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Sample records for 2n cross-section measurements

  1. Estimating Reaction Cross Sections from Measured (Gamma)-Ray Yields: The 238U(n,2n) and 239Pu(n,2n) Cross Sections

    SciTech Connect

    Younes, W

    2002-11-18

    A procedure is presented to deduce the reaction-channel cross section from measured partial {gamma}-ray cross sections. In its simplest form, the procedure consists in adding complementary measured and calculated contributions to produce the channel cross section. A matrix formalism is introduced to provide a rigorous framework for this approach. The formalism is illustrated using a fictitious product nucleus with a simple level scheme, and a general algorithm is presented to process any level scheme. In order to circumvent the cumbersome algebra that can arise in the matrix formalism, a more intuitive graphical procedure is introduced to obtain the same reaction cross-section estimate. The features and limitations of the method are discussed, and the technique is applied to extract the {sup 235}U (n,2n) and {sup 239}Pu(n,2n) cross sections from experimental partial {gamma}-ray cross sections, coupled with (enhanced) Hauser-Feshbach calculations.

  2. Surrogate Measurements of Actinide (n,2n) Cross Sections with NeutronSTARS

    SciTech Connect

    Casperson, R. J.; Burke, J. T.; Hughes, R. O.; Akindele, O. A.; Koglin, J. D.; Wang, B.; Tamashiro, A.

    2016-09-27

    Directly measuring (n,2n) cross sections on short-lived actinides presents a number of experimental challenges. The surrogate reaction technique is an experimental method for measuring cross sections on short-­lived isotopes, and it provides a unique solution for measuring (n,2n) cross sections. This technique involves measuring a charged-­particle reaction cross section, where the reaction populates the same compound nucleus as the reaction of interest. To perform these surrogate (n,2n) cross section measurements, a silicon telescope array has been placed along a beam line at the Texas A&M University Cyclotron Institute, which is surrounded by a large tank of gadolinium-doped liquid scintillator, which acts as a neutron detector. The combination of the charge-particle and neutron-detector arrays is referred to as NeutronSTARS. In the analysis procedure for calculating the (n,2n) cross section, the neutron detection efficiency and time structure plays an important role. Due to the lack of availability of isotropic, mono-energetic neutron sources, modeling is an important component in establishing this efficiency and time structure. This report describes the NeutronSTARS array, which was designed and commissioned during this project. It also describes the surrogate reaction technique, specifically referencing a 235U(n,2n) commissioning measurement that was fielded during the past year. Advanced multiplicity analysis techniques have been developed for this work, which should allow for efficient analysis of 241Pu(n,2n) and 239Pu(n,2n) cross section measurements

  3. Total Cross Section Measurements and Velocity Distributions of Hyperthermal Charge Transfer in Xe2+ + N2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hause, Michael; Prince, Benjamin; Bemish, Raymond

    Guided-ion beam measurements of the charge exchange (CEX) cross section for Xe2+ + N2 are reported for collision energies ranging from 0.3 to 100 eV in the center-of-mass frame. Measured total XS decrease from 69.5 +/-0.3 Angstroms2 (Angs.) at the lowest collision energies to 40 Angs.2at 100 eV. The product N2+CEX cross section is similar to the total CEX cross section while those of the dissociative product, N+, are less than 1Angs.2 for collision energies above 9 eV. The product N2+CEXcross section measured here are much larger than the total optical emission-excitation cross sections for the N2+(A) and (B) state products determined previously in the chemiluminescence study of Prince and Chiu suggesting that most of the N2+products are in the X state. Time-of-flight (TOF) spectra of both the Xe+ and N2+products suggest two different CEX product channels. The first leaves highly-vibrationally excited N2+products with forward scattered Xe+ (LAB frame) and releases between 0.35 to 0.6 eV translational energy for collisions below 17.6 eV. The second component decreases with collisional energy and leaves backscattered Xe+ and low-vibrational states of N2+.At collision energies above 17.6 eV, only charge exchange involving minimal momentum exchange remains in the TOF spectra. AFOSR 13RV07COR.

  4. 239Pu(n,2n) 238Pu cross section inferred from IDA calculations and GEANIE measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H; Ormand, W E; Dietrich, F S

    2000-09-01

    This report presents the latest {sup 239}Pu(n,2n){sup 238}Pu cross sections inferred from calculations performed with the nuclear reaction-modeling code system, IDA, coupled with experimental measurements of partial {gamma}-ray cross sections for incident neutron energies ranging from 5.68 to 17.18 MeV. It is found that the inferred {sup 239}Pu(n,2n){sup 238}Pu cross section peaks at E{sub inc} {approx} 11.4 MeV with a peak value of approximately 326 mb. At E{sub inc} {approx} 14 MeV, the inferred {sup 239}Pu(n,2n){sup 238}Pu cross section is found to be in good agreement with previous radio-chemical measurements by Lockheed. However, the shape of the inferred {sup 239}Pu(n,2n){sup 238}Pu cross section differs significantly from previous evaluations of ENDL, ENDF/B-V and ENDF/B-VI. In our calculations, direct, preequilibrium, and compound reactions are included. Also considered in the modeling are fission and {gamma}-cascade processes in addition to particle emission. The main components of physics adopted and the parameters used in our calculations are discussed. Good agreement of the inferred {sup 239}Pu(n,2n){sup 238}Pu cross sections derived separately from IDA and GNASH calculations is shown. The two inferences provide an estimate of variations in the deduced {sup 239}Pu(n,2n){sup 238}Pu cross section originating from modeling.

  5. Measurement of (23)Na(n,2n) cross section in well-defined reactor spectra.

    PubMed

    Košťál, Michal; Švadlenková, Marie; Baroň, Petr; Milčák, Ján; Mareček, Martin; Uhlíř, Jan

    2016-05-01

    The present paper aims to compare the calculated and experimental reaction rates of (23)Na(n,2n)(22)Na in a well-defined reactor spectra of a special core assembled in the LR-0 reactor. The experimentally determined reaction rate, derived using gamma spectroscopy of irradiated NaF sample, is used for average cross section determination. The resulting value averaged in spectra is 0.91±0.02µb. This cross-section is important as it is included in International Reactor Dosimetry and Fusion File and is also relevant to the correct estimation of long-term activity of Na coolant in Sodium Fast Reactors. The calculations were performed with the MCNP6 code using ENDF/B-VII.0, JEFF-3.1, JEFF-3.2, JENDL-3.3, JENDL-4, ROSFOND-2010 and CENDL-3.1 nuclear data libraries. Generally the best C/E agreement, within 2%, was found using the ROSFOND-2010 data set, whereas the worst, as high as 40%, was found using the ENDF/B-VII.0.

  6. Measurement of the {sup 241}Am(n,2n) reaction cross section using the activation method

    SciTech Connect

    Perdikakis, G.; Papadopoulos, C.T.; Vlastou, R.; Kokkoris, M.; Galanopoulos, S.; Patronis, N.; Lagoyannis, A.; Spyrou, A.; Zarkadas, Ch.; Kalyva, G.; Kossionides, S.; Karamanis, D.

    2006-06-15

    In the context of the n{sub T}OF Collaboration, the measurement of the cross section of the reaction {sup 241}Am(n,2n){sup 240}Am, has been performed, for the first time at neutron energies from 8.8 to 11.4 MeV, by the activation method, relative to the {sup 27}Al(n,a){sup 24}Na reaction reference cross section. The monoenergetic neutron beam was produced at the 5.5 MV TANDEM accelerator of NCSR ''Demokritos,'' by means of the {sup 2}H(d,n){sup 3}He reaction, using a deuterium filled gas cell. The radioactive target consisted of a 37 GBq {sup 241}Am source enclosed in a Pb container. After the end of the irradiation, the activity induced by the neutron beam at the target and reference, was measured off-line by a 56% relative efficiency, HPGe detector.

  7. Cross section measurements for neutron inelastic scattering and the (n, 2nγ) reaction on Pb206

    DOE PAGES

    Negret, A.; Mihailescu, L. C.; Borcea, C.; ...

    2015-06-30

    We measured excitation functions for γ production associated with the neutron inelastic scattering and the (n, 2n) reactions on 206Pb from threshold up to 18 MeV for about 40 transitions. Two independent measurements were performed using different samples and acquisition systems to check consistency of the results. Moreover, the neutron flux was determined with a 235U fission chamber and a procedure that were validated against a fluence standard. For incident energy higher than the threshold for the first excited level and up to 3.5 MeV, estimates are provided for the total inelastic and level cross sections by combining the presentmore » γ production cross sections with the level and decay data of 206Pb reported in the literature. The uncertainty common to all incident energies is 3.0% allowing overall uncertainties from 3.3% to 30% depending on transition and neutron energy. Finally, the present data agree well with earlier work, but significantly expand the experimental database while comparisons with model calculations using the talys reaction code show good agreement over the full energy range.« less

  8. 207Pb(n,2n{gamma})206Pb Cross-Section Measurements by In-Beam Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, P.; Kerveno, M.; Rudolf, G.; Borcea, C.; Jericha, E.; Jokic, S.; Lukic, S.; Mihailescu, L. C.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Pavlik, A.

    2006-03-13

    207Pb(n,2n{gamma})206Pb cross section were measured for incident neutron energies between 6 and 20 MeV with the white neutron beam produced at GELINA. The {gamma}-ray production cross section for the main transition (803 keV, 2+{yields} 0+) in 206Pb is compared to results obtained at Los Alamos and to the TALYS and EMPIRE-II code predictions.

  9. Measurement of the 23Na(n,2n) cross section in 235U and 252Cf fission neutron spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Košťál, Michal; Schulc, Martin; Rypar, Vojtěch; Losa, Evžen; Švadlenková, Marie; Baroň, Petr; Jánský, Bohumil; Novák, Evžen; Mareček, Martin; Uhlíř, Jan

    2017-09-01

    The presented paper aims to compare the calculated and experimental reaction rates of 23Na(n,2n)22Na in a well-defined reactor spectra and in the spontaneous fission spectrum of 252Cf. The experimentally determined reaction rate, derived using gamma spectroscopy of irradiated NaF sample, is used for average cross section determination.Estimation of this cross-section is important as it is included in International Reactor Dosimetry and Fusion File and is also relevant to the correct estimation of long-term activity of Na coolant in Sodium Fast Reactors. The calculations were performed with the MCNP6 code using ENDF/B-VII.0, JEFF-3.1, JEFF-3.2, JENDL-3.3, JENDL-4, ROSFOND-2010, CENDL-3.1 and IRDFF nuclear data libraries. In the case of reactor spectrum, reasonable agreement was not achieved with any library. However, in the case of 252Cf spectrum agreement was achieved with IRDFF, JEFF-3.1 and JENDL libraries.

  10. Measurement of the sup 19 F(n,2n) sup 18 F cross section from 18 to 27 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmann, C.L.; DeLuca, P.M. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    the {sup 19}F(n,2n){sup 18}F cross section was measured at neutron energies of 18, 21, 23, and 27 MeV. Nearly monoenergetic neutrons bombarded teflon (CF{sub 2}), Zr, and Au samples. {sup 19}F(n,2n){sup 18}F cross section values were determined relative to {sup nat}Zr(n,xn){sup 89}Zr and {sup 197}Au(n,2n){sup 196}Au from measurements of the {sup 18}F, {sup 89}Zr, and {sup 196}Au activities. Our results are in agreement with previous measurements below 20 MeV and extend the usefulness of this reaction to 27 MeV. 22 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  11. Radar Cross Section Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-30

    Radar 54 17. Measured Range Sidelobe Performance of Chirp Radar 56 18. Range and Cross Range Image of Target Dror.’ŕ Vehicle 57 19. Incoherent rms...the measured range resolution, 4.9 in, closely agrees with the theoretical performance for this weighting. The measured range sidelobe performance...Interval 4.89in. 2% kHz 300 kHz 310 kHz (b) Expanded Scale + 5 ft from Target Figure 17. Measured Range Sidelobe Performance of

  12. Partial (gamma)-Ray Cross Sections for the Reaction 239Pu(n,2n(gamma)i) and the 239Pu(n,2n) Cross Section

    SciTech Connect

    Beacker, J.A.; Bernstein, L.A.; Younes, W.; McNabb, D.P.; Garrett, P.E.; Archer, D.; McGrath, C.A.; Stoyer, M.A.; Chen, H.; Ormand, W.E.; Nelson, R.O.; Chadwick, M.B.; Johns, G.D.; Drake, D.; Young, P.G.; Devlin, M.; Fotiades, N.; Wilburn, W.S.

    2001-09-14

    Absolute partial {gamma}-ray cross sections for production of discrete {gamma} rays in the {sup 239}Pu(n,2n{gamma}i){sup 238}Pu reaction have been measured. The experiments were performed at LANSCE/WNR on the 60R flight line. Reaction {gamma}-rays were measured using the large-scale Compton-suppressed array of Ge detectors, GEANIE. The motivation for this experiment, an overview of the partial {gamma}-ray cross-section measurement, and an introduction to the main experimental issues will be presented. The energy resolution of the Ge detectors allowed identification of reaction {gamma} rays above the background of sample radioactivity and fission {gamma} rays. The use of planar Ge detectors with their reduced sensitivity to neutron interactions and improved line shape was also important to the success of this experiment. Absolute partial {gamma}-ray cross sections are presented for the 6{sub 1}{sup +} {yields} 4{sub 1}{sup +} member of the ground state rotational band in {sup 238}Pu, together with miscellaneous other {gamma}-ray partial cross sections. The n,2n reaction cross section shape and magnitude as a function of neutron energy was extracted from these partial cross sections using nuclear modeling (enhanced Hauser-Feshbach) to relate partial {gamma}-ray cross sections to the n,2n cross section. The critical nuclear modeling issue is the ratio of a partial cross section to the reaction channel cross section, and not the prediction of the absolute magnitude.

  13. Measurement of the Am241(n,2n) reaction cross section from 7.6 MeV to 14.5 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonchev, A. P.; Angell, C. T.; Boswell, M.; Crowell, A. S.; Fallin, B.; Hammond, S.; Howell, C. R.; Hutcheson, A.; Karwowski, H. J.; Kelley, J. H.; Pedroni, R. S.; Tornow, W.; Becker, J. A.; Dashdorj, D.; Kenneally, J.; Macri, R. A.; Stoyer, M. A.; Wu, C. Y.; Bond, E.; Chadwick, M. B.; Fitzpatrick, J.; Kawano, T.; Rundberg, R. S.; Slemmons, A.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2008-05-01

    The (n,2n) cross section of the radioactive isotope Am241 (T1/2=432.6 y) has been measured in the incident neutron energy range from 7.6 to 14.5 MeV in steps of a few MeV using the activation technique. Monoenergetic neutron beams were produced via the H2(d,n)He3 reaction by bombarding a pressurized deuterium gas cell with an energetic deuteron beam at the TUNL 10-MV Van de Graaff accelerator facility. The induced γ-ray activity of Am240 was measured with high-resolution HPGe detectors. The cross section was determined relative to Al, Ni, and Au neutron activation monitor foils, measured in the same geometry. Good agreement is obtained with previous measurements at around 9 and 14 MeV, whereas for a large discrepancy is observed when our data are compared to those reported by Perdikakis near 11 MeV. Very good agreement is found with the END-B/VII evaluation, whereas the JENDL-3.3 evaluation is in fair agreement with our data.

  14. Measurements of the 169Tm(n,2n)168Tm cross section between 9.0 and 17.5 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soter, J.; Bhike, Megha; Krishichayan, Fnu; Finch, S. W.; Tornow, W.

    2016-09-01

    Measurements of the 169Tm(n,2n)168Tm cross section have been performed in 0.5 MeV intervals for neutron energies ranging from 9.0 MeV to 17.5 MeV in order to resolve discrepancies in the current literature data. The neutron activation technique was used with 90Zr and 197Au as monitor foils. After irradiation, de-excitation gamma rays were recorded off-line with High-Purity Germanium (HPGE) detectors in TUNL's Low-Background Counting Facility. In addition, data for the 169Tm(n,3n)167Tm reaction have also been obtained from 15.5 MeV to 17.5 MeV. The results of these measurements provide the basis for investigating properties of the interial confinement fusion plasma in deuterium-tritium (DT) capsules at the National Ignition Facility located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  15. [Fast neutron cross section measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Knoll, G.F.

    1992-10-26

    From its inception, the Nuclear Data Project at the University of Michigan has concentrated on two major objectives: (1) to carry out carefully controlled nuclear measurements of the highest possible reliability in support of the national nuclear data program, and (2) to provide an educational opportunity for students with interests in experimental nuclear science. The project has undergone a successful transition from a primary dependence on our photoneutron laboratory to one in which our current research is entirely based on a unique pulsed 14 MeV fast neutron facility. The new experimental facility is unique in its ability to provide nanosecond bursts of 14 MeV neutrons under conditions that are clean'' and as scatter-free as possible, and is the only one of its type currently in operation in the United States. It has been designed and put into operation primarily by graduate students, and has met or exceeded all of its important initial performance goals. We have reached the point of its routine operation, and most of the data are now in hand that will serve as the basis for the first two doctoral dissertations to be written by participating graduate students. Our initial results on double differential neutron cross sections will be presented at the May 1993 Fusion Reactor Technology Workshop. We are pleased to report that, after investing several years in equipment assembly and optimization, the project has now entered its data production'' phase.

  16. Neutrino flux predictions for cross section measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hartz, Mark

    2015-05-15

    Experiments that measure neutrino interaction cross sections using accelerator neutrino sources require a prediction of the neutrino flux to extract the interaction cross section from the measured neutrino interaction rate. This article summarizes methods of estimating the neutrino flux using in-situ and ex-situ measurements. The application of these methods by current and recent experiments is discussed.

  17. Neodymium neutron cross section measurements.

    PubMed

    Barry, D P; Trbovich, M J; Danon, Y; Block, R C; Slovacek, R E; Leinweber, G; Burke, J A; Drindak, N J

    2005-01-01

    Neutron capture and transmission measurements were performed by the time-of-flight technique at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute LINAC using metallic neodymium samples. The capture measurements were made at the 25-m-long flight station with a 16-segment NaI(Tl) multiplicity detector, and the transmission measurements were performed at 15 and 25 m flight stations with a 6Li glass scintillation detector. After the data were collected and reduced, resonance parameters were determined by simultaneously fitting the transmission and capture data with the multilevel R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY. The resonance parameters for all naturally occurring neodymium isotopes lie within the energy range of 1.0-500 eV. The resulting resonance parameters were used to calculate the capture resonance integral with this energy region and were compared to calculations obtained when using the resonance parameters from ENDF-B/VI. The RPI parameters gave a resonance integral value of 32 +/- 0.5 b that is approximately 7% lower than that obtained with the ENDF-B/VI parameters. The current measurements significantly reduce the statistical uncertainties on the resonance parameters when compared with previously published parameters.

  18. Reliability of (γ ,1 n ), (γ ,2 n ), and (γ ,3 n ) cross-section data on 159Tb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varlamov, V.; Ishkhanov, B.; Orlin, V.

    2017-05-01

    The majority of partial and total photoneutron cross-section data were obtained using beams of quasimonoenergetic photons produced by annihilation in the flight of fast positrons and the method of neutron multiplicity-sorting procedures at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (California) and Saclay (France). Significant systematic disagreements between the two sets of data were obtained by employing the new objective physical data reliability criteria. It was found that many reaction cross sections are not reliable. As an example, a significant systematic uncertainty of the 159Tb(γ ,2 n ) cross-section data measured at Livermore is presented. The (γ ,2 n ) reaction cross section was obtained as erroneous, whereas the (γ ,3 n ) reaction cross section was not obtained at all. The detailed discussion of this analysis is presented. The newly unmeasured before (γ ,3 n ) cross section is obtained from the experimental (γ ,2 n ) cross section using simple equations based on the physical criteria.

  19. Prospects for Precision Neutrino Cross Section Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Deborah A.

    2016-01-28

    The need for precision cross section measurements is more urgent now than ever before, given the central role neutrino oscillation measurements play in the field of particle physics. The definition of precision is something worth considering, however. In order to build the best model for an oscillation experiment, cross section measurements should span a broad range of energies, neutrino interaction channels, and target nuclei. Precision might better be defined not in the final uncertainty associated with any one measurement but rather with the breadth of measurements that are available to constrain models. Current experience shows that models are better constrained by 10 measurements across different processes and energies with 10% uncertainties than by one measurement of one process on one nucleus with a 1% uncertainty. This article describes the current status of and future prospects for the field of precision cross section measurements considering the metric of how many processes, energies, and nuclei have been studied.

  20. Top differential cross section measurements (Tevatron)

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Andreas W.

    2012-01-01

    Differential cross sections in the top quark sector measured at the Fermilab Tevatron collider are presented. CDF used 2.7 fb{sup -1} of data and measured the differential cross section as a function of the invariant mass of the t{bar t} system. The measurement shows good agreement with the standard model and furthermore is used to derive limits on the ratio {kappa}/M{sub Pl} for gravitons which decay to top quarks in the Randall-Sundrum model. D0 used 1.0 fb{sup -1} of data to measure the differential cross section as a function of the transverse momentum of the top-quark. The measurement shows a good agreement to the next-to-leading order perturbative QCD prediction and various other standard model predictions.

  1. Undergraduate Measurements of Neutron Cross Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, S. F.; Vanhoy, J. R.; French, A. J.; Santonil, Z. C.; Crider, B. P.; Peters, E. E.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Prados-Estévez, F. M.; Ross, T. J.; Yates, S. W.

    Undergraduate students at the University of Dallas have investigated basic properties of nuclei through γ-ray and neutron spectroscopy following neutron scattering. The former has been used primarily for nuclear structure investigations, while the latter has been used to measure neutron scattering cross sections important for fission reactor applications. A series of (n,n') and (n,n'γ) measurements have been made on 54Fe and 56Fe to determine neutron cross sections for scattering to excited levels in these nuclei. The former provides the cross sections directly and the latter are used to deduce inelastic neutron scattering cross sections by measuring the γ-ray production cross sections to states not easily resolved in neutron spectroscopy. All measurements have been completed at the University of Kentucky Accelerator Laboratory using a 7-MV Model CN Van de Graaff accelerator, along with the neutron production and neutron and γ-ray detection systems located there. Students participate in accelerator operation, experimental setup, data acquisition, and data analyses. An overview of the research program and student contributions is presented.

  2. Measurement of the argon-38(n,2n)argon-37 and calcium- 40(n,alpha)argon-37 cross sections, and National Ignition Facility concrete activation using the rotating target neutron source. The design of an experiment to measure the beryllium-9(n,gamma)beryllium-10 cross section at 14 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belian, Anthony Paul

    The Rotating Target Neutron Source (RTNS) was used in experiments to measure neutron induced cross sections at 14 MeV, and the activation properties of a specific mix of concrete. The RTNS is an accelerator based DT fusion neutron source located at the University of California, Berkeley. Two of the experiments performed for this thesis were specifically of interest for the construction and operation of the National Ignition Facility (NIF), they were the 38Ar(n,2n)37Ar cross section measurement, and the concrete activation measurement. The NIF is a large multi-beam laser facility that will study the effects of age on the nation's stockpile of nuclear weapons. The NIF, when fully operational, will focus the energy of 192 Neodymium glass lasers onto a 1 mm diameter pellet filled with deuterium and tritium fuel. This pellet is compressed by the laser energy giving some of the individual atoms of deuterium and tritium enough kinetic energy to overcome the coulomb barrier and fuse. The energy output from these pellet implosions will be in the range of tens of mega-joules (MJ). The 38Ar(n,2n)37Ar reaction will be useful to NIF scientists to measure important parameters such as target energy yield and areal density. In order to make these measurements precise, an accurate 38Ar(n,2n)37Ar cross section was necessary. The cross sections measured were: 74.9 +/- 3.8 millibarns (mb) at 13.3 +/- 0.01 MeV, 89.2 +/- 4.0 mb at 14.0 +/- 0.03 MeV, and 123.57 +/- 6.4 mb at 15.0 +/- 0.06 MeV. With anticipated energy yields in the tens of mega-joules per pellet implosion, the number of neutrons released is in the range of 1019 to 1020 neutrons per implosion. With such a large number of neutrons, minimizing the activation of the surrounding structure is very much of interest for the sake of personnel radiation safety. To benchmark the computer codes used to calculate the anticipated neutron activation of target bay concrete, samples were irradiated at the RTNS. Dose rates from each sample

  3. Precise neutron inelastic cross section measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Negret, Alexandru

    2012-11-20

    The design of a new generation of nuclear reactors requires the development of a very precise neutron cross section database. Ongoing experiments performed at dedicated facilities aim to the measurement of such cross sections with an unprecedented uncertainty of the order of 5% or even smaller. We give an overview of such a facility: the Gamma Array for Inelastic Neutron Scattering (GAINS) installed at the GELINA neutron source of IRMM, Belgium. Some of the most challenging difficulties of the experimental approach are emphasized and recent results are shown.

  4. New yttrium evaluated cross sections and impact on 88-Y(n,2n)87-Y radchem

    SciTech Connect

    White, M; Kawano, T; Fotiadis, N; Devlin, M; Nelson, R; Garrett, P; Chadwick, M B; Becker, J A

    2004-03-04

    We evaluate new n+{sup 89}Y radchem cross sections using recent LANSCE/GEANIE measurements and GNASH nuclear model calculations, together with previous measurements at Livermore by Dietrich et al. A quantification of margins and uncertainties (QMU) analysis leads to evaluated cross sections for the (n,2n) population of the {sup 88}Y ground state and m1, m2 isomers, together with uncertainties. Our new results agree with historic radchem database cross sections within a few percent below 15 MeV (with larger differences above 15 MeV) and they therefore provide a validation of the historic Arthur work that is used in LANL simulation codes. Since the (n,2n) cross sections to the {sup 88}Y g.s. and m1, m2 isomers impact the average {sup 88}Y(n,2n){sup 87}Y cross section at leading-order, we determine the new 14.1 MeV average {sup 88}Y(n,2n){sup 87}Y cross section (crucially important for radchem). Our new 14 MeV average {sup 88}Y(n,2n){sup 87}Y cross section is 1107 mb ({+-} 4%) which agrees with the value obtained from the historic Arthur cross section data to 0.7%.

  5. Cross section measurements via residual nuclear decays: Analysis methods

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Fengqun; Gao Lei; Li Kuohu; Song Yueli; Zhang Fang; Kong Xiangzhong; Luo Junhua

    2009-11-15

    We develop an approach to calculating the pure cross section of the ground state of artificial radioactive nuclides that subtracts the effect of an excited state on the ground state. We apply a formalism to obtaining pure cross sections by subtracting the effect of excited states in the reactions {sup 122}Te(n,2n){sup 121}Te{sup g} and {sup 128}Te(n,2n){sup 127}Te{sup g}, induced by neutrons of about 14 MeV. The cross sections are measured by an activation relative to the {sup 93}Nb(n,2n){sup 92}Nb{sup m} reaction and are compared with results that take into account the effect of the excited state. Measurements are carried out by {gamma} detection using a coaxial high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector. As samples, spectroscopically pure Te powder is used. The fast neutrons are produced by the {sup 3}H(d,n){sup 4}He reaction. The neutron energies in these measurements are determined using the method of cross-section ratios between the {sup 90}Zr(n,2n){sup 89}Zr{sup m+g} and {sup 93}Nb(n,2n){sup 92}Nb{sup m} reactions.

  6. Inclusive jet cross section measurement at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Pagliarone, C.

    1996-08-01

    The CDF Collaboration has measured the inclusive jet cross section using 1992-93 collider data at 1.8 TeV. The CDF measurement is in very good agreement with NLO QCD predictions for transverse energies (E{sub T}) below 200 GeV. However, it is systematically higher than NLO QCD predictions for E{sub T} above 200 GeV.

  7. Fusion cross sections measurements with MUSIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnelli, P. F. F.; Fernández Niello, J. O.; Almaraz-Calderon, S.; Rehm, K. E.; Albers, M.; Digiovine, B.; Esbensen, H.; Henderson, D.; Jiang, C. L.; Nusair, O.; Palchan-Hazan, T.; Pardo, R. C.; Ugalde, C.; Paul, M.; Alcorta, M.; Bertone, P. F.; Lai, J.; Marley, S. T.

    2014-09-01

    The interaction between exotic nuclei plays an important role for understanding the reaction mechanism of the fusion processes as well as for the energy production in stars. With the advent of radioactive beams new frontiers for fusion reaction studies have become accessible. We have performed the first measurements of the total fusion cross sections in the systems 10 , 14 , 15C + 12C using a newly developed active target-detector system (MUSIC). Comparison of the obtained cross sections with theoretical predictions show a good agreement in the energy region accessible with existing radioactive beams. This type of comparison allows us to calibrate the calculations for cases that cannot be studied in the laboratory with the current experimental capabilities. The high efficiency of this active detector system will allow future measurements with even more neutron-rich isotopes. The interaction between exotic nuclei plays an important role for understanding the reaction mechanism of the fusion processes as well as for the energy production in stars. With the advent of radioactive beams new frontiers for fusion reaction studies have become accessible. We have performed the first measurements of the total fusion cross sections in the systems 10 , 14 , 15C + 12C using a newly developed active target-detector system (MUSIC). Comparison of the obtained cross sections with theoretical predictions show a good agreement in the energy region accessible with existing radioactive beams. This type of comparison allows us to calibrate the calculations for cases that cannot be studied in the laboratory with the current experimental capabilities. The high efficiency of this active detector system will allow future measurements with even more neutron-rich isotopes. This work is supported by the U.S. DOE Office of Nuclear Physics under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357 and the Universidad Nacional de San Martin, Argentina, Grant SJ10/39.

  8. Cross section of the 197Au(n,2n)196Au reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalamara, A.; Vlastou, R.; Kokkoris, M.; Diakaki, M.; Serris, M.; Patronis, N.; Axiotis, M.; Lagoyannis, A.

    2017-09-01

    The 197Au(n,2n)196Au reaction cross section has been measured at two energies, namely at 17.1 MeV and 20.9 MeV, by means of the activation technique, relative to the 27Al(n,α)24Na reference reaction cross section. Quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams were produced at the 5.5 MV Tandem T11/25 accelerator laboratory of NCSR "Demokritos", by means of the 3H(d,n)4He reaction, implementing a new Ti-tritiated target of ˜ 400 GBq activity. The induced γ-ray activity at the targets and reference foils has been measured with HPGe detectors. The cross section for the population of the second isomeric (12-) state m2 of 196Au was independently determined. Auxiliary Monte Carlo simulations were performed using the MCNP code. The present results are in agreement with previous experimental data and with theoretical calculations of the measured reaction cross sections, which were carried out with the use of the EMPIRE code.

  9. Investigation of the 241Am(n ,2 n )240Am cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalamara, A.; Vlastou, R.; Kokkoris, M.; Diakaki, M.; Tsinganis, A.; Patronis, N.; Axiotis, M.; Lagoyannis, A.

    2016-01-01

    The 241Am(n ,2 n )240Am reaction cross section has been measured at four energies, 10.0, 10.4, 10.8, and 17.1 MeV, by means of the activation technique, relative to the 27Al(n ,α )24Na reaction reference cross section. Quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams were produced via the 2H(d ,n )3He and the 3H(d ,n )4He reactions at the 5.5 MV Tandem T11/25 accelerator laboratory of NCSR "Demokritos". The high purity 241Am targets were provided by JRC-IRMM, Geel, Belgium. The induced γ -ray activity of 240Am was measured with high-resolution high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors. Auxiliary Monte Carlo simulations were performed with the mcnp code. The present results are in agreement with data obtained earlier and predictions obtained with the empire code.

  10. Measurements of 89Y(n,2n)88Y and 89Y(n,3n)87Y, 87mY cross sections for fast neutrons at KIRAMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    In, Eun Jin; Bak, Sang-In; Ham, Cheolmin; Kim, Do Yoon; Myung, Hyunjeong; Shim, Chungbo; Shin, Jae Won; Min, Kyung Joo; Zhou, Yujie; Park, Tae-Sun; Hong, Seung-Woo; Bhoraskar, V. N.

    2017-09-01

    A proton cyclotron MC-50 in Korea Institute of Radiological & Medical Science (KIRAMS) is used to carry out neutron activation experiments with Y2O3 targets irradiated with neutron beams of a continuous spectrum produced by proton beams on a thick beryllium target. Neutrons are generated by 9Be (p, n) reaction with an incident proton intensity of 20 μA. The neutron spectra generated by proton beams of 30, 35, and 40 MeV are calculated by GEANT4 simulations. Nb powders are used for neutron flux monitoring by measuring the activities of 92mNb through the reaction 93Nb (n, 2n). By using a subtraction method, the average cross section of 89Y(n,2n) and 89Y(n,3n) reactions at the neutron energies of 29.8 ± 1.8 MeV and 34.8 ± 1.8 MeV are extracted and are found to be close to the existing cross sections from the EXFOR data and the evaluated nuclear data libraries such as TENDL-2015 or EAF-2010.

  11. Top cross section measurement at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Compostella, Gabriele; /INFN, CNAF /Padua U.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the latest measurements of the t{bar t} pair production cross section performed by the CDF Collaboration analyzing p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV from Fermilab Tevatron, as presented at the XVIII International Workshop on Deep-Inelastic Scattering and Related Subjects. In order to test Standard Model predictions, several analysis methods are explored and all the top decay channels are considered, to better constrain the properties of the top quark and to search for possible sources of new physics affecting the pair production mechanism. Experimental results using an integrated luminosity up to 5.1 fb{sup -1} are presented.

  12. High precision neutron inelastic cross section measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olacel, A.; Belloni, F.; Borcea, C.; Boromiza, M.; Dessagne, Ph.; Henning, G.; Kerveno, M.; Negret, A.; Nyman, M.; Pirovano, E.; Plompen, A.

    2017-06-01

    High precision neutron inelastic scattering cross section data are very important for the development of the new generation of nuclear reactors (Gen IV). Our experiments, performed using the GELINA neutron source and the GAINS spectrometer of the European Commission Joint Research Center, Geel, produce highly reliable and precise cross section data. We will present the details of the setup and the data analysis technique allowing production of such unique results, and we will show examples of two experimental results.

  13. Absolute np and pp cross section determinations aimed at improving the standard for cross section measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Laptev, Alexander B; Haight, Robert C; Tovesson, Fredrik; Arndt, Richard A; Briscoe, William J; Paris, Mark W; Strakovsky, Igor I; Workman, Ron L

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of present research is a keeping improvement of the standard for cross section measurements of neutron-induced reactions. The cross sections for np and pp scattering below 1000 MeV are determined based on partial-wave analyses (PW As) of nucleon-nucleon scattering data. These cross sections are compared with the most recent ENDF/B-V11.0 and JENDL-4.0 data files, and the Nijmegen PWA. Also a comparison of evaluated data with recent experimental data was made to check a quality of evaluation. Excellent agreement was found between the new experimental data and our PWA predictions.

  14. Absolute np and pp Cross Section Determinations Aimed At Improving The Standard For Cross Section Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Laptev, A. B.; Haight, R. C.; Tovesson, F.; Arndt, R. A.; Briscoe, W. J.; Paris, M. W.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Workman, R. L.

    2011-06-01

    Purpose of present research is a keeping improvement of the standard for cross section measurements of neutron-induced reactions. The cross sections for np and pp scattering below 1 GeV are determined based on partial-wave analyses (PWAs) of nucleon-nucleon scattering data. These cross sections are compared with the most recent ENDF/B-VII.0 and JENDL-4.0 data files, and the Nijmegen PWA. Also a comparison of evaluated data with recent experimental data was made to check a quality of evaluation. Excellent agreement was found between the new experimental data and our PWA predictions.

  15. APPARATUS FOR MEASURING TOTAL NEUTRON CROSS SECTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Cranberg, L.

    1959-10-13

    An apparatus is described for measuring high-resolution total neutron cross sections at high counting rate in the range above 50-kev neutron energy. The pulsed-beam time-of-flight technique is used to identify the neutrons of interest which are produced in the target of an electrostatic accelerator. Energy modulation of the accelerator . makes it possible to make observations at 100 energy points simultaneously. 761O An apparatus is described for monitoring the proton resonance of a liquid which is particulariy useful in the continuous purity analysis of heavy water. A hollow shell with parallel sides defines a meander chamber positioned within a uniform magnetic fieid. The liquid passes through an inlet at the outer edge of the chamber and through a spiral channel to the central region of the chamber where an outlet tube extends into the chamber perpendicular to the magnetic field. The radiofrequency energy for the monitor is coupled to a coil positioned coaxially with the outlet tube at its entrance point within the chamber. The improvement lies in the compact mechanical arrangement of the monitor unit whereby the liquid under analysis is subjected to the same magnetic field in the storage and sensing areas, and the entire unit is shielded from external electrostatic influences.

  16. [Fast neutron cross section measurements]. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Knoll, G.F.

    1992-10-26

    From its inception, the Nuclear Data Project at the University of Michigan has concentrated on two major objectives: (1) to carry out carefully controlled nuclear measurements of the highest possible reliability in support of the national nuclear data program, and (2) to provide an educational opportunity for students with interests in experimental nuclear science. The project has undergone a successful transition from a primary dependence on our photoneutron laboratory to one in which our current research is entirely based on a unique pulsed 14 MeV fast neutron facility. The new experimental facility is unique in its ability to provide nanosecond bursts of 14 MeV neutrons under conditions that are ``clean`` and as scatter-free as possible, and is the only one of its type currently in operation in the United States. It has been designed and put into operation primarily by graduate students, and has met or exceeded all of its important initial performance goals. We have reached the point of its routine operation, and most of the data are now in hand that will serve as the basis for the first two doctoral dissertations to be written by participating graduate students. Our initial results on double differential neutron cross sections will be presented at the May 1993 Fusion Reactor Technology Workshop. We are pleased to report that, after investing several years in equipment assembly and optimization, the project has now entered its ``data production`` phase.

  17. Neutron-capture Cross Sections from Indirect Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Escher, J E; Burke, J T; Dietrich, F S; Ressler, J J; Scielzo, N D; Thompson, I J

    2011-10-18

    Cross sections for compound-nuclear reactions play an important role in models of astrophysical environments and simulations of the nuclear fuel cycle. Providing reliable cross section data remains a formidable task, and direct measurements have to be complemented by theoretical predictions and indirect methods. The surrogate nuclear reactions method provides an indirect approach for determining cross sections for reactions on unstable isotopes, which are difficult or impossible to measure otherwise. Current implementations of the method provide useful cross sections for (n,f) reactions, but need to be improved upon for applications to capture reactions.

  18. Measured microwave scattering cross sections of three meteorite specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, W. E.

    1972-01-01

    Three meteorite specimens were used in a microwave scattering experiment to determine the scattering cross sections of stony meteorites and iron meteorites in the frequency range from 10 to 14 GHz. The results indicate that the stony meteorites have a microwave scattering cross section that is 30 to 50 percent of their projected optical cross section. Measurements of the iron meteorite scattering were inconclusive because of specimen surface irregularities.

  19. Fission Cross Section Measurements of Actinides at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    F. Tovesson; A. B. Laptev; T. S. Hill

    2011-08-01

    Fission cross sections of a range of actinides have been measured at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) in support of nuclear energy applications. By combining measurement at two LANSCE facilities, Lujan Center and the Weapons Neutron Research center (WNR), differential cross sections can be measured from sub-thermal energies up to 200 MeV. Incident neutron energies are determined using the time-of-flight method, and parallel-plate ionization chambers are used to measure fission cross sections relative to the 235U standard. Recent measurements include the 233, 238U, 239-242Pu, and 243Am neutron-induced fission cross sections. In this paper preliminary results for fission cross sections of 243Am and 233U will be presented.

  20. Fission cross section measurements of actinides at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Tovesson, Fredrik; Laptev, Alexander B; Hill, Tony S

    2010-01-01

    Fission cross sections of a range of actinides have been measured at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) in support of nuclear energy applications. By combining measurement at two LANSCE facilities, Lujan Center and the Weapons Neutron Research center (WNR), differential cross sections can be measured from sub-thermal energies up to 200 MeV. Incident neutron energies are determined using the time-of-flight method, and parallel-plate ionization chambers are used to measure fission cross sections relative to the {sup 235}U standard. Recent measurements include the {sup 233,238}U, {sup 239,242}Pu and {sup 243}Am neutron-induced fission cross sections. In this paper preliminary results for cross section data of {sup 243}Am and {sup 233}U will be presented.

  1. First measurement of the charged current cross section at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, T.; Andreev, V.; Andrieu, B.; Appuhn, R.-D.; Arpagaus, M.; Babaev, A.; Bán, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Barth, M.; Bassler, U.; Beck, H. P.; Behrend, H.-J.; Belousov, A.; Berger, Ch.; Bergstein, H.; Bernardi, G.; Bernet, R.; Bertrand-Coremans, G.; Besançon, M.; Biddulph, P.; Bizot, J. C.; Blobel, V.; Borras, K.; Boudry, V.; Braemer, A.; Brasse, F.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Brune, C.; Büngener, L.; Bürger, J.; Büsser, F. W.; Buniatian, A.; Burke, S.; Buschhorn, G.; Campbell, A. J.; Carli, T.; Charles, F.; Clarke, D.; Clegg, A. B.; Colombo, M.; Coughlan, J. A.; Courau, A.; Coutures, Ch.; Cozzika, G.; Criegee, L.; Cussans, D. G.; Cvach, J.; Dagoret, S.; Dainton, J. B.; Danilov, M.; Dann, A. W. E.; Dau, W. D.; Daum, K.; David, M.; Deffur, E.; Delcourt, B.; Del Buono, L.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.; Dollfus, C.; Dowell, J. D.; Dreis, H. B.; Duboc, J.; Düllmann, D.; Dünger, O.; Duhm, H.; Ebert, J.; Ebert, T. R.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Ehrlichmann, H.; Eichenberger, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ellison, R. J.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Evrard, E.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Feeken, D.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Ferrarotto, F.; Flamm, K.; Flauger, W.; Fleischer, M.; Flieser, M.; Flügge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Fominykh, B.; Forbush, M.; Formánek, J.; Foster, J. M.; Franke, G.; Fretwurst, E.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamerdinger, K.; Garvey, J.; Gayler, J.; Gebauer, M.; Gellrich, A.; Genzel, H.; Gerhards, R.; Goerlach, U.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Goldberg, M.; Goldner, D.; Goodall, A. M.; Gorelov, I.; Goritchev, P.; Grab, C.; Grässler, H.; Grässler, R.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, G.; Gruber, C.; Haack, J.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Hamon, O.; Hampel, M.; Hanlon, E. M.; Hapke, M.; Haynes, W. J.; Heatherington, J.; Hedberg, V.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Henschel, H.; Herma, R.; Herynek, I.; Hildesheim, W.; Hill, P.; Hilton, C. D.; Hladký, J.; Hoeger, K. C.; Höppner, M.; Huet, Ph.; Hufnagel, H.; Ibbotson, M.; Itterbeck, H.; Jabiol, M.-A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacobsson, C.; Jaffre, M.; Janoth, J.; Jansen, T.; Jönsson, L.; Johannsen, K.; Johnson, D. P.; Johnson, L.; Jung, H.; Kalmus, P. I. P.; Kant, D.; Kazarian, S.; Kaschowitz, R.; Kasselmann, P.; Kathage, U.; Kaufmann, H. H.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kermiche, S.; Keuker, C.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Knies, G.; Ko, W.; Köhler, T.; Kolanoski, H.; Kole, F.; Kolya, S. D.; Korbel, V.; Korn, M.; Kostka, P.; Kotelnikov, S. K.; Krasny, M. W.; Krehbiel, H.; Krücker, D.; Krüger, U.; Krüner-Marquis, M.; Kubenka, J. P.; Küster, H.; Kuhlen, M.; Kurča, T.; Kurzhöfer, J.; Kuznik, B.; Lacour, D.; Lamarche, F.; Lander, R.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Lanius, P.; Laporte, J. F.; Lebedev, A.; Leverenz, C.; Levonian, S.; Ley, Ch.; Lindner, A.; Lindström, G.; Linsel, F.; Lipinski, J.; Loch, P.; Lohmander, H.; Lopez, G. C.; Lüers, D.; Lüke, D.; Magnussen, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mani, S.; Marage, P.; Marshall, R.; Martens, J.; Martin, R.; Martyn, H.-U.; Martyniak, J.; Masson, S.; Mavroidis, A.; Maxfield, S. J.; McMahon, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Mercer, D.; Merz, T.; Meyer, C. A.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Milone, V.; Milstead, D.; Moreau, F.; Morris, J. V.; Müller, G.; Murín, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Nawrath, G.; Newman, P. R.; Newton, D.; Neyret, D.; Nguyen, H. K.; Niebergall, F.; Niebuhr, C.; Nisius, R.; Nowak, G.; Noyes, G. W.; Nyberg-Werther, M.; Oberlack, H.; Obrock, U.; Olsson, J. E.; Panitch, A.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Peppel, E.; Perez, E.; Phillips, J. P.; Pichler, Ch.; Pitzl, D.; Pope, G.; Prell, S.; Prosi, R.; Rädel, G.; Raupach, F.; Reimer, P.; Reinshagen, S.; Ribarics, P.; Riech, V.; Riedlberger, J.; Riess, S.; Rietz, M.; Robertson, S. M.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rosenbauer, K.; Rostovtsev, A.; Royon, C.; Rüter, K.; Ruffer, M.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Sahlmann, N.; Sanchez, E.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Savitsky, M.; Schacht, P.; Schleper, P.; von Schlippe, W.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, D.; Schöning, A.; Schröder, V.; Schulz, M.; Schwab, B.; Schwind, A.; Seehausen, U.; Sefkow, F.; Sell, R.; Semenov, A.; Shekelyan, V.; Sheviakov, I.; Shooshtari, H.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Siegmon, G.; Siewert, U.; Sirois, Y.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Smirnov, P.; Smith, J. R.; Soloviev, Y.; Spitzer, H.; Staroba, P.; Steenbock, M.; Steffen, P.; Steinberg, R.; Stella, B.; Stephens, K.; Stier, J.; Stiewe, J.; Stösslein, U.; Strachota, J.; Straumann, U.; Struczinski, W.; Sutton, J. P.; Tapprogge, S.; Taylor, R. E.; Tchernyshov, V.; Thiebaux, C.; Thompson, G.; Tichomirov, I.; Truöl, P.; Turnau, J.; Tutas, J.; Usik, A.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallée, C.; Van Esch, P.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vartapetian, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Vecko, M.; Verrecchia, P.; Villet, G.; Wacker, K.; Wagener, A.; Walker, I. W.; Walther, A.; Weber, G.; Weber, M.; Weber, M.; Wegener, D.; Wegner, A.; Wellisch, H. P.; West, L. R.; Willard, S.; Winde, M.; Winter, G.-G.; Wolff, Th.; Wright, A. E.; Wünsch, E.; Wulff, N.; Yiou, T. P.; Žáček, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zimmer, M.; Zimmermann, W.; Zomer, F.; Zuber, K.; H1 Collaboration

    1994-03-01

    The cross section of the charged current process e-p → ve + hadrons is measured at HERA for transverse momenta of the hadron system larger than 25 GeV. The size of the cross section exhibits the W propagator.

  2. Rotational Energy Transfer Cross Sections in N2-N2 Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Green, Sheldon; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Rotational inelastic transitions of N2 have been studied in the coupled state (CS, also called centrifugal sudden) and infinite-order-sudden (IOS) approximations, using the N2-N2 rigid-rotor potential of van der Avoird et al. For benchmarking purposes, close coupling (CC) calculations have also been carried out over a limited energy range and for even j - even j collisions only. Both the CC and CS cross sections have been obtained with and without exchange symmetry, whereas exchange is neglected in the IOS calculations. The CS results track the CC cross sections rather well. At total energies between 113 to 219 cm(exp -1) the average deviation is 14%. The deviation decrease with increasing energy, indicating that the CS approximation can be used as a substitute at higher energies when the CC calculations become impractical. Comparison between the CS and IOS cross sections at the high energy end of the CS calculation, 500 - 680 cm(exp-1), shows significant differences between the two. In addition, the IOS results exhibits sensitivity to the amount of inelasticity and the results for large DELTA J transitions are subjected to bigger errors. At total energy 113 cm(exp -1) and above, the average deviation between state-to-state cross sections calculated with even and odd exchange symmetries is 1.5%.

  3. Rotational Energy Transfer Cross Sections in N2-N2 Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Green, Sheldon; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Rotational inelastic transitions of N2 have been studied in the coupled state (CS, also called centrifugal sudden) and infinite-order-sudden (IOS) approximations, using the N2-N2 rigid-rotor potential of van der Avoird et al. For benchmarking purposes, close coupling (CC) calculations have also been carried out over a limited energy range and for even j - even j collisions only. Both the CC and CS cross sections have been obtained with and without exchange symmetry, whereas exchange is neglected in the IOS calculations. The CS results track the CC cross sections rather well. At total energies between 113 to 219 cm(exp -1) the average deviation is 14%. The deviation decrease with increasing energy, indicating that the CS approximation can be used as a substitute at higher energies when the CC calculations become impractical. Comparison between the CS and IOS cross sections at the high energy end of the CS calculation, 500 - 680 cm(exp-1), shows significant differences between the two. In addition, the IOS results exhibits sensitivity to the amount of inelasticity and the results for large DELTA J transitions are subjected to bigger errors. At total energy 113 cm(exp -1) and above, the average deviation between state-to-state cross sections calculated with even and odd exchange symmetries is 1.5%.

  4. Actinide neutron-induced fission cross section measurements at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Tovesson, Fredrik K; Laptev, Alexander B; Hill, Tony S

    2010-01-01

    Fission cross sections of a range of actinides have been measured at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) in support of nuclear energy applications in a wide energy range from sub-thermal energies up to 200 MeV. A parallel-plate ionization chamber are used to measure fission cross sections ratios relative to the {sup 235}U standard while incident neutron energies are determined using the time-of-flight method. Recent measurements include the {sup 233,238}U, {sup 239-242}Pu and {sup 243}Am neutron-induced fission cross sections. Obtained data are presented in comparison with ex isting evaluations and previous data.

  5. Neutral pion cross section measurement at K2K

    SciTech Connect

    Mariani, C.

    2007-12-21

    In this paper we report the measurement of the rate of the single {pi}{sup o} production in the K2K close detector. Neutral current single {pi}{sup o} production is measured in Oxygen, in the 1 KT detector. The cross section ratio relative to the total charged current cross section is found to be: 0.063{+-}0.001(stat.){+-}0.006(syst.) in good agreement with the Monte Carlo expectation. Inclusive charged current {pi}{sup o} production is measured in C{sub 8}H{sub 8}, in the SciBar detector, the cross section ratio for these processes relative to the charged current quasi elastic neutrino cross section is found to be 0.306{+-}0.023(stat.){+-}0.025(syst.) showing an excess of (39{+-}15)% (statistical and systematic error added in quadrature) with respect to the prediction of our reference Monte Carlo.

  6. Progress on FP13 Total Cross Section Measurements Capability

    SciTech Connect

    Ullmann, John Leonard; Couture, Aaron Joseph; Koehler, Paul E.; Mocko, Michal; Mosby, Shea Morgan; Wender, Stephen Arthur

    2016-09-26

    An accurate knowledge of the neutron capture cross section is important for many applications. Experimental measurements are important since theoretical calculations of capture have been notoriously difficult, with the ratio of measured to calculated cross sections often a factor of 2 or more in the 10 keV to 1 MeV region. However, a direct measurement of capture cannot be made on many interesting radioactive nuclides because of their short half-life or backgrounds caused by their nuclear decay. On the other hand, neutron transmission measurements of the total cross section are feasible for a wide range of radioactive nuclides since the detectors are far from the sample, and often are less sensitive to decay radiation. The parameters extracted from a total cross section measurement, which include the average resonance spacing, the neutron strength function, and the average total radiation width, (Γγ), provide tight constraints on the calculation of the capture cross section, and when applied produce much more accurate results. These measurements can be made using the intense epithermal neutron flux at the Lujan Center on relatively small quantities of target material. It was the purpose of this project to investigate and develop the capability to make these measurements. A great deal of progress was made towards establishing this capability during 2016, including setting up the flight path and obtaining preliminary results, but more work remains to be done.

  7. High Energy Measurement of the Deuteron Photodisintegration Differential Cross Section

    SciTech Connect

    Schulte, Elaine

    2002-05-01

    New measurements of the high energy deuteron photodisintegration differential cross section were made at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in Newport News, Virginia. Two experiments were performed. Experiment E96-003 was performed in experimental Hall C. The measurements were designed to extend the highest energy differential cross section values to 5.5 GeV incident photon energy at forward angles. This builds upon previous high energy measurements in which scaling consistent with the pQCD constituent counting rules was observed at 90 degrees and 70 degrees in the center of mass. From the new measurements, a threshold for the onset of constituent counting rule scaling seems present at transverse momentum approximately 1.3 GeV/c. The second experiment, E99-008, was performed in experimental Hall A. The measurements were designed to explore the angular distribution of the differential cross section at constant energy. The measurements were made symmetric about 90 degrees

  8. Measurements of the cross sections of the 186W(n ,γ )187W , 182W(n ,p )182Ta , 154Gd(n ,2 n )153Gd , and 160Gd(n ,2 n )159Gd reactions at neutron energies of 5 to 17 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makwana, Rajnikant; Mukherjee, S.; Mishra, P.; Naik, H.; Singh, N. L.; Mehta, M.; Katovsky, K.; Suryanarayana, S. V.; Vansola, V.; Santhi Sheela, Y.; Karkera, M.; Acharya, R.; Khirwadkar, S.

    2017-08-01

    The cross sections of the 186W(n ,γ )187W , 183W(n ,p )183Ta and 154Gd(n ,2 n )153Gd , 160Gd(n ,2 n )159Gd reactions were measured at the neutron energies 5.08 ±0.165 , 8.96 ±0.77 , 12.47 ±0.825 , and 16.63 ±0.95 MeV . Standard neutron activation analysis technique and off-line γ ray spectrometry were used for the measurement and analysis of the data. Measurements were done in the energy range where few or no measured data are available. The results from the present work are compared with the literature data based on the EXFOR compilation. The experimental results are supported by theoretical predictions using nuclear modular codes TALYS 1.8 and EMPIRE 3.2.2. The predictability of different one-dimensional models available in TALYS 1.8 and Levden models in EMPIRE 3.2.2 were tested. A detailed comparison of experimental results with theoretical model calculations is made.

  9. Measurement of the 242Pu neutron capture cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckner, M. Q.; Wu, C. Y.; Henderson, R. A.; Bucher, B.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Baramsai, B.; Couture, A.; Jandel, M.; Mosby, S.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Ullmann, J. L.; Chyzh, A.; Dance Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Precision (n,f) and (n, γ) cross sections are important for the network calculations of the radiochemical diagnostic chain for the U.S. DOE's Stockpile Stewardship Program. 242Pu(n, γ) cross section is relevant to the network calculations of Pu and Am. Additionally, new reactor concepts have catalyzed considerable interest in the measurement of improved cross sections for neutron-induced reactions on key actinides. To date, little or no experimental data has been reported on 242Pu(n, γ) for incident neutron energy below 50 keV. A new measurement of the 242Pu(n, γ) reaction was performed with the DANCE together with an improved PPAC for fission-fragment detection at LANSCE during FY14. The relative scale of the 242Pu(n, γ) cross section spans four orders of magnitude for incident neutron energies from thermal to ~ 30 keV. The absolute scale of the 242Pu(n, γ) cross section is set according to the measured 239Pu(n,f) resonance at 7.8 eV; the target was spiked with 239Pu for this measurement. The absolute 242Pu(n, γ) neutron capture cross section is ~ 30% higher than the cross section reported in ENDF for the 2.7 eV resonance. Latest results to be reported. Funded by U.S. DOE Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344 (LLNL) and DE-AC52-06NA25396 (LANL). U.S. DOE/NNSA Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development. Isotopes (ORNL).

  10. Measurements of (n,{gamma}) cross sections with small samples

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, P.E.; Kaeppeler, F.

    1995-02-05

    Neutron capture cross section data for certain isotopes of very small natural abundance are crucial for a better understanding of the s- and p-processes of nucleosynthesis. Also, recent work has shown that many previous (n,{gamma}) measurements need to be extended to lower neutron energies and that the accuracy of some previous data need to be improved. At Los Alamos we have developed a system for measuring (n,{gamma}) cross sections on samples as small as 1 mg. We give examples of measurements made with this apparatus and discuss the nuclear astrophysics motivation for these and future measurements.

  11. Measurements of (n,{gamma}) cross sections with small samples

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, P.E.; Kaeppeler, F.

    1994-09-01

    Neutron capture cross section data for certain isotopes of very small natural abundance are crucial for a better understanding of the s- and p-processes of nucleosynthesis. Also, recent work has shown that many previous (n,{gamma}) measurements need to be extended to lower neutron energies and that the accuracy of some previous data need to be improved. At Los Alamos the authors have developed a system for measuring (n,{gamma}) cross sections on samples as small as 1 mg. They give examples of measurements made with this apparatus and discuss the nuclear astrophysics motivation for these and future measurements.

  12. Total cross sections for positrons scattered elastically from helium based on new measurements of total ionization cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diana, L. M.; Chaplin, R. L.; Brooks, D. L.; Adams, J. T.; Reyna, L. K.

    1990-01-01

    An improved technique is presented for employing the 2.3m spectrometer to measure total ionization cross sections, Q sub ion, for positrons incident on He. The new ionization cross section agree with the values reported earlier. Estimates are also presented of total elastic scattering cross section, Q sub el, obtained by subtracting from total scattering cross sections, Q sub tot, reported in the literature, the Q sub ion and Q sub Ps (total positronium formation cross sections) and total excitation cross sections, Q sub ex, published by another researcher. The Q sub ion and Q sub el measured with the 3m high resolution time-of-flight spectrometer for 54.9eV positrons are in accord with the results from the 2.3m spectrometer. The ionization cross sections are in fair agreement with theory tending for the most part to be higher, especially at 76.3 and 88.5eV. The elastic cross section agree quite well with theory to the vicinity of 50eV, but at 60eV and above the experimental elastic cross sections climb to and remain at about 0.30 pi a sub o sq while the theoretical values steadily decrease.

  13. Ozone absorption cross section measurements in the Wulf bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Stuart M.; Hupalo, Peter; Mauersberger, Konrad

    1993-01-01

    A tandem dual-beam spectrometer has been developed to determine ozone absorption cross sections for 13 selected wavelengths between 750 and 975 nm at room temperature. The increasingly pronounced structure in this region may interfere with atmospheric trace gas transitions that are useful for remote sensing and complicate the measurement of aerosols. Ozone concentrations were determined by absorption at the common HeNe laser transition near 632.8 nm using the absolute cross section reported previously. The overall accuracy of these room temperature measurements is generally better than 2 percent. A synoptic near-IR spectrum scaled to these measurements is employed for comparison with results of previous studies.

  14. The Inclusive Neutrino Charged Current Cross Section Measured in NOMAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godley, Andrew; Wu, Qun; Mishra, Sanjib

    2007-04-01

    The inclusive charged current cross section of muon neutrino interactions is measured as a function of energy using the NOMAD data. The significance of this measurement is its precision below 30 GeV, a region not previously well covered and of importance to current and proposed neutrino experiments. The procedure and results of the measurement will be presented.

  15. Performing Neutron Cross-Section Measurements at RIA

    SciTech Connect

    Ahle, L E

    2003-05-20

    The Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) is a proposed accelerator for the low energy nuclear physics community. Its goal is to understand the natural abundances of the elements heavier than iron, explore the nuclear force in systems far from stability, and study symmetry violation and fundamental physics in nuclei. To achieve these scientific goals, RIA promises to produce isotopes far from stability in sufficient quantities to allow experiments. It would also produce near stability isotopes at never before seen production rates, as much as 10{sup 12} pps. Included in these isotopes are many that are important to stockpile stewardship, such as {sup 87}Y, {sup 146-50}Eu, and {sup 231}Th. Given the expected production rates at RIA and a reasonably intense neutron source, one can expect to make {approx} 10 {micro}g targets of nuclei with a half-life of {approx}1 day. Thus, it will be possible at RIA to obtain experimental information on the neutron cross section for isotopes that have to date only been determined by theory. There are two methods to perform neutron cross-section measurements, prompt and delayed. The prompt method tries to measure each reaction as it happens. The exact technique employed will depend on the reaction of interest, (n,2n), (n,{gamma}), (n,p), etc. The biggest challenge with this method is designing a detector system that can handle the gamma ray background from the target. The delayed method, which is the traditional radiochemistry method for determining the cross-section, irradiates the targets and then counts the reaction products after the fact. While this allows one to avoid the target background, the allowed fraction of target impurities is extremely low. This is especially true for the desired reaction product with the required impurity fraction on the order of 10{sup -9}. This is particularly problematic for (n,2n) and (n,{gamma}) reactions, whose reaction production cannot be chemically separated from the target. In either case, the

  16. Study of (n,2n) reaction on 191,193Ir isotopes and isomeric cross section ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlastou, R.; Kalamara, A.; Kokkoris, M.; Patronis, N.; Serris, M.; Georgoulakis, M.; Hassapoglou, S.; Kobothanasis, K.; Axiotis, M.; Lagoyannis, A.

    2017-09-01

    The cross section of 191Ir(n,2n)190Irg+m1 and 191Ir(n,2n)190Irm2 reactions has been measured at 17.1 and 20.9 MeV neutron energies at the 5.5 MV tandem T11/25 Accelerator Laboratory of NCSR "Demokritos", using the activation method. The neutron beams were produced by means of the 3H(d,n)4He reaction at a flux of the order of 2 × 105 n/cm2s. The neutron flux has been deduced implementing the 27Al(n,α) reaction, while the flux variation of the neutron beam was monitored by using a BF3 detector. The 193Ir(n,2n)192Ir reaction cross section has also been determined, taking into account the contribution from the contaminant 191Ir(n,γ)192Ir reaction. The correction method is based on the existing data in ENDF for the contaminant reaction, convoluted with the neutron spectra which have been extensively studied by means of simulations using the NeusDesc and MCNP codes. Statistical model calculations using the code EMPIRE 3.2.2 and taking into account pre-equilibrium emission, have been performed on the data measured in this work as well as on data reported in literature.

  17. Measurements of multiphoton action cross sections for multiphoton microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Li-Chung; Horton, Nicholas G.; Wang, Ke; Chen, Shean-Jen; Xu, Chris

    2014-01-01

    We report quantitative measurements of two-, three-, and four-photon excitation action cross sections of several commonly used fluorophores and fluorescent proteins at three different excitation wavelengths of 800 nm, 1300 nm, and 1680 nm. The measured cross section values are consistent with simple quantum mechanic estimations. These values indicate that the optimum repetition rate for deep tissue 3-photon microscopy is approximately 1 to 2 MHz. We further demonstrate that it is feasible to perform 4-photon fluorescence microscopy of GFP labeled microglia in mouse brain in vivo at 1700 nm. 4-photon excitation increases the accessibility of fluorophores at the long wavelength spectral window of 1700 nm. PMID:25360361

  18. Uncertainty quantification in fission cross section measurements at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Tovesson, F.

    2015-01-09

    Neutron-induced fission cross sections have been measured for several isotopes of uranium and plutonium at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) over a wide range of incident neutron energies. The total uncertainties in these measurements are in the range 3–5% above 100 keV of incident neutron energy, which results from uncertainties in the target, neutron source, and detector system. The individual sources of uncertainties are assumed to be uncorrelated, however correlation in the cross section across neutron energy bins are considered. The quantification of the uncertainty contributions will be described here.

  19. Uncertainty Quantification in Fission Cross Section Measurements at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Tovesson, F.

    2015-01-15

    Neutron-induced fission cross sections have been measured for several isotopes of uranium and plutonium at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) over a wide range of incident neutron energies. The total uncertainties in these measurements are in the range 3–5% above 100 keV of incident neutron energy, which results from uncertainties in the target, neutron source, and detector system. The individual sources of uncertainties are assumed to be uncorrelated, however correlation in the cross section across neutron energy bins are considered. The quantification of the uncertainty contributions will be described here.

  20. Uncertainty quantification in fission cross section measurements at LANSCE

    DOE PAGES

    Tovesson, F.

    2015-01-09

    Neutron-induced fission cross sections have been measured for several isotopes of uranium and plutonium at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) over a wide range of incident neutron energies. The total uncertainties in these measurements are in the range 3–5% above 100 keV of incident neutron energy, which results from uncertainties in the target, neutron source, and detector system. The individual sources of uncertainties are assumed to be uncorrelated, however correlation in the cross section across neutron energy bins are considered. The quantification of the uncertainty contributions will be described here.

  1. Inelastic cross sections from gamma-ray measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Ronald Owen

    2010-12-06

    Measurements of gamma rays following neutron induced reactions have been studied with the Germanium Array for Neutron-induced Excitations (GEANIE) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) for many years. Gamma-ray excitation functions and coincidence studies provide insight into nuclear reaction mechanisms as well as expanding our knowledge of energy levels and gamma-rays. Samples studied with Ge detectors at LANSCE range from Be to Pu. Fe, Cr and Ti have been considered for use as reference cross sections. An overview of the measurements and efforts to create a reliable neutron-induced gamma-ray reference cross section will be presented.

  2. Partial photoneutron cross section measurements on 209Bi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheorghe, Ioana; Filipescu, Dan; Katayama, Seitaro; Utsunomiya, Hiroaki; Belyshev, Sergey; Stopani, Konstantin; Varlamov, Vladimir; Shima, Tatsushi; Lui, Yiu-Wing; Amano, Sho; Miyamoto, Shuji

    2017-09-01

    New data of total and partial (γ,xn) cross sections with x = 1-3 are proposed to be measured by direct neutron multiplicity sorting using Laser Compton scattering (LCS) gamma ray beams at the ELI-NP to solve long standing discrepancies between existing Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (USA) and France Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay photonuclear data. Pioneering experiments are currently performed at the NewSUBARU facility. We present here preliminary results on 209Bi(g,xn) cross section measurements.

  3. Measurement of correlated b quark cross sections at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdes, D.; CDF Collaboration

    1994-09-01

    Using data collected during the 1992--93 collider run at Fermilab, CDF has made measurements of correlated b quark cross section where one b is detected from a muon from semileptonic decay and the second b is detected with secondary vertex techniques. We report on measurements of the cross section as a function of the momentum of the second b and as a function of the azimuthal separation of the two b quarks, for transverse momentum of the initial b quark greater than 15 GeV. Results are compared to QCD predictions.

  4. 242Pu absolute neutron-capture cross section measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckner, M. Q.; Wu, C. Y.; Henderson, R. A.; Bucher, B.; Chyzh, A.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Baramsai, B.; Couture, A.; Jandel, M.; Mosby, S.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Ullmann, J. L.

    2017-09-01

    The absolute neutron-capture cross section of 242Pu was measured at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center using the Detector for Advanced Neutron-Capture Experiments array along with a compact parallel-plate avalanche counter for fission-fragment detection. During target fabrication, a small amount of 239Pu was added to the active target so that the absolute scale of the 242Pu(n,γ) cross section could be set according to the known 239Pu(n,f) resonance at En,R = 7.83 eV. The relative scale of the 242Pu(n,γ) cross section covers four orders of magnitude for incident neutron energies from thermal to ≈ 40 keV. The cross section reported in ENDF/B-VII.1 for the 242Pu(n,γ) En,R = 2.68 eV resonance was found to be 2.4% lower than the new absolute 242Pu(n,γ) cross section.

  5. C+C Fusion Cross Sections Measurements for Nuclear Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almaraz-Calderon, S.; Carnelli, P. F. F.; Rehm, K. E.; Albers, M.; Alcorta, M.; Bertone, P. F.; Digiovine, B.; Esbensen, H.; Fernandez Niello, J. O.; Henderson, D.; Jiang, C. L.; Lai, J.; Marley, S. T.; Nusair, O.; Palchan-Hazan, T.; Pardo, R. C.; Paul, M.; Ugalde, C.

    2015-06-01

    Total fusion cross section of carbon isotopes were obtained using the newly developed MUSIC detector. MUSIC is a highly efficient, active target-detector system designed to measure fusion excitation functions with radioactive beams. The present measurements are relevant for understanding x-ray superbursts. The results of the first MUSIC campaign as well as the astrophysical implications are presented in this work.

  6. C+C Fusion Cross Sections Measurements for Nuclear Astrophysics

    DOE PAGES

    Almaraz-Calderon, S.; Carnelli, P. F. F.; Rehm, K. E.; ...

    2015-06-02

    Total fusion cross section of carbon isotopes were obtained using the newly developed MUSIC detector. MUSIC is a highly efficient, active target-detector system designed to measure fusion excitation functions with radioactive beams. The present measurements are relevant for understanding x-ray superbursts. The results of the first MUSIC campaign as well as the astrophysical implications are presented in this work.

  7. Neutron scattering cross section measurements for Fe56

    DOE PAGES

    Ramirez, A. P. D.; Vanhoy, J. R.; Hicks, S. F.; ...

    2017-06-09

    Elastic and inelastic differential cross sections for neutron scattering from 56Fe have been measured for several incident energies from 1.30 to 7.96 MeV at the University of Kentucky Accelerator Laboratory. Scattered neutrons were detected using a C6D6 liquid scintillation detector using pulse-shape discrimination and time-of-flight techniques. The deduced cross sections have been compared with previously reported data, predictions from evaluation databases ENDF, JENDL, and JEFF, and theoretical calculations performed using different optical model potentials using the TALYS and EMPIRE nuclear reaction codes. The coupled-channel calculations based on the vibrational and soft-rotor models are found to describe the experimental (n,n0) andmore » (n,n1) cross sections well.« less

  8. Neutron scattering cross section measurements for 56Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, A. P. D.; Vanhoy, J. R.; Hicks, S. F.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Peters, E. E.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Harrison, T. D.; Howard, T. J.; Jackson, D. T.; Lenzen, P. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Pecha, R. L.; Rice, B. G.; Thompson, B. K.; Yates, S. W.

    2017-06-01

    Elastic and inelastic differential cross sections for neutron scattering from 56Fe have been measured for several incident energies from 1.30 to 7.96 MeV at the University of Kentucky Accelerator Laboratory. Scattered neutrons were detected using a C6D6 liquid scintillation detector using pulse-shape discrimination and time-of-flight techniques. The deduced cross sections have been compared with previously reported data, predictions from evaluation databases ENDF, JENDL, and JEFF, and theoretical calculations performed using different optical model potentials using the talys and empire nuclear reaction codes. The coupled-channel calculations based on the vibrational and soft-rotor models are found to describe the experimental (n ,n0 ) and (n ,n1 ) cross sections well.

  9. Neutron removal cross section as a measure of neutron skin

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, D. Q.; Ma, Y. G.; Cai, X. Z.; Tian, W. D.; Wang, H. W.

    2010-04-15

    We study the relation between neutron removal cross section (sigma{sub -N}) and neutron skin thickness for finite neutron-rich nuclei using the statistical abrasion ablation model. Different sizes of neutron skin are obtained by adjusting the diffuseness parameter of neutrons in the Fermi distribution. It is demonstrated that there is a good linear correlation between sigma{sub -N} and the neutron skin thickness for neutron-rich nuclei. Further analysis suggests that the relative increase of neutron removal cross section could be used as a quantitative measure for neutron skin thickness in neutron-rich nuclei.

  10. Inclusive neutrino cross section measurements at MINERvA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratchford, Jasmine; Minerva Collaboration

    2011-10-01

    The MINERvA experiment is a precision neutrino experiment designed to improve our understanding of the neutrino-nucleus interaction. The experiment uses a fully active scintillation detector to allow full event reconstruction and includes passive targets helium, water, carbon, iron and lead. Preliminary measurements of inclusive cross section ratios of lead to iron will be shown.

  11. Measurement of proton inelastic scattering cross sections on fluorine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiari, M.; Caciolli, A.; Calzolai, G.; Climent-Font, A.; Lucarelli, F.; Nava, S.

    2016-10-01

    Differential cross-sections for proton inelastic scattering on fluorine, 19F(p,p')19F, from the first five excited levels of 19F at 110, 197, 1346, 1459 and 1554 keV were measured for beam energies from 3 to 7 MeV at a scattering angle of 150° using a LiF thin target (50 μg/cm2) evaporated on a self-supporting C thin film (30 μg/cm2). Absolute differential cross-sections were calculated with a method not dependent on the absolute values of collected beam charge and detector solid angle. The validity of the measured inelastic scattering cross sections was then tested by successfully reproducing EBS spectra collected from a thick Teflon (CF2) target. As a practical application of these measured inelastic scattering cross sections in elastic backscattering spectroscopy (EBS), the feasibility of quantitative light element (C, N and O) analysis in aerosol particulate matter samples collected on Teflon by EBS measurements and spectra simulation is demonstrated.

  12. Fission, total and neutron capture cross section measurements at ORELA

    SciTech Connect

    Guber, K.H.; Spencer, R.R.; Leal, L.C.; Larson, D.C.; Dos Santos, G.; Harvey, J.A.; Hill, N.W.

    1998-08-01

    In support of the Nuclear Criticality Predictability Program established in response to the Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board Recommendation 93-2, time-of-flight (TOF) measurements of the fission cross sections of {sup 233}U in the neutron energy range from 0.36 eV to several hundred keV have been initiated at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA). Also total and capture cross sections of Al, Cl, and K in the energy range from about 100 eV to several hundred keV have been measured or are under way. The goal is to derive accurate cross section representations for the materials involved in criticality calculations of fuel storage, transportation, etc., configurations. Additional high-resolution measurements of the total cross sections of {sup 233}U below a few keV neutron energy are being planned for 1998, as well as for the other involved material. Evaluated data files in ENDF-6 format will be processed into formats for use in criticality analysis and utilized in benchmark data testing. Finally the data will be submitted for inclusion in ENDF/B.

  13. Neutron-induced Cross Section Measurements of Calcium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guber, K.; Kopecky, S.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Kauwenberghs, K.; Siegler, P.

    2014-05-01

    To support the US Department of Energy Nuclear Criticality Safety Program, neutron-induced cross section experiments were performed at the Geel Electron Linear Accelerator of the Institute for Reference Material and Measurements of the Joint Research Centers, European Union. Neutron capture and transmission measurements were carried out using a metallic calcium sample. The measured data will be used for a new calcium evaluation, which will be submitted with covariances to the ENDF/B nuclear data library.

  14. Absolute measurements of chlorine Cl+ cation single photoionization cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, E. M.; Juárez, A. M.; Kilcoyne, A. L. D.; Aguilar, A.; Hernández, L.; Antillón, A.; Macaluso, D.; Morales-Mori, A.; González-Magaña, O.; Hanstorp, D.; Covington, A. M.; Davis, V.; Calabrese, D.; Hinojosa, G.

    2015-01-01

    The photoionization of Cl+ leading to Cl2+ was measured in the photon energy range of 19.5-28.0 eV. A spectrum with a photon energy resolution of 15 meV normalized to absolute cross-section measurements is presented. The measurements were carried out by merging a Cl+ ion beam with a photon beam of highly monochromatic synchrotron radiation at the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The measured photoionization of Cl+ consists of several autoionization resonances surperimposed on the direct photoionization signal. Most of the prominent resonances are assigned to members of Rydberg series originating from the singlet ground state and from metastable triplet levels within the ground-state configuration of Cl+. The direct ionization cross section is no larger than 12 Mb.

  15. Neutron-Induced Cross Sections Measurements of Calcium

    SciTech Connect

    Guber, Klaus H; Kopecky, S.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Kauwenberghs, K.; Siegler, P.

    2013-01-01

    To support the US Department of Energy Nuclear Criticality Safety Program neutron induced cross section experiments were performed at the Geel Electron Linear Accelerator of the Institute for Reference Material and Measurements of the Joint Research Centers, European Union. Neutron capture and transmission measurements were carried out using a metallic calcium sample. The obtained data will be used for a new calcium evaluation, which will be submitted with its covariances to the ENDBF/B nuclear data base.

  16. Inclusive jet cross-section measurement at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Norniella, Olga; /Barcelona, IFAE

    2007-05-01

    The CDF Collaboration has measured the inclusive jet cross section using 1992-93 collider data at 1.8 TeV. The CDF measurement is in very good agreement with NLO QCD predictions for transverse energies (E{sub T}) below 200 GeV. However, it is systematically higher than NLO QCD predictions for E{sub T} above 200 GeV.

  17. A study of radar cross section measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, Malcolm W.

    1986-01-01

    Past, present, and proposed future technologies for the measurement of radar cross section were studied. The purpose was to determine which method(s) could most advantageously be implemented in the large microwave anechoic chamber facility which is operated at the antenna test range site. The progression toward performing radar cross section measurements of space vehicles with which the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle will be called upon to rendezvous and dock is a natural outgrowth of previous work conducted in recent years of developing a high accuracy range and velocity sensing radar system. The radar system was designed to support the rendezvous and docking of the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle with various other space vehicles. The measurement of radar cross sections of space vehicles will be necessary in order to plan properly for Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle rendezvous and docking assignments. The methods which were studied include: standard far-field measurements; reflector-type compact range measurements; lens-type compact range measurement; near field/far field transformations; and computer predictive modeling. The feasibility of each approach is examined.

  18. Ozone Cross-Section Measurement by Gas Phase Titration.

    PubMed

    Viallon, Joële; Moussay, Philippe; Flores, Edgar; Wielgosz, Robert I

    2016-11-01

    Elevated values of ground-level ozone damage health, vegetation, and building materials and are the subject of air quality regulations. Levels are monitored by networks using mostly ultraviolet (UV) absorption instruments, with traceability to standard reference photometers, relying on the UV absorption of ozone at the 253.65 nm line of mercury. We have redetermined the ozone cross-section at this wavelength based on gas phase titration (GPT) measurements. This is a well-known chemical method using the reaction of ozone (O3) with nitrogen monoxide (NO) resulting in nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and oxygen (O2). The BIPM GPT facility uses state-of-the-art flow measurement, chemiluminescence for NO concentration measurements, a cavity phase shift analyzer (CAPS) for NO2 measurements, and a UV ozone analyzer. The titration experiment is performed over the concentration range 100-500 nmol/mol, with NO and NO2 reactants/calibrants diluted down from standards with nominal mole fractions of 50 μmol/mol. Accurate measurements of NO, NO2, and O3 mole fractions allow the calculation of ozone absorption cross section values at 253.65 nm, and we report a value of 11.24 × 10(-18) cm(2) molecule(-1) with a relative expanded uncertainty of 1.8% (coverage factor k = 2) based on nitrogen monoxide titration values and a value of 11.22 × 10(-18) cm(2) molecule(-1) with a relative expanded uncertainty of 1.4% (coverage factor k = 2) based on nitrogen dioxide titration values. The excellent agreement between these values and recently published absorption cross-section measurements directly on pure ozone provide strong evidence for revising the conventionally accepted value of ozone cross section at 253.65 nm.

  19. Measurement of correlated b quark cross sections at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    CDF Collaboration

    1994-05-01

    Using data collected during the 1992--1993 collider run at Fermilab, CDF has made measurements of correlated b quark cross sections where one b is detected from the lepton from semileptonic decay and the second b is detected with secondary vertex techniques. We report on measurements of the cross section as a function of the momentum of the second b and as a function of the azimuthal separation of the two b quarks, for transverse momentum of the initial b quark greater than 15 GeV. The vertex reconstruction techniques are valid over a large range in transverse momentum, starting at a minimum of 10 GeV. Results are compared to QCD predictions.

  20. New Fission Cross Section Measurements using a Time Projection Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadler, Michael

    2008-03-01

    A group of six universities (ACU, California Polytechnic, Colorado School of Mines, Georgia Institute of Technology, Ohio, and Oregon State) and three national laboratories (Los Alamos, Lawrence Livermore, and Idaho) have undertaken the task of building a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) to measure the fission cross sections needed for the next generation of nuclear reactors. The fission TPC concept will be presented, and why we think we can improve on 50 years of fission study.

  1. Nuclear Astrophysics and Neutron Cross Section Measurements Using the ORELA

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, R. R.

    2000-08-25

    This is the final report for a research program which has been continuously supported by the AEC, ERDA, or USDOE since 1973. The neutron total and capture cross sections for n + {sup 88}Sr have been measured over the neutron energy range 100 eV to 1 MeV. The report briefly summaries our results and the importance of this work for nucleosynthesis and the optical model.

  2. Measurement of proton-induced target fragmentation cross sections in carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushita, K.; Nishio, T.; Tanaka, S.; Tsuneda, M.; Sugiura, A.; Ieki, K.

    2016-02-01

    In proton therapy, positron emitter nuclei are generated via the target nuclear fragmentation reactions between irradiated proton and nuclei constituting a human body. The proton-irradiated volume can be confirmed with measurement of annihilation γ-rays from the generated positron emitter nuclei. To achieve the high accuracy of proton therapy, in vivo dosimetry, i.e., evaluation of the irradiated dose during the treatment is important. To convert the measured activity distribution to irradiated dose, cross-sectional data for positron emitter production is necessary, which is currently insufficient in the treatment area. The purpose of this study is to collect cross-sectional data of 12C (p , pn)11C and 12C (p , p 2 n)10C reactions between the incident proton and carbon nuclei, which are important target nuclear fragmentation reactions, to estimate the range and exposure dose distribution in the patient's body. Using planar-type PET capable of measuring annihilation γ-rays at high positional resolution and thick polyethylene target, we measured cross-sectional data in continuous wide energy range. The cross section of 12C (p , pn)11C is in good agreement with existing experimental data. The cross section of 12C (p , p 2 n)10C is reported for the first data in the low-energy range of 67.6-10.5 MeV near the Bragg peak of proton beam.

  3. Measurements of Radiative Capture Cross Sections at Big Bang Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masaomi; Fukuda, Mitsunori; Tanaka, Yutaro; Du, Hang; Ohnishi, Kousuke; Yagi, Shoichi; Sugihara, Takanobu; Hori, Taichi; Nakamura, Shoken; Yanagihara, Rikuto; Matsuta, Kensaku; Mihara, Mototsugu; Nishimura, Daiki; Iwakiri, Shuichi; Kambayashi, Shohei; Kunimatsu, Shota; Sakakibara, Hikaru; Yamaoka, Shintaro

    We measured d(p, γ )3He cross sections at ECM = 0.12, 0.19, 0.44, and 0.57 MeV. In this energy region, available experimental values are systematically smaller than the recent calculation, so that additional experiments are desired for understanding the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. The experiment was performed by bombarding proton beams to the D2 gas target with the 5 MV Van de Graaff accelerator at Osaka University. The experimental d(p, γ )3He cross sections of the present study are systematically larger than previous data. On the other hand, recent theoretical results by Marcucci et al. are in good agreement with present experimental results.

  4. Cross-Section Measurements with the Radioactive Isotope Accelerator (RIA)

    SciTech Connect

    Stoyer, M A; Moody, K J; Wild, J F; Patin, J B; Shaughnessy, D A; Stoyer, N J; Harris, L J

    2002-11-19

    RIA will produce beams of exotic nuclei of unprecedented luminosity. Preliminary studies of the feasibility of measuring cross-sections of interest to the science based stockpile stewardship (SBSS) program will be presented, and several experimental techniques will be discussed. Cross-section modeling attempts for the A = 95 mass region will be shown. In addition, several radioactive isotopes could be collected for target production or medical isotope purposes while the main in-beam experiments are running. The inclusion of a broad range mass analyzer (BRAMA) capability at RIA will enable more effective utilization of the facility, enabling the performance of multiple experiments at the same time. This option will be briefly discussed.

  5. Measuring Neutron-Induced Reaction Cross Sections without Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, L. A.; Schiller, A.; Cooper, J. R.; Hoffman, R. D.; McMahan, M. A.; Fallon, P.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Mitchell, G.; Tavukcu, E.; Guttormsen, M.

    2003-04-01

    Neutron-induced reactions on radioactive nuclei play a significant role in nuclear astrophysics and many other applied nuclear physics topics. However, the majority of these cross sections are impossible to measure due to the high-background of the targets and the low-intensity of neutron beams. We have explored the possibility of using charged-particle transfer reactions to form the same "pre-compound" nucleus as one formed in a neutron-induced reaction in order to measure the relative decay probabilities of the nucleus as a function of energy. Multiplying these decay probabilities by the neutron absorption cross section will then produce the equivalent neutron-induced reaction cross section. In this presentation I will explore the validity of this "surrogate reaction" technique by comparing results from the recent 157Gd(3He,axng)156-xGd experiment using STARS (Silicon Telescope Array for Reaction Studies) at GAMMASPHERE with reaction model calculations for the 155Gd(n,xng)156-xGd. This work was funded by the US Department of Energy under contracts number W-7405-ENG-48 (LLNL), AC03-76SF00098 (LBNL) and the Norwegian Research Council (Oslo).

  6. Report on 241,242Am(n,x) surrogate cross section measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, J T; Ressler, J J; Gostic, J; Henderson, R A; Bernstein, L A; Escher, J E; Bleuel, D; Kritcher, A; Matoon, C; Scielzo, N D; Stoyer, M A

    2011-02-16

    The main goal of this measurement is to determine the {sup 242}Am(n,f) and {sup 241}Am(n,f) cross sections via the surrogate {sup 243}Am. Gamma-ray data was also collected for the purpose of measuring the (n,2n) cross-sections. The experiment was conducted using the STARS/LIBERACE experimental facility located at the 88 Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory the first week of February 2011. A description of the experiment and status of the data analysis follow.

  7. Inclusive Neutrino Cross Section Measurements at MINERvA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tice, Brian

    2012-10-01

    MINERvA part 4. The knowledge of inclusive neutrino cross sections is valuable for neutrino oscillation experiments. Determination of the A dependence of the cross section can help determine the role of nuclear effects in neutrino scattering, which is poorly known and difficult to model. Preliminary ratios of cross sections on carbon, iron and lead will be shown.

  8. Realizing the Opportunities of Neutron Cross Section Measurements at RIA

    SciTech Connect

    Ahle, L; Hausmann, M; Reifarth, R; Roberts, K; Roeben, M; Rusnak, B; Vieira, D

    2004-10-13

    The Rare Isotope Accelerator will produce many isotopes at never before seen rates. This will allow for the first time measurements on isotopes very far from stability and new measurement opportunities for unstable nuclei near stability. In fact, the production rates are such that it should be possible to collect 10 micrograms of many isotopes with a half-life of 1 day or more. This ability to make targets of short-lived nuclei enables the possibility of making neutron cross-section measurements important to the astrophysics and the stockpile stewardship communities. But to fully realize this opportunity, the appropriate infrastructure must be included at the RIA facility. This includes isotope harvesting capabilities, radiochemical areas for processing collected material, and an intense, ''mono-energetic'', tunable neutron source. As such, we have been developing a design for neutron source facility to be included at the RIA site. This facility would produce neutrons via intense beams of deuterons and protons on a variety of targets. The facility would also include the necessary radiochemical facilities for target processing. These infrastructure needs will be discussed in addition to the methods that would be employed at RIA for measuring these neutron cross-sections.

  9. Exclusive hadronic cross sections measured via ISR from BABAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafner, Andreas; Babar Collaboration

    2010-10-01

    Measuring the inclusive hadronic cross section in ee annihilation is of major interest for the determination of the Standard Model prediction of the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon a. The QED and weak contribution to a can be calculated with very high precission. At low energies, however, perturbation theory cannot be used to calculate the hadronic contribution aμhad. It therefore has to be derived via a dispersion relation from the sum of measured cross sections of exclusive hadronic reactions. Decreasing the experimental uncertainties on these channels is of utmost importance for an improved Standard Model prediction of a. Between 1999 and 2008 a data set of approximately 500 fb -1was recorded with the BABAR detector at the B-Factory PEP-II at SLAC (Stanford, USA), an electron-positron storage ring with fixed Center of Mass energy of 10.58 GeV. Using the technique of Initial State Radiation the energy range from threshold up to 4.5 GeV can be accessed. The measurement of the important process ee→ππ and other channels will be presented.

  10. Measuring astrophysically relevant 36Cl production cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Tyler; Skulski, Michael; Ostdiek, Karen; Lu, Wenting; Clark, Adam; Nelson, Austin; Beard, Mary; Collon, Philippe

    2016-09-01

    The short-lived radionuclide 36Cl (t1 / 2 = 0 . 301 Ma) is known to have existed in the Early Solar System (ESS), and evaluating its production sources can lead to better understanding of the processes taking place in ESS formation and their timescales. The X-wind model is used to explain 36Cl production via solar energetic particles from the young Sun, but is lacking empirical data for many relevant reactions. Bowers et al. (2013) measured the 33S(α,p)36Cl cross section at various energies in the range of 0.70-2.42 MeV/A, and found them to be systematically under predicted by Hauser-Feshbach statistical model codes TALYS and NON-SMOKER, highlighting the need for more empirical data for these cross sections. Recent results of the re-measurement of the 33S(α,p)36Cl reaction, providing greater coverage of the same energy range as Bowers et al., will be presented. Future plans for measurement of other 36Cl producing reactions will also be discussed.

  11. Measuring and modeling the backscattering cross section of a leaf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senior, T. B. A.; Sarabandi, K.; Ulaby, F. T.

    1987-01-01

    Leaves are a significant feature of any vegetation canopy, and for remote sensing purposes it is important to develop an effective model for predicting the scattering from a leaf. From measurements of the X band backscattering cross section of a coleus leaf in varying stages of dryness, it is shown that a uniform resistive sheet constitutes such a model for a planar leaf. The scattering is determined by the (complex) resistivity which is, in turn, entirely specified by the gravimetric moisture content of the leaf. Using an available asymptotic expression for the scattering from a rectangular resistive plate which includes, as a special case, a metallic plate whose resistivity is zero, the computed backscattering cross sections for both principal polarizations are found to be in excellent agreement with data measured for rectangular sections of leaves with different moisture contents. If the resistivity is sufficiently large, the asymptotic expressions do not differ significantly from the physical optics ones, and for naturally shaped leaves as well as rectangular sections, the physical optics approximation in conjunction with the resistive sheet model faithfully reproduces the dominant feataures of the scattering patterns under all moisture conditions.

  12. Measuring and modeling the backscattering cross section of a leaf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senior, T. B. A.; Sarabandi, K.; Ulaby, F. T.

    1987-01-01

    Leaves are a significant feature of any vegetation canopy, and for remote sensing purposes it is important to develop an effective model for predicting the scattering from a leaf. From measurements of the X band backscattering cross section of a coleus leaf in varying stages of dryness, it is shown that a uniform resistive sheet constitutes such a model for a planar leaf. The scattering is determined by the (complex) resistivity which is, in turn, entirely specified by the gravimetric moisture content of the leaf. Using an available asymptotic expression for the scattering from a rectangular resistive plate which includes, as a special case, a metallic plate whose resistivity is zero, the computed backscattering cross sections for both principal polarizations are found to be in excellent agreement with data measured for rectangular sections of leaves with different moisture contents. If the resistivity is sufficiently large, the asymptotic expressions do not differ significantly from the physical optics ones, and for naturally shaped leaves as well as rectangular sections, the physical optics approximation in conjunction with the resistive sheet model faithfully reproduces the dominant feataures of the scattering patterns under all moisture conditions.

  13. Measurement of 139La(n,γ) Cross Section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terlizzi, R.; Abbondanno, U.; Aerts, G.; Álvarez, H.; Alvarez-Velarde, F.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Assimakopoulos, P.; Audouin, L.; Badurek, G.; Baumann, P.; Bečvář, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Calviño, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Capote, R.; Carrillo de Albornoz, A.; Cennini, P.; Chepel, V.; Chiaveri, E.; Colonna, N.; Cortes, G.; Couture, A.; Cox, J.; Dahlfors, M.; David, S.; Dillmann, I.; Dolfini, R.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dridi, W.; Duran, I.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Embid-Segura, M.; Ferrant, L.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Fitzpatrick, L.; Frais-Koelbl, H.; Fujii, K.; Furman, W.; Gallino, R.; Goncalves, I.; Gonzalez-Romero, E.; Goverdovski, A.; Gramegna, F.; Griesmayer, E.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Haas, B.; Haight, R.; Heil, M.; Herrera-Martinez, A.; Igashira, M.; Isaev, S.; Jericha, E.; Kadi, Y.; Käppeler, F.; Karamanis, D.; Karadimos, D.; Kerveno, M.; Ketlerov, V.; Koehler, P.; Konovalov, V.; Kossionides, E.; Krtička, M.; Lamboudis, C.; Leeb, H.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, I.; Lozano, M.; Lukic, S.; Marganiec, J.; Marques, L.; Marrone, S.; Mastinu, P.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Moreau, C.; Mosconi, M.; Neves, F.; Oberhummer, H.; O'Brien, S.; Oshima, M.; Pancin, J.; Papachristodoulou, C.; Papadopoulos, C.; Paradela, C.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Perrot, L.; Plag, R.; Plompen, A.; Plukis, A.; Poch, A.; Pretel, C.; Quesada, J.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rosetti, M.; Rubbia, C.; Rudolf, G.; Rullhusen, P.; Salgado, J.; Sarchiapone, L.; Savvidis, I.; Stephan, C.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tavora, L.; Vannini, G.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Villamarin, D.; Vincente, M. C.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Voss, F.; Walter, S.; Wendler, H.; Wiescher, M.; Wisshak, K.

    2006-03-01

    We measured the neutron capture cross section of 139La relative to 197Au in the energy range of 0.6 eV to 9 keV at n_TOF, the neutron time-of-flight facility at CERN. After a description of the experimental apparatus, we discuss data analysis procedures. The data were fitted using R-matrix formalism to extract resonance parameters which, in turn, were used to calculate average level spacings D0 = 268 ± 22 eV and D1 < 250 eV, and neutron strength functions S0 = (0.79 ± 0.03)×10-4 and S1 = (0.73 ± 0.05)×10-4 for s- and p-wave resonances. The data also were used to determine Maxwellian-averaged neutron capture cross sections which, in turn, were used to calculate the 139La abundance synthesized in a stellar model of the main component of the s process.

  14. Validation of zirconium isotopes (n,g) and (n,2n) cross sections in a comprehensive LR-0 reactor operative parameters set.

    PubMed

    Košťál, Michal; Schulc, Martin; Rypar, Vojtěch; Losa, Evžen; Burianová, Nicola; Šimon, Jan; Mareček, Martin; Uhlíř, Jan

    2017-10-01

    Zirconium is an important material used in most of reactor concepts for fuel cladding. Thus the knowledge of its cross section is important for reliable prediction of fuel operation. Also (90)Zr(n,2n) reaction, is included in IRDFF files as dosimetry cross section standard. Due to its very high threshold, 12.1MeV, it is suitable for measurement of high energy neutrons. One of possible interesting applications is also evaluation of prompt fission neutron spectra in (235)U and (238)U what is under auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency in CIELO project. The experimental values - obtained with the LR-0 nuclear reactor - of various zirconium cross sections were compared with calculations with the MCNP6 code using IAEA CIELO, ENDF/B-VII.0, JEFF-3.1, JEFF-3.2, JENDL-3.3, JENDL-4, ROSFOND- 2010, and CENDL-3.1 transport libraries combined with the dosimetry cross sections extracted from the IRDFF library. Generally, the best C/E agreement for (90)Zr(n,2n) cross section, was found with the IAEA CIELO (235)U evaluation that includes an updated prompt fission neutron spectra in the evaluated data file. The cross section of this reaction averaged over LR-0 spectra was determined being 28.9 ± 1.2 µb, corrected to spectral shift, spectral averaged cross section in (235)U was determined to be 0.107 ± 0.005mb. Notable discrepancies were reported in both (94)Zr(n,g) and (96)Zr(n,g). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Neutrino-nucleon cross section measurements in NOMAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qun

    The NOMAD (Neutrino Oscillation MAgnetic Detector) experiment, using the SPS (Super Proton Syncrotron) neutrino beam (1 GeV < E nu < 200 GeV) at CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research), has collected more than 1.7 million neutrino induced charged and neutral current (CC and NC) events. This data is the largest high resolution neutrino nucleon scattering data to date and is ideal for precision measurements and searches in neutrino-physics. This thesis presents the precise measurement of the inclusive neutrino CC cross section in 2.5 GeV < E nu < 150 GeV region. The linear dependence of the inclusive CC cross section ( snCC ) versus the incoming neutrino energy (Enu ) is observed in the high energy region of 30 GeV < E nu < 150 GeV. Especially, the measurement in 2.5 GeV < Enu < 30 GeV region provides the first precise determination of snCC . The significant deviation from the linear dependence for snCC versus neutrino energy (Enu) is determined in the energy region less than 20 GeV. This thesis also presents an empirical measurement of NC/CC ratio dependence on hadronic energy in 2.5 GeV < EHad < 30 GeV. Likelihood techniques exploiting full event kinematics were developed. It gives the best neutral current and charged current separation in a traditional neutrino-nucleon scattering experiment. This measurement is going to give a better understanding of the neutral current background in current and future neutrino oscillation experiments.

  16. Active calibration target for bistatic radar cross-section measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pienaar, M.; Odendaal, J. W.; Joubert, J.; Cilliers, J. E.; Smit, J. C.

    2016-05-01

    Either passive calibration targets are expensive and complex to manufacture or their bistatic radar cross section (RCS) levels are significantly lower than the monostatic RCS levels of targets such as spheres, dihedral, and trihedral corner reflectors. In this paper the performance of an active calibration target with relative high bistatic RCS values is illustrated as a reference target for bistatic RCS measurements. The reference target is simple to manufacture, operates over a wide frequency range, and can be configured to calibrate all four polarizations (VV, HH, HV, and VH). Bistatic RCS measurements of canonical targets, performed in a controlled environment, are calibrated with the reference target and the results are compared to simulated results using FEKO.

  17. Gamma Efficiency Simulations towards Coincidence Measurements for Fusion Cross Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heine, M.; Courtin, S.; Fruet, G.; Jenkins, D. G.; Montanari, D.; Morris, L.; Regan, P. H.; Rudigier, M.; Symochko, D.

    2016-10-01

    With the experimental station STELLA (STELlar LAboratory) we will measure fusion cross sections of astrophysical relevance making use of the coincident detection of charged particles and gamma rays for background reduction. For the measurement of gamma rays from the de-excitation of fusion products a compact array of 36 UK FATIMA LaBr3 detectors is designed based on efficiency studies with Geant4. The photo peak efficiency in the region of interest compares to other gamma detection systems used in this field. The features of the internal decay of 138La is used in a background study to obtain an online calibration of the gamma detectors. Background data are fit to the Monte Carlo model of the self activity assuming crude exponential behavior of external background. Accuracy in the region of interest is of the order of some keV in this first study.

  18. Measurement of 150-Sm(n,2ngammai) 149-Sm cross sections between threshold and 20 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, J; Becker, J; Dashdorj, D; Dietrich, F S; Garrett, P; Hoffman, R; Younes, W; Nelson, R; Devlin, M; Fotiades, N

    2004-08-02

    Absolute partial {gamma}-ray cross sections for the production of discrete {gamma}-rays from the reaction {sup 150}Sm(n,2n{gamma}{sub i}){sup 149}Sm were measured using the GEANIE {gamma}-ray spectrometer coupled with the intense white neutron source at WNR/LANSCE. The measurements were made for incident neutron energies between threshold (8.04 MeV) and 20 MeV. The partial cross sections for 21 {gamma}-rays were extracted from the data. Of these, 17 were compared to calculations performed using the enhanced Hauser-Feshbach code STAPRE. The partial {gamma}-ray cross sections of the observed parallel decay paths to the ground state were summed, forming a lower bound for the (n,2n) reaction channel. A combination of theory and experiment was then used to deduce the (n,2n) reaction channel cross section.

  19. On the measurement of absorption cross sections of gaseous media

    SciTech Connect

    Gamalii, V.F.; Toptygin, D.D.

    1995-02-01

    A new technique for experimental determination of integral absorption cross sections of gaseous media by the method of modulation intracavity laser spectroscopy (MILS) is proposed. A formula relating the integral absorption cross section to the spectral position of radiation spectral condensation peaks in the absorption line wings is derived. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  20. 102Pd(n, {gamma}) Cross Section Measurement Using DANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Hatarik, R.; Alpizar-Vicente, A. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Esch, E.-I.; Haight, R. C.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Reifarth, R.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wouters, J. M.; Greife, U.

    2006-03-13

    The neutron capture cross section of the proton rich nucleus 102Pd was measured with the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The target was a 2 mg Pd foil with 78% enriched 102Pd. It was held by a 0.9 {mu}m thick Mylar bag which was selected after comparing different thicknesses of Kapton and Mylar for their scattering background. To identify the contribution of the other Pd isotopes the data of a natural Pd sample was compared to the data of the 102Pd enriched sample. A 12C sample was used to determine the scattering background. The 102Pd(n, {gamma}) rate is of importance for the p-process nucleosynthesis.

  1. Measurement of Neutrino Induced Quasi-Elastic Cross Section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae

    2006-04-01

    The measurement of the weak mixing angle is the goal, using the data collected in the NOMAD experiment at CERN. Studying the neutrino induced Quasi-Elastic (QE) scattering, in which neutrino hits neutron and results in a muon and a proton, would enhance our understanding of the `higher-twist effect' -- an effect that parameterizes the weak mixing angle. Toward this, I developed a likelihood probability density function that enabled me to eliminate a significant portion of the background, resonance and deep inelastic scattering events. As the Monte Carlo (MC) is only reliable to a precision not better than 15 -- 20 percent, I developed several techniques to make sure that MC and DATA agreed around 5 percent. The axial mass and QE cross section can then be calculated. Techniques and the preliminary results relevant to the calculation will be presented.

  2. EGAF: Measurement and Analysis of Gamma-ray Cross Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firestone, R. B.; Abusaleem, K.; Basunia, M. S.; Bečvář, F.; Belgya, T.; Bernstein, L. A.; Choi, H. D.; Escher, J. E.; Genreith, C.; Hurst, A. M.; Krtička, M.; Renne, P. R.; Révay, Zs.; Rogers, A. M.; Rossbach, M.; Siem, S.; Sleaford, B.; Summers, N. C.; Szentmiklosi, L.; van Bibber, K.; Wiedeking, M.

    2014-05-01

    The Evaluated Gamma-ray Activation File (EGAF) is the result of a 2000-2007 IAEA Coordinated Research Project to develop a database of thermal, prompt γ-ray cross sections, σγ, for all elemental and selected radioactive targets. No previous database of this kind had existed. EGAF was originally based on measurements using guided neutron beams from the Budapest Reactor on all elemental targets from Z=1-82, 90 and 92, except for He and Pm. The EGAF σγ data were published in the Database of Prompt Gamma Rays from Slow Neutron Capture for Elemental Analysis [1]. An international collaboration has formed to continue the EGAF measurements with isotopically enriched targets, derive total radiative thermal neutron cross sections, σ0, extend the σγ data from thermal to 20 MeV neutrons, compile a completed activation data file, improve sections of the Reference Input Parameter Library (RIPL) with more complete and up to date level and γ-ray data, evaluate statistical γ-ray data from reaction studies, and determine recommended neutron separations energies, Sn, for atomic mass evaluations. A new guided neutron beam facility has become available at the Garching (Munich) FRM II Reactor, and high energy neutron experimental facilities are being developed by a Berkeley area collaboration where 5-33 MeV neutron beams are available at the LBNL 88” cyclotron, 2.5 and 14 MeV beams at the University of California, Berkeley neutron generator laboratory, and high flux, 10 nṡcmṡ-2 s-1, neutron pulses available from the LLNL National Ignition Facility (NIF).

  3. Measurements of the gravitational collision cross section of aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Haley, C.P.; Loyalka, S.K.; Warder, R.C. Jr.; Tompson, R.V.; Podzimek, J. )

    1991-01-01

    It has long been recognized that the evolution of high concentrations of aerosols is strongly influenced by coagulation due to settling (gravitational coagulation). It has also been known that the models currently in use for this process are based on simple estimations and lack a firm theoretical/experimental basis. The problem of gravitational coagulation has, however, been studied extensively, theoretically, and recently, expressions useful in large computer programs have also become available. Experimental studies of the gravitational coagulation, however, have been based either on similitude (steel/aluminum spheres in glycerine) or integral experiments, and these do not provide the correct basis for verification of the theoretical results. The authors have therefore carried out new experimental measurements of the gravitational collision cross section by using an electrodynamic balance. An aerosol particle is suspended in the balance, a measured stream of monodisperse particles flows over the particle, and the increase is measured in the suspended particle size in a given time interval by using the drag force and instability method.

  4. The 235U(n,2n(gamma)) Yrast Partial Gamma-Ray Cross Sections: A Report on the 1998 -- 1999 GEANIE Data and Analysis Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Younes, W; Becker, J A; Bernstein, L A; Garret, P E; McGrath, C A; McNabb, D P; Nelson, R O; Devlin, M; Fotiades, N; Johns, G D

    2000-09-01

    Measurements of partial {sup 235}U(n,2n{gamma}) {gamma}-ray cross sections have been carried out as a function of incident neutron energy using the GEANIE spectrometer at LANSCE/WNR. The yields of {gamma} rays resulting from the population of discrete levels in the residual nucleus {sup 234}U have been measured at incident neutron energies in the 1-20-MeV range. These data provide, with the aid of nuclear reaction modeling, a measurement of the {sup 235}U(n,2n) reaction cross section and serve as a proof of principle of the y-ray technique for the parallel 23gPu(n,2n) measurement [l]. This paper presents the analysis of the {gamma}-ray data and the extraction of partial {gamma}-ray cross sections as a function of incident neutron energy. Uncertainties associated with the spectroscopic analysis of the data and validation of the results are discussed in detail.

  5. Proton Radiography: Cross Section Measurements and Detector Development

    SciTech Connect

    Michael J. Longo; H. R. Gustafson: Durga Rajaram; Turgun Nigmanov

    2010-04-16

    Proton radiography has become an important tool for predicting the performance of stockpiled nuclear weapons. Current proton radiography experiments at LANSCE are confined to relatively small targets on the order of centimeters in size because of the low beam energy. LANL scientists have made radiographs with 12 and 24 GeV protons produced by the accelerator at Brookhaven National Laboratory. These energies are in the range required for hydrotest radiography. The design of a facility for hydrotest radiography requires knowledge of the cross sections for producing high-energy particles in the forward direction, which are incorporated into the Monte Carlo simulation used in designing the beam and detectors. There are few existing measurements of neutron production cross sections for proton-nuclei interactions in the 50 GeV range, and almost no data exist for forward neutron production, especially for heavy target nuclei. Thus the data from the MIPP EMCAL and HCAL, for which our group was responsible, are critical to proton radiography. Since neutrons and photons cannot be focused by magnets, they cause a background “fog” on the images. This problem can be minimized by careful design of the focusing system and detectors. The purpose of our research was to measure forward production of neutrons produced by high-energy proton beams striking a variety of targets. The forward-going particles carry most of the energy from a high-energy proton interaction, so these are the most important to proton radiography. This work was carried out in conjunction with the Fermilab E-907 (MIPP) collaboration. Our group was responsible for designing and building the E907 forward neutron and photon calorimeters. With the support of our Stewardship Science Academic Alliances grants, we were able to design, build, and commission the calorimeters on budget and ahead of schedule. The MIPP experiment accumulated a large amount of data in the first run that ended in early 2006. Our group has

  6. Measured data used in the Watusi cross-section sets

    SciTech Connect

    Mustafa, M; Nethaway, D R

    1999-02-09

    In this document we list the experimental data that were used to make up the major cross- section sets that we use in the Watusi code to calculate the amount of detector activation in device tests. In order to use experimental data to make up a cross-section set, it is often necessary to extrapolate the cross sections down to either the threshold energy or to 0.01 keV, and to extrapolate up to 20 MeV. We then fit the data to a function so that we can get a smoothed set of interpolated values at up to 321 energy points. The combined data are then processed with the Hiroshima code into flux-weighted, group-averaged cross sections for use with the output from the different physics design codes. We typically use the standard 53 or 175 energy group structures. In a recent companion memo 1 we described the make up of all of the cross-section sets in detail, giving references to both the experimental data and the theoretical calculations that were used. The following sections have the experimental data, in the form of energy-cross section pairs, for the titanium, chromium, bromine, krypton, yttrium, zirconium, iodine, europium, lutetium, and bismuth sets. The other cross-section sets are not directly based on enough experimental data to warrant their listing here. Many of the reactions used in these sets are based on calculated cross sections. In making these calculations certain parameters are sometimes adjusted so that the calculated cross sections match experimental data. In some of these cases we have made a further normalization to give a closer agreement to selected experimental data, and such normalizations are noted in this document. In other cases no further normalization was made. In Table 1 we summarize the reactions for which we present the experimental data given in Tables 2-46. In Figs. 1-35 we show plots of the experimental data together with the actual excitation functions used in the cross-section sets. Some reactions in the current sets are based on

  7. Cross section measurements at LANSCE for defense, science and applications

    DOE PAGES

    Nelson, Ronald O.; Schwengner, R.; Zuber, K.

    2015-05-28

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) has three neutron sources that are used for nuclear science measurements. These sources are driven by an 800 MeV proton linear accelerator and cover an energy range from sub-thermal to hundreds of MeV. Research at the facilities is performed under the auspices of a US DOE user program under which research proposals are rated for merit by a program advisory committee and are scheduled based on merit and availability of beam time. A wide variety of instruments is operated at the neutron flight paths at LANSCE including neutron detector arrays, gamma-ray detector arrays,more » fission fragment detectors, and charged particle detectors. These instruments provide nuclear data for multiple uses that range from increasing knowledge in fundamental science to satisfying data needs for diverse applications such as nuclear energy, global security, and industrial applications. In addition, highlights of recent research related to cross sections measurements are presented, and future research initiatives are discussed.« less

  8. Cross section measurements at LANSCE for defense, science and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Ronald O.; Schwengner, R.; Zuber, K.

    2015-05-28

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) has three neutron sources that are used for nuclear science measurements. These sources are driven by an 800 MeV proton linear accelerator and cover an energy range from sub-thermal to hundreds of MeV. Research at the facilities is performed under the auspices of a US DOE user program under which research proposals are rated for merit by a program advisory committee and are scheduled based on merit and availability of beam time. A wide variety of instruments is operated at the neutron flight paths at LANSCE including neutron detector arrays, gamma-ray detector arrays, fission fragment detectors, and charged particle detectors. These instruments provide nuclear data for multiple uses that range from increasing knowledge in fundamental science to satisfying data needs for diverse applications such as nuclear energy, global security, and industrial applications. In addition, highlights of recent research related to cross sections measurements are presented, and future research initiatives are discussed.

  9. Cross Section Measurements at LANSCE for Defense, Science and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Ronald O.

    2015-05-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) has three neutron sources that are used for nuclear science measurements. These sources are driven by an 800 MeV proton linear accelerator and cover an energy range from sub-thermal to hundreds of MeV. Research at the facilities is performed under the auspices of a US DOE user program under which research proposals are rated for merit by a program advisory committee and are scheduled based on merit and availability of beam time. A wide variety of instruments is operated at the neutron flight paths at LANSCE including neutron detector arrays, gamma-ray detector arrays, fission fragment detectors, and charged particle detectors. These instruments provide nuclear data for multiple uses that range from increasing knowledge in fundamental science to satisfying data needs for diverse applications such as nuclear energy, global security, and industrial applications. Highlights of recent research related to cross sections measurements are presented, and future research initiatives are discussed.

  10. Measurement of Total Cross Sections at Pohang Neutron Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Guinyun; Meaze, A.K.M.M.H.; Ahmed, Hossain; Son, Dongchul; Lee, Young Seok; Kang, Hengsik; Cho, Moo-Hyun; Ko, In Soo; Namkung, Won; Ro, Tae-Ik.; Chung, Won-Chung; Kim, Young Ae; Yoo, Kun Joong; Chang, Jong Hwa

    2005-05-24

    The Pohang Neutron Facility, which consists of an electron linear accelerator, a water-cooled Ta target with a water moderator, and a time-of-flight path with an 11 m length has been operated since 2000. We report the status activities on the neutron total cross-section measurements in the neutron energy region from 0.01 eV to 100 eV by the neutron time-of-flight method at Pohang Neutron Facility. A 6Li-ZnS(Ag) scintillator with a diameter of 12.5 cm and a thickness of 1.5 cm has been used as a neutron detector. The background level has been determined by using notch-filters of Co, In, and Cd sheets. In order to reduce the gamma rays from Bremsstrahlung and that from neutron capture, we have employed a neutron-gamma separation system based on their different pulse shape. The present measurements for Ag, Hf, and Ta samples are compared with the previous ones and the evaluated data in ENDF/B-VI. The resonance parameters for Ag and Hf samples have been extracted from the transmission data by using the SAMMY code.

  11. Measurement of Scattering and Absorption Cross Sections of Dyed Microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Gaigalas, Adolfas K; Choquette, Steven; Zhang, Yu-Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of absorbance and fluorescence emission were carried out on aqueous suspensions of polystyrene (PS) microspheres with a diameter of 2.5 µm using a spectrophotometer with an integrating sphere detector. The apparatus and the principles of measurements were described in our earlier publications. Microspheres with and without green BODIPY@ dye were measured. Placing the suspension inside an integrating sphere (IS) detector of the spectrophotometer yielded (after a correction for fluorescence emission) the absorbance (called A in the text) due to absorption by BODIPY@ dye inside the microsphere. An estimate of the absorbance due to scattering alone was obtained by subtracting the corrected BODIPY@ dye absorbance (A) from the measured absorbance of a suspension placed outside the IS detector (called A1 in the text). The absorption of the BODIPY@ dye inside the microsphere was analyzed using an imaginary index of refraction parameterized with three Gaussian-Lorentz functions. The Kramer-Kronig relation was used to estimate the contribution of the BODIPY@ dye to the real part of the microsphere index of refraction. The complex index of refraction, obtained from the analysis of A, was used to analyze the absorbance due to scattering ((A1- A) in the text). In practice, the analysis of the scattering absorbance, A1-A, and the absorbance, A, was carried out in an iterative manner. It was assumed that A depended primarily on the imaginary part of the microsphere index of refraction with the other parameters playing a secondary role. Therefore A was first analyzed using values of the other parameters obtained from a fit to the absorbance due to scattering, A1-A, with the imaginary part neglected. The imaginary part obtained from the analysis of A was then used to reanalyze A1-A, and obtain better estimates of the other parameters. After a few iterations, consistent estimates were obtained of the scattering and absorption cross sections in the wavelength region 300

  12. 63Ni (n ,γ ) cross sections measured with DANCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigand, M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Göbel, K.; Heftrich, T.; Jandel, M.; Käppeler, F.; Lederer, C.; Kivel, N.; Korschinek, G.; Krtička, M.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Ostermöller, J.; Plag, R.; Reifarth, R.; Schumann, D.; Ullmann, J. L.; Wallner, A.

    2015-10-01

    The neutron capture cross section of the s -process branch nucleus 63Ni affects the abundances of other nuclei in its region, especially 63Cu and 64Zn. In order to determine the energy-dependent neutron capture cross section in the astrophysical energy region, an experiment at the Los Alamos National Laboratory has been performed using the calorimetric 4 π BaF2 array DANCE. The (n ,γ ) cross section of 63Ni has been determined relative to the well-known 197Au standard with uncertainties below 15%. Various 63Ni resonances have been identified based on the Q value. Furthermore, the s -process sensitivity of the new values was analyzed with the new network calculation tool NETZ.

  13. Experiment to measure total cross sections, differential cross sections and polarization effects in pp elastic scattering at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Guryn, W.

    1998-02-01

    The authors are describing an experiment to study proton-proton (pp) elastic scattering experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Using both polarized and unpolarized beams, the experiment will study pp elastic scattering from {radical}s = 50 GeV to {radical}s = 500 GeV in two kinematical regions. In the Coulomb Nuclear Interference (CNI) region, 0.0005 < {vert_bar}t{vert_bar} < 0.12 (GeV/c){sup 2}, they will measure and study the s dependence of the total and elastic cross sections, {sigma}{sub tot} and {sigma}{sub el}; the ratio of the real to the imaginary part of the forward elastic scattering amplitude, {rho}; and the nuclear slope parameter of the pp elastic scattering, b. In the medium {vert_bar}t{vert_bar}-region, {vert_bar}t{vert_bar} < 1.5 (GeV/c){sup 2}, they plan to study the evolution of the dip structure with s, as observed at ISR in the differential elastic cross section, d{sigma}{sub el}/dt, and the s and {vert_bar}t{vert_bar} dependence of b. With the polarized beams the following can be measured: the difference in the total cross sections as function of initial transverse spin states {Delta}{sigma}{sub T}, the analyzing power, A{sub N}, and the transverse spin correlation parameter A{sub NN}. The behavior of the analyzing power A{sub N} at RHIC energies in the dip region of d{sigma}{sub el}/dt, where a pronounced structure was found at fixed-target experiments will be studied. The relation of pp elastic scattering to the beam polarization measurement at RHIC is also discussed.

  14. Measuring cross sections using a sag tape: a generalized procedure

    Treesearch

    Gary A. Ray; Walter F. Megahan

    1979-01-01

    A procedure was developed for surveying cross sections using a sag tape with unequal end elevations. The procedure is as accurate as traditional engineer's level surveys, is faster and easier, and can be programed for a digital computer by following the flow diagram which is provided.

  15. FY07 LDRD Final Report Neutron Capture Cross-Section Measurements at DANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, W; Agvaanluvsan, U; Wilk, P; Becker, J; Wang, T

    2008-02-08

    reaction cross sections show resonance behavior or follow 1/v of the incident neutrons. In the case of odd-odd nuclei, the modeling problem is particularly difficult because degenerate states (rotational bands) present in even-even nuclei have separated in energy. Our work included interpretation of the {gamma}-ray spectra to compare with the Statistical Model and provides information on level density and statistical decay. Neutron capture cross sections are of programmatic interest to defense sciences because many elements were added to nuclear devices in order to determine various details of the nuclear detonation, including fission yields, fusion yields, and mix. Both product nuclei created by (n,2n) reactions and reactant nuclei are transmuted by neutron capture during the explosion. Very few of the (n,{gamma}) cross sections for reactions that create products measured by radiochemists have ever been experimentally determined; most are calculated by radiochemical equivalences. Our new experimentally measured capture cross sections directly impact our knowledge about the uncertainties in device performances, which enhances our capability of carrying out our stockpile stewardship program. Europium and gadolinium cross sections are important for both astrophysics and defense programs. Measurements made prior to this project on stable europium targets differ by 30-40%, which was considered to be significantly disparate. Of the gadolinium isotopes, {sup 151}Gd is important for stockpile stewardship, and {sup 153}Gd is of high interest to astrophysics, and nether of these (radioactive) gadolinium (n,{gamma}) cross sections have been measured. Additional stable gadolinium isotopes, including {sup 157,160}Gd are of interest to astrophysics. Historical measurements of gadolinium isotopes, including {sup 152,154}Gd, had disagreements similar to the 30-40% disagreements found in the historical europium data. Actinide capture cross section measurements are important for both

  16. Neutron inelastic cross section measurements for natTi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olacel, Adina; Belloni, Francesca; Borcea, Catalin; Boromiza, Marian; Dessagne, Philippe; Henning, Gregoire; Kerveno, Maëlle; Negret, Alexandru; Nyman, Markus; Pirovano, Elisa; Plompen, Arjan

    2017-09-01

    A neutron inelastic scattering experiment was performed at the GELINA (Geel Electron LINear Accelerator) neutron source of the European Commission Joint Research Centre Geel (EC-JRC Geel) with the aim of determining the reaction cross sections for the stable isotopes of natural titanium. A 235U fission chamber was used to monitor neutrons with energies up to 20 MeV. The GAINS (Gamma Array for Inelastic Neutron Scattering) spectrometer was employed to detect the γ rays resulting from the decay of the excited nuclei. We determined the γ-ray production cross sections of the first transitions in the 46,48,49,50Ti isotopes. The experimental values were compared with previous reported results and also with theoretical calculations performed with the TALYS 1.8 code using the default input parameters. Uncertainties of around 5% were obtained for the strongest observed transitions.

  17. Very small (n,γ) cross sections: two measurements for primordial and stellar nucleosynthesis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratzel, U.; Wiescher, M.; Beer, H.; Käppeler, F.; Steiniger, R.

    1989-04-01

    The measurement of neutron capture cross sections via the activation technique has been extended to cross sections in the μb range. The knowledge of small cross sections is important for the abundances of neutron magic nuclei, for the role of neutron poisons, and for primordial nucleosynthesis. Wherever the activation technique can be applied, such small cross sections can be determined with significantly improved accuracy, as is demonstrated for the examples of 7Li and 208Pb. In both cases, significantly smaller cross sections were obtained compared to previous results, and uncertainties were reduced by more than a factor two.

  18. Determination of cross sections of 60Ni(n,2n)59Ni induced by 14 MeV neutrons with accelerator mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Ming; Xu, Yongning; Guan, Yongjing; Shen, Hongtao; Du, Liang; Hongtao, Chen; Dong, Kejun; Jiang, Shan; Yang, Xuran; Wang, Xiaoming; Ruan, Xiang dong; Liu, Jiancheng; Wu, Shaoyong; Zhao, Qingzhang; Cai, Li; Pang, Fangfang

    2015-10-01

    The cross section of the 60Ni(n,2n)59Ni induced by neutron with energy around 14 MeV is important for a fusion environment. However, the published values are strongly discordant. By taking advantage of the high sensitivity of 59Ni measurement at China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE), determination of the cross section has been carried out. A natural Nickel foil was irradiated by neutrons produce by a T(D,n)α neutron generator. 57Co and 58Co which produced in the Nickel foil were chosen for the neutron fluence determination. Then the ratio of 59Ni/60Ni for the irradiated sample was determined via accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) utilizing a 13MV tandem accelerator and a Q3D magnet spectrometry at CIAE. As a result, the cross section of 60Ni(n,2n)59Ni for the incident neutron energy of (14.60 ± 0.40) MeV was determined to be (426 ± 53) mb.

  19. Reexamination of cross sections of the 100Mo(p,2n)99mTc reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takács, S.; Hermanne, A.; Ditrói, F.; Tárkányi, F.; Aikawa, M.

    2015-03-01

    The nuclear medicine community has been expressing concerns world wide regarding shortages of 99mTc supply based on fission production of 99Mo from highly enriched uranium (HEU) to prepare 99Mo/99mTc generators. As an alternative to reactor produced 99Mo/99mTc generator technology, the direct production of 99mTc on accelerators is considered. There are a number of methods of using accelerators to produce 99mTc and/or 99Mo. Direct production of 99mTc on highly enriched 100Mo target using cyclotrons is interesting for energies up to 20 MeV, so as to minimize the impurities from additional open reaction channels. To estimate the quality of the accelerator produced 99mTc all the possible reaction routes should be mapped which could be potentially involved in this technology. However, a well defined excitation function for the 100Mo(p,2n)99mTc primary reaction is needed, in order to achieve acceptable good results in assessing the quality of the accelerator-produced 99mTc by theoretical calculations. Most of the available experimental cross section data series for the 100Mo(p,2n)99mTc reaction have the same general shape while their amplitudes are different. A large difference more than a factor of two may, indeed, be observed between the lowest and the highest datasets values. The aim of this study was therefore to get a new evaluation for the 100Mo(p,2n)99mTc cross section, through three independent experiments, aiming at a more confident estimation about the amplitude of the excitation function.

  20. Benchmark experiment for the cross section of the 100Mo(p,2n)99mTc and 100Mo(p,pn)99Mo reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takács, S.; Ditrói, F.; Aikawa, M.; Haba, H.; Otuka, N.

    2016-05-01

    As nuclear medicine community has shown an increasing interest in accelerator produced 99mTc radionuclide, the possible alternative direct production routes for producing 99mTc were investigated intensively. One of these accelerator production routes is based on the 100Mo(p,2n)99mTc reaction. The cross section of this nuclear reaction was studied by several laboratories earlier but the available data-sets are not in good agreement. For large scale accelerator production of 99mTc based on the 100Mo(p,2n)99mTc reaction, a well-defined excitation function is required to optimise the production process effectively. One of our recent publications pointed out that most of the available experimental excitation functions for the 100Mo(p,2n)99mTc reaction have the same general shape while their amplitudes are different. To confirm the proper amplitude of the excitation function, results of three independent experiments were presented (Takács et al., 2015). In this work we present results of a thick target count rate measurement of the Eγ = 140.5 keV gamma-line from molybdenum irradiated by Ep = 17.9 MeV proton beam, as an integral benchmark experiment, to prove the cross section data reported for the 100Mo(p,2n)99mTc and 100Mo(p,pn)99Mo reactions in Takács et al. (2015).

  1. Deeply virtual Compton Scattering cross section measured with CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Guegan, Baptistse

    2014-09-01

    The Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) provide a new description of nucleon structure in terms of its elementary constituents, the quarks and the gluons. Including and extending the information provided by the form factors and the parton distribution functions, they describe the correlation between the transverse position and the longitudinal momentum fraction of the partons in the nucleon. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS), the electroproduction of a real photon on a single quark in the nucleon eN --> e'N'g, is the exclusive process most directly interpretable in terms of GPDs. A dedicated experiment to study DVCS with the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab has been carried out using a 5.9-GeV polarized electron beam and an unpolarized hydrogen target, allowing us to collect DVCS events in the widest kinematic range ever explored in the valence region : 1.0 < Q2 < 4.6 GeV2, 0.1 < xB < 0.58 and 0.09 < -t < 2.0 GeV2. In this paper, we show preliminary results of unpolarized cross sections and of polarized cross section differences for the DVCS channel.

  2. Differential scattering cross sections for collisions of 0.5-, 1.5-, and 5.0-keV helium atoms with He, H2, N2, and O2. [for atmospheric processes modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. H.; Smith, K. A.; Stebbings, R. F.; Chen, Y. S.

    1985-01-01

    This paper reports the first results of an experimental program established to provide cross section data for use in modeling various atmospheric processes. Absolute cross sections, differential in the scattering angle, have been measured for collisions of 0.5-, 1.5-, and 5.0-keV helium atoms with He, H2, N2, and O2 at laboratory scattering angles between 0.1 deg and 5 deg. The results are the sums of cross sections for elastic and inelastic scattering of helium atoms; charged collision products are not detected. Integration of the differential cross section data yields integral cross sections consistent with measurements by other workers. The apparatus employs a position-sensitive detector for both primary and scattered particles and uses a short target cell with a large exit aperture to ensure a simple and well-defined apparatus geometry.

  3. Final Report - Nucelar Astrophysics & Neutron Cross Section Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Carlton, Robert F.

    2005-02-01

    This enduring research program of 28 years has taken advantage of the excellent research facility of ORELA at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The fruitful collaborations include a number of scientists from ORNL and some from LASL. This program which has ranged from nuclear structure determinations to astrophysical applications has resulted in the identification and/or the refinement of the nuclear properties of more than 5,000 nuclear energy levels or compound energy states. The nuclei range from 30Si to 250Cf, the probes range from thermal to 50 MeV neutrons, and the studies range from capture gamma ray spectra to total and differential scattering and absorption cross sections.

  4. Comparison of the total cross sections measurements of CDF and E811

    SciTech Connect

    Albrow, M.; Beretvas, A.; Nodulman, L.; Giromini, P.

    1999-03-03

    The total cross section at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV has been measured by three groups (CDF, E710, and E811). We think that CDF should quote results based only on our own measurement. We also indicate how to compare cross sections measured by both CDF and D0.

  5. Measurements of Neutron Induced Cross Sections at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Guber, K.H.; Harvey, J.A.; Hill, N.W.; Koehler, P.E.; Leal, L.C.; Sayer, R.O.; Spencer, R.R.

    1999-09-20

    We have used the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) to measure neutron total and the fission cross sections of 233U in the energy range from 0.36 eV to ~700 keV. We report average fission and total cross sections. Also, we measured the neutron total cross sections of 27Al and Natural chlorine as well as the capture cross section of Al over an energy range from 100 eV up to about 400 keV.

  6. Quantitative infrared absorption cross sections of isoprene for atmospheric measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Brauer, C. S.; Blake, T. A.; Guenther, A. B.; ...

    2014-11-19

    Isoprene (C5H8, 2-methyl-1,3-butadiene) is a volatile organic compound (VOC) and is one of the primary contributors to annual global VOC emissions. Isoprene is produced primarily by vegetation as well as anthropogenic sources, and its OH- and O3-initiated oxidations are a major source of atmospheric oxygenated organics. Few quantitative infrared studies have been reported for isoprene, limiting the ability to quantify isoprene emissions via remote or in situ infrared detection. We thus report absorption cross sections and integrated band intensities for isoprene in the 600–6500 cm-1 region. The pressure-broadened (1 atmosphere N2) spectra were recorded at 278, 298, and 323 Kmore » in a 19.94 cm path-length cell at 0.112 cm-1 resolution, using a Bruker IFS 66v/S Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer. Composite spectra are derived from a minimum of seven isoprene sample pressures, each at one of three temperatures, and the number densities are normalized to 296 K and 1 atm.« less

  7. Absolute cross-section measurements for ionization of He Rydberg atoms in collisions with K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, F.; Renwick, S.; Martínez, H.; Morgan, T. J.

    1995-11-01

    Absolute cross sections for ionization of 1.5-10.0 keV/amu Rydberg helium atoms in principal quantum states 12<=n<=15 due to collisions with potassium have been measured. The data are compared with the free-electron cross section at equal velocity. Our results for the collisional ionization cross sections (σi) agree both in shape and absolute magnitude with the data available for the total electron-scattering cross sections (σe) and support recent theoretical models for ionization of Rydberg atoms with neutral perturbers.

  8. Measurements of neutron cross sections for chromium, yttrium and terbium at 134 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekimoto, Shun; Okumura, Shintaro; Yashima, Hiroshi; Ninomiya, Kazuhiko; Shima, Tatsushi; Takahashi, Naruto; Shinohara, Atsushi; Hagiwara, Masayuki; Iwamoto, Yosuke; Nishiizumi, Kunihiko; Caffee, Marc; Shibata, Seiichi; Ohtsuki, Tsutomu

    2014-09-01

    Neutron-induced reaction cross sections are essential to cosmochemists aiming to decipher the cosmic-ray irradiation history. These cross section data also serve as a comprehensive nuclear database for estimating residual radioactivities in accelerator facilities. Neutron cross sections in the energy range above 100 MeV have scarcely been measured experimentally; exceptions are for the target materials C, Cu, Pb, Bi. In many instances the neutron cross section is based on the corresponding proton cross section, the assumption being that above 100 MeV they are similar. In this work, we measured reaction cross sections of radionuclides produced through nuclear spallation reactions from Cr, Y and Tb induced by neutrons at 134 MeV. The irradiations were carried out using neutrons produced through Li-7 (p,n) reaction at N0 beam line in RCNP. To estimate quasi-monoenergetic neutron induced cross sections, the target stacks were irradiated on the two angles of 0 and 25 degrees for the axis of the primary proton beam. The results will be compared to the cross section data for the same target materials with 197, 287 and 386 MeV neutrons in our previous work. Neutron-induced reaction cross sections are essential to cosmochemists aiming to decipher the cosmic-ray irradiation history. These cross section data also serve as a comprehensive nuclear database for estimating residual radioactivities in accelerator facilities. Neutron cross sections in the energy range above 100 MeV have scarcely been measured experimentally; exceptions are for the target materials C, Cu, Pb, Bi. In many instances the neutron cross section is based on the corresponding proton cross section, the assumption being that above 100 MeV they are similar. In this work, we measured reaction cross sections of radionuclides produced through nuclear spallation reactions from Cr, Y and Tb induced by neutrons at 134 MeV. The irradiations were carried out using neutrons produced through Li-7 (p,n) reaction at N0

  9. Measurement of the 8Li( α, n) 11B reaction cross sections of astrophysical interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Kawamura, T.; Nakai, K.; Ishiyama, H.; Watanabe, Y. X.; Miyatake, H.; Tanaka, M. H.; Yoshikawa, N.; Jeong, S. C.; Fuchi, Y.; Katayama, I.; Nomura, T.; Das, S. K.; Saha, P. K.; Fukuda, T.; Nishio, K.; Mitsuoka, S.; Ikezoe, H.; Matsuda, M.; Ichikawa, S.; Furukawa, T.; Izumi, H.; Shimoda, T.; Mizoi, Y.; Terasawa, M.

    2004-12-01

    An accurate exclusive measurement of the 8Li( α, n) 11B reaction cross sections has been carried out successfully by using a highly efficient detector system and high-purity low energy 8Li-beam. The excitation function obtained with high statistics in the energy region from 0.9 to 2.7 MeV in the center-of-mass system is reported. The present cross sections show that the averaged ratio of total cross section to the inverted neutron capture cross section is 4 ˜ 5. Some details of the experimental method are also described.

  10. The Status of Cross Section Measurements for Neutron-induced Reactions Needed for Cosmic Ray Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sisterson, J. M.

    2003-01-01

    Cosmic ray interactions with lunar rocks and meteorites produce small amounts of radionuclides and stable isotopes. Advances in Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) allow production rates to be measured routinely in well-documented lunar rocks and meteorites. These measurements are analyzed using theoretical models to learn about the object itself and the history of the cosmic rays that fell on it. Good cross section measurements are essential input to the theoretical calculations. Most primary cosmic ray particles are protons so reliable cross sections for proton-induced reactions are essential. A cross section is deemed accurate if measurements made by different experimenters using different techniques result in consistent values. Most cross sections for proton induced reactions are now well measured. However, good cross section measurements for neutron-induced reactions are still needed. These cross sections are required to fully account for all galactic cosmic ray interactions at depth in an extraterrestrial object. When primary galactic cosmic ray (GCR) particles interact with an object many secondary neutrons are produced, which also initiate spallation reactions. Thus, the total GCR contribution to the overall cosmogenic nuclide archive has to include the contribution from the secondary neutron interactions. Few relevant cross section measurements have been reported for neutron-induced reactions at neutron energies greater than approximately 20 MeV. The status of the cross section measurements using quasi-monoenergetic neutron energies at iThemba LABS, South Africa and white neutron beams at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), Los Alamos are reported here.

  11. The Status of Cross Section Measurements for Neutron-induced Reactions Needed for Cosmic Ray Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sisterson, J. M.

    2003-01-01

    Cosmic ray interactions with lunar rocks and meteorites produce small amounts of radionuclides and stable isotopes. Advances in Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) allow production rates to be measured routinely in well-documented lunar rocks and meteorites. These measurements are analyzed using theoretical models to learn about the object itself and the history of the cosmic rays that fell on it. Good cross section measurements are essential input to the theoretical calculations. Most primary cosmic ray particles are protons so reliable cross sections for proton-induced reactions are essential. A cross section is deemed accurate if measurements made by different experimenters using different techniques result in consistent values. Most cross sections for proton induced reactions are now well measured. However, good cross section measurements for neutron-induced reactions are still needed. These cross sections are required to fully account for all galactic cosmic ray interactions at depth in an extraterrestrial object. When primary galactic cosmic ray (GCR) particles interact with an object many secondary neutrons are produced, which also initiate spallation reactions. Thus, the total GCR contribution to the overall cosmogenic nuclide archive has to include the contribution from the secondary neutron interactions. Few relevant cross section measurements have been reported for neutron-induced reactions at neutron energies greater than approximately 20 MeV. The status of the cross section measurements using quasi-monoenergetic neutron energies at iThemba LABS, South Africa and white neutron beams at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), Los Alamos are reported here.

  12. Determining neutron capture cross sections with the Surrogate Reaction Technique: Measuring decay probabilities with STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Church, J A; Ahle, L; Bernstein, L A; Cooper, J; Dietrich, F S; Escher, J; Forssen, C; Ai, H; Amro, H; Babilon, M; Beausang, C; Caggiano, J; Heinz, A; Hughes, R; McCutchan, E; Meyer, D; Plettner, C; Ressler, J; Zamfir, V

    2004-07-14

    Neutron-induced reaction cross sections are sometimes difficult to measure due to target or beam limitations. For two-step reactions proceeding through an equilibrated intermediate state, an alternate ''surrogate reaction'' technique can be applicable, and is currently undergoing investigation at LLNL. Measured decay probabilities for the intermediate nucleus formed in a light-ion reaction can be combined with optical-model calculations for the formation of the same intermediate nucleus via the neutron-induced reaction. The result is an estimation for overall (n,{gamma}/n/2n) cross sections. As a benchmark, the reaction {sup 92}Zr({alpha},{alpha}'), surrogate, for n+{sup 91}Zr, was studied at the A.W. Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory at Yale. Particles were detected in the silicon telescope STARS (Silicon Telescope Array for Reaction Studies) and {gamma}-ray energies measured with germanium clover detectors from the YRAST (Yale Rochester Array for SpecTroscopy) ball. The experiment and preliminary observations will be discussed.

  13. Determining neutron capture cross sections with the Surrogate Reaction Technique: Measuring decay probabilities with STARS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Church, J. A.; Ahle, L.; Bernstein, L. A.; Cooper, J.; Dietrich, F. S.; Escher, J.; Forssen, C.; Ai, H.; Amro, H.; Babilon, M.; et al.

    2005-07-01

    Neutron-induced reaction cross sections are sometimes difficult to measure due to target or beam limitations. For two-step reactions proceeding through an equilibrated intermediate state, an alternate "surrogate reaction" technique [J.D. Cramer and H.C. Britt, Nucl. Sci. Eng. 41, 177 (1970), H.C. Britt and J.B. Wilhelmy, Nucl. Sci. Eng. 72, 222 (1979), W.Younes and H.C. Britt, Phys. Rev. C 67, 024610 (2003)] can be applicable, and is currently undergoing investigation at LLNL. Measured decay probabilities for the intermediate nucleus formed in a light-ion reaction can be combined with optical-model calculations for the formation of the same intermediate nucleus via the neutron-induced reaction. The result is an estimation for overall (n,γ/n/2n) cross sections. As a bench-mark, the reaction 92Zr(α, α'), surrogate for n+91Zr, was studied at the A.W. Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory at Yale. Particles were detected in the silicon telescope STARS (Silicon Telescope Array for Reaction Studies) and γ-ray energies measured with germanium clover detectors from the YRAST (Yale Rochester Array for SpecTroscopy) ball. The experiment and preliminary observations will be discussed.

  14. Volumetric radar cross section of single tree calculated from far-field S-band measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, M.J.

    1988-08-01

    Backscatter radar cross section per unit volume of a single tree was calculated from far-field S-band measurements of radar cross section. The measurements were made at the SCATTER facility at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. The trees measured were an 11-ft (3.4-m) Austrian pine and a 22-ft (6.7-m) budding Modesto ash. Radar cross section of the pine was also measured after the needles had been stripped from the tree. The mean radar cross section per unit volume of the pine was -12 dBsm/m/sup 3/; the absence of needles had no significant effect on this result. The mean radar cross section per unit volume of the Modesto ash was -18 dBsm/m/sup 3/. 4 refs., 19 figs.

  15. Dissociation cross sections for N2 + N → 3N and O2 + O → 3O using the QCT method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mankodi, Tapan K.; Bhandarkar, Upendra V.; Puranik, Bhalchandra P.

    2017-05-01

    Cross sections for the homo-nuclear atom-diatom collision induced dissociations (CIDs): N2 + N and O2 + O are calculated using Quasi-Classical Trajectory (QCT) method on ab initio Potential Energy Surfaces (PESs). A number of studies for these reactions carried out in the past focused on the CID cross section values generated using London-Eyring-Polanyi-Sato PES and seldom listed the CID cross section data. A highly accurate CASSCF-CASPT2 N3 and a new O3 global PES are used for the present QCT analysis and the CID cross section data up to 30 eV relative energy are also published. In addition, an interpolating scheme based on spectroscopic data is introduced that fits the CID cross section for the entire ro-vibrational spectrum using QCT data generated at chosen ro-vibrational levels. The rate coefficients calculated using the generated CID cross section compare satisfactorily with the existing experimental and theoretical results. The CID cross section data generated will find an application in the development of a more precise chemical reaction model for Direct Simulation Monte Carlo code simulating hypersonic re-entry flows.

  16. Dissociation cross sections for N2 + N → 3N and O2 + O → 3O using the QCT method.

    PubMed

    Mankodi, Tapan K; Bhandarkar, Upendra V; Puranik, Bhalchandra P

    2017-05-28

    Cross sections for the homo-nuclear atom-diatom collision induced dissociations (CIDs): N2 + N and O2 + O are calculated using Quasi-Classical Trajectory (QCT) method on ab initio Potential Energy Surfaces (PESs). A number of studies for these reactions carried out in the past focused on the CID cross section values generated using London-Eyring-Polanyi-Sato PES and seldom listed the CID cross section data. A highly accurate CASSCF-CASPT2 N3 and a new O3 global PES are used for the present QCT analysis and the CID cross section data up to 30 eV relative energy are also published. In addition, an interpolating scheme based on spectroscopic data is introduced that fits the CID cross section for the entire ro-vibrational spectrum using QCT data generated at chosen ro-vibrational levels. The rate coefficients calculated using the generated CID cross section compare satisfactorily with the existing experimental and theoretical results. The CID cross section data generated will find an application in the development of a more precise chemical reaction model for Direct Simulation Monte Carlo code simulating hypersonic re-entry flows.

  17. Photon scattering cross sections of H2 and He measured with synchrotron radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ice, G. E.

    1977-01-01

    Total (elastic + inelastic) differential photon scattering cross sections have been measured for H2 gas and He, using an X-ray beam. Absolute measured cross sections agree with theory within the probable errors. Relative cross sections (normalized to theory at large S) agree to better than one percent with theoretical values calculated from wave functions that include the effect of electron-electron Coulomb correlation, but the data deviate significantly from theoretical independent-particle (e.g., Hartree-Fock) results. The ratios of measured absolute He cross sections to those of H2, at any given S, also agree to better than one percent with theoretical He-to-H2 cross-section ratios computed from correlated wave functions. It appears that photon scattering constitutes a very promising tool for probing electron correlation in light atoms and molecules.

  18. Neutron-induced fission-cross-section measurements and calculations of selected transplutonic isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.M.; Browne, J.C.

    1982-08-27

    The neutron-induced fission cross sections of /sup 242m/Am and /sup 245/Cm have been measured over an energy range of 10/sup -4/ eV to approx. 20 MeV in a series of experiments at three facilities during the past several years. The combined results of these measurements, in which only sub-milligram quantities of enriched isotopes were used, yield cross sections with uncertainties of approximately 5% below 10 MeV relative to the /sup 235/U standard cross section used to normalize the data. We summarize the resonance analysis of the /sup 242m/Am(n,f) cross section in the eV region. Hauser-Feshbach statistical calculations of the detailed fission cross sections of /sup 235/U and /sup 245/Cm have been carried out over the energy region from 0.1 to 5 MeV and these results are compared with our experimental data.

  19. Neutron cross section measurements at ORELA for improved nuclear data and their application.

    PubMed

    Guber, K H; Leal, L C; Sayer, R O; Koehler, P E; Valentine, T E; Derrien, H; Harvey, J A

    2005-01-01

    To support the Nuclear Criticality Safety Program, the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) has been used to measure the total and capture neutron cross sections of several nuclides in the energy range from 100 eV to -600 keV. Concerns about the use of existing cross section data in nuclear criticality calculations have been a prime motivator for the new cross-section measurements. Our new capture cross sections of aluminium, silicon, chlorine, fluorine and potassium in the energy range from 100 eV to 600 keV are substantially different from the cross sections in evaluated nuclear data files of ENDF/B-VI and JENDL-3.2.

  20. Deep inelastic cross-section measurements at large y with the ZEUS detector at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Arslan, O.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Bartosik, N.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bloch, I.; Bokhonov, V.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Brock, I.; Brugnera, R.; Bruni, A.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Catterall, C. D.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; D'Agostini, G.; Dementiev, R. K.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dolinska, G.; Drugakov, V.; Dusini, S.; Ferrando, J.; Figiel, J.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Hain, W.; Hartner, G.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ishitsuka, M.; Iudin, A.; Januschek, F.; Kadenko, I.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Khein, L. A.; Kisielewska, D.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Maeda, J.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Martin, J. F.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Mujkic, K.; Myronenko, V.; Nagano, K.; Nigro, A.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Paul, E.; Perlański, W.; Perrey, H.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycień, M.; Raval, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Samojlov, V.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shevchenko, R.; Shkola, O.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Spiridonov, A.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stopa, P.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tassi, E.; Temiraliev, T.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Trofymov, A.; Trusov, V.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.; Wolf, G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zotkin, D. S.; ZEUS Collaboration

    2014-10-01

    The reduced cross sections for e+p deep inelastic scattering have been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA at three different center-of-mass energies, 318, 251 and 225 GeV. The cross sections, measured double differentially in Bjorken x and the virtuality, Q2, were obtained in the region 0.13≤y ≤0.75, where y denotes the inelasticity and 5≤Q2≤110 GeV2. The proton structure functions F2 and FL were extracted from the measured cross sections.

  1. Measurements of K-shell ionization cross sections of Al and L-shell x-ray production cross sections of Se by intermediate-energy electron impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, C. S.; Wu, Y.; Yuan, Y.; Chang, C. H.; Qian, Z. C.; Zhu, J. J.; Moharram, Khalid

    2016-12-01

    The K-shell ionization cross sections of Al (Z = 13) and the total L-shell x-ray production cross sections of Se (Z = 34) from electron impacts with kinetic energies ranging from several keV to several tenths of keV have been measured by using an improved experimental setup. An Al target of monoatomic and grid carbon substrate, which consisted of ultrathin Al film (∼3 nm) deposited onto grid carbon substrate (∼200 nm) with a layer of monoatomic carbon between the film and the grid substrate, was first proposed and measured. In addition, targets of Al film (∼3 nm) and Se film (∼7.8 nm) deposited respectively onto thick carbon substrate (∼2 mm) were also measured. Our experimental results are compared with the distorted-wave Born approximation (DWBA) theory and experimental data from the literature. It has been observed that within the uncertainties, the DWBA agrees with our experimental measurements of K-shell ionization cross sections of Al and the total L-shell x-ray production cross sections of Se, and our measured data of Al K-shell ionization cross sections are consistent with the available experimental data. This is the first time that experimental data of Se-L-shell x-ray production cross sections in the intermediate-energy region have been published.

  2. Measurement of electron impact collisional excitation cross sections of Ni to Ge-like gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, M. J.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Jordan, N.; Scofield, J. H.; Reed, K. J.; Brown, G. V.; Hansen, S. B.; Porter, F. S.; Kelley, R.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Boyce, K. R.

    2017-03-01

    We have measured the collisional excitation cross sections for the 3d→4f and 3d→5f excitations in Au ions near the Ni-like charge state by using beam plasmas created in the Livermore electron beam ion trap EBIT-I. The cross sections have been experimentally determined at approximately 1, 2 and 3 keV above the threshold energy, ET, for the 3d→4f excitations (ET ˜ 2.5 keV) and at approximately 0.1, 1 and 2 keV above the threshold energy for the 3d→5f excitations (ET ˜ 3.3 keV). The cross section measurements were made possible by using the GSFC x-ray microcalorimeter at the Livermore EBIT facility. The absolute cross sections are determined from the ratio of the intensity of the collisionally excited bound-bound transitions to the intensity of the radiative recombination lines produced in EBIT-I plasmas. The effects of polarization and Auger decay channels are accounted for in the cross section determination. Measured cross sections are compared with those from HULLAC, DWS and FAC calculations. The measurements demonstrate that some errors exist in the calculated excitation cross sections.

  3. Measurement of electron impact collisional excitation cross sections of Ni to Ge-like gold

    DOE PAGES

    May, M. J.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Jordan, N.; ...

    2017-03-01

    We have measured the collisional excitation cross sections for the 3d→4f and 3d→5f excitations in Au ions near the Ni-like charge state by using beam plasmas created in the Livermore electron beam ion trap EBIT-I. The cross sections have been experimentally determined at approximately 1, 2 and 3 keV above the threshold energy, ET, for the 3d→4f excitations (ET ~2.5 keV) and at approximately 0.1, 1 and 2 keV above the threshold energy for the 3d→5f excitations (ET ~3.3 keV). The cross section measurements were made possible by using the GSFC x-ray microcalorimeter at the Livermore EBIT facility. The absolutemore » cross sections are determined from the ratio of the intensity of the collisionally excited bound-bound transitions to the intensity of the radiative recombination lines produced in EBIT-I plasmas. The effects of polarization and Auger decay channels are accounted for in the cross section determination. Measured cross sections are compared with those from HULLAC, DWS and FAC calculations. Finally, the measurements demonstrate that some errors exist in the calculated excitation cross sections.« less

  4. Cross Section Measurements Using the Zero Degree Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christl, M. J.; Adams, J. H., Jr.; Heilbronn, L.; Kuznetsov, E. N.; Miller, J.; Zeitlin, C.

    2007-01-01

    The Zero Degree Detector (ZDD) is an instrument that has been used in accelerator exposures to measure the angular dependence of particles produced in heavy ion fragmentation experiments. The ZDD uses two identical layers of pixelated silicon detectors that make coincident measurements over the active area of the instrument. The angular distribution of secondary particle produced in nuclear interactions for several heavy ions: and target materials will be presented along with performance characteristic of the instrument.

  5. Excitation and Charge Exchange Phenomena in Astronomical Objects: Measurement of Cross Sections and Lifetimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara; Smith, S.; Lozano, J.; Cadez, I.; Greewnood, J.; Mawhovter, R.; Williams, I.; Niimura, M.

    2003-01-01

    This document addresses extreme ultraviolet radiation and X-ray emissions from comets, planets and heliospheric gases focusing on the measurement of charge-exchange cross sections and radiative lifetimes. Highly-charged heavy ions present in the solar wind, and their abundance relative to the total oxygen-ion abundance are detailed. The plan for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory high-charge ion facility is outlined detailing its ability to measure absolute collisional excitation cross sections, absolute charge-exchange cross sections, lifetimes of metastable ion levels, and X-ray emission spectra following charge changes.

  6. Excitation and Charge Exchange Phenomena in Astronomical Objects: Measurement of Cross Sections and Lifetimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara; Smith, S.; Lozano, J.; Cadez, I.; Greewnood, J.; Mawhovter, R.; Williams, I.; Niimura, M.

    2003-01-01

    This document addresses extreme ultraviolet radiation and X-ray emissions from comets, planets and heliospheric gases focusing on the measurement of charge-exchange cross sections and radiative lifetimes. Highly-charged heavy ions present in the solar wind, and their abundance relative to the total oxygen-ion abundance are detailed. The plan for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory high-charge ion facility is outlined detailing its ability to measure absolute collisional excitation cross sections, absolute charge-exchange cross sections, lifetimes of metastable ion levels, and X-ray emission spectra following charge changes.

  7. Measurement of the inclusive jet cross section at D0 Run II

    SciTech Connect

    Agram, Jean-Laurent

    2004-12-17

    This work describes the measurement of inclusive jets cross section in the DØ experiment. This cross section is computed as a function of jet transverse momentum, in several rapidity intervals. This quantity is sensitive to the proton structure and is crucial for the determination of parton distribution functions (PDF), essentially for the gluon at high proton momentum fraction. The measurement presented here gives the first values obtained for Tevatron Run II for the cross section in several rapidity intervals, for an integrated luminosity of 143 pb-1. The results are in agreement, within the uncertainties, with theoretical Standard Model predictions, showing no evidence for new physics.

  8. Absolute metastable atom-atom collision cross section measurements using a magneto-optical trap.

    PubMed

    Matherson, K J; Glover, R D; Laban, D E; Sang, R T

    2007-07-01

    We present a new technique to measure absolute total collision cross sections from metastable neon atoms. The technique is based on the observation of the decay rate of trapped atoms as they collide with room temperature atoms. We present the first measurement of this kind using trapped neon atoms in the (3)P(2) metastable state colliding with thermal ground state argon. The measured cross section has a value of 556+/-26 A(2).

  9. The State of the Art of Neutrino Cross Section Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Deborah A.

    2015-06-08

    The study of neutrino interactions has recently experienced a renaissance, motivated by the fact that neutrino oscillation experiments depend critically on an accurate models of neutrino interactions. These models have to predict not only the signal and background populations that oscillation experiments see at near and far detectors, but they must also predict how the neutrino's energy which enters a nucleus gets transferred to energies of the particles that leave the nucleus after the neutrino interacts. Over the past year there have been a number of new results on many different neutrino (and antineutrino) interaction channels using several different target nuclei. These results are often not in agreement with predictions extraolated from charged lepton scattering measurements, or even from predictions anchored to neutrino measurements on deuterium. These new measurements are starting to give the community the handles needed to improve the theoretical description of neutrino interactions, which ultimately pave the way for precision oscillation measurements. This report briefly summarizes recent results and points out where those results differ from the predictions based on current models.

  10. Neutron Capture Cross Section Measurement on $^{238}$Pu at DANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Chyzh, A; Wu, C Y

    2011-02-14

    The proposed neutron capture measurement for {sup 238}Pu was carried out in Nov-Dec, 2010, using the DANCE array at LANSCE, LANL. The total beam-on-target time is about 14 days plus additional 5 days for the background measurement. The target was prepared at LLNL with the new electrplating cell capable of plating the {sup 238}Pu isotope simultaneously on both sides of the 3-{micro}m thick Ti backing foil. A total mass of 395 {micro}g with an activity of 6.8 mCi was deposited onto the area of 7 mm in diameter. The {sup 238}Pu sample was enriched to 99.35%. The target was covered by 1.4 {micro}m double-side aluminized mylar and then inserted into a specially designed vacuum-tight container, shown in Fig. 1, for the {sup 238}Pu containment. The container was tested for leaks in the vacuum chamber at LLNL. An identical container without {sup 238}Pu was made as well and used as a blank for the background measurement.

  11. Differential cross section measurements in ion-molecule collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Song

    1999-06-01

    A 14 m long beam line dedicated to study very small scattering angles in ion-molecule collisions has been set up in the University of Toledo Heavy Ion Accelerator (THIA) Laboratory. Together with position sensitive detectors for both the projectile and the recoil particles' detection, the beam line can be used to measure the projectile forward scattering angles of up to 2.5 milliradians (mrad) with a 0.025 mrad resolution, in coincidence with information on the recoil particles such as recoil charge states, energy, momentum and the molecular orientations.

  12. Scattered light and accuracy of the cross-section measurements of weak absorptions: Gas and liquid phase UV absorption cross sections of CH3CFCl2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahr, A.; Braun, W.; Kurylo, M. J.

    1993-01-01

    Ultraviolet absorption cross sections of CH3CFCl2(HCFC-141b) were determined in the gas phase (190-260 nm) and liquid phase (230-260 mm) at 298 K. The liquid phase absorption cross sections were then converted into accurate gas phase values using a previously described procedure. It has been demonstrated that scattered light from the shorter-wavelength region (as little as several parts per thousand) can seriously compromise the absorption cross-section measurement, particularly at longer wavelengths where cross sections are low, and can be a source of discrepancies in the cross sections of weakly absorbing halocarbons reported in the literature. A modeling procedure was developed to assess the effect of scattered light on the measured absorption cross section in our experiments, thereby permitting appropriate corrections to be made on the experimental values. Modeled and experimental results were found to be in good agreement. Experimental results from this study were compared with other available determinations and provide accurate input for calculating the atmospheric lifetime of HCFC-141b.

  13. Scattered light and accuracy of the cross-section measurements of weak absorptions: Gas and liquid phase UV absorption cross sections of CH3CFCl2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahr, A.; Braun, W.; Kurylo, M. J.

    1993-01-01

    Ultraviolet absorption cross sections of CH3CFCl2(HCFC-141b) were determined in the gas phase (190-260 nm) and liquid phase (230-260 mm) at 298 K. The liquid phase absorption cross sections were then converted into accurate gas phase values using a previously described procedure. It has been demonstrated that scattered light from the shorter-wavelength region (as little as several parts per thousand) can seriously compromise the absorption cross-section measurement, particularly at longer wavelengths where cross sections are low, and can be a source of discrepancies in the cross sections of weakly absorbing halocarbons reported in the literature. A modeling procedure was developed to assess the effect of scattered light on the measured absorption cross section in our experiments, thereby permitting appropriate corrections to be made on the experimental values. Modeled and experimental results were found to be in good agreement. Experimental results from this study were compared with other available determinations and provide accurate input for calculating the atmospheric lifetime of HCFC-141b.

  14. Fluorescence cross section measurements of biological agent simulants

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, J.R.

    1996-11-01

    Fluorescence is a powerful technique that has potential uses in detection and characterization of biological aerosols both in the battlefield and in civilian environments. Fluorescence techniques can be used with ultraviolet (UV) light detection and ranging (LIDAR) equipment to detect biological aerosol clouds at a distance, to provide early warning of a biological attack, and to track an potentially noxious cloud. Fluorescence can also be used for detection in a point sensor to monitor biological materials and to distinguish agents from benign aerosols. This work is part of a continuing program by the Army`s Chemical and Biological Defense Command to characterized the optical properties of biological agents. Reported here are ultraviolet fluorescence measurements of Bacillus megaterium and Bacillus Globigii aerosols suspended in an electrodynamic particle trap. Fluorescence spectra of a common atmospheric aerosol, pine pollen, are also presented.

  15. Measurement of the {gamma} cross section at D0 using dimuons

    SciTech Connect

    Abachi, S.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.

    1995-07-01

    The D0 experiment has measured the {gamma} differential cross section in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV for {vert_bar}y{sup {gamma}}{vert_bar} < 0.7. We find the measured cross section to be a factor of five larger than the O({alpha}{sub s}{sup 3}) QCD prediction for p{sub T}{sup {gamma}} > 5 GeV/c.

  16. A Time Projection Chamber for Precision {sup 239}Pu(n,f) Cross Section Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Heffner, M.

    2008-04-17

    High precision measurements of the {sup 239}Pu(n,f) cross section have been identified as important for the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) and other programs. Currently, the uncertainty on this cross section is of the order 2-3% for neutron energies below 14 MeV and the goal is to reduce this to less than 1%. The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) has been identified as a possible tool to make this high precision measurement.

  17. Measurement of the antineutrino neutral-current elastic differential cross section

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A.  A.; Brown, B.  C.; Bugel, L.; Cheng, G.; Church, E.  D.; Conrad, J.  M.; Dharmapalan, R.; Djurcic, Z.; Finley, D.  A.; Ford, R.; Garcia, F.  G.; Garvey, G.  T.; Grange, J.; Huelsnitz, W.; Ignarra, C.; Imlay, R.; Johnson, R.  A.; Karagiorgi, G.; Katori, T.; Kobilarcik, T.; Louis, W.  C.; Mariani, C.; Marsh, W.; Mills, G.  B.; Mirabal, J.; Moore, C.  D.; Mousseau, J.; Nienaber, P.; Osmanov, B.; Pavlovic, Z.; Perevalov, D.; Polly, C.  C.; Ray, H.; Roe, B.  P.; Russell, A.  D.; Shaevitz, M.  H.; Spitz, J.; Stancu, I.; Tayloe, R.; Van de Water, R.  G.; Wascko, M.  O.; White, D.  H.; Wickremasinghe, D.  A.; Zeller, G.  P.; Zimmerman, E.  D.

    2015-01-08

    We report the measurement of the flux-averaged antineutrino neutral current elastic scattering cross section (dσν-barN→ν-barN/dQ2) on CH2 by the MiniBooNE experiment using the largest sample of antineutrino neutral current elastic candidate events ever collected. The ratio of the antineutrino to neutrino neutral current elastic scattering cross sections and a ratio of the antineutrino neutral current elastic to antineutrino charged current quasi elastic cross sections are also presented.

  18. Measured Total Cross Sections of Slow Neutrons Scattered by Gaseous and Liquid 2H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atchison, F.; van den Brandt, B.; Bryś, T.; Daum, M.; Fierlinger, P.; Hautle, P.; Henneck, R.; Kirch, K.; Kohlbrecher, J.; Kühne, G.; Konter, J. A.; Pichlmaier, A.; Wokaun, A.; Bodek, K.; Kasprzak, M.; Kuźniak, M.; Geltenbort, P.; Giersch, M.; Zmeskal, J.; Hino, M.; Utsuro, M.

    2005-06-01

    The total scattering cross sections for slow neutrons with energies E in the range 300 neV to 3 meV for gaseous and liquid ortho-2H2 have been measured. The cross sections for 2H2 gas are found to be in excellent agreement with both the Hamermesh and Schwinger and the Young and Koppel models. For liquid 2H2, we confirm the existing experimental data in the cold neutron range and the discrepancy with the gas models. We find a clear 1/√(E') dependence at low energies for both states. A simple explanation for the liquid 2H2 cross section is offered.

  19. Proton radius of 14Be from measurement of charge-changing cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terashima, S.; Tanihata, I.; Kanungo, R.; Estradé, A.; Horiuchi, W.; Ameil, F.; Atkinson, J.; Ayyad, Y.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Dillmann, I.; Evdokimov, A.; Farinon, F.; Geissel, H.; Guastalla, G.; Janik, R.; Kimura, M.; Knoebel, R.; Kurcewicz, J.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Marta, M.; Mostazo, M.; Mukha, I.; Neff, T.; Nociforo, C.; Ong, H. J.; Pietri, S.; Prochazka, A.; Scheidenberger, C.; Sitar, B.; Suzuki, Y.; Takechi, M.; Tanaka, J.; Vargas, J.; Winfield, J. S.; Weick, H.

    2014-10-01

    The charge-changing cross sections of {}^{7,9-12,14}Be have been measured at 900AMeV on a carbon target. These cross sections are discussed both in terms of a geometrical and a Glauber model. From several different analyses of the cross sections, the proton distribution radius (proton radius) of {}^{14}Be is determined for the first time to be 2.41 ± 0.04 fm. A large difference in the proton and neutron radii is found. The proton radii are compared to the results of fermionic molecular dynamics (FMD) and antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD) calculations.

  20. Measurement of the antineutrino neutral-current elastic differential cross section

    DOE PAGES

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A.  A.; Brown, B.  C.; Bugel, L.; ...

    2015-01-08

    We report the measurement of the flux-averaged antineutrino neutral current elastic scattering cross section (dσν-barN→ν-barN/dQ2) on CH2 by the MiniBooNE experiment using the largest sample of antineutrino neutral current elastic candidate events ever collected. The ratio of the antineutrino to neutrino neutral current elastic scattering cross sections and a ratio of the antineutrino neutral current elastic to antineutrino charged current quasi elastic cross sections are also presented.

  1. Measurements of Neutron Capture Cross-Section for Tantalum at the Neutron Filtered Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritzay, Olena; Libman, Volodymyr

    2009-08-01

    The neutron capture cross sections of tantalum have been measured for the neutron energies 2 and 59 keV using the WWR-M Kyiv Research Reactor (KRR) of the Institute for Nuclear Research of the National Academy of Science of Ukraine. The cross sections of 181Ta (n, γ) 182Ta reaction were obtained by the activation method using a gamma-spectrometer with Ge(Li)-detector. The obtained neutron capture cross sections were compared with the known experimental data from database EXFOR/CSISRS and the ENDF libraries.

  2. Precision Measurement of the Proton Elastic Cross Section at High Q2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Longwu; E12-07-108 Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The measurement of proton electromagnetic form factors (FF) is a powerful way to understand the internal structure of proton and gain insight into the nature of the strong interaction. Current data of FF at high Q2 have large statistical and systematic uncertainties, which translate into large uncertainties in the extracted cross section in this kinematic range. The GMp experiment in Hall A at Jefferson Lab, starting from 2014, performed precision measurements of elastic ep scattering cross section in the Q2 range from 7 to 14 (GeV / c) 2. These measurements will improve the precision on the cross section in the covered Q2 range to about 2 % . They represent a great complement to the world's cross section data set and will be key inputs for future electromagnetic form factor experiments at similar kinematics. In this talk, the instrumentation and techniques used in the experiment will be described, and the current status of the analysis will be presented.

  3. Average Neutron Total Cross Sections in the Unresolved Energy Range From ORELA High Resolutio Transmission Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, H

    2004-05-27

    Average values of the neutron total cross sections of {sup 233}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, and {sup 239}Pu have been obtained in the unresolved resonance energy range from high-resolution transmission measurements performed at ORELA in the past two decades. The cross sections were generated by correcting the effective total cross sections for the self-shielding effects due to the resonance structure of the data. The self-shielding factors were found by calculating the effective and true cross sections with the computer code SAMMY for the same Doppler and resolution conditions as for the transmission measurements, using an appropriate set of resonance parameters. Our results are compared to results of previous measurements and to the current ENDF/B-VI data.

  4. Capture cross section measurement analysis in the Californium-252 spectrum with the Monte Carlo method.

    PubMed

    Manojlovič, Stanko; Trkov, Andrej; Žerovnik, Gašper; Snoj, Luka

    2015-07-01

    Absolute average capture cross sections of gold, thorium, tantalum, molybdenum, copper and strontium in (252)Cf spontaneous fission neutron spectrum were simulated for two types of experiment setups preformed by Z. Dezso and J. Csikai and by L. Green. The experiments were simulated with MCNP5 using cross section data from the ENDF/B-VII.0 library. The determination of neutron backscattering was calculated with the use of neutron flagging. Correction factors to experimentally measured values were determined to obtain average cross sections in a pure (252)Cf spontaneous fission spectrum. Influence of concrete wall thickness, air moisture and room size on the average cross section was analyzed. Correction factors amounted to about 30%. Corrected values corresponding to average cross sections in a pure (252)Cf spectrum were calculated for (197)Au, (232)Th, (181)Ta, (98)Mo, (65)Cu and (84)Sr. Average cross sections were also calculated with the RR_UNC software using IRDFF-v.1.05 and ENDF/B-VII.0 libraries. The revised average radiative capture cross sections are 75.5±0.1 mb for (197)Au, 87.0±1.6 mb for (232)Th , 98.0±4.5 mb for (181)Ta, 21.2±0.5 mb for (98)Mo, 10.3±0.3 mb for (63)Cu, and 34.9±6.5 mb for (84)Sr.

  5. Quantitative Collision Cross-Sections from FTICR Linewidth Measurements: Improvements in Theory and Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anupriya; Gustafson, Elaura; Mortensen, Daniel N.; Dearden, David V.

    2017-07-01

    Two corrections to the equation used in the cross-sectional areas by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance ("CRAFTI") technique are identified. In CRAFTI, ion collision cross-sections are obtained from the pressure-dependent ion linewidths in Fourier transform mass spectra. The effects of these corrections on the accuracy of the cross-sections obtained using the CRAFTI technique are evaluated experimentally using the 20 biogenic amino acids and several crown ether complexes with protonated alkyl monoamines. Good absolute agreement is obtained between the CRAFTI cross-sections and the corresponding cross-sections obtained using both static drift ion mobility spectrometry and computational simulations. These results indicate that the CRAFTI cross-sections obtained using the updated equation presented here are quantitatively descriptive of the size and shape of the gas-phase ions. Cross-sections that differ by less than 3% are measured for the isobaric isomers n-butylamine and tert-butylamine complexed with the crown ethers. This level of precision is similar to what has been achieved previously using traveling wave ion mobility devices. These results indicate that CRAFTI can be used to probe subtle structural differences between ions with approximately the same precision as that achieved in traveling wave ion mobility devices.

  6. O2 absorption cross sections /187-225 nm/ from stratospheric solar flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, J. R.; Mentall, J. E.

    1982-10-01

    The absorption cross sections of molecular oxygen are calculated in the wavelength range from 187 to 230 nm from solar flux measurements obtained within the stratosphere. Within the Herzberg continuum wavelength region the molecular oxygen cross sections are found to be about 30% smaller than the laboratory results of Shardanand and Rao (1977) from 200 to 210 nm and about 50% smaller than those of Hasson and Nicholls (1971). At wavelengths longer than 210 nm the cross sections agree with those of Shardanand and Rao. The effective absorption cross sections of O2 in the Schumann-Runge band region from 187 to 200 nm are calculated and compared to the empirical fit given by Allen and Frederick (1982). The calculated cross sections indicate that the transmissivity of the atmosphere may be underestimated by the use of the Allen and Frederic cross sections between 195 and 200 nm. The ozone column content between 30 and 40 km and the relative ozone cross sections are determined from the same solar flux data set.

  7. O2 absorption cross sections /187-225 nm/ from stratospheric solar flux measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, J. R.; Mentall, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    The absorption cross sections of molecular oxygen are calculated in the wavelength range from 187 to 230 nm from solar flux measurements obtained within the stratosphere. Within the Herzberg continuum wavelength region the molecular oxygen cross sections are found to be about 30% smaller than the laboratory results of Shardanand and Rao (1977) from 200 to 210 nm and about 50% smaller than those of Hasson and Nicholls (1971). At wavelengths longer than 210 nm the cross sections agree with those of Shardanand and Rao. The effective absorption cross sections of O2 in the Schumann-Runge band region from 187 to 200 nm are calculated and compared to the empirical fit given by Allen and Frederick (1982). The calculated cross sections indicate that the transmissivity of the atmosphere may be underestimated by the use of the Allen and Frederic cross sections between 195 and 200 nm. The ozone column content between 30 and 40 km and the relative ozone cross sections are determined from the same solar flux data set.

  8. O2 absorption cross sections /187-225 nm/ from stratospheric solar flux measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, J. R.; Mentall, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    The absorption cross sections of molecular oxygen are calculated in the wavelength range from 187 to 230 nm from solar flux measurements obtained within the stratosphere. Within the Herzberg continuum wavelength region the molecular oxygen cross sections are found to be about 30% smaller than the laboratory results of Shardanand and Rao (1977) from 200 to 210 nm and about 50% smaller than those of Hasson and Nicholls (1971). At wavelengths longer than 210 nm the cross sections agree with those of Shardanand and Rao. The effective absorption cross sections of O2 in the Schumann-Runge band region from 187 to 200 nm are calculated and compared to the empirical fit given by Allen and Frederick (1982). The calculated cross sections indicate that the transmissivity of the atmosphere may be underestimated by the use of the Allen and Frederic cross sections between 195 and 200 nm. The ozone column content between 30 and 40 km and the relative ozone cross sections are determined from the same solar flux data set.

  9. Average cross section measurement for 162Er (γ, n) reaction compared with theoretical calculations using TALYS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vagena, E.; Stoulos, S.

    2017-01-01

    Bremsstrahlung photon beam delivered by a linear electron accelerator has been used to experimentally determine the near threshold photonuclear cross section data of nuclides. For the first time, (γ, n) cross section data was obtained for the astrophysical important nucleus 162Er. Moreover, theoretical calculations have been applied using the TALYS 1.6 code. The effect of the gamma ray strength function on the cross section calculations has been studied. A satisfactorily reproduction of the available experimental data of photonuclear cross section at the energy region below 20 MeV could be achieved. The photon flux was monitored by measuring the photons yield from seven well known (γ, n) reactions from the threshold energy of each reaction up to the end-point energy of the photon beam used. An integrated cross-section 87 ± 14 mb is calculated for the photonuclear reaction 162Er (γ, n) at the energy 9.2-14 MeV. The effective cross section estimated using the TALYS code range between 89 and 96 mb depending on the γ-strength function used. To validate the method for the estimation of the average cross-section data of 162Er (γ, n) reaction, the same procedure has been performed to calculate the average cross-section data of 197Au (γ, n) and 55Mn (γ, n) reactions. In this case, the photons yield from the rest well known (γ, n) reactions was used in order to monitoring the photon flux. The results for 162Er (γ, n), 197Au (γ, n) and 55Mn (γ, n) are found to be in good agreement with the theoretical values obtained by TALYS 1.6. So, the present indirect process could be a valuable tool to estimate the effective cross section of (γ, n) reaction for various isotopes using bremsstrahlung beams.

  10. On the measurement of the proton-air cross section using air shower data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, R.; Blümer, J.; Engel, R.; Schüssler, F.; Unger, M.

    2009-06-01

    The analysis of high-energy air shower data allows one to study the proton-air cross section at energies beyond the reach of fixed target and collider experiments. The mean depth of the first interaction point and its fluctuations are a measure of the proton-air particle production cross section. Since the first interaction point in air cannot be measured directly, various methods have been developed in the past to estimate the depth of the first interaction from air shower observables in combination with simulations. As the simulations depend on assumptions made for hadronic particle production at energies and phase space regions not accessible in accelerator experiments, the derived cross sections are subject to significant systematic uncertainties. The focus of this work is the development of an improved analysis technique that allows a significant reduction of the model dependence of the derived cross section at very high energy. Performing a detailed Monte Carlo study of the potential and the limitations of different measurement methods, we quantify the dependence of the measured cross section on the hadronic interaction model used. Based on these results, a general improvement of the analysis methods is proposed by introducing the actually derived cross section already in the simulation of reference showers. The reduction of the model dependence is demonstrated for one of the measurement methods.

  11. Measurements of the Ultraviolet Fluorescence Cross Sections and Spectra of Bacillus Anthracis Simulants

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, J.R.

    1998-09-01

    Measurements of the ultraviolet autofluorescence spectra and absolute cross sections of the Bacillus anthracis (Ba) simulants Bacillus globigii (Bg), Bacillus megaterium (Bm), Bacillus subtilis (Bs), and Bacillus cereus (Bc) were measured. Fluorescence spectra and cross sections of pine pollen (Pina echinata) were measured for comparison. Both dried vegetative cells and spores separated from the sporulated vegetative material were studied. The spectra were obtained by suspending a small number (<10) of particles in air in our Single Particle Spectroscopy Apparatus (SPSA), illuminating the particles with light from a spectrally filtered arc lamp, and measuring the fluorescence spectra of the particles. The illumination was 280 nm (20 nm FWHM) and the fluorescence spectra was measured between 300 and 450 nm. The fluorescence cross section of vegetative Bg peaks at 320 nm with a maximum cross section of 5 X 10{sup -14} cm{sup 2}/sr-nm-particle while the Bg spore fluorescence peaks at 310 nm with peak fluorescence of 8 X 10{sup -15} cm{sup 2}/sr-nm-particle. Pine pollen particles showed a higher fluorescence peaking at 355 nm with a cross section of 1.7 X 10{sup -13} cm{sup 2}/sr-nm-particle. Integrated cross sections ranged from 3.0 X 10{sup -13} for the Bg spores through 2.25 X 10{sup -12} (cm{sup 2}/sr-particle) for the vegetative cells.

  12. Determination of band oscillator strengths of atmospheric molecules from high resolution vacuum ultraviolet cross section measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, W. H.

    1986-01-01

    An account is given of progress in work on (1) the determination of band oscillator strengths of the Schumann-Runge absorption bands of (16)O2 and (18)O2 from cross section measurements conducted at 79 K; (2) the determination of the absolute absorption cross section of the Schumann-Runge bands of (16)O(18)O from optical depth measurements performed on mixtures of (16)O2, (18)O2 and (16)O(18)O at 79K; and (3) the influence of Schumann-Runge linewing contributions on the determination of the Herzberg continuum absorption cross section of (16)O2 in the wavelength region 194 to 204 nm. The experimental investigations are effected at high resolution with a 6.65 m scanning spectrometer which is, by virtue of its small instrumental width (EWHM = 0.0013 nm), uniquely suitable for cross section measurements of molecular bands with discrete rotational structure. Absolute cross sections, which are independent of the instrumental function and from which band oscillator strengths are directly determined, are measured for the absorption bands that are most predissociated. Such measurements are needed for (1) accurate calculations of the stratospheric production of atomic oxygen and heavy ozone formed following the photopredissociation of (18)O(16)O by solar radiation penetrating between the absorption lines of (16)O2; (2) elucidation of the mechanism of predissociation of the upper state of the Schumann-Runge bands; and (3) determination of the true shape of the Herzberg continuum cross section.

  13. Measurements of the proton-air cross section with high energy cosmic ray experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, Rasha

    2016-07-01

    Detecting Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECRs) enables us to measure the proton-air inelastic cross section σinel p-air at energies that we are unable to access with particle accelerators. The proton-proton cross section σp-p is subsequently inferred from the proton-air cross section at these energies. UHECR experiments have been reportingon the proton-air inelastic cross section starting with the Fly's Eye in 1984 at √s =30 TeV and ending with the most recent result of the Telescope Array experiment at √s = 95 TeV in 2015. In this proceeding, I will summarize the most recent experimental results on the σinel p-air measurements from the UHECR experiments.

  14. Status update on the NIFFTE high precision fission cross section measurement program

    SciTech Connect

    Laptev, Alexander B; Tovesson, Fredrik; Burgett, Eric; Greife, Uwe; Grimes, Steven; Heffner, Michael D; Hertel, Nolan E; Hill, Tony; Isenhower, Donald; Klay, Jennifer L; Kornilov, Nickolay; Kudo, Ryuho; Loveland, Walter; Massey, Thomas; Mc Grath, Chris; Pickle, Nathan; Qu, Hai; Sharma, Sarvagya; Snyder, Lucas; Thornton, Tyler; Towell, Rusty S; Watson, Shon

    2010-01-01

    The Neutron Induced Fission Fragment Tracking Experiment (NIFFTE) program has been underway for nearly two years. The program's mission is to measure fission cross sections of the primary fissionable and fissile materials ({sup 235}U, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 238}U) as well as the minor actinides across energies from approximately 50 keV up to 20 MeV with an absolute uncertainty of less than one percent while investigating energy ranges from below an eV to 600 MeV. This basic nuclear physics data is being reinvestigated to support the next generation power plants and a fast burner reactor program. Uncertainties in the fast, resolved and unresolved resonance regions in plutonium and other transuranics are extremely large, dominating safety margins in the next generation nuclear power plants and power plants of today. This basic nuclear data can be used to support all aspects of the nuciear renaissance. The measurement campaign is utilizing a Time Projection Chamber or TPC as the tool to measure these cross sections to these unprecedented levels. Unlike traditional fission cross section measurements using time-of-flight and a multiple fission foil configurations in which fission cross sections in relation to that of {sup 235}U are performed, the TPC project uses time-of-flight and hydrogen as the benchmark cross section. Using the switch to hydrogen, a simple, smooth cross section that can be used which removes the uncertainties associated with the resolved and unresolved resonances in {sup 235}U.

  15. Measurement of 208Pb(n ,γ )209Pb Maxwellian averaged neutron capture cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weissman, L.; Tessler, M.; Arenshtam, A.; Eliyahu, I.; Halfon, S.; Guerrero, C.; Kaizer, B.; Kijel, D.; Kreisel, A.; Palchan, T.; Paul, M.; Perry, A.; Schimel, G.; Silverman, I.; Shor, A.; Tamim, N.; Vaintraub, S.

    2017-07-01

    The doubly magic 208Pb nucleus is a bottleneck at the termination of the s -process path due to its very low neutron capture cross section. This cross section is also important for the decomposition of s , r processes and U/Th radiogenic decay contributions to the Pb-Bi solar abundances. The 208Pb(n ,γ )209Pb cross section was measured at the Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility Phase I using an intense quasi-Maxwellian neutron source produced by irradiation of the liquid-lithium target with a 1.5-mA continuous-wave proton beam at 1.94 MeV. The cross section was measured by counting the β activity from the irradiated lead target. The measurement allowed us to evaluate the Maxwellian averaged cross section (MACS) at 30 keV obtaining a value of 0.33(2) mb. This has been compared with the earlier activation and time-of-flight measurements found in the literature. The MACS cross-sectional value of the 63Cu(n ,γ )64Cu reaction was determined in the same experiment and is compared to a recent published value.

  16. Measurement of the proton-air cross-section with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, Ralf

    2013-06-01

    We present the procedure to measure the proton-air cross-section at a center-of-mass energy per nucleon of 57 TeV developed by the Pierre Auger Collaboration. The conversion from proton-air to inelastic proton-proton cross-section with an extended Glauber calculation is discussed. The systematic uncertainties of the analysis are summarized and the final result compared to accelerator data and model predictions.

  17. Nuclear Reaction Data from Surrogate Measurements: A Consideration of (n,f) Cross Sections

    SciTech Connect

    Escher, J E; Bernstein, L A; Burke, J T; Dietrich, F S; Lyles, B F

    2007-07-30

    A brief summary of the Surrogate reaction method, an indirect approach for determining compound-nuclear reaction cross sections, is presented. The possibilities for obtaining accurate (n,f) cross sections from Surrogate measurements that are analyzed in the Weisskopf-Ewing and Ratio approximations are considered. Theoretical studies and benchmark experiments that provide new insights into the validity and limitations of the Surrogate approach, are discussed.

  18. Cross sections for (n, 2n), (n, p) and (n, ) reactions on osmium isotopes in the neutron energy range of 13.5-14.8 MeV.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liangyong; Yuan, Jilong; Tuo, Fei; Zhang, Yanbin; Kong, Xiangzhong; Liu, Rong; Jiang, Li

    2008-10-01

    Cross sections for (n, 2n), (n, p) and (n, alpha) reactions on the osmium isotopes were measured in the neutron energies 13.5-14.8 MeV by the activation technique with the monitor reaction (93)Nb(n, 2n)(92 m)Nb. Our measurements were carried out by gamma-detection using a coaxial high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector. Natural high-purity osmium powder (99.9%) was fabricated as the samples. The neutron energies were determined by the cross-section ratios for (93)Nb(n, 2n)(92 m)Nb and (90)Zr(n, 2n)(89 m+g)Zr reactions. The fast neutrons were produced by the T(d, n)(4)He reaction. The results obtained were compared with previous data.

  19. Measurement of the Am242m neutron-induced reaction cross sections

    DOE PAGES

    Buckner, M. Q.; Wu, C. Y.; Henderson, R. A.; ...

    2017-02-17

    The neutron-induced reaction cross sections of 242mAm were measured at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center using the Detector for Advanced Neutron-Capture Experiments array along with a compact parallel-plate avalanche counter for fission-fragment detection. A new neutron-capture cross section was determined, and the absolute scale was set according to a concurrent measurement of the well-known 242mAm(n,f) cross section. The (n,γ) cross section was measured from thermal energy to an incident energy of 1 eV at which point the data quality was limited by the reaction yield in the laboratory. Our new 242mAm fission cross section was normalized to ENDF/B-VII.1 tomore » set the absolute scale, and it agreed well with the (n,f) cross section from thermal energy to 1 keV. Lastly, the average absolute capture-to-fission ratio was determined from thermal energy to En = 0.1 eV, and it was found to be 26(4)% as opposed to the ratio of 19% from the ENDF/B-VII.1 evaluation.« less

  20. Measurement of the Amm242 neutron-induced reaction cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckner, M. Q.; Wu, C. Y.; Henderson, R. A.; Bucher, B.; Wimer, N.; Chyzh, A.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Baramsai, B.; Couture, A.; Jandel, M.; Mosby, S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Dance Collaboration

    2017-02-01

    The neutron-induced reaction cross sections of Amm242 were measured at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center using the Detector for Advanced Neutron-Capture Experiments array along with a compact parallel-plate avalanche counter for fission-fragment detection. A new neutron-capture cross section was determined, and the absolute scale was set according to a concurrent measurement of the well-known Amm242(n ,f ) cross section. The (n ,γ ) cross section was measured from thermal energy to an incident energy of 1 eV at which point the data quality was limited by the reaction yield in the laboratory. Our new Amm242 fission cross section was normalized to ENDF/B-VII.1 to set the absolute scale, and it agreed well with the (n ,f ) cross section reported by Browne et al. (1984) from thermal energy to 1 keV. The average absolute capture-to-fission ratio was determined from thermal energy to En=0.1 eV, and it was found to be 26(4)% as opposed to the ratio of 19 % from the ENDF/B-VII.1 evaluation.

  1. Proton Radius of 14Be from Measurement of Charge-Changing Cross Sections1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terashima, S.; Tanihata, I.; Kanungo, R.; Estradé, A.; Horiuchi, W.; Ameil, F.; Atkinson, J.; Ayyad, Y.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Dillmann, I.; Evdokimov, A.; Farinon, F.; Geissel, H.; Guastalla, G.; Janik, R.; Kimura, M.; Knoebel, R.; Kurcewicz, J.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Marta, M.; Mostazo, M.; Mukha, I.; Neff, T.; Nociforo, C.; Ong, H. J.; Pietri, S.; Prochazka, A.; Scheidenberger, C.; Sitar, B.; Suzuki, Y.; Takeuchi, M.; Tanaka, J.; Vargas, J.; Winfield, J. S.; Weick, H.

    Charge-changing cross sections for 7,9-12,14Be have been measured at ˜900A MeV on a carbon target. These cross sections are discussed both in terms of a geometrical and a Glauber model. From several different analyses of the cross sections, the proton distribution radius (proton radius) of 14Be was determined for the first time to be 2.41 ± 0.04 fm. A large difference in the proton and neutron radii is found. The charge-changing cross sections and the proton distribution radii are compared to the results of fermionic molecular dynamics (FMD) and antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD) under the Glauber model.

  2. Differential cross sections for scattering of 0.5-, 1.5-, and 5.0-keV hydrogen atoms by He, H2, N2, and O2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. H.; Chen, Y. S.; Smith, K. A.; Stebbings, R. F.

    1986-01-01

    This paper reports measurements of absolute cross sections, differential in angle, for scattering of 0.5-, 1.5-, and 5.0-keV hydrogen atoms by He, H2, N2, and O2 at laboratory scattering angles between 0.1 and 5 deg. The measured cross sections are the sums of those for elastic and inelastic collisions having a fast H atom product and are needed for calculating energy transfer to the upper atmosphere from precipitating ring current particles.

  3. Multidimensional analysis of fast-spectrum material replacement measurements for systematic estimation of cross section uncertainties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klann, P. G.; Lantz, E.; Mayo, W. T.

    1973-01-01

    A series of central core and core-reflector interface sample replacement experiments for 16 materials performed in the NASA heavy-metal-reflected, fast spectrum critical assembly (NCA) were analyzed in four and 13 groups using the GAM 2 cross-section set. The individual worths obtained by TDSN and DOT multidimensional transport theory calculations showed significant differences from the experimental results. These were attributed to cross-section uncertainties in the GAM 2 cross sections. Simultaneous analysis of the measured and calculated sample worths permitted separation of the worths into capture and scattering components which systematically provided fast spectrum averaged correction factors to the magnitudes of the GAM 2 absorption and scattering cross sections. Several Los Alamos clean critical assemblies containing Oy, Ta, and Mo as well as one of the NCA compositions were reanalyzed using the corrected cross sections. In all cases the eigenvalues were significantly improved and were recomputed to within 1 percent of the experimental eigenvalue. A comparable procedure may be used for ENDF cross sections when these are available.

  4. Integral-capture measurements and cross-section adjustments for Nd, Sm, and Eu

    SciTech Connect

    Anderl, R.A.; Schmittroth, F.; Harker, Y.D.

    1981-07-01

    Integral-capture reaction rates are reported for /sup 143/Nd, /sup 144/Nd, /sup 145/Nd, /sup 147/Sm, /sup 151/Eu, /sup 152/Eu, /sup 153/Eu, and /sup 154/Eu irradiated in different neutron spectra in EBR-II. These reaction rates are based primarily on mass-spectrometric measurements of the isotopic atom ratios of the capture product to the target nuclide. The neutron spectra are characterized using passive neutron dosimetry and spectrum-unfolding with the FERRET least-squares data analysis code. Reaction rates for the neutron spectrum monitors were determined by the radiometric technique using Ge(Li) spectrometers. These rates are also reported here. The integral data for the rare-earth samples and for the spectrum monitors were used in multigroup flux/cross-section adtustment analyses with FERRET to generate adjustments to 47 group representations of the ENDF/B-IV capture cross sections for the rare-earth isotopes. These adjusted cross sections are in good agreement with recent differential data and with adjusted cross sections based on STEK integral data. Examples are given of the use of the adjusted cross sections and covariance matrices for cross-section evaluation.

  5. Measurement of Scattering Cross Section with a Spectrophotometer with an Integrating Sphere Detector.

    PubMed

    Gaigalas, A K; Wang, Lili; Karpiak, V; Zhang, Yu-Zhong; Choquette, Steven

    2012-01-01

    A commercial spectrometer with an integrating sphere (IS) detector was used to measure the scattering cross section of microspheres. Analysis of the measurement process showed that two measurements of the absorbance, one with the cuvette placed in the normal spectrometer position, and the second with the cuvette placed inside the IS, provided enough information to separate the contributions from scattering and molecular absorption. Measurements were carried out with microspheres with different diameters. The data was fitted with a model consisting of the difference of two terms. The first term was the Lorenz-Mie (L-M) cross section which modeled the total absorbance due to scattering. The second term was the integral of the L-M differential cross section over the detector acceptance angle. The second term estimated the amount of forward scattered light that entered the detector. A wavelength dependent index of refraction was used in the model. The agreement between the model and the data was good between 300 nm and 800 nm. The fits provided values for the microsphere diameter, the concentration, and the wavelength dependent index of refraction. For wavelengths less than 300 nm, the scattering cross section had significant spectral structure which was inversely related to the molecular absorption. This work addresses the measurement and interpretation of the scattering cross section for wavelengths between 300 nm and 800 nm.

  6. Measurement of Scattering Cross Section with a Spectrophotometer with an Integrating Sphere Detector

    PubMed Central

    Gaigalas, A. K.; Wang, Lili; Karpiak, V.; Zhang, Yu-Zhong; Choquette, Steven

    2012-01-01

    A commercial spectrometer with an integrating sphere (IS) detector was used to measure the scattering cross section of microspheres. Analysis of the measurement process showed that two measurements of the absorbance, one with the cuvette placed in the normal spectrometer position, and the second with the cuvette placed inside the IS, provided enough information to separate the contributions from scattering and molecular absorption. Measurements were carried out with microspheres with different diameters. The data was fitted with a model consisting of the difference of two terms. The first term was the Lorenz-Mie (L-M) cross section which modeled the total absorbance due to scattering. The second term was the integral of the L-M differential cross section over the detector acceptance angle. The second term estimated the amount of forward scattered light that entered the detector. A wavelength dependent index of refraction was used in the model. The agreement between the model and the data was good between 300 nm and 800 nm. The fits provided values for the microsphere diameter, the concentration, and the wavelength dependent index of refraction. For wavelengths less than 300 nm, the scattering cross section had significant spectral structure which was inversely related to the molecular absorption. This work addresses the measurement and interpretation of the scattering cross section for wavelengths between 300 nm and 800 nm. PMID:26900524

  7. A measurement of unpolarized cross sections and polarized cross section differences of deeply virtual compton scattering on the proton at Jefferson laboratory using CLAS (e1-dvcs2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirlinger Saylor, Nicholas A. N.

    This thesis focuses on the Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) reaction e + p → e' + p' + gamma (DVCS). The reaction is measured using the e1-dvcs2 experiment run at Jefferson Laboratory in Hall B using CLAS. The experiment took place from 22 October, 2008 to 23 January, 2009, and experiment run time of 90 days. This analysis focuses on the determination of the DVCS cross section in bins of xB, Q 2, t and φ, and makes a comparison with already existing and parallel analyses of DVCS. By factorizing the cross section of the reaction into perturbative and non-perturbative parts, we may relate the cross section of this reaction to Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) for the proton, and in doing so, provide better insight as to the distributions of quarks and gluons within it, including spacial distribution and contributions of angular momentum.

  8. Evaluated Iridium, Yttrium, and Thulium Cross Sections and Integral Validation Against Critical Assembly and Bethe Sphere Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, M.B. Frankle, S.; Trellue, H.; Talou, P.; Kawano, T.; Young, P.G.; MacFarlane, R.E.; Wilkerson, C.W.

    2007-12-15

    We describe new dosimetry (radiochemical) ENDF evaluations for yttrium, iridium, and thulium. These LANL2006 evaluations were based upon measured data and on nuclear model cross section calculations. In the case of iridium and yttrium, new measurements using the GEANIE gamma-ray detector at LANSCE were used to infer (n,xn) cross sections, the measurements being augmented by nuclear model calculations using the GNASH code. The thulium isotope evaluations were based on GNASH calculations and older measurements. The evaluated cross section data are tested through comparisons of simulations with measurements of reaction rates in critical assemblies and in Bethe sphere (sometimes called Wyman sphere) integral experiments. Two types of Bethe sphere experiments were studied - a LiD experiment that had a significant component of 14 MeV neutrons, and a LiD-U experiment that additionally had varying amounts of fission neutrons depending upon the location. These simulations were performed with the MCNP code using continuous energy Monte Carlo, and because the neutron fluences can be modeled fairly accurately by MCNP at different locations in these assemblies, the comparisons provide a valuable validation test of the accuracy of the evaluated cross sections and their energy dependencies. The MCNP integral reaction rate validation testing for the three detectors yttrium, iridium, and thulium, in the LANL2006 database is summarized as follows: (1) (n,2n)near 14 MeV: In 14 MeV-dominated locations (the LiD Bethe spheres and the outer regions of the LiD-U Bethe spheres), the (n,2n) products are modeled very well for all three detectors, suggesting that the evaluated {sup 89}Y(n,2n), {sup 191}Ir(n,2n), and {sup 169}Tm(n,2n) cross sections are accurate to better than about 5% near 14 MeV; (2) (n,2n)near threshold: In locations that have a significant number of fission spectrum neutrons or downscattered neutrons from 14 MeV inelastic scattering (the central regions of the Li

  9. Cross-section-constrained top-quark mass measurement from dilepton events at the Tevatron.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Bednar, P; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; DeCecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Forrester, S; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giakoumopolou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Koay, S A; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kraus, J; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Luci, C; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyria, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sun, H; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wagner, W; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2008-02-15

    We report the first top-quark mass measurement that uses a cross-section constraint to improve the mass determination. This measurement is made with a dilepton tt event candidate sample collected with the Collider Detector II at Fermilab. From a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.2 fb(-1), we measure a top-quark mass of 170.7(-3.9)(+4.2)(stat)+/-2.6(syst)+/-2.4(theory) GeV/c(2). The measurement without the cross-section constraint is 169.7(-4.9)(+5.2)(stat)+/-3.1(syst) GeV/c(2).

  10. Measurement of gamma-ray total absorption cross sections using a [sup 56]Co source

    SciTech Connect

    Frankle, Christen M.; Moss, Calvin E.

    2008-12-01

    We have used a 150 MBq [sup 56]Co source to perform gamma-ray total absorption cross section measurements with very high precision. The use of [sup 56]Co allowed us to simultaneously measure the total cross section at 15 energies ranging from 0.847 MeV to 3.451 MeV. Seven sample materials were measured: Be, C, Cu, Ta, W, Pb, and U. In general, the measurement precision is better than 0.5% and in all cases better than 1.3%.

  11. Absolute measurement of the 242Pu neutron-capture cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckner, M. Q.; Wu, C. Y.; Henderson, R. A.; Bucher, B.; Chyzh, A.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Baramsai, B.; Couture, A.; Jandel, M.; Mosby, S.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Ullmann, J. L.; Dance Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    The absolute neutron-capture cross section of 242Pu was measured at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center using the Detector for Advanced Neutron-Capture Experiments array along with a compact parallel-plate avalanche counter for fission-fragment detection. The first direct measurement of the 242Pu(n ,γ ) cross section was made over the incident neutron energy range from thermal to ≈6 keV, and the absolute scale of the (n ,γ ) cross section was set according to the known 239Pu(n ,f ) resonance at En ,R=7.83 eV. This was accomplished by adding a small quantity of 239Pu to the 242Pu sample. The relative scale of the cross section, with a range of four orders of magnitude, was determined for incident neutron energies from thermal to ≈40 keV. Our data, in general, are in agreement with previous measurements and those reported in ENDF/B-VII.1; the 242Pu(n ,γ ) cross section at the En ,R=2.68 eV resonance is within 2.4 % of the evaluated value. However, discrepancies exist at higher energies; our data are ≈30 % lower than the evaluated data at En≈1 keV and are approximately 2 σ away from the previous measurement at En≈20 keV.

  12. Laboratory Measurements and Modeling of Molecular Photoabsorption Cross Sections for Planetary Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, G.; Smith, P. L.; Lewis, B. R.; Heays, A.; Blackie, D.; Pickering, J.

    2010-12-01

    Our research program comprises the measurement and modeling of ultraviolet molecular photoabsorption cross sections with the highest practical resolution. It supports efforts to interpret and model observations of planetary atmospheres. Measurement and modeling efforts on molecular nitrogen, sulfur dioxide, diatomic sulfur, and carbon dioxide are in progress. Molecular Nitrogen: We focus on the measurement of line f-values and line widths within the complex spectrum between 80 and 100 nm. Our measurements are incorporated into a theoretical model of the absorption spectrum of N2 which has established the mechanisms responsible for predissociation and reproduces all observed features in 14N2 and its isotopomers as a function of temperature. Sulfur Dioxide: We provide astronomers with high-resolution cross section data for the complex ultraviolet SO2 absorption spectrum. Using the Imperial College VUV Fourier transform spectrometer, we have completed and published room temperature cross sections from 198 to 325 nm and 160 K cross sections from 199 to 220 nm. We have completed work on further low-temperature measurements from 220 to 325 nm. Diatomic Sulfur: Interpretations of atmospheric (Io, Jupiter, cometary comae) S2 absorption features are hindered by a complete lack of laboratory cross section data in the ultraviolet. We are working to quantify the photoabsorption spectrum of S2 from 200 to 300 nm based on laboratory measurements and theoretical calculations. We have designed an experimental apparatus to produce a stable column of S2 vapor. Measurements of the absorption spectrum of S2 at high resolution will be complemented by coupled-channel calculations. Carbon Dioxide: The photodissociation of CO2 is a fundamental photochemical process in the atmospheres of Mars and Venus. Our research centers on the measurement of high resolution cross sections from 87 to 120 nm. We have completed measurements at 295 K and 195 K over the 106 to 120 nm region, and we have

  13. Radar Cross-Section (RCS) Measurements of a Dismount With Rocket-Propelled Grenade (RPG) Launcher at Ka-Band

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    corner reflector of known cross section was placed on the... Radar Cross - Section (RCS) Measurements of a Dismount with Rocket-Propelled Grenade (RPG) Launcher at Ka-Band by Suzanne R. Stratton and...Laboratory Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005 ARL-TR-3855 July 2006 Radar Cross - Section (RCS) Measurements of a Dismount with

  14. Measurement of the scattering cross section of slow neutrons on liquid parahydrogen from neutron transmission

    DOE PAGES

    Grammer, K. B.; Alarcon, R.; Barrón-Palos, L.; ...

    2015-05-08

    Liquid hydrogen is a dense Bose fluid whose equilibrium properties are both calculable from first principles using various theoretical approaches and of interest for the understanding of a wide range of questions in many-body physics. Unfortunately, the pair correlation function g(r) inferred from neutron scattering measurements of the differential cross section dσ/dΩ from different measurements reported in the literature are inconsistent. We have measured the energy dependence of the total cross section and the scattering cross section for slow neutrons with energies between 0.43 and 16.1 meV on liquid hydrogen at 15.6 K (which is dominated by the parahydrogen component)more » using neutron transmission measurements on the hydrogen target of the NPDGamma collaboration at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The relationship between the neutron transmission measurement we perform and the total cross section is unambiguous, and the energy range accesses length scales where the pair correlation function is rapidly varying. At 1 meV our measurement is a factor of 3 below the data from previous work. We present evidence that these previous measurements of the hydrogen cross section, which assumed that the equilibrium value for the ratio of orthohydrogen and parahydrogen has been reached in the target liquid, were in fact contaminated with an extra nonequilibrium component of orthohydrogen. Liquid parahydrogen is also a widely used neutron moderator medium, and an accurate knowledge of its slow neutron cross section is essential for the design and optimization of intense slow neutron sources. Furthermore, we describe our measurements and compare them with previous work.« less

  15. Measurement of the scattering cross section of slow neutrons on liquid parahydrogen from neutron transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Grammer, K. B.; Alarcon, R.; Barrón-Palos, L.; Blyth, D.; Bowman, J. D.; Calarco, J.; Crawford, C.; Craycraft, K.; Evans, D.; Fomin, N.; Fry, J.; Gericke, M.; Gillis, R. C.; Greene, G. L.; Hamblen, J.; Hayes, C.; Kucuker, S.; Mahurin, R.; Maldonado-Velázquez, M.; Martin, E.; McCrea, M.; Mueller, P. E.; Musgrave, M.; Nann, H.; Penttilä, S. I.; Snow, W. M.; Tang, Z.; Wilburn, W. S.

    2015-05-08

    Liquid hydrogen is a dense Bose fluid whose equilibrium properties are both calculable from first principles using various theoretical approaches and of interest for the understanding of a wide range of questions in many-body physics. Unfortunately, the pair correlation function g(r) inferred from neutron scattering measurements of the differential cross section dσ/dΩ from different measurements reported in the literature are inconsistent. We have measured the energy dependence of the total cross section and the scattering cross section for slow neutrons with energies between 0.43 and 16.1 meV on liquid hydrogen at 15.6 K (which is dominated by the parahydrogen component) using neutron transmission measurements on the hydrogen target of the NPDGamma collaboration at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The relationship between the neutron transmission measurement we perform and the total cross section is unambiguous, and the energy range accesses length scales where the pair correlation function is rapidly varying. At 1 meV our measurement is a factor of 3 below the data from previous work. We present evidence that these previous measurements of the hydrogen cross section, which assumed that the equilibrium value for the ratio of orthohydrogen and parahydrogen has been reached in the target liquid, were in fact contaminated with an extra nonequilibrium component of orthohydrogen. Liquid parahydrogen is also a widely used neutron moderator medium, and an accurate knowledge of its slow neutron cross section is essential for the design and optimization of intense slow neutron sources. Furthermore, we describe our measurements and compare them with previous work.

  16. Measurement of the scattering cross section of slow neutrons on liquid parahydrogen from neutron transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grammer, K. B.; Alarcon, R.; Barrón-Palos, L.; Blyth, D.; Bowman, J. D.; Calarco, J.; Crawford, C.; Craycraft, K.; Evans, D.; Fomin, N.; Fry, J.; Gericke, M.; Gillis, R. C.; Greene, G. L.; Hamblen, J.; Hayes, C.; Kucuker, S.; Mahurin, R.; Maldonado-Velázquez, M.; Martin, E.; McCrea, M.; Mueller, P. E.; Musgrave, M.; Nann, H.; Penttilä, S. I.; Snow, W. M.; Tang, Z.; Wilburn, W. S.

    2015-05-01

    Liquid hydrogen is a dense Bose fluid whose equilibrium properties are both calculable from first principles using various theoretical approaches and of interest for the understanding of a wide range of questions in many-body physics. Unfortunately, the pair correlation function g (r ) inferred from neutron scattering measurements of the differential cross section d/σ d Ω from different measurements reported in the literature are inconsistent. We have measured the energy dependence of the total cross section and the scattering cross section for slow neutrons with energies between 0.43 and 16.1 meV on liquid hydrogen at 15.6 K (which is dominated by the parahydrogen component) using neutron transmission measurements on the hydrogen target of the NPDGamma collaboration at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The relationship between the neutron transmission measurement we perform and the total cross section is unambiguous, and the energy range accesses length scales where the pair correlation function is rapidly varying. At 1 meV our measurement is a factor of 3 below the data from previous work. We present evidence that these previous measurements of the hydrogen cross section, which assumed that the equilibrium value for the ratio of orthohydrogen and parahydrogen has been reached in the target liquid, were in fact contaminated with an extra nonequilibrium component of orthohydrogen. Liquid parahydrogen is also a widely used neutron moderator medium, and an accurate knowledge of its slow neutron cross section is essential for the design and optimization of intense slow neutron sources. We describe our measurements and compare them with previous work.

  17. Measurement of the inclusive jet cross section using the midpoint algorithm in Run II at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Group, Robert Craig

    2006-01-01

    A measurement is presented of the inclusive jet cross section using the Midpoint jet clustering algorithm in five different rapidity regions. This is the first analysis which measures the inclusive jet cross section using the Midpoint algorithm in the forward region of the detector. The measurement is based on more than 1 fb-1 of integrated luminosity of Run II data taken by the CDF experiment at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The results are consistent with the predictions of perturbative quantum chromodynamics.

  18. Measurement of the neutron capture cross section of 99Tc using ANNRI at J-PARC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katabuchi, Tatsuya; Mizumoto, Motoharu; Igashira, Masayuki; Terada, Kazushi; Kimura, Atsushi; Nakamura, Shoji; Nakao, Taro; Iwamoto, Osamu; Iwamoto, Nobuyuki; Mizuyama, Kazuhito; Harada, Hideo; Hori, Jun-ich; Kino, Koichi

    2017-09-01

    The neutron capture cross section of 99Tc was measured using NaI(Tl) detectors of the Accurate Neutron-Nucleus Reaction Measurement Instrument (ANNRI) at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) in the energy range from thermal to the keV energy region. Preliminary results were presented and compared with previous measurements and evaluations.

  19. Fission hindrance studies in {sup 200}Pb: Evaporation residue cross section and spin distribution measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Shidling, P. D.; Badiger, N. M.; Nath, S.; Kumar, R.; Jhingan, A.; Singh, R. P.; Sugathan, P.; Muralithar, S.; Madhavan, N.; Sinha, A. K.; Pal, Santanu; Kailas, S.; Verma, S.; Kalita, K.; Mandal, S.; Singh, R.; Behera, B. R.; Varier, K. M.; Radhakrishna, M. C.

    2006-12-15

    Evaporation residue cross sections and spin distributions have been measured for {sup 200}Pb compound nucleus formed in {sup 16}O+{sup 184}W reaction at the laboratory beam energies of 84, 92, 100, 108, 116, and 120 MeV. The evaporation residues have been selected using the recoil mass spectrometer, HIRA and detected using a 2D position sensitive silicon detector. The evaporation residue spin distributions have been measured by detecting gamma rays with 14 element BGO multiplicity filter. Measured evaporation residue cross sections and spin distributions are compared with the values predicted by a standard statistical model code. Comparison shows that, in the energy region studied, the nuclear viscosity parameter {gamma}=3 is required to explain total evaporation residue cross sections and evaporation residue spin distributions.

  20. RIA R&D for Enabling Direct Neutron Cross-Section Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Ahle, L E; Rusnak, B; Stoyer, M

    2003-08-22

    The expected production rates at RIA imply it should be possible to collect 10-{micro}g of a one-day half-life isotope. The amount of material should be sufficient to enable direct neutron cross-section measurements for many unstable isotopes. This capability is crucial for many of the stockpile stewardship and some of the astrophysical cross-section measurements. Enabling this capability at RIA requires the ability to harvest the desired isotopes, process highly radioactive material into targets, and irradiate targets with neutrons. This paper will discuss the changes and additions to the RIA complex that are necessary in order to enable direct neutron cross-section measurements. This will include a discussion of harvesting as well as a conceptual design for a co-located experimental facility with radiochemistry capability and a variable 'mono-energetic' neutron source.

  1. Measurement of the inelastic proton-proton cross section at √{ s} = 7 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Aguilo, E.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hammer, J.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Pernicka, M.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, C.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Waltenberger, W.; Walzel, G.; Widl, E.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Gartner, J.; Janssen, X.; Luyckx, S.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Selvaggi, M.; Staykova, Z.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dero, V.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hreus, T.; Léonard, A.; Marage, P. E.; Mohammadi, A.; Reis, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Marcken, G.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Garcia, G.; Grunewald, M.; Klein, B.; Lellouch, J.; Marinov, A.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Verwilligen, P.; Walsh, S.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Ceard, L.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Militaru, O.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Schul, N.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Alves, G. A.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; Martins, T.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Carvalho, W.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Oguri, V.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Soares Jorge, L.; Sznajder, A.; Anjos, T. S.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dias, F. A.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Lagana, C.; Marinho, F.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Tcholakov, V.; Trayanov, R.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Jiang, C. H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Meng, X.; Tao, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Xiao, H.; Xu, M.; Zang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Guo, Y.; Li, W.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Teng, H.; Wang, D.; Zhang, L.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Osorio Oliveros, A. F.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Plestina, R.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Duric, S.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Morovic, S.; Attikis, A.; Galanti, M.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Müntel, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Heikkinen, A.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Ungaro, D.; Wendland, L.; Banzuzi, K.; Karjalainen, A.; Korpela, A.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Choudhury, S.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Millischer, L.; Nayak, A.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Shreyber, I.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Benhabib, L.; Bianchini, L.; Bluj, M.; Broutin, C.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Daci, N.; Dahms, T.; Dobrzynski, L.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Haguenauer, M.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Sabes, D.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Bodin, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Cardaci, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Drouhin, F.; Ferro, C.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Juillot, P.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Van Hove, P.; Fassi, F.; Mercier, D.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bondu, O.; Boudoul, G.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Sordini, V.; Tschudi, Y.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Roinishvili, V.; Anagnostou, G.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heracleous, N.; Hindrichs, O.; Jussen, R.; Klein, K.

    2013-05-01

    A measurement is presented of the inelastic proton-proton cross section at a centre-of-mass energy of √{ s} = 7 TeV. Using the CMS detector at the LHC, the inelastic cross section is measured through two independent methods based on information from (i) forward calorimetry (for pseudorapidity 3 < | η | < 5), in collisions where at least one proton loses more than 5 ×10-6 of its longitudinal momentum, and (ii) the central tracker (| η | < 2.4), in collisions containing an interaction vertex with more than one, two, or three tracks with transverse momenta pT > 200 MeV / c. The measurements cover a large fraction of the inelastic cross section for particle production over about nine units of pseudorapidity and down to small transverse momenta. The results are compared with those of other experiments, and with models used to describe high-energy hadronic interactions.

  2. (γ, 2n)-Reaction cross-section calculations of several even-even lanthanide nuclei using different level density models

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, A.; Sarpün, İ. H.; Aydın, A.; Tel, E.; Çapalı, V.; Özdoǧan, H.

    2015-01-15

    There are several level density models that can be used to predict photo-neutron cross sections. Some of them are Constant Temperature + Fermi Gas Model (CTFGM), Back-Shifted Fermi Gas Model (BSFM), Generalized Superfluid Model (GSM), Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov microscopic Model (HFBM). In this study, the theoretical photo-neutron cross sections produced by (γ, 2n) reactions for several eveneven lanthanide nuclei such as {sup 140,142}Ce, {sup 142,144,146,148,150}Nd, {sup 144,148,150,152,154}Sm, and {sup 160}Gd have been calculated on the different level density models as mentioned above by using TALYS 1.6 and EMPIRE 3.1 computer codes for incident photon energies up to 30 MeV. The obtained results have been compared with each other and available experimental data existing in the EXFOR database. Generally, at least one level density model cross-section calculations are in agreement with the experimental results for all reactions except {sup 144}Sm(γ, 2n){sup 142}Sm along the incident photon energy, TALYS 1.6 BSFM option for the level density model cross-section calculations can be chosen if the experimental data are not available or are improbable to be produced due to the experimental difficulty.

  3. Measurement of jet production cross sections in deep-inelastic ep scattering at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, V.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Begzsuren, K.; Belousov, A.; Bolz, A.; Boudry, V.; Brandt, G.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, D.; Buniatyan, A.; Bylinkin, A.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A. J.; Avila, K. B. Cantun; Cerny, K.; Chekelian, V.; Contreras, J. G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J. B.; Daum, K.; Diaconu, C.; Dobre, M.; Dodonov, V.; Eckerlin, G.; Egli, S.; Elsen, E.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Grebenyuk, A.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, G.; Haidt, D.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Hladkỳ, J.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Huber, F.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, X.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kogler, R.; Kostka, P.; Kretzschmar, J.; Krücker, D.; Krüger, K.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Levonian, S.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinski, B.; Malinovski, E.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Meyer, A. B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Morozov, A.; Müller, K.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P. R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nowak, G.; Olsson, J. E.; Ozerov, D.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Pirumov, H.; Pitzl, D.; Plačakytė, R.; Polifka, R.; Radescu, V.; Raicevic, N.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Šálek, D.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmitt, S.; Schoeffel, L.; Schöning, A.; Sefkow, F.; Shushkevich, S.; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Straumann, U.; Sykora, T.; Thompson, P. D.; Traynor, D.; Truöl, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vazdik, Y.; Wegener, D.; Wünsch, E.; Žáček, J.; Zhang, Z.; Žlebčík, R.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2017-04-01

    A precision measurement of jet cross sections in neutral current deep-inelastic scattering for photon virtualities 5.5cross sections are measured simultaneously and are presented as a function of jet transverse momentum observables and as a function of Q^2. Jet cross sections normalised to the inclusive neutral current DIS cross section in the respective Q^2-interval are also determined. Previous results of inclusive jet cross sections in the range 150

  4. Precision measurements of photoabsorption cross sections of Ar, Kr, Xe, and selected molecules at 58.4, 73.6, and 74.4 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, James A. R.; Yin, Lifeng

    1989-01-01

    Absolute absorption cross sections have been measured for the rare gases at 58.43, 73.59, and 74.37 nm with an accuracy of + or - 0.8 percent. For the molecules H2, N2, O2, CO, N2O, CO2, and CH4, precision measurements were made at 58.43 nm with an accuracy of + or - 0.8 percent. Molecular absorption cross sections are also reported at 73.59 and 74.37 nm. However, in the vicinity of these wavelengths most molecules exhibit considerable structure, and cross sections measured at these wavelengths may depend on the widths and the amounts of self-reversal of these resonance lines. A detailed discussion is given of the systematic errors encountered with the double-ion chamber used in the cross-sectional measurements. Details are also given of precision pressure measurements.

  5. Measurement of the tt cross section using high-multiplicity jet events

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V. M.; Alexeev, G. D.; Golovanov, G.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Malyshev, V. L.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Abbott, B.; Gutierrez, P.; Hossain, S.; Jain, S.; Rominsky, M.; Severini, H.; Skubic, P.; Strauss, M.; Abolins, M.; Benitez, J. A.; Brock, R.; Edmunds, D.

    2010-08-01

    We present a measurement of the tt cross section using high-multiplicity jet events produced in pp collisions at {radical}(s)=1.96 TeV. These data were recorded at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider with the D0 detector. Events with at least six jets, two of them identified as b jets, were selected from a 1 fb{sup -1} data set. The measured cross section, assuming a top quark mass of 175 GeV/c{sup 2}, is 6.9{+-}2.0 pb, in agreement with theoretical expectations.

  6. Measurements of the breakup and neutron removal cross sections for {sup 16}C

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, N. I.; Freer, M.; Clarke, N.M.; Curtis, N.; Soic, N.; Ziman, V.A.; Angelique, J.C.; Lecouey, J.L.; Marques, F.M.; Normand, G.; Orr, N.A.; Timis, C.; Bouchat, V.; Hanappe, F.; Kerckx, Y.; Materna, T.; Catford, W.N.; Dorvaux, O.; Stuttge, L.

    2004-12-01

    Measurements of the breakup and the neutron removal reactions of {sup 16}C have been made at 46 MeV/A and the decay cross sections measured. A correlation between the cluster breakup channels and the reaction Q value suggests that the reaction mechanism is strongly linked to quasielastic processes. No enhancement of the two-body cluster breakup cross section is seen for {sup 16}C. This result would indicate that {sup 16}C does not have a well developed cluster structure in the ground state, in agreement with recent calculations.

  7. Air Shower Fluctuations and the Measurement of the Proton-Air Cross Section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Engel, R.; Gaisser, T.K.; Ortiz, J.A.; Stanev, T.

    2003-07-01

    We explore the influence of fluctuations in the extensive air shower (EAS) development on the possibility to determine the proton-air cross section at high energy. This contribution concentrates on the two classical methods of obtaining the cross section in EAS experiments, (i) the measurement of the attenuation of the rate of showers with fixed muon and electron sizes with zenith angle, namely the constant intensity cut method, and (ii) the measurement of the distribution of the depth of maximum. We demonstrate that, depending on the selection method, shower fluctuations can strongly influence the characteristics of the selected showers in method (i). method (ii) is sub ject to model dependence.

  8. Measurements of jet and multijet cross sections with the CDF detector

    SciTech Connect

    Matthias Toennesmann

    2003-11-18

    Recent measurements of jet and multijet production cross sections from p{bar p} collisions recorded with the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) are summarized. First Run II results of the inclusive one jet cross section at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV as well as prospects for future extensions of this measurement are presented. We also studied the properties of three-jet events in Run Ib data at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV. All results are compared to predictions of Quantum Chromodynamics at next-to-leading order perturbation theory.

  9. High-Resolution Measurements of e++H2O Total Cross Section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loreti, A.; Kadokura, R.; Fayer, S. E.; Kövér, Á.; Laricchia, G.

    2016-12-01

    Using a purely electrostatic positron beam, the total cross section of positrons scattering from H2O has been measured for the first time with a high angular discrimination (≃1 ° ) against forward scattered projectiles. Results are presented in the energy range (10-300) eV. Significant deviations from previous measurements are found which are, if ascribed entirely to the angular acceptances of various experimental systems, in quantitative accord with ab initio theoretical predictions of the differential elastic scattering cross section.

  10. Measurement of the ee→ hadrons cross-section at low energy with ISR events at BABAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malaescu, B.; Babar Collaboration

    2011-09-01

    The precise measurement of the cross section ee→ππ(γ) from threshold to an energy of 3 GeV, using events with Initial State Radiation (ISR) collected with the BABAR detector, is presented. The ISR luminosity is determined from a study of the leptonic process ee→μμγ(γ), and the method is tested by the comparison with the next-to-leading order (NLO) QED prediction. The leading-order hadronic contribution to the muon magnetic anomaly calculated using the BABAR ππ cross section measured from threshold to 1.8 GeV is (514.1±2.2(stat)±3.1(syst))×10. Other results on ISR multihadronic cross sections from BABAR are presented.

  11. Measurement of the p-Air Cross-Section Using HiRes Stereo Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, Brian

    2004-05-01

    We present a meaasurement of the inelastic p-air cross-section at sqrt(s)>44 TeV with the High Resolution Fly's Eye (HiRes) stereo detector. HiRes measures the attenuation length of the primary cosmic ray indirectly from the distribution of the slant depth at which the number of shower particles reaches a maximum. In order to calculate the attenuation length from the slant depth, we determine the rate at which the energy of the primary particle dissipates using air shower simulations. The measurement of the attenuation length then allows one to calculate the inelastic cross-section for air, and, ultimately, the total proton-proton cross-section. We test the consistency of the momdels of the first interaction (e.g., QGSJET) with the HiRes data.

  12. Measurements of the neutron activation cross sections for Bi and Co at 386 MeV.

    PubMed

    Yashima, H; Sekimoto, S; Ninomiya, K; Kasamatsu, Y; Shima, T; Takahashi, N; Shinohara, A; Matsumura, H; Satoh, D; Iwamoto, Y; Hagiwara, M; Nishiizumi, K; Caffee, M W; Shibata, S

    2014-10-01

    Neutron activation cross sections for Bi and Co at 386 MeV were measured by activation method. A quasi-monoenergetic neutron beam was produced using the (7)Li(p,n) reaction. The energy spectrum of these neutrons has a high-energy peak (386 MeV) and a low-energy tail. Two neutron beams, 0° and 25° from the proton beam axis, were used for sample irradiation, enabling a correction for the contribution of the low-energy neutrons. The neutron-induced activation cross sections were estimated by subtracting the reaction rates of irradiated samples for 25° irradiation from those of 0° irradiation. The measured cross sections were compared with the findings of other studies, evaluated in relation to nuclear data files and the calculated data by Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System code.

  13. Cross section measurement of the 159Tb(n, γ)Tb160 nuclear reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzysiuk, N.; Kadenko, I.; Gressier, V.; Koning, A. J.

    2015-04-01

    The cross section of the 159Tb(n, γ)Tb160 reaction was measured in four mono-energetic neutron fields of energy 3.7, 4.3, 5.4, and 6.85 MeV, respectively, with the activation technique applied to metal discs of natural composition. To ensure an acceptable precision of the results all major sources of uncertainties were taken into account. Calculations of detector efficiency, incident neutron spectrum and correction factors were performed with the Monte Carlo code (MCNPX), whereas theoretical excitation functions were calculated with the TALYS-1.2 code and compared to the experimental cross section values. This paper presents both measurements and calculation leading to the cross section values.

  14. Measurements of neutron capture cross section for {sup 207,208}Pb

    SciTech Connect

    Segawa, M.; Toh, Y.; Harada, H.; Kitatani, F.; Koizumi, M.; Fukahori, T.; Iwamoto, N.; Iwamoto, O.; Oshima, M.; Hatsukawa, Y.; Nagai, Y.; Igashira, M.; Kamada, S.; Tajika, M.

    2014-05-02

    The neutron capture cross sections for {sup 207,208}Pb have been measured in the neutron energy region from 10 to 110 keV. The γ-rays cascaded from a capture state to the ground state or low-lying states of {sup 208,209}Pb were observed for the first time, using an anti-Compton Nal(Tl) spectrometer and a TOF method. The observed discrete γ-ray energy spectra enabled us to determine neutron capture cross sections for {sup 207,208}Pb with small systematic errors, since we could distinguish γ-ray of {sup 207,208}Pb(n,γ) reactions from background γ-ray with use of the γ-ray spectra. The obtained cross sections include both contributions of resonance and direct capture components different from the previous TOF measurements.

  15. First Measurement of the Muon Neutrino Charged Current Quasielastic Double Differential Cross Section

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A.A.; Anderson, C.E.; Bazarko, A.O.; Brice, S.J.; Brown, B.C.; Bugel, L.; Cao, J.; Coney, L.; Conrad, J.M.; Cox, D.C.; Curioni, A.; /Yale U. /Columbia U.

    2010-02-01

    A high-statistics sample of charged-current muon neutrino scattering events collected with the MiniBooNE experiment is analyzed to extract the first measurement of the double differential cross section (d{sup 2}{sigma}/dT{sub {mu}}d cos {theta}{sub {mu}}) for charged-current quasielastic (CCQE) scattering on carbon. This result features minimal model dependence and provides the most complete information on this process to date. With the assumption of CCQE scattering, the absolute cross section as a function of neutrino energy ({sigma}[E{sub {nu}}]) and the single differential cross section (d{sigma}/dQ{sup 2}) are extracted to facilitate comparison with previous measurements. These quantities may be used to characterize an effective axial-vector form factor of the nucleon and to improve the modeling of low-energy neutrino interactions on nuclear targets. The results are relevant for experiments searching for neutrino oscillations.

  16. Neutron Cross Section Measurements at ORELA for Improved Nuclear Data and Their Application

    SciTech Connect

    Guber, Klaus H; Leal, Luiz C; Sayer, Royce O; Koehler, Paul Edward; Valentine, Timothy E; Derrien, Herve; Harvey, John A

    2005-02-01

    Many older neutron cross-section evaluations from libraries such as ENDF/B-VI or JENDL-3.2 exhibit deficiencies or do not cover energy ranges that are important for criticality safety applications. These deficiencies may occur in the resolved and unresolved-resonance regions. Consequently, these evaluated data may not be adequate for nuclear criticality calculations where effects such as self-shielding, multiple scattering, or Doppler broadening are important. To support the Nuclear Criticality Predictability Program, neutron cross-section measurements have been initiated at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA). ORELA is the only high-power white neutron source with excellent time resolution still operating in the United States. It is ideally suited to measure fission, neutron total, and capture cross sections in the energy range from 1 eV to {approx}600 keV, which is important for many nuclear criticality safety applications.

  17. New Neutron Cross Section Measurements at ORELA for Improved Nuclear Data

    SciTech Connect

    Guber, Klaus H; Leal, Luiz C; Sayer, Royce O; Koehler, Paul Edward; Valentine, Timothy E; Derrien, Herve; Harvey, John A

    2004-07-01

    Many older neutron cross-section evaluations from libraries such as ENDF/B-VI or JENDL-3.2 exhibit deficiencies or do not cover energy ranges that are important for criticality safety applications. These deficiencies may occur in the resolved and unresolved-resonance regions. Consequently, these evaluated data may not be adequate for nuclear criticality calculations where effects such as self-shielding, multiple scattering, or Doppler broadening are important. To support the Nuclear Criticality Predictability Program, neutron cross-section measurements have been initiated at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA). ORELA is the only high-power white neutron source with excellent time resolution still operating in the United States. It is ideally suited to measure fission, neutron total, and capture cross sections in the energy range from 1 eV to {approx}600 keV, which is important for many nuclear criticality safety applications.

  18. New Neutron Cross-Section Measurements at ORELA for Improved Nuclear Criticality Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Guber, Klaus H; Leal, Luiz C; Sayer, Royce O; Koehler, Paul Edward; Valentine, Timothy E; Derrien, Herve; Harvey, John A

    2005-05-01

    Many older neutron cross-section evaluations from libraries such as ENDF/B-VI or JENDL-3.2 exhibit deficiencies or do not cover energy ranges that are important for criticality safety applications. These deficiencies may occur in the resolved and unresolved-resonance regions. Consequently, these evaluated data may not be adequate for nuclear criticality calculations where effects such as self-shielding, multiple scattering, or Doppler broadening are important. To support the Nuclear Criticality Predictability Program, neutron cross-section measurements have been initiated at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA). ORELA is the only high-power white neutron source with excellent time resolution still operating in the United States. It is ideally suited to measure fission, neutron total, and capture cross sections in the energy range from 1 eV to {approx}600 keV, which is important for many nuclear criticality safety applications.

  19. New Neutron Cross-Section Measurements at ORELA for Improved Nuclear Data Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Guber, K.H.; Leal, L.C.; Sayer, R.O.; Koehler, P.E.; Valentine, T.E.; Derrien, H.; Harvey, J.A.

    2005-05-24

    Many older neutron cross-section evaluations from libraries such as ENDF/B-VI or JENDL-3.2 exhibit deficiencies or do not cover energy ranges that are important for criticality safety applications. These deficiencies may occur in the resolved and unresolved-resonance regions. Consequently, these evaluated data may not be adequate for nuclear criticality calculations where effects such as self-shielding, multiple scattering, or Doppler broadening are important. To support the Nuclear Criticality Predictability Program, neutron cross-section measurements have been initiated at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA). ORELA is the only high-power white neutron source with excellent time resolution still operating in the United States. It is ideally suited to measure fission, neutron total, and capture cross sections in the energy range from 1 eV to {approx}600 keV, which is important for many nuclear criticality safety applications.

  20. A program to measure new energetic particle nuclear interaction cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guzik, T. G.; Albergo, S.; Chen, C. X.; Costa, S.; Crawford, H. J.; Engelage, J.; Ferrando, P.; Flores, I.; Greiner, L.; Jones, F. C.

    1994-01-01

    The Transport Collaboration, consisting of researchers from institutions in France, Germany, Italy, and the USA, has established a program to make new measurements of nuclear interaction cross sections for heavy projectiles (Z greater than or equal to 2) in targets of liquid H2, He and heavier materials. Such cross sections directly affect calculations of galactic and solar cosmic ray transport through matter and are needed for accurate radiation hazard assessment. To date, the collaboration has obtained data using the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Bevalac HISS facility with 20 projectiles from He-4 to Ni-58 in the energy range 393-910 MeV/nucleon. Preliminary results from the analysis of these data are presented here and compared to other measurements and to cross section prediction formulae.

  1. Measurement of the Proton + Proton Going to Proton + Proton + Neutral Pion Cross-Section Near Threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, M. Alan

    1991-02-01

    The first nuclear physics experiment at the IUCF Cooler is a measurement of the p+ptop+p+ pi^0 cross section near threshold. The Cooler, together with a thin internal H_2 gas jet target, allows for a precise cross section measurement by providing well-defined interaction energies and by eliminating background from p-nucleus pion production which has a much lower threshold. A cylindrically symmetric detector system has been installed in one of the straight sections of the ring and is used to detect the coincident protons in the exit channel with good energy and angular resolution. The mass of the unobserved is then deduced. Elastically scattered protons were detected at the same time and by the same detector as pion production events. Elastic scattering was used for normalization to obtain an absolute p+p top+p+pi^0 cross section.

  2. Measurement of (43)Sc and (44)Sc production cross-section with an 18MeV medical PET cyclotron.

    PubMed

    Carzaniga, Tommaso Stefano; Auger, Martin; Braccini, Saverio; Bunka, Maruta; Ereditato, Antonio; Nesteruk, Konrad Pawel; Scampoli, Paola; Türler, Andreas; van der Meulen, Nicholas

    2017-11-01

    (43)Sc and (44)Sc are positron emitter radionuclides that, in conjunction with the β(-) emitter (47)Sc, represent one of the most promising possibilities for theranostics in nuclear medicine. Their availability in suitable quantity and quality for medical applications is an open issue and their production with medical cyclotrons represents a scientific and technological challenge. For this purpose, an accurate knowledge of the production cross sections is mandatory. In this paper, we report on the cross section measurement of the reactions (43)Ca(p,n)(43)Sc, (44)Ca(p,2n) (43)Sc, (46)Ti(p,α)(43)Sc, and (44)Ca(p,n)(44)Sc at the Bern University Hospital cyclotron. A study of the production yield and purity performed by using commercially available enriched target materials is also presented. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. New Neutron Cross-Section Measurements from ORELA and New Resonance Parameter Evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Guber, Klaus H; Koehler, Paul; Wiarda, Dorothea; Harvey, John A; Valentine, Timothy E; Sayer, Royce O; Leal, Luiz C; Larson, Nancy M; Bigelow, Tim S

    2008-01-01

    A series of new measurements has been undertaken in response to deficiencies identified in nuclear data libraries of crucial importance to the Nuclear Criticality Safety Program. New data and evaluations, including covariances, are required for several materials found in mixtures with uranium. For this purpose we performed neutron capture and total cross-section measurements on natural potassium, {sup 41}K, and manganese.

  4. A measurement of neutrino induced quasi-elastic cross section in NOMAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae

    NOMAD (Neutrino Oscillation MAgnetic Detector) is a short baseline neutrino experiment at CERN (the European Laboratory for Particle physics) West Area Neutrino Facility (WANF) with a neutrino beam provided by the super proton synchrotron (SPS) accelerator [98]. In this dissertation, we present a measurement of the muon-neutrino induced quasi-elastic (QEL), nu mu + n → mu- + p, cross-section off an isoscalar target in the NOMAD detector. The incident neutrino energy in NOMAD experiment spans from 2.5 to 300 GeV. The measurement of the cross-section is conducted in a two-track topology where both a muon and a proton are fully reconstructed, and a one-track topology where only a muon is reconstructed. The QEL cross-section as a function of the incoming neutrino energy is consistent for the two different topologies, and within errors, constant as a function of the neutrino energy. We determine the energy-averaged cross-section, sigma = 0:908 +/- 0:012 (stat) +/-0:035 (syst) 10-38cm2, where the first is the averaged energy-dependent error (statistical error is dominant one), and the second is the energy-independent, or overall, error. From the shape-comparisons of kinematics of QEL events, the axial mass parameter is determined. It is in good agreement with the result from the measurement of QEL cross-section. Using the chi2 of the shapes of four independent kinematic variables between data and MC, we determine MA = 1:03 +/- 0:05 GeV. The cross-section and the axial mass presented in this thesis have the best precision to date.

  5. Measurement of the ozone absorption cross-section at the 253. 7 nm Mercury line

    SciTech Connect

    Mauersberger, K.; Barnes, J.; Hanson, D.; Morton, J.

    1986-07-01

    The absorption cross-section of ozone at 253.7 nm is frequently used as a standard for the entire UV wavelength range. The presently accepted value is 1.147 x 10/sup -17/ cm/sup 2/, known with an uncertainty of about 2%. The cross-section has been recently measured by simultaneously monitoring the ozone pressure, the impurities in the ozone gas, the gas temperature and the UV beam intensity. The cross-section at room temperature was found to be 1.137 x 10/sup -17/ cm/sup 2/, having an uncertainty of +- .7%. The improved accuracy will aid a number of ozone experiments including the i-italicn-italic s-italici-italict-italicu-italic photometers and Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet instruments.

  6. A measurement of the p p total cross section at radical s = 1800 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    White, S. )

    1991-10-01

    The {bar p}p differential elastic scattering cross section was measured at {radical}{bar s} = 1800 GeV, using an improved accelerator luminosity determination and CDF small angle data in the range of 0.05 {le} t {le} 0.2(GeV/c){sup 2}. By extrapolating the differential cross sections to t=0 and using the optical theorem we obtain a total cross section of {sigma}{sub tot}({bar p}p) = 72.0 {plus minus} 3.6 mb. This result is preliminary in the sense that we expect to further reduce the systematic error on the optical point. 9 refs., 8 figs.

  7. Measurement of 230Pa and 186Re Production Cross Sections Induced by Deuterons at Arronax Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duchemin, Charlotte; Guertin, Arnaud; Metivier, Vincent; Haddad, Ferid; Michel, Nathalie

    2014-02-01

    A dedicated program has been launched on production of innovative radionuclides for PET imaging and for β- and α targeted radiotherapy using proton or α particles at the ARRONAX cyclotron. Since the accelerator is also able to deliver deuteron beams up to 35 MeV, we have reconsidered the possibility of using them to produce medical isotopes. Two isotopes dedicated to targeted therapy have been considered: 226Th, a decay product of 230Pa, and 186Re. The production cross sections of 230Pa and 186Re, as well as those of the contaminants created during the irradiation, have been determined by the stacked-foil technique using deuteron beams. Experimental values have been quantified using a referenced cross section. The measured cross sections have been used to determine expected production yields and compared with the calculated values obtained using the Talys code with default parameters.

  8. Determination of lithium ion--rare gas potentials from total cross section measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Polak-Dingels, P.; Rajan, M.S.; Gislason, E.A.

    1982-10-15

    Total cross sections have been measured for Li/sup +/ ions scattered by He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe in the range Etheta/sub R/ = 5--1000 eV deg. Here E is the laboratory energy of the Li/sup +/ beam, and theta/sub R/ is the resolution angle of the apparatus. The cross sections have been inverted to obtain accurate estimates of the potential V(R) over a wide range of R including the attractive well region. The results are compared with other theoretical and experimental work on these systems.

  9. Double diffractive cross-section measurement in the forward region at the LHC.

    PubMed

    Antchev, G; Aspell, P; Atanassov, I; Avati, V; Baechler, J; Berardi, V; Berretti, M; Bossini, E; Bottigli, U; Bozzo, M; Brücken, E; Buzzo, A; Cafagna, F S; Catanesi, M G; Covault, C; Csanád, M; Csörgő, T; Deile, M; Eggert, K; Eremin, V; Ferro, F; Fiergolski, A; Garcia, F; Giani, S; Greco, V; Grzanka, L; Heino, J; Hilden, T; Karev, A; Kašpar, J; Kopal, J; Kundrát, V; Kurvinen, K; Lami, S; Latino, G; Lauhakangas, R; Leszko, T; Lippmaa, E; Lippmaa, J; Lokajíček, M; Losurdo, L; Lo Vetere, M; Lucas Rodríguez, F; Macrí, M; Mäki, T; Mercadante, A; Minafra, N; Minutoli, S; Nemes, F; Niewiadomski, H; Oliveri, E; Oljemark, F; Orava, R; Oriunno, M; Österberg, K; Palazzi, P; Procházka, J; Quinto, M; Radermacher, E; Radicioni, E; Ravotti, F; Robutti, E; Ropelewski, L; Ruggiero, G; Saarikko, H; Scribano, A; Smajek, J; Snoeys, W; Sziklai, J; Taylor, C; Turini, N; Vacek, V; Vítek, M; Welti, J; Whitmore, J; Wyszkowski, P

    2013-12-27

    The first double diffractive cross-section measurement in the very forward region has been carried out by the TOTEM experiment at the LHC with a center-of-mass energy of sqrt[s]=7  TeV. By utilizing the very forward TOTEM tracking detectors T1 and T2, which extend up to |η|=6.5, a clean sample of double diffractive pp events was extracted. From these events, we determined the cross section σDD=(116±25)  μb for events where both diffractive systems have 4.7<|η|min<6.5.

  10. Improved measurement of the neutron absorption cross section for very low velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroffenegger, J.; Fierlinger, P.; Hollering, A.; Geltenbort, P.; Lauer, T.; Rauch, H.; Zechlau, T.

    2016-01-01

    The absorption cross section of natural Gd and isotopic enriched 157Gd for ultra-cold neutrons (UCN) as a function of the velocity has been measured within a time-of-flight-experiment. Particular attention is paid to small velocities in the region of a few m/s. This is intended to determine the validity of the 1 / v-law governing absorption cross sections in this region and the resulting divergence at v = 0. The experiment does not show any significant violation of 1 / v for v > 3 m /s.

  11. Estimation of (n,f) Cross-Sections by Measuring Reaction Probability Ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Plettner, C; Ai, H; Beausang, C W; Bernstein, L A; Ahle, L; Amro, H; Babilon, M; Burke, J T; Caggiano, J A; Casten, R F; Church, J A; Cooper, J R; Crider, B; Gurdal, G; Heinz, A; McCutchan, E A; Moody, K; Punyon, J A; Qian, J; Ressler, J J; Schiller, A; Williams, E; Younes, W

    2005-04-21

    Neutron-induced reaction cross-sections on unstable nuclei are inherently difficult to measure due to target activity and the low intensity of neutron beams. In an alternative approach, named the 'surrogate' technique, one measures the decay probability of the same compound nucleus produced using a stable beam on a stable target to estimate the neutron-induced reaction cross-section. As an extension of the surrogate method, in this paper they introduce a new technique of measuring the fission probabilities of two different compound nuclei as a ratio, which has the advantage of removing most of the systematic uncertainties. This method was benchmarked in this report by measuring the probability of deuteron-induced fission events in coincidence with protons, and forming the ratio P({sup 236}U(d,pf))/P({sup 238}U(d,pf)), which serves as a surrogate for the known cross-section ratio of {sup 236}U(n,f)/{sup 238}U(n,f). IN addition, the P({sup 238}U(d,d{prime}f))/P({sup 236}U(d,d{prime}f)) ratio as a surrogate for the {sup 237}U(n,f)/{sup 235}U(n,f) cross-section ratio was measured for the first time in an unprecedented range of excitation energies.

  12. Measuring Neutron-Proton Radiative Capture Cross-section at Low Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, To Chin; Kovash, Michael; Matthews, June; Yang, Hongwei; Yang, Yunjie

    2015-10-01

    The experiment aims to fill in a gap in our data for the cross-section of neutron-proton radiative capture (p(n,d γ)) at energies below 500 keV. Current measurements in this energy range are scarce and inconsistent with theoretical predictions and with each other. A well-determined cross-section of the capture reaction in the low energy range is useful in nuclear physics due to its fundamental nature. The measurement is also of interest in cosmology. Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN), the process by which light elements are formed in early universe, is very sensitive to the p(n,d γ) cross-section in the low energy range. The measurement enables us to put tighter constraints on the theoretical predictions of BBN. We have conducted preliminary measurements in the van de Graaff accelerator facility at the University of Kentucky. Our array of detectors consists of three plastic scintillators to serve as proton targets and deuteron detectors, and five BGO scintillators to detect γ-rays. The combination results in an over-determination of reaction kinematics that discriminates against scattering processes and other backgrounds. We have obtained some early results which show promise for the precise measurement of the p(n,d γ) cross-section.

  13. Measurements of absolute absorption cross sections of ozone in the 185- to 254-nm wavelength region and the temperature dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshino, K.; Esmond, J. R.; Freeman, D. E.; Parkinson, W. H.

    1993-01-01

    Laboratory measurements of the relative absorption cross sections of ozone at temperatures 195, 228, and 295 K have been made throughout the 185 to 254 nm wavelength region. The absolute absorption cross sections at the same temperatures have been measured at several discrete wavelengths in the 185 to 250 nm region. The absolute cross sections of ozone have been used to put the relative cross sections on a firm absolute basis throughout the 185 to 255 nm region. These recalibrated cross sections are slightly lower than those of Molina and Molina (1986), but the differences are within a few percent and would not be significant in atmospheric applications.

  14. Measurements of absolute absorption cross sections of ozone in the 185- to 254-nm wavelength region and the temperature dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshino, K.; Esmond, J. R.; Freeman, D. E.; Parkinson, W. H.

    1993-01-01

    Laboratory measurements of the relative absorption cross sections of ozone at temperatures 195, 228, and 295 K have been made throughout the 185 to 254 nm wavelength region. The absolute absorption cross sections at the same temperatures have been measured at several discrete wavelengths in the 185 to 250 nm region. The absolute cross sections of ozone have been used to put the relative cross sections on a firm absolute basis throughout the 185 to 255 nm region. These recalibrated cross sections are slightly lower than those of Molina and Molina (1986), but the differences are within a few percent and would not be significant in atmospheric applications.

  15. Measurement of K Shell Photoelectric Cross Sections at a K Edge--A Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nayak, S. V.; Badiger, N. M.

    2007-01-01

    We describe in this paper a new method for measuring the K shell photoelectric cross sections of high-Z elemental targets at a K absorption edge. In this method the external bremsstrahlung (EB) photons produced in the Ni target foil by beta particles from a weak[superscript 90]Sr-[superscript 90]Y beta source are passed through an elemental target…

  16. New measurement of the 242Pu(n,γ) cross section at n_TOF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerendegui-Marco, J.; Guerrero, C.; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Quesada, J. M.; Mendoza, E.; Cano-Ott, D.; Eberhardt, K.; Junghans, A.

    2016-03-01

    The use of MOX fuel (mixed-oxide fuel made of UO2 and PuO2) in nuclear reactors allows substituting a large fraction of the enriched Uranium by Plutonium reprocessed from spent fuel. With the use of such new fuel composition rich in Pu, a better knowledge of the capture and fission cross sections of the Pu isotopes becomes very important. In particular, a new series of cross section evaluations have been recently carried out jointly by the European (JEFF) and United States (ENDF) nuclear data agencies. For the case of 242Pu, the two only neutron capture time-of-flight measurements available, from 1973 and 1976, are not consistent with each other, which calls for a new time-of flight capture cross section measurement. In order to contribute to a new evaluation, we have perfomed a neutron capture cross section measurement at the n_TOF-EAR1 facility at CERN using four C6D6 detectors, using a high purity target of 95 mg. The preliminary results assessing the quality and limitations (background, statistics and γ-flash effects) of this new experimental data are presented and discussed, taking into account that the aimed accuracy of the measurement ranges between 7% and 12% depending on the neutron energy region.

  17. Simultaneous Heavy Flavor Fractions and Top Cross Section Measurement at the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Mathis, Mark J.

    2010-04-01

    This dissertation describes the measurement of the top pair production cross section, using data from proton–antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV, with 2.7 ± 0.2 fb-1 of data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. Background contributions are measured concurrently with the top cross section in the b-tagged lepton-plus-jets sample using a kinematic fit, which simultaneously determines the cross sections and normalizations of t$\\bar{t}$, W + jets, QCD, and electroweak processes. This is the first application of a procedure of this kind. The top cross section is measured to be σt$\\bar{t}$ = 7.64±0.57(stat + syst)±0.45(lumi) pb and the Monte Carlo simulation scale factors KWb$\\bar{b}$ = 1.57±0.25, KW$\\bar{c}$ = 0.94±0.79, KWc = 1.9 ± 0.3, and KWq$\\bar{q}$ = 1.1 ± 0.3. These results are consistent with existing measurements using other procedures. More data will reduce the systematic uncertainties and will lead to the most precise of any single analysis to date.

  18. Absolute measurement of the 242Pu neutron-capture cross section

    DOE PAGES

    Buckner, M. Q.; Wu, C. Y.; Henderson, R. A.; ...

    2016-04-21

    Here, the absolute neutron-capture cross section of 242Pu was measured at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center using the Detector for Advanced Neutron-Capture Experiments array along with a compact parallel-plate avalanche counter for fission-fragment detection. The first direct measurement of the 242Pu(n,γ) cross section was made over the incident neutron energy range from thermal to ≈ 6 keV, and the absolute scale of the (n,γ) cross section was set according to the known 239Pu(n,f) resonance at En,R = 7.83 eV. This was accomplished by adding a small quantity of 239Pu to the 242Pu sample. The relative scale of the crossmore » section, with a range of four orders of magnitude, was determined for incident neutron energies from thermal to ≈ 40 keV. Our data, in general, are in agreement with previous measurements and those reported in ENDF/B-VII.1; the 242Pu(n,γ) cross section at the En,R = 2.68 eV resonance is within 2.4% of the evaluated value. However, discrepancies exist at higher energies; our data are ≈30% lower than the evaluated data at En ≈ 1 keV and are approximately 2σ away from the previous measurement at En ≈ 20 keV.« less

  19. Hadronic cross sections measurement with the SND detector at VEPP-2000 e+e- collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achasov, M. N.; Barnyakov, A. Yu; Barnyakov, M. Yu; Beloborodov, K. I.; Berdyugin, A. V.; Berkaev, D. E.; Blinov, V. E.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Botov, A. A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Dimova, T. V.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kardapoltsev, L. V.; Kirpotin, A. N.; Kononov, S. A.; Koop, I. A.; Korol, A. A.; Koshuba, S. V.; Kovrizhin, D. P.; Kravchenko, D. P.; Kupich, A. S.; Lysenko, A. P.; Martin, K. A.; Obrazovsky, A. E.; Onuchin, A. P.; Pakhtusova, E. V.; Kharlamov, A. G.; Romanov, A. L.; Senchenko, A. I.; Shatunov, P. Yu; Shatunov, Yu M.; Shtol, D. A.; Shwartz, D. B.; Silagadze, Z. K.; Skrinsky, A. N.; Surin, I. K.; Tikhonov, Yu A.; Usov, Yu V.; Vasiljev, A. V.; Zemlyansky, I. M.

    2015-11-01

    The cross sections {{{e}}}+{{{e}}}-\\to {π }+{π }-, 3π , 4π , ω {π }0, K+K-, η {π }+{π }-, η γ , {{p}}\\bar{{{p}}},{{n}}\\bar{{{n}}} have been measured with the spherical neutral detector at the VEPP-2000 e+e- collider in the energy range from 0.3 to 2.0 GeV.

  20. Measurement of K Shell Photoelectric Cross Sections at a K Edge--A Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nayak, S. V.; Badiger, N. M.

    2007-01-01

    We describe in this paper a new method for measuring the K shell photoelectric cross sections of high-Z elemental targets at a K absorption edge. In this method the external bremsstrahlung (EB) photons produced in the Ni target foil by beta particles from a weak[superscript 90]Sr-[superscript 90]Y beta source are passed through an elemental target…

  1. Measuring Cross-Section and Estimating Uncertainties with the fissionTPC

    SciTech Connect

    Bowden, N.; Manning, B.; Sangiorgio, S.; Seilhan, B.

    2015-01-30

    The purpose of this document is to outline the prescription for measuring fission cross-sections with the NIFFTE fissionTPC and estimating the associated uncertainties. As such it will serve as a work planning guide for NIFFTE collaboration members and facilitate clear communication of the procedures used to the broader community.

  2. Measurements of the Thermal Neutron Macroscopic Absorption Cross Section for Neutron Absorbing Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyani, Abouzar; Rostam, G. Gh.; Sadat Kiai, S. M.; Bakhsh, Hossin Jahan; Mahdavi, Farzad

    2011-12-01

    Objective of this study is measuring the macroscopic cross section of a neutron absorbing layer for thermal neutrons. For this purpose a neutron source and BF 3 detector have been applied. For measuring macroscopic cross section of thermal neutrons by the Formula, it is necessary to provide suitable geometric conditions in order to assume the production and build-up coefficient to be the unit value (=1). To fulfill required conditions for this assumption, surface of the detector is covered with a 2 mm thick layer of cadmium. Radiation window of the detector has a 3 cm diameter, situated directly in front of the source. By placing the cadmium cover over the detector, variation of values verses thickness of absorbent layer, renders linear function behavior, making it possible to measure the macroscopic cross section. The next stage is applying the MCNP code by simulating F1 tally and cosine-cards for calculating Total Macroscopic Cross-Section. Validation of this study is achieved through comparison of simulation by the MCNP code and results rendered by experiment measurements.

  3. Thermal neutron capture cross section of gadolinium by pile-oscillation measurements in MINERVE

    SciTech Connect

    Leconte, P.; Di-Salvo, J.; Antony, M.; Pepino, A.; Hentati, A.

    2012-07-01

    Natural gadolinium is used as a burnable poison in most LWR to account for the excess of reactivity of fresh fuels. For an accurate prediction of the cycle length, its nuclear data and especially its neutron capture cross section needs to be known with a high precision. Recent microscopic measurements at Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst. (RPI) suggest a 11% smaller value for the thermal capture cross section of {sup 157}Gd, compared with most of evaluated nuclear data libraries. To solve this inconsistency, we have analyzed several pile-oscillation experiments, performed in the MINERVE reactor. They consist in the measurement of the reactivity variation involved by the introduction in the reactor of small-samples, containing different mass amounts of natural gadolinium. The analysis of these experiments is done through the exact perturbation theory, using the PIMS calculation tool, in order to link the reactivity effect to the thermal capture cross section. The measurement of reactivity effects is used to deduce the 2200 m.s-1 capture cross section of {sup nat}Gd which is (49360 {+-} 790) b. This result is in good agreement with the JEFF3.1.1 value (48630 b), within 1.6% uncertainty at 1{sigma}, but is strongly inconsistent with the microscopic measurements at RPI which give (44200 {+-} 500) b. (authors)

  4. Measuring (n,f) cross sections of plutonium nuclei via the surrogate method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, R. O.; Beausang, C. W.; Ross, T. J.; Gell, K.; Good, E.; Tarlow, T.; Burke, J. T.; Casperson, R. J.; McCleskey, M.; Saastamoinen, A.; Cooper, N.; Humby, P.

    2012-10-01

    Neutron-induced cross section measurements of exotic nuclei provide a significant experimental challenge due to the need for radioactive targets and high neutron fluxes. Over the past few years the surrogate method has been shown to provide a means of indirectly measuring certain neutron-induced cross sections. Recent results benchmarking (p,t-f) and (p,d-f) reactions as surrogates for (n,f) cross section measurements in uranium nuclei show good agreement with literature data [1]. Building on this work, the use of (p,t-f) and (p,d-f) reactions has very recently been extended to surrogate measurements of the poorly established ^236Pu(n,f) and ^237Pu(n,f) cross sections. The experiment was performed at Texas A&M University using a 30 MeV proton beam from the K150 cyclotron, incident on ^239Pu and ^235U targets. Charged particle-fission and charged particle-γ coincidence data were collected using the combined silicon telescope and γ-ray array: STARLiTe. Preliminary results will be presented. This work was supported by DoE Grant Numbers: DE-FG52-09 NA29454 and DE-FG02-05 ER41379 (UR) and DE-AC52-07 NA27344 (LLNL).[4pt] [1] R.O. Hughes et al., PRC 85, 024613 (2012).

  5. Toward multi-differential cross sections: measuring two angularities on a single jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larkoski, Andrew J.; Moult, Ian; Neill, Duff

    2014-09-01

    The analytic study of differential cross sections in QCD has typically focused on individual observables, such as mass or thrust, to great success. Here, we present a first study of double differential jet cross sections considering two recoil-free angularities measured on a single jet. By analyzing the phase space defined by the two angularities and using methods from soft-collinear effective theory, we prove that the double differential cross section factorizes at the boundaries of the phase space. We also show that the cross section in the bulk of the phase space cannot be factorized using only soft and collinear modes, excluding the possibility of a global factorization theorem in soft-collinear effective theory. Nevertheless, we are able to define a simple interpolation procedure that smoothly connects the factorization theorem at one boundary to the other. We present an explicit example of this at next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy and show that the interpolation is unique up to α {/s 4} order in the exponent of the cross section, under reasonable assumptions. This is evidence that the interpolation is sufficiently robust to account for all logarithms in the bulk of phase space to the accuracy of the boundary factorization theorem. We compare our analytic calculation of the double differential cross section to Monte Carlo simulation and find qualitative agreement. Because our arguments rely on general structures of the phase space, we expect that much of our analysis would be relevant for the study of phenomenologically well-motivated observables, such as N -subjettiness, energy correlation functions, and planar flow.

  6. Absolute X-ray emission cross section measurements of Fe K transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hell, Natalie; Brown, Gregory V.; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Boyce, Kevin R.; Grinberg, Victoria; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline; Leutenegger, Maurice A.; Porter, Frederick Scott; Wilms, Jörn

    2016-06-01

    We have measured the absolute X-ray emission cross sections of K-shell transitions in highly charged L- and K-shell Fe ions using the LLNL EBIT-I electron beam ion trap and the NASA GSFC EBIT Calorimeter Spectrometer (ECS). The cross sections are determined by using the ECS to simultaneously record the spectrum of the bound-bound K-shell transitions and the emission from radiative recombination from trapped Fe ions. The measured spectrum is then brought to an absolute scale by normalizing the measured flux in the radiative recombination features to their theoretical cross sections, which are well known. Once the spectrum is brought to an absolute scale, the cross sections of the K-shell transitions are determined. These measurements are made possible by the ECS, which consists of a 32 channel array, with 14 channels optimized for detecting high energy photons (hν > 10 keV) and 18 channels optimized for detecting low energy photons (hν < 10 keV). The ECS has a large collection area, relatively high energy resolution, and a large bandpass; all properties necessary for this measurement technique to be successful. These data will be used to benchmark cross sections in the atomic reference data bases underlying the plasma modeling codes used to analyze astrophysical spectra, especially those measured by the Soft X-ray Spectrometer calorimeter instrument recently launched on the Hitomi X-ray Observatory.This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344, and supported by NASA grants to LLNL and NASA/GSFC and by ESA under contract No. 4000114313/15/NL/CB.

  7. Inelastic neutron scattering cross-section measurements on 7Li and 63,65Cu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyman, Markus; Belloni, Francesca; Ichinkhorloo, Dagvadorj; Pirovano, Elisa; Plompen, Arjan; Rouki, Chariklia

    2017-09-01

    The γ-ray production cross section for the 477.6-keV transition in 7Li following inelastic neutron scattering has been measured from the reaction threshold up to 18 MeV. This cross section is interesting as a possible standard for other inelastic scattering measurements. The experiment was conducted at the Geel Electron LINear Accelerator (GELINA) pulsed white neutron source with the Gamma Array for Inelastic Neutron Scattering (GAINS) spectrometer. Previous measurements of this cross section are reviewed and compared with our results. Recently, this cross section has also been calculated using the continuum discretized coupled-channels (CDCC) method. Experiments for studying neutrinoless double-β decay (2β0ν) or other very rare processes require greatly reducing the background radiation level (both intrinsic and external). Copper is a common shielding and structural material, used extensively in experiments such as COBRA, CUORE, EXO, GERDA, and MAJORANA. Understanding the background contribution arising from neutron interactions in Cu is important when searching for very weak experimental signals. Neutron inelastic scattering on natCu was investigated with GAINS. The results are compared with previous experimental data and evaluated nuclear data libraries.

  8. Measurement of the elastic, total and diffraction cross sections at tevatron energies

    SciTech Connect

    Belforte, S.; CDF Collaboration

    1993-11-01

    The CDF collaboration has measured the differential elastic cross section d{sigma}{sub el}/dt, the single diffraction dissociation double differential cross section d{sup 2}{sigma}{sub sd}/dM{sup 2}dt and the total inelastic cross section for antiproton-proton collisions at center of mass energies {radical}s = 546 and 1,800 GeV. Data for this measurement have been collected in short dedicated runs during the 1988--1989 data taking period of CDF. The elastic scattering slope is 15.28 {+-} 0.58 (16.98 {+-} 0.25) GeV{sup {minus}2} at {radical}s = 546 (1,800) GeV. Using the luminosity independent method (1 + {rho}{sup 2}){sigma}{sub T} is measured to be 62.64 {+-} 0.95 (81.83 {+-} 2.29) mb at {radical}s = 546 (1,800) GeV. Assuming {rho} = 0.15 the elastic, total and single diffraction cross sections are {sigma}{sub el} = 12.87 {+-} 0.30, {sigma}{sub T} = 61.26 {+-} 0.93 and {sigma}{sub sd} = 7.89 {+-} 0.33 mb ({sigma}{sub el} = 19.70 {+-} 0.85, {sigma}{sub T} = 80.03 {+-} 2.24 and {sigma}{sub sd} = 9.46 {+-} 0.44 mb) at {radical}s = 546 (1,800) GeV.

  9. Measurement of the Z → ττ cross section with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acerbi, E.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Aderholz, M.; Adomeit, S.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Siegrist, James L.

    2011-12-01

    The Z → ττ cross section is measured with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC in four different final states determined by the decay modes of the {tau} leptons: muon-hadron, electron-hadron, electron-muon, and muon-muon. The analysis is based on a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 36 pb⁻¹, at a proton-proton center-of-mass energy of √s = 7 TeV. Cross sections are measured separately for each final state in fiducial regions of high detector acceptance, as well as in the full phase space, over the mass region 66-116 GeV. The individual cross sections are combined and the product of the total Z production cross section and Z → ττ branching fraction is measured to be 0.97 ± 0.07(stat) ± 0.06(syst) ± 0.03(lumi) nb, in agreement with next-to-next-to-leading order calculations.

  10. Measurement of the Z→ττ cross section with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acerbi, E.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Aderholz, M.; Adomeit, S.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Akiyama, A.; Alam, M. S.; Alam, M. A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Aliyev, M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral, P.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amorim, A.; Amorós, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Andrieux, M.-L.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoun, S.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Archambault, J. P.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J.-F.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Atoian, G.; Aubert, B.; Auerbach, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Austin, N.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Bachy, G.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bahinipati, S.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, M. D.; Baker, S.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barashkou, A.; Barbaro Galtieri, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartsch, D.; Bartsch, V.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Battistoni, G.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beare, B.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K. H.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Behera, P. K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Beloborodova, O.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Ben Ami, S.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Benchouk, C.; Bendel, M.; Benedict, B. H.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernardet, K.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertin, A.; Bertinelli, F.; Bertolucci, F.; Besana, M. I.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bitenc, U.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanchot, G.; Blazek, T.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. B.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boelaert, N.; Böser, S.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bolnet, N. M.; Bona, M.; Bondarenko, V. G.; Boonekamp, M.; Boorman, G.; Booth, C. N.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borroni, S.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Botterill, D.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boulahouache, C.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozhko, N. I.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Braem, A.; Branchini, P.; Brandenburg, G. W.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Breton, D.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Brodet, E.; Broggi, F.; Bromberg, C.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, W. K.; Brown, G.; Brown, H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Buanes, T.; Bucci, F.; Buchanan, J.; Buchanan, N. J.; Buchholz, P.; Buckingham, R. M.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Budick, B.; Büscher, V.; Bugge, L.; Buira-Clark, D.; Bulekov, O.; Bunse, M.; Buran, T.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgess, T.; Burke, S.; Busato, E.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butin, F.; Butler, B.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Buttinger, W.; Byatt, T.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Calkins, R.; Caloba, L. P.; Caloi, R.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarri, P.; Cambiaghi, M.; Cameron, D.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canale, V.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Cantero, J.; Capasso, L.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capriotti, D.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Caramarcu, C.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, B.; Caron, S.; Carrillo Montoya, G. D.; Carter, A. A.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Cascella, M.; Caso, C.; Castaneda Hernandez, A. M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Cataldi, G.; Cataneo, F.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Caughron, S.; Cauz, D.; Cavalleri, P.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cetin, S. A.; Cevenini, F.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Chapman, J. W.; Chareyre, E.; Charlton, D. G.; Chavda, V.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, S.; Chen, T.; Chen, X.; Cheng, S.; Cheplakov, A.; Chepurnov, V. F.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Cheung, S. L.; Chevalier, L.; Chiefari, G.; Chikovani, L.; Childers, J. T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choudalakis, G.; Chouridou, S.; Christidi, I. A.; Christov, A.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciba, K.; Ciftci, A. K.; Ciftci, R.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciobotaru, M. D.; Ciocca, C.; Ciocio, A.; Cirilli, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, P. J.; Cleland, W.; Clemens, J. C.; Clement, B.; Clement, C.; Clifft, R. W.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coe, P.; Cogan, J. G.; Coggeshall, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cojocaru, C. D.; Colas, J.; Colijn, A. P.; Collard, C.; Collins, N. J.; Collins-Tooth, C.; Collot, J.; Colon, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Conidi, M. C.; Consonni, M.; Consonni, S. M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conventi, F.; Cook, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cooper-Smith, N. J.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Costin, T.; Côté, D.; Coura Torres, R.; Courneyea, L.; Cowan, G.; Cowden, C.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Crescioli, F.; Cristinziani, M.; Crosetti, G.; Crupi, R.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Cuciuc, C.-M.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Curatolo, M.; Curtis, C. J.; Cwetanski, P.; Czirr, H.; Czyczula, Z.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; D'Orazio, A.; da Silva, P. V. M.; da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dai, T.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dameri, M.; Damiani, D. S.; Danielsson, H. O.; Dannheim, D.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darlea, G. L.; Daum, C.; Dauvergne, J. P.; Davey, W.; Davidek, T.; Davidson, N.; Davidson, R.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davison, A. R.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Dawson, J. W.; Daya, R. K.; de, K.; de Asmundis, R.; de Castro, S.; de Castro Faria Salgado, P. E.; de Cecco, S.; de Graat, J.; de Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; de La Taille, C.; de la Torre, H.; de Lotto, B.; de Mora, L.; de Nooij, L.; de Oliveira Branco, M.; de Pedis, D.; de Salvo, A.; de Sanctis, U.; de Santo, A.; de Vivie de Regie, J. B.; Dean, S.; Dedovich, D. V.; Degenhardt, J.; Dehchar, M.; Del Papa, C.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Della Pietra, M.; Della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delpierre, P.; Delruelle, N.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demirkoz, B.; Deng, J.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Devetak, E.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dewilde, B.; Dhaliwal, S.; Dhullipudi, R.; di Ciaccio, A.; di Ciaccio, L.; di Girolamo, A.; di Girolamo, B.; di Luise, S.; di Mattia, A.; di Micco, B.; di Nardo, R.; di Simone, A.; di Sipio, R.; Diaz, M. A.; Diblen, F.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Dietzsch, T. A.; Diglio, S.; Dindar Yagci, K.; Dingfelder, J.; Dionisi, C.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Do Vale, M. A. B.; Do Valle Wemans, A.; Doan, T. K. O.; Dobbs, M.; Dobinson, R.; Dobos, D.; Dobson, E.; Dobson, M.; Dodd, J.; Doglioni, C.; Doherty, T.; Doi, Y.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolenc, I.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dohmae, T.; Donadelli, M.; Donega, M.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dos Anjos, A.; Dosil, M.; Dotti, A.; Dova, M. T.; Dowell, J. D.; Doxiadis, A. D.; Doyle, A. T.; Drasal, Z.; Drees, J.; Dressnandt, N.; Drevermann, H.; Driouichi, C.; Dris, M.; Dubbert, J.; Dubbs, T.; Dube, S.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Dudarev, A.; Dudziak, F.; Dührssen, M.; Duerdoth, I. P.; Duflot, L.; Dufour, M.-A.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Duxfield, R.; Dwuznik, M.; Dydak, F.; Dzahini, D.; Düren, M.; Ebenstein, W. L.; Ebke, J.; Eckert, S.; Eckweiler, S.; Edmonds, K.; Edwards, C. A.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Ehrich, T.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Ellis, K.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Ely, R.; Emeliyanov, D.; Engelmann, R.; Engl, A.; Epp, B.; Eppig, A.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Eriksson, D.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Ernwein, J.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Escobar, C.; Espinal Curull, X.; Esposito, B.; Etienne, F.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evangelakou, D.; Evans, H.; Fabbri, L.; Fabre, C.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farley, J.; Farooque, T.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Fatholahzadeh, B.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Fazio, S.; Febbraro, R.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Fehling-Kaschek, M.; Feligioni, L.; Fellmann, D.; Felzmann, C. U.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Ferencei, J.; Ferland, J.; Fernando, W.; Ferrag, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrara, V.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrer, M. L.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filippas, A.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, G.; Fischer, P.; Fisher, M. J.; Fisher, S. M.; Flechl, M.; Fleck, I.; Fleckner, J.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Flick, T.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Föhlisch, F.; Fokitis, M.; Fonseca Martin, T.; Forbush, D. A.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fortin, D.; Foster, J. M.; Fournier, D.; Foussat, A.; Fowler, A. J.; Fowler, K.; Fox, H.; Francavilla, P.; Franchino, S.; Francis, D.; Frank, T.; Franklin, M.; Franz, S.; Fraternali, M.; Fratina, S.; French, S. T.; Froeschl, R.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gadfort, T.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallas, M. V.; Gallo, V.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galyaev, E.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, Y. S.; Gapienko, V. A.; Gaponenko, A.; Garberson, F.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garitaonandia, H.; Garonne, V.; Garvey, J.; Gatti, C.; Gaudio, G.; Gaumer, O.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gayde, J.-C.; Gazis, E. N.; Ge, P.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geerts, D. A. A.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Gellerstedt, K.; Gemme, C.; Gemmell, A.; Genest, M. H.; Gentile, S.; George, M.; George, S.; Gerlach, P.; Gershon, A.; Geweniger, C.; Ghazlane, H.; Ghez, P.; Ghodbane, N.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giangiobbe, V.; Gianotti, F.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, A.; Gibson, S. M.; Gilbert, L. M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gilewsky, V.; Gillberg, D.; Gillman, A. R.; Gingrich, D. M.; Ginzburg, J.; Giokaris, N.; Giordano, R.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giovannini, P.; Giraud, P. F.; Giugni, D.; Giunta, M.; Giusti, P.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glazov, A.; Glitza, K. W.; Glonti, G. L.; Godfrey, J.; Godlewski, J.; Goebel, M.; Göpfert, T.; Goeringer, C.; Gössling, C.; Göttfert, T.; Goldfarb, S.; Goldin, D.; Golling, T.; Golovnia, S. N.; Gomes, A.; Gomez Fajardo, L. S.; Gonçalo, R.; Goncalves Pinto Firmino da Costa, J.; Gonella, L.; Gonidec, A.; Gonzalez, S.; González de La Hoz, S.; Gonzalez Silva, M. L.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goodson, J. J.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorfine, G.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Gorokhov, S. A.; Goryachev, V. N.; Gosdzik, B.; Gosselink, M.; Gostkin, M. I.; Gouanère, M.; Gough Eschrich, I.; Gouighri, M.; Goujdami, D.; Goulette, M. P.; Goussiou, A. G.; Goy, C.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grabski, V.; Grafström, P.; Grah, C.; Grahn, K.-J.; Grancagnolo, F.; Grancagnolo, S.; Grassi, V.; Gratchev, V.; Grau, N.; Gray, H. M.; Gray, J. A.; Graziani, E.; Grebenyuk, O. G.; Greenfield, D.; Greenshaw, T.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Griffiths, J.; Grigalashvili, N.; Grillo, A. A.; Grinstein, S.; Grishkevich, Y. V.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grognuz, J.; Groh, M.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Groth-Jensen, J.; Grybel, K.; Guarino, V. J.; Guest, D.; Guicheney, C.; Guida, A.; Guillemin, T.; Guindon, S.; Guler, H.; Gumpert, C.; Gunther, J.; Guo, B.; Guo, J.; Gupta, A.; Gusakov, Y.; Gushchin, V. N.; Gutierrez, A.; Gutierrez, P.; Guttman, N.; Gutzwiller, O.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Haas, A.; Haas, S.; Haber, C.; Hackenburg, R.; Hadavand, H. K.; Hadley, D. R.; Haefner, P.; Hahn, F.; Haider, S.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Haller, J.; Hamacher, K.; Hamal, P.; Hamilton, A.; Hamilton, S.; Han, H.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hance, M.; Handel, C.; Hanke, P.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, P. H.; Hansson, P.; Hara, K.; Hare, G. A.; Harenberg, T.; Harkusha, S.; Harper, D.; Harrington, R. D.; Harris, O. M.; Harrison, K.; Hartert, J.; Hartjes, F.; Haruyama, T.; Harvey, A.; Hasegawa, S.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hassani, S.; Hatch, M.; Hauff, D.; Haug, S.; Hauschild, M.; Hauser, R.; Havranek, M.; Hawes, B. M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R. J.; Hawkins, D.; Hayakawa, T.; Hayden, D.; Hayward, H. S.; Haywood, S. J.; Hazen, E.; He, M.; Head, S. J.; Hedberg, V.; Heelan, L.; Heim, S.; Heinemann, B.; Heisterkamp, S.; Helary, L.; Heller, M.; Hellman, S.; Hellmich, D.; Helsens, C.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Henke, M.; Henrichs, A.; Henriques Correia, A. M.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Henry-Couannier, F.; Hensel, C.; Henß, T.; Hernandez, C. M.; Hernández Jiménez, Y.; Herrberg, R.; Hershenhorn, A. D.; Herten, G.; Hertenberger, R.; Hervas, L.; Hessey, N. P.; Hidvegi, A.; Higón-Rodriguez, E.; Hill, D.; Hill, J. C.; Hill, N.; Hiller, K. H.; Hillert, S.; Hillier, S. J.; Hinchliffe, I.; Hines, E.; Hirose, M.; Hirsch, F.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hobbs, J.; Hod, N.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Hodgson, P.; Hoecker, A.; Hoeferkamp, M. R.; Hoffman, J.; Hoffmann, D.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holder, M.; Holmes, A.; Holmgren, S. O.; Holy, T.; Holzbauer, J. L.; Homma, Y.; Hong, T. M.; Hooft van Huysduynen, L.; Horazdovsky, T.; Horn, C.; Horner, S.; Horton, K.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Hou, S.; Houlden, M. A.; Hoummada, A.; Howarth, J.; Howell, D. F.; Hristova, I.; Hrivnac, J.; Hruska, I.; Hryn'Ova, T.; Hsu, P. J.; Hsu, S.-C.; Huang, G. S.; Hubacek, Z.; Hubaut, F.; Huegging, F.; Huffman, T. B.; Hughes, E. W.; Hughes, G.; Hughes-Jones, R. 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L.; Renaud, A.; Renkel, P.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Resende, B.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richards, A.; Richter, R.; Richter-Was, E.; Ridel, M.; Rieke, S.; Rijpstra, M.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Rios, R. R.; Riu, I.; Rivoltella, G.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J. E. M.; Robinson, M.; Robson, A.; Rocha de Lima, J. G.; Roda, C.; Roda Dos Santos, D.; Rodier, S.; Rodriguez, D.; Roe, A.; Roe, S.; Røhne, O.; Rojo, V.; Rolli, S.; Romaniouk, A.; Romanov, V. M.; Romeo, G.; Romero Maltrana, D.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosbach, K.; Rose, M.; Rosenbaum, G. A.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rosendahl, P. L.; Rosselet, L.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, E.; Rossi, L. P.; Rossi, L.; Rotaru, M.; Roth, I.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C. R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Rubinskiy, I.; Ruckert, B.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rud, V. I.; Rudolph, C.; Rudolph, G.; Rühr, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rulikowska-Zarebska, E.; Rumiantsev, V.; Rumyantsev, L.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Rust, D. R.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruwiedel, C.; Ruzicka, P.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Ryadovikov, V.; Ryan, P.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryder, N. C.; Rzaeva, S.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sadeh, I.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Sakamoto, H.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Saleem, M.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvachua Ferrando, B. M.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sampsonidis, D.; Samset, B. H.; Sanchez, A.; Sandaker, H.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, T.; Sandstroem, R.; Sandvoss, S.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sansoni, A.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarangi, T.; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E.; Sarri, F.; Sartisohn, G.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, T.; Sasao, N.; Satsounkevitch, I.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Sauvan, J. B.; Savard, P.; Savinov, V.; Savu, D. O.; Savva, P.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, D. H.; Says, L. P.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scallon, O.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schäfer, U.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schamov, A. G.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Scherzer, M. I.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schlereth, J. L.; Schmidt, E.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, M.; Schöning, A.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schram, M.; Schroeder, C.; Schroer, N.; Schuh, S.; Schuler, G.; Schultes, J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, J. W.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwierz, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Scott, W. G.; Searcy, J.; Sedykh, E.; Segura, E.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Sellden, B.; Sellers, G.; Seman, M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sevior, M. E.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shank, J. T.; Shao, Q. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaver, L.; Shaw, C.; Shaw, K.; Sherman, D.; Sherwood, P.; Shibata, A.; Shichi, H.; Shimizu, S.; Shimojima, M.; Shin, T.; Shmeleva, A.; Shochet, M. J.; Short, D.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sidoti, A.; Siebel, A.; Siegert, F.; Siegrist, J.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silbert, O.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, D.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simmons, B.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinnari, L. A.; Skovpen, K.; Skubic, P.; Skvorodnev, N.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Sloan, T. J.; Sloper, J.; Smakhtin, V.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, B. C.; Smith, D.; Smith, K. M.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snow, S. W.; Snow, J.; Snuverink, J.; Snyder, S.; Soares, M.; Sobie, R.; Sodomka, J.; Soffer, A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E.; Soldevila, U.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Solodkov, A. A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Sondericker, J.; Soni, N.; Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Sorbi, M.; Sosebee, M.; Soukharev, A.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanò, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spila, F.; Spiriti, E.; Spiwoks, R.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Spurlock, B.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stahl, T.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staude, A.; Stavina, P.; Stavropoulos, G.; Steele, G.; Steinbach, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stekl, I.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stevenson, K.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockmanns, T.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoerig, K.; Stoicea, G.; Stonjek, S.; Strachota, P.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strang, M.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Strong, J. A.; Stroynowski, R.; Strube, J.; Stugu, B.; Stumer, I.; Stupak, J.; Sturm, P.; Soh, D. A.; Su, D.; Subramania, Hs.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Sugimoto, T.; Suhr, C.; Suita, K.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Sushkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Sviridov, Yu. M.; Swedish, S.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Szeless, B.; Sánchez, J.; Ta, D.; Tackmann, K.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taga, A.; Taiblum, N.; Takahashi, Y.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A.; Tamsett, M. C.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, Y.; Tani, K.; Tannoury, N.; Tappern, G. P.; Tapprogge, S.; Tardif, D.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tassi, E.; Tatarkhanov, M.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terwort, M.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Thadome, J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thioye, M.; Thoma, S.; Thomas, J. P.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tic, T.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Y. A.; Timmermans, C. J. W. P.; Tipton, P.; Tique Aires Viegas, F. J.; Tisserant, S.; Tobias, J.; Toczek, B.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokunaga, K.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tong, G.; Tonoyan, A.; Topfel, C.; Topilin, N. D.; Torchiani, I.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Traynor, D.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Trinh, T. N.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trivedi, A.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiakiris, M.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsung, J.-W.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tua, A.; Tuggle, J. M.; Turala, M.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turlay, E.; Turra, R.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Tyrvainen, H.; Tzanakos, G.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Uhrmacher, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Underwood, D. G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Unno, Y.; Urbaniec, D.; Urkovsky, E.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Uslenghi, M.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valenta, J.; Valente, P.; Valentinetti, S.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; van der Graaf, H.; van der Kraaij, E.; van der Leeuw, R.; van der Poel, E.; van der Ster, D.; van Eijk, B.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Kesteren, Z.; van Vulpen, I.; Vandelli, W.; Vandoni, G.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Varela Rodriguez, F.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vazeille, F.; Vegni, G.; Veillet, J. J.; Vellidis, C.; Veloso, F.; Veness, R.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinek, E.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virchaux, M.; Virzi, J.; Vitells, O.; Viti, M.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vlasov, N.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; Volpini, G.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Loeben, J.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Vorwerk, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Voss, T. T.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, W.; Wagner, P.; Wahlen, H.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walbersloh, J.; Walch, S.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Waller, P.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, J. C.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Warsinsky, M.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, A. T.; Waugh, B. M.; Weber, J.; Weber, M.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, P.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weigell, P.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wellenstein, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wen, M.; Wenaus, T.; Wendler, S.; Weng, Z.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Werth, M.; Wessels, M.; Weydert, C.; Whalen, K.; Wheeler-Ellis, S. J.; Whitaker, S. P.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, S.; Whitehead, S. R.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicek, F.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik, L. A. M.; Wijeratne, P. A.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilhelm, I.; Wilkens, H. G.; Will, J. Z.; Williams, E.; Williams, H. H.; Willis, W.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wilson, M. G.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winkelmann, S.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wooden, G.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wraight, K.; Wright, C.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wulf, E.; Wunstorf, R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xaplanteris, L.; Xella, S.; Xie, S.; Xie, Y.; Xu, C.; Xu, D.; Xu, G.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamada, M.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yanush, S.; Yao, W.-M.; Yao, Y.; Yasu, Y.; Ybeles Smit, G. V.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Young, C.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zaets, V. G.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zajacova, Z.; Zalite, Yo. K.; Zanello, L.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeller, M.; Zemla, A.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zenonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Zhan, Z.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, S.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zieminska, D.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Živković, L.; Zmouchko, V. V.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zolnierowski, Y.; Zsenei, A.; Zur Nedden, M.; Zutshi, V.; Zwalinski, L.

    2011-12-01

    The Z→ττ cross section is measured with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC in four different final states determined by the decay modes of the τ leptons: muon-hadron, electron-hadron, electron-muon, and muon-muon. The analysis is based on a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 36pb-1, at a proton-proton center-of-mass energy of s=7TeV. Cross sections are measured separately for each final state in fiducial regions of high detector acceptance, as well as in the full phase space, over the mass region 66-116 GeV. The individual cross sections are combined and the product of the total Z production cross section and Z→ττ branching fraction is measured to be 0.97±0.07(stat)±0.06(syst)±0.03(lumi)nb, in agreement with next-to-next-to-leading order calculations.

  11. Measurement of muon neutrino and antineutrino induced single neutral pion production cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Colin E.

    2011-05-01

    Elucidating the nature of neutrino oscillation continues to be a goal in the vanguard of the efforts of physics experiment. As neutrino oscillation searches seek an increasingly elusive signal, a thorough understanding of the possible backgrounds becomes ever more important. Measurements of neutrino-nucleus interaction cross sections are key to this understanding. Searches for νμ → νe oscillation - a channel that may yield insight into the vanishingly small mixing parameter θ13, CP violation, and the neutrino mass hierarchy - are particularly susceptible to contamination from neutral current single π0 (NC 1π0) production. Unfortunately, the available data concerning NC 1π0 production are limited in scope and statistics. Without satisfactory constraints, theoretical models of NC 1π0 production yield substantially differing predictions in the critical Eν ~ 1 GeV regime. Additional investigation of this interaction can ameliorate the current deficiencies. The Mini Booster Neutrino Experiment (MiniBooNE) is a short-baseline neutrino oscillation search operating at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). While the oscillation search is the principal charge of the MiniBooNE collaboration, the extensive data (~ 106 neutrino events) offer a rich resource with which to conduct neutrino cross section measurements. This work concerns the measurement of both neutrino and antineutrino NC 1π0 production cross sections at MiniBooNE. The size of the event samples used in the analysis exceeds that of all other similar experiments combined by an order of magnitude. We present the first measurements of the absolute NC 1π0 cross section as well as the first differential cross sections in both neutrino and antineutrino mode. Specifically, we measure single differential cross sections with respect to pion momentum and pion angle. We find the

  12. Cluster cross sections from pickup measurements: Are the established methods consistent?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedor, J.; Poterya, V.; Pysanenko, A.; Fárník, M.

    2011-09-01

    Pickup of several molecules, H2O, HBr, and CH3OH, and Ar atoms on free ArN clusters has been investigated in a molecular beam experiment. The pickup cross sections of the clusters with known mean sizes, bar{N}≈ 150 and 260 were measured by two independent methods: (i) the cluster beam velocity decrease due to the momentum transfer of the picked up molecules to the clusters, and (ii) Poisson distribution of a selected cluster fragment ion as a function of the pickup pressure. In addition, the pickup cross sections were calculated using molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations. The simulations support the results of the velocity measurements. On the other hand, the Poisson distributions yield significantly smaller cross sections, inconsistent with the known ArN cluster sizes. These results are discussed in terms of: (i) an incomplete coagulation of guest molecules on the argon clusters when two or more molecules are picked up; and (ii) the fragmentation pattern of the embedded molecules and their clusters upon ionization on the Ar cluster. We conclude that the Poisson distribution method has to be cautiously examined, if conclusions should be drawn about the cluster cross section, or the mean cluster size bar{N}, and the number of picked up molecules.

  13. Neutrino and antineutrino inclusive charged-current cross section measurement with the MINOS near detector

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, Debdatta

    2009-01-01

    This thesis presents the measurement of energy dependence of the neutrino-nucleon inclusive charged current cross section on an isoscalar target in the range 3-50 GeV for neutrinos and 5-50 GeV energy range for antineutrinos. The data set was collected with the MINOS Near Detector using the wide band NuMI beam at Fermilab. The size of the charged current sample is 1.94 x 106 neutrino events and 1.60 x 105 antineutrino events. The flux has been extracted using a low hadronic energy sub-sample of the charged current events. The energy dependence of the cross section is obtained by dividing the charged current sample with the extracted flux. The neutrino and antineutrino cross section exhibits a linear dependence on energy at high energy but shows deviations from linear behavior at low energy. We also present a measurement of the ratio of antineutrino to neutrino inclusive cross section.

  14. Measurement of the elastic, total and single diffraction cross sections at Tevatron energies

    SciTech Connect

    Belforte, S.; CDF Collaboration

    1993-11-01

    CDF collaboration has measured the differential elastic cross section d{sigma}{sub el}/dt, the single diffraction dissociation double differential cross section d{sup 2}{sigma}{sub sd}/dM{sup 2}dt and the total inelastic cross section in antiproton-proton collisions at center of mass energies {radical}s=546 and 1800 GeV. The elastic scattering slope is 15.28{plus_minus}0.58 (16.98{plus_minus}0.25) GeV{sup {minus}2} at {radical}s = 546 (1800) GeV. Using the luminosity independent method, (1 + {rho}{sup 2}){sigma}{sub T} is measured to be 62.64{plus_minus}0.95 (81.83{plus_minus}2.29) mb at {radical}s = 546 (1800) GeV. Assuming {rho} = 0.15, the elastic, total and signal diffraction cross sections are {sigma}{sub el} = 12.87{plus_minus}0.30, {sigma}{sub T} = 61.26{plus_minus}0.93 and {sigma}{sub sd} = 7.89{plus_minus}0.33 mb ({sigma}{sub el} = 19.70{plus_minus}0.85, {sigma}{sub T} = 80.03{plus_minus}2.24 and {sigma}{sub sd} = 9.46{plus_minus}0.44 mb) at 546 (1800) GeV.

  15. Absolute measurement of the 242Pu neutron-capture cross section

    SciTech Connect

    Buckner, M. Q.; Wu, C. Y.; Henderson, R. A.; Bucher, B.; Chyzh, A.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Baramsai, B.; Couture, A.; Jandel, M.; Mosby, S.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Ullmann, J. L.

    2016-04-21

    Here, the absolute neutron-capture cross section of 242Pu was measured at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center using the Detector for Advanced Neutron-Capture Experiments array along with a compact parallel-plate avalanche counter for fission-fragment detection. The first direct measurement of the 242Pu(n,γ) cross section was made over the incident neutron energy range from thermal to ≈ 6 keV, and the absolute scale of the (n,γ) cross section was set according to the known 239Pu(n,f) resonance at En,R = 7.83 eV. This was accomplished by adding a small quantity of 239Pu to the 242Pu sample. The relative scale of the cross section, with a range of four orders of magnitude, was determined for incident neutron energies from thermal to ≈ 40 keV. Our data, in general, are in agreement with previous measurements and those reported in ENDF/B-VII.1; the 242Pu(n,γ) cross section at the En,R = 2.68 eV resonance is within 2.4% of the evaluated value. However, discrepancies exist at higher energies; our data are ≈30% lower than the evaluated data at En ≈ 1 keV and are approximately 2σ away from the previous measurement at En ≈ 20 keV.

  16. Absolute measurement of the 242Pu neutron-capture cross section

    SciTech Connect

    Buckner, M. Q.; Wu, C. Y.; Henderson, R. A.; Bucher, B.; Chyzh, A.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Baramsai, B.; Couture, A.; Jandel, M.; Mosby, S.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Ullmann, J. L.

    2016-04-21

    Here, the absolute neutron-capture cross section of 242Pu was measured at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center using the Detector for Advanced Neutron-Capture Experiments array along with a compact parallel-plate avalanche counter for fission-fragment detection. The first direct measurement of the 242Pu(n,γ) cross section was made over the incident neutron energy range from thermal to ≈ 6 keV, and the absolute scale of the (n,γ) cross section was set according to the known 239Pu(n,f) resonance at En,R = 7.83 eV. This was accomplished by adding a small quantity of 239Pu to the 242Pu sample. The relative scale of the cross section, with a range of four orders of magnitude, was determined for incident neutron energies from thermal to ≈ 40 keV. Our data, in general, are in agreement with previous measurements and those reported in ENDF/B-VII.1; the 242Pu(n,γ) cross section at the En,R = 2.68 eV resonance is within 2.4% of the evaluated value. However, discrepancies exist at higher energies; our data are ≈30% lower than the evaluated data at En ≈ 1 keV and are approximately 2σ away from the previous measurement at En ≈ 20 keV.

  17. a Measurement of Cross-Sections for Charge Transfer in Proton + Helium ---> Helium Ion + Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brower, Michael Chadbourne

    A microwave-resonance, optical-detection technique is used to measure the cross sections for charge transfer into the n = 3,L,m(,L) states of hydrogen by protons colliding with a helium gas target at energies between 30 and 80 keV. The feeding of the n = 3 states by states in higher n manifolds created by the collisions has been taken into account for the first time in this type of measurement, with a significant effect on the results. The final cross sections are one of only two measurements of the L,m(,L) cross sections in this system, and the only one to be able to resolve the 3d cross sections. The. uncertainties are 10% to 30% of the cross sections at all energies. The results are (UNFORMATTED TABLE FOLLOWS). Energy (keV). 30 50 60 80. (sigma)(,3s). 10('-18)cm('2) 1.6(3) 2.4(5) 2.0(4) 1.4(3). 3s(,0) 1 1 1 1. p(,0) 0.58(8) 0.19(2) 0.18(2) 0.13(1). p(,1) 0.36(6) 0.08(1) 0.04(1) 0.05(1). TOTAL 0.94(10) 0.27(2) 0.22(2) 0.18(1). d(,0) 0.055(10) 0.017(4) 0.019(4) 0.013(3). d(,1) 0.046(7) 0.014(3) 0.014(3) 0.010(2). d(,2) 0.022(4) 0.001(2) -0.002(2) -0.002(2). TOTAL 0.123(12) 0.032(5) 0.031(5) 0.021(4). (TABLE ENDS).

  18. Cross section measurements for production of positron emitters for PET imaging in carbon therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvador, S.; Colin, J.; Cussol, D.; Divay, C.; Fontbonne, J.-M.; Labalme, M.

    2017-04-01

    In light ion beam therapy, positron (β+) emitters are produced by the tissue nuclei through nuclear interactions with the beam ions. They can be used for the verification of the delivered dose using positron emission tomography by comparing the spatial distribution of the β+ emitters activity to a computer simulation taking into account the patient morphology and the treatment plan. However, the accuracy of the simulation greatly depends on the method used to generate the nuclear interactions producing these emitters. In the case of Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, the nuclear interaction models still lack the required accuracy due to insufficient experimental cross section data. This is particularly true for carbon therapy where literature data on fragmentation cross sections of a carbon beam with targets of medical interest are very scarce. Therefore, we performed at GANIL in July 2016 measurements on β+ emitter production cross sections with a carbon beam at 25, 50, and 95 MeV/nucleon on thin targets (C, N, O, and PMMA). We extracted the production cross section of C,1110, 13N, and O,1514 that are essential to constrain or develop MC nuclear fragmentation models.

  19. Proton inelastic scattering cross section measurements on 16O and 28Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boromiza, Marian; Borcea, Catalin; Dessagne, Philippe; Ghita, Dan; Glodariu, Tudor; Henning, Gregoire; Kerveno, Maëlle; Marginean, Nicolae; Mihai, Constantin; Negret, Alexandru; Nita, Cristina; Nyman, Markus; Olacel, Adina; Oprea, Andreea; Plompen, Arjan; Sotty, Christophe; Suliman, Gabriel; Suvaila, Rares; Stan, Lucian; Turturica, Andrei; Turturica, Gabriel

    2017-09-01

    A (p, p'γ) experiment was performed at the Tandem accelerator of IFIN-HH (Bucharest) with the purpose of measuring the proton inelastic cross-sections on 16O and 28Si. The goal was to investigate to which extent the neutron cross-sections on these nuclei can be inferred from those obtained with charged particles (i.e., protons). In doing so, we are trying to exploit the isospin symmetry by taking under consideration that the chosen targets are N = Z nuclei and, consequently, two mirror nuclei are formed in the (p,p') and (n,n') reactions. The experimental setup consisted of two HPGe detectors with 100% relative efficiency placed at 110∘ and 150∘ relative to the direction of the incident proton beam. The incident protons, which had energies ranging from 6 up to 17 MeV, were scattered on a thick quartz (SiO2) target. A Faraday cup was used to integrate the beam current, thus allowing an absolute determination of the γ production cross sections. We will briefly describe the data analysis procedure, the experimental particularities and difficulties and some preliminary results of the γ production cross sections for the most intense transitions both in 16O and 28Si.

  20. STORAGE RING CROSS SECTION MEASUREMENTS FOR ELECTRON IMPACT IONIZATION OF Fe{sup 7+}

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, M.; Novotný, O.; Savin, D. W.; Becker, A.; Grieser, M.; Krantz, C.; Repnow, R.; Wolf, A.; Bernhardt, D.; Müller, A.; Schippers, S.; Spruck, K.; Lestinsky, M.

    2015-11-01

    We have measured electron impact ionization for Fe{sup 7+} from the ionization threshold up to 1200 eV. The measurements were performed using the TSR heavy ion storage ring. The ions were stored long enough prior to measurements to remove most metastables, resulting in a beam of 94% ground-level ions. Comparing with the previously recommended atomic data, we find that the Arnaud and Raymond cross section is up to about 40% larger than our measurement, with the largest discrepancies below about 400 eV. The cross section of Dere agrees to within 10%, which is about the magnitude of the experimental uncertainties. The remaining discrepancies between our measurement and the Dere calculations are likely due to shortcomings in the theoretical treatment of the excitation-autoionization contribution.

  1. (n,2n) and (n,3n) cross sections of neutron-induced reactions on 150Sm for En from threshold to 35 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Dashdorj, D; Mitchell, G; Kawano, T; Becker, J; Wu, C; Devlin, M; Fotiades, N; Nelson, R; Kunieda, S

    2009-03-16

    Cross-section measurements were made of prompt discrete {gamma}-ray production as a function of incident neutron energy (E{sub n} = 1 to 35 MeV) on a {sup 150}Sm sample fo 1550 mg/cm{sup 2} of Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3} enriched to 95.6% in {sup 150}Sm. Results are compared with enhanced Hauser-Feshbach model calculations including the pre-equilibrium reactions. Energetic neutrons were delivered by the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center facility. The prompt-reaction {gamma} rays were detected with the Compton-suppressed Germanium Array for Neutron Induced Excitations (GEANIE). Incident neutron energies were determined by the time-of-flight technique. Excitation functions for thirteen individual {gamma}-rays up to E{sub x} = 0.8 MeV in {sup 149}Sm and one {gamma}-ray transition between the first excited and ground state in {sup 148}Sm were measured. Partial {gamma}-ray cross sections were calculated using GNASH, an enhanced Hauser-Feshbach statistical nuclear reaction model code, and compared with the experimental results. The particle transmission coefficients were calculated with new systematic 'global' optical model potential parameters. The coupled-channel optical model based on the soft rotor model was employed to calculate the particle transmission coefficients. The pre-equilibrium part of the spin distribution in {sup 150}Sm was calculated using the quantum mechanical theory of Feshbach, Kerman, and Koonin (FKK) and incorporated into the GNASH reaction model code. the partial cross sections for discrete {gamma}-ray cascade paths leading to the ground state in {sup 149}Sm and {sup 148}Sm have been summed (without double counting) to estimate lower limits for reaction cross sections. These lower limits are combined with Hauser-Feshbach model calculations to deduce the reaction channel cross sections. These reaction channel cross sections agree with previously measured experimental and ENDF/B-VII evaluations.

  2. Complete velocity distribution in river cross-sections measured by acoustic instruments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cheng, R.T.; Gartner, J.W.; ,

    2003-01-01

    To fully understand the hydraulic properties of natural rivers, velocity distribution in the river cross-section should be studied in detail. The measurement task is not straightforward because there is not an instrument that can measure the velocity distribution covering the entire cross-section. Particularly, the velocities in regions near the free surface and in the bottom boundary layer are difficult to measure, and yet the velocity properties in these regions play the most significant role in characterizing the hydraulic properties. To further characterize river hydraulics, two acoustic instruments, namely, an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP), and a "BoogieDopp" (BD) were used on fixed platforms to measure the detailed velocity profiles across the river. Typically, 20 to 25 stations were used to represent a river cross-section. At each station, water velocity profiles were measured independently and/or concurrently by an ADCP and a BD. The measured velocity properties were compared and used in computation of river discharge. In a tow-tank evaluation of a BD, it has been confirmed that BD is capable of measuring water velocity at about 11 cm below the free-surface. Therefore, the surface velocity distribution across the river was extracted from the BD velocity measurements and used to compute the river discharge. These detailed velocity profiles and the composite velocity distribution were used to assess the validity of the classic theories of velocity distributions, conventional river discharge measurement methods, and for estimates of channel bottom roughness.

  3. Evaporation residue cross-section measurements for 48Ti-induced reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Priya; Behera, B. R.; Mahajan, Ruchi; Thakur, Meenu; Kaur, Gurpreet; Kapoor, Kushal; Rani, Kavita; Madhavan, N.; Nath, S.; Gehlot, J.; Dubey, R.; Mazumdar, I.; Patel, S. M.; Dhibar, M.; Hosamani, M. M.; Khushboo, Kumar, Neeraj; Shamlath, A.; Mohanto, G.; Pal, Santanu

    2017-09-01

    Background: A significant research effort is currently aimed at understanding the synthesis of heavy elements. For this purpose, heavy ion induced fusion reactions are used and various experimental observations have indicated the influence of shell and deformation effects in the compound nucleus (CN) formation. There is a need to understand these two effects. Purpose: To investigate the effect of proton shell closure and deformation through the comparison of evaporation residue (ER) cross sections for the systems involving heavy compound nuclei around the ZCN=82 region. Methods: A systematic study of ER cross-section measurements was carried out for the 48Ti+Nd,150142 , 144Sm systems in the energy range of 140 -205 MeV . The measurement has been performed using the gas-filled mode of the hybrid recoil mass analyzer present at the Inter University Accelerator Centre (IUAC), New Delhi. Theoretical calculations based on a statistical model were carried out incorporating an adjustable barrier scaling factor to fit the experimental ER cross section. Coupled-channel calculations were also performed using the ccfull code to obtain the spin distribution of the CN, which was used as an input in the calculations. Results: Experimental ER cross sections for 48Ti+Nd,150142 were found to be considerably smaller than the statistical model predictions whereas experimental and statistical model predictions for 48Ti+144Sm were of comparable magnitudes. Conclusion: Though comparison of experimental ER cross sections with statistical model predictions indicate considerable non-compound-nuclear processes for 48Ti+Nd,150142 reactions, no such evidence is found for the 48Ti+144Sm system. Further investigations are required to understand the difference in fusion probabilities of 48Ti+142Nd and 48Ti+144Sm systems.

  4. Measurement of aluminum activation cross section and gas production cross section for 0.4 and 3-GeV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meigo, Shin-ichiro; Nishikawa, Masaaki; Iwamoto, Hiroki; Matsuda, Hiroki

    2017-09-01

    To estimate the lifetime and the radiation dose of the proton beam window used in the spallation neutron source at J-PARC, it is necessary to understand the accuracy of the production cross section of 3-GeV protons. To obtain data on aluminum, the reaction cross section of aluminum was measured at the entrance of the beam dump placed in the 3-GeV proton synchrotron. Owing to the use of well-calibrated current transformers and a well-collimated beam, the present data has good accuracy. After irradiation, the cross sections of Al(p,x)7Be, Al(p,x)22Na-22 and Al(p,x)24Na were obtained by gamma-ray spectroscopy using a Ge detector. It was found that the evaluated data of JENDL/HE-2007 agree well with the current experimental data, whereas intra-nuclear cascade models (Bertini, INCL-4.6, and JAM) with the GEM statistical decay model underestimate by about 30% in general. Moreover, gas production, such as T and He, and the cross sections were measured for carbon, which was utilized as the muon production target in J-PARC. The experiment was performed with 3-GeV proton having beam power of 0.5 MW, and the gasses emitted in the process were observed using a quadrupole mass spectrometer in the vacuum line for beam transport to the mercury target. It was found that the JENDL/HE-2007 data agree well with the present experimental data.

  5. Measurement of prompt photon cross-section with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishmukhametov, Renat

    The thesis presents the result of the measurement of the prompt photons production cross-section with the ATLAS detector on the Large Hadron Collider using 2010 data at 7 TeV center of mass energy. The measurement is done using two datasets, one for lower value of the transverse energy, another one is for the higher value of the transverse energy. A good agreement with the theoretical prediction is observed,The thesis presents the measurement of the prompt photon production cross-section with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider using 2010 data at 7 TeV center of mass energy. The measurement is done using two datasets, and for different values of photon transverse energy, ET. The first measurement, made for photons with ET>15 GeV, uses 880 nb-1 of collision data, and the second measurement, relevant for photons with ET>45 GeV, uses 35 pb-1 of data. Good agreement with the theoretical prediction for the cross-section is observed, especially for the higher transverse energy photons. This thesis also contains the result of the measurement of the electronic crosstalk in the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter, important for the photon calibration and calorimeter commissioning. especially with the higher transverse energy photons. The thesis also contains the results of the measurement of the electronic crosstalk in the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter, important for the photon calibration and calorimeter commissioning.

  6. Serial measurement of cross-sectional area in peripheral vein grafts using three-dimensional ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Leotta, D F; Primozich, J F; Beach, K W; Bergelin, R O; Strandness, D E

    2001-01-01

    Frequent surveillance of bypass grafts placed in the lower limbs can provide early detection of stenoses. A three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound (US) imaging system has been used to produce serial surface reconstructions of regions of interest in vein grafts in the lower extremities. Using anatomical reference points, data sets from serial studies are registered in a common 3-D coordinate system. Cross-sectional area measurements are extracted from the surface reconstructions in planes normal to the vessel center axis. These measurements are compared at matched sites over time to track changes in the vessel configuration. The quantitative measurements are paired with surface displays of the vessels for a complete depiction of the changing geometry. Example studies from three patients are shown, for time periods up to 38 weeks. The cross-sectional area measurements highlight regions of remodeling and developing stenoses within the grafts.

  7. Cross-Section-Constrained Top-Quark Mass Measurement from Dilepton Events at the Tevatron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M. G.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Aoki, M.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Azzi-Bacchetta, P.; Azzurri, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Baroiant, S.; Bartsch, V.; Bauer, G.; Beauchemin, P.-H.; Bedeschi, F.; Bednar, P.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Belloni, A.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Beringer, J.; Berry, T.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Blair, R. E.; Blocker, C.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boisvert, V.; Bolla, G.; Bolshov, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Bridgeman, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brubaker, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Byrum, K. L.; Cabrera, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chang, S. H.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Choudalakis, G.; Chuang, S. H.; Chung, K.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clark, D.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Cooper, B.; Copic, K.; Cordelli, M.; Cortiana, G.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cully, J. C.; Dagenhart, D.; Datta, M.; Davies, T.; de Barbaro, P.; Dececco, S.; Deisher, A.; de Lentdecker, G.; de Lorenzo, G.; Dell'Orso, M.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; de Pedis, D.; Derwent, P. F.; di Giovanni, G. P.; Dionisi, C.; di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Donini, J.; Dorigo, T.; Dube, S.; Efron, J.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Fedorko, W. T.; Feild, R. G.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Forrester, S.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garberson, F.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Gerberich, H.; Gerdes, D.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopolou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Gimmell, J. L.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grundler, U.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, K.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamilton, A.; Han, B.-Y.; Han, J. Y.; Handler, R.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harper, S.; Harr, R. F.; Harris, R. M.; Hartz, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hauser, J.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heijboer, A.; Heinemann, B.; Heinrich, J.; Henderson, C.; Herndon, M.; Heuser, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hill, C. S.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hocker, A.; Hou, S.; Houlden, M.; Hsu, S.-C.; Huffman, B. T.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Huston, J.; Incandela, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; Iyutin, B.; James, E.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeans, D.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, J. E.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Kar, D.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Kephart, R.; Kerzel, U.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirsch, L.; Klimenko, S.; Klute, M.; Knuteson, B.; Ko, B. R.; Koay, S. A.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kubo, T.; Kuhlmann, S. E.; Kuhr, T.; Kulkarni, N. P.; Kusakabe, Y.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lai, S.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lecompte, T.; Lee, J.; Lee, J.; Lee, Y. J.; Lee, S. W.; Lefèvre, R.; Leonardo, N.; Leone, S.; Levy, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C.; Lin, C. S.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, T.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Loreti, M.; Lovas, L.; Lu, R.-S.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Luci, C.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lyons, L.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Lytken, E.; Mack, P.; MacQueen, D.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maki, T.; Maksimovic, P.; Malde, S.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Marino, C. P.; Martin, A.; Martin, M.; Martin, V.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Maruyama, T.; Mastrandrea, P.; Masubuchi, T.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzemer, S.; Menzione, A.; Merkel, P.; Mesropian, C.; Messina, A.; Miao, T.; Miladinovic, N.; Miles, J.; Miller, R.; Mills, C.; Milnik, M.; Mitra, A.; Mitselmakher, G.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mülmenstädt, J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Mumford, R.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Nagano, A.; Naganoma, J.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Necula, V.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norman, M.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Oldeman, R.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Papaikonomou, A.; Paramonov, A. A.; Parks, B.; Pashapour, S.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Piedra, J.; Pinera, L.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Portell, X.; Poukhov, O.; Pounder, N.; Prakoshyn, F.; Pronko, A.; Proudfoot, J.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rademacker, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Reisert, B.; Rekovic, V.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Richter, S.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rossin, R.; Roy, P.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Saarikko, H.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Salamanna, G.; Saltó, O.; Santi, L.; Sarkar, S.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Scheidle, T.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. A.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scott, A. L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; Sfyria, A.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shapiro, M. D.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Sherman, D.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shon, Y.; Shreyber, I.; Sidoti, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sisakyan, A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Slaunwhite, J.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snihur, R.; Soderberg, M.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Spalding, J.; Spinella, F.; Spreitzer, T.; Squillacioti, P.; Stanitzki, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Stuart, D.; Suh, J. S.; Sukhanov, A.; Sun, H.; Suslov, I.; Suzuki, T.; Taffard, A.; Takashima, R.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, R.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Terashi, K.; Thom, J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Tipton, P.; Tiwari, V.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Tourneur, S.; Trischuk, W.; Tu, Y.; Turini, N.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vallecorsa, S.; van Remortel, N.; Varganov, A.; Vataga, E.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Veszpremi, V.; Vidal, M.; Vidal, R.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vine, T.; Vogel, M.; Volobouev, I.; Volpi, G.; Würthwein, F.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. G.; Wagner, R. L.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wagner, W.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Wester, W. C., III; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Williams, G.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, C.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wynne, S. M.; Yagil, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamashita, T.; Yang, C.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W. M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanello, L.; Zanetti, A.; Zaw, I.; Zhang, X.; Zheng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.

    2008-02-01

    We report the first top-quark mass measurement that uses a cross-section constraint to improve the mass determination. This measurement is made with a dilepton tt¯ event candidate sample collected with the Collider Detector II at Fermilab. From a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.2fb-1, we measure a top-quark mass of 170.7-3.9+4.2(stat)±2.6(syst)±2.4(theory)GeV/c2. The measurement without the cross-section constraint is 169.7-4.9+5.2(stat)±3.1(syst)GeV/c2.

  8. Neutron capture cross section measurements at the beam line 04 of J-PARC/MLF

    SciTech Connect

    Igashira, Masayuki; Harada, Hideo; Kiyanagi, Yoshiaki

    2012-11-12

    An Accurate Neutron-Nucleus Reaction measurement Instrument (ANNRI) at the beam line 04 of MLF (Material and Life Sciences Experimental Facilities) of J-PARC (Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex) was installed to measure neutron capture cross sections related to the research and development of innovative nuclear systems, the study on nuclear astrophysics, etc. ANNRI has two gamma-ray spectrometers: one is a Ge detector array placed at 22 m from the coupled type moderator of the spallation neutron source of J-PARC/MLF and the other is a pair of NaI(Tl) detectors at 28 m. Until the 11th of March, 2011, when we had big earthquakes, we measured capture cross sections of Zr-93, Tc-99, Pd-107, I-129, Cm-244, Cm-246, etc. After checking and repairing ANNRI, we restarted measurements, and ANNRI has been open to worldwide users at present.

  9. Positron interactions with water–total elastic, total inelastic, and elastic differential cross section measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Tattersall, Wade; Chiari, Luca; Machacek, J. R.; Anderson, Emma; Sullivan, James P.; White, Ron D.; Brunger, M. J.; Buckman, Stephen J.; Garcia, Gustavo; Blanco, Francisco

    2014-01-28

    Utilising a high-resolution, trap-based positron beam, we have measured both elastic and inelastic scattering of positrons from water vapour. The measurements comprise differential elastic, total elastic, and total inelastic (not including positronium formation) absolute cross sections. The energy range investigated is from 1 eV to 60 eV. Comparison with theory is made with both R-Matrix and distorted wave calculations, and with our own application of the Independent Atom Model for positron interactions.

  10. Radar Cross-Section Measurements of V22 Blade Tip with and without LLNL Tipcap Reflector

    SciTech Connect

    Poland, D; Simpson, R

    2000-07-01

    It is desired to quantify the effect, in terms of radar cross-section (RCS), of the addition of a small aluminum reflector to the end of the V22 blades. This reflector was designed and manufactured in order to facilitate blade lag measurements by the 95 GHz Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Radar Blade Tracker (RBT) system. The reflector used in these measurements was designed and fabricated at LLNL and is pictured in Figure 1.

  11. Evidence for WZ Production and a Measurement of the WZ Production Cross Section

    SciTech Connect

    Degenhardt, James D.

    2007-05-01

    This dissertation describes a test of the Standard Model (SM) of particle physics by measuring the probability, or cross section, of simultaneously producing a W boson and a Z boson from proton-antiproton collisions. The SM predicts the cross section of WZ production to be 3.68 ± 0.25 pb. The SM and physics of WZ production are described in Chapter 2 of this dissertation. The 1.96 TeV center-of-mass energy proton-antiproton collisions are provided by the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) Tevatron Collider. The W and Z particles are detected using the D0 detector, which is described in Chapter 3. The data were collected by the detector during 2002-2006 corresponding to 1 fb-1 of p{bar p} collisions. This data set is described in Chapter 6. The measurement uses the trilepton (evee, μvee, evμμ, and μvμμ) decay channels, in which a W decays to a charged lepton plus a neutrino and a Z decays to a pair of charged leptons. The W and Z particle selection criteria, detection efficiency, and background determination are described in Chapter 7. We observe 13 candidate events in 1 fb-1 of p$\\bar{p}$ collisions. In this data set we expect to see 4.5 ± 0.6 background events, and we expect to see 9.2 ± 1.0 signal events. The probability of 4.5 ± 0.6 background events to fluctuate to 13 or more events is 1.2 x 10-3 which is a 3.0 σ deviation from the background estimate. A log likelihood method is used to determine the most likely cross section as determined by the measured signal efficiencies, the expected backgrounds, and the observed data. Presented in Chapter 8 is a measurement of the cross section for p$\\bar{p}$ → WZ + X at √s = 1.96 TeV. The WZ diboson production cross section is measured to be σWZ = 2.7$+1.7\\atop{-1.3}$ pb. This is in agreement with the predicted Standard Model cross section.

  12. Sulphur Dioxide: High Resolution Ultra-Violet Photoabsorption Cross Section Measurements at 200K.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackie, D.; Blackwell-Whitehead, R.; Stark, G.; Pickering, J. C.; Rufus, J.; Thorne, A.; Smith, P. L.

    2007-12-01

    Sulphur Dioxide plays an important role not only within the Earth's atmosphere but also within the complex chemistry of both the upper atmosphere of Venus and the volcanically active Jovian moon Io. The lack of high resolution laboratory studies has prevented the full, accurate determination of absorption cross sections which are the basis for reliable photochemical models. High resolution laboratory measurements of SO2 are essential to resolve the complex SO2 spectrum and yield accurate photoabsorption cross sections. Using the Imperial College UV Fourier Transform Spectrometer new high resolution (λ/δλ ~ 450,000) measurements have been recorded over a range of temperatures and pressures. As part of an on-going series of measurements, current laboratory work focused on photoabsorption cross sections of SO2 at 200K across the wavelength range 220 → 325 nm. These measurements not only compliment previous room temperature measurements obtained at Imperial College in the 190 → 220 nm and 220 → 328 nm ranges (Stark et al., JGR Planets 104, 16, 585 (1999) and Rufus et al.,( JGR Planets 108, 2, 5 (2003)), but also coincide with the wavelength regions being recorded by the Venus Express mission through the UV-IR spectrometer SPICAV (ESA-SCI(2001)6). Our new measurements will allow accurate analysis of the chemical processes in the upper atmosphere of Venus. These absorption cross section measurements are the first to be acquired at this resolution, temperature and pressure. Results will be presented. This work was supported in part by NASA Grant NNG05GA03G, PPARC (UK), and the Leverhulme Trust.

  13. 3D Measurement of Anatomical Cross-sections of Foot while Walking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Makoto; Mochimaru, Masaaki; Kanade, Takeo

    Recently, techniques for measuring and modeling of human body are taking attention, because human models are useful for ergonomic design in manufacturing. We aim to measure accurate shape of human foot that will be useful for the design of shoes. For such purpose, shape measurement of foot in motion is obviously important, because foot shape in the shoe is deformed while walking or running. In this paper, we propose a method to measure anatomical cross-sections of foot while walking. No one had ever measured dynamic shape of anatomical cross-sections, though they are very basic and popular in the field of biomechanics. Our proposed method is based on multi-view stereo method. The target cross-sections are painted in individual colors (red, green, yellow and blue), and the proposed method utilizes the characteristic of target shape in the camera captured images. Several nonlinear conditions are introduced in the process to find the consistent correspondence in all images. Our desired accuracy is less than 1mm error, which is similar to the existing 3D scanners for static foot measurement. In our experiments, the proposed method achieved the desired accuracy.

  14. Measurement of Two-Photon Absorption Cross Section of Metal Ions by a Mass Sedimentation Approach

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhuo-Chen; Chen, Qi-Dai; Han, Bing; Liu, Xue-Qing; Song, Jun-Feng; Sun, Hong-Bo

    2015-01-01

    The photo-reduction of metal ions in solution induced by femtosecond laser is an important and novel method for fabricating three-dimensional metal microstructures. However, the nonlinear absorption cross section of metal ions remains unknown because its measurement is difficult. In the present study, a method based on Two-Photon Excited Sedimentation (TPES) is proposed to measure the two-photon absorption cross section (TPACS) of metal ions in solution. The power-squared dependence of the amount of sediment on the excitation intensity was confirmed, revealing that 800 nm femtosecond laser induced reduction of metal ions was a two photon absorption process. We believe that the proposed method may be applied to measure the TPACS of several metal ions, thereby opening a new avenue towards future analysis of two-photon absorption materials. PMID:26657990

  15. Photoionization cross section measurements of the excited states of cobalt in the near-threshold region

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Xianfeng Zhou, Xiaoyu; Cheng, Zaiqi; Jia, Dandan; Qu, Zehua; Yao, Guanxin; Zhang, Xianyi; Cui, Zhifeng

    2014-10-15

    We present measurements of photoionization cross-sections of the excited states of cobalt using a two-color, two-step resonance ionization technique in conjunction with a molecular beam time of flight (TOF) mass spectrometer. The atoms were produced by the laser vaporization of a cobalt rod, coupled with a supersonic gas jet. The absolute photoionization cross-sections at threshold and near-threshold regions (0-1.2 eV) were measured, and the measured values ranged from 4.2±0.7 Mb to 10.5±1.8 Mb. The lifetimes of four odd parity energy levels are reported for the first time.

  16. Measurement of (n,α) cross section for set of structural material isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khryachkov, Vitaly; Gurbich, Alexander; Khromyleva, Tatiana; Bondarenko, Ivan; Ketlerov, Vladimir; Prusachenko, Pavel

    2017-09-01

    A novel spectrometer was developed and used to measure the cross section for the (n,α) reaction at IPPE. Direct measurements of the α-particles yield from solid isotopic pure targets of 50, 52 and 53 chromium, 54 and 57 iron, 60 nickel, and 64 zinc were carried out in the neutron energy range from 4.7 to 7.2 MeV. For some isotopes the (n,α) reaction cross-section for neutron energies less than 14 MeV were measured for the first time. The result of the comparison of new experimental data with the evaluated data from libraries ENDF/B VII, JENDL 4.0, JEFF 3.1, ROSFOND 2010 and BROND 3 and with the experimental data of other authors is presented.

  17. Measurement of the Raman scattering cross section of the breathing mode in KDP and DKDP crystals.

    PubMed

    Demos, Stavros G; Raman, Rajesh N; Yang, Steven T; Negres, Raluca A; Schaffers, Kathleen I; Henesian, Mark A

    2011-10-10

    The spontaneous Raman scattering cross sections of the main peaks (related to the A1 vibrational mode) in rapid and conventional grown potassium dihydrogen phosphate and deuterated crystals are measured at 532 nm, 355 nm, and 266 nm. The measurement involves the use of the Raman line of water centered at 3400 cm-1 as a reference to obtain relative values of the cross sections which are subsequently normalized against the known absolute value for water as a function of excitation wavelength. This measurement enables the estimation of the transverse stimulated Raman scattering gain of these nonlinear optical materials in various configurations suitable for frequency conversion and beam control in high-power, large-aperture laser systems.

  18. New Neutron-Induced Cross-Section Measurements for Weak s-process Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Guber, Klaus H; Wiarda, Dorothea; Leal, Luiz C; Derrien, Herve; Ausmus, Clint; Brashear, Dane; White, John A

    2008-01-01

    A series of new neutron capture and transmission measurements has been undertaken at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) in response to deficiencies identified in nuclear data libraries of crucial importance to the Nuclear Criticality Safety Program. New data and evaluations including covariances are required for several stable fission products as well as for materials found in mixtures with uranium. For example, chromium and nickel as constituents of stainless steel perform poorly in criticality calculations due to their relatively large neutron cross sections and substantial uncertainties in previous measurements. Therefore, new neutron-capture and total cross-section measurements are needed for 52,53Cr and 58,60Ni. These newly obtained data can be used not only to improve criticality calculations but also to serve as input parameters for the weak s-process stellar model calculations in massive stars. We will report on new experiments for these nuclides.

  19. Measurements of gamma-ray production cross sections for shielding materials of space nuclear systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orphan, V. J.; John, J.; Hoot, C. G.

    1972-01-01

    Measurements of secondary gamma ray production from neutron interactions have been made over the entire energy range of interest in shielding applications. The epithermal capture gamma ray yields for both resolved gamma ray lines and continuum have been measured from thermal energies to 100 KeV for natural tungsten and U-238, two important candidate shield materials in SNAP reactor systems. Data are presented to illustrate the variation of epithermal capture gamma ray yields with neutron energy. The gamma ray production cross sections from (n,xy) reactions have been measured for Fe and Al from the threshold energies for inelastic scattering to approximately 16 MeV. Typical Fe and Al cross sections obtained with high-neutron energy resolution and averaged over broad neutron-energy groups are presented.

  20. Inexpensive circuit for the measurement of capture cross section of deep level defects in semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, C. V.; Fung, S.; Beling, C. D.

    1996-12-01

    A simple and inexpensive circuit to facilitate the direct measurement of capture cross section, when synchronized with a deep level transient spectroscopy system, is described. It avoids the most commonly encountered problem of loading and distortion of the bias (trap filling) pulses of nanosecond duration in the capture cross-section measurement. The capacitance meter, whose internal circuitry is responsible for the distortion, is connected and disconnected from the rest of the apparatus with the help of simple and low-cost reed relay switches featuring high operating speed and low contact resistance. Sharp bias pulses as small as 30 ns can successfully be applied to the sample with no observable distortion. Finally, a representative measurement is shown to demonstrate the simplicity and high performance of the circuit.

  1. Measurement of the Top Quark Pair Production Cross Section in pp¯ Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abachi, S.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adam, I.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.; Ahn, S.; Aihara, H.; Alves, G. A.; Amidi, E.; Amos, N.; Anderson, E. W.; Astur, R.; Baarmand, M. M.; Baden, A.; Balamurali, V.; Balderston, J.; Baldin, B.; Banerjee, S.; Bantly, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bazizi, K.; Belyaev, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bertram, I.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Biswas, N.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, P.; Boehnlein, A.; Bojko, N. I.; Borcherding, F.; Borders, J.; Boswell, C.; Brandt, A.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Buchholz, D.; Burtovoi, V. S.; Butler, J. M.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, D.; Casilum, Z.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakraborty, D.; Chang, S.-M.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chen, L.-P.; Chen, W.; Choi, S.; Chopra, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Christenson, J. H.; Chung, M.; Claes, D.; Clark, A. R.; Cobau, W. G.; Cochran, J.; Cooper, W. E.; Cretsinger, C.; Cullen-Vidal, D.; Cumings, M. A.; Cutts, D.; Dahl, O. I.; Davis, K.; de, K.; del Signore, K.; Demarteau, M.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; di Loreto, G.; Draper, P.; Drinkard, J.; Ducros, Y.; Dudko, L. V.; Dugad, S. R.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Engelmann, R.; Eno, S.; Eppley, G.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fahland, T.; Fatyga, M.; Fatyga, M. K.; Featherly, J.; Feher, S.; Fein, D.; Ferbel, T.; Finocchiaro, G.; Fisk, H. E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flattum, E.; Forden, G. E.; Fortner, M.; Frame, K. C.; Fuess, S.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, A. N.; Gartung, P.; Geld, T. L.; Genik, R. J., II; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gibbard, B.; Glenn, S.; Gobbi, B.; Goforth, M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gómez, B.; Gómez, G.; Goncharov, P. I.; González Solís, J. L.; Gordon, H.; Goss, L. T.; Goussiou, A.; Graf, N.; Grannis, P. D.; Green, D. R.; Green, J.; Greenlee, H.; Grim, G.; Grinstein, S.; Grossman, N.; Grudberg, P.; Grünendahl, S.; Guglielmo, G.; Guida, J. A.; Guida, J. M.; Gupta, A.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutnokov, Y. E.; Hadley, N. J.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Hahn, K. S.; Hall, R. E.; Hansen, S.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hedin, D.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hernández-Montoya, R.; Heuring, T.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hoftun, J. S.; Hsieh, F.; Hu, Ting; Hu, Tong; Huehn, T.; Ito, A. S.; James, E.; Jaques, J.; Jerger, S. A.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, J. Z.-Y.; Joffe-Minor, T.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jöstlein, H.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, C. K.; Kahn, S.; Kalbfleisch, G.; Kang, J. S.; Keohoe, R.; Kelly, M. L.; Kim, C. L.; Kim, S. K.; Klatchko, A.; Klima, B.; Klopfenstein, C.; Klyukhin, V. I.; Kochetkov, V. I.; Kohli, J. M.; Koltick, D.; Kostritskiy, A. V.; Kotcher, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kourlas, J.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozlovski, E. A.; Krane, J.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kunori, S.; Lami, S.; Lan, H.; Lander, R.; Landry, F.; Landsberg, G.; Lauer, B.; Leflat, A.; Li, H.; Li, J.; Li-Demarteau, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G.; Lincoln, D.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Q.; Liu, Y. C.; Lobkowicz, F.; Loken, S. C.; Lökös, S.; Leuking, L.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K.; Madaras, R. J.; Madden, R.; Magaña-Mendoza, L.; Mani, S.; Mao, H. S.; Markeloff, R.; Markosky, L.; Marshall, T.; Martin, M. I.; Mauritz, K. M.; May, B.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCarthy, R.; McDonald, J.; McKibben, T.; McKinley, J.; McMahon, T.; Melanson, H. L.; Merkin, M.; Merritt, K. W.; Miettinen, H.; Mincer, A.; de Miranda, J. M.; Mishra, C. S.; Mokhov, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Montgomery, H. E.; Mooney, P.; da Motta, H.; Murphy, C.; Nang, F.; Narain, M.; Narasimham, V. S.; Narayanan, A.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Nemethy, P.; Nes̆iĆ, D.; Nicola, M.; Norman, D.; Oesch, L.; Oguri, V.; Oltman, E.; Oshima, N.; Owen, D.; Padley, P.; Pang, M.; Para, A.; Park, Y. M.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Paterno, M.; Perkins, J.; Peters, M.; Piegaia, R.; Piekarz, H.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Pope, B. G.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Pus̆eljić, D.; Qian, J.; Quintas, P. Z.; Raja, R.; Rajagopalan, S.; Ramirez, O.; Rasmussen, L.; Reucroft, S.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rockwell, T.; Roe, N. A.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Rutherfoord, J.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Santoro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schellman, H.; Sculli, J.; Shabalina, E.; Shaffer, C.; Shankar, H. C.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shupe, M.; Singh, H.; Singh, J. B.; Sirotenko, V.; Smart, W.; Smith, A.; Smith, R. P.; Snihur, R.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Solomon, J.; Sood, P. M.; Sosebee, M.; Sotnikova, N.; Souza, M.; Spadafora, A. L.; Stephens, R. W.; Stevenson, M. L.; Stewart, D.; Stoianova, D. A.; Stoker, D.; Strauss, M.; Streets, K.; Strovink, M.; Sznajder, A.; Tamburello, P.; Tarazi, J.; Tartaglia, M.; Thomas, T. L.; Thompson, J.; Trippe, T. G.; Tuts, P. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vititoe, D.; Volkov, A. A.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, G.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weerts, H.; White, A.; White, J. T.; Wightman, J. A.; Willis, S.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wirjawan, J. V.; Womersley, J.; Won, E.; Wood, D. R.; Xu, H.; Yamada, R.; Yamin, P.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yang, J.; Yasuda, T.; Yepes, P.; Yoshikawa, C.; Youssef, S.; Yu, J.; Yu, Y.; Zhu, Q.; Zhu, Z. H.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.; Zverev, E. G.; Zylberstejn, A.

    1997-08-01

    We present a measurement of the tt¯ production cross section in pp¯ collisions at s = 1.8 TeV by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron. The measurement is based on data from an integrated luminosity of approximately 125 pb-1 accumulated during the 1992-1996 collider run. We observe 39 tt¯ candidate events in the dilepton and lepton+jets decay channels with an expected background of 13.7+/-2.2 events. For a top quark mass of 173.3 GeV/c2, we measure the tt¯ production cross section to be 5.5+/-1.8 pb.

  2. 245CM Fission Cross Section Measurement in the Thermal Energy Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serot, O.; Wagemans, C.; Vermote, S.; van Gils, J.

    2011-10-01

    A new cross section measurement for the 245Cm(n,f) reaction in the thermal energy region has been performed at the GELINA neutron facility of the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) in Geel, Belgium. The energy of the neutrons is determined applying the time of flight method using a flight path length of about 9 m. In the present work, the incident neutron energy covers 10 meV up to a few eV. A 98.48% enriched 245Cm sample was mounted back-to-back with a 10B sample in the centre of a vacuum chamber together with two surface barrier detectors positioned outside the neutron beam. One detector measured the 10B(n,α)7Li reaction products for the neutron flux determination, while the second one registered the 245Cm(n,f) fragments. In this way, the neutron flux can be determined simultaneously with the fission fragments. A control measurement has been performed replacing the 245Cm sample with a 235U sample in order to check that the well-known 235U(n,f) cross section can be reproduced. Our measurement yielded a 245Cm(nth,f) cross section of 2131±43±173 b and a Westcott factor gf=0.939±0.019.

  3. Measurements of the W production cross sections in association with jets with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES

    Aad, G.

    2015-02-19

    This paper presents cross sections for the production of a W boson in association with jets, measured in proton–proton collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s} = 7\\) TeV with the ATLAS experiment at the large hadron collider. With an integrated luminosity of 4.6fb-1, this data set allows for an exploration of a large kinematic range, including jet production up to a transverse momentum of 1TeV and multiplicities up to seven associated jets. The production cross sections for W bosons are measured in both the electron and muon decay channels. Differential cross sections for many observables are also presented including measurements of the jetmore » observables such as the rapidities and the transverse momenta as well as measurements of event observables such as the scalar sums of the transverse momenta of the jets. As a result, the measurements are compared to numerous QCD predictions including next-to-leading-order perturbative calculations, resummation calculations and Monte Carlo generators.« less

  4. A time projection chamber for high accuracy and precision fission cross-section measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Heffner, M.; Asner, D. M.; Baker, R. G.; ...

    2014-05-22

    The fission Time Projection Chamber (fissionTPC) is a compact (15 cm diameter) two-chamber MICROMEGAS TPC designed to make precision cross-section measurements of neutron-induced fission. The actinide targets are placed on the central cathode and irradiated with a neutron beam that passes axially through the TPC inducing fission in the target. The 4π acceptance for fission fragments and complete charged particle track reconstruction are powerful features of the fissionTPC which will be used to measure fission cross-sections and examine the associated systematic errors. This study provides a detailed description of the design requirements, the design solutions, and the initial performance ofmore » the fissionTPC.« less

  5. Measurement of the Single-Top-Quark Production Cross Section at CDF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M. G.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Azzurri, P.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Bartsch, V.; Bauer, G.; Beauchemin, P.-H.; Bedeschi, F.; Bednar, P.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Beringer, J.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Blair, R. E.; Blocker, C.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boisvert, V.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Bridgeman, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brubaker, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Byrum, K. L.; Cabrera, S.; Calancha, C.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chang, S. H.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Choudalakis, G.; Chuang, S. H.; Chung, K.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clark, D.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Copic, K.; Cordelli, M.; Cortiana, G.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cully, J. C.; Dagenhart, D.; Datta, M.; Davies, T.; de Barbaro, P.; de Cecco, S.; Deisher, A.; de Lorenzo, G.; Dell'Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; Derwent, P. F.; di Giovanni, G. P.; Dionisi, C.; di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Donini, J.; Dorigo, T.; Dube, S.; Efron, J.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Fedorko, W. T.; Feild, R. G.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garberson, F.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Genser, K.; Gerberich, H.; Gerdes, D.; Gessler, A.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Gimmell, J. L.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grundler, U.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, K.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Han, B.-Y.; Han, J. Y.; Handler, R.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harper, S.; Harr, R. F.; Harris, R. M.; Hartz, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hauser, J.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heijboer, A.; Heinemann, B.; Heinrich, J.; Henderson, C.; Herndon, M.; Heuser, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hill, C. S.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hocker, A.; Hou, S.; Houlden, M.; Hsu, S.-C.; Huffman, B. T.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Huston, J.; Incandela, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, J. E.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Kar, D.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Kephart, R.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirsch, L.; Klimenko, S.; Knuteson, B.; Ko, B. R.; Koay, S. A.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kubo, T.; Kuhr, T.; Kulkarni, N. P.; Kurata, M.; Kusakabe, Y.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lecompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C. S.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Liss, T. M.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, T.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Loreti, M.; Lovas, L.; Lu, R.-S.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Luci, C.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lyons, L.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Lytken, E.; Mack, P.; MacQueen, D.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maki, T.; Maksimovic, P.; Malde, S.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Marino, C. P.; Martin, A.; Martin, V.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Maruyama, T.; Mastrandrea, P.; Masubuchi, T.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Merkel, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Miladinovic, N.; Miller, R.; Mills, C.; Milnik, M.; Mitra, A.; Mitselmakher, G.; Miyake, H.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlok, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mülmenstädt, J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Mumford, R.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Nagano, A.; Naganoma, J.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Necula, V.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norman, M.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Papaikonomou, A.; Paramonov, A. A.; Parks, B.; Pashapour, S.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Peiffer, T.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pinera, L.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poukhov, O.; Pounder, N.; Prakoshyn, F.; Pronko, A.; Proudfoot, J.; Ptohos, F.; Pueschel, E.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rademacker, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Reisert, B.; Rekovic, V.; Renton, P.; Renz, M.; Rescigno, M.; Richter, S.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rossin, R.; Roy, P.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Saarikko, H.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Saltó, O.; Santi, L.; Sarkar, S.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schall, I.; Scheidle, T.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. A.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scott, A. L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Sherman, D.; Shimojima, M.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M.; Shon, Y.; Shreyber, I.; Sidoti, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sisakyan, A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Slaunwhite, J.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snihur, R.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Spalding, J.; Spreitzer, T.; Squillacioti, P.; Stanitzki, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Stuart, D.; Suh, J. S.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Suzuki, T.; Taffard, A.; Takashima, R.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, R.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Terashi, K.; Thom, J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Tipton, P.; Tiwari, V.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Tourneur, S.; Tu, Y.; Turini, N.; Ukegawa, F.; Vallecorsa, S.; van Remortel, N.; Varganov, A.; Vataga, E.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Veszpremi, V.; Vidal, M.; Vidal, R.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vine, T.; Vogel, M.; Volobouev, I.; Volpi, G.; Würthwein, F.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. G.; Wagner, R. L.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wagner, W.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Wester, W. C., III; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Williams, G.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, C.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wynne, S. M.; Xie, S.; Yagil, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W. M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanello, L.; Zanetti, A.; Zaw, I.; Zhang, X.; Zheng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.

    2008-12-01

    We report a measurement of the single-top-quark production cross section in 2.2fb-1 of p pmacr collision data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab at s=1.96TeV. Candidate events are classified as signal-like by three parallel analyses which use likelihood, matrix element, and neural network discriminants. These results are combined in order to improve the sensitivity. We observe a signal consistent with the standard model prediction, but inconsistent with the background-only model by 3.7 standard deviations with a median expected sensitivity of 4.9 standard deviations. We measure a cross section of 2.2-0.6+0.7(stat+syst)pb, extract the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix-element value |Vtb|=0.88-0.12+0.13(stat+syst)±0.07(theory), and set the limit |Vtb|>0.66 at the 95% C.L.

  6. The First Pion-Ar Cross-Section Measurement with the LArIAT Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Nutini, Irene

    2016-01-01

    A complete understanding of neutrinos properties requires a study and a characterization of the interactions of the daughter particles created in a neutrino-nucleus interaction. The Liquid Argon In A Testbeam (LArIAT) experiment is a small-scale liquid argon detector situated in the Fermilab Test Beam Facility. The LArIAT experiment is exposed to a tertiary beam comprised of mostly pions along with a mix of muons, protons, kaons, and electrons. LArIAT's goal is to characterize the response of the LArTPC to known incoming charged particles and measure their interactions in Argon, in order to understand their cross-sections and to help developing and tuning simulations and reconstruction algorithms for LArTPC neutrino experiments. The world's rst measurement of a pion cross-section on an Argon target, made with the LArIAT detector, is presented here.

  7. Proton-air cross section measurement with the ARGO-YBJ cosmic ray experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Aielli, G.; Camarri, P.; Iuppa, R.; Santonico, R.; Bacci, C.; Bussino, S.; Celio, P.; De Vincenzi, M.; James, I.; Mari, S. M.; Montini, P.; Pistilli, P.; Bartoli, B.; Bernardini, P.; Bleve, C.; De Mitri, I.; Mancarella, G.; Martello, D.; Zizzi, G.; Bi, X. J.

    2009-11-01

    The proton-air cross section in the energy range 1-100 TeV has been measured by the ARGO-YBJ cosmic ray experiment. The analysis is based on the primary cosmic ray flux attenuation for different atmospheric depths (i.e. zenith angles) and exploits the detector capabilities of selecting the shower development stage by means of hit multiplicity, density and lateral profile measurements at ground. The effects of shower fluctuations, the contribution of heavier primaries and the uncertainties of the hadronic interaction models, have been taken into account. The results have been used to estimate the total proton-proton cross section at center-of-mass energies between 70 and 500 GeV, where no accelerator data are currently available.

  8. Measurement of the proton-air cross section with ARGO-YBJ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Mitri, I.; ARGO-YBJ Collaboration

    2009-12-01

    In this work the results of p-air cross section measurements with the ARGO-YBJ experiment are reported. The analysis is based on the different flux attenuation for different atmospheric depths (i.e. zenith angles), by exploiting the detector capabilities in selecting the shower development stage by means of the size, hit density and lateral profile measurements. The systematic errors introduced by fluctuations in shower development and heavier primaries have been taken into account. The results can give useful insights on p-air interactions at energies where hadronic interaction models start to give significantly different expectations and allow to infer the p-p total cross section in the energy region ( √{s}=80 GeV-500 GeV) not covered by experiments at accelerators.

  9. A time projection chamber for high accuracy and precision fission cross-section measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Heffner, M.; Asner, D. M.; Baker, R. G.; Baker, J.; Barrett, S.; Brune, C.; Bundgaard, J.; Burgett, E.; Carter, D.; Cunningham, M.; Deaven, J.; Duke, D. L.; Greife, U.; Grimes, S.; Hager, U.; Hertel, N.; Hill, T.; Isenhower, D.; Jewell, K.; King, J.; Klay, J. L.; Kleinrath, V.; Kornilov, N.; Kudo, R.; Laptev, A. B.; Leonard, M.; Loveland, W.; Massey, T. N.; McGrath, C.; Meharchand, R.; Montoya, L.; Pickle, N.; Qu, H.; Riot, V.; Ruz, J.; Sangiorgio, S.; Seilhan, B.; Sharma, S.; Snyder, L.; Stave, S.; Tatishvili, G.; Thornton, R. T.; Tovesson, F.; Towell, D.; Towell, R. S.; Watson, S.; Wendt, B.; Wood, L.; Yao, L.

    2014-05-22

    The fission Time Projection Chamber (fissionTPC) is a compact (15 cm diameter) two-chamber MICROMEGAS TPC designed to make precision cross-section measurements of neutron-induced fission. The actinide targets are placed on the central cathode and irradiated with a neutron beam that passes axially through the TPC inducing fission in the target. The 4π acceptance for fission fragments and complete charged particle track reconstruction are powerful features of the fissionTPC which will be used to measure fission cross-sections and examine the associated systematic errors. This study provides a detailed description of the design requirements, the design solutions, and the initial performance of the fissionTPC.

  10. A Time Projection Chamber for High Accuracy and Precision Fission Cross-Section Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    T. Hill; K. Jewell; M. Heffner; D. Carter; M. Cunningham; V. Riot; J. Ruz; S. Sangiorgio; B. Seilhan; L. Snyder; D. M. Asner; S. Stave; G. Tatishvili; L. Wood; R. G. Baker; J. L. Klay; R. Kudo; S. Barrett; J. King; M. Leonard; W. Loveland; L. Yao; C. Brune; S. Grimes; N. Kornilov; T. N. Massey; J. Bundgaard; D. L. Duke; U. Greife; U. Hager; E. Burgett; J. Deaven; V. Kleinrath; C. McGrath; B. Wendt; N. Hertel; D. Isenhower; N. Pickle; H. Qu; S. Sharma; R. T. Thornton; D. Tovwell; R. S. Towell; S.

    2014-09-01

    The fission Time Projection Chamber (fissionTPC) is a compact (15 cm diameter) two-chamber MICROMEGAS TPC designed to make precision cross-section measurements of neutron-induced fission. The actinide targets are placed on the central cathode and irradiated with a neutron beam that passes axially through the TPC inducing fission in the target. The 4p acceptance for fission fragments and complete charged particle track reconstruction are powerful features of the fissionTPC which will be used to measure fission cross-sections and examine the associated systematic errors. This paper provides a detailed description of the design requirements, the design solutions, and the initial performance of the fissionTPC.

  11. Measurement of low-energy neutrino cross-sections with the PEANUT experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, S.; Ariga, A.; Arrabito, L.; Autiero, D.; Besnier, M.; Bozza, C.; Buontempo, S.; Carrara, E.; Consiglio, L.; Cozzi, M.; D'Ambrosio, N.; De Lellis, G.; Déclais, Y.; De Serio, M.; Di Capua, F.; Di Crescenzo, A.; Di Ferdinando, D.; Di Marco, N.; Duchesneau, D.; Ereditato, A.; Esposito, L. S.; Fukuda, T.; Giacomelli, G.; Giorgini, M.; Grella, G.; Hamada, K.; Ieva, M.; Juget, F.; Kitagawa, N.; Knuesel, J.; Kodama, K.; Komatsu, M.; Kose, U.; Kreslo, I.; Laktineh, I.; Longhin, A.; Lundberg, B.; Lutter, G.; Mandrioli, G.; Marotta, A.; Meisel, F.; Migliozzi, P.; Morishima, K.; Muciaccia, M. T.; Naganawa, N.; Nakamura, M.; Nakano, T.; Niwa, K.; Nonoyama, Y.; Paolone, V.; Pastore, A.; Patrizii, L.; Pistillo, C.; Pozzato, M.; Pupilli, F.; Rameika, R.; Rescigno, R.; Rosa, G.; Russo, A.; Sato, O.; Scotto Lavina, L.; Simone, S.; Sioli, M.; Sirignano, C.; Sirri, G.; Strolin, P.; Tenti, M.; Tioukov, V.; Yoshida, J.; Yoshioka, T.

    2010-11-01

    The PEANUT experiment was designed to study the NuMi neutrino beam at Fermilab. The detector uses a hybrid technique, being made of nuclear emulsions and scintillator trackers. Emulsion films act as a micrometric tracking device and are interleaved with lead plates used as passive material. The detector is designed to precisely reconstruct the topology of neutrino interactions and hence to measure the different contributions to the cross section. We present here the full reconstruction and analysis of 147 neutrino interactions and the measurement of the quasi-elastic, resonance and deep-inelastic contributions to the total charged current cross section at the energies of the NuMi neutrino beam. This technique could be applied for beam monitoring in future neutrino facilities, and this paper shows its proof-of-principle.

  12. Measurement of the Top Quark Pair Production Cross Section in the All-Jets Decay Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramov, V.; Acharya, B. S.; Adam, I.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.; Ahn, S.; Alves, G. A.; Amos, N.; Anderson, E. W.; Baarmand, M. M.; Babintsev, V. V.; Babukhadia, L.; Baden, A.; Baldin, B.; Banerjee, S.; Bantly, J.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Belyaev, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bertram, I.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Biswas, N.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, P.; Boehnlein, A.; Bojko, N. I.; Borcherding, F.; Boswell, C.; Brandt, A.; Breedon, R.; Briskin, G.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Buchholz, D.; Burtovoi, V. S.; Butler, J. M.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, D.; Casilum, Z.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakraborty, D.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chen, W.; Choi, S.; Chopra, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Christenson, J. H.; Chung, M.; Claes, D.; Clark, A. R.; Cobau, W. G.; Cochran, J.; Coney, L.; Cooper, W. E.; Coppage, D.; Cretsinger, C.; Cullen-Vidal, D.; Cummings, M. A.; Cutts, D.; Dahl, O. I.; Davis, K.; de, K.; del Signore, K.; Demarteau, M.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; di Loreto, G.; Draper, P.; Ducros, Y.; Dudko, L. V.; Dugad, S. R.; Dyshkant, A.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Engelmann, R.; Eno, S.; Eppley, G.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fahland, T.; Fatyga, M. K.; Feher, S.; Fein, D.; Ferbel, T.; Fisk, H. E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flattum, E.; Forden, G. E.; Fortner, M.; Frame, K. C.; Fuess, S.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, A. N.; Gartung, P.; Gavrilov, V.; Geld, T. L.; Genik, R. J.; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Gibbard, B.; Gobbi, B.; Gómez, B.; Gómez, G.; Goncharov, P. I.; González Solís, J. L.; Gordon, H.; Goss, L. T.; Gounder, K.; Goussiou, A.; Graf, N.; Grannis, P. D.; Green, D. R.; Greenlee, H.; Grinstein, S.; Grudberg, P.; Grünendahl, S.; Guglielmo, G.; Guida, J. A.; Guida, J. M.; Gupta, A.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hadley, N. J.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Hahn, K. S.; Hall, R. E.; Hanlet, P.; Hansen, S.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hebert, C.; Hedin, D.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hernández-Montoya, R.; Heuring, T.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hoftun, J. S.; Hsieh, F.; Hu, Tong; Ito, A. S.; Jaques, J.; Jerger, S. A.; Jesik, R.; Joffe-Minor, T.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jöstlein, H.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, C. K.; Kahn, S.; Kalbfleisch, G.; Karmanov, D.; Karmgard, D.; Kehoe, R.; Kim, S. K.; Klima, B.; Klopfenstein, C.; Ko, W.; Kohli, J. M.; Koltick, D.; Kostritskiy, A. V.; Kotcher, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozlovsky, E. A.; Krane, J.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kuleshov, S.; Kulik, Y.; Kunori, S.; Landry, F.; Landsberg, G.; Lauer, B.; Leflat, A.; Li, J.; Li, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G.; Lincoln, D.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipton, R.; Lobkowicz, F.; Lucotte, A.; Lueking, L.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K.; Madaras, R. J.; Madden, R.; Magaña-Mendoza, L.; Manankov, V.; Mani, S.; Mao, H. S.; Markeloff, R.; Marshall, T.; Martin, M. I.; Mauritz, K. M.; May, B.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCarthy, R.; McDonald, J.; McKibben, T.; McKinley, J.; McMahon, T.; Melanson, H. L.; Merkin, M.; Merritt, K. W.; Miao, C.; Miettinen, H.; Mincer, A.; Mishra, C. S.; Mokhov, N.; Moromisato, J.; Mondal, N. K.; Montgomery, H. E.; Mooney, P.; Mostafa, M.; da Motta, H.; Murphy, C.; Nang, F.; Narain, M.; Narasimham, V. S.; Narayanan, A.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Nemethy, P.; Norman, D.; Oesch, L.; Oguri, V.; Oshima, N.; Owen, D.; Padley, P.; Para, A.; Parashar, N.; Park, Y. M.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Paterno, M.; Pawlik, B.; Perkins, J.; Peters, M.; Piegaia, R.; Piekarz, H.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Pope, B. G.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quintas, P. Z.; Raja, R.; Rajagopalan, S.; Ramirez, O.; Reucroft, S.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rockwell, T.; Roco, M.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Rutherfoord, J.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Santoro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schellman, H.; Sculli, J.; Shabalina, E.; Shaffer, C.; Shankar, H. C.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shpakov, D.; Shupe, M.; Singh, H.; Singh, J. B.; Sirotenko, V.; Smith, E.; Smith, R. P.; Snihur, R.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Solomon, J.; Sosebee, M.; Sotnikova, N.; Souza, M.; Steinbrück, G.; Stephens, R. W.; Stevenson, M. L.; Stewart, D.; Stichelbaut, F.; Stoker, D.; Stolin, V.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Streets, K.; Strovink, M.; Sznajder, A.; Tamburello, P.; Tarazi, J.; Tartaglia, M.; Thomas, T. L.; Thompson, J.; Trippe, T. G.; Tuts, P. M.; Vaniev, V.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Volkov, A. A.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, G.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weerts, H.; White, A.; White, J. T.; Wightman, J. A.; Willis, S.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wirjawan, J. V.; Womersley, J.; Won, E.; Wood, D. R.; Wu, Z.; Yamada, R.; Yamin, P.; Yasuda, T.; Yepes, P.; Yip, K.; Yoshikawa, C.

    1999-09-01

    We present a measurement of tt¯ production in pp¯ collisions at s = 1.8 TeV from 110 pb-1 of data collected in the all-jets decay channel with the D0 detector at Fermilab. A neural network analysis yields a cross section of 7.1+/-2.8\\(stat\\)+/-1.5\\(syst\\) pb at a top quark mass \\(mt\\) of 172.1 GeV/c2. Using previous D0 measurements from dilepton and single lepton channels, the combined D0 result for the tt¯ production cross section is 5.9+/-1.2\\(stat\\)+/-1.1\\(syst\\) pb for mt = 172.1 GeV/c2.

  13. Absolute measurements of electron capture cross sections of C3+ from atomic and molecular hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sant'Anna, M. M.; Melo, W. S.; Santos, A. C. F.; Shah, M. B.; Sigaud, G. M.; Montenegro, E. C.

    2000-02-01

    Absolute measurements of single- and double-electron-capture cross sections by C3+ projectiles on atomic and molecular hydrogen targets were performed for projectile energies between 1.0 and 3.5 MeV for the single- and 1.0 and 2.0 MeV for the double-capture processes. The icons/Journals/Common/sigma" ALT="sigma" ALIGN="TOP"/> H /icons/Journals/Common/sigma" ALT="sigma" ALIGN="TOP"/> H2 cross section ratios were measured using an absolutely calibrated tungsten-tube furnace for the production of atomic hydrogen. The single-capture data are compared with calculations based on the boundary-corrected first Born approximation, the eikonal approximation and a semiclassical model, presenting a good overall agreement. Calculations for the double capture using an analytical expression, obtained within the independent electron approximation and based on the same semiclassical model, give a reasonable qualitative description of the data.

  14. A time projection chamber for high accuracy and precision fission cross-section measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heffner, M.; Asner, D. M.; Baker, R. G.; Baker, J.; Barrett, S.; Brune, C.; Bundgaard, J.; Burgett, E.; Carter, D.; Cunningham, M.; Deaven, J.; Duke, D. L.; Greife, U.; Grimes, S.; Hager, U.; Hertel, N.; Hill, T.; Isenhower, D.; Jewell, K.; King, J.; Klay, J. L.; Kleinrath, V.; Kornilov, N.; Kudo, R.; Laptev, A. B.; Leonard, M.; Loveland, W.; Massey, T. N.; McGrath, C.; Meharchand, R.; Montoya, L.; Pickle, N.; Qu, H.; Riot, V.; Ruz, J.; Sangiorgio, S.; Seilhan, B.; Sharma, S.; Snyder, L.; Stave, S.; Tatishvili, G.; Thornton, R. T.; Tovesson, F.; Towell, D.; Towell, R. S.; Watson, S.; Wendt, B.; Wood, L.; Yao, L.

    2014-09-01

    The fission Time Projection Chamber (fissionTPC) is a compact (15 cm diameter) two-chamber MICROMEGAS TPC designed to make precision cross-section measurements of neutron-induced fission. The actinide targets are placed on the central cathode and irradiated with a neutron beam that passes axially through the TPC inducing fission in the target. The 4π acceptance for fission fragments and complete charged particle track reconstruction are powerful features of the fissionTPC which will be used to measure fission cross-sections and examine the associated systematic errors. This paper provides a detailed description of the design requirements, the design solutions, and the initial performance of the fissionTPC.

  15. Measurement of the production cross-section in proton-proton collisions via the decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Beteta, C. Abellán; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Busetto, G.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elena, E.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H.-M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, RF; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gavrilov, G.; Geraci, A.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez-March, N.; Lowdon, P.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Sánchez, A. Martín; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Moggi, N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A.-B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, K.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, G.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Alvarez, A. Pazos; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Trigo, E. Perez; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pescatore, L.; Pesen, E.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrie, M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Seco, M.; Semennikov, A.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; De Paula, B. Souza; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Subbiah, V. K.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szilard, D.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ubeda Garcia, M.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; Voss, H.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilschut, H. W.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zvyagin, A.

    2015-07-01

    The production of the state in proton-proton collisions is probed via its decay to the final state with the LHCb detector, in the rapidity range and in the meson transverse-momentum range . The cross-section for prompt production of mesons relative to the prompt cross-section is measured, for the first time, to be at a centre-of-mass energy using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 0.7 fb, and at using 2.0 fb. The uncertainties quoted are, in order, statistical, systematic, and that on the ratio of branching fractions of the and decays to the final state. In addition, the inclusive branching fraction of -hadron decays into mesons is measured, for the first time, to be , where the third uncertainty includes also the uncertainty on the inclusive branching fraction from -hadron decays. The difference between the and meson masses is determined to be.

  16. Towards the measurement of the13C(d, p)14C cross section using AMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murillo-Morales, S.; Barrón-Palos, L.; Chávez, E.; Araujo-Escalona, V.

    2017-07-01

    A plan to study the total cross section for the13C(d, p)14C nuclear reaction has been developed for energies in the center-of-mass frame between 133 and 400 keV. The proposed experiment will use a deuterium beam (1-3 MeV of energy) from the Instituto de Física-UNAM 5.5 MV Van de Graaff accelerator and the produced14C will be afterwards measured by AMS technique in the LEMA-UNAM (HVEE 1 MV Tandetron). One of the main goals is to study the performance of the LEMA-UNAM facility in the cross section measurement in comparison with other data reported in the literature, measured by other techniques. In this work we present the current status of these studies. The relevance of the13C(d, p)14C reaction in the study of compound nucleus formation as well as in some astrophysics scenarios, and the importance of the development of the AMS technique to measure cross sections of nuclear reactions of astrophysical interest in Mixico are also discussed.

  17. Non-invasive measurement of long bone cross-sectional moment of inertia by photon absorptiometry.

    PubMed

    Martin, R B; Burr, D B

    1984-01-01

    The use of the Norland-Cameron Bone Mineral Analyzer (BMA) to measure the cross-sectional moment of inertia of the mineral in a long bone is described and data regarding the usefulness and precision of the method are presented. The correlation coefficients between BMA-measured CSMI and that obtained from cross-sectional geometry were 0.99 both for a series of aluminum tubes and five bones of different sizes. The BMA-measured CSMI was linearly correlated with the CSMI digitized from cross-sections of a series of human ulnas at the r = 0.92 and 0.95 level in the AP and ML directions, respectively. The BMA-measured CSMI also correlated well with the torsional and bending behavior of ulnar specimens. Finally, a method for estimation the CSMI of a long bone section from BMA readings of mineral content and bone width is described. A linear correlation of r = 0.98 with the CSMI digitized from sections of human radii is demonstrated.

  18. Cross section measurements for quasi-elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering with the MINOS near detector

    SciTech Connect

    Dorman, Mark Edward

    2008-04-01

    The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) is a long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment based at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) in Chicago, Illinois. MINOS measures neutrino interactions in two large iron-scintillator tracking/sampling calorimeters; the Near Detector on-site at FNAL and the Far Detector located in the Soudan mine in northern Minnesota. The Near Detector has recorded a large number of neutrino interactions and this high statistics dataset can be used to make precision measurements of neutrino interaction cross sections. The cross section for charged-current quasi-elastic scattering has been measured by a number of previous experiments and these measurements disagree by up to 30%. A method to select a quasi-elastic enriched sample of neutrino interactions in the MINOS Near Detector is presented and a procedure to fit the kinematic distributions of this sample and extract the quasi-elastic cross section is introduced. The accuracy and robustness of the fitting procedure is studied using mock data and finally results from fits to the MINOS Near Detector data are presented.

  19. Measurement of the Y87(n,g) cross section using surrogate reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, J. T.; Casperson, R. J.; Scielzo, N. D.; Escher, J. E.; Ressler, J. J.; Thompson, I. J.; Hughes, R. O.; Austin, R. A. E.; Benstead, J.; Tostevin, J. A.; McCleskey, M.; Saastomoinen, A.; Bromeit, A.; Maguire, M.; Foley, N.; Starke, A.; Salzillo, T.; Devan, M.; Ross, T.

    2013-10-01

    The direct reaction Y89(p,dg)Y88* was used as a surrogate reaction for Y87(n,g). A 28.5 MeV beam of protons induced reactions on Y89, Zr90, Zr91, Zr92, Zr94, Zr96 targets. The (p,d) and (p,t) reactions on these targets were measured using the STARLiTe array at the Texas A&M Cyclotron Institute. Particle singles events were measured for each target over an angle range of 32 to 60 degrees w.r.t. the beam. Gamma rays in coincidence with the particles were measured using 5 HPGe clover detectors. The results of the (p,t) particle angular distributions were compared to direct reaction theory to determine the spin imparted to the excited nucleus. The surrogate cross section of the Zr nuclei are compared to the known Zr(n,g) cross sections. Progress on the surrogate Y87(n,g) cross section measurement will be presented. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52- 07NA27344.

  20. Beauty production cross section measurements at E(cm) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect

    D'Onofrio, Monica; /Geneva U.

    2005-05-01

    The RunII physics program at the Tevatron started in spring 2001 with protons and antiprotons colliding at an energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, and it is carrying on with more than 500 pb{sup -1} of data as collected by both the CDF and D0 experiments. Recent results on beauty production cross section measurements are here reported.

  1. High resolution measurement of neutron inelastic scattering cross-sections for 23Na

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouki, C.; Archier, P.; Borcea, C.; De Saint Jean, C.; Drohé, J. C.; Kopecky, S.; Moens, A.; Nankov, N.; Negret, A.; Noguère, G.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Stanoiu, M.

    2012-04-01

    The neutron inelastic scattering cross-section of 23Na has been measured in response to the relevant request of the OECD-NEA High Priority Request List, which requires a target uncertainty of 4% in the energy range up to 1.35 MeV for the development of sodium-cooled fast reactors. The measurement was performed at the GELINA facility with the Gamma Array for Inelastic Neutron Scattering (GAINS), featuring eight high purity germanium detectors. The setup is installed at a 200 m flight path from the neutron source and provides high resolution measurements using the (n,n'γ)-technique. The sample was an 80 mm diameter metallic sodium disk prepared at IRMM. Transitions up to the seventh excited state were observed and the differential gamma cross-sections at 110° and 150° were measured, showing mostly isotropic gamma emission. From these the gamma production, level and inelastic cross-sections were determined for neutron energies up to 3838.9 keV. The results agree well with the existing data and the evaluated nuclear data libraries in the low energies, and provide new experimental points in the little studied region above 2 MeV. Following a detailed review of the methodology used for the gamma efficiency calibrations and flux normalization of GAINS data, an estimated total uncertainty of 2.2% was achieved for the inelastic cross-section integrals over the energy ranges 0.498-1.35 MeV and 1.35-2.23 MeV, meeting the required targets.

  2. Measuring the Cross-Section of Charged-Current Neutrino Interactions in Sodium Iodide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Benjamin; Coherent Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    An array of twenty-four 7.7 kg sodium iodide (NaI[Tl]) scintillating detectors has been deployed to the basement of the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in order to observe and measure the cross-section of charged-current neutrino interactions on 127I. Preliminary results and testing of these detectors will be presented herein. In addition, potential applications for observing coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CEvNS) will be discussed.

  3. Measurement of the Neutrino Neutral-Current Elastic Differential Cross Section

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A.A.; Anderson, C.E.; Bazarko, A.O.; Brice, S.J.; Brown, B.C.; Bugel, L.; Cao, J.; Coney, L.; Conrad, J.M.; Cox, D.C.; Curioni, A.; /Yale U. /Argonne

    2010-07-01

    We report a measurement of the flux-averaged neutral-current elastic differential cross section for neutrinos scattering on mineral oil (CH{sub 2}) as a function of four-momentum transferred squared, Q{sup 2}. It is obtained by measuring the kinematics of recoiling nucleons with kinetic energy greater than 50 MeV which are readily detected in MiniBooNE. This differential cross-section distribution is fit with fixed nucleon form factors apart from an axial mass, M{sub A}, that provides a best fit for M{sub A} = 1.39 {+-} 0.11 GeV. Using the data from the charged-current neutrino interaction sample, a ratio of neutral-current to charged-current quasi-elastic cross sections as a function of Q{sup 2} has been measured. Additionally, single protons with kinetic energies above 350 MeV can be distinguished from neutrons and multiple nucleon events. Using this marker, the strange quark contribution to the neutral-current axial vector form factor at Q{sup 2} = 0, {Delta}s, is found to be {Delta}s = 0.08{+-} 0.26.

  4. Measurement of dijet cross sections with a leading neutron in photoproduction at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khakzad, Mohsen

    Differential cross sections for the reaction e +p --> e+ + 2 jet + n + X in the photoproduction regime (the virtuality of the exchanged photon in the range Q 2 < 4 GeV2, and the fraction y of the positron's energy carried by the exchanged photon in the range 0.2 < y < 0.8) have been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA at a centre-of-mass energy of s = 300 GeV, using an integrated luminosity of 6.4 pb-1 . Cross sections are given for jet transverse energies EjetT > 6 GeV, neutron energy En > 400 GeV, and neutron scattering angle θ < 0.8 mrad. We have measured the fraction of all events with two jets (dijet events) which contain a leading neutron in the final state. The predictions of the One-Pion-Exchange model, describing the ep --> enX interaction through the exchange of a pion, are found to be in reasonable agreement with the measurements presented here; namely, the dijet differential cross section as a function of the jet transverse energies, the jet pseudorapidities, and the fraction of the momentum carried by the pion participating in the production of the dijet system.

  5. High-resolution photoabsorption cross section measurements of sulfur dioxide between 198 nm and 325 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Glenn; Smith, Peter; Blackie, Douglas; Blackwell-Whitehead, Richard; Pickering, Juliet; Rufus, James; Thorne, Anne

    Accurate photoabsorption cross section data at a range of temperatures are required for the incorporation of sulfur dioxide into atmospheric photochemical models. In addition to its role in the terrestrial atmosphere, sulfur dioxide is observed in significant concentrations in the atmospheres of Venus and Io. Our laboratory measurement program focuses on the very congested SO2 spectrum in the ultraviolet. Using the Imperial College UV Fourier transform spectrometer, we have recorded high-resolution (resolving power (λ/∆λ) = 450,000) absorption spectra in the 198 to 325 nm region over a range of temperatures from 160 K to 295 K. This high resolving power allows resolutions approaching those required to fully resolve the Doppler profile of SO2 in the UV. We have reported absolute photoabsorption cross sections at 295 K [Stark et al., JGR Planets 104, 16585 (1999); Rufus et al. JGR Planets 108, doi:10.1029/2002JE001931,(2003)]. Further measurements, at 160 K in the 198 to 200 nm region and at 195 K in the 220 to 325 nm region, have been recorded and analyzed. We present an overview of our new measured cross sections at temperatures and pressures comparable to those found in planetary atmospheres. This work was supported in part by NASA Grant NNG05GA03G, PPARC (UK), and the Leverhulme Trust.

  6. Measurement of neutrino induced charged current neutral pion production cross section at SciBooNE

    SciTech Connect

    Catala-Perez, Juan

    2014-01-01

    SciBooNE is a neutrino scattering experiment located in the Booster Neutrino Beam at Fermilab. It collected data from June 2007 to August 2008 to accurately measure muon neutrino and anti-neutrino cross sections on carbon around 1 GeV neutrino energy. In this thesis we present the results on the measurement of the muon neutrino cross section resulting in a μ- plus a single π0 final state (CC- π0 channel). The present work will show the steps taken to achieve this result: from the reconstruction improvements to the background extraction. The flux-averaged CC - π0 production cross section measurement obtained in this thesis < σCC- π0 > Φ = (5.6 ± 1.9fit ± 0.7beam ± 0.5int - 0.7det) × 10-40 cm2/N at an average energy of 0.89 GeV is found to agree well both with the expectation from the Monte Ca

  7. Cross-section measurements of neutron threshold reactions in various materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrzalová, J.; Svoboda, O.; Kugler, A.; Suchopár, M.; Wagner, V.

    As members of international collaboration "Energy and Transmutation of radioactive Waste" we routinely use (n,xn) threshold reactions in various materials to measure high energy neutron flux from spallation reactions. The cross-sections of many reactions important for our activation detectors are missing. To improve situation, we studied the neutron cross-sections using different quasi-monoenergetic neutron sources based on proton reaction on 7Li target. The measurements were performed in Nuclear Physics Institute of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic in Řež near Prague and in The Svedberg Laboratory in Uppsala (Sweden). We used neutron energies 17, 22, 30 and 35 MeV from the quasi-monoenergetic neutron source in Řež and neutron energies 22, 47 and 94 MeV in Uppsala. The last experiment was carried out in February 2010 in Uppsala using neutron energies 59, 66, 72 and 89 MeV. The study of neutron threshold reactions in yttrium was performed first time during this irradiation. We have developed procedure for the subtraction of contribution of the background neutrons. We studied various materials in the form of thin foils and observed good agreement with the data in EXFOR database and also with the calculations performed in deterministic code TALYS. Many cross-sections were measured in the energy regions where no experimental data are available so far.

  8. Measurement of the High Energy Neutrino-Nucleon Cross Section with IceCube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yiqian; Kiryluk, Joanna; IceCube Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    IceCube is a 1km3 neutrino detector located at the South Pole. It detects all-sky neutrinos of all flavors. IceCube has measured atmospheric muon and electron neutrino fluxes, and has recently discovered a flux of high energy extraterrestrial diffuse neutrinos. We present a novel analysis method and performance studies to determine the neutrino-nucleon cross section at high energies. It uses atmospheric and extraterrestrial neutrino-induced electromagnetic and hadronic showers (cascades) in the TeV-PeV energy range. In this method, uncertainties associated with the flux are canceled by using the ratio of yields from the Southern and Northern hemispheres in the Sky. At the energies in this study, the yields are sensitive to the deep-inelastic scattering cross-section and nucleon structure in a region of kinematic overlap with HERA and with the LHC. Their actual measurement forms a valuable proof-of-concept towards future measurements in the Extremely-High-Energy regime, which will provide sensitivity to new physics with unique neutrino probes. We have performed and will present an initial sensitivity study for determining the cross section from 5 years of data with the complete IceCube detector, as well as for the proposed IceCube-Gen2 high-energy extension. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation Grant No. 1205796.

  9. Neutron capture cross section measurements for 238U in the resonance region at GELINA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H. I.; Paradela, C.; Sirakov, I.; Becker, B.; Capote, R.; Gunsing, F.; Kim, G. N.; Kopecky, S.; Lampoudis, C.; Lee, Y.-O.; Massarczyk, R.; Moens, A.; Moxon, M.; Pronyaev, V. G.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Wynants, R.

    2016-06-01

    Measurements were performed at the time-of-flight facility GELINA to determine the 238U(n, γ) cross section in the resonance region. Experiments were carried out at a 12.5 and 60m measurement station. The total energy detection principle in combination with the pulse height weighting technique was applied using C6D6 liquid scintillators as prompt γ-ray detectors. The energy dependence of the neutron flux was measured with ionisation chambers based on the 10B(n, α) reaction. The data were normalised to the isolated and saturated 238U resonance at 6.67 eV. Special procedures were applied to reduce bias effects due to the weighting function, normalization, dead time and background corrections, and corrections related to the sample properties. The total uncertainty due to the weighting function, normalization, neutron flux and sample characteristics is about 1.5%. Resonance parameters were derived from a simultaneous resonance shape analysis of the GELINA capture data and transmission data obtained previously at a 42m and 150m station of ORELA. The parameters of resonances below 500 eV are in good agreement with those resulting from an evaluation that was adopted in the main data libraries. Between 500 eV and 1200 eV a systematic difference in the neutron width is observed. Average capture cross section data were derived from the experimental capture yield in the energy region between 3.5 keV and 90 keV. The results are in good agreement with an evaluated cross section resulting from a least squares fit to experimental data available in the literature prior to this work. The average cross section data derived in this work were parameterised in terms of average resonance parameters and included in a least squares analysis together with other experimental data reported in the literature.

  10. Cross-sectional profiles and volume reconstructions of soft tissues using laser beam measurements.

    PubMed

    Langelier, Eve; Dupuis, Daniel; Guillot, Michel; Goulet, Francine; Rancourt, Denis

    2004-12-01

    Precise geometric reconstruction is a valuable tool in the study of soft tissues biomechanics. Optical methods have been developed to determine the tissue cross section without mechanical contact with the specimen. An adaptation of the laser micrometer developed by Lee and Woo [ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 110 (2), pp. 110-114]. is proposed in which the laser-collimated beam rotates around and moves along a fixed specimen to reconstruct its cross sections and volume. Beam motion is computer controlled to accelerate data acquisition and improve beam positioning accuracy. It minimizes time-dependent shape modifications and increases global reconstruction precision. The technique is also competent for the measurement of immersed collagen matrices.

  11. Measurements of the tt-bar Cross Section at D0 and Interpretations

    SciTech Connect

    Lacroix, F.

    2010-02-10

    We present measurements of the tt-bar production cross in pp-bar collisions at a center of mass energy of sq root(s) = 1.96 TeV using dilepton, hadronic tau, lepton+jets and all hadronic events depending on the decay products of the W bosons from the top decays with data collected by the D0 detector We use the ratios of tt-bar cross sections in different final states to set upper limits on the branching fractions B(t->H{sup +}b->taunu b))<15% and B(t->H{sup +}b->cs-bar b))<57% for low charged-Higgs masses. Finally, based on predictions from higher order quantum chromodynamics, we extract a mass for the top quark from the combined tt-bar cross section.

  12. Measurement of the absolute differential cross section of proton–proton elastic scattering at small angles

    SciTech Connect

    Mchedlishvili, D.; Chiladze, D.; Dymov, S.; Bagdasarian, Z.; Barsov, S.; Gebel, R.; Gou, B.; Hartmann, M.; Kacharava, A.; Keshelashvili, I.; Khoukaz, A.; Kulessa, P.; Kulikov, A.; Lehrach, A.; Lomidze, N.; Lorentz, B.; Maier, R.; Macharashvili, G.; Merzliakov, S.; Mikirtychyants, S.; Nioradze, M.; Ohm, H.; Prasuhn, D.; Rathmann, F.; Serdyuk, V.; Schroer, D.; Shmakova, V.; Stassen, R.; Stein, H. J.; Stockhorst, H.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Stroher, H.; Tabidze, M.; Taschner, A.; Trusov, S.; Tsirkov, D.; Uzikov, Yu.; Valdau, Yu.; Wilkin, C.; Workman, R. L.; Wustner, P.

    2016-02-03

    The differential cross section for proton-proton elastic scattering has been measured at a beam kinetic energy of 1.0 GeV and in 200 MeV steps from 1.6 to 2.8 GeV for centre-of-mass angles in the range from 12°-16° to 25°-30°, depending on the energy. A precision in the overall normalisation of typically 3% was achieved by studying the energy losses of the circulating beam of the COSY storage ring as it passed repeatedly through the windowless hydrogen target of the ANKE magnetic spectrometer. It is shown that the data have a significant impact upon the results of a partial wave analysis. Furthermore, after extrapolating the differential cross sections to the forward direction, the results are broadly compatible with the predictions of forward dispersion relations.

  13. Measurement of {sup 238}Np fission cross-section by neutrons near thermal point (preliminary results)

    SciTech Connect

    Abramo; vich, S.N.; Andreev, M.F.; Bol`shakov, Y.M.

    1995-10-01

    Measurements have been carried out of {sup 238}Np fission cross-section by thermal neutrons. The isotope {sup 238}Np was built up through the reaction {sup 238}U(p,n) on an electrostatic accelerator. Extraction and cleaning of the sample were done by ion-exchange chromatography. Fast neutrons were generated on the electrostatic accelerator through the reaction {sup 9}Be(d,n); a polyethylene block was used to slow down neutrons. Registration of fission fragments was performed with dielectric track detectors. Suggesting that the behavior of {sup 238}Np and {sup 238}U. Westscott`s factors are indentical the fission cross-section of {sup 238}Np was obtained: {sigma}{sub fo}=2110 {plus_minus} 75 barn.

  14. Measurement of the absolute differential cross section of proton–proton elastic scattering at small angles

    DOE PAGES

    Mchedlishvili, D.; Chiladze, D.; Dymov, S.; ...

    2016-02-03

    The differential cross section for proton-proton elastic scattering has been measured at a beam kinetic energy of 1.0 GeV and in 200 MeV steps from 1.6 to 2.8 GeV for centre-of-mass angles in the range from 12°-16° to 25°-30°, depending on the energy. A precision in the overall normalisation of typically 3% was achieved by studying the energy losses of the circulating beam of the COSY storage ring as it passed repeatedly through the windowless hydrogen target of the ANKE magnetic spectrometer. It is shown that the data have a significant impact upon the results of a partial wave analysis.more » Furthermore, after extrapolating the differential cross sections to the forward direction, the results are broadly compatible with the predictions of forward dispersion relations.« less

  15. Energy-dependent excitation cross section measurements of the diagnostic lines of Fe XVII

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G V; Beiersdorfer, P; Chen, H; Scofield, J H; Boyce, K R; Kelley, R L; Kilbourne, C A; Porter, F S; Kahn, S M; Szymkowiak, A E

    2005-01-24

    By implementing a large-area, gain-stabilized microcalorimeter array on an electron beam ion trap, the electron-impact excitation cross sections for the dominant x-ray lines in the Fe XVII spectrum have been measured as a function of electron energy up to greater than three times the threshold energy, establishing a benchmark for atomic calculations. The results reveal a consistent overestimation by recent calculations of the excitation cross section of the resonance transition, which is shown to be at the root of several long-standing problems associated with modeling solar and astrophysical Fe XVII spectra. The data do not show strong contributions from resonance excitation contrary to recent statements in the literature.

  16. Measurement of photoionization cross sections of the excited states of titanium, cobalt, and nickel

    SciTech Connect

    Cong Ran; Cheng Yi; Yang Jiajun; Fan Jianmei; Yao Guanxin; Ji Xuehan; Zheng Xianfeng; Cui Zhifeng

    2009-07-01

    Resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) of Ti, Co, and Ni atoms has been investigated in the 285-320 nm region. We couple a laser-ablated metal target into a molecular beam to produce atoms. Ions produced from photoionization of the neutral atoms are monitored by a home-built time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Photoionization cross sections of the excited states of Ti, Co, and Ni were deduced from the dependence of the ion signal intensity on the laser intensity for photon energies close to the ionization threshold. The values obtained range from 0.2 to 6.0 Mb. No significant isotope dependence was found from measurements of the photoionization cross sections of {sup 46}Ti, {sup 47}Ti, {sup 48}Ti, {sup 58}Ni, and {sup 60}Ni.

  17. Combination of CDF and D0 Measurements of the Single Top Production Cross Section

    SciTech Connect

    Group, Tevatron Electroweak Working; Collaboration, for the CDF; Collaboration, the D0

    2009-08-01

    We report a combination of the CDF and D0 measurements of the inclusive single top quark production cross section in the s- and t-channels, {sigma}{sub s+t}, in p{bar p} collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The total integrated luminosity included in CDF's analysis is 3.2 fb{sup -1} and D0's analysis has 2.3 fb{sup -1}. A Bayesian analysis is used to extract the cross section from the distributions of multivariate discriminants provided by the collaborations. For a top quark mass m{sub t} = 170 GeV/c{sup 2}, we measure a cross section of 2.76{sub -0.47}{sup +0.58} pb. We extract the CKM matrix element |V{sub tb}| = 0.88 {+-} 0.07 with a 95% C.L. lower limit of |V{sub tb}| > 0.77.

  18. Cavity-enhanced measurements of hydrogen peroxide absorption cross sections from 353 to 410 nm.

    PubMed

    Kahan, Tara F; Washenfelder, Rebecca A; Vaida, Veronica; Brown, Steven S

    2012-06-21

    We report near-ultraviolet and visible absorption cross sections of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) using incoherent broad-band cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (IBBCEAS), a recently developed, high-sensitivity technique. The measurements reported here span the range of 353-410 nm and extend published electronic absorption cross sections by 60 nm to absorption cross sections below 1 × 10(-23) cm(2) molecule(-1). We have calculated photolysis rate constants for H(2)O(2) in the lower troposphere at a range of solar zenith angles by combining the new measurements with previously reported data at wavelengths shorter than 350 nm. We predict that photolysis at wavelengths longer than those included in the current JPL recommendation may account for up to 28% of the total hydroxyl radical (OH) production from H(2)O(2) photolysis under some conditions. Loss of H(2)O(2) via photolysis may be of the same order of magnitude as reaction with OH and dry deposition in the lower atmosphere; these processes have very different impacts on HO(x) loss and regeneration.

  19. Fission, total and neutron capture cross section measurements at ORELA for {sup 233}U, {sup 27}Al and natural chlorine

    SciTech Connect

    Guber, K.H.; Spencer, R.R.; Leal, L.C.; Larson, D.C.; Santos, G. Dos; Harvey, J.A.; Hill, N.W.

    1998-08-01

    The authors have made use of the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) to measure the fission cross section of {sup 233}U in the neutron energy range of 0.36 eV to {approximately} 700 keV. This paper reports integral data and average cross sections. In addition they measured the total neutron cross section of {sup 27}Al and natural chlorine, as well as the capture cross section of Al over an energy range from 100 eV up to about 400 keV.

  20. Absolute photo-destruction and photo-fragmentation cross section measurements using an electrostatic ion beam trap.

    PubMed

    Aviv, O; Kafle, B; Chandrasekaran, V; Heber, O; Rappaport, M L; Rubinstein, H; Schwalm, D; Strasser, D; Toker, Y; Zajfman, D

    2013-05-01

    We describe a technique to measure absolute photo-induced cross sections for cluster anions stored in an electrostatic ion beam trap (EIBT) with a central deflector. The setup allows determination of total photo-destruction cross sections as well as partial cross sections for fragmentation and electron detachment. The unique properties of this special EIBT setup are investigated and illustrated using small Al(n)(-) clusters.

  1. Nuclear astrophysics from neutron cross-section measurements on radiactive samples

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, P.E.; O'Brien, H.A.

    1988-01-01

    Reaction rates for both big-bang and stellar nucleosynthesis calculations can be obtained from the measurement of (n,p) (n, ..cap alpha..) and (n,..gamma..) cross sections for radioactive nuclei. In the past, large backgrounds associated with the sample activity limited these types of measurements to radioisotopes with very long half lives. The advent of the high-intensity neutron source at the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering CEnter (LANSCE) has greatly increased the number of nuclei which can be studied. Results of recent measurements on samples with half lives as short as fifty-three days are given. Plans for future measurements are discussed. 32 refs., 3 figs.

  2. Measurements of proton-induced production cross sections for Cl-36 from Ca and K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imamura, M.; Shibata, S.; Nishiizumi, K.; Caffee, M. W.

    1998-01-01

    Production cross sections for Cl-36 (half-life= 3.01 x 10(exp 5) y) have been measured for the nat.K(p,x), 39 K(p,x), nat.Ca(p,x) and Ca-40(p,x) reactions up to 40 MeV. The results of nat.Ca(p,x) reaction are generally consistent with measurements performed at somewhat higher energies. With the completion of these measurements it is now possible to proceed with model calculations of the solar cosmic ray (SCR) flux over the last 400 ky based on measurements of lunar surface materials.

  3. Measurement of Neutron Total Cross Sections in Support of the APT Program

    SciTech Connect

    Abfalterer, W.P.; Haight, R.C.; Morgan, G.L.; Bateman, F.B.; Dietrich, F.S.; Finlay, R.W.

    1998-11-04

    The authors have completed a new set of total cross section measurements of 37 samples spanning the periodic table. The authors employed the same technique as in a previous measurement, with refinements intended to allow measurements on separated isotopes, and with improved systematic error control. The goal of the new measurement was 1% statistical accuracy in 1% energy bins with systematic errors less than 1%. This was achieved for all but the smallest samples, for which the statistical accuracy was as large as 2% in 1% bins.

  4. Measurement of Neutrino Induced Exclusive Quasi-Elastic Cross Section in NOMAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae

    2007-04-01

    The measurement of neutrino induced charged current Quasi-Elastic (QE) cross section using the NOMAD data will be presented. The signature of the νμ QE interaction is an outgoing -circ and a proton. I developed a likelihood probability density function to separate QE from background - two track resonance and deep inelastic scattering events. Data themselves were used to help constrain the background estimate. By kinematic comparison to the measured QE data, the axial mass was also measured. This preliminary result is among the most precise measurements of the QE process.

  5. Cross-section activation measurement for U-238 through protons and deuterons in energy interval 10-14 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Guzhovskii, B.Y.; Abramovich, S.N.; Zvenigorodskii, A.G.

    1995-10-01

    There were presented results of cross-section measurements for nuclear reactions {sup 238}U(p,n){sup 238}Np, {sup 238}U(d,2n){sup 238}Np, {sup 238}U(d,t){sup 237}U, {sup 238}U(d,p){sup 239}U, and {sup 238}U(d,n){sup 239}Np. Interval of projectile energy was 10-14 MeV. For measurements of cross-sections it was used the activatio methods. The registration of {beta}- and {gamma}-activity was made with using of plastic scintillation detector and Ge(Li)-detector.

  6. Measurement of the Muon Neutrino Inclusive Charged Current Cross Section on Iron using the MINOS Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Loiacono, Laura Jean

    2010-05-01

    The Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) facility at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) produces an intense muon neutrino beam used by the Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS), a neutrino oscillation experiment, and the Main INjector ExpeRiment v-A, (MINERv A), a neutrino interaction experiment. Absolute neutrino cross sections are determined via σv = N vv , where the numerator is the measured number of neutrino interactions in the MINOS Detector and the denominator is the flux of incident neutrinos. Many past neutrino experiments have measured relative cross sections due to a lack of precise measurements of the incident neutrino flux, normalizing to better established reaction processes, such as quasielastic neutrino-nucleon scattering. But recent measurements of neutrino interactions on nuclear targets have brought to light questions about our understanding of nuclear effects in neutrino interactions. In this thesis the vμ inclusive charged current cross section on iron is measured using the MINOS Detector. The MINOS detector consists of alternating planes of steel and scintillator. The MINOS detector is optimized to measure muons produced in charged current vμ interactions. Along with muons, these interactions produce hadronic showers. The neutrino energy is measured from the total energy the particles deposit in the detector. The incident neutrino flux is measured using the muons produced alongside the neutrinos in meson decay. Three ionization chamber monitors located in the downstream portion of the NuMI beamline are used to measure the muon flux and thereby infer the neutrino flux by relation to the underlying pion and kaon meson flux. This thesis describes the muon flux instrumentation in the NuMI beam, its operation over the two year duration of this measurement, and the techniques used to derive the neutrino flux.

  7. Differential cross section measurements for γn→π-p above the first nucleon resonance region

    DOE PAGES

    Mattione, P. T.; Carman, D. S.; Strakovsky, I. I.; ...

    2017-09-01

    The quasi-freemore » $$\\gamma d\\to\\pi^{-}p(p)$$ differential cross section has been measured with CLAS at photon beam energies $$E_\\gamma$$ from 0.445 GeV to 2.510 GeV (corresponding to $W$ from 1.311 GeV to 2.366 GeV) for pion center-of-mass angles $$\\cos\\theta_\\pi^{c.m.}$$ from -0.72 to 0.92. A correction for final state interactions has been applied to this data to extract the $$\\gamma n\\to\\pi^-p$$ differential cross sections. These cross sections are quoted in 8428 $$(E_\\gamma,\\cos\\theta_\\pi^{c.m.})$$ bins, a factor of nearly three increase in the world statistics for this channel in this kinematic range. Lastly, these new data help to constrain coupled-channel analysis fits used to disentangle the spectrum of $N^*$ resonances and extract their properties. Selected photon decay amplitudes $$N^* \\to \\gamma n$$ at the resonance poles are determined for the first time and are reported here.« less

  8. Radiolysis of astrophysical ices by heavy ion irradiation: Destruction cross section measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Barros, A. L. F.; Boduch, P.; Domaracka, A.; Rothard, H.; da Silveira, E. F.

    2012-08-01

    Many solar system objects, such as planets and their satellites, dust grains in rings, and comets, are known to either be made of ices or to have icy surfaces. These ices are exposed to ionizing radiation including keV, MeV and GeV ions from solar wind or cosmic rays. Moreover, icy dust grains are present in interstellar space and, in particular, in dense molecular clouds. Radiation effects include radiolysis (the destruction of molecules leading to formation of radicals), the formation of new molecules following radiolysis, the desorption or sputtering of atoms or molecules from the surface, compaction of porous ices, and phase changes. This review discusses the application of infrared spectroscopy FTIR to study the evolution of the chemical composition of ices containing the most abundant molecular species found in the solar system and interstellar medium, such as H2O, CO, CO2 and hydrocarbons. We focus on the evolution of chemical composition with ion fluence in order to deduce the corresponding destruction and formation cross sections. Although initial approach focused on product identification, it became increasingly necessary to work toward a comprehensive understanding of ice chemistry. The abundances of these molecules in different phases of ice mantles provide important clues to the chemical processes in dense interstellar clouds, and therefore it is of importance to accurately measure the quantities such as dissociation and formation cross sections of the infrared features of these molecules. We also are able to obtain the scaling of these cross sections with deposited energy.

  9. Constraining the Sea Quark Distributions Through W+/- Cross Section Ratio Measurements at STAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posik, Matthew; STAR Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Over the past several years parton distribution functions (PDFs) have become more precise, however there are still regions where more data are needed to help constrain global PDF extractions. One such distribution is the sea quark distribution near the valence region (Bjorken-x 0.1 - 0.3), in particular the d / u distribution which seems to suggest possible non-perturbative effects playing a role in this region. The charged W cross section ratio (W+/W-) is sensitive to the unpolarized u , d , u , and d quark distributions at large Q2 (set by the W mass). Through proton+proton collisions, the STAR experiment at RHIC, is well equipped to measure the e+/- leptonic decays of W+/- bosons in the mid-rapidity range (|η|<= 1) at √{ s} = 500/510 GeV. At these kinematics STAR is sensitive to quark distributions near Bjorken-x of 0.16. RHIC runs from 2011 through 2013 have collected about 350 pb-1 of integrated luminosity, and a 2017 run is expected to provide an additional 400 pb-1. Presented here are preliminary results for the 2011-2012 W charged cross section ratios ( 100pb-1), and an update on the 2013 charged W cross section analysis ( 250 pb-1).

  10. Exclusive Neutrino Charged Current Coherent Pion Production Cross Section Measurements in MINERvA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuera, A.

    2012-03-01

    MINERvA (Main Injector Experiment for v-A) is a neutrino scattering experiment in the 1-10 GeV energy range in the NuMI high-intensity neutrino beam at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. MINERvA is measuring neutrino/antineutrino scattering off a variety of different nuclear materials (C, Fe, Pb, He, H2O) and plans to measure the A-dependence of the Charged Current Coherent Pion Production cross section. We provide an outline of this measurement including the expected event rates and our methods for differentiating signal from background.

  11. Total electron scattering cross sections for pyrimidine and pyrazine as measured using a magnetically confined experimental system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuss, M. C.; Sanz, A. G.; Blanco, F.; Oiler, J. C.; Limão-Vieira, P.; Brunger, M. J.; García, G.

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, a recently constructed apparatus for measuring electron scattering cross sections while applying a strong axial magnetic field is utilized for determining total scattering cross sections. The first molecules studied with this setup are pyrimidine (1,3-diazine) and pyrazine (1,4-diazine), whose total cross sections are obtained for the incident electron energy range of 8-500 eV. Quite good agreement with earlier theoretical predictions is found after accounting for the angular acceptance (angular resolution for forward scattering) of the apparatus. However, no other experimental total cross sections for electron scattering from pyrimidine or pyrazine have been found in the literature for comparison.

  12. Laser measurements of ozone absorption cross sections in the Chappuis band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Stuart M.; Mauersberger, Konrad

    1992-01-01

    A sensitive spectrometer has been developed that exploits several He-Ne laser transitions in the visible for precise, high resolution measurements of Chappuis band ozone absorption cross sections at room temperature. An overall uncertainty of better than one percent has been achieved through a combination of transducer calibrations and an experimental technique that unambiguously determines the impurity content of each ozone sample. Results compare favorably with those from most previous analyses in the visible range, though some are obviously lower than this consensus due probably to errors in ozone density measurements.

  13. A new measurement of the overlineνee - elastic cross section at very low energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amsler, C.; Avenier, M.; Broggini, C.; Busto, J.; Cerna, C.; Daraktchieva, Z.; Gervasio, G.; Jeanneret, P.; Jonkmans, G.; Koang, D. H.; Lamblin, J.; Lebrun, D.; Link, O.; Ould-Saada, F.; Puglierin, G.; Stutz, A.; Tadsen, A.; Vuilleumier, J. L.

    2002-10-01

    We have built a low background detector, a time projection chamber surrounded by an active anti-Compton, to measure the overlineνee - elastic cross section down to the antineutrino energy of 900 keV. With our detector, running at 18 m from the core of a nuclear reactor in Bugey, we could detect reactor antineutrinos by measuring both the energy and the direction of the recoiling electrons. We report here on a first analysis of the data using an automatic scanning procedure. The results we obtain are 1.5 σ higher than the ones predicted by the standard model.

  14. Measurements of wave height statistics and radar, cross-section in a wind wave tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. W.; Cross, A. E.

    1976-01-01

    There is currently wide interest among oceanographers and meteorologists in remote sensing of ocean surface characteristics. A wind wave tank developed at Langley Research Center is used to evaluate various remote sensing techniques based on electromagnetic scattering phenomena, and in the development and evaluation of theoretical scattering models. The wave tank is described, the statistics of the rough water surface are documented, and microwave radar cross-section measurement results are presented. The water surface statistics are similar in key respects to the open ocean, and the microwave scattering measurements show, qualitatively, theoretically predicted large and small scale scattering effects.

  15. Measurement of the absorption cross-sections of CFC-11 at conditions representing various model atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Zhenhua; Varanasi, Prasad

    1994-01-01

    Absorption cross-sections, K(sub V)(/(cm)(atm)), have been measured in the 9.2 and 11.8 micrometer bands of CFC-11 (CCl3F) using a high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometer. Temperature and total (N2-broadening) pressure have been varied to obtain results at conditions representative of the atmosphere. The measured absolute intensities (in units of 10(exp -17) cm/molecule of the 9.2 and 11.8 micrometer bands are 2.591 +/- 0.013 and 6.974 +/- 0.038, respectively.

  16. Cross Section Measurements for the 23Na(p,γ)24Mg Reaction at LUNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boeltzig, Axel; LUNA Collaboration

    2016-02-01

    LUNA, the Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics, is an accelerator facility for measurements of nuclear cross sections of astrophysical interest. The greatly reduced cosmic ray background at LUNA's underground location in the Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS) allows direct measurements of weak reactions at low energies. One of the reactions currently under study at LUNA is 23Na(p,γ)24Mg, which links the NeNa and MgAl cycles in stellar burning. The LUNA facility is presented, with a focus on the current experimental efforts to study the reaction 23Na(p,γ)24Mg.

  17. Nuclear matrix elements from direct lifetime or cross-section measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, V.; Cooper, N.; Hinton, M.; Ilie, G.; Radeck, D.

    2012-11-20

    The method of simultaneous lifetime and g factor measurements using a plunger device and the RDDS and TDRIV techniques is introduced. Results on lifetimes and hyperfine-interaction parameters for 2{sup +}{sub 1} states in {sup 104-108}Pd, {sup 96,98,104}Ru, and {sup 92,94}Zr, using a plunger device. Another method to obtain electromagnetic matrix elements is direct cross section measurements using NRF. The method is outlined, and some recent results on {sup 76}Se are shown.

  18. Cross section of 3He( 3He,2p) 4He measured near the Gamow peak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itahashi, T.; Kudomi, N.; Yoshida, S.; Kume, K.; Komori, M.; Ohsumi, H.

    2003-06-01

    We measured the cross section of 3He( 3He,2p) 4He in the energy region of 30-50 keV center of mass energy by using the OCEAN facility. The resulting astrophysical S-factors are in agreement with the existing data and their total errors are as good as those of the previous experiment. For further study we tried the measurements at lower energies than E cm = 30 keV. It will require running times of one month with more improvements such as background reduction and steady operation of the detection system.

  19. Measurement of the differential dijet production cross section in proton–proton collisions at

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2011-06-01

    A measurement of the double-differential inclusive dijet production cross section in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s)=7 TeV is presented as a function of the dijet invariant mass and jet rapidity. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 36 inverse picobarns, recorded with the CMS detector at the LHC. The measurement covers the dijet mass range 0.2 TeV to 3.5 TeV and jet rapidities up to |y|=2.5. It is found to be in good agreement with next-to-leading-order QCD predictions.

  20. New Precision Measurement of the 3He(4He,γ) 7Be Cross Section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, B. S.; Hass, M.; Nir-El, Y.; Haquin, G.

    2004-12-01

    The 3He(4He,γ) 7Be reaction plays an important role in determining the high energy solar neutrino flux and in understanding the abundances of primordial 7Li. This Letter reports a new precision measurement of the cross sections of this direct capture reaction, determined by measuring the ensuing 7Be activity in the region of Ec.m.=420 to 950keV. Various recent theoretical fits to our data result in a consistent extrapolated value of S34(0)=0.53(2)(1) keV b.

  1. Cross section measurement of 14N(p ,γ )15O in the CNO cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Q.; Görres, J.; deBoer, R. J.; Imbriani, G.; Best, A.; Kontos, A.; LeBlanc, P. J.; Uberseder, E.; Wiescher, M.

    2016-05-01

    Background: The CNO cycle is the main energy source in stars more massive than our sun; it defines the energy production and the cycle time that lead to the lifetime of massive stars, and it is an important tool for the determination of the age of globular clusters. In our sun about 1.6% of the total solar neutrino flux comes from the CNO cycle. The largest uncertainty in the prediction of this CNO flux from the standard solar model comes from the uncertainty in the 14N(p ,γ )15O reaction rate; thus, the determination of the cross section at astrophysical temperatures is of great interest. Purpose: The total cross section of the 14N(p ,γ )15O reaction has large contributions from the transitions to the Ex=6.79 MeV excited state and the ground state of 15O. The Ex=6.79 MeV transition is dominated by radiative direct capture, while the ground state is a complex mixture of direct and resonance capture components and the interferences between them. Recent studies have concentrated on cross-section measurements at very low energies, but broad resonances at higher energy may also play a role. A single measurement has been made that covers a broad higher-energy range but it has large uncertainties stemming from uncorrected summing effects. Furthermore, the extrapolations of the cross section vary significantly depending on the data sets considered. Thus, new direct measurements have been made to improve the previous high-energy studies and to better constrain the extrapolation. Methods: Measurements were performed at the low-energy accelerator facilities of the nuclear science laboratory at the University of Notre Dame. The cross section was measured over the proton energy range from Ep=0.7 to 3.6 MeV for both the ground state and the Ex=6.79 MeV transitions at θlab=0∘ , 45∘, 90∘, 135∘, and 150∘. Both TiN and implanted-14N targets were utilized. γ rays were detected by using an array of high-purity germanium detectors. Results: The excitation function as

  2. Measuring the Fusion Cross-Section of Light Nuclei with Low-Intensity Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbach, Tracy; Brown, Kyle; Hudan, Sylvie; Desouza, Romualdo

    2014-03-01

    Reactions between neutron-rich light nuclei have been proposed as a heat source in the crust of an accreting neutron star that triggers an X-ray superburst. To explore the probability of such fusion events as well as better understand the fusion dynamics between neutron-rich nuclei, an experimental program to measure the dependence of the fusion cross-section on neutron number has been initiated. Key to these measurements is developing an approach to measure the total fusion cross-section for beams of low-intensity light nuclei (<105 ions/s) on light targets. Fusion residues resulting from the fusion of oxygen nuclei with 12C at energies near and below the Coulomb barrier are directly measured and distinguished from unreacted beam particles on the basis of their energy and time-of-flight (TOF). The TOF is measured between a microchannel plate (MCP) detector and a segmented Si detector. Two initial problems were charge trapping in the Si detector and slit scattering in the MCP detector. These problems have both been minimized by implementing a gridless MCP detector and a new Si design making the measurement feasible. Supported by the US DOE under Grant No. DEFG02-88ER-40404

  3. Two-photon standard technique for measuring the two-photon absorption cross section in complex organic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Alfimov, E.E.; Groshev, D.E.; Makukha, V.K.; Meshalkin, Y.P.

    1995-03-01

    The two-photon standard technique for measuring the absolute cross sections for two-photon absorption of complex organic molecules is proposed, which is quite insensitive to the spatial and temporal fluctuations of the laser beam. n-Bismethylsterilbenzene (MSB) with a known value of the two-photon absorption cross section is used as a standard. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  4. Neutron Capture and Neutron Total Cross Sections Measurements for {sup 27}Al at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Guber, K.H.; Harvey, J.A.; Hill, N.W.; Koehler, P.E.; Leal, L.C.; Sayer, R.O.; Spencer, R.R.; Wright, R.Q.

    1999-08-30

    We have used the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) to measure neutron total and capture cross sections of {sup 27}Al in the energy range from 100 eV to {approximately}400 keV. We report the resonance parameters as well as the Maxwellian average capture cross sections.

  5. An evaluation of the reliability of muscle fiber cross-sectional area and fiber number measurements in rat skeletal muscle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: The reliability of estimating muscle fiber cross-sectional area (measure of muscle fiber size) and fiber number from only a subset of fibers in rat hindlimb muscle cross-sections has not been systematically evaluated. This study examined the variability in mean estimates of fiber cross-s...

  6. Gadolinium-148 and other spallation production cross section measurements for accelerator target facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Karen Corzine

    At the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center accelerator complex, protons are accelerated to 800 MeV and directed to two tungsten targets, Target 4 at the Weapons Neutron Research facility and the 1L target at the Lujan Center. The Department of Energy requires hazard classification analyses to be performed on these targets and places limits on certain radionuclide inventories in the targets to avoid characterizing the facilities as "nuclear facilities." Gadolinium-148 is a radionuclide created from the spallation of tungsten. Allowed isotopic inventories are particularly low for this isotope because it is an alpha-particle emitter with a 75-year half-life. The activity level of Gadolinium-148 is low, but it encompasses almost two-thirds of the total dose burden for the two tungsten targets based on present yield estimates. From a hazard classification standpoint, this severely limits the lifetime of these tungsten targets. The cross section is not well-established experimentally and this is the motivation for measuring the Gadolinium-148 production cross section from tungsten. In a series of experiments at the Weapons Neutron Research facility, Gadolinium-148 production was measured for 600- and 800-MeV protons on tungsten, tantalum, and gold. These experiments used 3 mum thin tungsten, tantalum, and gold foils and 10 mum thin aluminum activation foils. In addition, spallation yields were determined for many short-lived and long-lived spallation products with these foils using gamma and alpha spectroscopy and compared with predictions of the Los Alamos National Laboratory codes CEM2k+GEM2 and MCNPX. The cumulative Gadolinium-148 production cross section measured from tantalum, tungsten, and gold for incident 600-MeV protons were 15.2 +/- 4.0, 8.31 +/- 0.92, and 0.591 +/- 0.155, respectively. The average production cross sections measured at 800 MeV were 28.6 +/- 3.5, 19.4 +/- 1.8, and 3.69 +/- 0.50 for tantalum, tungsten, and gold, respectively. These cumulative

  7. An integral test of the inelastic cross sections of Pb and Mo using measured neutron spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shook, D. F.; Fieno, D.; Ford, C. H.; Wrights, G. N.

    1972-01-01

    Comparison of measurements and calculations of fast neutron spectra from a radioactive neutron source inside spheres of Mo or Pb and from a cylindrical reactor containing a thick Pb or Mo reflector are used as a test of ENDF cross sections. The sphere leakage spectra were measured at a sphere-to-spectrometer distance of 2 meters using a 54 Ci spherical Am-Be neutron source. Reactor leakage spectrum measurements were made at the surface of the ZP-1 reactor when bare, with a Pb radial reflector 21 cm thick, and with a metallic Mo radial reflector 10 cm thick. In the case of the thin Mo sphere there is agreement between the calculation and measurement. The Pb calculation is much lower than the measurement except at the highest neutron energy. Two-dimensional calculations of reactor spectra result indicate that the reactor source is reasonably well known. Significant differences in leakage spectrum shape for both Mo and Pb reflectors suggest that there are large uncertainties in the inelastic cross sections for Pb and some for Mo.

  8. Neutron-Induced Fission Cross Section Measurements for Uranium Isotopes and Other Actinides at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Laptev, Alexander B.; Tovesson, Fredrik K.; Hill, Tony S.

    2012-08-16

    A well established program of neutron-induced fission cross section measurement at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is supporting the Fuel Cycle Research program (FC R&D). The incident neutron energy range spans from sub-thermal up to 200 MeV by combining two LANSCE facilities, the Lujan Center and the Weapons Neutron Research center (WNR). The time-of-flight method is implemented to measure the incident neutron energy. A parallel-plate fission ionization chamber was used as a fission fragment detector. The event rate ratio between the investigated foil and a standard {sup 235}U foil is translated into a fission cross section ratio. Thin actinide targets with deposits of <200 {micro}g/cm{sup 2} on stainless steel backing were loaded into a fission chamber. In addition to previously measured data for {sup 237}Np, {sup 239-242}Pu, {sup 243}Am, new measurements include the recently completed {sup 233,238}U isotopes, {sup 236}U data which is being analyzed, and {sup 234}U data acquired in the 2011-2012 LANSCE run cycle. The new data complete the full suite of Uranium isotopes which were investigated with this experimental approach. When analysis of the new measured data is completed, data will be delivered to evaluators. Having data for multiple Uranium isotopes will support theoretical modeling capabilities and strengthens nuclear data evaluation.

  9. A planar near-field scanning technique for bistatic radar cross section measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuhela-Reuning, S.; Walton, E. K.

    1990-01-01

    A progress report on the development of a bistatic radar cross section (RCS) measurement range is presented. A technique using one parabolic reflector and a planar scanning probe antenna is analyzed. The field pattern in the test zone is computed using a spatial array of signal sources. It achieved an illumination pattern with 1 dB amplitude and 15 degree phase ripple over the target zone. The required scan plane size is found to be proportional to the size of the desired test target. Scan plane probe sample spacing can be increased beyond the Nyquist lambda/2 limit permitting constant probe sample spacing over a range of frequencies.

  10. Measurement and extrapolation of total cross sections of 12C+16O fusion at stellar energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Xiao

    Carbon burning and oxygen burning in massive stars (M ≥ 8M[special character omitted]) are important burning phases in late stellar evolution following helium burning. They determined the nucleosynthesis phases and the initial matter distribution. Hydrostatic burning of 12C and 16O at lower temperatures remains an important feature. The critical reactions are the 12C+12C, 12C+ 16O and 16O+16O fusion processes. Extensive effort, both experimentally and theoretically, has been invested in the determination of the reaction rates for all reaction channels. Despite this effort, there remain large uncertainties in the predicted results that rely primarily on the extrapolation of the data into the Gamow range. The predicted results depend sensitively on the adopted model parameters, hindrance effects, and the possibility of resonances at relevant energies. The astrophysical important energy range of the 12C+12C fusion reaction spans from 1.0 MeV to 3.0 MeV. However, its cross section has not been determined with enough precision, despite numerous studies, due to the extremely low reaction cross sections and the large experimental background. The 12C+16O is difficult for experimental measurement due to the same reason. To allow measurements of the 12C+ 12C and 12C+16O fusions at astrophysical energies, a large-area silicon strip detector array was developed. The total cross section of the 12C+16O fusion has been measured at low energies using the St Ana 5MV accelerator at the University of Notre Dame. A high-intensity oxygen beam was produced impinging on a thick ultra-pure graphite target. Protons and gamma-rays have been measured simultaneously in the center-of-mass energy range of 3.64 to 4.93 MeV, using silicon and HPGe detectors. Statistical model calculations were employed to interpret the experimental results. This provides a more reliable extrapolation for the 12C+16O fusion cross section reducing substantially the uncertainty for stellar model simulations.

  11. Coincidence measurement of the fully differential cross section for atomic-field bremsstrahlung

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faulk, J. D.; Quarles, C. A.

    1974-01-01

    A coincidence measurement was made of the absolute cross section for electron-atomic-field bremsstrahlung, differential in photon energy, photon-emission angle, and electron scattering angle. The incident electron energy was 140 keV and the scattering materials were thin films of aluminum and gold. The data are compared to the theoretical calculations of Elwert and Haug and of Bethe and Heitler. Both theories give generally satisfactory agreement for aluminum. The Elwert-Haug theory is somewhat more accurate for gold.

  12. New measurements of spin-dependent n-p cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Raichle, B. W.; Gould, C. R.; Haase, D. G.; Seely, M. L.; Walston, J. R.; Tornow, W.; Wilburn, W. S.; Penttilae, S. I.; Hoffmann, G. W.

    1999-06-10

    We report on new measurements of the spin-dependent neutron-proton total cross-section differences in longitudinal and transverse geometries ({delta}{sigma}{sub L} and {delta}{sigma}{sub T} respectively) and between 5 and 20 MeV. These transmission experiments involve a polarized neutron beam and polarized proton target. The polarized neutron beam was produced as a secondary beam via charged-particle induced neutron-production reactions. The proton target was cryogenically cooled and dynamically polarized. These data will be used to extract {epsilon}{sub 1}, the phase-shift parameter which characterizes the strength of the tensor interaction at low energy.

  13. Probing dynamics of fusion reactions through cross-section and spin distribution measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Maninder; Behera, B. R.; Singh, Gulzar; Singh, Varinderjit; Madhavan, N.; Muralithar, S.; Nath, S.; Gehlot, J.; Mohanto, G.; Mukul, Ish; Siwal, D.; Thakur, M.; Kapoor, K.; Sharma, P.; Banerjee, T.; Jhingan, A.; Varughese, T.; Bala, Indu; Nayak, B. K.; Saxena, A.; Chatterjee, M. B.; Stevenson, P. D.

    2016-05-01

    Present work aims to explicate the effect of entrance channel mass asymmetry on fusion dynamics for the Compound Nucleus 80Sr populated through two different channels, 16O+64Zn and 32S+48Ti, using cross-section and spin distribution measurements as probes. The evaporation spectra studies for these systems, reported earlier indicate the presence of dynamical effects for mass symmetric 32S+48Ti system.The CCDEF and TDHF calculations have been performed for both the systems and an attempt has been made to explain the reported deviations in the α-particle spectrum for the mass symmetric system.

  14. Cross section measurement on 139La (γ,γ') below neutron separation energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makinaga, A.; Rusev, G.; Schwengner, R.; Dönau, F.; Beyer, R.; Bemmerer, D.; Crespo, P.; Erhard, M.; Junghans, A. R.; Klug, J.; Nair, C.; Schilling, K. D.; Wagner, A.

    2010-06-01

    The γ-ray strength function is an important input quantity for the determination of the photoreaction rate and the neutron capture rate for astrophysics as well as for nuclear technologies. Recent studies show that extra γ-ray strength near the neutron separation energy Sn (pygmy resonance) affects the stellar reaction rate strongly. In this work, the photoabsorption cross section for 139La below Sn was measured using bremsstrahlung produced at the electron accelerator ELBE of Eorschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf with an electron beam of 11.5 MeV kinetic energy. Experimental result of 139La is presented.

  15. Coincidence measurement of the fully differential cross section for atomic-field bremsstrahlung

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faulk, J. D.; Quarles, C. A.

    1974-01-01

    A coincidence measurement was made of the absolute cross section for electron-atomic-field bremsstrahlung, differential in photon energy, photon-emission angle, and electron scattering angle. The incident electron energy was 140 keV and the scattering materials were thin films of aluminum and gold. The data are compared to the theoretical calculations of Elwert and Haug and of Bethe and Heitler. Both theories give generally satisfactory agreement for aluminum. The Elwert-Haug theory is somewhat more accurate for gold.

  16. Study for Nuclear Structures of 22-35Na Isotopes via Measurements of Reaction Cross Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Shinji

    2014-09-01

    T. Ohtsubo, M. Nagashima, T. Ogura, Y. Shimbara (Grad. Sch. of Sc., Niigata Univ.), M.Takechi, H. Geissel, M. Winkler (GSI), D. Nishimura, T. Sumikama (Dept. of Phys., Tokyo Univ. of Sc.), M. Fukuda, M. Mihara, H. Uenishi (Dept. of Phys., Osaka Univ.), T. Kuboki, T. Suzuki, T. Yamaguchi, H. Furuki, C. S. Lee, K. Sato (Dept. of Phys., Saitama Univ.), A. Ozawa, H. Ohnishi, T. Moriguchi, S. Fukuda, Y. Ishibashi, D. Nagae, R. Nishikiori, T. Niwa (Inst. of Phys., Univ. of Tsukuba), N. Aoi (RCNP), Rui-Jiu Chen, N. Inabe, D. Kameda, T. Kubo, M. Lantz, T. Ohnishi, K. Okumura, H. Sakurai, H. Suzuki, H. Takeda, S. Takeuchi, K. Tanaka, Y. Yanagisawa (RIKEN), De-Qing Fang, Yu-Gang Ma (SINAP), T. Izumikawa (RI Ctr., Niigata Univ.), and S. Momota (Fac. of Engn., Kochi Univ. of Tech.) Reaction cross sections (σR) for 22-35Na isotopes have been measured at around 240 MeV/nucleon. The σR for 22-35Na were measured for the first time. Enhancement in cross sections is clearly observed from the systematics for stable nuclei, for isotopes with large mass numbers. These enhancement can be mainly ascribed to the nuclear deformation. We will discuss the nuclear structure (neutron skin, nuclear shell structure) for neutron-excess Na isotopes. T. Ohtsubo, M. Nagashima, T. Ogura, Y. Shimbara (Grad. Sch. of Sc., Niigata Univ.), M.Takechi, H. Geissel, M. Winkler (GSI), D. Nishimura, T. Sumikama (Dept. of Phys., Tokyo Univ. of Sc.), M. Fukuda, M. Mihara, H. Uenishi (Dept. of Phys., Osaka Univ.), T. Kuboki, T. Suzuki, T. Yamaguchi, H. Furuki, C. S. Lee, K. Sato (Dept. of Phys., Saitama Univ.), A. Ozawa, H. Ohnishi, T. Moriguchi, S. Fukuda, Y. Ishibashi, D. Nagae, R. Nishikiori, T. Niwa (Inst. of Phys., Univ. of Tsukuba), N. Aoi (RCNP), Rui-Jiu Chen, N. Inabe, D. Kameda, T. Kubo, M. Lantz, T. Ohnishi, K. Okumura, H. Sakurai, H. Suzuki, H. Takeda, S. Takeuchi, K. Tanaka, Y. Yanagisawa (RIKEN), De-Qing Fang, Yu-Gang Ma (SINAP), T. Izumikawa (RI Ctr., Niigata Univ.), and S. Momota (Fac. of Engn

  17. Measurement of low $p_{T}$ $D^{0}$ meson production cross section at CDF II

    SciTech Connect

    Mussini, Manuel

    2011-05-01

    In this thesis we present a study of the production of D0 meson in the low transverse momentum region. In particular the inclusive differential production cross section of the D0 meson (in the two-body decay channel D0 → K-π+) is obtained extending the published CDF II measurement to pT as low as 1.5 GeV/c. This study is performed at the Tevatron Collider at Fermilab with the CDF II detector.

  18. Precision nuclear targets for Drell-Yan cross section measurements at 800 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Gursky, J.C.; Baer, H.; Flick, F.F.; Gallegos, D.

    1988-01-01

    Targets of iron, tungsten, carbon, and calcium of areal densities 2.3 to 5.8 g/cm/sup 2/ were fabricated to high precision for a fixed-target experiment performed in 1988 at Fermilab to measure relative Drell-Yan cross sections. The experiment used 800-GeV protons at an intensity of 2 x 10/sup 12/ protons per 23-second spill. Areal densities were determined to an accuracy of approximately 1 part in 10/sup 4/. The calcium targets were vacuum-encapsulated in stainless steel by electron-beam welding. 1 ref., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Measurements of neutron capture cross sections on 70Zn at 0.96 and 1.69 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punte, L. R. M.; Lalremruata, B.; Otuka, N.; Suryanarayana, S. V.; Iwamoto, Y.; Pachuau, Rebecca; Satheesh, B.; Thanga, H. H.; Danu, L. S.; Desai, V. V.; Hlondo, L. R.; Kailas, S.; Ganesan, S.; Nayak, B. K.; Saxena, A.

    2017-02-01

    The cross sections of the 70Zn(n ,γ )Zn71m (T1 /2=3.96 ±0.05 -h ) reaction have been measured relative to the 197Au(n ,γ )198Au cross sections at 0.96 and 1.69 MeV using a 7Li(p ,n )7Be neutron source and activation technique. The cross section of this reaction has been measured for the first time in the MeV region. The new experimental cross sections have been compared with the theoretical prediction by talys-1.6 with various level-density models and γ -ray strength functions as well as the tendl-2015 library. The talys-1.6 calculation with the generalized superfluid level-density model and Kopecky-Uhl generalized Lorentzian γ -ray strength function predicted the new experimental cross sections at both incident energies. The 70Zn(n ,γ ) g+m 71Zn total capture cross sections have also been derived by applying the evaluated isomeric ratios in the tendl-2015 library to the measured partial capture cross sections. The spectrum averaged total capture cross sections derived in the present paper agree well with the jendl-4.0 library at 0.96 MeV, whereas it lies between the tendl-2015 and the jendl-4.0 libraries at 1.69 MeV.

  20. Measurement of the $WW+WZ$ production cross section in a semileptonic decay mode at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Hurwitz, Martina

    2010-03-01

    The measurement of the WW + WZ production cross section in a semileptonic decay mode is presented. The measurement is carried out with 4.6 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF II detector in √s = 1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions at the Tevatron. The main experimental challenge is identifying the signal in the overwhelming background from W+jets production. The modeling of the W+jets background is carefully studied and a matrix element technique is used to build a discriminant to separate signal and background. The cross section of WW + WZ production is measured to be σ(p$\\bar{p}$ → WW + WZ) = 16.5-3.0+3.3 pb, in agreement with the next-to-leading order theoretical prediction of 15.1 ± 0.9 pb. The significance of the signal is evaluated to be 5.4σ. This measurement is an important milestone in the search for the Standard Model Higgs boson at the Tevatron.

  1. Measurement of the tt-bar Production Cross Section and Top Quark Mass at DO

    SciTech Connect

    Varnes, Erich W.

    2005-03-22

    I report on preliminary measurements of the tt-bar production cross section, and a measurement of the top quark mass, performed by the DO Collaboration. The cross section is measured using candidates for dilepton, single-lepton, and all-hadronic tt-bar decays collected at DO during RunII of the Tevatron. The results for the various modes are: {sigma}{sub tt-bar} 14.3{sub -4.3}{sup +5.1} (stat.) {sub -1.9}{sup +2.6} (syst.) {+-} 0.9 (lumi.) pb (dilepton){sigma}{sub tt-bar} = 7.2{sub -2.4}{sup +2.6} (stat.) {sub -1.7}{sup +1.6} (syst.) {+-} 0.5 (lumi.) pb (lepton+jets){sigma}{sub tt-bar} 7.7{sub -3.3}{sup +3.4} (stat.) {sub -3.7}{sup +4.7} (syst.) {+-} 0.5 (lumi.) pb 6(all-hadronic).The mass measurement uses an improved method to re-analyze lepton+jets events collected during RunI of the Tevatron, and obtains mt 180.1 {+-} 3.6 (stat.) {+-} 4.0 (syst.) GeV/c2.

  2. GRAPhEME: a setup to measure (n, xn γ) reaction cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, Greg; Bacquias, A.; Capdevielle, O.; Dessagne, P.; Kerveno, M.; Rudolf, G.; Borcea, C.; Negret, A.; Olacel, A.; Drohe, J.C.; Plompen, A.J.M.; Nyman, M.

    2015-07-01

    Most of nuclear reactor developments are using evaluated data base for numerical simulations. However, the considered databases present still large uncertainties and disagreements. To improve their level of precision, new measurements are needed, in particular for (n, xn) reactions, which are of great importance as they modify the neutron spectrum, the neutron population, and produce radioactive species. The IPHC group started an experimental program to measure (n, xn gamma) reaction cross sections using prompt gamma spectroscopy and neutron energy determination by time of flight. Measurements of (n, xn gamma) cross section have been performed for {sup 235,238}U, {sup 232}Th, {sup nat,182,183,184,186}W, {sup nat}Zr. The experimental setup is installed at the neutron beam at GELINA (Geel, Belgium). The setup has recently been upgraded with the addition of a highly segmented 36 pixels planar HPGe detector. Significant efforts have been made to reduce radiation background and electromagnetic perturbations. The setup is equipped with a high rate digital acquisition system. The analysis of the segmented detector data requires a specific procedure to account for cross signals between pixels. An overall attention is paid to the precision of the measurement. The setup characteristic and the analysis procedure will be presented along with the acquisition and analysis challenges. Examples of results and their impact on models will be discussed. (authors)

  3. Reanalysis of radioisotope measurements of the 9Be(γ ,n )8Be cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Alan E.

    2016-08-01

    The 9Be(γ ,n )8Be reaction is enhanced by a near-threshold 1 /2+ state. Contradictions between existing measurements of this reaction cross section affect calculations of astrophysical r -process yields, dark matter detector calibrations, and the theory of the nuclear structure of 9Be. Select well-documented radioisotope 9Be(γ ,n ) source yield measurements have been reanalyzed, providing a set of high-accuracy independently measured cross sections without the large systematic errors from recent beamline experiments [Arnold, Clegg, Iliadis, Karwowski, Rich, Tompkins, and Howell, Phys. Rev. C 85, 044605 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevC.85.044605; Utsunomiya, Katayama, Gheorghe, Imai, Yamaguchi, Kahl, Sakaguchi, Shima, Takahisa, and Miyamoto, Phys. Rev. C 92, 064323 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevC.92.064323]. A single-level Breit-Wigner fit of these corrected measurement yields are ER=1736.8 (18 ) keV, Γγ=0.742 (25 ) eV, and Γn=252 (17 ) keV for the 1 /2+ state, excluding a virtual state solution.

  4. Neutron induced fission cross section measurements of 240Pu and 242Pu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belloni, F.; Eykens, R.; Heyse, J.; Matei, C.; Moens, A.; Nolte, R.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Richter, S.; Sibbens, G.; Vanleeuw, D.; Wynants, R.

    2017-09-01

    Accurate neutron induced fission cross section of 240Pu and 242Pu are required in view of making nuclear technology safer and more efficient to meet the upcoming needs for the future generation of nuclear power plants (GEN-IV). The probability for a neutron to induce such reactions figures in the NEA Nuclear Data High Priority Request List [1]. A measurement campaign to determine neutron induced fission cross sections of 240Pu and 242Pu at 2.51 MeV and 14.83 MeV has been carried out at the 3.7 MV Van De Graaff linear accelerator at Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Braunschweig. Two identical Frisch Grid fission chambers, housing back to back a 238U and a APu target (A = 240 or A = 242), were employed to detect the total fission yield. The targets were molecular plated on 0.25 mm aluminium foils kept at ground potential and the employed gas was P10. The neutron fluence was measured with the proton recoil telescope (T1), which is the German primary standard for neutron fluence measurements. The two measurements were related using a De Pangher long counter and the charge as monitors. The experimental results have an average uncertainty of 3-4% at 2.51 MeV and for 6-8% at 14.81 MeV and have been compared to the data available in literature.

  5. Direct measurement of the 22Ne(p,γ)23Na reaction cross section at LUNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraro, Federico; LUNA Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    The 22Ne(p, γ)23Na reaction takes part in the NeNa cycle of hydrogen burning, influencing the production of the elements between 20Ne and 27Al in red giant stars, asymptotic giant stars and classical novae. The 22Ne(p,γ)27Na reaction rate is very uncertain because of a large number of tentative resonances in the Gamow window, where only upper limits were quoted in literature. A direct measurement of the 22Ne(p, γ)23Na reaction cross section has been carried out at LUNA using a windowless differential-pumping gas target with two high- purity germanium (HPGe) detectors. A new measurement with a 4π bismuth germanate (BGO) summing detector is ongoing. During the HPGe phase of the experiment the strengths of the resonances at 156.2 keV, 189.5 keV and 259.7 keV have been directly measured for the first time and their contribution to the reaction rate has been calculated. The decay scheme of the newly discovered resonances has been established as well and some improved upper limits on the unobserved resonances have been put. The BGO detector with its 70% γ-detection efficiency allows to measure the cross section at lower energy. In order to further investigate the resonances at 71 keV and 105 keV and the direct-capture component, the data taking is ongoing.

  6. Development of a Neutron Long Counter Detector for (α, n) Cross Section Measurements at Ohio University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandenburg, Kristyn; Meisel, Zach; Brune, Carl R.; Massey, Thomas; Soltesz, Doug; Subedi, Shiv

    2017-01-01

    The origin of the elements from roughly zinc-to-tin (30 < Z < 50) has yet to be determined. The neutron-rich neutrino driven wind of core collapse supernova (CCSN) is a proposed site for the nucleosynthesis of these elements. However, a significant source of uncertainty exists in elemental abundance yields from astrophysics model calculations due to the uncertainty for (α , n) reaction rates, as most of the relevant cross sections have yet to be measured. We are developing a neutron long counter tailored to measure neutrons for (α , n) reaction measurements performed at The Ohio University Edwards Accelerator Laboratory. The detector design will be optimized using the Monte-Carlo N-Particle transport code (MCNP6). Details of the optimization process, as well as the present status of the detector design will be provided. The plans for first (α , n) cross section measurements will also be briefly discussed. This work was supported in part by the US Department of Energy under Grant Number DE-FG02-88ER40387.

  7. Realizing the Opportunities of Neutron Cross-Section Measurements at RIA

    SciTech Connect

    Ahle, Larry; Roberts, Kevin; Roeben, Martin; Rusnak, Brian; Hausmann, Marc; Reifarth, Rene; Vieira, Dave

    2005-05-24

    The Rare Isotope Accelerator will produce many isotopes at never before seen rates. This will allow for the first-time measurements on isotopes very far from stability and new measurement opportunities for unstable nuclei near stability. In fact, the production rates are such that it should be possible to collect 10 micrograms of many isotopes with a half-life of 1 day or more. This ability to make targets of short-lived nuclei enables the possibility of making neutron cross-section measurements important to the astrophysics and the stockpile stewardship communities. But to fully realize this opportunity, the appropriate infrastructure must be included at the RIA facility. This includes isotope harvesting capabilities, radiochemical areas for processing collected material, and an intense, ''mono-energetic,'' tunable neutron source. As such, we have been developing a design for neutron source facility to be included at the RIA site. This facility would produce neutrons via intense beams of deuterons and protons on a variety of targets. The facility would also include the necessary radiochemical facilities for target processing. These infrastructure needs will be discussed in addition to the methods that would be employed at RIA for measuring these neutron cross sections.

  8. A Measurement of Inclusive Quasielastic Electron Cross Sections at X > 1 and High Q2

    SciTech Connect

    Petitjean, Thomas

    2002-07-04

    Experiment E89-008 measured inclusive electron scattering cross sections from different nuclei in Hall C at Jefferson Laboratory. Cross sections on the low energy loss side of the quasi-elastic peak (xBj > 1) are extracted for carbon, aluminum, iron and gold. The data cover four-momentum transfers squared of 0.97 to 5.73 GeV 2 =c 2 . The measured cross sections are compared to cross sections calculated using a microscopic spectral function. The cross section results are also analyzed in terms of the two scaling functions F (y) and f(Ψ'). For both the data is found to be independent of the momentum transfer (scaling of the first kind). For f(Ψ') the data is in addition independent of the mass number A (scaling of the second kind) and thus exhibits superscaling properties.

  9. Measurements of absolute total and partial cross sections for the electron ionization of tungsten hexafluoride (WF6)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basner, R.; Schmidt, M.; Becker, K.

    2004-04-01

    We measured absolute partial cross sections for the formation of positive ions followed by electron impact on tungsten hexafluoride (WF6) from threshold to 900 eV using a time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS). Dissociative ionization processes resulting in seven different singly charged ions (F+, W+, WFx+, x=1-5) and five doubly charged ions (W2+, WFx2+, x=1-4) were found to be the dominant ionization channels. The ion spectrum at all impact energies is dominated by WF5+ fragment ions. At 120 eV impact energy, the partial WF5+ ionization cross section has a maximum value of 3.92×10-16 cm2 that corresponds to 43% of the total ion yield. The cross section values of all the other singly charged fragment ions at 120 eV range between 0.39×10-16 and 0.73×10-16 cm2. The ionization cross sections of the doubly charged ions are more than one order of magnitude lower than the cross section of WF5+. Double ionization processes account for 21% of the total ion yield at 120 eV. The absolute total ionization cross section of WF6 was obtained as the sum of all measured partial ionization cross sections and is compared with available calculated cross sections.

  10. Measurement of the B cross section at CDF via B semileptonic decays

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    Using data collected during the 1992--1993 collider run at Fermilab, CDF has reconstructed several hundred charmed mesons (D{sup 0}, D{sup +}, D{sup *+} and D{sub s}) in association with leptons from B semileptonic decays. We report on a measurement of the cross section of B and B{sub s} mesons as a function of transverse momentum this sample. The observation of a charmed meson eliminates many systematic uncertainties in the background subtraction inherent in previous measurements from inclusive lepton samples, and allows the backgrounds to be measured from the data. The B meson PT range probed by the lepton+charm technique is 18 GeV and above, and thus these measurements complement similar measurements at lower PT in the fully exclusive channels B {yields} J/{psi}K and B {yields} J/{psi}K{sup *}. Results are compared to other Tevatron measurements and Next-To-Leading-Order QCD predictions.

  11. Cross Section Measurements of 12C+16O Fusion Reaction at Stellar Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Wanpeng; Fang, X.; Beard, M.; Gilardy, G.; Jung, H.; Liu, Q.; Lyons, S.; Robertson, D.; Setoodehnia, K.; Seymour, C.; Stech, E.; Vande Kolk, B.; Wiescher, M.; de Souza, R.; Hudan, S.; Singh, V.; Tang, X.; Uberseder, E.

    2016-09-01

    12C+16O is one of the three fusion reactions (12C+12C, 12C+16O, and 16O+16O) that play an important role at the late stage of stellar evolution in massive stars. The previous meassurements of its cross section at low energies rely on the singles measurements of either gamma rays or charged particles. New measurement was conducted for the 12C+16O reaction at Ecm = 3.64 - 4.93 MeV with the detection of both gammas and charged particles using the high intensity St ANA accelerator at the University of Notre Dame. The protons and alphas from the fusion evaporation were measured by a large area silicon strip detector array (SAND) while the gamma rays were detected by one large volume HPGe detector right after the target. Statistical model calculation were employed to interpret the experimental results. This provided a more reliable extrapolation for the 12C+16O fusion cross section, reducing substantially the uncertainty for stellar model simulations. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation through Grant Numbers PHY-1068192 and PHY-1419765 and the Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics under Grant No. PHY-0822648.

  12. Measurement of the t-channel single top quark production cross section

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Abolins, Maris A.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Aguilo, Ernest; Ahsan, Mahsana; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; /Michigan U. /Augustana Coll., Sioux Falls /Northeastern U.

    2009-07-01

    The D0 collaboration reports direct evidence for electroweak production of single top quarks through the t-channel exchange of a virtual W boson. This is the first analysis to isolate an individual single top quark production channel. We select events containing an isolated electron or muon, missing transverse energy, and two, three or four jets from 2.3 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. One or two of the jets are identified as containing a b hadron. We combine three multivariate techniques optimized for the t-channel process to measure the t- and s-channel cross sections simultaneously. We measure cross sections of 3.14{sub -0.80}{sup +0.94} pb for the t-channel and 1.05 {+-} 0.81 pb for the s-channel. The measured t-channel result is found to have a significance of 4.8 standard deviations and is consistent with the standard model prediction.

  13. Measurement of low-$$p_T$$ $D^+$ meson production cross-section at CDF II

    DOE PAGES

    Marchese, L.

    2017-03-17

    In this paper I report on a measurement of the low- p T D + -meson production cross-section in proton-antiproton collisions at 1.96 TeV center-of-mass energy, using the full data set collected by the CDF experiment at the Tevatron collider during Run II. The measurement is performed in a yet unexplored low transverse momentum range, down to 1.5 GeV/ c . The actual QCD theory cannot predict the behavior of the strong interactions in the low transferred-four-momentum region because in these kinematic conditions the strong coupling constant is of the order of the unity. Thus, a perturbative expansion is notmore » useful. At present, several phenomenological models have been proposed, but they are able to describe only a few aspects of the observed physical quantities and not the full complexity. Experimental results in these conditions are then crucial to test new QCD models. The measurement of the differential cross section at low p T plays an important role in this context allowing refinement of current knowledge. While these results lie within the band of theoretical uncertainty, differences in shape suggest that theoretical predictions can benefit from further refinement taking account of them.« less

  14. A Neutron Source Facility for Neutron Cross-Section Measurements on Radioactive Targets at RIA

    SciTech Connect

    Ahle, L E; Bernstein, L; Rusnak, B; Berio, R

    2003-05-20

    The stockpile stewardship program is interested in neutron cross-section measurements on nuclei that are a few nucleons away from stability. Since neutron targets do not exist, radioactive targets are the only way to directly perform these measurements. This requires a facility that can provide high production rates for these short-lived nuclei as well as a source of neutrons. The Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) promises theses high production rates. Thus, adding a co-located neutron source facility to the RIA project baseline would allow these neutron cross-section measurements to be made. A conceptual design for such a neutron source has been developed, which would use two accelerators, a Dynamitron and a linac, to create the neutrons through a variety of reactions (d-d, d-t, deuteron break-up, p-Li). This range of reactions is needed in order to provide the desired energy range from 10's of keV to 20 MeV. The facility would also have hot cells to perform chemistry on the radioactive material both before and after neutron irradiation. The present status of this design and direction of future work will be discussed.

  15. Partial gamma-ray cross section measurements in 109Ag(n, x n y p gamma) reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Fotiadis, Nikolaos; Devlin, Matthew James; Nelson, Ronald Owen; Carroll, James

    2015-06-02

    We report on absolute partial cross sections for production of discrete γ-rays using 109Ag(n, xnypγ) reactions with x ≤ 7 and y ≤ 1 in a total of 12 reaction channels. The data were taken using the GEANIE spectrometer comprised of 20 high-purity Ge detectors with 20 BGO escape-suppression shields. The broad-spectrum pulsed neutron beam of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center’s (LANSCE) WNR facility provided neutrons in the energy range from 0.2 to 300 MeV. The time-of- flight technique was used to determine the incident neutron energies. Partial γ-ray cross sections have been measured for a total of 109 transitions and for neutron energies 0.8 MeV< En<300 MeV. An estimate of the population of isomers in the (n, n'), (n, 2n) and (n, 3n) channels was made.

  16. Measurement of the radiative neutron capture cross section of Pb206 and its astrophysical implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domingo-Pardo, C.; Abbondanno, U.; Aerts, G.; Álvarez, H.; Alvarez-Velarde, F.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Assimakopoulos, P.; Audouin, L.; Badurek, G.; Baumann, P.; Bečvář, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Bisterzo, S.; Calviño, F.; Calviani, M.; Cano-Ott, D.; Capote, R.; Carrapiço, C.; Cennini, P.; Chepel, V.; Chiaveri, E.; Colonna, N.; Cortes, G.; Couture, A.; Cox, J.; Dahlfors, M.; David, S.; Dillman, I.; Dolfini, R.; Dridi, W.; Duran, I.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Embid-Segura, M.; Ferrant, L.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Fitzpatrick, L.; Frais-Koelbl, H.; Fujii, K.; Furman, W.; Gallino, R.; Goncalves, I.; Gonzalez-Romero, E.; Goverdovski, A.; Gramegna, F.; Griesmayer, E.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Haas, B.; Haight, R.; Heil, M.; Herrera-Martinez, A.; Igashira, M.; Isaev, M.; Jericha, E.; Käppeler, F.; Kadi, Y.; Karadimos, D.; Karamanis, D.; Kerveno, M.; Ketlerov, V.; Koehler, P.; Konovalov, V.; Kossionides, E.; Krtička, M.; Lamboudis, C.; Leeb, H.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, I.; Lozano, M.; Lukic, S.; Marganiec, J.; Marrone, S.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Moreau, C.; Mosconi, M.; Neves, F.; Oberhummer, H.; Oshima, M.; O'Brien, S.; Pancin, J.; Papachristodoulou, C.; Papadopoulos, C.; Paradela, C.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Perrot, L.; Plag, R.; Plompen, A.; Plukis, A.; Poch, A.; Pretel, C.; Quesada, J.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rosetti, M.; Rubbia, C.; Rudolf, G.; Rullhusen, P.; Salgado, J.; Sarchiapone, L.; Savvidis, I.; Stephan, C.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tavora, L.; Terlizzi, R.; Vannini, G.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Villamarin, D.; Vincente, M. C.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Voss, F.; Walter, S.; Wendler, H.; Wiescher, M.; Wisshak, K.

    2007-10-01

    The (n,γ) cross section of Pb206 has been measured at the CERN n_TOF facility with high resolution in the energy range from 1 eV to 620 keV by using two optimized C6D6 detectors. In the investigated energy interval about 130 resonances could be observed, from which 61 had enough statistics to be reliably analyzed via the R-matrix analysis code SAMMY. Experimental uncertainties were minimized, in particular with respect to (i) angular distribution effects of the prompt capture γ-rays, and to (ii) the TOF-dependent background due to sample-scattered neutrons. Other background components were addressed by background measurements with an enriched Pb208 sample. The effect of the lower energy cutoff in the pulse height spectra of the C6D6 detectors was carefully corrected via Monte Carlo simulations. Compared to previous Pb206 values, the Maxwellian averaged capture cross sections derived from these data are about 20% and 9% lower at thermal energies of 5 keV and 30 keV, respectively. These new results have a direct impact on the s-process abundance of Pb206, which represents an important test for the interpretation of the cosmic clock based on the decay of U238.

  17. Measurements of the $ZZ$ production cross sections in the $$2\\ell2\

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-10-29

    Measurements of the ZZ production cross sections in proton–proton collisions at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV are presented. We found that candidate events for the leptonic decay mode ZZ → 2l2ν, where l denotes an electron or a muon, are reconstructed and selected from data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.1 (19.6)fb-1 at 7 (8) TeV collected with the CMS experiment. The measured cross sections, σ(pp → ZZ)=5.1+1.5-1.4(stat)+1.4-1.1(syst)±0.1(lumi)pb at 7 TeV, and 7.2+0.8-0.8(stat)+1.9-1.5(syst)±0.2(lumi)pb at 8 TeV, are in good agreement with the standard model predictions with next-to-leading-order accuracy. Furthermore, the selected data are analyzed to search formore » anomalous triple gauge couplings involving the ZZ final state. In the absence of any deviation from the standard model predictions, limits are set on the relevant parameters. As a result, these limits are then combined with the previously published CMS results for ZZ in 4l final states, yielding the most stringent constraints on the anomalous couplings.« less

  18. 232Th, 233Pa, and 234U capture cross-section measurements in moderated neutron flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bringer, O.; Isnard, H.; AlMahamid, I.; Chartier, F.; Letourneau, A.

    2008-07-01

    The Th-U cycle was studied through the evolution of a 100 μg 232Th sample irradiated in a moderated neutron flux of 8.010 14 n/cm 2/s, intensity close to that of a thermal molten salt reactor. After 43 days of irradiation and 6 months of cooling, a precise mass spectrometric analysis, using both TIMS and MC-ICP-MS techniques, was performed, according to a rigorous methodology. The measured thorium and uranium isotopic ratios in the final irradiated sample were then compared with integral simulations based on evaluated data; an overall good agreement was seen. Four important thermal neutron-capture cross-sections were also extracted from the measurements, 232Th (7.34±0.21 b), 233Pa (38.34±1.78 b), 234U (106.12±3.34 b), and 235U (98.15±11.24 b). Our 232Th and 235U results confirmed existing values whereas the cross-sections of 233Pa and 234U (both key parameters) have been redefined.

  19. Measurement of the Single Top Quark Production Cross Section at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, Michael G.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, Dante E.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, Alberto; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab /Purdue U.

    2008-09-01

    We report a measurement of the single top quark production cross section in 2.2 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collision data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Candidate events are classified as signal-like by three parallel analyses which use likelihood, matrix element, and neural network discriminants. These results are combined in order to improve the sensitivity. We observe a signal consistent with the standard model prediction, but inconsistent with the background only model by 3.7 standard deviations with a median expected sensitivity of 4.9 standard deviations. We measure a cross section of 2.2{sub -0.6}{sup +0.7}(stat+sys) pb, extract the CKM matrix element value |V{sub tb}| = 0.88{sub -0.12}{sup +0.13}(stat + sys) {+-} 0.07(theory), and set the limit |V{sub tb}| > 0.66 at the 95% C.L.

  20. Measurement of the single-top-quark production cross section at CDF.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzurri, P; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Bednar, P; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calancha, C; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Derwent, P F; di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Genser, K; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Gessler, A; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Koay, S A; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kurata, M; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Liss, T M; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Luci, C; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlok, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Peiffer, T; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Renz, M; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schall, I; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Tourneur, S; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wagner, W; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Xie, S; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2008-12-19

    We report a measurement of the single-top-quark production cross section in 2.2 fb;{-1} of pp collision data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV. Candidate events are classified as signal-like by three parallel analyses which use likelihood, matrix element, and neural network discriminants. These results are combined in order to improve the sensitivity. We observe a signal consistent with the standard model prediction, but inconsistent with the background-only model by 3.7 standard deviations with a median expected sensitivity of 4.9 standard deviations. We measure a cross section of 2.2(-0.6)(+0.7)(stat+syst) pb, extract the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix-element value |V(tb)|=0.88(-0.12)(+0.13)(stat+syst)+/-0.07(theory), and set the limit |V(tb)|>0.66 at the 95% C.L.

  1. Measurement of alpha-induced reaction cross sections on erbium isotopes for γ process studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, G. G.; Szücs, T.; Török, Zs.; Fülöp, Zs.; Gyürky, Gy.; Halász, Z.; Somorjai, E.; Rauscher, T.

    2014-05-01

    The cross sections of the 162Er(α,γ)166Yb and 162,164,166Er(α,n)165,167,169Yb reactions have been measured at MTA Atomki. The radiative alpha capture reaction cross section was measured between Ec.m. = 11.21 MeV and Ec.m. = 16.09 MeV just above the astrophysically relevant energy region (which lies between 7.8 and 11.48 MeV at T9 = 3 GK). The 162Er(α,n)165Yb, 164Er(α,n)167Yb and 166Er(α,n)169Yb reactions were studied between Ec.m. = 12.19 and 16.09 MeV, Ec.m. = 13.17 and 16.59 MeV and Ec.m. = 12.68 and 17.08 MeV, respectively. The aim of this work is to provide experimental data for modeling the γ process which is thought to be responsible for the production of the proton-rich isotopes heavier than iron.

  2. CROSS-SECTIONAL AND LONGITUDINAL MEASUREMENTS OF NEIGHBORHOOD EXPERIENCE AND THEIR EFFECTS ON CHILDREN*

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Margot I.; Mare, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the abundance of research on neighborhoods’ effects on children, most studies of neighborhood effects are cross-sectional, rendering them unable to depict the dynamic nature of social life, and obscuring important aspects of community processes and outcomes. This study uses residential histories from the Los Angeles Family and Neighborhood Survey and the Child Development Supplement of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics to explore two questions: 1) How much do residential mobility and neighborhood change contribute to the overall socioeconomic variation in children’s neighborhoods? 2) Does measuring community factors at more than one point in time matter for the conclusions that we draw from research on “neighborhood effects” on children’s behavioral, cognitive and health-related well-being? Residential mobility plays a non-trivial role over the period of childhood in determining children’s exposure to neighborhoods of different economic types. However, quantitative estimates of neighborhood effects that allow neighborhood characteristics to vary through residential mobility and neighborhood change do not depict a strikingly different picture from cross-sectional estimates. Children do not experience enough variation in their local surroundings to produce meaningful differences between static and dynamic measurements of neighborhoods. We also uncover interesting regional and race/ethnic differences in neighborhood dynamics and neighborhood effects. PMID:25197150

  3. Measurement of the hadronic cross section in electron-positron annihilation

    SciTech Connect

    Clearwater, S.

    1983-11-01

    This thesis describes the most precise measurement to date of the ratio R, the hadronic cross section in lowest order electron-positron annihilation to the cross section for muon pair production in lowest order electron-positron annihilation. This experiment is of interest because R is a fundamental parameter that tests in a model independent way the basic assumptions of strong interaction theories. According to the assumptions of one of these theories the value of R is determined simply from the electric charges, spin, and color assignments of the produced quark-pairs. The experiment was carried out with the MAgnetic Calorimeter using collisions of 14.5 GeV electrons and positrons at the 2200m circumference PEP storage ring at SLAC. The MAC detector is one of the best-suited collider detectors for measuring R due to its nearly complete coverage of the full angular range. The data for this experiment were accumulated between February 1982 and April 1983 corresponding to a total event sample of about 40,000 hadronic events. About 5% of the data were taken with 14 GeV beams and the rest of the data were taken with 14.5 GeV beams. A description of particle interactions and experimental considerations is given.

  4. Measurement of alpha-induced reaction cross sections on erbium isotopes for γ process studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kiss, G. G.; Szücs, T.; Török, Zs.; Fülöp, Zs.; Gyürky, Gy.; Halász, Z.; Somorjai, E.; Rauscher, T.

    2014-05-02

    The cross sections of the {sup 162}Er(α,γ){sup 166}Yb and {sup 162,164,166}Er(α,n){sup 165,167,169}Yb reactions have been measured at MTA Atomki. The radiative alpha capture reaction cross section was measured between E{sub c.m.} = 11.21 MeV and E{sub c.m.} = 16.09 MeV just above the astrophysically relevant energy region (which lies between 7.8 and 11.48 MeV at T{sub 9} = 3 GK). The {sup 162}Er(α,n){sup 165}Yb, {sup 164}Er(α,n){sup 167}Yb and {sup 166}Er(α,n){sup 169}Yb reactions were studied between E{sub c.m.} = 12.19 and 16.09 MeV, E{sub c.m.} = 13.17 and 16.59 MeV and E{sub c.m.} = 12.68 and 17.08 MeV, respectively. The aim of this work is to provide experimental data for modeling the γ process which is thought to be responsible for the production of the proton-rich isotopes heavier than iron.

  5. Excitation Cross Section Measurement for n=3 to n=2 Line Emission in Fe17+ to Fe23+

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H; Gu, M F; Beiersdorfer, P; Boyce, K R; Brown, G V; Kahn, S M; Kelley, R L; Kilbourne, C A; Porter, F S; Scofield, J H

    2006-02-08

    The authors report the measurement of electron impact excitation cross sections for the strong iron L-shell 3 {yields} 2 lines of Fe XVIII through Fe XXIV at the EBIT-I electron beam ion trap using a crystal spectrometer and a 6 x 6 pixel array microcalorimeter. The cross sections were determined by direct normalization to the well established cross section of radiative electron capture through a sophisticated model analysis which results in the excitation cross section for 48 lines at multiple electron energies. They also studied the electron density dependent nature of the emission lines, which is demonstrated by the effective excitation cross section of the 3d {yields} 2p transition in Fe XXI.

  6. Measurement of the forward Z boson production cross-section in pp collisions at TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casanova Mohr, R.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruscio, F.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garcìa Pardiñas, J.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gastaldi, U.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Geraci, A.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lowdon, P.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Osorio Rodrigues, B.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skillicorn, I.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Sterpka, F.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tekampe, T.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Todd, J.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ubeda Garcia, M.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.

    2015-08-01

    A measurement of the production cross-section for Z bosons that decay to muons is presented. The data were recorded by the LHCb detector during pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 1.0 fb-1. The cross-section is measured for muons in the pseudorapidity range 2 .0 < η < 4 .5 with transverse momenta p T > 20 GeV /c. The dimuon mass is restricted to 60 < M μ + μ - < 120 GeV /c 2. The measured cross-section is

  7. Neutron Capture Cross Section Measurement on 91Zr at J-PARC/MLF/ANNRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, Jun-ichi; Yashima, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Shoji; Furutaka, Kazuyoshi; Hara, Kaoru Y.; Harada, Hideo; Hirose, Kentaro; Igashira, Masayuki; Katabuchi, Tatsuya; Kimura, Atsushi; Kino, Koichi; Kitatani, Fumito; Kiyanagi, Yoshiaki; Koizumi, Mitsuo; Mizumoto, Motoharu; Sano, Tadafumi; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Toh, Yosuke

    2015-05-01

    The neutron capture cross section measurement on 91Zr was performed at neutron TOF beam line ANNRI installed at J-PARC/MLF. Prompt capture gamma rays from the sample were detected with an array of large Ge detectors at a distance of 21.5 m from the spallation neutron source by the time-of-fligh (TOF) method. The neutron capture gamma-ray pulse-height spectra from the 182-eV p-wave resonance and the 292-eV s-wave resonance were obtained by gating on the TOF regions, respectively. Though the decay patterns of primary transitions from the capture state were quite different between resonances, the prominent characteristics common to both resonances was the very strong ground-state transition from the 935-keV state. Therefore, a ground-state transition method was applied to obtain the capture yield, so that the background components due to impurities were successfully eliminated. The preliminary result of the neutron capture cross section for 91Zr up to 5 keV is presented.

  8. Measurement and resonance analysis of the 237Np neutron capture cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, C.; Cano-Ott, D.; Mendoza, E.; Abbondanno, U.; Aerts, G.; Álvarez-Velarde, F.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Assimakopoulos, P.; Audouin, L.; Badurek, G.; Baumann, P.; Becvár, F.; Belloni, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Calviño, F.; Calviani, M.; Capote, R.; Carrapiço, C.; Carrillo de Albornoz, A.; Cennini, P.; Chepel, V.; Chiaveri, E.; Colonna, N.; Cortes, G.; Couture, A.; Cox, J.; Dahlfors, M.; David, S.; Dillmann, I.; Dolfini, R.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dridi, W.; Duran, I.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Embid-Segura, M.; Ferrant, L.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Fitzpatrick, L.; Frais-Koelbl, H.; Fujii, K.; Furman, W.; Goncalves, I.; González-Romero, E.; Goverdovski, A.; Gramegna, F.; Griesmayer, E.; Gunsing, F.; Haas, B.; Haight, R.; Heil, M.; Herrera-Martinez, A.; Igashira, M.; Isaev, S.; Jericha, E.; Käppeler, F.; Kadi, Y.; Karadimos, D.; Karamanis, D.; Ketlerov, V.; Kerveno, M.; Koehler, P.; Konovalov, V.; Kossionides, E.; Krtička, M.; Lampoudis, C.; Leeb, H.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, I.; Lossito, R.; Lozano, M.; Lukic, S.; Marganiec, J.; Marques, L.; Marrone, S.; Martínez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Moreau, C.; Mosconi, M.; Neves, F.; Oberhummer, H.; O'Brien, S.; Oshima, M.; Pancin, J.; Papachristodoulou, C.; Papadopoulos, C.; Paradela, C.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Perrot, L.; Pigni, M. T.; Plag, R.; Plompen, A.; Plukis, A.; Poch, A.; Praena, J.; Pretel, C.; Quesada, J.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rosetti, M.; Rubbia, C.; Rudolf, G.; Rullhusen, P.; Salgado, J.; Santos, C.; Sarchiapone, L.; Savvidis, I.; Stephan, C.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tavora, L.; Terlizzi, R.; Vannini, G.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Villamarin, D.; Vicente, M. C.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Voss, F.; Walter, S.; Wendler, H.; Wiescher, M.; Wisshak, K.

    2012-04-01

    The neutron capture cross section of 237Np was measured between 0.7 and 500 eV at the CERN n_TOF facility using the 4π BaF2 Total Absorption Calorimeter. The experimental capture yield was extracted minimizing all the systematic uncertainties and was analyzed together with the most reliable transmission data available using the sammy code. The result is a complete set of individual as well as average resonance parameters [D0=0.56(2) eV, <Γγ>=40.9(18) meV, 104S0=0.98(6), R'=9.8(6) fm]. The capture cross section obtained in this work is in overall agreement with the evaluations and the data of Weston and Todd [Nucl. Sci. Eng. 79, 184 (1981)], thus showing sizable differences with respect to previous data from Scherbakov [J. Nucl. Sci. Technol. 42, 135 (2005)] and large discrepancies with data Kobayashi [J. Nucl. Sci. Technol.JNSTAX0022-313110.3327/jnst.39.111 39, 111 (2002)]. The results indicate that a new evaluation combining the present capture data with reliable transmission data would allow reaching an accuracy better than 4%, in line with the uncertainty requirements of the nuclear data community for the design and operation of current and future nuclear devices.

  9. Surrogate measurements of the 241,242Am (n,f) cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ressler, J. J.; Burke, J. T.; Escher, J. E.; Adekola, A.; Austin, R. E. A.; Basunia, M. S.; Beausang, C. W.; Bernstein, L. A.; Bleuel, D.; Gostic, J.; Henderson, R. H.; Hughes, R. O.; Hurst, A.; Kritcher, A.; Mattoon, C. M.; Munson, J.; Phair, L. W.; Ross, T.; Scielzo, N. D.; Stoyer, M. A.

    2011-10-01

    New reactor designs and materials, reprocessing efforts, and transmutation of nuclear waste play significant roles in the future of nuclear energy. New or improved neutron measurements on a number of isotopes are needed to determine feasibility, effectiveness, and safety issues for the novel engineering efforts. Data collection is often hampered by the need for radioactive targets; the use of such targets is limited to longer-lived isotopes due to the large background induced by the decay of the material. However, cross sections for isotopes of interest can be obtained indirectly using light-ion reactions on long-lived neighbors. Decay from the compound state is assumed to be independent of the production reaction, allowing reactions with the neighboring isotopes to be used as a surrogate for the reaction of interest. Results from the neutron-induced fission cross sections of 241Am and 242Am, performed via surrogates 243Am(3He, α' f) and 243Am(3He, 3He' f), respectively, will be shown. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by LLNL under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  10. The First Measurement of the Left-Right Cross Section Asymmetry in Z Boson Production

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-David, R

    2004-01-06

    The first measurement of the left-right cross section asymmetry (A{sub LR}) in Z{sup 0} boson production has been made with the SLAC Large Detector (SLD) at the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC). The measurement was performed at a center-of-mass energy (E{sub cm}) of 91.55 GeV with a longitudinally polarized electron beam. The average beam polarization was (22.4 {+-} 0.6)%. Using a sample of 10,224 Z{sup 0} decays, A{sub LR} is measured to be 0.102 {+-} 0.O44(stat) {+-} 0.003(syst), which determines the effective electroweak mixing angle to be sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W}{sup eff} = 0.2375 {+-} 0.0056(stat) {+-} 0.0004(syst).

  11. Absolute single photoionization cross-section measurements of Rb2+ ions: experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macaluso, D. A.; Bogolub, K.; Johnson, A.; Aguilar, A.; Kilcoyne, A. L. D.; Bilodeau, R. C.; Bautista, M.; Kerlin, A. B.; Sterling, N. C.

    2016-12-01

    Absolute single photoionization cross-section measurements of Rb2+ ions were performed using synchrotron radiation and the photo-ion, merged-beams technique at the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Measurements were made at a photon energy resolution of 13.5 ± 2.5 meV from 37.31 to 44.08 eV spanning the 2P{}3/2o ground state and 2P{}1/2o metastable state ionization thresholds. Multiple autoionizing resonance series arising from each initial state are identified using quantum defect theory. The measurements are compared to Breit-Pauli R-matrix calculations with excellent agreement between theory and experiment.

  12. Measurement of the e+e-→ω η cross section below √{s }=2 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achasov, M. N.; Barnyakov, A. Yu.; Beloborodov, K. I.; Berdyugin, A. V.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Botov, A. A.; Dimova, T. V.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kardapoltsev, L. V.; Kasaev, A. S.; Kharlamov, A. G.; Kirpotin, A. N.; Kovrizhin, D. P.; Koop, I. A.; Korol, A. A.; Koshuba, S. V.; Kupich, A. S.; Martin, K. A.; Melnikova, N. A.; Obrazovsky, A. E.; Pakhtusova, E. V.; Senchenko, A. I.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Silagadze, Z. K.; Shatunov, Yu. M.; Shtol, D. A.; Shwartz, D. B.; Skrinsky, A. N.; Surin, I. K.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Vasiljev, A. V.

    2016-11-01

    The cross section of the process e+e-→ω η is measured in the center-of-mass energy range 1.34-2.00 GeV. The analysis is based on data collected with the SND detector at the VEPP-2000 e+e- collider. The measured e+e-→ω η cross section is the most accurate to date. A significant discrepancy is observed between our data and previous BABAR measurements.

  13. Measurement of fission cross section for 232Th (n,f) 131 ZX ( Z = 50 , 51, 52, 53) reaction induced by neutrons around 14 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Chang-lin; Qiu, Yi-jia; Wang, Qiang; Zhang, Zheng-wei; Zhang, Qian; Tan, Jun-cai; Lai, Cai-feng; Fang, Kai-hong

    2017-06-01

    The fission cross sections of 232Th (n,f) 131m, gSn , 232Th (n,f) 131Sb , 232Th (n,f) 131m, gTe , 232Th (n,f) 131I fission reactions induced by 14MeV neutrons were measured precisely with the neutron activation technique. The neutron flux was monitored by accompanying α particle in the irradiation and the neutron energies were determined by the cross section ratio of 90Zr (n,2n) 89Zr to 93Nb (n,2n) 92mNb reaction. The values of the cross sections of 232Th (n,f) 131m, gSn were analyzed, and the cross sections of 232Th (n,f) 131Sb were deduced to be 6.5± 0.7 , 6.3± 0.6 , 6.1± 0.6 mb at 14.1± 0.3 , 14.5± 0.3 and 14.8± 0.3 MeV, respectively. The values of the cross sections of 232Th (n,f) 131gTe were deduced to be 1.8± 0.1 , 1.5± 0.1 and 1.4± 0.1 mb at 14.1± 0.3 , 14.5± 0.3 and 14.8± 0.3 MeV, respectively. The values of the cross sections of 232Th (n,f) 131I were given as 1.8± 0.2 , 1.6± 0.2 , 1.5± 0.1 mb at 14.1± 0.3 , 14.5± 0.3 and 14.8± 0.3 MeV, respectively.

  14. Nonmechanical scanning laser Doppler velocimeter for cross-sectional two-dimensional velocity measurement.

    PubMed

    Maru, Koichi; Hata, Takahiro

    2012-12-01

    We propose a two-dimensional scanning laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) that does not require any moving mechanisms in its probe. In the proposed LDV, the measurement position can be scanned in two dimensions on a cross-sectional plane perpendicular to the direction of flow. The combination of the change in wavelength and change in port of the fiber array input to the probe is utilized for the scan. The experimental results using a sensor probe setup indicate that the measurement position can be scanned in two dimensions using the proposed method. The scanning range was estimated to be 39.7 mm in the axial direction over the wavelength range of 1536-1554 nm and 26.1 mm in the transverse direction for the use of 22 ports of the fiber array.

  15. Measurements of Differential Z/gamma*+jet+X Cross Sections with the D0 Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Lammers, Sabine

    2009-11-01

    We present measurements of differential cross sections in inclusive Z/{gamma}* plus jet production in a data sample of 1 fb{sup -1} collected with the D0 detector in proton antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Measured variables include the Z/{gamma}* transverse momentum (p{sub T}{sup Z}) and rapidity (y{sup Z}), the leading jet transverse momentum (p{sub T}{sup jet}) and rapidity (y{sup jet}), as well as various angles of the Z+jet system. We compare the results to different Monte Carlo event generators and next-to-leading order perturbative QCD (NLO pQCD) predictions, with non-perturbative corrections applied.

  16. New measurement of inclusive deep inelastic scattering cross sections at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picuric, Ivana

    2016-03-01

    A combined measurement is presented of all inclusive deep inelastic cross sections measured by the H1 and ZEUS collaborations in neutral and charged current unpolarised e±p scattering at HERA. The H1 and ZEUS collaborations collected total integrated luminosities of approximately 500 pb-1 each, divided about equally between e+p and e-p scattering. They include data taken at electron (positron) beam energy of 27.5 GeV and proton beam energies of 920, 820, 575 and 460 GeV corresponding to centre-of-mass energy of 320, 300, 251 and 225 GeV respectively. This enabled the two collaborations to explore a large phase space in Bjorken x and negative four-momentum-transfer squared, Q2. The combination method takes the correlations of the systematic uncertainties into account, resulting in improved accuracy.

  17. First measurements of inclusive muon neutrino charged current differential cross sections on argon.

    PubMed

    Anderson, C; Antonello, M; Baller, B; Bolton, T; Bromberg, C; Cavanna, F; Church, E; Edmunds, D; Ereditato, A; Farooq, S; Fleming, B; Greenlee, H; Guenette, R; Haug, S; Horton-Smith, G; James, C; Klein, E; Lang, K; Laurens, P; Linden, S; McKee, D; Mehdiyev, R; Page, B; Palamara, O; Partyka, K; Patch, A; Rameika, G; Rebel, B; Rossi, B; Soderberg, M; Spitz, J; Szelc, A M; Weber, M; Yang, T; Zeller, G

    2012-04-20

    The ArgoNeuT Collaboration presents the first measurements of inclusive muon neutrino charged current differential cross sections on argon. Obtained in the NuMI neutrino beam line at Fermilab, the flux-integrated results are reported in terms of outgoing muon angle and momentum. The data are consistent with the Monte Carlo expectation across the full range of kinematics sampled, 0°<θ(μ)<36° and 0measurements allow tests of low-energy neutrino scattering models important for interpreting results from long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments designed to investigate CP violation and the orientation of the neutrino mass hierarchy.

  18. A precise measurement of the left-right cross section asymmetry in Z boson production

    SciTech Connect

    Lath, A.

    1994-09-01

    The thesis presents a measurement of the left-right asymmetry, A{sub LR}, n the production cross section of Z Bosons produced by e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilations, using polarized electrons, at a center of mass energy of 91.26 Gev. The data presented was recorded by the SLD detector at the SLAC Linear Collider during the 1993 run. The mean luminosity-weighted polarization of the electron beam was {rho}{sup lum} = (63.0{+-}1.1)%. Using a sample of 49,392 Z events, we measure A{sub LR} to be 0.1626{+-}0.0071(stat){+-}0.0030(sys.), which determined the effective weak mixing angle to be sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W}{sup eff} = 0.2292{+-}0.0009(stat.){+-}0.0004(sys.). This result differs from that expected by the Standard Model of Particles and Fields by 2.5 standard deviations.

  19. New measurement of inclusive deep inelastic scattering cross sections at HERA

    SciTech Connect

    Picuric, Ivana

    2016-03-25

    A combined measurement is presented of all inclusive deep inelastic cross sections measured by the H1 and ZEUS collaborations in neutral and charged current unpolarised e{sup ±}p scattering at HERA. The H1 and ZEUS collaborations collected total integrated luminosities of approximately 500 pb{sup −1} each, divided about equally between e{sup +}p and e{sup −}p scattering. They include data taken at electron (positron) beam energy of 27.5 GeV and proton beam energies of 920, 820, 575 and 460 GeV corresponding to centre-of-mass energy of 320, 300, 251 and 225 GeV respectively. This enabled the two collaborations to explore a large phase space in Bjorken x and negative four-momentum-transfer squared, Q{sup 2}. The combination method takes the correlations of the systematic uncertainties into account, resulting in improved accuracy.

  20. Measurement of the ratio σ{tt}/σ{Z/γ{*}→ll} and precise extraction of the tt cross section.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calancha, C; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Chwalek, T; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; d'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; di Giovanni, G P; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Ebina, K; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Ershaidat, N; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Gessler, A; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Hughes, R E; Hurwitz, M; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, H W; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Lee, S W; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C-J; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Lovas, L; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Mastrandrea, P; Mathis, M; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Miladinovic, N; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mondragon, M N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlock, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Neubauer, S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramanov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Peiffer, T; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Potamianos, K; Poukhov, O; Prokoshin, F; Pronko, A; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Renton, P; Renz, M; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Rutherford, B; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Santi, L; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Simonenko, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thome, J; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Ttito-Guzmán, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Tourneur, S; Trovato, M; Tsai, S-Y; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vidal, M; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Weinelt, J; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanetti, A; Zeng, Y; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2010-07-02

    We report a measurement of the ratio of the tt to Z/γ{*} production cross sections in sqrt[s]=1.96  TeV pp collisions using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of up to 4.6  fb{-1}, collected by the CDF II detector. The tt cross section ratio is measured using two complementary methods, a b-jet tagging measurement and a topological approach. By multiplying the ratios by the well-known theoretical Z/γ{*}→ll cross section predicted by the standard model, the extracted tt cross sections are effectively insensitive to the uncertainty on luminosity. A best linear unbiased estimate is used to combine both measurements with the result σ{tt}=7.70±0.52  pb, for a top-quark mass of 172.5  GeV/c{2}.

  1. Determination of spectroscopic properties of atmospheric molecules from high resolution vacuum ultraviolet cross section and wavelength measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, W. H.; Yoshino, K.; Freeman, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    Progress is given on work on: cross section measurements in the transmission window regions of the Schumann-Runge bands of oxygen; the determinations of predissociation linewidths; the theoretical calculation of band oscillator strengths of the Schumann-Runge absorption bands of O-16O-18; the determination of molecular spectroscopic constants; and the combined Herzberg continuum cross sections. The experimental investigations relevant to the cross section measurements, predissociation linewidths, and molecular spectroscopic constants are effected at high resolution with a 6.65 m scanning spectrometer which is, by virtue of its small instrumental width (FWHM = 0.0013 nm), suitable for cross section measurements of molecular bands with discrete rotational structure. Such measurements are needed for accurate calculations of the stratospheric production of atomic oxygen and heavy ozone formed following the photo-predissociation of O-16O-18 by solar radiation penetrating between the absorption lines of O-16(sub 2).

  2. An ultrasonic methodology for muscle cross section measurement of support space flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatfield, Thomas R.; Klaus, David M.; Simske, Steven J.

    2004-09-01

    The number one priority for any manned space mission is the health and safety of its crew. The study of the short and long term physiological effects on humans is paramount to ensuring crew health and mission success. One of the challenges associated in studying the physiological effects of space flight on humans, such as loss of bone and muscle mass, has been that of readily attaining the data needed to characterize the changes. The small sampling size of astronauts, together with the fact that most physiological data collection tends to be rather tedious, continues to hinder elucidation of the underlying mechanisms responsible for the observed changes that occur in space. Better characterization of the muscle loss experienced by astronauts requires that new technologies be implemented. To this end, we have begun to validate a 360° ultrasonic scanning methodology for muscle measurements and have performed empirical sampling of a limb surrogate for comparison. Ultrasonic wave propagation was simulated using 144 stations of rotated arm and calf MRI images. These simulations were intended to provide a preliminary check of the scanning methodology and data analysis before its implementation with hardware. Pulse-echo waveforms were processed for each rotation station to characterize fat, muscle, bone, and limb boundary interfaces. The percentage error between MRI reference values and calculated muscle areas, as determined from reflection points for calf and arm cross sections, was -2.179% and +2.129%, respectively. These successful simulations suggest that ultrasound pulse scanning can be used to effectively determine limb cross-sectional areas. Cross-sectional images of a limb surrogate were then used to simulate signal measurements at several rotation angles, with ultrasonic pulse-echo sampling performed experimentally at the same stations on the actual limb surrogate to corroborate the results. The objective of the surrogate sampling was to compare the signal

  3. Measurement of the sup 3 He( n ,. gamma. ) sup 4 He cross section at thermal neutron energies

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfs, F.L.H.; Freedman, S.J.; Nelson, J.E. ); Dewey, M.S.; Greene, G.L. )

    1989-12-18

    We have measured the cross section for radiative capture of thermal neutrons on {sup 3}He. The measured cross section of 54{plus minus}6 {mu}b is used to estimate the astrophysical {ital S} factor for the reaction {sup 3}He({ital p},{ital e}{sup +}{nu}){sup 4}He which gives rise to high-energy neutrinos from the Sun.

  4. Experimental measurements with Monte Carlo corrections and theoretical calculations of neutron inelastic scattering cross section of 115In

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Xiao, Jun; Luo, Xiaobing

    2016-10-01

    The neutron inelastic scattering cross section of 115In has been measured by the activation technique at neutron energies of 2.95, 3.94, and 5.24 MeV with the neutron capture cross sections of 197Au as an internal standard. The effects of multiple scattering and flux attenuation were corrected using the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. Based on the experimental values, the 115In neutron inelastic scattering cross sections data were theoretically calculated between the 1 and 15 MeV with the TALYS software code, the theoretical results of this study are in reasonable agreement with the available experimental results.

  5. Measured Total Cross Sections of Slow Neutrons Scattered by Solid Deuterium and Implications for Ultracold Neutron Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Atchison, F.; Blau, B.; Brandt, B. van den; Brys, T.; Daum, M.; Fierlinger, P.; Hautle, P.; Henneck, R.; Heule, S.; Kirch, K.; Kohlbrecher, J.; Kuehne, G.; Konter, J.A.; Pichlmaier, A.; Wokaun, A.; Bodek, K.; Kasprzak, M.; Kuzniak, M.; Geltenbort, P.; Zmeskal, J.

    2005-10-28

    The total scattering cross sections for slow neutrons with energies in the range 100 neV to 3 meV for solid ortho-{sup 2}H{sub 2} at 18 and 5 K, frozen from the liquid, have been measured. The 18 K cross sections are found to be in excellent agreement with theoretical expectations and for ultracold neutrons dominated by thermal up scattering. At 5 K the total scattering cross sections are found to be dominated by the crystal defects originating in temperature induced stress but not deteriorated by temperature cycles between 5 and 10 K.

  6. Measurement of the nu(mu)-CCQE cross-section in the SciBooNE experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Alcaraz-Aunion, Jose Luis; Walding, Joseph; /Imperial Coll., London

    2009-09-01

    SciBooNE is a neutrino and anti-neutrino cross-section experiment at Fermilab, USA. The SciBooNE experiment is summarized and two independent CCQE analyses are described. For one of the analyses, an absolute {nu}{sub {mu}}-CCQE cross section in the neutrino energy region (0.6-1.6) GeV is shown and the technique developed for such a purpose is also explained. The total cross section measured over this energy range agrees well with expectations, based on the NEUT event generator and using a value of 1.21 GeV for the CCQE axial mass.

  7. Characterization of the Medley setup for measurements of neutron-induced fission cross sections at the GANIL-NFS facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarrío, Diego; Prokofiev, Alexander V.; Gustavsson, Cecilia; Jansson, Kaj; Andersson-Sundén, Erik; Al-Adili, Ali; Pomp, Stephan

    2017-09-01

    Neutron-induced fission cross sections of 235U and 238U are widely used as standards for monitoring of neutron beams and fields. An absolute measurement of these cross sections at an absolute scale, i.e., versus the H(n,p) scattering cross section, is planned with the white neutron beam under construction at the Neutrons For Science (NFS) facility in GANIL. The experimental setup, based on PPACs and ΔE-ΔE-E telescopes containing Silicon and CsI(Tl) detectors, is described. The expected uncertainties are discussed.

  8. Using a Time Projection Chamber to Measure High Precision Neutron-Induced Fission Cross Sections

    SciTech Connect

    Manning, Brett

    2015-08-06

    2014 LANSCE run cycle data will provide a preliminary 239Pu(n,f) cross section and will quantify uncertainties: PID and Target/beam non-uniformities. Continued running during the 2015 LANSCE run cycle: Thin targets to see both fission fragments and 239Pu(n,f) cross section and fully quantified uncertainties

  9. Recent results on exclusive hadronic cross sections measurements at BaBar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlow, Roger

    2017-01-01

    The BaBar Collaboration has an intensive program studying hadronic cross sections in low-energy e+e- annihilations, accessible via initial-state radiation. Our measurements allow significant improvements in the precision of the predicted value of the muon anomalous magnetic moment. These improvements are necessary for shedding light on the current 3 sigma difference between the predicted and the experimental values. We have published results on a number of processes with two to six hadrons in the final state, and other final state are currently under investigation. We report here on the most recent results obtained by analysing the entire BaBar dataset, including the , and other final states.

  10. On the measurement of the proton-air cross section using longitudinal shower profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, R.; Blümer, J.; Engel, R.; Schüssler, F.; Unger, M.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we will discuss the prospects of deducing the proton-air cross section from fluorescence telescope measurements of extensive air showers. As it is not possible to observe the point of first interaction, X1, directly, other observables closely linked to X1 must be inferred from the longitudinal profiles. This introduces a dependence on the models used to describe the shower development. The most straightforward candidate for a good correlation to X1 is the depth of shower maximum Xmax. We will discuss the sensitivity of an Xmax-based analysis on σ and quantify the systematic uncertainties arising from the model dependence, parameters of the reconstruction method itself and a possible non-proton contamination of the selected shower sample.

  11. Preparation of iridium targets by electrodeposition for neutron capture cross section measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, Evelyn M.; Moody, W. Allen; Arnold, Charles; Bredeweg, Todd A.; Jandel, Marian; Rusev, Gencho Y.

    2016-03-01

    Here, the preparation of 191Ir and 193Ir electrodeposits for neutron capture cross-section measurements at the detector for advanced neutron capture experiments located at the at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center is described. The electrodeposition of iridium in the desired thickness of 0.4–1 mg/cm2 is challenging. Better yields and thicknesses were obtained using electrodeposition from isopropyl alcohol solutions than from ammonium sulfate solutions. 191Ir and 193Ir targets were initially prepared using the standard single-sided electrodeposition cell. Iridium electrodepositions using a double-sided electrodeposition cell were developed and were optimized, resulting in thick, uniform iridium deposits. LA UR 15-22475.

  12. Measurement of low energy neutrino cross sections with the PEANUT experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, A.

    2011-11-23

    The PEANUT experiment was designed to study neutrino interactions in the few GeV range using the NuMi beam at Fermilab. The detector uses a hybrid technique, being made of nuclear emulsions and scintillator trackers. Emulsion films act as a tracking device and they are interleaved with lead plates used as neutrino target. The detector is designed to reconstruct the topology of neutrino interactions at the single particle level. We present here the full reconstruction and analysis of a sample of 147 neutrino interactions occurred in the PEANUT detector and the measurement of the quasi-elastic, resonance and deep-inelastic contributions to the total charged current cross-section. This technique could be applied for the beam monitoring for future neutrino facilities.

  13. Alpha capture reaction cross section measurements on Sb isotopes by activation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korkulu, Z.; Özkan, N.; Kiss, G. G.; Szücs, T.; Fülöp, Zs; Güray, R. T.; Gyürky, Gy; Halász, Z.; Somorjai, E.; Török, Zs; Yalçin, C.

    2016-01-01

    Alpha induced reactions on natural and enriched antimony targets were investigated via the activation technique in the energy range from 9.74 MeV to 15.48 MeV, close to the upper end of the Gamow window at a temperature of 3 GK relevant to the γ-process. The experiments were carried out at the Institute for Nuclear Research, the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (MTA Atomki). 121Sb(α,γ)125I, 121Sb(α,n)124I and 123Sb(α,n)126I reactions were measured using a HPGe detector. In this work, the 121Sb(α,n)124 cross section results and the comparison with the theoretical predictions (obtained with standard settings of the statistical model codes NON-SMOKER and TALYS) were presented.

  14. The Top Quark Pair Production Cross Section Measurement at LHC-ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, Y.

    2013-03-01

    Measurements of the production cross section of top-quark pairs (tbar {t}) in proton-proton (pp) collisions at √ {s} = 7 TeV are presented using 0.70 fb-1 of data recorded with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Events are selected in the dilepton topologies characterized by two oppositelysigned leptons, multi-jets, and large missing transverse energy. The result is σ tbar {t} = 177 ± 6(stat.) +17-14(syst.) ±8(lumi.) pb. Further application of b-quark flavor tagging technique (b-tag) in the selection can discard backgrounds that do not contain b-quarks in their final states. The result with the b-tag is σ tbar {t}(stat.) ^{+18}_{-14}(syst.) +8-7(lumi.) pb. Both of the two results agree with the Standard Model prediction and with each other.

  15. New measurements of spin-dependent n-p cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Raichle, B.W.; Gould, C.R.; Haase, D.G.; Seely, M.L.; Walston, J.R.; Tornow, W.; Wilburn, W.S.; Raichle, B.W.; Gould, C.R.; Haase, D.G.; Seely, M.L.; Walston, J.R.; Tornow, W.; Wilburn, W.S.; Penttilae, S.I.; Hoffmann, G.W.

    1999-06-01

    We report on new measurements of the spin-dependent neutron-proton total cross-section differences in longitudinal and transverse geometries ({Delta}{sigma}{sub L} and {Delta}{sigma}{sub T} respectively) and between 5 and 20 MeV. These transmission experiments involve a polarized neutron beam and polarized proton target. The polarized neutron beam was produced as a secondary beam via charged-particle induced neutron-production reactions. The proton target was cryogenically cooled and dynamically polarized. These data will be used to extract {var_epsilon}{sub 1}, the phase-shift parameter which characterizes the strength of the tensor interaction at low energy. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Direct Measurement of Polarized Absorption Cross-Section of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, M. F.; Milkie, D. E.; Kane, C. L.; Yodh, A. Y.; Kikkawa, J. M.

    2004-03-01

    We use a combination of polarized Raman scattering and linear optical absorption to infer optical absorption cross-sections of single-wall carbon nanotube ensembles for visible light co- and cross-polarized with respect to the nanotube axes. These data reveal a strong linear absorption anisotropy, and provide a rapid method by which linear absorption spectra can be used to quantitatively measure the orientation of dispersed nanotubes, even in strongly absorbing media for which Raman approaches are complicated by anisotropic re-absorption processes. Comparison with theory demonstrates that local field depolarization plays a crucial role in affecting optical spectra of the nanotubes. This work supported by NSF through DMR-0203378, DMR-079909 and DGE-0221664, NASA through NAG8-2172, DARPA/ONR through N00014-01-1-0831, and SENS.

  17. Structure of 8Li from a reaction cross-section measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, G. W.; Fukuda, M.; Nishimura, D.; Cai, X. L.; Fukuda, S.; Hachiuma, I.; Ichikawa, C.; Izumikawa, T.; Kanazawa, M.; Kitagawa, A.; Kuboki, T.; Lantz, M.; Mihara, M.; Nagashima, M.; Namihira, K.; Ohkuma, Y.; Ohtsubo, T.; Ren, Zhongzhou; Sato, S.; Shen, Z. Q.; Sugiyama, M.; Suzuki, S.; Suzuki, T.; Takechi, M.; Yamaguchi, T.; Xu, B. J.; Xu, W.

    2014-10-01

    We have precisely measured reaction cross sections (σR) for 8Li using 9Be, 12C , 27Al, and proton targets at intermediate energies by the transmission method. From the energy dependence of the σR including the high energy data, the density distribution of 8Li was deduced through a modified Glauber model. It is shown that 8Li has a shorter tail structure in the density as compared with that of 8B and the matter radius of 8Li is similar to those of the other nonhalo Li isotopes. The result is consistent with the previous experiments that there is a tendency for 8Li to be a skin nucleus.

  18. 232Th(n,γ)233Th Thermal Reaction Cross-Section Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maidana, Nora L.; Vanin, Vito R.; Castro, Ruy M.; Pascholati, Paulo R.; Helene, Otaviano; Dias, Mauro S.; Koskinas, Marina F.

    2005-05-01

    The 232Th(n,γ)233Th thermal neutron-capture reaction cross section was measured using targets of ˜ 1.5 mg of high-purity metallic thorium irradiated in the IPEN IEA-R1m 5 MW pool research reactor. The 197Au(n,γ)198Au reaction was used to monitor the thermal and epithermal neutron fluxes in the irradiation position, which was found using the Westcott formalism. The residual gamma-ray activity was followed with an HPGe detector. The detector efficiency curve was fitted by the least-squares method applying covariance analysis to all uncertainties involved. The experimental result is σ0 =7.20±0.20 b, in agreement with previous published values.

  19. High Statistics Measurement of the Cross Sections of γγ\\toπ+π- Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, T.; Uehara, S.; Watanabe, Y.; Abe, K.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Arinstein, K.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Balagura, V.; Barberio, E.; Bay, A.; Belous, K.; Bitenc, U.; Bizjak, I.; Blyth, S.; Bondar, A.; Bračko, M.; Browder, T. E.; Chang, M.-C.; Chen, A.; Chen, W. T.; Cheon, B. G.; Cho, I.-S.; Choi, S.-K.; Choi, Y.; Dalseno, J.; Dash, M.; Drutskoy, A.; Eidelman, S.; Fratina, S.; Gabyshev, N.; Golob, B.; Ha, H.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; Hazumi, M.; Heffernan, D.; Hokuue, T.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W.-S.; Iijima, T.; Ikado, K.; Imoto, A.; Inami, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, M.; Iwasaki, Y.; Kaji, H.; Kang, J. H.; Kapusta, P.; Katayama, N.; Kawasaki, T.; Kichimi, H.; Kim, H. O.; Kim, S. K.; Kim, Y. J.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kumar, R.; Kuo, C. C.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lee, M. J.; Lee, S. E.; Lesiak, T.; Li, J.; Limosani, A.; Lin, S.-W.; Liventsev, D.; MacNaughton, J.; Mandl, F.; Matsumoto, T.; Matyja, A.; McOnie, S.; Medvedeva, T.; Miyake, H.; Miyata, H.; Miyazaki, Y.; Mizuk, R.; Moloney, G. R.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nakazawa, H.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nishida, S.; Nitoh, O.; Noguchi, S.; Ohshima, T.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, S. L.; Ono, S.; Onuki, Y.; Ostrowicz, W.; Ozaki, H.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Park, K. S.; Pestotnik, R.; Piilonen, L. E.; Poluektov, A.; Sahoo, H.; Sakai, Y.; Satoyama, N.; Schneider, O.; Schümann, J.; Senyo, K.; Sevior, M. E.; Shapkin, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shibuya, H.; Shwartz, B.; Singh, J. B.; Sokolov, A.; Somov, A.; Soni, N.; Stanič, S.; Starič, M.; Stoeck, H.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Suzuki, S. Y.; Takasaki, F.; Tamai, K.; Tanaka, M.; Taylor, G. N.; Teramoto, Y.; Tian, X. C.; Tikhomirov, I.; Tsuboyama, T.; Tsukamoto, T.; Ueno, K.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Urquijo, P.; Usov, Y.; Varner, G.; Vervink, K.; Villa, S.; Vinokurova, A.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, P.; Won, E.; Xie, Q. L.; Yabsley, B. D.; Yamaguchi, A.; Yamashita, Y.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2007-07-01

    We report on a high statistics measurement of the total and differential cross sections of the process γγ\\toπ+π- in the π+π- invariant mass range 0.8 GeV/c2

  20. Measurement of low energy neutrino cross sections with the PEANUT experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, A.

    2011-11-01

    The PEANUT experiment was designed to study neutrino interactions in the few GeV range using the NuMi beam at Fermilab. The detector uses a hybrid technique, being made of nuclear emulsions and scintillator trackers. Emulsion films act as a tracking device and they are interleaved with lead plates used as neutrino target. The detector is designed to reconstruct the topology of neutrino interactions at the single particle level. We present here the full reconstruction and analysis of a sample of 147 neutrino interactions occurred in the PEANUT detector and the measurement of the quasi-elastic, resonance and deep-inelastic contributions to the total charged current cross-section. This technique could be applied for the beam monitoring for future neutrino facilities.

  1. Measurement of (n, xnγ) reaction cross sections in W isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henning, Greg; Bacquias, Antoine; Borcea, Catalin; Capote, Roberto; Dessagne, Philippe; Drohé, Jean-Claude; Kawano, Toshihiko; Kerveno, Maëlle; Negret, Alexandru; Nyman, Markus; Olacel, Adina; Plompen, Arjan; Romain, Pascal; Scholtes, Pol; Rudolf, Gérard

    2017-09-01

    Evaluated nuclear data bases currently used for numerical simulation for the development of nuclear reactors still present large uncertainties. Their improvement is necessary, in particular through better reaction models and nuclear data. Among the reactions of interest, (n, xn) reactions are of great importance for the operation of a reactor as they modify the neutron spectrum, the neutron population, and produce radioactive species. Experimental data on (n, xnγ) reaction provide strong constraints on nuclear reaction mechanism theories. Tungsten isotopes - which are deformed like actinides but do not fission - are of interest to test the models. 182,184,186W(n, xnγ) cross sections are measured; results are compared with model calculations by TALYS, EMPIRE and CoH codes.

  2. Underground Cross Section Measurements of Stellar Reactions at Astrophysically Relevant Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formicola, A.; Gugliemetti, A.

    Accurate knowledge of thermonuclear reaction rates is important to understand the generation of energy, the luminosity of neutrinos, and the synthesis of elements in stars and in the primordial nucleosynthesis. An innovative experimental approach for the study of nuclear fusion reactions based on an accelerator installed in a low background underground laboratory (the LUNA experiment at the Gran Sasso Laboratory) was able to give breaktrough results in this field over the last 25 years. By going underground and by using the typical techniques of low background physics, it is possible to measure nuclear cross sections down to the energy of stellar interest. In this proceeding, the experimental techniques adopted in underground nuclear astrophysics and an overwiev of present and proposed future facilities and of their major scientific drivers are reported.

  3. Preparation of iridium targets by electrodeposition for neutron capture cross section measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Bond, Evelyn M.; Moody, W. Allen; Arnold, Charles; ...

    2016-03-01

    Here, the preparation of 191Ir and 193Ir electrodeposits for neutron capture cross-section measurements at the detector for advanced neutron capture experiments located at the at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center is described. The electrodeposition of iridium in the desired thickness of 0.4–1 mg/cm2 is challenging. Better yields and thicknesses were obtained using electrodeposition from isopropyl alcohol solutions than from ammonium sulfate solutions. 191Ir and 193Ir targets were initially prepared using the standard single-sided electrodeposition cell. Iridium electrodepositions using a double-sided electrodeposition cell were developed and were optimized, resulting in thick, uniform iridium deposits. LA UR 15-22475.

  4. 232Th(n,{gamma})233Th Thermal Reaction Cross-Section Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Maidana, Nora L.; Vanin, Vito R.; Pascholati, Paulo R.; Helene, Otaviano; Castro, Ruy M.; Dias, Mauro S.; Koskinas, Marina F.

    2005-05-24

    The 232Th(n,{gamma})233Th thermal neutron-capture reaction cross section was measured using targets of {approx} 1.5 mg of high-purity metallic thorium irradiated in the IPEN IEA-R1m 5 MW pool research reactor. The 197Au(n,{gamma})198Au reaction was used to monitor the thermal and epithermal neutron fluxes in the irradiation position, which was found using the Westcott formalism. The residual gamma-ray activity was followed with an HPGe detector. The detector efficiency curve was fitted by the least-squares method applying covariance analysis to all uncertainties involved. The experimental result is {sigma}0 =7.20{+-}0.20 b, in agreement with previous published values.

  5. Measurements of the $ZZ$ production cross sections in the $2\\ell2\

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-10-29

    Measurements of the ZZ production cross sections in proton–proton collisions at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV are presented. We found that candidate events for the leptonic decay mode ZZ → 2l2ν, where l denotes an electron or a muon, are reconstructed and selected from data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.1 (19.6)fb-1 at 7 (8) TeV collected with the CMS experiment. The measured cross sections, σ(pp → ZZ)=5.1+1.5-1.4(stat)+1.4-1.1(syst)±0.1(lumi)pb at 7 TeV, and 7.2+0.8-0.8(stat)+1.9-1.5(syst)±0.2(lumi)pb at 8 TeV, are in good agreement with the standard model predictions with next-to-leading-order accuracy. Furthermore, the selected data are analyzed to search for anomalous triple gauge couplings involving the ZZ final state. In the absence of any deviation from the standard model predictions, limits are set on the relevant parameters. As a result, these limits are then combined with the previously published CMS results for ZZ in 4l final states, yielding the most stringent constraints on the anomalous couplings.

  6. Electron Impact Excitation Cross Section Measurement for n=3 to n=2 Line Emission in Fe17+ to Fe23+

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H; Beiersdorfer, P; Brown, G V; Scofield, J; Gu, M F; Kahn, S M; Boyce, K; Kelley, R; Kilbourne, C; Porter, F S

    2006-04-20

    We have measured the electron impact excitation cross sections for the strong iron L-shell 3 {yields} 2 lines of Fe XVIII to Fe XXIV at the EBIT-I electron beam ion trap using a crystal spectrometer and NASA-Goddard Space Flight Centers 6 x 6 pixel array microcalorimeter. The cross sections were determined by direct normalization to the well established cross section of radiative electron capture through a sophisticated model analysis which results in the excitation cross section for the strong Fe L-shell lines at multiple electron energies. This measurement is part of a laboratory X-ray astrophysics program utilizing the Livermore electron beam ion traps EBIT-I and EBIT-II.

  7. Electron Impact Excitation Cross Section Measurement for n=3 to n=2 Line Emission in Fe(17+) to Fe(23+)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, H.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G. V.; Scofield, J. H.; Gu, M. F.; Kahn, S. M.; Boyce, K. R.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porter, F. S.

    2006-01-01

    We have measured the electron impact excitation cross sections for the strong iron L-shell 3 --> 2 lines of Fe XVIII to Fe XXIV at the EBIT-I electron beam ion trap using a crystal spectrometer and NASA-Goddard Space Flight Centers 6 x 6 pixel array microcalorimeter. The cross sections were determined by direct normalization to the well established cross section of radiative electron capture through a sophisticated model analysis which results in the excitation cross section for the strong Fe L-shell lines at multiple electron energies. This measurement is part of a laboratory X-ray astrophysics program utilizing the Livermore electron beam ion traps EBIT-I and EBIT-II.

  8. Measurements of Cross Sections for Neutron-induced Reactions on Chromium and Yttrium Targets at 197 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekimoto, S.; Suzuki, H.; Yashima, H.; Ninomiya, K.; Kasamatsu, Y.; Shima, T.; Takahashi, N.; Shinohara, A.; Matsumura, H.; Hagiwara, M.; Nishiizumi, K.; Caffee, M. W.; Shibata, S.

    2014-05-01

    Reaction cross sections for Cr and Y induced by neutrons at 197 MeV were measured by using 7Li(p,n) reaction at N0 beam line in the Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University. To estimate quasi-monoenergetic neutron cross sections, Cr and Y samples were irradiated on the two angles of 0∘ and 25∘ relative to the axis of the primary proton beam. The measured cross section data in the natCr(n,x) and 89Y(n,x) reactions are compared to the JENDL high-energy file and the literature proton values, respectively. The results obtained are also compared to the cross section data for the same target materials with 287 and 386 MeV neutrons in our previous work.

  9. Measurements of absolute M-subshell X-ray production cross sections of Th by electron impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moy, A.; Merlet, C.; Dugne, O.

    2014-08-01

    Measurements of absolute M-subshell X-ray production cross sections for element Th were made by electron impact for energies ranging from the ionization threshold up to 38 keV. Experimental data were obtained by measuring the X-ray intensity emitted from ultrathin Th films deposited onto self-supporting C backing films. The measurements were conducted with an electron microprobe using high-resolution wavelength dispersive spectrometers. Recorded intensities were converted into absolute X-ray production cross sections by means of atomic data and estimation of the number of primary electrons, target thickness, and detector efficiency. Our experimental X-ray production cross sections, the first to be reported for the M subshells of Th, are compared with X-ray production cross sections calculated with the mean of ionization cross sections obtained from the distorted-wave Born approximation. The Mα X-ray production cross section calculated is in excellent agreement with the measurements, allowing future use for standardless quantification in electron probe microanalysis.

  10. Measurement of the Proton-Air Cross Section at s=57TeV with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almeda, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Antičić, T.; Aramo, C.; Arganda, E.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Bäcker, T.; Balzer, M.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Bardenet, R.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Baughman, B.; Bäuml, J.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Bellétoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; BenZvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Bruijn, R.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Burton, R. E.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Cheng, S. H.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chirinos Diaz, J.; Chudoba, J.; Clay, R. W.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cook, H.; Cooper, M. J.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dallier, R.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; De Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; Decerprit, G.; del Peral, L.; del Río, M.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Fajardo Tapia, I.; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Ferrero, A.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fliescher, S.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Fröhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Gaior, R.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; García, B.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Gascon, A.; Gemmeke, H.; Gesterling, K.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gookin, B.; Góra, D.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Gozzini, S. R.; Grashorn, E.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grigat, M.; Grillo, A. F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Guzman, A.; Hague, J. D.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Herve, A. E.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Jarne, C.; Jiraskova, S.; Josebachuili, M.; Kadija, K.; Kampert, K. H.; Karhan, P.; Kasper, P.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D.-H.; Kotera, K.; Krohm, N.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuehn, F.; Kuempel, D.; Kulbartz, J. K.; Kunka, N.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lauer, R.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Lemiere, A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, J.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Mertsch, P.; Meurer, C.; Mićanović, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miller, W.; Miramonti, L.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, E.; Moreno, J. C.; Morris, C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Mueller, S.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Münchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nhung, P. T.; Niemietz, L.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nožka, L.; Nyklicek, M.; Oehlschläger, J.; Olinto, A.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parra, A.; Parsons, R. D.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pȩkala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Petrovic, J.; Pfendner, C.; Phan, N.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Ponce, V. H.; Pontz, M.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rivera, H.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, J.; Robledo, C.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez, G.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Cabo, I.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouillé-d'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Rühle, C.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovancova, J.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F.; Schulte, S.; Schuster, D.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Silva Lopez, H. H.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Stanic, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Šuša, T.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Tamashiro, A.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Taşcău, O.; Tavera Ruiz, C. G.; Tcaciuc, R.; Tegolo, D.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tiwari, D. K.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Tristram, G.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van den Berg, A. M.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Warner, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Winnick, M. G.; Wommer, M.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.

    2012-08-01

    We report a measurement of the proton-air cross section for particle production at the center-of-mass energy per nucleon of 57 TeV. This is derived from the distribution of the depths of shower maxima observed with the Pierre Auger Observatory: systematic uncertainties are studied in detail. Analyzing the tail of the distribution of the shower maxima, a proton-air cross section of [505±22(stat)-36+28(syst)]mb is found.

  11. Absorption cross sections for HF laser lines due to traces of CO/sub 2/, N/sub 2/O, and CH/sub 4/ in air

    SciTech Connect

    Agroskin, V.Ya.; Vasil'ev, G.K.; Gur'ev, V.I.; Tatarinova, E.E.

    1986-12-01

    The emission from an HF (DF) laser is spread over a large number of vibrational-rotational lines in the range 2.7-4.2 ..mu..m, which contains absorption bands of virtually all substances of interesting quantitative gas analysis, and in particular, detecting atmospheric pollutants, determining discharges from industrial plants, locating deposits of certain minerals, forecasting volcanic activity, and so on. Pulsed chemical HF (DF) lasers can be based on the chain reaction of fluorine with hydrogen (deuterium), which is promising for these purposes because the number of lines is large by comparison with any other type of laser (about 100 lines). These lasers also have high efficiency in converting the pumping energy to radiation and high beam power with relatively small dimensions and the same laser cell can be used to obtain the emission from carbon dioxide in the range 9.6-10.6 ..mu..m by energy transfer from DF to carbon dioxide. It is necessary to know the absorption characteristics of the substances at the lines of the HF (DF) laser. In this paper, the authors report measured cross sections for carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxide, and carbon hydrogenate, in the form of minor impurities in the air (about 1-10%) for various lines from an HF laser. The authors compare the data with published values, while the available spectroscopic characteristics are used in theoretical calculations of the absorption cross section and compared with the experiment.

  12. Optical coherent tomography: promising in vivo measurement of hair shaft cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Bartels, Natalie; Stieler, Karola; Richter, Heike; Patzelt, Alexa; Lademann, Jürgen; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike

    2011-09-01

    Variations in hair shaft morphology reflect ethnical diversity, but may also indicate internal diseases, nutritional deficiency, or hair and scalp disorders. The measurement and the follow-up of the hair shaft thickness over a defined period of time would be a valuable diagnostic tool in clinical practice. Standard light microscopy (LM) measurements require the epilation of hair shafts and frequently yield inaccurate values caused by the elliptic geometry of human hair shafts. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive investigation method based on the principles of Michelson interferometry with a detection depth of approximately 1 mm in human skin. Two-dimensional images of the cross sections of tissue samples at a resolution of approximately 10 μm are produced, which allows convenient calculation of hair shaft thickness. To evaluate this new methodology for hair shaft thickness measurements, hair shafts taken from 28 healthy volunteers were analyzed by in vivo OCT and compared to standard in vitro LM measurements of hair shaft thickness. OCT yielded highly reproducible measurements of hair shaft thickness with a distinctly reduced variation compared to standard LM. This technique offers a unique opportunity for in vivo measurement and a follow-up of the kinetics of hair shaft thickness in humans during medical therapy.

  13. Optical coherent tomography: promising in vivo measurement of hair shaft cross section.

    PubMed

    Garcia Bartels, Natalie; Stieler, Karola; Richter, Heike; Patzelt, Alexa; Lademann, Jürgen; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike

    2011-09-01

    Variations in hair shaft morphology reflect ethnical diversity, but may also indicate internal diseases, nutritional deficiency, or hair and scalp disorders. The measurement and the follow-up of the hair shaft thickness over a defined period of time would be a valuable diagnostic tool in clinical practice. Standard light microscopy (LM) measurements require the epilation of hair shafts and frequently yield inaccurate values caused by the elliptic geometry of human hair shafts. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive investigation method based on the principles of Michelson interferometry with a detection depth of approximately 1 mm in human skin. Two-dimensional images of the cross sections of tissue samples at a resolution of approximately 10 μm are produced, which allows convenient calculation of hair shaft thickness. To evaluate this new methodology for hair shaft thickness measurements, hair shafts taken from 28 healthy volunteers were analyzed by in vivo OCT and compared to standard in vitro LM measurements of hair shaft thickness. OCT yielded highly reproducible measurements of hair shaft thickness with a distinctly reduced variation compared to standard LM. This technique offers a unique opportunity for in vivo measurement and a follow-up of the kinetics of hair shaft thickness in humans during medical therapy.

  14. Measurement and analysis of the Am243 neutron capture cross section at the n_TOF facility at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, E.; Cano-Ott, D.; Guerrero, C.; Berthoumieux, E.; Abbondanno, U.; Aerts, G.; Álvarez-Velarde, F.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Assimakopoulos, P.; Audouin, L.; Badurek, G.; Balibrea, J.; Baumann, P.; Bečvář, F.; Belloni, F.; Calviño, F.; Calviani, M.; Capote, R.; Carrapiço, C.; Carrillo de Albornoz, A.; Cennini, P.; Chepel, V.; Chiaveri, E.; Colonna, N.; Cortes, G.; Couture, A.; Cox, J.; Dahlfors, M.; David, S.; Dillmann, I.; Dolfini, R.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dridi, W.; Duran, I.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Ferrant, L.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Fitzpatrick, L.; Frais-Koelbl, H.; Fujii, K.; Furman, W.; Goncalves, I.; González-Romero, E.; Goverdovski, A.; Gramegna, F.; Griesmayer, E.; Gunsing, F.; Haas, B.; Haight, R.; Heil, M.; Herrera-Martinez, A.; Igashira, M.; Isaev, S.; Jericha, E.; Käppeler, F.; Kadi, Y.; Karadimos, D.; Karamanis, D.; Ketlerov, V.; Kerveno, M.; Koehler, P.; Konovalov, V.; Kossionides, E.; Krtička, M.; Lampoudis, C.; Leeb, H.; Lindote, A.; Lo Meo, S.; Lopes, I.; Lossito, R.; Lozano, M.; Lukic, S.; Marganiec, J.; Marques, L.; Marrone, S.; Martínez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Moreau, C.; Mosconi, M.; Neves, F.; Oberhummer, H.; O'Brien, S.; Oshima, M.; Pancin, J.; Papachristodoulou, C.; Papadopoulos, C.; Paradela, C.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Perrot, L.; Pigni, M. T.; Plag, R.; Plompen, A.; Plukis, A.; Poch, A.; Praena, J.; Pretel, C.; Quesada, J.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rubbia, C.; Rudolf, G.; Rullhusen, P.; Salgado, J.; Santos, C.; Sarchiapone, L.; Savvidis, I.; Stephan, C.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tavora, L.; Terlizzi, R.; Vannini, G.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Villamarin, D.; Vicente, M. C.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Voss, F.; Walter, S.; Wendler, H.; Wiescher, M.; Wisshak, K.; n TOF Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    Background: The design of new nuclear reactors and transmutation devices requires to reduce the present neutron cross section uncertainties of minor actinides. Purpose: Improvement of the Am243(n,γ) cross section uncertainty. Method: The Am243(n,γ) cross section has been measured at the n_TOF facility at CERN with a BaF2 total absorption calorimeter, in the energy range between 0.7 eV and 2.5 keV. Results: The Am243(n ,γ) cross section has been successfully measured in the mentioned energy range. The resolved resonance region has been extended from 250 eV up to 400 eV. In the unresolved resonance region our results are compatible with one of the two incompatible capture data sets available below 2.5 keV. The data available in EXFOR and in the literature have been used to perform a simple analysis above 2.5 keV. Conclusions: The results of this measurement contribute to reduce the Am243(n,γ) cross section uncertainty and suggest that this cross section is underestimated up to 25% in the neutron energy range between 50 eV and a few keV in the present evaluated data libraries.

  15. Measurement of Neutrino and Antineutrino Total Charged-Current Cross Sections on Carbon with MINERvA

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Lu

    2017-01-01

    This thesis presents a measurement of charged-current inclusive cross sections of muon neutrino and antineutrino interaction on carbon, and antineutrino to neutrino cross section ratio, r, in the energy range 2 - 22 GeV, with data collected in the MINERA experiment. The dataset corresponds to an exposure of 3.2 x 1020 protons on target (POT) for neutrinos and 1.01020 POT for antineutrinos. Measurement of neutrino and antineutrino charged-current inclusive cross sections provides essential constraints for future long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment at a few GeV energy range. Our measured antineutrino cross section has an uncertainty in the range 6.1% - 10.5% and is the most precise measurement below 6 GeV to date. The measured r has an uncertainty of 5.0% - 7.5%. This is the rst measurement below 6 GeV since Gargamelle in 1970s. The cross sections are measured as a function of neutrino energy by dividing the eciency corrected charged-current sample with extracted uxes. Fluxes are obtained using the low- method, which uses low hadronic energy subsamples of charged-current inclusive sample to extract ux. Measured cross sections show good agreement with the prediction of neutrino interaction models above 7 GeV, and are about 10% below the model below 7 GeV. The measured r agrees with the GENIE model [1] over the whole energy region. The measured cross sections and r are compared with world data.

  16. Measurement of the $b\\bar{b}$ di-jet cross section at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Vallecorsa, Sofia

    2007-01-01

    The dominant b production mechanism at the Tevatron is pair production through strong interactions. The lowest order QCD diagrams contain only b and $\\bar{b}$ quarks in the final state, for which momentum conservation requires the quarks to be produced back-to-back in azimuthal opening angle. When higher order QCD processes are considered, the presence of additional light quarks and gluons in the final state allows the azimuthal angle difference, Δφ, to spread. The next to leading order QCD calculation includes diagrams up to O(α$3\\atop{s}$) some of which, commonly known as flavor excitation and gluon splitting, provide a contribution of approximately the same magnitude as the lowest order diagrams. The study of b$\\bar{b}$ angular correlation gives predictions on the effective b quark production mechanisms and on the different contributions of the leading order and next-to-leading order terms. The first experimental results on inclusive bottom production at the Tevatron were strongly underestimated by the exact NLO QCD prediction. Later on this disagreement had been explained and reduced by theoretical and experimental improvements: new QCD calculations that implement the Fixed Order with Next-to- Leading-Logarithms calculation (FONLL); updated parton distribution functions and fragmentation functions; and more precise measurements. Previous measurements of b$\\bar{b}$ azimuthal angle correlation have, instead, reached various level of agreement with parton shower Monte Carlo and NLO predictions. Here we present a measurement of the b$\\bar{b}$ jet cross section and azimuthal angle correlation performed on about 260 pb-1 of data collected by the CDF II detector at Fermilab from March 2002 to September 2004. This study extends the energy range investigated by previous analyses, measuring jet transverse energies (ET) up to values of about 220 GeV. It relies on the good tracking capabilities of the CDF detector both at the trigger level and

  17. Inclusive jet cross section and strong coupling constant measurements at CMS

    SciTech Connect

    Cerci, Salim

    2016-03-25

    The probes which are abundantly produced in high energetic proton-proton (pp) collisions at the LHC are called jets. Events with jets can be described by Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) in terms of parton-parton scattering. The inclusive jet cross section in pp collision is the fundamental quantity which can be measured and predicted within the framework of perturbative QCD (pQCD). The strong coupling constant α{sub S} which can be determined empirically in the limit of massless quarks, is the single parameter in QCD. The jet measurements can also be used to determine strong coupling constant α{sub S} and parton density functions (PDFs). The recent jet measurements which are performed with the data collected by the CMS detector at different center-of-mass energies and down to very low transverse momentum p{sub T} are presented. The measurements are compared to Monte Carlo predictions and perturbative calculations up to next-to-next-to leading order. Finally, the precision jet measurements give further insight into the QCD dynamics.

  18. Validation of multigroup neutron cross sections and calculational methods for the advanced neutron source against the FOEHN critical experiments measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.A.; Gallmeier, F.X.; Gehin, J.C.

    1995-05-01

    The FOEHN critical experiment was analyzed to validate the use of multigroup cross sections and Oak Ridge National Laboratory neutronics computer codes in the design of the Advanced Neutron Source. The ANSL-V 99-group master cross section library was used for all the calculations. Three different critical configurations were evaluated using the multigroup KENO Monte Carlo transport code, the multigroup DORT discrete ordinates transport code, and the multigroup diffusion theory code VENTURE. The simple configuration consists of only the fuel and control elements with the heavy water reflector. The intermediate configuration includes boron endplates at the upper and lower edges of the fuel element. The complex configuration includes both the boron endplates and components in the reflector. Cross sections were processed using modules from the AMPX system. Both 99-group and 20-group cross sections were created and used in two-dimensional models of the FOEHN experiment. KENO calculations were performed using both 99-group and 20-group cross sections. The DORT and VENTURE calculations were performed using 20-group cross sections. Because the simple and intermediate configurations are azimuthally symmetric, these configurations can be explicitly modeled in R-Z geometry. Since the reflector components cannot be modeled explicitly using the current versions of these codes, three reflector component homogenization schemes were developed and evaluated for the complex configuration. Power density distributions were calculated with KENO using 99-group cross sections and with DORT and VENTURE using 20-group cross sections. The average differences between the measured values and the values calculated with the different computer codes range from 2.45 to 5.74%. The maximum differences between the measured and calculated thermal flux values for the simple and intermediate configurations are {approx} 13%, while the average differences are < 8%.

  19. Methods for obtaining true particle size distributions from cross section measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Lord, Kristina Alyse

    2013-01-01

    Sectioning methods are frequently used to measure grain sizes in materials. These methods do not provide accurate grain sizes for two reasons. First, the sizes of features observed on random sections are always smaller than the true sizes of solid spherical shaped objects, as noted by Wicksell [1]. This is the case because the section very rarely passes through the center of solid spherical shaped objects randomly dispersed throughout a material. The sizes of features observed on random sections are inversely related to the distance of the center of the solid object from the section [1]. Second, on a plane section through the solid material, larger sized features are more frequently observed than smaller ones due to the larger probability for a section to come into contact with the larger sized portion of the spheres than the smaller sized portion. As a result, it is necessary to find a method that takes into account these reasons for inaccurate particle size measurements, while providing a correction factor for accurately determining true particle size measurements. I present a method for deducing true grain size distributions from those determined from specimen cross sections, either by measurement of equivalent grain diameters or linear intercepts.

  20. Simultaneous measurement of (n,γ) and (n,fission) cross sections with the DANCE array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredeweg, T. A.; Jandel, M.; Fowler, M. M.; Bond, E. M.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Reifarth, R.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wouters, J. M.; Macri, R. A.; Wu, C. Y.; Becker, J. A.

    2006-10-01

    We have recently begun a program of high precision measurements of the key production and destruction reactions of important radiochemical diagnostic isotopes, including several isotopes of uranium, plutonium and americium. The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE), a 4π BaF2 array located at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, will be used to measure the neutron capture cross sections for most of the isotopes of interest. Since neutron capture measurements on many of the actinides are complicated by the presence of γ-rays arising from low-energy neutron-induced fission, we are currently using a dual parallel-plate avalanche counter with the target material electro-deposited directly on the center cathode foil. This design provides a high efficiency for detecting fission fragments and allows loading of pre-assembled target/detector assemblies into the neutron beam line at DANCE. An outline of the current experimental program will be presented as well as results from measurements on ^235U and ^252Cf that utilized the fission-tag detector.

  1. 10B(α,n)13N cross section measurement1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qian; Febbraro, Michael; Deboer, Richard; Wiescher, Michael

    2016-09-01

    The reactoin 10B(α,n)13N has been identified as a possible background source for underground experiments at low energy. Previously the differential cross section data has only been available at energies above Eα = 1.0 MeV. An improved measurement of this reaction has been performed extensively down to 0.57 MeV. It has been measured with two deuterated liquid scintillators, EJ315 and EJ301D, and with the help of unfolding technique, neutron energy information can be extracted. EJ301D is a newly-developed neutron detector, with better pulse shape discrimination, and has been used to do angular distribution measurements. In addition, the (α ,α1 γ) and (α ,p3 γ) channels have been monitored independently by observation of the 718 keV γ transition in 10B and 3853 keV γ transition in 13C. Preliminary data analysis indicates the discovery of a new resonance in low energy region. Future measurements will be carried out at CASPAR using the same detectors. Research supported by NSF PHY-1430152, and JINA PHY-1419765.

  2. Measurement of the top pair production cross section at CDF using neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marginean, Radu

    In the Tevatron accelerator at Fermilab protons and antiprotons are collided at a 1.96 TeV center of mass energy. CDF and DO are the two experiments currently operating at the Tevatron. At these energies top quark is mostly produced via strong interactions as a top anti-top pair ( tt¯). The top quark has an extremely short lifetime and according to the Standard Model it decays with ˜100% probability into a b quark and a W boson. In the "lepton + jets" channel, the signal from top pair production is detected for those events where one of the two W bosons decays hadronically in two quarks which we see as jets in the detector, and the other W decays into a electrically charged lepton and a neutrino. A relatively unambiguous identification in the detector is possible when we require that the charged lepton must be an electron or muon of either charge. The neutrino does not interact in the detector and its presence is inferred from an imbalance in the transverse energy of the event. We present a measurement of the top pair production cross section in pp¯ collisions at 1.96 TeV, from a data sample collected at CDF between March 2002 and September 2003 with an integrated luminosity of 193.5 pb-1 . In order to bring the signal to background ratio at manageable levels, measurements in this channel traditionally use precision tracking information to identify at least one secondary vertex produced in the decay of a long lived b hadron. A different approach is taken here. Because of the large mass of the top quark, tt¯ events tend to be more spherical and more energetic than most of the background processes which otherwise mimic the tt¯ signature in the "lepton + jets" channel. A number of energy based and event shape variables can be used to statistically discriminate between signal and background events. Monte Carlo simulation is used to model the kinematics of tt¯ and most of the background processes. A neural network technique is employed to combine multiple

  3. Determination of the Strong Coupling Constant and Multijet Cross Section Ratio Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wobisch, M.

    2011-06-01

    Concepts and results of determinations of the strong coupling in hadron collisions are discussed. A recent {alpha}{sub s} result from the inclusive jet cross section in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV is presented which is based on perturbative QCD calculations beyond next-to-leading order. Emphasis is put on the consistency of the conceptual approach. Conceptual limitations in the approach of extracting as from cross section data are discussed and how these can be avoided by using observables that are defined as ratios of cross sections. For one such observable, the multijet cross section ratio R{sub 3/2}, preliminary results are presented.

  4. Extracting integrated and differential cross sections in low energy heavy-ion reactions from backscattering measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Sargsyan, V. V.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Diaz-Torres, A.; Gomes, P. R. S.

    2016-07-07

    We suggest new methods to extract elastic (quasi-elastic) scattering angular distribution and reaction (capture) cross sections from the experimental elastic (quasi-elastic) backscattering excitation function taken at a single angle.

  5. Measurement of Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) cross sections with CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Hyon-Suk Jo

    2012-04-01

    Extraction of DVCS unpolarized and polarized cross sections in the largest kinematic domain ever explored in the valence region. Results are in good agreement with GPD model (VGG) predictions. Extraction of Compton Form Factors (M. Guidal) by fitting simultaneously these unpolarizedand polarized cross sections gives a large set of results in a very large kinematic domain for Re(H ) and Im(H ). Analysis of the data from the second part of the e1-DVCS experiment underway.

  6. Measurement of two-photon exchange effect by comparing elastic e±p cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimal, D.; Adikaram, D.; Raue, B. A.; Weinstein, L. B.; Arrington, J.; Brooks, W. K.; Ungaro, M.; Adhikari, K. P.; Afanasev, A. V.; Akbar, Z.; Pereira, S. Anefalos; Badui, R. A.; Ball, J.; Baltzell, N. A.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A. S.; Boiarinov, S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Bültmann, S.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chetry, T.; Ciullo, G.; Clark, L.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Compton, N.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; Alaoui, A. El; Fassi, L. El; Eugenio, P.; Fanchini, E.; Fedotov, G.; Fersch, R.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Forest, T. A.; Fradi, A.; Gevorgyan, N.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Gleason, C.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hanretty, C.; Harrison, N.; Hattawy, M.; Heddle, D.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jenkins, D.; Jiang, H.; Joosten, S.; Keller, D.; Khachatryan, G.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Lanza, L.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Markov, N.; McKinnon, B.; Mestayer, M. D.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Movsisyan, A.; Munevar, E.; Camacho, C. Munoz; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Ni, A.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paolone, M.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Phelps, W.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabatié, F.; Salgado, C.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Skorodumina, Iu.; Smith, G. D.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stankovic, Ivana; Stepanyan, S.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Taiuti, M.; Torayev, B.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zonta, I.; CLAS Collaboration

    2017-06-01

    Background: The electromagnetic form factors of the proton measured by unpolarized and polarized electron scattering experiments show a significant disagreement that grows with the squared four-momentum transfer (Q2). Calculations have shown that the two measurements can be largely reconciled by accounting for the contributions of two-photon exchange (TPE). TPE effects are not typically included in the standard set of radiative corrections since theoretical calculations of the TPE effects are highly model dependent, and, until recently, no direct evidence of significant TPE effects has been observed. Purpose: We measured the ratio of positron-proton to electron-proton elastic-scattering cross sections in order to determine the TPE contribution to elastic electron-proton scattering and thereby resolve the proton electric form factor discrepancy. Methods: We produced a mixed simultaneous electron-positron beam in Jefferson Lab's Hall B by passing the 5.6-GeV primary electron beam through a radiator to produce a bremsstrahlung photon beam and then passing the photon beam through a convertor to produce electron-positron pairs. The mixed electron-positron (lepton) beam with useful energies from approximately 0.85 to 3.5 GeV then struck a 30-cm-long liquid hydrogen (LH2) target located within the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). By detecting both the scattered leptons and the recoiling protons, we identified and reconstructed elastic scattering events and determined the incident lepton energy. A detailed description of the experiment is presented. Results: We present previously unpublished results for the quantity R2 γ, the TPE correction to the elastic-scattering cross section, at Q2≈0.85 and 1.45 GeV2 over a large range of virtual photon polarization ɛ . Conclusions: Our results, along with recently published results from VEPP-3, demonstrate a nonzero contribution from TPE effects and are in excellent agreement with the calculations that include TPE

  7. Analysis and testing of a bistatic radar cross section measurement capability for the AFIT anechoic chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCool, Timothy D.

    1990-12-01

    This research effort examined the feasibility of performing bistatic radar cross section (RCS) measurements in the AFIT anechoic chamber. The capability was established to measure the bistatic RCS of a target versus frequency and versus target azimuth angle. In either case, one of three bistatic angles (angle between transmit and receive antennas) is available: 45, 90, and 135 degrees. Accurate bistatic RCS measurements were obtained using a CW radar and utilizing background subtraction, bistatic calibration, and software range gating. Simple targets were selected for validation purposes since their bistatic RCS could be predicted. These consisted of spheres and flat plates (square, triangle, and five sided). Several computer codes were utilized for system validation. Two codes based on the uniform theory of diffraction were used to predict the scattering from the flat plates. A program using a Mie series solution provided the exact scattering from the flat plates. A program using a Mie series solution provided the exact scattering for the spheres, which were used for both RCS predictions and system calibrations.

  8. An Accurate Method for Measuring Airplane-Borne Conformal Antenna's Radar Cross Section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shuxia; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Yafeng; Hu, Chufeng

    2016-09-01

    The airplane-borne conformal antenna attaches itself tightly with the airplane skin, so the conventional measurement method cannot determine the contribution of the airplane-borne conformal antenna to its radar cross section (RCS). This paper uses the 2D microwave imaging to isolate and extract the distribution of the reflectivity of the airplane-borne conformal antenna. It obtains the 2D spatial spectra of the conformal antenna through the wave spectral transform between the 2D spatial image and the 2D spatial spectrum. After the interpolation from the rectangular coordinate domain to the polar coordinate domain, the spectral domain data for the variation of the scatter of the conformal antenna with frequency and angle is obtained. The experimental results show that the measurement method proposed in this paper greatly enhances the airplane-borne conformal antenna's RCS measurement accuracy, essentially eliminates the influences caused by the airplane skin and more accurately reveals the airplane-borne conformal antenna's RCS scatter properties.

  9. A facility for measurements of nuclear cross sections for fast neutron cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dangtip, S.; Ataç, A.; Bergenwall, B.; Blomgren, J.; Elmgren, K.; Johansson, C.; Klug, J.; Olsson, N.; Carlsson, G. A.; Söderberg, J.; Jonsson, O.; Nilsson, L.; Renberg, P.-U.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Brun, C. L.; Lecolley, F.-R.; Lecolley, J.-F.; Varignon, C.; Eudes, P.; Haddad, F.; Kerveno, M.; Kirchner, T.; Lebrun, C.

    2000-10-01

    A facility for measurements of neutron-induced double-differential light-ion production cross-sections, for application within, e.g., fast neutron cancer therapy, is described. The central detection elements are three-detector telescopes consisting of two silicon detectors and a CsI crystal. Use of /ΔE-ΔE-E techniques allows good particle identification for p, d, t, 3He and alpha particles over an energy range from a few MeV up to 100 MeV. Active plastic scintillator collimators are used to define the telescope solid angle. Measurements can be performed using up to eight telescopes at /20° intervals simultaneously, thus covering a wide angular range. The performance of the equipment is illustrated using experimental data taken with a carbon target at En=95 MeV. Distortions of the measured charged-particle spectra due to energy and particle losses in the target are corrected using a newly developed computer code. Results from such correction calculations are presented.

  10. Status of Charge Exchange Cross Section Measurements for Highly Charged Ions on Atomic Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draganic, I. N.; Havener, C. C.; Schultz, D. R.; Seely, D. G.; Schultz, P. C.

    2011-05-01

    Total cross sections of charge exchange (CX) for C5+, N6+, and O7+ ions on ground state atomic hydrogen are measured in an extended collision energy range of 1 - 20,000 eV/u. Absolute CX measurements are performed using an improved merged-beams technique with intense highly charged ion beams extracted from a 14.5 GHz ECR ion source mounted on a high voltage platform. In order to improve the problematic H+ signal collection for these exoergic CX collisions at low relative energies, a new double focusing electrostatic analyzer was installed. Experimental CX data are in good agreement with all previous H-oven relative measurements at higher collision energies. We compare our results with the most recent molecular orbital close-coupling (MOCC) and atomic orbital close-coupling (AOCC) theoretical calculations. Work supported by the NASA Solar & Heliospheric Physics Program NNH07ZDA001N, the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences and the Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences, and the Office of Basic Energy Sciences of the U.S. DoE.

  11. Gadolinium-148 production cross section measurements for 600-and 800-MEV protons.

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, K. C.; Devlin, M. J.; Pitcher, E. J.; Mashnik, S. G.; Hertel, N. E.

    2004-01-01

    In a series of experiments at LANSCE's WNR facility, {sup 148}Gd production was measured for 600- and 800-MeV protons on tungsten, tantalum, and gold. These experiments used 3 {mu}m thin W, Ta, and Au foils and 10 {mu}m thin Al activation foils. Gadolinium spallation yields were determined from these foils using alpha spectroscopy and compared with the LANL codes CEM2k+GEM2 and MCNPX. When heavy metal targets, such as tungsten, are bombarded with protons greater than a few hundred MeV many different nuclides are produced. These nuclides are both stable and radioactive and are created by spallation, proton activation, or secondary reactions with neutrons and other nuclear particles made in the target. These products are distributed somewhat heterogeneously throughout a thick target because of the energy dependence of the cross sections and energy loss of the proton beam within the target. From this standpoint, it is difficult to measure nuclide production cross sections for a given energy proton in a thick target. At the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerator complex, protons are accelerated to 800 MeV and directed to two tungsten targets, Target 4 at the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility and 1L target at the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center. DOE requires hazard classification analyses to be performed on these targets and places limits on radionuclide inventories in the target as a means of determining the 'nuclear facility' category level. Presently, WNR's Target 4 is a non-nuclear facility while the Lujan 1L target is classified as a Category 3 nuclear facility. Gadolinium-148 is a radionuclide created from the spallation of tungsten and other heavy elements. Allowable isotopic inventories are particularly low for this isotope because it is an alpha-particle emitter with a 75-year half-life. The activity level of {sup 148}Gd is generally low, but it encompasses almost two-thirds of the total inhalation dose burden in an accident

  12. Determination of Spectroscopic Properties of Atmospheric Molecules from High Resolution Vacuum Ultraviolet Cross Section and Wavelength Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, W. H.; Yoshino, K.

    1997-01-01

    An account is given of progress during the period 8/l/96-7/31/97 on work on (a) cross section measurements of O2 S-R using a Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) at the Photon Factory in Japan; (b) the determination of the predissociation linewidths of the Schumann-Runge bands (S-R) of 02; (c) cross section measurements of 02 Herzberg bands using a Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) at Imperial College; and (d) cross section measurements of H2O in the wavelength region 120-188 nm. The experimental investigations are effected at high resolution with a 6.65 m scanning spectrometer and with the Fourier transform spectrometer. Below 175 nm, synchrotron radiation is most suitable for cross section measurements in combination with spectrometers at the Photon Factory Japan. Cross section measurements of the Doppler limited bands depend on using the very high resolution, available with the Fourier transform spectrometer, (0.025/cm resolution). All of these spectroscopic measurements are needed for accurate calculations of the production of atomic oxygen, the penetration of solar radiation into the Earth's atmosphere, and photochemistry of minor molecules.

  13. Development for the study of a Cross Sectional Measurement of 3He-3He Solar Reaction