K_s}_0 = 14.534_{-0.146}^{+0.142}, all of which agree well with previous studies. The GCLFs are different between metal-rich (MR) and metal-poor (MP), and between inner and outer subpopulations, as MP clusters are fainter than their MR counterparts and the inner clusters are brighter than the outer ones, which confirm previous results. The NIR colors of the GC candidates are on average redder than those of the confirmed GCs, which leads to an obscure bimodal distribution of color indices. The relation of (V - K s)0 and metallicity shows a notable departure from linearity, with a shallower slope toward the redder end. The color-magnitude diagram (CMD) and color-color diagram show that many GC candidates are located out of the evolutionary tracks, suggesting that some of them may be false M31 GC candidates. The CMD also shows that the initial mass function of M31 GCs covers a large range, and the majority of the clusters have initial masses between 103 and 106 M ⊙.

  11. New 2MASS near-infrared photometry for globular clusters in M31

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Song; Ma, Jun; Wu, Zhenyu; Zhou, Xu

    2014-07-01

    We present Two Micron All Sky Survey JHK {sub s} photometry for 913 star clusters and candidates in the field of M31, which are selected from the latest Revised Bologna Catalog of M31 globular clusters (GCs) and candidates. The photometric measurements in this paper supplement this catalog, and provide the most comprehensive and homogeneous photometric catalog for M31 GCs in the JHK {sub s} bandpasses. In general, our photometry is consistent with previous measurements. The globular cluster luminosity function (GCLF) peaks for the confirmed GCs derived by fitting a t {sub 5} distribution using the maximum likelihood method are J{sub 0}=15.348{sub −0.208}{sup +0.206}, H{sub 0}=14.703{sub −0.180}{sup +0.176}, and K{sub s0}=14.534{sub −0.146}{sup +0.142}, all of which agree well with previous studies. The GCLFs are different between metal-rich (MR) and metal-poor (MP), and between inner and outer subpopulations, as MP clusters are fainter than their MR counterparts and the inner clusters are brighter than the outer ones, which confirm previous results. The NIR colors of the GC candidates are on average redder than those of the confirmed GCs, which leads to an obscure bimodal distribution of color indices. The relation of (V – K {sub s}){sub 0} and metallicity shows a notable departure from linearity, with a shallower slope toward the redder end. The color-magnitude diagram (CMD) and color-color diagram show that many GC candidates are located out of the evolutionary tracks, suggesting that some of them may be false M31 GC candidates. The CMD also shows that the initial mass function of M31 GCs covers a large range, and the majority of the clusters have initial masses between 10{sup 3} and 10{sup 6} M {sub ☉}.

  12. 2MASS photometry of edge-on spiral galaxies - I. Sample and general results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosenkov, A. V.; Sotnikova, N. Ya.; Reshetnikov, V. P.

    2010-01-01

    A sample of edge-on spiral galaxies aimed at a thorough study of the main structural and photometric parameters of edge-on galaxies, both of early- and late-types, is presented. The data were taken from the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) in the J, H and Ks filters. The sources were selected according to their angular size mainly on the basis of the 2MASS-selected Flat Galaxy Catalog (2MFGC). The sample consists of 175 galaxies in the Ks filter, 169 galaxies in the H filter and 165 galaxies in the J filter. We present bulge and disc decompositions of each galaxy image. All galaxies have been modelled with a Sérsic bulge and exponential disc with the BUDDA v2.1 package. Bulge and disc sizes, profile shapes, surface brightnesses are provided. Our sample is the biggest up-to-date sample of edge-on galaxies with derived structural parameters for discs and bulges. In this paper, we present the general results of the study of this sample. We determine several scaling relations for bulges and discs which indicate a tight link between their formation and evolution. We show that galaxies with bulges fitted by the Sérsic index n <~ 2 have quite different distributions of their structural parameters than galaxies with n >~ 2 bulges. At a first approximation the Sérsic index threshold n ~= 2 can be used to identify pseudobulges and classical bulges. Thus, the difference in parameter distributions and scaling relations for these subsamples suggests that two or more processes are responsible for disc galaxy formation. The main conclusions of our general statistical analysis of the sample are as follows. (i) The distribution of the apparent bulge axis ratio qb for the subsample with n <~ 2 can be attributed to triaxial, nearly prolate bulges that are seen from different projections, while n >~ 2 bulges seem to be oblate spheroids with moderate flattening. Triaxiality of late-type bulges may be due to the presence of a bar that thickened in the vertical direction during its

  13. Characterization of the Praesepe star cluster by photometry and proper motions with 2MASS, PPMXL, and Pan-STARRS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, P. F.; Chen, W. P.; Lin, C. C.; Huang, C. K.; Panwar, N.; Lee, C. H.; Pandey, A. K.; Tsai, M. F.; Tang, C.-H.; Goldman, B.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H.; Heasley, J. N.; Hodapp, K. W.; Huber, M. E.; Jedicke, R.; Kaiser, N.; Draper, P. W.; Grav, T.; and others

    2014-03-20

    Membership identification is the first step in determining the properties of a star cluster. Low-mass members in particular could be used to trace the dynamical history, such as mass segregation, stellar evaporation, or tidal stripping, of a star cluster in its Galactic environment. We identified member candidates of the intermediate-age Praesepe cluster (M44) with stellar masses ∼0.11-2.4 M {sub ☉}, using Panoramic Survey Telescope And Rapid Response System and Two Micron All Sky Survey photometry, and PPMXL proper motions. Within a sky area of 3° radius, 1040 candidates are identified, of which 96 are new inclusions. Using the same set of selection criteria on field stars, an estimated false positive rate of 16% was determined, suggesting that 872 of the candidates are true members. This most complete and reliable membership list allows us to favor the BT-Settl model over other stellar models. The cluster shows a distinct binary track above the main sequence, with a binary frequency of 20%-40%, and a high occurrence rate of similar mass pairs. The mass function is consistent with that of the disk population but shows a deficit of members below 0.3 solar masses. A clear mass segregation is evidenced, with the lowest-mass members in our sample being evaporated from this disintegrating cluster.

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: VRIZJHK photometry around Alpha Cen (Kervella+, 2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kervella, P.; Thevenin, F.

    2016-06-01

    table1.dat lists the background sources identified on deep CCD images of the close environment of Alpha Centauri (up to approximately 2.5'). Our VRIZ photometry has been complemented by JHK photometry extracted from the corresponding 2MASS images (Skrutskie et al., 2006AJ....131.1163S). This catalogue is particularly intended to provide a reference for future searches for faint companions of Alpha Centauri. Unavailable values are replaced by 99.00 in the table. We have revised the coordinates of the catalogue published in 2007. They are now much more consistent with reference astrometric catalogues such as 2MASS (Cat. II/246). There was a shift of typically 2 arcseconds between the 2MASS and SUSI2 coordinates, and now this is reduced to less than 0.5 arcsecond. We have also recomputed the photometric magnitudes using more accurate aperture corrections and instrument zero points The new version of the table is available on 13-Jun-2016, in place of the old one, in Vizier. (1 data file).

  15. Multicolor CCD photometry of six lenticular and spiral galaxies. Stellar population of the galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, A. S.

    2006-03-01

    The results of multicolor surface photometry of the S0 galaxies NGC 524, NGC 1138, and NGC 7280 and the spiral galaxies NGC 532, NGC 783, and NGC 1589 are analyzed. UBVRI observations were acquired with the 1.5-m telescope of the Maidanak Observatory (Uzbekistan), while JHK data were taken from the 2MASS catalog. The brightness and color distributions in the galaxies are analyzed. Extinction in dust lanes in three spiral galaxies is estimated. The contributions of the radiation of the spherical and disk components in different photometric bands are estimated. Two-color diagrams are used to estimate the composition of the stellar populations in various galaxy components. The variations of the color characteristics in the S0 galaxies is due mostly to radial metallicity gradients.

  16. Multicolor CCD photometry of six lenticular and spiral galaxies. Structure of the galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, A. S.

    2006-03-01

    The results of multicolor surface photometry of the S0 galaxies NGC 524, NGC 1138, and NGC 7280 and the spiral galaxies NGC 532, NGC 783, and NGC 1589 are reported. U BV RI observations were acquired with the 1.5-m telescope of the Maidanak Observatory (Uzbekistan), while JHK data were taken from the 2MASS catalog. The overall structure of the galaxies is analyzed and the galaxy images decomposed into bulge and disk components. The parameters of the galaxy components—rings, bars, spiral arms, and dust lanes—are determined. The bulge/disk decompositions based on averaged one-dimensional photometric profiles yield incorrect parameters for the bulges of the S0-Sa galaxies with bars and/or rings, whose inner regions are dominated by the radiation of the bulge.

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: JHK photometry near IRAS 06145+1455 (Brand+, 2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, J.; Wouterloot, J. G. A.

    2007-09-01

    The data presented here were obtained on February 15, 1995, with the ESO 2.2-m telescope at La Silla (Chile). Images in J, H, and K-bands were taken with the IRAC-2 camera and objective C, which resulted in a scale of 0.49"/pixel. (1 data file).

  18. APASS Landolt-Sloan BVgri Photometry of RAVE Stars. I. Data, Effective Temperatures, and Reddenings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munari, U.; Henden, A.; Frigo, A.; Zwitter, T.; Bienaymé, O.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Boeche, C.; Freeman, K. C.; Gibson, B. K.; Gilmore, G.; Grebel, E. K.; Helmi, A.; Kordopatis, G.; Levine, S. E.; Navarro, J. F.; Parker, Q. A.; Reid, W.; Seabroke, G. M.; Siebert, A.; Siviero, A.; Smith, T. C.; Steinmetz, M.; Templeton, M.; Terrell, D.; Welch, D. L.; Williams, M.; Wyse, R. F. G.

    2014-11-01

    We provide AAVSO Photometric All-Sky Survey (APASS) photometry in the Landolt BV and Sloan g'r'i' bands for all 425,743 stars included in the fourth RAVE Data Release. The internal accuracy of the APASS photometry of RAVE stars, expressed as the error of the mean of data obtained and separately calibrated over a median of four distinct observing epochs and distributed between 2009 and 2013, is 0.013, 0.012, 0.012, 0.014, and 0.021 mag for the B, V, g', r', and i' bands, respectively. The equally high external accuracy of APASS photometry has been verified on secondary Landolt and Sloan photometric standard stars not involved in the APASS calibration process and on a large body of literature data on field and cluster stars, confirming the absence of offsets and trends. Compared with the Carlsberg Meridian Catalog (CMC-15), APASS astrometry of RAVE stars is accurate to a median value of 0.098 arcsec. Brightness distribution functions for the RAVE stars have been derived in all bands. APASS photometry of RAVE stars, augmented by 2MASS JHK infrared data, has been χ2 fitted to a densely populated synthetic photometric library designed to widely explore temperature, surface gravity, metallicity, and reddening. Resulting T eff and E B - V , computed over a range of options, are provided and discussed, and will be kept updated in response to future APASS and RAVE data releases. In the process, we find that the reddening caused by a homogeneous slab of dust, extending for 140 pc on either side of the Galactic plane and responsible for EpolesB-V = 0.036 ± 0.002 at the Galactic poles, is a suitable approximation of the actual reddening encountered at Galactic latitudes |b| >= 25°.

  19. APASS Landolt-Sloan BVgri photometry of Rave stars. I. Data, effective temperatures, and reddenings

    SciTech Connect

    Munari, U.; Siviero, A.; Henden, A.; Frigo, A.; Bienaymé, O.; Siebert, A.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Boeche, C.; Grebel, E. K.; Freeman, K. C.; Gibson, B. K.; Gilmore, G.; Kordopatis, G.; Helmi, A.; Levine, S. E.; Navarro, J. F.; Parker, Q. A.; Reid, W.; Seabroke, G. M.; and others

    2014-11-01

    We provide AAVSO Photometric All-Sky Survey (APASS) photometry in the Landolt BV and Sloan g'r'i' bands for all 425,743 stars included in the fourth RAVE Data Release. The internal accuracy of the APASS photometry of RAVE stars, expressed as the error of the mean of data obtained and separately calibrated over a median of four distinct observing epochs and distributed between 2009 and 2013, is 0.013, 0.012, 0.012, 0.014, and 0.021 mag for the B, V, g', r', and i' bands, respectively. The equally high external accuracy of APASS photometry has been verified on secondary Landolt and Sloan photometric standard stars not involved in the APASS calibration process and on a large body of literature data on field and cluster stars, confirming the absence of offsets and trends. Compared with the Carlsberg Meridian Catalog (CMC-15), APASS astrometry of RAVE stars is accurate to a median value of 0.098 arcsec. Brightness distribution functions for the RAVE stars have been derived in all bands. APASS photometry of RAVE stars, augmented by 2MASS JHK infrared data, has been χ{sup 2} fitted to a densely populated synthetic photometric library designed to widely explore temperature, surface gravity, metallicity, and reddening. Resulting T {sub eff} and E {sub B–V}, computed over a range of options, are provided and discussed, and will be kept updated in response to future APASS and RAVE data releases. In the process, we find that the reddening caused by a homogeneous slab of dust, extending for 140 pc on either side of the Galactic plane and responsible for E{sub B−V}{sup poles} = 0.036 ± 0.002 at the Galactic poles, is a suitable approximation of the actual reddening encountered at Galactic latitudes |b| ≥ 25°.

  20. Partial molecular cloning of the JHK retrovirus using gammaretrovirus consensus PCR primers

    PubMed Central

    Halligan, Brian D; Sun, Hai-Yuan; Kushnaryov, Vladimir M; Grossberg, Sidney E

    2013-01-01

    The JHK virus (JHKV) was previously described as a type C retrovirus that has some distinctive ultrastructural features and replicates constitutively in a human B-lymphoblastoid cell line, JHK-3. In order to facilitate the cloning of sequences from JHKV, a series of partially degenerate consensus retroviral PCR primers were created by a data-driven design approach based on an alignment of 14 diverse gammaretroviral genomes. These primers were used in the PCR amplification of purified JHK virion cDNA, and ana lysis of the resulting amplified sequence indicates that the JHKV is in the murine leukemia virus (MLV) family. The JHK sequence is nearly identical to the corresponding region of the Bxv-1 endogenous mouse retrovirus (GenBank accession AC115959) and distinct from XMRV. JHKV gag-specific amplification was demonstrated with nucleic acids from uncultivated, frozen, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of the index patient, but not in PBMCs from nine healthy blood donors. Unlike earlier reports, in which MLV-like sequences were identified in human source material, which may have been due to murine contamination, budding retrovirions were demonstrated repeatedly by electron microscopy in uncultivated lymphocytes of the index patient that were morphologically identical in their development to the virions in the JHK-3 cells, and immunological evidence was obtained that the index patient produced IgG antibodies that bound to the budding viral particles in patient PBMCs and in the JHK-3 cells. These data indicate that the patient had been infected by JHKV, lending significance to the demonstration of JHKV amplicons in nucleic acids of the patient’s PBMCs. In future studies, the PCR primer sets described herein may expand the detection of an amplifiable subset of viruses related to MLV. PMID:24159361

  1. ARCHANGEL: Galaxy Photometry System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schombert, James

    2011-07-01

    ARCHANGEL is a Unix-based package for the surface photometry of galaxies. While oriented for large angular size systems (i.e. many pixels), its tools can be applied to any imaging data of any size. The package core contains routines to perform the following critical galaxy photometry functions: sky determinationframe cleaningellipse fittingprofile fittingtotal and isophotal magnitudes The goal of the package is to provide an automated, assembly-line type of reduction system for galaxy photometry of space-based or ground-based imaging data. The procedures outlined in the documentation are flux independent, thus, these routines can be used for non-optical data as well as typical imaging datasets. ARCHANGEL has been tested on several current OS's (RedHat Linux, Ubuntu Linux, Solaris, Mac OS X). A tarball for installation is available at the download page. The main routines are Python and FORTRAN based, therefore, a current installation of Python and a FORTRAN compiler are required. The ARCHANGEL package also contains Python hooks to the PGPLOT package, an XML processor and network tools which automatically link to data archives (i.e. NED, HST, 2MASS, etc) to download images in a non-interactive manner.

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: KV Vel and TW Crv JHK light curves (Ribeiro+, 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, T.; Baptista, R.

    2010-11-01

    Near-infrared time resolved photometric observations of KV Vel and TW Crv. KV Vel was observed quasi-simultaneously in JHK bands while TW Crv was observed on the H and K bands. Table contains the flux calibrated photometric measurements for each object on each band and consists of phase, flux and flux error. (1 data file).

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: JHK photometry of Sh 2-307 HII region (Roman-Lopes, 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman-Lopes, A.

    2010-02-01

    High-resolution near-infrared (NIR) imaging observations were performed in the direction of Sh 2-307. The data were taken during 2007 November, over eight nights. The NIR spectroscopic observations of the two brightest sources in the cluster region were made during the night of 2007 November 24. (1 data file).

  4. Exoplanetary Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, Joseph

    2008-09-01

    The Spitzer Space Telescope measured the first photons from exoplanets (Charbonneau et al. 2005, Deming et al. 2005). These secondary eclipses (planet passing behind star) revealed the planet's emitted infrared flux, and under a blackbody assumption provide a brightness temperature in each measured bandpass. Since the initial direct detections, Spitzer has made numerous measurements in the four Infrared Array Camera bandpasses at 3.6, 4.5, 5.7, and 8.0 microns; the Infrared Spectrograph's Blue Peakup Array at 16 microns; and the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer's 24-micron array. Initial measurements of orbital variation and further photometric study (Harrington et al. 2006, 2007) revealed the extreme day-night variability of some exoplanets, but full orbital phase curves of different planets (Knutson et al. 2007, 2008) demonstrated that not all planets are so variable. This talk will review progress and prospects in exoplanetary photometry.

  5. J, H, K photometry of 433 Eros and other asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, C. R.; Morrison, D.

    1976-01-01

    Results are reported for IR photometry of nine bright asteroids, including 433 Eros, which was conducted in the J, H, K, and (for Eros) L bands with an InSb photometer on the 1.3-m Kitt Peak telescope. It is found that the J-H and H-K color indices of all nine asteroids are slightly redder than those of the sun and that three C-type objects are somewhat redder in the same color indices than four S-types and an E-type. Eros is shown to have an unusually red J-K index; the shape of its IR spectral reflectance curve is attributed in part to the presence of the weak 2-micron pyroxene absorption band in the spectrum. The results show that JHK photometry is less diagnostic of asteroidal composition than higher-resolution IR spectrophotometry.

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: uvby-β photometry of WTTS (Chavarria-K+, 2000)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavarria-K, C.; Terranegra, L.; Moreno-Corral, M. A.; de, Lara E.

    2000-07-01

    We present uvby-β photometry of 116 X-ray flux-selected active stars in the directions of the Orion (40), Taurus-Auriga (58) and Scorpius OB2-2 (18) star forming regions. Additionally, we give near IR JHK photometry of 20 active stars in the Taurus-Auriga direction. The program stars were selected from the ROSAT All Sky Survey and EINSTEIN X-ray surveys and are spectroscopically confirmed weak-line T Tauri stars and weak-line T Tauri star candidates. The photometry confirms the young nature of the program stars and also indicates that a significant fraction of the sample could be foreground objects. The data given here probably represent the largest homogeneous uvby-β photometric sample of new WTTS and WTTS candidates. Many objects in the sample are observed photometrically for the first time. (4 data files).

  7. Characterisation of the Gaia photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, J. M.; Jordi, C.; Fabricius, C.; Voss, H.; Weiler, M.

    2014-07-01

    Our team at the University of Barcelona has contributed since the early phases of the mission to the definition, evaluation and calibration modelling of the Gaia photometry. To maximise the Gaia scientific exploitation, we have frequently shared many different tools and data with the astronomical community. Among this information we have defined several relationships among colours involving Gaia magnitudes and colours from other commonly used photometric systems (Johnson-Cousins, SDSS, Hipparcos, Tycho and 2MASS) for several types of stars (including white dwarfs). These relationships can be used for planning scientific exploitation of Gaia data, performing simulations of the Gaia-like sky, planning ground-based complementary observations and for building catalogues with auxiliary validation data. During the commissioning phase our team (as part of the Payload Experts group) has been intensively checking the first photometric data to analyse the health and properties of the real instrument. These preliminary analyses allowed us to monitor the throughput variations with time, assess the spectral resolution and re-evaluate the performances of the end-of-mission photometry. The Payload Experts group activities continue beyond the commissioning phase aiming to optimize the operations onboard for maximizing the scientific return. Some example of first spectra and photometry are shown.

  8. Infrared Photometry of Late-M, L, and T Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leggett, S. K.; Golimowski, David A.; Fan, Xiaohui; Geballe, T. R.; Knapp, G. R.; Brinkmann, J.; Csabai, István; Gunn, James E.; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Henry, Todd J.; Hindsley, Robert; Ivezić, Željko; Lupton, Robert H.; Pier, Jeffrey R.; Schneider, Donald P.; Smith, J. Allyn; Strauss, Michael A.; Uomoto, Alan; York, D. G.

    2002-01-01

    We present ZJHKL'M' photometry of a sample of 58 late M, L, and T dwarfs, most of which are identified from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the Two Micron All-Sky Survey. Near-infrared spectra and spectral classifications for most of this sample are presented in a companion paper by Geballe et al. We derive the luminosities of 18 dwarfs in the sample with known parallaxes, and the results imply that the effective temperature range for the L dwarfs in our sample is approximately 2200-1300 K and for the T dwarfs 1300-800 K. We obtained new photometric data at the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope for: 42 dwarfs at Z, 34 dwarfs at JHK, 21 dwarfs at L', as well as M' data for two L dwarfs and two T dwarfs. The M' data provide the first accurate photometry for L and T dwarfs in this bandpass-for a T2 and a T5 dwarf, we find K-M'=1.2 and 1.6, respectively. These colors are much bluer than predicted by published models, suggesting that CO may be more abundant in these objects than expected, as has been found for the T6 dwarf Gl 229B. We also find that K-L' increases monotonically through most of the M, L, and T subclasses, but it is approximately constant between types L6 and T5, restricting its usefulness as a temperature indicator. The degeneracy is probably due to the onset of CH4 absorption at the blue edge of the L' bandpass. The JHK colors of L dwarfs show significant scatter, suggesting that the fluxes in these bandpasses are sensitive to variations in photospheric dust properties. The H-K colors of the later T dwarfs also show some scatter, which we suggest is due to variations in pressure-induced H2 opacity, which is sensitive to gravity and metallicity.

  9. L' AND M' Photometry Of Ultracool Dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marley, M. S.; Tsvetanov, Z. I.; Vrba, F. J.; Henden, A. A.; Luginbuhl, C. B.

    2004-01-01

    We have compiled L' (3.4-4.1 microns) and M' (4.6- 4.8 microns) photometry of 63 single and binary M, L, and T dwarfs obtained at the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope using the Mauna Kea Observatory filter set. This compilation includes new L' measurements of eight L dwarfs and 13 T dwarfs and new M' measurements of seven L dwarfs, five T dwarfs, and the M1 dwarf Gl 229A. These new data increase by factors of 0. 6 and 1.6, respectively, the numbers of ultracool dwarfs T (sub eff) JHK spectra, L' photometry, and trigonometric parallaxes are available, and we estimate these quantities for nine other dwarfs whose parallaxes and flux-calibrated spectra have been obtained. BC(SUB K) is a well-behaved function of near-infrared spectral type with a dispersion of approx. 0.1 mag for types M6-T5 it is significantly more scattered for types T5-T9. T (sub eff) declines steeply and monotonically for types M6-L7 and T4-T9, but it is nearly constant at approx. 1450 K for types L7-T4 with assumed ages of approx. 3 Gyr. This constant T(sub eff) is evidenced by nearly unchanging values of L'-M' between types L6 and T3. It also supports recent models that attribute the changing near-infrared luminosities and spectral features across the L-T transition to the rapid migration, disruption, and/or thinning of condensate clouds over a narrow range of T(sub eff). The L' and M' luminosities of early-T dwarfs do not exhibit the pronounced humps or inflections previously noted in l through K bands, but insufficient data exist for types L6-T5 to assert that M(Sub L') and M(sub M') are strictly monotonic within this range of typew. We compare the observed K, L', and M' luminosities of L and T dwarfs in our sample with those predicted by precipitation-cloud-free models for varying surface gravities and sedimentation efficiencies.

  10. QDPHOT: Quick & Dirty PHOTometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mighell, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    QDPHOT is a fast CCD stellar photometry task which quickly produces CCD stellar photometry from two CCD images of a star field. It was designed to be a data mining tool for finding high-quality stellar observations in the data archives of the National Virtual Observatory. QDPHOT typically takes just a few seconds to analyze two Hubble Space Telescope WFPC2 observations of Local Group star clusters. It is also suitable for real-time data-quality analysis of CCD observations; on-the-fly instrumental color-magnitude diagrams can be produced at the telescope console during the few seconds between CCD readouts.

  11. The Structure of Galaxies I: Surface Photometry Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schombert, J.; Smith, A. K.

    2012-04-01

    This project uses the 2MASS all-sky image database to study the structure of galaxies over a range of luminosities, sizes and morphological types. This first paper in this series will outline the techniques, reliability and data products to our surface photometry program. Our program will analyze all acceptable galaxies (meeting our criteria for isolation from companions and bright stars) from the Revised Shapley-Ames and Uppsala galaxy catalogs. Resulting photometry and surface brightness profiles are released using a transparent scheme of data storage which includes not only all the processed data but knowledge of the processing steps and calibrating parameters.

  12. STAR CLUSTERS IN M33: UPDATED UBVRI PHOTOMETRY, AGES, METALLICITIES, AND MASSES

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Zhou; De Grijs, Richard E-mail: grijs@pku.edu.cn

    2014-04-01

    The photometric characterization of M33 star clusters is far from complete. In this paper, we present homogeneous UBVRI photometry of 708 star clusters and cluster candidates in M33 based on archival images from the Local Group Galaxies Survey, which covers 0.8 deg{sup 2} along the galaxy's major axis. Our photometry includes 387, 563, 616, 580, and 478 objects in the UBVRI bands, respectively, of which 276, 405, 430, 457, and 363 do not have previously published UBVRI photometry. Our photometry is consistent with previous measurements (where available) in all filters. We adopted Sloan Digital Sky Survey ugriz photometry for complementary purposes, as well as Two Micron All Sky Survey near-infrared JHK photometry where available. We fitted the spectral-energy distributions of 671 star clusters and candidates to derive their ages, metallicities, and masses based on the updated PARSEC simple stellar populations synthesis models. The results of our χ{sup 2} minimization routines show that only 205 of the 671 clusters (31%) are older than 2 Gyr, which represents a much smaller fraction of the cluster population than that in M31 (56%), suggesting that M33 is dominated by young star clusters (<1 Gyr). We investigate the mass distributions of the star clusters—both open and globular clusters—in M33, M31, the Milky Way, and the Large Magellanic Cloud. Their mean values are log (M {sub cl}/M {sub ☉}) = 4.25, 5.43, 2.72, and 4.18, respectively. The fraction of open to globular clusters is highest in the Milky Way and lowest in M31. Our comparisons of the cluster ages, masses, and metallicities show that our results are basically in agreement with previous studies (where objects in common are available); differences can be traced back to differences in the models adopted, the fitting methods used, and stochastic sampling effects.

  13. Introductory remarks: Photometry section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahearn, M. F.

    1981-01-01

    The principal goals of photometry and polarimetry are summarized. These goals include studies of the emission features of gaseous species of comets, the wavelength depenence of albedo, the phase function of scatter distribution, and time variation of rotation. Recent advances in photometric techniques were reviewed and include: use of proper filters, extension to the shortest and longest wavelengths, higher spectral resolving power, and polarizaton techniques.

  14. DEEP JHK{sub s} AND SPITZER IMAGING OF FOUR ISOLATED MOLECULAR CLOUD CORES

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, Nicholas L.; Mundy, Lee G.

    2009-07-10

    We present observations in eight wavebands from 1.25 to 24 {mu}m of four dense cores: L204C-2, L1152, L1155C-2, and L1228. Our goals are to study the young stellar object (YSO) population of these cores and to measure the mid-infrared extinction law. With our combined near-infrared and Spitzer photometry, we classify each source in the cores as, among other things, background stars, galaxies, or embedded YSOs. L1152 contains three YSOs and L1228 has seven, but neither L204C-2 nor L1155C-2 appear to contain any YSOs. We estimate an upper limit of 7 x 10{sup -5} to 5 x 10{sup -4} L{sub sun} for any undiscovered YSOs in our cores. We also compute the line-of-sight extinction law toward each background star. These measurements are averaged spatially, to create {chi}{sup 2} maps of the changes in the mid-infrared extinction law throughout our cores, and also in different ranges of extinction. From the {chi}{sup 2} maps, we identify two small regions in L1152 and L1228 where the outflows in those cores appear to be destroying the larger dust grains, thus altering the extinction law in those regions. On average, however, our extinction law is relatively flat from 3.6 to 24 {mu}m for all ranges of extinction and in all four cores. From 3.6 to 8 {mu}m, this law is consistent with a dust model that includes larger dust grains than the diffuse interstellar medium, which suggests grain growth has occurred in our cores. At 24 {mu}m, our extinction law is two to four times higher than predicted by dust models. However, it is similar to other empirical measurements.

  15. Third Workshop on Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, William J. (Editor); Lasher, Lawrence E. (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    The discoveries of extrasolar planets by Wolszczan, Mayor and Queloz, Butler et al., and others have stimulated a widespread effort to obtain a body of data sufficient to understand their occurrence and characteristics. Doppler velocity techniques have found dozens of extrasolar planets with masses similar to that of Jupiter. Approximately ten percent of the stars that show planets with orbital periods of a few days to a week are expected to show transits. With the mass obtained from Doppler velocity measurements and the size from transit photometry, the densities of the planets can be determined. Theoretical models of the structure of "hot Jupiters" (i.e., those planets within a tenth of an astronomical unit (AU) of the parent star) indicate that these planets should be substantially larger in size and lower in density than Jupiter. Thus the combination of transit and Doppler velocity measurements provide a critical test of the theories of planetary structure. Furthermore, because photometry can be done with small-aperture telescopes rather than requiring the use of much larger telescopes, transit photometry should also reduce the cost of discovering extrasolar planets.

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Tepidiphilus thermophilus Strain JHK30T (JCM 19170T) Isolated from a Terrestrial Hot Spring in India.

    PubMed

    Poddar, Abhijit; Lepcha, Rinchen T; Whitman, William B; Das, Subrata K

    2016-01-01

    Tepidiphilus thermophilus strain JHK30(T) was isolated from a hot spring at Surajkund, Jharkhand, India. It is a Gram-negative rod, nonsporulating, aerobic, and motile. The estimated genome is 2.3 Mb, with 2,186 protein-coding sequences. PMID:27516519

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Tepidiphilus thermophilus Strain JHK30T (JCM 19170T) Isolated from a Terrestrial Hot Spring in India

    PubMed Central

    Poddar, Abhijit; Lepcha, Rinchen T.; Whitman, William B.

    2016-01-01

    Tepidiphilus thermophilus strain JHK30T was isolated from a hot spring at Surajkund, Jharkhand, India. It is a Gram-negative rod, nonsporulating, aerobic, and motile. The estimated genome is 2.3 Mb, with 2,186 protein-coding sequences. PMID:27516519

  18. Chemically peculiar stars as seen with 2MASS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herdin, A.; Paunzen, E.; Netopil, M.

    2016-01-01

    Context. The chemically peculiar (CP) stars of the upper main sequence are well suited for investigating the impact of magnetic fields and diffusion on the surface layers of slowly rotating stars. They can even be traced in the Magellanic Clouds and are important to the understanding of the stellar formation and evolution. Aims: A systematic investigation of the near-infrared (NIR), 2MASS JHKs, photometry for the group of CP stars has never been performed. Nowadays, there is a great deal of data available in the NIR that reach very large distances. It is therefore very important for CP stars to be unambiguously detected in the NIR region and for these detections to be used to derive astrophysical parameters (age and mass) by applying isochrone fitting. Furthermore, we investigated whether the CP stars behave in a different way to normal-type stars in the various photometric diagrams. Methods: For our analysis, we carefully compiled a sample of CP and apparently normal (non-peculiar) type stars. Only stars for which high-quality (i.e. with low error levels), astrometric, and photometric data are available were chosen. In total, 639 normal and 622 CP stars were selected and further analysed. All stars were dereddened and calibrated in terms of the effective temperature and absolute magnitude (luminosity). Finally, isochrone fitting was applied. Results: No differences in the astrophysical parameters derived from 2MASS and Johnson UBV photometry were found. Furthermore, no statistical significant deviations from the normal type stars within several colour-colour and colour-magnitude diagrams were discovered. Therefore, it is not possible to detect new CP stars with the help of the photometric 2MASS colours only. A new effective temperature calibration, valid for all CP stars, using the (V - KS)0 colour was derived.

  19. Selecting M-giants with WISE photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing

    2015-08-01

    We use M-giants, M-dwarfs and QSOs identified by LAMOST to assess how well WISE & 2MASS colour-cuts can separate these populations through photometry. We find that the WISE bands are very efficient to separate M-giants from M-dwarfs, especially for the early-type stars. We derive a new photometric relation to estimate [Fe/H] for M-giants. We show that previous photometric distance relations may be biased and devise a new empirical distance relation. We detect M-giants in the Sagittarius stream from the ALLWISE Source Archive. Our detection shows good agreement with the bright stream, although the leading tail appears to be misaligned by a couple of degrees. We have measured the metallicity distribution at four locations along the stream, finding a clear metallicity offset between the leading and trailing tails.

  20. k2photometry: Read, reduce and detrend K2 photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Eylen, Vincent; Nowak, Grzegorz; Albrecht, Simon; Palle, Enric; Ribas, Ignasi; Bruntt, Hans; Perger, Manuel; Gandolfi, Davide; Hirano, Teriyuki; Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Kiilerich, Amanda; Arranz, Jorge P.; Badenas, Mariona; Dai, Fei; Deeg, Hans J.; Guenther, Eike W.; Montanes-Rodriguez, Pilar; Narita, Norio; Rogers, Leslie A.; Bejar, Victor J. S.; Shrotriya, Tushar S.; Winn, Joshua N.; Sebastian, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    k2photometry reads, reduces and detrends K2 photometry and searches for transiting planets. MAST database pixel files are used as input; the output includes raw lightcurves, detrended lightcurves and a transit search can be performed as well. Stellar variability is not typically well-preserved but parameters can be tweaked to change that. The BLS algorithm used to detect periodic events is a Python implementation by Ruth Angus and Dan Foreman-Mackey (https://github.com/dfm/python-bls).

  1. Photometry and the Virtual Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigo, C.; Solano, E.

    2013-05-01

    Building Spectral Energy Distributions combining data from different sources is becoming more important as astronomy takes an increasingly multi-wavelength approach. In order to do this, photometry data must be described in sufficient detail to allow for the conversion to compatible flux density units (including the description of magnitude systems and zero points). Furthermore, comparing observed photometry with the synthetic one for theoretical models allows to infer physical properties from the observed objects. But in order to do that, an even more detailed description of the observed photometric points is needed, including the transmission curves of the filters corresponding to the observed data. In the Virtual Observatory an important effort has been done towards this standardization with the Photometry Data Model. And in the SVO we have developed several services to help in this direction, providing detailed information about filters, synthetic photometry for theoretical models and tools to use all this to analyze observed data and estimate object physical properties.

  2. Asteroid Lightcurve Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, A. W.

    2004-05-01

    With the advent of modestly priced CCD cameras and computer controller and reduction software, amateurs can now do photometry on fainter targets than was possible even from large observatories only a decade or so ago. This has led to an explosion of lightcurve data that in turn has yielded rich results. We now have rotation periods for more than 1500 asteroids, extending down to objects only tens of meters in diameter, and well determined shapes and pole orientations of more than 100 objects. Among smaller asteroids, the dispersion in rotation rates ranges from minutes to months, with the slower ones mostly "tumbling," or in states of non-principal axis rotation. The fastest ones must be monolithic, as centrifugal force exceeds their gravity. But among those larger than a few hundred meters diameter, there is a "rotation barrier" at the rate where gravity and centrifugal force match, suggesting that most asteroids this large or larger are "rubble piles." The broad dispersion in spin rates, almost a bimodal distribution, has long been a mystery, but now appears likely to be due to thermal radiation torques from the randomly asymmetric shapes of small asteroids. This is a major paradigm shift from the past, where mutual collisions were considered to be the dominant (or only) evolutionary process affecting spins. Amateur observations have already contributed a great deal leading to this new view, and much remains to be done, providing abundant opportunities for amateur-professional collaborations.

  3. Photometry from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, M. J.; Bless, R. C.; Percival, J. W.; White, R. L.

    1992-01-01

    A brief description of the High Speed Photometer (HSP) of the Hubble Space Telescope is given, in particular the HSP light path, detectors, entrance apertures, and filters. The status of HSP testing to date is reported, and problems encountered with the bright earth and the telescope pointing system are described. The calibration effort for the HSP is well under way. Results of internal (instrument coordinate) aperture locations good to 0.05 arcsec and external (telescope coordinate) locations good to 0.02 arcsec are shown. The effects of spacecraft pointing and jitter on HSP photometry are detailed, and a preliminary measurement of spacecraft jitter with HSP is shown. The aperture calibration effort is verified by accurate pointing of a star to different HSP 1.0 arcsec entrance apertures, and photometric performance of the instrument is shown to be accurate to the 2 percent photon noise of the observations. Future science verification and guaranteed observing time programs are listed. Suggestions are made for future space-based photometers.

  4. Investigation of the open star cluster NGC 2323 (M50) based on the proper motions and photometry of its constituent stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, V. N.; Ananjevskaja, Yu. K.; Polyakov, E. V.

    2012-02-01

    The results of a comprehensive study of the Galactic open cluster NGC 2323 (M50) are presented. The positions of stars to a limiting magnitude {ie74-1} in a {ie74-2} area centered on the cluster were measured on six plates from the Pulkovo normal astrograph with a maximum epoch difference of 60 yr. The measurements were performed with the Pulkovo "Fantasy" automated measuring system upgraded in 2010. The corresponding areas from the USNO-A2.0, USNO-B1, and 2MASS catalogues were used as additional plates. As a result, the relative proper motions of stars were obtained with a root-mean-square error of 5.85 mas yr-1. A catalogue of UBV and JHK magnitudes for objects in the investigated area was compiled from available published resources. The astrometric selection of cluster members was made by the maximum likelihood method. A high individual cluster membership probability of a star ( P ≥ 80%) served as the first selection criterion. The position of a star on the photometric color-magnitude ( V ∝ ( B-V), J ∝ ( J-K)) diagrams of the cluster was considered as the second criterion. The position of an object on the color-color (( U-B)-( B-V), ( J-H)-( J-K)) diagrams served as the third criterion. On the basis of these criteria, it was established that 508 stars are members of NGC 2323. These data were used to refine the physical parameters of the cluster: the mean reddening {ie74-3}, the true distance modulus {ie74-4}, and the cluster age of about 140 Myr from the grid of isochrones computed by the Padova group for solar chemical composition. Two tables contain the catalogues of proper motions and photometry for stars in the area. The luminosity and mass functions were constructed. The cluster membership of red and blue giants, variable, double, and multiple stars was considered. The position of the cluster center was improved: {ie74-5}, δ = -08°20'16″(2000.0).

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Photometry of VdBH 222 stars and field stars (Marco+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marco, A.; Negueruela, I.; Gonzalez-Fernandez, C.; Maiz Apellaniz, J.; Dorda, R.; Clark, J. S.

    2014-05-01

    We obtained UBVR photometry of VdBH 222 using the ESO Faint Object Spectrograph and Camera (EFOSC2) on the NTT on the night of 24 June 2012. The instrument was equipped with CCD#40, which is a Loral/Lesser, thinned, AR-coated, UV-flooded, and MPP chip that is controlled by ESO-FIERA. It covers a field of view of and 4.1'x4.1' and has a pixel scale of 0.12". The JHK images were obtained using the Son OF Isaac (SOFI) near-IR spectrograph and camera on the NTT on 13 July 2008, equipped with a CCD providing a pixel scale of 0.288arcsec and an field of view of 4.92x4.95' (4 data files).

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: BVRI photometry of nova V445 Pup (Goranskij+, 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goranskij, V. P.; Shugarov, S. Yu.; Zharova, A. V.; Kroll, P.; Barsukova, E. A.

    2012-05-01

    In the Moscow SAI plate collection, we found 51 plates with images of V445 Pup taken with the SAI Crimean Station 40-cm f/4 astrograph and dated between 15 November 1969 and 4 November 1989. We found 56 measurable images of V445 Pup on the plates of the Sonneberg Observatory collection dated between 19 March 1984 and 17 January 1991. Additionally, we measured all the Internet-accessible Digital Sky Survey images of V445 Pup in B,R, and I bands and used 2MASS JHK magnitudes to study the spectral energy distribution of the progenitor. We performed our observations of the V445 Pup remnant between 31 March 2003 and 20 October 2009. These observations were acquired in the Special Astrophysical Observatory (SAO), with the 1-m Zeiss reflector and CCD UBVRcIc photometer equipped with an EEV 42-40 CCD chip. (4 data files).

  7. Detection by Transit Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, William J.; Koch, David G.; Jenkins, Jon M.; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A periodic sequence of planetary transits provides a valid detection of an orbiting planet and provides the relative size of the planet and its orbital period. Ancillary measurements of the stellar spectrum and the variations of the star's radial velocity or position combined with stellar models allow the absolute size of the planet and its mass to be obtained. The results of this approach have already shown that the planet orbiting HD209458 has only 70% of the mass of Jupiter, but is nearly 50% larger in radius. Based on models of planetary structure, these results imply that the planet must have spent most of its lifetime so close to the star that it has not been able to cool and contract as have the giant planets in our Solar System. Thus its density is much less than Jupiter and Saturn and is actually less than that of water; i.e., about 0.4 gr/cu cm. If more sensitive measurements of the light curve of stars with closely orbiting planets can be made that provide the varying amplitude of the light reflected by the planet at various phases in its orbit, then characteristics of the planetary atmosphere can be obtained. Potentially, these data can identify major molecular species present in the atmosphere and tell us if clouds are present and yield the phase function of the aerosols. Although such detail cannot be obtained for Earth-size planets because their signal amplitudes are too small, it is possible to get data critical to the determination of the structure of extrasolar planetary systems. In particular, the size distributions and their orbital distributions can be measured by the transit photometry missions now in development. The COROT mission should be able to find large terrestrial planets in short-period orbits while the more ambitious Kepler and Eddington missions should be able to detect planets even smaller than the Earth and at orbital distances that place them in the habitable zone of their stars.

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Photometry of nova LMC 2012 (Schwarz+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, G. J.; Shore, S. N.; Page, K. L.; Osborne, J. P.; Beardmore, A. P.; Walter, F. M.; Bode, M. F.; Drake, J. J.; Ness, J.-U.; Starrfield, S.; van Rossum, D. R.; Woodward, C. E.

    2015-03-01

    Nova LMC 2012 was discovered on March 26.397 UT (MJD56012.897) at a visual magnitude of 10.7 (Seach et al., 2012CBET.3071....1S). After discovery, LMC 2012 was observed by a number of different facilities at a variety of wavelengths. The discovery date is taken as day zero and the shorthand "Dn," where "n" is the number of days after day zero, is used here. Swift is a revolutionary facility for studying novae (see Schwarz et al. 2011, cat. J/ApJS/197/31, for details). Its three instruments cover the γ-ray (BAT), X-ray (XRT), plus UV and optical (UVOT) bandpasses. Swift obtained 74 uvm2 band (λeff=2246Å, FWHM=498Å) observations of LMC 2012 with the UVOT instrument from D1.2 until D671. There were also 12 uvw2 band (λeff=1928Å, FWHM=657Å) and nine uvw1 band (λeff=2600Å, FWHM=693Å) observations which were only obtained early on D1.2 and later during the observations after D300. The UVOT photometry is provided in Table2. LMC 2012 was extensively observed photometrically between D0.6 and D635 with the Small & Moderate Aperture Research Telescope System (SMARTS) at Cerro Tololo (see Walter et al., 2012PASP..124.1057W, for details). We obtained 250 photometric observations in BVRI/JHK from SMARTS. The optical photometry is supplemented with 54 early time CCD BVRI observations from the American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO). The optical and near-infrared photometry is also given in Table2. (2 data files).

  9. Second Workshop on Improvements to Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, William J. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The papers in these proceedings show that a major effort is under way to improve all aspects of photometry. Astronomical multichannel photometry, photodiodes, analog-to-digital converters, data reduction techniques, interference filters and optical fibers are discussed.

  10. Potential Nearby M Dwarf Stars Selected from the 2MASS Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Thomas H.; Thompson, Dayna L.

    2016-01-01

    Potential nearby red dwarf stars have been selected from the 2MASS catalogs using assumptions about apparent magnitudes and colors. Candidate stars in this study are north of the celestial equator and have been restricted to galactic latitudes greater than 20 degrees from the galactic plane to permit subsequent aperture photometry with small telescopes. Stars with close companions have also been eliminated. Most probable M giant stars were eliminated using the (J-H) - (H-K) two-color diagram. Proper motions were obtained from the USNO-B catalog. Additional potential M giant stars were eliminated by removing stars with very low proper motions. Known nearby stars were removed from the list and stars with proper motions greater than 0.175 arcsec yr-1 were also removed, since such stars will likely be studied in other programs devoted to stars of known proper motion. Photometric parallaxes for the candidate stars were computed using 2MASS photometry and stars having average photometric distances of 25 pc or less were retained. A sample of 121 stars was produced. These stars are being observed using Kron-Cousins R, I and CaH photometry. To date about 75% of the program stars have been observed. All are confirmed dwarf stars and about 50% have distances of 25 pc or less based on photometric parallaxes using Kron-Cousins photometry.This publication makes use of data products from the Two Micron All Sky Survey and the U.S. Naval Observatory B1.0 Catalog. Services and products provided by the Strasbourg Astronomical Data Center (CDS) and US Virtual Astronomical Observatory (VAO) were used in processing the data. Observations have been obtained using the telescopes of the Southeastern Association for Research in Astronomy (SARA).

  11. Far-Ultraviolet Stellar Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, E. G.; Carruthers, G. R.

    1993-12-01

    During a shuttle flight in May, 1991, wide field images were obtained for 12 star fields with the NRL far-ultraviolet cameras. These cameras provide sensitivity bands with effective wavelengths of lambda eff = 1367 Angstroms and lambda eff = 1702 Angstroms. The properties of the resulting magnitude system will be described and compared with previous photometry from the OAO2, ANS and TD1 satellites. Results from several fields in the vicinity of the galactic center will be discussed.

  12. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Photometry of VVV CL041 cluster (Chene+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chene, A.-N.; Ramirez Alegria, S.; Borissova, J.; O'Leary, E.; Martins, F.; Herve, A.; Kuhn, M.; Kurtev, R.; Consuelo Amigo Fuentes, P.; Bonatto, C.; Minniti, D.

    2015-11-01

    We present the JHKs photometry extracted from the VVV (VISTA variables in the Via Lactea) survey for the cluster VVV CL041. The photometry extraction was performed by employing the VVV-SkZ pipeline's (Mauro et al., 2013RMxAA..49..189M) automated software based on ALLFRAME (Stetson, 1994PASP..106..250S). 2MASS photometry was used for absolute flux calibration in the J, H, and Ks bands, using stars with 12.5

  13. UBV photometry of ER Vulpeculae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, R. K.; Padalia, T. D.; Srivastava, J. B.

    1991-08-01

    UBV photometry of the RS CVn-type eclipsing binary system ER Vulpeculae has been presented. The period comes out to be 0.698093d. The average depths of primary and secondary minima are, respectively, 0.21 and 0.12m. The colors at various phases have been given. A dip is seen around phase 0.73P as was seen in the observations of Arevalo et al. (1988). Large scatter is present in the observations as noticed earlier, and may be due to activity of the components.

  14. Development of 2MASS Catalog Server Kit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Chisato

    2011-11-01

    We develop a software kit called "2MASS Catalog Server Kit" to easily construct a high-performance database server for the 2MASS Point Source Catalog (includes 470,992,970 objects) and several all-sky catalogs. Users can perform fast radial search and rectangular search using provided stored functions in SQL similar to SDSS SkyServer. Our software kit utilizes open-source RDBMS, and therefore any astronomers and developers can install our kit on their personal computers for research, observation, etc. Out kit is tuned for optimal coordinate search performance. We implement an effective radial search using an orthogonal coordinate system, which does not need any techniques that depend on HTM or HEALpix. Applying the xyz coordinate system to the database index, we can easily implement a system of fast radial search for relatively small (less than several million rows) catalogs. To enable high-speed search of huge catalogs on RDBMS, we apply three additional techniques: table partitioning, composite expression index, and optimization in stored functions. As a result, we obtain satisfactory performance of radial search for the 2MASS catalog. Our system can also perform fast rectangular search. It is implemented using techniques similar to those applied for radial search. Our way of implementation enables a compact system and will give important hints for a low-cost development of other huge catalog databases.

  15. Photometry of late type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doherty, L. R.

    1972-01-01

    Broad band filter photometry for 57 bright stars of spectral type A2 discussed with peak instrument responses at 3320, 2980, 2460 and 1910 A. The data include nearly all usable filter observations of G, K and M types. Sampling is nearly complete for A and F giants and supergiants, with the exception of Cepheid variables. The basic results presented are relative digital counting rates obtained with a field-stop aperture of 10 minutes of arc. Characteristics of the four filter-photometer combinations and errors are discussed. Some observations require substantial correction if they are to represent the visually brightest star in the field. These corrections and the effects of interstellar reddening are discussed. The adjusted counts are then used to construct color-color diagrams and are compared to the recent SAO grid of model atmospheres.

  16. The 2060 Chiron: CCD photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bus, Schelte J.; Bowell, Edward; Harris, Alan W.

    1987-01-01

    R-band CCD photometry of 2060 was carried out on nine nights in Nov. and Dec. 1986. The rotation period is 5.9181 + or - 0.0003 hr and the peak to peak lightcurve amplitude is 0.088 + or - 0.0003 mag. Photometric parameters are H sub R = 6.24 + or - 0.02 mag and G sub R = + or - 0.15, though formal errors may not be realistic. The lightcurve has two pairs of extrema, but its asymmetry, as evidenced by the presence of significant odd Fourier harmonics, suggests macroscopic surface irregularities and/or the presence of some large scale albedo variegation. The observational rms residual is + or - 0.015 mag. On time scales from minutes to days there is no evidence for nonperiodic (cometary) brightness changes at the level of a few millimagnitudes.

  17. BV photometry of UX ARIETIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohin, S.; Raveendran, A. V.

    1989-03-01

    Differential BV photometry of UX Ari obtained on 58 nights during 1984-1985, 1985-1986, 1986-1987, and 1987-1988 observing season is presented. It is found that (B-V) is phase dependent, with the system being reddest at the light maximum. This is interpreted as being due to the variable fractional contribution by the G5 V component to the total light at shorter wavelengths. An analysis of the available data indicates that, at larger amplitudes of the photometric wave, the brightness at maximum increases and that at minimum decreases, and both converge to DeltaV of about 1.0 mag at very low amplitudes. It implies that the low wave amplitudes are essentially due to more homogeneity in the surface distribution of spots rather than to low levels of spot activity. The variation in wave amplitude is found to be near-sinusoidal with a period around 13-14 years.

  18. TT Arietis: Spectroscopy and Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaoan; Li, Zongyun; Ding, Yuerong; Zhang, Zhousheng; Li, Zili

    2002-04-01

    We report the photometry and spectroscopy of TT Arietis around the turn of the millennium, when the nova-like variable is in high state. A positive superhump since 1997 still exists. A more precise orbital period than before, 0.13755040+/-1.7×10-7 days, is established. The intensity of the Balmer emission core is found to modulate at the superhump period rather than the orbital period and 180° out of phase with continuum. The intensity of Balmer absorption wings is approximately proportional to the continuum flux. The correlation between Balmer lines and continuum provides a new clue to the study of sources of continuum and emission lines. The mass ratio of the binary is found to be in the range of 0.19+/-0.04, which lends strong support to the proposition that superhumps arise from the inner Lindblad 3:1 resonance in TT Ari, as in superoutbursts of SU UMa stars.

  19. WFPC2 Stellar Photometry with HSTphot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolphin, Andrew E.

    2000-01-01

    HSTphot, a photometry package designed to handle the undersampled PSFs found in WFPC2 images, is introduced and described, as well as some of the considerations that have to be made in order to obtain accurate PSF-fitting stellar photometry with WFPC2 data. Tests of HSTphot's internal reliability are made using multiple observations of the same field, and tests of external reliability are made by comparing with DoPHOT reductions of the same data. Subject headz'ngs: techniques: photometric

  20. Classification of stars with WBVR photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sichevskiy, S. G.; Mironov, A. V.; Malkov, O. Yu.

    2013-10-01

    We present a method of obtaining the most reliable stellar spectral type based on multi-color photometry. The method also allows us to estimate color excess EB-V and distance to the star. Approbation of the method using bright stars with known spectral classification and W BV R photometry permits to estimate its reliability. Stellar spectra models from Pickles (1998) library and Fluks et al. (1994) interstellar extinction law were used in the application of the method.

  1. Meteor44 Video Meteor Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, Wesley R.; Suggs, Robert M.; Cooke, William J.

    2004-01-01

    Meteor44 is a software system developed at MSFC for the calibration and analysis of video meteor data. The dynamic range of the (8bit) video data is extended by approximately 4 magnitudes for both meteors and stellar images using saturation compensation. Camera and lens specific saturation compensation coefficients are derived from artificial variable star laboratory measurements. Saturation compensation significantly increases the number of meteors with measured intensity and improves the estimation of meteoroid mass distribution. Astrometry is automated to determine each image's plate coefficient using appropriate star catalogs. The images are simultaneously intensity calibrated from the contained stars to determine the photon sensitivity and the saturation level referenced above the atmosphere. The camera s spectral response is used to compensate for stellar color index and typical meteor spectra in order to report meteor light curves in traditional visual magnitude units. Recent efforts include improved camera calibration procedures, long focal length 'streak' meteor photometry and two-station track determination. Meteor44 has been used to analyze data from the 2001, 2002 and 2003 MSFC Leonid observational campaigns as well as several lesser showers. The software is interactive and can be demonstrated using data from recent Leonid campaigns.

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Multiwavelength photometry of 34 galaxies (Rowlands+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowlands, K.; Dunne, L.; Dye, S.; Aragon-Salamanca, A.; Maddox, S.; da Cunha, E.; Smith, D. J. B.; Bourne, N.; Eales, S.; Gomez, H. L.; Smail, I.; Alpaslan, M.; Clark, C. J. R.; Driver, S.; Ibar, E.; Ivison, R. J.; Robotham, A.; Smith, M. W. L.; Valiante, E.

    2014-03-01

    Photometry for 34 submillimetre galaxies (including 5 galaxies with poor quality SED fits rejected from the final sample) utilised in the paper from the compilation in Magnelli et al (2012A&A...539A.155M, hereafter M12), which were taken from blank field (sub)millimetre surveys (850-1200um) which have robust counterparts identified with deep radio, interferometric submillimetre and/or mid-infrared imaging. In GOODS-N all photometry shortwards of 3um is described in Berta et al. (2010A&A...518L..30B, 2011A&A...532A..49B) and includes PSF-matched photometry from HST ACS bviz (version 1.0), FLAMINGOS JHK, IRAC 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8.0um was obtained with the ConvPhot code and spectroscopic redshifts and U-band magnitudes from Barger et al. (2008, Cat. J/ApJ/689/687). Deep CFHT WirCAM K_s band photometry was taken from Wang et al. (2010, Cat. J/ApJS/187/251). We refer the reader to http://www2011.mpe.mpg.de/ir/Research/PEP/publicdatareleases.php?lang=en for details, but briefly, magnitudes with value +99.99 are non-detections. ConvPhot-derived magnitudes are negative if they are fainter than the 1-sigma noise level. In this case the absolute value of the magnitude (with a small correction to galactic extinction) corresponds to half their flux and their magnitude uncertainty is equal to 0.7526mag. The U-band magnitudes from Barger et al. (2008, Cat. J/ApJ/689/687) are -99.99 if a source was not matched. In some cases magnitudes are negative and not -99.99, see Barger et al (2008, Cat. J/ApJ/689/687) for details. WIRCam Ks magnitudes are -99.99 if an object was not matched. The 70um MIPS data in GOODS-N are from Magnelli et al. (2011, Cat. J/A+A/528/A35), negative flux values indicate an upper limit, with the absolute flux value equal to the 5σ upper limit computed from the 70um residual map. We list the uncertainties from both the residual map and Monte-Carlo simulations which includes an additional statistical contribution from confusion noise, see Magnelli et al. (2011

  3. VLT/NACO and Subaru/CIAO JHK-band high-resolution imaging polarimetry of the Herbig Be star R Monocerotis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakawa, K.; Preibisch, T.; Kraus, S.; Ageorges, N.; Hofmann, K.-H.; Ishii, M.; Oya, S.; Rosen, A.; Schertl, D.; Weigelt, G.

    2008-09-01

    Aims: We investigate the dust properties of the disk and envelope of the Herbig Be star R Mon by means of near-infrared multiwavelength imaging polarimetry. Methods: We obtained JHK-band polarimetric images using the adaptive optics instruments NACO on the VLT, and CIAO on the Subaru telescope. Results: Our NACO JK_S-band images of ~0.1 arcsec angular resolution resolve clearly the R Mon binary system as well as twisted string-like features in the fan-shaped lobe. The polarimetric images reveal a butterfly-shaped polarization disk with an almost constant shape and an extension of 4 arcsec in the J, H, and K bands. In this region, the polarization values are as low as P_J˜7%, P_H˜2%, and P_K˜1%, and the polarization vectors are not systematically aligned along the equatorial plane. On the other hand, highly polarized scattered light is detected in the fan-shaped lobe (PJ ˜24%, PH ˜ 33%, and P_K˜53%). Conclusions: Our polarimetric data suggests the presence of multiple grain populations in the R Mon nebula. From our one-dimensional single scattering modeling, the maximum grain size in the nebula at large scale is estimated to be 0.23 μm. On the other hand, the aforementioned properties of the polarization disk and a nearly spherical appearance of the nebulosity close to the central star suggests the presence of large grains (micron-size or larger) in the polarization disk.

  4. Star-galaxy separation strategies for WISE-2MASS all-sky infrared galaxy catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovács, András; Szapudi, István

    2015-04-01

    We combine photometric information of the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) and Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) all-sky infrared data bases, and demonstrate how to produce clean and complete galaxy catalogues for future analyses. Adding 2MASS colours to WISE photometry improves star-galaxy separation efficiency substantially at the expense of losing a small fraction of the galaxies. We find that 93 per cent of the WISE objects within W1 < 15.2 mag have a 2MASS match, and that a class of supervised machine learning algorithms, support vector machines (SVM), are efficient classifiers of objects in our multicolour data set. We constructed a training set from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey PhotoObj table with known star-galaxy separation, and determined redshift distribution of our sample from the Galaxy and Mass Assembly spectroscopic survey. Varying the combination of photometric parameters input into our algorithm we show that W1WISE - J2MASS is a simple and effective star-galaxy separator, capable of producing results comparable to the multidimensional SVM classification. We present a detailed description of our star-galaxy separation methods, and characterize the robustness of our tools in terms of contamination, completeness, and accuracy. We explore systematics of the full sky WISE-2MASS galaxy map, such as contamination from moon glow. We show that the homogeneity of the full sky galaxy map is improved by an additional J2MASS < 16.5 mag flux limit. The all-sky galaxy catalogue we present in this paper covers 21 200 deg2 with dusty regions masked out, and has an estimated stellar contamination of 1.2 per cent and completeness of 70.1 per cent among 2.4 million galaxies with zmed ≈ 0.14. WISE-2MASS galaxy maps with well controlled stellar contamination will be useful for spatial statistical analyses, including cross-correlations with other cosmological random fields, such as the cosmic microwave background. The same techniques also yield a

  5. BVRI photometry of Nova KT Eri 2009 in quiescence and the 752 day period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munari, Ulisse; Dallaporta, Sergio

    2014-02-01

    We obtained extensive new BVRCIC photometry of Nova KT Eri 2009 over a 539-day interval during the post-outburst quiescence, from 30 September 2011 to 22 March 2013 (days +684 to +1223 past maximum). The median magnitudes we measured are B = 15.24, V = 15.00, RC = 14.75 and IC = 14.49. A marked variability is present (total amplitude of ΔV = 1.6 mag). Accounting for a generally overlooked correction to blue photographic magnitudes calibrated against modern B-band data, we found that mean brightness and amplitude of variability of KT Eri in quiescence are the same before and after the 2009 nova outburst. The distance to KT Eri derived from standard relations involving the absolute magnitude at maximum vs rate of decline (MMRD), is ∼6.5 kpc. At such a distance, to fit the BVRCIC + JHK flux distribution of KT Eri in quiescence requires an 8200 K blackbody with a radius of 3.5 R⊙, which is vastly larger than the radius of typical accretion disks of CVs and classical old novae (0.1 R⊙). The distance to KT Eri could therefore be much shorter than expected from MMRD relation. We also observed a new eclipse-like minimum to occur right on time following the 752 day period suspected to modulate the quiescence of KT Eri before the outburst. The nature of this period remains unclear. The faintness of KT Eri at infrared wavelengths (K = 14.1) precludes it from being the orbital period of the accreting WD, because in such a case the Roche lobe filling companion would be a cool giant shining at K∼9 mag.

  6. The FIRST-2MASS Red Quasar Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Glikman, E; Helfand, D J; White, R L; Becker, R H; Gregg, M D; Lacy, M

    2007-06-28

    Combining radio observations with optical and infrared color selection--demonstrated in our pilot study to be an efficient selection algorithm for finding red quasars--we have obtained optical and infrared spectroscopy for 120 objects in a complete sample of 156 candidates from a sky area of 2716 square degrees. Consistent with our initial results, we find our selection criteria--J-K > 1.7,R-K > 4.0--yield a {approx} 50% success rate for discovering quasars substantially redder than those found in optical surveys. Comparison with UVX- and optical color-selected samples shows that {approx}> 10% of the quasars are missed in a magnitude-limited survey. Simultaneous two-frequency radio observations for part of the sample indicate that a synchrotron continuum component is ruled out as a significant contributor to reddening the quasars spectra. We go on to estimate extinctions for our objects assuming their red colors are caused by dust. Continuum fits and Balmer decrements suggest E(B-V) values ranging from near zero to 2.5 magnitudes. Correcting the K-band magnitudes for these extinctions, we find that for K {le} 14.0, red quasars make up between 25% and 60% of the underlying quasar population; owing to the incompleteness of the 2MASS survey at fainter K-band magnitudes, we can only set a lower limit to the radio-detected red quasar population of > 20-30%.

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Spitzer and VRIJHK photometry of V582 Mon (Arulanantham+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arulanantham, N. A.; Herbst, W.; Cody, A. M.; Stauffer, J. R.; Rebull, L. M.; Agol, E.; Windemuth, D.; Marengo, M.; Winn, J. N.; Hamilton, C. M.; Mundt, R.; Johns-Krull, C. M.; Gutermuth, R. A.

    2016-07-01

    We have continued to obtain ground-based optical and near-infrared photometry over the last two years using A Novel Dual Imaging CAMera (ANDICAM) on the 1.3m telescope at Cerro-Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) in Chile. The instrument is operated by the SMARTS consortium. Data were collected almost nightly from 2013 October through 2014 April. Observations were resumed in 2014 September and continued until 2015 April. Each night, four 150s exposures were obtained in each of the three optical bands (VRI) along with 10-15 dithered exposures (30s each) in the near-infrared bands (JHK). All images have a 10.2'*10.2' field of view. The data acquisition and reduction processes are discussed briefly in Appendix A, and a more complete description is given by Windemuth & Herbst 2014 (cat. J/AJ/147/9). The VRIJHK magnitudes from the last two observing seasons have been added to the entire set of CCD data obtained since 1995, which is presented here as Table1. Images of KH 15D were collected with the InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC) on the Spitzer Space Telescope during six observational runs with five separate PI's spanning three distinct epochs since 2004 (2004 Mar 6 and 2004 Oct 08, PI Giovanni Fazio, Program ID=37; 2004 Oct 5-12 and 2005 Oct 21-29, PI Massimo Marengo, Program ID=3441; 2006 Mar 23-27, PI Eric Agol, Program ID=3469; 2008 Nov 1-2, PI Lucas A. Cieza, Program ID=50773). The fifth set of observations was obtained by the CSI 2264 team (PI=John R. Stauffer, Program ID=61027, 80040) as part of a large campaign to monitor young variable objects in NGC2264 (Cody et al. 2014, cat. J/AJ/147/82). These data were obtained over 28 consecutive days of observation in 2011 December (2011 Dec 3-2012 Jan 1). A final set of observations was obtained on eight nights between 2013 December and 2014 January (2013 Dec 22-2014 Jan 20, PI William Herbst, Program ID=90154, 90098). The full set of Spitzer photometry at all epochs is given in Table3. (2 data files).

  8. BVRIJHK photometry and proper motion analysis of NGC 6253 and the surrounding field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montalto, M.; Piotto, G.; Desidera, S.; Platais, I.; Carraro, G.; Momany, Y.; de Marchi, F.; Recio-Blanco, A.

    2009-10-01

    Context: We present a photometric and astrometric catalog of 187 963 stars located in the field around the old super-metal-rich Galactic open cluster NGC 6253. The total field-of-view covered by the catalog is 34”×33”. In this field, we provide CCD BVRI photometry. For a smaller region close to the cluster's center, we also provide near-infrared JHK photometry. Aims: We analyze the properties of NGC 6253 by using our new photometric data and astrometric membership. Methods: In June 2004, we targeted the cluster during a 10 day multi-site campaign, which involved the MPG/ESO 2.2 m telescope with its wide-field imager and the Anglo-Australian 3.9 m telescope, equipped with the IRIS2 near-infrared imager. Archival CCD images of NGC 6253 were used to derive relative proper motions and to calculate the cluster membership probabilities. Results: We have refined the cluster's fundamental parameters, deriving (V_0-M_v)=11.15, E(B - V) = 0.15, E(V - I) = 0.25, E(V - J) = 0.50, and E(V - H) = 0.55. The color excess ratios obtained using both the optical and near infrared colors indicate a normal reddening law in the direction of NGC 6253. The age of NGC 6253 at 3.5 Gyr, determined from our best-fitting isochrone appears to be slightly older than the previous estimates. Finally, we estimated the binary fraction among the cluster members to be ~20%-30% and identified 11 blue straggler candidates. Based on observation made at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile and at the Anglo-Australian Observatory, Siding Spring, Australia. The catalog presented in this paper is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/505/1129

  9. Detection of Terrestrial Planets Using Transit Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, David; Witteborn, Fred; Jenkins, Jon; Dunham, Edward; Boruci, William; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Transit photometry detection of planets offers many advantages: an ability to detect terrestrial size planets, direct determination of the planet's size, applicability to all main-sequence stars, and a differential brightness change of the periodic signature being independent of stellar distance or planetary orbital semi-major axis. Ground and space based photometry have already been successful in detecting transits of the giant planet HD209458b. However, photometry 100 times better is required to detect terrestrial planets. We present results of laboratory measurements of an end-to-end photometric system incorporating all of the important confounding noise features of both the sky and a space based photometer including spacecraft jitter. In addition to demonstrating an instrumental noise of less than 10 ppm (an Earth transit of a solar-like star is 80 ppm), the brightnesses of individual stars were dimmed to simulate Earth-size transit signals. These 'transits' were reliably detected as part of the tests.

  10. An Improved Method for Differential Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández Fernández, Javier; Chou, Dean-Yi; Pan, Yen-Chen; Wang, Li-Hang

    2012-05-01

    We developed a method to improve the conventional differential photometry by using many auxiliary stars to reduce noise in the reference light curve, which is used to calibrate the light curve of the target star. The data used in this study are taken with the Taiwan Automated Telescope network. The light curves of two δ Scuti, HD 163032 and V830 Her, are shown here as examples. The results are compared with four other methods: conventional differential photometry; ensemble photometry; the method of Tamuz, Mazeh, & Zucker; and trend filtering algorithm. The light curve computed with our method is smoother than the other four methods, while preserving the pulsational signals. The mode frequencies determined from the light curve from our method also has a higher S/N and lower error in comparison with other methods.

  11. Photometry of the old nova HZ Pup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassanelli, Tomas; Abbott, Tim

    2016-01-01

    This study of the old nova HZ Pup involved obtaining image data, removing the instrumental signature, performing photometry on the stellar images present, and generating light curves. Relative photometry between the target star and other stars in the image was used to remove atmospheric effects. A periodogram of this light curve shows the historically known periodicity close to 20 minutes. However, other periodicities are also present and it is not clear from the data which are real and which are artifacts of the sampling. These data will be combined with data from other telescopes collected contemporaneously in order to resolve this ambiguity.

  12. TRIPPy: Python-based Trailed Source Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, Wesley C.; Alexandersen, Mike; Schwamb, Megan E.; Marsset, Michael E.; Pike, Rosemary E.; Kavelaars, JJ; Bannister, Michele T.; Benecchi, Susan; Delsanti, Audrey

    2016-05-01

    TRIPPy (TRailed Image Photometry in Python) uses a pill-shaped aperture, a rectangle described by three parameters (trail length, angle, and radius) to improve photometry of moving sources over that done with circular apertures. It can generate accurate model and trailed point-spread functions from stationary background sources in sidereally tracked images. Appropriate aperture correction provides accurate, unbiased flux measurement. TRIPPy requires numpy, scipy, matplotlib, Astropy (ascl:1304.002), and stsci.numdisplay; emcee (ascl:1303.002) and SExtractor (ascl:1010.064) are optional.

  13. Exploring the 2MASS extended and point source catalogues with clustering redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Mubdi; Ménard, Brice; Scranton, Ryan

    2016-04-01

    The Two-Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS) has mapped out the low-redshift Universe down to KS ˜ 14 mag. As its near-infrared photometry primarily probes the featureless Rayleigh-Jeans tail of galaxy spectral energy distributions, colour-based redshift estimation is rather uninformative. Until now, redshift estimates for this data set have relied on optical follow-up suffering from selection biases. Here, we use the newly developed technique of clustering-based redshift estimation to infer the redshift distribution of the 2MASS sources regardless of their optical properties. We characterize redshift distributions of objects from the Extended Source Catalogue as a function of near-infrared colours and brightness and report some observed trends. We also apply the clustering redshift technique to dropout populations, sources with non-detections in one or more near-infrared bands, and present their redshift distributions. Combining all extended sources, we confirm with clustering redshifts that the distribution of this sample extends up to z ˜ 0.35. We perform a similar analysis with the Point Source Catalogue and show that it can be separated into stellar and extragalactic contributions with galaxies reaching z ˜ 0.7. We estimate that the Point Source Catalogue contains 1.6 million extragalactic objects: as many as in the Extended Source Catalogue but probing a cosmic volume 10 times larger.

  14. Spacewatch Taxonomic Photometry of Near-Earth Objects Detected by NEOWISE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Jeffrey A.; McMillan, Robert S.; Scotti, James V.

    2014-11-01

    We have performed a program of multiband photometry for carefully selected Near-Earth Objects (NEOs) having NEOWISE mission determined diameters (Mainzer et al. 2011 http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011ApJ...743..156M ).Standardized high precision V-band photometry of such objects establishes the albedo near the peak of incident solar flux, which reckons in modeling their thermal properties. These observations are valuable since the delivery of asteroids from the main belt to Earth-crossing orbits depends on albedo, size, & composition. Measurements of mineralogical classes by means of taxonomic photometry can thus help refine understanding of the filtering involved in asteroid transport.Due to the faintness of the targets and time limitations, the program typically used BVRI photometry to classify the objects using Dandy et al. (2003). Although less accurate and potentially more ambiguous than the Bus-DeMeo or Tholen systems, it is significantly easier to obtain for faint asteroids but still allows sorting into major taxonomic groups.The poster presents results of the reductions to date, concentrating on four particular asteroids observed May 30-31, 2014 at the Steward 2.3 meter with full UBVRIz colors. Simultaneous ZY/JHK measurements were taken by UKIRT which will also be presented if available.(36183) V=19.18±0.05, U-B=0.41±0.05, B-V=0.86±0.05, V-R=0.50±0.05, V-I=0.85±0.04 is consistent with an S type on the Dandy system.(85628) V=18.54±0.01, U-B=0.42±0.03, B-V=0.86±0.01, V-R=0.48±0.02, V-I=0.83±0.02, consistent with an S type.(85989) V=17.46±0.06, U-B=0.40±0.08, B-V=0.75±0.08, V-R=0.49±0.08, V-I=0.80±0.06 is consistent with an C type.(162181) V=18.59+/-0.01, U-B=0.44+/-0.02, B-V=0.88+/-0.01, V-R=0.48+/-0.01, V-I=0.87+/-0.01, consistent with an S type.Larsen acknowledges support from the USNA Kinnear Fellowship. Spacewatch was/is supported by JPL subcontract 100319 (2010-2011), NASA/NEOO grants NNG06GJ42G, NNX11AB52G, NNX12AG11G, NNX13AP99G, NNX14

  15. A Catalog of Candidate Field Horizontal-Branch and A-Type Stars. III. A 2MASS-Cleaned Version

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beers, Timothy C.; Almeida, Tiago; Rossi, Silvia; Wilhelm, Ronald; Marsteller, Brian

    2007-02-01

    We present coordinates and available photometric information (either from previous or recent broadband UBV observations, and near-infrared photometry from the 2MASS Point Source Catalog) for 12,056 stars (11,516 of which are unique) identified in the HK Survey of Beers and colleagues as candidate field horizontal-branch or A-type stars. These stars, in the apparent magnitude range 10<=B<=16.0, were selected using an objective-prism/interference-filter survey technique. The availability of 2MASS information permits assembly of a cleaned version of this catalog, comprising likely blue horizontal-branch (BHB) stars or blue stragglers in the color interval [-0.2<=(B-V)0<=+0.2], which are of particular interest for investigation of the structure, kinematics, and dynamics of the thick disk and inner halo of the Milky Way, the total mass and mass profile of the Galaxy, and as potential foreground/background objects in efforts to bracket distances to high-velocity clouds of H I. A comparison of the stars classified as high-likelihood BHB candidates with previous classifications based on UBV photometry and medium-resolution spectroscopy indicates that this class contains 78% correct identifications.

  16. ATel 7543: NIR photometry of SNhunt 275

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Noel; Artigau, Etienne

    2015-05-01

    SNhunt 275 (PSN J09093496+3307204) appears to be behaving similarly to SN 2009ip with an eruptive mass-loss event followed by a supernova explosion. We obtained a few epochs of NIR photometry using the Observatoire du Mont Megantic 1.6 m telescope and the CPAPIR instrument (Artigau et al. ...

  17. Photometry of Faint Wide Doubles in Hydra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, Wilfried; Thuemen, Chris; Gould, Ross

    2015-11-01

    Images of several double stars in Hydra published on the "Double Star Imaging Project" Yahoo Group page suggest magnitude issues compared with the corresponding WDS catalog data per end of 2014. Taking additional images with V and B filters enabled photometry for these pairs, suggesting significant corrections to the old data in WDS.

  18. Walraven photometry of nearby southern OB associations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Geus, E. J.; Lub, J.; Van De Grift, E.

    1990-01-01

    Homogeneous Walraven (VBLUW) photometry is presented for 5260 stars in the regions of five nearby southern OB associations: Scorpio Centaurus (Sco OB2), Orion OB1, Canis Major OB1, Monoceros OB1, and Scutum OB2. Derived V and (B - V) in the Johnson system are included.

  19. Detecting Problematic Observer Offsets in Sparse Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderwood, T.

    2014-06-01

    A heuristic method, based upon histogram analysis, is presented for detecting offsets pervasive enough to be symptoms of problematic observing technique or calibration. This method is illustrated by a study of scatter in AAVSO photoelectric photometry (PEP) for five well-observed variable stars.

  20. Detecting Problematic Observer Offsets in Sparse Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderwood, Tom

    2014-05-01

    A heuristic method, based upon histogram analysis, is presented for detecting offsets pervasive enough to be symptoms of problematic observing technique or calibration. This method is illustrated by a study of scatter in AAVSO photoelectric photometry (PEP) for five well-observed variable stars.

  1. TRIPP: Time Resolved Imaging Photometry Package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geckeler, Ralf D.; Schuh, Sonja; Dreizler, Stefan; Deetjen, Jochen; Gleissner, Thomas; Risse, Patrick; Rauch, Thomas; Göhler, Eckart; Hügelmeyer, Simon; Husser, Tim-Oliver; Israel, Holger; Benlloch-Garcia, Sara; Pottschmidt, Katja; Wilms, Jörn

    2014-05-01

    Written in IDL, TRIPP performs CCD time series reduction and analysis. It provides an on-line check of the incoming frames, performs relative aperture photometry and provides a set of time series tools, such as calculation of periodograms including false alarm probability determination, epoc folding, sinus fitting, and light curve simulations.

  2. Photoelectric photometry era at the Astronomical Institute of the Slovak Academy of Sciences III. Fast photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaňko, M.; Kollár, V.; Komžík, R.; Koza, J.; Pribulla, T.

    2015-12-01

    We present a continuation of the article series describing the photoelectric photometry era at the Astronomical Institute of the Slovak Academy of Sciences. The paper aims to provide a comprehensive technical description of implementation of the fast photometry at the Stará Lesná Observatory and estimates its photometric precision. Using integration times of 0.1 s and 0.01 s, an estimated photometric precision of the fast photometry is about 0.02 mag and 0.06 mag, respectively. Here, we also show the observation principles of the fast photometry and its use in positive observation of stellar occultation lasting 18.44 s by the asteroid (85) Io.

  3. Spectroscopy and Photometry of Mars Trojans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivkin, A. S.; Binzel, R. P.; Howell, E. S.; Bus, S. J.; Grier, J. A.

    2003-01-01

    Mars is the only terrestrial planet known to have co-orbiting Trojan asteroids. We have obtained visible and near-IR reflectance spectra of three of these objects: 5261 Eureka and 1998 VF31 in the L5 region and 1999 UJ7 in the LA region. We also obtained JHK spectrophotometry and a visible lightcurve for 5261 Eureka. The asteroid 5261 Eureka has a visible spectrum that is classified as Sr in the Bus taxonomy, and has infrared colors consistent with the A-class asteroids. The data for 1998 VF31 have a restricted wavelength range, but are most consistent with the Sr or Sa class, though we note a marginal consistency with the D class. We can rule out a C-class classification. 1999 UJ7 has an X-class or T-class spectrum, which is unlike that of the other two Mars Trojans. The photometric data for Eureka are limited, but we can constrain the period to longer than 5 hours (likely 5.5-6 hours) and lightcurve amplitude of at least 0.15 magnitude at this viewing geometry. The spectral differences among the Mars Trojans suggests that either they did not all form at their present solar distances or that they have not always been at their present sizes.

  4. Spectroscopy and Photometry of Mars Trojans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivkin, A. S.; Binzel, R. P.; Howell, E. S.; Bus, S. J.; Grier, J. A.

    2003-01-01

    Mars is the only terrestrial planet known to have co-orbiting "Trojan" asteroids. We have obtained visible and near-IR reflectance spectra of three of these objects: 5261 Eureka and 1998 VF31 in the L5 region and 1999 UJ7 in the L4 region. We also obtained JHK spectrophotometry and a visible lightcurve for 5261 Eureka. The asteroid 5261 Eureka has a visible spectrum that is classified as Sr in the Bus taxonomy, and has infrared colors consistent with the A-class asteroids. The data for 1998 VF31 have a restricted wavelength range, but are most consistent with the Sr or Sa class, though we note a marginal consistency with the D class. We can rule out a C-class classification. 1999 UJ7 has an X-class or T-class spectrum, which is unlike that of the other two Mars Trojans. The photometric data for Eureka are limited, but we can constrain the period to longer than 5 hours (likely 5.556 hours) and lightcurve amplitude of at least 0.15 magnitude at this viewing geometry. The spectral differences among the Mars Trojans suggests that either they did not all form at their present solar distances or that they have not always been at their present sizes. 0 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Keywords: Asteroids; Asteroids, composition; Spectroscopy; Satellites of Mars

  5. Precision Multiband Photometry with a DSLR Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Bakos, G. Á.; Penev, K.; Csubry, Z.; Hartman, J. D.; Bhatti, W.; de Val-Borro, M.

    2016-03-01

    Ground-based exoplanet surveys such as SuperWASP, HAT Network of Telescopes (HATNet), and KELT have discovered close to two hundred transiting extrasolar planets in the past several years. The strategy of these surveys is to look at a large field of view and measure the brightnesses of its bright stars to around half a percent per point precision, which is adequate for detecting hot Jupiters. Typically, these surveys use CCD detectors to achieve high precision photometry. These CCDS, however, are expensive relative to other consumer-grade optical imaging devices, such as digital single-lens reflex cameras (DSLRs). We look at the possibility of using a DSLR camera for precision photometry. Specifically, we used a Canon EOS 60D camera that records light in three colors simultaneously. The DSLR was integrated into the HATNet survey and collected observations for a month, after which photometry was extracted for 6600 stars in a selected stellar field. We found that the DSLR achieves a best-case median absolute deviation of 4.6 mmag per 180 s exposure when the DSLR color channels are combined, and 1000 stars are measured to better than 10 mmag (1%). Also, we achieve 10 mmag or better photometry in the individual colors. This is good enough to detect transiting hot Jupiters. We performed a candidate search on all stars and found four candidates, one of which is KELT-3b, the only known transiting hot Jupiter in our selected field. We conclude that the Canon 60D is a cheap, lightweight device capable of useful photometry in multiple colors.

  6. GASPS Photometry of the Tucana-Horologium Association

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberge, Donaldson J.; Roberge, Aki

    2010-01-01

    The GASPS Open Time Key Programme on Herschel represents a new opportunity to sensitively probe protoplanetary and debris disks at far-IR wavelengths. We present preliminary PACS 70 and 160 micron photometry of eighteen stars in the 30 Myr-old Tucana-Horologium association. Of these eighteen, eight were detected in the 70 micron band. Four of these eight were also detected in the 160 micron band. We constructed SEDs for these systems using optical data from Hipparcos (B and V), near-IR data from 2MASS (J, H, and K), mid-IR data from IRAS and Spitzer MIPS (12 and 24 microns, respectively), and the new far-IR data from PACS. For the stars showing IR excess emission, we fit simple single-temperature blackbody curves to the IR excess in order to determine the rough dust abundances and temperatures. Dust observations at these wavelengths will also be important for comparison with upcoming Herschel PACS spectra that will search for gas in the disks. Our goal is to determine or limit the ever-allusive gas-to-dust ratio for these disk systems.

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Photometry and proper motions in Praesepe (Wang+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P. F.; Chen, W. P.; Lin, C. C.; Pandey, A. K.; Huang, C. K.; Panwar, N.; Lee, C. H.; Tsai, M. F.; Tang, C.-H.; Goldman, B.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Draper, P. W.; Flewelling, H.; Grav, T.; Heasley, J. N.; Hodapp, K. W.; Huber, M. E.; Jedicke, R.; Kaiser, N.; Kudritzki, R.-P.; Luppino, G. A.; Lupton, R. H.; Magnier, E. A.; Metcalfe, N.; Monet, D. G.; Morgan, J. S.; Onaka, P. M.; Price, P. A.; Stubbs, C. W.; Sweeney, W.; Tonry, J. L.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Waters, C.

    2016-08-01

    Data used in this study include photometry and proper motion measurements within a 5° radius around the Praesepe center (R.A.=08h40m, decl.=+19°42', J2000). Archival data were taken from the 2MASS Point Sources Catalog (2MASS; cat. II/246), PPMXL (Roeser et al. 2010, cat. I/317), and Panoramic Survey Telescope And Rapid Response (Pan-STARRS). Pan-STARRS is a wide-field (7deg2) imaging system, with a 1.8m, f/4.4 telescope, equipped with a 1.4 giga-pixel camera. The prototype (PS1), located atop Haleakala, Maui, USA, has been patrolling the entire sky north of -30° declination since mid-2010 with a combination of gP1, rP1, iP1, zP1, and yP1 bands. The PS1 filters differ slightly from those of the SDSS. The gP1 filter extends 20nm redward of gSDSS for greater sensitivity and lower systematics for photometric redshift estimates. SDSS has no corresponding y filter (Tonry et al. 2012, cat. J/ApJ/750/99). Upon the completion of its 3.5yr mission by early 2014, PS1 will provide reliable photometry and astrometry. Table1 lists the properties of the 1040 candidates. (1 data file).

  8. Infrared Photometry for Automated Telescopes: Passband Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milone, Gene; Young, Andrew T.

    2011-03-01

    The high precision that photometry in the near and intermediate infrared region can provide has not been achieved, partly because of technical challenges (including cryogenics, which most IR detectors require), and partly because the filters in common use are not optimized to avoid water-vapor absorptions, which are the principal impediment to precise ground-based IR photometry. We review the IRWG filters that achieve this goal, and the trials that were undertaken to demonstrate their superiority. We focus especially on the near IR set and, for high elevation sites, the passbands in the N window. We also discuss the price to be paid for the improved precision, in the form of lower throughput, and why it should be paid: to achieve not only higher precision (i.e., improved signal-to-noise ratio), but also lower extinction, thus producing higher accuracy in extra-atmospheric magnitudes. The edges of the IRWG passbands are not defined by the edges of the atmospheric windows: therefore, they admit no flux from these (constantly varying) edges. The throughput cost and the lack of a large body of data already obtained in these passbands are principal reasons why the IRWG filters are not in wide use at observatories around the world that currently do IR work. Yet a measure of the signal-to-noise ratio varies inversely with both extinction and with a measure of the Forbes effect. So, the small loss of raw throughput is recouped in signal-to-noise gain. We illustrate these points with passbands of both near and intermediate IR passbands. There is also the matter of cost for small production runs of these filters; reduced costs can be realized through bulk orders with uniform filter specifications. As a consequence, the near-IR IRWG passbands offer the prospect of being able to do photometry in those passbands at both high and low elevation sites that are capable of supporting precise photometry, thereby freeing infrared photometry from the need to access exclusively high and

  9. 2MASS-IRAS Discovery of New Candidate Vega-type Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajardo-Acosta, S. B.; Beichman, C. A.; Cutri, R. M.

    2000-12-01

    We obtained J (1.25 μ m), H (1.65 μ m), and Ks (2.17 μ m) photometry from the 2-Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS), and 12, 25, 60, and 100 μ m photometry from the IRAS Faint Source Catalog (FSC), of field stars with galactic latitude > 20o. We identified main-sequence (luminosity class IV, IV--V, or V) stars using 3 methods: from previously known classifications; from Hipparcos distances and spectral types or J-Ks colors; or estimated from J-Ks, H-Ks colors. We searched this sample of main-sequence stars for excess 12 μ m emission with respect to the J, H, and Ks photospheric emission. This work is an extension of our previous survey of 2834 field stars, wherein we discovered, out of 296 main-sequence stars, 8 new candidate Vega-type systems with 12 μ m excesses (Fajardo-Acosta et al. 2000, ApJ, 538, L155). That survey was based on ≈ 35 % of the sky, and our new survey covers ≈ 75 % of the sky. We modeled the 12 μ m excess emission of our new cadidate systems, likely to arise from dust at ``terrestrial material'' temperatures, ~ 200--500 K, located at ~ 1-10 AU from the stars. Colder dust, more distant from the stars, might also exist in Kuiper Belt-like regions. We comment on the likelihood of spatially resolving these systems with current ground-based imaging technology. A fuller understanding of this dust may require more sensitive observations at long wavelengths by SIRTF. We acknowledge the support of the SIRTF Science Center, California Institute of Technology, which is operated under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  10. UBV photometry of hot white dwarf stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheselka, Mathew; Holberg, J. B.; Watkins, Ron; Collins, James; Tweedy, R. W.

    1993-12-01

    Johnson UBV photometry has been obtained for a set of hot degenerate stars, primarily DA and DO white dwarfs from among those detected in the Palomar-Green survey of UV excess objects. Most of our program stars have estimated effective temperatures (Teff) in the range 22,000 to 80,000 K and have no previous photometry. Some objects selected are also x-ray and extreme ultraviolet sources from the ROSAT all sky survey. The importance of precise photometric measurements in the analysis of x-ray data is discussed. A discrepancy between the observed colors and predicted colors is noted, and possibly accounted for by difficulties in defining the atmospheric cutoff of the U band and a general lack of hot stars used to define the photometric transformation between theoretical and observed colors.

  11. WISE Photometry for 400 Million SDSS Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Dustin; Hogg, David W.; Schlegel, David J.

    2016-02-01

    We present photometry of images from the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) of over 400 million sources detected by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We use a “forced photometry” technique, using measured SDSS source positions, star-galaxy classification, and galaxy profiles to define the sources whose fluxes are to be measured in the WISE images. We perform photometry with The Tractor image modeling code, working on our “unWISE” coaddds and taking account of the WISE point-spread function and a noise model. The result is a measurement of the flux of each SDSS source in each WISE band. Many sources have little flux in the WISE bands, so often the measurements we report are consistent with zero given our uncertainties. However, for many sources we get 3σ or 4σ measurements; these sources would not be reported by the “official” WISE pipeline and will not appear in the WISE catalog, yet they can be highly informative for some scientific questions. In addition, these small-signal measurements can be used in stacking analyses at the catalog level. The forced photometry approach has the advantage that we measure a consistent set of sources between SDSS and WISE, taking advantage of the resolution and depth of the SDSS images to interpret the WISE images; objects that are resolved in SDSS but blended together in WISE still have accurate measurements in our photometry. Our results, and the code used to produce them, are publicly available at http://unwise.me.

  12. Narrow band photometry of selected asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajamohan, R.; Bhargavi, S. G.

    1992-01-01

    The CCD photometry of selected asteroids was carried out to check for possible cometary activity in them. To distinguish the asteroids with possible cometary activity from those of the main belt, each object of interest was observed in two filters; one centered on the C2 emission band at 5140A (90A bandpass) and the other centered on the nearby continuum at 4845A (65A bandpass). None of the observed asteroids appear to have any C2 emission.

  13. Lightcurve Photometry Opportunities: 2016 July-September

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Brian D.; Harris, Alan W.; Durech, Josef; Benner, Lance A. M.

    2016-07-01

    We present lists of asteroid photometry opportunities for objects reaching a favorable apparition and having either none or poorly-defined lightcurve parameters. Additional data on these objects will help with shape and spin axis modeling via lightcurve inversion. We also include lists of objects that will be the target of radar observations. Lightcurves for these objects can help constrain pole solutions and/or remove rotation period ambiguities that might not come from using radar data alone.

  14. Variable Star Photometry at West Challow Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, D.

    2007-05-01

    This paper describes the facilities and observing programme of a small personal observatory set up in the UK for CCD photometry of variable stars. Its development has been driven by the belief that committed amateurs can make a valuable scientific contribution to the study of variable stars. Observing projects carried out at WCO are described including examples of Pro-Am collaboration and contributions to the observing programmes of the BAAVSS, AAVSO and CBA.

  15. Lightcurve Photometry Opportunities: 2016 April-June

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Brian D.; Harris, Alan W.; Durech, Josef; Benner, Lance A. M.

    2016-04-01

    We present lists of asteroid photometry opportunities for objects reaching a favorable apparition and having either none or poorly-defined lightcurve parameters. Additional data on these objects will help with shape and spin axis modeling via lightcurve inversion. We also include lists of objects that will be the target of radar observations. Lightcurves for these objects can help constrain pole solutions and/or remove rotation period ambiguities that might not come from using radar data alone.

  16. RR Lyrae Star Metallicities From Caby Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baird, Scott R.

    1996-11-01

    Ten RR Lyr stars have been observed at different pulsational phases with Caby photoelectric photometry to calibrate the response of this system to RR Lyr metallicity. As has been done for nonvariable stars, the data are displayed in a color-color diagram of hk vs b-y, where hk=(Ca-b)-(b-y). It is found that the system is much more sensitive to metal abundance than the Stromgren m1 index, and that the system retains good sensitivity even at the hottest phases of pulsation. The data produce lines of constant metallicity on the hk/b-y diagram which are single valued with respect to both b-y and hk. Therefore Caby photometry gives a metallicity which is independent of pulsational phase, a distinct advantage over ΔS and other techniques used to find RR Lyr abundances. This phase independence probably arises from the fact that Caby photometry is concerned largely with total absorption from the Ca K and H lines and the b - y continuum, and not the specific shapes of the hydrogen lines, which can be affected by changes in surface gravity as a function of phase in the pulsation and by emission near maximum light. The metallicity of the RRc star V7S3 Cen is determined to be -0.69±0.2 dex using the Caby technique.

  17. Surface photometry of WINGS galaxies with GASPHOT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Onofrio, M.; Bindoni, D.; Fasano, G.; Bettoni, D.; Cava, A.; Fritz, J.; Gullieuszik, M.; Kjærgaard, P.; Moretti, A.; Moles, M.; Omizzolo, A.; Poggianti, B. M.; Valentinuzzi, T.; Varela, J.

    2014-12-01

    Aims: We present the B, V, and K band surface photometry catalogs obtained by running the automatic software GASPHOT on galaxies from the WINGS cluster survey with isophotal areas larger than 200 pixels. The catalogs can be downloaded at the Centre de Données Astronomiques de Strasbourg. Methods: The luminosity growth curves of stars and galaxies in a given catalog relative to a given cluster image were obtained simultaneously by slicing the image with a fixed surface brightness step in several SExtractor runs. Then, using a single Sersic law convolved with a space-varying point spread function (PSF), GASPHOT performed a simultaneous χ2 best-fit of the major- and minor-axis luminosity growth curves of galaxies. We outline the GASPHOT performances and compare our surface photometry with that obtained by SExtractor, GALFIT, and GIM2D. This analysis is aimed at providing statistical information about the accuracy that is generally achieved by the softwares for automatic surface photometry of galaxies. Results: The GASPHOT catalogs provide the parameters of the Sersic law that fit the luminosity profiles for each galaxy and for each photometric band. They are the sky coordinates of the galaxy center (RA, Dec), the total magnitude (m), the semi-major axis of the effective isophote (Re), the Sersic index (n), the axis ratio (b/a), and a flag parameter (QFLAG) that generally indicates the fit quality. The WINGS-GASPHOT database includes 41 463 galaxies in the B band, 42 275 in the V band, and 71 687 in the K band. The bright early-type galaxies have higher Sersic indices and larger effective radii, as well as redder colors in their center. In general, the effective radii increase systematically from the K to the V and B band. Conclusions: The GASPHOT photometry agrees well with the surface photometry obtained by GALFIT and GIM2D, and with the aperture photometry provided by SExtractor. In particular, the direct comparison of structural parameters derived by different

  18. Spectroscopic classification of 2MASS_J16211735+4412541

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaringi, S.; Mason, E.; Van Winckel, H.; Escorza, A.

    2016-06-01

    We obtained a spectrum of the candidate short period binary 2MASS_J16211735+4412541 (CSS160603:162117+441254) with the high resolution HERMES spectrograph mounted on the 1.2m Mercator telescope on La Palma.

  19. Statistics of young starforming complexes in spiral galaxies using NIR photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosbøl, P.; Dottori, H.

    2008-10-01

    Aims: Very young stellar clusters and cluster complexes may be embedded in dust lanes along spiral arms in disk galaxies and escape detection in visual bands. Observations in the near-infrared K-band offer an almost unbiased view of such clusters or complexes due to the small attenuation by dust at this wavelength. The objective is to determine their population size, absolute K-band magnitude distribution above the limiting magnitude imposed by the data, and location relative to the spiral pattern in disk galaxies. Methods: All slightly extended sources were identified on deep K-band maps of 46 spiral galaxies reaching at least K=20.3 mag arcsec-2 at a signal-to-noise level of 3. The galaxies had inclination angles <65° and linear resolutions <100 pc with seeing better than 1 arcsec. The sample includes both barred and normal spirals with a wide spread in types. We also analyzed J- and H-band colors for 4 galaxies for which such images were available. An apparent magnitude limit of K = 19 mag was used for the sources analyzed in order to avoid marginal detections. Furthermore, we derived the source distributions of magnitudes and relative locations with respect to the spiral patterns. Results: Almost 70% (15/22) of the grand-design spiral galaxies show significant concentration of bright K-band knots in their arm regions corresponding to 30% (15/46) of the full sample. Color-color diagrams for the 4 spirals with JHK photometry suggest that a significant fraction of the diffuse sources found in the arms are complexes of young stellar clusters with ages <10 Myr and reddened with several magnitudes of visual extinction. The brightest knots reach an absolute K-band magnitude MK of -15.5 mag corresponding to stellar clusters or complexes with total masses up to at least 105 M⊙. Brightest magnitude and number of knots correlate with the total absolute magnitude of the host galaxy. More knots are seen in galaxies with high far-infrared flux and strong two-armed spiral

  20. The Progenitor of the FUor-Type Young Eruptive Star 2MASS J06593158-0405277

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kóspál, Á.; Ábrahám, P.; Moór, A.; Haas, M.; Chini, R.; Hackstein, M.

    2015-03-01

    Only a dozen confirmed FU Orionis-type young outbursting stars (FUors) are known today; this explains the interest in the recent FUor eruption of 2MASS J06593158-0405277. Its outburst and expected decline will be subject to numerous studies in the future. Almost equally important for the understanding of the eruption mechanism, however, is the physical characterization of the FUor’s precursor. Here we analyze unpublished archival data and summarize—and partly revise—all relevant photometry from optical to submillimeter wavelengths. Our analysis implies that the FUor is possibly associated with eight T Tauri star candidates and a strong Class 0 source. Adopting a distance of 450 pc for the FUor, we derive a quiescent bolometric luminosity and temperature of {{L}bol} = 4.8 L ⊙ and {{T}bol} = 1190 K, typical for young Class II sources. The central star has a temperature of {{T}eff} = 4000 K, a mass of 0.75 M ⊙ , and an age of about 6 × 105 yr. The SED implies a circumstellar mass of 0.01-0.06 M ⊙ , and the system is surrounded by a faint infrared nebulosity. Our results provide an almost complete picture of a FUor progenitor, supporting the interpretation of future post-outburst studies. Based on observations made with the Herschel Space Observatory. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  1. Quick and Dirty WFPC2 Stellar Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mighell, Kenneth J.

    2001-01-01

    The latest release of the IRAF (Image Reduction and Analysis Facility) MXTOOLS package includes the new tasks QDWFPC2 (Quick and Dirty Wide Field and Planetary Camera, which does quick CCD (charge-coupled device) stellar photometry on two Hubble Space Telescope (HST) WFPC2 (Wide Field and Planetary Camera) observations: WFPC2COLOR, which converts HST WFPC2 instrumental magnitudes to standard colors using the Holtzman et al. color equations, and QDCMD (Quick and Dirty Color Magnitude Diagram), which reads the output of WFPC2COLOR and displays a color-magnitude diagram on a user-chosen graphics device.

  2. Photometry and polarimetry of V 1057 Cygni.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rieke, G.; Lee, T.; Coyne, G.

    1972-01-01

    Evaluation of extensive photometric and polarimetric data over a six-month interval for V 1057 Cyg. The polarization appears to be constant and of interstellar origin; the photometry, which extends nearly six octaves from the ultraviolet to 22 microns in the infrared, indicates that the total observed luminosity is decreasing - having now declined about 10% from its earlier level. A model characterized by two circumstellar shells which absorb and reradiate short-wavelength stellar flux from an underlying A1-type star provides the best fit to the observational data. The present variability, however, cannot be due to circumstellar activity, but appears to originate in the star itself.

  3. Scintillation Noise in Exoplanet Transit Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Föhring, Dóra; Wilson, Richard; Osborn, James; Dhillon, Vik

    2015-04-01

    Transit photometry is a powerful technique for studying exoplanets. Transit observations from the ground of targets of magnitude V= 10 or brighter, however, are limited by scintillation noise due to Earth's atmosphere. Through turbulence profiling using instruments such as the stereo-SCIDAR, we have shown to able to accurately model scintillation noise, which is essential in order to fully account for the error budget of the observation. Through numerical modelling we find that employing scintillation reducing techniques enables an improvement of a factor between 1.36 — 1.6 on the astrophysical parameters.

  4. The RINGS Survey: Optical Broadband Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzio de Naray, Rachel; Mitchell, Carl; Spekkens, Kristine; Sellwood, Jerry; Williams, Ted

    2016-01-01

    We have targeted a sample of 19 nearby spiral galaxies, the RSS Imaging and Spectroscopy Nearby Galaxy Survey (RINGS), for detailed study of their mass distributions. We have obtained Fabry-Perot Halpha velocity fields using the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT), 21-cm HI observations using the Very Large Array (VLA), and optical broadband BVRI photometry using the CTIO 0.9m and KPNO 2.1m telescopes. We present the results of the photometric component of the survey including multicolor images, surface brightness profiles, and DiskFit structural models.

  5. Charles Nordmann and Multicolour Stellar Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lequeux, James

    2010-11-01

    Charles Nordmann (1881-1940), an astronomer at the Paris Observatory, was the first to determine the effective temperature of stars with his photometre heterochrome, simultaneously and independently of Rosenberg, Wilsing and Scheiner in Germany. He is also the remote precursor of the multicolour photometry of Johnson and Morgan. In spite of the quality of his temperature determinations, which were as good or better than those made by spectrophotometry, he rapidly fell into oblivion because of some failures in his scientific work. We examine his activity in the international context of the time, and explain why he has been forgotten, to be rediscovered only recently.

  6. V photometry of Titania, Oberon, and Triton

    SciTech Connect

    Goguen, J.D.; Hammel, H.B.; Brown, R.H.

    1989-02-01

    The phase angle and orbital brightness variations of Titania, Oberon, and Triton are presently obtained through analysis of V filter photometry obtained at Mauna Kea in 1982-1983. While Titania and Oberon exhibit magnitude variations with phase angle comparable to those of low-to-moderate albedo asteroids observed within several deg of opposition, Triton's phase variation is distinctly different from these and has a phase coefficient consistent with either a high-albedo regolith or an optically thick nonparticulate scattering layer (perhaps an atmosphere, or an ocean). A low-albedo regolith cannot on the strength of these data be ruled out, however. 39 references.

  7. Time Series Photometry of KZ Lacertae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joner, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    We present BVRI time series photometry of the high amplitude delta Scuti star KZ Lacertae secured using the 0.9-meter telescope located at the Brigham Young University West Mountain Observatory. In addition to the multicolor light curves that are presented, the V data from the last six years of observations are used to plot an O-C diagram in order to determine the ephemeris and evaluate evidence for period change. We wish to thank the Brigham Young University College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences as well as the Department of Physics and Astronomy for their continued support of the research activities at the West Mountain Observatory.

  8. 13-Color Photometry of 16 Variable Be-Stars - Part One - Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, M.; Schuster, W. J.

    1982-07-01

    We present thirteen color photometry of 16 variable Be stars observed at the Observatorio Astronomico Nacional in San Pedro Martir in Baja California, Our data cover the years 1977 to 1979, and we include earlier measurements of Johnson and Mitchell from 1965 to 1968 that have been corrected in order to have a homogeneous set of data.

  9. Improving the Pan-STARRs/2MASS 3-D dust map: Regularization for increased resolution and fidelity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Green, Gregory; Lee, Albert; Ford Schlafly, Edward

    2016-01-01

    The Green et al. (2015) 3-D map of interstellar dust uses photometry of nearly 1 billion stars from Pan-STARRS1 and 2MASS to infer the distribution of dust in the Milky Way. The current map treats each angular pixel (~ 6 arcmin) independently, and estimates the dust in 30 distance bins. However, dust structures cut across pixels and the fit could be improved by coupling the dust density in neighboring pixels. This also has the advantage that fewer stars would be required per pixel, allowing finer angular resolution. We propose a simple way to do this, and show that it allows the use of smaller angular pixels and produces sharper resolution in the distance direction for a test case in Orion. We intend to incorporate similar regularization into the next full-sky 3-D dust map.

  10. Our 3 Million Nearest Neighbors: The Field Luminosity and Mass Functions of M Dwarfs from Matched SDSS & 2MASS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochanski, John J.; Hawley, S. L.; Covey, K. R.; Reid, N.; West, A. A.; SDSS Collaboration

    2007-12-01

    We present the initial results of our investigation into the field luminosity and mass functions of M dwarfs. We have assembled a database of matched SDSS and 2MASS observations of 3 million low-mass stars, two orders of magnitude larger than any previous study on this topic. The observations span the entire SDSS footprint, about 8,400 square degrees. Using this 8-color photometry and improved color-absolute magnitude relations, we derive luminosities and masses for each star in our sample. We quantify the uncertainties in our analysis using results from a calibration region of 30 square degrees, where we have spectroscopic observations of several thousand stars. Additionally, we measure the structure of the local Milky Way, determining the density profiles of the thin and thick disks. The authors gratefully acknowledge the support of NSF grant AST06-07644 and NASA ADP grant NAG5-13111.

  11. Near-infrared photometry of carbon stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitelock, Patricia A.; Feast, Michael W.; Marang, Freddy; Groenewegen, M. A. T.

    2006-06-01

    Near-infrared, JHKL, photometry of 239 Galactic C-rich variable stars is presented and discussed. From these and published data, the stars were classified as Mira or non-Mira variables, and amplitudes and pulsation periods, ranging from 222 to 948 d for the Miras, were determined for most of them. A comparison of the colour and period relations with those of similar stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud indicates minor differences, which may be the consequence of sample selection effects. Apparent bolometric magnitudes were determined by combining the mean JHKL fluxes with mid-infrared photometry from IRAS and MSX. Then, using the Mira period luminosity relation to set the absolute magnitudes, distances were determined - to greater accuracy than has hitherto been possible for this type of star. Bolometric corrections to the K magnitude were calculated and prescriptions derived for calculating these from various colours. Mass-loss rates were also calculated and compared to values in the literature. Approximately one-third of the C-rich Miras and an unknown fraction of the non-Miras exhibit apparently random obscuration events that are reminiscent of the phenomena exhibited by the hydrogen-deficient R Coronae Borealis stars. The underlying cause of this is unclear, but it may be that mass loss, and consequently dust formation, is very easily triggered from these very extended atmospheres. Based on observations made at the South African Astronomical Observatory. E-mail: paw@saao.ac.za

  12. Photometry Of Pluto At Low Galactic Latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Erin; Buie, M.; Bagenal, F.

    2012-10-01

    Our research is part of an ongoing project to continue the long-term photometric monitoring of Pluto in hopes to constrain volatile migration on the surface. As Pluto passes near the center of the galaxy, the fields are too crowded with stars for normal aperture photometry. We approached this problem by using Optimal Image Subtraction (OIS). We took images, both containing and not containing Pluto, using the 0.8m robotic telescope at Lowell Observatory, the 1m robotic telescope at New Mexico State University, and the Faulkes 2m robotic telescope at Siding Spring, part of Las Cumbres Observatory. We are presently gathering data, but our main focus was the data from 2010. We began by taking images of the star fields at the galactic center without Pluto to build catalogs of standard stars. These catalogs were applied to the Pluto images in order to make interpolated images and to cross check our results. We extracted the photometry of Pluto from differenced images where the background stars were subtracted, and we then applied the transformation equation to solve for Pluto’s standard magnitude. We will present the details of our data processing methodology, as well as the 2010 Pluto B, V, and B-V light curves in comparison to those from previous years. This work was supported by NASA Planetary Astronomy Grant NNX09AB43G.

  13. TRIPPy: Trailed Image Photometry in Python

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, Wesley; Alexandersen, Mike; Schwamb, Megan E.; Marsset, Michaël; Pike, Rosemary E.; Kavelaars, J. J.; Bannister, Michele T.; Benecchi, Susan; Delsanti, Audrey

    2016-06-01

    Photometry of moving sources typically suffers from a reduced signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) or flux measurements biased to incorrect low values through the use of circular apertures. To address this issue, we present the software package, TRIPPy: TRailed Image Photometry in Python. TRIPPy introduces the pill aperture, which is the natural extension of the circular aperture appropriate for linearly trailed sources. The pill shape is a rectangle with two semicircular end-caps and is described by three parameters, the trail length and angle, and the radius. The TRIPPy software package also includes a new technique to generate accurate model point-spread functions (PSFs) and trailed PSFs (TSFs) from stationary background sources in sidereally tracked images. The TSF is merely the convolution of the model PSF, which consists of a moffat profile, and super-sampled lookup table. From the TSF, accurate pill aperture corrections can be estimated as a function of pill radius with an accuracy of 10 mmag for highly trailed sources. Analogous to the use of small circular apertures and associated aperture corrections, small radius pill apertures can be used to preserve S/Ns of low flux sources, with appropriate aperture correction applied to provide an accurate, unbiased flux measurement at all S/Ns.

  14. Ten Recent Enhancements To Aperture Photometry Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laher, Russ; Rebull, L. M.; Gorjian, V.

    2013-01-01

    Aperture Photometry Tool is free, multi-platform, easy-to-install software for astronomical research, as well as for learning, visualizing, and refining aperture-photometry analyses. This mature software has been under development for five years, and is a silent workhorse of the NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Program. Software version 2.1.5 is described by Laher et al., Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, Vol. 124, No. 917, pp. 737-763, (July 2012). Four software upgrades have been released since the publication, which include new capabilities, increased speed, more user-friendliness, and some minor bug fixes. Visit www.aperturephotometry.org to download the latest version. The enhancements are as follows: 1) Added new Tools menu option to write selected primary-image data to a comma-separated-value file (for importing into Excel); 2) Added a new display of the color-table levels on a separate panel; 3) Added a new tool to measure the angular separation between positions on the thumbnail image, via mouse-cursor drag and release; 4) Added a new tool to overlay an aperture at user-specified coordinates (in addition to aperture overlay via mouse click); 5) Speeded up the source-list tool with optional multithreading in its automatic mode (allowed thread number is user-specifiable); 6) Added a new “Number” column to the output aperture-photometry-table file in order to track the input source order (multithreading reorders the output); 7) Upgraded the source-list tool to accept input source lists containing positions in sexagesimal equatorial coordinates (in addition to decimal degrees, or, alternatively, pixel coordinates); 8) Added a new decimal/sexagesimal converter; 9) Upgraded the source-list creation tool to compute the detection threshold using robust estimates of the local background and local data dispersion, where the user can select the grid and window sizes for these local calculations; and 10) Modified the batch mode to

  15. Constraining Kepler Eclipsing Binary Properties with Time-Series and Multi-band Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windemuth, Diana; Agol, Eric

    2015-01-01

    We perform simultaneous fits to time-series (Kepler) and multi-band (SDSS griz + 2MASS JHKs) photometry to constrain stellar and orbital parameters of eclipsing binaries (EBs) from the Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalogue. We infer the stellar parameters by comparing Padova stellar evolution models to the extinction-corrected multi-band photometric data, and use the results as inputs to a Keplerian orbit model for the lightcurves. This method yields a self-consistent analysis and jointly constrains properties of both stars (orbital elements e, ω, i, tpe, p + stellar parameters rA, rB, mA, mB, fB/fA, [Fe/H], age, and quadratic limb darkening coefficients uA1, uA2, uB1, uB2). We apply our coupled time-series photometry and SED model to a sub-sample of detached EBs with p = 10 - 40 d, to minimize the influence of tidal or Doppler effects. The results of this analysis will feed into our circumbinary planet search, wherein we apply barycentric corrections to the Kepler EB lightcurves to look for signals due to planetary companions.

  16. Homogeneous photometry and star counts in the field of 9 Galactic star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seleznev, A. F.; Carraro, G.; Costa, E.; Loktin, A. V.

    2010-01-01

    We present homogeneous V, I CCD photometry of nine stellar fields in the two inner quadrants of the Galactic plane. The lines-of-view to most of these fields aim in the direction of the very inner Galaxy, where the Galactic field is very dense, and extinction is high and patchy. Our nine fields are, according to several catalogs, centred on Galactic star clusters, namely Trumpler 13, Trumpler 20, Lynga 4, Hogg 19, Lynga 12, Trumpler 25, Trumpler 26, Ruprecht 128, and Trumpler 34. Apart from their coordinates, and in some cases additional basic data (mainly from the 2MASS archive), their properties are poorly known. By means of star count techniques and field star decontaminated Color Magnitude diagrams, the nature and size of these visual over-densities has been established; and, when possible, new cluster fundamental parameters have been derived. To strengthen our findings, we complement our data-set with JHKs photometry from the 2MASS archive, that we analyze using a suitably defined Q-parameter. Most clusters are projected towards the Carina-Sagittarium spiral arm. Because of that, we detect in the Color Magnitude diagrams of most of the other fields several distinctive sequences produced by young population within the arm. All the clusters are of intermediate or old age. The most interesting cases detected by our study are, perhaps, that of Trumpler 20, which seems to be much older than previously believed, as indicated by its prominent - and double - red clump; and that of Hogg 19, a previously overlooked old open cluster, whose existence in such regions of the Milky Way is puzzling.

  17. TERMS PHOTOMETRY OF KNOWN TRANSITING EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Dragomir, Diana; Kane, Stephen R.; Ciardi, David R.; Gelino, Dawn M.; Payne, Alan; Ramirez, Solange V.; Von Braun, Kaspar; Wyatt, Pamela; Pilyavsky, Genady; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Wright, Jason T.; Zachary Gazak, J.; Rabus, Markus

    2011-10-15

    The Transit Ephemeris Refinement and Monitoring Survey conducts radial velocity and photometric monitoring of known exoplanets in order to refine planetary orbits and predictions of possible transit times. This effort is primarily directed toward planets not known to transit, but a small sample of our targets consists of known transiting systems. Here we present precision photometry for six WASP (Wide Angle Search for Planets) planets acquired during their transit windows. We perform a Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis for each planet and combine these data with previous measurements to redetermine the period and ephemerides for these planets. These observations provide recent mid-transit times which are useful for scheduling future observations. Our results improve the ephemerides of WASP-4b, WASP-5b, and WASP-6b and reduce the uncertainties on the mid-transit time for WASP-29b. We also confirm the orbital, stellar, and planetary parameters of all six systems.

  18. Techniques for Automated Single-Star Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, Gregory W.

    2001-01-01

    Tennessee State University operates several automatic photoelectric telescopes (APTs) located at Fairborn Observatory in the Patagonia Mountains of southern Arizona. The APTs are dedicated to photometric monitoring programs that would be expensive and difficult to accomplish without the advantages of automation. I review the operation of two of the telescopes (a 0.75- and 0.80-meter (m) APT) and the quality-control techniques that result in the routine acquisition of single-star differential photometry with a precision of 0.001 mag for single observations and 0.0001 - 0.0002 mag for seasonal means. I also illustrate the capabilities of the APTS with sample results from a program to measure luminosity cycles in sun-like stars and a related program to search for the signatures of extrasolar planets around these stars.

  19. UBVRI photometry of W Ursae Majoris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linnell, A. P.

    1985-03-01

    High speed UBVRI photometry of W Ursae Majoris produced 15,930 observations covering one complete cycle on 1984 March 5-6. For this epoch, total phase of primary minimum is flat in all spectral bands, while secondary minimum shows a substantial tilt during annual phases. The tilt correlates with a detectable O'Connell effect, indicates a transverse temperature gradient across the projected disk of the primary component, and is qualitatively consistent with a starspot origin for both effects. Gross characteristics of the color curves are consistent with those expected from the wavelength dependence of limb darkening. The observed greater color change at primary minimum as contrasted with secondary must have a different origin. There is qualitative consistency with a Rucinski hot secondary model. Whether consistency can also be achieved with a Mullan starspot model, or whether decisive discrimination between alterative physical models can be demonstrated must await detailed light synthesis simulation.

  20. Asteroid Maps From Photometry And Adaptive Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaasalainen, Mikko; Marchis, F.; Carry, B.

    2007-10-01

    While disk-integrated photometry is the main source of information on most asteroids, adaptive optics can provide some disk-resolved data on many larger (main-belt) asteroids. Asteroid models from lightcurve inversion agree well with the obtained AO images (Marchis et al. 2006, Icarus 185,39), but even more detailed models can be obtained by combining the two sources in inversion. In addition to giving more detail to existing models, the approach can also be used to obtain models of asteroids for which the photometric data are yet insufficient alone. This also helps to calibrate the inversion and deconvolution processes related to the separate sources; e.g., whether features apparently revealed by AO post-processing are real or artificial. We present some examples and discuss the resolution level of topographic detail in the resulting models. Hundreds of asteroids can be mapped in this way in the near future.

  1. Photoelectric photometry of comet Kohoutek (1973f)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohoutek, L.

    1976-01-01

    Comet Kohoutek was observed with the 50 cm (f/15) reflecting telescope of the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile, on fourteen nights between January 16 and 30, when the heliocentric and geocentric distances of the comet were r=0.66 - 1.00 A.U. and delta=0.81 - 0.96 A.U., respectively. The 40 inch and 80 inch diaphragms were used for the photometry of the cometary head in the UBV system and with six interference filters. The atmospheric conditions were good but the accuracy of observations was low due to large extinction and twilight. The mean error of one measurement of log F in all but Na 5893 A filters can be estimated at plus or minus 0.02, whereas the accuracy through the Na filter was substantially lower.

  2. Multicolour Optical Photometry of Active Geostationary Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolley, A.; Wade, G.; Bedard, D.

    Although broadband photometry has been used to infer information about artificial satellites since soon after the launch of Sputnik 1, the development of photometric techniques for non-resolved space object identification or characterisation has been hampered by the large number of variables involved. Many individual studies, and some long ongoing experiments, have used costly metre-class telescopes to obtain data despite other experiments demonstrating that much more flexible and affordable small aperture telescopes may be suitable for the task. In addition, due to the highly time consuming and weather dependent nature of obtaining photometric observations, many studies have suffered from data sets of limited size, or relied upon simulations to support their claims. With this in mind, an experiment was conducted with the aim of determining the utility of small aperture telescopes for conducting broadband photometry of satellites for the purpose of non-resolved space object identification and characterisation. A 14 inch Celestron CG-14 telescope was used to gain multiple night-long, high temporal resolution data sets of six active geostationary satellites. The results of the experiment cast doubt on the efficacy of some of the previous approaches to obtaining and analysing photometric data. It was discovered that geostationary satellite lightcurves can vary to a greater degree than has generally been recognised, and colour ratios vary considerably with changes in the illumination/observation geometry, making it difficult to use colour for satellite discrimination. Evidence was also detected of variations in the spectral energy distribution of sunlight reflected off satellite surface materials, which could have implications for surface material characterisation and techniques that aim to separate satellite body and solar panel contributions to the total observed spectra.

  3. Photometry Transforms Generation with PTGP (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, G.; Menzies, K.; Silvis, G.; Harris, B.

    2015-06-01

    (Abstract only) Historically the development of photometry transformation coefficients required extensive manual effort and the use of large spreadsheets. A new release—version 5.0—of the Photometry Transformations Generation Program (PTGP) achieves the goal of generating transformation coefficients without the use of spreadsheets—saving considerable time and ensuring data accuracy. PTGP version 5.0 works directly with VSP to retrieve the most recent standard star reference magnitudes (currently for M67 and NGC7790). It then processes instrument magnitude file(s) downloaded from vphot or exported from AIP4WIN or MAXIM. Either AUID or “Boulder” star identifications can be used for AIP4WIN and MAXIM. When using VPHOT data or “Boulder” star identifications, PTGP determines the AUID names for each of the reference standard stars. All standard transforms are calculated. Plots of each transform's data can be reviewed, and individual star observations added/deleted. Transform sets can be saved for further use. Transform sets can be compared and selected sets averaged. The averaged sets can be exported in a file format compatible with the AAVSO TA tool. The presentation will provide a brief overview and demonstration of the tool. It will also discuss the implications of using PYTHON for the development—both benefits and potential problems. The program runs on both PCs and Macs. A subsequent presentation will discuss the use of VPHOT and PTGP to generate transforms and the testing of the impacts of varying key VPHOT and PTGP parameters.

  4. The search for red AGN with 2MASS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutri, R. M.; Nelson, B. O.; Kirkpatrick, J. D.; Huchra, J. P.; Smith, P. S.

    2001-01-01

    We present the results of a simple, highly efficient 2MASS color-based survey that has already discovered 140 previously unknown red AGN and QSOs. These objects are near-infrared-bright and relatively nearby; the media redshift of the sample is z=0.25, and all but two have z<0.7.

  5. ACCURACY OF REMOTELY SENSED SO2 MASS EMISSION RATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Remote sensing data of single-stack power plant emissions and local wind speed have been analyzed to determined SO2 mass flux for comparison with EPA referenced methods. Four days of SO2 data were gathered from a moving platform by three upward-viewing remote sensors -- two ultra...

  6. THE 2MASS REDSHIFT SURVEY-DESCRIPTION AND DATA RELEASE

    SciTech Connect

    Huchra, John P.; Berlind, Perry; Calkins, Michael; Falco, Emilio; Mink, Jessica D.; Tokarz, Susan; Macri, Lucas M.; Masters, Karen L.; Jarrett, Thomas H.; Crook, Aidan C.; Cutri, Roc; Erdogdu, Pirin; Lahav, Ofer; George, Teddy; Hutcheson, Conrad M.; Mader, Jeff; Martimbeau, Nathalie; Schneider, Stephen; Skrutskie, Michael; Westover, Michael E-mail: karen.masters@port.ac.uk

    2012-04-01

    We present the results of the 2MASS Redshift Survey (2MRS), a ten-year project to map the full three-dimensional distribution of galaxies in the nearby universe. The Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) was completed in 2003 and its final data products, including an extended source catalog (XSC), are available online. The 2MASS XSC contains nearly a million galaxies with K{sub s} {<=} 13.5 mag and is essentially complete and mostly unaffected by interstellar extinction and stellar confusion down to a galactic latitude of |b| = 5 Degree-Sign for bright galaxies. Near-infrared wavelengths are sensitive to the old stellar populations that dominate galaxy masses, making 2MASS an excellent starting point to study the distribution of matter in the nearby universe. We selected a sample of 44,599 2MASS galaxies with K{sub s} {<=} 11.75 mag and |b| {>=} 5 Degree-Sign ({>=}8 Degree-Sign toward the Galactic bulge) as the input catalog for our survey. We obtained spectroscopic observations for 11,000 galaxies and used previously obtained velocities for the remainder of the sample to generate a redshift catalog that is 97.6% complete to well-defined limits and covers 91% of the sky. This provides an unprecedented census of galaxy (baryonic mass) concentrations within 300 Mpc. Earlier versions of our survey have been used in a number of publications that have studied the bulk motion of the Local Group, mapped the density and peculiar velocity fields out to 50 h{sup -1} Mpc, detected galaxy groups, and estimated the values of several cosmological parameters. Additionally, we present morphological types for a nearly complete sub-sample of 20,860 galaxies with K{sub s} {<=} 11.25 mag and |b| {>=} 10 Degree-Sign .

  7. Automated surface photometry for the Coma Cluster galaxies: The catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doi, M.; Fukugita, M.; Okamura, S.; Tarusawa, K.

    1995-01-01

    A homogeneous photometry catalog is presented for 450 galaxies with B(sub 25.5) less than or equal to 16 mag located in the 9.8 deg x 9.8 deg region centered on the Coma Cluster. The catalog is based on photographic photometry using an automated surface photometry software for data reduction applied to B-band Schmidt plates. The catalog provides accurate positions, isophotal and total magnitudes, major and minor axes, and a few other photometric parameters including rudimentary morphology (early of late type).

  8. The TAOS Project: High-Speed Crowded Field Aperture Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z.-W.; Kim, D.-W.; Wang, J.-H.; Lehner, M. J.; Chen, W. P.; Byun, Y.-I.; Alcock, C.; Axelrod, T.; Bianco, F. B.; Coehlo, N. K.; Cook, K. H.; Dave, R.; de Pater, I.; Giammarco, J.; King, S.-K.; Lee, T.; Lin, H.-C.; Marshall, S. L.; Porrata, R.; Protopapas, P.; Rice, J. A.; Schwamb, M. E.; Wang, S.-Y.; Wen, C.-Y.

    2009-12-01

    We have devised an aperture photometry pipeline for data reduction of image data from the Taiwanese-American Occultation Survey (TAOS). The photometry pipeline has high computational performance, and is capable of real-time photometric reduction of images containing up to 1000 stars, within the sampling rate of 5 Hz. The pipeline is optimized for both speed and signal-to-noise performance, and in the latter category it performs nearly as well as DAOPHOT. This paper provides a detailed description of the TAOS aperture photometry pipeline.

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: All-sky spectrally matched Tycho2 stars (Pickles+, 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickles, A.; Depagne, E.

    2011-03-01

    We present fitted UBVRI-ZY and u'g'r'i'z' magnitudes, spectral types, and distances for 2.4 million stars, derived from synthetic photometry of a library spectrum that best matches the Tycho2 BTVT, NOMAD RN, and 2MASS JHK2/S catalog magnitudes. We present similarly synthesized multifilter magnitudes, types, and distances for 4.8 million stars with 2MASS and SDSS photometry to g<16 within the Sloan survey region, for Landolt and Sloan primary standards, and for Sloan northern (photometric telescope) and southern secondary standards. (17 data files).

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: All-sky spectrally matched Tycho2 stars (Pickles+, 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickles, A.; Depagne, E.

    2011-03-01

    We present fitted UBVRI-ZY and u'g'r'i'z' magnitudes, spectral types, and distances for 2.4 million stars, derived from synthetic photometry of a library spectrum that best matches the Tycho2 BTVT, NOMAD RN, and 2MASS JHK2/S catalog magnitudes. We present similarly synthesized multifilter magnitudes, types, and distances for 4.8 million stars with 2MASS and SDSS photometry to g<16 within the Sloan survey region, for Landolt and Sloan primary standards, and for Sloan northern (photometric telescope) and southern secondary standards. (16 data files).

  11. Comparison of Metallicities Adopted for the Synthetic UBV Photometry with Those Evaluated by Means of RGU Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaali, S.; Güngör, S.; Karatas, Y.

    1998-04-01

    Comparison of metallicities adopted for the synthetic UBV photometry with those evaluated by means of RGU photometry for 92 stars is presented. The agreement only for zero metallicity. The discrepancy increases to low metallicities which cover Intermediate population and Population II main-sequence star. U-G and G-R colour indices are transformed from UBV synthetic data and do not include any observational error. Therefore, the disagreement may orginate from a systematic error in the metallicity calibration of relatively metal-poor stars in RGU photometry.

  12. Detection of Extrasolar Planets by Transit Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, William; Koch, David; Webster, Larry; Dunham, Edward; Witteborn, Fred; Jenkins, Jon; Caldwell, Douglas; Showen, Robert; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A knowledge of other planetary systems that includes information on the number, size, mass, and spacing of the planets around a variety of star types is needed to deepen our understanding of planetary system formation and processes that give rise to their final configurations. Recent discoveries show that many planetary systems are quite different from the solar system in that they often possess giant planets in short period orbits. The inferred evolution of these planets and their orbital characteristics imply the absence of Earth-like planets near the habitable zone. Information on the properties of the giant-inner planets is now being obtained by both the Doppler velocity and the transit photometry techniques. The combination of the two techniques provides the mass, size, and density of the planets. For the planet orbiting star HD209458, transit photometry provided the first independent confirmation and measurement of the diameter of an extrasolar planet. The observations indicate a planet 1.27 the diameter of Jupiter with 0.63 of its mass (Charbonneau et al. 1999). The results are in excellent agreement with the theory of planetary atmospheres for a planet of the indicated mass and distance from a solar-like star. The observation of the November 23, 1999 transit of that planet made by the Ames Vulcan photometer at Lick Observatory is presented. In the future, the combination of the two techniques will greatly increase the number of discoveries and the richness of the science yield. Small rocky planets at orbital distances from 0.9 to 1.2 AU are more likely to harbor life than the gas giant planets that are now being discovered. However, new technology is needed to find smaller, Earth-like planets, which are about three hundred times less massive than Jupiter-like planets. The Kepler project is a space craft mission designed to discover hundreds of Earth-size planets in and near the habitable zone around a wide variety of stars. To demonstrate that the

  13. 2MASS Extended Sources in the Zone of Avoidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarrett, T.-H.; Chester, T.; Cutri, R.; Schneider, S.; Rosenberg, J.; Huchra, J. P.; Mader, J.

    2000-07-01

    A new high-resolution near-infrared mapping effort, the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS), is now underway and will provide a complete census of galaxies as faint as 13.5 mag (3 mJy) at 2.2 μm for most of the sky, and ~12.1 mag (10 mJy) for regions veiled by the Milky Way. This census has already discovered nearby galaxies previously hidden behind our Galaxy and will allow delineation of large-scale structures in the distribution of galaxies across the whole sky. Here we report the detection and discovery of new extended sources from this survey for fields incorporating the Galactic plane at longitudes between 40° and 70°. Follow-up H I 21 cm and optical spectroscopy observations provide positive confirmation for 14 of the new 2MASS galaxies. We perform an internal completeness and reliability analysis for the sample, consisting of 7000 sources in ~1000 deg2 of area, including galaxies and Galactic nebulae from the W51 giant molecular cloud. The area-normalized detection rate is about one to two galaxies per deg2 brighter than 12.1 mag (10 mJy), roughly constant with Galactic latitude throughout the ``Zone of Avoidance,'' of which 85%-95% are newly discovered sources. In conjunction with the deep H I surveys, 2MASS will greatly increase the current census of galaxies hidden behind the Milky Way. Moreover, owing to its sensitivity to elliptical and other gas-poor galaxies, 2MASS will provide a key complementary data set to that of the gas-rich-sensitive H I surveys of the Milky Way galaxy, potentially uncovering nearby galaxies critical to the local gravity and mass density fields.

  14. 2MASS extended sources in the zone of avoidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarrett, T.; Chester, T.; Cutri, R.; Schneider, S.; Rosenberg, J.; Huchra, J.; Mader, J.

    2000-01-01

    A new high-resolution near-infrared mapping effort, the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS), is now underway and will provide a complete census of galaxies as faint as 13.5 mag (3 mJy) at 2.2 mu m for most of the sky, and similar to 12.1 mag (10 mJy) for regions veiled by the Milky Way.

  15. WIYN Open Cluster Study: UBVRI Photometry of NGC 2158

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taverne, Luke T.; Steinhauer, Aaron J.; Deliyannis, Constantine P.

    2015-01-01

    We present WIYN 0.9m HDI UBVRI photometry of NGC 2158, a very rich, intermediate-aged, open cluster located near the galactic anti-center. We report derived values for the cluster age, distance, reddening.

  16. BINARY STAR SYNTHETIC PHOTOMETRY AND DISTANCE DETERMINATION USING BINSYN

    SciTech Connect

    Linnell, Albert P.; DeStefano, Paul; Hubeny, Ivan E-mail: pdestefa@uw.edu

    2013-09-15

    This paper extends synthetic photometry to components of binary star systems. The paper demonstrates accurate recovery of single star photometric properties for four photometric standards, Vega, Sirius, GD153, and HD209458, ranging over the HR diagram, when their model synthetic spectra are placed in fictitious binary systems and subjected to synthetic photometry processing. Techniques for photometric distance determination have been validated for all four photometric standards.

  17. Recent Advances in Video Meteor Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, Wesley R.; Suggs, Robert M.; Meachem, Terry; Cooke, William J.

    2003-01-01

    One of the most common (and obvious) problems with video meteor data involves the saturation of the output signal produced by bright meteors, resulting in the elimination of such meteors from photometric determinations. It is important to realize that a "bright" meteor recorded by intensified meteor camera is not what would be considered "bright" by a visual observer - indeed, many Generation II or III camera systems are saturated by meteors with a visual magnitude of 3, barely even noticeable to the untrained eye. As the relatively small fields of view (approx.30 ) of the camera systems captures at best modest numbers of meteors, even during storm peaks, the loss of meteors brighter than +3 renders the determination of shower population indices from video observations even more difficult. Considerable effort has been devoted by the authors to the study of the meteor camera systems employed during the Marshall Space Flight Center s Leonid ground-based campaigns, and a calibration scheme has been devised which can extend the useful dynamic range of such systems by approximately 4 magnitudes. The calibration setup involves only simple equipment, available to amateur and professional, and it is hoped that use of this technique will make for better meteor photometry, and move video meteor analysis beyond the realm of simple counts.

  18. BVRI CCD photometry of Omega Centauri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcaino, Gonzalo; Liller, William

    1987-12-01

    The authors present the first CCD, BVRI main-sequence photometry for ω Cen, matched to the new BVRI isochrones of VandenBerg and Bell (1985). Their main conclusions are: (1) The main-sequence turnoffs as seen in the several colors are found to be at VTO = 18.3±0.15; the MSTO color indexes are at: B-V = 0.55±0.03, V-I = 0.73±0.03, and B-I = 1.28±0.03. (2) The magnitude difference between the main-sequence turnoff and the horizontal branch is ΔMV = 3.80±0.15, as derived from the color-magnitude diagrams. (3) The authors deduce a consistent age for ω Cen in all three color-magnitude diagrams of 17±1.5 Gyr. (4) The large scatter among the main-sequence stars demonstrates that the chemical inhomogeneity of about |Fe/H| = ≡1 dex persists as well in the unevolved stars, hence suggesting the composition to be primordial.

  19. The HST Milky Way Stellar Photometry Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radburn-Smith, David

    2012-10-01

    The Hubble Legacy Archive has invested a significant effort into automatically generating photometry for point sources in all HST observations regardless of the target. We estimate that this archive contains up to 800,000 Milky Way {MW} stars, distributed across the whole sky, complete to some three magnitudes fainter than SDSS. Approximately half of these stars have color information, which is required for stellar population analysis. This considerable archive is thus in need of collation, analysis, and publication.Here we propose to compile such a catalog for public access and to use it for two science goals: 1} A test of existing MW stellar models, where we will in particular constrain the fainter and more distant stellar populations; and 2} Probe the shape and structure of the MW stellar halo with a deeper star catalog than is currently available. These science cases will be used to fully define the catalog, in particular by assessing the different populations present in the observations, and by assessing the level of noise from contaminants and the completeness of the survey

  20. BVRI PHOTOMETRY OF 53 UNUSUAL ASTEROIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Q.-Z.

    2011-02-15

    We present the results of BVRI photometry and classification of 53 unusual asteroids, including 35 near-Earth asteroids (NEAs), 6 high eccentricity/inclination asteroids, and 12 recently identified asteroid-pair candidates. Most of these asteroids were not classified prior to this work. For the few asteroids that have been previously studied, the results are generally in agreement. In addition to observing and classifying these objects, we merge the results from severalphotometric/spectroscopic surveys to create the largest-ever sample with 449 spectrally classified NEAs for statistical analysis. We identify a 'transition point' of the relative number of C/X-like and S-like NEAs at H {approx} 18 {r_reversible} D {approx} 1 km with confidence level at {approx}95% or higher. We find that the C/X-like:S-like ratio for 18 {<=} H < 22 is about twice as high as that of H < 18 (0.33 {+-} 0.04 versus 0.17 {+-} 0.02), virtually supporting the hypothesis that smaller NEAs generally have less weathered surfaces (therefore less reddish appearance) due to younger collision ages.

  1. BVI CCD photometry of 47 Tucanae

    SciTech Connect

    Alcaino, G.; Liller, W.

    1987-08-01

    CCD BVI main-sequence photometry of 47 Tuc is presented, matched to the recent BVI isochrones of VandenBerg and Bell (1985). The main-sequence turnoffs are found to be at V = 17.60 + or - 0.1, B-V = 0.56 + or - 0.02; V-I = 0.68 + or - 0.02, and B-I = 1.24 + or - 0.02. The magnitude difference between the main-sequence turnoff and the horizontal branch is 3.55 + or - 0.15 for all three color indices. A consistent age for 47 Tuc of 17 Gyr and a consistent distance modulus of (m-M)v = 13.2 are obtained for all three indices, and an absolute magnitude of Mv = 0.85 is determined for the horizontal branch stars. The results also favor the adoption of (Fe/H) near -0.5 as the best abundance value for 47 Tuc. 38 references.

  2. Time series photometry and starspot properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oláh, Katalin

    2011-08-01

    Systematic efforts of monitoring starspots from the middle of the XXth century, and the results obtained from the datasets, are summarized with special focus on the observations made by automated telescopes. Multicolour photometry shows correlations between colour indices and brightness, indicating spotted regions with different average temperatures originating from spots and faculae. Long-term monitoring of spotted stars reveals variability on different timescales. On the rotational timescale new spot appearances and starspot proper motions are followed from continuous changes of light curves during subsequent rotations. Sudden interchange of the more and less active hemispheres on the stellar surfaces is the so called flip-flop phenomenon. The existence and strength of the differential rotation is seen from the rotational signals of spots being at different stellar latitudes. Long datasets, with only short, annual interruptions, shed light on the nature of stellar activity cycles and multiple cycles. The systematic and/or random changes of the spot cycle lengths are discovered and described using various time-frequency analysis tools. Positions and sizes of spotted regions on stellar surfaces are calculated from photometric data by various softwares. From spot positions derived for decades, active longitudes on the stellar surfaces are found, which, in case of synchronized eclipsing binaries can be well positioned in the orbital frame, with respect to, and affected by, the companion stars.

  3. BVRI photometry of DQ Herculis in 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitrienko, E. S.; Ibragimov, M. A.; Savanov, I. S.; Satovskii, B. L.; Egamberdiev, Sh. A.; Burkhanov, O. A.

    2015-09-01

    The results of BV RI photometry of the nova DQ Her 1934 performed at the Maidanak Observatory of the Astronomical Institute of the Uzbek Academy of Sciences in October 2014 are presented. The system's brightness, the out-of-eclipse color indices, and the shape of the minima in the BV RI light curves, which are due to eclipses of the white dwarf with its accreting disk-like envelope by the red dwarf, correspond to one of the lowest activity levels observed during the system's deepest relaxation after a nova outburst. The orbital-phase variations of the color indices indicate the presence of a considerably non-uniform brightness distribution for light coming from the disk-like envelope and other gaseous structures of DQ Her, which are observed at orbital phases of 0.85-1.15. The results can be qualitatively interpreted in a picture in which the gas flow structure is formed during mass exchange in an intermediate polar. The behavior found for the color indices could be due, for example, to the visibility in this phase interval of the passage of regions of shocks (tidal shocks, a hot line, and/or a detached shock) through the line of sight.

  4. NEW UBVRI PHOTOMETRY OF 234 M33 STAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Jun

    2013-04-15

    This is the second paper of our series. In this paper, we present UBVRI photometry for 234 star clusters in the field of M33. For most of these star clusters, there is photometry in only two bands in previous studies. The photometry of these star clusters is performed using archival images from the Local Group Galaxies Survey, which covers 0.8 deg{sup 2} along the major axis of M33. Detailed comparisons show that, in general, our photometry is consistent with previous measurements, and in particular that our photometry is in good agreement with that of Zloczewski and Kaluzny. Combined with star cluster photometry in previous studies, we present some results: none of the M33 youngest clusters ({approx}10{sup 7} yr) have masses approaching 10{sup 5} M{sub Sun }, and comparisons with models of simple stellar populations suggest a large range of ages for M33 star clusters and some as old as the Galactic globular clusters.

  5. FIXING THE U-BAND PHOTOMETRY OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Krisciunas, Kevin; Bastola, Deepak; Suntzeff, Nicholas B.; Espinoza, Juan; Gonzalez, David; Gonzalez, Luis; Gonzalez, Sergio; Hsiao, Eric Y.; Morrell, Nidia; Phillips, Mark M.; Hamuy, Mario E-mail: suntzeff@physics.tamu.edu E-mail: hsiao@lco.cl E-mail: mmp@lco.cl

    2013-01-01

    We present previously unpublished photometry of supernovae 2003gs and 2003hv. Using spectroscopically derived corrections to the U-band photometry, we reconcile U-band light curves made from imagery with the Cerro Tololo 0.9 m, 1.3 m, and Las Campanas 1 m telescopes. Previously, such light curves showed a 0.4 mag spread at one month after maximum light. This gives us hope that a set of corrected ultraviolet light curves of nearby objects can contribute to the full utilization of rest-frame U-band data of supernovae at redshift {approx}0.3-0.8. As pointed out recently by Kessler et al. in the context of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey supernova search, if we take the published U-band photometry of nearby Type Ia supernovae at face value, there is a 0.12 mag U-band anomaly in the distance moduli of higher redshift objects. This anomaly led the Sloan survey to eliminate from their analyses all photometry obtained in the rest-frame U-band. The Supernova Legacy Survey eliminated observer frame U-band photometry, which is to say nearby objects observed in the U-band, but they used photometry of high-redshift objects no matter in which band the photons were emitted.

  6. Dithering Strategies and Point-Source Photometry

    SciTech Connect

    Samsing, Johan; Kim, Alex G

    2011-02-22

    The accuracy in the photometry of a point source depends on the point-spread function (PSF), detector pixelization, and observing strategy. The PSF and pixel response describe the spatial blurring of the source, the pixel scale describes the spatial sampling of a single exposure, and the observing strategy determines the set of dithered exposures with pointing offsets from which the source flux is inferred. In a wide-field imaging survey, sources of interest are randomly distributed within the field of view and hence are centered randomly within a pixel. A given hardware configuration and observing strategy therefore have a distribution of photometric uncertainty for sources of fixed flux that fall in the field. In this article we explore the ensemble behavior of photometric and position accuracies for different PSFs, pixel scales, and dithering patterns. We find that the average uncertainty in the flux determination depends slightly on dither strategy, whereas the position determination can be strongly dependent on the dithering. For cases with pixels much larger than the PSF, the uncertainty distributions can be non-Gaussian, with rms values that are particularly sensitive to the dither strategy. We also find that for these configurations with large pixels, pointings dithered by a fractional pixel amount do not always give minimal average uncertainties; this is in contrast to image reconstruction for which fractional dithers are optimal. When fractional pixel dithering is favored, a pointing accuracy of better than {approx}0.15 {approx}0.15 pixel width is required to maintain half the advantage over random dithers.

  7. Multicolor surface photometry of powerful radio galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, E.P.

    1988-01-01

    CCD images of 72 powerful radio galaxies have been obtained with the KPNO 2.1m, 4m and CTIO 4m telescopes utilizing B, V, and R filters to study the colors and other photometric properties of these large systems. The GASP software package was used for the data reduction and detailed 2-d surface photometry. In addition, image modeling techniques were employed to investigate the contributions to galaxy properties by point-like nuclear sources seen in some of these galaxies. It was found that powerful radio galaxies show a much higher frequency than normal bright ellipticals of having optical morphologies which deviate from elliptical symmetry. Approximately 50% of the sample exhibit non-elliptically symmetric isophotes. These prominent distortions are present at surface brightness levels of {le} 25 V mag/(arc sec){sup 2}. In addition, a large fraction ({approximately}50%) of the remaining radio galaxies without the aforementioned morphological peculiarities have large isophotal twists ({Delta}P.A. {ge} 10{degree}) or ellipticity gradients. Significantly {approximately}50% of the galaxies with strong optical emission lines in their spectra display optically peculiar structures very similar to those found by Toomre and Toomre (1972) in their simulations of interacting disk galaxies. The galaxies with weak emission lines in their spectra are less frequently ({approximately}10%) distorted from elliptical shape. Those that are exhibit features like isophote twists, double nuclei and close companion galaxies embedded in the radio galaxy optical isophotes. The (B-V) colors of many of the powerful radio galaxies with strong emission lines are blue relative to normal giant ellipticals at the same redshift.

  8. 2MASS Catalog Server Kit Version 2.1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, C.

    2013-10-01

    The 2MASS Catalog Server Kit is open source software for use in easily constructing a high performance search server for important astronomical catalogs. This software utilizes the open source RDBMS PostgreSQL, therefore, any users can setup the database on their local computers by following step-by-step installation guide. The kit provides highly optimized stored functions for positional searchs similar to SDSS SkyServer. Together with these, the powerful SQL environment of PostgreSQL will meet various user's demands. We released 2MASS Catalog Server Kit version 2.1 in 2012 May, which supports the latest WISE All-Sky catalog (563,921,584 rows) and 9 major all-sky catalogs. Local databases are often indispensable for observatories with unstable or narrow-band networks or severe use, such as retrieving large numbers of records within a small period of time. This software is the best for such purposes, and increasing supported catalogs and improvements of version 2.1 can cover a wider range of applications including advanced calibration system, scientific studies using complicated SQL queries, etc. Official page: http://www.ir.isas.jaxa.jp/~cyamauch/2masskit/

  9. Oxygen- and carbon-rich variable red giant populations in the Magellanic Clouds from EROS, OGLE, MACHO, and 2MASS photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiśniewski, M.; Marquette, J. B.; Beaulieu, J. P.; Schwarzenberg-Czerny, A.; Tisserand, P.; Lesquoy, É.

    2011-06-01

    Context. The carbon-to-oxygen (C/O) ratio of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars constitutes an important index of evolutionary and environment/metallicity factor. Aims: We develop a method for mass C/O classification of AGBs in photometric surveys without using periods. Methods: For this purpose we rely on the slopes in the tracks of individual stars in the colour-magnitude diagram. Results: We demonstrate that our method enables the separation of C-rich and O-rich AGB stars with little confusion. For the Magellanic Clouds we demonstrate that this method works for several photometric surveys and filter combinations. As we rely on no period identification, our results are relatively insensitive to the phase coverage, aliasing, and time-sampling problems that plague period analyses. For a subsample of our stars, we verify our C/O classification against published C/O catalogues. With our method we are able to produce C/O maps of the entire Magellanic Clouds. Conclusions: Our purely photometric method for classification of C- and O-rich AGBs constitutes a method of choice for large, near-infrared photometric surveys. Because our method depends on the slope of colour-magnitude variation but not on magnitude zero point, it remains applicable to objects with unknown distances.

  10. Revised Filter Profiles and Zero Points for Broadband Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Andrew W.; von Braun, Kaspar

    2015-02-01

    Estimating accurate bolometric fluxes for stars requires reliable photometry to absolutely flux calibrate the spectra. This is a significant problem for studies of very bright stars, which are generally saturated in modern photometric surveys. Instead we must rely on photometry with less precise calibration. We utilize precisely flux-calibrated spectra to derive improved filter bandpasses and zero points for the most common sources of photometry for bright stars. In total, we test 39 different filters in the General Catalog of Photometric Data as well as those from Tycho-2 and Hipparcos. We show that utilizing inaccurate filter profiles from the literature can create significant color terms resulting in fluxes that deviate by gsim10% from actual values. To remedy this we employ an empirical approach; we iteratively adjust the literature filter profile and zero point, convolve it with catalog spectra, and compare to the corresponding flux from the photometry. We adopt the passband values that produce the best agreement between photometry and spectroscopy and are independent of stellar color. We find that while most zero points change by < 5%, a few systems change by 10-15%. Our final profiles and zero points are similar to recent estimates from the literature. Based on determinations of systematic errors in our selected spectroscopic libraries, we estimate that most of our improved zero points are accurate to 0.5-1%.

  11. Correlating Total Visual Magnitude Estimates and CCD Photometry for Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidger, Mark Richard

    2015-08-01

    A key facet of understanding the activity of comets is coverage of their light curve. For some comets such as 2P/Encke there is good light curve coverage from visual observers extending back over many returns over more than 2 centuries. However, in recent years, CCD photometry by amateur astronomers has become the dominant data source and the number of total visual magnitude estimates has reduced sharply, making comparison of recent and historical photometric data for comets increasingly difficult. The relationship between total visual magnitude estimates - dominated by the emission from the Swan bands of C2 - and CCD aperture photometry - dominated by the dust continuum - has been far from clear.This paper compares CCD aperture photometry and total visual magnitude for several recent well-observed bright comets, including C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy), C/2012 S1 (ISON) and C/2011 L4 (PanSTARRS) using a consistent and homogeneous database of observations from (mainly) Spanish observers. For comets with a 1/r radial coma profile, good agreement is found between CCD aperture photometry and total visual magnitude estimates for a CCD aperture corresponding to a physical coma diameter of ≈105km.The relationship between the coma radial brightness slope and the equivalent physical aperture for CCD photometry to obtain agreement with total visual magnitude estimates is investigated.

  12. Empirical extinction coefficients for the GALEX, SDSS, 2MASS and WISE passbands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, H. B.; Liu, X. W.; Xiang, M. S.

    2013-04-01

    By using the `standard pair' technique of pairing stars of almost nil and high extinction but otherwise with almost identical stellar parameters from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), and combining this information with photometry from the SDSS, Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX), Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) photometry ranging from the far ultraviolet (UV) to the mid-infrared (mid-IR), we measure dust reddening in the FUV - NUV, NUV - u, u - g, g - r, r - i, i - z, z - J, J - H, H - Ks, Ks - W1 and W1 - W2 colours for thousands of Galactic stars. The measurements, together with the E(B - V) values given by Schlegel et al., allow us to derive the observed, model-free reddening coefficients for these colours. The results are compared with previous measurements and with the predictions of various Galactic reddening laws. We find that (i) the dust reddening map of Schlegel et al. overestimates E(B - V) by about 14 per cent, consistent with the recent work of Schlafly et al. and Schlafly & Finkbeiner; (ii) after accounting for the differences in reddening normalization, the newly deduced reddening coefficients for colours FUV - NUV, NUV - u, u - g, g - r, r - i, i - z, z - J, J - H and H - Ks differ by respectively -1640, 15.5, 12.6, -0.8, 3.4, -0.7, 3.5, 2.5 and 1.4 per cent from the predictions of the Fitzpatrick reddening law for an assumed total-to-selective extinction ratio R(V) = 3.1, and by respectively -1730, 13.0 , 8.1, 10.0, 8.0, -13.5, -1.7, -6.7 and -17.1 per cent from the predictions of the CCM reddening law; and (iii) all the new reddening coefficients, except those for NUV - u and u - g, favour the R(V) = 3.1 Fitzpatrick reddening law over the R(V) = 3.1 CCM and O'Donnell reddening laws. Using the Ks-band extinction coefficient predicted by the R(V) = 3.1 Fitzpatrick law and the observed reddening coefficients, we deduce new extinction coefficients for the FUV, NUV, u, g, r, i, z, J, H, W1 and W2

  13. HST photometry of the trapezium cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, Charles F.; Stauffer, John R.; Hartmann, Lee; Soderblom, David R.; Jones, Burton F.; Werner, Michael W.; Mccaughrean, Mark J.

    1994-01-01

    We have obtained images of 11 fields in the Trapezium cluster with the Planetary Camera (PC) of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in order to extend Herbig & Terndrup's (1986) study of this prototype, dense embedded cluster to fainter magnitudes than is possible from the ground. Using these images, we have identified 319 stars within an area of approximately 12 sq arc min corresponding roughly to a volume of approximately 0.065 cu pc assuming the cluster is approximately spherically symmetric. Our completeness limits for star identification in V-band and I-band images are V approximately = 20 and I(sub c) approximately = 19 respectively, corresponding to a mass limit of approximately 0.15 solar mass if the faintest stars have the same average A(sub v) as that estimated for the brighter stars in the cluster. We have compared the V versus V-I color-magnitude diagram derived from the HST photometry to new theoretical isochrones. Star formation in the Trapezium appears to be remarkably coeval, with greater than or = 80% of the stars having inferred ages less than 1 Myr. Over the somewhat limited mass range of the observations, there is no evidence for 'bimodal' star formation-the high- and low-mass stars appear to have the same ages. The sharp cores of the HST images and the small angular size of the PC pixels has allowed us to identify 35 new visual binaries in the cluster with separations from approximately 0.06 arc sec (approximately 26 AU) to approximately 1.0 arc sec (approximately 440 AU). For the range of binary separations that we are sensitive to, the observed binary frequency for the Trapezium is essentially identical to that estimated for field low-mass stars by Duquennoy & Mayor (1991). The most straightfoward inference from this result is that binaries in this separation are unlikely to be formed by a tidal capture process. We have also identified three stars which have associated compact nebulosity visible in the HST images. One of these star + nebulosity

  14. Optical broad-band photometry and reference image for APMUKS(BJ) B215839.70-615403.9 / ASASSN-15lh from the Dark Energy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melchior, Peter; Drlica-Wagner, Alexander; Bechtol, Keith; Rykoff, Eli; Hartley, William; Dark Energy Survey Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    We report optical broad-band photometry of the host galaxy APMUKS(BJ) B215839.70-615403.9 of SLSN ASASSN-15lh (ATel #7642; Dong et al., arXiv:1507.03010). The images were obtained using the DECam imager on the Blanco 4-m telescope at NOAO's Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory during Year-2 observations of the Dark Energy Survey (DES). A preliminary reduction of the images was performed by the DES Data Management pipeline (Mohr et al. 2012, SPIE Conference Series, 84510D; Desai et al. 2012, ApJ, 757, 83). The photometry was measured using SExtractor with additional calibration via stellar locus regression to provide magnitude zero points with 2-3% calibration uncertainty for point sources (relative to 2MASS) and mildly increased uncertainties for extended sources. We fit the DES g-r, r-i, and i-z colors to a red-sequence model from redMaPPer (Rykoff et al. 2014, ApJ, 785, 104) and obtain a redshift 0.25±0.02, consistent with the spectroscopic redshift of z = 0.2326 (ATel #7774). Fixed to that redshift, the host photometry is fully consistent with a red-sequence galaxy. We combine photometry from DES grizY with VHS NIR (ATel #7776) and WISE IR and fit a linear combination of single stellar populations with a variety of ages. We find that the fit is dominated by an old (5 Gyr) component, consistent with those of elliptical galaxies. We further compare with dusty SEDs taken from the latest set of templates in EAZY (Brammer, van Dokkum & Coppi, 2008, ApJ, 686, 1503). The combined host photometry is not well described by any of the dusty templates.

  15. Catálogo de Grupos Compactos del 2MASS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, M. C.; Alonso, M. V.; Mendes de Oliveira, C.

    We present a catalog of Compact Groups automatically extracted from the 2MASS extended source catalog (Sktrutskie et al. 2006). Following the cri- teria defined by Hickson (1982), we find 329 Compact Groups. After a vi- sual inspection, we find out that only 295 groups constitute our final catalog, due to some galaxy miss-identifications in the parent catalog. Finally, we found 17% previously known Compact Groups while the remaining (83%) represents a brand new sample. From these Compact Groups, 172 have all their members with redshifts available in the literature, however only 97 of these groups (56%) have four or more accordant galaxies. This is the largest velocity filtered sample available at present and constitutes the baseline to our statistical studies of Compact Groups. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  16. Division B Commission 25: Astronomical Photometry and Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Alistair; Adelman, Saul; Milone, Eugene; Anthony-Twarog, Barbara; Bastien, Pierre; Chen, Wen Ping; Howell, Steve; Knude, Jens; Kurtz, Donald; Magalhães, Antonio Mario; Menzies, John; Smith, Allyn; Volk, Kevin

    2016-04-01

    Commission 25 (C25) deals with the techniques and issues involved with the measurement of optical and infrared radiation intensities and polarization from astronomical sources. As such, in recent years attention has focused on photometric standard stars, atmospheric extinction, photometric passbands, transformation between systems, nomenclature, and observing and reduction techniques. At the start of the trimester C25 changed its name from Stellar Photometry and Polarization to Astronomical Photometry and Polarization so as to explicitly include in its mandate particular issues arising from the measurement of resolved sources, given the importance of photometric redshifts of distant galaxies for many of the large photometric surveys now underway. We begin by summarizing commission activities over the 2012-2014 period, follow with a report on Polarimetry, continue with Photometry topics that have been of interest to C25 members, and conclude with a Vision for the Future.

  17. CCD Photometry of bright stars using objective wire mesh

    SciTech Connect

    Kamiński, Krzysztof; Zgórz, Marika; Schwarzenberg-Czerny, Aleksander

    2014-06-01

    Obtaining accurate photometry of bright stars from the ground remains problematic due to the danger of overexposing the target and/or the lack of suitable nearby comparison stars. The century-old method of using objective wire mesh to produce multiple stellar images seems promising for the precise CCD photometry of such stars. Furthermore, our tests on β Cep and its comparison star, differing by 5 mag, are very encouraging. Using a CCD camera and a 20 cm telescope with the objective covered by a plastic wire mesh, in poor weather conditions, we obtained differential photometry with a precision of 4.5 mmag per two minute exposure. Our technique is flexible and may be tuned to cover a range as big as 6-8 mag. We discuss the possibility of installing a wire mesh directly in the filter wheel.

  18. CCD Photometry of Bright Stars Using Objective Wire Mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiński, Krzysztof; Schwarzenberg-Czerny, Aleksander; Zgórz, Marika

    2014-06-01

    Obtaining accurate photometry of bright stars from the ground remains problematic due to the danger of overexposing the target and/or the lack of suitable nearby comparison stars. The century-old method of using objective wire mesh to produce multiple stellar images seems promising for the precise CCD photometry of such stars. Furthermore, our tests on β Cep and its comparison star, differing by 5 mag, are very encouraging. Using a CCD camera and a 20 cm telescope with the objective covered by a plastic wire mesh, in poor weather conditions, we obtained differential photometry with a precision of 4.5 mmag per two minute exposure. Our technique is flexible and may be tuned to cover a range as big as 6-8 mag. We discuss the possibility of installing a wire mesh directly in the filter wheel.

  19. SED and Emission Line Properties of Red 2MASS AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuraszkiewicz, Joanna; Wilkes, Belinda J.; Schmidt, Gary; Ghosh, Himel

    2009-09-01

    Radio and far-IR surveys, and modeling of the cosmic X-ray background suggest that a large population of obscured AGN has been missed by traditional, optical surveys. The Two Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS) has revealed a large population (surface density comparable to that of optically selected AGN with Ks<14.5mag) of mostly nearby (median z=0.25), red, moderately obscured AGN, among which 75% are previously unidentified emission-line AGN, with 85% showing broad emission lines. We present the SED and emission line properties of 44 such red (J-Ks>2) 2MASS AGN observed with Chandra. They lie at z<0.37, span a full range of spectral types (Type 1, intermediate, Type 2),Ks-to-X-ray slopes, and polarization (<13%). Their IR-to-X-ray spectral energy distributions (SEDs) are red in the near-IR/opt/UV showing little or no blue bump. The optical colors are affected by reddening, host galaxy emission, redshift, and in few, highly polarized objects, also by scattered AGN light. The levels of obscuration obtained from optical, X-rays, and far-IR imply N_H

  20. A Study of Dust Cloud Parameters by Vilnius Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smriglio, F.; Dasgupta, A. K.; Boyle, R. P.

    Three-dimensional classification of stars based on their seven-color CCD photometry in the Vilnius system has been succesfully applied to study the small scale structure of interstellar dust clouds. In the present paper the statistical equations of Munch are modified and applied to stars located beyond the galactic absorbing layer. This particular use of Munch's statistics and the properties of CCD photometry in the Vilnius system offer a better possibility of probing the small scale structure of interstellar medium outside of the solar vicinity. This new technique and the first results are discussed.

  1. The spotted contact binary SS ARIETIS - Spectroscopy and infrared photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rainger, P. P.; Bell, S. A.; Hilditch, R. W.

    1992-02-01

    The first infrared photometry for the W-UMa system SS Ari is presented. An analysis based on medium-resolution spectroscopy presented here shows that SS Ari is a W-type system with a mass ratio of 0.33. It seems certain that the asymmetry in the published light curves and those obtained for this study can be explained by the effect of spots on one or possibly both components of the system. The precise location, size and temperature of these spots require the use of Doppler Imaging techniques in conjunction with high-quality multiband photometry.

  2. A method for determining stellar parameters from multicolor photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sichevskij, S. G.

    2012-09-01

    Amethod for determining the most probable spectral types, color excesses E B- V , and distances of stars from multicolor photometry is described. The main idea of the method is modeling the photometric data using various models for the stellar spectra and the interstellar extinction law, and applying the maximum likelihood method. The reliability of the method is estimated using stars with known spectral types and WBVR photometry, based on the empirical library of stellar spectra of Pickles and the model for the interstellar extinction law developed by Fluks et al.

  3. 2MASS J035523.37+113343.7: A Young, Dusty, Nearby, Isolated Brown Dwarf Resembling a Giant Exoplanet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Rice, Emily L.; Cruz, Kelle L.; Mamajek, Eric E.; Núñez, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    We present parallax and proper motion measurements, near-infrared spectra, and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer photometry for the low surface gravity L5γ dwarf 2MASS J035523.37+113343.7 (2M0355). We use these data to evaluate photometric, spectral, and kinematic signatures of youth as 2M0355 is the reddest isolated L dwarf yet classified. We confirm its low-gravity spectral morphology and find a strong resemblance to the sharp triangular shaped H-band spectrum of the ~10 Myr planetary-mass object 2M1207b. We find that 2M0355 is underluminous compared to a normal field L5 dwarf in the optical and Mauna Kea Observatory J, H, and K bands and transitions to being overluminous from 3 to 12 μm, indicating that enhanced photospheric dust shifts flux to longer wavelengths for young, low-gravity objects, creating a red spectral energy distribution. Investigating the near-infrared color-magnitude diagram for brown dwarfs confirms that 2M0355 is redder and underluminous compared to the known brown dwarf population, similar to the peculiarities of directly imaged exoplanets 2M1207b and HR8799bcd. We calculate UVW space velocities and find that the motion of 2M0355 is consistent with young disk objects (<2-3 Gyr) and it shows a high likelihood of membership in the AB Doradus association.

  4. 2MASS J035523.37+113343.7: A YOUNG, DUSTY, NEARBY, ISOLATED BROWN DWARF RESEMBLING A GIANT EXOPLANET

    SciTech Connect

    Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Rice, Emily L.; Cruz, Kelle L.; Nunez, Alejandro; Mamajek, Eric E. E-mail: jfaherty@amnh.org

    2013-01-01

    We present parallax and proper motion measurements, near-infrared spectra, and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer photometry for the low surface gravity L5{gamma} dwarf 2MASS J035523.37+113343.7 (2M0355). We use these data to evaluate photometric, spectral, and kinematic signatures of youth as 2M0355 is the reddest isolated L dwarf yet classified. We confirm its low-gravity spectral morphology and find a strong resemblance to the sharp triangular shaped H-band spectrum of the {approx}10 Myr planetary-mass object 2M1207b. We find that 2M0355 is underluminous compared to a normal field L5 dwarf in the optical and Mauna Kea Observatory J, H, and K bands and transitions to being overluminous from 3 to 12 {mu}m, indicating that enhanced photospheric dust shifts flux to longer wavelengths for young, low-gravity objects, creating a red spectral energy distribution. Investigating the near-infrared color-magnitude diagram for brown dwarfs confirms that 2M0355 is redder and underluminous compared to the known brown dwarf population, similar to the peculiarities of directly imaged exoplanets 2M1207b and HR8799bcd. We calculate UVW space velocities and find that the motion of 2M0355 is consistent with young disk objects (<2-3 Gyr) and it shows a high likelihood of membership in the AB Doradus association.

  5. Galileo Photometry of Asteroid 951 Gaspra

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Helfenstein, P.; Veverka, J.; Thomas, P.C.; Simonelli, D.P.; Lee, P.; Klaasen, K.; Johnson, T.V.; Breneman, H.; Head, J.W.; Murchie, S.; Fanale, F.; Robinson, M.; Clark, B.; Granahan, J.; Garbeil, H.; McEwen, A.S.; Kirk, R.L.; Davies, M.; Neukum, G.; Mottola, S.; Wagner, R.; Belton, M.; Chapman, C.; Pilcher, C.

    1994-01-01

    Galileo images of Gaspra make it possible for the first time to determine a main-belt asteroid's photometric properties accurately by providing surface-resolved coverage over a wide range of incidence and emission angles and by extending the phase angle coverage to phases not observable from Earth. We combine Earth-based telescopic photometry over phase angles 2?? ??? ?? ??? 25?? with Galileo whole-disk and disk-resolved data at 33?? ??? ?? ??? 51?? to derive average global photometric properties in terms of Hapke's photometric model. The microscopic texture and particle phase-function behavior of Gaspra's surface are remarkably like those of other airless rocky bodies such as the Moon. The macroscopic surface roughness parameter, ??̄ = 29??, is slightly larger than that reported for typical lunar materials. The particle single scattering albedo, ??́0 = 0.36 ?? 0.07, is significantly larger than for lunar materials, and the opposition surge amplitude, B0 = 1.63 ?? 0.07, is correspondingly smaller. We determine a visual geometric albedo pv = 0.22 ?? 0.06 for Gaspra, in close agreement with pv = 0.22 ?? 0.03 estimated from Earth-based observations. Gaspra's phase integral is 0.47, and the bolometric Bond albedo is estimated to be 0.12 ?? 0.03. An albedo map derived by correcting Galileo images with our average global photometric function reveals subdued albedo contrasts of ??10% or less over Gaspra's northern hemisphere. Several independent classification algorithms confirm the subtle spectral heterogeneity reported earlier (S. Mottola, M. DiMartino, M. Gonano-Beurer, H. Hoffman, and G. Neukum, 1993, Asteroids, Comets, Meteors, pp. 421-424; M. J. S. Belton et al., 1992, Science 257, 1647-1652). Whole-disk colors (0.41 ??? ?? ??? 0.99 ??m) vary systematically with longitude by about ??5%, but color differences as large as 30% occur locally. Colors vary continuously between end-member materials whose areal distribution correlates with regional topography. Infrared

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: VI photometry and spectroscopy in h+{chi} Per (Currie+, 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currie, T.; Hernandez, J.; Irwin, J.; Kenyon, S. J.; Tokarz, S.; Balog, Z.; Bragg, A.; Berlind, P.; Calkins, M.

    2010-04-01

    Optical VI photometry of h and {chi} Persei were taken with the Mosaic Imager at the 4m Mayall telescope at the Kitt Peak National Observatory on 2006 October 13-16 and 27-30. We acquired low-resolution optical spectroscopy of Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS)-detected stars within 1deg2 of the cluster centers. For faint stars, we used the multiobject, fiber-fed spectrograph Hectospec on the 6.5m MMT. Brighter stars were observed with the fiber-fed spectrograph Hydra on the 3.5m WIYN telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory and single-slit FAST spectrograph on the 1.5m Tillinghast telescope at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory. (4 data files).

  7. Infrared space observatory photometry of circumstellar dust in Vega-type systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fajardo-Acosta, S. B.; Stencel, R. E.; Backman, D. E.; Thakur, N.

    1998-01-01

    The ISOPHOT (Infrared Space Observatory Photometry) instrument onboard the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) was used to obtain 3.6-90 micron photometry of Vega-type systems. Photometric data were calibrated with the ISOPHOT fine calibration source 1 (FCS1). Linear regression was used to derive transformations to make comparisons to ground-based and IRAS photometry systems possible. These transformations were applied to the photometry of 14 main-sequence stars. Details of these results are reported on.

  8. Photometry of Faint and Wide Doubles in Vulpecula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, Wilfried; Thuemen, Chris

    2016-04-01

    Images of several double stars in Vulpecula published on the "Double Star Imaging Project" Yahoo Group page suggest magnitude issues compared with the corresponding WDS catalog data per April 2015. Taking additional images with V-filter enabled photometry for these pairs, providing confirming results.

  9. Photometry of Faint and Wide Doubles in Sagitta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, Wilfried; Thuemen, Chris

    2016-02-01

    Images of several double stars in Sagitta published on the "Double Star Imaging Project" Yahoo Group page suggest magnitude issues compared with the corresponding WDS catalog data per April 2015. Taking additional images with V-filter enabled photometry for these pairs, provided confirming results.

  10. Photometry and Measurement of Faint and Wide Doubles in Eridanus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, Wilfried; Thuemen, Chris

    2015-07-01

    Images of several double stars in Eridanus published on the "Double Star Imaging Project" Yahoo Group page suggest magnitude issues compared with the corresponding WDS catalog data per 2014.12. Taking additional images with V-filter enabled photometry for these pairs with confirming results.

  11. Multiband photometry of PSNJ14102342-4318437 with OAUNI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereyra, A.; Cori, W.; Ricra, J.; Zevallos, M.; Tello, J.

    2016-01-01

    We report multiband photometry of Type Ib SN PSNJ14102342-4318437 (ATel #8415, ATel #8434, ATel #8437, ATel #8504) on 2016-01-10 (UT) gathered with the OAUNI 51cm telescope (Pereyra et al. 2015; arXiv:1512.03104) at Huancayo Observatory, Peru.

  12. Characterization of Transiting Exoplanets by Way of Differential Photometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowley, Michael; Hughes, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a simple activity for plotting and characterizing the light curve from an exoplanet transit event by way of differential photometry analysis. Using free digital imaging software, participants analyse a series of telescope images with the goal of calculating various exoplanet parameters, including size, orbital radius and…

  13. Photoelectric photometry of J V. [Jupiter satellite Amalthea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millis, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    UBV photometry of J V (Amalthea) near greatest western elongation shows this satellite to be about one magnitude fainter than previously believed. It is observed to be very red, having a B-V color index near + 1.5 mag. Unlike the Galilean satellites, J V appears to be a low-albedo object.

  14. Research Note - Absolute UBV Photometry at the Zacatecas Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, W. J.; Parrao, L.; Gonazlez-Bedolla, S. F.; Rios-Herrera, M.; Berumen, M. R.

    1985-12-01

    Atmospheric extinction data, color coefficients, errors of observation and a list of standard and comparison stars are given for UB V photometry at the Astronomical Observatory in Zacatecas. Our observing and reduction procedures are discussed briefly, and our extinction coefficients and observing errors compared with previous values. The uses of these results are mentioned.

  15. JCMT COADD: UKT14 continuum and photometry data reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, David; Oliveira, Firmin J.; Tilanus, Remo P. J.; Jenness, Tim

    2014-11-01

    COADD was used to reduce photometry and continuum data from the UKT14 instrument on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope in the 1990s. The software can co-add multiple observations and perform sigma clipping and Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistical analysis. Additional information on the software is available in the JCMT Spring 1993 newsletter (large PDF).

  16. Iontophoresis and Flame Photometry: A Hybrid Interdisciplinary Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, Duncan; Cottam, Linzi; Bradley, Sarah; Brannigan, Jeanie; Davis, James

    2010-01-01

    The combination of reverse iontophoresis and flame photometry provides an engaging analytical experiment that gives first-year undergraduate students a flavor of modern drug delivery and analyte extraction techniques while reinforcing core analytical concepts. The experiment provides a highly visual demonstration of the iontophoresis technique and…

  17. BVRI Photometry of the Supernova Candidate Gaia16ath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinko, J.; Feher, T.; Gyurita, A.; Redli, M.; Sukolova, D.

    2016-07-01

    We report confirmation and photometry of the recently discovered Gaia Science Alerts transient Gaia16ath. CCD frames were taken with the 60/90 cm Schmidt telescope through Bessell B,V,R,I filters at Konkoly Observatory, Piszkesteto, Hungary on July 11.01 UT. The transient was detected with high significance (S/N > 20) in all bands.

  18. Photoelectric UBV-photometry of triple-star components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anosova, Zh. P.; Sudakov, S. V.

    Photoelectric UBV photometry has been obtained for components of 30 bright and nearby (V ⪉ 10m, r ⪉ 100 pc) triple stars for purposes of finding physically linked triple systems, their distances and the subsequent investigation of their dynamical evolution. For every component colour excesses EB-V and EU-B are determined and photometric parallaxes πph are calculated.

  19. Crowded Field Photometry in the CLASH Clusters: Measuring the Red Sequence of Cluster Galaxies with Robust Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, Thomas; Donahue, Megan; Moustakas, John; Kelson, Daniel; Coe, Dan A.; Postman, Marc; CLASH Team

    2016-01-01

    The Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH) is an HST multi-cycle treasury program investigating 25 massive clusters of galaxies with X-ray gas Tx > 5 keV, spanning ~5 to ~30 x 10^14 solar masses, and a redshift range of 0.15 < z < 0.9. With 500 orbits of HST time and 16-filter, ultraviolet to infrared photometry of each cluster, this survey offers an unprecedented dataset for cluster galaxy photometry across a span of age and mass, but obtaining robust photometry for the cluster members has been hampered by the crowded field. We have developed a new technique to detect and define objects despite the presence of overlapping light profiles and to measure photometry of galaxies overlapping the extended haloes of massive galaxies. Utilizing spectral energy distribution fitting, we infer the properties of the detected galaxies, including their abundances and the time since their first star formation. Here we will discuss our technique and results, including the role metallicity and age play in shaping the red sequence of cluster galaxies.

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Gaia photometry for white dwarfs (Carrasco+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, J. M.; Catalan, S.; Jordi, C.; Tremblay, P.-E.; Napiwotzki, R.; Luri, X.; Robin, A. C.; Kowalski, P. M.

    2014-03-01

    The Gaia space mission, through its 5-6 years survey of the whole sky up to magnitude V=20-25, will drastically increase the sample of known white dwarfs allowing to address new science questions. In this paper we provide a characterisation of Gaia photometry for the case of white dwarfs to better prepare for the analysis of the scientific output of the mission including relationships among colours involving Gaia magnitudes (white light G, blue GBP, red GRP and GRVS passbands) and colours from other commonly used photometric systems (Johnson-Cousins, SDSS and 2MASS). We also present numbers of white dwarfs predicted by the Gaia Universe Model Snapshot and compare them with an alternative simulation calibrated with the local white dwarfs sample. In these online tables we provide the values used to fit the relationships in the paper, especially useful for those cases where the deviation from the established relationships is large. The most recent Gaia transmission curves and three different compositions for white dwarfs were considered here (pure hydrogen, pure helium and mixed composition with H/He=0.1). (3 data files).

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Vilnius photometry near Sh 2-205 (Straizys+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straizys, V.; Cepas, V.; Boyle, R. P.; Zdanavicius, J.; Maskoliunas, M.; Kazlauskas, A.; Zdanavicius, K.; Cernis, K.

    2016-04-01

    Table 1 contains the results of photometry of 302 stars down to V=19.5mag in the Vilnius seven-color system in the vicinity of the dark cloud TGU H942 P7 and emission nebula Sh2-205. Photometric data are used to classify stars in spectral and luminosity classes. The identification numbers, coordinates, V magnitudes and six color indices in the Vilnius system, photometric two-dimensional spectral types (spectral and luminosity classes) are given. The identification numbers start from from 1001 to avoid confusion with the catalog of Cepas et al. (2013BaltA..22..243C, Cat. J/BaltA/22/223). The coordinates are from PPMXL catalog (Roeser et al. 2010AJ....139.2440R, Cat. I/317). Table 2 contains the list of 88 YSOs, identified using the Koenig & Leisawitz (2014ApJ...791..131K) classification scheme, which combines the WISE and 2MASS near- and mid-infrared colours. The identification number and W1, W2, W3, J, H, Ks magnitudes are from WISE All-sky Data Release (Cutri et al., 2012yCat.2311....0C, Cat. II/311). The types of identified YSOs are given. (2 data files).

  2. CIRCUMSTELLAR ENVIRONMENT AND EFFECTIVE TEMPERATURE OF THE YOUNG SUBSTELLAR ECLIPSING BINARY 2MASS J05352184-0546085

    SciTech Connect

    Mohanty, Subhanjoy; Stassun, Keivan G.; Mathieu, Robert D.

    2009-05-20

    We present new Spitzer IRAC/PU/MIPS photometry from 3.6 to 24 {mu}m, and new Gemini GMOS photometry at 0.48 {mu}m, of the young brown dwarf eclipsing binary 2MASS J05352184-0546085, located in the Orion Nebula Cluster. No excess disk emission is detected. The measured fluxes at {lambda} {<=} 8 {mu}m are within 1{sigma} ({approx}<0.1 mJy) of a bare photosphere, and the 3{sigma} upper limit at 16 {mu}m is a mere 0.04 mJy above the bare photospheric level. Together with the known properties of the system, this implies the absence of optically thick disks around the individual components. It also implies that if any circumbinary disk is present, it must either be optically thin and extremely tenuous (10{sup -10} M {sub sun}) if it extends in to within {approx}0.1 AU of the binary (the approximate tidal truncation radius), or it must be optically thick with a large inner hole, >0.6-10 AU in radius depending on degree of flaring. The consequence in all cases is that disk accretion is likely to be negligible or absent. This supports the recent proposal that the strong H{alpha} emission in the primary (more massive) brown dwarf results from chromospheric activity, and thereby bolsters the hypothesis that the surprising T {sub eff} inversion observed between the components is due to strong magnetic fields on the primary. Our data also set constraints on the T {sub eff} of the components independent of spectral type, and thereby on models of the aforementioned magnetic field effects. We discuss the consequences for the derived fundamental properties of young brown dwarfs and very low mass stars in general. Specifically, if very active isolated young brown dwarfs and very low mass stars suffer the same activity/field related effects as the 2M0535-05 primary, the low-mass stellar/substellar initial mass function currently derived from standard evolutionary tracks may be substantially in error.

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Infrared photometry of all known members in Taurus (Esplin+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esplin, T. L.; Luhman, K. L.; Mamajek, E. E.

    2016-08-01

    =100 for all targets except 2MASS J04221376+1525298, which was observed with the short cross-dispersed (SXD) mode (R=800). Our classifications are presented in Table6. The 34 remaining viable candidates that have not been observed with spectroscopy are presented in Table7. (6 data files).

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Infrared photometry of all known members in Taurus (Esplin+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esplin, T. L.; Luhman, K. L.; Mamajek, E. E.

    2016-08-01

    =100 for all targets except 2MASS J04221376+1525298, which was observed with the short

  5. RASNZ Photometry Section, Incorporating the Auckland Photoelectric Observers' Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, S.

    2012-06-01

    (Abstract only) This review traces the development of amateur photoelectric and CCD photometry in New Zealand from its beginnings in the late 1960s at Christchurch and Auckland, through the Auckland Photoelectric Observers' Group and the RASNZ Photometry Section to its present place in Variable Stars South. For this period of over forty years the participants have been heavily involved with southern hemisphere variable star astronomy and observatories such as Carter, Mt. John, and Auckland, together with which were sponsored the highly successful photoelectric conferences, PEP 1-5. Samples of various projects are shown and described. The full text can be seen at http://www.variablestarssouth.org/index.php/community/member-publications/posters

  6. Copernicus spectra and infrared photometry of 42 Orionis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, H. M.; Snow, T. P., Jr.; Gehrz, R. D.; Hackwell, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    The Orion sword star 42 Ori is embedded in a nebula north of and separated from the Orion nebula. The B1 V star is probably normal. Other members of the multiple remain poorly defined, and the nebula may exhibit some peculiarities that may depend on them. Copernicus ultraviolet spectra of the star are described here, especially in the form of tables of wavelength identifications. The properties of the interstellar material in the line of sight are also discussed. Infrared photometry is presented which suggests that the ratio of total to selective extinction ranges from 3 to 3.5 for the interstellar matter in the direction of 42 Ori. The IR photometry provides no evidence for companion stellar or circumstellar components.

  7. An Aperture Photometry Pipeline for K2 Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzasi, Derek L.; Carboneau, Lindsey; Lezcano, Andy; Vydra, Ekaterina

    2016-01-01

    As part of an ongoing research program with undergraduate students at Florida Gulf Coast University, we have constructed an aperture photometry pipeline for K2 data. The pipeline performs dynamic automated aperture mask definition for all targets in the K2 fields, followed by aperture photometry and detrending. Our pipeline is currently used to support a number of projects, including studies of stellar rotation and activity, red giant asteroseismology, gyrochronology, and exoplanet searches. In addition, output is used to support an undergraduate class on exoplanets aimed at a student audience of both majors and non-majors. The pipeline is designed for both batch and single-target use, and is easily extensible to data from other missions, and pipeline output is available to the community. This paper will describe our pipeline and its capabilities and illustrate the quality of the results, drawing on all of the applications for which it is currently used.

  8. High-speed multicolour photometry with CMOS cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokhvala, S. M.; Zhilyaev, B. E.; Reshetnyk, V. M.

    2012-11-01

    We present the results of testing the commercial digital camera Nikon D90 with a CMOS sensor for high-speed photometry with a small telescope Celestron 11'' at the Peak Terskol Observatory. CMOS sensor allows to perform photometry in 3 filters simultaneously that gives a great advantage compared with monochrome CCD detectors. The Bayer BGR colour system of CMOS sensors is close to the Johnson BVR system. The results of testing show that one can carry out photometric measurements with CMOS cameras for stars with the V-magnitude up to ≃14^{m} with the precision of 0.01^{m}. Stars with the V-magnitude up to ˜10 can be shot at 24 frames per second in the video mode.

  9. Absolute stellar photometry on moderate-resolution FPA images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stone, T.C.

    2009-01-01

    An extensive database of star (and Moon) images has been collected by the ground-based RObotic Lunar Observatory (ROLO) as part of the US Geological Survey program for lunar calibration. The stellar data are used to derive nightly atmospheric corrections for the observations from extinction measurements, and absolute calibration of the ROLO sensors is based on observations of Vega and published reference flux and spectrum data. The ROLO telescopes were designed for imaging the Moon at moderate resolution, thus imposing some limitations for the stellar photometry. Attaining accurate stellar photometry with the ROLO image data has required development of specialized processing techniques. A key consideration is consistency in discriminating the star core signal from the off-axis point spread function. The analysis and processing methods applied to the ROLO stellar image database are described. ?? 2009 BIPM and IOP Publishing Ltd.

  10. TFIT: A Photometry Package for Mixed-Resolution Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laidler, V. G.; Grogin, N.; Clubb, K.; Ferguson, H.; Papovich, C.; Dickinson, M.; Idzi, R.; MacDonald, E.; Ouchi, M.; Mobasher, B.

    2006-07-01

    TFIT is a software package for measuring relative galaxy photometry between imaging data sets with different angular resolutions, such as the Hubble ACS and Spitzer IRAC images taken for the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS). It combines prior information about spatial position and morphology obtained from high angular resolution images with PSF information about both images to construct object templates, which it then fits to a lower-resolution image of the same field. Simulations demonstrate that this technique improves accuracy in uncrowded fields, with performance holding steady as crowding increases and object separation decreases to 1.5 PSF FWHM: outperforming SExtractor by a factor of two. Photometry is also measured, with < 10% degradation, for objects that SExtractor fails to deblend. On real GOODS data, TFIT produces results that are consistent with a traditional PSF subtraction method. TFIT is implemented in Python and C++.

  11. Astronomical Photometry and the Legacy of Arne Henden (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joner, M.

    2015-06-01

    (Abstract only) Arne Henden has helped provide a valuable resource to the photometric community with the publication of the 1982 book Astronomical Photometry. I will present a brief review of the topics covered in this handbook and recount some of the many times that it has been useful to myself and my students for answering a wide variety of questions dealing with the acquisition and reduction of photometric observations.

  12. Luminosities and temperatures of M dwarf stars from infrared photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veeder, G. J.

    1974-01-01

    Bolometric magnitudes for a large number of M type dwarf stars, obtained by broadband infrared photometry at 1.65, 2.2, and 3.5 microns, are reviewed. The data obtained indicate that one parameter is sufficient to describe the blanketing in all of the UBVRI bands for all types of M dwarfs. In general, late M dwarfs seem to have lower effective temperatures than are predicted by theoretical models.

  13. UBV photometry of OB and field stars at l = 250

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, B.C. )

    1990-09-01

    Photoelectric UBV photometry is presented for 70 stars in the SLS Catalog and 35 field stars in the vicinity of l = 250. Reddenings vary from a minimum of 0.25 up to 0.9. Except for six stars, possibly possessing a common distance and reddening, the distance modulus-color excess diagram of the SLS stars reveals no obvious clusters or associations. SLS stars 989 and 999 may be variable. 23 refs.

  14. Using a Web Cam CCD to do V Band Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temple, Paul

    2009-05-01

    With the plethora of cheap web cam based CCD cameras in the market today, it seemed expedient to find out if they can be used to do photometry. An experiment was planned to determine if it was possible to do this kind of exacting measurement. Arne Henden (AAVSO) believed it would be possible to do V band photometry to 0.05 mag accuracy with a web cam CCD. Using a 6" refractor, the heart of M42 was repeatedly imaged. Theta 2 and SAO 132322 were the comparison stars and V361 Orion was the target variable. Since the 1/4 HAD CCD chip only allows for a field of 10x7 arc minutes using the 6" refractor, the number targets was limited. The RGB on the chip itself provides the filters needed for photometry. The G band pass on the chip ranges from 425-650 nm with a peak band pass at 540, V band pass is 475-645 with a peak at 525. The results indicate that a web cam CCD can be used for V band photometry. With a 10 second calibrated exposure without the Peltier cooling being engaged, the results for the 2 target stars were ± 0.18 mag. The star Theta 2 was 0.18 brighter in V than the actual measurement from the Tycho catalog. SAO 132322 was -0.012 mag dimmer than the listed Tycho measurement. Then using SAO 132322 and Theta 2 as comparison stars, V361 Orion was estimated at 7.786 magnitudes. This is inline with visual estimates received before and after this date. With more estimates of known magnitude comparison stars, a correction factor should be estimated and applied to the variable work that will make it more accurate. This correction factor should bring it close to Arne Henden's estimate of 0.05 mag accuracy.

  15. One Percent Strömvil Photometry in M 67

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, A. G. D.; Boyle, R. P.; Janusz, R.

    2005-05-01

    The Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope on Mt. Graham is being used in a program of CCD photometry of open and globular clusters. We are using the Ströomvil System (Straižys et al. 1996), a combination of the Strömgren and Vilnius Systems. This system allows stars to be classified as to temperature, surface gravity, metallicity and reddening from the photometric measures alone. However, to make accurate estimates of the stellar parameters the photometry should be accurate to 1 or 1.5 percent. In our initial runs on the VATT we did not achieve this accuracy. The problem turned out to be scattered light in the telescope and this has now been reduced so we can do accurate photometry. Boyle has written a routine in IRAF which allows us to correct the flats for any differences. We take rotated frames and also frames which are offset in position by one third of a frame, east-west and north-south. Measures of the offset stars give us the corrections that need to be made to the flat. Robert Janusz has written a program, the CommandLog, which allows us to paste IRAF commands in the correct order to reduce measures made on a given observing run. There is an automatic version where one can test various parameters and get a set of solutions. Now we have a set of Strömvil frames in the open cluster, M 67 and we compare our color-magnitude diagram with those of BATC (Fan et al. 1996) and Vilnius (Boyle et al. 1998). A preliminary report of the M 67 photometry will be found in Laugalys et al. (2004). Here we report on a selected set of stars in the M 67 frames, those with errors 1 percent or less.

  16. Transformed photometry of young stars in Cha requested

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2013-01-01

    Dr. Peter Abraham (Konkoly Observatory, Budapest, Hungary) requested the assistance of AAVSO observers in monitoring eight young stars in Chamaeleon in support of photometry he and his colleagues will be obtaining with the VLT/ISAAC (infrared) and Herschel Space Observatory (far-infrared) during January-February 2013. The targets are CR Cha, CT Cha, HP Cha (Glass I), VW Cha, VZ Cha, WW CHa, WX Cha, XX Cha. Calibrated, transformed VRI photometry is requested to precisely monitor changes in the optical brightness and colors of these objects. Calibration and transformation of the photometry is crucial - if all of the data are not on the same system and particularly if the colors are not transformed, it will be extremely difficult to correlate the data usefully. Previous observations indicate that the stars are highly variable. Brightness changes can be expected from a few tenths of a magnitude to up to 1-2 magnitudes on a timescale of a few days to a few weeks. Observers are asked to try to obtain one to two sets of VRI images per night. Finder charts with sequences may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See full Alert Notice for more details.

  17. Automatic CCD Imaging Systems for Time-series CCD Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caton, D. B.; Pollock, J. T.; Davis, S. A.

    2004-12-01

    CCDs allow precision photometry to be done with small telescopes and at sites with less than ideal seeing conditions. The addition of an automatic observing mode makes it easy to do time-series CCD photometry of variable stars and AGN/QSOs. At Appalachian State University's Dark Sky Observatory (DSO), we have implemented automatic imaging systems for image acquisition, scripted filter changing, data storage and quick-look online photometry two different telescopes, the 32-inch and 18-inch telescopes. The camera at the 18-inch allows a simple system where the data acquisition PC controls a DFM Engineering filter wheel and Photometrics/Roper camera. The 32-inch system is the more complex, with three computers communicating in order to make good use of its camera's 30-second CCD-read time for filter change. Both telescopes use macros written in the PMIS software (GKR Computer Consulting). Both systems allow automatic data capture with only tended care provided by the observer. Indeed, one observer can easily run both telescopes simultaneously. The efficiency and reliability of these systems also reduces observer errors. The only unresolved problem is an occasional but rare camera-read error (the PC is apparently interrupted). We also sometimes experience a crash of the PMIS software, probably due to its 16-bit code now running in the Windows 2000 32-bit environment. We gratefully acknowledge the support of the National Science Foundation through grants number AST-0089248 and AST-9119750, the Dunham Fund for Astrophysical Research, and the ASU Research Council.

  18. Night sky photometry with amateur-grade digital cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrozek, Tomasz; Gronkiewicz, Dominik; Kolomanski, Sylwester; Steslicki, Marek

    2015-08-01

    Measurements of night sky brightness can give us valuable information on light pollution. The more the measurements we have the better is our knowledge on the spatial distribution of the pollution on local and global scale.High accuracy professional photometry of night sky can be performed with dedicated instruments. The main drawbacks of this method are high price and low mobility. This limits an amount of observers and therefore amount of photometric data that can be collected. In order to overcome the problem of limited amount of data we can involve amateur astronomers in photometry of night sky. However, to achieve this goal we need a method that utilizes equipment which is usually used by amateur astronomers, e.g digital cameras.We propose a method that enables good accuracy photometry of night sky with a use of digital compact or DSLR cameras. In the method reduction of observations and standarization to Johnson UBV system are performed. We tested several cameras and compared results to Sky Quality Meter (SQM) measurements. The overall consistency for results is within 0.2 mag.

  19. M2K Planet Search: Spectroscopic Screening and Transit Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Andrew; Gaidos, E.; Fischer, D.; Lepine, S.

    2010-10-01

    The M2K project is a search for planets orbiting nearby early M and late K dwarf drawn from the SUPERBLINK catalog. M and K dwarfs are highly attractive targets for finding low-mass and habitable planets because (1) close-in planets are more likely to orbit within their habitable zone, (2) planets orbiting them induce a larger Doppler signal and have deeper transits than similar planets around F, G, and early K type stars, (3) planet formation models predict they hold an abundance of super-Earth sized planets, and (4) they represent the vast majority of the stars close enough for direct imaging techniques. In spite of this, only 10% of late K and early M dwarfs are being monitored by current Doppler surveys. As part of the M2K project we have obtained low-resolution spectra for more than 2000 of our sample of 10,000 M and K dwarfs. We vet our sample by screening these stars for high metallicity and low chromospheric activity. We search for transits on targets showing high RMS Doppler signal and photometry candidates provided by SuperWASP project. By using "snapshot” photometry have been able to achieve sub-millimag photometry on numerous transit targets in the same night. With further follow-up observations we will be able to detect planets smaller than 10 Earth masses.

  20. Theory of wide-angle photometry from standard stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usher, Peter D.

    1989-01-01

    Wide angle celestial structures, such as bright comet tails and nearby galaxies and clusters of galaxies, rely on photographic methods for quantified morphology and photometry, primarily because electronic devices with comparable resolution and sky coverage are beyond current technological capability. The problem of the photometry of extended structures and of how this problem may be overcome through calibration by photometric standard stars is examined. The perfect properties of the ideal field of view are stated in the guise of a radiometric paraxial approximation, in the hope that fields of view of actual telescopes will conform. Fundamental radiometric concepts are worked through before the issue of atmospheric attenuation is addressed. The independence of observed atmospheric extinction and surface brightness leads off the quest for formal solutions to the problem of surface photometry. Methods and problems of solution are discussed. The spectre is confronted in the spirit of standard stars and shown to be chimerical in that light, provided certain rituals are adopted. After a brief discussion of Baker-Sampson polynomials and the vexing issue of saturation, a pursuit is made of actual numbers to be expected in real cases. While the numbers crunched are gathered ex nihilo, they demonstrate the feasibility of Newton's method in the solution of this overdetermined, nonlinear, least square, multiparametric, photometric problem.

  1. Multi-channel fiber photometry for population neuronal activity recording

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qingchun; Zhou, Jingfeng; Feng, Qiru; Lin, Rui; Gong, Hui; Luo, Qingming; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Minmin; Fu, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Fiber photometry has become increasingly popular among neuroscientists as a convenient tool for the recording of genetically defined neuronal population in behaving animals. Here, we report the development of the multi-channel fiber photometry system to simultaneously monitor neural activities in several brain areas of an animal or in different animals. In this system, a galvano-mirror modulates and cyclically couples the excitation light to individual multimode optical fiber bundles. A single photodetector collects excited light and the configuration of fiber bundle assembly and the scanner determines the total channel number. We demonstrated that the system exhibited negligible crosstalk between channels and optical signals could be sampled simultaneously with a sample rate of at least 100 Hz for each channel, which is sufficient for recording calcium signals. Using this system, we successfully recorded GCaMP6 fluorescent signals from the bilateral barrel cortices of a head-restrained mouse in a dual-channel mode, and the orbitofrontal cortices of multiple freely moving mice in a triple-channel mode. The multi-channel fiber photometry system would be a valuable tool for simultaneous recordings of population activities in different brain areas of a given animal and different interacting individuals. PMID:26504642

  2. Identification of red supergiants in nearby galaxies with mid-IR photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britavskiy, N. E.; Bonanos, A. Z.; Mehner, A.; García-Álvarez, D.; Prieto, J. L.; Morrell, N. I.

    2014-02-01

    Context. The role of episodic mass loss in massive-star evolution is one of the most important open questions of current stellar evolution theory. Episodic mass loss produces dust and therefore causes evolved massive stars to be very luminous in the mid-infrared and dim at optical wavelengths. Aims: We aim to increase the number of investigated luminous mid-IR sources to shed light on the late stages of these objects. To achieve this we employed mid-IR selection criteria to identity dusty evolved massive stars in two nearby galaxies. Methods: The method is based on mid-IR colors, using 3.6 μm and 4.5 μm photometry from archival Spitzer Space Telescope images of nearby galaxies and J-band photometry from 2MASS. We applied our criteria to two nearby star-forming dwarf irregular galaxies, Sextans A and IC 1613, selecting eight targets, which we followed-up with spectroscopy. Results: Our spectral classification and analysis yielded the discovery of two M-type supergiants in IC 1613, three K-type supergiants and one candidate F-type giant in Sextans A, and two foreground M giants. We show that the proposed criteria provide an independent way for identifying dusty evolved massive stars that can be extended to all nearby galaxies with available Spitzer/IRAC images at 3.6 μm and 4.5 μm. Based on observations made with the Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC), installed in the Spanish Observatorio de El Roque de Los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, on the island of La Palma, and the 2.5 m du Pont telescope in operation at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.Spectra are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/562/A75

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: 3D reddening map for stars from 2MASS phot. (Gontcharov, 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gontcharov, G. A.

    2016-07-01

    A three-dimensional reddening map for stars within 1100pc of the Sun are presented. Analysis of the distribution of 70 million stars from the 2MASS catalog with the most accurate photometry on the (J-Ks)-Ks diagram supplemented with Monte Carlo simulations has shown that one of the maxima of this distribution corresponds to F-type dwarfs and subgiants with a mean absolute magnitude MKs=2.5m. The shift of this maximum toward large (J-Ks) with increasing Ks reflects the reddening of these stars with increasing heliocentric distance. The distribution of the sample of stars over Ks, l, and b cells with a statistically significant number of stars in each cell corresponds to their distribution over three-dimensional spatial cells. As a result, the reddening E(J-Ks) has been determined with an accuracy of 0.03m for spatial cells with a side of 100pc. All of the known large absorbing clouds within 1100pc of the Sun have manifested themselves in the results obtained. The absorbing matter of the Gould Belt is shown to manifest itself at latitudes up to 40° and within 600pc of the Sun. The size and influence of the Gould Belt may have been underestimated thus far. The absorbing matter at latitudes up to 60° and within 1100pc of the Sun has been found to be distributed predominantly in the first and second quadrants in the southern hemisphere and in the third and fourth quadrants in the northern hemisphere. Also the data of the Rv (2012AstL...38...12G) and Av (2012AstL...38...87G) 3D maps are added. (1 data file).

  4. Galactic model parameters of cataclysmic variables: Results from a new absolute magnitude calibration with 2MASS and WISE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özdönmez, A.; Ak, T.; Bilir, S.

    2015-01-01

    In order to determine the spatial distribution, Galactic model parameters and luminosity function of cataclysmic variables (CVs), a J-band magnitude limited sample of 263 CVs has been established using a newly constructed period-luminosity-colours (PLCs) relation which includes J,Ks and W1-band magnitudes in 2MASS and WISE photometries, and the orbital periods of the systems. This CV sample is assumed to be homogeneous regarding to distances as the new PLCs relation is calibrated with new or re-measured trigonometric parallaxes. Our analysis shows that the scaleheight of CVs is increasing towards shorter periods, although selection effects for the periods shorter than 2.25 h dramatically decrease the scaleheight: the scaleheight of the systems increases from 192 pc to 326 pc as the orbital period decreases from 12 to 2.25 h. The z-distribution of all CVs in the sample is well fitted by an exponential function with a scaleheight of 213-10+11 pc. However, we suggest that the scaleheight of CVs in the Solar vicinity should be ∼300 pc and that the scaleheights derived using the sech2 function should be also considered in the population synthesis models. The space density of CVs in the Solar vicinity is found 5.58(1.35)×10-6 pc-3 which is in the range of previously derived space densities and not in agreement with the predictions of the population models. The analysis based on the comparisons of the luminosity function of white dwarfs with the luminosity function of CVs in this study show that the best fits are obtained by dividing the luminosity functions of white dwarfs by a factor of 350-450.

  5. Improving Kepler Pipeline Sensitivity with Pixel Response Function Photometry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Robert L.; Bryson, Steve; Jenkins, Jon Michael; Smith, Jeffrey C

    2014-06-01

    We present the results of our investigation into the feasibility and expected benefits of implementing PRF-fitting photometry in the Kepler Science Processing Pipeline. The Kepler Pixel Response Function (PRF) describes the expected system response to a point source at infinity and includes the effects of the optical point spread function, the CCD detector responsivity function, and spacecraft pointing jitter. Planet detection in the Kepler pipeline is currently based on simple aperture photometry (SAP), which is most effective when applied to uncrowded bright stars. Its effectiveness diminishes rapidly as target brightness decreases relative to the effects of noise sources such as detector electronics, background stars, and image motion. In contrast, PRF photometry is based on fitting an explicit model of image formation to the data and naturally accounts for image motion and contributions of background stars. The key to obtaining high-quality photometry from PRF fitting is a high-quality model of the system's PRF, while the key to efficiently processing the large number of Kepler targets is an accurate catalog and accurate mapping of celestial coordinates onto the focal plane. If the CCD coordinates of stellar centroids are known a priori then the problem of PRF fitting becomes linear. A model of the Kepler PRF was constructed at the time of spacecraft commissioning by fitting piecewise polynomial surfaces to data from dithered full frame images. While this model accurately captured the initial state of the system, the PRF has evolved dynamically since then and has been seen to deviate significantly from the initial (static) model. We construct a dynamic PRF model which is then used to recover photometry for all targets of interest. Both simulation tests and results from Kepler flight data demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach. Kepler was selected as the 10th mission of the Discovery Program. Funding for this mission is provided by NASA’s Science

  6. Karl Schwarzschild's investigations of ``out-of-focus photometry'' between 1897-1899 and his contribution to photographic photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habison, Peter

    From 1897 to 1899 Karl Schwarzschild was working at Kuffner Observatory in Vienna. During these years he developed new measuring techniques in the field of photographic photometry, where he particularly studied the quantitative determination of the departure of the reciprocity law during photographic exposures. During that time stellar magnitudes were almost exclusively determined by measuring the size of in-focus stellar disks. Photometry using out-of-focus exposures had been proposed, but had not yet been tried. Schwarzschild's very first paper in this context contains two important results: The intimation that estimating densities on out-of-focus plates could give an accuracy of better than 0.05 mag and the analysis of his photographic data indicated that the reciprocity law (S=Iṡ t), was not obeyed. >From the paper it is not clear how he came to set himself this double task. A series of singly exposed plates date from September 1897, whereas the series of exposures of particular relevance to the question of the time dependence of plate density all date from October 1897. It is remarkable how Schwarzschild succeeded in deriving a better approximation of the characteristic curve's dependence on intensity and time. The talk will focus on Schwarzschild's investigations of ``out-of-focus photometry'' between 1897 and 1899. A few selected original photographic plates will be presented and discussed.

  7. Photographic surface photometry of the Milky Way. III - Photometry of the central area of the Galaxy in the ultraviolet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proell, H. J.; Schmidt-Kaler, T.; Schlosser, W.

    1983-01-01

    6 photographic plates, taken at La Silla, Chile, with the spherical mirror super-wide-angle camera of the Astronomisches Institut der Ruhr Universität Bochum (see paper I: Schmidt-Kaler, Th. et al., 1982) were measured to study the surface brightness distribution in the area around the centre of the Milky Way, between galactic longitudes 297° and 27°, and latitudes - 30° to + 30°, with an angular resolution of 0.°3 × 0.°3 (Fig. 5). In section 2 the plate material and details of the reductions are presented, so far as not already given in paper I. During the photometric scanning of the plates all stars brighter than a limiting magnitude mlim were marked by hand, and the corresponding data points were replaced by an average from neighbouring points (section 3). Defined at the level of 50% elimination, mlim ≌ 8.m0 (in U). Figure 4 shows the effect of various methods of eliminating bright stars. The errors of the surface photometry are discussed in section 4. The internal mean error of the intensity of one data point, as determined from the scatter from the 6 plates, is ± 9.4%. This error is split into an additive component ± 8 S10U (S10 = intensity of a star of 10m), mostly due to the contributions of airglow and scattered light, and a multiplicative component of ± 7.5%, mostly due to the uncertainty of the photographic characteristic curve. Possible systematic errors are estimated and upper limits for these are given in table II. Section 5 presents the results of the photometry. For the sake of clear representation in the isophote map (Fig 5) data with intermediate intensities 110 < Igal ≦ 250 S10U were smoothed over 0.°9 × 0.°9, data with Igal ≦ 110 S10U were smoothed over 1.°2 × 1.°2. The mean error of the isophotes is about ± 6%. We then compare our photometry with existing ultraviolet surface photometries. Apart from the area l = 320° to 330°, b = -25° to -20° where our intensities are probably vitiated by some remaining airglow

  8. Comparison of ozone determinations by ultraviolet photometry and gas-phase titration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demore, W. B.; Patapoff, M.

    1976-01-01

    A comparison of ozone determinations based on ultraviolet absorption photometry and gas-phase titration (GPT) shows good agreement between the two methods. Together with other results, these findings indicate that three candidate reference methods for ozone, UV photometry, IR photometry, and GPT are in substantial agreement. However, the GPT method is not recommended for routine use by air pollution agencies for calibration of ozone monitors because of susceptibility to experimental error.

  9. MULTI-COLOR TRANSIT PHOTOMETRY OF GJ 1214b THROUGH BJHK{sub s} BANDS AND A LONG-TERM MONITORING OF THE STELLAR VARIABILITY OF GJ 1214

    SciTech Connect

    Narita, Norio; Hori, Yasunori; Onitsuka, Masahiro; Sukom, Amnart; Tamura, Motohide; Suenaga, Takuya; Takahashi, Yasuhiro H.; Fukui, Akihiko; Kuroda, Daisuke; Yanagisawa, Kenshi; Ikoma, Masahiro; Kurosaki, Kenji; Kawashima, Yui; Nagayama, Takahiro; Nakajima, Yasushi; Hirano, Teruyuki; Kawauchi, Kiyoe; Kuzuhara, Masayuki; Ohnuki, Hiroshi; Izumiura, Hideyuki; and others

    2013-08-20

    We present five new transit light curves of GJ 1214b taken in the BJHK{sub s} bands. Two transits were observed in the B band using the Subaru Prime Focus Camera (Suprime-Cam) and the Faint Object Camera and Spectrograph (FOCAS) instruments on board the Subaru 8.2 m telescope, and one transit was done in the JHK{sub s} bands simultaneously with the Simultaneous Infrared Imager for Unbiased Survey (SIRIUS) camera on the Infrared Survey Facility (IRSF) 1.4 m telescope. Markov Chain Monte Carlo analyses show that the planet-to-star radius ratios are R{sub p}/R{sub s} = 0.11651 {+-} 0.00065 (B band, Subaru/Suprime-Cam), R{sub p}/R{sub s} = 0.11601 {+-} 0.00117 (B band, Subaru/FOCAS), R{sub p}/R{sub s} = 0.11654 {+-} 0.00080 (J band, IRSF/SIRIUS), R{sub p}/R{sub s}= 0.11550{sup +0.00142}{sub -0.00153} (H band, IRSF/SIRIUS), and R{sub p}/R{sub s} = 0.11547 {+-} 0.00127 (K{sub s} band, IRSF/SIRIUS). The Subaru Suprime-Cam transit photometry shows a possible spot-crossing feature. Comparisons of the new transit depths and those from previous studies with the theoretical models by Howe and Burrows suggest that the high molecular weight atmosphere (e.g., 1% H{sub 2}O + 99% N{sub 2}) models are most likely, however, the low molecular weight (hydrogen-dominated) atmospheres with extensive clouds are still not excluded. We also report a long-term monitoring of the stellar brightness variability of GJ 1214 observed with the MITSuME 50 cm telescope in the g', R{sub c}, and I{sub c} bands simultaneously. The monitoring was conducted for 32 nights spanning 78 nights in 2012, and we find a periodic brightness variation with a period of P{sub s} = 44.3 {+-} 1.2 days and semi-amplitudes of 2.1% {+-} 0.4% in the g' band, 0.56% {+-} 0.08% in the R{sub c} band, and 0.32% {+-} 0.04% in the I{sub c} band.

  10. Photometry and spectroscopy in the open cluster alpha Persei, 2.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, Charles F.

    1994-01-01

    Results from a combination of new spectroscopic and photometric observations in the lower main sequence and pre-main sequence of the open cluster alpha Persei are presented. New echelle spectroscopy has provided radial and rotational velocity information for thirteen candidate members, three of which are nonmembers based on radial velocity, absence of a Li 6707 A feature, and absence of H alpha emission. A set of revised rotational velocity estimates for several slowly rotating candidates identified earlier is given, yielding rotational velocities as low as 7 km/s for two apparent cluster members. VI photometry for several pre-main-sequence members is given; the new (V, V-I(sub K) photometry yields a more clearly defined pre-main sequence. A list of approximately 30 new faint candidate members based on the (V, V-I(sub K)), charge coupled device (CCD) photometry is presented in an effort to identify additional cluster members at very low masses. Low-dispersion spectra obtained for several of these candidates provide in some cases supporting evidence for cluster membership. The single brown dwarf candidate in this cluster is for the first time placed in a color-magnitude diagram with other cluster members, providing a better means for establishing its true status. Stars from among the list of new photometric candidates may provide the means for establishing a sequence of cluster members down to very faint magnitudes (V approximately 21) and consequently very low masses. New coordinate determinations for previous candidate members and finding charts for the new photometric candidates are provided in Appendices.

  11. High-precision photometry for K2 Campaign 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C. X.; Penev, K.; Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. Á.; Bhatti, W.; Domsa, I.; de Val-Borro, M.

    2015-12-01

    The two reaction wheel K2 mission promises and has delivered new discoveries in the stellar and exoplanet fields. However, due to the loss of accurate pointing, it also brings new challenges for the data reduction processes. In this paper, we describe a new reduction pipeline for extracting high-precision photometry from the K2 data set, and present public light curves for the K2 Campaign 1 target pixel data set. Key to our reduction is the derivation of global astrometric solutions from the target stamps, from which accurate centroids are passed on for high-precision photometry extraction. We extract target light curves for sources from a combined UCAC4 and EPIC catalogue - this includes not only primary targets of the K2 campaign 1, but also any other stars that happen to fall on the pixel stamps. We provide the raw light curves, and the products of various detrending processes aimed at removing different types of systematics. Our astrometric solutions achieve a median residual of ˜0.127 arcsec. For bright stars, our best 6.5 h precision for raw light curves is ˜20 parts per million (ppm). For our detrended light curves, the best 6.5 h precision achieved is ˜15 ppm. We show that our detrended light curves have fewer systematic effects (or trends, or red-noise) than light curves produced by other groups from the same observations. Example light curves of transiting planets and a Cepheid variable candidate, are also presented. We make all light curves public, including the raw and detrended photometry, at http://k2.hatsurveys.org.

  12. Inferring planetary obliquity using rotational and orbital photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, J. C.; Sekowski, C.; Haggard, H. M.; Pallé, E.; Cowan, N. B.

    2016-03-01

    The obliquity of a terrestrial planet is an important clue about its formation and critical to its climate. Previous studies using simulated photometry of Earth show that continuous observations over most of a planet's orbit can be inverted to infer obliquity. However, few studies of more general planets with arbitrary albedo markings have been made and, in particular, a simple theoretical understanding of why it is possible to extract obliquity from light curves is missing. Reflected light seen by a distant observer is the product of a planet's albedo map, its host star's illumination, and the visibility of different regions. It is useful to treat the product of illumination and visibility as the kernel of a convolution. Time-resolved photometry constrains both the albedo map and the kernel, the latter of which sweeps over the planet due to rotational and orbital motion. The kernel's movement distinguishes prograde from retrograde rotation for planets with non-zero obliquity on inclined orbits. We demonstrate that the kernel's longitudinal width and mean latitude are distinct functions of obliquity and axial orientation. Notably, we find that a planet's spin axis affects the kernel - and hence time-resolved photometry - even if this planet is east-west uniform or spinning rapidly, or if it is north-south uniform. We find that perfect knowledge of the kernel at 2-4 orbital phases is usually sufficient to uniquely determine a planet's spin axis. Surprisingly, we predict that east-west albedo contrast is more useful for constraining obliquity than north-south contrast.

  13. New Release of the BSM Epoch Photometry Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henden, A.

    2016-06-01

    (Abstract only) The Bright Star Monitor (BSM) Epoch Photometry Database (EPD) is a searchable catalog of all observations made by one of the AAVSO's five BSM systems. The newest release of this database contains some 100 million datasets, from both northern and southern hemispheres, taken over the last six years. These have been calibrated by both nightly visits to Landolt standard fields as well as through the use of the Tycho2 photometric catalog. The paper will describe how the observations were made, how to access the catalog, and the limitations to the photometric accuracy. Some examples of well-studied fields will be shown.

  14. Preliminary results on interstellar reddening as deduced from filter photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laget, M.

    1972-01-01

    Filter photometry has been used to derive the interstellar reddening law from stars through the study of a single spectral type, B0. The deficiency in the far ultraviolet flux of a supergiant relative to a main sequence star is compared with the difference in the flux distribution due to a change of one spectral class. Individual interstellar reddening curves show the general feature reported by Stecher (1969) and by Bless and Savage (1970). There is a large amount of scatter in the far ultraviolet which may be partially due to a real difference in interstellar extinction and partially due to observational inaccuracy.

  15. Optical photometry and spectroscopy of Nova Del 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomov, T.; Ilkiewicz, K.; Swierczynski, E.; Belcheva, M.; Dimitrov, D.

    2013-08-01

    We report optical BV photometry and spectroscopy of Nova Del 2013, carried out between August 14.88 UT and August 15.08 UT. Using a 60 cm Cassegrain telescope at the Nicolaus Copernicus University Observatory (Torun, Poland) we estimated the V brightness of the Nova to be 6.31+/-0.02 mag and 6.18+/-0.03 mag on Aug. 14.94 UT and Aug. 15.02 UT respectively. HD 194113 (F2, V=8.00 mag) was used as a comparison star.

  16. EUVE photometry of SS Cygni: Dwarf nova outbursts and oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Mauche, C.W.

    1995-05-15

    The authors present EUVE Deep Survey photometry and AAVSO optical measurements of the 1993 August and 1994 June/July outbursts of the dwarf nova SS Cygni. The EUV and optical light curves are used to illustrate the different response of the accretion disk to outbursts which begin at the inner edge and propagate outward, and those which begin at the outer edge and propagate inward. Furthermore, the authors describe the properties of the quasi-coherent 7--9 s sinusoidal oscillations in the EUV flux detected during the rise and plateau stages of these outbursts.

  17. CCD Photometry of SW Ursae Majoris during the 1996 Superoutburst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogami, Daisaku; Baba, Hajime; Kato, Taichi; Novak, Rudolf

    1998-04-01

    Differential CCD photometry of the 1996 April superoutburst of SW UMa was performed both at the Nicholas Copernicus Observatory and at the Ouda Station, Kyoto University. Although superhumps with a period of 0.05818 (+/- 0.00002) d and possible small-amplitude quasi periodic oscillations (QPOs) were detected, we failed to find the so-called super-QPOs. SW UMa has been proved to be the fourth SU UMa-type dwarf nova, following AL Com, V1028 Cyg, and HV Vir, in which an analysis of the superhump maxima timings revealed an increase in the superhump period.

  18. CCD time-resolved photometry of faint cataclysmic variables. III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, Steve B.; Szkody, Paula; Kreidl, Tobias J.; Mason, Keith O.; Puchnarewicz, E. M.

    1990-01-01

    CCD time-resolved photometry in V, B, and near-IR for 17 faint cataclysmic variables (CVs) is presented and analyzed. The data are obtained at Kitt Peak National Observatory, the Perkins reflector, Lowell Observatory, and the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos from April-June 1989. The degree of variability and periodicities for the CVs are examined. It is observed that the variability of most of the stars is consistent with CV class behavior. Orbital periods for five CVs are determined, and three potential eclipsing systems are detected.

  19. A digital imaging photometry system for cometary data acquisition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clifton, K. S.; Benson, C. M.; Gary, G. A.

    1986-01-01

    This report describes a digital imaging photometry system developed in the Space Science Laboratory at the Marshall Space Flight center. The photometric system used for cometary data acquisition is based on an intensified secondary electron conduction (ISEC) vidicon coupled to a versatile data acquisition system which allows real-time interactive operation. Field tests on the Orion and Rosette nebulas indicate a limiting magnitude of approximately m sub v = 14 over the 40 arcmin field-of-view. Observations were conducted of Comet Giacobini-Zinner in August 1985. The resulting data are discussed in relation to the capabilities of the digital analysis system. The development program concluded on August 31, 1985.

  20. Spectroscopy and photometry for low-mass stars in Praesepe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Scott D.; Stauffer, John R.; Prosser, Charles F.; Herter, Terry

    1994-01-01

    We have obtained spectral types, H alpha equivalent widths, and optical photometry for a small sample of late K and M dwarf candidate members of the Praesepe open cluster. At least for the small sample of stars we have observed, all of the Paesepe members later than M2 have H alpha in emission. The chromospheric activity of the Praesepe satrs is essentially the same as that for Hyades members of the same mass, as expected since the two clusters are thought to be the same age.

  1. LEMON: an (almost) completely automated differential-photometry pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrón, V.; Fernández, M.

    2011-11-01

    We present LEMON, the CCD differential-photometry pipeline, written in Python, developed at the Institute of Astrophysics of Andalusia (CSIC) and originally designed for its use at the 1.23 m CAHA telescope for automated variable stars detection and analysis. The aim of our tool is to make it possible to completely reduce thousands of images of time series in a matter of hours and with minimal user interaction, if not none at all, automatically detecting variable stars and presenting the results to the astronomer.

  2. uvby photometry in McCormick proper motion fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degewij, J.

    1982-01-01

    The Danish 50 cm telescope at the European Southern Observatory was used to obtain high-precision uvby photometry for 50 F2 to G2 stars, with V values in the 9.4-12.3 mag range, which were selected in the southern galactic polar regions of the McCormick proper motion fields and measured on six different nights. The brighter stars are found to systematically exhibit smaller m(1) indices, of about 0.02 mag, upon comparison with the earlier data of Blaauw et al (1976). Single measurements are given for 98 stars in eight McCormick fields at intermediate southern galactic latitudes.

  3. MYRaf: An Easy Aperture Photometry GUI for IRAF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niaei, M. S.; KiliÇ, Y.; Özeren, F. F.

    2015-07-01

    We describe the design and development of MYRaf, a GUI (Graphical User Interface) that aims to be completely open-source under General Public License (GPL). MYRaf is an easy to use, reliable, and a fast IRAF aperture photometry GUI tool for those who are conversant with text-based software and command-line procedures in GNU/Linux OSs. MYRaf uses IRAF, PyRAF, matplotlib, ginga, alipy, and SExtractor with the general-purpose and high-level programming language Python, and uses the Qt framework.

  4. Milky Way demographics with the VVV survey. II. Color transformations and near-infrared photometry for 136 million stars in the southern Galactic disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, M.; Barbá, R.; Gunthardt, G.; Minniti, D.; Lucas, P.; Majaess, D.; Irwin, M.; Emerson, J. P.; Gonzalez-Solares, E.; Hempel, M.; Saito, R. K.; Gurovich, S.; Roman-Lopes, A.; Moni-Bidin, C.; Santucho, M. V.; Borissova, J.; Kurtev, R.; Toledo, I.; Geisler, D.; Dominguez, M.; Beamin, J. C.

    2013-04-01

    The new multi-epoch near-infrared VISTA Variables in the Vía Láctea (VVV) survey is sampling 562 deg2 of the Galactic bulge and adjacent regions of the disk. Accurate astrometry established for the region surveyed allows the VVV data to be merged with overlapping surveys (e.g., GLIMPSE, WISE, 2MASS, etc.), thereby enabling the construction of longer baseline spectral energy distributions for astronomical targets. However, in order to maximize use of the VVV data, a set of transformation equations are required to place the VVV JHKs photometry onto the 2MASS system. The impetus for this work is to develop those transformations via a comparison of 2MASS targets in 152 VVV fields sampling the Galactic disk. The transformation coefficients derived exhibit a reliance on variables such as extinction. The transformed data were subsequently employed to establish a mean reddening law of EJ-H/EH-Ks = 2.13 ± 0.04, which is the most precise determination to date and merely emphasizes the pertinence of the VVV data for determining such important parameters. Based on observations taken within the ESO VISTA Public Survey VVV, Programme ID 179.B-2002.

  5. High Precision Photometry for the K2 Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xu; Soares-Furtado, Melinda; Penev, Kaloyan; Hartman, Joel; Bakos, Gaspar; Bhatti, Waqas; Domsa, Istvan; de Val-Borro, Miguel

    2015-12-01

    The two reaction wheel K2 mission brings new challenges for the data reduction processes. We developed a reduction pipeline for extracting high precision photometry from the K2 dataset and we use this pipeline to generate light curves for the K2 Campaign 0 super-stamps and K2 Campaign 1 target pixel dataset. Key to our reduction technique is the derivation of global astrometric solutions from the target stamps from which accurate centroids are passed on for high precision photometry extraction. We also implemented the image subtraction method to reduce the K2 Campaign 0 super-stamps containing open clusters M35 and NGC2158. We extract target light curvesfor sources from a combined UCAC4 and EPIC catalogue -- this includes not only primary targets of the K2 Mission, but also other stars that happen to fall on the pixel stamps. Our astrometric solutions achieve a median residual of ~0.127". For bright stars, our best 6.5 hour precision for raw light curves is ~20 parts per million (ppm). For our detrended light curves, the best 6.5 hour precision achieved is ~15 ppm. We show that our detrended light curves have fewer systematic effects (or trends, or red-noise) than light curves produced by other groups from the same observations. We highlight the measurements of rotation curves using the K2 light curves of stars within open cluster M35 and NGC2158.

  6. Spectroscopy and photometry campaign on three bright Wolf Rayet stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2013-06-01

    Dr. Noel Richardson (Universite de Montreal) and colleagues have invited AAVSO observers to participate in an international professional-amateur spectroscopy and photometry campaign on the Wof Rayet stars WR 134, WR 135, and WR 137 (HD 191765, HD 192103, and HD 192641). The campaign has begun and runs through September 17, 2013. The purpose of the campaign is to study clumping aspects of the strong winds and changes present in large structures in the stellar winds in these WR stars. Spectroscopy and UBVRI time-series observations are requested. Supplemental targets to be observed if time permits are V905 Sco (HD 160529) and V4375 Sgr (HD 316285). Finder charts with sequences may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). Photometry should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. Details of the campaign are given at: http://www.stsci.de/wr134/index.htm. Instructions for sending spectroscopy data to Dr. Richardson are given at http! ://www.stsci.de/wr134/pdf/data_transfer.pdf.

  7. Multicolor photometry of triple system b Per requested

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2013-01-01

    Dr. Bob Zavala (U.S. Naval Observatory, Flagstaff) has requested AAVSO assistance in obtaining multicolor photometry of the bright triple system b Per in order to prepare for and detect a possible eclipse of the AB components by the C component predicted for 2013 January 23. Multi-color photometric observations of 4.5V b Per are requested 2013 January 23 through February 04. Based on a revised period of 702.45 ± 0.05 days, the next time of minimum light is predicted for HJD = 2456321.35 ± 0.05 (UT 2013 January 28 20:24UT ± 1.5 hours). The eclipse may last for up to four days, so the coverage requested will provide both a baseline out-of-eclipse light curve and a multi-color eclipse light curve for analysis. Photometry is needed at the level of 0.02-0.03 magnitude or better, as the eclipse may be as deep as 0.1 magnitude. For PEP observers, V coverage, and B if possible, is requested. DSLR observers should use whatever band(s) are available to them. Finder charts may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See full Alert Notice for more details and links.

  8. A new look at photometry of the Moon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goguen, J.D.; Stone, T.C.; Kieffer, H.H.; Buratti, B.J.

    2010-01-01

    We use ROLO photometry (Kieffer, H.H., Stone, T.C. [2005]. Astron. J. 129, 2887-2901) to characterize the before and after full Moon radiance variation for a typical highlands site and a typical mare site. Focusing on the phase angle range 45??. ) to calculate the scattering matrix and solve the radiative transfer equation for I/. F. The mean single scattering albedo is ??=0.808, the asymmetry parameter is ???cos. ?????=0.77 and the phase function is very strongly peaked in both the forward and backward scattering directions. The fit to the observations for the highland site is excellent and multiply scattered photons contribute 80% of I/. F. We conclude that either model, roughness or multiple scattering, can match the observations, but that the strongly anisotropic phase functions of realistic particles require rigorous calculation of many orders of scattering or spurious photometric roughness estimates are guaranteed. Our multiple scattering calculation is the first to combine: (1) a regolith model matched to the measured particle size distribution and index of refraction of the lunar soil, (2) a rigorous calculation of the particle phase function and solution of the radiative transfer equation, and (3) application to lunar photometry with absolute radiance calibration. ?? 2010 Elsevier Inc.

  9. Deep photometry and integral magnitudes of 8 nearby galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, Ts. B.

    2016-02-01

    We estimated integral magnitudes of galaxies trying to include the contribution of the brightest part of their halos. We performed surface photometry based on (i) concentric elliptical rims, corresponding to the peripheral ellipticity of the image, (ii) median estimation of the mean value of the rim pixels, (iii) apparent radial brightness profiles, corresponding to the rim medians, and (iv) magnitude curves of growth, derived by numerical integrations of the apparent rim profiles, without preliminary background estimation and removal. Furthermore, we used the magnitude curves of growth to determine the integral magnitudes (limited by size and deepness of our frames) and compared them with the total magnitudes in the data base HyperLeda. Also, we used the rim-profiles to estimate the background level far enough from the galaxy center and we build (here—only for trial) the intrinsic radial profiles (with background removal). We apply this photometry on 8 nearby galaxies, observed with CCD in the system BVRC IC by the 50 cm Schmidt telescope of the Rozhen NAO in 2003-2004. We build radial profiles which occur to be as average 1.8 times (1.2-2.5 times) larger than in data base NED and of integral brightness that occurs to be about 1.4 times (1.2-1.7 times) higher than in data base HyperLeda. The relative brightness additions, found here, correlate with the color index and anti-correlate with the luminosity of the galaxy.

  10. Changes on Pluto's Surface Revealed with Long Timebase Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Erin; Buie, M.

    2013-10-01

    We are continuing to monitor the long-term photometric behavior of Pluto in order to constrain volatile surface migration. As Pluto passes near the center of the galaxy, the fields are too crowded for normal aperture photometric techniques. We approached this problem with a combination of point-spread function (PSF) photometry and optimal image subtraction (OIS). Our data are from the 0.8-m robotic telescope at Lowell Observatory, the 1-m robotic telescope at New Mexico State Observatory, and the Faulkes 2-m robotic telescope at Siding Spring, part of Las Cumbres Observatory. Our latest results add photometric data up through 2012 to the data collected since discovery. Our new reduction scheme consists of background catalogs, image subtraction using deep templates, and Pluto photometry extraction. We also use the known photometric properties of Charon determined with HST to remove Charon's contribution from old and new data and compare these results with the HST data where Pluto is measured by itself. Data since 2002 show marked departures from the behavior prior to that time. These results provide clear evidence for time evolution of Pluto's surface albedo. We will present these results along with implications for present-day processes that are altering the surface of Pluto. This work also provides crucial insight into the effort required to provide ground-based support observations for the upcoming New Horizons flyby of Pluto in 2015. Support for this work was provided by NASA Planetary Astronomy Program, grant number NNX09AB43G.

  11. Orion Project: A Photometry and Spectroscopy Project for Small Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Jeffrey L.

    2014-05-01

    Orion, the hunter, is one of the most famous constellations. Its declination is such that it is visible from most of the civilized world. In addition, most of the stars of Orion are very bright and interesting. Originally this Project was called the Betelgeuse Campaign, but four more stars were added so the name was changed to the Orion Project. The Project now includes Betelgeuse, Rigel and the three stars of Orion's belt, Mintaka, Alnilam and Alnitak. Both photometry and spectroscopy provide data for the Project. The Project has several goals. First is to help beginners with photometry and spectroscopy. The second goal is the actual observations and data. Because these stars are very bright, they are seldom observed in detail. Their brightness also posses a problem for most professional observatories. It is hoped that by having observations over a long time, interesting changes can be seen that will warrant closer investigation. The AAVSO has an excellent archive of photometric data, but is still lacking a means of handling spectroscopic data. As a third goal it is hoped that the procedures refined in this Project for spectroscopic data may help promote a similar system for the AAVSO.

  12. Infrared spectroscopy and photometry of Comet Austin 1990 V

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanner, Martha S.; Russell, Ray W.; Lynch, David K.; Brooke, Timothy Y.

    1993-01-01

    3-micron and 10-micron spectra and IR photometry of the dynamically new Comet Austin 1990 V were obtained for March-May 1990. An unusual 9-11 micron emission feature 15-20 percent above the continuum is evident at 0.78 AU postperihelion. The shape, in particular a peak at 11.06 micron, differs from that seen in Halley and several other comets, suggesting a difference in the mineralogy of the silicate grains. The 3.1-7.7 micron spectrum at 0.35 AU shows no obvious feature; feature/continuum contrast of the 3.36 micron emission feature is less than about 5 percent. Based on the IR photometry and a dust model weighted toward small grains, the dust production rate on 6 May at 0.78 AU was about 3 x 10 exp 5 g/s. The corresponding dust/gas mass ratio was about 0.1, classifying Austin as a dust-poor comet. This designation refers only to the relative dust cross section, not to the total mass.

  13. UBV Photometry of the young open cluster Berkely 87

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akinyemi, Abolaji; Eskridge, Paul B.

    2015-01-01

    We obtained UBV imaging of a field in the young open cluster Berkeley 87. From these images, we measured the brightness of ~180 stars in the cluster. Our photometry was calibrated using published photometry (Turner & Forbes 1982 PASP 94, 789) of a subset of stars in our field. The cluster is in a region of the sky with strongly varying extinction. Therefore we made a (U-B)-(B-V) color-color diagram of the field and used this to de-redden the stars on a case by case basis. We de-reddened the stars using the unreddened supergiant and main sequence colors from Astrophysical Quantities (Cox 2000).The color-magnitude diagrams of the de-reddened stars are compared to the Padova isochrones(Marigo et al 2008 A&A 482 883). The isochrones are generated for a range of ages, with solar metalicity and no α enhancement. The best fit for the isochrones was the main sequence de-reddened stars from which the age of the cluster is estimated to be 20 million years. This is older than previous age estimates (1-5 million years) from earlier studies of the cluster. This may indicate age variation in the cluster.We acknowledge the support of the Physics and Astronomy department, and the College of Science and Engineering, Minnesota State University, Mankato.

  14. PHOTOMETRY OF VARIABLE STARS FROM DOME A, ANTARCTICA

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Lingzhi; Macri, Lucas M.; Krisciunas, Kevin; Wang Lifan; Ashley, Michael C. B.; Lawrence, Jon S.; Luong-Van, Daniel; Storey, John W. V.; Cui Xiangqun; Gong Xuefei; Yuan Xiangyan; Feng Longlong; Yang Ji; Zhu Zhenxi; Liu Qiang; Zhou Xu; Pennypacker, Carl R.; Shang Zhaohui; Yang Huigen; York, Donald G.

    2011-11-15

    Dome A on the Antarctic plateau is likely one of the best observing sites on Earth thanks to the excellent atmospheric conditions present at the site during the long polar winter night. We present high-cadence time-series aperture photometry of 10,000 stars with i < 14.5 mag located in a 23 deg{sup 2} region centered on the south celestial pole. The photometry was obtained with one of the CSTAR telescopes during 128 days of the 2008 Antarctic winter. We used this photometric data set to derive site statistics for Dome A and to search for variable stars. Thanks to the nearly uninterrupted synoptic coverage, we found six times as many variables as previous surveys with similar magnitude limits. We detected 157 variable stars, of which 55% were unclassified, 27% were likely binaries, and 17% were likely pulsating stars. The latter category includes {delta} Scuti, {gamma} Doradus, and RR Lyrae variables. One variable may be a transiting exoplanet.

  15. Stromvil CCD Photometry in Globular Cluster M 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, Richard P.; Janusz, R.; Philip, A. G. D.; Straizys, V.; Vrba, F.

    2007-12-01

    We observed the globular cluster M 3 in the 7-band Stromvil system plus Vilnius X-band at the 1.8-m Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope with a 2K CCD giving a 6-arcmin field. We observed the open cluster M 67 in the same run. Here from the residuals of many stars fit to quality CCD Vilnius photometry (Laugalys et al., 2004, Baltic Astronomy, 13, 1) we reshape and thus correct the initial flatfields. M 67 with a wide color base gives the color transformations of the run by calibrating from about 12 photoelectric standards in the Stromvil and similar Vilnius systems. In M 3 six photoelectric standards of moderate quality, all red stars of 13th magnitude in the Vilnius system calibrate the zero-point magnitude scale. Point-spread-function fitting to the stars in the crowded M 3 field resolves blends. With relatively short exposures of minutes a limiting magnitude V=15 is obtained with a signal/noise ratio about 100. So from this new photometry we subsequently can classify all types of stars and treat questions of reddening, distances, membership and metallicity at least at the horizontal branch of the cluster.

  16. Differential Photometry of Asteroids 727 Nipponia and 741 Botolphia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leake, M. A.; Rollins, C.; Wark, T. J.

    2004-11-01

    Differential photometry of the asteroids 727 Nipponia and 741 Botolphia yielded light curves and periods consistent with those available from observers of the Observatoire de Geneve. Data were collected with the SARA 0.9-m telescope at KPNO over the nights of April 27, 2003, May 14, 2004, and June 27-29, 2004, using an Apogee AP7p 511x512 CCD camera, and reduced with Mira 6.0 and IDL routines. This project will help find the rotation period of several primitive asteroids and follow up with spectral analyses to determine where on these asteroids water of hydration may be located. The Nipponia data cover a full rotation period (nominally 5.07h) and the phased light curve resembles those of Behrend et al. at the Ob. Geneve (http://obswww.unige.ch/ behrend/). The Botolphia data cover a quarter of the almost 24-h (provisional) period, and supplement light curves available from the Ob. Geneve groups. Both asteroids are small (about 30 km), mid-belt, of uncertain taxonomy (DT for Nipponia, X for Botolphia), and have slightly high albedo (0.14 to 0.24); whether they are "primitive" is uncertain. Continuing differential photometry at varying phase angles and spectral analyses are planned to examine the spectral heterogeneity of these objects and to search for water of hydration. This research was part of the summer REU program at the Southeastern Association for Research in Astronomy (SARA), made possible by National Science Foundation Grant AST-0097616.

  17. Far-ultraviolet stellar photometry: Fields in Sagittarius and Scorpius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Edward G.; Carruthers, George R.

    1995-02-01

    Far-ultraviolet photometry for 741 objects in a field in Sagittarius centered near M8 and 541 objects in a field centered near sigma Scorpii is presented. These data were extracted from electographic images obtained with two cameras during a shuttle flight in 1991 April/May. The cameras provided band passes with lambdaeff = 1375 A and lambdaeff = 1781 A. Synthetic colors show that these bands are sensitive to effective temperature for hot stars. Our measurements were placed on a quantitative far-ultraviolet magnitude scale by convolving the spectra of stars observed by IUE with our cameras' spectral response functions. Fifty-eight percent of the ultraviolet objects were identified with visible stars using the SIMBAD database while another 40% of the objects are blends of early type stars too close together to separate with our resolution. Our photometry is compared with that from the TD-1, OAO 2, and ANS satellites and the S201 (Apollo 16) far-ultraviolet camera and found to agree at the level of a few tenths of a magnitude. Unlike previous studies, almost half of the identified visual counterparts to the ultraviolet objects are early B stars. A plot of distance modulus against ultraviolet color excess reveals a significant population of stars with strong ultraviolet excess.

  18. The MOST Asteroseismology Mission: Ultraprecise Photometry from Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Gordon; Matthews, Jaymie; Kuschnig, Rainer; Johnson, Ron; Rucinski, Slavek; Pazder, John; Burley, Gregory; Walker, Andrew; Skaret, Kristina; Zee, Robert; Grocott, Simon; Carroll, Kieran; Sinclair, Peter; Sturgeon, Don; Harron, John

    2003-09-01

    The Microvariablity and Oscillations of Stars (MOST) mission is a low-cost microsatellite designed to detect low-degree acoustic oscillations (periods of minutes) with micromagnitude precision in solar-type stars and metal-poor subdwarfs. There are also plans to detect light reflected from giant, short-period, extrasolar planets and the oscillations of roAp stars and the turbulent variability in the dense winds of Wolf-Rayet stars. This paper describes the experiment and how we met the challenge of ultraprecise photometry despite severe constraints on the mass, volume, and power available for the instrument. A side-viewing, 150 mm aperture Rumak-Maksutov telescope feeds two frame-transfer CCDs, one for tracking and the other for science. There is a single 300 nm wide filter centered at 525 nm. Microlenses project Fabry images of the brighter (V<=10) target stars onto the science CCD. Fainter target stars will be focused directly elsewhere on the CCD. MOST was launched on 2003 June 30 into a low-Earth, Sun-synchronous, polar orbit allowing stars between -19° and +36° declination to be viewed continuously for up to 60 days. Attitude is controlled by reaction wheels and magnetotorquers. A solar safety shutter over the telescope diagonal is the only other moving part. Accumulated photometry will be used to calibrate response across the target field stop, and data will be compressed and downloaded to three dedicated ground stations.

  19. From Spitzer Galaxy photometry to Tully-Fisher distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorce, J. G.; Tully, R. B.; Courtois, H. M.; Jarrett, T. H.; Neill, J. D.; Shaya, E. J.

    2014-10-01

    This paper involves a data release of the observational campaign: Cosmicflows with Spitzer (CFS). Surface photometry of the 1270 galaxies constituting the survey is presented. An additional ˜400 galaxies from various other Spitzer surveys are also analysed. CFS complements the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies, that provides photometry for an additional 2352 galaxies, by extending observations to low galactic latitudes (|b| < 30°). Among these galaxies are calibrators, selected in the K band, of the Tully-Fisher relation. The addition of new calibrators demonstrates the robustness of the previously released calibration. Our estimate of the Hubble constant using supernova host galaxies is unchanged, H0 = 75.2 ± 3.3 km s-1 Mpc-1. Distance-derived radial peculiar velocities, for the 1935 galaxies with all the available parameters, will be incorporated into a new data release of the Cosmicflows project. The size of the previous catalogue will be increased by 20 per cent, including spatial regions close to the Zone of Avoidance.

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: CU Vir Stroemgren differential photometry (Pyper+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyper, D. M.; Stevens, I. R.; Adelman, S. J.

    2014-06-01

    Our data are from two sources: Stroemgren differential uvby photometry obtained using the Four College Automated Photometric Telescope (FCAPT) originally on Mt. Hopkins, AZ, and later at Fairborn Observatory, Washington Camp, AZ, and photometry from the Solar Mass Ejection Imager (SMEI). (1 data file).

  1. Surface photometry of a sample of elliptical and S0 galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    De carvalho, R.R.; Da costa, L.N.; Djorgovski, S. California Institute of Technology, Pasadena )

    1991-08-01

    The results are reported of surface photometry of 38 early-type galaxies, located mainly in the Fornax Cluster. Detailed comparisons with previously published work are given along with internal and external error estimates for all quantities, and some serious systematic discrepancies in the older aperture photometry of some of the galaxies in the present sample are pointed out. 15 refs.

  2. Constraints on the Bulk Composition of Uranus from Herschel PACS and ISO LWS Photometry, SOFIA FORCAST Photometry and Spectroscopy, and Ground-Based Photometry of its Thermal Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orton, Glenn; Mueller, Thomas; Burgdorf, Martin; Fletcher, Leigh; de Pater, Imke; Atreya, Sushil; Adams, Joseph; Herter, Terry; Keller, Luke; Sidher, Sunil; Sinclair, James; Fujiyoshi, Takuya

    2016-04-01

    We present thermal infrared observations of the disk of Uranus at 17-200 μm to deduce its global thermal structure and bulk composition. We combine 17-200 μm filtered photometric measurements by the Herschel PACS and ISO LWS instruments and 19-35 μm filtered photometry and spectroscopy by the SOFIA FORCAST instrument, supplemented by 17-25 μm ground-based photometric filtered imaging of Uranus. Previous analysis of infrared spectroscopic measurements of the disk of Uranus made by the Spitzer IRS instrument yielded a model for the disk-averaged temperature profile and stratospheric composition (Orton et al. 2014a Icarus 243,494; 2014b Icarus 243, 471) that were consistent with submillimeter spectroscopy by the Herschel SPIRE instrument (Swinyard et al. 2014, MNRAS 440, 3658). Our motivation to observe the 17-35 μm spectrum was to place more stringent constraints on the global para-H2 / ortho-H2 ratio in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere than the ISO SWS results of Fouchet et al. (2003, Icarus 161, 127), who examined H2 quadrupole lines. We will discuss the consistency of these observations with a higher para-H2 fraction than implied by local thermal equilibrium, which would resolve a discrepancy between the Spitzer-based model and observations of HD lines by the Herschel PACS experiment (Feuchtgruber et al. 2013 Astron. & Astrophys. 551, A126). Constraints on the global para-H2 fraction allow for more precise analysis of the far-infrared spectrum, which is sensitive to the He:H2 ratio, a quantity that was not constrained by the Spitzer IRS spectra. The derived model, which assumed the ratio derived by the Voyager-2 IRIS/radio-science occultation experiment (Conrath et al. 1987 J. Geophys. Res. 92, 15003), is inconsistent with 70-200 μm PACS photometry (Mueller et al. 2016 Astron. & Astrophys. submittted) and ISO LWS photometric measurements. However, the model can be made consistent with the observations if the fraction of He relative to H2 were

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: YSOVAR: infrared photometry in NGC 1333 (Rebull+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebull, L. M.; Stauffer, J. R.; Cody, A. M.; Gunther, H. M.; Hillenbrand, L. A.; Poppenhaeger, K.; Wolk, S. J.; Hora, J.; Hernandez, J.; Bayo, A.; Covey, K.; Forbrich, J.; Gutermuth, R.; Morales-Calderon, M.; Plavchan, P.; Song, I.; Bouy, H.; Terebey, S.; Cuillandre, J. C.; Allen, L. E.

    2016-06-01

    We present the Young Stellar Object VARiability (YSOVAR) data for NGC1333. There are 701 objects (see Table1) with mid-infrared light curves in one or both warm Spitzer bands. All YSOVAR Spitzer light curve tabular data are available via the YSOVAR data delivery to the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA; http://irsa.ipac.caltech.edu/frontpage/). The sky observed by the two IRAC channels (3.6 and 4.5μm, or IRAC-1 and -2) fields of view is slightly offset with the central ~10'*10' region, centered on 03:29:06+31:19:30, covered by both channels. The observations were obtained under program ID61026, between 2011 October 10 and November 14 (~35 days). Near-infrared observations were obtained using the Peters Automated Infrared Imaging Telescope (PAIRITEL), which is an automated 1.3m telescope. PAIRITEL was located at the Whipple Observatory at Mt. Hopkins, Arizona; the same telescope and camera used for the northern part of 2MASS, PAIRITEL acquired simultaneous J, H, and Ks images. The observations of NGC1333 were obtained over 24 epochs from 2010 October 7 to 2012 November 19. We compiled additional photometry from several different sources. Early in the Spitzer mission, NGC1333 was observed by both the guaranteed time observations (GTOs) and the Cores-to-Disks (c2d) Legacy program (Evans et al. 2009, cat. J/ApJS/181/321), with both IRAC and the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS). NGC1333 was covered in the Two-Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS; see cat II/246) and was also located in a field targeted by the long exposure 6X 2MASS program (see cat II/281). As described in Rebull 2015 (cat. J/AJ/150/17), we included these main 2MASS catalog and deeper 6X catalog near-infrared JHKs data into our database. We also include the ~30 deep JH space-based measurements from Greissl et al. (2007AJ....133.1321G). Chandra X-ray Observatory Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer for wide-field imaging (ACIS-I) observations of NGC1333 were first reported in Getman et al. 2002 (cat. J

  4. Distinguishing the Least Massive Stars from the Most Massive Brown Dwarfs -- Parallaxes, Photometry, and Luminosities for Objects Near the Stellar/Substellar Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieterich, Sergio; Henry, T. J.; Jao, W.; Winters, J. G.; RECONS

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of a large survey of nearby (d < 25) very low mass stars and brown dwarfs with spectral types ranging from M6V to L5. This spectral type range is thought to encompass the end of the stellar main sequence. We obtained trigonometric parallaxes for 71 targets and optical (VRI) photometry for 115 targets, 44 of which already had parallaxes in the literature. We combine our VRI photometry with near and mid infrared photometry from 2MASS and WISE to compute new bolometric corrections and luminosities. We estimate effective temperatures based on the latest atmospheric models and use these data to create a real HR diagram mapping the bottom of the main sequence. We discuss the location of several benchmark binaries with dynamical masses in the HR diagram, and how they constrain the mass-luminosity relation. Our new HR diagram hints at the existence of two photometric sequences that overlap in color, but are distinct in luminosity. Could this be the overlap of the stellar main sequence and a new brown dwarf sequence? The trends in color-magnitude space also indicate that the stellar main sequence may end at an earlier spectral subtype than previously thought. This work is based in part on observations obtained at the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) telescope, which is a joint project of the Brazilian Ministry of Science and Technology, the U.S. National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), and Michigan State University (MSU). Additional observations obtained with the CTIO 0.9m telescope, which is operated by the SMARTS Consortium under the auspices of NOAO and the National Science Foundation. This work is funded by NSF grant AST-0908402.

  5. Galaxy Detection in 2MASS: Global Expectations and Results from Several Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chester, T.; Jarrett, T.

    1995-01-01

    An alogorithm has been developed and used to find galaxies in the 2MASS data. It uses the central surface brightness and measured size to discriminate galaxies from the much larger stellar population.

  6. Time series photometry of faint cataclysmic variables with a CCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, Timothy Mark Cameron

    1992-08-01

    I describe a new hardware and software environment for the practice of time-series stellar photometry with the CCD systems available at McDonald Observatory. This instrument runs suitable CCD's in frame transfer mode and permits windowing on the CCD image to maximize the duty cycle of the photometer. Light curves may be extracted and analyzed in real time at the telescope and image data are stored for later, more thorough analysis. I describe a star tracking algorithm, which is optimized for a timeseries of images of the same stellar field. I explore the extraction of stellar brightness measures from these images using circular software apertures and develop a complete description of the noise properties of this technique. I show that scintillation and pixelization noise have a significant effect on high quality observations. I demonstrate that optimal sampling and profile fitting techniques are unnecessarily complex or detrimental methods of obtaining stellar brightness measures under conditions commonly encountered in timeseries CCD photometry. I compare CCD's and photomultiplier tubes as detectors for timeseries photometry using light curves of a variety of stars obtained simultaneously with both detectors and under equivalent conditions. A CCD can produce useful data under conditions when a photomultiplier tube cannot, and a CCD will often produce more reliable results even under photometric conditions. I prevent studies of the cataclysmic variables (CV's) AL Com, CP Eri, V Per, and DO Leo made using the time series CCD photometer. AL Com is a very faint CV at high Galactic latitude and a bona fide Population II CV. Some of the properties of AL Com are similar to the dwarf nova WZ Sge and others are similar to the intermediate polar EX Hya, but overall AL Com is unlike any other well-studied cataclysmic variable. CP Eri is shown to be the fifth known interacting binary white dwarf. V Per was the first CV found to have an orbital period near the middle of the

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Extended red(dened) regions in 2MASS (Frieswijk+, 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frieswijk, W. W. F.; Shipman, R. F.

    2010-04-01

    Basic parameters of 2909 extended red regions in the outer Galactic plane (1320 at 60" and 1589 at 90" resolution). The sources have been extracted from the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS, Cat. ). For each source Galactic coordinates, total number of resolution cells, linear extend in longitude and latitude and number of 2MASS point sources are given. The calculated reliability of the sources is >99.9%. (1 data file).

  8. Results from a Program of Full Disk Solar Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, G.; Cookson, A.; Dobias, J.; Preminger, D.; Walton, S.

    Photometry of the full solar disk has been carried out at the San Fernando Observatory since 1985. A number of quantities are computed from images obtained in the red, blue and K-line. Photometric irradiance deficits due to sunspots and excesses due to faculae and network are highly correlated with variations in the total solar irradiance (TSI) from spacecraft. Multiple correlation coefficients as high as 0.95 to 0.97, depending on spacecraft and interval, have been obtained. Recent work shows that the short-term rotation variation of the TSI is due to the coming and going of active regions whereas the solar cycle variations on the scale of the solar cycle are due to changes in line blanketing associated with faculae and network.

  9. Using Photometry to Probe the Circumstellar Environment of δ Scorpii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, C. E.; Wiegert, P. A.; Tycner, C.; Henry, G. W.; Cyr, R. P.; Halonen, R. J.; Muterspaugh, M. W.

    2013-05-01

    We acquired Johnson BV photometry of the binary Be disk system δ Scorpii during its 2009, 2010, 2011, and 2012 observing seasons and used it to probe the innermost regions of the disk. We found that several disk building events have occurred during this time, resulting in an overall brightening in the V band and reddening of the system. In addition to these long-term trends, we found cyclical variability in each observing season on timescales between 60 and 100 days. We were able to reproduce the changes in the magnitude and color of δ Sco using our theoretical models and found that variable mass-loss rates in the range 2.5-7.0 × 10-9 M ⊙ yr-1 over ~35 days can reproduce the observed increase in brightness.

  10. USING PHOTOMETRY TO PROBE THE CIRCUMSTELLAR ENVIRONMENT OF {delta} SCORPII

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, C. E.; Wiegert, P. A.; Cyr, R. P.; Halonen, R. J.; Tycner, C.; Henry, G. W.; Muterspaugh, M. W.

    2013-05-15

    We acquired Johnson BV photometry of the binary Be disk system {delta} Scorpii during its 2009, 2010, 2011, and 2012 observing seasons and used it to probe the innermost regions of the disk. We found that several disk building events have occurred during this time, resulting in an overall brightening in the V band and reddening of the system. In addition to these long-term trends, we found cyclical variability in each observing season on timescales between 60 and 100 days. We were able to reproduce the changes in the magnitude and color of {delta} Sco using our theoretical models and found that variable mass-loss rates in the range 2.5-7.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -9} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} over {approx}35 days can reproduce the observed increase in brightness.

  11. CCD photometry of globular clusters in NGC 3377

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, William E.

    1990-08-01

    New CCD photometry to a limit B = 24.3 is presented for a sample of globular clusters around NGC 337, an intermediate-size elliptical in the Leo group. Assuming that the luminosity function of its globular clusters follows the same log-normal form as in other galaxies, a peak frequency level (turnover magnitude) of B(0) = 23.35 + or - 0.40 is derived for a combined sample of clusters in NGC 3377 and NGC 3379. Matching this to the globular clusters in the Milky Way then gives a distance modulus (m - M)B (Leo) = 30.2, or d = (10.7 + or - 2.2) Mpc, in good agreement with other recent distance-scale methods. The clusters around NGC 3377 follow a highly ellipsoidal space distribution; two different tests show that their distribution is at least as flattened as the E6 shape of the galaxy itself.

  12. CCD photometry of globular clusters in NGC 3377

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, W.E. )

    1990-09-01

    New CCD photometry to a limit B = 24.3 is presented for a sample of globular clusters around NGC 337, an intermediate-size elliptical in the Leo group. Assuming that the luminosity function of its globular clusters follows the same log-normal form as in other galaxies, a peak frequency level (turnover magnitude) of B(0) = 23.35 + or - 0.40 is derived for a combined sample of clusters in NGC 3377 and NGC 3379. Matching this to the globular clusters in the Milky Way then gives a distance modulus (m - M)B (Leo) = 30.2, or d = (10.7 + or - 2.2) Mpc, in good agreement with other recent distance-scale methods. The clusters around NGC 3377 follow a highly ellipsoidal space distribution; two different tests show that their distribution is at least as flattened as the E6 shape of the galaxy itself. 31 refs.

  13. Interpretation of integrated-disk photometry of Callisto and Ganymede

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pang, K.; Ajello, J. M.; Lumme, K.; Bowell, E.

    1983-01-01

    The Lumme-Bowell (1981) theory has been used to interpret the integrated phase curves of Callisto and Ganymede, and it is noted that while the theory explains the brightness angles of these satellites up to about 80 deg solar phase angle, the observed brightness drops off at larger angles more rapidly than predicted. It is suggested that this discrepancy is due to the fact that single regolith particles must have phase functions which are much more elongated in the forward or backward scattering directions than is allowed for by the Lumme-Bowell theory. The hemispheric asymmetry in Callisto's surface texture can be explained by invoking the formation of an ice film on the trailing side, consistent with Voyager detailed photometry and thermometry of Callisto.

  14. Three years of photometry of IM Pegasi = HR 8703

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaton, J. A.; Hall, D. S.; Henry, G. W.; Lovell, L. P.; Stephan, C. A.; Chambliss, C. R.; Detterline, P. K.; Landis, H. J.; Louth, H.; Renner, T. R.

    1983-01-01

    Differential photometry of this K1 IV-III p RS CVn-type binary in 1978-79, 1979-80, and 1980-81 at eight different observatories shows that the variability, discovered originally by Herbst, is periodic. The mean of three different determinations of the photometric period was 24(d).39 + or 0(d).03, about 1 percent shorter than the orbital period of 24(d).649 determined spectroscopically by Harper. The total range observed during these three years was for V from 5(m).60 to 5(m).85. The light curve was nearly sinusoidal but always noticieably asymmetric, with the sense reversing sometime between 1979-80 and 1980-81.

  15. Spitzer IRAC Photometry for Time Series in Crowded Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calchi Novati, S.; Gould, A.; Yee, J. C.; Beichman, C.; Bryden, G.; Carey, S.; Fausnaugh, M.; Gaudi, B. S.; Henderson, C. B.; Pogge, R. W.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Wibking, B.; Zhu, W.; Spitzer Team; Udalski, A.; Poleski, R.; Pawlak, M.; Szymański, M. K.; Skowron, J.; Mróz, P.; Kozłowski, S.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Ulaczyk, K.; OGLE Group

    2015-12-01

    We develop a new photometry algorithm that is optimized for the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) Spitzer time series in crowded fields and that is particularly adapted to faint or heavily blended targets. We apply this to the 170 targets from the 2015 Spitzer microlensing campaign and present the results of three variants of this algorithm in an online catalog. We present detailed accounts of the application of this algorithm to two difficult cases, one very faint and the other very crowded. Several of Spitzer's instrumental characteristics that drive the specific features of this algorithm are shared by Kepler and WFIRST, implying that these features may prove to be a useful starting point for algorithms designed for microlensing campaigns by these other missions.

  16. Towards photometry pipeline of the Indonesian space surveillance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyatikanto, Rhorom; Religia, Bahar; Rachman, Abdul; Dani, Tiar

    2015-09-01

    Optical observation through sub-meter telescope equipped with CCD camera becomes alternative method for increasing orbital debris detection and surveillance. This observational mode is expected to eye medium-sized objects in higher orbits (e.g. MEO, GTO, GSO & GEO), beyond the reach of usual radar system. However, such observation of fast moving objects demands special treatment and analysis technique. In this study, we performed photometric analysis of the satellite track images photographed using rehabilitated Schmidt Bima Sakti telescope in Bosscha Observatory. The Hough transformation was implemented to automatically detect linear streak from the images. From this analysis and comparison to USSPACECOM catalog, two satellites were identified and associated with inactive Thuraya-3 satellite and Satcom-3 debris which are located at geostationary orbit. Further aperture photometry analysis revealed the periodicity of tumbling Satcom-3 debris. In the near future, it is not impossible to apply similar scheme to establish an analysis pipeline for optical space surveillance system hosted in Indonesia.

  17. The symbiosis of photometry and radial-velocity measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, William D.

    1994-01-01

    The FRESIP mission is optimized to detect the inner planets of a planetary system. According to the current paradigm of planet formation, these planets will probably be small Earth-sized objects. Ground-based radial-velocity programs now have the sensitivity to detect Jovian-mass planets in orbit around bright solar-type stars. We expect the more massive planets to form in the outer regions of a proto-stellar nebula. These two types of measurements will very nicely complement each other, as they have highest detection probability for very different types of planets. The combination of FRESIP photometry and ground-based spectra will provide independent confirmation of the existence of planetary systems in orbit around other stars. Such detection of both terrestrial and Jovian planets in orbit around the same star is essential to test our understanding of planet formation.

  18. Flaring on RS CVn systems: Results from EUVE Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osten, R. A.; Brown, A.; Ayres, T. R.

    We present broadband EUV photometry for a sample of RS CVn systems observed with the Deep Survey Spectrometer and Right Angle Program (RAP) Scanners on the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE). We have developed robust data analysis and light curve software for the interpretation of these data. Large-scale flaring activity is seen on 15 of the 18 systems studied. These binaries cover a range in orbital period of 0.7 days to 21 days and include a mixture of giant, subgiant, and dwarf luminosity classes. For many systems the photometric coverage extends over several orbital periods and flaring is unambiguously characterized. We present statistics on the distribution of variability in the survey. Correlations of flaring with binary properties are examined.

  19. FRAM telescope - monitoring of atmospheric extinction and variable star photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurysek, J.; Honkova, K.; Masek, M.

    2015-02-01

    The FRAM (F/(Ph)otometric Robotic Atmospheric Monitor) telescope is a part of the Pierre Auger Observatory (PAO) located near town Malargüe in Argentina. The main task of the FRAM telescope is the continuous night - time monitoring of the atmospheric extinction and its wavelength dependence. The current methodology of the measurement of a atmospheric extinction and for instrumentation properties also allows simultaneous observation of other interesting astronomical targets. The current observations of the FRAM telescope are focused on the photometry of eclipsing binaries, positional refinement of minor bodies of the Solar system and observations of optical counterparts of gamma ray bursts. In this contribution, we briefly describe the main purpose of the FRAM telescope for the PAO and we also present its current astrono mical observing program.

  20. Millisecond optical photometry of the DQ Herculis objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imamura, James N.; Steiman-Cameron, Thomas Y.

    1988-01-01

    The results of millisecond optical photometry of the DQ Herculis stars EX Hya, H2252-035, V1223 Sgr, and AE Aqr obtained at the Las Campanas Observatory and Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory during the years 1985, 1986, and 1987 are reported. The data for coherent and incoherent features are searched for. Coherent features (other than those previously known) were not detected for frequencies between 0.1 and 250 Hz at 4-sigma upper limits of 0.05-0.4 percent. Evidence is not found for 1-3 s, quasi-coherent features. Such features have been detected in the optical emission of the AM Her objects AN UMa, EF Eri, and E1405-451. Because of the similarities between AM Her and DQ Her objects, it was suggested that such quasi-coherent features might also be found in the DQ Her objects.

  1. Prelude to, and Nature of the Space Photometry Revolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilliland, Ronald L.

    2015-09-01

    It is now less than a decade since CoRoT initiated the space photometry revolution with breakthrough discoveries, and five years since Kepler started a series of similar advances. I'll set the context for this revolution noting the status of asteroseismology and exoplanet discovery as it was 15-25 years ago in order to give perspective on why it is not mere hyperbole to claim CoRoT and Kepler fostered a revolution in our sciences. Primary events setting up the revolution will be recounted. I'll continue with noting the major discoveries in hand, and how asteroseismology and exoplanet studies, and indeed our approach to doing science, have been forever changed thanks to these spectacular missions.

  2. Asteroid models from photometry and complementary data sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaasalainen, Mikko

    2016-05-01

    I discuss inversion methods for asteroid shape and spin reconstruction with photometry (lightcurves) and complementary data sources such as adaptive optics or other images, occultation timings, interferometry, and range-Doppler radar data. These are essentially different sampling modes (generalized projections) of plane-of-sky images. An important concept in this approach is the optimal weighting of the various data modes. The maximum compatibility estimate, a multi-modal generalization of the maximum likelihood estimate, can be used for this purpose. I discuss the fundamental properties of lightcurve inversion by examining the two-dimensional case that, though not usable in our three-dimensional world, is simple to analyze, and it shares essentially the same uniqueness and stability properties as the 3-D case. After this, I review the main aspects of 3-D shape representations, lightcurve inversion, and the inclusion of complementary data.

  3. An interactive modular design for computerized photometry in spectrochemical analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bair, V. L.

    1980-01-01

    A general functional description of totally automatic photometry of emission spectra is not available for an operating environment in which the sample compositions and analysis procedures are low-volume and non-routine. The advantages of using an interactive approach to computer control in such an operating environment are demonstrated. This approach includes modular subroutines selected at multiple-option, menu-style decision points. This style of programming is used to trace elemental determinations, including the automated reading of spectrographic plates produced by a 3.4 m Ebert mount spectrograph using a dc-arc in an argon atmosphere. The simplified control logic and modular subroutine approach facilitates innovative research and program development, yet is easily adapted to routine tasks. Operator confidence and control are increased by the built-in options including degree of automation, amount of intermediate data printed out, amount of user prompting, and multidirectional decision points.

  4. Photometry of stars in the Cas OB5 Associations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanriver, Mehmet; Keskin, Ahmet

    2016-07-01

    OB associations are a grouping of very young associations, contain 10-100 very hot massive stars, spectral types O and B. Also, the OB associations contain low and intermediate mass stars, too. Association members are believed to form within the same small volume inside a giant molecular cloud. Once the surrounding dust and gas is blown away, the remaining stars become not tied up and begin to drift separately. It is believed that the majority of all stars in the Milky Way were formed in OB associations. O type stars are short-lived, and will be at an end as supernovae after roundly a million years. OB associations are generally only a few million years in age or less. In this study, the photometry of UU Cas and field star which been Cas OB5 association member was carried out. Light curves and color diagrams are given in the study.

  5. Results of the 2015 Mexican Asteroid Photometry Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sada, Pedro V.; Navarro-Meza, Samuel; Reyes-Ruiz, Mauricio; Olguin, Lorenzo L.; Saucedo, Julio C.; Loera-Gonzalez, Pablo

    2016-04-01

    The 2015 Mexican Asteroid Photometry Campaign was organized at the 2nd National Planetary Astrophysics Workshop held in 2015 March at the Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León in Monterrey, México. Three asteroids were selected for coordinated observations from several Mexican observatories. We report full lightcurves for the main-belt asteroid 1084 Tamariwa (P = 6.195 ± 0.001 h) and near-Earth asteroid (NEA) 4055 Magellan (P = 7.479 ± 0.001 h). Asteroid 1466 Mundleria was also observed on eight nights but no lightcurve was obtained because of its faintness, a crowded field-of-view, and low amplitude (<0.03 mag).

  6. Photometry of AM Herculis - A slow optical pulsar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Priedhorsky, W. C.; Krzeminski, W.

    1978-01-01

    Multicolor photometry of the X-ray binary AM Her suggests that the red component of the optical flux is closely related to the source of optical circular polarization in the system. It is concluded from the periodic modulation of flux in the U through R bands, which is particularly well-defined when plotted as color curves, that the primary and secondary minima are neither eclipses by a secondary star nor eclipses by a hot spot. It is suggested that the primary minimum in the visual light curve is the eclipse of a region of intense optical emission in the magnetic field near the surface of a degenerate dwarf by that dwarf itself.

  7. SIT Vidicon photometry for four old Magellanic Cloud clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, W. E.; Hesser, J. E.; Atwood, B.

    1983-12-01

    SIT Vidicon photometry in B and V from the CTIO 4-m telescope is presented for NGC 1466, NGC 2203, NGC 2210, and NGC 2257 in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The deepest data are for NGC 2257, where the main sequence turnoff is reached at V = 22.4, confirming Stryker's (1983) inference from photographic data that the cluster has an age comparable to those of the Galactic globular clusters. NGC 2203 is found to be an intermediate-age cluster with a C-M diagram similar to that of NGC 7789 in the Galaxy. For NGC 1466 and NGC 2210 the present data are compatible with previous studies that have found these to be genuinely old clusters in the Galactic globular cluster sense.

  8. Steps toward a physical calibration of UBV photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buser, R.; Kurucz, R. L.

    The large data base of photoelectric measurements on the Johnson UBV system has been a primary source of information in many fields of astrophysical interest. The availability of UBV data for virtually all types of stars known to make up the stellar populations in galaxies requires a continued effort toward establishing a fully physical calibration of these data in order to propagate effectively the improving knowledge on stellar evolution and stellar atmospheres (i.e., the HR diagram) through the observations relevant to the structure and evolution of the galaxies. One of the major links in this long chain of scientific progress is provided by the synthesis of stellar photometric properties from theoretical model atmospheres. This paper will briefly address some of the basic problems involved in the synthetic color calculations and discuss the theoretical calibration of UBV photometry as obtained from various grids of model atmospheres covering a large range of stellar types.

  9. Glory revealed in disk-integrated photometry of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García Muñoz, A.; Pérez-Hoyos, S.; Sánchez-Lavega, A.

    2014-06-01

    Context. Reflected light from a spatially unresolved planet yields unique insight into the overall optical properties of the planet cover. Glories are optical phenomena caused by light that is backscattered within spherical droplets following a narrow distribution of sizes; they are well known on Earth as localised features above liquid clouds. Aims: Here we report the first evidence for a glory in the disk-integrated photometry of Venus and, in turn, of any planet. Methods: We used previously published phase curves of the planet that were reproduced over the full range of phase angles with model predictions based on a realistic description of the Venus atmosphere. We assumed that the optical properties of the planet as a whole can be described by a uniform and stable cloud cover, an assumption that agrees well with observational evidence. Results: We specifically show that the measured phase curves mimic the scattering properties of the Venus upper-cloud micron-sized aerosols, also at the small phase angles at which the glory occurs, and that the glory contrast is consistent with what is expected after multiple scattering of photons. In the optical, the planet appears to be brighter at phase angles of ~11-13° than at full illumination; it undergoes a maximum dimming of up to ~10% at phases in between. Conclusions: Glories might potentially indicate spherical droplets and, thus, extant liquid clouds in the atmospheres of exoplanets. A prospective detection will require exquisite photometry at the small planet-star separations of the glory phase angles. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  10. Recovering physical properties from narrow-band photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenell, W.; Cid Fernandes, R.; Benítez, N.; Vale Asari, N.

    2013-05-01

    Our aim in this work is to answer, using simulated narrow-band photometry data, the following general question: What can we learn about galaxies from these new generation cosmological surveys? For instance, can we estimate stellar age and metallicity distributions? Can we separate star-forming galaxies from AGN? Can we measure emission lines, nebular abundances and extinction? With what precision? To accomplish this, we selected a sample of about 300k galaxies with good S/N from the SDSS and divided them in two groups: 200k objects and a template library of 100k. We corrected the spectra to z = 0 and converted them to filter fluxes. Using a statistical approach, we calculated a Probability Distribution Function (PDF) for each property of each object and the library. Since we have the properties of all the data from the STARLIGHT-SDSS database, we could compare them with the results obtained from summaries of the PDF (mean, median, etc). Our results shows that we retrieve the weighted average of the log of the galaxy age with a good error margin (σ ≈ 0.1 - 0.2 dex), and similarly for the physical properties such as mass-to-light ratio, mean stellar metallicity, etc. Furthermore, our main result is that we can derive emission line intensities and ratios with similar precision. This makes this method unique in comparison to the other methods on the market to analyze photometry data and shows that, from the point of view of galaxy studies, future photometric surveys will be much more useful than anticipated.

  11. Far-ultraviolet photometry of the globular cluster omega Cen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, Jonathan H.; O'Connell, Robert W.; Rood, Robert T.; Dorman, Ben; Landsman, Wayne B.; Cheng, K.-P.; Bohlin, Ralph C.; Hintzen, Paul M. N.; Roberts, Morton S.; Smith, Andrew M.

    1994-01-01

    We present far-ultraviolet images of the globular cluster omega Centauri obtained with the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT) during the 1990 December Astro-1 mission. A total of 1957 sources are detected at 1620 A to a limiting ultraviolet (UV) magnitude of 16.4 in the central 24 min diameter region of the field and a limit of 15.6 over the remainder of the 40 min diameter field. Over 1400 of these sources are matched with stars on a Stroemgren u band charge coupled devices (CCD) frame obtained with the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) 0.9 m telescope to produce a (far-UV, u) color-magnitude diagram (CMD). Completeness of the sample and error estimates are determined by photometry of artificial stars added to the images. The horizontal branch (HB) of the CMD is heavily populated hotter than 9000 K. A large number of 'extreme HB' stars are found hotter than a conspicuous break in the HB at T(sub e) approximately 16000 K. There is also a significant population of stars above the HB, the brightest of which is 4 mag brighter than the HB. Most of the hotter of these appear to be 'AGB-manque' or 'Post-Early Asymptotic Giant Branch' stars. We compare the observations to recent theoretical evolutionary tracks for the zero-age HB and subsequent phases. The tracks match the data well, with the exception of the hotter HB stars, many of which fall below the zero-age horizontal branch. It is unclear as yet whether these are a special population or an artifact of errors in the models or photometry. We identify 33 stars with T(sub e) greater than or approximately = 50000 K, which are hotter than zero-age HB stars with envelope masses of 0.003 solar mass.

  12. Magnetic activity on V889 Herculis. Combining photometry and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Järvinen, S. P.; Korhonen, H.; Berdyugina, S. V.; Ilyin, I.; Strassmeier, K. G.; Weber, M.; Savanov, I.; Tuominen, I.

    2008-09-01

    Aims: In this paper we analyse photometric and spectroscopic observations of the young active dwarf V889 Her. We present new surface temperature maps, and compare them to earlier published Doppler maps, as well as to the results obtained from long-term photometry. Methods: The light curve inversions and surface temperature maps were obtained using the Occamian approach inversion technique. Results: The 12 years of photometric records on V889 Her suggest a possible photometric cycle of approximately 9 years. Variability on this time scale is detected in the maximum, minimum, and mean photometric magnitudes. The spots prefer to concentrate on two active longitudes that are approximately 180° apart. Furthermore, one flip-flop event, i.e., a sudden change of the dominant active longitude by 180°, is detected at the time of the global maximum activity. The wings of the Ca II 8662 Å indicate that the quiet photosphere of the V889 Her is similar to the one of the present Sun supporting earlier determined atmospheric parameters, while the chromosphere of V889 Her shows signs of much stronger activity. The temperature maps reveal that the polar regions are covered by spots, which are about 1500 K cooler than the quiet photosphere. The mean spot latitude varies slightly with time. It appears that the spot latitudes from our Doppler images and the spot migration rates revealed by photometry indicate a weaker differential rotation than reported earlier, but in the same (solar-like) direction. Based on observations made with the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated on the island of La Palma jointly by Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias. Table [see full textsee full textsee full text] and Figs. [see full textsee full textsee full text]-[see full textsee full textsee full text] are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  13. Exoplanet Photometry and Spectroscopy with HII/L2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, M.

    2000-12-01

    With the recent discovery of extrasolar planets (exoplanets) around nearby stars by indirect methods, one of the next goals of the exoplanet study is to directly detect the giant exoplanets and to make photometry and spectroscopy. The next decade will be the time to move from discovery to characterization of exoplanet systems. This, however, requires all of high sensitivity, high spatial resolution, and high dynamic range observations at infrared wavelengths, which will be difficult to achieve from the ground. In this paper, we describe a coronagraphic camera and spectrometer for the HII/L2 mission for mid- and far-infrared astronomy and show the photometry and spectroscopy of exoplanets to be one of the most important scientific aims for this mission. The proposed HII/L2 coronagraph will cover the wavelength between 4 and 27 micron, optimized at 5 micron. The plate scale is about 0.06 arcsec, covering a field-of-view of about 1 arcmin by 1 arcmin with a 1024x1024 array detector. Occulting masks of diameter greater than 0.72 arcsec will be available, which enables the observations of exoplanets beyond ~2 AU around nearby (d~5 pc) stars. The coronagraph greatly takes advantage of the single (non-segmented) mirror of the HII/L2 telescope design. A high-efficiency Ge or CdTe grism with a resolution of a few hundreds will be installed for the coronagraphic spectroscopy of the exoplanet atmosphere. Rich spectral features at mid-infrared wavelengths enable us to study various atmospheric components and to make a comparative study of the exoplanets and our solar system planets.

  14. Searching for dark clouds in the outer galactic plane. I. A statistical approach for identifying extended red(dened) regions in 2MASS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frieswijk, W. W. F.; Shipman, R. F.

    2010-06-01

    Context. Most of what is known about clustered star formation to date comes from well studied star forming regions located relatively nearby, such as Rho-Ophiuchus, Serpens and Perseus. However, the recent discovery of infrared dark clouds may give new insights in our understanding of this dominant mode of star formation in the Galaxy. Though the exact role of infrared dark clouds in the formation process is still somewhat unclear, they seem to provide useful laboratories to study the very early stages of clustered star formation. Infrared dark clouds have been identified predominantly toward the bright inner parts of the galactic plane. The low background emission makes it more difficult to identify similar objects in mid-infrared absorption in the outer parts. This is unfortunate, because the outer Galaxy represents the only nearby region where we can study effects of different (external) conditions on the star formation process. Aims: The aim of this paper is to identify extended red regions in the outer galactic plane based on reddening of stars in the near-infrared. We argue that these regions appear reddened mainly due to extinction caused by molecular clouds and young stellar objects. The work presented here is used as a basis for identifying star forming regions and in particular the very early stages. An accompanying paper describes the cross-identification of the identified regions with existing data, uncovering more on the nature of the reddening. Methods: We use the Mann-Whitney U-test, in combination with a friends-of-friends algorithm, to identify extended reddened regions in the 2MASS all-sky JHK survey. We process the data on a regular grid using two different resolutions, 60´´ and 90´´. The two resolutions have been chosen because the stellar surface density varies between the crowded spiral arm regions and the sparsely populated galactic anti-center region. Results: We identify 1320 extended red regions at the higher resolution and 1589 in the

  15. Probing Accretion in Magnetic Cataclysmic Variables from High Time Resolution Optical Photometry and X-ray Observations from ASTROSAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, David; Marsh, Tom; Revnivtsev, Mikhail; Bonnet-Bidaud, Jean-Marc; Mouchet, Martine; Pal Singh, Kulinder; Semena, Andrey; Dhillon, Vik; Breytenbach, Hannes; Irawati, Puji; Potter, Stephen

    2016-07-01

    We present results from an on-going program of high speed CCD photometry of magnetic cataclysmic variables (mCVs) aimed at characterizing their high frequency (˜0.1-10 Hz) optical variability. In particular, we have been actively attempting to detect Quasi-Periodic Oscillations in many Polars, indicative of shock instabilities in their accretion columns. We have used a variety of instruments for this purpose, including the EM-CCD based SHOC camera on the SAAO 1.9-m telescope, SALTICAM and BVIT on SALT and Ultraspec on the TNO 2.5-m telescope. While we have detected QPOs seen before in the systems V834 Cen and VV Pup, we have only found evidence for one new detection, namely for 2MASS J19283247-5001344, an eclipsing polar. This may indicate that QPOs are somewhat of a rarity in Polars. We have also seen evidence for lower frequency QPOs, with characteristic timescales of 10s of seconds to several minutes. In addition, we have been investigating the nature of the breaks in the Power Density Spectra (νF_ν) power law for Intermediate Polars (e.g. EX Hya). This may give clues to the size of the inner radius of the accretion disc, where the magnetosphere begins to dominate the accretion flow. Finally, results of our recent ASTROSAT program on mCVs will be discussed.

  16. EXTENDED PHOTOMETRY FOR THE DEEP2 GALAXY REDSHIFT SURVEY: A TESTBED FOR PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFT EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Daniel J.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Coil, Alison L.; Cooper, Michael C.; Gwyn, Stephen D. J. E-mail: janewman@pitt.edu E-mail: m.cooper@uci.edu

    2013-02-15

    This paper describes a new catalog that supplements the existing DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey photometric and spectroscopic catalogs with ugriz photometry from two other surveys: the Canada-France-Hawaii Legacy Survey (CFHTLS) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Each catalog is cross-matched by position on the sky in order to assign ugriz photometry to objects in the DEEP2 catalogs. We have recalibrated the CFHTLS photometry where it overlaps DEEP2 in order to provide a more uniform data set. We have also used this improved photometry to predict DEEP2 BRI photometry in regions where only poorer measurements were available previously. In addition, we have included improved astrometry tied to SDSS rather than USNO-A2.0 for all DEEP2 objects. In total this catalog contains {approx}27, 000 objects with full ugriz photometry as well as robust spectroscopic redshift measurements, 64% of which have r > 23. By combining the secure and accurate redshifts of the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey with ugriz photometry, we have created a catalog that can be used as an excellent testbed for future photo-z studies, including tests of algorithms for surveys such as LSST and DES.

  17. THE PANCHROMATIC HUBBLE ANDROMEDA TREASURY. X. ULTRAVIOLET TO INFRARED PHOTOMETRY OF 117 MILLION EQUIDISTANT STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Benjamin F.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Byler, Nell; Johnson, L. C. E-mail: jd@astro.washington.edu E-mail: lcjohnso@astro.washington.edu; and others

    2014-11-01

    We have measured stellar photometry with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) and Advanced Camera for Surveys in near ultraviolet (F275W, F336W), optical (F475W, F814W), and near infrared (F110W, F160W) bands for 117 million resolved stars in M31. As part of the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury survey, we measured photometry with simultaneous point-spread function (PSF) fitting across all bands and at all source positions after precise astrometric image alignment (<5-10 mas accuracy). In the outer disk, the photometry reaches a completeness-limited depth of F475W ∼ 28, while in the crowded, high surface brightness bulge, the photometry reaches F475W ∼ 25. We find that simultaneous photometry and optimized measurement parameters significantly increase the detection limit of the lowest-resolution filters (WFC3/IR) providing color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) that are up to 2.5 mag deeper when compared with CMDs from WFC3/IR photometry alone. We present extensive analysis of the data quality including comparisons of luminosity functions and repeat measurements, and we use artificial star tests to quantify photometric completeness, uncertainties and biases. We find that the largest sources of systematic error in the photometry are due to spatial variations in the PSF models and charge transfer efficiency corrections. This stellar catalog is the largest ever produced for equidistant sources, and is publicly available for download by the community.

  18. The Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury. X. Ultraviolet to Infrared Photometry of 117 Million Equidistant Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Benjamin F.; Lang, Dustin; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Bell, Eric F.; Bianchi, Luciana; Byler, Nell; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Girardi, Léo; Gordon, Karl; Gregersen, Dylan; Johnson, L. C.; Kalirai, Jason; Lauer, Tod R.; Monachesi, Antonela; Rosenfield, Philip; Seth, Anil; Skillman, Eva

    2014-11-01

    We have measured stellar photometry with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) and Advanced Camera for Surveys in near ultraviolet (F275W, F336W), optical (F475W, F814W), and near infrared (F110W, F160W) bands for 117 million resolved stars in M31. As part of the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury survey, we measured photometry with simultaneous point-spread function (PSF) fitting across all bands and at all source positions after precise astrometric image alignment (<5-10 mas accuracy). In the outer disk, the photometry reaches a completeness-limited depth of F475W ~ 28, while in the crowded, high surface brightness bulge, the photometry reaches F475W ~ 25. We find that simultaneous photometry and optimized measurement parameters significantly increase the detection limit of the lowest-resolution filters (WFC3/IR) providing color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) that are up to 2.5 mag deeper when compared with CMDs from WFC3/IR photometry alone. We present extensive analysis of the data quality including comparisons of luminosity functions and repeat measurements, and we use artificial star tests to quantify photometric completeness, uncertainties and biases. We find that the largest sources of systematic error in the photometry are due to spatial variations in the PSF models and charge transfer efficiency corrections. This stellar catalog is the largest ever produced for equidistant sources, and is publicly available for download by the community.

  19. The rotation period of Epsilon Eri from photometry of its starspots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, Gary J.; Hall, Douglas S.; Mattingly, Phil; Robb, Steve; Wood, Jim; Zeigler, Kenneth; Grim, Bruce

    1991-01-01

    BV photometry at six observatories in 1988/1989 and 1989/1990 shows variability resulting from five starspots which lived 1 or 2 months each, had rotation periods in the range P between 10.0d and 12.3d, and had amplitudes in the range 0.01 m - 0.03 m. From the range in P it was possible to estimate k greater than 0.20 +/- 0.05 for the differential rotation coefficient. Ca II K-line photometry, polarimetry, and earlier photometry reported in the literature has also shown variability with periodicities in the same 10 d -12 d range.

  20. A Pan-STARRS1-based recalibration of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Schlafly, E.; Green, G.

    2014-01-01

    We present a recalibration of the SDSS DR9 photometry with new flat fields and zero points derived from Pan-STARRS. Using PSF photometry of 60 million stars with 16 < r < 20, we obtain SDSS flat-field and amplifier gain corrections stable to 3 millimagnitudes (mmag) in g,r,i,z bands and 15 mmag in u band. We also identify transient non-photometric periods in SDSS ("contrails") based on photometric deviations co-temporal in SDSS bands. The recalibrated SDSS and PS1 photometry agree with systematics at the 7 mmag level.

  1. The AAVSO Photoelectric Photometry Program in Its Scientific and Socio-Historic Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Percy, J. R.

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, I review the work of the AAVSO in the area of photoelectric photometry (PEP). This work was influenced by several trends: in science, in technology, and in the sociology of amateur astronomy. Through the 1980s, the AAVSO photoelectric photometry program competed with other such programs and, in recent years, has been overshadowed by CCD photometry programs. Nevertheless, the AAVSO PEP program has, through careful organization, motivation, and feedback, produced extensive scientific results, and can continue to do so. In the case of my own research, AAVSO PEP observations have also contributed significantly to the education of my students.

  2. THE SOLAR NEIGHBORHOOD. XXIII. CCD PHOTOMETRIC DISTANCE ESTIMATES OF SCR TARGETS-77 M DWARF SYSTEMS WITHIN 25 pc

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, Jennifer G.; Henry, Todd J.; Jao, Wei-Chun; Subasavage, John P.; Finch, Charlie T.; Hambly, Nigel C. E-mail: thenry@chara.gsu.edu E-mail: jsubasavage@ctio.noao.edu E-mail: nch@roe.ac.uk

    2011-01-15

    We present CCD photometric distance estimates of 100 SCR (SuperCOSMOS RECONS) systems with {mu} {>=} 0.''18 yr{sup -1}, 29 of which are new discoveries previously unpublished in this series of papers. These distances are estimated using a combination of new VRI photometry acquired at CTIO and JHK magnitudes extracted from 2MASS. The estimates are improvements over those determined using photographic plate BRI magnitudes from SuperCOSMOS plus JHK, as presented in the original discovery papers. In total, 77 of the 100 systems investigated are predicted to be within 25 pc. If all 77 systems are confirmed to have {pi}{sub trig} {>=} 40 mas, this sample would represent a 23% increase in M dwarf systems nearer than 25 pc in the southern sky.

  3. A new look at photometry of the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goguen, Jay D.; Stone, Thomas C.; Kieffer, Hugh H.; Buratti, Bonnie J.

    2010-08-01

    We use ROLO photometry (Kieffer, H.H., Stone, T.C. [2005]. Astron. J. 129, 2887-2901) to characterize the before and after full Moon radiance variation for a typical highlands site and a typical mare site. Focusing on the phase angle range 45° < α < 50°, we test two different physical models, macroscopic roughness and multiple scattering between regolith particles, for their ability to quantitatively reproduce the measured radiance difference. Our method for estimating the rms slope angle is unique and model-independent in the sense that the measured radiance factor I/ F at small incidence angles (high Sun) is used as an estimate of I/ F for zero roughness regolith. The roughness is determined from the change in I/ F at larger incidence angles. We determine the roughness for 23 wavelengths from 350 to 939 nm. There is no significant wavelength dependence. The average rms slope angle is 22.2° ± 1.3° for the mare site and 34.1° ± 2.6° for the highland site. These large slopes, which are similar to previous "photometric roughness" estimates, require that sub-mm scale "micro-topography" dominates roughness measurements based on photometry, consistent with the conclusions of Helfenstein and Shepard (Helfenstein, P., Shepard, M.K. [1999]. Icarus 141, 107-131). We then tested an alternative and very different model for the before and after full Moon I/ F variation: multiple scattering within a flat layer of realistic regolith particles. This model consists of a log normal size distribution of spheres that match the measured distribution of particles in a typical mature lunar soil 72141,1 (McKay, D.S., Fruland, R.M., Heiken, G.H. [1974]. Proc. Lunar Sci. Conf. 5, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 1 (5), 887-906). The model particles have a complex index of refraction 1.65-0.003 i, where 1.65 is typical of impact-generated lunar glasses. Of the four model parameters, three were fixed at values determined from Apollo lunar soils: the mean radius and width of the log normal

  4. Resolved photometry of extragalactic young massive star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, S. S.; de Mink, S. E.; Eldridge, J. J.; Langer, N.; Bastian, N.; Seth, A.; Smith, L. J.; Brodie, J.; Efremov, Yu. N.

    2011-08-01

    Aims: We present colour-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) of young massive star clusters in several galaxies located well beyond the Local Group. The richness of these clusters allows us to obtain large samples of post-main sequence stars and test how well the observed CMDs are reproduced by canonical stellar isochrones. Methods: We use imaging of seven clusters in the galaxies NGC 1313, NGC 1569, NGC 1705, NGC 5236 and NGC 7793 obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on board the Hubble Space Telescope and carry out PSF-fitting photometry of individual stars in the clusters. The clusters have ages in the range ~(5-50) × 106 years and masses of ~105 M⊙-106 M⊙. Although crowding prevents us from obtaining photometry in the inner regions of the clusters, we are still able to measure up to 30-100 supergiant stars in each of the richest clusters. The resulting CMDs and luminosity functions are compared with photometry of artificially generated clusters, designed to reproduce the photometric errors and completeness as realistically as possible. Results: In agreement with previous studies, our CMDs show no clear gap between the H-burning main sequence and the He-burning supergiant stars, contrary to predictions by common stellar isochrones. In general, the isochrones also fail to match the observed number ratios of red-to-blue supergiant stars, although the difficulty of separating blue supergiants from the main sequence complicates this comparison. In several cases we observe a large spread (1-2 mag) in the luminosities of the supergiant stars that cannot be accounted for by observational errors. We find that this spread can be reproduced by including an age spread of ~(10-30) × 106 years in the models. However, age spreads cannot fully account for the observed morphology of the CMDs and other processes, such as the evolution of interacting binary stars, may also play a role. Conclusions: Colour-magnitude diagrams can be successfully obtained for massive star

  5. Geometry of the LMC Disk: Results from MACHO and 2MASS

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolaev, S; Drake, A; Keller, S; Cook, K; Dalal, N; Griest, K; Welch, D; Kanbur, S

    2003-11-04

    We have cross-correlated MACHO LMC Cepheids with 2MASS Second Incremental Release Catalog. The resulting database is considerably larger than the set of OGLE Cepheids in the LMC bar, and has significantly better areal coverage, allowing more accurate determination of LMC geometry. Random-phase correction is applied to 2MASS J, H, and Ks magnitudes, using the knowledge of V-band light curve and the ephemeris of 2MASS observations, to produce mean magnitudes. The improvement of phase-corrected PL relations over random-phase PL relations is clearly demonstrated. Reddening is estimated for each star individually, further improving the accuracy of the method. The orientation parameters of the LMC are derived by a Maximum Likelihood approach which solves for viewing angles and PL coefficients simultaneously, providing an unbiased estimation. The results of the analysis are used to place limits on warping of the LMC disk. Implications for the microlensing optical depth are also discussed.

  6. Multicolor surface photometry of a sample of low luminosity radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Sheetal Kumar; Pandey, S. K.; Chakradhari, N. K.; Baburao Pandge, Mahadev

    2015-08-01

    We present a detailed multiband photometric study of five galaxies, selected from a sample of low luminosity early-type galaxies from B2 sample, which have mpg = 15.7, mV = 16.5, redshifts up to 0.2, radio powers P408 = 1023 - 1026.5 W Hz-1 and between 1022 - 1025 W Hz-1 at 1.4 GHz. We have used observed BVR and Hα images from IGO 2m telescope (Pune, India) and 2m HCT, Indian Astronomical Observatory (IAO Hanle, India), and archival multiband data from SDSS (ugriz), 2MASS (JHKs ), WISE, Spitzer (mid-IR), XMM, CHANDRA (X-ray), UV (GALEX) and radio from VLA, IRAM for this study.We used standard technique of surface photometry by fitting ellipses to the isophotes for studying the distribution of light in the galaxies by studying their surface brightness profiles, ellipticity profiles, position angle profiles, variation of center of isophotes along semi-major axis, shapes of isophotes, radial color gradients, twists in isophotes and fine structure variations from smooth light profile. The obtained surface brightness profiles are fitted to the core-Sersic model for decomposing the galaxy light profiles and quantify the radial stellar distributions of the sample galaxies.The multiband color index profiles, e.g. u-g, g-r, r-i, i-z, B-R, B-V, J-Hs , J-Ks , H-Ks , R-Ks , 3.4-4.6 μm, 4.6-12 μm (mid-IR) and FUV-NUV(UV), are obtained and combined with various maps e.g . unsharp-masked images, residual maps, quotient maps, dust extinction maps, Hα emission maps, CO intensity maps, diffuse X-ray emission maps and extinction curves of the galaxies to study the morphology, properties and physical correlations of different phases (e.g cool gas, dust, ionized gas and hot gases) of Inter Stellar Medium and to examine various star formation related processes in the galaxies.

  7. Optical and near infrared photometry of Butcher-Oemler clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shier, Lisa M.; Rieke, Marcia J.

    1993-01-01

    Rich clusters of galaxies at moderate redshifts (z approx. .3) have a larger proportion of optically blue galaxies than their low redshift counterparts. Spectroscopic examination of the blue galaxies by various authors has shown that the blue galaxies are generally Seyferts, show evidence for recent star formation, or are foreground objects. Unfortunately, spectroscopy is too time consuming to be used on large samples. Thus, we have looked for a way to separate Seyferts, starbursts, ellipticals and nonmembers using photometry alone. Five moderate redshift clusters, Abell numbers 777, 963, 1758, 1961 and 2218, have been observed in the V, R and K bands. We model the spectral energy distributions of various kinds of galaxies found in clusters and derive observed colors. We have modeled the spectral energy distributions (SED) of several kinds of galaxies and compute their colors as a function of redshift. We expect to see ellipticals, spirals, starbursts, post-starburst and Seyfert galaxies. The SED of elliptical and Sbc galaxies was observed by Rieke and Rieke. The SEDs for the starburst galaxies was created by adding a reddened 10(exp 8) year old burst to a spiral galaxy SED. The post-starburst (E+A) galaxy SEDs are composed of a slightly reddened 10(exp 9) year old burst and elliptical galaxy SED. SEDs for the Seyferts were created by adding a v(exp -1.1) power law, and a hot dust thermal spectrum to the Sbc. From the SEDs the colors of galaxies at various redshifts with assorted filters were computed. Lilly & Gunn (1985) have optical and infrared photometry for a sample of galaxies in CL0024+1654 observed spectroscopically by Dressler, Gunn and Schneider (1985). We have used this data to choose the most appropriate SEDs for our starburst and post-starburst models. The most likely explanation for the optically blue colors in most cluster galaxies is star formation. Very few galaxies lie in the Seyfert locus. Abel 1758 has more Seyfert candidates than the other

  8. The expected Gaia revolution in asteroid science: Photometry and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cellino, A.

    2014-07-01

    Gaia is expected to produce a major revolution in our knowledge of the asteroids. Apart from a huge improvement in the accuracy of the orbital elements of these objects, something which is a ''natural'' consequence of the unprecedented astrometric accuracy of Gaia, we can also expect that the photometric and spectrophotometric performances of the Gaia detectors will be such to substantially move ahead the frontier of the domain of physical characterization of asteroids by means of remote observations. A list of physical properties, that will be derived from the analysis of the detections corresponding to different observed transits of each object in the Gaia focal plane during five years of operational activity, includes masses, sizes, average densities, spin properties, reflectance spectra, albedos, as well as a new taxonomic classification. In this review, the focus will be on Gaia photometry and spectrophotometry. The method of photometric inversion of sparse photometric data developed to reduce Gaia photometric data of asteroids will be described, and its expected performances will be discussed. In particular, the choice of assuming for the objects the shapes of ideal triaxial ellipsoids, fairly simplistic in an era in which much more refined shape models are currently used in photometric inversion methods, will be justified by the need of minimizing the CPU time needed to process data for hundreds of thousands of objects in a reasonable time. The processing of spectrophotometric data will be also described. These data will produce a huge data set of reflectance spectra of asteroids. A particular advantage of these data will be that of including also the blue part of the spectrum, which has been substantially lost since the epoch in which the CCD detectors have replaced the older photomultipliers used for UBVRI photometry. The big data set of new asteroid spectra will be also used to develop a new asteroid taxonomy, used new algorithms developed for this

  9. Infrared photometry and polarimetry of Cygnus X-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Terry Jay; Gehrz, Robert D.; Kobulnicky, Henry A.; Molnar, Lawrence A.; Howard, Eric M.

    1994-01-01

    We present photometry and linear polarimetry of Cygnus X-3 at K (2.2 micrometers) obtained over a 5 yr period. Photometry and polarimetry at J, H, and K of nearby field stars is also presented. From an analysis of these data we find: (1) Using the x-ray ephemeris of Kitamoto et al. (ApJ, 384, 263 (1992), including the first and second derivatives of the period, the leading edge of the decline to minimum in the quiescent K light curve has not changed in phase since 1974. The duration of the minimum in the light curve has changed significantly between different epochs, becoming much broader in 1993 than it was previously. (2) In addition to an interstellar polarization component, it is likely Cyg X-3 has an intrinsic polarization component that is variable. The variations in the polarization do not show any diagnostic pattern with orbital phase. A crude analysis of the polarization suggests the intrinsic polarization of Cyg X-3 has a mean position angle of approximately 12 deg, nearly the same as the direction of the expanding radio lobes. This is consistent with circumstellar electrons scattering in an equatorial disk that is perpendicular to the lobe axis. (3) The mean position angle for the interstellar polarization in the direction of Cyg X-3 is 150 deg. This is nearly perpendicular to the axis of interstellar radio scattering seen in the extended (Very Long Baseline Inteferometry (VLBI) images. Since the position angle of interstellar polarization is the same as the projected magnetic field direction, this suggests the interstellar (not circumstellar) scattering must be taking place perpendicular to the interstellar magnetic field lines. (4) Cyg X-3 was observed at K during a flare on 1992 September 30 with a temporal resolution of 6 s. The flaring had rise and fall times of approximately 50 s with peak intensities up to 80 mJy. The flux between individual flare events never dropped to quiescent levels for the duration of our observations (approximately 2000 s).

  10. Infrared Passbands for Accurate IR Photometry : the IRWG set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milone, E. F.; Young, A. T.

    2002-12-01

    The well-known past limitations in accuracy and precision of infrared photometry has been shown to be due primarily to atmospheric features within passbands and the use of the edges of the atmospheric windows to define those passbands. The saturation of portions of the passbands high in the atmosphere means, especially for the longer wavelength passbands, a large difference between a linearly extrapolated zero-air mass magnitude and the actual value. The rapid curvature of the extinction curve between 1 and 0 air mass is known as the Forbes effect. Since the strengths of atmospheric features vary with altitude and the circumstances of each site, different observatories have responded to the problem by redefining the Johnson system from J to Q to suit the needs of the site. The result has been a proliferation of systems, with filters having been selected for maximum throughput and so not necessarily placed, shaped, and narrowed to minimize optimally the effects of the absorption bands of the terrestrial atmosphere. Given this situation and in light of the tremendous promise of high precision presented by infrared photometry, and with the support of an important segment of the IR community, the Infrared Astronomy Working Group (IRWG) was created inside IAU Com. 25 to solve the problem. A subgroup of the IRWG consisting of Young, Milone, and Stagg set about examining the properties of existing passbands and in optimizing the placement and width of passbands within the atmospheric windows. Here we review the transformation properties of the recommended Z to Q passbands and of the IR filters produced by Custom Scientific Co. to approximate the near IR passbands of this set, their signal to noise ratios, and results of the standardization testing project at the Rothney Astrophysical Observatory over the past few years. The extinction coefficients determined with the manufactured filters demonstrate the usefulness of these passbands for transformation to the standard

  11. Photometry and Spectroscopy of BD+35 1111 in M38

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, Steven P.; Kwitter, Karen B.; Sami, Mona; Beltz-Mohrmann, Gillian

    2014-06-01

    BD+35 1111 is a ~10.5-magnitude star in the field of M38, an open cluster that has been a target of our ongoing study of Hα emission variability in massive stars via narrowband CCD photometry (e.g. Souza, Davis, and Teich 2013, BAAS. 45, PM354.22). BD+35 1111 has no MKK classification in the literature, and is not listed as variable in GCVS, VSX, or NSVS. It is included, with no further characterization, in both the Vatican and Kohoutek catalogs of emission line stars. Using inhomogeneous ensemble photometry (e.g. Bhatti, Richmond, Ford, and Petro 2010, ApJ Supp., 186, 233), we find it to be an irregular variable with a range of ~0.15 mag. To further understand this star we obtained a medium-resolution spectrum using the DIS spectrograph on the ARC 3.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory. We classify BD+35 1111 as B2Ve, the only confirmed Be star in the field of M38. This raises the question of membership, since the age of M38 is likely 250 Ma or greater (Pandey et al. 2007, Publ. Astron. Soc. Japan 59, 547). From published B and V magnitudes we find a nominal distance to BD+35 1111 of 1.6 kpc, but with a range of 1.3 to 2.0 kpc, marginally consistent with distance estimates for M38 ranging from 1.0 to 1.4 kpc. If a member, BD+35 1111 is a candidate blue straggler. If not, it may have escaped from a nearby younger cluster, possibly Kronberger 1 (Kronberger et al. 2006, A&A 447, 921), which has the right heliocentric distance and age. The notion that BD+35 1111 is behind M38 is supported by its reddening of EB-V ~ 0.5, significantly higher than for M38 itself 0.24). We gratefully acknowledge support for student research from NSF grant AST-1005024 to the Keck Northeast Astronomy Consortium, Williams College, and NASA via an American Astronomical Society Small Research Grant.

  12. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The 2MASS database (IPAC/UMass, 2000)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrutskie, M. F.; Schneider, S. E.; Stiening, R.; Strom, S. E.; Weinberg, M. D.; Beichman, C.; Chester, T.; Cutri, R.; Lonsdale, C.; Elias, J.; Elston, R.; Capps, R.; Carpenter, J.; Huchra, J.; Liebert, J.; Monet, D.; Price, S.; Seitzer, P.

    2000-09-01

    The Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) project is designed to close the gap between our current technical capability and our knowledge of the near-infrared sky. In addition to providing a context for the interpretation of results obtained at infrared and other wavelengths, 2MASS will provide direct answers to immediate questions on the large-scale structure of the Milky Way and the Local Universe. To achieve these goals, 2MASS is uniformly scanning the entire sky in three near-infrared bands to detect and characterize point sources brighter than about 1 mJy in each band, with signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) greater than 10, using a pixel size of 2.0". This will achieve an 80,000-fold improvement in sensitivity relative to earlier surveys. 2MASS uses two new, highly-automated 1.3-m telescopes, one at Mt. Hopkins, AZ, and one at CTIO, Chile. Each telescope is equipped with a three-channel camera, each channel consisting of a 256x256 array of HgCdTe detectors, capable of observing the sky simultaneously at J (1.25 μm), H (1.65 μm), and Ks (2.17 μm), to a 3σ limiting sensivity of 17.1, 16.4 and 1.3mag in thge three bands. The 2MASS arrays image the sky while the telescopes scan smoothly in declination at a rate of ~1' per second. The 2MASS data "tiles" are 6° long in the declination direction and one camera frame (8.5') wide. The camera field-of-view shifts by ~1/6 of a frame in declination from frame-to-frame. The camera images each point on the sky six times for a total integration time of 7.8 s, with sub-pixel "dithering", which improves the ultimate spatial resolution of the final Atlas Images. The University of Massachusetts (UMass) is responsible for the overall management of the project, and for developing the infrared cameras and on-site computing systems at both facilities. The Infrared Processing and Analysis Center (IPAC) is responsible for all data processing through the Production Pipeline, and construction and distribution of the data products. The 2MASS

  13. Comparisons between Ground-Based Photometry and Space-Based Measurements of the Total Solar Irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, G.; Cookson, A.; Dobias, J.; Walton, S.

    2005-05-01

    We will review the usefulness of ground-based full-disk photometry in conjunction with space-based measurements of the Total Solar Irradiance (TSI). It is known that sunspots and faculae cause changes in the TSI. These features need to be modeled using ground-based photometry and their effects removed in order to search for possible other causes of TSI variation. Work to date has shown that approximately 94% of the variance in TSI can be explained by sunspots and faculae/network. Since ground-based photometry is carried out daily, it can help identify anomalies in space-based TSI measurements. Finally, ground-based photometry can help in tying together TSI measurements from different spacecraft that have different native irradiance scales. This work has been partially supported by grants from NASA and NSF.

  14. LROC NAC Photometry as a Tool for Studying Physical and Compositional Properties of the Lunar Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clegg, R. N.; Jolliff, B. L.; Boyd, A. K.; Stopar, J. D.; Sato, H.; Robinson, M. S.; Hapke, B. W.

    2014-10-01

    LROC NAC photometry has been used to study the effects of rocket exhaust on lunar soil properties, and here we apply the same photometric methods to place compositional constraints on regions of silicic volcanism and pure anorthosite on the Moon.

  15. New Insights on Lunar Surface Properties from the Perspective of LRO NAC Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clegg-Watkins, R. N.; Jolliff, B. L.

    2016-05-01

    The use of NAC photometry has allowed us to gain new insights into physical changes of regolith at spacecraft landing sites, and to determine correlations between composition and reflectance that can be applied to areas of unusual composition.

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: WASP-104b and WASP-106b photometry (Smith+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. M. S.; Anderson, D. R.; Armstrong, D. J.; Barros, S. C. C.; Bonomo, A. S.; Bouchy, F.; Brown, D. J. A.; Collier, Cameron A.; Delrez, L.; Faedi, F.; Gillon, M.; Gomez Maqueo Chew, Y.; Hebrard, G.; Jehin, E.; Lendl, M.; Louden, T. M.; Maxted, P. F. L.; Montagnier, G.; Neveu-Vanmalle, M.; Osborn, H. P.; Pepe, F.; Pollacco, D.; Queloz, D.; Rostron, J. W.; Segransan, D.; Smalley, B.; Triaud, A. H. M. J.; Turner, O. D.; Udry, S.; Walker, S. R.; West, R. G.; Wheatley, P. J.

    2014-09-01

    The stars WASP-104 and WASP-106 were observed by SuperWASP-N from 2008 to 2011, and by WASP-South from 2009 to 2010. This differential survey photometry has been de-reddened and normalised. Further photometry was obtained using the TRAPPIST, Euler, Liverpool and Isaac Newton telescopes in 2013 and 2014. All these data are plotted in Figures 1 and 2. (1 data file).

  17. Near-Infrared Stellar Photometry of the M31 Spiral Arm around OB Association A24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodaira, Keiichi; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Vansevičius, Vladas; Tamura, Motohide; Tokunaga, Alan; Kobayashi, Naoto

    1998-09-01

    Deep high-resolution JHK images of a 2' × 2' field around the OB association A24 near the 7 kpc spiral arm in M31 were measured to yield photometric data of more than 3000 stars with the faintest magnitude being J = 21.3, H = 20.5, and K = 19.6. The photometric data for the 1037 stars that are brightest in the K band are presented. Judging from the color-magnitude and the two-color diagrams, we find that the majority of the observed stars are AGB stars including large-amplitude variables. They are distributed smoothly over the observed field, and we find no clear evidence of varying extinction over the field for these red stars. The present sample includes bright AGB stars of MK <= -8 and about 30 young blue objects of (J-H) < 0.75 that are brighter than MJ ~= -6.5.

  18. A Search for Ringed Exoplanets Using Kepler Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heising, Matthew Z.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Schlichting, Hilke E.

    2015-11-01

    Models are developed to simulate light curves of stars dimmed by transiting exoplanets with and without rings. These models are then applied to Kepler photometry to search for planetary rings in a sample of 21 exoplanets, mostly hot Jupiters, chosen to offer the best observational opportunity for discovering potential rings. We also examine what kinds of rings might be expected for these planets, in terms of both size and orientation, based on arguments involving the host planet’s equilibrium temperature, its likely obliquities, and the formation and stability of possible ring systems. Finding no evidence for rings, for each of the 21 studied planets it is determined on an observational basis which potential rings can be rejected out of a representative set of fiducial rings, varying in both size and orientation. For 12 of the 21 planets, we determined that Saturn-like rings could be ruled out for at least certain orientations. Additionally, the detectability of rings is studied, and it is found that ringed planets with small obliquities (roughly 5°-10°) can yield large signals, which is encouraging for future work, since such small obliquities are expected for hot Jupiters.

  19. Extended Stromgren Photometry of M22 Red Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony-Twarog, B. J.; Craig, J. S.; Twarog, B. A.

    1994-05-01

    M22 is a low-latitude globular cluster with significant reddening (E(B-V) ~ 0.42, Crocker 1988) and evidence for a modest spread in extinction across the cluster field. It is also a cluster with some evidence for chemical inhomogeneity. We have applied extended Stromgren photometry (uvbyCa) to several fields in this cluster, focusing on a sample of ~ 300 giants, many of which have membership information from proper motions (Peterson & Cudworth 1994) and quite a number of which have spectroscopic measurements for Fe, Ca, Na, CN and CH abundances. Our results strengthen and support the findings of Lehnert et al. (1991) and Norris & Freeman (1983). Our photometric calcium index, which correlates well with spectroscopic indicators, shows a spread far larger than could be explained by differential reddening. The calcium metallicity index correlates well with the conventional Stromgren metal index m_1, and both are positively correlated with enhanced CN and CH as evidenced by S3839 and W(G) from Norris & Freeman. Although a significant spread in m_1 exists, the spread in iron it implies is nearly an order of magnitude larger than observed spectroscopically, and it is suggested that variations in CN play the largest role in the dispersion of m_1 indices. M22 appears to be a cluster with an unusual history that, unlike omega Cen, has led to enhancements of alpha --rich species with little variation in iron-peak elements.

  20. Surface Photometry of the Southern Milky Way at 170 NM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, J.; Schlosser, W.; Schmidtobreick, L.; Koczet, P.

    As part of the D2-Space-Shuttle-Mission in 1993, the GAUSS-Camera has obtained photographic images of the Milky Way in various passbands in the Ultraviolet. Each film covers an area of the sky of about 140^\\circ. Six images were obtained at 170 nm, but only three of them could be used. The calibration has been done using the catalogued intensities of stars and transforming them into surface brightnesses. Then the stars on the images have been filtered out and the Shuttle-Glow has been eliminated. The images finally have been transformed into maps of the Milky Way in galactic coordinates l, b. These maps cover the Milky Way between the Galactic Center and Vela (360^\\circ <= l <= 270^\\circ, - -25^\\circ <= b <= 35^\\circ) and include dark clouds, reflection nebulae and bright open clusters. They are a perfect tool to investigate the distribution of these objects and therefore the global structure of the Milky Way. The image of the Milky Way at 170 nm is heavily dominated by interstellar extinction, leading to high intensity gradients all over the galactic plane. The images at 217 nm and 280 nm, also obtained by the GAUSS-Camera, and previous photometries taken in U, B, V and R have been used for comparison.

  1. Multicolor NTT Photometry of the Anomalous Globular Cluster NGC 288

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcaino, Gonzalo; Liller, William; Alvarado, Franklin

    1997-12-01

    We present UBV photometry of 2494 stars in a 38 arcmin square field in the anomalous high latitude globular cluster NGC 288 observed with a CCD camera and the 3.5 m NTT at ESO/La Silla. Our results can be summarized as follows: VTO=18.90±0.l4, and turnoff colors at (B-V)TO=0.46±0.05, (U - B)TO= -0.02±0.05 and independently (U - V)TO=0.45±0.07 (estimated external uncertainties). By fitting the resulting B - V ridge line to the theoretical isochrones of Bergbusch & VandenBerg (1992, ApJS, 81, 163) with [Fe/H]=-1.26, Y=0.2358, and [O/Fe]=+0.55, we derive the following values: the apparent distance modulus, (m - M)V = 14.85±0.10 and the interstellar reddening E(B - V) =0.04±0.02, and an age of 14±2 Gyr. We note the presence of approximately 17 blue stragglers, 4 hot faint BHB stars, and 5 faint possibly variable stars.

  2. Infrared photometry of the black hole candidate Sagittarius A*

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Close, Laird M.; Mccarthy, Donald W. JR.; Melia, Fulvio

    1995-01-01

    An infrared source has been imaged within 0.2 +/- 0.3 arcseconds of the unique Galactic center radio source Sgr A* High angular resolution (averaged value of the Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) approximately 0.55 arcseconds) was achieved by rapid (approximately 50 Hz) real-time images motion compensation. The source's near-infrared magnitudes (K = 12.1 +/- 0.3, H = 13.7 +/- 0.3, and J = 16.6 +/- 0.4) are consistent with a hot object reddened by the local extinction A(sub v) approximately 27). At the 3 sigma level of confidence, a time series of 80 images limits the source variability to less than 50% on timescales from 3 to 30 minutes. The photometry is consistent with the emission from a simple accretion disk model for a approximately 1 x 10(exp 6) solar mass black hole. However, the fluxes are also consistent with a hot luminous (L approximately 10(exp 3.5) to 10(exp 4-6) solar luminosity) central cluster star positionally coincident with Sgr A*.

  3. Photometry of dark atmosphereless planetary bodies: an efficient numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkman, Olli; Muinonen, Karri; Peltoniemi, Jouni

    2015-12-01

    We present a scattering model for regolith-covered Solar System bodies. It can be used to compute the intensity of light scattered by a surface consisting of packed, mutually shadowing particles. Our intention is to provide a model in which other researchers can apply in studies of Solar System photometry. Our model is a Lommel-Seeliger type model, representing a medium composed of individual scatterers with small single-scattering albedo. This means that it is suitable for dark regolith surfaces such as the Moon and many classes of asteroids. Our model adds an additional term which takes into account the mutual shadowing between the scatterers. The scatterers can have an arbitrary phase function. We use a numerical ray-tracing simulation to compute the shadowing contribution. We present the model in a form which makes implementing it in existing software straightforward and fast. The model in practice is implemented as files containing pre-computed values of the surface reflection coefficient, which can be loaded into a user's program and used to compute the scattering in the desired viewing geometries. As the usage requires only a little simple arithmetic and a table look-up, it is as fast to use as common analytical models.

  4. macula: Rotational modulations in the photometry of spotted stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kipping, David M.

    2012-09-01

    Photometric rotational modulations due to starspots remain the most common and accessible way to study stellar activity. Modelling rotational modulations allows one to invert the observations into several basic parameters, such as the rotation period, spot coverage, stellar inclination and differential rotation rate. The most widely used analytic model for this inversion comes from Budding (1977) and Dorren (1987), who considered circular, grey starspots for a linearly limb darkened star. That model is extended to be more suitable in the analysis of high precision photometry such as that by Kepler. Macula, a Fortran 90 code, provides several improvements, such as non-linear limb darkening of the star and spot, a single-domain analytic function, partial derivatives for all input parameters, temporal partial derivatives, diluted light compensation, instrumental offset normalisations, differential rotation, starspot evolution and predictions of transit depth variations due to unocculted spots. The inclusion of non-linear limb darkening means macula has a maximum photometric error an order-of-magnitude less than that of Dorren (1987) for Sun-like stars observed in the Kepler-bandpass. The code executes three orders-of-magnitude faster than comparable numerical codes making it well-suited for inference problems.

  5. RELATIVE PHOTOMETRY OF HAT-P-1b OCCULTATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Beky, Bence; Holman, Matthew J.; Noyes, Robert W.; Sasselov, Dimitar D.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Bakos, Gaspar A.; Winn, Joshua N.

    2013-06-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph observations of two occultations of the transiting exoplanet HAT-P-1b. By measuring the planet to star flux ratio near opposition, we constrain the geometric albedo of the planet, which is strongly linked to its atmospheric temperature gradient. An advantage of HAT-P-1 as a target is its binary companion ADS 16402 A, which provides an excellent photometric reference, simplifying the usual steps in removing instrumental artifacts from HST time-series photometry. We find that without this reference star, we would need to detrend the lightcurve with the time of the exposures as well as the first three powers of HST orbital phase, and this would introduce a strong bias in the results for the albedo. However, with this reference star, we only need to detrend the data with the time of the exposures to achieve the same per-point scatter, therefore we can avoid most of the bias associated with detrending. Our final result is a 2{sigma} upper limit of 0.64 for the geometric albedo of HAT-P-1b between 577 and 947 nm.

  6. NEOWISE STUDIES OF ASTEROIDS WITH SLOAN PHOTOMETRY: PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Mainzer, A.; Masiero, J.; Bauer, J.; Hand, E.; Grav, T.; Mo, W.; Tholen, D. J.; McMillan, R. S.; Maleszewski, C.; Wright, E.; Watkins, J.; Spahr, T.; Cutri, R. M.; Walker, R.

    2012-01-20

    We have combined the NEOWISE and Sloan Digital Sky Survey data to study the albedos of 24,353 asteroids with candidate taxonomic classifications derived using Sloan photometry. We find a wide range of moderate to high albedos for candidate S-type asteroids that are analogous to the S complex defined by previous spectrophotometrically based taxonomic systems. The candidate C-type asteroids, while generally very dark, have a tail of higher albedos that overlaps the S types. The albedo distribution for asteroids with a photometrically derived Q classification is extremely similar to those of the S types. Asteroids with similar colors to (4) Vesta have higher albedos than the S types, and most have orbital elements similar to known Vesta family members. Finally, we show that the relative reflectance at 3.4 and 4.6 {mu}m is higher for D-type asteroids and suggest that their red visible and near-infrared spectral slope extends out to these wavelengths. Understanding the relationship between size, albedo, and taxonomic classification is complicated by the fact that the objects with classifications were selected from the visible/near-infrared Sloan Moving Object Catalog, which is biased against fainter asteroids, including those with lower albedos.

  7. New Insights into Stellar Astrophysics from High-Precision Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderblom, David R.

    2013-01-01

    The rich harvest of information on the occurrence and nature of planets around solar-type stars is why Kepler was built, but equally profound from this mission are the insights and quantitative physical studies of stars. The Kepler sample is dominated by the ~100,000 stars that are like the Sun, yet the Kepler field includes examples of nearly every stellar type. Kepler's exquisite photometry - continuously over an extended time - has enabled the detection of new phenomena and has provided critical tests of stellar models. In this brief review I will summarize some of the exciting new findings that Kepler has made possible, including: Stellar surface granulation in late-type stars; Evidence for rapid rotation of the cores of some evolved stars; Flares on G, K and M stars; Precise ages for older solar-type stars; Evidence for "mixed" modes in evolved stars that couple p-modes to interior g-modes; Stellar differential rotation; Detection of stellar activity cycles from asteroseismology; Mixing processes in stars; Detailed studies of eclipsing binaries; A comparison of the Sun to similar stars; Pulsating stars; Stellar surface features revealed by planet transits.

  8. High Precision Photometry of Bright Transiting Exoplanet Hosts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Maurice; Eastman, Jason; Johnson, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Within the past two decades, the successful search for exoplanets and the characterization of their physical properties have shown the immense progress that has been made towards finding planets with characteristics similar to Earth. For most exoplanets with a radius about the size of Earth, evaluating their physical properties, such as the mass, radius and equilibrium temperature, cannot be determined with satisfactory precision. The MINiature Exoplanet Radial Velocity Array (MINERVA) was recently built to obtain spectroscopic and photometric measurements to find, confirm, and characterize Earth-like exoplanets. MINERVA's spectroscopic survey targets the brightest, nearby stars which are well-suited to the array's capabilities, while its primary photometric goal is to search for transits around these bright targets. Typically, it is difficult to find satisfactory comparison stars within a telescope's field of view when the primary target is very bright. This issue is resolved by using one of MINERVA's telescopes to observe the primary bright star while the other telescopes observe a distinct field of view that contains satisfactory bright comparison stars. We describe the code used to identify nearby comparison stars, schedule the four telescopes, produce differential photometry from multiple telescopes, and show the first results from this effort.This work has been funded by the Ronald E. McNair Post-Baccalaureate Achievement Program, the ERAU Honors Program, the ERAU Undergraduate Research Spark Fund, and the Banneker Institute at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics.

  9. High-speed ultraviolet photometry of HD 60435

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, M.; Nelson, M. J.; Bless, R. C.; Dolan, J. F.; Elliot, J. L.; Percival, J. W.; Robinson, E. L.; Van Citters, G. W.

    1993-01-01

    We present the first high-speed ultraviolet photometry of an oscillating Ap star, HD 60435. After removing known orbital effects related to the Hubble Space Telescope, we confirm the presence of a strong pulsation period at a frequency of 123.70 cycles per day. In addition, we find significant amplitude modulation of this frequency that we suggest could be the result of beating of multiple periodicities. In this context, we suggest evidence for the presence of four additional frequencies at nu = 120.56, 126.55, 149.49, and 221.03 cycles per day. Three of these frequencies correspond well to frequencies detected in optical observations of HD 60435. The fourth, at 149.49 cycles per day, if real, is a potentially new pulsation mode that has not been detected in ground-based observations of this star. The amplitude of the 123 cycles per day pulsation is significantly larger in the ultraviolet than it is in the blue.

  10. The Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury Survey: UV-IR Photometry of 117 Million Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Benjamin F.; Lang, Dustin; Dalcanton, Julianne; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Johnson, Lent C.; Byler, Nell; Gregersen, Dylan; Seth, Anil; Girardi, Leo; PHAT Survey Team

    2015-01-01

    We have measured resolved stellar photometry using HST/WFC3 and HST/ACS imaging in near ultraviolet (F275W, F336W), optical (F475W, F814W), and near infrared (F110W, F160W) with simultaneous point spread function fitting across all bands at all source positions. All images were aligned to 5-10 milliarcsecond relative accuracy and to 50 milliarcsec global accuracy. In the outer disk, the photometry reaches a completeness-limited depth of F475W~28, while in the crowded, high surface brightness bulge, the photometry reaches F475W~25. We find that simultaneous photometry and optimized measurement parameters significantly increase the detection limit of the lowest resolution filters (WFC3/IR) providing color-magnitude diagrams that are up to 2.5 magnitudes deeper when compared with color-magnitude diagrams from WFC3/IR photometry alone. This stellar catalog is the largest ever produced for equidistant sources, and is publicly available for download by the community. The quality of the photometry catalog, as well as examples of some initial results from model fitting will be discussed. PHAT is supported by HST GO-12055 administered by NASA.

  11. SYNMAG PHOTOMETRY: A FAST TOOL FOR CATALOG-LEVEL MATCHED COLORS OF EXTENDED SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Bundy, Kevin; Yasuda, Naoki; Hogg, David W.; Higgs, Tim D.; Nichol, Robert C.; Masters, Karen L.; Lang, Dustin; Wake, David A.

    2012-12-01

    Obtaining reliable, matched photometry for galaxies imaged by different observatories represents a key challenge in the era of wide-field surveys spanning more than several hundred square degrees. Methods such as flux fitting, profile fitting, and PSF homogenization followed by matched-aperture photometry are all computationally expensive. We present an alternative solution called 'synthetic aperture photometry' that exploits galaxy profile fits in one band to efficiently model the observed, point-spread-function-convolved light profile in other bands and predict the flux in arbitrarily sized apertures. Because aperture magnitudes are the most widely tabulated flux measurements in survey catalogs, producing synthetic aperture magnitudes (SYNMAGs) enables very fast matched photometry at the catalog level, without reprocessing imaging data. We make our code public and apply it to obtain matched photometry between Sloan Digital Sky Survey ugriz and UKIDSS YJHK imaging, recovering red-sequence colors and photometric redshifts with a scatter and accuracy as good as if not better than FWHM-homogenized photometry from the GAMA Survey. Finally, we list some specific measurements that upcoming surveys could make available to facilitate and ease the use of SYNMAGs.

  12. Vinculación entre varios cúmulos estelares y estructuras del medio interestelar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corti, M. A.; Baume, G. L.; Panei, J. A.; Suad, L. A.; Testori, J. C.; Borissova, J.; Kurtev, R.; Chené, A. N.; Ramirez Alegría, S.

    2015-08-01

    We study the embedded clusters DBS77, 78, 102, 160, and 161 located in the Galactic plane in the fourth quadrant of the Milky Way and the surrounding interstellar medium (ISM). We analyzed UBVIc photometry (SOAR) and infrared spectroscopy (NTT, ESO). We complemented these data with JHK (VVV2MASS), HI 21 cm bands (SGPS), 1.4 GHz (ATCA), and 4.85 GHz (PMN). We did multiband analysis and spectral classification of the brightest stars in each area. We also identified the ISM structures possibly related to the clusters. Finally, we obtained the main parameters of the studied clusters, the structures of the ISM and the link between them.

  13. Photometric Study of IC 2156

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadross, A. L.; Hendy, Y. H. M.

    2016-04-01

    We present an optical UBVRI photometric analysis of the poorly studied open star cluster IC 2156 using Sloan Digital Sky Survey data in order to estimate its astrophysical properties. We compare these with results from our previous studies that relied on the 2MASS JHK near-infrared photometry. The stellar density distributions and color-magnitude diagrams of the cluster are used to determine its geometrical structure, real radius, core and tidal radii, and its distance from the Sun, the Galactic plane, and the Galactic center. We also estimate, the age, color excesses, reddening-free distance modulus, membership, total mass, luminosity function, mass function, and relaxation time of the cluster.

  14. The RSA survey of dwarf galaxies, 1: Optical photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vader, J. Patricia; Chaboyer, Brian

    1994-01-01

    We present detailed surface photometry, based on broad B-band charge coupled device (CCD) images, of about 80 dwarf galaxies. Our sample represents approximately 10% of all dwarf galaxies identified in the vicinity of Revised Shapley-Ames (RSA) galaxies on high resolution blue photographic plates, referred to as the RSA survey of dwarf galaxies. We derive global properties and radial surface brightness profiles, and examine the morphologies. The radial surface brightness profiles of dwarf galaxies, whether early or late type, display the same varieties in shape and complexity as those of classical giant galaxies. Only a few are well described by a pure r(exp 1/4) law. Exponential profiles prevail. Features typical of giant disk galaxies, such as exponential profiles with a central depression, lenses, and even, in one case (IC 2041), a relatively prominent bulge are also found in dwarf galaxies. Our data suggest that the central region evolves from being bulge-like, with an r(exp 1/4) law profile, in bright galaxies to a lens-like structure in dwarf galaxies. We prove detailed surface photometry to be a helpful if not always sufficient tool in investigating the structure of dwarf galaxies. In many cases kinematic information is needed to complete the picture. We find the shapes of the surface brightness profiles to be loosely associated with morphological type. Our sample contains several new galaxies with properties intermediate between those of giant and dwarf ellipticals (but no M32-like objects). This shows that such intermediate galaxies exist so that at least a fraction of early-type dwarf ellipticals is structurally related to early-type giants instead of belonging to a totally unrelated, disjunct family. This supports an origin of early-type dwarf galaxies as originally more massive systems that acquired their current morphology as a result of substantial, presumable supernova-driven, mass loss. On the other hand, several early-type dwarfs in our sample are

  15. The RSA survey of dwarf galaxies, 1: Optical photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vader, J. Patricia; Chaboyer, Brian

    1994-10-01

    We present detailed surface photometry, based on broad B-band charge coupled device (CCD) images, of about 80 dwarf galaxies. Our sample represents approximately 10% of all dwarf galaxies identified in the vicinity of Revised Shapley-Ames (RSA) galaxies on high resolution blue photographic plates, referred to as the RSA survey of dwarf galaxies. We derive global properties and radial surface brightness profiles, and examine the morphologies. The radial surface brightness profiles of dwarf galaxies, whether early or late type, display the same varieties in shape and complexity as those of classical giant galaxies. Only a few are well described by a pure r1/4 law. Exponential profiles prevail. Features typical of giant disk galaxies, such as exponential profiles with a central depression, lenses, and even, in one case (IC 2041), a relatively prominent bulge are also found in dwarf galaxies. Our data suggest that the central region evolves from being bulge-like, with an r1/4 law profile, in bright galaxies to a lens-like structure in dwarf galaxies. We prove detailed surface photometry to be a helpful if not always sufficient tool in investigating the structure of dwarf galaxies. In many cases kinematic information is needed to complete the picture. We find the shapes of the surface brightness profiles to be loosely associated with morphological type. Our sample contains several new galaxies with properties intermediate between those of giant and dwarf ellipticals (but no M32-like objects). This shows that such intermediate galaxies exist so that at least a fraction of early-type dwarf ellipticals is structurally related to early-type giants instead of belonging to a totally unrelated, disjunct family. This supports an origin of early-type dwarf galaxies as originally more massive systems that acquired their current morphology as a result of substantial, presumable supernova-driven, mass loss. On the other hand, several early-type dwarfs in our sample are merger

  16. The Founders of the XXth Century Stellar Photometry in Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pustylnik, I.; Mironov, A.

    Our contribution is dedicated to two ``godfathers'' of astrophotometry in Russia - Vitold Karlovich Ceraski (1849-1925) and Vladimir Borisovich Nikonov (1905-1987). We discuss their scientific legacy and its impact upon the formation of the school of stellar photometry in Russia and the USSR. The graduate of Moscow University in 1871 V. Ceraski started his scientific career in the University astronomical observatory. Already at the dawn of XXth century he was universally regarded as an indisputable authority in Russian astrophotometry. Ceraski introduced essential improvements into the K.-F. Zöllner's visual polarimetric photometer. With its aid he measured in 1903-1905 the stellar magnitude of the Sun with an accuracy close to its modern value (within a 5 % margin) by carefully comparing the brightness of Venus with that of the speck of the solar light reflected from the convex glass surface (during the day) and by comparing the brightness of Venus with that of the brightest stars (in the night). V. Nikonov, the graduate of Leningrad University, in 1925 embarked upon scientific investigations in the local Astronomical Institute. During these years the 13 inch reflector has been installed by Leningrad astronomers at the mountain Kanobili (Abastumani observatory, Georgia). In 1937 Nikonov constructed the first in the USSR photoelectric photometer. Experiments with it indicated that the attainable precision for 4.5m stars amounted to 0.003m. It was obvious for Nikonov that with such a precision one should exercise extreme care in reduction of stellar magnitudes beyond the earth's upper atmosphere. In 1944 he elaborated a method to account for atmospheric extinction which is now universally known as Nikonov's method. Its underlying idea lies in the observations of all non-variable stars available in the program for different air masses.

  17. Campaign Photometry During The 2010 Eclipse Of Epsilon Aurigae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Jeff; Stencel, R. E.

    2011-01-01

    Epsilon Aurigae is a long period (27.1 years) eclipsing binary star system with an eclipse that lasts nearly 2 years, but with severe ambiguities about component masses and shape. The current eclipse began on schedule in August of 2009. During the previous, 1982-1984 eclipse, an International Campaign was formed to coordinate a detailed study of the system. While that Campaign was deemed successful, the evolutionary status of the star system remained unclear. Epsilon Aurigae has been observed nearly continuously since the 1982 eclipse. The current Campaign was officially started in 2006. In addition to a Yahoo forum we have a dedicated web site and more than 18 online newsletters reporting photometry, spectroscopy, interferometry and polarimetry data. High quality UBVRIJH band photometric data since before the start of the current eclipse has been submitted. We explore the color differences among the light curves in terms of eclipse phases and archival data. At least one new model of the star system has been proposed since the current Campaign began: a low mass but very high luminosity F star plus a B star surrounded by a debris disk. The current eclipse and in particular the interferometry and spectroscopic data have caused new thoughts on defining eclipsing variable star contact points and phases of an eclipse. Second contact may not be the same point as start of totality and third contact may not be the same point as the start of egress and end of totality. In addition, the much awaited mid-eclipse brightening may or may not have appeared. This paper identifies the current Campaign contributors and the photometric data. This work was supported in part by the bequest of William Herschel Womble in support of astronomy at the University of Denver, by NSF grant 1016678 to the University of Denver.

  18. Inverse problems of NEO photometry: Imaging the NEO population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaasalainen1, Mikko; Durech, Josef

    2007-05-01

    Photometry is the main source of information on NEOs (and other asteroids) en masse. Surveys such as Pan-STARRS and LSST will produce colossal photometric databases that can readily be used for mapping the physical characteristics of the whole asteroid population. These datasets are efficiently enriched by any additional dense photometric or other observations. Due to their quickly changing geometries with respect to the Earth, NEOs are the subpopulation that can be mapped the fastest. I review the state of the art in the construction of physical asteroid models from sparse and/or dense photometric data (that can also be combined with other data modes). The models describe the shapes, spin states, scattering properties and surface structure of the targets, and are the solutions of inverse problems necessarily involving comprehensive mathematical analysis. I sum up what we can and cannot get from photometric data, and how all this is done in practice. I also discuss the new freely available software package for solving photometric inverse problems (soon to be released). The analysis of photometric datasets will very soon become an automated industry, resulting in tens of thousands of asteroid models, a large portion of them NEOs. The computational effort in this is considerable in both computer and human time, which means that a large portion of the targets is likely to be analyzed only once. This, again, means that we have to have a good understanding of the reliability of our models, and this is impossible without a thorough understanding of the mathematical nature of the inverse problem(s) involved. Very important concepts are the uniqueness and stability of the solution, the parameter spaces, the so-called inverse crimes in simulations and error prediction, and the domination of systematic errors over random ones.

  19. SECONDARY ECLIPSE PHOTOMETRY OF WASP-4b WITH WARM SPITZER

    SciTech Connect

    Beerer, Ingrid M.; Knutson, Heather A.; Burrows, Adam; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Laughlin, Gregory; Agol, Eric; Cowan, Nicolas B.; Charbonneau, David; Desert, Jean-Michel; Deming, Drake; Langton, Jonathan; Lewis, Nikole K.; Showman, Adam P.

    2011-01-20

    We present photometry of the giant extrasolar planet WASP-4b at 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m taken with the Infrared Array Camera on board the Spitzer Space Telescope as part of Spitzer's extended warm mission. We find secondary eclipse depths of 0.319% {+-} 0.031% and 0.343% {+-} 0.027% for the 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m bands, respectively, and show model emission spectra and pressure-temperature profiles for the planetary atmosphere. These eclipse depths are well fit by model emission spectra with water and other molecules in absorption, similar to those used for TrES-3 and HD 189733b. Depending on our choice of model, these results indicate that this planet has either a weak dayside temperature inversion or no inversion at all. The absence of a strong thermal inversion on this highly irradiated planet is contrary to the idea that highly irradiated planets are expected to have inversions, perhaps due the presence of an unknown absorber in the upper atmosphere. This result might be explained by the modestly enhanced activity level of WASP-4b's G7V host star, which could increase the amount of UV flux received by the planet, therefore reducing the abundance of the unknown stratospheric absorber in the planetary atmosphere as suggested in Knutson et al. We also find no evidence for an offset in the timing of the secondary eclipse and place a 2{sigma} upper limit on |ecos {omega}| of 0.0024, which constrains the range of tidal heating models that could explain this planet's inflated radius.

  20. Spitzer/IRAC Photometry Of The Four Largest Uranian Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, Richard; Emery, J.; Rivkin, A.; Trilling, D.

    2012-10-01

    The surfaces of the four largest Uranian satellites are dominated by water ice and a spectrally neutral constituent that is likely carbonaceous in composition. CO2 ice has been detected on Ariel, Umbriel, and Titania, with no detection on the furthest regular Uranian satellite, Oberon (Grundy et al., 2003, 2006). Whether CO2 ice is primordial or is actively produced in the Uranian system is unclear; however, it seems unlikely that primordial CO2 ice would remain exposed on an icy satellite surface over the age of the Solar System. One possible mechanism for producing CO2 ice is bombardment of water ice and carbonaceous material by charged particles caught in Uranus’ magnetic field. Unlike the other large Uranian satellites, Oberon spends part of its orbit outside the confines of Uranus’ magnetic field, which might help explain why CO2 ice has yet to be detected on Oberon. We are using photometric data gathered by the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC), onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope (SST), in order to search for the signature of CO2 ice on Oberon, and confirm its presence on Ariel, Umbriel, and Titania at longer wavelengths than previous studies. IRAC collects data in four different channels, which are centered roughly at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 µm. Additionally, we are gathering spectroscopic data using SpeX on IRTF, at similar longitudes to the IRAC observations, in order to characterize the distribution of CO2 ice on these icy satellites over a wide range of near-infrared wavelengths. Our preliminary photometry results for Oberon indicate that there is a steep reduction in reflected solar flux from channel 1 to channel 2, suggesting that surface materials are absorbing photons at wavelengths within the bandpass of channel 2. We will present the results of our photometric analysis of the four largest Uranian moons.

  1. BVRI photometry of NGC 3231, NGC 7055, and NGC 7127

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paunzen, E.; Hermansson, L.; Holmström, P.

    2012-06-01

    Context. Open clusters are often used as tracers for the formation and evolution of the Milky Way. But they can also be used to study distinct "local stellar populations" and all kind of stellar groups. All these studies crucially depend on their unambiguous detection and classification separating them from the fore- and background field population. Aims: Still more than one third of the catalogued galactic open clusters are unstudied to date. We have chosen three northern open cluster fields, namely NGC 3231, NGC 7055, and NGC 7127 which have been never studied before to shed more light on their true nature. Methods: We present Johnson-Cousins BVRI photometry down to V ≈ 19 mag. After the transformation to the standard systems, colour-magnitude diagrams were generated. These diagrams were used to fit solar abundant isochrones to determine the distance modulus, reddening and apparent age of the main sequences. Results: As reported before, a significant plate-dependent distortion of the UCAC3 compared to the PPMXL within all three star fields was found. No correlation of this distortion with the apparent magnitude of the objects was detected. From the analysis of the colour-magnitude diagrams and the available proper motions we conclude that NGC 7055 and NGC 7127 are young, real, open clusters with ages of about 10 and 100 Myr, respectively. They are located in a distance of about 3300 as well as 5700 pc from the Sun. NGC 3231, on the other hand, is probably a high galactic latitude open cluster remnant. The complete tables with the photometric measurements are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/542/A68

  2. Precision Photometry to Study the Nature of Dark Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenzon, Wolfgang; Schubnell, Michael

    2011-01-30

    Over the past decade scientists have collected convincing evidence that the expansion of the universe is accelerating, leading to the conclusion that the content of our universe is dominated by a mysterious 'dark energy'. The fact that present theory cannot account for the dark energy has made the determination of the nature of dark energy central to the field of high energy physics. It is expected that nothing short of a revolution in our understanding of the fundamental laws of physics is required to fully understand the accelerating universe. Discovering the nature of dark energy is a very difficult task, and requires experiments that employ a combination of different observational techniques, such as type-Ia supernovae, gravitational weak lensing surveys, galaxy and galaxy cluster surveys, and baryon acoustic oscillations. A critical component of any approach to understanding the nature of dark energy is precision photometry. This report addresses just that. Most dark energy missions will require photometric calibration over a wide range of intensities using standardized stars and internal reference sources. All of the techniques proposed for these missions rely on a complete understanding of the linearity of the detectors. The technical report focuses on the investigation and characterization of 'reciprocity failure', a newly discovered count-rate dependent nonlinearity in the NICMOS cameras on the Hubble Space Telescope. In order to quantify reciprocity failure for modern astronomical detectors, we built a dedicated reciprocity test setup that produced a known amount of light on a detector, and to measured its response as a function of light intensity and wavelength.

  3. BATC 15 Band Photometry of the Open Cluster NGC 188

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiaxin; Ma, Jun; Wu, Zhenyu; Wang, Song; Zhou, Xu

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents CCD multicolor photometry for the old open cluster NGC 188. The observations were carried out as part of the Beijing-Arizona-Taiwan-Connecticut Multicolor Sky Survey from 1995 February to 2008 March, using 15 intermediate-band filters covering 3000-10000 Å. By fitting the Padova theoretical isochrones to our data, the fundamental parameters of this cluster are derived: an age of t=7.5+/- 0.5 Gyr, a distance modulus of {(m-M)}0=11.17+/- 0.08, and a reddening of E(B-V)=0.036+/- 0.010. The radial surface density profile of NGC 188 is obtained using the star count. By fitting the King model, the structural parameters of NGC 188 are derived: a core radius of {R}c=3\\buildrel{ \\prime}\\over{.} 80, a tidal radius of {R}t=44\\buildrel{ \\prime}\\over{.} 78, and a concentration parameter of {C}0={log}({R}t/{R}c)=1.07. Fitting the mass function (MF) to a power-law function φ (m)\\propto {m}α , the slopes of the MFs for different spatial regions are derived. We find that NGC 188 presents a slope break in the MF. The break mass is {m}{break}=0.885 {M}⊙ . In the mass range above {m}{break}, the slope of the overall region is α =-0.76. The slope of the core region is α =1.09, and the slopes of the external regions are α =-0.86 and α =-2.15, respectively. In the mass range below {m}{break}, these slopes are α =0.12, α =4.91, α =1.33, and α =-1.09, respectively. The mass segregation in NGC 188 is reflected in the obvious variation of the slopes in different spatial regions of this cluster.

  4. Characterization of Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stellar Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukugita, Masataka; Yasuda, Naoki; Doi, Mamoru; Gunn, James E.; York, Donald G.

    2011-02-01

    We study the photometric properties of stars in the data archive of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), the prime aim being to understand the photometric calibration over the entire data set. It is confirmed that the photometric calibration of point sources is accurately on the system defined by the SDSS standard stars. We have also confirmed that the photometric synthesis of the SDSS spectrophotometric data gives broadband fluxes that agree with the photometry with errors of no more than 0.04 mag and little systematic tilt with wavelength. This verifies that the response functions of the 2.5 m telescope system are well characterized. We locate stars in the SDSS photometric system, so that stars can roughly be classified into spectral classes from the color information. We show how metallicity and surface gravity affect colors, and that stars contained in the SDSS general catalog, plotted in color space, show a distribution that matches well with what is anticipated from the variations of metallicity and surface gravity. The color-color plots are perfectly consistent among the three samples—stars in the SDSS general catalog, SDSS standard stars, and spectrophotometric stars of Gunn & Stryker—especially when some considerations are taken into account of the differences (primarily metallicity) of the samples. We show that the g - r-inverse temperature relation is tight and can be used as a good estimator of the effective temperature of stars over a fairly wide range of effective temperatures. We also confirm that the colors of G2V stars in the SDSS photometric system match well with the Sun.

  5. Uncovering Multiple Populations in Globular Clusters with Washington Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisler, Douglas; Cummings, Jeff; Villanova, Sandro; Carraro, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Globular Clusters (GCs), long considered as ideal Simple Stellar Populations, are now known to harbor a wide variety of chemical inhomogeneities. Multiple populations (MP) are being found in a growing number of Galactic globular clusters (GCs) via both photometric and spectroscopic techniques. Indeed, it has been suggested that a GC is an object that possesses MP. A definitive investigation of MP in GCs will undoubtedly provide a profound improvement in our understanding of their formation and evolution.However, most studies employ either high resolution VLT spectroscopy, HST photometry or inefficient filters from the ground. A ground-based photometric system which is both efficient and effective would be especially excellent for uncovering MP. We demonstrate that the Washington system meets these goals. The Washington C filter, in addition to being specifically designed for the purpose of detecting MPs, is both much broader and redder than competing UV filters, making it far more efficient at detecting MPs and much less sensitive to reddening and extinction.Our analysis of the well-studied GC NGC 1851 shows indeed that the C filter is both very efficient and effective at detecting its previously discovered MPs in the RGB and SGB, using relatively little telescope time on only a 1-meter telescope. Remarkably, we have also detected an intrinsically broad MS best characterized by two distinct but heavily overlapping populations that cannot be explained by binaries, field stars, or photometric errors. Detailed analysis shows that the MS distribution is in very good agreement with that seen on the RGB. This is the first time MPs in a MS have been discovered from the ground, and just as strikingly, using only a 1-meter telescope. The Washington system thus proves to be a very powerful tool for investigating MPs, and holds particular promise for extragalactic objects where photons are limited.

  6. Deep Surface Photometry of M87 with 13 Optical Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ying; Zhou, Xu; Ma, Jun; Wu, Hong; Yang, Yanbin; Li, Jiuli; Chen, Jiansheng

    2005-06-01

    Multicolor surface photometry of M87 was undertaken with the Beijing-Arizona-Taiwan-Connecticut photometric system, which contains 13 optical bands covering a range from 3800 to 10000 Å. Radial profiles have been derived for surface brightness, ellipticity, position angle, and the residuals from the fitted ellipses. The results show a good agreement with pure elliptical isophotes for M87, and no obvious substructure or dust is detected out to r=500'', corresponding to 40 kpc from the center. The surface brightness profile at r<190'' is well fitted by the de Vaucouleurs law. Moreover, a cD envelope is detected outside that radius. Given the surface brightness profiles of the 13 bands, the spectral energy distribution (SED) of M87 is obtained as a function of semimajor axis (SMA). By fitting the observed SEDs to synthetic ones derived from the PEGASE model, we explored the star formation history (SFH) of this giant elliptical galaxy. In the hypothesis that the evolution time T of M87 is the same as the mean age of its globular clusters, about 14 Gyr, we find that the characteristic timescale τ of the SFH increases monotonically from 2 to 7 Gyr as a function of SMA, while the luminosity-weighted mean stellar ages range from about 11 to 9 Gyr in a mild decrease, and the mean stellar metallicity Z drops from 0.017 to 0.014 as the SMA increases to r=500''. In the range 40''

  7. Documentation for the machine-readable version of the ANS Ultraviolet Photometry Catalogue of Point Sources (Wesselius et al 1982)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, W. H., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The machine-readable version of the Astronomical Netherlands Satellite ultraviolet photometry catalog is described in detail, with a byte-by-byte format description and characteristics of the data file given. The catalog is a compilation of ultraviolet photometry in five bands, within the wavelength range 155 nm to 330 nm, for 3573 mostly stellar objects. Additional cross reference data (object identification, UBV photometry and MK spectral types) are included in the catalog.

  8. Near-infrared Variability in the 2MASS Calibration Fields: A Search for Planetary Transit Candidates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plavchan, Peter; Jura, M.; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Cutri, Roc M.; Gallagher, S. C.

    2008-01-01

    The Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) photometric calibration observations cover approximately 6 square degrees on the sky in 35 'calibration fields,' each sampled in nominal photometric conditions between 562 and 3692 times during the 4 years of the 2MASS mission. We compile a catalog of variables from the calibration observations to search for M dwarfs transited by extrasolar planets. We present our methods for measuring periodic and nonperiodic flux variability. From 7554 sources with apparent K(sub s) magnitudes between 5.6 and 16.1, we identify 247 variables, including extragalactic variables and 23 periodic variables. We have discovered three M dwarf eclipsing systems, including two candidates for transiting extrasolar planets.

  9. Globular clusters in the Magellanic Clouds - II. IR-array photometry for 12 globular clusters and contributions to the integrated cluster light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraro, F. R.; Fusi Pecci, F.; Testa, V.; Greggio, L.; Corsi, C. E.; Buonanno, R.; Terndrup, D. M.; Zinnecker, H.

    1995-01-01

    We report JHK results of observations of 12 globular clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), and present colour-magnitude diagrams down to K=16 (corresponding to M_K~-2.6) for ~450 stars in these clusters. We merge our data with BV photometry for 11 LMC clusters, previously published in Paper I of this series, and use the merged data to study the evolution of integrated magnitudes and colours of simple stellar populations (SSPs), which are samples of coeval and chemically homogeneous stars. In particular, we examine the effect of phase transitions (ph-ts), which signal the appearance of the RGB or AGB in SSPs of increasing age. We find that the AGB contributes ~60 per cent of the integrated cluster light at K, while the contribution from the bright RGB stars (i.e., K_0<14.3, log L/L_~2.66) is correlated with the s parameter (Elson & Fall) ranging from ~0 per cent for s=0 up to ~20 per cent for s>35. The age at which the RGB ph-t actually takes place (i.e., the calibration of s with age) depends on the details of stellar evolutionary models. In 'classical' models (those without overshooting), the RGB ph-t occurs at ~(6+/-2)x10^8 yr and lasts for 2.9x10^8 yr. In models with overshooting, the occurrence of the RGB ph-t is later [at ~(1.5+/-0.3)x10^9 yr] and the duration is longer (4.3x10^8 yr). While the age and duration of the RGB ph-t depend on the treatment of mixing, both classical and overshooting models yield the same fractional contribution of RGB stars to the integrated cluster light before and after the RGB ph-t, in agreement with the Fuel Comsumption Theorem (Renzini & Buzzoni). We report extensive experiments which show that the variations of the integrated colours of the LMC clusters from s=31 to 43 are controlled by the complex interplay of various factors, different from colour to colour and frequently dominated by the stochastic noise induced by a few very bright objects. The overall picture that emerges is consistent with the early conclusions

  10. Classifying IR sources in the SMC: 2MASS/MSX color-based identifications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egan, M. P.; van Dyk, S. D.

    2000-12-01

    The Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) was observed in the mid-infrared by the Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) and in the near-IR by the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS). We have performed a cross-correlation of the MSX SMC point source catalog and the 2MASS point source catalog and find 236 matches. The colors of the sources correspond very well with sources seen by MSX/2MASS in the Large Magellanic Cloud (Egan et al. 2000 submitted). Using the identification scheme developed for the LMC, we identify a number of stellar populations and red nebulae, including main sequence stars, giant stars, red supergiants, carbon- and oxygen-rich asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, planetary nebulae, H II regions, and other dusty objects likely associated with early-type stars. The spatial distribution of the infrared SMC sources may contribute to understanding stellar formation and evolution in the SMC and its overall galactic evolution. Our combined mid- and near-infrared photometric baseline provides a powerful means of locating new objects in the SMC for future ground-based and space-based follow-up observations.

  11. Laser flare photometry: a noninvasive, objective, and quantitative method to measure intraocular inflammation.

    PubMed

    Tugal-Tutkun, Ilknur; Herbort, Carl P

    2010-10-01

    Aqueous flare and cells are the two inflammatory parameters of anterior chamber inflammation resulting from disruption of the blood-ocular barriers. When examined with the slit lamp, measurement of intraocular inflammation remains subjective with considerable intra- and interobserver variations. Laser flare cell photometry is an objective quantitative method that enables accurate measurement of these parameters with very high reproducibility. Laser flare photometry allows detection of subclinical alterations in the blood-ocular barriers, identifying subtle pathological changes that could not have been recorded otherwise. With the use of this method, it has been possible to compare the effect of different surgical techniques, surgical adjuncts, and anti-inflammatory medications on intraocular inflammation. Clinical studies of uveitis patients have shown that flare measurements by laser flare photometry allowed precise monitoring of well-defined uveitic entities and prediction of disease relapse. Relationships of laser flare photometry values with complications of uveitis and visual loss further indicate that flare measurement by laser flare photometry should be included in the routine follow-up of patients with uveitis. PMID:19430730

  12. Hot Subdwarf Stars Among the Objects Rejected from the PG Catalog: a First Assessment Using GALEX Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, Richard A.; Stark, M. A.; Green, Richard F.; Durrell, Patrick R.

    2009-01-01

    The hot subdwarf (sd) stars in the Palomar Green (PG) catalog of ultraviolet excess (UVX) objects play a key role in investigations of the frequency and types of binary companions and the distribution of orbital periods. These are important for establishing whether and by which channels the sd stars arise from interactions in close binary systems. It has been suggested that the list of PG sd stars is biased by the exclusion of many stars in binaries, whose spectra show the Ca I1 K line in absorption. A total of 1125 objects that were photometrically selected as candidates were ultimately rejected from the final PG catalog using this K-line criterion. We study 88 of these 'PG-Rejects' (PGRs), to assess whether there are significant numbers of unrecognized sd stars in binaries among the PGR objects. The presence of a sd should cause a large UVX, compared with the cool K-line star. We assemble GALEX, Johnson V, and 2MASS photometry and compare the colors of these PGR objects with those of known sd stars, cool single stars, and hot+cool binaries. Sixteen PGRs were detected in both the far- and near-ultraviolet GALEX passbands. Eleven of these, plus the 72 cases with only an upper limit in the far-ultraviolet band, are interpreted as single cool stars, appropriately rejected by the PG spectroscopy. Of the remaining five stars, three are consistent with being sd stars paired with a cool main sequence companion, while two may be single stars or composite systems of another type. We discuss the implications of these findings for the 1125 PGR objects as a whole. An enlarged study is desirable to increase confidence in these first results and to identify individual sd+cool binaries or other composites for follow-up study. The GALEX AIS data have sufficient sensitivity to carry out this larger study.

  13. Homogeneous Photometry. V. The Globular Cluster NGC 4147

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stetson, Peter B.; Catelan, M.; Smith, Horace A.

    2005-12-01

    New BVRI broadband photometry and astrometry are presented for the globular cluster NGC 4147, based upon measurements derived from 524 ground-based CCD images mostly either donated by colleagues or retrieved from public archives. We have also reanalyzed five exposures of the cluster obtained with WFPC2 on the Hubble Space Telescope in the F439W and F555W (B and V) filters. We present calibrated color-magnitude and color-color diagrams. Analysis of the color-magnitude diagram reveals morphological properties generally consistent with published metal-abundance estimates for the cluster, and an age typical of other Galactic globular clusters of similar metallicity. We have also redetermined the periods and mean magnitudes for the RR Lyrae variables, including a new c-type variable reported here for the first time. Our data do not show clear evidence for photometric variability in candidate V18, recently reported by Arellano Ferro et al. (2004, Rev. Mex. A&A, 40, 209). These observations also support the nonvariable status of candidates V5, V9, and V15. The union of our light-curve data with those of Newburn (1957, AJ, 62, 197), Mannino (1957, Mem. Soc. Astron. Italiana, 28, 285), and Arellano Ferro et al. (op. cit.) permits the derivation of significantly improved periods. The mean periods and the Bailey period-amplitude diagrams support the classification of the cluster as Oosterhoff I, despite its predominantly blue horizontal branch. The number ratio of c- to ab-type RR Lyrae stars, on the other hand, is unusually high for an Oosterhoff I cluster. The calibrated results have been made available through the first author's Web site. Based in part on archival observations made with ESO telescopes at the La Silla and Paranal Observatory under program ID 60.A-9050(A). This publication makes use of data products from the Two Micron All Sky Survey, which is a joint project of the University of Massachusetts and the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center

  14. High-precision ground-based photometry of exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mooij, Ernst J. W.; Jayawardhana, Ray

    2013-04-01

    High-precision photometry of transiting exoplanet systems has contributed significantly to our understanding of the properties of their atmospheres. The best targets are the bright exoplanet systems, for which the high number of photons allow very high signal-to-noise ratios. Most of the current instruments are not optimised for these high-precision measurements, either they have a large read-out overhead to reduce the readnoise and/or their field-of-view is limited, preventing simultaneous observations of both the target and a reference star. Recently we have proposed a new wide-field imager for the Observatoir de Mont-Megantic optimised for these bright systems (PI: Jayawardhana). The instruments has a dual beam design and a field-of-view of 17' by 17'. The cameras have a read-out time of 2 seconds, significantly reducing read-out overheads. Over the past years we have obtained significant experience with how to reach the high precision required for the characterisation of exoplanet atmospheres. Based on our experience we provide the following advice: Get the best calibrations possible. In the case of bad weather, characterise the instrument (e.g. non-linearity, dome flats, bias level), this is vital for better understanding of the science data. Observe the target for as long as possible, the out-of-transit baseline is as important as the transit/eclipse itself. A short baseline can lead to improperly corrected systematic and mis-estimation of the red-noise. Keep everything (e.g. position on detector, exposure time) as stable as possible. Take care that the defocus is not too strong. For a large defocus, the contribution of the total flux from the sky-background in the aperture could well exceed that of the target, resulting in very strict requirements on the precision at which the background is measured.

  15. Surface photometry of galaxies in low density regions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vennik, J.; Hopp, U.; Kovachev, B.; Kuhn, B.; Elsaesser, H.

    1996-06-01

    We perform detailed surface photometry, based on B- and/or R-band CCD images of 92 faint galaxies. They are a subsample of those galaxies which were studied by Hopp et al. (1994) in the direction of three nearby voids. We derive integral photometric parameters and radial surface brightness profiles and compare them to those of several faint galaxy samples, located in different environments, and of a bright field galaxy sample. According to the obtained photometric characteristics, our sample is a mixture of intrinsically bright and faint galaxies, about 60% of them belonging to the bright subsample (M_B_<-19.0). These bright ones show mean characteristics of typical Freeman's disks and are mainly located in the background of the observed voids. The faint subsample (M_B_>=-19.0) has parameters typical for the low-surface-brightness (LSB) galaxies. There are a few well isolated galaxies both among the bright and faint subsamples. About 40% of studied galaxies reveal ellipticity and position angle variations along of the radius. The (B-R) colour indices of the observed galaxies span over a wide range of 0.5-1.8mag with a median value at 1.11 mag, rather blue. About 30% of the observed galaxies reveal radial colour gradients at a 5σ significance level. These galaxies show typically red centers and are getting bluer towards the periphery. The most isolated galaxies in our sample show relatively blue colours (B_T_-R_T_=~0.8). About 40% of the studied galaxies have surface brightness profiles which can be described by the model of single exponential disk. 38% of our galaxies have more complicated profiles and either can be approximated by two exponentials or show the presence of a small bulge. 20% of the observed galaxies have central light depression and outer irregularities - typical for some dwarf galaxies. These profile type frequencies are similar to those of faint field galaxy sample. The evolutionary history of both the isolated and clustered galaxies obviously

  16. Optical Photometry of GRB 021004: The First Month

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, Stephen T.; Weidinger, Michael; Fynbo, Johan P. U.; Gorosabel, Javier; Hjorth, Jens; Pedersen, Kristian; Méndez Alvarez, Javier; Augusteijn, Thomas; Castro Cerón, J. M.; Castro-Tirado, Alberto; Dahle, Håkon; Egholm, M. P.; Jakobsson, Páll; Jensen, Brian L.; Levan, Andrew; Møller, Palle; Pedersen, Holger; Pursimo, Tapio; Ruiz-Lapuente, Pilar; Thomsen, Bjarne

    2003-05-01

    We present UBVRCIC photometry of the optical afterglow of the gamma-ray burst GRB 021004 taken at the Nordic Optical Telescope between approximately 8 hours and 30 days after the burst. These data are combined with an analysis of the 87 ks Chandra X-ray observations of GRB 021004 taken at a mean epoch of 33 hr after the burst to investigate the nature of this GRB. We find an intrinsic spectral slope at optical wavelengths of βUH=0.39+/-0.12 and an X-ray slope of βX=0.94+/-0.03. There is no evidence for color evolution between 8.5 hr and 5.5 days after the burst. The optical decay becomes steeper approximately 5 days after the burst. This appears to be a gradual break due to the onset of sideways expansion in a collimated outflow. Our data suggest that the extragalactic extinction along the line of sight to the burst is between AV~0.3 and 0.5 and has an extinction law similar to that of the Small Magellanic Cloud. The optical and X-ray data are consistent with a relativistic fireball with the shocked electrons being in the slow cooling regime and having an electron index of p=1.9+/-0.1. The burst occurred in an ambient medium that is homogeneous on scales larger than approximately 1018 cm but inhomogeneous on smaller scales. The mean particle density is similar to what is seen for other bursts (0.1 cm-3<~n<~100 cm-3). Our results support the idea that the brightening seen at approximately 0.1 days was due to interaction with a clumpy ambient medium within 1017-1018 cm of the progenitor. The agreement between the predicted optical decay and that observed approximately 10 minutes after the burst suggests that the physical mechanism controlling the observed flux at t~10 minutes is the same as the one operating at t>0.5 days. Based on observations taken with the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated on the island of Santa Miguel de la Palma jointly by Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de

  17. Disk-resolved photometry of Asteroid (2867) Steins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spjuth, S.; Jorda, L.; Lamy, P. L.; Keller, H. U.; Li, J.-Y.

    2012-11-01

    We present a new method to perform disk-resolved photometry in order to investigate the intrinsic photometric properties of the surface of small Solar System bodies. We adopt the standard approach where a shape model is combined with a photometric formalism - in practise the Hapke formalism - to remove the effects of topography and recover the photometric (Hapke) parameters of either the global surface or, in its most elaborated form, the spatial variations of these parameters across the surface. Our method operates in the space of the facets representing the three-dimensional shape of the body, whereas all past analysis have always been performed in the space of the image pixels although they are not intrinsic to the surface of the body. This has the advantage of automatically tracking the same local surface element on a series of images. We first apply our method to images of the nucleus of Comet 9P/Tempel 1 obtained by the High-Resolution Imager (HRI) instrument on board the Deep Impact spacecraft and our derived Hapke parameters are in good agreement with those published by Li et al. (Li, J.-Y. et al. [2007]. Icarus 187, 41-55) within their respective uncertainties. We confirm the presence of an extended region of higher roughness in the southern hemisphere of the nucleus and the higher albedo of the ice-rich regions identified by Sunshine et al. (Sunshine, J.M. et al. [2006]. Science 311, 1453-1455) near the equator. The photometric properties of Asteroid (2867) Steins are then studied from multi-spectral images obtained with the OSIRIS Wide Angle Camera (WAC) on board the Rosetta spacecraft during its flyby on 5 September 2008. Our analysis indicates that the surface is highly porous (∼84%) and that it exhibits both a shadow-hiding opposition effect (SHOE) and probably, a coherent-backscatter opposition effect (CBOE). The single scattering albedo is the highest (SSA = 0.57) ever observed among small bodies visited by spacecrafts. Our modelled roughness

  18. Stability of the ACS CCD: geometry, flat fielding, photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marchi, Guido

    2002-07-01

    A moderately crowded stellar field, located 6' West of the centre of the cluster 47 Tuc, is observed repeatedly {every three weeks with the WFC, every other month with the HRC} in various filters, spending 1 orbit per epoch. Different filters will be used every time, so that over the course of the year all filters will have been employed at least twice. The most common filters will be checked more frequently. The same field has been observed in the course of the SMOV phase and the positions and magnitudes of the most prominent stars have been accurately measured. Although the field is neither a proper astrometric nor a proper photometric standard one, the positions and magnitudes of the objects in it can be used to monitor any local and large scale variations in the platescale and sensitivity of the detectors. It should be noted that for the filters which have already been used during the SMOV phase it will be sufficient to take one single image, without CR-SPLIT, since the exposure time is always short {20-30 sec} and there will be so many stars that the few of them which are affected by cosmic rays can be discarded as outliers in the photometry. For narrow and medium band filters not exercised on this target in the SMOV phase, however, a baseline will have to be set. This expenditure of time will apply to the current cycle only. At variance with the approach used in SMOV, there is no need for large telescope slews to place the same objects on opposite sides of the detectors, thence allowing the programme to remain compact and efficient. All exposure level parameters are set to their default values, except for the amplifier gain of the WFC exposures in the F606W band, which will be collected with the gain value of 2 for the WFC for compatibility with the SMOV observations. The exposure time is typically 30 seconds for the WFC, 60 sec for the HRC. No attempt will be made to attain a predefined or the same orientation on the sky amongst different epochs. Typically

  19. Absolute parameters for AI Phoenicis using WASP photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkby-Kent, J. A.; Maxted, P. F. L.; Serenelli, A. M.; Turner, O. D.; Evans, D. F.; Anderson, D. R.; Hellier, C.; West, R. G.

    2016-06-01

    Context. AI Phe is a double-lined, detached eclipsing binary, in which a K-type sub-giant star totally eclipses its main-sequence companion every 24.6 days. This configuration makes AI Phe ideal for testing stellar evolutionary models. Difficulties in obtaining a complete lightcurve mean the precision of existing radii measurements could be improved. Aims: Our aim is to improve the precision of the radius measurements for the stars in AI Phe using high-precision photometry from the Wide Angle Search for Planets (WASP), and use these improved radius measurements together with estimates of the masses, temperatures and composition of the stars to place constraints on the mixing length, helium abundance and age of the system. Methods: A best-fit ebop model is used to obtain lightcurve parameters, with their standard errors calculated using a prayer-bead algorithm. These were combined with previously published spectroscopic orbit results, to obtain masses and radii. A Bayesian method is used to estimate the age of the system for model grids with different mixing lengths and helium abundances. Results: The radii are found to be R1 = 1.835 ± 0.014 R⊙, R2 = 2.912 ± 0.014 R⊙ and the masses M1 = 1.1973 ± 0.0037 M⊙, M2 = 1.2473 ± 0.0039 M⊙. From the best-fit stellar models we infer a mixing length of 1.78, a helium abundance of YAI = 0.26 +0.02-0.01 and an age of 4.39 ± 0.32 Gyr. Times of primary minimum show the period of AI Phe is not constant. Currently, there are insufficient data to determine the cause of this variation. Conclusions: Improved precision in the masses and radii have improved the age estimate, and allowed the mixing length and helium abundance to be constrained. The eccentricity is now the largest source of uncertainty in calculating the masses. Further work is needed to characterise the orbit of AI Phe. Obtaining more binaries with parameters measured to a similar level of precision would allow us to test for relationships between helium

  20. Improved mm-wave photometry for kinetic inductance detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, M.; Roesch, M.; Désert, F.-X.; Monfardini, A.; Benoit, A.; Mauskopf, P.; Ade, P.; Boudou, N.; Bourrion, O.; Camus, P.; Cruciani, A.; Doyle, S.; Hoffmann, C.; Leclercq, S.; Macias-Perez, J. F.; Ponthieu, N.; Schuster, K. F.; Tucker, C.; Vescovi, C.

    2013-03-01

    Context. We have developed a dual-band (140 and 220 GHz) mm-wave imaging camera based on superconducting kinetic inductance detector (KID) arrays. Each array contains 132 superconducting resonators whose resonant frequencies are shifted by mm-wave photons absorption. The read out is achieved with a single electronics chain per band, taking advantage of the intrinsic KID frequency-domain multiplexability. The arrays are easily scalable and well adapted for future large format focal plane instruments. NIKA (formerly Néel IRAM KID Array, now New IRAM KID Array) has been specifically designed for the IRAM 30 m telescope at Pico Veleta, and is one of the first instruments using KIDs to have made measurements of astronomical sources. Aims: In this Letter we describe the solutions adopted to improve the calibration accuracy and the sensitivity of the instrument, and we report on the outcome of the 3rd NIKA observing run of October, 2011. Methods: We use a fast electronic modulation of the readout tone for each KID pixel in order to linearize the instrument calibration, which we track with measurements of planets. We also adopt a new design of the KIDs, sensitive to both polarizations, to increase the amount of radiation absorbed and thus the optical efficiency of the system. Results: We measured an average sensitivity on the sky of 21 mJys0.5 per beam at 140 GHz and 140 mJys0.5 at 220 GHz in the best observing conditions (τ220 ≃ 0.2) after atmospheric noise decorrelation. The sensitivity at 220 GHz was limited by the atmospheric attenuation and loading as well as a reduction in the spectral bandwidth due to a misplaced filter. We found the repeatability in the photometry over the entire observing run to be better than 10% in both bands, thus demonstrating a significant improvement over the previous runs. We also find good agreement between NIKA measurements of faint astronomical sources and previous measurements of the same sources.

  1. Results of CCD Transit Photometry Testing for the Kepler Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, D.; Witteborn, F.; Dunham, E.; Jenkins, J.; Borucki, W.; Webster, L.

    1999-12-01

    Transit signals produced by Earth-size planets in orbit around solar-like stars are of the order of 8e-5 and have durations from 4 to 16 hours for planets in or near the habitable zone. A mission to search for habitable planets has been proposed (Koch, et al., 1998). At the heart of the mission is an array of CCDs used to continuously measure the relative brightness variations of 100,000 dwarf stars for transits. A testbed facility has been constructed to determine the effects of various induced noise sources on the capability of a CCD photometer to maintain an instrument relative precision of better than 1e-5. The photometry facility includes: a simulated star field with an approximate solar spectrum, fast optics to simulate the space borne telescope, a thinned back-illuminated CCD similar to those to be used on the spacecraft operating at 1 Mpix/sec read rate, and shutterless operation. The test facility is thermally and mechanically isolated. Each source of noise is introduced in a controlled fashion and evaluated. Pointing noise or changing thermal conditions in the spacecraft can cause star-image motion at the milli-pixel level. These motions are imposed by piezo-electric devices that move the photometer relative to the star field. Transit signals as small as Earth-size transits of solar-like stars are generated and measured. This is accomplished by electrical self-heating and expansion of fine wires placed across many of the star apertures. The small decrease in stellar brightness is used to demonstrate that Earth-size planets can be detected under realistic noise conditions and at the shot-noise-limited level. The effects of imposing several noise sources are shown and the resulting detectability of planets is presented. This work is supported in part by the NASA Discovery program and NASA Ames. Koch, D., Borucki, W., Webster, L., Dunham, E., Jenkins, J., Marriott, J. and Reitsema, H. SPIE Conf. on Space Telescopes and Instruments V, 3356, 599-607 (1998)

  2. Photoelectric photometry of Comet P/Halley from Mauna Kea Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piscitelli, J. R.; Tholen, D. J.; Hammel, H. B.; Lark, N.

    1986-01-01

    A program of photoelectric photometry of comet Halley yielded 60 nights of usable photometry. The uncertainty in the photometry in all filters except OH is better than 2%. Throughout the apparition, the comet is brightest in the filters that isolated the neutral gas emission features of OH, CN, C2, and C3. The fluxes in the filters that isolated the ionic emission features of CO(+) and H2O(+) are comparable to the continuum when centered upon the optocenter, thereby making the ionic emission weak to undetectable above the continuum. The continuum colors do not appear to be a function of phase angle; therefore, the colors are probably indicative of dust grain composition and are not dominated by scattering geometry effects.

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: IC 2602 VRI photometry (Foster+ 1997)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, D. C.; Byrne, P. B.; Hawley, S. L.; Rolleston, W. R. J.

    1997-03-01

    We present the results of VRI photometry of the young open cluster IC 2602. Two 15x15arcmin2 fields were observed in February and May 1991 using the 1-m Swope telescope at Las Campanas. Using theoretical isochrones obtained from D'Antona & Mazzitelli (1994ApJS...90..467D), and allowing for observational and other uncertainties, we identify 78 primary candidate members with 12=50%, as might be expected given its low galactic latitude. We also compare our photometry with that given for the X-ray detected stars of Randich et al. (1995A&A...300..134R) present complimentary narrow band Hα photometry for a subset of the stars. (1 data file).

  4. CCD photometry of late-type stars in the young open cluster IC 2602

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, D. C.; Byrne, P. B.; Hawley, S. L.; Rolleston, W. R. J.

    1997-11-01

    We present the results of VRI photometry of the young open cluster IC 2602. Two 15 arcmin times 15 arcmin fields were observed in February and May 1991 using the 1-m Swope telescope at Las Campanas. Using theoretical isochrones obtained from \\cite[D'Antona & Mazzitelli (1994)]{dam94}, and allowing for observational and other uncertainties, we identify 78 primary candidate members with 12= 50%, as might be expected given its low galactic latitude. We also compare our photometry with that given for the X-ray detected stars of \\cite[Randich et al. (1995)]{ran95}. We present complimentary narrow band H alpha photometry for a subset of the stars.

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: uvby photometry of 4 CP stars (Adelman, 1997)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelman, S. J.

    1996-11-01

    Differential Stroemgren uvby photometric observations from the Four College Automated Photoelectric Telescope are presented for four magnetic chemically peculiar stars. Comparison with uvby photometry of Pedersen & Thomsen for HD 37776 yields an improved period of 1.538675 days. New periods of 15.0305 days and 18.065 days are found for the sharp-lined stars HR 2258 and HR 6958, respectively, rather than one of their aliases. For HR 6958 each color shows a slightly different time of maximum. Comparison of the four color photometry of 108 Aqr taken during the fall of 1995 which well covers the period shows the presence of a secondary minimum near primary maximum in u, v, and b. Comparison with published photometry indicates indicates that subtle changes in the shapes of the light curves have occurred suggesting that this star might be precessing. (5 data files).

  6. ASTERIA: A CubeSat for Exoplanet Transit and Stellar Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, Mary; Seager, Sara

    2015-12-01

    We present ASTERIA, a 6U CubeSat demonstrator for exoplanet transit photometry. ASTERIA, currently in development at JPL and due to be launched in mid to late 2016, is a testbed for a two-stage pointing system capable of <10 arcsecond pointing as well as active thermal control. These two features will allow ASTERIA to achieve very high photometric precision (<100 ppm) in a very small and cost effective package. ASTERIA will be used to search for transits of known RV planets as well as perform long duration, high cadence stellar photometry. The stellar photometry data will be used to study flares and stellar activity on a variety of stellar types. This presentation will focus on ASTERIA's science mission.

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: CCD photometry of 11 dwarf irregular galaxies (Hopp+, 1995)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopp, U.; Schulte-Ladbeck, R. E.

    1995-02-01

    We present CCD imaging and photometry in B and Cousins R of the dwarf irregular galaxies UGC 4459 (=DDO 53), UGC 5272 (A=DDO 64 and B), UGC 5340 (=DDO 68), UGC 6456, UGC 7559 (=DDO 126), UGC 8024 (=NGC 4789A=DDO 154), UGC 8091 (= GR 8=DDO 155), UGC 8320 (=DDO 168), UGC 8760 (=DDO 183), and DDO 210. For DDO 210 we also give results in the V filter. Photometry of the resolved stars was carried out on background-subtracted images using DAOPHOT. The tables of measurements include positions, magnitudes, colors, a magnitude error, and a color error. Integrated fluxes and colors are also reported. The single-star photometry is compared to previous results in three of the galaxies (UGC 8024, UGC 8091, DDO 210). (11 data files).

  8. Optical BVRI photometry of common proper motion F/G/K+M wide separation binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ting; Marshall, Jennifer L.; Williams, Patrick; Chavez, Joy; Lépine, Sébastien

    2014-10-01

    We present optical (BVRI) photometric measurements of a sample of 76 common proper motion wide separation main-sequence binary pairs. The pairs are composed of a F-, G-, or K-type primary star and an M-type secondary. The sample is selected from the revised NLTT catalog and the LSPM catalog. The photometry is generally precise to 0.03 mag in all bands. We separate our sample into two groups, dwarf candidates and subdwarf candidates, using the reduced proper motion diagram constructed with our improved photometry. The M subdwarf candidates in general have larger V – R colors than the M dwarf candidates at a given V – I color. This is consistent with an average metallicity difference between the two groups, as predicted by the PHOENIX/BT-Settl models. The improved photometry will be used as input into a technique to determine the metallicities of the M-type stars.

  9. Stellar photometry with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide-field/Planetary camera - A progress report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holtzman, Jon A.; Hunter, Deidre; Groth, Edward J.; Light, Robert M.; Faber, S. M.

    1991-01-01

    The prospects for the use of the Wide-Field/Planetary Camera (WFPC) for stellar photometry are described. The large halos of the point-spread function (PSF) resulting from spherical aberration and from spatial, temporal, and color variations of the PSF are the main limitations to accurate photometry. Degradations caused by crowding are exacerbated by the halos of the PSF. An attempt is made to quantify these effects and determine the current accuracy of stellar photometry with the WFPC. In realistic cases, the brighter stars in crowded fields have 0.09 mag errors; fainter stars have larger errors depending on the degree of crowding. It is shown that measuring Cepheids in Virgo Cluster galaxies is not currently possible without inordinate increases in exposure times.

  10. Hypercalibration: A Pan-STARRS1-based Recalibration of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Schlafly, Edward F.; Schlegel, David J.; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Jurić, Mario; Burgett, William S.; Chambers, Kenneth C.; Denneau, Larry; Draper, Peter W.; Flewelling, Heather; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Kaiser, Nick; Magnier, E. A.; Metcalfe, N.; Morgan, Jeffrey S.; Price, Paul A.; Stubbs, Christopher W.; Tonry, John L.

    2016-05-01

    We present a recalibration of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) photometry with new flat fields and zero points derived from Pan-STARRS1. Using point-spread function (PSF) photometry of 60 million stars with 16 < r < 20, we derive a model of amplifier gain and flat-field corrections with per-run rms residuals of 3 millimagnitudes (mmag) in griz bands and 15 mmag in u band. The new photometric zero points are adjusted to leave the median in the Galactic north unchanged for compatibility with previous SDSS work. We also identify transient non-photometric periods in SDSS (“contrails”) based on photometric deviations co-temporal in SDSS bands. The recalibrated stellar PSF photometry of SDSS and PS1 has an rms difference of {9, 7, 7, 8} mmag in griz, respectively, when averaged over 15‧ regions.

  11. Precision of a Low-Cost InGaAs Detector for Near Infrared Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Peter W.; Croll, Bryce; Simcoe, Robert A.

    2013-09-01

    We have designed, constructed, and tested an InGaAs near-infrared camera to explore whether low-cost detectors can make small (<= 1 m) telescopes capable of precise (< 1 mmag) infrared photometry of relatively bright targets. The camera is constructed around the 640 × 512 pixel APS640C sensor built by FLIR Electro-Optical Components. We designed custom analog-to-digital electronics for maximum stability and minimum noise. The InGaAs dark current halves with every 7°C of cooling, and we reduce it to 840 e- s-1 pixel-1 (with a pixel-to-pixel variation of ± 200 e- s-1 pixel-1) by cooling the array to -20°C. Beyond this point, glow from the readout dominates. The single-sample read noise of 149 e- is reduced to 54 e- through up-the-ramp sampling. Laboratory testing with a star field generated by a lenslet array shows that two-star differential photometry is possible to a precision of 631 ± 205 ppm (0.68 mmag) hr-1/2 at a flux of 2.4 × 104 e- s-1. Employing three comparison stars and decorrelating reference signals further improves the precision to 483 ± 161 ppm (0.52 mmag) hr-1/2. Photometric observations of HD80606 and HD80607 (J = 7.7 and 7.8) in the Y band shows that differential photometry to a precision of 415 ppm (0.45 mmag) hr-1/2 is achieved with an effective telescope aperture of 0.25 m. Next-generation InGaAs detectors should indeed enable Poisson-limited photometry of brighter dwarfs with particular advantage for late-M and L types. In addition, one might acquire near-infrared photometry simultaneously with optical photometry or radial velocity measurements to maximize the return of exoplanet searches with small telescopes.

  12. FAINT NEAR-ULTRAVIOLET/FAR-ULTRAVIOLET STANDARDS FROM SWIFT/UVOT, GALEX, AND SDSS PHOTOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, Michael H.; Hoversten, Erik A.; Roming, Peter W. A.; Brown, Peter E-mail: hoversten@astro.psu.ed E-mail: brown@astro.psu.ed

    2010-12-10

    At present, the precision of deep ultraviolet photometry is somewhat limited by the dearth of faint ultraviolet standard stars. In an effort to improve this situation, we present a uniform catalog of 11 new faint (u {approx} 17) ultraviolet standard stars. High-precision photometry of these stars has been taken from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and Galaxy Evolution Explorer archives and combined with new data from the Swift Ultraviolet Optical Telescope to provide precise photometric measures extending from the near-infrared to the far-ultraviolet. These stars were chosen because they are known to be hot (20, 000 < T{sub eff} < 50, 000 K) DA white dwarfs with published Sloan spectra that should be photometrically stable. This careful selection allows us to compare the combined photometry and Sloan spectroscopy to models of pure hydrogen atmospheres to both constrain the underlying properties of the white dwarfs and test the ability of white dwarf models to predict the photometric measures. We find that the photometry provides good constraints on white dwarf temperatures, which demonstrates the ability of Swift/UVOT to investigate the properties of hot luminous stars. We further find that the models reproduce the photometric measures in all 11 passbands to within their systematic uncertainties. Within the limits of our photometry, we find the standard stars to be photometrically stable. This success indicates that the models can be used to calibrate additional filters to our standard system, permitting easier comparison of photometry from heterogeneous sources. The largest source of uncertainty in the model fitting is the uncertainty in the foreground reddening curve, a problem that is especially acute in the UV.

  13. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): Accurate Panchromatic Photometry from Optical Priors using LAMBDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, A. H.; Robotham, A. S. G.; Bourne, N.; Driver, S. P.; Dunne, L.; Maddox, S. J.; Alpaslan, M.; Andrews, S. K.; Bauer, A. E.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Brough, S.; Brown, M. J. I.; Cluver, M.; Davies, L. J. M.; Holwerda, B. W.; Hopkins, A. M.; Jarrett, T. H.; Kafle, P. R.; Lange, R.; Liske, J.; Loveday, J.; Moffett, A. J.; Norberg, P.; Popescu, C. C.; Smith, M.; Taylor, E. N.; Tuffs, R. J.; Wang, L.; Wilkins, S. M.

    2016-04-01

    We present the Lambda Adaptive Multi-band Deblending Algorithm in R (LAMBDAR), a novel code for calculating matched aperture photometry across images that are neither pixel- nor PSF-matched, using prior aperture definitions derived from high resolution optical imaging. The development of this program is motivated by the desire for consistent photometry and uncertainties across large ranges of photometric imaging, for use in calculating spectral energy distributions. We describe the program, specifically key features required for robust determination of panchromatic photometry: propagation of apertures to images with arbitrary resolution, local background estimation, aperture normalisation, uncertainty determination and propagation, and object deblending. Using simulated images, we demonstrate that the program is able to recover accurate photometric measurements in both high-resolution, low-confusion, and low-resolution, high-confusion, regimes. We apply the program to the 21-band photometric dataset from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) Panchromatic Data Release (PDR; Driver et al. 2016), which contains imaging spanning the far-UV to the far-IR. We compare photometry derived from LAMBDAR with that presented in Driver et al. (2016), finding broad agreement between the datasets. Nonetheless, we demonstrate that the photometry from LAMBDAR is superior to that from the GAMA PDR, as determined by a reduction in the outlier rate and intrinsic scatter of colours in the LAMBDAR dataset. We similarly find a decrease in the outlier rate of stellar masses and star formation rates using LAMBDAR photometry. Finally, we note an exceptional increase in the number of UV and mid-IR sources able to be constrained, which is accompanied by a significant increase in the mid-IR colour-colour parameter-space able to be explored.

  14. Galaxy And Mass Assembly: accurate panchromatic photometry from optical priors using LAMBDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, A. H.; Robotham, A. S. G.; Bourne, N.; Driver, S. P.; Dunne, L.; Maddox, S. J.; Alpaslan, M.; Andrews, S. K.; Bauer, A. E.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Brough, S.; Brown, M. J. I.; Clarke, C.; Cluver, M.; Davies, L. J. M.; Grootes, M. W.; Holwerda, B. W.; Hopkins, A. M.; Jarrett, T. H.; Kafle, P. R.; Lange, R.; Liske, J.; Loveday, J.; Moffett, A. J.; Norberg, P.; Popescu, C. C.; Smith, M.; Taylor, E. N.; Tuffs, R. J.; Wang, L.; Wilkins, S. M.

    2016-07-01

    We present the Lambda Adaptive Multi-Band Deblending Algorithm in R (LAMBDAR), a novel code for calculating matched aperture photometry across images that are neither pixel- nor PSF-matched, using prior aperture definitions derived from high-resolution optical imaging. The development of this program is motivated by the desire for consistent photometry and uncertainties across large ranges of photometric imaging, for use in calculating spectral energy distributions. We describe the program, specifically key features required for robust determination of panchromatic photometry: propagation of apertures to images with arbitrary resolution, local background estimation, aperture normalization, uncertainty determination and propagation, and object deblending. Using simulated images, we demonstrate that the program is able to recover accurate photometric measurements in both high-resolution, low-confusion, and low-resolution, high-confusion, regimes. We apply the program to the 21-band photometric data set from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) Panchromatic Data Release (PDR; Driver et al. 2016), which contains imaging spanning the far-UV to the far-IR. We compare photometry derived from LAMBDAR with that presented in Driver et al. (2016), finding broad agreement between the data sets. None the less, we demonstrate that the photometry from LAMBDAR is superior to that from the GAMA PDR, as determined by a reduction in the outlier rate and intrinsic scatter of colours in the LAMBDAR data set. We similarly find a decrease in the outlier rate of stellar masses and star formation rates using LAMBDAR photometry. Finally, we note an exceptional increase in the number of UV and mid-IR sources able to be constrained, which is accompanied by a significant increase in the mid-IR colour-colour parameter-space able to be explored.

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: gr photometry of Sextans A and Sextans B (Bellazzini+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellazzini, M.; Beccari, G.; Fraternali, F.; Oosterloo, T. A.; Sollima, A.; Testa, V.; Galleti, S.; Perina, S.; Faccini, M.; Cusano, F.

    2014-04-01

    The tables present deep LBT/LBC g and r photometry of the stars having image quality parameters (provided by DAOPHOTII) CHI<=2 and SHARP within magnitude-dependent contours traced to include the bulk of stellar objects. The observations were achieved on the night og 2012-02-21 with the Large Binocular Camera at the Large Binocular Telescope in binocular mode; g images were acquired with the blue arm and r images with the red arm of the telescope/camera. The astrometry and the photometry were calibrated with stars in common with SDSS-DR9 (V/139). (2 data files).

  16. Spectroscopy and photometry of the nova M31N 2014-01a at maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabrika, S.; Barsukova, E. A.; Valeev, A. F.; Sholukhova, O.; Hornoch, K.; Shafter, A. W.; Henze, M.

    2014-01-01

    We report optical spectroscopy and photometry of the recent M31 nova candidate M31N 2014-01a (= PNV J00431362+4114469) detected by the Lick Observatory Supernova Search on 2014 Jan. 02.13 UT (http://www.cbat.eps.harvard.edu/unconf/followups/J00431362+4114469.html ) and also observed on 2014 Jan. 05.42 UT as a 16.4 mag object by T. Yusa and K. Kato (Japan). Using the Russian BTA telescope equipped with the SCORPIO spectrograph we have obtained spectra and photometry of the nova M31N 2014-01a on 2014 Jan.

  17. Autocorrelation Analysis of Hipparcos Photometry of Short-Period Be Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Percy, John R.; Hosick, JoAnne; Kincaide, Heather; Pang, Ceci

    2002-05-01

    We have used Hipparcos epoch photometry and a form of autocorrelation analysis to investigate the amplitude and timescale of the short-period variability of 82 Be stars, including 46 Be stars that were analyzed by Hubert & Floquet using Fourier and CLEAN analysis and 36 other Be stars that were suspected of short-period variability. Our method has given useful information for about 84% of these stars; for the rest, the time distribution of the Hipparcos epoch photometry limits the capability of our technique.

  18. BV RI CCD photometry of 361,281 objects in the field of M 31

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magnier, E. A.; Lewin, W. H. G.; Van Paradijs, J.; Hasinger, G.; Jain, A.; Pietsch, W.; Truemper, J.

    1992-01-01

    Deep BV RI CCD photometry was performed on a 1 sq deg region of M 31. A catalog of photometry and astrometry of a total of 361,281 stars is presented, with typical completion limits of BV RI = (22.3, 22.2, 22.2, 20.9). Photometric accuracy is about 2 percent at V = 19. This catalog allows detailed studies of stellar populations and reddening. The data are currently being used to assist in finding the optical counterparts of Einstein and ROSAT X-ray sources.

  19. Documentation for the machine-readable version of a catalogue of homogeneous photometry of bright stars on the DDO system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, W. H., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The magnetic tape version of the Catalog of Homogeneous Photometry of Bright Stars on the DDO System is described. The catalog represents a compilation of DDO photometry of 2196 bright G and K stars prepared from observations made at Kitt Peak National and Cerro Tololo Inter-American observatories. Stars representative of good velocities, spectral types, and freedom from companion contamination are presented.

  20. Spitzer Spectra of 2MASS/MSX Selected Sources in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egan, M. P.; van Dyk, S. D.; Sloan, G. C.; Kraemer, K. E.; Price, S. D.

    2005-12-01

    We present results from our Spitzer Space Telescope study of late type stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). The source selection and tentative identification of spectral type had been made using color-color data derived fromTwo-micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS) and Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) measurements and the source identification model previously developed by Egan, van Dyk, and Price (2001) for the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Results of the Spitzer SMC spectral survey show surprises in that many stars expected to be oxygen-rich, high-luminosity asymptotic giants turned out to have carbon-rich envelopes. Overpopulations in the Magellanic Cloud carbon star population, relative to Milky Way samples, have been noted by other research teams. Similar results for a 2MASS/MSX selected sample in the LMC have been found by the Spitzer team led by J. Kastner (Buchanan et al., in press). These results imply that the lower metallicity in the SMC (and LMC) allows much easier evolution to carbon-rich envelope chemistries across all mass ranges for AGB stars than is seen in the Milky Way. This fact has implications for the future use of color-color diagrams for classifying stars in other galaxies. In order to distinguish between C-rich and O-rich AGB stars by color, correct spectral bands must be chosen, and the metallicity and color relationship well understood. We will present the spectra from the Spitzer SMC sample in this paper, and compare 2MASS/MSX colors for the SMC with similar Milky Way samples. We will also examine the theoretical implications of the dearth of OH/IR stars found in the SMC versus previous expectations.

  1. DETECTION OF RADIO EMISSION FROM THE HYPERACTIVE L DWARF 2MASS J13153094-2649513AB

    SciTech Connect

    Burgasser, Adam J.; Melis, Carl; Zauderer, B. Ashley; Berger, Edo

    2013-01-01

    We report the detection of radio emission from the unusually active L5e + T7 binary 2MASS J13153094-2649513AB made with the Australian Telescope Compact Array. Observations at 5.5 GHz reveal an unresolved source with a continuum flux of 370 {+-} 50 {mu}Jy, corresponding to a radio luminosity of L{sub rad} = {nu}L{sub {nu}} = (9 {+-} 3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 23} erg s{sup -1} and log{sub 10} L{sub rad}/L{sub bol} = -5.44 {+-} 0.22. No detection is made at 9.0 GHz to a 5{sigma} limit of 290 {mu}Jy, consistent with a power-law spectrum S{sub {nu}}{proportional_to}{nu}{sup -{alpha}} with {alpha} {approx}> 0.5. The emission is quiescent, with no evidence of variability or bursts over three hours of observation, and no measurable polarization (V/I < 34%). 2MASS J1315-2649AB is one of the most radio-luminous ultracool dwarfs detected in quiescent emission to date, comparable in strength to other cool sources detected in outburst. Its detection indicates no decline in radio flux through the mid-L dwarfs. It is unique among L dwarfs in having strong and persistent H{alpha} and radio emission, indicating the coexistence of a cool, neutral photosphere (low electron density) and a highly active chromosphere (high electron density and active heating). These traits, coupled with the system's mature age and substellar secondary, make 2MASS J1315-2649AB an important test for proposed radio emission mechanisms in ultracool dwarfs.

  2. BRITE-Constellation: Nanosatellites for precision photometry of bright stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, W. W.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Schwarzenberg-Czerny, A.; Koudelka, O. F.; Grant, C. C.; Zee, R. E.; Kuschnig, R.; Mochnacki, St.; Rucinski, S. M.; Matthews, J. M.; Orleański, P.; Pamyatnykh, A. A.; Pigulski, A.; Alves, J.; Guedel, M.; Handler, G.; Wade, G. A.; Scholtz, A. L.; Scholtz

    2014-02-01

    BRITE-Constellation (where BRITE stands for BRIght Target Explorer) is an international nanosatellite mission to monitor photometrically, in two colours, brightness and temperature variations of stars brighter than V ~ 4, with precision and time coverage not possible from the ground. The current mission design consists of three pairs of 7 kg nanosats (hence ``Constellation'') from Austria, Canada and Poland carrying optical telescopes (3 cm aperture) and CCDs. One instrument in each pair is equipped with a blue filter; the other, a red filter. The first two nanosats (funded by Austria) are UniBRITE, designed and built by UTIAS-SFL (University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies-Space Flight Laboratory) and its twin, BRITE-Austria, built by the Technical University Graz (TUG) with support of UTIAS-SFL. They were launched on 25 February 2013 by the Indian Space Agency, under contract to the Canadian Space Agency. Each BRITE instrument has a wide field of view (~ 24 degrees), so up to 15 bright stars can be observed simultaneously in 32 × 32 sub-rasters. Photometry (with reduced precision but thorough time sampling) of additional fainter targets will be possible through on-board data processing. A critical technical element of the BRITE mission is the three-axis attitude control system to stabilize a nanosat with very low inertia. The pointing stability is better than 1.5 arcminutes rms, a significant advance by UTIAS-SFL over any previous nanosatellite. BRITE-Constellation will primarily measure p- and g-mode pulsations to probe the interiors and ages of stars through asteroseismology. The BRITE sample of many of the brightest stars in the night sky is dominated by the most intrinsically luminous stars: massive stars seen at all evolutionary stages, and evolved medium-mass stars at the very end of their nuclear burning phases (cool giants and AGB stars). The Hertzsprung-Russell diagram for stars brighter than mag V=4 from which the BRITE-Constellation sample

  3. Efficient Selection and Classification of Infrared Excess Emission Stars Based on AKARI and 2MASS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jinzeng; Huang, Yafang

    2015-08-01

    The selection of young stellar objects (YSOs) based on excessive emission in the infrared is easily contaminated by post-main-sequence stars and various types of emission line stars with similar properties. We define here stringent criteria for an efficient selection and classification of stellar sources with infrared excess emission based on combined 2MASS and AKARI colors. First of all, bright dwarfs and giants with known spectral types were selected from the Hipparcos Catalogue and cross-identified with the 2MASS and AKARI Point Source Catalogues to produce the main-sequence and the post-main-sequence tracks, which appear as expected as tight tracks with very small dispersion. However, several of the main-sequence stars indicate excess emission in the color space. Further investigations based on the SIMBAD data help to clarify their nature as classical Be stars, which are found to be located in a well isolated region on each of the color-color (C-C) diagrams. Several kinds of contaminants were then removed based on their distribution on the C-C diagrams. A test sample of Herbig Ae/Be stars and classical T Tauri stars were cross-identified with the 2MASS and AKARI catalogs to define the loci of YSOs with different masses on the C-C diagrams. Well classified Class I and Class II sources were taken as a second test sample to discriminate between various types of YSOs at possibly different evolutionary stages. This helped to define the loci of different types of YSOs and a set of criteria for selecting YSOs based on their colors in the near- and mid-infrared. Candidate YSOs toward IC 1396 indicating excess emission in the near-infrared were employed to verify the validity of the new source selection criteria defined based on C-C diagrams compiled with the 2MASS and AKARI data. Optical spectroscopy and spectral energy distributions of the IC 1396 sample yield a clear identification of the YSOs and further confirm the criteria defined for exploring the nature and

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: 2MASS J22560844+5954299 spectra (Kjurkchieva+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjurkchieva, D.; Khruzina, T.; Dimitrov, D.; Groebel, R.; Ibryamov, S.; Nikolov, G.

    2015-11-01

    The spectral observations of 2MASS J22560844+5954299 were carried by the 2m RCC telescope equipped with the focal reducer FoReRo 2 and grism with 720-lines/mm. The resolution of the spectra is 2pix or 2.7Å; and they cover the range 5600-7000Å. Most of the spectra have a S/N of 16-22 excluding those at the eclipse where the S/N value is around 7. The spectra were reduced using IRAF packages for bias subtraction, flat-fielding, cosmic ray removal, and one-dimensional spectrum extraction. (2 data files).

  5. Effects of 2 mass % Si admixture in a laser-produced Fe plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Krasa, Josef; Laska, Leos; Rohlena, Karel; Velyhan, Andriy; Lorusso, Antonella; Nassisi, Vincenzo; Czarnecka, Agata; Parys, Piotr; Ryc, Leszek; Wolowski, Jerzy

    2008-11-10

    Emission of multiply charged ions and soft x-rays from the plasmas produced by laser pulses focused on (111) surface of Fe and Fe-2 mass % Si single crystals is investigated for wavelengths of 1064 and 248 nm and intensities up to {approx_equal}1x10{sup 10} W/cm{sup 2}. It is demonstrated that the Si admixture in the Fe plasma results in a higher emission of Fe{sup q+} ions (1{<=}q{<=}4) but in a markedly lower x-ray emission. The relation of wavelengths and pulse durations of laser beams used is figured in the fluence dependence of the ion emission.

  6. Efficient Selection and Classification of Infrared Excess Emission Stars Based on AKARI and 2MASS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ya Fang; Zeng Li, Jin; Rector, Travis A.; Mallamaci, Carlos C.

    2013-05-01

    The selection of young stellar objects (YSOs) based on excess emission in the infrared is easily contaminated by post-main-sequence stars and various types of emission line stars with similar properties. We define in this paper stringent criteria for an efficient selection and classification of stellar sources with infrared excess emission based on combined Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) and AKARI colors. First of all, bright dwarfs and giants with known spectral types were selected from the Hipparcos Catalogue and cross-identified with the 2MASS and AKARI Point Source Catalogues to produce the main-sequence and the post-main-sequence tracks, which appear as expected as tight tracks with very small dispersion. However, several of the main-sequence stars indicate excess emission in the color space. Further investigations based on the SIMBAD data help to clarify their nature as classical Be stars, which are found to be located in a well isolated region on each of the color-color (C-C) diagrams. Several kinds of contaminants were then removed based on their distribution in the C-C diagrams. A test sample of Herbig Ae/Be stars and classical T Tauri stars were cross-identified with the 2MASS and AKARI catalogs to define the loci of YSOs with different masses on the C-C diagrams. Well classified Class I and Class II sources were taken as a second test sample to discriminate between various types of YSOs at possibly different evolutionary stages. This helped to define the loci of different types of YSOs and a set of criteria for selecting YSOs based on their colors in the near- and mid-infrared. Candidate YSOs toward IC 1396 indicating excess emission in the near-infrared were employed to verify the validity of the new source selection criteria defined based on C-C diagrams compiled with the 2MASS and AKARI data. Optical spectroscopy and spectral energy distributions of the IC 1396 sample yield a clear identification of the YSOs and further confirm the criteria defined

  7. EFFICIENT SELECTION AND CLASSIFICATION OF INFRARED EXCESS EMISSION STARS BASED ON AKARI AND 2MASS DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Yafang; Li Jinzeng; Rector, Travis A.; Mallamaci, Carlos C.

    2013-05-15

    The selection of young stellar objects (YSOs) based on excess emission in the infrared is easily contaminated by post-main-sequence stars and various types of emission line stars with similar properties. We define in this paper stringent criteria for an efficient selection and classification of stellar sources with infrared excess emission based on combined Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) and AKARI colors. First of all, bright dwarfs and giants with known spectral types were selected from the Hipparcos Catalogue and cross-identified with the 2MASS and AKARI Point Source Catalogues to produce the main-sequence and the post-main-sequence tracks, which appear as expected as tight tracks with very small dispersion. However, several of the main-sequence stars indicate excess emission in the color space. Further investigations based on the SIMBAD data help to clarify their nature as classical Be stars, which are found to be located in a well isolated region on each of the color-color (C-C) diagrams. Several kinds of contaminants were then removed based on their distribution in the C-C diagrams. A test sample of Herbig Ae/Be stars and classical T Tauri stars were cross-identified with the 2MASS and AKARI catalogs to define the loci of YSOs with different masses on the C-C diagrams. Well classified Class I and Class II sources were taken as a second test sample to discriminate between various types of YSOs at possibly different evolutionary stages. This helped to define the loci of different types of YSOs and a set of criteria for selecting YSOs based on their colors in the near- and mid-infrared. Candidate YSOs toward IC 1396 indicating excess emission in the near-infrared were employed to verify the validity of the new source selection criteria defined based on C-C diagrams compiled with the 2MASS and AKARI data. Optical spectroscopy and spectral energy distributions of the IC 1396 sample yield a clear identification of the YSOs and further confirm the criteria defined

  8. Periodic Brightness Modulation of the T Tauri Star V716 Per Based on Optical and Infrared Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsunova, O. Yu.; Grinin, V. P.; Arharov, A. A.; Semenov, A. O.; Sergeev, S. G.; Efimova, N. V.

    2016-06-01

    Results of long-term optical and near infrared observations (VRI and JHK bands, respectively) of the T Tauri star V716 Per are reported. The previously discovered period of the optical brightness variation of the star is confirmed. Our data yield a period of 7.50 days. The period is stable over the entire interval of our observations (about 12 years), although the shape and amplitude of the brightness phase curves varied from season to season. For the first time it is shown that this period is also present in the variations of the JHK infrared fluxes. It is also shown that besides the short period, a slow wave with a duration comparable to the interval of our observations appears in the variations of the star's brightness. Two models of the star's variability are considered for analyzing its photometric behavior: (a) surface activity owing to the existence of cold (magnetic) spots on the star and (b) AA Tau type variability caused by periodic eclipsing of the star by its own circumstellar disk, the inner region of which is warped because of interactions with the star's magnetosphere. The latter model matches the optical observations better. In the infrared, that model only provides a partial fit to the observed variability. In the K band, the major contribution to the variability is from changes in the luminosity of the inner disk caused by fluctuations in the accretion rate.

  9. The SDSS-2MASS-WISE 10-dimensional stellar colour locus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenport, James R. A.; Ivezić, Željko; Becker, Andrew C.; Ruan, John J.; Hunt-Walker, Nicholas M.; Covey, Kevin R.; Lewis, Alexia R.; AlSayyad, Yusra; Anderson, Lauren M.

    2014-06-01

    We present the fiducial main-sequence stellar locus traced by 10 photometric colours observed by Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS), and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Median colours are determined using 1052 793 stars with r-band extinction less than 0.125. We use this locus to measure the dust extinction curve relative to the r band, which is consistent with previous measurements in the SDSS and 2MASS bands. The WISE band extinction coefficients are larger than predicted by standard extinction models. Using 13 lines of sight, we find variations in the extinction curve in H, Ks, and WISE bandpasses. Relative extinction decreases towards Galactic anticentre, in agreement with prior studies. Relative extinction increases with Galactic latitude, in contrast to previous observations. This indicates a universal mid-IR extinction law does not exist due to variations in dust grain size and chemistry with Galactocentric position. A preliminary search for outliers due to warm circumstellar dust is also presented, using stars with high signal-to-noise ratio in the W3 band. We find 199 such outliers, identified by excess emission in Ks - W3. Inspection of SDSS images for these outliers reveals a large number of contaminants due to nearby galaxies. Six sources appear to be genuine dust candidates, yielding a fraction of systems with infrared excess of 0.12 ± 0.05 per cent.

  10. 2 MASS Near-Infared Imaging of the Supernova Remnant IC443

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rho, Jeonghee; van Dyk, Schuyler; Jarrett, T.; Roc, C.; Reach, W. T.

    We present near-infrared imaging of IC443, covering the entire supernova remnant (50' diameter) from The Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS). 2MASS imaging is taken simultaneously in the J (1.25 microns), H (1.65 microns) and K_s (2.17 microns) bands using a 1.3 m telescope with a three-channel camera. The images have 3.5'' spatial resolution with a pixel size of 1''. The bands include lines of Pβ, [Ni~II] and [Fe~II] for J band, Br10 and [Fe~II] for H band, and Brγ and H_2 for K_s band. Emission from IC443 was detected in all 3 bands from most of the optically bright parts of the remnant, revealing a shell-like morphology. This is the first near-infrared image of the northeastern and eastern parts. The color and structure are very different between the northeastern and southern parts. The northeastern shell shows sheet-like filamentary structure, similar to that of optical emission, with J and H band emission equivalently bright, and weak K_s emission. The H flux is higher than the K flux in the northeast; its ratio is similar order of magnitude to that of previously measured infrared spectroscopy from 2 positions. The ratio implies that the H band emission from the northeastern shell is mostly [Fe II] (1.64 microns), and the [Fe II] emission is much stronger than Brγ. This contrasts to the ratio of 0.06 observed in H~II regions. The strong [Fe II] line is produced not only by efficient excitation of Fe but also by grain destruction. Most of bright J band emission can be explained by hydrogen line of Pβ (1.28 microns) when we estimate the expected intensity relative to Brγ and Hα. In contrast, the south ridge is dominated by K_s band light with knotty structure, and has weak J and H band emission. The shocked H_2 line emission is well known from the sinus ridge produced by an interaction with dense molecular clouds. The large field of view of the 2MASS image shows that the H_2 emission extends to the east and inner shell of northeastern optical emission, which

  11. 2 MASS Near-Infrared Imaging of the Supernova Remnant IC443

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rho, J.; van Dyk, S.; Jarrett, T.; Cutri, R.; Reach, W.

    1999-05-01

    We present near-infrared imaging of IC443, covering the entire supernova remnant (50' diameter) from The Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS). 2MASS imaging is taken simultaneously in the J (1.25mu m), H (1.65mu m) and K_s (2.17mu m) bands using a 1.3 m telescope with a three-channel camera. The images have 3.5'' spatial resolution with a pixel size of 1''. The bands include lines of Pbeta , [Ni II] and [Fe II] for J band, Br10 and [Fe II] for H band, and Brgamma and H_2 for K_s band. Emission from IC443 was detected in all 3 bands from most of the optically bright parts of the remnant, revealing a shell-like morphology. This is the first near-infrared image of the northeastern and eastern parts. The color and structure are very different between the northeastern and southern parts. The northeastern shell shows sheet-like filamentary structure, similar to that of optical emission, with J and H band emission equivalently bright, and weak K_s emission. The H flux is higher than the K flux in the northeast; its ratio is similar order of magnitude to that of previously measured infrared spectroscopy from 2 positions. The ratio implies that the H band emission from the northeastern shell is mostly [Fe II] (1.64mu m), and the [Fe II] emission is much stronger than Brgamma . This contrasts to the ratio of 0.06 observed in H II regions. The strong [Fe II] line is produced not only by efficient excitation of Fe but also by grain destruction. Most of bright J band emission can be explained by hydrogen line of Pbeta (1.28mu m) when we estimate the expected intensity relative to Brgamma and Hα . In contrast, the south ridge is dominated by K_s band light with knotty structure, and has weak J and H band emission. The shocked H_2 line emission is well known from the sinus ridge produced by an interaction with dense molecular clouds. The large field of view of the 2MASS image shows that the H_2 emission extends to the east and inner shell of northeastern optical emission, which is

  12. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Hipparcos photometry of CP stars (Adelman 1998)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelman, S. J.

    1998-06-01

    The Hipparcos photometry of the chemically peculiar main-sequence B, A and F stars are examined for variability. Some non-magnetic CP stars, Mercury-Manganese and metallic-line stars, which according to canonical wisdom should not be variable, may be variable and are identified for further study. Some potentially important magnetic CP stars are noted. (3 data files).

  13. AN UPDATED CATALOG OF M33 CLUSTERS AND CANDIDATES: UBVRI PHOTOMETRY AND SOME STATISTICAL RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Jun

    2012-08-15

    We present UBVRI photometry for 392 star clusters and candidates in the field of M33, which are selected from the most recent star cluster catalog. In this catalog, the authors listed star clusters' parameters such as cluster positions, magnitudes, colors in the UBVRIJHK{sub s} filters, and so on. However, a large fraction of objects in this catalog do not have previously published photometry. Photometry is performed using archival images from the Local Group Galaxies Survey, which covers 0.8 deg{sup 2} along the major axis of M33. Detailed comparisons show that, in general, our photometry is consistent with previous measurements. Positions (right ascension and declination) for some clusters are corrected here. Combined with previous literature, ours constitute a large sample of M33 star clusters. Based on this cluster sample, we present some statistical results: none of the youngest M33 clusters ({approx}10{sup 7} yr) have masses approaching 10{sup 5} M{sub Sun} ; roughly half the star clusters are consistent with the 10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} M{sub Sun} mass models; the continuous distribution of star clusters along the model line indicates that M33 star clusters have been formed continuously from the epoch of the first star cluster formation until recent times; and there are {approx}50 star clusters which are overlapped with the Galactic globular clusters on the color-color diagram, and these clusters are old globular cluster candidates in M33.

  14. New shape models of asteroids reconstructed from sparse-in-time photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durech, Josef; Hanus, Josef; Vanco, Radim; Oszkiewicz, Dagmara Anna

    2015-08-01

    Asteroid physical parameters - the shape, the sidereal rotation period, and the spin axis orientation - can be reconstructed from the disk-integrated photometry either dense (classical lightcurves) or sparse in time by the lightcurve inversion method. We will review our recent progress in asteroid shape reconstruction from sparse photometry. The problem of finding a unique solution of the inverse problem is time consuming because the sidereal rotation period has to be found by scanning a wide interval of possible periods. This can be efficiently solved by splitting the period parameter space into small parts that are sent to computers of volunteers and processed in parallel. We will show how this approach of distributed computing works with currently available sparse photometry processed in the framework of project Asteroids@home. In particular, we will show the results based on the Lowell Photometric Database. The method produce reliable asteroid models with very low rate of false solutions and the pipelines and codes can be directly used also to other sources of sparse photometry - Gaia data, for example. We will present the distribution of spin axis of hundreds of asteroids, discuss the dependence of the spin obliquity on the size of an asteroid,and show examples of spin-axis distribution in asteroid families that confirm the Yarkovsky/YORP evolution scenario.

  15. Spectroscopy and photometry of the nova candidate M33N 2013-12a

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabrika, S.; Barsukova, E. A.; Valeev, A. F.; Sholukhova, O.; Hornoch, K.; Shafter, A. W.; Henze, M.

    2014-01-01

    We report optical spectroscopy and photometry of a recent M33 nova candidate (M33N 2013-12a = PNV J01331092+3037511) detected by the Lick Observatory Supernova Search ( http://www.cbat.eps.harvard.edu/unconf/followups/J01331092+3037511.html ).

  16. Physical studies of asteroids. XXV - Photoelectric photometry of asteroids obtained at ESO and Hoher List Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagerkvist, C.-I.; Magnusson, P.; Debehogne, H.; Hoffmann, M.; Erikson, A.; de Campos, A.; Cutispoto, G.

    1992-11-01

    Photoelectric photometry of 14 asteroids, carried out at ESO and the Hoher List Observatory during 1990 and 1991, are presented. Composite lightcurves were derived for the asteroids 140 Siwa, 238 Hypatia, 347 Pariana, 389 Industria and 1593 Fagnes. UBV colors are also given for ten of the asteroids.

  17. Thermal Emission Photometry of Deep Impact Flyby Target (163249) 2002 GT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Lucy F.; Moskovitz, N. A.; Licandro, J.; Emery, J. P.; Reddy, V.; Vilas, F.; 2002 GT Observing Team

    2013-10-01

    Near-Earth asteroid (163249) 2002 GT is now the target of a Deep Impact spacecraft flyby in Jan. 2020 (see Pittichova et al., this volume, for details of the flyby and observing campaign). Thermal emission photometry of 2002 GT was obtained from NIRI on Gemini-North in the L' and M' filters, which are centered at 3.76 and 4.68 microns respectively. J- and K-band reflectance photometry was also acquired in support of the thermal observations. The full JKL'M' set was acquired on UT 2013-Jun-13 at a solar phase angle of 53 degrees. A further set of photometry in J, K, and L' only was carried out on 2013-Jun-19 at a phase angle of 65 degrees. High water vapor conditions at Mauna Kea during this period unfortunately prevented acquisition of a second set of M' measurements. In addition, N-band photometry of 2002 GT was conducted on 2013-Jun-10 from CanariCam at the 10-meter Gran Telescopio Canarias using a beta version of the moving object guiding system. Data were acquired in three filters between 8.7 and 12.5 microns, although the limitations of the guiding are complicating the analysis. (We note that N-band observing was not offered by either Gemini or IRTF during this apparition.) Data analysis is ongoing and results will be discussed. We appreciate the efforts of the Gemini and GTC staff in support of these observing programs.

  18. Fast Optical Photometry of V404 Cyg at the MDM Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terndrup, D.; Wagner, R. M.; Starrfield, S.

    2015-06-01

    We obtained continuous fast differential optical photometry of V404 Cyg with the 1.3 m McGraw-Hill Telescope of the MDM Observatory on Kitt Peak on the nights of 2015 June 19.220-19.474, 20.194-20.472, 21.199-21.460, and 22.188-22.421 UT.

  19. Photometry of HD 51480 = V644 Monocerotis - A Be binary system

    SciTech Connect

    Halbedel, E.M. )

    1989-11-01

    Four years of photometry of the composite Be + K binary system HD 51480 = V644 Mon is presented. The star is found to be irregularly variable. Analysis of two coude spectra of the H-alpha region reveals a continuing strong P Cygni profile for H-alpha which is variable in a minor fashion. 20 refs.

  20. Photometry of the eclipsing cataclysmic variable SDSS J152419.33+220920.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, R.; Echevarría, J.; Hernández Santisteban, J. V.

    2013-06-01

    Aims: We present new photometry of the faint (g ~ 19 mag) and poorly studied cataclysmic variable SDSS J152419.33+220920.0, analyze its light curve and provide an accurate ephemeris for this system. Methods: Time-resolved CCD differential photometry was carried out using the 1.5 m and 0.84 m telescopes at the Observatorio Astronómico Nacional at San Pedro Mártir. Results: From time-resolved photometry of the system obtained during six nights (covering more than twenty primary eclipse cycles in more than three years), we show that this binary presents a strong primary and a weak secondary modulation. Our light curve analysis shows that only two fundamental frequencies are present, corresponding to the orbital period and a modulation with twice this frequency. We determine the accurate ephemeris of the system to be HJDeclipse = 2 454 967.6750(1) + 0.06531866661(1) E. A double-hump orbital period modulation, a standing feature in several bounce-back systems at quiescence, is present at several epochs. However, we found no other evidence to support the hypothesis that this system belongs to the post-minimum orbital-period systems. Photometry described in Table 1 is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/554/A25

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Carrier fit analysis of LQ Hya photometry (Olspert+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olspert, N.; Kapyla, M. J.; Pelt, J.; Cole, E. M.; Hackman, T.; Lehtinen, J.; Henry, G. W.

    2015-02-01

    The epochs as well as differential magnitudes of primary and secondary minima obtained from the model are presented. The analysis was done for the homogeneous data set D2 as denoted in the paper (photometry obtained with the T3 0.4m APT at the Fairborn Observatory). (1 data file).

  2. Determination of cyclamate by high-performance liquid chromatography with indirect photometry.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, A; Damawandi, E; Wagmann, M

    1983-12-01

    Most artificial sweeteners have been determined by high-performance liquid chromatography, but not cyclamate. We propose a simple method using standard equipment without any chemical reaction involving the cyclamate ion by applying the technique of indirect photometry. Saccharin, dulcin and aspartame may also be determined, if present. PMID:6662891

  3. Wide-field photometry at 20 Hz for the TAOS II Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geary, John C.; Wang, Shiang-Yu; Lehner, Matthew J.; Jorden, Paul; Fryer, Martin

    2012-09-01

    The TAOS II Project requires high-speed differential photometry of 10-20 thousand stars over a telescope field of 154mm diameter with 16-micron spatial resolution and good noise performance. We are developing a custom CMOS imager array to accomplish this task.

  4. Wide Field Multicolor CCD Photometry in the Vicinity of the Open Cluster King 7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdanavičius, J.; Čepas, V.; Zdanavičius, K.; Straižys, V.

    We present the results of CCD photometry in the seven-color Vilnius system for 1549 stars down to V = 16 mag in a 1.5 square degree field around the cluster King 7, at the Perseus and Camelopardalis border. Using photometric parameters, two-dimensional spectral types, interstellar extinctions and distances for most of the stars are determined.

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: COSMOS Multi-Wavelength Photometry Catalog (Capak+, 2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capak, P.; Aussel, H.; Ajiki, M.; McCracken, H. J.; Mobasher, B.; Scoville, N.; Shopbell, P.; Taniguchi, Y.; Thompson, D.; Tribiano, S.; Sasaki, S.; Blain, A. W.; Brusa, M.; Carilli, C.; Comastri, A.; Carollo, C. M.; Cassata, P.; Colbert, J.; Ellis, R. S.; Elvis, M.; Giavalisco, M.; Green, W.; Guzzo, L.; Hasinger, G.; Ilbert, O.; Impey, C.; Jahnke, K.; Kartaltepe, J.; Kneib, J.-P.; Koda, J.; Koekemoer, A.; Komiyama, Y.; Leauthaud, A.; Lefevre, O.; Lilly, S.; Liu, C.; Massey, R.; Miyazaki, S.; Murayama, T.; Nagao, T.; Peacock, J. A.; Pickles, A.; Porciani, C.; Renzini, A.; Rhodes, J.; Rich, M.; Salvato, M.; Sanders, D. B.; Scarlata, C.; Schiminovich, D.; Schinnerer, E.; Scodeggio, M.; Sheth, K.; Shioya, Y.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Taylor, J. E.; Yan, L.; Zamorani, G.

    2008-03-01

    The present COSMOS data were collected on a variety of telescopes and instruments, as well as from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) second data release (DR2) archive (u, g, r, i, z) and Hubble Space Telescope (HST, F814W). This paper covers the processing of the data obtained with Suprime-Cam on the Subaru 8.3m telescope (Bj, Vj, g+, r+, i+, z+, NB816), Megaprime on the 3.6m Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT, u*, i*), FLAMINGOS on the Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO, Ks) 4m telescope, and the Infrared Side Port Imager on the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO, Ks) 4m telescope during the 2004-2005 observing season. The COSMOS I band catalog is an I band selected multi-color catalog for 2 square degrees centered on the COSMOS field at 10:00:28.6, +02:12:21. The total magnitude (SExtractor mag_auto) for a source must have an AB magnitude of less than i+<25 to appear in the archival catalog. All photometry is in the AB magnitude system and measured in a 3 arc second aperture on PSF-matched images unless otherwise noted. A magnitude of -99 indicates a photometric measurement was not possible due to lack of data, a large number of bad pixels, or saturation. A magnitude of 99.0 indicates no detection. In the case of no detection the error given for the object is the 1 sigma limiting magnitude at the position of the souce. The photometry is as measured on the images with no corrections applied. We recommend applying the magnitude offsets in the paper to obtain the best possible photometry. More details on the photometry are available in the paper. The Photometric Redshifts included in this catalog are described in Mobasher et al. (2007ApJS..172..117M) and have an accuracy of dz/(1+z)<0.031 at z<1.2 and I<24. It is important to pay attention to the flag columns at the end of the catalog. The cleanest catalog will have all flags set to 0. The photometry flags indicate the area of the photometry aperture, in square arc seconds, which is in a masked

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: COSMOS Multi-Wavelength Photometry Catalog (Capak+, 2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capak, P.; Aussel, H.; Ajiki, M.; McCracken, H. J.; Mobasher, B.; Scoville, N.; Shopbell, P.; Taniguchi, Y.; Thompson, D.; Tribiano, S.; Sasaki, S.; Blain, A. W.; Brusa, M.; Carilli, C.; Comastri, A.; Carollo, C. M.; Cassata, P.; Colbert, J.; Ellis, R. S.; Elvis, M.; Giavalisco, M.; Green, W.; Guzzo, L.; Hasinger, G.; Ilbert, O.; Impey, C.; Jahnke, K.; Kartaltepe, J.; Kneib, J.-P.; Koda, J.; Koekemoer, A.; Komiyama, Y.; Leauthaud, A.; Lefevre, O.; Lilly, S.; Liu, C.; Massey, R.; Miyazaki, S.; Murayama, T.; Nagao, T.; Peacock, J. A.; Pickles, A.; Porciani, C.; Renzini, A.; Rhodes, J.; Rich, M.; Salvato, M.; Sanders, D. B.; Scarlata, C.; Schiminovich, D.; Schinnerer, E.; Scodeggio, M.; Sheth, K.; Shioya, Y.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Taylor, J. E.; Yan, L.; Zamorani, G.

    2008-03-01

    The present COSMOS data were collected on a variety of telescopes and instruments, as well as from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) second data release (DR2) archive (u, g, r, i, z) and Hubble Space Telescope (HST, F814W). This paper covers the processing of the data obtained with Suprime-Cam on the Subaru 8.3m telescope (Bj, Vj, g+, r+, i+, z+, NB816), Megaprime on the 3.6m Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT, u*, i*), FLAMINGOS on the Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO, Ks) 4m telescope, and the Infrared Side Port Imager on the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO, Ks) 4m telescope during the 2004-2005 observing season. The COSMOS I band catalog is an I band selected multi-color catalog for 2 square degrees centered on the COSMOS field at 10:00:28.6, +02:12:21. The total magnitude (SExtractor mag_auto) for a source must have an AB magnitude of less than i+<25 to appear in the archival catalog. All photometry is in the AB magnitude system and measured in a 3" aperture on PSF-matched images unless otherwise noted. A magnitude of -99 indicates a photometric measurement was not possible due to lack of data, a large number of bad pixels, or saturation. A magnitude of 99.0 indicates no detection. In the case of no detection the error given for the object is the 1 sigma limiting magnitude at the position of the source. The photometry is as measured on the images with no corrections applied. We recommend applying the magnitude offsets in the paper to obtain the best possible photometry. More details on the photometry are available in the paper. The Photometric Redshifts included in this catalog are described in Mobasher et al. (2007ApJS..172..117M) and have an accuracy of dz/(1+z)<0.031 at z<1.2 and I<24. It is important to pay attention to the flag columns at the end of the catalog. The cleanest catalog will have all flags set to 0. The photometry flags indicate the area of the photometry aperture, in square arc seconds, which is in a masked region. A

  7. Spitzer Photometry of WISE-Selected Brown Dwarf and Hyper-Lumninous Infrared Galaxy Candidates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffith, Roger L.; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Eisenhardt, Peter R. M.; Gelino, Christopher R.; Cushing, Michael C.; Benford, Dominic; Blain, Andrew; Bridge, Carrie R.; Cohen, Martin; Cutri, Roc M.; Donoso, Emilio; Jarrett, Thomas H.; Lonsdale, Carol; Mace, Gregory; Mainzer, A.; Marsh, Ken; Padgett, Deborah; Petty, Sara; Ressler, Michael E.; Skrutskie, Michael F.; Stanford, Spencer A.; Stern, Daniel; Tsai, Chao-Wei; Wright, Edward L.; Wu, Jingwen

    2012-01-01

    We present Spitzer 3.6 and 4.5 micrometer photometry and positions for a sample of 1510 brown dwarf candidates identified by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) all-sky survey. Of these, 166 have been spectroscopically classified as objects with spectral types M(1), L(7), T(146), and Y(12). Sixteen other objects are non-(sub)stellar in nature. The remainder are most likely distant L and T dwarfs lacking spectroscopic verification, other Y dwarf candidates still awaiting follow-up, and assorted other objects whose Spitzer photometry reveals them to be background sources. We present a catalog of Spitzer photometry for all astrophysical sources identified in these fields and use this catalog to identify seven fainter (4.5 m to approximately 17.0 mag) brown dwarf candidates, which are possibly wide-field companions to the original WISE sources. To test this hypothesis, we use a sample of 919 Spitzer observations around WISE-selected high-redshift hyper-luminous infrared galaxy candidates. For this control sample, we find another six brown dwarf candidates, suggesting that the seven companion candidates are not physically associated. In fact, only one of these seven Spitzer brown dwarf candidates has a photometric distance estimate consistent with being a companion to the WISE brown dwarf candidate. Other than this, there is no evidence for any widely separated (greater than 20 AU) ultra-cool binaries. As an adjunct to this paper, we make available a source catalog of 7.33 x 10(exp 5) objects detected in all of these Spitzer follow-up fields for use by the astronomical community. The complete catalog includes the Spitzer 3.6 and 4.5 m photometry, along with positionally matched B and R photometry from USNO-B; J, H, and Ks photometry from Two Micron All-Sky Survey; and W1, W2, W3, and W4 photometry from the WISE all-sky catalog.

  8. THE CARNEGIE SUPERNOVA PROJECT: FIRST PHOTOMETRY DATA RELEASE OF LOW-REDSHIFT TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Contreras, Carlos; Phillips, M. M.; Folatelli, Gaston; Stritzinger, Maximilian; Boldt, Luis; Gonzalez, Sergio; Krzeminski, Wojtek; Morrell, Nidia; Roth, Miguel; Salgado, Francisco; Hamuy, Mario; Maureira, MarIa Jose; Suntzeff, Nicholas B.; Persson, S. E.; Burns, Christopher R.; Freedman, W. L.; Madore, Barry F.; Murphy, David; Wyatt, Pamela

    2010-02-15

    The Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP) is a five-year survey being carried out at the Las Campanas Observatory to obtain high-quality light curves of {approx}100 low-redshift Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) in a well-defined photometric system. Here we present the first release of photometric data that contains the optical light curves of 35 SNe Ia, and near-infrared light curves for a subset of 25 events. The data comprise 5559 optical (ugriBV) and 1043 near-infrared (Y JHK{sub s} ) data points in the natural system of the Swope telescope. Twenty-eight SNe have pre-maximum data, and for 15 of these, the observations begin at least 5 days before B maximum. This is one of the most accurate data sets of low-redshift SNe Ia published to date. When completed, the CSP data set will constitute a fundamental reference for precise determinations of cosmological parameters, and serve as a rich resource for comparison with models of SNe Ia.

  9. Physical properties and transmission spectrum of the WASP-80 planetary system from multi-colour photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancini, L.; Southworth, J.; Ciceri, S.; Dominik, M.; Henning, Th.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Lanza, A. F.; Rabus, M.; Snodgrass, C.; Vilela, C.; Alsubai, K. A.; Bozza, V.; Bramich, D. M.; Calchi Novati, S.; D'Ago, G.; Figuera Jaimes, R.; Galianni, P.; Gu, S.-H.; Harpsøe, K.; Hinse, T.; Hundertmark, M.; Juncher, D.; Kains, N.; Korhonen, H.; Popovas, A.; Rahvar, S.; Skottfelt, J.; Street, R.; Surdej, J.; Tsapras, Y.; Wang, X.-B.; Wertz, O.

    2014-02-01

    WASP-80 is one of only two systems known to contain a hot Jupiter which transits its M-dwarf host star. We present eight light curves of one transit event, obtained simultaneously using two defocussed telescopes. These data were taken through the Bessell I, Sloan g'r'i'z' and near-infrared JHK passbands. We use our data to search for opacity-induced changes in the planetary radius, but find that all values agree with each other. Our data are therefore consistent with a flat transmission spectrum to within the observational uncertainties. We also measure an activity index of the host star of log R 'HK = -4.495, meaning that WASP-80 A shows strong chromospheric activity. The non-detection of starspots implies that, if they exist, they must be small and symmetrically distributed on the stellar surface. We model all available optical transit light curves and obtain improved physical properties and orbital ephemerides for the system. Full Table 2 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/562/A126

  10. Deriving star formation histories from photometry using energy balance spectral energy distribution modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Daniel J. B.; Hayward, Christopher C.

    2015-10-01

    Panchromatic spectral energy distribution fitting is a critical tool for determining the physical properties of distant galaxies, such as their stellar mass and star formation rate. One widely used method is the publicly available MAGPHYS code. We build on our previous analysis by presenting some modifications which enable MAGPHYS to automatically estimate galaxy star formation histories (SFHs), including uncertainties, based on ultraviolet to far-infrared photometry. We use state-of-the art synthetic photometry derived by performing three-dimensional dust radiative transfer on hydrodynamic simulations of isolated disc and merging galaxies to test how well the modified MAGPHYS is able to recover SFHs under idealized conditions, where the true SFH is known. We find that while the SFH of the model with the best fit to the synthetic photometry is a poor representation of the true SFH (showing large variations with the line of sight to the galaxy and spurious bursts of star formation), median-likelihood SFHs generated by marginalizing over the default MAGPHYS libraries produce robust estimates of the smoothly varying isolated disc simulation SFHs. This preference for the median-likelihood SFH is quantitatively underlined by our estimates of χ ^2_SFH (analogous to the χ2 goodness-of-fit estimator) and Δ M / M (the integrated absolute mass discrepancy between the model and true SFH) that strongly prefer the median-likelihood SFHs over those that best fit the UV-to-far-IR photometry. In contrast, we are unable to derive a good estimate of the SFH for the merger simulations (either best fit or median likelihood) despite being able to obtain a reasonable fit to the simulated photometry, likely because the analytic SFHs with bursts superposed in the standard MAGPHYS library are insufficiently general/realistic.

  11. INFORMATION ON THE MILKY WAY FROM THE 2MASS ALL SKY STAR COUNT: BIMODAL COLOR DISTRIBUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Chan-Kao; Lai, Shao-Yu; Peng, Ting-Hung; Ko, Chung-Ming E-mail: cmko@astro.ncu.edu.tw

    2012-11-10

    The J - K{sub s} color distributions (CDs) with a bin size of 0.05 mag has been carried out for the entire Milky Way using the Two Micron All Sky Survey Point Source Catalog (2MASS PSC). The CDs are bimodal, with a red peak at 0.8 < J - K{sub s} < 0.85 and a blue peak at 0.3 < J - K{sub s} < 0.4. The colors of the red peak are more or less the same for the whole sky, but those of the blue peak depend on Galactic latitude (J - K{sub s} {approx} 0.35 at low Galactic latitudes and 0.35 < J - K{sub s} < 0.4 for other sky areas). The blue peak dominates the bimodal CDs at low Galactic latitudes and becomes comparable with the red peak in other sky regions. In order to explain the bimodal distribution and the global trend shown by the all-sky 2MASS CDs, we assemble an empirical Hertzsprung-Russell (H-R) diagram, which is composed of observational-based near-infrared H-R diagrams and color-magnitude diagrams, and incorporate a Milky Way model. In the empirical H-R diagram, the main-sequence turn-off for stars in the thin disk is relatively bluer, (J - K{sub s} ){sub 0} = 0.31, compared with that of the thick disk which is (J - K{sub s} ){sub 0} = 0.39. The age of the thin/thick disk is roughly estimated to be around 4-5/8-9 Gyr according to the color-age relation of the main-sequence turn-off. In general, the 2MASS CDs can be treated as a tool to measure the age of the stellar population of the Milky Way in a statistical manner and to our knowledge it is the first attempt to do so.

  12. Discovery of an X-Ray-emitting Contact Binary System 2MASS J11201034‑2201340

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chin-Ping; Yang, Ting-Chang; Chou, Yi; Liu, L.; Qian, S.-B.; Hui, C. Y.; Kong, Albert K. H.; Lin, L. C. C.; Tam, P. H. T.; Li, K. L.; Ngeow, Chow-Choong; Chen, W. P.; Ip, Wing-Huen

    2016-06-01

    We report the detection of orbital modulation, a model solution, and the X-ray properties of a newly discovered contact binary, Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) J11201034‑2201340. We serendipitously found this X-ray point source outside the error ellipse when searching for possible X-ray counterparts of γ-ray millisecond pulsars among the unidentified objects detected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. The optical counterpart of the X-ray source (unrelated to the γ-ray source) was then identified using archival databases. The long-term Catalina Real-Time Transient Survey detected a precise signal with a period of P=0.28876208(56) days. A follow-up observation made by the Super Light Telescope of Lulin Observatory revealed the binary nature of the object. Utilizing archived photometric data of multi-band surveys, we construct the spectral energy distribution (SED), which is well fit by a K2V spectral template. The fitting result of the orbital profile using the Wilson–Devinney code suggests that 2MASS J11201034-2201340 is a short-period A-type contact binary and the more massive component has a cool spot. The X-ray emission was first noted in observations made by Swift, and then further confirmed and characterized by an XMM-Newton observation. The X-ray spectrum can be described by a power law or thermal Bremsstrahlung. Unfortunately, we could not observe significant X-ray orbital modulation. Finally, according to the SED, this system is estimated to be 690 pc from Earth with a calculated X-ray intensity of (0.7-1.5)× {10}30 erg s‑1, which is in the expected range of an X-ray emitting contact binary.

  13. A SEARCH FOR HIGH PROPER MOTION T DWARFS WITH Pan-STARRS1 + 2MASS + WISE

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Michael C.; Deacon, Niall R.; Magnier, Eugene A.; Aller, Kimberly M.; Bowler, Brendan P.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Hodapp, K. W.; Kaiser, N.; Kudritzki, R.-P.; Morgan, J. S.; Tonry, J. L.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Dupuy, Trent J.; Redstone, Joshua; Goldman, Bertrand; Price, P. A.

    2011-10-20

    We have searched {approx}8200 deg{sup 2} for high proper motion ({approx}0.''5-2.''7 year{sup -1}) T dwarfs by combining first-epoch data from the Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) 3{pi} Survey, the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) All-Sky Point Source Catalog, and the WISE Preliminary Data Release. We identified two high proper motion objects with the very red (W1 - W2) colors characteristic of T dwarfs, one being the known T7.5 dwarf GJ 570D. Near-IR spectroscopy of the other object (PSO J043.5395+02.3995 {identical_to} WISEP J025409.45+022359.1) reveals a spectral type of T8, leading to a photometric distance of 7.2 {+-} 0.7 pc. The 2.''56 year{sup -1} proper motion of PSO J043.5+02 is the second highest among field T dwarfs, corresponding to a tangential velocity of 87 {+-} 8 km s{sup -1}. According to the Besancon galaxy model, this velocity indicates that its galactic membership is probably in the thin disk, with the thick disk an unlikely possibility. Such membership is in accord with the near-IR spectrum, which points to a surface gravity (age) and metallicity typical of the field population. We combine 2MASS, Sloan Digital Sky Survey, WISE, and PS1 astrometry to derive a preliminary parallax of 171 {+-} 45 mas (5.8{sup +2.0} {sub -1.2} pc), the first such measurement using PS1 data. The proximity and brightness of PSO J043.5+02 will facilitate future characterization of its atmosphere, variability, multiplicity, distance, and kinematics. The modest number of candidates from our search suggests that the immediate ({approx}10 pc) solar neighborhood does not contain a large reservoir of undiscovered T dwarfs earlier than about T8.

  14. Supervoids in the WISE-2MASS catalogue imprinting cold spots in the cosmic microwave background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finelli, F.; García-Bellido, J.; Kovács, A.; Paci, F.; Szapudi, I.

    2016-01-01

    The Cold Spot (CS) is a clear feature in the cosmic microwave background (CMB); it could be of primordial origin, or caused by a intervening structure along the line of sight. We identified a large projected underdensity in the recently constructed WISE-2MASS all-sky infrared galaxy catalogue aligned with the CS direction at (l, b) ≈ (209°, -57°). It has an angular size of tens of degrees, and shows a ˜20 per cent galaxy underdensity in the centre. Moreover, we find another large underdensity in the projected WISE-2MASS galaxy map at (l, b) ≈ (101°, 46°) (hereafter Draco supervoid), also aligned with a CMB decrement, although less significant than that of the CS direction. Motivated by these findings, we develop spherically symmetric Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi (LTB) compensated void models to explain the observed CMB decrements with these two underdensities, or `supervoids'. Within our perturbative treatment of the LTB voids, we find that the integrated Sachs-Wolfe and Riess-Sciama effects due to the Draco supervoid can account for the CMB decrement observed in the same direction. On the contrary, the extremely deep CMB decrement in the CS direction is more difficult to explain by the presence of the CS supervoid only. Nevertheless, the probability of a random alignment between the CS and the corresponding supervoid is disfavoured, and thus its contribution as a secondary anisotropy cannot be neglected. We comment on how the approximations used in this paper, in particular the assumption of spherical symmetry, could change quantitatively our conclusions and might provide a better explanation for the CMB CS.

  15. 2MASS J154043.42-510135.7: a new addition to the 5 pc population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez Garrido, A.; Lodieu, N.; Béjar, V. J. S.; Ruiz, M. T.; Gauza, B.; Rebolo, R.; Zapatero Osorio, M. R.

    2014-07-01

    Aims: The aim of the project is to find the stars closest to the Sun and to contribute to the completion of the stellar and substellar census of the solar neighbourhood. Methods: We identified a new late-M dwarf within 5 pc, looking for high proper motion sources in the 2MASS-WISE cross-match. We collected astrometric and photometric data available from public large-scale surveys. We complemented this information with low-resolution (R ~ 500) optical (600-1000 nm) and near-infrared (900-2500 nm) spectroscopy with instrumentation on the European Southern Observatory New Technology Telescope to confirm the nature of our candidate. We also present a high-quality medium-resolution VLT/X-shooter spectrum covering the 400 to 2500 nm wavelength range. Results: We classify this new neighbour as an M7.0 ± 0.5 dwarf using spectral templates from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and spectral indices. Lithium absorption at 670.8 nm is not detected in the X-shooter spectrum, indicating that the M7 dwarf is older than 600 Myr and more massive than 0.06 M⊙. We also derive a trigonometric distance of 4.4+0.5-0.4 pc, in agreement with the spectroscopic distance estimate, making 2MASS J154043.42-510135.7 (2M1540) the nearest M7 dwarf to the Sun. This trigonometric distance is somewhat closer than the ~6 pc distance reported by the ALLWISE team, who independently identified this object recently. This discovery represents an increase by 25% in the number of M7-M8 dwarfs already known at distances closer than 8 pc from our Sun. We derive a density of ρ = 1.9 ± 0.9 × 10-3 pc-3 for M7 dwarfs in the 8 pc volume, a value similar to those quoted in the literature. Conclusions: This new ultracool dwarf is among the 50 closest systems to the Sun, demonstrating that our current knowledge of the stellar census within the 5 pc sample remains incomplete. 2M1540 represents a unique opportunity to search for extrasolar planets around ultracool dwarfs due to its proximity and brightness. Based on

  16. 2MASS J22560844+5954299: the newly discovered cataclysmic star with the deepest eclipse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjurkchieva, D.; Khruzina, T.; Dimitrov, D.; Groebel, R.; Ibryamov, S.; Nikolov, G.

    2015-12-01

    Context. The SW Sex stars are assumed to represent a distinguished stage in cataclysmic variable (CV) evolution, making it especially important to study them. Aims: We discovered a new cataclysmic star and carried out prolonged and precise photometric observations, as well as medium-resolution spectral observations. Modelling these data allowed us to determine the physical parameters and to establish its peculiarities. Methods: To obtain a light curve solution we used model whose emission sources are a white dwarf surrounded by an accretion disk with a hot spot, a gaseous stream near the disk's lateral side, and a secondary star filling its Roche lobe. The obtained physical parameters are compared with those of other SW Sex-subtype stars. Results: The newly discovered cataclysmic variable 2MASS J22560844+5954299 shows the deepest eclipse amongst the known nova-like stars. It was reproduced by totally covering a very luminous accretion disk by a red secondary component. The temperature distribution of the disk is flatter than that of steady-state disk. The target is unusual with the combination of a low mass ratio q ~ 1.0 (considerably below the limit q = 1.2 of stable mass transfer of CVs) and an M-star secondary. The intensity of the observed three emission lines, Hα, He 5875, and He 6678, sharply increases around phase 0.0, accompanied by a Doppler jump to the shorter wavelength. The absence of eclipses of the emission lines and their single-peaked profiles means that they originate mainly in a vertically extended hot-spot halo. The emission Hα line reveals S-wave wavelength shifts with semi-amplitude of around 210 km s-1 and phase lag of 0.03. Conclusions: The non-steady-state emission of the luminous accretion disk of 2MASS J22560844+5954299 was attributed to the low viscosity of the disk matter caused by its unusually high temperature. The star shows all spectral properties of an SW Sex variable apart from the 0.5 central absorption. Based on data collected

  17. Discovery of a Very Young Field L Dwarf, 2MASS J01415823-4633574

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Barman, Travis S.; Burgasser, Adam J.; McGovern, Mark R.; McLean, Ian S.; Tinney, Christopher G.; Lowrance, Patrick J.

    2006-03-01

    While following up L dwarf candidates selected photometrically from the Two Micron All Sky Survey, we uncovered an unusual object designated 2MASS J01415823-4633574. Its optical spectrum exhibits very strong bands of vanadium oxide but abnormally weak absorptions by titanium oxide, potassium, and sodium. Morphologically, such spectroscopic characteristics fall intermediate between old field early-L dwarfs [log(g)~5] and very late M giants [log(g)~0], leading us to favor low gravity as the explanation for the unique spectral signatures of this L dwarf. Such a low gravity can be explained only if this L dwarf is much lower in mass than a typical old field L dwarf of similar temperature and is still contracting to its final radius. These conditions imply a very young age. Further evidence of youth is found in the near-infrared spectrum, including a triangular-shaped H-band continuum, reminiscent of young brown dwarf candidates discovered in the Orion Nebula Cluster. Using the above information along with comparisons to brown dwarf atmospheric and interior models, our current best estimate is that this L dwarf has an age of 1-50 Myr and a mass of 6-25MJ. Although the lack of a lithium detection (pseudo-equivalent width <1 Å) might appear to contradict other evidence of youth, we suggest that lithium becomes weaker at lower gravity like all other alkali lines and thus needs to be carefully considered before being used as a diagnostic of age or mass for objects in this regime. The location of 2MASS 0141-4633 on the sky coupled with a distance estimate of ~35 pc and the above age estimate suggests that this object may be a brown dwarf member of either the 30 Myr old Tucana/Horologium association or the ~12 Myr old β Pic moving group. Distance as determined through trigonometric parallax (underway) and a measure of the total space motion are needed to test this hypothesis. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as

  18. THE IMPACT OF CONTAMINATED RR LYRAE/GLOBULAR CLUSTER PHOTOMETRY ON THE DISTANCE SCALE

    SciTech Connect

    Majaess, D.; Turner, D.; Lane, D.; Gieren, W.

    2012-06-10

    RR Lyrae variables and the stellar constituents of globular clusters are employed to establish the cosmic distance scale and age of the universe. However, photometry for RR Lyrae variables in the globular clusters M3, M15, M54, M92, NGC 2419, and NGC 6441 exhibit a dependence on the clustercentric distance. For example, variables and stars positioned near the crowded high-surface brightness cores of the clusters may suffer from photometric contamination, which invariably affects a suite of inferred parameters (e.g., distance, color excess, absolute magnitude, etc.). The impetus for this study is to mitigate the propagation of systematic uncertainties by increasing awareness of the pernicious impact of contaminated and radial-dependent photometry.

  19. Stellar photometry including saturated images: Results on M67 with WFPC2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilliland, Ronald L.

    1994-01-01

    The Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) on Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is providing unsurpassed imaging capabilities and supporting accurate stellar photometry over large fields of view at high angular resolution. I discuss a feature of the WFPC2 CCD systems that nominally limits the dynamic range attainable with single exposures: a 12 bit analog to digital converter that does not allow sampling of the CCD full-well depth even at the low gain (14e(sup -)/DN) setting. I demonstrate that accurate stellar photometry can be performed on stellar images that are strongly saturated. Two 40 s exposures in V and I bands on the old open cluster M67 are analyzed to demonstrate photometric capabilities with a dynamic range of over 12 mag from single exposures. New photometric results for both bright and faint objects in M67 are derived from the WFPC2 data.

  20. WISE data and sparse photometry used for shape reconstruction of asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ďurech, Josef; Hanuš, Josef; Alí-Lagoa, Victor M.; Delbo, Marco; Oszkiewicz, Dagmara A.

    2016-01-01

    Asteroid disk-integrated sparse-in-time photometry can be used for determination of shapes and spin states of asteroids by the lightcurve inversion method. To clearly distinguish the correct solution of the rotation period from other minima in the parameter space, data with good photometric accuracy are needed. We show that if the low-quality sparse photometry obtained from ground-based astrometric surveys is combined with data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) satellite, the correct rotation period can be successfully derived. Although WISE observed in mid-IR wavelengths, we show that for the period and spin determination, these data can be modelled as reflected light. The absolute fluxes are not required since only relative variation of the flux over the rotation is sufficient to determine the period. We also discuss the potential of combining all WISE data with the Lowell photometric database to create physical models of thousands of asteroids.

  1. Combining Photometry from Kepler and TESS to Improve Short-period Exoplanet Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Placek, Ben; Knuth, Kevin H.; Angerhausen, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    Planets emit thermal radiation and reflect incident light that they receive from their host stars. As a planet orbits its host star the photometric variations associated with these two effects produce very similar phase curves. If observed through only a single bandpass, this leads to a degeneracy between certain planetary parameters that hinder the precise characterization of such planets. However, observing the same planet through two different bandpasses gives much more information about the planet. Here we develop a Bayesian methodology for combining photometry from both Kepler and the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite. In addition, we demonstrate via simulations that one can disentangle the reflected and thermally emitted light from the atmosphere of a hot-Jupiter as well as more precisely constrain both the geometric albedo and day-side temperature of the planet. This methodology can further be employed using various combinations of photometry from the James Webb Space Telescope, the Characterizing ExOplanet Satellite, or the PLATO mission.

  2. The photometric properties of brightest cluster galaxies. II - SIT and CCD surface photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoessel, J. G.

    1980-01-01

    Surface photometry of the first-ranked galaxy in 108 Abell clusters is presented. Galaxy structure, as parameterized by simple Hubble law models, is found to correlate with galaxy absolute magnitude and cluster structure. All the structure data support the dynamical friction evolution model. Twenty-eight percent of the galaxies have multiple component nuclei; the short lifetimes of such systems provide the best available evidence that ongoing evolution actually occurs. Average magnitude and structure evolution rates are derived from the data.

  3. Recent Ground-Based Photometry Compared with Space-Based TSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, G. A.; Cookson, A.; Preminger, D.

    2010-12-01

    Solar activity continues at low levels with occasional modest increases. We will compare indices from ground-based photometry with variations in Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) from SORCE/TIM as well as other space-based instruments. During the solar minimum of 2008-2009 regressions of solar indices with SORCE/TIM gave a quiet sun TSI of 1360.62 +/- 0.04 W/m^2. This work has been partly supported by NSF grant ATM-0848518.

  4. Photometry-based estimation of the total number of stars in the Universe.

    PubMed

    Manojlović, Lazo M

    2015-07-20

    A novel photometry-based estimation of the total number of stars in the Universe is presented. The estimation method is based on the energy conservation law and actual measurements of the extragalactic background light levels. By assuming that every radiated photon is kept within the Universe volume, i.e., by approximating the Universe as an integrating cavity without losses, the total number of stars in the Universe of about 6×1022 has been obtained. PMID:26367847

  5. RESOLVE Survey Photometry and Volume-limited Calibration of the Photometric Gas Fractions Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckert, Kathleen D.; Kannappan, Sheila J.; Stark, David V.; Moffett, Amanda J.; Norris, Mark A.; Snyder, Elaine M.; Hoversten, Erik A.

    2015-09-01

    We present custom-processed ultraviolet, optical, and near-infrared photometry for the REsolved Spectroscopy of a Local VolumE (RESOLVE) survey, a volume-limited census of stellar, gas, and dynamical mass within two subvolumes of the nearby universe (RESOLVE-A and RESOLVE-B). RESOLVE is complete down to baryonic mass ˜ {10}9.1-9.3 {M}⊙ , probing the upper end of the dwarf galaxy regime. In contrast to standard pipeline photometry (e.g., SDSS), our photometry uses optimal background subtraction, avoids suppressing color gradients, and employs multiple flux extrapolation routines to estimate systematic errors. With these improvements, we measure brighter magnitudes, larger radii, bluer colors, and a real increase in scatter around the red sequence. Combining stellar mass estimates based on our optimized photometry with the nearly complete H i mass census for RESOLVE-A, we create new z = 0 volume-limited calibrations of the photometric gas fractions (PGF) technique, which predicts gas-to-stellar mass ratios (G/S) from galaxy colors and optional additional parameters. We analyze G/S-color residuals versus potential third parameters, finding that axial ratio is the best independent and physically meaningful third parameter. We define a “modified color” from planar fits to G/S as a function of both color and axial ratio. In the complete galaxy population, upper limits on G/S bias linear and planar fits. We therefore model the entire PGF probability density field, enabling iterative statistical modeling of upper limits and prediction of full G/S probability distributions for individual galaxies. These distributions have two-component structure in the red color regime. Finally, we use the RESOLVE-B 21 cm census to test several PGF calibrations, finding that most systematically under- or overestimate gas masses, but the full probability density method performs well.

  6. Multi-band Differential Photometry of the Eclipsing Variable Star NSVS 5750160

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrington, R. C.; Tuhey, E. M.

    2014-12-01

    We present new multi-band differential aperture photometry of the eclipsing variable star NSVS 5750160. The light curves are analyzed with the Wilson-Devinney model to determine best-fit stellar models. Our models show that NSVS 5750160 is consistent with a W-type W Ursae Majoris eclipsing variable star, and require the presence of a spot to fit the observed O’Connell effect. Two different spot models are presented but neither model is conclusive.

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Segue 3 VI photometry (Ortolani+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortolani, S.; Bica, E.; Barbuy, B.

    2015-01-01

    Johnson-Cousins V and I images were obtained at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG), equipped with the spectrograph/focal reducer DOLORES, with a 2000x2000-pixels of 8.5x8.5-arcmin2 CCD giving 0.25arcsec/pix, during the night of 2011 June 26-27. Additional B, V and I photometry was obtained, with the same equipment, in the night of 2012 June 17-18. (2 data files).

  8. Documentation for the machine-readable version of the thirteen color photometry of 1380 bright stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, W. H., Jr.; Roman, N. G.

    1981-01-01

    The magnetic tape version of the catalogue of thirteen-color photometry of 1380 bright stars, containing data on the 13 color medium narrow band photometric system is described. Observations of essentially all stars brighter than fifth visual magnitude north of delta = -20 deg and brighter than fourth visual magnitude south of delta = -20 deg are included. It is intended to enable users to read and process the tape without the common difficulties and uncertainties.

  9. BVRI CCD photometry of the metal-poor globular cluster M68 (NGC 4590)

    SciTech Connect

    Alcaino, G.; Liller, W.; Alvarado, F.; Wenderoth, E. )

    1990-06-01

    BVRI photometry of the low metallicity globular cluster M68 (NGC 4590) was obtained with a CCD camera and the 2.2-m ESO telescope. The resulting BV color-magnitude diagrams are compared with the observations of McClure et al. (1987). The observations are also compared with theoretical isochrones, yielding a cluster age of 13 Gyr with a likely external uncertainty of 2 or 3 Gyr. 25 refs.

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: VEGAS-SSS photometry of NGC3115 (Cantiello+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantiello, M.; Capaccioli, M.; Napolitano, N.; Grado, A.; Limatola, L.; Paolillo, M.; Iodice, E.; Romanowsky, A. J.; Forbes, D. A.; Raimondo, G.; Spavone, M.; La Barbera, F.; Puzia, T. H.; Schipani, P.

    2015-03-01

    We present g and i band photometry for ~47000 extended and point-like objects in the ~0.8 square degree area centred on NGC3115. For ~30000 object in the catalogue, structural parameters are also available. For each object equatorial coordinates, galactocentric distance from the photometric center of NGC3115, magnitudes in g and i bands (SDSS calibrated), colour, local extinction and sctructural parameters. (1 data file).

  11. Photometry with Multi-anode Microchannel Arrays (mamas) and Charge Injection Devices (cids)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timothy, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    The characteristics of two kinds of detectors are summarized with emphasis on those aspects that would affect their use in high accuracy astronomical photometry. The first type, the multianode microchannel arrays (MAMA), are a family of pulse counting array detectors. Components and operation principles are reviewed and quantum efficiency, noise characteristics, and dynamic range characteristics are described. The second type, charge injection devices (CID), are discussed in reference to their applicability to photometric detection at optical wavelengths.

  12. ASPIN: Research project on near-Earth asteroid photometry in frame of the ISON optical network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molotov, Igor; Inasaridze, Raguli; Elenin, Leonid; Krugly, Yurij; Rumyantsev, Vasilij; Namkhai, Tungalag; Schmalz, Sergei; Tsogt-Ochir, Shijirbayar

    International Scientific Optical Network (ISON) represents one of largest systems specializing in observation of space objects. The main goal of project is observations of space debris. As an additional task the regular photometry of near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) is carried out using the network’s telescopes with apertures from 0.4 m up to 2.6 m (ASPIN project - Asteroid Search and Photometry Initiative). The photometry is aimed at getting lightcurves of asteroids for solving different tasks concerning with physical properties of these celestial bodies. The lightcurves have been obtained with a typical photometric accuracy of 0.01-0.03 mag. The main purpose of the observations is to study characteristics of asteroids such as rotation period, size and shape of the body, surface composition and other. It is expected to detect an influence of the YORP effect. Special attention is paid to the detection of binary asteroids. During 2013 the photometric observations have been carried out at 12 observatories during more than 250 nights which have been allowed to obtain the data on 40 NEAs as well as 15 main-belt asteroids. In result the rotation periods have been determined for 8 NEAs in the first time and refined for 10 NEAs. Two binary systems were discovered. Lightcurves of 11 main-belt asteroids with diameters less than 10 km (binary systems or members of small clusters) were obtained. Several of the observed asteroids were radar targets - between them the NEA (367943) Duende (or 2012 DA14), which was approached to the Earth in day of falling the Chelyabinsk meteor on February 23, 2013. The obtained results will be presented and perspectives of NEA photometry with ISON telescopes will be discussed.

  13. Erratum: High-Precision Photometry of Extreme Kbo 2003 EL61" (2008, AJ, 135, 1749)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacerda, Pedro; Jewitt, David; Peixinho, Nuno

    2008-10-01

    We report an error in Table 3 of the original paper: the UT and Julian dates, Columns 1 and 2, and the photometry, Column 3, are misaligned below row 153. The corrected version of Table 3 is presented herein. These corrections are only typographical in nature, and none of the results or conclusions of the paper are affected. We acknowledge Daniel C. Fabrycky for detecting this error.

  14. The physiological basis of heterochromatic flicker photometry demonstrated in the ganglion cells of the macaque retina.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, B B; Martin, P R; Valberg, A

    1988-01-01

    1. Heterochromatic flicker photometry is a way of measuring the spectral sensitivity of the human eye. Two lights of different colour are sinusoidally alternated at, typically, 10-20 Hz, and their relative intensities adjusted by the observer until the sensation of flicker is minimized. This technique has been used to define the human photopic luminosity, or V lambda, function on which photometry is based. 2. We have studied the responses of macaque retinal ganglion cells using this stimulus paradigm. The responses of the phasic ganglion cells go through a minimum at relative radiances very similar to that predicted from the V lambda function. At this point, defined as equal luminance, an abrupt change in response phase was observed. A small residual response at twice the flicker frequency was apparent under some conditions. 3. The spectral sensitivity of parafoveal phasic cells measured in this way corresponded very closely to that of human observers minimizing flicker on the same apparatus. 4. Minima in phasic cell activity were independent of flicker frequency, as is the case in the psychophysical task. 5. The response minima of phasic cells obey the laws of additivity and transitivity which are important characteristics of heterochromatic flicker photometry. 6. As the relative intensities of the lights were altered responses of tonic, spectrally opponent cells usually underwent a gradual phase change with vigorous responses at equal luminance. The responses of tonic cells treated individually or as a population could not be related to the V lambda function in any meaningful way. 7. We conclude that the phasic, magnocellular cell system of the primate visual pathway underlies performance in the psychophysical task of heterochromatic flicker photometry. It is likely that other tasks in which spectral sensitivity conforms to the V lambda function also rely on this cell system. PMID:3253435

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: UBVRIJHK photometry in NGC1624 (Jose+, 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jose, J.; Pandey, A. K.; Ogura, K.; Ojha, D. K.; Bhatt, B. C.; Samal, M. R.; Chauhan, N.; Sahu, D. K.; Rawat, P. S.

    2011-10-01

    The CCD UBVRI observations of NGC 1624 were carried out using Hanle Faint Object Spectrograph and Camera (HFOSC) of the 2-m Himalayan Chandra Telescope (HCT) of Indian Astronomical Observatory (IAO), Hanle, India on 2004 November 3. We repeated the observations of NGC 1624 in V and Ic filters to get a deeper photometry on 2006 December 12 using the 104-cm Sampurnanand Telescope (ST) of Aryabhatta Research Institute of observational sciencES (ARIES), Naini Tal, India. (1 data file).

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: VRIJHK photometry of 3C 279 (Sandrinelli+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandrinelli, A.; Covino, S.; Dotti, M.; Treves, A.

    2016-07-01

    The starting point of the present investigation is the VRIJHK photometric observations obtained with the robotic Rapid Eye Mounting telescope (REM) at La Silla, which are described in detail in Sandrinelli et al. 2014 (cat. J/A+A/562/A79). We add to the data available in the above mentioned paper the REM photometry of 3C 279 (see Table2), which is unpublished thus far. (2 data files).

  17. Assessment of the SFH retrieved from u'g'r'i'z' photometry using DynBaS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejía, A. J.; Magris, G.

    2014-10-01

    We present a progress on the evaluation of uncertainties and biases on the determination of the stellar mass, mean stellar age and dust extinction retrieved from broadband (rest-frame) u'g'r'i'z' photometry using a non-parametric SED fitting method named DynBaS (Magris et al. in prep.). We show that the so called template mismatch, can be successfully avoided, providing better recovery even if only optical broadband photometry is fitted.

  18. Variability in the 2MASS calibration fields: a search for transient obscuration events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quillen, Alice C.; Ciocca, Marco; Carlin, Jeffrey L.; Bell, Cameron P. M.; Meng, Zeyang

    2014-07-01

    We searched the light curves of over 40 000 stars in the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) calibration data base, spanning approximately 4 yr, for objects that have significant day-long dimming events. We also searched the multi-colour light curves for red-dimming events that could be due to transient extinction. In the colour-independent sigma-limited search, we found 46 previously unrecognized eclipsing binaries, 6 previously unrecognized periodic variable stars likely to be intrinsic pulsators and 21 young stellar objects in the ρ Ophiuchus star formation region previously studied by Parks et al. An additional 11 objects exhibited dimming events, and most of these are unclassified. The search for red-dimming events primarily reveals a population of low-luminosity active galaxies that become bluer when they are brighter, and variable young stellar objects exhibiting high cross-correlation coefficients between colour and brightness. The young stellar objects primarily exhibit brightness and colour variations in the direction of interstellar extinction whereas the active galaxies can have a bowed distribution in colour and magnitude with reduced variation in colour when the object is brightest. Among the objects that are usually quiescent (not strongly variable), we failed to find any dimming events deeper than 0.2 mag and lasting longer than a day. Two of the young stellar objects, however, dimmed by 0.2 mag for longer than a day without strong colour variation.

  19. Long Period Variables in the LMC: Results from MACHO and 2Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, O J; Cook, K H; Keller, S C; Hawley, S L

    2004-07-19

    We use the eight year light curve database from the MACHO (MAssive Compact Halo Objects) project together with infrared colors and magnitudes from 2MASS (the Two Micron All Sky Survey) to identify a sample of 22,000 long period variables in the Large Magellanic Cloud (referred to hereafter as LMC LPVs). A period luminosity diagram of these stars reveals six well defined sequences, in substantial agreement with previous analyses of samples from OGLE (Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment). In our analysis we identify analogues to galactic LPVs in the LMC LPV sample. We find that carbon dominated AGB stars populate only two of the sequences, one of which includes the Mira variables. The high luminosity end of the same two sequences are also the location of the only stars with J K{sub s} > 2, indicating that they are enshrouded in dust. The unknown mechanism that produces the variability of the last sequence--those stars with long secondary periods--produces different morphology in the period luminosity diagram than what is seen in the first four sequences, which are thought to be caused by pulsation. In particular, the last sequence extends to lower luminosity RGB stars and the luminosity function does not peak among the AGB stars. We point out several features which will constrain new models of the period luminosity sequences.

  20. Very low-mass stars and brown dwarfs from 2MASS and DENIS.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chester, T.

    2MASS (Two Micron All Sky Survey) and DENIS (DEep Near-Infrared survey of the Southern sky) will provide a sample of very low mass stars that is complete to a distance of 50 pc, even for the latest M star currently known. This compares with the current completeness out to 5 - 10 pc. This sample will contain 1,000 to 10,000 times more M stars than currently cataloged. This catalog will be free from proper motion selection effects and will not be limited by the completeness of optical magnitude studies. Evidence from several square degrees of proto-camera data processed and examined to date, shows that roughly 1 source is found in every square degree that has no counterpart on a POSS I plate. The first of these sources was found to be a binary system with component stars of roughly equal brightness having an M6 - M7 combined spectrum. The author discusses the effectiveness of these surveys for detecting brown dwarfs.

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: BVI photometry of NGC 2547 (Naylor+, 2002)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naylor, T.; Totten, E. J.; Jeffries, R. D.; Pozzo, M.; Devey, C. R.; Thompson, S. A.

    2002-11-01

    The catalogues have been created using the optimal photometry algorithm described in Naylor (1998MNRAS.296..339N) and Naylor et al. (2002MNRAS.335..291N, this paper). Further information is also available from Tim Naylor's optimal photometry page ( http://www.astro.ex.ac.uk/people/timn/Photometry/description.html ). The catalogues are primarily in what is called cluster format, though there are occasional variations where they are needed. There is a deep survey (Table 3), a shallower, but wider area survey (Table 4), and the combination of these (Table 5). Extracted from the deep catalogue are tables of members of the cluster derived using either the D'Antona & Mazzitelli (1997MmSAI..68..807D) isochrones (Table 6). or the Siess (2000A&A...358..593S) isochrones (Table 7). These catalogues are the result of a collaboration between teams within the Exeter Astrophysics Group led by Tim Naylor, and the Keele Astrophysics Group led by Rob Jeffries. The contributors to the currently available catalogues are Tina Devey, Monica Pozzo (now at Imperial), Simon Thompson and Ed Totten. (6 data files).

  2. Detecting Bias in a Self-Organizing Map of Galaxy Photometry Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claytor, Zachary R.

    2016-01-01

    High redshift (very distant) galaxy surveys record broad-band photometry for billions of galaxies in order to measure distances in a faster, more cost-effective way than spectroscopy. Knowing these distances (more specifically, the redshifts) helps cosmologists learn more about the early universe and how it evolved, but calibrating the redshifts from photometry requires a color-selection technique. One such technique is the Self-Organizing Map (SOM), a machine-learning algorithm that projects high-dimensional photometry data onto a visual, two-dimensional map. High-redshift galaxies can be identified efficiently in such a mapping. However, there is a chance that high-redshift galaxies are lost to low-redshift regions and vice versa due to photometric error; this effect was analyzed. A Monte Carlo simulation was run on objects selected from along the boundary between high- and low-redshift regions. Roughly 18% of selected objects scattered from high- to low-redshift, and about 16% scattered the other way. Further research will design a better metric of the scattering percentages based on the number density of galaxies in the map, and future work should use these analysis techniques on other high-redshift data.

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Westerlund 2 UBVIc photometry (Hur+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hur, H.; Park, B.-G.; Sung, H.; Bessell, M. S.; Lim, B.; Chun, M.-Y.; Sohn, S. T.

    2015-06-01

    Deep UBVIC observations were obtained on 2009 March 28 and 2 the 8kx8k Mosaic II CCD camera (0.268arcsec/pix) of the 4m Blanco telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO). We used the SDSS u filter for U-band photometry and the Harris BVI filter set for BVIC photometry. The exposure times were 7 and 150s in I, 10 and 300s in V, 20 and 300s in B, and 100 and 1200 s in u. The average seeing was ~0.9-arcsec. For the photometry of bright stars and for the standardization of U-B, we performed additional observations with the Y4KCam CCD camera and UBVIC filter set of the 1m telescope at CTIO on 2011 March 5. The exposure times were 5 and 180s in I, 5 and 180s in V, 10 and 300s in B, and 30 and 600s in U. (2 data files).

  4. A SEARCH FOR THE TRANSIT OF HD 168443b: IMPROVED ORBITAL PARAMETERS AND PHOTOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Pilyavsky, Genady; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Wright, Jason T.; Wang, Xuesong X.; Kane, Stephen R.; Ciardi, David R.; Dragomir, Diana; Von Braun, Kaspar; Howard, Andrew W.; De Pree, Chris; Marlowe, Hannah; Fischer, Debra; Henry, Gregory W.; Jensen, Eric L. N.; Laughlin, Gregory

    2011-12-20

    The discovery of transiting planets around bright stars holds the potential to greatly enhance our understanding of planetary atmospheres. In this work we present the search for transits of HD 168443b, a massive planet orbiting the bright star HD 168443 (V = 6.92) with a period of 58.11 days. The high eccentricity of the planetary orbit (e = 0.53) significantly enhances the a priori transit probability beyond that expected for a circular orbit, making HD 168443 a candidate for our ongoing Transit Ephemeris Refinement and Monitoring Survey. Using additional radial velocities from Keck High Resolution Echelle Spectrometer, we refined the orbital parameters of this multi-planet system and derived a new transit ephemeris for HD 168443b. The reduced uncertainties in the transit window make a photometric transit search practicable. Photometric observations acquired during predicted transit windows were obtained on three nights. Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory 1.0 m photometry acquired on 2010 September 7 had the required precision to detect a transit but fell just outside of our final transit window. Nightly photometry from the T8 0.8 m automated photometric telescope at Fairborn Observatory, acquired over a span of 109 nights, demonstrates that HD 168443 is constant on a timescale of weeks. Higher-cadence photometry on 2011 April 28 and June 25 shows no evidence of a transit. We are able to rule out a non-grazing transit of HD 168443b.

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Spitzer photometry of globulars in 2 galaxies (Spitler+, 2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitler, L. R.; Forbes, D. A.; Beasley, M. A.

    2010-06-01

    Catalogues are described in Spitler et al. (2008MNRAS.389.1150S) All photometry is corrected for Galactic dust extinction and are on the Vega photometric system. NGC 5128 optical photometry is from Peng et al. (2004ApJS..150..367P), as compiled in Woodley et al. (2007AJ....134..494W). Globular cluster identification numbers are from Woodley et al. (2007, Cat. J/AJ/134/494). NGC 4594 optical photometry is from Spitler et al. (2006AJ....132.1593S) updated with new aperture corrections as described in Harris et al. (2010MNRAS.401.1965H). Identification number, globular cluster half-light radii and the assumed distance modulus for the half-light radii are from Spitler et al. (2006, Cat. J/AJ/132/1593). A ultra-compact dwarf galaxy is included in this catalogue with ID="ucd" (see also Hau et al. 2009MNRAS.394L..97H). (2 data files).

  6. Spectral photometry of extreme helium stars: Ultraviolet fluxes and effective temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drilling, J. S.; Schoenberner, D.; Heber, U.; Lynas-Gray, A. E.

    1982-01-01

    Ultraviolet flux distributions are presented for the extremely helium rich stars BD +10 deg 2179, HD 124448, LSS 3378, BD -9 deg 4395, LSE 78, HD 160641, LSIV -1 deg 2, BD 1 deg 3438, HD 168476, MV Sgr, LS IV-14 deg 109 (CD -35 deg 11760), LSII +33 deg 5 and BD +1 deg 4381 (LSIV +2 deg 13) obtained with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE). Broad band photometry and a newly computed grid of line blanketed model atmospheres were used to determine accurate angular diameters and total stellar fluxes. The resultant effective temperatures are in most cases in satisfactory agreement with those based on broad band photometry and/or high resolution spectroscopy in the visible. For two objects, LSII +33 deg 5 and LSE 78, disagreement was found between the IUE observations and broadband photometry: the colors predict temperatures around 20,000 K, whereas the UV spectra indicate much lower photospheric temperatures of 14,000 to 15,000 K. The new temperature scale for extreme helium stars extends to lower effective temperatures than that of Heber and Schoenberner (1981) and covers the range from 8,500 K to 32,000 K.

  7. New 1982-1990 photometry of Lambda Andromedae and its 11-year cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Douglas S.; Henry, Gregory W.; Boehme, Dietmar; Brooks, Peter A.; Chang, Sandy; Dolzan, Ales; Fortier, George L.; Fried, Robert E.; Genet, Russell M.; Grim, Bruce S.

    1991-01-01

    The paper presents photoelectric photometry of Lambda And never before published, obtained between February 1982 and December 1990 at 29 different observatories. Then it is combined with all other photometry available (previously published, contained in the I.A.U. Commission 27 Archives, and obtained with the Vanderbilt 16-inch automatic telescope but not yet published), to yield a 14.8-year data base. Analysis reveals a long-term cycle in mean brightness, with a full range of 0.15 m and a period of 11.4 +/- 0.4 years. Because most of the new photometry was concentrated in the 1983-1984 observing season, this one well-defined light curve is analyzed with a two-spot model. Spot A keeps a 0.04 m amplitude throughout four rotation cycles whereas the amplitude of spot B diminishes from 0.09 m down almost to 0.03 m. The spot rotation periods were 55.9 d +/- 0.6 d and 52.8 d +/- 1.0 d, respectively.

  8. Photometric monitoring of eta Carinae, and the general problem of accurate photometry of S Dor variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterken, C.; Freyhammer, L. M.; Arentoft, T.; van Genderen, A. M.

    2001-06-01

    We review the particular problems of ground-based photometry of the composite object eta Carinae for which high-precision long-term photometric monitoring is so hard to accomplish. eta Car, by its appearance as an ultrabright extended object, by its anomalous spectral nature, and by its most outspoken variability, is the single most difficult stellar object to measure photometrically and to monitor over a long time interval. The problems belong to several levels: very limited availability of an astrophysically appropriate photometric system, the presence of strong (and variable) emission lines, the need for a telescope with a suitable f-ratio, and the steadily diminishing possibilities to collect data over a long period of time. We demonstrate that the transformation from our y measurements to V is valid for many stars, but not for eta Car nor for some less peculiar objects. Even pure Johnson V data can not be guaranteed to be accurately tied to the E-region standard stars. The'underestimated' V-magnitude of eta Car based on y-filter photometry is not to be considered a suspicious characteristic of our intermediate-band photometry, but is an inherent element of the photometric approach of discussing V magnitudes on the basis of data obtained with a Stromgren y filter. Aperture corrections of a single isolated measurement remain prone to random errors of the order of 0.005-0.015 mag.

  9. Spectroscopy and Strömgren Photometry in the Young Open Cluster NGC 2169

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yost, C. C.; Gray, R. O.; Murdick, L.; Robinson, P.

    2000-12-01

    NGC 2169 is a young (1.5 x 107 yr) open cluster in Orion with no associated nebulosity. As part of our program of searching for peculiar stars in open clusters, we have obtained classification--resolution (1.8Å/2 pixels) spectra for 23 stars, low--resolution (20Å/2 pixels) spectra for an additional 9 stars, and Strömgren uvby photometry for 40 stars in the field of NGC 2169 down to V ~ 15.5. The observations were made on the 0.8 meter telescope of Appalachian State University's Dark Sky Observatory. NGC 2169 appears to have very few members later than spectral type A3. However, the Strömgren photometry yields 5 new candidate members of NGC 2169, plus a population of possible but not probable pre--main--sequence stars. The spectroscopy shows that most stars in NGC 2169 are normal, except for two helium--weak B--type stars, and a mild Silicon Bp star. More spectroscopy and photometry is planned in the field. This project has been partially funded by a small AAS Grant, plus an Undergraduate Research Scholarship from the Graduate School of Appalachian State University to C.C. Yost. We would also like to acknowledge a grant from the Fund for Astrophysical Research.

  10. Spitzer Mid-Infrared Photometry of 500 - 750 K Brown Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leggett, S. K.; Albert, L.; Artigau, E.; Burningham, B.; Delfosse, X.; Delorme, P.; Forveille, T.; Lucas, P. W.; Marley, M. S.; Pinfield, D. J.; Reylé, C.; Saumon, D.; Smart, R. L.; Warren, S. J.

    2011-12-01

    Mid-infrared data, including Spitzer warm-IRAC [3.6] and [4.5] photometry, is critical for understanding the cold population of brown dwarfs now being found, objects which have more in common with planets than stars. As effective temperature (Teff) drops from 800 K to 400 K, the fraction of flux emitted beyond 3μm increases rapidly, from about 40% to >75%. This rapid increase makes a color like H-[4.5] a very sensitive temperature indicator, and it can be combined with a gravity- and metallicity-sensitive color like H-K to constrain all three of these fundamental properties, which in turn gives us mass and age for these slowly cooling objects. Determination of mid-infrared color trends also allows better exploitation of the WISE mission by the community. We use new Spitzer Cycle 6 IRAC photometry, together with published data, to present trends of color with type for L0 to T10 dwarfs. We also use the atmospheric and evolutionary models of Saumon & Marley to investigate the masses and ages of 13 very late-type T dwarfs, which have H-[4.5]>3.2 and Teff ≍500 K to 750 K. Note: This is an updated version of Leggett et al. (2010a); a photometry compilation is available at www.gemini.edu/staff/sleggett.

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Deep VI photometry of Sgr dIrr (Beccari+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beccari, G.; Bellazzini, M.; Fraternali, F.; Battaglia, G.; Perina, S.; Sollima, A.; Oosterloo, T. A.; Testa, V.; Galleti, S.

    2014-10-01

    Photometric catalogue of the dwarf irregular galaxy Sagittarius. The catalogue is obtained from deep V and I band wide field photometry from VIMOS at VLT. Only sources having at least six independent magnitude estimates per filter were included in this catalogue. The average and the standard error of the mean of the independent measures obtained from the different images were adopted as the final values of the instrumental magnitude and of the uncertainty on the relative photometry. The instrumental v and i magnitudes were transformed into the Johnson-Kron-Cousins V,I photometric system using more than 70 bright stars (V<22.5) in common with the publicly available HST Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) photometry by Holtzman et al. (2006ApJS..166..534H). The instrumental coordinates were transformed into J2000 Equatorial coordinates with 2nd degree polynomials, using more than 1000 stars in common with the GSC2.2 catalog. Please see Section 2.2 for details. (1 data file).

  12. Synthetic photometry for carbon-rich giants. II. The effects of pulsation and circumstellar dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowotny, W.; Aringer, B.; Höfner, S.; Lederer, M. T.

    2011-05-01

    Context. Red giant stars approaching the end of the evolutionary phase of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) are, inter alia, characterised by (i) pulsations of the stellar interiors; and (ii) the development of dusty stellar winds. Therefore, such very evolved objects cannot be adequately described with hydrostatic dust-free model atmospheres. Aims: By using self-consistent dynamic model atmospheres which simulate pulsation-enhanced dust-driven winds we studied in detail the influence of the above mentioned two effects on the spectral appearance of long period variables with carbon-rich atmospheric chemistry. While the pulsations lead to large-amplitude photometric variability, the dusty envelopes (resulting from the outflows which contain dust particles composed of amorphous carbon) cause pronounced circumstellar reddening. Methods: Based on one selected dynamical model which is representative of C-type Mira variables with intermediate mass loss rates, we calculated synthetic spectra and photometry for standard broad-band filters (Johnson-Cousins-Glass system) from the visual to the near-infrared. The synthetic photometry was subsequently compared with observational results. Results: Our modelling allows to investigate in detail the substantial effect of circumstellar dust on the resultant photometry. The pronounced absorption of amorphous carbon dust grains (increasing towards shorter wavelengths; Qabs/a ∝ λ - β with β ≈ 1), leads to colour indices which are significantly redder than the corresponding ones based on hydrostatic dust-free models. Only if we account for this circumstellar reddening we get synthetic colours that are comparable to observations of evolved AGB stars. The photometric variations of the dynamical model were compared to observed lightcurves of the C-type Mira RU Vir which appears to be quite similar to the model (although the model is not a dedicated fit). We found good agreement concerning the principal behaviour of the BVRIJHKL

  13. A Recalibration of Optical Photometry: Tycho-2, Strömgren, and Johnson Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maíz Apellániz, J.

    2006-02-01

    I use high-quality Hubble Space Telescope (HST) spectrophotometry to analyze the calibration of three popular optical photometry systems: Tycho-2 BT and VT, Strömgren uvby, and Johnson UBV. For Tycho-2, I revisit the analysis of an earlier paper to include the new recalibration of grating/aperture corrections, vignetting, and charge transfer inefficiency effects produced by the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph group and to consider the consequences of both random and systematic uncertainties. The new results reaffirm the good quality of both the Tycho-2 photometry and the HST spectrophotometry but yield a slightly different value for ZPBT-VT of 0.033+/-0.001 (random) +/-0.005 (systematic) mag. For the Strömgren v, b, and y filters I find that the published sensitivity curves are consistent with the available photometry and spectrophotometry, and I derive new values for the associated ZPb-y and ZPm1. The same conclusion is drawn for the Johnson B and V filters and the associated ZPB-V. The situation is different for the Strömgren u and the Johnson U filters. There I find that the published sensitivity curves yield results that are inconsistent with the available photometry and spectrophotometry, likely caused by an incorrect treatment of atmospheric effects on the short-wavelength end. I reanalyze the data to produce new average sensitivity curves for those two filters and new values for ZPc1 and ZPU-B. The new computation of synthetic U-B and B-V colors uses a single B sensitivity curve, which eliminates the previous unphysical existence of different definitions for each color. Finally, I find that if one uses values from the literature for which uncertainties are not given, reasonable estimates for these are 1%-2% for Strömgren b-y, m1, and c1 and 2%-3% for Johnson B-V and U-B. The use of the results in this paper should lead to a significant reduction of systematic errors when comparing synthetic photometry models with real colors and indices.

  14. Our Southern Neighbors - 2000 Nearby Red Dwarf Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winters, Jennifer G.; Hosey, A. D.; Lurie, J. C.; Hambly, N.; Henry, T. J.; Jao, W.; Riedel, A. R.; Subasavage, J.

    2013-01-01

    Distance determinations to nearby objects are vitally important, as our solar neighbors set the standards for the primary rung in the cosmic distance ladder. The optimal tool for accomplishing this seemingly simple task is trigonometric parallax. Measuring parallaxes is very time-intensive, however. Photometric distance estimates can be useful in deciding which are the best targets for the limited slots available in traditional parallax programs. Photometry also reveals stars that do not fall neatly onto the main sequence, such as young stars, unresolved multiples, and subdwarfs, once an accurate trigonometric parallax has been measured. We present photometry and distances for more than 2000 southern M dwarf systems thought to be near the Sun, broken into three distinct samples. The first includes ~500 systems with accurate trigonometric parallaxes placing them within 25 pc --- ~150 have been published as a result of the RECONS astrometry program at the CTIO 0.9m telescope, which we now operate for NOAO. For an additional ~700 systems, we use VRI measurements from our photometry program (also at the 0.9m) with 2MASS JHK photometry to estimate distances accurate to 15%. Roughly one third of these systems are on our parallax program. The third sample includes ~1000 more systems for which plate BRI photometry from SuperCOSMOS is combined with JHK to provide distances accurate to 26%. Together, these three sets of stars comprise a list of ~2100 red dwarf systems within 25 pc in the southern sky. These stars are crucial to our understanding of the stellar luminosity and mass functions in the Milky Way and beyond, and provide ideal targets for planets searches using a variety of techniques. This effort is supported by the NSF through grants AST-0908402 and AST-1109445, and via observations made possible by the SMARTS Consortium.

  15. Long Period Variables in the Magellanic Clouds: OGLE + 2 MASS + DENIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groenewegen, M. A. T.

    2004-10-01

    The 68 000 I-band light curves of variable stars detected by the OGLE survey in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (MCs) are fitted by Fourier series, and also correlated with the DENIS and 2MASS all-sky release databases and with lists of spectroscopically confirmed M-, S- and C-stars. Lightcurves and the results of the lightcurve fitting (periods and amplitudes) and DENIS and 2MASS magnitudes are presented for 2277 M-, S-, C-stars in the MCs. The following aspects are discussed: the K-band period-luminosity relations for the spectroscopically confirmed AGB stars, period changes over a timespan of about 17 years in a subset of about 400 LPVs, and candidate obscured AGB stars. The use of a sample of spectroscopically confirmed variables shows specifically that almost all carbon stars are brighter than the tip of the RGB, and occupy sequences A+, B+, C and D. It is shown (for the LMC where there is a sufficient number of spectroscopically identified M-stars) that for sequences A+, B+, C the M-stars are on average fainter than the C-stars, as expected from an evolutionary point of view and previously observed in MC clusters. However, this is not so for sequence ``D'', suggesting that the origin of the so-called Long Secondary Periods is not related to an evolutionary effect. The fraction of objects that has a period in sequence ``D'' is also independent of chemical type. Three stars are identified that have been classified as oxygen-rich in the 1970s and carbon-rich in 1990s. Possibly they underwent a thermal pulse in the last 20 years, and dredged-up enough carbon to switch spectral type. The observations over almost two decades seem to suggest that up to 10% of AGB variables changed pulsation mode over that time span. More robust estimates will come from the ongoing and future (microlensing) photometric surveys. A sample of 570 variable red objects ((J-K) > 2.0 or (I-K) > 4.0) is presented in which most stars are expected to be dust-obscured AGB stars. Estimates

  16. Variable stars in the VVV globular clusters. I. 2MASS-GC 02 and Terzan 10

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso-García, Javier; Dékány, István; Catelan, Márcio; Ramos, Rodrigo Contreras; Gran, Felipe; Leyton, Paul; Minniti, Dante; Amigo, Pía E-mail: idekany@astro.puc.cl E-mail: rcontrer@astro.puc.cl E-mail: pia.amigo@uv.cl E-mail: dante@astrofisica.cl

    2015-03-01

    The VISTA Variables in the Vía Láctea (VVV) ESO Public Survey is opening a new window to study inner Galactic globular clusters (GCs) using their variable stars. These GCs have been neglected in the past due to the difficulties caused by the presence of elevated extinction and high field stellar densities in their lines of sight. However, the discovery and study of any present variables in these clusters, especially RR Lyrae stars, can help to greatly improve the accuracy of their physical parameters. It can also help to shed some light on the questions raised by the intriguing Oosterhoff dichotomy in the Galactic GC system. In a series of papers we plan to explore variable stars in the GCs falling inside the field of the VVV survey. In this first paper, we search for and study the variables present in two highly reddened, moderately metal-poor, faint, inner Galactic GCs: 2MASS-GC 02 and Terzan 10. We report the discovery of sizable populations of RR Lyrae stars in both GCs. We use near-infrared period–luminosity relations to determine the color excess of each RR Lyrae star, from which we obtain both accurate distances to the GCs and the ratios of the selective-to-total extinction in their directions. We find the extinction toward both clusters to be elevated, non-standard, and highly differential. We also find both clusters to be closer to the Galactic center than previously thought, with Terzan 10 being on the far side of the Galactic bulge. Finally, we discuss their Oosterhoff properties, and conclude that both clusters stand out from the dichotomy followed by most Galactic GCs.

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Young and embedded clusters in Cygnus-X (Maia+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maia, F. F. S.; Moraux, E.; Joncour, I.

    2016-02-01

    CFHT/WIRCam was used to acquire deep (960s, 1200s, 480s) JHK exposures of five fields covering ~1 degree squared in the Cygnus-X complex, in six nights between 04/09/2012 and 29/10/2012. The frames were detrended and coadded into a master mosaic where PSF photometry was carried out using SExtractor and PSFex software using a 2-sigma detection threshold. The resulting catalog was calibrated against the 2MASS catalog, but no transformation was done to our data. Instead, bright sources (brighter than the saturation magnitude) were recovered from 2MASS and calibrated to the WIRCam instrumental system to complement our catalog. The final table contains about 310000 stars spanning 12 magnitudes and reaching K=18.5 at 95% completeness. The fundamental parameters of 10 young stellar systems in the region were derived through this final catalogue. (2 data files).

  18. Cross-correlation of 2MASS and WMAP 3: implications for the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rassat, Anaïs; Land, Kate; Lahav, Ofer; Abdalla, Filipe B.

    2007-05-01

    We perform a cross-correlation of the cosmic microwave background using the third year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) data with the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) galaxy map (about 828000 galaxies with median redshift z ~ 0.07). One motivation is to detect the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect, expected if the cosmic gravitational potential is time dependent; for example, as it is in a flat universe with a dark energy component. The measured spherical harmonic cross-correlation signal favours the ISW signal expected in the concordance Lambda cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model over that of zero correlation, although both are consistent with the data within 2σ. Within a flat ΛCDM model we find a best-fitting value of ΩΛ = 0.85 and ΩΛ < 0.89 (95 per cent CL). The above limits assume a galaxy bias bg(σ8/0.75) ~ 1.40 +/- 0.03, which we derived directly from the 2MASS autocorrelation. Another goal is to test if previously reported anomalies in the WMAP data are related to the galaxy distribution (the so-called `axis of evil' - AoE). No such anomaly is observed in the 2MASS data nor are there any observed AoE correlations between the 2MASS and WMAP3 data.

  19. Peering Through the Dust: NuSTAR Observations of Two FIRST-2MASS Red Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaMassa, Stephanie M.; Ricarte, Angelo; Glikman, Eilat; Urry, C. Megan; Stern, Daniel; Yaqoob, Tahir; Lansbury, George B.; Civano, Francesca; Boggs, Steve E.; Brandt, W. N.; Chen, Chien-Ting J.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Hailey, Chuck J.; Harrison, Fiona; Hickox, Ryan C.; Koss, Michael; Ricci, Claudio; Treister, Ezequiel; Zhang, Will

    2016-03-01

    Some reddened quasars appear to be transitional objects in the paradigm of merger-induced black hole growth/galaxy evolution, where a heavily obscured nucleus starts to be unveiled by powerful quasar winds evacuating the surrounding cocoon of dust and gas. Hard X-ray observations are able to peer through this gas and dust, revealing the properties of circumnuclear obscuration. Here, we present NuSTAR and XMM-Newton/Chandra observations of FIRST-2MASS-selected red quasars F2M 0830+3759 and F2M 1227+3214. We find that though F2M 0830+3759 is moderately obscured (NH,Z = (2.1 ± 0.2) × 1022 cm-2) and F2M 1227+3214 is mildly absorbed ({N}{{H},{{Z}}}={3.4}-0.7+0.8× {10}21 cm-2) along the line of sight, heavier global obscuration may be present in both sources, with {N}{{H},{{S}}}={3.7}-2.6+4.1× {10}23 cm-2 and <5.5 × 1023 cm-2 for F2M 0830+3759 and F2M 1227+3214, respectively. F2M 0830+3759 also has an excess of soft X-ray emission below 1 keV, which is well accommodated by a model where 7% of the intrinsic X-ray emission from the active galactic nucleus (AGN) is scattered into the line of sight. While F2M 1227+3214 has a dust-to-gas ratio (E(B - V)/NH) consistent with the Galactic value, the value of E(B - V)/NH for F2M 0830+3759 is lower than the Galactic standard, consistent with the paradigm that the dust resides on galactic scales while the X-ray reprocessing gas originates within the dust sublimation zone of the broad-line region. The X-ray and 6.1 μm luminosities of these red quasars are consistent with the empirical relations derived for high-luminosity, unobscured quasars, extending the parameter space of obscured AGNs previously observed by NuSTAR to higher luminosities.

  20. The AAVSO Photoelectric Photometry Program in its Scientific and Socio-Historic Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Percy, John R.

    2011-05-01

    Photoelectric photometry began in the 1900s through the work of Guthnick, Stebbins, and others who constructed and used photometers based on the recently-discovered photoelectric effect. The mid 20th century saw a confluence of several areas of amateur interest: astronomy, telescope making, radio and electronics, and general interest in space. This is the time when AAVSO photoelectric photometry (PEP) began, with observers using mostly hand-built photometers on hand-built telescopes. The 1980s brought a revolution: affordable off-the-shelf solid-state photometers, and infrastructure such as the International Amateur-Professional Photoelectric Photometry (IAPPP) conferences, books, and journal. The AAVSO developed a formal PEP program in the early 1980s. Its emphasis was on long-term monitoring of pulsating red giants. It was competing, not always successfully, with programs such as active sun-like binaries (RS CVn stars) which offered "instant gratification" in the form of publicity and quick publications. Nevertheless, the AAVSO PEP program has, through careful organization, motivation, and feedback to observers, produced extensive scientific results. In this presentation, I shall describe, as examples, my own work, its scientific significance, its educational benefit to dozens of my students, and its satisfaction to the observers. To some extent, the AAVSO PEP program has been superceded by its CCD program, but there is still a useful place for ongoing PEP observations of thousands of variable stars. Reference: http://www.aavso.org/sites/default/files/newsletter/PEP/lastpepnl.pdf Acknowledgements: I thank NSERC Canada for research support, my students, and AAVSO staff and observers, especially Howard Landis.

  1. Near-infrared Photometry of Y Dwarfs: Low Ammonia Abundance and the Onset of Water Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leggett, S. K.; Morley, Caroline V.; Marley, M. S.; Saumon, D.

    2015-01-01

    We present new near-infrared photometry for seven late-type T dwarfs and nine Y-type dwarfs, and lower limit magnitudes for a tenth Y dwarf, obtained at Gemini Observatory. We also present a reanalysis of H-band imaging data from the Keck Observatory Archive, for an 11th Y dwarf. These data are combined with earlier MKO-system photometry, Spitzer and WISE mid-infrared photometry, and available trigonometric parallaxes, to create a sample of late-type brown dwarfs that includes 10 T9-T9.5 dwarfs or dwarf systems, and 16 Y dwarfs. We compare the data to our models, which include updated H2 and NH3 opacity, as well as low-temperature condensate clouds. The models qualitatively reproduce the trends seen in the observed colors; however, there are discrepancies of around a factor of two in flux for the Y0-Y1 dwarfs, with T eff ≈ 350-400 K. At T eff ~ 400 K, the problems could be addressed by significantly reducing the NH3 absorption, for example by halving the abundance of NH3 possibly by vertical mixing. At T eff ~ 350 K, the discrepancy may be resolved by incorporating thick water clouds. The onset of these clouds might occur over a narrow range in T eff, as indicated by the observed small change in 5 μm flux over a large change in J - W2 color. Of the known Y dwarfs, the reddest in J -W2 are WISEP J182831.08+265037.8 and WISE J085510.83-071442.5. We interpret the former as a pair of identical 300-350 K dwarfs, and the latter as a 250 K dwarf. If these objects are ~3 Gyr old, their masses are ~10 and ~5 Jupiter-masses, respectively.

  2. Quasar probabilities and redshifts from WISE mid-IR through GALEX UV photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiPompeo, M. A.; Bovy, J.; Myers, A. D.; Lang, D.

    2015-09-01

    Extreme deconvolution (XD) of broad-band photometric data can both separate stars from quasars and generate probability density functions for quasar redshifts, while incorporating flux uncertainties and missing data. Mid-infrared photometric colours are now widely used to identify hot dust intrinsic to quasars, and the release of all-sky WISE data has led to a dramatic increase in the number of IR-selected quasars. Using forced photometry on public WISE data at the locations of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) point sources, we incorporate this all-sky data into the training of the XDQSOz models originally developed to select quasars from optical photometry. The combination of WISE and SDSS information is far more powerful than SDSS alone, particularly at z > 2. The use of SDSS+WISE photometry is comparable to the use of SDSS+ultraviolet+near-IR data. We release a new public catalogue of 5537 436 (total; 3874 639 weighted by probability) potential quasars with probability PQSO > 0.2. The catalogue includes redshift probabilities for all objects. We also release an updated version of the publicly available set of codes to calculate quasar and redshift probabilities for various combinations of data. Finally, we demonstrate that this method of selecting quasars using WISE data is both more complete and efficient than simple WISE colour-cuts, especially at high redshift. Our fits verify that above z ˜ 3 WISE colours become bluer than the standard cuts applied to select quasars. Currently, the analysis is limited to quasars with optical counterparts, and thus cannot be used to find highly obscured quasars that WISE colour-cuts identify in significant numbers.

  3. Bayesian High-redshift Quasar Classification from Optical and Mid-IR Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Gordon T.; Myers, Adam D.; Peters, Christina M.; Krawczyk, Coleman M.; Chase, Greg; Ross, Nicholas P.; Fan, Xiaohui; Jiang, Linhua; Lacy, Mark; McGreer, Ian D.; Trump, Jonathan R.; Riegel, Ryan N.

    2015-08-01

    We identify 885,503 type 1 quasar candidates to i≲ 22 using the combination of optical and mid-IR photometry. Optical photometry is taken from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III: Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (SDSS-III/BOSS), while mid-IR photometry comes from a combination of data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) “AllWISE” data release and several large-area Spitzer Space Telescope fields. Selection is based on a Bayesian kernel density algorithm with a training sample of 157,701 spectroscopically confirmed type 1 quasars with both optical and mid-IR data. Of the quasar candidates, 733,713 lack spectroscopic confirmation (and 305,623 are objects that we have not previously classified as photometric quasar candidates). These candidates include 7874 objects targeted as high-probability potential quasars with 3.5\\lt z\\lt 5 (of which 6779 are new photometric candidates). Our algorithm is more complete to z\\gt 3.5 than the traditional mid-IR selection “wedges” and to 2.2\\lt z\\lt 3.5 quasars than the SDSS-III/BOSS project. Number counts and luminosity function analysis suggest that the resulting catalog is relatively complete to known quasars and is identifying new high-z quasars at z\\gt 3. This catalog paves the way for luminosity-dependent clustering investigations of large numbers of faint, high-redshift quasars and for further machine-learning quasar selection using Spitzer and WISE data combined with other large-area optical imaging surveys.

  4. Using Herschel Far-Infrared Photometry to Constrain Star Formation Rates in CLASH Cluster Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Rebecca L.; Postman, Marc; Fogarty, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    The Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH) program obtained broadband images of 25 massive galaxy clusters in 16 passbands from the UV to the near-IR. The data was taken with the Wide-field Camera 3 (WFC3), and the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). These 25 clusters have also been observed in the mid-IR by Spitzer IRAC, the far-IR by the Herschel Space Observatory PACS and SPIRE, and in the x-ray by the Chandra and XMM observatories. We focused on the two brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in the survey (MACS1931.8-2653 and RXJ1532.9+3021) that have reddening-corrected UV-derived star formation rates (SFRs) > 100 M⊙ yr-1 as measured by Fogarty et al (2015). The inclusion of Herschel data provides unique constraints on dust content and independent estimates of the star formation rates in these interesting galaxies. We performed photometry on the five Herschel bands (100-500μm), and removed any contamination from other cluster members. We fit a UV-FIR SED to each galaxy to measure the bolometric dust luminosity (Lbol), which we use to derive the FIR obscured SFR. We calculate the sum of the measured UV unobscured SFR from the HST photometry and the FIR obscured SFR from the Herschel photometry to get a total SFR for these two BCGs. We compared this to the reddening-corrected SFRs and found they were in agreement within error. This confirms that the Kennicutt and Calzetti methods for calculating star formation rates are both applicable for these highly star-forming massive cluster galaxies.

  5. How the extinction of extragalactic background light affects surface photometry of galaxies, groups and clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zackrisson, E.; Micheva, G.; Östlin, G.

    2009-08-01

    The faint regions of galaxies, groups and clusters hold important clues about how these objects formed, and surface photometry at optical and near-infrared wavelengths represents a powerful tool for studying such structures. Here, we identify a hitherto unrecognized problem with this technique, related to how the night sky flux is typically measured and subtracted from astronomical images. While most of the sky flux comes from regions between the observer and the target object, a small fraction - the extragalactic background light (EBL) - comes from behind. We argue that since this part of the sky flux can be subjected to extinction by dust present in the galaxy/group/cluster studied, standard reduction procedures may lead to a systematic oversubtraction of the EBL. Even very small amounts of extinction can lead to spurious features in radial surface brightness profiles and colour maps of extended objects. We assess the likely impact of this effect on a number of topics in extragalactic astronomy where very deep surface photometry is currently attempted, including studies of stellar haloes, starburst host galaxies, disc truncations and diffuse intragroup/intracluster light. We argue that EBL extinction may provide at least a partial explanation for the anomalously red colours reported for the haloes of disc galaxies and for the hosts of local starburst galaxies. EBL extinction effects also mimic truncations in discs with unusually high dust opacities, but are unlikely to be the cause of such features in general. Failure to account for EBL extinction can also give rise to a non-negligible underestimate of intragroup and intracluster light at the faintest surface brightness levels currently probed. Finally, we discuss how EBL extinction effects may be exploited to provide an independent constraint on the surface brightness of the EBL, using a combination of surface photometry and direct star counts.

  6. Predicting spectral features in galaxy spectra from broad-band photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdalla, F. B.; Mateus, A.; Santos, W. A.; Sodrè, L., Jr.; Ferreras, I.; Lahav, O.

    2008-07-01

    We explore the prospects of predicting emission-line features present in galaxy spectra given broad-band photometry alone. There is a general consent that colours, and spectral features, most notably the 4000 Å break, can predict many properties of galaxies, including star formation rates and hence they could infer some of the line properties. We argue that these techniques have great prospects in helping us understand line emission in extragalactic objects and might speed up future galaxy redshift surveys if they are to target emission-line objects only. We use two independent methods, Artificial Neural Networks (based on the ANNz code) and Locally Weighted Regression (LWR), to retrieve correlations present in the colour N-dimensional space and to predict the equivalent widths present in the corresponding spectra. We also investigate how well it is possible to separate galaxies with and without lines from broad-band photometry only. We find, unsurprisingly, that recombination lines can be well predicted by galaxy colours. However, among collisional lines some can and some cannot be predicted well from galaxy colours alone, without any further redshift information. We also use our techniques to estimate how much information contained in spectral diagnostic diagrams can be recovered from broad-band photometry alone. We find that it is possible to classify active galactic nuclei and star formation objects relatively well using colours only. We suggest that this technique could be used to considerably improve redshift surveys such as the upcoming Fibre Multi Object Spectrograph (FMOS) survey and the planned Wide Field Multi Object Spectrograph (WFMOS) survey.

  7. Correlation between anterior chamber characteristics and laser flare photometry immediately after femtosecond laser treatment before phacoemulsification.

    PubMed

    Pahlitzsch, M; Torun, N; Pahlitzsch, M L; Klamann, M K J; Gonnermann, J; Bertelmann, E; Pahlitzsch, T

    2016-08-01

    PurposeTo assess the anterior chamber (AC) characteristics and its correlation to laser flare photometry immediately after femtosecond laser-assisted capsulotomy and photodisruption.Patients and methodsThe study included 97 cataract eyes (n=97, mean age 68.6 years) undergoing femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery (FLACS). Three cohorts were analysed relating to the flare photometry directly post femtosecond laser treatment (flare <100 n=28, 69.6±7 years; flare 100-249 n=47, 67.7±8 years; flare >249 photon counts per ms cohort n=22, 68.5±10 years). Flare photometry (KOWA FM-700), corneal topography (Oculus Pentacam, Germany: AC depth, volume, angle, pachymetry), axial length, pupil diameter, and endothelial cells were assessed before FLACS, immediately after femtosecond laser treatment and 1 day postoperative (LenSx Alcon, USA). Statistical data were analysed by SPSS v19.0, Inc.ResultsThe AC depth, AC volume, AC angle, central and thinnest corneal thickness showed a significant difference between flare <100 vs flare 100-249 10 min post femtosecond laser procedure (P=0.002, P=0.023, P=0.007, P=0.003, P=0.011, respectively). The AC depth, AC volume, and AC angle were significantly larger (P=0.001, P=0.007, P=0.003, respectively) in the flare <100 vs flare >249 cohort 10 min post femtosecond laser treatment.ConclusionsA flat AC, low AC volume, and a narrow AC angle were parameters associated with higher intraocular inflammation. These criteria could be used for patient selection in FLACS to reduce postoperative intraocular inflammation. PMID:27229702

  8. EMCCD SPECKLE INTERFEROMETRY WITH THE 6 m TELESCOPE: ASTROMETRIC MEASUREMENTS, DIFFERENTIAL PHOTOMETRY, AND ORBITS

    SciTech Connect

    Docobo, Jose A.; Tamazian, Vakhtang S.; Melikian, Norair D. E-mail: vakhtang.tamazian@usc.e E-mail: nmelikia@bao.sci.a

    2010-10-15

    Results of the EMCCD-based speckle interferometric observations and differential photometry for 46 visual binaries obtained in 2007 June and July with the 6 m telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory (Russia) are presented. First preliminary orbits for COU 401, COU 1281, and COU 1037 as well as improved orbits for CHR 137, COU 100, COU 1136, COU 798, CHR 51, CHR 55, COU 315, COU 206, and ADS 13961, along with their dynamical mass estimates, are reported. On the basis of dynamical parallax information, first distance estimates for COU 100, COU 1136, COU 798, COU 206, and COU 1037 are calculated.

  9. Solar irradiance from Nimbus-7 compared with ground-based photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, G. A.; Cookson, A. M.; Hoyt, D. V.

    1994-01-01

    We have compared total solar irradiance from Nimbus-7 with ground-based photometry from the San Fernando Observatory (SFO) for 109 days between 1 June and 31 December, 1988. We have also included in some analyses NOAA-9 SBUV2 data or F10.7 radio flux. The Nimbus-7 data are from orbital samples, averaged to the mean time of observation at SFO. Using the same parameters as in Chapman et al. (1992), the multiple regression gives an R(exp 2) = 0.9131 and a 'solar minimum' irradiance, S(sub 0) = 1371.76 +/- 0.18 W/sq m for the best fit.

  10. Photometry of the full solar disk at the San Fernando Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, G. A.; Cookson, A. M.; Dobias, J. J.; Preminger, D. G.; Walton, S. R.

    2004-01-01

    Daily photometry of the full solar disk began at the San Fernando Observatory in mid-1985. At present, observations with two photometric telescopes produce images in the red, blue and CaII K-line. The smaller telescope obtains images that are 512 × 512 pixels. The larger one obtains images that are 1024 × 1024 pixels. In addition, the larger telescope produces images with a narrower K-line and an IR filter. Images are processed to determine a number of photometric quantities including sunspot deficits and facular/network excesses. These photometric quantities are highly correlated with fluctuations in the total solar irradiance (TSI) from spacecraft experiments.

  11. UBV Photometry, Times of Minimum, and Light Curve Solutions for the Algol system, RU Eri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shope, S.; Sowell, J.; Williamon, R.

    1999-12-01

    RU Eri is an Algol system with partial eclipses and a period of 15 hours. The components appear to be slightly evolved F and K stars. UBV photometry has been acquired over six seasons with the 36-inch telescope at the DeKalb County (GA) School System's Fernbank Science Center. Times of minimum have been determined per filter and season, and a literature search has provided additional values for examining the possibility of period changes. Preliminary light curve solutions using all of our data have been derived with the Wilson-Devinney binary star code.

  12. Physical parameters of NGC6705 (M11) open cluster using Strömgren photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casamiquela, L.; Balaguer-Núñez, L.; Jordi, C.; Masana, E.

    2015-05-01

    NGC 6705 (M11) is a middle-age well-studied open cluster. Its location in an area where the interstellar extinction is relatively low, its exceptional stellar density and richness, and the presence of both early type and evolved stars makes this cluster an interesting target for many scientific issues. Although NGC 6705 has been widely studied, Strömgren photometry was missing. The observations by our team have yielded uvbyH photometry for 51293 stars in an area of 34'×34' and with V_{lim}˜21. Observed stars with complete photometry (9308) are classified into photometric regions and their physical parameters are determined using standard relations among color indices for each of the photometric regions of the HR diagram. That allows us to provide an astrophysical characterization of the cluster: E(b-y)=0.31±0.05 (E(B-V)=0.42); V_{0}-M_{V}=11.9±0.7 (d˜2000pc); [Fe/H]=-0.2±0.4 (Z=0.009). In addition, we discuss the accuracy of the physical parameters through comparison with those recently determined by Beaver et al. (2013) with Strömgren photometry. We find mean systematic differences of Δ V=-0.015±0.038, Δ (b-y)=-0.017±0.046, Δ m_{1}=-0.014±0.092, Δ c_{1}=+0.014±0.131, and Δ β=-0.036±0.042. These are caused by different selection of reference stars for the instrumental-to-standard transformation. We also compare our results with those from the spectroscopic Gaia-ESO Survey (GES) to assess the quality of the photometric determinations. This work can be useful to give input astrophysical parameters to the spectral analyses being made by GES. We find out clear different trends for the stars bluer and redder than (b-y)=0.4 (T_{eff}˜8000 K), due to the different instrumental setups used for the GIRAFFE observations (HR3 and HR15N). We find that mean differences in effective temperatures and gravities for both works are compatible within the errors. However, mean difference in metallicity for stars with (b-y)>0.4 is discrepant by -0.65 dex.

  13. Ultraviolet photometry from the Orbiting Astronomical Observatory. XI - The 1971 eclipse of 32 Cygni

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doherty, L. R.; Mcnall, J. F.; Holm, A. V.

    1974-01-01

    We observed the 1971 eclipse of 32 Cyg at regular intervals from November 1 to 15 with the wide-band filter photometers aboard OAO-2. Data have been reduced for seven filter bands with effective wavelengths between 4250 and 1430 A. Both the constancy of the light near mid-eclipse for the shorter wavelengths, and the derived energy distribution of the B component over all of these wavelengths indicate that the eclipse was total. The spectral types determined from the photometry of the two components are B5 and K4 Ib, after correction for interstellar reddening of 0.10 mag in B-V.

  14. Optical Photometry of the flaring gamma-ray blazar AO 0235+164

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pursimo, Tapio; Losada, Illa R.; Messa, Matteo; Gafton, Emanuel; Ojha, Roopesh

    2016-03-01

    We report optical photometry of the blazar AO 0235+164 obtained with the 2.56m Nordic Optical Telescope in La Palma to look for any enhanced optical activity associated with a recent flare in the daily averaged gamma-ray flux seen in the public lightcurve of the Fermi/LAT instrument: http://fermi.gsfc.nasa.gov/FTP/glast/data/lat/catalogs/asp/current/lightcurves/0235+164_86400.png Fermi/LAT first reported a detection of gamma-ray activity from this source in Sep, 2008 (ATel#1744) and a short timescale flare in Oct 14, 2008 (ATel#1784).

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Infrared photometry of Galactic and MC PN (Phillips+, 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, J. P.; Ramos-Larios, G.

    2015-07-01

    We have acquired photometry and mapping of a wide range of Galactic disc, Galactic bulge, and LMC PNe using data deriving from the second Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-plane Survey Extraordinaire (GLIMPSE II) (Benjamin et al., 2003PASP..115..953B, Cat. II/293), and the program Surveying the Agents of a Galaxy.s Evolution (SAGE; Meixner et al., 2006AJ....132.2268M, Cat. J/AJ/132/2268). Both of these surveys were undertaken using the Spitzer Space Telescope (SST; Werner et al., 2004ApJS..154....1W). (3 data files).

  16. Infrared photometry of the RS CVn short-period systems - XY UMa and WY Cnc

    SciTech Connect

    Arevalo, M.J.; Lazaro, C. )

    1990-03-01

    Infrared J and K light curves of two RS CVn short-period systems, XY UMa and WY Cnc, are presented. Both systems show similar variability in the infrared to that observed in the visual. From the colors an infrared excess is inferred for the primary component of both systems. A new determination of their geometrical elements is presented and the resulting parameters are compared to those previously obtained from visible photometry. The light curves show peculiarities that may indicate the presence of gas streams in the systems. 27 refs.

  17. Worldwide photometry and lightcurve observations of 1 Ceres during the 1975-1976 apparition

    SciTech Connect

    Tedesco, E.F.; Taylor, R.C.; Drummond, J.; Harwood, D.; Nickoloff, I.; Scaltriti, F.

    1983-04-01

    Lightcurves and UBV photometry of Ceres from the 1975-1976 apparition are presented. The synodic period is 0.37812 + or 0.00004 day, the mean absolute V magnitude is 3.61 + or 0.03, and the phase coefficient is 0.040 + or - 0.001 mag/deg. The U-B and B-V phase coefficients are +0.0015 + or - 0.0007 and +0.0006 + or - 0.0003 mag/deg, respectively. The colors at zero phase are B-V +0.70 + or - 0.01 and U-B +0.41 + or 0.01.

  18. Follow-up of Kepler candidates transiting hot-Jupiter with ground based photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaillard, Clement; Stephens, D.; Larson, J.; Ranquist, E.; Stoker, E.; Rawlins, J.

    2013-10-01

    We have selected a group of planetary candidates from the Kepler field with short transiting times and observed them at the West Mountain Observatory (WMO) with the objective to confirm or find their nature. The resulting light curves showed that KOI667 is a diluted eclipsing binary. Further observations at the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory (DAO) and the use of Point Spread Function (PSF) photometry resolved the eclipsing binary. We present the techniques used to obtain the light curves and the identification of the eclipsing binary.

  19. DWARF IRREGULAR GALAXY LEO A: SUPRIME-CAM WIDE-FIELD STELLAR PHOTOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Stonkutė, Rima; Narbutis, Donatas; Vansevičius, Vladas; Arimoto, Nobuo; Hasegawa, Takashi; Tamura, Naoyuki

    2014-10-01

    We have surveyed a complete extent of Leo A—an apparently isolated gas-rich low-mass dwarf irregular galaxy in the Local Group. The B, V, and I passband CCD images (typical seeing ∼0.''8) were obtained with the Subaru Telescope equipped with the Suprime-Cam mosaic camera. The wide-field (20' × 24') photometry catalog of 38,856 objects (V ∼ 16-26 mag) is presented. This survey is also intended to serve as ''a finding chart'' for future imaging and spectroscopic observation programs of Leo A.

  20. Far ultraviolet wide field imaging and photometry - Spartan-202 Mark II Far Ultraviolet Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruthers, George R.; Heckathorn, Harry M.; Opal, Chet B.; Witt, Adolf N.; Henize, Karl G.

    1988-01-01

    The U.S. Naval Research Laboratory' Mark II Far Ultraviolet Camera, which is expected to be a primary scientific instrument aboard the Spartan-202 Space Shuttle mission, is described. This camera is intended to obtain FUV wide-field imagery of stars and extended celestial objects, including diffuse nebulae and nearby galaxies. The observations will support the HST by providing FUV photometry of calibration objects. The Mark II camera is an electrographic Schmidt camera with an aperture of 15 cm, a focal length of 30.5 cm, and sensitivity in the 1230-1600 A wavelength range.

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: CCD BVI photometry in NGC 5927 (Samus+, 1996)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samus, N.; Kravtsov, V.; Ipatov, A.; Smirnov, O.; Alcaino, G.; Liller, W.; Alvarado, F.

    1996-04-01

    We present for the globular cluster NGC 5927 the first multicolor CCD photometry that reaches below the cluster's main sequence turnoff. The turnoff is located approximately at VTO=20.1mag, (B-V)TO=1.18mag, (V-I)TO=1.30mag. There is a hint of horizontal branch morphology variations with distance from the cluster center. Using the isochrones of VandenBerg & Bell (1985ApJS...58..561V), we derive the cluster age to be about 15Gyr. (1 data file).

  2. Another neon nova - Early infrared photometry and spectroscopy of Nova Cygni 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayward, T. L.; Gehrz, R. D.; Miles, J. W.; Houck, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    Infrared photometry and spectrophotometry of Nova Cygni 1992 taken within 54 days of its eruption show a strong 12.8-micron Ne II forbidden emission line as well as hydrogen recombination lines. Spectra with lambda/Delta lambda of about 2000 resolve the Ne II forbidden and 12.37-micron Hu-alpha lines with about 2200 km/s (FWHM). The Ne II forbidden line shows multiple velocity components. The amount of forbidden Ne II required to produce the observed emission feature exceeds the solar abundance of neon by at least a factor of 4.

  3. The Secret Lives of Cepheids: Searching for Evolutionary Changes Using Photoelectric Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toce, Michael; Guinan, Edward F.; Engle, Scott G.; Wasatonic, Richard P.

    2016-01-01

    Classical Cepheids are pulsating, yellow supergiants and one of the most important classes of variable stars. They have a direct linear relationship between their period and luminosity and thus serve as crucial "standard candles" for determining the cosmic distance scale and measuring the Hubble Constant. Also, Cepheids play a fundamental role in the calibration of Type Ia supernovae, indicating that the expansion of the Universe is accelerating, and also infer the existence of dark energy. Studies of changes in their pulsation periods and amplitudes reveal evolutionary changes too subtle to detect directly, and understanding these various characteristics of Cepheids is critical to their use as high-precision standard candles. To this end, the Villanova Secret Lives of Cepheids (SLiC) program was created as a comprehensive study of Cepheid behavior, evolution, pulsations, atmospheres, heating dynamics, shocks and winds. As part of the SLiC program, ground-based photometry is being carried out of small sample of bright Cepheids. The observations are being made using the 14-inch reflector telescope at Villanova Campus Observatory. Mounted on the telescope is a SBIG photoelectric photometer equipped with standard Johnson UBVRI filters. Photometry is being carried out of the following stars along with their spectral type, period, and visual mag: X Cyg (F7Ib, ~16.39d, 6.47mag), DT Cyg (F7.5Ib, ~2.5d, 5.82mag), S Sge (G5Ibv, ~8.38d, 5.36mag), FF Aql (F6Ib, ~4.47d, 5.38mag), Eta Aql (F6Iab, ~7.18d,3.80mag), and Delta Cep (F5Iab, ~5.37d, 3.75mag). The primary scientific objectives are to obtain light curves to investigate possible evolutionary changes from small variations in luminosity, light amplitude and pulsation period. Special emphasis was placed on the classical Cepheid X Cyg due to recent changes in pulsation period, shown by Szabados via a phase jump in X Cyg's O-C (observed - calculated). X Cyg holds priority in our observations as we attempt to affirm or deny

  4. Ultraviolet photometry of Nova Cygni 1992 obtained with the high speed photometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, M.; Bless, R. C.; Oegelman, H.; Elliot, J. L.; Gallagher, J. S.; Nelson, M. J.; Percival, J. W.; Robinson, E. L.; Van Citters, G. W.

    1994-01-01

    In this Letter we present the first high-speed ultraviolet photometry of an active, classical nova, Nova Cygni 1992. The 45 minute observation shows significant evidence for power at frequencies that correspond to periods of about 565 and 900 s. Each of these periods has an amplitude of about 3 mmag. Since this data set is short, we cannot establish the nature of the detected variability and so, we discuss possible physical mechanisms ranging from short-lived phenomena to stable periodic modulations that could result in the observed variations.

  5. Target selection of classical pulsating variables for space-based photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plachy, E.; Molnar, L.; Szabo, R.; Kolenberg, K.; Banyai, E.

    2016-05-01

    In a few years the Kepler and TESS missions will provide ultra- precise photometry for thousands of RR Lyrae and hundreds of Cepheid stars. In the extended Kepler mission all targets are proposed in the Guest Observer (GO) Program, while the TESS space telescope will work with full frame images and a ~15-16th mag brightness limit with the possibility of short cadence measurements for a limited number of pre-selected objects. This paper highlights some details of the enormous and important work of the target selection process made by the members of Working Group 7 (WG#7) of the Kepler and TESS Asteroseismic Science Consortium.

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: BVIc differential photometry of GSC 0762-110 (Wils+, 2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wils, P.; Rozakis, I.; Kleidis, S.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Bernhard, K.

    2007-11-01

    Photometry of the triple-mode radially pulsating variable GSC 0762-0110 has been performed. The star has a fundamental period of 0.1945d and period ratios of 0.7641 and 0.8012. In addition two non-radial modes were found, for which the amplitude diminished considerably over the last few years. The data presented here are the B, V and Ic differential instrumental magnitudes of GSC 0762-0110 with respect to GSC 0766-2426. The V data are from four different observatories, the B and Ic data from a single observatory. Instrumental details are given in the paper. (3 data files).

  7. PSF homogenization for multi-band photometry from space on extended objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucaud, A.; Dole, H.; Abergel, A.; Ayasso, H.; Orieux, F.

    2016-09-01

    We present a fast and robust tool to create PSF matching kernels for multi-band photometric studies. Such kernels are useful for convolving images down to the same PSF prior to computing flux measurements like aperture photometry or spectral fitting. Unlike similar existing methods, we use a Wiener filter to take into account the real shape of the effective PSF, usually very complex for space telescopes. We apply this scheme to Euclid simulated PSF images to demonstrate the efficiency of the algorithm. This tool is publicly available http://www.github.io/aboucaud/pypher.

  8. Studying Titan's surface photometry in the 5 microns atmospheric window with the Cassini/VIMS instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornet, T.; Altobelli, N.; Sotin, C.; Le Mouelic, S.; Rodriguez, S.; Philippe, S.; Brown, R. H.; Barnes, J. W.; Buratti, B. J.; Baines, K. H.; Clark, R. N.; Nicholson, P. D.

    2014-12-01

    Due to the influence of methane gas and a thick aerosols haze in the atmosphere, Titan's surface is only visible in 7 spectral atmospheric windows centered at 0.93, 1.08, 1.27, 1.59, 2.01, 2.7-2.8 and 5 microns with the Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS). The 5 microns atmospheric window constitutes the only one being almost insensitive to the haze scattering and which presents only a reduced atmospheric absorption contribution to the signal recorded by the instrument. Despite these advantages leading to the almost direct view of the surface, the 5 microns window is also the noisiest spectral window of the entire VIMS spectrum (an effect highly dependent on the time exposure used for the observations), and it is not totally free from atmospheric contributions, enough to keep "artefacts" in mosaics of several thousands of cubes due to atmospheric and surface photometric effects amplified by the very heterogeneous viewing conditions between each Titan flyby. At first order, a lambertian surface photometry at 5 microns has been used as an initial parameter in order to estimate atmospheric opacity and surface photometry in all VIMS atmospheric windows and to determine the albedo of the surface, yet unknown, both using radiative transfer codes on single cubes or empirical techniques on global hyperspectral mosaics. Other studies suggested that Titan's surface photometry would not be uniquely lambertian but would also contain anisotropic lunar-like contributions. In the present work, we aim at constraining accurately the surface photometry of Titan and residual atmospheric absorption effects in this 5 microns window using a comprehensive study of relevant sites located at various latitudes. Those include bright and dark (dunes) terrains, 5-microns bright terrains (Hotei Regio and Tui Regio), the Huygens Landing Site and high latitudes polar lakes and seas. The VIMS 2004 to 2014 database, composed of more than 40,000 hyperspectral cubes acquired on

  9. Wavelet analysis of fast photometry on Cygnus X-1 with the AstraLux camera

    SciTech Connect

    Luque-Escamilla, P. L.; Marti, J.; Combi, Jorge A.; Arjonilla, Alvaro Munoz; Sanchez-Sutil, J. R.

    2008-10-08

    We present sub-second fast photometry for the high mass X-ray binary Cygnus X-1. We try to observe variability due to instabilities in the accretion process at optical wavelengths. The observations were carried out using the high speed AstraLux camera at the Calar Alto 2.2 m telescope, Spain, in November 2006 and August 2007. We report that the Cygnus X-1 system light curve sampled every 30 milli-second did not display strong enough evidence of any periodic component related to the source.

  10. Statistical error analysis in CCD time-resolved photometry with applications to variable stars and quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, Steve B.; Warnock, Archibald, III; Mitchell, Kenneth J.

    1988-01-01

    Differential photometric time series obtained from CCD frames are tested for intrinsic variability using a newly developed analysis of variance technique. In general, the objects used for differential photometry will not all be of equal magnitude, so the techniques derived here explicitly correct for differences in the measured variances due to photon statistics. Other random-noise terms are also considered. The technique tests for the presence of intrinsic variability without regard to its random or periodic nature. It is then applied to observations of the variable stars ZZ Ceti and US 943 and the active extragalactic objects OQ 530, US 211, US 844, LB 9743, and OJ 287.

  11. Ultraviolet photometry from the Orbiting Astronomical Observatory. XXI - Absolute energy distribution of stars in the ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bless, R. C.; Code, A. D.; Fairchild, E. T.

    1976-01-01

    The absolute energy distribution in the ultraviolet is given for the stars alpha Vir, eta UMa, and alpha Leo. The calibration is based on absolute heterochromatic photometry between 2920 and 1370 A carried out with an Aerobee sounding rocket. The fundamental radiation standard is the synchrotron radiation from 240-MeV electrons in a certain synchrotron storage ring. On the basis of the sounding-rocket calibration, the preliminary OAO-2 spectrometer calibration has been revised; the fluxes for the three program stars are tabulated in energy per second per square centimeter per unit wavelength interval.

  12. Simple Photometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Allan

    2012-01-01

    Details are given of a visual photometer based on Joly's paraffin block apparatus of 1888. It is readily constructed from a couple of ordinary candles and a piece of aluminum foil, but enables two luminous sources to be compared to plus or minus 15-20%; this is much better than the eye alone can do. (Contains 1 figure.)

  13. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II: Photometry and Supernova Ia Light Curves from the 2005 Data

    SciTech Connect

    Holtzman, Jon A.; Marriner, John; Kessler, Richard; Sako, Masao; Dilday, Ben; Frieman, Joshua A.; Schneider, Donald P.; Bassett, Bruce; Becker, Andrew; Cinabro, David; DeJongh, Fritz; Depoy, Darren L.; Doi, Mamoru; Garnavich, Peter M.; Hogan, Craig J.; Jha, Saurabh; Konishi, Kohki; Lampeitl, Hubert; Marshall, Jennifer L.; McGinnis, David; Miknaitis, Gajus; /KICP, Chicago /Portsmouth U., ICG /Ohio State U., Dept. Astron. /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Johns Hopkins U. /Rochester Inst. Tech. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Portsmouth U., ICG /Tokyo U., Inst. Astron. /South African Astron. Observ. /Cape Town U. /Tokyo U., ICRR /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2010-08-26

    We present ugriz light curves for 146 spectroscopically confirmed or spectroscopically probable Type Ia supernovae from the 2005 season of the SDSS-II Supernova survey. The light curves have been constructed using a photometric technique that we call scene modeling, which is described in detail here; the major feature is that supernova brightnesses are extracted from a stack of images without spatial resampling or convolution of the image data. This procedure produces accurate photometry along with accurate estimates of the statistical uncertainty, and can be used to derive photometry taken with multiple telescopes. We discuss various tests of this technique that demonstrate its capabilities. We also describe the methodology used for the calibration of the photometry, and present calibrated magnitudes and fluxes for all of the spectroscopic SNe Ia from the 2005 season.

  14. Lightcurve, Color and Phase Function Photometry of the OSIRIS-REx Target Asteroid (101955) Bennu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hergenrother, Carl W.; Nolan, Michael C.; Binzel, Richard P.; Cloutis, Edward A.; Barucci, Maria Antonietta; Michel, Patrick; Scheeres, Daniel J.; d'Aubigny, Christian Drouet; Lazzaro, Daniela; Pinilla-Alonso, Noemi; Campins, Humberto; Licandro, Javier; Clark, Beth E.; Rizk, Bashar; Beshore, Edward C.; Lauretta, Dante S.

    2013-09-01

    The NASA OSIRIS-REx mission will retrieve a sample of the carbonaceous near-Earth Asteroid (101955) Bennu and return it to Earth in 2023. Photometry in the Eight Color Asteroid Survey (ECAS) filter system and Johnson-Cousins V and R filters were conducted during the two most recent apparitions in 2005/2006 and 2011/2012. Lightcurve observations over the nights of September 14-17, 2005 yielded a synodic rotation period of 4.2905 ± 0.0065 h, which is consistent with the results of Nolan et al. (2013). ECAS color measurements made during the same nights confirm the B-type classification of Clark et al. (Clark, B.E., Binzel, R.P., Howell, E.S., Cloutis, E.A., Ockert-Bell, M., Christensen, P., Barucci, M.A., DeMeo, F., Lauretta, D.S., Connolly, H., Soderberg, A., Hergenrother, C., Lim, L., Emery, J., Mueller, M. [2011]. Icarus 216, 462-475). A search for the 0.7 μm hydration feature using the method of Vilas (Vilas, F. [1994]. Icarus 111, 456-467) did not reveal its presence. Photometry was obtained over a range of phase angles from 15° to 96° between 2005 and 2012. The resulting phase function slope of 0.040 magnitudes per degree is consistent with the phase slopes of other low albedo near-Earth asteroids (Belskaya, I.N., Shevchenko, V.G. [2000]. Icarus 147, 94-105).

  15. Photometry of very bright stars with Kepler and K2 smear data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, B. J. S.; White, T. R.; Huber, D.; Murphy, S. J.; Bedding, T. R.; Caldwell, D. A.; Sarai, A.; Aigrain, S.; Barclay, T.

    2016-01-01

    High-precision time series photometry with the Kepler satellite has been crucial to our understanding both of exoplanets, and via asteroseismology, of stellar physics. After the failure of two reaction wheels, the Kepler satellite has been repurposed as Kepler-2 (K2), observing fields close to the ecliptic plane. As these fields contain many more bright stars than the original Kepler field, K2 provides an unprecedented opportunity to study nearby objects amenable to detailed follow-up with ground-based instruments. Due to bandwidth constraints, only a small fraction of pixels can be downloaded, with the result that most bright stars which saturate the detector are not observed. We show that engineering data acquired for photometric calibration, consisting of collateral `smear' measurements, can be used to reconstruct light curves for bright targets not otherwise observable with Kepler/K2. Here we present some examples from Kepler Quarter 6 and K2 Campaign 3, including the δ Scuti variables HD 178875 and 70 Aqr, and the red giant HR 8500 displaying solar-like oscillations. We compare aperture and smear photometry where possible, and also study targets not previously observed. These encouraging results suggest this new method can be applied to most Kepler and K2 fields.

  16. THE CHANDRA SURVEY OF THE COSMOS FIELD. II. SOURCE DETECTION AND PHOTOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Puccetti, S.; Vignali, C.; Cappelluti, N.; Brunner, H.; Brusa, M.; Fruscione, A.; Finoguenov, A.; Fiore, F.; Zamorani, G.; Gilli, R.; Comastri, A.; Aldcroft, T. L.; Elvis, M.; Civano, F.; Miyaji, T.; Damiani, F.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Mainieri, V.

    2009-12-01

    The Chandra COSMOS Survey (C-COSMOS) is a large, 1.8 Ms, Chandra program that covers the central contiguous {approx}0.92 deg{sup 2} of the COSMOS field. C-COSMOS is the result of a complex tiling, with every position being observed in up to six overlapping pointings (four overlapping pointings in most of the central {approx}0.45 deg{sup 2} area with the best exposure, and two overlapping pointings in most of the surrounding area, covering an additional {approx}0.47 deg{sup 2}). Therefore, the full exploitation of the C-COSMOS data requires a dedicated and accurate analysis focused on three main issues: (1) maximizing the sensitivity when the point-spread function (PSF) changes strongly among different observations of the same source (from {approx}1 arcsec up to {approx}10 arcsec half-power radius); (2) resolving close pairs; and (3) obtaining the best source localization and count rate. We present here our treatment of four key analysis items: source detection, localization, photometry, and survey sensitivity. Our final procedure consists of a two step procedure: (1) a wavelet detection algorithm to find source candidates and (2) a maximum likelihood PSF fitting algorithm to evaluate the source count rates and the probability that each source candidate is a fluctuation of the background. We discuss the main characteristics of this procedure, which was the result of detailed comparisons between different detection algorithms and photometry tools, calibrated with extensive and dedicated simulations.

  17. New Horizons disk-integrated approach photometry of Pluto and Charon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zangari, Amanda M.; Buie, Marc W.; Buratti, Bonnie J.; Verbiscer, Anne J.; Howett, C. J. A.; Weaver, H. A.; Olkin, Catherine B.; Ennico, Kimberly; Young, Leslie A.; Stern, S. A.

    2015-11-01

    Approach and cruise observations of Pluto and Charon by NASA's New Horizons LOng Range Reconnaissance Imager ("LORRI") allow monitoring of Pluto not only at phase angles beyond Earth's 2 degree limit, but present a near constant sub-observer latitude of 43 degrees. However, the creation of light curves and solar phase curves of the pair prove to be an interesting challenge. Early images of the pair from July 2013 are barely resolved and have low signal, while later images show the pair clearly resolved and at sufficient resolution. Just at the Pluto approaches the signal level and image quality of prior HST images, surface features become resolved, rendering disk integrated photometry increasingly difficult and inaccurate, with the largest discrepancies found at longitudes which show the intersection of features informally named Tombaugh Regio ("the heart") and Cthulhu Macula ("the whale"). Now, post flyby, accurate knowledge of the radius and the shapes of surface features and their patterns of dark and light, allow for the creation of custom PSFs created from flyby maps. Using these maps, we present disk-integrated approach photometry, a solar phase curve and estimate Hapke parameters, taking into account the sub-observer position.This work was supported by the NASA New Horizons Project.

  18. Recovering Astrophysical Signals of Background Variable Sources in Kepler Data by Means of Custom Aperture Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowers, Rebecca Lyn; Pepper, Joshua; Prsa, Andrej

    2016-01-01

    Originally designed for exoplanet discovery, the NASA Kepler mission conducted long-baseline observations of hundreds of thousands of stars, providing a wealth of high-precision photometric data useful for a wide variety of scientific investigations (multiple stellar systems, long-period variables, asteroseismology, etc.). By examining astrophysical targets in the Kepler data set and performing pixel-level data analysis and custom aperture photometry, we seek to identify contaminating astrophysical sources of variability. We are using our own customized suite of Python programs to perform photometry, visualization, data reduction, and differential image analysis, all of which will aid us in determining whether the variability identified in the released Kepler light curves is a result of true variation in the target stars (i.e. eclipsing binaries, pulsating variables, etc.) or if the photometric signals have been contaminated by the presence of background astrophysical sources. In the case of the latter, we obtain optimized light curves for the background variables using the custom apertures.

  19. BVRI CCD photometry of the globular cluster NGC 1904 (M79)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcaino, Gonzalo; Liller, William; Alvarado, Franklin; Wenderoth, Erich

    1994-01-01

    We present BVRI photometry of three overlapping fields in the globular cluster NGC 1904 (M79), observed with a charge coupled device (CCD) camera and the 2.2 m Max-Planck-Institute telescope at European Southern Observatory (ESO) La Silla. We critically compare our photometry using the INVENTORY data reduction code with results derived by other investigators using different codes. These comparisons convince us that all modern codes give results reliable to at least +/- 0.03 mag at all levels, as long as the fields are not overly crowded. Specifically, our results for NGC 1904 (M79) are as follows: VTO = 19.60 +/- 0.10 (estimated external error), with turnoff colors at B - V = 0.40, V - R = 0.27, V - I = 0.57, and B - I = 0.97, all with estimated external errors of +/- 0.06. By fitting the four resulting ridge lines to the theoretical isochrones of VandenBerg & Bell (1985) interpolated to (Fe/H) = -1.60, Y = 0.20, and (O/Fe) = 0.00, we derive an average value for the age of 16 Gyr, where we have adopted E(B - V) = 0.01.

  20. T-PHOT: PSF-matched, prior-based, multiwavelength extragalactic deconfusion photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlin, E.; Fontana, A.; Ferguson, H. C.; Dunlop, J. S.; Elbaz, D.; Bourne, N.; Bruce, V. A.; Buitrago, F.; Castellano, M.; Schreiber, C.; Grazian, A.; McLure, R. J.; Okumura, K.; Shu, X.; Wang, T.; Amorín, R.; Boutsia, K.; Cappelluti, N.; Comastri, A.; Derriere, S.; Faber, S. M.; Santini, P.

    2016-09-01

    T-PHOT extracts accurate photometry from low-resolution images of extragalactic fields, where the blending of sources can be a serious problem for accurate and unbiased measurement of fluxes and colors. It gathers data from a high-resolution image of a region of the sky and uses the source positions and morphologies to obtain priors for the photometric analysis of the lower resolution image of the same field. T-PHOT handles different types of datasets as input priors, including a list of objects that will be used to obtain cutouts from the real high-resolution image, a set of analytical models (as .fits stamps), and a list of unresolved, point-like sources, useful for example for far-infrared wavelength domains. T-PHOT yields accurate estimations of fluxes within the intrinsic uncertainties of the method when systematic errors are taken into account (which can be done using a flagging code given in the output), and handles multiwavelength optical to far-infrared image photometry. T-PHOT was developed as part of the ASTRODEEP project (www.astrodeep.eu).

  1. New aperture photometry of QSO 0957+561; application to time delay and microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovaldsen, J. E.; Teuber, J.; Schild, R. E.; Stabell, R.

    2003-05-01

    We present a re-reduction of archival CCD frames of the doubly imaged quasar 0957+561 using a new photometry code. Aperture photometry with corrections for both cross contamination between the quasar images and galaxy contamination is performed on about 2650 R-band images from a five year period (1992-1997). From the brightness data a time delay of 424.9 +/- 1.2 days is derived using two different statistical techniques. The amount of gravitational microlensing in the quasar light curves is briefly investigated, and we find unambiguous evidence of both long term and short term microlensing. We also note the unusual circumstance regarding time delay estimates for this gravitational lens. Estimates by different observers from different data sets or even with the same data sets give lag estimates differing by typically 8 days, and error bars of only a day or two. This probably indicates several complexities where the result of each estimate depends upon the details of the calculation.

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: 1889-2015 photometry of Stingray nebula (Schaefer+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, B. E.; Edwards, Z. I.

    2016-02-01

    To get broad-band magnitudes for the Stingray, we have pulled from a wide variety of sources --the Harvard photographic plate collection from 1889 to 1989, the visual magnitude estimates of Albert Jones as archived by the American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO) from 1994 to 2007, the All Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) from 2001 to 2009, the AAVSO telescopes going into the AAVSO Photometric All-sky Survey (APASS) from 2011 to 2015, plus our own photometry from CCD images with DECam on the Cerro Tololo 4-m Blanco telescope from 2014. We have added 15 mag from the literature or derived by us from the literature, all on six nights from 1969 to 1996. At our request, A. Henden has put the Stingray in the queue for time series photometry on the 0.61-m Optical Craftsmen Telescope at the Mount John Observatory in New Zealand. The 1-minute CCD integrations were through a Johnson V filter on the nights of 2015 March 23, 26, and 27. (1 data file).

  3. Analysis of Kepler's Short-cadence Photometry for TrES-2b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kipping, David; Bakos, Gáspár

    2011-05-01

    We present an analysis of 18 short-cadence (SC) transit light curves of TrES-2b using quarter 0 (Q0) and quarter 1 (Q1) from the Kepler Mission. The photometry is of unprecedented precision, 237 ppm minute-1, allowing for the most accurate determination of the transit parameters yet obtained for this system. Global fits of the transit photometry, radial velocities, and known transit times are used to obtain a self-consistent set of refined parameters for this system, including updated stellar and planetary parameters. Special attention is paid to fitting for limb darkening and eccentricity. We place an upper limit on the occultation depth to be <72.9 ppm to 3σ confidence, indicating TrES-2b has the lowest determined geometric albedo for an exoplanet, of Ag < 0.146. We also produce a transit timing analysis using Kepler's SC data and demonstrate exceptional timing precision at the level of a few seconds for each transit event. With 18 fully sampled transits at such high precision, we are able to produce stringent constraints on the presence of perturbing planets, Trojans, and extrasolar moons. We introduce the novel use of control data to identify phasing effects. We also exclude the previously proposed hypotheses of short-period transit time variation and additional transits but find that the hypothesis of long-term inclination change is neither supported nor refuted by our analysis. Based on archival data of the Kepler telescope.

  4. Orion Project: A Photometry and Spectroscopy Project for Small Observatories (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    (Abstract only) Orion, the hunter, is one of the most famous constellations. Its declination is such that it is visible from most of the civilized world. In addition, most of the stars of Orion are very bright and interesting. Originally this project was called the Betelgeuse Campaign, but four more stars were added so the name was changed to the Orion Project. The project now includes Betelgeuse, Rigel, and the three stars of Orion’s belt, Mintaka, Alnilam, and Alnitak. Both photometry and spectroscopy provide data for the project. The project has several goals, the first of which is to help beginners with photometry and spectroscopy. The second goal is to obtain the actual observations and data. Because these stars are very bright, they are seldom observed in detail. Their brightness also poses a problem for most professional observatories. It is hoped that by having observations over a long time, interesting changes can be seen that will warrant closer investigation. As a third goal it is hoped that the procedures refined in the project for spectroscopic data may help promote a similar system for the AAVSO, which has an excellent archive of photometric data, but is still lacking a means of handling spectroscopic data.

  5. RGB color photometry of the solar corona from total solar eclipses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shopov, Y. Y.; Varonov, A.; Stoykova, D. A.

    2016-02-01

    In the following article we present some of our results from observations of two total solar eclipses (TSE). By combining appropriate photographic equipment and post-processing techniques we show that numerous solar phenomena can be captured in details during TSE. We use color slide RGB photometry technique to visualize invisible regions of the solar corona and to highlight some of the solar phenomena that are very difficult for observation by Earth-based observatories. In fact it reveals more details of the far solar corona than any original image taken from ground-based observations. RGB photometry visualizes different components of the solar corona in one image, which is impossible using conventional observations. This makes it valuable tool for studies of the solar corona. Here we first observe peculiar near infrared emission regions around the upper part of the solar limb during the 1999 TSE. So far its origin is unknown and they need further studies including observations during other solar eclipses. Our observational experiment was designed for other purposes and their registration was completely unexpected.

  6. ANALYSIS OF KEPLER'S SHORT-CADENCE PHOTOMETRY FOR TrES-2b

    SciTech Connect

    Kipping, David; Bakos, Gaspar

    2011-05-20

    We present an analysis of 18 short-cadence (SC) transit light curves of TrES-2b using quarter 0 (Q0) and quarter 1 (Q1) from the Kepler Mission. The photometry is of unprecedented precision, 237 ppm minute{sup -1}, allowing for the most accurate determination of the transit parameters yet obtained for this system. Global fits of the transit photometry, radial velocities, and known transit times are used to obtain a self-consistent set of refined parameters for this system, including updated stellar and planetary parameters. Special attention is paid to fitting for limb darkening and eccentricity. We place an upper limit on the occultation depth to be <72.9 ppm to 3{sigma} confidence, indicating TrES-2b has the lowest determined geometric albedo for an exoplanet, of A{sub g} < 0.146. We also produce a transit timing analysis using Kepler's SC data and demonstrate exceptional timing precision at the level of a few seconds for each transit event. With 18 fully sampled transits at such high precision, we are able to produce stringent constraints on the presence of perturbing planets, Trojans, and extrasolar moons. We introduce the novel use of control data to identify phasing effects. We also exclude the previously proposed hypotheses of short-period transit time variation and additional transits but find that the hypothesis of long-term inclination change is neither supported nor refuted by our analysis.

  7. HERSCHEL FAR-INFRARED AND SUBMILLIMETER PHOTOMETRY FOR THE KINGFISH SAMPLE OF NEARBY GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, D. A.; Aniano, G.; Draine, B. T.; Engelbracht, C. W.; Hinz, J. L.; Montiel, E. J.; Krause, O.; Groves, B. A.; Roussel, H.; Appleton, P. N.; Armus, L.; Beirao, P.; Bolatto, A. D.; Brandl, B. R.; Calzetti, D.; Crocker, A. F.; Croxall, K. V.; Galametz, M.; Gordon, K. D.; Hao, C.-N.; and others

    2012-01-20

    New far-infrared and submillimeter photometry from the Herschel Space Observatory is presented for 61 nearby galaxies from the Key Insights on Nearby Galaxies: A Far-Infrared Survey with Herschel (KINGFISH) sample. The spatially integrated fluxes are largely consistent with expectations based on Spitzer far-infrared photometry and extrapolations to longer wavelengths using popular dust emission models. Dwarf irregular galaxies are notable exceptions, as already noted by other authors, as their 500 {mu}m emission shows evidence for a submillimeter excess. In addition, the fraction of dust heating attributed to intense radiation fields associated with photodissociation regions is found to be (21 {+-} 4)% larger when Herschel data are included in the analysis. Dust masses obtained from the dust emission models of Draine and Li are found to be on average nearly a factor of two higher than those based on single-temperature modified blackbodies, as single blackbody curves do not capture the full range of dust temperatures inherent to any galaxy. The discrepancy is largest for galaxies exhibiting the coolest far-infrared colors.

  8. Photometry of the post-common-envelope binary PG 0308+096

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somers, M. W.; Lockley, J. J.; Naylor, T.; Wood, Janet H.

    1996-06-01

    We present R- and H-band photometry of PG 0308+096. We demonstrate that the orbital modulation is consistent with that of a dwarf M star heated by a DA white dwarf within the constraints given by the kinematic parameters. By fitting the photometry with an irradiation model we determine that the radius of the white dwarf is 0.019<=R_wd<=0.026 R_ (90 per cent confidence). In order to derive these limits, we have developed a fitting procedure that takes account of the external constraints derived from the spectroscopic analysis by Saffer et al. We determine that the period of the system is 0.286654+/-0.00000078d, which is one of the cycle count aliases considered by Saffer et al. We show that the Hα emission from the surface of the red star can be modelled as either optically thick or thin, but in the latter case the red dwarf must have intrinsic emission.

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: ZYJHK photometry in Pleiades (Lodieu+, 2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodieu, N.; Dobbie, P. D.; Deacon, N. R.; Hodgkin, S. T.; Hambly, N. C.; Jameson, R. F.

    2007-11-01

    We present the results of a deep wide-field near-infrared survey of 12deg2 of the Pleiades conducted as part of the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (UKIRT) Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS) Galactic Cluster Survey (GCS). We have extracted over 340 high-probability proper motion (PM) members down to 0.03M{sun} using a combination of UKIDSS photometry and PM measurements obtained by cross-correlating the GCS with data from the Two Micron All Sky Survey, the Isaac Newton Telescope and the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. Additionally, we have unearthed 73 new candidate brown dwarf (BD) members on the basis of five-band UKIDSS photometry alone. We have identified 23 substellar multiple system candidates out of 63 candidate BDs from the (Y-K, Y) and (J-K, J) colour-magnitude diagrams, yielding a binary frequency of 2844 per cent in the 0.075-0.030M{sun} mass range. (7 data files).

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Far UV Stellar Photometry (Schmidt+ 1995)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, E. G.; Carruthers, G. R.

    1995-07-01

    Far-ultraviolet photometry for 741 objects in a field in Sagittarius centered near M8 and 541 objects in a field centered near zeta Scorpii is presented. These data were extracted from electrographic images obtained with two cameras during a shuttle flight in 1991 April/May. The cameras provided band passes with lambda_eff = 1375 A and lambda_eff = 1781 A. Synthetic colors show that these bands are sensitive to effective temperature for hot stars. Our measurements were placed on a quantitative far-ultraviolet magnitude scale by convolving the spectra of stars observed by IUE with our cameras' spectral response functions. Fifty-eight percent of the ultraviolet objects were identified with visible stars using the SIMBAD database while another 40% of the objects are blends of early type stars too close together to separate with our resolution. Our photometry is compared with that from the TD-1, OAO 2, and ANS satellites and the S201 (Apollo 16) far-ultraviolet camera and found to agree at the level of a few tenths of a magnitude. Unlike previous studies, almost half of the identified visual counterparts to the ultraviolet objects are early B stars. A plot of distance modulus against ultraviolet color excess reveals a significant population of stars with strong ultraviolet excesses. (2 data files).

  11. Spitzer IRAC mid-infrared photometry of 500-750 brown dwarf

    SciTech Connect

    Saumon, Didier; Leggett, Sandy K; Albert, Loic; Artigau, Etienne; Burningham, Ben; Delfosse, Xavier; Delorme, Philippe; Forveille, Thierry; Lucas, Philip W; Marley, Mark S; Pinfield, David J; Reyle, Celine; Smart, Richard L; Warren, Stephen J

    2010-10-26

    Mid-infrared data, including Spitzer warm-IRAC [3.6] and [4.5] photometry, is critical for understanding the cold population of brown dwarfs now being found, objects which have more in common with planets than stars. As effective temperature (T{sub eff}) drops from 800K to 400K, the fraction of flux emitted beyond 3 {mu}m increases rapidly, from about 40% to > 75%. This rapid increase makes a color like H-[4.5] a very sensitive temperature indicator, and it can be combined with a gravity- and metallicity-sensitive color like H-K to constrain all three of these fundamental properties, which in turn gives us mass and age for these slowly cooling objects. Determination of mid-infrared color trends also allows better exploitation of the WISE mission by the community. We use new Spitzer Cycle 6 IRAC photometry, together with published data, to present trends of color with type for L0 to T10 dwarfs. We also use the atmospheric and evolutionary models of Saumon and Marley to investigate the masses and ages of 13 very late-type T dwarfs, which have H-[4.5] > 3.2 and T{sub eff} {approx} 500K to 750K.

  12. A laboratory module on radiometry, photometry and colorimetry for an undergraduate optics course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polak, Robert D.

    2014-07-01

    The bachelor's degree in Physics at Loyola University Chicago requires both an upper-division course in Optics as well as a companion Optics Laboratory course. Recently, the laboratory course has undergone dramatic changes. Traditional weekly laboratories have been replaced with three laboratory modules, where students focus on a single topic over several weeks after which the students submit a laboratory report written in the style of a journal article following American Institute of Physics style manual. With this method, students are able to gain a deeper understanding of the specific topic areas of radiometry, photometry and colorimetry, lens design and aberrations, and polarization and interference while using industry-standard equipment and simulation software. In particular, this work will provide the details of the laboratory module on radiometry, photometry and colorimetry where students use a photoradiometer and integrating sphere to characterize the optical properties of an LCD monitor, light bulb and a fiber optic light source calculating properties such as luminous flux, luminous intensity, luminance, CIE color coordinates, NTSC ratio, color temperature and luminous efficacy.

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: HST photometry of M31 globular clusters (Federici+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federici, L.; Cacciari, C.; Bellazzini, M.; Fusi Pecci, F.; Galleti, S.; Perina, S.

    2013-01-01

    Tables g58.dat, g108.dat, g105.dat, g219.dat, b468.dat, g1.dat, g64.dat, g87.dat, g119.dat, g287.dat, g302.dat, g11.dat, g33.dat, g76.dat, g312.dat, g319.dat, g322.dat present the photometry of the individual stars of 17 M31 globular clusters observed with the WFPC2 on board of the HST, employing the F555W/F814W filters (Fusi Pecci et al. 1996AJ....112.1461F (FFP96), Rich et al. 2005AJ....129.2670R (R05)). The data reduction has been performed using ROMAFOT (Buonanno et al. 1983A&A...126..278B), a multicomponent fitting package purposely adapted to handle HST data, that provides as output the magnitudes and the pixel positions of the detected sources. The CTE-corrected photometric data were converted to the Johnson-Cousins V,I magnitudes according to Holtzman et al (1995PASP..107..156H). Table g351.dat presents the photometry of the individual stars of the M31 globular cluster B405-G351 observed with the HST/COSTAR-corrected FOC + the F430W/F480LP filters. The data reduction has been performed using ROMAFOT; the photometric data were converted to the Johnson-Cousins system B,V magnitudes (see FFP96). Tables gc1.dat, gc2.dat, gc3.dat, gc5.dat, gc6.dat, gc7.dat, gc8.dat, gc9.dat, gc10.dat, gc4.dat, ec1.dat, ec2.dat, ec3.dat, ec4.dat present the photometry of the individual stars of 14 M31 globular clusters observed with the WFC/ACS on board of the HST + F435W/F606W filters (see Galleti et al., 2006ApJ...650L.107G; Mackey et al., 2007ApJ...655L..85M; Mackey et al., 2006ApJ...653L.105M). The data reduction has been performed using the ACS module of DOLPHOT, a point spread function-fitting package specifically devoted to the photometry of HST data, that provides as output the magnitudes and the pixel positions of the detected sources, and a number of quality parameters for a suitable sample selection. The tables present, for the ACS chip holding the cluster, all the stars with valid measurements in both passbands, global quality flag=1, crowding parameter <0.5, chi

  14. IDENTIFICATION OF A WIDE, LOW-MASS MULTIPLE SYSTEM CONTAINING THE BROWN DWARF 2MASS J0850359+105716

    SciTech Connect

    Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Burgasser, Adam J.; Bochanski, John J.; Looper, Dagny L.; West, Andrew A.; Van der Bliek, Nicole S.

    2011-03-15

    We report our discovery of NLTT 20346 as an M5+M6 companion system to the tight binary (or triple) L dwarf 2MASS J0850359+105716. This nearby ({approx}31 pc), widely separated ({approx}7700 AU) quadruple system was identified through a cross-match of proper motion catalogs. Follow-up imaging and spectroscopy of NLTT 20346 revealed it to be a magnetically active M5+M6 binary with components separated by {approx}2'' (50-80 AU). Optical spectroscopy of the components shows only moderate H{alpha} emission corresponding to a statistical age of {approx}5-7 Gyr for both M dwarfs. However, NLTT 20346 is associated with the XMM-Newton source J085018.9+105644, and based on X-ray activity the age of NLTT 20346 is between 250 and 450 Myr. Strong Li absorption in the optical spectrum of 2MASS J0850+1057 indicates an upper age limit of 0.8-1.5 Gyr, favoring the younger age for the primary. Using evolutionary models in combination with an adopted system age of 0.25-1.5 Gyr indicates a total mass for 2MASS J0850+1057 of 0.07 {+-} 0.02 M{sub sun}, if it is a binary. NLTT 20346/2MASS J0850+1057 joins a growing list of hierarchical systems containing brown dwarf binaries and is among the lowest binding energy associations found in the field. Formation simulations via gravitational fragmentation of massive extended disks have successfully produced a specific analog to this system.

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: BVI photometry of Be 27, Be 24 and Be 36 (Donati+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donati, P.; Bragaglia, A.; Cignoni, M.; Cocozza, G.; Tosi, M.

    2013-01-01

    High quality photometry of three open clusters has been acquired at the ESO 3.58m New Technology Telescope (NTT) of the La Silla Observatory (Chile) with the instrument SUperb Seeing Imager (SUSI2) in 2005 and 2006. Data was analyzed using Daophot II. We estimated age, distance, metallicity, and reddening for the three clusters (Be27, Be34, and Be36) using BVI photometry and the synthetic-CMD technique (based on data collected at ESO telescopes under programme 076.D-0119) (3 data files).

  16. Accurate PSF-matched photometry for the J-PAS survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez-Teja, Yolanda; Benitez, Txitxo; Dupke, Renato a.

    2015-08-01

    The Javalambre-PAU Astrophysical Survey (J-PAS) is expected to map 8,600 squared-degrees of the sky using 54 narrow and 5 broad band filters. Carried out by a Spanish-Brazilian consortium, the main goal of this survey is to measure Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAOs) with photometric redshifts. The expectation is measuring these photometric redshifts with a precision of dz/(1 + z) ~ 0.003 for 100 million galaxies and a few millions of quasars, and reaching an accuracy of dz/(1 + z) ~ 0.01 for other 300 million galaxies. With these numbers, it will be possible to determine w in the Dark Energy (DE) equation of state with an accuracy of < 4%. To achieve such precision and measure the radial BAOs, not only an advanced technical setup but also special data processing tools are required. These tools must be accurate as well as suitable to be implemented in fully automated and computationally efficient algorithms.The factor that most influences the photometric redshift precision is the quality of the photometry. For that reason we have developed a new technique based on the Chebyshev-Fourier bases (CHEFs, Jiménez-Teja & Benítez 2012, ApJ, 745, 150) to obtain a highly precise multicolor photometry without PSF consideration, thus saving a considerable amount of time and circumventing severe problems such as the PSF variability across the images. The CHEFs are a set of mathematical orthonormal bases with different scale and resolution levels, originally designed to fit the surface light distribution of galaxies. They have proved to be able to model any kind of morphology, including spirals, highly elliptical, or irregular galaxies, including isophotal twists and fine substructure. They also fit high signal-to-noise images, lensing arcs and stars with great accuracy. We can calculate optimal, unbiased, total magnitudes directly through these CHEFs models and, thus, colors without needing the PSF.We compare our photometry with widely-used codes such as SExtractor (Bertin

  17. REVIEW ARTICLE: Photometry, radiometry and 'the candela': evolution in the classical and quantum world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwinkels, Joanne C.; Ikonen, Erkki; Fox, Nigel P.; Ulm, Gerhard; Rastello, Maria Luisa

    2010-10-01

    The metrological fields of photometry and radiometry and their associated units are closely linked through the current definition of the base unit of luminous intensity—the candela. These fields are important to a wide range of applications requiring precise and accurate measurements of electromagnetic radiation and, in particular, the amount of radiant energy (light) that is perceived by the human eye. The candela has been one of the base units since the inception of the International System of Units (SI) and is the only base unit that quantifies a fundamental biological process—human vision. This photobiological process spans an enormous dynamic range of light levels from a few-photon interaction involved in triggering the vision mechanism to a level of more than 1015 photons per second that is accommodated by the visual response under bright daylight conditions. This position paper, prepared by members of the Task Group on the SI of the Consultative Committee for Photometry and Radiometry Strategic Planning Working Group (CCPR WG-SP), reviews the evolution of these fields of optical radiation measurements and their consequent impact on definitions and realization of the candela. Over the past several decades, there have been significant developments in sources, detectors, measuring instruments and techniques, that have improved the measurement of photometric and radiometric quantities for classical applications in lighting design, manufacturing and quality control processes involving optical sources, detectors and materials. These improved realizations largely underpin the present (1979) definition of the candela. There is no consensus on whether this radiant-based definition fully satisfies the current and projected needs of the optical radiation community. There is also no consensus on whether a reformulation of the definition of the candela in terms of photon flux will be applicable to the lighting community. However, there have been significant recent

  18. Multicolor Photometry of the Merging Galaxy Cluster A2319: Dynamics and Star Formation Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Peng-Fei; Yuan, Qi-Rong; Zhang, Li; Zhou, Xu

    2014-05-01

    Asymmetric X-ray emission and a powerful cluster-scale radio halo indicate that A2319 is a merging cluster of galaxies. This paper presents our multicolor photometry for A2319 with 15 optical intermediate filters in the Beijing-Arizona-Taiwan-Connecticut (BATC) system. There are 142 galaxies with known spectroscopic redshifts within the viewing field of 58' × 58' centered on this rich cluster, including 128 member galaxies (called sample I). A large velocity dispersion in the rest frame, 1622^{+91}_{-70} km s-1, suggests merger dynamics in A2319. The contour map of projected density and localized velocity structure confirm the so-called A2319B substructure, at ~10' northwest to the main concentration A2319A. The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of more than 30,000 sources are obtained in our BATC photometry down to V ~ 20 mag. A u-band (~3551 Å) image with better seeing and spatial resolution, obtained with the Bok 2.3 m telescope at Kitt Peak, is taken to make star-galaxy separation and distinguish the overlapping contamination in the BATC aperture photometry. With color-color diagrams and photometric redshift technique, 233 galaxies brighter than h BATC = 19.0 are newly selected as member candidates after an exclusion of false candidates with contaminated BATC SEDs by eyeball-checking the u-band Bok image. The early-type galaxies are found to follow a tight color-magnitude correlation. Based on sample I and the enlarged sample of member galaxies (called sample II), subcluster A2319B is confirmed. The star formation properties of cluster galaxies are derived with the evolutionary synthesis model, PEGASE, assuming a Salpeter initial mass function and an exponentially decreasing star formation rate (SFR). A strong environmental effect on star formation histories is found in the manner that galaxies in the sparse regions have various star formation histories, while galaxies in the dense regions are found to have shorter SFR time scales, older stellar ages, and

  19. NEAR-INFRARED PHOTOMETRY OF Y DWARFS: LOW AMMONIA ABUNDANCE AND THE ONSET OF WATER CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Leggett, S. K.; Morley, Caroline V.; Marley, M. S.; Saumon, D.

    2015-01-20

    We present new near-infrared photometry for seven late-type T dwarfs and nine Y-type dwarfs, and lower limit magnitudes for a tenth Y dwarf, obtained at Gemini Observatory. We also present a reanalysis of H-band imaging data from the Keck Observatory Archive, for an 11th Y dwarf. These data are combined with earlier MKO-system photometry, Spitzer and WISE mid-infrared photometry, and available trigonometric parallaxes, to create a sample of late-type brown dwarfs that includes 10 T9-T9.5 dwarfs or dwarf systems, and 16 Y dwarfs. We compare the data to our models, which include updated H{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} opacity, as well as low-temperature condensate clouds. The models qualitatively reproduce the trends seen in the observed colors; however, there are discrepancies of around a factor of two in flux for the Y0-Y1 dwarfs, with T {sub eff} ≈ 350-400 K. At T {sub eff} ∼ 400 K, the problems could be addressed by significantly reducing the NH{sub 3} absorption, for example by halving the abundance of NH{sub 3} possibly by vertical mixing. At T {sub eff} ∼ 350 K, the discrepancy may be resolved by incorporating thick water clouds. The onset of these clouds might occur over a narrow range in T {sub eff}, as indicated by the observed small change in 5 μm flux over a large change in J – W2 color. Of the known Y dwarfs, the reddest in J –W2 are WISEP J182831.08+265037.8 and WISE J085510.83–071442.5. We interpret the former as a pair of identical 300-350 K dwarfs, and the latter as a 250 K dwarf. If these objects are ∼3 Gyr old, their masses are ∼10 and ∼5 Jupiter-masses, respectively.

  20. Multicolor photometry of the merging galaxy cluster A2319: Dynamics and star formation properties

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Peng-Fei; Yuan, Qi-Rong; Zhang, Li; Zhou, Xu E-mail: yuanqirong@njnu.edu.cn

    2014-05-01

    Asymmetric X-ray emission and a powerful cluster-scale radio halo indicate that A2319 is a merging cluster of galaxies. This paper presents our multicolor photometry for A2319 with 15 optical intermediate filters in the Beijing-Arizona-Taiwan-Connecticut (BATC) system. There are 142 galaxies with known spectroscopic redshifts within the viewing field of 58' × 58' centered on this rich cluster, including 128 member galaxies (called sample I). A large velocity dispersion in the rest frame, 1622{sub −70}{sup +91} km s{sup –1}, suggests merger dynamics in A2319. The contour map of projected density and localized velocity structure confirm the so-called A2319B substructure, at ∼10' northwest to the main concentration A2319A. The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of more than 30,000 sources are obtained in our BATC photometry down to V ∼ 20 mag. A u-band (∼3551 Å) image with better seeing and spatial resolution, obtained with the Bok 2.3 m telescope at Kitt Peak, is taken to make star-galaxy separation and distinguish the overlapping contamination in the BATC aperture photometry. With color-color diagrams and photometric redshift technique, 233 galaxies brighter than h {sub BATC} = 19.0 are newly selected as member candidates after an exclusion of false candidates with contaminated BATC SEDs by eyeball-checking the u-band Bok image. The early-type galaxies are found to follow a tight color-magnitude correlation. Based on sample I and the enlarged sample of member galaxies (called sample II), subcluster A2319B is confirmed. The star formation properties of cluster galaxies are derived with the evolutionary synthesis model, PEGASE, assuming a Salpeter initial mass function and an exponentially decreasing star formation rate (SFR). A strong environmental effect on star formation histories is found in the manner that galaxies in the sparse regions have various star formation histories, while galaxies in the dense regions are found to have shorter SFR time