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Sample records for 2p decay mechanism

  1. Decay mechanism and lifetime of 67Kr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigorenko, L. V.; Golubkova, T. A.; Vaagen, J. S.; Zhukov, M. V.

    2017-02-01

    The lifetime of the recently discovered 2 p emitter 67Kr was found to be considerably below the lower limit predicted theoretically. This communication addresses this issue. Different separation energy systematics are analyzed and different mechanisms for 2 p emission are evaluated. We find that the most plausible reason for this disagreement is the decay mechanism of 67Kr, which is not "true 2 p " emission but rather "transitional dynamics" on the borderline between true 2 p and sequential 2 p decay mechanisms. If this is correct, this imposes stringent limits of Er=1.35 -1.42 MeV on the ground-state energy of 66Br relative to the 65Se-p threshold.

  2. Observation of {chi}{sub bJ}(1P,2P) decays to light hadrons

    SciTech Connect

    Asner, D. M.; Edwards, K. W.; Reed, J.; Briere, R. A.; Tatishvili, G.; Vogel, H.; Onyisi, P. U. E.; Rosner, J. L.; Alexander, J. P.; Cassel, D. G.; Duboscq, J. E.; Ehrlich, R.; Fields, L.; Galik, R. S.; Gibbons, L.; Gray, R.; Gray, S. W.; Hartill, D. L.; Heltsley, B. K.; Hertz, D.

    2008-11-01

    Analyzing {upsilon}(nS) decays acquired with the CLEO detector operating at the CESR e{sup +}e{sup -} collider, we measure for the first time the product branching fractions B[{upsilon}(nS){yields}{gamma}{chi}{sub bJ}((n-1)P)]B[{chi}{sub bJ}(n-1)P){yields}X{sub i}] for n=2 and 3, where X{sub i} denotes, for each i, one of the 14 exclusive light-hadron final states for which we observe significant signals in both {chi}{sub bJ}(1P) and {chi}{sub bJ}(2P) decays. We also determine upper limits for the electric dipole (E1) transitions {upsilon}(3S){yields}{gamma}{chi}{sub bJ}(1P)

  3. Search for 2 p decay of the first excited state of 17Ne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharov, P. G.; Fomichev, A. S.; Bezbakh, A. A.; Chudoba, V.; Egorova, I. A.; Golovkov, M. S.; Golubkova, T. A.; Gorshkov, A. V.; Grigorenko, L. V.; Kaminski, G.; Knyazev, A. G.; Krupko, S. A.; Mentel, M.; Nikolskii, E. Yu.; Parfenova, Yu. L.; Pluchinski, P.; Rymzhanova, S. A.; Sidorchuk, S. I.; Slepnev, R. S.; Stepantsov, S. V.; Ter-Akopian, G. M.; Wolski, R.

    2017-08-01

    Two-proton decay of the 17Ne low-lying states populated in the 1H(18Ne,d )17Ne transfer reaction is studied. The two-proton width Γ2 p of the 17Ne first excited 3 /2- state at E*=1.288 MeV is of importance for the two-proton radioactivity theory and nuclear-astrophysics applications. A dedicated search for the two-proton emission of this state was performed leading to the new upper limit obtained for the width ratio Γ2 p/Γγ<1.6 (3 ) ×10-4 . An original, "combined mass" method is suggested and tested as capable of improving the resolution of the experiment, which is a prime significance for the study of nuclear states with extremely small particle-to-gamma width ratios Γpart/Γγ . The condition Γpart≪Γγ is quite common for the states of astrophysical interest, which makes the proposed approach promising in this field.

  4. An efficient query mechanism base on P2P networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaohua; Mu, Aiqin; Zhao, Defang

    2013-07-01

    How to implement the efficient query is the key problem deployed on P2P networks. This paper analyses the shortage of several query algorithm, and presents a new algorithm DDI, which means distributed searching with double indices. It discusses the popularity of documents and the linking status of the networks, and calculates the availability of the nodes in whole network, determines the route of the query process. It compares the items of time using, the quantity of requests and update information by the emulate experiments. Along with the rapid development of computer network technology, peer-to-peer (referred to as P2P) network research has gradually become mature, and it is widely used in different fields, some large P2P computing project has entered the implementation stage. At present, many more popular software systems such as Gnutella, Freenet, Napster are deployed based on P2P technology. How to achieve effective information query has become one of the key problems of P2P research.

  5. Level-to-level and total probability for Auger decay including direct double processes of Ar 2p-1 hole states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Jiaolong; Liu, Pengfei; Xiang, Wenjun; Yuan, Jianmin

    2013-03-01

    Auger decay including direct double processes of Ar 2p-1 hole levels is investigated in the framework of perturbation theory implemented by distorted wave approximation with balanced large-scale configuration interaction among the successive ions being taken into account. The complex transition amplitude obtained from the second perturbation theory for the direct double Auger decay (DAD) is decomposed into approximate formulas according to two generally agreed mechanisms of shake-off and knock-out. Practical computations showed that the knock-out condition is fulfilled and thus justified such a decomposition treatment of knock-out mechanism. The contribution to the DAD probability from knock-out mechanism is larger than shake-off by an order of magnitude and therefore the former is dominant. The interference effect between the knock-out and shake-off mechanisms should be trivial and neglecting it we obtained a branching ratio of 12.0% for the direct DAD into triply charged states of Ar3+. By including cascade double decay, a total branching ratio of 14.9% is obtained. Our result explained recent experimental results on the branching ratio into triply charged ion, and should be useful for further detailed experimental investigations.

  6. Cytoplasmic RNA decay pathways - Enzymes and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Łabno, Anna; Tomecki, Rafał; Dziembowski, Andrzej

    2016-12-01

    RNA decay plays a crucial role in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Work conducted over the last decades has defined the major mRNA decay pathways, as well as enzymes and their cofactors responsible for these processes. In contrast, our knowledge of the mechanisms of degradation of non-protein coding RNA species is more fragmentary. This review is focused on the cytoplasmic pathways of mRNA and ncRNA degradation in eukaryotes. The major 3' to 5' and 5' to 3' mRNA decay pathways are described with emphasis on the mechanisms of their activation by the deprotection of RNA ends. More recently discovered 3'-end modifications such as uridylation, and their relevance to cytoplasmic mRNA decay in various model organisms, are also discussed. Finally, we provide up-to-date findings concerning various pathways of non-coding RNA decay in the cytoplasm. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Alignment of Ar+ Ions Produced After Resonant Auger Decay of Ar* 2p5 3d Resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, M.; Marquette, A.; Grum-Grzhimailo, A.; Flesch, R.; Rühl, E.

    Fluorescence spectra have been recorded in the wavelength region 300 nm <= λ(fluo) <= 500 nm after resonant 2p --> 3d excitation of atomic Ar using monochromatic synchrotron light. The radiative emission is characterized by strong transitions from Ar+ 3p4 (1S, 1D, 3P) nl ionic states. It is mainly assigned to processes of the type 3p4 4d --> 3p4 4p and 3p4 4p --> 3p4 4s. In addition, we have analyzed the degree of polarization of the fluorescence lines and we have determined the alignment of the Ar+ ions, which are produced after the resonant Auger decay. In comparison to investigations based on photoelectron spectroscopy, the spectral analysis of the fluorescence provides complementary information about the electronic relaxation during the resonant Auger process and, in particular, it allows one to examine directly the remaining ion.

  8. A distributed incentive compatible pricing mechanism for P2P networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Zhao, Zheng; Xiong, Xiao; Shi, Qingwei

    2007-09-01

    Peer-to-Peer (P2P) systems are currently receiving considerable interest. However, as experience with P2P networks shows, the selfish behaviors of peers may lead to serious problems of P2P network, such as free-riding and white-washing. In order to solve these problems, there are increasing considerations on reputation system design in the study of P2P networks. Most of the existing works is concerning probabilistic estimation or social networks to evaluate the trustworthiness for a peer to others. However, these models can not be efficient all the time. In this paper, our aim is to provide a general mechanism that can maximize P2P networks social welfare in a way of Vickrey-Clarke-Groves family, while assuming every peer in P2P networks is rational and selfish, which means they only concern about their own outcome. This mechanism has some desirable properties using an O(n) algorithm: (1) incentive compatibility, every peer truly report its connection type; (2) individually rationality; and (3) fully decentralized, we design a multiple-principal multiple-agent model, concerning about the service provider and service requester individually.

  9. Angle-resolved study of Ar 2p{sub 1/2,3/2}{sup -1} ns,d resonant Auger decay

    SciTech Connect

    Farhat, A.; Humphrey, M.; Langer, B.

    1997-04-01

    The Auger decay of core excited states in rare gases has been subject to rather intense investigation over a number of years due to its complex nature. The authors have measured the intensity distributions and angular distributions ({beta} parameters) for the Auger decay spectra following each of the 2p{sub 1/2,3/2} {r_arrow} 4s, 3d, 4d resonant excitations in argon. This report presents their result only for the angular distributions ({beta} parameters) of the 2p{sub 1/2}{sup {minus}1}4s resonance.

  10. Method of predicting mechanical properties of decayed wood

    DOEpatents

    Kelley, Stephen S.

    2003-07-15

    A method for determining the mechanical properties of decayed wood that has been exposed to wood decay microorganisms, comprising: a) illuminating a surface of decayed wood that has been exposed to wood decay microorganisms with wavelengths from visible and near infrared (VIS-NIR) spectra; b) analyzing the surface of the decayed wood using a spectrometric method, the method generating a first spectral data of wavelengths in VIS-NIR spectra region; and c) using a multivariate analysis to predict mechanical properties of decayed wood by comparing the first spectral data with a calibration model, the calibration model comprising a second spectrometric method of spectral data of wavelengths in VIS-NIR spectra obtained from a reference decay wood, the second spectral data being correlated with a known mechanical property analytical result obtained from the reference decayed wood.

  11. Measurements of radiative-decay rates of the 2s22p(2P°)-2s2p2(4P) intersystem transitions of C+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Z.; Kwong, Victor H. S.; Wang, Jiebing; Parkinson, W. H.

    1993-08-01

    The radiative-decay rates of the 2s22p(2P0)-2s2p2(4P) intersystem transitions of C+ ions have been measured by recording the time dependence of the ~233-nm emission. A cylindrical radio-frequency ion trap was used to store electron-impact-produced C+ ions. The time-dependent signals were analyzed by multiexponential least-squares fits to the data. The measured radiative-decay rates to the ground term are 146.4(+8.3,-9.2) s-1 for 4P1/2, 11.6(+0.8,-1.7) s-1 for 4P3/2, and 51.2(+2.6,-3.5) s-1 for 4P5/2. Comparison of the measured values with theoretical values is presented.

  12. Hyperbolic decay of photo-created Sb2+ ions in Sn2P2S6:Sb crystals detected with electron paramagnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basun, S. A.; Halliburton, L. E.; Evans, D. R.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we employed a method that overcomes the known limitations of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) to monitor charge trap dynamics over a broad temperature range not normally accessible due to the lifetime broadening of the EPR lines at higher temperatures. This was achieved by measuring the decay of the EPR intensity after thermal annealing by rapid cycling back to low temperatures for the EPR measurement. This technique was used to experimentally demonstrate interesting physics in the form of a direct measurement of the hyperbolic decay 1/(1+t) of a charge trap population, which previously was only considered theoretically. The nontrivial effects of bimolecular recombination are demonstrated in the Sn2S2P6:Sb crystals, providing an explanation of the optical sensitization process observed in photorefractive Sn2P2S6:Sb used for dynamic holography.

  13. Single and double K-shell resonant photoionization and Auger decay of 1s → 2p excited states of O+-O4+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Jiaolong; Li, Yongjun; Liu, Pengfei; Gao, Cheng; Yuan, Jianmin

    2017-09-01

    In this work, single and double photoionization cross sections in the vicinity of 1s → 2p resonances are investigated theoretically for quantum states belonging to the ground and first excited configurations of O+-O4+. R-matrix method has been employed to obtain the single ionization cross section, whereas the double ionization cross sections are obtained by the branching ratios of the direct double Auger decay to the total Auger decay. By analyzing possible double ionization pathways, we conclude that the double photoionization originates predominately from the direct double Auger decay of the K-shell resonant states. Our theoretical work diagnosed the population fraction of the quantum state prepared in a recent experiment and successfully interpreted the experimental observations on both single and double photoionization cross sections.

  14. Incentive Mechanism for P2P Content Sharing over Heterogenous Access Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Kenichiro; Hashimoto, Ryo; Yoshino, Makoto; Shinkuma, Ryoichi; Takahashi, Tatsuro

    In peer-to-peer (P2P) content sharing, users can share their content by contributing their own resources to one another. However, since there is no incentive for contributing contents or resources to others, users may attempt to obtain content without any contribution. To motivate users to contribute their resources to the service, incentive-rewarding mechanisms have been proposed. On the other hand, emerging wireless technologies, such as IEEE 802.11 wireless local area networks, beyond third generation (B3G) cellular networks and mobile WiMAX, provide high-speed Internet access for wireless users. Using these high-speed wireless access, wireless users can use P2P services and share their content with other wireless users and with fixed users. However, this diversification of access networks makes it difficult to appropriately assign rewards to each user according to their contributions. This is because the cost necessary for contribution is different in different access networks. In this paper, we propose a novel incentive-rewarding mechanism called EMOTIVER that can assign rewards to users appropriately. The proposed mechanism uses an external evaluator and interactive learning agents. We also investigate a way of appropriately controlling rewards based on the system service's quality and managing policy.

  15. Shake-off of loosely bound electrons in Auger decays of Kr 2p core hole states

    SciTech Connect

    Morishita, Y.; Suzuki, I.H.; Ibuki, T.

    2005-10-15

    Multicharged Kr ions have been measured using monochromatized undulator radiation combined with a coincidence technique. It has been found that a charge-state distribution of Kr ions being coincident with satellite peaks of Kr 2p{sub 3/2} photoelectron is slightly different from that for the main line. Resonant Auger peaks for 2p{sup -1}nl{yields}{sup 1}G{sub 4} nl transitions generated essentially Kr{sup 4+} only, which differs from the charge-state distribution for the normal Auger peak. These findings suggest that loosely bound electrons in high Rydberg orbitals are easily shaken-off in electron emission processes.

  16. The pore structure and gating mechanism of K2P channels

    PubMed Central

    Piechotta, Paula L; Rapedius, Markus; Stansfeld, Phillip J; Bollepalli, Murali K; Erhlich, Gunter; Andres-Enguix, Isabelle; Fritzenschaft, Hariolf; Decher, Niels; Sansom, Mark S P; Tucker, Stephen J; Baukrowitz, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Two-pore domain (K2P) potassium channels are important regulators of cellular electrical excitability. However, the structure of these channels and their gating mechanism, in particular the role of the bundle-crossing gate, are not well understood. Here, we report that quaternary ammonium (QA) ions bind with high-affinity deep within the pore of TREK-1 and have free access to their binding site before channel activation by intracellular pH or pressure. This demonstrates that, unlike most other K+ channels, the bundle-crossing gate in this K2P channel is constitutively open. Furthermore, we used QA ions to probe the pore structure of TREK-1 by systematic scanning mutagenesis and comparison of these results with different possible structural models. This revealed that the TREK-1 pore most closely resembles the open-state structure of KvAP. We also found that mutations close to the selectivity filter and the nature of the permeant ion profoundly influence TREK-1 channel gating. These results demonstrate that the primary activation mechanisms in TREK-1 reside close to, or within the selectivity filter and do not involve gating at the cytoplasmic bundle crossing. PMID:21822218

  17. Observation of the Decays Λb0→χc 1p K- and Λb0→χc 2p K-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Arnau Romeu, J.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Babuschkin, I.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baker, S.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Baranov, A.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Baryshnikov, F.; Baszczyk, M.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Beiter, A.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Beranek, S.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Betancourt, C.; Betti, F.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bezshyiko, Ia.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Birnkraut, A.; Bitadze, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Boettcher, T.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Bordyuzhin, I.; Borgheresi, A.; Borghi, S.; Borisyak, M.; Borsato, M.; Bossu, F.; Boubdir, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Buchanan, E.; Burr, C.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D. H.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Chamont, D.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chatzikonstantinidis, G.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S. F.; Chobanova, V.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Chubykin, A.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombs, G.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Costa Sobral, C. M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Da Cunha Marinho, F.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; Davis, A.; De Aguiar Francisco, O.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Serio, M.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C. T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Dembinski, H.-P.; Demmer, M.; Dendek, A.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Dijkstra, H.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dungs, K.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziewiecki, M.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Déléage, N.; Easo, S.; Ebert, M.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Fazzini, D.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez, G.; Fernandez Prieto, A.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fini, R. A.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fleuret, F.; Fohl, K.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forshaw, D. C.; Forty, R.; Franco Lima, V.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Fu, J.; Funk, W.; Furfaro, E.; Färber, C.; Gabriel, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garcia Martin, L. M.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Garsed, P. J.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianı, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gizdov, K.; Gligorov, V. V.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gorelov, I. V.; Gotti, C.; Govorkova, E.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greim, R.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Gruber, L.; Gruberg Cazon, B. R.; Grünberg, O.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Göbel, C.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; Hatch, M.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heister, A.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hombach, C.; Hopchev, P. H.; Huard, Z.-C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hushchyn, M.; Hutchcroft, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jiang, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Karacson, M.; Kariuki, J. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khairullin, E.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Kirn, T.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Klimkovich, T.; Koliiev, S.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Kopecna, R.; Koppenburg, P.; Kosmyntseva, A.; Kotriakhova, S.; Kozachuk, A.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreps, M.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Lefèvre, R.; Lemaitre, F.; Lemos Cid, E.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, T.; Li, Y.; Li, Z.; Likhomanenko, T.; Lindner, R.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, X.; Loh, D.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusiani, A.; Lyu, X.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Maltsev, T.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marinangeli, M.; Marino, P.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martin, M.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massacrier, L. M.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurice, E.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Merli, A.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Mogini, A.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morello, M. J.; Morgunova, O.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Morris, A. P.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Mulder, M.; Mussini, M.; Müller, D.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nieswand, S.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Nogay, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Ossowska, A.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pais, P. R.; Palano, A.; Palutan, M.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Pappenheimer, C.; Parker, W.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Pastore, A.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pikies, M.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Placinta, V.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poli Lener, M.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Pomery, G. J.; Ponce, S.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Poslavskii, S.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Prisciandaro, J.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, C.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Ramos Pernas, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Ratnikov, F.; Raven, G.; Ravonel Salzgeber, M.; Reboud, M.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; dos Reis, A. C.; Remon Alepuz, C.; Renaudin, V.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Rogozhnikov, A.; Roiser, S.; Rollings, A.; Romanovskiy, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Rudolph, M. S.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sadykhov, E.; Sagidova, N.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Gonzalo, D.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schael, S.; Schellenberg, M.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schreiner, H. F.; Schubert, K.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sergi, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Siddi, B. G.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Silva de Oliveira, L.; Simi, G.; Simone, S.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Soares Lavra, l.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefko, P.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stemmle, S.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevens, H.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tilley, M. J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Toriello, F.; Tourinho Jadallah Aoude, R.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Traill, M.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tully, A.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valassi, A.; Valat, S.; Valenti, G.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vecchi, S.; van Veghel, M.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Venkateswaran, A.; Verlage, T. A.; Vernet, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Viana Barbosa, J. V.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Viemann, H.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vitti, M.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Voneki, B.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Wark, H. M.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Winn, M. A.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wraight, K.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yao, Y.; Yin, H.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zarebski, K. A.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zheng, Y.; Zhu, X.; Zhukov, V.; Zonneveld, J. B.; Zucchelli, S.; LHCb Collaboration

    2017-08-01

    The first observation of the decays Λb0→χc 1p K- and Λb0→χc 2p K- is reported using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb-1, collected by the LHCb experiment in p p collisions at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. The following ratios of branching fractions are measured: B/(Λb0→χc 1p K-) B (Λb0→J /ψ p K-) =0.242 ±0.014 ±0.013 ±0.009 ,B/(Λb0→χc 2p K-) B (Λb0→J /ψ p K-) =0.248 ±0.020 ±0.014 ±0.009 ,B/(Λb0→χc 2p K-) B (Λb0→χc 1p K-) =1.02 ±0.10 ±0.02 ±0.05 , where the first uncertainty is statistical, the second systematic, and the third due to the uncertainty on the branching fractions of the χc 1→J /ψ γ and χc 2→J /ψ γ decays. Using both decay modes, the mass of the Λb0 baryon is also measured to be mΛb0=5619.44 ±0.28 ±0.26 MeV /c2 , where the first and second uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively.

  18. Mechanisms of endonuclease-mediated mRNA decay

    PubMed Central

    Schoenberg, Daniel R.

    2012-01-01

    Endonuclease cleavage was one of the first identified mechanisms of mRNA decay but until recently it was thought to play a minor role to the better-known processes of deadenylation, decapping and exonuclease-catalyzed decay. Most of the early examples of endonuclease decay came from studies of a particular mRNA whose turnover changed in response to hormone, cytokine, developmental or nutritional stimuli. Only a few of these examples of endonuclease-mediated mRNA decay progressed to the point where the enzyme responsible for the initiating event was identified and studied in any detail. The discovery of microRNAs and RISC-catalyzed endonuclease cleavage followed by the identification of PIN (pilT N-terminal) domains that impart endonuclease activity to a number of the proteins involved in mRNA decay has led to a resurgence of interest in endonuclease-mediated mRNA decay. PIN domains show no substrate selectivity, and their involvement in a number of decay pathways highlights a recurring theme that the context in which an endonuclease functions is a primary factor in determining whether any given mRNA will be targeted for decay by this or the default exonuclease-mediated decay processes. PMID:21957046

  19. Radiative corrections to false vacuum decay in quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezuglov, M. A.; Onishchenko, A. I.

    2017-08-01

    We consider radiative corrections to false vacuum decay within the framework of quantum mechanics for the general potential of the form 1/2 M ϕ2(ϕ -A )(ϕ -B ), where M , A and B are arbitrary parameters. For this type of potential we provide analytical results for Green function in the background of a corresponding bounce solution together with a one loop expression for false vacuum decay rate. Next, we discuss the computations of higher order corrections for false vacuum decay rates and provide numerical expressions for two and three loop contributions.

  20. Non-exponential and oscillatory decays in quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Peshkin, Murray; Volya, Alexander; Zelevinsky, Vladimir

    2014-08-07

    The quantum-mechanical theory of the decay of unstable states is revisited. We show that the decay is non-exponential both in the short-time and long-time limits using a more physical definition of the decay rate than the one usually used. We report results of numerical studies based on Winter's model that may elucidate qualitative features of exponential and non-exponential decay more generally. The main exponential stage is related to the formation of a radiating state that maintains the shape of its wave function with exponentially diminishing normalization. We discuss situations where the radioactive decay displays several exponents. The transient stages between different regimes are typically accompanied by interference of various contributions and resulting oscillations in the decay curve. The decay curve can be fully oscillatory in a two-flavor generalization of Winter's model with some values of the parameters. We consider the implications of that result for models of the oscillations reported by GSI.

  1. Non-exponential and oscillatory decays in quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peshkin, Murray; Volya, Alexander; Zelevinsky, Vladimir

    2014-08-01

    The quantum-mechanical theory of the decay of unstable states is revisited. We show that the decay is non-exponential both in the short-time and long-time limits using a more physical definition of the decay rate than the one usually used. We report results of numerical studies based on Winter's model that may elucidate qualitative features of exponential and non-exponential decay more generally. The main exponential stage is related to the formation of a radiating state that maintains the shape of its wave function with exponentially diminishing normalization. We discuss situations where the radioactive decay displays several exponents. The transient stages between different regimes are typically accompanied by interference of various contributions and resulting oscillations in the decay curve. The decay curve can be fully oscillatory in a two-flavor generalization of Winter's model with some values of the parameters. We consider the implications of that result for models of the oscillations reported by GSI.

  2. A cooperation mechanism for pure P2P file-sharing networks to improve application-level QoS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakamiya, Naoki; Konishi, Junjiro; Murata, Masayuki

    2006-10-01

    To provide application-oriented network services, a variety of overlay networks are deployed over physical IP networks. Since they share and compete for the same physical network resources, their selfish behaviors affect each other and, as a result, their performance deteriorates. In this paper, we propose a mechanism for pureP2P networks of file-sharing applications to cooperate with each other. In our proposal, a cooperative peer first finds another P2P network and establishes a logical link to a cooperative peer in the found network. Both ends of the logical link decide whether they cooperate or not from a viewpoint of the mutualism. When they consider they benefit from the cooperation, messages and files are exchanged among cooperative P2P networks through the logical link. For an efficient and effective cooperation, our mechanism has an algorithm for the selection of cooperative peers and a caching mechanism to avoid putting too much load on cooperative peers and cooperating networks. Simulation results showed that the number of discovered providing peers and the ratio of search hits increased about twice, while the load by the cooperation among P2P networks was reduced about half by caching.

  3. The signature of initial production mechanisms in isotropic turbulence decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meldi, M.

    2016-03-01

    In the present work the quantification of the time-lasting effects of production mechanisms in homogeneous isotropic turbulence decay is addressed. The analysis is developed through the use of theoretical tools as well as numerical calculations based on the eddy damped quasinormal Markovian (EDQNM) model. In both cases a modified Lin equation is used, which accounts for production mechanisms as proposed by Meldi, Lejemble, and Sagaut ["On the emergence of non-classical decay regimes in multiscale/fractal generated isotropic turbulence," J. Fluid Mech. 756, 816-843 (2014)]. The approaches used show that an exponential decay law can be observed if the intensity of the forcing is strong enough to drive the turbulence dynamics, before a power-law decay is eventually attained. The EDQNM numerical results indicate that the exponential regime can persist for long evolution times, longer than the observation time in grid turbulence experiments. A rigorous investigation of the self-similar behavior of the pressure spectrum has been performed by a comprehensive comparison of EDQNM data with direct numerical simulation (DNS)/experiments in the literature. While DNS and free decay EDQNM simulations suggest the need of a very high Reλ threshold in order to observe a clear -7/3 slope of the pressure inertial range, experimental data and forced EDQNM calculations indicate a significantly lower value. This observation suggests that the time-lasting effects of production mechanisms, which cannot be excluded in experiments, play a role in the lack of general agreement with classical numerical approaches. These results reinforce the urge to evolve the numerical simulation state of the art towards the prediction of realistic physical states.

  4. Nuclear Spin Echo Decay for the Walstedt-Cheong Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Todd; Recchia, Charles; Seber, Derek; Pennington, Charles

    1997-03-01

    We present calculations of nuclear spin echo decay for the Walstedt-Cheong mechanism(R. E. Walstedt and S. -W. Cheong, Phys. Rev. B 51, 3163 (1995)) in which observed A nuclei are coupled to B nuclei that are experiencing magnetic spin lattice re laxation effects. It has been shown that this mechanism must be taken into account when NMR transverse relaxation rates are being analyzed to provide information on vortex dynamics and electronic spin susceptibility in cuprate superconductors.(R ecchia et al, submitted 1996) We report a method of computing spin echo decays which eliminates the need for numerical simulations and phase distribution approximations(C. H. Recchia, K. Gorny, and C. H. Pennington, Phys. Rev. B 54, 4207 (1996)) and involves the time evolution of normal modes of a relaxation matrix.

  5. Mechanisms of protection by NHA against fungal decay

    Treesearch

    Frederick Green; William Henry; Tor Schultz

    2002-01-01

    Treating wood with the water-borne sodium salt of N'-N-naphthaloylhydroxylamine (Na-NHA) protects wood against decay and termite damage. Initial testing indicated little or no inhibition of sapstain fungi, molds, or soft-rot fungi by Na-NHA, suggesting that the mechanism by which this compound protected wood was complex and not that of a broad-spectrum biocide....

  6. Cosmological model with decaying vacuum energy from quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szydłowski, Marek

    2015-06-01

    We construct the cosmological model to explain the cosmological constant problem. We built the extension of the standard cosmological model Λ CDM by consideration of decaying vacuum energy represented by the running cosmological term. From the principles of quantum mechanics one can find that in the long-term behavior survival probability of unstable states is a decreasing function of the cosmological time and has the inverse powerlike form. This implies that cosmological constant ρvac=Λ (t )=Λbare+α/t2 where Λbare and α are constants. We investigate the dynamics of this model using dynamical system methods due to a link to the Λ (H ) cosmologies. We have found the exact solution for the scale factor as well as the indicators of its variability like the deceleration parameter and the jerk. From the calculation of the jerk we obtain a simple test of the decaying vacuum in the Friedman-Robertson-Walker universe. Using astronomical data [SNIa, H (z ), CMB, BAO] we have estimated the model parameters and compared this model with the Λ CDM model. Our statistical results indicate that the decaying vacuum model is a little worse than the Λ CDM model. But the decaying vacuum cosmological model explains the small value of the cosmological constant today.

  7. Radiative decay probabilities of the (2s{sup 2}2p{sub 1/2}{sup 5}3s{sub 1/2}){sub J=0} level in neonlike ions

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Obst, M.; Safronova, U. I.

    2011-01-15

    The radiative decay rates of the (2s{sup 2}2p{sub 1/2}{sup 5}3s{sub 1/2}){sub J=0} level in neonlike ions have been calculated for nuclear charges ranging from Z=10 to Z=110. The calculations include the magnetic dipole decay to the (2s{sup 2}2p{sub 3/2}{sup 5}3s{sub 1/2}){sub J=1} level, which is shown to be the dominant decay branch in low-Z and very-high-Z ions, as well as the two-electron, one-photon decays to the (2s{sup 2}2p{sub 3/2}{sup 5}3p{sub 1/2}){sub J=1} and (2s{sup 2}2p{sub 3/2}{sup 5}3p{sub 3/2}){sub J=1} levels, which dominate near Z=50. We also take into account a small magnetic quadrupole decay branch to the (2s{sup 2}2p{sub 3/2}{sup 5}3s{sub 1/2}){sub J=2} level and calculate the total radiative lifetime of the (2s{sup 2}2p{sub 1/2}{sup 5}3s{sub 1/2}){sub J=0} level. The resulting values span over 15 orders of magnitude, and much of this range is accessible with modern atomic lifetime measurement techniques. In particular, we calculate a value of 1.6x10{sup 4} s{sup -1} for the radiative decay rate of the (2s{sup 2}2p{sub 1/2}{sup 5}3s{sub 1/2}){sub J=0} level in Fe XVII and show that the corresponding magnetic dipole transition has a measurable spectral intensity for electron densities below about 1x10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}.

  8. Nonradiative decay mechanism of fluoren-9-ylidene malononitrile ambipolar derivatives.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Leandro A; Cai, Xichen; Neckers, Douglas C

    2011-03-24

    We report recent results on the nonradiative decay (NRD) of fluoren-9-ylidene malononitrile (FM) ambipolar derivatives (FMDs). 2,7- and 3,6-disubstituted FMDs present distinctive photophysics. Charge separation was found dominant for excited state relaxation. The radiative decay (RD) is sensitive to changes in temperature and solvent medium only for the case of 3,6-FMDs. Excited state deactivation of carbazole-containing 3,6-FMD (CPAFM36) was exclusively nonradiative in polar solvents with excited state lifetimes shorter than 10 ps. The charge separation/recombination mechanism of the corresponding FMDs is suggested to fall in the inverted Marcus region of electron transfer. Given the electron-withdrawing properties of the FM unit, its ambipolar derivatives are suggested as potential candidates for air-stable organic thin-film transistors and molecular organic photovoltaics.

  9. Quantization in Classical Mechanics and Diffusion Mechanism of Alpha Decay, Proton and Cluster Radioactivity, Spontaneous Fission

    SciTech Connect

    Rusov, V. D.; Vlasenko, D. S.; Deliyergiyev, M. A.; Mavrodiev, S. Cht.

    2010-01-01

    Based on the Chetaev generalized theorem the Schroedinger equation as the stability condition of trajectories in classical dynamics in the presence of dissipative forces is derived. In the framework of this approach the alternative model for unified description of alpha decay, spontaneous fission, cluster and proton radioactivity and is developed. We show the possibility of the classical (without tunneling) description of radioactive decay of heavy nuclei, when the so called noise-induced transition or, in other words, the stochastic channel of radioactive decay conditioned by the Kramers diffusion mechanism is generated under certain conditions.Using the ENSDF nuclear data, we have found the parametrized solutions of the Kramers equation of the Langevin type by the Alexandrov dynamic auto-regularization method (REGN-Dubna program). These solutions describe with high-accuracy the dependences of half-life (the decay probability) of heavy radioactive nuclei on total kinetic energy of daughter decay products.Verification of the inverse problem solution in the framework of the universal Kramers description of alpha decay, spontaneous fission, cluster and proton radioactivity, which based on the newest experimental data for alpha-decay of even-even superheavy nuclei (Z = 114, 116, 118), shows good coincidence of the experimental and theoretical dependences of half-life on alpha-decay energy.

  10. Quantization in Classical Mechanics and Diffusion Mechanism of Alpha Decay, Proton and Cluster Radioactivity, Spontaneous Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusov, V. D.; Mavrodiev, S. Cht.; Vlasenko, D. S.; Deliyergiyev, M. À.

    2010-01-01

    Based on the Chetaev generalized theorem the Schroedinger equation as the stability condition of trajectories in classical dynamics in the presence of dissipative forces is derived. In the framework of this approach the alternative model for unified description of alpha decay, spontaneous fission, cluster and proton radioactivity and is developed. We show the possibility of the classical (without tunneling) description of radioactive decay of heavy nuclei, when the so called noise-induced transition or, in other words, the stochastic channel of radioactive decay conditioned by the Kramers diffusion mechanism is generated under certain conditions. Using the ENSDF nuclear data, we have found the parametrized solutions of the Kramers equation of the Langevin type by the Alexandrov dynamic auto-regularization method (REGN-Dubna program). These solutions describe with high-accuracy the dependences of half-life (the decay probability) of heavy radioactive nuclei on total kinetic energy of daughter decay products. Verification of the inverse problem solution in the framework of the universal Kramers description of alpha decay, spontaneous fission, cluster and proton radioactivity, which based on the newest experimental data for alpha-decay of even-even superheavy nuclei (Z = 114, 116, 118), shows good coincidence of the experimental and theoretical dependences of half-life on alpha-decay energy.

  11. Possible nuclear decay of bismuth induced by a mechanical impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marakhtanov, M. K.

    2016-09-01

    It is experimentally shown that the metallic dust after the inertial explosion induced by the impact of a metallic bismuth striker on a fixed steel barrier contains platinum and boron, which were absent before the explosion. The existence of platinum and boron is qualitatively determined. The emission of single 8-MeV α particles is also detected from the metallic dust that forms at the site of the impact interaction of bismuth with steel. Both effects point to possible nuclear decay of bismuth due to the energy of a mechanical impact.

  12. Systematic study of the singularity mechanism in heavy quarkonium decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qian; Hanhart, Christoph; Zhao, Qiang

    2013-08-01

    We investigate in detail the role of heavy meson loops in the transition from JPC =1-- sources to candidates for QCD "exotics", such as Zc (3900), Zb (10610) and Zb‧ (10650). We demonstrate that, if a vector state strongly couples to a heavy meson pair in an S-wave and this system decays to another heavy meson pair (e.g. via pion emission), again in an S-wave, the pertinent diagrams get enhanced significantly, if the intermediate states are (near) on-shell and have small relative momenta. In a limited kinematic range this mechanism generates "singularity regions" that lead to the creation of a large number of low-energy heavy meson pairs, providing an ideal environment for the formation of hadron-hadron bound states or resonances. For instance, we predict that the signals for Zb and Zb‧ should be a lot stronger in ϒ (6 S) decays due to this mechanism, if these states are indeed hadron-hadron resonances. The findings of this work should be valuable for deepening our understanding of the nature of the mentioned states.

  13. The "footloose" mechanism: Iceberg decay from hydrostatic stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Till J. W.; Wadhams, Peter; Bates, Richard; Elosegui, Pedro; Stern, Alon; Vella, Dominic; Abrahamsen, E. Povl; Crawford, Anna; Nicholls, Keith W.

    2014-08-01

    We study a mechanism of iceberg breakup that may act together with the recognized melt and wave-induced decay processes. Our proposal is based on observations from a recent field experiment on a large ice island in Baffin Bay, East Canada. We observed that successive collapses of the overburden from above an unsupported wavecut at the iceberg waterline created a submerged foot fringing the berg. The buoyancy stresses induced by such a foot may be sufficient to cause moderate-sized bergs to break off from the main berg. A mathematical model is developed to test the feasibility of this mechanism. The results suggest that once the foot reaches a critical length, the induced stresses are sufficient to cause calving. The theoretically predicted maximum stable foot length compares well to the data collected in situ. Further, the model provides analytical expressions for the previously observed "rampart-moat" iceberg surface profiles.

  14. Nonlinear Viscoelastic Mechanism for Aftershock Triggering and Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbakov, R.; Zhang, X.

    2016-12-01

    Aftershocks are ubiquitous in nature. They are the manifestation of relaxation phenomena observed in various physical systems. In one prominent example, they typically occur after large earthquakes. They also occur in other natural or experimental systems, for example, in solar flares, in fracture experiments on porous materials and acoustic emissions, after stock market crashes, in the volatility of stock prices returns, in internet traffic variability and e-mail spamming, to mention a few. The observed aftershock sequences usually obey several well defined non-trivial empirical laws in magnitude, temporal, and spatial domains. In many cases their characteristics follow scale-invariant distributions. The occurrence of aftershocks displays a prominent temporal behavior due to time-dependent mechanisms of stress and/or energy transfer. In this work, we consider a slider-block model to mimic the behavior of a seismogenic fault. In the model, we introduce a nonlinear viscoelastic coupling mechanism to capture the essential characteristics of crustal rheology and stress interaction between the blocks and the medium. For this purpose we employ nonlinear Kelvin-Voigt elements consisting of an elastic spring and a dashpot assembled in parallel to introduce viscoelastic coupling between the blocks and the driving plate. By mapping the model into a cellular automaton we derive the functional form of the stress transfer mechanism in the model. We show that the nonlinear viscoelasticity plays a critical role in triggering of aftershocks. It explains the functional form of the Omori-Utsu law and gives physical interpretation of its parameters. The proposed model also suggests that the power-law rheology of the fault gauge and underlying lower crust and upper mantle control the decay rate of aftershocks. To verify this, we analyze several prominent aftershock sequences to estimate their decay rates and correlate with the rheological properties of the underlying lower crust and

  15. Towards the Design of Unexploitable Construction Mechanisms for Multiple-Tree Based P2P Streaming Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinkmeier, Michael; Fischer, Mathias; Grau, Sascha; Schaefer, Guenter

    In peer-to-peer based live streaming systems, a great number of participants have to cooperate to efficiently and reliably distribute a continuous flow of data. Each receiving peer in return provides its resources to the system. Since these systems operate in a completely distributed manner, it is of particular importance, to prevent malicious members from harvesting important topology information or influencing the streaming system to their needs. In this article, we analyze potential attack methods on multiple-tree-based P2P streaming systems, discuss important design decisions to constrain the impact of malicious behaviour, and we introduce the new concept of peer testaments. By analyzing existing systems, we show that so far only few attention has been given to the design of unexploitable construction mechanisms. Based on the identified design decisions, we propose a novel streaming system and evaluate it by exposing it to different types of internal attackers. Our results show that these attackers have to spend large effort to reach relevant positions in the streaming topology and that their bandwidth contribution far outnumbers the damage they achieve.

  16. Comment on ''Effect of entanglement on the decay dynamics of a pair of H(2p) atoms due to spontaneous emission''

    SciTech Connect

    Sancho, Pedro; Plaja, Luis

    2011-06-15

    T. Tanabe et al. [Phys. Rev. A 82, 040101(R) (2010)] have experimentally demonstrated that the emission properties of unstable atoms in entangled and product states are different. The authors define an apparent decay time as a fitting parameter which falls below the lifetime of the single atom for entangled pairs. We argue that their results about coincidence time spectra are correct, but those concerning lifetimes cannot be considered conclusive because they assume the emission of photons by the two atoms to be independent processes, a doubtful hypothesis for entangled states. We suggest an improved evaluation of the lifetimes based on a rigorous approach, which demands some modifications of the experimental procedure.

  17. Observation of the Decays Λ_{b}^{0}→χ_{c1}pK^{-} and Λ_{b}^{0}→χ_{c2}pK^{-}.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Andreassi, G; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Archilli, F; d'Argent, P; Arnau Romeu, J; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Babuschkin, I; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Baker, S; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Baranov, A; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Baryshnikov, F; Baszczyk, M; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Beiter, A; Bel, L J; Bellee, V; Belloli, N; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Beranek, S; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bertolin, A; Betancourt, C; Betti, F; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bezshyiko, Ia; Bifani, S; Billoir, P; Birnkraut, A; Bitadze, A; Bizzeti, A; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Boettcher, T; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Bordyuzhin, I; Borgheresi, A; Borghi, S; Borisyak, M; Borsato, M; Bossu, F; Boubdir, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Braun, S; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Buchanan, E; Burr, C; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D H; Capriotti, L; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carniti, P; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cavallero, G; Cenci, R; Chamont, D; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chatzikonstantinidis, G; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S F; Chobanova, V; Chrzaszcz, M; Chubykin, A; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Cogoni, V; Cojocariu, L; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombs, G; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Costa Sobral, C M; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Crocombe, A; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Da Cunha Marinho, F; Dall'Occo, E; Dalseno, J; Davis, A; De Aguiar Francisco, O; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Serio, M; De Simone, P; Dean, C T; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Dembinski, H-P; Demmer, M; Dendek, A; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dey, B; Di Canto, A; Di Nezza, P; Dijkstra, H; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dufour, L; Dujany, G; Dungs, K; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziewiecki, M; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Déléage, N; Easo, S; Ebert, M; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fay, R; Fazzini, D; Ferguson, D; Fernandez, G; Fernandez Prieto, A; Ferrari, F; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fini, R A; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fleuret, F; Fohl, K; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forshaw, D C; Forty, R; Franco Lima, V; Frank, M; Frei, C; Fu, J; Funk, W; Furfaro, E; Färber, C; Gabriel, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garcia Martin, L M; García Pardiñas, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Garsed, P J; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gavardi, L; Gazzoni, G; Gerick, D; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianì, S; Gibson, V; Girard, O G; Giubega, L; Gizdov, K; Gligorov, V V; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gorelov, I V; Gotti, C; Govorkova, E; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graverini, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greim, R; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Gruber, L; Gruberg Cazon, B R; Grünberg, O; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Göbel, C; Hadavizadeh, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hamilton, B; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hatch, M; He, J; Head, T; Heister, A; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P H; Huard, Z-C; Hulsbergen, W; Humair, T; Hushchyn, M; Hutchcroft, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jawahery, A; Jiang, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Kariuki, J M; Karodia, S; Kecke, M; Kelsey, M; Kenzie, M; Ketel, T; Khairullin, E; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Kirn, T; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Klimkovich, T; Koliiev, S; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Kopecna, R; Koppenburg, P; Kosmyntseva, A; Kotriakhova, S; Kozachuk, A; Kozeiha, M; Kravchuk, L; Kreps, M; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Krzemien, W; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kuonen, A K; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Lefèvre, R; Lemaitre, F; Lemos Cid, E; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, T; Li, Y; Li, Z; Likhomanenko, T; Lindner, R; Lionetto, F; Liu, X; Loh, D; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lucchesi, D; Lucio Martinez, M; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Lusiani, A; Lyu, X; Machefert, F; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Maguire, K; Malde, S; Malinin, A; Maltsev, T; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Manning, P; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marinangeli, M; Marino, P; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martin, M; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martinez Vidal, F; Martins Tostes, D; Massacrier, L M; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathad, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Mauri, A; Maurice, E; Maurin, B; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McNab, A; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Melnychuk, D; Merk, M; Merli, A; Michielin, E; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Mitzel, D S; Mogini, A; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monroy, I A; Monteil, S; Morandin, M; Morello, M J; Morgunova, O; Moron, J; Morris, A B; Morris, A P; Mountain, R; Muheim, F; Mulder, M; Mussini, M; Müller, D; Müller, J; Müller, K; Müller, V; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nandi, A; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neri, N; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Neuner, M; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nieswand, S; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nogay, A; O'Hanlon, D P; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Ogilvy, S; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, C J G; Ossowska, A; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pais, P R; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L L; Pappenheimer, C; Parker, W; Parkes, C; Passaleva, G; Pastore, A; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perret, P; Pescatore, L; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Petrov, A; Petruzzo, M; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pikies, M; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Piucci, A; Placinta, V; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Poikela, T; Polci, F; Poli Lener, M; Poluektov, A; Polyakov, I; Polycarpo, E; Pomery, G J; Ponce, S; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Poslavskii, S; Potterat, C; Price, E; Prisciandaro, J; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, C; Qian, W; Quagliani, R; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rama, M; Ramos Pernas, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Ratnikov, F; Raven, G; Ravonel Salzgeber, M; Reboud, M; Redi, F; Reichert, S; Dos Reis, A C; Remon Alepuz, C; Renaudin, V; Ricciardi, S; Richards, S; Rihl, M; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Lopez, J A; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogozhnikov, A; Roiser, S; Rollings, A; Romanovskiy, V; Romero Vidal, A; Ronayne, J W; Rotondo, M; Rudolph, M S; Ruf, T; Ruiz Valls, P; Saborido Silva, J J; Sadykhov, E; Sagidova, N; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanchez Gonzalo, D; Sanchez Mayordomo, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santimaria, M; Santovetti, E; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Saunders, D M; Savrina, D; Schael, S; Schellenberg, M; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmelzer, T; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schreiner, H F; Schubert, K; Schubiger, M; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Semennikov, A; Sergi, A; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Sestini, L; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, V; Siddi, B G; Silva Coutinho, R; Silva de Oliveira, L; Simi, G; Simone, S; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, E; Smith, I T; Smith, J; Smith, M; Soares Lavra, L; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Spradlin, P; Sridharan, S; Stagni, F; Stahl, M; Stahl, S; Stefko, P; Stefkova, S; Steinkamp, O; Stemmle, S; Stenyakin, O; Stevens, H; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Stramaglia, M E; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, K; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Tayduganov, A; Tekampe, T; Tellarini, G; Teubert, F; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tilley, M J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Toriello, F; Tourinho Jadallah Aoude, R; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Trabelsi, K; Traill, M; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Trisovic, A; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tully, A; Tuning, N; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vacca, C; Vagnoni, V; Valassi, A; Valat, S; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; van Veghel, M; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Venkateswaran, A; Verlage, T A; Vernet, M; Vesterinen, M; Viana Barbosa, J V; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vieites Diaz, M; Viemann, H; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vitti, M; Volkov, V; Vollhardt, A; Voneki, B; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; de Vries, J A; Vázquez Sierra, C; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Walsh, J; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Wark, H M; Watson, N K; Websdale, D; Weiden, A; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wilkinson, G; Wilkinson, M; Williams, M; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Williams, T; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Winn, M A; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wraight, K; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xu, Z; Yang, Z; Yang, Z; Yao, Y; Yin, H; Yu, J; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zarebski, K A; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zheng, Y; Zhu, X; Zhukov, V; Zonneveld, J B; Zucchelli, S

    2017-08-11

    The first observation of the decays Λ_{b}^{0}→χ_{c1}pK^{-} and Λ_{b}^{0}→χ_{c2}pK^{-} is reported using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0  fb^{-1}, collected by the LHCb experiment in pp collisions at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. The following ratios of branching fractions are measured: B(Λ_{b}^{0}→χ_{c1}pK^{-})/B(Λ_{b}^{0}→J/ψpK^{-})=0.242±0.014±0.013±0.009,B(Λ_{b}^{0}→χ_{c2}pK^{-})/B(Λ_{b}^{0}→J/ψpK^{-})=0.248±0.020±0.014±0.009,B(Λ_{b}^{0}→χ_{c2}pK^{-})/B(Λ_{b}^{0}→χ_{c1}pK^{-})=1.02±0.10±0.02±0.05,where the first uncertainty is statistical, the second systematic, and the third due to the uncertainty on the branching fractions of the χ_{c1}→J/ψγ and χ_{c2}→J/ψγ decays. Using both decay modes, the mass of the Λ_{b}^{0} baryon is also measured to be m_{Λ_{b}^{0}}=5619.44±0.28±0.26  MeV/c^{2}, where the first and second uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively.

  18. The 'footloose' mechanism: Iceberg decay from hydrostatic stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, T. J. W.; Wadhams, P.; Bates, C. R.; Elosegui, P.; Stern, A. A.; Vella, D.; Abrahamsen, E. P.; Crawford, A. J.; Nicholls, K. W.

    2014-12-01

    We study a mechanism of iceberg breakup that may act together with the recognized melt and wave-induced decay processes. Our proposal is based on observations from a recent field experiment on a large ice island in Baffin Bay, East Canada. We observed that successive collapses of the overburden from above an unsupported wavecut at the iceberg waterline created a submerged foot fringing the berg. The buoyancy stresses induced by such a foot may be sufficient to cause moderate-sized bergs to break off from the main berg. A mathematical model is developed to test the feasibility of this mechanism. The results suggest that once the foot reaches a critical length, the induced stresses are sufficient to cause calving. The theoretically predicted maximum stable foot length compares well to the data collected in situ. Further, the model provides analytical expressions for the previously observed 'rampart-moat' iceberg surface profiles. Finally, we comment on the implications for the calving of icebergs from shelf fronts, where similar underwater 'feet' have been observed.

  19. Mechanism of Block of Single Protopores of the Torpedo Chloride Channel Clc-0 by 2-(p-Chlorophenoxybutyric) Acid (Cpb)

    PubMed Central

    Pusch, Michael; Accardi, Alessio; Liantonio, Antonella; Ferrera, Loretta; De Luca, Annamaria; Camerino, Diana Conte; Conti, Franco

    2001-01-01

    We investigated in detail the mechanism of inhibition by the S(−) enantiomer of 2-(p-chlorophenoxy)butyric acid (CPB) of the Torpedo Cl− channel, ClC-0. The substance has been previously shown to inhibit the homologous skeletal muscle channel, CLC-1. ClC-0 is a homodimer with probably two independently gated protopores that are conductive only if an additional common gate is open. As a simplification, we used a mutant of ClC-0 (C212S) that has the common gate “locked open” (Lin, Y.W., C.W. Lin, and T.Y. Chen. 1999. J. Gen. Physiol. 114:1–12). CPB inhibits C212S currents only when applied to the cytoplasmic side, and single-channel recordings at voltages (V) between −120 and −80 mV demonstrate that it acts independently on individual protopores by introducing a long-lived nonconductive state with no effect on the conductance and little effect on the lifetime of the open state. Steady-state macroscopic currents at −140 mV are half-inhibited by ∼0.5 mM CPB, but the inhibition decreases with V and vanishes for V ≥ 40 mV. Relaxations of CPB inhibition after voltage steps are seen in the current responses as an additional exponential component that is much slower than the gating of drug-free protopores. For V ≤ −40 mV, where a significant inhibition is observable for the CPB concentrations used in this study (≤10 mM), the concentration dependence of its onset kinetics is consistent with CPB binding according to a bimolecular reaction. At all voltages, only the openings of drug-free protopores appear to contribute significantly to the current observed at any time. Lowering internal Cl− hastens significantly the apparent “on” rate, suggesting that internal Cl− antagonizes CPB binding to closed pores. Vice versa, lowering external Cl− reduces the apparent rate of CPB dissociation from open pores. We studied also the point mutant K519E (in the context of the C212S mutant) that has altered conduction properties and slower single protopore

  20. Fragile X Proteins FMRP and FXR2P Control Synaptic GluA1 Expression and Neuronal Maturation via Distinct Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Guo, Weixiang; Polich, Eric D; Su, Juan; Gao, Yu; Christopher, Devin M; Allan, Andrea M; Wang, Min; Wang, Feifei; Wang, Guangfu; Zhao, Xinyu

    2015-06-16

    Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) and its autosomal paralog FXR2P are selective neuronal RNA-binding proteins, and mice that lack either protein exhibit cognitive deficits. Although double-mutant mice display more severe learning deficits than single mutants, the molecular mechanism behind this remains unknown. In the present study, we discovered that FXR2P (also known as FXR2) is important for neuronal dendritic development. FMRP and FXR2P additively promote the maturation of new neurons by regulating a common target, the AMPA receptor GluA1, but they do so via distinct mechanisms: FXR2P binds and stabilizes GluA1 mRNA and enhances subsequent protein expression, whereas FMRP promotes GluA1 membrane delivery. Our findings unveil important roles for FXR2P and GluA1 in neuronal development, uncover a regulatory mechanism of GluA1, and reveal a functional convergence between fragile X proteins in neuronal development. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. An Effective Power Saving Mechanism for IEEE 802.11 PSM in Double-Layered Mobile P2P Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ju-Hee; Kim, Taek-Hun; Song, Jin-Woo; Lee, Kwang-Jo; Yang, Sung-Bong

    In this paper, we propose a scheme for double-layered mobile P2P systems that enhances energy efficiency by modifying PSM(Power Saving Mode) defined in 802.11. The proposed scheme lengthens the beacon interval adaptively and adopts a known power saving scheme for more power saving. The experimental results showed that the proposed scheme improved 58.3% in terms of the average energy saving and 10% in terms of the average success ratio for file searches over the system with the standard PSM.

  2. Configuration-interaction-induced dynamic spin polarization of the Ar*(2p{sub 1/2,3/2}{sup -1}4s{sub 1/2}){sub J=1} resonant Auger decay

    SciTech Connect

    Lohmann, B.; Langer, B.; Snell, G.; Canton, S.; Berrah, N.; Kleiman, U.; Becker, U.; Martins, M.

    2005-02-01

    Spin-resolved measurements of the Ar{sup *}(2p{sub 1/2,3/2}{sup -1}4s{sub 1/2}){sub J=1} resonantly excited L{sub 2,3}M{sub 2,3}M{sub 2,3} Auger decay have been performed. The low resolution Auger spectrum, which due to cancellation between different multiplet components should exhibit virtually zero dynamic spin polarization, reveals an unexpected nonvanishing polarization effect. Calculations within a relativistic distorted wave approximation explain this effect as configuration-interaction (CI) induced. The CI generates experimentally unresolved fine structure components with low and high total angular momentum, giving rise to asymmetric cases where the high J part of certain multiplets is suppressed by internal selection rules for diagram lines. In this case, only the low J components survive with no partner for spin-polarization cancellation.

  3. Non-exponential decay in Quantum Mechanics and Quantum Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacosa, Francesco

    2014-10-01

    We describe some salient features as well as some recent developments concerning short-time deviations from the exponential decay law in the context of Quantum Mechanics by using the Lee Hamiltonian approach and Quantum Field Theory by using relativistic Lagrangians. In particular, the case in which two decay channels are present is analyzed: the ratio of decay probability densities, which is a constant equal to the ratio of decay widths in the exponential limit, shows in general sizable fluctuations which persist also at long times.

  4. Murine K2P5.1 Deficiency Has No Impact on Autoimmune Neuroinflammation due to Compensatory K2P3.1- and KV1.3-Dependent Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Bittner, Stefan; Bobak, Nicole; Hofmann, Majella-Sophie; Schuhmann, Michael K; Ruck, Tobias; Göbel, Kerstin; Brück, Wolfgang; Wiendl, Heinz; Meuth, Sven G

    2015-07-24

    Lymphocytes express potassium channels that regulate physiological cell functions, such as activation, proliferation and migration. Expression levels of K2P5.1 (TASK2; KCNK5) channels belonging to the family of two-pore domain potassium channels have previously been correlated to the activity of autoreactive T lymphocytes in patients with multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis. In humans, K2P5.1 channels are upregulated upon T cell stimulation and influence T cell effector functions. However, a further clinical translation of targeting K2P5.1 is currently hampered by a lack of highly selective inhibitors, making it necessary to evaluate the impact of KCNK5 in established preclinical animal disease models. We here demonstrate that K2P5.1 knockout (K2P5.1-/-) mice display no significant alterations concerning T cell cytokine production, proliferation rates, surface marker molecules or signaling pathways. In an experimental model of autoimmune neuroinflammation, K2P5.1-/- mice show a comparable disease course to wild-type animals and no major changes in the peripheral immune system or CNS compartment. A compensatory upregulation of the potassium channels K2P3.1 and KV1.3 seems to counterbalance the deletion of K2P5.1. As an alternative model mimicking autoimmune neuroinflammation, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in the common marmoset has been proposed, especially for testing the efficacy of new potential drugs. Initial experiments show that K2P5.1 is functionally expressed on marmoset T lymphocytes, opening up the possibility for assessing future K2P5.1-targeting drugs.

  5. Murine K2P5.1 Deficiency Has No Impact on Autoimmune Neuroinflammation due to Compensatory K2P3.1- and KV1.3-Dependent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Bittner, Stefan; Bobak, Nicole; Hofmann, Majella-Sophie; Schuhmann, Michael K.; Ruck, Tobias; Göbel, Kerstin; Brück, Wolfgang; Wiendl, Heinz; Meuth, Sven G.

    2015-01-01

    Lymphocytes express potassium channels that regulate physiological cell functions, such as activation, proliferation and migration. Expression levels of K2P5.1 (TASK2; KCNK5) channels belonging to the family of two-pore domain potassium channels have previously been correlated to the activity of autoreactive T lymphocytes in patients with multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis. In humans, K2P5.1 channels are upregulated upon T cell stimulation and influence T cell effector functions. However, a further clinical translation of targeting K2P5.1 is currently hampered by a lack of highly selective inhibitors, making it necessary to evaluate the impact of KCNK5 in established preclinical animal disease models. We here demonstrate that K2P5.1 knockout (K2P5.1−/−) mice display no significant alterations concerning T cell cytokine production, proliferation rates, surface marker molecules or signaling pathways. In an experimental model of autoimmune neuroinflammation, K2P5.1−/− mice show a comparable disease course to wild-type animals and no major changes in the peripheral immune system or CNS compartment. A compensatory upregulation of the potassium channels K2P3.1 and KV1.3 seems to counterbalance the deletion of K2P5.1. As an alternative model mimicking autoimmune neuroinflammation, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in the common marmoset has been proposed, especially for testing the efficacy of new potential drugs. Initial experiments show that K2P5.1 is functionally expressed on marmoset T lymphocytes, opening up the possibility for assessing future K2P5.1-targeting drugs. PMID:26213925

  6. Accelerated detection of brown-rot decay : comparison of soil block test, chemical analysis, mechanical properties, and immunodetection

    Treesearch

    C. A. Clausen; S. N. Kartal

    2003-01-01

    Early detection of wood decay is critical because decay fungi can cause rapid structural failure. The objective of this study was to compare the sensitivity of different methods purported to detect brown-rot decay in the early stages of development. The immunodiagnostic wood decay (IWD)test, soil block test/cake pan test, mechanical property tests, and chemical...

  7. In Situ Neutron Diffraction Studies of the Ion Exchange Synthesis Mechanism of Li2Mg2P3O9N: Evidence for a Hidden Phase Transition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jue; Whitfield, Pamela S; Saccomanno, Michael R; Bo, Shou-Hang; Hu, Enyuan; Yu, Xiqian; Bai, Jianming; Grey, Clare P; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Khalifah, Peter G

    2017-07-12

    Motivated by predictions made using a bond valence sum difference map (BVS-DM) analysis, the novel Li-ion conductor Li2Mg2P3O9N was synthesized by ion exchange from a Na2Mg2P3O9N precursor. Impedance spectroscopy measurements indicate that Li2Mg2P3O9N has a room temperature Li-ion conductivity of about 10(-6) S/cm (comparable to LiPON), which is 6 orders of magnitude higher than the extrapolated Na-ion conductivity of Na2Mg2P3O9N at this temperature. The structure of Li2Mg2P3O9N was determined from ex situ synchrotron and time-of-flight neutron diffraction data to retain the P213 space group, though with a cubic lattice parameter of a = 9.11176(8) Å that is significantly smaller than the a = 9.2439(1) Å of Na2Mg2P3O9N. The two Li-ion sites are found to be very substantially displaced (∼0.5 Å) relative to the analogous Na sites in the precursor phase. The non-molten salt ion exchange method used to prepare Li2Mg2P3O9N produces a minimal background in powder diffraction experiments, and was therefore exploited for the first time to follow a Li(+)/Na(+) ion exchange reaction using in situ powder neutron diffraction. Lattice parameter changes during ion exchange suggest that the reaction proceeds through a Na2-xLixMg2P3O9N solid solution (stage 1) followed by a two-phase reaction (stage 2) to form Li2Mg2P3O9N. However, full Rietveld refinements of the in situ neutron diffraction data indicate that the actual transformation mechanism is more complex and instead involves two thermodynamically distinct solid solutions in which the Li exclusively occupies the Li1 site at low Li contents (stage 1a) and then migrates to the Li3 site at higher Li contents (stage 1b), a crossover driven by the different signs of the local volume change at these sites. In addition to highlighting the importance of obtaining full structural data in situ throughout the ion exchange process, these results provide insights into the general question of what constitutes a thermodynamic phase.

  8. In Situ Neutron Diffraction Studies of the Ion Exchange Synthesis Mechanism of Li2Mg2P3O9N: Evidence for a Hidden Phase Transition

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Jue; Whitfield, Pamela S.; Saccomanno, Michael R.; ...

    2017-06-06

    Motivated by predictions made using a bond valence sum difference map (BVS-DM) analysis, the novel Li-ion conductor Li2Mg2P3O9N was synthesized in this paper by ion exchange from a Na2Mg2P3O9N precursor. Impedance spectroscopy measurements indicate that Li2Mg2P3O9N has a room temperature Li-ion conductivity of about 10–6 S/cm (comparable to LiPON), which is 6 orders of magnitude higher than the extrapolated Na-ion conductivity of Na2Mg2P3O9N at this temperature. The structure of Li2Mg2P3O9N was determined from ex situ synchrotron and time-of-flight neutron diffraction data to retain the P213 space group, though with a cubic lattice parameter of a = 9.11176(8) Å that ismore » significantly smaller than the a = 9.2439(1) Å of Na2Mg2P3O9N. The two Li-ion sites are found to be very substantially displaced (~0.5 Å) relative to the analogous Na sites in the precursor phase. The non-molten salt ion exchange method used to prepare Li2Mg2P3O9N produces a minimal background in powder diffraction experiments, and was therefore exploited for the first time to follow a Li+/Na+ ion exchange reaction using in situ powder neutron diffraction. Lattice parameter changes during ion exchange suggest that the reaction proceeds through a Na2–xLixMg2P3O9N solid solution (stage 1) followed by a two-phase reaction (stage 2) to form Li2Mg2P3O9N. However, full Rietveld refinements of the in situ neutron diffraction data indicate that the actual transformation mechanism is more complex and instead involves two thermodynamically distinct solid solutions in which the Li exclusively occupies the Li1 site at low Li contents (stage 1a) and then migrates to the Li3 site at higher Li contents (stage 1b), a crossover driven by the different signs of the local volume change at these sites. Finally, in addition to highlighting the importance of obtaining full structural data in situ throughout the ion exchange process, these results provide insights into the general question of what

  9. Genetic Alterations of the Retinoblastoma-Related Gene RB2/p130 Identify Different Pathogenetic Mechanisms in and among Burkitt’s Lymphoma Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Cinti, Caterina; Leoncini, Lorenzo; Nyongo, Aggrey; Ferrari, Filomena; Lazzi, Stefano; Bellan, Cristiana; Vatti, Rosella; Zamparelli, Alessandra; Cevenini, Gabriele; osi, Gian Marco T; Claudio, Pier Paolo; Maraldi, Nadir M.; Tosi, Piero; Giordano, Antonio

    2000-01-01

    Alterations of cell cycle-associated genes probably contribute to the pathogenesis of Burkitt’s Lymphoma (BL), in addition to c-myc translocation. Mutations disrupting the nuclear localization signal of the retinoblastoma-related gene RB2/p130 have been documented recently in BL cell lines and primary tumors. Given the importance of the RB2/p130 gene in controlling cell growth, mutations of this gene may result in uncontrolled cell proliferation. We tested the expression and genomic organization of the RB2/p130 gene in relation to the proliferative features of a series of BL samples collected from the endemic and sporadic regions, regardless of whether the samples were acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related. The expression of the Rb2/p130, p107, and cell proliferation-related proteins (cyclin A and B) was determined by immunohistochemistry. The structures of exons 19 through 22 of the RB2/p130 gene, encoding for the B domain and C terminus, were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis and single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) technique. The direct PCR products were sequenced to identify the actual mutations. Our results suggest that BL is composed of a mixture of molecular types with distinct genetic and phenotypic patterns, probably resulting from different pathogenetic mechanisms. In endemic BL, the RB2/p130 gene is mutated in most of the cases, and the protein is restricted to the cytoplasm. In AIDS-related BL, high levels of nuclear expression of the wild-type pRb2/p130, p107, and cell proliferation-related proteins were detected. This finding is in line with the molecular mechanisms observed in virus-linked oncogenesis. Sporadic BLs were mainly characterized by the low nuclear values of the wild-type pRb2/p130 and, conversely, the high values of p107. The increased cell proliferation due to different alterations of cell growth control by Rb-related proteins may be the first step in lymphomagenesis, during which additional

  10. How ion channels sense mechanical force: insights from mechanosensitive K2P channels TRAAK, TREK1, and TREK2.

    PubMed

    Brohawn, Stephen G

    2015-09-01

    The ability to sense and respond to mechanical forces is essential for life and cells have evolved a variety of systems to convert physical forces into cellular signals. Within this repertoire are the mechanosensitive ion channels, proteins that play critical roles in mechanosensation by transducing forces into ionic currents across cellular membranes. Understanding how these channels work, particularly in animals, remains a major focus of study. Here, I review the current understanding of force gating for a family of metazoan mechanosensitive ion channels, the two-pore domain K(+) channels (K2Ps) TRAAK, TREK1, and TREK2. Structural and functional insights have led to a physical model for mechanical activation of these channels. This model of force sensation by K2Ps is compared to force sensation by bacterial mechanosensitive ion channels MscL and MscS to highlight principles shared among these evolutionarily unrelated channels, as well as differences of potential functional relevance. Recent advances address fundamental questions and stimulate new ideas about these unique mechanosensors.

  11. T(T,2n)4He and 3He(3He,2p)4He: The Reaction Mechanism from Solar Energies to 10 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacher, A. D.; Brune, C. R.; Sayre, D. B.; Hale, G. M.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.

    2016-03-01

    We have studied the energy dependence of the reaction mechanism of the T(t,2n)4He reaction at stellar energies and of its charge symmetric analog reaction 3He(3He,2p)4He at energies up 10 MeV. We find that the reaction mechanism changes dramatically over this energy range in part due to the interference of the two identical fermions in the three-body final state. This contribution is dedicated to the memory of Tom Tombrello, my Ph.D. advisor at Cal Tech, who died in 2014.

  12. The Mechanism of Inactivation of T4 Bacteriophage by Tritium Decay

    PubMed Central

    Funk, Fred; Person, Stanley; Bockrath, Richard C.

    1968-01-01

    Coliphage T4 was used as a model system to study the mechanism of biological inactivation produced by tritium decay. Experimentally, tritiated precursors were incorporated into phage DNA (thymidine-3H) or into phage protein (3H-amino acids). The ratio of killing efficiencies for decays originating in phage DNA to those originating in phage protein was 2.6. Inactivation by decays from labeled amino acids was assumed to occur exclusively from β-particle irradiation of phage DNA. If decays originating in DNA are due solely to irradiation of DNA, then the killing efficiencies reflect the energy transfer paths in phage DNA for decays originating in phage DNA and in the protein coat. The energy transfer paths were determined for the two cases with the help of a computer and found to be very nearly equal to the experimentally determined ratio (2.6). The killing efficiencies for decays originating in phage DNA were 0.12 and for decays originating in protein 0.046. PMID:5678320

  13. Chlorophyll-quinone photochemistry in liposomes: mechanisms of radical formation and decay

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, J.K.; Tollin, G.

    1980-01-01

    Laser flash photolysis has been used to investigate the mechanism of formation and decay of the radical species generated by light induced electron transfer from chlorophyll a triplet to quinone in egg phosphatidyl choline bilayer vesicles. Chlorophyll triplet quenching by quinone is controlled by diffusion occurring within the bilayer membrane and reflects bilayer viscosity. Radical formation via separation of the intermediate ion pair is also inhibited by increased bilayer viscosity. Cooperativity is observed in this process due to an enhancement of radical separation by electron transfer from semiquinone anion radical to a neighboring quinone molecule. Two modes of radical decay are observed, a rapid recombination occurring within the bilayer and a much slower recombination occurring across the bilayer. The slow decay is only observed with quinones which are not tightly anchored into the bilayer, and is probably the result of electron transfer from semiquinone anion radical formed within the bilayer to a quinone molecule residing at the bilayer-water interface. With benzoquinone, approximately 60% of the radical decay occurs via the slow mode. Triplet to radical conversion efficiencies in the bilayer systems are comparable to those obtained in fluid solution (approx. 60%). However, radical recombination, at least for the slow decay mechanism, is considerably retarded.

  14. Physical and mechanical properties and fire, decay, and termite resistance of treated oriented strandboard

    Treesearch

    Nadir Ayrilmis; S Nami Kartal; Theodore L. Laufenberg; Jerrold E. Winandy; Robert H. White

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of a number of chemicals on the physical and mechanical properties and fire, decay, and termite resistance of oriented strandboard (OSB) panels. Disodium octaborate tetrahydrate (DOT), boric acid (BA), melamine phosphate (MP), and a BA/DOT mixture were sprayed onto the furnish at varying concentrations. The panels were tested for...

  15. Propagation and amplitude decay mechanisms of internal solitary waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ling-ling; Wang, Chun-ling; Tang, Hong-wu; Chen, Hong

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, a modified dynamic coherent eddy model (DCEM) of large eddy simulation is applied to study internal solitary waves in a numerical flume. The model was verified by physical experiment and applied to investigate the potential influence factors on internal wave amplitude. In addition, we discussed the energy loss of internal solitary wave as well as hydrodynamics in the propagation. The results of our study show that (1) Step-depth is the most sensitive factor on wave amplitude for the "step-pool" internal wave generation method and the wave amplitudes obey a linear increase with step depth, and the increase rate is about 0.4. (2) Wave energy loss obeys a linear decrease with the propagation distance and its loss rate of large amplitude waves is smaller than that of small amplitude waves. (3) Loss of kinetic energy in wave valley is larger than that near the interface due to relative high fluctuating frequency. (4) Discovered boundary jet-flow can intensify the bottom shear, which might be one of the mechanisms of substance transportation, and the boundary layers of jet flows are easily influenced by the adjacent waves.

  16. Physical and Mechanical Properties and Fire, Decay, and Termite Resistance of Treated Oriented Strandboard

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    mechanical properties and fire, decay, andtermite re- sistance of oriented strandboard (OSB) panels. Disodium octaborate tetrahydrate (DOT), boric acid ... Boric acid DOT MP BA/DOTb Content aBA = boric acid DOT = disodium octaborate tetrahydrate: MP =melamine phosphate. bHereafter these will be...mechanical and physical properties in medium den- sity fiberboard treated with zinc borate at retentions of 0.25, 0.5, 1, and 1.5 per- cent boric acid

  17. Leveraging the Mechanism of Oxidative Decay for Adenylate Kinase to Design Structural and Functional Resistances.

    PubMed

    Howell, Stanley C; Richards, David H; Mitch, William A; Wilson, Corey J

    2015-10-16

    Characterization of the mechanisms underlying hypohalous acid (i.e., hypochlorous acid or hypobromous acid) degradation of proteins is important for understanding how the immune system deactivates pathogens during infections and damages human tissues during inflammatory diseases. Proteins are particularly important hypohalous acid reaction targets in pathogens and in host tissues, as evidenced by the detection of chlorinated and brominated oxidizable residues. While a significant amount of work has been conducted for reactions of hypohalous acids with a range of individual amino acids and small peptides, the assessment of oxidative decay in full-length proteins has lagged in comparison. The most rigorous test of our understanding of oxidative decay of proteins is the rational redesign of proteins with conferred resistances to the decay of structure and function. Toward this end, in this study, we experimentally determined a putative mechanism of oxidative decay using adenylate kinase as the model system. In turn, we leveraged this mechanism to rationally design new proteins and experimentally test each system for oxidative resistance to loss of structure and function. From our extensive assessment of secondary structure, protein hydrodynamics, and enzyme activity upon hypochlorous acid or hypobromous acid challenge, we have identified two key strategies for conferring structural and functional resistance, namely, the design of proteins (adenylate kinase enzymes) that are resistant to oxidation requires complementary consideration of protein stability and the modification (elimination) of certain oxidizable residues proximal to catalytic sites.

  18. Leveraging the Mechanism of Oxidative Decay for Adenylate Kinase to Design Structural and Functional Resistances

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Stanley C.; Richards, David H.; Mitch, William A.; Wilson, Corey J.

    2016-01-01

    Characterization of the mechanisms underlying hypohalous acid (i.e., hypochlorous acid or hypobromous acid) degradation of proteins is important for understanding how the immune system deactivates pathogens during infections, and damages human tissues during inflammatory diseases. Proteins are particularly important hypohalous acid reaction targets in pathogens and in host tissues, as evidenced by the detection of chlorinated and brominated oxidizable residues. While a significant amount of work has been conducted for reactions of hypohalous acids with a range of individual amino acids and small peptides, the assessment of oxidative decay in full-length proteins has lagged in comparison. The most rigorous test of our understanding of oxidative decay of proteins is the rational redesign of proteins with conferred resistances to the decay of structure and function. Toward this end, in this study we experimentally determined a putative mechanism of oxidative decay using adenylate kinase as the model system. In turn, we leveraged this mechanism to rationally design new proteins and experimentally test each system for oxidative resistance to loss of structure and function. From our extensive assessment of secondary-structure, protein hydrodynamics and enzyme activity upon hypochlorous acid or hypobromous acid challenge, we have identified two key strategies for conferring structural and functional resistance. Namely, the design of proteins (adenylate kinase enzymes) that are resistant to oxidation requires complementary consideration of protein stability and the modification (elimination) of certain oxidizable residues proximal to catalytic sites. PMID:26266833

  19. Magnetars: Time Evolution, Superfluid Properties, and the Mechanism of Magnetic Field Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arras, P.; Cumming, A.; Thompson, C.

    2004-06-01

    We calculate the coupled thermal evolution and magnetic field decay in relativistic model neutron stars threaded by superstrong magnetic fields (B>1015 G). Our main goal is to evaluate how such ``magnetars'' evolve with time and how field decay modifies the transitions to core superfluidity and cooling dominated by surface X-ray emission. Observations of a thermal X-ray spectral component and fast timing noise place strong constraints on the presence of a superfluid core. We find that the transition to core superfluidity can be significantly delayed by magnetic field decay in the age range ~103-105 yr. The mechanism of Hall drift is related to the stability of the core magnetic field and to currents flowing outward through the crust. The heating effect is enhanced if it is continuous rather than spasmodic. Condensation of a heavy element layer at the surface is shown to cause only modest changes in the outward conduction of heat.

  20. Cosmology with a decaying vacuum energy parametrization derived from quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szydłowski, M.; Stachowski, A.; Urbanowski, K.

    2015-07-01

    Within the quantum mechanical treatment of the decay problem one finds that at late times tthe survival probability of an unstable state cannot have the form of an exponentially decreasing function of time t but it has an inverse power-like form. This is a general property of unstable states following from basic principles of quantum theory. The consequence of this property is that in the case of false vacuum states the cosmological constant becomes dependent on time: Λ — Λbare ≡ Λ(t) — Λbare ∼ 1/t2. We construct the cosmological model with decaying vacuum energy density and matter for solving the cosmological constant problem and the coincidence problem. We show the equivalence of the proposed decaying false vacuum cosmology with the Λ(t) cosmologies (the Λ(t)CDM models). The cosmological implications of the model of decaying vacuum energy (dark energy) are discussed. We constrain the parameters of the model with decaying vacuum using astronomical data. For this aim we use the observation of distant supernovae of type Ia, measurements of H(z), BAO, CMB and others. The model analyzed is in good agreement with observation data and explain a small value of the cosmological constant today.

  1. Disentangling the various Mechanisms of neutrinoless double beta decay to extract the neutrino mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergados, J. D.

    2011-12-01

    It is well known that there exist many mechanisms that may contribute to neutrinoless double beta decay. By exploiting the fact that the associated nuclear matrix elements are target dependent we show that, given definite experimental results on a sufficient number of targets, one can determine or sufficiently constrain all lepton violating parameters including the mass term. As a specific example we show that, given the observation of the 0νββ-decay in three different nuclei, e.g. 76Ge, 100Mo and 130Te, and assuming just three active lepton number violating parameters, e.g. light and heavy neutrino mass mechanisms in left handed currents as well as R-parity breaking SUSY mechanism, one may determine all lepton violating parameters, provided that they are relatively real.

  2. Disentangling the various Mechanisms of neutrinoless double beta decay to extract the neutrino mass

    SciTech Connect

    Vergados, J. D.

    2011-12-16

    It is well known that there exist many mechanisms that may contribute to neutrinoless double beta decay. By exploiting the fact that the associated nuclear matrix elements are target dependent we show that, given definite experimental results on a sufficient number of targets, one can determine or sufficiently constrain all lepton violating parameters including the mass term. As a specific example we show that, given the observation of the 0{nu}{beta}{beta}-decay in three different nuclei, e.g. {sup 76}Ge, {sup 100}Mo and {sup 130}Te, and assuming just three active lepton number violating parameters, e.g. light and heavy neutrino mass mechanisms in left handed currents as well as R-parity breaking SUSY mechanism, one may determine all lepton violating parameters, provided that they are relatively real.

  3. Interpretation of the surface charge decay kinetics on insulators with different neutralization mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Boya; Zhang, Guixin

    2017-03-01

    Surface charge decay kinetics on corona-charged polymeric insulators were studied. In the experiment, the sample surface exposed to corona was kept open to ambient air whereas the opposite surface was in contact with a grounded plate. The resulting surface potential distribution was scanned in a raster mode using a Kelvin electrostatic probe, from which the relief map of charge density was obtained by an inverse calculation method. The developed procedure allowed for implementation of two study cases: (i) gas neutralization took place under natural conditions, with enhanced concentration of free ions, and with limited gas volume; (ii) surface charge decay occurred only due to bulk neutralization. Three mechanisms were considered responsible for surface charge decay, i.e., bulk neutralization, gas neutralization, and surface conduction. They were discussed separately with the help of numerical models, which quantified the relative importance of each mechanism on the total process of charge decay. The results of the latter case were further utilized to determine the energy distribution of electron and hole traps of the materials based on the isothermal relaxation current theory.

  4. Influence of fluoride additions on biological and mechanical properties of Na2O-CaO-SiO2-P2O5 glass-ceramics.

    PubMed

    Li, H C; Wang, D G; Hu, J H; Chen, C Z

    2014-02-01

    Two series of Na2O-CaO-SiO2-P2O5 glass-ceramics doped with NH4HF2 (G-NH4HF2) or CaF2 (G-CaF2) have been prepared by sol-gel method. The glass-ceramic phase composition and morphology were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS). The mechanical properties and thermal expansion coefficient were measured by a microhardness tester, an electronic tensile machine and a thermal expansion coefficient tester. The structure difference between these two glass-ceramics was investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and the in vitro bioactivity of the glass-ceramics was determined by in vitro simulated body fluid (SBF) immersion test. The hemolysis test, in vitro cytotoxicity test, systemic toxicity test and the implanted experiment in animals were used to evaluate the biocompatibility of the glass-ceramics. The mechanical properties of sample G-NH4HF2 are lower than that of sample G-CaF2, and the bioactivity of sample G-NH4HF2 is better than that of sample G-CaF2. The thermal expansion coefficients of these two glass-ceramics are all closer to that of Ti6Al4V. After 7 days of SBF immersion, apatites were induced on glass-ceramic surface, indicating that the glass-ceramics have bioactivity. The hemolysis test, in vitro cytotoxicity test and systemic toxicity test demonstrate that the glass-ceramics do not cause hemolysis reaction, and have no toxicity to cell and living animal. The implanted experiment in animals shows that bone tissue can form a good osseointegration with the implant after implantation for two months, indicating that the glass-ceramics are safe to serve as implants.

  5. T(T,4He)2n and 3He(3He,4He)2p Reactions and the Energy Dependence of Their Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacher, Andrew; McNabb, Dennis; Brune, Carl; Sayre, Dan; Hale, Gerry; Frenje, Johan; Gatu Johnson, Maria

    2015-10-01

    We have studied the T(T,alpha)2n reaction because it is the charge symmetric analog to the 3He(3He,alpha)2p reaction which completes the most direct mode of the p-p chain in stellar interiors. These reactions lead to three-body final states whose energy spectrum shapes are dominated by the strong nucleon-alpha interaction and the weaker nucleon-nucleon interaction. These experiments were done at OMEGA at the University of Rochester and at the NIF at Lawrence Livermore Lab. We will focus on two features: (1) the excitation energy dependence of the reaction mechanism and (2) the center-of-mass energy dependence of the reaction mechanism. At stellar energies (OMEGA and the NIF) we find that the shape of the neutron spectrum peaks in the middle. The n-alpha 1/2-excited state is about two times stronger than the n-alpha 3/2-ground state. For the 3He+3He reaction (at CalTech), the proton spectrum peaks at the high end. The p-alpha 3/2-state is about two times stronger than the 1/2-state. This difference in the spectrum shape is explained by theoretical models which include the interference between the two identical fermions in the final state. At CalTech we have angular distributions of the 3He+3He reaction from 2 MeV to 18 MeV. We see the p-wave strength increasing.

  6. 2p radioactivity studied by tracking technique

    SciTech Connect

    Mukha, Ivan

    2010-06-01

    The recent advance in experimental studies of short-lived exotic nuclei beyond the proton drip line is presented. In particular, in-flight decays of proton-unbound nuclei with picosecond lifetimes can be probed by a novel technique which tracks all decay products precisely, and the decay vertices as well as the angular correlations of the fragments are deduced from the measured trajectories. The corresponding pioneering experiment which identified a previously-unknown isotope {sup 19}Mg and its two-proton (2p) radioactivity as well as studied the reference 2p decay of the known isotope {sup 16}Ne is described. Systematic studies of other 2p precursors beyond the proton drip line are foreseen with this powerful technique whose sensitivity is larger by factor of 30 in comparison with a conventional invariant-mass method. The 2p radioactivity candidates {sup 30}Ar, {sup 34}Ca and {sup 26}S are discussed. Information about the respective one-proton unbound nuclei can be obtained with this technique by evaluating proton-heavy-fragment correlations. Systematic studies of nuclei beyond the proton drip line, e.g., the well-known proton resonances above the 'waiting points' in the astrophysical rp-process, {sup 69}Br and {sup 73}Br are feasible.

  7. Barr-Freire-Zee mechanism for the hydrogen-ionizing decaying neutrino dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tommasini, Daniele

    1992-12-01

    We consider the scenario of the hydrogen-ionizing decaying neutrino dark matter, advocated by Sciama to solve several ionization problems in astrophysics and cosmology. We show that dangerously large neutrino oscillations are expected in general in the particle physics models introduced to provide the required neutrino masses and dark matter decay lifetime. However, the implementation of a mechanism recently discovered by Barr, Freire and Zee, allows to realize this scenario free of large neutrino oscillations. Furthermore, in this case a mass scale for the light neutrinos, which can be naturally the MSW solar neutrino scale ~ 10-3 eV, is automatically associated to the value ~ 1023 s of the dark matter decay lifetime, needed to solve the ionization problems. A realization of the mechanism in the supersymmetric standard model with broken R-parity is then considered as an example. In that case, the heavy neutrino providing the dark matter is made up mainly by the standard muon neutrino νμ.

  8. The sphingosine kinase inhibitor 2-(p-hyroxyanilino)-4-(p-chlorophenyl)thiazole reduces androgen receptor expression via an oxidative stress-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Tonelli, Francesca; Alossaimi, Manal; Williamson, Leon; Tate, Rothwelle J; Watson, David G; Chan, Edmond; Bittman, Robert; Pyne, Nigel J; Pyne, Susan

    2013-03-01

    Sphingosine kinase catalyses the formation of sphingosine 1-phosphate and is linked with androgen receptor signalling in prostate cancer cells. Therefore, we investigated the effect of sphingosine kinase inhibitors on androgen receptor expression. Androgen-sensitive LNCaP cells were treated with SKi (2-(p-hydroxyanilino)-4-(p-chlorophenyl)thiazole), which inhibits sphingosine kinases 1 and 2 activity, and the effect on androgen receptor expression was measured. Treatment of cells with SK1 inhibitors reduced the expression of the androgen receptor and prostate-specific antigen, while (R)-FTY720 methyl ether (a sphingosine-kinase-2-selective inhibitor), at a concentration that eliminates sphingosine kinase 2 from cells, had no significant effect on androgen receptor expression. The effect of SKi on androgen receptor expression was independent of the SKi-induced proteasomal degradation of SK1 and was post translational, although androgen receptor mRNA transcript was reduced. Fumonisin B1 (a ceramide synthase inhibitor) also failed to reverse the effect of SKi on androgen receptor expression, thereby excluding a role for ceramide derived from the salvage pathway. The effect of SKi on androgen receptor expression was reversed by N-acetylcysteine, which was used to scavenge reactive oxygen species. Inhibition of sphingosine kinase 1 activity abrogates androgen receptor signalling via an oxidative stress-induced, p53-independent mechanism in prostate cancer cells. Therefore, SK1 inhibitors may offer therapeutic potential in promoting the removal of AR receptors from prostate cancer cells, resulting in an increased efficacy, which is likely to be superior to inhibitors that simply reversibly inhibit AR signalling. © 2012 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  9. The nature of massive neutrinos and multiple mechanisms in neutrinoless double-beta decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meroni, Aurora

    2015-11-01

    Determining the nature -Dirac or Majorana- of massive neutrinos is one of the most pressing and challenging problems in the field of neutrino physics. We discuss how one can possibly extract information on the couplings, if any, which might be involved in (ββ)_{0ν}-decay using a multi-isotope approach. We investigate as well the potential of combining data on the half-lives of nuclides with largely different Nuclear Matrix Elements such as 136Xe and of one or more of the four nuclei 76Ge, 82Se, 100Mo and 130Te, for discriminating between different pairs of noninterfering or interfering mechanisms of (ββ)_{0ν}-decay. The case studies do not extend to the evaluation of the theoretical uncertainties of the results, due to the nuclear matrix elements calculations and other causes.

  10. The rapid decay phase of the afterglow as the signature of the Blandford-Znajek mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathanail, A.; Strantzalis, A.; Contopoulos, I.

    2016-02-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are believed to be powered by the electromagnetic extraction of spin energy from a black hole endowed with a magnetic field supported by electric currents in a surrounding disc (Blandford & Znajek). A generic feature of this mechanism is that, under certain fairly general assumptions, the energy loss rate decays exponentially. In this work, we are looking precisely for such exponential decay in the light curves of long-duration GRBs observed with the X-ray telescope (XRT) instrument on the Swift satellite. We found out that almost 30 per cent of XRT light curves show such behaviour before they reach the afterglow plateau. According to Blandford & Znajek, the duration of the burst depends on the magnetic flux accumulated on the event horizon. This allows us to estimate the surface magnetic field of a possible progenitor. Our estimations are consistent with magnetic fields observed in Wolf-Rayet stars.

  11. Interatomic Coulombic Decay: The Mechanism for Rapid Deexcitation of Hollow Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Richard A.; Gruber, Elisabeth; Schwestka, Janine; Kozubek, Roland; Madeira, Teresa I.; Marques, José P.; Kobus, Jacek; Krasheninnikov, Arkady V.; Schleberger, Marika; Aumayr, Friedrich

    2017-09-01

    The impact of a highly charged ion onto a solid gives rise to charge exchange between the ion and target atoms, so that a slow ion gets neutralized in the vicinity of the surface. Using highly charged Ar and Xe ions and the surface-only material graphene as a target, we show that the neutralization and deexcitation of the ions proceeds on a sub-10 fs time scale. We further demonstrate that a multiple Interatomic Coulombic Decay (ICD) model can describe the observed ultrafast deexcitation. Other deexcitation mechanisms involving nonradiative decay and quasimolecular orbital formation during the impact are not important, as follows from the comparison of our experimental data with the results of first-principles calculations. Our method also enables the estimation of ICD rates directly.

  12. Mechanism of block of single protopores of the Torpedo chloride channel ClC-0 by 2-(p-chlorophenoxy)butyric acid (CPB).

    PubMed

    Pusch, M; Accardi, A; Liantonio, A; Ferrera, L; De Luca, A; Camerino, D C; Conti, F

    2001-07-01

    We investigated in detail the mechanism of inhibition by the S(-) enantiomer of 2-(p-chlorophenoxy)butyric acid (CPB) of the Torpedo Cl(-)channel, ClC-0. The substance has been previously shown to inhibit the homologous skeletal muscle channel, CLC-1. ClC-0 is a homodimer with probably two independently gated protopores that are conductive only if an additional common gate is open. As a simplification, we used a mutant of ClC-0 (C212S) that has the common gate "locked open" (Lin, Y.W., C.W. Lin, and T.Y. Chen. 1999. J. Gen. Physiol. 114:1-12). CPB inhibits C212S currents only when applied to the cytoplasmic side, and single-channel recordings at voltages (V) between -120 and -80 mV demonstrate that it acts independently on individual protopores by introducing a long-lived nonconductive state with no effect on the conductance and little effect on the lifetime of the open state. Steady-state macroscopic currents at -140 mV are half-inhibited by approximately 0.5 mM CPB, but the inhibition decreases with V and vanishes for V > or = 40 mV. Relaxations of CPB inhibition after voltage steps are seen in the current responses as an additional exponential component that is much slower than the gating of drug-free protopores. For V = 60 mV) with an IC50 of approximately 30-40 mM. Altogether, these findings support a model for the mechanism of CPB inhibition in which the drug competes with Cl(-) for binding to a site of the pore where it blocks permeation. CPB binds preferentially to closed channels, and thereby also strongly alters the gating of the single protopore. Since the affinity of CPB for open WT pores is extremely low, we cannot decide in this case if it acts also as an open pore blocker. However, the experiments with the mutant K519E strongly support this interpretation. CPB block may become a useful tool to study the pore of ClC channels. As a first application, our results provide additional evidence for a double-barreled structure of ClC-0 and ClC-1.

  13. Auger decay mechanism in photon-stimulated desorption of ions from surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, C.C.

    1983-11-01

    Photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) of positive ions was studied with synchrotron radiation using an angle-integrating time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Ion yields as functions of photon energy near core levels were measured from condensed gases, alkali fluorides, and other alkali and alkaline earth halides. These results are compared to bulk photoabsorption measurements with emphasis on understanding fundamental desorption mechanisms. The applicability of the Auger decay mechanism, in which ion desorption is strictly proportional to surface absorption, is discussed in detail. The Auger decay model is developed in detail to describe Na/sup +/ and F/sup +/ desorption from NaF following Na(1s) excitation. The major decay pathways of the Na(1s) hole leading to desorption are described and equations for the energetics of ion desorption are developed. Ion desorption spectra of H/sup +/, Li/sup +/, and F/sup +/ are compared to bulk photoabsorption near the F(2s) and Li(1s) edges of LiF. A strong photon beam exposure dependence of ion yields from alkali fluorides is revealed, which may indicate the predominance of metal ion desorption from defect sites. The large role of indirect mechanisms in ion desorption condensed N/sub 2/-O/sub 2/ multilayers is demonstrated and discussed. Ion desorption spectra from several alkali halides and alkaline earth halides are compared to bulk photoabsorption spectra. Relative ion yields from BaF/sub 2/ and a series of alkali halides are discussed in terms of desorption mechanisms.

  14. Velocity overshoot decay mechanisms in compound semiconductor field-effect transistors with a submicron characteristic length

    SciTech Connect

    Jyegal, Jang

    2015-06-15

    Velocity overshoot is a critically important nonstationary effect utilized for the enhanced performance of submicron field-effect devices fabricated with high-electron-mobility compound semiconductors. However, the physical mechanisms of velocity overshoot decay dynamics in the devices are not known in detail. Therefore, a numerical analysis is conducted typically for a submicron GaAs metal-semiconductor field-effect transistor in order to elucidate the physical mechanisms. It is found that there exist three different mechanisms, depending on device bias conditions. Specifically, at large drain biases corresponding to the saturation drain current (dc) region, the velocity overshoot suddenly begins to drop very sensitively due to the onset of a rapid decrease of the momentum relaxation time, not the mobility, arising from the effect of velocity-randomizing intervalley scattering. It then continues to drop rapidly and decays completely by severe mobility reduction due to intervalley scattering. On the other hand, at small drain biases corresponding to the linear dc region, the velocity overshoot suddenly begins to drop very sensitively due to the onset of a rapid increase of thermal energy diffusion by electrons in the channel of the gate. It then continues to drop rapidly for a certain channel distance due to the increasing thermal energy diffusion effect, and later completely decays by a sharply decreasing electric field. Moreover, at drain biases close to a dc saturation voltage, the mechanism is a mixture of the above two bias conditions. It is suggested that a large secondary-valley energy separation is essential to increase the performance of submicron devices.

  15. Efficacy and possible mechanisms of perillaldehyde in control of Aspergillus niger causing grape decay.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jun; Wang, Yanzhen; Zeng, Hong; Li, Zongyun; Zhang, Peng; Tessema, Akalate; Peng, Xue

    2015-06-02

    A variety of plant products have been recognized for their antifungal activity and recently have attracted food industry attention for their efficacy in controlling postharvest fungal decay of fruits. The antifungal activity of perillaldehyde (PAE) was evaluated against Aspergillus niger, a known cause of grape spoilage, and possible mechanisms were explored. PAE showed notable antifungal activity against A. niger, with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and a minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC) of 0.25 and 1 μl/ml, respectively. The accumulation of mycelial biomass was also inhibited by PAE in a dose-dependent manner, completely inhibiting mycelial growth at 1 μl/ml. In vivo data confirmed that the vapour treatment of grapes with various concentrations of PAE markedly improved control of A. niger and suppressed natural decay. Concentrations of PAE of 0.075 μl/ml air showed the greatest inhibition of fungal growth compared to the controls. Further experiments indicated that PAE activated a membrane-active mechanism that inhibits ergosterol synthesis, increases membrane permeability (as evidenced by extracellular pH and conductivity measurements), and disrupts membrane integrity, leading to cell death. Our findings suggest that this membrane-active mechanism makes PAE a promising potential antifungal agent for postharvest control of grape spoilage.

  16. Mechanism of decay of the cry1Aa mRNA in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez-Cruz, C; Olmedo-Alvarez, G

    1997-01-01

    We undertook the study of the decay process of the cry1Aa mRNA of Bacillus thuringiensis expressed in B. subtilis. The cry1Aa transcript is a 3.7-kb mRNA expressed during sporulation whose transcriptional control has previously been studied in both B. subtilis and B. thuringiensis. We found that the cry1Aa mRNA has a half-life of around 9 min and that its decay occurs through endoribonucleolytic cleavages which result in three groups of high-molecular-weight mRNA intermediates ranging in size from 2.7 to 0.5 kb. A comparative study carried out with Escherichia coli showed a similar pattern of degradation intermediates. Primer extension analysis carried out on RNA from B. subtilis revealed that most cleavages occur within two regions located toward the 5' and 3' ends of the mRNA. The most prominent processing site observed for the cry1Aa mRNA isolated from B. subtilis is only two bases away from that occurring on RNA isolated from E. coli. Most cleavage sites occur at seemingly single-stranded RNA segments rich in A and U nucleotides, suggesting that a common and conserved mechanism may process the cry1Aa mRNA. PMID:9335281

  17. A biological mechanism for Bayesian feature selection: Weight decay and raising the LASSO.

    PubMed

    Connor, Patrick; Hollensen, Paul; Krigolson, Olav; Trappenberg, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    Biological systems are capable of learning that certain stimuli are valuable while ignoring the many that are not, and thus perform feature selection. In machine learning, one effective feature selection approach is the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) form of regularization, which is equivalent to assuming a Laplacian prior distribution on the parameters. We review how such Bayesian priors can be implemented in gradient descent as a form of weight decay, which is a biologically plausible mechanism for Bayesian feature selection. In particular, we describe a new prior that offsets or "raises" the Laplacian prior distribution. We evaluate this alongside the Gaussian and Cauchy priors in gradient descent using a generic regression task where there are few relevant and many irrelevant features. We find that raising the Laplacian leads to less prediction error because it is a better model of the underlying distribution. We also consider two biologically relevant online learning tasks, one synthetic and one modeled after the perceptual expertise task of Krigolson et al. (2009). Here, raising the Laplacian prior avoids the fast erosion of relevant parameters over the period following training because it only allows small weights to decay. This better matches the limited loss of association seen between days in the human data of the perceptual expertise task. Raising the Laplacian prior thus results in a biologically plausible form of Bayesian feature selection that is effective in biologically relevant contexts.

  18. Evolution of novel wood decay mechanisms in Agaricales revealed by the genome sequences of Fistulina hepatica and Cylindrobasidium torrendii

    PubMed Central

    Floudas, Dimitrios; Held, Benjamin W.; Riley, Robert; Nagy, Laszlo G.; Koehler, Gage; Ransdell, Anthony S.; Younus, Hina; Chow, Julianna; Chiniquy, Jennifer; Lipzen, Anna; Tritt, Andrew; Sun, Hui; Haridas, Sajeet; LaButti, Kurt; Ohm, Robin A.; Kües, Ursula; Blanchette, Robert A.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Minto, Robert E.; Hibbett, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Wood decay mechanisms in Agaricomycotina have been traditionally separated in two categories termed white and brown rot. Recently the accuracy of such a dichotomy has been questioned. Here, we present the genome sequences of the white rot fungus Cylindrobasidium torrendii and the brown rot fungus Fistulina hepatica both members of Agaricales, combining comparative genomics and wood decay experiments. Cylindrobasidium torrendii is closely related to the white-rot root pathogen Armillaria mellea, while F. hepatica is related to Schizophyllum commune, which has been reported to cause white rot. Our results suggest that C. torrendii and S. commune are intermediate between white-rot and brown-rot fungi, but at the same time they show characteristics of decay that resembles soft rot. Both species cause weak wood decay and degrade all wood components but leave the middle lamella intact. Their gene content related to lignin degradation is reduced, similar to brown-rot fungi, but both have maintained a rich array of genes related to carbohydrate degradation, similar to white-rot fungi. These characteristics appear to have evolved from white-rot ancestors with stronger ligninolytic ability. Fistulina hepatica shows characteristics of brown rot both in terms of wood decay genes found in its genome and the decay that it causes. However, genes related to cellulose degradation are still present, which is a plesiomorphic characteristic shared with its white-rot ancestors. Four wood degradation-related genes, homologs of which are frequently lost in brown-rot fungi, show signs of pseudogenization in the genome of F. hepatica. These results suggest that transition towards a brown rot lifestyle could be an ongoing process in F. hepatica. Our results reinforce the idea that wood decay mechanisms are more diverse than initially thought and that the dichotomous separation of wood decay mechanisms in Agaricomycotina into white rot and brown rot should be revisited. PMID:25683379

  19. Evolution of novel wood decay mechanisms in Agaricales revealed by the genome sequences of Fistulina hepatica and Cylindrobasidium torrendii

    DOE PAGES

    Floudas, Dimitrios; Held, Benjamin W.; Riley, Robert; ...

    2015-02-12

    Wood decay mechanisms in Agaricomycotina have been traditionally separated in two categories termed white and brown rot. Recently the accuracy of such a dichotomy has been questioned. In this paper, we present the genome sequences of the white-rot fungus Cylindrobasidium torrendii and the brown-rot fungus Fistulina hepatica both members of Agaricales, combining comparative genomics and wood decay experiments. C. torrendii is closely related to the white-rot root pathogen Armillaria mellea, while F. hepatica is related to Schizophyllum commune, which has been reported to cause white rot. Our results suggest that C. torrendii and S. commune are intermediate between white-rot andmore » brown-rot fungi, but at the same time they show characteristics of decay that resembles soft rot. Both species cause weak wood decay and degrade all wood components but leave the middle lamella intact. Their gene content related to lignin degradation is reduced, similar to brown-rot fungi, but both have maintained a rich array of genes related to carbohydrate degradation, similar to white-rot fungi. These characteristics appear to have evolved from white-rot ancestors with stronger ligninolytic ability. F. hepatica shows characteristics of brown rot both in terms of wood decay genes found in its genome and the decay that it causes. However, genes related to cellulose degradation are still present, which is a plesiomorphic characteristic shared with its white-rot ancestors. Four wood degradation-related genes, homologs of which are frequently lost in brown-rot fungi, show signs of pseudogenization in the genome of F. hepatica. These results suggest that transition toward a brown-rot lifestyle could be an ongoing process in F. hepatica. Finally, our results reinforce the idea that wood decay mechanisms are more diverse than initially thought and that the dichotomous separation of wood decay mechanisms in Agaricomycotina into white rot and brown rot should be revisited.« less

  20. Evolution of novel wood decay mechanisms in Agaricales revealed by the genome sequences of Fistulina hepatica and Cylindrobasidium torrendii

    SciTech Connect

    Floudas, Dimitrios; Held, Benjamin W.; Riley, Robert; Nagy, Laszlo G.; Koehler, Gage; Ransdell, Anthony S.; Younus, Hina; Chow, Julianna; Chiniquy, Jennifer; Lipzen, Anna; Tritt, Andrew; Sun, Hui; Haridas, Sajeet; LaButti, Kurt; Ohm, Robin A.; Kües, Ursula; Blanchette, Robert A.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Minto, Robert E.; Hibbett, David S.

    2015-02-12

    Wood decay mechanisms in Agaricomycotina have been traditionally separated in two categories termed white and brown rot. Recently the accuracy of such a dichotomy has been questioned. In this paper, we present the genome sequences of the white-rot fungus Cylindrobasidium torrendii and the brown-rot fungus Fistulina hepatica both members of Agaricales, combining comparative genomics and wood decay experiments. C. torrendii is closely related to the white-rot root pathogen Armillaria mellea, while F. hepatica is related to Schizophyllum commune, which has been reported to cause white rot. Our results suggest that C. torrendii and S. commune are intermediate between white-rot and brown-rot fungi, but at the same time they show characteristics of decay that resembles soft rot. Both species cause weak wood decay and degrade all wood components but leave the middle lamella intact. Their gene content related to lignin degradation is reduced, similar to brown-rot fungi, but both have maintained a rich array of genes related to carbohydrate degradation, similar to white-rot fungi. These characteristics appear to have evolved from white-rot ancestors with stronger ligninolytic ability. F. hepatica shows characteristics of brown rot both in terms of wood decay genes found in its genome and the decay that it causes. However, genes related to cellulose degradation are still present, which is a plesiomorphic characteristic shared with its white-rot ancestors. Four wood degradation-related genes, homologs of which are frequently lost in brown-rot fungi, show signs of pseudogenization in the genome of F. hepatica. These results suggest that transition toward a brown-rot lifestyle could be an ongoing process in F. hepatica. Finally, our results reinforce the idea that wood decay mechanisms are more diverse than initially thought and that the dichotomous separation of wood decay mechanisms in Agaricomycotina into white rot and brown rot should be revisited.

  1. Evolution of novel wood decay mechanisms in Agaricales revealed by the genome sequences of Fistulina hepatica and Cylindrobasidium torrendii.

    PubMed

    Floudas, Dimitrios; Held, Benjamin W; Riley, Robert; Nagy, Laszlo G; Koehler, Gage; Ransdell, Anthony S; Younus, Hina; Chow, Julianna; Chiniquy, Jennifer; Lipzen, Anna; Tritt, Andrew; Sun, Hui; Haridas, Sajeet; LaButti, Kurt; Ohm, Robin A; Kües, Ursula; Blanchette, Robert A; Grigoriev, Igor V; Minto, Robert E; Hibbett, David S

    2015-03-01

    Wood decay mechanisms in Agaricomycotina have been traditionally separated in two categories termed white and brown rot. Recently the accuracy of such a dichotomy has been questioned. Here, we present the genome sequences of the white-rot fungus Cylindrobasidium torrendii and the brown-rot fungus Fistulina hepatica both members of Agaricales, combining comparative genomics and wood decay experiments. C. torrendii is closely related to the white-rot root pathogen Armillaria mellea, while F. hepatica is related to Schizophyllum commune, which has been reported to cause white rot. Our results suggest that C. torrendii and S. commune are intermediate between white-rot and brown-rot fungi, but at the same time they show characteristics of decay that resembles soft rot. Both species cause weak wood decay and degrade all wood components but leave the middle lamella intact. Their gene content related to lignin degradation is reduced, similar to brown-rot fungi, but both have maintained a rich array of genes related to carbohydrate degradation, similar to white-rot fungi. These characteristics appear to have evolved from white-rot ancestors with stronger ligninolytic ability. F. hepatica shows characteristics of brown rot both in terms of wood decay genes found in its genome and the decay that it causes. However, genes related to cellulose degradation are still present, which is a plesiomorphic characteristic shared with its white-rot ancestors. Four wood degradation-related genes, homologs of which are frequently lost in brown-rot fungi, show signs of pseudogenization in the genome of F. hepatica. These results suggest that transition toward a brown-rot lifestyle could be an ongoing process in F. hepatica. Our results reinforce the idea that wood decay mechanisms are more diverse than initially thought and that the dichotomous separation of wood decay mechanisms in Agaricomycotina into white rot and brown rot should be revisited. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  2. Transcriptome and secretome analyses of the wood decay fungus Wolfiporia cocos support alternative mechanisms of lignocellulose conversion

    Treesearch

    Jill Gaskell; Robert A. Blanchette; Philip E. Stewart; Sandra Splinter BonDurant; Marie Adams; Grzegorz Sabat; Philip Kersten; Daniel Cullen

    2016-01-01

    Certain wood decay basidiomycetes, collectively referred to as brown rot fungi, rapidly depolymerize cellulose while leaving behind the bulk of cell wall lignin as a modified residue. The mechanism(s) employed is unclear, but considerable evidence implicates the involvement of diffusible oxidants generated via Fenton-like chemistry. Toward a better understanding of...

  3. Testing neutrino mass generation mechanisms from the lepton flavor violating decay of the Higgs boson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Mayumi; Kanemura, Shinya; Sakurai, Kodai; Sugiyama, Hiroaki

    2016-12-01

    We investigate how observations of the lepton flavor violating decay of the Higgs boson (h → ℓℓ‧) can narrow down models of neutrino mass generation mechanisms, which were systematically studied in Refs. [1,2] by focusing on the combination of new Yukawa coupling matrices with leptons. We find that a wide class of models for neutrino masses can be excluded if evidence for h → ℓℓ‧ is really obtained in the current or future collider experiments. In particular, simple models of Majorana neutrino masses cannot be compatible with the observation of h → ℓℓ‧. It is also found that some of the simple models to generate masses of Dirac neutrinos radiatively can be compatible with a significant rate of the h → ℓℓ‧ process.

  4. Inclusive J/{psi} Production in {Upsilon} Decay Via Color-Singlet Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    He Zhiguo; Wang Jianxiong

    2011-05-23

    We report the recent works about the inclusive J/{psi} production in {Upsilon} decay. Our results show that until now the color-singlet (CS) contribution which includes leading order ({alpha}{sub s}{sup 5}){Upsilon}{yields}J/{psi}+cc-barg process and {alpha}{sub s}{sup 6} order {Upsilon}{yields}J/{psi}+gg(4g) process as well as {alpha}{sub s}{sup 2{alpha}2} order {Upsilon}{yields}J/{psi}+cc-bar and {Upsilon}{yields}J/{psi}+gg processes can not explain the experimental data yet. A preliminary CS prediction of R{sub cc} (B({Upsilon}{yields}J/{psi}+cc-bar+X)/B({Upsilon}{yields}J/{psi}+X)) 0.39{sub -0.20}{sup +0.21}, which is much larger than color-octet (CO) prediction, is also given as a good quantity to discriminate the CS and color-octet mechanism.

  5. Significance of decay mechanism into continuum in dynamical Wannier-Stark ladder

    SciTech Connect

    Nemoto, Yuya; Maeshima, Nobuya; Hino, Ken-ichi

    2013-12-04

    We examine the resonance structure of photodressed electron states of laser-driven Wannier-Stark ladder, namely, dynamic Wannier-Stark ladder, in terms of the excess density of states (DOS) closely related to a lifetime of the state of concern. It is revealed that the resonance structure in the strong laser-field region shows clear dependence on the ratio, η, of a Bloch-frequency to a laser frequency. As the laser strength increases, for η = 1, the excess DOS becomes involved with a lot of newly-growing resonance peaks. This result would be understood from the viewpoint of a Fano-like decay-mechanism caused by a multichannel continuum effect, in marked contrast to the cases of larger η’s; for η = 3, the excess DOS just is found to show a pronounced red-shift of a single dominant peak caused by a single-channel continuum effect.

  6. Few active mechanisms of the 0νββ decay and effective mass of Majorana neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šimkovic, Fedor; Vergados, John; Faessler, Amand

    2010-12-01

    It is well known that there exist many mechanisms that may contribute to neutrinoless double beta decay. By exploiting the fact that the associated nuclear matrix elements are target dependent we show that, given definite experimental results on a sufficient number of targets, one can determine or sufficiently constrain all lepton violating parameters including the mass term. As a specific example we show that, assuming the observation of the 0νββ decay in three different nuclei, e.g., Ge76, Mo100, and Te130, and just three lepton number violating mechanisms (light- and heavy-neutrino mass mechanisms as well as the R-parity breaking supersymmetry mechanism) being active, there are only four different solutions for the lepton violating parameters, provided that they are relatively real. In particular, our analysis shows that the effective neutrino Majorana mass |mββ| can be almost uniquely extracted by utilizing other existing constraints (cosmological observations and tritium β-decay experiments). We also point out the possibility that the nonobservation of the 0νββ decay for some isotopes could be in agreement with a value of |mββ| in the sub-eV region. We thus suggest that it is important to have at least two different 0νββ-decay experiments for a given nucleus. We note that obtained results are sensitive to the accuracy of measured half-lives and to uncertainties in calculated nuclear matrix elements.

  7. Separate Gating Mechanisms Mediate the Regulation of K2P Potassium Channel TASK-2 by Intra- and Extracellular pH*

    PubMed Central

    Niemeyer, María Isabel; Cid, L. Pablo; Peña-Münzenmayer, Gaspar; Sepúlveda, Francisco V.

    2010-01-01

    TASK-2 (KCNK5 or K2P5.1) is a background K+ channel that is opened by extracellular alkalinization and plays a role in renal bicarbonate reabsorption and central chemoreception. Here, we demonstrate that in addition to its regulation by extracellular protons (pHo) TASK-2 is gated open by intracellular alkalinization. The following pieces of evidence suggest that the gating process controlled by intracellular pH (pHi) is independent from that under the command of pHo. It was not possible to overcome closure by extracellular acidification by means of intracellular alkalinization. The mutant TASK-2-R224A that lacks sensitivity to pHo had normal pHi-dependent gating. Increasing extracellular K+ concentration acid shifts pHo activity curve of TASK-2 yet did not affect pHi gating of TASK-2. pHo modulation of TASK-2 is voltage-dependent, whereas pHi gating was not altered by membrane potential. These results suggest that pHo, which controls a selectivity filter external gate, and pHi act at different gating processes to open and close TASK-2 channels. We speculate that pHi regulates an inner gate. We demonstrate that neutralization of a lysine residue (Lys245) located at the C-terminal end of transmembrane domain 4 by mutation to alanine abolishes gating by pHi. We postulate that this lysine acts as an intracellular pH sensor as its mutation to histidine acid-shifts the pHi-dependence curve of TASK-2 as expected from its lower pKa. We conclude that intracellular pH, together with pHo, is a critical determinant of TASK-2 activity and therefore of its physiological function. PMID:20351106

  8. Mechanisms of heat transfer enhancement and slow decay of swirl in tubes using tangential injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, F.; Dhir, V. K.

    1995-04-01

    The turbulent flowfield in a tube heated uniformly from the wall has been experimentally studied when fluid is injected tangentially. The experiments were conducted by injecting air through injectors placed on the periphery of a 88.9-mm inside diameter and 2.5-m long acrylic tube. Six injectors of 22.23-mm inside diameter were used and tangential to total momentum flux ratio of 2.67 was obtained in the experiments. Temperature profiles were measured with a resistance thermometer probe. Profiles for mean velocities in the axial and tangential directions, as well as the Reynolds stresses were obtained using a single rotated straight hot wire and a single rotated slanted hot wire anemometer. No significant difference in mean velocities and Reynolds stresses were found between the adiabatic experiments and diabatic ones. Two major mechanisms for enhancement of heat transfer are identified: (1) high maximum axial velocity near the wall produces higher heat flux from the wall; and (2) high turbulence level in the middle region of the tube improves mixing and, thus, rate of heat transfer. Furthermore, it is observed that both the kinetic energy of the mean flow and the turbulence level decrease as swirl decays. However, during the decay process, the high turbulence-energy-production from Reynolds stresses is necessary to transfer the kinetic energy of the mean flow to the turbulence energy. This high turbulence-production, in turn, slows down the rate of decrease of the turbulence level. As a result, the swirl and the heat transfer enhancement are preserved for a long distance.

  9. A program for undergraduate research into the mechanisms of sensory coding and memory decay

    SciTech Connect

    Calin-Jageman, R J

    2010-09-28

    This is the final technical report for this DOE project, entitltled "A program for undergraduate research into the mechanisms of sensory coding and memory decay". The report summarizes progress on the three research aims: 1) to identify phyisological and genetic correlates of long-term habituation, 2) to understand mechanisms of olfactory coding, and 3) to foster a world-class undergraduate neuroscience program. Progress on the first aim has enabled comparison of learning-regulated transcripts across closely related learning paradigms and species, and results suggest that only a small core of transcripts serve truly general roles in long-term memory. Progress on the second aim has enabled testing of several mutant phenotypes for olfactory behaviors, and results show that responses are not fully consistent with the combinitoral coding hypothesis. Finally, 14 undergraduate students participated in this research, the neuroscience program attracted extramural funding, and we completed a successful summer program to enhance transitions for community-college students into 4-year colleges to persue STEM fields.

  10. The excited-state decay mechanism of 2,4-dithiothymine in the gas phase, microsolvated surroundings, and aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Xie, Bin-Bin; Wang, Qian; Guo, Wei-Wei; Cui, Ganglong

    2017-03-15

    The photophysics of thiothymines has been extensively studied computationally in the past few years due to their significant potential as photosensitizers in photodynamic therapy. However, the corresponding computational studies of the photophysical mechanism of 2,4-dithiothymine are scarce. Herein we have employed the CASPT2//CASSCF and QM(CASPT2//CASSCF)/MM methods to systematically explore the excited-state decay mechanism of 2,4-dithiothymine in isolated, microsolvated, and aqueous surroundings. First, we have optimized minima and conical intersections in and between the lowest six excited singlet and triplet states i.e., , , , , and ; then, based on computed excited-state decay paths and spin-orbit couplings, we have proposed several nonadiabatic pathways that efficiently populate the lowest triplet state to explain the experimentally observed ultrahigh triplet-state quantum yield. Moreover, we have found that the excited-state decay mechanism in microsolvated and aqueous environments is more complicated than that in the gas phase. The solute-solvent interaction has significant effects on the excited-state potential energy surfaces of 2,4-dithiothymine and eventually on its excited-state decay mechanism. Finally, the present computational efforts contribute important mechanistic knowledge to the understanding of the photophysics of thiothymine-based photosensitizers.

  11. Genome, transcriptome, and secretome analysis of wood decay fungus Postia placenta supports unique mechanisms of lignocellulose conversion

    Treesearch

    Diego Martinez; Jean Challacombe; Ingo Morgenstern; David Hibbett; Monika Schmoll; Christian P. Kubicek; Patricia Ferreira; Francisco J. Ruiz-Duenas; Angel T. Martinez; Philip J. Kersten; Kenneth E. Hammel; Jill A. Gaskell; Daniel Cullen

    2009-01-01

    Brown-rot fungi such as Postia placenta are common inhabitants of forest ecosystems and are also largely responsible for the destructive decay of wooden structures. Rapid depolymerization of cellulose is a distinguishing feature of brown-rot, but the biochemical mechanisms and underlying genetics are poorly understood. Systematic examination of the P. placenta genome,...

  12. Mechanisms and Rates of Decay of Marine Viruses in Seawater †

    PubMed Central

    Suttle, Curtis A.; Chen, Feng

    1992-01-01

    Loss rates and loss processes for viruses in coastal seawater from the Gulf of Mexico were estimated with three different marine bacteriophages. Decay rates in the absence of sunlight ranged from 0.009 to 0.028 h-1, with different viruses decaying at different rates. In part, decay was attributed to adsorption by heat-labile particles, since viruses did not decay or decayed very slowly in seawater filtered through a 0.2-μm-pore-size filter (0.2-μm-filtered seawater) and in autoclaved or ultracentrifuged seawater but continued to decay in cyanide-treated seawater. Cyanide did cause decay rates to decrease, however, indicating that biological processes were also involved. The observations that decay rates were often greatly reduced in 0.8- or 1.0-μm-filtered seawater, whereas bacterial numbers were not, suggested that most bacteria were not responsible for the decay. Decay rates were also reduced in 3-μm-filtered or cycloheximide-treated seawater but not in 8-μm-filtered seawater, implying that flagellates consumed viruses. Viruses added to flagellate cultures decayed at 0.15 h-1, corresponding to 3.3 viruses ingested flagellate-1 h-1. Infectivity was very sensitive to solar radiation and, in full sunlight, decay rates were 0.4 to 0.8 h-1. Even when UV-B radiation was blocked, rates were as high as 0.17 h-1. Calculations suggest that in clear oceanic waters exposed to full sunlight, most of the virus decay, averaged over a depth of 200 m, would be attributable to solar radiation. When decay rates were averaged over 24 h for a 10-m coastal water column, loss rates of infectivity attributable to sunlight were similar to those resulting from all other processes combined. Consequently, there should be a strong diel signal in the concentration of infectious viruses. In addition, since sunlight destroys infectivity more quickly than virus particles, a large proportion of the viruses in seawater is probably not infective. Images PMID:16348812

  13. A possible mechanism for enhanced persistent current sextupole decay in SSC dipoles

    SciTech Connect

    Stiening, R.

    1991-01-01

    It has recently been discovered that the HEAR superconducting dipoles have a periodic pattern in their fields as measured along the axis of the dipole. This effect has more recently been observed in the prototype SSC 5 cm dipole. The wavelength of the periods observed in both dipoles is equal to the transposition pitch length of the Rutherford cable. A plausible explanation for the periodic pattern is the existence of a transport current trapped within the cable. That is, a current which runs through one strand from the solder joint at the one end of the cable to the solder joint at the other end, and which returns back by way of another strand. The average current in the strands, which is the current from the power supply, is unaffected by the presence of currents trapped within the cable. The size of the observed field oscillation suggests that the trapped currents might be as large as 100 amps. There is evidence that the trapped currents are time dependent. This is reasonable since the I-V characteristics of the various resistive elements in the cable are all different so the equilibrium distribution of current in the strands should depend on the excitation level of the magnet. It is the purpose of this note to point out that the time dependence of trapped currents is a powerful mechanism for causing the time decay of persistent current'' multipoles.

  14. MALDI In-Source Decay of Protein: The Mechanism of c-Ion Formation

    PubMed Central

    Takayama, Mitsuo

    2016-01-01

    The in-source decay (ISD) phenomenon, the fragmentation at an N–Cα bond of a peptide backbone that occurs within several tens of nanoseconds in the ion-source in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS), is discussed from the standpoints of the discovery and early publications dealing with MALDI-ISD, the formation of c-ions in energy-sudden desorption/ionization methods, the formation of radical species in a MALDI, model construction for ISD, and matrix materials that are suitable for use in MALDI-ISD. The formation of c-ions derived from peptides and proteins in MALDI-ISD can be rationalized by a mechanism involving intermolecular hydrogen transfer, denoted as the “Takayama’s model” by De Pauw’s group (Anal. Chem. 79: 8678–8685, 2007). It should be emphasized that the model for MALDI-ISD was constructed on the basis of X-ray crystallography and scanning probe microscopy (SPM) analyses of matrix crystals, as well as the use of isotopically-labelled peptides. PMID:27162707

  15. Ultrafast excited state dynamics of 5,6-dihydroxyindole, a key eumelanin building block: nonradiative decay mechanism.

    PubMed

    Gauden, Magdalena; Pezzella, Alessandro; Panzella, Lucia; Napolitano, Alessandra; d'Ischia, Marco; Sundström, Villy

    2009-09-17

    As part of a program designed to elucidate the excited state properties of key eumelanin building blocks, we report herein a study of 5,6-dihydroxyindole (DHI) in phosphate buffer at pH 3 and pH 7 using femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. The transient absorption changes following excitation at 266 nm were used to directly monitor relaxation of the excited states. It was found that the initially generated excited state of DHI, exhibiting two main absorption bands at approximately 450 and approximately 550 nm, decays with a time constant of 5-10 ps to the equilibrated singlet excited state characterized by a very similar spectrum. This latter state then decays to the ground state and the triplet state with a characteristic time of approximately 140-180 ps. Concomitant with the singlet excited state decay of DHI, spectral features characteristic of the DHI cation radical (band at approximately 575 nm) and the triplet state (band at 440-450 nm) are detected. These species do not decay further since geminate recombination of the solvated electron and the DHI radical cation, as well as deprotonation of the cation to form the neutral semiquinone radical, occur on a time scale longer than that covered by the present experiments. These results offer novel insights into the mechanisms of nonradiative decay of eumelanin building blocks of possible relevance to the putative photoprotective and phototoxic roles of these biopolymers.

  16. Non-adiabatic dynamics investigation of the radiationless decay mechanism of trans-urocanic acid in the S2 state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Li; Zhou, Pan-Wang; Zhao, Guang-Jiu

    2016-07-01

    The trans-urocanic acid, a UV chromophore in the epidermis of human skin, was found to exhibit a wavelength dependent isomerization property. The isomerization quantum yield to cis-urocanic is greatest when being excited to the S1 state, whereas exciting the molecule to the S2 state causes almost no isomerization. The comparative photochemical behavior of the trans-urocanic on the S1 and S2 states continues to be the subject of intense research effort. This study is concerned with the unique photo-behavior of this interesting molecule on the S2 state. Combining the on-the-fly surface hopping dynamics simulations and static electronic structure calculations, three decay channels were observed following excitation to the S2 state. An overwhelming majority of the molecules decay to the S1 state through a planar or pucker characterized minimum energy conical intersection (MECI), and then decay to the ground state along a relaxation coordinate driven by a pucker deformation of the ring. A very small fraction of molecules decay to the S1 state by a MECI characterized by a twisting motion around the CC double bond, which continues to drive the molecule to deactivate to the ground state. The latter channel is related with the photoisomerization process, whereas the former one will only generate the original trans-form products. The present work provides a novel S2 state decay mechanism of this molecule, which offers useful information to explain the wavelength dependent isomerization behavior.

  17. Maslinic Acid, a Natural Triterpene, Induces a Death Receptor-Mediated Apoptotic Mechanism in Caco-2 p53-Deficient Colon Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Zurita, Fernando J.; Rufino-Palomares, Eva E.; García-Salguero, Leticia; Peragón, Juan; Medina, Pedro P.; Parra, Andrés; Cascante, Marta; Lupiáñez, José A.

    2016-01-01

    Maslinic acid (MA) is a natural triterpene present in high concentrations in the waxy skin of olives. We have previously reported that MA induces apoptotic cell death via the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in HT29 colon cancer cells. Here, we show that MA induces apoptosis in Caco-2 colon cancer cells via the extrinsic apoptotic pathway in a dose-dependent manner. MA triggered a series of effects associated with apoptosis, including the cleavage of caspases -8 and -3, and increased the levels of t-Bid within a few hours of its addition to the culture medium. MA had no effect on the expression of the Bax protein, release of cytochrome-c or on the mitochondrial membrane potential. This suggests that MA triggered the extrinsic apoptotic pathway in this cell type, as opposed to the intrinsic pathway found in the HT29 colon-cancer cell line. Our results suggest that the apoptotic mechanism induced in Caco-2 may be different from that found in HT29 colon-cancer cells, and that in Caco-2 cells MA seems to work independently of p53. Natural antitumoral agents capable of activating both the extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways could be of great use in treating colon-cancer of whatever origin. PMID:26751572

  18. Updated constraints on the light-neutrino exchange mechanisms of the 0νββ-decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Štefánik, Dušan; Dvornický, Rastislav; Šimkovic, Fedor

    2015-10-01

    The neutrinoless double-beta (0νββ) decay associated with light neutrino exchange mechanisms, which are due to both left-handed V-A and right-handed V+A leptonic and hadronic currents, is discussed by using the recent progress achieved by the GERDA, EXO and KamlandZen experiments. The upper limits for effective neutrino mass mββ and the parameters <λ> and <η> characterizing the right handed current mechanisms are deduced from the data on the 0νββ-decay of 76Ge and 136Xe using nuclear matrix elements calculated within the nuclear shell model and quasiparticle random phase approximation and phase-space factors calculated with exact Dirac wave functions with finite nuclear size and electron screening. The careful analysis of upper constraints on effective lepton number violating parameters assumes a competition of the above mechanisms and arbitrary values of involved CP violating phases.

  19. 2p radioactivity studies with a TPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ascher, P.; Audirac, L.; Adimi, N.; Blank, B.; Borcea, C.; Brown, B. A.; Companis, I.; Delalee, F.; Demonchy, C. E.; de Oliveira Santos, F.; Giovinazzo, J.; Grévy, S.; Grigorenko, L. V.; Kurtukian-Nieto, T.; Leblanc, S.; Pedroza, J.-L.; Perrot, L.; Pibernat, J.; Serani, L.; Srivastava, P.; Thomas, J.-C.

    2011-11-01

    After the discovery of two-proton radioactivity in 2002, an important effort has been made in order to observe each emitted particle individually. Energy and angular correlations between the protons should reveal details about the mechanism of this exotic decay mode. In this framework, an experiment has been performed at LISE/GANIL, where the two protons emitted in the decay of 54Zn have been individually observed for the first time. Angular and energy correlations were determined and allowed a first comparison with theoretical predictions.

  20. Force decay evaluation of thermoplastic and thermoset elastomeric chains: A mechanical design comparison.

    PubMed

    Masoud, Ahmed I; Tsay, T Peter; BeGole, Ellen; Bedran-Russo, Ana K

    2014-11-01

    To compare the following over a period of 8 weeks: (1) force decay between thermoplastic (TP) and thermoset (TS) elastomeric chains; (2) force decay between light (200-g) and heavy (350-g) initial forces; and (3) force decay between direct chains and chain loops (stretched from one pin around the second pin and back to the first pin). TP and TS chains were obtained from American Orthodontics™ (AOTP, AOTS) and ORMCO™ (OrTP, OrTS). Each of the four chain groups was subdivided into four subgroups with 10 specimens per subgroup: (1) direct chains light force, (2) direct chains heavy force, (3) chain loops light force, and (4) chain loops heavy force. The experiment was performed in artificial saliva (pH of 6.75) at 37°C. A significant difference was found between TP and TS chains, with an average mean difference of around 20% more force decay found in the TP chains (P < .001, α  =  .05). There was no significant difference between direct chains and chain loops except in OrTP, in which direct chains showed more force decay. There was also no significant difference in force decay identified when using light vs heavy forces. TS chains decayed less than TP chains, and chain loop retraction was beneficial only when using OrTP chains. Contrary to the interchangeable use of TP and TS chains in the published literature and in clinical practice, this study demonstrates that they perform differently under stress and that a clear distinction should be made between the two.

  1. Intramolecular Charge Transfer Dynamics of 4-(DIMETHYLAMINO)BENZONITRILE: Ultrafast Branching Followed by a Two-Fold Decay Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coto, Pedro B.; Serrano-Andrés, Luis; Gustavsson, Thomas; Fujiwara, Takashige; Lim, Edward C.

    2010-06-01

    4-(Dimethylamino)benzonitrile (DMABN) is a paradigm molecule system that exhibits dual fluorescence and intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) in polar solvents. Although numbers of different experimental and theoretical methods have been carried out to date for elucidating the basic mechanism of its energy relaxation, there are still some crucial problems that remain unanswered. The time-resolved transient absorption and time-resolved fluorescence upconversion will be presented, as combined with ab initio CASPT2//CASSCF calculations, which indicate that a more complex mechanism may be suggested in the ICT reaction in a polar environment. A scheme of ultrafast branching relaxation followed by two-fold decay is proposed in which, whereas the fully twisted ICT (TICT) state is responsible for the transient absorption, a distinct partially twisted ICT (pTICT) structure is for the fluorescent ICT state, both displaying clearly different decay rates.

  2. Reaction Mechanism Dependence Of The Population And Decay Of 10HE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Han; Redpath, Thomas; Thoennessen, Michael; MoNA Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of neutron unbound systems allow for stringent tests of theoretical nuclear structure models at extreme neutron-to-proton ratios. It was recently suggested that the decay of broad neutron unbound states would be sensitive to the incoming channel wavefunction. Thus, the extended wavefunctions of halo nuclei could significantly affect the observed decay energy spectra for broad neutron unbound resonances. Experimental evidence for such an effect had been suggested in the case of 10He. Its ground state resonance decaying to 8He +n +n exhibited a shift of about 500 keV when populated in a proton removal reaction from 11Li compared to the transfer reaction 8He(t,p). In order to test this effect we measured the 10He ground state resonance in two reactions using beams with different wavefunctions. We compared the decay energy spectrum of 10He populated in a three-proton removal reaction from the (non-halo) nucleus 13B with the spectrum from the one-proton removal reaction using the halo-nucleus 11Li. The decay energy spectra were reconstructed from the measured momenta of the 8He fragment and two coincident neutrons. The experiments were performed at the Coupled Cyclotron Facility of the NSCL with the Sweeper magnet and the MoNA-LISA array. This work is supported by NSF Grant PHY-1002511 and NNSA Grant DE-NA0000979.

  3. Modern Instrumental Methods to Investigate the Mechanism of Biological Decay in Wood Plastic Composites

    Treesearch

    Grace Sun; Rebecca Ibach; Marek Gnatowski; Jessie Glaeser; Mathew Leung; John. Haight

    2014-01-01

    Various instrumental techniques were used to study the fungal decay process in wood plastic composite (WPC) boards. Commercial boards exposed near Hilo, Hawaii (HI) for eight years in both sun and shadow locations were inspected and tested periodically. After eight years of exposure, both boards were evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), while a selected...

  4. Composition of phenolic compounds in wild apple with multiple resistance mechanisms against postharvest blue mold decay

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Several wild apple accessions (Malus sieversii) from Kazakhstan and two (Malus × soulardii, Malus sylvestris) from other parts of the world are highly resistant to blue mold decay caused by Penicillium expansum. Previous studies on the wound responses of these apples to infection by this fungus sug...

  5. An ab initio Study of Decay Mechanism of Adenine: the Facile Path of the Amino NH Bond Cleavage

    SciTech Connect

    Conti, Irene; Garavelli, Marco; Orlandi, Giorgio

    2007-12-26

    A comprehensive study of the radiationless decay processes of the lowest excited singlet states in the isolated 9H-Adenine has been performed at the CASPT2//CASSCF level. The minimum energy paths of the L{sub a}, L{sub b} and n{pi}* singlet states along different skeletal distortions have been computed and the Conical Intersections (CIs) involving these states have been determined. The fast deactivation path of L{sub a} along a skeletal deformation, which leads to a S{sub 0}/L{sub a} CI, as previously discussed, is confirmed. Moreover, low-lying CIs between S{sub 0} and {pi}{sigma}* singlet states have been characterized, where {sigma}* is the antibonding orbital localized on a N-H bond of the amino ({pi}{sigma}{sub NH2*}) or of the azine group ({pi}{sigma}{sub N9H*}). We have found that the repulsive {pi}{sigma}{sub NH2*} state associated with an amino N-H bond can be populated through a barrierless way. Therefore, the decay path shows a bifurcation leading to two possible ways of radiationless deactivation: on one hand a non-photochemical decay through the S{sub 0}/L{sub a} or S{sub 0}/n{pi}* CIs and on the other hand a photochemical process via the possible access to the S{sub 0}/{pi}{sigma}{sub NH2*} CI that produces N-H cleavage. In this way, we can explain the H atom loss found upon UV excitation. We have considered also the decay of higher energy bright states. We have found that these states can decay also by converting to the repulsive {pi}{sigma}{sub N9H*} state associated with the azine NH bond. This new channel suggests an increase of H-atom photoproduction yield by excitating Adenine with lower wavelength radiations. The study of the decay processes of an Adenine molecule in the double strand d(A)10{center_dot}d(T)10 in water solvent is currently underway: Adenine is treated by the Quantum Mechanical (QM) approach and the remaining molecules are described at the Molecular Mechanics (MM) level. We use the COBRAMM program that is a tunable QM/MM approach

  6. Capacity decay mechanism of microporous separator-based all-vanadium redox flow batteries and its recovery.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Luo, Qingtao; Wei, Xiaoliang; Nie, Zimin; Thomsen, Edwin; Chen, Baowei; Sprenkle, Vincent; Wang, Wei

    2014-02-01

    The results of the investigation of the capacity decay mechanism of vanadium redox flow batteries with microporous separators as membranes are reported. The investigation focuses on the relationship between the electrochemical performance and electrolyte compositions at both the positive and negative half-cells. Although the concentration of total vanadium ions remains nearly constant at both sides over cycling, the net transfer of solution from one side to the other and thus the asymmetrical valance of vanadium ions caused by the subsequent disproportionate self-discharge reactions at both sides lead to capacity fading. Through in situ monitoring of the hydraulic pressure of the electrolyte during cycling at both sides, the convection was found to arise from differential hydraulic pressures at both sides of the separators and plays a dominant role in capacity decay. A capacity-stabilizing method is developed and was successfully demonstrated through the regulation of gas pressures in both electrolyte tanks.

  7. Messenger RNA Decay.

    PubMed

    Kushner, Sidney R

    2007-04-01

    This chapter discusses several topics relating to the mechanisms of mRNA decay. These topics include the following: important physical properties of mRNA molecules that can alter their stability; methods for determining mRNA half-lives; the genetics and biochemistry of proteins and enzymes involved in mRNA decay; posttranscriptional modification of mRNAs; the cellular location of the mRNA decay apparatus; regulation of mRNA decay; the relationships among mRNA decay, tRNA maturation, and ribosomal RNA processing; and biochemical models for mRNA decay. Escherichia coli has multiple pathways for ensuring the effective decay of mRNAs and mRNA decay is closely linked to the cell's overall RNA metabolism. Finally, the chapter highlights important unanswered questions regarding both the mechanism and importance of mRNA decay.

  8. Anonymity in P2P Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzanares-Lopez, Pilar; Muñoz-Gea, Juan Pedro; Malgosa-Sanahuja, Josemaria; Sanchez-Aarnoutse, Juan Carlos

    In the last years, the use of peer-to-peer (P2P) applications to share and exchange knowledge among people around the world has experienced an exponential growth. Therefore, it is understandable that, like in any successful communication mechanism used by a lot of humans being, the anonymity can be a desirable characteristic in this scenario. Anonymity in P2P networks can be obtained by means of different methods, although the most significant ones are broadcast protocols, dining-cryptographer (DC) nets and multiple-hop paths. Each of these methods can be tunable in order to build a real anonymity P2P application. In addition, there is a mathematical tool called entropy that can be used in some scenarios to quantify anonymity in communication networks. In some cases, it can be calculated analytically but in others it is necessary to use simulation to obtain the network entropy.

  9. Lepton flavor violating {tau} decays in the type-III seesaw mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Arhrib, Abdesslam; Benbrik, Rachid; Chen, C.-H.

    2010-06-01

    In this paper, the lepton flavor violating {tau}{yields}lP(V) (P, V={pi}{sup 0}, {eta}, {eta}{sup '}, {rho}{sup 0}, {omega}, {phi}) and {tau}{yields}3l (l=e, {mu}) decays are studied in the framework of the type-III seesaw model, in which new triplet fermions with a zero hypercharge (Y=0) interact with ordinary lepton doublets via Yukawa couplings, and affect tree-level leptonic Z-boson couplings. We investigate the experimental bound from the leptonic Z decay to get constraints on the existing parameters space. We predict that the upper limits on the branching ratios of {tau}{yields}lP(V) and {tau}{yields}3l can reach the experimental current limits.

  10. Evolutionary Perspectives on Diversity of Lignocellulose Decay Mechanisms in Basidionycetes (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    ScienceCinema

    Hibbett, David [Clark University

    2016-07-12

    David Hibbett from Clark University on "Evolutionary Perspectives on Diversity of Lignocellulose Decay Mechanisms in Basidiomycetes" at the 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 21, 2012 in Walnut Creek, California.

  11. Evolutionary Perspectives on Diversity of Lignocellulose Decay Mechanisms in Basidionycetes (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    SciTech Connect

    Hibbett, David

    2012-03-21

    David Hibbett from Clark University on "Evolutionary Perspectives on Diversity of Lignocellulose Decay Mechanisms in Basidiomycetes" at the 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 21, 2012 in Walnut Creek, California.

  12. Influence of heat treatments upon the mechanical properties and in vitro bioactivity of ZrO2-toughened MgO-CaO-SiO2-P2O5-CaF2 glass-ceramics.

    PubMed

    Li, Huan-Cai; Wang, Dian-Gang; Meng, Xiang-Guo; Chen, Chuan-Zhong

    2014-09-01

    Zirconia-toughened MgO-CaO-SiO2-P2O5-CaF2 glass-ceramics are prepared using sintering techniques, and a series of heat treatment procedures are designed to obtain a glass-ceramic with improved properties. The crystallization behavior, phase composition, and morphology of the glass-ceramics are characterized. The bending strength, elastic modulus, fracture toughness, and microhardness of the glass-ceramics are investigated, and the effect mechanism of heat treatments upon the mechanical properties is discussed. The bioactivity of glass-ceramics is then evaluated using the in vitro simulated body fluid (SBF) soaking test, and the mechanism whereby apatite forms on the glass-ceramic surfaces in the SBF solution is discussed. The results indicate that the main crystal phase of the G-24 sample undergoing two heat treatment procedures is Ca5(PO4)3F (fluorapatite), and those of the G-2444 sample undergoing four heat treatment procedures are Ca5(PO4)3F and β-CaSiO3 (β-wollastonite). The heat treatment procedures are found to greatly influence the mechanical properties of the glass-ceramic, and an apatite layer is induced on the glass-ceramic surface after soaking in the SBF solution.

  13. Triangle mechanisms in the build up and decay of the N*(1875 )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samart, Daris; Liang, Wei-Hong; Oset, Eulogio

    2017-09-01

    We studied the N*(1875 ) (3 /2-) resonance with a multichannel unitary scheme, considering the Δ π and Σ*K , with their interaction extracted from chiral Lagrangians, and then added two more channels, the N*(1535 ) π and N σ , which proceed via triangle diagrams involving the Σ*K and Δ π respectively in the intermediate states. The triangle diagram in the N*(1535 ) π case develops a singularity at the same energy as the resonance mass. We determined the couplings of the resonance to the different channels and the partial decay widths. We found a very large decay width to Σ*K , and also observed that, due to interference with other terms, the N σ channel has an important role in the π π mass distributions at low invariant masses, leading to an apparently large N σ decay width. We discuss justifying the convenience of an experimental reanalysis of this resonance, in light of the findings of the paper, using multichannel unitary schemes.

  14. Decoupling recombination mechanisms and trap state localization in direct bandgap semiconductors using photoluminescence decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerber, M. W.; Kleiman, R. N.

    2017-09-01

    In this work, we show that extraction of the true bulk lifetime from the biexponential decay that follows from low initial carrier density photoluminescence decay experiments is not generally possible, and introduce new models to enable extraction of the bulk lifetime in the case where the initial carrier density exceeds the doping level. From measurements with high initial carrier density, we establish quasi-equilibrium between localized and free carrier states and accurately measure the bulk lifetime. Using our new models, we measure the time constants associated with localization processes as well as nonradiative and radiative bulk recombination in our GaAs double heterostructures grown with molecular beam epitaxy from experiments with varied excitation strength providing initial carrier densities that range from around 1014 to 1017 cm-3. We demonstrate that this approach can be applied to lightly doped (1016 cm-3) materials where the strongest excitation yields initial carrier densities that exceed the doping level. In our n-type sample, we report lifetime values of (22.7 ± 0.1) ns for bulk recombination, (73 ± 1) ns for trap-capture, (51 ± 2) ns for trap-emission, and (63 ± 2) ns for trap-decay, with a low-level injection effective radiative efficiency of (27.5 ± 0.7)%. In our p-type sample, we report lifetime values of (78.9 ± 0.3) ns for bulk recombination, (77.5 ± 0.7) ns for trap-capture, (530 ± 10) ns for trap-emission, and (177 ± 4) ns for trap-decay, with a low-level injection effective radiative efficiency of (47.0 ± 0.8)%. In comparison with the long and short lifetimes extracted from the biexponential decay with weak excitation, the mean bulk lifetime measured with strong excitation was (33 ± 2)% and (53 ± 1)% longer than the short lifetime, and (68 ± 4)% and (103 ± 3)% shorter than the long lifetime in our n-type and p-type samples, respectively. In our n-type sample, the extracted low-level injection nonradiative lifetime was (33 ± 1

  15. Mechanical and biological properties of two types of bioactive bone cements containing MgO-CaO-SiO2-P2O5-CaF2 glass and glass-ceramic powder.

    PubMed

    Tamura, J; Kawanabe, K; Kobayashi, M; Nakamura, T; Kokubo, T; Yoshihara, S; Shibuya, T

    1996-01-01

    In this study two types of bioactive bone cement containing either MgO-CaO-SiO2-P2O5-CaF2 glass (type A) or glass-ceramic powder (type B) were made to evaluate the effect of the crystalline phases on their mechanical and biological properties. Type A bone cement was produced from glass powder and bisphenol-a-glycidyl methacrylate (BIS-GMA) resin, and type B from glass-ceramic powder containing apatite and wollastonite crystals and BIS-GMA resin. Glass or glass-ceramic powder (30, 50, 70, and 80 by wt %) was added to the cement. The compressive strength of type A (153-180 MPa) and B (167-194 MPa) cement were more than twice that of conventional polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) cement (68 MPa). Histological examination of rat tibiae showed that all the bioactive cements formed direct contact with the bone. A reactive layer was seen at the bone-cement interface. In specimens with type A cement the reactive layer consisted of two layers, a radiopaque outer layer (Ca-P-rich layer) and a relatively radiolucent inner layer (low-calcium-level layer). With type B cement, although the Ca-P-rich layer was seen, the radiolucent inner layer was absent. Up to 26 weeks there was progressive bone formation around each cement (70 wt %) and no evidence of biodegradation. The mechanical and biological properties of the cements were compared with those of a previously reported bone cement containing MgO-free CaO-SiO2-P2O5-CaF2 glass powder (designated type C).

  16. Updated constraints on the light-neutrino exchange mechanisms of the 0νββ-decay

    SciTech Connect

    Štefánik, Dušan; Dvornický, Rastislav; Šimkovic, Fedor

    2015-10-28

    The neutrinoless double-beta (0νββ) decay associated with light neutrino exchange mechanisms, which are due to both left-handed V-A and right-handed V+A leptonic and hadronic currents, is discussed by using the recent progress achieved by the GERDA, EXO and KamlandZen experiments. The upper limits for effective neutrino mass m{sub ββ} and the parameters 〈λ〉 and 〈η〉 characterizing the right handed current mechanisms are deduced from the data on the 0νββ-decay of {sup 76}Ge and {sup 136}Xe using nuclear matrix elements calculated within the nuclear shell model and quasiparticle random phase approximation and phase-space factors calculated with exact Dirac wave functions with finite nuclear size and electron screening. The careful analysis of upper constraints on effective lepton number violating parameters assumes a competition of the above mechanisms and arbitrary values of involved CP violating phases.

  17. 2p2 Team News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, H.

    2000-06-01

    The 2p2 Team continued towards the implementation at the 2.2-m of the same BOB (Broker for Observation Blocks) observing interface as seen at other ESO telescopes. This requires an interface to be written between the existing BOB software and the non-VLT compatible control software for the Wide-Field Imager (WFI) and 2.2-m. Cristian Urrutia, Tatiana Paz and Eduardo Robledo are heading its development. With this software in place, observers can use the VLT Phase 2 Proposal Preparation System (P2PP) for definition of their exposures, whether they are for Visitor or Service Mode.

  18. Convergent losses of decay mechanisms and rapid turnover of symbiosis genes in mycorrhizal mutualists.

    PubMed

    Kohler, Annegret; Kuo, Alan; Nagy, Laszlo G; Morin, Emmanuelle; Barry, Kerrie W; Buscot, Francois; Canbäck, Björn; Choi, Cindy; Cichocki, Nicolas; Clum, Alicia; Colpaert, Jan; Copeland, Alex; Costa, Mauricio D; Doré, Jeanne; Floudas, Dimitrios; Gay, Gilles; Girlanda, Mariangela; Henrissat, Bernard; Herrmann, Sylvie; Hess, Jaqueline; Högberg, Nils; Johansson, Tomas; Khouja, Hassine-Radhouane; LaButti, Kurt; Lahrmann, Urs; Levasseur, Anthony; Lindquist, Erika A; Lipzen, Anna; Marmeisse, Roland; Martino, Elena; Murat, Claude; Ngan, Chew Y; Nehls, Uwe; Plett, Jonathan M; Pringle, Anne; Ohm, Robin A; Perotto, Silvia; Peter, Martina; Riley, Robert; Rineau, Francois; Ruytinx, Joske; Salamov, Asaf; Shah, Firoz; Sun, Hui; Tarkka, Mika; Tritt, Andrew; Veneault-Fourrey, Claire; Zuccaro, Alga; Tunlid, Anders; Grigoriev, Igor V; Hibbett, David S; Martin, Francis

    2015-04-01

    To elucidate the genetic bases of mycorrhizal lifestyle evolution, we sequenced new fungal genomes, including 13 ectomycorrhizal (ECM), orchid (ORM) and ericoid (ERM) species, and five saprotrophs, which we analyzed along with other fungal genomes. Ectomycorrhizal fungi have a reduced complement of genes encoding plant cell wall-degrading enzymes (PCWDEs), as compared to their ancestral wood decayers. Nevertheless, they have retained a unique array of PCWDEs, thus suggesting that they possess diverse abilities to decompose lignocellulose. Similar functional categories of nonorthologous genes are induced in symbiosis. Of induced genes, 7-38% are orphan genes, including genes that encode secreted effector-like proteins. Convergent evolution of the mycorrhizal habit in fungi occurred via the repeated evolution of a 'symbiosis toolkit', with reduced numbers of PCWDEs and lineage-specific suites of mycorrhiza-induced genes.

  19. Convergent losses of decay mechanisms and rapid turnover of symbiosis genes in mycorrhizal mutualists

    DOE PAGES

    Kohler, Annegret; Kuo, Alan; Nagy, Laszlo G.; ...

    2015-02-23

    To elucidate the genetic bases of mycorrhizal lifestyle evolution, we sequenced new fungal genomes, including 13 ectomycorrhizal (ECM), orchid (ORM) and ericoid (ERM) species, and five saprotrophs, which we analyzed along with other fungal genomes. Ectomycorrhizal fungi have a reduced complement of genes encoding plant cell wall-degrading enzymes (PCWDEs), as compared to their ancestral wood decayers. Nevertheless, they have retained a unique array of PCWDEs, thus suggesting that they possess diverse abilities to decompose lignocellulose. Similar functional categories of nonorthologous genes are induced in symbiosis. Of induced genes, 7-38% are orphan genes, including genes that encode secreted effector-like proteins. Convergentmore » evolution of the mycorrhizal habit in fungi occurred via the repeated evolution of a 'symbiosis toolkit', with reduced numbers of PCWDEs and lineage-specific suites of mycorrhiza-induced genes.« less

  20. Convergent losses of decay mechanisms and rapid turnover of symbiosis genes in mycorrhizal mutualists

    SciTech Connect

    Kohler, Annegret; Kuo, Alan; Nagy, Laszlo G.; Morin, Emmanuelle; Barry, Kerrie W.; Buscot, Francois; Canbäck, Björn; Choi, Cindy; Cichocki, Nicolas; Clum, Alicia; Colpaert, Jan; Copeland, Alex; Costa, Mauricio D.; Doré, Jeanne; Floudas, Dimitrios; Gay, Gilles; Girlanda, Mariangela; Henrissat, Bernard; Herrmann, Sylvie; Hess, Jaqueline; Högberg, Nils; Johansson, Tomas; Khouja, Hassine-Radhouane; LaButti, Kurt; Lahrmann, Urs; Levasseur, Anthony; Lindquist, Erika A.; Lipzen, Anna; Marmeisse, Roland; Martino, Elena; Murat, Claude; Ngan, Chew Y.; Nehls, Uwe; Plett, Jonathan M.; Pringle, Anne; Ohm, Robin A.; Perotto, Silvia; Peter, Martina; Riley, Robert; Rineau, Francois; Ruytinx, Joske; Salamov, Asaf; Shah, Firoz; Sun, Hui; Tarkka, Mika; Tritt, Andrew; Veneault-Fourrey, Claire; Zuccaro, Alga; Tunlid, Anders; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Hibbett, David S.; Martin, Francis

    2015-02-23

    To elucidate the genetic bases of mycorrhizal lifestyle evolution, we sequenced new fungal genomes, including 13 ectomycorrhizal (ECM), orchid (ORM) and ericoid (ERM) species, and five saprotrophs, which we analyzed along with other fungal genomes. Ectomycorrhizal fungi have a reduced complement of genes encoding plant cell wall-degrading enzymes (PCWDEs), as compared to their ancestral wood decayers. Nevertheless, they have retained a unique array of PCWDEs, thus suggesting that they possess diverse abilities to decompose lignocellulose. Similar functional categories of nonorthologous genes are induced in symbiosis. Of induced genes, 7-38% are orphan genes, including genes that encode secreted effector-like proteins. Convergent evolution of the mycorrhizal habit in fungi occurred via the repeated evolution of a 'symbiosis toolkit', with reduced numbers of PCWDEs and lineage-specific suites of mycorrhiza-induced genes.

  1. Biocontrol of postharvest gray and blue mold decay of apples with Rhodotorula mucilaginosa and possible mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Li, Renping; Zhang, Hongyin; Liu, Weimin; Zheng, Xiaodong

    2011-03-30

    The efficacy of Rhodotorula mucilaginosa against postharvest gray mold, blue mold and natural decay development of apples and the possible mechanisms involved were investigated. The decay incidence and lesion diameter of gray mold and blue mold of apples treated by R. mucilaginosa were significantly reduced compared with the control fruits, and the higher concentration of R. mucilaginosa, the better the efficacy of the biocontrol. R. mucilaginosa also significantly reduced the natural decay development of apples following storage at 20°C for 35 days or at 4°C for 45 days followed by 20°C for 15 days. Germination and survival of spores of Penicillium expansum and Botrytis cinerea were markedly inhibited by R. mucilaginosa in an in vitro test. Rapid colonization of the yeast in apple wounds was observed whether stored at 20°C or 4°C. In apples, the activities of peroxidase (POD) and polyphenoloxidase (PPO) were significantly induced and lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde (MDA) content) was highly inhibited by R. mucilaginosa treatment compared with those of the control fruits. All these results indicated that R. mucilaginosa has great potential for development of commercial formulations to control postharvest pathogens on fruits. Its modes of action were based on competition for space and nutrients with pathogens, inducement of activities of defense-related enzymes such as POD, PPO and inhibition of lipid peroxidation (MDA content) of apples, so as to enhance the resistance and delay the ripening and senescence of apples. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of ZrO(2) additions on the crystallization, mechanical and biological properties of MgO-CaO-SiO(2)-P(2)O(5)-CaF(2) bioactive glass-ceramics.

    PubMed

    Li, H C; Wang, D G; Meng, X G; Chen, C Z

    2014-06-01

    A series of ZrO(2) doped MgO-CaO-SiO(2)-P(2)O(5)-CaF(2) bioactive glass-ceramics were obtained by sintering method. The crystallization behavior, phase composition, morphology and structure of glass-ceramics were characterized. The bending strength, elastic modulus, fracture toughness, micro-hardness and thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) of glass-ceramics were investigated. The in vitro bioactivity and cytotoxicity tests were used to evaluate the bioactivity and biocompatibility of glass-ceramics. The sedimentation mechanism and growth process of apatites on sample surface were discussed. The results showed that the mainly crystalline phases of glass-ceramics were Ca(5)(PO4)3F (fluorapatite) and β-CaSiO(3). (β-wollastonite). m-ZrO(2) (monoclinic zirconia) declined the crystallization temperatures of glasses. t-ZrO(2) (tetragonal zirconia) increased the crystallization temperature of Ca(5)(PO4)(3)F and declined the crystallization temperature of β-CaSiO(3). t-ZrO(2) greatly increased the fracture toughness, bending strength and micro-hardness of glass-ceramics. The nanometer apatites were induced on the surface of glass-ceramic after soaking 28 days in SBF (simulated body fluid), indicating the glass-ceramic has good bioactivity. The in vitro cytotoxicity test demonstrated the glass-ceramic has no toxicity to cell.

  3. Research on biodeterioration of wood, 1987-1992. 1. Decay mechanisms and biocontrol. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Highley, T.L.; Clausen, C.A.; Croan, S.C.; Green, F.; Illman, B.L.

    1994-03-01

    Growing concerns about the environment present an urgent need for new approaches to preserving wood. Some commonly used preservatives have been banned or restricted in several countries. The research paper first describes current knowledge about how white-and-brown rot fungi decay wood and then delineates research in to problem areas: (1) control of wood decay through targeting biosynthetic and degradative pathways, and (2) biological control (biocontrol) of wood decay through non-decay micro-organisms.

  4. Combinedatomic–nuclear decay

    SciTech Connect

    Dzyublik, A. Ya.

    2016-05-15

    We analyzed in details the combined decay of the atomic-nuclear state, which consists of the excited 3/2{sup +} level of {sub 63}{sup 153}Eu and K hole, formed in the K capture by {sup 153}Gd. This decay proceeds in two stages. First, the nucleus transfers its energy to 2p electron, which flies into the continuum spectrum, and then returns into 1s hole, emitting γ quantum with the energy equal to the sum of energies of the nuclear and atomic transitions. We estimated the decay probability to be 2.2 × 10{sup −13}, that is much less than the recent experimental findings.

  5. Reduced order modeling of mechanical degradation induced performance decay in lithium-ion battery porous electrodes

    DOE PAGES

    Barai, Pallab; Smith, Kandler; Chen, Chien -Fan; ...

    2015-06-17

    In this paper, a one-dimensional computational framework is developed that can solve for the evolution of voltage and current in a lithium-ion battery electrode under different operating conditions. A reduced order model is specifically constructed to predict the growth of mechanical degradation within the active particles of the carbon anode as a function of particle size and C-rate. Using an effective diffusivity relation, the impact of microcracks on the diffusivity of the active particles has been captured. Reduction in capacity due to formation of microcracks within the negative electrode under different operating conditions (constant current discharge and constant current constantmore » voltage charge) has been investigated. At the beginning of constant current discharge, mechanical damage to electrode particles predominantly occurs near the separator. As the reaction front shifts, mechanical damage spreads across the thickness of the negative electrode and becomes relatively uniform under multiple discharge/charge cycles. Mechanical degradation under different drive cycle conditions has been explored. It is observed that electrodes with larger particle sizes are prone to capacity fade due to microcrack formation. Finally, under drive cycle conditions, small particles close to the separator and large particles close to the current collector can help in reducing the capacity fade due to mechanical degradation.« less

  6. Reduced order modeling of mechanical degradation induced performance decay in lithium-ion battery porous electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Barai, Pallab; Smith, Kandler; Chen, Chien -Fan; Kim, Gi -Heon; Mukherjee, Partha P.

    2015-06-17

    In this paper, a one-dimensional computational framework is developed that can solve for the evolution of voltage and current in a lithium-ion battery electrode under different operating conditions. A reduced order model is specifically constructed to predict the growth of mechanical degradation within the active particles of the carbon anode as a function of particle size and C-rate. Using an effective diffusivity relation, the impact of microcracks on the diffusivity of the active particles has been captured. Reduction in capacity due to formation of microcracks within the negative electrode under different operating conditions (constant current discharge and constant current constant voltage charge) has been investigated. At the beginning of constant current discharge, mechanical damage to electrode particles predominantly occurs near the separator. As the reaction front shifts, mechanical damage spreads across the thickness of the negative electrode and becomes relatively uniform under multiple discharge/charge cycles. Mechanical degradation under different drive cycle conditions has been explored. It is observed that electrodes with larger particle sizes are prone to capacity fade due to microcrack formation. Finally, under drive cycle conditions, small particles close to the separator and large particles close to the current collector can help in reducing the capacity fade due to mechanical degradation.

  7. Σ--antihyperon correlations in Z0 decay and investigation of the baryon production mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbiendi, G.; Ainsley, C.; Åkesson, P. F.; Alexander, G.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barillari, T.; Barlow, R. J.; Batley, R. J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, K. W.; Bell, P. J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brown, R. M.; Burckhart, H. J.; Campana, S.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R. K.; Carter, A. A.; Carter, J. R.; Chang, C. Y.; Charlton, D. G.; Ciocca, C.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, M.; de Roeck, A.; de Wolf, E. A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I. P.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J. W.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, M.; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwé, M.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G. G.; Harel, A.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R. D.; Hill, J. C.; Horváth, D.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T. R.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R. K.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kennedy, B. W.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Krämer, T.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G. D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S. L.; Loebinger, F. K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, A.; Ludwig, J.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Martin, A. J.; Mashimo, T.; Mättig, P.; McKenna, J.; McPherson, R. A.; Meijers, F.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F. S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, N.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D. J.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Nanjo, H.; Neal, H. A.; O'Neale, S. W.; Oh, A.; Oreglia, M. J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pásztor, G.; Pater, J. R.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, D. E.; Pooth, O.; Przybycień, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Roney, J. M.; Rossi, A. M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisyan, E. K. G.; Schaile, A. D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schröder, M.; Schumacher, M.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T. G.; Shen, B. C.; Sherwood, P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A. M.; Sobie, R.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Strom, D.; Ströhmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M. A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Trigger, I.; Trócsányi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M. F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvári, B.; Vollmer, C. F.; Vannerem, P.; Vértesi, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Ward, C. P.; Ward, D. R.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, N. K.; Wells, P. S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; Wilson, G. W.; Wilson, J. A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T. R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, L.

    2009-12-01

    Data collected around sqrt{s}=91 GeV by the OPAL experiment at the LEP e+e- collider are used to study the mechanism of baryon formation. As the signature, the fraction of Σ- hyperons whose baryon number is compensated by the production of a overline{Σ-},overline{Λ} or overline{Ξ-} antihyperon is determined. The method relies entirely on quantum number correlations of the baryons, and not rapidity correlations, making it more model independent than previous studies. Within the context of the JETSET implementation of the string hadronization model, the diquark baryon production model without the popcorn mechanism is strongly disfavored with a significance of 3.8 standard deviations including systematic uncertainties. It is shown that previous studies of the popcorn mechanism with Λ overline{Λ} and p\\uppi overline{p} correlations are not conclusive, if parameter uncertainties are considered.

  8. Localizing gene regulation reveals a staggered wood decay mechanism for the brown rot fungus Postia placenta

    Treesearch

    Jiwei Zhang; Gerald N. Presley; Kenneth E. Hammel; Jae-San Ryu; Jon R. Menke; Melania Figueroa; Dehong Hu; Galya Orr; Jonathan S. Schilling

    2016-01-01

    Wood-degrading brown rot fungi are essential recyclers of plant biomass in forest ecosystems. Their efficient cellulolytic systems, which have potential biotechnological applications, apparently depend on a combination of two mechanisms: lignocellulose oxidation (LOX) by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and polysaccharide hydrolysis by a limited set of glycoside...

  9. Competing analysis of α and 2p2n-emission from compound nuclei formed in neutron induced reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Amandeep; Sharma, Manoj K.

    2017-01-01

    The decay mechanism of compound system 61Ni* formed in fast neutron induced reactions is explored within the collective clusterization approach of the Dynamical Cluster-decay Model (DCM) in reference to a recent experiment over an energy spread of En = 1- 100 MeV. The excitation functions for the decay of the compound nucleus 61Ni* formed in the n +60Ni reaction show a double humped variation with incident beam energy where the peak at lower energy corresponds to α-emission while the one at higher energy originates from 2 p 2 n-emission. The experimentally observed transmutation of α-emission at lower energy into 2 p 2 n-emission at higher incident energies is explained on the basis of temperature dependence of the binding energies used within the framework of DCM. The cross-sections for the formation of the daughter nucleus 57Fe after emission of α-cluster from the 61Ni* nucleus are addressed by employing the neck length parameter (ΔR), finding decent agreement with the available experimental data. The calculations are done for non-sticking choice of moment of inertia (INS) in the centrifugal potential term, which forms the essential ingredient in DCM based calculations. In addition to this, the effect of mass (and charge) of the compound nucleus is exercised in view of α and 2 p 2 n emission and comparative study of the decay profiles of compound systems with mass A = 17-93 is employed to get better description of decay patterns.

  10. Decay mechanisms of protonated 4-quinolone antibiotics after electrospray ionization and ion activation.

    PubMed

    Kovačević, Borislav; Schorr, Pascal; Qi, Yulin; Volmer, Dietrich A

    2014-11-01

    This study presents a detailed experimental investigation of charge isomers of protonated 4-quinolone antibiotics molecules formed during electrospray ionization (ESI) with proposed dissociation mechanisms after collisional activation. Piperazinyl quinolones have been previously shown to exhibit erratic behavior during tandem MS analyses of biological samples, which originated from varying ratios of two isomeric variants formed during ESI. Here, a combination of ESI-collision-induced dissociation (CID), differential ion mobility spectrometry (DMS), high resolution MS, and density functional theory (DFT) was used to investigate the underlying mechanisms of isomer formation and their individual dissociation behaviors. The study focused on ciprofloxacin; major findings were confirmed using structurally related 4-quinolones. DFT calculations showed a reversal of basicity for piperazinyl quinolones between liquid and gas phase. We provide an experimental comparison and theoretical treatment of factors influencing the formation ratio of the charge isomers during ESI, including solvent pH, protic/aprotic nature of solvent, and structural effects such as pK a and proton affinity. The actual dissociation mechanisms of the isomers of the protonated molecules were studied by separating the individual isomers via DMS-MS, which allowed type-specific CID spectra to be recorded. Both primary CID reactions of the two charge isomers originated from the same carboxyl group by charge-remote (CO(2) loss) and charge-mediated (H(2)O loss) fragmentation of the piperazinyl quinolones, depending on whether the proton resides on the more basic keto or the piperazinyl group, followed by a number of secondary dissociation reactions. The proposed mechanisms were supported by calculated energies of precursors, transition states, and products for competing pathways.

  11. MEMS measurements of single cell stiffness decay due to cyclic mechanical loading.

    PubMed

    Barazani, Bruno; Warnat, Stephan; MacIntosh, Andrew J; Hubbard, Ted

    2017-08-25

    The goal of this study was to measure the mechanical stiffness of individual cells and to observe changes due to the application of repeated cell mechanical loads. 28 single baker's yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) were fatigue tested and had their stiffness measured during repetitive loading cycles performed by a MEMS squeezer in aqueous media. Electrothermal micro-actuators compressed individual cells against a reference back spring; cell and spring motions were measured using a FFT image analysis technique with ~10 nm resolution. Cell stiffness was calculated based on measurements of cell elongation vs. applied force which resulted in stiffness values in the 2-10 N/m range. The effect of increased force was studied for cells mechanically cycled 37 times. Cell stiffness decreased as the force and the cycle number increased. After 37 loading cycles (~4 min), forces of 0.24, 0.29, 0.31, and 0.33 μN caused stiffness drops of 5%, 13%, 31% and 41% respectively. Cells force was then set to 0.29 μN and cells were tested over longer runs of 118 and 268 cycles. After 118 cycles (~12 min) cells experienced an average stiffness drop of 68%. After 268 cycles (~25 min) cells had a stiffness drop of 77%, and appeared to reach a stiffness plateau of 20-25% of the initial stiffness after approximately 200 cycles.

  12. Transition from direct to sequential two-proton decay in s-d shell nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubkova, T. A.; Xu, X.-D.; Grigorenko, L. V.; Mukha, I. G.; Scheidenberger, C.; Zhukov, M. V.

    2016-11-01

    The transition between different mechanisms of two-proton decay in exotic nuclei and the governing physical conditions are generally studied. To perform this large-scale survey, the direct-decay model, which is widely used, was improved by generalizing the semi-analytical approaches used before. The improved model provides a flawless phenomenological description of three-body correlations in 2p decays, as is demonstrated by several examples of decays of low-lying states in 16Ne. Different transition mechanisms are shown to occur beyond the proton dripline for s-d shell nuclei. It is found that the transition dynamics of 2p-emitters allows the extraction of the width of the ground-state resonance of the core + p subsystem. The practical application of the method is illustrated by determining properties of the 14F ground state derived from the 15Ne →13O + 2 p decay data, and of the 29Cl ground state derived from the 30Ar →28S + 2 p decay data.

  13. Localizing gene regulation reveals a staggered wood decay mechanism for the brown rot fungus Postia placenta

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiwei; Presley, Gerald N.; Ryu, Jae-San; Menke, Jon R.; Figueroa, Melania; Orr, Galya; Schilling, Jonathan S.

    2016-01-01

    Wood-degrading brown rot fungi are essential recyclers of plant biomass in forest ecosystems. Their efficient cellulolytic systems, which have potential biotechnological applications, apparently depend on a combination of two mechanisms: lignocellulose oxidation (LOX) by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and polysaccharide hydrolysis by a limited set of glycoside hydrolases (GHs). Given that ROS are strongly oxidizing and nonselective, these two steps are likely segregated. A common hypothesis has been that brown rot fungi use a concentration gradient of chelated metal ions to confine ROS generation inside wood cell walls before enzymes can infiltrate. We examined an alternative: that LOX components involved in ROS production are differentially expressed by brown rot fungi ahead of GH components. We used spatial mapping to resolve a temporal sequence in Postia placenta, sectioning thin wood wafers colonized directionally. Among sections, we measured gene expression by whole-transcriptome shotgun sequencing (RNA-seq) and assayed relevant enzyme activities. We found a marked pattern of LOX up-regulation in a narrow (5-mm, 48-h) zone at the hyphal front, which included many genes likely involved in ROS generation. Up-regulation of GH5 endoglucanases and many other GHs clearly occurred later, behind the hyphal front, with the notable exceptions of two likely expansins and a GH28 pectinase. Our results support a staggered mechanism for brown rot that is controlled by differential expression rather than microenvironmental gradients. This mechanism likely results in an oxidative pretreatment of lignocellulose, possibly facilitated by expansin- and pectinase-assisted cell wall swelling, before cellulases and hemicellulases are deployed for polysaccharide depolymerization. PMID:27621450

  14. Localizing gene regulation reveals a staggered wood decay mechanism for the brown rot fungus Postia placenta.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiwei; Presley, Gerald N; Hammel, Kenneth E; Ryu, Jae-San; Menke, Jon R; Figueroa, Melania; Hu, Dehong; Orr, Galya; Schilling, Jonathan S

    2016-09-27

    Wood-degrading brown rot fungi are essential recyclers of plant biomass in forest ecosystems. Their efficient cellulolytic systems, which have potential biotechnological applications, apparently depend on a combination of two mechanisms: lignocellulose oxidation (LOX) by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and polysaccharide hydrolysis by a limited set of glycoside hydrolases (GHs). Given that ROS are strongly oxidizing and nonselective, these two steps are likely segregated. A common hypothesis has been that brown rot fungi use a concentration gradient of chelated metal ions to confine ROS generation inside wood cell walls before enzymes can infiltrate. We examined an alternative: that LOX components involved in ROS production are differentially expressed by brown rot fungi ahead of GH components. We used spatial mapping to resolve a temporal sequence in Postia placenta, sectioning thin wood wafers colonized directionally. Among sections, we measured gene expression by whole-transcriptome shotgun sequencing (RNA-seq) and assayed relevant enzyme activities. We found a marked pattern of LOX up-regulation in a narrow (5-mm, 48-h) zone at the hyphal front, which included many genes likely involved in ROS generation. Up-regulation of GH5 endoglucanases and many other GHs clearly occurred later, behind the hyphal front, with the notable exceptions of two likely expansins and a GH28 pectinase. Our results support a staggered mechanism for brown rot that is controlled by differential expression rather than microenvironmental gradients. This mechanism likely results in an oxidative pretreatment of lignocellulose, possibly facilitated by expansin- and pectinase-assisted cell wall swelling, before cellulases and hemicellulases are deployed for polysaccharide depolymerization.

  15. The genome of Pleurotus eryngii provides insights into the mechanisms of wood decay.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rui-Heng; Li, Yan; Wáng, Ying; Wan, Jia-Ning; Zhou, Chen-Li; Wāng, Ying; Gao, Ying-Nv; Mao, Wen-Jun; Tang, Li-Hua; Gong, Ming; Wu, Ying-Ying; Bao, Da-Peng

    2016-12-10

    Pleurotus eryngii (DC.) Quél. is widely used for bioconverting lignocellulosic byproducts into biofuel and value added products. Sequencing and annotating the genome of a monokaryon strain P. eryngii 183 allows us to gain a better understanding of carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes) and oxidoreductases for degradation of lignocellulose in white-rot fungi. The genomic data provides insights into genomic basis of degradation mechanisms of lignin and cellulose and may pave new avenues for lignocellulose bioconversion. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Differential ammonia decay kinetics indicates more than one concurrent etiological mechanism for symptomatic hyperammonemia caused by valproate overdose.

    PubMed

    Mojumder, Deb Kumar; De Oleo, Radhames Ramos

    2014-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) has successfully been used in the therapy of a number of conditions including absence seizures, partial seizures, tonic-clonic seizures, bipolar disorder, schizoaffective disorder, social phobias, neuropathic pain and migraine headaches. There is a high rise in number of cases of toxicity due to overdose of VPA. Hyperammonemia, a common side-effect of VPA, is caused by several proposed etiologies, reported as having uncertain correlation with VPA dose or concentration. We present here a case of a 25-year-old female patient with a past history of psychiatric complaints, presented with elevated serum VPA levels associated with elevated venous ammonia levels subsequent to VPA overdose. Later in the presence of sub-therapeutic serum VPA levels her venous ammonia levels remained raised and slowly down-trending. VPA levels and ammonia levels were found to be normal after 14 days. Patient was treated with levocarnitine. Her liver enzymes were never elevated. Different decay kinetics of venous ammonia in presence of high and low concentrations of VPA indicates that VPA can cause symptomatic hyperammonemia via more than one concurrent etiological mechanism. In this patient, the mechanisms causing hyperammonia secondary to VPA use were not related to hepatic damage or carnitine deficiency.

  17. Transcriptome and Secretome Analyses of the Wood Decay Fungus Wolfiporia cocos Support Alternative Mechanisms of Lignocellulose Conversion.

    PubMed

    Gaskell, Jill; Blanchette, Robert A; Stewart, Philip E; BonDurant, Sandra Splinter; Adams, Marie; Sabat, Grzegorz; Kersten, Phil; Cullen, Dan

    2016-07-01

    Certain wood decay basidiomycetes, collectively referred to as brown rot fungi, rapidly depolymerize cellulose while leaving behind the bulk of cell wall lignin as a modified residue. The mechanism(s) employed is unclear, but considerable evidence implicates the involvement of diffusible oxidants generated via Fenton-like chemistry. Toward a better understanding of this process, we have examined the transcriptome and secretome of Wolfiporia cocos when cultivated on media containing glucose, purified crystalline cellulose, aspen (Populus grandidentata), or lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) as the sole carbon source. Compared to the results obtained with glucose, 30, 183, and 207 genes exhibited 4-fold increases in transcript levels in cellulose, aspen, and lodgepole pine, respectively. Mass spectrometry identified peptides corresponding to 64 glycoside hydrolase (GH) proteins, and of these, 17 corresponded to transcripts upregulated on one or both woody substrates. Most of these genes were broadly categorized as hemicellulases or chitinases. Consistent with an important role for hydroxyl radical in cellulose depolymerization, high transcript levels and upregulation were observed for genes involved in iron homeostasis, iron reduction, and extracellular peroxide generation. These patterns of regulation differ markedly from those of the closely related brown rot fungus Postia placenta and expand the number of enzymes potentially involved in the oxidative depolymerization of cellulose. The decomposition of wood is an essential component of nutrient cycling in forest ecosystems. Few microbes have the capacity to efficiently degrade woody substrates, and the mechanism(s) is poorly understood. Toward a better understanding of these processes, we show that when grown on wood as a sole carbon source the brown rot fungus W. cocos expresses a unique repertoire of genes involved in oxidative and hydrolytic conversions of cell walls. Copyright © 2016, American Society for

  18. Transcriptome and Secretome Analyses of the Wood Decay Fungus Wolfiporia cocos Support Alternative Mechanisms of Lignocellulose Conversion

    PubMed Central

    Gaskell, Jill; Blanchette, Robert A.; Stewart, Philip E.; BonDurant, Sandra Splinter; Adams, Marie; Sabat, Grzegorz; Kersten, Phil

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Certain wood decay basidiomycetes, collectively referred to as brown rot fungi, rapidly depolymerize cellulose while leaving behind the bulk of cell wall lignin as a modified residue. The mechanism(s) employed is unclear, but considerable evidence implicates the involvement of diffusible oxidants generated via Fenton-like chemistry. Toward a better understanding of this process, we have examined the transcriptome and secretome of Wolfiporia cocos when cultivated on media containing glucose, purified crystalline cellulose, aspen (Populus grandidentata), or lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) as the sole carbon source. Compared to the results obtained with glucose, 30, 183, and 207 genes exhibited 4-fold increases in transcript levels in cellulose, aspen, and lodgepole pine, respectively. Mass spectrometry identified peptides corresponding to 64 glycoside hydrolase (GH) proteins, and of these, 17 corresponded to transcripts upregulated on one or both woody substrates. Most of these genes were broadly categorized as hemicellulases or chitinases. Consistent with an important role for hydroxyl radical in cellulose depolymerization, high transcript levels and upregulation were observed for genes involved in iron homeostasis, iron reduction, and extracellular peroxide generation. These patterns of regulation differ markedly from those of the closely related brown rot fungus Postia placenta and expand the number of enzymes potentially involved in the oxidative depolymerization of cellulose. IMPORTANCE The decomposition of wood is an essential component of nutrient cycling in forest ecosystems. Few microbes have the capacity to efficiently degrade woody substrates, and the mechanism(s) is poorly understood. Toward a better understanding of these processes, we show that when grown on wood as a sole carbon source the brown rot fungus W. cocos expresses a unique repertoire of genes involved in oxidative and hydrolytic conversions of cell walls. PMID:27107121

  19. Genome, transcriptome, and secretome analysis of wood decay fungus postia placenta supports unique mechanisms of lignocellulose conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Diego; Challacombe, Jean F; Misra, Monica; Xie, Gary; Brettin, Thomas; Morgenstern, Ingo; Hibbett, David; Schmoll, Monika; Kubicek, Christian P; Ferreira, Patricia; Ruiz - Duenase, Francisco J; Martinez, Angel T; Kersten, Phil; Hammel, Kenneth E; Vanden Wymelenberg, Amber; Gaskell, Jill; Lindquist, Erika; Sabati, Grzegorz; Bondurant, Sandra S; Larrondo, Luis F; Canessa, Paulo; Vicunna, Rafael; Yadavk, Jagiit; Doddapaneni, Harshavardhan; Subramaniank, Venkataramanan; Pisabarro, Antonio G; Lavin, Jose L; Oguiza, Jose A; Master, Emma; Henrissat, Bernard; Coutinho, Pedro M; Harris, Paul; Magnuson, Jon K; Baker, Scott; Bruno, Kenneth; Kenealy, William; Hoegger, Patrik J; Kues, Ursula; Ramaiva, Preethi; Lucas, Susan; Salamov, Asaf; Shapiro, Harris; Tuh, Hank; Chee, Christine L; Teter, Sarah; Yaver, Debbie; James, Tim; Mokrejs, Martin; Pospisek, Martin; Grigoriev, Igor; Rokhsar, Dan; Berka, Randy; Cullen, Dan

    2008-01-01

    Brown-rot fungi such as Postia placenta are common inhabitants of forest ecosystems and are also largely responsible for the destructive decay of wooden structures. Rapid depolymerization of cellulose is a distinguishing feature of brown-rot, but the biochemical mechanisms and underlying genetics are poorly understood. Systematic examination of the P. placenta genome, transcriptome and secretome revealed unique extracellular enzyme systems, including an unusual repertoire of extracellular glycoside hydrolases. Genes encoding exocellobiohydrolases and cellulose-binding domains, typical of cellulolytic microbes, are absent in this efficient cellulose-degrading fungus. When P. placenta was grown in medium containing cellulose as sole carbon source, transcripts corresponding to many hemicellulases and to a single putative {beta}-1-4 endoglucanase were expressed at high levels relative to glucose grown cultures. These transcript profiles were confirmed by direct identification of peptides by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC{center_dot}MSIMS). Also upregulated during growth on cellulose medium were putative iron reductases, quinone reductase, and structurally divergent oxidases potentially involved in extracellular generation of Fe(II) and H202. These observations are consistent with a biodegradative role for Fenton chemistry in which Fe(II) and H202 react to form hydroxyl radicals, highly reactive oxidants capable of depolymerizing cellulose. The P. placenta genome resources provide unparalleled opportunities for investigating such unusual mechanisms of cellulose conversion. More broadly, the genome offers insight into the diversification of lignocellulose degrading mechanisms in fungi. Comparisons to the closely related white-rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium support an evolutionary shift from white-rot to brown-rot during which the capacity for efficient depolymerization of lignin was lost.

  20. Excited state structures and decay dynamics of 1,3-dimethyluracils in solutions: resonance Raman and quantum mechanical calculation study.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming-Juan; Liu, Ming-Xia; Zhao, Yan-Ying; Pei, Ke-Mei; Wang, Hui-Gang; Zheng, Xuming; Fang, Wei Hai

    2013-10-03

    The resonance Raman spectroscopic study of the excited state structural dynamics of 1,3-dimethyluracil (DMU), 5-bromo-1,3-dimethyluracil (5BrDMU), uracil, and thymine in water and acetonitrile were reported. Density functional theory calculations were carried out to help elucidate the ultraviolet electronic transitions associated with the A-, and B-band absorptions and the vibrational assignments of the resonance Raman spectra. The effect of the methylation at N1, N3 and C5 sites of pyrimidine ring on the structural dynamics of uracils in different solvents were explored on the basis of the resonance Raman intensity patterns. The relative resonance Raman intensities of DMU and 5BrDMU are computed at the B3LYP-TD level. Huge discrepancies between the experimental resonance Raman intensities and the B3LYP-TD predicted ones were observed. The underlying mechanism was briefly discussed. The decay channel through the S1((1)nπ*)/S2((1)ππ*) conical intersection and the S1((1)nπ*)/T1((3)ππ*) intersystem crossing were revealed by using the CASSCF(8,7)/6-31G(d) level of theory calculations.

  1. Biocontrol of post-harvest Alternaria alternata decay of cherry tomatoes with rhamnolipids and possible mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Yan, Fujie; Xu, Shixiang; Guo, Jun; Chen, Qianru; Meng, Qin; Zheng, Xiaodong

    2015-05-01

    Rhamnolipids were reported to have evident antifungal activity. The efficacy of rhamnolipids against Alternaria alternata and their possible mechanisms involved were investigated. The decay incidences of A. alternata of cherry tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum) treated by rhamnolipids were significantly reduced. The in vitro assays showed that rhamnolipids inhibited fungal growth on solid medium and prevented spore germination and mycelium growth in liquid medium. In addition, the combination of rhamnolipids and essential oil had a synergistic effect leading to the decrease of fungicidal concentrations of laurel oil. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy observations of the pathogen revealed significant morphological and cell structural alterations in the hyphae. Compared to the control, the content of nucleic acid in supernatant of the suspension of A. alternata increased, while the content of DNA and protein of mycelium decreased, which was in agreement with electrolyte leakage experiments. Rhamnolipids could be an alternative to chemicals for controlling post-harvest phytopathogenic fungi on fruits and vegetables. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. SR proteins and the nonsense-mediated decay mechanism are involved in human GLB1 gene alternative splicing

    PubMed Central

    Santamaria, Raül; Vilageliu, Lluïsa; Grinberg, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Background The human GLB1 gene is known to give rise to two alternatively spliced mRNAs, which encode two different proteins: lysosomal β-galactosidase (β-gal) and elastin-binding protein (EBP). The β-gal transcript includes the 16 exons of the GLB1 gene. In the EBP transcript, exons 3, 4 and 6 are skipped, while exon 5 has a different reading frame. However, little is known on how this alternative splicing is regulated. Findings Cycloheximide treatment of HeLa cells and human fibroblasts revealed the presence of new transcripts that are otherwise degraded by nonsense-mediated decay (NMD). A minigene carrying the exons involved in the alternative splicing of GLB1 was constructed. Improving the acceptor-site scores of exons 3 or 4 increased the relative inclusion of these exons, but did not stop them being skipped in some transcripts. Overexpression of different SR proteins altered the relative proportion of the different transcripts produced by the minigene, indicating a possible mechanism for the regulation of the alternative splicing of GLB1. Finally, a comparison of this gene among different species was performed. Conclusion In the processing of the GLB1 RNA several transcripts are generated, but only those with a correct reading frame are not degraded. The differential inclusion/exclusion of exons could be partially explained by the relatively weak splice sites in the exons involved. Different SR proteins have an effect on the process of skipping of these exons, at least in the minigene conditions, indicating a possible mechanism for the regulation of the alternative splicing of the GLB1 gene. PMID:19114006

  3. A Remedy for Network Operators against Increasing P2P Traffic: Enabling Packet Cache for P2P Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakao, Akihiro; Sasaki, Kengo; Yamamoto, Shu

    We observe that P2P traffic has peculiar characteristics as opposed to the other type of traffic such as web browsing and file transfer. Since they exploit swarm effect — a multitude of end points downloading the same content piece by piece nearly at the same time, thus, increasing the effectiveness of caching — the same pieces of data end up traversing the network over and over again within mostly a short time window. In the light of this observation, we propose a network layer packet-level caching for reducing the volume of emerging P2P traffic, transparently to the P2P applications — without affecting operations of the P2P applications at all — rather than banning it, restricting it, or modifying P2P systems themselves. Unlike the other caching techniques, we aim to provide as generic a caching mechanism as possible at network layer — without knowing much detail of P2P application protocols — to extend applicability to arbitrary P2P protocols. Our preliminary evaluation shows that our approach is expected to reduce a significant amount of P2P traffic transparently to P2P applications.

  4. Correlation between flavor-violating decay of long-lived slepton and tau in the coannihilation scenario with the seesaw mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneko, Satoru; Saito, Hiroki; Sato, Joe; Shimomura, Takashi; Vives, Oscar; Yamanaka, Masato

    2011-06-01

    We investigate flavor violating decays of the long-lived lightest slepton and the tau lepton in the coannihilation region of the minimal supersymmetric standard model with a seesaw mechanism to generate neutrino masses. We consider a situation where the mass difference between the lightest neutralino, as the lightest supersymmetric particle, and the lightest slepton, as the next-to-lightest supersymmetric particle, is smaller than the mass of tau lepton. In this situation, the lifetime of the lightest slepton is very long and it is determined by lepton flavor violating (LFV) couplings because the slepton mainly consists of the lighter stau and the flavor conserving 2-body decay is kinematically forbidden. We show that the lifetime can change many orders of magnitude by varying the Yukawa couplings entering the seesaw mechanism. We also show that the branching ratios of LFV tau decays are strongly correlated with the lightest slepton lifetime. Therefore the branching ratios of LFV tau decays can be determined or constrained by measuring the slepton lifetime at the LHC experiment.

  5. Radioactive Decay

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Radioactive decay is the emission of energy in the form of ionizing radiation. Example decay chains illustrate how radioactive atoms can go through many transformations as they become stable and no longer radioactive.

  6. Tooth Decay

    MedlinePlus

    You call it a cavity. Your dentist calls it tooth decay or dental caries. They're all names for a hole in your tooth. The cause of tooth decay is plaque, a sticky substance in your mouth made up mostly of germs. Tooth decay starts in the outer layer, called the enamel. Without ...

  7. Trunk decays

    Treesearch

    Alex L. Shigo

    1989-01-01

    Trunk decays are major causes of low quality wood-wood with little or no economic value. As a forest practitioner you should be able to recognize trees at high risk for decay and remove them if timber production is your primary objective. Remember, however, that decayed trees often develop into den trees or nesting sites and provide essential habitat for wildlife....

  8. Fine Structure of the Upsilon 2p States.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovelock, Dale Michael John

    1990-01-01

    The Columbia-Stony Brook (CUSB) collaboration has measured the photon spectrum resulting from the decays Upsilon (3S)togamma + hadrons using the CUSB-II BGO calorimeter. The spectrum contains the signal from the electromagnetic transitions Upsilon (3S)togammachi _{b,J=0,1,2} (2P). From this signal the masses of the chi_{b}(2P) states were determined to be 10268.0 +/- 0.8, 10255.4 +/- 0.8, and 10233.9 +/- 1.2 MeV for the J = 2, 1, and 0 states respectively. The ratio of the mass splittings, (M_{chi _{b2}} - M_{chi_{b1}} )/(M_{chi_{b1 }} - M_ {chi_{b0}}) imply that the long range confining piece of the inter-quark potential transforms as a Lorentz scalar.

  9. E6 Gamma Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B. Alex; Rae, W. D. M.

    2011-05-06

    Rare electric hexacontatetrapole (E6) transitions are studied in the full (f{sub 7/2},f{sub 5/2},p{sub 3/2},p{sub 1/2}) shell-model basis. Comparison of theory to the results from the gamma decay in {sup 53}Fe and from inelastic electron scattering on {sup 52}Cr provides unique and interesting tests of the valence wavefunctions, the models used for energy density functionals and into the origin of effective charge.

  10. Is the X (3915 ) the χc 0(2 P )?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Stephen Lars

    2015-03-01

    The Particle Data Group Meson Summary Table lists the X (3915 ) meson, an ω J /ψ mass peak seen in B →K ω J /ψ decays and γ γ →ω J /ψ two-photon fusion reactions, as the χc 0(2 P ), the 23P0 charmonium state. Here, with some reasonable assumptions, it is shown that if the X (3915 ) is the χc 0(2 P ), the measured strength of the γ γ →X (3915 ) signal implies an upper limit on the branching fraction B (χc 0(2 P )→ω J /ψ ) that is below a lower limit inferred for the same quantity from the B →K X (3915 ) decay rate. Also, the absence any signal for X (3915 )→D0D¯0 in B+→K+D0D¯0 decays is used to infer the limit B (X (3915 )→D0D¯0)<1.2 ×B (X (3915 )→ω J /ψ ). This contradicts expectations that χc 0(2 P ) decays to D0D¯0 should be a dominant process, while decays to ω J /ψ , which are Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka suppressed, should be relatively rare. These, plus reasons given earlier by Guo and Meissner, raise concerns about the X (3915 )=χc 0(2 P ) assignment.

  11. On a saturation mechanism of two-upper-hybrid-plasmon parametric decay instability in the second harmonic ECRH experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusakov, E. Z.; Popov, A. Yu

    2017-02-01

    The nonlinear saturation of low-power-threshold two-upper-hybrid (UH)-plasmon parametric decay instability (PDI) of an extraordinary pump wave-excited in the presence of a nonmonotonous density profile is analyzed in detail. It is shown that the primary absolute PDI enhancing the UH wave fluctuations from the thermal noise level, which was analyzed in linear approximation in Popov and Gusakov (2015 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 57 025022), is saturated due to a secondary low-threshold decay of the daughter UH wave. The secondary decay leads to excitation of the secondary UH wave, downshifted in frequency and also trapped in the vicinity of the local maximum of the density profile, and the ion Bernstein wave. A set of equations describing the primary and secondary decays and accounting for the finite pump-beam width is derived and solved numerically. The results of numerical modeling are shown to be in agreement with an analytical estimation of the growth rates of both the primary and secondary parametric decays and of the saturation level. The anomalous absorption of the pump wave due to the two plasmon PDI is estimated at a level of 6% for the plasma density profile considered in the paper.

  12. Polarized Proton Target for the g2p Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, Melissa

    2013-04-01

    The g2^p experiment was completed in Jefferson Lab's Hall A in the spring of 2012. These data will provide the first measurement of the proton's g2 structure function in the region 0.02 < Q^2 < 0.2 GeV^2. A large scale installation was required for the g2^p experiment, including a polarized ammonia (NH3) target never before used in Hall A. Based on the principle of Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP), microwave pumping is used to polarize irradiated ammonia in a high magnetic field at a temperature of 1K. In order to achieve the proposed kinematic range, the target magnet field was used at both 2.5,and 5,. Few studies of DNP have been done previously with a target field of 2.5,, making these data of particular interest. In addition, an experiment to measure the proton form factor ratio (GE/GM) ran concurrently with the g2^p experiment and required a different target polarization direction. Therefore, a rotatable target chamber was needed for transition between configurations. This talk will introduce the concept of DNP and describe the unique challenges faced in the design of the g2^p target. Performance indicators such as polarization decay rate and anneal time will be presented along with preliminary polarimetry results.

  13. Study of the decay mechanism for B→pp¯K and B→pp¯π

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belle Collaboration; Wei, J.-T.; Wang, M.-Z.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Balagura, V.; Barberio, E.; Bay, A.; Belous, K.; Bitenc, U.; Bondar, A.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Browder, T. E.; Chang, P.; Chao, Y.; Chen, A.; Chen, K.-F.; Cheon, B. G.; Chiang, C.-C.; Cho, I.-S.; Choi, Y.; Choi, Y. K.; Cole, S.; Danilov, M.; Dash, M.; Drutskoy, A.; Eidelman, S.; Fratina, S.; Gabyshev, N.; Golob, B.; Ha, H.; Haba, J.; Hara, T.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; Hazumi, M.; Heffernan, D.; Hokuue, T.; Hoshi, Y.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Hyun, H. J.; Iijima, T.; Ikado, K.; Inami, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, M.; Iwasaki, Y.; Kah, D. H.; Kang, J. H.; Katayama, N.; Kawai, H.; Kawasaki, T.; Kichimi, H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, K.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kumar, R.; Kuo, C. C.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. E.; Lesiak, T.; Lin, S.-W.; Liu, Y.; Liventsev, D.; Mandl, F.; Matsumoto, T.; Matyja, A.; McOnie, S.; Medvedeva, T.; Mitaroff, W.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyake, H.; Miyata, H.; Miyazaki, Y.; Mizuk, R.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nishida, S.; Nitoh, O.; Ogawa, S.; Ohshima, T.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, S. L.; Ozaki, H.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Park, K. S.; Pestotnik, R.; Piilonen, L. E.; Sahoo, H.; Sakai, Y.; Schneider, O.; Schümann, J.; Seidl, R.; Senyo, K.; Sevior, M. E.; Shapkin, M.; Shibuya, H.; Shiu, J.-G.; Singh, J. B.; Sokolov, A.; Somov, A.; Stanič, S.; Starič, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tajima, O.; Takasaki, F.; Tamai, K.; Tanaka, M.; Taylor, G. N.; Teramoto, Y.; Tian, X. C.; Tikhomirov, I.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uehara, S.; Ueno, K.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Urquijo, P.; Varner, G.; Varvell, K. E.; Vervink, K.; Villa, S.; Vinokurova, A.; Wang, C. C.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, Y.; Wedd, R.; Won, E.; Yamaguchi, A.; Yamashita, Y.; Yamauchi, M.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2008-01-01

    We study the characteristics of the low mass pp¯ enhancements near threshold in the three-body decays B→pp¯K and B→pp¯π. We observe that the proton polar angle distributions in the pp¯ helicity frame in the two decays have the opposite polarity, and measure the forward-backward asymmetries as a function of the pp¯ mass for the pp¯K mode. We also search for the intermediate two-body decays, B→p¯Δ and B→pΔ, and set upper limits on their branching fractions. These results are obtained from a 414 fb data sample that contains 449×10BB¯ events collected near the ϒ(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy ee collider.

  14. Study of the decay mechanism for B+ → ppbarK+ and B+ → ppbarπ+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, J.-T.; Wang, M.-Z.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Balagura, V.; Barberio, E.; Bay, A.; Belous, K.; Bitenc, U.; Bondar, A.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Browder, T. E.; Chang, P.; Chao, Y.; Chen, A.; Chen, K.-F.; Cheon, B. G.; Chiang, C.-C.; Cho, I.-S.; Choi, Y.; Choi, Y. K.; Cole, S.; Danilov, M.; Dash, M.; Drutskoy, A.; Eidelman, S.; Fratina, S.; Gabyshev, N.; Golob, B.; Ha, H.; Haba, J.; Hara, T.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; Hazumi, M.; Heffernan, D.; Hokuue, T.; Hoshi, Y.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Hyun, H. J.; Iijima, T.; Ikado, K.; Inami, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, M.; Iwasaki, Y.; Kah, D. H.; Kang, J. H.; Katayama, N.; Kawai, H.; Kawasaki, T.; Kichimi, H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, K.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kumar, R.; Kuo, C. C.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. E.; Lesiak, T.; Lin, S.-W.; Liu, Y.; Liventsev, D.; Mandl, F.; Matsumoto, T.; Matyja, A.; McOnie, S.; Medvedeva, T.; Mitaroff, W.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyake, H.; Miyata, H.; Miyazaki, Y.; Mizuk, R.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nishida, S.; Nitoh, O.; Ogawa, S.; Ohshima, T.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, S. L.; Ozaki, H.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Park, K. S.; Pestotnik, R.; Piilonen, L. E.; Sahoo, H.; Sakai, Y.; Schneider, O.; Schümann, J.; Seidl, R.; Senyo, K.; Sevior, M. E.; Shapkin, M.; Shibuya, H.; Shiu, J.-G.; Singh, J. B.; Sokolov, A.; Somov, A.; Stanič, S.; Starič, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tajima, O.; Takasaki, F.; Tamai, K.; Tanaka, M.; Taylor, G. N.; Teramoto, Y.; Tian, X. C.; Tikhomirov, I.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uehara, S.; Ueno, K.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Urquijo, P.; Varner, G.; Varvell, K. E.; Vervink, K.; Villa, S.; Vinokurova, A.; Wang, C. C.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, Y.; Wedd, R.; Won, E.; Yamaguchi, A.; Yamashita, Y.; Yamauchi, M.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zupanc, A.; Belle Collaboration

    2008-01-01

    We study the characteristics of the low mass ppbar enhancements near threshold in the three-body decays B+ → ppbarK+ and B+ → ppbarπ+. We observe that the proton polar angle distributions in the ppbar helicity frame in the two decays have the opposite polarity, and measure the forward-backward asymmetries as a function of the ppbar mass for the ppbarK+ mode. We also search for the intermediate two-body decays, B+ →pbarΔ++ and B+ → pΔbar0, and set upper limits on their branching fractions. These results are obtained from a 414 fb-1 data sample that contains 449 ×106 BBbar events collected near the ϒ (4 S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider.

  15. Reexamining the light neutrino exchange mechanism of the 0 ν β β decay with left- and right-handed leptonic and hadronic currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Štefánik, Dušan; Dvornický, Rastislav; Šimkovic, Fedor; Vogel, Petr

    2015-11-01

    The extension of the Majorana neutrino mass mechanism of the neutrinoless double-beta decay (0 ν β β ) with the inclusion of right-handed leptonic and hadronic currents is revisited. While only the exchange of light neutrinos is assumed, the s1 /2 and p1 /2 states of emitted electrons as well as recoil corrections to the nucleon currents are taken into account. Within the standard approximations the decay rate is factorized into a sum of products of kinematical phase-space factors, nuclear matrix elements, and the fundamental parameters that characterize the lepton number violation. Unlike in the previous treatments, the induced pseudoscalar term of hadron current is included, resulting in additional nuclear matrix elements. An improved numerical computation of the phase-space factors is presented, based on the exact Dirac wave functions of the s1 /2 and p1 /2 electrons with finite nuclear size and electron screening taken into account. The dependence of values of these phase-space factors on the different approximation schemes used in evaluation of electron wave functions is discussed. The upper limits for effective neutrino mass and the parameters <λ > and <η > characterizing the right-handed current mechanism are deduced from data on the 0 ν β β decay of Ge76 and Xe136 using nuclear matrix elements calculated within the nuclear shell model and quasiparticle random phase approximation. The differential decay rates, i.e., the angular correlations and the single electron energy distributions for various combinations of the total lepton number violating parameters that can help to disentangle the possible mechanism, are described and discussed.

  16. Decay Mechanism of NO3(•) Radical in Highly Concentrated Nitrate and Nitric Acidic Solutions in the Absence and Presence of Hydrazine.

    PubMed

    Garaix, Guillaume; Horne, Gregory P; Venault, Laurent; Moisy, Philippe; Pimblott, Simon M; Marignier, Jean Louis; Mostafavi, Mehran

    2016-06-09

    The decay mechanism of NO3(•) has been determined through a combination of experiment and calculation for 7 mol dm(-3) solutions of deaerated aqueous LiNO3 and HNO3, in the absence and presence of hydrazine (N2H4, N2H5(+), and N2H6(2+)). In the absence of hydrazine, the predominant NO3(•) decay pathways are strongly dependent upon the pH of the solution. For neat, neutral pH LiNO3 solutions (7 mol dm(-3)), NO3(•) produced by the pulse is fully consumed within 160 μs by OH(•) (37%), H2O (29%), NO2(-) (17%), and NO2 (17%). For acidic HNO3 solutions (7 mol dm(-3)), radiolytically produced NO3(•) is predominantly consumed within 1 ms by HNO2 (15%) and NO2 (80%). Intervening formulations exhibit the mechanistic transition from neat LiNO3 to neat HNO3. In highly acidic nitric acid solution, hydrazine exists mainly as N2H5(+) and N2H6(2+), both of which rapidly consume NO3(•) in addition to other decay mechanisms, with rate constants of 2.9 (±0.9) × 10(7) and 1.3 (±0.3) × 10(6) dm(3) mol(-1) s(-1), respectively.

  17. Radioactive decay.

    PubMed

    Groch, M W

    1998-01-01

    When a parent radionuclide decays to its daughter radionuclide by means of alpha, beta, or isomeric transition, the decay follows an exponential form, which is characterized by the decay constant lambda. The decay constant represents the probability per unit time that a single radioatom will decay. The decay equation can be used to provide a useful expression for radionuclide decay, the half-life, the time when 50% of the radioatoms present will have decayed. Radiotracer half-life has direct implications in nuclear imaging, radiation therapy, and radiation safety because radionuclide half-life affects the ability to evaluate tracer kinetics and create appropriate nuclear images and also affects organ, tumor, and whole-body radiation dose. The number of radioatoms present in a sample is equal to the activity, defined as the number of transitions per unit time, divided by the decay constant; the mass of radioatoms present in a sample can be calculated to determine the specific activity (activity per unit mass). The dynamic relationship between the number of parent and daughter atoms present over time may lead to radioactive equilibrium, which takes two forms--secular and transient--and has direct relevance to generator-produced radionuclides.

  18. Chelating efficiency and thermal, mechanical and decay resistance performances of chitosan copper complex in wood-polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Lu, John Z; Duan, Xinfang; Wu, Qinglin; Lian, Kun

    2008-09-01

    Wood-polymer composites (WPC) have been extensively used for building products, outdoor decking, automotive, packaging materials, and other applications. WPC is subject to fungal and termite attacks due to wood components enveloped in the thermoplastic matrix. Much effort has been made to improve decay resistance of WPC using zinc borate and other chemicals. In this study, chitosan copper complex (CCC) compounds were used as a potential preservative for wood-HDPE composites. CCC was formulated by reacting chitosan with copper salts under controlled conditions. Inductively coupled plasma (ICP) analytical results indicated that chitosan had high chelating efficiency with copper cations. CCC-treated wood-HDPE composites had a thermal behavior similar to untreated and zinc borate-treated wood-HDPE composites. Incorporation of CCC in wood-HDPE composites did not significantly influence board density of the resultant composites, but had a negative effect on tensile strength at high CCC concentration. In comparison with solid wood and the untreated wood-HDPE composites, 3% CCC-treated wood-HDPE composites significantly improved the decay resistance against white rot fungus Trametes versicolor and brown rot fungus Gloeophyllum trabeum. Especially, CCC-treated wood-HDPE composites were more effectively against the brown rot than the untreated and chitosan-treated wood-HDPE composites. Moreover, CCC-treated wood-HDPE composites performed well as zinc borate-treated wood-HDPE composites on fungal decay resistance. Accordingly, CCC can be effectively used as a preservative for WPC.

  19. General decay rates for the wave equation with mixed-type damping mechanisms on unbounded domain with finite measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias Silva, Flávio R.; Nascimento, Flávio A. F.; Rodrigues, José H.

    2015-12-01

    This paper is concerned with the study of the uniform decay rates of the energy associated with the wave equation subject to a locally distributed viscoelastic dissipation and a nonlinear frictional damping u_{tt}- Δ u+ int_0^t g(t-s)div[a(x)nabla u(s)] ds + b(x) f(u_t)=0 quad on quad Ω×]0,infty[, where {Ωsubset{R}^n, n≥ 2} is an unbounded open set with finite measure and unbounded smooth boundary {partialΩ = Γ}. Supposing that the localization functions satisfy the "competitive" assumption {a(x)+b(x)≥δ>0} for all {xin Ω} and the relaxation function g satisfies certain nonlinear differential inequalities introduced by Lasiecka et al. (J Math Phys 54(3):031504, 2013), we extend to our considered domain the prior results of Cavalcanti and Oquendo (SIAM J Control Optim 42(4):1310-1324, 2003). In addition, while in Cavalcanti and Oquendo (2003) the authors just consider exponential and polynomial decay rate estimates, in the present article general decay rate estimates are obtained.

  20. Hypernuclear Weak Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itonaga, K.; Motoba, T.

    The recent theoretical studies of Lambda-hypernuclear weak decaysof the nonmesonic and pi-mesonic ones are developed with the aim to disclose the link between the experimental decay observables and the underlying basic weak decay interactions and the weak decay mechanisms. The expressions of the nonmesonic decay rates Gamma_{nm} and the decay asymmetry parameter alpha_1 of protons from the polarized hypernuclei are presented in the shell model framework. We then introduce the meson theoretical Lambda N -> NN interactions which include the one-meson exchanges, the correlated-2pi exchanges, and the chiral-pair-meson exchanges. The features of meson exchange potentials and their roles on the nonmesonic decays are discussed. With the adoption of the pi + 2pi/rho + 2pi/sigma + omega + K + rhopi/a_1 + sigmapi/a_1 exchange potentials, we have carried out the systematic calculations of the nonmesonic decay observables for light-to-heavy hypernuclei. The present model can account for the available experimental data of the decay rates, Gamma_n/Gamma_p ratios, and the intrinsic asymmetry parameters alpha_Lambda (alpha_Lambda is related to alpha_1) of emitted protons well and consistently within the error bars. The hypernuclear lifetimes are evaluated by converting the total weak decay rates Gamma_{tot} = Gamma_pi + Gamma_{nm} to tau, which exhibit saturation property for the hypernuclear mass A ≥ 30 and agree grossly well with experimental data for the mass range from light to heavy hypernuclei except for the very light ones. Future extensions of the model and the remaining problems are also mentioned. The pi-mesonic weak processes are briefly surveyed, and the calculations and predictions are compared and confirmed by the recent high precision FINUDA pi-mesonic decay data. This shows that the theoretical basis seems to be firmly grounded.

  1. High-temperature sustainability of strong fiber Bragg gratings written into Sb-Ge-codoped photosensitive fiber: decay mechanisms involved during annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yonghang; He, Jinglei; Sun, Tong; Grattan, Kenneth T. V.

    2004-03-01

    An antimony-germanium- (Sb-Ge-) codoped fiber specially designed for the fabrication of fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) with high temperature sustainability has been developed. The photosensitivity and the high-temperature sustainability of FBGs that have been written into this fiber were tested. The results obtained showed that the FBG written into this fiber has a very high temperature sustainability of 900 °C. A decay mechanism that involves cation hopping is presented to explain the observed high temperature sustainability of the grating written into this fiber.

  2. Multiple Decay Mechanisms and 2D‐UV Spectroscopic Fingerprints of Singlet Excited Solvated Adenine‐Uracil Monophosphate

    PubMed Central

    Li, Quansong; Giussani, Angelo; Segarra‐Martí, Javier; Nenov, Artur; Rivalta, Ivan; Voityuk, Alexander A.; Mukamel, Shaul; Roca‐Sanjuán, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The decay channels of singlet excited adenine uracil monophosphate (ApU) in water are studied with CASPT2//CASSCF:MM potential energy calculations and simulation of the 2D‐UV spectroscopic fingerprints with the aim of elucidating the role of the different electronic states of the stacked conformer in the excited state dynamics. The adenine 1La state can decay without a barrier to a conical intersection with the ground state. In contrast, the adenine 1Lb and uracil S(U) states have minima that are separated from the intersections by sizeable barriers. Depending on the backbone conformation, the CT state can undergo inter‐base hydrogen transfer and decay to the ground state through a conical intersection, or it can yield a long‐lived minimum stabilized by a hydrogen bond between the two ribose rings. This suggests that the 1Lb, S(U) and CT states of the stacked conformer may all contribute to the experimental lifetimes of 18 and 240 ps. We have also simulated the time evolution of the 2D‐UV spectra and provide the specific fingerprint of each species in a recommended probe window between 25 000 and 38 000 cm−1 in which decongested, clearly distinguishable spectra can be obtained. This is expected to allow the mechanistic scenarios to be discerned in the near future with the help of the corresponding experiments. Our results reveal the complexity of the photophysics of the relatively small ApU system, and the potential of 2D‐UV spectroscopy to disentangle the photophysics of multichromophoric systems. PMID:27113273

  3. Managing Linguistic Data Summaries in Advanced P2P Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayek, Rabab; Raschia, Guillaume; Valduriez, Patrick; Mouaddib, Noureddine

    As the amount of stored data increases, data localization techniques become no longer sufficient in P2P systems. A practical approach is to rely on compact database summaries rather than raw database records, whose access is costly in large P2P systems. In this chapter, we describe a solution for managing linguistic data summaries in advanced P2P applications which are dealing with semantically rich data. The produced summaries are synthetic, multidimensional views over relational tables. The novelty of this proposal relies on the double summary exploitation in distributed P2P systems. First, as semantic indexes, they support locating relevant nodes based on their data descriptions. Second, due to their intelligibility, these summaries can be directly queried and thus approximately answer a query without the need for exploring original data. The proposed solution consists first in defining a summary model for hierarchical P2P systems. Second, appropriate algorithms for summary creation and maintenance are presented. A query processing mechanism, which relies on summary querying, is then proposed to demonstrate the benefits that might be obtained from summary exploitation.

  4. Two-proton radioactivity and three-body decay. V. Improved momentum distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigorenko, L. V.; Egorova, I. A.; Zhukov, M. V.; Charity, R. J.; Miernik, K.

    2010-07-01

    Nowadays quantum-mechanical theory allows one to reliably calculate the processes of 2p radioactivity (true three-body decays) and the corresponding energy and angular correlations up to distances of the order of 103 fm. However, the precision of modern experiments has now become sufficient to indicate some deficiency of the predicted theoretical distributions. In this paper we discuss extrapolation along the classical trajectories as a method to improve the convergence of the theoretical energy and angular correlations at very large distances (of the order of atomic distances), where only long-range Coulomb forces are still operating. The precision of this approach is demonstrated using the “exactly” solvable semianalytical models with simplified three-body Hamiltonians. It is also demonstrated that for heavy 2p emitters, the 2p decay momentum distributions can be sensitive to the effect of screening by atomic electrons. We compare theoretical results with available experimental data.

  5. Regulated inositol-requiring protein 1-dependent decay as a mechanism of corin RNA and protein deficiency in advanced human systolic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Lee, Rebecca; Xu, Bin; Rame, J Eduardo; Felkin, Leanne E; Barton, Paul; Dries, Daniel L

    2014-12-01

    The compensatory actions of the endogenous natriuretic peptide system require adequate processing of natriuretic peptide pro‐hormones into biologically active, carboxyl‐terminal fragments. Natriuretic peptide pro‐peptide processing is accomplished by corin, a transmembrane serine protease expressed by cardiomyocytes. Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) processing is inadequate in advanced heart failure and is independently associated with adverse outcomes; however, the molecular mechanisms causing impaired BNP processing are not understood. We hypothesized that the development of endoplasmic reticulum stress in cardiomyocytes in advanced heart failure triggers inositol‐requiring protein 1 (IRE1)‐dependent corin mRNA decay, which would favor a molecular substrate favoring impaired natriuretic peptide pro‐peptide processing. Two independent samples of hearts obtained from patients with advanced heart failure at transplant demonstrated that corin RNA was reduced as Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP)/BNP RNA increased. Increases in spliced X‐box protein 1, a marker for IRE1‐endoribonuclease activity, were associated with decreased corin RNA. Moreover, ≈50% of the hearts demonstrated significant reductions in corin RNA and protein as compared to the nonfailing control sample. In vitro experiments demonstrated that induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress in cultured cardiomyocytes with thapsigargin activated IRE1's endoribonuclease activity and time‐dependent reductions in corin mRNA. In HL‐1 cells, overexpression of IRE1 activated IRE1 endoribonuclease activity and caused corin mRNA decay, whereas IRE1‐RNA interference with shRNA attenuated corin mRNA decay after induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress with thapsigargin. Pre‐treatment of cells with Actinomycin D to inhibit transcription did not alter the magnitude or time course of thapsigargin‐induced corin mRNA decline, supporting the hypothesis that this was the result of IRE1

  6. Regulated Inositol‐Requiring Protein 1‐Dependent Decay as a Mechanism of Corin RNA and Protein Deficiency in Advanced Human Systolic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Rebecca; Xu, Bin; Rame, J. Eduardo; Felkin, Leanne E.; Barton, Paul; Dries, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    Background The compensatory actions of the endogenous natriuretic peptide system require adequate processing of natriuretic peptide pro‐hormones into biologically active, carboxyl‐terminal fragments. Natriuretic peptide pro‐peptide processing is accomplished by corin, a transmembrane serine protease expressed by cardiomyocytes. Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) processing is inadequate in advanced heart failure and is independently associated with adverse outcomes; however, the molecular mechanisms causing impaired BNP processing are not understood. We hypothesized that the development of endoplasmic reticulum stress in cardiomyocytes in advanced heart failure triggers inositol‐requiring protein 1 (IRE1)‐dependent corin mRNA decay, which would favor a molecular substrate favoring impaired natriuretic peptide pro‐peptide processing. Methods and Results Two independent samples of hearts obtained from patients with advanced heart failure at transplant demonstrated that corin RNA was reduced as Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP)/BNP RNA increased. Increases in spliced X‐box protein 1, a marker for IRE1‐endoribonuclease activity, were associated with decreased corin RNA. Moreover, ≈50% of the hearts demonstrated significant reductions in corin RNA and protein as compared to the nonfailing control sample. In vitro experiments demonstrated that induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress in cultured cardiomyocytes with thapsigargin activated IRE1's endoribonuclease activity and time‐dependent reductions in corin mRNA. In HL‐1 cells, overexpression of IRE1 activated IRE1 endoribonuclease activity and caused corin mRNA decay, whereas IRE1‐RNA interference with shRNA attenuated corin mRNA decay after induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress with thapsigargin. Pre‐treatment of cells with Actinomycin D to inhibit transcription did not alter the magnitude or time course of thapsigargin‐induced corin mRNA decline, supporting the hypothesis that this was

  7. Root proliferation in decaying roots and old root channels: A nutrient conservation mechanism in oligotrophic mangrove forests?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKee, K.L.

    2001-01-01

    1. In oligotrophic habitats, proliferation of roots in nutrient-rich microsites may contribute to overall nutrient conservation by plants. Peat-based soils on mangrove islands in Belize are characterized by the presence of decaying roots and numerous old root channels (0.1-3.5 cm diameter) that become filled with living and highly branched roots of Rhizophora mangle and Avicennia germinans. The objectives of this study were to quantify the proliferation of roots in these microsites and to determine what causes this response. 2. Channels formed by the refractory remains of mangrove roots accounted for only 1-2% of total soil volume, but the proportion of roots found within channels varied from 9 to 24% of total live mass. Successive generations of roots growing inside increasingly smaller root channels were also found. 3. When artificial channels constructed of PVC pipe were buried in the peat for 2 years, those filled with nutrient-rich organic matter had six times more roots than empty or sand-filled channels, indicating a response to greater nutrient availability rather than to greater space or less impedance to root growth. 4. Root proliferation inside decaying roots may improve recovery of nutrients released from decomposing tissues before they can be leached or immobilized in this intertidal environment. Greatest root proliferation in channels occurred in interior forest zones characterized by greater soil waterlogging, which suggests that this may be a strategy for nutrient capture that minimizes oxygen losses from the whole root system. 5. Improved efficiency of nutrient acquisition at the individual plant level has implications for nutrient economy at the ecosystem level and may explain, in part, how mangroves persist and grow in nutrient-poor environments.

  8. Data Sharing in P2P Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayek, Rabab; Raschia, Guillaume; Valduriez, Patrick; Mouaddib, Noureddine

    In this chapter, we survey P2P data sharing systems. All along, we focus on the evolution from simple file-sharing systems, with limited functionalities, to Peer Data Management Systems (PDMS) that support advanced applications with more sophisticated data management techniques. Advanced P2P applications are dealing with semantically rich data (e.g., XML documents, relational tables), using a high-level SQL-like query language. We start our survey with an overview over the existing P2P network architectures, and the associated routing protocols. Then, we discuss data indexing techniques based on their distribution degree and the semantics they can capture from the underlying data. We also discuss schema management techniques which allow integrating heterogeneous data. We conclude by discussing the techniques proposed for processing complex queries (e.g., range and join queries). Complex query facilities are necessary for advanced applications which require a high level of search expressiveness. This last part shows the lack of querying techniques that allow for an approximate query answering.

  9. Short-time dynamics and decay mechanism of 2(1H)-pyridinone upon excitation to the light-absorbing S4(21𝝅 𝝅* ) state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Teng-Shuo; Xue, Jia-Dan; Zheng, Xuming; Xie, Bin-Bin; Fang, Wei-Hai

    2017-03-01

    The excited-state structural dynamics and the decay mechanism of 2(1H)-pyridinone (NHP) after excitation to the S4(21π π* ) light-absorbing state were studied using resonance Raman spectroscopy and complete-active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) calculations. The B-band absorption cross-section and the corresponding absolute resonance Raman cross-sections were simulated using a simple model based on time-dependent wave-packet theory. The geometric structures of the singlet electronic excited states and their curve-crossing points were optimized at the CASSCF level of theory. The obtained short-time structural dynamics in easy-to-visualize internal coordinates were then compared with the CASSCF-predicted structural-parameter changes of S4(21π π* ) /S3 (21nπ* ) -MIN , S4(21π π* ) /S1 (11nπ* ) -MIN , and S4(21π π* ) -MIN . Our results indicate that the initial population of NHP in the S4 state bifurcates in or near the Franck-Condon region, leading to two predominant (S4S3-MIN and S4S1-MIN) internal conversion pathways. The lowest-lying S2(11π π* ) excited state is finally formed via subsequent internal conversions S3(21nπ* ) /S2 (11π π* ) -MIN and S1(11nπ* ) /S2 (11π π* ) -MIN. The enol-keto tautomeric mechanism does not seem to play a role. The decay mechanism in the singlet realm is proposed.

  10. New mechanism for Type-II seesaw dominance in SO(10) with low-mass , RH neutrinos, and verifiable LFV, LNV and proton decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Bidyut Prava; Parida, Mina Ketan

    2015-05-01

    The dominance of Type-II seesaw mechanism for the neutrino masses has attracted considerable attention because of a number of advantages. We show a novel approach to achieve Type-II seesaw dominance in non-supersymmetric SO(10) grand unification where a low-mass boson and specific patterns of right-handed neutrino masses are predicted within the accessible energy range of the Large Hadron Collider. In spite of the high value of the seesaw scale, - GeV, the model predicts new dominant contributions to neutrino-less double beta decay in the - channel close to the current experimental limits via exchanges of heavier singlet fermions used as essential ingredients of this model even when the light active neutrino masses are normally hierarchical or invertedly hierarchical. We obtain upper bounds on the lightest sterile neutrino mass GeV, GeV and GeV for normally hierarchical, invertedly hierarchical and quasi-degenerate patterns of light-neutrino masses, respectively. The underlying non-unitarity effects lead to lepton flavour violating decay branching ratios within the reach of ongoing or planned experiments and the leptonic CP-violation parameter nearly two order larger than the quark sector. Some of the predicted values on the proton lifetime for are found to be within the currently accessible search limits. Other aspects of model applications including leptogenesis etc. are briefly indicated.

  11. DNA Compaction by Yeast Mitochondrial Protein ABF2p

    SciTech Connect

    Friddle, R W; Klare, J E; Noy, A; Corzett, M; Balhorn, R; Baskin, R J; Martin, S S; Baldwin, E P

    2003-05-09

    We used high resolution Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to image compaction of linear and circular DNA by the yeast mitochondrial protein ABF2p , which plays a major role in maintaining mitochondrial DNA. AFM images show that protein binding induces drastic bends in the DNA backbone for both linear and circular DNA. At high concentration of ABF2p DNA collapses into a tight globular structure. We quantified the compaction of linear DNA by measuring the end-to-end distance of the DNA molecule at increasing concentrations of ABF2p. We also derived a polymer statistical mechanics model that gives quantitative description of compaction observed in our experiments. This model shows that a number of sharp bends in the DNA backbone is often sufficient to cause DNA compaction. Comparison of our model with the experimental data showed excellent quantitative correlation and allowed us to determine binding characteristics for ABF2. Our studies indicate that ABF2 compacts DNA through a novel mechanism that involves bending of DNA backbone. We discuss the implications of such a mechanism for mitochondrial DNA maintenance.

  12. Excited states of a significantly ruffled porphyrin: computational study on structure-induced rapid decay mechanism via intersystem crossing.

    PubMed

    Bai, Fu-Quan; Nakatani, Naoki; Nakayama, Akira; Hasegawa, Jun-ya

    2014-06-12

    The compound meso-tetra-tert-butylporphyrin (H2T(t-Bu)P) is a significantly ruffled porphyrin and known as a good quencher. Compared with planar porphyrins, H2T(t-Bu)P showed bathochromic shift and rapid radiationless decay of the (1)(π, π*) excited state. Density functional theory, approximated coupled-cluster theory, and complete active space self-consistent field method level calculations were performed for the potential energy surface (PES) of the low-lying singlet and triplet states of H2T(t-Bu)P. The origin of the bathochromic shift in the absorption and fluorescence spectra was attributed to both steric distortions of the ring and electronic effects of the substituents. The nonradiative deactivation process of H2T(t-Bu)P via intersystem crossing (ISC) is proposed as (S1 → T2 → T1 → S0). Along a nonplanar distortion angle, the PESs of the S1 and T2 states are very close to each other, which suggests that many channels exist for ISC. For the T1 → S0 transition, minimum energy ISC points were located, and spin-orbit coupling (SOC) was evaluated. The present results indicate that the ISC can also occur at the T1/S0 intersection, in addition to the vibrational SOC promoted by specific normal modes.

  13. Solvent effects on emission yield and lifetime for coumarin laser dyes. Requirements for a rotatory decay mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, G. II; Jackson, W.R.; Choi, C.Y.; Bergmark, W.R.

    1985-01-17

    Photophysical parameters have been determined for coumarin laser dyes in a variety of organic solvents, water, and mixed media. The response of fluorescence emission yield and lifetime to changes in solvent polarity was a sensitive function of coumarin substitution pattern. Most important were substituent influences which resulted in enlarged excited-state dipole moments for the fluorescent state. For dyes displaying sharp reductions in emission yield and lifetime with increased solvent polarity, protic media and particularly water were most effective in inhibiting fluorescence. The temperature dependence of emission yield and lifetime was measured for two solvent-sensitive dyes in acetonitrile and in a highly viscous solvent, glycerol. The quenching of coumarin fluorescence by oxygen for dyes with lifetimes > 2 ns was also observed. The dominant photophysical features for coumarin dyes are discussed in terms of emission from an intramolecular charge-transfer (ICT) excited state and an important nonradiative decay path involving rotation of the amine functionality (7-position) leading to a twisted intramolecular CT state (TICT). The role of excited-state bond orders involving the rotating group in determining the importance of interconversions of the type ICT ..-->.. TICT is discussed. 73 references, 1 figure, 3 tables.

  14. Capacity Decay Mechanism of Microporous Separator-Based All-Vanadium Redox Flow Batteries and its Recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Bin; Luo, Qingtao; Wei, Xiaoliang; Nie, Zimin; Thomsen, Edwin; Chen, Baowei; Sprenkle, Vincent; Wang, Wei

    2013-10-29

    For all vanadium redox flow batteries (VRBs) with porous separators as membranes, convection effect is found to play a dominant role in the capacity decay of the cells over cycling by investigating the relationship between electrical performances and electrolyte compositions at both positive and negative sides. Although the concentration of total vanadium ions hardly changes at both sides over cycling, the net transfer of solutions from one side to another and thus asymmetrical valance of vanadium ions at both sides lead to the capacity fading and lower energy efficiency, which is confirmed to result from the hydraulic pressure differential at both sides of separators. In this paper, the hydraulic pressures of solutions at both sides can be in-situ monitored, and regulated by varying the gas pressures in electrolyte tanks. It is found that the capacity can be stabilized and the net transfer of solutions can be prevented by slightly tailoring the hydraulic pressure differential at both sides of separators, which, however, doesn’t work for Nafion membranes, suggesting the negligible convection factor in flow cells using Nafion membranes. Therefore, the possibility of porous separators allows long-term running for VRBs without capacity loss, highlighting a new pathway to develop membranes used in VRBs.

  15. Kinetics of the Reactions of F((sup 2)P) and Cl((sup 2)P) with HNO3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wine, P. H.; Wells, J. R.; Nicovich, J. M.

    1997-01-01

    The kinetics of the reactions of HNO3 with fluorine (k(sub 1)) and Chlorine (k(sub 2)) atoms have been studied by using a time-resolved long-path laser absorption technique to monitor the appearance of product NO3 radicals following 351-nm pulsed laser photolysis of X2/HNO3/He mixtures (X = F,Cl). Absolute rate coefficients for the F((sup 2)P) + HNO reaction have been determined over the temperature range 260-373 K. Between 260 and 320 K, the data are adequately represented by the Arrhenius expression k(sub 1)(T) = (6.0 +/- 2.6) x 10(exp -12) exp[(40 +/- 120)/T]cu cm/(molecule.s). Between 335 and 373 K, the rate coefficient is found to be (2.0 +/- 0.3) x 10(exp -11)cu cm/(molecule.s) independent of temperature. The observed temperature dependence suggests that reaction proceeds via competing direct abstraction and complex pathways. No NO3 production was observed in the experiments with X equals Cl, thus establishing that k(sub 2)(298 K) is less than 2 x 10(exp -16) cu cm/(molecule.s). The Cl((sup 2)P) + HNO reaction was also investigated by using a pulsed laser photolysis-resonance fluorescence technique to monitor the decay of Cl((sup 2)P). Upper limit values for k(sub 2) obtained from these experiments, in units of 10(exp -16)cu cm/(molecule.s), are 13 at 298 K and 10 at 400 K.

  16. Kinetics of the Reactions of F((sup 2)P) and Cl((sup 2)P) with HNO3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wine, P. H.; Wells, J. R.; Nicovich, J. M.

    1997-01-01

    The kinetics of the reactions of HNO3 with fluorine (k(sub 1)) and Chlorine (k(sub 2)) atoms have been studied by using a time-resolved long-path laser absorption technique to monitor the appearance of product NO3 radicals following 351-nm pulsed laser photolysis of X2/HNO3/He mixtures (X = F,Cl). Absolute rate coefficients for the F((sup 2)P) + HNO reaction have been determined over the temperature range 260-373 K. Between 260 and 320 K, the data are adequately represented by the Arrhenius expression k(sub 1)(T) = (6.0 +/- 2.6) x 10(exp -12) exp[(40 +/- 120)/T]cu cm/(molecule.s). Between 335 and 373 K, the rate coefficient is found to be (2.0 +/- 0.3) x 10(exp -11)cu cm/(molecule.s) independent of temperature. The observed temperature dependence suggests that reaction proceeds via competing direct abstraction and complex pathways. No NO3 production was observed in the experiments with X equals Cl, thus establishing that k(sub 2)(298 K) is less than 2 x 10(exp -16) cu cm/(molecule.s). The Cl((sup 2)P) + HNO reaction was also investigated by using a pulsed laser photolysis-resonance fluorescence technique to monitor the decay of Cl((sup 2)P). Upper limit values for k(sub 2) obtained from these experiments, in units of 10(exp -16)cu cm/(molecule.s), are 13 at 298 K and 10 at 400 K.

  17. Is radioactive decay really exponential?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aston, P. J.

    2012-03-01

    Radioactive decay of an unstable isotope is widely believed to be exponential. This view is supported by experiments on rapidly decaying isotopes but is more difficult to verify for slowly decaying isotopes. The decay of 14C can be calibrated over a period of 12550 years by comparing radiocarbon dates with dates obtained from dendrochronology. It is well known that this approach shows that radiocarbon dates of over 3000 years are in error, which is generally attributed to past variation in atmospheric levels of 14C. We note that predicted atmospheric variation (assuming exponential decay) does not agree with results from modelling, and that theoretical quantum mechanics does not predict exact exponential decay. We give mathematical arguments that non-exponential decay should be expected for slowly decaying isotopes and explore the consequences of non-exponential decay. We propose an experimental test of this prediction of non-exponential decay for 14C. If confirmed, a foundation stone of current dating methods will have been removed, requiring a radical reappraisal both of radioisotope dating methods and of currently predicted dates obtained using these methods.

  18. Acid sensitive background potassium channels K2P3.1 and K2P9.1 undergo rapid dynamin-dependent endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Mant, Alexandra; Williams, Sarah E; O'Kelly, Ita

    2013-01-01

    Acid-sensitive, two-pore domain potassium channels, K2P3.1 and K2P9.1, are implicated in cardiac and nervous tissue responses to hormones, neurotransmitters and drugs. K2P3.1 and K2P9.1 leak potassium from the cell at rest and directly impact membrane potential. Hence altering channel number on the cell surface drives changes in cellular electrical properties. The rate of K2P3.1 and K2P9.1 delivery to and recovery from the plasma membrane determines both channel number at the cell surface and potassium leak from cells. This study examines the endocytosis of K2P3.1 and K2P9.1. Plasma membrane biotinylation was used to follow the fate of internalized GFP-tagged rat K2P3.1 and K2P9.1 transiently expressed in HeLa cells. Confocal fluorescence images were analyzed using Imaris software, which revealed that both channels are endocytosed by a dynamin-dependent mechanism and over the course of 60 min, move progressively toward the nucleus. Endogenous endocytosis of human K2P3.1 and K2P9.1 was examined in the lung carcinoma cell line, A549. Endogenous channels are endocytosed over a similar time-scale to the channels expressed transiently in HeLa cells. These findings both validate the use of recombinant systems and identify an endogenous model system in which K2P3.1 and K2P9.1 trafficking can be further studied. PMID:23807092

  19. Acid sensitive background potassium channels K2P3.1 and K2P9.1 undergo rapid dynamin-dependent endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Mant, Alexandra; Williams, Sarah; O'Kelly, Ita

    2013-01-01

    Acid-sensitive, two-pore domain potassium channels, K(2P)3.1 and K(2P)9.1, are implicated in cardiac and nervous tissue responses to hormones, neurotransmitters and drugs. K(2P)3.1 and K(2P)9.1 leak potassium from the cell at rest and directly impact membrane potential. Hence altering channel number on the cell surface drives changes in cellular electrical properties. The rate of K(2P)3.1 and K(2P)9.1 delivery to and recovery from the plasma membrane determines both channel number at the cell surface and potassium leak from cells. This study examines the endocytosis of K(2P)3.1 and K(2P)9.1. Plasma membrane biotinylation was used to follow the fate of internalized GFP-tagged rat K(2P)3.1 and K(2P)9.1 transiently expressed in HeLa cells. Confocal fluorescence images were analyzed using Imaris software, which revealed that both channels are endocytosed by a dynamin-dependent mechanism and over the course of 60 min, move progressively toward the nucleus. Endogenous endocytosis of human K(2P)3.1 and K(2P)9.1 was examined in the lung carcinoma cell line, A549. Endogenous channels are endocytosed over a similar time-scale to the channels expressed transiently in HeLa cells. These findings both validate the use of recombinant systems and identify an endogenous model system in which K(2P)3.1 and K(2P)9.1 trafficking can be further studied.

  20. Eukaryotic initiation factor 4G suppresses nonsense-mediated mRNA decay by two genetically separable mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Joncourt, Raphael; Eberle, Andrea B; Rufener, Simone C; Mühlemann, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD), which is best known for degrading mRNAs with premature termination codons (PTCs), is thought to be triggered by aberrant translation termination at stop codons located in an environment of the mRNP that is devoid of signals necessary for proper termination. In mammals, the cytoplasmic poly(A)-binding protein 1 (PABPC1) has been reported to promote correct termination and therewith antagonize NMD by interacting with the eukaryotic release factors 1 (eRF1) and 3 (eRF3). Using tethering assays in which proteins of interest are recruited as MS2 fusions to a NMD reporter transcript, we show that the three N-terminal RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) of PABPC1 are sufficient to antagonize NMD, while the eRF3-interacting C-terminal domain is dispensable. The RRM1-3 portion of PABPC1 interacts with eukaryotic initiation factor 4G (eIF4G) and tethering of eIF4G to the NMD reporter also suppresses NMD. We identified the interactions of the eIF4G N-terminus with PABPC1 and the eIF4G core domain with eIF3 as two genetically separable features that independently enable tethered eIF4G to inhibit NMD. Collectively, our results reveal a function of PABPC1, eIF4G and eIF3 in translation termination and NMD suppression, and they provide additional evidence for a tight coupling between translation termination and initiation.

  1. The Memory Trace Supporting Lose-Shift Responding Decays Rapidly after Reward Omission and Is Distinct from Other Learning Mechanisms in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Thapa, Rajat

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The propensity of animals to shift choices immediately after unexpectedly poor reinforcement outcomes is a pervasive strategy across species and tasks. We report here that the memory supporting such lose-shift responding in rats rapidly decays during the intertrial interval and persists throughout training and testing on a binary choice task, despite being a suboptimal strategy. Lose-shift responding is not positively correlated with the prevalence and temporal dependence of win-stay responding, and it is inconsistent with predictions of reinforcement learning on the task. These data provide further evidence that win-stay and lose-shift are mediated by dissociated neural mechanisms and indicate that lose-shift responding presents a potential confound for the study of choice in the many operant choice tasks with short intertrial intervals. We propose that this immediate lose-shift responding is an intrinsic feature of the brain’s choice mechanisms that is engaged as a choice reflex and works in parallel with reinforcement learning and other control mechanisms to guide action selection. PMID:27896312

  2. Localizing gene regulation reveals a staggered wood decay mechanism for the brown rot fungus Postia placenta

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jiwei; Presley, Gerald N.; Hammel, Kenneth E.; Ryu, Jae-San; Menke, Jon R.; Figueroa, Melania; Hu, Dehong; Orr, Galya; Schilling, Jonathan S.

    2016-09-12

    The fungi that cause brown rot of wood are essential contributors to biomass recycling in forest ecosystems. Their highly efficient cellulolytic systems, which may have practical applications, apparently depend on a combination of two mechanisms: nonselective oxidation of the lignocellulose by reactive oxygen species (ROS) coupled with hydrolysis of the polysaccharide components by a limited set of glycoside hydrolases (GHs). Since the production of strongly oxidizing ROS appears incompatible with the operation of GHs, it has been proposed that the fungi regulate ROS production by maintaining concentration gradients of the chelated metal ions they use to generate extracellular oxidants. However, calculations have indicated that this protective mechanism is physically infeasible. We examined a different hypothesis, that expression of ROS and GH components is temporally staggered by brown rot fungi in wood. We sectioned thin wafers of spruce and aspen that had been colonized directionally by Postia placenta and measured expression of relevant genes and some of the encoded enzymes, thus using the spatial distribution of fungal hyphae to resolve a fine-scale temporal sequence. Hierarchical clustering of gene expression for eight oxidoreductases thought to have a role in ROS production and of eight GHs revealed a zone of oxidoreductase upregulation at the hyphal front that persisted about 48 h before upregulation of the GHs. Additional evidence for differential expression was provided by localization of endoglucanase, xylanase, mannanase, and laccase activities in the colonized wood. Our results support a two-step mechanism for brown rot, in which substrate oxidation precedes enzymatic hydrolysis.

  3. Near-IR laser generation of a high-energy conformer of L-alanine and the mechanism of its decay in a low-temperature nitrogen matrix.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Cláudio M; Lapinski, Leszek; Fausto, Rui; Reva, Igor

    2013-03-28

    Monomers of L-alanine (ALA) were isolated in cryogenic nitrogen matrices at 14 K. Two conformers were identified for the compound trapped from the gas-phase into the solid nitrogen environment. The potential energy surface (PES) of ALA was theoretically calculated at the MP2 and QCISD levels. Twelve minima were located on this PES. Seven low-energy conformers fall within the 0-10 kJ mol(-1) range and should be appreciably populated in the equilibrium gas phase prior to deposition. Observation of only two forms in the matrices is explained in terms of calculated barriers to conformational rearrangements. All conformers with the O=C-O-H moiety in the cis orientation are separated by low barriers and collapse to the most stable form I during deposition of the matrix onto the low-temperature substrate. The second observed form II has the O=C-O-H group in the trans orientation. The remaining trans forms have very high relative energies (between 24 and 30 kJ mol(-1)) and are not populated. The high-energy trans form VI, that differs from I only by rotation of the OH group, was found to be separated from other conformers by barriers that are high enough to open a perspective for its stabilization in a matrix. The form VI was photoproduced in situ by narrow-band near-infrared irradiation of the samples at 6935-6910 cm(-1), where the first overtone of the OH stretching vibration in form I appears. The photogenerated form VI decays in N2 matrices back to conformer I with a characteristic decay time of ∼15 min. The mechanism of the VI → I relaxation is rationalized in terms of the proton tunneling.

  4. Mechanism and dynamics of intramolecular triplet state decay of 1-propyl-4-thiouracil and its α-methyl-substituted derivatives studied in perfluoro-1,3-dimethylcyclohexane.

    PubMed

    Wenska, Grazyna; Taras-Goślińska, Katarzyna; Łukaszewicz, Adam; Burdziński, Gotard; Koput, Jacek; Maciejewski, Andrzej

    2011-08-01

    The absorption, phosphorescence and phosphorescence excitation spectra, phosphorescence quantum yields, and T(1) excited state lifetimes of four 4-thiouracil derivatives were measured for the first time in chemically inert and very weakly interacting perfluoro-1,3-dimethylcyclohexane at room temperature. The set of the 4-thiouracil derivatives comprises 1-propyl-4-thiouracil (PTU) and the related compounds having a methyl substituent at the position α to the thiocarbonyl group, namely 1-propyl-4-thiothymine (PTT), 1,3-dimethyl-4-thiouracil (DMTU), and 1-methyl-3-trideuteriomethyl-4-thiouracil ([D(3)]DMTU). Quantitative information on the intramolecular decay of the T(1) excited state of the four 4-thiouracil derivatives is presented, and the mechanism and dynamics of this process are discussed. In the absence of self quenching and solvent induced deactivation, the T(1) decay of the four 4-thiouracil derivatives was dominated by intramolecular nonradiative processes (NR). The values of the rate constant k(NR) in DMTU and [D(3)]DMTU are about 4 times larger than that in PTT and about 3 times larger than that in PTU. The reasons for the enhanced nonradiative rate constant in DMTU are discussed. It is concluded that the faster rate of the nonradiative processes in DMTU is related to a larger contribution from mixing of the T(2) (nπ*) state into the lowest energy T(1) (ππ*) state, as compared to the analogous coupling in PTU and PTT. This conclusion is supported by ab initio calculations performed at the EOM-CC2/aug-cc-pVDZ level of theory. The energy spacing between the T(2) (nπ*) and T(1) (ππ*) states is estimated to be about 500, 1100, and 2000 cm(-1) for DMTU, PTU, and PTT, respectively. Among the three compounds in question, the predicted energy spacing is thus the smallest for DMTU. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry and Owner Societies 2011

  5. Radiative lifetimes of the 2s2p2(4P) metastable levels of N III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, Z.; Kwong, Victor H. S.; Parkinson, W. H.

    1993-01-01

    The radiative decay rates of N III 175 nm intersystem lines were measured in the laboratory by recording the time dependence of photon intensities emitted as the 2s2p2(4P) metastable term of N(2+) ions decay to the 2s22p(2P0) ground term. A cylindrical radio frequency ion trap was used to store the electron impact-produced N(2+) ions. The radiative decay signals were analyzed by multiexponential least-squares fits to the data. The measured radiative decay rates to the ground term are 1019(+/- 64)/s for 4P sub 1/2, 74.5(+/- 5.4)/s for 4P sub 3/2, and 308( +/- 22)/s for 4P sub 5/2. Comparisons of the measured values with theoretical values are presented.

  6. Radiative lifetimes of the 2s2p2(4P) metastable levels of N III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, Z.; Kwong, Victor H. S.; Parkinson, W. H.

    1993-01-01

    The radiative decay rates of N III 175 nm intersystem lines were measured in the laboratory by recording the time dependence of photon intensities emitted as the 2s2p2(4P) metastable term of N(2+) ions decay to the 2s22p(2P0) ground term. A cylindrical radio frequency ion trap was used to store the electron impact-produced N(2+) ions. The radiative decay signals were analyzed by multiexponential least-squares fits to the data. The measured radiative decay rates to the ground term are 1019(+/- 64)/s for 4P sub 1/2, 74.5(+/- 5.4)/s for 4P sub 3/2, and 308( +/- 22)/s for 4P sub 5/2. Comparisons of the measured values with theoretical values are presented.

  7. Use of microphysical relationships to discern growth/decay mechanisms of cloud droplets with focus on Z-LWC relationships.

    SciTech Connect

    Liu,Y.; Daum, P.H.; Yum, S.S.; Wang, J.

    2008-05-01

    Cloud droplet size distributions hence the key microphysical quantities (e.g., radar reflectivity, droplet concentration, liquid water content, relative dispersion, and mean-volume radius) are determined by different physical mechanisms, including pre-cloud aerosols as CCNs, cloud updraft, and various turbulent entrainment-mixing processes. Therefore, different relationships among these microphysical properties are expected in response to these various mechanisms. The effect of turbulent entrainment-mixing processes is particularly vexing, with different entrainment-mixing processes likely leading to different microphysical relationships. Cloud radar has been widely used to infer the cloud liquid water content (L) from the measurement of radar reflectivity (Z) using a Z-L relationship. Existing Z-L expressions have been often obtained empirically, and differ substantially (Khain et al. 2008). The discrepancy among Z-L relations, which has been hindering the application of cloud radar in measuring cloud properties, likely stems from the different relationships between the relevant microphysical properties caused by different physical processes. This study first analyzes the Z-L relationship theoretically, and identify the key microphysical properties that affect this relationship, and then address the effects of various processes on the Z-L relationship by discerning the characteristics of the relationships between the relative dispersion, droplet concentration, liquid water content, and mean-volume radius calculated from in-situ measurements of cloud droplet size distributions. Effort is also made to further relate the microphysical relationships to physical processes such as turbulent entrainment-mixing.

  8. Mechanical property loss and the occurrence of wood decay during experimental outdoor aging of wood based panels

    Treesearch

    Charles G. Carll; Alex C. Wiedenhoeft

    2007-01-01

    Small specimens of sheathing-grade oriented strandboard (OSB) and sheathing-grade plywood were evaluated for retention of mechanical properties in exterior exposure over a series of exposure times. In contrast to previous studies of this nature, specimens at prolonged exposure times were also evaluated (in something more than a cursory manner) for presence of decay....

  9. Genome, transcriptome, and secretome analysis of wood decay fungus Postia placenta supports unique mechanisms of lignocellulose conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Diego; Challacombe, Jean; Morgenstern, Ingo; Hibbett, David; Schmoll, Monika; Kubicek, Christian P.; Ferreira, Patricia; Ruiz-Duenas, Francisco J.; Martinez, Angel T.; Kersten, Phil; Hammel, Kenneth E.; Vanden Wymelenberg, Amber; Gaskell, Jill; Lindquist, Erika; Sabat, Grzegorz; Splinter BonDurant, Sandra; Larrondo, Luis F.; Canessa, Paulo; Vicuna, Rafael; Yadav, Jagjit; Doddapaneni, Harshavardhan; Subramanian, Venkataramanan; Pisabarro, Antonio G.; Lavín, José L.; Oguiza, José A.; Master, Emma; Henrissat, Bernard; Coutinho, Pedro M.; Harris, Paul; Magnuson, Jon Karl; Baker, Scott E.; Bruno, Kenneth; Kenealy, William; Hoegger, Patrik J.; Kües, Ursula; Ramaiya, Preethi; Lucas, Susan; Salamov, Asaf; Shapiro, Harris; Tu, Hank; Chee, Christine L.; Misra, Monica; Xie, Gary; Teter, Sarah; Yaver, Debbie; James, Tim; Mokrejs, Martin; Pospisek, Martin; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Brettin, Thomas; Rokhsar, Dan; Berka, Randy; Cullen, Dan

    2009-02-04

    Brown-rot fungi such as Postia placenta are common inhabitants of forest ecosystems and are also largely responsible for the destructive decay of wooden structures. Rapid depolymerization of cellulose is a distinguishing feature of brown-rot, but the biochemical mechanisms and underlying genetics are poorly understood. Systematic examination of the P. placenta genome, transcriptome, and secretome revealed unique extracellular enzyme systems, including an unusual repertoire of extracellular glycoside hydrolases. Genes encoding exocellobiohydrolases and cellulose-binding domains, typical of cellulolytic microbes, are absent in this efficient cellulose-degrading fungus. When P. placenta was grown in media containing cellulose as sole carbon source, transcripts corresponding to many hemicellulases and to a single putative β-1-4 endoglucanase were expressed at high levels relative to glucose grown cultures. These transcript profiles were confirmed by direct identification of peptides by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Also upregulated under cellulolytic culture conditions were putative iron reductases, quinone reductase, and structurally divergent oxidases potentially involved in extracellular generation of Fe(II) and H2O2. These observations are consistent with a biodegradative role for Fenton chemistry in which Fe(II) and H2O2 react to form hydroxyl radicals, highly reactive oxidants capable of depolymerizing cellulose. The P. placenta genome resources provide unparalleled opportunities for investigating such unusual mechanisms of cellulose conversion. More broadly, the genome offers insight into the diversification of lignocellulose degrading mechanisms in fungi. In particular, comparisons between P. placenta and the closely related white-rot fungus, Phanerochaete chrysosporium support an evolutionary shift from white-rot to brown-rot during which efficient depolymerization of lignin was lost.

  10. Protein Kinase A Is Central for Forward Transport of Two-pore Domain Potassium Channels K2P3.1 and K2P9.1*

    PubMed Central

    Mant, Alexandra; Elliott, David; Eyers, Patrick A.; O'Kelly, Ita M.

    2011-01-01

    Acid-sensitive two-pore domain potassium channels (K2P3.1 and K2P9.1) play key roles in both physiological and pathophysiological mechanisms, the most fundamental of which is control of resting membrane potential of cells in which they are expressed. These background “leak” channels are constitutively active once expressed at the plasma membrane, and hence tight control of their targeting and surface expression is fundamental to the regulation of K+ flux and cell excitability. The chaperone protein, 14-3-3, binds to a critical phosphorylated serine in the channel C termini of K2P3.1 and K2P9.1 (Ser393 and Ser373, respectively) and overcomes retention in the endoplasmic reticulum by βCOP. We sought to identify the kinase responsible for phosphorylation of the terminal serine in human and rat variants of K2P3.1 and K2P9.1. Adopting a bioinformatic approach, three candidate protein kinases were identified: cAMP-dependent protein kinase, ribosomal S6 kinase, and protein kinase C. In vitro phosphorylation assays were utilized to determine the ability of the candidate kinases to phosphorylate the channel C termini. Electrophysiological measurements of human K2P3.1 transiently expressed in HEK293 cells and cell surface assays of GFP-tagged K2P3.1 and K2P9.1 enabled the determination of the functional implications of phosphorylation by specific kinases. All of our findings support the conclusion that cAMP-dependent protein kinase is responsible for the phosphorylation of the terminal serine in both K2P3.1 and K2P9.1. PMID:21357689

  11. Protein kinase A is central for forward transport of two-pore domain potassium channels K2P3.1 and K2P9.1.

    PubMed

    Mant, Alexandra; Elliott, David; Eyers, Patrick A; O'Kelly, Ita M

    2011-04-22

    Acid-sensitive two-pore domain potassium channels (K2P3.1 and K2P9.1) play key roles in both physiological and pathophysiological mechanisms, the most fundamental of which is control of resting membrane potential of cells in which they are expressed. These background "leak" channels are constitutively active once expressed at the plasma membrane, and hence tight control of their targeting and surface expression is fundamental to the regulation of K(+) flux and cell excitability. The chaperone protein, 14-3-3, binds to a critical phosphorylated serine in the channel C termini of K2P3.1 and K2P9.1 (Ser(393) and Ser(373), respectively) and overcomes retention in the endoplasmic reticulum by βCOP. We sought to identify the kinase responsible for phosphorylation of the terminal serine in human and rat variants of K2P3.1 and K2P9.1. Adopting a bioinformatic approach, three candidate protein kinases were identified: cAMP-dependent protein kinase, ribosomal S6 kinase, and protein kinase C. In vitro phosphorylation assays were utilized to determine the ability of the candidate kinases to phosphorylate the channel C termini. Electrophysiological measurements of human K2P3.1 transiently expressed in HEK293 cells and cell surface assays of GFP-tagged K2P3.1 and K2P9.1 enabled the determination of the functional implications of phosphorylation by specific kinases. All of our findings support the conclusion that cAMP-dependent protein kinase is responsible for the phosphorylation of the terminal serine in both K2P3.1 and K2P9.1.

  12. SUMOylation silences heterodimeric TASK potassium channels containing K2P1 subunits in cerebellar granule neurons.

    PubMed

    Plant, Leigh D; Zuniga, Leandro; Araki, Dan; Marks, Jeremy D; Goldstein, Steve A N

    2012-11-20

    The standing outward K(+) current (IKso) governs the response of cerebellar granule neurons to natural and medicinal stimuli including volatile anesthetics. We showed that SUMOylation silenced half of IKso at the surface of cerebellar granule neurons because the underlying channels were heterodimeric assemblies of K2P1, a subunit subject to SUMOylation, and the TASK (two-P domain, acid-sensitive K(+)) channel subunits K2P3 or K2P9. The heterodimeric channels comprised the acid-sensitive portion of IKso and mediated its response to halothane. We anticipate that SUMOylation also influences sensation and homeostatic mechanisms in mammals through TASK channels formed with K2P1.

  13. Tensor interactions and τ decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godina Nava, J. J.; López Castro, G.

    1995-09-01

    We study the effects of charged tensor weak currents on the strangeness-changing decays of the τ lepton. First, we use the available information on the K+e3 form factors to obtain B(τ--->K-π0ντ)~10-4 when the Kπ system is produced in an antisymmetric tensor configuration. Then we propose a mechanism for the direct production of the K*2(1430) in τ decays. Using the current upper limit on this decay we set a bound on the symmetric tensor interactions.

  14. Why X(3915) is so Narrow as a χc0(2P) State?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yue; Wang, Guo-Li; Wang, Tianhong; Ju, Wan-Li

    2013-11-01

    New resonance X(3915) was identified as the charmonium χc0(2P) by BaBar Collaboration, but there still seems an open question of this assignment: why its full width is so narrow? To answer this question, we calculate the Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka (OZI)-allowed strong decays X(3915)-> D \\bar D, where X(3915) is assigned as a χc0(2P) state, and estimate its full width in the cooperating framework of 3P0 model and the Bethe-Salpeter (BS) method using the Mandelstam formalism, during which nonperturbative quantum chromodynamics (QCD) effects of the hadronic matrix elements are well-considered by overlapping integral over the relativistic Salpeter wave functions of the initial and final states. We find the node structure of χc0(2P) wave function resulting in the narrow width of X(3915) and show the dependence of the decay width on the variation of the initial mass of X(3915). We point out that the rate of (Γ (X(3915)-> D+ D-))/(Γ (X(3915)-> D0 /line{D *0} is crucial to confirm whether X(3915) is the χc0(2P) state or not.

  15. Fuzzy-rule-based Adaptive Resource Control for Information Sharing in P2P Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhengping; Wu, Hao

    With more and more peer-to-peer (P2P) technologies available for online collaboration and information sharing, people can launch more and more collaborative work in online social networks with friends, colleagues, and even strangers. Without face-to-face interactions, the question of who can be trusted and then share information with becomes a big concern of a user in these online social networks. This paper introduces an adaptive control service using fuzzy logic in preference definition for P2P information sharing control, and designs a novel decision-making mechanism using formal fuzzy rules and reasoning mechanisms adjusting P2P information sharing status following individual users' preferences. Applications of this adaptive control service into different information sharing environments show that this service can provide a convenient and accurate P2P information sharing control for individual users in P2P networks.

  16. ISOLDE decay station for decay studies of interest in astrophysics and exotic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fynbo, Hans; Kirseboom, Oliver S.; Tengblad, Olof

    2017-04-01

    We report on studies of the beta-decays of 31Ar, {}{20,21}Mg, and 16N performed at the ISOLDE decay station (IDS) at CERN. These studies illustrate how beta-decays measured with the IDS can be used to extract information of astrophysical interest, or to study the structure and decay mechanism of exotic nuclei. We discuss the specific implementation of the IDS designed for this type of studies including detector setups and data acquisition.

  17. P2P Reputation Management Through Social Networking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Despotovic, Zoran

    Reputation systems offer a viable solution to the problem of risk reduction in online communities, in situation in which other mechanism such as litigation or security cannot help. Building on the assumption that its participating entities engage in repeated interactions, a reputation system can either signal what happened in the past or aggregate the past feedback in such a way as to influence the future actions of the concerned entity. In the former case, the concerned entity's behavior is seen as static, while the sent signal is expected to be indicative of the entity's future actions. In the latter case, behavior is dynamic in the sense that the entity can adjust it given the observed feedback, while the purpose of the reputation system is to induce adjustments according to the designer's needs. In this chapter, we discuss these two classes of solutions in detail. In particular, we investigate how they apply to P2P networks, what additional problems and difficulties the P2P environment introduces and what scalable solutions to these problems the current research offers.

  18. Semileptonic Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Luth, Vera G.; /SLAC

    2012-10-02

    The following is an overview of the measurements of the CKM matrix elements |V{sub cb}| and |V{sub ub}| that are based on detailed studies of semileptonic B decays by the BABAR and Belle Collaborations and major advances in QCD calculations. In addition, a new and improved measurement of the ratios R(D{sup (*)}) = {Beta}({bar B} {yields} D{sup (*)}{tau}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}})/{Beta}({bar B} {yields} D{sup (*)}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}) is presented. Here D{sup (*)} refers to a D or a D* meson and {ell} is either e or {mu}. The results, R(D) = 0.440 {+-} 0.058 {+-} 0.042 and R(D*) = 0.332 {+-} 0.024 {+-} 0.018, exceed the Standard Model expectations by 2.0{sigma} and 2.7{sigma}, respectively. Taken together, they disagree with these expectations at the 3.4{sigma} level. The excess of events cannot be explained by a charged Higgs boson in the type II two-Higgs-doublet model.

  19. Therapeutic targeting of two-pore-domain potassium (K(2P)) channels in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Wiedmann, Felix; Schmidt, Constanze; Lugenbiel, Patrick; Staudacher, Ingo; Rahm, Ann-Kathrin; Seyler, Claudia; Schweizer, Patrick A; Katus, Hugo A; Thomas, Dierk

    2016-05-01

    The improvement of treatment strategies in cardiovascular medicine is an ongoing process that requires constant optimization. The ability of a therapeutic intervention to prevent cardiovascular pathology largely depends on its capacity to suppress the underlying mechanisms. Attenuation or reversal of disease-specific pathways has emerged as a promising paradigm, providing a mechanistic rationale for patient-tailored therapy. Two-pore-domain K(+) (K(2P)) channels conduct outward K(+) currents that stabilize the resting membrane potential and facilitate action potential repolarization. K(2P) expression in the cardiovascular system and polymodal K2P current regulation suggest functional significance and potential therapeutic roles of the channels. Recent work has focused primarily on K(2P)1.1 [tandem of pore domains in a weak inwardly rectifying K(+) channel (TWIK)-1], K(2P)2.1 [TWIK-related K(+) channel (TREK)-1], and K(2P)3.1 [TWIK-related acid-sensitive K(+) channel (TASK)-1] channels and their role in heart and vessels. K(2P) currents have been implicated in atrial and ventricular arrhythmogenesis and in setting the vascular tone. Furthermore, the association of genetic alterations in K(2P)3.1 channels with atrial fibrillation, cardiac conduction disorders and pulmonary arterial hypertension demonstrates the relevance of the channels in cardiovascular disease. The function, regulation and clinical significance of cardiovascular K(2P) channels are summarized in the present review, and therapeutic options are emphasized. © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  20. Pseudogene CYP4Z2P 3′UTR promotes angiogenesis in breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Lufeng; Li, Xiaoman; Gu, Yi; Ma, Yihua; Xi, Tao

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • A new critical role of pseudogene CYP4Z2P 3′UTR in breast cancer is proposed. • We examine the level of pseudogene CYP4Z2P 3′UTR in breast cancer tissues. • The functions of CYP4Z2P 3′UTR and mechanism were studied. • The mechanism provides new insights for the breast cancer progression. - Abstract: Pseudogenes have long been marked as “false” genes, which are similar with real genes but have no apparent function. The 3′UTR is well-known to regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally. Our recent evidence, however, indicates novel functional roles of pseudogene CYP4Z2P 3′UTR (Z2P-UTR). We found that ectopic expression of Z2P-UTR in breast cancer cells significantly increased the expression of VEGF-A without affecting cell proliferation in vitro. Meanwhile, conditioned medium (CM) from Z2P-UTR overexpression cells enhanced proliferation, migration and tube formation of HUVEC, and promoted angiogenesis in ex vivo models. Also, CM increased the expression of VEGFR2 in HUVEC. Our data suggest that Z2P-UTR can promote breast cancer angiogenesis partly via paracrine pathway of VEGF-A/VEGFR2.

  1. Providing VoD Streaming Using P2P Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedro Muñoz-Gea, Juan; Malgosa-Sanahuja, Josemaria; Manzanares-Lopez, Pilar; Carlos Sanchez-Aarnoutse, Juan

    Overlays and P2P systems, initially developed to support IP multicast and file-sharing, have moved beyond that functionality. They are also proving to be key technologies for the delivery of video streaming. Recently, there have been a number of successful deployments for "live" P2P streaming. However, the question remains open whether similar P2P technologies can be used to provide VoD (Video-On-Demand) services. A P2P VoD service is more challenging to design than a P2P live streaming system because the system should allow users arriving at arbitrary times to watch (arbitrary parts of) the video.

  2. An anti-attack model based on complex network theory in P2P networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Hao; Lu, Songnian; Zhao, Dandan; Zhang, Aixin; Li, Jianhua

    2012-04-01

    Complex network theory is a useful way to study many real systems. In this paper, an anti-attack model based on complex network theory is introduced. The mechanism of this model is based on a dynamic compensation process and a reverse percolation process in P2P networks. The main purpose of the paper is: (i) a dynamic compensation process can turn an attacked P2P network into a power-law (PL) network with exponential cutoff; (ii) a local healing process can restore the maximum degree of peers in an attacked P2P network to a normal level; (iii) a restoring process based on reverse percolation theory connects the fragmentary peers of an attacked P2P network together into a giant connected component. In this way, the model based on complex network theory can be effectively utilized for anti-attack and protection purposes in P2P networks.

  3. The observation of decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudbery, A.

    1984-10-01

    It is argued that the usual formulation of quantum mechanics does not satisfactorily describe physical change: the standard formula for a transition probability does not follow from the postulates. Instead, these yield the paradox that a watched pot never bolls (sometimes called "Zeno's paradox"). The paradox is reviewed and the possibility of avoiding it is discussed. A simple model of a decaying system is analysed; the system is then considered in continuous interaction with an apparatus designed to observe the time development of the system. In the light of this analysis, the possibility is considered of replacing the usual (diserete) projection postulate by a continuous projection postulate.

  4. Risk Management of P2P Internet Financing Service Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yalei, Li

    2017-09-01

    Since 2005, the world’s first P2P Internet financing service platform Zopa in UK was introduced, in the development of “Internet +” trend, P2P Internet financing service platform has been developed rapidly. In 2007, China’s first P2P platform “filming loan” was established, marking the P2P Internet financing service platform to enter China and the rapid development. At the same time, China’s P2P Internet financing service platform also appeared in different forms of risk. This paper focuses on the analysis of the causes of risk of P2P Internet financing service platform and the performance of risk management process. It provides a solution to the Internet risk management plan, and explains the risk management system of the whole P2P Internet financing service platform and the future development direction.

  5. Ethanol separation from ethanol-water solution by ultrasonic atomization and its proposed mechanism based on parametric decay instability of capillary wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Masanori; Matsuura, Kazuo; Fujii, Toshitaka

    2001-02-01

    We show the experimental data of selective ethanol separation from ethanol-water solution, using ultrasonic atomization. Pure ethanol could be obtained directly from a solution with several mol% ethanol-water solution at 10 °C. This result can be explained in terms of parametric decay instability of capillary wave, in which high localization and accumulation of acoustic energy occur, leading to ultrasonic atomization. That is, parametric decay instability condenses the energy of longitudinal waves in a highly localized surface area of the capillary wave, and causes ultrasonic atomization.

  6. Proton decay theory

    SciTech Connect

    Marciano, W.J.

    1983-01-01

    Topics include minimal SU(5) predictions, gauge boson mediated proton decay, uncertainties in tau/sub p/, Higgs scalar effects, proton decay via Higgs scalars, supersymmetric SU(5), dimension 5 operators and proton decay, and Higgs scalars and proton decay. (WHK)

  7. N-glycosylation-dependent control of functional expression of background potassium channels K2P3.1 and K2P9.1.

    PubMed

    Mant, Alexandra; Williams, Sarah; Roncoroni, Laura; Lowry, Eleanor; Johnson, Daniel; O'Kelly, Ita

    2013-02-01

    Two-pore domain potassium (K(2P)) channels play fundamental roles in cellular processes by enabling a constitutive leak of potassium from cells in which they are expressed, thus influencing cellular membrane potential and activity. Hence, regulation of these channels is of critical importance to cellular function. A key regulatory mechanism of K(2P) channels is the control of their cell surface expression. Membrane protein delivery to and retrieval from the cell surface is controlled by their passage through the secretory and endocytic pathways, and post-translational modifications regulate their progression through these pathways. All but one of the K(2P) channels possess consensus N-linked glycosylation sites, and here we demonstrate that the conserved putative N-glycosylation site in K(2P)3.1 and K(2P)9.1 is a glycan acceptor site. Patch clamp analysis revealed that disruption of channel glycosylation reduced K(2P)3.1 current, and flow cytometry was instrumental in attributing this to a decreased number of channels on the cell surface. Similar findings were observed when cells were cultured in reduced glucose concentrations. Disruption of N-linked glycosylation has less of an effect on K(2P)9.1, with a small reduction in number of channels on the surface observed, but no functional implications detected. Because nonglycosylated channels appear to pass through the secretory pathway in a manner comparable with glycosylated channels, the evidence presented here suggests that the decreased number of nonglycosylated K(2P)3.1 channels on the cell surface may be due to their decreased stability.

  8. N-Glycosylation-dependent Control of Functional Expression of Background Potassium Channels K2P3.1 and K2P9.1*

    PubMed Central

    Mant, Alexandra; Williams, Sarah; Roncoroni, Laura; Lowry, Eleanor; Johnson, Daniel; O'Kelly, Ita

    2013-01-01

    Two-pore domain potassium (K2P) channels play fundamental roles in cellular processes by enabling a constitutive leak of potassium from cells in which they are expressed, thus influencing cellular membrane potential and activity. Hence, regulation of these channels is of critical importance to cellular function. A key regulatory mechanism of K2P channels is the control of their cell surface expression. Membrane protein delivery to and retrieval from the cell surface is controlled by their passage through the secretory and endocytic pathways, and post-translational modifications regulate their progression through these pathways. All but one of the K2P channels possess consensus N-linked glycosylation sites, and here we demonstrate that the conserved putative N-glycosylation site in K2P3.1 and K2P9.1 is a glycan acceptor site. Patch clamp analysis revealed that disruption of channel glycosylation reduced K2P3.1 current, and flow cytometry was instrumental in attributing this to a decreased number of channels on the cell surface. Similar findings were observed when cells were cultured in reduced glucose concentrations. Disruption of N-linked glycosylation has less of an effect on K2P9.1, with a small reduction in number of channels on the surface observed, but no functional implications detected. Because nonglycosylated channels appear to pass through the secretory pathway in a manner comparable with glycosylated channels, the evidence presented here suggests that the decreased number of nonglycosylated K2P3.1 channels on the cell surface may be due to their decreased stability. PMID:23250752

  9. Genomewide analysis of polysaccharides degrading enzymes in 11 white- and brown-rot Polyporales provides insight into mechanisms of wood decay

    Treesearch

    Chiaki Hori; Jill Gaskell; Kiyohiko Igarashi; Masahiro Samejima; David Hibbett; Bernard Henrissat; Dan Cullen

    2013-01-01

    To degrade the polysaccharides, wood-decay fungi secrete a variety of glycoside hydrolases (GHs) and carbohydrate esterases (CEs) classified into various sequence-based families of carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZys) and their appended carbohydrate-binding modules (CBM). Oxidative enzymes, such as cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH) and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase (...

  10. The methyl- and aza-substituent effects on nonradiative decay mechanisms of uracil in water: a transient absorption study in the UV region.

    PubMed

    Hua, XinZhong; Hua, LinQiang; Liu, XiaoJun

    2016-05-18

    The nonradiative decay dynamics of photo-excited uracil (Ura) and its derivatives, i.e., thymine (5-methyluracil, Thy), 6-methyluracil (6-MU) and 6-azauracil (6-AU) in water, has been studied using a femtosecond transient absorption method. The molecules are populated in the lowest (1)ππ* state by a pump pulse at 266 nm, and a broadband continuum in the deep UV region is then employed as the probe. The extension of the continuous UV probe down to 250 nm enables us to investigate comprehensively the population dynamics of the ground states for those molecules and to uncover the substituent effects on nonradiative decay dynamics of uracil. Vibrational cooling in the ground states of Ura, Thy and 6-MU has been directly observed for the first time, providing solid evidence of the ultrafast (1)ππ* → S0 decay. In combination with the ground state bleaching signals, it is consolidated that their lowest (1)ππ* state decays via two parallel pathways, i.e., (1)ππ* → S0 and (1)ππ* → (1)nπ*. Moreover, the contribution of the (1)ππ* → (1)nπ* channel is found to be much smaller for Thy or 6-MU than for Ura. Different from methyl-substitution, the initial (1)ππ* state of the aza-substituent 6-AU decays primarily to the (1)nπ* state, while the (1)ππ* → S0 channel can be negligible. Our study provides a comprehensive understanding of the substituent effects on the excited-state dynamics of uracil in water.

  11. A Scalable P2P Video Streaming Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ivan

    Peer-to-peer (P2P) networking technique represents a vast potential to overcome many constraints in the conventional content distribution networks, especially for the real-time applications such as P2P streaming. In this chapter, a P2P streaming system is examined, and the proposed system combines multiple-description source coding technique and a scalable streaming infrastructure. The proposed system aims to gradually offload congested traffic from a centralized bottleneck to the under-utilized P2P networks and hence, provides seamless transitions from client/server streaming to centralized P2P streaming and to decentralized P2P streaming. The performance of the proposed framework is evaluated in terms of video frame loss rate, which reflects the probability of freeze video frames.

  12. Photo induced three body decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maul, Christof; Gericke, Karl-Heinz

    The photo induced three body decay : ABC hnu A B C, where a molecule ABC decays into three fragments A, B and C upon irradiation, is reviewed. Various experimental and theoretical techniques for the investigation of this reaction and their application to a wide range of molecular species are discussed. Emphasis is laid on the distinction between concerted and stepwise processes, consisting of one single or two consecutive kinetic events, respectively. The concerted fragmentation scheme is further classified as being of either synchronous or asynchronous character, depending on whether or not the bond breaking processes take place in unison. The three body decays of acetone, azomethane and s-tetrazine are discussed in detail as prototypes for these mechanisms. A novel kinematic analysis approach, based on the evaluation of fragment kinetic energy distributions, is presented and applied to the ultraviolet photodissociation of phosgene. Competing pathways are found to be operative, dominated by the asynchronous concerted mechanism with preferential forward scattering of the carbon monoxide fragment. The synchronous concerted decay plays a minor role under significant excitation of the in-plane and out-of-plane bending modes of the parent molecule. Finally the power of the newly developed method for the analysis of the three body decay of a small polyatomic molecule is highlighted.

  13. Supporting Collaboration and Creativity Through Mobile P2P Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wierzbicki, Adam; Datta, Anwitaman; Żaczek, Łukasz; Rzadca, Krzysztof

    Among many potential applications of mobile P2P systems, collaboration applications are among the most prominent. Examples of applications such as Groove (although not intended for mobile networks), collaboration tools for disaster recovery (the WORKPAD project), and Skype's collaboration extensions, all demonstrate the potential of P2P collaborative applications. Yet, the development of such applications for mobile P2P systems is still difficult because of the lack of middleware.

  14. Wood decay fungi of subalpine conifer forests

    Treesearch

    Jessie A. Glaeser; Kevin T. Smith

    2016-01-01

    One of the fundamental skills needed for hazard tree assessment is the evaluation of decay. This may be a difficult task as we usually only use external symptoms (wounds, basal swellings, decayed branch stubs), signs (mushrooms, fungal crusts or brackets) or mechanical/indirect sampling methods (drilling, electrical or sonic resistance) to estimate the amount of sound...

  15. Effects of tensor interactions in τ decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López Castro, G.; Godina Nava, J. J.

    1996-02-01

    Recent claims for the observation of antisymmetric weak tensor currents in π and K decays are considered for the case of τ→Kπν transitions. Assuming the existence of symmetric tensor currents, a mechanism for the direct production of the K2*(1430) spin-2 meson in τ decays is proposed.

  16. Holographic decays of large-spin mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peeters, Kasper; Sonnenschein, Jacob; Zamaklar, Marija

    2006-02-01

    We study the decay process of large-spin mesons in the context of the gauge/string duality, using generic properties of confining backgrounds and systems with flavour branes. In the string picture, meson decay corresponds to the quantum-mechanical process in which a string rotating on the IR ``wall'' fluctuates, touches a flavour brane and splits into two smaller strings. This process automatically encodes flavour conservation as well as the Zweig rule. We show that the decay width computed in the string picture is in remarkable agreement with the decay width obtained using the phenomenological Lund model.

  17. Isotope shifts of the 2 p3 /2-2 p1 /2 transition in B-like ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubova, N. A.; Malyshev, A. V.; Tupitsyn, I. I.; Shabaev, V. M.; Kozhedub, Y. S.; Plunien, G.; Brandau, C.; Stöhlker, Th.

    2016-05-01

    Isotope shifts of the 2 p3 /2-2 p1 /2 transition in B-like ions are evaluated for a wide range of the nuclear charge number: Z =8 -92 . The calculations of the relativistic nuclear recoil and nuclear size effects are performed using a large-scale configuration-interaction Dirac-Fock-Sturm method. The corresponding QED corrections are also taken into account. The results of the calculations are compared with the theoretical values obtained with other methods. The accuracy of the isotope shifts of the 2 p3 /2-2 p1 /2 transition in B-like ions is significantly improved.

  18. Superconductivity in noncentrosymmetric A g2P d3S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, H.; Okabe, H.; Matsushita, Y.; Isobe, M.; Takayama-Muromachi, E.

    2017-05-01

    We have successfully synthesized the single crystal of A g2P d3S , which exhibits superconductivity with the transition temperature of Tc=2.25 K . A g2P d3S crystallizes in the space group P 4132 with the filled β -Mn structure, which has no inversion symmetry. The value of the Ginzburg-Landau parameter κGL indicates that A g2P d3S is a type-II superconductor. Δ C (Tc) /γnTc=1.50 and 2 Δ /kBTc=3.48 from the heat-capacity analyses indicate that A g2P d3S is a weak-coupling Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) superconductor with an isotropic superconducting gap. On the other hand, the violation of the Werthamer-Helfand-Hohenberg curve in the H -T phase diagram implies A g2P d3S is not a typical BCS superconductor.

  19. Reduced transcription of the RB2/p130 gene in human lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Xue Jun, Hu; Gemma, Akihiko; Hosoya, Yoko; Matsuda, Kuniko; Nara, Michiya; Hosomi, Yukio; Okano, Tetsuya; Kurimoto, Futoshi; Seike, Masahiro; Takenaka, Kiyoshi; Yoshimura, Akinobu; Toyota, Minoru; Kudoh, Shoji

    2003-11-01

    Reduced expression of the retinoblastoma gene (RB)2/p130 protein, as well as mutation of exons 19, 20, 21, and 22 of the same gene, has been reported in primary lung cancer. However, it has been suggested by other investigators that mutational inactivation and loss of the RB2/p130 gene and protein, respectively, are rare events in lung cancer. In order to determine the contribution and mechanisms of RB2/p130 gene inactivation to lung cancer development and progression, we quantified RB2/p130 mRNA expression levels in a range of human lung cancer cell lines (n = 13) by real-time reverse transcription (RT)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis. In comparison to normal lung tissue, reduced transcription of the RB2/p130 gene was found in all small cell lung cancer cell lines examined, along with six out of the eight nonsmall cell lung cancers tested, most of which had inactivation of RB/p16 pathway. On the basis of Western blot analysis, the expression of RB2/p130 protein was consistent with RNA expression levels in all lung cancer cell lines examined. In addition, the mutational status of the RB2/p130 gene (specifically, exons 19, 20, 21, and 22) was determined in 30 primary lung cancers (from patients with distant metastasis) and 30 lung cancer cell lines by PCR-single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis and direct DNA sequencing. There was no evidence of somatic mutations within the RB2/p130 gene in the 60 lung cancer samples (both cell lines and tumors) assessed, including the 11 lung cancer cell lines that displayed reduced expression of the gene. Furthermore, hypermethylation of the RB2/p130 promoter was not found in any of the above-mentioned 11 cell lines, as determined by a DNA methylation assay, combined bisulfite restriction analysis (COBRA). The results of the present study suggest that the reduced RB2/p130 expression seen in lung cancer may be in part transcriptionally mediated, albeit not likely via a mechanism involving hypermethylation

  20. Photochemistry of bromoacetylene - Formation of HBr and quenching of excited Br/4 2P 0 1/2/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laufer, A. H.

    1979-01-01

    The photolysis of bromacetylene is examined by means of vacuum ultraviolet flash photolysis-kinetic spectroscopy, with attention given to the production of Br atoms in the 2P 0 3/2 and 2P 0 1/2 states, the production of HBr, and UV absorption attributable to the ethynyl radical. Although Br(2P 0 1/2) and Br(2P 0 3/2) were both directly observed at the shortest delay time after the flash, strongly indicating the presence of the ethynyl radical, transient absorption by C2H was not detected in the range 125 to 180 nm. Quenching rate constants for the decay of the 2P 0 1/2 state of Br, which is observed to form concurrently with the ground state, are derived for quenching by He, CH2Br, CF4, and D2 from the pseudo-first-order decay rates. HBr was observed as a secondary photolysis product, and a model of its formation by the exothermic reaction of ground-state atoms with C2HBR, coupled with the secondary production of Br atoms, is found to agree well with the experiment.

  1. Multiple modalities converge on a common gate to control K2P channel function.

    PubMed

    Bagriantsev, Sviatoslav N; Peyronnet, Rémi; Clark, Kimberly A; Honoré, Eric; Minor, Daniel L

    2011-07-15

    Members of the K(2P) potassium channel family regulate neuronal excitability and are implicated in pain, anaesthetic responses, thermosensation, neuroprotection, and mood. Unlike other potassium channels, K(2P)s are gated by remarkably diverse stimuli that include chemical, thermal, and mechanical modalities. It has remained unclear whether the various gating inputs act through separate or common channel elements. Here, we show that protons, heat, and pressure affect activity of the prototypical, polymodal K(2P), K(2P)2.1 (KCNK2/TREK-1), at a common molecular gate that comprises elements of the pore-forming segments and the N-terminal end of the M4 transmembrane segment. We further demonstrate that the M4 gating element is conserved among K(2P)s and is employed regardless of whether the gating stimuli are inhibitory or activating. Our results define a unique gating mechanism shared by K(2P) family members and suggest that their diverse sensory properties are achieved by coupling different molecular sensors to a conserved core gating apparatus.

  2. Gating, Regulation, and Structure in K2P K+ Channels: In Varietate Concordia?

    PubMed

    Niemeyer, María Isabel; Cid, L Pablo; González, Wendy; Sepúlveda, Francisco V

    2016-09-01

    K2P K(+) channels with two pore domains in tandem associate as dimers to produce so-called background conductances that are regulated by a variety of stimuli. Whereas gating in K2P channels has been poorly understood, recent developments have provided important clues regarding the gating mechanism for this family of proteins. Two modes of gating present in other K(+) channels have been considered. The first is the so-called activation gating that occurs by bundle crossing and the splaying apart of pore-lining helices commanding ion passage. The second mode involves a change in conformation at the selectivity filter (SF), which impedes ion flow at this narrow portion of the conduction pathway and accounts for extracellular pH modulation of several K2P channels. Although some evidence supports the existence of an activation gate in K2P channels, recent results suggest that perhaps all stimuli, even those sensed at a distant location in the protein, are also mediated by SF gating. Recently resolved crystal structures of K2P channels in conductive and nonconductive conformations revealed that the nonconductive state is reached by blockade by a lipid acyl chain that gains access to the channel cavity through intramembrane fenestrations. Here we discuss whether this novel type of gating, proposed so far only for membrane tension gating, might mediate gating in response to other stimuli or whether SF gating is the only type of opening/closing mechanism present in K2P channels.

  3. Ring current proton decay by charge exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. H.; Hoffman, R. A.; Fritz, T.

    1975-01-01

    Explorer 45 measurements during the recovery phase of a moderate magnetic storm have confirmed that the charge exchange decay mechanism can account for the decay of the storm-time proton ring current. Data from the moderate magnetic storm of 24 February 1972 was selected for study since a symmetrical ring current had developed and effects due to asymmetric ring current losses could be eliminated. It was found that after the initial rapid decay of the proton flux, the equatorially mirroring protons in the energy range 5 to 30 keV decayed throughout the L-value range of 3.5 to 5.0 at the charge exchange decay rate calculated by Liemohn. After several days of decay, the proton fluxes reached a lower limit where an apparent equilibrium was maintained, between weak particle source mechanisms and the loss mechanisms, until fresh protons were injected into the ring current region during substorms. While other proton loss mechanisms may also be operating, the results indicate that charge exchange can entirely account for the storm-time proton ring current decay, and that this mechanism must be considered in all studies involving the loss of proton ring current particles.

  4. Studies of Ion Acoustic Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, R.P.; Bauer, B.S.; Baker, K.L. |

    1994-03-07

    In this project, we advanced knowledge of Ion Acoustic Decay on several fronts. In this project, we have developed and demonstrated the capability to perform experimental and theoretical studies of the Ion Acoustic Decay Instability. We have at the same time demonstrated an improved capability to do multichannel spectroscopy and Thomson scattering. We made the first observations of the time-resolved second harmonic emission at several angles simultaneously, and the first observations of the emission both parallel and perpendicular to the electric field of the laser light. We used Thomson scattering to make the first observations of the plasma waves driven by acoustic decay in a warm plasma with long density scale lengths. We also advanced both the linear and the nonlinear theory of this instability. We are thus prepared to perform experiments to address this mechanism as needed for applications.

  5. Sumoylation Silences Heterodimeric TASK Potassium Channels Containing K2P1 Subunits in Cerebellar Granule Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Plant, Leigh D.; Zuniga, Leandro; Araki, Dan; Marks, Jeremy D.; Goldstein, Steve A. N.

    2013-01-01

    The standing outward K+ current (IKso) governs the response of cerebellar granule neurons to natural and medicinal stimuli including volatile anesthetics. In this study, we showed that sumoylation silenced half of IKso at the surface of cerebellar granule neurons because the underlying channels were heterodimeric assemblies of K2P1, a subunit subject to sumoylation, and the two P domain, acid-sensitive K+ (TASK) channel subunits, K2P3 or K2P9. The heteromeric channels comprised the acid-sensitive portion of IKso and mediated its response to halothane. We anticipate that sumoylation also influences sensation and homeostatic mechanisms in mammals through TASK channels formed with K2P1. PMID:23169818

  6. Stick slip, charge separation and decay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lockner, D.A.; Byerlee, J.D.; Kuksenko, V.S.; Ponomarev, A.V.

    1986-01-01

    Measurements of charge separation in rock during stable and unstable deformation give unexpectedly large decay times of 50 sec. Time-domain induced polarization experiments on wet and dry rocks give similar decay times and suggest that the same decay mechanisms operate in the induced polarization response as in the relaxation of charge generated by mechanical deformation. These large decay times are attributed to electrochemical processes in the rocks, and they require low-frequency relative permittivity to be very large, in excess of 105. One consequence of large permittivity, and therefore long decay times, is that a significant portion of any electrical charge generated during an earthquake can persist for tens or hundreds of seconds. As a result, electrical disturbances associated with earthquakes should be observable for these lengths of time rather than for the milliseconds previously suggested. ?? 1986 Birka??user Verlag.

  7. An Efficient, Scalable and Robust P2P Overlay for Autonomic Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Deng; Liu, Hui; Vasilakos, Athanasios

    The term Autonomic Communication (AC) refers to self-managing systems which are capable of supporting self-configuration, self-healing and self-optimization. However, information reflection and collection, lack of centralized control, non-cooperation and so on are just some of the challenges within AC systems. Since many self-* properties (e.g. selfconfiguration, self-optimization, self-healing, and self-protecting) are achieved by a group of autonomous entities that coordinate in a peer-to-peer (P2P) fashion, it has opened the door to migrating research techniques from P2P systems. P2P's meaning can be better understood with a set of key characteristics similar to AC: Decentralized organization, Self-organizing nature (i.e. adaptability), Resource sharing and aggregation, and Fault-tolerance. However, not all P2P systems are compatible with AC. Unstructured systems are designed more specifically than structured systems for the heterogeneous Internet environment, where the nodes' persistence and availability are not guaranteed. Motivated by the challenges in AC and based on comprehensive analysis of popular P2P applications, three correlative standards for evaluating the compatibility of a P2P system with AC are presented in this chapter. According to these standards, a novel Efficient, Scalable and Robust (ESR) P2P overlay is proposed. Differing from current structured and unstructured, or meshed and tree-like P2P overlay, the ESR is a whole new three dimensional structure to improve the efficiency of routing, while information exchanges take in immediate neighbors with local information to make the system scalable and fault-tolerant. Furthermore, rather than a complex game theory or incentive mechanism, asimple but effective punish mechanism has been presented based on a new ID structure which can guarantee the continuity of each node's record in order to discourage negative behavior on an autonomous environment as AC.

  8. Baryonic B Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chistov, R.

    2016-02-01

    In this talk the decays of B-mesons into baryons are discussed. Large mass of B-meson makes possible the decays of the type B → baryon (+mesons). Experimental observations and measurements of these decays at B-factories Belle and BaBar have stimulate the development of theoretical models in this field. We briefly review the experimental results together with the current theoretical models which describe baryonic B decays.

  9. Single-molecule mRNA decay measurements reveal promoter regulated mRNA stability in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Trcek, Tatjana; Larson, Daniel R.; Moldón, Alberto; Query, Charles C.; Singer, Robert H.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Messenger RNA decay measurements are typically performed on a population of cells. However, this approach cannot reveal sufficient complexity to provide information on mechanisms that may regulate mRNA degradation, possibly on short time scales. To address this deficiency, we measured cell cycle regulated decay in single yeast cells using single-molecule FISH. We found that two genes responsible for mitotic progression, SWI5 and CLB2 exhibit a mitosis-dependent mRNA stability switch. Their transcripts are stable until mitosis when a precipitous decay eliminates the mRNA complement, preventing carry-over into the next cycle. Remarkably, the specificity and timing of decay is entirely regulated by their promoter, independent of specific cis mRNA sequences. The mitotic exit network protein, Dbf2p binds to SWI5 and CLB2 mRNAs co-transcriptionally and regulates their decay. This work reveals the promoter-dependent control of mRNA stability, a novel regulatory mechanism that could be employed by a variety of mRNAs and organisms. PMID:22196726

  10. PKC-dependent activation of human K2P18.1 K+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Rahm, Ann-Kathrin; Gierten, Jakob; Kisselbach, Jana; Staudacher, Ingo; Staudacher, Kathrin; Schweizer, Patrick A; Becker, Rüdiger; Katus, Hugo A; Thomas, Dierk

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Two-pore-domain K+ channels (K2P) mediate K+ background currents that modulate the membrane potential of excitable cells. K2P18.1 (TWIK-related spinal cord K+ channel) provides hyperpolarizing background currents in neurons. Recently, a dominant-negative loss-of-function mutation in K2P18.1 has been implicated in migraine, and activation of K2P18.1 channels was proposed as a therapeutic strategy. Here we elucidated the molecular mechanisms underlying PKC-dependent activation of K2P18.1 currents. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Human K2P18.1 channels were heterologously expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, and currents were recorded with the two-electrode voltage clamp technique. KEY RESULTS Stimulation of PKC using phorbol 12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) activated the hK2P18.1 current by 3.1-fold in a concentration-dependent fashion. The inactive analogue 4α-PMA had no effect on channel activity. The specific PKC inhibitors bisindolylmaleimide I, Ro-32-0432 and chelerythrine reduced PMA-induced channel activation indicating that PKC is involved in this effect of PMA. Selective activation of conventional PKC isoforms with thymeleatoxin (100 nM) did not reproduce K2P18.1 channel activation. Current activation by PMA was not affected by pretreatment with CsA (calcineurin inhibitor) or KT 5720 (PKA inhibitor), ruling out a significant contribution of calcineurin or cross-talk with PKA to the PKC-dependent hK2P18.1 activation. Finally, mutation of putative PKC phosphorylation sites did not prevent PMA-induced K2P18.1 channel activation. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS We demonstrated that activation of hK2P18.1 (TRESK) by PMA is mediated by PKC stimulation. Hence, PKC-mediated activation of K2P18.1 background currents may serve as a novel molecular target for migraine treatment. PMID:22168364

  11. Electron transfer mediated decay in NeXe triggered by K-LL Auger decay of Ne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stumpf, Vasili; Scheit, Simona; Kolorenč, Přemysl; Gokhberg, Kirill

    2017-01-01

    In this article we present the results of an ab initio study of electron transfer mediated decay (ETMD) in NeXe dimer triggered by the K-LL Auger decay of Ne. We found that the Ne2+ (2p-21D)Xe and Ne2+ (2p-21S)Xe states which are strongly populated in the Auger process may decay by ETMD emitting a slow electron and leading to the Coulomb explosion of the dimer which results in Ne+ and Xe2+ ions. We also computed the corresponding decay widths, the ETMD electron spectra, and the kinetic energy release of the nuclei (KER) spectra. We showed that the spectra corresponding to the decaying states which derive from the two multiplets have completely different shape which reflects differing accessibility of the ETMD final states. Thus, in the Ne2+ (2p-21S)Xe state ETMD is allowed for all interatomic distances accessible in nuclear dynamics, while in the Ne2+ (2p-21D)Xe state the ETMD channels become closed one by one. This in turn leads to the different behavior of the ETMD decay widths and ultimately the spectra. We show how these differences make it possible to study ETMD of the two states separately in a coincident measurement. We also discuss how the dynamics which follow ETMD in the final state manifold may lead to the appearance of the unusual products: Ne, Xe3+ and a slow electron.

  12. Trisomy 2p: Analysis of unusual phenotypic findings

    SciTech Connect

    Lurie, I.W.; Ilyina, H.G.; Gurevich, D.B.

    1995-01-16

    We present three probands with partial trisomies 2p21-23 due to ins(4;2)(q21;p21p23) pat, 2p23-pter due to t(2;4)(p23;q35)mat, and 2p21-pter due to t(2;11)(p21;q23.3)mat. More than 50 cases of partial trisomy 2p have been reviewed and some abnormalities, unusual for most other types of structural autosomal imbalance, have been found in patients with inherited forms of 2p trisomy and in their non-karyotyped sibs. Neural tube defects (anencephaly, occipital encephalocele, and spina bifida) were found in five probands and 4/6 affected non-karyotyped sibs. The only triplicated segment common to all was 2p24. Different forms of {open_quotes}broncho-pulmonary a/hypoplasia{close_quotes} (including two cases of lung agenesis) were described in four patients (overlapping triplicated segment was 2p21-p25). Three patients (with overlapping triplicated segment 2p23-p25) had diaphragmatic hernia. Abnormal rotation of the heart or L-transposition of large vessels (with or without visceral heterotaxia) was found in two infants (overlapping triplicated segment 2p23-p24). In two patients with common triplicated segment 2p22.3-p25, neuroblastoma has been described. The occurrence of all these defects may be explained either by the action of the same gene(s) mapped to 2p24 or by action of some independent factors located in different segments of the short arm. Although the latter hypothesis is much less probable, it can not be rejected at the present time. We propose the existence of a genetic system controlling surveillance of an abnormal embryo to explain the phenotypic differences between patients with the same imbalance within a family. In some {open_quotes}restrictive{close_quotes} combinations the abnormal embryos will die, although in {open_quotes}permissive{close_quotes} combinations they can survive. 47 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. The 2S(+) - 2P separation in KO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Partridge, Harry; Dyall, Kenneth G.

    1991-01-01

    The 2S(+) - 2P separation in KO is investigated using large basis sets and high levels of correlation treatment. Relativistic effects are included at the Dirac-Fock level and reduce the separation only slightly. The basis set superposition error is considered in detail. On the basis of these calculations, our best estimate places the 2p sub 3/2 state about 200 cm(exp -1) above the ground 2 sigma(+) state in agreement with our previous estimate.

  14. Phosphorylation of Chs2p regulates interaction with COPII

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsen, Mia Kyed; Cheng, Zhiliang; Lam, Sheung Kwan; Roth-Johnson, Elizabeth; Barfield, Robyn M.; Schekman, Randy

    2013-01-01

    Summary Trafficking of the chitin synthase Chs2p from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the bud-neck in late mitosis is tightly regulated by the cell cycle via phosphorylation of serine residues in the N-terminus of the protein. Here, we describe the effects of Chs2p phosphorylation on the interaction with coat protein complex II (COPII). Identification of a cdc5ts mutant, which fails to transport Chs2p–3xGFP to the bud-neck and instead accumulates the protein in intracellular puncta, led us to discover that Chs2p–3xGFP accumulates at ER exit sites in metaphase-arrested wild-type cells. Using an in vitro ER vesicle formation assay we showed that phosphorylation of Chs2p by the cyclin-dependent kinase CDK1 prevents packaging into COPII vesicles, whereas dephosphorylation of Chs2p by the phosphatase Cdc14p stimulates selection into the vesicles. We found that the cytoplasmic N-terminal domain of Chs2p, which contains the CDK1 phosphorylation sites, interacts with the COPII component Sec24p in a yeast two-hybrid assay and that phosphomimetic substitutions of serines at the CDK1 consensus sites reduces the interaction. Our data suggest that dephosphorylation functions as a molecular switch for regulated ER exit of Chs2p. PMID:23525003

  15. Network Awareness in P2P-TV Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traverso, Stefano; Leonardi, Emilio; Mellia, Marco; Meo, Michela

    The increasing popularity of applications for video-streaming based on P2P paradigm (P2P-TV) is raising the interest of both broadcasters and network operators. The former see a promising technology to reduce the cost of streaming content over the Internet, while offering a world-wide service. The latter instead fear that the traffic offered by these applications can grow without control, affecting other services, and possibly causing network congestion and collapse. The “Network-Aware P2P-TV Application over Wise Networks” FP7 project aims at studying and developing a novel P2P-TV application offering the chance to broadcast high definition video to broadcasters and to carefully manage the traffic offered by peers to the network, therefore avoiding worries to Internet providers about network overload. In such context, we design a simulator to evaluate performance of different P2P-TV solutions, to compare them both considering end-users’ and network providers’ perspectives, such as quality of service perceived by subscribers and link utilization. In this paper, we provide some results that show how effective can be a network aware P2P-TV system.

  16. Improving P2P live-content delivery using SVC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schierl, T.; Sánchez, Y.; Hellge, C.; Wiegand, T.

    2010-07-01

    P2P content delivery techniques for video transmission have become of high interest in the last years. With the involvement of client into the delivery process, P2P approaches can significantly reduce the load and cost on servers, especially for popular services. However, previous studies have already pointed out the unreliability of P2P-based live streaming approaches due to peer churn, where peers may ungracefully leave the P2P infrastructure, typically an overlay networks. Peers ungracefully leaving the system cause connection losses in the overlay, which require repair operations. During such repair operations, which typically take a few roundtrip times, no data is received from the lost connection. While taking low delay for fast-channel tune-in into account as a key feature for broadcast-like streaming applications, the P2P live streaming approach can only rely on a certain media pre-buffer during such repair operations. In this paper, multi-tree based Application Layer Multicast as a P2P overlay technique for live streaming is considered. The use of Flow Forwarding (FF), a.k.a. Retransmission, or Forward Error Correction (FEC) in combination with Scalable video Coding (SVC) for concealment during overlay repair operations is shown. Furthermore the benefits of using SVC over the use of AVC single layer transmission are presented.

  17. Stu2p binds tubulin and undergoes an open-to-closed conformational change

    PubMed Central

    Al-Bassam, Jawdat; van Breugel, Mark; Harrison, Stephen C.; Hyman, Anthony

    2006-01-01

    Stu2p from budding yeast belongs to the conserved Dis1/XMAP215 family of microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs). The common feature of proteins in this family is the presence of HEAT repeat–containing TOG domains near the NH2 terminus. We have investigated the functions of the two TOG domains of Stu2p in vivo and in vitro. Our data suggest that Stu2p regulates microtubule dynamics through two separate activities. First, Stu2p binds to a single free tubulin heterodimer through its first TOG domain. A large conformational transition in homodimeric Stu2p from an open structure to a closed one accompanies the capture of a single free tubulin heterodimer. Second, Stu2p has the capacity to associate directly with microtubule ends, at least in part, through its second TOG domain. These two properties lead to the stabilization of microtubules in vivo, perhaps by the loading of tubulin dimers at microtubule ends. We suggest that this mechanism of microtubule regulation is a conserved feature of the Dis1/XMAP215 family of MAPs. PMID:16567500

  18. Manifestation of intermediate meson loop effects in charmonium decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuan-Jiang; Li, Gang; Zhao, Qiang

    2010-09-01

    We report the progress on understanding some of those existing puzzles in charmonium decays. We show that the intermediate meson loops (IML) as a long-distance transition mechanism will provide novel insights into these issues. In particular, we show that the IML mechanism would be essentially important for understanding the Ψ(3770) non-Dbar D decays. We also comment that such a mechanism is correlated with the Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka (OZI) rule evasions in charmonium hadronic decays.

  19. Structure And Function of the Yeast U-Box-Containing Ubiquitin Ligase Ufd2p

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, D.; Li, W.; Ye, Y.; Brunger, A.T.

    2009-06-04

    Proteins conjugated by Lys-48-linked polyubiquitin chains are preferred substrates of the eukaryotic proteasome. Polyubiquitination requires an activating enzyme (E1), a conjugating enzyme (E2), and a ligase (E3). Occasionally, these enzymes only assemble short ubiquitin oligomers, and their extension to full length involves a ubiquitin elongating factor termed E4. Ufd2p, as the first E4 identified to date, is involved in the degradation of misfolded proteins of the endoplasmic reticulum and of a ubiquitin-{beta}-GAL fusion substrate in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The mechanism of action of Ufd2p is unknown. Here we describe the crystal structure of the full-length yeast Ufd2p protein. Ufd2p has an elongated shape consisting of several irregular Armadillo-like repeats with two helical hairpins protruding from it and a U-box domain flexibly attached to its C terminus. The U-box of Ufd2p has a fold similar to that of the RING (Really Interesting New Gene) domain that is present in certain ubiquitin ligases. Accordingly, Ufd2p has all of the hallmarks of a RING finger-containing ubiquitin ligase: it associates with its cognate E2 Ubc4p via its U-box domain and catalyzes the transfer of ubiquitin from the E2 active site to Ufd2p itself or to an acceptor ubiquitin molecule to form unanchored diubiquitin oligomers. Thus, Ufd2p can function as a bona fide E3 ubiquitin ligase to promote ubiquitin chain elongation on a substrate.

  20. Linear polarization of the 2p{sup 5}3s{yields}2p{sup 6} lines following the inner-shell photoionization of sodiumlike ions

    SciTech Connect

    Inal, M.K.; Surzhykov, A.; Fritzsche, S.

    2005-10-15

    The inner-shell photoionization of highly charged, many-electron ions and their subsequent radiative decay are studied theoretically within the multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock approach. Special attention is paid to the linear polarization of the characteristic x-ray radiation. Detailed calculations have been carried out, in particular for the 2p{sup 5}3s{yields}2p{sup 6} radiative transitions following ionization of the 2p electron of the sodiumlike iron Fe{sup 15+} and uranium U{sup 81+} ions. For these elements, the inner-shell photoionization was found to induce the (relatively) low linear polarization of the subsequently emitted photons which is strongly affected, moreover, by the higher-order (nondipole) effects in the electron-photon interaction.

  1. A Role for K2P Channels in the Operation of Somatosensory Nociceptors.

    PubMed

    Plant, Leigh D

    2012-01-01

    The ability to sense mechanical, thermal, and chemical stimuli is critical to normal physiology and the perception of pain. Contact with noxious stimuli triggers a complex series of events that initiate innate protective mechanisms designed to minimize or avoid injury. Extreme temperatures, mechanical stress, and chemical irritants are detected by specific ion channels and receptors clustered on the terminals of nociceptive sensory nerve fibers and transduced into electrical information. Propagation of these signals, from distant sites in the body to the spinal cord and the higher processing centers of the brain, is also orchestrated by distinct groups of ion channels. Since their identification in 1995, evidence has emerged to support roles for K2P channels at each step along this pathway, as receptors for physiological and noxious stimuli, and as determinants of nociceptor excitability and conductivity. In addition, the many subtypes of K2P channels expressed in somatosensory neurons are also implicated in mediating the effects of volatile, general anesthetics on the central and peripheral nervous systems. Here, I offer a critical review of the existing data supporting these attributes of K2P channel function and discuss how diverse regulatory mechanisms that control the activity of K2P channels act to govern the operation of nociceptors.

  2. A Role for K2P Channels in the Operation of Somatosensory Nociceptors

    PubMed Central

    Plant, Leigh D.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to sense mechanical, thermal, and chemical stimuli is critical to normal physiology and the perception of pain. Contact with noxious stimuli triggers a complex series of events that initiate innate protective mechanisms designed to minimize or avoid injury. Extreme temperatures, mechanical stress, and chemical irritants are detected by specific ion channels and receptors clustered on the terminals of nociceptive sensory nerve fibers and transduced into electrical information. Propagation of these signals, from distant sites in the body to the spinal cord and the higher processing centers of the brain, is also orchestrated by distinct groups of ion channels. Since their identification in 1995, evidence has emerged to support roles for K2P channels at each step along this pathway, as receptors for physiological and noxious stimuli, and as determinants of nociceptor excitability and conductivity. In addition, the many subtypes of K2P channels expressed in somatosensory neurons are also implicated in mediating the effects of volatile, general anesthetics on the central and peripheral nervous systems. Here, I offer a critical review of the existing data supporting these attributes of K2P channel function and discuss how diverse regulatory mechanisms that control the activity of K2P channels act to govern the operation of nociceptors. PMID:22403526

  3. Multiple proton decays of 6Be, 8C, 8B(IAS) and excited states in 10C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobotka, Lee

    2011-10-01

    Recent technical advances have allowed for high-order correlation experiments to be done. We have primarily focused on experiments in which the final channels are composed of only alphas and protons. Four cases we have studied are: 6Be, 10C*, 8C, and 8B*(IAS) via 3, 4, 5, and 3-particle correlation measurements, respectively. While the first case had been studied before, our work presents very high statistics in the full Jacobi coordinates (the coordinates needed to describe 3-body decay.) Our study of 10C excited states provides isolatable examples of: correlated 2p decay, from one state, and the decay of another which is unusually highly correlated, a ``ménage a quatre.'' 8C decay presents the only case of sequential 3-body 2p decay steps (i.e. 2p-2p.) The intermediate in this 2-step process is the first example (6Be) mentioned above. Unlike the well-studied second step (6Be decay), the first step in this 2p-2p process provides another example of correlated 2p emission. The decay of 8B(IAS), the isobaric analog of 8C, also decays overwhelmingly by 2p emission, in this case to 6Li(IAS). This IAS-to-IAS 2p decay is one for which decay to the potential 1p intermediates is energetically allowed but isospin forbidden. This represents an expansion, over that originally envisioned by Goldanski, of the conceivable nuclear territory for 2p decay.

  4. Secure mobile agent for telemedicine based on P2P networks.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Wen-Shin; Pan, Jiann-I

    2013-06-01

    Exploring intelligent mobile agent (MA) technology for assisting medical services or transmitting personal patient-health information in telemedicine applications has been widely investigated. Conversely, peer-to-peer (P2P) networking has become one of the most popular applications used in the Internet because of its benefits for easy-to-manage resources and because it balances workloads. Therefore, constructing an agent-based telemedicine platform based on P2P networking architecture is necessary. The main purpose of this paper is to construct a safe agent-based telemedicine that based on P2P networking architecture. Two themes are addressed in this paper: (a) the P2P network architecture for an agent-based telemedicine service, and (b) the security mechanisms for the proposed telemedicine networking architecture. When an MA contains patient information and migrates from one host to another through the Internet, it can be attacked by other software agents or agent platforms that can illegally access patient information. The proposed P2P network architecture is based on the JXTA protocol and provides two types of telemedicine service models: the predictable service model and unpredictable service model. This architecture employs a two-layer safety mechanism for MAs (i.e., time-limited black boxes and RSA undetachable signature technologies), to provide a secure solution for agent-based telemedicine services.

  5. P2P-based botnets: structural analysis, monitoring, and mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Guanhua; Eidenbenz, Stephan; Ha, Duc T; Ngo, Hung Q

    2008-01-01

    Botnets, which are networks of compromised machines that are controlled by one or a group of attackers, have emerged as one of the most serious security threats on the Internet. With an army of bots at the scale of tens of thousands of hosts or even as large as 1.5 million PCs, the computational power of botnets can be leveraged to launch large-scale DDoS (Distributed Denial of Service) attacks, sending spamming emails, stealing identities and financial information, etc. As detection and mitigation techniques against botnets have been stepped up in recent years, attackers are also constantly improving their strategies to operate these botnets. The first generation of botnets typically employ IRC (Internet Relay Chat) channels as their command and control (C&C) centers. Though simple and easy to deploy, the centralized C&C mechanism of such botnets has made them prone to being detected and disabled. Against this backdrop, peer-to-peer (P2P) based botnets have emerged as a new generation of botnets which can conceal their C&C communication. Recently, P2P networks have emerged as a covert communication platform for malicious programs known as bots. As popular distributed systems, they allow bots to communicate easily while protecting the botmaster from being discovered. Existing work on P2P-based hotnets mainly focuses on measurement of botnet sizes. In this work, through simulation, we study extensively the structure of P2P networks running Kademlia, one of a few widely used P2P protocols in practice. Our simulation testbed incorporates the actual code of a real Kademlia client software to achieve great realism, and distributed event-driven simulation techniques to achieve high scalability. Using this testbed, we analyze the scaling, reachability, clustering, and centrality properties of P2P-based botnets from a graph-theoretical perspective. We further demonstrate experimentally and theoretically that monitoring bot activities in a P2P network is difficult

  6. Polyphosphides NbMn/sub 2/P/sub 12/, MoMn/sub 2/P/sub 12/, and WMn/sub 2/P/sub 12/ with TiMn/sub 2/P/sub 12/-type structure

    SciTech Connect

    Scholz, U.D.; Jeitschko, W.; Reehuis, M.

    1988-06-01

    The title compounds are new and were prepared by reaction of the elemental components in a tin flux. They crystallize with the monoclinic (C2/c) TiMn/sub 2/P/sub 12/-type structure, which was refined for NbMn/sub 2/P/sub 12/ (R = 0.044 for 70 variable parameters and 1688 structure factors) and MoMn/sub 2/P/sub 12/ (R = 0.020 for 70 variables and 2871 F values). Chemical bonding in these compounds can be rationalized on the basis of classical two-electron bonds. In this simple bonding model the Mn atoms with octahedral P coordination (d/sup 2/sp/sup 3/hybrid) obtain a (low spin) d/sup 5/ system. They are displaced from the centers of their P octahedra to permit Mn-Mn bonding (Mn-Mn distances of 285.1 and 287.7 pm for the Nb and Mo compounds, respectively), thus compensating their spins. The early transition-metal atoms have square-antiprismatic P coordination (d/sup 4/sp/sup 3/ hybrid). In this model their fifth d orbital is filled with one (Nb) or two (Mo, W) electrons. Consequently MoMn/sub 2/P/sub 12/ and WMn/sub 2/P/sub 12/ are diamagnetic, while NbMn/sub 2/P/sub 12/ shows paramagnetism with a magnetic moment of ..mu.. = 1.96 ..mu../sub B/. The metallic conductivity of the three compounds is rationalized by the overlap of bonding and antibonding bands (semimetal). None of the compounds TMn/sub 2/P/sub 12/ (T = Ti, Nb, Mo, W) becomes superconducting down to 1.8 K.

  7. Molecular Chaperones and the Assembly of the Prion Ure2p in Vitro*

    PubMed Central

    Savistchenko, Jimmy; Krzewska, Joanna; Fay, Nicolas; Melki, Ronald

    2008-01-01

    The protein Ure2 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae possesses prion properties at the origin of the [URE3] trait. In vivo, a high molecular weight form of inactive Ure2p is associated to [URE3]. The faithful and continued propagation of [URE3]is dependent on the expression levels of molecular chaperones from the Hsp100, -70, and -40 families; however, so far, their role is not fully documented. Here we investigate the effects of molecular chaperones from the Hsp40, Hsp70, Hsp90, and Hsp100 families and the chaperonin CCT/Tric on the assembly of full-length Ure2p. We show that Hsp104p greatly stimulates Ure2p aggregation, whereas Ssa1p, Ydj1p, Sis1p, and Hsp82p inhibit aggregation to different extents. The nature of the high molecular weight Ure2p species that forms in the presence of the different molecular chaperones and their nucleotide dependence is described. We show that Hsp104p favors the aggregation of Ure2p into non-fibrillar high molecular weight particles, whereas Ssa1p, Ydj1p, Sis1p, and Hsp82p sequester Ure2p in spherical oligomers. Using fluorescently labeled full-length Ure2p and Ure2p-(94–354) and fluorescence polarization, we show that Ssa1p binding to Ure2p is ATP-dependent, whereas that of Hsp104p is not. We also show that Ssa1p preferentially interacts with the N-terminal domain of Ure2p that is critical for prion propagation, whereas Ydj1p preferentially interacts with the C-terminal domain of the protein, and we discuss the significance of this observation. Finally, the affinities of Ssa1p, Ydj1p, and Hsp104p for Ure2p are determined. Our in vitro observations bring new insight into the mechanism by which molecular chaperones influence the propagation of [URE3]. PMID:18400756

  8. Ni2P Makes Application of the PtRu Catalyst Much Stronger in Direct Methanol Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jinfa; Feng, Ligang; Liu, Changpeng; Xing, Wei

    2015-10-12

    PtRu is regarded as the best catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells, but the performance decay resulting from the loss of Ru seriously hinders commercial applications. Herein, we demonstrated that the presence of Ni2 P largely reduces Ru loss, which thus makes the application of PtRu much stronger in direct methanol fuel cells. Outstanding catalytic activity and stability were observed by cyclic voltammetry. Upon integrating the catalyst material into a practical direct methanol fuel cell, the highest maximum power density was achieved on the PtRu-Ni2P/C catalyst among the reference catalysts at different temperatures. A maximum power density of 69.9 mW cm(-2) at 30 °C was obtained on PtRu-Ni2P/C, which is even higher than the power density of the state-of-the-art commercial PtRu catalyst at 70 °C (63.1 mW cm(-2)). Moreover, decay in the performance resulting from Ru loss was greatly reduced owing to the presence of Ni2 P, which is indicative of very promising applications. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Laser-based measurement of transition probabilities of neon 2p 53s-2p 53p transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Takashi; Goto, Chiaki; Uetani, Yasunori; Fukuda, Kuniya

    1985-01-01

    By using the magic-angle, pulsed-excitation method in the presence of a magnetic field, the authors have measured the branching ratios for 2p 53s-2p 53p transitions in neon. By combining values for the lifetime of the upper levels with the branching ratios, they have determined the transition probabilities of 31 transitions. The results are in good agreement with those from emission spectroscopy of a high-pressure are plasma by Bridges and Wiese.

  10. Radiative Corrections to One-Photon Decays of Hydrogenic Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Sapirstein, J; Pachucki, K; Cheng, K T

    2003-11-11

    Radiative corrections to the decay rate of n = 2 states of hydrogenic ions are calculated. The transitions considered are the M1 decay of the 2s state to the ground state and the E1(M2) decays of the 2p{sub 1/2} and 2p{sub 3/2} states to the ground state. The radiative corrections start in order {alpha}(Z{alpha}){sup 2}, but the method used sums all orders of Z{alpha}. The leading {alpha}(Z{alpha}){sup 2} correction for the E1 decays is calculated and compared with the exact result. The extension of the calculational method to parity nonconserving transitions in neutral atoms is discussed.

  11. Exploring the Feasibility of Reputation Models for Improving P2P Routing under Churn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sànchez-Artigas, Marc; García-López, Pedro; Herrera, Blas

    Reputation mechanisms help peer-to-peer (P2P) networks to detect and avoid unreliable or uncooperative peers. Recently, it has been discussed that routing protocols can be improved by conditioning routing decisions to the past behavior of forwarding peers. However, churn — the continuous process of node arrival and departure — may severely hinder the applicability of rating mechanisms. In particular, short lifetimes mean that reputations are often generated from a small number of transactions.

  12. Determinants of Default in P2P Lending

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This paper studies P2P lending and the factors explaining loan default. This is an important issue because in P2P lending individual investors bear the credit risk, instead of financial institutions, which are experts in dealing with this risk. P2P lenders suffer a severe problem of information asymmetry, because they are at a disadvantage facing the borrower. For this reason, P2P lending sites provide potential lenders with information about borrowers and their loan purpose. They also assign a grade to each loan. The empirical study is based on loans’ data collected from Lending Club (N = 24,449) from 2008 to 2014 that are first analyzed by using univariate means tests and survival analysis. Factors explaining default are loan purpose, annual income, current housing situation, credit history and indebtedness. Secondly, a logistic regression model is developed to predict defaults. The grade assigned by the P2P lending site is the most predictive factor of default, but the accuracy of the model is improved by adding other information, especially the borrower’s debt level. PMID:26425854

  13. 2P Vortex Wake Pattern in Vortex-Induced Vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govardhan, R.; Williamson, C. H. K.

    1999-11-01

    Flow-visualization in the free vibration experiments of Khalak & Williamson (1997,1999) indicated the existence of the 2P wake vortex pattern (2 pairs of vortices per cycle; as defined in the forced vibration experiments of Williamson & Roshko, 1988), in support of Brika & Laneville (1993), although these visualization techniques are distinctly unclear at high Reynolds numbers (Re ~10^3-10^4 ). Forced vibrations [Sheridan et al. (1998), Techet et al. (1998)] show the 2P mode under some conditions. However, a large number of accurate numerical simulations, at low Re ~200, as well as 2D simulations at higher Re ~500 (Blackburn & Henderson 1999), clearly do not find the 2P mode. There has thus been some debate as to the existence of the 2P mode as a steady state pattern. Hence, DPIV measurements in the wake of the elastically-mounted cylinder have been performed to finally resolve this question. The present results show that the 2P mode is remarkably repeatable and continues indefinitely. The reason for this apparent disparity between experiments and DNS therefore seems to be either a Reynolds number effect or the fact that the computed flow is constrained to be 2D. Further, it is shown that this pattern corresponds with the splitting of a region of vorticity due to the strain rate field of neighbouring vortices. wake patterns show interesting differences. Supported by ONR Contracts N00014-94-1-1197 & N00014-95-1-0332.

  14. Protecting Data Privacy in Structured P2P Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jawad, Mohamed; Serrano-Alvarado, Patricia; Valduriez, Patrick

    P2P systems are increasingly used for efficient, scalable data sharing. Popular applications focus on massive file sharing. However, advanced applications such as online communities (e.g., medical or research communities) need to share private or sensitive data. Currently, in P2P systems, untrusted peers can easily violate data privacy by using data for malicious purposes (e.g., fraudulence, profiling). To prevent such behavior, the well accepted Hippocratic database principle states that data owners should specify the purpose for which their data will be collected. In this paper, we apply such principles as well as reputation techniques to support purpose and trust in structured P2P systems. Hippocratic databases enforce purpose-based privacy while reputation techniques guarantee trust. We propose a P2P data privacy model which combines the Hippocratic principles and the trust notions. We also present the algorithms of PriServ, a DHT-based P2P privacy service which supports this model and prevents data privacy violation. We show, in a performance evaluation, that PriServ introduces a small overhead.

  15. Determinants of Default in P2P Lending.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Cinca, Carlos; Gutiérrez-Nieto, Begoña; López-Palacios, Luz

    2015-01-01

    This paper studies P2P lending and the factors explaining loan default. This is an important issue because in P2P lending individual investors bear the credit risk, instead of financial institutions, which are experts in dealing with this risk. P2P lenders suffer a severe problem of information asymmetry, because they are at a disadvantage facing the borrower. For this reason, P2P lending sites provide potential lenders with information about borrowers and their loan purpose. They also assign a grade to each loan. The empirical study is based on loans' data collected from Lending Club (N = 24,449) from 2008 to 2014 that are first analyzed by using univariate means tests and survival analysis. Factors explaining default are loan purpose, annual income, current housing situation, credit history and indebtedness. Secondly, a logistic regression model is developed to predict defaults. The grade assigned by the P2P lending site is the most predictive factor of default, but the accuracy of the model is improved by adding other information, especially the borrower's debt level.

  16. Molecular determinants of the cell-cycle regulated Mcm1p-Fkh2p transcription factor complex.

    PubMed

    Boros, Joanna; Lim, Fei-Ling; Darieva, Zoulfia; Pic-Taylor, Aline; Harman, Ruth; Morgan, Brian A; Sharrocks, Andrew D

    2003-05-01

    The MADS-box transcription factor Mcm1p and forkhead (FKH) transcription factor Fkh2p act in a DNA-bound complex to regulate cell-cycle dependent expression of the CLB2 cluster in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Binding of Fkh2p requires prior binding by Mcm1p. Here we have investigated the molecular determinants governing the formation of the Mcm1p- Fkh2p complex. Fkh2p exhibits cooperativity in complex formation with Mcm1p and we have mapped a small region of Fkh2p located immediately upstream of the FKH DNA binding domain that is required for this cooperativity. This region is lacking in the related protein Fkh1p that cannot form ternary complexes with Mcm1p. A second region is identified that inhibits Mcm1p-independent DNA binding by Fkh2p. The spacing between the Mcm1p and Fkh2p binding sites is also a critical determinant for complex formation. We also show that Fkh2p can form ternary complexes with the human counterpart of Mcm1p, serum response factor (SRF). Mutations at analogous positions in Mcm1p, which are known to affect SRF interaction with its partner protein Elk-1, abrogate complex formation with Fkh2p, demonstrating evolutionary conservation of coregulatory protein binding surfaces. Our data therefore provide molecular insights into the mechanisms of Mcm1p- Fkh2p complex formation and more generally aid our understanding of MADS-box protein function.

  17. Market Design for a P2P Backup System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seuken, Sven; Charles, Denis; Chickering, Max; Puri, Sidd

    Peer-to-peer (P2P) backup systems are an attractive alternative to server-based systems because the immense costs of large data centers can be saved by using idle resources on millions of private computers instead. This paper presents the design and theoretical analysis of a market for a P2P backup system. While our long-term goal is an open resource exchange market using real money, here we consider a system where monetary transfers are prohibited. A user who wants to backup his data must in return supply some of his resources (storage space, upload and download bandwidth) to the system.We propose a hybrid P2P architecture where all backup data is transferred directly between peers, but a dedicated server coordinates all operations and maintains meta-data. We achieve high reliability guarantees while keeping our data replication factor low by adopting sophisticated erasure coding technology (cf., [2]).

  18. High Performance Rh2P Electrocatalyst for Efficient Water Splitting.

    PubMed

    Duan, Haohong; Li, Dongguo; Tang, Yan; He, Yang; Fang, Ji Shu; Wang, Rongyue; Lv, Haifeng; Lopes, Pietro P; Paulikas, Arvydas P; Li, Haoyi; Mao, Scott X; Wang, Chong-Min; Markovic, Nenad M; Li, Jun; Stamenkovic, Vojislav R; Li, Yadong

    2017-03-26

    Search for active, stable and cost-efficient electrocataltysts for hydrogen production via water splitting could make substantial impact to the energy technologies that do not rely on fossil fuels. Here we report the synthesis of rhodium phosphide electrocatalyst with low metal loading in the form of nanocubes (NCs) dispersed in high surface area carbon (Rh2P/C) by a facile solvo-thermal approach. The Rh2P/C exhibit remarkable performance for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) compared to Rh/C and Pt/C catalysts. The atomic structure of the Rh2P NCs was directly observed by annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (ADF-STEM), which revealed phosphorous-rich outermost atomic layer. Combined experimental and computational studies suggest that surface phosphorous plays crucial role in determining the robust catalyst properties.

  19. Fragrance material review on 2-(p-tolyloxy)ethyl acetate.

    PubMed

    McGinty, D; Letizia, C S; Api, A M

    2012-09-01

    A toxicologic and dermatologic review of 2-(p-tolyloxy)ethyl acetate when used as a fragrance ingredient is presented. 2-(p-tolyloxy)ethyl acetate is a member of the fragrance structural group aryl alkyl alcohol simple acid esters (AAASAE). The AAASAE fragrance ingredients are prepared by reacting an aryl alkyl alcohol with a simple carboxylic acid (a chain of 1-4 carbons) to generate formate, acetate, propionate, butyrate, isobutyrate and carbonate esters. This review contains a detailed summary of all available toxicology and dermatology papers that are related to this individual fragrance ingredient and is not intended as a stand-alone document. Available data for 2-(p-tolyloxy)ethyl acetate were evaluated, then summarized, and includes physical properties data. A safety assessment of the entire AAASAE will be published simultaneously with this document. Please refer to Belsito et al. (2012) for an overall assessment of the safe use of this material and all AAASAE in fragrances.

  20. Faraday effect in Sn2P2S6 crystals.

    PubMed

    Krupych, Oleh; Adamenko, Dmytro; Mys, Oksana; Grabar, Aleksandr; Vlokh, Rostyslav

    2008-11-10

    We have revealed a large Faraday rotation in tin thiohypodiphosphate (Sn(2)P(2)S(6)) crystals, which makes this material promising for magneto-optics. The effective Faraday tensor component and the Verdet constant for the direction of the optic axis have been determined by measuring the pure Faraday rotation in Sn(2)P(2)S(6) crystals with both the single-ray and small-angular polarimetric methods at the normal conditions and a wavelength of 632.8 nm. The effective Verdet constant is found to be equal to 115 rad/T x m.

  1. Mini Magnetospheric Plasma Propulsion (M2P2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, Dennis; Winglee, Robert

    2000-01-01

    The M2P2 concept is based on the transfer of momentum from the solar wind to an artificial magnetic field structure like that naturally occurs at all magnetized planets in the Solar System, called the magnetosphere. The objectives of this program include the following: (1) Demonstrate artificial magnetospheric inflation through cold plasma filling in vacuum; (2) Demonstrate deflection of a surrogate solar wind by an artificial magnetosphere in the laboratory vacuum chamber; (3) Compare theoretical calculations for thrust forces with laboratory measurements; (4) Develop flight control algorithms for planning mission specific trajectories; and (5) Develop M2P2 system concept.

  2. The Social Impact of P2P Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glorioso, Andrea; Pagallo, Ugo; Ruffo, Giancarlo

    The chapter deals with the social impact of P2P systems in light of a bidirectional connection by which technological developments influence, in a complex and often unpredictable way, the social environment whereas the dynamic evolution of the latter does affect technological progress. From this perspective, the aim is to deepen legal issues, sociological trends, economical aspects, and political dimensions of P2P technology, along with some of its next possible outputs, in order to assess one of the most compelling alternatives to the traditional frame of highly centralized human interaction.

  3. Radiative decays at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giubega, L. E.

    2016-12-01

    Precise measurements on rare radiative B decays are performed with the LHCb experiment at LHC. The LHCb results regarding the ratio of branching fractions for two radiative decays, B 0 → K *0 γ and B s → ϕ γ, the direct CP asymmetry in B 0 → K *0 γ decay channel and the observation of the photon polarization in the B ± → K ±π∓π± γ decay, are included. The first two measurements were performed in 1 fb-1 of pp collisions data and the third one in 3 fb-1 of data, respectively.

  4. Is decay constant?

    PubMed

    Pommé, S; Stroh, H; Altzitzoglou, T; Paepen, J; Van Ammel, R; Kossert, K; Nähle, O; Keightley, J D; Ferreira, K M; Verheyen, L; Bruggeman, M

    2017-09-07

    Some authors have raised doubt about the invariability of decay constants, which would invalidate the exponential-decay law and the foundation on which the common measurement system for radioactivity is based. Claims were made about a new interaction - the fifth force - by which neutrinos could affect decay constants, thus predicting changes in decay rates in correlation with the variations of the solar neutrino flux. Their argument is based on the observation of permille-sized annual modulations in particular decay rate measurements, as well as transient oscillations at frequencies near 11 year(-1) and 12.7 year(-1) which they speculatively associate with dynamics of the solar interior. In this work, 12 data sets of precise long-term decay rate measurements have been investigated for the presence of systematic modulations at frequencies between 0.08 and 20 year(-1). Besides small annual effects, no common oscillations could be observed among α, β(-), β(+) or EC decaying nuclides. The amplitudes of fitted oscillations to residuals from exponential decay do not exceed 3 times their standard uncertainty, which varies from 0.00023 % to 0.023 %. This contradicts the assertion that 'neutrino-induced' beta decay provides information about the deep solar interior. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. The N2-P3 complex of the evoked potential and human performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odonnell, Brian F.; Cohen, Ronald A.

    1988-01-01

    The N2-P3 complex and other endogenous components of human evoked potential provide a set of tools for the investigation of human perceptual and cognitive processes. These multidimensional measures of central nervous system bioelectrical activity respond to a variety of environmental and internal factors which have been experimentally characterized. Their application to the analysis of human performance in naturalistic task environments is just beginning. Converging evidence suggests that the N2-P3 complex reflects processes of stimulus evaluation, perceptual resource allocation, and decision making that proceed in parallel, rather than in series, with response generation. Utilization of these EP components may provide insights into the central nervous system mechanisms modulating task performance unavailable from behavioral measures alone. The sensitivity of the N2-P3 complex to neuropathology, psychopathology, and pharmacological manipulation suggests that these components might provide sensitive markers for the effects of environmental stressors on the human central nervous system.

  6. Neutralino dark matter from heavy gravitino decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohri, Kazunori; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Yokoyama, Jun'Ichi

    2005-10-01

    We propose a new scenario of nonthermal production of neutralino cold dark matter, in which the overproduction problem of lightest supersymmetric particles (LSPs) in the standard thermal history is naturally solved. The mechanism requires a heavy modulus field which decays mainly to ordinary particles releasing large entropy to dilute gravitinos produced just after inflation and thermal relics of LSPs. Significant amount of gravitinos are also pair-produced at the decay, which subsequently decay into the neutralinos. We identify the regions of the parameter space in which the requisite abundance of the neutralino dark matter is obtained without spoiling the big-bang nucleosynthesis by injection of hadronic showers from gravitino decay. The neutralino abundance obtained in this mechanism is insensitive to the details of the superparticle mass spectrum, unlike the standard thermal abundance. We also briefly mention the testability of the scenario in future experiments.

  7. Large-Scale Mini-Magnetosphere Plasma Propulsion (M2P2) Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winglee, R. M.; Slough, J.; Ziemba, T.; Euripides, P.; Adrian, M. L.; Gallagher, D.; Craven, P.; Tomlinson, W.; Cravens, J.; Burch, J.; hide

    2001-01-01

    Mini-Magnetosphere Plasma Propulsion (M2P2) is an innovative plasma propulsion system that has the potential to propel spacecraft at unprecedented speeds of 50 to 80 km per second with a low-power requirement of approx. 1 kW per 100 kg of payload and approx. 1 kg of neutral gas [fuel] consumption per day of acceleration. Acceleration periods from several days to a few months are envisioned. High specific impulse and efficiency are achieved through coupling of the spacecraft to the 400 km per second solar wind through an artificial magnetosphere. The mini-magnetosphere or inflated magnetic bubble is produced by the injection of cold dense plasma into a spacecraft-generated magnetic field envelope. Magnetic bubble inflation is driven by electromagnetic processes thereby avoiding the material and deployment problems faced by mechanical solar sail designs, Here, we present the theoretical design of M2P2 as well as initial results from experimental testing of an M2P2 prototype demonstrating: 1) inflation of the dipole magnetic field geometry through the internal injection of cold plasma; and 2) deflection of and artificial solar wind by the prototype M2P2 system. In addition, we present plans for direct laboratory measurement of thrust imparted to a prototype M2P2 by an artificial solar wind during the summer of 2001.

  8. Large-Scale Mini-Magnetosphere Plasma Propulsion (M2P2) Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winglee, R. M.; Slough, J.; Ziemba, T.; Euripides, P.; Gallagher, D.; Craven, P.; Adrian, M. L.; Tomlinson, W.; Cravens, J.; Burch, J.; hide

    2001-01-01

    Mini-Magnetosphere Plasma Propulsion (M2P2) is an innovative plasma propulsion system that has the potential to propel spacecraft at unprecedented speeds of 50 to 80 km/s, with a low power requirement of approx. 1 kW per 100 kg of payload and -1 kg of neutral gas [fuel] consumption per day of acceleration. Acceleration periods from several days to a few months are envisioned. High specific impulse and efficiency are achieved through coupling of the spacecraft to the 400 km/s. solar wind through an artificial magnetosphere. The mini-magnetosphere or inflated magnetic bubble is produced by the injection of cold dense plasma into a spacecraft-generated magnetic field envelope. Magnetic bubble inflation is driven by electromagnetic processes thereby avoiding the material and deployment problems faced by mechanical solar sail designs. Here, we present the theoretical design of M2P2 as well as initial results from experimental testing of an M2P2 prototype demonstrating: 1) inflation of the dipole magnetic field geometry through the internal injection of cold plasma; and 2) deflection of and artificial solar wind by the prototype M2P2 system. In addition, we present plans for direct laboratory measurement of thrust imparted to a prototype M2P2 by an artificial solar wind during the summer of 2001.

  9. Hydrothermal synthesis of Ni2P nanoparticle and its hydrodesulfurization of dibenzothiophene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qi; Han, Yang; Huang, Xiang; Dai, Jinhui; Tian, Jintao; Zhu, Zhibin; Yue, Li

    2017-04-01

    Nanosized nickel phosphide (Ni2P) has been synthesized via hydrothermal reaction with environmental-friendly red phosphorus and nickel chloride. The reaction mechanism has been studied by measurement techniques of IC, XRD ,TEM, EDS, and XPS. The results showed that the particle sizes of as-prepared Ni2P are in nanoscale ranging from 10 to 30 nm. In hydrothermal reaction, red phosphorus reacts with water to its oxyacids, especially its hypophosphorous acid (or hypophosphite) which can reduce nickel chloride to nickel, and then metallic nickel will penetrate into the rest of red phosphorus to generate nano-Ni2P. Furthermore, the catalytic performance of as-synthesized Ni2P for the hydrodesulfurization of dibenzothiophene has been tested. It has been shown that the HDS reaction process over Ni2P catalyst agrees well with the pseudo-first order kinetic equation, and the HDS conversion can reach up to 43.83% in 5 h with a stable increasing catalytic activity during the whole examination process.

  10. The Clathrin Adaptor Gga2p Is a Phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate Effector at the Golgi Exit

    PubMed Central

    Demmel, Lars; Gravert, Maike; Ercan, Ebru; Habermann, Bianca; Müller-Reichert, Thomas; Kukhtina, Viktoria; Haucke, Volker; Baust, Thorsten; Sohrmann, Marc; Kalaidzidis, Yannis; Klose, Christian; Beck, Mike; Peter, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI(4)P) is a key regulator of membrane transport required for the formation of transport carriers from the trans-Golgi network (TGN). The molecular mechanisms of PI(4)P signaling in this process are still poorly understood. In a search for PI(4)P effector molecules, we performed a screen for synthetic lethals in a background of reduced PI(4)P and found the gene GGA2. Our analysis uncovered a PI(4)P-dependent recruitment of the clathrin adaptor Gga2p to the TGN during Golgi-to-endosome trafficking. Gga2p recruitment to liposomes is stimulated both by PI(4)P and the small GTPase Arf1p in its active conformation, implicating these two molecules in the recruitment of Gga2p to the TGN, which ultimately controls the formation of clathrin-coated vesicles. PI(4)P binding occurs through a phosphoinositide-binding signature within the N-terminal VHS domain of Gga2p resembling a motif found in other clathrin interacting proteins. These data provide an explanation for the TGN-specific membrane recruitment of Gga2p. PMID:18287542

  11. Large-Scale Mini-Magnetosphere Plasma Propulsion (M2P2) Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winglee, R. M.; Slough, J.; Ziemba, T.; Euripides, P.; Adrian, M. L.; Gallagher, D.; Craven, P.; Tomlinson, W.; Cravens, J.; Burch, J.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Mini-Magnetosphere Plasma Propulsion (M2P2) is an innovative plasma propulsion system that has the potential to propel spacecraft at unprecedented speeds of 50 to 80 km per second with a low-power requirement of approx. 1 kW per 100 kg of payload and approx. 1 kg of neutral gas [fuel] consumption per day of acceleration. Acceleration periods from several days to a few months are envisioned. High specific impulse and efficiency are achieved through coupling of the spacecraft to the 400 km per second solar wind through an artificial magnetosphere. The mini-magnetosphere or inflated magnetic bubble is produced by the injection of cold dense plasma into a spacecraft-generated magnetic field envelope. Magnetic bubble inflation is driven by electromagnetic processes thereby avoiding the material and deployment problems faced by mechanical solar sail designs, Here, we present the theoretical design of M2P2 as well as initial results from experimental testing of an M2P2 prototype demonstrating: 1) inflation of the dipole magnetic field geometry through the internal injection of cold plasma; and 2) deflection of and artificial solar wind by the prototype M2P2 system. In addition, we present plans for direct laboratory measurement of thrust imparted to a prototype M2P2 by an artificial solar wind during the summer of 2001.

  12. Large-Scale Mini-Magnetosphere Plasma Propulsion (M2P2) Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winglee, R. M.; Slough, J.; Ziemba, T.; Euripides, P.; Gallagher, D.; Craven, P.; Adrian, M. L.; Tomlinson, W.; Cravens, J.; Burch, J.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Mini-Magnetosphere Plasma Propulsion (M2P2) is an innovative plasma propulsion system that has the potential to propel spacecraft at unprecedented speeds of 50 to 80 km/s, with a low power requirement of approx. 1 kW per 100 kg of payload and -1 kg of neutral gas [fuel] consumption per day of acceleration. Acceleration periods from several days to a few months are envisioned. High specific impulse and efficiency are achieved through coupling of the spacecraft to the 400 km/s. solar wind through an artificial magnetosphere. The mini-magnetosphere or inflated magnetic bubble is produced by the injection of cold dense plasma into a spacecraft-generated magnetic field envelope. Magnetic bubble inflation is driven by electromagnetic processes thereby avoiding the material and deployment problems faced by mechanical solar sail designs. Here, we present the theoretical design of M2P2 as well as initial results from experimental testing of an M2P2 prototype demonstrating: 1) inflation of the dipole magnetic field geometry through the internal injection of cold plasma; and 2) deflection of and artificial solar wind by the prototype M2P2 system. In addition, we present plans for direct laboratory measurement of thrust imparted to a prototype M2P2 by an artificial solar wind during the summer of 2001.

  13. Measurement and Analysis of P2P IPTV Program Resource

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xingshu; Wang, Haizhou; Zhang, Qi

    2014-01-01

    With the rapid development of P2P technology, P2P IPTV applications have received more and more attention. And program resource distribution is very important to P2P IPTV applications. In order to collect IPTV program resources, a distributed multi-protocol crawler is proposed. And the crawler has collected more than 13 million pieces of information of IPTV programs from 2009 to 2012. In addition, the distribution of IPTV programs is independent and incompact, resulting in chaos of program names, which obstructs searching and organizing programs. Thus, we focus on characteristic analysis of program resources, including the distributions of length of program names, the entropy of the character types, and hierarchy depth of programs. These analyses reveal the disorderly naming conventions of P2P IPTV programs. The analysis results can help to purify and extract useful information from chaotic names for better retrieval and accelerate automatic sorting of program and establishment of IPTV repository. In order to represent popularity of programs and to predict user behavior and popularity of hot programs over a period, we also put forward an analytical model of hot programs. PMID:24772008

  14. Measurement and analysis of P2P IPTV program resource.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenxian; Chen, Xingshu; Wang, Haizhou; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Cheng

    2014-01-01

    With the rapid development of P2P technology, P2P IPTV applications have received more and more attention. And program resource distribution is very important to P2P IPTV applications. In order to collect IPTV program resources, a distributed multi-protocol crawler is proposed. And the crawler has collected more than 13 million pieces of information of IPTV programs from 2009 to 2012. In addition, the distribution of IPTV programs is independent and incompact, resulting in chaos of program names, which obstructs searching and organizing programs. Thus, we focus on characteristic analysis of program resources, including the distributions of length of program names, the entropy of the character types, and hierarchy depth of programs. These analyses reveal the disorderly naming conventions of P2P IPTV programs. The analysis results can help to purify and extract useful information from chaotic names for better retrieval and accelerate automatic sorting of program and establishment of IPTV repository. In order to represent popularity of programs and to predict user behavior and popularity of hot programs over a period, we also put forward an analytical model of hot programs.

  15. β -Decay Half-Lives of 110 Neutron-Rich Nuclei across the N =82 Shell Gap: Implications for the Mechanism and Universality of the Astrophysical r Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorusso, G.; Nishimura, S.; Xu, Z. Y.; Jungclaus, A.; Shimizu, Y.; Simpson, G. S.; Söderström, P.-A.; Watanabe, H.; Browne, F.; Doornenbal, P.; Gey, G.; Jung, H. S.; Meyer, B.; Sumikama, T.; Taprogge, J.; Vajta, Zs.; Wu, J.; Baba, H.; Benzoni, G.; Chae, K. Y.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Fukuda, N.; Gernhäuser, R.; Inabe, N.; Isobe, T.; Kajino, T.; Kameda, D.; Kim, G. D.; Kim, Y.-K.; Kojouharov, I.; Kondev, F. G.; Kubo, T.; Kurz, N.; Kwon, Y. K.; Lane, G. J.; Li, Z.; Montaner-Pizá, A.; Moschner, K.; Naqvi, F.; Niikura, M.; Nishibata, H.; Odahara, A.; Orlandi, R.; Patel, Z.; Podolyák, Zs.; Sakurai, H.; Schaffner, H.; Schury, P.; Shibagaki, S.; Steiger, K.; Suzuki, H.; Takeda, H.; Wendt, A.; Yagi, A.; Yoshinaga, K.

    2015-05-01

    The β -decay half-lives of 110 neutron-rich isotopes of the elements from Rb 37 to Sn 50 were measured at the Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory. The 40 new half-lives follow robust systematics and highlight the persistence of shell effects. The new data have direct implications for r -process calculations and reinforce the notion that the second (A ≈130 ) and the rare-earth-element (A ≈160 ) abundance peaks may result from the freeze-out of an (n ,γ )⇄(γ ,n ) equilibrium. In such an equilibrium, the new half-lives are important factors determining the abundance of rare-earth elements, and allow for a more reliable discussion of the r process universality. It is anticipated that universality may not extend to the elements Sn, Sb, I, and Cs, making the detection of these elements in metal-poor stars of the utmost importance to determine the exact conditions of individual r -process events.

  16. Vacuum decay in a soluble model

    SciTech Connect

    Ferraz de Camargo F, A.; Shellard, R.C.; Marques, G.C.

    1984-03-15

    We study a field-theoretical model where the decay rate of the false vacuum can be computed up to the first quantum corrections in both the high-temperature and zero-temperature limits. We find that the dependence of the decay rate on the height and width of the potential barrier does not follow the same simple area rule as in the quantum-mechanical case. Furthermore, its behavior is strongly model dependent.

  17. Breit-Pauli energy levels belonging to 2p 4, 2s2p 5, 2p 6, 2p 33ℓ configurations and all E1 transitions among these levels in Mg V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deb, N. C.; Hibbert, A.

    2007-07-01

    We present accurate oscillator strengths, line strengths and radiative rates for 1073 E1 transitions among the 86 levels belonging to 2s 22p 4, 2s2p 5, 2p 6, and 2s 22p 3( 4S o, 2D o, 2P o)3ℓ configurations in Mg V. We have used 1s and 2s Hartree-Fock orbitals, re-optimized 2p on 2p 3( 2D o)3s 3D o and optimized 3s,3p,3d orbitals on real states. Sixteen additional orbitals up to 8d are optimized either as a correction to n = 3 physical orbitals or as a correlation orbital. A very large set of configurations including up to three electron promotions are used to account for all important correlation effects. All of the main five terms in the Breit-Pauli operator (except the orbit-orbit interaction) are included in order to account for the relativistic effects. Small adjustments to the diagonal elements of the Hamiltonian matrix are made to bring the calculated energies within a few cm -1 of the corresponding NIST recommended data wherever available. The calculated oscillator strengths, line strengths, and radiative rates for almost all of the E1 transitions show excellent agreement with the corresponding MCDF results of Fischer. The recent results of Bhatia et al. are found to be consistently higher by 20-45%. The accuracy of the present calculation is considered to be better than the NIST accuracy ratings for various transitions.

  18. Radioactive Decay - An Analog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGeachy, Frank

    1988-01-01

    Presents an analog of radioactive decay that allows the student to grasp the concept of half life and the exponential nature of the decay process. The analog is devised to use small, colored, plastic poker chips or counters. Provides the typical data and a graph which supports the analog. (YP)

  19. Radioactive Decay - An Analog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGeachy, Frank

    1988-01-01

    Presents an analog of radioactive decay that allows the student to grasp the concept of half life and the exponential nature of the decay process. The analog is devised to use small, colored, plastic poker chips or counters. Provides the typical data and a graph which supports the analog. (YP)

  20. Chapter 3: Wood Decay

    Treesearch

    Dan Cullen

    2014-01-01

    A significant portion of global carbon is sequestered in forest systems. Specialized fungi have evolved to efficiently deconstruct woody plant cell walls. These important decay processes generate litter, soil bound humic substances, or carbon dioxide and water. This chapter reviews the enzymology and molecular genetics of wood decay fungi, most of which are members of...

  1. Transmembrane Helix Straightening and Buckling Underlies Activation of Mechanosensitive and Thermosensitive K2P Channels

    PubMed Central

    Lolicato, Marco; Riegelhaupt, Paul M.; Arrigoni, Cristina; Clark, Kimberly A.; Minor, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Mechanical and thermal activation of ion channels is central to touch, thermosensation, and pain. The TRAAK/TREK K2P potassium channel subfamily produces background currents that alter neuronal excitability in response to pressure, temperature, signaling lipids, and anesthetics. How such diverse stimuli control channel function is unclear. Here we report structures of K2P4.1 (TRAAK) bearing C-type gate-activating mutations that reveal a tilting and straightening of the M4 inner transmembrane helix and a buckling of the M2 transmembrane helix. These conformational changes move M4 in a direction opposite to that in classical potassium channel activation mechanisms and open a passage lateral to the pore that faces the lipid bilayer inner leaflet. Together, our findings uncover a unique aspect of K2P modulation, indicate a means for how the K2P C-terminal cytoplasmic domain affects the C-type gate which lies ~40Å away, and suggest how lipids and bilayer inner leaflet deformations may gate the channel. PMID:25500157

  2. Hal2p functions in Bdf1p-involved salt stress response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Liu, Liangyu; Wang, Mingpeng; Fu, Jiafang; Zhang, Zhaojie; Hou, Jin; Bao, Xiaoming

    2013-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Bdf1p associates with the basal transcription complexes TFIID and acts as a transcriptional regulator. Lack of Bdf1p is salt sensitive and displays abnormal mitochondrial function. The nucleotidase Hal2p detoxifies the toxic compound 3' -phosphoadenosine-5'-phosphate (pAp), which blocks the biosynthesis of methionine. Hal2p is also a target of high concentration of Na(+). Here, we reported that HAL2 overexpression recovered the salt stress sensitivity of bdf1Δ. Further evidence demonstrated that HAL2 expression was regulated indirectly by Bdf1p. The salt stress response mechanisms mediated by Bdf1p and Hal2p were different. Unlike hal2Δ, high Na(+) or Li(+) stress did not cause pAp accumulation in bdf1Δ and methionine supplementation did not recover its salt sensitivity. HAL2 overexpression in bdf1Δ reduced ROS level and improved mitochondrial function, but not respiration. Further analyses suggested that autophagy was apparently defective in bdf1Δ, and autophagy stimulated by Hal2p may play an important role in recovering mitochondrial functions and Na(+) sensitivity of bdf1Δ. Our findings shed new light towards our understanding about the molecular mechanism of Bdf1p-involved salt stress response in budding yeast.

  3. Research on the efficiency of the spatial information service in the P2P network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Lian; Hu, Baoqing

    2008-10-01

    Now most of the spatial information service applications still adopt the centralized pattern, which brings the network congestion or single point of failure to the side of center server. But the P2P technique takes away the bottleneck in data transmission exists in traditional C/S model by virtue of its multilink self-adaptive mechanism of the data transmission, which has a magnitude meaning for researches on the spatial information service delivering. As the spatial data has the characteristic of the massive volumes and client change the interesting spatial area so frequently that the spatial application efficiency is sharply decreased, the author brought forward a layered P2P architecture of the spatial data interoperation and flexible group mode in P2P network. A mechanism of the layered query queue of the oriented association and the self-adapted cache mode were introduced to adjust the peer loading and the link numbers for the reliable data capture. In this way, we can provide the each peer the rapid data transmission speed, the great data transmission reliability and the better user experience. A prototype was developed and it proved the efficiency of this P2P spatial information service framework. At last the futures of involved techniques and methods are concluded.

  4. Research on the efficiency of distributed virtual geographic environment in P2P network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Lian; Hu, Baoqing

    2008-12-01

    Now most of distributed virtual geographic environments (DVGE) applications still adopt the centralized pattern, which brings the network congestion or single point of failure to the side of center server. But the P2P technique takes away the bottleneck in data transmission exists in traditional C/S model by virtue of its multilink self-adaptive mechanism of the data transmission, which has a magnitude meaning for researches on the spatial data delivering in distributed virtual geographic environment. As the spatial data has the characteristic of the massive volumes and client change the interesting spatial area in virtual scene so frequently that the spatial application efficiency is sharply decreased, the author brought forward a layered P2P architecture of the spatial data interoperation and flexible group mode in P2P network. A mechanism of layered query of oriented suit (LQOS) and the self-adapted cache mode were introduced to adjust the peer loading and the link numbers for the reliable data capture. In this way, we provide DVGE the rapid data transmission speed among peers, the great data transmission reliability and the better user experience. A DVGE prototype was developed and it proved the efficiency of this P2P DVGE framework. At last the futures of involved techniques and methods are concluded.

  5. Transmembrane helix straightening and buckling underlies activation of mechanosensitive and thermosensitive K(2P) channels.

    PubMed

    Lolicato, Marco; Riegelhaupt, Paul M; Arrigoni, Cristina; Clark, Kimberly A; Minor, Daniel L

    2014-12-17

    Mechanical and thermal activation of ion channels is central to touch, thermosensation, and pain. The TRAAK/TREK K(2P) potassium channel subfamily produces background currents that alter neuronal excitability in response to pressure, temperature, signaling lipids, and anesthetics. How such diverse stimuli control channel function is unclear. Here we report structures of K(2P)4.1 (TRAAK) bearing C-type gate-activating mutations that reveal a tilting and straightening of the M4 inner transmembrane helix and a buckling of the M2 transmembrane helix. These conformational changes move M4 in a direction opposite to that in classical potassium channel activation mechanisms and open a passage lateral to the pore that faces the lipid bilayer inner leaflet. Together, our findings uncover a unique aspect of K(2P) modulation, indicate a means for how the K(2P) C-terminal cytoplasmic domain affects the C-type gate which lies ∼40Å away, and suggest how lipids and bilayer inner leaflet deformations may gate the channel.

  6. Multiple modalities converge on a common gate to control K2P channel function

    PubMed Central

    Bagriantsev, Sviatoslav N; Peyronnet, Rémi; Clark, Kimberly A; Honoré, Eric; Minor, Daniel L

    2011-01-01

    Members of the K2P potassium channel family regulate neuronal excitability and are implicated in pain, anaesthetic responses, thermosensation, neuroprotection, and mood. Unlike other potassium channels, K2Ps are gated by remarkably diverse stimuli that include chemical, thermal, and mechanical modalities. It has remained unclear whether the various gating inputs act through separate or common channel elements. Here, we show that protons, heat, and pressure affect activity of the prototypical, polymodal K2P, K2P2.1 (KCNK2/TREK-1), at a common molecular gate that comprises elements of the pore-forming segments and the N-terminal end of the M4 transmembrane segment. We further demonstrate that the M4 gating element is conserved among K2Ps and is employed regardless of whether the gating stimuli are inhibitory or activating. Our results define a unique gating mechanism shared by K2P family members and suggest that their diverse sensory properties are achieved by coupling different molecular sensors to a conserved core gating apparatus. PMID:21765396

  7. DNA structure directs positioning of the mitochondrial genome packaging protein Abf2p

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Arka; Lyonnais, Sébastien; Battistini, Federica; Hospital, Adam; Medici, Giorgio; Prohens, Rafel; Orozco, Modesto; Vilardell, Josep; Solà, Maria

    2017-01-01

    The mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) is assembled into nucleo-protein structures termed nucleoids and maintained differently compared to nuclear DNA, the involved molecular basis remaining poorly understood. In yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), mtDNA is a ∼80 kbp linear molecule and Abf2p, a double HMG-box protein, packages and maintains it. The protein binds DNA in a non-sequence-specific manner, but displays a distinct ‘phased-binding’ at specific DNA sequences containing poly-adenine tracts (A-tracts). We present here two crystal structures of Abf2p in complex with mtDNA-derived fragments bearing A-tracts. Each HMG-box of Abf2p induces a 90° bend in the contacted DNA, causing an overall U-turn. Together with previous data, this suggests that U-turn formation is the universal mechanism underlying mtDNA compaction induced by HMG-box proteins. Combining this structural information with mutational, biophysical and computational analyses, we reveal a unique DNA binding mechanism for Abf2p where a characteristic N-terminal flag and helix are crucial for mtDNA maintenance. Additionally, we provide the molecular basis for A-tract mediated exclusion of Abf2p binding. Due to high prevalence of A-tracts in yeast mtDNA, this has critical relevance for nucleoid architecture. Therefore, an unprecedented A-tract mediated protein positioning mechanism regulates DNA packaging proteins in the mitochondria, and in combination with DNA-bending and U-turn formation, governs mtDNA compaction. PMID:27899643

  8. X(3872), IG(JPC) = 0+(1++), as the χc1(2P) charmonium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achasov, N. N.; Rogozina, E. V.

    2015-09-01

    Contrary to almost standard opinion that the X(3872) resonance is the D∗0D¯0 + c.c. molecule or the qcq¯c¯ four-quark state, we discuss the scenario where the X(3872) resonance is the cc¯ = χc1(2P) charmonium which “sits on” the D∗0D¯0 threshold. We explain the shift of the mass of the X(3872) resonance with respect to the prediction of a potential model for the mass of the χc1(2P) charmonium by the contribution of the virtual D∗D¯ + c.c. intermediate states into the self energy of the X(3872) resonance. This allows us to estimate the coupling constant of the X(7872) resonance with the D∗0D¯0 channel, the branching ratio of the X(3872) → D∗0D¯0 + c.c. decay, and the branching ratio of the X(3872) decay into all non-D∗0D¯0 + c.c. states. We predict a significant number of unknown decays of X(3872) via two gluon: X(3872) →gluon gluon →hadrons. We suggest a physically clear program of experimental researches for verification of our assumption.

  9. Towards the Engineering of Dependable P2P-Based Network Control — The Case of Timely Routing Control Messages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutschku, Kurt; Nakao, Akihiro

    This paper introduces a methodology for engineering best-effort P2P algorithms into dependable P2P-based network control mechanism. The proposed method is built upon an iterative approach consisting of improving the original P2P algorithm by appropriate mechanisms and of thorough performance assessment with respect to dependability measures. The potential of the methodology is outlined by the example of timely routing control for vertical handover in B3G wireless networks. In detail, the well-known Pastry and CAN algorithms are enhanced to include locality. By showing how to combine algorithmic enhancements with performance indicators, this case study paves the way for future engineering of dependable network control mechanisms through P2P algorithms.

  10. Lyapunov decay in quantum irreversibility.

    PubMed

    García-Mata, Ignacio; Roncaglia, Augusto J; Wisniacki, Diego A

    2016-06-13

    The Loschmidt echo--also known as fidelity--is a very useful tool to study irreversibility in quantum mechanics due to perturbations or imperfections. Many different regimes, as a function of time and strength of the perturbation, have been identified. For chaotic systems, there is a range of perturbation strengths where the decay of the Loschmidt echo is perturbation independent, and given by the classical Lyapunov exponent. But observation of the Lyapunov decay depends strongly on the type of initial state upon which an average is carried out. This dependence can be removed by averaging the fidelity over the Haar measure, and the Lyapunov regime is recovered, as has been shown for quantum maps. In this work, we introduce an analogous quantity for systems with infinite dimensional Hilbert space, in particular the quantum stadium billiard, and we show clearly the universality of the Lyapunov regime.

  11. Lyapunov decay in quantum irreversibility

    PubMed Central

    Roncaglia, Augusto J.; Wisniacki, Diego A.

    2016-01-01

    The Loschmidt echo—also known as fidelity—is a very useful tool to study irreversibility in quantum mechanics due to perturbations or imperfections. Many different regimes, as a function of time and strength of the perturbation, have been identified. For chaotic systems, there is a range of perturbation strengths where the decay of the Loschmidt echo is perturbation independent, and given by the classical Lyapunov exponent. But observation of the Lyapunov decay depends strongly on the type of initial state upon which an average is carried out. This dependence can be removed by averaging the fidelity over the Haar measure, and the Lyapunov regime is recovered, as has been shown for quantum maps. In this work, we introduce an analogous quantity for systems with infinite dimensional Hilbert space, in particular the quantum stadium billiard, and we show clearly the universality of the Lyapunov regime. PMID:27140966

  12. Chromosome 2 (2p16) abnormalities in Carney complex tumours

    PubMed Central

    Matyakhina, L; Pack, S; Kirschner, L; Pak, E; Mannan, P; Jaikumar, J; Taymans, S; Sandrini, F; Carney, J; Stratakis, C

    2003-01-01

    Carney complex (CNC) is an autosomal dominant multiple endocrine neoplasia and lentiginosis syndrome characterised by spotty skin pigmentation, cardiac, skin, and breast myxomas, and a variety of endocrine and other tumours. The disease is genetically heterogeneous; two loci have been mapped to chromosomes 17q22–24 (the CNC1 locus) and 2p16 (CNC2). Mutations in the PRKAR1A tumour suppressor gene were recently found in CNC1 mapping kindreds, while the CNC2 and perhaps other genes remain unidentified. Analysis of tumour chromosome rearrangements is a useful tool for uncovering genes with a role in tumorigenesis and/or tumour progression. CGH analysis showed a low level 2p amplification recurrently in four of eight CNC tumours; one tumour showed specific amplification of the 2p16-p23 region only. To define more precisely the 2p amplicon in these and other tumours, we completed the genomic mapping of the CNC2 region, and analysed 46 tumour samples from CNC patients with and without PRKAR1A mutations by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) using bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs). Consistent cytogenetic changes of the region were detected in 40 (87%) of the samples analysed. Twenty-four samples (60%) showed amplification of the region represented as homogeneously stained regions (HSRs). The size of the amplicon varied from case to case, and frequently from cell to cell in the same tumour. Three tumours (8%) showed both amplification and deletion of the region in their cells. Thirteen tumours (32%) showed deletions only. These molecular cytogenetic changes included the region that is covered by BACs 400-P-14 and 514-O-11 and, in the genetic map, corresponds to an area flanked by polymorphic markers D2S2251 and D2S2292; other BACs on the centromeric and telomeric end of this region were included in varying degrees. We conclude that cytogenetic changes of the 2p16 chromosomal region that harbours the CNC2 locus are frequently observed in tumours from CNC

  13. Inclusive and exclusive measurements of B decays to χc 1 and χc 2 at Belle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhardwaj, V.; Miyabayashi, K.; Panzenböck, E.; Trabelsi, K.; Frey, A.; Abdesselam, A.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Al Said, S.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, D. M.; Atmacan, H.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.; Babu, V.; Badhrees, I.; Bahinipati, S.; Bakich, A. M.; Bala, A.; Bansal, V.; Barberio, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Biswal, J.; Bobrov, A.; Bondar, A.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Browder, T. E.; Červenkov, D.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, S.-K.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, D.; Dalseno, J.; Danilov, M.; Doležal, Z.; Dutta, D.; Eidelman, S.; Farhat, H.; Fast, J. E.; Ferber, T.; Frost, O.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Ganguly, S.; Garmash, A.; Gillard, R.; Glattauer, R.; Goh, Y. M.; Goldenzweig, P.; Golob, B.; Greenwald, D.; Haba, J.; Hamer, P.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; He, X. H.; Hou, W.-S.; Iijima, T.; Inami, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jaegle, I.; Joffe, D.; Joo, K. K.; Julius, T.; Kato, E.; Katrenko, P.; Kawasaki, T.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, K.; Ko, B. R.; Kobayashi, N.; Kodyš, P.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kuhr, T.; Kumar, R.; Kumita, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lee, I. S.; Li, C.; Li, Y.; Li Gioi, L.; Libby, J.; Liventsev, D.; Loos, A.; Lukin, P.; Masuda, M.; Matvienko, D.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Mohanty, S.; Moll, A.; Moon, H. K.; Mussa, R.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nanut, T.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nayak, M.; Nisar, N. K.; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Pakhlova, G.; Pal, B.; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Pedlar, T. K.; Pestotnik, R.; Petrič, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Pulvermacher, C.; Purohit, M. V.; Rauch, J.; Ribežl, E.; Ritter, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Sahoo, H.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, S.; Santelj, L.; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Savinov, V.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Seino, Y.; Semmler, D.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Sevior, M. E.; Shebalin, V.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Shwartz, B.; Simon, F.; Singh, J. B.; Sohn, Y.-S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Starič, M.; Stypula, J.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tamponi, U.; Tanida, K.; Teramoto, Y.; Uchida, M.; Uehara, S.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Urquijo, P.; Usov, Y.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Vinokurova, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.-Z.; Wang, P.; Wang, X. L.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Wehle, S.; Won, E.; Yamaoka, J.; Yashchenko, S.; Ye, H.; Yook, Y.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yusa, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.; Belle Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    We report inclusive and exclusive measurements for χc 1 and χc 2 production in B decays. We measure B (B →χc 1X )=(3.03 ±0.05 (stat )±0.24 (syst ))×10-3 and B (B →χc 2X )=(0.70 ±0.06 (stat )±0.10 (syst ))×10-3 . For the first time, χc 2 production in exclusive B decays in the modes B0→χc 2π-K+ and B+→χc 2π+π-K+ has been observed, along with first evidence for the B+→χc 2π+KS0 decay mode. For χc 1 production, we report the first observation in the B+→χc 1π+π-K+ , B0→χc 1π+π-KS0 and B0→χc 1π0π-K+ decay modes. Using these decay modes, we observe a difference in the production mechanism of χc 2 in comparison to χc 1 in B decays. In addition, we report searches for X (3872 ) and χc 1(2 P ) in the B+→(χc 1π+π-)K+ decay mode. The reported results use 772 ×106 B B ¯ events collected at the ϒ (4 S ) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider.

  14. Theory of {tau} mesonic decays

    SciTech Connect

    Li, B.A.

    1997-02-01

    Studies of {tau} mesonic decays are presented. A mechanism for the axial-vector current at low energies is proposed. The VMD is used to treat the vector current. All the meson vertices of both normal parity and abnormal parity (Wess-Zumino-Witten anomaly) are obtained from an effective chiral theory of mesons. a{sub 1} dominance is found in the decay modes of the {tau} lepton: 3{pi}, f(1285){pi}. Both the {rho} and the a{sub 1} meson contribute to the decay {tau}{r_arrow}K{sup {asterisk}}K{nu}; it is found that the vector current is dominant. CVC is tested by studying e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}. The branching ratios of {tau}{r_arrow}{omega}{pi}{nu} and K{bar K}{nu} are calculated. In terms of a similar mechanism the {Delta}s=1 decay modes of the {tau} lepton are studied and K{sub a} dominance is found in {tau}{r_arrow}K{sup {asterisk}}{pi}{nu} and K{sup {asterisk}}{eta}{nu}. The suppression of {tau}{r_arrow}K{rho}{nu} is revealed. The branching ratio of {tau}{r_arrow}{eta}K{nu} is computed. As a test of this theory, the form factors of {pi}{r_arrow}e{gamma}{nu} and K{r_arrow}e{gamma}{nu} are determined. The theoretical results agree with data reasonably well. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  15. Mathematical modeling of "2P" mode vortex wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Saikat; Stremler, Mark; Schnipper, Teis; Andersen, Anders

    2010-11-01

    The "2P" mode vortex wake, in which two vortex pairs are generated per shedding cycle, is a commonly occurring wake structure behind oscillating bluff bodies. We will present an idealized model of these wakes that consists of a singly-periodic Hamiltonian system of four point vortices. The system is made integrable with an imposed spatial symmetry that is motivated by the experimentally observed wake structure. This model generalizes our previous work by allowing for unequal vortex strengths in the shed pairs. Comparisons with experimental wakes generated by a flapping foil in a flowing soap film show that this model can be used to characterize the vortex trajectories in "2P" mode wakes and to estimate the experimental vortex strengths.

  16. Supporting seamless mobility for P2P live streaming.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunsam; Kim, Sangjin; Lee, Choonhwa

    2014-01-01

    With advent of various mobile devices with powerful networking and computing capabilities, the users' demand to enjoy live video streaming services such as IPTV with mobile devices has been increasing rapidly. However, it is challenging to get over the degradation of service quality due to data loss caused by the handover. Although many handover schemes were proposed at protocol layers below the application layer, they inherently suffer from data loss while the network is being disconnected during the handover. We therefore propose an efficient application-layer handover scheme to support seamless mobility for P2P live streaming. By simulation experiments, we show that the P2P live streaming system with our proposed handover scheme can improve the playback continuity significantly compared to that without our scheme.

  17. Supporting Seamless Mobility for P2P Live Streaming

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eunsam; Kim, Sangjin; Lee, Choonhwa

    2014-01-01

    With advent of various mobile devices with powerful networking and computing capabilities, the users' demand to enjoy live video streaming services such as IPTV with mobile devices has been increasing rapidly. However, it is challenging to get over the degradation of service quality due to data loss caused by the handover. Although many handover schemes were proposed at protocol layers below the application layer, they inherently suffer from data loss while the network is being disconnected during the handover. We therefore propose an efficient application-layer handover scheme to support seamless mobility for P2P live streaming. By simulation experiments, we show that the P2P live streaming system with our proposed handover scheme can improve the playback continuity significantly compared to that without our scheme. PMID:24977171

  18. K2P Potassium Channels, Mysterious and Paradoxically Exciting

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Steve A. N.

    2013-01-01

    New evidence reveals that the common electrolyte disorder hypokalemia can induce K2P1 channels that are normally selective for K+ to break the rules and conduct Na+. This defiant behavior leads to paradoxical depolarization of many cells in the heart, increasing the risk for lethal arrhythmia. The new research resolves a mystery uncovered 50 years ago and bestows an array of new riddles. Here, I discuss how K2P1 might achieve this alchemy—through stable residence of the K+ selectivity filter in a Na+-conductive state between its open and C-inactive configurations—and predict that other K+ channels and environmental stimuli will be discovered to produce the same excitatory misconduct. PMID:21868351

  19. Hat2p recognizes the histone H3 tail to specify the acetylation of the newly synthesized H3/H4 heterodimer by the Hat1p/Hat2p complex

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Zhang, Li; Liu, Tingting; Chai, Chengliang; Fang, Qianglin; Wu, Han; Agudelo Garcia, Paula A.; Han, Zhifu; Zong, Shuai; Yu, You; Zhang, Xinyue; Parthun, Mark R.; Chai, Jijie; Xu, Rui-Ming; Yang, Maojun

    2014-01-01

    Post-translational modifications of histones are significant regulators of replication, transcription, and DNA repair. Particularly, newly synthesized histone H4 in H3/H4 heterodimers becomes acetylated on N-terminal lysine residues prior to its incorporation into chromatin. Previous studies have established that the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complex Hat1p/Hat2p medicates this modification. However, the mechanism of how Hat1p/Hat2p recognizes and facilitates the enzymatic activities on the newly assembled H3/H4 heterodimer remains unknown. Furthermore, Hat2p is a WD40 repeat protein, which is found in many histone modifier complexes. However, how the WD40 repeat proteins facilitate enzymatic activities of histone modification enzymes is unclear. In this study, we first solved the high-resolution crystal structure of a Hat1p/Hat2p/CoA/H4 peptide complex and found that the H4 tail interacts with both Hat1p and Hat2p, by which substrate recruitment is facilitated. We further discovered that H3 N-terminal peptides can bind to the Hat2p WD40 domain and solved the structure of the Hat1p/Hat2p/CoA/H4/H3 peptide complex. Moreover, the interaction with Hat2p requires unmodified Arg2/Lys4 and Lys9 on the H3 tail, suggesting a novel model to specify the activity of Hat1p/Hat2p toward newly synthesized H3/H4 heterodimers. Together, our study demonstrated the substrate recognition mechanism by the Hat1p/Hat2p complex, which is critical for DNA replication and other chromatin remodeling processes. PMID:24835250

  20. Aquatic Toxicity of Decontaminating Solutions DS-2/DS-2P

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-09-01

    toxicity of the DS-2 and DS-2P mixtures on Daphnia magna, (water flea), Pimephales promelas (fathead minnow), Eisenia foetida (earthwonm) and...checked graphically using the same procedure described in the daphnia methods. 2.3 Earthworm Assay Earthworm toxicity testing utiiizcd Eisenia foetida as...graphically using the same proccdure described in the daphnia methods. 2.3 Er.thworm Assay Earthworm toxicity testing utilized Eisenia foetida as the

  1. Pure P2P mediation system: A mappings discovery approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    selma, El yahyaoui El idrissi; Zellou, Ahmed; Idri, Ali

    2015-02-01

    The information integration systems consist in offering a uniform interface to provide access to a set of autonomous and distributed information sources. The most important advantage of this system is that it allows users to specify what they want, rather than thinking about how to get the responses. The works realized in this area have particular leads to two major classes of integration systems: the mediation systems based on the paradigm mediator / adapter and peer to peer systems (P2P). The combination of both systems has led to a third type; is the mediation P2P systems. The P2P systems are large-scale systems, self-organized and distributed. They allow the resource management in a completely decentralized way. However, the integration of structured information sources, heterogeneous and distributed proves to be a complex problem. The objective of this work is to propose an approach to resolve conflicts and establish a mapping between the heterogeneous elements. This approach is based on clustering; the latter is to group similar Peers that share common information in the same subnet. Thus, to facilitate the heterogeneity, we introduced three additional layers of our hierarchy of peers: internal schema, external schema and Schema directory peer. We used linguistic techniques, and precisely the name correspondence technique, that is based on the similarity of names to propose a correspondence.

  2. Load Balancing in Structured P2P Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yingwu

    In this chapter we start by addressing the importance and necessity of load balancing in structured P2P networks, due to three main reasons. First, structured P2P networks assume uniform peer capacities while peer capacities are heterogeneous in deployed P2P networks. Second, resorting to pseudo-uniformity of the hash function used to generate node IDs and data item keys leads to imbalanced overlay address space and item distribution. Lastly, placement of data items cannot be randomized in some applications (e.g., range searching). We then present an overview of load aggregation and dissemination techniques that are required by many load balancing algorithms. Two techniques are discussed including tree structure-based approach and gossip-based approach. They make different tradeoffs between estimate/aggregate accuracy and failure resilience. To address the issue of load imbalance, three main solutions are described: virtual server-based approach, power of two choices, and address-space and item balancing. While different in their designs, they all aim to improve balance on the address space and data item distribution. As a case study, the chapter discusses a virtual server-based load balancing algorithm that strives to ensure fair load distribution among nodes and minimize load balancing cost in bandwidth. Finally, the chapter concludes with future research and a summary.

  3. Uniform Sampling for Directed P2P Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Cyrus; Carzaniga, Antonio

    Selecting a random peer with uniform probability across a peer-to-peer (P2P) network is a fundamental function for unstructured search, data replication, and monitoring algorithms. Such uniform sampling is supported by several techniques. However, current techniques suffer from sample bias and limited applicability. In this paper, we present a sampling algorithm that achieves a desired uniformity while making essentially no assumptions about the underlying P2P network. This algorithm, called doubly stochastic converge (DSC), iteratively adjusts the probabilities of crossing each link in the network during a random walk, such that the resulting transition matrix is doubly stochastic. DSC is fully decentralized and is designed to work on both directed and undirected topologies, making it suitable for virtually any P2P network. Our simulations show that DSC converges quickly on a wide variety of topologies, and that the random walks needed for sampling are short for most topologies. In simulation studies with FreePastry, we show that DSC is resilient to high levels of churn, while incurring a minimal sample bias.

  4. An Overlapping Structured P2P for REIK Overlay Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenjun; Song, Jingjing; Yu, Jiguo

    REIK is based on a ring which embedded an inverse Kautz digraph, to enable multi-path P2P routing. It has the constant degree and the logarithmic diameter DHT scheme with constant congestion and Byzantine fault tolerance. However, REIK did not consider the interconnection of many independent smaller networks. In this paper, we propose a new approach to build overlay network, OLS-REIK which is an overlapping structured P2P for REIK overlay network. It is a more flexible interconnecting different REIK network. Peers can belong to several rings, allowing this interconnection. By connecting smaller structured overlay networks in an unstructured way, it provides a cost effective alternative to hierarchical structured P2P systems requiring costly merging. Routing of lookup messages is performed as in REIK within one ring, but a peer belonging to several rings forwards the request to the different rings it belongs to. Furthermore a small number of across point is enough to ensure a high exhaustiveness level.

  5. The downstream decay of trapped lee waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hills, Matthew O. G.

    The mechanisms through which trapped lee waves decay, and where this decay occurs, are of utmost importance in order to understand the impact that these waves have on the larger-scale climate system. Previous studies have shown trapped waves as contributing a significant fraction of the total orographic drag, but they remain poorly understood. In this dissertation, two decay mechanisms are analyzed and compared --- stratospheric leakage, and boundary layer absorption. Decay of lee waves through upward leakage of wave energy towards the stable stratosphere is studied primarily using a linear Boussinesq model, forced by either a three-layer atmosphere or a more realistic four-layer atmosphere containing vertical wind shear and an elevated inversion. Weak downstream decay occurs due to the stratosphere in the highly-idealized three-layer atmosphere, albeit at too slow of a rate for the typical decay seen in nature. In the more realistic profile, rapid downstream decay occurs through stratospheric leakage --- leading to a removal of the wavetrain within 1.5 wavelengths in the most extreme case of a 200 m deep elevated inversion. As the depth the elevated inversion is reduced, the potential rate of downstream decay is increased. For all profiles, the rate of leakage due to the stratosphere is shown to be maximized for values of stratospheric stability (N s) slightly larger than for the threshold for decay, with a decreasing trend in the rate of decay as the stratospheric stability is further increased. The impact of the stratosphere and boundary layer on trapped wave decay are both simulated using a full nonlinear numerical model. Decay through boundary layer absorption is seen to vary slightly with the atmospheric profile --- relating to the location and the structure of the resonant wave duct compared to the boundary layer. Rates of downstream decay due to the stratosphere agree well between the linear and nonlinear models. Given the highly-idealized atmospheric

  6. Time-Resolved Measurement of Interatomic Coulombic Decay Induced by Two-Photon Double Excitation of Ne2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takanashi, T.; Golubev, N. V.; Callegari, C.; Fukuzawa, H.; Motomura, K.; Iablonskyi, D.; Kumagai, Y.; Mondal, S.; Tachibana, T.; Nagaya, K.; Nishiyama, T.; Matsunami, K.; Johnsson, P.; Piseri, P.; Sansone, G.; Dubrouil, A.; Reduzzi, M.; Carpeggiani, P.; Vozzi, C.; Devetta, M.; Negro, M.; Faccialà, D.; Calegari, F.; Trabattoni, A.; Castrovilli, M. C.; Ovcharenko, Y.; Mudrich, M.; Stienkemeier, F.; Coreno, M.; Alagia, M.; Schütte, B.; Berrah, N.; Plekan, O.; Finetti, P.; Spezzani, C.; Ferrari, E.; Allaria, E.; Penco, G.; Serpico, C.; De Ninno, G.; Diviacco, B.; Di Mitri, S.; Giannessi, L.; Jabbari, G.; Prince, K. C.; Cederbaum, L. S.; Demekhin, Ph. V.; Kuleff, A. I.; Ueda, K.

    2017-01-01

    The hitherto unexplored two-photon doubly excited states [Ne*(2 p-13 s )]2 were experimentally identified using the seeded, fully coherent, intense extreme ultraviolet free-electron laser FERMI. These states undergo ultrafast interatomic Coulombic decay (ICD), which predominantly produces singly ionized dimers. In order to obtain the rate of ICD, the resulting yield of Ne2+ ions was recorded as a function of delay between the extreme ultraviolet pump and UV probe laser pulses. The extracted lifetimes of the long-lived doubly excited states, 390 (-130 /+450 ) fs , and of the short-lived ones, less than 150 fs, are in good agreement with ab initio quantum mechanical calculations.

  7. Ring current proton decay by charge exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. H.; Hoffman, R. A.; Fritz, T. A.

    1976-01-01

    Explorer 45 (S3-A) measurements were made during the recovery phase of the moderate magnetic storm of February 24, 1972, in which a symmetric ring current had developed and effects due to asymmetric ring current losses could be eliminated. It was found that after the initial rapid decay of the proton flux, which is a consequence of the dissipation of the asymmetric ring current, the equatorially mirroring protons in the energy range 5-30 keV decayed throughout the L value range of 3.5-5.0 at the charge exchange decay rate calculated by Liemohn (1961). After several days of decay, the proton fluxes reached a lower limit where an apparent equilibrium was maintained, between weak particle source mechanisms and the loss mechanisms, until fresh protons were injected into the ring current region during substorms. While other proton loss mechanisms may also be operating, the results indicate that charge exchange is more than sufficient as a particle loss mechanism for the storm time proton ring current decay.

  8. Proton-decaying, light nuclei accessed via the invariant-mass method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Kyle

    2017-01-01

    Two-nucleon decay is the most recently discovered nuclear decay mode. For proton-rich nuclei, the majority of multi-proton decays occur via sequential steps of one-proton emission. Direct two-proton (2p) decay was believed to occur only in even-Z nuclei beyond the proton drip line where one-proton decay is energy forbidden. This has been observed for the ground states of around a dozen nuclei including 6Be, the lightest case, and 54Zn, the heaviest case. Direct 2p decay has also recently been observed for isobaric analog states where all possible 1p intermediates are either isospin allowed and energy forbidden, or energy-allowed and isospin forbidden. For light proton emitters, the lifetimes are short enough that the invariant-mass technique is ideal for measuring the decay energy, intrinsic width and, for multi-proton decays, the momentum correlations between the fragments. I will describe recent measurements of proton emitters using the invariant-mass technique with the High Resolution Array (HiRA). I will present a new, high-statistics measurement on the sequential 2p decay of excited states in 17Ne. Measuring the momentum correlations between the decay fragments allow us to determine the 1p intermediate state through which the decay proceeds. I will present data on the isobaric-analog pair 8C and 8BIAS, which highlight the two known types of direct 2p decay. I will also present the first observation of 17Na, which is unbound with respect to three-proton emission. Finally I will present a new measurement on the width of the first-excited state of 9C and compare to recent theoretical calculations.

  9. Cytoplasmic localization of sterol transcription factors Upc2p and Ecm22p in S.cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Marie, Chelsea; Leyde, Sarah; White, Theodore C

    2008-01-01

    Ergosterol homeostasis is a critical process for fungal cells. Paralogous zinc cluster transcription factors Upc2p and Ecm22p are major regulators of ergosterol biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Upc2p and Ecm22p sense and respond to sterol depletion but their mechanism of activation has not been defined. Subcellular localization and functional expression of Upc2p–GFP and Ecm22p-GFP was monitored by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry in live yeast cells. Both fusion proteins localized to intracellular membranes and to perinuclear foci. Perinuclear localization of Upc2p-GFP and Ecm22p-GFP was increased when ergosterol biosynthesis was blocked by azole drug treatment. Nuclear localization in response to sterol depletion is consistent with the hypothesis that Upc2p and Ecm22p are trafficked from a membrane to the nucleus as a post-translational mechanism of sterol sensing. PMID:18675371

  10. Radiative B Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Bard, D.; /Imperial Coll., London

    2011-11-23

    I discuss recent results in radiative B decays from the Belle and BaBar collaborations. I report new measurements of the decay rate and CP asymmetries in b {yields} s{gamma} and b {yields} d{gamma} decays, and measurements of the photon spectrum in b {yields} s{gamma}. Radiative penguin decays are flavour changing neutral currents which do not occur at tree level in the standard model (SM), but must proceed via one loop or higher order diagrams. These transitions are therefore suppressed in the SM, but offer access to poorlyknown SM parameters and are also a sensitive probe of new physics. In the SM, the rate is dominated by the top quark contribution to the loop, but non-SM particles could also contribute with a size comparable to leading SM contributions. The new physics effects are potentially large which makes them theoretically very interesting, but due to their small branching fractions they are typically experimentally challenging.

  11. Charmless B Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Gradl, Wolfgang; /Edinburgh U.

    2007-03-06

    Rare charmless hadronic B decays are a good testing ground for the standard model. The dominant amplitudes contributing to this class of B decays are CKM suppressed tree diagrams and b {yields} s or b {yields} d loop diagrams (''penguins''). These decays can be used to study interfering standard model (SM) amplitudes and CP violation. They are sensitive to the presence of new particles in the loops, and they provide valuable information to constrain theoretical models of B decays. The B factories BABAR at SLAC and Belle at KEK produce B mesons in the reaction e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B}. So far they have collected integrated luminosities of about 406 fb{sup -1} and 600 fb{sup -1}, respectively. The results presented here are based on subsets of about 200-500 fb{sup -1} and are preliminary unless a journal reference is given.

  12. RARE KAON DECAYS.

    SciTech Connect

    LITTENBERG, L.

    2005-07-19

    Lepton flavor violation (LFV) experiments have probed sensitivities corresponding to mass scales of well over 100 TeV, making life difficult for models predicting accessible LFV in kaon decay and discouraging new dedicated experiments of this type.

  13. Radiative decays at LHCb

    SciTech Connect

    Giubega, L. E.; Collaboration: LHCb Collaboration

    2016-12-15

    Precise measurements on rare radiative B decays are performed with the LHCb experiment at LHC. The LHCb results regarding the ratio of branching fractions for two radiative decays, B{sup 0} → K{sup *0}γ and B{sub s} → ϕγ, the direct CP asymmetry in B{sup 0} → K{sup *0}γ decay channel and the observation of the photon polarization in the B{sup ±} → K{sup ±}π{sup ∓}π{sup ±}γ decay, are included. The first two measurements were performed in 1 fb{sup –1} of pp collisions data and the third one in 3 fb{sup –1} of data, respectively.

  14. Bremsstrahlung in {alpha} Decay Reexamined

    SciTech Connect

    Boie, H.; Scheit, H.; Jentschura, U. D.; Koeck, F.; Lauer, M.; Schwalm, D.; Milstein, A. I.; Terekhov, I. S.

    2007-07-13

    A high-statistics measurement of bremsstrahlung emitted in the {alpha} decay of {sup 210}Po has been performed, which allows us to follow the photon spectra up to energies of {approx}500 keV. The measured differential emission probability is in good agreement with our theoretical results obtained within the quasiclassical approximation as well as with the exact quantum mechanical calculation. It is shown that, due to the small effective electric dipole charge of the radiating system, a significant interference between the electric dipole and quadrupole contributions occurs, which is altering substantially the angular correlation between the {alpha} particle and the emitted photon.

  15. Fragrance material review on 2-p-tolylethanol.

    PubMed

    Scognamiglio, J; Jones, L; Letizia, C S; Api, A M

    2012-09-01

    A toxicologic and dermatologic review of 2-p-tolylethanol when used as a fragrance ingredient is presented. 2-p-tolylethanol is a member of the fragrance structural group Aryl Alkyl Alcohols and is a primary alcohol. The AAAs are a structurally diverse class of fragrance ingredients that includes primary, secondary, and tertiary alkyl alcohols covalently bonded to an aryl (Ar) group, which may be either a substituted or unsubstituted benzene ring. The common structural element for the AAA fragrance ingredients is an alcohol group-C-(R1)(R2)OH and generically the AAA fragrances can be represented as an Ar-C-(R1)(R2)OH or Ar-Alkyl-C-(R1)(R2)OH group. This review contains a detailed summary of all available toxicology and dermatology papers that are related to this individual fragrance ingredient and is not intended as a stand-alone document. A safety assessment of the entire Aryl Alkyl Alcohols will be published simultaneously with this document; please refer to Belsito et al. (2012) for an overall assessment of the safe use of this material and all other branched chain saturated alcohols in fragrances. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Precision lifetime measurements of the 2p levels in lithium

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, H.G.; Kurtz, C.; Tanner, C.E.

    1995-08-01

    These measurements are motivated by the theoretical challenges posed by lithium. The three-electron lithium atom is one of the simplest atomic systems with which to test atomic structure calculations. Recently, there were several ab initio calculations of the lithium 2s-2p oscillator strengths, which agree to 0.15%. However, the theoretical results differ by 5 sigma from the precise fast-beam-laser lifetime measurement of Gaupp and Andra (Berlin). Hence the need for a new independent and precise measurement. Improvements were added to the fast beam laser techniques developed for cesium in order to measure the lithium 2p state lifetime. Although the technique is similar to that of cesium, the lithium atom presents a few new complications. Since the atom is lighter, it travels more quickly through the interaction and detection regions. Therefore, the 670 nm wavelength requires a dye laser to produce sufficient intensity to populate the excited state. Unfortunately, the intensity of the dye laser is inherently less stable than that of a diode laser. Another complication is that the ion-beam intensity is much more sensitive to fluctuations in the accelerating voltage. Two detectors were added: one to monitor the ion-beam intensity, and the other to monitor the laser power. With the information from the additional detectors, a new data analysis scheme was developed. Sufficient data were taken to evaluate the benefits of the new detectors. No additional work is planned at Argonne for this experiment.

  17. Strength loss in decayed wood

    Treesearch

    Rebecca E. Ibach; Patricia K. Lebow

    2014-01-01

    Wood is a durable engineering material when used in an appropriate manner, but it is susceptible to biological decay when a log, sawn product, or final product is not stored, handled, or designed properly. Even before the biological decay of wood becomes visually apparent, the decay can cause the wood to become structurally unsound. The progression of decay to that...

  18. O2, pH, and Redox Potential Microprofiles around Potamogeton malaianus Measured Using Microsensors

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Bin; Han, Ruiming; Wang, Guoxiang; Cao, Xun

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to elucidate the effects of periphyton on the microprofiles of oxygen (O2), pH, and oxidation-reduction potential around the stems and leaves of a submerged macrophyte Potamogeton malaianus and on the plant growth in the eutrophic shallow Taihu Lake, China. The microprofiles were measured using a motorized microprofiling system equipped with microsensors. The leaf age of the macrophyte and periphyton exerted significant effects on the microprofiles of O2, pH, and oxidation-reduction potential. O2 concentration and pH increased whereas the oxidation-reduction potential decreased with decreasing distance to the stem/leaf surface. The fluctuation amplitudes of O2, pH, and oxidation-reduction potential were the largest in the microprofiles of mature leaves and the lowest in senescent leaves. The periphyton increased the thickness of the broad diffusive boundary layer and fluctuation amplitudes of O2, pH, and oxidation-reduction potential. When the periphyton was removed, the thickness of the broad diffusive boundary layer in the microprofiles of stems, senescent leaves, and mature leaves reduced by 29.0%, 49.72%, and 70.34%, and the O2, pH, and oxidation-reduction potential fluctuation amplitudes also declined accordingly. Our results suggest that a thick periphyton exerted negative effects on the growth of macrophytes by providing extensive shading and creating a barrier that hindered the transport of dissolved substances such as O2, and led to premature decline in macrophytes in the eutrophic Taihu Lake. The consequent implications can help to elucidate the control mechanism of the broad diffusive boundary layer around macrophytes on nutrient cycling in eutrophic waters and to better understand the role of this layer in the Taihu Lake and other similar eutrophic waters. PMID:25004129

  19. O2, pH, and redox potential microprofiles around Potamogeton malaianus measured using microsensors.

    PubMed

    Dong, Bin; Han, Ruiming; Wang, Guoxiang; Cao, Xun

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to elucidate the effects of periphyton on the microprofiles of oxygen (O2), pH, and oxidation-reduction potential around the stems and leaves of a submerged macrophyte Potamogeton malaianus and on the plant growth in the eutrophic shallow Taihu Lake, China. The microprofiles were measured using a motorized microprofiling system equipped with microsensors. The leaf age of the macrophyte and periphyton exerted significant effects on the microprofiles of O2, pH, and oxidation-reduction potential. O2 concentration and pH increased whereas the oxidation-reduction potential decreased with decreasing distance to the stem/leaf surface. The fluctuation amplitudes of O2, pH, and oxidation-reduction potential were the largest in the microprofiles of mature leaves and the lowest in senescent leaves. The periphyton increased the thickness of the broad diffusive boundary layer and fluctuation amplitudes of O2, pH, and oxidation-reduction potential. When the periphyton was removed, the thickness of the broad diffusive boundary layer in the microprofiles of stems, senescent leaves, and mature leaves reduced by 29.0%, 49.72%, and 70.34%, and the O2, pH, and oxidation-reduction potential fluctuation amplitudes also declined accordingly. Our results suggest that a thick periphyton exerted negative effects on the growth of macrophytes by providing extensive shading and creating a barrier that hindered the transport of dissolved substances such as O2, and led to premature decline in macrophytes in the eutrophic Taihu Lake. The consequent implications can help to elucidate the control mechanism of the broad diffusive boundary layer around macrophytes on nutrient cycling in eutrophic waters and to better understand the role of this layer in the Taihu Lake and other similar eutrophic waters.

  20. Brr2p RNA helicase with a split personality: insights into structure and function.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Daniela; Beggs, Jean D

    2010-08-01

    RNA helicases are involved in many cellular processes. Pre-mRNA splicing requires eight different DExD/H-box RNA helicases, which facilitate spliceosome assembly and remodelling of the intricate network of RNA rearrangements that are central to the splicing process. Brr2p, one of the spliceosomal RNA helicases, stands out through its unusual domain architecture. In the present review we highlight the advances made by recent structural and biochemical studies that have important implications for the mechanism and regulation of Brr2p activity. We also discuss the involvement of human Brr2 in retinitis pigmentosa, a degenerative eye disease, and how its functions in splicing might connect to the molecular pathology of the disease.

  1. P2P Approach for Web Services Publishing and Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Mohmammad Towhidul; Akon, Mursalin; Shen, Xuemin (Sherman)

    Web service is an emerging paradigm for distributing business applications from different platforms to a wide variety of clients. The critical factor in seamlessly accessing web services is to discover the appropriate service and the related service providers. Unfortunately, current web service technologies use centralized directory to keep the service index, which is not scalable and at the same time vulnerable to single point of failure. Peer to peer system is a popular decentralized architecture which can be used for key look up service with scalability and self organization. Thus there is an opportunity to intersect the P2P framework with web services to provide the scalable solution. In this chapter, we discuss the key methods to deploy web services using the peer-to-peer technology.

  2. Considerations on stress triaxiality variation for 2P armor steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zichil, V.; Coseru, A.; Nedeff, F.; Tomozei, C.

    2017-05-01

    Stress triaxiality is considered an invariant of stress, defined as the ratio of hydrostatic stress (hydrostatic pressure by other authors) and the equivalent stress (usually calculated using von Mises criterion). If the values of the main three stresses have comparable sizes, stress triaxiality can be also calculated using the first invariant of the stress tensor. Despite that the stress triaxiality is an invariant, the authors have determined experimentally and analytically its variation with the force at the tensile test, but also with the radius of notches caused in the specimen. 2P armor steel being used in lightweight armor, these notches occur after shocks with foreign objects. Furthermore, the authors have revealed the stress triaxiality variation function of the test type. The tests were performed on tensile specimens loaded for tensile test, pure torsion test, 25% tensile - 75% torsion test, 50% tensile - 50% torsion test, 75% tensile - 25% torsion test. The mathematical model used was designed by Xue.

  3. Beta-decay properties of 25 Si and 26 P

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, J.-C.; Achouri, L.; Äystö, J.; Béraud, R.; Blank, B.; Canchel, G.; Czajkowski, S.; Dendooven, P.; Ensallem, A.; Giovinazzo, J.; Guillet, N.; Honkanen, J.; Jokinen, A.; Laird, A.; Lewitowicz, M.; Longour, C.; Oliveira Santos, F.; Peräjärvi, K.; Stanoiu, M.

    2004-09-01

    The β-decay properties of the neutron-deficient nuclei 25Si and 26P have been investigated at the GANIL/LISE3 facility by means of charged-particle and γ-ray spectroscopy. The decay schemes obtained and the Gamow-Teller strength distributions are compared to shell-model calculations based on the USD interaction. B(GT) values derived from the absolute measurement of the β-decay branching ratios give rise to a quenching factor of the Gamow-Teller strength of 0.6. A precise half-life of 43.7 (6) ms was determined for 26P, the β-(2)p decay mode of which is described.

  4. Role of dorsal root ganglion K2P1.1 in peripheral nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Qingxiang; Yuan, Jingjing; Xiong, Ming; Wu, Shaogen; Chen, Liyong; Bekker, Alex; Yang, Tiande

    2017-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury-caused hyperexcitability and abnormal ectopic discharges in the primary sensory neurons of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) play a key role in neuropathic pain development and maintenance. The two-pore domain background potassium (K2P) channels have been identified as key determinants of the resting membrane potential and neuronal excitability. However, whether K2P channels contribute to neuropathic pain is still elusive. We reported here that K2P1.1, the first identified mammalian K2P channel, was highly expressed in mouse DRG and distributed in small-, medium-, and large-sized DRG neurons. Unilateral lumbar (L) 4 spinal nerve ligation led to a significant and time-dependent reduction of K2P1.1 mRNA and protein in the ipsilateral L4 DRG, but not in the contralateral L4 or ipsilateral L3 DRG. Rescuing this reduction through microinjection of adeno-associated virus-DJ expressing full-length K2P1.1 mRNA into the ipsilateral L4 DRG blocked spinal nerve ligation-induced mechanical, thermal, and cold pain hypersensitivities during the development and maintenance periods. This DRG viral microinjection did not affect acute pain and locomotor function. Our findings suggest that K2P1.1 participates in neuropathic pain development and maintenance and may be a potential target in the management of this disorder. PMID:28326939

  5. Observation of two-proton radioactivity of 19Mg by tracking the decay products.

    PubMed

    Mukha, I; Sümmerer, K; Acosta, L; Alvarez, M A G; Casarejos, E; Chatillon, A; Cortina-Gil, D; Espino, J; Fomichev, A; García-Ramos, J E; Geissel, H; Gómez-Camacho, J; Grigorenko, L; Hoffmann, J; Kiselev, O; Korsheninnikov, A; Kurz, N; Litvinov, Yu; Martel, I; Nociforo, C; Ott, W; Pfutzner, M; Rodríguez-Tajes, C; Roeckl, E; Stanoiu, M; Weick, H; Woods, P J

    2007-11-02

    We have observed the two-proton radioactivity of the previously unknown (19)Mg ground state by tracking the decay products in-flight. For the first time, the trajectories of the 2p-decay products, (17)Ne+p+p, have been measured by using tracking microstrip detectors which allowed us to reconstruct the 2p-decay vertices and fragment correlations. The half-life of (19)Mg deduced from the measured vertex distribution is 4.0(15) ps in the system of (19)Mg. The Q value of the 2p decay of the (19)Mg ground state inferred from the measured p-p-(17)Ne correlations is 0.75(5) MeV.

  6. Decay of superdeformed bands

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, M.P.; Khoo, T.L.; Lauritsen, T.

    1995-12-31

    One of the major challenges in the study of superdeformation is to directly connect the large number of superdeformed bands now known to the yrast states. In this way, excitation energies, spins and parities can be assigned to the levels in the second well which is essential to establish the collective and single-particle components of these bands. This paper will review some of the progress which has been made to understand the decay of superdeformed bands using the new arrays including the measurement of the total decay spectrum and the establishment of direct one-step decays from the superdeformed band to the yrast line in {sup 194}Hg. 42 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Suppressed Charmed B Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Snoek, Hella Leonie

    2009-06-02

    This thesis describes the measurement of the branching fractions of the suppressed charmed B0 → D*- a0+ decays and the non-resonant B0 → D*- ηπ+ decays in approximately 230 million Υ(4S) → B$\\bar{B}$ events. The data have been collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in California. Theoretical predictions of the branching fraction of the B0 → D*- a{sub 0}+ decays show large QCD model dependent uncertainties. Non-factorizing terms, in the naive factorization model, that can be calculated by QCD factorizing models have a large impact on the branching fraction of these decay modes. The predictions of the branching fractions are of the order of 10-6. The measurement of the branching fraction gives more insight into the theoretical models. In general a better understanding of QCD models will be necessary to conduct weak interaction physics at the next level. The presence of CP violation in electroweak interactions allows the differentiation between matter and antimatter in the laws of physics. In the Standard Model, CP violation is incorporated in the CKM matrix that describes the weak interaction between quarks. Relations amongst the CKM matrix elements are used to present the two relevant parameters as the apex of a triangle (Unitarity Triangle) in a complex plane. The over-constraining of the CKM triangle by experimental measurements is an important test of the Standard Model. At this moment no stringent direct measurements of the CKM angle γ, one of the interior angles of the Unitarity Triangle, are available. The measurement of the angle γ can be performed using the decays of neutral B mesons. The B0 → D*- a0+ decay is sensitive to the angle γ and, in comparison to the current decays that are being employed, could significantly

  8. Bottomonium spectroscopy and radiative transitions involving the χb J(1 P ,2 P ) states at BaBar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lee, M. J.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; So, R. Y.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Dey, B.; Gary, J. W.; Long, O.; Campagnari, C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Lockman, W. S.; Panduro Vazquez, W.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Miyashita, T. S.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Roehrken, M.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Pushpawela, B. G.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Martellotti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Dauncey, P. D.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Prell, S.; Ahmed, H.; Gritsan, A. V.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Cowan, G.; Bougher, J.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Schubert, K. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Lafferty, G. D.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Cowan, R.; Sciolla, G.; Cheaib, R.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Martinelli, M.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; LoSecco, J. M.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Feltresi, E.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Pacetti, S.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Pilloni, A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Dittrich, S.; Grünberg, O.; Hess, M.; Leddig, T.; Voß, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Vasseur, G.; Anulli, F.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Fulsom, B. G.; Graham, M. T.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kim, P.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Lindemann, D.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va'vra, J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wulsin, H. W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; De Mori, F.; Filippi, A.; Gamba, D.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Villanueva-Perez, P.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Beaulieu, A.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Choi, H. H. F.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Lueck, T.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.; BaBar Collaboration

    2014-12-01

    We use (121 ±1 ) million Υ (3 S ) and (98 ±1 ) million Υ (2 S ) mesons recorded by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e+e- collider at SLAC to perform a study of radiative transitions involving the χb J(1 P ,2 P ) states in exclusive decays with μ+μ- γ γ final states. We reconstruct twelve channels in four cascades using two complementary methods. In the first we identify both signal photon candidates in the electromagnetic calorimeter (EMC), employ a calorimeter timing-based technique to reduce backgrounds, and determine branching-ratio products and fine mass splittings. These results include the best observational significance yet for the χb 0(2 P )→γ Υ (2 S ) and χb 0(1 P )→γ Υ (1 S ) transitions. In the second method, we identify one photon candidate in the EMC and one which has converted into an e+e- pair due to interaction with detector material, and we measure absolute product branching fractions. This method is particularly useful for measuring Υ (3 S )→γ χb 1 ,2(1 P ) decays. Additionally, we provide the most up-to-date derived branching fractions, matrix elements and mass splittings for χb transitions in the bottomonium system. Using a new technique, we also measure the two lowest-order spin-dependent coefficients in the nonrelativistic QCD Hamiltonian.

  9. Does mass accretion lead to field decay in neutron stars?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shibazaki, N.; Murakami, T.; Shaham, J.; Nomoto, K.

    1989-01-01

    Adopting the hypothesis of accretion-induced magnetic field decay in neutron stars, the consequent evolution of a neutron star's spin and magnetic field are calculated. The results are consistent with observations of binary and millisecond radio pulsars. Thermomagnetic effects could provide a possible physical mechanism for such accretion-induced field decay.

  10. Exotic Higgs decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kling, Felix

    Many models of physics beyond the Standard Model include an extended Higgs sector, responsible for electroweak symmetry breaking, and predict the existence of additional Higgs bosons. The Type II Two-Higgs-Doublet Model (2HDM) is a particularly well motivated scenario and a suitable framework for phenomenological studies of extended Higgs sectors. Its low energy spectrum includes two CP-even Higgses h and H, one CP-odd Higgs A, and a pair of charged Higgses H +/-. We study the implication of the LHC Higgs search re- sults on the Type II 2HDM and identify regions of parameter space which are consistent with all experimental and theoretical constraints and can accommo- date the observed 125 GeV Higgs signal. This includes parameter space with a distinctive mass hierarchy which permit a sizable mass splitting between the undiscovered non-Standard Model Higgs states. If this mass splitting is large enough, exotic Higgs decay channels into either a Higgs plus a Standard Model gauge boson or two lighter Higgses open up. This can significantly weaken the reach of the conventional Higgs decay channels into Standard Model particles but also provide the additional opportunity to search for exotic Higgs decay channels. We provide benchmark planes to explore exotic Higgs decay scenar- ios and perform detailed collider analyses to study the exotic decay channels H/A → AZ/HZ and H+/- → AW/HW. We find that these exotic decays offer complementary discovery channels to the conventional modes for both neutral and charged Higgs searches and permit exclusion and discovery in large regions of parameter space.

  11. SU(3) breaking in hyperon beta decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roos, M.

    1990-08-01

    The symmetry breaking in the hyperon semi-leptonic decays is analyzed with the constraint the | us| is given by K e3. The mechanisms of symmetry breaking of Donoghue, Holstein and Klimt and the one-loop corrected vector form factors of Krause are compared with data.

  12. Flavor changing nucleon decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maekawa, Nobuhiro; Muramatsu, Yu

    2017-04-01

    Recent discovery of neutrino large mixings implies the large mixings in the diagonalizing matrices of 5 bar fields in SU (5) grand unified theory (GUT), while the diagonalizing matrices of 10 fields of SU (5) are expected to have small mixings like Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix. We calculate the predictions of flavor changing nucleon decays (FCND) in SU (5), SO (10), and E6 GUT models which have the above features for mixings. We found that FCND can be the main decay mode and play an important role to test GUT models.

  13. Search for the decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casanova Mohr, R.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruscio, F.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gastaldi, U.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Geraci, A.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Matthieu, K.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Ninci, D.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Osorio Rodrigues, B.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skillicorn, I.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Sterpka, F.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tekampe, T.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Todd, J.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.

    2015-08-01

    A search for decays is performed using 3 .0 fb1- of pp collision data recorded by the LHCb experiment during 2011 and 2012. The f 0(980) meson is reconstructed through its decay to the π + π - final state in the mass window 900 MeV /c 2 < m( π + π -) < 1080 MeV /c 2. No significant signal is observed. The first upper limits on the branching fraction of are set at 90 % (95 %) confidence level. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  14. Energetic Landscape of MDM2-p53 Interactions by Computational Mutagenesis of the MDM2-p53 Interaction.

    PubMed

    Thayer, Kelly M; Beyer, George A

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin ligase MDM2, a principle regulator of the tumor suppressor p53, plays an integral role in regulating cellular levels of p53 and thus a prominent role in current cancer research. Computational analysis used MUMBO to rotamerize the MDM2-p53 crystal structure 1YCR to obtain an exhaustive search of point mutations, resulting in the calculation of the ΔΔG comprehensive energy landscape for the p53-bound regulator. The results herein have revealed a set of residues R65-E69 on MDM2 proximal to the p53 hydrophobic binding pocket that exhibited an energetic profile deviating significantly from similar residues elsewhere in the protein. In light of the continued search for novel competitive inhibitors for MDM2, we discuss possible implications of our findings on the drug discovery field.

  15. Wip1 inhibitor GSK2830371 inhibits neuroblastoma growth by inducing Chk2/p53-mediated apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhenghu; Wang, Long; Yao, Dayong; Yang, Tianshu; Cao, Wen-Ming; Dou, Jun; Pang, Jonathan C.; Guan, Shan; Zhang, Huiyuan; Yu, Yang; Zhao, Yanling; Wang, Yongfeng; Xu, Xin; Shi, Yan; Patel, Roma; Zhang, Hong; Vasudevan, Sanjeev A.; Liu, Shangfeng; Yang, Jianhua; Nuchtern, Jed G.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is the most common extracranial tumor in children. Unlike in most adult tumors, tumor suppressor protein 53 (p53) mutations occur with a relatively low frequency in NB and the downstream function of p53 is intact in NB cell lines. Wip1 is a negative regulator of p53 and hindrance of Wip1 activity by novel inhibitor GSK2830371 is a potential strategy to activate p53’s tumor suppressing function in NB. Yet, the in vivo efficacy and the possible mechanisms of GSK2830371 in NB have not yet been elucidated. Here we report that novel Wip1 inhibitor GSK2830371 induced Chk2/p53-mediated apoptosis in NB cells in a p53-dependent manner. In addition, GSK2830371 suppressed the colony-formation potential of p53 wild-type NB cell lines. Furthermore, GSK2830371 enhanced doxorubicin- (Dox) and etoposide- (VP-16) induced cytotoxicity in a subset of NB cell lines, including the chemoresistant LA-N-6 cell line. More importantly, GSK2830371 significantly inhibited tumor growth in an orthotopic xenograft NB mouse model by inducing Chk2/p53-mediated apoptosis in vivo. Taken together, this study suggests that GSK2830371 induces Chk2/p53-mediated apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo in a p53 dependent manner. PMID:27991505

  16. A plant virus movement protein regulates the Gcn2p kinase in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Frederic; Aparicio-Sanchis, Rafael; Gadea, José; Sánchez-Navarro, Jesús Ángel; Pallás, Vicente; Murguía, José Ramón

    2011-01-01

    Virus life cycle heavily depends on their ability to command the host machinery in order to translate their genomes. Animal viruses have been shown to interfere with host translation machinery by expressing viral proteins that either maintain or inhibit eIF2α function by phosphorylation. However, this interference mechanism has not been described for any plant virus yet. Prunnus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV) is a serious pathogen of cultivated stone fruit trees. The movement protein (MP) of PNRSV is necessary for the cell-to-cell movement of the virus. By using a yeast-based approach we have found that over-expression of the PNRSV MP caused a severe growth defect in yeast cells. cDNA microarrays analysis carried out to characterise at the molecular level the growth interference phenotype reported the induction of genes related to amino acid deprivation suggesting that expression of MP activates the GCN pathway in yeast cells. Accordingly, PNRSV MP triggered activation of the Gcn2p kinase, as judged by increased eIF2α phosphorylation. Activation of Gcn2p by MP expression required a functional Tor1p kinase, since rapamycin treatment alleviated the yeast cell growth defect and blocked eIF2α phosphorylation triggered by MP expression. Overall, these findings uncover a previously uncharacterised function for PNRSV MP viral protein, and point out at Tor1p and Gcn2p kinases as candidate susceptibility factors for plant viral infections.

  17. Relativistic model of 2p-2h meson exchange currents in (anti)neutrino scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz Simo, I.; E Amaro, J.; Barbaro, M. B.; De Pace, A.; Caballero, J. A.; Donnelly, T. W.

    2017-06-01

    We develop a model of relativistic, charged meson-exchange currents (MEC) for neutrino-nucleus interactions. The two-body current is the sum of seagull, pion-in-flight, pion-pole and Δ-pole operators. These operators are obtained from the weak pion-production amplitudes for the nucleon derived in the nonlinear σ-model together with weak excitation of the {{Δ }}(1232) resonance and its subsequent decay into Nπ . With these currents we compute the five 2p-2h response functions contributing to ({ν }l,{l}-) and ({\\overline{ν }}l,{l}+) reactions in the relativistic Fermi gas model. The total current is the sum of vector and axial two-body currents. The vector current is related to the electromagnetic MEC operator that contributes to electron scattering. This allows one to check our model by comparison with the results of De Pace et al (2003 Nucl. Phys. A 726 303). Thus, our model is a natural extension of that model to the weak sector with the addition of the axial MEC operator. The dependences of the response functions on several ingredients of the approach are analyzed. Specifically we discuss relativistic effects, quantify the size of the direct-exchange interferences, and the relative importance of the axial versus vector current.

  18. Migration of Dust Particles from Comet 2P Encke

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ipatov, S. I.

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the migration of dust particles under the gravitational influence of all planets (except for Pluto), radiation pressure, Poynting-Robertson drag and solar wind drag for Beta equal to 0.002, 0.004, 0.01, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4. For silicate particles such values of Beta correspond to diameters equal to about 200, 100, 40, 9, 4, 2, and 1 microns, respectively. We used the Bulirsh-Stoer method of integration, and the relative error per integration step was taken to be less than lo-'. Initial orbits of the particles were close to the orbit of Comet 2P Encke. We considered initial particles near perihelion (runs denoted as Delta tsub o, = 0), near aphelion (Delta tsub o, = 0.5), and also studied their initial positions when the comet moved for Pa/4 after perihelion passage (such runs are denoted as Delta tsub o, =i 0.25), where Pa is the period of the comet. Variations in time T when perihelion was passed was varied with a step 0.1 day for series 'S' and with a step 1 day for series 'L'. For each Beta we considered N = 101 particles for "S" runs and 150 particles for "L" runs.

  19. Multicast Services over Structured P2P Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzanares-Lopez, Pilar; Malgosa-Sanahuja, Josemaria; Muñoz-Gea, Juan Pedro; Sanchez-Aarnoutse, Juan Carlos

    IP multicast functionality was defined as an efficient method to transmit datagrams to a group of receivers. However, although a lot of research work has been done in this technology, IP multicast has not spread out over the Internet as much as expected, reducing its use for local environments (i.e., LANs). The peer-to-peer networks paradigm can be used to overcome the IP multicast limitations. In this new scenario (called Application Layer Multicast or ALM), the multicast functionality is changed from network to application layer. Although ALM solution can be classified into unstructured and structured solutions, the last ones are the best option to offer multicast services due to the effectiveness in the discovery nodes, their mathematical definition and the totally decentralized management. In this chapter we are going to offer a tutorial of the main structured ALM solutions, but introducing two novelties with respect to related surveys in the past: first, the systematic description of most representative structured ALM solution in OverSim (one of the most popular p2p simulation frameworks). Second, some simulation comparatives between flooding-based and tree-based structured ALM solution are also presented.

  20. CP violation in semileptonic tau lepton decays

    SciTech Connect

    Delepine, D.; Castro, G. Lopez; Lozano, L.-T. Lopez

    2005-08-01

    The leading order contribution to the direct CP asymmetry in {tau}{sup {+-}}{yields}K{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} decay rates is evaluated within the standard model. The weak phase required for CP violation is introduced through an interesting mechanism involving second order weak interactions, which is also responsible for tiny violations of the {delta}S={delta}Q rule in K{sub l3} decays. The calculated CP asymmetry turns out to be of order 10{sup -12}, leaving a large window for studying effects of nonstandard sources of CP violation in this observable.

  1. Attractor Explosions and Catalyzed Vacuum Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Daniel; Silverstein, Eva; Starr, David

    2006-05-05

    We present a mechanism for catalyzed vacuum bubble production obtained by combining moduli stabilization with a generalized attractor phenomenon in which moduli are sourced by compact objects. This leads straightforwardly to a class of examples in which the Hawking decay process for black holes unveils a bubble of a different vacuum from the ambient one, generalizing the new endpoint for Hawking evaporation discovered recently by Horowitz. Catalyzed vacuum bubble production can occur for both charged and uncharged bodies, including Schwarzschild black holes for which massive particles produced in the Hawking process can trigger vacuum decay. We briefly discuss applications of this process to the population and stability of metastable vacua.

  2. Helicity and nuclear β decay correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Ran; Sternberg, Matthew G.; Garcia, Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    We present simple derivations of nuclear β-decay correlations with an emphasis on the special role of helicity. This topic provides a good opportunity to teach students about helicity and chirality in particle physics with exercises that use simple aspects of quantum mechanics. In addition, this paper serves as an introduction to nuclear β-decay correlations from both a theoretical and experimental perspective. This article can be used to introduce students to ongoing experiments searching for hints of new physics in the low-energy precision frontier.

  3. CCQE, 2p2h excitations and ν—energy reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Nieves, J.; Simo, I. Ruiz; Sánchez, F.; Vacas, M. J. Vicente

    2015-05-15

    We analyze the MiniBooNE muon neutrino CCQE-like dσ/dT{sub μ} d cos θ{sub μ} data using a theoretical model that, among other nuclear effects, includes RPA correlations and 2p2h (multinucleon) mechanisms. These corrections turn out to be essential for the description of the data. We find that MiniBooNE CCQE-like data are fully compatible with former determinations of the nucleon axial mass M{sub A} ∼ 1.05 GeV. This is in sharp contrast with several previous analysis where anomalously large values of M{sub A} ∼ 1.4 GeV have been suggested. We also show that because of the the multinucleon mechanism effects, the algorithm used to reconstruct the neutrino energy is not adequate when dealing with quasielastic-like events. Finally, we analyze the MiniBooNE unfolded cross section, and show that it exhibits an excess (deficit) of low (high) energy neutrinos, which is an artifact of the unfolding process that ignores 2p2h mechanisms.

  4. Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miramonti, Lino

    0ν2β decay is a very powerful tool for probing the physics beyond the particle Standard Model. After the recent discovery of neutrino flavor oscillation, we know that neutrinos must have a mass (at least two of them). The 0ν2β decay discovery could fix the neutrino mass scale and its nature (Majorana particle). The unique characteristics of the Borexino detector and its Counting Test Facility (CTF) can be employed for high sensitivity studies of 116Cd 0ν2β decay: the CAMEO project. A first step foresees 24 enriched 116CdWO4 crystals for a total mass of 65 kg in the Counting Test Facility; then, 370 enriched 116CdWO4 crystals, for a total mass of 1 ton in the Borexino detector. Measurements of 116CdWO4 crystals and Monte Carlo simulations have shown that the CAMEO experiment sensitivity will be T1/20ν > 1026 y, for the 65 kg phase, and T1/20ν > 1027 y for the 1 ton phase; consequently the limit on the effective neutrino mass will be ≤ 60 meV, and ≤ 20 meV, respectively. This work is based upon the experiments performed by the INR (Kiev) (and from 1998 also by the University of Florence) at the Solotvina Underground Laboratory (Ukraine). The current status of 0ν2β, and future projects of 0ν2β decay research are also briefly reviewed.

  5. Decay Time of Cathodoluminescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2009-01-01

    Simple measurements of the decay time of cathodoluminescence are described. Cathodoluminescence is used in many devices, including computer monitors, oscilloscopes, radar displays and television tubes. The experimental setup is simple and easy to build. Two oscilloscopes, a function generator, and a fast photodiode are needed for the experiments.…

  6. Discoloration & decay in oak

    Treesearch

    Alex L. Shigo

    1971-01-01

    Diseases that result in discoloration and decay of wood are major problems affecting all species of oak. Wounds often start the processes that can lead to these diseases. The type and severity of the wound, the vigor of the tree, the environment, and the aggressiveness of microorganisms that infect are some of the most important factors that determine the nature of the...

  7. Decay Time of Cathodoluminescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2009-01-01

    Simple measurements of the decay time of cathodoluminescence are described. Cathodoluminescence is used in many devices, including computer monitors, oscilloscopes, radar displays and television tubes. The experimental setup is simple and easy to build. Two oscilloscopes, a function generator, and a fast photodiode are needed for the experiments.…

  8. Dynamic regulation of mRNA decay during neural development.

    PubMed

    Burow, Dana A; Umeh-Garcia, Maxine C; True, Marie B; Bakhaj, Crystal D; Ardell, David H; Cleary, Michael D

    2015-04-21

    Gene expression patterns are determined by rates of mRNA transcription and decay. While transcription is known to regulate many developmental processes, the role of mRNA decay is less extensively defined. A critical step toward defining the role of mRNA decay in neural development is to measure genome-wide mRNA decay rates in neural tissue. Such information should reveal the degree to which mRNA decay contributes to differential gene expression and provide a foundation for identifying regulatory mechanisms that affect neural mRNA decay. We developed a technique that allows genome-wide mRNA decay measurements in intact Drosophila embryos, across all tissues and specifically in the nervous system. Our approach revealed neural-specific decay kinetics, including stabilization of transcripts encoding regulators of axonogenesis and destabilization of transcripts encoding ribosomal proteins and histones. We also identified correlations between mRNA stability and physiologic properties of mRNAs; mRNAs that are predicted to be translated within axon growth cones or dendrites have long half-lives while mRNAs encoding transcription factors that regulate neurogenesis have short half-lives. A search for candidate cis-regulatory elements identified enrichment of the Pumilio recognition element (PRE) in mRNAs encoding regulators of neurogenesis. We found that decreased expression of the RNA-binding protein Pumilio stabilized predicted neural mRNA targets and that a PRE is necessary to trigger reporter-transcript decay in the nervous system. We found that differential mRNA decay contributes to the relative abundance of transcripts involved in cell-fate decisions, axonogenesis, and other critical events during Drosophila neural development. Neural-specific decay kinetics and the functional specificity of mRNA decay suggest the existence of a dynamic neurodevelopmental mRNA decay network. We found that Pumilio is one component of this network, revealing a novel function for this RNA

  9. Anatomy of decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bel, Lennaert; De Bruyn, Kristof; Fleischer, Robert; Mulder, Mick; Tuning, Niels

    2015-07-01

    The decays B {/d 0} → D {/d -} D {/d +} and B {/s 0} → D {/s -} D {/s +} probe the CP-violating mixing phases ϕ d and ϕ s , respectively. The theoretical uncertainty of the corresponding determinations is limited by contributions from penguin topologies, which can be included with the help of the U-spin symmetry of the strong interaction. We analyse the currently available data for B {/d, s 0} → D {/d, s -} D {/d, s +} decays and those with similar dynamics to constrain the involved non-perturbative parameters. Using further information from semileptonic B {/d 0} → D {/d -} ℓ + ν ℓ decays, we perform a test of the factorisation approximation and take non-factorisable SU(3)-breaking corrections into account. The branching ratios of the B {/d 0} → D {/d -} D {/d +}, B {/s 0} → D {/s -} D {/d +} and B {/s 0} → D {/s -} D {/s +}, B {/d 0} → D {/d -} D {/s +} decays show an interesting pattern which can be accommodated through significantly enhanced exchange and penguin annihilation topologies. This feature is also supported by data for the B {/s 0} → D {/d -} D {/d +} channel. Moreover, there are indications of potentially enhanced penguin contributions in the B {/d 0} → D {/d -} D {/d +} and B {/s 0} → D {/s -} D {/s +} decays, which would make it mandatory to control these effects in the future measurements of ϕ d and ϕ s . We discuss scenarios for high-precision measurements in the era of Belle II and the LHCb upgrade.

  10. Inflaton dark matter from incomplete decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastero-Gil, Mar; Cerezo, Rafael; Rosa, João G.

    2016-05-01

    We show that the decay of the inflaton field may be incomplete, while nevertheless successfully reheating the Universe and leaving a stable remnant that accounts for the present dark matter abundance. We note, in particular, that since the mass of the inflaton decay products is field dependent, one can construct models, endowed with an appropriate discrete symmetry, where inflaton decay is kinematically forbidden at late times and only occurs during the initial stages of field oscillations after inflation. We show that this is sufficient to ensure the transition to a radiation-dominated era and that inflaton particles typically thermalize in the process. They eventually decouple and freeze out, yielding a thermal dark matter relic. We discuss possible implementations of this generic mechanism within consistent cosmological and particle physics scenarios, for both single-field and hybrid inflation.

  11. Leptogenesis and gravity: Baryon asymmetry without decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, J. I.; Shore, G. M.

    2017-03-01

    A popular class of theories attributes the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe to CP-violating decays of super-heavy BSM particles in the Early Universe. Recently, we discovered a new source of leptogenesis in these models, namely that the same Yukawa phases which provide the CP violation for decays, combined with curved-spacetime loop effects, lead to an entirely new gravitational mechanism for generating an asymmetry, driven by the expansion of the Universe and independent of the departure of the heavy particles from equilibrium. In this Letter, we build on previous work by analysing the full Boltzmann equation, exploring the full parameter space of the theory and studying the time-evolution of the asymmetry. Remarkably, we find regions of parameter space where decays play no part at all, and where the baryon asymmetry of the Universe is determined solely by gravitational effects.

  12. Symmetry relations in nucleon decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurlbert, Anya; Wilczek, Frank

    1980-05-01

    Some experimental consequences of the structure of the effective hamiltonian for nucleon decay are presented. New results concern relations among inclusive decay rates, a striking test of the kinship hypothesis involving μ+ polarization, and soft π theorems.

  13. Heat shock-induced degradation of Msn2p, a Saccharomyces cerevisiae transcription factor, occurs in the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Lallet, S; Garreau, H; Poisier, C; Boy-Marcotte, E; Jacquet, M

    2004-10-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the zinc finger transcription factor Msn2p is a central component of the general stress response. It is activated in response to a wide variety of environmental changes, including physicochemical stresses as well as nutritional starvation, and induces the expression of a large set of genes required for cellular adaptation. The transcriptional activity of Msn2p in response to stresses is transient, and must therefore be strictly controlled. It is mainly regulated by reversible translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus upon the onset of stress, under the control of the cAMP-APK and the TOR pathways. In this report, we describe a new level of control: heat shock-induced degradation of Msn2p by the 26S proteasome. This degradation occurs in the nucleus and is further enhanced when Msn2p is fully active. Moreover, we show that the cyclin-dependent protein kinase Srb10p, a component of the transcription machinery, plays a role in the enhanced degradation of Msn2p upon heat shock. These findings provide new insights into the mechanisms by which Msn2p is transiently activated in response to stress.

  14. The casein kinases Yck1p and Yck2p act in the secretory pathway, in part, by regulating the Rab exchange factor Sec2p

    PubMed Central

    Stalder, Danièle; Novick, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Sec2p is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor that activates Sec4p, the final Rab GTPase of the yeast secretory pathway. Sec2p is recruited to secretory vesicles by the upstream Rab Ypt32p acting in concert with phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PI(4)P). Sec2p also binds to the Sec4p effector Sec15p, yet Ypt32p and Sec15p compete against each other for binding to Sec2p. We report here that the redundant casein kinases Yck1p and Yck2p phosphorylate sites within the Ypt32p/Sec15p binding region and in doing so promote binding to Sec15p and inhibit binding to Ypt32p. We show that Yck2p binds to the autoinhibitory domain of Sec2p, adjacent to the PI(4)P binding site, and that addition of PI(4)P inhibits Sec2p phosphorylation by Yck2p. Loss of Yck1p and Yck2p function leads to accumulation of an intracellular pool of the secreted glucanase Bgl2p, as well as to accumulation of Golgi-related structures in the cytoplasm. We propose that Sec2p is phosphorylated after it has been recruited to secretory vesicles and the level of PI(4)P has been reduced. This promotes Sec2p function by stimulating its interaction with Sec15p. Finally, Sec2p is dephosphorylated very late in the exocytic reaction to facilitate recycling. PMID:26700316

  15. Arf3p GTPase is a key regulator of Bud2p activation for invasive growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jia-Wei; Lee, Fang-Jen S

    2013-08-01

    The regulation and signaling pathways involved in the invasive growth of yeast have been studied extensively because of their general applicability to fungal pathogenesis. Bud2p, which functions as a GTPase-activating protein (GAP) for Bud1p/Rsr1p, is required for appropriate budding patterns and filamentous growth. The regulatory mechanisms leading to Bud2p activation, however, are poorly understood. In this study, we report that ADP-ribosylation factor 3p (Arf3p) acts as a regulator of Bud2p activation during invasive growth. Arf3p binds directly to the N-terminal region of Bud2p and promotes its GAP activity both in vitro and in vivo. Genetic analysis shows that deletion of BUD1 suppresses the defect of invasive growth in arf3Δ or bud2Δ cells. Lack of Arf3p, like that of Bud2p, causes the intracellular accumulation of Bud1p-GTP. The Arf3p-Bud2p interaction is important for invasive growth and facilitates the Bud2p-Bud1p association in vivo. Finally, we show that under glucose depletion-induced invasion conditions in yeast, more Arf3p is activated to the GTP-bound state, and the activation is independent of Arf3p guanine nucleotide-exchange factor Yel1p. Thus we demonstrate that a novel spatial activation of Arf3p plays a role in regulating Bud2p activation during glucose depletion-induced invasive growth.

  16. Theory of weak hypernuclear decay

    SciTech Connect

    Dubach, J.F.; Feldman, G.B.; Holstein, B.R. |; de la Torre, L.

    1996-07-01

    The weak nomesonic decay of {Lambda}-hypernuclei is studied in the context of a one-meson-exchange model. Predictions are made for the decay rate, the {ital p}/{ital n} stimulation ratio and the asymmetry in polarized hypernuclear decay. Copyright {copyright} 1996 Academic Press, Inc.

  17. Protecting log cabins from decay

    Treesearch

    R. M. Rowell; J. M. Black; L. R. Gjovik; W. C. Feist

    1977-01-01

    This report answers the questions most often asked of the Forest Service on the protection of log cabins from decay, and on practices for the exterior finishing and maintenance of existing cabins. Causes of stain and decay are discussed, as are some basic techniques for building a cabin that will minimize decay. Selection and handling of logs, their preservative...

  18. B Decays Involving Light Mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Eschrich, Ivo Gough; /UC, Irvine

    2007-01-09

    Recent BABAR results for decays of B-mesons to combinations of non-charm mesons are presented. This includes B decays to two vector mesons, B {yields} {eta}{prime}({pi}, K, {rho}) modes, and a comprehensive Dalitz Plot analysis of B {yields} KKK decays.

  19. Whi2p links nutritional sensing to actin-dependent Ras-cAMP-PKA regulation and apoptosis in yeast.

    PubMed

    Leadsham, Jane E; Miller, Katherine; Ayscough, Kathryn R; Colombo, Sonia; Martegani, Enzo; Sudbery, Pete; Gourlay, Campbell W

    2009-03-01

    Elucidating the mechanisms by which eukaryotic cells coordinate environmental signals with intracellular ;fate' decisions, such as apoptosis, remains one of the important challenges facing cell biologists. It has recently emerged that the dynamic nature of the actin cytoskeleton is an important factor in the linkage of sensation of extracellular stimuli to signalling mechanisms that regulate programmed cell death. In yeast, actin has been shown to play a role in the regulation of apoptosis as cells prepare themselves for quiescence in the face of nutritional exhaustion, by facilitating the shutdown of Ras-cAMP-PKA pathway activity. Here, we demonstrate that the loss of Whi2p function, a protein known to influence cell cycle exit under conditions of nutritional stress, leads to cell death in yeast that displays the hallmarks of actin-mediated apoptosis. We show that actin-mediated apoptosis occurs as a result of inappropriate Ras-cAMP-PKA activity in Deltawhi2 cells. Cells lacking Whi2p function exhibit an aberrant accumulation of activated Ras2 at the mitochondria in response to nutritional depletion. This study provides evidence that the shutdown of cAMP-PKA signalling activity in wild-type cells involves Whi2p-dependent targeting of Ras2p to the vacuole for proteolysis. We also demonstrate for the first time that Whi2p-dependent regulation of cAMP-PKA signalling plays a physiological role in the differentiation of yeast colonies by facilitating elaboration of distinct zones of cell death.

  20. Superallowed Fermi beta decay

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, J. C.; Towner, I. S.

    1998-12-21

    Superallowed 0{sup +}{yields}0{sup +} nuclear beta decay provides a direct measure of the weak vector coupling constant, G{sub V}. We survey current world data on the nine accurately determined transitions of this type, which range from the decay of {sup 10}C to that of {sup 54}Co, and demonstrate that the results confirm conservation of the weak vector current (CVC) but differ at the 98% confidence level from the unitarity condition for the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix. We examine the reliability of the small calculated corrections that have been applied to the data, and assess the likelihood of even higher quality nuclear data becoming available to confirm or deny the discrepancy. Some of the required experiments depend upon the availability of intense radioactive beams. Others are possible today.

  1. Decay Dynamics of Tumors

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The fractional cell kill is a mathematical expression describing the rate at which a certain population of cells is reduced to a fraction of itself. We investigate the mathematical function that governs the rate at which a solid tumor is lysed by a cell population of cytotoxic lymphocytes. We do it in the context of enzyme kinetics, using geometrical and analytical arguments. We derive the equations governing the decay of a tumor in the limit in which it is plainly surrounded by immune cells. A cellular automaton is used to test such decay, confirming its validity. Finally, we introduce a modification in the fractional cell kill so that the expected dynamics is attained in the mentioned limit. We also discuss the potential of this new function for non-solid and solid tumors which are infiltrated with lymphocytes. PMID:27310010

  2. Exploring the hypothesis that limiting diffusion of fungal oxidants underlies decay resistance in acetylated wood

    Treesearch

    Christopher G. Hunt; Steven Lacher; Kolby Hirth; Linda Lorenz; Kenneth E. Hammel

    2017-01-01

    The mechanisms by which chemical modifications, specifically acetylation, improve the decay resistance of wood are a topic of active research. In the early stages of decay, fungi secrete lowmolecular- weight oxidants or oxidant precursors. These oxidants diffuse through the wet wood cell wall and oxidize cell wall polymers, which enable the decay process to proceed....

  3. The role of chemical transport in the brown-rot decay resistance of modified wood

    Treesearch

    Samuel Zelinka; R. Ringman; A. Pilgard; E. E. Thybring; Joseph Jakes; K. Richter

    2016-01-01

    Chemical modification of wood increases decay resistance but the exact mechanisms remain poorly understood. Recently, Ringman and coauthors examined established theories addressing why modified wood has increased decay resistance and concluded that the most probable cause of inhibition and/or delay of initiation of brown-rot decay is lowering the equilibrium moisture...

  4. PyDecay/GraphPhys: A Unified Language and Storage System for Particle Decay Process Descriptions

    SciTech Connect

    Dunietz, Jesse N.; /MIT /SLAC

    2011-06-22

    To ease the tasks of Monte Carlo (MC) simulation and event reconstruction (i.e. inferring particle-decay events from experimental data) for long-term BaBar data preservation and analysis, the following software components have been designed: a language ('GraphPhys') for specifying decay processes, common to both simulation and data analysis, allowing arbitrary parameters on particles, decays, and entire processes; an automated visualization tool to show graphically what decays have been specified; and a searchable database storage mechanism for decay specifications. Unlike HepML, a proposed XML standard for HEP metadata, the specification language is designed not for data interchange between computer systems, but rather for direct manipulation by human beings as well as computers. The components are interoperable: the information parsed from files in the specification language can easily be rendered as an image by the visualization package, and conversion between decay representations was implemented. Several proof-of-concept command-line tools were built based on this framework. Applications include building easier and more efficient interfaces to existing analysis tools for current projects (e.g. BaBar/BESII), providing a framework for analyses in future experimental settings (e.g. LHC/SuperB), and outreach programs that involve giving students access to BaBar data and analysis tools to give them a hands-on feel for scientific analysis.

  5. Ionic-charge dependence of the intermolecular coulombic decay time scale for aqueous ions probed by the core-hole clock.

    PubMed

    Pokapanich, Wandared; Kryzhevoi, Nikolai V; Ottosson, Niklas; Svensson, Svante; Cederbaum, Lorenz S; Öhrwall, Gunnar; Björneholm, Olle

    2011-08-31

    Auger electron spectroscopy combined with theoretical calculations has been applied to investigate the decay of the Ca 2p core hole of aqueous Ca(2+). Beyond the localized two-hole final states on the calcium ion, originating from a normal Auger process, we have further identified the final states delocalized between the calcium ion and its water surroundings and produced by core level intermolecular Coulombic decay (ICD) processes. By applying the core-hole clock method, the time scale of the core level ICD was determined to be 33 ± 1 fs for the 2p core hole of the aqueous Ca(2+). The comparison of this time constant to those associated with the aqueous K(+), Na(+), Mg(2+), and Al(3+) ions reveals differences of 1 and up to 2 orders of magnitude. Such large variations in the characteristic time scales of the core level ICD processes is qualitatively explained by different internal decay mechanisms in different ions as well as by different ion-solvent distances and interactions.

  6. Radioactive decay data tables

    SciTech Connect

    Kocher, D.C.

    1981-01-01

    The estimation of radiation dose to man from either external or internal exposure to radionuclides requires a knowledge of the energies and intensities of the atomic and nuclear radiations emitted during the radioactive decay process. The availability of evaluated decay data for the large number of radionuclides of interest is thus of fundamental importance for radiation dosimetry. This handbook contains a compilation of decay data for approximately 500 radionuclides. These data constitute an evaluated data file constructed for use in the radiological assessment activities of the Technology Assessments Section of the Health and Safety Research Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The radionuclides selected for this handbook include those occurring naturally in the environment, those of potential importance in routine or accidental releases from the nuclear fuel cycle, those of current interest in nuclear medicine and fusion reactor technology, and some of those of interest to Committee 2 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection for the estimation of annual limits on intake via inhalation and ingestion for occupationally exposed individuals.

  7. RADIATIVE PENGUIN DECAYS FROM BABAR

    SciTech Connect

    Eigen, Gerald

    2003-08-28

    Electroweak penguin decays provide a promising hunting ground for Physics beyond the Standard Model (SM). The decay B {yields} X{sub s}{gamma}, which proceeds through an electromagnetic penguin loop, already provides stringent constraints on the supersymmetric (SUSY) parameter space. The present data samples of {approx}1 x 10{sup 8} B{bar B} events allow to explore radiative penguin decays with branching fractions of the order of 10{sup -6} or less. In this brief report they discuss a study of B {yields} K*{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} decay modes and a search for B {yields} {rho}({omega}){gamma} decays.

  8. Charmless b decays at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Donega, Mauro; /Geneva U.

    2005-07-01

    The authors report on the charmless B decays measurements performed on 180 pb{sup -1} of data collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. This paper describes: the first observation of the decay mode B{sub s} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -} and the measurement of the direct Cp asymmetry in the ({bar B}){sub d} {yields} K{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} decay; the first evidence of the decay mode B{sub s} {yields} {phi}{phi} and the branching ratio and Cp asymmetry for the B{sup {+-}} {yields} {phi}K{sup {+-}} decay.

  9. New G -parity violating amplitude in the J /ψ decay?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldini Ferroli, R.; De Mori, F.; Destefanis, M.; Maggiora, M.; Pacetti, S.; Yan, L.; Bertani, M.; Calcaterra, A.; Felici, G.; Patteri, P.; Wang, Y. D.; Zallo, A.; Bettoni, D.; Cibinetto, G.; Farinelli, R.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Mezzadri, G.; Santoro, V.; Savrié, M.; Bianchi, F.; Greco, M.; Marcello, S.; Spataro, S.; Carloni Calame, C. M.; Montagna, G.; Nicrosini, O.; Piccinini, F.

    2017-02-01

    The J /ψ meson has negative G parity so that, in the limit of isospin conservation, its decay into π+π- should be purely electromagnetic. However, the measured branching fraction B (J /ψ →π+π- ) exceeds by more than 4.5 standard deviations the expectation computed according to BABAR data on the e+e- →π+π- cross section. The possibility that the two-gluon plus one-photon decay mechanism is not suppressed by G -parity conservation is discussed, even by considering other multipion decay channels. As also obtained by phenomenological computation, such a decay mechanism could be responsible for the observed discrepancy. Finally, we notice that the BESIII experiment, having the potential to perform an accurate measurement of the e+e- →π+π- cross section in the J /ψ mass energy region, can definitely prove or disprove this strong G -parity-violating mechanism by confirming or confuting the BABAR data.

  10. The excited spin state of Comet 2P/Encke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belton, Michael J. S.; Samarasinha, Nalin H.; Fernández, Yan R.; Meech, Karen J.

    2005-05-01

    Ways to rationalize the different periods (e.g., 15.08 h, Luu and Jewitt, 1990, Icarus 86, 69-81; 11.01 h, Fernández et al., 2004, Icarus, in this issue; Lowry et al., 2003, Lunar Planet. Sci. XXXIV, Abstract 2056) seen in near aphelion R-band light curves of Comet 2P/Encke are explored. We show that the comet is usually active at aphelion and it's observed light curves contain signal from both the nucleus and an unresolved coma. The coma contribution to the observed brightness is generally found to dominate with the nucleus providing from 28 to 87% of the total brightness. The amplitude of the observed variations cannot be explained by the nucleus alone and are due to coma activity. We show that some seven periodicities exist in the observed light curves at various times and that this is likely the result of an active nucleus spinning in an excited spin state. The changing periodicities are probably due to changes in the relative strengths of the active areas. We work out possible excited states based on experience with model light curves and by using an analogy to light curve observations of Comet 1P/Halley for which the spin state has been separately determined from spacecraft observations. There is a possibility of a fully relaxed principal axis spin state (0.538 d -1; P=44.6 h) but, because it provides a poorer fit to the observed periodicities than the best fit excited state together with the absence of a peak near 1.08 d -1 ( 2f) in the frequency spectrum of the Fernández et al. (2000, Icarus 147, 145-160) thermal IR lightcurve, we consider it unlikely. Both SAM and LAM excited states are allowed by the underlying periodicities and additional information is needed to choose between these. Our choice of a low excitation SAM state, i.e., one in which the instantaneous spin axis nutates around the total angular momentum vector in a motion that is characterized by limited angular oscillations around the long axis, is based on Sekanina's (1988, Astron J. 95

  11. Pre-stimulus alpha power affects vertex N2-P2 potentials evoked by noxious stimuli.

    PubMed

    Babiloni, Claudio; Del Percio, Claudio; Brancucci, Alfredo; Capotosto, Paolo; Le Pera, Domenica; Marzano, Nicola; Valeriani, Massimiliano; Romani, Gian Luca; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Rossini, Paolo Maria

    2008-03-28

    It is well known that scalp potentials evoked by nonpainful visual and auditory stimuli are enhanced in amplitude when preceded by pre-stimulus low-amplitude alpha rhythms. This study tested the hypothesis that the same holds for the amplitude of vertex N2-P2 potentials evoked by brief noxious laser stimuli, an issue of interest for clinical perspective. EEG data were recorded in 10 subjects from 30 electrodes during laser noxious stimulation. The artifact-free vertex N2-P2 complex was spatially enhanced by surface Laplacian transformation. Pre-stimulus alpha power was computed at three alpha sub-bands according to subject's individual alpha frequency peak (i.e. about 6-8Hz for alpha 1, 8-10Hz for alpha 2 and 10-12Hz for alpha 3 sub-band). Individual EEG single trials were divided in two sub-groups. The strong-alpha sub-group (high band power) included halfway of all EEG single trials, namely those having the highest pre-stimulus alpha power. Weak-alpha sub-group (low band power) included the remaining trials. Averaging procedure provided laser evoked potentials for both trial sub-groups. No significant effect was found for alpha 1 and alpha 2 sub-bands. Conversely, compared to strong-alpha 3 sub-group, weak-alpha 3 sub-group showed vertex N2-P2 potentials having significantly higher amplitude (p<0.05). These results extend to the later phases of pain processing systems the notion that generation mechanisms of pre-stimulus alpha rhythms and (laser) evoked potentials are intrinsically related and subjected to fluctuating "noise". That "noise" could explain the trial-by-trial variability of laser evoked potentials and perception.

  12. Casein kinase II is required for the spindle assembly checkpoint by regulating Mad2p in fission yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Shimada, Midori; Yamamoto, Ayumu; Murakami-Tonami, Yuko; Nakanishi, Makoto; Yoshida, Takashi; Aiba, Hirofumi; Murakami, Hiroshi

    2009-10-23

    The spindle checkpoint is a surveillance mechanism that ensures the fidelity of chromosome segregation in mitosis. Here we show that fission yeast casein kinase II (CK2) is required for this checkpoint function. In the CK2 mutants mitosis occurs in the presence of a spindle defect, and the spindle checkpoint protein Mad2p fails to localize to unattached kinetochores. The CK2 mutants are sensitive to the microtubule depolymerising drug thiabendazole, which is counteracted by ectopic expression of mad2{sup +}. The level of Mad2p is low in the CK2 mutants. These results suggest that CK2 has a role in the spindle checkpoint by regulating Mad2p.

  13. Prompt proton decay in the vicinity of 56Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, E. K.; Rudolph, D.; Andersson, L.-L.; Torres, D. A.; Carpenter, M. P.; Charity, R. J.; Chiara, C. J.; Ekman, J.; Fahlander, C.; Hoel, C.; Pechenaya, O. L.; Reviol, W.; du Rietz, R.; Sarantites, D. G.; Seweryniak, D.; Sobotka, L. G.; Zhu, S.

    2007-11-01

    A new decay mode, the so called prompt proton decay, was discovered in 1998. It has since proven to be an important decay mechanism for several neutron deficient nuclei in the A˜60 region. To measure with high accuracy the energies and angular distributions of these protons, a state-of-the-art charged particle detector—LuWuSiA—was developed. It was first utilized during a fusion-evaporation reaction experiment performed at Argonne National Laboratory, U.S.A. In this contribution, the characteristics of the prompt proton decay are discussed along with the special features of LuWuSiA as well as a revisit to the prompt proton decay in 58Cu.

  14. Investigation of Periodic Nuclear Decay Data with Spectral Analysis Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javorsek, D.; Sturrock, P.; Buncher, J.; Fischbach, E.; Gruenwald, T.; Hoft, A.; Horan, T.; Jenkins, J.; Kerford, J.; Lee, R.; Mattes, J.; Morris, D.; Mudry, R.; Newport, J.; Petrelli, M.; Silver, M.; Stewart, C.; Terry, B.; Willenberg, H.

    2009-12-01

    We provide the results from a spectral analysis of nuclear decay experiments displaying unexplained periodic fluctuations. The analyzed data was from 56Mn decay reported by the Children's Nutrition Research Center in Houston, 32Si decay reported by an experiment performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, and 226Ra decay reported by an experiment performed at the Physikalisch-Technische-Bundesanstalt in Germany. All three data sets possess the same primary frequency mode consisting of an annual period. Additionally a spectral comparison of the local ambient temperature, atmospheric pressure, relative humidity, Earth-Sun distance, and the plasma speed and latitude of the heliospheric current sheet (HCS) was performed. Following analysis of these six possible causal factors, their reciprocals, and their linear combinations, a possible link between nuclear decay rate fluctuations and the linear combination of the HCS latitude and 1/R motivates searching for a possible mechanism with such properties.

  15. Feeding and decay of superdeformed states

    SciTech Connect

    Khoo, T.L.; Lauritsen, T.; Ahmad, I.; Carpenter, M.P.; Fernandez, P.B.; Janssens, R.V.F.; Moore, E.F.; Wolfs, F.L.H. ); Benet, Ph.; Daly, P.J. ); Beard, K.B.; Garg, U.; Ye, D. ); Drigert, M.W. )

    1992-01-01

    The mechanisms for feeding and decay of superdeformed (SD) bands are examined. Data connected with both processes in [sup 192]Hg are compared with model calculations. The calculations successfully reproduce the data, suggesting that the mechanisms for both processes are understood. Constraints on the energy of the SD band energies and on the well-depths at low and high spins have been obtained. At the point of decay around spin 10, we suggest that the SD band is 3.3--4.3 MeV above the normal yrast line and that the well depths at spin 10 and 40 are 0.5--1.3 and 3.5--4.5 MeV, respectively.

  16. Feeding and decay of superdeformed states

    SciTech Connect

    Khoo, T.L.; Lauritsen, T.; Ahmad, I.; Carpenter, M.P.; Fernandez, P.B.; Janssens, R.V.F.; Moore, E.F.; Wolfs, F.L.H.; Benet, Ph.; Daly, P.J.; Beard, K.B.; Garg, U.; Ye, D.; Drigert, M.W.

    1992-12-31

    The mechanisms for feeding and decay of superdeformed (SD) bands are examined. Data connected with both processes in {sup 192}Hg are compared with model calculations. The calculations successfully reproduce the data, suggesting that the mechanisms for both processes are understood. Constraints on the energy of the SD band energies and on the well-depths at low and high spins have been obtained. At the point of decay around spin 10, we suggest that the SD band is 3.3--4.3 MeV above the normal yrast line and that the well depths at spin 10 and 40 are 0.5--1.3 and 3.5--4.5 MeV, respectively.

  17. Rare B Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, P.D.; /Victoria U.

    2006-02-24

    Recent results from Belle and BaBar on rare B decays involving flavor-changing neutral currents or purely leptonic final states are presented. Measurements of the CP asymmetries in B {yields} K*{gamma} and b {yields} s{gamma} are reported. Also reported are updated limits on B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}}, B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}, B{sup +} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{nu} and the recent measurement of B {yields} X{sub s}{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}.

  18. Rare decays and CP asymmetries in charged B decays

    SciTech Connect

    Deshpande, N.G.

    1991-01-01

    The theory of loop induced rare decays and the rate asymmetry due to CP violation in charged B Decays in reviewed. After considering b {yields} s{gamma} and b {yields} se{sup +}e{sup {minus}} decays, the asymmetries for pure penguin process are estimated first. A larger asymmetry can result in those modes where a tree diagram and a penguin diagram interfere, however these estimates are necessarily model dependent. Estimates of Cabbibo suppressed penguins are also considered.

  19. Ufd2p synthesizes branched ubiquitin chains to promote the degradation of substrates modified with atypical chains

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chao; Liu, Weixiao; Ye, Yihong; Li, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Ubiquitination of a subset of proteins by ubiquitin chain elongation factors (E4), represented by Ufd2p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is a pivotal regulator for many biological processes. However, the mechanism of Ufd2p-mediated ubiquitination is largely unclear. Here, we show that Ufd2p catalyses K48-linked multi-monoubiquitination on K29-linked ubiquitin chains assembled by the ubiquitin ligase (Ufd4p), resulting in branched ubiquitin chains. This reaction depends on the interaction of K29-linked ubiquitin chains with two N-terminal loops of Ufd2p. Only following the addition of K48-linked ubiquitin to substrates modified with K29-linked ubiquitin chains, can the substrates be escorted to the proteasome for degradation. We demonstrate that this ubiquitin chain linkage switching reaction is essential for ERAD, oleic acid and acid pH resistance in yeast. Thus, our results suggest that Ufd2p functions by switching ubiquitin chain linkages to allow the degradation of proteins modified with a ubiquitin linkage, which is normally not targeted to the proteasome. PMID:28165462

  20. Growth and characterization of VO2/p-GaN/sapphire heterostructure with phase transition properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Jiming; Wang, Minhuan; Miao, Lihua; Li, Xiaoxuan; Luo, Yingmin; Zhang, Dong; Zhang, Yuzhi

    2015-12-01

    High quality pure phase VO2 films were deposited on p-GaN/sapphire substrates by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). A well-defined interface with dense and uniform morphology was observed in the as-grown VO2/p-GaN/sapphire heterostructure. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses confirmed the valence state of vanadium (V) in VO2 films was principally composed of V4+ with trace amount of V5+, no other valence state of V was detected. Meanwhile, a distinct reversible semiconductor-to-metal (SMT) phase transition with resistance change up to nearly three orders of magnitude was observed in the temperature dependent electrical resistance measurement, which was comparable to the high quality VO2 film grown directly on sapphire substrates. Our present findings will give a deeper insight into the physical mechanism behind the exotic characteristics of VO2/p-GaN heterostructure, and further motivate research in novel devices with combined functional properties of both correlated oxide and wide bandgap nitride semiconductors.

  1. Cooperation enhanced by indirect reciprocity in spatial prisoner's dilemma games for social P2P systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Lin-Lin; Li, Ming-Chu; Wang, Zhen

    2016-11-01

    With the growing interest in social Peer-to-Peer (P2P) applications, relationships of individuals are further exploited to improve the performances of reputation systems. It is an on-going challenge to investigate how spatial reciprocity aids indirect reciprocity in sustaining cooperation in practical P2P environments. This paper describes the construction of an extended prisoner's dilemma game on square lattice networks with three strategies, i.e., defection, unconditional cooperation, and reciprocal cooperation. Reciprocators discriminate partners according to their reputations based on image scoring, where mistakes in judgment of reputations may occur. The independent structures of interaction and learning neighborhood are discussed, with respect to the situation in which learning environments differ from interaction networks. The simulation results have indicated that the incentive mechanism enhances cooperation better in structured peers than among a well-mixed population. Given the realistic condition of inaccurate reputation scores, defection is still successfully held down when the players interact and learn within the unified neighborhoods. Extensive simulations have further confirmed the positive impact of spatial structure on cooperation with different sizes of lattice neighborhoods. And similar conclusions can also be drawn on regular random networks and scale-free networks. Moreover, for the separated structures of the neighborhoods, the interaction network has a critical effect on the evolution dynamics of cooperation and learning environments only have weaker impacts on the process. Our findings further provide some insights concerning the evolution of collective behaviors in social systems.

  2. Polymodal activation of the TREK-2 K2P channel produces structurally distinct open states

    PubMed Central

    McClenaghan, Conor; Schewe, Marcus; Aryal, Prafulla; Carpenter, Elisabeth P.; Baukrowitz, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The TREK subfamily of two-pore domain (K2P) K+ channels exhibit polymodal gating by a wide range of physical and chemical stimuli. Crystal structures now exist for these channels in two main states referred to as the “up” and “down” conformations. However, recent studies have resulted in contradictory and mutually exclusive conclusions about the functional (i.e., conductive) status of these two conformations. To address this problem, we have used the state-dependent TREK-2 inhibitor norfluoxetine that can only bind to the down state, thereby allowing us to distinguish between these two conformations when activated by different stimuli. Our results reconcile these previously contradictory gating models by demonstrating that activation by pressure, temperature, voltage, and pH produce more than one structurally distinct open state and reveal that channel activation does not simply involve switching between the up and down conformations. These results also highlight the diversity of structural mechanisms that K2P channels use to integrate polymodal gating signals. PMID:27241700

  3. The family of K2P channels: salient structural and functional properties

    PubMed Central

    Feliciangeli, Sylvain; Chatelain, Frank C; Bichet, Delphine; Lesage, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Potassium channels participate in many biological functions, from ion homeostasis to generation and modulation of the electrical membrane potential. They are involved in a large variety of diseases. In the human genome, 15 genes code for K+ channels with two pore domains (K2P). These channels form dimers of pore-forming subunits that produce background conductances finely regulated by a range of natural and chemical effectors, including signalling lipids, temperature, pressure, pH, antidepressants and volatile anaesthetics. Since the cloning of TWIK1, the prototypical member of this family, a lot of work has been carried out on their structure and biology. These studies are still in progress, but data gathered so far show that K2P channels are central players in many processes, including ion homeostasis, hormone secretion, cell development and excitability. A growing number of studies underline their implication in physiopathological mechanisms, such as vascular and pulmonary hypertension, cardiac arrhythmias, nociception, neuroprotection and depression. This review gives a synthetic view of the most noticeable features of these channels. PMID:25530075

  4. TASK-2: a K2P K+ channel with complex regulation and diverse physiological functions

    PubMed Central

    Cid, L. Pablo; Roa-Rojas, Hugo A.; Niemeyer, María I.; González, Wendy; Araki, Masatake; Araki, Kimi; Sepúlveda, Francisco V.

    2013-01-01

    TASK-2 (K2P5.1) is a two-pore domain K+ channel belonging to the TALK subgroup of the K2P family of proteins. TASK-2 has been shown to be activated by extra- and intracellular alkalinization. Extra- and intracellular pH-sensors reside at arginine 224 and lysine 245 and might affect separate selectivity filter and inner gates respectively. TASK-2 is modulated by changes in cell volume and a regulation by direct G-protein interaction has also been proposed. Activation by extracellular alkalinization has been associated with a role of TASK-2 in kidney proximal tubule bicarbonate reabsorption, whilst intracellular pH-sensitivity might be the mechanism for its participation in central chemosensitive neurons. In addition to these functions TASK-2 has been proposed to play a part in apoptotic volume decrease in kidney cells and in volume regulation of glial cells and T-lymphocytes. TASK-2 is present in chondrocytes of hyaline cartilage, where it is proposed to play a central role in stabilizing the membrane potential. Additional sites of expression are dorsal root ganglion neurons, endocrine and exocrine pancreas and intestinal smooth muscle cells. TASK-2 has been associated with the regulation of proliferation of breast cancer cells and could become target for breast cancer therapeutics. Further work in native tissues and cells together with genetic modification will no doubt reveal the details of TASK-2 functions that we are only starting to suspect. PMID:23908634

  5. Numerical simulation on n-MoS2/p-Si heterojunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Quanrong; Li, Yiqi; Shen, Yonglong; Chen, Lian; Wang, Geming; Wang, Shenggao

    2017-03-01

    n-MoS2/p-Si heterojunction solar cells were simulated by using Analysis of Microelectronic and Photonic Structures (AMPS-1D) software. In order to fundamentally understand the mechanism of such kind of cells, the effects of electron affinity, band gap and thickness for MoS2, as well as the donor concentration in Si layer on the devices performance were simulated and discussed in detail. The effects of defect states in Si layer and at n-MoS2/p-Si interface on the performance of devices were also simulated. It is demonstrated that two-dimensional monolayer MoS2 with the highest band gap of 1.8 eV is the optimized option for ideal devices which can give out the highest efficiency over 19.0%. Si layer with higher acceptor concentration is more likely to be recommended in achieving higher power conversion efficiency if defect level can be effectively controlled. The defect states in Si layer and at MoS2/Si interface were identified to influence the performance of the devices significantly.

  6. Weak decay of /Λ-hypernuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberico, W. M.; Garbarino, G.

    2002-10-01

    experiment obtained a positive intrinsic Λ asymmetry parameter, aΛ, for Λ5H→e. This is in complete disagreement with a previous measurement, which obtained a large and negative aΛ for p-shell hypernuclei, and with theory, which predicts a negative value moderately dependent on nuclear structure effects. Also in this case, improved experiment establishing with certainty the sign and magnitude of aΛ for s- and p-shell hypernuclei will provide a guidance for a deeper understanding of hypernuclear dynamics and decay mechanisms.

  7. Role of K2P channels in stimulus-secretion coupling

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Donghee; Kang, Dawon

    2014-01-01

    Two-pore domain K+ (K2P) channels are involved in a variety of physiological processes by virtue of their high basal activity and sensitivity to various biological stimuli. One of these processes is secretion of hormones and transmitters in response to stimuli such as hypoxia, acidosis and receptor agonists. The rise in intracellular [Ca2+] ([Ca2+]i) that is critical for the secretory event can be achieved by several mechanisms: (a) Inhibition of resting (background) K+ channels, (b) activation of Na+/Ca2+-permeable channels and (c) release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores. Here, we discuss the role of TASK and TREK in stimulus-secretion mechanisms in carotid body chemoreceptor cells and adrenal medullary/cortical cells. Studies show that stimuli such as hypoxia and acidosis cause cell depolarization and transmitter/hormone secretion by inhibition of TASK or TREK. Subsequent elevation of [Ca2+]i produced by opening of voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels then activates a Na+-permeable cation channel, presumably to help sustain the depolarization and [Ca2+]i. Agonists such as angiotensin II may elevate [Ca2+]i via multiple mechanisms involving both inhibition of TASK/TREK and Ca2+ release from internal stores to cause aldosterone secretion. Thus, inhibition of resting (background) K+ channels and subsequent activation of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels and Na+-permeable non-selective cation channels may be a common ionic mechanism that lead to hormone and transmitter secretion. PMID:25476848

  8. The splitting and oscillator strengths for the 2S/2/S-2p/2/P/0/ doublet in lithium-like sulfur. [during Skylab observed solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pegg, D. J.; Forester, J. P.; Elston, S. B.; Griffin, P. M.; Peterson, R. S.; Thoe, R. S.; Vane, C. R.; Sellin, I. A.; Groeneveld, K.-O.

    1977-01-01

    The beam-foil technique has been used to study the 2S(2)S-2p(2)P(0) doublet in S XIV. The results confirm the doublet splitting measured aboard Skylab during solar flare events. In addition, the oscillator strengths for the resonance transitions comprising this doublet have been measured and found to agree well with recent relativistic f-value calculations.

  9. Decaying warm dark matter and neutrino masses.

    PubMed

    Lattanzi, M; Valle, J W F

    2007-09-21

    Neutrino masses may arise from spontaneous breaking of ungauged lepton number. Because of quantum gravity effects the associated Goldstone boson - the majoron - will pick up a mass. We determine the lifetime and mass required by cosmic microwave background observations so that the massive majoron provides the observed dark matter of the Universe. The majoron decaying dark matter scenario fits nicely in models where neutrino masses arise via the seesaw mechanism, and may lead to other possible cosmological implications.

  10. Decaying Warm Dark Matter and Neutrino Masses

    SciTech Connect

    Lattanzi, M.; Valle, J. W. F.

    2007-09-21

    Neutrino masses may arise from spontaneous breaking of ungauged lepton number. Because of quantum gravity effects the associated Goldstone boson--the majoron--will pick up a mass. We determine the lifetime and mass required by cosmic microwave background observations so that the massive majoron provides the observed dark matter of the Universe. The majoron decaying dark matter scenario fits nicely in models where neutrino masses arise via the seesaw mechanism, and may lead to other possible cosmological implications.

  11. Core excitation and decay in rare gas mono- and multilayers on a metal surface: screening, deexcitation, and desorption of neutrals and ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocker, G.; Feulner, P.; Scheuerer, R.; Zhu, L.; Menzel, D.

    1990-06-01

    In order to investigate the modification of excitation and decay of core holes by condensation and adsorption in the simplest possible cases, as well as the coupling to atomic motion, we have studied the Ar2p and Kr3d excitation regions in Ar and Kr mono- and multilayers on Ru(001). Using synchrotron radiation from BESSY (Berlin), total and Auger electron yields and yields of desorbing ions and neutrals, as function of photon energy, as well as decay electron spectra for specific primary excitations have been measured. The main results are: Multilayers: Energies for resonant core excitations are shifted to higher values by 0.6 to 1 eV compared to free atoms; for Kr, surface (smaller shifts) and bulk excitations can be distinguished. Autoionization and normal Auger spectra are clearly different, as in the gas phase. Besides desorption of neutral atoms as in the valence region, singly and doubly charged ions as well as ionic clusters are desorbed. Monolayers: The shift of resonant excitation energies relative to the gas phase is smaller than for condensed layers. Decay spectra for resonant and non-resonant excitations are identical, as for strongly coupled chemisorbates, proving that charge exchange with the metal is fast compared to core decay. As in the valence region, only neutral atoms desorb. The results shed light on the screening and charge transfer behaviour and on the mechanisms of stimulated desorption which are operative in them.

  12. Altered Expression of Two-Pore Domain Potassium (K2P) Channels in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Sarah; Bateman, Andrew; O'Kelly, Ita

    2013-01-01

    Potassium channels have become a focus in cancer biology as they play roles in cell behaviours associated with cancer progression, including proliferation, migration and apoptosis. Two-pore domain (K2P) potassium channels are background channels which enable the leak of potassium ions from cells. As these channels are open at rest they have a profound effect on cellular membrane potential and subsequently the electrical activity and behaviour of cells in which they are expressed. The K2P family of channels has 15 mammalian members and already 4 members of this family (K2P2.1, K2P3.1, K2P9.1, K2P5.1) have been implicated in cancer. Here we examine the expression of all 15 members of the K2P family of channels in a range of cancer types. This was achieved using the online cancer microarray database, Oncomine (www.oncomine.org). Each gene was examined across 20 cancer types, comparing mRNA expression in cancer to normal tissue. This analysis revealed all but 3 K2P family members (K2P4.1, K2P16.1, K2P18.1) show altered expression in cancer. Overexpression of K2P channels was observed in a range of cancers including breast, leukaemia and lung while more cancers (brain, colorectal, gastrointestinal, kidney, lung, melanoma, oesophageal) showed underexpression of one or more channels. K2P1.1, K2P3.1, K2P12.1, were overexpressed in a range of cancers. While K2P1.1, K2P3.1, K2P5.1, K2P6.1, K2P7.1 and K2P10.1 showed significant underexpression across the cancer types examined. This analysis supports the view that specific K2P channels may play a role in cancer biology. Their altered expression together with their ability to impact the function of other ion channels and their sensitivity to environmental stimuli (pO2, pH, glucose, stretch) makes understanding the role these channels play in cancer of key importance. PMID:24116006

  13. Altered expression of two-pore domain potassium (K2P) channels in cancer.

    PubMed

    Williams, Sarah; Bateman, Andrew; O'Kelly, Ita

    2013-01-01

    Potassium channels have become a focus in cancer biology as they play roles in cell behaviours associated with cancer progression, including proliferation, migration and apoptosis. Two-pore domain (K2P) potassium channels are background channels which enable the leak of potassium ions from cells. As these channels are open at rest they have a profound effect on cellular membrane potential and subsequently the electrical activity and behaviour of cells in which they are expressed. The K2P family of channels has 15 mammalian members and already 4 members of this family (K2P2.1, K2P3.1, K2P9.1, K2P5.1) have been implicated in cancer. Here we examine the expression of all 15 members of the K2P family of channels in a range of cancer types. This was achieved using the online cancer microarray database, Oncomine (www.oncomine.org). Each gene was examined across 20 cancer types, comparing mRNA expression in cancer to normal tissue. This analysis revealed all but 3 K2P family members (K2P4.1, K2P16.1, K2P18.1) show altered expression in cancer. Overexpression of K2P channels was observed in a range of cancers including breast, leukaemia and lung while more cancers (brain, colorectal, gastrointestinal, kidney, lung, melanoma, oesophageal) showed underexpression of one or more channels. K2P1.1, K2P3.1, K2P12.1, were overexpressed in a range of cancers. While K2P1.1, K2P3.1, K2P5.1, K2P6.1, K2P7.1 and K2P10.1 showed significant underexpression across the cancer types examined. This analysis supports the view that specific K2P channels may play a role in cancer biology. Their altered expression together with their ability to impact the function of other ion channels and their sensitivity to environmental stimuli (pO2, pH, glucose, stretch) makes understanding the role these channels play in cancer of key importance.

  14. Decay of Bogoliubov excitations in one-dimensional Bose gases

    SciTech Connect

    Ristivojevic, Zoran; Matveev, K. A.

    2016-07-11

    For this research, we study the decay of Bogoliubov quasiparticles in one-dimensional Bose gases. Starting from the hydrodynamic Hamiltonian, we develop a microscopic theory that enables one to systematically study both the excitations and their decay. At zero temperature, the leading mechanism of decay of a quasiparticle is disintegration into three others. We find that low-energy quasiparticles (phonons) decay with the rate that scales with the seventh power of momentum, whereas the rate of decay of the high-energy quasiparticles does not depend on momentum. In addition, our approach allows us to study analytically the quasiparticle decay in the whole crossover region between the two limiting cases. When applied to integrable models, including the Lieb-Liniger model of bosons with contact repulsion, our theory confirms the absence of the decay of quasiparticle excitations. Finally, we account for two types of integrability-breaking perturbations that enable finite decay: three-body interaction between the bosons and two-body interaction of finite range.

  15. Decay of Bogoliubov excitations in one-dimensional Bose gases

    DOE PAGES

    Ristivojevic, Zoran; Matveev, K. A.

    2016-07-11

    For this research, we study the decay of Bogoliubov quasiparticles in one-dimensional Bose gases. Starting from the hydrodynamic Hamiltonian, we develop a microscopic theory that enables one to systematically study both the excitations and their decay. At zero temperature, the leading mechanism of decay of a quasiparticle is disintegration into three others. We find that low-energy quasiparticles (phonons) decay with the rate that scales with the seventh power of momentum, whereas the rate of decay of the high-energy quasiparticles does not depend on momentum. In addition, our approach allows us to study analytically the quasiparticle decay in the whole crossovermore » region between the two limiting cases. When applied to integrable models, including the Lieb-Liniger model of bosons with contact repulsion, our theory confirms the absence of the decay of quasiparticle excitations. Finally, we account for two types of integrability-breaking perturbations that enable finite decay: three-body interaction between the bosons and two-body interaction of finite range.« less

  16. Sound decay of notes from acoustic guitars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galazen, Erika; Nordberg, Joni; Huber, Thomas M.

    2005-09-01

    The acoustic guitar produces tones by transferring energy from the strings, through the bridge to the top plate, back, and air cavity of the guitar. The vibrations are ultimately radiated into the air as sound. The air-cavity and body resonances of the guitar play an important role in both the tone and the sustain (the time it takes notes to decay) produced by the guitar. To study the relationship between resonances of the guitar and the sustain of notes, the resonance frequencies were measured using a mechanical shaker attached to the body of the guitar and laser Doppler vibrometer to measure its vibration. A string was tuned to different frequencies and plucked. The decay of the note was measured with an electromagnetic pickup that measured the vibration of the string, a vibrometer to measure vibration of the top plate, and microphones located inside and outside the guitar. As expected, when the fundamental frequency of the string was near one of the resonances of the guitar, the decay rate was faster (shorter sustain) than when the string was between resonances. The relationship between the decay rates of the different parts of the system will also be discussed.

  17. Wood decay at sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, François; Coston-Guarini, Jennifer; Guarini, Jean-Marc; Fanfard, Sandrine

    2016-08-01

    The oceans and seas receive coarse woody debris since the Devonian, but the kinetics of wood degradation remains one of many unanswered questions about the fate of driftwood in the marine environment. A simple gravimetric experiment was carried out at a monitoring station located at the exit of a steep, forested Mediterranean watershed in the Eastern Pyrenees. The objective was to describe and quantify, with standardized logs (in shape, structure and constitution), natural degradation of wood in the sea. Results show that the mass decrease of wood logs over time can be described by a sigmoidal curve. The primary process of wood decay observed at the monitoring station was due to the arrival and installation of wood-boring species that consumed more than half of the total wood mass in six months. Surprisingly, in a region where there is little remaining wood marine infrastructure, "shipworms", i.e. xylophagous bivalves, are responsible for an important part of this wood decay. This suggests that these communities are maintained probably by a frequent supply of a large quantity of riparian wood entering the marine environment adjacent to the watershed. By exploring this direct link between terrestrial and marine ecosystems, our long term objective is to determine how these supplies of terrestrial organic carbon can sustain wood-based marine communities as it is observed in the Mediterranean Sea.

  18. Clg2p interacts with Clf and ClUrase to regulate appressorium formation, pathogenicity and conidial morphology in Curvularia lunata

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tong; Wang, Yuying; Ma, Bingchen; Hou, Jumei; Jin, Yazhong; Zhang, Youli; Ke, Xiwang; Tai, Lianmei; Zuo, Yuhu; Dey, Kishore

    2016-01-01

    Ras is a small GTPase that regulates numerous processes in the cellular development and morphogenesis of many organisms. In this study, we identified and functionally characterized the Clg2p gene of Curvularia lunata, which is homologous with the Ras protein. The Clg2p deletion mutant (ΔClg2p) had altered appressorium formation and conidial morphology and produced fewer, smaller lesions compared with the wild-type strain. When a dominant Clg2p allele was introduced into the mutant, all of these defective phenotypes were completely restored. To further understand the regulation of Clg2p in appressorium formation and conidial morphology, and its role in pathogenicity, seven Clg2p-interacting proteins were screened using a yeast two-hybrid assay. Two of these proteins, Clf, a homologue of Mst11, which corresponds to MAP kinase kinase kinase in Magnaporthe oryzae, and urate oxidase (designated ClUrase) were functionally characterized. Clg2p specifically interacted with Clf through its RA domain to regulate appressorium formation and pathogenicity, whereas the Clg2p-ClUrase interaction regulated conidial morphology without affecting fungal pathogenicity. This report is the first to elucidate the regulatory mechanism of the key Ras protein Clg2p in C. lunata. PMID:27041392

  19. Search for rare B decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, H.; Hamacher, T.; Hofmann, R. P.; Kirchhoff, T.; Mankel, R.; Nau, A.; Nowak, S.; Reßing, D.; Schröder, H.; Schulz, H. D.; Walter, M.; Wurth, R.; Hast, C.; Kapitza, H.; Kolanoski, H.; Kosche, A.; Lange, A.; Lindner, A.; Schieber, M.; Siegmund, T.; Spaan, B.; Thurn, H.; Töpfer, D.; Wegener, D.; Eckstein, P.; Frankl, C.; Graf, J.; Schmidtler, M.; Schramm, M.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Waldi, R.; Reim, K.; Wegener, H.; Eckmann, R.; Kuipers, H.; Mai, O.; Mundt, R.; Oest, T.; Reiner, R.; Schmidt-Parzefall, W.; Stiewe, J.; Werner, S.; Ehret, K.; Hofmann, W.; Hüpper, A.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Spengler, J.; Krieger, P.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Prentice, J. D.; Saull, P. R. B.; Tzamariudaki, K.; van de Water, R. G.; Yoon, T.-S.; Schneider, M.; Weseler, S.; Kernel, G.; Križan, P.; Križnič, E.; Podobnik, T.; Živko, T.; Balagura, V.; Barsuk, S.; Belyaev, I.; Chistov, R.; Danilov, M.; Gershtein, L.; Gershtein, Yu.; Golutyin, A.; Korolko, I.; Kostina, G.; Litvintsev, D.; Pakhlov, P.; Semenov, S.; Snizhko, A.; Tichomirov, I.; Zaitsev, Yu.; Argus Collaboration

    1995-02-01

    Using the ARGUS detector at the e +e - storage ring DORIS II at DESY, we have searched for decays b → sgluon through full reconstruction of a whole event. Two B overlineB decays were found with one of B meson decaying into a final state without charmed particles. We also obtained an upper limit of Br(B + → τ+ντ) of 1.04% at 90% CL.

  20. Rare beauty and charm decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, T.; LHCb Collaboration

    2017-07-01

    Rare beauty and charm decays can provide powerful probes of physics beyond the Standard Model. These proceedings summarise the latest measurements of rare beauty and charm decays from the LHCb experiment at the end of Run 1 of the LHC. Whilst the majority of the measurements are consistent with SM predictions, small differences are seen in the rate and angular distribution of ℓ- decay processes.

  1. Three body dissociation of CS2(2+) subsequent to various S(2p) Auger transitions.

    PubMed

    Saha, K; Banerjee, S B; Bapat, B

    2013-10-28

    Fragmentation kinematics of CS2 following various S(2p) Auger transitions is studied. Employing a combination of electron energy analysis and recoil ion momentum spectroscopy, changes in the dissociation channel yields, as well as the differences in the kinematical parameters for various bands of Auger hole states are presented. The fragmentation mechanism for dissociative channels leading to complete atomization of CS2(2+) molecular ion is studied in detail. We find that CS2(2+) does not retain linear geometry and is bent before undergoing concerted break-up. It is also observed that different geometric configurations of the CS2(2+) precursor result in different kinetic energy release values.

  2. Three body dissociation of CS22+ subsequent to various S(2p) Auger transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, K.; Banerjee, S. B.; Bapat, B.

    2013-10-01

    Fragmentation kinematics of CS2 following various S(2p) Auger transitions is studied. Employing a combination of electron energy analysis and recoil ion momentum spectroscopy, changes in the dissociation channel yields, as well as the differences in the kinematical parameters for various bands of Auger hole states are presented. The fragmentation mechanism for dissociative channels leading to complete atomization of CS_2^{2+} molecular ion is studied in detail. We find that CS_2^{2+} does not retain linear geometry and is bent before undergoing concerted break-up. It is also observed that different geometric configurations of the CS_2^{2+} precursor result in different kinetic energy release values.

  3. Rare B Decays at Babar

    SciTech Connect

    Palombo, Fernando; Collaboration, for the BABAR

    2009-01-12

    The author presents some of the most recent BABAR measurements for rare B decays. These include rate asymmetries in the B decays to K{sup (*)}l{sup +}l{sup -} and K{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and branching fractions in the B decays to l{sup +}{nu}{sub l}, K{sub 1}(1270){sup +}{pi}{sup -} and K{sub 1}(1400){sup +}{pi}{sup -}. The author also reports a search for the B{sup +} decay to K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}.

  4. Interatomic Coulombic decay in a He dimer: Ab initio potential-energy curves and decay widths

    SciTech Connect

    Kolorenc, Premysl; Kryzhevoi, Nikolai V.; Sisourat, Nicolas; Cederbaum, Lorenz S.

    2010-07-15

    The energy gained by either of the two helium atoms in a helium dimer through simultaneous ionization and excitation can be efficiently transferred to the other helium atom, which then ionizes. The respective relaxation process called interatomic Coulombic decay (ICD) is the subject of the present paper. Specifically, we are interested in ICD of the lowest of the ionized excited states, namely, the He{sup +}(n=2)He states, for which we calculated the relevant potential-energy curves and the interatomic decay widths. The full-configuration interaction method was used to obtain the potential-energy curves. The decay widths were computed by utilizing the Fano ansatz, Green's-function methods, and the Stieltjes imaging technique. The behavior of the decay widths with the interatomic distance is examined and is elucidated, whereby special emphasis is given to the asymptotically large interatomic separations. Our calculations show that the electronic ICD processes dominate over the radiative decay mechanisms over a wide range of interatomic distances. The ICD in the helium dimer has recently been measured by Havermeier et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 133401 (2010)]. The impact of nuclear dynamics on the ICD process is extremely important and is discussed by Sisourat et al. [Nat. Phys. 6, 508 (2010)] based on the ab initio data computed in the present paper.

  5. Proposed experimental test of Bell's inequality in nuclear beta decay

    SciTech Connect

    Skalsey, M.

    1986-04-15

    A ..beta.. decay experiment is proposed for testing Bell's inequality, related to hidden-variables alternatives to quantum mechanics. The experiment uses Mott scattering for spin polarization analysis of internal conversion electrons. Beta-decay electrons, in cascade with the conversion electrons, are longitudinally polarized due to parity violation in the weak interaction. So simply detecting the ..beta.. electron direction effectively measures the spin. A two-particle spin-spin correlation can thus be investigated and related, within certain assumptions, to Bell's inequality. The example of /sup 203/Hg decay is used for a calculation of expected results. Specific problems related to nuclear structure and experimental inconsistencies are also discussed.

  6. Observation of the Forbidden Magnetic Dipole Transition 6{sup 2}P{sub ½} --> 7{sup 2}P{sub ½} in Atomic Thallium

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Chu, S.

    1976-10-01

    A measurement of the 6{sup 2}P{sub ½} --> 7{sup 2}P{sub ½} forbidden magnetic dipole matrix element in atomic thallium is described. A pulsed, linearly polarized dye laser tuned to the transition frequency is used to excite the thallium vapor from the 6{sup 2}P{sub ½} ground state to the 7{sup 2}P{sub ½} excited state. Interference between the magnetic dipole M1 amplitude and a static electric field induced E1 amplitude results in an atomic polarization of the 7{sup 2}P{sub ½} state, and the subsequent circular polarization of 535 nm fluorescence. The circular polarization is seen to be proportional to / as expected, and measured for several transitions between hyperfine levels of the 6{sup 2}P{sub ½} and 7{sup 2}P{sub ½} states. The result is = -(2.11 +- 0.30) x 10{sup -5} parallel bar e parallel bar dirac constant/2mc, in agreement with theory.

  7. Cluster decay in the superallowed α decay region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhagwat, A.; Liotta, R. J.

    2017-09-01

    The emissions of α particles and protons are the dominant decay channels in the neutron-deficient nuclei corresponding to the s d g major shell. The possibility of cluster emission is explored here. It is shown that the cluster decay mode has a small yet sizable branching ratio.

  8. CP violation in K decays and rare decays

    SciTech Connect

    Buchalla, G.

    1996-12-01

    The present status of CP violation in decays of neutral kaons is reviewed. In addition selected rare decays of both K and B mesons are discussed. The emphasis is in particular on observables that can be reliably calculated and thus offer the possibility of clean tests of standard model flavor physics. 105 refs.

  9. The final stages of spliceosome maturation require Spp2p that can interact with the DEAH box protein Prp2p and promote step 1 of splicing.

    PubMed Central

    Roy, J; Kim, K; Maddock, J R; Anthony, J G; Woolford, J L

    1995-01-01

    Pre-mRNA processing occurs by assembly of splicing factors on the substrate to form the spliceosome followed by two consecutive RNA cleavage-ligation reactions. The Prp2 protein hydrolyzes ATP and is required for the first reaction (Yean SL, Lin RJ, 1991, Mol Cell Biol 11:5571-5577; Kim SH, Smith J, Claude A, Lin RJ, 1992, EMBO J 11:2319-2326). The Saccharomyces cerevisiae SPP2 gene was previously identified as a high-copy suppressor of temperature-sensitive prp2 mutants (Last RL, Maddock JR, Woolford JL Jr, 1987, Genetics 117:619-631). We have characterized the function of Spp2p in vivo and in vitro. Spp2p is an essential protein required for the first RNA cleavage reaction in vivo. Depletion of Spp2p from yeast cells results in accumulation of unspliced pre-mRNAs. A temperature-sensitive spp2-1 mutant accumulates pre-mRNAs in vivo and is unable to undergo the first splicing reaction in vitro. However, spliceosomal complexes are assembled in extracts prepared from the mutant. We show that Spp2p function is required after spliceosome assembly but prior to the first reaction. Spp2p associates with the spliceosome before the first RNA cleavage reaction and is likely to be released from the spliceosome following ATP hydrolysis by Prp2p. The Prp2 and Spp2 proteins are capable of physically interacting with each other. These results suggest that Spp2p interacts with Prp2p in the spliceosome prior to the first cleavage-ligation reaction. Spp2p is the first protein that has been found to interact with a DEAD/H box splicing factor. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 PMID:7493316

  10. New superhindered polydentate polyphosphine ligands P(CH2CH2P(t)Bu2)3, PhP(CH2CH2P(t)Bu2)2, P(CH2CH2CH2P(t)Bu2)3, and their ruthenium(II) chloride complexes.

    PubMed

    Gilbert-Wilson, Ryan; Field, Leslie D; Bhadbhade, Mohan M

    2012-03-05

    The synthesis and characterization of the extremely hindered phosphine ligands, P(CH(2)CH(2)P(t)Bu(2))(3) (P(2)P(3)(tBu), 1), PhP(CH(2)CH(2)P(t)Bu(2))(2) (PhP(2)P(2)(tBu), 2), and P(CH(2)CH(2)CH(2)P(t)Bu(2))(3) (P(3)P(3)(tBu), 3) are reported, along with the synthesis and characterization of ruthenium chloro complexes RuCl(2)(P(2)P(3)(tBu)) (4), RuCl(2)(PhP(2)P(2)(tBu)) (5), and RuCl(2)(P(3)P(3)(tBu)) (6). The bulky P(2)P(3)(tBu) (1) and P(3)P(3)(tBu) (3) ligands are the most sterically encumbered PP(3)-type ligands so far synthesized, and in all cases, only three phosphorus donors are able to bind to the metal center. Complexes RuCl(2)(PhP(2)P(2)(tBu)) (5) and RuCl(2)(P(3)P(3)(tBu)) (6) were characterized by crystallography. Low temperature solution and solid state (31)P{(1)H} NMR were used to demonstrate that the structure of RuCl(2)(P(2)P(3)(tBu)) (4) is probably analogous to that of RuCl(2)(PhP(2)P(2)(tBu)) (5) which had been structurally characterized.

  11. Accelerated Decay of Radioisotopes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    00-01 -2013 Technical June20 l l-June 2012 4 . TITLE AND SUBTITLE Sa. CONTRACT NUMBER DTRA MIPR 11-2362M Accelerated Decay of Radioisotopes Sb...268 x E +2 4.788 026 x E -2 6.894 757 4.535 924 x E -1 4.214 011 x E -2 1.601 846 x E +1 1.000 000 x E -2 2.579 760 x E - 4 1.000 000 x E -8...c a y o f R a d i o i s o t o p e s " P r o p o s a l # B R C A L L 0 7 - N - 2 - 0 0 4 7 I l l u s t r a t i o n o f \\ P F R P a s p o

  12. Double beta decay: Calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brofferio, Chiara

    2008-11-01

    Calorimeters or, with a more specific definition, low temperature detectors, have been used by now for more than 15 years in Double Beta Decay (DBD) searches, with excellent results: they compete with Ge diodes for the rank of detectors with the highest sensitivity to the effective neutrino mass, which is defined as a linear combination of the neutrino mass eigenvalues. After a brief introduction to the argument, with some notes on DBD and on bolometers, an update on the now closed experiment CUORICINO and on its successor, CUORE, is given. The fundamental role of background is then revealed and commented, introducing in this way the importance of the specific experiment now under construction, CUORE-0, that will precede CUORE to help optimizing the struggle against surface background. The possible future of this technique is then commented, quoting important R&D studies that are going on, for active shielding bolometers and for scintillating bolometers coupled with light detecting bolometers.

  13. Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorini, Ettore

    2007-06-01

    The recent results showing the presence of neutrino oscillations clearly indicate that the difference between the squared mass of neutrinos of different flavors is different from zero, but are unable to determine the nature and the absolute value of the neutrino mass. Neutrinoless double beta decay (DBD) is at present the most powerful tool to ascertain if the neutrino is a Majorana particle and to determine under this condition the absolute value of its mass. The results already obtained in this lepton violating process will be reported and the two presently running DBD experiments briefly discussed. The future second generation experiments will be reviewed with special emphasis to those already partially approved. In conclusion the peculiar and interdisciplinary nature of these searches will be stressed in their exciting aim to discover if neutrino is Dirac or Majorana particle.

  14. Involvement of Conserved Amino Acids in the C-Terminal Region of LINE-1 ORF2p in Retrotransposition.

    PubMed

    Christian, Claiborne M; Sokolowski, Mark; deHaro, Dawn; Kines, Kristine J; Belancio, Victoria P

    2017-03-01

    Long interspersed element 1 (L1) is the only currently active autonomous retroelement in the human genome. Along with the parasitic SVA and short interspersed element Alu, L1 is the source of DNA damage induced by retrotransposition: a copy-and-paste process that has the potential to disrupt gene function and cause human disease. The retrotransposition process is dependent upon the ORF2 protein (ORF2p). However, it is unknown whether most of the protein is important for retrotransposition. In particular, other than the Cys motif, the C terminus of the protein has not been intensely examined in the context of retrotransposition. Using evolutionary analysis and the Alu retrotransposition assay, we sought to identify additional amino acids in the C terminus important for retrotransposition. Here, we demonstrate that Gal4-tagged and untagged C-terminally truncated ORF2p fragments possess residual potential to drive Alu retrotransposition. Using sight-directed mutagenesis we identify that while the Y1180 amino acid is important for ORF2p- and L1-driven Alu retrotransposition, a mutation at this position improves L1 retrotransposition. Even though the mechanism of the contribution of Y1180 to Alu and L1 mobilization remains unknown, experimental evidence rules out its direct involvement in the ability of the ORF2p reverse transcriptase to generate complementary DNA. Additionally, our data support that ORF2p amino acids 1180 and 1250-1262 may be involved in the reported ORF1p-mediated increase in ORF2p-driven Alu retrotransposition.

  15. Decay of oscillating universes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mithani, Audrey Todhunter

    2016-08-01

    It has been suggested by Ellis et al that the universe could be eternal in the past, without beginning. In their model, the "emergent universe'' exists forever in the past, in an "eternal'' phase before inflation begins. We will show that in general, such an "eternal'' phase is not possible, because of an instability due to quantum tunneling. One candidate model, the "simple harmonic universe'' has been shown by Graham et al to be perturbatively stable; we find that it is unstable with respect to quantum tunneling. We also investigate the stability of a distinct oscillating model in loop quantum cosmology with respect to small perturbations and to quantum collapse. We find that the model has perturbatively stable and unstable solutions, with both types of solutions occupying significant regions of the parameter space. All solutions are unstable with respect to collapse by quantum tunneling to zero size. In addition, we investigate the effect of vacuum corrections, due to the trace anomaly and the Casimir effect, on the stability of an oscillating universe with respect to decay by tunneling to the singularity. We find that these corrections do not generally stabilize an oscillating universe. Finally, we determine the decay rate of the oscillating universe. Although the wave function of the universe lacks explicit time dependence in canonical quantum cosmology, time evolution may be present implicitly through the semiclassical superspace variables, which themselves depend on time in classical dynamics. Here, we apply this approach to the simple harmonic universe, by extending the model to include a massless, minimally coupled scalar field φ which has little effect on the dynamics but can play the role of a "clock''.

  16. A Novel P2P traffic Prediction Algorithm Based on Hybrid Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhi-jie, Han; Ru-chuan, Wang; Xiao-yang, Duan

    The increasing P2P network traffic on the Internet has leaded to the problem of network congestion. In the consequence of the diversification of the P2P traffic and protocol, research on the management of P2P traffic has had many problems needed to resolve. P2P traffic Prediction is kernel problem in the P2P traffic management. Based on the P2P traffic characters, this thesis present a P2P traffic model, gived a traffic prediction algorithm bases on wavelet-analysis, and proved the accuracy of the algorithm. Simulation has experiment figures that the algorithm a high prediction precision and superior real-time performance.

  17. Decaying and growing eigenmodes in open quantum systems: Biorthogonality and the Petermann factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Soo-Young

    2009-10-01

    We study the biorthogonality between decaying and growing eigenmodes in one-dimensional potential barrier problems. It is shown that Petermann factors Kn of the eigenmodes, a measure of nonorthogonality, are involved in decaying mechanism of an initially confined particle. We also show that the decay tail of the growing modes at an exceptional point (EP), where Kn become infinite, is not exponential, but ˜t2e-ΓEPt , ΓEP the decay rate of the decaying mode at EP. In addition, the geometrical phase near an EP is illustrated by the evolution of wave function.

  18. Particle decay in inflationary cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Boyanovsky, D.; Vega, H.J. de

    2004-09-15

    We investigate the relaxation and decay of a particle during inflation by implementing the dynamical renormalization group. This investigation allows us to give a meaningful definition for the decay rate in an expanding universe. As a prelude to a more general scenario, the method is applied here to study the decay of a particle in de Sitter inflation via a trilinear coupling to massless conformally coupled particles, both for wavelengths much larger and much smaller than the Hubble radius. For superhorizon modes we find that the decay is of the form {eta}{sup {gamma}{sub 1}} with {eta} being conformal time and we give an explicit expression for {gamma}{sub 1} to leading order in the coupling which has a noteworthy interpretation in terms of the Hawking temperature of de Sitter space-time. We show that if the mass M of the decaying field is <decay rate during inflation is enhanced over the Minkowski space-time result by a factor 2H/{pi}M. For wavelengths much smaller than the Hubble radius we find that the decay law is e with C({eta}) the scale factor and {alpha} determined by the strength of the trilinear coupling. In all cases we find a substantial enhancement in the decay law as compared to Minkowski space-time. These results suggest potential implications for the spectrum of scalar density fluctuations as well as non-Gaussianities.

  19. Tree Decay - An Expanded Concept

    Treesearch

    Alex L. Shigo

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of this publication is to clarify further the tree decay concept that expands the classical concept to include the orderly response of the tree to wounding and infection-compartmentalization-and the orderly infection of wounds by many microorganisms-successions. The heartrot concept must be abandoned because it deals only with decay-causing fungi and it...

  20. Tree decay an expanded concept

    Treesearch

    Alex L. Shigo

    1979-01-01

    This publication is the final one in a series on tree decay developed in cooperation with Harold G. Marx, Research Application Staff Assistant, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Washington, D.C. The purpose of this publication is to clarify further the tree decay concept that expands the classical concept to include the orderly response of the tree to...

  1. Theoretical understanding of charm decays

    SciTech Connect

    Bigi, I.I.

    1986-08-01

    A detailed description of charm decays has emerged. The various concepts involved are sketched. Although this description is quite successful in reproducing the data the chapter on heavy flavour decays is far from closed. Relevant questions like on th real strength of weak annihilation, Penguin operators, etc. are still unanswered. Important directions in future work, both on the experimental and theoretical side are identified.

  2. Soudan 2 nucleon decay experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Thron, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    The Soudan 2 nucleon decay experiment consists of a 1.1 Kton fine grained iron tracking calorimeter. It has a very isotropic detection structure which along with its flexible trigger will allow detection of multiparticle and neutrino proton decay modes. The detector has now entered its construction stage.

  3. Particle decay in inflationary cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyanovsky, D.; de Vega, H. J.

    2004-09-01

    We investigate the relaxation and decay of a particle during inflation by implementing the dynamical renormalization group. This investigation allows us to give a meaningful definition for the decay rate in an expanding universe. As a prelude to a more general scenario, the method is applied here to study the decay of a particle in de Sitter inflation via a trilinear coupling to massless conformally coupled particles, both for wavelengths much larger and much smaller than the Hubble radius. For superhorizon modes we find that the decay is of the form ηΓ1 with η being conformal time and we give an explicit expression for Γ1 to leading order in the coupling which has a noteworthy interpretation in terms of the Hawking temperature of de Sitter space-time. We show that if the mass M of the decaying field is ≪H then the decay rate during inflation is enhanced over the Minkowski space-time result by a factor 2H/πM. For wavelengths much smaller than the Hubble radius we find that the decay law is e with C(η) the scale factor and α determined by the strength of the trilinear coupling. In all cases we find a substantial enhancement in the decay law as compared to Minkowski space-time. These results suggest potential implications for the spectrum of scalar density fluctuations as well as non-Gaussianities.

  4. Relativistic CI calculations of spectroscopic data for the 2p6 and 2p53l configurations in Ne-like ions between Mg III and Kr XXVII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jönsson, P.; Bengtsson, P.; Ekman, J.; Gustafsson, S.; Karlsson, L. B.; Gaigalas, G.; Froese Fischer, C.; Kato, D.; Murakami, I.; Sakaue, H. A.; Hara, H.; Watanabe, T.; Nakamura, N.; Yamamoto, N.

    2014-01-01

    Energies, E1, M1, E2, M2 transition rates, oscillator strengths, and lifetimes from relativistic configuration interaction calculations are reported for the states of the 2p6, 2p53s, 2p53p, and 2p53d, configurations in all Ne-like ions between Mg III and Kr XXVII. Core-valence and core-core correlation effects are accounted for through single and double excitations to increasing sets of active orbitals. The Breit interaction and leading quantum electrodynamic effects are included as perturbations. The results are compared with experiments and other recent benchmark calculations. In Mg III, Al IV, Si V, P VI, S VII, and Ar IX, for which experimental energies are known to high accuracy, the mean error in the calculated energies is only 0.011%.

  5. Top decays in extended models

    SciTech Connect

    Gaitan, R.; Miranda, O. G.; Cabral-Rosetti, L. G.

    2009-04-20

    Top quark decays are interesting as a mean to test the Standard Model (SM) predictions. The Cabbibo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM)-suppressed process t{yields}cWW, and the rare decays t{yields}cZ, t{yields}H{sup 0}+c, and t{yields}c{gamma} an excellent window to probe the predictions of theories beyond the SM. We evaluate the flavor changing neutral currents (FCNC) decay t{yields}H{sup 0}+c in the context of Alternative Left-Right symmetric Models (ALRM) with extra isosinglet heavy fermions; the FCNC decays may place at tree level and are only supressed by the mixing between ordinary top and charm quarks. We also comment on the decay process t{yields}c+{gamma}, which involves radiative corrections.

  6. Kir2.1 and K2P1 channels reconstitute two levels of resting membrane potential in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Dongchuan; Chen, Kuihao; Zhou, Min; Liu, Zheng; Chen, Haijun

    2017-08-01

    Outward and inward background currents across the cell membrane balance, determining resting membrane potential. Inward rectifier K(+) channel subfamily 2 (Kir2) channels primarily maintain the resting membrane potential of cardiomyocytes. Human cardiomyocytes exhibit two levels of resting membrane potential at subphysiological extracellular K(+) concentrations or pathological hypokalaemia, however, the underlying mechanism is unclear. In the present study, we show that human cardiomyocytes derived from induced pluripotent stem cells with enhanced expression of isoform 1 of Kir2 (Kir2.1) channels and mouse HL-1 cardiomyocytes with ectopic expression of two pore-domain K(+) channel isoform 1 (K2P1) recapitulate two levels of resting membrane potential, indicating the contributions of Kir2.1 and K2P1 channels to the phenomenon. In Chinese hamster ovary cells that express the channels, Kir2.1 currents non-linearly counterbalance hypokalaemia-induced K2P1 leak cation currents, reconstituting two levels of resting membrane potential. These findings support the hypothesis that Kir2 currents non-linearly counterbalance inward background cation currents, such as K2P1 currents, accounting for two levels of resting membrane potential in human cardiomyocytes and demonstrating a novel mechanism that regulates excitability. Inward rectifier K(+) channel subfamily 2 (Kir2) channels primarily maintain the normal resting membrane potential of cardiomyocytes. At subphysiological extracellular K(+) concentrations or pathological hypokalaemia, human cardiomyocytes show both hyperpolarized and depolarized resting membrane potentials; these depolarized potentials cause cardiac arrhythmia; however, the underlying mechanism is unknown. In the present study, we show that inward rectifier K(+) channel subfamily 2 isoform 1 (Kir2.1) currents non-linearly counterbalance hypokalaemia-induced two pore-domain K(+) channel isoform 1 (K2P1) leak cation currents, reconstituting two levels of

  7. Reactions of excited I*(/sup 2/P /SUB 1/2/ ) and unexcited I(/sup 2/P /SUB 3/2/ ) iodine atoms in perfluoroalkyl radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Andreeva, T.L.; Kuznetsova, S.V.; Maslov, A.I.; Sobel'man, I.I.

    1983-01-01

    A method of investigating reactions of excited and unexcited atoms is discussed. It is based on pulsed photolysis of molecules with simultaneous passage of laser radiation through the working medium. The method proposed is used to investigate the reactions that accompany the photolysis of the molecules RI(CF/sub 3/I, n-C/sub 3/F/sub 7/I, i-C/sub 3/F/sub 7/I). The rate constants of the recombination of iodine atoms into I/sub 2/ in the presence of RI molecules are calculated for the atoms I(/sup 2/P /SUB 3/2/ ) and I*(/sup 2/P /SUB 1/2/ ), as are the recombination constants of the radicals R into R/sub 2/ and with the atoms I*(/sup 2/P /SUB 1/2/ ) and I(/sup 2/P /SUB 3/2/ ) into the RI molecule. It is shown that the I(/sup 2/P /SUB 3/2/ ) atoms are much more active in the recombination into I/sub 2/ and RI than the I*(/sup 2/P /SUB 1/2/ ) atoms. The role of the investigated reactions in the kinetics of a photodissociation iodine laser (PDIL) is discussed. The results are compared with the published data.

  8. Interstitial deletion 2p11.2-p12: report of a patient with mental retardation and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Tzschach, Andreas; Graul-Neumann, Luitgard M; Konrat, Kateryna; Richter, Reyk; Ebert, Grit; Ullmann, Reinhard; Neitzel, Heidemarie

    2009-02-01

    Deletions of chromosome bands 2p11.2 and 2p12 are rare, and only six patients have been reported to date. Here, we report on a 5-year-old girl with an 11.4 Mb interstitial deletion of chromosome bands 2p11.2-p12 and the characterization of this deletion by high-resolution array CGH. The patient presented with mental retardation, microcephaly and short stature. Facial features included broad nasal bridge, frontal bossing and mild dolichocephaly. Phenotypic comparison with previously published patients failed to reveal a consistent clinical pattern apart from developmental delay/mental retardation, which is probably due to different sizes and/or positions of the individual deletions. Among the 40 known genes deleted in our patient is REEP1, haploinsufficiency of which causes autosomal dominant spastic paraplegia type 31 (SPG31, OMIM 610250). Additional patients with well-characterized deletions within 2p11.2 and 2p12 will be needed to determine the role of individual genes for the clinical manifestations. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Charm and bottom semileptonic decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'donnell, Patrick J.; Turan, Gürsevil

    1997-07-01

    We review the present status of theoretical attempts to calculate the semileptonic charm and bottom decays and then present a calculation of these decays in the light-front frame at the kinematic point q2=0. This allows us to evaluate the form factors at the same value of q2, even though the allowed kinematic ranges for charm and bottom decays are very different. Also, at this kinematic point the decay is given in terms of only one form factor A0(0). For the ratio of the decay rates given by the E653 collaboration we show that the determination of the ratio of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix elements is consistent with that obtained from the unitarity constraint, though a new measurement by the E687 Collaboration is about two standard deviations too high. At present, though, the unitarity method still has greater accuracy. Since comparisons of the semileptonic decays into ρ and either electrons or muons will be available soon from the E791 Fermilab experiment, we also look at the massive muon case. We show that for a range of q2 the SU(3)F symmetry breaking is small even though the contributions of the various helicity amplitudes becomes more complicated. For B decays, the decay B-->K*ll¯ at q2=0 involves an extra form factor coming from the photon contribution and so is not amenable to the same kind of analysis, leaving only the decay B-->K*νν¯ as a possibility. As the mass of the decaying particle increases we note that the SU(3) symmetry becomes badly broken at q2=0.

  10. Pyrethroids inhibit K2P channels and activate sensory neurons: basis of insecticide-induced paraesthesias.

    PubMed

    Castellanos, Aida; Andres, Alba; Bernal, Laura; Callejo, Gerard; Comes, Nuria; Gual, Arcadi; Giblin, Jonathan P; Roza, Carolina; Gasull, Xavier

    2017-09-25

    Pyrethroid insecticides are widely used for pest control, in agriculture or in human public health commonly as a topical treatment for scabies and head lice. Exposure to pyrethroids such as permethrin or tetramethrin (TM) causes sensory alterations such as transient pain, burning, stinging sensations and paraesthesias. Despite the well-known effects of pyrethroids on sodium channels, actions on other channels that control sensory neuron excitability are less studied. Given the role of two-pore domain potassium (K2P) channels in modulating sensory neuron excitability and firing, both in physiological and pathological conditions, we examined the effect of pyrethroids on K2P channels mainly expressed in sensory neurons. Through electrophysiological and calcium imaging experiments, we show that a high percentage of TM-responding neurons were nociceptors, which were also activated by TRPA1 and/or TRPV1 agonists. This pyrethroid also activated and enhanced the excitability of peripheral saphenous nerve fibers. Pyrethroids produced a significant inhibition of native TRESK, TRAAK, TREK-1 and TREK-2 currents. Similar effects were found in transfected HEK293 cells. At the behavioral level, intradermal TM injection in the mouse paw produced nocifensive responses and caused mechanical allodynia, demonstrating that the effects seen on nociceptors in culture lead to pain-associated behaviors in vivo. In TRESK knockout mice, pain-associated behaviors elicited by TM were enhanced, providing further evidence for a role of this channel in preventing excessive neuronal activation. Our results indicate that inhibition of K2P channels facilitates sensory neuron activation and increases their excitability. These effects contribute to the generation of paraesthesias and pain after pyrethroid exposure.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and

  11. Pih1p-Tah1p Puts a Lid on Hexameric AAA+ ATPases Rvb1/2p.

    PubMed

    Tian, Shaoxiong; Yu, Ge; He, Huan; Zhao, Yu; Liu, Peilu; Marshall, Alan G; Demeler, Borries; Stagg, Scott M; Li, Hong

    2017-10-03

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Sc) R2TP complex affords an Hsp90-mediated and nucleotide-driven chaperone activity to proteins of small ribonucleoprotein particles (snoRNPs). The current lack of structural information on the ScR2TP complex, however, prevents a mechanistic understanding of this biological process. We characterized the structure of the ScR2TP complex made up of two AAA+ ATPases, Rvb1/2p, and two Hsp90 binding proteins, Tah1p and Pih1p, and its interaction with the snoRNP protein Nop58p by a combination of analytical ultracentrifugation, isothermal titration calorimetry, chemical crosslinking, hydrogen-deuterium exchange, and cryoelectron microscopy methods. We find that Pih1p-Tah1p interacts with Rvb1/2p cooperatively through the nucleotide-sensitive domain of Rvb1/2p. Nop58p further binds Pih1p-Tahp1 on top of the dome-shaped R2TP. Consequently, nucleotide binding releases Pih1p-Tah1p from Rvb1/2p, which offers a mechanism for nucleotide-driven binding and release of snoRNP intermediates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Dynamics of excimer formation and decay in supercritical krypton

    SciTech Connect

    Holroyd, Richard A.; Cook, Andrew R.; Preses, Jack M.

    2009-12-14

    New infrared absorbing species are identified in the pulse radiolysis of supercritical Kr at high pressures. The species are believed to be excimers. Their formation and decay rates have been time resolved using the Laser Electron Accelerator Facility. An initial species, formed in less than 1 ns, absorbs at several wavelengths between 790 and 1300 nm; The decay of this species is initially fast, followed by a slower component; the decay rate increases with pressure. As this initial species decays a second excimer is formed absorbing at 830, 890, and 990 nm. The growth and decay rates of this excimer are also pressure dependent. A third excimer, absorbing between 1000 and 1200 nm grows at a rate similar to that of the decay of the second species. The decay rate of the third species is also pressure dependent; the lifetime increases from 9.4 ns at 109 bar to 49 ns at 15 bar. A kinetic mechanism is proposed that satisfactorily reproduces the experimental results. The first species is identified as a higher energy gerade triplet state excimer and the second as the singlet gerade state.

  13. Indispensable role of Mdm2/p53 interaction during the embryonic and postnatal inner ear development

    PubMed Central

    Laos, M.; Sulg, M.; Herranen, A.; Anttonen, T.; Pirvola, U.

    2017-01-01

    p53 is a key component of a signaling network that protects cells against various stresses. As excess p53 is detrimental to cells, its levels are tightly controlled by several mechanisms. The E3 ubiquitin ligase Mdm2 is a major negative regulator of p53. The significance of balanced p53 levels in normal tissues, at different stages of lifetime, is poorly understood. We have studied in vivo how the disruption of Mdm2/p53 interaction affects the early-embryonic otic progenitor cells and their descendants, the auditory supporting cells and hair cells. We found that p53 accumulation, as a consequence of Mdm2 abrogation, is lethal to both proliferative progenitors and non-proliferating, differentiating cells. The sensitivity of postmitotic supporting cells to excess p53 decreases along maturation, suggesting that maturation-related mechanisms limit p53′s transcriptional activity towards pro-apoptotic factors. We have also investigated in vitro whether p53 restricts supporting cell’s regenerative capacity. Unlike in several other regenerative cellular models, p53 inactivation did not alter supporting cell’s proliferative quiescence nor transdifferentiation capacity. Altogether, the postmitotic status of developing hair cells and supporting cells does not confer protection against the detrimental effects of p53 upregulation. These findings might be linked to auditory disturbances observed in developmental syndromes with inappropriate p53 upregulation. PMID:28181574

  14. 7 CFR 51.490 - Decay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Cantaloups 1 Definitions § 51.490 Decay. Decay means breakdown, disintegration or fermentation of the flesh or rind of the cantaloup caused by bacteria or fungi; except that dry type decays...

  15. 7 CFR 51.490 - Decay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Cantaloups 1 Definitions § 51.490 Decay. Decay means breakdown, disintegration or fermentation of the flesh or rind of the cantaloup caused by bacteria or fungi; except that dry type decays...

  16. 7 CFR 51.490 - Decay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Cantaloups 1 Definitions § 51.490 Decay. Decay means breakdown, disintegration or fermentation of the flesh or rind of the cantaloup caused by bacteria or fungi; except that dry type decays...

  17. Semileptonic and leptonic B decays, circa 2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricciardi, Giulia

    2017-02-01

    We summarize the status of semileptonic and leptonic B decays, including |Vcb| and |Vub| exclusive and inclusive determinations, decays to excited states of the charm meson spectrum and decays into τ leptons.

  18. Primordial nucleosynthesis with decaying particles. I - Entropy-producing decays. II - Inert decays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherrer, Robert J.; Turner, Michael S.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of a nonrelativistic particle X, which decays out of equilibrium, on primordial nucleosynthesis is investigated, including both the energy density of the X particle and the electromagnetic entropy production from its decay. The results are parametrized in terms of the X particle lifetime and the density parameter rm(X), where m(X) is the X particle mass and r is the ratio of X number density to photon number density prior to nucleosynthesis. The results rule out particle lifetimes greater than 1-10 s for large values of rm(X). The question of a decaying particle which produces no electromagnetic entropy in the course of its decay is addressed, and particles which produce both entropy and an inert component in their decay are discussed.

  19. Primordial nucleosynthesis with decaying particles. I - Entropy-producing decays. II - Inert decays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherrer, Robert J.; Turner, Michael S.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of a nonrelativistic particle X, which decays out of equilibrium, on primordial nucleosynthesis is investigated, including both the energy density of the X particle and the electromagnetic entropy production from its decay. The results are parametrized in terms of the X particle lifetime and the density parameter rm(X), where m(X) is the X particle mass and r is the ratio of X number density to photon number density prior to nucleosynthesis. The results rule out particle lifetimes greater than 1-10 s for large values of rm(X). The question of a decaying particle which produces no electromagnetic entropy in the course of its decay is addressed, and particles which produce both entropy and an inert component in their decay are discussed.

  20. Observation of 2p3d(1Po)→1s3d(1De) radiative transition in He-like Si, S, and Cl ions.

    PubMed

    Kasthurirangan, S; Saha, J K; Agnihotri, A N; Bhattacharyya, S; Misra, D; Kumar, A; Mukherjee, P K; Santos, J P; Costa, A M; Indelicato, P; Mukherjee, T K; Tribedi, L C

    2013-12-13

    We present an experimental determination of the 2p3d(1Po)→1s3d(1De) x-ray line emitted from He-like Si, S, and Cl projectile ions, excited in collisions with thin carbon foils, using a high-resolution bent-crystal spectrometer. A good agreement between the observation and state-of-the-art relativistic calculations using the multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock formalism including the Breit interaction and QED effects implies the dominance of fluorescent decay over the autoionization process for the 2p3d(^{1}P^{o}) state of He-like heavy ions. This is the first observation of the fluorescence-active doubly excited states in He-like Si, S, and Cl ions.

  1. Double Beta Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorini, Ettore

    2010-12-01

    Almost exactly seventy years ago and only one year before his tragic disappearance the ingenious idea of Ettore Majorana is becoming one of the most important step in the development of fundamental physics. The problem of the nature of the neutrino, namely if it is a massless Dirac particle different from its antineutrino or a Majorana particle with finite mass, is discussed. In fact the recent results showing the presence of neutrino oscillations clearly indicates that the difference between the squared mass of neutrinos of different flavours is finite. Neutrinoless double beta decay (DBD) is at present the most powerful tool to determine the effective value of the mass of a Majorana neutrino. The results already obtained in this lepton violating process will be reported and the two presently running DBD experiments briefly discussed. The future second generation experiments will be reviewed with special emphasis to those already at least partially approved. In conclusion the peculiar and interdisciplinary nature of these searches will be stressed in their exciting aim to discover if neutrino is indeed a Majorana particle.

  2. Nonleptonic Bc→VV decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, Susmita; Dash, P. C.; Priyadarsini, M.; Naimuddin, Sk.; Barik, N.

    2013-11-01

    We study the exclusive nonleptonic Bc→VV decays, within the factorization approximation, in the framework of the relativistic independent quark model, based on a confining potential in the scalar-vector harmonic form. The weak form factors are extracted from the overlap integral of meson wave functions derived in the relativistic independent quark model. The predicted branching ratios for different Bc-meson decays are obtained in a wide range, from a tiny value of O(10-6) for Bc→D*D(s)* to a large value of 24.32% for Bc→Bs*ρ-, in general agreement with other dynamical-quark-model predictions. The decay modes Bc→Bs*ρ- and Bc→B*ρ- with high branching ratios of 24.32% and 1.73%, respectively, obtained in this model should be detectable at the LHC and Tevatron in the near future. The b→c, u induced decays are predicted predominantly in the longitudinal mode, whereas the c¯→s¯, d¯ induced decays are obtained in a slightly higher transverse mode. The CP-odd fractions (R⊥) for different decay modes are predicted and those for color-favored Bc→D*D*, D*Ds* decays indicate significant CP violation in this sector.

  3. Decay of Solar Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, David H.; Choudhary, Debi Prasad

    2005-01-01

    We examine the record of sunspot group areas observed over a period of 100 years to determine the rate of decay of solar active regions. We exclude observations of groups when they are more than 60deg in longitude from the central meridian and only include data when at least three days of observations are available following the date of maximum area for a spot group's disk passage. This leaves data for some 24,000 observations of active region decay. We find that the decay rate is a constant 20 microHem/day for spots smaller than about 200 microHem (about the size of a supergranule). This decay rate increases linearly to about 90 microHem/day for spots with areas of 1000 microHem. We find no evidence for significant variations in active region decay from one solar cycle to another. However, we do find that the decay rate is slower at lower latitudes. This gives a slower decay rate during the declining phase of sunspot cycles.

  4. Decay of Solar Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, David H.; Choudhary, Debi Prasad

    2005-01-01

    We examine the record of sunspot group areas observed over a period of 100 years to determine the rate of decay of solar active regions. We exclude observations of groups when they are more than 60deg in longitude from the central meridian and only include data when at least three days of observations are available following the date of maximum area for a spot group's disk passage. This leaves data for some 24,000 observations of active region decay. We find that the decay rate is a constant 20 microHem/day for spots smaller than about 200 microHem (about the size of a supergranule). This decay rate increases linearly to about 90 microHem/day for spots with areas of 1000 microHem. We find no evidence for significant variations in active region decay from one solar cycle to another. However, we do find that the decay rate is slower at lower latitudes. This gives a slower decay rate during the declining phase of sunspot cycles.

  5. Timescale of non-exponential decay for the nuclear β-decay process in a decoherence model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, A.; Sikdar, A. K.

    2016-11-01

    The quantum-mechanical time evolution of an isolated β-unstable nuclear state in the context of certain models predicts that the square of the amplitude of the initial undecayed state becomes an approximately exponential function of time on a timescale on the order of 10-22-10-21s . It was argued that a measurement process required to distinguish between the parent and the daughter nuclear states in such a short time would destroy the characteristics of the long-lived β-unstable nuclear state, thus fundamentally restricting the observability of β decay on a short timescale. Since the interaction of the nuclear state with the environment is almost inevitable, we have obtained the timescale of initial non-exponential decay for the nuclear β decay from an estimation of quantum decoherence time considering the atom of the decaying nucleus as a quantum detector. It has been found from such considerations that a decoherence timescale of β decay is on the order of 10-16-10-15s and the decay should remain reversible and non-exponential on this timescale. The possibilities of observing the effect of non-exponential decay in nuclear systems have been discussed.

  6. Spa2p Interacts with Cell Polarity Proteins and Signaling Components Involved in Yeast Cell Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sheu, Yi-Jun; Santos, Beatriz; Fortin, Nathalie; Costigan, Christine; Snyder, Michael

    1998-01-01

    The yeast protein Spa2p localizes to growth sites and is important for polarized morphogenesis during budding, mating, and pseudohyphal growth. To better understand the role of Spa2p in polarized growth, we analyzed regions of the protein important for its function and proteins that interact with Spa2p. Spa2p interacts with Pea2p and Bud6p (Aip3p) as determined by the two-hybrid system; all of these proteins exhibit similar localization patterns, and spa2Δ, pea2Δ, and bud6Δ mutants display similar phenotypes, suggesting that these three proteins are involved in the same biological processes. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments demonstrate that Spa2p and Pea2p are tightly associated with each other in vivo. Velocity sedimentation experiments suggest that a significant portion of Spa2p, Pea2p, and Bud6p cosediment, raising the possibility that these proteins form a large, 12S multiprotein complex. Bud6p has been shown previously to interact with actin, suggesting that the 12S complex functions to regulate the actin cytoskeleton. Deletion analysis revealed that multiple regions of Spa2p are involved in its localization to growth sites. One of the regions involved in Spa2p stability and localization interacts with Pea2p; this region contains a conserved domain, SHD-II. Although a portion of Spa2p is sufficient for localization of itself and Pea2p to growth sites, only the full-length protein is capable of complementing spa2 mutant defects, suggesting that other regions are required for Spa2p function. By using the two-hybrid system, Spa2p and Bud6p were also found to interact with components of two mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways important for polarized cell growth. Spa2p interacts with Ste11p (MAPK kinase [MEK] kinase) and Ste7p (MEK) of the mating signaling pathway as well as with the MEKs Mkk1p and Mkk2p of the Slt2p (Mpk1p) MAPK pathway; for both Mkk1p and Ste7p, the Spa2p-interacting region was mapped to the N-terminal putative regulatory domain

  7. Decay Heat Removal from a GFR Core by Natural Convection

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Wesley C.; Hejzlar, Pavel; Driscoll, Michael J.

    2004-07-01

    One of the primary challenges for Gas-cooled Fast Reactors (GFR) is decay heat removal after a loss of coolant accident (LOCA). Due to the fact that thermal gas cooled reactors currently under design rely on passive mechanisms to dissipate decay heat, there is a strong motivation to accomplish GFR core cooling through natural phenomena. This work investigates the potential of post-LOCA decay heat removal from a GFR core to a heat sink using an external convection loop. A model was developed in the form of the LOCA-COLA (Loss of Coolant Accident - Convection Loop Analysis) computer code as a means for 1D steady state convective heat transfer loop analysis. The results show that decay heat removal by means of gas cooled natural circulation is feasible under elevated post-LOCA containment pressure conditions. (authors)

  8. (Higgs) vacuum decay during inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joti, Aris; Katsis, Aris; Loupas, Dimitris; Salvio, Alberto; Strumia, Alessandro; Tetradis, Nikolaos; Urbano, Alfredo

    2017-07-01

    We develop the formalism for computing gravitational corrections to vacuum decay from de Sitter space as a sub-Planckian perturbative expansion. Non-minimal coupling to gravity can be encoded in an effective potential. The Coleman bounce continuously deforms into the Hawking-Moss bounce, until they coincide for a critical value of the Hubble constant. As an application, we reconsider the decay of the electroweak Higgs vacuum during inflation. Our vacuum decay computation reproduces and improves bounds on the maximal inflationary Hubble scale previously computed through statistical techniques.

  9. Decays of the b quark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorndike, Edward H.; Poling, Ronald A.

    1988-01-01

    Recent experimental results on the decay of b-flavored hadrons are reviewed. Substantial progress has been made in the study of exclusive and inclusive B-meson decays, as well as in the theoretical understanding of these processes. The two most prominent developments are the continuing failure to observe evidence of decays of the b quark to a u quark rather than a c quark, and the surprisingly high level of B 0- overlineB0 mi xing which has recently been reported by the ARGUS collaboration. Notwithstanding these results, we conclude that the health of the Standard Model is excellent.

  10. Glueball decay in holographic QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Koji; Tan, C.-I; Terashima, Seiji

    2008-04-15

    Using holographic QCD based on D4-branes and D8-anti-D8-branes, we have computed couplings of glueballs to light mesons. We describe glueball decay by explicitly calculating its decay widths and branching ratios. Interestingly, while glueballs remain less well understood both theoretically and experimentally, our results are found to be consistent with the experimental data for the scalar glueball candidate f{sub 0}(1500). More generally, holographic QCD predicts that decay of any glueball to 4{pi}{sup 0} is suppressed, and that mixing of the lightest glueball with qq mesons is small.

  11. Structural basis for dual roles of Aar2p in U5 snRNP assembly

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Gert; Cristão, Vanessa F.; Santos, Karine F.; Jovin, Sina Mozaffari; Heroven, Anna C.; Holton, Nicole; Lührmann, Reinhard; Beggs, Jean D.; Wahl, Markus C.

    2013-01-01

    Yeast U5 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle (snRNP) is assembled via a cytoplasmic precursor that contains the U5-specific Prp8 protein but lacks the U5-specific Brr2 helicase. Instead, pre-U5 snRNP includes the Aar2 protein not found in mature U5 snRNP or spliceosomes. Aar2p and Brr2p bind competitively to a C-terminal region of Prp8p that comprises consecutive RNase H-like and Jab1/MPN-like domains. To elucidate the molecular basis for this competition, we determined the crystal structure of Aar2p in complex with the Prp8p RNase H and Jab1/MPN domains. Aar2p binds on one side of the RNase H domain and extends its C terminus to the other side, where the Jab1/MPN domain is docked onto a composite Aar2p–RNase H platform. Known Brr2p interaction sites of the Jab1/MPN domain remain available, suggesting that Aar2p-mediated compaction of the Prp8p domains sterically interferes with Brr2p binding. Moreover, Aar2p occupies known RNA-binding sites of the RNase H domain, and Aar2p interferes with binding of U4/U6 di-snRNA to the Prp8p C-terminal region. Structural and functional analyses of phospho-mimetic mutations reveal how phosphorylation reduces affinity of Aar2p for Prp8p and allows Brr2p and U4/U6 binding. Our results show how Aar2p regulates both protein and RNA binding to Prp8p during U5 snRNP assembly. PMID:23442228

  12. Theory of cluster radioactive decay and of cluster formation in nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, S. S.; Gupta, Raj K.

    1989-05-01

    A new model is proposed for the mechanism of cluster formation and then penetration of the confining nuclear interaction barrier in radioactive nuclei. The cluster formation is treated as a quantum-mechanical fragmentation process and the WKB penetrability is found analytically. Applications of the model are made to 14C decay of 222-224Ra and 24Ne decay of 232U. The branching ratio for 14C decay of 232U is also calculated and is found to be incredibly small as compared to that for its 24Ne decay.

  13. Lifetime of inner-shell hole states of Ar (2p) and Kr (3d) using equation-of-motion coupled cluster method

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Aryya; Vaval, Nayana; Pal, Sourav

    2015-07-14

    Auger decay is an efficient ultrafast relaxation process of core-shell or inner-shell excited atom or molecule. Generally, it occurs in femto-second or even atto-second time domain. Direct measurement of lifetimes of Auger process of single ionized and double ionized inner-shell state of an atom or molecule is an extremely difficult task. In this paper, we have applied the highly correlated complex absorbing potential-equation-of-motion coupled cluster (CAP-EOMCC) approach which is a combination of CAP and EOMCC approach to calculate the lifetime of the states arising from 2p inner-shell ionization of an Ar atom and 3d inner-shell ionization of Kr atom. We have also calculated the lifetime of Ar{sup 2+}(2p{sup −1}3p{sup −1}) {sup 1}D, Ar{sup 2+}(2p{sup −1}3p{sup −1}) {sup 1}S, and Ar{sup 2+}(2p{sup −1}3s{sup −1}) {sup 1}P double ionized states. The predicted results are compared with the other theoretical results as well as experimental results available in the literature.

  14. Pex19p contributes to peroxisome inheritance in the association of peroxisomes to Myo2p.

    PubMed

    Otzen, Marleen; Rucktäschel, Robert; Thoms, Sven; Emmrich, Kerstin; Krikken, Arjen M; Erdmann, Ralf; van der Klei, Ida J

    2012-07-01

    During budding of yeast cells peroxisomes are distributed over mother cell and bud, a process that involves the myosin motor protein Myo2p and the peroxisomal membrane protein Inp2p. Here, we show that Pex19p, a peroxin implicated in targeting and complex formation of peroxisomal membrane proteins, also plays a role in peroxisome partitioning. Binding studies revealed that Pex19p interacts with the cargo-binding domain of Myo2p. We identified mutations in Myo2p that specifically reduced binding to Pex19p, but not to Inp2p. The interaction between Myo2p and Pex19p was also reduced by a mutation that blocked Pex19p farnesylation. Microscopy revealed that the Pex19p-Myo2p interaction is important for peroxisome inheritance, because mutations that affect this interaction hamper peroxisome inheritance in vivo. Together these data suggest that both Inp2p and Pex19p are required for proper association of peroxisomes to Myo2p. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  15. The excitation and collisional deactivation of metastable N/2P/ atoms in auroras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zipf, E. C.; Espy, P. J.; Boyle, C. F.

    1980-01-01

    The concentration and altitude distribution of metastable N(2P) atoms was measured in a diffuse IBC II(+) auroral arc. The dominant N(2P) source is shown to be the dissociative excitation of N2 by electron impact with a minor contribution from the dissociative recombination of N2(+) ions. The possibility that an ion-molecule process involving atomic oxygen and vibrationally excited N2(+) ions is a significant N(2P) source is examined. Values for the proportional yield of N(+), N(2P), N(2D), and N(4S) atoms from electron-impact dissociation of N2 under optically thick conditions are given.

  16. The excitation and collisional deactivation of metastable N/2P/ atoms in auroras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zipf, E. C.; Espy, P. J.; Boyle, C. F.

    1980-01-01

    The concentration and altitude distribution of metastable N(2P) atoms was measured in a diffuse IBC II(+) auroral arc. The dominant N(2P) source is shown to be the dissociative excitation of N2 by electron impact with a minor contribution from the dissociative recombination of N2(+) ions. The possibility that an ion-molecule process involving atomic oxygen and vibrationally excited N2(+) ions is a significant N(2P) source is examined. Values for the proportional yield of N(+), N(2P), N(2D), and N(4S) atoms from electron-impact dissociation of N2 under optically thick conditions are given.

  17. Two pore domain potassium channels in cerebral ischemia: a focus on K2P9.1 (TASK3, KCNK9)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Recently, members of the two-pore domain potassium channel family (K2P channels) could be shown to be involved in mechanisms contributing to neuronal damage after cerebral ischemia. K2P3.1-/- animals showed larger infarct volumes and a worse functional outcome following experimentally induced ischemic stroke. Here, we question the role of the closely related K2P channel K2P9.1. Methods We combine electrophysiological recordings in brain-slice preparations of wildtype and K2P9.1-/- mice with an in vivo model of cerebral ischemia (transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO)) to depict a functional impact of K2P9.1 in stroke formation. Results Patch-clamp recordings reveal that currents mediated through K2P9.1 can be obtained in slice preparations of the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN) as a model of central nervous relay neurons. Current characteristics are indicative of K2P9.1 as they display an increase upon removal of extracellular divalent cations, an outward rectification and a reversal potential close to the potassium equilibrium potential. Lowering extracellular pH values from 7.35 to 6.0 showed comparable current reductions in neurons from wildtype and K2P9.1-/- mice (68.31 ± 9.80% and 69.92 ± 11.65%, respectively). These results could be translated in an in vivo model of cerebral ischemia where infarct volumes and functional outcomes showed a none significant tendency towards smaller infarct volumes in K2P9.1-/- animals compared to wildtype mice 24 hours after 60 min of tMCAO induction (60.50 ± 17.31 mm3 and 47.10 ± 19.26 mm3, respectively). Conclusions Together with findings from earlier studies on K2P2.1-/- and K2P3.1-/- mice, the results of the present study on K2P9.1-/- mice indicate a differential contribution of K2P channel subtypes to the diverse and complex in vivo effects in rodent models of cerebral ischemia. PMID:20646278

  18. RARE DECAYS INCLUDING PENGUINS

    SciTech Connect

    Eigen, G

    2003-12-04

    The authors present a preliminary measurement of the exclusive charmless semileptonic B decays, B {yields} {rho}{ell}{nu}, and the extraction of the CKM parameters V{sub ub}. IN a data sample of 55 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} events they measure a branching fraction of {Beta}(B {yields} {rho}{ell}{nu}) = (3.39 {+-} 0.44{sub stat} {+-} 0.52{sub sys} {+-} 0.60{sub th}) x 10{sup -4} yielding |V{sub ub}| = (3.69 {+-} 0.23{sub stat} {+-} 0.27{sub sys -0.59th}{sup +0.40}) x 10{sup -3}. Next, they report on a preliminary study of the radiative penguin modes B {yields} K{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} and B {yields} K*{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}. In a data sample of 84 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} events they observe a significant signal (4.4{sigma}) in B {yields} K{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}, yielding a branching fraction of {Beta}(B {yields} K{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}) = (0.78{sub -0.20-0.18}{sup +0.24+0.11}) x 10{sup -6}. In B {yields} K*{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} the observed yield is not yet significant (2.8{sigma}), yielding an upper limit of the branching fraction of {Beta}(B {yields} K*{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}) 3.0 x 10{sup -6} {at} 90% confidence level. Finally, they summarize preliminary results of searches for B {yields} {rho}({omega}){gamma}, B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +} {nu}{bar {nu}} and B{sup 0} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}.

  19. Radiative Leptonic B Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Edward Tann

    2007-01-01

    We present the results of a search for B+ meson decays into γℓ+v, where ℓ = e,μ. We use a sample of 232 million B$\\bar{B}$ meson pairs recorded at the Υ(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory. We measure a partial branching fraction Δβ in a restricted region of phase space that reduces the effect of theoretical uncertainties, requiring the lepton energy to be in the range 1.875 and 2.850 GeV, the photon energy to be in the range 0.45 and 2.35 GeV, and the cosine of the angle between the lepton and photon momenta to be less than -0.36, with all quantities computed in the Υ(4S) center-of-mass frame. We find Δβ(B+ → γℓ+v) = (-0.31.5+1.3(statistical) -0.6+0.6(systematic) ± 0.1(theoretical)) x 10-6, under the assumption of lepton universality. Interpreted as a 90% confidence-level Bayesian upper limit, the result corresponds to 1.7 x 10-6 for a prior at in amplitude, and 2.3 x 10-6 for a prior at in branching fraction.

  20. A hydrophobic barrier deep within the inner pore of the TWIK-1 K2P potassium channel

    PubMed Central

    Aryal, Prafulla; Abd-Wahab, Firdaus; Bucci, Giovanna; Sansom, Mark S. P.; Tucker, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent X-ray crystal structures of the two-pore domain (K2P) family of potassium channels have revealed a unique structural architecture at the point where the cytoplasmic bundle-crossing gate is found in most other tetrameric K+ channels. However, despite the apparently open nature of the inner pore in the TWIK-1 (K2P1/KCNK1) crystal structure, the reasons underlying its low levels of functional activity remain unclear. In this study, we use a combination of molecular dynamics simulations and functional validation to demonstrate that TWIK-1 possesses a hydrophobic barrier deep within the inner pore, and that stochastic dewetting of this hydrophobic constriction acts as a major barrier to ion conduction. These results not only provide an important insight into the mechanisms which control TWIK-1 channel activity, but also have important implications for our understanding of how ion permeation may be controlled in similar ion channels and pores. PMID:25001086

  1. A hydrophobic barrier deep within the inner pore of the TWIK-1 K2P potassium channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryal, Prafulla; Abd-Wahab, Firdaus; Bucci, Giovanna; Sansom, Mark S. P.; Tucker, Stephen J.

    2014-07-01

    Recent X-ray crystal structures of the two-pore domain (K2P) family of potassium channels have revealed a unique structural architecture at the point where the cytoplasmic bundle-crossing gate is found in most other tetrameric K+ channels. However, despite the apparently open nature of the inner pore in the TWIK-1 (K2P1/KCNK1) crystal structure, the reasons underlying its low levels of functional activity remain unclear. In this study, we use a combination of molecular dynamics simulations and functional validation to demonstrate that TWIK-1 possesses a hydrophobic barrier deep within the inner pore, and that stochastic dewetting of this hydrophobic constriction acts as a major barrier to ion conduction. These results not only provide an important insight into the mechanisms which control TWIK-1 channel activity, but also have important implications for our understanding of how ion permeation may be controlled in similar ion channels and pores.

  2. CP violation in K decays

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, F.J.

    1989-05-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental progress on the manifestation of CP violation in K decays, and toward understanding whether CP violation originates in a phase, or phases, in the weak mixing matrix of quarks is reviewed. 23 refs., 10 figs.

  3. The Search for Proton Decay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshak, Marvin L.

    1984-01-01

    Provides the rationale for and examples of experiments designed to test the stability of protons and bound neutrons. Also considers the unification question, cosmological implications, current and future detectors, and current status of knowledge on proton decay. (JN)

  4. The Search for Proton Decay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshak, Marvin L.

    1984-01-01

    Provides the rationale for and examples of experiments designed to test the stability of protons and bound neutrons. Also considers the unification question, cosmological implications, current and future detectors, and current status of knowledge on proton decay. (JN)

  5. Questions Students Ask: Beta Decay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koss, Jordan; Hartt, Kenneth

    1988-01-01

    Answers a student's question about the emission of a positron from a nucleus. Discusses the problem from the aspects of the uncertainty principle, beta decay, the Fermi Theory, and modern physics. (YP)

  6. Decoherence delays false vacuum decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachlechner, Thomas C.

    2013-05-01

    We show that gravitational interactions between massless thermal modes and a nucleating Coleman-de Luccia bubble may lead to efficient decoherence and strongly suppress metastable vacuum decay for bubbles that are small compared to the Hubble radius. The vacuum decay rate including gravity and thermal photon interactions has the exponential scaling \\Gamma \\sim \\Gamma _{CDL}^{2}, where ΓCDL is the Coleman-de Luccia decay rate neglecting photon interactions. For the lowest metastable initial state an efficient quantum Zeno effect occurs due to thermal radiation of temperatures as low as the de Sitter temperature. This strong decoherence effect is a consequence of gravitational interactions with light external mode. We argue that efficient decoherence does not occur for the case of Hawking-Moss decay. This observation is consistent with requirements set by Poincaré recurrence in de Sitter space.

  7. Questions Students Ask: Beta Decay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koss, Jordan; Hartt, Kenneth

    1988-01-01

    Answers a student's question about the emission of a positron from a nucleus. Discusses the problem from the aspects of the uncertainty principle, beta decay, the Fermi Theory, and modern physics. (YP)

  8. Complex Degradation Processes Lead to Non-Exponential Decay Patterns and Age-Dependent Decay Rates of Messenger RNA

    PubMed Central

    Deneke, Carlus; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Valleriani, Angelo

    2013-01-01

    Experimental studies on mRNA stability have established several, qualitatively distinct decay patterns for the amount of mRNA within the living cell. Furthermore, a variety of different and complex biochemical pathways for mRNA degradation have been identified. The central aim of this paper is to bring together both the experimental evidence about the decay patterns and the biochemical knowledge about the multi-step nature of mRNA degradation in a coherent mathematical theory. We first introduce a mathematical relationship between the mRNA decay pattern and the lifetime distribution of individual mRNA molecules. This relationship reveals that the mRNA decay patterns at steady state expression level must obey a general convexity condition, which applies to any degradation mechanism. Next, we develop a theory, formulated as a Markov chain model, that recapitulates some aspects of the multi-step nature of mRNA degradation. We apply our theory to experimental data for yeast and explicitly derive the lifetime distribution of the corresponding mRNAs. Thereby, we show how to extract single-molecule properties of an mRNA, such as the age-dependent decay rate and the residual lifetime. Finally, we analyze the decay patterns of the whole translatome of yeast cells and show that yeast mRNAs can be grouped into three broad classes that exhibit three distinct decay patterns. This paper provides both a method to accurately analyze non-exponential mRNA decay patterns and a tool to validate different models of degradation using decay data. PMID:23408982

  9. Correlation and relativistic effects in 2p photoelectron spectra of sodium atoms from the initial state 2{p}^{6}3p

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaobin; Shi, Yinglong; Xing, Yongzhong; Lu, Feiping; Chen, Zhanbin

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the 2p photoelectron spectra of sodium atoms with the initial state 2{p}63p at a photon energy of 54 eV. The analysis is performed based on the multi-configuration Dirac–Fock method. Special attention is given to the influences of correlation and relativistic effects on the spectra structures. To explore the nature and importance of such influences, calculations were performed based on detailed analyses of the thresholds, relative intensities and corresponding data calculated in the nonrelativistic limit.

  10. Laboratory Measurements of the Relative Intensity of the 3s-->2p and 3d-->2p Transitions in Fe XVII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Behar, E.; Boyce, K. R.; Brown, G. V.; Chen, H.; Gendreau, K. C.; Gu, M.-F.; Gygax, J.; Kahn, S. M.; Kelley, R. L.; Porter, F. S.; Stahle, C. K.; Szymkowiak, A. E.

    2002-09-01

    The intensity ratios of the 3s-->2p and 3d-->2p lines in Fe XVII were measured on the Livermore electron beam ion trap employing a complementary set of spectrometers, including a high-resolution crystal spectrometer and the Goddard 32 pixel calorimeter. The resulting laboratory data are in agreement with satellite measurements of the Sun and astrophysical sources in collisional equilibrium such as Capella, Procyon, and NGC 4636. The results disagree with earlier laboratory measurements and assertions that processes not accounted for in laboratory measurements must play a role in the formation of the Fe XVII spectra in solar and astrophysical plasmas.

  11. Carvedilol targets human K2P3.1 (TASK1) K+ leak channels

    PubMed Central

    Staudacher, K; Staudacher, I; Ficker, E; Seyler, C; Gierten, J; Kisselbach, J; Rahm, A-K; Trappe, K; Schweizer, PA; Becker, R; Katus, HA; Thomas, D

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Human K2P3.1 (TASK1) channels represent potential targets for pharmacological management of atrial fibrillation. K2P channels control excitability by stabilizing membrane potential and by expediting repolarization. In the heart, inhibition of K2P currents by class III antiarrhythmic drugs results in action potential prolongation and suppression of electrical automaticity. Carvedilol exerts antiarrhythmic activity and suppresses atrial fibrillation following cardiac surgery or cardioversion. The objective of this study was to investigate acute effects of carvedilol on human K2P3.1 (hK2P3.1) channels. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Two-electrode voltage clamp and whole-cell patch clamp electrophysiology was used to record hK2P3.1 currents from Xenopus oocytes, Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (hPASMC). KEY RESULTS Carvedilol concentration-dependently inhibited hK2P3.1 currents in Xenopus oocytes (IC50= 3.8 µM) and in mammalian CHO cells (IC50= 0.83 µM). In addition, carvedilol sensitivity of native IK2P3.1 was demonstrated in hPASMC. Channels were blocked in open and closed states in frequency-dependent fashion, resulting in resting membrane potential depolarization by 7.7 mV. Carvedilol shifted the current–voltage (I–V) relationship by −6.9 mV towards hyperpolarized potentials. Open rectification, characteristic of K2P currents, was not affected. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS The antiarrhythmic drug carvedilol targets hK2P3.1 background channels. We propose that cardiac hK2P3.1 current blockade may suppress electrical automaticity, prolong atrial refractoriness and contribute to the class III antiarrhythmic action in patients treated with the drug. PMID:21410455

  12. CP violation in sbottom decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deppisch, Frank F.; Kittel, Olaf

    2010-06-01

    We study CP asymmetries in two-body decays of bottom squarks into charginos and top quarks. These asymmetries probe the SUSY CP phases of the sbottom and the chargino sector in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM). We identify the MSSM parameter space where the CP asymmetries are sizeable. As a result, potentially detectable CP asymmetries in sbottom decays are found, which motivates further detailed experimental studies for probing the SUSY CP phases at the LHC.

  13. Discovery of a nonyrast K{sup {pi}}=8{sup +} isomer in {sup 162}Dy, and the influence of competing K-mixing mechanisms on its highly forbidden decay

    SciTech Connect

    Swan, T. P. D.; Walker, P. M.; Podolyak, Zs.; Reed, M. W.; Dracoulis, G. D.; Lane, G. J.; Kibed, T.; Smith, M. L.

    2011-03-15

    The {sup 160}Gd({sup 9}Be,{alpha}3n){sup 162}Dy reaction has been used to study high-spin states in {sup 162}Dy. Pulsed beam conditions were utilized for enhanced isomer sensitivity. An isomer at 2188.1(3) keV with a half-life of 8.3(3) {mu}s has been discovered and assigned K{sup {pi}}= 8{sup +} with a two-quasineutron configuration. Among 11 {gamma}-ray decay branches, an E2, {Delta}K=8 transition to the ground-state band was observed with a reduced hindrance of f{sub {nu}}=35, agreeing well with systematics correlating f{sub {nu}} with the product of the valence neutron and proton numbers (N{sub p}N{sub n}) over an extended N,Z range. Small deviations from N{sub p}N{sub n} dependence are analyzed for a range of two-quasiparticle isomer decays and interpreted as arising from a weak dependence on the isomer excitation energy relative to the yrast line.

  14. Hybrid structure of X(3872) and its radiative decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takizawa, Makoto; Shimizu, Kiyotaka; Takeuchi, Sachiko

    2014-09-01

    We study the radiative decays of the X (3872) using a charmonium-two-meson hybrid model with the two-meson states consisting of the D0 D *0 , D+D*- , J / Φρ , and J / Φω . We can reproduce the observed mass of the X(3872) in this framework. The obtained structure of the X (3872) explains many of the observed properties, such as the isospin symmetry breaking, the production rate in the p p collision, a lack of the existence of the χc 1 (2 P) peak predicted by the quark model and the absence of the charged partner of the X (3872) . We shall report the results of the X (3872) --> J / Φ γ and X (3872) -->Φ' γ decay rates in our approach.

  15. Slow Interatomic Coulombic Decay of Multiply Excited Neon Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iablonskyi, D.; Nagaya, K.; Fukuzawa, H.; Motomura, K.; Kumagai, Y.; Mondal, S.; Tachibana, T.; Takanashi, T.; Nishiyama, T.; Matsunami, K.; Johnsson, P.; Piseri, P.; Sansone, G.; Dubrouil, A.; Reduzzi, M.; Carpeggiani, P.; Vozzi, C.; Devetta, M.; Negro, M.; Calegari, F.; Trabattoni, A.; Castrovilli, M. C.; Faccialà, D.; Ovcharenko, Y.; Möller, T.; Mudrich, M.; Stienkemeier, F.; Coreno, M.; Alagia, M.; Schütte, B.; Berrah, N.; Kuleff, A. I.; Jabbari, G.; Callegari, C.; Plekan, O.; Finetti, P.; Spezzani, C.; Ferrari, E.; Allaria, E.; Penco, G.; Serpico, C.; De Ninno, G.; Nikolov, I.; Diviacco, B.; Di Mitri, S.; Giannessi, L.; Prince, K. C.; Ueda, K.

    2016-12-01

    Ne clusters (˜5000 atoms ) were resonantly excited (2 p →3 s ) by intense free electron laser (FEL) radiation at FERMI. Such multiply excited clusters can decay nonradiatively via energy exchange between at least two neighboring excited atoms. Benefiting from the precise tunability and narrow bandwidth of seeded FEL radiation, specific sites of the Ne clusters were probed. We found that the relaxation of cluster surface atoms proceeds via a sequence of interatomic or intermolecular Coulombic decay (ICD) processes while ICD of bulk atoms is additionally affected by the surrounding excited medium via inelastic electron scattering. For both cases, cluster excitations relax to atomic states prior to ICD, showing that this kind of ICD is rather slow (picosecond range). Controlling the average number of excitations per cluster via the FEL intensity allows a coarse tuning of the ICD rate.

  16. Double Beta Decay in Gauge Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergados, J. D.

    2002-09-01

    Neutrinoless double beta decay is a very important process both from the particle and nuclear physics point of view. From the elementary particle point of view it pops up in almost every model, giving rise among others to the following mechanisms: a) The traditional contributions like the light neutrino mass mechanism as well as the jL - jR leptonic interference (λ and η terms). b) The exotic R-parity violating supersymmetric (SUSY) contributions. From the nuclear physics point of view it is challenging, because: 1) The nuclei, which can undergo double beta decay, have complicated nuclear structure. 2) The energetically allowed transitions are suppressed (exhaust a small part of all the strength). 3) Since in some mechanisms the intermediate particles are very heavy one must cope with the short distance behavior of the transition operators. 4) The intermediate momenta involved are quite high and one has to consider momentum dependent terms of the nucleon current. Taking the above effects into account from the experimental limits on the interesting nuclei A = 76, 82, 96, 100, 116, 128, 130, 136 and 150, we have extracted new limits on the various lepton violating parameters. In particular we get a stringent limit on the R-parity violating parameter λ '111 < 4.0 × 10-4.

  17. Deactivation of Ni2P/SiO2 catalyst in hydrodechlorination of chlorobenzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jixiang; Ci, Donghui; Yang, Qing; Li, Kelun

    2014-11-01

    The deactivation of the Ni2P/SiO2 catalyst in the hydrodechlorination of chlorobenzene was studied. To better illuminate the reasons for the deactivation, the effect of HCl on the structure and activity of Ni2P/SiO2 was investigated. For comparison, the deactivation of the Ni/SiO2 catalyst was also involved. It was found that the Ni2P particles possessed good resistance to HCl poison and to sintering, which is ascribed to the electron-deficiency of Niδ+(0 < δ < 1) site in Ni2P. Acted as the Lewis and Brönsted acid site, the Niδ+ site and the Psbnd OH group on Ni2P/SiO2 catalyzed the formation of the carbonaceous deposit that was difficultly eliminated by hydrogenation. The carbonaceous deposit covered the active sites and might also induce a decrease in the Ni2P crystallinity, subsequently leading to the Ni2P/SiO2 deactivation. Different from Ni2P/SiO2, Ni/SiO2 was mainly deactivated by the chlorine poison and the sintering of nickel crystallites.

  18. 29 CFR 1917.22 - Hazardous cargo 2 (See § 1917.2(p)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hazardous cargo 2 (See § 1917.2(p)). 1917.22 Section 1917.22 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... § 1917.2(p)). 2 The Department of Transportation and the United States Coast Guard apply...

  19. 29 CFR 1917.22 - Hazardous cargo 2 (See § 1917.2(p)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hazardous cargo 2 (See § 1917.2(p)). 1917.22 Section 1917.22 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... § 1917.2(p)). 2 The Department of Transportation and the United States Coast Guard apply...

  20. 29 CFR 1917.22 - Hazardous cargo 2 (See § 1917.2(p)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hazardous cargo 2 (See § 1917.2(p)). 1917.22 Section 1917.22 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... § 1917.2(p)). 2 The Department of Transportation and the United States Coast Guard apply...

  1. 29 CFR 1917.22 - Hazardous cargo 2 (See § 1917.2(p)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hazardous cargo 2 (See § 1917.2(p)). 1917.22 Section 1917.22 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... § 1917.2(p)). 2 The Department of Transportation and the United States Coast Guard apply...

  2. Identification of NCF2/p67phox as a novel p53 target gene.

    PubMed

    Italiano, Dafne; Lena, Anna Maria; Melino, Gerry; Candi, Eleonora

    2012-12-15

    Analysis of microarrays performed in p53-, TAp63α- and ΔNp63α-inducible SaOs-2 cell lines allowed the identification of NCF2 mRNA upregulation in response to p53 induction. NCF2 gene encodes for p67phox, the cytosolic subunit of the NADPH oxidase enzyme complex. The recruitment of p67phox to the cell membrane causes the activation of the NADPH oxidase complex followed by the generation of NADP+ and superoxide from molecular oxygen. The presence of three putative p53 binding sites on the NCF2 promoter was predicted, and the subsequent luciferase and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed the activation of NCF2 promoter by p53 and its direct binding in vivo to at least one of the sites, thus confirming the hypothesis. NCF2 upregulation was also confirmed by real-time PCR in several cell lines after p53 activation. NCF2 knockdown by siRNA results in a significant reduction of ROS production and stimulates cell death, suggesting a protective function of Nox2-generated ROS in cells against apoptosis. These results provide insight into the redox-sensitive signaling mechanism that mediates cell survival involving p53 and its novel target NCF2/p67phox.

  3. Utility-based packet scheduling in P2P mesh-based multicast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakareski, Jacob; Frossard, Pascal

    2009-01-01

    We consider streaming video content over an overlay network of peer nodes. We propose a novel streaming strategy that is built on utility-based packet scheduling and proportional resource sharing in order to flight against free-riders. Each of the peers employs a mesh-pull mechanism to organize the download of media packets from its neighbours. For eficient resource utilization, data units are requested from neighbours based on their utility. The packet utility is driven by both its importance for the video reconstruction quality at the receiving peer and its popularity within the peer neighbourhood. In order to discourage free-riding in the system, requesting peers then share the upload bandwidth of a sending peer in proportion to their transmission rate to that peer . Our simulation results show that the proposed protocols increase the performance of a mesh-pull P2P streaming system. Significant improvements are registered relative to existing solutions in terms of average quality and average decoding rate.

  4. Efficient Plasma Production in Low Background Neutral Pressures with the M2P2 Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziemba, T.; Euripides, P.; Winglee, R.; Slough, J.; Giersch, L.

    2003-01-01

    Mini-Magnetospheric Plasma Propulsion (M2P2) seeks the creation of a large-scale (10 km radius) magnetic wall or bubble (i.e. a magnetosphere) by the electromagnetic inflation of a small-scale (20 cm radius) dipole magnet. The inflated magnetosphere will intercept the solar wind and thereby provide high-speed propulsion with modest power and fuel requirements due to the gain provided by the ambient medium. Magnetic field inflation is produced by the injection of plasma onto the dipole magnetic field eliminating the need for large mechanical structures and added material weight at launch. For successful inflation of the magnetic bubble a beta near unity must be achieved along the imposed dipole field. This is dependent on the plasma parameters that can be achieved with a plasma source that provide continuous operation at the desired power levels of 1 to 2 kilowatts. Over the last two years we have been developing a laboratory prototype to demonstrate the inflation of the magnetic field under space-like conditions. In this paper we will present some of the latest results from the prototype development at the University of Washington and show that the prototype can produce high ionization efficiencies while operating in near space like neutral background pressures producing electron temperatures of a few tens of electron volts. This allows for operation with propellant expenditures lower than originally estimated.

  5. Large-scale P2P network based distributed virtual geographic environment (DVGE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xicheng; Yu, Liang; Bian, Fuling

    2007-06-01

    Virtual Geographic Environment has raised full concern as a kind of software information system that helps us understand and analyze the real geographic environment, and it has also expanded to application service system in distributed environment--distributed virtual geographic environment system (DVGE), and gets some achievements. However, limited by the factor of the mass data of VGE, the band width of network, as well as numerous requests and economic, etc. DVGE still faces some challenges and problems which directly cause the current DVGE could not provide the public with high-quality service under current network mode. The Rapid development of peer-to-peer network technology has offered new ideas of solutions to the current challenges and problems of DVGE. Peer-to-peer network technology is able to effectively release and search network resources so as to realize efficient share of information. Accordingly, this paper brings forth a research subject on Large-scale peer-to-peer network extension of DVGE as well as a deep study on network framework, routing mechanism, and DVGE data management on P2P network.

  6. Regulation of the Mdm2-p53 signaling axis in the DNA damage response and tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Carr, Michael I; Jones, Stephen N

    2016-12-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor acts as a guardian of the genome in mammalian cells undergoing DNA double strand breaks induced by a various forms of cell stress, including inappropriate growth signals or ionizing radiation. Following damage, p53 protein levels become greatly elevated in cells and p53 functions primarily as a transcription factor to regulate the expression a wide variety of genes that coordinate this DNA damage response. In cells undergoing high amounts of DNA damage, p53 can promote apoptosis, whereas in cells undergoing less damage, p53 promotes senescence or transient cell growth arrest and the expression of genes involved in DNA repair, depending upon the cell type and level of damage. Failure of the damaged cell to undergo growth arrest or apoptosis, or to respond to the DNA damage by other p53-coordinated mechanisms, can lead to inappropriate cell growth and tumorigenesis. In cells that have successfully responded to genetic damage, the amount of p53 present in the cell must return to basal levels in order for the cell to resume normal growth and function. Although regulation of p53 levels and function is coordinated by many proteins, it is now widely accepted that the master regulator of p53 is Mdm2. In this review, we discuss the role(s) of p53 in the DNA damage response and in tumor suppression, and how post-translational modification of Mdm2 regulates the Mdm2-p53 signaling axis to govern p53 activities in the cell.

  7. NMR study of heavy fermion compound EuNi2P2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magishi, K.; Watanabe, R.; Hisada, A.; Saito, T.; Koyama, K.; Fujiwara, T.

    2015-03-01

    We report the results of 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements on heavy fermion compound EuNi2P2 in order to investigate the magnetic properties at low temperatures from a microscopic view point. The Knight shift has a negative value in an entire temperature range, and the absolute value increases with decreasing temperature but exhibits a broad maximum around 40 K, which is similar to the behavior of the magnetic susceptibility. Also, the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T1 is almost constant at high temperatures above 200 K, which is reminiscent of the relaxation mechanism dominated by the interaction of the 31P nucleus with fluctuating Eu-4f moments. Below 200 K, 1/T1 gradually decreases on cooling due to the change of the valence in the Eu ion. At low temperatures, 1/T1 does not obey the Korringa relation, in contrast to typical heavy fermion compounds. The nuclear spin-spin relaxation rate 1/T2 shows the similar behavior as 1/T1 at high temperatures. But, below 50 K, 1/T2 increases upon cooling due to the development of the magnetic excitation.

  8. Convergence of Internet and TV: The Commercial Viability of P2P Content Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boever, Jorn

    The popularity of (illegal) P2P (peer-to-peer) file sharing has a disruptive impact on Internet traffic and business models of content providers. In addition, several studies have found an increasing demand for bandwidth consuming content, such as video, on the Internet. Although P2P systems have been put forward as a scalable and inexpensive model to deliver such content, there has been relatively little economic analysis of the potentials and obstacles of P2P systems as a legal and commercial content distribution model. Many content providers encounter uncertainties regarding the adoption or rejection of P2P networks to spread content over the Internet. The recent launch of several commercial, legal P2P content distribution platforms increases the importance of an integrated analysis of the Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats (SWOT).

  9. Probing three-nucleon-force effects via (p ,2 p ) reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minomo, Kosho; Kohno, Michio; Yoshida, Kazuki; Ogata, Kazuyuki

    2017-08-01

    We propose to use proton knockout reactions (p ,2 p ) from a deeply bound orbit as a new probe into three-nucleon-force (3NF) effects. The remarkable advantage of using (p ,2 p ) reaction is that we can choose an appropriate kinematical condition to probe the 3NF effects. We analyze (p ,2 p ) reactions on a 40Ca target within the framework of distorted-wave impulse approximation with a g -matrix interaction based on chiral two- and three-nucleon forces. The chiral 3NF effects significantly change the peak height of the triple differential cross section of (p ,2 p ) reaction. We also clarify the correspondence between the (p ,2 p ) cross sections and the in-medium p p cross sections.

  10. Magnetic circular dichroism in the ion yield of polarized chromium atoms at the 2p edge

    SciTech Connect

    Pruemper, G.; Viefhaus, J.; Becker, U.; Kroeger, S.; Mueller, R.; Zimmermann, P.; Martins, M.

    2003-09-01

    The effect of magnetic dichroism in the partial and total ion yield of chromium, i.e., the absorption of polarized chromium vapor was observed in the gas phase. The measurements were performed at the 2p edge and at photon energies above the 2p edge. The structure of the dichroism at the 2p edge can be understood by including the coupling of the 2p hole with the 3d and 4s shells. Our experimental results for the dichroism at the 2p edge are similar to results of solid-state experiments. Implications for the sum rules used as a standard tool to calculate the spin and orbital momentum are discussed.

  11. Precision lifetime measurements of Cs 6p 2P1/2 and 6p 2P3/2 levels by single-photon counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, L.; Hill, W. T., III; Sibener, S. J.; Price, Stephen D.; Tanner, C. E.; Wieman, C. E.; Leone, Stephen R.

    1994-09-01

    Time-correlated single-photon counting is used to measure the lifetimes of the 6p 2P1/2 and 6p 2P3/2 levels in atomic Cs with accuracies ~=0.2-0.3 %. A high-repetition-rate, femtosecond, self-mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser is used to excite Cs produced in a well-collimated atomic beam. The time interval between the excitation pulse and the arrival of a fluorescence photon is measured repetitively until the desired statistics are obtained. The lifetime results are 34.75(7) and 30.41(10) ns for the 6p 2P1/2 and 6p 2P3/2 levels, respectively. These lifetimes fall between those extracted from ab initio many-body perturbation-theory calculations by Blundell, Johnson, and Sapirstein [Phys. Rev. A 43, 3407 (1991)] and V. A. Dzuba et al. [Phys. Lett. A 142, 373 (1989)] and are in all cases within 0.9% of the calculated values. The measurement errors are dominated by systematic effects, and methods to alleviate these and to approach an accuracy of 0.1% are discussed. The technique is a viable alternative to the fast-beam laser approach for measuring lifetimes with extreme accuracy.

  12. Laboratory Measurements of the Fe XVII 2p-3s and 2p-3d Transitions and Comparison with Solar and Astrophysical Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Bitter, M.; von Goeler, S.; Hill, K. W.

    2004-07-01

    The L-shell emission spectrum of Fe XVII is measured in high-temperature laboratory plasmas, and the inferred intensities of the 3s-->2p transitions relative to those of the dominant 3d-->2p transition are compared to solar observations, as well as to observations of Capella, Procyon, Castor C, II Pegassi, and NGC 4636 with the Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray observatories. The results from laboratory and astrophysical plasmas are in very good agreement, indicating that the collisional line formation processes found in low-density, high-temperature laboratory plasmas are a good description of those found in astrophysical plasmas. The laboratory observations disagree, however, to varying degrees with spectral modeling calculations. A review of existing laboratory measurements suggests that the intensity of the dominant 3d-->2p transition is overestimated by spectral modeling predications. By calibrating spectral models with laboratory data, especially by decreasing the strength of the dominant 3d-->2p transition, spectral models can be brought into agreement with the majority of solar and astrophysical observations. Without doing so, opacity effects may be grossly overestimated.

  13. Kinetics of an oxygen - iodine active medium with iodine atoms optically pumped on the 2P1/2 - 2P3/2 transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagidullin, M. V.; Malyshev, M. S.; Azyazov, V. N.

    2015-08-01

    The kinetics of the processes occurring in an O2 - I2 - He - H2O gas flow in which photodissociation of molecular iodine at a wavelength close to 500 nm and excitation of atomic iodine on the 2P1/2 - 2P3/2 transition by narrow-band radiation near 1315 nm are implemented successively has been analysed. It is shown that implementation of these processes allows one to form an oxygen - iodine medium with a high degree of dissociation of molecular iodine and a relative content of singlet oxygen O2(a1Δ) exceeding 10%. Having formed a supersonic gas flow with a temperature ~100 K from this medium, one can reach a small-signal gain of about 10-2 cm-1 on the 2P1/2 - 2P3/2 transition in iodine atoms. The specific power per unit flow cross section in the oxygen - iodine laser with this active medium may reach ~100 W cm-2.

  14. α-decay under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissim, N.

    2016-12-01

    The physical phenomenon of α-decay is a key feature in several geophysical models describing the structure and formation of Earth and our galaxy. Two of the most prominent characteristics of Earth determined from the α-decay phenomenon are 1) the Earth's age, determined by the relative abundance of α-decaying elements such as Th and U in meteorites and on Earth, and 2) the Earth's source of heat, with roughly 70% of the radioactive heat production attributed to α-decay of U and Th. Textbooks on nuclear phenomenon proclaim that the α-decay lifetime of elements is a constant of nature; however, if it is affected by environmental conditions, the models mentioned above must be refined. In this work [1] we suggest that a change in the lifetime of the α-decay process in 241Am may be detected at high pressures achievable in the laboratory [2], essentially, due to the extraordinary high compression of Am at megabar pressures. The Thomas-Fermi model [3] was used to calculate the effect of pressure on the atomic electron density, and the corresponding change in the atomic potential of 241Am. It was found that at pressures of about 0.5 Mbar the relative change in the lifetime of 241Am is about -2 × 10-4. Detailed experimental procedures to measure this effect by compressing the 241Am metal in a diamond-anvil cell are presented, with diagnostics based on counting the 60-keV γ rays accompanying α decay and/or mass spectrometry on the 237Np/241Am isotope ratio of samples recovered after compression for an extended period of time. [1] N. Nissim, F. Belloni, S. Eliezer, D. Delle Side, J. M. Martinez Val, "Toward a measurement of α-decay lifetime change at high pressure: The case of 241Am", Phys. Rev. C., 94, 014601 (2016).[2] S. Eliezer, J.M. Martinez Val, M. Piera, "Alpha decay perturbations by atomic effects at extreme conditions", Phys. Lett. B, 672, 372(2009).[3] F. Belloni," Alpha decay in electron environments of increasing density: From the bare nucleus to

  15. Why is the Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka rule so strongly violated in J/Ψ decays?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glozman, L. Ya.

    2006-01-01

    The new f0(1790) meson recently observed by BES Collaboration in J/Ψ decay, is seen only in the Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka (OZI)-forbidden channel. It is shown that chiral symmetry restoration in excited hadrons implies a new selection rule of dynamical origin that forbids some of the OZI-favored mechanisms of decays. Hence decays into channels that are suppressed by OZI can become dominant.

  16. Quantum Decay of the 'False Vacuum' and Pair Creation of Soliton Domain Walls

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, John H. Jr.

    2011-03-28

    Quantum decay of metastable states ('false vacua') has been proposed as a mechanism for bubble nucleation of new universes and phase transitions in the early universe. Experiments indicate the occurrence of false vacuum decay, within a region bounded by soliton domain walls that nucleate via quantum tunneling, in a highly anisotropic condensed matter system. This phenomenon provides a compelling example of false vacuum decay in the laboratory.

  17. Few body hypernuclear systems: Weak decays

    SciTech Connect

    Dover, C.B.

    1987-01-01

    The experimental and theoretical situation regarding mesonic and non-mesonic decays of light hypernuclei is reviewed. Although some models give reasonable results for pionic decays as well as the total weak decay rate, no existing approach explains, even qualitatively, the observed spin-isospin dependence of ..lambda..N ..-->.. NN non-mesonic weak decays. 31 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Kaons in flavour tagged B decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, H.; Ehrlichmann, H.; Hamacher, T.; Hofmann, R. P.; Kirchhoff, T.; Nau, A.; Nowak, S.; Schröder, H.; Schulz, H. D.; Walter, M.; Wurth, R.; Hast, C.; Kolanoski, H.; Kosche, A.; Lange, A.; Lindner, A.; Mankel, R.; Schieber, M.; Siegmund, T.; Spaan, B.; Thurn, H.; Töpfer, D.; Wegener, D.; Bittner, M.; Eckstein, P.; Paulini, M. G.; Reim, K.; Wegener, H.; Mundt, R.; Oest, T.; Reiner, R.; Schmidt-Parzefall, W.; Funk, W.; Stiewe, J.; Werner, S.; Ehret, K.; Hofmann, W.; Hüpper, A.; Khan, S.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Seeger, M.; Spengler, J.; Britton, D. I.; Charlesworth, C. E. K.; Edwards, K. W.; Hyatt, E. R. F.; Kapitza, H.; Krieger, P.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Patel, P. M.; Prentice, J. D.; Saull, P. R. B.; Tzamariudaki, K.; van de Water, R. G.; Yoon, T.-S.; Reßing, D.; Schmidtler, M.; Schneider, M.; Schubert, K. R.; Strahl, K.; Waldi, R.; Weseler, S.; Kernel, G.; Križan, P.; Križnič, E.; Podobnik, T.; Živko, T.; Cronström, H. I.; Jönsson, L.; Balagura, V.; Belyaev, I.; Chechelnitsky, S.; Danilov, M.; Droutskoy, A.; Gershtein, Yu.; Golutvin, A.; Kostina, G.; Litvintsev, D.; Lubimov, V.; Pakhlov, P.; Ratnikov, F.; Semenov, S.; Snizhko, A.; Soloshenko, V.; Tichomirov, I.; Zaitsev, Yu.

    1994-09-01

    Using the ARGUS detector at the e + e - storage ring DORIS II, flavour-dependent kaon production in B meson decays has been studied. Using the leptons as flavour tags, it has been possible to separately measure the multiplicities of K +, K - and K {/s 0} in inclusive B decays and in semileptonic B decays. The kaon production in semileptonic B decays was further used to estimate the ratio of charmed decays over all decays, and thus also the fraction of charmless B decays.

  19. Phase-space exploration in nuclear giant resonance decay

    SciTech Connect

    Drozdz, S.; Nishizaki, S.; Wambach, J.; Speth, J. Institute of Nuclear Physics, PL-31-342 Krakow Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana, Illinois 61801 College of Humanities and Social Sciences, Iwate University, Ueda 3-18-34, Morioka 020 )

    1995-02-13

    The rate of phase-space exploration in the decay of isovector and isoscalar giant quadrupole resonances in [sup 40]Ca is analyzed. The study is based on the time dependence of the survival probability and of the spectrum of generalized entropies evaluated in the space of one-particle--one-hole (1p-1h) and 2p-2h states. Three different cases for the level distribution of 2p-2h background states, corresponding to (a) high degeneracy, (b) classically regular motion, and (c) classically chaotic motion, are studied. In the latter case the isovector excitation evolves almost statistically while the isoscalar excitation remains largely localized, even though it penetrates the whole available phase space.

  20. α -decay chains of recoiled superheavy nuclei: A theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niyti, Sawhney, Gudveen; Sharma, Manoj K.; Gupta, Raj K.

    2015-05-01

    A systematic theoretical study of α -decay half-lives in the superheavy mass region of the periodic table of elements is carried out by extending the quantum-mechanical fragmentation theory based on the