Science.gov

Sample records for 2p2 1sedouble excitation

  1. CCQE, 2p2h excitations and ν—energy reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Nieves, J.; Simo, I. Ruiz; Sánchez, F.; Vacas, M. J. Vicente

    2015-05-15

    We analyze the MiniBooNE muon neutrino CCQE-like dσ/dT{sub μ} d cos θ{sub μ} data using a theoretical model that, among other nuclear effects, includes RPA correlations and 2p2h (multinucleon) mechanisms. These corrections turn out to be essential for the description of the data. We find that MiniBooNE CCQE-like data are fully compatible with former determinations of the nucleon axial mass M{sub A} ∼ 1.05 GeV. This is in sharp contrast with several previous analysis where anomalously large values of M{sub A} ∼ 1.4 GeV have been suggested. We also show that because of the the multinucleon mechanism effects, the algorithm used to reconstruct the neutrino energy is not adequate when dealing with quasielastic-like events. Finally, we analyze the MiniBooNE unfolded cross section, and show that it exhibits an excess (deficit) of low (high) energy neutrinos, which is an artifact of the unfolding process that ignores 2p2h mechanisms.

  2. Blue-green luminescence in Hg free excited Sr2P2O7:Tb3+ pyrophosphate phosphor for NUV excited LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohale, R. L.; Chimankar, O. P.; Dhoble, S. J.

    2015-02-01

    Tb3+ activated Sr2P2O7 phosphor was prepared by modified solid state diffusion technique at 700°C. The XRD pattern of Sr2P2O7 is in well argument with the standard ICDD File (24-1011) available. Surface morphology of the present phosphor has been studied by scanning electron microscope (SEM). In photoluminescence investigation, the excitation spectra of the phosphor extends from 200 to 400 nm gives optimum absorption at 352 nm, which is mercury free excitation and characteristics of NUV excited LED. Under the excitation of 352 nm, Sr2P2O7 doped with trivalent terbium ions produces weak blue emission between 400-500 nm owing to the 5D3 to the 7FJ transitions of Tb3+ and strong green emission in 500650 nm region of the visible spectrum due to the 4f-4f transitions from the 5D4 to 7FJ (J=6, 5, 4, 3) states of Tb3+. The entire study reveals that the present phosphor have promising applications in the lamp industry especially for solid state lighting (mercury free excited lamp phosphor) and NUV LEDs.

  3. EuCo2P2: A Model Molecular-Field Helical Heisenberg Antiferromagnet

    DOE PAGES

    Sangeetha, N. S.; Cuervo-Reyes, Eduardo; Pandey, Abhishek; ...

    2016-07-19

    The metallic compound EuCo2P2 with the body-centered tetragonal ThCr2Si2 structure containing Eu spins-7/2 was previously shown from single-crystal neutron diffraction measurements to exhibit a helical antiferromagnetic (AFM) structure below TN=66.5 K with the helix axis along the c axis and with the ordered moments aligned within the ab plane. Here we report crystallography, electrical resistivity, heat capacity, magnetization, and magnetic susceptibility measurements on single crystals of this compound. We demonstrate that EuCo2P2 is a model molecular-field helical Heisenberg antiferromagnet from comparisons of the anisotropic magnetic susceptibility χ, high-field magnetization, and magnetic heat capacity of EuCo2P2 single crystals at temperature T≤TNmore » with the predictions of our recent formulation of molecular-field theory. Values of the Heisenberg exchange interactions between the Eu spins are derived from the data. The low-T magnetic heat capacity ~T3 arising from spin-wave excitations with no anisotropy gap is calculated and found to be comparable to the lattice heat capacity. The density of states at the Fermi energy of EuCo2P2 and the related compound BaCo2P2 are found from the heat capacity data to be large, 10 and 16 states/eV per formula unit for EuCo2P2 and BaCo2P2, respectively. These values are enhanced by a factor of ~2.5 above those found from DFT electronic structure calculations for the two compounds. Additionally, the calculations also find ferromagnetic Eu–Eu exchange interactions within the ab plane and AFM interactions between Eu spins in nearest- and next-nearest planes, in agreement with the MFT analysis of χab(T≤TN).« less

  4. EuCo2P2 : A model molecular-field helical Heisenberg antiferromagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangeetha, N. S.; Cuervo-Reyes, Eduardo; Pandey, Abhishek; Johnston, D. C.

    2016-07-01

    The metallic compound EuCo2P2 with the body-centered tetragonal ThCr2Si2 structure containing Eu spins-7/2 was previously shown from single-crystal neutron diffraction measurements to exhibit a helical antiferromagnetic (AFM) structure below TN=66.5 K with the helix axis along the c axis and with the ordered moments aligned within the a b plane. Here we report crystallography, electrical resistivity, heat capacity, magnetization, and magnetic susceptibility measurements on single crystals of this compound. We demonstrate that EuCo2P2 is a model molecular-field helical Heisenberg antiferromagnet from comparisons of the anisotropic magnetic susceptibility χ , high-field magnetization, and magnetic heat capacity of EuCo2P2 single crystals at temperature T ≤TN with the predictions of our recent formulation of molecular-field theory. Values of the Heisenberg exchange interactions between the Eu spins are derived from the data. The low-T magnetic heat capacity ˜T3 arising from spin-wave excitations with no anisotropy gap is calculated and found to be comparable to the lattice heat capacity. The density of states at the Fermi energy of EuCo2P2 and the related compound BaCo2P2 are found from the heat capacity data to be large, 10 and 16 states/eV per formula unit for EuCo2P2 and BaCo2P2 , respectively. These values are enhanced by a factor of ˜2.5 above those found from DFT electronic structure calculations for the two compounds. The calculations also find ferromagnetic Eu-Eu exchange interactions within the a b plane and AFM interactions between Eu spins in nearest- and next-nearest planes, in agreement with the MFT analysis of χa b(T ≤TN) .

  5. Faraday effect in Sn2P2S6 crystals.

    PubMed

    Krupych, Oleh; Adamenko, Dmytro; Mys, Oksana; Grabar, Aleksandr; Vlokh, Rostyslav

    2008-11-10

    We have revealed a large Faraday rotation in tin thiohypodiphosphate (Sn(2)P(2)S(6)) crystals, which makes this material promising for magneto-optics. The effective Faraday tensor component and the Verdet constant for the direction of the optic axis have been determined by measuring the pure Faraday rotation in Sn(2)P(2)S(6) crystals with both the single-ray and small-angular polarimetric methods at the normal conditions and a wavelength of 632.8 nm. The effective Verdet constant is found to be equal to 115 rad/T x m.

  6. Mini Magnetospheric Plasma Propulsion (M2P2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, Dennis; Winglee, Robert

    2000-01-01

    The M2P2 concept is based on the transfer of momentum from the solar wind to an artificial magnetic field structure like that naturally occurs at all magnetized planets in the Solar System, called the magnetosphere. The objectives of this program include the following: (1) Demonstrate artificial magnetospheric inflation through cold plasma filling in vacuum; (2) Demonstrate deflection of a surrogate solar wind by an artificial magnetosphere in the laboratory vacuum chamber; (3) Compare theoretical calculations for thrust forces with laboratory measurements; (4) Develop flight control algorithms for planning mission specific trajectories; and (5) Develop M2P2 system concept.

  7. Energy calculation of 2s2 1S, 2p2 1D, 3s2 1S, 3p2 1D, 3d2 1G, 4p2 1D, 4d2 1D, 4f2 1I doubly excited states using a new wave function to four terms for 2 ≤ Z ≤ 15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sow, B.; Sow, M.; Gning, Y.; Traore, A.; Ndao, A. S.; Wague, A.

    2016-06-01

    Calculation of the energy levels of atoms and ions with 2 ≤ Z ≤ 15 are carried out in this paper using a Hyllerass approximation. The method used is one of Screen Constant by Nuclear Charge Unit to calculate the total energy of two-electron atomic systems in ground and different doubly excited states. Employing a new wave function including correlation, we were able to calculate excited states (nl)2 (n ≤ 4). The Comparison of these results with the ones of other methods shows a good agreement.

  8. α and 2 p 2 n emission in fast neutron-induced reactions on 60Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fotiades, N.; Devlin, M.; Haight, R. C.; Nelson, R. O.; Kunieda, S.; Kawano, T.

    2015-06-01

    Background: The cross sections for populating the residual nucleus in the reaction ZAX(n,x) Z -2 A -4Y exhibit peaks as a function of incident neutron energy corresponding to the (n ,n'α ) reaction and, at higher energy, to the (n ,2 p 3 n ) reaction. The relative magnitudes of these peaks vary with the Z of the target nucleus. Purpose: Study fast neutron-induced reactions on 60Ni. Locate experimentally the nuclear charge region along the line of stability where the cross sections for α emission and for 2 p 2 n emission in fast neutron-induced reactions are comparable as a further test of reaction models. Methods: Data were taken by using the Germanium Array for Neutron-Induced Excitations. The broad-spectrum pulsed neutron beam of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center's Weapons Neutron Research facility provided neutrons in the energy range from 1 to 250 MeV. The time-of-flight technique was used to determine the incident-neutron energies. Results: Absolute partial cross sections for production of seven discrete Fe γ rays populated in 60Ni (n ,α /2 p x n γ ) reactions with 2 ≤x ≤5 were measured for neutron energies 1 MeV2 p 2 n and 2 p 3 n emission at higher incident energies in the nuclear charge region around Fe.

  9. NMR study of heavy fermion compound EuNi2P2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magishi, K.; Watanabe, R.; Hisada, A.; Saito, T.; Koyama, K.; Fujiwara, T.

    2015-03-01

    We report the results of 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements on heavy fermion compound EuNi2P2 in order to investigate the magnetic properties at low temperatures from a microscopic view point. The Knight shift has a negative value in an entire temperature range, and the absolute value increases with decreasing temperature but exhibits a broad maximum around 40 K, which is similar to the behavior of the magnetic susceptibility. Also, the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T1 is almost constant at high temperatures above 200 K, which is reminiscent of the relaxation mechanism dominated by the interaction of the 31P nucleus with fluctuating Eu-4f moments. Below 200 K, 1/T1 gradually decreases on cooling due to the change of the valence in the Eu ion. At low temperatures, 1/T1 does not obey the Korringa relation, in contrast to typical heavy fermion compounds. The nuclear spin-spin relaxation rate 1/T2 shows the similar behavior as 1/T1 at high temperatures. But, below 50 K, 1/T2 increases upon cooling due to the development of the magnetic excitation.

  10. The effect of Tb+3 on α-Sr2P2O7 phosphor for green LED phosphor application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Nimesh P.; Srinivas, M.; Verma, Vishwnath; Modi, Dhaval

    2015-06-01

    A series of Tb+3 activated α-Sr2P2O7 (Strontium Pyrophosphate) phosphors were synthesized by high temperature combustion synthesis method. The structural analysis has been done by x-ray diffraction and FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrum). The results obtained in structural characterization indicate that the doping concentration did not affect the crystal phase and structure of the phosphors. X-ray diffraction pattern reveals that the all samples were consistence with the JCPDS card No. 24-1011. The phosphor was excited at 232 nm wavelength, very intense PL green emission peak have been observed at 545 nm. This illustrates, that the phosphors could be efficiently excited because of the charge transfer band of the host as well as the energy transfer process occurred between host (Sr2P2O7) and activator (Tb+3). By increasing the doping concentration of Tb+3, the intensity of 545 nm emission peak has been increased predominantly and it suggest that the phosphor prepared has very good application in green LED phosphor.

  11. Raman spectroscopic study of (Ph 2P) 2CCH 2 and [(Ph 2P) 2CCH 2]W(CO) 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fickert, C.; Posset, U.; Kiefer, W.

    1997-06-01

    The Raman and IR spectra of 1,1-bis[diphenylphosphino]ethene (Ph 2P) 2CCH 2 (vdpp) and the tetracarbonyl tungsten complex (vdpp)W(CO) 4 have been recorded. Vibrational assignments are proposed based on local symmetry considerations. For the vinylidene stretching mode a coordination shift is observed from 1588 cm -1 in polycrystalline vdpp to 1581 cm -1 in its tetracarbonyl tungsten complex. From a comparison of the v(CO) splitting pattern with those of related complexes monoclinic structure with factor group C2h and four formula units per unit cell is concluded.

  12. Competing analysis of α and 2p2n-emission from compound nuclei formed in neutron induced reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Amandeep; Sharma, Manoj K.

    2017-01-01

    The decay mechanism of compound system 61Ni* formed in fast neutron induced reactions is explored within the collective clusterization approach of the Dynamical Cluster-decay Model (DCM) in reference to a recent experiment over an energy spread of En = 1- 100 MeV. The excitation functions for the decay of the compound nucleus 61Ni* formed in the n +60Ni reaction show a double humped variation with incident beam energy where the peak at lower energy corresponds to α-emission while the one at higher energy originates from 2 p 2 n-emission. The experimentally observed transmutation of α-emission at lower energy into 2 p 2 n-emission at higher incident energies is explained on the basis of temperature dependence of the binding energies used within the framework of DCM. The cross-sections for the formation of the daughter nucleus 57Fe after emission of α-cluster from the 61Ni* nucleus are addressed by employing the neck length parameter (ΔR), finding decent agreement with the available experimental data. The calculations are done for non-sticking choice of moment of inertia (INS) in the centrifugal potential term, which forms the essential ingredient in DCM based calculations. In addition to this, the effect of mass (and charge) of the compound nucleus is exercised in view of α and 2 p 2 n emission and comparative study of the decay profiles of compound systems with mass A = 17-93 is employed to get better description of decay patterns.

  13. Large-Scale Mini-Magnetosphere Plasma Propulsion (M2P2) Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winglee, R. M.; Slough, J.; Ziemba, T.; Euripides, P.; Adrian, M. L.; Gallagher, D.; Craven, P.; Tomlinson, W.; Cravens, J.; Burch, J.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Mini-Magnetosphere Plasma Propulsion (M2P2) is an innovative plasma propulsion system that has the potential to propel spacecraft at unprecedented speeds of 50 to 80 km per second with a low-power requirement of approx. 1 kW per 100 kg of payload and approx. 1 kg of neutral gas [fuel] consumption per day of acceleration. Acceleration periods from several days to a few months are envisioned. High specific impulse and efficiency are achieved through coupling of the spacecraft to the 400 km per second solar wind through an artificial magnetosphere. The mini-magnetosphere or inflated magnetic bubble is produced by the injection of cold dense plasma into a spacecraft-generated magnetic field envelope. Magnetic bubble inflation is driven by electromagnetic processes thereby avoiding the material and deployment problems faced by mechanical solar sail designs, Here, we present the theoretical design of M2P2 as well as initial results from experimental testing of an M2P2 prototype demonstrating: 1) inflation of the dipole magnetic field geometry through the internal injection of cold plasma; and 2) deflection of and artificial solar wind by the prototype M2P2 system. In addition, we present plans for direct laboratory measurement of thrust imparted to a prototype M2P2 by an artificial solar wind during the summer of 2001.

  14. Large-Scale Mini-Magnetosphere Plasma Propulsion (M2P2) Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winglee, R. M.; Slough, J.; Ziemba, T.; Euripides, P.; Gallagher, D.; Craven, P.; Adrian, M. L.; Tomlinson, W.; Cravens, J.; Burch, J.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Mini-Magnetosphere Plasma Propulsion (M2P2) is an innovative plasma propulsion system that has the potential to propel spacecraft at unprecedented speeds of 50 to 80 km/s, with a low power requirement of approx. 1 kW per 100 kg of payload and -1 kg of neutral gas [fuel] consumption per day of acceleration. Acceleration periods from several days to a few months are envisioned. High specific impulse and efficiency are achieved through coupling of the spacecraft to the 400 km/s. solar wind through an artificial magnetosphere. The mini-magnetosphere or inflated magnetic bubble is produced by the injection of cold dense plasma into a spacecraft-generated magnetic field envelope. Magnetic bubble inflation is driven by electromagnetic processes thereby avoiding the material and deployment problems faced by mechanical solar sail designs. Here, we present the theoretical design of M2P2 as well as initial results from experimental testing of an M2P2 prototype demonstrating: 1) inflation of the dipole magnetic field geometry through the internal injection of cold plasma; and 2) deflection of and artificial solar wind by the prototype M2P2 system. In addition, we present plans for direct laboratory measurement of thrust imparted to a prototype M2P2 by an artificial solar wind during the summer of 2001.

  15. A study of a sector spectrophotometer and auroral O+(2P-2D) emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swenson, G. R.

    1976-01-01

    The metastable O+(2P-2D) auroral emission was investigated. The neighboring OH contaminants and low intensity levels of the emission itself necessitated the evolution of an instrument capable of separating the emission from the contaminants and having a high sensitivity in the wavelength region of interest. A new type of scanning photometer was developed and its properties are discussed. The theoretical aspects of auroral electron interaction with atomic oxygen and the resultant O+(2P-2D) emissions were examined in conjunction with N2(+)1NEG emissions. Ground based measurements of O+(2P-2D) auroral emission intensities were made using the spatial scanning photometer (sector spectrophotometer). Simultaneous measurements of N2(+)1NEG sub 1,0 emission intensity were made in the same field of view using a tilting photometer. Time histories of the ratio of these two emissions made in the magnetic zenith during auroral breakup periods are given. Theories of I sub 7319/I sub 4278 of previous investigators were presented. A rocket measurement of N2(+)1NEG sub 0,0 and O+(2P-2D) emission in aurora was examined in detail and was found to agree with the ground based measurements. Theoretical examination resulted in the deduction of the electron impact efficiency generating O+(2P) and also suggests a large source of O+(2P) at low altitude. A possible source is charge exchange of N+(1S) with OI(3P).

  16. K2P2: Reduced data from campaigns 0-4 of the K2 mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handberg, R.; Lund, M. N.

    2017-01-01

    Context. After the loss of a second reaction wheel the Kepler mission was redesigned as the K2 mission, pointing towards the ecliptic and delivering data for new fields approximately every 80 days. The steady flow of data obtained with a reduced pointing stability calls for dedicated pipelines for extracting light curves and correcting these for use in, e.g., asteroseismic analysis. Aims: We provide corrected light curves for the K2 fields observed until now (campaigns 0-4), and provide a comparison with other pipelines for K2 data extraction/correction. Methods: Raw light curves are extracted from K2 pixel data using the "K2-pixel-photometry" (K2P2) pipeline, and corrected using the KASOC filter. Results: The use of K2P2 allows for the extraction of the order of 90 000 targets in addition to 70 000 targets proposed by the community - for these, other pipelines provide no data. We find that K2P2 in general performs as well as, or better than, other pipelines for the tested metrics of photometric quality. In addition to stars, pixel masks are properly defined using K2P2 for extended objects such as galaxies for which light curves are also extracted.

  17. Highly efficient acousto-optic diffraction in Sn2P2S6 crystals.

    PubMed

    Martynyuk-Lototska, I Yu; Mys, O G; Grabar, A A; Stoika, I M; Vysochanskii, Yu M; Vlokh, R O

    2008-01-01

    We have studied the acousto-optic (AO) diffraction in Sn2P2S6 crystals and found that they manifest high values of an AO figure of merit. The above crystals may therefore be used as highly efficient materials in different AO applications.

  18. Vapor-phase synthesis of mesoporous SiO2-P2O5 thin films.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Norikazu; Kaihara, Junji; Nishiyama, Yuko; Egashira, Yasuyuki; Ueyama, Korekazu

    2007-04-24

    Mesoporous SiO2-P2O5 films were synthesized from the vapor phase onto a silicon substrate. First, a precursor solution of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (C16TAB), H3PO4, ethanol, and water was deposited on a silicon substrate by a spin-coating method. Then, the C16TAB-H3PO4 composite film was treated with tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) vapor at 90-180 degrees C for 2.5 h. The H3PO4-C16TAB composite formed a hexagonal structure on the silicon substrate before vapor treatment. The TEOS molecules penetrated into the film without a phase transition. The periodic mesostructure of the SiO2-P2O5 films was retained after calcination. The calcined films showed a high proton conductivity of about 0.55 S/cm at room temperature. The molar ratio of P/Si in the SiO2-P2O5 film was as high as 0.43, a level that was not attained by a premixing sol-gel method. The high phosphate group content and the ordered periodic mesostructure contributed to the high proton conductivity.

  19. Pre-stimulus alpha power affects vertex N2-P2 potentials evoked by noxious stimuli.

    PubMed

    Babiloni, Claudio; Del Percio, Claudio; Brancucci, Alfredo; Capotosto, Paolo; Le Pera, Domenica; Marzano, Nicola; Valeriani, Massimiliano; Romani, Gian Luca; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Rossini, Paolo Maria

    2008-03-28

    It is well known that scalp potentials evoked by nonpainful visual and auditory stimuli are enhanced in amplitude when preceded by pre-stimulus low-amplitude alpha rhythms. This study tested the hypothesis that the same holds for the amplitude of vertex N2-P2 potentials evoked by brief noxious laser stimuli, an issue of interest for clinical perspective. EEG data were recorded in 10 subjects from 30 electrodes during laser noxious stimulation. The artifact-free vertex N2-P2 complex was spatially enhanced by surface Laplacian transformation. Pre-stimulus alpha power was computed at three alpha sub-bands according to subject's individual alpha frequency peak (i.e. about 6-8Hz for alpha 1, 8-10Hz for alpha 2 and 10-12Hz for alpha 3 sub-band). Individual EEG single trials were divided in two sub-groups. The strong-alpha sub-group (high band power) included halfway of all EEG single trials, namely those having the highest pre-stimulus alpha power. Weak-alpha sub-group (low band power) included the remaining trials. Averaging procedure provided laser evoked potentials for both trial sub-groups. No significant effect was found for alpha 1 and alpha 2 sub-bands. Conversely, compared to strong-alpha 3 sub-group, weak-alpha 3 sub-group showed vertex N2-P2 potentials having significantly higher amplitude (p<0.05). These results extend to the later phases of pain processing systems the notion that generation mechanisms of pre-stimulus alpha rhythms and (laser) evoked potentials are intrinsically related and subjected to fluctuating "noise". That "noise" could explain the trial-by-trial variability of laser evoked potentials and perception.

  20. Acoustic and elastic properties of Sn(2)P(2)S(6) crystals.

    PubMed

    Mys, O; Martynyuk-Lototska, I; Grabar, A; Vlokh, R

    2009-07-01

    We present the results concerned with acoustic and elastic properties of Sn(2)P(2)S(6) crystals. The complete matrices of elastic stiffness and compliance coefficients are determined in both the crystallographic coordinate system and the system associated with eigenvectors of the elastic stiffness tensor. The acoustic slowness surfaces are constructed and the propagation and polarization directions of the slowest acoustic waves promising for acousto-optic interactions are determined on this basis. The acoustic obliquity angle and the deviation of polarization of the acoustic waves from purely transverse or longitudinal states are quantitatively analysed.

  1. Optical Sensitizing of Photorefractive Sn2P2S6 With CW and Pulsed Pre-Exposure (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-16

    time delayed transient photoinduced absorption ( photo -chromism) [1], and transient photoinduced scattering (transient beam fanning) [2]. The second...smaller effect of sensitizing with considerably different lifetimes of secondary centers was observed in nominally undoped Sn2P2S6, tellurium doped ...Sn2P2S6:Te 1%, and co- doped Sn2P2S6:Sb:Te 0.5%, Sb 0.5% samples. Well below the saturation level, the light induced absorption increases linearly

  2. Pressure Induced Enhancement of Superconductivity in LaRu2P2.

    PubMed

    Li, Baoxuan; Lu, Pengchao; Liu, Jianzhong; Sun, Jian; Li, Sheng; Zhu, Xiyu; Wen, Hai-Hu

    2016-04-18

    To explore new superconductors beyond the copper-based and iron-based systems is very important. The Ru element locates just below the Fe in the periodic table and behaves like the Fe in many ways. One of the common thread to induce high temperature superconductivity is to introduce moderate correlation into the system. In this paper, we report the significant enhancement of superconducting transition temperature from 3.8 K to 5.8 K by using a pressure only of 1.74 ± 0.05 GPa in LaRu2P2 which has an iso-structure of the iron-based 122 superconductors. The ab-initio calculation shows that the superconductivity in LaRu2P2 at ambient pressure can be explained by the McMillan's theory with strong electron-phonon coupling. However, it is difficult to interpret the enhancement of Tc versus pressure within this picture. Detailed analysis of the pressure induced evolution of resistivity and upper critical field Hc2(T) reveals that the increase of Tc with pressure may be accompanied by the involvement of extra electron-boson interaction. This suggests that the Ru-based system has some commonality as the Fe-based superconductors.

  3. Ferromagnetism in the Kondo-lattice compound CePd2P2.

    PubMed

    Tran, Vinh Hung; Bukowski, Zbigniew

    2014-06-25

    We report physical properties of CePd2P2 crystallizing in the tetragonal ThCr2Si2-type structure (space group I4/mmm). Dc-magnetic susceptibility, magnetization, specific heat, electrical resistivity and magnetoresistance measurements establish a ferromagnetic ordering below the Curie temperature TC = 28.4 ± 0.2 K. Critical analysis of isothermal and isofield magnetization yields critical exponents of β = 0.405 ± 0.005, γ = 1.11 ± 0.05 and δ = 3.74 ± 0.04. The ordered state is characterized by saturation moment Ms ∼ 0.98μB and magnon energy gap Δ/kB ∼25–35 K. The studied properties reflect a competing influence of the Kondo and crystalline electric field (CEF) interactions. The strength of the Kondo effect is assigned by a low-temperature Kondo scale TK ∼19 ± 10 K and a high-temperature Kondo scale TK ~ H 117 } 10 K. A model of the inelastic scattering of the conduction electrons with an exchanged CEF energy ΔCEF was applied to the magnetic resistivity. An average value ΔCEF = 260 ± 30 K is consistent in the relationships with TK and TK H. We argue that the CePd2P2 compound appears to be a new ferromagnetic Kondo-lattice among the Ce-based intermetallics.

  4. Pressure Induced Enhancement of Superconductivity in LaRu2P2

    PubMed Central

    Li, Baoxuan; Liu, Jianzhong; Sun, Jian; Li, Sheng; Zhu, Xiyu; Wen, Hai-Hu

    2016-01-01

    To explore new superconductors beyond the copper-based and iron-based systems is very important. The Ru element locates just below the Fe in the periodic table and behaves like the Fe in many ways. One of the common thread to induce high temperature superconductivity is to introduce moderate correlation into the system. In this paper, we report the significant enhancement of superconducting transition temperature from 3.8 K to 5.8 K by using a pressure only of 1.74 ± 0.05 GPa in LaRu2P2 which has an iso-structure of the iron-based 122 superconductors. The ab-initio calculation shows that the superconductivity in LaRu2P2 at ambient pressure can be explained by the McMillan’s theory with strong electron-phonon coupling. However, it is difficult to interpret the enhancement of Tc versus pressure within this picture. Detailed analysis of the pressure induced evolution of resistivity and upper critical field Hc2(T) reveals that the increase of Tc with pressure may be accompanied by the involvement of extra electron-boson interaction. This suggests that the Ru-based system has some commonality as the Fe-based superconductors. PMID:27086696

  5. Pressure Induced Enhancement of Superconductivity in LaRu2P2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Baoxuan; Lu, Pengchao; Liu, Jianzhong; Sun, Jian; Li, Sheng; Zhu, Xiyu; Wen, Hai-Hu

    2016-04-01

    To explore new superconductors beyond the copper-based and iron-based systems is very important. The Ru element locates just below the Fe in the periodic table and behaves like the Fe in many ways. One of the common thread to induce high temperature superconductivity is to introduce moderate correlation into the system. In this paper, we report the significant enhancement of superconducting transition temperature from 3.8 K to 5.8 K by using a pressure only of 1.74 ± 0.05 GPa in LaRu2P2 which has an iso-structure of the iron-based 122 superconductors. The ab-initio calculation shows that the superconductivity in LaRu2P2 at ambient pressure can be explained by the McMillan’s theory with strong electron-phonon coupling. However, it is difficult to interpret the enhancement of Tc versus pressure within this picture. Detailed analysis of the pressure induced evolution of resistivity and upper critical field Hc2(T) reveals that the increase of Tc with pressure may be accompanied by the involvement of extra electron-boson interaction. This suggests that the Ru-based system has some commonality as the Fe-based superconductors.

  6. Fermi Surface of the Pnictide Superconductor LaRu2 P 2 studied by quantum oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moll, Philip; Balakirev, Fedor; McDonald, Ross; Karpinski, Janusz; Bukowski, Zbigniew; Blaha, Peter; Schwarz, Karlheinz; Batlogg, Bertram

    2011-03-01

    LaRu 2 P2 is a stochiometric pnictide superconductor (Tc ~ 4.1 K) and crystallizes in the ThCr 2 Si 2 structure (the ``122'' pnictide family). We have mapped out its Fermi surface via the deHaas-vanAlphen effect in pulsed magnetic fields up to 60T (LANL/NHMFL). Pronounced oscillations were observed in the magnetic torque measured with a microcantilever setup. Two features are particularly noteworthy: The oscillations can be followed to surprisingly high temperatures beyond 20K, and the main frequency component at θ = 20circ; (θ = 0circ; at HIIc) is at 349T (α -peak), significantly lower than in the related compounds LaFe 2 P2 . A second frequency originating from a larger Fermi surface cross-section at 1921 T (β -peak) is identified. The temperature dependence of the amplitudes is well described by the Lifshitz- Kosevich formalism and gives low effective masses m*/m = 0.80 (α sheet) and 1.09 (β sheet). Therefore, most ``122'' metals appear to have similarly low effective masses.

  7. Electron-phonon interaction and superconductivity in BaIr2P2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billington, D.

    2016-10-01

    Detailed calculations of the electronic structure, phonons and electron-phonon coupling of the superconducting compound BaIr2P2 were performed from first-principles. The electronic structure showed excellent agreement with the available experimental data. The total electron-phonon coupling constant was {λ\\text{ep}}=0.52 and the logarithmically averaged phonon frequency was \\hbar {ω\\text{log}}/{{k}\\text{B}}=168 K. From the Allen-Dynes formula, with {μ\\ast}=0.11 , the superconducting critical temperature was estimated to be {{T}\\text{c}}=2.05 K, which is in excellent agreement with the experiment. These results indicate that the electron-phonon coupling is of moderate strength and is easily capable of supporting the observed superconductivity.

  8. Efficient Plasma Production in Low Background Neutral Pressures with the M2P2 Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziemba, T.; Euripides, P.; Winglee, R.; Slough, J.; Giersch, L.

    2003-01-01

    Mini-Magnetospheric Plasma Propulsion (M2P2) seeks the creation of a large-scale (10 km radius) magnetic wall or bubble (i.e. a magnetosphere) by the electromagnetic inflation of a small-scale (20 cm radius) dipole magnet. The inflated magnetosphere will intercept the solar wind and thereby provide high-speed propulsion with modest power and fuel requirements due to the gain provided by the ambient medium. Magnetic field inflation is produced by the injection of plasma onto the dipole magnetic field eliminating the need for large mechanical structures and added material weight at launch. For successful inflation of the magnetic bubble a beta near unity must be achieved along the imposed dipole field. This is dependent on the plasma parameters that can be achieved with a plasma source that provide continuous operation at the desired power levels of 1 to 2 kilowatts. Over the last two years we have been developing a laboratory prototype to demonstrate the inflation of the magnetic field under space-like conditions. In this paper we will present some of the latest results from the prototype development at the University of Washington and show that the prototype can produce high ionization efficiencies while operating in near space like neutral background pressures producing electron temperatures of a few tens of electron volts. This allows for operation with propellant expenditures lower than originally estimated.

  9. Simulation of Mini-Magnetospheric Plasma Propulsion (M2P2) Interacting with an External Plasma Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winglee, R. M.; Euripides, P.; Ziemba, T.; Slough, J.; Giersch, L.

    2003-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made over the last year in the development of the laboratory Mini-Magnetospheric Plasma Propulsion (M2P2) prototype. The laboratory testing has shown that that the plasma can be produced at high neutral gas efficiency, at high temperatures (a few tens of eV) with excellent confinement up to the point where chamber wall interactions dominate the physics. This paper investigates the performance of the prototype as it is opposed by an external plasma acting as a surrogate for the solar wind. The experiments were performed in 5ft diameter by 6ft long vacuum chamber at the University of Washington. The solar wind source comprised of a 33 kWe arc jet attached to a 200 kWe inductively generated plasma source. The dual plasma sources allow the interaction to be studied for different power levels, shot duration and production method. It is shown that plasma from the solar wind source (SWS) is able to penetrate the field of the M2P2 magnetic when no plasma is present. With operation of the M2P2 plasma source at only 1.5 kWe, the penetration of the SWS even at the highest power of operation at 200 kWe is stopped. This deflection is shown to be greatly enhanced over that produced by the magnet alone. In addition it is shown that with the presence of the SWS, M2P2 is able to produce enhanced magnetized plasma production out to at least 10 magnet radii where the field strength is only marginally greater than the terrestrial field. The results are consistent with the initial predictions that kWe M2P2 systems would be able to deflect several hundred kWe plasma winds to produce enhanced propulsion for a spacecraft.

  10. 2P2Idb v2: update of a structural database dedicated to orthosteric modulation of protein–protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Basse, Marie-Jeanne; Betzi, Stéphane; Morelli, Xavier; Roche, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    2P2Idb is a hand-curated structural database dedicated to protein–protein interactions with known small molecule orthosteric modulators. It compiles the structural information related to orthosteric inhibitors and their target [i.e. related 3D structures available in the RCSB Protein Data Bank (PDB)] and provides links to other useful databases. 2P2Idb includes all interactions for which both the protein–protein and protein–inhibitor complexes have been structurally characterized. Since its first release in 2010, the database has grown constantly and the current version contains 27 protein–protein complexes and 274 protein–inhibitor complexes corresponding to 242 unique small molecule inhibitors which represent almost a 5-fold increase compared to the previous version. A number of new data have been added, including new protein–protein complexes, binding affinities, molecular descriptors, precalculated interface parameters and links to other webservers. A new query tool has been implemented to search for inhibitors within the database using standard molecular descriptors. A novel version of the 2P2I-inspector tool has been implemented to calculate a series of physical and chemical parameters of the protein interfaces. Several geometrical parameters including planarity, eccentricity and circularity have been added as well as customizable distance cutoffs. This tool has also been extended to protein–ligand interfaces. The 2P2I database thus represents a wealth of structural source of information for scientists interested in the properties of protein–protein interactions and the design of protein–protein interaction modulators. Database URL: http://2p2idb.cnrs-mrs.fr PMID:26980515

  11. Unconventional magnetism in ThCr2Si2-type phosphides, La1 xNdxCo2P2

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Corey; Kovnir, Kirill; Garlea, Vasile O; Choi, E.; Zhou, Haidong; Shatruk, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Quaternary phases La1 xNdxCo2P2 (x = 0, 0.12, 0.25, 0.37, 0.50, 0.63, 0.75, 0.88, 1.0) have been synthesized from Sn flux to investigate the origins of drastic differences in properties between ferromagnetic LaCo2P2 and antiferromagnetic NdCo2P2. Powder and single-crystal X-ray diffraction indicate that all La1 xNdxCo2P2 samples are isostructural and crystallize in the ThCr2Si2 structure type. The unit cell parameters and volume change non-linearly with the Nd content (x), with the x < 0.50 10 samples being closer to LaCo2P2 and the ones with x > 0.50 being closer to NdCo2P2. These structural differences are also reflected in the magnetic behavior. The samples with lower Nd content are characterized by ferromagnetic ordering in the Co sublattice with the TC increasing from 132 K for x = 0 to 262 K for x = 0.50, while the samples with higher Nd content exhibit suppressed magnetization in the Co sublattice and canted antiferromagnetic ordering with TC ~ 270 K. Refinement of neutron powder 15 diffraction patterns for x = 0.50 and 0.75 reveals a gradual ordering of the Nd 4f moments under the influence of Co 3d moments below 100 K. At low temperatures and zero field, these samples exhibit antiferromagnetic ordering of both Nd and Co magnetic moments, but under applied field they demonstrate the stabilization of a ferrimagnetic state with antiparallel alignment of the 4f and 3d moments, as indicated by isothermal magnetization measurements. The re-entrant ferrimagnetic transition 20 is also observed in samples with x > 0.50 if the temperature is lowered below 5 K. The occurrence of this low-temperature magnetic transition was confirmed by alternating-current susceptibility measurements.

  12. Enhanced Superconductivity in Close Proximity to the Structural Phase Transition of Sr1-xBaxNi2P2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, Kazutaka; Kitahama, Yutaka; Iba, Keita; Takasuga, Masaya; Nohara, Minoru

    2017-03-01

    The structural evolution and superconductivity of a 122-type solid solution Sr1-xBaxNi2P2 were studied. We found that an orthorhombic-tetragonal structural phase transition takes place at x = 0.5, and is characterized by the P-P dimers breaking. The superconducting transition temperature exhibited its highest value of 2.85 K at x = 0.4.

  13. Nqrs Data for C24H46I2N6O2P2Sn (Subst. No. 1589)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chihara, H.; Nakamura, N.

    This document is part of Subvolume B 'Substances Containing C10H16 … Zn' of Volume 48 'Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Spectroscopy Data' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains an extract of Section '3.2 Data tables' of the Chapter '3 Nuclear quadrupole resonance data' providing the NQRS data for C24H46I2N6O2P2Sn (Subst. No. 1589)

  14. Estimation of a 2p2h effect on Gamow-Teller transitions within the second Tamm-Dancoff approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minato, F.

    2016-04-01

    Two-particle two-hole (2p2h) effect on the Gamow-Teller (GT) transition for neutron-rich nuclei is studied by the second Tamm-Dancoff approximation (STDA) with the Skyrme interaction. Unstable 24O and 34Si and stable 48Ca nuclei are chosen to study the quenching and fragmentation of the GT strengths. Correlation of the 2p2h configurations causes about 20 % quenching and downward shift of GT giant resonances (GTGRs). The residual interaction changing relative angular momentum that appeared in the tensor force part gives a meaningful effect to the GT strength distributions. In this work, 17 - 26 % of the total GT strengths are brought to high-energy region above GTGRs. In particular, the tensor force brings strengths to high energy more than 50 MeV. STDA calculation within a small model space for 2p2h configuration is also performed and experimental data of 48Ca is reproduced reasonably.

  15. Metabolic and thermal stimuli control K2P2.1 (TREK-1) through modular sensory and gating domains

    PubMed Central

    Bagriantsev, Sviatoslav N; Clark, Kimberly A; Minor, Daniel L

    2012-01-01

    K2P2.1 (TREK-1) is a polymodal two-pore domain leak potassium channel that responds to external pH, GPCR-mediated phosphorylation signals, and temperature through the action of distinct sensors within the channel. How the various intracellular and extracellular sensory elements control channel function remains unresolved. Here, we show that the K2P2.1 (TREK-1) intracellular C-terminal tail (Ct), a major sensory element of the channel, perceives metabolic and thermal commands and relays them to the extracellular C-type gate through transmembrane helix M4 and pore helix 1. By decoupling Ct from the pore-forming core, we further demonstrate that Ct is the primary heat-sensing element of the channel, whereas, in contrast, the pore domain lacks robust temperature sensitivity. Together, our findings outline a mechanism for signal transduction within K2P2.1 (TREK-1) in which there is a clear crosstalk between the C-type gate and intracellular Ct domain. In addition, our findings support the general notion of the existence of modular temperature-sensing domains in temperature-sensitive ion channels. This marked distinction between gating and sensory elements suggests a general design principle that may underlie the function of a variety of temperature-sensitive channels. PMID:22728824

  16. Metabolic and thermal stimuli control K(2P)2.1 (TREK-1) through modular sensory and gating domains.

    PubMed

    Bagriantsev, Sviatoslav N; Clark, Kimberly A; Minor, Daniel L

    2012-08-01

    K(2P)2.1 (TREK-1) is a polymodal two-pore domain leak potassium channel that responds to external pH, GPCR-mediated phosphorylation signals, and temperature through the action of distinct sensors within the channel. How the various intracellular and extracellular sensory elements control channel function remains unresolved. Here, we show that the K(2P)2.1 (TREK-1) intracellular C-terminal tail (Ct), a major sensory element of the channel, perceives metabolic and thermal commands and relays them to the extracellular C-type gate through transmembrane helix M4 and pore helix 1. By decoupling Ct from the pore-forming core, we further demonstrate that Ct is the primary heat-sensing element of the channel, whereas, in contrast, the pore domain lacks robust temperature sensitivity. Together, our findings outline a mechanism for signal transduction within K(2P)2.1 (TREK-1) in which there is a clear crosstalk between the C-type gate and intracellular Ct domain. In addition, our findings support the general notion of the existence of modular temperature-sensing domains in temperature-sensitive ion channels. This marked distinction between gating and sensory elements suggests a general design principle that may underlie the function of a variety of temperature-sensitive channels.

  17. Synthesis of β-Ca2P2O7:Tb(3+) to gamma radiation detection by thermoluminescence.

    PubMed

    Roman-Lopez, J; Lozano, I B; Cruz-Zaragoza, E; Castañeda, J I Guzman; Díaz-Góngora, J A I

    2017-03-06

    In this work, luminescent emissions of beta-calcium pyrophosphate doped with terbium ions (β-Ca2P2O7:Tb(3+)) were studied. The Ca2P2O7:Tb(3+) powders were prepared by precipitation and annealed at 900°C for 2h was applied on the powders to observe the beta phase. Radioluminescence measurements showed emission bands related with (5)D3 ((5)D4)→(7)FJ transitions of Tb(3+) ions. Three overlapped peaks at 126, 165 and 220°C were observed in thermoluminescence response. A linear TL dose-response in the range of 0.2-10Gy and an acceptable TL reproducibility were showed by the β-Ca2P2O7:Tb(3+) samples exposed to (60)Co gamma radiation. The TL glow curves were analyzed by Initial Rise method and Computational Glow-Curve Deconvolution assuming a General Order Kinetic model to evaluate the kinetic parameters related with the TL peaks.

  18. Electromagnetic Moments of Radioactive 136Te and the Emergence of Collectivity 2p+2n outside of Double-Magic 132Sn

    SciTech Connect

    Allmond, James M; Stuchberry, A. E.; Danchev, M.; Baktash, Cyrus; Gargano, A.; Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo {nmn}; Radford, David C; Bingham, C. R.; Brown, Alex; Coraggio, L.; Covello, A.; Gross, Carl J; Hausladen, Paul; Itaco, N.; Lagergren, Karin B; Padilla-Rodal, Elizabeth; Pavan, John R; Riley, Mark; Stone, N. J.; Stracener, Daniel W; Varner Jr, Robert L; Yu, Chang-Hong

    2017-01-01

    Radioactive 136Te has two valence protons and two valence neutrons outside of the 132Sn double shell closure, providing a simple laboratory for exploring the emergence of collectivity and nucleon- nucleon interactions. Coulomb excitation of 136Te on a titanium target was utilized to determine an extensive set of electromagnetic moments for the three lowest-lying states, including B(E2;0+1 2+1 ), Q(2+1 ), and g(2+1 ). The results indicate that the first-excited state, 2+1 , composed of the simple 2p 2n system, is prolate deformed, and its wavefunction is dominated by neutron degrees of freedom, but not to the extent previously suggested. It is demonstrated that extreme sensitivity of g(2+1 ) to the proton and neutron contributions to the wavefunction provides unique insight into the nature of emerging collectivity, and g(2+1 ) was used to differentiate among several state-of-the-art theoretical calculations. Our results are best described by the most recent shell model calculations.

  19. Magnetization and transport properties of single RPd2P2 (R=Y, La-Nd, Sm-Ho, Yb)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drachuck, Gil; Boehmer, Anna; Bud'Ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul

    Single crystals of RPd2P2 (R=Y, La-Nd, Sm-Ho, Yb) were grown using a self-flux method and were characterized by room-temperature powder X-ray diffraction, anisotropic temperature and field dependent magnetization and temperature dependent in-plane resistivity. Anisotropic magnetic properties, arising mostly from crystal electric field (CEF) effects, were observed for most magnetic rare earths. The experimentally estimated CEF parameters B02 were calculated from the anisotropic paramagnetic θab and θcvalues. Ordering temperatures, as well as the polycrystalline averaged paramagnetic Curie-Weiss temperature, θave, were extracted from magnetization and resistivity measurements. Work done at Ames Laboratory was supported by US Department of Energy, Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering under Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH111358.

  20. Radiative lifetimes of the 2s2p2(4P) metastable levels of N III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, Z.; Kwong, Victor H. S.; Parkinson, W. H.

    1993-01-01

    The radiative decay rates of N III 175 nm intersystem lines were measured in the laboratory by recording the time dependence of photon intensities emitted as the 2s2p2(4P) metastable term of N(2+) ions decay to the 2s22p(2P0) ground term. A cylindrical radio frequency ion trap was used to store the electron impact-produced N(2+) ions. The radiative decay signals were analyzed by multiexponential least-squares fits to the data. The measured radiative decay rates to the ground term are 1019(+/- 64)/s for 4P sub 1/2, 74.5(+/- 5.4)/s for 4P sub 3/2, and 308( +/- 22)/s for 4P sub 5/2. Comparisons of the measured values with theoretical values are presented.

  1. Structural Investigation of Phosphorus in CaO-SiO2-P2O5 Ternary Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhanjun; Cai, Shengjia; Zhang, Mei; Guo, Min; Zhang, Zuotai

    2017-02-01

    The system of CaO-SiO2-P2O5 ternary glass is not only among the major constituents of steelmaking slags in iron and steel industry, but also play a significant role in other industrial process, such as chemical engineering and glass industry. In the present study, the structure of CaO-SiO2-P2O5 ternary glass with varying P2O5 content from 0 to 15 wt pct at a fixed CaO/SiO2 = 1.4 was investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation combined with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectra techniques. The results indicated that P5+ ions have a higher affinity to Ca2+ ions which are then stripped away from the silicate network with the addition of P2O5, resulting in the formation of Ca-O-P and Si-O-Si linkages. In addition, almost all P5+ ions displayed as Q_{P}0 ( Q_{P}n , n is the number of bridging oxygen in one [PO4]-tetrahedra units) and a small fraction of P5+ ions behave as Q_{P}1 (P-O-P) and P-O-Si. The enhanced degree of polymerization can be detected from the increase of X_{Si}3 and X_{P}1 /X_{P}0 (mole fraction of {Q}_{Si}i or {Q}_{P}i ). Furthermore, the ratio of Raman scattering coefficients for Q_{Si}i /Q_{Si}1 and Q_{P}i /Q_{P}1 were determined by combining MD simulated result with Raman spectra, which were considered to be suitable to the present study.

  2. Structural Investigation of Phosphorus in CaO-SiO2-P2O5 Ternary Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhanjun; Cai, Shengjia; Zhang, Mei; Guo, Min; Zhang, Zuotai

    2017-04-01

    The system of CaO-SiO2-P2O5 ternary glass is not only among the major constituents of steelmaking slags in iron and steel industry, but also play a significant role in other industrial process, such as chemical engineering and glass industry. In the present study, the structure of CaO-SiO2-P2O5 ternary glass with varying P2O5 content from 0 to 15 wt pct at a fixed CaO/SiO2 = 1.4 was investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation combined with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectra techniques. The results indicated that P5+ ions have a higher affinity to Ca2+ ions which are then stripped away from the silicate network with the addition of P2O5, resulting in the formation of Ca-O-P and Si-O-Si linkages. In addition, almost all P5+ ions displayed as {{Q}}_{{P}}0 ( {{Q}}_{{P}}n , n is the number of bridging oxygen in one [PO4]-tetrahedra units) and a small fraction of P5+ ions behave as {{Q}}_{{P}}1 (P-O-P) and P-O-Si. The enhanced degree of polymerization can be detected from the increase of {{X}}_{{Si}}3 and X_{{P}}1 /X_{{P}}0 (mole fraction of {{Q}}_{{Si}}i or {{Q}}_{{P}}i ). Furthermore, the ratio of Raman scattering coefficients for Q_{{Si}}i /Q_{{Si}}1 and Q_{{P}}i /Q_{{P}}1 were determined by combining MD simulated result with Raman spectra, which were considered to be suitable to the present study.

  3. Maltodextrin and fat preference deficits in "taste-blind" P2X2/P2X3 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Sclafani, Anthony; Ackroff, Karen

    2014-07-01

    Adenosine triphosphate is a critical neurotransmitter in the gustatory response to the 5 primary tastes in mice. Genetic deletion of the purinergic P2X2/P2X3 receptor greatly reduces the neural and behavioral response to prototypical primary taste stimuli. In this study, we examined the behavioral response of P2X double knockout mice to maltodextrin and fat stimuli, which appear to activate additional taste channels. P2X double knockout and wild-type mice were given 24-h choice tests (vs. water) with ascending concentrations of Polycose and Intralipid. In Experiment 1, naive double knockout mice, unlike wild-type mice, were indifferent to dilute (0.5-4%) Polycose solutions but preferred concentrated (8-32%) Polycose to water. In a retest, the Polycose-experienced double knockout mice, like wild-type mice, preferred all Polycose concentrations. In Experiment 2, naive double knockout mice, unlike wild-type mice, were indifferent to dilute (0.313-2.5%) Intralipid emulsions but preferred concentrated (5-20%) Intralipid to water. In a retest, the fat-experienced double knockout mice, like wild-type mice, strongly preferred 0.313-5% Intralipid to water. These results indicate that the inherent preferences of mice for maltodextrin and fat are dependent upon adenosine triphosphate taste cell signaling. With experience, however, P2X double knockout mice develop strong preferences for the nontaste flavor qualities of maltodextrin and fat conditioned by the postoral actions of these nutrients.

  4. Cross sections for production of H(2p, 2s, 1s) by electron collisional dissociation of H2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ajello, J. M.; James, G. K.; Shemansky, D. E.

    1991-01-01

    The excitation function of H Ly-alpha from the astrophysically important dissociation of electron-excited H2 over the range 10-700 eV has been measured. The analysis predicts the cross section to energies higher than the present experimental limit, and it is found that the predicted shape is in close agreement with measured results. At 6 eV the cross section is dominated by the electric dipole first Born component, while at 100 eV the electric dipole component constitutes 73 percent of the total H(2p) cross section. The cross sections of the H(2s) and H(1s) components are calculated.

  5. WN4 longitudinal structure in the O (5S - 3P) and O+ (2P - 2D) ionospheric emissions as simulated by the C-IAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martynenko, Oleg; Ward, William E.; Shepherd, Gordon; Cho, Young-Min; Namgaladze, Alexander; Fomichev, Victor; McConnell, John; Semeniuk, Kirill; Beagley, Stephen

    A newly developed Canadian Ionosphere and Atmosphere Model (C-IAM) is introduced. It is being developed on the basis of two existing first principle models: the extended Canadian Middle Atmosphere Model (CMAM) and the ionospheric part of the Upper Atmosphere Model (UAM). The model extends from the surface to the inner magnetosphere and hence, is able to describe in a self-consistent way how lower atmosphere dynamical variability propagates into and affects the upper atmosphere and ionosphere. The C-IAM was applied to model the spatial structure of two different ionospheric emissions: the nighttime 135.6 nm O ( (5) S - (3) P) and daytime 732 nm O (+) ( (2) P - (2) D) emissions. The IMAGE satellite observations showed a wave number 4 (WN4) longitudinal structure in the 135.6 nm ionospheric emission emanating from the equatorial ionization anomaly at 350-400 km near 20:00 local time at each longitude. C-IAM simulations are in a good agreement with the observations. Model result analysis reveals that the main mechanism for generating the WN4 structure in the 135.6 nm emission is a modification of the ionospheric dynamo field caused by longitudinal variation of the zonal wind due to waves penetrating from the lower atmosphere. It was also shown, that during geomagnetic storms and substorms the high-latitudinal electric field fully suppresses the dynamo, so that the emission intensity dramatically decreases and the WN4 structure does not appear. The 732 nm emission simulated with the C-IAM also reveals the WN4 structure. Similar to the 135.6 nm emission, this structure is caused by waves penetrating from the lower atmosphere. However, the mechanism of excitation is quite different. The 732 nm emission is produced by the instant local ionization and excitation, and, hence, its variation is caused by the neutral density variability in the F2 region (above 200 km) without any involvement of the electric field effects. Correspondingly, latitudinal distribution of this

  6. Magnetization and transport properties of single crystalline RPd2P2 (R=Y, La–Nd, Sm–Ho, Yb)

    DOE PAGES

    Drachuck, Gil; Böhmer, Anna E.; Bud'ko, Sergey L.; ...

    2016-05-27

    Single crystals of RPd2P2 (R=Y, La–Nd, Sm–Ho, Yb) were grown out of a high temperature solution rich in Pd and P and characterized by room-temperature powder X-ray diffraction, anisotropic temperature- and field-dependent magnetization and temperature-dependent in-plane resistivity measurements. In this series, YPd2P2 and LaPd2P2 YbPd2P2 (with Yb2+) are non-local-moment bearing. Furthermore, YPd2P2 and LaPd2P2 are found to be superconducting with Tc≃0.75 and 0.96 K respectively. CePd2P2 and PrPd2P2 magnetically order at low temperature with a ferromagnetic component along the crystallographic c-axis. The rest of the series manifest low temperature antiferromagnetic ordering. EuPd2P2 has Eu2+ ions and both EuPd2P2 and GdPd2P2 have isotropic paramagnetic susceptibilities consistent with L =0 and J=S=more » $$\\frac{7}{2}$$ and exhibit multiple magnetic transitions. For R=Eu–Dy, there are multiple, T>1.8 K transitions in zero applied magnetic field and for R=Nd, Eu, Gd, Tb, and Dy there are clear metamagnetic transitions at T=2.0 K for H< 55 kOe. Strong anisotropies arising mostly from crystal electric field (CEF) effects were observed for most magnetic rare earths with L≠0. The experimentally estimated CEF parameters B$$_2^0$$ were calculated from the anisotropic paramagnetic θab and θc values and compared to theoretical trends across the rare earth series. Lastly, the ordering temperatures as well as the polycrystalline averaged paramagnetic Curie–Weiss temperature, θave, were extracted from magnetization and resistivity measurements, and compared to the de-Gennes factor.« less

  7. Bulk Electronic Structure of Superconducting LaRu2P2 Single Crystals Measured by Soft-X-Ray Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razzoli, E.; Kobayashi, M.; Strocov, V. N.; Delley, B.; Bukowski, Z.; Karpinski, J.; Plumb, N. C.; Radovic, M.; Chang, J.; Schmitt, T.; Patthey, L.; Mesot, J.; Shi, M.

    2012-06-01

    We present a soft x-ray angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (SX-ARPES) study of the stoichiometric pnictide superconductor LaRu2P2. The observed electronic structure is in good agreement with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. However, it is significantly different from its counterpart in high-temperature superconducting Fe pnictides. In particular, the bandwidth renormalization present in the Fe pnictides (˜2-3) is negligible in LaRu2P2 even though the mass enhancement is similar in both systems. Our results suggest that the superconductivity in LaRu2P2 has a different origin with respect to the iron pnictides. Finally, we demonstrate that the increased probing depth of SX-ARPES, compared to the widely used ultraviolet ARPES, is essential in determining the bulk electronic structure in the experiment.

  8. Residual Chemosensory Capabilities in Double P2X2/P2X3 Purinergic Receptor Null Mice: Intraoral or Postingestive Detection?

    PubMed Central

    Hallock, Robert M.; Tatangelo, Marco; Barrows, Jennell

    2009-01-01

    Mice lacking the purinergic receptors, P2X2 and P2X3 (P2X2/P2X3Dbl−/−), exhibit essentially no tastant-evoked activity in the chorda tympani and glossopharyngeal nerves and substantial loss of tastant-evoked behavior as measured in long-term intake experiments. To assess whether the residual chemically driven behaviors in these P2X2/P2X3Dbl−/− mice were attributable to postingestive detection or oropharyngeal detection of the compounds, we used brief access lickometer tests to assess the behavioral capabilities of the P2X2/P2X3Dbl−/− animals. The P2X2/P2X3Dbl−/− mice showed avoidance to high levels (10 mM quinine and 10–30 mM denatonium benzoate) of classical “bitter”-tasting stimuli in 24-h, 2-bottle preference tests but minimal avoidance of these substances in the lickometer tests, suggesting that the strong avoidance in the intake tests was largely mediated by post-oral chemosensors. Similarly, increases in consumption of 1 M sucrose by P2X2/P2X3Dbl−/− mice in long-term intake tests were not mirrored by increases in consumption of sucrose in lickometer tests, suggesting that sucrose detection in these mice is mediated by postingestive consequences. In contrast, in brief access tests, P2X2/P2X3Dbl−/− mice avoided citric acid and hydrochloric acid at the same concentrations as their wild-type counterparts, indicating that these weak acids activate oropharyngeal chemoreceptors. PMID:19833662

  9. Double P2X2/P2X3 Purinergic Receptor Knockout Mice Do Not Taste NaCl or the Artificial Sweetener SC45647

    PubMed Central

    Eddy, Meghan C.; Eschle, Benjamin K.; Barrows, Jennell; Hallock, Robert M.; Finger, Thomas E.

    2009-01-01

    The P2X ionotropic purinergic receptors, P2X2 and P2X3, are essential for transmission of taste information from taste buds to the gustatory nerves. Mice lacking both P2X2 and P2X3 purinergic receptors (P2X2/P2X3Dbl−/−) exhibit no taste-evoked activity in the chorda tympani and glossopharyngeal nerves when stimulated with taste stimuli from any of the 5 classical taste quality groups (salt, sweet, sour, bitter, and umami) nor do the mice show taste preferences for sweet or umami, or avoidance of bitter substances (Finger et al. 2005. ATP signaling is crucial for communication from taste buds to gustatory nerves. Science. 310[5753]:1495–1499). Here, we compare the ability of P2X2/P2X3Dbl−/− mice and P2X2/P2X3Dbl+/+ wild-type (WT) mice to detect NaCl in brief-access tests and conditioned aversion paradigms. Brief-access testing with NaCl revealed that whereas WT mice decrease licking at 300 mM and above, the P2X2/P2X3Dbl−/− mice do not show any change in lick rates. In conditioned aversion tests, P2X2/P2X3Dbl−/− mice did not develop a learned aversion to NaCl or the artificial sweetener SC45647, both of which are easily avoided by conditioned WT mice. The inability of P2X2/P2X3Dbl−/− mice to show avoidance of these taste stimuli was not due to an inability to learn the task because both WT and P2X2/P2X3Dbl−/− mice learned to avoid a combination of SC45647 and amyl acetate (an odor cue). These data suggest that P2X2/P2X3Dbl−/− mice are unable to respond to NaCl or SC45647 as taste stimuli, mirroring the lack of gustatory nerve responses to these substances. PMID:19833661

  10. NMR investigation of spin fluctuations in the itinerant-electron magnetic compound Sr1 -xCaxCo2P2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Masaki; Michioka, Chishiro; Ueda, Hiroaki; Yoshimura, Kazuyoshi

    2017-02-01

    We took P31 NMR measurements of mainly paramagnetic phase Sr1 -xCaxCo2P2 (0 ≤x ≤0.5 ) to reveal the itinerant-electron metamagnetic transition, and of its magnetically ordered phase (0.7 ≤x ≤1 ), and characterized their spin fluctuations by estimating the spin fluctuation parameter T0 corresponding to the width of the spin fluctuation in the spectrum in frequency space. SrCo2P2 has a quasi-two-dimensional uncollapsed tetragonal (ucT) cell without interlayer P-P bonds, whereas CaCo2P2 has a three-dimensional collapsed tetragonal (cT) cell with P-P bonds. The a b -in-plane component of T0 is much larger than the out-of-plane component in SrCo2P2 . As x increases from 0 to 0.5, the in-plane component of T0 decreases proportionally with the metamagnetic transition field. In the antiferromagnetic cT phase (0.7 ≤x ≤1 ), T0 is constant and spin fluctuations show an isotropic character in contrast to their behavior in the paramagnetic ucT phase (0 ≤x ≤0.5 ). These results indicate that the in-plane spin fluctuations due to the quasi-two-dimensional crystal structure play a significant role in the metamagnetic transition of this system.

  11. The stimulation of proliferation and differentiation of periodontal ligament cells by the ionic products from Ca7Si2P2O16 bioceramics.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yinghong; Wu, Chengtie; Xiao, Yin

    2012-07-01

    The ultimate goal of periodontal tissue engineering is to produce predictable regeneration of alveolar bone, root cementum, and periodontal ligament, which are lost as a result of periodontal diseases. To achieve this goal, it is of great importance to develop novel bioactive materials which could stimulate the proliferation, differentiation and osteogenic/cementogenic gene expression of periodontal ligament cells (PDLCs) for periodontal regeneration. In this study, we synthesized novel Ca(7)Si(2)P(2)O(16) ceramic powders for the first time by the sol-gel method and investigated the biological performance of PDLCs after exposure to different concentrations of Ca(7)Si(2)P(2)O(16) extracts. The original extracts were prepared at 200 mg ml(-1) and further diluted with serum-free cell culture medium to obtain a series of diluted extracts (100, 50, 25, 12.5 and 6.25 mg ml(-1)). Proliferation, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, Ca deposition, and osteogenesis/cementogenesis-related gene expression (ALP, Col I, Runx2 and CEMP1) were assayed for PDLCs on days 7 and 14. The results showed that the ionic products from Ca(7)Si(2)P(2)O(16) powders significantly stimulated the proliferation, ALP activity, Ca deposition and osteogenesis/cementogenesis-related gene expression of PDLCs. In addition, it was found that Ca(7)Si(2)P(2)O(16) powders had excellent apatite-mineralization ability in simulated body fluids. This study demonstrated that Ca(7)Si(2)P(2)O(16) powders with such a specific composition possess the ability to stimulate the PDLC proliferation and osteoblast/cemenoblast-like cell differentiation, indicating that they are a promising bioactive material for periodontal tissue regeneration application.

  12. Fusion protein His-Hsp65-6IA2P2 prevents type 1 diabetes through nasal immunization in NOD Mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shiping; Li, Guoliang; Liu, Kunfeng; Yang, Xue; Cao, Rongyue; Zong, Li; Long, Jun; Jin, Liang; Wu, Jie

    2016-06-01

    Human heat shock protein 60 (Hsp60), is an endogenous β-cells autoantigen, it could postpone the onset of insulitis and sooner type 1 diabetes mellitus. P277 is one of Hsp65 determinants at position 437-469 of amino acids cascaded. Meanwhile, it's already well-known that there were several better anti-diabetic B epitopes, such as insulinoma antigen-2 (IA-2). Currently, fusion protein IA2P2 has constructed in order to enhance its pharmacological efficacy. In addition, added homologous bacterial-derived Hsp65 and His tag were beneficial to protein immunogenicity and purification separately. So, finally we examined a fusion protein His-Hsp65-6IA2P2 could regulate Th2 immune response and reduce natural diabetic incidence in NOD mice. We constructed two express vector pET28a-His-Hsp65-6P277 and pET28a-His-Hsp65-6IA2P2. After purification, we observed that triple intranasal administration of these two fusion protein in 4-week-old NOD mice maintained normal blood glucose and weight, with a lower diabetic or insulitis incidence. Consistent with induced splenic T cells proliferation and tolerance, His-Hsp65-6IA2P2-treated mice performed reduced IFN-γ and increased IL-10 level. In conclusion, we suggested that fusion protein His-Hsp65-6IA2P2 could be reconstructed and purified successively. Furthermore, nasal administration of this fusion protein could rebalance T cells population and prevent T1DM.

  13. Penta­cobalt(II) divanadium(III) tetrakis(diphosphate), Co5V2(P2O7)4

    PubMed Central

    Bronova, Anna; Glaum, Robert; Litterscheid, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Co5V2(P2O7)4 was crystallized by chemical vapour transport using HCl as transport agent. Its crystal structure is isotypic to that of FeII 5FeIII 2(P2O7)4 and can be regarded as a member of the thortveitite structure family with corrugated layers of metal–oxygen polyhedra extending parallel to (010). Significant occupational disorder between cobalt(II) and vanadium(III) is observed. Four of the five cation sites are occupied by both cobalt and vanadium. The fifth cation site (Co1) is occupied by cobalt only. Sites Co1, M3 and M4 are located on twofold axes. Sites Co1, M2, M3 and M4 show o­cta­hedral coordination by oxygen; M5 has a square-pyramidal environment. PMID:23723750

  14. Complex magnetic phase diagram with multistep spin-flop transitions in L a0.25P r0.75C o2P2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xiaoyan; Garlea, V. Ovidiu; Kovnir, Kirill; Thompson, Corey M.; Xu, Tongshuai; Cao, Huibo; Chai, Ping; Tener, Zachary P.; Yan, Shishen; Xiong, Peng; Shatruk, Michael

    2017-01-01

    L a0.25P r0.75C o2P2 crystallizes in the tetragonal ThC r2S i2 structure type and shows multiple magnetic phase transitions driven by changes in temperature and magnetic field. The nature of these transitions was investigated by a combination of magnetic and magnetoresistance measurements and both single crystal and powder neutron diffraction. The Co magnetic moments order ferromagnetically (FM) parallel to the c axis at 282 K, followed by antiferromagnetic (AFM) ordering at 225 K. In the AFM structure, the Co magnetic moments align along the c axis with FM [C o2P2] layers arranged in an alternating sequence, ↑↑↓↓ , which leads to the doubling of the c axis in the magnetic unit cell. Another AFM transition is observed at 27 K, due to the ordering of a half of Pr moments in the a b plane. The other half of Pr moments undergoes AFM ordering along the c axis at 11 K, causing simultaneous reorientation of the previously ordered Pr moments into an AFM structure with the moments being canted with respect to the c axis. This AFM transition causes an abrupt decrease in electrical resistivity at 11 K. Under applied magnetic field, two metamagnetic transitions are observed in the Pr sublattice at 0.8 and 5.4 T. They correlate with two anomalies in magnetoresistance measurements at the same critical fields. A comparison of the temperature- and field-dependent magnetic properties of L a0.25P r0.75C o2P2 to the magnetic behavior of PrC o2P2 is provided.

  15. Luminescence study and dosimetry approach of Ce on an α-Sr2 P2 O7 phosphor synthesized by a high-temperature combustion method.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nimesh P; Srinivas, M; Modi, Dhaval; Vishwnath, Verma; Murthy, K V R

    2015-06-01

    We report synthesis of a cerium-activated strontium pyrophosphate (Sr2 P2 O7 ) phosphor using a high-temperature combustion method. Samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), photoluminescence (PL) and thermoluminescence (TL). The XRD pattern reveals that Sr2 P2 O7 has an α-phase with crystallization in the orthorhombic space group of Pnam. The IR spectrum of α-Sr2 P2 O7 displays characteristic bands at 746 and 1190 cm(-1) corresponding to the absorption of (P2 O7 )(-4) . PL emission spectra exhibit a broad emission band around 376 nm in the near-UV region due to the allowed 5d-4f transition of cerium and suggest its applications in a UV light-emitting diode (LED) source. PL also reveals that the emission originates from 5d-4f transition of Ce(3+) and intensity increases with doping concentration. TL measurements made after X-ray irradiation, manifest a single intense glow peak at around 192°C, which suggests that this is an outstanding candidate for dosimetry applications. The kinetic parameters, activation energy and frequency factor of the glow curve were calculated using different analysis methods.

  16. A novel pyrophosphate BaCr2(P2O7)2 as green pigment with high NIR solar reflectance and durable chemical stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Zhengxu; Zhang, Wanqi; Huang, Yanlin; Wei, Donglei; Seo, Hyo Jin

    2014-08-01

    A novel pyrophosphate BaCr2(P2O7)2 was synthesized by the conventional solid-state reaction. The X-ray diffraction (XRD), FTIR spectrum, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) near infrared (NIR) reflectance spectra were applied to characterize the powders. The refractive indexes and nature of the VB and CB were determined. The structure, color properties and application were investigated. The results reveal that the anomalist bodies with smooth surfaces were obtained at 1200 °C with a mean size of 3 μm. A high reflectance peak at 535 nm was observed in the visible region, which is associated with the brilliant and deep green color of this pigment. With all the acids, alkali and deionized water treatment, the polycrystalline pigment BaCr2(P2O7)2 was found to be durable in chemical stability. The significantly high NIR solar reflectance of BaCr2(P2O7)2 is 90.0%, a higher cooling ability, so it has been selected to be tested as cool green pigment in ceramics. Moreover, this novel pyrophosphate pigment has great potential as cool pigment for surface coating applications.

  17. Experimental visualization of the diffusion pathway of sodium ions in the Na3[Ti2P2O10F] anode for sodium-ion battery

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhaohui; Wang, Yuesheng; Sun, Chunwen; Alonso, J. A.; Fernández-Díaz, M. T.; Chen, Liquan

    2014-01-01

    Sodium-ion batteries have attracted considerable interest as an alternative to lithium-ion batteries for electric storage applications because of the low cost and natural abundance of sodium resources. The materials with an open framework are highly desired for Na-ion insertion/extraction. Here we report on the first visualization of the sodium-ion diffusion path in Na3[Ti2P2O10F] through high-temperature neutron powder diffraction experiments. The evolution of the Na-ion displacements of Na3[Ti2P2O10F] was investigated with high-temperature neutron diffraction (HTND) from room temperature to 600°C; difference Fourier maps were utilized to estimate the Na nuclear-density distribution. Temperature-driven Na displacements indicates that sodium-ion diffusion paths are established within the ab plane. As an anode for sodium-ion batteries, Na3[Ti2P2O10F] exhibits a reversible capacity of ~100 mAh g−1 with lower intercalation voltage. It also shows good cycling stability and rate capability, making it promising applications in sodium-ion batteries. PMID:25427677

  18. Experimental visualization of the diffusion pathway of sodium ions in the Na3[Ti2P2O10F] anode for sodium-ion battery.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhaohui; Wang, Yuesheng; Sun, Chunwen; Alonso, J A; Fernández-Díaz, M T; Chen, Liquan

    2014-11-27

    Sodium-ion batteries have attracted considerable interest as an alternative to lithium-ion batteries for electric storage applications because of the low cost and natural abundance of sodium resources. The materials with an open framework are highly desired for Na-ion insertion/extraction. Here we report on the first visualization of the sodium-ion diffusion path in Na3[Ti2P2O10F] through high-temperature neutron powder diffraction experiments. The evolution of the Na-ion displacements of Na3[Ti2P2O10F] was investigated with high-temperature neutron diffraction (HTND) from room temperature to 600°C; difference Fourier maps were utilized to estimate the Na nuclear-density distribution. Temperature-driven Na displacements indicates that sodium-ion diffusion paths are established within the ab plane. As an anode for sodium-ion batteries, Na3[Ti2P2O10F] exhibits a reversible capacity of ~100 mAh g(-1) with lower intercalation voltage. It also shows good cycling stability and rate capability, making it promising applications in sodium-ion batteries.

  19. Crystal structure and vibrational spectra of tetrasodium dimagnesium dihydrogen diphosphate octahydrate Na 4Mg 2(H 2P 2O 7) 4·8H 2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harcharras, M.; Ennaciri, A.; Assaaoudi, H.; Mattei, G.; D'Orazio, V.; Moliterni, A. G. G.; Capitelli, F.

    2003-04-01

    A tetrasodium dimagnesium dihydrogen diphosphate octahydrate Na 4Mg 2(H 2P 2O 7) 4·8H 2O was synthesized. It crystallizes in the monoclinic system, space group P2 1/ m (no. 11), Z=4, and its unit-cell parameters are: a=8.0445(3) Å, b=11.5244(5) Å, c=9.0825(4) Å, β=113.1401(2)°, V=774.28(6) Å 3. The structure was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffractometry and refined to a R index of 0.0294 (w R=0.0727) for 1878 independent reflections with I>2 σ( I). The framework is made by the alternance of layers of MgO 6/NaO 6 octahedra and double tetrahedra PO 4 along b-axis. Such layers are characterized by the presence of strong hydrogen bonds. (H 2P 2O 7) 2- anions exhibit bent eclipsed conformation. Besides, the crystal was analyzed by FT-IR and micro-Raman vibrational spectroscopy. No coincidences of the majority of the Raman and infrared spectra bands of Na 4Mg 2(H 2P 2O 7) 4·8H 2O confirms a centrosymmetric structure of this material. The vibrational spectra confirm the bent POP configuration in this compound.

  20. 2p2 Team News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, H.

    2001-03-01

    In December we welcomed Emanuel Galliano to our team. Emanuel is a French student at ESO Chile who is already familiar with La Silla, through his previous work with the DENIS group. He will be working primarily on operations at the 2.2-m. In February, however, we bade farewell to Emanuela Pompei after nearly two years with the team. Although Emanuela is leaving La Silla, she will remain with ESO in Chile, commencing work as a Staff Astronomer on Paranal in March. We wish her all the best in her move north.

  1. Induction of MDM2-P2 Transcripts Correlates with Stabilized Wild-Type p53 in Betel- and Tobacco-Related Human Oral Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ralhan, Ranju; Sandhya, Agarwal; Meera, Mathur; Bohdan, Wasylyk; Nootan, Shukla K.

    2000-01-01

    MDM2, a critical element of cellular homeostasis mechanisms, is involved in complex interactions with important cell-cycle and stress-response regulators including p53. The mdm2-P2 promoter is a transcriptional target of p53. The aim of this study was to determine the association between mdm2-P2 transcripts and the status of the p53 gene in betel- and tobacco-related oral squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) to understand the mechanism of deregulation of MDM2 and p53 expression and their prognostic implications in oral tumorigenesis. Elevated levels of MDM2 proteins were observed in 11 of 25 (44%) oral hyperplastic lesions, nine of 15 (60%) dysplastic lesions, and 71 of 100 (71%) SCCs. The intriguing feature of the study was the identification and different subcellular localization of three isoforms of MDM2 (ie, 90 kd, 76 kd, and 57 kd) in oral SCCs and their correlation with p53 overexpression in each tumor. The hallmark of the study was the detection of mdm2-P2 transcripts in 12 of 20 oral SCCs overexpressing both MDM2 and p53 proteins while harboring wild-type p53 alleles. Furthermore, mdm2 amplification was an infrequent event in betel- and tobacco-associated oral tumorigenesis. The differential compartmentalization of the three isoforms of MDM2 suggests that each has a distinct function, potentially in the regulation of p53 and other gene products implicated in oral tumorigenesis. In conclusion, we report herein the first evidence suggesting that enhanced translation of mdm2-P2 transcripts (S-mdm2) may represent an important mechanism of overexpression and consequent stabilization and functional inactivation of wild-type p53 serving as an adverse prognosticator in betel- and tobacco-related oral cancer. The clinical significance of the functional inactivation of wild-type p53 by MDM2 is underscored by the significantly shorter median disease-free survival time (16 months) observed in p53/MDM2-positive cases as compared to those which did not show co-expression of

  2. Magnetic phase transition of high-pressure phase (VO)2P2O7 studied by high-field ESR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraka, K.; Nagasaka, Y.; Kunimoto, T.; Inagaki, Y.; Okubo, S.; Ohta, H.; Saito, T.; Azuma, M.; Takano, M.

    2004-05-01

    The high-pressure phase of (VO)2P2O7 (HP-VOPO) is a S=1/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnetic alternating chain compound with one spin gap. The high-field ESR measurements of the HP-VOPO single crystal have been performed using the pulsed magnetic field up to 30T. Small anomaly is observed in ESR mode for both a- and b-axis. The linewidth became broad around Bc=20T when the field is applied along the a- and b-axis. The magnetic state of HP-VOPO above Bc will be discussed.

  3. Structure of the calcium pyrophosphate monohydrate phase (Ca2P2O7·H2O): towards understanding the dehydration process in calcium pyrophosphate hydrates.

    PubMed

    Gras, Pierre; Ratel-Ramond, Nicolas; Teychéné, Sébastien; Rey, Christian; Elkaim, Erik; Biscans, Béatrice; Sarda, Stéphanie; Combes, Christèle

    2014-09-01

    Calcium pyrophosphate hydrate (CPP, Ca(2)P(2)O(7) · nH2O) and calcium orthophosphate compounds (including apatite, octacalcium phosphate etc.) are among the most prevalent pathological calcifications in joints. Even though only two dihydrated forms of CPP (CPPD) have been detected in vivo (monoclinic and triclinic CPPD), investigations of other hydrated forms such as tetrahydrated or amorphous CPP are relevant to a further understanding of the physicochemistry of those phases of biological interest. The synthesis of single crystals of calcium pyrophosphate monohydrate (CPPM; Ca(2)P(2)O(7) · H2O) by diffusion in silica gel at ambient temperature and the structural analysis of this phase are reported in this paper. Complementarily, data from synchrotron X-ray diffraction on a CPPM powder sample have been fitted to the crystal parameters. Finally, the relationship between the resolved structure for the CPPM phase and the structure of the tetrahydrated calcium pyrophosphate β phase (CPPT-β) is discussed.

  4. Crystal structure of Rb2Mn3(H2O)2[P2O7]2, a new representative of the family of hydrated diphosphates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiriukhina, G. V.; Yakubovich, O. V.; Dimitrova, O. V.; Volkov, A. S.

    2016-09-01

    The crystal structure of Rb2Mn3(H2O)2[P2O7]2, a new phase obtained in the form of single crystals under hydrothermal conditions in the MnCl2-Rb3PO4-H2O system, is determined by X-ray diffraction (Xcalibur-S-CCD diffractometer, R = 0.0270): a = 9.374(2), b = 8.367(2), c = 9.437(2) Å, ß = 99.12(2)°, space group P21/ c, Z = 2, D x = 3.27 g/cm3. A correlation between the unit-cell parameters and the size of cations forming the crystal structures of isostructural A2M3(H2O)2[P2O7]2 diphosphates ( A = K, NH4, Rb, or Na; M = Mn, Fe, Co, or Ni) is revealed. It is shown that, due to the topological similarity, the structures of diphosphates and orthophosphates of the farringtonite structural type can undergo mutual transformations.

  5. Heavy-metal extraction from sewage sludge using phosphorous-based salts: optimization process with Na2H2P2O7.

    PubMed

    Navarro-González, Milagros; Ortega-López, Vanesa; Lópéz-Fernández, Juana I; Amo-Salas, Mariano; González-Carcedo, Salvador

    2016-11-24

    Land application is one of the important disposal alternatives for sewage sludge, but availability of potential toxic metals often restricts its uses. Three phosphorous-based salts (Na2H2P2O7, K4P2O7, KH2PO4) were studied as potential metal extractants. The conclusions of the research were that greater extractive efficiency is achieved through a 30-min process of vertical shaking with disodium diacid pyrophosphate - Na2H2P2O7 - at a concentration of 0.2 M at pH 2. Alternatively, the optimized process with oscillating shaking equipment would require 60 min. In both cases the average of set of extracted metals is around 50%. A second extraction process with potassium pyrophosphate - K4P2O7 at pH 6 achieved the reduction of further total amounts of metal, upper 65% with respect to the initial content. In this way the sludge could be used in land applications, with restrictions on each soil, according to the limit values specified in the future regulations.

  6. 2P2I HUNTER: a tool for filtering orthosteric protein-protein interaction modulators via a dedicated support vector machine.

    PubMed

    Hamon, Véronique; Bourgeas, Raphael; Ducrot, Pierre; Theret, Isabelle; Xuereb, Laura; Basse, Marie Jeanne; Brunel, Jean Michel; Combes, Sebastien; Morelli, Xavier; Roche, Philippe

    2014-01-06

    Over the last 10 years, protein-protein interactions (PPIs) have shown increasing potential as new therapeutic targets. As a consequence, PPIs are today the most screened target class in high-throughput screening (HTS). The development of broad chemical libraries dedicated to these particular targets is essential; however, the chemical space associated with this 'high-hanging fruit' is still under debate. Here, we analyse the properties of 40 non-redundant small molecules present in the 2P2I database (http://2p2idb.cnrs-mrs.fr/) to define a general profile of orthosteric inhibitors and propose an original protocol to filter general screening libraries using a support vector machine (SVM) with 11 standard Dragon molecular descriptors. The filtering protocol has been validated using external datasets from PubChem BioAssay and results from in-house screening campaigns. This external blind validation demonstrated the ability of the SVM model to reduce the size of the filtered chemical library by eliminating up to 96% of the compounds as well as enhancing the proportion of active compounds by up to a factor of 8. We believe that the resulting chemical space identified in this paper will provide the scientific community with a concrete support to search for PPI inhibitors during HTS campaigns.

  7. Quantum oscillations of the superconductor LaRu2P2: Comparable mass enhancement λ≈1 in Ru and Fe phosphides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moll, Philip J. W.; Kanter, Jakob; McDonald, Ross D.; Balakirev, Fedor; Blaha, Peter; Schwarz, Karlheinz; Bukowski, Zbigniew; Zhigadlo, Nikolai D.; Katrych, Sergiy; Mattenberger, Kurt; Karpinski, Janusz; Batlogg, Bertram

    2011-12-01

    We have studied the angular-dependent de Haas-van Alphen oscillations of LaRu2P2 using magnetic torque in pulsed magnetic fields up to 60 T. The observed oscillation frequencies are in excellent agreement with the geometry of the calculated Fermi surface. The temperature dependence of the oscillation amplitudes reveals effective masses m*(α)=0.71 and m*(β)=0.99 me, which are enhanced over the calculated band mass by λcyc of 0.8. We find a similar enhancement of λγ≈1 in comparing the measured electronic specific heat (γ=11.5 mJ/mol K2) with the total density of states from band-structure calculations. Remarkably, very similar mass enhancements have been reported in other pnictides, LaFe2P2, LaFePO (Tc≈4K), and LaRuPO, independent of whether they are superconducting or not. This is contrary to the common perceptions that the normal-state quasiparticle renormalizations reflect the strength of the superconducting pairing mechanism and leads to new questions about pairing in isostructural and isoelectronic Ru- and Fe-pnictide superconductors.

  8. Measurement of electron-impact excitation in boronlike carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lafyatis, G. P.; Kohl, J. L.

    1987-01-01

    The cross section for the electron-impact excitation of C(+) (2s2 2p 2P0)-(2s2p2 2D) is measured in a colliding-beams apparatus for several collision energies near the threshold for the process. A cross section of (1.1 + or - 0.3) x 10 to the -16th sq cm at threshold is found. Reasonable agreement is found with close-coupling calculations.

  9. Modification of magnetic anisotropy through 3d-4f coupling in La0.75Pr0.25Co2P2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovnir, Kirill; Thompson, Corey M.; Garlea, V. Ovidiu; Haskel, Daniel; Polyanskii, Anatolii A.; Zhou, Haidong; Shatruk, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Magnetic behavior of La0.75Pr0.25Co2P2 was investigated by a combination of magnetic measurements, magneto-optical imaging, neutron diffraction, and x-ray absorption spectroscopy, including x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. The material crystallizes in the ThCr2Si2 structure type and exhibits three consecutive magnetic phase transitions. At 167 K, the Co magnetic moments order ferromagnetically in the ab plane of the tetragonal crystal structure. At 66 K, a ferromagnetic ordering of Pr(4f) moments parallel to the c axis causes a rotation of the Co(3d) moments towards the c axis in the direction opposite to the Pr moments, thus forming a noncollinear ferrimagnetically ordered structure and switching the direction of the total magnetization from the ab plane to the c axis. The third magnetic transition observed at 35 K is likely associated with the establishment of the collinear ferrimagnetic order along the c axis.

  10. Hyperbolic decay of photo-created Sb2+ ions in Sn2P2S6:Sb crystals detected with electron paramagnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basun, S. A.; Halliburton, L. E.; Evans, D. R.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we employed a method that overcomes the known limitations of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) to monitor charge trap dynamics over a broad temperature range not normally accessible due to the lifetime broadening of the EPR lines at higher temperatures. This was achieved by measuring the decay of the EPR intensity after thermal annealing by rapid cycling back to low temperatures for the EPR measurement. This technique was used to experimentally demonstrate interesting physics in the form of a direct measurement of the hyperbolic decay 1/(1+t) of a charge trap population, which previously was only considered theoretically. The nontrivial effects of bimolecular recombination are demonstrated in the Sn2S2P6:Sb crystals, providing an explanation of the optical sensitization process observed in photorefractive Sn2P2S6:Sb used for dynamic holography.

  11. Sn vacancies in photorefractive Sn2P2S6 crystals: An electron paramagnetic resonance study of an optically active hole trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golden, E. M.; Basun, S. A.; Evans, D. R.; Grabar, A. A.; Stoika, I. M.; Giles, N. C.; Halliburton, L. E.

    2016-10-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) is used to identify the singly ionized charge state of the Sn vacancy ( VSn - ) in single crystals of Sn2P2S6 (often referred to as SPS). These vacancies, acting as a hole trap, are expected to be important participants in the photorefractive effect observed in undoped SPS crystals. In as-grown crystals, the Sn vacancies are doubly ionized ( VSn 2 - ) with no unpaired spins. They are then converted to a stable EPR-active state when an electron is removed (i.e., a hole is trapped) during an illumination below 100 K with 633 nm laser light. The resulting EPR spectrum has g-matrix principal values of 2.0079, 2.0231, and 1.9717. There are resolved hyperfine interactions with two P neighbors and one Sn neighbor. The isotropic portions of these hyperfine matrices are 167 and 79 MHz for the two 31P neighbors and 8504 MHz for the one Sn neighbor (this latter value is the average for 117Sn and 119Sn). These VSn - vacancies are shallow acceptors with the hole occupying a diffuse wave function that overlaps the neighboring Sn2+ ion and (P2S6)4- anionic unit. Using a general-order kinetics approach, an analysis of isothermal decay curves of the VSn - EPR spectrum in the 107-115 K region gives an activation energy of 283 meV.

  12. In vivo evaluation of CaO-SiO2-P2O5-B2O3 glass-ceramics coating on Steinman pins.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Hyup; Hong, Kug Sun; Baek, Hae-Ri; Seo, Jun-Hyuk; Lee, Kyung Mee; Ryu, Hyun-Seung; Lee, Hyun-Kyung

    2013-07-01

    Surface coating using ceramics improves the bone bonding strength of an implant. We questioned whether a new type of glass-ceramics (BGS-7) coating (CaO-SiO2 -P2 O5 -B2 O3 ) would improve the osseointegration of Steinman pins (S-pins) both biomechanically and histomorphometrically. An in vivo study was performed using rabbits by inserting three S-pins into each iliac bone. The pins were 2.2-mm S-pins with a coating of 30-μm-thick BGS-7 and 550-nm-thick hydroxyapatite (HA), as opposed to an S-pin without coating. A tensile strength test and histomorphometrical evaluation was performed. In the 2-week group, the BGS-7 implant showed a significantly higher tensile strength than the S-pin. In the 4- and 8-week groups, the BGS-7 implants had significantly higher tensile strengths than the S-pins and HA implants. The histomorphometrical study revealed that the BGS-7 implant had a significantly higher contact ratio than the S-pin and HA implants in the 4-week group. The biomechanical and histomorphometrical tests showed that the BGS-7 coating had superior bone bonding properties than the groups without the coating from the initial stage of insertion. The BGS-7 coating of an S-pin will enhance the bone bonding strength, and there might also be an advantage in human bone bonding.

  13. Critical behavior near the Lifshitz point in Sn(2)P(2)(S(1 - x)Se(x))(6) ferroelectric semiconductors from thermal diffusivity measurements.

    PubMed

    Oleaga, A; Salazar, A; Kohutych, A A; Vysochanskii, Yu M

    2011-01-19

    The thermal diffusivity of the ferroelectric family Sn(2)P(2)(Se(x)S(1 - x))(6) (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) has been measured by a high-resolution ac photopyroelectric technique, using single crystals, with the aim of studying the evolution of the ferroelectric transition with Se doping. Its change from second order character to first order while passing the Lifshitz point (x approximately 0.28) has been evaluated, as well as the splitting of the transition at high Se concentrations. The critical behavior of the ferroelectric transition in terms of the different universality classes and their underlying physical dominant effects (tricriticality, long-range dipole interactions, Lifshitz point) has been discussed using thermal diffusivity measurements in the very close vicinity of the critical temperature. This study reveals that for Se concentrations around the Lifshitz point, long-range dipole interactions do not play a significant role and that the critical parameters are close to those predicted for the Lifshitz universality class.

  14. Influence of fluoride additions on biological and mechanical properties of Na2O-CaO-SiO2-P2O5 glass-ceramics.

    PubMed

    Li, H C; Wang, D G; Hu, J H; Chen, C Z

    2014-02-01

    Two series of Na2O-CaO-SiO2-P2O5 glass-ceramics doped with NH4HF2 (G-NH4HF2) or CaF2 (G-CaF2) have been prepared by sol-gel method. The glass-ceramic phase composition and morphology were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS). The mechanical properties and thermal expansion coefficient were measured by a microhardness tester, an electronic tensile machine and a thermal expansion coefficient tester. The structure difference between these two glass-ceramics was investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and the in vitro bioactivity of the glass-ceramics was determined by in vitro simulated body fluid (SBF) immersion test. The hemolysis test, in vitro cytotoxicity test, systemic toxicity test and the implanted experiment in animals were used to evaluate the biocompatibility of the glass-ceramics. The mechanical properties of sample G-NH4HF2 are lower than that of sample G-CaF2, and the bioactivity of sample G-NH4HF2 is better than that of sample G-CaF2. The thermal expansion coefficients of these two glass-ceramics are all closer to that of Ti6Al4V. After 7 days of SBF immersion, apatites were induced on glass-ceramic surface, indicating that the glass-ceramics have bioactivity. The hemolysis test, in vitro cytotoxicity test and systemic toxicity test demonstrate that the glass-ceramics do not cause hemolysis reaction, and have no toxicity to cell and living animal. The implanted experiment in animals shows that bone tissue can form a good osseointegration with the implant after implantation for two months, indicating that the glass-ceramics are safe to serve as implants.

  15. Structural and thermal characterization of CaO-MgO-SiO2-P2O5-CaF2 glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Kansal, Ishu; Goel, Ashutosh; Tulyaganov, Dilshat U.; Rajagopal, Raghu R.; Ferreira, Jose M.

    2012-08-01

    The paper presents the influence of varying CaO/MgO ratio on the structure and thermal properties of CaO-MgO-SiO2-P2O5-CaF2 glasses. A series of eight glass compositions in the glass forming region of diopside (CaMgSi2O6) - fluorapatite [Ca5(PO4)3F] - wollastonite (CaSiO3) ternary system have been designed and synthesized by varying diopside/wollastonite ratio in glasses. The as prepared melt-quenched glasses have been characterized for their structure by infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and magic angle spinning (MAS)-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Silicon is predominantly present as Q2 (Si) species, while phosphorus tends to coordinate in orthophosphate environment in all the investigated glasses. The change in CaO/MgO ratio had an insignificant affect on the structure of glasses. The thermal sintering and crystallization parameters for the studied glasses have been obtained from differential thermal analysis (DTA) while crystalline phase fractions in the sintered glass-ceramics have been analyzed by X-ray diffraction adjoined with Rietveld refinement. Diopside, fluorapatite, wollastonite and pseudowollastonite have crystallized as the main crystalline phases in all the glass-ceramics with their content varying with respect to variation in CaO/MgO ratio in glasses. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) has been used to shed light on the microstructure of glass-ceramics. The possible implications of structure and sintering behaviour of glasses on their bioactivity have been discussed.

  16. TREK-1 (K2P2.1) K(+) channels are suppressed in patients with atrial fibrillation and heart failure and provide therapeutic targets for rhythm control.

    PubMed

    Lugenbiel, Patrick; Wenz, Fabian; Syren, Pascal; Geschwill, Pascal; Govorov, Katharina; Seyler, Claudia; Frank, Derk; Schweizer, Patrick A; Franke, Jennifer; Weis, Tanja; Bruehl, Claus; Schmack, Bastian; Ruhparwar, Arjang; Karck, Matthias; Frey, Norbert; Katus, Hugo A; Thomas, Dierk

    2017-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia. Concomitant heart failure (HF) poses a particular therapeutic challenge and is associated with prolonged atrial electrical refractoriness compared with non-failing hearts. We hypothesized that downregulation of atrial repolarizing TREK-1 (K2P2.1) K(+) channels contributes to electrical remodeling during AF with HF, and that TREK-1 gene transfer would provide rhythm control via normalization of atrial effective refractory periods in this AF subset. In patients with chronic AF and HF, atrial TREK-1 mRNA levels were reduced by 82% (left atrium) and 81% (right atrium) compared with sinus rhythm (SR) subjects. Human findings were recapitulated in a porcine model of atrial tachypacing-induced AF and reduced left ventricular function. TREK-1 mRNA (-66%) and protein (-61%) was suppressed in AF animals at 14-day follow-up compared with SR controls. Downregulation of repolarizing TREK-1 channels was associated with prolongation of atrial effective refractory periods versus baseline conditions, consistent with prior observations in humans with HF. In a preclinical therapeutic approach, pigs were randomized to either atrial Ad-TREK-1 gene therapy or sham treatment. Gene transfer effectively increased TREK-1 protein levels and attenuated atrial effective refractory period prolongation in the porcine AF model. Ad-TREK-1 increased the SR prevalence to 62% during follow-up in AF animals, compared to 35% in the untreated AF group. In conclusion, TREK-1 downregulation and rhythm control by Ad-TREK-1 transfer suggest mechanistic and potential therapeutic significance of TREK-1 channels in a subgroup of AF patients with HF and prolonged atrial effective refractory periods. Functional correction of ionic remodeling through TREK-1 gene therapy represents a novel paradigm to optimize and specify AF management.

  17. Cryogenic exciter

    DOEpatents

    Bray, James William [Niskayuna, NY; Garces, Luis Jose [Niskayuna, NY

    2012-03-13

    The disclosed technology is a cryogenic static exciter. The cryogenic static exciter is connected to a synchronous electric machine that has a field winding. The synchronous electric machine is cooled via a refrigerator or cryogen like liquid nitrogen. The static exciter is in communication with the field winding and is operating at ambient temperature. The static exciter receives cooling from a refrigerator or cryogen source, which may also service the synchronous machine, to selected areas of the static exciter and the cooling selectively reduces the operating temperature of the selected areas of the static exciter.

  18. Determination of the 1s2{\\ell }2{{\\ell }}^{\\prime } state production ratios {{}^{4}P}^{o}/{}^{2}P, {}^{2}D/{}^{2}P and {{}^{2}P}_{+}/{{}^{2}P}_{-} from fast (1{s}^{2},1s2s\\,{}^{3}S) mixed-state He-like ion beams in collisions with H2 targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benis, E. P.; Zouros, T. J. M.

    2016-12-01

    New results are presented on the ratio {R}m={σ }{T2p}( {}4P)/{σ }{T2p}({}2P) concerning the production cross sections of Li-like 1s2s2p quartet and doublet P states formed in energetic ion-atom collisions by single 2p electron transfer to the metastable 1s2s {}3S component of the He-like ion beam. Spin statistics predict a value of R m = 2 independent of the collision system in disagreement with most reported measurements of {R}m≃ 1{--}9. A new experimental approach is presented for the evaluation of R m having some practical advantages over earlier approaches. It also allows for the determination of the separate contributions of ground- and metastable-state beam components to the measured spectra. Applying our technique to zero-degree Auger projectile spectra from 4.5 MeV {{{B}}}3+ (Benis et al 2002 Phys. Rev. A 65 064701) and 25.3 MeV {{{F}}}7+ (Zamkov et al 2002 Phys. Rev. A 65 062706) mixed state (1{s}2 {}1S,1s2s {}3S) He-like ion collisions with H2 targets, we report new values of {R}m=3.5+/- 0.4 for boron and {R}m=1.8+/- 0.3 for fluorine. In addition, the ratios of {}2D/{}2P and {{}2P}+/{{}2P}- populations from either the metastable and/or ground state beam component, also relevant to this analysis, are evaluated and compared to previously reported results for carbon collisions on helium (Strohschein et al 2008 Phys. Rev. A 77 022706) including a critical comparison to theory.

  19. Relativistic electron-correlation on the 2p-2s transitions in Li-like to F-like Xe ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Liang-huan; Liu, Jing-jing; Kang, Xiao-ping

    2016-06-01

    Energy levels, wavelengths, transition rates and line strengths are reported for transitions in Li-like to F-like Xe ions, Xe LII-XLVI. For the calculations, a fully relativistic GRASP2k code based on the multiconfiguration Dirac-Hartree-Fock (MCDHF) method has been adopted, Valence and core-Valence correlation effects were accounted for through single- and double-excitation expansions to increasing sets of active orbitals. The fine-structure energy levels and wavelengths are compared with experimental data and with values from other calculations. The calculated values including core-valence correlation are found to be similar and compare very well with other theoretical and experimental values for Xe ions. Our calculated wavelengths for Li-, Be- and B-like ions are much more precise than some available theoretical data and reveal significant shortcomings of the various theoretical predictions.

  20. Optical phase conjugation of picosecond pulses at 1.06 mum in Sn(2)P(2)S(6):Te for wavefront correction in high-power Nd-doped amplifier systems.

    PubMed

    Bach, Tobias; Nawata, Kouji; Jazbinsek, Mojca; Omatsu, Takashige; Günter, Peter

    2010-01-04

    We report, for the first time to our knowledge, on picosecondpulse optical phase conjugation using photorefractive Sn(2)P(2)S(6) crystals. For 7.2-ps pulses at 1.06 mum, we have achieved phase-conjugate reflectivities of up to 45% with very fast build-up times, about 15 ms at an intensity of 23 W/cm(2) using Te-doped Sn(2)P(2)S(6). We furthermore demonstrate aberration-free 5 W optical output of 8-ps pulses at 1.06 mum from a side pumped Nd:YVO(4) amplifier using the Sn(2)P(2)S(6)-based phase-conjugate feedback.

  1. Exciter switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcpeak, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    A new exciter switch assembly has been installed at the three DSN 64-m deep space stations. This assembly provides for switching Block III and Block IV exciters to either the high-power or 20-kW transmitters in either dual-carrier or single-carrier mode. In the dual-carrier mode, it provides for balancing the two drive signals from a single control panel located in the transmitter local control and remote control consoles. In addition to the improved switching capabilities, extensive monitoring of both the exciter switch assembly and Transmitter Subsystem is provided by the exciter switch monitor and display assemblies.

  2. Accurate ab initio potential energy surface, thermochemistry, and dynamics of the Br(2P, 2P3/2) + CH4 → HBr + CH3 reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czakó, Gábor

    2013-04-01

    Chemically accurate full-dimensional non-spin-orbit and spin-orbit (SO) ground-state potential energy surfaces (PESs) are obtained for the Br + CH4 → HBr + CH3 reaction by fitting 21 574 composite ab initio energy points. The composite method considers electron correlation methods up to CCSD(T), basis sets up to aug-cc-pwCVTZ-PP, correlation of the core electrons, scalar relativistic effects via an effective core potential (ECP), and SO corrections, thereby achieving an accuracy better than 0.5 kcal/mol. Benchmark structures and relative energies are computed for the stationary points using the ab initio focal-point analysis (FPA) scheme based on both ECP and Douglas-Kroll approaches providing all-electron relativistic CCSDT(Q)/complete-basis-set quality energies. The PESs accurately describe the saddle point of the abstraction reaction and the van der Waals complexes in the entrance and product channels. The SO-corrected PES provides a classical barrier height of 7285(7232 ± 50) cm-1, De values of 867(799 ± 10) and 399(344 ± 10) cm-1 for the complexes CH3-HBr and CH3-BrH, respectively, and reaction endothermicity of 7867(7857 ± 50) cm-1, in excellent agreement with the new, FPA-based benchmark data shown in parentheses. The difference between the Br + CH4 asymptotes of the non-SO and SO PESs is 1240 cm-1, in good agreement with the experiment (1228 cm-1). Quasiclassical trajectory calculations based on more than 13 million trajectories for the late-barrier Br + CH4(vk = 0, 1) [k = 1, 2, 3, 4] reactions show that the vibrational energy, especially the excitation of the stretching modes, activates the reaction much more efficiently than translational energy, in agreement with the extended Polanyi rules. Angular distributions show dominant backward scattering for the ground-state reaction and forward scattering for the stretching-excited reactions. The reactivity on the non-SO PES is about 3-5 times larger than that on the SO PES in a wide collision energy

  3. Accurate ab initio potential energy surface, thermochemistry, and dynamics of the Br(2P, 2P(3∕2)) + CH4 → HBr + CH3 reaction.

    PubMed

    Czakó, Gábor

    2013-04-07

    Chemically accurate full-dimensional non-spin-orbit and spin-orbit (SO) ground-state potential energy surfaces (PESs) are obtained for the Br + CH4 → HBr + CH3 reaction by fitting 21 574 composite ab initio energy points. The composite method considers electron correlation methods up to CCSD(T), basis sets up to aug-cc-pwCVTZ-PP, correlation of the core electrons, scalar relativistic effects via an effective core potential (ECP), and SO corrections, thereby achieving an accuracy better than 0.5 kcal∕mol. Benchmark structures and relative energies are computed for the stationary points using the ab initio focal-point analysis (FPA) scheme based on both ECP and Douglas-Kroll approaches providing all-electron relativistic CCSDT(Q)∕complete-basis-set quality energies. The PESs accurately describe the saddle point of the abstraction reaction and the van der Waals complexes in the entrance and product channels. The SO-corrected PES provides a classical barrier height of 7285(7232 ± 50) cm(-1), De values of 867(799 ± 10) and 399(344 ± 10) cm(-1) for the complexes CH3-HBr and CH3-BrH, respectively, and reaction endothermicity of 7867(7857 ± 50) cm(-1), in excellent agreement with the new, FPA-based benchmark data shown in parentheses. The difference between the Br + CH4 asymptotes of the non-SO and SO PESs is 1240 cm(-1), in good agreement with the experiment (1228 cm(-1)). Quasiclassical trajectory calculations based on more than 13 million trajectories for the late-barrier Br + CH4(vk = 0, 1) [k = 1, 2, 3, 4] reactions show that the vibrational energy, especially the excitation of the stretching modes, activates the reaction much more efficiently than translational energy, in agreement with the extended Polanyi rules. Angular distributions show dominant backward scattering for the ground-state reaction and forward scattering for the stretching-excited reactions. The reactivity on the non-SO PES is about 3-5 times larger than that on the SO PES in a wide

  4. Ekectron-Impact Excitation of C+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, A. J.; Ballance, C. P.; Loch, S. D.; Pindzola, M. S.

    2015-05-01

    Electron-impact excitation cross sections are calculated for ground and excited states of C+ using the R-matrix with pseudo-states method. We used the configurations 1s2 2s2 nl (3 s <= nl <= 12 g) , 1s2 2 s 2 pnl (2 p <= nl <= 12 g) , 1s2 2p2 nl (2 p <= nl <= 12 g) , 1s2 2 s 3s2 , and 1s2 2 s 3d2 , resulting in 890 LS terms and 2048 LSJ levels. Excitation cross sections for the 1s2 2s2 2 p2 P -->4 P,2 D,2 S transitions are in good agreement with experiment. Combined with previous calculations for C and Cq+ (q = 2- 5), sufficient excitation, ionization, and recombination atomic data is now available to generate high quality collisional-radiative coefficients for the entire C isonuclear sequence. Work supported in part by grants from NASA, NSF, and DOE.

  5. Exciting Pools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Bradford L.

    1975-01-01

    Advocates the creation of swimming pool oscillations as part of a general investigation of mechanical oscillations. Presents the equations, procedure for deriving the slosh modes, and methods of period estimation for exciting swimming pool oscillations. (GS)

  6. [Co(η5-P5){η2-P2H(mes)}]2-: a phospha-organometallic complex obtained by the transition-metal-mediated activation of the heptaphosphide trianion.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Caroline M; Westcott, Bethan H; Raybould, Melissa A C; McGrady, John E; Goicoechea, Jose M

    2012-09-03

    A carbon copy: The chemical activation of the heptaphosphide trianion with [Co(PEt(2)Ph)(2)(mes)(2)] (see picture; 1) yields the novel phospha-organometallic complex [Co(η(5)-P(5)){η(2)-P(2)H(mes)}](2-) (2). The reaction product maintains the nuclearity of the parent cluster, but extensive cage fragmentation takes place to yield a diamagnetic "inorganometallic" cobalt complex.

  7. Excited baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, N.C.

    1986-01-01

    The status of the theory of the low-energy approach to hadron structure is reviewed briefly by surveying a few relevant models. A few examples of tests needed to sort out the predictions of different models pertaining to the quark-gluon structure of hadrons are discussed, and given the resulting physics objectives, a few experimental options for excited baryon research at CFBAF are suggested. (LEW)

  8. Synthesis and characterization of fac-[M(CO)3(P)(OO)] and cis-trans-[M(CO)2(P)2(OO)] complexes (M = Re, (99m)Tc) with acetylacetone and curcumin as OO donor bidentate ligands.

    PubMed

    Triantis, Charalampos; Tsotakos, Theodoros; Tsoukalas, Charalampos; Sagnou, Marina; Raptopoulou, Catherine; Terzis, Aris; Psycharis, Vassilis; Pelecanou, Maria; Pirmettis, Ioannis; Papadopoulos, Minas

    2013-11-18

    The synthesis and characterization of neutral mixed ligand complexes fac-[M(CO)3(P)(OO)] and cis-trans-[M(CO)2(P)2(OO)] (M = Re, (99m)Tc), with deprotonated acetylacetone or curcumin as the OO donor bidentate ligands and a phosphine (triphenylphosphine or methyldiphenylphosphine) as the monodentate P ligand, is described. The complexes were synthesized through the corresponding fac-[M(CO)3(H2O)(OO)] (M = Re, (99m)Tc) intermediate aqua complex. In the presence of phosphine, replacement of the H2O molecule of the intermediate complex at room temperature generates the neutral tricarbonyl monophosphine fac-[Re(CO)3(P)(OO)] complex, while under reflux conditions further replacement of the trans to the phosphine carbonyl generates the new stable dicarbonyl bisphosphine complex cis-trans-[Re(CO)2(P)2(OO)]. The Re complexes were fully characterized by elemental analysis, spectroscopic methods, and X-ray crystallography showing a distorted octahedral geometry around Re. Both the monophosphine and the bisphosphine complexes of curcumin show selective binding to β-amyloid plaques of Alzheimer's disease. At the (99m)Tc tracer level, the same type of complexes, fac-[(99m)Tc(CO)3(P)(OO)] and cis-trans-[(99m)Tc(CO)2(P)2(OO)], are formed introducing new donor combinations for (99m)Tc(I). Overall, β-diketonate and phosphine constitute a versatile ligand combination for Re(I) and (99m)Tc(I), and the successful employment of the multipotent curcumin as β-diketone provides a solid example of the pharmacological potential of this system.

  9. Relativistic electron correlation, quantum electrodynamics, and the lifetime of the 1s(2)2s(2)2p2p0(3/2) level in boronlike argon.

    PubMed

    Lapierre, A; Jentschura, U D; Crespo López-Urrutia, J R; Braun, J; Brenner, G; Bruhns, H; Fischer, D; González Martínez, A J; Harman, Z; Johnson, W R; Keitel, C H; Mironov, V; Osborne, C J; Sikler, G; Soria Orts, R; Shabaev, V; Tawara, H; Tupitsyn, I I; Ullrich, J; Volotka, A

    2005-10-28

    The lifetime of the Ar13+ 1s(2)2s(2)2p2p0(3/2) metastable level was determined at the Heidelberg Electron Beam Ion Trap to be 9.573(4)(5). The accuracy level of one per thousand makes this measurement sensitive to quantum electrodynamic effects like the electron anomalous magnetic moment (EAMM) and to relativistic electron-electron correlation effects like the frequency-dependent Breit interaction. Theoretical predictions, adjusted for the EAMM, cluster about a lifetime that is approximately shorter than our experimental result.

  10. Sexual excitement.

    PubMed

    Stoller, R J

    1976-08-01

    Sexual excitement depends on a scenario the person to be aroused has been writing since childhood. The story is an adventure, an autobiography disguised as fiction, in which the hero/heroine hides crucial intrapsychic conflicts, mysteries, screen memories of actual traumatic events and the resolution of these elements into a happy ending, best celebrated by orgasm. The function of the fantasy is to take these painful experiences and convert them to pleasure-triumph. In order to sharpen excitement-the vibration between the fear of original traumas repeating and the hope of a pleasurable conclusion this time-one introduces into the story elements of risk (approximations of the trauma) meant to prevent boredom and safety factors (sub-limnal signals to the storyteller that the risk are not truly dangerous). Sexual fantasy can be studied by means of a person's daydreams (including those chosen in magazines, books, plays, television, movies, and outright pornography), masturbatory behavior, object choice, foreplay, techniques of intercourse, or postcoital behavior.

  11. Effects of Substitution of K2O for Na2O on the Bioactivity of CaO-Na2O-SiO2-P2O5 glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taehee; Hwang, Chawon; Gwoo, Donggun; Park, Hoyyul; Ryu, Bong-Ki

    2012-10-01

    The compositional dependences of bioactivity, thermal properties, atomic structure, and surface morphology have been investigated in the CaO-Na2O-SiO2-P2O5 system; this system is known as a bioglass. 45S5 Bioglass® is known to be a general and highly bioactive material. However, the bioactivity of this glassy material is expected to be improved by modifying the alkali-metal composition. Thermal properties, density, and molar volume were measured to investigate the structural packing. FT-IR spectra and X-ray diffraction were used to confirm the structures of these glasses. The morphology was examined using field emission electron microscopy, and the formation of a Ca-P layer was studied using an energy-dispersive system. This study shows that the tendency to form a calcium phosphate layer is increased with the substitution of K2O for Na2O.

  12. Bone bonding behavior of MgO-CaO-SiO2-P2O5-CaF2 glass (mother glass of A.W-glass-ceramics).

    PubMed

    Kitsugi, T; Yamamuro, T; Nakamura, T; Kokubo, T

    1989-06-01

    In this study, it was found that a Ca-P layer and a Si layer were formed on the interface of the mother glass of apatite-wollastonite containing glass-ceramics (designated AW) and bone tissue. The dissolution of Si, Ca, and P from glass (MgO-CaO-SiO2-P2O5-CaF2) is necessary to form a chemical film (a Si layer and a Ca-P layer). The three kinds of glasses used were 1) a mirror surface of the mother glass (MgO 4.6, CaO 44.9, SiO2 34.2, P2O5 16.3, CaF 0.5 weight ratio) of AW (designated G-AW (mirror], 2) an abraded surface of G-AW (designated G-AW (#2000)), 3) a mirror surface SiO2 glass (designated G-Si, 100% SiO2). The glass plates (15 mm x 10 mm x 2 mm) were implanted into the metaphysis of tibia of mature male rabbits for 10 and 25 weeks. The failure load, when an implant detached from the bone or when the bone itself broke, was measured by a detaching test and the interface of glass/bone was observed by SEM-EPMA. Failure loads in G-Si, G-AW (mirror), and G-AW (#2000) 10 weeks after implantation were 0.18 +/- 0.24, 3.06 +/- 1.29, and 2.94 +/- 1.77 kg, respectively. Those in G-Si, G-AW (mirror), and G-AW (#2000) 25 weeks after implantation were 1.30 +/- 1.18, 3.88 +/- 1.06, and 3.55 +/- 1.51, respectively. The failure loads in G-Si vs. G-AW (mirror) and those in G-Si vs. G-AW (#2000) differed significantly (P less than 0.01). There were no significant differences in the failure load according to the surface roughness of G-AW. As shown by SEM-EPMA observation, a Si layer next to G was adjacent to a Ca-P layer next to the bone. The chemical film showed no increase in thickness as time passed. A Ca-P layer did not form on the interface of Si-G and bone.

  13. Effects of sodium and potassium ions on a novel SeO2-B2O3-SiO2-P2O5-CaO bioactive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trandafir, D. L.; Ponta, O.; Ciceo-Lucacel, R.; Simon, V.

    2015-01-01

    The study is focused on Na2O and/or K2O influence on a new sol-gel derived SeO2-B2O3-SiO2-P2O5-CaO bioactive system. The structural changes induced by Na2O and/or K2O addition were correlated with the samples behavior in simulated biological media. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy were used to characterize the structure and the type of the chemical bonds. The morphology of the samples was characterized through scanning electron microscopy (SEM). XRD results pointed out a prevalent vitreous structure with an incipient hydroxyapatite (HA) crystalline phase. FTIR results revealed a complex network consisting of silicate, phosphate and borate units, as well as the development of both A- and B-type of carbonate-substituted HA. The bioactivity of the samples was tested in vitro following the evolution of the apatite layers self-assembled on the samples surface in simulated body fluid. Their biocompatibility was investigated after samples surface functionalization with protein. The results indicate that sodium and potassium addition improves the biocompatibility by enhancement of protein adherence on samples surface and without to prevent the samples bioactivity.

  14. Influence of heat treatments upon the mechanical properties and in vitro bioactivity of ZrO2-toughened MgO-CaO-SiO2-P2O5-CaF2 glass-ceramics.

    PubMed

    Li, Huan-Cai; Wang, Dian-Gang; Meng, Xiang-Guo; Chen, Chuan-Zhong

    2014-09-01

    Zirconia-toughened MgO-CaO-SiO2-P2O5-CaF2 glass-ceramics are prepared using sintering techniques, and a series of heat treatment procedures are designed to obtain a glass-ceramic with improved properties. The crystallization behavior, phase composition, and morphology of the glass-ceramics are characterized. The bending strength, elastic modulus, fracture toughness, and microhardness of the glass-ceramics are investigated, and the effect mechanism of heat treatments upon the mechanical properties is discussed. The bioactivity of glass-ceramics is then evaluated using the in vitro simulated body fluid (SBF) soaking test, and the mechanism whereby apatite forms on the glass-ceramic surfaces in the SBF solution is discussed. The results indicate that the main crystal phase of the G-24 sample undergoing two heat treatment procedures is Ca5(PO4)3F (fluorapatite), and those of the G-2444 sample undergoing four heat treatment procedures are Ca5(PO4)3F and β-CaSiO3 (β-wollastonite). The heat treatment procedures are found to greatly influence the mechanical properties of the glass-ceramic, and an apatite layer is induced on the glass-ceramic surface after soaking in the SBF solution.

  15. Disappearance of superconductivity in the solid solution between (Ca4Al2O6)(Fe2As2) and (Ca4Al2O6)(Fe2P2) superconductors.

    PubMed

    Shirage, Parasharam M; Kihou, Kunihiro; Lee, Chul-Ho; Takeshita, Nao; Eisaki, Hiroshi; Iyo, Akira

    2012-09-19

    The effect of alloying the two perovskite-type iron-based superconductors (Ca(4)Al(2)O(6))(Fe(2)As(2)) and (Ca(4)Al(2)O(6))(Fe(2)P(2)) was examined. While the two stoichiometric compounds possess relatively high T(c)'s of 28 and 17 K, respectively, their solid solutions of the form (Ca(4)Al(2)O(6))(Fe(2)(As(1-x)P(x))(2)) do not show superconductivity over a wide range from x = 0.50 to 0.95. The resultant phase diagram is thus completely different from those of other typical iron-based superconductors such as BaFe(2)(As,P)(2) and LaFe(As,P)O, in which superconductivity shows up when P is substituted for As in the non-superconducting "parent" compounds. Notably, the solid solutions in the non-superconducting range exhibit resistivity anomalies at temperatures of 50-100 K. The behavior is reminiscent of the resistivity kink commonly observed in various non-superconducting parent compounds that signals the onset of antiferromagnetic/orthorhombic long-range order. The similarity suggests that the suppression of the superconductivity in the present case also has a magnetic and/or structural origin.

  16. Effect of ZrO(2) additions on the crystallization, mechanical and biological properties of MgO-CaO-SiO(2)-P(2)O(5)-CaF(2) bioactive glass-ceramics.

    PubMed

    Li, H C; Wang, D G; Meng, X G; Chen, C Z

    2014-06-01

    A series of ZrO(2) doped MgO-CaO-SiO(2)-P(2)O(5)-CaF(2) bioactive glass-ceramics were obtained by sintering method. The crystallization behavior, phase composition, morphology and structure of glass-ceramics were characterized. The bending strength, elastic modulus, fracture toughness, micro-hardness and thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) of glass-ceramics were investigated. The in vitro bioactivity and cytotoxicity tests were used to evaluate the bioactivity and biocompatibility of glass-ceramics. The sedimentation mechanism and growth process of apatites on sample surface were discussed. The results showed that the mainly crystalline phases of glass-ceramics were Ca(5)(PO4)3F (fluorapatite) and β-CaSiO(3). (β-wollastonite). m-ZrO(2) (monoclinic zirconia) declined the crystallization temperatures of glasses. t-ZrO(2) (tetragonal zirconia) increased the crystallization temperature of Ca(5)(PO4)(3)F and declined the crystallization temperature of β-CaSiO(3). t-ZrO(2) greatly increased the fracture toughness, bending strength and micro-hardness of glass-ceramics. The nanometer apatites were induced on the surface of glass-ceramic after soaking 28 days in SBF (simulated body fluid), indicating the glass-ceramic has good bioactivity. The in vitro cytotoxicity test demonstrated the glass-ceramic has no toxicity to cell.

  17. Electron Impact Excitation Of Ti XIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Kanti M.; Keenan, F. P.

    2012-05-01

    Emission lines of Ti XIX are important for the modeling and diagnostics of lasing, fusion and astrophysical plasmas, for which atomic data are required for a variety of parameters, such as energy levels, radiative rates (A- values), and excitation rates or equivalently the effective collision strengths (Υ), which are obtained from the electron impact collision strengths (Ω). Experimentally, energy levels are available for Ti XIX on the NIST website, but there is paucity for accurate collisional atomic data. Therefore, here we report a complete set of results (namely energy levels, radiative rates, and effective collision strengths) for all transitions among the lowest 98 levels of Ti XIX. These levels belong to the (1s2) 2s2, 2s2p, 2p2, 2s3l, 2p3l, 2s4l, and 2p4l configurations. Finally, we also report the A- values for four types of transitions, namely electric dipole (E1), electric quadrupole (E2), magnetic dipole (M1), and magnetic quadrupole (M2), because these are also required for plasma modeling. For our calculations of wavefunctions, we have adopted the fully relativistic GRASP code, and for the calculations of Ω, the Dirac atomic R-matrix code (DARC) of PH Norrington and IP Grant. Additionally, parallel calculations have also been performed with the Flexible Atomic Code (FAC) of Gu, so that all atomic parameters can be rigorously assessed for accuracy.

  18. RESONANT CAVITY EXCITATION SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Baker, W.R.; Kerns, Q.A.; Riedel, J.

    1959-01-13

    An apparatus is presented for exciting a cavity resonator with a minimum of difficulty and, more specifically describes a sub-exciter and an amplifier type pre-exciter for the high-frequency cxcitation of large cavities. Instead of applying full voltage to the main oscillator, a sub-excitation voltage is initially used to establish a base level of oscillation in the cavity. A portion of the cavity encrgy is coupled to the input of the pre-exciter where it is amplified and fed back into the cavity when the pre-exciter is energized. After the voltage in the cavity resonator has reached maximum value under excitation by the pre-exciter, full voltage is applied to the oscillator and the pre-exciter is tunned off. The cavity is then excited to the maximum high voltage value of radio frequency by the oscillator.

  19. Fabrication and evaluation of osteoblastic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells on novel CaO-SiO2-P2O5-B2O3 glass-ceramics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Hyup; Seo, Jun-Hyuk; Lee, Kyung Mee; Ryu, Hyun-Seung; Baek, Hae-Ri

    2013-07-01

    Apatite-wollastonite glass-ceramics have high mechanical strength, and CaO-SiO2 -B2 O3 glass-ceramics showed excellent bioactivity and high biodegradability. A new type of CaO-SiO2 -P2 O5 -B2 O3 system of bioactive glass-ceramics (BGS-7) was fabricated, and the effect and usefulness was evaluated via bioactivity using simulated body fluid and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). The purpose of this study was to compare BGS-7 and hydroxyapatite (HA) using hMSCs in order to evaluate the bioactivity of BGS-7 and its possibility as a bone graft extender. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) staining, ALP activity, cell proliferation 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium, inner salt (MTS) assay, Alizarin Red-S (AR-S) staining, calcium levels, the mRNA expression of ALP, osteocalcin, osteopontin, and runt-related transcription factor 2 (runx-2) using reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and the protein expression of osteocalcin and runx-2 using Western blot were measured by transplanting hMSC onto a tissue culture plate, HA, and BGS-7. The ALP staining and AR-S staining of BGS-7 was greater than that of HA and control. The ALP value of BGS-7 was significantly higher than that of HA and control. The MTS results showed that BGS-7 had a higher value than the groups transplanted onto HA and control on day 15. The calcium level was higher than the control in both HA and BGS-7, and was especially high in BGS-7. There were more mineral products on BGS-7 than on the HA when analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. The mRNA expression of ALP, osteopontin, osteocalcin, and runx-2 were higher on BGS-7 than on HA and the control when analyzed by RT-PCR. The relative gene expression of osteopontin and runx-2 were found to be higher on BGS-7 than on HA and the control by Western blot. Accordingly, it is predicted that BGS-7 would have high biocompatibility and good osteoconductivity, and presents a possibility as a new

  20. Reactivity of the anionic diphosphorus complex [Mo2Cp2(μ-PCy2)(μ-κ(2):κ(2)-P2)(CO)2]- toward phosphorus- and transition metal-based electrophiles.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, M Angeles; García, M Esther; García-Vivó, Daniel; Lozano, Raquel; Ramos, Alberto; Ruiz, Miguel A

    2013-08-05

    The reactions of the Li(+) salt of the title anion with chlorophosphines PR2Cl (R = Cy, Ph, (t)Bu) led in all cases to products of formula [Mo2Cp2(μ-PCy2)(μ-κ(2)(P,P)':κ(2)(P,P″)-P2PR2)(CO)2], with the PR2 group inserted in one of the Mo-P(basal) bonds of the anion to give novel tridentate phosphinodiphosphenyl ligands, as confirmed by the solid-state structure of the PCy2 compound. When R was the bulky (t)Bu group, this product was in equilibrium with an isomer of formula [Mo2Cp2(μ-PCy2)(μ-κ(2)(P,P)':κ(2)(P,P')-P2P(t)Bu2)(CO)2], in which the diphosphorus ligand of the anion binds the P(t)Bu2 group through the lone pair of electrons at the basal P atom in an "end-on" fashion (computed P-P-P(t)Bu2 = 114.7°); the latter isomer was more stable than the former, according to the NMR data and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The title anion reacted with halide complexes of the type [MXLn] (MLn = FeCp(CO)2, MoCp(CO)3, ZrCpCl, Mn(CO)5, Re(CO)5) to give compounds of formula [Mo2MCp2(μ-PCy2)(μ-κ(2):κ(2):κ(1)-P2)(CO)2Ln] incorporating the organometallic fragment MLn also in an "end-on" position at the basal P atom of the anion, as confirmed by the solid-state structure of the Fe compound (P-P = 2.089(2) Å; P-P-Fe = 124.6(1)°). All these complexes, except the Zr compound, underwent a fluxional process in solution involving a swing of the P2 ligand around the Mo-Mo axis with concomitant exchange of the MLn fragment between the P atoms of the diphosphorus ligand, as revealed by variable-temperature NMR experiments. Thermal decarbonylation of the Mn and Re compounds gave hexanuclear derivatives of formula [Mo4M2Cp4(μ-PCy2)2(μ4-κ(1):κ(2):κ(2):κ(1)-P2)2(CO)12] (M = Mn, Re) as a mixture of two isomers derived from the different assembly of the asymmetric Mo2P2 subunits, as confirmed through X-ray analyses of both compounds. Each of the P2 ligands in these two complexes bind two Mo and two M atoms (M = Mn, Re), with the latter defining central P4M

  1. Excited charmed mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, J.N.; Shukla, S.

    1995-05-01

    The experimental status of excited charmed mesons is reviewed and is compared to theoretical expectations. Six states have been observed and their properties are consistent with those predicted for excited charmed states with orbital angular momentum equal to one.

  2. Portable vibration exciter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beecher, L. C.; Williams, F. T.

    1970-01-01

    Gas-driven vibration exciter produces a sinusoidal excitation function controllable in frequency and in amplitude. It allows direct vibration testing of components under normal loads, removing the possibility of component damage due to high static pressure.

  3. Acoustically excited heated jets. 1: Internal excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, J.; Ahuja, K. K.; Brown, W. H.; Salikuddin, M.; Morris, P. J.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of relatively strong upstream acoustic excitation on the mixing of heated jets with the surrounding air are investigated. To determine the extent of the available information on experiments and theories dealing with acoustically excited heated jets, an extensive literature survey was carried out. The experimental program consisted of flow visualization and flowfield velocity and temperature measurements for a broad range of jet operating and flow excitation conditions. A 50.8-mm-diam nozzle was used for this purpose. Parallel to the experimental study, an existing theoretical model of excited jets was refined to include the region downstream of the jet potential core. Excellent agreement was found between theory and experiment in moderately heated jets. However, the theory has not yet been confirmed for highly heated jets. It was found that the sensitivity of heated jets to upstream acoustic excitation varies strongly with the jet operating conditions and that the threshold excitation level increases with increasing jet temperature. Furthermore, the preferential Strouhal number is found not to change significantly with a change of the jet operating conditions. Finally, the effects of the nozzle exit boundary layer thickness appear to be similar for both heated and unheated jets at low Mach numbers.

  4. SiO2-P2O5-HfO2-Al2O3-Na2O glasses activated by Er3+ ions: From bulk sample to planar waveguide fabricated by rf-sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiasera, A.; Vasilchenko, I.; Dorosz, D.; Cotti, M.; Varas, S.; Iacob, E.; Speranza, G.; Vaccari, A.; Valligatla, S.; Zur, L.; Lukowiak, A.; Righini, G. C.; Ferrari, M.

    2017-01-01

    0.4 Er3+-doped 90.7 SiO2 - 4.4 P2O5 - 2.3 HfO2 - 1.7 Al2O3 - 0.7 Na2O planar waveguide was fabricated by multi-target rf-sputtering technique starting by massive Er3+-activated P2O5-SiO2-Al2O3-Na2O glass. The optical parameters were measured by m-line apparatus operating at 632.8, 1319 and 1542 nm. The waveguide compositions were investigated by Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy and its morphology analyzed by Atomic Force Microscopy. The waveguide exhibits a single propagation mode at 1319 and 1542 nm with an attenuation coefficient of 0.2 dB/cm in the infrared. The emission of 4I13/2 → 4I15/2 transition of Er3+ ion, with a 28.5 nm bandwidth was observed upon TE0 mode excitation at 514.5 nm. The optical and spectroscopic features of the Er3+-activated parent P2O5-SiO2-Al2O3-Na2O glass were also investigated.

  5. 8. POWERHOUSE INTERIOR SHOWING EXCITER No. 1 IN FOREGROUND, EXCITER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. POWERHOUSE INTERIOR SHOWING EXCITER No. 1 IN FOREGROUND, EXCITER No. 2., AND GENERATOR UNITS BEHIND EXCITER No. 2 IN BACKGROUND. EXCITER No. 1 GENERATOR HAS A COVER OVER TOP HALF OF COMMUTATOR ELEMENT. VIEW TO NORTHWEST. - Rush Creek Hydroelectric System, Powerhouse Exciters, Rush Creek, June Lake, Mono County, CA

  6. Excitability dependent pattern formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhakara, Kaumudi; Gholami, Azam; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2014-03-01

    On starvation, the amoebae Dictyostelium discoideum emit the chemo-attractant cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) at specific frequencies. The neighboring amoebae sense cAMP through membrane receptors and produce their own cAMP. Soon the cells synchronize and move via chemotaxis along the gradient of cAMP. The response of the amoebae to the emission of cAMP is seen as spiral waves or target patterns under a dark field microscope. The causal reasons for the selection of one or the other patterns are still unclear. Here we present a possible explanation based on excitability. The excitability of the amoebae depends on the starvation time because the gene expression changes with starvation. Cells starved for longer times are more excitable. In this work, we mix cells of different excitabilities to study the dependence of the emergent patterns on the excitability. Preliminary results show a transition from spirals to target patterns for specific excitabilities. A phase map of the patterns for different combinations of excitability and number densities is obtained. We compare our findings with numerical simulations of existing theoretical models.

  7. 15. POWERHOUSE INTERIOR SHOWING EXCITER No. 2 WITH EXCITER No. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. POWERHOUSE INTERIOR SHOWING EXCITER No. 2 WITH EXCITER No. 1 BEHIND. OVERHEAD CRANE DANGLES AT TOP OF PHOTO. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Rush Creek Hydroelectric System, Powerhouse Exciters, Rush Creek, June Lake, Mono County, CA

  8. Electron Impact Excitation of Ti XVIII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jia Yong; Zeng, Jiao Long; Zhao, Gang; Bari, Muhanmmud Abbas; Zhang, Jie

    2005-10-01

    Two different methods were used to calculate the collision strengths of boron-like titanium. One was a close-coupling way using the Dirac Atomic R-matrix Code (DARC) of P. H. Norrington and I. P. Grant (private communication), and the other was based on a relativistic distorted-wave (RDW) approximation with a Flexible Atomic Code (FAC) by Gu (2003). For DARC, the lowest 125 fine-structure levels belonging to the (1s2) 2s22p, 2s2p2, 2p3, 2s23l, 2s2p3l, and 2p23l (l=s, p, and d) configurations were included in the calculations. The target model space encompassed the lowest 15 levels, and all 105Δn=0 transitions together with 40 partial waves were included in calculations of the collision strengths. For FAC, the configuration interactions included in the calculations of atomic structure and excitation were among the same configurations of DARC. The collision strengths for all 125 levels were calculated at 10 scattered electron energies (10-10000eV). The effective collision strengths, obtained after integrating the collision strengths of two codes over a Maxwellian distribution of electron energies, were also calculated for the electron temperatures in the range (50-500eV). For application to spectral modeling or diagnostics, we report a complete set of data for the energy levels, radiative rates, and effective collision strengths (only FAC) for all transitions.

  9. Geomagnetic excitation of nutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ron, C.; Vondrák, J.

    2015-08-01

    We tested the hypothesis of Malkin (2013), who demonstrated that the observed changes of Free Core Nutation parameters (phase, amplitude) occur near the epochs of geomagnetic jerks. We found that if the numerical integration of Brzeziński broad-band Liouville equations of atmospheric/oceanic excitations is re-initialized at the epochs of geomagnetic jerks, the agreement between the integrated and observed celestial pole offsets is improved (Vondrák & Ron, 2014). Nevertheless, this approach assumes that the influence of geomagnetic jerks leads to a stepwise change in the position of celestial pole, which is physically not acceptable. Therefore we introduce a simple continuous excitation function that hypothetically describes the influence of geomagnetic jerks, and leads to rapid but continuous changes of pole position. The results of numerical integration of atmospheric/oceanic excitations and this newly introduced excitation are then compared with the observed celestial pole offsets, and prove that the agreement is improved significantly.

  10. Excitation Methods for Bridge Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, C.R.; Duffy, T.A.; Cornwell, P.J.; Doebling, S.W.

    1999-02-08

    This paper summarizes the various methods that have been used to excited bridge structures during dynamic testing. The excitation methods fall into the general categories of ambient excitation methods and measured-input excitation methods. During ambient excitation the input to the bridge is not directly measured. In contrast, as the category label implies, measured-input excitations are usually applied at a single location where the force input to the structure can be monitored. Issues associated with using these various types of measurements are discussed along with a general description of the various excitation methods.

  11. Spin waves and magnetic excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Borovik-Romanov, A.S.; Sinha, S.K.

    1988-01-01

    This book describes both simple spin waves (magnons) and complicated excitations in magnetic systems. The following subjects are covered: - various methods of magnetic excitation investigations such as neutron scattering on magnetic excitations, spin-wave excitation by radio-frequency, power light scattering on magnons and magnetic excitation observation within the light-absorption spectrum; - oscillations of magnetic electron systems coupled with phonons, nuclear spin systems and localized impurity modes: - low-dimensional magnetics, amorphous magnetics and spin glasses.

  12. Adsorption of the cis-[Pt(NH3)2(P2O7)](2-) (phosphaplatin) on hydroxyapatite nanocrystals as a smart way to selectively release activated cis-[Pt(NH3)2Cl2] (cisplatin) in tumor tissues.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Michele; De Castro, Federica; Romano, Alessandro; Migoni, Danilo; Piccinni, Barbara; Verri, Tiziano; Lelli, Marco; Roveri, Norberto; Fanizzi, Francesco P

    2016-04-01

    The relevant adsorption of cis-[Pt(NH3)2(P2O7)](2-) (phosphaplatin) on hydroxyapatite nanocrystals (nHAP) was observed and studied in water suspension. Phosphaplatin cytotoxicity, which is very low for HeLa, MCF-7 and HS-5 cell lines could be enhanced, reaching that of cisplatin, by interaction with solid nHAP. This effect stems from nHAP ability to catalyze the phosphaplatin hydrolysis, producing the same hydrolytic species responsible for cisplatin antitumor activity.

  13. Energies and E1, M1, E2, M2 transition rates for states of the 2s{sup 2}2p, 2s2p{sup 2}, and 2p{sup 3} configurations in boron-like ions between N III and Zn XXVI

    SciTech Connect

    Rynkun, P.; Joensson, P.; Gaigalas, G.; Froese Fischer, C.

    2012-07-15

    Energies, E1, M1, E2, M2 transition rates, line strengths, oscillator strengths, and lifetimes from relativistic configuration interaction calculations are reported for the states of the (1s{sup 2})2s{sup 2}2p, 2s2p{sup 2}, and 2p{sup 3} configurations in all boron-like ions between N III and Zn XXVI. Valence, core-valence, and core-core correlation effects were accounted for through single-double multireference (SD-MR) expansions to increasing sets of active orbitals.

  14. Proteins of Excitable Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Nachmansohn, David

    1969-01-01

    Excitable membranes have the special ability of changing rapidly and reversibly their permeability to ions, thereby controlling the ion movements that carry the electric currents propagating nerve impulses. Acetylcholine (ACh) is the specific signal which is released by excitation and is recognized by a specific protein, the ACh-receptor; it induces a conformational change, triggering off a sequence of reactions resulting in increased permeability. The hydrolysis of ACh by ACh-esterase restores the barrier to ions. The enzymes hydrolyzing and forming ACh and the receptor protein are present in the various types of excitable membranes. Properties of the two proteins directly associated with electrical activity, receptor and esterase, will be described in this and subsequent lectures. ACh-esterase has been shown to be located within the excitable membranes. Potent enzyme inhibitors block electrical activity demonstrating the essential role in this function. The enzyme has been recently crystallized and some protein properties will be described. The monocellular electroplax preparation offers a uniquely favorable material for analyzing the properties of the ACh-receptor and its relation to function. The essential role of the receptor in electrical activity has been demonstrated with specific receptor inhibitors. Recent data show the basically similar role of ACh in the axonal and junctional membranes; the differences of electrical events and pharmacological actions are due to variations of shape, structural organization, and environment. PMID:19873642

  15. Positron excitation of neon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parcell, L. A.; Mceachran, R. P.; Stauffer, A. D.

    1990-01-01

    The differential and total cross section for the excitation of the 3s1P10 and 3p1P1 states of neon by positron impact were calculated using a distorted-wave approximation. The results agree well with experimental conclusions.

  16. Magnetostrictive resonance excitation

    DOEpatents

    Schwarz, Ricardo B.; Kuokkala, Veli-Tapani

    1992-01-01

    The resonance frequency spectrum of a magnetostrictive sample is remotely determined by exciting the magnetostrictive property with an oscillating magnetic field. The permeability of a magnetostrictive material and concomitant coupling with a detection coil varies with the strain in the material whereby resonance responses of the sample can be readily detected. A suitable sample may be a magnetostrictive material or some other material having at least one side coated with a magnetostrictive material. When the sample is a suitable shape, i.e., a cube, rectangular parallelepiped, solid sphere or spherical shell, the elastic moduli or the material can be analytically determined from the measured resonance frequency spectrum. No mechanical transducers are required and the sample excitation is obtained without contact with the sample, leading to highly reproducible results and a measurement capability over a wide temperature range, e.g. from liquid nitrogen temperature to the Curie temperature of the magnetostrictive material.

  17. Experiments on excitation waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, S. C.

    Recent trends in the experimentation on chemical and biochemical excitation waves are presented. In the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction, which is the most suitable chemical laboratory system for the study of wave propagation in excitable medium, the efficient control of wave dynamics by electrical fields and by light illumination is illustrated. In particular, the effects of a feedback control are shown. Further new experiments in this system are concerned with three-dimensional topologies and boundary effects. Important biological applications are found in the aggregation of slime mould amoebae, in proton waves during oscillatory glycolysis, and in waves of spreading depression in neuronal tissue as studied by experiments in chicken retina. Numerical simulations with appropriate reaction-diffusion models complement a large number of these experimental findings.

  18. Excitable scale free networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copelli, M.; Campos, P. R. A.

    2007-04-01

    When a simple excitable system is continuously stimulated by a Poissonian external source, the response function (mean activity versus stimulus rate) generally shows a linear saturating shape. This is experimentally verified in some classes of sensory neurons, which accordingly present a small dynamic range (defined as the interval of stimulus intensity which can be appropriately coded by the mean activity of the excitable element), usually about one or two decades only. The brain, on the other hand, can handle a significantly broader range of stimulus intensity, and a collective phenomenon involving the interaction among excitable neurons has been suggested to account for the enhancement of the dynamic range. Since the role of the pattern of such interactions is still unclear, here we investigate the performance of a scale-free (SF) network topology in this dynamic range problem. Specifically, we study the transfer function of disordered SF networks of excitable Greenberg-Hastings cellular automata. We observe that the dynamic range is maximum when the coupling among the elements is critical, corroborating a general reasoning recently proposed. Although the maximum dynamic range yielded by general SF networks is slightly worse than that of random networks, for special SF networks which lack loops the enhancement of the dynamic range can be dramatic, reaching nearly five decades. In order to understand the role of loops on the transfer function we propose a simple model in which the density of loops in the network can be gradually increased, and show that this is accompanied by a gradual decrease of dynamic range.

  19. Harmonically excited orbital variations

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, T.

    1985-08-06

    Rephrasing the equations of motion for orbital maneuvers in terms of Lagrangian generalized coordinates instead of Newtonian rectangular cartesian coordinates can make certain harmonic terms in the orbital angular momentum vector more readily apparent. In this formulation the equations of motion adopt the form of a damped harmonic oscillator when torques are applied to the orbit in a variationally prescribed manner. The frequencies of the oscillator equation are in some ways unexpected but can nonetheless be exploited through resonant forcing functions to achieve large secular variations in the orbital elements. Two cases are discussed using a circular orbit as the control case: (1) large changes in orbital inclination achieved by harmonic excitation rather than one impulsive velocity change, and (2) periodic and secular changes to the longitude of the ascending node using both stable and unstable excitation strategies. The implications of these equations are also discussed for both artificial satellites and natural satellites. For the former, two utilitarian orbits are suggested, each exploiting a form of harmonic excitation. 5 refs.

  20. Pulse excitation of bolometer bridges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rusk, S. J.

    1972-01-01

    Driving bolometer bridge by appropriately phased excitation pulses increases signal-to-noise ratio of bolometer sensor which operates on a chopped light beam. Method allows higher applied voltage than is possible by conventional ac or dc excitation.

  1. Apparatus for photon excited catalysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saffren, M. M. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus is described for increasing the yield of photonically excited gas phase reactions by extracting excess energy from unstable, excited species by contacting the species with the surface of a finely divided solid.

  2. Many-electron aspects of molecular promotion in ion-atom collisions - Production of core-excited states of Li in Li/+/-He collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elston, S. B.; Vane, C. R.; Schumann, S.

    1979-01-01

    Production of core-excited autoionizing states of neutral Li having configurations of the form 1snln(prime)l(prime) has been observed over the impact-energy range from 10-50 keV. Although the results for production of all such states is remarkably consistent with a quasi-molecular-excitation model proposed by Stolterfoht and Leithaeuser (1976), production of individual lines in the observed spectra exhibits collision-velocity dependencies indicative of considerably more complex processes, including processes which appear to be inherently two-electron in nature. Excitation functions are presented for (1s2s/2/)/2/S, 1s(2s2p/3/P)/2/P, 1s(2s2p/1/P)/2/P, and (1s2p/2/)/2/D core-excited state of Li and for total core excitation.

  3. Get excited: reappraising pre-performance anxiety as excitement.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Alison Wood

    2014-06-01

    Individuals often feel anxious in anticipation of tasks such as speaking in public or meeting with a boss. I find that an overwhelming majority of people believe trying to calm down is the best way to cope with pre-performance anxiety. However, across several studies involving karaoke singing, public speaking, and math performance, I investigate an alternative strategy: reappraising anxiety as excitement. Compared with those who attempt to calm down, individuals who reappraise their anxious arousal as excitement feel more excited and perform better. Individuals can reappraise anxiety as excitement using minimal strategies such as self-talk (e.g., saying "I am excited" out loud) or simple messages (e.g., "get excited"), which lead them to feel more excited, adopt an opportunity mind-set (as opposed to a threat mind-set), and improve their subsequent performance. These findings suggest the importance of arousal congruency during the emotional reappraisal process.

  4. Search for Gluonic Excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Eugenio, Paul

    2007-10-26

    Studies of meson spectra via strong decays provide insight regarding QCD at the confinement scale. These studies have led to phenomenological models for QCD such as the constituent quark model. However, QCD allows for a much richer spectrum of meson states which include extra states such as exotics, hybrids, multi-quarks, and glueballs. First discussion of the status of exotic meson searches is given followed by a discussion of plans at Jefferson Lab to double the energy of the machine to 12 GeV, which will allow us to access photoproduction of mesons in search for gluonic excited states.

  5. Search for Gluonic Excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Eugenio

    2007-10-01

    Studies of meson spectra via strong decays provide insight regarding QCD at the confinement scale. These studies have led to phenomenological models for QCD such as the constituent quark model. However, QCD allows for a much richer spectrum of meson states which include extra states such as exotics, hybrids, multi-quarks, and glueballs. First discussion of the status of exotic meson searches is given followed by a discussion of plans at Jefferson Lab to double the energy of the machine to 12 GeV, which will allow us to access photoproduction of mesons in search for gluonic excited states.

  6. SHOCK-EXCITED OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Creveling, R.

    1957-12-17

    S> A shock-excited quartz crystal oscillator is described. The circuit was specifically designed for application in micro-time measuring work to provide an oscillator which immediately goes into oscillation upon receipt of a trigger pulse and abruptly ceases oscillation when a second pulse is received. To achieve the instant action, the crystal has a prestressing voltage applied across it. A monostable multivibrator receives the on and off trigger pulses and discharges a pulse through the crystal to initiate or terminate oscillation instantly.

  7. Metastable Interactions: Dissociative Excitation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-05-01

    participate. The mercuric halide compounds HgBr2 , HgCl 2 , and HgI2 are of recent interest because of laser output achieved on the B2 E - X2 E transition in...the * respective mercuric halide radicals in the range of 400-600 nm. Population inversion has been obtained by photodissociation and electron impact...excitation in mixtures o the mercuric - halide compounds and the rare gases. Chang and -* Burnham (3) have noted Improved laser efficiency and improved

  8. Structures, energies, and spin-spin coupling constants of fluoro-substituted 1,3-diborata-2,4-diphosphoniocyclobutanes: four-member B-P-B-P rings B2P2F(n)H(8-n) with n = 0, 1, 2, 4.

    PubMed

    Del Bene, Janet E; Alkorta, Ibon; Elguero, José

    2011-05-05

    An ab initio study has been carried out to determine the structures, relative stabilities, and spin-spin coupling constants of a set of 15 fluoro-substituted 1,3-diborata-2,4-diphosphoniocyclobutanes B(2)P(2)F(n)H(8-n), for n = 0, 1, 2, 4, with four-member B-P-B-P rings. Except for B(2)P(2)F(4)H(4) with four fluorines bonded to two borons, these rings are puckered in a butterfly conformation. For a fixed number of fluorines, the isomers with B-F bonds are significantly more stable than those with P-F bonds. As the number of fluorines increases, the energy difference between the most stable isomer and the other isomers increases. Transition structures which interconvert axial and equatorial positions present relatively small inversion barriers. Coupling constants involving (31)P, namely, (1)J(B-P), (1)J(P-F), (2)J(P-P), (2)J(P-F), and (3)J(P-F) are large and are capable of providing structural information. They are sensitive to the number of fluorines present and can discriminate between axial, equatorial, and geminal B-F and P-F bonds, although not all do this to the same extent. (1)J(B-P) and (2)J(P-P) are similar in equilibrium and transition structures. Although transition structures no longer discriminate between axial and equatorial bonds, (1)J(P-F) and (3)J(P-F) remain sensitive to the number of fluorine atoms present.

  9. Excited states of boron isoelectronic series from explicitly correlated wave functions.

    PubMed

    Gálvez, F J; Buendía, E; Sarsa, A

    2005-04-15

    The ground state and some low-lying excited states arising from the 1s2 2s2p2 configuration of the boron isoelectronic series are studied starting from explicitly correlated multideterminant wave functions. One- and two-body densities in position space have been calculated and different expectation values such as , , , , , and , where r, r12, and R stand for the electron-nucleus, interelectronic, and two electron center of mass coordinates, respectively, have been obtained. The energetic ordering of the excited states and the fulfillment of the Hund's rules is analyzed systematically along the isoelectronic series in terms of the electron-electron and electron-nucleus potential energies. The effects of electronic correlations have been systematically studied by comparing the correlated results with the corresponding noncorrelated ones. All the calculations have been done by using the variational Monte Carlo method.

  10. Excitability in Dictyostelium development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwab, David

    2013-03-01

    Discovering how populations of cells reliably develop into complex multi-cellular structures is a key challenge in modern developmental biology. This requires an understanding of how networks at the single-cell level, when combined with intercellular signaling and environmental cues, give rise to the collective behaviors observed in cellular populations. I will present work in collaboration with the Gregor lab, showing that the signal-relay response of starved cells of the amoebae Dictyostelium discoideum can be well modeled as an excitable system. This is in contrast to existing models of the network that postulate a feed-forward cascade. I then extend the signal-relay model to describe how spatial gradient sensing may be achieved via excitability. One potential advantage of relying on feedback for gradient sensing is in preventing ``cheaters'' that do not produce signals from taking over the population. I then combine these models of single-cell signaling and chemotaxis to perform large-scale agent-based simulations of aggregating populations. This allows direct study of how variations in single-cell dynamics modify population behavior. In order to further test this model, I use the results of a screen for mutant cell lines that exhibit altered collective patterns. Finally, I use an existing FRET movie database of starved cell populations at varying cell densities and dilution rates to study heterogeneity in repeated spatio-temporal activity patterns.

  11. Front interaction induces excitable behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra-Rivas, P.; Matías, M. A.; Colet, P.; Gelens, L.; Walgraef, D.; Gomila, D.

    2017-02-01

    Spatially extended systems can support local transient excitations in which just a part of the system is excited. The mechanisms reported so far are local excitability and excitation of a localized structure. Here we introduce an alternative mechanism based on the coexistence of two homogeneous stable states and spatial coupling. We show the existence of a threshold for perturbations of the homogeneous state. Subthreshold perturbations decay exponentially. Superthreshold perturbations induce the emergence of a long-lived structure formed by two back to back fronts that join the two homogeneous states. While in typical excitability the trajectory follows the remnants of a limit cycle, here reinjection is provided by front interaction, such that fronts slowly approach each other until eventually annihilating. This front-mediated mechanism shows that extended systems with no oscillatory regimes can display excitability.

  12. Fission fragment excited laser system

    DOEpatents

    McArthur, David A.; Tollefsrud, Philip B.

    1976-01-01

    A laser system and method for exciting lasing action in a molecular gas lasing medium which includes cooling the lasing medium to a temperature below about 150 K and injecting fission fragments through the lasing medium so as to preferentially excite low lying vibrational levels of the medium and to cause population inversions therein. The cooled gas lasing medium should have a mass areal density of about 5 .times. 10.sup.-.sup.3 grams/square centimeter, relaxation times of greater than 50 microseconds, and a broad range of excitable vibrational levels which are excitable by molecular collisions.

  13. Optically excited states in positronium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, R. H.; Ziock, Klaus P.; Magnotta, F.; Dermer, Charles D.; Failor, R. A.; Jones, K. M.

    1990-01-01

    Optical excitation are reported of the 1 3S-2 3P transition in positronium, and a second excitation from n=2 to higher n states. The experiment used light from two pulsed dye lasers. Changes in the positronium annihilation rate during and after the laser pulse were used to deduce the excited state populations. The n=2 level was found to be saturable and excitable to a substantial fraction of n=2 positronium to higher levels. Preliminary spectroscopic measurements were performed on n=14 and n=15 positronium.

  14. Structures, energies, and spin-spin coupling constants of methyl-substituted 1,3-diborata-2,4-diphosphoniocyclobutanes: four-member B-P-B-P rings B2P2(CH3)(n)H(8-n), with n = 0, 1, 2, 4.

    PubMed

    Del Bene, Janet E; Alkorta, Ibon; Elguero, José

    2011-09-29

    An ab initio study has been carried out to determine the structures, relative stabilities, and spin-spin coupling constants of a set of 17 methyl-substituted 1,3-diborata-2,4-diphosphoniocyclobutanes B(2)P(2)(CH(3))(n)H(8-n), for n = 0, 1, 2, 4, with four-member B-P-B-P rings. The B-P-B-P rings are puckered in a butterfly conformation, in agreement with experimental data for related molecules. Isomers with the CH(3) group bonded to P are more stable than those with CH(3) bonded to B. If there is only one methyl group or if two methyl groups are bonded to two different P or B atoms, isomers with equatorial bonds are more stable than those with axial bonds. However, when two methyl groups are present, the gem isomers are the most stable for molecules B(2)P(2)(CH(3))(2)H(6) with P-C and B-C bonds, respectively. Transition structures present barriers to the interconversion of two equilibrium structures or to the interchange of axial and equatorial positions in the same isomer. These barriers are very low for the isomer with two methyl groups bonded to B in axial positions for the isomer with four axial bonds and for the isomer with geminal B-C bonds at both B atoms. Coupling constants (1)J(B-P), (1)J(P-C), (1)J(B-C), (2)J(P-P), and (3)J(P-C) are capable of providing structural information. They are sensitive to the number of methyl groups present and can discriminate between axial, equatorial, and geminal bonds, although not all do this to the same extent. The one-bond coupling constants (1)J(B-P), (1)J(P-C), and (1)J(B-C) are similar in equilibrium and transition structures, but (3)J(P-C) and (2)J(P-P) are not. These coupling constants and those of the corresponding fluoro-derivatives of the 1,3-diborata-2,4-diphosphoniocyclobutanes demonstrate the great sensitivity of phosphorus coupling to structural and electronic effects.

  15. The Excitable Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Offner, Franklin F.

    1972-01-01

    The model of the excitable membrane assumes common channels for Na+ and K+; the two ion species interact within the pores through their electrostatic forces. The electric field varies across the membrane and with time, as a result of ionic redistribution. Ionic flow is primarily controlled by energy barriers at the two interfaces and by Ca++ adsorption at the external interface. When the membrane is polarized, the high electric field at the external interface acting on the membrane fixed charge keeps the effective channel diameter small, so that only dihydrated ions can cross the interface. The higher energy required to partially dehydrate Na+ accounts for its lower permeability when polarized. Depolarized, the channel entrance can expand, permitting quadrihydrated ions to pass; the large initial Na+ flow is the result of the large concentration ratio across the interface. The effect at the internal interface is symmetric; Na+ crosses with greater difficulty when the membrane is depolarized. Na+ inactivation occurs when the ion distribution within the membrane has assumed its new steady-state value. Calculations based on parameters consistent with physicochemical data agree generally with a wide range of experiments. The model does not obey the two fundamental Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) postulates (independence principle, ion flow proportional to thermodynamic potential). In several instances the model predicts experimental results which are not predicted by the HH equations. ImagesFIGURE 12 PMID:4655662

  16. Double excitations in finite systems.

    PubMed

    Romaniello, P; Sangalli, D; Berger, J A; Sottile, F; Molinari, L G; Reining, L; Onida, G

    2009-01-28

    Time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) is widely used in the study of linear response properties of finite systems. However, there are difficulties in properly describing excited states, which have double- and higher-excitation characters, which are particularly important in molecules with an open-shell ground state. These states would be described if the exact TDDFT kernel were used; however, within the adiabatic approximation to the exchange-correlation (xc) kernel, the calculated excitation energies have a strict single-excitation character and are fewer than the real ones. A frequency-dependent xc kernel could create extra poles in the response function, which would describe states with a multiple-excitation character. We introduce a frequency-dependent xc kernel, which can reproduce, within TDDFT, double excitations in finite systems. In order to achieve this, we use the Bethe-Salpeter equation with a dynamically screened Coulomb interaction W(omega), which can describe these excitations, and from this we obtain the xc kernel. Using a two-electron model system, we show that the frequency dependence of W does indeed introduce the double excitations that are instead absent in any static approximation of the electron-hole screening.

  17. Excited waves in shear layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bechert, D. W.

    1982-01-01

    The generation of instability waves in free shear layers is investigated. The model assumes an infinitesimally thin shear layer shed from a semi-infinite plate which is exposed to sound excitation. The acoustical shear layer excitation by a source further away from the plate edge in the downstream direction is very weak while upstream from the plate edge the excitation is relatively efficient. A special solution is given for the source at the plate edge. The theory is then extended to two streams on both sides of the shear layer having different velocities and densities. Furthermore, the excitation of a shear layer in a channel is calculated. A reference quantity is found for the magnitude of the excited instability waves. For a comparison with measurements, numerical computations of the velocity field outside the shear layer were carried out.

  18. Effect of temperature of Li2O-Al2O3-TiO2-P2O5 solid-state electrolyte coating process on the performance of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yu-Feng; Zhao, Shi-Xi; Xu, Ya-Hui; Nan, Ce-Wen

    2015-11-01

    Electrochemical performance of spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 (LNMO) at elevated temperature is improved by solid-state electrolyte Li2O-Al2O3-TiO2-P2O5 (LATP) coating. Crystallinity and thickness of coatings are controlled by adjusting the coating process at two different temperatures (550 and 650 °C). 2.0 wt.% LATP-modified LNMO cathode materials obtained at 650 °C exhibits remarkably promoted electrochemical performance compared to that of the pristine one in terms of cycling and rate ability at 55 °C. The enhanced performance of the surface-modified samples can be accounted for the suppressed side reactions between the cathode materials and electrolyte solution. What is more important is that LATP cannot only protect the active materials from electrolyte solution but also improve Li+ mobility. The higher crystallinity of glass-ceramic LATP coating layer with thinner thickness implies more unobstructed, stable and shorter diffusion path of Li+ transport. It is found that the coating process is in favor of the disordered to ordered phase transition, implying that the heating process of coating plays a role of anneal as well.

  19. Vibrational excitation induces double reaction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kai; Leung, Lydie; Lim, Tingbin; Ning, Zhanyu; Polanyi, John C

    2014-12-23

    Electron-induced reaction at metal surfaces is currently the subject of extensive study. Here, we broaden the range of experimentation to a comparison of vibrational excitation with electronic excitation, for reaction of the same molecule at the same clean metal surface. In a previous study of electron-induced reaction by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), we examined the dynamics of the concurrent breaking of the two C-I bonds of ortho-diiodobenzene physisorbed on Cu(110). The energy of the incident electron was near the electronic excitation threshold of E0=1.0 eV required to induce this single-electron process. STM has been employed in the present work to study the reaction dynamics at the substantially lower incident electron energies of 0.3 eV, well below the electronic excitation threshold. The observed increase in reaction rate with current was found to be fourth-order, indicative of multistep reagent vibrational excitation, in contrast to the first-order rate dependence found earlier for electronic excitation. The change in mode of excitation was accompanied by altered reaction dynamics, evidenced by a different pattern of binding of the chemisorbed products to the copper surface. We have modeled these altered reaction dynamics by exciting normal modes of vibration that distort the C-I bonds of the physisorbed reagent. Using the same ab initio ground potential-energy surface as in the prior work on electronic excitation, but with only vibrational excitation of the physisorbed reagent in the asymmetric stretch mode of C-I bonds, we obtained the observed alteration in reaction dynamics.

  20. Complex-scaling treatment for quantum entanglement in doubly excited helium atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chien-Hao; Ho, Yew Kam

    2015-05-01

    Recently, we have investigated entanglement measures in natural atomic systems that involve two highly correlated indistinguishable spin-1/2 fermions (electrons). Linear entropy and von Neumann entropy were calculated for spatial (electron-electron orbital) entanglement measures for ground and singly excited bound states in two-electron atomic systems, such as He, H- and Ps-. In our present work, we carry out an investigation on entanglement in doubly excited resonance states of helium. Since resonance states are lying in the scattering continuum, their energies are no longer bound by the variational theorem; we apply the complex scaling method to solve the complex energy pole with which the resonance energy and resonance width are deduced. Hylleraas-type wave functions are used to consider correlation effects. Once the wave function for a doubly excited state is obtained, we apply the Schmidt decomposition method to calculate the linear entropy and von Neumann entropy for the doubly excited 2s2, 2 s3 s, 2p2, 3s2, and 3p21Se resonance states in the helium atom. Work supported by the Ministry of Science and Technology of Taiwan.

  1. Coulomb excitations of monolayer germanene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Po-Hsin; Chiu, Yu-Huang; Wu, Jhao-Ying; Shyu, Feng-Lin; Lin, Ming-Fa

    2017-01-01

    The feature-rich electronic excitations of monolayer germanene lie in the significant spin-orbit coupling and the buckled structure. The collective and single-particle excitations are diversified by the magnitude and direction of transferred momentum, the Fermi energy and the gate voltage. There are four kinds of plasmon modes, according to the unique frequency- and momentum-dependent phase diagrams. They behave as two-dimensional acoustic modes at long wavelength. However, for the larger momenta, they might change into another kind of undamped plasmons, become the seriously suppressed modes in the heavy intraband e–h excitations, keep the same undamped plasmons, or decline and then vanish in the strong interband e–h excitations. Germanene, silicene and graphene are quite different from one another in the main features of the diverse plasmon modes.

  2. Coulomb excitations of monolayer germanene

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Po-Hsin; Chiu, Yu-Huang; Wu, Jhao-Ying; Shyu, Feng-Lin; Lin, Ming-Fa

    2017-01-01

    The feature-rich electronic excitations of monolayer germanene lie in the significant spin-orbit coupling and the buckled structure. The collective and single-particle excitations are diversified by the magnitude and direction of transferred momentum, the Fermi energy and the gate voltage. There are four kinds of plasmon modes, according to the unique frequency- and momentum-dependent phase diagrams. They behave as two-dimensional acoustic modes at long wavelength. However, for the larger momenta, they might change into another kind of undamped plasmons, become the seriously suppressed modes in the heavy intraband e–h excitations, keep the same undamped plasmons, or decline and then vanish in the strong interband e–h excitations. Germanene, silicene and graphene are quite different from one another in the main features of the diverse plasmon modes. PMID:28091555

  3. Excitations of strange bottom baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woloshyn, R. M.

    2016-09-01

    The ground-state and first-excited-state masses of Ωb and Ω_{bb} baryons are calculated in lattice QCD using dynamical 2 + 1 flavour gauge fields. A set of baryon operators employing different combinations of smeared quark fields was used in the framework of the variational method. Results for radial excitation energies were confirmed by carrying out a supplementary multiexponential fitting analysis. Comparison is made with quark model calculations.

  4. 46 CFR 111.12-3 - Excitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS Generator Construction and Circuits § 111.12-3 Excitation. In general, excitation must meet... generator unless it is provided with a permanent magnet or a residual-magnetism-type exciter that has...

  5. 46 CFR 111.12-3 - Excitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS Generator Construction and Circuits § 111.12-3 Excitation. In general, excitation must meet... generator unless it is provided with a permanent magnet or a residual-magnetism-type exciter that has...

  6. 46 CFR 111.12-3 - Excitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS Generator Construction and Circuits § 111.12-3 Excitation. In general, excitation must meet... generator unless it is provided with a permanent magnet or a residual-magnetism-type exciter that has...

  7. 46 CFR 111.12-3 - Excitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS Generator Construction and Circuits § 111.12-3 Excitation. In general, excitation must meet... generator unless it is provided with a permanent magnet or a residual-magnetism-type exciter that has...

  8. 46 CFR 111.12-3 - Excitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS Generator Construction and Circuits § 111.12-3 Excitation. In general, excitation must meet... generator unless it is provided with a permanent magnet or a residual-magnetism-type exciter that has...

  9. Electrostatic Tuning of Cellular Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Börjesson, Sara I.; Parkkari, Teija; Hammarström, Sven; Elinder, Fredrik

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Voltage-gated ion channels regulate the electric activity of excitable tissues, such as the heart and brain. Therefore, treatment for conditions of disturbed excitability is often based on drugs that target ion channels. In this study of a voltage-gated K channel, we propose what we believe to be a novel pharmacological mechanism for how to regulate channel activity. Charged lipophilic substances can tune channel opening, and consequently excitability, by an electrostatic interaction with the channel's voltage sensors. The direction of the effect depends on the charge of the substance. This was shown by three compounds sharing an arachidonyl backbone but bearing different charge: arachidonic acid, methyl arachidonate, and arachidonyl amine. Computer simulations of membrane excitability showed that small changes in the voltage dependence of Na and K channels have prominent impact on excitability and the tendency for repetitive firing. For instance, a shift in the voltage dependence of a K channel with −5 or +5 mV corresponds to a threefold increase or decrease in K channel density, respectively. We suggest that electrostatic tuning of ion channel activity constitutes a novel and powerful pharmacological approach with which to affect cellular excitability. PMID:20141752

  10. Electron-excited molecule interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Christophorou, L.G. Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN . Dept. of Physics)

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the limited but significant knowledge to date on electron scattering from vibrationally/rotationally excited molecules and electron scattering from and electron impact ionization of electronically excited molecules is briefly summarized and discussed. The profound effects of the internal energy content of a molecule on its electron attachment properties are highlighted focusing in particular on electron attachment to vibrationally/rotationally and to electronically excited molecules. The limited knowledge to date on electron-excited molecule interactions clearly shows that the cross sections for certain electron-molecule collision processes can be very different from those involving ground state molecules. For example, optically enhanced electron attachment studies have shown that electron attachment to electronically excited molecules can occur with cross sections 10{sup 6} to 10{sup 7} times larger compared to ground state molecules. The study of electron-excited molecule interactions offers many experimental and theoretical challenges and opportunities and is both of fundamental and technological significance. 54 refs., 15 figs.

  11. Redox Control of Cardiac Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Nitin T.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been associated with various human diseases, and considerable attention has been paid to investigate their physiological effects. Various ROS are synthesized in the mitochondria and accumulate in the cytoplasm if the cellular antioxidant defense mechanism fails. The critical balance of this ROS synthesis and antioxidant defense systems is termed the redox system of the cell. Various cardiovascular diseases have also been affected by redox to different degrees. ROS have been indicated as both detrimental and protective, via different cellular pathways, for cardiac myocyte functions, electrophysiology, and pharmacology. Mostly, the ROS functions depend on the type and amount of ROS synthesized. While the literature clearly indicates ROS effects on cardiac contractility, their effects on cardiac excitability are relatively under appreciated. Cardiac excitability depends on the functions of various cardiac sarcolemal or mitochondrial ion channels carrying various depolarizing or repolarizing currents that also maintain cellular ionic homeostasis. ROS alter the functions of these ion channels to various degrees to determine excitability by affecting the cellular resting potential and the morphology of the cardiac action potential. Thus, redox balance regulates cardiac excitability, and under pathological regulation, may alter action potential propagation to cause arrhythmia. Understanding how redox affects cellular excitability may lead to potential prophylaxis or treatment for various arrhythmias. This review will focus on the studies of redox and cardiac excitation. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 432–468. PMID:22897788

  12. First excited states in doubly-odd {sup 110}Sb: Smooth band termination in the A {approx} 110 region

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, G.J.; Fossan, D.B.; Thorslund, I.

    1996-11-01

    Excited states have been identified for the first time in {sup 110}Sb in a comprehensive series of {gamma}-spectroscopy experiments, including recoil-mass and neutron-field measurements. Three high-spin decoupled bands with configurations based on 2p-2h excitations across the Z = 50 shell gap, are observed to show the features of smooth band termination, the first such observation in an odd-odd nucleus. The yrast intruder band has been connected to the low spin levels and is tentatively identified up to its predicred termination at I{sup {pi}} = (45{sup +}). Detailed configuration assignments are made through comparison with configuration-dependent cranked Nilsson-Strutinsky calculations; excellent agreement with experiment is obtained. The systematic occurrence of smoothly terminating bands in the neighboring isotopes is discussed.

  13. Excitation with quantum light. I. Exciting a harmonic oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carreño, J. C. López; Laussy, F. P.

    2016-12-01

    We present a two-part study of the excitation of an optical target by quantum light. In this first part, we introduce the problematic and address the first case of interest, that of exciting the quantum harmonic oscillator, corresponding to, e.g., a single-mode passive cavity or a noninteracting bosonic field. We introduce a mapping of the Hilbert space that allows to chart usefully the accessible regions. We then consider the quantum excitation from single-photon sources in the form of a two-level system under various regimes of (classical) pumping: incoherent, coherent, and in the Mollow triplet regime. We close this first part with an overview of the material to be covered in the subsequent work.

  14. Electron impact cross sections for the 2,2P state excitation of lithium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vuskovic, L.; Trajmar, S.; Register, D. F.

    1982-01-01

    Electron impact excitation of the 2p 2P state of Li was studied at 10, 20, 60, 100, 150 and 200 eV. Relative differential cross sections in the angular range 3-120 deg were measured and then normalized to the absolute scale by using the optical f value. Integral and momentum transfer cross sections were obtained by extrapolating the differential cross sections to 0 deg and to 180 deg. The question of normalizing electron-metal-atom collision cross sections in general was examined and the method of normalization to optical f values in particular was investigated in detail. It has been concluded that the extrapolation of the apparent generalized oscillator strength (obtained from the measured differential cross sections) to the zero momentum transfer limit with an expression using even powers of the momentum transfer and normalization of the limit to the optical f value yields reliable absolute cross sections.

  15. Sadomasochism, sexual excitement, and perversion.

    PubMed

    Kernberg, O F

    1991-01-01

    Sadomasochism, an ingredient of infantile sexuality, is an essential part of normal sexual functioning and love relations, and of the very nature of sexual excitement. Sadomasochistic elements are also present in all sexual perversions. Sadomasochism starts out as the potential for erotic masochism in both sexes, and represents a very early capacity to link aggression with the libidinal elements of sexual excitement. Sexual excitement may be considered a basic affect that overcomes primitive splitting of love and hatred. Erotic desire is a more mature form of sexual excitement. Psychoanalytic exploration makes it possible to uncover the unconscious components of sexual excitement: wishes for symbiotic fusion and for aggressive penetration and intermingling; bisexual identifications; the desire to transgress oedipal prohibitions and the secretiveness of the primal scene, and to violate the boundaries of a teasing and withholding object. The relation between these wishes and the development of erotic idealization processes in both sexes is explored in the context of a critical review of the pertinent psychoanalytic literature.

  16. Indirect excitation of ultrafast demagnetization

    PubMed Central

    Vodungbo, Boris; Tudu, Bahrati; Perron, Jonathan; Delaunay, Renaud; Müller, Leonard; Berntsen, Magnus H.; Grübel, Gerhard; Malinowski, Grégory; Weier, Christian; Gautier, Julien; Lambert, Guillaume; Zeitoun, Philippe; Gutt, Christian; Jal, Emmanuelle; Reid, Alexander H.; Granitzka, Patrick W.; Jaouen, Nicolas; Dakovski, Georgi L.; Moeller, Stefan; Minitti, Michael P.; Mitra, Ankush; Carron, Sebastian; Pfau, Bastian; von Korff Schmising, Clemens; Schneider, Michael; Eisebitt, Stefan; Lüning, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Does the excitation of ultrafast magnetization require direct interaction between the photons of the optical pump pulse and the magnetic layer? Here, we demonstrate unambiguously that this is not the case. For this we have studied the magnetization dynamics of a ferromagnetic cobalt/palladium multilayer capped by an IR-opaque aluminum layer. Upon excitation with an intense femtosecond-short IR laser pulse, the film exhibits the classical ultrafast demagnetization phenomenon although only a negligible number of IR photons penetrate the aluminum layer. In comparison with an uncapped cobalt/palladium reference film, the initial demagnetization of the capped film occurs with a delayed onset and at a slower rate. Both observations are qualitatively in line with energy transport from the aluminum layer into the underlying magnetic film by the excited, hot electrons of the aluminum film. Our data thus confirm recent theoretical predictions. PMID:26733106

  17. Indirect excitation of ultrafast demagnetization.

    PubMed

    Vodungbo, Boris; Tudu, Bharati; Tudu, Bahrati; Perron, Jonathan; Delaunay, Renaud; Müller, Leonard; Berntsen, Magnus H; Grübel, Gerhard; Malinowski, Grégory; Weier, Christian; Gautier, Julien; Lambert, Guillaume; Zeitoun, Philippe; Gutt, Christian; Jal, Emmanuelle; Reid, Alexander H; Granitzka, Patrick W; Jaouen, Nicolas; Dakovski, Georgi L; Moeller, Stefan; Minitti, Michael P; Mitra, Ankush; Carron, Sebastian; Pfau, Bastian; von Korff Schmising, Clemens; Schneider, Michael; Eisebitt, Stefan; Lüning, Jan

    2016-01-06

    Does the excitation of ultrafast magnetization require direct interaction between the photons of the optical pump pulse and the magnetic layer? Here, we demonstrate unambiguously that this is not the case. For this we have studied the magnetization dynamics of a ferromagnetic cobalt/palladium multilayer capped by an IR-opaque aluminum layer. Upon excitation with an intense femtosecond-short IR laser pulse, the film exhibits the classical ultrafast demagnetization phenomenon although only a negligible number of IR photons penetrate the aluminum layer. In comparison with an uncapped cobalt/palladium reference film, the initial demagnetization of the capped film occurs with a delayed onset and at a slower rate. Both observations are qualitatively in line with energy transport from the aluminum layer into the underlying magnetic film by the excited, hot electrons of the aluminum film. Our data thus confirm recent theoretical predictions.

  18. Stochastic excitation of stellar oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samadi, Reza

    2001-05-01

    Since more than about thirty years, solar oscillations are thought to be excited stochastically by the turbulent motions in the solar convective zone. It is currently believed that oscillations of stars lower than 2 solar masses - which possess an upper convective zone - are excited stochastically by turbulent convection in their outer layers. Providing that accurate measurements of the oscillation amplitudes and damping rates are available it is possible to evaluate the power injected into the modes and thus - by comparison with the observations - to constrain current theories. A recent theoretical work (Samadi & Goupil, 2001; Samadi et al., 2001) supplements and reinforces the theory of stochastic excitation of star vibrations. This process was generalized to a global description of the turbulent state of their convective zone. The comparison between observation and theory, thus generalized, will allow to better know the turbulent spectrum of stars, and this in particular thanks to the COROT mission.

  19. Excitation optimization for damage detection

    SciTech Connect

    Bement, Matthew T; Bewley, Thomas R

    2009-01-01

    A technique is developed to answer the important question: 'Given limited system response measurements and ever-present physical limits on the level of excitation, what excitation should be provided to a system to make damage most detectable?' Specifically, a method is presented for optimizing excitations that maximize the sensitivity of output measurements to perturbations in damage-related parameters estimated with an extended Kalman filter. This optimization is carried out in a computationally efficient manner using adjoint-based optimization and causes the innovations term in the extended Kalman filter to be larger in the presence of estimation errors, which leads to a better estimate of the damage-related parameters in question. The technique is demonstrated numerically on a nonlinear 2 DOF system, where a significant improvement in the damage-related parameter estimation is observed.

  20. Indirect excitation of ultrafast demagnetization

    DOE PAGES

    Vodungbo, Boris; Tudu, Bahrati; Perron, Jonathan; ...

    2016-01-06

    Does the excitation of ultrafast magnetization require direct interaction between the photons of the optical pump pulse and the magnetic layer? Here, we demonstrate unambiguously that this is not the case. For this we have studied the magnetization dynamics of a ferromagnetic cobalt/palladium multilayer capped by an IR-opaque aluminum layer. Upon excitation with an intense femtosecond-short IR laser pulse, the film exhibits the classical ultrafast demagnetization phenomenon although only a negligible number of IR photons penetrate the aluminum layer. In comparison with an uncapped cobalt/palladium reference film, the initial demagnetization of the capped film occurs with a delayed onset andmore » at a slower rate. Both observations are qualitatively in line with energy transport from the aluminum layer into the underlying magnetic film by the excited, hot electrons of the aluminum film. As a result, our data thus confirm recent theoretical predictions.« less

  1. Indirect excitation of ultrafast demagnetization

    SciTech Connect

    Vodungbo, Boris; Tudu, Bahrati; Perron, Jonathan; Delaunay, Renaud; Müller, Leonard; Berntsen, Magnus H.; Grübel, Gerhard; Malinowski, Grégory; Weier, Christian; Gautier, Julien; Lambert, Guillaume; Zeitoun, Philippe; Gutt, Christian; Jal, Emmanuelle; Reid, Alexander H.; Granitzka, Patrick W.; Jaouen, Nicolas; Dakovski, Georgi L.; Moeller, Stefan; Minitti, Michael P.; Mitra, Ankush; Carron, Sebastian; Pfau, Bastian; von Korff Schmising, Clemens; Schneider, Michael; Eisebitt, Stefan; Lüning, Jan

    2016-01-06

    Does the excitation of ultrafast magnetization require direct interaction between the photons of the optical pump pulse and the magnetic layer? Here, we demonstrate unambiguously that this is not the case. For this we have studied the magnetization dynamics of a ferromagnetic cobalt/palladium multilayer capped by an IR-opaque aluminum layer. Upon excitation with an intense femtosecond-short IR laser pulse, the film exhibits the classical ultrafast demagnetization phenomenon although only a negligible number of IR photons penetrate the aluminum layer. In comparison with an uncapped cobalt/palladium reference film, the initial demagnetization of the capped film occurs with a delayed onset and at a slower rate. Both observations are qualitatively in line with energy transport from the aluminum layer into the underlying magnetic film by the excited, hot electrons of the aluminum film. As a result, our data thus confirm recent theoretical predictions.

  2. Recurrent Excitation in Neocortical Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Rodney J.; Koch, Christof; Mahowald, Misha; Martin, Kevan A. C.; Suarez, Humbert H.

    1995-08-01

    The majority of synapses in the mammalian cortex originate from cortical neurons. Indeed, the largest input to cortical cells comes from neighboring excitatory cells. However, most models of cortical development and processing do not reflect the anatomy and physiology of feedback excitation and are restricted to serial feedforward excitation. This report describes how populations of neurons in cat visual cortex can use excitatory feedback, characterized as an effective "network conductance," to amplify their feedforward input signals and demonstrates how neuronal discharge can be kept proportional to stimulus strength despite strong, recurrent connections that threaten to cause runaway excitation. These principles are incorporated into models of cortical direction and orientation selectivity that emphasize the basic design principles of cortical architectures.

  3. Modeling excitable systems: Reentrant tachycardia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lancaster, Jarrett L.; Hellen, Edward H.; Leise, Esther M.

    2010-01-01

    Excitable membranes are an important type of nonlinear dynamical system, and their study can be used to provide a connection between physical and biological circuits. We discuss two models of excitable membranes important in cardiac and neural tissues. One model is based on the Fitzhugh-Nagumo equations, and the other is based on a three-transistor excitable circuit. We construct a circuit that simulates reentrant tachycardia and its treatment by surgical ablation. This project is appropriate for advanced undergraduates as a laboratory capstone project or as a senior thesis or honors project and can also be a collaborative project, with one student responsible for the computational predictions and another for the circuit construction and measurements.

  4. Calculation of molecular excitation rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, George

    1993-01-01

    State-to-state collisional excitation rates for interstellar molecules observed by radio astronomers continue to be required to interpret observed line intensities in terms of local temperatures and densities. A problem of particular interest is collisional excitation of water which is important for modeling the observed interstellar masers. In earlier work supported by a different NASA Grant, excitation of water in collisions with He atoms was studied; after many years of successively more refined calculations that problem now seems to be well understood, and discrepancies with earlier experimental data for related (pressure broadening) phenomena are believed to reflect experimental errors. Because of interstellar abundances, excitation by H2, the dominant interstellar species, is much more important than excitation by He, although it has been argued that rates for excitation by these are similar. Under the current grant theoretical study of this problem has begun which is greatly complicated by the additional degrees of freedom which must be included both in determining the interaction potential and also in the molecular scattering calculation. We have now computed the interaction forces for nearly a thousand molecular geometries and are close to having an acceptable global fit to these points which is necessary for the molecular dynamics calculations. Also, extensive modifications have been made to the molecular scattering code, MOLSCAT. These included coding the rotational basis sets and coupling matrix elements required for collisions of an asymmetric top with a linear rotor. A new method for numerical solution of the coupled equations has been incorporated. Because of the long-ranged nature of the water-hydrogen interaction it is necessary to integrate the equations to rather large intermolecular separations, and the integration methods previously available in MOLSCAT are not ideal for such cases. However, the method used by Alexander in his HIBRIDON code is

  5. Excited-to-excited-state scattering using weak measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    U, Satya Sainadh; Narayanan, Andal

    2015-11-01

    Weak measurements are a subset of measurement processes in quantum mechanics wherein the system, which is being measured, interacts very weakly with the measuring apparatus. Measurement values of observables undergoing a weak interaction and their amplification are concepts that have sharpened our understanding of interaction processes in quantum mechanics. Recent experiments show that naturally occurring processes such as resonance fluorescence from excited states of an atom can exhibit weak value amplification effect. In this paper we theoretically analyze the process of elastic resonance fluorescence from a V -type three-level atomic system, using the well-known Weiskopff-Wigner (WW) theory of spontaneous emission. Within this theory we show that a weak interaction regime can be identified and for suitable choices of initial and final excited states the mean scattering time between these states show an amplification effect during interaction with the vacuum bath modes of the electromagnetic field. We thus show that a system-bath interaction can show weak value amplification. Using our theory we reproduce the published experimental results carried out in such a system. More importantly, our theory can calculate scattering time scales in elastic resonance scattering between multiple excited states of a single atom or between common excited state configurations of interacting multiatom systems.

  6. Directional excitation without breaking reciprocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramezani, Hamidreza; Dubois, Marc; Wang, Yuan; Shen, Y. Ron; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-09-01

    We propose a mechanism for directional excitation without breaking reciprocity. This is achieved by embedding an impedance matched parity-time symmetric potential in a three-port system. The amplitude distribution within the gain and loss regions is strongly influenced by the direction of the incoming field. Consequently, the excitation of the third port is contingent on the direction of incidence while transmission in the main channel is immune. Our design improves the four-port directional coupler scheme, as there is no need to implement an anechoic termination to one of the ports.

  7. Pseudorandom selective excitation in NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walls, Jamie D.; Coomes, Alexandra

    2011-09-01

    In this work, average Hamiltonian theory is used to study selective excitation under a series of small flip-angle θ-pulses θ ≪ {π}/{3} applied either periodically [corresponding to the DANTE pulse sequence] or aperiodically to a spin-1/2 system. First, an average Hamiltonian description of the DANTE pulse sequence is developed that is valid for frequencies either at or very far from integer multiples of {1}/{τ}, where τ is the interpulse delay. For aperiodic excitation, a single resonance, νsel, can be selectively excited if the θ-pulse phases are modulated in concert with the interpulse delays. The conditions where average Hamiltonian theory can be accurately applied to describe the dynamics under aperiodic selective pulses, which are referred to as pseudorandom-DANTE or p-DANTE sequences, are similar to those found for the DANTE sequence. Signal averaging over different p-DANTE sequences improves the apparent selectivity at νsel by reducing the excitations at other frequencies. Experimental demonstrations of p-DANTE sequences and comparisons with the theory are presented.

  8. Predictions for Excited Strange Baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Fernando, Ishara P.; Goity, Jose L.

    2016-04-01

    An assessment is made of predictions for excited hyperon masses which follow from flavor symmetry and consistency with a 1/N c expansion of QCD. Such predictions are based on presently established baryonic resonances. Low lying hyperon resonances which do not seem to fit into the proposed scheme are discussed.

  9. Elementary Excitations in Quantum Liquids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pines, David

    1981-01-01

    Discusses elementary excitations and their role in condensed matter physics, focusing on quantum plasma, helium liquids, and superconductors. Considers research primarily conducted in the 1950s and concludes with a brief survey of some closely related further developments. (Author/JN)

  10. Pattern Formation in Excitable Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, Alexander S.

    1997-03-01

    In this talk I give a short review of the history and the current state of theoretical research on spiral wave patterns in excitable media. I start with the theoretical model of wave propagation in excitable media proposed in 1946 by Wiener and Rosenblueth(N. Wiener and A. Rosenblueth, The mathematical formulation of the problem of conduction of impulses in a network of connected excitable elements, specifically in cardiac muscle, Arch. Inst. Cardiol. Mexico 16 (1946) 205). This model describes spiral waves rotating around obstacles. I show how, by taking additionally into account curvature effects and gradual recovery of the medium after passage of an excitation wave, the model is generalized to describe freely rotating spiral waves and the breakup which produces spirals. In the context of this kinematic model, complex dynamics of spiral waves, i.e. their meandering, drift and resonance, is discussed. Instabilities of spiral waves in confined geometries, i.e. inside a circular region and on a sphere, are analyzed. At the end, I show how spiral waves in such systems can be efficiently controlled by application of a delayed global feedback. The talk is based on the review paper(A. S. Mikhailov, V. A. Davydov, and V. S. Zykov, Complex dynamics of spiral waves and motion of curves, Physica D 70 (1994) 1) and the monograph(A. S. Mikhailov, Foundations of Synergetics I, 2nd revised edition (Springer, Berlin, 1994)).

  11. Launch Excitement with Water Rockets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanchez, Juan Carlos; Penick, John

    2007-01-01

    Explosions and fires--these are what many students are waiting for in science classes. And when they do occur, students pay attention. While we can't entertain our students with continual mayhem, we can catch their attention and cater to their desires for excitement by saying, "Let's make rockets." In this activity, students make simple, reusable…

  12. Fast excitation variable period wiggler

    SciTech Connect

    van Steenbergen, A.; Gallardo, J.; Romano, T.; Woodle, M.

    1991-01-01

    The design of an easily stackable, variable period length, fast excitation driven wiggler, making use of geometrically alternating substacks of Vanadium Permandur ferromagnetic laminations, interspaced with conductive, non magnetic, laminations which act as eddy current induced field reflectors,'' is discussed and experimental results obtained with short wiggler models are presented.

  13. Fast excitation variable period wiggler

    SciTech Connect

    van Steenbergen, A.; Gallardo, J.; Romano, T.; Woodle, M.

    1991-12-31

    The design of an easily stackable, variable period length, fast excitation driven wiggler, making use of geometrically alternating substacks of Vanadium Permandur ferromagnetic laminations, interspaced with conductive, non magnetic, laminations which act as eddy current induced ``field reflectors,`` is discussed and experimental results obtained with short wiggler models are presented.

  14. Perceptual Load Alters Visual Excitability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carmel, David; Thorne, Jeremy D.; Rees, Geraint; Lavie, Nilli

    2011-01-01

    Increasing perceptual load reduces the processing of visual stimuli outside the focus of attention, but the mechanism underlying these effects remains unclear. Here we tested an account attributing the effects of perceptual load to modulations of visual cortex excitability. In contrast to stimulus competition accounts, which propose that load…

  15. Communicating the Excitement of Science

    ScienceCinema

    Michael Turner

    2016-07-12

    In this talk (which will include some exciting science) I will discuss some lessons I have learned about communicating science to scientists (in my own field and others), students, the public, the press, and policy makers in giving 500+ colloquia and seminars, 300+ public lectures and many informal presentations (including cocktail parties).

  16. Exciting cytoskeleton-membrane waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlomovitz, R.; Gov, N. S.

    2008-10-01

    Propagating waves on the surface of cells, over many micrometers, involve active forces. We investigate here the mechanical excitation of such waves when the membrane is perturbed by an external oscillatory force. The external perturbation may trigger the propagation of such waves away from the force application. This scheme is then suggested as a method to probe the properties of the excitable medium of the cell, and learn about the mechanisms that drive the wave propagation. We then apply these ideas to a specific model of active cellular membrane waves, demonstrating how the response of the system to the external perturbation depends on the properties of the model. The most outstanding feature that we find is that the excited waves exhibit a resonance phenomenon at the frequency corresponding to the tendency of the system to develop a linear instability. Mechanical excitation of membrane waves in cells at different frequencies can therefore be used to characterize the properties of the mechanism underlying the existence of these waves.

  17. Band Excitation Kelvin probe force microscopy utilizing photothermal excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Liam; Jesse, Stephen; Balke, Nina; Rodriguez, Brian J.; Kalinin, Sergei; Li, Qian

    2015-03-13

    A multifrequency open loop Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) approach utilizing photothermal as opposed to electrical excitation is developed. Photothermal band excitation (PthBE)-KPFM is implemented here in a grid mode on a model test sample comprising a metal-insulator junction with local charge-patterned regions. Unlike the previously described open loop BE-KPFM, which relies on capacitive actuation of the cantilever, photothermal actuation is shown to be highly sensitive to the electrostatic force gradient even at biases close to the contact potential difference (CPD). PthBE-KPFM is further shown to provide a more localized measurement of true CPD in comparison to the gold standard ambient KPFM approach, amplitude modulated KPFM. In conclusion, PthBE-KPFM data contain information relating to local dielectric properties and electronic dissipation between tip and sample unattainable using conventional single frequency KPFM approaches.

  18. Band Excitation Kelvin probe force microscopy utilizing photothermal excitation

    DOE PAGES

    Collins, Liam; Jesse, Stephen; Balke, Nina; ...

    2015-03-13

    A multifrequency open loop Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) approach utilizing photothermal as opposed to electrical excitation is developed. Photothermal band excitation (PthBE)-KPFM is implemented here in a grid mode on a model test sample comprising a metal-insulator junction with local charge-patterned regions. Unlike the previously described open loop BE-KPFM, which relies on capacitive actuation of the cantilever, photothermal actuation is shown to be highly sensitive to the electrostatic force gradient even at biases close to the contact potential difference (CPD). PthBE-KPFM is further shown to provide a more localized measurement of true CPD in comparison to the gold standardmore » ambient KPFM approach, amplitude modulated KPFM. In conclusion, PthBE-KPFM data contain information relating to local dielectric properties and electronic dissipation between tip and sample unattainable using conventional single frequency KPFM approaches.« less

  19. Mean excitation energies for molecular ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Phillip W. K.; Sauer, Stephan P. A.; Oddershede, Jens; Sabin, John R.

    2017-03-01

    The essential material constant that determines the bulk of the stopping power of high energy projectiles, the mean excitation energy, is calculated for a range of smaller molecular ions using the RPA method. It is demonstrated that the mean excitation energy of both molecules and atoms increase with ionic charge. However, while the mean excitation energies of atoms also increase with atomic number, the opposite is the case for mean excitation energies for molecules and molecular ions. The origin of these effects is explained by considering the spectral representation of the excited state contributing to the mean excitation energy.

  20. Light baryons and their excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichmann, Gernot; Fischer, Christian S.; Sanchis-Alepuz, Hèlios

    2016-11-01

    We study ground states and excitations of light octet and decuplet baryons within the framework of Dyson-Schwinger and Faddeev equations. We improve upon similar approaches by explicitly taking into account the momentum-dependent dynamics of the quark-gluon interaction that leads to dynamical chiral symmetry breaking. We perform calculations in both the three-body Faddeev framework and the quark-diquark approximation in order to assess the impact of the latter on the spectrum. Our results indicate that both approaches agree well with each other. The resulting spectra furthermore agree one-to-one with experiment, provided well-known deficiencies of the rainbow-ladder approximation are compensated for. We also discuss the mass evolution of the Roper and the excited Δ with varying pion mass and analyze the internal structure in terms of their partial wave decompositions.

  1. Receiver-exciter controller design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansma, P. A.

    1982-01-01

    A description of the general design of both the block 3 and block 4 receiver-exciter controllers for the Deep Space Network (DSN) Mark IV-A System is presented along with the design approach. The controllers are designed to enable the receiver-exciter subsystem (RCV) to be configured, calibrated, initialized and operated from a central location via high level instructions. The RECs are designed to be operated under the control of the DMC subsystem. The instructions are in the form of standard subsystem blocks (SSBs) received via the local area network (LAN). The centralized control provided by RECs and other DSCC controllers in Mark IV-A is intended to reduce DSN operations costs from the Mark III era.

  2. Studies of Highly Excited Atoms.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-02

    collisions with photoions produced by the absorption of two blue laser photons or to an effect varying as the square of the number of excited atoms. Since...Physique Atomique , F-91191. (4). Our calculations indicate values of a = 3x 108 Gif-sur-Yvette. France. ., (d Permanent address: Fakultat fur Physik...collisions with points of particular importance for this experi- photoions produced by the absorption of two blue- -- ment. First, the atomic beam is

  3. Channelopathies of skeletal muscle excitability

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Stephen C.

    2016-01-01

    Familial disorders of skeletal muscle excitability were initially described early in the last century and are now known to be caused by mutations of voltage-gated ion channels. The clinical manifestations are often striking, with an inability to relax after voluntary contraction (myotonia) or transient attacks of severe weakness (periodic paralysis). An essential feature of these disorders is fluctuation of symptoms that are strongly impacted by environmental triggers such as exercise, temperature, or serum K+ levels. These phenomena have intrigued physiologists for decades, and in the past 25 years the molecular lesions underlying these disorders have been identified and mechanistic studies are providing insights for therapeutic strategies of disease modification. These familial disorders of muscle fiber excitability are “channelopathies” caused by mutations of a chloride channel (ClC-1), sodium channel (NaV1.4), calcium channel (CaV1.1) and several potassium channels (Kir2.1, Kir2.6, Kir3.4). This review provides a synthesis of the mechanistic connections between functional defects of mutant ion channels, their impact on muscle excitability, how these changes cause clinical phenotypes, and approaches toward therapeutics. PMID:25880512

  4. Synaptic Control of Motoneuronal Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Rekling, Jens C.; Funk, Gregory D.; Bayliss, Douglas A.; Dong, Xiao-Wei; Feldman, Jack L.

    2016-01-01

    Movement, the fundamental component of behavior and the principal extrinsic action of the brain, is produced when skeletal muscles contract and relax in response to patterns of action potentials generated by motoneurons. The processes that determine the firing behavior of motoneurons are therefore important in understanding the transformation of neural activity to motor behavior. Here, we review recent studies on the control of motoneuronal excitability, focusing on synaptic and cellular properties. We first present a background description of motoneurons: their development, anatomical organization, and membrane properties, both passive and active. We then describe the general anatomical organization of synaptic input to motoneurons, followed by a description of the major transmitter systems that affect motoneuronal excitability, including ligands, receptor distribution, pre- and postsynaptic actions, signal transduction, and functional role. Glutamate is the main excitatory, and GABA and glycine are the main inhibitory transmitters acting through ionotropic receptors. These amino acids signal the principal motor commands from peripheral, spinal, and supraspinal structures. Amines, such as serotonin and norepinephrine, and neuropeptides, as well as the glutamate and GABA acting at metabotropic receptors, modulate motoneuronal excitability through pre- and postsynaptic actions. Acting principally via second messenger systems, their actions converge on common effectors, e.g., leak K+ current, cationic inward current, hyperpolarization-activated inward current, Ca2+ channels, or presynaptic release processes. Together, these numerous inputs mediate and modify incoming motor commands, ultimately generating the coordinated firing patterns that underlie muscle contractions during motor behavior. PMID:10747207

  5. Wedding ring shaped excitation coil

    DOEpatents

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Tsai, Peter

    2001-01-01

    A high frequency inductively coupled electrodeless lamp includes an excitation coil with an effective electrical length which is less than one half wavelength of a driving frequency applied thereto, preferably much less. The driving frequency may be greater than 100 MHz and is preferably as high as 915 MHz. Preferably, the excitation coil is configured as a non-helical, semi-cylindrical conductive surface having less than one turn, in the general shape of a wedding ring. At high frequencies, the current in the coil forms two loops which are spaced apart and parallel to each other. Configured appropriately, the coil approximates a Helmholtz configuration. The lamp preferably utilizes an bulb encased in a reflective ceramic cup with a pre-formed aperture defined therethrough. The ceramic cup may include structural features to aid in alignment and/or a flanged face to aid in thermal management. The lamp head is preferably an integrated lamp head comprising a metal matrix composite surrounding an insulating ceramic with the excitation integrally formed on the ceramic. A novel solid-state oscillator preferably provides RF power to the lamp. The oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency.

  6. Self-excited multifractal dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filimonov, V.; Sornette, D.

    2011-05-01

    We introduce the self-excited multifractal (SEMF) model, defined such that the amplitudes of the increments of the process are expressed as exponentials of a long memory of past increments. The principal novel feature of the model lies in the self-excitation mechanism combined with exponential nonlinearity, i.e. the explicit dependence of future values of the process on past ones. The self-excitation captures the microscopic origin of the emergent endogenous self-organization properties, such as the energy cascade in turbulent flows, the triggering of aftershocks by previous earthquakes and the "reflexive" interactions of financial markets. The SEMF process has all the standard stylized facts found in financial time series, which are robust to the specification of the parameters and the shape of the memory kernel: multifractality, heavy tails of the distribution of increments with intermediate asymptotics, zero correlation of the signed increments and long-range correlation of the squared increments, the asymmetry (called "leverage" effect) of the correlation between increments and absolute value of the increments and statistical asymmetry under time reversal.

  7. Entanglement entropy of electronic excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plasser, Felix

    2016-05-01

    A new perspective into correlation effects in electronically excited states is provided through quantum information theory. The entanglement between the electron and hole quasiparticles is examined, and it is shown that the related entanglement entropy can be computed from the eigenvalue spectrum of the well-known natural transition orbital (NTO) decomposition. Non-vanishing entanglement is obtained whenever more than one NTO pair is involved, i.e., in the case of a multiconfigurational or collective excitation. An important implication is that in the case of entanglement it is not possible to gain a complete description of the state character from the orbitals alone, but more specific analysis methods are required to decode the mutual information between the electron and hole. Moreover, the newly introduced number of entangled states is an important property by itself giving information about excitonic structure. The utility of the formalism is illustrated in the cases of the excited states of two interacting ethylene molecules, the conjugated polymer para-phenylene vinylene, and the naphthalene molecule.

  8. On Diversity of Configurations Generated by Excitable Cellular Automata with Dynamical Excitation Intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamatzky, Andrew

    2012-11-01

    Excitable cellular automata with dynamical excitation interval exhibit a wide range of space-time dynamics based on an interplay between propagating excitation patterns which modify excitability of the automaton cells. Such interactions leads to formation of standing domains of excitation, stationary waves and localized excitations. We analyzed morphological and generative diversities of the functions studied and characterized the functions with highest values of the diversities. Amongst other intriguing discoveries we found that upper boundary of excitation interval more significantly affects morphological diversity of configurations generated than lower boundary of the interval does and there is no match between functions which produce configurations of excitation with highest morphological diversity and configurations of interval boundaries with highest morphological diversity. Potential directions of future studies of excitable media with dynamically changing excitability may focus on relations of the automaton model with living excitable media, e.g. neural tissue and muscles, novel materials with memristive properties and networks of conductive polymers.

  9. Transfer Excitation Processes Observed in N3+-He and O3+-He Collisions at Elab = 33 eV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Yoh

    2016-09-01

    We measured the relative state-selective differential cross sections (DCSs) for one-electron capture reactions using a crossed-beam apparatus. The scattering angle θlab studied in the laboratory frame ranged from -3.0 to 22° and the laboratory collision energy Elab was 33 eV. Only the transfer excitation processes, i.e., the electron capture reactions with the simultaneous excitation of the projectile, were observed. The DCSs were determined for the following reactions: N3+ (1s2 2s2 1S) + He (1s2 1S) → N2+ (1s2 2s2p2 2D) + He+ (1s 2S) + 10.3 eV, O3+ (1s2 2s2 2p 2P) + He (1s2 1S) → O2+ (1s2 2s 2p3 3P) + He+ (1s 2S) + 12.7 eV, and O3+ (1s2 2s2 2p 2P) + He (1s2 1S) → O2+ (1s2 2s 2p3 3D) + He+ (1s 2S) + 15.5 eV. In the N3+-He system, the DCSs for the reaction are zero at the center-of-mass angle θcm = 0 and show a peak at a certain angle and a shoulder at a larger angle. In the O3+-He system, the DCSs are again zero at θcm = 0. The capture process to the O2+ (1s2 2s 2p3 3P) state is mainly observed at smaller scattering angles, and the reaction to the O2+ (1s2 2s 2p3 3D) state becomes dominant with increasing scattering angle. A classical trajectory analysis within the two-state approximation based on the ab initio potentials for (NHe)3+ revealed that the transfer excitation of a two-electron process takes place through a single crossing of the relevant potentials.

  10. Control of excitation in the fluorescence microscope.

    PubMed

    Lea, D J; Ward, D J

    1979-01-01

    In fluorescence microscopy image brightness and contrast and the rate of fading depend upon the intensity of illumination of the specimen. An iris diaphragm or neutral density filters may be used to reduce fluorescence excitation. Also the excitation bandwidth may be varied by using a broad band exciter filter with a set of interchangeable yellow glass filters at the lamphouse.

  11. Turbulent swirling jets with excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taghavi, Rahmat; Farokhi, Saeed

    1988-01-01

    An existing cold-jet facility at NASA Lewis Research Center was modified to produce swirling flows with controllable initial tangential velocity distribution. Two extreme swirl profiles, i.e., one with solid-body rotation and the other predominated by a free-vortex distribution, were produced at identical swirl number of 0.48. Mean centerline velocity decay characteristics of the solid-body rotation jet flow exhibited classical decay features of a swirling jet with S - 0.48 reported in the literature. However, the predominantly free-vortex distribution case was on the verge of vortex breakdown, a phenomenon associated with the rotating flows of significantly higher swirl numbers, i.e., S sub crit greater than or equal to 0.06. This remarkable result leads to the conclusion that the integrated swirl effect, reflected in the swirl number, is inadequate in describing the mean swirling jet behavior in the near field. The relative size (i.e., diameter) of the vortex core emerging from the nozzle and the corresponding tangential velocity distribution are also controlling factors. Excitability of swirling jets is also investigated by exciting a flow with a swirl number of 0.35 by plane acoustic waves at a constant sound pressure level and at various frequencies. It is observed that the cold swirling jet is excitable by plane waves, and that the instability waves grow about 50 percent less in peak r.m.s. amplitude and saturate further upstream compared to corresponding waves in a jet without swirl having the same axial mass flux. The preferred Strouhal number based on the mass-averaged axial velocity and nozzle exit diameter for both swirling and nonswirling flows is 0.4.

  12. Excited states in 129I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deleanu, D.; Balabanski, D. L.; Venkova, Ts.; Bucurescu, D.; Mărginean, N.; Ganioǧlu, E.; Căta-Danil, Gh.; Atanasova, L.; Căta-Danil, I.; Detistov, P.; Filipescu, D.; Ghiţă, D.; Glodariu, T.; Ivaşcu, M.; Mărginean, R.; Mihai, C.; Negret, A.; Pascu, S.; Sava, T.; Stroe, L.; Suliman, G.; Zamfir, N. V.

    2013-01-01

    Excited states in 129I were populated with the 124Sn(7Li,2n) reaction at 23 MeV. In-beam measurements of γ-ray coincidences were performed with an array of eight HPGe detectors and five LaBr3(Ce) scintillation detectors. Based on the γγ coincidence data, a positive parity band structure built on the 7/2+ ground state was established and the πg7/2 configuration at oblate deformation was assigned to it. The results are compared to interacting Boson-Fermion model (IBFM) and total Routhian surface (TRS) calculations.

  13. Volumetric Light-Field Excitation

    PubMed Central

    Schedl, David C.; Bimber, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    We explain how to concentrate light simultaneously at multiple selected volumetric positions by means of a 4D illumination light field. First, to select target objects, a 4D imaging light field is captured. A light field mask is then computed automatically for this selection to avoid illumination of the remaining areas. With one-photon illumination, simultaneous generation of complex volumetric light patterns becomes possible. As a full light-field can be captured and projected simultaneously at the desired exposure and excitation times, short readout and lighting durations are supported. PMID:27363565

  14. High Frequency Chandler Wobble Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitz, F.; Stuck, J.; Thomas, M.

    2003-04-01

    Variations of Earth rotation on sub-daily to secular timescales are caused by mass redistributions in the Earth system as a consequence of geophysical processes and gravitational influences. Forced oscillations of polar motion are superposed by free oscillations of the Earth, i.e. the Chandler wobble and the free core nutation. In order to study the interactions between externally induced polar motion and the Earth's free oscillations, a non-linear gyroscopic model has been developed. In most of the former investigations on polar motion, the Chandler wobble is introduced as a damped oscillation with predetermined frequency and amplitude. However, as the effect of rotational deformation is a backcoupling mechanism of polar motion on the Earth's rotational dynamics, both period and amplitude of the Chandler wobble are time-dependent when regarding additional excitations from, e.g., atmospheric or oceanic mass redistributions. The gyroscopic model is free of any explicit information concerning amplitude, phase, and period of free oscillations. The characteristics of the Earth's free oscillation is reproduced by the model from rheological and geometrical parameters and rotational deformation is taken into account. This enables to study the time variable Chandler oscillation when the gyro is forced with atmospheric and oceanic angular momentum from the global atmospheric ECHAM3-T21 general circulation model together with the ocean model for circulation and tides OMCT driven by ECHAM including surface pressure. Besides, mass redistributions in the Earth's body due to gravitational and loading deformations are regarded and external torques exerted by Moon and Sun are considered. The numerical results of the gyro are significantly related with the geodetically observed time series of polar motion published by the IERS. It is shown that the consistent excitation is capable to counteract the damping and thus to maintain the Chandler amplitude. Spectral analyses of the ECHAM

  15. Peculiarities of collisional excitation transfer with excited screened energy levels of atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Gerasimov, V. A.; Gerasimov, V. V.; Pavlinskiy, A. V.

    2007-09-15

    We report an experimental discovery of deviations from the known regularities in collisional excitation transfer processes for metal atoms. The collisional excitation transfer with excited screened energy levels of thulium and dysprosium atoms is studied. The selecting role of the screening 6s shell in collisional excitation transfer is shown.

  16. Gene circuit designs for noisy excitable dynamics.

    PubMed

    Rué, Pau; Garcia-Ojalvo, Jordi

    2011-05-01

    Certain cellular processes take the form of activity pulses that can be interpreted in terms of noise-driven excitable dynamics. Here we present an overview of different gene circuit architectures that exhibit excitable pulses of protein expression, when subject to molecular noise. Different types of excitable dynamics can occur depending on the bifurcation structure leading to the specific excitable phase-space topology. The bifurcation structure is not, however, linked to a particular circuit architecture. Thus a given gene circuit design can sustain different classes of excitable dynamics depending on the system parameters.

  17. Three-photon excitation in fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hell, Stefan W.; Bahlmann, Karsten; Schrader, Martin; Soini, Aleksi; Malak, Henryk; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    1996-01-01

    We show experiments proving the feasibility of scanning fluorescence microscopy by three-photon excitation. Three-photon excitation fluorescence axial images are shown of polystyrene beads stained with the fluorophore 2,5- bis(4-biphenyl)oxazole (BBO). Three-photon excitation is performed at an excitation wavelength of 900 nm and with pulses of 130 fs duration provided by a mode-locked titanium-sapphire laser. Fluorescence is collected between 350 and 450 nm. The fluorescence image signal features a third-order dependence on the excitation power, also providing intrinsic 3-D imaging. The resolution of a three-photon excitation microscope is increased over that of a comparable two-photon excitation microscope.

  18. 1s22p3 and 1s22s23l, l = s,p,d, excited states of boron isoelectronic series from explicitly correlated wave functions.

    PubMed

    Gálvez, F J; Buendía, E; Sarsa, A

    2005-07-15

    For some members of the boron isoelectronic series and starting from explicitly correlated wave functions, six low-lying excited states have been studied. Three of them arise from the 1s(2)2p(3) configuration, and the other three from the 1s(2)2s(2)3l, l = s,p,d, configurations. This work follows a previous one on both the 1s(2)2s(2)2p-(2)P ground state and the four excited states coming from the 1s(2)2s2p(2) configuration. Energies, one- and two-body densities in position space and some other two-body properties in position and momentum spaces have been obtained. A systematic analysis of the energetic ordering of the states as a function of the total orbital angular momentum and spin is performed in terms of the electron-nucleus and electron-electron potential energies and the role of the angular correlation is discussed. All calculations have been carried out by using the Monte Carlo algorithm.

  19. Multiphoton excitation of fluorescent DNA base analogs.

    PubMed

    Katilius, Evaldas; Woodbury, Neal W

    2006-01-01

    Multiphoton excitation was used to investigate properties of the fluorescent DNA base analogs, 2-aminopurine (2AP) and 6-methylisoxanthopterin (6MI). 2-aminopurine, a fluorescent analog of adenine, was excited by three-photon absorption. Fluorescence correlation measurements were attempted to evaluate the feasibility of using three-photon excitation of 2AP for DNA-protein interaction studies. However, high excitation power and long integration times needed to acquire high signal-to-noise fluorescence correlation curves render three-photon excitation FCS of 2AP not very useful for studying DNA base dynamics. The fluorescence properties of 6-methylisoxanthopterin, a guanine analog, were investigated using two-photon excitation. The two-photon absorption cross-section of 6MI was estimated to be about 2.5 x 10(-50) cm(4)s (2.5 GM units) at 700 nm. The two-photon excitation spectrum was measured in the spectral region from 700 to 780 nm; in this region the shape of the two-photon excitation spectrum is very similar to the shape of single-photon excitation spectrum in the near-UV spectral region. Two-photon excitation of 6MI is suitable for fluorescence correlation measurements. Such measurements can be used to study DNA base dynamics and DNA-protein interactions over a broad range of time scales.

  20. Excitation of interstellar hydrogen chloride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufild, David A.; Green, Sheldon

    1994-01-01

    We have computed new rate coefficients for the collisional excitation of HCl by He, in the close-coupled formalism and using an interaction potential determined recently by Willey, Choong, & DeLucia. Results have been obtained for temperatures between 10 K and 300 K. With the use of the infinite order sudden approximation, we have derived approximate expressions of general applicability which may be used to estimate how the rate constant for a transition (J to J prime) is apportioned among the various hyperfine states F prime of the final state J prime. Using these new rate coefficients, we have obtained predictions for the HCl rotational line strengths expected from a dense clump of interstellar gas, as a function of the HCl fractional abundance. Over a wide range of HCl abundances, we have found that the line luminosities are proportional to abundance(exp 2/3), a general result which can be explained using a simple analytical approximation. Our model for the excitation of HCl within a dense molecular cloud core indicates that the J = 1 goes to 0 line strengths measured by Blake, Keene, & Phillips toward the Orion Molecular Cloud (OMC-1) imply a fractional abundance n(HCl)/n(H2) approximately 2 x 10(exp -9), a value which amounts to only approximately 0.3% of the cosmic abundance of chlorine nuclei. Given a fractional abundance of 2 x 10(exp -9), the contribution of HCl emission to the total radiative cooling of a dense clump is small. For Orion, we predict a flux approximately 10(exp -19) W/sq cm for the HCl J = 3 goes to 2 line near 159.8 micrometers, suggesting that the strength of this line could be measured using the Infrared Space Observatory.

  1. Statistical dynamo theory: Mode excitation.

    PubMed

    Hoyng, P

    2009-04-01

    We compute statistical properties of the lowest-order multipole coefficients of the magnetic field generated by a dynamo of arbitrary shape. To this end we expand the field in a complete biorthogonal set of base functions, viz. B= summation operator_{k}a;{k}(t)b;{k}(r) . The properties of these biorthogonal function sets are treated in detail. We consider a linear problem and the statistical properties of the fluid flow are supposed to be given. The turbulent convection may have an arbitrary distribution of spatial scales. The time evolution of the expansion coefficients a;{k} is governed by a stochastic differential equation from which we infer their averages a;{k} , autocorrelation functions a;{k}(t)a;{k *}(t+tau) , and an equation for the cross correlations a;{k}a;{l *} . The eigenfunctions of the dynamo equation (with eigenvalues lambda_{k} ) turn out to be a preferred set in terms of which our results assume their simplest form. The magnetic field of the dynamo is shown to consist of transiently excited eigenmodes whose frequency and coherence time is given by Ilambda_{k} and -1/Rlambda_{k} , respectively. The relative rms excitation level of the eigenmodes, and hence the distribution of magnetic energy over spatial scales, is determined by linear theory. An expression is derived for |a;{k}|;{2}/|a;{0}|;{2} in case the fundamental mode b;{0} has a dominant amplitude, and we outline how this expression may be evaluated. It is estimated that |a;{k}|;{2}/|a;{0}|;{2} approximately 1/N , where N is the number of convective cells in the dynamo. We show that the old problem of a short correlation time (or first-order smoothing approximation) has been partially eliminated. Finally we prove that for a simple statistically steady dynamo with finite resistivity all eigenvalues obey Rlambda_{k}<0 .

  2. Circadian regulation of human cortical excitability

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Julien Q. M.; Gaggioni, Giulia; Chellappa, Sarah L.; Papachilleos, Soterios; Brzozowski, Alexandre; Borsu, Chloé; Rosanova, Mario; Sarasso, Simone; Middleton, Benita; Luxen, André; Archer, Simon N.; Phillips, Christophe; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Maquet, Pierre; Massimini, Marcello; Vandewalle, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged wakefulness alters cortical excitability, which is essential for proper brain function and cognition. However, besides prior wakefulness, brain function and cognition are also affected by circadian rhythmicity. Whether the regulation of cognition involves a circadian impact on cortical excitability is unknown. Here, we assessed cortical excitability from scalp electroencephalography (EEG) responses to transcranial magnetic stimulation in 22 participants during 29 h of wakefulness under constant conditions. Data reveal robust circadian dynamics of cortical excitability that are strongest in those individuals with highest endocrine markers of circadian amplitude. In addition, the time course of cortical excitability correlates with changes in EEG synchronization and cognitive performance. These results demonstrate that the crucial factor for cortical excitability, and basic brain function in general, is the balance between circadian rhythmicity and sleep need, rather than sleep homoeostasis alone. These findings have implications for clinical applications such as non-invasive brain stimulation in neurorehabilitation. PMID:27339884

  3. Excitement in shame: the price we pay.

    PubMed

    Aledort, Stewart L

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the role of excitement in shame, extending the theoretical underpinnings of my work (Aledort, 2002, 2003, 2008, 2009) on narcissism and the omnipotent child syndrome. Shame, excitement, and early narcissistic self-states are complexly intermingled, each influencing the other. Empathy alone is insufficient; the passion connected to shame can be easily hidden. Detailed case studies describe a model for working with the excitement in shame, how it functions, and how it gets resolved.

  4. Collisional energy transfer from excited nitrogen dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Patten, K.O.

    1991-05-01

    The radiative lifetimes of gaseous nitrogen dioxide excited by pulsed, tunable dye laser radiation are determined for excitation wavelengths ranging from 400 to 750 nm. When the data are expressed in the form of zero-pressure radiative rate constants (k{sub 0}/s{sup {minus}1}), they fit a linear equation with respect to excitation energy. This fit predicts a radiative lifetime of 64 {mu}s for 400 nm excitation and 102 {mu}s at 750 nm. The effects of pressure, observation delay time, and wavelength range of the fluorescence detection apparatus are determined for both radiative lifetime and quenching constant. Dispersed fluorescence spectra from excited nitrogen dioxide are analyzed into three-parameter functions that approximate the corresponding excited state population distributions. Energy transfer from nitrogen dioxide excited at 532 nm and colliding with thirteen buffer gases is studied by this population deconvolution method. The energy removal rate constants increase in the order Ne < Ar < Kr < Xe < He < CO < N{sub 2} < O{sub 2} < NO < NO{sub 2} < CO{sub 2} < SF{sub 6} < SO{sub 2}. The energy transfer rate constant is strongly correlated with the number of degrees of freedom of the buffer molecule and with low vibrational frequencies of the buffer molecule. Population deconvolution from excited nitrogen dioxide fluorescence spectra is again employed to find energy removal rate constants for the NO {sub 2}{sup *}-NO{sub 2} collisions, excited by dye laser at 475.34, 435.04, and 400.00 nm. The energy transfer rate constant increases with decreasing excitation wavelength. The energy removal rate constant between 400 and 532 nm excitation increases as the (3.6 {plus minus} 0.4) power of the excitation photon energy. 76 refs., 67 figs., 16 tabs.

  5. Spatially encoded multiple-quantum excitation.

    PubMed

    Ridge, Clark D; Borvayeh, Leila; Walls, Jamie D

    2013-05-28

    In this work, we present a simple method to spatially encode the transition frequencies of nuclear spin transitions and to read out these frequencies within a single scan. The experiment works by combining pulsed field gradients with an excitation sequence that selectively excites spin transitions within certain sample regions. After the initial excitation, imaging the resulting ẑ-magnetization is used to determine the locations where the excitations occurred, from which the corresponding transition frequencies are determined. Simple experimental demonstrations of this technique on one- and two-spin systems are presented.

  6. Laser Excited Fluorescence Studies Of Black Liquor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, J. J.; Semerjian, H. G.

    1986-10-01

    Laser excited fluorescence of black liquor was investigated as a possible monitoring technique for pulping processes. A nitrogen pumped dye laser was used to examine the fluorescence spectrum of black liquor solutions. Various excitation wavelengths were used between 290 and 403 nm. Black liquor fluorescence spectra were found to vary with both excitation wavelength and black liquor concentration. Laser excited fluorescence was found to be a sensitive technique for measurement of black liquor with good detection limits and linear response over a large dynamic range.

  7. Quasiparticle excitations in superdeformed [sup 192]Hg

    SciTech Connect

    Fallon, P. ); Lauritsen, T.; Ahmad, I.; Carpenter, M.P. ); Cederwall, B.; Clark, R.M. ); Crowell, B. ); Deleplanque, M.A.; Diamond, R.M. ); Gall, B.; Hannachi, F. ); Henry, R.G.; Janssens, R.V.F.; Khoo, T.L. ); Korichi, A. ); Lee, I.Y.; Macchiavelli, A.O. (Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence

    1995-04-01

    For the first time, two excited superdeformed (SD) bands have been observed in the double closed shell superdeformed nucleus [sup 192]Hg. One of the SD bands exhibits a pronounced peak in the dynamic moment of inertia which is interpreted as a crossing between two excited SD configurations involving the [ital N]=7 intruder and the [512]5/2 orbitals. This is only the second occurrence of such a crossing in a SD nucleus around [ital A]=190. The second excited SD band has near identical transition energies to an excited SD band in [sup 191]Hg.

  8. Local pair natural orbitals for excited states.

    PubMed

    Helmich, Benjamin; Hättig, Christof

    2011-12-07

    We explore how in response calculations for excitation energies with wavefunction based (e.g., coupled cluster) methods the number of double excitation amplitudes can be reduced by means of truncated pair natural orbital (PNO) expansions and localized occupied orbitals. Using the CIS(D) approximation as a test model, we find that the number of double excitation amplitudes can be reduced dramatically with minor impact on the accuracy if the excited state wavefunction is expanded in state-specific PNOs generated from an approximate first-order guess wavefunction. As for ground states, the PNO truncation error can also for excitation energies be controlled by a single threshold related to generalized natural occupation numbers. The best performance is found with occupied orbitals which are localized by the Pipek-Mezey localization. For a large test set of excited states we find with this localization that already a PNO threshold of 10(-8)-10(-7), corresponding to an average of only 40-80 PNOs per pair, is sufficient to keep the PNO truncation error for vertical excitation energies below 0.01 eV. This is a significantly more rapid convergence with the number doubles amplitudes than in domain-based local response approaches. We demonstrate that the number of significant excited state PNOs scales asymptotically linearly with the system size in the worst case of completely delocalized excitations and sub-linearly whenever the chromophore does not increase with the system size. Moreover, we observe that the flexibility of state-specific PNOs to adapt to the character of an excitation allows for an almost unbiased treatment of local, delocalized and charge transfer excited states.

  9. Local pair natural orbitals for excited states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmich, Benjamin; Hättig, Christof

    2011-12-01

    We explore how in response calculations for excitation energies with wavefunction based (e.g., coupled cluster) methods the number of double excitation amplitudes can be reduced by means of truncated pair natural orbital (PNO) expansions and localized occupied orbitals. Using the CIS(D) approximation as a test model, we find that the number of double excitation amplitudes can be reduced dramatically with minor impact on the accuracy if the excited state wavefunction is expanded in state-specific PNOs generated from an approximate first-order guess wavefunction. As for ground states, the PNO truncation error can also for excitation energies be controlled by a single threshold related to generalized natural occupation numbers. The best performance is found with occupied orbitals which are localized by the Pipek-Mezey localization. For a large test set of excited states we find with this localization that already a PNO threshold of 10-8-10-7, corresponding to an average of only 40-80 PNOs per pair, is sufficient to keep the PNO truncation error for vertical excitation energies below 0.01 eV. This is a significantly more rapid convergence with the number doubles amplitudes than in domain-based local response approaches. We demonstrate that the number of significant excited state PNOs scales asymptotically linearly with the system size in the worst case of completely delocalized excitations and sub-linearly whenever the chromophore does not increase with the system size. Moreover, we observe that the flexibility of state-specific PNOs to adapt to the character of an excitation allows for an almost unbiased treatment of local, delocalized and charge transfer excited states.

  10. Nuclear excitations and reaction mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Fallieros, S.; Levin, F.S.

    1990-08-01

    The main theme of this report is the study and interpretation of the sequence of events that occur during the collisions of nuclear particles. Some of the processes discussed in parts A and B involve short range interactions; others involve interactions of long range. In most of part A one of the particles in the initial or in the final state (or in both) is a photon, which serves as a probe of the second particle, which may be a nucleus, a proton, a pion or any other hadron. The complexity of the processes taking place during the collisions makes it necessary to simplify some aspects of the physical problem. This leads to the introduction of modals which are used to describe a limited number of features in as much detail as possible. The main interest is the understanding of the hadronic excitations which result from the absorption of a photon and the determination of the fundamental structure constants of the target particle. In part B, all the particles are hadrons. The purpose here is to develop and apply optimal quantal methods appropriate for describing the interacting systems. Of particular interest are three-particle collision systems in which the final state consists of three free particles. Part B also considers the process of nuclear fusion as catalyzed by bound muons.

  11. Multi-photon excitation microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Diaspro, Alberto; Bianchini, Paolo; Vicidomini, Giuseppe; Faretta, Mario; Ramoino, Paola; Usai, Cesare

    2006-01-01

    Multi-photon excitation (MPE) microscopy plays a growing role among microscopical techniques utilized for studying biological matter. In conjunction with confocal microscopy it can be considered the imaging workhorse of life science laboratories. Its roots can be found in a fundamental work written by Maria Goeppert Mayer more than 70 years ago. Nowadays, 2PE and MPE microscopes are expected to increase their impact in areas such biotechnology, neurobiology, embryology, tissue engineering, materials science where imaging can be coupled to the possibility of using the microscopes in an active way, too. As well, 2PE implementations in noninvasive optical bioscopy or laser-based treatments point out to the relevance in clinical applications. Here we report about some basic aspects related to the phenomenon, implications in three-dimensional imaging microscopy, practical aspects related to design and realization of MPE microscopes, and we only give a list of potential applications and variations on the theme in order to offer a starting point for advancing new applications and developments. PMID:16756664

  12. Multi-photon excitation microscopy.

    PubMed

    Diaspro, Alberto; Bianchini, Paolo; Vicidomini, Giuseppe; Faretta, Mario; Ramoino, Paola; Usai, Cesare

    2006-06-06

    Multi-photon excitation (MPE) microscopy plays a growing role among microscopical techniques utilized for studying biological matter. In conjunction with confocal microscopy it can be considered the imaging workhorse of life science laboratories. Its roots can be found in a fundamental work written by Maria Goeppert Mayer more than 70 years ago. Nowadays, 2PE and MPE microscopes are expected to increase their impact in areas such biotechnology, neurobiology, embryology, tissue engineering, materials science where imaging can be coupled to the possibility of using the microscopes in an active way, too. As well, 2PE implementations in noninvasive optical bioscopy or laser-based treatments point out to the relevance in clinical applications. Here we report about some basic aspects related to the phenomenon, implications in three-dimensional imaging microscopy, practical aspects related to design and realization of MPE microscopes, and we only give a list of potential applications and variations on the theme in order to offer a starting point for advancing new applications and developments.

  13. What Gets a Cell Excited? Kinky Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Alan R.

    2014-01-01

    Hodgkin and Huxley's (5) revealing the origins of cellular excitability is one of the great triumphs of physiology. In an extraordinarily deft series of papers, they were able to measure the essential electrical characteristics of neurons and synthesize them into a quantitative model that accounts for the excitability of neurons and other…

  14. Excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging microscope

    PubMed Central

    Favreau, Peter F.; Hernandez, Clarissa; Heaster, Tiffany; Alvarez, Diego F.; Rich, Thomas C.; Prabhat, Prashant; Leavesley, Silas J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Hyperspectral imaging is a versatile tool that has recently been applied to a variety of biomedical applications, notably live-cell and whole-tissue signaling. Traditional hyperspectral imaging approaches filter the fluorescence emission over a broad wavelength range while exciting at a single band. However, these emission-scanning approaches have shown reduced sensitivity due to light attenuation from spectral filtering. Consequently, emission scanning has limited applicability for time-sensitive studies and photosensitive applications. In this work, we have developed an excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging microscope that overcomes these limitations by providing high transmission with short acquisition times. This is achieved by filtering the fluorescence excitation rather than the emission. We tested the efficacy of the excitation-scanning microscope in a side-by-side comparison with emission scanning for detection of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing endothelial cells in highly autofluorescent lung tissue. Excitation scanning provided higher signal-to-noise characteristics, as well as shorter acquisition times (300  ms/wavelength band with excitation scanning versus 3  s/wavelength band with emission scanning). Excitation scanning also provided higher delineation of nuclear and cell borders, and increased identification of GFP regions in highly autofluorescent tissue. These results demonstrate excitation scanning has utility in a wide range of time-dependent and photosensitive applications. PMID:24727909

  15. Excitation of helium ion by positron impact

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, P.; Ghosh, A.S.

    1986-01-01

    Three (1s,2s,2p) and five (1s,2s,2p,3s-bar,3p-bar) -state close-coupling methods have been employed to calculate the n = 2 excitation cross sections of helium ion by positron impact. The effect of pseudostate is found to be very pronounced in the case of 1s-2s excitation.

  16. Multimode optical fibers: steady state mode exciter.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, M; Sugimura, A; Ikegami, T

    1976-09-01

    The steady state mode power distribution of the multimode graded index fiber was measured. A simple and effective steady state mode exciter was fabricated by an etching technique. Its insertion loss was 0.5 dB for an injection laser. Deviation in transmission characteristics of multimode graded index fibers can be avoided by using the steady state mode exciter.

  17. Coulomb excitation of radioactive {sup 79}Pb

    SciTech Connect

    Lister, C.J.; Blumenthal, D.; Davids, C.N.

    1995-08-01

    The technical challenges expected in experiments with radioactive beams can already be explored by using ions produced in primary reactions. In addition, the re-excitation of these ions by Coulomb excitation allows a sensitive search for collective states that are well above the yrast line. We are building an experiment to study Coulomb excitation of radioactive ions which are separated from beam particles by the Fragment Mass Analyzer. An array of gamma detectors will be mounted at the focal plane to measure the gamma radiation following re-excitation. Five Compton-suppressed Ge detectors and five planar LEPS detectors will be used. The optimum experiment of this type appears to be the study of {sup 79}Rb following the {sup 24}Mg ({sup 58}Ni,3p) reaction. We calculate that about 5 x 10{sup 5} {sup 79}Rb nuclei/second will reach the excitation foil. This rubidium isotope was selected for study as it is strongly produced and is highly deformed, so easily re-excited. The use of a {sup 58}Ni re-excitation foil offers the best yields. After re-excitation the ions will be subsequently transported into a shielded beamdump to prevent the accumulation of activity.

  18. Excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging microscope.

    PubMed

    Favreau, Peter F; Hernandez, Clarissa; Heaster, Tiffany; Alvarez, Diego F; Rich, Thomas C; Prabhat, Prashant; Leavesley, Silas J

    2014-04-01

    Hyperspectral imaging is a versatile tool that has recently been applied to a variety of biomedical applications, notably live-cell and whole-tissue signaling. Traditional hyperspectral imaging approaches filter the fluorescence emission over a broad wavelength range while exciting at a single band. However, these emission-scanning approaches have shown reduced sensitivity due to light attenuation from spectral filtering. Consequently, emission scanning has limited applicability for time-sensitive studies and photosensitive applications. In this work, we have developed an excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging microscope that overcomes these limitations by providing high transmission with short acquisition times. This is achieved by filtering the fluorescence excitation rather than the emission. We tested the efficacy of the excitation-scanning microscope in a side-by-side comparison with emission scanning for detection of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing endothelial cells in highly autofluorescent lung tissue. Excitation scanning provided higher signal-to-noise characteristics, as well as shorter acquisition times (300  ms/wavelength band with excitation scanning versus 3  s/wavelength band with emission scanning). Excitation scanning also provided higher delineation of nuclear and cell borders, and increased identification of GFP regions in highly autofluorescent tissue. These results demonstrate excitation scanning has utility in a wide range of time-dependent and photosensitive applications.

  19. Multiphoton excited fluorescence spectroscopy of biomolecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birch, David J. S.

    2001-09-01

    Recent work on the emerging application of multiphoton excitation to fluorescence studies of biomolecular dynamics and structure is reviewed. The fundamental principles and experimental techniques of multiphoton excitation are outlined, fluorescence lifetimes, anisotropy and spectra in membranes, proteins, hydrocarbons, skin, tissue and metabolites are featured, and future opportunities are highlighted.

  20. Study of excited nucleons and their structure

    SciTech Connect

    Burkert, Volker D.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in the study of excited nucleons are discussed. Much of the progress has been achieved due to the availability of high precision meson production data in the photoproduction and electroproduction sectors, the development of multi-channel partial wave analysis techniques, and advances in Lattice QCD with predictions of the full excitation spectrum.

  1. Numerical simulation of excited jet mixing layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, J. N.; Hankey, W. L.

    1987-01-01

    A numerical simulation of unsteady flow in jet mixing layers, both with and without external excitation, has been performed by solving the time-dependent compressible Navier-Stokes equations. Computations were performed on a CRAY X-MP computer using MacCormick's explicit finite difference algorithm. Different excitation methods were investigated and were shown to be very effective in controlling the well organized periodic production, shedding and pairing of large scale vortex structures. It is found that pressure excitation was generally more effective than temperature excitation, and that grid refinement results in substantial improvement in the resolution of unsteady features. The location and orientation, in addition to the frequency, of the excitation source are shown to have a significant influence on the production and interaction of large scale vortex structures in the jet mixing layer.

  2. Excited States of Non-Isolated Chromophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsika, S.; Kozak, C.; Kistler, K.

    2009-06-01

    The photophysical and photochemical behavior of nucleobases is very important because of their biological role as the building blocks in DNA and RNA. Great progress has been made in understanding the excited-state properties of single bases. In order to understand the photophysical properties of nucleobases in complex environments we have investigated their excited states (a) in aqueous solutions and (b) as π-stacked dimers in DNA. The solvatochromic shifts of the excited states of pyrimidine nucleobases in aqueous solution have been investigated using a combined QM/MM procedure where the quantum mechanical solute is described using high level multireference configuration interaction methods while molecular dynamics simulations are used to obtain the structure of the solvent around the solute in an average way. The excited states of π-stacked nucleobases have also been investigated using various ab initio methods. The effect of the environment on the excited states and conical intersections is investigated.

  3. Effects of core turbulence on jet excitability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mankbadi, Reda R.; Raman, Ganesh; Rice, Edward J.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of varying freestream core turbulence on the evolution of a circular jet with and without tonal excitation are examined. Measurements are made on an 8.8 cm diameter jet at a Mach number of 0.3. The jet is excitated by plane waves at Strouhal number 0.5. For the excited and unexcited cases the turbulence level is varied by screens and grids placed upstream of the nozzle exit. The experiment results are compared with a theoretical model which incorporates a variable core turbulence and considers the energy interactions between the mean flow, the turbulence and the forced component. Both data and theory indicate that increasing the freestream turbulence diminishes the excitability of the jet and reduces the effect of excitation on the spreading rate of the jet.

  4. Loss of excitation of synchronous generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krištof, Vladimír; Mešter, Marián

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents results of study of loss-of-excitation phenomena simulations. Loss of excitation is a very common fault in synchronous machine operating and can be caused by short circuit of the field winding, unexpected field breaker open or loss-of-excitation relay mal-operation. According to the statistic [1], the generator failure due to loss-of-excitation accounts for 69% of all generator failures. There has been concern over possible incorrect operation of the relay when operating the generator in the under-excited region, during stable transient swings and during major system disturbances. This article can serve as inputs for system operators in preparation of operation area or protection relaying area.

  5. Localization of electrons and excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, Sven

    2006-07-01

    Electrons, electron holes, or excitations in finite or infinite 'multimer systems' may be localized or delocalized. In the theory of Hush, localization depends on the ratio Δ/ λ ( Δ/2 = coupling; λ = reorganization energy). The latter theory has been extended to the infinite system [S. Larsson, A. Klimkāns, Mol. Cryst. Liq. Cryst. 355 (2000) 217]. The metal/insulator transition often takes place abruptly as a function of Δ/ λ. It is argued that localization in a system with un-filled bands cannot be determined on the basis of Mott-Hubbard U alone, but depends on the number of accessible valence states, reorganization energy λ and coupling Δ (=2t). In fact U = 0 does not necessarily imply delocalization. The analysis here shows that there are many different situations for an insulator to metal transition. Charge transfer in doped NiO is characterized by Ni 2+ - Ni 3+ exchange while charge transfer in pure NiO is characterized by a disproportionation 2Ni 2+ → Ni + + Ni 3+. In spite of the great differences between these two cases, U has been applied without discrimination to both. The relevant localization parameters appear to be Δ and λ in the first case, with only two oxidation states, and U, Δ and λ in the second case with three oxidation states. The analysis is extended to insulator-metal transitions, giant magnetic resistance (GMR) and high Tc superconductivity (SC). λ and Δ can be determined quite accurately in quantum mechanical calculations involving only one and two monomers, respectively.

  6. Inclination Excitation in Compact Extrasolar Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Juliette; Adams, Fred C.

    2015-05-01

    The Kepler Mission has detected dozens of compact planetary systems with more than four transiting planets. This sample provides a collection of close-packed planetary systems with relatively little spread in the inclination angles of the inferred orbits. We have explored the effectiveness of dynamical mechanisms in exciting orbital inclination in this class of solar systems. The two mechanisms we discuss are self-excitation of orbital inclination in initially (nearly) coplanar planetary systems and perturbations by additional unseen larger bodies in the outer regions of the solar systems. For both of these scenarios, we determine the regimes of parameter space for which orbital inclination can be effectively excited. For compact planetary systems with the observed architectures, we find that the orbital inclination angles are not spread out appreciably through self-excitation, resulting in a negligible scatter in impact parameter and a subsequently stable transiting system. In contrast, companions in the outer solar system can be effective in driving variations of the inclination angles of the inner planetary orbits, leading to significant scatter in impact parameter and resultantly non-transiting systems. We present the results of our study, the regimes in which each excitation method - self-excitation of inclination and excitation by a perturbing secondary - are relevant, and the magnitude of the effects.

  7. Chirp excitation of ultrasonic guided waves.

    PubMed

    Michaels, Jennifer E; Lee, Sang Jun; Croxford, Anthony J; Wilcox, Paul D

    2013-01-01

    Most ultrasonic guided wave methods require tone burst excitations to achieve some degree of mode purity while maintaining temporal resolution. In addition, it is often desirable to acquire data using multiple frequencies, particularly during method development when the best frequency for a specific application is not known. However, this process is inconvenient and time-consuming, particularly if extensive signal averaging at each excitation frequency is required to achieve a satisfactory signal-to-noise ratio. Both acquisition time and data storage requirements may be prohibitive if responses from many narrowband tone burst excitations are measured. Here chirp excitations are utilized to address the need to both test at multiple frequencies and achieve a high signal-to-noise ratio to minimize acquisition time. A broadband chirp is used to acquire data at a wide range of frequencies, and deconvolution is applied to extract multiple narrowband responses. After optimizing the frequency and duration of the desired tone burst excitation, a long-time narrowband chirp is used as the actual excitation, and the desired tone burst response is similarly extracted during post-processing. Results are shown that demonstrate the efficacy of both broadband and narrowband chirp excitations.

  8. Seismic excitation by space shuttles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kanamori, H.; Mori, J.; Sturtevant, B.; Anderson, D.L.; Heaton, T.

    1992-01-01

    Shock waves generated by the space shuttles Columbia (August 13, 1989), Atlantis (April 11, 1991) and Discovery (September 18, 1991) on their return to Edwards Air Force Base, California, were recorded by TERRAscope (Caltech's broadband seismic network), the Caltech-U.S.G.S Southern California Seismic Network (SCSN), and the University of Southern California (USC) Los Angeles Basin Seismic Network. The spatial pattern of the arrival times exhibits hyperbolic shock fronts from which the path, velocity and altitude of the space shuttle could be determined. The shock wave was acoustically coupled to the ground, converted to a seismic wave, and recorded clearly at the broadband TERRAscope stations. The acoustic coupling occurred very differently depending on the conditions of the Earth's surface surrounding the station. For a seismic station located on hard bedrock, the shock wave (N wave) was clearly recorded with little distortion. Aside from the N wave, very little acoustic coupling of the shock wave energy to the ground occurred at these sites. The observed N wave record was used to estimate the overpressure of the shock wave accurately; a pressure change of 0.5 to 2.2 mbars was obtained. For a seismic station located close to the ocean or soft sedimentary basins, a significant amount of shock wave energy was transferred to the ground through acoustic coupling of the shock wave and the oceanic Rayleigh wave. A distinct topography such as a mountain range was found effective to couple the shock wave energy to the ground. Shock wave energy was also coupled to the ground very effectively through large man made structures such as high rise buildings and offshore oil drilling platforms. For the space shuttle Columbia, in particular, a distinct pulse having a period of about 2 to 3 seconds was observed, 12.5 s before the shock wave, with a broadband seismograph in Pasadena. This pulse was probably excited by the high rise buildings in downtown Los Angeles which were

  9. Ionization of excited xenon atoms by electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erwin, Daniel A.; Kunc, Joseph A.

    2004-08-01

    Measured cross sections for electron-impact ionization of excited Xe atoms are not presently available. Therefore, we combine in this work the formalisms of the binary encounter approximation and Sommerfeld’s quantization of atomic orbits and derive from first-principles cross sections for ionization of excited atoms by electrons of low and moderate energies (up to a few hundred eV ). The approach of this work can be used to calculate the cross sections for electron-impact ionization of excited atoms and atomic ions other than xenon.

  10. Pulse Vector-Excitation Speech Encoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Grant; Gersho, Allen

    1989-01-01

    Proposed pulse vector-excitation speech encoder (PVXC) encodes analog speech signals into digital representation for transmission or storage at rates below 5 kilobits per second. Produces high quality of reconstructed speech, but with less computation than required by comparable speech-encoding systems. Has some characteristics of multipulse linear predictive coding (MPLPC) and of code-excited linear prediction (CELP). System uses mathematical model of vocal tract in conjunction with set of excitation vectors and perceptually-based error criterion to synthesize natural-sounding speech.

  11. Vibrational excitation of CO by blackbody radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arriola, L.; Wilson, J. W.

    1985-09-01

    Lasers excited by blackbody radiation are of interest for power beaming applications in space. In such a system sunlight is collected and focused into a blackbody cavity, heating it to approximately 2000 K. An appropriate absorbing molecule is vibrationally heated but not translationally heated when passed through the blackbody cavity. The vibrationally excited gas is then mixed with a lasant resulting in laser emission. The number density of CO molecules within a blackbody radiation field of a given temperature and pressure is calculated. Such calculations show the degree of excitation achievable, under ideal conditions, from blackbody pumping.

  12. Materials Data on Zr2P2O9 (SG:12) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2016-05-13

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on Ca2P2O7 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-02-04

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Materials Data on K2P2H2O7 (SG:11) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2016-02-05

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. Materials Data on Re2P2O11 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2016-02-10

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. 2p2h effects on the weak pion production cross section

    SciTech Connect

    Mariano, A.; Barbero, C.

    2015-05-15

    The ν{sub l}n → l{sup −}p QE reaction on the A-target is used as a signal event or/and to reconstruct the neutrino energy, using two-body kinematics. Competition of another processes could lead to misidentification of the arriving neutrinos, being important the fake events coming from the CC1π background. A precise knowledge of cross sections is a prerequisite in order to make simulations in event generators to substract the fake ones from the QE countings, and in this contribution we analyze the different nuclear effects on the CC1π channel. Our calculations also can be extended for the NC case.

  17. Materials Data on Al2P2H9NO11 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2016-02-05

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Protein-Protein Interaction Inhibition (2P2I)-Oriented Chemical Library Accelerates Hit Discovery.

    PubMed

    Milhas, Sabine; Raux, Brigitt; Betzi, Stéphane; Derviaux, Carine; Roche, Philippe; Restouin, Audrey; Basse, Marie-Jeanne; Rebuffet, Etienne; Lugari, Adrien; Badol, Marion; Kashyap, Rudra; Lissitzky, Jean-Claude; Eydoux, Cécilia; Hamon, Véronique; Gourdel, Marie-Edith; Combes, Sébastien; Zimmermann, Pascale; Aurrand-Lions, Michel; Roux, Thomas; Rogers, Catherine; Müller, Susanne; Knapp, Stefan; Trinquet, Eric; Collette, Yves; Guillemot, Jean-Claude; Morelli, Xavier

    2016-08-19

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) represent an enormous source of opportunity for therapeutic intervention. We and others have recently pinpointed key rules that will help in identifying the next generation of innovative drugs to tackle this challenging class of targets within the next decade. We used these rules to design an oriented chemical library corresponding to a set of diverse "PPI-like" modulators with cores identified as privileged structures in therapeutics. In this work, we purchased the resulting 1664 structurally diverse compounds and evaluated them on a series of representative protein-protein interfaces with distinct "druggability" potential using homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence (HTRF) technology. For certain PPI classes, analysis of the hit rates revealed up to 100 enrichment factors compared with nonoriented chemical libraries. This observation correlates with the predicted "druggability" of the targets. A specific focus on selectivity profiles, the three-dimensional (3D) molecular modes of action resolved by X-ray crystallography, and the biological activities of identified hits targeting the well-defined "druggable" bromodomains of the bromo and extraterminal (BET) family are presented as a proof-of-concept. Overall, our present study illustrates the potency of machine learning-based oriented chemical libraries to accelerate the identification of hits targeting PPIs. A generalization of this method to a larger set of compounds will accelerate the discovery of original and potent probes for this challenging class of targets.

  19. Materials Data on K2P2H2O7 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2016-02-04

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on Hg2P2S7 (SG:5) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2016-02-04

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on CeTl2P2S7 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. K2P2— A Photometry Pipeline for the K2 Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, Mikkel N.; Handberg, Rasmus; Davies, Guy R.; Chaplin, William J.; Jones, Caitlin D.

    2015-06-01

    With the loss of a second reaction wheel, resulting in the inability to point continuously and stably at the same field of view, the NASA Kepler satellite recently entered a new mode of observation known as the K2 mission. The data from this redesigned mission present a specific challenge; the targets systematically drift in position on an ∼6 hr timescale, inducing a significant instrumental signal in the photometric time series—this greatly impacts the ability to detect planetary signals and perform asteroseismic analysis. Here we detail our version of a reduction pipeline for K2 target pixel data, which automatically defines masks for all targets in a given frame; extracts the target’s flux and position time series; corrects the time series based on the apparent movement on the CCD (either in 1D or 2D), combined with the correction of instrumental and/or planetary signals via the Kepler Asteroseismic Science Operations Center (KASOC) filter, thus rendering the time series ready for asteroseismic analysis; computes power spectra for all targets and identifies potential contaminations between targets. From a test of our pipeline on a sample of targets from the K2 campaign 0, the recovery of data for multiple targets increases the amount of potential light curves by a factor of ≥slant 10. Our pipeline could be applied to the upcoming TESS and PLATO 2.0 missions.

  3. Experimental study of the 2p-2h band in {sup 111}Sn

    SciTech Connect

    Ganguly, S.; Banerjee, P.; Ray, I.; Kshetri, R.; Raut, R.; Bhattacharya, S.; Saha-Sarkar, M.; Goswami, A.; Basu, S. K.

    2008-09-15

    The {delta}I=2 intruder band in {sup 111}Sn, built upon the 4074.3 keV state, was studied. The states were populated in the {sup 100}Mo({sup 20}Ne, {alpha}5n) reaction at a beam energy of 136 MeV. Mean lifetimes of five states up to 8737.2 keV (spin 43/2{sup -}) have been measured for the first time using the Doppler shift attenuation method. In addition, an upper limit of mean lifetime has been estimated for the 9860.0 keV (spin 47/2{sup -}) state. The B(E2) values, derived from the present lifetime results, indicate a quadrupole deformation of {beta}{sub 2}=0.28{+-}0.02 for the 31/2{sup -} state and decrease progressively with spin, suggesting a reduction in collectivity. The dynamic moment of inertia for the band also decreases continuously up to the highest observed frequencies. These results, along with the predictions of a total Routhian surface calculation, suggest that the {delta}I=2 band in {sup 111}Sn undergoes a change of shape from collective prolate to triaxial with increase in spin and possibly terminates in a noncollective oblate state at a high spin.

  4. Materials Data on LiMo2P2O9 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2016-10-15

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Materials Data on K2In2P2HO10 (SG:19) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2016-04-23

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. Materials Data on LiCr2P2O9 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2016-10-28

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Materials Data on LiV2P2O9 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2016-10-28

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Materials Data on LiCo2P2O9 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2016-10-29

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on LiTi2P2O9 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2016-10-27

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on As2P2S7 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2016-02-04

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Radiative transitions involving the (2p2)(3 Pe) metastable autodetaching of H(-)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, V. L.; Bhatia, A. K.; Temkin, A.

    1974-01-01

    The absorption coefficient for the free-bound transition H (ls) + e(-)+ h omega yields H(-)(2 sq p,(3)P(e)) is calculated (together with the differential emission rate for the inverse process) using ls - 2s - 2p close coupling continuum wave functions and a Hylleraas bound state wave function. A maximum in the absorption and emission spectra is found to occur at a photon wavelength of 1219.5 A, which is 2 A closer to the Lyman alpha line than predicted by the calculations of Drake, and is in closer agreement with the stellar absorption feature identified by Heap and Stecher. The free-bound absorption process appears to be a significant source of continuous ultraviolet opacity.

  12. Materials Data on LiFe2P2O9 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2016-10-28

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on NaMo2P2O9 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2016-10-28

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Materials Data on LiNi2P2O9 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2016-10-31

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. Materials Data on CaSn2P2O9 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2016-02-11

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Materials Data on Fe2P2H4NO8 (SG:15) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Materials Data on Mo2P2O11 (SG:11) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2016-04-22

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Materials Data on ZnCr2P2O9 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2014-09-30

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on ZnCo2P2O9 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2014-09-30

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on CaMo2P2O9 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2014-09-30

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on CaFe2P2O9 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2014-09-30

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on Mn2P2O9 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2014-09-30

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Materials Data on MgCr2P2O9 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2014-09-30

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Materials Data on ZnSn2P2O9 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2014-09-30

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Materials Data on MgFe2P2O9 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2014-09-30

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. Materials Data on CaMn2P2O9 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2014-09-30

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Materials Data on CaCr2P2O9 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2014-09-30

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Materials Data on MgMo2P2O9 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2014-09-30

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on MgMn2P2O9 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2014-09-30

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on Cr2P2O9 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2014-09-30

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on Mo2P2O9 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2014-09-30

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on Al2P2H4O11 (SG:61) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2016-05-31

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on KV2P2H4O13 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2016-04-23

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. α and 2p2n emission in fast neutron-induced reactions on Ni60

    DOE PAGES

    Fotiades, N.; Devlin, M.; Haight, R. C.; ...

    2015-06-19

    The cross sections for populating the residual nucleus in the reaction AZX(n,x)A-4Z-2Y exhibit peaks as a function of incident neutron energy corresponding to the (n,n'α) reaction and, at higher energy, to the (n,2p3n) reaction. In addition, the relative magnitudes of these peaks vary with the Z of the target nucleus.

  15. Hydrogen Bonds in Excited State Proton Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horke, D. A.; Watts, H. M.; Smith, A. D.; Jager, E.; Springate, E.; Alexander, O.; Cacho, C.; Chapman, R. T.; Minns, R. S.

    2016-10-01

    Hydrogen bonding interactions between biological chromophores and their surrounding protein and solvent environment significantly affect the photochemical pathways of the chromophore and its biological function. A common first step in the dynamics of these systems is excited state proton transfer between the noncovalently bound molecules, which stabilizes the system against dissociation and principally alters relaxation pathways. Despite such fundamental importance, studying excited state proton transfer across a hydrogen bond has proven difficult, leaving uncertainties about the mechanism. Through time-resolved photoelectron imaging measurements, we demonstrate how the addition of a single hydrogen bond and the opening of an excited state proton transfer channel dramatically changes the outcome of a photochemical reaction, from rapid dissociation in the isolated chromophore to efficient stabilization and ground state recovery in the hydrogen bonded case, and uncover the mechanism of excited state proton transfer at a hydrogen bond, which follows sequential hydrogen and charge transfer processes.

  16. The aeronomy of vibrationally excited ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, J. E.; Allen, J. E., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Theoretical calculations show that above 80 km in the earth's atmosphere the production of vibrationally excited ozone by chemical processes leads to number densities which are usually larger than those expected for local thermodynamic equilibrium. Quenching of highly excited molecules produced in O+O2+M, O3+M provided a significant source of the lower lying states above the mesopause while the 9.6 microns emission of O3 (0,0,1) was a major sink. Analysis of available laboratory results implied that reactions involving excited ozone play a significant role in the global ozone balance despite the relatively small abundance of the molecule. However, this effect is implicit in many of the rate coefficients currently used in stratospheric calculations. In the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere, where the excited state populations differ from those for thermal equilibrium, published reaction rate data are not necessarily applicable to aeronomic calculations.

  17. How to excite a rogue wave

    SciTech Connect

    Akhmediev, N.; Ankiewicz, A.; Soto-Crespo, J. M.

    2009-10-15

    We propose initial conditions that could facilitate the excitation of rogue waves. Understanding the initial conditions that foster rogue waves could be useful both in attempts to avoid them by seafarers and in generating highly energetic pulses in optical fibers.

  18. Nonlinear excited waves on the interventricular septum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekki, Naoaki; Harada, Yoshifumi; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2012-11-01

    Using a novel ultrasonic noninvasive imaging method, we observe some phase singularities in propagating excited waves on a human cardiac interventricular septum (IVS) for a healthy young male. We present a possible physical model explaining one-dimensional dynamics of phase singularities in nonlinearly excited waves on the IVS. We show that at least one of the observed phase singularities in the excited waves on the IVS can be explained by the Bekki-Nozaki hole solution of the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation without any adjustable parameters. We conclude that the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation is such a suitable model for one-dimensional dynamics of cardiac phase singularities in nonlinearly excited waves on the IVS.

  19. Acoustics of Excited Jets: A Historical Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Cliffard A.

    2005-01-01

    The idea that a jet may be excited by external forcing is not new. The first published demonstration of a jet responding to external pressure waves occurred in the mid-1800's. It was not, however, until the 1950's, with the advent of commercial jet aircraft, that interest in the subject greatly increased. Researchers first used excited jets to study the structure of the jet and attempt to determine the nature of the noise sources. The jet actuators of the time limited the range (Reynolds and Mach numbers) of jets that could be excited. As the actuators improved, more realistic jets could be studied. This has led to a better understanding of how jet excitation may be used not only as a research tool to understand the flow properties and noise generation process, but also as a method to control jet noise.

  20. The DSS-14 C-band exciter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowan, D. R.

    1989-01-01

    The development and implementation of a C-band exciter for use with the Block IV Receiver-Exciter Subsystem at Deep Space Station 14 (DSS-14) has been completed. The exciter supplements the standard capabilities of the Block IV system by providing a drive signal for the C-band transmitter while generating coherent translation frequencies for C-band (5-GHz) to S-band (2.2- to 2.3-GHz) Doppler extraction, C-band to L-band (1.6-GHz) zero delay measurements, and a level calibrated L-band test signal. Exciter functions are described, and a general explanation and description of the C-band uplink controller is presented.

  1. Inclination Excitation in Extrasolar Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Juliette; Adams, Fred C.

    2015-01-01

    The Kepler Mission has detected dozens of planetary systems with more than four transiting planets. This sample provides a collection of planetary systems with little or no excited inclination between the inferred orbits. This present study examines the magnitude and efficacy of three potential mechanisms for exciting orbital inclination in these systems: self-excitation of orbital inclination in initially coplanar planetary systems, perturbations by larger bodies within the planetary systems, and perturbations by massive bodies external to the systems. For each of these mechanisms, we determine the regime(s) of parameter space for which orbital inclination excitation is effective. This work provides constraints on the properties (masses and orbital elements) of possible additional bodies in observed planetery systems, and on their dynamical history. One interesting application is to consider the relative size of the external perturbations both in and out of clusters.

  2. Ultrafast optical excitation of magnetic skyrmions

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, N.; Seki, S.; Tokura, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic skyrmions in an insulating chiral magnet Cu2OSeO3 were studied by all-optical spin wave spectroscopy. The spins in the conical and skyrmion phases were excited by the impulsive magnetic field from the inverse-Faraday effect, and resultant spin dynamics were detected by using time-resolved magneto-optics. Clear dispersions of the helimagnon were observed, which is accompanied by a distinct transition into the skyrmion phase, by sweeping temperature and magnetic field. In addition to the collective excitations of skyrmions, i.e., rotation and breathing modes, several spin precession modes were identified, which would be specific to optical excitation. The ultrafast, nonthermal, and local excitation of the spin systems by photons would lead to the efficient manipulation of nano-magnetic structures. PMID:25897634

  3. Faraday waves under time-reversed excitation.

    PubMed

    Pietschmann, Dirk; Stannarius, Ralf; Wagner, Christian; John, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Do parametrically driven systems distinguish periodic excitations that are time mirrors of each other? Faraday waves in a Newtonian fluid are studied under excitation with superimposed harmonic wave forms. We demonstrate that the threshold parameters for the stability of the ground state are insensitive to a time inversion of the driving function. This is a peculiarity of some dynamic systems. The Faraday system shares this property with standard electroconvection in nematic liquid crystals [J. Heuer et al., Phys. Rev. E 78, 036218 (2008)]. In general, time inversion of the excitation affects the asymptotic stability of a parametrically driven system, even when it is described by linear ordinary differential equations. Obviously, the observed symmetry has to be attributed to the particular structure of the underlying differential equation system. The pattern selection of the Faraday waves above threshold, on the other hand, discriminates between time-mirrored excitation functions.

  4. Broadband single-molecule excitation spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Piatkowski, Lukasz; Gellings, Esther; van Hulst, Niek F.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 25 years, single-molecule spectroscopy has developed into a widely used tool in multiple disciplines of science. The diversity of routinely recorded emission spectra does underpin the strength of the single-molecule approach in resolving the heterogeneity and dynamics, otherwise hidden in the ensemble. In early cryogenic studies single molecules were identified by their distinct excitation spectra, yet measuring excitation spectra at room temperature remains challenging. Here we present a broadband Fourier approach that allows rapid recording of excitation spectra of individual molecules under ambient conditions and that is robust against blinking and bleaching. Applying the method we show that the excitation spectra of individual molecules exhibit an extreme distribution of solvatochromic shifts and distinct spectral shapes. Importantly, we demonstrate that the sensitivity and speed of the broadband technique is comparable to that of emission spectroscopy putting both techniques side-by-side in single-molecule spectroscopy. PMID:26794035

  5. Mode Selective Excitation Using Coherent Control Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Ajay K.; Konradi, Jakow; Materny, Arnulf; Sarkar, Sisir K.

    2008-11-14

    Femtosecond time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (fs-CARS) gives access to ultrafast molecular dynamics. However, femtosecond laser pulses are spectrally broad and therefore coherently excite several molecular modes. While the temporal resolution is high, usually no mode-selective excitation is possible. This paper demonstrates the feasibility of selectively exciting specific molecular vibrations in solution phase with shaped fs laser excitation using a feedback-controlled optimization technique guided by an evolutionary algorithm. This approach is also used to obtain molecule-specific CARS spectra from a mixture of different substances. The optimized phase structures of the fs pulses are characterized to get insight into the control process. Possible applications of the spectrum control are discussed.

  6. Magnetic Excitation for Spin Vibration Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Dexter; Mehmed, Oral; Brown, Gerald V.

    1997-01-01

    The Dynamic Spin Rig Laboratory (DSRL) at the NASA Lewis Research Center is a facility used for vibration testing of structures under spinning conditions. The current actuators used for excitation are electromagnetic shakers which are configured to apply torque to the rig's vertical rotor. The rotor is supported radially and axially by conventional bearings. Current operation is limited in rotational speed, excitation capability, and test duration. In an effort to enhance its capabilities, the rig has been initially equipped with a radial magnetic bearing which provides complementary excitation and shaft support. The new magnetic feature has been used in actual blade vibration tests and its performance has been favorable. Due to the success of this initial modification further enhancements are planned which include making the system fully magnetically supported. This paper reports on this comprehensive effort to upgrade the DSRL with an emphasis on the new magnetic excitation capability.

  7. Students Excited by Stellar Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-02-01

    In the constellation of Ophiuchus, above the disk of our Milky Way Galaxy, there lurks a stellar corpse spinning 30 times per second -- an exotic star known as a radio pulsar. This object was unknown until it was discovered last week by three high school students. These students are part of the Pulsar Search Collaboratory (PSC) project, run by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Green Bank, WV, and West Virginia University (WVU). The pulsar, which may be a rare kind of neutron star called a recycled pulsar, was discovered independently by Virginia students Alexander Snider and Casey Thompson, on January 20, and a day later by Kentucky student Hannah Mabry. "Every day, I told myself, 'I have to find a pulsar. I better find a pulsar before this class ends,'" said Mabry. When she actually made the discovery, she could barely contain her excitement. "I started screaming and jumping up and down." Thompson was similarly expressive. "After three years of searching, I hadn't found a single thing," he said, "but when I did, I threw my hands up in the air and said, 'Yes!'." Snider said, "It actually feels really neat to be the first person to ever see something like that. It's an uplifting feeling." As part of the PSC, the students analyze real data from NRAO's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) to find pulsars. The students' teachers -- Debra Edwards of Sherando High School, Leah Lorton of James River High School, and Jennifer Carter of Rowan County Senior High School -- all introduced the PSC in their classes, and interested students formed teams to continue the work. Even before the discovery, Mabry simply enjoyed the search. "It just feels like you're actually doing something," she said. "It's a good feeling." Once the pulsar candidate was reported to NRAO, Project Director Rachel Rosen took a look and agreed with the young scientists. A followup observing session was scheduled on the GBT. Snider and Mabry traveled to West Virginia to assist in the

  8. Electron impact vibrational excitation of methyl chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaamini, Ahmad; Hargreaves, Leigh; Khakoo, Murtadha

    2016-05-01

    Low energy differential cross sections and excitation functions for vibrational excitation of CH3 Cl are presented for five vibrational features in the electron energy loss spectrum of this molecule. Electron energies range from 1 eV to 15 eV and scattering angles from 10o to 125o. Results will be compared to existing data for CH3 Cl in the literature. Funded by a NSF-AMOP-RUI Grant.

  9. Fast pulsed excitation wiggler or undulator

    DOEpatents

    van Steenbergen, Arie

    1990-01-01

    A fast pulsed excitation, electromagnetic undulator or wiggler, employing geometrically alternating substacks of thin laminations of ferromagnetic material, together with a single turn current loop excitation of the composite assembly, of such shape and configuration that intense, spatially alternating, magnetic fields are generated; for use as a pulsed mode undulator or wiggler radiator, for use in a Free Electron Laser (FEL) type radiation source or, for use in an Inverse Free Electron Laser (IFEL) charged particle accelerator.

  10. Intrinsic asymmetry of polar motion excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizouard, C.

    2012-12-01

    Anisotropy of the pole tide and Earth triaxiality make the polar motion excitation asymmetric with respect to and y pole coordinates (Okamoto and Sasao 1977). After having proposed a general description of these non isotropic effects, we show that there are significant in light of the contemporaneous accuracy of the pole coordinates and cannot be cast aside in the interpretation of the Chandler wobble excitation

  11. Electron excitation from ground state to first excited state: Bohmian mechanics method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Song; Shuang, Zhao; Fu-Ming, Guo; Yu-Jun, Yang; Su-Yu, Li

    2016-03-01

    The excitation process of electrons from the ground state to the first excited state via the resonant laser pulse is investigated by the Bohmian mechanics method. It is found that the Bohmian particles far away from the nucleus are easier to be excited and are excited firstly, while the Bohmian particles in the ground state is subject to a strong quantum force at a certain moment, being excited to the first excited state instantaneously. A detailed analysis for one of the trajectories is made, and finally we present the space and energy distribution of 2000 Bohmian particles at several typical instants and analyze their dynamical process at these moments. Project supported by the Doctoral Research Start-up Funding of Northeast Dianli University, China (Grant No. BSJXM-201332), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11547114, 11534004, 11474129, 11274141, 11447192, and 11304116), and the Graduate Innovation Fund of Jilin University, China (Grant No. 2015091).

  12. How much double excitation character do the lowest excited states of linear polyenes have?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starcke, Jan Hendrik; Wormit, Michael; Schirmer, Jochen; Dreuw, Andreas

    2006-10-01

    Doubly excited states play important roles in the low-energy region of the optical spectra of polyenes and their investigation has been subject of theoretical and experimental studies for more than 30 years now and still is in the focus of ongoing research. In this work, we address the question why doubly excited states play a role in the low-energy region of the optical spectrum of molecular systems at all, since from a naive point of view one would expect their excitation energy approximately twice as large as the one of the corresponding single excitation. Furthermore, we show that extended-ADC(2) is well suited for the balanced calculation of the low-lying excited 21Ag-, 11Bu- and 11Bu+ states of long all- trans polyenes, which are known to possess substantial double excitation character. A careful re-investigation of the performance of TDDFT calculations for these states reveals that the previously reported good performance for the 21Ag- state relies heavily on fortuitous cancellation of errors. Finally, the title question is answered such that for short polyenes the lowest excited 21Ag- and 11Bu- states can clearly be classified as doubly excited, whereas the 11Ag- ground state is essentially represented by the (ground-state) HF determinant. For longer polyenes, in addition to increasing double excitation contributions in the 21Ag- and 11Bu- states, the ground state itself aquires substantial double excitation character (45% in C 22H 24), so that the transition from the ground state to these excited states should not be addressed as the excitation of two electrons relative to the 11Ag- ground state.

  13. Multiple proton decays of 6Be, 8C, 8B(IAS) and excited states in 10C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobotka, Lee

    2011-10-01

    Recent technical advances have allowed for high-order correlation experiments to be done. We have primarily focused on experiments in which the final channels are composed of only alphas and protons. Four cases we have studied are: 6Be, 10C*, 8C, and 8B*(IAS) via 3, 4, 5, and 3-particle correlation measurements, respectively. While the first case had been studied before, our work presents very high statistics in the full Jacobi coordinates (the coordinates needed to describe 3-body decay.) Our study of 10C excited states provides isolatable examples of: correlated 2p decay, from one state, and the decay of another which is unusually highly correlated, a ``ménage a quatre.'' 8C decay presents the only case of sequential 3-body 2p decay steps (i.e. 2p-2p.) The intermediate in this 2-step process is the first example (6Be) mentioned above. Unlike the well-studied second step (6Be decay), the first step in this 2p-2p process provides another example of correlated 2p emission. The decay of 8B(IAS), the isobaric analog of 8C, also decays overwhelmingly by 2p emission, in this case to 6Li(IAS). This IAS-to-IAS 2p decay is one for which decay to the potential 1p intermediates is energetically allowed but isospin forbidden. This represents an expansion, over that originally envisioned by Goldanski, of the conceivable nuclear territory for 2p decay.

  14. Tailoring dye-sensitized upconversion nanoparticle excitation bands towards excitation wavelength selective imaging

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Xiang; Lee, Hyungseok; Bilsel, Osman; ...

    2015-01-01

    One of the key roadblocks in UCNP development is its extremely limited choices of excitation wavelengths. We report a generic design to program UCNPs to possess highly tunable dye characteristic excitation bands. Using such distinctive properties, we were able to develop a new excitation wavelength selective security imaging. Finally, this work unleashed the greater freedom of the excitation wavelengths of the upconversion nanoparticles and we believe it is a game-changer in the field and this method will enable numerous applications that are currently limited by existing UCNPs.

  15. Electronic excitations in long polyenes revisited.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Maximilian; Tavan, Paul

    2012-03-28

    We apply the valence shell model OM2 [W. Weber and W. Thiel, Theor. Chem. Acc. 103, 495, (2000)] combined with multireference configuration interaction (MRCI) to compute the vertical excitation energies and transition dipole moments of the low-energy singlet excitations in the polyenes with 4 ≤ N ≤ 22π-electrons. We find that the OM2/MRCI descriptions closely resemble those of Pariser-Parr-Pople (PPP) π-electron models [P. Tavan and K. Schulten, Phys. Rev. B 36, 4337, (1987)], if equivalent MRCI procedures and regularly alternating model geometries are used. OM2/MRCI optimized geometries are shown to entail improved descriptions particularly for smaller polyenes (N ≤ 12), for which sizeable deviations from the regular model geometries are found. With configuration interaction active spaces covering also the σ- in addition to the π-electrons, OM2/MRCI excitation energies turn out to become smaller by at most 0.35 eV for the ionic and 0.15 eV for the covalent excitations. The particle-hole (ph) symmetry, which in Pariser-Parr-Pople models arises from the zero-differential overlap approximation, is demonstrated to be only weakly broken in OM2 such that the oscillator strengths of the covalent 1B(u)(-) states, which artificially vanish in ph-symmetric models, are predicted to be very small. According to OM2/MRCI and experimental data the 1B(u)(-) state is the third excited singlet state for N < 12 and becomes the second for N ≥ 14. By comparisons with results of other theoretical approaches and experimental evidence we argue that deficiencies of the particular MRCI method employed by us, which show up in a poor size consistency of the covalent excitations for N > 12, are caused by its restriction to at most doubly excited references.

  16. Electronic excitations in long polyenes revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Maximilian; Tavan, Paul

    2012-03-01

    We apply the valence shell model OM2 [W. Weber and W. Thiel, Theor. Chem. Acc. 103, 495, (2000), 10.1007/s002149900083] combined with multireference configuration interaction (MRCI) to compute the vertical excitation energies and transition dipole moments of the low-energy singlet excitations in the polyenes with 4 ⩽ N ⩽ 22π-electrons. We find that the OM2/MRCI descriptions closely resemble those of Pariser-Parr-Pople (PPP) π-electron models [P. Tavan and K. Schulten, Phys. Rev. B 36, 4337, (1987)], if equivalent MRCI procedures and regularly alternating model geometries are used. OM2/MRCI optimized geometries are shown to entail improved descriptions particularly for smaller polyenes (N ⩽ 12), for which sizeable deviations from the regular model geometries are found. With configuration interaction active spaces covering also the σ- in addition to the π-electrons, OM2/MRCI excitation energies turn out to become smaller by at most 0.35 eV for the ionic and 0.15 eV for the covalent excitations. The particle-hole (ph) symmetry, which in Pariser-Parr-Pople models arises from the zero-differential overlap approximation, is demonstrated to be only weakly broken in OM2 such that the oscillator strengths of the covalent 1B_u^- states, which artificially vanish in ph-symmetric models, are predicted to be very small. According to OM2/MRCI and experimental data the 1B_u^- state is the third excited singlet state for N < 12 and becomes the second for N ⩾ 14. By comparisons with results of other theoretical approaches and experimental evidence we argue that deficiencies of the particular MRCI method employed by us, which show up in a poor size consistency of the covalent excitations for N > 12, are caused by its restriction to at most doubly excited references.

  17. First in-beam observation of excited states in {sup 156}{sub 72}Hf{sub 84} using the recoul-decay tagging method

    SciTech Connect

    Seweryniak, D.; Ahmad, H.; Amro, D.J.

    1996-12-31

    Excited states in the proton rich nuclide {sup 156}{sub 72}Hf{sub 84} were observed for the first time using the {sup 102}({sup 58}Ni, 2p2n){sup 156}Hf reaction at 270 MeV. Gamma rays were detected with the AYEBALL array of Compton suppressed Ge detectors, placed in front of the Fragment Mass Analyzer, and were assigned to individual reaction charmers using the Recoil-Decay Tagging Method. Prompt {gamma}-ray cascades were associated with the alpha decay of both the ground state and the 8{sup +} isomeric state in {sup 156}Hf. The level scheme constructed for {sup 156}Hf is compared with level schemes of lighter even-even N=84 isotones and is discussed within the framework of the Shell Model.

  18. Excited-state imaging of cold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheludko, David V.; Bell, Simon C.; Vredenbregt, Edgar J. D.; Scholten, Robert E.

    2007-09-01

    We have investigated state-selective diffraction contrast imaging (DCI) of cold 85Rb atoms in the first excited (52P3/2) state. Excited-state DCI requires knowledge of the complex refractive index of the atom cloud, which was calculated numerically using a semi-classical model. The Autler-Townes splitting predicted by the model was verified experimentally, showing excellent agreement. 780 nm lasers were used to cool and excite atoms within a magneto-optical trap, and the atoms were then illuminated by a 776 nm imaging laser. Several excited-state imaging techniques, including blue cascade fluorescence, on-resonance absorption, and DCI have been demonstrated. Initial results show that improved signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) will be required to accurately determine the excited state fraction. We have demonstrated magnetic field gradient compression of the cold atom cloud, and expect that further progress on compression and additional cooling will achieve sufficient diffraction contrast for quantitative state-selective imaging.

  19. Asymptotic properties of mathematical models of excitability.

    PubMed

    Biktasheva, I V; Simitev, R D; Suckley, R; Biktashev, V N

    2006-05-15

    We analyse small parameters in selected models of biological excitability, including Hodgkin-Huxley (Hodgkin & Huxley 1952 J. Physiol.117, 500-544) model of nerve axon, Noble (Noble 1962 J. Physiol.160, 317-352) model of heart Purkinje fibres and Courtemanche et al. (Courtemanche et al. 1998 Am. J. Physiol.275, H301-H321) model of human atrial cells. Some of the small parameters are responsible for differences in the characteristic time-scales of dynamic variables, as in the traditional singular perturbation approaches. Others appear in a way which makes the standard approaches inapplicable. We apply this analysis to study the behaviour of fronts of excitation waves in spatially extended cardiac models. Suppressing the excitability of the tissue leads to a decrease in the propagation speed, but only to a certain limit; further suppression blocks active propagation and leads to a passive diffusive spread of voltage. Such a dissipation may happen if a front propagates into a tissue recovering after a previous wave, e.g. re-entry. A dissipated front does not recover even when the excitability restores. This has no analogy in FitzHugh-Nagumo model and its variants, where fronts can stop and then start again. In two spatial dimensions, dissipation accounts for breakups and self-termination of re-entrant waves in excitable media with Courtemanche et al. kinetics.

  20. Targeting individual excited states in DMRG.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorando, Jonathan; Hachmann, Johannes; Kin-Lic Chan, Garnet

    2007-03-01

    The low-lying excited states of π-conjugated molecules are important for the development of novel devices such as lasers, light-emitting diodes, photovoltaic cells, and field-effect transistors [1,2]. The ab-intio Density Matrix Renormalization Group (DMRG) provides a powerful way to explore the electronic structure of quasi-one-dimensional systems such as conjugated organic oligomers. However, DMRG is limited to targeting only low-lying excited states through state-averaged DMRG (SDMRG). There are several drawbacks; state-averaging degrades the accuracy of the excited states and is limited to at most a few of the low-lying states [3]. In this study, we present a new method for targeting higher individual excited states. Due to progress in the field of numerical analysis presented by Van Der Horst and others [4], we are able to target individual excited states of the Hamiltonian. This is accomplished by modifying the Jacobi-Davidson algorithm via a ``Harmonic Ritz'' procedure. We will present studies of oligoacenes and polyenes that compare the accuracy of SDMRG and Harmonic Davidson DMRG. [1] Burroughes, et al. , Nature 347, 539 (1990). [2] Shirota, J. Mater. Chem. 10, 1, (2000). [3] Ramasesha, Pati, Krishnamurthy, Shuai, Bredas, Phys. Rev. B. 54, 7598, (1997). [4] Bai, Demmel, Dongarra, Ruhe, Van Der Horst, Templates for the Solution of Algebraic Eigenvalue Problems, SIAM, 2000.

  1. Atmospheric Excitation of Planetary Normal Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanimoto, Toshiro

    2001-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to: (1) understand the phenomenon of continuous free oscillations of the Earth and (2) examine the idea of using this phenomenon for planetary seismology. We first describe the results on (1) and present our evaluations of the idea (2) in the final section. In 1997, after almost forty years since the initial attempt by Benioff et al, continuous free oscillations of the Earth were discovered. Spheroidal fundamental modes between 2 and 7 millihertz are excited continuously with acceleration amplitudes of about 0.3-0.5 nanogals. The signal is now commonly found in virtually all data recorded by STS-1 type broadband seismometers at quiet sites. Seasonal variation in amplitude and the existence of two coupled modes between the atmosphere and the solid Earth support that these oscillations are excited by the atmosphere. Stochastic excitation due to atmospheric turbulence is a favored mechanism, providing a good match between theory and data. The atmosphere has ample energy to support this theory because excitation of these modes require only 500-10000 W whereas the atmosphere contains about 117 W of kinetic energy. An application of this phenomenon includes planetary seismology, because other planets may be oscillating due to atmospheric excitation. The interior structure of planets could be learned by determining the eigenfrequencies in the continuous free oscillations. It is especially attractive to pursue this idea for tectonically quiet planets, since quakes may be too infrequent to be recorded by seismic instruments.

  2. [Pre-excitation syndrome in monozygotic twins].

    PubMed

    Mispireta, J L; Cárdenas, M; Attié, F; Martínez-Ríos, M A; Medrano, G A

    1976-01-01

    A family group of seven members is presented, two of which have pre-excitation syndrome. These subjects are identical twin brothers. One of them has the W-P-W syndrome tipe B, and the other has L-G-L syndrome. The latter had an associated atrial-septal defect, and the other twin had no associated cardiovascular lesions. Both underwent electrocardiographic and vectorcardiographic studies, as well as His bundle electrograms. In the case with W-P-W, the diagnosis was made by electrocardiography, and was confirmed by vertocardiography. The His bundle electrogram showed the habitual findings in this type of pre-excitation. The His bundle potential was preceded by the beginning of the delta wave. The patient with W-P-W had episodes of supraventricular paroxysmal tachycardia, some of these with antegrade conduction through the normal pathway, and others with conduction through the anomalous pathway. The other had a L-G-L syndrome, demonstrated by electrocardiography and vectorcardiography. During the register of the His bundle electrogram, he did not present pre-excitation, the tracings in basal conditions as well as during atrial stimulation were normal. The conclusion is that many factors exist which back up the hypothesis that the pre-excitation syndromes occur because of anomalous pathways, and that this type of alteration might have a sex linked genetic basis. This presumption appears to be confirmed by the presence of pre-excitation in identical twin brothers. Other possibilities are also discussed.

  3. Theory of elementary excitations in quasiperiodic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albuquerque, E. L.; Cottam, M. G.

    2003-03-01

    The aim of this work is to present a comprehensive and up-to-date review of the main physical properties (such as energy profiles, localization, scale laws, multifractal analysis, transmission spectra, transmission fingerprints, electronic structures, magnetization curves and thermodynamic properties) of the elementary excitations that can propagate in multilayered structures with constituents arranged in a quasiperiodic fashion. These excitations include plasmon-polaritons, spin waves, light waves and electrons, among others. A complex fractal or multifractal profile of the energy spectra is the common feature among these excitations. The quasiperiodic property is formed by the incommensurate arrangement of periodic unit cells and can be of the type referred to as deterministic (or controlled) disorder. The resulting excitations are characterized by the nature of their Fourier spectrum, which can be dense pure point (as for the Fibonacci sequence) or singular continuous (as for the Thue-Morse and double-period sequences). These sequences are described in terms of a series of generations that obey particular recursion relations, and they can be considered as intermediate systems between a periodic crystal and the random amorphous solids, thus defining a novel description of disorder. A discussion is also included of some spectroscopic techniques used to probe the excitations, emphasizing Raman and Brillouin light scattering.

  4. Tone-excited jet: Theory and experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, K. K.; Lepicovsky, J.; Tam, C. K. W.; Morris, P. J.; Burrin, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    A detailed study to understand the phenomenon of broadband jet-noise amplification produced by upstream discrete-tone sound excitation has been carried out. This has been achieved by simultaneous acquisition of the acoustic, mean velocity, turbulence intensities, and instability-wave pressure data. A 5.08 cm diameter jet has been tested for this purpose under static and also flight-simulation conditions. An open-jet wind tunnel has been used to simulate the flight effects. Limited data on heated jets have also been obtained. To improve the physical understanding of the flow modifications brought about by the upstream discrete-tone excitation, ensemble-averaged schlieren photographs of the jets have also been taken. Parallel to the experimental study, a mathematical model of the processes that lead to broadband-noise amplification by upstream tones has been developed. Excitation of large-scale turbulence by upstream tones is first calculated. A model to predict the changes in small-scale turbulence is then developed. By numerically integrating the resultant set of equations, the enhanced small-scale turbulence distribution in a jet under various excitation conditions is obtained. The resulting changes in small-scale turbulence have been attributed to broadband amplification of jet noise. Excellent agreement has been found between the theory and the experiments. It has also shown that the relative velocity effects are the same for the excited and the unexcited jets.

  5. Patterns of conductivity in excitable automata with updatable intervals of excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamatzky, Andrew

    2012-11-01

    We define a cellular automaton where a resting cell excites if number of its excited neighbors belong to some specified interval and boundaries of the interval change depending on ratio of excited and refractory neighbors in the cell's neighborhood. We calculate excitability of a cell as a number of possible neighborhood configurations that excite the resting cell. We call cells with maximal values of excitability conductive. In exhaustive search of functions of excitation interval updates we select functions which lead to formation of connected configurations of conductive cells. The functions discovered are used to design conductive, wirelike, pathways in initially nonconductive arrays of cells. We demonstrate that by positioning seeds of growing conductive pathways it is possible to implement a wide range of routing operations, including reflection of wires, stopping wires, formation of conductive bridges, and generation of new wires in the result of collision. The findings presented may be applied in designing conductive circuits in excitable nonlinear media, reaction-diffusion chemical systems, neural tissue, and assemblies of conductive polymers.

  6. Stationary Phonon Squeezing by Optical Polaron Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papenkort, T.; Axt, V. M.; Kuhn, T.

    2017-03-01

    We demonstrate that a stationary squeezed phonon state can be prepared by a pulsed optical excitation of a semiconductor quantum well. Unlike previously discussed scenarios for generating squeezed phonons, the corresponding uncertainties become stationary after the excitation and do not oscillate in time. The effect is caused by two-phonon correlations within the excited polaron. We demonstrate by quantum kinetic simulations and by a perturbation analysis that the energetically lowest polaron state comprises two-phonon correlations which, after the pulse, result in an uncertainty of the lattice momentum that is continuously lower than in the ground state of the semiconductor. The simulations show the dynamics of the polaron formation process and the resulting time-dependent lattice uncertainties.

  7. Artificial Excitation of Schumann Resonance with HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streltsov, A. V.; Chang, C. L.

    2014-12-01

    We report results from the experiment aimed at the artificial excitation of extremely-low-frequency (ELF) electromagnetic waves with frequencies corresponding to the frequency of Schumann resonance (typically, 7.5 - 8.0 Hz frequency range). Electromagnetic waves with these frequencies can form a standing pattern inside the spherical cavity formed by the surface of the earth and the ionosphere. In the experiment the ELF waves were excited by heating the ionosphere with X-mode HF electromagnetic waves generated by the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in Alaska. The experiment demonstrates that heating of the ionosphere can excite relatively large-amplitude electromagnetic waves with frequencies in the range of the Schumann resonance, when the ionosphere has a strong F-layer and an electric field greater than 5 mV/m is present in the E-region.

  8. Asymmetric magnon excitation by spontaneous toroidal ordering

    SciTech Connect

    Hayami, Satoru; Kusunose, Hiroaki; Motome, Yukitoshi

    2016-04-12

    The effects of spontaneous toroidal ordering on magnetic excitation are theoretically investigated for a localized spin model that includes a staggered Dzyaloshinsky–Moriya interaction and anisotropic exchange interactions, which arise from the antisymmetric spin–orbit coupling and the multiorbital correlation effect. We show that the model exhibits a Néel-type antiferromagnetic order, which simultaneously accompanies a ferroic toroidal order. We find that the occurrence of toroidal order modulates the magnon dispersion in an asymmetric way with respect to the wave number: a toroidal dipole order on the zigzag chain leads to a band-bottom shift, while a toroidal octupole order on the honeycomb lattice gives rise to a valley splitting. These asymmetric magnon excitations could be a source of unusual magnetic responses, such as nonreciprocal magnon transport. A variety of modulations are discussed while changing the lattice and magnetic symmetries. Furthermore, the implications regarding candidate materials for asymmetric magnon excitations are presented.

  9. Photothermal measurements using a localized excitation source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aamodt, L. C.; Murphy, J. C.

    1981-08-01

    Optical-beam deflection (OBD) photothermal imaging uses spatially localized excitation to observe spatial variations in the sample surface temperature. This paper analyzes OBD signals produced by localized excitation in terms of three-dimensional thermal diffusion in the sample and in the fluid region in contact with the sample. The dependence of the signals on the local optical absorption coefficient, on gas/sample thermal properties, on modulation frequency, and on the probe/excitation beam radii are discussed with special attention being given to determining the spatial resolution possible for OBD imaging. A criterion for photothermal ''saturation'' appropriate to localized optical absorption is developed. Finally, a new variant of the OBD technique is introduced, which is especially adapted to studying optical and thermal boundaries in the plane of the sample. Some comparisons between theory and experiment are provided which illustrate transverse thermal diffusion.

  10. Resonance Raman excitation profiles of lycopene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoskins, L. C.

    1981-01-01

    The resonance Raman spectrum of lycopene has been examined in acetone solvent and excitation profiles of the three fundamentals ν1, ν2, and ν3 have been determined. The excitation data and the visible spectrum have been analyzed using two-mode and three-mode vibrational models, with the two-mode model involving virtual states of ν1 and ν2 giving the best fit to the data. This mode mixing or Duskinsky effect was not observed for β-carotene. The single-mode and three-mode theories which have been used to explain the corresponding data for β-carotene are shown to be inconsistent with the experimental data of lycopene. Equations for calculating excitation profiles and visible spectra are given.

  11. On modulations of the Chandler wobble excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zotov, L.; Bizouard, C.

    2012-12-01

    We derive the Chandler wobble excitation from the polar motion (PM) observations by using the Panteleev corrective filtering. The latter method is based on inversion of the Euler-Liouville equation, with additional filtering in the Chandler frequency band. The excitation reconstruction reveals amplitude changes different from the one observed in the Chandler wobble itself. Their main feature, well observable over the length of the day (LOD), is the presence of a 18.6-year amplitude modulation synchronous with the lunar orbital precession cycle and tidal effects. The filtering of oceanic and atmospheric excitation in the Chandler frequency band also reveals a coherent 18.6-year oceanic pattern. Most probably the ocean provide a channel for the tidal energy transfer.

  12. Chandler wobble excitation reconstruction and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zotov, Leonid

    2010-05-01

    Different methods of geodetic excitation reconstruction from observations of the polar motion are compared. Among them Wilson-Jeffreys filter, Tikhonov regularization, Panteleev corrective smoothing. Reconstruction of Chandler excitation is an inverse problem, aggravated by the strong annual oscillation, which is nearby in frequency band. Special attempts to filter annual oscillation out were undertaken, among them the harmonic model subtraction, Singular Spectrum Analysis (SSA) and Panteleev smoothing. Obtained results compared one with another and with geophysical excitations, such as atmospheric and oceanic angular momentum, El Nino event, solar and lunar tides. Amplitude and phase correlation analysis was performed. Phase change of the Chandler oscillation in the 30-th of the XX century found a partial explanation. This work is supported by grant of the President of Russia MK-4234.2009.5

  13. Charge-displacement analysis for excited states

    SciTech Connect

    Ronca, Enrico Tarantelli, Francesco; Pastore, Mariachiara Belpassi, Leonardo; De Angelis, Filippo; Angeli, Celestino; Cimiraglia, Renzo

    2014-02-07

    We extend the Charge-Displacement (CD) analysis, already successfully employed to describe the nature of intermolecular interactions [L. Belpassi et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 132, 13046 (2010)] and various types of controversial chemical bonds [L. Belpassi et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 130, 1048 (2008); N. Salvi et al., Chem. Eur. J. 16, 7231 (2010)], to study the charge fluxes accompanying electron excitations, and in particular the all-important charge-transfer (CT) phenomena. We demonstrate the usefulness of the new approach through applications to exemplary excitations in a series of molecules, encompassing various typical situations from valence, to Rydberg, to CT excitations. The CD functions defined along various spatial directions provide a detailed and insightful quantitative picture of the electron displacements taking place.

  14. Minimizing broadband excitation under dissipative conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelman, David; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2005-12-01

    Optimal control theory is employed for the task of minimizing the excited-state population of a dye molecule in solution. The spectrum of the excitation pulse is contained completely in the absorption band of the molecule. Only phase control is studied which is equivalent to optimizing the transmission of the pulse through the medium. The molecular model explicitly includes two electronic states and a single vibrational mode. The other degrees of freedom are classified as bath modes. The surrogate Hamiltonian method is employed to incorporate these bath degrees of freedom. Their influence can be classified as electronic dephasing and vibrational relaxation. In accordance with experimental results, minimal excitation is associated with a negatively chirped pulses. Optimal pulses with more complex transient structure are found to be superior to linearly chirped pulses. The difference is enhanced when the fluence is increased. The improvement degrades when dissipative effects become more dominant.

  15. Excited light meson spectroscopy from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Thomas, Hadron Spectrum Collaboration

    2012-04-01

    I report on recent progress in calculating excited meson spectra using lattice QCD, emphasizing results and phenomenology. With novel techniques we can now extract extensive spectra of excited mesons with high statistical precision, including spin-four states and those with exotic quantum numbers. As well as isovector meson spectra, I will present new calculations of the spectrum of excited light isoscalar mesons, something that has up to now been a challenge for lattice QCD. I show determinations of the flavor content of these mesons, including the eta-eta' mixing angle, providing a window on annihilation dynamics in QCD. I will also discuss recent work on using lattice QCD to map out the energy-dependent phase shift in pi-pi scattering and future applications of the methodology to the study of resonances and decays.

  16. Asymptotic wave propagation in excitable media.

    PubMed

    Bernus, Olivier; Vigmond, Edward

    2015-07-01

    Wave shape and velocity are important issues in reaction-diffusion systems, and are often the result of competition in media with heterogeneous conduction properties. Asymptotic wave front propagation at maximal conduction velocity has been previously reported in the context of anisotropic cardiac tissue, but it is unknown whether this is a universal property of excitable tissues where conduction velocity can be locally modulated by mechanisms other than anisotropy. Here, we investigate the impact of conduction heterogeneities and boundary effects on wave propagation in excitable media. Following a theoretical analysis, we find that wave-front cusps occur where local velocity is reduced and that asymptotic wave fronts propagate at the maximal translational conduction velocity. Simulations performed in different reaction-diffusion systems, including cardiac tissue, confirm our theoretical findings. We conclude that this property can be found in a wide range of reaction-diffusion systems with excitable dynamics and that asymptotic wave-front shapes can be predicted.

  17. Shear layer excitation, experiment versus theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bechert, D. W.; Stahl, B.

    1984-01-01

    The acoustical excitation of shear layers is investigated. Acoustical excitation causes the so-called orderly structures in shear layers and jets. Also, the deviations in the spreading rate between different shear layer experiments are due to the same excitation mechanism. Measurements in the linear interaction region close to the edge from which the shear layer is shed are examined. Two sets of experiments (Houston 1981 and Berlin 1983/84) are discussed. The measurements were carried out with shear layers in air using hot wire anemometers and microphones. The agreement between these measurements and the theory is good. Even details of the fluctuating flow field correspond to theoretical predictions, such as the local occurrence of negative phase speeds.

  18. Self-excitation of surface plasmon polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordo, V. G.

    2016-04-01

    The novel effect of self-excitation of surface plasmons (SESP) in a plasmonic nanocavity is predicted, and its theory is developed from first principles. It is assumed that the cavity is formed by a nanogap between two metals and contains polarizable inclusions. Basing on the dyadic Green's function of the structure, the equations for the field in the cavity are investigated. It is shown that under certain conditions the field becomes unstable that leads to its self-excitation. The threshold criterion for self-excitation as well as the frequency of self-oscillation are derived in an analytical form. The SESP effect is explained in terms of a positive feedback for the polarization of inclusions provided by the field reflected from the cavity walls. These findings suggest a principally new avenue to surface plasmon generation which does not employ stimulated emission and is different from SPASER or plasmon laser.

  19. Nanoscale control of phonon excitations in graphene

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyo Won; Ko, Wonhee; Ku, JiYeon; Jeon, Insu; Kim, Donggyu; Kwon, Hyeokshin; Oh, Youngtek; Ryu, Seunghwa; Kuk, Young; Hwang, Sung Woo; Suh, Hwansoo

    2015-01-01

    Phonons, which are collective excitations in a lattice of atoms or molecules, play a major role in determining various physical properties of condensed matter, such as thermal and electrical conductivities. In particular, phonons in graphene interact strongly with electrons; however, unlike in usual metals, these interactions between phonons and massless Dirac fermions appear to mirror the rather complicated physics of those between light and relativistic electrons. Therefore, a fundamental understanding of the underlying physics through systematic studies of phonon interactions and excitations in graphene is crucial for realising graphene-based devices. In this study, we demonstrate that the local phonon properties of graphene can be controlled at the nanoscale by tuning the interaction strength between graphene and an underlying Pt substrate. Using scanning probe methods, we determine that the reduced interaction due to embedded Ar atoms facilitates electron–phonon excitations, further influencing phonon-assisted inelastic electron tunnelling. PMID:26109454

  20. Excited baryons in the 1/Nc expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matagne, N.; Stancu, Fl.

    2012-04-01

    We briefly describe the 1/Nc expansion method for studying baryon masses. Two approaches of the large Nc excited baryons have been proposed so far. The first one, based on the Hartree picture, treats the baryon as a ground state core and an excited quark and the second one, suggested recently, considers the baryon globally, without decoupling the system. The masses of excited states of mixed orbital symmetry of nonstrange and strange baryons belonging to the lowest [70, -] multiplet are calculated in the 1/Nc expansion to order 1/Nc with the new method which allows to considerably reduce the number of linearly independent operators entering the mass formula. The status of the resonance Λ(1405) is discussed.

  1. Measurement of excited layer thickness in highly photo-excited GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Lingliang; Tian, Jinshou; Wang, Tao; Wu, Shengli; Li, Fuli; Gao, Guilong

    2016-10-01

    Highly photo-excited layer thickness in GaAs is measured using a pump probe arrangement. A normally incident pump illumination spatially modulated by a mask will induce a corresponding refractive index change distribution in the depth direction due to edge scattering and attenuation absorption effect, which can deflect the probe beam passing through this excited region. Maximum deflection of the probe beam will be limited by the thickness of excited layer, and thus can also be employed to measure the thickness of the photo-excited layer of the material. Theoretical calculation confirms the experimental results. This method can find its application in measurements of photo-excited layer thickness of many kinds of materials and be significant to study the characteristics of materials in laser machining, grating and waveguide fabricating.

  2. Influence of excitation and deexcitation processes on the dynamics of laser-excited argon clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moll, M.; Schlanges, M.; Bornath, Th.; Krainov, V. P.

    2015-03-01

    The excitation of atomic clusters by intense infrared laser pulses leads to the creation of highly charged ions and to the emission of energetic photons. These phenomena, which follow from ionization processes occurring in the cluster, depend significantly on the population of ground states and excited states in the laser-produced nanoplasma. This makes it necessary to account for collisional excitation and deexcitation processes. We investigate the interaction of femtosecond laser pulses with argon clusters by means of a nanoplasma model. Considering laser excitation with single and double pulses, we analyze the role of excitation and deexcitation processes in detail and calculate the yield of highly charged ions and of energetic photons in different wavelength regimes.

  3. BROADBAND EXCITATION IN NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Tycko, R.

    1984-10-01

    Theoretical methods for designing sequences of radio frequency (rf) radiation pulses for broadband excitation of spin systems in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) are described. The sequences excite spins uniformly over large ranges of resonant frequencies arising from static magnetic field inhomogeneity, chemical shift differences, or spin couplings, or over large ranges of rf field amplitudes. Specific sequences for creating a population inversion or transverse magnetization are derived and demonstrated experimentally in liquid and solid state NMR. One approach to broadband excitation is based on principles of coherent averaging theory. A general formalism for deriving pulse sequences is given, along with computational methods for specific cases. This approach leads to sequences that produce strictly constant transformations of a spin system. The importance of this feature in NMR applications is discussed. A second approach to broadband excitation makes use of iterative schemes, i.e. sets of operations that are applied repetitively to a given initial pulse sequences, generating a series of increasingly complex sequences with increasingly desirable properties. A general mathematical framework for analyzing iterative schemes is developed. An iterative scheme is treated as a function that acts on a space of operators corresponding to the transformations produced by all possible pulse sequences. The fixed points of the function and the stability of the fixed points are shown to determine the essential behavior of the scheme. Iterative schemes for broadband population inversion are treated in detail. Algebraic and numerical methods for performing the mathematical analysis are presented. Two additional topics are treated. The first is the construction of sequences for uniform excitation of double-quantum coherence and for uniform polarization transfer over a range of spin couplings. Double-quantum excitation sequences are demonstrated in a liquid crystal system. The

  4. Electron-impact vibrational excitation of cyclopropane

    SciTech Connect

    Čurík, R. Čársky, P.; Allan, M.

    2015-04-14

    We report a very detailed test of the ab initio discrete momentum representation (DMR) method of calculating vibrational excitation of polyatomic molecules by electron impact, by comparison of its results with an extensive set of experimental data, covering the entire range of scattering angles from 10{sup ∘} to 180{sup ∘} and electron energies from 0.4 to 20 eV. The DMR calculations were carried out by solving the two-channel Lippmann-Schwinger equation in the momentum space, and the interaction between the scattered electron and the target molecule was described by exact static-exchange potential corrected by a density functional theory (DFT) correlation-polarization interaction that models target’s response to the field of incoming electron. The theory is found to quantitatively reproduce the measured spectra for all normal modes, even at the difficult conditions of extreme angles and at low energies, and thus provides full understanding of the excitation mechanism. It is shown that the overlap of individual vibrational bands caused by limited experimental resolution and rotational excitation must be properly taken into account for correct comparison of experiment and theory. By doing so, an apparent discrepancy between published experimental data could be reconciled. A substantial cross section is found for excitation of the non-symmetric HCH twisting mode ν{sub 4} of A{sub 1}{sup ″} symmetry by the 5.5 eV A{sub 2}{sup ′} resonance, surprisingly because the currently accepted selection rules predict this process to be forbidden. The DMR theory shows that the excitation is caused by an incoming electron in an f-wave of A{sub 2}{sup ′} symmetry which causes excitation of the non-symmetric HCH twisting mode ν{sub 4} of the A{sub 1}{sup ″} symmetry and departs in p- and f-waves of A{sub 2}{sup ″} symmetry.

  5. Band excitation method applicable to scanning probe microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2017-01-03

    Scanning probe microscopy may include a method for generating a band excitation (BE) signal and simultaneously exciting a probe at a plurality of frequencies within a predetermined frequency band based on the excitation signal. A response of the probe is measured across a subset of frequencies of the predetermined frequency band and the excitation signal is adjusted based on the measured response.

  6. Band excitation method applicable to scanning probe microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2015-08-04

    Scanning probe microscopy may include a method for generating a band excitation (BE) signal and simultaneously exciting a probe at a plurality of frequencies within a predetermined frequency band based on the excitation signal. A response of the probe is measured across a subset of frequencies of the predetermined frequency band and the excitation signal is adjusted based on the measured response.

  7. Computing correct truncated excited state wavefunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacalis, N. C.; Xiong, Z.; Zang, J.; Karaoulanis, D.

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrate that, if a wave function's truncated expansion is small, then the standard excited states computational method, of optimizing one "root" of a secular equation, may lead to an incorrect wave function - despite the correct energy according to the theorem of Hylleraas, Undheim and McDonald - whereas our proposed method [J. Comput. Meth. Sci. Eng. 8, 277 (2008)] (independent of orthogonality to lower lying approximants) leads to correct reliable small truncated wave functions. The demonstration is done in He excited states, using truncated series expansions in Hylleraas coordinates, as well as standard configuration-interaction truncated expansions.

  8. Charmonium excited state spectrum in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Jozef Dudek; Robert Edwards; Nilmani Mathur; David Richards

    2008-02-01

    Working with a large basis of covariant derivative-based meson interpolating fields we demonstrate the feasibility of reliably extracting multiple excited states using a variational method. The study is performed on quenched anisotropic lattices with clover quarks at the charm mass. We demonstrate how a knowledge of the continuum limit of a lattice interpolating field can give additional spin-assignment information, even at a single lattice spacing, via the overlap factors of interpolating field and state. Excited state masses are systematically high with respect to quark potential model predictions and, where they exist, experimental states. We conclude that this is most likely a result of the quenched approximation.

  9. Laser Excited Fluorescence For Forensic Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinney, Robert E.

    1986-07-01

    The application of laser excited fluorescence to the detection and identification of latent fingerprints was first accomplished ten years ago. The development of the technology has progressed rapidly with the introduction of commercial equipment by several manufacturers. Systems based on Argon-ion, Copper-vapor, and frequency-doubled Nd:YAG lasers are compared. The theoretical basis of detection by fluorescence is discussed along with the more useful techniques of dye staining. Other applications of the laser excited fluorescence in forensic investigation include gunshot residue analysis, serology, collection of trace evidence, and document examination.

  10. The resonance Raman excitation profile of lutein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoskins, L. C.

    The resonance Raman excitation profiles for the ν 1, ν 2 and ν 3 vibrations of lutein in acetone, toluene and carbon disulfide solvents have been measured. The results are interpreted in terms of a three-mode vibrational theory which includes both homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadening effects. Excellent agreement between calculated and observed excitation profiles and visible spectra was found in acetone and toluene, but the results in carbon disulfide indicate a possible breakdown in the three-mode model. The major broadening mechanism is homogeneous, with about a 25% contribution from inhomogeneous broadening.

  11. The resonance Raman excitation profile of fucoxanthin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballard, L. J.; Glasgow, L. A.; Hoskins, L. C.; Krohe, T.

    1989-01-01

    The resonance Raman excitation profiles (RREPs) of the ν 1 and ν 2 vibrations of fucoxanthin in acetone and toluene solvents have been studied. Fucoxanthin, which is a predominant pigment in marine seaweed and phytoplankton, has several structural differences from carotenoids for which excitation profiles have been determined. The RREPs for fucoxanthin are interpreted in terms of a two-mode model and show a B2 value which is approximately 20% lower than for carotenoids like β-carotene and lutein which occur in higher plants. Excellent fits between experimental data and the theoretical model were observed in both solvents.

  12. Double Photoionization of excited Lithium and Beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    Yip, Frank L.; McCurdy, C. William; Rescigno, Thomas N.

    2010-05-20

    We present total, energy-sharing and triple differential cross sections for one-photon, double ionization of lithium and beryllium starting from aligned, excited P states. We employ a recently developed hybrid atomic orbital/ numerical grid method based on the finite-element discrete-variable representation and exterior complex scaling. Comparisons with calculated results for the ground-state atoms, as well as analogous results for ground-state and excited helium, serve to highlight important selection rules and show some interesting effects that relate to differences between inter- and intra-shell electron correlation.

  13. Elementary spin excitations in ultrathin itinerant magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakeri, Khalil

    2014-12-01

    Elementary spin excitations (magnons) play a fundamental role in condensed matter physics, since many phenomena e.g. magnetic ordering, electrical (as well as heat) transport properties, ultrafast magnetization processes, and most importantly electron/spin dynamics can only be understood when these quasi-particles are taken into consideration. In addition to their fundamental importance, magnons may also be used for information processing in modern spintronics. Here the concept of spin excitations in ultrathin itinerant magnets is discussed and reviewed. Starting with a historical introduction, different classes of magnons are introduced. Different theoretical treatments of spin excitations in solids are outlined. Interaction of spin-polarized electrons with a magnetic surface is discussed. It is shown that, based on the quantum mechanical conservation rules, a magnon can only be excited when a minority electron is injected into the system. While the magnon creation process is forbidden by majority electrons, the magnon annihilation process is allowed instead. These fundamental quantum mechanical selection rules, together with the strong interaction of electrons with matter, make the spin-polarized electron spectroscopies as appropriate tools to excite and probe the elementary spin excitations in low-dimensional magnets e.g ultrathin films and nanostructures. The focus is put on the experimental results obtained by spin-polarized electron energy loss spectroscopy and spin-polarized inelastic tunneling spectroscopy. The magnon dispersion relation, lifetime, group and phase velocity measured using these approaches in various ultrathin magnets are discussed in detail. The differences and similarities with respect to the bulk excitations are addressed. The role of the temperature, atomic structure, number of atomic layers, lattice strain, electronic complexes and hybridization at the interfaces are outlined. A possibility of simultaneous probing of magnons and phonons

  14. Exciting baryons: Now and in the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennington, M. R.

    2012-04-01

    This is the final talk of NSTAR2011 conference. It is not a summary talk, but rather a looking forward to what still needs to be done in excited baryon physics. In particular, we need to hone our tools connecting experimental inputs with QCD. At present we rely on models that often have doubtful connections with the underlying theory, and this needs to be dramatically improved, if we are to reach definitive conclusions about the relevant degrees of freedom of excited baryons. Conclusions that we want to have by NSTAR2021.

  15. Two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    So, P T; Dong, C Y; Masters, B R; Berland, K M

    2000-01-01

    Two-photon fluorescence microscopy is one of the most important recent inventions in biological imaging. This technology enables noninvasive study of biological specimens in three dimensions with submicrometer resolution. Two-photon excitation of fluorophores results from the simultaneous absorption of two photons. This excitation process has a number of unique advantages, such as reduced specimen photodamage and enhanced penetration depth. It also produces higher-contrast images and is a novel method to trigger localized photochemical reactions. Two-photon microscopy continues to find an increasing number of applications in biology and medicine.

  16. Reactions of R(2)P-P(SiMe(3))Li with [(R'(3)P)(2)PtCl(2)]. A general and efficient entry to phosphanylphosphinidene complexes of platinum. Syntheses and structures of [(eta(2)-P=(i)Pr(2))Pt(p-Tol(3)P)(2)], [(eta(2)-P=(t)Bu(2))Pt(p-Tol(3)P)(2)], [{eta(2)-P=(N(i)Pr(2))(2)}Pt(p-Tol(3)P)(2)] and [{(Et(2)PhP)(2)Pt}(2)P(2)].

    PubMed

    Domańska-Babul, Wioleta; Chojnacki, Jaroslaw; Matern, Eberhard; Pikies, Jerzy

    2009-01-07

    The reactions of lithium derivatives of diphosphanes R(2)P-P(SiMe(3))Li (R = (t)Bu, (i)Pr, Et(2)N and (i)Pr(2)N) with [(R'(3)P)(2)PtCl(2)] (R'(3)P = Et(3)P, Et(2)PhP, EtPh(2)P and p-Tol(3)P) proceed in a facile manner to afford side-on bonded phosphanylphosphinidene complexes of platinum [(eta(2)-P=R(2))Pt(PR'(3))(2)]. The related reactions of Ph(2)P-P(SiMe(3))Li with [(R'(3)P)(2)PtCl(2)] did not yield [(eta(2)-P=PPh(2))Pt(PR'(3))(2)] and resulted mainly in the formation of [{(R'(3)P)(2)Pt}(2)P(2)], Ph(2)P-PLi-PPh(2), (Me(3)Si)(2)PLi and (Me(3)Si)(3)P. Crystallographic data are reported for the compounds [(eta(2)-P=R(2))Pt(p-Tol(3)P)(2)] (R = (t)Bu, (i)Pr, ((i)Pr(2)N)(2)P) and for [{(Et(2)PhP)(2)Pt}(2)P(2)].

  17. Relaxation channels of multi-photon excited xenon clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Serdobintsev, P. Yu.; Melnikov, A. S.; Rakcheeva, L. P. Murashov, S. V.; Khodorkovskii, M. A.; Lyubchik, S.; Timofeev, N. A.; Pastor, A. A.

    2015-09-21

    The relaxation processes of the xenon clusters subjected to multi-photon excitation by laser radiation with quantum energies significantly lower than the thresholds of excitation of atoms and ionization of clusters were studied. Results obtained by means of the photoelectron spectroscopy method showed that desorption processes of excited atoms play a significant role in the decay of two-photon excited xenon clusters. A number of excited states of xenon atoms formed during this process were discovered and identified.

  18. Relaxation channels of multi-photon excited xenon clusters.

    PubMed

    Serdobintsev, P Yu; Rakcheeva, L P; Murashov, S V; Melnikov, A S; Lyubchik, S; Timofeev, N A; Pastor, A A; Khodorkovskii, M A

    2015-09-21

    The relaxation processes of the xenon clusters subjected to multi-photon excitation by laser radiation with quantum energies significantly lower than the thresholds of excitation of atoms and ionization of clusters were studied. Results obtained by means of the photoelectron spectroscopy method showed that desorption processes of excited atoms play a significant role in the decay of two-photon excited xenon clusters. A number of excited states of xenon atoms formed during this process were discovered and identified.

  19. Relaxation channels of multi-photon excited xenon clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serdobintsev, P. Yu.; Rakcheeva, L. P.; Murashov, S. V.; Melnikov, A. S.; Lyubchik, S.; Timofeev, N. A.; Pastor, A. A.; Khodorkovskii, M. A.

    2015-09-01

    The relaxation processes of the xenon clusters subjected to multi-photon excitation by laser radiation with quantum energies significantly lower than the thresholds of excitation of atoms and ionization of clusters were studied. Results obtained by means of the photoelectron spectroscopy method showed that desorption processes of excited atoms play a significant role in the decay of two-photon excited xenon clusters. A number of excited states of xenon atoms formed during this process were discovered and identified.

  20. "Fast Excitation" CID in Quadrupole Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Murrell, J.; Despeyroux, D.; Lammert, Stephen {Steve} A; Stephenson Jr, James {Jim} L; Goeringer, Doug

    2003-01-01

    Collision-induced dissociation (CID) in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer is usually performed by applying a small amplitude excitation voltage at the same secular frequency as the ion of interest. Here we disclose studies examining the use of large amplitude voltage excitations (applied for short periods of time) to cause fragmentation of the ions of interest. This process has been examined using leucine enkephalin as the model compound and the motion of the ions within the ion trap simulated using ITSIM. The resulting fragmentation information obtained is identical with that observed by conventional resonance excitation CID. ''Fast excitation'' CID deposits (as determined by the intensity ratio of the a{sub 4}/b{sub 4} ion of leucine enkephalin) approximately the same amount of internal energy into an ion as conventional resonance excitation CID where the excitation signal is applied for much longer periods of time. The major difference between the two excitation techniques is the higher rate of excitation (gain in kinetic energy) between successive collisions with helium atoms with ''fast excitation'' CID as opposed to the conventional resonance excitation CID. With conventional resonance excitation CID ions fragment while the excitation voltage is still being applied whereas for ''fast excitation'' CID a higher proportion of the ions fragment in the ion cooling time following the excitation pulse. The fragmentation of the (M + 17H){sup 17+} of horse heart myoglobin is also shown to illustrate the application of ''fast excitation'' CID to proteins.

  1. Two-color temporal focusing multiphoton excitation imaging with tunable-wavelength excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lien, Chi-Hsiang; Abrigo, Gerald; Chen, Pei-Hsuan; Chien, Fan-Ching

    2017-02-01

    Wavelength tunable temporal focusing multiphoton excitation microscopy (TFMPEM) is conducted to visualize optical sectioning images of multiple fluorophore-labeled specimens through the optimal two-photon excitation (TPE) of each type of fluorophore. The tunable range of excitation wavelength was determined by the groove density of the grating, the diffraction angle, the focal length of lenses, and the shifting distance of the first lens in the beam expander. Based on a consideration of the trade-off between the tunable-wavelength range and axial resolution of temporal focusing multiphoton excitation imaging, the presented system demonstrated a tunable-wavelength range from 770 to 920 nm using a diffraction grating with groove density of 830 lines/mm. TPE fluorescence imaging examination of a fluorescent thin film indicated that the width of the axial confined excitation was 3.0±0.7 μm and the shifting distance of the temporal focal plane was less than 0.95 μm within the presented wavelength tunable range. Fast different wavelength excitation and three-dimensionally rendered imaging of Hela cell mitochondria and cytoskeletons and mouse muscle fibers were demonstrated. Significantly, the proposed system can improve the quality of two-color TFMPEM images through different excitation wavelengths to obtain higher-quality fluorescent signals in multiple-fluorophore measurements.

  2. The CLAS Excited Baryon Program at JLab

    SciTech Connect

    Crede, Volker

    2007-10-26

    Nucleons are complex systems of confined quarks and exhibit characteristic spectra of excited states. Highly excited nucleon states are sensitive to details of quark confinement which is poorly understood within Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), the fundamental theory of strong interactions. Thus, measurements of excited states and the corresponding determination of their properties are needed to come to a better understanding of how confinement works in nucleons. However, the excited states of the nucleon cannot simply be inferred from cleanly separated spectral lines. Quite the contrary, a spectral analysis in nucleon resonance physics is challenging because of the fact that the resonances are broadly overlapping states which decay into a multitude of final states involving mesons and baryons. To provide a consistent and complete picture of an individual nucleon resonance, the various possible production and decay channels must be treated in a multichannel framework that permits separating resonance from background contributions. Very often, resonances reveal themselves more clearly through interference with dominant amplitudes. These interference terms can be isolated via polarization observables. The current CLAS effort is to utilize highly-polarized hydrogen and deuterium targets as well as polarized photon beams toward a complete measurement of a large number of reaction channels.

  3. The CLAS Excited Baryon Program at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Volker Crede

    2007-10-01

    Nucleons are complex systems of confined quarks and exhibit characteristic spectra of excited states. Highly excited nucleon states are sensitive to details of quark confinement which is poorly understood within Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), the fundamental theory of strong interactions. Thus, measurements of excited states and the corresponding determination of their properties are needed to come to a better understanding of how confinement works in nucleons. However, the excited states of the nucleon cannot simply be inferred from cleanly separated spectral lines. Quite the contrary, a spectral analysis in nucleon resonance physics is challenging because of the fact that the resonances are broadly overlapping states which decay into a multitude of final states involving mesons and baryons. To provide a consistent and complete picture of an individual nucleon resonance, the various possible production and decay channels must be treated in a multichannel framework that permits separating resonance from background contributions. Very often, resonances reveal themselves more clearly through interference with dominant amplitudes. These interference terms can be isolated via polarization observables. The current CLAS effort is to utilize highly-polarized hydrogen and deuterium targets as well as polarized photon beams toward a complete measurement of a large number of reaction channels.

  4. Excitation of atmospheric oscillations by volcanic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanamori, Hiroo; Mori, Jim; Harkrider, David G.

    1994-11-01

    We investigated the mechanism of atmospheric oscillations with periods of about 300 s which were observed for the 1991 Pinatubo and the 1982 El Chichon eruptions. Two distinct spectral peaks, at T = 270 and 230 s for the Pinatubo eruption and at T = 195 and 266 s for the El Chichon eruptions, have been reported. We found similar oscillations for the 1980 Mount St. Helens and the 1883 Krakatoa eruptions. To explain these observations, we investigated excitation problems for two types of idealized sources, 'mass injection' and 'energy injection' sources, placed in an isothermal atmosphere. In general, two modes of oscillations, 'acoustic' and 'gravity' modes, can be excited. For realistic atmospheric parameters, the acoustic and gravity modes have a period of 275 and 304 s, respectively. For a realistic time history of eruption, atmospheric oscillations with an amplitude of 50 to 100 Pa (0.5 to 1 mbar) can be excited by an energy injection source with a total energy of 10(exp 17) J. This result is consistent with the observations and provides a physical basis for interpretation of atmospheric oscillations excited by volcanic eruptions.

  5. On the excitation of Goodwin's oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonova, A. O.; Reznik, S. N.; Todorov, M. D.

    2014-11-01

    We consider the necessary condition for excitation of long-periodic Goodwin's oscillations and short-periodic sawtooth oscillations in the Goodwin model with fixed delay in the induced investment. Also, using the method of equivalent linearization we evaluate the amplitude of steady-state oscillation.

  6. Coherent Rydberg Excitation in Thermal Microcells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loew, Robert

    2011-05-01

    In order to create quantum devices based on the Rydberg blockade mechanism, it is necessary to have a confinement of the excitation volume to less than the blockade radius in a frozen gas of atoms; i.e. the excitation times need to be shorter than the timescales of the respective dephasing mechanisms. While ultracold gases seem to be the obvious choice, our approach utilizes thermal atomic vapor in small glass cells which offer multiple advantages like good optical access and scalability. Such a system can be realized by confining the atoms to geometries in the micron regime. Decoherence effects like resonant interactions of the Rydberg atoms with polaritonic excitations in the glass have been studied and can be minimized by the appropriate choice of Rydberg states. Using a bandwidth-limited pulsed laser system for the Rydberg excitation we observe coherent Rabi oscillations on the nanosecond timescale. In collaboration with Renate Daschner, Harald Kuebler, Bernhard Huber, Thomas Baluktsian, Andreas Koelle, James Shaffer, and Tilman Pfau.

  7. Does intrinsic motivation enhance motor cortex excitability?

    PubMed

    Radel, Rémi; Pjevac, Dusan; Davranche, Karen; d'Arripe-Longueville, Fabienne; Colson, Serge S; Lapole, Thomas; Gruet, Mathieu

    2016-11-01

    Intrinsic motivation (IM) is often viewed as a spontaneous tendency for action. Recent behavioral and neuroimaging evidence indicate that IM, in comparison to extrinsic motivation (EM), solicits the motor system. Accordingly, we tested whether IM leads to greater excitability of the motor cortex than EM. To test this hypothesis, we used two different tasks to induce the motivational orientation using either words representing each motivational orientation or pictures previously linked to each motivational orientation through associative learning. Single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation over the motor cortex was applied when viewing the stimuli. Electromyographic activity was recorded on the contracted first dorsal interosseous muscle. Two indexes of corticospinal excitability (the amplitude of motor-evoked potential and the length of cortical silent period) were obtained through unbiased automatic detection and analyzed using a mixed model that provided both statistical power and a high level of control over all important individual, task, and stimuli characteristics. Across the two tasks and the two indices of corticospinal excitability, the exposure to IM-related stimuli did not lead to a greater corticospinal excitability than EM-related stimuli or than stimuli with no motivational valence (ps > .20). While these results tend to dismiss the advantage of IM at activating the motor cortex, we suggest alternative hypotheses to explain this lack of effect, which deserves further research.

  8. Supersolitons: Solitonic Excitations in Atomic Soliton Chains

    SciTech Connect

    Novoa, David; Michinel, Humberto; Perez-Garcia, Victor M.

    2008-10-03

    We show that, by tuning interactions in nonintegrable vector nonlinear Schroedinger equations modeling Bose-Einstein condensates and other relevant physical systems, it is possible to achieve a regime of elastic particlelike collisions between solitons. This would allow one to construct a Newton's cradle with solitons and supersolitons: localized collective excitations in solitary-wave chains.

  9. New Logic Circuit with DC Parametric Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugahara, Masanori; Kaneda, Hisayoshi

    1982-12-01

    It is shown that dc parametric excitation is possible in a circuit named JUDO, which is composed of two resistively-connected Josephson junctions. Simulation study proves that the circuit has large gain and properties suitable for the construction of small, high-speed logic circuits.

  10. Residual Excitation and Ego-Defensive Attributions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gollwitzer, Peter M.; Earle, Walter B.

    It has been suggested that egotistical attributions for success and failure are mediated by the affective reactions resulting from achievement outcomes. To establish the motivational impact of failure-related affect on subsequent ego-defensive attributions, an excitation transfer paradigm was used to manipulate the negative feelings elicited by…

  11. On the Electronically Excited States of Uracil

    SciTech Connect

    Epifanovsky, Evgeny; Kowalski, Karol; Fan, Peng-Dong; Valiev, Marat; Matsika, Spiridoula; Krylov, Anna

    2008-10-09

    Vertical excitation energies in uracil in the gas phase and in water solution are investigated by the equation-of-motion coupled-cluster and multi-reference configuration interaction methods. Basis set effects are found to be important for converged results. The analysis of electronic wave functions reveals that the lowest singlet states are predominantly of a singly excited character and are therefore well described by single-reference equation-of-motion methods augmented by a perturbative triples correction to account for dynamical correlation. Our best estimates for the vertical excitation energies for the lowest singlet n and are 5.0±0.1 eV and 5.3±0.1 eV, respectively. The solvent effects for these states are estimated to be +0.5 eV and ±0.1 eV, respectively. We attribute the difference between the computed vertical excitations and the maximum of the experimental absorption to strong vibronic interaction between the lowest A00 and A0 states leading to intensity borrowing by the forbidden transition.

  12. Dipolar excitation in the third stability region.

    PubMed

    Konenkov, Nikolai V; Chernyak, Eugenii Ya; Stepanov, Vladimir A

    2016-01-01

    Dipole resonant excitation of ions creates instability bands which follow iso-β lines where β is the characteristic exponent (stability parameter). Instability bands are exited most effectively on the fundamental frequency π= βΩ/2. Here π is the angle resonance frequency of the dipolar voltage applied to x or y pair rods of the analyzer, and Ω is the angle frequency of the main drive voltage. Our goal is to study the mass peak shape in the third stability region with dipolar resonance excitation of the instability band with respect to the resonance frequency π and the dipolar potential amplitude. Numerical integration of the ion motion equations with a given ion source emittance is used to investigate peak shapes and ion transmission. We show that it is possible to vary the resolution power at any part of the third stability region. A change of the dipolar potential phase leads to a periodical variation of the resolution with period π.The most effective dipolar excitation in the y direction is along βy near the stability boundary. The mass peak shape is calculated also for a quadrupole with round rods. The best peak shape (small tails and high resolution) takes place for the rod set with r/r0=1.130. Dipolar excitation increases the transmission by approximately 5-10% at a given resolution.

  13. Multipurpose exciter with low phase noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conroy, B.; Le, D.

    1989-01-01

    Results of an effort to develop a lower-cost exciter with high stability, low phase noise, and controllable phase and frequency for use in Deep Space Network and Goldstone Solar System Radar applications are discussed. Included is a discussion of the basic concept, test results, plans, and concerns.

  14. Contour Line Portraits: Excited about Artistic Abilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neal, Kari Gertz

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a self-portrait project that encouraged students, boosted their self-confidence, and got them excited about their artistic abilities--while producing amazing results. This lesson effectively develops artistic ability by compelling students to see that drawing is quite simply breaking down objects into the…

  15. Contextual fear conditioning depresses infralimbic excitability.

    PubMed

    Soler-Cedeño, Omar; Cruz, Emmanuel; Criado-Marrero, Marangelie; Porter, James T

    2016-04-01

    Patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) show hypo-active ventromedial prefrontal cortices (vmPFC) that correlate with their impaired ability to discriminate between safe and dangerous contexts and cues. Previously, we found that auditory fear conditioning depresses the excitability of neurons populating the homologous structure in rodents, the infralimbic cortex (IL). However, it is undetermined if IL depression was mediated by the cued or contextual information. The objective of this study was to examine whether contextual information was sufficient to depress IL neuronal excitability. After exposing rats to context-alone, pseudoconditioning, or contextual fear conditioning, we used whole-cell current-clamp recordings to examine the excitability of IL neurons in prefrontal brain slices. We found that contextual fear conditioning reduced IL neuronal firing in response to depolarizing current steps. In addition, neurons from contextual fear conditioned animals showed increased slow afterhyperpolarization potentials (sAHPs). Moreover, the observed changes in IL excitability correlated with contextual fear expression, suggesting that IL depression may contribute to the encoding of contextual fear.

  16. Nuclear excitation and precompound nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    De, A.; Ray, S.; Ghosh, S.K.

    1988-06-01

    The angular distribution of nucleons emitted in nucleon-induced precompound nuclear reactions are calculated taking into account the effect of excitation on the kinematics of nucleon-nucleon scattering inside the target-plus-projectile system. The results are compared with quantum mechanical calculations and those of reaction models based on a pure nucleon-nucleon collision picture.

  17. Magnetic Excitations from Stripes in Cuprate Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tranquada, J. M.; Woo, H.; Perring, T. G.; Goka, H.; Gu, G. D.; Xu, G.; Fujita, M.; Yamada, K.

    2004-03-01

    While it is generally believed that antiferromagnetic spin excitations play a significant role in the pairing mechanism of copper-oxide superconductors [1], the nature of the magnetic excitations themselves remains a matter of controversy. Recent measurements of the dispersion of spin excitations in superconducting YBa_2Cu_3O_6+x (YBCO) have attracted much attention. Here we present the results of comprehensive inelastic neutron scattering measurements of the momentum- and energy-dependent spectra of the magnetic fluctuations in La_0.875Ba_0.125CuO_4, which exhibits inhomogeneous, charge-stripe order. We will also point out universalities and differences in the magnetic excitation spectra compared to related charge-stripe ordered compounds and high-temperature superconductors, including La_2-xSr_xNiO4 and YBCO. JMT, HW, GDG and GX are supported by U.S. Department of Energy contract # DE-AC02-98CH1088 [1] J. Orenstein and A. J. Millis, Science 288, 468 (2000).

  18. Synthesis of laughter by modifying excitation characteristics.

    PubMed

    Thati, Sathya Adithya; Kumar K, Sudheer; Yegnanarayana, B

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, a method to synthesize laughter by modifying the excitation source information is presented. The excitation source information is derived by extracting epoch locations and instantaneous fundamental frequency using zero frequency filtering approach. The zero frequency filtering approach is modified to capture the rapidly varying instantaneous fundamental frequency in natural laugh signals. The nature of variation of excitation features in natural laughter is examined to determine the features to be incorporated in the synthesis of a laugh signal. Features such as pitch period and strength of excitation are modified in the utterance of vowel /a/ or /i/ to generate the laughter signal. Frication is also incorporated wherever appropriate. Laugh signal is generated by varying parameters at both call level and bout level. Experiments are conducted to determine the significance of different features in the perception of laughter. Subjective evaluation is performed to determine the level of acceptance and quality of synthesis of the synthesized laughter signal for different choices of parameter values and for different input types.

  19. Excitation system for rotating synchronous machines

    DOEpatents

    Umans, Stephen D.; Driscoll, David J.

    2002-01-01

    A system for providing DC current to a rotating superconducting winding is provided. The system receives current feedback from the superconducting winding and determines an error signal based on the current feedback and a reference signal. The system determines a control signal corresponding to the error signal and provides a positive and negative superconducting winding excitation voltage based on the control signal.

  20. An Artificial Ising System with Phononic Excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaffari, Hamed; Griffith, W. Ashley; Benson, Philip; Nasseri, M. H. B.; Young, R. Paul

    Many intractable systems and problems can be reduced to a system of interacting spins. Here, we report mapping collective phononic excitations from different sources of crystal vibrations to spin systems. The phononic excitations in our experiments are due to micro and nano cracking (yielding crackling noises due to lattice distortion). We develop real time mapping of the multi-array senores to a network-space and then mapping the excitation- networks to spin-like systems. We show that new mapped system satisfies the quench (impulsive) characteristics of the Ising model in 2D classical spin systems. In particular, we show that our artificial Ising system transits between two ground states and approaching the critical point accompanies with a very short time frozen regime, inducing formation of domains separated by kinks. For a cubic-test under a true triaxial test (3D case), we map the system to a 6-spin ring under a transversal-driving field where using functional multiplex networks, the vector components of the spin are inferred (i.e., XY model). By visualization of spin patterns of the ring per each event, we demonstrate that ``kinks'' (as defects) proliferate when system approach from above to its critical point. We support our observations with employing recorded acoustic excitations during distortion of crystal lattices in nano-indentation tests on different crystals (silicon and graphite), triaxial loading test on rock (poly-crystal) samples and a true 3D triaxial test.

  1. Ionic electrostatic excitations along biological membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, Afshin

    2011-02-01

    A theoretical analysis of ionic electrostatic excitations of a charged biological membrane is presented within the framework of the fluid theory for surface ions inside and outside the cell, in conjunction with the Poisson's equation. General expressions of dispersion relations are obtained for electrostatic oscillations of intrinsic cellular with different shapes and symmetries.

  2. Extracting excited mesons from the finite volume

    SciTech Connect

    Doring, Michael

    2014-12-01

    As quark masses come closer to their physical values in lattice simulations, finite volume effects dominate the level spectrum. Methods to extract excited mesons from the finite volume are discussed, like moving frames in the presence of coupled channels. Effective field theory can be used to stabilize the determination of the resonance spectrum.

  3. Saturated excitation of fluorescence to quantify excitation enhancement in aperture antennas.

    PubMed

    Aouani, Heykel; Hostein, Richard; Mahboub, Oussama; Devaux, Eloïse; Rigneault, Hervé; Ebbesen, Thomas W; Wenger, Jérôme

    2012-07-30

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is widely used to probe the electromagnetic intensity amplification on optical antennas, yet measuring the excitation intensity amplification is a challenge, as the detected fluorescence signal is an intricate combination of excitation and emission. Here, we describe a novel approach to quantify the electromagnetic amplification in aperture antennas by taking advantage of the intrinsic non linear properties of the fluorescence process. Experimental measurements of the fundamental f and second harmonic 2f amplitudes of the fluorescence signal upon excitation modulation are used to quantify the electromagnetic intensity amplification with plasmonic aperture antennas.

  4. Accelerating slow excited state proton transfer

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, David J.; Concepcion, Javier J.; Brennaman, M. Kyle; Binstead, Robert A.; Meyer, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Visible light excitation of the ligand-bridged assembly [(bpy)2RuaII(L)RubII(bpy)(OH2)4+] (bpy is 2,2′-bipyridine; L is the bridging ligand, 4-phen-tpy) results in emission from the lowest energy, bridge-based metal-to-ligand charge transfer excited state (L−•)RubIII-OH2 with an excited-state lifetime of 13 ± 1 ns. Near–diffusion-controlled quenching of the emission occurs with added HPO42− and partial quenching by added acetate anion (OAc−) in buffered solutions with pH control. A Stern–Volmer analysis of quenching by OAc− gave a quenching rate constant of kq = 4.1 × 108 M−1⋅s−1 and an estimated pKa* value of ∼5 ± 1 for the [(bpy)2RuaII(L•−)RubIII(bpy)(OH2)4+]* excited state. Following proton loss and rapid excited-state decay to give [(bpy)2RuaII(L)RubII(bpy)(OH)3+] in a H2PO4−/HPO42− buffer, back proton transfer occurs from H2PO4− to give [(bpy)2RuaII(L)Rub(bpy)(OH2)4+] with kPT,2 = 4.4 × 108 M−1⋅s−1. From the intercept of a plot of kobs vs. [H2PO4−], k = 2.1 × 106 s−1 for reprotonation by water providing a dramatic illustration of kinetically limiting, slow proton transfer for acids and bases with pKa values intermediate between pKa(H3O+) = −1.74 and pKa(H2O) = 15.7. PMID:23277551

  5. Excitation mechanism of non-migrating tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyoshi, Yasunobu; Pancheva, Dora; Mukhtarov, Plamen; Jin, Hidekatsu; Fujiwara, Hitoshi; Shinagawa, Hiroyuki

    2017-04-01

    Using an atmosphere-ionosphere coupled model, the excitation source and temporal (seasonal and interannual) variations in non-migrating tides are investigated in this study. We first focus our attention on temporal variations in eastward moving diurnal tide with zonal wavenumber 3 (DE3), which is the largest of all the non-migrating tides in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT). Our simulation results indicate that upward propagation of the DE3 excited in the troposphere is sensitive to the zonal mean zonal wind in the stratosphere and mesosphere. The DE3 amplitude is enhanced in the region where the vertical shear of the zonal mean zonal wind is positive (westerly shear). Quasi-2-year variation in the DE3 amplitude in the MLT region is generated by quasi-2-year variation in the zonal mean zonal wind between 40 and 70 km, which is modulated by the stratospheric QBO. The excitation mechanisms of SW3 (westward moving semidiurnal tide with zonal wavenumber 3) and SW1 (westward moving semidiurnal tide with zonal wavenumber 1) are also investigated. During equinoxes, the SW3 and SW1 are excited by tropospheric heating (latent heat release and solar radiative heating) associated with cumulus convection in the tropics, and propagate upward into the MLT region. On the other hand, during solstices, SW3 and SW1 are generated in the winter stratosphere and mesosphere through the nonlinear interaction between the stationary planetary wave and migrating semidiurnal tide, and propagate upward to the lower thermosphere. The excitation sources of other non-migrating tides are also discussed.

  6. Self-excitation of single nanomechanical pillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun S.; Qin, Hua; Blick, Robert H.

    2010-03-01

    Self-excitation is a mechanism that is ubiquitous for electromechanical power devices such as electrical generators. This is conventionally achieved by making use of the magnetic field component in electrical generators (Nedic and Lipo 2000 IEEE/IAS Conf. Records (Rome, Italy) vol 1 pp 51-6), a good and widely visible example of which is the wind turbine farm (Muljadi et al 2005 J. Sol. Energy Eng. 127 581-7). In other words, a static force, such as the wind acting on rotor blades, can generate a resonant excitation at a certain mechanical frequency. For nanomechanical systems (Craighead 2000 Science 290 1532-5 Roukes 2001 Phys. World 14 25-31 Cleland 2003 Foundations of Nanomechanics (Berlin: Springer); Ayari et al 2007 Nano Lett. 7 2252-7 Koenig et al 2008 Nat. Nanotechnol. 3 482-4) such a self-excitation (SE) mechanism is also highly desirable, because it can generate mechanical oscillations at radio frequencies by simply applying a dc bias voltage. This is of great importance for low-power signal communication devices and detectors, as well as for mechanical computing elements. For a particular nanomechanical system—the single electron shuttle—this effect was predicted some time ago by Gorelik et al (Phys. Rev. Lett. 80 4526-9). Here, we use a nanoelectromechanical single electron transistor (NEMSET) to demonstrate self-excitation for both the soft and hard regimes, respectively. The ability to use self-excitation in nanomechanical systems may enable the detection of quantum mechanical backaction effects (Naik et al 2006 Nature 443 193-6) in direct tunneling, macroscopic quantum tunneling (Savelev et al 2006 New J. Phys. 8 105-15) and rectification (Pistolesi and Fazio 2005 Phys. Rev. Lett. 94 036806-4). All these effects have so far been overshadowed by the large driving voltages that had to be applied.

  7. Cascadable excitability in optically injected microdisks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Vaerenbergh, Thomas; Alexander, Koen; Fiers, Martin; Mechet, Pauline; Dambre, Joni; Bienstman, Peter

    2014-05-01

    All-optical spiking neural networks would allow high speed parallelized processing of time-encoded information, using the same energy efficient computational principles as our brain. As the neurons in these networks need to be able to process pulse trains, they should be excitable. Using simulations, we demonstrate Class 1 excitability in optically injected microdisk lasers, and propose a cascadable optical spiking neuron design. The neuron has a clear threshold and an integrating behavior. In addition, we show that the optical phase of the input pulses can be used to create inhibitory, as well as excitatory perturbations. Furthermore, we incorporate our optical neuron design in a topology that allows a disk to react on excitations from other disks. Phase tuning of the intermediate connections allows to control the disk response. Additionally, we investigate the sensitivity of the disk circuit to deviations in driving current and locking signal wavelength detuning. Using state-of-the-art fabrication techniques for microdisk laser, the standard deviation of the lasing wavelength is still about one order of magnitude too large. Finally, as the dynamical behavior of the microdisks is identical to the behavior in Semiconductor Ring Lasers (SRL), we compare the excitability mechanism due to optically injection with the previously proposed excitability due to asymmetry in the intermodal coupling in SRLs, as the latter mechanism can also be induced in disks due to, e.g., asymmetry in the external reaction. In both cases, the symmetry between the two counter-propagating modes of the cavity needs to be broken to prevent switching to the other mode, and allow the system to relax to its initial state after a perturbation. However, the asymmetry due to optical injection results in an integrating spiking neuron, whereas the asymmetry in the intermodal coupling is known to result in a resonating spiking neuron.

  8. Peroxyacetyl radical: Electronic excitation energies, fundamental vibrational frequencies, and symmetry breaking in the first excited state

    SciTech Connect

    Copan, Andreas V.; Wiens, Avery E.; Nowara, Ewa M.; Schaefer, Henry F.; Agarwal, Jay

    2015-02-07

    Peroxyacetyl radical [CH{sub 3}C(O)O{sub 2}] is among the most abundant peroxy radicals in the atmosphere and is involved in OH-radical recycling along with peroxyacetyl nitrate formation. Herein, the ground (X{sup ~}) and first (A{sup ~}) excited state surfaces of cis and trans peroxyacetyl radical are characterized using high-level ab initio methods. Geometries, anharmonic vibrational frequencies, and adiabatic excitation energies extrapolated to the complete basis-set limit are reported from computations with coupled-cluster theory. Excitation of the trans conformer is found to induce a symmetry-breaking conformational change due to second-order Jahn-Teller interactions with higher-lying excited states. Additional benchmark computations are provided to aid future theoretical work on peroxy radicals.

  9. Superposition of Fragment Excitations for Excited States of Large Clusters with Application to Helium Clusters.

    PubMed

    Closser, Kristina D; Ge, Qinghui; Mao, Yuezhi; Shao, Yihan; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2015-12-08

    We develop a local excited-state method, based on the configuration interaction singles (CIS) wave function, for large atomic and molecular clusters. This method exploits the properties of absolutely localized molecular orbitals (ALMOs), which strictly limits the total number of excitations, and results in formal scaling with the third power of the system size for computing the full spectrum of ALMO-CIS excited states. The derivation of the equations and design of the algorithm are discussed in detail, with particular emphasis on the computational scaling. Clusters containing ∼500 atoms were used in evaluating the scaling, which agrees with the theoretical predictions, and the accuracy of the method is evaluated with respect to standard CIS. A pioneering application to the size dependence of the helium cluster spectrum is also presented for clusters of 25-231 atoms, the largest of which results in the computation of 2310 excited states per sampled cluster geometry.

  10. Coulomb excitation of states in 238U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGowan, F. K.; Milner, W. T.

    1994-05-01

    Twenty-two states in 238U have been observed with 18 MeV 4He ions on a thick target. Eight 2 + states between 966 and 1782 keV and three 3 - states are populated by direct E2 and E3, respectively. The remaining states are either weakly excited by multiple Coulomb excitation and /or populated by the γ-ray decay of the directly excited states. Spin assignments are based on γ-ray angular distributions. Reduced transition probabilities have been deduced from the γ-ray yields. The B(E2) values for excitation of the 2 + states range from 0.10 to 3.0 W.u. (281 W.u. for the first 2 + state). For the 3 states, the B(E3, 0 → 3 -) values are 7.1, 7.8, and 24.2 W.u. Several of the 2 + states have decay branches to the one-phonon states with B(E2) values between 27 and 56 W.u. which are an order of magnitude larger than the B(E2) values between the one- and zero-phonon states. This disagrees with our present understanding of collectivity in nuclei if these 2 + states are considered to be collective two-phonon excitations. However, the excitation energies of these 2 + states with respect to the one-phonon states are only 1.3 to 1.6. The B(E1) values for 17 transitions between the positive- and negative-parity states range between 10 -3 and 10 -7 W.u. The B(E1) branching ratios for many of these transitions have large deviations from the Alaga-rule predictions. These deviations can be understood by the strong Coriolis coupling between the states of the one-phonon octupole quadruplet in deformed nuclei. The general features of the experimental results for the B(E3) values are reproduced by the microscopic calculations of Neergård and Vogel when the Coriolis coupling between the states of the octupole quadruplet is included.

  11. Coulomb excitation of states in 232Th

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGowan, F. K.; Milner, W. T.

    1993-09-01

    Twenty-five states in 232Th have been observed with 18 MeV 4He ions on a thick target. Eleven 2 + states between 774 and 1554 keV and three 3 - states are populated by direct E2 and E3, respectively. The remaining states are either weakly excited by multiple Coulomb excitation and/or populated by the decay of the directly excited states. Spin assignments are based on γ-ray angular distributions. Reduced transition probabilities have been deduced from the γ-ray yields. The B(E2) values for excitation of the 2 + states range from 0.024 to 3.5 W.u. (222 W.u. for the first 2 + state). For the 3 - states, the B(E3,0 → 3 -) values are 1.7, 11, and 24 W.u. A possible two-phonon state at 1554 keV, which is nearly harmonic, decays to four members of the one-phonon states, to the ground-state band, and to the K = 0 - octupole band. The B(E2) value for excitation of this state is 0.66 ± 0.05 W.u. and the B(E1) values for decay of this state are (2 and 6)×10 -4 W.u. The B(E2) values between two- and one-phonon vibrational states range between 16 and 53 W.u. which are an order of magnitude larger than the B(E2) values between the one- and zero-phonon states. This disagrees with our present understanding of collectivity in nuclei if this 2 + state is considered to be a collective two-phonon excitation. The 2 + states at 1477 and 1387 keV, which are also nearly harmonic, are possible candidates with two-phonon structure. The agreement between the experimental results and the microscopic calculations by Neergård and Vogel of the B(E3,0 → 3) for the 3 - members of the one-phonon octupole quadruplet is satisfactory when the Coriolis coupling between the states with K and K ± 1 is included. The B(E1) branching ratios for transitions from the 3 - and 1 - states to the ground-state band have large deviations from the Alaga-rule predictions. These deviations can be understood by the strong Coriolis coupling between the states of the octupole quadruplet in deformed nuclei.

  12. Direct excitation of microwave-spin dressed states using a laser-excited resonance Raman interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahriar, M. S.; Hemmer, P. R.

    1990-10-01

    We have used a laser-induced resonance Raman transition between the ground-state hyperfine sublevels in a sodium atomic beam to excite individual dressed states of the microwave-spin hyperfine transition. In addition, we have used the microwave interaction to excite the Raman trapped state. Extension of this technique to mm waves or to the far infrared may lead to applications such as mm-wave-beam steering and holographic image conversion.

  13. Search for intrinsic collective excitations in Sm152

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulp, W. D.; Wood, J. L.; Garrett, P. E.; Wu, C. Y.; Cline, D.; Allmond, J. M.; Bandyopadhyay, D.; Dashdorj, D.; Choudry, S. N.; Hayes, A. B.; Hua, H.; Mynk, M. G.; McEllistrem, M. T.; McKay, C. J.; Orce, J. N.; Teng, R.; Yates, S. W.

    2008-06-01

    The 685 keV excitation energy of the first excited 0+ state in Sm152 makes it an attractive candidate to explore expected two-phonon excitations at low energy. Multiple-step Coulomb excitation and inelastic neutron scattering studies of Sm152 are used to probe the E2 collectivity of excited 0+ states in this “soft” nucleus and the results are compared with model predictions. No candidates for two-phonon Kπ=0+quadrupole vibrational states are found. A 2+,K=2 state with strong E2 decay to the first excited Kπ=0+ band and a probable 3+ band member are established.

  14. Viscous flow drag reduction by acoustic excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagel, Robert T.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental program in which the effectiveness of a single large eddy break up (LEBU) blade is enhanced by proper acoustic excitation is described. Acoustic waves are generated in response to the incident large scale eddies and directed at the blade trailing edge through the test surface floor below the manipulator blade. The acoustic input is phase locked to the incident flow. Control of the acoustic input apparently allows enhancement of the large eddy cancellation process leading to a decrease of skin friction coefficient. Control of this process with acoustic excitation indicates that vortex unwinding is the mechanism for large eddy destruction in the boundary layer. A deeper understanding of this phenomena could lead to better drag reduction technology and further understanding of the physics of the turbulent boundary layer.

  15. Rotational excitations in two-color photoassociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazra, Jisha; Deb, Bimalendu

    2010-02-01

    We show that it is possible to excite higher rotational states J>2 in ultracold photoassociation by two laser fields. Usually higher J states are suppressed in photoassociation at ultracold temperatures in the regime of Wigner threshold laws. We propose a scheme in which one strong laser field drives photoassociation transition close to either J=1 or J=2 rotational state of a particular vibrational level of an electronically excited molecule. The other laser field is tuned near photoassociation resonance with J>2 rotational levels of the same vibrational state. The strong laser field induces a strong continuum-bound dipole coupling. The resulting dipole force between two colliding atoms modifies the continuum states forming continuum-bound dressed states with a significant component of higher partial waves in the continuum configuration. When the second laser is scanned near the resonance of the higher J states, these states become populated due to photoassociative transitions from the modified continuum.

  16. Modeling Excitable Systems Coupled Through External Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noorbakhsh, Javad; Mehta, Pankaj

    2013-03-01

    Excitable systems are stable dynamical systems in which any input beyond a threshold results in a significant output. This behavior is ubiquitous in nature and is seen in biological systems such as Dictyostelium discoideum amoeba and neurons to oscillatory chemical reactions. In this work we will focus on transition to oscillation in populations of excitable systems coupled through an external medium and will study their synchronization. We will describe a mechanism to tune the frequency of oscillations using an external input and will study the effects of stochasticity and inhomogeneity on the collective behavior of the system. Furthermore we will include diffusion into the dynamics of the external medium and will study formation of spatial patterns, their characteristics and their robustness to different factors.

  17. Earth Rotational Variations Excited by Geophysical Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Benjamin F.

    2004-01-01

    Modern space geodetic measurement of Earth rotation variations, particularly by means of the VLBI technique, has over the years allowed studies of Earth rotation dynamics to advance in ever-increasing precision, accuracy, and temporal resolution. A review will be presented on our understanding of the geophysical and climatic causes, or "excitations". for length-of-day change, polar motion, and nutations. These excitations sources come from mass transports that constantly take place in the Earth system comprised of the atmosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, lithosphere, mantle, and the cores. In this sense, together with other space geodetic measurements of time-variable gravity and geocenter motion, Earth rotation variations become a remote-sensing tool for the integral of all mass transports, providing valuable information about the latter on a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Future prospects with respect to geophysical studies with even higher accuracy and resolution will be discussed.

  18. Excitation and Characterization of Chladni Plate Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourke, Shannon; Behringer, Ernest

    2011-04-01

    When a thin metal plate with a small amount of sand on it is made to vibrate, aesthetically pleasing sand patterns can form along the nodal lines of the plate. These symmetric patterns are called Chladni Patterns. Students taking PHY 101 Physical Science in the Arts at Eastern Michigan University create these patterns by pulling a violin bow across the edge of a plate, or by using a mechanical oscillator to drive the center of a plate. These two methods only allow a small subset of all possible points on the plate to be excited. We designed and built an electronic device that allows its user to excite the plate at any point. We present patterns created with this electronic device and other methods, and describe ways to model the observed patterns.

  19. Diversity improves performance in excitable networks

    PubMed Central

    Copelli, Mauro; Roberts, James A.

    2016-01-01

    As few real systems comprise indistinguishable units, diversity is a hallmark of nature. Diversity among interacting units shapes properties of collective behavior such as synchronization and information transmission. However, the benefits of diversity on information processing at the edge of a phase transition, ordinarily assumed to emerge from identical elements, remain largely unexplored. Analyzing a general model of excitable systems with heterogeneous excitability, we find that diversity can greatly enhance optimal performance (by two orders of magnitude) when distinguishing incoming inputs. Heterogeneous systems possess a subset of specialized elements whose capability greatly exceeds that of the nonspecialized elements. We also find that diversity can yield multiple percolation, with performance optimized at tricriticality. Our results are robust in specific and more realistic neuronal systems comprising a combination of excitatory and inhibitory units, and indicate that diversity-induced amplification can be harnessed by neuronal systems for evaluating stimulus intensities. PMID:27168961

  20. Decay modes of the excited pseudoscalar glueball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshraim, Walaa I.; Schramm, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    We study three different chiral Lagrangians that describe the two- and three-body decays of an excited pseudoscalar glueball, JP C=0*-+ , into light mesons and charmonium states as well as into a scalar and pseudoscalar glueball. We compute the decay channels for an excited pseudoscalar glueball with a mass of 3.7 GeV and consider a ground-state pseudoscalar glueball of mass 2.6 GeV, following predictions from lattice QCD simulations. These states and channels are in reach of the ongoing BESIII experiment and the PANDA experiments at the upcoming FAIR facility experiment. We present the resulting decay branching ratios with a parameter-free prediction.

  1. Excitation of millimeter and submillimeter water masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufeld, David A.; Melnick, Gary J.

    1991-01-01

    The excitation of maser emission in millimeter and submillimeter transitions of interstellar and circumstellar water is considered. An escape probability method is used to determine the equilibrium populations in 349 rotational states of both ortho- and para-water under varying conditions of gas temperature, density, water abundance, and radiation field. It is shown that, under those conditions believed to prevail around late-type stars and within star-forming regions, strong millimeter and submillimeter water maser emission can be generated by collisional excitations by H2. Several maser transitions can have strengths close to that of the 22 GHz line. The water maser line which can be observed from mountaintop facilities and those which will require air- or space-borne platforms are indicated. The exact portion of parameter space in which each maser transition exhibits peak emission is shown.

  2. Active chaotic excitation for bolted joint monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasel, Timothy R.; Todd, Michael D.; Park, Gyuhae

    2006-03-01

    Recent research has shown that high frequency chaotic excitation and state space reconstruction may be used to identify incipient damage (loss of preload) in a bolted joint. In this study, a new experiment is undertaken with updated test equipment, including a piezostack actuator that allows for precise control of bolt preload. The excitation waveform is applied to a macro-fiber composite (MFC) patch that is bonded to the test structure and is sensed in an active manner using a second MFC patch. A novel prediction error algorithm, based on comparing filtered properties of the guided chaotic waves, is used to determine the damage state of a frame structure and is shown to be highly sensitive to small levels of bolt preload loss. The performance of the prediction error method is compared with standard structural health monitoring damage features that are based on time series analysis using auto-regressive (AR) models.

  3. Transient absorption of vibrationally excited water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, H. J.; Nienhuys, H.-K.; Gallot, G.; Lascoux, N.; Gale, G. M.; Leicknam, J.-C.; Bratos, S.

    2002-02-01

    We study the spectral response of the transition between the first and the second excited state of the O-H stretch vibration of HDO dissolved in liquid D2O with two-color femtosecond mid-infrared spectroscopy. The spectral response of this transition differs strongly from the fundamental absorption spectrum of the O-H stretch vibration. In addition, excitation of the O-H stretch vibration is observed to lead to a change of the hydrogen-bond dynamics of liquid water. We show that both these observations can be described with a refined quantum-mechanical version of the Lippincott-Schroeder model for hydrogen-bonded OH⋯O systems.

  4. A shunt-excited inductive power link.

    PubMed

    Sylvan, K; Jordan, J R; Whittington, H W

    1989-01-01

    An alternative derivation of the separation-insensitive property of series-excited self-oscillating inductive power transfer circuits is presented. This analysis is based on network theory and does not include the explicit determination of frequency as a step in the derivation. The separation-insensitivity principle is extended to shunt-excited links which exhibit a theoretical voltage transfer function of unity while the coupling factor exceeds the reciprocal of the secondary quality factor. This requires the inclusion of a series resistor in the primary resonator's capacitive arm. Series RC elements are replaced by parallel forms in both the primary and secondary; this provides a more convenient output impedance level without the need for another transformer. A demonstration circuit is described and tested. It is found that separation-insensitivity occurs while the coupling factor exceeds the reciprocal of the loaded secondary quality factor. Somewhat inferior response is obtained from a simpler circuit having no added resistances in the primary.

  5. The excitation of O2 in auroras.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cartwright, D. C.; Trajmar, S.; Williams, W.

    1972-01-01

    Newly measured electron impact cross sections for excitation of the a super 1 Delta sub g and b super 1 Sigma (plus) sub g electronic states of O2 have been employed to predict the absolute volume emission rates from these states under auroral conditions. A secondary electron flux typical of an IBC II nighttime aurora was used, and the most important quenching processes were included in the calculations. The new excitation cross sections for the a super 1 Delta sub g and b super 1 Sigma (plus) sub g states are more than an order of magnitude larger than previous estimates and lead to correspondingly greater intensities in the atmospheric and IR atmospheric band systems. The calculated intensity ratios of the volume emission rates of 7621 A and 1.27 micron to that for 3914 A are smaller than those obtained from aircraft observations and recent rocket experiments.

  6. Dynamical analysis of highly excited molecular spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Kellman, M.E.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is new methods for analysis of spectra and dynamics of highly excited vibrational states of molecules. In these systems, strong mode coupling and anharmonicity give rise to complicated classical dynamics, and make the simple normal modes analysis unsatisfactory. New methods of spectral analysis, pattern recognition, and assignment are sought using techniques of nonlinear dynamics including bifurcation theory, phase space classification, and quantization of phase space structures. The emphasis is chaotic systems and systems with many degrees of freedom.

  7. Effects of Ultrasound Pulsing on Neural Excitability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-30

    to alter the - excitability of myelinated fibers within the frog sciatic nerve. The magnitude and direction of these changes are critically dependent...on the timing of the burst relative to the electrical stimulus and are different for various fiber types and frog species. These effects cannot be...the ganglion-microelectrode approach in favor of using a compound nerve trunk (the frog sciatic nerve) which cold be stimulated and recorded from

  8. Excitation of a slow wave structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Peng; Lau, Y. Y.; Hoff, Brad; French, D. M.; Luginsland, J. W.

    2012-12-15

    The Green's function on a slow wave structure is constructed. The Green's function includes all radial modes, and for each radial mode, all space harmonics. We compare the analytic solution of the frequency response on the slow wave structure with that obtained from a particle-in-cell code. Favorable comparison is obtained when the first few lower order modes are resonantly excited. This gives some confidence in the prediction of converting a pulse train into radiation using a slow wave structure.

  9. Magnetic and quasiparticle excitations in cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennemann, K.-H.

    2005-09-01

    [Dedicated to Bernhard Mühlschlegel on the occasion ofhis 80th birthday]Assuming for simplicity that the electrons or the holes in cuprate superconductors interact predominantly with spin-fluctuations, we determine within the random phase approximation (RPA)the dynamical susceptibility, in particular the resonance peak resulting as feedback from superconductivity, as well as the elementary quasiparticle excitations in hole-doped systems.

  10. Mixing gasdynamic laser with nonequilibrium arc excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov, G. G.; Kovshechnikov, V. B.; Rutberg, F. G.

    2016-05-01

    A mixing gasdynamic laser with nonuniform arc excitation is investigated using a model setup. Tentative analysis of the results indicates the appropriateness of using plasmatrons to improve the efficiency of mixing gasdynamic lasers by making carbon dioxide molecules vibrationally more nonuniform. In addition, a plasmatron serves as a preionization source both for a fast-flow gas-discharge laser and for a gasdynamic laser with combined pumping.

  11. Curvature Analysis of Cardiac Excitation Wavefronts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    computational cardiac-cell network accurately reproduces a particular kind of cardiac arrhythmia , such as ventricular fibrillation. Curvature Analysis of Cardiac...network accurately reproduces a particular kind of cardiac arrhythmia , such as ventricular fibrillation. Index Terms Cardiac excitation waves...isopotentials, Bézier curves, curvature, cardiac arrhythmia and fibrillation Ç 1 INTRODUCTION AN estimated 81,000,000 American adults, more than onein three

  12. Photocycloaddition of anthracene to excited C-60

    SciTech Connect

    Gol`dshleger, N.F.; Denisov, N.N.; Lobach, A.S.

    1995-02-01

    The ability to participate in photochemical cycloaddition reactions is characteristic feature of chromophores with a carbon double bond. In this work, the authors demonstrate the formation of an adduct by cycloaddition of anthracene to the triplet-excited C-60 fullerene under anaerobic conditions, which provides a straight forward way to synthesize new derivatives of C-60 fullerenes. Reaction methods, conditions, and mechanisms are included along with the characterization of the fullerene derivative with IR, MS, and NMR methods.

  13. TXRF spectrometry at ion beam excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, V.; Egorov, E.; Afanas’ef, M.

    2017-02-01

    The work presents short discussion of TXRF and PIXE methods peculiarities. Taking into account of these peculiarities we elaborate the experimental scheme for TXRF measurements at ion beam excitation of characteristical fluorescence. The scheme is built on base of the planar X-ray waveguide-resonator with specific design. Features of the new experimental method and possibilities of Sokol-3 ion beam analytical complex were used for the method application in real measurements.

  14. Multiphonon excitations in boson quantum films

    SciTech Connect

    Clements, B.E. |; Krotscheck, E. |; Tymczak, C.J.

    1996-05-01

    Dynamical excitations in thin liquid films of {sup 4}He adsorbed to a substrate are investigated by using a microscopic theory of excitations that includes multiple-phonon scattering. We study the dispersion relation, excitation mechanisms, transition densities, and particle currents as a function of surface coverage. A primary new result is that we have included three-phonon scattering processes in the calculation of the dynamic structure function and the one-body current densities. With the exception that our ground state is determined by our variational theory, rather than taken from experiment, our work on the dynamic structure function is the generalization of that of Jackson [Phys. Rev. A {bold 4}, 2386 (1971)] to inhomogeneous systems (films). Using sum rules for the dynamic structure function as a guide, we suggest a simple scaling argument for improving the agreement between our dynamic structure function and the experimental one. The addition of three-phonon contributions bring about the following changes. First, the energy of most modes is lowered by a non-negligible amount for finite momentum excitations. Second, the film{close_quote}s surface mode is the exception; it is only slightly affected. Third, for monolayer films there is large scattering at high energies at intermediate values of momenta. This scattering can be traced back to an anomalously large contribution to the two-particle density of states. Fourth, all modes with energy above a critical energy decay, and the associated peaks of the dynamic structure function are broadened. Fifth, the maxonlike character is enhanced in the bulklike modes. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  15. Wave excitation by inhomogeneous suprathermal electron beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freund, H. P.; Dillenburg, D.; Wu, C. S.

    1982-01-01

    Wave excitation by an inhomogeneous suprathermal electron beam in a homogeneous magnetized plasma is studied. Not only is the beam density nonuniform, but the beam electrons possess a sheared bulk velocity. The general dispersion equation encompassing both electrostatic and electromagnetic effects is derived. Particular attention is given to the whistler mode. It is established that the density-gradient and velocity-shear effects are important for waves with frequencies close to the lower-hybrid resonance frequency.

  16. Core excitation of Li by electron impact

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwary, S.N.

    1985-07-01

    Cross sections for the excitation of a core electron, which leads to autoionization, in lithium (Li) atomic system by electron impact have been calculated with use of the single-configuration Hartree-Fock wave function within the asymptotic Green's-function approximation (AGFA) in the low-bombarding-energy region. Comparison is made with available results. Our investigation demonstrates that the AGFA supports the R-matrix as well as the distorted-wave Born-approximation behavior.

  17. Extreme ultraviolet photodissociative excitation of molecular oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    Photodissociation processes in molecular oxygen occurring in the wavelength range from 500 to 900 A, investigated through observations of the resulting atomic fluorescence radiation, are reported. The dispersed radiation from a continuous light source was used to excite the gas, and the resulting fluorescence radiation was observed in the ultraviolet and infrared. The results obtained are compared with the dissociation cross sections derived by Matsunaga and Watanabe (1967).

  18. Stimulation of unidirectional pulses in excitable systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, M.; Ovsyshcher, I. E.; Fleidervish, I.; Crystal, E.; Rabinovitch, A.

    2004-10-01

    Using a judicious spatial shape of input current pulses (and electrodes), responses of an excitable system (FitzHugh-Nagumo) appear as unidirectional pulses (UDP’s) instead of bidirectional ones (in one dimension) or circular ones (in two dimensions). The importance of the UDP’s for a possible mechanism for pinpointing the reentry cycle position and for a possible use in tachycardia suppression is discussed.

  19. Collisional excitation of interstellar methyl cyanide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Sheldon

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical calculations are used to determine the collisional excitation rates of methyl cyanide under interstellar molecular cloud conditions. The required Q(L,M) as a function of kinetic temperature were determined by averaging fixed energy IOS (infinite order sudden) results over appropriate Boltzmann distributions of collision energies. At a kinetic temperature of 40 K, rates within a K ladder were found to be accurate to generally better than about 30 percent.

  20. Excitation of terahertz nanoantennas by Rabi waves

    SciTech Connect

    Slepyan, G. Ya.; Yerchak, Y. D.; Maksimenko, S. A.; Hoffmann, A.; Bass, F. G.

    2011-10-03

    Theoretical model of quantum dot ring, strongly coupled with classical electromagnetic field, is developed. We demonstrate, that tunnel current in the QD-ring has low-frequency component, excited by Rabi waves, propagating into the ring, and the ring can be considered as a candidate for role of terahertz magnetic loop antenna. The low-frequency current is inspired by the asymmetry of electron tunneling.

  1. STIRAP on helium: Excitation to Rydberg states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Deqian

    Research in optically induced transitions between dierent atomic levels has a long history. For transitions between states driven by a coherent optical eld, the theoretical eciency could be ideally high as 100% but there could be many factors preventing this. In the three state helium atom excitation process, i.e. 23S→33P→nL , the stimulated emission from intermediate state makes it hard to achieve ecient population transfer to the nal state through an intuitive excitation order. One technique to achieve a higher eciency is Stimulated Raman Adiabatic Passage (STIRAP) which is being studied and under research in our lab. Unlike traditional three level excitation processes, STIRAP actually uses a counter intuitive pulsed laser beams timing arrangement. The excitation objects are metastable helium atoms traveling in a vacuum system with a longitudinal velocity of ~ 1070 m/s. We are using a 389 nm UV laser to connect the 23S and the 33P state and a frequency tunable ~790 nm IR laser to connect the 33P state and the dierent Rydberg states. A third 1083 nm wavelength laser beam drives the 23S → 23P transition to transversely separate the residual metastable atoms and the Rydberg atoms for eciency measurements. The data is taken by a stainless steel detector in the vacuum system. As the Rydberg atoms will get ionized by blackbody radiation under room temperature, we can utilize this for their detection. An ion detector sitting on the eld plate is capable to collect the ion signals of the Rydberg atoms for detection. So far the whole system has not been ready for data collection and measurement, so here we are using data and results from previous theses for discussions. The highest transition frequency that has ever been achieved in our lab is around 70% after corrections.

  2. Electron-impact excitation of Ne4+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, D. C.; Badnell, N. R.

    2000-10-01

    We present the results of extensive close-coupling calculations of electron-impact excitation of the C-like ion, Ne4+. We first compare effective collision strengths determined from a 20-level Breit-Pauli R-matrix calculation with those obtained from a 20-level intermediate-coupling frame transformation (ICFT) R-matrix calculation. The ICFT method was also employed to perform two much larger calculations; we compare the effective collision strengths determined from these calculations with each other and with those obtained from the 20-level calculations in order to assess the effects of increasing both the size of the configuration-interaction expansion of the target and the size of the close-coupling expansion. Our final calculation, with 130 terms and 261 levels in the configuration-interaction expansion of the target and 66 terms and 138 levels in the close-coupling expansion, provides improved data for excitation between the levels of the 2s22p2, 2s2p3 and 2p4 configurations and the first close-coupling results for excitation to the levels of the 2s22p3ℓ configurations in Ne4+.

  3. Non-radiative excitation fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riachy, Lina; Vézy, Cyrille; Jaffiol, Rodolphe

    2016-03-01

    Non-radiative Excitation Fluorescence Microscopy (NEFM) constitutes a new way to observe biological samples beyond the diffraction limit. Non-radiative excitation of the samples is achieved by coating the substrate with donor species, such as quantum dots (QDs). Thus the dyes are not excited directly by the laser source, as in common fluorescence microscopy, but through a non-radiative energy transfer. To prevent dewetting of the donor film, we have recently implemented a silanization process to covalently bond the QDs on the substrate. An homogeneous monolayer of QDs was then deposited on only one side of the coverslips. Atomic force microscopy was then used to characterize the QD layer. We highlight the potential of our method through the study of Giant Unilamellar Vesicles (GUVs) labeled with DiD as acceptor, in interaction with surface functionalized with poly-L-lysine. In the presence of GUVs, we observed a quenching of QDs emission, together with an emission of DiD located in the membrane, which clearly indicated that non-radiative energy transfer from QDs to DiD occurs.

  4. The Chandlerian Period of minimum excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Naosuke

    Up to the present, the Chandlerian Period has been defined as the mean period of the revolution of the pole around its mean position. However, as the motion of the excitation pole does not contain the Chandlerian component, we can determine the length of the Chandlerian Period under the condition that the motion of the excitation pole attains a minimum after elimination of the Chandlerian component. It is calculated as 416 (mean solar) days. It means the period deduced from the angular velocity of the pole around the instantaneous excitation pole, and is able to match better those deduced from the theory of the internal constitution of the Earth. The calculated results using the recent data of ERP with a high precision show that the Chandlerian Period in this sense seems to have a reality. The main results are shown in the Figure on the next pape. This paper was published in full form in the Journal of the Geodetic Society of Japan, 33 (1987) pp.97-100.

  5. Excitation picture of an interacting Bose gas

    SciTech Connect

    Kira, M.

    2014-12-15

    Atomic Bose–Einstein condensates (BECs) can be viewed as macroscopic objects where atoms form correlated atom clusters to all orders. Therefore, the presence of a BEC makes the direct use of the cluster-expansion approach–lucrative e.g. in semiconductor quantum optics–inefficient when solving the many-body kinetics of a strongly interacting Bose. An excitation picture is introduced with a nonunitary transformation that describes the system in terms of atom clusters within the normal component alone. The nontrivial properties of this transformation are systematically studied, which yields a cluster-expansion friendly formalism for a strongly interacting Bose gas. Its connections and corrections to the standard Hartree–Fock–Bogoliubov approach are discussed and the role of the order parameter and the Bogoliubov excitations are identified. The resulting interaction effects are shown to visibly modify number fluctuations of the BEC. Even when the BEC has a nearly perfect second-order coherence, the BEC number fluctuations can still resolve interaction-generated non-Poissonian fluctuations. - Highlights: • Excitation picture expresses interacting Bose gas with few atom clusters. • Semiconductor and BEC many-body investigations are connected with cluster expansion. • Quantum statistics of BEC is identified in terms of atom clusters. • BEC number fluctuations show extreme sensitivity to many-body correlations. • Cluster-expansion friendly framework is established for an interacting Bose gas.

  6. Spin-flavor composition of excited baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernando, Ishara; Goity, Jose

    2015-10-01

    The excited baryon masses are analyzed in the framework of the 1 /Nc expansion using the available physical masses and also the masses obtained in lattice QCD for different quark masses. The baryon states are organized into irreducible representations of SU (6) × O (3) , where the [ 56 ,lP =0+ ] ground state and excited baryons, and the [ 56 ,2+ ] and [ 70 ,1- ] excited states are analyzed. The analyses are carried out to O 1 /Nc and first order in the quark masses. The issue of state identifications is discussed. Numerous parameter independent mass relations result at those orders, among them the well known Gell-Mann-Okubo and Equal Spacing relations, as well as additional relations involving baryons with different spins. It is observed that such relations are satisfied at the expected level of precision. Predictions for physically unknown states for each multiplet are obtained. From the quark-mass dependence of the coefficients in the baryon mass formulas an increasingly simpler picture of the spin-flavor composition of the baryons is observed with increasing pion mass (equivalently, increasing mu , d masses), as measured by the number of significant mass operators. This work was supported in part by DOE Contract No. DE-AC05-06OR23177 under which JSA operates the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (J. L. G.), and by the NSF (USA) through Grant PHY-0855789 and PHY-1307413 (I. P. F and J. L. G).

  7. Electron-induced excitation of 93Mo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiara, C. J.; Carroll, J. J.; Marsh, J. C.; Matters, D. A.; Lane, G. J.; Hartley, D. J.; Polasik, M.; Rzadkiewicz, J.; Carpenter, M. P.; Greene, J. P.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Seweryniak, D.; Zhu, S.

    2016-09-01

    The inverse of the internal-conversion process, whereby a free electron is captured into an atomic orbital and subsequently excites the nucleus to a higher-lying state via a virtual energy exchange, was predicted to exist 40 years ago but has yet to be demonstrated experimentally. To search for this mode of nuclear excitation by electron capture, we performed an experiment at the ATLAS facility at Argonne National Laboratory. The t1/2 = 6.85-h, 21/2+ state of 93Mo was populated in the 7Li(90Zr, p 3 n) reaction. The excitation mechanism was predicted to induce depopulation of this isomer as the fast-moving 93mMo recoils slowed in the target material, emitting a characteristic sequence of γ rays in the process. Results of the search for these signature γ rays using Digital Gammasphere will be presented. This material is based upon work supported by the US DOE, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357. This research used resources of ANL's ATLAS facility, which is a DOE Office of Science User Facility.

  8. Excitable Pattern Formation in Inhomogeneous Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhakara, Kaumudi; Gholami, Azam; Zykov, Vladimir; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2015-03-01

    On starvation, the amoebae Dictyostelium discoideum signal via the chemo-attractant cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). The amoebae sense cAMP through membrane receptors and produce their own cAMP. Simultaneously they produce a basal level of Phosphodiesterase, an enzyme that degrades cAMP. Soon a pattern of rotating spiral waves or circular waves is formed at the multi-cellular level. The causal reasons for the selection of one or the other pattern are still unclear. Here we report experimental and theoretical investigations of the pattern-formation of mixtures of cells starved for different times. The excitability of the amoebae depends on the starvation time due to time dependent gene expressions. Cells starved for longer times are known to exhibit increased excitability. We report phase maps of the patterns for mixtures of different combinations of excitability. Numerical simulations of a modified Kessler-Levine model allow us to explain the experimental results and provide new insights into the dynamical behavior of the system. This work is supported by the Max Planck Society.

  9. Thermal Excitation System for Shearography (TESS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansing, Matthew D.; Bullock, Michael W.

    1996-01-01

    One of the most convenient and effective methods of stressing a part or structure for shearographic evaluation is thermal excitation. This technique involves heating the part, often convectively with a heat gun, and then monitoring with a shearography device the deformation during cooling. For a composite specimen, unbonds, delaminations, inclusions, or matrix cracking will deform during cooling differently than other more structurally sound regions and thus will appear as anomalies in the deformation field. However, one of the difficulties that cause this inspection to be dependent on the operator experience is the conventional heating process. Fanning the part with a heat gun by hand introduces a wide range of variability from person to person and from one inspection to the next. The goal of this research effort was to conduct research in the methods of thermal excitation for shearography inspection. A computerized heating system was developed for inspection of 0.61 m (24 in.) square panels. The Thermal Excitation System for Shearography (TESS) provides radiant heating with continuous digital measurement of the surface temperature profile to ensure repeatability. The TESS device functions as an accessory to any electronic shearography device.

  10. Excitation of photon echo by noise pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baruzdin, S. A.

    2016-10-01

    The excitation of photon echo by noise pulses that are formed by modulation of the carrying frequency with Gauss noise is modeled. The modeling is based on optical Bloch equations the solution of which for noise pulse realizations is constructed by their stepwise approximation. In terms of the formalism of state transfer matrices, the two- and three-pulse excitation modes are analyzed. The complex envelopes of the primary and stimulated echo responses are determined. In the linear (low-level-signal) mode, the shape of the two-pulse echo corresponds to that of the time delayed and inverted noise pulse. The boundary of the linear mode, upon exceeding of which distortions of the shape of the noise pulse become noticeable, is determined. The shape of the stimulated (three-pulse) echo in the linear mode corresponds to that of the autocorrelation function of the noise pulse realization. Upon passage beyond the boundary of the linear mode, the shape of the three-pulse echo corresponds either to the cross-correlation function of distorted noise pulses (with different intensities) or to the autocorrelation function of distorted pulses (with the same intensities). The modeled photon echo excitation modes can be used in photon echo processors to process signals in the light range.

  11. Excitation equilibria in plasmas; a classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Mullen, J. A. M.

    1990-07-01

    This review gives a classification of the excitation kinetics ruled by electrons in plasmas. It is a study on the atomic state distribution function (ASDF) and its relation with underlying processes, which, for the case of an electron excitation kinetics (EEK) plasma, is merely a competition between free and bound electrons, the same particles in different circumstances. In a quasi steady state the population density of an atomic state results from production-destruction balances in equilibrium. If all balances are proper, i.e., consist of each other's inverse processes, then the ASDF is described by the Boltzmann-Saha relation. In other cases the balance will be denoted as improper, the ASDF will deviate from the equilibrium shape, but reflecting the underlying improper balances, it may give information about the plasma. Four improper balances and their impact on the ASDF are dealt with. An important feature is that improper balances are associated with particle transport. Special attention is paid to the distribution function of the excitation saturation balance in which the overpopulated bound electrons are subjected to frequent interactions with free electrons and the energy distribution of the free electrons is taken over. This distribution, denoted as the bound Maxwell distribution, is experimentally found in several ionizing plasmas. Its recombining counterpart, the deexcitation saturation balance, creates under certain conditions inversion in the ASDF, the basis for the recombination laser.

  12. Asymmetric magnon excitation by spontaneous toroidal ordering

    DOE PAGES

    Hayami, Satoru; Kusunose, Hiroaki; Motome, Yukitoshi

    2016-04-12

    The effects of spontaneous toroidal ordering on magnetic excitation are theoretically investigated for a localized spin model that includes a staggered Dzyaloshinsky–Moriya interaction and anisotropic exchange interactions, which arise from the antisymmetric spin–orbit coupling and the multiorbital correlation effect. We show that the model exhibits a Néel-type antiferromagnetic order, which simultaneously accompanies a ferroic toroidal order. We find that the occurrence of toroidal order modulates the magnon dispersion in an asymmetric way with respect to the wave number: a toroidal dipole order on the zigzag chain leads to a band-bottom shift, while a toroidal octupole order on the honeycomb latticemore » gives rise to a valley splitting. These asymmetric magnon excitations could be a source of unusual magnetic responses, such as nonreciprocal magnon transport. A variety of modulations are discussed while changing the lattice and magnetic symmetries. Furthermore, the implications regarding candidate materials for asymmetric magnon excitations are presented.« less

  13. Excited States of {sup 11}Be

    SciTech Connect

    Cappuzzello, F.; Cunsolo, A.; Fortier, S.; Foti, A.; Laurent, H.; Lenske, H.; Maison, J.M.; Melita, A.L.; Nociforo, C.; Rosier, L.; Stephan, C.; Tassan-Got, L.; Winfield, J.S.; Wolter, H.H.

    2000-12-31

    The {sup 11}B({sup 7}Li,{sup 7}Be){sup 11}Be reaction at 57 MeV incident energy was used to explore the {sup 11}Be excitation energy spectrum at forward angles. Angular distributions were extracted for the transitions to the ground and to the states of {sup 11}Be at excitation energies of E*=0.32, 1.78, 2.69, 3.41, 3.89, 3.96, 6.05 MeV combined with the ground and the first excited state of {sup 7}Be. Also the SDR [1][2] oscillation mode was observed at E*=9.5 MeV and FWHM{approx}9 MeV and a new peak at E*=6.05 MeV and FWHM{approx}0.3 MeV was observed. QRPA calculations in the G-matrix representation are in progress in order to describe the continuum structure of {sup 11}Be. DWBA calculations have been started to evaluate transferred angular momenta both in the one step and in the two steps dynamical framework.

  14. Experiments on shells under base excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellicano, Francesco; Barbieri, Marco; Zippo, Antonio; Strozzi, Matteo

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the present paper is a deep experimental investigation of the nonlinear dynamics of circular cylindrical shells. The specific problem regards the response of circular cylindrical shells subjected to base excitation. The shells are mounted on a shaking table that furnishes a vertical vibration parallel to the cylinder axis; a heavy rigid disk is mounted on the top of the shells. The base vibration induces a rigid body motion, which mainly causes huge inertia forces exerted by the top disk to the shell. In-plane stresses due to the aforementioned inertias give rise to impressively large vibration on the shell. An extremely violent dynamic phenomenon suddenly appears as the excitation frequency varies up and down close to the linear resonant frequency of the first axisymmetric mode. The dynamics are deeply investigated by varying excitation level and frequency. Moreover, in order to generalise the investigation, two different geometries are analysed. The paper furnishes a complete dynamic scenario by means of: (i) amplitude frequency diagrams, (ii) bifurcation diagrams, (iii) time histories and spectra, (iv) phase portraits and Poincaré maps. It is to be stressed that all the results presented here are experimental.

  15. Generalized Sagdeev approach to nonlinear plasma excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we extend the Sagdeev pseudopotential approach by introducing the generalized potential, which is used for the investigation of nonlinear periodic, solitary, as well as double layer excitations in plasmas. Particularly in the framework of the generalized potential, the nonlinear excitations are investigated based on their total Sagdeev pseudoenergy. In this framework, conventional solitons are categorized as species with zero Sagdeev energy. A new type of positive energy solitons with subsonic Mach numbers is found. It is remarked that positive energy solitons do not obey the standard behavior of KdV solitons. Different types of nonlinear excitations are characterized in terms of their Sagdeev energy, and the parametric regions in which they exist are studied in detail. The nonlinear periodic waves are found to be either negative or positive energy type, characteristics of which are found to be quite different. A small amplitude theory of Sagdeev cnoidal waves is developed, which can be used to investigate the low energy waves with Mach numbers close to the critical one. Using the new concept of Sagdeev energy, we study different properties of large amplitude positive and negative energy nonlinear periodic waves in a plasma with arbitrary degree of electron degeneracy ranging from dilute classical up to the completely degenerate plasmas.

  16. Seismic Excitation of the Polar Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Benjamin Fong; Gross, Richard S.; Han, Yan-Ben

    1996-01-01

    The mass redistribution in the earth as a result of an earthquake faulting changes the earth's inertia tensor, and hence its rotation. Using the complete formulae developed by Chao and Gross (1987) based on the normal mode theory, we calculated the earthquake-induced polar motion excitation for the largest 11,015 earthquakes that occurred during 1977.0-1993.6. The seismic excitations in this period are found to be two orders of magnitude below the detection threshold even with today's high precision earth rotation measurements. However, it was calculated that an earthquake of only one tenth the size of the great 1960 Chile event, if happened today, could be comfortably detected in polar motion observations. Furthermore, collectively these seismic excitations have a strong statistical tendency to nudge the pole towards approx. 140 deg E, away from the actually observed polar drift direction. This non-random behavior, similarly found in other earthquake-induced changes in earth rotation and low-degree gravitational field by Chao and Gross (1987), manifests some geodynamic behavior yet to be explored.

  17. Unravelling the Excitation Spectrum of the Nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Sandorfi, Andrew M.

    2013-03-01

    The low-energy structure of QCD lies encoded in the excited states of the nucleon, a complicated overlap of many resonances. Recent Lattice calculations have confirmed the longstanding quark model predictions of many more excited states than have been identified. Reactions that probe the spectrum are clouded by effects that dress the interactions and complicate the identification of excited levels and the interpretation of their structure. Recent theoretical work has exposed dramatic effects from such dressings. On the experimental side, new complete measurements of pseudoscalar meson photo-production are being pursued at several laboratories, where here the designation of complete refers to measurements of most if not all of the 16 possible reaction observables. This has been the focus of a series of experiments at Jefferson Lab culminating in the recently completed g9/FROST and g14/HDice runs which are now under analysis. With realistic errors, the number of observables needed to constrain the production amplitude is many more than required of a mathematical solution.

  18. Photoionization of aligned molecular excited states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appling, J. R.; White, M. G.; Kessler, W. J.; Fernandez, R.; Poliakoff, E. D.

    1988-02-01

    Photoelectron angular distributions of several excited states of NO have been measured in an effort to better elucidate the role of alignment in resonant multiphoton excitation processes of molecules. In contrast to previous molecular REMPI measurements on NO, (2+1) angular distributions taken for low rotational levels of the E 2Σ+ (4sσ) Rydberg state of NO exhibit complex angular behavior which is characteristic of strong spatial alignment of the optically prepared levels. Photoelectron angular distributions were also found to be strongly branch and J dependent with the lowest rotational levels of the R21+S11 branch exhibiting the full anisotropy expected for an overall three-photon process. Fluorescence anisotropies extracted from complementary two-photon fluorescence angular distribution measurements reveal small, but nonzero alignment in all rotational levels with J>1/2, in contrast to the photoelectron results. Additional photoelectron angular distributions taken for (1+1) REMPI via the A 2Σ+ (3sσ), v=0 state exhibit near ``cos2θ'' distributions characteristic of photoionization of unaligned target states. The observed photoelectron data are qualitatively interpreted on the basis of the angular momentum constraints of the excitation-induced alignment and photoionization dynamics which determine the observable moments in the angular distribution.

  19. The excitation of tsunamis by deep earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okal, Emile A.

    2017-01-01

    Motivated by the detection of a millimetric tsunami following the deep earthquake of 24 May 2013 in the Sea of Okhotsk (depth 603 km; record moment M0 = 3.95 × 1028 dyn*cm), we present a number of theoretical studies of the influence of source depth, zs, on the excitation of tsunamis by dislocation sources. In the framework of the static deformation of an elastic half-space, we show that the energy available for tsunami excitation by a seismic source whose depth is significantly greater than source dimensions is expected to vary as M02/zs2, in contrast to the classical scaling as M04/3 for shallow sources. This is verified by numerical simulations based on the MOST algorithm, which also confirm the interpretation of the millimetric signals observed on DART sensors during the 2013 event. The normal mode formalism, which considers tsunamis as a special branch of the spheroidal oscillations if the Earth in the presence of a water layer at its surface, also predicts an M02/zs2 scaling for point source double-couples, and confirms millimetric amplitudes in the geometry of the DART buoys having recorded the 2013 Okhotsk tsunami. A general investigation of potential tsunami excitation as a function of depth for realistic intermediate and deep sources suggests the admittedly remote possibility of damaging events if deep earthquakes even greater than the 2013 event could occur at the bottom of Wadati-Benioff zones.

  20. Motional sideband excitation using rotating electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaac, C. A.

    2013-04-01

    A form of motional sideband excitation is described in which a rotating dipole electric field is applied asymmetrically onto a Penning-type trap in the presence of a mechanism for cooling the axial motion of the trapped particles. In contrast to the traditional motional sideband excitation, which uses an oscillating electric field, the rotating field results in only one active sideband in each sense of rotation and so avoids accidental excitation of the other sideband making it applicable to Penning-type traps with a large degree of anharmonicity. Expressions are derived for the magnetron radius expansion and compression rates attainable, and approximations are made for the case of strong and weak drives. A comparison is made with data, taken using a two-stage positron accumulator presented by Isaac [C. A. Isaac, C. J. Baker, T. Mortensen, D. P. van der Werf, and M. Charlton, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.107.033201 107, 033201 (2011)], showing good agreement between the model and experiment.

  1. Composite lateral electric field excited piezoelectric resonator.

    PubMed

    Zaitsev, B D; Shikhabudinov, A M; Borodina, I A; Teplykh, A A; Kuznetsova, I E

    2017-01-01

    The novel method of suppression of parasitic oscillations in lateral electric field excited piezoelectric resonator is suggested. Traditionally such resonator represents the piezoelectric plate with two electrodes on one side of the plate. The crystallographic orientation of the plate is selected so that the tangential components of electric field excite bulk acoustic wave with given polarization travelling along the normal to the plate sides. However at that the normal components of field excite the parasitic Lamb waves and bulk waves of other polarization which deteriorate the resonant properties of the resonator. In this work we suggest to separate the source of the HF electric field and resounded piezoelectric plate by air gap. In this case the tangential components of the field in piezoelectric plate do not practically weaken but normal components significantly decrease. This method is realized on the composite resonator having the structure "glass plate with rectangular electrodes - air gap - plate of 128 Y-X lithium niobate." It has been shown that there exist the optimal value of the width gap which ensure the good quality of series and parallel resonances in frequency range 3-4MHz with record values of Q-factor of ∼15,000 in both cases.

  2. Excitation energy transfer in the photosystem I

    SciTech Connect

    Webber, Andrew N

    2012-09-25

    Photosystem I is a multimeric pigment protein complex in plants, green alage and cyanobacteria that functions in series with Photosystem II to use light energy to oxidize water and reduce carbon dioxide. The Photosystem I core complex contains 96 chlorophyll a molecules and 22 carotenoids that are involved in light harvesting and electron transfer. In eucaryotes, PSI also has a peripheral light harvesting complex I (LHCI). The role of specific chlorophylls in excitation and electron transfer are still unresolved. In particular, the role of so-called bridging chlorophylls, located between the bulk antenna and the core electron transfer chain, in the transfer of excitation energy to the reaction center are unknown. During the past funding period, site directed mutagenesis has been used to create mutants that effect the physical properties of these key chlorophylls, and to explore how this alters the function of the photosystem. Studying these mutants using ultrafast absorption spectroscopy has led to a better understanding of the process by which excitation energy is transferred from the antenna chlorophylls to the electron transfer chain chlorophylls, and what the role of connecting chlorophylls and A_0 chlorophylls is in this process. We have also used these mutants to investigate whch of the central group of six chlorophylls are involved in the primary steps of charge separation and electron transfer.

  3. Electrically Excited Plasmonic Nanoruler for Biomolecule Detection.

    PubMed

    Dathe, André; Ziegler, Mario; Hübner, Uwe; Fritzsche, Wolfgang; Stranik, Ondrej

    2016-09-14

    Plasmon-based sensors are excellent tools for a label-free detection of small biomolecules. An interesting group of such sensors are plasmonic nanorulers that rely on the plasmon hybridization upon modification of their morphology to sense nanoscale distances. Sensor geometries based on the interaction of plasmons in a flat metallic layer together with metal nanoparticles inherit unique advantages but need a special optical excitation configuration that is not easy to miniaturize. Herein, we introduce the concept of nanoruler excitation by direct, electrically induced generation of surface plasmons based on the quantum shot noise of tunneling currents. An electron tunneling junction consisting of a metal-dielectric-semiconductor heterostructure is directly incorporated into the nanoruler basic geometry. With the application of voltage on this modified nanoruler, the plasmon modes are directly excited without any additional optical component as a light source. We demonstrate via several experiments that this electrically driven nanoruler possesses similar properties as an optically exited one and confirm its sensing capabilities by the detection of the binding of small biomolecules such as antibodies. This new sensing principle could open the way to a new platform of highly miniaturized, integrated plasmonic sensors compatible with monolithic integrated circuits.

  4. Imaging of cardiac electrical excitation conduction.

    PubMed

    Zhou, D F; Jiang, S Q; Zhu, J C; Zhao, C; Yan, Y R; Gronemeyer, D; Van Leeuwen, P

    2015-08-01

    We present a multiple time windows beamformer (MTWB) method of solving the inverse problem of magnetic field and non-invasively imaging the cardiac electrical excitation conduction using the magnetocardiac signals acquired by a 61-channel superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). The MTWB constructs spatial filters for each location in source space, one for each component of the source moment based on the distributed source model, and estimates the cardiac equivalent current sources. The output of spatial filters is the source strength estimated in three-dimensional space and the weight matrix calculated with magnetocardiac signals in multiple time windows. A signal subspace projection technique is used to suppress noise. Then, the characteristics of cardiac electrical excitation conduction among two healthy subjects and two coronary vessel stenosis (CVS) patients are extracted from reconstructed current sources with maximum strength at each instant during QRS complex and ST-T segment, and a series of two-dimensional cardiac electrical excitation conduction maps (EECM) are obtained. It is demonstrated that two healthy subjects are of similar and the stronger electrical activities than those of two CVS patients. This technique can be used as an effective tool for the diagnosis of heart diseases.

  5. Charge transfer excitations from excited state Hartree-Fock subsequent minimization scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Theophilou, Iris; Tassi, M.; Thanos, S.

    2014-04-28

    Photoinduced charge-transfer processes play a key role for novel photovoltaic phenomena and devices. Thus, the development of ab initio methods that allow for an accurate and computationally inexpensive treatment of charge-transfer excitations is a topic that nowadays attracts a lot of scientific attention. In this paper we extend an approach recently introduced for the description of single and double excitations [M. Tassi, I. Theophilou, and S. Thanos, Int. J. Quantum Chem. 113, 690 (2013); M. Tassi, I. Theophilou, and S. Thanos, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 124107 (2013)] to allow for the description of intermolecular charge-transfer excitations. We describe an excitation where an electron is transferred from a donor system to an acceptor one, keeping the excited state orthogonal to the ground state and avoiding variational collapse. These conditions are achieved by decomposing the space spanned by the Hartree-Fock (HF) ground state orbitals into four subspaces: The subspace spanned by the occupied orbitals that are localized in the region of the donor molecule, the corresponding for the acceptor ones and two more subspaces containing the virtual orbitals that are localized in the neighborhood of the donor and the acceptor, respectively. Next, we create a Slater determinant with a hole in the subspace of occupied orbitals of the donor and a particle in the virtual subspace of the acceptor. Subsequently we optimize both the hole and the particle by minimizing the HF energy functional in the corresponding subspaces. Finally, we test our approach by calculating the lowest charge-transfer excitation energies for a set of tetracyanoethylene-hydrocarbon complexes that have been used earlier as a test set for such kind of excitations.

  6. Probabilistic solutions of nonlinear oscillators excited by combined colored and white noise excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siu-Siu, Guo; Qingxuan, Shi

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) systems combined to Gaussian white noise and Gaussian/non-Gaussian colored noise excitations are investigated. By expressing colored noise excitation as a second-order filtered white noise process and introducing colored noise as an additional state variable, the equation of motion for SDOF system under colored noise is then transferred artificially to multi-degree-of-freedom (MDOF) system under white noise excitations with four-coupled first-order differential equations. As a consequence, corresponding Fokker-Planck-Kolmogorov (FPK) equation governing the joint probabilistic density function (PDF) of state variables increases to 4-dimension (4-D). Solution procedure and computer programme become much more sophisticated. The exponential-polynomial closure (EPC) method, widely applied for cases of SDOF systems under white noise excitations, is developed and improved for cases of systems under colored noise excitations and for solving the complex 4-D FPK equation. On the other hand, Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) method is performed to test the approximate EPC solutions. Two examples associated with Gaussian and non-Gaussian colored noise excitations are considered. Corresponding band-limited power spectral densities (PSDs) for colored noise excitations are separately given. Numerical studies show that the developed EPC method provides relatively accurate estimates of the stationary probabilistic solutions, especially the ones in the tail regions of the PDFs. Moreover, statistical parameter of mean-up crossing rate (MCR) is taken into account, which is important for reliability and failure analysis. Hopefully, our present work could provide insights into the investigation of structures under random loadings.

  7. Energy Gap of Neutral Excitations Implies Vanishing Charge Susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Haruki

    2017-03-01

    In quantum many-body systems with a U(1) symmetry, such as particle number conservation and axial spin conservation, there are two distinct types of excitations: charge-neutral excitations and charged excitations. The energy gaps of these excitations may be independent from each other in strongly correlated systems. The static susceptibility of the U(1) charge vanishes when the charged excitations are all gapped, but its relation to the neutral excitations is not obvious. Here we show that a finite excitation gap of the neutral excitations is, in fact, sufficient to prove that the charge susceptibility vanishes (i.e., the system is incompressible). This result gives a partial explanation for why the celebrated quantization condition n (S -mz)∈Z at magnetization plateaus works even in spatial dimensions greater than one.

  8. The [NeIV] Lines in High Excitation Gaseous Nebulae.

    PubMed

    Aller, L H

    1970-04-01

    The "forbidden" lines of three times ionized neon are among the most precious indicators of electron temperature and excitation. They are also predicted to be among the strongest lines observed in the far ultraviolet spectra of high excitation nebulae.

  9. 11. POWERHOUSE INTERIOR, DETAIL OF EXCITER No. 2 GENERAL ELECTRIC ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. POWERHOUSE INTERIOR, DETAIL OF EXCITER No. 2 GENERAL ELECTRIC GENERATOR SHOWING COPPER COMMUTATOR AND CARBON BRUSHES. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Rush Creek Hydroelectric System, Powerhouse Exciters, Rush Creek, June Lake, Mono County, CA

  10. 14. POWERHOUSE INTERIOR, EXCITER No. 2 SHOWING GENERAL ELECTRIC INDUCTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. POWERHOUSE INTERIOR, EXCITER No. 2 SHOWING GENERAL ELECTRIC INDUCTION MOTOR IN SERIES BETWEEN PELTON-DOBLE IMPULSE WHEEL AND GENERAL ELECTRIC GENERATOR. VIEW TO EAST. - Rush Creek Hydroelectric System, Powerhouse Exciters, Rush Creek, June Lake, Mono County, CA

  11. 5. POWERHOUSE INTERIOR SHOWING EXCITER No. 1. SMALL PELTONDOBLE IMPULSE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. POWERHOUSE INTERIOR SHOWING EXCITER No. 1. SMALL PELTON-DOBLE IMPULSE WHEEL IN FOREGROUND. VIEW TO NORTHWEST. - Rush Creek Hydroelectric System, Powerhouse Exciters, Rush Creek, June Lake, Mono County, CA

  12. 10. POWERHOUSE INTERIOR, DETAIL OF EXCITER No. 2 GENERAL ELECTRIC ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. POWERHOUSE INTERIOR, DETAIL OF EXCITER No. 2 GENERAL ELECTRIC GENERATOR SHOWING CABLING FROM ARMATURE TO COMMUTATOR. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Rush Creek Hydroelectric System, Powerhouse Exciters, Rush Creek, June Lake, Mono County, CA

  13. 13. POWERHOUSE INTERIOR, DETAIL OF EXCITER No. 2 GENERAL ELECTRIC ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. POWERHOUSE INTERIOR, DETAIL OF EXCITER No. 2 GENERAL ELECTRIC INDUCTION MOTOR NAMEPLATE. VIEW TO EAST. - Rush Creek Hydroelectric System, Powerhouse Exciters, Rush Creek, June Lake, Mono County, CA

  14. Strong decays of excited baryons in Large Nc QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Goity, Jose; Scoccola, Norberto

    2007-02-01

    We present the analysis of the strong decays widths of excited baryons in the framework of the 1/Nc expansion of QCD. These studies are performed up to order 1/Nc and include both positive and negative parity excited baryons.

  15. 69. Credit TCL. Housing of Pelton exciter impulse wheel and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    69. Credit TCL. Housing of Pelton exciter impulse wheel and attached General Electric 60 kW exciter generator. - Battle Creek Hydroelectric System, Battle Creek & Tributaries, Red Bluff, Tehama County, CA

  16. 6. POWERHOUSE INTERIOR SHOWING EXCITER No. 1. HANDCONTROLLED GATE VALVE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. POWERHOUSE INTERIOR SHOWING EXCITER No. 1. HAND-CONTROLLED GATE VALVE SHOWN ON NOZZLE TO PELTON-DOBLE IMPULSE WHEEL. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Rush Creek Hydroelectric System, Powerhouse Exciters, Rush Creek, June Lake, Mono County, CA

  17. 12. POWERHOUSE INTERIOR SHOWING EXCITER No. 2 SMALL PELTONDOBLE IMPULSE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. POWERHOUSE INTERIOR SHOWING EXCITER No. 2 SMALL PELTON-DOBLE IMPULSE WHEEL, HAND-CONTROLLED GATE VALVE, AND NOZZLE. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Rush Creek Hydroelectric System, Powerhouse Exciters, Rush Creek, June Lake, Mono County, CA

  18. Impact self-excited vibrations of linear motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuravlev, V. Ph.

    2010-08-01

    Impact self-exciting vibration modes in a linear motor of a monorail car are studied. Existence and stability conditions of self-exciting vibrations are found. Ways of avoiding the vibrations are discussed.

  19. Simultaneous two-photon excitation of photodynamic therapy agents

    SciTech Connect

    Wachter, E.A.; Fisher, W.G. |; Partridge, W.P.; Dees, H.C.; Petersen, M.G.

    1998-01-01

    The spectroscopic and photochemical properties of several photosensitive compounds are compared using conventional single-photon excitation (SPE) and simultaneous two-photon excitation (TPE). TPE is achieved using a mode-locked titanium:sapphire laser, the near infrared output of which allows direct promotion of non-resonant TPE. Excitation spectra and excited state properties of both type 1 and type 2 photodynamic therapy (PDT) agents are examined.

  20. Roundabout relaxation: collective excitation requires a detour to equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Morita, Hidetoshi; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2005-03-04

    Relaxation to equilibrium after strong and collective excitation is studied by using a Hamiltonian dynamical system of a one-dimensional XY model. After an excitation of a domain of K elements, the excitation is concentrated to fewer elements, which are made farther away from equilibrium, and the excitation intensity increases logarithmically with K. Equilibrium is reached only after taking this roundabout route, with the time for relaxation diverging asymptotically as Kgamma with gamma approximately 4.2.

  1. Roundabout Relaxation: Collective Excitation Requires a Detour to Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Hidetoshi; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2005-03-01

    Relaxation to equilibrium after strong and collective excitation is studied by using a Hamiltonian dynamical system of a one-dimensional XY model. After an excitation of a domain of K elements, the excitation is concentrated to fewer elements, which are made farther away from equilibrium, and the excitation intensity increases logarithmically with K. Equilibrium is reached only after taking this roundabout route, with the time for relaxation diverging asymptotically as Kγ with γ≈4.2.

  2. Radiative transitions of excited ions moving slowly in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Hongwei Chen, Wencong; Li, Peng; Zhao, Yongtao; Zhou, Xianming; Li, Zhen; Li, Fuli; Dong, Chenzhong

    2014-12-15

    The electric dipole transitions of excited ions moving slowly in plasmas are studied. The results show that some transitions forbidden for excited ions at rest become allowed for moving excited ions. The transition rates change with varying speed of the ions. Forbidden transitions are strongly influenced by the speed, non-forbidden transitions are weakly influenced.

  3. LASERS IN MEDICINE: Two-photon excitation of aluminium phthalocyanines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshalkin, Yu P.; Alfimov, E. E.; Vasil'ev, N. E.; Denisov, A. N.; Makukha, V. K.; Ogirenko, A. P.

    1999-12-01

    A demonstration is given of the feasibility of two-photon excitation of aluminium phthalocyanine and of the pharmaceutical preparation 'Fotosens', used in photodynamic therapy. The excitation source was an Nd:YAG laser emitting at the 1064 nm wavelength. The spectra of the two-photon-excited luminescence were obtained and the two-photon absorption cross sections were determined.

  4. The mechanism of electronic excitation in the bacterial bioluminescent reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemtseva, E. V.; Kudryasheva, N. S.

    2007-01-01

    The current state of the problem of formation of the electron-excited product in the chemiluminescent reaction that underlies the bacterial luminescence is analysed. Various schemes of chemical transformations capable of producing a bacterial bioluminescence emitter are presented. The problem of excitation of secondary emitters is considered; two possible mechanisms of their excitation are analysed.

  5. Nuclear excitation by electronic transition of 235U

    DOE PAGES

    Chodash, P. A.; Norman, E. B.; Burke, J. T.; ...

    2016-03-11

    Here, nuclear excitation by electronic transition (NEET) is a rare nuclear excitation that can occur in isotopes containing a low-lying nuclear excited state. Over the past 40 yr, several experiments have attempted to measure NEET of 235U and those experiments have yielded conflicting results.

  6. Dynamic analysis of parametrically excited system under uncertainties and multi-frequency excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Sha; Han, Qinkai; Peng, Zhike; Chu, Fulei

    2016-05-01

    Some system parameters in mechanical systems are always uncertain due to uncertainties in geometric and material properties, lubrication condition and wear. For a more reasonable estimation of dynamic analysis of the parametrically excited system, the effect of uncertain parameters should be taken into account. This paper presents a new non-probabilistic analysis method for solving the dynamic responses of parametrically excited systems under uncertainties and multi-frequency excitations. By using the multi-dimensional harmonic balance method (MHBM) and the Chebyshev inclusion function (CIF), an interval multi-dimensional harmonic balance method (IMHBM) is obtained. To illustrate the accuracy of the proposed method, a time-varying geared system of wind turbine with different kinds of uncertainties is demonstrated. By comparing with the results of the scanning method, it is shown that the presented method is valid and effective for the parametrically excited system with uncertainties and multi-frequency excitations. The effects of some uncertain system parameters including uncertain mesh stiffnesses and uncertain bearing stiffnesses on the frequency responses of the system are also discussed in detail. It is shown that the dynamic responses of the system are insensitive to the uncertain mesh stiffness and bearing stiffnesses of the planetary gear stage. The uncertain bearing stiffnesses of the intermediate and high-speed stages will lead to relatively large uncertainties in the dynamic responses around resonant regions. It will provide valuable guidance for the optimal design and condition monitoring of wind turbine gearboxes.

  7. Excited-State Dynamics in Folic Acid and 6-CARBOXYPTERIN upon Uva Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Huijuan; Vogt, R. Aaron; Crespo-Hernandez, Carlos E.

    2013-06-01

    The excited-state dynamics of folic acid (FA) and 6-carboxypterin (6CP) are poorly understood and work is needed to uncover the relaxation pathways that ultimately lead to their oxidative damage of DNA. In our approach, broad-band transient absorption spectroscopy was used to monitor the evolution of the excited states in FA and 6CP in basic aqueous solution upon excitation at 350 nm. In addition, quantum-chemical calculations were performed to assist in the interpretation of the experimental results and in the postulation of kinetic mechanisms. The combined experimental and computational results support a kinetic model where excitation of FA results in ultrafast charge separation (τ = 0.6 ps), which decays back to the ground state primarily by charge recombination with a lifetime of 2.2 ps. A small fraction of the charge transfer state undergoes intersystem crossing to populate the lowest-energy triplet state with a lifetime of 200 ps. On the other hand, a large fraction of the initially excited singlet state in 6CP decays by fluorescence emission with a lifetime of 100 ps, while intersystem crossing to the triplet state occurs with a lifetime of 4.4 ns. The potential implications of these results to the oxidative damage of DNA by FA and 6CP will be discussed. Funding from the National Science Foundation is gratefully acknowledged (CHE-1255084).

  8. Combined effect of cascade through circular orbits and Stark quenching on the decay of n=2→n=1 transition of H-like Fe in beam-foil excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Yogesh; Mishra, Adya P.; Nandi, T.

    2014-11-01

    Recently Mishra et al. (Mishra AP, et al. J Quant Spectrosc Radiat Transf 2013;120:114-9), while analyzing the effects of cascading through circular orbits (l=n-1)on the decay of unresolved 2p,2s→1s transitions of H-like Fe, neglected the effect of electric field at the exit surface of foil on the lifetime of the 2s state. In the present work we have considered the combined effect of cascading through circular orbits and the Stark mixing on the decay of the 2p,2s→1s transitions of H-like Fe in beam-foil excitation. It is observed that the natural lifetime of the 2s state (350.6 ps) is reduced to 221.8±22.4 ps due to Stark mixing of the long-lived 2s2S1/2 state with the very close and short-lived 2p P1/2o2 state. The strength of the electric field responsible for such mixing comes out to be 7.09±0.37×106 V/cm. The results of the present work for cascading of circular orbits through the 2p state are in good agreement (within the error bars) with those obtained earlier by Mishra et al.

  9. Stretched-State Excitations with the

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Luis Alberto Casimiro

    Neutron time-of-fight spectra were obtained for the ^{14}C(p,n) ^{14}N, ^{18 }O(p,n)^{18}F, and ^{30}Si(p,n) ^{30}P reactions at 135 MeV with the beam-swinger system at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility. Excitation-energy spectra and the differential cross sections for the observed excitations in these reactions were extracted over the momentum transfer range from 0 to 2.7 fm^{-1}. The primary goal of this work was to obtain the strengths and distributions for the "stretched" states. The identification of these states was based on comparisons of the theoretical differential cross sections, performed in a DWIA formalism, with the experimental cross sections. Isospin assignments were based primarily on comparisons of the measured (p,n) and (e,e^') spectroscopic strengths. Candidate (pid_ {5/2},nu{rm p}_sp {3/2}{-1}), J^ pi = 4 ^- T = 0, 1 and 2, 1 hbaromega states, were identified at E_{x} = 8.5, 13.8, 19.5, and 26.7 MeV in the ^{14}C(p,n) ^{14}N reaction, and the corresponding isovector strengths were extracted. The observed 4^--state excitation energies and the strengths are in good agreement with the analog T = 1 and 2, 4^--states observed in the (e,e^') reaction. Large -basis shell-model calculations were found to predict reasonably well the excitation energies; however, these calculations overpredict the strength by a factor of 2, for the T = 1 and 2 components. In the ^{18}O(p,n) ^{18}F reaction at 135 MeV, (pi d_{5/2},nu {rm d}_sp{5/2}{-1 }) 5^+ T = 0 0hbaromega strength was observed, concentrated in a single state, at E_{x} = 1.1 MeV, with 75% of the extreme-single-particle-model (ESPM) strength, in good agreement with a shell-model calculation. No 6^- 1hbaromega strength was observed in this reaction. Candidate (pi {rm d}_{5/2},nu p _sp{3/2}{-1}) J ^pi = 4^- T = 0, 1 and 2, 1hbaromega states, were identified at E_{x} = 3.9, 9.4, 10.2, 11.4, 12.0, 14.4, 15.3, 17.3, 18.0, 19.7, 21.4, and 23.4 MeV. The observed 4^- T = 2 state excitation energies and

  10. Electron-impact excitation and ionization cross sections for ground state and excited helium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Ralchenko, Yu. Janev, R.K.; Kato, T.; Fursa, D.V.; Bray, I.; Heer, F.J. de

    2008-07-15

    Comprehensive and critically assessed cross sections for the electron-impact excitation and ionization of ground state and excited helium atoms are presented. All states (atomic terms) with n{<=}4 are treated individually, while the states with n{>=}5 are considered degenerate. For the processes involving transitions to and from n{>=}5 levels, suitable cross section scaling relations are presented. For a large number of transitions, from both ground and excited states, convergent close coupling calculations were performed to achieve a high accuracy of the data. The evaluated/recommended cross section data are presented by analytic fit functions, which preserve the correct asymptotic behavior of the cross sections. The cross sections are also displayed in graphical form.

  11. Dynamic Characteristics of Excited Atomic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezuglov, N. N.; Dimitrijevic, M. S.; Klyucharev, A. N.; Mihajlov, A. A.

    2014-12-01

    The dynamics of excited atom interactions with other atoms, which often lead to associative ionization, is largely governed by stochastic diffusion of the valence electron through Rydberg states prior to the ionization. Such processes are associated with random changes of the energy state of the highly excited electron, and they are likely to influence the nuclear dynamics, especially at subthermal collision energies. Possibilities of manipulation of the chaotic dynamics of Rydberg states require a detailed exploration. For an electron in a given Rydberg state moving in a microwave field, which can be generated via interaction with another atom or molecule, there exists critical field strength, above which motion of the electron in the energy space is chaotic. Recently a way to block the dynamic chaos regime was shown, if a given Rydberg state is located somewhat above the middle between the two other states with the orbital quantum number differing by one, whereby level shifts can be controlled by employing Stark/Zeeman shifts in external DC electric/magnetic fields. The stochastic effects in collisions involving Rydberg particles, in which the initial and final reaction channels are connected via intermediate highly excited collision complexes with multiple crossings of energy levels, can be treated using the dynamic chaos approach (Chirikov criterion, Standard and Keppler mapping of time evolution of the Rydberg electron, solution of the Fokker-Plank- and Langevin-type of equations, etc.). Such approach to obtaining dynamics characteristics is a natural choice, since the treatment of Rydberg electron dynamics as a kind of diffusion process allowing one to bypass the multi-level-crossing problem, which can hardly be solved by conventional quantum chemistry methods.

  12. Culturing conditions determine neuronal and glial excitability.

    PubMed

    Stoppelkamp, Sandra; Riedel, Gernot; Platt, Bettina

    2010-12-15

    The cultivation of pure neuronal cultures is considered advantageous for the investigation of cell-type specific responses (such as transmitter release and also pharmacological agents), however, divergent results are a likely consequence of media modifications and culture composition. Using Fura-2 based imaging techniques, we here set out to compare calcium responses of rat hippocampal neurones and glia to excitatory stimulation with l-glutamate in different culture types and media. Neurones in neurone-enriched cultures had increased responses to 10 μM and 100 μM l-glutamate (+43 and 45%, respectively; p's< 0.001) and a slower recovery compared to mixed cultures, indicating heightened excitability. In matured (15-20 days in vitro) mixed cultures, neuronal responder rates were suppressed in a neurone-supportive medium (Neurobasal-A, NB: 65%) compared to a general-purpose medium (supplemented minimal essential medium, MEM: 96%). Glial response size in contrast did not differ greatly in isolated or mixed cultures maintained in MEM, but responder rates were suppressed in both culture types in NB (e.g. 10 μM l-glutamate responders in mixed cultures: 29% in NB, 71% in MEM). This indicates that medium composition is more important for glial excitability than the presence of neurones, whereas the presence of glia has an important impact on neuronal excitability. Therefore, careful consideration of culturing conditions is crucial for interpretation and comparison of experimental results. Especially for investigations of toxicity and neuroprotection mixed cultures may be more physiologically relevant over isolated cultures as they comprise aspects of mutual influences between glia and neurones.

  13. Fluorescence lifetime excitation cytometry by kinetic dithering.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenyan; Vacca, Giacomo; Castillo, Maryann; Houston, Kevin D; Houston, Jessica P

    2014-07-01

    Flow cytometers are powerful high-throughput devices that capture spectroscopic information from individual particles or cells. These instruments provide a means of multi-parametric analyses for various cellular biomarkers or labeled organelles and cellular proteins. However, the spectral overlap of fluorophores limits the number of fluorophores that can be used simultaneously during experimentation. Time-resolved parameters enable the quantification of fluorescence decay kinetics, thus circumventing common issues associated with intensity-based measurements. This contribution introduces fluorescence lifetime excitation cytometry by kinetic dithering (FLECKD) as a method to capture multiple fluorescence lifetimes using a hybrid time-domain approach. The FLECKD approach excites fluorophores by delivering short pulses of light to cells or particles by rapid dithering and facilitates measurement of complex fluorescence decay kinetics by flow cytometry. Our simulations demonstrated a resolvable fluorescence lifetime value as low as 1.8 ns (±0.3 ns) with less than 20% absolute error. Using the FLECKD instrument, we measured the shortest average fluorescence lifetime value of 2.4 ns and found the system measurement error to be ±0.3 ns (SEM), from hundreds of monodisperse and chemically stable fluorescent microspheres. Additionally, we demonstrate the ability to detect two distinct excited state lifetimes from fluorophores in single cells using FLECKD. This approach presents a new ability to resolve multiple fluorescence lifetimes while retaining the fluidic throughput of a cytometry system. The ability to discriminate more than one average fluorescence lifetime expands the current capabilities of high-throughput and intensity-based cytometry assays as the need to tag one single cell with multiple fluorophores is now widespread.

  14. Paramagnetic excited vortex states in superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Rodolpho Ribeiro; Doria, Mauro M.; Romaguera, Antonio R. de C.

    2016-06-01

    We consider excited vortex states, which are vortex states left inside a superconductor once the external applied magnetic field is switched off and whose energy is lower than of the normal state. We show that this state is paramagnetic and develop here a general method to obtain its Gibbs free energy through conformal mapping. The solution for any number of vortices in any cross-section geometry can be read off from the Schwarz-Christoffel mapping. The method is based on the first-order equations used by Abrikosov to discover vortices.

  15. A numerical method to model excitable cells.

    PubMed Central

    Joyner, R W; Westerfield, M; Moore, J W; Stockbridge, N

    1978-01-01

    We have extended a fast, stable, and accurate method for the numerical solution of cable equations to include changes in geometry and membrane properties in order to model a single excitable cell realistically. In addition, by including the provision that the radius may be a function of distance along an axis, we have achieved a general and powerful method for simulating a cell with any number of branched processes, any or all of which may be nonuniform in diameter, and with no restriction on the branching pattern. PMID:656539

  16. Recent Theoretical Studies On Excitation and Recombination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pradhan, Anil K.

    2000-01-01

    New advances in the theoretical treatment of atomic processes in plasmas are described. These enable not only an integrated, unified, and self-consistent treatment of important radiative and collisional processes, but also large-scale computation of atomic data with high accuracy. An extension of the R-matrix work, from excitation and photoionization to electron-ion recombination, includes a unified method that subsumes both the radiative and the di-electronic recombination processes in an ab initio manner. The extensive collisional calculations for iron and iron-peak elements under the Iron Project are also discussed.

  17. Optical measurements of auto-excited oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez López, Carlos; Gutiérrez Hernández, David Asael; Mendoza Santoyo, Fernando

    2009-09-01

    In this work, the measurements done, by way of digital holography, of auto-induced mechanical oscillations assumed by signals of frequency near to the first natural modal of resonance, are reported. Using a high speed digital camera, the study of a rectangular membrane under external excitation of a very low mechanical amplitude level, is done. The optical technique of high temporal and spatial resolution allows the acquisition and processing of data coming from thousands of acquired images with a relation of 5000 frames per second.

  18. The exciting star of HH 57

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, M.; Dopita, M. A.; Schwartz, R.

    1986-01-01

    The first spectral classification for the exciting star of HH 57 is provided. The star is an F8 III and suffers about 5 mag of visual extinction, far greater than that toward the HH 57A knot, only a few arcseconds away. This difference supports the previous identification of a flattened geometry for the circumstellar dust around this star. Using IRAS photometry, a distance of 940 pc to HH 57 is determined by bolometrically matching the observed luminosity of the star to those of FU Ori and V1057 Cyg.

  19. Excited light isoscalar mesons from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Thomas

    2011-07-01

    I report a recent lattice QCD calculation of an excited spectrum of light isoscalar mesons, something that has up to now proved challenging for lattice QCD. With novel techniques we extract an extensive spectrum with high statistical precision, including spin-four states and, for the first time, light isoscalars with exotic quantum numbers. In addition, the hidden flavour content of these mesons is determined, providing a window on annihilation dynamics in QCD. I comment on future prospects including applications to the study of resonances.

  20. Excitation of solar p-modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldreich, Peter; Murray, Norman; Kumar, Pawan

    1994-01-01

    We investigate the rates at which energy is supplied to individual p-modes as a function of their frequencies nu and angular degrees l. The observationally determined rates are compared with those calculated on the hypothesis that the modes are stochastically excited by turbulent convection. The observationally determined excitation rate is assumed to be equal to the product of the mode's energy E and its (radian) line width Gamma. We obtain E from the mode's mean square surface velocity with the aid of its velocity eigenfuction. We assume that Gamma measures the mode's energy decay rate, even though quasi-elastic scattering may dominate true absorption. At fixed l, E(Gamma) arises as nu(exp 7) at low nu, reaches a peak at nu approximately equal 3.5 mHz, and then declines as nu(exp 4.4) at higher nu . At fixed nu, E(Gamma) exhibits a slow decline with increasing l. To calculate energy input rates, P(sub alpha), we rely on the mixing-length model of turbulent convection. We find entropy fluctuations to be about an order of magnitude more effective than the Reynolds stress in exciting p-modes . The calculated P(sub alpha) mimic the nu(exp 7) dependence of E(Gamma) at low nu and the nu(exp -4.4) dependence at high nu. The break of 11.4 powers in the nu-dependence of E(Gamma) across its peak is attributed to a combination of (1) the reflection of high-frequency acoustic waves just below the photosphere where the scale height drops precipitously and (2) the absence of energy-bearing eddies with short enough correlation times to excite high-frequency modes. Two parameters associated with the eddy correlation time are required to match the location and shape of the break. The appropriate values of these parameters, while not unnatural, are poorly constrained by theory. The calculated P(sub alpha) can also be made to fit the magnitude of E(Gamma) with a reasonable value for the eddy aspect ratio. Our resutls suggest a possible explanation for the decline of mode energy

  1. Automatic cytometric device using multiple wavelength excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rongeat, Nelly; Ledroit, Sylvain; Chauvet, Laurence; Cremien, Didier; Urankar, Alexandra; Couderc, Vincent; Nérin, Philippe

    2011-05-01

    Precise identification of eosinophils, basophils, and specific subpopulations of blood cells (B lymphocytes) in an unconventional automatic hematology analyzer is demonstrated. Our specific apparatus mixes two excitation radiations by means of an acousto-optics tunable filter to properly control fluorescence emission of phycoerythrin cyanin 5 (PC5) conjugated to antibodies (anti-CD20 or anti-CRTH2) and Thiazole Orange. This way our analyzer combining techniques of hematology analysis and flow cytometry based on multiple fluorescence detection, drastically improves the signal to noise ratio and decreases the spectral overlaps impact coming from multiple fluorescence emissions.

  2. Radial excitations of current-carrying vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Betti; Michel, Florent; Peter, Patrick

    2017-04-01

    We report on the existence of a new type of cosmic string solutions in the Witten model with U (1) × U (1) symmetry. These solutions are superconducting with radially excited condensates that exist for both gauged and ungauged currents. Our results suggest that these new configurations can be macroscopically stable, but microscopically unstable to radial perturbations. Nevertheless, they might have important consequences for the network evolution and particle emission. We discuss these effects and their possible signatures. We also comment on analogies with non-relativistic condensed matter systems where these solutions may be observable.

  3. Fluorescence Spectroscopy with Surface Plasmon Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, T.; Kreiter, M.; Knoll, W.

    In recent years, much effort has been directed towards the development of optical biosensors. While direct sensors are capable of monitoring the presence of an analyte without the use of labelling groups, the class of indirect sensors exploits the signal enhancement caused by bound marker molecules. Surface plasmon spectroscopy (SPS) as a direct detection method [1] is known to lack sensitivity for monitoring of low molecular mass analytes. In order to enhance the sensitivity and to improve the detection limit the technique was combined with fluorescence detection schemes in surface plasmon fluorescence spectroscopy (SPFS), as described recently [2]. Here, we briefly review the theory of plasmon excitation and the experimental realization of SPFS.

  4. Coherent motion in excited free shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wygnanski, Israel J.; Petersen, Robert A.

    1987-01-01

    The application of the inviscid instability approach to externally excited turbulent free shear flows at high Reynolds numbers is explored. Attention is given to the cases of a small-deficit plane turbulent wake, a plane turbulent jet, an axisymmetric jet, the nonlinear evolution of instabilities in free shear flows, the concept of the 'preferred mode', vortex pairing in turbulent mixing layers, and experimental results for the control of free turbulent shear layers. The special features often attributed to pairing or to the preferred mode are found to be difficult to comprehend; the concept of feedback requires further substantiation in the case of incompressible flow.

  5. Superparamagnetic segmentation by excitable neural systems.

    PubMed

    Neirotti, Juan P; Kurcbart, Samuel M; Caticha, Nestor

    2003-09-01

    Magnetic modeling for clustering or segmentation purposes can either associate the image data to external quenched fields or to the interactions among a set of auxiliary variables. The latter gives rise to superparamagnetic segmentation and is usually done with Potts systems. We have used the superparamagnetic clustering technique to segment images, with the aid of different associated systems. Results using Potts model are comparable to those obtained using excitable FitzHugh-Nagumo and Morris-Lecar model neurons. Interactions between the associated system components are a function of the difference of luminosity on a gray scale of neighbor pixels and the difference of membrane potential.

  6. The photodissociation and reaction dynamics of vibrationally excited molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Crim, F.F.

    1993-12-01

    This research determines the nature of highly vibrationally excited molecules, their unimolecular reactions, and their photodissociation dynamics. The goal is to characterize vibrationally excited molecules and to exploit that understanding to discover and control their chemical pathways. Most recently the author has used a combination of vibrational overtone excitation and laser induced fluorescence both to characterize vibrationally excited molecules and to study their photodissociation dynamics. The author has also begun laser induced grating spectroscopy experiments designed to obtain the electronic absorption spectra of highly vibrationally excited molecules.

  7. Intermittent movement of localized excitations of a nonlinear lattice.

    PubMed

    Rumpf, Benno

    2004-01-01

    The mobility of localized high-amplitude excitations of the discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation is studied. The excitations can either be pinned at the lattice or they can propagate depending on their energy and particle number. Such localized excitation can emit or absorb waves with a low amplitude which changes the amount of these quantities in the excitation. For statistical reasons, the excitations absorb a high amount of energy per particle through their interaction with low-amplitude waves. They can only move if their energy decreases temporarily either by a random fluctuation or by an external force.

  8. Collisional Excitation of Automotive Fuel Components (ethanol and Isooctane)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobb, Rachelle H.; White, Allen R.; Devasher, Rebecca B.

    2009-06-01

    It is possible to excite fuel components indirectly via a 10.6 um CO2 laser. A 9% solution of isopropanol in ethanol was used, as it has a strong absorption cross section at 10.6 um. CO2 laser excitation of pure ethanol caused little or no change in absorption in the C-H stretch region. However, the ethanol/isopropanol mixture did show a response proportional to laser excitation. Further studies indicate that excitation of isooctane/isopropanol mixture is also possible via collisional energy transfer between the laser excited isopropanol and isooctane.

  9. On Emulation of Flueric Devices in Excitable Chemical Medium

    PubMed Central

    Adamatzky, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Flueric devices are fluidic devices without moving parts. Fluidic devices use fluid as a medium for information transfer and computation. A Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) medium is a thin-layer spatially extended excitable chemical medium which exhibits travelling excitation wave-fronts. The excitation wave-fronts transfer information. Flueric devices compute via jets interaction. BZ devices compute via excitation wave-fronts interaction. In numerical model of BZ medium we show that functions of key flueric devices are implemented in the excitable chemical system: signal generator, and, xor, not and nor Boolean gates, delay elements, diodes and sensors. Flueric devices have been widely used in industry since late 1960s and are still employed in automotive and aircraft technologies. Implementation of analog of the flueric devices in the excitable chemical systems opens doors to further applications of excitation wave-based unconventional computing in soft robotics, embedded organic electronics and living technologies. PMID:27997561

  10. VIBRATIONALLY EXCITED C{sub 6}H

    SciTech Connect

    Gottlieb, C. A.; McCarthy, M. C.; Thaddeus, P.

    2010-08-15

    Rotational spectra of the linear carbon chain radical C{sub 6}H in two low-lying excited vibrational states were observed both at millimeter wavelengths in a low-pressure glow discharge and at centimeter wavelengths in a supersonic molecular beam. Two series of harmonically related lines with rotational constants within 0.3% of the {sup 2{Pi}} ground state were assigned to the {sup 2{Sigma}} and {sup 2{Delta}} vibronic components of an excited bending vibrational level. Measurements of the intensities of the lines in the glow discharge indicate that the {sup 2{Sigma}} component lies very close to ground, but the {sup 2{Delta}} component is much higher in energy. The standard Hamiltonian for an isolated {sup 2{Delta}} state with five spectroscopic constants reproduces the observed rotational spectrum, but several high-order distortion terms in the spin-rotation interaction are needed to reproduce the spectrum of the {sup 2{Sigma}} component in C{sub 6}H and C{sub 6}D. The derived spectroscopic constants allow astronomers to calculate the rotational spectra of the {sup 2{Sigma}} and {sup 2{Delta}} states up to 260 GHz to within 0.1 km s{sup -1} or better in equivalent radial velocity.

  11. Electromagnetic excitation of the Delta(1232) resonance

    SciTech Connect

    V. Pascalutsa; M. Vanderhaeghen; Shin Nan Yang

    2006-09-05

    We review the description of the lowest-energy nucleon excitation--the Delta(1232)-resonance. Much of the recent effort has been focused on the precision measurements of the nucleon to Delta transition by means of electromagnetic probes. We review the results of those measurements and confront them with the state-of-the-art calculations based on chiral effective-field theories (EFT), lattice QCD, and QCD-inspired models. Some of the theoretical approaches are reviewed in detail. In particular, we describe the chiral EFT of QCD in the energy domain of the Delta-resonance, and its applications to the electromagnetic nucleon-to-Delta transition (gamma N Delta). We also describe the recent dynamical and unitary-isobar models of pion electroproduction which are extensively used in the extraction of the gamma* N Delta form factors from experiment. Furthermore, we discuss the link of the gamma* N Delta form factors to generalized parton distributions (GPDs), as well as the predictions of perturbative QCD for these transition form factors. The present status of understanding the Delta-resonance properties and the nature of its excitation is summarized.

  12. Fusion excitation functions involving transitional nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K.E.; Jiang, C.L.; Esbensen, H.

    1995-08-01

    Measurements of fusion excitation functions involving transitional nuclei {sup 78}Kr and {sup 100}Mo showed a different behavior at low energies, if compared to measurements with {sup 86}Kr and {sup 92}Mo. This points to a possible influence of nuclear structure on the fusion process. One way to characterize the structure of vibrational nuclei is via their restoring force parameters C{sub 2} which can be calculated from the energy of the lowest 2{sup +} state and the corresponding B(E2) value. A survey of the even-even nuclei between A = 28-150 shows strong variations in C{sub 2} values spanning two orders of magnitude. The lowest values for C{sub 2} are observed for {sup 78}Kr, {sup 104}Ru and {sup 124}Xe followed by {sup 74,76}Ge, {sup 74,76}Se, {sup 100}Mo and {sup 110}Pd. In order to learn more about the influence of {open_quotes}softness{close_quotes} on the sub-barrier fusion enhancement, we measured cross sections for evaporation residue production for the systems {sup 78}Kr + {sup 104}Ru and {sup 78}Kr + {sup 76}Ge with the gas-filled magnet technique. For both systems, fusion excitation functions involving the closed neutron shell nucleus {sup 86}Kr were measured previously. The data are presently being analyzed.

  13. Turbine blade-tip clearance excitation forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez-Sanchez, M.; Greitzer, E. M.

    1985-01-01

    The results of an effort to assess the existing knowledge and plan the required experimentation in the area of turbine blade tip excitation forces is summarized. The work was carried out in three phases. The first was a literature search and evaluation, which served to highlight the state of the art and to expose the need for an articulated theoretical experimental effort to provide not only design data, but also a rational framework for their extrapolation to new configurations and regimes. The second phase was a start in this direction, in which several of the explicit or implicit assumptions contained in the usual formulations of the Alford force effect were removed and a rigorous linearized flow analysis of the behavior of a nonsymmetric actuator disc was carried out. In the third phase a preliminary design of a turbine test facility that would be used to measure both the excitation forces themselves and the flow patterns responsible for them were conducted and do so over a realistic range of dimensionless parameters.

  14. Electron impact ionization-excitation of Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancarani, Lorenzo Ugo; Gomez, A. I.; Gasaneo, G.; Mitnik, D. M.; Ambrosio, M. J.

    2016-09-01

    We calculate triple differential cross sections (TDCS) for the process of ionization-excitation of Helium by fast electron impact in which the residual ion is left in the n =2 excited state. We chose the strongly asymmetric kinematics used in the experiment performed by Dupré et al.. In a perturbative scheme, for high projectile energies the four-body problem reduces to a three-body one and, within that framework, we solve the time- independent Schrödinger equation with a Sturmian approach. The method, based on Generalized Sturmian Functions (GSF), is employed to obtain the initial ground state of Helium, the single-continuum state and the scattering wave function; for each of them, the GSF basis is constructed with the corresponding adequate asymptotic conditions. Besides, the method presents the following advantage: the scattering amplitudes can be extracted directly in the asymptotic region of the scattering solution, and thus the TDCS can be obtained without requiring a matrix element evaluation.

  15. A novel phase portrait for neuronal excitability.

    PubMed

    Drion, Guillaume; Franci, Alessio; Seutin, Vincent; Sepulchre, Rodolphe

    2012-01-01

    Fifty years ago, FitzHugh introduced a phase portrait that became famous for a twofold reason: it captured in a physiological way the qualitative behavior of Hodgkin-Huxley model and it revealed the power of simple dynamical models to unfold complex firing patterns. To date, in spite of the enormous progresses in qualitative and quantitative neural modeling, this phase portrait has remained a core picture of neuronal excitability. Yet, a major difference between the neurophysiology of 1961 and of 2011 is the recognition of the prominent role of calcium channels in firing mechanisms. We show that including this extra current in Hodgkin-Huxley dynamics leads to a revision of FitzHugh-Nagumo phase portrait that affects in a fundamental way the reduced modeling of neural excitability. The revisited model considerably enlarges the modeling power of the original one. In particular, it captures essential electrophysiological signatures that otherwise require non-physiological alteration or considerable complexification of the classical model. As a basic illustration, the new model is shown to highlight a core dynamical mechanism by which calcium channels control the two distinct firing modes of thalamocortical neurons.

  16. Force Sensor Characterization Under Sinusoidal Excitations

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Nieves; de Vicente, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    The aim in the current work is the development of a method to characterize force sensors under sinusoidal excitations using a primary standard as the source of traceability. During this work the influence factors have been studied and a method to minimise their contributions, as well as the corrections to be performed under dynamic conditions have been established. These results will allow the realization of an adequate characterization of force sensors under sinusoidal excitations, which will be essential for its further proper use under dynamic conditions. The traceability of the sensor characterization is based in the direct definition of force as mass multiplied by acceleration. To do so, the sensor is loaded with different calibrated loads and is maintained under different sinusoidal accelerations by means of a vibration shaker system that is able to generate accelerations up to 100 m/s2 with frequencies from 5 Hz up to 2400 Hz. The acceleration is measured by means of a laser vibrometer with traceability to the units of time and length. A multiple channel data acquisition system is also required to simultaneously acquire the electrical output signals of the involved instrument in real time. PMID:25290287

  17. New topological excitations in quantum Hall systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyanda-Geller, Yuli; Lin, Tsuging; Simion, George; Watson, John D.; Manfra, Michael J.; Csathy, Gabor; Rokhinson, Leonid

    2014-03-01

    We discover new topological excitations of two dimensional electrons in the quantum Hall regime. The strain dependence of resistivity observed experimentally is shown to change sign upon crossing filling-factor-specified boundaries of reentrant integer quantum Hall effect (RIQHE) states. This observation violates the known symmetry of electron bubbles thought to be responsible for the RIQHE. We demonstrate theoretically that electron bubbles become elongated in the vicinity of charge defects and form textures of finite size. Calculations confirm that textures lower the energy of excitations. In the two-electron bubble crystal these textures form two-dimensional hedgehogs around defects having one extra electron, and vortices around defects lacking one electron. Strain affects vortices and hedgehogs differently, explaining striking strain-dependent resistivity. The sharp transition from insulating RIQHE state to conducting state is caused by melting of Abrikosov crystal comprised of the defects. The proposed physical mechanism of conductivity due to topological defects is shown to lead to an unusually large magnitude of the strain effect on resistivity in the range of RIQHE filling factors, in agreement with experiment. Research was partially supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering under Awards DE-SC0010544 (Y.L-G), DE-SC0008630 (L.P.R.), DE-SC0006671 (G.S. and M.M.).

  18. Tunneling ionization of vibrationally excited nitrogen molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornev, Aleksei S.; Zon, Boris A.

    2015-09-01

    Ionization of molecular nitrogen plays an important role in the process of light-filament formation in air. In the present paper we theoretically investigated tunneling ionization of the valence 3 σg and 1 πu shells in a N2 molecule using a strong near-infrared laser field. This research is based on our previously proposed theory of anti-Stokes-enhanced tunneling ionization with quantum accounting for the vibrationally excited states of the molecules [A. S. Kornev and B. A. Zon, Phys. Rev. A 86, 043401 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevA.86.043401]. We demonstrated that if the N2 molecule is ionized from the ground vibrational state, then the contribution of the 1 πu orbital is 0.5%. In contrast, for vibrationally excited states with a certain angle between the light polarization vector and the molecule axis, both shells can compete and even reverse their contributions due to the anti-Stokes mechanism. The structure constants of molecular orbitals are extracted from numerical solutions to the Hartree-Fock equations. This approach correctly takes into account the exchange interaction. Quantum consideration of vibrational motion results in the occurrence of the critical vibrational state, the tunneling ionization from which has the maximum rate. The numbers of the critical vibrational states are different for different valence shells. In addition, quantum description of vibrations changes the rate of ionization from the ground vibrational state by 20%-40% in comparison with the quasiclassical results.

  19. Collisional deactivation of highly vibrationally excited pyrazine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Laurie A.; Barker, John R.

    1996-07-01

    The collisional deactivation of vibrationally excited pyrazine (C4N2H4) in the electronic ground state by 19 collider gases was studied using the time-resolved infrared fluorescence (IRF) technique. The pyrazine was photoexcited with a 308 nm laser and its vibrational deactivation was monitored following rapid radiationless transitions to produce vibrationally excited molecules in the electronic ground state. The IRF data were analyzed by a simple approximate inversion method, as well as with full collisional master equation simulations. The average energies transferred in deactivating collisions (<ΔE>d) exhibit a near-linear dependence on vibrational energy at lower energies and less dependence at higher energies. The deactivation of ground state pyrazine was found to be similar to that of ground state benzene [J. R. Barker and B. M. Toselli, Int. Rev. Phys. Chem. 12, 305 (1990)], but it is strikingly different from the deactivation of triplet state pyrazine [T. J. Bevilacqua and R. B. Weisman, J. Chem. Phys. 98, 6316 (1993)].

  20. Low-lying excitations in 72Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, A. I.; Benzoni, G.; Watanabe, H.; Nishimura, S.; Browne, F.; Daido, R.; Doornenbal, P.; Fang, Y.; Lorusso, G.; Patel, Z.; Rice, S.; Sinclair, L.; Söderström, P.-A.; Sumikama, T.; Wu, J.; Xu, Z. Y.; Yagi, A.; Yokoyama, R.; Baba, H.; Avigo, R.; Bello Garrote, F. L.; Blasi, N.; Bracco, A.; Camera, F.; Ceruti, S.; Crespi, F. C. L.; de Angelis, G.; Delattre, M.-C.; Dombradi, Zs.; Gottardo, A.; Isobe, T.; Kojouharov, I.; Kurz, N.; Kuti, I.; Matsui, K.; Melon, B.; Mengoni, D.; Miyazaki, T.; Modamio-Hoyborg, V.; Momiyama, S.; Napoli, D. R.; Niikura, M.; Orlandi, R.; Sakurai, H.; Sahin, E.; Sohler, D.; Shaffner, H.; Taniuchi, R.; Taprogge, J.; Vajta, Zs.; Valiente-Dobón, J. J.; Wieland, O.; Yalcinkaya, M.

    2016-03-01

    Low-lying excited states in 72Ni have been investigated in an in-flight fission experiment at the RIBF facility of the RIKEN Nishina Center. The combination of the state-of-the-art BigRIPS and EURICA setups has allowed for a very accurate study of the β decay from 72Co to 72Ni, and has provided first experimental information on the decay sequence 72Fe→72Co→72Ni and on the delayed neutron-emission branch 73Co→72Ni . Accordingly, we report nearly 60 previously unobserved γ transitions which deexcite 21 new levels in 72Ni. Evidence for the location of the so-sought-after (42+) ,(62+) , and (81+) seniority states is provided. As well, the existence of a low-spin β -decaying isomer in odd-odd neutron-rich Co isotopes is confirmed for mass A =72 . The new experimental information is compared to simple shell-model calculations including only neutron excitations across the f p g shells. It is shown that, in general, the calculations reproduce well the observed states.

  1. Subdominant Eigenmode Excitation in Stellarator Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pueschel, M. J.; Faber, B. J.; Hegna, C. C.; Terry, P. W.; Hatch, D. R.

    2015-11-01

    Owing to their complex geometry, stellarators are known to give rise to a large number of unstable eigenmodes for any single flux tube. As has recently been demonstrated for HSX cases [B.J. Faber et al., Phys. Plasmas 22, 072305 (2015)], these eigenmodes have very different properties, may come in pairs, and can easily switch from subdominant to dominant upon small adjustments in geometry or input parameters. In addition, the question of stable eigenmodes has so far not been addressed in stellarators, which may be excited nonlinearly and affect the turbulent dynamics. In tokamaks, the subdominant microtearing mode tends to be responsible for a majority of the magnetic transport, whereas its role in stellarators is yet to be determined. Here, gyrokinetic GENE simulations in a geometry similar to Wendelstein 7-X are performed, solving for the full linear eigenvalue spectrum. In the unstable range, eigenmode structures are compared, and the limitations of iterative solvers are discussed. Additional focus lies on turbulent excitation: nonlinear simulations and mode structures are projected onto the linear eigenmodes, clarifying the role of subdominantly unstable as well as stable linear eigenmodes in the quasi-saturated state, with possible consequences for quasilinear modeling. Supported by DOE grant DE-SC0006103.

  2. Ocean tidal excitation of polar motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanchez, B. V.

    1979-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to ascertain the response of the rotational motion of the earth to forcing functions produced by the water mass redistribution due to the ocean tides. In particular, the components of displacement of the rotation axis at the surface of the Earth were obtained. The investigation also addressed the larger question concerning the possibility of excitation of the Chandler wobble of the earth. In general, the results show the existence of a polar wobble as a response to each of the components of the ocean tides. The magnitude of the polar displacement depends on two factors: the amplitude of the tidal component and its period. The maximum periodic contributions are: the Doodson's component number 055.565 with a period of 18.613 years and 50 cm of polar displacement, the annual component 056.544 with 37 cm of polar displacement and the semi-annual 057.555 with 32 cm. The tidal components with daily and semi-daily periods yield very small polar displacements of the order of 0.01 cm. The combined effect of all the periodic components can yield as much as 90 cm of pole displacements. The changes produced by the ocean tides in the products of inertia are periodic and regular, therefore, they cannot be the source of excitation of the Chandler wobble.

  3. Topological excitations in a kagome magnet.

    PubMed

    Pereiro, Manuel; Yudin, Dmitry; Chico, Jonathan; Etz, Corina; Eriksson, Olle; Bergman, Anders

    2014-09-08

    Chirality--that is, left or right handedness--is present in many scientific areas, and particularly in condensed matter physics. Inversion symmetry breaking relates chirality with skyrmions, which are protected field configurations with particle-like and topological properties. Here we show that a kagome magnet, with Heisenberg and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions, causes non-trivial topological and chiral magnetic properties. We also find that under special circumstances, skyrmions emerge as excitations, having stability even at room temperature. Chiral magnonic edge states of a kagome magnet offer, in addition, a promising way to create, control and manipulate skyrmions. This has potential for applications in spintronics, that is, for information storage or as logic devices. Collisions between these particle-like excitations are found to be elastic at very low temperature in the skyrmion-skyrmion channel, albeit without mass-conservation. Skyrmion-antiskyrmion collisions are found to be more complex, where annihilation and creation of these objects have a distinct non-local nature.

  4. Nicotinic excitation of rat hypoglossal motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Chamberlin, N L; Bocchiaro, C M; Greene, R W; Feldman, J L

    2002-01-01

    Hypoglossal motoneurons (HMNs), which innervate the tongue muscles, are involved in several important physiological functions, including the maintenance of upper airway patency. The neural mechanisms that affect HMN excitability are therefore important determinants of effective breathing. Obstructive sleep apnea is a disorder characterized by recurrent collapse of the upper airway that is likely due to decline of pharyngeal motoneuron activity during sleep. Because cholinergic neuronal activity is closely coupled to wake and sleep states, we tested the effects and pharmacology of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) activation on HMNs. We made intracellular recordings from HMNs in medullary slices from neonatal rats and found that local application of the nicotinic agonist, 1,1-dimethyl-4-phenylpiperazinium iodide, excited HMNs by a Ca(2+)-sensitive, and TTX-insensitive inward current that was blocked by dihydro-beta-erythroidine (IC(50): 19+/-3 nM), methyllycaconitine (IC(50): 32+/-7 nM), and mecamylamine (IC(50): 88+/-11 nM), but not by alpha-bungarotoxin (10 nM). This is consistent with responses being mediated by postsynaptic nAChRs that do not contain the alpha7 subunit. These results suggest that nAChR activation may contribute to central maintenance of upper airway patency and that the decline in firing rate of cholinergic neurons during sleep could potentially disfacilitate airway dilator muscle activity, contributing to airway obstruction.

  5. Dual excitation acoustic paramagnetic logging tool

    DOEpatents

    Vail, III, William B.

    1989-01-01

    New methods and apparatus are disclosed which allow measurement of the presence of oil and water in gelogical formations using a new physical effect called the Acoustic Paramagnetic Logging Effect (APLE). The presence of petroleum in formation causes a slight increase in the earth's magnetic field in the vicinity of the reservoir. This is the phenomena of paramagnetism. Application of an acoustic source to a geological formation at the Larmor frequency of the nucleous present causes the paramagnetism of the formation to disappear. This results in a decrease in the earth's magnetic field in the vicinity of the oil bearing formation. Repetitively frequency sweeping the acoustic source through the Larmor frequency of the nucleons present (approx. 2 kHz) causes an amplitude modulation of the earth's magnetic field which is a consequence of the APLE. The amplitude modulation of the earth's magnetic field is measured with an induction coil gradiometer and provides a direct measure of the amount of oil and water in the excitation zone of the formation. The phase of the signal is used to infer the longitudinal relaxation times of the fluids present, which results in the ability in general to separate oil and water and to measure the viscosity of the oil present. Such measurements may be preformed in open boreholes and in cased well bores. The Dual Excitation Acoustic Paramagnetic Logging Tool employing two acoustic sources is also described.

  6. Dual excitation acoustic paramagnetic logging tool

    DOEpatents

    Vail, W.B. III.

    1989-02-14

    New methods and apparatus are disclosed which allow measurement of the presence of oil and water in geological formations using a new physical effect called the Acoustic Paramagnetic Logging Effect (APLE). The presence of petroleum in formation causes a slight increase in the earth's magnetic field in the vicinity of the reservoir. This is the phenomena of paramagnetism. Application of an acoustic source to a geological formation at the Larmor frequency of the nucleons present causes the paramagnetism of the formation to disappear. This results in a decrease in the earth's magnetic field in the vicinity of the oil bearing formation. Repetitively frequency sweeping the acoustic source through the Larmor frequency of the nucleons present (approx. 2 kHz) causes an amplitude modulation of the earth's magnetic field which is a consequence of the APLE. The amplitude modulation of the earth's magnetic field is measured with an induction coil gradiometer and provides a direct measure of the amount of oil and water in the excitation zone of the formation. The phase of the signal is used to infer the longitudinal relaxation times of the fluids present, which results in the ability in general to separate oil and water and to measure the viscosity of the oil present. Such measurements may be performed in open boreholes and in cased well bores. The Dual Excitation Acoustic Paramagnetic Logging Tool employing two acoustic sources is also described. 6 figs.

  7. Vertical Distribution of Vibrationally Excited Hydroxyl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grygalashvyly, Mykhaylo; Becker, Erich; Sonnemann, Gerd

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge about the vertical distribution of the vibrationally excited states of hydroxyl (OH*) is important for the interpretation of airglow measurements with respect to dynamical processes in the mesopause region. We derive an approximate analytical expression for the distribution of OH* that highlights the dependence on atomic oxygen and temperature. In addition, we use an advanced numerical model for the formation and relaxation of OH* and investigate the distributions of the different vibrationally exited states of OH*. For the production of OH*, the model includes the reaction of atomic hydrogen with ozone, as well as the reaction of atomic oxygen with hydroperoxy radicals. As loss processes we include 1) deactivation by atomic oxygen, molecular oxygen, and molecular nitrogen, 2) spontaneous emission, and 3) loss due to chemical reaction with atomic oxygen. All these processes take the dependence on the vibrational number into account. The quenching by molecular and atomic oxygen is parameterized by a multi-quantum relaxation scheme. This diagnostic model for OH* has been implemented as part of a chemistry-transport model that is driven by the dynamics simulated with the KMCM (Kühlungsborn Mechanistic general Circulation Model). Numerical results confirm that emission from excited states with higher vibrational number is weaker and emanates from higher altitudes. In addition we find that the OH*-peak altitudes depend significantly on season and latitude. This behavior is mainly controlled by the corresponding variations of atomic oxygen and temperature, as is also confirmed by the aforementioned approximate theory.

  8. Controlling the dissociation dynamics of acetophenone radical cation through excitation of ground and excited state wavepackets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore Tibbetts, Katharine; Tarazkar, Maryam; Bohinski, Timothy; Romanov, Dmitri A.; Matsika, Spiridoula; Levis, Robert J.

    2015-08-01

    Time-resolved measurements of the acetophenone radical cation prepared via adiabatic ionization with strong field 1270 nm excitation reveal coupled wavepacket dynamics that depend on the intensity of the 790 nm probe pulse. At probe intensities below 7× {10}11 W cm-2, out of phase oscillations between the parent molecular ion and the benzoyl fragment ion are shown to arise from a one-photon excitation from the ground D0 ionic surface to the D1 and/or D2 excited surfaces by the probe pulse. At higher probe intensities, a second set of wavepacket dynamics are observed that couple the benzoyl ion to the phenyl, butadienyl, and acylium fragment ions. Equation of motion coupled cluster calculations of the ten lowest lying ionic surfaces and the dipole couplings between the ground ionic surface D0 and the nine excited states enable elucidation of the dissociation pathways and deduction of potential dissociation mechanisms. The results can lead to improved control schemes for selective dissociation of the acetophenone radical cation.

  9. Excited state baryon spectroscopy from lattice QCD

    DOE PAGES

    Robert G. Edwards; Dudek, Jozef J.; Richards, David G.; ...

    2011-10-31

    Here, we present a calculation of the Nucleon and Delta excited state spectrum on dynamical anisotropic clover lattices. A method for operator construction is introduced that allows for the reliable identification of the continuum spins of baryon states, overcoming the reduced symmetry of the cubic lattice. Using this method, we are able to determine a spectrum of single-particle states for spins up to and including $J = 7/2$, of both parities, the first time this has been achieved in a lattice calculation. We find a spectrum of states identifiable as admixtures of $SU(6) Ⓧ O(3)$ representations and a counting ofmore » levels that is consistent with the non-relativistic $qqq$ constituent quark model. This dense spectrum is incompatible with quark-diquark model solutions to the "missing resonance problem" and shows no signs of parity doubling of states.« less

  10. Excited State Quantum-Classical Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krstic, Predrag

    2005-05-01

    The development of a new theoretical, algorithmic, and computational framework is reported describing the corresponding excited state many-body dynamics by applying multiphysics described by classical equations of motion for nuclei and Hartree-Fock/Multi-Configuration Hartree-Fock and multiresolution techniques for solving the quantum part of the problem (i.e. the motion of the electrons). We primarily have in mind reactive and electron-transition dynamics which involves molecular clusters, containing hundreds of atoms, perturbed by a slow ionic/atomic/molecular projectile, with possible applications in plasma-surface interactions, cluster physics, chemistry and biotechnology. The validation of the developed technique is performed at three-body systems. Application to the transition dynamics in small carbon clusters and hydrocarbons perturbed by slow carbon ions resolves some long-standing issues in the ion-surface interactions in fusion tokamaks.

  11. Broadband Transmission Loss Due to Reverberant Excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barisciano, Lawrence P. Jr.

    1999-01-01

    The noise transmission characteristics of candidate curved aircraft sidewall panel constructions is examined analytically using finite element models of the selected panel geometries. The models are validated by experimental modal analyses and transmission loss testing. The structural and acoustic response of the models are then examined when subjected to random or reverberant excitation, the simulation of which is also discussed. For a candidate curved honeycomb panel, the effect of add-on trim panel treatments is examined. Specifically, two different mounting configurations are discussed and their effect on the transmission loss of the panel is presented. This study finds that the add-on acoustical treatments do improve on the primary structures transmission loss characteristics, however, much more research is necessary to draw any valid conclusions about the optimal configuration for the maximum noise transmission loss. This paper describes several directions for the extension of this work.

  12. UV excitation and radiationless deactivation of imidazole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbatti, Mario; Lischka, Hans; Salzmann, Susanne; Marian, Christel M.

    2009-01-01

    The vertical spectrum and the radiationless decay of imidazole have been investigated theoretically. Benchmark calculations were performed employing different methods and levels. Four different conical intersections were characterized and the reaction paths connecting the Franck-Condon region to them were computed. Two of the conical intersections show puckered structures while the other two show NH and ring dissociation patterns. The ππ ∗/S0 N1-puckered conical intersection is connected to the planar πσ ∗/S0 ring-opened conical intersection by a branch of the crossing seam. After excitation into the first π1π∗ state, the internal conversion can occur either in this branch of crossing seam or along the NH-dissociation path.

  13. Excited state baryon spectroscopy from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Robert G. Edwards; Dudek, Jozef J.; Richards, David G.; Wallace, Stephen J.

    2011-10-31

    Here, we present a calculation of the Nucleon and Delta excited state spectrum on dynamical anisotropic clover lattices. A method for operator construction is introduced that allows for the reliable identification of the continuum spins of baryon states, overcoming the reduced symmetry of the cubic lattice. Using this method, we are able to determine a spectrum of single-particle states for spins up to and including $J = 7/2$, of both parities, the first time this has been achieved in a lattice calculation. We find a spectrum of states identifiable as admixtures of $SU(6) Ⓧ O(3)$ representations and a counting of levels that is consistent with the non-relativistic $qqq$ constituent quark model. This dense spectrum is incompatible with quark-diquark model solutions to the "missing resonance problem" and shows no signs of parity doubling of states.

  14. Excitation of turbulence by density waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tichen, C. M.

    1985-01-01

    A nonlinear system describes the microdynamical state of turbulence that is excited by density waves. It consists of an equation of propagation and a master equation. A group-scaling generates the scaled equations of many interacting groups of distribution functions. The two leading groups govern the transport processes of evolution and eddy diffusivity. The remaining sub-groups represent the relaxation for the approach of diffusivity to equilibrium. In strong turbulence, the sub-groups disperse themselves and the ensemble acts like a medium that offers an effective damping to close the hierarchy. The kinetic equation of turbulence is derived. It calculates the eddy viscosity and identifies the effective damping of the assumed medium self-consistently. It formulates the coupling mechanism for the intensification of the turbulent energy at the expense of the wave energy, and the transfer mechanism for the cascade. The spectra of velocity and density fluctuations find the power law k sup-2 and k sup-4, respectively.

  15. Kisspeptin Excitation of GnRH Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Rønnekleiv, Oline K.; Kelly, Martin J.

    2014-01-01

    Kisspeptin binding to its cognate G protein-coupled receptor (GPR54, aka Kiss1R) in gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons stimulates peptide release and activation of the reproductive axis in mammals. Kisspeptin has pronounced pre- and postsynaptic effects, with the latter dominating the excitability of GnRH neurons. Presynaptically, kisspeptin increases the excitatory drive (both GABA-A and glutamate) to GnRH neurons and postsynaptically, kisspeptin inhibits an A-type and inwardly rectifying K + (Kir 6.2 and GIRK) currents and activates nonselective cation (TRPC) currents to cause long-lasting depolarization and increased action potential firing. The signaling cascades and the multiple intracellular targets of kisspeptin actions in native GnRH neurons are continuing to be elucidated. This review summarizes our current state of knowledge about kisspeptin signaling in GnRH neurons. PMID:23550004

  16. Photonic simulation of topological excitations in metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Wei; Sun, Yong; Chen, Hong; Shen, Shun-Qing

    2014-01-01

    Condensed matter systems with topological order and metamaterials with left-handed chirality have attracted recently extensive interests in the fields of physics and optics. So far the topological order and chirality of electromagnetic wave are two independent concepts, and there is no work to address their connection. Here we propose to establish the relation between the topological order in condensed matter systems and the chirality in metamaterials, by mapping explicitly Maxwell's equations to the Dirac equation in one dimension. We report an experimental implement of the band inversion in the Dirac equation, which accompanies change of chirality of electromagnetic wave in metamaterials, and the first microwave measurement of topological excitations and topological phases in one dimension. Our finding provides a proof-of-principle example that electromagnetic wave in the metamaterials can be used to simulate the topological order in condensed matter systems and quantum phenomena in relativistic quantum mechanics in a controlled laboratory environment. PMID:24452532

  17. Observation of Orbitally Excited Bs Mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Abulencia, A.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M. G.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Azzi-Bacchetta, P.; Azzurri, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Baroiant, S.; Bartsch, V.; Bauer, G.; Beauchemin, P.-H.; Bedeschi, F.; Bednar, P.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Belloni, A.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Beringer, J.; Berry, T.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Blair, R. E.; Blocker, C.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boisvert, V.; Bolla, G.; Bolshov, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brubaker, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Byrum, K. L.; Cabrera, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chang, S. H.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Choudalakis, G.; Chuang, S. H.; Chung, K.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clark, D.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Cooper, B.; Copic, K.; Cordelli, M.; Cortiana, G.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cully, J. C.; Dagenhart, D.; Datta, M.; Davies, T.; de Barbaro, P.; de Cecco, S.; Deisher, A.; de Lentdecker, G.; de Lorenzo, G.; Dell'Orso, M.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; de Pedis, D.; Derwent, P. F.; di Giovanni, G. P.; Dionisi, C.; di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Donini, J.; Dorigo, T.; Dube, S.; Efron, J.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Fedorko, W. T.; Feild, R. G.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Forrester, S.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garberson, F.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Gerberich, H.; Gerdes, D.; Giagu, S.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Gimmell, J. L.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grundler, U.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, K.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamilton, A.; Han, B.-Y.; Han, J. Y.; Handler, R.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harper, S.; Harr, R. F.; Harris, R. M.; Hartz, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hauser, J.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heijboer, A.; Heinemann, B.; Heinrich, J.; Henderson, C.; Herndon, M.; Heuser, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hill, C. S.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hocker, A.; Hou, S.; Houlden, M.; Hsu, S.-C.; Huffman, B. T.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Huston, J.; Incandela, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; Iyutin, B.; James, E.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeans, D.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, J. E.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Kar, D.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Kephart, R.; Kerzel, U.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirsch, L.; Klimenko, S.; Klute, M.; Knuteson, B.; Ko, B. R.; Koay, S. A.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kubo, T.; Kuhlmann, S. E.; Kuhr, T.; Kulkarni, N. P.; Kusakabe, Y.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lai, S.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lecompte, T.; Lee, J.; Lee, J.; Lee, Y. J.; Lee, S. W.; Lefèvre, R.; Leonardo, N.; Leone, S.; Levy, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C.; Lin, C. S.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, T.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Loreti, M.; Lovas, L.; Lu, R.-S.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Luci, C.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lyons, L.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Lytken, E.; Mack, P.; MacQueen, D.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maki, T.; Maksimovic, P.; Malde, S.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Marino, C. P.; Martin, A.; Martin, M.; Martin, V.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Maruyama, T.; Mastrandrea, P.; Masubuchi, T.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzemer, S.; Menzione, A.; Merkel, P.; Mesropian, C.; Messina, A.; Miao, T.; Miladinovic, N.; Miles, J.; Miller, R.; Mills, C.; Milnik, M.; Mitra, A.; Mitselmakher, G.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mülmenstädt, J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Mumford, R.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Nagano, A.; Naganoma, J.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Necula, V.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norman, M.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Oldeman, R.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Papaikonomou, A.; Paramonov, A. A.; Parks, B.; Pashapour, S.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Piedra, J.; Pinera, L.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Portell, X.; Poukhov, O.; Pounder, N.; Prakoshyn, F.; Pronko, A.; Proudfoot, J.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rademacker, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Reisert, B.; Rekovic, V.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Richter, S.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rossin, R.; Roy, P.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Saarikko, H.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Salamanna, G.; Saltó, O.; Santi, L.; Sarkar, S.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Savard, P.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Scheidle, T.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. A.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scott, A. L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shapiro, M. D.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Sherman, D.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shon, Y.; Shreyber, I.; Sidoti, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sisakyan, A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Slaunwhite, J.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snihur, R.; Soderberg, M.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Spalding, J.; Spinella, F.; Spreitzer, T.; Squillacioti, P.; Stanitzki, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Stuart, D.; Suh, J. S.; Sukhanov, A.; Sun, H.; Suslov, I.; Suzuki, T.; Taffard, A.; Takashima, R.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, R.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Terashi, K.; Thom, J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Tipton, P.; Tiwari, V.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Tourneur, S.; Trischuk, W.; Tu, Y.; Turini, N.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vallecorsa, S.; van Remortel, N.; Varganov, A.; Vataga, E.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Veszpremi, V.; Vidal, M.; Vidal, R.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vine, T.; Vogel, M.; Volobouev, I.; Volpi, G.; Würthwein, F.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. G.; Wagner, R. L.; Wagner, J.; Wagner, W.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Wester, W. C., III; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Williams, G.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, C.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wynne, S. M.; Yagil, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamashita, T.; Yang, C.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W. M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanello, L.; Zanetti, A.; Zaw, I.; Zhang, X.; Zheng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.

    2008-02-01

    We report the observation of two narrow resonances consistent with states of orbitally excited (L=1) Bs mesons using 1fb-1 of pp¯ collisions at s=1.96TeV collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. We use two-body decays into K- and B+ mesons reconstructed as B+→J/ψK+, J/ψ→μ+μ- or B+→D¯0π+, D¯0→K+π-. We deduce the masses of the two states to be m(Bs1)=5829.4±0.7MeV/c2 and m(Bs2*)=5839.6±0.7MeV/c2.

  18. The decay of highly excited open strings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, D.; Turok, N.; Wilkinson, R.; Jetzer, P.

    1988-01-01

    The decay rates of leading edge Regge trajectory states are calculated for very high level number in open bosonic string theories, ignoring tachyon final states. The optical theorem simplifies the analysis while enabling identification of the different mass level decay channels. The main result is that (in four dimensions) the greatest single channel is the emission of a single photon and a state of the next mass level down. A simple asymptotic formula for arbitrarily high level number is given for this process. Also calculated is the total decay rate exactly up to N=100. It shows little variation over this range but appears to decrease for larger N. The formalism is checked in examples and the decay rate of the first excited level calculated for open superstring theories. The calculation may also have implications for high spin meson resonances.

  19. Chemotaxis to Excitable Waves in Dictyostelium Discoideum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmik, Arpan; Rappel, Wouter-Jan; Levine, Herbert

    In recent years, there have been significant advances in our understanding of the mechanisms underlying chemically directed motility by eukaryotic cells such as Dictyostelium. In particular, the LEGI model has proven capable of providing a framework for quantitatively explaining many experiments that present Dictyostelium cells with tailored chemical stimuli and monitor their subsequent polarization. Here, we couple the LEGI approach to an excitable medium model of the cAMP wave-field that is self-generated by the cells and investigate the extent to which this class of models enables accurate chemotaxis to the cAMP waveforms expected in vivo. Our results indicate that the ultra-sensitive version of the model does an excellent job in providing natural wave rectification, thereby providing a compelling solution to the ``back-of-the-wave paradox'' during cellular aggregation. This work was supported by National Institutes of Health Grant P01 GM078586.

  20. Nonlinear Resonance of Mechanically Excited Sessile Drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chun-Ti; Daniel, Susan; Steen, Paul

    2013-11-01

    The spectrum of frequencies and mode shapes for an inviscid drop on a planar substrate have recently been documented. For vertical excitation, zonal modes respond to the driving frequency harmonically and non-zonal modes subharmonically, consistent with the prior literature. In this study, we report observations from the regime of nonlinear response. Here, zonals can respond non-harmonically, both sub- and super-harmonic responses are reported. The principal challenge to generating and observing superharmonic resonances of higher zonal modes is a mode-mixing behavior. However, using a simple visual simulation based on the ray-tracing technique, the individual contributions to the mixed resonance behavior can be extracted. In summary, results from experiment and theory show that the zonal modes, which respond harmonically and can mix with non-zonal modes without interfering with one another in the linear regime, tend to respond sub- or superharmonically and compete with non-zonal modes in the nonlinear regime.