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Sample records for 2ncsu cvm raleigh

  1. SCEC CVM-Toolkit (CVM-T) -- High Performance Meshing Tools for SCEC Community Velocity Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Small, P.; Maechling, P. J.; Ely, G. P.; Olsen, K. B.; Withers, K.; Graves, R. W.; Jordan, T. H.; Plesch, A.; Shaw, J. H.

    2010-12-01

    The SCEC Community Velocity Model Toolkit (CVM-T) enables earthquake modelers to quickly build, visualize, and validate large-scale 3D velocity meshes using SCEC CVM-H or CVM-4. CVM-T is comprised of three main components: (1) a current SCEC community velocity model for Southern California, (2) tools for extracting meshes from this model and visualizing them, and (3) an automated test framework for evaluating new releases of CVMs using SCEC’s AWP-ODC forward wave propagation software and one, or more, ground motion goodness of fit (GoF) algorithms. CVM-T is designed to help SCEC modelers build large-scale velocity meshes by extracting material properties from the most current version of Community Velocity Model H (CVM-H) and to provide a consistent interface as new CVM-H versions are developed. The CVM-T software provides a highly-scalable interface to CVM-H 6.2 (and later) voxets. Along with an improved interface to CVM-H material properties, the CVM-T software adds a geotechnical layer (GTL) to CVM-H 6.2+ based on Ely’s Vs30-derived GTL. The initial release of CVM-T also extends the coverage region for CVM-H 6.2 with a Hadley-Kanamori 1D background. Smoothing is performed within the transition boundary between the core model and the 1D background. The user interface now includes a C API that allows applications to query the model either by elevation or depth. The Extraction and Visualization Tools (EVT) include a parallelized 3D mesh generator which can quickly generate meshes (consisting of Vp, Vs, and density) from either CVM-H or CVM-4 with over 100 billion points. Python plotting scripts can be employed to plot horizontal or profile slices from existing meshes or directly from either CVM. The Automated Test Framework (ATF) is a system for quantitatively evaluating new versions of CVM-H and ensuring that the model improves against prior versions. The ATF employs the CruiseControl build and test framework to run an AWP-ODC simulation for the 2008 Chino

  2. Raleigh leaves Lamont for Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggs, William Ward

    Barry Raleigh, director of Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory for the past 8 years, has left that job to become Dean of the University of Hawaii's new School of Oceans, Earth Sciences, and Technology.A search committee chaired by Lamont geochemist Charles Langmuir has been formed to find Raleigh's successor, and committee member Lynn Sykes, a seismologist at Lamont, said “We expect to have a short list drawn up by the end of the calendar year.”

  3. ASSESSMENT OF IMMUNE RESPONSES TO PENICILLIUM CHRYSOGENUM AND CHARACTERIZATION OF ITS ALLERGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessment of immune responses to Penicillium chrysogenum and characterization of its allergens

    Yongjoo Chung1, Michael E Viana2, Lisa B Copeland3, and MaryJane K Selgrade3, Marsha D W Ward3. 1 UNC, SPH, Chapel Hill, NC, 2NCSU, CVM, Raleigh, NC, 3US EPA, ORD, NHEERL, RTP,...

  4. ASSESSING THE ALLERGIC POTENTIAL OF INDOOR AIR FUNGAL CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessing the Allergic Potential of Indoor Air Fungal Contaminants
    Marsha D W Ward1, Michael E Viana2, Yonjoo Chung3, Najwa Haykal-Coates1, Lisa B Copeland1, Steven H Gavett1, and MaryJane K Selgrade1. 1US EPA, ORD, NHEERL, RTP, NC, USA. 2NCSU, CVM, Raleigh, NC, USA, 3 UNC, S...

  5. THE ALLERGENIC POTENTIAL OF INDOOR AIR FUNGAL CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory


    The Allergenic Potential of Indoor Air Fungal Contaminants
    Marsha D W Ward1, Michael E Viana2, Yongjoo Chung3, Najwa Haykal-Coates1, Lisa B Copeland1, Steven H Gavett1, and MaryJane K Selgrade1. 1US EPA, ORD, NHEERL, RTP, NC, USA. 2NCSU, CVM, Raleigh, NC, USA, 3 UNC, SPH,...

  6. ASSESSING ALLERGENICITY OF INDOOR AIR FUNGAL CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessing Allergenicity of Indoor Air Fungal Contaminants
    M D W Ward1, M E Viana2, N Haykal-Coates1, L B Copeland1, S H Gavett1, and MJ K Selgrade1. 1US EPA, ORD, NHEERL, RTP, NC, USA. 2NCSU, CVM, Raleigh, NC, USA.
    Rationale: The indoor environment has increased in impor...

  7. COMPARISON OF OVERALL METABOLISM OF 1,2,3,7,8-PENTACHLORODIBENZO-P-DIOXIN (PECDD) IN CYP1A2(-L-)KNOCKOUT (KO) AND C57BL/6N PARENTAL STRAINS OF MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessment of immune responses to Penicillium chrysogenum and characterization of its allergens

    Yongjoo Chung1, Michael E Viana2, Lisa B Copeland3, and MaryJane K Selgrade3, Marsha D W Ward3. 1 UNC, SPH, Chapel Hill, NC, 2NCSU, CVM, Raleigh, NC, 3US EPA, ORD, NHEERL, RTP,...

  8. 76 FR 76152 - City of Raleigh; Notice of Intent To File License Application, Filing of Pre-Application Document...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-06

    ... Regulations. h. Potential Applicant Contact: Kenneth Waldroup, Assistant Public Utilities Director, City of Raleigh, P.O. Box 590, Raleigh, NC 27601; (919) 996-3489; Kenneth.Waldroup@raleighnc.gov . i. FERC...

  9. 75 FR 81269 - Ward Transformer Superfund Site Raleigh, Wake County, NC; Notice of Settlements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-27

    ... AGENCY Ward Transformer Superfund Site Raleigh, Wake County, NC; Notice of Settlements AGENCY... Ward Transformer Superfund Site located in Raleigh, Wake County, North Carolina for publication. DATES... your comments, identified by Docket ID No. EPA-RO4- SFUND-2010-1053 or Site name Ward...

  10. 78 FR 14543 - Ward Transformer Superfund Site; Raleigh, Wake County, NC; Notice of Settlement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-06

    ... AGENCY Ward Transformer Superfund Site; Raleigh, Wake County, NC; Notice of Settlement AGENCY... Agency has entered into a settlement at the Ward Transformer Superfund Site located in Raleigh, Wake... EPA Region 4 contact Ms. Paula V. Painter. Submit your comments by Site name Ward...

  11. TeleOperator/telePresence System (TOPS) Concept Verification Model (CVM) development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimamoto, Mike S.

    1993-01-01

    The development of an anthropomorphic, undersea manipulator system, the TeleOperator/telePresence System (TOPS) Concept Verification Model (CVM) is described. The TOPS system's design philosophy, which results from NRaD's experience in undersea vehicles and manipulator systems development and operations, is presented. The TOPS design approach, task teams, manipulator, and vision system development and results, conclusions, and recommendations are presented.

  12. Frequency of BLAD and CVM alleles in sires and elite heifers of Czech Holstein cattle.

    PubMed

    Cítek, J; Rehout, V; Schröffelová, D; Hradecká, E

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, we analyse the occurrence of BLAD and CVM heterozygous animals in Holstein cattle in the Czech Republic in 1993-2005. The occurrence of BLAD heterozygous sires and heifers (BL) during the period 1993-1998 in Czech Holsteins was 13.9% and 10.7%. Radical measures have been taken to restore the population. Evidently, the measures have been efficient, in 2005 one BLAD heterozygous sire of 101 was found. Continuous testing is necessary, because in commercial herds, the eradication process is not short-term. The found occurrence ofCVM heterozygous sires (CV) decreased from 20% in 2001 to 8% (7 positive of 85) in 2005.This is still quite a high frequency. The occurrence in CV females of 20% remains higher. Therefore, the use of CV sires should be restricted thoroughly. Identification of the molecular basis for inherited diseases, should lead to control measures which would enable the quick recovery of the population. PMID:19113030

  13. [Contribution of the cervical vertebral maturation (CVM) method to dentofacial orthopedics: update].

    PubMed

    Elhaddaoui, R; Benyahia, H; Azaroual, F; Zaoui, F

    2014-11-01

    The successful orthopedic treatment of skeletal Class II malocclusions is closely related to the reasoned determination of the optimal time to initiate the treatment. This is why various methods have been proposed to assess skeletal maturation, such as a hand-wrist radiograph or the cervical vertebral maturation (CVM) method. The hand-wrist radiograph was up to now the most frequently used method to assess skeletal maturation. However, the clinical and biological limitations of this technique, as well as the need to perform an additional radiograph, were reasons to develop another method to explore the maturation stages of visible cervical vertebrae on a simple lateral cephalometric radiograph. The authors compare the 2 methods and prove the greater contribution of the CVM method compared to the hand-wrist radiograph.

  14. Using S3 cloud storage with ROOT and CvmFS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsuaga-Ríos, María; Heikkilä, Seppo S.; Duellmann, Dirk; Meusel, René; Blomer, Jakob; Couturier, Ben

    2015-12-01

    Amazon S3 is a widely adopted web API for scalable cloud storage that could also fulfill storage requirements of the high-energy physics community. CERN has been evaluating this option using some key HEP applications such as ROOT and the CernVM filesystem (CvmFS) with S3 back-ends. In this contribution we present an evaluation of two versions of the Huawei UDS storage system stressed with a large number of clients executing HEP software applications. The performance of concurrently storing individual objects is presented alongside with more complex data access patterns as produced by the ROOT data analysis framework. Both Huawei UDS generations show a successful scalability by supporting multiple byte-range requests in contrast with Amazon S3 or Ceph which do not support these commonly used HEP operations. We further report the S3 integration with recent CvmFS versions and summarize the experience with CvmFS/S3 for publishing daily releases of the full LHCb experiment software stack.

  15. 76 FR 38389 - Caraleigh Phosphate and Fertlizer Works Superfund Site; Raleigh, Wake County, NC; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-30

    ... response costs concerning the Caraleigh Phosphate and Fertilizer Works Superfund Site located in Raleigh...-0534 or Site name Caraleigh Phosphate and Fertilizer Works Superfund Site by one of the...

  16. Culture as metaphor: company culture and business strategy at Raleigh Industries, c. 1945-60.

    PubMed

    Lloyd-Jones, R; Lewis, M J; Eason, M

    1999-01-01

    This study of Raleigh Industries, one of the leading bicycle manufactures in the world in the immediate post-war years, argues that its business strategy was in part shaped by a managerial commitment to a dominant company culture which was deeply embedded in Raleigh's history. Using the notion of culture as metaphor, the paper examines the way that core values in the company acted as a guide in the setting of organisational goals and, intended or unintended, impinged upon company performance. In many respects, the culture guided the company well, but our study shows a number of ambiguities, tensions and contradictions between culture and strategy which had negative effects on company behaviour. Thus, Raleigh's attachment to personal capitalism constrained its capacity expansion programme, and, while it adopted what appeared to be a progressive education and training policy, it in effect trained workers for the past rather than the future.

  17. Culture as metaphor: company culture and business strategy at Raleigh Industries, c. 1945-60.

    PubMed

    Lloyd-Jones, R; Lewis, M J; Eason, M

    1999-01-01

    This study of Raleigh Industries, one of the leading bicycle manufactures in the world in the immediate post-war years, argues that its business strategy was in part shaped by a managerial commitment to a dominant company culture which was deeply embedded in Raleigh's history. Using the notion of culture as metaphor, the paper examines the way that core values in the company acted as a guide in the setting of organisational goals and, intended or unintended, impinged upon company performance. In many respects, the culture guided the company well, but our study shows a number of ambiguities, tensions and contradictions between culture and strategy which had negative effects on company behaviour. Thus, Raleigh's attachment to personal capitalism constrained its capacity expansion programme, and, while it adopted what appeared to be a progressive education and training policy, it in effect trained workers for the past rather than the future. PMID:19455773

  18. 76 FR 14698 - Raleigh Film and Television Studios, LLC, Los Angeles, CA; Notice of Negative Determination on...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-17

    ... Employment and Training Administration Raleigh Film and Television Studios, LLC, Los Angeles, CA; Notice of... Determination Regarding Application for Reconsideration for the workers and former workers of Raleigh Film and... the Federal Register on October 25, 2010 (75 FR 65512). The subject firm supplies sound...

  19. RECRUITING AND RETAINING AFRICAN-AMERICANS FOR AN EXPOSURE STUDY IN SOUTHEAST RALEIGH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently completed a study of African-Americans' exposure to particulate matter (PM) in Southeast Raleigh. A primary goal was to compare PM levels measured at ambient and residential sites with those from personal exposure monitors...

  20. RECRUITING AND RETAINING PARTICIPANTS FOR AN EXPOSURE STUDY IN SOUTHEAST RALEIGH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently completed a study of African-Americans' exposure to particulate matter (PM) in Southeast Raleigh. A primary goal was to compare PM levels measured at ambient and residential sites with those from personal exposure monitors...

  1. 78 FR 19733 - Draft General Management Plan and Draft Environmental Impact Statement, Fort Raleigh National...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-02

    ... National Park Service Draft General Management Plan and Draft Environmental Impact Statement, Fort Raleigh National Historic Site, North Carolina AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of... National Park Service announces the availability of a Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the...

  2. 78 FR 3964 - Request for Public Comment, Raleigh County Memorial Airport, Beckley, WV

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-17

    ... request in a conservation easement for wildlife enhancement, with no adverse impact to the airport. Land... Federal Aviation Administration Request for Public Comment, Raleigh County Memorial Airport, Beckley, WV AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Request for public comment. SUMMARY:...

  3. 77 FR 38376 - Request for Public Comment, Raleigh County Memorial Airport, Beckley, WV

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-27

    ... approximately 549.6 acres of a `surface rights only' release to be sold and land then placed in a Conservation... Federal Aviation Administration Request for Public Comment, Raleigh County Memorial Airport, Beckley, WV AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Request for public comment. SUMMARY:...

  4. 78 FR 12238 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Charlotte, Raleigh/Durham and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-22

    .../Durham and Winston-Salem Carbon Monoxide Limited Maintenance Plan AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... Charlotte, Raleigh/Durham and Winston-Salem carbon monoxide (CO) maintenance areas. Specifically, the State... 0 2. Section 52.1770(e) is amended by adding a new entry for entry for ``8-Hour Carbon...

  5. 75 FR 65512 - Raleigh Film and Television Studios, LLC, Los Angeles, CA; Notice of Affirmative Determination...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-25

    ... Employment and Training Administration Raleigh Film and Television Studios, LLC, Los Angeles, CA; Notice of... Film and Television Studios, LLC, Los Angeles, California (the subject firm). The Notice of determination was issued on January 14, 2010 and published in the Federal Register on February 16, 2010 (75...

  6. 77 FR 55899 - CSX Transportation, Inc.-Discontinuance of Service Exemption-in Raleigh County, WV

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-11

    ... approximately 13.5 miles of rail line between milepost WG 12.0 near Helen and milepost WG 25.5 at McVey in Raleigh County, W. Va. The line is owned by Norfolk Southern Railway Company (NSR) and has been operated...--Norfolk & W. Ry., FD 32768 (ICC served Oct. 27, 1995). According to CSXT, the lease was amended in...

  7. INDOOR/OUTDOOR PARTICLE SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS MEASURED IN SELECT HOMES IN THE RALEIGH-DURHAM-CHAPEL HILL, NC AREA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Particle size distributions were measured indoors and outdoors of six residences in the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill, NC area to characterize the factors affecting particle concentrations in the indoor environment, including infiltration of outdoor aerosols. Size resolved partic...

  8. The Crabtree Creek pluton: A deformed Mid-Paleozoic( ) stitching pluton on the west flank of the Raleigh metamorphic belt

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, E.F. . Dept. of Earth Sciences); Stoddard, E.F. . Dept. of MEAS)

    1993-03-01

    Crystalline rocks on the west flank of the Alleghanian-aged Raleigh metamorphic belt are subdivided into four west-dipping lithotectonic terranes in the Falls Lake and north Raleigh areas. The rocks of these terranes are separated from east to west on the basis of bulk rock composition, metamorphic textural characteristics, and discrete structural discontinuities into the Raleigh terrane (RT), Crabtree terrane (CT), Falls Lake melange (FLM), and the volcanogenic Carolina slate belt (CSB). The RT and CT are separated by the dextral shear Nutbush Creek fault zone, while the Falls Lake thrust juxtaposes the CT and FLM. The structural character of the discontinuity separating the FLM and the CSB is unclear, although thrusting has been proposed. The results of geologic mapping in the Raleigh West 7.5[prime] quadrangle for the NC Geological Survey's COGEOMAP project in the Raleigh 1[degree] sheet indicate that only the CSB and CT are exposed west of I-440 between US 70 and I-40. This confirms the mapping results of Horton and others that the melange pinches out in north Raleigh just north of US 70. South of US 70, a large orthogneiss body, the Crabtree Creek composite granitic pluton, occupies the same relative position as the melange, separating mafic and intermediate metavolcanic rocks of the CSB from nonlineated and lineated interlayered schists and gneisses of the CT. The pluton is subdivided into a foliated leucocratic, medium grained muscovite granitic orthogneiss, and a foliated leucocratic to mesocratic medium to coarse grained muscovite [plus minus] biotite granitic orthogneiss containing abundant porphyroclastic disks, rods, and knobs of quartz. Because its lobes locally display intrusive contacts with metavolcanic and metasedimentary rocks of both terranes, the Crabtree Creek pluton represents an intrusion that stitched the two terranes together.

  9. 78 FR 45909 - Designation for the Amarillo, TX; Cairo, IL; Baton Rouge, LA; Raleigh, NC; and Belmond, IA Areas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-30

    ...)). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: In the December 28, 2012 Federal Register (77 FR 76453), GIPSA requested applications... Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration Designation for the Amarillo, TX; Cairo, IL; Baton Rouge, LA; Raleigh, NC; and Belmond, IA Areas AGENCY: Grain Inspection, Packers and...

  10. Ultrafine particles near a major roadway in Raleigh, North Carolina: downwind attenuation and correlation with traffic-related pollutants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ultrafine particles (UFPs, diameter <100 run) emitted by traffic are a potential direct health threat to nearby populations and may additionally act as a tracer for co-emitted pollutants. During summertime in Raleigh, North Carolina, UFPs were simultaneously measured upwind and d...

  11. [Autopsy of a common error: the introduction of curare in Europe by W. Raleigh].

    PubMed

    Lienhart, A

    2009-04-01

    One of the most erroneous and repeated assertion in the history of pharmacology for anaesthetists is to say that "the curare was introduced in Europe by Sir Walter Raleigh under the name of ourari". On the contrary, the names to be reminded are: Lawrence Keymis for the first citation of the word ourari, José Gumilla for the word curare and the description of its effects, Charles-Marie de La Condamine for the import of the first known samples. The mistake was initiated by Alexander von Humboldt and developed by the physiologist Münter, a student of Johannes Müller, quoted by Claude Bernard. The repetition of this error was facilitated by the world diffusion of Claude Bernard's work.

  12. An Assessment of Farmers' Willingness to Pay for Extension Services Using the Contingent Valuation Method (CVM): The Case of Oyo State, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ajayi, A. O.

    2006-01-01

    This study assessed farmers' willingness to pay (WTP) for extension services. The Contingent Valuation Method (CVM) was used to assess the amount which farmers are willing to pay. Primary data on the demographic, socio-economic variables of farmers and their WTP were collected from 228 farmers selected randomly in a stage-wise sampling procedure…

  13. Meeting report: 27th International conference on antiviral research, in Raleigh, NC, USA.

    PubMed

    Vere Hodge, R Anthony

    2014-11-01

    The 27th International Conference on Antiviral Research (ICAR) was held in Raleigh, North Carolina, USA from May 12 to 16, 2014. This article summarizes the principal invited lectures. John Drach (Elion Award) described the early days of antiviral drugs and their novel modes of action. Piet Herdewijn (Holý Award) used evolutionary pressure to select DNA polymerases that accept nucleoside analogs. Replacing thymine by 5-chlorouracil led to the generation of a new form of Escherichia coli. Adrian Ray (Prusoff Award) demonstrated how prodrugs can markedly improve both the efficacy and safety of potential drugs. The keynote addresses, by David Margolis and Myron Cohen, tackled two emerging areas of HIV research, to find an HIV "cure" and to prevent HIV transmission, respectively. These topics were discussed further in other presentations - a cure seems to be a distant prospect but there are exciting developments for reducing HIV transmission. TDF-containing vaginal rings and GSK-744, as a long-lasting injection, offer great hope. There were three mini-symposia. Although therapy with TDF/FTC gives excellent control of HBV replication, there are only a few patients who achieve a functional cure. Myrcludex, an entry inhibitor, is active against both HBV and HDV. The recent progress with HBV replication in cell cultures has transformed the search for new antiviral compounds. The HBV capsid protein has been recognized as key player in HBV DNA synthesis. Unexpectedly, compounds which enhance capsid formation, markedly reduce HBV DNA synthesis. The development of BCX4430, which is active against Marburg and Ebola viruses, is of great current interest.

  14. Water-Resources Data and Hydrogeologic Setting at the Raleigh Hydrogeologic Research Station, Wake County, North Carolina, 2005-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McSwain, Kristen Bukowski; Bolich, Richard E.; Chapman, Melinda J.; Huffman, Brad A.

    2009-01-01

    Water-resources data were collected to describe the hydrologic conditions at the Raleigh hydrogeologic research station, located in the Piedmont Physiographic Province of North Carolina. Data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and the North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Division of Water Quality, from May 2005 through September 2007 are presented in this report. Three well clusters and four piezometers were installed at the Raleigh hydrogeologic research station along an assumed flow path from recharge to discharge areas. Each well cluster includes four wells to monitor the regolith, transition zone, and shallow and deep bedrock. Borehole, surface, and waterborne geophysics were conducted to examine the lithology and physical properties of the bedrock and to determine the aerial extent of near vertical diabase dikes. Slug tests were conducted in the wells at each cluster to determine the hydraulic conductivity of the formation tapped by each well. Periodic water-level altitudes were measured in all wells and in four piezometers. Continuous hourly water levels were measured in wells for variable periods of time during the study, and a surface-water gage collected 15-minute stage data from April to June 2006. In October 2005 and April 2006, water-quality samples were collected from a tributary and in all wells at the Raleigh hydrogeologic research station. Continuous water-quality data were collected hourly in three wells from December 2005 through January 2007 and every 15 minutes in the tributary from May to June 2006. In August 2006, streambed temperatures and drive-point ground-water samples were collected across lines of section spanning the Neuse River.

  15. Supporting Individuals within Their Families or in Homes of Their Own: The CAP-MR/DD Program in Raleigh, North Carolina.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shoultz, Bonnie

    Findings are presented from a site visit to a Raleigh, North Carolina, program that provides in-home support to children and adults with severe disabilities and their families. The program, the Wake County Community Alternatives Program for Persons with Mental Retardation/Developmental Disabilities, is administered by the North Carolina Department…

  16. The Effects of Urban Form on Ambient Air Pollution and Public Health Risk: A Case Study in Raleigh, North Carolina

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Daniel A.; Huegy, Joseph; Gibson, Jacqueline MacDonald

    2014-01-01

    Since motor vehicles are a major air pollution source, urban designs that decrease private automobile use could improve air quality and decrease air pollution health risks. Yet, the relationships among urban form, air quality, and health are complex and not fully understood. To explore these relationships, we model the effects of three alternative development scenarios on annual average fine particulate matter (PM2.5) concentrations in ambient air and associated health risks from PM2.5 exposure in North Carolina’s Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill area. We integrate transportation demand, land-use regression, and health risk assessment models to predict air quality and health impacts for three development scenarios: current conditions, compact development, and sprawling development. Compact development slightly decreases (−0.2%) point estimates of regional annual average PM2.5 concentrations, while sprawling development slightly increases (+1%) concentrations. However, point estimates of health impacts are in opposite directions: compact development increases (+39%) and sprawling development decreases (−33%) PM2.5-attributable mortality. Further, compactness increases local variation in PM2.5 concentrations and increases the severity of local air pollution hotspots. Hence, this research suggests that while compact development may improve air quality from a regional perspective, it may also increase the concentration of PM2.5 in local hotspots and increase population exposure to PM2.5. Health effects may be magnified if compact neighborhoods and PM2.5 hotspots are spatially co-located. We conclude that compactness alone is an insufficient means of reducing the public health impacts of transportation emissions in automobile-dependent regions. Rather, additional measures are needed to decrease automobile dependence and the health risks of transportation emissions. PMID:25490890

  17. Hydrogeology, groundwater seepage, nitrate distribution, and flux at the Raleigh hydrologic research station, Wake County, North Carolina, 2005-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McSwain, Kristen Bukowski; Bolich, Richard E.; Chapman, Melinda J.

    2013-01-01

    rom 2005 to 2007, the U.S. Geological Survey and the North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Division of Water Quality, conducted a study to describe the geologic framework, measure groundwater quality, characterize the groundwater-flow system, and describe the groundwater/surface-water interaction at the 60-acre Raleigh hydrogeologic research station (RHRS) located at the Neuse River Waste Water Treatment Plant in eastern Wake County, North Carolina. Previous studies have shown that the local groundwater quality of the surficial and bedrock aquifers at the RHRS had been affected by high levels of nutrients. Geologic, hydrologic, and water-quality data were collected from 3 coreholes, 12 wells, and 4 piezometers at 3 well clusters, as well as from 2 surface-water sites, 2 multiport piezometers, and 80 discrete locations in the streambed of the Neuse River. Data collected were used to evaluate the three primary zones of the Piedmont aquifer (regolith, transition zone, and fractured bedrock) and characterize the interaction of groundwater and surface water as a mechanism of nutrient transport to the Neuse River. A conceptual hydrogeologic cross section across the RHRS was constructed using new and existing data. Two previously unmapped north striking, nearly vertical diabase dikes intrude the granite beneath the site. Groundwater within the diabase dike appeared to be hydraulically isolated from the surrounding granite bedrock and regolith. A correlation exists between foliation and fracture orientation, with most fractures striking parallel to foliation. Flowmeter logging in two of the bedrock wells indicated that not all of the water-bearing fractures labeled as water bearing were hydraulically active, even when stressed by pumping. Groundwater levels measured in wells at the RHRS displayed climatic and seasonal trends, with elevated groundwater levels occurring during the late spring and declining to a low in the late fall. Vertical

  18. Rural School Supervision: Abstracts of Addresses Delivered at the Second Conference of Supervisors of the Southeastern States Held at Raleigh, North Carolina, December 6 and 7, 1926. Bulletin, 1927, No. 24

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Education, Department of the Interior, 1927

    1927-01-01

    This bulletin contains abstracts of addresses delivered at a two-day conference of State and county rural-school supervisors in the South-eastern States, called by the United States Commissioner of Education at Raleigh, N.C. December 6 and 7, 1926. Abstracts were prepared from manuscripts submitted by the authors. The conference was attended by…

  19. ASSESSMENT OF A CRUDE FUNGAL (METARHIZIUM ANISOPLIAE) EXTRACT AND IT'S COMPONENTS FOR ALLERGENICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    ASSESSMENT OF A CRUDE FUNGAL (METARHIZIUM ANISOPLIAE) EXTRACT AND IT'S COMPONENTS FOR ALLERGENICITY. M D W Ward1, M E Viana2, L B Copeland1, and MJ K Selgrade1. 1US EPA, ORD, NHEERL, RTP, NC, USA. 2NCSU, College of Veterinary Medicine, Raleigh, NC, USA.
    Metarhizium anisopli...

  20. EFFECT OF THREE DIFFERENT SIZED FRACTIONS OF OUTDOOR PM ON INFLAMMATORY AND OXIDATIVE MARKERS IN VIVO

    EPA Science Inventory

    EFFECT OF THREE DIFFERENT SIZED FRACTIONS OF OUTDOOR PM ON INFLAMMATORY MARKERS IN VIVO
    C A J Dick', P Singh2, P. Evansky3, S Becker3 and M I Gilmour3.
    'Center For Environmental Medicine and Lung Biology, UNC, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 2NCSU, Raleigh, NC 'Experimental Toxicolog...

  1. Hydrogeology, groundwater seepage, nitrate distribution, and flux at the Raleigh hydrologic research station, Wake County, North Carolina, 2005-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McSwain, Kristen Bukowski; Bolich, Richard E.; Chapman, Melinda J.

    2013-01-01

    rom 2005 to 2007, the U.S. Geological Survey and the North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Division of Water Quality, conducted a study to describe the geologic framework, measure groundwater quality, characterize the groundwater-flow system, and describe the groundwater/surface-water interaction at the 60-acre Raleigh hydrogeologic research station (RHRS) located at the Neuse River Waste Water Treatment Plant in eastern Wake County, North Carolina. Previous studies have shown that the local groundwater quality of the surficial and bedrock aquifers at the RHRS had been affected by high levels of nutrients. Geologic, hydrologic, and water-quality data were collected from 3 coreholes, 12 wells, and 4 piezometers at 3 well clusters, as well as from 2 surface-water sites, 2 multiport piezometers, and 80 discrete locations in the streambed of the Neuse River. Data collected were used to evaluate the three primary zones of the Piedmont aquifer (regolith, transition zone, and fractured bedrock) and characterize the interaction of groundwater and surface water as a mechanism of nutrient transport to the Neuse River. A conceptual hydrogeologic cross section across the RHRS was constructed using new and existing data. Two previously unmapped north striking, nearly vertical diabase dikes intrude the granite beneath the site. Groundwater within the diabase dike appeared to be hydraulically isolated from the surrounding granite bedrock and regolith. A correlation exists between foliation and fracture orientation, with most fractures striking parallel to foliation. Flowmeter logging in two of the bedrock wells indicated that not all of the water-bearing fractures labeled as water bearing were hydraulically active, even when stressed by pumping. Groundwater levels measured in wells at the RHRS displayed climatic and seasonal trends, with elevated groundwater levels occurring during the late spring and declining to a low in the late fall. Vertical

  2. New house dust collection system and its use in a study of asthma in dust mite sensitive children in Raleigh, North Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Lindstrom, A.B.; Beck, M.A.; Henry, M.M.; Barnes, D.M.; Henderson, F.W.

    1993-01-01

    A prototype dust collection system, the House Dust Vacuum One (HDVI), was designed for use in a study to investigate the relationship between house dust mite antigen levels and the presence of asthma in dust mite sensitive children. The HDVI was designed for the collection of dust samples from all potentially relevant domestic substrates, with the primary sampling objective being the retrieval at least 100 mg of sample material. During the winter of 1991-92, dust samples were collected from six different microenvironments in the homes of 49 dust mite sensitive children living in the Raleigh, NC metropolitan area. In addition to the standard antigen immunoassay, the performance of the HDVI was assessed by conducting side by side comparison tests using two alternative antigen collection systems. Microenvironmental antigen concentrations were found to be lognormally distributed within the test homes and within each microenvironment. With the relatively large quantity of sample material collected and the ease with which the HDVI was able to collect samples from a wide variety of substrates, the new unit was determined to be well suited for surface dust and dust mite antigen collection studies.

  3. Raleigh County Remedial Laboratory: Mathematics. Draft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capehart, Ernestine

    A project was conducted to develop a program of effective remediation in mathematics for the adolescent learner using the laboratory approach. The project addressed: (1) material development and equipment/supply selection for use within the laboratory which would address individual/small group needs; (2) identification of specific needs of…

  4. RESPIRATORY PHYSIOLOGICAL AND ALLERGIC-TYPE RESPONSES TO AN EXTRACT OF STACHYBOTRYS CHARTARUM IN BALB/C MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    RESPIRATORY PHYSIOLOGICAL AND ALLERGIC-TYPE RESPONSES TO AN EXTRACT OF Stachybotrys chartarum IN BALB/C MICE. ME Viana1, N Haykal-Coates2, S H Gavett2, MJ Selgrade2, and M D W Ward2. 1APR/CVM, NCSU, Raleigh, NC, USA. 2NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, RTP, NC, USA.
    Rationale: assess the ab...

  5. DEVELOPMENTAL EXPOSURE TO A THYROID DISRUPTING CHEMICAL STIMULATES PHAGOCYTOSIS IN JUVENILE SPRAGUE-DAWLEY RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Developmental Exposure to a Thyroid Disrupting Chemical Stimulates Phagocytosis in Juvenile Sprague-Dawley Rats.
    AA Rooney1, R Matulka2, and R Luebke3. 1NCSU/US EPA CVM, Department of Anatomy, Physiological Sciences and Radiology, Raleigh, NC;2UNC Department of Toxicology, Cha...

  6. PERINATAL EXPOSURE TO ATRAZINE SUPPRESSES JUVENILE IMMUNE FUNCTION IN MALE, BUT NOT FEMALE SPRAGUE-DAWLEY RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    PERINATAL EXPOSURE TO ATRAZINE SUPPRESSES JUVENILE IMMUNE FUNCTION IN MALE, BUT NOT FEMALE SPRAGUE-DAWLEY RATS. AA Rooney1 and RW Luebke2. 1NCSU/USEPA CVM, Department of Anatomy, Physiological Sciences, and Radiology, Raleigh, NC;2USEPA, NHEERL, RTP, NC.
    The ability of the ...

  7. Dillard Drive Middle & Elementary School, Raleigh, North Carolina.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Design Cost Data, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Presents design features of the Dillard Drive Middle & Elementary School (North Carolina) that incorporates daylighting in the majority of the classrooms, the gymnasium, dining room, and media center. The design also uses advanced lighting controls, fiber optic networking, automatic environmental controls, and an energy management system that…

  8. Typographia: A Hybrid, Alphabetic Exploration of Raleigh, NC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rieder, David

    2010-01-01

    "As compositionists delve more deeply into the material and technical dimensions of digital media, the contemporary arts should be valued as a source for new approaches to hybrid forms of writing and textuality." In addition to "Typographia", this work includes a companion essay (PDF): From Street to Software: How a Lettered "Flaneur" Invented a…

  9. City of Raleigh, Wilders Grove Service Center, Solid Waste Services Facility. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Cox; Bill Black; Battle, Fred

    2015-07-22

    Final Report for DOE Grant EE0002808. Grant award was for technology demonstration of geothermal energy systems. One of the major objectives identified for the demonstration portion of the grant was to prove the viability of Ground Source Heat Pump (GSHP) systems in significantly reducing energy usage of HVAC and domestic water heating systems compared to traditional systems. Data were monitored and conclusions drawn, including estimating payback timeframes and documenting lessons learned.

  10. 78 FR 37118 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Charlotte, Raleigh/Durham and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-20

    ... publicly available, i.e., Confidential Business Information or other information whose disclosure is... Section, Air Planning Branch, Air, Pesticides and Toxics Management Division, U.S. Environmental..., Air Planning Branch, Air, Pesticides and Toxics Management Division, U.S. Environmental...

  11. Methods and Apparatuses for Signaling with Geometric Constellations in a Raleigh Fading Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barsoum, Maged F. (Inventor); Jones, Christopher R. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Communication systems are described that use signal constellations, which have unequally spaced (i.e., `geometrically` shaped) points. In many embodiments, the communication systems use specific geometric constellations that are capacity optimized at a specific SNR (signal to noise ratio). In addition, ranges within which the constellation points of a capacity optimized constellation can be perturbed and are still likely to achieve a given percentage of the optimal capacity increase compared to a constellation that maximizes d (sub min) (i.e. minimum distance between constellations) are also described. Capacity measures that are used in the selection of the location of constellation points include, but are not limited to, parallel decode (PD) capacity and joint capacity.

  12. SOUTHEASTCON '85; Proceedings of the Conference, Raleigh, NC, March 31-April 3, 1985

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1985-05-01

    Current developments in electronics technology and related fields are examined in reviews and reports. Subject areas covered include computer-aided education, power generation and transmission, electromagnetics, VLSI design tools, control theory, microprocessor interfacing and applications, computer networks, computer vision, electrooptical sensors, engineering education, computer algorithms and architectures, signal processing, solid-state devices, logic design, biological systems, controller design, and radio communications. Consideration is given to reduction of intersatellite interference by means of polarization diversity, simulation of scattering from continuous surfaces, C-band satellite receivers, performance assessment of tracking filters, range simulation for laser-ranger testing, and accelerated stress testing of amorphous silicon solar cells.

  13. Ducts Sealing Using Injected Spray Sealant, Raleigh, North Carolina (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-03-01

    In multifamily and attached buildings, traditional duct sealing methods are often impractical or costly and disruptive because of the difficulty in accessing leakage sites. In this project, two retrofit duct sealing techniques - manually-applied sealants and injecting a spray sealant, were implemented in several low-rise multi-unit buildings. An analysis on the cost and performance of the two methods are presented. Each method was used in twenty housing units: approximately half of each group of units are single story and the remainder two-story. Results show that duct leakage to the outside was reduced by an average of 59% through the use of manual methods, and by 90% in the units where the injected spray sealant was used. It was found that 73% of the leakage reduction in homes that were treated with injected spray sealant was attributable to the manual sealing done at boots, returns and the air handler. The cost of manually-applying sealant ranged from $275 to $511 per unit and for the injected spray sealant the cost was $700 per unit. Modeling suggests a simple payback of 2.2 years for manual sealing and 4.7 years for the injected spray sealant system. Utility bills were collected for one year before and after the retrofits. Utility bill analysis shows 14% and 16% energy savings using injected spray sealant system and hand sealing procedure respectively in heating season whereas in cooling season, energy savings using injected spray sealant system and hand sealing were both 16%.

  14. 78 FR 22198 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Charlotte, Raleigh/Durham and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-15

    .../Durham and Winston Salem Carbon Monoxide Limited Maintenance Plan AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... of the 8- hour carbon monoxide (CO) National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for the Charlotte... action. DATES: The direct final rule published at 78 FR 12238 on February 22, 2013, is withdrawn as...

  15. 78 FR 12267 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Charlotte, Raleigh/Durham and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-22

    .../Durham and Winston-Salem Carbon Monoxide Limited Maintenance Plan AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... Winston-Salem carbon monoxide (CO) maintenance areas. Specifically, the State submitted a...

  16. High-resolution Crop Surface Models (CSM) and Crop Volume Models (CVM) on field level by terrestrial laser scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmeister, Dirk; Bolten, Andreas; Curdt, Constanze; Waldhoff, Guido; Bareth, Georg

    2010-11-01

    The interdisciplinary Transregional Collaborative Research Center 32 (CRC/TR 32) works on exchange processes between soil, vegetation, and the adjacent atmospheric boundary layer (SVA). Within this research project a terrestrial laser scanning sensor is used in a multitemporal approach for determining agricultural plant parameters. In contrast to other studies with phase-change or optical probe sensors, time-of-flight measurements are used. On three dates in the year 2008 a sugar beet field (4.3 ha) in Western Germany was surveyed by a terrestrial laser scanner (Riegl LMS-Z420i). Point clouds are georeferenced, trimmed, and compared with official elevation data. The estimated plant parameters are (i) surface model comparison between different crop surfaces and (ii) crop volumes as well as (iii) soil roughness parameters for SVA-Modelling. The results show, that the estimation of these parameters is possible and the method should be validated and extended.

  17. 78 FR 70531 - Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 93-Raleigh/Durham, North Carolina; Notification of Proposed Production...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-26

    ... Proposed Production Activity; GlaxoSmithKline, PLC (Pharmaceutical Products); Zebulon, North Carolina The... activity to the FTZ Board on behalf of GlaxoSmithKline, PLC (GlaxoSmithKline), located in Zebulon,...

  18. Proceedings of the Annual Adult Education Research Conference (25th, Raleigh, North Carolina, April 5-7, 1984).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh. Dept. of Adult and Community Coll. Education.

    These proceedings contain 50 papers. Selected brief titles include: "A Comparative Analysis of Costs and Perceived Effectiveness of Postgraduate Continuing Education for Mississippi Pharmacists" (Bellande); "A Conceptual and Empirical Perspective on Adult Education Program Planning Theory" (Boshier); "Self-Directed Adult Learning" (Brookfield);…

  19. 78 FR 43141 - Foreign-Trade Zone 93-Raleigh-Durham, North Carolina, Authorization of Production Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-19

    ... inviting public comment (78 FR 17635, 3-22-2013). The FTZ Board has determined that no further review of... Production Activity, Southern Lithoplate, Inc. (Aluminum Printing Plates), Youngsville, North Carolina...

  20. 78 FR 17635 - Foreign-Trade Zone 93-Raleigh-Durham, North Carolina; Notification of Proposed Production...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-22

    ... Production Activity; Southern Lithoplate, Inc. (Aluminum Printing Plates); Youngsville, North Carolina The... production of aluminum offset printing plates for the printing industry. Pursuant to 15 CFR 400.14(b), FTZ... rates during customs entry procedures that apply to aluminum printing plates (duty- free) for...

  1. Academy of Human Resource Development Conference Proceedings (Raleigh-Durham, North Carolina, March 8-12, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuchinke, K. Peter, Ed.

    This two-volume document contains the proceedings of the 2000 conference of the Academy of Human Resource Development (AHRD). Volume 1 contains the following materials: conference overview; text of a town forum on social responsibility and human resource development (HRD); papers from symposia 1-24; and papers from innovative sessions 1-4. The…

  2. Thermomechanical and Thermochemical Behavior of a Hafnium-20 Percent Tantalum Alloy. Ph.D. Thesis - North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, J. P.

    1971-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the thermomechanical and thermochemical behavior of a high temperature, oxidation resistant, hafnium-20 percent tantalum alloy. The elastic and shear moduli of this alloy were determined in air up to 1000 C and in vacuum up to 2000 C using a mechanical resonance technique. The internal friction of the alloy was measured up to temperatures greater than 1400 C. Room temperature stress-strain behavior of the oxidized and unoxidized alloy was established. The effect of annealing on the elastic and shear moduli of the extruded rod material was investigated. The martensitic-type phase transformation occurring in the alloy was studied using hot stage metallography and electron microscopy. Static oxidation tests were conducted on the alloy at temperatures from 1000 C to 1700 C with weight gain measurements made as a function of time and temperatures. Surface morphology studies were conducted on the oxide coatings formed at the different temperatures using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques.

  3. 77 FR 73978 - Reorganization of Foreign-Trade Zone 93 Under Alternative Site Framework, Raleigh/Durham, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-12

    ..., the Board adopted the alternative site framework (ASF) (74 FR 1170, 01/12/2009; correction 74 FR 3987, 01/22/2009; 75 FR 71069- 71070, 11/22/2010) as an option for the ] establishment or reorganization of... Federal Register (77 FR 16536-16537, 03/21/12) and the application has been processed pursuant to the...

  4. 77 FR 16536 - Foreign-Trade Zone 93-Raleigh/Durham, NC; Application for Reorganization Under Alternative Site...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-21

    ... zone under the alternative site framework (ASF) adopted by the Board (74 FR 1170-1173, 1/12/09 (correction 74 FR 3987, 1/22/09); 75 FR 71069-71070, 11/22/10). The ASF is an option for grantees for the... approved by the Board on November 4, 1983 (Board Order 233, 48 FR 52108, 11/16/83) and expanded on...

  5. 78 FR 13857 - Foreign-Trade Zone 93-Raleigh-Durham, NC; Authorization of Production Activity; Revlon Consumer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-01

    ... (77 FR 65856-65857, 10/31/12). The FTZ Board has determined that no further review of the activity is... FTZ Act and the Board's regulations, including Section 400.14. Dated: February 19, 2013. Andrew...

  6. 77 FR 76453 - Opportunity for Designation in Amarillo, TX; Cairo, IL; Baton Rouge, LA; Raleigh, NC; and Belmond...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-28

    ... Prairie Dog Town Fork of the Red River), Carson, Childress, Collingsworth, Dallam, Deaf Smith (east of U.S..., Lipscomb, Moore, Ochiltree, Oldham, Potter, Randall (north of Prairie Dog Town Fork of the Red River,...

  7. 75 FR 11902 - West Virginia; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-12

    ..., Pocahontas, Raleigh, Ritchie, Roane, and Wyoming Counties for Public Assistance. Fayette, Greenbrier, McDowell, Mingo, Nicholas, Pendleton, Pocahontas, Raleigh, and Wyoming Counties for emergency...

  8. Makin' It Happen with Business & Marketing Education. Annual Atlantic Coast Business & Marketing Education Conference Proceedings (13th, Raleigh, North Carolina, February 16-17, 1996). Volume 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goins, L. Keith, Ed.

    This proceedings includes the following papers: "Dealing with Discipline Problems in Schools" (Allen); "Developing Global Awareness" (Arnold); "Desktop Publishing Using WordPerfect 6.0 for Windows" (Broughton); "Learn and Earn" (Cauley); "Using the Computer to Teach Merchandising Math" (Clodfelter); "Schoolwide Network Makin' It Happen" (Crews);…

  9. Degradation Mechanisms in Aluminum Matrix Composites: Alumina/Aluminum and Boron/Aluminum. Ph.D. Thesis - North Carolina State Univ. at Raleigh

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, G. C.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of fabrication and long term thermal exposure (up to 10,000 hours at 590 K) on two types of aluminum matrix composites were examined. An alumina/aluminum composite, was made of continuous alpha Al2O3 fibers in a matrix of commercially pure aluminum alloyed with 2.8% lithium. The mechanical properties of the material, the effect of isothermal exposure, cyclic thermal exposure, and fatigue are presented. Two degradation mechanisms are identified. One was caused by formation of a nonstoichiometric alumina during fabrication, the other by a loss of lithium to a surface reaction during long term thermal exposure. The other composite, boron/aluminum, made of boron fibers in an aluminum matrix, was investigated using five different aluminum alloys for the matrices. The mechanical properties of each material and the effect of isothermal and cyclic thermal exposure are presented. The effects of each alloy constituent on the degradation mechanisms are discussed. The effects of several reactions between alloy constituents and boron fibers on the composite properties are discussed.

  10. Back to the Future with Business and Marketing Education. Annual Atlantic Coast Business and Marketing Education Conference Proceedings (12th, Raleigh, North Carolina, February 17-18, 1995).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joyner, Randy L., Ed.

    This proceedings includes: "Bridging the International Learning Gap" (Arnold); "Back to the Future" (Baker); "Conducting Successful Class Projects over the Internet" (Beasley); "The Need for Ethics Instruction at the High School Level" (Brown); "Incorporating Industry-Based Skills Standards into High School Secretarial Programs" (Bunn);…

  11. An Analytical Investigation of an Oscillating Wedge in a Supersonic Perfect Gas Flow. Ph.D Thesis - North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, R. M.

    1971-01-01

    Several aspects of the oscillating wedge are investigated to evaluate both the resulting trends for the wedge and methods of analyzing unsteady flows. An existing hypersonic small disturbance theory for an oscillating thin wedge is extended and applied. A perturbation method involving linearization about the known flow is then derived and discussed. Subsequently, a finite difference technique for calculating the complete unsteady flow field of the wedge in motion is presented and discussed in conjunction with some calculated quasi-static nonlinear trends.

  12. Building Bridges to Tomorrow in Business and Marketing Education. Atlantic Coast Business and Marketing Education Conference Proceedings (15th, Raleigh, North Carolina, February 20-21, 1998).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swope, John A., Ed.

    This proceedings includes the following papers: "Using Multimedia in Computer Applications" (Delores Barnhill); "Becoming an International Educator: Why, How, and What" (Ray D. Bernardi); "Online Courses--A Bridge for Education" (Phyllis J. Broughton); "Web Page Maintenance" (Linda Carr, Mary Cauley); "Teaching Suggestions to Help Students Prevent…

  13. Noise-Con 81; Proceedings of the National Conference on Noise Control Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, June 8-10, 1981

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royster, L. H.; Hart, F. D.; Stewart, N. D.

    Topics discussed include noise control regulations and benefits, noise source identification, and the applications of damping materials. Papers are presented on Federal control technology initiatives in occupational noise, sound power measurement using the cross-spectral technique, low frequency noise reduction of acoustic enclosures, and the reflection and absorption of high-intensity sound at the surface of bulk porous materials. Attention is also given to nonacoustic design parameters for industrial mufflers, to educational programs for hearing conservation, and to a finite element analysis applied to open-end spinning noise.

  14. To designate the Federal building and United States courthouse located at 300 Fayetteville Street in Raleigh, North Carolina, as the "Jesse Helms Federal Building and United States Courthouse".

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Ellmers, Renee L. [R-NC-2

    2012-11-27

    11/28/2012 Referred to the Subcommittee on Economic Development, Public Buildings and Emergency Management. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  15. Affinal and Consanguineal Kin as a Social Support for the Rural Elderly. Paper of the Journal Series of the North Carolina Agricultural Research Service, Raleigh, NC.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kivett, Vira R.

    Although the support network of elderly individuals has received increased attention recently, most research has focused on the parent child relationship without examining other levels of kin interrelations. To examine the help received by rural-transitional older adults from their consanguineous kin (adult children, grandchildren, siblings,…

  16. A Poor Harvest: North Carolina's Rural Schools. A Reprint of Articles Published in The Raleigh News and Observer, March 26-28, 1989.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graves, Bill; Bolch, Judy

    This series of newspaper articles evaluates North Carolina's schools and establishes a relationship between the state's rural poverty and low student achievement levels. Test scores in 1988 are consistently low in all but four of the poorest rural counties. Small schools are disappearing from rural areas. Large schools can offer students more…

  17. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the North American Chapter of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (20th, Raleigh, NC, October 31-November 3, 1998). Volume 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berenson, Sarah, Ed.; Dawkins, Karen, Ed.; Blanton, Maria, Ed.; Coulombe, Wendy, Ed.; Kolb, John, Ed.; Norwood, Karen, Ed.; Stiff, Lee, Ed.

    This conference proceedings contains three plenary session reports, 12 working group and 79 research reports, 35 short oral reports, 60 poster session reports, and two discussion group reports. The titles of all papers (excluding "short orals", "posters", and brief discussion group reports) are: (1) "On Relationships between Psychological and…

  18. Moving Business and Marketing Education into the 21st Century. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Atlantic Coast Business and Marketing Education Conference (17th, Raleigh, North Carolina, February 18-19, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parke, David, Ed.

    This document contains 21 presentations from a conference on business and marketing education. The following papers are included: "Microsoft Excel 2000" (Jeff Fuller); "Clueless in the Classroom? Hints To Help!" (Mary W. Evans); "A Strategy To Improve Narrative-Number Linkage in Business Writing" (Ellis A. Hayes); "Corporate View: Bringing Realism…

  19. Making the Year 2000 a Sure Winner. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Atlantic Coast Business and Marketing Education Conference (16th, Raleigh, North Carolina, February 19-20, 1999).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stallings, Patricia, Ed.

    This document contains 21 presentations from a conference on business and marketing education. The following papers are included: "Business and Marketing Education: In Tune with the Times" (Clarice P. Brantley); "Portfolio Assessment--A Sure Winner" (Ann Bullock); "The Effect of the Year 2000 on Web Page Maintenance" (Linda Carr);…

  20. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the North American Chapter of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (20th, Raleigh, NC, October 31-November 3, 1998). Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berenson, Sarah, Ed.; Dawkins, Karen, Ed.; Blanton, Maria, Ed.; Coulombe, Wendy, Ed.; Kolb, John, Ed.; Norwood, Karen, Ed.; Stiff, Lee, Ed.

    This conference proceedings contains three plenary session reports, 12 working group and 79 research reports, 35 short oral reports, 60 poster session reports, and two discussion group reports. Major papers (excluding "short orals" and "posters") include: (1) "Semantical Obstacles in Mathematics Understanding" (Carlos Arteaga and Manuel Santos);…

  1. Proceedings of the Conference of the American Country Life Association, Inc. (42nd, Raleigh, North Carolina, July 9-10, 1963). Our Concern for the Disadvantaged in Town and Country Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Country Life Association, Sioux Falls, SD.

    The future of the disadvantaged is discussed in these proceedings of a 1963 conference of the American Country Life Association. Papers presented at 3 panel discussions give detailed information on the disadvantaged. The panel discussion on the types of disadvantaged people covered American Indians, Appalachian whites, migrants, and Negroes. The…

  2. An Odyssey into the New Millennium: Rediscover 21st Century Business & Marketing Education. Proceedings of the Annual Atlantic Coast Business & Marketing Education Conference (18th, Raleigh, North Carolina, February 15-17, 2001).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Sheila, Ed.

    The following 13 papers on business and marketing education are included in this document: "Internet Marketing" (Herb Brown, Jerry Kandies); "Disk This . . . Paper Flow on the Go!" (Mary Evans, Wilbur Whitley); "Production and Evaluation of On-Line Tutorials" (Margie Gallagher, Evelyn Farrior, Jane Geissler); "Basic Skills Needed for Entry-Level…

  3. ANALYSIS OF ANDROGEN- AND EGF-RECEPTOR EXPRESSION IN THE FETAL RAT PHALLUS AFTER EXPOSURE TO VINCLOZOLIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analysis of Androgen- and EGF-Receptor Expression in the Fetal Rat Phallus After Exposure to Vinclozolin
    Cynthia Wolf1,2, Barbara Abbott1, Gerald A. LeBlanc2, and L. Earl Gray, Jr.1
    1USEPA, ORD, NHEERL, RTD, RTP, NC 27711, 2NCSU, Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, Ral...

  4. Removal characteristics of plasma chemical vaporization machining with a pipe electrode for optical fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Takino, Hideo; Yamamura, Kazuya; Sano, Yasuhisa; Mori, Yuzo

    2010-08-10

    Plasma chemical vaporization machining (CVM) is a high-precision chemical shaping method using rf plasma generated in the proximity of an electrode in an atmospheric environment. The purpose of the present study is to clarify the removal characteristics of plasma CVM using a pipe electrode. Polished fused silica plates were processed by plasma CVM, polishing, and precision grinding under various conditions. The removal rate of plasma CVM was about 4 to 1100 times faster than that of polishing, and the maximum removal rate was almost equal to that of precision grinding. The roughness of the resultant surfaces was almost the same as that of the polished surfaces.

  5. 75 FR 5371 - Environmental Impact Statement: Cumberland, Harnett and Wake Counties, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-02

    .... Coleman, P.E., Director of Preconstruction and Environment, Federal Highway Administration, 310 New Bern..., 2010. Clarence W. Coleman, Director of Preconstruction and Environment, Raleigh, North...

  6. 78 FR 57057 - Oral Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Amprolium; Meloxicam

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-17

    ... Internet may obtain these documents at the CVM FOIA Electronic Reading Room: http://www.fda.gov/AboutFDA/CentersOffices/OfficeofFoods/CVM/CVMFOIAElectronicReadingRoom/default.htm . This rule does not meet the... requirement to submit an environmental assessment or an environmental impact statement because it is of a...

  7. The migrations of Drosophila muscle founders and primordial germ cells are interdependent.

    PubMed

    Stepanik, Vincent; Dunipace, Leslie; Bae, Young-Kyung; Macabenta, Frank; Sun, Jingjing; Trisnadi, Nathanie; Stathopoulos, Angelike

    2016-09-01

    Caudal visceral mesoderm (CVM) cells migrate from posterior to anterior of the Drosophila embryo as two bilateral streams of cells to support the specification of longitudinal muscles along the midgut. To accomplish this long-distance migration, CVM cells receive input from their environment, but little is known about how this collective cell migration is regulated. In a screen we found that wunen mutants exhibit CVM cell migration defects. Wunens are lipid phosphate phosphatases known to regulate the directional migration of primordial germ cells (PGCs). PGC and CVM cell types interact while PGCs are en route to the somatic gonadal mesoderm, and previous studies have shown that CVM impacts PGC migration. In turn, we found here that CVM cells exhibit an affinity for PGCs, localizing to the position of PGCs whether mislocalized or trapped in the endoderm. In the absence of PGCs, CVM cells exhibit subtle changes, including more cohesive movement of the migrating collective, and an increased number of longitudinal muscles is found at anterior sections of the larval midgut. These data demonstrate that PGC and CVM cell migrations are interdependent and suggest that distinct migrating cell types can coordinately influence each other to promote effective cell migration during development. PMID:27578182

  8. Animal Cloning and Food Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... from clones and their offspring out of the food chain until CVM could further evaluate the issue. back to top FDA Studies Cloning For more than five years, CVM ... evaluate the safety of food from these animals. The resulting report, called a ...

  9. Draft genome sequences of Streptococcus bovis strains ATCC 33317 and JB1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report the draft genome sequences of Streptococcus bovis type strain ATTC 33317 (CVM42251) isolated from cow dung and strain JB1 (CVM42252) isolated from a cow rumen in 1977. Strains were subjected to Next Generation sequencing and the genome sizes are approximately 2 MB and 2.2 MB, respectively....

  10. Continuous Video Modeling to Assist with Completion of Multi-Step Home Living Tasks by Young Adults with Moderate Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mechling, Linda C.; Ayres, Kevin M.; Bryant, Kathryn J.; Foster, Ashley L.

    2014-01-01

    The current study evaluated a relatively new video-based procedure, continuous video modeling (CVM), to teach multi-step cleaning tasks to high school students with moderate intellectual disability. CVM in contrast to video modeling and video prompting allows repetition of the video model (looping) as many times as needed while the user completes…

  11. Using the Contingent Valuation Method for Dollar Valuations of Library Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hider, Philip

    2008-01-01

    An application of the contingent valuation method (CVM) for estimating the economic value of a regional public library service is described, and some of the key methodological issues surrounding CVM and other stated preference techniques are discussed with reference to library use and funding contexts. Given the range of valuations that can result…

  12. Structured for Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forde, Dana

    2008-01-01

    When North Carolina native Evan Raleigh was in search of the perfect college, he had three things in mind: (1) the strength of the school's academic reputation; (2) the size of the school; and (3) the school's location and proximity to home. He found all three in the form of Wake Forest University. But Raleigh, who received a full academic…

  13. 77 FR 46685 - In the Matter of: Steven Neal Greenoe, Currently Incarcerated at: Inmate #54450-056, USP Atlanta...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-06

    ... being that of August 12, 2011 (76 FR 50661 (August 16, 2011)), has continued the Regulations in effect...: 8933 Windjammer Drive, Raleigh, NC 27615; Order Denying Export Privileges On January 10, 2012, in the U....S. Penitentiary, P.O. Box 1150160, Atlanta, GA, and 8933 Windjammer Drive, Raleigh, NC 27615,...

  14. Institutional Research and Strategies for Higher Education Issues in the 1980's and Research Exchange Forum. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the North Carolina Association for Institutional Research (7th, Raleigh, North Carolina, November 1, 1979) and the Drive-In Conference (Chapel Hill, North Carolina, April 18, 1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Charles I., Ed.; Ussery, Robert M., Ed.

    Proceedings of the 1979 conference of the North Carolina Association for Institutional Research and the 1980 Research Search Exchange Drive-In Conference Program, which address the skills needed by institutional researchers to deal with the issues in higher education in the 1980s, are presented. Highlights of the North Carolina association…

  15. Pretreatment of human cervicovaginal mucus with pluronic F127 enhances nanoparticle penetration without compromising mucus barrier properties to herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed

    Ensign, Laura M; Lai, Samuel K; Wang, Ying-Ying; Yang, Ming; Mert, Olcay; Hanes, Justin; Cone, Richard

    2014-12-01

    Mucosal drug delivery nanotechnologies are limited by the mucus barrier that protects nearly all epithelial surfaces not covered with skin. Most polymeric nanoparticles, including polystyrene nanoparticles (PS), strongly adhere to mucus, thereby limiting penetration and facilitating rapid clearance from the body. Here, we demonstrate that PS rapidly penetrate human cervicovaginal mucus (CVM), if the CVM has been pretreated with sufficient concentrations of Pluronic F127. Importantly, the diffusion rate of large polyethylene glycol (PEG)-coated, nonmucoadhesive nanoparticles (PS-PEG) did not change in F127-pretreated CVM, implying that F127 did not significantly alter the native pore structure of CVM. Additionally, herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) remains adherent in F127-pretreated CVM, indicating that the presence of F127 did not reduce adhesive interactions between CVM and the virions. In contrast to treatment with a surfactant that has been approved for vaginal use as a spermicide (nonoxynol-9 or N9), there was no increase in inflammatory cytokine release in the vaginal tract of mice after daily application of 1% F127 for 1 week. Pluronic F127 pretreatment holds potential as a method to safely improve the distribution, retention, and efficacy of nanoparticle formulations without compromising CVM barrier properties to pathogens. PMID:25347518

  16. Pretreatment of Human Cervicovaginal Mucus with Pluronic F127 Enhances Nanoparticle Penetration without Compromising Mucus Barrier Properties to Herpes Simplex Virus

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mucosal drug delivery nanotechnologies are limited by the mucus barrier that protects nearly all epithelial surfaces not covered with skin. Most polymeric nanoparticles, including polystyrene nanoparticles (PS), strongly adhere to mucus, thereby limiting penetration and facilitating rapid clearance from the body. Here, we demonstrate that PS rapidly penetrate human cervicovaginal mucus (CVM), if the CVM has been pretreated with sufficient concentrations of Pluronic F127. Importantly, the diffusion rate of large polyethylene glycol (PEG)-coated, nonmucoadhesive nanoparticles (PS–PEG) did not change in F127-pretreated CVM, implying that F127 did not significantly alter the native pore structure of CVM. Additionally, herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) remains adherent in F127-pretreated CVM, indicating that the presence of F127 did not reduce adhesive interactions between CVM and the virions. In contrast to treatment with a surfactant that has been approved for vaginal use as a spermicide (nonoxynol-9 or N9), there was no increase in inflammatory cytokine release in the vaginal tract of mice after daily application of 1% F127 for 1 week. Pluronic F127 pretreatment holds potential as a method to safely improve the distribution, retention, and efficacy of nanoparticle formulations without compromising CVM barrier properties to pathogens. PMID:25347518

  17. Epidemiology of Cardiovascular Malformations among Newborns in Monchegorsk (North-West Russia): a Register-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Postoev, Vitaly A.; Talykova, Ljudmila V.; Vaktskjold, Arild

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular malformations (CVM) are one of the most prevalent groups of birth defects. Knowledge about the prevalence, distribution and survival in Russia has been limited. The aim of our study was to assess the perinatal prevalence, structure and risk factors for CVM among newborns in Monchegorsk (Murmansk Oblast, Russia) and the mortality among the affected newborns in the period 1973-2008. Design and methods A register-based study on data from the Kola and Murmansk County Birth Registers. The study included 28,511 births. Results The registered perinatal prevalence was 3.0 per 1000 new-borns, with septal defects as the most prevalent. CVM was twenty times more prevalent among stillborn than live born, and one-third of the live born with a CVM died during the first week of life. The perinatal mortality rate with CVM was 442 per 1000 newborns. This indicator decreased over time. The mothers of newborns with a CVM were ten times more likely to have stillbirth in their anamnesis. The adjusted odds ratio between maternal smoking during pregnancy and CVM was 4.09 [95% confidence interval: 1.75-9.53]. Conclusions The diagnosed perinatal prevalence was relatively low. A previous stillbirth by the mother was highly associated with being born with a CVM. An adjusted elevated risk was also observed among smoking mothers. Perinatal survival increased over time, but varied to a large extent between the different types of CVM. Significance for public health Cardiovascular malformation is one of the most common groups of birth defects. It is considered an important public health issue, as these malformations are the main cause of infant deaths in developed countries. Precise estimates about the prevalence and perinatal survival are needed to organise and plan health care for such newborns. Our study is the first report from the Russian Federation based on data from population-based birth registers. PMID:25343136

  18. Screening for bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency, deficiency of uridine monophosphate synthase, complex vertebral malformation, bovine citrullinaemia, and factor XI deficiency in Holstein cows reared in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD), deficiency of uridine monophosphate synthase (DUMPS), complex vertebral malformation (CVM), bovine citrullinaemia (BC) and factor XI deficiency (FXID) are autosomal recessive hereditary disorders, which have had significant economic impact on dairy cattle breeding worldwide. In this study, 350 Holstein cows reared in Turkey were screened for BLAD, DUMPS, CVM, BC and FXID genotypes to obtain an indication on the importance of these defects in Turkish Holsteins. Methods Genomic DNA was obtained from blood and the amplicons of BLAD, DUMPS, CVM, BC and FXID were obtained by using PCR. PCR products were digested with TaqI, AvaI and AvaII restriction enzymes for BLAD, DUMPS, and BC, respectively. These digested products and PCR product of FXID were analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis stained with ethidium bromide. CVM genotypes were detected by DNA sequencing. Additionally, all genotypes were confirmed by DNA sequencing to determine whether there was a mutant allele or not. Results Fourteen BLAD, twelve CVM and four FXID carriers were found among the 350 Holstein cows examined, while carriers of DUMPS and BC were not detected. The mutant allele frequencies were calculated as 0.02, 0.017, and 0.006 for BLAD, CVM and FXID, respectively with corresponding carrier prevalence of 4.0% (BLAD), 3.4% (CVM) and 1.2% (FXID). Conclusion This study demonstrates that carriers of BLAD, CVM and FXID are present in the Turkish Holstein population, although at a low frequency. The actual number of clinical cases is unknown, but sporadic cases may appear. As artificial insemination is widely used in dairy cattle breeding, carriers of BLAD, CVM and FXID are likely present within the population of breeding sires. It is recommended to screen breeding sires for these defective genes in order to avoid an unwanted spread within the population. PMID:20929557

  19. Incidence of bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency, complex vertebral malformation, and deficiency of uridine-5-monophosphate synthase carriers in Brazilian Girolando cattle.

    PubMed

    Paiva, D S; Fonseca, I; Pinto, I S B; Ianella, P; Campos, T A; Caetano, A R; Paiva, S R; Silva, M V G B; Martins, M F

    2013-01-01

    Among the various hereditary diseases that have been widely studied in dairy cattle, bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD), deficiency of uridine-5-monophosphate synthase (DUMPS), and complex vertebral malformation (CVM) are noteworthy because of their high impact on overall herd productivity as a consequence of increased calf mortality. The aim of this study was to verify the frequency of carriers of BLAD, CVM, and DUMPS mutant alleles in cows and bulls from the National Girolando Progeny Test carried out in Brazil by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism and allele-specific PCR assays. A total of 777 animals were genotyped for BLAD, 783 for CVM, and 122 for DUMPS. The frequencies of carriers for BLAD and CVM were 0.77 and 1.53%, respectively, whereas no carriers of DUMPS were observed. PMID:24065661

  20. Animal Drug Safety FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... the top How do you determine if a veterinary drug is safe to market? As mandated by the ... to the top How does CVM remove unsafe veterinary drugs from the market? See Withdrawal of New Animal ...

  1. 75 FR 6037 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Guidance for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-05

    ... enter the human food chain immediately at the completion of an investigational study. CVM's monitoring... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed... Medicine AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and...

  2. 75 FR 12756 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Prescription Drug...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-17

    ... advertisements published in journals, magazines, other periodicals, and newspapers, and advertisements broadcast... companies annually under Sec. 202.1(j)(4), and the Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM) estimates...

  3. Implication of complex vertebral malformation and bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency DNA-based testing on disease frequency in the Holstein population.

    PubMed

    Schütz, E; Scharfenstein, M; Brenig, B

    2008-12-01

    Two inherited lethal disorders, bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) and complex vertebral malformation (CVM), play a major role in breeding of Holstein cattle. Both inherited diseases are based on single nucleotide polymorphisms that have been known for 12 and 7 yr, respectively. A total of 25,753 cattle were genotyped for BLAD (18,200 tests) and CVM (14,493 tests) in our laboratory since the beginning of the genotyping programs for these diseases. Based on founder effects, the CVM mutation is thought to be linked to milk production. The BLAD was genotyped using RFLP until 2001; then a fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay on a LightCycler was used, as for CVM genotyping. By using single nucleotide polymorphism-aided breeding, the allelic frequency of the BLAD and CVM mutations in the active sire population was reduced from 9.4% in 1997 to 0.3% in 2007 (BLAD) and from 8.3% in 2002 to 2.3% in 2007 (CVM), with calculated half-life of the mutant allele of 2.1 yr for BLAD and 3.6 yr for CVM. An observed increase of BLAD frequency in 1999 could be attributed to the massive use of a BLAD-positive sire tested falsely negative in another laboratory. These data show that marker-assisted selection is capable of substantially reducing the frequency of a mutation within a period of not more than 5 yr. The different selection strategies against the lethal recessive allele in CVM and BLAD are reflected in the different reduction rates of the specific allele frequencies. PMID:19038961

  4. Willingness to pay for public health services in rural Central Java, Indonesia: methodological considerations when using the contingent valuation method.

    PubMed

    Shono, Aiko; Kondo, Masahide; Ohmae, Hiroshi; Okubo, Ichiro

    2014-06-01

    In the health sectors of low- and middle-income countries, contingent valuation method (CVM) studies on willingness to pay (WTP) have been used to gather information on demand variation or financial perspectives alongside price setting, such as the introduction of user fees and valuation of quality improvements. However, WTP found in most CVM studies have only explored the preferences that consumers express through their WTP without exploring whether they are actually able to pay for it. Therefore, this study examines the issues pertaining to WTP estimation for health services using the conventional CVM. We conducted 202 household interviews in 2008, in which we asked respondents about three types of public health services in Indonesia and assessed WTP estimated by the conventional CVM as well as in the scenario of "resorting to debt" to recognize their budget constraints. We find that all the demand curves for both WTP scenarios show gaps. Furthermore, the gap for midwife services is negatively affected by household income and is larger for the poor. These results prove that CVM studies on WTP do not always reveal WTP in the latter scenario. Those findings suggest that WTP elicited by the conventional CVM is different to that from the maximum price that prevents respondents from resorting to debt as their WTP. In order to bridge this gap in the body of knowledge on this topic, studies should improve the scenarios that CVM analyses use to explore WTP. Furthermore, because valuing or pricing health services based on the results of CVM studies on WTP alone can exacerbate the inequity of access to these services, information provided by such studies requires careful interpretation when used for this purpose, especially for the poor and vulnerable sections of society.

  5. Cerebral venous malformation with meningioma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    MU, QINGCHUN; ZHANG, KUN; WANG, JUSTIN; SAYARI, ARASH; HUANG, HAIYAN

    2016-01-01

    A 43-year-old female patient was admitted to The First Hospital of Jilin University (Changchun, China) on 1st October 2011 with a 10-day history of discontinuous, whole-brain headache and a 1-year history of impaired vision and memory deterioration, accompanied by right facial numbness. Clinical signs and radiological features observed using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) led to the diagnosis of an intracranial meningioma accompanied by a cerebral venous malformation (CVM). The patient underwent neurosurgical resection of the meningioma, but required no further treatment for the CVM. At a 1-year follow-up examination, the patient continued to complain of discontinuous headache. Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) was used to reconfirm the CVM diagnosis; however, no treatment was administered due to the high risks of treatment and only mild symptoms experienced by the patient. The present case demonstrates the efficacy of DSA for detecting the presence and specific nature of CVM, and compares the value of MRI and DSA in the diagnosis of CVM. The majority of CVM patients exhibit no clinical symptoms, and the disease prognosis is typically favorable. PMID:26998016

  6. Modeling weight variability in a pan coating process using Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Preetanshu; Katakdaunde, Manoj; Turton, Richard

    2006-10-06

    The primary objective of the current study was to investigate process variables affecting weight gain mass coating variability (CV(m) ) in pan coating devices using novel video-imaging techniques and Monte Carlo simulations. Experimental information such as the tablet location, circulation time distribution, velocity distribution, projected surface area, and spray dynamics was the main input to the simulations. The data on the dynamics of tablet movement were obtained using novel video-imaging methods. The effects of pan speed, pan loading, tablet size, coating time, spray flux distribution, and spray area and shape were investigated. CV(m) was found to be inversely proportional to the square root of coating time. The spray shape was not found to affect the CV(m) of the process significantly, but an increase in the spray area led to lower CV(m) s. Coating experiments were conducted to verify the predictions from the Monte Carlo simulations, and the trends predicted from the model were in good agreement. It was observed that the Monte Carlo simulations underpredicted CV(m) s in comparison to the experiments. The model developed can provide a basis for adjustments in process parameters required during scale-up operations and can be useful in predicting the process changes that are needed to achieve the same CV(m) when a variable is altered.

  7. 78 FR 31976 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-Members of SGIP 2...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-28

    ... published a notice in the Federal Register pursuant to Section 6(b) of the Act on March 7, 2013 (78 FR 14836...; International Business Machines Corporation (IBM), Yorktown Heights, NY; ABB Inc., Raleigh, NC; ARC...

  8. NASA's 2013 REEL Science Communications contest: Hurricane Science

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video on NASA satellite and aircraft observations of hurricanes was produced by Will Reiss and Erik Borchers, students at Cardinal Gibbons High School in Raleigh, North Carolina. Will and Erik...

  9. 76 FR 72002 - National Register of Historic Places; Notification of Pending Nominations and Related Actions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-21

    ... GUAM Guam County Agat World War II Amtrac, Address Restricted, Agat, 11000880 MARYLAND Prince George's... Rochester Heights Historic District, (Post-World War II and Modern Architecture in Raleigh, North...

  10. Familial Incidence of Cardiovascular Malformations in Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kelle, Angela M; Qureshi, Muhammad Y; Olson, Timothy M; Eidem, Benjamin W; O'Leary, Patrick W

    2015-12-01

    Obstructive left-sided congenital heart lesions exhibit familial clustering, and familial echocardiographic screening for bicuspid aortic valve has become standard practice. Hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) is a severe left-sided obstructive lesion; however, familial screening is not universally recommended. The purpose of this study was to define the incidence of cardiovascular malformations (CVMs) in first-degree relatives of HLHS probands. First-degree relatives were screened for CVM by transthoracic echocardiography. Screening was completed in 152 family members (97 parents and 55 siblings) of 52 probands. Of these, 17 of 152 (11%) had CVM. Anomalies detected included: bicuspid aortic valve in 5 (3%), isolated dilated ascending aorta in 4 (3%), coarctation of the aorta in 1, partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection in 1, anomalous, intramural coronary artery in 1, bicuspid pulmonary valve in 1, and other anomalies in 4. Most were previously undiagnosed (11 of 17, 65%). Fourteen of 52 families (27%) had ≥1 relative with CVM. Overall, 7 of 55 siblings (13%), 5 of 46 fathers (11%) and 5 of 51 mothers (10%) had CVM. Although the incidence of CVM in first-degree relatives of HLHS probands was lower in this cohort than previously reported, it remained substantial, with at least one additional member having CVM in 27% of families. The frequent occurrence of undiagnosed CVM highlights the importance of routine familial screening in HLHS. In fact, even if screening was done in childhood, it may be appropriate to screen again in the third or fourth decade to exclude isolated enlargement of the ascending aorta. PMID:26433269

  11. The usefulness of dental and cervical maturation stages in New Zealand children for Disaster Victim Identification.

    PubMed

    Timmins, Kimberley; Liversidge, Helen; Farella, Mauro; Herbison, Peter; Kieser, Jules

    2012-06-01

    Age estimation of young victims of natural and un-natural disasters remains a crucial and challenging task during the process of Disaster Victim Identification (DVI). The purpose of this study was to compare dental maturity using the Demirjian and Cameriere methods and to explore the relationship between dental age and cervical vertebral maturity (CVM) using the Hassel and Farman method for a group of New Zealand children. The study used lateral cephalometric and panoramic radiographs of 200 orthodontic patients aged 7-17 years. Dental age was calculated from mandibular tooth formation stages using the Demirjian and Cameriere methods by calculating the ratio of tooth length to apex width for these teeth. CVM was assessed using stages from Hassel and Farman. Reliability of maturity from reassessment of 20 radiographs showed good agreement for the three methods. Chronological and dental ages were compared using a mixed model. Descriptive statistics of dental ages by CVM stage were calculated. The results show that both dental methods were similar in assessing maturity. A disadvantage of using the Cameriere method was that all seven teeth reached maturity at 13.69 and 14.06 years in females and males respectively, compared to age 16 using the Dermijian method. Females reached CVM stages at earlier chronological and dental ages than males. Mean chronological age for CVM stages 2-5 is about 1 year earlier in females than males. The Demirjian and Cameriere methods of dental maturity and CVM are reliable and useful in assessing dental and skeletal maturity. Ideally in a DVI situation, both the methods of Demirjian and Cameriere, together with CVM, should be employed in the ageing of individuals suspected of being between 7 and 16 years.

  12. Clinical, Genetic and Environmental Factors Associated with Congenital Vertebral Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Giampietro, P.F.; Raggio, C.L.; Blank, R.D.; McCarty, C.; Broeckel, U.; Pickart, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Congenital vertebral malformations (CVM) pose a significant health problem because they can be associated with spinal deformities, such as congenital scoliosis and kyphosis, in addition to various syndromes and other congenital malformations. Additional information remains to be learned regarding the natural history of congenital scoliosis and related health problems. Although significant progress has been made in understanding the process of somite formation, which gives rise to vertebral bodies, there is a wide gap in our understanding of how genetic factors contribute to CVM development. Maternal diabetes during pregnancy most commonly contributes to the occurrence of CVM, followed by other factors such as hypoxia and anticonvulsant medications. This review highlights several emerging clinical issues related to CVM, including pulmonary and orthopedic outcome in congenital scoliosis. Recent breakthroughs in genetics related to gene and environment interactions associated with CVM development are discussed. The Klippel-Feil syndrome which is associated with cervical segmentation abnormalities is illustrated as an example in which animal models, such as the zebrafish, can be utilized to provide functional evidence of pathogenicity of identified mutations. PMID:23653580

  13. [Temporal stability of river ecological restoration based on the assessment of contingent valuation method: a case study of Shanghai urban river].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi-Fei; Wang, Dan

    2013-04-01

    Whether the assessment results of Contingent Valuation Method (CVM) have temporal stability is an important issue in examining the reliability of CVM findings, and also, is critical to decide whether CVM can be applied to evaluate the ecosystem services value in China. Taking the ecological restoration along the Caohejing River in Shanghai as a case, three CVM survey schemes with one month apart and two years apart were designed. Then, 426, 498, and 200 questionnaires in these surveys were comparatively analyzed, respectively. The mean values of the willingness to pay (WTP) from the three surveys were 14. 2, 14. 1, and 18. 0 RMB, and the median values were 5, 5, and 10 RMB, respectively. With the comparison of the WTP distribution and the main statistics, the analysis of the factors affecting the WTP, and the test of the significances of temporal variables, it was found that the CVM results from the surveys with one-month apart had temporal stability, while those from the surveys with two years apart presented definite difference.

  14. Cluster approach to dilute magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holvorcem, Paulo R. C.; Osório, Roberto

    1988-10-01

    A cluster algebra is developed for the definition of independent correlation functions in the cluster-variation method (CVM) for the spin-1 Ising model. A scheme is then introduced for the study of site-dilute spin- {1}/{2} Ising models by means of the CVM. The procedure regards the site-dilute spin- {1}/{2} model as the spin-1 model with additional constraints due to dilution. The Desjardins-Steinsvoll algortihm is used for the transformation of the CVM equations into a set of differential equations for the independent correlation functions with the inverse temperature as parameter. The evolution of the correlation functions with temperature and the behavior of response functions such as the specific heat and the susceptability are then obtained for any degree of dilution. As an introduction to this scheme, its detailed application is presented here for the simple case of the pair approximation.

  15. Characterization of cumulus cloud fields using trajectories in the center of gravity versus water mass phase space: 1. Cloud tracking and phase space description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiblum, Reuven H.; Altaratz, Orit; Koren, Ilan; Feingold, Graham; Kostinski, Alexander B.; Khain, Alexander P.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Fredj, Erick; Dagan, Guy; Pinto, Lital; Yaish, Ricki; Chen, Qian

    2016-06-01

    We study the evolution of warm convective cloud fields using large eddy simulations of continental and trade cumulus. Individual clouds are tracked a posteriori from formation to dissipation using a 3-D cloud-tracking algorithm, and results are presented in the phase space of center of gravity altitude versus cloud liquid water mass (CvM space). The CvM space is shown to contain rich information on cloud field characteristics, cloud morphology, and common cloud development pathways, together facilitating a comprehensive understanding of the cloud field. In this part we show how the meteorological (thermodynamic) conditions that determine the cloud properties are projected on the CvM phase space and how changes in the initial conditions affect the clouds' trajectories in this space. This part sets the stage for a detailed microphysical analysis that will be shown in part II.

  16. Testing long-period ground-motion simulations of scenario earthquakes using the Mw 7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah mainshock: Evaluation of finite-fault rupture characterization and 3D seismic velocity models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graves, Robert W.; Aagaard, Brad T.

    2011-01-01

    Using a suite of five hypothetical finite-fault rupture models, we test the ability of long-period (T>2.0 s) ground-motion simulations of scenario earthquakes to produce waveforms throughout southern California consistent with those recorded during the 4 April 2010 Mw 7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake. The hypothetical ruptures are generated using the methodology proposed by Graves and Pitarka (2010) and require, as inputs, only a general description of the fault location and geometry, event magnitude, and hypocenter, as would be done for a scenario event. For each rupture model, two Southern California Earthquake Center three-dimensional community seismic velocity models (CVM-4m and CVM-H62) are used, resulting in a total of 10 ground-motion simulations, which we compare with recorded ground motions. While the details of the motions vary across the simulations, the median levels match the observed peak ground velocities reasonably well, with the standard deviation of the residuals generally within 50% of the median. Simulations with the CVM-4m model yield somewhat lower variance than those with the CVM-H62 model. Both models tend to overpredict motions in the San Diego region and underpredict motions in the Mojave desert. Within the greater Los Angeles basin, the CVM-4m model generally matches the level of observed motions, whereas the CVM-H62 model tends to overpredict the motions, particularly in the southern portion of the basin. The variance in the peak velocity residuals is lowest for a rupture that has significant shallow slip (<5 km depth), whereas the variance in the residuals is greatest for ruptures with large asperities below 10 km depth. Overall, these results are encouraging and provide confidence in the predictive capabilities of the simulation methodology, while also suggesting some regions in which the seismic velocity models may need improvement.

  17. The contingent valuation method in health care.

    PubMed

    Klose, T

    1999-05-01

    The contingent valuation method (CVM) is a survey-based, hypothetical and direct method to determine monetary valuations of effects of health technologies. This comprehensive review of CVM in the health care literature points at methodological as well as conceptual issues of CVM and on willingness to pay as a measure of benefits compared with other measures used in medical technology assessment. Studies published before 1998 were found by searching computerised databases and former review literature. Studies were included, when performing CVM using original data and meeting qualitative criteria. Theoretical validity of CVM was sufficiently shown and there were several indications of convergent validity. No results on criterion validity and only a few on reliability were found. There was widespread use of different elicitation formats, which make comparisons of studies problematic. Direct questions were seen problematic. First bids used in bidding games influenced the monetary valuation significantly (starting point bias). There were indications that the range of bids of payment cards also affected the valuation (range bias). However, no strategic bias was found. The influence of different states of valuation (ex-ante, ex-post) and of payment methods, as well as the possible aggregation of the results of decomposed scenarios rather than more complex holistic scenarios, were rarely investigated. Further methodological analysis and testing seems to be necessary before CVM may be used in health care decision making. Important research topics are the connection of assessment of different elicitation methods and criterion validity as well as tests on reliability according to methodological issues. Concerning conceptual issues, the analysis of the influence of different states of evaluation and of the status of the respondents as diseased or non-diseased, as well as the aggregation of results of decomposed scenarios, proved to be topics of further research. PMID:10538292

  18. Inflammatory responses and side effects generated by several adjuvant-containing vaccines in turbot.

    PubMed

    Noia, M; Domínguez, B; Leiro, J; Blanco-Méndez, J; Luzardo-Álvarez, A; Lamas, J

    2014-05-01

    Several of the adjuvants used in fish vaccines cause adhesions in internal organs when they are injected intraperitoneally. We describe the damage caused by vaccines containing different adjuvants in the turbot Scophthalmus maximus and show that internal adhesions can be greatly reduced by injecting the fish in a specific way. Injection of fish with the needle directed towards the anterior part of the peritoneal cavity induced formation of a single cell-vaccine mass (CVM) that became attached to the parietal peritoneum. However, injection of the fish with the needle pointing in the opposite direction generated many small CVM that became attached to the visceral and parietal peritoneum and in some cases caused internal adhesions. We describe the structural and cellular changes in the adjuvant-induced CVMs. The CVMs mainly comprised neutrophils and macrophages, although most of the former underwent apoptosis, which was particularly evident from day 3 post-injection. The apoptotic cells were phagocytosed by macrophages, which were the dominant cell type from the first days onwards. All of the vaccines induced angiogenesis in the area of contact between the CVM and the mesothelium. Vaccines containing oil-based adjuvants or microspheres induced the formation of granulomas in the CVM; however, no granulomas were observed in the CVM induced by vaccines containing aluminium hydroxide or Matrix-Q(®) as adjuvants. All of the vaccines induced strong migration of cells to the peritoneal cavity. Although some of these cells remained unattached in the peritoneal cavity, most of them formed part of the CVM. We also observed migration of the cells from the peritoneal cavity to lymphoid organs, indicating bidirectional traffic of cells between the inflamed areas and these organs.

  19. Screening for toxic phorbol esters in jerky pet treat products using LC-MS.

    PubMed

    Nishshanka, Upul; Jayasuriya, Hiranthi; Chattopadhaya, Chaitali; Kijak, Philip J; Chu, Pak-Sin; Reimschuessel, Renate; Tkachenko, Andriy; Ceric, Olgica; De Alwis, Hemakanthi G

    2016-05-01

    Since 2007, the U.S. FDA's Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM) has been investigating reports of pets becoming ill after consuming jerky pet treats. Jerky used in pet treats contains glycerin, which can be made from vegetable oil or as a byproduct of biodiesel production. Because some biodiesel is produced using oil from Jatropha curcas, a plant that contains toxic compounds including phorbol esters, CVM developed a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) screening method to evaluate investigational jerky samples for the presence of these toxins. Results indicated that the samples analyzed with the new method did not contain Jatropha toxins at or above the lowest concentration tested. PMID:27038400

  20. [Evaluation of professional exposure to chloride vinyl monomer and vinyl idene chloride for a pharmaceutical packaging worker].

    PubMed

    Dorsi, F; De Grandis, D; Laurelli, R; Narda, R; Pietrantonio, E; Scarlini, E; Soldati, P S

    2007-01-01

    The study was conducted by Judicial Policy investigations of Prosecution's Office. The event was connected by a professional founded suspicion disease of a pharmaceutical worker. First information coming from the Authority indicated a chloride vinyl monomer (CVM) exposure. We applied a chemical risk assessment method to estimate real professional exposure. The method was based on the productive cycle, physical and chemical and toxicological properties. The method combined to environmental data permitted to formulate etiological hypothesis. The worker during drugs packaging was exposed to CVM and vinylidene chloride (CVDM) caused by blister warming and by glue deposition. We explain the evaluations by which we could consider the pollutant different distribution in workplaces.

  1. Balancing Public Trust Resources of Mono Lake and Los Angeles' Water Right: An Economic Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loomis, John B.

    1987-08-01

    The contingent valuation method (CVM) is used to quantify the Public Trust values of Mono Lake at alternative lake levels. The dichotomous choice approach to contingent valuation is employed using a logit model. The economic benefit to California residents of preserving Mono Lake is estimated to be 1.5 billion. Purchase of replacement water and power would cost 26.2 million annually. On efficiency grounds, reallocation of water for maintenance of Public Trust values at Mono Lake is warranted. The CVM appears to be a useful methodology to evaluate the balancing and feasibility tests of the expanded Public Trust doctrine suggested by the California Supreme Court.

  2. AB125. Androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer is associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Yuanjie; Zhu, Shimiao

    2015-01-01

    Background There is no consensus regarding whether androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cardiovascular mortality (CVM). The objective of this study was to determine the role of ADT for prostate cancer (PCa) in development of cardiovascular events (CVD and CVM). Methods and findings We performed a meta-analysis from population-based observational studies comparing ADT vs control aimed at treating PCa in patients with PCa, reporting either CVD or CVM as outcome. Publications were searched using Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library Central Register of observational studies database up to May 31th 2014, and supplementary searches in publications from potentially relevant journals. 6 studies were identified with a total of 129,802 ADT users and 165,605 controls investigating the relationship between ADT and CVD. The incidence of CVD was 10% higher in ADT groups, although no significant association was observed (HR =1.10, 95% CIs: 1.00-1.21; P=0.06). For different types of ADT, CVD was related with gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) (HR =1.19, 95% CIs: 1.04-1.36; P<0.001) and GnRH plus oral antiandrogen (AA) (HR =1.46, 95% CIs: 1.03-2.08; P=0.04), but not with AA alone or orchiectomy. For CVM, 119,625 ADT users and 150,974 controls from 6 eligible studies were included, pooled result suggested that ADT was associated with CVM (HR =1.17, 95% CIs: 1.04-1.32; P=0.01). Significantly increased CVM was also detected in GnRH and GnRH plus AA groups. When patients received other treatments (e.g., prostatectomy and radiotherapy) were ruled out of consideration, more increased CVD (HR =1.19, 95% CIs: 1.08-1.30; P<0.001) and CVM (HR =1.30, 95% CIs: 1.13-1.50; P<0.001) were found in men treated with ADT monotherapy. Conclusions ADT is associated with both CVD and CVM. Particularly, GnRH alone and GnRH plus AA can significantly increase the incidence of cardiovascular events in patients with PCa.

  3. AB187. Androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer is associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Yuanjie; Zhu, Shimiao

    2016-01-01

    Objectives There is no consensus regarding whether androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cardiovascular mortality (CVM). The objective of this study was to determine the role of ADT for prostate cancer (PCa) in development of cardiovascular events (CVD and CVM). Methods We performed a meta-analysis from population-based observational studies comparing ADT vs. control aimed at treating PCa in patients with PCa, reporting either CVD or CVM as outcome. Publications were searched using Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library Central Register of observational studies database up to May 31th 2014, and supplementary searches in publications from potentially relevant journals. Six studies were identified with a total of 129,802 ADT users and 165,605 controls investigating the relationship between ADT and CVD. Result The incidence of CVD was 10% higher in ADT groups, although no significant association was observed (HR =1.10, 95% CIs, 1.00–1.21; P=0.06). For different types of ADT, CVD was related with gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) (HR =1.19, 95% CIs, 1.04–1.36; P<0.001) and GnRH plus oral antiandrogen (AA) (HR =1.46, 95% CIs, 1.03–2.08; P=0.04), but not with AA alone or orchiectomy. For CVM, 119,625 ADT users and 150,974 controls from 6 eligible studies were included, pooled result suggested that ADT was associated with CVM (HR=1.17, 95% CIs, 1.04–1.32; P=0.01). Significantly increased CVM was also detected in GnRH and GnRH plus AA groups. When patients received other treatments (e.g., prostatectomy and radiotherapy) were ruled out of consideration, more increased CVD (HR =1.19, 95% CIs, 1.08–1.30; P<0.001) and CVM (HR =1.30, 95% CIs, 1.13–1.50; P<0.001) were found in men treated with ADT monotherapy. Conclusions ADT is associated with both CVD and CVM. Particularly, GnRH alone and GnRH plus AA can significantly increase the incidence of cardiovascular events in patients with PCa.

  4. 21 CFR 515.10 - Medicated feed mill license applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Veterinary Medicine home page at http://www.fda.gov/cvm. (b) A completed medicated feed mill license must... new animal drugs are manufactured and labeled in accordance with the applicable regulations published... (HFV-220), Center for Veterinary Medicine, Food and Drug Administration, 7500 Standish Pl.,...

  5. 21 CFR 515.10 - Medicated feed mill license applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Veterinary Medicine home page at http://www.fda.gov/cvm. (b) A completed medicated feed mill license must... new animal drugs are manufactured and labeled in accordance with the applicable regulations published... (HFV-220), Center for Veterinary Medicine, Food and Drug Administration, 7500 Standish Pl.,...

  6. 76 FR 6143 - Draft Guidance for Industry on “Target Animal Safety and Effectiveness Protocol Development and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-03

    ... for review by the Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM), Office of New Animal Drug Evaluation (ONADE... guidance to the Communications Staff (HFV-12), Center for Veterinary Medicine, Food and Drug Administration... Veterinary Medicine (HFV-110), Food and Drug Administration, 7500 Standish Pl., Rockville, MD 20855,...

  7. 76 FR 13629 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Chemistry, Manufacturing, and Controls Information-Fermentation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-14

    ...), Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM), Food and Drug Administration, 7519 Standish Pl., Rockville, MD... 20852. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Michael J. Popek, Center for Veterinary Medicine (HFV-144), Food... rights for or on any person and does not operate to bind FDA or the public. An alternative approach...

  8. 75 FR 6038 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Guidance for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-05

    ... Center for Veterinary Medicine Using the Food and Drug Administration Electronic Submission Gateway... Veterinary Medicine's (CVM's) ``Guidance for Industry on How to Submit Information in Electronic Format to the Center for Veterinary Medicine Using the FDA Electronic Gateway.'' DATES: Submit written...

  9. 78 FR 53772 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for Office of Management and Budget Review...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-30

    ... Federal Register of May 16, 2013 (78 FR 28851), FDA published a 60-day notice requesting public comment on... Information in Electronic Format to the Center for Veterinary Medicine Using the Food and Drug Administration... CFR 11.2 (OMB Control Number 0910-0454)--Extension The Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM)...

  10. 75 FR 22598 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for Office and Management and Budget Review...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-29

    ... Protocol Without Data in Electronic Format to the Center for Veterinary Medicine AGENCY: Food and Drug... Industry on How to Submit a Protocol Without Data in Electronic Format to the Center for Veterinary... drug sponsors, the Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM) reviews protocols for safety and...

  11. 75 FR 58411 - Center for Veterinary Medicine eSubmitter Workshop; Public Workshop; Request for Comments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Center for Veterinary Medicine eSubmitter Workshop; Public...: ``Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM) eSubmitter Workshop.'' The purpose of the public workshop is to..., Center for Veterinary Medicine (HFV-100), Food and Drug Administration, 7520 Standish Pl., Rockville,...

  12. Depletion of penicillin G residues in sows after intramuscular injection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The US-FDA CVM has not established a tolerance for penicillin residues in swine tissues, but across much of Europe and Asia a tolerance of 50 ppb penicillin G is in effect. In the US, heavy sows are often treated with extra-label doses of penicillin G, however appropriate pre-slaughter withdrawal p...

  13. Correlation between cervical vertebral maturation and chronological age in a group of Iranian females

    PubMed Central

    Safavi, Seyed Mohammadreza; Beikaii, Hanie; Hassanizadeh, Raheleh; Younessian, Farnaz; Baghban, Alireza Akbarzadeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Correlation between chronological age at different stages of cervical vertebral maturation (CVM) is important in clinical orthodontic practice. The objective of this study was to evaluate the correlation between CVM stage and chronological age in a group of Iranian female patients. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted on 196 digital lateral cephalometry of female patients with the age ranged 9-14 years. The CVM stage was determined with two calibrated examiners, using the method developed by Baccetti and its correlation with mean chronological age was assessed by the Spearman rank-order. The intra and inter-agreements were evaluated by weighted Kappa statistics in overall diagnosis of stages, in addition to determination of presence or absent of concavities at the lower border of second, third and fourth cervical vertebrae and the shapes of the third and fourth vertebrae. P < 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: The correlation coefficient between CVM stages and chronological age was relatively low (r = 0.62). The least amount of inter-observer agreement was determined to be at the clinical decision of the shape of the fourth vertebra. Conclusion: Regarding the low reported correlation, the concomitant usage of other skeletal indicators seems necessary for precise determination of physiological age of the patients. PMID:26604958

  14. 75 FR 16001 - New Animal Drugs; Removal of Obsolete and Redundant Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-31

    ... Study Implementation (DESI) program (68 FR 47332). CVM proposed to withdraw the new animal drug... had a new strategy and concept for assessing the safety of antimicrobial new animal drugs, including... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 558 (formerly Docket No. 2003N-0324) New...

  15. 77 FR 38638 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for Office of Management and Budget Review...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-28

    ... substances that are GRAS by qualified experts. In the Federal Register of April 17, 1997 (62 FR 18938) (the... December 28, 2010 (75 FR 81536) (the GRAS reopener), FDA announced the reopening of the comment period for... submission process. FDA's Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM) continues to comply with the GRAS...

  16. Whole-genome sequencing of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Cubana strains isolated from agricultural sources

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report draft genomes of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Cubana strain CVM42234 isolated from chick feed in 2012 and Salmonella Cubana strain 76814 isolated from swine in 2004. The genome sizes are 4,975,046 and 4,936,251 base pairs, respectively....

  17. Characterization of cumulus cloud fields using trajectories in the center of gravity versus water mass phase space: 2. Aerosol effects on warm convective clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiblum, Reuven H.; Altaratz, Orit; Koren, Ilan; Feingold, Graham; Kostinski, Alexander B.; Khain, Alexander P.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Fredj, Erick; Dagan, Guy; Pinto, Lital; Yaish, Ricki; Chen, Qian

    2016-06-01

    In Part I of this work a 3-D cloud tracking algorithm and phase space of center of gravity altitude versus cloud liquid water mass (CvM space) were introduced and described in detail. We showed how new physical insight can be gained by following cloud trajectories in the CvM space. Here this approach is used to investigate aerosol effects on cloud fields of warm cumuli. We show a clear effect of the aerosol loading on the shape and size of CvM clusters. We also find fundamental differences in the CvM space between simulations using bin versus bulk microphysical schemes, with the bin scheme precipitation expressing much higher sensitivity to changes in aerosol concentrations. Using the bin microphysical scheme, we find that the increase in cloud center of gravity altitude with increase in aerosol concentrations occurs for a wide range of cloud sizes. This is attributed to reduced sedimentation, increased buoyancy and vertical velocities, and increased environmental instability, all of which are tightly coupled to inhibition of precipitation processes and subsequent feedbacks of clouds on their environment. Many of the physical processes shown here are consistent with processes typically associated with cloud invigoration.

  18. 75 FR 22598 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for Office and Management and Budget Review...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-29

    ... enter the human food chain immediately at the completion of an investigational study. CVM's monitoring... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for... Format to the Center for Veterinary Medicine AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION:...

  19. Comparison of the Effects of Continuous Video Modeling, Video Prompting, and Video Modeling on Task Completion by Young Adults with Moderate Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mechling, Linda C.; Ayres, Kevin M.; Bryant, Kathryn J.; Foster, Ashley L.

    2014-01-01

    This study compared the effects of three procedures (video prompting: VP, video modeling: VM, and continuous video modeling: CVM) on task completion by three high school students with moderate intellectual disability. The comparison was made across three sets of fundamentally different tasks (putting away household items in clusters of two items;…

  20. A Comparison of Antimicrobial Susceptibility and MIC-distributions in Enterococcus Isolates Originating from Humans, Animals and Retail Meat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objectives: The National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS) is a collaborative effort between the Food and Drug Administration's Center for Veterinary Medicine (FDA CVM), U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The NARMS prog...

  1. Spectral Amplification Factors of Long-Period (3 to 10 s) Strong Ground Motions in and around the Los Angeles Basin during the Mw7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah Earthquake of April 4, 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatayama, K.; Kalkan, E.

    2012-12-01

    We evaluated spectral amplification factors of long-period ground motions (3 to 10 s) in the Los Angeles (LA) basin by computing Fourier spectral ratios of the basin sites with respect to the surrounding reference hard-rock sites from the Mw7.2 April 4, 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake records and presented period-specific (4, 6, 8 and 10 s) maps of amplification factors for the long periods. This earthquake was the first event providing many (236) high-quality recordings to study spatial variation of long-period amplification in the LA basin. We also tried numerical wave propagation simulations for two of the recent 3D seismic-velocity models for south California: SCEC (Southern California Earthquake Center) CVM (Community Velocity Model)-4.0 and CVM-H 6.2 to examine how these models account for the observed long-period amplification factors. Comparison of the period-specific maps of amplification factors between the observation and the simulation for the two velocity models shows that both CVM-4.0 and CVM-H 6.2 can roughly reproduce the observed amplification factors with the period range of 8 to 10 s in the LA basin. Concerning the shorter-period range (4 to 6 s), however, both of the two models leave more to be improved so that the observed amplification factors can be better simulated. We also find that CVM-4.0 has an advantage over CVM-H 6.2 in terms of the south-eastern part of the LA basin, because CVM-H 6.2 indicates non-observed large amplification there, while CVM-4.0 does not indicate the false amplification. For the period of 10 s, the largest amplification factor of about 5 was observed in the central part of the LA basin, which is well simulated in terms of good agreements between the observed and the simulated amplification factors. The simulation from the two velocity models also indicates the large amplification even in the San Gabriel (SG) valley, which disagrees with the observation. For 8 s, larger amplification factors of about 5 were observed

  2. 5S clavam biosynthesis is controlled by an atypical two-component regulatory system in Streptomyces clavuligerus.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Thomas; Zelyas, Nathan J; Cai, Hui; Tahlan, Kapil; Wong, Annie; Jensen, Susan E

    2012-09-01

    Streptomyces clavuligerus produces a collection of five clavam metabolites, including the clinically important β-lactamase inhibitor clavulanic acid, as well as four structurally related metabolites called 5S clavams. The paralogue gene cluster of S. clavuligerus is one of three clusters of genes for the production of these clavam metabolites. A region downstream of the cluster was analyzed, and snk, res1, and res2, encoding elements of an atypical two-component regulatory system, were located. Mutation of any one of the three genes had no effect on clavulanic acid production, but snk and res2 mutants produced no 5S clavams, whereas res1 mutants overproduced 5S clavams. Reverse transcriptase PCR analyses showed that transcription of cvm7p (which encodes a transcriptional activator of 5S clavam biosynthesis) and 5S clavam biosynthetic genes was eliminated in snk and in res2 mutants but that snk and res2 transcription was unaffected in a cvm7p mutant. Both snk and res2 mutants could be complemented by introduction of cvm7p under the control of an independently regulated promoter. In vitro assays showed that Snk can autophosphorylate and transfer its phosphate group to both Res1 and Res2, and Snk-H365, Res1-D52, and Res2-D52 were identified as the phosphorylation sites for the system. Dephosphorylation assays indicated that Res1 stimulates dephosphorylation of Res2∼P. These results suggest a regulatory cascade in which Snk and Res2 form a two-component system controlling cvm7p transcription, with Res1 serving as a checkpoint to modulate phosphorylation levels. Cvm7P then activates transcription of 5S clavam biosynthetic genes.

  3. Assessment of skeletal maturation with permanent mandibular second molar calcification stages among a group of Nepalese orthodontic patients

    PubMed Central

    Giri, Jamal; Shrestha, Basanta Kumar; Yadav, Rajiv; Ghimire, Tika Ram

    2016-01-01

    Background Assessment of growth status of a patient is a key component in orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning for growing patients with skeletal discrepancy. Skeletal maturation based on hand-wrist radiograph and cervical vertebral maturation (CVM) are commonly used methods of growth assessment. Studies have shown that stages of dental calcification can also be used to assess skeletal maturation status of an individual, whereas other studies have suggested that the relationship between dental calcification and skeletal maturation should be interpreted with caution owing to racial variation. Objective To evaluate the relationship between permanent mandibular second molar calcification stages and skeletal maturity assessed by CVM among a group of Nepalese orthodontic patients. Materials and methods One hundred and sixty-eight digital radiographs (84 orthopantomograms and 84 lateral cephalograms) were obtained from the records of 84 patients who sought orthodontic treatment in Orthodontic and Dentofacial Orthopaedic Unit, Department of Dentistry, Institute of Medicine, Kathmandu. Two parameters were used in this study, namely, CVM stages from lateral cephalogram and Demirjian index (DI) stages from orthopantomogram. The evaluation of digital radiographs was carried out on a computer screen with a resolution of 1,280×800 pixels. The association between DI stages of permanent mandibular second molar and CVM stages was assessed. Results A statistically significant association was found between DI and CVM stages for both male and female subjects with Pearson’s contingency coefficient value of 0.751 and 0.766 for male and female subjects, respectively. Conclusion Skeletal maturation can be reliably assessed with dental calcification stages of permanent mandibular second molar for Nepalese orthodontic patients. PMID:27099531

  4. Diffusion of Immunoglobulin G in Shed Vaginal Epithelial Cells and in Cell-Free Regions of Human Cervicovaginal Mucus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying-Ying; Schroeder, Holly A.; Nunn, Kenetta L.; Woods, Karen; Anderson, Deborah J.; Cone, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Human cervicovaginal mucus (CVM) is a viscoelastic gel containing a complex mixture of mucins, shed epithelial cells, microbes and macromolecules, such as antibodies, that together serve as the first line of defense against invading pathogens. Here, to investigate the affinity between IgG and different mucus constituents, we used Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) to measure the diffusion of IgG in fresh, minimally modified CVM. We found that CVM exhibits substantial spatial variations that necessitate careful selection of the regions in which to perform FRAP. In portions of CVM devoid of cells, FRAP measurements using different IgG antibodies and labeling methods consistently demonstrate that both exogenous and endogenous IgG undergo rapid diffusion, almost as fast as in saline, in good agreement with the rapid diffusion of IgG in mid-cycle endocervical mucus that is largely devoid of cells. This rapid diffusion indicates the interactions between secreted mucins and IgG must be very weak and transient. IgG also accumulated in cellular debris and shed epithelial cells that had become permeable to IgG, which may allow shed epithelial cells to serve as reservoirs of secreted IgG. Interestingly, in contrast to cell-free regions of CVM, the diffusion of cell-associated IgG was markedly slowed, suggesting greater affinity between IgG and cellular constituents. Our findings contribute to an improved understanding of the role of IgG in mucosal protection against infectious diseases, and may also provide a framework for using FRAP to study molecular interactions in mucus and other complex biological environments. PMID:27362256

  5. Nanoparticles reveal that human cervicovaginal mucus is riddled with pores larger than viruses

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Samuel K.; Wang, Ying-Ying; Hida, Kaoru; Cone, Richard; Hanes, Justin

    2010-01-01

    The mechanisms by which mucus helps prevent viruses from infecting mucosal surfaces are not well understood. We engineered non-mucoadhesive nanoparticles of various sizes and used them as probes to determine the spacing between mucin fibers (pore sizes) in fresh undiluted human cervicovaginal mucus (CVM) obtained from volunteers with healthy vaginal microflora. We found that most pores in CVM have diameters significantly larger than human viruses (average pore size 340 ± 70 nm; range approximately 50–1800 nm). This mesh structure is substantially more open than the 15–100-nm spacing expected assuming mucus consists primarily of a random array of individual mucin fibers. Addition of a nonionic detergent to CVM caused the average pore size to decrease to 130 ± 50 nm. This suggests hydrophobic interactions between lipid-coated “naked” protein regions on mucins normally cause mucin fibers to self-condense and/or bundle with other fibers, creating mucin “cables” at least three times thicker than individual mucin fibers. Although the native mesh structure is not tight enough to trap most viruses, we found that herpes simplex virus (approximately 180 nm) was strongly trapped in CVM, moving at least 8,000-fold slower than non-mucoadhesive 200-nm nanoparticles. This work provides an accurate measurement of the pore structure of fresh, hydrated ex vivo CVM and demonstrates that mucoadhesion, rather than steric obstruction, may be a critical protective mechanism against a major sexually transmitted virus and perhaps other viruses. PMID:20018745

  6. 40 CFR 52.1778 - Significant deterioration of air quality.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... quality. 52.1778 Section 52.1778 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Significant deterioration of air quality. (a)-(b) (c) All applications and other information required pursuant... Air Quality, 1641 Mail Service Center, Raleigh, North Carolina 27699-1641 or local agencies,...

  7. 40 CFR 52.1778 - Significant deterioration of air quality.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... quality. 52.1778 Section 52.1778 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Significant deterioration of air quality. (a)-(b) (c) All applications and other information required pursuant... Air Quality, 1641 Mail Service Center, Raleigh, North Carolina 27699-1641 or local agencies,...

  8. 40 CFR 52.1778 - Significant deterioration of air quality.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... quality. 52.1778 Section 52.1778 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Significant deterioration of air quality. (a)-(b) (c) All applications and other information required pursuant... Air Quality, 1641 Mail Service Center, Raleigh, North Carolina 27699-1641 or local agencies,...

  9. 40 CFR 52.1778 - Significant deterioration of air quality.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... quality. 52.1778 Section 52.1778 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Significant deterioration of air quality. (a)-(b) (c) All applications and other information required pursuant... Air Quality, 1641 Mail Service Center, Raleigh, North Carolina 27699-1641 or local agencies,...

  10. 40 CFR 52.1778 - Significant deterioration of air quality.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... quality. 52.1778 Section 52.1778 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Significant deterioration of air quality. (a)-(b) (c) All applications and other information required pursuant... Air Quality, 1641 Mail Service Center, Raleigh, North Carolina 27699-1641 or local agencies,...

  11. 7 CFR 305.2 - Approved treatments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... for approval by submitting the treatment schedule, along with any supporting information and data, to... Health Science and Technology, 1730 Varsity Drive, Suite 400, Raleigh, NC 27606-5202. Upon receipt of such an application, the Administrator will review the schedule and the supporting information and...

  12. Apparatus for Teaching Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnix, Richard B.; Carpenter, D. Rae, Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Describes: (1) the construction of a variable-volume resonator and Raleigh-disk resonance detector from simple materials; and (2) a learning aid for performing 60 experiments in basic electricity and electronics (consisting of a circuit board, components, and mask sheets). Illustrative experiments are included for both apparatus. (DH)

  13. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION: JOINT (NSF-EPA) VERIFICATION STATEMENT AND REPORT: TRITON SYSTEMS, LLC SOLID BOWL CENTRIFUGE, MODEL TS-5000

    EPA Science Inventory

    Verification testing of the Triton Systems, LLC Solid Bowl Centrifuge Model TS-5000 (TS-5000) was conducted at the Lake Wheeler Road Field Laboratory Swine Educational Unit in Raleigh, North Carolina. The TS-5000 was 48" in diameter and 30" deep, with a bowl capacity of 16 ft3. ...

  14. Biographical Sketches from Interviews Conducted by Lourdes Ruiz, Teacher, Dulce Elementary School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pono, Filomena P., Comp.

    Eight biographical sketches of some Jicarilla Apache and Spanish American people who live and work in Dulce, New Mexico are given. These sketches contain brief descriptions of the lives of Jose Gabriel Abeyta, Cevero Caramillo, Chon LaBrier, Espeedie Garcia Ruiz, Raleigh Tafoya, Norman Tecube, Hubert Velarde, and Henry "Buster" L. Vicenti. At the…

  15. MATERNAL ATRAZINE (ATR) ALTERS HYPOTHALAMIC DOPAMINE (HYP-DA) AND SERUM PROLACTIN (SPRL) IN MALE PUPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Maternal Atrazine (ATR) alters hypothalamic dopamine (HYP-DA) and serum prolactin (sPRL) in male pups. 1Christopher Langdale, 2Tammy Stoker and 2Ralph Cooper. 1 Dept. of Cell Biology, North Carolina State University College of Veterinary Medicine, Raleigh, NC. 2 Endocrinology ...

  16. Researchers Mull STEM Gender Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viadero, Debra

    2009-01-01

    Intrigued by the interviews with high school valedictorians that the Raleigh, N.C., News & Observer publishes this time each year, researcher E. Ann York decided to gather up three years' worth of its stories to look for any gender differences in the aspirations of these highest-achieving local students. Were boys more likely to strive for careers…

  17. DEVELOPMENTAL ATRAZINE EXPOSURE SUPPRESSES IMMUNE FUNCTION IN MALE, BUT NOT FEMALE SPRAGUE-DAWLEY RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Developmental Atrazine Exposure Suppresses Immune Function in Male, but not Female Sprague-Dawley Rats

    Andrew A. Rooney,*,1 Raymond A. Matulka,? and Robert Luebke?

    *College of Veterinary Medicine, Anatomy, Physiological Sciences and Radiology, NCSU, Raleigh, North...

  18. Paraprofessional of the Year 2009: Tina Adams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, John N., III

    2009-01-01

    There is no doubt among the staff and managers at North Carolina State University (NCSU) Libraries, Raleigh, that advanced library technician Tina Adams deserves to be the winner of the "Library Journal's "Paraprofessional of the Year Award for 2009." "Certainly this library has never seen anyone like her before, not in my nine years on staff,"…

  19. A+ Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instructor, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Underwood Elementary School in Raleigh, North Carolina, offers 100 electives with names like Crystal Ball (study of the future), Coastal Ecology, and Magical Math. This magnet school has an open admissions policy, an outstanding reputation in creative dramatics, teachers who are self starting, and a principal with vision and organization. (MT)

  20. (AMD) ANALYSIS OF AIR QUALITY DATA NEAR ROADWAYS USING A DISPERSION MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    We used a dispersion model to analyze measurements made during a field study conducted by the U.S. EPA in July-August 2006, to estimate the impact of traffic emissions on air quality at distances of tens of meters from an 8 lane highway located in Raleigh, North Carolina. The air...

  1. PERIODS OF VERTEBRAL COLUMN SENSITIVITY TO BORIC ACID TREATMENT IN CD-1 MICE IN UTERO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Periods of vertebral column sensitivity to boric acid treatment in CD-1 mice in utero.

    Cherrington JW, Chernoff N.

    Department of Toxicology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695, USA. jana_cherrington@hotmail.com

    Boric acid (BA) has many uses as...

  2. 77 FR 3326 - Cancellation of Environmental Impact Statement in Orange County, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-23

    ... [Federal Register Volume 77, Number 14 (Monday, January 23, 2012)] [Notices] [Page 3326] [FR Doc.... Clarence W. Coleman, Jr., Preconstruction and Environmental Team Leader, Raleigh, North Carolina. [FR Doc... Elizabeth Brady Road Extension between US 70 Business and US 70 Bypass in Orange County, North Carolina....

  3. CHARACTERIZATION OF NEAR-ROAD POLLUTANT GRADIENTS USING PATH-INTEGRATED OPTICAL REMOTE SENSING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding motor vehicle emissions, near roadway pollutant dispersion, and their potential impact to near roadway populations is an area of growing interest. A field study was conducted near 1-440 in Raleigh NC in July and August of 2006. This paper presents a subset of measur...

  4. AIR PARTICULATE POLLUTION EXPOSURE INDUCES SYSTEMIC OXIDATIVE STRESS IN HEALTHY MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air particulate pollution exposure induces systemic oxidative stress in healthy mice

    Elizabeth S Roberts1 and Kevin L Dreher2. 1 College or Veterinary Medicine, NC State University, Raleigh, NC , 2US Environmental Protection Agency, NHEERL, RTP, NC

    Epidemiological s...

  5. IN VITRO LUNG ALVEOLAR EPITHELIAL CELL INJURY AND INFLAMMATORY RESPONSE TO PARTICULATE MATTER-ASSOCIATED METALS - MODULATION BY EXPOSURE TO TNF-ALPHA, IL-BETA, OR IFN-GAMMA

    EPA Science Inventory

    IN VITRO LUNG ALVEOLAR EPITHELIAL CELL INJURY AND INFLAMMATORY RESPONSE TO PARTICULATE MATTER-ASSOCIATED METALS - MODULATION BY EXPOSURE TO TNF , IL-1 , OR IFN .

    JA Dye, KE Peoples*, CL Hayes?. US EPA, ORD, Pulmonary Toxicology Branch, RTP, NC, *HHMI-SRI, NCSU, Raleigh, NC...

  6. REAL-TIME MEASUREMENT OF AIRWAY RESPONSES TO SULOFUR DIOXIDE (SO2) IN AN INTACT, AWAKE GUINEA PIG MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Real-time measurment of airway responses to Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) in an intact, awake guinea pig model. J Stanek1,2, Q Krantz2, J Nolan2, D Winsett2, W Watkinson2, and D Costa2. 1College of Veterinary Medicine, NCSU, Raleigh, NC, USA; 2Pulmonary Toxicology Branch, ETD, NHEERL, US...

  7. 75 FR 34973 - Notice of Opportunity To Submit Content Request for the Agricultural Energy Program Surveys

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-21

    ... National Agricultural Statistics Service Notice of Opportunity To Submit Content Request for the... currently accepting stakeholder feedback on future energy related topics and questionnaire content for.../ or via mail to: USDA-NASS, Energy Content Team, P.O. Box 27767, Raleigh, NC 27611; or fax to:...

  8. 78 FR 26032 - Change in Bank Control Notices; Acquisitions of Shares of a Bank or Bank Holding Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-03

    ... Citizens BancShares, Inc., and thereby indirectly retain voting shares of First-Citizens Bank & Trust..., South Carolina, as a group acting in concert, to retain voting shares of First Citizens BancShares, Inc., and thereby indirectly retain voting shares of First-Citizens Bank & Trust, both in Raleigh,...

  9. An Umbrella for Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randal, Judith

    1979-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency has awarded several grants to study effects of and possible solutions to the problem of "acid rain"; pollution from atmospheric nitric and sulfuric acids. The research program is administered through North Carolina State University at Raleigh and will focus on biological effects of acid rain. (JMF)

  10. Unmaking Brown

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockette, Tim

    2010-01-01

    America's schools are more segregated now than they were in the late 1960s. More than 50 years after "Brown v. Board of Education," educators need to radically rethink the meaning of "school choice." For decades at Wake County, buses would pick up public school students in largely minority communities along the Raleigh Beltline. This system won…

  11. The Impact of Achieve3000 on Elementary Literacy Outcomes: Evidence from a Two-Year Randomized Control Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Darryl V.; Lenard, Matthew A.; Page, Lindsay Coleman

    2016-01-01

    School districts are increasingly adopting technology-based resources in an attempt to improve student achievement. This paper reports the two-year results from randomized control trial of Achieve3000 in the Wake County Public School System (WCPSS) in Raleigh, North Carolina. Achieve3000 is an early literacy program that differentiates non-fiction…

  12. The North Carolina Capitol: Pride of the State. Teaching with Historic Places.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper, Howard

    North Carolina's state capitol rises majestically on Union Square in downtown Raleigh, a city created in 1792 to serve as North Carolina's permanent capital. Built between 1833-40, the granite building is one of the finest and best preserved examples of civic Greek Revival architecture in the United States. This lesson is based on the National…

  13. The Quality Improvement Management Approach as Implemented in a Middle School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayless, David L.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    The Total Quality Management Theory of W. E. Deming can be adapted within an educational organization to build structures that support educators' beliefs. A case study of the implementation of Deming principles at the LeRoy Martin Middle School in Raleigh (North Carolina) illustrates the effectiveness of this management approach. (SLD)

  14. TRANSPORT AND DEPOSITION OF NANO-SIZE PARTICLES IN THE UPPER HUMAN RESPIRATORY AIRWAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    TRANSPORT AND DEPOSITION OF NANO-SIZE PARTICLES IN THE UPPER HUMAN RESPIRATORY AIRWAYS. Zhe Zhang*, Huawei Shi, Clement Kleinstreuer, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7910; Chong S. Kim, National Health and En...

  15. 75 FR 17177 - West Virginia Disaster #WV-00016

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-05

    ... ADMINISTRATION West Virginia Disaster WV-00016 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of West..., Kanawha, Mercer, Raleigh. Contiguous Counties (Economic Injury Loans Only): West Virginia: Boone,...

  16. 77 FR 60002 - West Virginia Disaster #WV-00029

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION West Virginia Disaster WV-00029 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of West...; Nicholas; Raleigh. Contiguous Counties (Economic Injury Loans Only): West Virginia: Boone; Braxton;...

  17. Learning while Undocumented

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pluviose, David

    2008-01-01

    North Carolina's 58 community colleges have been key players in the state's fast-shifting economy, driven in large part by the numerous businesses flocking to the high-technology Raleigh-Durham Research Triangle area. Major employers like IBM, Novartis, Credit Suisse, and EA Associates have all partnered with North Carolina Community College…

  18. SNAP/SHOT Your Ability to Support That Next Application.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Ernest L.

    SNAP/SHOT (System Network Analysis Program-Simulated Host Overview Technique) is a discrete simulation of a network and/or host model available through IBM at the Raleigh System Center. The simulator provides an analysis of a total IBM Communications System. Input data must be obtained from RMF, SMF, and the CICS Analyzer to determine the existing…

  19. 5-AZA-2'-DEOXYCYTIDINE-INDUCED DYSMORPHOGENESIS IN THE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    5-AZA-2'-deoxycytidine-induced dysmorphogenesis in the rat.

    Branch S, Chernoff N, Brownie C, Francis BM.

    Department of Toxicology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695, USA. S_Branch@ncsu.edu

    5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (d-AZA) causes tem...

  20. Assessing General Education Learning Outcomes Achieved in the Inquiry-Guided, Self-Designed Major at North Carolina State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, David B.

    2003-01-01

    North Carolina State University (NCSU) is a Research Intensive (Research I) university located in Raleigh, the state capital. Increasingly over the past ten years, NCSU faculty interested in issues of teaching and learning have used the term "inquiry-guided learning" (IGL) to describe the kind of learning they are trying to promote. The term…

  1. ON-ROAD REMOTE SENSING OF AUTOMOBILE EMISSIONS IN THE RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, NORTH CAROLINA AREA: 1997-2001

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes automobile exhaust remote sensing data collected by EPA at a number of sites in the Research Triangle Park, NC area during 1997. Data were also collected at one site in Raleigh, NC from 1998 through 2001 for the Coordinating Research Council (CRC) study of re...

  2. Peanut Roaster Temperatures Relative to Salmonella Kill

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ARS, Market Quality and Handling Research Unit, Raleigh NC 27695 In response to the limited peanut butter contamination incident of 2006/7, studies were initiated to examine the effect of various time and temperature protocols on log kill levels for Salmonella on peanuts. The objective of the work ...

  3. Developing a Billion Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gergen, Christopher; Rego, Lyndon; Wright, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Intentionally developing the leadership capacity of all students is a necessary requirement for schools around the world. The Center for Creative Leadership in Greensboro, N.C., has been at the center of this work and presents three schools as examples: Ravenscroft School in Raleigh, N.C., the African Leadership Academy in Johannesburg, South…

  4. 76 FR 78331 - Environmental Impact Statement: Jackson County, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-16

    ...). FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr. Mitch Batuzich, Preconstruction and Environment Specialist... be provided in the local news media. The draft EIS will be available for public and agency review and...., Director of Preconstruction & Environment, Raleigh, North Carolina. BILLING CODE 4910-22-P...

  5. OXIDATIVE STRESS PARTICIPATES IN ACUTE LUNG INJURY AND ACTIVATION OF MITOGEN ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASES (MAPK) FOLLOWING AIR POLLUTION PARTICLE EXPOSURE (PM)

    EPA Science Inventory

    OXIDATIVE STRESS PARTICIPATES IN ACUTE LUNG INJURY AND ACTIVATION OF MITOGEN ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASES (MAPK) FOLLOWING AIR POLLUTION PARTICLE EXPOSURE (PM). E S Roberts1, R Jaskot2, J Richards2, and K L Dreher2. 1College of Veterinary Medicine, NC State University, Raleigh, NC a...

  6. Advisory List of Instructional Media for Reduction of Sex Bias.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh. Div. of Educational Media.

    Instructional media appropriate to schools' efforts to reduce sex bias are described in this advisory list. Entries were selected from those materials submitted by publishers which received favorable reviews by educators. Most materials were evaluated by members of the Raleigh, North Carolina chapter of the National Organization for Women.…

  7. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION: Separation of Manure Solids from Flushed Swine Waste. Hoffland Environmental Inc. Drag Screen and Clarifier

    EPA Science Inventory

    Verification testing of the Hoffland Drag Screen and Clarifier was conducted at the North Carolina State University's Lake Wheeler Road Field Laboratory, in Raleigh, North Carolina. The farm is designed to operate as a research and teaching facility with the capacity for 250 so...

  8. PARTIAL CHARACTERIZATION OF ALLERGENS IN EXTRACTS OF STACHYBOTRYS CHARTARUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    PARTIAL CHARACTERIZATION OF ALLERGENS IN EXTRACTS OF Stachybotrys chartarum. M E Viana1, MJ Selgrade2, and M D Ward2. 1NCSU, Raleigh, NC, USA. 2NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, RTP, NC, USA.

    Exposure to Stachybotrys chartarum has been associated with the development of serious health ...

  9. Thinking Like a Whole Building: Whole Foods Market New Construction Summary, U.S. Department of Energy's Commercial Building Partnerships (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-04-01

    Whole Foods Market participates in the U.S. Department of Energy's Commercial Building Partnerships (CBP) to identify and develop cost-effective, readily deployed, replicable energy efficiency measures (EEMs) for commercial buildings. Whole Foods Market is working with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) on a retrofit and a new construction CBP project. Whole Foods Market's CBP new construction project is a standalone store in Raleigh, North Carolina. Whole Foods Market examined the energy systems and the interactions between those systems in the design for the new Raleigh store. Based on this collaboration and preliminary energy modeling, Whole Foods Market and NREL identified a number of cost-effective EEMs that can be readily deployed in other Whole Foods Market stores and in other U.S. supermarkets. If the actual savings in the Raleigh store - which NREL will monitor and verify - match the modeling results, each year this store will save nearly $100,000 in operating costs (Raleigh's rates are about $0.06/kWh for electricity and $0.83/therm for natural gas). The store will also use 41% less energy than a Standard 90.1-compliant store and avoid about 3.7 million pounds of carbon dioxide emissions.

  10. 7 CFR 305.32 - Irradiation treatment of regulated fruit to be moved interstate from areas quarantined for fruit...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... radioisotope or a major modification to equipment that affects the delivered dose. Recertification may be... guidance and principles from American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards or an equivalent... for Plant Health Science and Technology, 1730 Varsity Drive, Suite 400, Raleigh, NC 27606. Before...

  11. Proceedings of the 2nd workshop on lyme disease in the Southeast

    SciTech Connect

    Apperson, C.S.; Levine, J.F.; Snoddy, E.L.

    1993-12-31

    This volume provides author prepared abstracts of oral presentation at the Second Workshop on Lyme Disease in the Southeast head in Raleigh, North Carolina September 7-9, 1993. The 33 presentations covered various aspects of the epidemic including geographical distribution of various species of ticks, transmission risks, Lyme Disease epidemiology, and taxonomic aspects.

  12. Easing Overcrowded High Schools with Limited Capital Funds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lighthall, Christina

    2012-01-01

    The greatest capital expenditure a school system can make is a high school. What can be done to accommodate students and programs when funding is scarce, high schools are crowded, and more students are expected? The Wake County Public School System (WCPSS) in Raleigh, North Carolina, first addressed this issue when enrollment growth more than…

  13. Thinking Like a Whole Building: A Whole Foods Market New Construction Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Deru, M.; Bonnema, E.; Doebber, I.; Hirsch, A.; McIntyre, M.; Scheib, J.

    2011-04-01

    Whole Foods Market participates in the U.S. Department of Energy's Commercial Building Partnerships (CBP) to identify and develop cost-effective, readily deployed, replicable energy efficiency measures (EEMs) for commercial buildings. Whole Foods Market is working with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) on a retrofit and a new construction CBP project. Whole Foods Market's CBP new construction project is a standalone store in Raleigh, North Carolina. Whole Foods Market examined the energy systems and the interactions between those systems in the design for the new Raleigh store. Based on this collaboration and preliminary energy modeling, Whole Foods Market and NREL identified a number of cost-effective EEMs that can be readily deployed in other Whole Foods Market stores and in other U.S. supermarkets. If the actual savings in the Raleigh store - which NREL will monitor and verify - match the modeling results, each year this store will save nearly $100,000 in operating costs (Raleigh's rates are about $0.06/kWh for electricity and $0.83/therm for natural gas). The store will also use 41% less energy than a Standard 90.1-compliant store and avoid about 3.7 million pounds of carbon dioxide emissions.

  14. Year 3 Magnet Schools Assistance Program Annual Progress Report, 2009-10. E&R Report No. 10.09

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brasfield, Jon; Cárdenas, Virginia

    2010-01-01

    The three Magnet Schools Assistance Program (MSAP) schools: East Garner International Baccalaureate Magnet Middle School (EGMMS), Garner International Baccalaureate Magnet High School (GMHS), and Southeast Raleigh Leadership and Technology Magnet High School (SRMHS) have shown progress on MSAP performance measures during the 3rd year of the grant.…

  15. MYOCARDIAL AND CARDIOVASCULAR EFFECTS FOLLOWING PULMONARY EXPOSURE TO ZINC

    EPA Science Inventory

    CARDIOVASCULAR INJURY FOLLOWING PULMONARY EXPOSURE TO ZINC
    PS Gilmour, A Nyska, MC Schladweiler, AD Ledbetter, CF Moyer, JM Samet, and UP Kodavanti, CEMALB, UNC, Chapel Hill, NC; NIEHS, RTP, NC; US EPA/ORD/NHEERL/HSD, Chapel Hill, NC; Pathology Associates, Inc., Raleigh, NC; ...

  16. THE BIOCIDE TRIBUTYLTIN ALTERS TESTOSTERONE ESTERIFICATION IN MUD SNAILS (ILYANASSA OBSOLETA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Biocide Tributyltin Alters Testosterone Esterification in Mud Snails (Ilyanassa obsoleta)

    Meredith P. Gooding and Gerald A. LeBlanc
    Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7633

    Tributyltin (TBT...

  17. DIESEL AND CARBON PARTICLES ENHANCE HOUSE DUST MITE-INDUCED PULMONARY HYPERSENSITIVITY IN BROWN NORWAY RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diesel and Carbon Particles Enhance House Dust Mite-Induced Pulmonary Hypersensitivity in Brown Norway Rats. P. Singh1, M.J. Daniels2, D. Winsett2, J. Richards2, K. Crissman2, M. Madden2 and M.I. Gilmour2. 1NCSU, Raleigh, NC and 2 USEPA, Research Triangle Park, NC.

    Ep...

  18. 78 FR 58184 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; North Carolina; Removal of Stage II Gasoline...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-23

    ... plans for the Charlotte-Gastonia Area on July 5, 1995 (60 FR 34859), the Greensboro-Winston-Salem-High Point Area on September 9, 1993 (58 FR 47391), and the Raleigh-Durham Area on April 18, 1994 (59 FR... in EPA's June 7, 2013, proposed rulemaking. See 78 FR 34303. The comment period for this...

  19. COMPARISON OF PULMONARY RESPONSES TO AUTOMOBILE-GENERATED AND NIST STANDARD REFERENCE MATERIAL DIESEL PARTICULATE EMISSIONS IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    COMPARISON OF PULMONARY RESPONSES TO AUTOMOBILE-GENERATED AND NIST STANDARD REFERENCE MATERIAL DIESEL PARTICULATE EMISSIONS IN MICE. P. Singh1, C.A.J. Dick2, J. Richards3, M.J. Daniels3, and M.I. Gilmour3. 1NCSU, Raleigh, NC, 2UNC, Chapel Hill, NC and 3 USEPA, ORD, NHEERL, (ETD,...

  20. 76 FR 77824 - Dicofol; Cancellation Order for Certain Pesticide Registrations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-14

    ... range of stakeholders including environmental, human health, and agricultural advocates; the chemical industry; pesticide users; and members of the public interested in the sale, distribution, or use of... address 11603 Agan Chemical Manufacturing Ltd, 4515 Falls of Neuse Rd. Suite 300, Raleigh, NC 27609....

  1. 78 FR 34303 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; North Carolina; Removal of Stage II Gasoline...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-07

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; North Carolina; Removal of Stage... redesignation requests and the maintenance plans for the Charlotte-Gastonia Area on July 5, 1995 (60 FR 34859), Greensboro- Winston-Salem-High Point Area on September 9, 1993 (58 FR 47391), and the Raleigh-Durham Area...

  2. The Secrets of St. Agnes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Janell

    2006-01-01

    This article reveals the disturbing truths uncovered by a retired biology professor about the past practices of a North Carolina hospital. In the 1990s, Irene Clark was a biology professor at St. Augustine's College, a historically Black college in Raleigh, North Carolina. One day, a janitor asked the native Virginian what she knew about the…

  3. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION: JOINT (NSF-EPA) VERIFICATION STATEMENT AND REPORT: BROME AGRI SALES, LTD., MAXIMIZER SEPARATOR, MODEL MAX 1016 - 03/01/WQPC-SWP

    EPA Science Inventory

    Verification testing of the Brome Agri Sales Ltd. Maximizer Separator, Model MAX 1016 (Maximizer) was conducted at the Lake Wheeler Road Field Laboratory Swine Educational Unit in Raleigh, North Carolina. The Maximizer is an inclined screen solids separator that can be used to s...

  4. MAP KINASE SIGNALING IN PULMONARY FIBROBLASTS EXPOSED TO PARTICULATE MATTER (PM) AND BRONCHOAL VEOLAR LAVAGE FLUID (BALF) FROM HEALTHY AND HYPERTENSIVE RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    MAP KINASE SIGNALING IN PULMONARY FIBROBLASTS EXPOSED TO PARTICULATE MATTER (PM) AND BRONCHOALVEOLAR LAVAGE FLUID (BALF) FROM HEALTHY AND HYPERTENSIVE RATS. 1P Zhang, UP Kodavanti. NHEERL, US EPA, Research Triangle Park, 1School of Vet Med, NCSU, Raleigh, NC
    Exposure to PM ma...

  5. Attending to Teacher Attire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sternberg, Ruth E.

    2003-01-01

    Describes efforts by school superintendents to develop dress codes for school employees. Describes link between teacher dress and student decorum. Includes excerpts from staff dress codes from three school districts: Goose Creek Consolidated School District, Baytown, Texas; Denver Public Schools, Colorado; Wake County Public Schools, Raleigh,…

  6. 75 FR 43 - Modification of Class E Airspace; Beckley, WV

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-04

    ... Memorial Airport, Beckley, WV, in the Federal Register on October 19, 2009 (74 FR 53408), Docket No. FAA... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Modification of Class E Airspace; Beckley, WV AGENCY... that modifies Class E airspace at Raleigh County Memorial Airport, Beckley, WV. This rule increases...

  7. INCREASING DIVERSITY IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING: THE ORD RESEARCH APPRENTICESHIP PROGRAM FOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The "Research Apprenticeship Program for High School Students" began in 1990 as a collaborative effort between EPA's Office of Research and Development in Research Triangle Park, NC and Shaw University, an Historically Black College/University (HBCU) in Raleigh, NC. The program a...

  8. Spatial Gradients and Source Apportionment of Volatile Organic Compounds Near Roadways

    EPA Science Inventory

    Concentrations of 55 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are reported near a highway in Raleigh, NC (traffic volume of approximately 125,000 vehicles/day). Levels of VOCs generally decreased exponentially with perpendicular distance from the roadway 10-100m). The EPA Chemical Mass ...

  9. Evaluation of the southern California seismic velocity models through simulation of recorded events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taborda, Ricardo; Azizzadeh-Roodpish, Shima; Khoshnevis, Naeem; Cheng, Keli

    2016-06-01

    Significant effort has been devoted over the last two decades to the development of various seismic velocity models for the region of southern California, United States. These models are mostly used in forward wave propagation simulation studies, but also as base models for tomographic and source inversions. Two of these models, the community velocity models CVM-S and CVM-H, are among the most commonly used for this region. This includes two alternative variations to the original models, the recently released CVM-S4.26 which incorporates results from a sequence of tomographic inversions into CVM-S, and the user-controlled option of CVM-H to replace the near-surface profiles with a VS30-based geotechnical model. Although either one of these models is regarded as acceptable by the modeling community, it is known that they have differences in their representation of the crustal structure and sedimentary deposits in the region, and thus can lead to different results in forward and inverse problems. In this paper, we evaluate the accuracy of these models when used to predict the ground motion in the greater Los Angeles region by means of an assessment of a collection of simulations of recent events. In total, we consider 30 moderate-magnitude earthquakes (3.5 < Mw < 5.5) between 1998 and 2014, and compare synthetics with data recorded by seismic networks during these events. The simulations are done using a finite-element parallel code, with numerical models that satisfy a maximum frequency of 1 Hz and a minimum shear wave velocity of 200 m s-1. The comparisons between data and synthetics are ranked quantitatively by means of a goodness-of-fit (GOF) criteria. We analyse the regional distribution of the GOF results for all events and all models, and draw conclusions from the results and how these correlate to the models. We find that, in light of our comparisons, the model CVM-S4.26 consistently yields better results.

  10. Aspects of fracture mechanics in cryogenic model design. Part 2: NTF materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.; Lisagor, W. B.

    1983-01-01

    Results of fatigue crack growth and fracture toughness tests conducted on three candidate materials are presented. Fatigue crack growth and fracture toughness tests were conducted on NITRONIC 40 at room temperature and -275 F. Fracture toughness tests were also conducted on Vascomax 200 and 250 maraging steel from room temperature to -320 F. NITRONIC 40 was used to make the Pathfinder 1 model. The fatigue crack growth rate tests were conducted at room temperature and -275 F on three-point notch bend specimens. The fracture toughness tests on the as received and stress relieved materials at -275 F were conducted on the center crack tension specimens. Toughness tests were also conducted on Vascomax CVM-200 and CVM-250 maraging steel from room temperature to -320 F using round and rectangular compact specimens.

  11. Effect of tip relief on endurance characteristics of super nitralloy and AISI M-50 spur gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, D. P.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1974-01-01

    Tests were conducted with two groups of 8.89-centimeter (3.5-in.) pitch diameter spur gears with standard 20 deg involute profile with tip relief made of CVM Super-Nitralloy (5Ni-2Al) and CVM AISI M-50 at a temperature of 350 K (170 F). Super-Nitralloy gears with tip relief had a life 150 percent that of gears without tip relief. An increased scoring phenomenon was noted with the Super-Nitralloy gears with tip relief. Through-hardened AISI M-50 gears with tip relief failed due to tooth fracture. AISI M-50 gears without tip relief had a life approximately 40 times greater than the AISI M-50 gears with tip relief.

  12. A life study of AISI M-50 and Super Nitralloy spur gears with and without tip relief

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, D. P.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1973-01-01

    Tests were conducted at 170 F with groups of 3.5-in.-pitch-diameter spur gear with and without tip relief made of consumable-electrode vacuum melted (CVM) Spur Nitralloy (5Ni-2Al) and CVM AISI M-50 steel. The AISI M-50 gears without tip relief had lives approximately 50 percent longer than the Super Nitralloy gears without tip relief. However, the Super Nitralloy gears with tip relief had lives equal to the AISI M-50 gears without tip relief. The difference in lives were not statistically significant. All gears failed by classical pitting fatigue at the pitch circle. However, the AIAI M-50 gears with tip relief failed by tooth fracture. AISI M-50 gear sets without tip relief having a spalled gear tooth which were deliberately overrun after spalling had occurred, failed by tooth fracture.

  13. Estimating residents' willingness to pay for groundwater protection in the Vietnamese Mekong Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vo, Danh Thanh; Huynh, Khai Viet

    2014-11-01

    Groundwater in the Vietnamese Mekong Delta is facing the pollution and it needs to be protected. Searching literature reviews on economic valuation techniques, the contingent valuation method (CVM) has been popularly applied to estimate the economic value of water protection. This approach is based on a hypothetical scenario in which respondents are requested through questionnaires to reveal their maximum willingness to pay (WTP) for the water protection project. The study used the approach of CVM to analyze the households' motivations and their WTP for the program of groundwater protection in the Mekong Delta. The study performed that the residents in the delta were willing to pay approximately 141,730 VND (US6.74) per household a year. Groundwater could be an inferior good with the negative income effect found in the demanding for clean groundwater. Respondent's gender and groundwater-related health risk consideration were factors sensitively affecting the probability of demanding for groundwater protection.

  14. Application of the contingent valuation method in a developing country: a case study of the Yusufeli dam in northeast Turkey.

    PubMed

    Alp, Emre; Yetiş, Ulkü

    2010-01-01

    Hydroelectric power plants and dams often play an important role in developing countries in terms of their contribution to economy. In accordance with the energy policies of Turkish Republic, Yusufeli Dam and Hydroelectric Power Plant in Northeastern Turkey have been initiated. In this study, the Contingent Valuation Method (CVM) was conducted in Yusufeli Village to determine the environmental costs of the Yusufeli Project. The purpose is to assess the willingness to pay (WTP) of Yusufeli Village residents for restoration of the environmental impacts of the dam project and also to investigate the underlying economic, psychological, and social motivations for WTP. WTP was calculated as US$761 per person which can further be used in the cost-benefit analysis. The results from the study suggest that application of the CVM in rural and urban areas located in the same region can show differences.

  15. Comparisons of modified Vasco X-2 and AISI 9310 gear steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, D. P.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1980-01-01

    Endurance tests were conducted with four groups of spur gears manufactured from three heats of consumable electrode vacuum melted (CVM) modified Vasco X-2. Endurance tests were also conducted with gears manufactured from CVM AISI 9310. Bench type rolling element fatigue tests were conducted with both materials. Hardness measurements were made to 811 K. There was no statistically significant life difference between the two materials. Life differences between the different heats of modified Vasco X-2 can be attributed to heat treat variation and resultant hardness. Carburization of gear flanks only can eliminate tooth fracture as a primary failure mode for modified Vasco X-2. However, a tooth surface fatigue spall can act as a nucleus of a tooth fracture failure for the modified Vasco X-2.

  16. Demand for health care in Denmark: results of a national sample survey using contingent valuation.

    PubMed

    Gyldmark, M; Morrison, G C

    2001-10-01

    In this paper we use willingness to pay (WTP) to elicit values for private insurance covering treatment for four different health problems. By way of obtaining these values, we test the viability of the contingent valuation method (CVM) and econometric techniques, respectively, as means of eliciting and analysing values from the general public. WTP responses from a Danish national sample survey, which was designed in accordance with existing guidelines, are analysed in terms of consistency and validity checks. Large numbers of zero responses are common in WTP studies, and are found here; therefore, the Heckman selectivity model and log-transformed OLS are employed. The selectivity model is rejected, but test results indicate that the lognormal model yields efficient and unbiased estimates. The results give confidence in the WTP estimates obtained and, more generally, in CVM as a means of valuing publicly provided goods and in econometrics as a tool for analysing WTP results containing many zero responses.

  17. Client value models provide a framework for rational library planning (or, phrasing the answer in the form of a question).

    PubMed

    Van Moorsel, Guillaume

    2005-01-01

    Libraries often do not know how clients value their product/ service offerings. Yet at a time when the mounting costs for library support are increasingly difficult to justify to the parent institution, the library's ability to gauge the value of its offerings to clients has never been more critical. Client Value Models (CVMs) establish a common definition of value elements-or a "value vocabulary"-for libraries and their clients, thereby providing a basis upon which to make rational planning decisions regarding product/service acquisition and development. The CVM concept is borrowed from business and industry, but its application has a natural fit in libraries. This article offers a theoretical consideration and practical illustration of CVM application in libraries.

  18. Pitting fatigue characteristics of AISI M-50 and super nitralloy spur gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, D. P.; Chevalier, J. L.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1973-01-01

    Two groups of 3.50-in. pitch-diameter spur gears, without tip relief, made from consumable-electrode vacuum-melted (CVM) AISI M-50 steel and CVM super nitralloy (5Ni-2A1) were tested under conditions which produced fatigue pitting. The M-50 gears had fatigue lives approximately 50 percent longer than the super nitralloy gears. Both groups of gears failed by classical rolling-element fatigue at the pitch circle. When the gears were overrun past initial spall formation, the spalled M-50 gear teeth failed by fatigue fracture. The M-50 material had higher wear than the super nitralloy material. Differences in fatigue life and wear were not considered statistically significant.

  19. Detection of Tritrichomonas foetus by polymerase chain reaction in cultured isolates, cervicovaginal mucus, and formalin-fixed tissues from infected heifers and fetuses.

    PubMed

    BonDurant, Robert H; Campero, Carlos M; Anderson, Mark L; Van Hoosear, Karen A

    2003-11-01

    A rapid, reliable polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay, originally developed for definitive laboratory identification of the bovine venereal pathogen Tritrichomonas foetus from cultures of male reproductive tract fluids, was used for testing the following: 1) cultured, geographically disparate trichomonad isolates, 2) formalin-fixed tissues from infected heifers and naturally infected fetuses, and 3) cervicovaginal mucus (CVM) from experimentally infected females. In 12 of 12 Western Hemisphere isolates of pathogenic T. foetus (isolated from outbreaks of clinical trichomoniasis or from screening surveys) and in 1 of 1 American Type Culture Collection strain of Tritrichomonas suis, PCR yielded a positive result, i.e., a 347-base pair amplicon in the 5.8S ribosomal RNA and internal transcribed spacer (5.8S-ITS) region of the genome, whereas cultures of Trichomonas vaginalis and Trichomonas gallinae did not produce a PCR product. The PCR assay was also positive in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded endometrial samples from 4 of 4 experimentally infected heifers, as well as in archived tissues from 2 of 2 T. foetus-infected aborted bovine fetuses that were submitted to the diagnostic laboratory from a natural outbreak. It was negative in fixed, embedded uterine tissues of 2 of 2 uninfected virgin heifers used as negative controls and in archived fixed gut tissue of a T. gallinae-infected pigeon. In another experiment, CVM aspirated from 4 of 4 experimentally infected heifers in the fifth or sixth postinfection week yielded a positive PCR product of the expected size, whereas CVM from 2 of 2 controls were PCR negative. Pending validation in larger clinical studies, the PCR assay for the 5.8S-ITS coding region of the T. foetus genome offers the prospect of definitive identification of this agent directly from CVM or from formalin-fixed tissues or when false-positive culture results are suspected. PMID:14667024

  20. Passive imaging of hydrofractures in the South Belridge diatomite

    SciTech Connect

    Ilderton, D.C.; Patzek, T.W.; Rector, J.W.; Vinegar, H.J.

    1996-03-01

    The authors present the results of a seismic analysis of two hydrofractures spanning the entire diatomite column (1,110--1,910 ft or 338--582 m) in Shell`s Phase 2 steam drive pilot in South Belridge, California. These hydrofractures were induced at two depths (1,110--1,460 and 1,560--1,910 ft) and imaged passively using the seismic energy released during fracturing. The arrivals of shear waves from the cracking rock (microseismic events) were recorded at a 1 ms sampling rate by 56 geophones in three remote observation wells, resulting in 10 GB of raw data. These arrival times were then inverted for the event locations, from which the hydrofracture geometry was inferred. A five-dimensional conjugate-gradient algorithm with a depth-dependent, but otherwise constant shear wave velocity model (CVM) was developed for the inversions. To validate CVM, they created a layered shear wave velocity model of the formation and used it to calculate synthetic arrival times from known locations chosen at various depths along the estimated fracture plane. These arrival times were then inverted with CVM and the calculated locations compared with the known ones, quantifying the systematic error associated with the assumption of constant shear wave velocity. They also performed Monte Carlo sensitivity analyses on the synthetic arrival times to account for all other random errors that exist in field data. After determining the limitations of the inversion algorithm, they hand-picked the shear wave arrival times for both hydrofractures and inverted them with CVM.

  1. Comparing Mutational Variabilities

    PubMed Central

    Houle, D.; Morikawa, B.; Lynch, M.

    1996-01-01

    We have reviewed the available data on V(M), the amount of genetic variation in phenotypic traits produced each generation by mutation. We use these data to make several qualitative tests of the mutation-selection balance hypothesis for the maintenance of genetic variance (MSB). To compare V(M) values, we use three dimensionless quantities: mutational heritability, V(M)/V(E); the mutational coefficient of variation, CV(M); and the ratio of the standing genetic variance to V(M), V(G)/V(M). Since genetic coefficients of variation for life history traits are larger than those for morphological traits, we predict that under MSB, life history traits should also have larger CV(M). This is confirmed; life history traits have a median CV(M) value more than six times higher than that for morphological traits. V(G)/V(M) approximates the persistence time of mutations under MSB in an infinite population. In order for MSB to hold, V(G)/V(M) must be small, substantially less than 1000, and life history traits should have smaller values than morphological traits. V(G)/V(M) averages about 50 generations for life history traits and 100 generations for morphological traits. These observations are all consistent with the predictions of a mutation-selection balance model. PMID:8807316

  2. Spheno-Occipital Synchondrosis Fusion Correlates with Cervical Vertebrae Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Pérez, María José; McNamara, James A.; Velasco-Torres, Miguel; Benavides, Erika; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; Catena, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the closure stage of the spheno-occipital synchondrosis and the maturational stage of the cervical vertebrae (CVM) in growing and young adult subjects using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). CBCT images with an extended field of view obtained from 315 participants (148 females and 167 males; mean age 15.6 ±7.3 years; range 6 to 23 years) were analyzed. The fusion status of the synchondrosis was determined using a five-stage scoring system; the vertebral maturational status was evaluated using a six-stage stratification (CVM method). Ordinal regression was used to study the ability of the synchondrosis stage to predict the vertebral maturation stage. Vertebrae and synchondrosis had a strong significant correlation (r = 0.89) that essential was similar for females (r = 0.88) and males (r = 0.89). CVM stage could be accurately predicted from synchondrosis stage by ordinal regression models. Prediction equations of the vertebral stage using synchondrosis stage, sex and biological age as predictors were developed. Thus this investigation demonstrated that the stage of spheno-occipital synchondrosis, as determined in CBCT images, is a reasonable indicator of growth maturation. PMID:27513752

  3. Spheno-Occipital Synchondrosis Fusion Correlates with Cervical Vertebrae Maturation.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Pérez, María José; Alarcón, José Antonio; McNamara, James A; Velasco-Torres, Miguel; Benavides, Erika; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; Catena, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the closure stage of the spheno-occipital synchondrosis and the maturational stage of the cervical vertebrae (CVM) in growing and young adult subjects using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). CBCT images with an extended field of view obtained from 315 participants (148 females and 167 males; mean age 15.6 ±7.3 years; range 6 to 23 years) were analyzed. The fusion status of the synchondrosis was determined using a five-stage scoring system; the vertebral maturational status was evaluated using a six-stage stratification (CVM method). Ordinal regression was used to study the ability of the synchondrosis stage to predict the vertebral maturation stage. Vertebrae and synchondrosis had a strong significant correlation (r = 0.89) that essential was similar for females (r = 0.88) and males (r = 0.89). CVM stage could be accurately predicted from synchondrosis stage by ordinal regression models. Prediction equations of the vertebral stage using synchondrosis stage, sex and biological age as predictors were developed. Thus this investigation demonstrated that the stage of spheno-occipital synchondrosis, as determined in CBCT images, is a reasonable indicator of growth maturation. PMID:27513752

  4. [WTP guidance technology: a comparison of payment card, single-bounded and double-bounded dichotomous formats for evaluating non-use values of Sanjiang Plain ecotourism water resources].

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-Guang; Wang, Qiu-Dan; Li, Chen-Yang

    2014-09-01

    Contingent valuation method (CVM) is the most widespread method to assess resources and value of environmental goods and services. The guidance technology of willingness to pay (WTP) is an important means of CVM. Therefore, the study on the WTP guidance technology is an important approach to improve the reliability and validity of CVM. This article conducted comprehensive evaluation on non-use value of eco-tourism water resources in Sanjiang Plain by using payment card, single-bound dichotomous choice and double-bound dichotomous choice. Results showed that the socio-economic attributes were consistent with the willingness to pay in the three formats, and the tender value, age, educational level, annual income and the concern level had significant effect on the willingness to pay, while gender and job did not have significant influence. The WTP value was 112.46 yuan per capita with the payment card, 136.15 with the single-bound dichotomous choice, and 168.74 with the double-bound dichotomous choice. Comprehensive consideration of the nature of the investigation, investigation costs and statistical techniques, the result of double-bound dichotomous choice (47.86 x 10(8) yuan · a(-1)) was best in accordance with the reality, and could be used as non-use value of eco-tourism water resources in Sanjiang Plain. The format of questionnaire was very important to improve its validity, and made a great influence on the WTP.

  5. Circular Vibration Planing of Inconel 718

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hettiarachchi, Nandita Kalyanakumara; Moriwaki, Toshimichi; Shibasaka, Toshiro; Nakamoto, Keiichi

    Circular vibration milling (CVM) is achieved by vibrating a milling cutter about the machine tool spindle axis in a circular path, in addition to its rotary motion. CVM has been proven capable of producing better surface finishes on difficult to cut materials. However, the CVM process is far slower than conventional milling process. In circular vibration planing (CVP) process, the cutting tool is clamped without rotation and fed at a speed comparable to the feed speed of conventional milling. By superimposing circular vibration motion, necessary cutting speed could be achieved keeping the feed speed at realistic values. Inconel 718 was machined by CVP and conventional milling at a similar feed rate. It was observed that CVP could reduce tool wear and hence produce better surface finishes than conventional milling. A geometric simulation showed a major difference between uncut chip shapes of the two processes. The difference of uncut chip shapes suggests that in CVP process, less rubbing occurs between tool flank face and work before the tool penetrates in to the work to form a chip. The reduced rubbing of the flank face is proposed as the reson for reduced tool wear in CVP when compared with conventional milling.

  6. Brief communication: a proposed method for the assessment of pubertal stage in human skeletal remains using cervical vertebrae maturation.

    PubMed

    Shapland, Fiona; Lewis, Mary E

    2014-01-01

    The assessment of age-at-death in non-adult skeletal remains is under constant review. However, in many past societies an individual's physical maturation may have been more important in social terms than their exact age, particularly during the period of adolescence. In a recent article (Shapland and Lewis: Am J Phys Anthropol 151 (2013) 302-310) highlighted a set of dental and skeletal indicators that may be useful in mapping the progress of the pubertal growth spurt. This article presents a further skeletal indicator of adolescent development commonly used by modern clinicians: cervical vertebrae maturation (CVM). This method is applied to a collection of 594 adolescents from the medieval cemetery of St. Mary Spital, London. Analysis reveals a potential delay in ages of attainment of the later CVM stages compared with modern adolescents, presumably reflecting negative environmental conditions for growth and development. The data gathered on CVM is compared to other skeletal indicators of pubertal maturity and long bone growth from this site to ascertain the usefulness of this method on archaeological collections.

  7. Quantitative assessment of cervical vertebral maturation using cone beam computed tomography in Korean girls.

    PubMed

    Byun, Bo-Ram; Kim, Yong-Il; Yamaguchi, Tetsutaro; Maki, Koutaro; Son, Woo-Sung

    2015-01-01

    This study was aimed to examine the correlation between skeletal maturation status and parameters from the odontoid process/body of the second vertebra and the bodies of third and fourth cervical vertebrae and simultaneously build multiple regression models to be able to estimate skeletal maturation status in Korean girls. Hand-wrist radiographs and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images were obtained from 74 Korean girls (6-18 years of age). CBCT-generated cervical vertebral maturation (CVM) was used to demarcate the odontoid process and the body of the second cervical vertebra, based on the dentocentral synchondrosis. Correlation coefficient analysis and multiple linear regression analysis were used for each parameter of the cervical vertebrae (P < 0.05). Forty-seven of 64 parameters from CBCT-generated CVM (independent variables) exhibited statistically significant correlations (P < 0.05). The multiple regression model with the greatest R (2) had six parameters (PH2/W2, UW2/W2, (OH+AH2)/LW2, UW3/LW3, D3, and H4/W4) as independent variables with a variance inflation factor (VIF) of <2. CBCT-generated CVM was able to include parameters from the second cervical vertebral body and odontoid process, respectively, for the multiple regression models. This suggests that quantitative analysis might be used to estimate skeletal maturation status.

  8. HIV Inhibition by Lactobacilli: Easier in a Test Tube Than in Real Life

    PubMed Central

    Linhares, Iara M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A lactobacillus-dominant vaginal microbiota has been shown to decrease heterosexual HIV transmission. Nunn et al. now report that a vaginal microbiota dominated by Lactobacillus crispatus is associated with a relative inability of HIV pseudoviral particles to transverse cervicovaginal mucus (CVM) in vitro [mBio 6(5):e01084-15, 2015, doi:10.1128/mBio.01084-15]. The purported inhibitory mechanism is the interaction between carboxyl groups present on HIV and in CVM that occurred only under acidic conditions when carboxyl groups were protonated. L. crispatus produces high levels of lactic acid and results in the lowest vaginal pH when it is the dominant vaginal bacterium. In addition, high levels of lactic acid inhibit the proliferation of other bacteria that might negatively affect CVM structure. The utility of enhancing L. crispatus dominance to inhibit HIV transmission awaits assessment of the influence of ejaculated semen on this property and investigations on the role of Lactobacillus products such as d-lactic acid in this property. PMID:26443461

  9. Applicability of the Calgary-Cambridge Guide to Dog and Cat Owners for Teaching Veterinary Clinical Communications.

    PubMed

    Englar, Ryane E; Williams, Melanie; Weingand, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    Effective communication in health care benefits patients. Medical and veterinary schools not only have a responsibility to teach communication skills, the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) Council on Education (COE) requires that communication be taught in all accredited colleges of veterinary medicine. However, the best strategy for designing a communications curriculum is unclear. The Calgary-Cambridge Guide (CCG) is one of many models developed in human medicine as an evidence-based approach to structuring the clinical consultation through 71 communication skills. The model has been revised by Radford et al. (2006) for use in veterinary curricula; however, the best approach for veterinary educators to teach communication remains to be determined. This qualitative study investigated if one adaptation of the CCG currently taught at Midwestern University College of Veterinary Medicine (MWU CVM) fulfills client expectations of what constitutes clinically effective communication. Two focus groups (cat owners and dog owners) were conducted with a total of 13 participants to identify common themes in veterinary communication. Participants compared communication skills they valued to those taught by MWU CVM. The results indicated that while the CCG skills that MWU CVM adopted are applicable to cat and dog owners, they are not comprehensive. Participants expressed the need to expand the skillset to include compassionate transparency and unconditional positive regard. Participants also expressed different communication needs that were attributed to the species of companion animal owned.

  10. Modeling of Virion Collisions in Cervicovaginal Mucus Reveals Limits on Agglutination as the Protective Mechanism of Secretory Immunoglobulin A

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Alex; McKinley, Scott A.; Shi, Feng; Wang, Simi; Mucha, Peter J.; Harit, Dimple; Forest, M. Gregory; Lai, Samuel K.

    2015-01-01

    Secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA), a dimeric antibody found in high quantities in the gastrointestinal mucosa, is broadly associated with mucosal immune protection. A distinguishing feature of sIgA is its ability to crosslink pathogens, thereby creating pathogen/sIgA aggregates that are too large to traverse the dense matrix of mucin fibers in mucus layers overlying epithelial cells and consequently reducing infectivity. Here, we use modeling to investigate this mechanism of “immune exclusion” based on sIgA-mediated agglutination, in particular the potential use of sIgA to agglutinate HIV in cervicovaginal mucus (CVM) and prevent HIV transmission. Utilizing reported data on HIV diffusion in CVM and semen, we simulate HIV collision kinetics in physiologically-thick mucus layers–a necessary first step for sIgA-induced aggregation. We find that even at the median HIV load in semen of acutely infected individuals possessing high viral titers, over 99% of HIV virions will penetrate CVM and reach the vaginal epithelium without colliding with another virion. These findings imply that agglutination is unlikely to be the dominant mechanism of sIgA-mediated protection against HIV or other sexually transmitted pathogens. Rather, we surmise that agglutination is most effective against pathogens either present at exceedingly high concentrations or that possess motility mechanisms other than Brownian diffusion that significantly enhance encounter rates. PMID:26132216

  11. Short communication: Distribution of recessive genetic defect carriers in Chinese Holstein.

    PubMed

    Sun, D X; Fan, X H; Xie, Y; Chu, Q; Sun, Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, S L; Gong, W J; Chen, S H; Li, Y H; Shi, W H; Zhang, Y

    2011-11-01

    In dairy cattle, 4 important recessive hereditary diseases exist: complex vertebral malformation (CVM), bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD), citrullinemia (CTLN), and deficiency of uridine monophosphate synthase (DUMPS). Holstein Associations in developed countries have established monitoring systems for such disorders in Holstein bulls for decades. Over the past decades, China has continuously imported Holstein semen and embryos, mainly from North America but also from Europe. The dissemination of such genetic defects was undetermined until now, although efforts were taken to develop molecular techniques and detect carriers for CVM and BLAD in small populations of Chinese dairy cattle. Thus, herein we extensively screened 732 proven bulls participating in artificial insemination programs and 136 young bulls entering progeny test from 15 bull stations in China for CVM, BLAD, CTLN, and DUMPS. The proportion of carriers of the defects was found to be 7.72, 1.38, 0.23, and 0.12%, respectively. Given our findings, early diagnostic and monitoring systems on recessive inherited disorders among proven and young bulls entering the national genetic improvement programs for dairy cattle of China should be established immediately, in which a series of measures will be taken to prevent further spreading of such disorders and gradually eliminate them in the dairy cattle population in China. PMID:22032394

  12. Applicability of the Calgary-Cambridge Guide to Dog and Cat Owners for Teaching Veterinary Clinical Communications.

    PubMed

    Englar, Ryane E; Williams, Melanie; Weingand, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    Effective communication in health care benefits patients. Medical and veterinary schools not only have a responsibility to teach communication skills, the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) Council on Education (COE) requires that communication be taught in all accredited colleges of veterinary medicine. However, the best strategy for designing a communications curriculum is unclear. The Calgary-Cambridge Guide (CCG) is one of many models developed in human medicine as an evidence-based approach to structuring the clinical consultation through 71 communication skills. The model has been revised by Radford et al. (2006) for use in veterinary curricula; however, the best approach for veterinary educators to teach communication remains to be determined. This qualitative study investigated if one adaptation of the CCG currently taught at Midwestern University College of Veterinary Medicine (MWU CVM) fulfills client expectations of what constitutes clinically effective communication. Two focus groups (cat owners and dog owners) were conducted with a total of 13 participants to identify common themes in veterinary communication. Participants compared communication skills they valued to those taught by MWU CVM. The results indicated that while the CCG skills that MWU CVM adopted are applicable to cat and dog owners, they are not comprehensive. Participants expressed the need to expand the skillset to include compassionate transparency and unconditional positive regard. Participants also expressed different communication needs that were attributed to the species of companion animal owned. PMID:27075274

  13. Thermodynamic properties of coherent interfaces in f.c.c.-based Ag-Al alloys: A first-principles study

    SciTech Connect

    Asta, M.; Hoyt, J.J.

    2000-03-14

    The thermodynamic properties of coherent interphase boundaries (IPBs) between the Al-rich-matrix and Guinier-Preston-zone (GP-zone) precipitate phases in Ag-Al are studied from first principles. The cluster-variation-method (CVM), with effective-cluster-interaction (ECI) parameters derived from the results of ab initio total energy calculations, is used to compute the interfacial free energies ({gamma}) and composition profiles of flat {l_brace}111{r_brace} and {l_brace}100{r_brace} IPBs as a function of temperature (T). The calculated values of {gamma} increase monotonically from zero to 35 (37)mJ/M{sup 2} for {l_brace}111{r_brace}({l_brace}100{r_brace}) IPBs as T is lowered from the critical temperature (calculated to be 760 K) to 450 K. Monte-Carlo simulations, based on the same set of ECIs used in the CVM work, have been performed to compute GP-zone morphologies at 450 K. Simulated precipitate shapes are found to be anisotropic, consistent with experimental observations. The CVM is used also to compute the gradient coefficient ({kappa}) in the Cahn-Hilliard coarse-grained free energy. Calculated values of {kappa} are found to display non-negligible concentration and temperature dependencies, in contrast to the predictions of regular-solution theory.

  14. Determination of tricaine residues in fish by liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Nochetto, Cristina B; Reimschuessel, Renate; Gieseker, Charles; Cheely, Christie-Sue; Carson, Mary C

    2009-01-01

    Tricaine methanesulfonate (MS-222) is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM), as an anesthetic drug for select aquaculture species. It was approved for use as a handling aid with a 3 week withdrawal time. The drug is rapidly metabolized and excreted; therefore, CVM approved its use without requiring a regulatory method for drug residues in tissues. However, there are concerns that the drug may be used to sedate fish during transport to slaughter. A regulatory method will enable monitoring for unsafe residues of this drug resulting from extralabel use. We present a quantitative method, using LC at a target level of 0.1 mg/kg (ppm), for three different farmed species: salmon (Salmo salar); tilapia (Oreochromis spp.); and catfish (Ictalurus punctatus). The assay begins with an acetonitrile extraction, followed by filtration and mixed-mode cation-exchange solid-phase extraction cleanup. The extracts are analyzed by reversed-phase LC with UV detection at 320 nm. The method was validated by using fish fillets with incurred residues, control fish fillets, and fish fillets fortified at half the target level, the target level, and twice the target level (0.05, 0.1, and 0.2 ppm, respectively). For all species, accuracy is > or =80% and the RSD is < or =10%. The method complies with CVM performance criteria for the determination of veterinary drug residues. PMID:19714996

  15. [WTP guidance technology: a comparison of payment card, single-bounded and double-bounded dichotomous formats for evaluating non-use values of Sanjiang Plain ecotourism water resources].

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-Guang; Wang, Qiu-Dan; Li, Chen-Yang

    2014-09-01

    Contingent valuation method (CVM) is the most widespread method to assess resources and value of environmental goods and services. The guidance technology of willingness to pay (WTP) is an important means of CVM. Therefore, the study on the WTP guidance technology is an important approach to improve the reliability and validity of CVM. This article conducted comprehensive evaluation on non-use value of eco-tourism water resources in Sanjiang Plain by using payment card, single-bound dichotomous choice and double-bound dichotomous choice. Results showed that the socio-economic attributes were consistent with the willingness to pay in the three formats, and the tender value, age, educational level, annual income and the concern level had significant effect on the willingness to pay, while gender and job did not have significant influence. The WTP value was 112.46 yuan per capita with the payment card, 136.15 with the single-bound dichotomous choice, and 168.74 with the double-bound dichotomous choice. Comprehensive consideration of the nature of the investigation, investigation costs and statistical techniques, the result of double-bound dichotomous choice (47.86 x 10(8) yuan · a(-1)) was best in accordance with the reality, and could be used as non-use value of eco-tourism water resources in Sanjiang Plain. The format of questionnaire was very important to improve its validity, and made a great influence on the WTP. PMID:25757326

  16. Genes Specific for the Biosynthesis of Clavam Metabolites Antipodal to Clavulanic Acid Are Clustered with the Gene for Clavaminate Synthase 1 in Streptomyces clavuligerus

    PubMed Central

    Mosher, Roy H.; Paradkar, Ashish S.; Anders, Cecilia; Barton, Barry; Jensen, Susan E.

    1999-01-01

    Portions of the Streptomyces clavuligerus chromosome flanking cas1, which encodes the clavaminate synthase 1 isoenzyme (CAS1), have been cloned and sequenced. Mutants of S. clavuligerus disrupted in cvm1, the open reading frame located immediately upstream of cas1, were constructed by a gene replacement procedure. Similar techniques were used to generate S. clavuligerus mutants carrying a deletion that encompassed portions of the two open reading frames, cvm4 and cvm5, located directly downstream of cas1. Both classes of mutants still produced clavulanic acid and cephamycin C but lost the ability to synthesize the antipodal clavam metabolites clavam-2-carboxylate, 2-hydroxymethyl-clavam, and 2-alanylclavam. These results suggested that cas1 is clustered with genes essential and specific for clavam metabolite biosynthesis. When a cas1 mutant of S. clavuligerus was constructed by gene replacement, it produced lower levels of both clavulanic acid and most of the antipodal clavams except for 2-alanylclavam. However, a double mutant of S. clavuligerus disrupted in both cas1 and cas2 produced neither clavulanic acid nor any of the antipodal clavams, including 2-alanylclavam. This outcome was consistent with the contribution of both CAS1 and CAS2 to a common pool of clavaminic acid that is shunted toward clavulanic acid and clavam metabolite biosynthesis. PMID:10223939

  17. Panel recommendations on Oil Spill Risk Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellor, George L.

    A technical panel was convened by the Minerals Management Services (MMS) of the Department of Interior to identify deficiencies and recommend improvements in their Oil Spill Risk Analysis (OSRA) model. Members of the panel were J. M. Bane, Jr. (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill), G. S. Janowitz (North Carolina State University, Raleigh), T. H. Lee (University of Miami, Miami, Fla.), G. L. Mellor (Princeton University, Princeton, N.J.), M. L. Spaulding (University of Rhode Island, Kingston), and F. M. Vukovich (Research Triangle Institute, Raleigh-Durham, N.C.).The present OSRA model uses climatologically derived near-surface velocity fields on which are superposed oil trajectory velocities derived from the so-called “3.5% rule”: this uses a wind series derived from a “transition probability matrix” statistical approach.

  18. On the interaction between the external magnetic field and nanofluid inside a vertical square duct

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Kashif; Ahmad, Shabbir; Ahmad, Shahzad Ashraf, Muhammad; Asif, Muhammad

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, we numerically study how the external magnetic field influences the flow and thermal characteristics of nanofluid inside a vertical square duct. The flow is considered to be laminar and hydrodynamically as well as thermally developed, whereas the thermal boundary condition of constant heat flux per unit axial length with constant peripheral temperature at any cross section, is assumed. The governing equations are solved using the spectral method and the finite difference method. Excellent comparison is noted in the numerical results given by the two methods but the spectral method is found to be superior in terms of both efficiency and accuracy. We have noted that the flow reversal due to high Raleigh number may be controlled by applying an external magnetic field of suitable strength. Moreover, the Nusselt number is found to be almost a linear function of the nanoparticle volume fraction parameter, for different values of the Raleigh number and the magnetic parameter.

  19. A Simple Sensor Model for THUNDER Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Joel F.; Bryant, Robert G.

    2009-01-01

    A quasi-static (low frequency) model is developed for THUNDER actuators configured as displacement sensors based on a simple Raleigh-Ritz technique. This model is used to calculate charge as a function of displacement. Using this and the calculated capacitance, voltage vs. displacement and voltage vs. electrical load curves are generated and compared with measurements. It is shown this model gives acceptable results and is useful for determining rough estimates of sensor output for various loads, laminate configurations and thicknesses.

  20. Porcine skin flow-through diffusion cell system.

    PubMed

    Baynes, R E

    2001-11-01

    Porcine Skin Flow-Through Diffusion Cell System (Ronald E. Baynes, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina). Porcine skin can be used in a diffusion cell apparatus to study the rate and extent of absorption of topically applied chemicals through the skin. Although the skin of a number of animals can be used in this system, that of the pig most closely approximates human skin anatomically and physiologically.

  1. Production Mechanisms, Number Concentration, Size Distribution. Chemical Composition, and Optical Properties of Sea Spray Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meskhidze, Nicholas; Petters, Markus; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Bates. Tim; O'Dowd, Colin; Reid, Jeff; Lewis, Ernie R.; Gantt, Brett; Anguelova, Magdalena D.; Bhave, Prakash V.; Bird, James; Callaghan, Adrian H.; Ceburnis, Darius; Chang, Rachel; Clark, Antony; deLeeuw, Gerrit; Deane, Grant; DeMott, Paul J.; Elliot, Scott; Facchini, Maria Cristina; Fairall, Chris W.; Hawkins, Lelia; Hu, Yongxiang; Smirnov, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Over forty scientists from six countries convened in Raleigh, NC on June 4-6 2012 to review the status and prospects of sea spray aerosol research. Participants were researchers from the oceanography and atmospheric science communities, including academia, private industry, and government agencies. The recommendations from the working groups are summarized in a science prioritization matrix that is meant to prioritize the research agenda and identify areas of investigation by the magnitude of their impact on proposed science questions. Str

  2. EFFECTS OF ALLERGIC AIRWAYS DISEASE ON INFLUENZA VIRUS INFECTION IN BROWN NORWAY RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    EFFECTS OF ALLERGIC AIRWAYS DISEASE ON INFLUENZA VIRUS INFECTION IN BROWN NORWAY RATS (P. Singhl, D.W. Winsett2, M.J. Daniels2,
    C.A.J. Dick', K.B. Adlerl and M.I. Gilmour2, INCSU, Raleigh, N.C., 2NHEERL/ORD/ USEPA, RTP, N.C. and 3UNC, Chapel Hill, N.C.)The interaction between ...

  3. Measurement of RT amplitudes and wavelengths of laser driven plates

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, A.M.; Gillespie, C.H.

    1997-10-16

    A laser drive plate, that is a dense solid plate drive by a laser heated, lower density plasma, is inherently Raleigh-Taylor (R-T) unstable, We have previously indicated that observed surface perturbation on the plate are probably R-T instabilities, initiated by the mode structure of the driving laser beam. Using a semi- transparent impact target viewed with a polarized Epi-Illuminated Confocal Streak Microscope, has allowed us to measure the amplitude and growth of the instability.

  4. Dental and Chronological Ages as Determinants of Peak Growth Period and Its Relationship with Dental Calcification Stages

    PubMed Central

    Litsas, George; Lucchese, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the relationship between dental, chronological, and cervical vertebral maturation growth in the peak growth period, as well as to study the association between the dental calcification phases and the skeletal maturity stages during the same growth period. Methods: Subjects were selected from orthodontic pre-treatment cohorts consisting of 420 subjects where 255 were identified and enrolled into the study, comprising 145 girls and 110 boys. The lateral cephalometric and panoramic radiographs were examined from the archives of the Department of Orthodontics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. Dental age was assessed according to the method of Demirjian, and skeletal maturation according to the Cervical Vertebral Maturation Method. Statistical elaboration included Spearman Brown formula, descriptive statistics, Pearson’s correlation coefficient and regression analysis, paired samples t-test, and Spearman’s rho correlation coefficient. Results: Chronological and dental age showed a high correlation for both gender(r =0.741 for boys, r = 0.770 for girls, p<0.001). The strongest correlation was for the CVM Stage IV for both males (r=0.554) and females (r=0.68). The lowest correlation was for the CVM Stage III in males (r=0.433, p<0.001) and for the CVM Stage II in females (r=0.393, p>0.001). The t-test revealed statistically significant differences between these variables (p<0.001) during the peak period. A statistically significant correlation (p<0.001) between tooth calcification and CVM stages was determined. The second molars showed the highest correlation with CVM stages (CVMS) (r= 0.65 for boys, r = 0.72 for girls). Conclusion: Dental age was more advanced than chronological for both boys and girls for all CVMS. During the peak period these differences were more pronounced. Moreover, all correlations between skeletal and dental stages were statistically significant. The second molars showed the highest correlation whereas the

  5. Impact of Safe Drinking Water Act amendments of 1986 on selected utilities in North Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    DiGiano, F.A.; Sobsey, M.D.; Anderson, J.S.

    1991-04-01

    Organic and microbial contaminants that are currently or are planned to be regulated under the 1986 amendments to the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) were investigated in the following water supplies of the Urban Water Consortium established by The Water Resources Research Institute of The University of North Carolina: Burlington, Orange Water and Sewer Authority (OWASA), Durham, High Point, Raleigh and Winston-Salem. A review of the NPDES permits in each of these water supply sources confirmed that only the water supplies for Raleigh and Winston-Salem are vulnerable to industrial waste from direct discharges (six and seven sources, respectively). Those listed for Raleigh, however, are classified as minor industrial dischargers by an EPA rating system. At High Point, vulnerability is not so much from industrial discharges as from the potential for accidental contamination due to leakage from several oil storage depots. Very few contaminants that are or will be regulated by the SDWA were uncovered in these NPDES permits. It appears that the SDWA amendments' requirement for removal of disinfection by-products will have a much greater impact on the six cities studied than will the regulations regarding SOCs and VOCs.

  6. Automated detection of cracks on the faying surface within high-load transfer bolted speciments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheatley, Gregory; Kollgaard, Jeffrey R.

    2003-07-01

    Boeing is currently conducting evaluation testing of the Comparative Vacuum Monitoring (CVMTM) system offered by Structural Monitoring Systems, Ltd (SMS). Initial testing has been conducted by SMS, with further test lab validations to be performed at Boeing in Seattle. Testing has been conducted on dog bone type specimens that have been cut at the center line. A notch was cut at one of the bolt holes and a CVM sensor installed on both sides of the plate. The doublers were added and a single line of 4 bolts along the longitudinal center line were used to attach the doubler plates to the dog bone type specimen. In this way, a high load transfer situation exists between the two halves of the dog bone specimen and the doubler plates. The CVM sensors are slightly over 0.004" (0.1mm) in thickness and are installed directly upon the faying surface of the dog bone specimen. Testing was conducted on an Instron 8501 Servohydraulic testing machine at the Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Western Australia. The standard laboratory equipment offered by Structural Monitoring Systems, Ltd was used for crack detection. This equipment included the Kvac (vacuum supply) and the Sim8 (flow meter). The Sim8 was electrically connected to the Instron machine so that as soon as a crack was detected, fatigue loading was halted. The aim of the experiment was for CVM to detect a crack on the faying surface of the specimens at a length of 0.050" +/- 0.010". This was accomplished successfully. CVM has been developed on the principle that a small volume maintained at a low vacuum is extremely sensitive to any ingress of air. In addition to the load bearing sensors described above, self-adhesive, elastomeric sensors with fine channels on the adhesive face have been developed. When the sensors have been adhered to the structure under test, these fine channels, and the structure itself, form a manifold of galleries alternately at low vacuum and atmospheric pressure

  7. A general software module for CAMAC, equipment and composite variable control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daneels, A.; Skarek, P.

    1986-06-01

    Current PS controls application software has a strong hierarchical structure of software modules which translate user-friendly commands into the intricacies of hardware devices. Starting from the most elementary hardware level, these are: (i) the "interface module" (IM), which hides the various CAMAC commands so as to provide a standard access to each type of CAMAC module; (ii) the "equipment module" (EM) presents a simple standard software interface of each process equipment. There is one EM for each type of equipment and all process equipment is accessed through EMs via IMs; (iii) the "composite variable module" (CVM) provides control of abstract beam variables. It involves control of several and possibly different kinds of equipment. Setting a CVM results in appropriate setting of all relevant equipment through calls to their EMs. For the LEP Preinjector (LPI) a new generation of application software is being implemented based on the experiments with the current system and the technological evolution since its conception. The logical levels of IM, EM and CVM are kept, but their managerial and housekeeping functions are merged into a single module: the "General Module" (GM). This paper represents the characteristics of the GM, its decomposition into housekeeping and management activities ones to supervise device specific controls, and its structuring into logic and data modules. This results in a unique frame for all modules in the application hierarchy. It is transparent to the programmes so that the development of specific IMs, EMs and CVMs reduces to editing appropriate data tables, developing specific codes or re-using existing ones. This new generation of application software follows modern ideas on conceptual modelling by data abstraction and object-oriented programming.

  8. Excited states in 146Sm and 147Sm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kownacki, J.; Sujkowski, Z.; Hammarén, E.; Liukkonen, E.; Piiparinen, M.; Lindblad, Th.; Ryde, H.; Paar, V.

    1980-03-01

    The 144, 146Nd(α, χn) and 146,148Nd( 3He, χn) reactions with Eα = 20-43 MeV and E3He , = 19-27 MeV are used to investigate excited states in the isotopes 146Sm and 147Sm. The experiments involve measurements of singles γ-ray spectra and conversion electron spectra, γ-ray angular distributions and three-parameter ( Eγ- Eγ-time) coincidences. From these experiments information is obtained for states with spin up to I = 13 +and I = {27}/{2}-, respectively. These states are interpreted within the framework of the cluster-vibration model (CVM) as well as the shell model. In the latter approach, the energies of several well established states, in both isotopes, are calculated using empirical singleparticle energies, empirical two-particle interaction matrix elements and angular momentum algebra. The average deviation between the calculated and the experimental energies is less than 100 keV. The CVM calculations involve the coupling of a three-particle neutron cluster to the quadrupole vibration of the core. For 147Sm, these calculations reproduce the observed sequence of states based on the I π = {7}/{2}- ground state, as well as the sequence of states based on the I π = {13}/{2}+ excited state. The CVM calculations also reproduce the ground band in 146Sm, while for the negative parity states based on the cluster (f {7}/{2}i {13}/{2}) 3 --10 - an additional shift in energy is expected due to the mixing with octupole phonons.

  9. Risk assessment in regulatory policy making for human and veterinary public health.

    PubMed

    Lathers, Claire M

    2002-08-01

    Risk assessment is the method of systematically identifying and assessing factors that influence the probability and consequences of a negative event occurring. One responsibility of veterinary medicine is to protect animal and human health. Food animal production uses antibiotics to enhance production. Regulators evaluate new production technology to ensure animal safety and safe, edible products and to make public policy decisions by assessing risks/benefits. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Center for Veterinary Medicine's (CVM's) first risk assessment addressed the potential human health impact of campylobacter effects associated with the use of fluoroquinolines in food-producing animals. CVM used the Monte Carlo method to estimate risk byprobability distributions that reflect the uncertainty and variability in the data used for the assessment. Enterococci faecium is a species more likely to be resistant to antibiotics of last resort. Effective control of multidrug-resistant enterococci will requirea better understanding of the transfer of E. faeciumfrom animals to humans and the interaction between E. faecium, the hospital environment, and humans; prudent antibiotic use; better contact isolation in hospitals; and better surveillance. CVM will model these factors in a second, more complex risk assessment designed to examine the indirect transfer of resistance from animals to humans. Use of risk assessments allows researchers, the industry, regulatory authorities, and educators to make better policy decisions regarding antimicrobial use in food animals and humans and the development of resistance. Today the question of whether the use of antimicrobials for growth enhancement infood animals should or should not be terminated for the benefit of human health remains unresolved. PMID:12162467

  10. Morphological comparison of cervical vertebrae in adult females with different sagittal craniofacial patterns: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Alkan, Özer; Aydoğan, Cihan; Akkaya, Sevil

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Cervical vertebral maturation (CVM) methods have gained popularity to assess growth and development status for orthodontic patients. Although craniofacial and craniocervical structures are known to be associated, there is no evidence in the literature if this relation might negatively affect the accuracy of CVM assessments. Therefore, this study aimed to comparatively investigate the sizes of the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th cervical vertebrae in adult females (radius union stage of skeletal maturity) who have different sagittal skeletal patterns. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted, and 151 lateral cephalometric radiographs of adult female patients were assessed in the study. Patients were assigned to three groups according to ANB angle. Parameters including concavity depth at the lower border of the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th cervical vertebrae and base length, upper border length, body length, posterior height, anterior height, and body height of the 3rd and 4th cervical vertebrae bodies were measured. One-way analysis of variance was used for between-group comparisons. Results: No statistically significant differences were found between groups in terms of concavity depth at the lower borders of the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th cervical vertebrae (P > 0.05). Base length, upper border length, body length, posterior height, anterior height, and body height of the 3rd and 4th cervical vertebrae were also similar between groups (P > 0.05). Conclusions: The results of this study supports that sagittal craniofacial pattern has no effect on the accuracy of using the methods assessing CVM and calculating cervical vertebral age. PMID:27630474

  11. Morphological comparison of cervical vertebrae in adult females with different sagittal craniofacial patterns: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Alkan, Özer; Aydoğan, Cihan; Akkaya, Sevil

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Cervical vertebral maturation (CVM) methods have gained popularity to assess growth and development status for orthodontic patients. Although craniofacial and craniocervical structures are known to be associated, there is no evidence in the literature if this relation might negatively affect the accuracy of CVM assessments. Therefore, this study aimed to comparatively investigate the sizes of the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th cervical vertebrae in adult females (radius union stage of skeletal maturity) who have different sagittal skeletal patterns. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted, and 151 lateral cephalometric radiographs of adult female patients were assessed in the study. Patients were assigned to three groups according to ANB angle. Parameters including concavity depth at the lower border of the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th cervical vertebrae and base length, upper border length, body length, posterior height, anterior height, and body height of the 3rd and 4th cervical vertebrae bodies were measured. One-way analysis of variance was used for between-group comparisons. Results: No statistically significant differences were found between groups in terms of concavity depth at the lower borders of the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th cervical vertebrae (P > 0.05). Base length, upper border length, body length, posterior height, anterior height, and body height of the 3rd and 4th cervical vertebrae were also similar between groups (P > 0.05). Conclusions: The results of this study supports that sagittal craniofacial pattern has no effect on the accuracy of using the methods assessing CVM and calculating cervical vertebral age.

  12. Economic value of instream flow for non-commercial whitewater boating using recreation demand and contingent valuation methods.

    PubMed

    Loomis, John; McTernan, James

    2014-03-01

    Whitewater river kayaking and river rafting require adequate instream flows that are often adversely affected by upstream water diversions. However, there are very few studies in the USA of the economic value of instream flow to inform environmental managers. This study estimates the economic value of instream flow to non-commercial kayakers derived using a Travel Cost Method recreation demand model and Contingent Valuation Method (CVM), a type of Contingent Behavior Method (CBM). Data were obtained from a visitor survey administered along the Poudre River in Colorado. In the dichotomous choice CVM willingness to pay (WTP) question, visitors were asked if they would still visit the river if the cost of their trip was $Y higher, and the level of $Y was varied across the sample. The CVM yielded an estimate of WTP that was sensitive to flows ranging from $55 per person per day at 300 Cubic Feet per Second (CFS) to a maximum $97 per person per day at flows of 1900 CFS. The recreation demand model estimated a boater's number of trips per season. We found the number of trips taken was also sensitive to flow, ranging from as little as 1.63 trips at 300 CFS to a maximum number of 14 trips over the season at 1900 CFS. Thus, there is consistency between peak benefits per trip and number of trips, respectively. With an average of about 100 non-commercial boaters per day, the maximum marginal values per acre foot averages about $220. This value exceeds irrigation water values in this area of Colorado.

  13. [Diet as a cardiovascular risk factor in family medicine].

    PubMed

    Bergman Marković, Biserka; Katić, Milica; Vrdoljak, Davorka; Kranjcević, Ksenija; Jasna, Vucak; Ivezić Lalić, Dragica

    2010-05-01

    Although Mediterranean country by its geographic position, according to cardiovascular mortality (CVM) rate, Croatia belongs to Central-East European countries with high CV mortality. Prevention by changing nutritional habits is population (public health programmes) or individually targeted. General practitioner (GP) provides care for whole person in its environment and GP's team plays a key role in achieving lifestyle changes. GPs intervention is individually/group/family targeted by counselling or using printed leaflets (individual manner, organized programmes). Adherence to lifestyle changes is not an easy task; it is higher when recommendations are simple and part of individually tailored programme with follow- ups included. Motivation is essential, but obstacles to implementation (by patient and GPs) are also important. Nutritional intervention influences most important CV risk factors: cholesterol level, blood pressure (BP), diabetes. Restriction in total energy intake with additional nutritional interventions is recommended. Lower animal fat intake causes CVM reduction by 12%, taking additional serving of fruit/day by 7% and vegetables by 4%. Restriction of dietary salt intake (3 g/day) lowers BP by 2-8 mm Hg, CVM by 16%. Nutritional intervention gains CHD and stroke redact in healthy adults (12%, 11% respectively). Respecting individual lifestyle and nutrition, GP should suggest both home cooking and careful food declaration reading and discourage salt adding. Recommended daily salt intake is < or =6 g. In BP lowering, salt intake restriction (10-12 to 5-6 g/day) is as efficient as taking one antihypertensive drug. Lifestyle intervention targeting nutritional habits and pharmacotherapy is the most efficient combination in CV risk factors control.

  14. UCVM: Open Source Software for Understanding and Delivering 3D Velocity Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, D.; Small, P.; Maechling, P. J.; Jordan, T. H.; Shaw, J. H.; Plesch, A.; Chen, P.; Lee, E. J.; Taborda, R.; Olsen, K. B.; Callaghan, S.

    2014-12-01

    Physics-based ground motion simulations can calculate the propagation of earthquake waves through 3D velocity models of the Earth. The Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) has developed the Unified Community Velocity Model (UCVM) framework to help researchers build structured or unstructured velocity meshes from 3D velocity models for use in wave propagation simulations. The UCVM software framework makes it easy to extract P and S wave propagation speeds and other material properties from 3D velocity models by providing a common interface through which researchers can query earth models for a given location and depth. Currently, the platform supports multiple California models, including SCEC CVM-S4 and CVM-H 11.9.1, and has been designed to support models from any region on earth. UCVM is currently being use to generate velocity meshes for many SCEC wave propagation codes, including AWP-ODC-SGT and Hercules. In this presentation, we describe improvements to the UCVM software. The current version, UCVM 14.3.0, released in March of 2014, supports the newest Southern California velocity model, CVM-S4.26, which was derived from 26 full-3D tomographic iterations using CVM-S4 as the starting model (Lee et al., this meeting), and the Broadband 1D velocity model used in the CyberShake 14.2 study. We have ported UCVM to multiple Linux distributions and OS X. Also included in this release is the ability to add small-scale stochastic heterogeneities to extract Cartesian meshes for use in high-frequency ground motion simulations. This tool was built using the C language open-source FFT library, FFTW. The stochastic parameters (Hurst exponent, correlation length, and the horizontal/vertical aspect ratio) can be customized by the user. UCVM v14.3.0 also provides visualization scripts for constructing cross-sections, horizontal slices, basin depths, and Vs30 maps. The interface allows researchers to visually review velocity models . Also, UCVM v14.3.0 can extract

  15. An overview of methods and applications to value informal care in economic evaluations of healthcare.

    PubMed

    Koopmanschap, Marc A; van Exel, Job N A; van den Berg, Bernard; Brouwer, Werner B F

    2008-01-01

    This paper compares several applied valuation methods for including informal care in economic evaluations of healthcare programmes: the proxy good method; the opportunity cost method; the contingent valuation method (CVM); conjoint measurement (CM); and valuation of health effects in terms of health-related quality of life (HR-QOL) and well-being. The comparison focuses on three questions: what outcome measures are available for including informal care in economic evaluations of healthcare programmes; whether these measures are compatible with the common types of economic evaluation; and, when applying these measures, whether all relevant aspects of informal care are incorporated. All types of economic evaluation can incorporate a monetary value of informal care (using the opportunity cost method, the proxy good method, CVM and CM) on the cost side of an analysis, but only when the relevant aspects of time costs have been valued. On the effect side of a cost-effectiveness or cost-utility analysis, the health effects (for the patient and/or caregiver) measured in natural units or QALYs can be combined with cost estimates based on the opportunity cost method or the proxy good method. One should be careful when incorporating CVM and CM in cost-minimization, cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analyses, as the health effects of patients receiving informal care and the carers themselves may also have been valued separately. One should determine whether the caregiver valuation exercise allows combination with other valuation techniques. In cost-benefit analyses, CVM and CM appear to be the best tools for the valuation of informal care. When researchers decide to use the well-being method, we recommend applying it in a cost-benefit analysis framework. This method values overall QOL (happiness); hence it is broader than just HR-QOL, which complicates inclusion in traditional health economic evaluations that normally define outcomes more narrowly. Using broader, non

  16. A Vs30-derived Near-surface Seismic Velocity Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ely, G. P.; Jordan, T. H.; Small, P.; Maechling, P. J.

    2010-12-01

    Shallow material properties, S-wave velocity in particular, strongly influence ground motions, so must be accurately characterized for ground-motion simulations. Available near-surface velocity information generally exceeds that which is accommodated by crustal velocity models, such as current versions of the SCEC Community Velocity Model (CVM-S4) or the Harvard model (CVM-H6). The elevation-referenced CVM-H voxel model introduces rasterization artifacts in the near-surface due to course sample spacing, and sample depth dependence on local topographic elevation. To address these issues, we propose a method to supplement crustal velocity models, in the upper few hundred meters, with a model derived from available maps of Vs30 (the average S-wave velocity down to 30 meters). The method is universally applicable to regions without direct measures of Vs30 by using Vs30 estimates from topographic slope (Wald, et al. 2007). In our current implementation for Southern California, the geology-based Vs30 map of Wills and Clahan (2006) is used within California, and topography-estimated Vs30 is used outside of California. Various formulations for S-wave velocity depth dependence, such as linear spline and polynomial interpolation, are evaluated against the following priorities: (a) capability to represent a wide range of soil and rock velocity profile types; (b) smooth transition to the crustal velocity model; (c) ability to reasonably handle poor spatial correlation of Vs30 and crustal velocity data; (d) simplicity and minimal parameterization; and (e) computational efficiency. The favored model includes cubic and square-root depth dependence, with the model extending to a depth of 350 meters. Model parameters are fit to Boore and Joyner's (1997) generic rock profile as well as CVM-4 soil profiles for the NEHRP soil classification types. P-wave velocity and density are derived from S-wave velocity by the scaling laws of Brocher (2005). Preliminary assessment of the new model

  17. UCVM: An Open Source Software Package for Querying and Visualizing 3D Velocity Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, D.; Small, P.; Maechling, P. J.; Jordan, T. H.; Shaw, J. H.; Plesch, A.; Chen, P.; Lee, E. J.; Taborda, R.; Olsen, K. B.; Callaghan, S.

    2015-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) seismic velocity models provide foundational data for ground motion simulations that calculate the propagation of earthquake waves through the Earth. The Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) has developed the Unified Community Velocity Model (UCVM) package for both Linux and OS X. This unique framework provides a cohesive way for querying and visualizing 3D models. UCVM v14.3.0, supports many Southern California velocity models including CVM-S4, CVM-H 11.9.1, and CVM-S4.26. The last model was derived from 26 full-3D tomographic iterations on CVM-S4. Recently, UCVM has been used to deliver a prototype of a new 3D model of central California (CCA) also based on full-3D tomographic inversions. UCVM was used to provide initial plots of this model and will be used to deliver CCA to users when the model is publicly released. Visualizing models is also possible with UCVM. Integrated within the platform are plotting utilities that can generate 2D cross-sections, horizontal slices, and basin depth maps. UCVM can also export models in NetCDF format for easy import into IDV and ParaView. UCVM has also been prototyped to export models that are compatible with IRIS' new Earth Model Collaboration (EMC) visualization utility. This capability allows for user-specified horizontal slices and cross-sections to be plotted in the same 3D Earth space. UCVM was designed to help a wide variety of researchers. It is currently being use to generate velocity meshes for many SCEC wave propagation codes, including AWP-ODC-SGT and Hercules. It is also used to provide the initial input to SCEC's CyberShake platform. For those interested in specific data points, the software framework makes it easy to extract P and S wave propagation speeds and other material properties from 3D velocity models by providing a common interface through which researchers can query earth models for a given location and depth. Also included in the last release was the ability to add small

  18. An overview of methods and applications to value informal care in economic evaluations of healthcare.

    PubMed

    Koopmanschap, Marc A; van Exel, Job N A; van den Berg, Bernard; Brouwer, Werner B F

    2008-01-01

    This paper compares several applied valuation methods for including informal care in economic evaluations of healthcare programmes: the proxy good method; the opportunity cost method; the contingent valuation method (CVM); conjoint measurement (CM); and valuation of health effects in terms of health-related quality of life (HR-QOL) and well-being. The comparison focuses on three questions: what outcome measures are available for including informal care in economic evaluations of healthcare programmes; whether these measures are compatible with the common types of economic evaluation; and, when applying these measures, whether all relevant aspects of informal care are incorporated. All types of economic evaluation can incorporate a monetary value of informal care (using the opportunity cost method, the proxy good method, CVM and CM) on the cost side of an analysis, but only when the relevant aspects of time costs have been valued. On the effect side of a cost-effectiveness or cost-utility analysis, the health effects (for the patient and/or caregiver) measured in natural units or QALYs can be combined with cost estimates based on the opportunity cost method or the proxy good method. One should be careful when incorporating CVM and CM in cost-minimization, cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analyses, as the health effects of patients receiving informal care and the carers themselves may also have been valued separately. One should determine whether the caregiver valuation exercise allows combination with other valuation techniques. In cost-benefit analyses, CVM and CM appear to be the best tools for the valuation of informal care. When researchers decide to use the well-being method, we recommend applying it in a cost-benefit analysis framework. This method values overall QOL (happiness); hence it is broader than just HR-QOL, which complicates inclusion in traditional health economic evaluations that normally define outcomes more narrowly. Using broader, non

  19. Role of digitalis-like substance in the hypertension of streptozotocin-induced diabetes and simulated weightlessness in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pamnani, M. B.; Chen, S.; Haddy, F. J.; Yuan, C.; Mo, Z.

    1998-01-01

    We have examined the role of plasma Na+-K+ pump inhibitor (SPI) in the hypertension of streptozotocin induced insulin dependent diabetes (IDDM) in reduced renal mass rats. The increase in blood pressure (BP) was associated with an increase in extracellular fluid volume (ECFV), and SPI and a decrease in myocardial Na+,K+ATPase (NKA) activity, suggesting that increased SPI, which inhibits cardiovascular muscle (CVM) cell NKA activity, may be involved in the mechanism of IDDM-hypertension. In a second study, using prolonged suspension resulted in a decrease in cardiac NKA activity, suggesting that cardiovascular deconditioning following space flight might in part result from insufficient SPI.

  20. The response of hydrophobic organics and potential toxicity in streams to urbanization of watersheds in six metropolitan areas of the United States.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Wade L; Goodbred, Steven L

    2009-10-01

    Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) were deployed in streams along a gradient of urban land-use intensity in and around six metropolitan areas: Atlanta, Georgia; Raleigh-Durham, North Carolina; and Denver-Fort Collins, Colorado, in 2003; and Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas; Milwaukee-Green Bay, Wisconsin; and Portland, Oregon, in 2004 to examine relations between percent urban land cover in watersheds and the occurrence, concentrations, and potential toxicity of hydrophobic compounds. Of the 142 endpoints measured in SPMD dialysates, 30 were significantly (alpha = 0.05) related to the percent of urban land cover in the watersheds in at least one metropolitan area. These 30 endpoints included the aggregated measures of the total number of compounds detected and relative toxicity (Microtox(R) and P450RGS assays), in addition to the concentrations of 27 individual hydrophobic compounds. The number of compounds detected, P450RGS assay values, and the concentrations of pyrogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were significantly related to percent urban land cover in all six metropolitan areas. Pentachloroanisole, the most frequently detected compound, was significantly related to urban land cover in all metropolitan areas except Dallas-Fort Worth. Petrogenic PAHs and dibenzofurans were positively related to percent urban land cover in Atlanta, Raleigh-Durham, Denver, and Milwaukee-Green Bay. Results for other endpoints were much more variable. The number of endpoints significantly related to urban land cover ranged from 6 in Portland to 21 Raleigh-Durham. Based on differences in the number and suite of endpoints related to urban intensity, these results provide evidence of differences in factors governing source strength, transport, and/or fate of hydrophobic compounds in the six metropolitan areas studied. The most consistent and significant results were that bioavailable, aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonists increase in streams as basins become urbanized. Potential

  1. Quantifying the Effects of Wheat Residue on Severity of Stagonospora nodorum Blotch and Yield in Winter Wheat.

    PubMed

    Mehra, L K; Cowger, C; Weisz, R; Ojiambo, P S

    2015-11-01

    Stagonospora nodorum blotch (SNB), caused by the fungus Parastagonospora nodorum, is a major disease of wheat (Triticum aestivum). Residue from a previously infected wheat crop can be an important source of initial inoculum, but the effects of infected residue on disease severity and yield have not previously been quantified. Experiments were conducted in Raleigh and Salisbury, North Carolina, in 2012, 2013, and 2014 using the moderately susceptible winter wheat cultivar DG Shirley. In 2014, the highly susceptible cultivar DG 9012 was added to the experiment and the study was conducted at an additional site in Tyner, North Carolina. Four (2012) or six (2013 and 2014) wheat residue treatments were applied in the field in a randomized complete block design with five replicates. Treatments in 2012 were 0, 30, 60, and 90% residue coverage of the soil surface, while 10 and 20% residue treatments were added in 2013 and 2014. Across site-years, disease severity ranged from 0 to 50% and increased nonlinearly (P < 0.05) as residue level increased, with a rapid rise to an upper limit and showing little change in severity above 20 to 30% soil surface coverage. Residue coverage had a significant (P < 0.05) effect on disease severity in all site-years. The effect of residue coverage on yield was only significant (P < 0.05) for DG Shirley at Raleigh and Salisbury in 2012 and for DG 9012 at Salisbury in 2014. Similarly, residue coverage significantly (P < 0.05) affected thousand-kernel weight only of DG 9012 in 2014 at Raleigh and Salisbury. Our results showed that when wheat residue was sparse, small additions to residue density produced greater increases in SNB than when residue was abundant. SNB only led to effects on yield and test weight in the most disease-conducive environments, suggesting that the economic threshold for the disease may be higher than previously assumed and warrants review. PMID:26167761

  2. Elevated Linkage Disequilibrium and Signatures of Soft Sweeps Are Common in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Garud, Nandita R; Petrov, Dmitri A

    2016-06-01

    The extent to which selection and demography impact patterns of genetic diversity in natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster is yet to be fully understood. We previously observed that linkage disequilibrium (LD) at scales of ∼10 kb in the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP), consisting of 145 inbred strains from Raleigh, North Carolina, measured both between pairs of sites and as haplotype homozygosity, is elevated above neutral demographic expectations. We also demonstrated that signatures of strong and recent soft sweeps are abundant. However, the extent to which these patterns are specific to this derived and admixed population is unknown. It is also unclear whether these patterns are a consequence of the extensive inbreeding performed to generate the DGRP data. Here we analyze LD statistics in a sample of >100 fully-sequenced strains from Zambia; an ancestral population to the Raleigh population that has experienced little to no admixture and was generated by sequencing haploid embryos rather than inbred strains. We find an elevation in long-range LD and haplotype homozygosity compared to neutral expectations in the Zambian sample, thus showing the elevation in LD is not specific to the DGRP data set. This elevation in LD and haplotype structure remains even after controlling for possible confounders including genomic inversions, admixture, population substructure, close relatedness of individual strains, and recombination rate variation. Furthermore, signatures of partial soft sweeps similar to those found in the DGRP as well as partial hard sweeps are common in Zambia. These results suggest that while the selective forces and sources of adaptive mutations may differ in Zambia and Raleigh, elevated long-range LD and signatures of soft sweeps are generic in D. melanogaster.

  3. Climatology of diurnal trends and vertical distribution of ozone in the atmospheric boundary layer in urban North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Aneja, V P; Arya, S P; Li, Y; Murray, G C; Manuszak, T L

    2000-01-01

    Vertical measurements of ozone were made on a 610-m-tall tower located about 15 km southeast of Raleigh, NC, as part of an effort by the state of North Carolina to develop a state implementation plan (SIP) for ozone control in the Raleigh Metropolitan Statistical Area. During summer 1993, 1994, and 1995, ozone was monitored at ground level, 250 m, and 433 m. Boundary layer wind, temperature, and other meteorological variable profiles were determined from balloon soundings. During summer 1996 and 1997, ozone was monitored at ground level, 76 m, 128 m, and 433 m. This paper presents the analysis and discussion of the five-year data. The evolutions of the convective boundary layer during daytime and the stable nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) were found to have marked impacts on ozone concentrations. A strong diurnal pattern, with an afternoon maximum and an early morning minimum, was dominant at ground level, but it was much weaker at elevated levels and insignificant above the NBL at night. Ozone deposition velocities at night during the measurement periods were estimated to range from 0.09 to 0.64 cm/sec. We found evidence of regional transport of ozone and/or its precursors from northwest and north of the site, which may play a role in high ozone events in the Raleigh-Durham area. Ozone concentrations between the various elevated levels were well correlated, while correlations between the ground and upper levels were much weaker. However, a strong correlation was found between the nighttime and early morning ozone concentrations (CR) in the residual layer above the NBL and the maximum ground level concentration (Co max) the following afternoon. Based on this correlation, the latter may be predicted by an observational model Co max = 27.76e 0.016 CR.

  4. The response of hydrophobic organics and potential toxicity in streams to urbanization of watersheds in six metropolitan areas of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bryant, W.L.; Goodbred, S.L.

    2009-01-01

    Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) were deployed in streams along a gradient of urban land-use intensity in and around six metropolitan areas: Atlanta, Georgia; Raleigh - Durham, North Carolina; and Denver - Fort Collins, Colorado, in 2003; and Dallas - Fort Worth, Texas; Milwaukee - Green Bay, Wisconsin; and Portland, Oregon, in 2004 to examine relations between percent urban land cover in watersheds and the occurrence, concentrations, and potential toxicity of hydrophobic compounds. Of the 142 endpoints measured in SPMD dialysates, 30 were significantly (alpha = 0.05) related to the percent of urban land cover in the watersheds in at least one metropolitan area. These 30 endpoints included the aggregated measures of the total number of compounds detected and relative toxicity (Microtox?? and P450RGS assays), in addition to the concentrations of 27 individual hydrophobic compounds. The number of compounds detected, P450RGS assay values, and the concentrations of pyrogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were significantly related to percent urban land cover in all six metropolitan areas. Pentachloroanisole, the most frequently detected compound, was significantly related to urban land cover in all metropolitan areas except Dallas - Fort Worth. Petrogenic PAHs and dibenzofurans were positively related to percent urban land cover in Atlanta, Raleigh - Durham, Denver, and Milwaukee - Green Bay. Results for other endpoints were much more variable. The number of endpoints significantly related to urban land cover ranged from 6 in Portland to 21 Raleigh-Durham. Based on differences in the number and suite of endpoints related to urban intensity, these results provide evidence of differences in factors governing source strength, transport, and/or fate of hydrophobic compounds in the six metropolitan areas studied. The most consistent and significant results were that bioavailable, aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonists increase in streams as basins become

  5. More stable and more efficient alternatives of Z-907: carbazole-based amphiphilic Ru(II) sensitizers for dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Cheema, Hammad; Islam, Ashraful; Younts, Robert; Gautam, Bhoj; Bedja, Idriss; Gupta, Ravindra Kumar; Han, Liyuan; Gundogdu, Kenan; El-Shafei, Ahmed

    2014-12-28

    Here we report two novel amphiphilic Ru(II) heteroleptic bipyridyl complexes, HD-14 and HD-15, compared to previously reported NCSU-10. We have combined the strong electron donor characteristics of carbazole and the hydrophobic nature of different long alkyl chains, C7, C18 and C2 (NCSU-10), tethered to N-carbazole to study their influence on photocurrent, photovoltage and long term stability for dye-sensitized solar cells. Photon harvesting efficiency and electron donating characteristics of carbazole-based ancillary ligands were found to be unaffected by different alkyl chain lengths. However, a slight drop in the Voc of HD-14 and HD-15 was observed compared to that of NCSU-10. It was found by nanosecond flash photolysis transient absorption (TA) measurements that the faster the dye regeneration the higher the photocurrent density response, and the dye regeneration time was found to be 2.6, 3.6, and 3.7 μs for HD-14, HD-15, and N719 dyes, respectively. The difference in the amplitude of the transient absorption (TA) signal of the oxidized dye as measured by femtosecond TA studies is in excellent agreement with the photocurrent generated, which was in the following order HD-14 > HD-15 > N719. Under 1000 h light soaking conditions, HD-15 maintained up to 98% (only 2% loss) of the initial power conversion efficiency compared to 8% loss for HD-14 and 22% loss in the power conversion efficiency for NCSU-10. HD-15 was strikingly stable to light soaking conditions when employed in the presence of an ionic liquid electrolyte, which paves the way for widespread applications of dye-sensitized solar cells with long term stability. The total power conversion efficiency (η) was 9.27% for HD-14 and 9.17% for HD-15 compared to 8.92% for N719.

  6. Renewable Energy Opportunity Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Hancock, E.; Mas, C.

    1998-11-13

    Presently, the US EPA is constructing a new complex at Research Triangle Park, North Carolina to consolidate its research operations in the Raleigh-Durham area. The National Computer Center (NCC) is currently in the design process and is planned for construction as partof this complex. Implementation of the new technologies can be planned as part of the normal construction process, and full credit for elimination of the conventional technologies can be taken. Several renewable technologies are specified in the current plans for the buildings. The objective of this study is to identify measures that are likely to be both technically and economically feasible.

  7. An instability in neutron stars at birth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burrows, Adam; Fryxell, Bruce A.

    1992-01-01

    Calculations with a two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulation show that a generic Raleigh-Taylor-like instability occurs in the mantles of nascent neutron stars, that it is possibly violent, and that the standard spherically symmetric models of neutron star birth and supernova explosion may be inadequate. Whether this 'convective' instability is pivotal to the supernova mechanism, pulsar nagnetic fields, or a host of other important issues that attend stellar collapse remains to be seen, but its existence promises to modify all questions concerning this most energetic of astronomical phenomena.

  8. FIBER-TEX 1991: The Fifth Conference on Advanced Engineering Fibers and Textile Structures for Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, John D. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    This document is a compilation of papers presented at a joint NASA/North Carolina State University/DoD/Clemson University/Drexel University conference on Fibers, Textile Technology, and Composites Structures held at the College of Textiles Building on Centennial Campus of North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina on October 15-17, 1991. Conference papers presented information on advanced engineering fibers, textile processes and structures, structural fabric production, mechanics and characteristics of woven composites, pultruded composites, and the latest requirements for the use of textiles in the production of composite materials and structures.

  9. Case Studies on the Effectiveness of State Financial Incentives for Renewable Energy

    SciTech Connect

    2002-09-01

    September 2002 · NREL/SR-620-32819 Case Studies on the Effectiveness of State Financial Incentives for Renewable Energy S. Gouchoe, V. Everette, and R. Haynes North Carolina State University Raleigh, North Carolina National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 NREL is a U.S. Department of Energy Laboratory Operated by Midwest Research Institute · Battelle · Bechtel Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 September 2002 · NREL/SR-620-32819Case Studies on the Effecti

  10. Whole Building Efficiency for Whole Foods: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Deru, M.; Doebber, I.; Hirsch, A.

    2013-02-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory partnered with Whole Foods Market under the Commercial Building Partnership (CBP) program to design and implement a new store in Raleigh, North Carolina. The result was a design with a predicted energy savings of 40% over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004, and 25% energy savings over their standard design. Measured performance of the as-built building showed that the building did not achieve the predicted performance. A detailed review of the project several months after opening revealed a series of several items in construction and controls items that were not implemented properly and were not fully corrected in the commissioning process.

  11. The route to chaos in thermal convection at infinite Prandtl number. I - Some trajectories and bifurcations. [in earth mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Cheryl A.; Turcotte, Donald L.

    1989-01-01

    The question of whether or not thermal convection in the earth's mantle is chaotic is addressed. It is suggested that the high Prandtl number/high Raleigh number thermal convection associated with mantle convection is chaotic. To test this hypothesis, the route to chaos in a fluid with infinite Prandtl number is examined, using the Saltzman (1962) equations and the Lorenz (1963) equations. It is concluded that thermal convection at infinite Prandtl number becomes chaotic by means of symmetry-breaking pitchfork bifurcations and the appearance of Hopf bifurcations which produce unstable periodic orbits.

  12. Planning a Global Array of Broadband Seismic Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koper, Keith D.; Ammon, Charles J.

    2013-08-01

    A diverse group of more than 70 seismologists met for 2 days in Raleigh, N.C., to report on recent innovations in seismic array methods and to discuss the future of seismic arrays in global seismology. The workshop was sponsored by the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS), with U.S. National Science Foundation funding. Participants included representatives of existing array research groups in Australia, Canada, Germany, Japan, Norway, and the United States, with individuals from academia, government, and industry. The workshop was organized by the authors of this meeting report, Pablo Ampeuro (California Institute of Technology), and Colleen Dalton (Boston University), along with IRIS staff support.

  13. Indian Ocean Biogeochemical Processes and Ecological Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofori, Leslie

    2010-11-01

    The Sustained Indian Ocean Biogeochemistry and Ecosystem Research (SIBER) conference was held in 2006 in Goa, India. The goals of the workshop were to assess the known facts about basin-wide biogeochemical and ecological dynamics of the Indian Ocean, to answer major questions, and to draw a road map for future research. The AGU monograph Indian Ocean Biogeochemical Processes and Ecological Variability, edited by Jerry D. Wiggert, Raleigh R. Hood, S. Wajih A. Naqvi, Kenneth H. Brink, and Sharon L. Smith, synthesizes the talks that were presented at this conference. In this interview, Eos talks with Jerry Wiggert, assistant professor of marine science at University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg.

  14. HL-20 Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Robert Vess, a lecturer in mechanical and aerospace engineering at North Carolina State Univeristy, Raleigh, N.C., installs the window flange trim on a full-size engineering model of the HL-20 lifting body for the NASA Langley Research Center. The model, which is approximately 29 feet long, was built by NCSU and North Carolina Agricultural and Technical Univeristy, Greensboro, N.C., for studying crew seating arrangements, habitability, equipment layout, crew ingress and egress, and maintance and handling operations. The studies will take place at Langley and at the NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas.

  15. Dependence of the ion energy on the parameters of the laser pulse and target in the radiation-pressure-dominated regime of acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Echkina, E. Yu.; Inovenkov, I. N.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Pegoraro, F.; Borghesi, M.; Bulanov, S. V.

    2010-01-15

    When the dominant mechanism for ion acceleration is the laser radiation pressure, the conversion efficiency of the laser energy into the energy of relativistic ions may be very high. Stability analysis of a thin plasma layer accelerated by the radiation pressure shows that Raleigh-Taylor instability may enhance plasma inhomogeneity. In the linear stage of instability, the plasma layer decays into separate bunches, which are accelerated by the radiation pressure similarly to clusters accelerated under the action of an electromagnetic wave. The energy and luminosity of an ion beam accelerated in the radiation-pressure-dominated regime are calculated.

  16. Can crops tolerate acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, J.K.

    1989-11-01

    This brief article describes work by scientists at the ARS Air Quality-Plant Growth and Development Laboratory in Raleigh, North Carolina, that indicates little damage to crops as a result of acid rain. In studies with simulated acid rain and 216 exposed varieties of 18 crops, there were no significant injuries nor was there reduced growth in most species. Results of chronic and acute exposures were correlated in sensitive tomato and soybean plants and in tolerant winter wheat and lettuce plants. These results suggest that 1-hour exposures could be used in the future to screen varieties for sensitivity to acid rain.

  17. Hydrated electron yields in liquid and supercritical water—a theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiller, Robert; Horváth, Ákos

    2012-09-01

    Our theory, outlined earlier [Schiller, R., 1990. Ion-electron pairs in condensed polar media treated as H-like atoms. J. Chem. Phys. 92, 5527-5532.], is based on the idea that the electron and its geminate positive ion form a hydrogen-like atom, which can be ionized at the expense of the energy fluctuations in the medium. Temperature, T, static relative permittivity, ɛs, and constant-volume molar specific heat, Cvm, play here the decisive role; the combination Tɛs2√{Cvm}, is the variable by which the yield can be predicted. The calculations agree with the recent experimental results on the temperature dependent yields of hydrated electrons by Kratz et al. [Kratz, S., Torres-Alcan, J., Urbanek, J., Lindner, J., Vöhringer, P., 2010. Geminate recombination of hydrated electrons in liquid-to-supercritical water studied by ultrafast time-resolved spectroscopy. Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 12, 12169-12176.] reasonably well.

  18. Ambient Noise Tomography of Southern California Images Dipping San Andreas-Parallel Structure and Low-Velocity Salton Trough Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barak, S.; Klemperer, S. L.; Lawrence, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    Ambient noise tomography (ANT) images the entire crust but does not depend on the spatial and temporal distribution of events. Our ANT high-resolution 3D velocity model of southern California uses 849 broadband stations, vastly more than previous studies, and four years of data, 1997-1998, 2007, and 2011, chosen to include our own broadband Salton Seismic Imaging Project, a 40-station transect across the Salton Trough, as well as other campaign stations in both Mexico and the U.S.A., and permanent stations. Our shear-wave model has 0.05° x 0.05° lateral and 1 km vertical blocks. We used the Harvard Community Velocity Model (CVM-H) as the initial model for the inversion. We show significant differences relative to the CVM-H model, especially in the lower crust and upper mantle. We observe prominent low-velocity anomalies in the upper mantle under the Salton Buttes and Cerro Prieto geothermal fields, indicating high-temperatures and possibly partial-melt. Similar low-velocity zones have been previously observed along the Gulf of California. We also observe vertical to gradually dipping lateral velocity contrasts in the lower crust under the southern part of the San Andreas Fault. The east to northeast dip may represent crustal fabric sheared by movement of the Pacific plate under the North American plate prior to the initiation of transform motion.

  19. Exploring the use of tablet PCs in veterinary medical education: opportunity or obstacle?

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Rush, Bonnie R; Wilkerson, Melinda; van der Merwe, Deon

    2014-01-01

    A tablet PC is a laptop computer with a touch screen and a digital pen or stylus that can be used for handwritten notes and drawings. The use of tablet PCs has been investigated in many disciplines such as engineering, mathematics, science, and education. The purpose of this article is to explore student and faculty attitudes toward and experiences with tablet PCs 6 years after the implementation of a tablet PC program in the College of Veterinary Medicine (CVM) at Kansas State University (K-State). This study reports that the use of tablet PCs has enhanced students' learning experiences through learner-interface interaction, learner-content interaction, learner-instructor interaction, and learner-learner interaction. This study also identifies digital distraction as the major negative experience with tablet PCs during class time. The tablet PC program provides CVM faculty the potential to pursue technology integration strategies that support expected learning outcomes and provides students the potential to develop self-monitoring and self-discipline skills that support learning with digital technologies.

  20. Impact of perceived importance of ecosystem services and stated financial constraints on willingness to pay for riparian meadow restoration in Flanders (Belgium).

    PubMed

    Chen, Wendy Y; Aertsens, Joris; Liekens, Inge; Broekx, Steven; De Nocker, Leo

    2014-08-01

    The strategic importance of ecosystem service valuation as an operational basis for policy decisions on natural restoration has been increasingly recognized in order to align the provision of ecosystem services with the expectation of human society. The contingent valuation method (CVM) is widely used to quantify various ecosystem services. However, two areas of concern arise: (1) whether people value specific functional ecosystem services and overlook some intrinsic aspects of natural restoration, and (2) whether people understand the temporal dimension of ecosystem services and payment schedules given in the contingent scenarios. Using a peri-urban riparian meadow restoration project in Flanders, Belgium as a case, we explored the impacts of residents' perceived importance of various ecosystem services and stated financial constraints on their willingness-to-pay for the proposed restoration project employing the CVM. The results indicated that people tended to value all the benefits of riparian ecosystem restoration concurrently, although they accorded different importances to each individual category of ecosystem services. A longer payment scheme can help the respondents to think more about the flow of ecosystem services into future generations. A weak temporal embedding effect can be detected, which might be attributed to respondents' concern about current financial constraints, rather than financial bindings associated with their income and perceived future financial constraints. This demonstrates the multidimensionality of respondents' financial concerns in CV. This study sheds light on refining future CV studies, especially with regard to public expectation of ecosystem services and the temporal dimension of ecosystem services and payment schedules.

  1. Multi-view L2-SVM and its multi-view core vector machine.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chengquan; Chung, Fu-lai; Wang, Shitong

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a novel L2-SVM based classifier Multi-view L2-SVM is proposed to address multi-view classification tasks. The proposed Multi-view L2-SVM classifier does not have any bias in its objective function and hence has the flexibility like μ-SVC in the sense that the number of the yielded support vectors can be controlled by a pre-specified parameter. The proposed Multi-view L2-SVM classifier can make full use of the coherence and the difference of different views through imposing the consensus among multiple views to improve the overall classification performance. Besides, based on the generalized core vector machine GCVM, the proposed Multi-view L2-SVM classifier is extended into its GCVM version MvCVM which can realize its fast training on large scale multi-view datasets, with its asymptotic linear time complexity with the sample size and its space complexity independent of the sample size. Our experimental results demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed Multi-view L2-SVM classifier for small scale multi-view datasets and the proposed MvCVM classifier for large scale multi-view datasets.

  2. Venous malformation and haemangioma: differential diagnosis, diagnosis, natural history and consequences.

    PubMed

    Lee, B B

    2013-03-01

    Venous malformation (VM) is the most common form of congenital vascular malformation (CVM). VM presents at birth as an inborn vascular defect and never disappears/regresses spontaneously through the rest of life; it will continue to grow slowly at a rate that is proportional to the growth rate of the body. Haemangioma is not a vascular malformation but one of the vascular tumours originating from the endothelial cells; it develops after birth mostly in the infantile/neonatal period with a distinctive growth cycle: a proliferation phase of early rapid growth followed by an involutional phase of slow regression. Although the vascular malformation and vascular tumour belong to the 'vascular anomaly' together, both conditions are fundamentally different not only in their anatomical, histological and pathophysiological findings but also in their clinical courses. Therefore, an appropriate differential diagnosis of the VM is mandated not only from other kinds of CVMs but also from 'genuine' haemangioma. Appropriate diagnosis and assessment of VMs can be made based on clinical presentation and a proper combination of basic non-invasive studies in general but the presence of a mixed lesion involving other types of CVM lesions and the type of VM lesion, extratruncular and truncular, will dictate the need for further work-up with additional non- to less-invasive study or angiography. Otherwise, angiography is usually reserved for therapeutic planning and treatment.

  3. Identification of feigned mental retardation using the new generation of malingering detection instruments: preliminary findings.

    PubMed

    Graue, Lili O; Berry, David T R; Clark, Jessica A; Sollman, Myriam J; Cardi, Michelle; Hopkins, Jaclyn; Werline, Dellynda

    2007-12-01

    A recent Supreme Court decision--Atkins v. Virginia, 536 U.S. 304 (2002)--prohibiting the execution of mentally retarded (MR) defendants may have raised the attractiveness of feigning this condition in the criminal justice system. Unfortunately, very few published studies have addressed the detection of feigned MR. The present report compared results from tests of intelligence, psychiatric feigning, and neurocognitive faking in a group of 26 mild MR participants (MR) and 25 demographically matched community volunteers asked to feign MR (CVM). Results showed that the CVM suppressed their IQ scores to approximate closely the level of MR participants. WAIS-III and psychiatric malingering measures were relatively ineffective at discriminating feigned from genuine MR. Although neurocognitive malingering tests were more accurate, their reduced specificity in MR participants was of potential concern. Revised cutting scores, set to maintain a Specificity rate of about .95 in MR clients, were identified, although they require cross-validation. Overall, these results suggest that new cutting scores will likely need to be validated to detect feigned MR using current malingering instruments.

  4. Assessing Conformance with Benford's Law: Goodness-Of-Fit Tests and Simultaneous Confidence Intervals.

    PubMed

    Lesperance, M; Reed, W J; Stephens, M A; Tsao, C; Wilton, B

    2016-01-01

    Benford's Law is a probability distribution for the first significant digits of numbers, for example, the first significant digits of the numbers 871 and 0.22 are 8 and 2 respectively. The law is particularly remarkable because many types of data are considered to be consistent with Benford's Law and scientists and investigators have applied it in diverse areas, for example, diagnostic tests for mathematical models in Biology, Genomics, Neuroscience, image analysis and fraud detection. In this article we present and compare statistically sound methods for assessing conformance of data with Benford's Law, including discrete versions of Cramér-von Mises (CvM) statistical tests and simultaneous confidence intervals. We demonstrate that the common use of many binomial confidence intervals leads to rejection of Benford too often for truly Benford data. Based on our investigation, we recommend that the CvM statistic Ud(2), Pearson's chi-square statistic and 100(1 - α)% Goodman's simultaneous confidence intervals be computed when assessing conformance with Benford's Law. Visual inspection of the data with simultaneous confidence intervals is useful for understanding departures from Benford and the influence of sample size.

  5. Loss of col8a1a function during zebrafish embryogenesis results in congenital vertebral malformations.

    PubMed

    Gray, Ryan S; Wilm, Thomas P; Smith, Jeff; Bagnat, Michel; Dale, Rodney M; Topczewski, Jacek; Johnson, Stephen L; Solnica-Krezel, Lilianna

    2014-02-01

    Congenital vertebral malformations (CVM) occur in 1 in 1000 live births and in many cases can cause spinal deformities, such as scoliosis, and result in disability and distress of affected individuals. Many severe forms of the disease, such as spondylocostal dystostosis, are recessive monogenic traits affecting somitogenesis, however the etiologies of the majority of CVM cases remain undetermined. Here we demonstrate that morphological defects of the notochord in zebrafish can generate congenital-type spine defects. We characterize three recessive zebrafish leviathan/col8a1a mutant alleles ((m531, vu41, vu105)) that disrupt collagen type VIII alpha1a (col8a1a), and cause folding of the embryonic notochord and consequently adult vertebral column malformations. Furthermore, we provide evidence that a transient loss of col8a1a function or inhibition of Lysyl oxidases with drugs during embryogenesis was sufficient to generate vertebral fusions and scoliosis in the adult spine. Using periodic imaging of individual zebrafish, we correlate focal notochord defects of the embryo with vertebral malformations (VM) in the adult. Finally, we show that bends and kinks in the notochord can lead to aberrant apposition of osteoblasts normally confined to well-segmented areas of the developing vertebral bodies. Our results afford a novel mechanism for the formation of VM, independent of defects of somitogenesis, resulting from aberrant bone deposition at regions of misshapen notochord tissue.

  6. Loss of col8a1a Function during Zebrafish Embryogenesis Results in Congenital Vertebral Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Ryan S.; Wilm, Thomas; Smith, Jeff; Bagnat, Michel; Dale, Rodney M.; Topczewski, Jacek; Johnson, Stephen L.; Solnica-Krezel, Lilianna

    2014-01-01

    Congenital vertebral malformations (CVM) occur in 1 in 1,000 live births and in many cases can cause spinal deformities, such as scoliosis, and result in disability and distress of affected individuals. Many severe forms of the disease, such as spondylocostal dystostosis, are recessive monogenic traits affecting somitogenesis, however the etiologies of the majority of CVM cases remain undetermined. Here we demonstrate that morphological defects of the notochord in zebrafish can generate congenital-type spine defects. We characterize three recessive zebrafish leviathan/col8a1a mutant alleles (m531, vu41, vu105) that disrupt collagen type VIII alpha1a (col8a1a), and cause folding of the embryonic notochord and consequently adult vertebral column malformations. Furthermore, we provide evidence that a transient loss of col8a1a function or inhibition of Lysyl oxidases with drugs during embryogenesis was sufficient to generate vertebral fusions and scoliosis in the adult spine. Using periodic imaging of individual zebrafish, we correlate focal notochord defects of the embryo with vertebral malformations (VM) in the adult. Finally, we show that bends and kinks in the notochord can lead to aberrant apposition of osteoblasts normally confined to well-segmented areas of the developing vertebral bodies. Our results afford a novel mechanism for the formation of VM, independent of defects of somitogenesis, resulting from aberrant bone deposition at regions of misshapen notochord tissue. PMID:24333517

  7. Radiological Indicators of Bone Age Assessment in Cephalometric Images. Review

    PubMed Central

    Durka-Zając, Magdalena; Mituś-Kenig, Maria; Derwich, Marcin; Marcinkowska-Mituś, Agata; Łoboda, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Summary The ability to assess bone age accurately is important and allows to diagnose the patient correctly and to plan orthodontic treatment appropriately. The aim of the work is to present views of different authors on the subject of using cephalometric images to determine bone age and its significance for conducting appropriate orthodontic treatment. Publications from the PubMed medical database were analyzed. Search criteria: bone age assessment, CVM method. Ultimately, 36 papers out of 1354 publications were selected. The research of many authors confirms the usefulness of various methods using cephalometric images to assess skeletal age. Currently, the CVM method devised by Baccetti et al. is the most frequently mentioned one in literature. It seems that bone age assessment methods based on evaluating the morphological structure of the cervical vertebrae in cephalometric images can clearly differentiate skeletal maturity in children regardless of their race or sex. Bearing in mind the constant technological progress in medicine and stomatology, bone age assessment methods need to be perfected in order to alleviate their impact on the patient as much as possible. PMID:27536337

  8. How Much Are Floridians Willing to Pay for Protecting Sea Turtles from Sea Level Rise?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamed, Ahmed; Madani, Kaveh; Von Holle, Betsy; Wright, James; Milon, J. Walter; Bossick, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Sea level rise (SLR) is posing a great inundation risk to coastal areas. Some coastal nesting species, including sea turtle species, have experienced diminished habitat from SLR. Contingent valuation method (CVM) was used in an effort to assess the economic loss impacts of SLR on sea turtle nesting habitats for Florida coasts; and to elicit values of willingness to pay (WTP) of Central Florida residents to implement certain mitigation strategies, which would protect Florida's east coast sea turtle nesting areas. Using the open-ended and dichotomous choice CVM, we sampled residents of two Florida communities: Cocoa Beach and Oviedo. We estimated the WTP of households from these two cities to protect sea turtle habitat to be between 42 and 57 per year for 5 years. Additionally, we attempted to assess the impact of the both the respondents' demographics and their perception toward various situations on their WTP value. Findings include a negative correlation between the age of a respondent and the probability of an individual willing to pay the hypothetical WTP amount. We found that WTP of an individual was not dependent on prior knowledge of the effects of SLR on sea turtle habitat. The greatest indicators of whether or not an individual was willing to pay to protect sea turtle habitat were the respondents' perception regarding the trustworthiness and efficiency of the party which will implement the conservation measures and their confidence in the conservation methods used. Respondents who perceive sea turtles having an effect on their life were also more likely to pay.

  9. How Much Are Floridians Willing to Pay for Protecting Sea Turtles from Sea Level Rise?

    PubMed

    Hamed, Ahmed; Madani, Kaveh; Von Holle, Betsy; Wright, James; Milon, J Walter; Bossick, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Sea level rise (SLR) is posing a great inundation risk to coastal areas. Some coastal nesting species, including sea turtle species, have experienced diminished habitat from SLR. Contingent valuation method (CVM) was used in an effort to assess the economic loss impacts of SLR on sea turtle nesting habitats for Florida coasts; and to elicit values of willingness to pay (WTP) of Central Florida residents to implement certain mitigation strategies, which would protect Florida's east coast sea turtle nesting areas. Using the open-ended and dichotomous choice CVM, we sampled residents of two Florida communities: Cocoa Beach and Oviedo. We estimated the WTP of households from these two cities to protect sea turtle habitat to be between $42 and $57 per year for 5 years. Additionally, we attempted to assess the impact of the both the respondents' demographics and their perception toward various situations on their WTP value. Findings include a negative correlation between the age of a respondent and the probability of an individual willing to pay the hypothetical WTP amount. We found that WTP of an individual was not dependent on prior knowledge of the effects of SLR on sea turtle habitat. The greatest indicators of whether or not an individual was willing to pay to protect sea turtle habitat were the respondents' perception regarding the trustworthiness and efficiency of the party which will implement the conservation measures and their confidence in the conservation methods used. Respondents who perceive sea turtles having an effect on their life were also more likely to pay.

  10. Radiological Indicators of Bone Age Assessment in Cephalometric Images. Review.

    PubMed

    Durka-Zając, Magdalena; Mituś-Kenig, Maria; Derwich, Marcin; Marcinkowska-Mituś, Agata; Łoboda, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    The ability to assess bone age accurately is important and allows to diagnose the patient correctly and to plan orthodontic treatment appropriately. The aim of the work is to present views of different authors on the subject of using cephalometric images to determine bone age and its significance for conducting appropriate orthodontic treatment. Publications from the PubMed medical database were analyzed. Search criteria: bone age assessment, CVM method. Ultimately, 36 papers out of 1354 publications were selected. The research of many authors confirms the usefulness of various methods using cephalometric images to assess skeletal age. Currently, the CVM method devised by Baccetti et al. is the most frequently mentioned one in literature. It seems that bone age assessment methods based on evaluating the morphological structure of the cervical vertebrae in cephalometric images can clearly differentiate skeletal maturity in children regardless of their race or sex. Bearing in mind the constant technological progress in medicine and stomatology, bone age assessment methods need to be perfected in order to alleviate their impact on the patient as much as possible. PMID:27536337

  11. Stated preferences for the removal of physical pain resulting from permanently disabling occupational injuries. A contingent valuation study of Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Ho, Jiune-Jye; Liu, Jin-Tan; Wang, Jung-Der

    2005-05-01

    Within the process of calculating the true costs of illness, physical pain is a component of intangible, or human, costs. One method of estimating the monetary value of such costs is the 'contingent valuation method' (CVM), a stated preference method based upon the elicitation of levels of willingness to pay (WTP) facilitated through surveys. This study is amongst the first of its kind to apply CVM to the estimation of the cost of the removal of physical pain resulting from permanently disabling occupational injuries. We assume that a painkilling drug has been invented to mitigate physical pain with the advantages of validity and instantaneity, and without any side effects. The WTP of each of the respondents is determined by a two-step sequential-bidding process. The maximum WTP under log normal distribution was NT 1791 US dollars/day (65.1 US dollars), whilst under Weibull distribution it was NT 1913 US dollars/day (69.6 US dollars). Older respondents, those with higher household income, fall injuries, longer periods of hospitalization, or with a perceived demand for the painkilling drug in excess of one day, displayed a positive independent effect on the eliciting of their WTP. In addition, respondents with higher 'out-of-pocket' expenses, or where the interview took place 2 years or more after the injury occurred, responded with a lower WTP.

  12. Non-market valuation of off-highway vehicle recreation in Larimer County, Colorado: Implications of trail closures.

    PubMed

    Deisenroth, Daniel; Loomis, John; Bond, Craig

    2009-08-01

    Few economic studies are available to measure off-highway vehicle recreation benefits foregone when trails must be closed to protect the environment. This paper estimates the non-market benefits associated with off-highway vehicle (OHV) recreation on National Forest lands in Larimer County, Colorado. We use a contingent valuation model (CVM) to estimate benefits to OHV users, which includes dirt bike riders, all terrain vehicle (ATV) riders, and 4-wheel drive (4x4) users. Using CVM we find the mean consumer surplus estimates to be $78 per person per day. These results are consistent with the few previous estimates of OHV recreation benefits. This equates to a per trail per summer consumer surplus of at least between $219,467 and $296,876, and a county level surplus per summer to be at least between $796,447 and $1,077,367. These benefits can be compared to environmental costs to obtain a more complete picture of the effects of trail closure, as well as the negative spillovers to non-motorized users.

  13. Multi-view L2-SVM and its multi-view core vector machine.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chengquan; Chung, Fu-lai; Wang, Shitong

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a novel L2-SVM based classifier Multi-view L2-SVM is proposed to address multi-view classification tasks. The proposed Multi-view L2-SVM classifier does not have any bias in its objective function and hence has the flexibility like μ-SVC in the sense that the number of the yielded support vectors can be controlled by a pre-specified parameter. The proposed Multi-view L2-SVM classifier can make full use of the coherence and the difference of different views through imposing the consensus among multiple views to improve the overall classification performance. Besides, based on the generalized core vector machine GCVM, the proposed Multi-view L2-SVM classifier is extended into its GCVM version MvCVM which can realize its fast training on large scale multi-view datasets, with its asymptotic linear time complexity with the sample size and its space complexity independent of the sample size. Our experimental results demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed Multi-view L2-SVM classifier for small scale multi-view datasets and the proposed MvCVM classifier for large scale multi-view datasets. PMID:26773824

  14. Economic valuation of informal care: the contingent valuation method applied to informal caregiving.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Bernard; Brouwer, Werner; van Exel, Job; Koopmanschap, Marc

    2005-02-01

    This paper reports the results of the application of the contingent valuation method (CVM) to determine a monetary value of informal care. We discuss the current practice in valuing informal care and a theoretical model of the costs and benefits related to the provision of informal care. In addition, we developed a survey in which informal caregivers' willingness to accept (WTA) to provide an additional hour of informal care was elicited. This method is better than normally recommended valuation methods able to capture the heterogeneity and dynamics of informal care. Data were obtained from postal surveys. A total of 153 informal caregivers and 149 care recipients with rheumatoid arthritis returned a completed survey. Informal caregivers reported a mean WTA to provide a hypothetical additional hour of informal care of 9.52 Euro (n=124). Many hypotheses derived from the theoretical model and the literature were supported by the data.CVM is a promising alternative for existing methods like the opportunity cost method and the proxy good method to determine a monetary value of informal care that can be incorporated in the numerator of any economic evaluation.

  15. Vaginal delivery of paclitaxel via nanoparticles with non-mucoadhesive surfaces suppresses cervical tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ming; Yu, Tao; Wang, Ying-Ying; Lai, Samuel K.; Zeng, Qi; Miao, Bolong; Tang, Benjamin C.; Simons, Brian W.; Ensign, Laura; Liu, Guanshu; Chan, Kannie W. Y.; Juang, Chih-Yin; Mert, Olcay; Wood, Joseph; Fu, Jie; McMahon, Michael T.; Wu, T.-C.; Hung, Chien-Fu; Hanes, Justin

    2014-01-01

    Local delivery of chemotherapeutics in the cervicovaginal tract using nanoparticles may reduce adverse side effects associated with systemic chemotherapy, while improving outcomes for early stage cervical cancer. We hypothesize drug-loaded nanoparticles must rapidly penetrate cervicovaginal mucus (CVM) lining the female reproductive tract to effectively deliver their payload to underlying diseased tissues in a uniform and sustained manner. We develop paclitaxel-loaded nanoparticles, composed entirely of polymers used in FDA-approved products, which rapidly penetrate human CVM and provide sustained drug release with minimal burst effect. We further employ a mouse model with aggressive cervical tumors established in the cervicovaginal tract to compare paclitaxel-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (conventional particles , or CP) and similar particles coated with Pluronic® F127 (mucus-penetrating particles , or MPP). CP are mucoadhesive and, thus, aggregated in mucus, while MPP achieve more uniform distribution and close proximity to cervical tumors. Paclitaxel-MPP suppress tumor growth more effectively and prolong median survival of mice compared to free paclitaxel or paclitaxel-CP. Histopathological studies demonstrate minimal toxicity to the cervicovaginal epithelia, suggesting paclitaxel-MPP may be safe for intravaginal use. These results demonstrate for the first time the in vivo advantages of polymer-based MPP for treatment of tumors localized to a mucosal surface. PMID:24339398

  16. Assessing Conformance with Benford’s Law: Goodness-Of-Fit Tests and Simultaneous Confidence Intervals

    PubMed Central

    Lesperance, M.; Reed, W. J.; Stephens, M. A.; Tsao, C.; Wilton, B.

    2016-01-01

    Benford’s Law is a probability distribution for the first significant digits of numbers, for example, the first significant digits of the numbers 871 and 0.22 are 8 and 2 respectively. The law is particularly remarkable because many types of data are considered to be consistent with Benford’s Law and scientists and investigators have applied it in diverse areas, for example, diagnostic tests for mathematical models in Biology, Genomics, Neuroscience, image analysis and fraud detection. In this article we present and compare statistically sound methods for assessing conformance of data with Benford’s Law, including discrete versions of Cramér-von Mises (CvM) statistical tests and simultaneous confidence intervals. We demonstrate that the common use of many binomial confidence intervals leads to rejection of Benford too often for truly Benford data. Based on our investigation, we recommend that the CvM statistic Ud2, Pearson’s chi-square statistic and 100(1 − α)% Goodman’s simultaneous confidence intervals be computed when assessing conformance with Benford’s Law. Visual inspection of the data with simultaneous confidence intervals is useful for understanding departures from Benford and the influence of sample size. PMID:27018999

  17. Economic amenity values of wildlife: Six case studies in Pennsylvania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafer, Elwood L.; Carline, Robert; Guldin, Richard W.; Cordell, H. Ken

    1993-09-01

    The travel clost method (TCM) and contingent valuation method (CVM) were used to evaluate the economic value of six different ecotourism activities involving observation of wildlife in Pennsylvania. The six activities were: catch-and-release trout fishing; catch-and-release trout fishing with fly-fishing equipment; viewing waterfowl; watching elk; observing migration flights of raptors; and seeing live wildlife in an environmental education setting. TCM results provided significant statistical relationships between level of use and travel costs for the two types of trout fishing activities. CVM provided estimates of consumer surplus for the other four sites. The consumers' surplus value (1988 dollars) of all six activities to participants amounted to a total of more than 1.28 million annually—twice the total out-of-pocket expenditures of approximately 640,000 spent to visit the sites. The economic amenity values of the six activities compare favorably with similarly derived values in other studies for hunting, fishing, hiking, and backpacking in dispersed recreation environments and wilderness areas in western states.

  18. Invertebrate response to changes in streamflow hydraulics in two urban areas in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knight, Rodney R.; Cuffney, Thomas F.

    2012-01-01

    Stream hydrology is foundational to aquatic ecosystems and has been shown to be a structuring element for fish and invertebrates. The relations among urbanization, hydraulics, and invertebrate communities were investigated by the U.S. Geological Survey, National Water-Quality Assessment Program by using measures of stream hydraulics in two areas of the United States. Specifically, the hypothesis that the effects of urbanization on streamflow and aquatic biota are transferable across geographic regions was tested. Data from sites in Raleigh, North Carolina, and Milwaukee–Green Bay, Wisconsin, were compared and indicate that increasing urbanization has an effect on hydraulic characteristics (Reynolds number, shear stress, and stream power for example) in each metropolitan area, though limited commonality of significant correlations was noted between areas. Correspondence of significant correlations between invertebrate and hydraulic metrics between study areas also was limited. The links between urbanization, hydraulics, and invertebrates could be seen only in the Raleigh data. Connections among these three elements in the Milwaukee–Green Bay data were not clear and likely were obscured by antecedent land cover. Observed biotic differences due to hydrology and urbanization characteristics are not similar between geographic regions.

  19. Constraints on Alleghanian vertical displacements in the southern Appalachian Piedmont, based on aluminum-in-hornblende barometry

    SciTech Connect

    Vyhnal, C.R.; McSween, H.Y Jr. )

    1990-10-01

    Aluminum-in-hornblende barometry of Alleghanian granitoid plutons in the southern Appalachian Piedmont provides new constraints on synorogenic, vertical crustal displacements. Systematic differences in depths of emplacement between plutons in the Carolina slate belt and the Charlotte and Kings Mountain belts appear to confirm previously proposed Alleghanian folding of earlier isothermal surfaces. The Kiokee and Raleigh belts represent ductile horsts that have undergone as much as 18.5 and 15.1 km, respectively, or normal displacement along boundary faults prior to late Alleghanian dextral shearing Plutons in or near the Eastern slate and Belair belts were emplaced at depths similar to those in the Carolina slate belt. Plutons partly or completely covered by Atlantic Coastal Plain sediments, however, appear to have been emplaced deeper and earlier, perhaps reflecting uplift prior to Alleghanian time. Geothermal gradients for the various lithotectonic belts estimated from these data are consistent with the previously recognized decrease in Alleghanian metamorphic overprinting away from the Kiokee-Raleigh belt thermal axis.

  20. Muco-inert nanoparticle probes and drug carriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying-Ying

    2011-12-01

    Mucus coats the exposed surfaces of the eyes and respiratory, gastrointestinal (GI) and cervicovaginal (CV) tracts, and protects mucosal tissues against pathogens and other foreign particulates. Most foreign particles are effectively trapped in mucus through steric and adhesive interactions, and are rapidly eliminated by different mucus clearance mechanisms. Nevertheless, mucus also immobilizes conventional drug and gene carriers, thereby precluding sustained and targeted drug delivery to mucosal sites. Synthetic particles engineered with muco-inert surfaces, and some viruses, can readily penetrate mucus gel, and may serve as useful probes to understand the biophysical barrier properties of mucus. Improved understanding of the mucus barrier could provide insights into methods to enhance drug and gene delivery at mucosal surfaces, as well as understanding the occasional failure of mucus to protect against infection or injury. Recently, muco-inert nanoparticles were developed by conjugating a dense layer of low MW polyethylene glycol to particle surfaces. Since they are slowed only by steric obstruction from the mucus mesh, various sized muco-inert nanoparticles can be used to probe the microstructure and microrheology of mucus. I applied this technique to determine whether the mucus barrier may be altered by exogenous factors, including the presence of detergent, pH changes and synthetic nanoparticles. I first studied the microrheology of native human cervicovaginal mucus (CVM), and found that CVM behaves as a viscoelastic solid at length scales ≥ 1 microm (preventing large particles from diffusing through) but as a viscoelastic liquid at length scales up to at least 500 nm (allowing smaller particles to diffuse through low viscosity fluid-filled pores). Treating CVM with a nonionic detergent, N9, shifted the viscoelastic liquid-solid transition point to < 200 nm, suggesting hydrophobic interactions between mucin fibers play an important role in regulating the

  1. Muco-inert nanoparticle probes and drug carriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying-Ying

    2011-12-01

    Mucus coats the exposed surfaces of the eyes and respiratory, gastrointestinal (GI) and cervicovaginal (CV) tracts, and protects mucosal tissues against pathogens and other foreign particulates. Most foreign particles are effectively trapped in mucus through steric and adhesive interactions, and are rapidly eliminated by different mucus clearance mechanisms. Nevertheless, mucus also immobilizes conventional drug and gene carriers, thereby precluding sustained and targeted drug delivery to mucosal sites. Synthetic particles engineered with muco-inert surfaces, and some viruses, can readily penetrate mucus gel, and may serve as useful probes to understand the biophysical barrier properties of mucus. Improved understanding of the mucus barrier could provide insights into methods to enhance drug and gene delivery at mucosal surfaces, as well as understanding the occasional failure of mucus to protect against infection or injury. Recently, muco-inert nanoparticles were developed by conjugating a dense layer of low MW polyethylene glycol to particle surfaces. Since they are slowed only by steric obstruction from the mucus mesh, various sized muco-inert nanoparticles can be used to probe the microstructure and microrheology of mucus. I applied this technique to determine whether the mucus barrier may be altered by exogenous factors, including the presence of detergent, pH changes and synthetic nanoparticles. I first studied the microrheology of native human cervicovaginal mucus (CVM), and found that CVM behaves as a viscoelastic solid at length scales ≥ 1 microm (preventing large particles from diffusing through) but as a viscoelastic liquid at length scales up to at least 500 nm (allowing smaller particles to diffuse through low viscosity fluid-filled pores). Treating CVM with a nonionic detergent, N9, shifted the viscoelastic liquid-solid transition point to < 200 nm, suggesting hydrophobic interactions between mucin fibers play an important role in regulating the

  2. A new EEG measure using the 1D cluster variation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maren, Alianna J.; Szu, Harold H.

    2015-05-01

    A new information measure, drawing on the 1-D Cluster Variation Method (CVM), describes local pattern distributions (nearest-neighbor and next-nearest neighbor) in a binary 1-D vector in terms of a single interaction enthalpy parameter h for the specific case where the fractions of elements in each of two states are the same (x1=x2=0.5). An example application of this method would be for EEG interpretation in Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCIs), especially in the frontier of invariant biometrics based on distinctive and invariant individual responses to stimuli containing an image of a person with whom there is a strong affiliative response (e.g., to a person's grandmother). This measure is obtained by mapping EEG observed configuration variables (z1, z2, z3 for next-nearest neighbor triplets) to h using the analytic function giving h in terms of these variables at equilibrium. This mapping results in a small phase space region of resulting h values, which characterizes local pattern distributions in the source data. The 1-D vector with equal fractions of units in each of the two states can be obtained using the method for transforming natural images into a binarized equi-probability ensemble (Saremi & Sejnowski, 2014; Stephens et al., 2013). An intrinsically 2-D data configuration can be mapped to 1-D using the 1-D Peano-Hilbert space-filling curve, which has demonstrated a 20 dB lower baseline using the method compared with other approaches (cf. SPIE ICA etc. by Hsu & Szu, 2014). This CVM-based method has multiple potential applications; one near-term one is optimizing classification of the EEG signals from a COTS 1-D BCI baseball hat. This can result in a convenient 3-D lab-tethered EEG, configured in a 1-D CVM equiprobable binary vector, and potentially useful for Smartphone wireless display. Longer-range applications include interpreting neural assembly activations via high-density implanted soft, cellular-scale electrodes.

  3. Validity of ActiGraph Child-Specific Equations during Various Physical Activities

    PubMed Central

    Crouter, Scott E.; Horton, Magdalene; Bassett, David R.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to examine the validity of seven child-specific ActiGraph prediction equations/cut-points (Crouter vector magnitude 2-regression model (Cvm2RM), Crouter vertical axis 2RM (Cva2RM), Freedson, Treuth, Trost, Puyau and Evenson) for estimating energy expenditure (EE) and time spent in sedentary behaviors, light physical activity (LPA), moderate PA (MPA), and vigorous PA (VPA). METHODS Forty boys and 32 girls (mean±SD; age, 12±0.8 yrs) participated in the study. Participants performed eight structured activities and approximately 2-hrs of free-living activity. Activity data was collected using an ActiGraph GT3X+, positioned on the right hip, and EE (METRMR; activity VO2 divided by resting VO2) was measured using a Cosmed K4b2. ActiGraph prediction equations were compared against the Cosmed for METRMR and time spent in sedentary behaviors, LPA, MPA, VPA, and MVPA. RESULTS For the structured activities, all prediction methods were significantly different from measured METRMR for ≥ 3 activities (P<0.05), however all provided close estimates of METRMR during walking. On average, participants were monitored for 95.0±36.5 minutes during the free-living measurement. The Cvm2RM and Puyau methods were within 0.9 METRMR of measured free-living METRMR (P>0.05); all other methods significantly underestimated measured METRMR (P<0.05). The Cva2RM was within 9.7 minutes of measured time spent in sedentary behaviors, LPA, MPA, and MVPA, which was the best of the methods examined. All prediction equations underestimated VPA by 6.0–13.6 minutes. CONCLUSION Compared to the Cosmed, the Cvm2RM and Puyau methods provided the best estimate of METRMR and the Cva2RM provided the closest estimate of time spent in each intensity category during the free-living measurement. Lastly, all prediction methods had large individual prediction errors. PMID:23439413

  4. Citizens' distrust of government and their protest responses in a contingent valuation study of urban heritage trees in Guangzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wendy Y; Hua, Junyi

    2015-05-15

    Protest response is a common aspect of contingent valuation (CV) studies, which has attracted growing attention from scholars worldwide. Distrust of government, understood as one of the major reasons for protest response, has been prevalent across transitional China experiencing dramatic changes in its economy, society and natural environment. Citizen distrust of government would significantly hinder the efficiency and validity of the contingent valuation method (CVM) application focusing on the provision of public environmental and ecological goods in China, as a large proportion of protest responses might be induced. Hitherto little has been done to link residents' trust in government to their environmental behaviors in developing and transitional economies like China where CVM has been increasingly applied to generate meaningful and reliable information for integrating both ecological and socioeconomic perspectives into policy decisions. This study aims to investigate the discrepancies between protest responses induced by distrust of government and non-protest responses, using the contingent valuation of heritage trees in Guangzhou as a case. The combination of a set of debriefing questions and several attitudinal questions is employed in the questionnaire. Based on logit analysis and discriminant analysis, it has been found that protestors who distrust government and non-protestors share similar salient values associated with urban heritage trees in Guangzhou, especially their distinctive historical and cultural values, in comparison with ordinary urban trees. Residents with low familiarity with heritage trees (who rarely visit sites with heritage trees, know little about management and conservation techniques, and consider present management to be ineffective) are likely to act as protesters with the "distrust of government" belief. Only if more opportunities are provided for residents to obtain access to urban heritage tree sites, more information (about

  5. The effects of rearing density on growth, size heterogeneity and inter-individual variation of feed intake in monosex male Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus L.

    PubMed

    Azaza, M S; Assad, A; Maghrbi, W; El-Cafsi, M

    2013-11-01

    The growth dispersion of farmed fish is a subject of increasing interest and one of the most important factors in stocking density. On a duration of 60 days, the effect of stocking density on the growth, coefficient of variation and inter-individual variation of feed intake (CVFI) of juvenile Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus L. (14.9 ± 1.2 g) were studied in an experimental tank-based flow-through system. Groups of fish were stocked at four stocking densities: 200, 400, 600 and 800 fish/m3, corresponding to a density of ∼3, 6, 9 and 12 kg/m3 and referred to as D1, D2, D3 and D4, respectively. Each treatment was applied to triplicate groups in a completely randomized design. No treatment-related mortality was observed. The fish densities increased throughout the experiment from 3 to 23.5, 6 to 43.6, 9 to 56.6 and 12 to 69 kg/m3. Results show that mass gain and specific growth rate (SGR, %M/day) were negatively correlated with increased stocking density. Groups of the D1 treatment reached a mean final body mass (FBM) of 119.3 g v. 88.9 g for the D4 groups. Feed conversion ratios (FCRs) were 1.38, 1.54, 1.62 and 1.91 at D1, D2, D3 and D4 treatments, respectively. Growth heterogeneity, expressed by the inter-individual variations of fish mass (CVM), was significantly affected by time (P < 0.001), stocking density (P < 0.001) and their interaction (P < 0.05). The difference in CVM was particularly conspicuous towards the end of the experiment and was positively correlated with stocking density. Similarly, radiographic study shows that CVFI was also found to be significantly greater for groups reared at high stocking densities (D3 and D4) than the other treatments (D1 and D2). These differences in both CVM and CVFI related to the stocking density need to be taken into account by husbandry practices to assure the production of more homogeneous fish size. A simple economic analysis indicates a parabolic relationship between profit and density with optimal final

  6. Anthelmintic resistance on goat farms in Georgia: efficacy of anthelmintics against gastrointestinal nematodes in two selected goat herds.

    PubMed

    Terrill, T H; Kaplan, R M; Larsen, M; Samples, O M; Miller, J E; Gelaye, S

    2001-06-28

    Gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) parasitism is a major constraint to production of goats in the southeastern United States. The conventional method of control used by producers in this region is frequent use of anthelmintics during the warm season. Overuse of anthelmintics has led to an increase in the incidence of anthelmintic resistance in many parts of the world, but data on prevalence of anthelmintic resistance in GIN of goats in the southeastern United States are very limited. To address this issue, anthelmintic efficacy was determined in goat herds at the Fort Valley State University, Agricultural Research Station (FVSU-ARS) and the University of Georgia, College of Veterinary Medicine (UGA-CVM) using fecal egg count reduction (FECR) tests and DrenchRite((R)) larval development assays (LDA). At FVSU-ARS, 2-year-old Spanish goat does were randomly allocated to one of nine different treatment groups (n = 10): albendazole (ABZ; 20mg/kg body weight (BW)), fenbendazole (FBZ; 20mg/kg BW), ivermectin (IVM; 0.4 mg/kg BW), doramectin (DRM; 0.4 mg/kg BW), moxidectin (MOX; 0.4 mg/kg BW), levamisole (LEV; 12 mg/kg BW), morantel tartrate (MOR; 10mg/kg BW), a combination of IVM (0.4 mg/kg BW) and ABZ (20 mg/kg BW), and untreated controls. At UGA-CVM, goats were randomly allocated to one of five different treatment groups (n = 8): ABZ (20 mg/kg BW), IVM (0.4 mg/kg BW), MOX (0.4 mg/kg BW), LEV (12 mg/kg BW), and untreated controls. All drugs in both experiments were administered orally. Anthelmintic efficacy was calculated by comparing 14-day post-treatment FEC of treated and control animals, and percent reductions were interpreted using the World Association for the Advancement of Veterinary Parasitology guidelines for resistance. For the LDA, nematode eggs were isolated from pooled fecal samples of untreated control goats in each herd and used to perform DrenchRite((R)) assays. In the FVSU-ARS herd, MOX, LEV, the combination of IVM and ABZ, IVM, DRM, ABZ, MOR, and FBZ

  7. Estimating Active Transportation Behaviors to Support Health Impact Assessment in the United States.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, Theodore J; Gibson, Jacqueline MacDonald

    2016-01-01

    Health impact assessment (HIA) has been promoted as a means to encourage transportation and city planners to incorporate health considerations into their decision-making. Ideally, HIAs would include quantitative estimates of the population health effects of alternative planning scenarios, such as scenarios with and without infrastructure to support walking and cycling. However, the lack of baseline estimates of time spent walking or biking for transportation (together known as "active transportation"), which are critically related to health, often prevents planners from developing such quantitative estimates. To address this gap, we use data from the 2009 US National Household Travel Survey to develop a statistical model that estimates baseline time spent walking and biking as a function of the type of transportation used to commute to work along with demographic and built environment variables. We validate the model using survey data from the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill, NC, USA, metropolitan area. We illustrate how the validated model could be used to support transportation-related HIAs by estimating the potential health benefits of built environment modifications that support walking and cycling. Our statistical model estimates that on average, individuals who commute on foot spend an additional 19.8 (95% CI 16.9-23.2) minutes per day walking compared to automobile commuters. Public transit riders walk an additional 5.0 (95% CI 3.5-6.4) minutes per day compared to automobile commuters. Bicycle commuters cycle for an additional 28.0 (95% CI 17.5-38.1) minutes per day compared to automobile commuters. The statistical model was able to predict observed transportation physical activity in the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill region to within 0.5 MET-hours per day (equivalent to about 9 min of daily walking time) for 83% of observations. Across the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill region, an estimated 38 (95% CI 15-59) premature deaths potentially could be avoided if the entire

  8. Estimating the economic benefits of maintaining residential lake levels at an irrigation reservoir: A contingent valuation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loomis, John; Smith, Adam; Huszar, Paul

    2005-08-01

    The contingent valuation method (CVM) was used to estimate homeowners' willingness to pay for water leasing to maintain stable lake levels at an irrigation reservoir in a residential neighborhood. A binary logit model was used to analyze households' voter referendum responses for maintaining the lake level. The median willingness to pay (WTP) was found to be $368 per year for lakefront residents and $59 per year for off-lake residents. The median WTP for lakefront residents was significantly different from off-lake residents at the 90% confidence level. Using the median WTP for lakefront and nonlakefront residents, we found that the increase in homeowner association fees would generate approximately $43,000, enough money to lease sufficient water to reach the target higher lake level in a normal water year.

  9. Estimating the economic benefits of maintaining residential lake levels at an irrigation reservoir: A contingent valuation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loomis, John; Smith, Adam; Huszar, Paul

    2005-08-01

    The contingent valuation method (CVM) was used to estimate homeowners' willingness to pay for water leasing to maintain stable lake levels at an irrigation reservoir in a residential neighborhood. A binary logit model was used to analyze households' voter referendum responses for maintaining the lake level. The median willingness to pay (WTP) was found to be 368 per year for lakefront residents and 59 per year for off-lake residents. The median WTP for lakefront residents was significantly different from off-lake residents at the 90% confidence level. Using the median WTP for lakefront and nonlakefront residents, we found that the increase in homeowner association fees would generate approximately $43,000, enough money to lease sufficient water to reach the target higher lake level in a normal water year.

  10. Exploring factors influencing farmers' willingness to pay (WTP) for a planned adaptation programme to address climatic issues in agricultural sectors.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Adeel; Masud, Muhammad Mehedi; Al-Amin, Abul Quasem; Yahaya, Siti Rohani Binti; Rahman, Mahfuzur; Akhtar, Rulia

    2015-06-01

    This study empirically estimates farmers' willingness to pay (WTP) for a planned adaptation programme for addressing climate issues in Pakistan's agricultural sectors. The contingent valuation method (CVM) was employed to determine a monetary valuation of farmers' preferences for a planned adaptation programme by ascertaining the value attached to address climatic issues. The survey was conducted by distributing structured questionnaires among Pakistani farmers. The study found that 67 % of respondents were willing to pay for a planned adaptation programme. However, several socioeconomic and motivational factors exert greater influence on their willingness to pay (WTP). This paper specifies the steps needed for all institutional bodies to better address issues in climate change. The outcomes of this paper will support attempts by policy makers to design an efficient adaptation framework for mitigating and adapting to the adverse impacts of climate change. PMID:25613801

  11. Estimating farmers' willingness to pay for climate change adaptation: the case of the Malaysian agricultural sector.

    PubMed

    Masud, Muhammad Mehedi; Junsheng, Ha; Akhtar, Rulia; Al-Amin, Abul Quasem; Kari, Fatimah Binti

    2015-02-01

    This paper estimates Malaysian farmers' willingness to pay (WTP) for a planned adaptation programme for addressing climate issues in the Malaysian agricultural sector. We used the contingent valuation method (CVM) for a monetary valuation of farmers' preferences for a planned adaptation programme by ascertaining the value attached to address climatic issues in the Malaysian agricultural sector. Structured questionnaires were distributed among the sampled farmers. The study found that 74 % of respondents were willing to pay for a planned adaptation programme and that several socioeconomic and motivation factors have greater influence on their WTP. This paper clearly specifies the steps needed for all institutional bodies to better address issues in climate change. The outcomes of this paper will support policy makers to better design an efficient adaptation framework for adapting to the adverse impacts of climate change. PMID:25632900

  12. [Vertebral and multiple organ malformations in a black and white German Holstein calf].

    PubMed

    Buck, Bettina Constanze; Ulrich, Reiner; Wöhlke, Anne; Kuiper, Heidi; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Distl, Ottmar

    2010-01-01

    A male black and white German Holstein calf showed a congenital, high-graded scoliosis and rotation of the thoracal spinal cord associated with shortening and fusion of multiple vertebral bodies and abnormal bending of the processus spinosus. Furthermore reduced birth weight, partial hypoplasia of the lung, excessive liver segmentation, doubled gall bladder, rectal atresia, horseshoe kidney, and uterine atresia were found. Due to the exclusion of a point mutation in exon 4 of the solute carrier family 35 (UDP-N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc) transporter), member A3 (SLC35A3) gene, complex vertebral malformation (CVM) was ruled out. Conclusively, it is hypothetized that the presented case resembles a new brachyspina syndrome with a still unresolved genetic etiology.

  13. Lubricant and additive effects on spur gear fatigue life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, D. P.; Zaretsky, E. V.; Scibbe, H. W.

    1985-01-01

    Spur gear endurance tests were conducted with six lubricants using a single lot of consumable-electrode vacuum melted (CVM) AISI 9310 spur gears. The sixth lubricant was divided into four batches each of which had a different additive content. Lubricants tested with a phosphorus-type load carrying additive showed a statistically significant improvement in life over lubricants without this type of additive. The presence of sulfur type antiwear additives in the lubricant did not appear to affect the surface fatigue life of the gears. No statistical difference in life was produced with those lubricants of different base stocks but with similar viscosity, pressure-viscosity coefficients and antiwear additives. Gears tested with a 0.1 wt % sulfur and 0.1 wt % phosphorus EP additives in the lubricant had reactive films that were 200 to 400 (0.8 to 1.6 microns) thick.

  14. Effect of five lubricants on life of AISI 9310 spur gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, D. P.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1985-01-01

    Spur-gear surface fatigue tests were conducted with five lubricants using a single lot of consumable-electrode vacuum melted (CVM) AISI 9310 spur gears. The lot of gears was divided into five groups, each of which was tested with a different lubricant. The test lubricants are classified as either a synthetic hydrocarbon, mineral oil, or ester-based lubricant. All five lubricants have imilar viscosity and pressure-viscosity coefficients. A pentaerythritol base stock without sufficient antiwear additives produced a surface fatigue life pproximately 22 percent that of the same base stock with chlorine and phosphorus type additives. The presence of sulfur type antiwear additives in the lubricant did not appear to affect the surface fatigue life of the gears tested. No statistical difference in the 10-percent surface fatigue life was produced with four of the five lubricants.

  15. Lubricant and additive effects on spur gear fatigue life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, D. P.; Zaretsky, E. V.; Scibbe, H. W.

    1986-01-01

    Spur gear endurance tests were conducted with six lubricants using a single lot of consumable-electrode vacuum melted (CVM) AISI 9310 spur gears. The sixth lubricants was divided into four batches each of which had a different additive content. Lubricant tested with a phosphorus-type load carrying additive showed a statistically significant improvement in life over lubricants without this type of additive. The presence of sulfur type antiwear additives in the lubricant did not appear to affect the surface fatigue life of the gears. No statistical difference in life was produced with those lubricants of different base stocks but with similar viscosity, pressure-viscosity coefficients and antiwar additives. Gears tested with a 0.1 wt pct sulfur and 0.1 wt pct phosphorus EP additives in the lubricant had reactive films that were 200 to 400 (0.8 to 1.6 microns) thick.

  16. Boundary lubrication of formulated C-ethers in air to 300 C. 2: Organic acid additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Friction and wear measurements were made on CVM M-50 steel lubricated with three C-ether (modified polyphenyl ether) formulations in dry and moist air. Results were compared to those obtained with a formulated Type 2 ester and the C-ether base fluid. A ball-on-disk sliding friction apparatus was used. Experimental conditions were a 1-kilogram load, a 17-meter/minute surface speed, and a 25 to 300 C (77 to 572 F) disk temperature range. The three C-ether formulations yielded better boundary lubricating characteristics than the Type 2 ester under most test conditions. All C-ether formulations exhibited higher friction coefficients than the ester from 150 to 300 C (302 to 572 F) and similar or lower values from 25 to 150 C (77 to 302 F).

  17. Boundary lubrication of formulated C-ethers in air to 300 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Friction and wear measurements were made in dry and moist air on CVM M-50 steel lubricated with six C-ether formulations containing phosphorus ester and organic acid additives. Results were compared to those obtained with a formulated Type 2 ester and the C-ether base fluid. A ball-on-disk sliding friction apparatus was used. Experimental conditions were a 1-kilogram load, 17 meter-per-minute (100 rpm) surface speed, and a 25 to 300 C disk temperature range. The C-ether base fluid and the C-ether formulations yielded lower wear than the ester under most test conditions. The C-ether formulations exhibited higher friction coefficients than the ester from 150 to 300 C and similar or lower values from 25 to 150 C.

  18. Estimating farmers' willingness to pay for climate change adaptation: the case of the Malaysian agricultural sector.

    PubMed

    Masud, Muhammad Mehedi; Junsheng, Ha; Akhtar, Rulia; Al-Amin, Abul Quasem; Kari, Fatimah Binti

    2015-02-01

    This paper estimates Malaysian farmers' willingness to pay (WTP) for a planned adaptation programme for addressing climate issues in the Malaysian agricultural sector. We used the contingent valuation method (CVM) for a monetary valuation of farmers' preferences for a planned adaptation programme by ascertaining the value attached to address climatic issues in the Malaysian agricultural sector. Structured questionnaires were distributed among the sampled farmers. The study found that 74 % of respondents were willing to pay for a planned adaptation programme and that several socioeconomic and motivation factors have greater influence on their WTP. This paper clearly specifies the steps needed for all institutional bodies to better address issues in climate change. The outcomes of this paper will support policy makers to better design an efficient adaptation framework for adapting to the adverse impacts of climate change.

  19. Concepts and applications for influenza antigenic cartography

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Zhipeng; Zhang, Tong; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2011-01-01

    Influenza antigenic cartography projects influenza antigens into a two or three dimensional map based on immunological datasets, such as hemagglutination inhibition and microneutralization assays. A robust antigenic cartography can facilitate influenza vaccine strain selection since the antigenic map can simplify data interpretation through intuitive antigenic map. However, antigenic cartography construction is not trivial due to the challenging features embedded in the immunological data, such as data incompleteness, high noises, and low reactors. To overcome these challenges, we developed a computational method, temporal Matrix Completion-Multidimensional Scaling (MC-MDS), by adapting the low rank MC concept from the movie recommendation system in Netflix and the MDS method from geographic cartography construction. The application on H3N2 and 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza A viruses demonstrates that temporal MC-MDS is effective and efficient in constructing influenza antigenic cartography. The web sever is available at http://sysbio.cvm.msstate.edu/AntigenMap. PMID:21761589

  20. Exploring factors influencing farmers' willingness to pay (WTP) for a planned adaptation programme to address climatic issues in agricultural sectors.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Adeel; Masud, Muhammad Mehedi; Al-Amin, Abul Quasem; Yahaya, Siti Rohani Binti; Rahman, Mahfuzur; Akhtar, Rulia

    2015-06-01

    This study empirically estimates farmers' willingness to pay (WTP) for a planned adaptation programme for addressing climate issues in Pakistan's agricultural sectors. The contingent valuation method (CVM) was employed to determine a monetary valuation of farmers' preferences for a planned adaptation programme by ascertaining the value attached to address climatic issues. The survey was conducted by distributing structured questionnaires among Pakistani farmers. The study found that 67 % of respondents were willing to pay for a planned adaptation programme. However, several socioeconomic and motivational factors exert greater influence on their willingness to pay (WTP). This paper specifies the steps needed for all institutional bodies to better address issues in climate change. The outcomes of this paper will support attempts by policy makers to design an efficient adaptation framework for mitigating and adapting to the adverse impacts of climate change.

  1. Mucus-penetrating nanoparticles for vaginal and gastrointestinal drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ensign-Hodges, Laura

    A method that could provide more uniform and longer-lasting drug delivery to mucosal surfaces holds the potential to greatly improve the effectiveness of prophylactic and therapeutic approaches for numerous diseases and conditions, including sexually transmitted infections and inflammatory bowel disease. However, the body's natural defenses, including adhesive, rapidly cleared mucus linings coating nearly all entry points to the body not covered by skin, has limited the effectiveness of drug and gene delivery by nanoscale delivery systems. Here, we investigate the use of muco-inert mucus-penetrating nanoparticles (MPP) for improving vaginal and gastrointestinal drug delivery. Conventional hydrophobic nanoparticles strongly adhere to mucus, facilitating rapid clearance from the body. Here, we demonstrate that mucoadhesive polystyrene nanoparticles (conventional nanoparticles, CP) become mucus-penetrating in human cervicovaginal mucus (CVM) after pretreatment with sufficient concentrations of Pluronic F127. Importantly, the diffusion rate of large MPP did not change in F127 pretreated CVM, implying there is no affect on the native pore structure of CVM. Additionally, there was no increase in inflammatory cytokine release in the vaginal tract of mice after daily application of 1% F127 for one week. Importantly, HSV virus remains adherent in F127-pretreated CVM. Mucosal epithelia use osmotic gradients for fluid absorption and secretion. We hypothesized that hypotonically-induced fluid uptake could be advantageous for rapidly delivering drugs through mucus to the vaginal epithelium. We evaluated hypotonic formulations for delivering water-soluble drugs and for drug delivery with MPP. Hypotonic formulations markedly increased the rate at which drugs and MPP reached the epithelial surface. Additionally, hypotonic formulations greatly enhanced drug and MPP delivery to the entire epithelial surface, including deep into the vaginal folds (rugae) that isotonic formulations

  2. The Current Landscape of Genetic Testing in Cardiovascular Malformations: Opportunities and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Landis, Benjamin J.; Ware, Stephanie M.

    2016-01-01

    Human cardiovascular malformations (CVMs) frequently have a genetic contribution. Through the application of novel technologies, such as next-generation sequencing, DNA sequence variants associated with CVMs are being identified at a rapid pace. While clinicians are now able to offer testing with NGS gene panels or whole exome sequencing to any patient with a CVM, the interpretation of genetic variation remains problematic. Variable phenotypic expression, reduced penetrance, inconsistent phenotyping methods, and the lack of high-throughput functional testing of variants contribute to these challenges. This article elaborates critical issues that impact the decision to broadly implement clinical molecular genetic testing in CVMs. Major benefits of testing include establishing a genetic diagnosis, facilitating cost-effective screening of family members who may have subclinical disease, predicting recurrence risk in offsprings, enabling early diagnosis and anticipatory management of CV and non-CV disease phenotypes, predicting long-term outcomes, and facilitating the development of novel therapies aimed at disease improvement or prevention. Limitations include financial cost, psychosocial cost, and ambiguity of interpretation of results. Multiplex families and patients with syndromic features are two groups where disease causation could potentially be firmly established. However, these account for the minority of the overall CVM population, and there is increasing recognition that genotypes previously associated with syndromes also exist in patients who lack non-CV findings. In all circumstances, ongoing dialog between cardiologists and clinical geneticists will be needed to accurately interpret genetic testing and improve these patients’ health. This may be most effectively implemented by the creation and support of CV genetics services at centers committed to pursuing testing for patients. PMID:27504451

  3. How Much Are Floridians Willing to Pay for Protecting Sea Turtles from Sea Level Rise?

    PubMed

    Hamed, Ahmed; Madani, Kaveh; Von Holle, Betsy; Wright, James; Milon, J Walter; Bossick, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Sea level rise (SLR) is posing a great inundation risk to coastal areas. Some coastal nesting species, including sea turtle species, have experienced diminished habitat from SLR. Contingent valuation method (CVM) was used in an effort to assess the economic loss impacts of SLR on sea turtle nesting habitats for Florida coasts; and to elicit values of willingness to pay (WTP) of Central Florida residents to implement certain mitigation strategies, which would protect Florida's east coast sea turtle nesting areas. Using the open-ended and dichotomous choice CVM, we sampled residents of two Florida communities: Cocoa Beach and Oviedo. We estimated the WTP of households from these two cities to protect sea turtle habitat to be between $42 and $57 per year for 5 years. Additionally, we attempted to assess the impact of the both the respondents' demographics and their perception toward various situations on their WTP value. Findings include a negative correlation between the age of a respondent and the probability of an individual willing to pay the hypothetical WTP amount. We found that WTP of an individual was not dependent on prior knowledge of the effects of SLR on sea turtle habitat. The greatest indicators of whether or not an individual was willing to pay to protect sea turtle habitat were the respondents' perception regarding the trustworthiness and efficiency of the party which will implement the conservation measures and their confidence in the conservation methods used. Respondents who perceive sea turtles having an effect on their life were also more likely to pay. PMID:26319030

  4. Serum insulin-like growth factor-1 levels in females and males in different cervical vertebral maturation stages

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Shreya; Deoskar, Anuradha; Gupta, Puneet; Jain, Sandhya

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this cross sectional study was to assess serum insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) levels in female and male subjects at various cervical vertebral maturation (CVM) stages. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study sample consisted of 60 subjects, 30 females and 30 males, in the age range of 8-23 years. For all subjects, serum IGF-1 level was estimated from blood samples by means of chemiluminescence immunoassay (CLIA). CVM was assessed on lateral cephalograms using the method described by Baccetti. Serum IGF-1 level and cervical staging data of 30 female subjects were included and taken from records of a previous study. Data were analyzed by Kruska-Wallis and Mann Whitney test. Bonferroni correction was carried out and alpha value was set at 0.003. RESULTS: Peak value of serum IGF-1 was observed in cervical stages CS3 in females and CS4 in males. Differences between males and females were observed in mean values of IGF-1 at stages CS3, 4 and 5. The highest mean IGF-1 levels in males was observed in CS4 followed by CS5 and third highest in CS3; whereas in females the highest mean IGF-1 levelswas observed in CS3 followed by CS4 and third highest in CS5. Trends of IGF-1 in relation to the cervical stages also differed between males and females. The greatest mean serum IGF-1 value for both sexes was comparable, for females (397 ng/ml) values were slightly higher than in males (394.8 ng/ml). CONCLUSIONS: Males and females showed differences in IGF-1 trends and levels at different cervical stages. PMID:25992990

  5. Rare DNA copy number variants in cardiovascular malformations with extracardiac abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Lalani, Seema R; Shaw, Chad; Wang, Xueqing; Patel, Ankita; Patterson, Lance W; Kolodziejska, Katarzyna; Szafranski, Przemyslaw; Ou, Zhishuo; Tian, Qi; Kang, Sung-Hae L; Jinnah, Amina; Ali, Sophia; Malik, Aamir; Hixson, Patricia; Potocki, Lorraine; Lupski, James R; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Bacino, Carlos A; Dawson, Brian; Beaudet, Arthur L; Boricha, Fatima M; Whittaker, Runako; Li, Chumei; Ware, Stephanie M; Cheung, Sau Wai; Penny, Daniel J; Jefferies, John Lynn; Belmont, John W

    2013-01-01

    Clinically significant cardiovascular malformations (CVMs) occur in 5–8 per 1000 live births. Recurrent copy number variations (CNVs) are among the known causes of syndromic CVMs, accounting for an important fraction of cases. We hypothesized that many additional rare CNVs also cause CVMs and can be detected in patients with CVMs plus extracardiac anomalies (ECAs). Through a genome-wide survey of 203 subjects with CVMs and ECAs, we identified 55 CNVs >50 kb in length that were not present in children without known cardiovascular defects (n=872). Sixteen unique CNVs overlapping these variants were found in an independent CVM plus ECA cohort (n=511), which were not observed in 2011 controls. The study identified 12/16 (75%) novel loci including non-recurrent de novo 16q24.3 loss (4/714) and de novo 2q31.3q32.1 loss encompassing PPP1R1C and PDE1A (2/714). The study also narrowed critical intervals in three well-recognized genomic disorders of CVM, such as the cat-eye syndrome region on 22q11.1, 8p23.1 loss encompassing GATA4 and SOX7 and 17p13.3-p13.2 loss. An analysis of protein-interaction databases shows that the rare inherited and de novo CNVs detected in the combined cohort are enriched for genes encoding proteins that are direct or indirect partners of proteins known to be required for normal cardiac development. Our findings implicate rare variants such as 16q24.3 loss and 2q31.3-q32.1 loss, and delineate regions within previously reported structural variants known to cause CVMs. PMID:22929023

  6. Rare DNA copy number variants in cardiovascular malformations with extracardiac abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Lalani, Seema R; Shaw, Chad; Wang, Xueqing; Patel, Ankita; Patterson, Lance W; Kolodziejska, Katarzyna; Szafranski, Przemyslaw; Ou, Zhishuo; Tian, Qi; Kang, Sung-Hae L; Jinnah, Amina; Ali, Sophia; Malik, Aamir; Hixson, Patricia; Potocki, Lorraine; Lupski, James R; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Bacino, Carlos A; Dawson, Brian; Beaudet, Arthur L; Boricha, Fatima M; Whittaker, Runako; Li, Chumei; Ware, Stephanie M; Cheung, Sau Wai; Penny, Daniel J; Jefferies, John Lynn; Belmont, John W

    2013-02-01

    Clinically significant cardiovascular malformations (CVMs) occur in 5-8 per 1000 live births. Recurrent copy number variations (CNVs) are among the known causes of syndromic CVMs, accounting for an important fraction of cases. We hypothesized that many additional rare CNVs also cause CVMs and can be detected in patients with CVMs plus extracardiac anomalies (ECAs). Through a genome-wide survey of 203 subjects with CVMs and ECAs, we identified 55 CNVs >50 kb in length that were not present in children without known cardiovascular defects (n=872). Sixteen unique CNVs overlapping these variants were found in an independent CVM plus ECA cohort (n=511), which were not observed in 2011 controls. The study identified 12/16 (75%) novel loci including non-recurrent de novo 16q24.3 loss (4/714) and de novo 2q31.3q32.1 loss encompassing PPP1R1C and PDE1A (2/714). The study also narrowed critical intervals in three well-recognized genomic disorders of CVM, such as the cat-eye syndrome region on 22q11.1, 8p23.1 loss encompassing GATA4 and SOX7 and 17p13.3-p13.2 loss. An analysis of protein-interaction databases shows that the rare inherited and de novo CNVs detected in the combined cohort are enriched for genes encoding proteins that are direct or indirect partners of proteins known to be required for normal cardiac development. Our findings implicate rare variants such as 16q24.3 loss and 2q31.3-q32.1 loss, and delineate regions within previously reported structural variants known to cause CVMs.

  7. The Current Landscape of Genetic Testing in Cardiovascular Malformations: Opportunities and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Landis, Benjamin J; Ware, Stephanie M

    2016-01-01

    Human cardiovascular malformations (CVMs) frequently have a genetic contribution. Through the application of novel technologies, such as next-generation sequencing, DNA sequence variants associated with CVMs are being identified at a rapid pace. While clinicians are now able to offer testing with NGS gene panels or whole exome sequencing to any patient with a CVM, the interpretation of genetic variation remains problematic. Variable phenotypic expression, reduced penetrance, inconsistent phenotyping methods, and the lack of high-throughput functional testing of variants contribute to these challenges. This article elaborates critical issues that impact the decision to broadly implement clinical molecular genetic testing in CVMs. Major benefits of testing include establishing a genetic diagnosis, facilitating cost-effective screening of family members who may have subclinical disease, predicting recurrence risk in offsprings, enabling early diagnosis and anticipatory management of CV and non-CV disease phenotypes, predicting long-term outcomes, and facilitating the development of novel therapies aimed at disease improvement or prevention. Limitations include financial cost, psychosocial cost, and ambiguity of interpretation of results. Multiplex families and patients with syndromic features are two groups where disease causation could potentially be firmly established. However, these account for the minority of the overall CVM population, and there is increasing recognition that genotypes previously associated with syndromes also exist in patients who lack non-CV findings. In all circumstances, ongoing dialog between cardiologists and clinical geneticists will be needed to accurately interpret genetic testing and improve these patients' health. This may be most effectively implemented by the creation and support of CV genetics services at centers committed to pursuing testing for patients. PMID:27504451

  8. Detection of Haplotypes Associated with Prenatal Death in Dairy Cattle and Identification of Deleterious Mutations in GART, SHBG and SLC37A2

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Sébastien; Capitan, Aurelien; Djari, Anis; Rodriguez, Sabrina C.; Barbat, Anne; Baur, Aurélia; Grohs, Cécile; Weiss, Bernard; Boussaha, Mekki; Esquerré, Diane; Klopp, Christophe; Rocha, Dominique; Boichard, Didier

    2013-01-01

    The regular decrease of female fertility over time is a major concern in modern dairy cattle industry. Only half of this decrease is explained by indirect response to selection on milk production, suggesting the existence of other factors such as embryonic lethal genetic defects. Genomic regions harboring recessive deleterious mutations were detected in three dairy cattle breeds by identifying frequent haplotypes (>1%) showing a deficit in homozygotes among Illumina Bovine 50k Beadchip haplotyping data from the French genomic selection database (47,878 Holstein, 16,833 Montbéliarde, and 11,466 Normande animals). Thirty-four candidate haplotypes (p<10−4) including previously reported regions associated with Brachyspina, CVM, HH1, and HH3 in Holstein breed were identified. Haplotype length varied from 1 to 4.8 Mb and frequencies from 1.7 up to 9%. A significant negative effect on calving rate, consistent in heifers and in lactating cows, was observed for 9 of these haplotypes in matings between carrier bulls and daughters of carrier sires, confirming their association with embryonic lethal mutations. Eight regions were further investigated using whole genome sequencing data from heterozygous bull carriers and control animals (45 animals in total). Six strong candidate causative mutations including polymorphisms previously reported in FANCI (Brachyspina), SLC35A3 (CVM), APAF1 (HH1) and three novel mutations with very damaging effect on the protein structure, according to SIFT and Polyphen-2, were detected in GART, SHBG and SLC37A2 genes. In conclusion, this study reveals a yet hidden consequence of the important inbreeding rate observed in intensively selected and specialized cattle breeds. Counter-selection of these mutations and management of matings will have positive consequences on female fertility in dairy cattle. PMID:23762392

  9. Comparison of simulations and experimental results from ICF implosions using capsules of varying surface roughness.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, R. E.; Glebov, V.

    2005-10-01

    We have conducted a series of indirect-drive ICF implosion experiments at Omega, using capsules with deliberately roughened surfaces. The 10 atm DD fill capsules had a convergence ratio of 18, higher than previous Nova experiments [M. Marinak et al, Phys. Plasmas 3, 2070 (1996)]; the pre-heat shielded, Ge-doped CH ablators had moderately high (˜200) Raleigh-Taylor growth factors. Each capsule's surface quality was measured using atomic force microscopy. Gated x-ray imaging of the imploded core was used to assure that basic symmetry was maintained, while `best-surface' capsules were used as controls with every experimental run. Neutron yields were observed to decrease as surface roughness increased. Integrated simulations, including mix modeling, have been performed, and are compared to the experimental results. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  10. Super-resolving quantum radar: Coherent-state sources with homodyne detection suffice to beat the diffraction limit

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Kebei; Lee, Hwang; Gerry, Christopher C.; Dowling, Jonathan P.

    2013-11-21

    There has been much recent interest in quantum metrology for applications to sub-Raleigh ranging and remote sensing such as in quantum radar. For quantum radar, atmospheric absorption and diffraction rapidly degrades any actively transmitted quantum states of light, such as N00N states, so that for this high-loss regime the optimal strategy is to transmit coherent states of light, which suffer no worse loss than the linear Beer's law for classical radar attenuation, and which provide sensitivity at the shot-noise limit in the returned power. We show that coherent radar radiation sources, coupled with a quantum homodyne detection scheme, provide both longitudinal and angular super-resolution much below the Rayleigh diffraction limit, with sensitivity at shot-noise in terms of the detected photon power. Our approach provides a template for the development of a complete super-resolving quantum radar system with currently available technology.

  11. Tools for Citizen-Science Recruitment and Student Engagement in Your Research and in Your Classroom

    PubMed Central

    Council, Sarah E.; Horvath, Julie E.

    2016-01-01

    The field of citizen science is exploding and offers not only a great way to engage the general public in science literacy through primary research, but also an avenue for teaching professionals to engage their students in meaningful community research experiences. Though this field is expanding, there are many hurdles for researchers and participants, as well as challenges for teaching professionals who want to engage their students. Here we highlight one of our projects that engaged many citizens in Raleigh, NC, and across the world, and we use this as a case study to highlight ways to engage citizens in all kinds of research. Through the use of numerous tools to engage the public, we gathered citizen scientists to study skin microbes and their associated odors, and we offer valuable ideas for teachers to tap into resources for their own students and potential citizen-science projects. PMID:27047587

  12. Unraveling the loblolly's secrets

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-06

    Breeding better trees has not been the sort of project guaranteed to win a scientist fast tenure. They take years to mature and decades may pass before the progeny of a cross can be evaluated. But Ron Sederoff and David O'Malley of North Carolina State University at Raleigh have now created a shortcut with a genetic map of the loblolly pine, a major source of wood pulp and paper products as well as timber that normally takes 12-15 years to mature. Using polymerase chain reaction techniques to amplify and analyze pine DNA, the researchers plotted about 200 markers on the tree's twelve pairs of chromosomes - in effect, the most extensive map ever made of a woody plant. Within a couple of years associations will emerge between the genetic markers and specific traits. By screening the DNA of seedlings, scientists will be able to known which trees they want to produce.

  13. Alcohol and inflammatory responses: Highlights of the 2015 Alcohol and Immunology Research Interest Group (AIRIG) meeting.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Abigail R; Morris, Niya L; Hammer, Adam M; Curtis, Brenda; Remick, Daniel G; Yeligar, Samantha M; Poole, Lauren; Burnham, Ellen L; Wyatt, Todd A; Molina, Patricia E; So-Armah, Kaku; Cisneros, Trinidad; Wang, Guoshun; Lang, Charles H; Mandrekar, Pranoti; Kovacs, Elizabeth J; Choudhry, Mashkoor A

    2016-08-01

    On September 27, 2015 the 20th annual Alcohol and Immunology Research Interest Group (AIRIG) meeting was held as a satellite symposium at the annual meeting of the Society for Leukocyte Biology in Raleigh, NC. The 2015 meeting focused broadly on adverse effects of alcohol and alcohol-use disorders in multiple organ systems. Divided into two plenary sessions, AIRIG opened with the topic of pulmonary inflammation as a result of alcohol consumption, which was followed by alcohol's effect on multiple organs, including the brain and liver. With presentations showing the diverse range of underlying pathology and mechanisms associated with multiple organs as a result of alcohol consumption, AIRIG emphasized the importance of continued alcohol research, as its detrimental consequences are not limited to one or even two organs, but rather extend to the entire host as a whole. PMID:27522326

  14. Long codas of coupled wave systems in seismic basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seligman, Thomas H.

    2002-11-01

    Quite some time ago it was pointed out that the damage patterns and Fourier spectra of the 1985 earthquake in Mexico City are only compatible with a resonant effect of horizontal waves with the approximate speed of sound waves in water [see Flores et al., Nature 326, 783 (1987)]. In a more recent paper it was pointed out that this indeed will occur with a very specific frequency selection for a coupled system of Raleigh waves at the interface of the bottom of the ancient lakebed with the more solid deposits, and an evanescent sound wave in the mud above [see J. Flores et al., Bull. Seismol. Soc. Am. 89, 14-21 (1999)]. In the present talk we shall go over these arguments again and show that strong reflection at the edges of the lake must occur to account for the strong magnification entailing necessarily a long coda, and that the mecanism can be understood in the same terms.

  15. Numerical simulation of non-viscous liquid pinch off using a coupled level set-boundary integral method

    SciTech Connect

    Garzon, Maria; Sethian, James A.; Gray, Leonard J

    2009-01-01

    Simulations of the pinch off of an inviscid fluid column are carried out based upon a potential flow model with capillary forces. The interface location and the time evolution of the free surface boundary condition are both approximated by means of level set techniques on a fixed domain. The interface velocity is obtained via a Galerkin boundary integral solution of the 3D axisymmetric Laplace equation. A short time analytical solution of the Raleigh-Taylor instability in a liquid column is available, and this result is compared with our numerical experiments to validate the algorithm. The method is capable of handling pinch-off and after pinch-off events, and simulations showing the time evolution of the fluid tube are presented.

  16. An emerging reactor technology for chemical synthesis: surface acoustic wave-assisted closed-vessel Suzuki coupling reactions.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Ketav; Friend, James; Yeo, Leslie; Perlmutter, Patrick

    2014-07-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the use of an energy-efficient surface acoustic wave (SAW) device for driving closed-vessel SAW-assisted (CVSAW), ligand-free Suzuki couplings in aqueous media. The reactions were carried out on a mmolar scale with low to ultra-low catalyst loadings. The reactions were driven by heating resulting from the penetration of acoustic energy derived from RF Raleigh waves generated by a piezoelectric chip via a renewable fluid coupling layer. The yields were uniformly high and the reactions could be executed without added ligand and in water. In terms of energy density this new technology was determined to be roughly as efficient as microwaves and superior to ultrasound.

  17. Basic principles and mechanisms of selective oil agglomeration

    SciTech Connect

    Wheelock, T.D.; Drzymala, J.; Allen, R.W.; Hu, Y.-C.; Tyson, D.; Xiaoping, Qiu; Lessa, A.

    1990-01-01

    Numerous measurements of the heat of immersion of coal were conducting using several different particle size fractions of No. 2 Gas Seam coal from Raleigh County, West Virginia. The heat of immersion was determined in water, methanol, heptane, hexadecane and neohexane (2,2-dimethybutane). A comparison of the results with those determined previously for Illinois No. 6 coal is discussed. A number of potential pyrite depressants for use in oil agglomeration of coal were screened by testing the response of sulfidized mineral pyrite to agglomeration with heptane in the presence of the potential depressant. The following were tested; sodium dithionite, sodium thiosulfate, ferrous sulfate, ferric sulfate, titanous chloride, hydrogen peroxide, Oxone (a form of potassium monopersulfate), pyrogallol, quebracho (colloidal dispersant derived from tree bark), milk whey, and several organic thiols. Ferric chloride was applied to mixtures of Upper Freeport coal and sulfidized mineral pyrite before subjecting the mixtures to agglomeration with heptane. 7 refs., 23 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Selected Physical, Chemical, and Biological Data for 30 Urbanizing Streams in the North Carolina Piedmont Ecoregion, 2002-2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Giddings, E.M.; Moorman, Michelle; Cuffney, Thomas F.; McMahon, Gerard; Harned, Douglas A.

    2007-01-01

    This report provides summarized physical, chemical, and biological data collected during a study of the effects of urbanization on stream ecosystems as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment study. The purpose of this study was to examine differences in biological, chemical, and physical characteristics of streams across a gradient of urban intensity. Thirty sites were selected along an urbanization gradient that represents conditions in the North Carolina Piedmont ecoregion, including the cities of Raleigh, Durham, Cary, Greensboro, Winston-Salem, High Point, Asheboro, and Oxford. Data collected included streamflow variability, stream temperature, instream chemistry, instream aquatic habitat, and collections of the algal, macroinvertebrate, and fish communities. In addition, ancillary data describing land use, socioeconomic conditions, and urban infrastructure were compiled for each basin using a geographic information system analysis. All data were processed and summarized for analytical use and are presented in downloadable data tables, along with the methods of data collection and processing.

  19. Tools for Citizen-Science Recruitment and Student Engagement in Your Research and in Your Classroom.

    PubMed

    Council, Sarah E; Horvath, Julie E

    2016-03-01

    The field of citizen science is exploding and offers not only a great way to engage the general public in science literacy through primary research, but also an avenue for teaching professionals to engage their students in meaningful community research experiences. Though this field is expanding, there are many hurdles for researchers and participants, as well as challenges for teaching professionals who want to engage their students. Here we highlight one of our projects that engaged many citizens in Raleigh, NC, and across the world, and we use this as a case study to highlight ways to engage citizens in all kinds of research. Through the use of numerous tools to engage the public, we gathered citizen scientists to study skin microbes and their associated odors, and we offer valuable ideas for teachers to tap into resources for their own students and potential citizen-science projects.

  20. Dynamics of a geothermal field traced by noble gases: Cerro Prieto, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Mazor, E.; Truesdell, A.H.

    1981-01-01

    Noble gases have been measured mass spectrometrically in samples collected during 1977 from producing wells at Cerro Prieto. Positive correlations between concentrations of radiogenic (He, /sup 40/Ar) and atmospheric noble gases (Ne, Ar, and Kr) suggest the following dynamic model: the geothermal fluids originated from meteoric water penetrated to more than 2500 m depth (below the level of first boiling) and mixed with radiogenic helium and argon-40 formed in the aquifer rocks. Subsequently, small amounts of steam were lost by a Raleigh process (0 to 3%) and mixing with shallow cold water occurred (0 to 30%). Noble gases are sensitive tracers of boiling in the initial stages of 0 to 3% steam separation and complement other tracers, such as Cl or temperature, which are effective only beyond this range.

  1. Response of Stream Chemistry During Base Flow to Gradients of Urbanization in Selected Locations Across the Conterminous United States, 2002-04

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sprague, Lori A.; Harned, Douglas A.; Hall, David W.; Nowell, Lisa H.; Bauch, Nancy J.; Richards, Kevin D.

    2007-01-01

    During 2002-2004, the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program conducted a study to determine the effects of urbanization on stream water quality and aquatic communities in six environmentally heterogeneous areas of the conterminous United States--Atlanta, Georgia; Raleigh-Durham, North Carolina; Milwaukee-Green Bay, Wisconsin; Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas; Denver, Colorado; and Portland, Oregon. This report compares and contrasts the response of stream chemistry during base flow to urbanization in different environmental settings and examines the relation between the exceedance of water-quality benchmarks and the level of urbanization in these areas. Chemical characteristics studied included concentrations of nutrients, dissolved pesticides, suspended sediment, sulfate, and chloride in base flow. In three study areas where the background land cover in minimally urbanized basins was predominantly forested (Atlanta, Raleigh-Durham, and Portland), urban development was associated with increased concentrations of nitrogen and total herbicides in streams. In Portland, there was evidence of mixed agricultural and urban influences at sites with 20 to 50 percent urban land cover. In two study areas where agriculture was the predominant background land cover (Milwaukee-Green Bay and Dallas-Fort Worth), concentrations of nitrogen and herbicides were flat or decreasing as urbanization increased. In Denver, which had predominantly shrub/grass as background land cover, nitrogen concentrations were only weakly related to urbanization, and total herbicide concentrations did not show any clear pattern relative to land cover - perhaps because of extensive water management in the study area. In contrast, total insecticide concentrations increased with increasing urbanization in all six study areas, likely due to high use of insecticides in urban applications and, for some study areas, the proximity of urban land cover to the sampling sites. Phosphorus

  2. Numerical Simulation of a Tornado Generating Supercell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Fred H.; Ahmad, Nashat N.; LimonDuparcmeur, Fanny M.

    2012-01-01

    The development of tornadoes from a tornado generating supercell is investigated with a large eddy simulation weather model. Numerical simulations are initialized with a sounding representing the environment of a tornado producing supercell that affected North Carolina and Virginia during the Spring of 2011. The structure of the simulated storm was very similar to that of a classic supercell, and compared favorably to the storm that affected the vicinity of Raleigh, North Carolina. The presence of mid-level moisture was found to be important in determining whether a supercell would generate tornadoes. The simulations generated multiple tornadoes, including cyclonic-anticyclonic pairs. The structure and the evolution of these tornadoes are examined during their lifecycle.

  3. MAIZE: a 1 MA LTD-Driven Z-Pinch at The University of Michigan

    SciTech Connect

    Gilgenbach, R. M.; Gomez, M. R.; Zier, J. C.; Tang, W. W.; French, D. M.; Lau, Y. Y.; Mazarakis, M. G.; Cuneo, M. E.; Johnston, M. D.; Oliver, B. V.; Mehlhorn, T. A.; Kim, A. A.; Sinebryukhov, V. A.

    2009-01-21

    Researchers at The University of Michigan have constructed and tested a 1-MA Linear Transformer Driver (LTD), the first of its type to reach the USA. The Michigan Accelerator for Inductive Z-pinch Experiments, (MAIZE), is based on the LTD developed at the Institute of High Current Electronics in collaboration with Sandia National Labs and UM. This LTD utilizes 80 capacitors and 40 spark gap switches, arranged in 40 'bricks,' to deliver a 1 MA, 100 kV pulse with 100 ns risetime into a matched resistive load. Preliminary resistive-load test results are presented for the LTD facility.Planned experimental research programs at UM include: a) Studies of Magneto-Raleigh-Taylor instability of planar foils, and b) Vacuum convolute studies including cathode and anode plasma.

  4. Flood of December 25, 1987, in Millington, Tennessee and vicinity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewis, James G.; Gamble, Charles R.

    1989-01-01

    Intense rainfall totaling 9.2 in. in a 12-hour period on December 24-25, 1987, and 14.8 in for the period December 24-27 caused record floods in Millington, Tennessee and vicinity. The peak discharge of Big Creek at Raleigh-Millington Road was almost twice the discharge of the 100-year flood discharge and that of Loosahatchie River near Arlington was about equal to the 50-year flood discharge. The inundated area and flood elevations are depicted on a map of Millington, Tennessee and vicinity. Water surface profiles for the peak of December 25, 1987, for Loosahatchie River, Big Creek, Royster Creek, North Fork Creek, Casper Creek, and an unnamed tributary to Big Creek are shown. Flood damages and cleanup costs for this record flood have been estimated at about $9.2 million. (USGS)

  5. Temperature and water quality effects in simulated woodland pools on the infection of Culex mosquito larvae by Lagenidium giganteum (Oomycetes: Lagenidiales) in North Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Guzman, D.R.; Axtell, R.C.

    1987-06-01

    Asexual stages of the California (CA) isolate of Lagenidium giganteum cultured on sunflower seed extract (SFE)-agar, were applied to outdoor pools containing Culex larvae near Raleigh, NC in August and September 1984. Infection rates among the larvae ranged from 19 to 74% at 2-4 days posttreatment and subsequent epizootics eliminated most of the newly hatched larvae for at least 10 days posttreatment. Substantial reductions in numbers of larvae and adult emergence were achieved from a single application of the fungus. Water quality and temperature data are presented. From laboratory assays of organically polluted water, the percent infection of Culex quinquefasciatus by the fungus was correlated with water quality and temperature. A logistic model of water quality (COD and NH/sub 3/-N) effects on infectivity rates by the CA isolate is described.

  6. Relation of urbanization to stream fish assemblages and species traits in nine metropolitan areas of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, Larry R.; Gregory, M. Brian; May, Jason T.

    2009-01-01

    We examined associations of fish assemblages and fish traits with urbanization and selected environmental variables in nine major United States metropolitan areas. The strongest relations between fishes and urbanization occurred in the metropolitan areas of Atlanta, Georgia; Birmingham, Alabama; Boston, Massachusetts; and Portland, Oregon. In these areas, environmental variables with strong associations (rs ≥ 0.70) with fish assemblages and fish traits tended to have strong associations with urbanization. Relations of urbanization with fish assemblages and fish traits were weaker in Denver, Colorado; Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas; Milwaukee-Green Bay, Wisconsin; and Raleigh, North Carolina. Environmental variables associated with fishes varied among the metropolitan areas. The metropolitan areas with poor relations may have had a limited range of possible response because of previous landscape disturbances. Given the complexities of urban landscapes in different metropolitan areas, our results indicate that caution is warranted when generalizing about biological responses to urbanization.

  7. Modeling of Compressible Flow with Friction and Heat Transfer Using the Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Alak; Majumdar, Alok

    2007-01-01

    The present paper describes the verification and validation of a quasi one-dimensional pressure based finite volume algorithm, implemented in Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP), for predicting compressible flow with friction, heat transfer and area change. The numerical predictions were compared with two classical solutions of compressible flow, i.e. Fanno and Rayleigh flow. Fanno flow provides an analytical solution of compressible flow in a long slender pipe where incoming subsonic flow can be choked due to friction. On the other hand, Raleigh flow provides analytical solution of frictionless compressible flow with heat transfer where incoming subsonic flow can be choked at the outlet boundary with heat addition to the control volume. Nonuniform grid distribution improves the accuracy of numerical prediction. A benchmark numerical solution of compressible flow in a converging-diverging nozzle with friction and heat transfer has been developed to verify GFSSP's numerical predictions. The numerical predictions compare favorably in all cases.

  8. Applications and statistical properties of minimum significant difference-based criterion testing in a toxicity testing program

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Q.; Denton, D.L.; Shukla, R.

    2000-01-01

    As a follow up to the recommendations of the September 1995 SETAC Pellston Workshop on Whole Effluent Toxicity (WET) on test methods and appropriate endpoints, this paper will discuss the applications and statistical properties of using a statistical criterion of minimum significant difference (MSD). The authors examined the upper limits of acceptable MSDs as acceptance criterion in the case of normally distributed data. The implications of this approach are examined in terms of false negative rate as well as false positive rate. Results indicated that the proposed approach has reasonable statistical properties. Reproductive data from short-term chronic WET test with Ceriodaphnia dubia tests were used to demonstrate the applications of the proposed approach. The data were collected by the North Carolina Department of Environment, Health, and Natural Resources (Raleigh, NC, USA) as part of their National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System program.

  9. Experimental investigation of turbulent natural convection flow in a converging channel

    SciTech Connect

    Ayinde, T.F.

    2008-05-15

    This paper reports the results of fluid flow measurements for natural convection in a converging plates channel using the particle image velocimetry (PIV) system. The channel walls were symmetrically subjected to uniform temperature conditions. Velocity characteristics were obtained for two inclination angles, {theta} = 15 and 45 , and two heating conditions corresponding to Ra{sub L} = 2.7 x 10{sup 8} and 4.4 x 10{sup 8}, where Ra{sub L} is the Raleigh number based on the length of the channel wall. Results are presented as vector plots as well as profiles of mean velocities and turbulence quantities. They show that the main flow is aligned with the orientation of the channel walls, due to the effect of buoyancy force, which is no longer exclusively in the vertical direction. They also reveal the presence of reverse flow, which leads to the formation of two symmetric vortices in the core. (author)

  10. Simple solar spectral model for direct and diffuse irradiance on horizontal and tilted planes at the earth's surface for cloudless atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, R.; Riordan, C.

    1984-12-01

    A new, simple model for calculating clear-sky direct and diffuse spectral irradiance on horizontal and tilted surfaces is presented. The model is based on previously reported simple algorithms and on comparisons with rigorous radiative transfer calculations and limited outdoor measurements. Equations for direct normal irradiance are outlined; and include: Raleigh scattering; aerosol scattering and absorption; water vapor absorption; and ozone and uniformly mixed gas absorption. Inputs to the model include solar zenith angle, collector tilt angle, atmospheric turbidity, amount of ozone and precipitable water vapor, surface pressure, and ground albedo. The model calculates terrestrial spectra from 0.3 to 4.0 ..mu..m with approximately 10 nm resolution. A major goal of this work is to provide researchers with the capability to calculate spectral irradiance for different atmospheric conditions and different collector geometries using microcomputers. A listing of the computer program is provided.

  11. Intellectual parachute and balloon systems based on fiber optic technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaev, Alexander M.; Nikolaev, Pavel M.; Nikolaev, Yuri M.; Morozov, Oleg G.; Zastela, Mikhail Yu.; Morozov, Gennady A.

    2014-04-01

    For any parachute system, it is important to predict the opening forces it will experience in order to make a safe and economic choice of materials to be used. Developed fiber optic sensors on two twisted fibers with the locked ends and variable twisting step have been used for creation of intellectual knots of perspective vehicles, in particular, parachute canopies and slings. We decided to change our measuring procedure from measuring of transmitted power or its Raleigh scattering in different ends of twisted fibers onto Brillouin scattering characterization. For this situation we offered the kind of method of frequency variation to get the information about the frequency shift and Q-factor of the Brillouin scattering in each sensor.

  12. Effect of thermal stresses on the vibration of composite cantilevered plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klosner, J. M.; Cheng, T.-H.

    This study explores the effects of thermal stresses on the dynamic characteristics of composite cantilevered plates. The induced thermal stresses are determined by appealing to the principle of minimum strain energy, while the Raleigh-Ritz procedure is used to obtain the plate frequencies. Extensive numerical calculations were carried out in order to gain quantitative understanding of how different choices of aspect ratios and temperature change intensities (T0) influence the natural frequencies of composite cantilevered plates. It is shown that the first bending mode frequencies are unaffected by the induced stresses, while the first torsional mode frequencies decrease quite significantly with increasing values of T0, and therefore with increased magnitudes of the thermal stresses.

  13. Dynamics of a geothermal field traced by noble gases: Cerro Prieto, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mazor, E.; Truesdell, A.H.

    1984-01-01

    Noble gases have been measured mass spectrometrically in samples collected during 1977 from producing wells at Cerro Prieto. Positive correlations between concentrations of radiogenic (He and 40Ar) and atmospheric noble gases (Ne, Ar and Kr) suggest the following dynamic model: the geothermal fluids originated from meteoric water that penetrated to more than 2500 m depth (below the level of first boiling) and mixed with radiogenic He and 40Ar formed in the aquifer rocks. Subsequently, small amounts of steam were lost by a Raleigh process (0 - 30%) and mixing with shallow cold water occurred (0 - 30%). Noble gases are sensitive tracers of boiling in the initial stages of 0 - 3% steam separation and complement other tracers, such as C1 or temperature, which are effective only beyond this range. ?? 1984.

  14. Analysis of experimental shaft seal data for high-performance turbomachines - As for Space Shuttle main engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Mullen, R. L.; Braun, M. J.; Burcham, R. E.; Diamond, W. A.

    1987-01-01

    High-pressure, high-temperature seal flow (leakage) data for nonrotating and rotating Raleigh-step and convergent-tapered-bore seals were characterized in terms of a normalized flow coefficient. The data for normalized Rayleigh-step and nonrotating tapered-bore seals were in reasonable agreement with theory, but data for the rotating tapered-bore seals were not. The tapered-bore-seal operational clearances estimated from the flow data were significantly larger than calculated. Although clearances are influenced by wear from conical to cylindrical geometry and errors in clearance corrections, the problem was isolated to the shaft temperature - rotational speed clearance correction. The geometric changes support the use of some conical convergence in any seal. Under these conditions rotation reduced the normalized flow coefficiently by nearly 10 percent.

  15. Analysis of experimental shaft seal data for high-performance turbomachines, as for Space Shuttle main engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Braun, M. J.; Mullen, R. L.; Burcham, R. E.; Diamond, W. A.

    1985-01-01

    High-pressure, high-temperature seal flow (leakage) data for nonrotating and rotating Raleigh-step and convergent-tapered-bore seals were characterized in terms of a normalized flow coefficient. The data for normalized Rayleigh-steip and nonrotating tapered-bore seals were in reasonable agreement with theory, but data for the rotating tapered-bore seals were not. The tapered-bore-seal operational clearances estimated from the flow data were significantly larger than calculated. Although clearances are influenced by wear from conical to cylindrical geometry and errors in clearance corrections, the problem was isolated to the shaft temperature - rotational speed clearance correction. The geometric changes support the use of some conical convergence in any seal. Under these conditions rotation reduced the normalized flow coefficiently by nearly 10 percent.

  16. Tools for Citizen-Science Recruitment and Student Engagement in Your Research and in Your Classroom.

    PubMed

    Council, Sarah E; Horvath, Julie E

    2016-03-01

    The field of citizen science is exploding and offers not only a great way to engage the general public in science literacy through primary research, but also an avenue for teaching professionals to engage their students in meaningful community research experiences. Though this field is expanding, there are many hurdles for researchers and participants, as well as challenges for teaching professionals who want to engage their students. Here we highlight one of our projects that engaged many citizens in Raleigh, NC, and across the world, and we use this as a case study to highlight ways to engage citizens in all kinds of research. Through the use of numerous tools to engage the public, we gathered citizen scientists to study skin microbes and their associated odors, and we offer valuable ideas for teachers to tap into resources for their own students and potential citizen-science projects. PMID:27047587

  17. Proceedings: Agricultural Technology Alliance: November 1996 Meeting

    SciTech Connect

    1997-02-01

    This publication is a compilation of field trip overviews, presentations and committee reports from the EPRI-ATA meeting held in Raleigh, North Carolina, November 13-15, 1996. The field trips included a Postharvest Produce Conditioning Tour, an Aquaculture and Waste Management Tour, and an Aerobic Swine Waste Tour. The presentations and committee reports included the following: (1) An Overview: Agricultural Research Programs in North Carolina; (2) Irrigation in Humid Regions--Needs and Scheduling; (3) Nutrients in North Carolina Waters; (4) Animal Waste Problems--Severity and Outlook; (5) Crop Production, Handling and Drying Energy Use and Research Needs; (6) Soil Testing and the Internet: Present and Future Potential; (7) North Carolina Licensing of Soil Scientist; (8) Current Status of the ATA; (9) ATA Office Report; (10) Committee Reports; and (11) Steering Committee Minutes.

  18. Behavioural response to combined insecticide and temperature stress in natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Fournier-Level, A; Neumann-Mondlak, A; Good, R T; Green, L M; Schmidt, J M; Robin, C

    2016-05-01

    Insecticide resistance evolves extremely rapidly, providing an illuminating model for the study of adaptation. With climate change reshaping species distribution, pest and disease vector control needs rethinking to include the effects of environmental variation and insect stress physiology. Here, we assessed how both long-term adaptation of populations to temperature and immediate temperature variation affect the genetic architecture of DDT insecticide response in Drosophila melanogaster. Mortality assays and behavioural assays based on continuous activity monitoring were used to assess the interaction between DDT and temperature on three field-derived populations from climate extremes (Raleigh for warm temperate, Tasmania for cold oceanic and Queensland for hot tropical). The Raleigh population showed the highest mortality to DDT, whereas the Queensland population, epicentre for derived alleles of the resistance gene Cyp6g1, showed the lowest. Interaction between insecticide and temperature strongly affected mortality, particularly for the Tasmanian population. Activity profiles analysed using self-organizing maps show that the insecticide promoted an early response, whereas elevated temperature promoted a later response. These distinctive early or later activity phases revealed similar responses to temperature and DDT dose alone but with more or less genetic variance depending on the population. This change in genetic variance among populations suggests that selection particularly depleted genetic variance for DDT response in the Queensland population. Finally, despite similar (co)variation between traits in benign conditions, the genetic responses across population differed under stressful conditions. This showed how stress-responsive genetic variation only reveals itself in specific conditions and thereby escapes potential trade-offs in benign environments.

  19. Comparison of daily and weekly precipitation sampling efficiencies using automatic collectors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schroder, L.J.; Linthurst, R.A.; Ellson, J.E.; Vozzo, S.F.

    1985-01-01

    Precipitation samples were collected for approximately 90 daily and 50 weekly sampling periods at Finley Farm, near Raleigh, North Carolina from August 1981 through October 1982. Ten wet-deposition samplers (AEROCHEM METRICS MODEL 301) were used; 4 samplers were operated for daily sampling, and 6 samplers were operated for weekly-sampling periods. This design was used to determine if: (1) collection efficiences of precipitation are affected by small distances between the Universal (Belfort) precipitation gage and collector; (2) measurable evaporation loss occurs and (3) pH and specific conductance of precipitation vary significantly within small distances. Average collection efficiencies were 97% for weekly sampling periods compared with the rain gage. Collection efficiencies were examined by seasons and precipitation volume. Neither factor significantly affected collection efficiency. No evaporation loss was found by comparing daily sampling to weekly sampling at the collection site, which was classified as a subtropical climate. Correlation coefficients for pH and specific conductance of daily samples and weekly samples ranged from 0.83 to 0.99.Precipitation samples were collected for approximately 90 daily and 50 weekly sampling periods at Finley farm, near Raleigh, North Carolina from August 1981 through October 1982. Ten wet-deposition samplers were used; 4 samplers were operated for daily sampling, and 6 samplers were operated for weekly-sampling periods. This design was used to determine if: (1) collection efficiencies of precipitation are affected by small distances between the University (Belfort) precipitation gage and collector; (2) measurable evaporation loss occurs and (3) pH and specific conductance of precipitation vary significantly within small distances.

  20. The effects of urban warming on herbivore abundance and street tree condition.

    PubMed

    Dale, Adam G; Frank, Steven D

    2014-01-01

    Trees are essential to urban habitats because they provide services that benefit the environment and improve human health. Unfortunately, urban trees often have more herbivorous insect pests than rural trees but the mechanisms and consequences of these infestations are not well documented. Here, we examine how temperature affects the abundance of a scale insect, Melanaspis tenebricosa (Comstock) (Hemiptera: Diaspididae), on one of the most commonly planted street trees in the eastern U.S. Next, we examine how both pest abundance and temperature are associated with water stress, growth, and condition of 26 urban street trees. Although trees in the warmest urban sites grew the most, they were more water stressed and in worse condition than trees in cooler sites. Our analyses indicate that visible declines in tree condition were best explained by scale-insect infestation rather than temperature. To test the broader relevance of these results, we extend our analysis to a database of more than 2700 Raleigh, US street trees. Plotting these trees on a Landsat thermal image of Raleigh, we found that warmer sites had over 70% more trees in poor condition than those in cooler sites. Our results support previous studies linking warmer urban habitats to greater pest abundance and extend this association to show its effect on street tree condition. Our results suggest that street tree condition and ecosystem services may decline as urban expansion and global warming exacerbate the urban heat island effect. Although our non-probability sampling method limits our scope of inference, our results present a gloomy outlook for urban forests and emphasize the need for management tools. Existing urban tree inventories and thermal maps could be used to identify species that would be most suitable for urban conditions.

  1. Effects of antecedent land cover on physical, chemical, and biological responses to urbanization in streams across the conterminous United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuffney, T. F.; Qian, S.

    2012-12-01

    The effects of urbanization on physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of streams were assessed across gradients of urbanization in 9 metropolitan areas of the conterminous US (Boston, MA; Raleigh; NC, Birmingham, AL; Atlanta, GA; Milwaukee-Green Bay, WI; Denver, CO; Dallas-Fort Worth, TX; Salt Lake City, UT; and Portland, OR) as a part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water Quality Assessment Program. Gradients of urbanization were established on the basis of a multimetric index of urban intensity that combined land cover, population, and road density. Simple regression models established that the condition of biological communities (e.g., invertebrate responses) showed statistically significant degradation as urbanization increased in six (Boston, Raleigh, Birmingham, Atlanta, Salt Lake, and Portland) of the nine metropolitan areas. Multiple regression models incorporating basin-scale land cover (e.g., forest, agricultural land) and environmental variables (e.g., water temperature, chemistry, hydrology) did not substantially improve the explanatory power of the regressions and could not explain differences in responses among metropolitan areas. Multilevel hierarchical models incorporating basin- and regional-scale predictors demonstrated that regional-scale climate (air temperature and precipitation) and antecedent land cover (i.e., land cover being converted to urban) predicted invertebrate responses to urbanization. The lack of identifiable urban responses for Milwaukee-Green Bay, Denver, and Dallas-Fort Worth were associated with high levels of antecedent agriculture (row crops and grazing) that degraded the biological communities and obscured the effects of urbanization. Urbanization was associated with increases in conductivity, nutrients, pesticides, and hydrologic variability. Levels of these variables at background sites were higher in regions with high antecedent agriculture; consequently, the effects of urbanization appeared to be

  2. Modeling anomalous surface - wave propagation across the Southern Caspian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Priestly, K.F.; Patton, H.J.; Schultz, C.A.

    1998-01-09

    The crust of the south Caspian basin consists of 15-25 km of low velocity, highly attenuating sediment overlying high velocity crystalline crust. The Moho depth beneath the basin is about 30 km as compared to about 50 km in the surrounding region. Preliminary modeling of the phase velocity curves shows that this thick sediments of the south Caspian basin are also under-lain by a 30-35 km thick crystalline crust and not by typical oceanic crust. This analysis also suggest that if the effect of the over-pressuring of the sediments is to reduce Poissons` ratio, the over-pressured sediments observed to approximately 5 km do not persist to great depths. It has been shown since 1960`s that the south Caspian basin blocks the regional phase Lg. Intermediate frequency (0.02-0.04 Hz) fundamental mode Raleigh waves propagating across the basin are also severely attenuated, but the low frequency surface waves are largely unaffected. This attenuation is observed along the both east-to-west and west-to-east great circle paths across the basin, and therefore it cannot be related to a seismograph site effect. We have modeled the response of surface waves in an idealized rendition of the south Caspian basin model using a hybrid normal mode / 2-D finite difference approach. To gain insight into the features of the basin which cause the anomalous surface wave propagation, we have varied parameters of the basin model and computed synthetic record sections to compare with the observed seismograms. We varied the amount of mantel up-warp, the shape of the boundaries, the thickness and shear wave Q of the sediments and mantle, and the depth of the water layer. Of these parameters, the intermediate frequency surface waves are most severely affected by the sediments thickness and shear wave attenuation. fundamental mode Raleigh wave phase velocities measure for paths crossing the basin are extremely low.

  3. Mapping Urban Ecosystem Services Using High Resolution Aerial Photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilant, A. N.; Neale, A.; Wilhelm, D.

    2010-12-01

    Ecosystem services (ES) are the many life-sustaining benefits we receive from nature: e.g., clean air and water, food and fiber, cultural-aesthetic-recreational benefits, pollination and flood control. The ES concept is emerging as a means of integrating complex environmental and economic information to support informed environmental decision making. The US EPA is developing a web-based National Atlas of Ecosystem Services, with a component for urban ecosystems. Currently, the only wall-to-wall, national scale land cover data suitable for this analysis is the National Land Cover Data (NLCD) at 30 m spatial resolution with 5 and 10 year updates. However, aerial photography is acquired at higher spatial resolution (0.5-3 m) and more frequently (1-5 years, typically) for most urban areas. Land cover was mapped in Raleigh, NC using freely available USDA National Agricultural Imagery Program (NAIP) with 1 m ground sample distance to test the suitability of aerial photography for urban ES analysis. Automated feature extraction techniques were used to extract five land cover classes, and an accuracy assessment was performed using standard techniques. Results will be presented that demonstrate applications to mapping ES in urban environments: greenways, corridors, fragmentation, habitat, impervious surfaces, dark and light pavement (urban heat island). Automated feature extraction results mapped over NAIP color aerial photograph. At this scale, we can look at land cover and related ecosystem services at the 2-10 m scale. Small features such as individual trees and sidewalks are visible and mappable. Classified aerial photo of Downtown Raleigh NC Red: impervious surface Dark Green: trees Light Green: grass Tan: soil

  4. The effects of urban warming on herbivore abundance and street tree condition.

    PubMed

    Dale, Adam G; Frank, Steven D

    2014-01-01

    Trees are essential to urban habitats because they provide services that benefit the environment and improve human health. Unfortunately, urban trees often have more herbivorous insect pests than rural trees but the mechanisms and consequences of these infestations are not well documented. Here, we examine how temperature affects the abundance of a scale insect, Melanaspis tenebricosa (Comstock) (Hemiptera: Diaspididae), on one of the most commonly planted street trees in the eastern U.S. Next, we examine how both pest abundance and temperature are associated with water stress, growth, and condition of 26 urban street trees. Although trees in the warmest urban sites grew the most, they were more water stressed and in worse condition than trees in cooler sites. Our analyses indicate that visible declines in tree condition were best explained by scale-insect infestation rather than temperature. To test the broader relevance of these results, we extend our analysis to a database of more than 2700 Raleigh, US street trees. Plotting these trees on a Landsat thermal image of Raleigh, we found that warmer sites had over 70% more trees in poor condition than those in cooler sites. Our results support previous studies linking warmer urban habitats to greater pest abundance and extend this association to show its effect on street tree condition. Our results suggest that street tree condition and ecosystem services may decline as urban expansion and global warming exacerbate the urban heat island effect. Although our non-probability sampling method limits our scope of inference, our results present a gloomy outlook for urban forests and emphasize the need for management tools. Existing urban tree inventories and thermal maps could be used to identify species that would be most suitable for urban conditions. PMID:25054326

  5. The Effects of Urban Warming on Herbivore Abundance and Street Tree Condition

    PubMed Central

    Dale, Adam G.; Frank, Steven D.

    2014-01-01

    Trees are essential to urban habitats because they provide services that benefit the environment and improve human health. Unfortunately, urban trees often have more herbivorous insect pests than rural trees but the mechanisms and consequences of these infestations are not well documented. Here, we examine how temperature affects the abundance of a scale insect, Melanaspis tenebricosa (Comstock) (Hemiptera: Diaspididae), on one of the most commonly planted street trees in the eastern U.S. Next, we examine how both pest abundance and temperature are associated with water stress, growth, and condition of 26 urban street trees. Although trees in the warmest urban sites grew the most, they were more water stressed and in worse condition than trees in cooler sites. Our analyses indicate that visible declines in tree condition were best explained by scale-insect infestation rather than temperature. To test the broader relevance of these results, we extend our analysis to a database of more than 2700 Raleigh, US street trees. Plotting these trees on a Landsat thermal image of Raleigh, we found that warmer sites had over 70% more trees in poor condition than those in cooler sites. Our results support previous studies linking warmer urban habitats to greater pest abundance and extend this association to show its effect on street tree condition. Our results suggest that street tree condition and ecosystem services may decline as urban expansion and global warming exacerbate the urban heat island effect. Although our non-probability sampling method limits our scope of inference, our results present a gloomy outlook for urban forests and emphasize the need for management tools. Existing urban tree inventories and thermal maps could be used to identify species that would be most suitable for urban conditions. PMID:25054326

  6. Cardiovagal Modulation and Efficacy of Aerobic Exercise Training in Obese Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Baynard, Tracy; Goulopoulou, Styliani; Sosnoff, Ruth F.; Fernhall, Bo; Kanaley, Jill A.

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is associated with poor exercise tolerance and peak aerobic capacity (VO2peak) even when compared to obese non-diabetic peers. Exercise training studies have demonstrated improvements in VO2peak among T2D, yet there is a large amount of variability in this response. Recent evidence suggests that cardiac autonomic modulation may be an important factor when considering improvements in aerobic capacity. Purpose To determine the effects of a 16 wk aerobic exercise program on VO2peak in obese individuals, with and without T2D, who were classified as having either high or low cardiovagal modulation (HCVM or LCVM) at baseline. Methods Obese individuals (38 women/19 men; BMI = 36.1 kg/m2) were studied in the fasted state. ECG recordings were obtained while seated for 3 min, prior to and after 4 mo of exercise training (4 d/wk, 65% VO2peak). The ECG recording was analyzed for HRV in the spectral domain. Groups were split on a marker of CVM (normalized high frequency (HFnu)) at the 50th percentile, as either high (H) or low (L) CVM. Results VO2peak only increased with exercise training among those classified as having HCVM, regardless of diabetes status (T2D: HCVM 20.3 to 22.5 mL/kg/min, LCVM 24.3 to 25.0 mL/kg/min; Obese non-diabetics: HCVM 24.5 to 26.3 mL/kg/min, LCVM 23.1 to 23.7 mL/kg/min) (p<0.05). No change in VO2peak was observed for the LCVM group. Changes in weight do not explain the change in VO2peak among the HCVM group. Glucose tolerance only improved among the LCVM group with T2D. Conclusion Obese individuals, with or without T2D, when classified as having relatively HCVM prior to exercise training, have a greater propensity to improve VO2peak following a 16-week aerobic training program. PMID:23899888

  7. Geodesy-based estimates of loading rates on faults beneath the Los Angeles basin with a new, computationally efficient method to model dislocations in 3D heterogeneous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollins, C.; Argus, D. F.; Avouac, J. P.; Landry, W.; Barbot, S.

    2015-12-01

    North-south compression across the Los Angeles basin is accommodated by slip on thrust faults beneath the basin that may present significant seismic hazard to Los Angeles. Previous geodesy-based efforts to constrain the distributions and rates of elastic strain accumulation on these faults [Argus et al 2005, 2012] have found that the elastic model used has a first-order impact on the inferred distribution of locking and creep, underlining the need to accurately incorporate the laterally heterogeneous elastic structure and complex fault geometries of the Los Angeles basin into this analysis. We are using Gamra [Landry and Barbot, in prep.], a newly developed adaptive-meshing finite-difference solver, to compute elastostatic Green's functions that incorporate the full 3D regional elastic structure provided by the SCEC Community Velocity Model. Among preliminary results from benchmarks, forward models and inversions, we find that: 1) for a modeled creep source on the edge dislocation geometry from Argus et al [2005], the use of the SCEC CVM material model produces surface velocities in the hanging wall that are up to ~50% faster than those predicted in an elastic halfspace model; 2) in sensitivity-modulated inversions of the Argus et al [2005] GPS velocity field for slip on the same dislocation source, the use of the CVM deepens the inferred locking depth by ≥3 km compared to an elastic halfspace model; 3) when using finite-difference or finite-element models with Dirichlet boundary conditions (except for the free surface) for problems of this scale, it is necessary to set the boundaries at least ~100 km away from any slip source or data point to guarantee convergence within 5% of analytical solutions (a result which may be applicable to other static dislocation modeling problems and which may scale with the size of the area of interest). Here we will present finalized results from inversions of an updated GPS velocity field [Argus et al, AGU 2015] for the inferred

  8. Intra-event and Inter-event Ground Motion Variability from 3-D Broadband (0-8 Hz) Ensemble Simulations of Mw 6.7 Thrust Events Including Rough Fault Descriptions, Small-Scale Heterogeneities and Q(f)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Withers, K.; Olsen, K. B.; Shi, Z.; Day, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    We model blind thrust scenario earthquakes matching the fault geometry of 1994 Mw 6.7 Northridge earthquake up to 8 Hz by first performing dynamic rupture propagation using a support operator method (SORD). We extend the ground motion by converting the slip-rate data to a kinematic source for the finite difference wave propagation code AWP-ODC, which incorporates an improved frequency-dependent attenuation approach. This technique has high accuracy for Q values down to 15. The desired Q function is fit to the 'effective' Q over the coarse grained-cell for low Q, and a simple interpolation formula is used to interpolate the weights for arbitrary Q. Here, we use a power-law model Q above a reference frequency in the form Q 0 f^n with exponents ranging from 0.0-0.9. We find envelope and phase misfits only slightly larger than that of the elastic case when compared with that of the frequency-wavenumber solution for both a homogenous and a layered model with a large-velocity contrast. We also include small-scale medium complexity in both a 1D layered model and a 3D medium extracted from SCEC CVM-S4 including a surface geotechnical layer (GTL). We model additional realizations of the scenario by varying the hypocenter location, and find that similar moment magnitudes are generated. We observe that while the ground motion pattern changes, the median ground motion is not affected significantly, when binned as a function of distance, and is within 1 interevent standard deviation from the median GMPEs. We find that intra-event variability for the layered model simulations is similar to observed values of single-station standard deviation. We show that small-scale heterogeneity can significantly affect the intra-event variability at frequencies greater than ~1 Hz, becoming increasingly important at larger distances from the source. We perform a parameter space study by varying statistical parameters and find that the variability is fairly independent of the correlation length

  9. Comparative safety and effectiveness of long-acting inhaled agents for treating chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a systematic review and network meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tricco, Andrea C; Strifler, Lisa; Veroniki, Areti-Angeliki; Yazdi, Fatemeh; Khan, Paul A; Scott, Alistair; Ng, Carmen; Antony, Jesmin; Mrklas, Kelly; D'Souza, Jennifer; Cardoso, Roberta; Straus, Sharon E

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the safety and effectiveness of long-acting β-antagonists (LABA), long-acting antimuscarinic agents (LAMA) and inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) for managing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Setting Systematic review and network meta-analysis (NMA). Participants 208 randomised clinical trials (RCTs) including 134 692 adults with COPD. Interventions LABA, LAMA and/or ICS, alone or in combination, versus each other or placebo. Primary and secondary outcomes The proportion of patients with moderate-to-severe exacerbations. The number of patients experiencing mortality, pneumonia, serious arrhythmia and cardiovascular-related mortality (CVM) were secondary outcomes. Results NMA was conducted including 20 RCTs for moderate-to-severe exacerbations for 26 141 patients with an exacerbation in the past year. 32 treatments were effective versus placebo including: tiotropium, budesonide/formoterol, salmeterol, indacaterol, fluticasone/salmeterol, indacaterol/glycopyrronium, tiotropium/fluticasone/salmeterol and tiotropium/budesonide/formoterol. Tiotropium/budesonide/formoterol was most effective (99.2% probability of being the most effective according to the Surface Under the Cumulative RAnking (SUCRA) curve). NMA was conducted on mortality (88 RCTs, 97 526 patients); fluticasone/salmeterol was more effective in reducing mortality than placebo, formoterol and fluticasone alone, and was the most effective (SUCRA=71%). NMA was conducted on CVM (37 RCTs, 55 156 patients) and the following were safest: salmeterol versus each OF placebo, tiotropium and tiotropium (Soft Mist Inhaler (SMR)); fluticasone versus tiotropium (SMR); and salmeterol/fluticasone versus tiotropium and tiotropium (SMR). Triamcinolone acetonide was the most harmful (SUCRA=81%). NMA was conducted on pneumonia occurrence (54 RCTs, 61 551 patients). 24 treatments were more harmful, including 2 that increased risk of pneumonia versus placebo; fluticasone and fluticasone

  10. CyberShake: Running Seismic Hazard Workflows on Distributed HPC Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callaghan, S.; Maechling, P. J.; Graves, R. W.; Gill, D.; Olsen, K. B.; Milner, K. R.; Yu, J.; Jordan, T. H.

    2013-12-01

    As part of its program of earthquake system science research, the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) has developed a simulation platform, CyberShake, to perform physics-based probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) using 3D deterministic wave propagation simulations. CyberShake performs PSHA by simulating a tensor-valued wavefield of Strain Green Tensors, and then using seismic reciprocity to calculate synthetic seismograms for about 415,000 events per site of interest. These seismograms are processed to compute ground motion intensity measures, which are then combined with probabilities from an earthquake rupture forecast to produce a site-specific hazard curve. Seismic hazard curves for hundreds of sites in a region can be used to calculate a seismic hazard map, representing the seismic hazard for a region. We present a recently completed PHSA study in which we calculated four CyberShake seismic hazard maps for the Southern California area to compare how CyberShake hazard results are affected by different SGT computational codes (AWP-ODC and AWP-RWG) and different community velocity models (Community Velocity Model - SCEC (CVM-S4) v11.11 and Community Velocity Model - Harvard (CVM-H) v11.9). We present our approach to running workflow applications on distributed HPC resources, including systems without support for remote job submission. We show how our approach extends the benefits of scientific workflows, such as job and data management, to large-scale applications on Track 1 and Leadership class open-science HPC resources. We used our distributed workflow approach to perform CyberShake Study 13.4 on two new NSF open-science HPC computing resources, Blue Waters and Stampede, executing over 470 million tasks to calculate physics-based hazard curves for 286 locations in the Southern California region. For each location, we calculated seismic hazard curves with two different community velocity models and two different SGT codes, resulting in over

  11. Use of Chemical Analysis and Assays of Semipermeable Membrane Devices Extracts to Assess the Response of Bioavailable Organic Pollutants in Streams to Urbanization in Six Metropolitan Areas of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bryant, Wade L.; Goodbred, Steve L.; Leiker, Thomas L.; Inouye, Laura; Johnson, B. Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Studies to assess the effects of urbanization on stream ecosystems are being conducted as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. The overall objectives of these studies are to (1) determine how hydrologic, geomorphic, water quality, habitat, and biological characteristics respond to land-use changes associated with urbanization in specific environmental settings, and (2) compare these responses across environmental settings. As part of an integrated assessment, semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) were deployed in streams along a gradient of urban land-use intensity in and around Atlanta, Georgia; Raleigh-Durham, North Carolina; and Denver-Fort Collins, Colorado, in 2003; and Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas; Milwaukee-Green Bay, Wisconsin; and Portland, Oregon, in 2004. Sites were selected to avoid point-source discharge and to minimize natural variability within each of the six metropolitan areas. In addition to standard chemical analysis for hydrophobic organic contaminants, three assays were used to address mixtures and potential toxicity: (1) Fluoroscan provides an estimate of the total concentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs); (2) the P450RGS assay indicates the presence and levels of aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonists; and (3) Microtox? measures toxicological effects on photo-luminescent bacteria. Of the 140 compounds targeted or identified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis in this study, 67 were not detected. In terms of numbers and types of compounds, the following were detected: 2 wood preservatives, 6 insecticides (parent compounds), 5 herbicides, 22 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, 2 dibenzofurans, 4 polychlorinated biphenyls, 7 compounds associated with fragrances or personal care products, 4 steroids associated with wastewater, 5 polydibromated diphenyl ethers (flame retardants), 3 plasticizers, 3 antimicrobials/disinfectants, and 3 detergent metabolites. Of the 73 compounds

  12. Molecular Engineering, Photophysical and Electrochemical Characterizations of Novel Ru(II) and BODIPY Sensitizers for Mesoporous TiO2 Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheema, Hammad Arshad

    precludes coplanarity of the naphthalene moiety, thus decreasing the extracted photocurrent response from solar device. The findings were published in Dyes and Pigments (doi:10.1016/j.dyepig.2014.08.005). For HD-7 and HD-8, intriguing difference caused by structural isomerization based on anthracene and phenanthrene stilbazole type ancillary ligands, respectively in Ru (II) sensitizers was investigated using femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. It was found that the excited electrons in HD-7 are prone to ISC (intersystem crossing) much more than that in HD-8 and those triplet electrons are not being injected in TiO2 efficiently as discussed in Chapter 5. To achieve long term stability, we combined the strong electron donor characteristics of carbazole and the hydrophobic nature of long alkyl chains, C7 (HD-14 ), C18 (HD-15) and C2 (NCSU-10), tethered to N-carbazole. HD-15 showed strikingly good long term light soaking stability and maintained up to 98% of initial efficiency value compared to 92% for HD-14 and 78% for NCSU-10, as discussed in Chapter 6. Boron dipyromethene (BODIPY) dyes HB-1, HB-2 and HB-3 were synthesized and fully characterized for dye solar cells. It was found that having long alkyl chains tethered to the donor groups alone are not sufficient for achieving highly efficient photovoltaic response from BODIPY dyes (Chapter 7). Thus, replacement of fluorines from BODIPY core with long alkoxy chains has been suggested for future work.

  13. Realization of thermal Convection into the initial Earth's Core on the Stage of planetary Accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Professor Khachay, Yurie

    2015-04-01

    Convection in the Earth's core is not only the main mechanism of heat-mass transfer, but the significant component of the MHD mechanism of geomagnetic field generation. However the research of different convection forms on the Earth's accumulation stage had been so far not produced. Regarding the convection realization into the initial core of the growing proto planet we can distinguish some qualitative different stages. The earliest from them for the area of the planets of the Earth's group had been realized in to the pre planetary bodies, when the energy dissipation by the decay of the short living radioactive, first of all 26Al, provided the melted state of the inner areas of the proto planet. By that the masses and relative velocities of body's impacts during the process of accumulation had been small. That stipulated the low temperature values of the growing proto planetary surface [1] and the background of Raleigh heat convection realization. On the next stage of the planetary accumulation the contribution of short living isotopes to the energetic process during the decay 26Al decreased, but the energy contribution from the body's impact increased. The balance of the energy on the surface of the proto planet leaded to the melted state of the upper envelope and to the inelastic character of the impact. Further during the increase of the proto planetary mass, increase of the pressure and the melting temperature with the depth and decrease of the intensity of the dissipate energy by the body's impact, which became more elastic because of the silicate part, the background of the Raleigh heat convection can be realized [2]. However the falling of accumulated bodies can lead to the random distribution of the heat anomalies, which we could research only in the frame of the 3-D model [3-4]. For researching of the MHD mechanism of geomagnetic field generation developing yet on the stage of Earth's accumulation in that paper are presented the results of numerical

  14. Dehydration embrittlement of serpentine and its implications for earthquakes at depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, H.; Dobrzhinetskaya, L.; Green, H.

    2003-04-01

    Earthquakes at depths greater than ˜50 km cannot occur by unassisted brittle failure but could be triggered by embrittlement accompanying dehydration of hydrous minerals (e.g. Raleigh and Paterson, 1965). However, there is some question whether such embrittlement will occur if the ΔV of the dehydration reaction is negative, as occurs with increasing pressure for most low-pressure hydrous minerals. To test this hypothesis, we have chosen an extensively-serpentinized peridotite, in which the serpentine mineral present, antigorite, has a large stability field at elevated pressure and temperature. We conducted triaxial deformation experiments at constant strain rate using a Griggs-type apparatus at P = 1.0-3.4 GPa and T = 550-750 ^oC, and rapid-pumping experiments at comparable temperatures in a Walker-type multianvil apparatus, culminating at P = 6 GPa. Over this pressure range, the ΔV of reaction varies from highly positive to significantly negative. At the lowest temperatures, no reaction was observed. In deformation experiments at these conditions, faulting due to brittle failure was produced at low pressure but at high pressure deformation was ductile. At temperatures outside the stability field of antigorite, samples that were only pressurized and annealed did not show faulting. However, specimens subjected to a differential stress during dehydration displayed faults and localized zones of dehydration products consisting of very fine-grained new olivine or talc, +/- enstatite (grain size less than 200 nm). Deformed samples also showed Mode I cracks and fluid inclusions inside large crystals of relict olivine. Extensive fluid reactions were also observed along the grain boundaries between the relict olivine and antigorite. These observations indicate that antigorite dehydration under stress triggers faulting under conditions where the ΔV of reaction is negative as well as those where ΔV is positive. We do not yet know why this is so. We conclude that

  15. Transport and deposition of nitrogen oxides and ozone in the atmospheric surface layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongxian

    Tropospheric ozone is an important photochemical air pollutant, which increases respiratory-related diseases, decreases crop yields, and causes other environmental problems. This research has focused on the measurement of soil biogenic emissions of nitric oxide (NO), one of the precursors for ozone formation, from intensively managed soils in the Southeast US, and examined the transport and deposition of NOx (NO + NO2) and ozone in the atmospheric surface layer, and the effects of NO emissions and its chemical reactions on ozone flux and deposition to the earth's surface. Emissions of nitric oxide were measured from an intensively managed agricultural soil, in the lower coastal plain of North Carolina (near Plymouth, NC), using a dynamic chamber technique. Measurements of soil NO emissions in several crop canopies were conducted at four different sites in North Carolina during late spring and summer of 1994-1996. The turbulent fluxes of NO2 and O3 at 5 m and 10 m above the ground were measured using the eddy-correlation technique near Plymouth, NC during late spring of 1995 and summer of 1996, concurrent with measurements of soil NO emissions using the dynamic chamber system. Soil NO emission from within the corn field was high averaging approximately 35 ng N/m2/s during the measurement period of 1995. In another study, vertical measurements of ozone were made on a 610 m tall tower located 15 km Southeast of Raleigh, NC during the summers of 1993-1997, as part of an effort by the State of North Carolina to develop a State Implementation Plan (SIP) for ozone control in the Raleigh Metropolitan Statistical Area. A strong correlation was observed between the nighttime and early morning ozone concentrations in the residual layer (CR) above the NBL and the maximum ground level concentration (C o max) the following afternoon. Based on this correlation, an empirical regression equation (Co max = 27.67*exp(0.016 CR)) was developed for predicting maximum ground level ozone

  16. Preliminary Physical Stratigraphy and Geophysical Data of the USGS Hope Plantation Core (BE-110), Bertie County, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weems, Robert E.; Seefelt, Ellen L.; Wrege, Beth M.; Self-Trail, Jean M.; Prowell, David C.; Durand, Colleen; Cobbs, Eugene F.; McKinney, Kevin C.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction In March and April, 2004, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the North Carolina Geological Survey (NCGS) and the Raleigh Water Resources Discipline (WRD), drilled a stratigraphic test hole and well in Bertie County, North Carolina (fig. 1). The Hope Plantation test hole (BE-110-2004) was cored on the property of Hope Plantation near Windsor, North Carolina. The drill site is located on the Republican 7.5 minute quadradrangle at lat 36?01'58'N., long 78?01'09'W. (decimal degrees 36.0329 and 77.0192) (fig. 2). The altitude of the site is 48 ft above mean sea level as determined by Paulin Precise altimeter. This test hole was continuously cored by Eugene F. Cobbs, III and Kevin C. McKinney (USGS) to a total depth of 1094.5 ft. Later, a ground water observation well was installed with a screened interval between 315-329 feet below land surface (fig. 3). Upper Triassic, Lower Cretaceous, Upper Cretaceous, Tertiary, and Quaternary sediments were recovered from the site. The core is stored at the NCGS Coastal Plain core storage facility in Raleigh, North Carolina. In this report, we provide the initial lithostratigraphic summary recorded at the drill site along with site core photographs, data from the geophysical logger, calcareous nannofossil biostratigraphic correlations (Table 1) and initial hydrogeologic interpretations. The lithostratigraphy from this core can be compared to previous investigations of the Elizabethtown corehole, near Elizabethtown, North Carolina in Bladen County (Self-Trail, Wrege, and others, 2004), the Kure Beach corehole, near Wilmington, North Carolina in New Hanover County (Self-Trail, Prowell, and Christopher, 2004), the Esso #1, Esso #2, Mobil #1 and Mobil #2 cores in the Albermarle and Pamlico Sounds (Zarra, 1989), and the Cape Fear River outcrops in Bladen County (Farrell, 1998; Farrell and others, 2001). This core is the third in a series of planned benchmark coreholes that will be used to elucidate the

  17. Preliminary Physical Stratigraphy and Geophysical Data From the USGS Dixon Core, Onslow County, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seefelt, Ellen L.; Gonzalez, Wilma Aleman B.; Self-Trail, Jean M.; Weems, Robert E.; Edwards, Lucy E.; Pierce, Herbert A.; Durand, Colleen T.

    2009-01-01

    In October through November 2006, scientists from the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) Eastern Region Earth Surface Processes Team (EESPT) and the Raleigh (N.C.) Water Science Center (WSC), in cooperation with the North Carolina Geological Survey (NCGS) and the Onslow County Water and Sewer Authority (ONWASA), drilled a stratigraphic test hole and well in Onslow County, N.C. The Dixon corehole was cored on ONWASA water utility property north of the town of Dixon, N.C., in the Sneads Ferry 7.5-minute quadrangle at latitude 34deg33'35' N, longitude 77deg26'54' W (decimal degrees 34.559722 and -77.448333). The site elevation is 66.0 feet (ft) above mean sea level as determined using a Paulin precision altimeter. The corehole attained a total depth of 1,010 ft and was continuously cored by the USGS EESPT drilling crew. A groundwater monitoring well was installed in the screened interval between 234 and 254 ft below land surface. The section cored at this site includes Upper Cretaceous, Paleogene, and Neogene sediments. The Dixon core is stored at the NCGS Coastal Plain core storage facility in Raleigh. The Dixon corehole is the fourth and last in a series of planned North Carolina benchmark coreholes drilled by the USGS Coastal Carolina Project. These coreholes explore the physical stratigraphy, facies, and thickness of Cretaceous, Paleogene, and Neogene Coastal Plain sediments in North Carolina. Correlations of lithologies, facies, and sequence stratigraphy can be made with the Hope Plantation corehole, N.C., near Windsor in Bertie County (Weems and others, 2007); the Elizabethtown corehole, near Elizabethtown, N.C., in Bladen County (Self-Trail and others, 2004b); the Smith Elementary School corehole, near Cove City, N.C., in Craven County (Harris and Self-Trail, 2006; Crocetti, 2007); the Kure Beach corehole, near Wilmington, N.C., in New Hanover County (Self-Trail and others, 2004a); the Esso#1, Esso #2, Mobil #1, and Mobil #2 cores in Albermarle and Pamlico Sounds

  18. Career attitudes of first-year veterinary students before and after a required course on veterinary careers.

    PubMed

    Fish, Richard E; Griffith, Emily H

    2014-01-01

    Careers in Veterinary Medicine is a required, one-credit-hour course at the North Carolina State University College of Veterinary Medicine (NCSU-CVM), which meets once weekly during veterinary students' first semester. Lectures in this course are presented by one or more veterinarians representing diverse career areas. A voluntary, anonymous survey was distributed before the first class meeting in 2011 (PRE) and at the end of the semester (POST) to assess if students' career interests changed during the semester. The survey collected basic demographic data and students' preferences (on a Likert scale) for 17 veterinary career paths. Out of 63 students, 36 (57%) in the POST survey said that their career interests had changed during the semester, and 17 of the 26 students (65%) who gave a reason credited the careers course as one factor in reconsidering their career choice. Only 3 of the 17 career paths had statistically significant PRE/POST survey differences in Likert response frequency (equine practice, pathology, and wildlife medicine), but both informal discussions with students and responses to open-ended survey questions indicated that many students valued the introduction to unfamiliar veterinary career areas. Careers in Veterinary Medicine is a vital component of recent career-planning initiatives in the college, which will be especially important to veterinary students as they face continued changes in the profession, such as the increased debt load of the new graduate and the threat of veterinary workforce oversupply.

  19. Valuation of ecological resources and functions

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, M.J.; Bilyard, G.R.; Link, S.O.

    1998-01-01

    Ecological resources are natural resources that provide certain necessary but overlooked system maintenance functions within ecosystems. Environmental economics is in search of an appropriate analysis framework to determine economic values of such resources, This paper presents a framework that estimates and compiles the components of value for a natural ecosystem. The framework begins with the ecological processes involved, which provide functions within the ecosystem and services valued by humans. We discuss the additive or competive nature of these values, and estimate these values through conventional and unconventional techniques. We apply the framework to ecological resources in a shrub-steppe dryland habitat being displaced by development. We first determine which functions and services are mutually exclusive (e.g., farming vs soil stabilization) and which are complementary or products of joint production (e.g., soil stabilization and maintenance of species). We then apply benefit transfer principles with contingent valuation methodology (CVM), travel cost methodology (TCM), and hedonic damage pricing (HDP). Finally, we derive upper-limit values for more difficult-to-value functions through the use of human analogs, which we argue are the most appropriate method of valuation under some circumstances. The highest values of natural shrub-steppe habitat appear to be derived from soil stabilization. 59 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Anode purge strategy optimization of the polymer electrode membrane fuel cell system under the dead-end anode operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhe; Yu, Yi; Wang, Guangjin; Chen, Xuesong; Chen, Pei; Chen, Jun; Zhou, Su

    2016-07-01

    Dead-ended anode (DEA) mode is commonly applied in fuel cell vehicles for the hydrogen purge at the anode side, to reduce fuel waste and enhance fuel cell efficiency. Anode purge is necessary and is definitely important with respect to removing liquid water and accumulated nitrogen in the gas diffusion layer and the flow field of the DEA-mode fuel cell. In this paper, the effect of different purge strategies on the stack performance and system efficiency is investigated experimentally using fast data acquisition and advanced tools, such as the fast cell voltage measurement (CVM) system and the mass spectrum. From the fast data acquisition, the voltage stability, liquid water and nitrogen concentration measurement in the anode exhaust are compared and analyzed under different purge strategy designs and using different purge valves. The results show that under the optimal purge strategy, the DEA fuel cell stack can achieve the desired stability and system efficiency based on the analysis of the cell voltage and purge volume. Moreover, the diameter of the purge valve has a great impact on the voltage stability because a diameter change will result in a different pressure drop and purge volume when the purge valve is open.

  1. Boundary lubrication of formulated C-ether in air to 300 deg C. 1: Phosphorus ester additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.; Hady, W. F.

    1972-01-01

    Friction and wear measurements were made on CVM M-50 steel lubricated with three C-ether (modified polyphenyl ether) formulations in dry and wet air. Results were compared to those obtained with a formulated Type 2 ester and the C-ether base fluid. A ball-on-disk sliding friction apparatus was used. Experimental conditions were a 1-kilogram load, a 17-meter-perminute (100-rpm) surface speed, and a 25 to 300 C (77 to 572 F) disk temperature range. The C-ether base fluid and the three formulated C-ether fluids yielded lower wear than the Type 2 ester over the entire temperature range. All C-ether fluids exhibited slightly higher friction coefficients than the ester from 150 to 300 C (302 to 572 F) and similar values from 25 to 150 C (77 to 302 F). In general, lower wear rates were observed with the C-ethers when tested in wet air as compared to a dry air atmosphere.

  2. Cardiovascular malformations in Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, A.E.; Ardinger, H.H.; Ardinger, R.H. Jr.

    1997-01-31

    We reviewed 215 patients (59 new, 156 from the literature) with Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS), and found that 95 (44%) had a cardiovascular malformation (CVM). Classifying CVMs by disordered embryonic mechanisms, there were 5 (5.3%) class I (ectomesenchymal tissue migration abnormalities), 56 (58.9%) class II (abnormal intracardiac blood flow), 25 (26.3%) class IV (abnormal extracellular matrix), and 5 (5.3%) class V (abnormal targeted growth). Comparing the frequencies of individual CVMs in this series with a control group (the Baltimore-Washington Infant Study), there were 6 individual CVMs which showed a significant difference from expected values. When frequencies of CVMs in SLOS were analyzed by mechanistic class, classes IV and V were significantly more frequent, and class I significantly less frequent, than the control group. Although CVMs in SLOS display mechanistic heterogeneity, with an overall predominance of class II CVMs, the developmental error appears to favor alteration of the cardiovascular developmental mechanisms underlying atrioventricular canal and anomalous pulmonary venous return. This information should assist the clinical geneticist evaluating a patient with possible SLOS, and should suggest research direction for the mechanisms responsible for the SLOS phenotype. 102 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  3. Effect of two synthetic lubricants on life of AISI 9310 spur gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Dennis P.; Shimski, John

    1991-01-01

    Spur-gear fatigue tests were conducted with two lubricants using a single lot of consumable-electrode vacuum-melted (CVM) AISI 9310 spur gears. The gears were case carburized and hardened to Rockwell C60. The gear pitch diameter was 8.89 cm. The lot of gears was divided into two groups, each of which was tested with a different lubricant. The test lubricants can be classified as synthetic polyol-ester-based lubricants. One lubricant was 30 percent more viscous that the other. Both lubricants have similar pressure viscosity coefficients. Test conditions included a bulk gear temperature of 350 K, a maximum Hertz stress of 1.71 GPa at the pitch line, and a speed of 10,000 rpm. The surface fatigue life of gears tested with one lubricant was approximately 2.4 times that for gears tested with the other lubricant. The lubricant with the 30 percent higher viscosity gave a calculated elastohydrodynamic (EHD) film thickness that was 20 percent higher than the other lubricant. This increased EHD film thickness is the most probable reason for the improvement in surface fatigue life of gears tested with this lubricant over gears tested with the less viscous lubricant.

  4. VMCast: A VM-Assisted Stability Enhancing Solution for Tree-Based Overlay Multicast.

    PubMed

    Gu, Weidong; Zhang, Xinchang; Gong, Bin; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Lu

    2015-01-01

    Tree-based overlay multicast is an effective group communication method for media streaming applications. However, a group member's departure causes all of its descendants to be disconnected from the multicast tree for some time, which results in poor performance. The above problem is difficult to be addressed because overlay multicast tree is intrinsically instable. In this paper, we proposed a novel stability enhancing solution, VMCast, for tree-based overlay multicast. This solution uses two types of on-demand cloud virtual machines (VMs), i.e., multicast VMs (MVMs) and compensation VMs (CVMs). MVMs are used to disseminate the multicast data, whereas CVMs are used to offer streaming compensation. The used VMs in the same cloud datacenter constitute a VM cluster. Each VM cluster is responsible for a service domain (VMSD), and each group member belongs to a specific VMSD. The data source delivers the multicast data to MVMs through a reliable path, and MVMs further disseminate the data to group members along domain overlay multicast trees. The above approach structurally improves the stability of the overlay multicast tree. We further utilized CVM-based streaming compensation to enhance the stability of the data distribution in the VMSDs. VMCast can be used as an extension to existing tree-based overlay multicast solutions, to provide better services for media streaming applications. We applied VMCast to two application instances (i.e., HMTP and HCcast). The results show that it can obviously enhance the stability of the data distribution.

  5. Comprehensive evaluation of environmental and economic benefits of China's urban underground transportation construction projects.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaobin; Chen, Zhilong; Guo, Dongjun

    2015-07-01

    Urban underground transportation projects are introduced to address problems of scarce green land and traffic pollution. As construction of urban underground transportation is still in its infancy, there is no definite quantitative measurement on whether the construction is beneficial and what influences it will place on the region in China. This study intends to construct a comprehensive evaluation method for evaluating social, economic and environmental benefits of urban underground transportation projects and proposes the concept, role and principle for evaluation of environmental and economic benefits. It figures out relationship between the environment and factors of city development. It also summarizes three relevant factors, including transportation, biophysics and social economy, and works out indicators to evaluate the influence of urban underground transportation construction. Based on Contingent Valuation Method (CVM), Cost of Illness Approach (CIA), Human Capital Approach (HCA), this paper constructs 13 monetization calculation models for social, economic and environmental benefits in response to seven aspects, namely, reducing noise pollution and air pollution, using land efficiently, improving traffic safety, reducing traffic congestion, saving shipping time and minimizing transportation costs.

  6. The economic value of conjoint local management in water resources: Results from a contingent valuation in the Boquerón aquifer (Albacete, SE Spain).

    PubMed

    Rupérez-Moreno, Carmen; Pérez-Sánchez, Julio; Senent-Aparicio, Javier; del Pilar Flores-Asenjo, Maria

    2015-11-01

    In the field of water resources management, the Water Framework Directive is the first directive to adopt an ecosystem approach, establishing principles and economic tools for an integrated management of water resources to protect, conserve and restore all water bodies. The incorporation of local authorities in this management involves quality benefits that are perceived by users in an effective and lasting way. The purpose of this paper is to present the economic value of the environmental recovery of the overexploited Boquerón aquifer in Hellín (Albacete, SE Spain) and all of its associated ecosystems. This aquifer operates as a regulating reservoir for the surface waters of the Hellín Canal. The contingent valuation method (CVM) applied in this environmental assessment of the aquifer showed that its non-use value was €147,470 per year, due to the high environmental awareness of the Hellín people, which is enough to ensure the survival of the ecosystems linked to the aquifer.

  7. Simulation of time-dependent pool shape during laser spot welding: Transient effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlen, Georg; Ludwig, Andreas; Sahm, Peter R.

    2003-12-01

    The shape and depth of the area molten during a welding process is of immense technical importance. This study investigates how the melt pool shape during laser welding is influenced by Marangoni convection and tries to establish general qualitative rules of melt pool dynamics. A parameter study shows how different welding powers lead to extremely different pool shapes. Special attention is paid to transient effects that occur during the melting process as well as after switching off the laser source. It is shown that the final pool shape can depend strongly on the welding duration. The authors use an axisymmetric two-dimensional (2-D) control-volume-method (CVM) code based on the volume-averaged two-phase model of alloy solidification by Ni and Beckermann[1] and the SIMPLER algorithm by Patankar.[2] They calculate the transient distribution of temperatures, phase fractions, flow velocities, pressures, and concentrations of alloying elements in the melt and two solid phases (peritectic solidification) for a stationary laser welding process. Marangoni flow is described using a semiempirical model for the temperature-dependent surface tension gradient. The software was parallelized using the shared memory standard OpenMP.

  8. Mechanism of lubrication by tricresylphosphate (TCP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faut, O. D.; Wheeler, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    A pin-on-disk tribometer equipped with an induction heater was used to study the coefficient of friction as a function of temperature for tricresylphosphate (TCP) on continuous vacuum melted (CVM) M-50 tool steel when the TCP was present in a liquid reservoir (bulk lubrication), and when it was applied as a liquid layer directly to the disk (limited lubrication). Under limited lubrication conditions, experiments were performed in dry ( 100 ppm H2O) air, dry ( 20 ppm H2O) nitrogen, dry nitrogen with the disks heated to 700 C then cooled to room temperature before the TCP was applied and the measurements made (preheated disks), and moist nitrogen using preheated disks. When the coefficient of friction was plotted as a function of the disk temperature, the friction decreased at a characteristic temperature, T sub r whose observed values were 265 C for bulk lubrication conditions in dry air, 225 C for limited lubrication conditions in dry air, and 215 C for limited lubrication conditions in dry nitrogen. No decrease in friction was observed with preheated disks; instead a sharp failure temperature was observed at 218 C, which was taken as the temperature about which the behavior of TCP should be judged, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed the presence of phosphate on the surface of the iron pins used in the tribometer under TCP lubrication. Depth profile studies support the idea that a chemical reaction occurs between the TCP and the metal surface at T sub r.

  9. Comparison of the effectiveness of one- and two-suture prosthesis used to correct left laryngeal hemiplegia in the equine: followed by Nd:YAG laser ventricle ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnett, Cindy; Tate, Lloyd P.; Correa, Maria T.

    1992-06-01

    The effectiveness of one or two suture prothesis in performing laryngoplasty was compared. Forty-six horses treated for left laryngeal hemiplegia at North Carolina State University, College of Veterinary Medicine (NCSU-CVM) between January 1987 and April 1991 were included in the study. Thirty-seven of the horses were treated with two sutures, while nine were treated with one suture. All horses, after recovering from general anesthesia, were sedated the following day and were subjected to a transendoscopic neodymium: yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser ablation of the left laryngeal ventricle. Ability to perform after treatment relative to before treatment, reduction or elimination of respiratory noise, owner or trainer satisfaction, were compared for the two suture prosthetic procedures using chi-squared test or Fisher's exact test. No statistical significant differences were found for performance, reduction of noise, and owner or trainer satisfaction. The use of one or two sutures seemed to have no effect on the effectiveness of prosthetic laryngoplasty procedure followed by Nd:YAG ventricular ablation.

  10. Study of the efficacy of prosthetic laryngoplasty followed by Nd:YAG laser ventricular ablation for treatment of left laryngeal hemiplegia in the horse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Brenda; Tate, Lloyd P.; Correa, Maria T.

    1992-06-01

    A telephone survey was conducted to assess the efficacy of laryngoplasty surgery followed by Nd:YAG laser laryngeal ventricular ablation. Forty-three horses were included in the study that were treated at North Carolina State University, College of Veterinary Medicine (NCSU- CVM) January 1987 and September 1990. Questions asked of the owners or trainers of the horses related to complications that the horses may have had since leaving the hospital, ability to perform after treatment relative to before treatment, how respiratory noise after treatment related to before treatment, results of follow-up endoscopic exams, additional surgery that may have been performed, and owner satisfaction with the procedure. Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to determine the success of the procedure. Success was defined as a reduction of noise or improvement in performance ability. Results of the test indicated that the two procedures had an effect in reducing respiratory noise (p equals 0.0001) and increasing performance (p equals 0.0017).

  11. One medicine, one university: the DVM/MPH program at the University of Illinois.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, John A; Hershow, Ronald C

    2008-01-01

    The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign College of Veterinary Medicine (UIUC-CVM) and the University of Illinois-Chicago School of Public Health (UIC-SPH) are in the fourth year of a collaborative Doctor of Veterinary Medicine and Master of Public Health dual-degree program. The two campuses, one urban and one rural, are 150 miles apart but are sister schools within the University of Illinois system. This article describes the origin of the program, how the program functions across two campuses, its academic focus, required coursework, and research projects designed to fulfill the program's capstone requirements. The article shows how two campuses can be linked through a combination of online and on-site didactic coursework, briefly describes innovative proposals for projects within the United States and abroad, and highlights faculty committed to educating cross-trained public-health professionals while addressing the national need for veterinarians trained in public health. The authors also discuss how the dual-degree program has led to the formation of the Illinois Center for One Medicine, One Health (ICOMOH), an intra-university collaboration focusing on the interface of human, animal, and ecosystem health.

  12. Implementing the Contingent Valuation Method for supporting decision making in the waste management sector.

    PubMed

    Gaglias, A; Mirasgedis, S; Tourkolias, C; Georgopoulou, E

    2016-07-01

    This study presents an application of the Contingent Valuation Method (CVM) for valuing the environmental impacts associated with the operation of landfills for residues following waste treatment and depicts how the results of the analysis can be used for decision making in the field of waste management. The survey was conducted in Ikaria, Greece, a medium-sized island in the northern Aegean Sea, with a view to estimate the amount of compensatory benefits that are socially acceptable to be attributed to the hosting community of a new landfill for residues. The results showed that the mean willingness to pay per household to create a fund for financing social and environmental programs in the community that will host the landfill in question was estimated at €6.5-6.7 per 2-month and household taking into account all households of the sample. This estimate is at the same order of magnitude but at the lower band compared to the results of other relevant studies showing that the public in Ikaria is aware for the relatively limited environmental burdens associated with the operation of landfills for residues following an integrated waste management treatment. PMID:27114113

  13. Evaluation of advanced lubricants for aircraft applications using gear surface fatigue tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Dennis P.; Shimski, John

    1991-01-01

    Surface pitting fatigue life tests were conducted with five lubricants, using spur gears made from a single lot of consumable-electrode vacuum melted (CVM) AISI 9310 steel. The gears were case carbonized and hardened to a Rockwell c-60 and finish ground. The gear pitch diameter was 8.89 cm. The lot of gears was divided into five groups, each of which was tested with a different lubricant. The test lubricants can be classified as synthetic polyol-esters with various viscosities and additive packages. Test conditions included bulk gear temperature of 350 K, a maximum Hertz stress of 1.71 GPa (248 ksi) at the pitch line, and a speed of 10,000 RPM. The lubricant with a viscosity that provided a specific film thickness greater than one and with an additive package produced far greater gear surface fatigue lives than lubricants with a viscosity that provided specific film thickness less than one. A low viscosity lubricant with an additive package produced gear surface fatigue lives equivalent to a similar base stock lubricant with 30 percent higher viscosity, but without an additive package. Lubricants with the same viscosity and similar additive packages gave equivalent gear surface fatigue lives.

  14. VMCast: A VM-Assisted Stability Enhancing Solution for Tree-Based Overlay Multicast

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Weidong; Zhang, Xinchang; Gong, Bin; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Lu

    2015-01-01

    Tree-based overlay multicast is an effective group communication method for media streaming applications. However, a group member’s departure causes all of its descendants to be disconnected from the multicast tree for some time, which results in poor performance. The above problem is difficult to be addressed because overlay multicast tree is intrinsically instable. In this paper, we proposed a novel stability enhancing solution, VMCast, for tree-based overlay multicast. This solution uses two types of on-demand cloud virtual machines (VMs), i.e., multicast VMs (MVMs) and compensation VMs (CVMs). MVMs are used to disseminate the multicast data, whereas CVMs are used to offer streaming compensation. The used VMs in the same cloud datacenter constitute a VM cluster. Each VM cluster is responsible for a service domain (VMSD), and each group member belongs to a specific VMSD. The data source delivers the multicast data to MVMs through a reliable path, and MVMs further disseminate the data to group members along domain overlay multicast trees. The above approach structurally improves the stability of the overlay multicast tree. We further utilized CVM-based streaming compensation to enhance the stability of the data distribution in the VMSDs. VMCast can be used as an extension to existing tree-based overlay multicast solutions, to provide better services for media streaming applications. We applied VMCast to two application instances (i.e., HMTP and HCcast). The results show that it can obviously enhance the stability of the data distribution. PMID:26562152

  15. Heartworms, macrocyclic lactones, and the specter of resistance to prevention in the United States.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Dwight D

    2012-01-01

    In order to provide a background to current concerns relative to the possible resistance of heartworms to macrocyclic lactones, this review summarizes various studies in which lack of efficacies (LOEs) have been observed in dogs on macrocyclic lactone preventives relative to the United States of America. Some of these studies have been published in the peer-reviewed literature, others have appeared in various reports to the Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM) of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) of the USA as New Animal Drug Application (NADA) summaries, and one appeared as a letter to US veterinarians. This review also discusses reports relating to the potential problem of heartworm resistance in microfilariae and third-stage larvae, as well as molecular markers associated with resistance to macrocyclic lactones within Dirofilaria immitis. As more work is being done in this area of great concern relative to the protection of dogs from infection using this class of preventives, it seems timely to summarize what is known about heartworms, their potential resistance to treatment, and the means of selecting for resistance genes in populations of this helminth in the laboratory and in the field.

  16. Heartworms, macrocyclic lactones, and the specter of resistance to prevention in the United States

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In order to provide a background to current concerns relative to the possible resistance of heartworms to macrocyclic lactones, this review summarizes various studies in which lack of efficacies (LOEs) have been observed in dogs on macrocyclic lactone preventives relative to the United States of America. Some of these studies have been published in the peer-reviewed literature, others have appeared in various reports to the Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM) of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) of the USA as New Animal Drug Application (NADA) summaries, and one appeared as a letter to US veterinarians. This review also discusses reports relating to the potential problem of heartworm resistance in microfilariae and third-stage larvae, as well as molecular markers associated with resistance to macrocyclic lactones within Dirofilaria immitis. As more work is being done in this area of great concern relative to the protection of dogs from infection using this class of preventives, it seems timely to summarize what is known about heartworms, their potential resistance to treatment, and the means of selecting for resistance genes in populations of this helminth in the laboratory and in the field. PMID:22776618

  17. Estimating the demand for municipal waste compost via farmers' willingness-to-pay in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Danso, G; Drechsel, P; Fialor, S; Giordano, M

    2006-01-01

    This paper has its primary focus on the analysis of perceptions and willingness-to-pay (WTP) for composted municipal solid and faecal waste among urban and peri-urban farmers and other potential compost users in Ghana. Participatory rural appraisal and contingent valuation methods (CVM) were used for the demand analysis. Most respondents were clear and firm in their responses to the principal question about WTP for compost, as well as in giving their views and perceptions about issues involved in demand for compost. The probit analysis proved valuable in highlighting variables, which explain variations in the WTP. The WTP analysis allowed the quantification of the compost demand under different scenarios of subsidized and non-subsidized compost production, with due allowance for a local reference price to cover compost station operating costs. The analysis revealed that the effective demand for compost for agricultural purposes is marginal and limited by farmers' transport costs. Only through the additional consideration of the demand of the construction sector can about 25% of the organic waste produced in Ghana's capital, Accra, be transformed and utilized. Public subsidies appear necessary and could be generated through savings in transport and disposal. Without subsidies, the challenge for an increased agricultural use is how to produce a low-cost but nutrient-rich compost, which can compete with abundant and cheap poultry manure and still achieve the price to maintain a compost station. The experience in Ghana shows that this is hardly possible except through private-public partnerships. PMID:16356706

  18. Endurance and failure characteristics of main-shaft jet engine bearings at 3x10 to the 6th power DN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bamberger, E. N.; Zaretsky, E. V.; Signer, H.

    1976-01-01

    Groups of thirty 120-mm bore angular contact ball bearings were endurance tested at a speed of 12,000 and 25,000 rpm and a thrust load of 66 721 N. The bearings were manufactured from a single heat of VIM-VAR AISI M-50 steel. At 1.44X1 million and 3.0x1 million DN, 84 483 and 74 800 bearing test hours were accumulated, respectively. Test results were compared with similar bearings made from CVM AISI M-50 steel run under the same conditions. Bearing lives at speeds of 3x1 million DN with the VIM-VAR AISI M-50 steel were nearly equivalent to those obtained at lower speeds. A combined processing and material life factor of 44 was found for VIM-VAR AISI M-50 steel. Continuous running after a spall has occurred at 3.0x1 million DN can result in a destructive fracture of the bearing inner race.

  19. Comprehensive evaluation of environmental and economic benefits of China's urban underground transportation construction projects.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaobin; Chen, Zhilong; Guo, Dongjun

    2015-07-01

    Urban underground transportation projects are introduced to address problems of scarce green land and traffic pollution. As construction of urban underground transportation is still in its infancy, there is no definite quantitative measurement on whether the construction is beneficial and what influences it will place on the region in China. This study intends to construct a comprehensive evaluation method for evaluating social, economic and environmental benefits of urban underground transportation projects and proposes the concept, role and principle for evaluation of environmental and economic benefits. It figures out relationship between the environment and factors of city development. It also summarizes three relevant factors, including transportation, biophysics and social economy, and works out indicators to evaluate the influence of urban underground transportation construction. Based on Contingent Valuation Method (CVM), Cost of Illness Approach (CIA), Human Capital Approach (HCA), this paper constructs 13 monetization calculation models for social, economic and environmental benefits in response to seven aspects, namely, reducing noise pollution and air pollution, using land efficiently, improving traffic safety, reducing traffic congestion, saving shipping time and minimizing transportation costs. PMID:26387347

  20. Validation study of the BetaStar plus lateral flow assay for detection of beta-lactam antibiotics in milk.

    PubMed

    Abouzied, Mohamed; Driksna, Dana; Walsh, Coilin; Sarzynski, Michael; Walsh, Aaron; Ankrapp, David; Klein, Frank; Rice, Jennifer; Mozola, Mark

    2012-01-01

    A validation study designed to meet the requirements of the AOAC Research Institute and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Center for Veterinary Medicine (FDA/CVM) was conducted for a receptor and antibody-based, immunochromatographic method (BetaStar Plus) for detection of beta-lactam antibiotic residues in raw, commingled bovine milk. The assay was found to detect amoxicillin, ampicillin, ceftiofur, cephapirin, cloxacillin, and penicillin G at levels below the FDA tolerance/safe levels, but above the maximum sensitivity thresholds established by the National Conference on Interstate Milk Shipments (NCIMS). Results of the part I (internal) and part II (independent laboratory) dose-response studies employing spiked samples were in close agreement. The test was able to detect all six drugs at the approximate 90/95% sensitivity levels when presented as incurred residues in milk collected from cows that had been treated with the specific drug. Selectivity of the assay was 100%, as no false-positive results were obtained in testing of 1031 control milk samples. Results of ruggedness experiments established the operating parameter tolerances for the BetaStar Plus assay. Results of cross-reactivity testing established that the assay detects certain other beta-lactam drugs (dicloxacillin and ticarcillin), but it does not cross-react with any of 30 drugs belonging to other classes. Abnormally high bacterial or somatic cell counts in raw milk produced no interference with the ability of the test to detect beta-lactams at tolerance/safe levels.

  1. Assessing Local Communities’ Willingness to Pay for River Network Protection: A Contingent Valuation Study of Shanghai, China

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Zhaoyi; Che, Yue; Yang, Kai; Jiang, Yu

    2012-01-01

    River networks have experienced serious degradation because of rapid urbanization and population growth in developing countries such as China, and the protection of these networks requires the integration of evaluation with ecology and economics. In this study, a structured questionnaire survey of local residents in Shanghai (China) was conducted in urban and suburban areas. The study examined residents’ awareness of the value of the river network, sought their attitude toward the current status, and employed a logistic regression analysis based on the contingent valuation method (CVM) to calculate the total benefit and explain the socioeconomic factors influencing the residents’ willingness to pay (WTP). The results suggested that residents in Shanghai had a high degree of recognition of river network value but a low degree of satisfaction with the government’s actions and the current situation. The study also illustrated that the majority of respondents were willing to pay for river network protection. The mean WTP was 226.44 RMB per household per year. The number of years lived in Shanghai, the distance from the home to the nearest river, and the amount of the bid were important factors that influenced the respondents’ WTP. Suggestions for comprehensive management were proposed for the use of policy makers in river network conservation. PMID:23202821

  2. Energetics and statistics of order in alloys with application to oxide superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    de Fontaine, D. California Univ., Berkeley, CA . Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering); Ceder, G. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Asta, M. California Univ., Berkeley, CA .

    1991-06-01

    Now that first-principles calculations of ordering transformations are becoming increasingly accurate, the deficiencies of earlier mean field methods are becoming increasingly apparent. New techniques, based on cluster expansions, are now alleviating many of the earlier problems and are producing very satisfactory results. These ideas will be illustrated for the case of oxygen ordering in the YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub z} superconducting compound, for which a very simple two-dimensional Ising model has been developed. The model features nearest-neighbor repulsive effective pair interactions and anisotropic (attractive/repulsive) next-nearest-neighbor interactions. CVM (cluster variation method) calculations based on this model have produced a phase diagram in remarkable agreement with experimentally determined phase boundaries. Monte Carlo simulations have confirmed the validity of the model and have provided a rationalization for the influence of oxygen order on the value of {Tc} (superconducting transition temperature) in off-stoichiometric compounds. 46 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Effects of obstruent consonants on the F0 contour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Helen M.

    2003-10-01

    When a vowel follows an obstruent consonant, the fundamental frequency in the first few tens of milliseconds of the vowel is influenced by the voicing characteristics of the consonant. The goal of the research reported here is to model this influence, with the intention of improving generation of F0 contours in rule-based speech synthesis. Data have been recorded from 10 subjects. Stops, fricatives, and the nasal /m/ were paired with the vowels /i,opena/ to form CVm syllables. The syllables mVm served as baselines with which to compare the obstruents. The target syllables were embedded in carrier sentences. Intonation was varied so that each target syllable was produced with either a high, low, or no pitch accent. Results vary among subjects, but in general, obstruent effects on F0 primarily occur when the syllable carries a high pitch. In that case, F0 is increased relative to the baseline following voiceless obstruents, but F0 closely follows the baseline following voiced obstruents. After voiceless obstruents, F0 may be increased for up to 80 ms following voicing onset. When a syllable carries a low or no pitch accent, F0 is increased slightly following all obstruents. [Work supported by NIH Grant No. DC04331.

  4. In vivo optical imaging of brain tumors and arthritis using fluorescent SapC-DOPS nanovesicles.

    PubMed

    Chu, Zhengtao; LaSance, Kathleen; Blanco, Victor; Kwon, Chang-Hyuk; Kaur, Balveen; Frederick, Malinda; Thornton, Sherry; Lemen, Lisa; Qi, Xiaoyang

    2014-01-01

    We describe a multi-angle rotational optical imaging (MAROI) system for in vivo monitoring of physiopathological processes labeled with a fluorescent marker. Mouse models (brain tumor and arthritis) were used to evaluate the usefulness of this method. Saposin C (SapC)-dioleoylphosphatidylserine (DOPS) nanovesicles tagged with CellVue Maroon (CVM) fluorophore were administered intravenously. Animals were then placed in the rotational holder (MARS) of the in vivo imaging system. Images were acquired in 10° steps over 380°. A rectangular region of interest (ROI) was placed across the full image width at the model disease site. Within the ROI, and for every image, mean fluorescence intensity was computed after background subtraction. In the mouse models studied, the labeled nanovesicles were taken up in both the orthotopic and transgenic brain tumors, and in the arthritic sites (toes and ankles). Curve analysis of the multi angle image ROIs determined the angle with the highest signal. Thus, the optimal angle for imaging each disease site was characterized. The MAROI method applied to imaging of fluorescent compounds is a noninvasive, economical, and precise tool for in vivo quantitative analysis of the disease states in the described mouse models. PMID:24837630

  5. Estimating willingness to pay for environment conservation: a contingent valuation study of Kanas Nature Reserve, Xinjiang, China.

    PubMed

    Han, Fang; Yang, Zhaoping; Wang, Hui; Xu, Xiaoliang

    2011-09-01

    The primary objective of this study is to estimate publics' willingness to pay (WTP) for environment conservation and analyze factors influencing WTP. A questionnaire survey based on the contingent valuation method (CVM) was carried out at Kanas Nature Reserve, Xinjiang, China. Seventy-three percent of the 412 respondents were willing to pay at different levels, and the mean WTP value was RMB 54.60 ($8.03). The results of this survey struck an optimistic note that publics were willing to contribute to improve environmental quality. Logistic regression analysis was employed to compare the characteristics of those who were and were not willing to pay. Chi-square tests were administered to identify the relationships between various explanatory factors and WTP. Conclusions and implications of the empirical study can be provided to policy makers and site managers. In a wider sense, the findings of this study should make a good contribution to the literature related to WTP for environment conservation of natural attractions. PMID:21107901

  6. Valuation of Ecological Resources and Functions

    PubMed

    Scott; Bilyard; Link; Ulibarri; Westerdahl; Ricci; Seely

    1998-01-01

    / Ecological resources are natural resources that provide certain necessary but overlooked system maintenance functions within ecosystems. Environmental economics is in search of an appropriate analysis framework to determine economic values of such resources. This paper presents a framework that estimates and compiles the components of value for a natural ecosystem. The framework begins with the ecological processes involved, which provide functions within the ecosystem and services valued by humans. We discuss the additive or competive nature of these values, and estimate these values through conventional and unconventional techniques. We apply the framework to ecological resources in a shrub-steppe dryland habitat being displaced by development. We first determine which functions and services are mutually exclusive (e.g., farming vs soil stabilization) and which are complementary or products of joint production (e.g., soil stabilization and maintenance of species). We then apply benefit transfer principles with contingent valuation methodology (CVM), travel cost methodology (TCM), and hedonic damage pricing (HDP). Finally, we derive upper-limit values for more difficult-to-value functions through the use of human analogs, which we argue are the most appropriate method of valuation under some circumstances. The highest values of natural shrub-steppe habitat appear to be derived from soil stabilization.KEY WORDS: Natural resource economics; Ecological economics; Ecological resources; Shrub-steppe; Environmental valuation; Cost; Benefit; Value PMID:9419284

  7. VMCast: A VM-Assisted Stability Enhancing Solution for Tree-Based Overlay Multicast.

    PubMed

    Gu, Weidong; Zhang, Xinchang; Gong, Bin; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Lu

    2015-01-01

    Tree-based overlay multicast is an effective group communication method for media streaming applications. However, a group member's departure causes all of its descendants to be disconnected from the multicast tree for some time, which results in poor performance. The above problem is difficult to be addressed because overlay multicast tree is intrinsically instable. In this paper, we proposed a novel stability enhancing solution, VMCast, for tree-based overlay multicast. This solution uses two types of on-demand cloud virtual machines (VMs), i.e., multicast VMs (MVMs) and compensation VMs (CVMs). MVMs are used to disseminate the multicast data, whereas CVMs are used to offer streaming compensation. The used VMs in the same cloud datacenter constitute a VM cluster. Each VM cluster is responsible for a service domain (VMSD), and each group member belongs to a specific VMSD. The data source delivers the multicast data to MVMs through a reliable path, and MVMs further disseminate the data to group members along domain overlay multicast trees. The above approach structurally improves the stability of the overlay multicast tree. We further utilized CVM-based streaming compensation to enhance the stability of the data distribution in the VMSDs. VMCast can be used as an extension to existing tree-based overlay multicast solutions, to provide better services for media streaming applications. We applied VMCast to two application instances (i.e., HMTP and HCcast). The results show that it can obviously enhance the stability of the data distribution. PMID:26562152

  8. On the structure of negative-parity states in 66Zn and 70Ge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleemann, L.; Eberth, J.; Neumann, W.; Zobel, V.

    1982-09-01

    Mean lifetimes of negative-parity states in 66Zn and 70Ge have been measured using the recoil distance Doppler shift technique. The states in 66Zn have been studied through the reaction 55Mn( 14N, 2pnγ) 66Zn at E = 47 MeV, those in 70Ge through the reaction 56Fe( 16O, 2pγ) 70Ge at E = 46 MeV. The measurements were performed with a plunger apparatus with a piezo-electric distance regulation. The mean lifetimes in 66Zn were measured to be 66 ± 4ps (5 - state), 43 ± 2 ps (6 - state), 192 ± 15 ps (7 - state), and 2.7 ± 1.2 ps (9 - state), those of 70Ge 19.7 ± 2 ps (5 - state), 51 ± 4 ps (6 - state), and 25.2 ± 1.4 ps (7 - state). Deduced B ( Ml) and B( E2) values are compared with theoretical predictions of a two-proton cluster-vibration coupling model (CVM) which describes these states as couplings of g {9}/{2} ⊗ (fp shell) proton clusters to zero, one and higher phonon excitations of the corresponding Ni and Zn cores. Good overall agreement between the theoretical values and the experimental data was found.

  9. Tumor cell vascular mimicry: Novel targeting opportunity in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Hendrix, Mary J C; Seftor, Elisabeth A; Seftor, Richard E B; Chao, Jun-Tzu; Chien, Du-Shieng; Chu, Yi-Wen

    2016-03-01

    In 1999, the American Journal of Pathology published an article, entitled "Vascular channel formation by human melanoma cells in vivo and in vitro: vasculogenic mimicry" by Maniotis and colleagues, which ignited a spirited debate for several years and earned the journal's distinction of a "citation classic" (Maniotis et al., 1999). Tumor cell vasculogenic mimicry (VM), also known as vascular mimicry, describes the plasticity of aggressive cancer cells forming de novo vascular networks and is associated with the malignant phenotype and poor clinical outcome. The tumor cells capable of VM share the commonality of a stem cell-like, transendothelial phenotype, which may be induced by hypoxia. Since its introduction as a novel paradigm for melanoma tumor perfusion, many studies have contributed new findings illuminating the underlying molecular pathways supporting VM in a variety of tumors, including carcinomas, sarcomas, glioblastomas, astrocytomas, and melanomas. Of special significance is the lack of effectiveness of angiogenesis inhibitors on tumor cell VM, suggesting a selective resistance by this phenotype to conventional therapy. Facilitating the functional plasticity of tumor cell VM are key proteins associated with vascular, stem cell, extracellular matrix, and hypoxia-related signaling pathways--each deserving serious consideration as potential therapeutic targets and diagnostic indicators of the aggressive, metastatic phenotype. This review highlights seminal findings pertinent to VM, including the effects of a novel, small molecular compound, CVM-1118, currently under clinical development to target VM, and illuminates important molecular pathways involved in the suppression of this plastic, aggressive phenotype, using melanoma as a model.

  10. Applications of Gene Replacement Technology to Streptomyces clavuligerus Strain Development for Clavulanic Acid Production

    PubMed Central

    Paradkar, A. S.; Mosher, R. H.; Anders, C.; Griffin, A.; Griffin, J.; Hughes, C.; Greaves, P.; Barton, B.; Jensen, S. E.

    2001-01-01

    Cephamycin C production was blocked in wild-type cultures of the clavulanic acid-producing organism Streptomyces clavuligerus by targeted disruption of the gene (lat) encoding lysine ɛ-aminotransferase. Specific production of clavulanic acid increased in the lat mutants derived from the wild-type strain by 2- to 2.5-fold. Similar beneficial effects on clavulanic acid production were noted in previous studies when gene disruption was used to block the production of the non-clavulanic acid clavams produced by S. clavuligerus. Therefore, mutations in lat and in cvm1, a gene involved in clavam production, were introduced into a high-titer industrial strain of S. clavuligerus to create a double mutant with defects in production of both cephamycin C and clavams. Production of both cephamycin C and non-clavulanic acid clavams was eliminated in the double mutant, and clavulanic acid titers increased about 10% relative to those of the parental strain. This represents the first report of the successful use of genetic engineering to eliminate undesirable metabolic pathways in an industrial strain used for the production of an antibiotic important in human medicine. PMID:11319114

  11. Gone with the heat: a fundamental constraint on the imaging of dust and molecular gas in the early Universe.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Yu; Papadopoulos, Padelis P; Ivison, R J; Galametz, Maud; Smith, M W L; Xilouris, Emmanuel M

    2016-06-01

    Images of dust continuum and carbon monoxide (CO) line emission are powerful tools for deducing structural characteristics of galaxies, such as disc sizes, H2 gas velocity fields and enclosed H2 and dynamical masses. We report on a fundamental constraint set by the cosmic microwave background (CMB) on the observed structural and dynamical characteristics of galaxies, as deduced from dust continuum and CO-line imaging at high redshifts. As the CMB temperature rises in the distant Universe, the ensuing thermal equilibrium between the CMB and the cold dust and H2 gas progressively erases all spatial and spectral contrasts between their brightness distributions and the CMB. For high-redshift galaxies, this strongly biases the recoverable H2 gas and dust mass distributions, scale lengths, gas velocity fields and dynamical mass estimates. This limitation is unique to millimetre/submillimetre wavelengths and unlike its known effect on the global dust continuum and molecular line emission of galaxies, it cannot be addressed simply. We nevertheless identify a unique signature of CMB-affected continuum brightness distributions, namely an increasing rather than diminishing contrast between such brightness distributions and the CMB when the cold dust in distant galaxies is imaged at frequencies beyond the Raleigh-Jeans limit. For the molecular gas tracers, the same effect makes the atomic carbon lines maintain a larger contrast than the CO lines against the CMB.

  12. Arthropods of the great indoors: characterizing diversity inside urban and suburban homes.

    PubMed

    Bertone, Matthew A; Leong, Misha; Bayless, Keith M; Malow, Tara L F; Dunn, Robert R; Trautwein, Michelle D

    2016-01-01

    Although humans and arthropods have been living and evolving together for all of our history, we know very little about the arthropods we share our homes with apart from major pest groups. Here we surveyed, for the first time, the complete arthropod fauna of the indoor biome in 50 houses (located in and around Raleigh, North Carolina, USA). We discovered high diversity, with a conservative estimate range of 32-211 morphospecies, and 24-128 distinct arthropod families per house. The majority of this indoor diversity (73%) was made up of true flies (Diptera), spiders (Araneae), beetles (Coleoptera), and wasps and kin (Hymenoptera, especially ants: Formicidae). Much of the arthropod diversity within houses did not consist of synanthropic species, but instead included arthropods that were filtered from the surrounding landscape. As such, common pest species were found less frequently than benign species. Some of the most frequently found arthropods in houses, such as gall midges (Cecidomyiidae) and book lice (Liposcelididae), are unfamiliar to the general public despite their ubiquity. These findings present a new understanding of the diversity, prevalence, and distribution of the arthropods in our daily lives. Considering their impact as household pests, disease vectors, generators of allergens, and facilitators of the indoor microbiome, advancing our knowledge of the ecology and evolution of arthropods in homes has major economic and human health implications.

  13. Liquid filament instability due to stretch-induced phase separation in polymer solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arinstein, Arkadii; Kulichikhin, Valery; Malkin, Alexander; Technion-Israel Institute of Technology Collaboration; Institute of Petrochemical Synthesis, Russian Academy of Sciences Team

    2015-03-01

    The instability in a jet of a viscoelastic semi-dilute entangled polymer solution under high stretching is discussed. Initially, the variation in osmotic pressure can compensate for decrease in the capillary force, and the jet is stable. The further evolution of the polymer solution along the jet results in formation of a filament in the jet center and of a near-surface solvent layer. Such a redistribution of polymer seems like a ``phase separation'', but it is related to stretching of the jet. The viscous liquid shell demonstrates Raleigh-type instability resulting in the formation of individual droplets on the oriented filament. Experimental observations showed that this separation is starting during few first seconds, and continues of about 10 -15 seconds. The modeling shows that a jet stretching results in a radial gradient in the polymer distribution: the polymer is concentrated in the jet center, whereas the solvent is remaining near the surface. The key point of this model is that a large longitudinal stretching of a polymer network results in its lateral contraction, so a solvent is pressed out of this polymer network because of the decrease in its volume. V.K. and A.M. acknowledge the financial support of the Russian Scientific Foundation (Grant 4-23-00003).

  14. Water quality of the Neuse River, North Carolina : variability, pollution loads, and long-term trends

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harned, Douglas A.

    1980-01-01

    A water-quality study of the Neuse River, N.C., based on data collected during 1956-77 at the U.S. Geological Survey stations at Clayton and Kinston, employs statistical trend analysis techniques that provide a framework for river quality assessment. Overall, water-quality of the Neuse River is satisfactory for most uses. At Clayton, fecal coliform bacteria and nutrient levels are high, but algae and total-organic-carbon data indicate water-quality improvement in recent years, due probably to a new wastewater treatment plant located downstream from Raleigh, N.C. Pollution was determined by subtracting estimated natural loads of constituents from measured total loads. Pollution makes up approximately 50% of the total dissolved material transported by the Neuse. Two different data transformation methods allowed trends to be identified in constituent concentrations. The methods recomputed the concentrations as if they were determined at a constant discharge over the period of record. Although little change since 1956 can be seen in most constituents, large changes in some constituents, such as increases in potassium and sulfate, indicate that the water quality of the Neuse River has noticeably deteriorated. Increases in sulfate are probably largely due to increased long-term inputs of sulfur compounds from airborne pollutants. (USGS)

  15. Measurement of toxic and related air pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Jayanty, R.K.M.; Gay, B.W. Jr.

    1990-12-01

    A joint conference for the fifth straight year cosponsored by the Air and Waste Management Association's EM-3, EM-4, and ITF-2 technical committees, and the Atmospheric Research and Exposure Assessment Laboratory (AREAL) of the US Environmental Protection Agency, was held in Raleigh, North Carolina, May 1-4, 1990. The technical program consisted of 187 presentations, held in 20 technical sessions, on recent advances in the measurement and monitoring of toxic and related pollutants found in ambient and source atmospheres. Covering a wide range of measurement topics and supported by 66 exhibitors of instrumentation and consulting services, the symposium was attended by more than 850 professionals from the US and other countries. This overview highlights a selection of the technical presentations. A synopsis of the keynote address to the symposium is also included. Presentations include: (1) radon, (2) atmospheric chemistry and fate of toxic pollutants, (3) supercritical fluid extraction, (4) acidic deposition, (5) determination of polar and volatile organic pollutants in ambient air, (6) Delaware Superfund innovative technology evaluation (SITE) study, (7) mobile sources emissions characterization, (8) Superfund site air monitoring, (9) exposure assessment, (10) chemometrics and environmental data analysis, (11) nicotine in environmental tobacco smoke, (12) source monitoring, (13) effects of air toxics on plants, (14) measurement of volatile organic pollutants, (15) general, (16) air pollution dispersion modeling, (17) measurement of hazardous waste emissions, (18) measurement of indoor toxic air contaminants, and (19) environmental quality assurance.

  16. Arthropods of the great indoors: characterizing diversity inside urban and suburban homes.

    PubMed

    Bertone, Matthew A; Leong, Misha; Bayless, Keith M; Malow, Tara L F; Dunn, Robert R; Trautwein, Michelle D

    2016-01-01

    Although humans and arthropods have been living and evolving together for all of our history, we know very little about the arthropods we share our homes with apart from major pest groups. Here we surveyed, for the first time, the complete arthropod fauna of the indoor biome in 50 houses (located in and around Raleigh, North Carolina, USA). We discovered high diversity, with a conservative estimate range of 32-211 morphospecies, and 24-128 distinct arthropod families per house. The majority of this indoor diversity (73%) was made up of true flies (Diptera), spiders (Araneae), beetles (Coleoptera), and wasps and kin (Hymenoptera, especially ants: Formicidae). Much of the arthropod diversity within houses did not consist of synanthropic species, but instead included arthropods that were filtered from the surrounding landscape. As such, common pest species were found less frequently than benign species. Some of the most frequently found arthropods in houses, such as gall midges (Cecidomyiidae) and book lice (Liposcelididae), are unfamiliar to the general public despite their ubiquity. These findings present a new understanding of the diversity, prevalence, and distribution of the arthropods in our daily lives. Considering their impact as household pests, disease vectors, generators of allergens, and facilitators of the indoor microbiome, advancing our knowledge of the ecology and evolution of arthropods in homes has major economic and human health implications. PMID:26819844

  17. The chemical evolution of oceanic and continental lithosphere: Case studies in the US Cordillera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jean, Marlon Mauricio

    Investigations into ophiolite from California demonstrated that these ultramafic rocks formed within the mantle wedge of a subduction zone. Fore-arc locales are dominated by highly refractory peridotite, formed by hydrous-fractional partial melting that began in the garnet stability field and ended in the spinel stability field. These ophiolites also displayed enriched fluid-mobile element concentrations. Based on melt models, these elements should have extremely low concentrations, yet all pyroxenes display enriched compositions. A new algorithm was derived to model this fluid enrichment process, which represents the total addition of material to the mantle wedge source region and can be applied to any refractory mantle peridotite that has been modified by melt extraction and/or metasomatism. Investigations into the interaction of a mantle plume with continental lithosphere demonstrated that Yellowstone-Snake River Plain olivine tholeiites are compatible with genesis from a deep-seated mantle plume and were modeled via mixing of three components. The variable age, thickness, and composition of North American lithosphere guide this process. Drill core near Twin Falls, ID was examined to assess (1) the chemical evolution of olivine tholeiite, (2) how basalt evolves in continental settings, and (3) the dominant fractionation process, e.g., fractional crystallization, Raleigh fractional crystallization, or assimilation fractional crystallization.

  18. Effects of operating variables on PAH emissions and mutagenicity of emissions from woodstoves.

    PubMed

    McCrillis, R C; Watts, R R; Warren, S H

    1992-05-01

    As part of the Integrated Air Cancer Project, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has conducted field emission measurement programs in Raleigh, North Carolina, and Boise, Idaho, to identify the potential mutagenic impact of residential wood burning and motor vehicles on ambient and indoor air. These studies included the collection of emission samples from chimneys serving wood burning appliances. Parallel projects were undertaken in instrumented woodstove test laboratories to quantify woodstove emissions during operations typical of in-house usage but under more controlled conditions. Three woodstoves were operated in test laboratories over a range of burnrates, burning eastern oak, southern yellow pine, or western white pine. Two conventional stoves were tested at an altitude of 90 m. One of the conventional stoves and a catalytic stove were tested at an altitude of 825 m. Decreasing burnrate increased total particulate emissions from the conventional stoves while the catalytic stove's total particulate emissions were unaffected. There was no correlation of total particulate emissions with altitude whereas total polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emissions were higher at the lower altitude. Mutagenicity of the catalytic stove emissions was higher than emissions from the conventional stove. Emissions from burning pine were more mutagenic than emissions from oak.

  19. Changes in Carbon Flux at the Duke Forest Hardwood Ameriflux Site Due to Land Cover/Land Use Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCombs, A. G.

    2014-12-01

    The Raleigh/Durham, North Carolina metropolitan area has been ranked by Forbes as the fastest growing cities in the United States. As a result of the rapid growth, there has been a significant amount of urban sprawl. The objective of this study was to determine if the changes in land use and land cover have caused a change in the carbon flux near the Duke Forest AmeriFlux station that was active from 2001 to 2008. The land cover and land use were assessed every two years to determine how land cover has changed at the Duke Forest Hardwoods (US-Dk2) AmeriFlux site from 2001 to 2008 using Landsat scenes. The change in land cover and land use was then compared to changes in the carbon footprint that is computed annually from 2001 to 2008. The footprint model for each wind direction determined that there are changes annually and that the research will determine if these changes are due to annual weather patterns or land use and land cover changes.

  20. Detecting Acoustic Emissions With/Without Dehydration of Serpentine Outside P-T Field of Conventional Brittle Failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, H.; Fei, Y.; Silver, P. G.; Green, H. W.

    2005-12-01

    It is currently thought that earthquakes cannot be triggered at depths greater than ~60 km by unassisted brittle failure or frictional sliding, but could be triggered by dehydration embrittlement of hydrous minerals (Raleigh and Paterson, 1965; Green and Houston, 1995; Kirby, 1995; Jung et al., 2004). Using a new multianvil-based system for detecting acoustic emissions with four channels at high pressure and high temperature that was recently developed (Jung et al., 2005), we tested this hypothesis by deforming samples of serpentine. We found that acoustic emissions were detected not only during/after the dehydration of serpentine, but even in the absence of dehydration. These emissions occurred at high pressure and high temperature, and thus outside pressure-temperature field of conventional brittle failure. Backscattered-electron images of microstructures of the post-run specimen revealed fault slip at elevated pressure, with offsets of up to ~500 μm, even without dehydration. Analysis of P-wave travel times from the four sensors confirmed that the acoustic emissions originated from within the specimen during fault slip. These observations suggest that earthquakes can be triggered by slip along a fault containing serpentine at significantly higher pressure and temperature conditions than that previously thought, even without dehydration. They are thus consistent with faulting mechanisms that appeal to dehydration embrittlement, as well as those that rely solely on the rheology of non-dehydrated serpentine.

  1. Impacts of global warming on residential heating and cooling degree-days in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Petri, Yana; Caldeira, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is expected to decrease heating demand and increase cooling demand for buildings and affect outdoor thermal comfort. Here, we project changes in residential heating degree-days (HDD) and cooling degree-days (CDD) for the historical (1981–2010) and future (2080–2099) periods in the United States using median results from the Climate Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5) simulations under the Representation Concentration Pathway 8.5 (RCP8.5) scenario. We project future HDD and CDD values by adding CMIP5 projected changes to values based on historical observations of US climate. The sum HDD + CDD is an indicator of locations that are thermally comfortable, with low heating and cooling demand. By the end of the century, station median HDD + CDD will be reduced in the contiguous US, decreasing in the North and increasing in the South. Under the unmitigated RCP8.5 scenario, by the end of this century, in terms of HDD and CDD values considered separately, future New York, NY, is anticipated to become more like present Oklahoma City, OK; Denver, CO, becomes more like Raleigh, NC, and Seattle, WA, becomes more like San Jose, CA. These results serve as an indicator of projected climate change and can help inform decision-making. PMID:26238673

  2. Comparison of Over-the-Rail and Rail Yard Measurements of Diesel Locomotives.

    PubMed

    Graver, Brandon M; Frey, H Christopher

    2015-11-01

    Locomotive prime mover engine emission rates are typically measured at steady-state for discrete throttle notches using an engine dynamometer weighted by a standard duty cycle. However, this method may not represent real-world locomotive emissions. A method for in-use measurement of passenger locomotives, using a portable emissions measurement system (PEMS), was developed to estimate duty cycle average emission rates. We conducted 48 measurements of one-way trips between Raleigh and Charlotte, NC, on 7 locomotives and 18 sets of measurements in the rail yard (RY). Real-world duty cycles differed from those used for regulatory analyses, leading to statistically significant lower cycle average NOx and HC emission rates. Compared to RY measurements, notch average NOx emission rates measured over-the-rail (OTR) at the highest two notch settings were, on average, 19% lower for four locomotives. At the highest notch, OTR CO2 emission rates were, on average, 12% lower than RY rates for five locomotives. For a more accurate representation of real-world emission rates, OTR measurements are preferred. However, using steady-state notch average RY emission rates and standard duty cycles may be tolerable for some applications. OTR versus RY cycle average emission rates typically differed by less than 10%.

  3. Advances in random matrix theory, zeta functions, and sphere packing.

    PubMed

    Hales, T C; Sarnak, P; Pugh, M C

    2000-11-21

    Over four hundred years ago, Sir Walter Raleigh asked his mathematical assistant to find formulas for the number of cannonballs in regularly stacked piles. These investigations aroused the curiosity of the astronomer Johannes Kepler and led to a problem that has gone centuries without a solution: why is the familiar cannonball stack the most efficient arrangement possible? Here we discuss the solution that Hales found in 1998. Almost every part of the 282-page proof relies on long computer verifications. Random matrix theory was developed by physicists to describe the spectra of complex nuclei. In particular, the statistical fluctuations of the eigenvalues ("the energy levels") follow certain universal laws based on symmetry types. We describe these and then discuss the remarkable appearance of these laws for zeros of the Riemann zeta function (which is the generating function for prime numbers and is the last special function from the last century that is not understood today.) Explaining this phenomenon is a central problem. These topics are distinct, so we present them separately with their own introductory remarks.

  4. Introducing sub-wavelength pixel THz camera for the understanding of close pixel-to-wavelength imaging challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, A.; Marchese, L.; Bolduc, M.; Terroux, M.; Dufour, D.; Savard, E.; Tremblay, B.; Oulachgar, H.; Doucet, M.; Le Noc, L.; Alain, C.; Jerominek, H.

    2012-06-01

    Conventional guidelines and approximations useful in macro-scale system design can become invalidated when applied to the smaller scales. An illustration of this is when camera pixel size becomes smaller than the diffraction-limited resolution of the incident light. It is sometimes believed that there is no benefit in having a pixel width smaller than the resolving limit defined by the Raleigh criterion, 1.22 λ F/#. Though this rarely occurs in today's imaging technology, terahertz (THz) imaging is one emerging area where the pixel dimensions can be made smaller than the imaging wavelength. With terahertz camera technology, we are able to achieve sub-wavelength pixel sampling pitch, and therefore capable of directly measuring if there are image quality benefits to be derived from sub-wavelength sampling. Interest in terahertz imaging is high due to potential uses in security applications because of the greater penetration depth of terahertz radiation compared to the infrared and the visible. This paper discusses the modification by INO of its infrared MEMS microbolometer detector technology toward a THz imaging platform yielding a sub-wavelength pixel THz camera. Images obtained with this camera are reviewed in this paper. Measurements were also obtained using microscanning to increase sampling resolution. Parameters such as imaging resolution and sampling are addressed. A comparison is also made with results obtained with an 8-12 μm band camera having a pixel pitch close to the diffractionlimit.

  5. Performance of deep-rooted phreatophytic trees at a site containing total petroleum hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Ferro, Ari M; Adham, Tareq; Berra, Brett; Tsao, David

    2013-01-01

    Poplar and willow tree stands were installed in 2003 at a site in Raleigh, North Carolina containing total petroleum hydrocarbon - contaminated groundwater. The objective was groundwater uptake and plume control. The water table was 5 to 6 m below ground surface (bgs) and therefore methods were used to encourage deep root development. Growth rates, rooting depth and sap flow were measured for trees in Plot A located in the center of the plume and in Plot B peripheral to the plume. The trees were initially sub-irrigated with vertically installed drip-lines and by 2005 had roots 4 to 5 m bgs. Water balance calculations suggested groundwater uptake. In 2007, the average sap flow was higher for Plot B (approximately 59 L per day per tree) than for Plot A (approximately 23 L per day per tree), probably as a result of TPH-induced stress in Plot A. Nevertheless, the estimated rate of groundwater uptake for Plot A was sufficient, relative to the calculated rate of groundwater flux beneath the stand, that a high level of plume control was achieved based on MODFLOW modeling results. Down-gradient groundwater monitoring wells installed in late 2011 should provide quantitative data for plume control.

  6. Using nonlinear ultrasound measurements to track thermal aging in modified 9%Cr ferritic martensitic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, Daniel; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Jacobs, Laurence J.; Ruiz, Alberto; Joo, Young-Sang

    2015-03-01

    This study investigates early thermal aging in 9%Cr ferritic martensitic (FM) steel, which is caused by the formation of second phases during high temperature exposure. This study employs a recently developed nonlinear ultrasonic technique to explore the sensitivity of the nonlinearity parameter. Experimental results show that the nonlinearity parameter is sensitive to certain changes in material's properties such as thermal embrittlement and hardness changes; therefore, it can be used as an indicator of the thermal damage. The specimens investigated are heat treated for different holding times ranging from 200h to 3000h at 650°C. Nonlinear ultrasonic experiments are conducted for each specimen using a wedge transducer to generate and an air-coupled transducer to detect Raleigh surface waves. The amplitudes of the first and second order harmonics are measured at different propagation distances and these amplitudes are used to obtain the relative nonlinearity parameter for each specimen with a different holding time. The nonlinear ultrasonic results are compared with independent mechanical measurements and metallographic images. This research proposes the nonlinear ultrasonic technique as a nondestructive evaluation tool not only to detect thermal damage in early stages, and also to qualitatively assess the stage of thermal damage.

  7. Application of municipal sludge (biosolids) for agricultural purposes and groundwater nitrate concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Welby, C.W. . Dept. of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences)

    1993-03-01

    One of the more popular means of handling sewage sludge from municipalities is its application to agricultural lands. A variety of crops are grown with the expectation that plants will utilize the nitrogen. However, a complex scenario allows some of the nitrate to move below root depth and eventually to the water table at depths of up to 30 ft. The City of Raleigh, NC injects sewage sludge ( residuals'', biosolids'') into soils derived largely from the Rolesville Granite in an area of typical rolling Piedmont topography. A 1975 background study of part of the site demonstrated differences in groundwater quality between areas farmed over a period of years and areas dominated by second-growth pine and harwood forests. Groundwater quality data collected semiannually between 1982 and 1988 show gradual buildup of nitrate in some fields; in others groundwater quality apparently remains unaffected by nitrate from the sludge. Monitoring well placement may play a role in these differences. Minimum time from the sludge application to an increase in groundwater nitrate is from 9 to 12 months. An ongoing study of a 12-acre field which lay fallow for a number of years prior to sludge application in 1990 demonstrates that some nitrate does move downward fairly rapidly, its movement being recorded in both the saprolite and groundwater. Comparison of nitrate content of groundwater from monitoring wells at a nearby dairy farm shows that normal agricultural practices may also increase the nitrate content of the shallow groundwater.

  8. Behavior of Au species in Au/Fe2O3 catalysts characterized by novel in situ heating techniques and aberration-corrected STEM imaging.

    PubMed

    Allard, Lawrence F; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria; Overbury, Steven H

    2010-08-01

    The recent advent of a novel design of in situ heating technology for electron microscopes has permitted unprecedented control of elevated temperature studies of catalytic materials, particularly when coupled with the sub-Angström imaging performance of a modern aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). Using micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS)-based Aduro heating chips from Protochips, Inc. (Raleigh, NC, USA) allows nearly instantaneous heating and cooling of catalyst powders, avoiding effects of temperature ramping as experienced with standard heating stages. The heating technology also provides stable operation limited only by the inherent drift in the microscope stage, thus allowing full image resolution to be achieved even at elevated temperatures. The present study details the use of both the high X-Y spatial resolution in both dark-field and simultaneous bright-field imaging, along with the high resolution in Z (depth sectioning) provided by the large probe incidence semiangle in the aberration-corrected instrument, to characterize the evolution of microstructure in a commercial Au/Fe2O3 water-gas shift catalyst during elevated temperature treatment. The phenomenon of Au diffusion to the surface of hematite support particles to form discrete crystalline Au nanoparticles in the 1-2 nm size range, after a prior leaching treatment to remove surface Au species has been characterized.

  9. Evolution of gold structure during thermal treatment of Au/FeOx catalysts revealed by aberration-corrected electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Allard, Lawrence F; Borisevich, Albina; Deng, Weiling; Si, Rui; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria; Overbury, Steven H

    2009-06-01

    High-resolution aberration-corrected electron microscopy was performed on a series of catalysts derived from a parent material, 2 at.% Au/Fe(2)O(3) (WGC ref. no. 60C), prepared by co-precipitation and calcined in air at 400 degrees C, and a catalyst prepared by leaching surface gold from the parent catalyst and exposed to various treatments, including use in the water-gas shift reaction at 250 degrees C. Aberration-corrected JEOL 2200FS (JEOL USA, Peabody, MA) and Vacuum Generators HB-603U STEM instruments were used to image fresh, reduced, leached, used and re-oxidized catalyst samples. A new in situ heating technology (Protochips Inc., Raleigh, NC, USA), which permits full sub-Angström imaging resolution in the JEOL 2200FS was used to study the effects of temperature on the behavior of gold species. A remarkable stability of gold to redox treatments up to 400 degrees C, with atomic gold decorating step surfaces of iron oxide was identified. On heating the samples in vacuum to 700 degrees C, it was found that monodispersed gold began to sinter to form nanoparticles above 500 degrees C. Gold species internal to the iron oxide support material was shown to diffuse to the surface at elevated temperature, coalescing into discrete nanocrystals. The results demonstrate the value of in situ heating for understanding morphological changes in the catalyst with elevated temperature treatments.

  10. Novel MEMS-based gas-cell/heating specimen holder provides advanced imaging capabilities for in situ reaction studies.

    PubMed

    Allard, Lawrence F; Overbury, Steven H; Bigelow, Wilbur C; Katz, Michael B; Nackashi, David P; Damiano, John

    2012-08-01

    In prior research, specimen holders that employ a novel MEMS-based heating technology (Aduro™) provided by Protochips Inc. (Raleigh, NC, USA) have been shown to permit sub-Ångström imaging at elevated temperatures up to 1,000°C during in situ heating experiments in modern aberration-corrected electron microscopes. The Aduro heating devices permit precise control of temperature and have the unique feature of providing both heating and cooling rates of 10⁶°C/s. In the present work, we describe the recent development of a new specimen holder that incorporates the Aduro heating device into a "closed-cell" configuration, designed to function within the narrow (2 mm) objective lens pole piece gap of an aberration-corrected JEOL 2200FS STEM/TEM, and capable of exposing specimens to gases at pressures up to 1 atm. We show the early results of tests of this specimen holder demonstrating imaging at elevated temperatures and at pressures up to a full atmosphere, while retaining the atomic resolution performance of the microscope in high-angle annular dark-field and bright-field imaging modes.

  11. Cryomesh: a new substrate for cryo-electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Craig; Carragher, Bridget; Potter, Clinton S

    2010-02-01

    Here we evaluate a new grid substrate developed by ProtoChips Inc. (Raleigh, NC) for cryo-transmission electron microscopy. The new grids are fabricated from doped silicon carbide using processes adapted from the semiconductor industry. A major motivating purpose in the development of these grids was to increase the low-temperature conductivity of the substrate, a characteristic that is thought to affect the appearance of beam-induced movement (BIM) in transmission electron microscope (TEM) images of biological specimens. BIM degrades the quality of data and is especially severe when frozen biological specimens are tilted in the microscope. Our results show that this new substrate does indeed have a significant impact on reducing the appearance and severity of beam-induced movement in TEM images of tilted cryo-preserved samples. Furthermore, while we have not been able to ascertain the exact causes underlying the BIM phenomenon, we have evidence that the rigidity and flatness of these grids may play a major role in its reduction. This improvement in the reliability of imaging at tilt has a significant impact on using data collection methods such as random conical tilt or orthogonal tilt reconstruction with cryo-preserved samples. Reduction in BIM also has the potential for improving the resolution of three-dimensional cryo-reconstructions in general.

  12. Overland Flow Analysis Using Time Series of Suas-Derived Elevation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeziorska, J.; Mitasova, H.; Petrasova, A.; Petras, V.; Divakaran, D.; Zajkowski, T.

    2016-06-01

    With the advent of the innovative techniques for generating high temporal and spatial resolution terrain models from Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) imagery, it has become possible to precisely map overland flow patterns. Furthermore, the process has become more affordable and efficient through the coupling of small UAS (sUAS) that are easily deployed with Structure from Motion (SfM) algorithms that can efficiently derive 3D data from RGB imagery captured with consumer grade cameras. We propose applying the robust overland flow algorithm based on the path sampling technique for mapping flow paths in the arable land on a small test site in Raleigh, North Carolina. By comparing a time series of five flights in 2015 with the results of a simulation based on the most recent lidar derived DEM (2013), we show that the sUAS based data is suitable for overland flow predictions and has several advantages over the lidar data. The sUAS based data captures preferential flow along tillage and more accurately represents gullies. Furthermore the simulated water flow patterns over the sUAS based terrain models are consistent throughout the year. When terrain models are reconstructed only from sUAS captured RGB imagery, however, water flow modeling is only appropriate in areas with sparse or no vegetation cover.

  13. Thermal Convection in a cylindrical enclosure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, K.

    The microgravity experiment in the Apollo space mission during 1973 has established the importance of the surface tension as a propulsive force on the onset of convection because surface tension varies with temperature. Any temperature gradient established across the surface of the fluid is accompanied by a gradient in surface tension. However, the surface tension driven convection experiment flown in the shuttle flight has not shown any evidence of oscillatory flow even for Marangoni number as high as 105. The paper discusses thermal convection in a cylindrical enclosure with free boundary in a microgravity environment. The surface deformation caused by g-jitter and its relation to the oscillatory flow is studied. The system to be investigated in cylindrical layers of fluid heated from beneath with upper boundary free, initially in mechanical equilibrium, but subjected to the gradient of heat. At any instant of time, in a microgravity environment, the oscillatory part of g-jitter can be as high as 10 -3 g, where g is the gravitational acceleration on the surface of the earth [1]. The instability of a Boussinesq fluid [2] is analyzed in terms of the dimensionless parameters Raleigh number, Ra, Prandtl number, Pr, Marangoni number, M and the aspect ratio, A and relative importance of these parameters is established. References [1] Bannister, T C., etal, NASA, TMX-64772, 1973 [2] Shukla, K N, Applied Mechanics Review, Vol. 54, (5), PP 391-404, 2001

  14. Hospital bioterrorism planning and burn surge.

    PubMed

    Kearns, Randy D; Myers, Brent; Cairns, Charles B; Rich, Preston B; Hultman, C Scott; Charles, Anthony G; Jones, Samuel W; Schmits, Grace L; Skarote, Mary Beth; Holmes, James H; Cairns, Bruce A

    2014-01-01

    On the morning of June 9, 2009, an explosion occurred at a manufacturing plant in Garner, North Carolina. By the end of the day, 68 injured patients had been evaluated at the 3 Level I trauma centers and 3 community hospitals in the Raleigh/Durham metro area (3 people who were buried in the structural collapse died at the scene). Approximately 300 employees were present at the time of the explosion, when natural gas being vented during the repair of a hot water heater ignited. The concussion from the explosion led to structural failure in multiple locations and breached additional natural gas, electrical, and ammonia lines that ran overhead in the 1-story concrete industrial plant. Intent is the major difference between this type of accident and a terrorist using an incendiary device to terrorize a targeted population. But while this disaster lacked intent, the response, rescue, and outcomes were improved as a result of bioterrorism preparedness. This article discusses how bioterrorism hospital preparedness planning, with an all-hazards approach, became the basis for coordinated burn surge disaster preparedness. This real-world disaster challenged a variety of systems, hospitals, and healthcare providers to work efficiently and effectively to manage multiple survivors. Burn-injured patients served as a focus for this work. We describe the response, rescue, and resuscitation provided by first responders and first receivers as well as efforts made to develop burn care capabilities and surge capacity.

  15. Advanced Electrical, Optical and Data Communication Infrastructure Development

    SciTech Connect

    Simon Cobb

    2011-04-30

    The implementation of electrical and IT infrastructure systems at the North Carolina Center for Automotive Research , Inc. (NCCAR) has achieved several key objectives in terms of system functionality, operational safety and potential for ongoing research and development. Key conclusions include: (1) The proven ability to operate a high speed wireless data network over a large 155 acre area; (2) Node to node wireless transfers from access points are possible at speeds of more than 50 mph while maintaining high volume bandwidth; (3) Triangulation of electronic devices/users is possible in areas with overlapping multiple access points, outdoor areas with reduced overlap of access point coverage considerably reduces triangulation accuracy; (4) Wireless networks can be adversely affected by tree foliage, pine needles are a particular challenge due to the needle length relative to the transmission frequency/wavelength; and (5) Future research will use the project video surveillance and wireless systems to further develop automated image tracking functionality for the benefit of advanced vehicle safety monitoring and autonomous vehicle control through 'vehicle-to-vehicle' and 'vehicle-to-infrastructure' communications. A specific advantage realized from this IT implementation at NCCAR is that NC State University is implementing a similar wireless network across Centennial Campus, Raleigh, NC in 2011 and has benefited from lessons learned during this project. Consequently, students, researchers and members of the public will be able to benefit from a large scale IT implementation with features and improvements derived from this NCCAR project.

  16. Do cities simulate climate change? A comparison of herbivore response to urban and global warming.

    PubMed

    Youngsteadt, Elsa; Dale, Adam G; Terando, Adam J; Dunn, Robert R; Frank, Steven D

    2015-01-01

    Cities experience elevated temperature, CO2 , and nitrogen deposition decades ahead of the global average, such that biological response to urbanization may predict response to future climate change. This hypothesis remains untested due to a lack of complementary urban and long-term observations. Here, we examine the response of an herbivore, the scale insect Melanaspis tenebricosa, to temperature in the context of an urban heat island, a series of historical temperature fluctuations, and recent climate warming. We survey M. tenebricosa on 55 urban street trees in Raleigh, NC, 342 herbarium specimens collected in the rural southeastern United States from 1895 to 2011, and at 20 rural forest sites represented by both modern (2013) and historical samples. We relate scale insect abundance to August temperatures and find that M. tenebricosa is most common in the hottest parts of the city, on historical specimens collected during warm time periods, and in present-day rural forests compared to the same sites when they were cooler. Scale insects reached their highest densities in the city, but abundance peaked at similar temperatures in urban and historical datasets and tracked temperature on a decadal scale. Although urban habitats are highly modified, species response to a key abiotic factor, temperature, was consistent across urban and rural-forest ecosystems. Cities may be an appropriate but underused system for developing and testing hypotheses about biological effects of climate change. Future work should test the applicability of this model to other groups of organisms.

  17. Do cities simulate climate change? A comparison of herbivore response to urban and global warming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Youngsteadt, Elsa; Dale, Adam G.; Terando, Adam; Dunn, Robert R.; Frank, Steven D.

    2014-01-01

    Cities experience elevated temperature, CO2, and nitrogen deposition decades ahead of the global average, such that biological response to urbanization may predict response to future climate change. This hypothesis remains untested due to a lack of complementary urban and long-term observations. Here, we examine the response of an herbivore, the scale insect Melanaspis tenebricosa, to temperature in the context of an urban heat island, a series of historical temperature fluctuations, and recent climate warming. We survey M. tenebricosa on 55 urban street trees in Raleigh, NC, 342 herbarium specimens collected in the rural southeastern United States from 1895 to 2011, and at 20 rural forest sites represented by both modern (2013) and historical samples. We relate scale insect abundance to August temperatures and find that M. tenebricosa is most common in the hottest parts of the city, on historical specimens collected during warm time periods, and in present-day rural forests compared to the same sites when they were cooler. Scale insects reached their highest densities in the city, but abundance peaked at similar temperatures in urban and historical datasets and tracked temperature on a decadal scale. Although urban habitats are highly modified, species response to a key abiotic factor, temperature, was consistent across urban and rural-forest ecosystems. Cities may be an appropriate but underused system for developing and testing hypotheses about biological effects of climate change. Future work should test the applicability of this model to other groups of organisms.

  18. Within-Colony Variation in the Immunocompetency of Managed and Feral Honey Bees (Apis mellifera L.) in Different Urban Landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Appler, R. Holden; Frank, Steven D.; Tarpy, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Urbanization has the potential to dramatically affect insect populations worldwide, although its effects on pollinator populations are just beginning to be understood. We compared the immunocompetency of honey bees sampled from feral (wild-living) and managed (beekeeper-owned) honey bee colonies. We sampled foragers from feral and managed colonies in rural, suburban, and urban landscapes in and around Raleigh, NC, USA. We then analyzed adult workers using two standard bioassays for insect immune function (encapsulation response and phenoloxidase activity). We found that there was far more variation within colonies for encapsulation response or phenoloxidase activity than among rural to urban landscapes, and we did not observe any significant difference in immune response between feral and managed bees. These findings suggest that social pollinators, like honey bees, may be sufficiently robust or variable in their immune responses to obscure any subtle effects of urbanization. Additional studies of immune physiology and disease ecology of social and solitary bees in urban, suburban, and natural ecosystems will provide insights into the relative effects of changing urban environments on several important factors that influence pollinator productivity and health. PMID:26529020

  19. An alternative model for the development of the allochthonous southern Appalachian Piedmont.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zen, E.-A.

    1981-01-01

    The recent deep-seismic-reflection data across the S Appalachian Piedmont require rethinking of the tectonic relations in that area. Some of the traditional tectonic-lithostratigraphic belts of the Piedmont may be 'doubly allochthonous', that is, they may be terranes that are exotic mutually and with respect to the N American craton. These terranes may have been brought to the edge of the craton by plate-tectonic processes, in a manner similar to that proposed for the post-Triassic 'Wrangellia' in southeastern Alaska, and then obducted onto the craton as traditional thrust allochthons. If this idea is correct, then there is no compelling need for an intercontinental suture in the lower crust under the exposed southern Appalachian Piedmont; however, multiple sutures may obtain under the Coastal Plain overlap or farther off shore. The location of the Paleozoic Iapetus Ocean may also be off the present shore. The tectonic units now exposed in the Appalachian Piedmont not only may not be continuous with those of the N Appalachian region that have been considered by many authors to be the same on a cylindrical model but could have had different geologic origins. The nature of the ultramafic rocks spatially associated with the Kings Mountain belt and the Raleigh and Kiokee belts, as well as the paleomagnetic orientations of rocks of the various Piedmont belts, may provide useful tests for this microplate model.-Author

  20. Second harmonic generation from small gold metallic particles: From the dipolar to the quadrupolar response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nappa, J.; Russier-Antoine, I.; Benichou, E.; Jonin, Ch.; Brevet, P. F.

    2006-11-01

    Hyper Raleigh scattering, a common technique to investigate the second harmonic light scattered from a liquid suspension of molecular compounds and to determine their quadratic hyperpolarizability, has been used for aqueous suspensions of gold nanoparticles, the diameter of which ranges from 20 up to 150nm. The hyper Rayleigh signal intensity was recorded as a function of the angle of polarization of the incident fundamental wave. For the particles with a diameter smaller than 50nm, the response is dominated by the dipolar contribution arising from the deviation of the particle shape from that of a perfect sphere. For larger diameter particles, retardation effects in the interaction of the electromagnetic fields with the particles cannot be neglected any longer and the response deviates from the pure dipolar response, exhibiting a strong quadrupolar contribution. It is then shown that in order to quantify the relative magnitude of these two dipolar and quadrupolar contributions, a weighting parameter ζV which equals unity for a pure quadrupolar contribution and vanishes for a pure dipolar response, can be introduced.

  1. Mechanisms for selective coalescence of coals

    SciTech Connect

    Wheelock, T.D.; Markuszewski, R.; Fan, C.W.; Drzymala, J.; Allen, R.W.; Hu, Y.C.; Tyson, D.; Xiaoping, Qiu; Lessa, A.

    1988-12-01

    The study of basic mechanisms which underlie various processes for cleaning coal by selective agglomeration with oil was continued. Upper Freeport coal, used extensively in this study, was further characterized by measuring its heat of wetting in dilute salt solutions (CaCl{sub 2}/NaCl/FeCl{sub 3}) range of pH. The effect of mild surface oxidation on the agglomeration characteristics of Lower Kittanning coal was investigated because of the large pyritic sulfur content of this material. Oxidation was performed by exposing a thin layer of the finely ground coal to air at room temperature for 10 days. When the ground material was subsequently agglomerated with heptane, the agglomeration recovery of the oxidized coal was only slightly less than that of unoxidized coal. However, the sulfur content was lower than that of agglomerated coal which had not been oxidized. The effect of pyrite surface properties on the separation of coal/pyrite mixtures was further studied by combining acid-cleaned mineral pyrite with No. 2 gas seam coal from Raleigh Country, West Virginia. The separation was not as good as that obtained previously with mixtures involving mineral pyrite which had been mildly oxidized. 1 ref., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Computational Physics in Africa, its Scope and Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheth, Chandra

    2002-08-01

    There is a large untapped potential scientific talent available among the estimated 700 million people who live in Africa. Computational physics has the scope of playing a key role in tapping this potential and associated with this are a number of challenges. Since CCP2001, there has been a significant effort in place in addressing some of the problems faced in Africa. The effort of D.Stauffer through website: www.thp-uni-koeln.de under the umbrella of EPS and Forum on Physics in Africa through efforts of researchers of African origin in USA are some of the positive developments. Computational Physics Division of APS can play a significant role in the successful implementation of computational physics in Africa. This article explains the role of Computational Physics in Africa, its need, its scope and challenges and the contributions APS can make. References: 1. C.V.Sheth, Proceedings of CCP2001. 2. E.F. Redish in : Computers in Physics Instruction, Proceedings Aug 1-5,1988,Raleigh,North Carolina, U.S.A., Addison-Wesley, 1990. keywords: computers in physics education, computational physics. PACS: 07-05.-t, 01.50.Ht, 01.50.-i, 01.40Gm,01.40-d

  3. Plant materials and amendments for controlling wind and water erosion on a fly ash disposal area: TVA Colbert Fossil Plant, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Maddox, J.J.; Behel, D.; Soileau, J.M.; Kelsoe, J.

    1996-12-31

    Fly ash disposal sites adjacent to fossil fueled generating plants are subject to wind and water erosion which increases the operation and maintenance costs. Gullies and unstable areas in the disposal sites require expensive leveling and filling practices. Test evaluated both warm- and cool-season cover crops established by either sod or seed. Amendments to the ash consisted of composted poultry litter (CPL), soil, soil+CPL, fertilizer and beneficial soil microbes including mycorrhizal fungi. Turf sods (419 Bermuda, Emerald zoysia, and Raleigh St. Augustine) were compared in greenhouse and field studies. Six legumes and 12 grass species were tested in the greenhouse as seeded cover crops using similar amendments and raw poultry litter (PL). Legumes grew better with CPL and Boil amendments and grasses grew better on PL and soil amendments possibly due to differences in N requirements and N supply. Cool season crops generally grew faster than warm season species in the greenhouse tests. Amendments should be mixed with the FA to ameliorate the effects of boron and salt toxicity and to increase the water holding capacity. Bermuda sod grew faster than either St, Augustine or Emerald zoysia, but requires more water. A microbial amendment increased dry matter yields of bermuda sod 2 to 3 times after 40 to 60 days over unamended controls. Microbial amendments may be justified on an economic and sustainable basis. A field study is assessing the environmental and cultural requirements to grow a cover crop on an annual basis.

  4. Poultry waste digester. Final progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, J.C.H.

    1983-01-01

    A simple and low-cost poultry waste digester (PWD) was constructed at North Carolina State University's Poultry Research Farm at Raleigh, N.C. The PWD system was designed to process a daily output of 600 kg of manure from 4000 caged laying hens. The system consisted of two digesters connected in series, a heating system, a hot water tank, and other metering equipment. The primary and secondary digesters were horizontal cylinders located partially below ground level. They were made of Red Mud plastic lining, supported in the insulated trenches, and covered with insulated roofs. The primary digester volume was 15 m/sup 3/ with an 8 m/sup 3/ liquid volume and a gas head-space above the liquid. The secondary digester volume was 30 m/sup 3/ with a 16 m/sup 3/ liquid volume. The temperature (50/sup 0/C) of the primary digester was maintained by the hot dilution water added with manure and a SolaRoll heating mat laid underneath the plastic lining. The design, operation, performance, energy balance, and economics of the digester are discussed and evaluated in this final progress report.

  5. The Marine Ecology of the Laguna San Rafael (Southern Chile): Ice Scour and Opportunism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenport, John

    1995-07-01

    Surveys of the intertidal fauna and flora, the plankton, fish, birds and marine mammals of the Laguna San Rafael were carried out by a Raleigh International Expedition in January-February 1993. The Laguna is dominated by the effects of scouring, low temperature and low salinity produced by the calving, tide-water San Rafael glacier that discharges into the Laguna. The fauna and flora are simple and largely limited to a small sector of the Laguna, relatively unaffected by ice. There is a predominance of herbivorous fish, ducks, geese and swans, feeding mainly on macroalgae. Penguins, cormorants, sea lions and porpoises make up the top predators. The strandline is influenced by very heavy rainfall and supports a fauna of freshwater and terrestrial molluscs and earthworms, fed upon by birds and frogs. Large numbers of mussels are present in the north-eastern sector of the Laguna, but many are found in poor condition, high on the shore. It is suggested that poor condition and mortality are caused by large calving waves that dislodge mussels. Such waves are caused by occasional loss of massive quantities of ice from the glacier.

  6. Genetic Architecture of Abdominal Pigmentation in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Dembeck, Lauren M; Huang, Wen; Magwire, Michael M; Lawrence, Faye; Lyman, Richard F; Mackay, Trudy F C

    2015-05-01

    Pigmentation varies within and between species and is often adaptive. The amount of pigmentation on the abdomen of Drosophila melanogaster is a relatively simple morphological trait, which serves as a model for mapping the genetic basis of variation in complex phenotypes. Here, we assessed natural variation in female abdominal pigmentation in 175 sequenced inbred lines of the Drosophila melanogaster Genetic Reference Panel, derived from the Raleigh, NC population. We quantified the proportion of melanization on the two most posterior abdominal segments, tergites 5 and 6 (T5, T6). We found significant genetic variation in the proportion of melanization and high broad-sense heritabilities for each tergite. Genome-wide association studies identified over 150 DNA variants associated with the proportion of melanization on T5 (84), T6 (34), and the difference between T5 and T6 (35). Several of the top variants associated with variation in pigmentation are in tan, ebony, and bric-a-brac1, genes known to affect D. melanogaster abdominal pigmentation. Mutational analyses and targeted RNAi-knockdown showed that 17 out of 28 (61%) novel candidate genes implicated by the genome-wide association study affected abdominal pigmentation. Several of these genes are involved in developmental and regulatory pathways, chitin production, cuticle structure, and vesicle formation and transport. These findings show that genetic variation may affect multiple steps in pathways involved in tergite development and melanization. Variation in these novel candidates may serve as targets for adaptive evolution and sexual selection in D. melanogaster.

  7. Genetic Architecture of Abdominal Pigmentation in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Dembeck, Lauren M.; Huang, Wen; Magwire, Michael M.; Lawrence, Faye; Lyman, Richard F.; Mackay, Trudy F. C.

    2015-01-01

    Pigmentation varies within and between species and is often adaptive. The amount of pigmentation on the abdomen of Drosophila melanogaster is a relatively simple morphological trait, which serves as a model for mapping the genetic basis of variation in complex phenotypes. Here, we assessed natural variation in female abdominal pigmentation in 175 sequenced inbred lines of the Drosophila melanogaster Genetic Reference Panel, derived from the Raleigh, NC population. We quantified the proportion of melanization on the two most posterior abdominal segments, tergites 5 and 6 (T5, T6). We found significant genetic variation in the proportion of melanization and high broad-sense heritabilities for each tergite. Genome-wide association studies identified over 150 DNA variants associated with the proportion of melanization on T5 (84), T6 (34), and the difference between T5 and T6 (35). Several of the top variants associated with variation in pigmentation are in tan, ebony, and bric-a-brac1, genes known to affect D. melanogaster abdominal pigmentation. Mutational analyses and targeted RNAi-knockdown showed that 17 out of 28 (61%) novel candidate genes implicated by the genome-wide association study affected abdominal pigmentation. Several of these genes are involved in developmental and regulatory pathways, chitin production, cuticle structure, and vesicle formation and transport. These findings show that genetic variation may affect multiple steps in pathways involved in tergite development and melanization. Variation in these novel candidates may serve as targets for adaptive evolution and sexual selection in D. melanogaster. PMID:25933381

  8. Using Passive Sampling Devices to Assess Chemistry and Toxicity in Streams from six U.S Metropolitan Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steven, G. L.; Cuffney, T.; Tate, C.

    2005-05-01

    The U.S. population is growing by almost 3 million people a year with concomitant increase in urban development. Increased urbanization causes changes to watersheds which may affect aquatic biota by altering the physical and chemical environment. We deployed semi-membrane-permeable-devices (SPMDs) for 30 days to passively sample hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) from 180 streams in six major metropolitan areas in the U.S.: Atlanta, Georgia, Dallas/Fort Worth, Texas, Denver, Colorado, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Portland, Oregon, and Raleigh/Durham, North Carolina. SPMD extracts were tested with two assays: (1)Fluoroscan which estimates PAH concentration (pyrene index) by exposing samples to UV light and (2)P450RGS which measures induction of CYP1A a liver enzyme involved in detoxification of organic contaminants. There was a strong positive relation between urban intensity and both the pyrene index and CYP1A in streams from all six metropolitan areas indicating higher HOC concentrations and greater potential toxicity at higher urbanization levels. Invertebrate community responses as measured by EPT taxa richness and benthic index of biotic integrity were also significantly and negatively correlated with both the pyrene index and CYP1A. Our results suggest that toxicity may be a factor in degradation of invertebrate communities in urban environments.

  9. Copenhagen Revisited: why the Germansdid not Achieve AN Atomic Bomb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lustig, Harry

    2002-10-01

    Michael Frayn's highly acclaimed play "Copenhagen", which reenacts the 1941 visit by Werner Heisenberg to Niels Bohr in Nazi-occupied Copenhagen, has now closed after a production in New York that won a Pulitzer Prize, and a successful tour of many cities in the US. Symposia in New York, Washington, Cambridge, Pasadena, and Raleigh have presented the science - quantum mechanics and nuclear physics - that undergirds the play, have debated its historical accuracy, and have celebrated its theatrical realization. The play, the symposia, and recently released documents have led to a new and heightened debate about old questions, among them why Heisenberg visited Bohr, what went on during their uncongenial meeting, and why the Germans did not succeed in building an atomic bomb. This in turn has resulted in a plethora of sometimes polemical articles in journals and magazines, that try to answer the questions. In this talk I will review some of the evidence, in particular about the German failure to make a bomb. While I will concentrate on the physics, the "political" factors will also be adumbrated.

  10. [Comment on] BOSP members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    The new Board on Ocean Science and Policy (BOSP) (Eos, June 7, 1983, p. 402) met for the first time on May 4. John B. Slaughter, former director of the National Science Foundation and now chancellor of the University of Maryland in College Park, is the board's chairman. Other board members are D. James Baker, Jr. (University of Washington, Seattle); Kirk Bryan (Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton University); John P. Craven (University of Hawaii); Charles L. Drake (Dartmouth College); Paul M. Fye (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution); Edward D. Goldberg (Scripps Institution of Oceanography); G. Ross Heath (Oregon State University); Judith T. Kildow (Massachusetts Institute of Technology); John A. Knauss (University of Rhode Island); James J. McCarthy (Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University); H. William Menard (Scripps Institution of Oceanography); C. Barry Raleigh (Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory); Roger Revelle (University of California, San Diego); David A. Ross (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution); Brian J. Rothschild (University of Maryland); William M. Sackett (University of South Florida); John H. Steele (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution); and Carl Wunsch (MIT). Wallace Broecker (Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory), an original board member, resigned after the first meeting. Broecker told Eos that combining the science and policy boards resulted in a new board whose mission is too broad. A new board member will be appointed in Broecker's place

  11. Colony-level effects of imidacloprid in subterranean termites (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae).

    PubMed

    Parman, Vincent; Vargo, Edward L

    2010-06-01

    We determined the impact of imidacloprid (Premise) on colonies of Reticulitermes spp. (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae) through soil applications in the field. We selected 11 houses in the Raleigh, NC, area with active termite infestations. In-ground monitoring stations (mean = 75.9 stations) were installed around each house, and samples of termites visiting the monitors, in mud tubes, as well as samples from wood debris in the yard, were collected monthly for up to 14 mo to determine the numbers and locations of colonies present before treatment. We used microsatellite genetic markers to identify individual colonies present on each property. All houses were treated with Premise 75 WSP by using an exterior perimeter/interior spot treatment. After treatment, termite samples were collected monthly for 3 mo and then quarterly for 2 yr to track the fate of colonies. Of the 12 treated colonies (those attacking structures), 75% disappeared within 90 d and were not detected again. In contrast, only 25% of 48 untreated colonies (located 2 m or further from the treatment zone) and 40% of the six likely treated colonies (located within 0.5 m of the treatment zone but not known to be attacking the structure) were not detected again during the study. Our findings are consistent with strong colony-level effects of soil treatments with imidacloprid, resulting in the suppression or elimination of Reticulitermes spp. colonies in many cases.

  12. Assessment of regional variation in streamflow responses to urbanization and the persistence of physiography.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Kristina G; Morse, Nathaniel B; Bain, Daniel J; Bettez, Neil D; Grimm, Nancy B; Morse, Jennifer L; Palta, Monica M; Shuster, William D; Bratt, Anika R; Suchy, Amanda K

    2015-03-01

    Aquatic ecosystems are sensitive to the modification of hydrologic regimes, experiencing declines in stream health as the streamflow regime is altered during urbanization. This study uses streamflow records to quantify the type and magnitude of hydrologic changes across urbanization gradients in nine U.S. cities (Atlanta, GA, Baltimore, MD, Boston, MA, Detroit, MI, Raleigh, NC, St. Paul, MN, Pittsburgh, PA, Phoenix, AZ, and Portland, OR) in two physiographic settings. Results indicate similar development trajectories among urbanization gradients, but heterogeneity in the type and magnitude of hydrologic responses to this apparently uniform urban pattern. Similar urban patterns did not confer similar hydrologic function. Study watersheds in landscapes with level slopes and high soil permeability had less frequent high-flow events, longer high-flow durations, lower flashiness response, and lower flow maxima compared to similarly developed watersheds in landscape with steep slopes and low soil permeability. Our results suggest that physical characteristics associated with level topography and high water-storage capacity buffer the severity of hydrologic changes associated with urbanization. Urbanization overlain upon a diverse set of physical templates creates multiple pathways toward hydrologic impairment; therefore, we caution against the use of the urban homogenization framework in examining geophysically dominated processes.

  13. Reducing regional vulnerabilities and multi-city robustness conflicts using many-objective optimization under deep uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Patrick; Trindade, Bernardo; Jonathan, Herman; Harrison, Zeff; Gregory, Characklis

    2016-04-01

    Emerging water scarcity concerns in southeastern US are associated with several deeply uncertain factors, including rapid population growth, limited coordination across adjacent municipalities and the increasing risks for sustained regional droughts. Managing these uncertainties will require that regional water utilities identify regionally coordinated, scarcity-mitigating strategies that trigger the appropriate actions needed to avoid water shortages and financial instabilities. This research focuses on the Research Triangle area of North Carolina, seeking to engage the water utilities within Raleigh, Durham, Cary and Chapel Hill in cooperative and robust regional water portfolio planning. Prior analysis of this region through the year 2025 has identified significant regional vulnerabilities to volumetric shortfalls and financial losses. Moreover, efforts to maximize the individual robustness of any of the mentioned utilities also have the potential to strongly degrade the robustness of the others. This research advances a multi-stakeholder Many-Objective Robust Decision Making (MORDM) framework to better account for deeply uncertain factors when identifying cooperative management strategies. Results show that the sampling of deeply uncertain factors in the computational search phase of MORDM can aid in the discovery of management actions that substantially improve the robustness of individual utilities as well as the overall region to water scarcity. Cooperative water transfers, financial risk mitigation tools, and coordinated regional demand management must be explored jointly to decrease robustness conflicts between the utilities. The insights from this work have general merit for regions where adjacent municipalities can benefit from cooperative regional water portfolio planning.

  14. Reducing regional vulnerabilities and multi-city robustness conflicts using many-objective optimization under deep uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trindade, B. C.; Reed, P. M.; Herman, J. D.; Zeff, H. B.; Characklis, G. W.

    2015-12-01

    Emerging water scarcity concerns in southeastern US are associated with several deeply uncertain factors, including rapid population growth, limited coordination across adjacent municipalities and the increasing risks for sustained regional droughts. Managing these uncertainties will require that regional water utilities identify regionally coordinated, scarcity-mitigating strategies that trigger the appropriate actions needed to avoid water shortages and financial instabilities. This research focuses on the Research Triangle area of North Carolina, seeking to engage the water utilities within Raleigh, Durham, Cary and Chapel Hill in cooperative and robust regional water portfolio planning. Prior analysis of this region through the year 2025 has identified significant regional vulnerabilities to volumetric shortfalls and financial losses. Moreover, efforts to maximize the individual robustness of any of the mentioned utilities also have the potential to strongly degrade the robustness of the others. This research advances a multi-stakeholder Many-Objective Robust Decision Making (MORDM) framework to better account for deeply uncertain factors when identifying cooperative management strategies. Results show that the sampling of deeply uncertain factors in the computational search phase of MORDM can aid in the discovery of management actions that substantially improve the robustness of individual utilities as well as of the overall region to water scarcity. Cooperative water transfers, financial risk mitigation tools, and coordinated regional demand management should be explored jointly to decrease robustness conflicts between the utilities. The insights from this work have general merit for regions where adjacent municipalities can benefit from cooperative regional water portfolio planning.

  15. A Microscopic View of Oil Slick Break-Up and Emulsion Formation in Breaking Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, J.; Shahrokhi, H.; Shaw, J. M.

    1996-11-01

    The hydrodynamic behaviour of oil spills in breaking waves determines the appropriateness and effectiveness of remedial measures during clean-up operations. Oil slicks either disperse as fine drops or form water in oil emulsions when exposed to breaking waves. However, there is little agreement with respect to the controlling variables or mechanisms for emulsification or dispersion and predictions are unreliable. For example, predicted energy dissipation rates in breaking waves are too low to account for the drop sizes encountered experimentally[1]. In this paper, we assess the impact of hydrodynamics and physical properties on the formation of dispersions or emulsions. The maximum stable drop size for dispersions arising from oil slicks and water in oil emulsions are shown to be controlled by Raleigh-Taylor instability or the prevalent local shear stress. Data from four experimental studies[2-5], with a broad range of physical properties were fitted quantitatively. As high shear events are intermittent, stable water in oil emulsions can be formed by dispersion inversion near the water air interface or by water entrained by gas bubbles passing through oil slicks. 1) Li & Garrett, 19th AMOP, Calgary AB, 1, 185-198 (1996). 2) Lin et al., Report CG-D-54-78, U.S. Coast Guard, Washington D.C. (1978). 3) Buist, MASc Thesis, University of Toronto (1979). 4) Wallace et al., 9th AMOP, Edmonton AB, 2, 421-429, June 10-12 (1986). 5) Ross Environmental Research Ltd., Ottawa ON, Report EE-96, (1987).

  16. Arthropods of the great indoors: characterizing diversity inside urban and suburban homes

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Misha; Bayless, Keith M.; Malow, Tara L.F.; Dunn, Robert R.; Trautwein, Michelle D.

    2016-01-01

    Although humans and arthropods have been living and evolving together for all of our history, we know very little about the arthropods we share our homes with apart from major pest groups. Here we surveyed, for the first time, the complete arthropod fauna of the indoor biome in 50 houses (located in and around Raleigh, North Carolina, USA). We discovered high diversity, with a conservative estimate range of 32–211 morphospecies, and 24–128 distinct arthropod families per house. The majority of this indoor diversity (73%) was made up of true flies (Diptera), spiders (Araneae), beetles (Coleoptera), and wasps and kin (Hymenoptera, especially ants: Formicidae). Much of the arthropod diversity within houses did not consist of synanthropic species, but instead included arthropods that were filtered from the surrounding landscape. As such, common pest species were found less frequently than benign species. Some of the most frequently found arthropods in houses, such as gall midges (Cecidomyiidae) and book lice (Liposcelididae), are unfamiliar to the general public despite their ubiquity. These findings present a new understanding of the diversity, prevalence, and distribution of the arthropods in our daily lives. Considering their impact as household pests, disease vectors, generators of allergens, and facilitators of the indoor microbiome, advancing our knowledge of the ecology and evolution of arthropods in homes has major economic and human health implications. PMID:26819844

  17. Investigations of the effects of air quality on surface UV solar radiation using measurements from the NOAA-EPA Brewer UV Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lantz, K. O.; Kiedron, P.; Petropavlovskikh, I. V.; Lichtenberger, A.

    2009-12-01

    Effects of air quality on the variability of erythemally-weighted solar irradiance and ultraviolet spectral solar irradiance is explored at five sites of the NOAA-EPA Brewer UV network (NEUBrew). NEUBrew site locations include Table Mountain near Boulder, CO, Bondville, IL, Fort Peck, MT, Raleigh, NC, and Houston, TX. The NEUBrew UV Network consists of Mark IV Brewer spectrophotometers and provides UV spectral solar irradiance, total ozone, and ozone profiles. Tropospheric ozone column is calculated from Umkehr retrievals from the Brewer spectrophotometer and is compared with NOAA ozone-sondes at the Boulder, CO. The NEUBrew locations were chosen because of proximity to sites from the SURFRAD Network and the USDA UV Network to provide cloud and aerosol optical properties in the ultraviolet and visible regions. A cloud screening algorithm is used to limit analysis to cloud free days. Using model calculations from the Tropospheric Ultraviolet and Visible Radiative Transfer Model (TUV-RTM) and ground-based UV solar irradiance measurements, UV spectral “transmittance factors” are computed. The sensitivity of UV solar radiation is investigated statistically as a function of solar zenith angle, total ozone, tropospheric ozone column, and aerosol optical depth.

  18. Comparison of Over-the-Rail and Rail Yard Measurements of Diesel Locomotives.

    PubMed

    Graver, Brandon M; Frey, H Christopher

    2015-11-01

    Locomotive prime mover engine emission rates are typically measured at steady-state for discrete throttle notches using an engine dynamometer weighted by a standard duty cycle. However, this method may not represent real-world locomotive emissions. A method for in-use measurement of passenger locomotives, using a portable emissions measurement system (PEMS), was developed to estimate duty cycle average emission rates. We conducted 48 measurements of one-way trips between Raleigh and Charlotte, NC, on 7 locomotives and 18 sets of measurements in the rail yard (RY). Real-world duty cycles differed from those used for regulatory analyses, leading to statistically significant lower cycle average NOx and HC emission rates. Compared to RY measurements, notch average NOx emission rates measured over-the-rail (OTR) at the highest two notch settings were, on average, 19% lower for four locomotives. At the highest notch, OTR CO2 emission rates were, on average, 12% lower than RY rates for five locomotives. For a more accurate representation of real-world emission rates, OTR measurements are preferred. However, using steady-state notch average RY emission rates and standard duty cycles may be tolerable for some applications. OTR versus RY cycle average emission rates typically differed by less than 10%. PMID:26421758

  19. Evolution of Ion Clouds in the Equatorial Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrochuk, Yevgeny; Blaunstein, Nathan; Mishin, Evgeny; Pedersen, Todd; Caton, Ron; Viggiano, Al; Schuman, Nick

    2015-11-01

    We report on the results of 2- and 3-dimentional numerical investigations of the evolution of samarium ion clouds injected in the equatorial ionosphere, alike the recent MOSC experiments. The ambient conditions are described by a standard model of the quiet-time equatorial ionosphere from 90 to 350 km. The altitudinal distribution of the transport processes and ambient electric and magnetic fields is taken into account. The fast process of stratification of ion clouds and breaking into small plasmoids occur only during the late stage of the cloud evolution. The role of the background plasma and its depletion zones formed due to the short-circuiting currents is not as evident as in mid latitudes. It is also revealed that the altitudinal dependence of the diffusion and drift plays a minor role in the cloud evolution at the equator. Likewise, the cloud remains stable with respect to the Raleigh-Taylor and gradient-drift instabilities. These two features are defined by the equatorial near-horizontal magnetic field which leads to a strongly-elongated ellipsoid-like plasma cloud. The critical dip angle separating the stable (equatorial) and unstable (mid-latitude) cloud regimes will be defined in future simulation studies, as well as the dependence on the ambient electric field and neutral wind. 2Space Vehicles Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory

  20. Trees Grow on Money: Urban Tree Canopy Cover and Environmental Justice

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Kirsten; Fragkias, Michail; Boone, Christopher G.; Zhou, Weiqi; McHale, Melissa; Grove, J. Morgan; O’Neil-Dunne, Jarlath; McFadden, Joseph P.; Buckley, Geoffrey L.; Childers, Dan; Ogden, Laura; Pincetl, Stephanie; Pataki, Diane; Whitmer, Ali; Cadenasso, Mary L.

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the distributional equity of urban tree canopy (UTC) cover for Baltimore, MD, Los Angeles, CA, New York, NY, Philadelphia, PA, Raleigh, NC, Sacramento, CA, and Washington, D.C. using high spatial resolution land cover data and census data. Data are analyzed at the Census Block Group levels using Spearman’s correlation, ordinary least squares regression (OLS), and a spatial autoregressive model (SAR). Across all cities there is a strong positive correlation between UTC cover and median household income. Negative correlations between race and UTC cover exist in bivariate models for some cities, but they are generally not observed using multivariate regressions that include additional variables on income, education, and housing age. SAR models result in higher r-square values compared to the OLS models across all cities, suggesting that spatial autocorrelation is an important feature of our data. Similarities among cities can be found based on shared characteristics of climate, race/ethnicity, and size. Our findings suggest that a suite of variables, including income, contribute to the distribution of UTC cover. These findings can help target simultaneous strategies for UTC goals and environmental justice concerns. PMID:25830303

  1. Lidar investigations of atmospheric dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philbrick, C. Russell; Hallen, Hans D.

    2015-09-01

    Ground based lidar techniques using Raleigh and Raman scattering, differential absorption (DIAL), and supercontinuum sources are capable of providing unique signatures to study dynamical processes in the lower atmosphere. The most useful profile signatures of dynamics in the lower atmosphere are available in profiles of time sequences of water vapor and aerosol optical extinction obtained with Raman and DIAL lidars. Water vapor profiles are used to study the scales and motions of daytime convection cells, residual layer bursts into the planetary boundary layer (PBL), variations in height of the PBL layer, cloud formation and dissipation, scale sizes of gravity waves, turbulent eddies, as well as to study the seldom observed phenomena of Brunt-Väisälä oscillations and undular bore waves. Aerosol optical extinction profiles from Raman lidar provide another tracer of dynamics and motion using sequential profiles atmospheric aerosol extinction, where the aerosol distribution is controlled by dynamic, thermodynamic, and photochemical processes. Raman lidar profiles of temperature describe the stability of the lower atmosphere and measure structure features. Rayleigh lidar can provide backscatter profiles of aerosols in the troposphere, and temperature profiles in the stratosphere and mesosphere, where large gravity waves, stratospheric clouds, and noctilucent clouds are observed. Examples of several dynamical features are selected to illustrate interesting processes observed with Raman lidar. Lidar experiments add to our understanding of physical processes that modify atmospheric structure, initiate turbulence and waves, and describe the relationships between energy sources, atmospheric stability parameters, and the observed dynamics.

  2. Synchrophasor Based Tracking Three-Phase State Estimator and It's Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Phadke, A. G.; Thorp, James; Centeno, Virgilio; Gardner, Matthew; Novosel, Damir; Hu, Yi; Elizondo, David

    2013-08-31

    Electric power infrastructure is one of the critical resources of the nation. Its reliability in the face of natural or man-made catastrophes is of paramount importance for the economic and public health wellbeing of a modern society. Maintaining high levels of security for the high voltage transmission back bone of the electric supply network is a task requiring access to modern monitoring tools. These tools have been made particularly effective with the advent of synchronized phasor measurement units (PMUs) which became available in late 1990s, and have now become an indispensable for optimal monitoring, protection and control of the power grid. The present project was launched with an objective of demonstrating the value of the Wide Area Measurement System (WAMS) using PMUs and its applications on the Dominion Virginia Power High Voltage transmission grid. Virginia Tech is the birth place of PMUs, and was chosen to be the Principal Investigator of this project. In addition to Dominion Virginia Power, Quanta Technology of Raleigh, NC was selected to be co-Principal Investigators of this project.

  3. Gone with the heat: a fundamental constraint on the imaging of dust and molecular gas in the early Universe.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Yu; Papadopoulos, Padelis P; Ivison, R J; Galametz, Maud; Smith, M W L; Xilouris, Emmanuel M

    2016-06-01

    Images of dust continuum and carbon monoxide (CO) line emission are powerful tools for deducing structural characteristics of galaxies, such as disc sizes, H2 gas velocity fields and enclosed H2 and dynamical masses. We report on a fundamental constraint set by the cosmic microwave background (CMB) on the observed structural and dynamical characteristics of galaxies, as deduced from dust continuum and CO-line imaging at high redshifts. As the CMB temperature rises in the distant Universe, the ensuing thermal equilibrium between the CMB and the cold dust and H2 gas progressively erases all spatial and spectral contrasts between their brightness distributions and the CMB. For high-redshift galaxies, this strongly biases the recoverable H2 gas and dust mass distributions, scale lengths, gas velocity fields and dynamical mass estimates. This limitation is unique to millimetre/submillimetre wavelengths and unlike its known effect on the global dust continuum and molecular line emission of galaxies, it cannot be addressed simply. We nevertheless identify a unique signature of CMB-affected continuum brightness distributions, namely an increasing rather than diminishing contrast between such brightness distributions and the CMB when the cold dust in distant galaxies is imaged at frequencies beyond the Raleigh-Jeans limit. For the molecular gas tracers, the same effect makes the atomic carbon lines maintain a larger contrast than the CO lines against the CMB. PMID:27429763

  4. Trees grow on money: urban tree canopy cover and environmental justice.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Kirsten; Fragkias, Michail; Boone, Christopher G; Zhou, Weiqi; McHale, Melissa; Grove, J Morgan; O'Neil-Dunne, Jarlath; McFadden, Joseph P; Buckley, Geoffrey L; Childers, Dan; Ogden, Laura; Pincetl, Stephanie; Pataki, Diane; Whitmer, Ali; Cadenasso, Mary L

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the distributional equity of urban tree canopy (UTC) cover for Baltimore, MD, Los Angeles, CA, New York, NY, Philadelphia, PA, Raleigh, NC, Sacramento, CA, and Washington, D.C. using high spatial resolution land cover data and census data. Data are analyzed at the Census Block Group levels using Spearman's correlation, ordinary least squares regression (OLS), and a spatial autoregressive model (SAR). Across all cities there is a strong positive correlation between UTC cover and median household income. Negative correlations between race and UTC cover exist in bivariate models for some cities, but they are generally not observed using multivariate regressions that include additional variables on income, education, and housing age. SAR models result in higher r-square values compared to the OLS models across all cities, suggesting that spatial autocorrelation is an important feature of our data. Similarities among cities can be found based on shared characteristics of climate, race/ethnicity, and size. Our findings suggest that a suite of variables, including income, contribute to the distribution of UTC cover. These findings can help target simultaneous strategies for UTC goals and environmental justice concerns.

  5. Microwave processing of materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, A.D.; Lauf, R.J.; Garard, R.S.

    1997-11-01

    A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (LMES) and Lambda Technologies, Inc. (Lambda) of Raleigh, N.C., was initiated in May 1995. [Lockheed Martin Energy Research, Corp. (LMER) has replaced LMES]. The completion data for the Agreement was December 31, 1996. The purpose of this work is to explore the feasibility of several advanced microwave processing concepts to develop new energy-efficient materials and processes. The project includes two tasks: (1) commercialization of the variable-frequency microwave furnace (VFMF); and (2) microwave curing of polymer composites. The VFMF, whose initial conception and design was funded by the Advanced Industrial Concepts (AIC) Materials Program, will allow us, for the first time, to conduct microwave processing studies over a wide frequency range. This novel design uses a high-power traveling wave tube (TWT) originally developed for electronic warfare. By using this microwave source, one can not only select individual microwave frequencies for particular experiments, but also achieve uniform power densities over a large area by the superposition of many different frequencies.

  6. Remotely triggered seismicity on the United States west coast following the Mw 7.9 Denali fault earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prejean, S.G.; Hill, D.P.; Brodsky, E.E.; Hough, S.E.; Johnston, M.J.S.; Malone, S.D.; Oppenheimer, D.H.; Pitt, A.M.; Richards-Dinger, K. B.

    2004-01-01

    The Mw 7.9 Denali fault earthquake in central Alaska of 3 November 2002 triggered earthquakes across western North America at epicentral distances of up to at least 3660 km. We describe the spatial and temporal development of triggered activity in California and the Pacific Northwest, focusing on Mount Rainier, the Geysers geothermal field, the Long Valley caldera, and the Coso geothermal field. The onset of triggered seismicity at each of these areas began during the Love and Raleigh waves of the Mw 7.9 wave train, which had dominant periods of 15 to 40 sec, indicating that earthquakes were triggered locally by dynamic stress changes due to low-frequency surface wave arrivals. Swarms during the wave train continued for ???4 min (Mount Rainier) to ???40 min (the Geysers) after the surface wave arrivals and were characterized by spasmodic bursts of small (M ??? 2.5) earthquakes. Dynamic stresses within the surface wave train at the time of the first triggered earthquakes ranged from 0.01 MPa (Coso) to 0.09 MPa (Mount Rainier). In addition to the swarms that began during the surface wave arrivals, Long Valley caldera and Mount Rainier experienced unusually large seismic swarms hours to days after the Denali fault earthquake. These swarms seem to represent a delayed response to the Denali fault earthquake. The occurrence of spatially and temporally distinct swarms of triggered seismicity at the same site suggests that earthquakes may be triggered by more than one physical process.

  7. Molecular markers reveal infestation dynamics of the bed bug (Hemiptera: Cimicidae) within apartment buildings.

    PubMed

    Booth, Warren; Saenz, Virna L; Santangelo, Richard G; Wang, Changlu; Schal, Coby; Vargo, Edward L

    2012-05-01

    The bed bug, Cimex lectularius L. (Hemiptera: Cimicidae), has experienced an extraordinary global resurgence in recent years, the reasons for which remain poorly understood. Once considered a pest of lower socioeconomic classes, bed bugs are now found extensively across all residential settings, with widespread infestations established in multiapartment buildings. Within such buildings, understanding the population genetic structure and patterns of dispersal may prove critical to the development of effective control strategies. Here, we describe the development of 24 high-resolution microsatellite markers through next generation 454 pyrosequencing and their application to elucidate infestation dynamics within three multistory apartment buildings in the United States. Results reveal contrasting characteristics potentially representative of geographic or locale differences. In Raleigh, NC, an infestation within an apartment building seemed to have started from a single introduction followed by extensive spread. In Jersey City, NJ, two or more introductions followed by spread are evident in two buildings. Populations within single apartments in all buildings were characterized by high levels of relatedness and low levels of diversity, indicative of foundation from small, genetically depauperate propagules. Regardless of the number of unique introductions, genetic data indicate that spread within buildings is extensive, supporting both active and human-mediated dispersal within and between adjacent rooms or apartments spanning multiple floors. PMID:22679860

  8. Comparison of two-transsacral-screw fixation versus triangular osteosynthesis for transforaminal sacral fractures.

    PubMed

    Min, Kyong S; Zamorano, David P; Wahba, George M; Garcia, Ivan; Bhatia, Nitin; Lee, Thay Q

    2014-09-01

    Transforaminal pelvic fractures are high-energy injuries that are translationally and rotationally unstable. This study compared the biomechanical stability of triangular osteosynthesis vs 2-transsacral-screw fixation in the repair of a transforaminal pelvic fracture model. A transforaminal fracture model was created in 10 cadaveric lumbopelvic specimens. Five of the specimens were stabilized with triangular osteosynthesis, which consisted of unilateral L5-to-ilium lumbopelvic fixation and ipsilateral iliosacral screw fixation. The remaining 5 were stabilized with a 2-transsacral-screw fixation technique that consisted of 2 transsacral screws inserted across S1. All specimens were loaded cyclically and then loaded to failure. Translation and rotation were measured using the MicroScribe 3D digitizing system (Revware Inc, Raleigh, North Carolina). The 2-transsacral-screw group showed significantly greater stiffness than the triangular osteosynthesis group (2-transsacral-screw group, 248.7 N/mm [standard deviation, 73.9]; triangular osteosynthesis group, 125.0 N/mm [standard deviation, 66.9]; P=.02); however, ultimate load and rotational stiffness were not statistically significant. Compared with triangular osteosynthesis fixation, the use of 2 transsacral screws provides a comparable biomechanical stability profile in both translation and rotation. This newly revised 2-transsacral-screw construct offers the traumatologist an alternative method of repair for vertical shear fractures that provides biplanar stability. It also offers the advantage of percutaneous placement in either the prone or supine position.

  9. High dead-space syringes and the risk of HIV and HCV infection among injecting drug users.

    PubMed

    Zule, William A; Bobashev, Georgiy

    2009-03-01

    This study examines the association between using and sharing high dead-space syringes (HDSSs)--which retain over 1000 times more blood after rinsing than low dead-space syringes (LDSSs)--and prevalent HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections among injecting drug users (IDUs). A sample of 851 out-of-treatment IDUs was recruited in Raleigh-Durham, North Carolina, between 2003 and 2005. Participants were tested for HIV and HCV antibodies. Demographic, drug use, and injection practice data were collected via interviews. Data were analyzed using multiple logistic regression analysis. Participants had a mean age of 40 years and 74% are male, 63% are African American, 29% are non-Hispanic white, and 8% are of other race/ethnicity. Overall, 42% of participants had ever used an HDSS and 12% had shared one. HIV prevalence was 5% among IDUs who had never used an HDSS compared with 16% among IDUs who had shared one. The HIV model used a propensity score approach to adjust for differences between IDUs who had used an HDSS and those who had never used one. The HCV models included all potential confounders as covariates. A history of sharing HDSSs was associated with prevalent HIV (odds ratio=2.50; 95% confidence interval=1.01, 6.15). Use and sharing of HDSSs were also associated with increased odds of HCV infection. Prospective studies are needed to determine if sharing HDSSs is associated with increased HIV and HCV incidence among IDUs.

  10. Impacts of global warming on residential heating and cooling degree-days in the United States.

    PubMed

    Petri, Yana; Caldeira, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is expected to decrease heating demand and increase cooling demand for buildings and affect outdoor thermal comfort. Here, we project changes in residential heating degree-days (HDD) and cooling degree-days (CDD) for the historical (1981-2010) and future (2080-2099) periods in the United States using median results from the Climate Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5) simulations under the Representation Concentration Pathway 8.5 (RCP8.5) scenario. We project future HDD and CDD values by adding CMIP5 projected changes to values based on historical observations of US climate. The sum HDD + CDD is an indicator of locations that are thermally comfortable, with low heating and cooling demand. By the end of the century, station median HDD + CDD will be reduced in the contiguous US, decreasing in the North and increasing in the South. Under the unmitigated RCP8.5 scenario, by the end of this century, in terms of HDD and CDD values considered separately, future New York, NY, is anticipated to become more like present Oklahoma City, OK; Denver, CO, becomes more like Raleigh, NC, and Seattle, WA, becomes more like San Jose, CA. These results serve as an indicator of projected climate change and can help inform decision-making. PMID:26238673

  11. Light interaction with microroughened surfaces based on nuclear microfilters and secondary metallic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolyanskii, A. S.; Briskman, Boris A.; Kolesnikova, V. V.; Kolninov, O. V.; Lazorenko-Manevich, R. M.; Bozadzhiev, L. L.

    2004-10-01

    Optical properties of the modern kinds of nano/microstructure materials - nuclear microfilters (NM) and their metallic replica (so called "needle structures" (NS)) are studied in visible as well as in IR region. The materials are produced from PolyEthylene Terephtalate (PET) film irradiated by accelerated Xe ions as well as by actinoids. The transparence of the ion-irradiated PET films decreases and the reflection increases with the duration of chemical treatment. The interference fringe pattern (IFP) becomes diffuse and weak at the final stages of the etching process. An intense diffraction background (DB) appears in the IR-spectra. A correlation between IFP and DB change and evoked by micropore formation the PET film mass losses is established. DB spectral form can be described by ~λ-2 law at initial stages of the etching and by standard Raleigh law (~λ-4) at the end of the process. The optical properties of the NS prepared from copper and nickel on the base of the same NM are investigated. In both cases development of the surface roughness results in suppression of the "mirror-like" component in the reflected light. A phenomenon of the surface-enhanced IR scattering is discovered for Cu-NS. Possible applications of such nano/microstructure materials in optics are discussed.

  12. Compilation of water-resources data and hydrogeologic setting for four research stations in the Piedmont and Blue Ridge physiographic provinces of North Carolina, 2000-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huffman, Brad A.; Pfeifle, Cassandra A.; Chapman, Melinda J.; Bolich, Richard E.; Campbell, Ted R.; Geddes, Donald J.; Pippin, Charles G.

    2006-01-01

    Water-resources data were collected to describe the hydrologic conditions at four research stations in the Piedmont and Blue Ridge Physiographic Provinces of North Carolina. Data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and the North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Division of Water Quality, from September 2000 through September 2004 are presented in this report. The locations and periods of data collection are as follows: the Lake Wheeler Road research station (Raleigh) from April 2001 to September 2004, the Langtree Peninsula research station (Mooresville) from September 2000 to September 2004, the Upper Piedmont research station (Reidsville) from March 2002 to September 2004, and the Bent Creek research station (Asheville) from July 2002 to September 2004. Data presented in this report include well-construction characteristics for 110 wells, periodic ground-water-level measurements for 96 wells, borehole geophysical logs for 23 wells, hourly ground-water-level measurements for 12 wells, continuous-stage measurements for 2 streams, continuous water-quality measurements for 8 wells and 2 streams, periodic water-quality samples for 57 wells and 6 stream sites, slug-test results for 38 wells, and shallow ground-water-flow maps. In addition, the geology and hydrogeology at each site are summarized.

  13. Using Gradient Analysis to Determine and Compare Invertebrate Responses to Urbanization: Can We Achieve Understanding Without Defining Reference Conditions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuffney, T. F.; Giddings, E. M.; Coles, J. F.; Zappia, H.

    2005-05-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program uses a gradient design to investigate the effects of urbanization across the U.S. This design has successfully defined invertebrate responses in metropolitan areas associated with Boston, MA, Birmingham, AL, Salt Lake City, UT, and Raleigh, NC. An urban intensity index (UII) based on population, land use, land cover, and infrastructure is used to define the gradient without explicitly identifying reference sites, although the low end of the urban gradient may include such sites. Many invertebrate metrics (e.g., tolerance, biotic integrity, richness) are significantly related to UII. Detection of responses is not dependent upon reference conditions and this design can detect responses even when many low intensity (UII < 20) sites are excluded. Reference conditions can be inferred from regressions of metrics and UII by creating a "dummy" site where the components of the UII are set to background values (e.g., population = 0, road density = 0) and then extrapolating metrics for this site (UII = 0). Unfortunately, these end members (reference site conditions) tend to be highly variable and it is more difficult to determine these values than to detect the existence, form, and rate of response across the urban gradient.

  14. Safety evaluation report related to the renewal of the operating license for the research reactor at North Carolina State University

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    This safety evaluation report (SER) summarizes the findings of a safety review conducted by the staff of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation (NRR). The staff conducted this review in response to a timely application filed by North Carolina State University (the licensee or NCSU) for a 20-year renewal of Facility Operating License R-120 to continue to operate the NCSU PULSTAR research reactor. The facility is located in the Burlington Engineering Laboratory complex on the NCSU campus in Raleigh, North Carolina. In its safety review, the staff considered information submitted by the licensee (including past operating history recorded in the licensee`s annual reports to the NRC), as well as inspection reports prepared by NRC Region H personnel and first-hand observations. On the basis of this review, the staff concludes that NCSU can continue to operate the PULSTAR research reactor, in accordance with its application, without endangering the health and safety of the public. 16 refs., 31 figs., 7 tabs.

  15. Gone with the heat: a fundamental constraint on the imaging of dust and molecular gas in the early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhi-Yu; Papadopoulos, Padelis P.; Ivison, R. J.; Galametz, Maud; Smith, M. W. L.; Xilouris, Emmanuel M.

    2016-06-01

    Images of dust continuum and carbon monoxide (CO) line emission are powerful tools for deducing structural characteristics of galaxies, such as disc sizes, H2 gas velocity fields and enclosed H2 and dynamical masses. We report on a fundamental constraint set by the cosmic microwave background (CMB) on the observed structural and dynamical characteristics of galaxies, as deduced from dust continuum and CO-line imaging at high redshifts. As the CMB temperature rises in the distant Universe, the ensuing thermal equilibrium between the CMB and the cold dust and H2 gas progressively erases all spatial and spectral contrasts between their brightness distributions and the CMB. For high-redshift galaxies, this strongly biases the recoverable H2 gas and dust mass distributions, scale lengths, gas velocity fields and dynamical mass estimates. This limitation is unique to millimetre/submillimetre wavelengths and unlike its known effect on the global dust continuum and molecular line emission of galaxies, it cannot be addressed simply. We nevertheless identify a unique signature of CMB-affected continuum brightness distributions, namely an increasing rather than diminishing contrast between such brightness distributions and the CMB when the cold dust in distant galaxies is imaged at frequencies beyond the Raleigh-Jeans limit. For the molecular gas tracers, the same effect makes the atomic carbon lines maintain a larger contrast than the CO lines against the CMB.

  16. Performance-based assessment of reconstructed images

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    During the early 90s, I engaged in a productive and enjoyable collaboration with Robert Wagner and his colleague, Kyle Myers. We explored the ramifications of the principle that tbe quality of an image should be assessed on the basis of how well it facilitates the performance of appropriate visual tasks. We applied this principle to algorithms used to reconstruct scenes from incomplete and/or noisy projection data. For binary visual tasks, we used both the conventional disk detection and a new challenging task, inspired by the Rayleigh resolution criterion, of deciding whether an object was a blurred version of two dots or a bar. The results of human and machine observer tests were summarized with the detectability index based on the area under the ROC curve. We investigated a variety of reconstruction algorithms, including ART, with and without a nonnegativity constraint, and the MEMSYS3 algorithm. We concluded that the performance of the Raleigh task was optimized when the strength of the prior was near MEMSYS's default 'classic' value for both human and machine observers. A notable result was that the most-often-used metric of rms error in the reconstruction was not necessarily indicative of the value of a reconstructed image for the purpose of performing visual tasks.

  17. Optics Program Simplifies Analysis and Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Engineers at Goddard Space Flight Center partnered with software experts at Mide Technology Corporation, of Medford, Massachusetts, through a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract to design the Disturbance-Optics-Controls-Structures (DOCS) Toolbox, a software suite for performing integrated modeling for multidisciplinary analysis and design. The DOCS Toolbox integrates various discipline models into a coupled process math model that can then predict system performance as a function of subsystem design parameters. The system can be optimized for performance; design parameters can be traded; parameter uncertainties can be propagated through the math model to develop error bounds on system predictions; and the model can be updated, based on component, subsystem, or system level data. The Toolbox also allows the definition of process parameters as explicit functions of the coupled model and includes a number of functions that analyze the coupled system model and provide for redesign. The product is being sold commercially by Nightsky Systems Inc., of Raleigh, North Carolina, a spinoff company that was formed by Mide specifically to market the DOCS Toolbox. Commercial applications include use by any contractors developing large space-based optical systems, including Lockheed Martin Corporation, The Boeing Company, and Northrup Grumman Corporation, as well as companies providing technical audit services, like General Dynamics Corporation

  18. Hospital Bioterrorism Planning and Burn Surge

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Brent; Cairns, Charles B.; Rich, Preston B.; Hultman, C. Scott; Charles, Anthony G.; Jones, Samuel W.; Schmits, Grace L.; Skarote, Mary Beth; Holmes, James H.; Cairns, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    On the morning of June 9, 2009, an explosion occurred at a manufacturing plant in Garner, North Carolina. By the end of the day, 68 injured patients had been evaluated at the 3 Level I trauma centers and 3 community hospitals in the Raleigh/Durham metro area (3 people who were buried in the structural collapse died at the scene). Approximately 300 employees were present at the time of the explosion, when natural gas being vented during the repair of a hot water heater ignited. The concussion from the explosion led to structural failure in multiple locations and breached additional natural gas, electrical, and ammonia lines that ran overhead in the 1-story concrete industrial plant. Intent is the major difference between this type of accident and a terrorist using an incendiary device to terrorize a targeted population. But while this disaster lacked intent, the response, rescue, and outcomes were improved as a result of bioterrorism preparedness. This article discusses how bioterrorism hospital preparedness planning, with an all-hazards approach, became the basis for coordinated burn surge disaster preparedness. This real-world disaster challenged a variety of systems, hospitals, and healthcare providers to work efficiently and effectively to manage multiple survivors. Burn-injured patients served as a focus for this work. We describe the response, rescue, and resuscitation provided by first responders and first receivers as well as efforts made to develop burn care capabilities and surge capacity. PMID:24527874

  19. The wind-forced response on a buoyant coastal current: Observations of the western Gulf of Maine plume

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fong, D.A.; Geyer, W.R.; Signell, R.P.

    1997-01-01

    The Freshwater plume in the western Gulf of Maine is being studied as part of an interdisciplinary investigation of the physical transport of a toxic alga. A field program was conducted in the springs of 1993 and 1994 to map the spatial and temporal patterns of salinity, currents and algal toxicity. The observations suggest that the plume's cross-shore structure varies markedly as a function of fluctuations in alongshore wind forcing. Consistent with Ekman drift dynamics, upwelling favorable winds spread the plume offshore, at times widening it to over 50 km in offshore extent, while downwelling favorable winds narrow the plume width to as little as 10 km. Using a simple slab model, we find qualitative agreement between the observed variations of plume width and those predicted by Ekman theory for short time scales of integration. Near surface current meters show significant correlations between cross-shore currents and alongshore wind stress, consistent with Ekman theory. Estimates of the terms in the alongshore momentum equation calculated from moored current meter arrays also indicate a dominant Ekman balance within the plume. A significant correlation between alongshore currents and winds suggests that interfacial drag may be important, although inclusion of a Raleigh drag term does not significantly improve the alongshore momentum balance.

  20. Colloidal electrodynamics, electrohydrodynamics and thermodynamics in confined geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yilong

    We use digital video microscopy and liquid structure theory to measure pair potentials of charged stabilized colloidal spheres in an equilibrium monolayer. Anomalous attraction is founded between like-charged spheres in different degree of confinement, different composition of spheres or substrates, at high ionic strength, or for larger spheres. Error analysis is developed to rule out artifacts. We show that one wall is enough to induce the attraction and gold substrate can enhance such effect. The recently derived configuration temperature is generalized to a hierarchy of hyperconfigurational temperatures. We show their relation to the hypervirial theorem. These temperature definitions are successfully tested experimentally for the first time via colloidal systems. The results confirmed our anomalous attractions measured in the previous chapter. As a set of constrains, hyperconfigurational temperatures are used to determine free parameters in an unknown potential. Other applications and thermodynamic considerations are discussed. The complicate electrohydrodynamic interplay of microions' fluxes and macroions in an electric field can induce many instabilities. A zoo of self-organized colloidal patterns are discovered in electrolysis of a horizontal layer of aqueous colloid. At low voltage, spheres cooperatively form various quasi-stationary microscopic clusters. At higher bias, spheres passively trace the electroconvection which is more nonlinear than its thermal analogy, the Raleigh-Benard convection. Explaining these patterns provides new challenge in pattern formation, electrokinetic of colloid and electrochemistry.

  1. The microwave properties of the jovian clouds: A new model for the complex dielectric constant of aqueous ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duong, Danny; Steffes, Paul G.; Noorizadeh, Sahand

    2014-02-01

    A new model for the complex dielectric constant of aqueous ammonia (NH4OH) under conditions characteristic of the jovian clouds has been developed. The new model is based on laboratory measurements in the frequency range between 2 and 8.5 GHz for ammonia concentrations of 0-8.5% by volume and temperatures between 274 and 297 K. The new model is based on the Meissner and Wentz (Meissner, T., Wentz, F.J. [2004]. IEEE Trans. Geosci. Rem. Sens. 42, 1836-1849) model of the complex dielectric constant of pure water but contains corrections for dissolved ammonia. Assuming Raleigh scattering, these measurements are applied to a cloud attenuation model to calculate the range of opacity of the jovian aqueous ammonia clouds. These measurements will improve our understanding of the data collected by the Juno microwave radiometer (MWR) by better characterizing the absorption properties of the aqueous ammonia present in the jovian atmosphere. The new model has been validated for temperatures up to 313 K, and may be consistently used for the expected conditions for aqueous clouds in all of the outer planets. The model fits 60.26% of all laboratory measurements within 2-sigma uncertainty. Descriptions of the experimental setups, uncertainties associated with the laboratory measurements, the model fitting process, the new model, and its application to approximating jovian cloud opacity are provided.

  2. Advances in random matrix theory, zeta functions, and sphere packing

    PubMed Central

    Hales, T. C.; Sarnak, P.; Pugh, M. C.

    2000-01-01

    Over four hundred years ago, Sir Walter Raleigh asked his mathematical assistant to find formulas for the number of cannonballs in regularly stacked piles. These investigations aroused the curiosity of the astronomer Johannes Kepler and led to a problem that has gone centuries without a solution: why is the familiar cannonball stack the most efficient arrangement possible? Here we discuss the solution that Hales found in 1998. Almost every part of the 282-page proof relies on long computer verifications. Random matrix theory was developed by physicists to describe the spectra of complex nuclei. In particular, the statistical fluctuations of the eigenvalues (“the energy levels”) follow certain universal laws based on symmetry types. We describe these and then discuss the remarkable appearance of these laws for zeros of the Riemann zeta function (which is the generating function for prime numbers and is the last special function from the last century that is not understood today.) Explaining this phenomenon is a central problem. These topics are distinct, so we present them separately with their own introductory remarks. PMID:11058156

  3. Do cities simulate climate change? A comparison of herbivore response to urban and global warming.

    PubMed

    Youngsteadt, Elsa; Dale, Adam G; Terando, Adam J; Dunn, Robert R; Frank, Steven D

    2015-01-01

    Cities experience elevated temperature, CO2 , and nitrogen deposition decades ahead of the global average, such that biological response to urbanization may predict response to future climate change. This hypothesis remains untested due to a lack of complementary urban and long-term observations. Here, we examine the response of an herbivore, the scale insect Melanaspis tenebricosa, to temperature in the context of an urban heat island, a series of historical temperature fluctuations, and recent climate warming. We survey M. tenebricosa on 55 urban street trees in Raleigh, NC, 342 herbarium specimens collected in the rural southeastern United States from 1895 to 2011, and at 20 rural forest sites represented by both modern (2013) and historical samples. We relate scale insect abundance to August temperatures and find that M. tenebricosa is most common in the hottest parts of the city, on historical specimens collected during warm time periods, and in present-day rural forests compared to the same sites when they were cooler. Scale insects reached their highest densities in the city, but abundance peaked at similar temperatures in urban and historical datasets and tracked temperature on a decadal scale. Although urban habitats are highly modified, species response to a key abiotic factor, temperature, was consistent across urban and rural-forest ecosystems. Cities may be an appropriate but underused system for developing and testing hypotheses about biological effects of climate change. Future work should test the applicability of this model to other groups of organisms. PMID:25163424

  4. Assessing and promoting physical activity in African American barbershops: results of the FITStop pilot study.

    PubMed

    Linnan, Laura A; Reiter, Paul L; Duffy, Courtney; Hales, Derek; Ward, Dianne S; Viera, Anthony J

    2011-01-01

    This study assessed the feasibility of recruiting African American men in barbershops, assessing their physical activity, conducting physical measurements, and gauging their interest in barbershop-based health research. The authors recruited African American shop owners (n = 4), barbers (n = 6), and customers (n = 90) from four barbershops in Raleigh and Durham, North Carolina, during 2009. The participation levels were high among owners (100%), barbers (67%), and customers (81%). In addition to completing a self-administered survey, 57% (51/90) of the customers completed physical measurements. According to self-reported data, 34% (30/88) of the customers met national physical activity recommendations within the last week. Customers expressed moderately high interest in learning more about health at barbershops and joining a barbershop-based physical activity contest. The estimated recruiting cost per customer was $105.92. Barbershops offer an effective setting for recruiting African American men and conducting physical measurements as well as an interesting possible location for conducting future interventions.

  5. Tropospheric Airborne Meteorological Data Reporting (TAMDAR) Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, Taumi S.; Moninger, William R.; Mamrosh, Richard D.

    2008-01-01

    This paper is an overview of the Tropospheric Airborne Meteorological Data Reporting (TAMDAR) project, giving some history on the project, various applications of the atmospheric data, and future ideas and plans. As part of NASA's Aviation Safety and Security Program, the TAMDAR project developed a small low-cost sensor that collects useful meteorological data and makes them available in near real time to improve weather forecasts. This activity has been a joint effort with FAA, NOAA, universities, and industry. A tri-agency team collaborated by developing a concept of operations, determining the sensor specifications, and evaluating sensor performance as reported by Moosakhanian et. al. (2006). Under contract with Georgia Tech Research Institute, NASA worked with AirDat of Raleigh, NC to develop the sensor. The sensor is capable of measuring temperature, relative humidity, pressure, and icing. It can compute pressure altitude, indicated and true air speed, ice accretion rate, wind speed and direction, peak and average turbulence, and eddy dissipation rate. The overall development process, sensor capabilities, and performance based on ground and flight tests is reported by Daniels (2002), Daniels et. al. (2004) and by Tsoucalas et. al. (2006). An in-service evaluation of the sensor was performed called the Great Lakes Fleet Experiment (GLFE), first reported by Moninger et. al. (2004) and Mamrosh et. al. (2005). In this experiment, a Mesaba Airlines fleet was equipped to collect meteorological data over the Great Lakes region during normal revenue-producing flights.

  6. Single-Station Passive Seismic Stratigraphy for the characterization of subsurface structure of the Valtellina valley (central Alps, northern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mele, M.; Bini, A.; Bassi, S.; Giudici, M.; Monti, M.; Azzola, M.

    2012-04-01

    The reconstruction of the subsurface structure of alpine valleys plays a key-role in the evaluation of their genesis, entrenchment and tectonic evolution. As a matter of fact, their characterization is strictly dependent on borehole data (water wells, shallow geognostic logs) and land based, deep seismic reflection/refraction lines; unfortunately, the availability of these datasets is often limited by economic and logistical limitations. In this work the subsurface structure of the Valtellina buried valley (central Alps, northern Italy) was investigated by the means of Single-Station Passive Seismic Stratigraphy (S-SPSS), which yields the 1D shear velocity (Vs) profiles, based on the Horizontal to Vertical Spectral Ratios (HVSR) of microtremors produced by Raleigh waves trapped in the ground and provided by measurements of the resonance frequencies produced by a layered seismic stratigraphy. The study area is the central part of Valtellina, W-E oriented along the Insubric line and drained by the Adda river. The sedimentary succession is known by shallow (

  7. Measurements of the Diameter and Velocity Distributions of Atomized Tablet-Coating Solutions for Pharmaceutical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterday, Kathryn; Aliseda, Alberto; Lasheras, Juan

    2009-11-01

    The atomization of colloidal suspensions is of particular interest to the manufacturing of tablets and pills used as drug delivery systems by the pharmaceutical industry. At various stages in the manufacturing process, the tablets are coated with a spray of droplets produced by co-axial atomizers. The mechanisms of droplet size and spray formation in these types of atomizers are dominated by Kelvin-Helmholtz and Raleigh-Taylor instabilities for both low[1] and high[2] Ohnesorge numbers. We present detailed phase Doppler measurements of the Sauter Mean Diameter of the droplets produced by co-axial spray atomizers using water-based colloidal suspensions with solid concentrations ranging from fifteen to twenty percent and acetone-based colloidal suspensions with solid concentrations ranging from five to ten percent. Our results compare favorably with predictions by Aliseda's model. This suggests that the final size distribution is mainly determined by the instabilities caused by the sudden acceleration of the liquid interface. [1]Varga, C. M., et al. (2003) J. Fluid Mech. 497:405-434 [2]Aliseda, A. et al. (2008). J. Int. J. Multiphase Flow, 34(2), 161-175.

  8. Responses of benthic macroinvertebrates to urbanization in nine metropolitan areas of the conterminous United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cuffney, T.F.; McMahon, G.; Kashuba, R.; May, J.T.; Waite, I.R.

    2009-01-01

    The effects of urbanization on benthic macroinvertebrates were investigated in nine metropolitan areas (Boston, MA; Raleigh, NC; Atlanta, GA; Birmingham, AL; Milwaukee–Green Bay, WI; Denver, CO; Dallas–Fort Worth, TX; Salt Lake City, UT; and Portland, OR) as a part of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Assessment Program. Several invertebrate metrics showed strong, linear responses to urbanization when forest or shrublands were developed. Responses were difficult to discern in areas where urbanization was occurring on agricultural lands because invertebrate assemblages were already severely degraded. There was no evidence that assemblages showed any initial resistance to urbanization. Ordination scores, EPT taxa richness, and the average tolerance of organisms were the best indicators of changes in assemblage condition at a site. Richness metrics were better indicators than abundance metrics, and qualitative samples were as good as quantitative samples. A common set of landscape variables (population density, housing density, developed landcover, impervious surface, and roads) were strongly correlated with urbanization and invertebrate responses in all non-agricultural areas. The instream environmental variables (hydrology, water chemistry, habitat, and temperature) that were strongly correlated with urbanization and invertebrate responses were influenced by environmental setting (e.g., dominant ecoregion) and varied widely among metropolitan areas. Multilevel hierarchical regression models were developed that predicted invertebrate responses using only two landcover variables—basinscale landcover (percentage of basin area in developed land) and regional-scale landcover (antecedent agricultural land).

  9. De-cloaking the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deno Stelter, Richard; Eikenberry, Stephen S.

    2016-01-01

    We present a preliminary extinction map of the Galactic Center, made by using the Raleigh-Jeans Color Excess method (Majewski et al, 2011) and a Bayesian approach. The Galactic Center, due to its high density of stars, contains the Milky Way Galaxy's majority of massive stars and their black hole/neutron star remnants. These cosmic laboratories challenge our understanding of the most extreme physical environments in the universe. However, the extinction from the intervening gas and dust is extremely high (A_V~30), and cloaks these objects from view in visible wavelengths. Near-infrared wavelengths are less susceptible to extinction from gas and dust by factors of several magnitudes, but still suffer from differential reddening at very small scales; eg, 5 arcseconds (Gosling et al MNRAS 2009). De-reddening the GC furthers broadband imaging surveys of all types, such X-ray binary IR counterpart or transient searches being carried out by CIRCE on the GTC. Furthermore, MIRADAS, with its multiplexing capability and high resolution, will take advantage of these extinction maps as well to probe the chemo-dynamics and structure of the inner Milky Way when it goes on-sky in 2018/2019.

  10. Supernova-relevant hydrodynamic instability experiments on the Nova Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, J.; arnett, D.; Remington, B.A.; Glendinning, S.G.; wallace, R.; Mangan, R.; Rubenchik, A.; Fryxell, B.A.

    1997-04-18

    Supernova 1987A focused attention on the critical role of hydrodynamic instabilities in the evolution of supernovae. To test the modeling of these instabilities we are developing laboratory experiments of hydrodynamic mixing under conditions relevant to supernovae. The target consists of two-layer planar package composed on 85 micron Cu backed by 500 micron CH2, having a single mode sinusoidal perturbation at the interface, with gamma = 200 microns, nuo + 20 microns. The Nova laser is used to generate a 10-15 Mbar (10- 15x10{sup 12} dynes/cm2) shock at the interface, which triggers perturbation growth, due to the Richtmyer-Meshov instability followed by the Raleigh-Taylor instability as the interface decelerates. This resembles the hydrodynamics of the He-H interface of a Type II supernova at the intermediate times, up to a few x10{sup 3} s. The experiment is modeled using the hydrodynamic codes HYADES and CALE, and the supernova code PROMETHEUS. We are designing experiments to test the differences in the growth of 2D vs 3D single mode perturbations; such differences may help explain the high observed velocities of radioactive core material in SN1987A. Results of the experiments and simulations are presented.

  11. Biothermal modeling of transurethral ultrasound applicators for MR-guided prostate thermal therapy (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Anthony B.; Diederich, Chris J.; Nau, William H.; Tyreus, Per D.; Gill, Harcharan; Bouley, Donna; Butts, R. K.; Rieke, Viola; Daniel, Bruce; Sommer, Graham

    2005-04-01

    Thermal ablation is a minimally-invasive treatment option for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and localized prostate cancer. Accurate spatial control of thermal dose delivery is paramount to improving thermal therapy efficacy and avoiding post-treatment complications. We have recently developed three types of transurethral ultrasound applicators, each with different degrees of heating selectivity. These applicators have been evaluated in vivo in coordination with magnetic resonance temperature imaging, and demonstrated to accurately ablate specific regions of the canine prostate. A finite difference biothermal model of the three types of transurethral ultrasound applicators (sectored tubular, planar, and curvilinear transducer sections) was developed and used to further study the performance and heating capabilities of each these devices. The biothermal model is based on the Pennes bioheat equation. The acoustic power deposition pattern corresponding to each applicator type was calculated using the rectangular radiator approximation to the Raleigh Sommerfield diffraction integral. In this study, temperature and thermal dose profiles were calculated for different treatment schemes and target volumes, including single shot and angular scanning procedures. This study also demonstrated the ability of the applicators to conform the cytotoxic thermal dose distribution to a predefined target area. Simulated thermal profiles corresponded well with MR temperature images from previous in vivo experiments. Biothermal simulations presented in this study reinforce the potential of improved efficacy of transurethral ultrasound thermal therapy of prostatic disease.

  12. Economics and societal impacts of tornadoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bluestein, Howard B.

    2011-08-01

    During the spring of 2011, there were a record number of unusually strong and devastating tornadoes in the United States, which killed more than 500 people, the most in the country since 1953. Tornadoes are responsible for more than $1 billion annually (adjusted to 2007 U.S. dollars) in property damage and for disrupting thousands of lives and businesses. The most notable tornado this past spring devastated Joplin, Mo.; tornadoes also struck such diverse locations as Springfield, Mass.; Tuscaloosa, Ala.; Raleigh, N. C.; communities near Oklahoma City, Okla.; Minneapolis, Minn.; central and east Texas; Philadelphia, Pa.; and St. Louis, Mo. It is therefore timely to assess the economic and societal impacts of tornadoes. In this book the authors use various statistical techniques to evaluate the cost of tornadoes to society. They begin by reviewing the methodologies of formulating a tornado climatology across diverse regions according to tornado intensity, deaths, injuries, and property damage, and they then provide a history of the U.S. National Weather Service's (NWS) public warning efforts, describe tornado shelters and how the public responds to warnings, and suggest ways to reduce tornado risk.

  13. Predicting urban design effects on physical activity and public health: A case study.

    PubMed

    MacDonald Gibson, Jacqueline; Rodriguez, Daniel; Dennerlein, Taylor; Mead, Jill; Hasch, Trisha; Meacci, Grant; Levin, Stuart

    2015-09-01

    With increasing global concerns about obesity and related health effects, tools to predict how urban form affects population physical activity and health are needed. However, such tools have not been well established. This article develops a computer simulation model for forecasting the health effects of urban features that promote walking. The article demonstrates the model using a proposed small-area plan for a neighborhood of 10,400 residents in Raleigh, North Carolina, one of the fastest-growing and most sprawling U.S. cities. The simulation model predicts that the plan would increase average daily time spent walking for transportation by 17 min. As a result, annual deaths from all causes are predicted to decrease by 5.5%. Annual new cases of diabetes, coronary heart disease, stroke, and hypertension are predicted to decline by 1.9%, 2.3%, 1.3%, and 1.6%, respectively. The present value of these health benefits is $21,000 per resident.

  14. Hospital bioterrorism planning and burn surge.

    PubMed

    Kearns, Randy D; Myers, Brent; Cairns, Charles B; Rich, Preston B; Hultman, C Scott; Charles, Anthony G; Jones, Samuel W; Schmits, Grace L; Skarote, Mary Beth; Holmes, James H; Cairns, Bruce A

    2014-01-01

    On the morning of June 9, 2009, an explosion occurred at a manufacturing plant in Garner, North Carolina. By the end of the day, 68 injured patients had been evaluated at the 3 Level I trauma centers and 3 community hospitals in the Raleigh/Durham metro area (3 people who were buried in the structural collapse died at the scene). Approximately 300 employees were present at the time of the explosion, when natural gas being vented during the repair of a hot water heater ignited. The concussion from the explosion led to structural failure in multiple locations and breached additional natural gas, electrical, and ammonia lines that ran overhead in the 1-story concrete industrial plant. Intent is the major difference between this type of accident and a terrorist using an incendiary device to terrorize a targeted population. But while this disaster lacked intent, the response, rescue, and outcomes were improved as a result of bioterrorism preparedness. This article discusses how bioterrorism hospital preparedness planning, with an all-hazards approach, became the basis for coordinated burn surge disaster preparedness. This real-world disaster challenged a variety of systems, hospitals, and healthcare providers to work efficiently and effectively to manage multiple survivors. Burn-injured patients served as a focus for this work. We describe the response, rescue, and resuscitation provided by first responders and first receivers as well as efforts made to develop burn care capabilities and surge capacity. PMID:24527874

  15. Power attenuation characteristics as switch-over criterion in personal satellite mobile communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castro, Jonathan P.

    1993-01-01

    A third generation mobile system intends to support communications in all environments (i.e., outdoors, indoors at home or office and when moving). This system will integrate services that are now available in architectures such as cellular, cordless, mobile data networks, paging, including satellite services to rural areas. One way through which service integration will be made possible is by supporting a hierarchical cellular structure based on umbrella cells, macro cells, micro and pico cells. In this type of structure, satellites are part of the giant umbrella cells allowing continuous global coverage, the other cells belong to cities, neighborhoods, and buildings respectively. This does not necessarily imply that network operation of terrestrial and satellite segments interconnect to enable roaming and spectrum sharing. However, the cell concept does imply hand-off between different cell types, which may involve change of frequency. Within this propsective, the present work uses power attenuation characteristics to determine a dynamic criterion that allows smooth transition from space to terrestrial networks. The analysis includes a hybrid channel that combines Rician, Raleigh and Log Normal fading characteristics.

  16. Advances in random matrix theory, zeta functions, and sphere packing.

    PubMed

    Hales, T C; Sarnak, P; Pugh, M C

    2000-11-21

    Over four hundred years ago, Sir Walter Raleigh asked his mathematical assistant to find formulas for the number of cannonballs in regularly stacked piles. These investigations aroused the curiosity of the astronomer Johannes Kepler and led to a problem that has gone centuries without a solution: why is the familiar cannonball stack the most efficient arrangement possible? Here we discuss the solution that Hales found in 1998. Almost every part of the 282-page proof relies on long computer verifications. Random matrix theory was developed by physicists to describe the spectra of complex nuclei. In particular, the statistical fluctuations of the eigenvalues ("the energy levels") follow certain universal laws based on symmetry types. We describe these and then discuss the remarkable appearance of these laws for zeros of the Riemann zeta function (which is the generating function for prime numbers and is the last special function from the last century that is not understood today.) Explaining this phenomenon is a central problem. These topics are distinct, so we present them separately with their own introductory remarks. PMID:11058156

  17. Phase Transformations and Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, H. W.

    2011-12-01

    Phase transformations have been cited as responsible for, or at least involved in, "deep" earthquakes for many decades (although the concept of "deep" has varied). In 1945, PW Bridgman laid out in detail the string of events/conditions that would have to be achieved for a solid/solid transformation to lead to a faulting instability, although he expressed pessimism that the full set of requirements would be simultaneously achieved in nature. Raleigh and Paterson (1965) demonstrated faulting during dehydration of serpentine under stress and suggested dehydration embrittlement as the cause of intermediate depth earthquakes. Griggs and Baker (1969) produced a thermal runaway model of a shear zone under constant stress, culminating in melting, and proposed such a runaway as the origin of deep earthquakes. The discovery of Plate Tectonics in the late 1960s established the conditions (subduction) under which Bridgman's requirements for earthquake runaway in a polymorphic transformation could be possible in nature and Green and Burnley (1989) found that instability during the transformation of metastable olivine to spinel. Recent seismic correlation of intermediate-depth-earthquake hypocenters with predicted conditions of dehydration of antigorite serpentine and discovery of metastable olivine in 4 subduction zones, suggests strongly that dehydration embrittlement and transformation-induced faulting are the underlying mechanisms of intermediate and deep earthquakes, respectively. The results of recent high-speed friction experiments and analysis of natural fault zones suggest that it is likely that similar processes occur commonly during many shallow earthquakes after initiation by frictional failure.

  18. Subjective evaluation of a prototype earmuff exhibiting flat and nonlinear attenuation characteristics.

    PubMed

    Stokes, J P; Royster, L H; Pearson, R G; Royster, J D

    1991-02-01

    Subjective user responses were obtained for a test earmuff exhibiting approximately flat (uniform) attenuation of about 25 dB from 500 to 8000 Hz for sound pressure levels (SPLs) less than 120 dB. At SPLs above 120 dB, the test earmuff exhibited nonlinear (level-dependent) attenuation characteristics such that noise reduction increased with increasing sound level. The study population consisted of police officers from the Raleigh, North Carolina, Police Department as they were performing arms requalification by executing a series of firing programs during two sequential and identical relays. The study subjects wore either the test earmuff or a comparable conventional earmuff during the first relay, then the alternate protector for the second relay with the order counterbalanced. Results indicated a significant preference for the test earmuff in three comparison areas: comfort, perceived hearing protection, and speech understanding. The study demonstrates that ammunition type and level of noise exposure contributed significantly to a preference in favor of the test earmuff. The subjects who used the quietest of the ammunition types rated the test earmuff significantly better than the remaining subjects with respect to speech understanding. PMID:2011979

  19. Temperature Measurement in Microhollow Cathode Discharges in Atmospheric Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Block, Rolf; Toedter, Olaf; Schoenbach, Karl H.

    1998-10-01

    By reducing the diameter of the cathode opening in hollow cathode discharge geometry to values on the order of one hundred micrometers we were able to operate the discharges in a direct current mode at atmospheric pressure in air. The possibility to operate microhollow cathode discharges (MHCD) in parallel [1] in atmospheric air opens a wide range of applications. At atmospheric pressures, the electric power of a single discharge was measured as 8W. The power density in the microhollow exceeds 1MW/cm^3. This leads to strong thermal loading of the electrodes. In order to study the thermal properties of the discharge we have used a method based on emission spectroscopy. The rotational structure of the emitted lines corresponding to the second positive system of nitrogen contains information on the neutral gas temperature. Taking the apparatus profile into account the temperature of the rotational excited molecules can be estimated by a comparison of simulated and measured data. Measurements on MHCD up to atmospheric pressure show an increase in the neutral gas temperature to values exceeding 1000K. In addition to the gas temperature the electrode temperatures were measured and the thermodynamic behavior of the electrode configuration was calculated. [1] W. Shi, K.H. Schoenbach Parallel Operation of Microhollow Cathode Discharges, ICOPS98, Raleigh, NC, USA, 1998 This work was funded by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) in cooperation with the DDR&E Air Plasma Ramparts MURI program, and by the Department of Energy, Advanced Energy Division.

  20. Prototype of a subsurface drip irrigation emitter: Manufacturing, hydraulic evaluation and experimental analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, Wanderley De Jesus; Rodrigues Sinobas, Leonor; Sánchez, Raúl; Arriel Botrel, Tarlei; Duarte Coelho, Rubens

    2013-04-01

    Root and soil intrusion into the conventional emitters is one of the major disadvantages to obtain a good uniformity of water application in subsurface drip irrigation (SDI). In the last years, there have been different approaches to reduce these problems such as the impregnation of emitters with herbicide, and the search for an emitter geometry impairing the intrusion of small roots. Within the last this study, has developed and evaluated an emitter model which geometry shows specific physical features to prevent emitter clogging. This work was developed at the Biosystems Engineering Department at ESALQ-USP/Brazil, and it is a part of a research in which an innovated emitteŕs model for SDI has been developed to prevent root and soil particles intrusion. An emitter with a mechanical-hydraulic mechanism (opening and closing the water outlet) for SDI was developed and manufactured using a mechanical lathe process. It was composed by a silicon elastic membrane a polyethylene tube and a Vnyl Polychloride membrane protector system. In this study the performance of the developed prototype was assessed in the laboratory and in the field conditions. In the laboratory, uniformity of water application was calculated by the water emission uniformity coefficient (CUE), and the manufacturer's coefficient of variation (CVm). In addition, variation in the membrane diameter submitted to internal pressures; head losses along the membrane, using the energy equation; and, precision and accuracy of the equation model, analyzed by Pearson's correlation coefficient (r), and by Willmott's concordance index (d) were also calculated with samples of the developed emitters. In the field, the emitters were installed in pots with and without sugar cane culture from October 2010 to January 2012. During this time, flow rate in 20 emitters were measured periodically, and the aspects of them about clogging at the end of the experiment. Emitters flow rates were measured quarterly to calculate