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Sample records for 2pi effective action

  1. Nonperturbative renormalization for 2PI effective action techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Berges, J. . E-mail: j.berges@thphys.uni-heidelberg.de; Borsanyi, Sz. . E-mail: borsanyi@thphys.uni-heidelberg.de; Reinosa, U. . E-mail: julien.serreau@th.u-psud.fr

    2005-12-15

    Nonperturbative approximation schemes based on two-particle irreducible (2PI) effective actions provide an important means for our current understanding of (non-)equilibrium quantum field theory. A remarkable property is their renormalizability, since these approximations involve selective summations to infinite perturbative orders. In this paper, we show how to renormalize all n-point functions of the theory, which are given by derivatives of the 2PI-resummed effective action {gamma} [{phi}] for scalar fields {phi}. This provides a complete description in terms of the generating functional for renormalized proper vertices, which extends previous prescriptions in the literature on the renormalization for 2PI effective actions. The importance of the 2PI-resummed generating functional for proper vertices stems from the fact that the latter respect all symmetry properties of the theory and, in particular, Goldstone's theorem in the phase with spontaneous symmetry breaking. This is important in view of the application of these techniques to gauge theories, where Ward identities play a crucial role.

  2. 2PI effective action at four loop order in φ4 theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrington, M. E.; Meggison, B. A.; Pickering, D.

    2016-07-01

    It is well known that perturbative pressure calculations show poor convergence. Calculations using a two-particle irreducible (2PI) effective action show improved convergence at the 3 loop level, but no calculations have been done at 4 loops. We consider the 2PI effective theory for a symmetric scalar theory with quartic coupling in four dimensions. We calculate the pressure and two different nonperturbative vertices as functions of coupling and temperature. Our results show that the 4 loop contribution can become larger than the 3 loop term when the coupling is large. This indicates a breakdown of the 2PI approach, and the need for higher order n PI approximations. In addition, our results demonstrate the renormalizability of 2PI calculations at the 4 loop level. This is interesting because the counterterm structure of the 2PI theory at 4 loops is different from the structure at n ≤3 loops. Two vertex counterterms are required at the 4 loop level, but not at lower loop order. This unique feature of the 2PI theory has never been verified numerically.

  3. Symmetry-improved 2PI approach to the Goldstone-boson IR problem of the SM effective potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilaftsis, Apostolos; Teresi, Daniele

    2016-05-01

    The effective potential of the Standard Model (SM), from three loop order and higher, suffers from infrared (IR) divergences arising from quantum effects due to massless would-be Goldstone bosons associated with the longitudinal polarizations of the W± and Z bosons. Such IR pathologies also hinder accurate evaluation of the two-loop threshold corrections to electroweak quantities, such as the vacuum expectation value of the Higgs field. However, these divergences are an artifact of perturbation theory, and therefore need to be consistently resummed in order to obtain an IR-safe effective potential. The so-called Two-Particle-Irreducible (2PI) effective action provides a rigorous framework to consistently perform such resummations, without the need to resort to ad hoc subtractions or running into the risk of over-counting contributions. By considering the recently proposed symmetry-improved 2PI formalism, we address the problem of the Goldstone-boson IR divergences of the SM effective potential in the gaugeless limit of the theory. In the same limit, we evaluate the IR-safe symmetry-improved 2PI effective potential, after taking into account quantum loops of chiral fermions, as well as the renormalization of spurious custodially breaking effects triggered by fermionic Yukawa interactions. Finally, we compare our results with those obtained with other methods presented in the literature.

  4. Precise determination of the I=2 {pi}{pi} scattering length from mixed-action lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Beane, Silas R.; Torok, Aaron; Luu, Thomas C.; Orginos, Kostas; Parreno, Assumpta; Savage, Martin J.; Walker-Loud, Andre

    2008-01-01

    The I=2 {pi}{pi} scattering length is calculated in fully dynamical lattice QCD with domain-wall valence quarks on the asqtad-improved coarse MILC configurations (with fourth-rooted staggered sea quarks) at four light-quark masses. Two- and three-flavor mixed-action chiral perturbation theory at next-to-leading order is used to perform the chiral and continuum extrapolations. At the physical charged pion mass, we find m{sub {pi}}a{sub {pi}}{sub {pi}}{sup I=2}=-0.043 30{+-}0.000 42, where the error bar combines the statistical and systematic uncertainties in quadrature.

  5. Coherent effects in hyper-Raman scattering using the 2(pi)(n) pump pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malakian, Iu. P.

    1988-04-01

    An effect involving the emission of hyper-Raman frequency radiation from a medium of four-level atoms pumped by 2(pi)(n) pulses during coherent two-photon excitation of the medium is predicted. Based on four-wave parametric processes, an idler wave is generated in the form of n sequential pulses, whose intensities rise towards the pump trailing edge. The results are pertinent to problems of ultrashort-pulse generation.

  6. Zeeman effect in CaF(2Pi(3/2)).

    PubMed

    Krems, R V; Egorov, D; Helton, J S; Maussang, K; Nguyen, S V; Doyle, J M

    2004-12-15

    The Zeeman effect in the excited A 2Pi(3/2) state of CaF is measured and analyzed over a wide range of magnetic fields. It is found that the splitting of the Zeeman levels is largely determined by the coupling between different rotational states and there are no low-field seeking states in the J=3/2 manifold of Zeeman levels at high magnetic fields. A model of the Zeeman spectrum based on the ligand-field theory of CaF is shown to be accurate in the interval of magnetic fields 0-5 Tesla. This demonstrates that the magnetic moment of the CaF(A 2Pi(3/2)) molecule is effectively determined by the spin angular momentum of a single electron and the orbital motion of the valence electron around the Ca2+ core. An analysis of the Zeeman spectrum as a function of the molecular rotational constant indicates that 2Pi(3/2) molecules should have significant rotational constants (at least as large as twice the rotational constant of CaF) to be amenable to magnetic trapping in high fields.

  7. Constraining the effective action by a method of external sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbrecht, Björn; Millington, Peter

    2016-05-01

    We propose a novel method of evaluating the effective action, wherein the physical one- and two-point functions are obtained in the limit of non-vanishing external sources. We illustrate the self-consistency of this method by recovering the usual 2PI effective action due to Cornwall, Jackiw and Tomboulis, differing only by the fact that the saddle-point evaluation of the path integral is performed along the extremal quantum, rather than classical, path. As such, this approach is of particular relevance to situations where the dominant quantum and classical paths are non-perturbatively far away from one-another. A pertinent example is the decay of false vacua in radiatively-generated potentials, as may occur for the electroweak vacuum of the Standard Model. In addition, we describe how the external sources may instead be chosen so as to yield the two-particle-point-irreducible (2PPI) effective action of Coppens and Verschelde. Finally, in the spirit of the symmetry-improved effective action of Pilaftsis and Teresi, we give an example of how the external sources can be used to preserve global symmetries in truncations of the 2PI effective action. Specifically, in the context of an O (2) model with spontaneous symmetry breaking, we show that this approach allows the Hartree-Fock approximation to be re-organized, such that the Goldstone boson remains massless algebraically in the symmetry-broken phase and we obtain the correct second-order thermal phase transition.

  8. Action languages: Dimensions, effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, Daniel G.; Streeter, Gordon

    1989-01-01

    Dimensions of action languages are discussed for communication between humans and machines, and the message handling capabilities of object oriented programming systems are examined. Design of action languages is seen to be very contextual. Economical and effective design will depend on features of situations, the tasks intended to be accomplished, and the nature of the devices themselves. Current object oriented systems turn out to have fairly simple and straightforward message handling facilities, which in themselves do little to buffer action or even in some cases to handle competing messages. Even so, it is possible to program a certain amount of discretion about how they react to messages. Such thoughtfulness and perhaps relative autonomy of program modules seems prerequisite to future systems to handle complex interactions in changing situations.

  9. New effective interaction for 0({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){omega} shell-model calculations in the sd-pf valence space

    SciTech Connect

    Nowacki, F.; Poves, A.

    2009-01-15

    The neutron-rich isotopes with Z{<=}20, in particular those with neutron numbers around N=28, have been the focus of a lot experimental and theoretical scrutiny during the past few years. Shell-model calculations using the effective interaction SDPF-NR were able to predict or to explain most of the properties featured by these nuclei. Prominent among them is the disappearance of the N=28 shell closure for Z{<=}16. We have incorporated into SDPF-NR some modifications, either on purely theoretical grounds or guided by new experimental information. The proposed interaction SDPF-U offers enhanced reliability with respect to the earlier version.

  10. Effects of Security actions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, Ramona; Andersson-Sköld, Yvonne; Nyberg, Lars; Johansson, Magnus

    2010-05-01

    In a project funded by the Swedish Civil Contingencies Agency, the effort and work to reduce different kinds of accidents are being evaluated. The project wants to illuminate the links between actions and outcome, so we can learn from today's performance and in the future select more effective measures and overall deal with accidents more efficiently. The project ESS covers the field of frequent accidents such as sliding accidents at home, in house fires and less common accidents such as chemical and land fill accidents up to even more rare accidents such as natural accidents and hazards. In the ESS project SGI (Swedish geotechnical institute) will evaluate the work and effort concerning various natural hazards limited to landslides, erosion and flooding. The aim is to investigate how municipalities handle, especially prevention, of such natural disasters today. The project includes several aspects such as: • which are the driving forces for risk analysis in a municipality • do one use risk mapping (and what type) in municipal risk analysis • which aspects are most important when selecting preventive measures • in which way do one learn from past accidents • and from previous accidents elsewhere, by for example use existing databases • etc There are many aspects that play a role in a well-functioning safety promotion work. The overall goal is to examine present work and activities, highlight what is well functioning and identify weak points. The aim is to find out where more resources are needed and give suggestions for a more efficient security work. This includes identification of the most efficient "tools" in use or needed. Such tools can be education, directives, funding, more easily available maps and information regarding previous accidents and preventive measures etc. The project will result in recommendations for more effective ways to deal with landslides, erosion and flooding. Since different kinds of problems can occur depending on level of

  11. Schwinger multichannel study of the 2Pi(g) shape resonance in N2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Gibson, Thomas L.; Lima, Marco A. P.; Mckoy, Vincent

    1987-01-01

    The results of a study on electron-target correlations in the 2Pi(g) shape resonance of elastic e-N2 scattering, using the Schwinger multichannel formulation, are reported. The effects of basis set, orbital representation, and closed-channel-configurations are delineated. The different roles of radial and angular correlations are compared.

  12. Measurement of Activated Au foils by 2{pi}{beta}+2{pi}{beta}-{gamma} Coincidence Counting and EGS5 Monte Carlo Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Yasushi; Harano, Hideki; Matsumoto, Tetsuro; Nishiyama, Jun; Moriyama, Kentaro; Unno, Yasuhiro; Yamada, Takahiro; Yunoki, Akira; Hino, Yoshio; Kudo, Katsuhisa

    2009-03-10

    Neutron activation analysis using Au foil is a common and important method for measurement of thermal neutron fluence. To determine the activity of Au foil experimentally, Kawada et al. proposed 2{pi}{beta}+2{pi}{beta}-{gamma} coincidence counting. This method is based on 4{pi}{beta}-{gamma} coincidence counting but a 4{pi}{beta} detector is divided into two 2{pi}{beta} detectors those are independently operated in the method. In this research the correction factors in 2{pi}{beta}+2{pi}{beta}-{gamma} coincidence counting were obtained by measurement and simulation. The activities obtained by these correction factors were in good agreement.

  13. 2PI functional techniques for gauge theories: QED

    SciTech Connect

    Reinosa, Urko Serreau, Julien

    2010-05-15

    We discuss the formulation of the prototype gauge field theory, QED, in the context of two-particle-irreducible (2PI) functional techniques with particular emphasis on the issues of renormalization and gauge symmetry. We show how to renormalize all n-point vertex functions of the (gauge-fixed) theory at any approximation order in the 2PI loop-expansion by properly adjusting a finite set of local counterterms consistent with the underlying gauge symmetry. The paper is divided in three parts: a self-contained presentation of the main results and their possible implementation for practical applications; a detailed analysis of ultraviolet divergences and their removal; a number of appendices collecting technical details.

  14. High resolution absorption cross sections for the A2Pi-X2Pi system of ClO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wine, P. H.; Ravishankara, A. R.; Philen, D. L.; Davis, D. D.; Watson, R. T.

    1977-01-01

    High-resolution ultraviolet absorption cross-sections for the ClO molecule are obtained, with the aim of facilitating studies of ozone depletion resulting from the injection of chlorofluorocarbons into the atmosphere. The spectroscopic analysis, which involves a frequency-doubled tunable dye laser with a bandwidth of 0.015 A, is described. Studies of the rotational lines of the ClO A 2Pi 3/2-X2Pi 3/2 9-10 band were conducted. Peak cross-sections for the P and R lines of the 9-0 band are found to be 10.0, 9.6, 8.6, 10.6, 10.3, and 9.2 times ten to the negative seventeenth power cm squared, with estimated accuracy of plus or minus 25%. Problems in distinguishing between Cl-35 and Cl-37 absorption are also considered.

  15. Action-effect binding by observational learning.

    PubMed

    Paulus, Markus; van Dam, Wessel; Hunnius, Sabine; Lindemann, Oliver; Bekkering, Harold

    2011-10-01

    The acquisition of bidirectional action-effect associations plays a central role in the ability to intentionally control actions. Humans learn about actions not only through active experience, but also through observing the actions of others. In Experiment 1, we examined whether action-effect associations can be acquired by observational learning. To this end, participants observed how a model repeatedly pressed two buttons during an observation phase. Each of the buttonpresses led to a specific tone (action effect). In a subsequent test phase, the tones served as target stimuli to which the participants had to respond with buttonpresses. Reaction times were shorter if the stimulus-response mapping in the test phase was compatible with the action-effect association in the observation phase. Experiment 2 excluded the possibility that the impact of perceived action effects on own actions was driven merely by an association of spatial features with the particular tones. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the presence of an agent is necessary to acquire novel action-effect associations through observation. Altogether, the study provides evidence for the claim that bidirectional action-effect associations can be acquired by observational learning. Our findings are discussed in the context of the idea that the acquisition of action-effect associations through observation is an important cognitive mechanism subserving the human ability for social learning.

  16. The GROOP Effect: Groups Mimic Group Actions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Jessica Chia-Chin; Sebanz, Natalie; Knoblich, Gunther

    2011-01-01

    Research on perception-action links has focused on an interpersonal level, demonstrating effects of observing individual actions on performance. The present study investigated perception-action matching at an inter-group level. Pairs of participants responded to hand movements that were performed by two individuals who used one hand each or they…

  17. Optimal targeting of HER2-PI3K signaling in breast cancer: mechanistic insights and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Rexer, Brent N; Arteaga, Carlos L

    2013-07-01

    The combination of a PI3K inhibitor with trastuzumab has been shown to be effective at overcoming trastuzumab resistance in models of HER2(+) breast cancer by inhibiting HER2-PI3K-FOXO-survivin signaling. In this review the potential clinical implications of these findings are discussed.

  18. On the update of DIN-2PI spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Novikov, A. G. Puchkov, A. V.

    2011-12-15

    The prospects of increasing the resolution of the DIN-2PI spectrometer at initial neutron energies of 50-500 meV are discussed. The spectrometer resolution can be significantly improved using time-of-flight neutron monochromatization supplemented with a monochromator crystal. The application of this combined monochromatization technique makes the dependence that the instrumental resolution has on the duration of the neutron pulse from the IBR-2 reactor insignificant. This update will make it possible to perform experiments with initial neutron energies to several hundreds of meV in the energy-dumping mode, which, in turn, allows one to study condensed media in a wide range of temperatures, including cryogenic.

  19. Conformal symmetry of brane world effective actions

    SciTech Connect

    McFadden, Paul L.; Turok, Neil

    2005-01-15

    A simple derivation of the low-energy effective action for brane worlds is given, highlighting the role of conformal invariance. We show how to improve the effective action for a positive- and negative-tension brane pair using the AdS/CFT correspondence.

  20. Nonperturbative QED effective action at finite temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sang Pyo; Lee, Hyun Kyu; Yoon, Yongsung

    2010-07-15

    We propose a novel method for the effective action of spinor and scalar QED at finite temperature in time-dependent electric fields, where charged pairs evolve in a nonadiabatic way. The imaginary part of the effective action consists of thermal loops of the Fermi-Dirac or Bose-Einstein distribution for the initial thermal ensemble, weighted with factors of the Bogoliubov coefficients for quantum effects. And the real part of the effective action is determined by the mean number of produced pairs and vacuum polarization at zero temperature. In the weak-field limit, the mean number of produced pairs is shown twice the imaginary part. We explicitly find the finite-temperature effective action in a constant electric field.

  1. Parity propensities in rotational energy transfer of OH X 2Pi(i) with helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wysong, Ingrid J.; Jeffries, Jay B.; Crosley, David R.

    1991-01-01

    Preliminary results of rotational energy transfer in ground state OH in collisions in He are reported. A surprising propensity is found: conservation of total parity is favored in collisions which change in spin-orbit component, the reversible reaction 2Pi3/2 yields 2Pi1/2. This has implications concerning the OH-He potential surface.

  2. Action-based effects on music perception.

    PubMed

    Maes, Pieter-Jan; Leman, Marc; Palmer, Caroline; Wanderley, Marcelo M

    2014-01-01

    The classical, disembodied approach to music cognition conceptualizes action and perception as separate, peripheral processes. In contrast, embodied accounts of music cognition emphasize the central role of the close coupling of action and perception. It is a commonly established fact that perception spurs action tendencies. We present a theoretical framework that captures the ways in which the human motor system and its actions can reciprocally influence the perception of music. The cornerstone of this framework is the common coding theory, postulating a representational overlap in the brain between the planning, the execution, and the perception of movement. The integration of action and perception in so-called internal models is explained as a result of associative learning processes. Characteristic of internal models is that they allow intended or perceived sensory states to be transferred into corresponding motor commands (inverse modeling), and vice versa, to predict the sensory outcomes of planned actions (forward modeling). Embodied accounts typically refer to inverse modeling to explain action effects on music perception (Leman, 2007). We extend this account by pinpointing forward modeling as an alternative mechanism by which action can modulate perception. We provide an extensive overview of recent empirical evidence in support of this idea. Additionally, we demonstrate that motor dysfunctions can cause perceptual disabilities, supporting the main idea of the paper that the human motor system plays a functional role in auditory perception. The finding that music perception is shaped by the human motor system and its actions suggests that the musical mind is highly embodied. However, we advocate for a more radical approach to embodied (music) cognition in the sense that it needs to be considered as a dynamical process, in which aspects of action, perception, introspection, and social interaction are of crucial importance.

  3. Action-based effects on music perception

    PubMed Central

    Maes, Pieter-Jan; Leman, Marc; Palmer, Caroline; Wanderley, Marcelo M.

    2013-01-01

    The classical, disembodied approach to music cognition conceptualizes action and perception as separate, peripheral processes. In contrast, embodied accounts of music cognition emphasize the central role of the close coupling of action and perception. It is a commonly established fact that perception spurs action tendencies. We present a theoretical framework that captures the ways in which the human motor system and its actions can reciprocally influence the perception of music. The cornerstone of this framework is the common coding theory, postulating a representational overlap in the brain between the planning, the execution, and the perception of movement. The integration of action and perception in so-called internal models is explained as a result of associative learning processes. Characteristic of internal models is that they allow intended or perceived sensory states to be transferred into corresponding motor commands (inverse modeling), and vice versa, to predict the sensory outcomes of planned actions (forward modeling). Embodied accounts typically refer to inverse modeling to explain action effects on music perception (Leman, 2007). We extend this account by pinpointing forward modeling as an alternative mechanism by which action can modulate perception. We provide an extensive overview of recent empirical evidence in support of this idea. Additionally, we demonstrate that motor dysfunctions can cause perceptual disabilities, supporting the main idea of the paper that the human motor system plays a functional role in auditory perception. The finding that music perception is shaped by the human motor system and its actions suggests that the musical mind is highly embodied. However, we advocate for a more radical approach to embodied (music) cognition in the sense that it needs to be considered as a dynamical process, in which aspects of action, perception, introspection, and social interaction are of crucial importance. PMID:24454299

  4. Action!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senese, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    A small group of teachers at one Illinois high school is helping to effect and promote change. Through the Action Research Laboratory (ARL), teams of teachers conduct collaborative action research to improve classroom practices. Data from the first two years of the ARL indicate that teachers are eager to participate in, and have thrived in, their…

  5. Effective actions for anomalous hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haehl, Felix M.; Loganayagam, R.; Rangamani, Mukund

    2014-03-01

    We argue that an effective field theory of local fluid elements captures the constraints on hydrodynamic transport stemming from the presence of quantum anomalies in the underlying microscopic theory. Focussing on global current anomalies for an arbitrary flavour group, we derive the anomalous constitutive relations in arbitrary even dimensions. We demonstrate that our results agree with the constraints on anomaly governed transport derived hitherto using a local version of the second law of thermodynamics. The construction crucially uses the anomaly inflow mechanism and involves a novel thermofield double construction. In particular, we show that the anomalous Ward identities necessitate non-trivial interaction between the two parts of the Schwinger-Keldysh contour.

  6. Learning from Their Own Actions: The Unique Effect of Producing Actions on Infants' Action Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerson, Sarah A.; Woodward, Amanda L.

    2014-01-01

    Prior research suggests that infants' action production affects their action understanding, but little is known about the aspects of motor experience that render these effects. In Study 1, the relative contributions of self-produced (n = 30) and observational (n = 30) action experience on 3-month-old infants' action understanding was…

  7. Effective actions for bosonic topological defects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Ruth

    1990-01-01

    A gauge field theory is considered which admits p-dimensional topological defects, expanding the equations of motion in powers of the defect thickness. In this way an effective action and effective equation of motion is derived for the defect in terms of the coordinates of the p-dimensional worldsurface defined by the history of the core of the defect.

  8. From Outcome Prediction to Action Selection: Developmental Change in the Role of Action-Effect Bindings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verschoor, Stephan A.; Spapé, Michiel; Biro, Szilvia; Hommel, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Ideomotor theory considers bidirectional action-effect associations to be the fundamental building blocks for intentional action. The present study employed a novel pupillometric and oculomotor paradigm to study developmental changes in the role of action-effects in the acquisition of voluntary action. Our findings suggest that both 7- and…

  9. (-)-Carvone: antispasmodic effect and mode of action.

    PubMed

    Souza, Fábia Valéria M; da Rocha, Marcelly Barbosa; de Souza, Damião P; Marçal, Rosilene Moretti

    2013-03-01

    (-)-Carvone is a monoterpene ketone found in spearmint (Mentha spicata var. crispa) essential oil that is widely used as an odor and flavor additive. An intestinal antispasmodic effect was recently reported for (-)-carvone, and it has been shown to be more potent than its (+)-antipode. The mechanism of (-)-carvone action in the intestines has not been investigated. To gain a better understanding of the (-)-carvone antispasmodic effect, we investigated its pharmacological effects in the guinea pig ileum. Terminal portions of the ileum were mounted for isotonic contraction recordings. The effect of (-)-carvone was compared with that of the classical calcium channel blocker (CCB) verapamil. In isolated ileal smooth muscle, (-)-carvone did not produce direct contractile or relaxation responses and did not modify electrically elicited contractions or low K(+)-evoked contractions. The submaximal contractions induced by histamine (p<0.001), BaCl2 (p<0.05), and carbachol (p<0.01) were significantly reduced by (-)-carvone. The contractile response elicited by high concentrations of carbachol was reduced but not abolished by (-)-carvone. No additive action was detected with co-incubation of (-)-carvone and verapamil on carbachol-induced contraction. (-)-Carvone reduced the contraction induced by high K(+) and was almost 100 times more potent than verapamil. Thus, (-)-carvone showed a typical and potent CCB-like action. Many effects described for both (-)-carvone and spearmint oil can be explained as a CCB-like mode of action.

  10. Perturbation analysis for the rotational spectrum of the NiBr radical in the X2Pi3/2 and A2Delta5/2 states.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Emi; Okabayashi, Toshiaki; Tanimoto, Mitsutoshi

    2004-07-01

    The millimeter- and submillimeter-wave spectra of the NiBr radical in the X (2)Pi(3/2) and A (2)Delta(5/2) states were observed by a source-modulated microwave spectrometer. The NiBr radical was generated in a dc glow discharge through the mixture of Br(2) vapor and Ar gas by the sputtering reaction with a Ni cathode. Observed transition frequencies were independently analyzed for both electronic states using a standard polynomial expression of a Hund's case (c) approximation. Anomalous behavior of the effective molecular constants in the X (2)Pi(3/2) state was interpreted as the result of the perturbation between the X (2)Pi(3/2) and A (2)Delta(5/2) states. The deperturbed molecular constants were derived using a simplified supermultiplet Hamiltonian including the interaction terms between the two electronic states.

  11. Feynman rules for effective Regge action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov, E. N.; Cherednikov, I. O.; Kuraev, E. A.; Lipatov, L. N.

    2005-08-01

    Starting from the gauge invariant effective action in the quasi-multi-Regge kinematics (QMRK), we obtain the effective reggeized gluon (R)-particle (P) vertices of the following types: RPP, RRP, RRPP, RPPP, RRPPP, and RPPPP, where the on-mass-shell particles are gluons, or sets of gluons with small invariant masses. The explicit expressions satisfying the Bose-symmetry and gauge invariance conditions are obtained. As a comment to the Feynman rules for derivation of the amplitudes in terms of effective vertices we present a "vocabulary" for practitioners.

  12. Sensory Attenuation for Jointly Produced Action Effects

    PubMed Central

    Loehr, Janeen D.

    2012-01-01

    Successful joint action often requires people to distinguish between their own and others’ contributions to a shared goal. One mechanism that is thought to underlie a self-other distinction is sensory attenuation, whereby the sensory consequences of one’s own actions are reduced compared to other sensory events. Previous research has shown that the auditory N1 event-related potential (ERP) response is reduced for self-generated compared to externally generated tones. The current study examined whether attenuation also occurs for jointly generated tones, which require two people to coordinate their actions to produce a single tone. ERP responses were measured when participants generated tones alone (tone onset immediately followed the participant’s button press) or with a partner (tone onset immediately followed the participant’s or the partner’s button press, whichever occurred second). N1 attenuation was smaller for jointly generated tones compared to self-generated tones. For jointly generated tones, greater delays between the participant’s and the partner’s button presses were associated with reduced attenuation; moreover, only trials in which there was no delay between the participant’s press and tone onset showed attenuation, whereas trials in which there were delays did not show attenuation. These findings indicate that people differentiate between their own and another person’s contributions to a joint action at the sensorimotor level, even when they must act together to produce a single, shared effect. PMID:23596429

  13. Exploring soft constraints on effective actions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, Massimo; Guerrieri, Andrea L.; Huang, Yu-tin; Lee, Chao-Jung; Wen, Congkao

    2016-10-01

    We study effective actions for simultaneous breaking of space-time and internal symmetries. Novel features arise due to the mixing of Goldstone modes under the broken symmetries which, in contrast to the usual Adler's zero, leads to non-vanishing soft limits. Such scenarios are common for spontaneously broken SCFT's. We explicitly test these soft theorems for N=4 sYM in the Coulomb branch both perturbatively and non-perturbatively. We explore the soft constraints systematically utilizing recursion relations. In the pure dilaton sector of a general CFT, we show that all amplitudes up to order s n ˜ ∂2 n are completely determined in terms of the k-point amplitudes at order s k with k ≤ n. Terms with at most one derivative acting on each dilaton insertion are completely fixed and coincide with those appearing in the conformal DBI, i.e. DBI in AdS. With maximal supersymmetry, the effective actions are further constrained, leading to new non-renormalization theorems. In particular, the effective action is fixed up to eight derivatives in terms of just one unknown four-point coefficient and one more coefficient for ten-derivative terms. Finally, we also study the interplay between scale and conformal invariance in this context.

  14. Action-Sentence Compatibility: The Role of Action Effects and Timing

    PubMed Central

    Diefenbach, Christiane; Rieger, Martina; Massen, Cristina; Prinz, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Research on embodied approaches to language comprehension suggests that we understand linguistic descriptions of actions by mentally simulating these actions. Evidence is provided by the action-sentence compatibility effect (ACE) which shows that sensibility judgments for sentences are faster when the direction of the described action matches the response direction. In two experiments, we investigated whether the ACE relies on actions or on intended action effects. Participants gave sensibility judgments of auditorily presented sentences by producing an action effect on a screen at a location near the body or far from the body. These action effects were achieved by pressing a response button that was located in either the same spatial direction as the action effect, or in the opposite direction. We used a go/no-go task in which the direction of the to-be-produced action effect was either cued at the onset of each sentence (Experiment 1) or at different points in time before and after sentence onset (Experiment 2). Overall, results showed a relationship between the direction of the described action and the direction of the action effect. Furthermore, Experiment 2 indicated that depending on the timing between cue presentation and sentence onset, participants responded either faster when the direction of the described action matched the direction of the action effect (positive ACE), or slower (negative ACE). These results provide evidence that the comprehension of action sentences involves the activation of representations of action effects. Concurrently activated representations in sentence comprehension and action planning can lead to both priming and interference, which is discussed in the context of the theory of event coding. PMID:23734134

  15. Approximation of functions in L^{p(x)}_{2\\pi} by trigonometric polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharapudinov, Idris I.

    2013-04-01

    We consider the Lebesgue space L^{p(x)}_{2\\pi} with variable exponent p(x). It consists of measurable functions f(x) for which the integral \\int_0^{2\\pi}\\vert f(x)\\vert^{p(x)}\\,dx exists. We establish an analogue of Jackson's first theorem in the case when the 2\\pi-periodic variable exponent p(x)\\ge1 satisfies the condition \\displaystyle \\vert p(x')-p(x'')\\vert\\ln\\frac{2\\pi}{\\vert x'-x''\\vert}=O(1),\\qquad x',x''\\in \\lbrack -\\pi,\\pi \\rbrack . Under the additional assumption p_- =\\min_x p(x)\\gt1 we also get an analogue of Jackson's second theorem. We establish an L^{p(x)}_{2\\pi}-analogue of Bernstein's estimate for the derivative of a trigonometric polynomial and use it to prove an inverse theorem for the analogues of the Lipschitz classes {Lip}(\\alpha,M)_{p(\\,\\cdot\\,)}\\subset L^{p(x)}_{2\\pi} for 0\\lt \\alpha\\lt 1. Thus we establish direct and inverse theorems of the theory of approximation by trigonometric polynomials in the classes {Lip}(\\alpha,M)_{p(\\,\\cdot\\,)}. In the definition of the modulus of continuity of a function f(x)\\in L^{p(x)}_{2\\pi}, we replace the ordinary shift f^h(x)=f(x+h) by an averaged shift determined by Steklov's function s_h(f)(x)=\\frac{1}{h}\\int_0^hf(x+t)\\,dt.

  16. Effectiveness of a solar action campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, M.

    1981-01-01

    This paper discusses the effectiveness of a Solar Action Campaign implemented to facilitate the commercialization of Solar Energy in a large metropolitan area. The campaign was developed by the staff of the Crosby Gardens Environmental Library. Crosby Gardens is an urban environmental and cultural park. The Solar Action Campaign in Toledo, Ohio, included the coordination of a variety of activities and events designed to stimulate consumer awareness of the Solar Energy applications in the area. Activities included coordinating two workshops, production of media tools, a sunshine awards banquet, and an intensive media campaign. The Solar Week in Toledo provided the stimulus for coalitions to be built, intensive information exchange, and most importantly - media coverage.

  17. Representing the Hyphen in Action-Effect Associations: Automatic Acquisition and Bidirectional Retrieval of Action-Effect Intervals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dignath, David; Pfister, Roland; Eder, Andreas B.; Kiesel, Andrea; Kunde, Wilfried

    2014-01-01

    We examined whether a temporal interval between an action and its sensory effect is integrated in the cognitive action structure in a bidirectional fashion. In 3 experiments, participants first experienced that actions produced specific acoustic effects (high and low tones) that occurred temporally delayed after their actions. In a following test…

  18. Effective action theory of Andreev level spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galaktionov, Artem V.; Zaikin, Andrei D.

    2015-12-01

    With the aid of the Keldysh effective action technique we develop a microscopic theory describing Andreev level spectroscopy experiments in nontunnel superconducting contacts. We derive an effective impedance of such contacts which accounts for the presence of Andreev levels in the system. At subgap bias voltages and low temperatures, inelastic Cooper pair tunneling is accompanied by transitions between these levels resulting in a set of sharp current peaks. We evaluate the intensities of such peaks, establish their dependence on the external magnetic flux piercing the structure and estimate the thermal broadening of these peaks. We also specifically address the effect of capacitance renormalization in a nontunnel superconducting contact and its impact on both the positions and heights of the current peaks. At overgap bias voltages, the I -V curve is determined by quasiparticle tunneling and contains current steps related to the presence of discrete Andreev states in our system.

  19. The universal one-loop effective action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozd, Aleksandra; Ellis, John; Quevillon, Jérémie; You, Tevong

    2016-03-01

    We present the universal one-loop effective action for all operators of dimension up to six obtained by integrating out massive, non-degenerate multiplets. Our general expression may be applied to loops of heavy fermions or bosons, and has been checked against partial results available in the literature. The broad applicability of this approach simplifies one-loop matching from an ultraviolet model to a lower-energy effective field theory (EFT), a procedure which is now reduced to the evaluation of a combination of matrices in our universal expression, without any loop integrals to evaluate. We illustrate the relationship of our results to the Standard Model (SM) EFT, using as an example the supersymmetric stop and sbottom squark Lagrangian and extracting from our universal expression the Wilson coefficients of dimension-six operators composed of SM fields.

  20. Embracing causality in specifying the indeterminate effects of actions

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, F.

    1996-12-31

    This paper makes the following two contributions to formal theories of actions: Showing that a causal minimization framework can be used effectively to specify the effects of indeterminate actions; and showing that for certain classes of such actions, regression, an effective computational mechanism, can be used to reason about them.

  1. Radiation and collisional energy transfer among the A 2Pi(i) and X 2Sigma(+) states of CN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Yuhui; Lu, Richang; Halpern, Joshua B.

    1993-01-01

    Laser-photolysis-laser-induced-fluorescence methods are used to characterize the collisional energy transfer between CN (A 2Pi(i) and (X 2Sigma(+)) states and to measure radiative lifetimes of the (A 2Pi(i)) v-prime = 2-7 vibrational levels. In addition, use of the A 2Pi(i) - X 2Sigma(+) system for the laser-induced-fluorescence determination of (X 2Sig(+)) populations is demonstrated and discussed.

  2. Boundary Effective Action for Quantum Hall States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gromov, Andrey; Jensen, Kristan; Abanov, Alexander G.

    2016-03-01

    We consider quantum Hall states on a space with boundary, focusing on the aspects of the edge physics which are completely determined by the symmetries of the problem. There are four distinct terms of Chern-Simons type that appear in the low-energy effective action of the state. Two of these protect gapless edge modes. They describe Hall conductance and, with some provisions, thermal Hall conductance. The remaining two, including the Wen-Zee term, which contributes to the Hall viscosity, do not protect gapless edge modes but are instead related to the local boundary response fixed by symmetries. We highlight some basic features of this response. It follows that the coefficient of the Wen-Zee term can change across an interface without closing a gap or breaking a symmetry.

  3. Causal binding of actions to their effects.

    PubMed

    Buehner, Marc J; Humphreys, Gruffydd R

    2009-10-01

    According to widely held views in cognitive science harking back to David Hume, causality cannot be perceived directly, but instead is inferred from patterns of sensory experience, and the quality of these inferences is determined by perceivable quantities such as contingency and contiguity. We report results that suggest a reversal of Hume's conjecture: People's sense of time is warped by the experience of causality. In a stimulus-anticipation task, participants' response behavior reflected a shortened experience of time in the case of target stimuli participants themselves had generated, relative to equidistant, equally predictable stimuli they had not caused. These findings suggest that causality in the mind leads to temporal binding of cause and effect, and extend and generalize beyond earlier claims of intentional binding between action and outcome.

  4. Boundary Effective Action for Quantum Hall States.

    PubMed

    Gromov, Andrey; Jensen, Kristan; Abanov, Alexander G

    2016-03-25

    We consider quantum Hall states on a space with boundary, focusing on the aspects of the edge physics which are completely determined by the symmetries of the problem. There are four distinct terms of Chern-Simons type that appear in the low-energy effective action of the state. Two of these protect gapless edge modes. They describe Hall conductance and, with some provisions, thermal Hall conductance. The remaining two, including the Wen-Zee term, which contributes to the Hall viscosity, do not protect gapless edge modes but are instead related to the local boundary response fixed by symmetries. We highlight some basic features of this response. It follows that the coefficient of the Wen-Zee term can change across an interface without closing a gap or breaking a symmetry. PMID:27058090

  5. Boundary Effective Action for Quantum Hall States.

    PubMed

    Gromov, Andrey; Jensen, Kristan; Abanov, Alexander G

    2016-03-25

    We consider quantum Hall states on a space with boundary, focusing on the aspects of the edge physics which are completely determined by the symmetries of the problem. There are four distinct terms of Chern-Simons type that appear in the low-energy effective action of the state. Two of these protect gapless edge modes. They describe Hall conductance and, with some provisions, thermal Hall conductance. The remaining two, including the Wen-Zee term, which contributes to the Hall viscosity, do not protect gapless edge modes but are instead related to the local boundary response fixed by symmetries. We highlight some basic features of this response. It follows that the coefficient of the Wen-Zee term can change across an interface without closing a gap or breaking a symmetry.

  6. Wong's equations and the small x effective action in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Jalilian-Marian, Jamal; Jeon, Sangyong; Venugopalan, Raju

    2000-07-13

    We propose a new form for the small x effective action in QCD. This form of the effective action is motivated by Wong's equations for classical, colored particles in non-Abelian background fields. We show that the BFKL equation, which sums leading logarithms in x, is efficiently reproduced with this form of the action. We argue that this form of the action may be particularly useful in computing next-to-leading-order results in QCD at small x.

  7. The role of action effects in 12-month-olds' action control: a comparison of televised model and live model.

    PubMed

    Klein, Annette M; Hauf, Petra; Aschersleben, Gisa

    2006-12-01

    The present study investigated differences in infant imitation after watching a televised model and a live model and addressed the issue of whether action effects influence infants' action control in both cases. In a 2x2 design, 12-month-old infants observed a live or a televised model performing a three-step action sequence, in which either the 2nd or the 3rd action step was combined with an acoustical action effect. We assumed that infants would use the observed action-effect relations for their own action control in the test phase afterwards. Even though results exhibited differences in the absolute amount of imitation between the two demonstration groups, both groups showed similar result patterns regarding the action effect manipulation: infants imitated the action step that was followed by a salient action effect more often and mostly as the first target action, emphasizing the important role of action effects in infants' action control. PMID:17138306

  8. Protein kinase A-mediated cell proliferation in brown preadipocytes is independent of Erk1/2, PI{sub 3}K and mTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yanling; Sato, Masaaki; Guo, Yuan; Bengtsson, Tore; Nedergaard, Jan

    2014-10-15

    The physiological agonist norepinephrine promotes cell proliferation of brown preadipocytes during the process of tissue recruitment. In a primary culture system, cAMP mediates these adrenergic effects. In the present study, we demonstrated that, in contrast to other systems where the mitogenic effect of cAMP requires the synergistic action of (serum) growth factors, especially insulin/IGF, the cAMP effect in brown preadipocytes was independent of serum and insulin. Protein kinase A, rather than Epac, mediated the cAMP mitogenic effect. The Erk 1/2 family of MAPK, the PI{sub 3}K system and the mTOR complexes were all activated by cAMP, but these activations were not necessary for cAMP-induced cell proliferation; a protein kinase C isoform may be involved in mediating cAMP-activated cell proliferation. We conclude that the generally acknowledged cellular mediators for induction of cell proliferation are not involved in this process in the brown preadipocyte system; this conclusion may be of relevance both for examination of mechanisms for induction of brown adipose tissue recruitment but also for understanding the mechanism behind e.g. certain endocrine neoplasias. - Highlights: • cAMP can mimick norepinephrine-induced proliferation of brown preadipocytes. • The cAMP-induced proliferation can occur in the absence of serum, of any other growth factors, and of insulin. • Erk1/2, PI{sub 3}K and mTOR are cAMP activated but not involved in induction of proliferation. • A Protein Kinase C member may be in the signalling cascade. • This pathway analysis may also be of importance for certain endocrine hyper- and neoplasias.

  9. Action-effect congruence during observational learning leads to faster action sequence learning.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Jared C; Gray, Zachary; Schilberg, Lukas; Vidrin, Ilya; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    Common coding theory suggests that any action (pressing a piano key) is intimately linked with its resultant sensory effect (an auditory musical tone). We conducted two experiments to explore the effect of varying auditory action-effect patterns during complex action learning. In Experiment 1, participants were assigned to 1 of 4 groups, watched a silent video of a hand playing a sequence on a piano keyboard with no auditory action effect (observation) and were asked to practise and perform the sequence on an identical keyboard with varying action effects (reproduction). During reproduction, Group 1 heard no auditory tones (identical to observed video), Group 2 heard typical scale-ascending piano tones with each key press, Group 3 heard fixed but out-of-sequence piano tones with each key press, and Group 4 heard random piano tones with each key press. In Experiment two, new participants were assigned to 1 of 2 groups and watched an identical video; however, the video in this experiment contained typical, scale-ascending piano sounds. During reproduction, Group 1 heard no auditory tones while Group 2 heard typical, scale-ascending piano tones with each key press (identical to observed video). Our results showed that participants whose action-effect patterns during reproduction matched those in the observed video learned the action sequence faster than participants whose action-effect patterns during reproduction differed from those in the observed video. Additionally, our results suggest that adding an effect during reproduction (when one is absent during observation) is somewhat more detrimental to action sequence learning than removing an effect during reproduction (when one is present during observation).

  10. Unconscious Effects of Action on Perception

    PubMed Central

    Halász, Veronika; Cunnington, Ross

    2012-01-01

    We spend much of our life predicting the future. This involves developing theories and making predictions about others’ intentions, goals and about the consequences of the actions we are observing. Adapting our actions and behaviours to the environment is required for achieving our goals, and to do this the motor system relies on input from sensory modalities. However, recent theories suggest that the link between motor and perceptual areas is bidirectional, and that predictions based on planned or intended actions can unconsciously influence and modify our perception. In the following review we describe current theories on the link between action and perception, and examine the ways in which the motor system can unconsciously alter our perception. PMID:24962769

  11. Steady-state 2. pi. pulses under conditions of passive locking of laser modes

    SciTech Connect

    Komarov, K.P.; Ugozhaev, V.D.

    1984-06-01

    A theoretical study is made of laser mode locking in the regime of self-induced transparency of a passive filter. It is shown that there is a solution in the form of ultrashort steady-state 2..pi.. pulses. The range of stability of this regime and its characteristics are determined. By way of example, estimates are obtained of parameters of a steady-state pulse emitted by an alexandrite laser with a potassium absorption cell.

  12. [Effects of sustained and stopped hand actions on sensible/nonsensible judgments of verbal phrase of action: comparison between actual action and viewing a movie].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yukiko; Hakoda, Yuji

    2002-04-01

    The present study investigated how an actual action or viewing a movie of an action influences the subsequent semantic processing of a verbal phrase concerning the action (e.g., holding a bag with a hand). Forty participants made sensible/nonsensible judgments about the target phrase which were preceded by one of the four prime conditions: sustained action, stopped action, sustained viewing movie, and stopped viewing movie. A facilitatory priming effect was observed in the sustained action condition. Whereas an inhibitory effect was observed in the stopped action condition. These results suggest that the kinetic information affects on the semantic processing of a verbal phrase of action.

  13. The Role of Attention in a Joint-Action Effect

    PubMed Central

    Doneva, Silviya P.; Cole, Geoff G.

    2014-01-01

    The most common explanation for joint-action effects has been the action co-representation account in which observation of another's action is represented within one's own action system. However, recent evidence has shown that the most prominent of these joint-action effects (i.e., the Social Simon effect), can occur when no co-actor is present. In the current work we examined whether another joint-action phenomenon (a movement congruency effect) can be induced when a participant performs their part of the task with a different effector to that of their co-actor and when a co-actor's action is replaced by an attention-capturing luminance signal. Contrary to what is predicted by the action co-representation account, results show that the basic movement congruency effect occurred in both situations. These findings challenge the action co-representation account of this particular effect and suggest instead that it is driven by bottom-up mechanisms. PMID:24642806

  14. Effective actions of nongeometric five-branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatzistavrakidis, Athanasios; Gautason, Fridrik Freyr; Moutsopoulos, George; Zagermann, Marco

    2014-03-01

    An interesting consequence of string dualities is that they reveal situations where the geometry of a string background appears to be globally ill defined, a phenomenon usually referred to as nongeometry. On the other hand, string theory contains extended objects with nontrivial monodromy around them, often dubbed defect or exotic branes in codimension-2. We determine and examine the worldvolume actions and the couplings of certain such branes. In particular, based on specific chains of T- and S-dualities, we derive the Dirac-Born-Infeld and Wess-Zumino actions, which describe the dynamics of type IIB five-branes as well as their couplings to the appropriate gauge potentials associated to mixed symmetry tensors. Based on these actions we discuss how these branes act as sources of nongeometric fluxes. In one case this flux is what is usually termed Q flux, associated to a T-fold compactification, while in the S-dual case a type of nongeometry related to the Ramond-Ramond sector is encountered.

  15. Multi-agent Reinforcement Learning Model for Effective Action Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youk, Sang Jo; Lee, Bong Keun

    Reinforcement learning is a sub area of machine learning concerned with how an agent ought to take actions in an environment so as to maximize some notion of long-term reward. In the case of multi-agent, especially, which state space and action space gets very enormous in compared to single agent, so it needs to take most effective measure available select the action strategy for effective reinforcement learning. This paper proposes a multi-agent reinforcement learning model based on fuzzy inference system in order to improve learning collect speed and select an effective action in multi-agent. This paper verifies an effective action select strategy through evaluation tests based on Robocop Keep away which is one of useful test-beds for multi-agent. Our proposed model can apply to evaluate efficiency of the various intelligent multi-agents and also can apply to strategy and tactics of robot soccer system.

  16. Vibrational energy transfer in OH X 2Pi(i), v = 2 and 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raiche, George A.; Jeffries, Jay B.; Rensberger, Karen J.; Crosley, David R.

    1990-01-01

    Using an IR-pump/UV-probe method in a flow discharge cell, vibrational energy transfer in OH X 2Pi(i) has been studied. OH is prepared in v = 2 by overtone excitation, and the time evolution of population in v = 2 and 1 monitored by laser-induced fluorescence. Rate constants for vibrational relaxation by the colliders H2O, NH3, CO2, and CH4 were measured. Ratios of rate constants for removal from the two states, k2/k1, range from two to five.

  17. Kinetics of CH(X 2Pi) radical reactions with cyclopropane, cyclopentane, and cyclohexane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zabarnick, S.; Fleming, J. W.; Lin, M. C.

    1988-01-01

    Rate constants have been obtained for CH(X 2Pi) radical reactions with cyclopropane, cyclopentane, and cyclohexane in order to establish the rate of CH insertion into secondary C-H bonds in alkanes. Data indicate that there is no measurable dependence on photolysis laser energy. The reactions all exhibited rate constants that decrease with increasing temperature. It is suggested that a possible set of pathways for the cycloalkane reactions is a ring-opening process where the excited adduct decomposes to a hydrogen atom and a diene.

  18. The Effect of Action Experience on Sensorimotor EEG Rhythms during Action Observation

    PubMed Central

    Quandt, Lorna C.; Marshall, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    A recent line of inquiry has examined how an observer’s experience with action changes the neural processing of similar actions when they are subsequently observed. The current study used electroencephalography (EEG) to test the hypothesis that giving participants different types and amounts of experience with specific objects would lead to differential patterns of sensorimotor rhythms during the observation of similar actions on those objects. While EEG was recorded, three groups of participants (n = 20 in each group; mean age = 22.0 years, SD = 2.7) watched video clips of an actor reaching, grasping, and lifting two objects. Participants then received information about differences in weight between the two objects. One group gained this information through extended sensorimotor experience with the objects, a second group received much briefer sensorimotor experience with the objects, and the third group read written information about the objects’ weights. Participants then viewed the action sequences again. For participants who had sensorimotor experience with the objects, the EEG response to viewing the actions was differentially sensitive to the anticipated weight of the objects. We conclude that this sensitivity was based on the participant’s prior sensorimotor experience with the objects. The participants who only received semantic information about the objects showed no such effects. The primary conclusion is that even brief experience with actions affects sensorimotor cortex activity during the subsequent observation of similar actions. PMID:24568874

  19. Instanton Effective Action in Deformed Super Yang-Mills Theories

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Hiroaki; Ito, Katsushi; Sasaki, Shin

    2008-11-23

    We study the ADHM construction of instantons in N = 2 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory deformed in constant Ramond-Ramond (R-R) 3-form field strength background in type IIB superstrings. We compare the deformed instanton effective action with the effective action of fractional D3/D(-1) branes at the orbifold singularity of C{sup 2}/Z{sub 2} in the same R-R background. We find discrepancy between them at the second order in deformation parameters, which comes from the coupling of the translational zero modes of the D(-1)-branes to the R-R background. We improve the deformed action by adding a term with spacetime dependent gauge coupling such that the action reproduces the effective action of the fractional branes.

  20. The Evidence for the Effectiveness of Action Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, H. Skipton; Marquardt, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    For the past 50 years, organizations and individuals around the world have reported success in their use of action learning programs to solve problems, develop leaders, build teams and transform their corporate cultures. However, very little rigorous research has been conducted to determine the effectiveness of action learning. The authors…

  1. Effective action of QED in electric field backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sang Pyo; Lee, Hyun Kyu; Yoon, Yongsung

    2008-11-15

    We use the evolution operator method to find the one-loop effective action of scalar and spinor QED in electric field backgrounds in terms of the Bogoliubov coefficient between the ingoing and the outgoing vacua. We obtain the exact one-loop effective action for a Sauter-type electric field, E{sub 0}sech{sup 2}(t/{tau}), and show that the imaginary part correctly yields the vacuum persistence. The renormalized effective action shows the general relation between the vacuum persistence and the total mean number of created pairs for the constant and the Sauter-type electric field.

  2. On the influence of reward on action-effect binding.

    PubMed

    Muhle-Karbe, Paul S; Krebs, Ruth M

    2012-01-01

    Ideomotor theory states that the formation of anticipatory representations about the perceptual consequences of an action [i.e., action-effect (A-E) binding] provides the functional basis of voluntary action control. A host of studies have demonstrated that A-E binding occurs fast and effortlessly, yet little is known about cognitive and affective factors that influence this learning process. In the present study, we sought to test whether the motivational value of an action modulates the acquisition of A-E associations. To this end, we linked specific actions with monetary incentives during the acquisition of novel A-E mappings. In a subsequent test phase, the degree of binding was assessed by presenting the former effect stimuli as task-irrelevant response primes in a forced-choice response task, absent reward. Binding, as indexed by response priming through the former action-effects, was only found for reward-related A-E mappings. Moreover, the degree to which reward associations modulated the binding strength was predicted by individuals' trait sensitivity to reward. These observations indicate that the association of actions and their immediate outcomes depends on the motivational value of the action during learning, as well as on the motivational disposition of the individual. On a larger scale, these findings also highlight the link between ideomotor theories and reinforcement-learning theories, providing an interesting perspective for future research on anticipatory regulation of behavior.

  3. On the influence of reward on action-effect binding.

    PubMed

    Muhle-Karbe, Paul S; Krebs, Ruth M

    2012-01-01

    Ideomotor theory states that the formation of anticipatory representations about the perceptual consequences of an action [i.e., action-effect (A-E) binding] provides the functional basis of voluntary action control. A host of studies have demonstrated that A-E binding occurs fast and effortlessly, yet little is known about cognitive and affective factors that influence this learning process. In the present study, we sought to test whether the motivational value of an action modulates the acquisition of A-E associations. To this end, we linked specific actions with monetary incentives during the acquisition of novel A-E mappings. In a subsequent test phase, the degree of binding was assessed by presenting the former effect stimuli as task-irrelevant response primes in a forced-choice response task, absent reward. Binding, as indexed by response priming through the former action-effects, was only found for reward-related A-E mappings. Moreover, the degree to which reward associations modulated the binding strength was predicted by individuals' trait sensitivity to reward. These observations indicate that the association of actions and their immediate outcomes depends on the motivational value of the action during learning, as well as on the motivational disposition of the individual. On a larger scale, these findings also highlight the link between ideomotor theories and reinforcement-learning theories, providing an interesting perspective for future research on anticipatory regulation of behavior. PMID:23130005

  4. The Internal Anticipation of Sensory Action Effects: When Action Induces FFA and PPA Activity.

    PubMed

    Kühn, Simone; Seurinck, Ruth; Fias, Wim; Waszak, Florian

    2010-01-01

    Voluntary action - in particular the ability to produce desired effects in the environment - is fundamental to human existence. According to ideomotor theory we can achieve goals in the environment by means of anticipating their outcomes. We aimed at providing neurophysiological evidence for the assumption that performing actions calls for the activation of brain areas associated with the sensory effects usually evoked by the actions. We conducted an fMRI study in which right and left button presses lead to the presentation of face and house pictures. We compared a baseline phase with the same phase after participants experienced the association between button presses and pictures. We found an increase in the parahippocampal place area (PPA) for the response that has been associated with house pictures and fusiform face area (FFA) for the response that has been coupled with face pictures. This observation constitutes support for ideomotor theory.

  5. Effects of intentional motor actions on embodied language processing.

    PubMed

    Rueschemeyer, Shirley-Ann; Lindemann, Oliver; van Rooij, Daan; van Dam, Wessel; Bekkering, Harold

    2010-01-01

    Embodied theories of language processing suggest that this motor simulation is an automatic and necessary component of meaning representation. If this is the case, then language and action systems should be mutually dependent (i.e., motor activity should selectively modulate processing of words with an action-semantic component). In this paper, we investigate in two experiments whether evidence for mutual dependence can be found using a motor priming paradigm. Specifically, participants performed either an intentional or a passive motor task while processing words denoting manipulable and nonmanipulable objects. The performance rates (Experiment 1) and response latencies (Experiment 2) in a lexical-decision task reveal that participants performing an intentional action were positively affected in the processing of words denoting manipulable objects as compared to nonmanipulable objects. This was not the case if participants performed a secondary passive motor action (Experiment 1) or did not perform a secondary motor task (Experiment 2). The results go beyond previous research showing that language processes involve motor systems to demonstrate that the execution of motor actions has a selective effect on the semantic processing of words. We suggest that intentional actions activate specific parts of the neural motor system, which are also engaged for lexical-semantic processing of action-related words and discuss the beneficial versus inhibitory nature of this relationship. The results provide new insights into the embodiment of language and the bidirectionality of effects between language and action processing. PMID:20178948

  6. An ERP study of motor compatibility effects in action language.

    PubMed

    Santana, Eduardo J; de Vega, Manuel

    2013-08-14

    This ERP study explores the brain's response to the manipulation of motor compatibility in action-related language. In Experiment 1 participants read sentences in which a protagonist performed two different manual actions either simultaneously or consecutively (e.g. While/after cleaning the wound he unrolled the bandage…). The ERPs were measured in the second-clause verb (e.g. unrolled) and noun (e.g. bandage). Notably, only the noun showed compatibility effects, namely a larger N400 in the simultaneous (incompatible) version than in the consecutive (compatible) version, suggesting that readers need to integrate the meaning of the whole sentence to evaluate the feasibility of the actions. In Experiment 2, motor compatibility was manipulated in a different way: all the sentences described the protagonist as performing two simultaneous actions that were both manual (While cleaning the wound he unrolled the bandage), or one action that was perceptual and the other manual (While looking at the wound he unrolled the bandage). The N400 effects for the former incompatible condition were replicated, again in the second-clause noun. The results demonstrated that readers of action language employ their pragmatic world knowledge to test the feasibility of motor actions, taking into account the embodied constraints of such actions. PMID:23796780

  7. An ERP study of motor compatibility effects in action language.

    PubMed

    Santana, Eduardo J; de Vega, Manuel

    2013-08-14

    This ERP study explores the brain's response to the manipulation of motor compatibility in action-related language. In Experiment 1 participants read sentences in which a protagonist performed two different manual actions either simultaneously or consecutively (e.g. While/after cleaning the wound he unrolled the bandage…). The ERPs were measured in the second-clause verb (e.g. unrolled) and noun (e.g. bandage). Notably, only the noun showed compatibility effects, namely a larger N400 in the simultaneous (incompatible) version than in the consecutive (compatible) version, suggesting that readers need to integrate the meaning of the whole sentence to evaluate the feasibility of the actions. In Experiment 2, motor compatibility was manipulated in a different way: all the sentences described the protagonist as performing two simultaneous actions that were both manual (While cleaning the wound he unrolled the bandage), or one action that was perceptual and the other manual (While looking at the wound he unrolled the bandage). The N400 effects for the former incompatible condition were replicated, again in the second-clause noun. The results demonstrated that readers of action language employ their pragmatic world knowledge to test the feasibility of motor actions, taking into account the embodied constraints of such actions.

  8. Antimalarials in dermatology: mechanism of action, indications, and side effects.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Caruncho, C; Bielsa Marsol, I

    2014-04-01

    Antimalarial drugs have been in common use in dermatology since the 1950s. Their mechanism of action is complex, and it is now known that they act through various pathways. We review the indications for antimalarials in dermatology, their adverse effects, and some less well-known effects, such as their antithrombotic and hypolipidemic action. The most recent recommendations concerning ophthalmological screening in patients on antimalarials are also reviewed.

  9. Age effects on rotational hand action.

    PubMed

    Varadhan, S K M; Zhang, Wei; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M; Latash, Mark L

    2012-06-01

    We investigated age-related differences in finger coordination during rotational hand actions. Two hypotheses based on earlier studies were tested: higher safety margins and lower synergy indices were expected in the elderly. Young and elderly subjects held a handle instrumented with five six-component force sensors and performed discrete accurate pronation and supination movements. The weight of the system was counterbalanced with another load. Indices of synergies stabilizing salient performance variables, such as total normal force, total tangential force, moments produced by these forces, and total moment of force were computed at two levels of a hypothetical control hierarchy, at the virtual finger-thumb level and at the individual finger level. At each level, synergy indices reflected the normalized difference between the sum of the variances of elemental variables and variance of their combined output, both computed at comparable phases over repetitive trials. The elderly group performed the task slower and showed lower safety margins for the thumb during the rotation phase. Overall, the synergy indices were not lower in the elderly group. In several cases, these indices were significantly higher in the elderly than in the younger participants. Hence, both main hypotheses have been falsified. We interpret the unexpectedly low safety margins in the elderly as resulting from several factors such as increased force variability, impaired feed-forward control, and the fact that there was no danger of dropping the object. Our results suggest that in some natural tasks, such as the one used in this study, healthy elderly persons show no impairment, as compared to younger persons, in their ability to organize digits into synergies stabilizing salient performance variables. PMID:22236650

  10. AGE EFFECTS ON ROTATIONAL HAND ACTION

    PubMed Central

    SKM, Varadhan; Zhang, Wei; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.; Latash, Mark L.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated age-related differences in finger coordination during rotational hand actions. Two hypotheses based on earlier studies were tested: higher safety margins and lower synergy indices were expected in the elderly. Young and elderly subjects held a handle instrumented with five six-component force sensors and performed discrete accurate pronation and supination movements. The weight of the system was counterbalanced with another load. Indices of synergies stabilizing salient performance variables, such as total normal force, total tangential force, moments produced by these forces, and total moment of were computed at two levels of a hypothetical control hierarchy, at the virtual finger-thumb level and at the individual finger level. At each level, synergy indices reflected the normalized difference between the sum of the variances of elemental variables and variance of their combined output, both computed at comparable phases over repetitive trials. The elderly group performed the task slower and showed lower safety margins for the thumb during the rotation phase. Overall, the synergy indices were not lower in the elderly group. In several cases, these indices were significantly higher in the elderly than in the younger participants. Hence, both main hypotheses have been falsified. We interpret the unexpectedly low safety margins in the elderly as resulting from several factors such as increased force variability, impaired feed-forward control, and the fact that there was no danger of dropping the object. Our results suggest that in some natural tasks, such as the one used in this study, healthy elderly persons show no impairment, as compared to younger persons, in their ability to organize digits into synergies stabilizing salient performance variables. PMID:22236650

  11. 102({h_bar}/2{pi})k Large Area Atom Interferometers

    SciTech Connect

    Chiow, Sheng-wey; Kovachy, Tim; Chien, Hui-Chun; Kasevich, Mark A.

    2011-09-23

    We demonstrate atom interferometers utilizing a novel beam splitter based on sequential multiphoton Bragg diffractions. With this sequential Bragg large momentum transfer (SB-LMT) beam splitter, we achieve high contrast atom interferometers with momentum splittings of up to 102 photon recoil momenta (102({h_bar}/2{pi})k). To our knowledge, this is the highest momentum splitting achieved in any atom interferometer, advancing the state-of-the-art by an order of magnitude. We also demonstrate strong noise correlation between two simultaneous SB-LMT interferometers, which alleviates the need for ultralow noise lasers and ultrastable inertial environments in some future applications. Our method is intrinsically scalable and can be used to dramatically increase the sensitivity of atom interferometers in a wide range of applications, including inertial sensing, measuring the fine structure constant, and detecting gravitational waves.

  12. Laser R2PI spectroscopic and mass spectrometric studies of chiral neurotransmitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giardini, A.; Marotta, V.; Paladini, A.; Piccirillo, S.; Rondino, F.; Satta, M.; Speranza, M.

    2007-07-01

    One color, mass selected resonant two-photon ionization (1cR2PI) spectra of supersonically expanded bare neurotransmitter, (1 S,2 S)-(+)- N-methyl pseudoephedrine (MPE), and its complexes with chiral and achiral molecules have been investigated. The excitation spectrum of bare MPE has been analyzed and discussed on the basis of theoretical predictions at the B3LYP/6-31G** level of theory. The results allowed to get information on the possible conformers of MPE molecule and on the intermolecular forces on its cluster formed with a variety of solvent molecules, including chiral alcohols, lactates and water. Further information on intermolecular interactions have been obtained with ESI-CID-MS 2 technique, applied to chiral biomolecules linked through a metal ion to the neurotransmitter. The experimental results are compared with theoretical predictions.

  13. Perception, Action, and Roelofs Effect: A Mere Illusion of Dissociation

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    A prominent and influential hypothesis of vision suggests the existence of two separate visual systems within the brain, one creating our perception of the world and another guiding our actions within it. The induced Roelofs effect has been described as providing strong evidence for this perception/action dissociation: When a small visual target is surrounded by a large frame positioned so that the frame's center is offset from the observer's midline, the perceived location of the target is shifted in the direction opposite the frame's offset. In spite of this perceptual mislocalization, however, the observer can accurately guide movements to the target location. Thus, perception is prone to the illusion while actions seem immune. Here we demonstrate that the Roelofs illusion is caused by a frame-induced transient distortion of the observer's apparent midline. We further demonstrate that actions guided to targets within this same distorted egocentric reference frame are fully expected to be accurate, since the errors of target localization will exactly cancel the errors of motor guidance. These findings provide a mechanistic explanation for the various perceptual and motor effects of the induced Roelofs illusion without requiring the existence of separate neural systems for perception and action. Given this, the behavioral dissociation that accompanies the Roelofs effect cannot be considered evidence of a dissociation of perception and action. This indicates a general need to re-evaluate the broad class of evidence purported to support this hypothesized dissociation. PMID:15510224

  14. Boldine action against the stannous chloride effect.

    PubMed

    Reiniger, I W; Ribeiro da Silva, C; Felzenszwalb, I; de Mattos, J C; de Oliveira, J F; da Silva Dantas, F J; Bezerra, R J; Caldeira-de-Araújo, A; Bernardo-Filho, M

    1999-12-15

    Peumus boldus extract has been used in popular medicine in the treatment of biliar litiase, hepatic insufficiency and liver congestion. Its effects are associated to the substance boldine that is present in its extract. In the present work, we evaluated the influence of boldine both in: (i) the structural conformation of a plasmid pUC 9.1 through gel electrophoresis analysis; and in (ii) the survival of the strain of Escherichia coli AB1157 submitted to reactive oxygen species (ROS), generated by a Fenton like reaction, induced by stannous chloride. Our results show a reduction of the lethal effect induced by stannous chloride on the survival of the E. coli culture in the presence of boldine. The supercoiled form of the plasmid is not modified by stannous chloride in the presence of boldine. We suggest that the protection induced by boldine could be explained by its anti-oxidant mechanism. In this way, the boldine could be reacting with stannous ions, protecting them against the oxidation and, consequently, avoiding the generation of ROS. PMID:10624900

  15. Effective action for noncommutative Bianchi I model

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenbaum, M.; Vergara, J. D.; Minzoni, A. A.

    2013-06-12

    Quantum Mechanics, as a mini-superspace of Field Theory has been assumed to provide physically relevant information on quantum processes in Field Theory. In the case of Quantum Gravity this would imply using Cosmological models to investigate quantum processes at distances of the order of the Planck scale. However because of the Stone-von Neuman Theorem, it is well known that quantization of Cosmological models by the Wheeler-DeWitt procedure in the context of a Heisenberg-Weyl group with piecewise continuous parameters leads irremediably to a volume singularity. In order to avoid this information catastrophe it has been suggested recently the need to introduce in an effective theory of the quantization some form of reticulation in 3-space. On the other hand, since in the geometry of the General Relativistic formulation of Gravitation space can not be visualized as some underlying static manifold in which the physical system evolves, it would be interesting to investigate whether the effective reticulation which removes the singularity in such simple cosmologies as the Bianchi models has a dynamical origin manifested by a noncommutativity of the generators of the Heisenberg-Weyl algebra, as would be expected from an operational point of view at the Planck length scale.

  16. Effective action of softly broken supersymmetric theories

    SciTech Connect

    Nibbelink, Stefan Groot; Nyawelo, Tino S.

    2007-02-15

    We study the renormalization of (softly) broken supersymmetric theories at the one loop level in detail. We perform this analysis in a superspace approach in which the supersymmetry breaking interactions are parametrized using spurion insertions. We comment on the uniqueness of this parametrization. We compute the one loop renormalization of such theories by calculating superspace vacuum graphs with multiple spurion insertions. To perform this computation efficiently we develop algebraic properties of spurion operators, that naturally arise because the spurions are often surrounded by superspace projection operators. Our results are general apart from the restrictions that higher super covariant derivative terms and some finite effects due to noncommutativity of superfield dependent mass matrices are ignored. One of the soft potentials induces renormalization of the Kaehler potential.

  17. Stratospheric ozone loss, ultraviolet effects and action spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coohill, Thomas P.

    The major effect of stratospheric ozone loss will be an increase in the amount of ultraviolet radiation reaching the ground. This increase will be entirely contained within the UV-B (290-320nm). How this will impact life on Earth will be determined by the UV-B photobiology of exposed organisms, including humans. One of the analytical methods useful in estimating these effects is Action Spectroscopy (biological effect as a function of wavelength). Carefully constructed action spectra will allow us to partially predict the increase in bio-effect due to additional UV exposure. What effect this has on the organism and the system in which the organism resides is of paramount importance. Suitable action spectra already exist for human skin cancer, human cell mutation and killing, and for one immune response. Comprehensive and widely applicable action spectra for terrestrial and aquatic plant responses are being generated but are not yet suitable for extensive analysis. There is little data available for animals, other than those experiments completed in the laboratory as model systems for human studies. Some polychromatic action spectra have proven useful in determining the possible impact of ozone loss on biological systems. The pitfalls and limits of this approach will be addressed.

  18. Clusters containing open-shell molecules. II. Equilibrium structures of ArnOH Van der Waals clusters (X2Pi, n=1 to 15)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Minzhong; Bacic, Zlatko; Hutson, Jeremy M.

    2002-09-01

    The equilibrium and low-lying isomeric structures of ArnOH (X2)Pi clusters for n=1 to 15 are investigated by simulated annealing calculations. Potential energy surfaces are obtained by a pairwise-additive approach, taking into account the open-shell nature of OH X2Pi and including spin-orbit coupling. It is found that the spin-orbit coupling suppresses the Jahn-Teller effect, and many of the clusters have high-symmetry structures (Cnnu with n>2) which would be forbidden in the absence of spin-orbit coupling. The structures are generally similar to those previously found for the closed-shell systems ArnHF and ArnHCl, but different from those for the open-shell systems ArnNO and ArnCH. This is because Ar-OH (X2)Pi, like Ar-HF and Ar-HCl but unlike Ar-NO and Ar-CH, has a near-linear equilibrium structure. ArnOH clusters for n up to 6 have all Ar atoms in a single shell around OH. In the clusters with n=7 to 9, OH is under a pentagonal pyramid formed by six Ar atoms, while the others bind to its exterior, away from OH. For n=10 to 12, the minimum-energy structures have OH inside an Arn cage, which is essentially icosahedral for n=12 but has vacancies for n=10 and 11. For n>12, the extra Ar atoms begin to form a second solvation shell. The global minimum of ArnOH may be constructed from the minimum-energy structure of Arn+1 by replacing one Ar atom with OH.

  19. Selective effects of an octopus toxin on action potentials

    PubMed Central

    Dulhunty, Angela; Gage, Peter W.

    1971-01-01

    1. A lethal, water soluble toxin (Maculotoxin, MTX) with a molecular weight less than 540, can be extracted from the salivary glands of an octopus (Hapalochlaena maculosa). 2. MTX blocks action potentials in sartorius muscle fibres of toads without affecting the membrane potential. Delayed rectification is not inhibited by the toxin. 3. At low concentrations (10-6-10-5 g/ml.) MTX blocks action potentials only after a certain number have been elicited. The number of action potentials, which can be defined accurately, depends on the concentration of MTX and the concentration of sodium ions in the extracellular solution. 4. The toxin has no post-synaptic effect at the neuromuscular junction and it is concluded that it blocks neuromuscular transmission by inhibiting action potentials in motor nerve terminals. PMID:4330930

  20. Power effects on cognitive control: Turning conflict into action.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Petra C; Kleiman, Tali; Amodio, David M

    2015-06-01

    Power is known to promote effective goal pursuit, especially when it requires one to overcome distractions or bias. We proposed that this effect involves the ability to engage and implement cognitive control. In Study 1, we demonstrated that power enhances behavioral performance on a response conflict task and that it does so by enhancing controlled processing rather than by reducing automatic processing. In Study 2, we used an event-related potential index of anterior cingulate activity to test whether power effects on control were due to enhanced conflict sensitivity or action implementation. Power did not significantly affect neural sensitivity to conflict; rather, high power was associated with a stronger link between conflict processing and intended action, relative to low power. These findings suggest a new perspective on how social factors can affect controlled processing and offer new evidence regarding the transition between conflict detection and the implementation of action control.

  1. The Kent State {open_quote}{open_quote}2{pi}{close_quote}{close_quote} neutron polarimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, J.W.; Du, Q.; Anderson, B.D.; Baldwin, A.R.; Foster, C.C.; Garcia, L.A.; Hu, X.; Kurmanov, R.; Lamm, D.L.; Madey, R.; Pella, P.J.; Stephenson, E.J.; Wang, Y. |; Wetmore, B.; Zhang, W.

    1995-09-01

    We designed, tested and calibrated a medium-energy neutron polarimeter of a new design, which we call the {open_quote}{open_quote}2{pi}{close_quote}{close_quote} polarimeter because of its symmetric coverage of all 2{pi} of azimuth for double-scattered neutrons. During calibration tests at the IUCF we observed an over all neutron time-of-flight resolution of 360 ps. The measured analyzing power is typically 39{percent} for neutrons of both 130 and 165 MeV for optimum software cuts. The efficiency is typically 0.3{percent}. {copyright} {ital 1995 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Rotational dependence of the proton-transfer reaction HBr{sup +}+ CO{sub 2}{yields} HOCO{sup +}+ Br. II. Comparison of HBr{sup +} ({sup 2}{Pi}{sub 3/2}) and HBr{sup +} ({sup 2}{Pi}{sub 1/2})

    SciTech Connect

    Paetow, Lisa; Unger, Franziska; Beutel, Bernd; Weitzel, Karl-Michael

    2010-12-21

    The effects of reactant ion rotational excitation on the exothermic proton-transfer reactions of HBr{sup +}({sup 2}{Pi}{sub 1/2}) and DBr{sup +}({sup 2}{Pi}{sub 1/2}), respectively, with CO{sub 2} were studied in a guided ion beam apparatus. Cross sections are presented for collision energies in the center of mass system E{sub c.m.} in the range of 0.23 to 1.90 eV. The HBr{sup +}/DBr{sup +} ions were prepared in a state-selective manner by resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization. The mean rotational energy was varied from 3.4 to 46.8 meV for HBr{sup +}({sup 2}{Pi}{sub 1/2}) and from 1.8 to 40.9 meV for DBr{sup +}({sup 2}{Pi}{sub 1/2}). Both reactions studied are inhibited by collision energy, as expected for exothermic reactions. For all collision energies considered, the cross section decreases with increasing rotational energy of the ion, but the degree of the rotational dependence differs depending on the collision energy. For E{sub c.m.}= 0.31 eV, the cross sections of the deuteron transfer are significantly larger than those of the proton transfer. For higher E{sub c.m.} they differ very little. The current results for the exothermic proton transfer are systematically compared to previously published data for the endothermic proton transfer starting from HBr{sup +}({sup 2}{Pi}{sub 3/2}) [L. Paetow et al., J. Chem. Phys. 132, 174305 (2010)]. Additional new data regarding the latter reaction are presented to further confirm the conclusions. The dependences on rotational excitation found cannot be explained by the corresponding change in the total energy of the system. For both the endothermic and the exothermic reaction, the cross section is maximized for the smallest rotational energy, at least well above the threshold.

  3. Derivative expansion at small mass for the spinor effective action

    SciTech Connect

    Dunne, Gerald V.; Huet, Adolfo; Hur, Jin; Min, Hyunsoo

    2011-05-15

    We study the small-mass limit of the one-loop spinor effective action, comparing the derivative expansion approximation with exact numerical results that are obtained from an extension to spinor theories of the partial-wave cutoff method. In this approach, one can compute numerically the renormalized one-loop effective action for radially separable gauge field background fields in spinor QED. We highlight an important difference between the small-mass limit of the derivative expansion for spinor and scalar theories.

  4. A high-resolution vacuum ultraviolet photoionization, photoelectron, and pulsed field ionization study of CS{sub 2} near the CS{sub 2}{sup +}(X{sup 2}{Pi}{sub 3/2,1/2}) thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J.; Cheung, Y.; Evans, M.; Liao, C.; Ng, C.Y.; Hsu, C.; Heimann, P.; Lefebvre-Brion, H.; Cossart-Magos, C.

    1997-01-01

    High-resolution photoionization efficiency (PIE) and pulsed field ionization photoelectron (PFI-PE) spectra for CS{sub 2} have been measured using coherent vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser radiation in the energy range of 81050{endash}82100 cm{sup {minus}1}. The PIE and threshold photoelectron (TPE) spectra for CS{sub 2} in the energy range of 80850{endash}82750 cm{sup {minus}1} have also been obtained using synchrotron radiation. The analysis of the PIE spectra reveals three Rydberg series converging to the excited CS{sub 2}{sup +}({sup 2}{Pi}{sub 1/2}) spin{endash}orbit state. These series, with quantum defects of 1.430, 1.616, and 0.053, are associated with the [{sup 2}{Pi}{sub 1/2}]np{sigma}{sub u}, [{sup 2}{Pi}{sub 1/2}]np{pi}{sub u}, and [{sup 2}{Pi}{sub 1/2}]nf{sub u} configurations. The Stark shift effect on the ionization threshold of CS{sub 2} has been examined as a function of dc electric fields (F) in the range of 0.65{endash}1071 V/cm. The observed F dependence of the Stark shift for the ionization onset of CS{sub 2} is consistent with the prediction by the classical adiabatic field ionization formula. The extrapolation of the ionization onset to zero F yields accurate values for IE[CS{sub 2}{sup +}({tilde X}{sup 2}{Pi}{sub 3/2})]. In order to determine accurate IEs and to probe autoionizing structures for molecular species by PIE measurements, it is necessary to minimize the electric field used for ion extraction. Assignment of Renner{endash}Teller structures resolved in the VUV PFI-PE spectrum is guided by the recent nonresonant two-photon (N2P) PFI-PE and theoretical studies. Analysis of the PFI-PE spectrum also yields accurate values for IE[CS{sub 2}{sup +}({tilde X}{sup 2}{Pi}{sub 3/2,1/2})]. Taking average of the IE values determined by VUV-PFI-PE, N2P-PFI-PE, and Stark field extrapolation methods, we obtain a value of 81285.7{plus_minus}2.8 cm{sup {minus}1} for IE[CS{sub 2}{sup +}({tilde X}{sup 2}{Pi}{sub 3/2})]. (Abstract Truncated)

  5. R2PI Spectroscopy of Aromatic Molecules Produced in an Ethylene-Rich Flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpentier, Yvain; Pino, Thomas; Bréchignac, Philippe

    2013-10-01

    Laser spectroscopy, combined with mass spectrometry, was applied to study the spectra of aromatic molecules produced in a premixed ethylene-rich flat flame. These studies produce new gas-phase electronic spectra of polyaromatic compounds, which ultimately will guide the understanding of the chemical processes that lead to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) growth or PAH formation locking. Resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI) spectra of all species detectable in a specific fuel-rich flame were recorded simultaneously during a single scan of the laser wavelength, within the 220-330 nm range. Comparison with spectra available in the literature allowed us to identify 16 aromatic species. In the PAH forming region of this flame, we found that the main PAHs are accompanied by a great diversity of other species, including in particular various side-chains on aromatic networks. We also show that this technique allows, at least in some cases, to distinguish between different isomers associated with the same mass peak, although the extracted PAHs are only cooled down to room temperature.

  6. Action Research: Effective Marketing Strategies for a Blended University Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Ruth Gannon; Ley, Kathryn

    2008-01-01

    This action research study investigated a marketing plan based on collaboration among a program faculty team and other organizational units for a graduate professional program. From its inception through the second year of operation, program enrollment increased due to the marketing plan based on an effective approach grounded in simple marketing…

  7. Effects of Action Relations on the Configural Coding between Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riddoch, M. J.; Pippard, B.; Booth, L.; Rickell, J.; Summers, J.; Brownson, A.; Humphreys, G. W.

    2011-01-01

    Configural coding is known to take place between the parts of individual objects but has never been shown between separate objects. We provide novel evidence here for configural coding between separate objects through a study of the effects of action relations between objects on extinction. Patients showing visual extinction were presented with…

  8. Finiteness of the Coulomb gauge QCD perturbative effective action

    SciTech Connect

    Andraši, A.; Taylor, J.C.

    2015-05-15

    At 2-loop order in the Coulomb gauge, individual Feynman graphs contributing to the effective action have energy divergences. It is proved that these cancel in suitable combinations of graphs. This has previously been shown only for transverse external fields. The calculation results in a generalization of the Christ–Lee term which was inserted into the Hamiltonian.

  9. Intersubjective action-effect binding: eye contact modulates acquisition of bidirectional association between our and others' actions.

    PubMed

    Sato, Atsushi; Itakura, Shoji

    2013-06-01

    In everyday social life, we predict others' actions in response to our own actions. Subsequently, on the basis of these predictions, we control our actions to attain desired social outcomes and/or adjust our actions to accommodate the anticipated actions of the others. Representation of the bidirectional association between our and others' actions, that is, intersubjective action-effect binding, could make such intersubjective action control easier and smoother. The present study investigated not only whether or not intersubjective action-effect binding was acquired but also whether or not eye contact modulated it. Experiment 1 showed that after a repeated experience during which participants' finger movements triggered a target female individual's mouth gesture, observing the target's mouth gestures came to automatically trigger the participants' finger movements. Experiments 2 and 3 revealed that this effect was not observed when the target's gaze direction was averted (Experiment 2) or when the target's eyes were closed (Experiment 3) throughout the acquisition phase. These results indicate that intersubjective action-effect binding occurs and that an ostensive signal, that is, eye contact modulates it.

  10. Action video game training reduces the Simon Effect.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Claire V; Barrett, Doug J K; Nitka, Aleksander; Raynes, Kerry

    2016-04-01

    A number of studies have shown that training on action video games improves various aspects of visual cognition including selective attention and inhibitory control. Here, we demonstrate that action video game play can also reduce the Simon Effect, and, hence, may have the potential to improve response selection during the planning and execution of goal-directed action. Non-game-players were randomly assigned to one of four groups; two trained on a first-person-shooter game (Call of Duty) on either Microsoft Xbox or Nintendo DS, one trained on a visual training game for Nintendo DS, and a control group who received no training. Response times were used to contrast performance before and after training on a behavioral assay designed to manipulate stimulus-response compatibility (the Simon Task). The results revealed significantly faster response times and a reduced cost of stimulus-response incompatibility in the groups trained on the first-person-shooter game. No benefit of training was observed in the control group or the group trained on the visual training game. These findings are consistent with previous evidence that action game play elicits plastic changes in the neural circuits that serve attentional control, and suggest training may facilitate goal-directed action by improving players' ability to resolve conflict during response selection and execution. PMID:26238760

  11. Action video game training reduces the Simon Effect.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Claire V; Barrett, Doug J K; Nitka, Aleksander; Raynes, Kerry

    2016-04-01

    A number of studies have shown that training on action video games improves various aspects of visual cognition including selective attention and inhibitory control. Here, we demonstrate that action video game play can also reduce the Simon Effect, and, hence, may have the potential to improve response selection during the planning and execution of goal-directed action. Non-game-players were randomly assigned to one of four groups; two trained on a first-person-shooter game (Call of Duty) on either Microsoft Xbox or Nintendo DS, one trained on a visual training game for Nintendo DS, and a control group who received no training. Response times were used to contrast performance before and after training on a behavioral assay designed to manipulate stimulus-response compatibility (the Simon Task). The results revealed significantly faster response times and a reduced cost of stimulus-response incompatibility in the groups trained on the first-person-shooter game. No benefit of training was observed in the control group or the group trained on the visual training game. These findings are consistent with previous evidence that action game play elicits plastic changes in the neural circuits that serve attentional control, and suggest training may facilitate goal-directed action by improving players' ability to resolve conflict during response selection and execution.

  12. Effects of antidepressants on cytokine production and actions.

    PubMed

    Castanon, Nathalie; Leonard, Brian E; Neveu, Pierre J; Yirmiya, Raz

    2002-10-01

    There are intriguing analogies between many features of depression and physiological and behavioral responses to infection, which are mediated by the brain effects of cytokines. These observations suggest that depression can be considered as a psychoneuroimmunological disorder where a central increase of pro-inflammatory cytokines, may have adverse consequences on the functional activity of the neurochemical and neuroendocrine systems implicated in the symptoms of the disorder. According to this hypothesis, the therapeutic effects of antidepressants should be at least partly exerted by attenuating the brain expression and/or actions of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Despite their inherent limitations, animal models of depression that are based on behavioral and pharmacological analogies with the symptoms observed in humans, represent the best available tool to test this hypothesis and to investigate the action mechanisms of the immune effects of antidepressants. Treatment with different classes of antidepressants indeed conferred protection against cytokine-induced depressive-like biological and behavioral changes. This 'anti-inflammatory' profile may be due to alterations of the pro-/anti-inflammatory cytokine balance. The mechanisms underlying these effects of antidepressants are presently unknown, but the available literature suggests several possibilities, including actions on different molecules representing potential mediators of mood disorders induced by cytokines. The studies summarized in this review have opened up new vistas in both the pathophysiology of depression and the pharmacology of antidepressants. Whether their demonstrated immune effects are a side effect or a significant part of their clinical activity still remains to be elucidated.

  13. Covariant effective action for a Galilean invariant quantum Hall system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geracie, Michael; Prabhu, Kartik; Roberts, Matthew M.

    2016-09-01

    We construct effective field theories for gapped quantum Hall systems coupled to background geometries with local Galilean invariance i.e. Bargmann spacetimes. Along with an electromagnetic field, these backgrounds include the effects of curved Galilean spacetimes, including torsion and a gravitational field, allowing us to study charge, energy, stress and mass currents within a unified framework. A shift symmetry specific to single constituent theories constraints the effective action to couple to an effective background gauge field and spin connection that is solved for by a self-consistent equation, providing a manifestly covariant extension of Hoyos and Son's improvement terms to arbitrary order in m.

  14. Note on scaling arguments in the effective average action formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagani, Carlo

    2016-08-01

    The effective average action (EAA) is a scale-dependent effective action where a scale k is introduced via an infrared regulator. The k dependence of the EAA is governed by an exact flow equation to which one associates a boundary condition at a scale μ . We show that the μ dependence of the EAA is controlled by an equation fully analogous to the Callan-Symanzik equation which allows one to define scaling quantities straightforwardly. Particular attention is paid to composite operators which are introduced along with new sources. We discuss some simple solutions to the flow equation for composite operators and comment on their implications in the case of a local potential approximation.

  15. Covariant effective action for loop quantum cosmology a la Palatini

    SciTech Connect

    Olmo, Gonzalo J.; Singh, Parampreet E-mail: psingh@perimeterinstitute.ca

    2009-01-15

    In loop quantum cosmology, non-perturbative quantum gravity effects lead to the resolution of the big bang singularity by a quantum bounce without introducing any new degrees of freedom. Though fundamentally discrete, the theory admits a continuum description in terms of an effective Hamiltonian. Here we provide an algorithm to obtain the corresponding effective action, establishing in this way the covariance of the theory for the first time. This result provides new insights on the continuum properties of the discrete structure of quantum geometry and opens new avenues to extract physical predictions such as those related to gauge invariant cosmological perturbations.

  16. Subliminal Priming of Actions Influences Sense of Control over Effects of Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wenke, Dorit; Fleming, Stephen M.; Haggard, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    The experience of controlling one's own actions, and through them events in the outside world, is a pervasive feature of human mental life. Two experiments investigated the relation between this sense of control and the internal processes involved in action selection and cognitive control. Action selection was manipulated by subliminally priming…

  17. The rotational spectrum of the NH+ radical in its X 2Pi and a 4Sigma- states.

    PubMed

    Hübers, Heinz-Wilhelm; Evenson, Kenneth M; Hill, Christian; Brown, John M

    2009-07-21

    Transitions between the spin-rotational levels of the (14)NH(+) radical in the v = 0 levels of its X (2)Pi and a (4)Sigma(-) states have been studied by the technique of laser magnetic resonance at far-infrared wavelengths. The data have been combined with a previous zero-field measurement of the J = 1 1/2 - 1/2 transition frequencies at 1.01 THz to determine a much improved set of molecular parameters for NH(+) in the X (2)Pi state; the major parameters for the a (4)Sigma(-) state have also been determined. A full determination of the hyperfine parameters for both (14)N and (1)H nuclei has been achieved for the first time. Accurate predictions of the transition frequencies between the low-lying levels of the radical in the absence of a magnetic field have also been made, including lambda-doubling frequencies for use by radio astronomers. PMID:19624201

  18. Using the Psychology of Language to Effectively Communicate Actionable Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    The words used to articulate science can have as significant a psychological impact on public perception as the data itself. It is therefore essential to utilize language that not only accurately relates the scientific information, but also effectively conveys a message that is congruent with the presenter's motivation for expressing the data. This is especially relevant for environmental subjects that are surrounded by emotionally charged, political discourses. For example are terms like catastrophe and disaster; while these words may accurately illustrate impartial scientific data, they will likely trigger psychological responses in audiences such as fear or denial that have a detrimental impact on the human decision making process. I propose a set of 5 key principles to assist in communicating data to the general public that both support the transfer of ideas and the presenter's intended psychological impact. 1) Articulate the underlying intentions that motivate the communication of data in a transparent manner 2) Use language congruent with the presenter's stated intentions 3) Maintain a neutral, non-judgmental attitude towards the complex human psychological and emotional dynamics present in a target audience 4) Demonstrate acceptance and compassion when analyzing past and present human actions that adversely affect the environment 5) Develop a perspective of non-attachment when proposing future actions and/or consequences of current human behaviors. The application of these 5 principles provides a framework to move from our current understanding of problems and solutions to effective physical action that allows us to gracefully adapt with our ever changing planet.

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: MgH in the A2{Pi}-X2{Sigma}+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkle, K. H.; Wallace, L.; Ram, R. S.; Bernath, P. F.; Sneden, C.; Lucatello, S.

    2013-09-01

    Rotationally resolved lines within the A2{Pi}-X2{ transition of the 25MgH and 26MgH isotopologues were measured from spectra recorded by J. Black, P. F. Bernath, C. R. Brazier, and R. Hubbard in 1984 (National Solar Observatory (NSO) archive reference 1984/03/13/#2) with the 1m Fourier transform spectrometer associated with the McMath-Pierce Solar Telescope of the NSO at Kitt Peak. (6 data files).

  20. The effects of an action's "age-of-acquisition" on action-sentence processing.

    PubMed

    Gilead, Michael; Liberman, Nira; Maril, Anat

    2016-11-01

    How does our brain allow us comprehend abstract/symbolic descriptions of human action? Whereas past research suggested that processing action language relies on sensorimotor brain regions, recent work suggests that sensorimotor activation depends on participants' task goals, such that focusing on abstract (vs. concrete) aspects of an action activates "default mode network" (rather than sensorimotor) regions. Following a Piagetian framework, we hypothesized that for actions acquired at an age wherein abstract/symbolic cognition is fully-developed, even when participants focus on the concrete aspects of an action, they should retrieve abstract-symbolic mental representations. In two studies, participants processed the concrete (i.e., "how") and abstract (i.e., "why") aspects of late-acquired and early-acquired actions. Consistent with previous research, focusing on the abstract (vs. concrete) aspects of an action resulted in greater activation in the "default mode network". Importantly, the activation in these regions was higher when processing later-acquired (vs. earlier acquired) actions-also when participants' goal was to focus on the concrete aspects of the action. We discuss the implications of the current findings to research on the involvement of concrete representations in abstract cognition. PMID:27431759

  1. Maternal and child undernutrition: effective action at national level.

    PubMed

    Bryce, Jennifer; Coitinho, Denise; Darnton-Hill, Ian; Pelletier, David; Pinstrup-Andersen, Per

    2008-02-01

    80% of the world's undernourished children live in just 20 countries. Intensified nutrition action in these countries can lead to achievement of the first Millennium Development Goal (MDG) and greatly increase the chances of achieving goals for child and maternal mortality (MDGs 4 and 5). Despite isolated successes in specific countries or for interventions--eg, iodised salt and vitamin A supplementation--most countries with high rates of undernutrition are failing to reach undernourished mothers and children with effective interventions supported by appropriate policies. This paper reports on an assessment of actions addressing undernutrition in the countries with the highest burden of undernutrition, drawing on systematic reviews and best-practice reports. Seven key challenges for addressing undernutrition at national level are defined and reported on: getting nutrition on the list of priorities, and keeping it there; doing the right things; not doing the wrong things; acting at scale; reaching those in need; data-based decisionmaking; and building strategic and operational capacity. Interventions with proven effectiveness that are selected by countries should be rapidly implemented at scale. The period from pregnancy to 24 months of age is a crucial window of opportunity for reducing undernutrition and its adverse effects. Programme efforts, as well as monitoring and assessment, should focus on this segment of the continuum of care. Nutrition resources should not be used to support actions unlikely to be effective in the context of country or local realities. Nutrition resources should not be used to support actions that have not been proven to have a direct effect on undernutrition, such as stand-alone growth monitoring or school feeding programmes. In addition to health and nutrition interventions, economic and social policies addressing poverty, trade, and agriculture that have been associated with rapid improvements in nutritional status should be

  2. Laxative effects and mechanism of action of Brazilian green propolis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Brazilian green propolis is reported to have wide range of biological properties including antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, anti-influenza, and antioxidant activities. In the digestive system, a protective effect of propolis on gastric ulcer has been reported, but a laxative effect has not yet been reported. We investigated the effect and the mechanism of action of water and ethanol extracts of Brazilian green propolis. Methods We examined the laxative effect of propolis on stool frequency by administering orally an ethanol extract of propolis (EEP) or a water extract of propolis (WEP) at 10, 50, 100, or 500 mg/kg to normal mice. We then investigated the effects of propolis using constipation model mice induced by two types of drugs, loperamide (a μ opioid receptor agonist) and clonidine (an α-2 adrenergic receptor agonist). We also investigated the effects of WEP on gastrointestinal transit and contractional tension of the ileum to uncover the mechanism of action of WEP. Results Treatment with WEP, but not with EEP, significantly increased the weight of stools (p<0.01 at 500 mg/kg). WEP treatment significantly restored stool frequency and stool weight in clonidine-induced constipation model mice, but not in loperamide-induced constipation model mice. WEP treatment did not affect gastro-intestinal transit, but significantly increased the contractional tension of the isolated ileum of guinea pigs. This increase was inhibited by an acetylcholine receptor antagonist (atropine), but not by a 5-HT receptor antagonist (GR113808). Conclusion These findings indicate that WEP has laxative effects both in normal mice and in clonidine-induced constipation model mice. The laxative effects of WEP might be mediated by increased contractional tension of the ileum exerted at least in part via activation of an acetylcholine receptor. PMID:23088672

  3. Hawking radiation, effective actions and covariant boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Rabin; Kulkarni, Shailesh

    2008-01-01

    From an appropriate expression for the effective action, the Hawking radiation from charged black holes is derived, using only covariant boundary conditions at the event horizon. The connection of our approach with the Unruh vacuum and the recent analysis [S.P. Robinson, F. Wilczek, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95 (2005) 011303, arxiv:gr-qc/0502074; S. Iso, H. Umetsu, F. Wilczek, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96 (2006) 151302, arxiv:hep-th/0602146; R. Banerjee, S. Kulkarni, arxiv:arXiv: 0707.2449 [hep-th

  4. The impact of subliminal effect images in voluntary vs. stimulus-driven actions.

    PubMed

    Le Bars, Solène; Hsu, Yi-Fang; Waszak, Florian

    2016-11-01

    According to the ideomotor theory, actions are represented in terms of their sensory effects. In the current study we tested whether subliminal effect images influence action control (1) at early and/or late preparatory stages of (2) voluntary actions or stimulus-driven actions (3) with or without Stimulus-Response (S-R) compatibility. In Experiment 1, participants were presented at random with 50% of S-R compatible stimulus-driven action trials and 50% of voluntary action trials. The actions' effects (i.e. up- or down-pointing arrows) were presented subliminally before each action (i.e. a keypress). In voluntary actions, participants selected more often the action congruent with the prime when it was presented at long intervals before the action. Moreover they responded faster in prime-congruent than in prime-incongruent trials when primes were presented at short intervals before the action. In Experiment 2, participants were only presented with stimulus-driven action trials, with or without S-R compatibility. In stimulus-driven action trials with S-R compatibility (e.g., left-pointing arrow signaling a left keypress), subliminal action-effects did not generate any significant effect on RTs or error rates. On the other hand, in stimulus-driven action trials without S-R compatibility (e.g., letter "H" signaling a left keypress), participants were significantly faster in prime-congruent trials when primes were presented at the shortest time interval before the action. These results suggest that subliminal effect images facilitate voluntary action preparation on an early and a late level. Stimulus-driven action preparation is influenced on a late level only, and only if there is no compatibility between the stimulus and the motor response, that is when the response is not automatically triggered by the common properties existing between the stimulus and the required action.

  5. Thalidomide: dermatological indications, mechanisms of action and side-effects.

    PubMed

    Wu, J J; Huang, D B; Pang, K R; Hsu, S; Tyring, S K

    2005-08-01

    Thalidomide was first introduced in the 1950s as a sedative but was quickly removed from the market after it was linked to cases of severe birth defects. However, it has since made a remarkable comeback for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved use in the treatment of erythema nodosum leprosum. Further, it has shown its effectiveness in unresponsive dermatological conditions such as actinic prurigo, adult Langerhans cell histiocytosis, aphthous stomatitis, Behçet's syndrome, graft-versus-host disease, cutaneous sarcoidosis, erythema multiforme, Jessner-Kanof lymphocytic infiltration of the skin, Kaposi sarcoma, lichen planus, lupus erythematosus, melanoma, prurigo nodularis, pyoderma gangrenosum and uraemic pruritus. This article reviews the history, pharmacology, mechanism of action, clinical uses and adverse effects of thalidomide.

  6. Vitamin D: Metabolism, Molecular Mechanism of Action, and Pleiotropic Effects.

    PubMed

    Christakos, Sylvia; Dhawan, Puneet; Verstuyf, Annemieke; Verlinden, Lieve; Carmeliet, Geert

    2016-01-01

    1,25-Dihydroxvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3] is the hormonally active form of vitamin D. The genomic mechanism of 1,25(OH)2D3 action involves the direct binding of the 1,25(OH)2D3 activated vitamin D receptor/retinoic X receptor (VDR/RXR) heterodimeric complex to specific DNA sequences. Numerous VDR co-regulatory proteins have been identified, and genome-wide studies have shown that the actions of 1,25(OH)2D3 involve regulation of gene activity at a range of locations many kilobases from the transcription start site. The structure of the liganded VDR/RXR complex was recently characterized using cryoelectron microscopy, X-ray scattering, and hydrogen deuterium exchange. These recent technological advances will result in a more complete understanding of VDR coactivator interactions, thus facilitating cell and gene specific clinical applications. Although the identification of mechanisms mediating VDR-regulated transcription has been one focus of recent research in the field, other topics of fundamental importance include the identification and functional significance of proteins involved in the metabolism of vitamin D. CYP2R1 has been identified as the most important 25-hydroxylase, and a critical role for CYP24A1 in humans was noted in studies showing that inactivating mutations in CYP24A1 are a probable cause of idiopathic infantile hypercalcemia. In addition, studies using knockout and transgenic mice have provided new insight on the physiological role of vitamin D in classical target tissues as well as evidence of extraskeletal effects of 1,25(OH)2D3 including inhibition of cancer progression, effects on the cardiovascular system, and immunomodulatory effects in certain autoimmune diseases. Some of the mechanistic findings in mouse models have also been observed in humans. The identification of similar pathways in humans could lead to the development of new therapies to prevent and treat disease. PMID:26681795

  7. [Mechanisms of action of statins and their pleiotropic effects].

    PubMed

    Davignon, J; Mabile, L

    2001-02-01

    This brief review and update considers a few aspects of the mechanisms of action of statins, especially those related to some of the pleiotropic effects that have clinical relevance. The beneficial effect on endothelial dysfunction is a class effect that is related not only to the lowering of plasma LDL-cholesterol but also to a direct effect on nitric oxide (NO) production. It is an early and sustained effect, linked to oxidative processes, that deserves particular attention since endothelial dysfunction is intimately linked to atherogenesis. Awareness of the anti-inflammatory effect came about following the observation that statin administration in humans reduces markers of inflammation in the circulation. The importance of these observations is ascribable to the fact that atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease, that the inflammatory process in a coronary artery is now measurable in vivo in humans, that it contributes to the progression and the destabilization of the plaque, and also, because statins exert a number of effects that tend to stabilize it. Statins, and particularly lipophilic statins, in general inhibit cell proliferation, seemingly by multifaceted mechanisms. These include inhibition of cell cycle progression, induction of apoptosis, reduction of cyclooxygenase-2 activity and an enhancement of angiogenesis. At the center of these mechanisms stands the ability to inhibit G protein prenylation through a reduction of farnesylation and geranylgeranylation. This effect has been used to show that statins are anticarcinogenic in vitro and in animals. The clinical relevance of such a property remains to be proven but is supported by promising observations in animals and in humans which are detailed in this review. Finally, the ability of lipophilic statins to increase the production of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2), and to enhance osteogenesis in animals combined with the results of several clinical studies should stimulate physicians to

  8. One loop superstring effective actions and N=8 supergravity

    SciTech Connect

    Moura, Filipe

    2008-06-15

    In a previous article we have shown the existence of a new independent R{sup 4} term, at one loop, in the type IIA and heterotic effective actions, after reduction to four dimensions, besides the usual square of the Bel-Robinson tensor. It had been shown that such a term could not be directly supersymmetrized, but we showed that was possible after coupling to a scalar chiral multiplet. In this article, we study the extended (N=8) supersymmetrization of this term, where no other coupling can be taken. We show that such supersymmetrization cannot be achieved at the linearized level. This is in conflict with the theory one gets after toroidal compactification of type II superstrings being N=8 supersymmetric. We interpret this result in the face of the recent claim that perturbative supergravity cannot be decoupled from string theory in d{>=}4, and N=8, d=4 supergravity is in the swampland.

  9. Mephedrone: Public health risk, mechanisms of action, and behavioral effects.

    PubMed

    Dybdal-Hargreaves, Nicholas F; Holder, Nicholas D; Ottoson, Paige E; Sweeney, Melanie D; Williams, Tyisha

    2013-08-15

    The recent shortage of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, Ecstasy) has led to an increased demand for alternative amphetamine-like drugs such as the synthetic cathinone, 4-methylmethcathinone (mephedrone). Despite the re-classification of mephedrone as a Class B restricted substance by the United Kingdom and restrictive legislation by the United States, international policy regarding mephedrone control is still developing and interest in synthetic amphetamine-like drugs could drive the development of future mephedrone analogues. Currently, there is little literature investigating the mechanism of action and long-term effects of mephedrone. As such, we reviewed the current understanding of amphetamines, cathinones, and cocaine emphasizing the potentially translational aspects to mephedrone, as well as contrasting with the work that has been done specifically on mephedrone in order to present the current state of understanding of mephedrone in terms of its risks, mechanisms, and behavioral effects. Emerging research suggests that while there are structural and behavioral similarities of mephedrone with amphetamine-like compounds, it appears that serotonergic signaling may mediate more of mephedrone's effects unlike the more dopaminergic dependent effects observed in traditional amphetamine-like compounds. As new designer drugs are produced, current and continuing research on mephedrone and other synthetic cathinones should help inform policymakers' decisions regarding the regulation of novel 'legal highs.'

  10. Inhibition of fatty acid synthase suppresses U-2 OS cell invasion and migration via downregulating the activity of HER2/PI3K/AKT signaling pathway in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Tao Fang; Wang, Heng; Peng, Ai Fen; Luo, Qing Feng; Liu, Zhi Li; Zhou, Rong Ping; Gao, Song; Zhou, Yang; Chen, Wen Zhao

    2013-10-18

    Highlights: •We investigate the relationship between FASN and HER2 or p-HER2 by IHC in OS tissues. •We construct FASN-specific RNAi plasmid. •Inhibiting FASN down-regulates HER2/PI3K/AKT cell signaling in U-2 OS. •Inhibiting FASN blocks U-2 OS cell invasion and migration. -- Abstract: FASN plays an important role in the malignant phenotype of various tumors. Our previous studies show that inhibition FASN could induce apoptosis and inhibit proliferation in human osteosarcoma (OS) cell in vivo and vitro. The aim in this study was to investigate the effect of inhibition FASN on the activity of HER2/PI3K/AKT axis and invasion and migration of OS cell. The expression of FASN, HER2 and p-HER2(Y1248) proteins was detected by immunohistochemistry in OS tissues from 24 patients with pulmonary metastatic disease, and the relationship between FASN and p-HER2 as well as HER2 was investigated. The results showed that there was a positive correlation between FASN and HER2 as well as p-HER2 protein expression. The U-2 OS cells were transfected with either the FASN specific RNAi plasmid or the negative control RNAi plasmid. FASN mRNA was measured by RT-PCR. Western blot assays was performed to examine the protein expression of FASN, HER2, p-HER2(Y1248), PI3K, Akt and p-Akt (Ser473). Migration and invasion of cells were investigated by wound healing and transwell invasion assays. The results showed that the activity of HER2/PI3K/AKT signaling pathway was suppressed by inhibiting FASN. Meanwhile, the U-2OS cells migration and invasion were also impaired by inhibiting the activity of FASN/HER2/PI3K/AKT. Our results indicated that inhibition of FASN suppresses OS cell invasion and migration via down-regulation of the “HER2/PI3K/AKT” axis in vitro. FASN blocker may be a new therapeutic strategy in OS management.

  11. 29 CFR 1614.409 - Effect of filing a civil action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Effect of filing a civil action. 1614.409 Section 1614.409... EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY Appeals and Civil Actions § 1614.409 Effect of filing a civil action... the Commission in writing....

  12. 29 CFR 1614.409 - Effect of filing a civil action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Effect of filing a civil action. 1614.409 Section 1614.409... EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY Appeals and Civil Actions § 1614.409 Effect of filing a civil action... the Commission in writing....

  13. 43 CFR 46.115 - Consideration of past actions in the analysis of cumulative effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Consideration of past actions in the... Environmental Quality § 46.115 Consideration of past actions in the analysis of cumulative effects. When... Memorandum on Consideration of Past Actions in Cumulative Effects Analysis” dated June 24, 2005, or...

  14. Learning Associations between Action and Perception: Effects of Incompatible Training on Body Part and Spatial Priming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiggett, Alison J.; Hudson, Matt; Tipper, Steve P.; Downing, Paul E.

    2011-01-01

    Observation of another person executing an action primes the same action in the observer's motor system. Recent evidence has shown that these priming effects are flexible, where training of new associations, such as making a foot response when viewing a moving hand, can reduce standard action priming effects (Gillmeister, Catmur, Liepelt, Brass,…

  15. Simple system for measuring tritium Ad/absorption using a 2. pi. counter and thermal desorption spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Miyake, H.; Matsuyama, M.; Watanabe, K. ); Cowgill, D.F. )

    1992-03-01

    In this paper, the authors develop a simple system using tritium tracer and thermal desorption techniques to measure the tritium adsorption and/or absorption on/in a material having typical surface conditions: namely, not cleaned surface. The tritium counting devices used were a 2{pi} counter and conventional proportional counter. With this system, the amounts of ad/absorption could be measured without exposing the samples to air after exposing them to tritium gas. The overall efficiency (F) of the 2{pi} counter was described at F = exp({minus}2.64h), where h is the distance from the sample to the detector. Ad/absorption measurements were carried out for several materials used for fabricating conventional vacuum systems. The results were, in the order of decreasing amounts of ad/absorption, as (fiber reinforced plastics(FRP)) {gt} (nickel(Ni), molybdenum disulfide(MoS{sub 2})) {gt} (stainless steel (SS304), iron(Fe), aluminum alloy(A2219)) {gt} (boron nitride(h-BN), silicon carbide (SiC), SS304 passivated by anodic oxidation layers(ASS) and that by boron nitride segregation layers (BSS)). The relative amounts were abut 100 for Ni and 0.1 for ASS and BSS, being normalized to Fe = 1.

  16. The biological effects and possible modes of action of nanosilver.

    PubMed

    Völker, Carolin; Oetken, Matthias; Oehlmann, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Novel physicochemical and biological properties have led to a versatile spectrum of applications for nanosized silver particles. Silver nanoparticles are applied primarily for their antimicrobial effects, and may variety of commercially available products have emerged. To better predict and prevent possible environmental impacts from silver nanoparticles that are derived from increasing production volumes and environmental release, more data on the biological effects are needed on appropriate model organisms. We examined the literature that addressed the adverse effects of silver nanoparticles on different levels of biological integration, including in vitro and in vivo test systems. Results of in vitro studies indicate a dose-dependent programmed cell death included by oxidative stress as main possible pathway of toxicity. Furthermore, silver nanoparticles may affect cellular enzymes by interference with free thiol groups and mimicry of endogenous ions. Similar mechanisms may apply for antibacterial effects produced by nonasilver. These effects are primary from the interference nanosilver has with bacterial cell membranes. Few in vivo studies have been performed to evaluated the toxic mode of action of nanosilver or to provide evidence for oxidative stress as an important mechanism of nanosilver toxicity. Organisms that are most acutely sensitive to nanosilver toxicity are the freshwater filter-freeding organisms. Both in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated tha silver ions released from nanoparticle surface contribute to the toxicity, and, indeed, some findings indicated a unique nanoparticles effect. For an adequate evaluation of the environmental impact of nanosilver, greater emphasis should be placed on combining mechanistic investigations that are performed in vitro, with results obtained in in vivo test systems. Future in vivo test system studies should emphasize long-term exposure scenarios. Moreover, the dietary uptake of silver nanoparticles and

  17. Self-action effects in semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dneprovskii, V. S.; Kanev, A. R.; Kozlova, M. V.; Smirnov, A. M.

    2014-05-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) dynamic photonic crystal regime has been utilized to investigate self-diffraction effect and nonlinear optical properties of excitons in CdSe/ZnS colloidal quantum dots (QDs). Self-diffraction at 2D photonic crystal arises for three intersecting beams of Nd+3:YAG laser second harmonic in the case of one-photon resonant excitation of the exciton (electron - hole) transition QDs. The relaxation time of excited excitons has been measured by pump and probe technique at induced one-dimensional transient diffraction grating. Two-exponential decay with initial fast and slow parts was discovered. Self-action effect has been discovered in the case of stationary resonant excitation of excitons in CdSe/ZnS QDs by the beam of second harmonic of powerful 12-nanosecond laser pulses. The bleaching of exciton absorption and the creation of transparency channel (this effect provokes self-diffraction of the second harmonic beam) was explained by the dominating coexisting and competing processes of state filling in stationary excited quantum dots and Stark-shift of exciton spectral band. The peculiarities of the influence of these processes at the change of exciton absorption in quantum dots in the case of different detuning from exciton resonance (quantum dots with different size have been used) was analyzed.

  18. Ecological effects of contaminants and remedial actions in Bear Creek

    SciTech Connect

    Southworth, G.R.; Loar, J.M.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Stewart, A.J. ); Burris, J.A. )

    1992-01-01

    Ecological studies of the Bear Creek watershed, which drains the area surrounding several Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant waste disposal facilities, were initiated in May 1984 and are continuing at present. These studies consisted of an initial, detailed characterization of the benthic invertebrate and fish communities in Bear Creek, and they were followed by a presently ongoing monitoring phase that involves reduced sampling intensities. The characterization phase utilized two approaches: (1) instream sampling of benthic invertebrate and fish communities in Bear Creek to identify spatial and temporal patterns in distribution and abundance and (2) laboratory bioassays on water samples from Bear Creek and selected tributaries to identify potential sources of toxicity to biota. The monitoring phase of the ecological program relates to the long-term goals of identifying and prioritizing contaminant sources and assessing the effectiveness of remedial actions. It continues activities of the characterization phase at less frequent intervals. The Bear Greek Valley is a watershed that drains the area surrounding several closed Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant waste disposal facilities. Past waste disposal practices in Bear Creek Valley resulted in contamination of Bear Creek and consequent ecological damage. Extensive remedial actions have been proposed at waste sites, and some of the have been implemented or are now underway. The proposed study plan consists of an initial, detailed characterization of the benthic invertebrate and fish communities in Bear Creek in the first year followed by a reduction in sampling intensity during the monitoring phase of the plan. The results of sampling conducted from May 1984 through early 1989 are presented in this report.

  19. [Biological effects of rare earth elements and their action mechanisms].

    PubMed

    He, Yuejun; Xue, Li

    2005-10-01

    This paper reviewed the effects of rare earth elements on plant root development, biomass, quality, and resistance against stress. Applying appropriate amount of rare earth elements could not only promote seed germination and root development, increase plant biomass, but also improve harvest quality and plant resistance against stress. The plant uptake characteristics of rare earth elements, as well as their contents, distribution, existing forms, and cytolocalization in plants were discussed, with the focus on the effects of rare earth elements on photosynthesis and chlorophyll formation, nutrient uptake, relationships between rare earth elements and calcium, and action mechanisms of rare earth elements on cell membrane and enzymes. Rare earth elements could enhance chlorophyll content and improve photosynthetic rate, and thus, could increase plant biomass. When an appropriate amount of rare earth elements was applied, the uptake of nutrients by plant and their transformation and utilization were promoted. Rare earth elements could replace calcium ion to participate in enzymatic reactions, maintain the osmosis and stability of cell membrane, promote the protection function of cell membrane, and enhance the plant resistance capability against stress. In the end, further researches on rare earth elements were suggested.

  20. Moduli effective action in warped brane-world compactifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garriga, Jaume; Pujolàs, Oriol; Tanaka, Takahiro

    2003-04-01

    We consider a class of 5D brane-world solutions with a power-law warp factor a(y)~yq, and bulk dilaton with profile /φ~lny, where /y is the proper distance in the extra dimension. This class includes the heterotic M-theory brane-world of [Phys. Rev. D 59 (1999) 086001, and ] and the Randall-Sundrum (RS) model as a limiting case. In general, there are two moduli fields y+/-, corresponding to the ``positions'' of two branes (which live at the fixed points of an orbifold compactification). Classically, the moduli are massless, due to a scaling symmetry of the action. However, in the absence of supersymmetry, they develop an effective potential at one loop. Local terms proportional to K+/-4, where K+/-=q/y+/- is the local curvature scale at the location of the corresponding brane, are needed in order to remove the divergences in the effective potential. Such terms break the scaling symmetry and hence they may act as stabilizers for the moduli. When the branes are very close to each other, the effective potential induced by massless bulk fields behaves like V~d-4, where /d is the separation between branes. When the branes are widely separated, the potentials for each one of the moduli generically develop a ``Coleman-Weinberg''-type behaviour of the form a4(y+/-)K+/-4ln(K+/-/μ+/-), where μ+/- are renormalization scales. In the RS case, the bulk geometry is AdS and K+/- are equal to a constant, independent of the position of the branes, so these terms do not contribute to the mass of the moduli. However, for generic warp factor, they provide a simple stabilization mechanism. For /q>~10, the observed hierarchy can be naturally generated by this potential, giving the lightest modulus a mass of order m-<~TeV.

  1. Action Control: Independent Effects of Memory and Monocular Viewing on Reaching Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westwood, D.A.; Robertson, C.; Heath, M.

    2005-01-01

    Evidence suggests that perceptual networks in the ventral visual pathway are necessary for action control when targets are viewed with only one eye, or when the target must be stored in memory. We tested whether memory-linked (i.e., open-loop versus memory-guided actions) and monocular-linked effects (i.e., binocular versus monocular actions) on…

  2. Prediction of human actions: expertise and task-related effects on neural activation of the action observation network.

    PubMed

    Balser, Nils; Lorey, Britta; Pilgramm, Sebastian; Stark, Rudolf; Bischoff, Matthias; Zentgraf, Karen; Williams, Andrew Mark; Munzert, Jörn

    2014-08-01

    The action observation network (AON) is supposed to play a crucial role when athletes anticipate the effect of others' actions in sports such as tennis. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to explore whether motor expertise leads to a differential activation pattern within the AON during effect anticipation and whether spatial and motor anticipation tasks are associated with a differential activation pattern within the AON depending on participant expertise level. Expert (N=16) and novice (N=16) tennis players observed video clips depicting forehand strokes with the instruction to either indicate the predicted direction of ball flight (spatial anticipation) or to decide on an appropriate response to the observed action (motor anticipation). The experts performed better than novices on both tennis anticipation tasks, with the experts showing stronger neural activation in areas of the AON, namely, the superior parietal lobe, the intraparietal sulcus, the inferior frontal gyrus, and the cerebellum. When novices were contrasted with experts, motor anticipation resulted in stronger activation of the ventral premotor cortex, the supplementary motor area, and the superior parietal lobe than spatial anticipation task did. In experts, the comparison of motor and spatial anticipation revealed no increased activation. We suggest that the stronger activation of areas in the AON during the anticipation of action effects in experts reflects their use of the more fine-tuned motor representations they have acquired and improved during years of training. Furthermore, results suggest that the neural processing of different anticipation tasks depends on the expertise level.

  3. Effects of action video game training on visual working memory.

    PubMed

    Blacker, Kara J; Curby, Kim M; Klobusicky, Elizabeth; Chein, Jason M

    2014-10-01

    The ability to hold visual information in mind over a brief delay is critical for acquiring information and navigating a complex visual world. Despite the ubiquitous nature of visual working memory (VWM) in our everyday lives, this system is fundamentally limited in capacity. Therefore, the potential to improve VWM through training is a growing area of research. An emerging body of literature suggests that extensive experience playing action video games yields a myriad of perceptual and attentional benefits. Several lines of converging work suggest that action video game play may influence VWM as well. The current study utilized a training paradigm to examine whether action video games cause improvements to the quantity and/or the quality of information stored in VWM. The results suggest that VWM capacity, as measured by a change detection task, is increased after action video game training, as compared with training on a control game, and that some improvement to VWM precision occurs with action game training as well. However, these findings do not appear to extend to a complex span measure of VWM, which is often thought to tap into higher-order executive skills. The VWM improvements seen in individuals trained on an action video game cannot be accounted for by differences in motivation or engagement, differential expectations, or baseline differences in demographics as compared with the control group used. In sum, action video game training represents a potentially unique and engaging platform by which this severely capacity-limited VWM system might be enhanced. PMID:25068696

  4. Effects of action video game training on visual working memory.

    PubMed

    Blacker, Kara J; Curby, Kim M; Klobusicky, Elizabeth; Chein, Jason M

    2014-10-01

    The ability to hold visual information in mind over a brief delay is critical for acquiring information and navigating a complex visual world. Despite the ubiquitous nature of visual working memory (VWM) in our everyday lives, this system is fundamentally limited in capacity. Therefore, the potential to improve VWM through training is a growing area of research. An emerging body of literature suggests that extensive experience playing action video games yields a myriad of perceptual and attentional benefits. Several lines of converging work suggest that action video game play may influence VWM as well. The current study utilized a training paradigm to examine whether action video games cause improvements to the quantity and/or the quality of information stored in VWM. The results suggest that VWM capacity, as measured by a change detection task, is increased after action video game training, as compared with training on a control game, and that some improvement to VWM precision occurs with action game training as well. However, these findings do not appear to extend to a complex span measure of VWM, which is often thought to tap into higher-order executive skills. The VWM improvements seen in individuals trained on an action video game cannot be accounted for by differences in motivation or engagement, differential expectations, or baseline differences in demographics as compared with the control group used. In sum, action video game training represents a potentially unique and engaging platform by which this severely capacity-limited VWM system might be enhanced.

  5. Regulation of international energy markets: Economic effects of political actions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbakova, Anastasia V.

    Recent increases in volatility of energy prices have led many governments to reevaluate their regard of national energy reserves and reconsider future exploration, production, and consumption patterns. The flurry of activity that has been generated by such price volatility has included large-scale nationalizations of energy sectors, unilateral renegotiations of foreign energy development contracts, and expropriations of resources from foreign energy firms on one hand, and on the other hand more rapid energy sector liberalization, intensified search for and development of renewable fuels and technologies, and development of incentives for increased energy efficiency and conservation. The aim of this dissertation is to examine and quantify the extent of positive and negative effects that have resulted from some of these activities. The first chapter focuses on quantifying the effect that nationalistic sentiment has had on economic attractiveness of energy sectors during the decade prior to the recent global economic crisis, as measured by foreign direct investment (FDI) inflows. Empirical results demonstrate that both political and economic conditions play an important role in investors' decisions. A combination of investment friendliness, corruption levels, and democracy all help to explain the trends in energy-sector investment levels over time in my sample countries, although differences in the types of corruption existing in these nations do not. Investment levels, in turn, appear to influence future levels of oil production, underscoring the significance of good investment policies for future success of energy sectors. Chapter two considers the response of energy stock prices to severe regulatory actions. It employs an event study framework to examine causal effects of critical informational announcements (i.e. events of expropriation and nationalization) on daily returns and cumulative losses in firm value of energy corporations. Results show that a firm

  6. Polyphenols: Extraction Methods, Antioxidative Action, Bioavailability and Anticarcinogenic Effects.

    PubMed

    Brglez Mojzer, Eva; Knez Hrnčič, Maša; Škerget, Mojca; Knez, Željko; Bren, Urban

    2016-01-01

    Being secondary plant metabolites, polyphenols represent a large and diverse group of substances abundantly present in a majority of fruits, herbs and vegetables. The current contribution is focused on their bioavailability, antioxidative and anticarcinogenic properties. An overview of extraction methods is also given, with supercritical fluid extraction highlighted as a promising eco-friendly alternative providing exceptional separation and protection from degradation of unstable polyphenols. The protective role of polyphenols against reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, UV light, plant pathogens, parasites and predators results in several beneficial biological activities giving rise to prophylaxis or possibly even to a cure for several prevailing human diseases, especially various cancer types. Omnipresence, specificity of the response and the absence of or low toxicity are crucial advantages of polyphenols as anticancer agents. The main problem represents their low bioavailability and rapid metabolism. One of the promising solutions lies in nanoformulation of polyphenols that prevents their degradation and thus enables significantly higher concentrations to reach the target cells. Another, more practiced, solution is the use of mixtures of various polyphenols that bring synergistic effects, resulting in lowering of the required therapeutic dose and in multitargeted action. The combination of polyphenols with existing drugs and therapies also shows promising results and significantly reduces their toxicity. PMID:27409600

  7. Calculated hydroxyl A2 sigma --> X2 pi (0, 0) band emission rate factors applicable to atmospheric spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cageao, R. P.; Ha, Y. L.; Jiang, Y.; Morgan, M. F.; Yung, Y. L.; Sander, S. P.

    1997-01-01

    A calculation of the A2 sigma --> X2 pi (0, 0) band emission rate factors and line center absorption cross sections of OH applicable to its measurement using solar resonant fluorescence in the terrestrial atmosphere is presented in this paper. The most accurate available line parameters have been used. Special consideration has been given to the solar input flux because of its highly structured Fraunhofer spectrum. The calculation for the OH atmospheric emission rate factor in the solar resonant fluorescent case is described in detail with examples and intermediate results. Results of this calculation of OH emission rate factors for individual rotational lines are on average 30% lower than the values obtained in an earlier work.

  8. OH(A 2Sigma(+) - X 2Pi) emission from dissociative excitation of HO2 at 147 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suto, M.; Lee, L. C.

    1984-01-01

    The photodissociation processes of the HO2 radical have been studied using the Xe resonance line at 147 nm as a light source. HO2 radical was produced by the reaction H + O2 + He HO2 + He in a flow tube, and the HO2 concentration was measured by a titration method HO2 + NO - OH + NO2. An observed emission in the 310 + or -10 nm region was found to be due solely to photodissociation and is attributed to the OH(A 2Sigma(+) - X 2Pi) system. This emission was studied as a function of O2 and H2 pressure added to the flow tube. Other possible photoemission processes were considered, including photoexcitation of OH, photodissociative excitation of H2O2, emission from the reaction O(D-1) + H, and metastable O2 produced from photodissociation of HO2. It is concluded that the emission intensities produced from these processes is negligible.

  9. What a_____ thing to do! Formally characterizing actions by their expected effects.

    PubMed

    Wood, Dustin; Tov, William; Costello, Cory

    2015-06-01

    A number of personality frameworks assume traits describe central tendencies of action--for instance, calling someone assertive indicates they have a tendency to perform assertive actions. But what makes it appropriate to characterize an action by terms like assertive, kind, or honest? We propose that actions are characterized by such terms in large part by having expected effects on the environment which match particular conceptual templates. In the present studies, we attempt to better identify the expected effect dimensions perceivers seem to utilize to make action characterizations related to the Big Five and HEXACO personality dimensions. To do so, a set of 150 situation-action scenarios were generated from actions suggestive of conscientiousness-related characteristics (Study 1), and of characteristics in other HEXACO domains (Study 2). Participants then characterized each action on a range of bipolar dimensions (e.g., assertive vs. submissive). A separate group of raters coded the expected effects of performing these actions on 21 different outcomes (e.g., effort expenditure; achievement of career goals). Action characterizations were highly predicted by expected effect dimensions in ways that matched provisional hypotheses and were consistent across studies. Furthermore, actions characterizations tended to be highly diagnostic of self-reported individual differences in the same characteristics. We discuss implications for a range of phenomena, such as understanding the relations between behaviors and traits, integrating trait models and decision-making models, and understanding the effect of situational features on personality traits. PMID:25621857

  10. The effects of an action video game on visual and affective information processing.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Kira; West, Robert

    2013-04-01

    Playing action video games can have beneficial effects on visuospatial cognition and negative effects on social information processing. However, these two effects have not been demonstrated in the same individuals in a single study. The current study used event-related brain potentials (ERPs) to examine the effects of playing an action or non-action video game on the processing of emotion in facial expression. The data revealed that 10h of playing an action or non-action video game had differential effects on the ERPs relative to a no-contact control group. Playing an action game resulted in two effects: one that reflected an increase in the amplitude of the ERPs following training over the right frontal and posterior regions that was similar for angry, happy, and neutral faces; and one that reflected a reduction in the allocation of attention to happy faces. In contrast, playing a non-action game resulted in changes in slow wave activity over the central-parietal and frontal regions that were greater for targets (i.e., angry and happy faces) than for non-targets (i.e., neutral faces). These data demonstrate that the contrasting effects of action video games on visuospatial and emotion processing occur in the same individuals following the same level of gaming experience. This observation leads to the suggestion that caution should be exercised when using action video games to modify visual processing, as this experience could also have unintended effects on emotion processing.

  11. Effects of troglitazone and pioglitazone on the action potentials and membrane currents of rabbit ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, S; Watanabe, T

    1998-09-18

    The effects of the antidiabetic thiazolidinediones troglitazone and pioglitazone on action potentials and membrane currents were studied in rabbit ventricular myocytes. Troglitazone (10 microM) reversibly reduced excitability of the myocytes and modified their action potential configuration. It significantly increased the stimulation threshold required to elicit action potentials and decreased action potential amplitude and the maximum upstroke velocity of the action potentials. The Inhibition of the maximum upstroke velocity by troglitazone was also significant at 1 microM. Voltage-clamp experiments revealed that troglitazone (10 microM) reversibly inhibited both the slow inward Ca2+ current and the steady-state K+ current. In contrast to troglitazone, pioglitazone (1-10 microM) had no significant effect on the excitability, action potential configuration, or membrane currents of myocytes. These results suggest that troglitazone, but not pioglitazone, modulates Na+, Ca2+ and K+ currents, leading to the changes in excitability and action potential configuration of ventricular myocytes. PMID:9797043

  12. Ganoderma tsugae Extract Inhibits Growth of HER2-Overexpressing Cancer Cells via Modulation of HER2/PI3K/Akt Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Han-Peng; Hsu, Shih-Chung; Li, Jhy-Wei; Tseng, Hsiu-Hsueh; Chuang, Tzu-Chao; Liu, Jah-Yao; Chen, Shih-Jung; Su, Muh-Hwan; Cheng, Yung-Chi; Chou, Wei-Yuan; Kao, Ming-Ching

    2013-01-01

    Ganoderma, also known as Lingzhi or Reishi, has been used for medicinal purposes in Asian countries for centuries. It is a medicinal fungus with a variety of biological properties including immunomodulatory and antitumor activities. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms by which Ganoderma tsugae (GT), one of the most common species of Ganoderma, inhibits the proliferation of HER2-overexpressing cancer cells. Here, we show that a quality assured extract of GT (GTE) inhibited the growth of HER2-overexpressing cancer cells in vitro and in vivo and enhanced the growth-inhibitory effect of antitumor drugs (e.g., taxol and cisplatin) in these cells. We also demonstrate that GTE induced cell cycle arrest by interfering with the HER2/PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Furthermore, GTE curtailed the expression of the HER2 protein by modulating the transcriptional activity of the HER2 gene and the stability/degradation of the HER2 protein. In conclusion, this study suggests that GTE may be a useful adjuvant therapeutic agent in the treatment of cancer cells that highly express HER2. PMID:23662119

  13. Forward-to-backward differential-cross-section ratio in electron-impact vibrational excitation via the {sup 2}{pi} resonance of CO

    SciTech Connect

    Poparic, G.B.; Galijas, S.M.D.; Belic, D.S.

    2004-08-01

    Electron-impact excitation of the CO molecule has been investigated by use of a crossed beam double trochoidal electron spectrometer. Forward and backward scattered electrons from the {sup 2}{pi} resonance are analyzed. In order to separate these two contributions, electron beam modulation and time-of-flight detection of scattered electrons have been introduced. Backward electrons are additionally delayed in time by introduction of a decelerator device. The operation of this device is tested by a measurement performed on the {sup 2}{pi}{sub g} resonance in N{sub 2} molecule. The ratio of forward-to-backward scattered electrons from the {sup 2}{pi} resonance in CO is found to be equal to 1, and thus the angular distribution of scattered electrons to be symmetric relative to 90 deg. This conclusion is compared to existing angular distribution measurements and theoretical predictions.

  14. Cross sections and band strengths for the N2O/+/ /A 2Sigma+ to X 2Pi/ system produced by vacuum ultraviolet radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, L. C.; Judge, D. L.

    1974-01-01

    Analysis of cross sections that have been obtained for the production of the N2O(+) (A 2Sigma+ to X 2Pi) fluorescence, using vacuum ultraviolet radiation between 462 and 755 A. The fluorescence spectra produced using incident photons of 715.6- and 754.9-A wavelengths are presented, as well as the relative fluorescence cross sections for the individual observed bands of the above-mentioned N2O(+) system. Finally, absolute cross sections for the production of the N2O(+) (A 2Sigma+ to X 2Pi) system are presented, as well as band strengths for the A 2Sigma+(0,0,0) to X 2Pi(n1,n2,0) fluorescence.

  15. Effects of navigated TMS on object and action naming.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Pavon, Julio C; Mäkelä, Niko; Lehtinen, Henri; Lioumis, Pantelis; Mäkelä, Jyrki P

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has been used to induce speech disturbances and to affect speech performance during different naming tasks. Lately, repetitive navigated TMS (nTMS) has been used for non-invasive mapping of cortical speech-related areas. Different naming tasks may give different information that can be useful for presurgical evaluation. We studied the sensitivity of object and action naming tasks to nTMS and compared the distributions of cortical sites where nTMS produced naming errors. Eight healthy subjects named pictures of objects and actions during repetitive nTMS delivered to semi-random left-hemispheric sites. Subject-validated image stacks were obtained in the baseline naming of all pictures before nTMS. Thereafter, nTMS pulse trains were delivered while the subjects were naming the images of objects or actions. The sessions were video-recorded for offline analysis. Naming during nTMS was compared with the baseline performance. The nTMS-induced naming errors were categorized by error type and location. nTMS produced no-response errors, phonological paraphasias, and semantic paraphasias. In seven out of eight subjects, nTMS produced more errors during object than action naming. Both intrasubject and intersubject analysis showed that object naming was significantly more sensitive to nTMS. When the number of errors was compared according to a given area, nTMS to postcentral gyrus induced more errors during object than action naming. Object naming is apparently more easily disrupted by TMS than action naming. Different stimulus types can be useful for locating different aspects of speech functions. This provides new possibilities in both basic and clinical research of cortical speech representations.

  16. Effects of navigated TMS on object and action naming

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Pavon, Julio C.; Mäkelä, Niko; Lehtinen, Henri; Lioumis, Pantelis; Mäkelä, Jyrki P.

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has been used to induce speech disturbances and to affect speech performance during different naming tasks. Lately, repetitive navigated TMS (nTMS) has been used for non-invasive mapping of cortical speech-related areas. Different naming tasks may give different information that can be useful for presurgical evaluation. We studied the sensitivity of object and action naming tasks to nTMS and compared the distributions of cortical sites where nTMS produced naming errors. Eight healthy subjects named pictures of objects and actions during repetitive nTMS delivered to semi-random left-hemispheric sites. Subject-validated image stacks were obtained in the baseline naming of all pictures before nTMS. Thereafter, nTMS pulse trains were delivered while the subjects were naming the images of objects or actions. The sessions were video-recorded for offline analysis. Naming during nTMS was compared with the baseline performance. The nTMS-induced naming errors were categorized by error type and location. nTMS produced no-response errors, phonological paraphasias, and semantic paraphasias. In seven out of eight subjects, nTMS produced more errors during object than action naming. Both intrasubject and intersubject analysis showed that object naming was significantly more sensitive to nTMS. When the number of errors was compared according to a given area, nTMS to postcentral gyrus induced more errors during object than action naming. Object naming is apparently more easily disrupted by TMS than action naming. Different stimulus types can be useful for locating different aspects of speech functions. This provides new possibilities in both basic and clinical research of cortical speech representations. PMID:25228868

  17. Geometry of the quantum Hall effect: An effective action for all dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabali, Dimitra; Nair, V. P.

    2016-07-01

    We present a general formula for the topological part of the effective action for integer quantum Hall systems in higher dimensions, including fluctuations of the gauge field and metric around background fields of a specified topological class. The result is based on a procedure of integrating up from the Dolbeault index density which applies for the degeneracies of Landau levels, combined with some input from the standard descent procedure for anomalies. Features of the topological action in (2 +1 ), (4 +1 ), (6 +1 ) dimensions, including the contribution due to gravitational anomalies, are discussed in some detail.

  18. Imp2 regulates GBM progression by activating IGF2/PI3K/Akt pathway

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Qingchun; Wang, Lijun; Yu, Fengbo; Gao, Haijun; Lei, Ting; Li, Peiwen; Liu, Pengfei; Zheng, Xu; Hu, Xitong; Chen, Yong; Jiang, Zhenfeng; Sayari, Arash J; Shen, Jia; Huang, Haiyan

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastomas multiforme (GBM) are the most frequently occurring malignant brain cancers. Treatment for GBM consists of surgical resection and subsequent adjuvant radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Despite this, GBM patient survival is limited to 12–15 months, and researchers are continually trying to develop improved therapy options. Insulin-like growth factor 2 mRNA-binding protein 2 (Imp2) is known to be upregulated in many cancers and is known to regulate the signaling activity of insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2). However, relatively little is known about its role in malignant development of GBM. In this study, we first found Imp2 is upregulated in GBM tissues by using clinical samples and public database search. Studies with loss and gain of Imp2 expression in in vitro GBM cell culture system demonstrated the role of Imp2 in promoting GBM cell proliferation, migration, invasion and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Additionally, our results show that Imp2 regulates the activity of IGF2, which further activates PI3K/Akt signaling, thereby to promote GBM malignancy. Inhibition of Imp2 was also found to sensitize GBM to temozolomide treatment. These observations add to the current knowledge of GBM biology, and may prove useful in development of more effective GBM therapy. PMID:25719943

  19. Intersubjective Action-Effect Binding: Eye Contact Modulates Acquisition of Bidirectional Association between Our and Others' Actions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sato, Atsushi; Itakura, Shoji

    2013-01-01

    In everyday social life, we predict others' actions in response to our own actions. Subsequently, on the basis of these predictions, we control our actions to attain desired social outcomes and/or adjust our actions to accommodate the anticipated actions of the others. Representation of the bidirectional association between our and others'…

  20. Object Rotation Effects on the Timing of a Hitting Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Mark A.; van der Kamp, John; Savelsbergh, Geert J. P.; Oudejans, Raoul R. D.; Davids, Keith

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the authors investigated how perturbing optical information affects the guidance of an unfolding hitting action. Using monocular and binocular vision, six participants were required to hit a rectangular foam object, released from two different heights, under four different approach conditions, two with object rotation (to perturb…

  1. A molecular beam-optical Stark study of the A sup 2. Pi. -- X sup 2. Sigma. band system of YO

    SciTech Connect

    Steimle, T.C.; Shirley, J.E. )

    1990-03-15

    The permanent electric dipole moments of yttrium monoxide YO in its {ital X} {sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +}, {ital A} {sup 2}{Pi}{sub 3/2}, and {ital A} {sup 2}{Pi}{sub 1/2} states have been experimentally determined from an analysis of the Stark shifts in the optical spectrum of a molecular beam sample. The determined values are 4.45(7), 3.68(2), and 3.22(8) D, respectively. The results are discussed in terms of bonding models for YO and are compared to recent theoretical predictions.

  2. High resolution vacuum ultraviolet pulsed field ionization photoelectron band for OCS{sup +}(X{sup 2}{Pi}): An experimental and theoretical study

    SciTech Connect

    Stimson, S.; Evans, M.; Ng, C.Y.; Hsu, C.; Heimann, P.; Destandau, C.; Chambaud, G.; Rosmus, P.

    1998-04-01

    The vacuum ultraviolet pulsed field ionization photoelectron (PFI-PE) band for OCS{sup +}(X{sup 2}{Pi}) in the energy region of 11.09{endash}11.87 eV has been measured using high resolution monochromatized synchrotron radiation. The ionization energies (IEs) for the formation of the (0,0,0) X{sup 2}{Pi}{sub 3/2} and (0,0,0) {sup 2}{Pi}{sub 1/2} states of OCS{sup +} are determined to be 11.1831{plus_minus}0.0005 and 11.2286{plus_minus}0.0005eV, respectively, yielding a value of 367{plus_minus}1.2cm{sup {minus}1} for the spin{endash}orbit splitting. Using the internally contracted multireference configuration interaction approach, three-dimensional potential energy functions (PEFs) for the OCS{sup +}(X{sup 2}{Pi}) state have been generated and used in the variational Renner{endash}Teller calculations of the vibronic states. The energies of all vibronic states (J=P) for J=1/2, 3/2, 5/2, and 7/2 have been computed in the energy range of {approx}4000cm{sup {minus}1} above the IE[OCS{sup +}(X{sup 2}{Pi}{sub 3/2})] for the assignment of the experimental spectrum. By a minor modification of the {ital ab initio} PEFs, good correlations are found between the experimental and theoretical Renner{endash}Teller structures. Similar to the PFI-PE bands for CO{sub 2}{sup +}(X{sup 2}{Pi}{sub g}) and CS{sub 2}{sup +}(X{sup 2}{Pi}{sub g}), weak transitions have been detected in the PFI-PE band for OCS{sup +}(X{sup 2}{Pi}), which are forbidden in the Franck{endash}Condon approximation. The nonvanishing single-photon ionization cross sections involving the excitation of the bending vibrational modes of OCS{sup +}, CO{sub 2}{sup +}, and CS{sub 2}{sup +}, in their ground electronic states are attributed to the symmetries of the geometry-dependent electronic transition dipole operator components. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Constraining gravitational interactions in the M theory effective action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Anirban

    2014-08-01

    We consider purely gravitational interactions of the type {{D}^{6n}}{{{ R}}^{4}} in the effective action of M theory in 11 dimensional flat spacetime. The duality between M theory on S 1 and type IIA string theory relates them to the type IIA interactions of the form {{e}^{2n{{\\phi }_{A}}}}{{D}^{6n}}{{{ R}}^{4}} where {{\\phi }_{A}} is the type IIA dilaton. The coefficients of the M theory interactions are determined by the strongly coupled type IIA theory. Given the nature of the dilaton dependence, it is plausible that for low values of n, the coefficient has a similar structure as the genus (n+1) string amplitude of the type IIA {{D}^{6n}}{{{ R}}^{4}} interaction, namely the transcendental nature. Assuming this, and focussing on the even-even spin structure part of the type IIA string amplitude, this coefficient is given by the type IIB genus (n+1) amplitude, which we constrain using supersymmetry, S-duality and maximal supergravity. The source terms of the Poisson equations satisfied by the S-duality invariant IIB couplings play a central role in the analysis. This procedure yields partial contributions to several multi-loop type IIB string amplitudes, from which we extract the transcendental nature of the corresponding M theory couplings. For n\\leqslant 2, all possible source terms involve only BPS couplings. While the {{{ R}}^{4}} and {{D}^{6}}{{{ R}}^{4}} M theory couplings agree with known results, the coefficient of the {{D}^{12}}{{{ R}}^{4}} interaction takes the form \\zeta {{(2)}^{3}}({{\\Omega }_{1}}+{{\\Omega }_{2}}\\zeta (3)). We also analyze the {{D}^{18}}{{{ R}}^{4}} and {{D}^{24}}{{{ R}}^{4}} interactions, and show that their coefficients have at least the terms \\zeta {{(2)}^{4}}({{\\tilde{\\Omega }}_{1}}+{{\\tilde{\\Omega }}_{2}}\\zeta (3)+{{\\tilde{\\Omega }}_{3}}\\zeta (5)) and \\zeta {{(2)}^{5}}({{\\underline{\\Omega }}_{1}}+{{\\underline{\\Omega }}_{2}}\\zeta (3)+{{\\underline{\\Omega }}_{3}}\\zeta (5) +\\;{{\\underline{\\Omega }}_{4

  4. 12 CFR 347.103 - Effect of state law on actions taken under this subpart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Effect of state law on actions taken under this subpart. 347.103 Section 347.103 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY INTERNATIONAL BANKING § 347.103 Effect of state law on actions taken under...

  5. 12 CFR 347.103 - Effect of state law on actions taken under this subpart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Effect of state law on actions taken under this subpart. 347.103 Section 347.103 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY INTERNATIONAL BANKING § 347.103 Effect of state law on actions taken under...

  6. 12 CFR 347.103 - Effect of state law on actions taken under this subpart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Effect of state law on actions taken under this subpart. 347.103 Section 347.103 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY INTERNATIONAL BANKING § 347.103 Effect of state law on actions taken under...

  7. 12 CFR 347.103 - Effect of state law on actions taken under this subpart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Effect of state law on actions taken under this subpart. 347.103 Section 347.103 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY INTERNATIONAL BANKING § 347.103 Effect of state law on actions taken under...

  8. Target- and Effect-Directed Actions towards Temporal Goals: Similar Mechanisms?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walter, Andrea M.; Rieger, Martina

    2012-01-01

    The goal of an action can consist of generating a change in the environment (to produce an effect) or changing one's own situation in the environment (to move to a physical target). To investigate whether the mechanisms of effect-directed and target-directed action control are similar, participants performed continuous reversal movements. They…

  9. 12 CFR 347.103 - Effect of state law on actions taken under this subpart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Effect of state law on actions taken under this subpart. 347.103 Section 347.103 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY INTERNATIONAL BANKING § 347.103 Effect of state law on actions taken under...

  10. 14 CFR 1216.321 - Environmental effects abroad of major Federal actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Federal actions. 1216.321 Section 1216.321 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE...) Other Requirements § 1216.321 Environmental effects abroad of major Federal actions. (a) In accordance with these procedures and E.O. 12114, “Environmental Effects Abroad of Major Federal Actions” (44...

  11. Action-Effect Codes in and before the Central Bottleneck: Evidence from the Psychological Refractory Period Paradigm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paelecke, Marko; Kunde, Wilfried

    2007-01-01

    Voluntary motor actions aim at and are thus governed by predictable action effects. Therefore, representations of an action's effects normally must become activated prior to the action itself. In 5 psychological refractory period experiments the authors investigated whether the activation of such effect representations coincides with the response…

  12. Focused ultrasound effects on nerve action potential in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Colucci, Vincent; Strichartz, Gary; Jolesz, Ferenc; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2009-01-01

    Minimally invasive applications of thermal and mechanical energy to selective areas of the human anatomy have led to significant advances in treatment of and recovery from typical surgical interventions. Image-guided focused ultrasound allows energy to be deposited deep into the tissue, completely noninvasively. There has long been interest in using this focal energy delivery to block nerve conduction for pain control and local anesthesia. In this study, we have performed an in vitro study to further extend our knowledge of this potential clinical application. The sciatic nerves from the bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) were subjected to focused ultrasound (at frequencies of 0.661MHz and 1.986MHz) and to heated Ringer’s solution. The nerve action potential was shown to decrease in the experiments and correlated with temperature elevation measured in the nerve. The action potential recovered either completely, partially, or not at all, depending on the parameters of the ultrasound exposure. The reduction of the baseline nerve temperature by circulating cooling fluid through the sonication chamber did not prevent the collapse of the nerve action potential; but higher power was required to induce the same endpoint as without cooling. These results indicate that a thermal mechanism of focused ultrasound can be used to block nerve conduction, either temporarily or permanently. PMID:19647923

  13. Understanding the participation of quadricyclane as nucleophile in polar [2sigma + 2sigma + 2pi] cycloadditions toward electrophilic pi molecules.

    PubMed

    Domingo, Luis R; Saéz, José A; Zaragozá, Ramón J; Arnó, Manuel

    2008-11-21

    The formal [2sigma + 2sigma + 2pi] cycloaddition of quadricyclane, 1, with dimethyl azodicarboxylate, 2, in water has been studied using DFT methods at the B3LYP/6-31G** and MPWB1K/6-31G** levels. In the gas phase, the reaction of 1 with 2 has a two-stage mechanism with a large polar character and an activation barrier of 23.2 kcal/mol. Inclusion of water through a combined discrete-continuum model changes the mechanism to a two-step model where the first nucleophilic attack of 1 to 2 is the rate-limiting step with an activation barrier of 14.7 kcal/mol. Analysis of the electronic structure of the transition state structures points out the large zwitterionic character of these species. A DFT analysis of the global electrophilicity and nucleophilicity of the reagents provides a sound explanation about the participation of 1 as a nucleophile in these cycloadditions. This behavior is reinforced by a further study of the reaction of 1 with 1,1-dicyanoethylene.

  14. A crossed-beam study of the state-resolved dynamics of CH( X sup 2. Pi. )+D sub 2. I. The inelastic scattering channel

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, R.G.; Liu, K. )

    1990-08-15

    The state-to-state integral cross sections for the inelastic scattering of CH({ital X} {sup 2}{Pi}) and D{sub 2} to produce rotationally excited CH({ital X} {sup 2}{Pi}) product have been measured in a crossed-beam apparatus by the laser-induced fluorescence method. Two types of measurements were performed: (1) the translational energy dependence of an individual quantum state of the product and (2) the state distribution of the products at fixed and well-defined translational energy. For the inelastic scattering channel, the cross sections gradually increased from a dynamical threshold to a broad maximum and then slowly decreased as the translational energy increases. Evidence for multiple-impact rotational rainbows was found and a possible frequency-locking phenomenon between the two receding rotors resulted. Moderate orbital alignment was observed except for the highest rotational levels of the product. By comparing and contrasting the kinematically similar system CH({ital X} {sup 2}{Pi})+He, the influence of a strongly attractive potential energy surface on the inelastic scattering of CH+D{sub 2} was inferred. Combining the results of the inelastic scattering and the isotopic exchange channels (the following paper) provide an unprecedented look into the dynamics of collisions between CH({ital X} {sup 2}{Pi}) and D{sub 2}.

  15. Absolute rate coefficients over extended temperature ranges and mechanisms of the CF(X(2)Pi) reactions with F(2), Cl(2) and O(2).

    PubMed

    Vetters, B; Dils, B; Nguyen, T L; Vereecken, L; Carl, S A; Peeters, J

    2009-06-01

    The absolute rate coefficients of the reactions of the carbyne-radical CF(X(2)Pi, nu = 0) with O(2), F(2) and Cl(2) have been measured over extended temperature ranges, using pulsed-laser photodissociation-laser-induced fluorescence (PLP-LIF) techniques. The CF(X(2)Pi) radicals were generated by KrF excimer laser 2-photon photolysis of CF(2)Br(2) at 248 nm and the real-time exponential decays of CF(X(2)Pi, nu = 0) at varying coreactant concentrations, in large excess, were monitored by LIF (A(2)Sigma(+), nu' = 1 <-- X(2)Pi, nu'' = 0 transition). The experimental bimolecular rate coefficients of the CF(X(2)Pi) reactions with F(2) and Cl(2) can be described by simple Arrhenius expressions: k(F2)(295-408 K) = (1.5 +/- 0.2) x 10(-11) exp[-(370 +/- 40)K/T] cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1); and k(Cl2)(295-392 K) = (6.1 +/- 2.1) x 10(-12) exp[+(280 +/- 120)K/T]. The k(F2)(T) and k(Cl2)(T) results can be rationalized in terms of direct halogen-atom abstraction reactions in which the radical character of CF dominates; a quantum chemical CBS-Q//BHandHLYP/6-311G(d,p) study confirms that the ground state reactants CF(X(2)Pi) + F(2)(X(1)Sigma) connect directly with the ground-state products CF(2)(X(1)A(1)) + F((2)P) via a nearly barrierless F-atom abstraction route. The rate coefficient of CF(X(2)Pi) + O(2) can be represented by a two-term Arrhenius expression: k(O2)(258-780 K) = 1.1 x 10(-11) exp(-850 K/T) + 2.3 x 10(-13) exp(500 K/T), with a standard deviation of 5%. The first term dominates at higher temperatures T and the second at lower T where a negative temperature dependence is observed (<290 K). Quantum chemical computations at the CBS-QB3 and CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVDZ levels of theory show that the k(O2)(T) behaviour is consistent with a change of the dominant rate-determining mechanism from a carbyne-type insertion into the O-O bond at high T to a radical-radical combination at low T.

  16. Action semantics modulate action prediction.

    PubMed

    Springer, Anne; Prinz, Wolfgang

    2010-11-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that action prediction involves an internal action simulation that runs time-locked to the real action. The present study replicates and extends these findings by indicating a real-time simulation process (Graf et al., 2007), which can be differentiated from a similarity-based evaluation of internal action representations. Moreover, results showed that action semantics modulate action prediction accuracy. The semantic effect was specified by the processing of action verbs and concrete nouns (Experiment 1) and, more specifically, by the dynamics described by action verbs (Experiment 2) and the speed described by the verbs (e.g., "to catch" vs. "to grasp" vs. "to stretch"; Experiment 3). These results propose a linkage between action simulation and action semantics as two yet unrelated domains, a view that coincides with a recent notion of a close link between motor processes and the understanding of action language.

  17. The sense of agency is action-effect causality perception based on cross-modal grouping.

    PubMed

    Kawabe, Takahiro; Roseboom, Warrick; Nishida, Shin'ya

    2013-07-22

    Sense of agency, the experience of controlling external events through one's actions, stems from contiguity between action- and effect-related signals. Here we show that human observers link their action- and effect-related signals using a computational principle common to cross-modal sensory grouping. We first report that the detection of a delay between tactile and visual stimuli is enhanced when both stimuli are synchronized with separate auditory stimuli (experiment 1). This occurs because the synchronized auditory stimuli hinder the potential grouping between tactile and visual stimuli. We subsequently demonstrate an analogous effect on observers' key press as an action and a sensory event. This change is associated with a modulation in sense of agency; namely, sense of agency, as evaluated by apparent compressions of action-effect intervals (intentional binding) or subjective causality ratings, is impaired when both participant's action and its putative visual effect events are synchronized with auditory tones (experiments 2 and 3). Moreover, a similar role of action-effect grouping in determining sense of agency is demonstrated when the additional signal is presented in the modality identical to an effect event (experiment 4). These results are consistent with the view that sense of agency is the result of general processes of causal perception and that cross-modal grouping plays a central role in these processes.

  18. Student Teacher Candidates' Effect on Student Learning as Measured through Action Research Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moffett, David W.; Reid, Barbara K.; Zhou, Yunfang

    2008-01-01

    The unit determined that "Assessment 5: Effect on Student Learning" would be best measured by student teachers and interns utilizing an action research activity in their clinical experience. Twenty four action research projects were evaluated by the Director of Student Teaching. Interraters blind to the Director's scores evaluated the projects.…

  19. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Reading Strategies for College Students: An Action Research Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelech, James; Hibbard, Susan T.

    2011-01-01

    This study was an action research project evaluating the effectiveness of selected reading strategies on student learning. The action research was conducted in an undergraduate measurement course in a teacher preparation program. Students used a pre-selected reading strategy to read assigned readings then completed a quiz on the readings and a…

  20. 47 CFR 1.102 - Effective dates of actions taken pursuant to delegated authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Effective dates of actions taken pursuant to delegated authority. 1.102 Section 1.102 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE General Rules of Practice and Procedure Reconsideration and Review of Actions Taken by the Commission and Pursuant to...

  1. 47 CFR 1.102 - Effective dates of actions taken pursuant to delegated authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Effective dates of actions taken pursuant to delegated authority. 1.102 Section 1.102 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE General Rules of Practice and Procedure Reconsideration and Review of Actions Taken by the Commission and Pursuant to...

  2. High-energy effective action from scattering of QCD shock waves

    SciTech Connect

    Ian Balitsky

    2005-07-01

    At high energies, the relevant degrees of freedom are Wilson lines - infinite gauge links ordered along straight lines collinear to the velocities of colliding particles. The effective action for these Wilson lines is determined by the scattering of QCD shock waves. I develop the symmetric expansion of the effective action in powers of strength of one of the shock waves and calculate the leading term of the series. The corresponding first-order effective action, symmetric with respect to projectile and target, includes both up and down fan diagrams and pomeron loops.

  3. High-energy effective action from scattering of QCD shock waves

    SciTech Connect

    Ian Balitsky

    2005-05-15

    At high energies, the relevant degrees of freedom are Wilson lines - infinite gauge links ordered along straight lines collinear to the velocities of colliding particles. The effective action for these Wilson lines is determined by the scattering of QCD shock waves. I develop the symmetric expansion of the effective action in powers of strength of one of the shock waves and calculate the leading term of the series. The corresponding first-order effective action, symmetric with respect to projectile and target, includes both up and down fan diagrams and pomeron loops.

  4. High-energy effective action from scattering of QCD shock waves

    SciTech Connect

    Ian Balitsky

    2005-10-25

    At high energies, the relevant degrees of freedom are Wilson lines--infinite gauge links ordered along straight lines collinear to the velocities of colliding particles. The effective action for these Wilson lines is determined by the scattering of QCD shock waves. I develop the symmetric expansion of the effective action in powers of strength of one of the shock waves and calculate the leading term of the series. The corresponding first-order effective action, symmetric with respect to the projectile and target, includes both up and down fan diagrams and pomeron loops.

  5. High-energy effective action from scattering of QCD shock waves

    SciTech Connect

    Ian Balitsky

    2007-01-01

    At high energies, the relevant degrees of freedom are Wilson lines--infinite gauge links ordered along straight lines collinear to the velocities of colliding particles. The effective action for these Wilson lines is determined by the scattering of QCD shock waves. I develop the symmetric expansion of the effective action in powers of strength of one of the shock waves and calculate the leading term of the series. The corresponding first-order effective action, symmetric with respect to projectile and target, includes both up and down fan diagrams and pomeron loops.

  6. High-energy effective action from scattering of QCD shock waves

    SciTech Connect

    Ian Balitsky

    2005-06-16

    At high energies, the relevant degrees of freedom are Wilson lines - infinite gauge links ordered along straight lines collinear to the velocities of colliding particles. The effective action for these Wilson lines is determined by the scattering of QCD shock waves. I develop the symmetric expansion of the effective action in powers of strength of one of the shock waves and calculate the leading term of the series. The corresponding first-order effective action, symmetric with respect to projectile and target, includes both up and down fan diagrams and pomeron loops.

  7. Target- and effect-directed actions towards temporal goals: similar mechanisms?

    PubMed

    Walter, Andrea M; Rieger, Martina

    2012-08-01

    The goal of an action can consist of generating a change in the environment (to produce an effect) or changing one's own situation in the environment (to move to a physical target). To investigate whether the mechanisms of effect-directed and target-directed action control are similar, participants performed continuous reversal movements. They either synchronized movement reversals with regularly presented tones (temporal targets) or produced tones at reversals isochronously (temporal effects). In both goal conditions an irrelevant goal characteristic was integrated into the goal representation (loudness, Experiment 1). When targets and effects were presented within the same reversal movement, similarities were enhanced (Experiment 2). When the task posed spatial demands in addition to temporal demands, target- and effect-directed movement kinematics changed equally with tempo (Experiment 3). Correlations between target-directed and effect-directed movements in temporal variability indicated similar timing mechanisms (Experiments 1 and 2). Only gradual differences between target- and effect-directed movements were observed. We conclude that the same mechanisms of action control, including the anticipation of upcoming events, underlie effect-directed and target-directed movements. Ideomotor theories of action control should incorporate action targets as goals similar to action effects. PMID:22686693

  8. Exploring the effect of action familiarity on SPTs recall performance in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Lekeu, Françoise; Van der Linden, Martial; Moonen, Gustave; Salmon, Eric

    2002-12-01

    This study examined the performance of normal controls (NC) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients on free recall, semantic cued recall and object cued recall of both subject-performed tasks (SPTs) and verbal descriptions of actions, by controlling familiarity of actions associated to objects. The results showed that both groups performed better after SPT encoding than after verbal encoding, in all three types of recall. In addition, this SPT advantage was greater for AD patients than for NC in the object cued recall test, emphasizing AD patients' sensibility to the congruence of cues between encoding and retrieval conditions. Following verbal encoding, NC showed a better recall for less familiar actions than for highly familiar actions, whereas AD patients exhibited the opposite pattern. These results reflect that AD patients did not benefit from a distinctiveness effect at encoding for improving subsequent retrieval of verbal information, probably due to a reduced level of elaboration during encoding. However, there was no effect of action familiarity on recall performance by both groups following SPT encoding. These results suggest that memory for verbal actions and SPTs is governed by different principles. In addition, they demonstrate the robustness of the SPT effect in AD patients, who were able to improve memory performance in the SPT condition not only with highly familiar actions but also with less familiar actions. PMID:12650231

  9. Effect of a prenylamine analog (MG8926) on spontaneous action potentials in isolated rabbit sinoatrial node.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, H; Matsuoka, I; Ono, T; Yoshida, H; Uchibori, T; Kogi, K

    1996-12-01

    Effects of verapamil, prenylamine and a prenylamine analog, MG8926 on the intracellular spontaneous action potentials recorded from the isolated rabbit sinoatrial (SA) node were studied. Verapamil (1 microM), a selective inhibitor for slow Ca2+ channels, prolonged the cycle length, decreased the rate of diastolic depolarization, the rate of rise of action potential, the amplitude of action potential and the maximal diastolic potential, and usually arrested showing subthreshold fluctuation of the membrane potential within several ten min. Prenylamine (10 microM), a nonselective inhibitor for slow Ca2+ channels, tended to prolong the cycle length to decrease the diastolic depolarization, the rate of rise of action potential, the amplitude of action potential. However, these changes were statistically insignificant. Prenylamine at the concentration of 10 microM had no effect on the maximal diastolic potential. MG8926 (10 microM) prolonged the cycle length, decreased the rate of diastolic depolarization, the rate of rise of action potential and tended to decrease the amplitude of action potential. MG8926 at the concentration of 10 microM had almost no effect on the maximal diastolic potential. The present findings may indicate that replacement of phenyl residue of prenylamine by cyclohexyl residue increases the inhibitory action on the slow Ca2+ channels in rabbit SA node.

  10. Monosodium urate activates Src/Pyk2/PI3 kinase and cathepsin dependent unconventional protein secretion from human primary macrophages.

    PubMed

    Välimäki, Elina; Miettinen, Juho J; Lietzén, Niina; Matikainen, Sampsa; Nyman, Tuula A

    2013-03-01

    Monosodium urate (MSU) is an endogenous danger signal that is crystallized from uric acid released from injured cells. MSU is known to activate inflammatory response in macrophages but the molecular mechanisms involved have remained uncharacterized. Activated macrophages start to secrete proteins to activate immune response and to recruit other immune cells to the site of infection and/or tissue damage. Secretome characterization after activation of innate immune system is essential to unravel the details of early phases of defense responses. Here, we have analyzed the secretome of human primary macrophages stimulated with MSU using quantitative two-dimensional gel electrophoresis based proteomics as well as high-throughput qualitative GeLC-MS/MS approach combining protein separation by SDS-PAGE and protein identification by liquid chromatography-MS/MS. Both methods showed that MSU stimulation induced robust protein secretion from lipopolysaccharide-primed human macrophages. Bioinformatic analysis of the secretome data showed that MSU stimulation strongly activates unconventional, vesicle mediated protein secretion. The unconventionally secreted proteins included pro-inflammatory cytokines like IL-1β and IL-18, interferon-induced proteins, and danger signal proteins. Also active forms of lysosomal proteases cathepsins were secreted on MSU stimulation, and cathepsin activity was essential for MSU-induced unconventional protein secretion. Additionally, proteins associated to phosphorylation events including Src family tyrosine kinases were increased in the secretome of MSU-stimulated cells. Our functional studies demonstrated that Src, Pyk2, and PI3 kinases act upstream of cathepsins to activate the overall protein secretion from macrophages. In conclusion, we provide the first comprehensive characterization of protein secretion pathways activated by MSU in human macrophages, and reveal a novel role for cathepsins and Src, Pyk2, PI3 kinases in the activation of

  11. Adverse Effects of Psychotropic Medications: A Call to Action.

    PubMed

    Mago, Rajnish

    2016-09-01

    Adverse effects are common, bothersome, and a leading cause of discontinuation of treatment. The methodology for evaluating adverse effects of medications has been greatly neglected, however, especially in comparison to the methodology for assessment of efficacy of medications. Existing methods for assessment and reporting of adverse effects have important limitations leading to lack of much-needed data related to adverse effects. Lastly, there is little systematic research into management of most adverse effects. A series of recommendations are made in this article about how to improve identification, assessment, reporting, and management of adverse effects. PMID:27514294

  12. Leadership: Improving Its Effectiveness. Research Action Brief Number 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Educational Management, Eugene, OR.

    This brief summarizes the major findings of significant research studies dealing with different leadership behaviors and strategies for increasing leadership effectiveness. Fred Fiedler's Contingency Theory of Leadership Effectiveness emphasizes that a leader's effectiveness is determined by how well his leadership style fits the specific…

  13. Light mesons in QCD and unquenching effects from the 3PI effective action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Richard; Fischer, Christian S.; Heupel, Walter

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the impact of unquenching effects on QCD Green's functions, in the form of quark-loop contributions to both the gluon propagator and three-gluon vertex, in a three-loop inspired truncation of the three-particle irreducible (3PI) effective action. The fully coupled system of Dyson-Schwinger equations for the quark-gluon, ghost-gluon and three-gluon vertices, together with the quark propagator, are solved self-consistently; our only input are the ghost and gluon propagators themselves that are constrained by calculations within lattice QCD. We find that the two different unquenching effects have roughly equal, but opposite, impact on the quark-gluon vertex and quark propagator, with an overall negative impact on the latter. By taking further derivatives of the 3PI effective action, we construct the corresponding quark-antiquark kernel of the Bethe-Salpeter equation for mesons. The leading component is gluon exchange between two fully dressed quark-gluon vertices, thus introducing for the first time an obvious scalar-scalar component to the binding. We gain access to time-like properties of bound states by analytically continuing the coupled system of Dyson-Schwinger equations to the complex plane. We observe that the vector axial-vector splitting is in accord with experiment and that the lightest quark-antiquark scalar meson is above 1 GeV in mass.

  14. The prooxidant action of dietary antioxidants leading to cellular DNA breakage and anticancer effects: implications for chemotherapeutic action against cancer.

    PubMed

    Ullah, M F; Ahmad, Aamir; Khan, Husain Y; Zubair, H; Sarkar, Fazlul H; Hadi, S M

    2013-11-01

    Plant-derived dietary antioxidants have attracted considerable interest in recent past for their ability to induce apoptosis and regression of tumors in animal models. While it is believed that the antioxidant properties of these agents may contribute to lowering the risk of cancer induction by impeding oxidative injury to DNA, it could not account for apoptosis induction and chemotherapeutic observations. In this article, we show that dietary antioxidants can alternatively switch to a prooxidant action in the presence of transition metals such as copper. Such a prooxidant action leads to strand breaks in cellular DNA and growth inhibition in cancer cells. Further, the cellular DNA breakage and anticancer effects were found to be significantly enhanced in the presence of copper ions. Moreover, inhibition of antioxidant-induced DNA strand breaks and oxidative stress by Cu(I)-specific chelators bathocuproine and neocuproine demonstrated the role of endogenous copper in the induction of the prooxidant mechanism. Since it is well established that tissue, cellular, and serum copper levels are considerably elevated in various malignancies, such a prooxidant cytotoxic mechanism better explains the anticancer activity of dietary antioxidants against cancer cells.

  15. Effect of action verbs on the performance of a complex movement.

    PubMed

    Rabahi, Tahar; Fargier, Patrick; Rifai Sarraj, Ahmad; Clouzeau, Cyril; Massarelli, Raphael

    2013-01-01

    The interaction between language and motor action has been approached by studying the effect of action verbs, kinaesthetic imagery and mental subtraction upon the performance of a complex movement, the squat vertical jump (SVJ). The time of flight gave the value of the height of the SVJ and was measured with an Optojump® and a Myotest® apparatuses. The results obtained by the effects of the cognitive stimuli showed a statistically significant improvement of the SVJ performance after either loudly or silently pronouncing, hearing or reading the verb saute (jump in French language). Action verbs specific for other motor actions (pince = pinch, lèche = lick) or non-specific (bouge = move) showed no or little effect. A meaningless verb for the French subjects (tiáo = jump in Chinese) showed no effect as did rêve (dream), tombe (fall) and stop. The verb gagne (win) improved significantly the SVJ height, as did its antonym perds (lose) suggesting a possible influence of affects in the subjects' performance. The effect of the specific action verb jump upon the heights of SVJ was similar to that obtained after kinaesthetic imagery and after mental subtraction of two digits numbers from three digits ones; possibly, in the latter, because of the intervention of language in calculus. It appears that the effects of the specific action verb jump did seem effective but not totally exclusive for the enhancement of the SVJ performance. The results imply an interaction among language and motor brain areas in the performance of a complex movement resulting in a clear specificity of the corresponding action verb. The effect upon performance may probably be influenced by the subjects' intention, increased attention and emotion produced by cognitive stimuli among which action verbs.

  16. The effect of action recognition and robot awareness in cooperative robot teams

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, L.E.

    1995-03-01

    Previous research in cooperative robotics has investigated several possible ways of coordinating the actions of cooperative teams -- from implicit cooperation through sensory feedback to explicit cooperation using the exchange of communicated messages. These various approaches differ in the extent to which robot team members arc aware of, or recognize, the actions of their teammates, and the extent to which they use this information to effect their own actions. The research described in this paper investigates this issue of robot awareness of team member actions and its effect on cooperative team performance by examining the results of a series of experiments on teams of physical mobile robots performing a laboratory version of hazardous waste cleanup. In these experiments. we vary the team size (and thus the level of redundancy in team member capabilities) and the level of awareness robots have of their teammates` current actions and evaluate the team`s performance using two metrics: time and energy. The results indicate that the impact of action awareness on cooperative team performance is a function not only of team size and the metric of evaluation. but also on the degree to which the effects of actions can be sensed through the world, the relative amount of work that is available per robot, and the cost of replicated actions. From these empirical studies, we propose a number of principles regarding the use of action recognition and robot awareness of team member actions in cooperative teams -- principles which will help guide engineers in the design and composition of the proper cooperative team for a given robotic mission.

  17. World-volume effective action of exotic five-brane in M-theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Tetsuji; Sasaki, Shin; Yata, Masaya

    2016-02-01

    We study the world-volume effective action of an exotic five-brane, known as the M-theory 53-brane (M53-brane) in eleven dimensions. The supermultiplet of the world-volume theory is the {N}=(2, 0) tensor multiplet in six dimensions. The world-volume action contains three Killing vectors {widehat{k}}_{widehat{I}}^M ( Ȋ = 1 , 2 , 3) associated with the U(1)3 isometry. We find the effective T-duality rule for the eleven-dimensional backgrounds that transforms the M5-brane effective action to that of the M53-brane. We also show that our action provides the source term for the M53-brane geometry in eleven-dimensional supergravity.

  18. Health-beneficial effects of probiotics: Its mode of action.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Yuji; Ushida, Kazunari

    2009-08-01

    It is now widely recognized that probiotics have health-beneficial effects on humans and animals. Probiotics should survive in the intestinal tract to exert beneficial effects on the host's health. To keep a sufficient level of probiotic bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract, a shorter interval between doses may be required. Although adherence to the intestinal epithelial cell and mucus is not a universal property of probiotics, high ability to adhere to the intestinal surface might strongly interfere with infection of pathogenic bacteria and regulate the immune system. The administration of probiotic Lactobacillus stimulated indigenous Lactobacilli and the production of short-chain fatty acids. This alteration of the intestinal environment should contribute to maintain the host's health. The immunomodulatory effects of probiotics are related to important parts of their beneficial effects. Probiotics may modulate the intestinal immune response through the stimulation of certain cytokine and IgA secretion in intestinal mucosa. The health-beneficial effects, in particular the immunomodulation effect, of probiotics depend on the strain used. Differences in indigenous intestinal microflora significantly alter the magnitude of the effects of a probiotic. Specific probiotic strains suitable for each animal species and their life stage as well as each individual should be found.

  19. [Biochemistry, molecular mechanism of action and biological effects of endotoxin].

    PubMed

    Burgmann, H; Breyer, S

    1995-01-01

    This review is a brief attempt at providing an overview of a subject of enormous complexity-endotoxins and the mediators associated with its biological effects. More specifically it deals with biochemistry and biology of endotoxin, detection of endotoxin with the Limulus amebocyte lysate test, the molecular mechanisms and biological effects, and in the last part with future aspects of therapeutical strategies. It seems certain that the subject will become even more complex and possibly controversial as scientific knowledge further involves. However, because of the high mortality rate of patients suffering from gram-negative sepsis all efforts have to be made to find effective therapeutical strategies.

  20. Functional integral equation for the complete effective action in quantum field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharnhorst, K.

    1997-02-01

    Based on a methodological analysis of the effective action approach, certain conceptual foundations of quantum field theory are reconsidered to establish a quest for an equation for the effective action. Relying on the functional integral formulation of Lagrangian quantum field theory, we propose a functional integral equation for the complete effective action which can be understood as a certain fixed-point condition. This is motivated by a critical attitude toward the distinction, artificial from an experimental point of view, between classical and effective action. While for free field theories nothing new is accomplished, for interacting theories the concept differs from the established paradigm. The analysis of this new concept concentrates on gauge field theories, treating QED as the prototype model. An approximative approach to the functional integral equation for the complete effective action of QED is exploited to obtain certain nonperturbative information about the quadratic kernels of the action. As a particular application the approximate calculation of the QED coupling constant α is explicitly studied. It is understood as one of the characteristics of a fixed point given as a solution of the functional integral equation proposed. Finally, within the present approach the vacuum energy problem is considered, as are possible implications for the concept of induced gravity.

  1. Effects of movement distance, duration, velocity, and type on action prediction in 12-month-olds.

    PubMed

    Daum, Moritz M; Gampe, Anja; Wronski, Caroline; Attig, Manja

    2016-05-01

    The goal of the present study was to test the influence of the spatial and temporal dynamics of observed manual actions on infants' action prediction. Twelve-month-old infants were presented with reach-and-transport actions performed by a human agent. Movement distance, duration, and - resulting from the two - movement velocity were systematically varied. Action prediction was measured via the latency of gaze arrival at target in relation to agent's hand. The results showed a general effect of all parameters on the infants' perception of goal-directed actions: Infants were more likely to predict the action goal the longer the movement distance was, the longer the movement duration was, and the slower the movement velocity was. In addition, they were more likely to predict the goal of a reaching than a transport action. The present findings extent previous findings by showing that infants are not only sensitive to differences in distances, durations, and velocities at early age but that these factors have a strong impact on the prediction of the goal of observed actions.

  2. Characterization of the Minimum Energy Paths for the Reactions of CH(X(sup 2 Pi) and (1)CH2 with C2H2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.; Langhoff, S. R. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The reactions of CH(sup 2 Pi) and singlet methylene (1)CH2 with acetylene lead to intermediates which may be important in soot formation. CH(sup 2 Pi) + acetylene leads to CHCHCH (C3H3), CHCCH (C3H2), and propargyl (CH2CCH). (1)CH2 + acetylene leads to cyclopropene and propargyl. All of these reaction products are formed with no barrier. Miller and Melius have previously discussed the dimerization of propargyl to give benzene. C3H3 and C3H2 can dimerize with no barrier to give benzene and para-benzyne, respectively. C3H3 and C3H2 can also add to smaller polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and may be important species in forming larger PAH or fullerenes.

  3. THE MAGNESIUM ISOTOPOLOGUES OF MgH IN THE A {sup 2}{Pi}-X {sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +} SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkle, Kenneth H.; Wallace, Lloyd; Ram, Ram S.; Bernath, Peter F.; Sneden, Christopher; Lucatello, Sara E-mail: wallace@noao.edu E-mail: pbernath@odu.edu E-mail: sara.lucatello@oapd.inaf.it

    2013-08-15

    Using laboratory hollow cathode spectra we have identified lines of the less common magnesium isotopologues of MgH, {sup 25}MgH and {sup 26}MgH, in the A {sup 2}{Pi}-X {sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +} system. Based on the previous analysis of {sup 24}MgH, molecular lines have been measured and molecular constants derived for {sup 25}MgH and {sup 26}MgH. Term values and linelists, in both wavenumber and wavelength units, are presented. The A {sup 2}{Pi}-X {sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +} system of MgH is important for measuring the magnesium isotope ratios in stars. Examples of analysis using the new linelists to derive the Mg isotope ratio in a metal poor dwarf and giant are shown.

  4. Effectiveness of Mentoring Program Practices. Research in Action. Issue 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuBois, David L.

    2007-01-01

    This article focuses on mentoring program practices in relation to issues of effectiveness, while recognizing that implications for program quality conceptualized more broadly is a key concern in need of greater investigation. The author provides an overview of selected conceptual and methodological issues involved with identification of…

  5. Observation Can Be as Effective as Action in Problem Solving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osman, Magda

    2008-01-01

    This study discusses findings that replicate and extend the original work of Burns and Vollmeyer (2002), which showed that performance in problem-solving tasks was more accurate when people were engaged in a non-specific goal than in a specific goal. The main innovation here was to examine the goal specificity effect under both observation-based…

  6. Acute Stressor Effects on Goal-Directed Action in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Stephanie; Hauber, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Here we examined effects of acute stressors that involve either systemic coadministration of corticosterone/yohimbine (3 mg/kg each) to increase glucocorticoid/noradrenaline activity (denoted as "pharmacological" stressor) or one or several distinct restraint stressors (denoted as "single" vs. "multiple" stressor) on…

  7. Explanation of non-additive effects in mixtures of similar mode of action chemicals.

    PubMed

    Kamo, Masashi; Yokomizo, Hiroyuki

    2015-09-01

    Many models have been developed to predict the combined effect of drugs and chemicals. Most models are classified into two additive models: independent action (IA) and concentration addition (CA). It is generally considered if the modes of action of chemicals are similar then the combined effect obeys CA; however, many empirical studies report nonlinear effects deviating from the predictions by CA. Such deviations are termed synergism and antagonism. Synergism, which leads to a stronger toxicity, requires more careful management, and hence it is important to understand how and which combinations of chemicals lead to synergism. In this paper, three types of chemical reactions are mathematically modeled and the cause of the nonlinear effects among chemicals with similar modes of action was investigated. Our results show that combined effects obey CA only when the modes of action are exactly the same. Contrary to existing knowledge, combined effects are generally nonlinear even if the modes of action of the chemicals are similar. Our results further show that the nonlinear effects vanish out when the chemical concentrations are low, suggesting that the current management procedure of assuming CA is rarely inappropriate because environmental concentrations of chemicals are generally low.

  8. Action-effect binding is decreased in motor conversion disorder: implications for sense of agency.

    PubMed

    Kranick, Sarah M; Moore, James W; Yusuf, Nadia; Martinez, Valeria T; LaFaver, Kathrin; Edwards, Mark J; Mehta, Arpan R; Collins, Phoebe; Harrison, Neil A; Haggard, Patrick; Hallett, Mark; Voon, Valerie

    2013-07-01

    The abnormal movements seen in motor conversion disorder are affected by distraction and entrainment, similar to voluntary movement. Unlike voluntary movement, however, patients lack a sense of control for the abnormal movements, a failure of "self-agency." The action-effect binding paradigm has been used to quantify the sense of self-agency, because subjective contraction of time between an action and its effect only occurs if the patient feels that they are the agent responsible for the action. We used this paradigm, coupled with emotional stimuli, to investigate the sense of agency with voluntary movements in patients with motor conversion disorder. Twenty patients with motor conversion disorder and 20 age-matched and sex-matched healthy volunteers used a rotating clock to judge the time of their own voluntary key presses (action) and a subsequent auditory tone (effect) after they completed conditioning blocks in which high, medium, and low tones were coupled to images of happy, fearful, and neutral faces. The results replicated those produced previously: it was reported that an effect after a voluntary action occurred earlier, and the preceding action occurred later, compared with trials that used only key presses or tones. Patients had reduced overall binding scores relative to healthy volunteers, suggesting a reduced sense of agency. There was no effect of the emotional stimuli (faces) or other interaction effects. Healthy volunteers with subclinical depressive symptoms had higher overall binding scores. We demonstrate that patients with motor conversion disorder have decreased action-effect binding for normal voluntary movements compared with healthy volunteers, consistent with the greater experience of lack of control.

  9. D2 to M2 procedure for D2-brane DBI effective action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klusoň, J.

    2009-02-01

    We apply the procedure that was suggested in [B. Ezhuthachan, S. Mukhi, C. Papageorgakis, arxiv:/0806.1639] to the case of abelian D2-brane Dirac-Born-Infeld effective action and discuss its limitation. Then we suggest an alternative form of this procedure that is based on an existence of interpolating action proposed in [T. Ortin, hep-th/9707113, Y. Lozano, hep-th/9707011].

  10. Effect of tactile stimulation on primary motor cortex excitability during action observation combined with motor imagery.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Megumi; Kubota, Shinji; Onmyoji, Yusuke; Hirano, Masato; Uehara, Kazumasa; Morishita, Takuya; Funase, Kozo

    2015-07-23

    We aimed to investigate the effects of the tactile stimulation to an observer's fingertips at the moment that they saw an object being pinched by another person on the excitability of observer's primary motor cortex (M1) using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). In addition, the above effects were also examined during action observation combined with the motor imagery. Motor evoked potentials (MEP) were evoked from the subjects' right first dorsal interosseous (FDI) and abductor digiti minimi (ADM) muscles. Electrical stimulation (ES) inducing tactile sensation was delivered to the subjects' first and second fingertips at the moment of pinching action performed by another person. Although neither the ES nor action observation alone had significant effects on the MEP amplitude of the FDI or ADM, the FDI MEP amplitude which acts as the prime mover during pinching was reduced when ES and action observation were combined; however, no such changes were seen in the ADM. Conversely, that reduced FDI MEP amplitude was increased during the motor imagery. These results indicated that the M1 excitability during the action observation of pinching action combined with motor imagery could be enhanced by the tactile stimulation delivered to the observer's fingertips at the moment corresponding to the pinching being observed.

  11. The joint Simon effect depends on perceived agency, but not intentionality, of the alternative action

    PubMed Central

    Stenzel, Anna; Dolk, Thomas; Colzato, Lorenza S.; Sellaro, Roberta; Hommel, Bernhard; Liepelt, Roman

    2014-01-01

    A co-actor's intentionality has been suggested to be a key modulating factor for joint action effects like the joint Simon effect (JSE). However, in previous studies intentionality has often been confounded with agency defined as perceiving the initiator of an action as being the causal source of the action. The aim of the present study was to disentangle the role of agency and intentionality as modulating factors of the JSE. In Experiment 1, participants performed a joint go/nogo Simon task next to a co-actor who either intentionally controlled a response button with own finger movements (agency+/intentionality+) or who passively placed the hand on a response button that moved up and down on its own as triggered by computer signals (agency−/intentionality−). In Experiment 2, we included a condition in which participants believed that the co-actor intentionally controlled the response button with a Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) while placing the response finger clearly besides the response button, so that the causal relationship between agent and action effect was perceptually disrupted (agency−/intentionality+). As a control condition, the response button was computer controlled while the co-actor placed the response finger besides the response button (agency−/intentionality−). Experiment 1 showed that the JSE is present with an intentional co-actor and causality between co-actor and action effect, but absent with an unintentional co-actor and a lack of causality between co-actor and action effect. Experiment 2 showed that the JSE is absent with an intentional co-actor, but no causality between co-actor and action effect. Our findings indicate an important role of the co-actor's agency for the JSE. They also suggest that the attribution of agency has a strong perceptual basis. PMID:25140144

  12. Evolution of the violin: The law of effect in action.

    PubMed

    Wasserman, Edward A; Cullen, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    As is true for most other human inventions, the origin of the violin is unknown. What is known is that this popular and versatile instrument has notably changed over the course of several hundred years. At issue is whether those evolutionary changes in the construction of the violin are the result of premeditated, intelligent design or whether they arose through a trial-and-error process. Recent scientific evidence favors the latter account. Our perspective piece puts these recent empirical findings into a comprehensive selectionist framework. According to this view, the many things we do and make--like violins--arise from a process of variation and selection which accords with the law of effect. Contrary to popular opinion, there is neither mystique nor romance in this process; it is as fundamental and ubiquitous as the law of natural selection. As with the law of natural selection in the evolution of organisms, there is staunch resistance to the role of the law of effect in the evolution of human inventions. We conclude our piece by considering several objections to our perspective. PMID:26569015

  13. Effective Swimmer’s Action during the Grab Start Technique

    PubMed Central

    Mourão, Luis; de Jesus, Karla; Roesler, Hélio; Machado, Leandro J.; Fernandes, Ricardo J.; Vilas-Boas, João Paulo; Vaz, Mário A. P.

    2015-01-01

    The external forces applied in swimming starts have been often studied, but using direct analysis and simple interpretation data processes. This study aimed to develop a tool for vertical and horizontal force assessment based on the swimmers’ propulsive and structural forces (passive forces due to dead weight) applied during the block phase. Four methodological pathways were followed: the experimented fall of a rigid body, the swimmers’ inertia effect, the development of a mathematical model to describe the outcome of the rigid body fall and its generalization to include the effects of the inertia, and the experimental swimmers’ starting protocol analysed with the inclusion of the developed mathematical tool. The first three methodological steps resulted in the description and computation of the passive force components. At the fourth step, six well-trained swimmers performed three 15 m maximal grab start trials and three-dimensional (3D) kinetic data were obtained using a six degrees of freedom force plate. The passive force contribution to the start performance obtained from the model was subtracted from the experimental force due to the swimmers resulting in the swimmers’ active forces. As expected, the swimmers’ vertical and horizontal active forces accounted for the maximum variability contribution of the experimental forces. It was found that the active force profile for the vertical and horizontal components resembled one another. These findings should be considered in clarifying the active swimmers’ force variability and the respective geometrical profile as indicators to redefine steering strategies. PMID:25978370

  14. Evolution of the violin: The law of effect in action.

    PubMed

    Wasserman, Edward A; Cullen, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    As is true for most other human inventions, the origin of the violin is unknown. What is known is that this popular and versatile instrument has notably changed over the course of several hundred years. At issue is whether those evolutionary changes in the construction of the violin are the result of premeditated, intelligent design or whether they arose through a trial-and-error process. Recent scientific evidence favors the latter account. Our perspective piece puts these recent empirical findings into a comprehensive selectionist framework. According to this view, the many things we do and make--like violins--arise from a process of variation and selection which accords with the law of effect. Contrary to popular opinion, there is neither mystique nor romance in this process; it is as fundamental and ubiquitous as the law of natural selection. As with the law of natural selection in the evolution of organisms, there is staunch resistance to the role of the law of effect in the evolution of human inventions. We conclude our piece by considering several objections to our perspective.

  15. The Fourier transform microwave spectrum of the arsenic dicarbide radical (CCAs: X (2)Pi(1/2)) and its (13)C isotopologues.

    PubMed

    Sun, M; Clouthier, D J; Ziurys, L M

    2009-12-14

    The pure rotational spectrum of the CCAs radical in its ground electronic and spin state, X (2)Pi(12), has been measured using Fourier transform microwave techniques in the frequency range of 12-40 GHz. This species was created in a supersonic expansion from a reaction mixture of AsCl(3) and C(2)H(2) or CH(4) diluted in high pressure argon, using a pulsed nozzle containing a dc discharge source. Three rotational transitions were measured for the main isotopologue, (12)C(12)CAs, in the Omega=12 ladder; both lambda-doubling and arsenic (I=32) hyperfine interactions were observed in these spectra. In addition, two to four rotational transitions were recorded for the (13)C(13)CAs, (13)C(12)CAs, and (12)C(13)CAs species. In these three isotopologues, hyperfine splittings were also resolved arising from the (13)C nuclei (I=12), creating complex spectral patterns. The CCAs spectra were analyzed with a case (a) Hamiltonian, and effective rotational, lambda-doubling, and arsenic and carbon-13 hyperfine constants were determined for the Omega=12 ladder. From the effective rotational constants of the four isotopologues, an r(m) ((1)) structure has been derived with r(C-C)=1.287 A and r(C-As)=1.745 A. These bond lengths indicate that the predominant structure for arsenic dicarbide is C=C=As, with some contributing C[Triple Bond]C and C[Triple Bond]As triple bond characters. The hyperfine constants established in this work indicate that about 23 of the unpaired electron density lies on the arsenic atom, with the remaining percentage on the terminal carbon. The value of the arsenic quadrupole coupling constant (eqQ=-202 MHz) suggests that the As-C bond has a mixture of covalent and ionic characters, consistent with theoretical predictions that both pi backbonding and electron transfer play a role in creating a linear, as opposed to a cyclic, structure for certain heteroatom dicarbides.

  16. Testing the RRPP vertex of effective Regge action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuraev, E. A.; Bytev, V. V.; Bakmaev, S.; Antonov, E. N.

    2008-06-01

    We discuss the possibility of checking the vertex with creation of two real gluons in collision of two reggeized ones (RRPP) which can reveal themselves in process of scalar meson production in high energy peripheral nucleon collisions. Numerical estimations of the cross section of a pair of charged pion production for the LHC facility give the value of an order of 10 mb. We also estimate the excess of production of positively charged muons (as a decay of pions) created by cosmic ray proton collisions with the atmosphere gas nuclei to be in reasonable agreement with modern data. The effects of higher orders which reveal themselves as a screening factor are considered in terms of impact parameter representation. We estimate the cross section of pion pair production in central region to fall faster than factorial σn ∼ 1 / (n2 n !).

  17. Effect of nanomaterials on the compound action potential of the shore crab, Carcinus maenas.

    PubMed

    Windeatt, Kirsten M; Handy, Richard D

    2013-06-01

    Little is known about the effects of manufactured nanomaterials on the function of nerves. The experiment aimed to test the effects of three different nanomaterials (1 mg l⁻¹ of TiO₂ NPs, Ag NPs or SWCNT) on the compound action potential of the shore crab (Carcinus maenas) compared with an appropriate bulk powder or metal salt control (bulk TiO₂ powder, AgNO₃ and carbon black respectively). In single action potential recordings, there were no effects of any of the nanomaterials on the peak amplitude, duration, rate of rise (depolarisation), or rate of decrease (repolarisation) of the compound action potential in crab saline, despite settling of each nanomaterial directly onto the nerve preparation. The ability of the crab nerve to be stimulated to tetanus was also unaffected by exposure to the nanomaterials compared with the appropriate bulk powder or metal salt control. Solvent controls with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) also had no effect on action potentials. Overall, the study concludes that there were no effects of the materials at the concentrations tested on the compound action potential of the shore crab in physiological saline. PMID:22394242

  18. Renormalized effective actions in radially symmetric backgrounds: Exact calculations versus approximation methods

    SciTech Connect

    Dunne, Gerald V.; Hur, Jin; Lee, Choonkyu; Min, Hyunsoo

    2008-02-15

    Our previously developed calculational method (the partial-wave cutoff method) is employed to evaluate explicitly scalar one-loop effective actions in a class of radially symmetric background gauge fields. Our method proves to be particularly effective when it is used in conjunction with a systematic WKB series for the large partial-wave contribution to the effective action. By comparing these numerically exact calculations against the predictions based on the large-mass expansion and derivative expansion, we discuss the validity ranges of the latter approximation methods.

  19. Reviewing Biosphere Reserves globally: effective conservation action or bureaucratic label?

    PubMed

    Coetzer, Kaera L; Witkowski, Edward T F; Erasmus, Barend F N

    2014-02-01

    The Biosphere Reserve (BR) model of UNESCO's Man and the Biosphere Programme reflects a shift towards more accountable conservation. Biosphere Reserves attempt to reconcile environmental protection with sustainable development; they explicitly acknowledge humans, and human interests in the conservation landscape while still maintaining the ecological values of existing protected areas. Conceptually, this model is attractive, with 610 sites currently designated globally. Yet the practical reality of implementing dual 'conservation' and 'development' goals is challenging, with few examples successfully conforming to the model's full criteria. Here, we review the history of Biosphere Reserves from first inception in 1974 to the current status quo, and examine the suitability of the designation as an effective conservation model. We track the spatial expansion of Biosphere Reserves globally, assessing the influence of the Statutory Framework of the World Network of Biosphere Reserves and Seville strategy in 1995, when the BR concept refocused its core objectives on sustainable development. We use a comprehensive range of case studies to discuss conformity to the Programme, the social and ecological consequences associated with implementation of the designation, and challenges in aligning conservation and development. Given that the 'Biosphere Reserve' label is a relatively unknown designation in the public arena, this review also provides details on popularising the Biosphere Reserve brand, as well as prospects for further research, currently unexploited, but implicit in the designation.

  20. Dopaminergic action beyond its effects on motor function: imaging studies.

    PubMed

    Brooks, David J

    2006-08-01

    Along with motor programming, it is now thought that tonic release of dopamine in the striatum acts to focus and filter non-motor activities such as working memory, implicit learning, decision making, and planning. Additionally, thresholds to painful stimuli may well be dopamine dependant. Phasic (burst) release of dopamine in the basal ganglia and frontal areas is thought to play a role in alerting organisms to novel and potentially rewarding stimuli and in mediating contextual learning. Dopamine release also drives a craving for stimuli and facilitates their enjoyment. Functional imaging can help elucidate the role of dopamine in mediating non-motor activities. The integrity of dopamine terminal function can be measured with PET and SPECT in vivo in health and Parkinson's disease (PD) and this can be correlated with performance of executive tasks. In addition, these imaging modalities allow dopamine release in response to stimuli (both rewarding and unrewarding) to be detected, as reflected by changes in D2 receptor availability to radioligands. Finally, the functional effects of dopamine deficiency and its replacement can be monitored by studying patterns of brain activation, as evidenced by regional blood flow changes. In this review, some of the insights that imaging has given us concerning the role of dopamine in non-motor functions is presented.

  1. Effect of Action Video Games on the Spatial Distribution of Visuospatial Attention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, C. Shawn; Bavelier, Daphne

    2006-01-01

    The authors investigated the effect of action gaming on the spatial distribution of attention. The authors used the flanker compatibility effect to separately assess center and peripheral attentional resources in gamers versus nongamers. Gamers exhibited an enhancement in attentional resources compared with nongamers, not only in the periphery but…

  2. Effect of small scale motions on dynamo actions generated by the Beltrami-like flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Mingtian

    2016-08-01

    The geodynamo and solar dynamo are driven by the turbulent flows which involve motions of various scales. Of particular interest is what role is played by the small scale motions in these dynamos. In this paper, the integral equation approach is employed to investigate the effect of the small scale motions on dynamo actions driven by multiscale Beltrami-like flows in a cylindrical vessel. The result shows that some small scale motions can trigger a transition of a dynamo from a steady to an unsteady state. Our results also show that when the poloidal components of the small and large scale flows share the same direction in the equatorial plane, the small scale flows have more positive or less detrimental effect on the onsets of the dynamo actions in comparison with the case that the poloidal components have different directions. These findings shed light on the effect of the small scale turbulence on dynamo actions.

  3. The Combined Effect of Precession and Convection on the Dynamo Action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xing

    2016-08-01

    To understand the generation of the Earth’s magnetic field and those of other planets, we numerically investigate the combined effect of precession and convection on dynamo action in a spherical shell. Convection alone, precession alone, and the combined effect of convection and precession are studied at the low Ekman number at which the precessing flow is already unstable. The key result is that although precession or convection alone are not strong enough to support the dynamo action, the combined effect of precession and convection can support the dynamo action because of the resonance of precessional and convective instabilities. This result may explain why the geodynamo has been maintained for such a long time compared to the Martian dynamo.

  4. Tunneling and the validity of the low-momentum expansion of the effective action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Carl M.; Cooper, Fred; Freedman, Barry; Haymaker, Richard W.

    We investigate the validity of the low-momentum expansion of the effective action in a quantum mechanical version of scalar QED with hamiltonian H = {1}/{2}mφ 2+ {1}/{2}m Å2+ {1}/{24}λ [φ 2 - a 2] 2+ {1}/{2}e 2φ 2A 2. In a "Coleman-Weinberg" or Born-Oppenheimer approximation where the "photon" field A is treated exactly, we find that the validity of the low-momentum expansion of the effective action in determining instanton solutions is related to the validity of the WKB approximation for the "photon" propagator. We find that there is a regime in φ, where the naive WKB approximation breaks down. A more careful WKB calculation including turning points leads to an improved local potential. We calculate in this model the improved local potential and determine the correction to the instanton action.

  5. When moving without volition: implied self-causation enhances binding strength between involuntary actions and effects.

    PubMed

    Dogge, Myrthel; Schaap, Marloes; Custers, Ruud; Wegner, Daniel M; Aarts, Henk

    2012-03-01

    The conscious awareness of voluntary action is associated with systematic changes in time perception: The interval between actions and outcomes is experienced as compressed in time. Although this temporal binding is thought to result from voluntary movement and provides a window to the sense of agency, recent studies challenge this idea by demonstrating binding in involuntary movement. We offer a potential account for these findings by proposing that binding between involuntary actions and effects can occur when self-causation is implied. Participants made temporal judgements concerning a key press and a tone, while they learned to consider themselves as the cause of the effect or not. Results showed that implied self-causation (vs. no implied self-causation) increased temporal binding. Since intrinsic motor cues of movement were absent, these results suggest that sensory evidence about the key press caused binding in retrospect and in line with the participant's sense of being an agent.

  6. Community ACTION Boards: An Innovative Model for Effective Community–Academic Research Partnerships

    PubMed Central

    James, Sherline; Arniella, Guedy; Bickell, Nina A.; Walker, Willie; Robinson, Virginia; Taylor, Barbara; Horowitz, Carol R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Community-based participatory research (CBPR) requires equitable partnerships between community stakeholders and academics. Traditionally, researchers relied on community advisory boards, but these boards often play a reactive role on a project-by-project basis. The East and Central Harlem Health Outcomes (ECHHO) Community Action Board (CAB), however, is an effective, proactive group. Objectives The ECHHO board sought to identify key strategies and tools to build and employ a partnership model, and to disseminate lessons learned to other community–academic partnerships. Methods Current and former board members were interviewed and a wide range of related documents was reviewed. Lessons Learned The board became effective when it prioritized action and relationship-building, across seven key domains: Shared priorities, diversity, participation, transparency, mutual respect and recognition, and personal connections. The model is depicted graphically. Conclusion Community advisory boards may benefit from attention to taking action, and to building relationships between academics and community members. PMID:22616207

  7. Mitochondrial dysfunction has divergent, cell type-dependent effects on insulin action.

    PubMed

    Martin, Sheree D; Morrison, Shona; Konstantopoulos, Nicky; McGee, Sean L

    2014-07-01

    The contribution of mitochondrial dysfunction to insulin resistance is a contentious issue in metabolic research. Recent evidence implicates mitochondrial dysfunction as contributing to multiple forms of insulin resistance. However, some models of mitochondrial dysfunction fail to induce insulin resistance, suggesting greater complexity describes mitochondrial regulation of insulin action. We report that mitochondrial dysfunction is not necessary for cellular models of insulin resistance. However, impairment of mitochondrial function is sufficient for insulin resistance in a cell type-dependent manner, with impaired mitochondrial function inducing insulin resistance in adipocytes, but having no effect, or insulin sensitising effects in hepatocytes. The mechanism of mitochondrial impairment was important in determining the impact on insulin action, but was independent of mitochondrial ROS production. These data can account for opposing findings on this issue and highlight the complexity of mitochondrial regulation of cell type-specific insulin action, which is not described by current reductionist paradigms.

  8. Mitochondrial dysfunction has divergent, cell type-dependent effects on insulin action

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Sheree D.; Morrison, Shona; Konstantopoulos, Nicky; McGee, Sean L.

    2014-01-01

    The contribution of mitochondrial dysfunction to insulin resistance is a contentious issue in metabolic research. Recent evidence implicates mitochondrial dysfunction as contributing to multiple forms of insulin resistance. However, some models of mitochondrial dysfunction fail to induce insulin resistance, suggesting greater complexity describes mitochondrial regulation of insulin action. We report that mitochondrial dysfunction is not necessary for cellular models of insulin resistance. However, impairment of mitochondrial function is sufficient for insulin resistance in a cell type-dependent manner, with impaired mitochondrial function inducing insulin resistance in adipocytes, but having no effect, or insulin sensitising effects in hepatocytes. The mechanism of mitochondrial impairment was important in determining the impact on insulin action, but was independent of mitochondrial ROS production. These data can account for opposing findings on this issue and highlight the complexity of mitochondrial regulation of cell type-specific insulin action, which is not described by current reductionist paradigms. PMID:24944900

  9. Effect of Fuzheng Huayu formula and its actions against liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chenghai; Hu, Yiyang; Xu, Lieming; Liu, Cheng; Liu, Ping

    2009-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is a common histological process to develop into cirrhosis in various chronic liver diseases including chronic hepatitis and fatty liver. Therefore anti-liver fibrosis is very important strategy to treat chronic liver diseases. Fuzheng Huayu (FZHY), a preparation containing herbs such as Radix Salvia Miltiorrhizae, Cordyceps, Semen Persicae, was formulated on the basis of Chinese medicine theory in treating liver fibrosis and was approved. Pharmacological studies and clinical trials demonstrate that FZHY has a significant effect against liver fibrosis and that many of the pharmacological actions are attributable to the effect. This article reviews the effects and actions of FZHY, in particular the effects observed from clinical trials in treating liver fibrosis caused by chronic hepatitis B and the actions on inhibition of hepatic stellate cell activation, protection of hepatocytes and inhibition of hepatic sinusoidal capillarization. This article also reviews the coordinated effects of the constituent herbs of FZHY and the actions of their active compounds such as salvianonic acid B (SA-B) on liver fibrosis. PMID:19558726

  10. Wave action modifies the effects of consumer diversity and warming on algal assemblages.

    PubMed

    Mrowicki, Robert J; O'Connor, Nessa E

    2015-04-01

    To understand the consequences of biodiversity loss, it is necessary to test how biodiversity-ecosystem functioning relationships may vary with predicted environmental change. In particular, our understanding will be advanced by studies addressing the interactive effects of multiple stressors on the role of biodiversity across trophic levels. Predicted increases in wave disturbance and ocean warming, together with climate-driven range shifts of key consumer species, are likely to have profound impacts on the dynamics of coastal marine communities. We tested whether wave action and temperature modified the effects of gastropod grazer diversity (Patella vulgata, Littorina littorea, and Gibbula umbilicalis) on algal assemblages in experimental rock pools. The presence or absence of L. littorea appeared to drive changes in microalgal and macroalgal biomass and macroalgal assemblage structure. Macroalgal biomass also decreased with increasing grazer species richness, but only when wave action was enhanced. Further, independently of grazer diversity, wave action and temperature had interactive effects on macroalgal assemblage structure. Warming also led to a reversal of grazer-macroalgal interaction strengths from negative to positive, but only when there was no wave action. Our results show that hydrodynamic disturbance can exacerbate the effects of changing consumer diversity, and may also disrupt the influence of other environmental stressors on key consumer-resource interactions. These findings suggest that the combined effects of anticipated abiotic and biotic change on the functioning of coastal marine ecosystems, although difficult to predict, may be substantial. PMID:26230022

  11. The combined effects of action observation and passive proprioceptive training on adaptive motor learning.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yuming; Bao, Shancheng; Wang, Jinsung

    2016-09-01

    Sensorimotor adaptation can be induced by action observation, and also by passive training. Here, we investigated the effect of a protocol that combined action observation and passive training on visuomotor adaptation, by comparing it with the effect of action observation or passive training alone. Subjects were divided into five conditions during the training session: (1) action observation, in which the subjects watched a video of a model who adapted to a novel visuomotor rotation; (2) proprioceptive training, in which the subject's arm was moved passively to target locations that were associated with desired trajectories; (3) combined training, in which the subjects watched the video of a model during a half of the session and experienced passive movements during the other half; (4) active training, in which the subjects adapted actively to the rotation; and (5) a control condition, in which the subjects did not perform any task. Following that session, all subjects adapted to the same visuomotor rotation. Results showed that the subjects in the combined training condition adapted to the rotation significantly better than those in the observation or proprioceptive training condition, although their performance was not as good as that of those who adapted actively. These findings suggest that although a protocol that combines action observation and passive training consists of all the processes involved in active training (error detection and correction, effector-specific and proprioceptively based reaching movements), these processes in that protocol may work differently as compared to a protocol in which the same processes are engaged actively.

  12. Effective Rotations: Action Effects Determine the Interplay of Mental and Manual Rotations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janczyk, Markus; Pfister, Roland; Crognale, Michael A.; Kunde, Wilfried

    2012-01-01

    The last decades have seen a growing interest in the impact of action on perception and other concurrent cognitive processes. One particularly interesting example is that manual rotation actions facilitate mental rotations in the same direction. The present study extends this research in two fundamental ways. First, Experiment 1 demonstrates that…

  13. The rotational spectrum of the NiI radical in the X 2Delta(5/2) and A 2Pi(3/2) states.

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, Toru; Okabayashi, Emi Y; Koto, Fumi; Tanimoto, Mitsutoshi; Okabayashi, Toshiaki

    2006-06-14

    The millimeter- and submillimeter-wave spectra of the NiI radical in the X (2)Delta(5/2) and A (2)Pi(3/2) states were observed by a source-modulated microwave spectrometer. The NiI radical was generated by a dc glow discharge in the mixture of CH(3)I vapor and Ar gas through the sputtering reaction with a Ni cathode. Observed transition frequencies for each electronic state were independently analyzed using a polynomial energy expression based on Hund's case (c) approximation. The deperturbed rotational constants were also estimated by the perturbation analysis including interaction terms between the ground state and the lowest excited state.

  14. Einstein coefficients for rotational lines of the (0,0) band of the NO A2sigma(+)-X2Pi system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reisel, John R.; Carter, Campbell D.; Laurendeau, Normand M.

    1992-01-01

    A summary of the spectroscopic equations necessary for prediction of the molecular transition energies and the Einstein A and B coefficients for rovibronic lines of the gamma(0,0) band of nitric oxide (NO) is presented. The calculated molecular transition energies are all within 0.57/cm of published experimental values; in addition, over 95 percent of the calculated energies give agreement with measured results within 0.25/cm. Einstein coefficients are calculated from the band A00 value and the known Hoenl-London factors and are tabulated for individual rovibronic transitions in the NO A2sigma(+)-X2Pi(0,0) band.

  15. Perturbing the action observation network during perception and categorization of actions' goals and grips: state-dependency and virtual lesion TMS effects.

    PubMed

    Jacquet, Pierre O; Avenanti, Alessio

    2015-03-01

    Watching others grasping and using objects activates an action observation network (AON), including inferior frontal (IFC), anterior intraparietal (AIP), and somatosensory cortices (S1). Yet, causal evidence of the differential involvement of such AON sensorimotor nodes in representing high- and low-level action components (i.e., end-goals and grip type) is meager. To address this issue, we used transcranial magnetic stimulation-adaptation (TMS-A) during 2 novel action perception tasks. Participants were shown adapting movies displaying a demonstrator performing goal-directed actions with a tool, using either power or precision grips. They were then asked to match the end-goal (Goal-recognition task) or the grip (Grip-recognition task) of actions shown in test pictures to the adapting movies. TMS was administered over IFC, AIP, or S1 during presentation of test pictures. Virtual lesion-like effects were found in the Grip-recognition task where IFC stimulation induced a general performance decrease, suggesting a critical role of IFC in perceiving grips. In the Goal-recognition task, IFC and S1 stimulation differently affected the processing of "adapted" and "nonadapted" goals. These "state-dependent" effects suggest that the overall goal of seen actions is encoded into functionally distinct and spatially overlapping neural populations in IFC-S1 and such encoding is critical for recognizing and understanding end-goals.

  16. Positive Education for School Leaders: Exploring the Effects of Emotion-Gratitude and Action-Gratitude

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Lea; Stokes, Helen

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study describes the effect of two gratitude interventions designed to trigger emotion-gratitude (gratitude diary) and action-gratitude (gratitude letter) in school leaders. Case study methodology was applied to analyse reflective journals of 27 school leaders. The gratitude diary served to foster a more balanced view of the…

  17. Learned Patterns of Action-Effect Anticipation Contribute to the Spatial Displacement of Continuously Moving Stimuli

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, J. Scott; Hunsinger, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    When participants control the horizontal movements of a stimulus and indicate its vanishing point after it unexpectedly vanishes, the perceived vanishing point is displaced beyond the actual vanishing point, and the size of the displacement is directly related to the action-effect anticipation one has to generate to successfully control the…

  18. Effects of Movement Velocity and Maximal Concentric and Eccentric Actions on the Bilateral Deficit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickin, D. Clark; Too, Danny

    2006-01-01

    This study was performed to examine the effects of movement velocity and maximal concentric and eccentric actions on the bilateral deficit. Eighteen female participants performed maximal unilateral and bilateral knee extensions concentrically and eccentrically across six movement velocities (30, 60, 90, 120, 150, and 180[degrees]/s). Repeated…

  19. Action Naming in Anomic Aphasic Speakers: Effects of Instrumentality and Name Relation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jonkers, Roel; Bastiaanse, Roelien

    2007-01-01

    Many studies reveal effects of verb type on verb retrieval, mainly in agrammatic aphasic speakers. In the current study, two factors that might play a role in action naming in anomic aphasic speakers were considered: the conceptual factor instrumentality and the lexical factor name relation to a noun. Instrumental verbs were shown to be better…

  20. Nonperturbative corrections to 4D string theory effective actions from SL(2,Z) duality and supersymmetry.

    PubMed

    Robles-Llana, Daniel; Rocek, Martin; Saueressig, Frank; Theis, Ulrich; Vandoren, Stefan

    2007-05-25

    We find the D(-1)- and D1-brane instanton contributions to the hypermultiplet moduli space of type IIB string compactifications on Calabi-Yau threefolds. These combine with known perturbative and world sheet instanton corrections into a single modular invariant function that determines the hypermultiplet low-energy effective action.

  1. 21 CFR 25.60 - Environmental effects abroad of major agency actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Environmental effects abroad of major agency actions. 25.60 Section 25.60 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT CONSIDERATIONS Other Requirements § 25.60 Environmental...

  2. 21 CFR 25.60 - Environmental effects abroad of major agency actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Environmental effects abroad of major agency actions. 25.60 Section 25.60 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT CONSIDERATIONS Other Requirements § 25.60 Environmental...

  3. Characterizing Teaching Effectiveness in the Joint Action Theory in Didactics: An Exploratory Study in Primary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sensevy, Gérard

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an exploratory study of two consecutive reading sessions conducted in primary school by two different teachers. Our purpose is twofold. From a theoretical viewpoint, we propose a tentative set of conditions of teaching effectiveness by relying on the Joint Action Theory in Didactics. From a methodological viewpoint, drawing on…

  4. Effects of Differentiated Instruction on Students' Attitudes Towards Turkish Courses: An Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karadag, Ruhan; Yasar, Sefik

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the effects of differentiated instruction approach on students' attitudes in Turkish course. The study was carried out through an action research approach and conducted with the 5th grade students in Turkey. Data of the study were collected through Turkish Course Attitude Scale and semi-structured…

  5. The Effects of Issue Investigation and Action Training on Environmental Behavior in Seventh Grade Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramsey, John M.; Hungerford, Harold

    1989-01-01

    This study reports the instructional effects of issue investigation and action training on the environmental behavior of middle school students. Discussed are the methodology including training and modules, the design of the study, instruments used, scoring protocols, and analysis of results. (Author/CW)

  6. The Effects of Single Laban Effort Action Instruction on Undergraduate Conducting Students' Gestural Clarity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, John T., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of Laban Effort Action (slash) instruction in an undergraduate conducting class on college wind ensemble member's ratings of conductors' gestural clarity. Participants--undergraduate and graduate wind ensemble members (N = 28)--rated 32 videos of eight undergraduate conducting students who had…

  7. Effects of the "Positive Action" Program on Indicators of Positive Youth Development among Urban Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Kendra M.; Vuchinich, Samuel; Ji, Peter; DuBois, David L.; Acock, Alan; Bavarian, Niloofar; Day, Joseph; Silverthorn, Naida; Flay, Brian R.

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated effects of "Positive Action," a school-based social-emotional and character development intervention, on indicators of positive youth development (PYD) among a sample of low-income, ethnic minority youth attending 14 urban schools. The study used a matched-pair, cluster-randomized controlled design at the school…

  8. Toward a Psychophysics of Agency: Detecting Gain and Loss of Control over Auditory Action Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Repp, Bruno H.; Knoblich, Gunther

    2007-01-01

    Theories of agency--the feeling of being in control of one's actions and their effects--emphasize either perceptual or cognitive aspects. This study addresses both aspects simultaneously in a finger-tapping paradigm. The tasks required participants to detect when synchronization of their taps with computer-controlled tones changed to…

  9. Alternative Measures for Assessing Affirmative Action Effectiveness. AIR 1989 Annual Forum Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staub, Kay

    Assessments of institutional effectiveness in affirmative action tend to take either a simple, bottom-line approach (tracking number and percentage of female/minority faculty) or a sophisticated multiple regression-based approach (evaluating rank or salary equity). Either approach may obscure or overlook positive changes occurring within…

  10. Nonperturbative corrections to 4D string theory effective actions from SL(2,Z) duality and supersymmetry.

    PubMed

    Robles-Llana, Daniel; Rocek, Martin; Saueressig, Frank; Theis, Ulrich; Vandoren, Stefan

    2007-05-25

    We find the D(-1)- and D1-brane instanton contributions to the hypermultiplet moduli space of type IIB string compactifications on Calabi-Yau threefolds. These combine with known perturbative and world sheet instanton corrections into a single modular invariant function that determines the hypermultiplet low-energy effective action. PMID:17677762

  11. Using Action Research Interventions to Improve the Effectiveness of an Executive Team

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarty, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to conduct an in-depth investigation of an executive team, to determine which internal and external factors impacted the team and to determine in what ways action research interventions improved the team's effectiveness. Methodology: The subjects in this study were seven members of a school district…

  12. Action Control and Dispositional Hope: An Examination of Their Effect on Self-Regulated Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papantoniou, Georgia; Moraitou, Despina; Katsadima, Effie; Dinou, Magda

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The present study examined the effect of action control (i.e., disengagement, initiative, and persistence) and dispositional hope (i.e., pathways thought, and agency thinking) on self-regulated learning strategy use (i.e., cognitive, metacognitive, and resource management) and course achievement. Method: A total of 275 undergraduate…

  13. Action Research: Effects of Self-Efficacy Training on Low Achieving Freshmen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haselden, Polly G.; Sanders, Marla; Sturkie, Lindsay

    2012-01-01

    This action research project investigated the effects of self-efficacy training on low achieving high school freshman who were considered to be at risk for academic failure. Six students participated in psycho-educational group counseling sessions for forty-five minutes weekly over the course of a nine-week reporting period. Findings indicated…

  14. The Effects of the Coordination Support on Shared Mental Models and Coordinated Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Hyunsong; Kim, Dongsik

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of coordination support (tool support and tutor support) on the development of shared mental models (SMMs) and coordinated action in a computer-supported collaborative learning environment. Eighteen students were randomly assigned to one of three conditions, including the tool condition, the…

  15. 21 CFR 25.60 - Environmental effects abroad of major agency actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Environmental effects abroad of major agency actions. 25.60 Section 25.60 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... subject to the exemptions, exclusions, and modification in contents, timing, and availability of...

  16. 21 CFR 25.60 - Environmental effects abroad of major agency actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Environmental effects abroad of major agency actions. 25.60 Section 25.60 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... subject to the exemptions, exclusions, and modification in contents, timing, and availability of...

  17. Antifertility effect and some pharmacological actions of Butea frondosa seed extracts.

    PubMed

    Razdan, M K; Kapila, K; Bhide, N K

    1969-10-01

    The antifertility effects and pharmacological actions of Betea fronosa seed extracts are reported. An alcoholic extract, chloroform extract, and an aqueous extract were tested. Drugs were administered in 6 female mice 5 days after mating. Laparotomy was performed on the 10th day of pregnancy to observe the implants and delivery by Cesarean section was made at 20 days. Female rats were similarly treated. Female rats were studied as well for estreus cycle and mating behavior under the influence of the drug. Antiestrogenic activity was tested in mature mice and androgenic activity was tested in immature male mice at 6 different extract doses. Decidual cell reaction was tested in rats with pseudopregnancy given different doses of the extract daily. Abortifacient and teratogenic actions were studied. Pharmacological studies included antiinflammatory studies, isolated tissues, blood pressure and respiration, diuretic action, and acute toxicity. Results indicate only the alcohol extract to be active. It has a distinct antifertility effect in rats but without a clearcut dose-response relationship. There was an incomplete suppression of fertility at 100 mg/kg. Estreus cycle was uneffected by the extracts although there was delayed mating in half the animals and a significant reduction in offspring. There was some inhibition of ovulation produced by the extract. Differences between controls and treated groups were insignificant regarding antiestrogenic activity and androgenic activity. There was a partial blocking of the decidual cell reaction. Complete resorption of implants was seen in 4 out of 5 mice when the extract was given at 1 gm/kg. The only other pharmacological action noted was inhibition of the action of acetylcholine and histamine on the guinea pig ileum. Pharamcodynamic and toxic effects are probably unrelated to the antifertility action of the extract.

  18. DPB hydrogen getters on Pd (110) - its action and the effect of impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, A; Gee, R

    2005-03-11

    Density Functional Theory (DFT) is used to investigate the action of hydrogen getter 1,4-diphenyl-butadiyne, or DPB, on Pd(110) surface. We study reaction pathways and energetics of several relevant processes, including H{sub 2} adsorption, dissociation and migration on the metal surface, getter-metal interaction, and the energetics of H uptake by the getter. We also explore the effect of impurities like CO and CO{sub 2} on the action of the getter. Activation barriers for certain reactions are computed to shed light on the feasibility of such processes at room temperature.

  19. Induced low-energy effective action in the 6D, N = (1 , 0) hypermultiplet theory on the vector multiplet background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchbinder, I. L.; Merzlikin, B. S.; Pletnev, N. G.

    2016-08-01

    We consider the six dimensional N = (1 , 0) hypermultiplet model coupled to an external field of the Abelian vector multiplet in harmonic superspace approach. Using the superfield proper-time technique we find the divergent part of the effective action and derive the complete finite induced low-energy superfield effective action. This effective action depends on external field and contains in bosonic sector all the powers of the constant Maxwell field strength. The obtained result can be treated as the 6D, N = (1 , 0) supersymmetric Heisenberg-Euler type effective action.

  20. The Effects of Maintenance Actions on the PFDavg of Spring Operated Pressure Relief Valves

    DOE PAGES

    Harris, S.; Gross, R.; Goble, W; Bukowski, J

    2015-12-01

    The safety integrity level (SIL) of equipment used in safety instrumented functions is determined by the average probability of failure on demand (PFDavg) computed at the time of periodic inspection and maintenance, i.e., the time of proof testing. The computation of PFDavg is generally based solely on predictions or estimates of the assumed constant failure rate of the equipment. However, PFDavg is also affected by maintenance actions (or lack thereof) taken by the end user. This paper shows how maintenance actions can affect the PFDavg of spring operated pressure relief valves (SOPRV) and how these maintenance actions may be accountedmore » for in the computation of the PFDavg metric. The method provides a means for quantifying the effects of changes in maintenance practices and shows how these changes impact plant safety.« less

  1. The Effects of Maintenance Actions on the PFDavg of Spring Operated Pressure Relief Valves

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, S.; Gross, R.; Goble, W; Bukowski, J

    2015-12-01

    The safety integrity level (SIL) of equipment used in safety instrumented functions is determined by the average probability of failure on demand (PFDavg) computed at the time of periodic inspection and maintenance, i.e., the time of proof testing. The computation of PFDavg is generally based solely on predictions or estimates of the assumed constant failure rate of the equipment. However, PFDavg is also affected by maintenance actions (or lack thereof) taken by the end user. This paper shows how maintenance actions can affect the PFDavg of spring operated pressure relief valves (SOPRV) and how these maintenance actions may be accounted for in the computation of the PFDavg metric. The method provides a means for quantifying the effects of changes in maintenance practices and shows how these changes impact plant safety.

  2. THE EFFECTS OF MAINTENANCE ACTIONS ON THE PFDavg OF SPRING OPERATED PRESSURE RELIEF VALVES

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, S.; Gross, R.

    2014-04-01

    The safety integrity level (SIL) of equipment used in safety instrumented functions is determined by the average probability of failure on demand (PFDavg) computed at the time of periodic inspection and maintenance, i.e., the time of proof testing. The computation of PFDavg is generally based solely on predictions or estimates of the assumed constant failure rate of the equipment. However, PFDavg is also affected by maintenance actions (or lack thereof) taken by the end user. This paper shows how maintenance actions can affect the PFDavg of spring operated pressure relief valves (SOPRV) and how these maintenance actions may be accounted for in the computation of the PFDavg metric. The method provides a means for quantifying the effects of changes in maintenance practices and shows how these changes impact plant safety.

  3. Rotationally resolved pulsed-field ionization photoelectron bands for O{sub 2}{sup +}(A {sup 2}{pi}{sub u},v{sup +}=0-12) in the energy range of 17.0-18.2 eV

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Y.; Evans, M.; Ng, C. Y.; Hsu, C.-W.; Jarvis, G. K.

    2000-01-15

    We have obtained rotationally resolved pulsed-field ionization photoelectron (PFI-PE) spectra for O{sub 2} in the energy range of 17.05-18.13 eV, covering the ionization transitions O{sub 2}{sup +}(A {sup 2}{pi}{sub u},v{sup +}=0-12,N{sup +})(<-)O{sub 2}(X {sup 3}{sigma}{sub g}{sup -},v{sup ''}=0,N{sup ''}). Although these O{sub 2}{sup +}(A {sup 2}{pi}{sub u},v{sup +}) PFI-PE bands have significant overlaps with vibrational bands for O{sub 2}{sup +}(a {sup 4}{pi}{sub u}) and O{sub 2}{sup +}(X {sup 2}{pi}{sub g}), we have identified all the O{sub 2}{sup +}(A {sup 2}{pi}{sub u},v{sup +}=0-12) bands by simulation of spectra obtained using supersonically cooled O{sub 2} samples with rotational temperatures {approx_equal}20 and 220 K. While these v{sup +}=0-12 PFI-PE bands represent the first rotationally resolved photoelectron data for O{sub 2}{sup +}(A {sup 2}{pi}{sub u}), the PFI-PE bands for O{sub 2}{sup +}(A {sup 2}{pi}{sub u},v{sup +}=9 and 10) are the first rotationally resolved spectroscopic data for these levels. The simulation also allows the determination of accurate ionization energies, vibrational constants, and rotational constants for O{sub 2}{sup +}(A {sup 2}{pi}{sub u},v{sup +}=0-12). The analysis of the PFI-PE spectra supports the conclusion of the previous emission study that the O{sub 2}{sup +}(A {sup 2}{pi}{sub u},v{sup +}=9 and 10) states are strongly perturbed by a nearby electronic state. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  4. Feature activation during word recognition: action, visual, and associative-semantic priming effects

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Kevin J. Y.; Dijkstra, Ton; Rueschemeyer, Shirley-Ann

    2015-01-01

    Embodied theories of language postulate that language meaning is stored in modality-specific brain areas generally involved in perception and action in the real world. However, the temporal dynamics of the interaction between modality-specific information and lexical-semantic processing remain unclear. We investigated the relative timing at which two types of modality-specific information (action-based and visual-form information) contribute to lexical-semantic comprehension. To this end, we applied a behavioral priming paradigm in which prime and target words were related with respect to (1) action features, (2) visual features, or (3) semantically associative information. Using a Go/No-Go lexical decision task, priming effects were measured across four different inter-stimulus intervals (ISI = 100, 250, 400, and 1000 ms) to determine the relative time course of the different features. Notably, action priming effects were found in ISIs of 100, 250, and 1000 ms whereas a visual priming effect was seen only in the ISI of 1000 ms. Importantly, our data suggest that features follow different time courses of activation during word recognition. In this regard, feature activation is dynamic, measurable in specific time windows but not in others. Thus the current study (1) demonstrates how multiple ISIs can be used within an experiment to help chart the time course of feature activation and (2) provides new evidence for embodied theories of language. PMID:26074836

  5. Priming tool actions: Are real objects more effective primes than pictures?

    PubMed

    Squires, Scott D; Macdonald, Scott N; Culham, Jody C; Snow, Jacqueline C

    2016-04-01

    Humans are faster to grasp an object such as a tool if they have previewed the same object beforehand. This priming effect is strongest when actors gesture the use of the tool rather than simply move it, possibly because the previewed tool activates action-specific routines in dorsal-stream motor networks. Here, we examined whether real tools, which observers could physically act upon, serve as more potent primes than two-dimensional images of tools, which do not afford physical action. Participants were presented with a prime stimulus that could be either a real tool or a visually matched photograph of a tool. After a brief delay, participants interacted with a real tool target, either by 'grasping to move,' or 'grasping to use' it. The identities of the prime and target tools were either the same (congruent trials; e.g., spatula-spatula) or different (incongruent trials; e.g., whisk-spatula). As expected, participants were faster to initiate grasps during trials when they had to move the tool rather than gesture its use. Priming effects were observed for grasp-to-use, but not grasp-to-move, responses. Surprisingly, however, both pictures of tools and real tools primed action responses equally. Our results indicate that tool priming effects are driven by pictorial cues and their implied actions, even in the absence of volumetric cues that reflect the tangibility and affordances of the prime.

  6. Applauding with Closed Hands: Neural Signature of Action-Sentence Compatibility Effects

    PubMed Central

    Aravena, Pia; Hurtado, Esteban; Riveros, Rodrigo; Cardona, Juan Felipe; Manes, Facundo; Ibáñez, Agustín

    2010-01-01

    Background Behavioral studies have provided evidence for an action–sentence compatibility effect (ACE) that suggests a coupling of motor mechanisms and action-sentence comprehension. When both processes are concurrent, the action sentence primes the actual movement, and simultaneously, the action affects comprehension. The aim of the present study was to investigate brain markers of bidirectional impact of language comprehension and motor processes. Methodology/Principal Findings Participants listened to sentences describing an action that involved an open hand, a closed hand, or no manual action. Each participant was asked to press a button to indicate his/her understanding of the sentence. Each participant was assigned a hand-shape, either closed or open, which had to be used to activate the button. There were two groups (depending on the assigned hand-shape) and three categories (compatible, incompatible and neutral) defined according to the compatibility between the response and the sentence. ACEs were found in both groups. Brain markers of semantic processing exhibited an N400-like component around the Cz electrode position. This component distinguishes between compatible and incompatible, with a greater negative deflection for incompatible. Motor response elicited a motor potential (MP) and a re-afferent potential (RAP), which are both enhanced in the compatible condition. Conclusions/Significance The present findings provide the first ACE cortical measurements of semantic processing and the motor response. N400-like effects suggest that incompatibility with motor processes interferes in sentence comprehension in a semantic fashion. Modulation of motor potentials (MP and RAP) revealed a multimodal semantic facilitation of the motor response. Both results provide neural evidence of an action-sentence bidirectional relationship. Our results suggest that ACE is not an epiphenomenal post-sentence comprehension process. In contrast, motor-language integration

  7. Promoting the translation of intentions into action by implementation intentions: behavioral effects and physiological correlates

    PubMed Central

    Wieber, Frank; Thürmer, J. Lukas; Gollwitzer, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    The present review addresses the physiological correlates of planning effects on behavior. Although intentions to act qualify as predictors of behavior, accumulated evidence indicates that there is a substantial gap between even strong intentions and subsequent action. One effective strategy to reduce this intention–behavior gap is the formation of implementation intentions that specify when, where, and how to act on a given goal in an if-then format (“If I encounter situation Y, then I will initiate action Z!”). It has been proposed that implementation intentions render the mental representation of the situation highly accessible and establish a strong associative link between the mental representations of the situation and the action. These process assumptions have been examined in behavioral research, and in physiological research, a field that has begun to investigate the temporal dynamics of and brain areas involved in implementation intention effects. In the present review, we first summarize studies on the cognitive processes that are central to the strategic automation of action control by implementation intentions. We then examine studies involving critical samples with impaired self-regulation. Lastly, we review studies that have applied physiological measures such as heart rate, cortisol level, and eye movement, as well as electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies on the neural correlates of implementation intention effects. In support of the assumed processes, implementation intentions increased goal attainment in studies on cognitive processes and in critical samples, modulated brain waves related to perceptual and decision processes, and generated less activity in brain areas associated with effortful action control. In our discussion, we reflect on the status quo of physiological research on implementation intentions, methodological and conceptual issues, related research, and propose future

  8. The mRNA expression of DRD2, PI3KCB, and AKT1 in the blood of acute schizophrenia patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liang; Luo, Yin; Zhang, Guofu; Jin, Chunhui; Zhou, Zhenhe; Cheng, Zaohuo; Yuan, Guozhen

    2016-09-30

    The phosphoinositide 3 kinase - protein kinase B (PI3K-Akt) signaling pathway plays an important role in the dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) pathway and in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. This study measured the mRNA levels of DRD2, PI3KCB, and AKT1 in peripheral blood samples from 24 acute schizophrenia patients and 20 healthy controls using real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (real-time qRT-PCR). We found that in the acute schizophrenia patients, the mRNA expression levels of DRD2 and PI3KCB were significantly lower than those in the healthy controls, while the AKT1 mRNA levels were significantly higher than those in the healthy controls. A significant relationship between the mRNA levels of DRD2 and PI3KCB was found only in the controls. In conclusion, the gene expression state of the DRD2-PI3K-AKT signaling cascade differed significantly between acute schizophrenia patients and healthy controls. PMID:27449010

  9. Linear response theory for symmetry improved two particle irreducible effective actions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Michael J.; Whittingham, Ian B.; Kosov, Daniel S.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the linear response of an O (N ) scalar quantum field theory subject to external perturbations using the symmetry-improved two-particle irreducible effective action (SI-2PIEA) formalism [A. Pilaftsis and D. Teresi, Nucl. Phys. B874, 594 (2013)]. Despite satisfactory equilibrium behavior, we find a number of unphysical effects at the linear response level. Goldstone boson field fluctuations are overdetermined, with the only consistent solution being to set the fluctuations and their driving sources to zero, except for momentum modes where the Higgs and Goldstone self-energies obey a particular relationship. Also Higgs field fluctuations propagate masslessly, despite the Higgs propagator having the correct mass. These pathologies are independent of any truncation of the effective action and still exist even if we relax the overdetermining Ward identities, so long as the constraint is formulated O (N ) covariantly. We discuss possible reasons for the apparent incompatibility of the constraints and linear response approximation and possible ways forward.

  10. Entrainment and task co-representation effects for discrete and continuous action sequences.

    PubMed

    van der Wel, Robrecht P R D; Fu, En

    2015-12-01

    A large body of work has established an influence of other people's actions on our own actions. For example, actors entrain to the movements of others, in studies that typically employ continuous movements. Likewise, studies on co-representation have shown that people automatically co-represent a co-actor's task, in studies that typically employ discrete actions. Here we examined entrainment and co-representation within a single task paradigm. Participants sat next to a confederate while simultaneously moving their right hand back and forth between two targets. We crossed whether or not the participant and the confederate moved over an obstacle and manipulated whether participants generated discrete or continuous movement sequences, while varying the space between the actors and whether the actors could see each other's movements. Participants moved higher when the confederate cleared an obstacle than when he did not. For continuous movements, this effect depended on the availability of visual information, as would be expected on the basis of entrainment. In contrast, the co-actor's task modulated the height of discrete movements, regardless of the availability of visual information, which is consistent with co-representation. Space did not have an effect. These results provide new insights into the interplay between co-representation and entrainment for discrete- and continuous-action tasks. PMID:25911443

  11. Positive mood + action = negative mood + inaction: effects of general action and inaction concepts on decisions and performance as a function of affect.

    PubMed

    Albarracin, Dolores; Hart, William

    2011-08-01

    General action and inaction concepts have been shown to produce broad, goal-mediated effects on cognitive and motor activity irrespective of the type of activity. The current research tested a model in which action and inaction goals interact with the valence of incidental moods to guide behavior. Over four experiments, participants' moods were manipulated to be positive (happy), neutral, or negative (angry or sad), and then general action, inaction, and neutral concepts were primed. In Experiment 1, action primes increased intellectual performance when participants experienced a positive (happy) or neutral mood, whereas inaction primes increased performance when participants experienced a negative (angry) mood. Including a control-prime condition, Experiments 2 and 3 replicated these results measuring the number of general interest articles participants were willing to read and participants' memory for pictures of celebrities. Experiment 4 replicated the results comparing happiness with sadness and suggested that the effect of the prime's adoption was automatic. Overall, the findings supported an interactive model by which action concepts and positive affect produce the same increases in active behavior as inaction concepts and negative affect.

  12. The characteristics of action potentials in primo vessels and the effects of acetylcholine injection to the action potentials.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seong Jin; Lim, Jaekwan; Yeon, Sun Hee; Kwon, O Sang; Choi, Kwang-Ho; Choi, Sun-Mi; Ryu, Yeon-Hee

    2013-01-01

    In a previous study, we found that Primo vessels generate different action potentials in smooth muscles, but this study compared the pulse shape to distinguish the two tissues. Thus, a more sophisticated extracellular experiment was performed in this study using an acetylcholine injection; we then observed changes in the amplitude, FWHM (full width at half maximum), and period to explore Primo vessel function. A third type of pulse was recorded for Primo vessels. We observed fast depolarizing and repolarizing phases for this pulse. Further, its FWHM was 30 ms between smooth muscles and neurons. Acetylcholine affected only the period. The amplitude and FWHM were consistent after injection. Primo-vessels generated action potentials at twice the frequency after injection. From the results, we speculate that Primo-vessels perform a role in transferring signals in a different manner, which may be relevant for acupuncture treatment.

  13. Discretization effects and the scalar meson correlator in mixed-action lattice simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Aubin, C.; Laiho, Jack; Van de Water, Ruth S.

    2008-06-01

    We study discretization effects in a mixed-action lattice theory with domain-wall valence quarks and Asqtad-improved staggered sea quarks. At the level of the chiral effective Lagrangian, discretization effects in the mixed-action theory give rise to two new parameters as compared to the lowest order Lagrangian for rooted-staggered fermions - the residual quark mass m{sub res} and the mixed valence-sea meson mass splitting {delta}{sub mix}. We find that m{sub res}, which parametrizes explicit chiral symmetry breaking in the mixed-action theory, is approximately one-quarter the size of our lightest valence quark mass on our coarser lattice spacing and of comparable size to that of simulations by the RBC and UKQCD Collaborations. We also find that the size of {delta}{sub mix} is comparable to the size of the smallest of the staggered meson taste splittings measured by the MILC Collaboration. Because lattice artifacts are different in the valence and sea sectors of the mixed-action theory, they give rise to unitarity-violating effects that disappear in the continuum limit, some of which should be described by mixed-action chiral perturbation theory (MA{chi}PT). Such effects are expected to be mild for many quantities of interest but are expected to be significant in the case of the isovector scalar (a{sub 0}) correlator. Specifically, once the parameters m{sub res}, {delta}{sub mix}, and two others that can be determined from the light pseudoscalar meson spectrum are known, the two-particle intermediate state 'bubble' contribution to the scalar correlator is completely predicted within MA{chi}PT. We find that the behavior of the scalar meson correlator is quantitatively consistent with the MA{chi}PT prediction; this supports the claim that MA{chi}PT describes the dominant unitarity-violating effects in the mixed-action theory and can therefore be used to remove lattice artifacts and recover physical quantities.

  14. Diosgenin, 4-hydroxyisoleucine, and fiber from fenugreek: mechanisms of actions and potential effects on metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Scott; Stephens, Jacqueline M

    2015-03-01

    Metabolic syndrome and its complications continue to rise in prevalence and show no signs of abating in the immediate future. Therefore, the search for effective treatments is a high priority in biomedical research. Products derived from botanicals have a time-honored history of use in the treatment of metabolic diseases including type 2 diabetes. Trigonella foenum-graecum, commonly known as fenugreek, is an annual herbaceous plant that has been a staple of traditional herbal medicine in many cultures. Although fenugreek has been studied in both clinical and basic research settings, questions remain about its efficacy and biologic mechanisms of action. Diosgenin, 4-hydroxyisoleucine, and the fiber component of the plant are the most intensively studied bioactive constituents present in fenugreek. These compounds have been demonstrated to exert beneficial effects on several physiologic markers including glucose tolerance, inflammation, insulin action, liver function, blood lipids, and cardiovascular health. Although insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the favorable effects of fenugreek have been gained, we still do not have definitive evidence establishing its role as a therapeutic agent in metabolic disease. This review aims to summarize the currently available evidence on the physiologic effects of the 3 best-characterized bioactive compounds of fenugreek, with particular emphasis on biologic mechanisms of action relevant in the context of metabolic syndrome. PMID:25770257

  15. Cost-effectiveness of organ donation: evaluating investment into donor action and other donor initiatives.

    PubMed

    Whiting, James F; Kiberd, Bryce; Kalo, Zoltan; Keown, Paul; Roels, Leo; Kjerulf, Maria

    2004-04-01

    Initiatives aimed at increasing organ donation can be considered health care interventions, and will compete with other health care interventions for limited resources. We have developed a model capable of calculating the cost-utility of organ donor initiatives and applied it to Donor Action, a successful international program designed to optimize donor practices. The perspective of the payer in the Canadian health care system was chosen. A Markov model was developed to estimate the net present value incremental lifetime direct medical costs and quality adjusted life years (QALYs) as a consequence of increased kidney transplantation rates. Cost-saving and cost-effectiveness thresholds were calculated. The effects of changing the success rate and time frame of the intervention was examined as a sensitivity analysis. Transplantation results in a gain of 1.99 QALYs and a cost savings of Can$104,000 over the 20-year time frame compared with waiting on dialysis. Implementation of an intervention such as Donor Action, which produced as few as three extra donors per million population, would be cost-effective at a cost of Can$1.0 million per million population. The cost-effectiveness of Donor Action and other organ donor initiatives compare favorably to other health care interventions. Organ donation may be underfunded in North America.

  16. Low Energy Effective Action of Quantum Gravity and the Naturalness Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Hikaru

    2013-02-01

    In quantum gravity or string theory, it is natural to take the topology change of the space into account. We consider the low energy effective action for such case and show that it does not have a simple form of the local action but has a multilocal form. Actually, in quantum gravity or matrix model, there are some mechanisms that the low energy effective action becomes Seff = \\sumici Si + \\sumijcijSiSj + \\sumijkcijk Si Sj Sk + \\ctdot, where Si is a local action of the form Si = \\int dDx√ {g(x)}Oi(x). We further discuss that the topology change of the space naturally leads to the multiverse in which indefinite number of macroscopic universes exist in parallel. In this case, the space-time coordinates x in the multilocal action may sit either in the same universe or in different ones. We then consider the wave function of the entire multiverse, and see how the locality and causality are recovered in such theory. We further discuss the possibility of solving the naturalness problem. In doing so, we need to introduce some assumptions to interpret the multiverse wave function. We consider two different possibilities. One is to simply assume the probabilistic interpretation for the multiverse wave function. The other is to assume infrared cutoff independence of the partition function of the universe. In both cases, we find that the big fix occurs, in which all the coupling constants in the low energy physics are determined by the dynamics of the multiverse. Actually, we find that they are fixed in such a way that the total entropy of the universe at the late stage (in the far future) is maximized. Although the argument here is similar to Coleman's original one given in the late 1980s, our results are based on Lorentzian signature theory and the dynamical mechanism is rather different.

  17. Effectiveness and sustainability of remedial actions for land restoration in Abeokuta urban communities, Ogun State, Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawal-Adebowale, Okanlade

    2016-04-01

    Land as a major collective human property faces a great deal of threats and eventual degradation from both natural and human causal factors across the globe. But for the central role of land in human's sustenance and quality living, man cannot afford to lose its natural asset and as such takes mitigating or remedial actions to save and restore his land for sustainable use. In view of this, the study assessed the causal factors of land degradation in urban areas of Abeokuta and effectiveness and sustainability of the taken remedial actions to stem the tide of land degradation in the study area. The selected communities were purposively selected based on the observed prevalence of degraded lands in the areas. A qualitative research approach which encompasses observational techniques - participant/field observation, interactive discussion and photographic capturing, was used for collection of data on land degradation in the study area. A combination of phenomenological, inductive thematic analysis and conversation/discourse analysis was employed for data analysis. The results showed land gradients/slopes, rainfall, run-offs/erosion, land-entrenched foot impacts, sand scraping/mining, poor/absence of drainage system and land covers as causal factors of land degradation in the study area. The employed remedial actions for restoration of degraded land included filling of drenches with sand bags, wood logs, bricks and stones, and sand filling. The study though observed that filling of drenches caused by erosion with rubles/stones and construction of drainage were effective remedial actions, good drainage system was presumed to be the most appropriate and sustainable remedial action for land restoration in the study area.

  18. Coding Controlled and Triggered Cursor Movements as Action Effects: Influences on the Auditory Simon Effect for Wheel-Rotation Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Dong-Yuan Debbie; Procter, Robert W.; Pick, David F.

    2007-01-01

    Four experiments investigated influences of irrelevant action effects on response selection in Simon tasks for which tone pitch was relevant and location irrelevant, and responses were clockwise-counterclockwise wheel rotations. When the wheel controlled left-right movement of a cursor in a direction opposite an instructed left-right hand-movement…

  19. Observation of radiation-pressure effects and back-action cancellation in interferometric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidmann, A.; Caniard, T.; Verlot, P.; Briant, T.; Cohadon, P.-F.

    2008-02-01

    Radiation pressure exerted by light in interferometric measurements is responsible for displacements of mirrors which appear as an additional back-action noise and limit the sensitivity of the measurement. We experimentally study these effects by monitoring in a very highfinesse optical cavity the displacements of a mirror with a sensitivity at the 10 -20 m/√Hz level. This unique sensitivity is a step towards the first observation of the fundamental quantum effects of radiation pressure and the resulting standard quantum limit in interferometric measurements. Our experiment may become a powerful facility to test quantum noise reduction schemes, and we already report the first experimental demonstration of a back-action noise cancellation. Using a classical radiation-pressure noise to mimic the quantum noise of light, we have observed a drastic improvement of sensitivity both in position and force measurements.

  20. Towards next-to-leading order transport coefficients from the four-particle irreducible effective action

    SciTech Connect

    Carrington, M. E.; Kovalchuk, E.

    2010-03-15

    Transport coefficients can be obtained from two-point correlators using the Kubo formulas. It has been shown that the full leading order result for electrical conductivity and (QCD) shear viscosity is contained in the resummed two-point function that is obtained from the three-loop three-particle irreducible resummed effective action. The theory produces all leading order contributions without the necessity for power counting, and in this sense it provides a natural framework for the calculation. In this article we study the four-loop four-particle irreducible effective action for a scalar theory with cubic and quartic interactions, with a nonvanishing field expectation value. We obtain a set of integral equations that determine the resummed two-point vertex function. A next-to-leading order contribution to the viscosity could be obtained from this set of coupled equations.

  1. Lipid-Regulating Effect of Traditional Chinese Medicine: Mechanisms of Actions

    PubMed Central

    Bei, Wei-Jian; Guo, Jiao; Wu, Hai-Yun; Cao, Yang

    2012-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has been increasingly used for the treatment of dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease. Recently, much progress has been made in studies on the mechanisms of action of the lipid-regulating effect of TCM in animal experiments. Current researches showed that the lipid-regulating effect of TCM may be related to the following actions: (1) inhibiting intestinal absorption of lipids; (2) reducing the biosynthesis of endogenous lipids; (3) increasing the catabolism of lipid, sterol substances in live system; (4) increasing the secretion of sterol substances in live system; (5) regulating transcription factors related to lipid metabolism. This paper provides an overview of the recent advances and discusses their implications in future development of lipid-lowering drugs from TCM. PMID:22611438

  2. Supplemental action learning workshops: Understanding the effects of independent and cooperative workshops on students' knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Kathryn Michelle

    Community colleges enroll more than half of the undergraduate population in the United States, thereby retaining students of varying demographics with extracurricular demands differing from traditional four-year university students. Often in a collegiate lecture course, students are limited in their abilities to absorb and process information presented by their instructors due to content-specific cognitive gaps between the instructor and the student (Preszler, 2009). Research has shown that implementation of instructor-facilitated action learning workshops as supplemental instruction may help bridge these cognitive gaps allowing better student conceptualization and dissemination of knowledge (Drake, 2011; Fullilove & Treisman, 1990; Preszler, 2009; Udovic, Morris, Dickman, Postlethwait, & Wetherwax, 2002). The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of cooperative action learning workshops and independent action learning workshops on students' knowledge of specified topics within a General Biology I with lab course. The results of this investigation indicate that implementation of an instructor-facilitated action learning workshop did not affect students' knowledge gain; furthermore, attendance of a particular workshop style (independent or cooperative) did not affect students' knowledge gain.

  3. Lay Evaluation of Financial Experts: The Action Advice Effect and Confirmation Bias

    PubMed Central

    Zaleskiewicz, Tomasz; Gasiorowska, Agata; Stasiuk, Katarzyna; Maksymiuk, Renata; Bar-Tal, Yoram

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this experimental project was to investigate lay peoples’ perceptions of epistemic authority (EA) in the field of finance. EA is defined as the extent to which a source of information is treated as evidence for judgments independently of its objective expertise and based on subjective beliefs. Previous research suggested that EA evaluations are biased and that lay people tend to ascribe higher EA to experts who advise action (in the case of medical experts) or confirm clients’ expectations (in the case of politicians). However, there has been no research into biases in lay evaluations of financial experts and this project is aimed to fill this gap. Experiment 1 showed that lay people tended to ascribe greater authority to financial consultants who gave more active advice to clients considering taking out a mortgage. Experiment 2 confirmed the action advice effect found in Experiment 1. However, the outcomes of Experiments 2 and – particularly – 3 suggested that this bias might also be due to clients’ desire to confirm their own opinions. Experiment 2 showed that the action advice effect was moderated by clients’ own opinions on taking loans. Lay people ascribed the greatest EA to the advisor in the scenario in which he advised taking action and where this coincided with the client’s positive opinion on the advisability of taking out a loan. In Experiment 3 only participants with a positive opinion on the financial product ascribed greater authority to experts who recommended it; participants whose opinion was negative tended to rate consultants who advised rejecting the product more highly. To conclude, these three experiments revealed that lay people ascribe higher EA to financial consultants who advise action rather than maintenance of the status quo, but this effect is limited by confirmation bias: when the client’s a priori opinion is salient, greater authority is ascribed to experts whose advice confirms it. In this sense, results

  4. Additive effect of combined application of magnesium and MK-801 on analgesic action of morphine.

    PubMed

    Bujalska-Zadrożny, Magdalena; Duda, Kamila

    2014-01-01

    As previously reported, magnesium ions (Mg(2+)) administered in relatively low doses markedly potentiated opioid analgesia in neuropathic pain, in which the effectiveness of opioids is limited. Considering that Mg(2+) behaves like an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, the effect of this ion on the analgesic action of morphine was compared with that of MK-801. Acute pain was evoked by mechanical or thermal stimuli, whereas neuropathic hyperalgesia was induced by streptozotocin (STZ) administration. Magnesium sulphate (40 mg/kg i.p.) or MK-801 (0.05 mg/kg s.c.) administered alone did not modify the nociceptive threshold to acute stimuli or the streptozotocin hyperalgesia but significantly augmented the analgesic action of morphine (5 mg/kg i.p.). Furthermore, if these drugs (i.e. magnesium sulphate and MK-801) were applied concomitantly, a clear additive effect on the analgesic action of morphine occurred in both models of pain. Possible explanations of these observations are discussed. PMID:24577345

  5. Observing Grasping Actions Directed to Emotion-Laden Objects: Effects upon Corticospinal Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira-Campos, Anaelli A.; Saunier, Ghislain; Della-Maggiore, Valeria; De Oliveira, Laura A. S.; Rodrigues, Erika C.; Vargas, Claudia D.

    2016-01-01

    The motor system is recruited whenever one executes an action as well as when one observes the same action being executed by others. Although it is well established that emotion modulates the motor system, the effect of observing other individuals acting in an emotional context is particularly elusive. The main aim of this study was to investigate the effect induced by the observation of grasping directed to emotion-laden objects upon corticospinal excitability (CSE). Participants classified video-clips depicting the right-hand of an actor grasping emotion-laden objects. Twenty video-clips differing in terms of valence but balanced in arousal level were selected. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were then recorded from the first dorsal interosseous using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) while the participants observed the selected emotional video-clips. During the video-clip presentation, TMS pulses were randomly applied at one of two different time points of grasping: (1) maximum grip aperture, and (2) object contact time. CSE was higher during the observation of grasping directed to unpleasant objects compared to pleasant ones. These results indicate that when someone observes an action of grasping directed to emotion-laden objects, the effect of the object valence promotes a specific modulation over the motor system. PMID:27625602

  6. Observing Grasping Actions Directed to Emotion-Laden Objects: Effects upon Corticospinal Excitability.

    PubMed

    Nogueira-Campos, Anaelli A; Saunier, Ghislain; Della-Maggiore, Valeria; De Oliveira, Laura A S; Rodrigues, Erika C; Vargas, Claudia D

    2016-01-01

    The motor system is recruited whenever one executes an action as well as when one observes the same action being executed by others. Although it is well established that emotion modulates the motor system, the effect of observing other individuals acting in an emotional context is particularly elusive. The main aim of this study was to investigate the effect induced by the observation of grasping directed to emotion-laden objects upon corticospinal excitability (CSE). Participants classified video-clips depicting the right-hand of an actor grasping emotion-laden objects. Twenty video-clips differing in terms of valence but balanced in arousal level were selected. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were then recorded from the first dorsal interosseous using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) while the participants observed the selected emotional video-clips. During the video-clip presentation, TMS pulses were randomly applied at one of two different time points of grasping: (1) maximum grip aperture, and (2) object contact time. CSE was higher during the observation of grasping directed to unpleasant objects compared to pleasant ones. These results indicate that when someone observes an action of grasping directed to emotion-laden objects, the effect of the object valence promotes a specific modulation over the motor system. PMID:27625602

  7. Renormalized effective actions in radially symmetric backgrounds: Partial wave cutoff method

    SciTech Connect

    Dunne, Gerald V.; Hur, Jin; Lee, Choonkyu

    2006-10-15

    The computation of the one-loop effective action in a radially symmetric background can be reduced to a sum over partial-wave contributions, each of which is the logarithm of an appropriate one-dimensional radial determinant. While these individual radial determinants can be evaluated simply and efficiently using the Gel'fand-Yaglom method, the sum over all partial-wave contributions diverges. A renormalization procedure is needed to unambiguously define the finite renormalized effective action. Here we use a combination of the Schwinger proper-time method, and a resummed uniform DeWitt expansion. This provides a more elegant technique for extracting the large partial-wave contribution, compared to the higher-order radial WKB approach which had been used in previous work. We illustrate the general method with a complete analysis of the scalar one-loop effective action in a class of radially separable SU(2) Yang-Mills background fields. We also show that this method can be applied to the case where the background gauge fields have asymptotic limits appropriate to uniform field strengths, such as, for example, in the Minkowski solution, which describes an instanton immersed in a constant background. Detailed numerical results will be presented in a sequel.

  8. Observing Grasping Actions Directed to Emotion-Laden Objects: Effects upon Corticospinal Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira-Campos, Anaelli A.; Saunier, Ghislain; Della-Maggiore, Valeria; De Oliveira, Laura A. S.; Rodrigues, Erika C.; Vargas, Claudia D.

    2016-01-01

    The motor system is recruited whenever one executes an action as well as when one observes the same action being executed by others. Although it is well established that emotion modulates the motor system, the effect of observing other individuals acting in an emotional context is particularly elusive. The main aim of this study was to investigate the effect induced by the observation of grasping directed to emotion-laden objects upon corticospinal excitability (CSE). Participants classified video-clips depicting the right-hand of an actor grasping emotion-laden objects. Twenty video-clips differing in terms of valence but balanced in arousal level were selected. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were then recorded from the first dorsal interosseous using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) while the participants observed the selected emotional video-clips. During the video-clip presentation, TMS pulses were randomly applied at one of two different time points of grasping: (1) maximum grip aperture, and (2) object contact time. CSE was higher during the observation of grasping directed to unpleasant objects compared to pleasant ones. These results indicate that when someone observes an action of grasping directed to emotion-laden objects, the effect of the object valence promotes a specific modulation over the motor system.

  9. Rapid Sensitization of Physiological, Neuronal, and Locomotor Effects of Nicotine: Critical Role of Peripheral Drug Actions

    PubMed Central

    Lenoir, Magalie; Tang, Jeremy S.; Woods, Amina S.

    2013-01-01

    Repeated exposure to nicotine and other psychostimulant drugs produces persistent increases in their psychomotor and physiological effects (sensitization), a phenomenon related to the drugs' reinforcing properties and abuse potential. Here we examined the role of peripheral actions of nicotine in nicotine-induced sensitization of centrally mediated physiological parameters (brain, muscle, and skin temperatures), cortical and VTA EEG, neck EMG activity, and locomotion in freely moving rats. Repeated injections of intravenous nicotine (30 μg/kg) induced sensitization of the drug's effects on all these measures. In contrast, repeated injections of the peripherally acting analog of nicotine, nicotine pyrrolidine methiodide (nicotinePM, 30 μg/kg, i.v.) resulted in habituation (tolerance) of the same physiological, neuronal, and behavioral measures. However, after repeated nicotine exposure, acute nicotinePM injections induced nicotine-like physiological responses: powerful cortical and VTA EEG desynchronization, EMG activation, a large brain temperature increase, but weaker hyperlocomotion. Additionally, both the acute locomotor response to nicotine and nicotine-induced locomotor sensitization were attenuated by blockade of peripheral nicotinic receptors by hexamethonium (3 mg/kg, i.v.). These data suggest that the peripheral actions of nicotine, which precede its direct central actions, serve as a conditioned interoceptive cue capable of eliciting nicotine-like physiological and neural responses after repeated nicotine exposure. Thus, by providing a neural signal to the CNS that is repeatedly paired with the direct central effects of nicotine, the drug's peripheral actions play a critical role in the development of nicotine-induced physiological, neural, and behavioral sensitization. PMID:23761889

  10. OH/A 2 Sigma + - X 2 Pi sub i/ yield from H2O photodissociation in 1050-1370 A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, L. C.

    1980-01-01

    The cross section and quantum yield for the production of the OH(A 2 Sigma + - X 2 Pi sub i) emission from H2O photodissociation by synchrotron radiation in the region 1050-1370 A are determined. Measurements of the photoemission and photoabsorption cross sections obtained for incident radiation bandwidths of 2 A reveal different vibrational structures in the range 1250-1370 A, and the photoemission is attributed to the 3a1-4a1 valence and 3a1-3sa1 Rydberg transitions. Photoemission quantum yields determined from the ratio of photoemission to photoabsorption cross sections are found to increase sharply at a threshold of 1362-5 A to a peak of 11% at 1300 A, then to decrease slowly with decreasing wavelength. Implications of the results for the dissociation processes of H2O are considered.

  11. Effective-action approach to wave propagation in scalar QED plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yuan; Fisch, Nathaniel J.; Qin, Hong

    2016-07-01

    A relativistic quantum field theory with nontrivial background fields is developed and applied to study waves in plasmas. The effective action of the electromagnetic 4-potential is calculated ab initio from the standard action of scalar QED using path integrals. The resultant effective action is gauge invariant and contains nonlocal interactions, from which gauge bosons acquire masses without breaking the local gauge symmetry. To demonstrate how the general theory can be applied, we give two examples: a cold unmagnetized plasma and a cold uniformly magnetized plasma. Using these two examples, we show that all linear waves well known in classical plasma physics can be recovered from relativistic quantum results when taking the classical limit. In the opposite limit, classical wave dispersion relations are modified substantially. In unmagnetized plasmas, longitudinal waves propagate with nonzero group velocities even when plasmas are cold. In magnetized plasmas, anharmonically spaced Bernstein waves persist even when plasmas are cold. These waves account for cyclotron absorption features observed in spectra of x-ray pulsars. Moreover, cutoff frequencies of the two nondegenerate electromagnetic waves are red-shifted by different amounts. These corrections need to be taken into account in order to correctly interpret diagnostic results in laser plasma experiments.

  12. Learning to Control Actions: Transfer Effects following a Procedural Cognitive Control Computerized Training

    PubMed Central

    Shahar, Nitzan; Meiran, Nachshon

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have addressed action control training. In the current study, participants were trained over 19 days in an adaptive training task that demanded constant switching, maintenance and updating of novel action rules. Participants completed an executive functions battery before and after training that estimated processing speed, working memory updating, set-shifting, response inhibition and fluid intelligence. Participants in the training group showed greater improvement than a no-contact control group in processing speed, indicated by reduced reaction times in speeded classification tasks. No other systematic group differences were found across the different pre-post measurements. Ex-Gaussian fitting of the reaction-time distribution revealed that the reaction time reduction observed among trained participants was restricted to the right tail of the distribution, previously shown to be related to working memory. Furthermore, training effects were only found in classification tasks that required participants to maintain novel stimulus-response rules in mind, supporting the notion that the training improved working memory abilities. Training benefits were maintained in a 10-month follow-up, indicating relatively long-lasting effects. The authors conclude that training improved action-related working memory abilities. PMID:25799443

  13. New Insights into the Mechanisms of Action of Cotinine and its Distinctive Effects from Nicotine.

    PubMed

    Grizzell, J Alex; Echeverria, Valentina

    2015-10-01

    Tobacco consumption is far higher among a number of psychiatric and neurological diseases, supporting the notion that some component(s) of tobacco may underlie the oft-reported reduction in associated symptoms during tobacco use. Popular dogma holds that this component is nicotine. However, increasing evidence support theories that cotinine, the main metabolite of nicotine, may underlie at least some of nicotine's actions in the nervous system, apart from its adverse cardiovascular and habit forming effects. Though similarities exist, disparate and even antagonizing actions between cotinine and nicotine have been described both in terms of behavior and physiology, underscoring the need to further characterize this potentially therapeutic compound. Cotinine has been shown to be psychoactive in humans and animals, facilitating memory, cognition, executive function, and emotional responding. Furthermore, recent research shows that cotinine acts as an antidepressant and reduces cognitive-impairment associated with disease and stress-induced dysfunction. Despite these promising findings, continued focus on this potentially safe alternative to tobacco and nicotine use is lacking. Here, we review the effects of cotinine, including comparisons with nicotine, and discuss potential mechanisms of cotinine-specific actions in the central nervous system which are, to date, still being elucidated.

  14. Effect and evaluation of prying action for top- and seat-angle connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Ali; Hasan, Rafiq

    2015-06-01

    Nonlinear finite element (FE) static analyses of top- and seat-angle connections were performed using ABAQUS standard to investigate the influence of connection parameters and its properties on prying action developed due to the interaction between column flange and top angle's vertical leg. Contact phenomenon between two interfaces with finite sliding and bolt pretension in the initial step of analysis was considered in the FE model. FE analysis results were compared with the experimental ones to examine the applicability of the FE model. Then, the location of plastic hinges in connection assemblages was investigated at the ultimate state of the connection and a parametric study was performed varying connection parameters, material properties of connection assemblages, and magnitude of bolt pretension to visualize their effects on prying force and on the position of prying force on top angle's vertical leg. Current study shows that plastic hinges not only develop at top angle's heel and bolt hole region but also in the bolt shank that differs from some assumptions of power model (Kishi and Chen 1990): (1) top angle thickness and gage distance from angle heel to bolt hole center line have an distinct effect on prying action; and (2) distributed prying force developed near the region of the top edge of tension angle's leg adjacent to column flange can contribute to the failure of the connection. Finally, a mathematical formulation to identify the location of prying force action point is proposed.

  15. Group effects of instrumentality and name relation on action naming in bilingual anomic aphasia.

    PubMed

    Kambanaros, Maria

    2009-07-01

    Verb production in sentences was investigated in two groups of late bilingual Greek-English speakers: individuals with anomic aphasia and a control group. Verb retrieval in sentences was significantly impaired in both languages for the individuals with anomic aphasia. Additional results revealed no effect of instrumentality on action naming in sentences in either language. However, there was a negative effect of verb-noun name relation on instrumental verb production in English only. Results confirm intact verb lemma retrieval for this group of bilingual individuals with anomic aphasia, but a breakdown at the level of accessing the phonological or lexical form.

  16. Effect of Nitrogen Additives on Flame Retardant Action of Tributyl Phosphate: Phosphorus – Nitrogen Synergism

    SciTech Connect

    Gaan, Sabyasachi; Sun, Gang; Hutches, Katherine; Engelhard, Mark H.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of nitrogen additives like urea, guanidine carbonate and melamine formaldehyde on the flame retardant efficacy of tributyl phosphate (TBP) has been investigated. From the LOI tests on treated cotton it is clear that the nitrogen additives have synergistic action. Estimation of activation energy of decomposition of treated cotton indicated that nitrogen additives enhance the thermal stability during the burning process. SEM pictures of chars formed after LOI test showed the formation of protective polymeric coating on the surface. The surface of chars formed were evaluated using FTIR-ATR and XPS analysis which showed that the coating was composed of Phosphorus-Nitrogen-Oxygen containing species. Formation of this coating during the burning process could lead to the synergistic interaction of phosphorus and nitrogen. Based on the experimental data we have further proposed several reaction mechanisms which could contribute to synergistic action and formation of protective coating on the surface of char.

  17. Language Comprehension in the Balance: The Robustness of the Action-Compatibility Effect (ACE)

    PubMed Central

    Zwaan, Rolf A.; van der Stoep, Nathan; Guadalupe, Tulio; Bouwmeester, Samantha

    2012-01-01

    How does language comprehension interact with motor activity? We investigated the conditions under which comprehending an action sentence affects people's balance. We performed two experiments to assess whether sentences describing forward or backward movement modulate the lateral movements made by subjects who made sensibility judgments about the sentences. In one experiment subjects were standing on a balance board and in the other they were seated on a balance board that was mounted on a chair. This allowed us to investigate whether the action compatibility effect (ACE) is robust and persists in the face of salient incompatibilities between sentence content and subject movement. Growth-curve analysis of the movement trajectories produced by the subjects in response to the sentences suggests that the ACE is indeed robust. Sentence content influenced movement trajectory despite salient inconsistencies between implied and actual movement. These results are interpreted in the context of the current discussion of embodied, or grounded, language comprehension and meaning representation. PMID:22363580

  18. Action-specific effects in aviation: what determines judged runway size?

    PubMed

    Gray, Rob; Navia, José Antonio; Allsop, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Several recent studies have shown that the performance of a skill that involves acting on a goal object can influence one's judgment of the size of that object. The present study investigated this effect in an aviation context. Novice pilots were asked to perform a series of visual approach and landing manoeuvres in a flight simulator. After each landing, participants next performed a task in which runway size was judged for different simulated altitudes. Gaze behaviour and control stick kinematics were also analyzed. There were significant relationships between judged runway size and multiple action-related variables including touchdown velocity, time fixating the runway, and the magnitude and frequency of control inputs. These findings suggest that relationship between the perception of a target object and action is not solely determined by performance success or failure but rather involves a relationship between multiple variables that reflect the actor's ability.

  19. The cognition-enhancing effects of psychostimulants involve direct action in the prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Robert C; Devilbiss, David M; Berridge, Craig W

    2015-06-01

    Psychostimulants are highly effective in the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. The clinical efficacy of these drugs is strongly linked to their ability to improve cognition dependent on the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and extended frontostriatal circuit. The procognitive actions of psychostimulants are only associated with low doses. Surprisingly, despite nearly 80 years of clinical use, the neurobiology of the procognitive actions of psychostimulants has only recently been systematically investigated. Findings from this research unambiguously demonstrate that the cognition-enhancing effects of psychostimulants involve the preferential elevation of catecholamines in the PFC and the subsequent activation of norepinephrine α2 and dopamine D1 receptors. In contrast, while the striatum is a critical participant in PFC-dependent cognition, where examined, psychostimulant action within the striatum is not sufficient to enhance cognition. At doses that moderately exceed the clinical range, psychostimulants appear to improve PFC-dependent attentional processes at the expense of other PFC-dependent processes (e.g., working memory, response inhibition). This differential modulation of PFC-dependent processes across dose appears to be associated with the differential involvement of noradrenergic α2 versus α1 receptors. Collectively, this evidence indicates that at low, clinically relevant doses, psychostimulants are devoid of the behavioral and neurochemical actions that define this class of drugs and instead act largely as cognitive enhancers (improving PFC-dependent function). This information has potentially important clinical implications as well as relevance for public health policy regarding the widespread clinical use of psychostimulants and for the development of novel pharmacologic treatments for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and other conditions associated with PFC dysregulation.

  20. The cognition-enhancing effects of psychostimulants involve direct action in the prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Robert C; Devilbiss, David M; Berridge, Craig W

    2015-06-01

    Psychostimulants are highly effective in the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. The clinical efficacy of these drugs is strongly linked to their ability to improve cognition dependent on the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and extended frontostriatal circuit. The procognitive actions of psychostimulants are only associated with low doses. Surprisingly, despite nearly 80 years of clinical use, the neurobiology of the procognitive actions of psychostimulants has only recently been systematically investigated. Findings from this research unambiguously demonstrate that the cognition-enhancing effects of psychostimulants involve the preferential elevation of catecholamines in the PFC and the subsequent activation of norepinephrine α2 and dopamine D1 receptors. In contrast, while the striatum is a critical participant in PFC-dependent cognition, where examined, psychostimulant action within the striatum is not sufficient to enhance cognition. At doses that moderately exceed the clinical range, psychostimulants appear to improve PFC-dependent attentional processes at the expense of other PFC-dependent processes (e.g., working memory, response inhibition). This differential modulation of PFC-dependent processes across dose appears to be associated with the differential involvement of noradrenergic α2 versus α1 receptors. Collectively, this evidence indicates that at low, clinically relevant doses, psychostimulants are devoid of the behavioral and neurochemical actions that define this class of drugs and instead act largely as cognitive enhancers (improving PFC-dependent function). This information has potentially important clinical implications as well as relevance for public health policy regarding the widespread clinical use of psychostimulants and for the development of novel pharmacologic treatments for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and other conditions associated with PFC dysregulation. PMID:25499957

  1. The Take Action Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boudreau, Sue

    2010-01-01

    The Take Action Project (TAP) was created to help middle school students take informed and effective action on science-related issues. The seven steps of TAP ask students to (1) choose a science-related problem of interest to them, (2) research their problem, (3) select an action to take on the problem, (4) plan that action, (5) take action, (6)…

  2. Molecular-beam optical Stark and Zeeman study of the A {sup 2}{Pi}--X {sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +} (0,0) band system of BaF

    SciTech Connect

    Steimle, Timothy C.; Frey, Sarah; Le, Anh; DeMille, David; Rahmlow, David A.; Linton, Colan

    2011-07-15

    The A {sup 2}{Pi}-X {sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +} (0,0) band system of barium monofluoride (BaF) has been recorded using high-resolution laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy both field-free and in the presence of static magnetic and electric fields. The field-free spectra for the {sup 135}BaF, {sup 137}BaF, and {sup 138}BaF isotopologues were modeled to generate an improved set of spectroscopic constants for the A {sup 2}{Pi}({upsilon} = 0) and X {sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +}({upsilon} = 0) states. The observed optical Stark shifts for the {sup 138}BaF isotopologue were analyzed to produce the permanent electric dipole moments of 1.50(2) and 1.31(2) D for the A {sup 2}{Pi}{sub 1/2}({upsilon} = 0) and A {sup 2}{Pi}{sub 3/2} ({upsilon} = 0) states, respectively. The observed optical Zeeman shifts for the {sup 138}BaF isotopologue were analyzed to produce a set of magnetic g factors for the A {sup 2}{Pi}({upsilon} = 0) and X {sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +}({upsilon} = 0) states.

  3. Alignment effects in beer mugs: Automatic action activation or response competition?

    PubMed

    Roest, Sander A; Pecher, Diane; Naeije, Lilian; Zeelenberg, René

    2016-08-01

    Responses to objects with a graspable handle are faster when the response hand and handle orientation are aligned (e.g., a key press with the right hand is required and the object handle is oriented to the right) than when they are not aligned. This effect could be explained by automatic activation of specific motor programs when an object is viewed. Alternatively, the effect could be explained by competition at the response level. Participants performed a reach-and-grasp or reach-and-button-press action with their left or right hand in response to the color of a beer mug. The alignment effect did not vary as a function of the type of action. In addition, the alignment effect disappeared in a go/no-go version of the task. The same results were obtained when participants made upright/inverted decisions, so that object shape was task-relevant. Our results indicate that alignment effects are not due to automatic motor activation of the left or right limb.

  4. Alignment effects in beer mugs: Automatic action activation or response competition?

    PubMed

    Roest, Sander A; Pecher, Diane; Naeije, Lilian; Zeelenberg, René

    2016-08-01

    Responses to objects with a graspable handle are faster when the response hand and handle orientation are aligned (e.g., a key press with the right hand is required and the object handle is oriented to the right) than when they are not aligned. This effect could be explained by automatic activation of specific motor programs when an object is viewed. Alternatively, the effect could be explained by competition at the response level. Participants performed a reach-and-grasp or reach-and-button-press action with their left or right hand in response to the color of a beer mug. The alignment effect did not vary as a function of the type of action. In addition, the alignment effect disappeared in a go/no-go version of the task. The same results were obtained when participants made upright/inverted decisions, so that object shape was task-relevant. Our results indicate that alignment effects are not due to automatic motor activation of the left or right limb. PMID:27184058

  5. Effect of eplerenone on insulin action in essential hypertension: a randomised, controlled, crossover study.

    PubMed

    McMurray, E M; Wallace, I R; Ennis, C; Hunter, S J; Atkinson, A B; Bell, P M

    2014-10-01

    An association exists between hyperaldosteronism, hypertension and impaired insulin action. Eplerenone is a selective mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist; however, little is known about its effects on insulin action. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of eplerenone on insulin action in hypertensive adults, using the hyperinsulinaemic euglycaemic clamp. A randomised, controlled, double-blind, crossover design was employed. After a 6-week washout period, hypertensive, non-diabetic patients were treated with either eplerenone 25 mg twice daily or doxazosin 2 mg twice daily for 12 weeks. After each treatment period, insulin action was assessed by a hyperinsulinaemic euglycaemic clamp, with isotope dilution methodology. After washout, treatment groups were crossed over. Fifteen patients completed the study. There were no differences in fasting glucose, or fasting insulin between treatment with eplerenone or doxazosin. The measure of overall insulin sensitivity, exogenous glucose infusion rates during the last 30 min of the clamp, was similar with both treatments; 23.4 (3.9) μmol kg(-1) min(-1) after eplerenone and 23.3 (3.6) μmol kg(-1) min(-1) after doxazosin (P=0.83). Isotopically determined fasting endogenous glucose production rates were similar after both treatments (eplerenone 9.4 (0.6) μmol kg(-1) min(-1) vs doxazosin 10.6 (0.7) μmol kg(-1) min(-1)). There was a trend for lower endogenous glucose production rates during hyperinsulinaemia following eplerenone compared with doxazosin (2.0 (0.8) μmol kg(-1) min(-1) vs 4.1 (0.9) μmol kg(-1) min(-1)). There was no difference in insulin stimulated peripheral glucose utilisation rates after treatment with eplerenone or doxazosin (25.4 (3.6) μmol kg(-1) min(-1) vs 27.0 (3.9) μmol kg(-1) min(-1)). This study gives reassuring evidence of the neutral effect of eplerenone on insulin action in hypertensive, non-diabetic patients.

  6. Bridging the Gap between the Other and Me: The Functional Role of Motor Resonance and Action Effects in Infants' Imitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulus, Markus; Hunnius, Sabine; Vissers, Marlies; Bekkering, Harold

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates a two-stage model of infants' imitative learning from observed actions and their effects. According to this model, the observation of another person's action activates the corresponding motor code in the infants' motor repertoire (i.e. leads to motor resonance). The second process guiding imitative behavior results from the…

  7. 42 CFR 493.1808 - Adverse action on any type of CLIA certificate: Effect on Medicare approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Adverse action on any type of CLIA certificate... REQUIREMENTS Enforcement Procedures § 493.1808 Adverse action on any type of CLIA certificate: Effect on Medicare approval. (a) Suspension or revocation of any type of CLIA certificate. When CMS suspends...

  8. 42 CFR 493.1808 - Adverse action on any type of CLIA certificate: Effect on Medicare approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Adverse action on any type of CLIA certificate... REQUIREMENTS Enforcement Procedures § 493.1808 Adverse action on any type of CLIA certificate: Effect on Medicare approval. (a) Suspension or revocation of any type of CLIA certificate. When CMS suspends...

  9. 42 CFR 493.1808 - Adverse action on any type of CLIA certificate: Effect on Medicare approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Adverse action on any type of CLIA certificate... REQUIREMENTS Enforcement Procedures § 493.1808 Adverse action on any type of CLIA certificate: Effect on Medicare approval. (a) Suspension or revocation of any type of CLIA certificate. When CMS suspends...

  10. 42 CFR 493.1808 - Adverse action on any type of CLIA certificate: Effect on Medicare approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Adverse action on any type of CLIA certificate... REQUIREMENTS Enforcement Procedures § 493.1808 Adverse action on any type of CLIA certificate: Effect on Medicare approval. (a) Suspension or revocation of any type of CLIA certificate. When CMS suspends...

  11. 42 CFR 493.1808 - Adverse action on any type of CLIA certificate: Effect on Medicare approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Adverse action on any type of CLIA certificate... REQUIREMENTS Enforcement Procedures § 493.1808 Adverse action on any type of CLIA certificate: Effect on Medicare approval. (a) Suspension or revocation of any type of CLIA certificate. When CMS suspends...

  12. Argument structure effects in action verb naming in static and dynamic conditions.

    PubMed

    den Ouden, Dirk-Bart; Fix, Steve; Parrish, Todd B; Thompson, Cynthia K

    2009-03-01

    Argument structure, as in the participant roles entailed within the lexical representation of verbs, affects verb processing. Recent neuroimaging studies show that when verbs are heard or read, the posterior temporoparietal region shows increased activation for verbs with greater versus lesser argument structure complexity, usually bilaterally. In addition, patients with agrammatic aphasia show verb production deficits, graded based on argument structure complexity. In the present study, we used fMRI to examine the neural correlates of verb production in overt action naming conditions. In addition, we tested the differential effects of naming when verbs were presented dynamically in video segments versus statically in line drawings. Results showed increased neuronal activity associated with production of transitive as compared to intransitive verbs not only in posterior regions, but also in left inferior frontal cortex. We also found significantly greater activation for transitive versus intransitive action naming for videos compared to pictures in the right inferior and superior parietal cortices, areas associated with object manipulation. These findings indicate that verbs with greater argument structure density engender graded activation of both anterior and posterior portions of the language network and support verb naming deficit patterns reported in lesion studies. In addition, the similar findings derived under video and static picture naming conditions provide validity for using videos in neuroimaging studies, which are more naturalistic and perhaps ecologically valid than using static pictures to investigate action naming.

  13. The effective action of warped M-theory reductions with higher-derivative terms. Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimm, Thomas W.; Pugh, Tom G.; Weissenbacher, Matthias

    2015-12-01

    We study the three-dimensional effective action obtained by reducing eleven-dimensional supergravity with higher-derivative terms on a background solution including a warp-factor, an eight-dimensional compact manifold, and fluxes. The dynamical fields are Kähler deformations and vectors from the M-theory three-form. We show that the potential is only induced by fluxes and the naive contributions obtained from higher-curvature terms on a Calabi-Yau background vanish once the back-reaction to the full solution is taken into account. For the resulting three-dimensional action we analyse the Kähler potential and complex coordinates and show compatibility with N=2 supersymmetry. We argue that the higher-order result is also compatible with a no-scale condition. We find that the complex coordinates should be formulated as divisor integrals for which a non-trivial interplay between the warp-factor terms and the higher-curvature terms allow a derivation of the moduli space metric. This leads us to discuss higher-derivative corrections to the M5-brane action.

  14. Effects of lead acetate on guinea pig - cochear microphonics, action potential, and motor nerve conduction velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamura, K.; Maehara, N.; Terayama, K.; Ueno, N.; Kohyama, A.; Sawada, Y.; Kishi, R.

    1987-04-01

    Segmental demyelination and axonal degeneration of motor nerves induced by lead exposure is well known in man, and animals. The effect of lead acetate exposure to man may involve the cranial nerves, since vertigo and sensory neuronal deafness have been reported among lead workers. However, there are few reports concerning the dose-effects of lead acetate both to the peripheral nerve and the cranial VII nerve with measurement of blood lead concentration. The authors investigated the effects of lead acetate to the cochlea and the VIII nerve using CM (cochlear microphonics) and AP (action potential) of the guinea pigs. The effects of lead acetate to the sciatic nerve were measured by MCV of the sciatic nerve with measurement of blood lead concentration.

  15. Behavioural effects of fluoxetine and tianeptine, two antidepressants with opposite action mechanisms, in rats.

    PubMed

    Nowakowska, E; Kus, K; Chodera, A; Rybakowski, J

    2000-01-01

    The behavioural effects of two antidepressants with opposite molecular mechanisms, tianeptine 7-[(3-chloro-6,11-dihydro-6-methyldibenzo[c,f][1,2]thiazepin - 11-yl)amino]heptanoic acid S,S-dioxide, CAS 66981-73-5) 5 mg/kg p.o., a serotonin reuptake enhancer, and fluoxetine (+/-)-N-methyl-3-phenyl-3-[(alpha, alpha, alpha-trifluoro-p- tolyl)oxy]propylamine, CAS 54910-89-3) 5 mg/kg p.o., a serotonin reuptake inhibitor, were compared after single and prolonged administration (7 and 14 days) once daily). In all experiments the drug effects were noted at the peak activity time: 30 min after tianeptine and 60 min after fluoxetine administration. In the immobility time test both drugs had a shortening effect on immobility time only after prolonged administration or, in single treatment, after joint administration. A different pattern was observed in the two compartment test: both antidepressants showed anxiolytic effects after single and prolonged treatment. However, when the drugs were given in joint administration, the anxiolytic effects were entirely abolished after single as well as prolonged treatment. In reference spatial memory test (food finding time in the maze) tianeptine had no effect, whereas fluoxetine caused, after single and prolonged treatment, a very marked improvement of reference memory. Joint administration of both drugs resulted in worsening the effects on memory in comparison to fluoxetine alone, but the results were still significantly better vs. control. In the test for sedative action (in the Activity Meter AM-1, where the movements of the animals are counted electronically) only after prolonged treatment with tianeptine a diminished locomotor activity could be observed. It is concluded that in the action of the drugs (beside the effect on serotonin uptake) other mechanisms must play an important role. The diminished locomotor activity after tianeptine suggests an influence on the dopaminergic or GABA-Receptor system.

  16. Toxic effects of fatty acids on yeast cells: possible mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Hunková, Z; Fencl, A

    1978-08-01

    As shown in a previous paper, threshold concentrations of lower and intermediate fatty acids inhibit the uptake of inorganic phosphate, growth, and cell division in yeast cells. This demonstrates that, apart from these effects, the acids cause an increase in the respiration quotient (RQ), inhibition of CO2 fixation, production of ethanol at the expense of anabolic processes, and inhibition of active amino acid transport in the yeast Candida utilis. On the other hand, the threshold concentrations have no effect on intracellular pH. The inhibition of the inorganic phosphate uptake cannot be the sole primary mode of action of fatty acids since the omission of inorganic phosphate in the incubation medium brings about an inhibition of anabolic processes that is lower than that brought about by fatty acids since the omission of inorganic phosphate in the incubation medium brings about an inhibition of anabolic processes that is lower than that brought by fatty acids at concentrations still premitting some phosphate uptake. Although 2,4-dinitrophenol and caproic acid at low concentrations cause an analogous decrease in biomass yield, their combination does not bring about any marked increase in the effect. Considering the physicochemical properties of fatty acids and their preferential action on energy-requiring processes, one of the key sites of action can be assumed to be the mitochondrial membrane. Fatty acids might inhibit the transport of anions, especially phosphate, across the membrane, and disturb the membrane potential by affecting the transport protons. The physiocochemical properties of fatty acids may also give rise to their binding to other intracellular membranes and to a subsequent interference with the function of the corresponding organelles.

  17. Mediobasal Hypothalamic SIRT1 Is Essential for Resveratrol’s Effects on Insulin Action in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Colette M.; Gutierrez-Juarez, Roger; Lam, Tony K.T.; Arrieta-Cruz, Isabel; Huang, Loli; Schwartz, Gary; Barzilai, Nir; Rossetti, Luciano

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) and its activator resveratrol are emerging as major regulators of metabolic processes. We investigate the site of resveratrol action on glucose metabolism and the contribution of SIRT1 to these effects. Because the arcuate nucleus in the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH) plays a pivotal role in integrating peripheral metabolic responses to nutrients and hormones, we examined whether the actions of resveratrol are mediated at the MBH. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Sprague Dawley (SD) male rats received acute central (MBH) or systemic injections of vehicle, resveratrol, or SIRT1 inhibitor during basal pancreatic insulin clamp studies. To delineate the pathway(s) by which MBH resveratrol modulates hepatic glucose production, we silenced hypothalamic SIRT1 expression using a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) inhibited the hypothalamic ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channel with glibenclamide, or selectively transected the hepatic branch of the vagus nerve while infusing resveratrol centrally. RESULTS Our studies show that marked improvement in insulin sensitivity can be elicited by acute administration of resveratrol to the MBH or during acute systemic administration. Selective inhibition of hypothalamic SIRT1 using a cell-permeable SIRT1 inhibitor or SIRT1-shRNA negated the effect of central and peripheral resveratrol on glucose production. Blockade of the KATP channel and hepatic vagotomy significantly attenuated the effect of central resveratrol on hepatic glucose production. In addition, we found no evidence for hypothalamic AMPK activation after MBH resveratrol administration. CONCLUSIONS Taken together, these studies demonstrate that resveratrol improves glucose homeostasis mainly through a central SIRT1-dependent pathway and that the MBH is a major site of resveratrol action. PMID:21896928

  18. Differential effects of age-of-acquisition for concrete nouns and action verbs: evidence for partly distinct representations?

    PubMed

    Boulenger, Véronique; Décoppet, Nathalie; Roy, Alice C; Paulignan, Yves; Nazir, Tatjana A

    2007-04-01

    There is growing evidence that words that are acquired early in life are processed faster and more accurately than words acquired later, even by adults. As neuropsychological and neuroimaging studies have implicated different brain networks in the processing of action verbs and concrete nouns, the present study was aimed at contrasting reaction times to early and later-acquired action verbs and concrete nouns, in order to determine whether effects of word learning age express differently for the two types of words. Our results show that while word frequency affected both types of words in the same way, distinct learning age effects were observed for action verbs and concrete nouns. A further experiment specified that this difference was observed for verbs describing actions belonging to the human motor repertoire, but not for verbs denoting actions past this repertoire (e.g., to neigh). We interpret these data within a recently emerging framework according to which language processing is associated with sensory motor programs.

  19. Supermatrix proper-time representation of one-loop effective action and gauge invariance

    SciTech Connect

    Min, H. ); Lee, C. )

    1990-01-15

    Starting from the supermatrix proper-time representation, we construct the gauge-invariant one-loop effective action for generic renormalizable field theories involving spin-0, -1/2, and -1 fields in flat or curved spacetime. In the presence of fermion couplings involving the {gamma}{sub 5} matrix (but the theory having no genuine gauge anomaly), gauge invariance requires that the usual ultraviolet renormalization procedure be supplemented by appropriate finite renormalization terms. The supermatrix method is very convenient for finding the finite renormalization terms associated with vertex functions involving some external fermion legs.

  20. Evaluation of the Antibacterial Effects and Mechanism of Action of Protocatechualdehyde against Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Li, Shili; Yu, Yanmei; Chen, Juanni; Guo, Bing; Yang, Liang; Ding, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Protocatechualdehyde (PCA) is an important plant-derived natural product that has been associated with a wide variety of biological activities and has been widely used in medicine as an antioxidant, anti-aging and an anti-inflammatory agent. However, fewer reports concerning its antibacterial effects on plant-pathogenic bacteria exist. Therefore, in this study, protocatechualdehyde was evaluated for its antibacterial activity against plant pathogens along with the mechanism of its antibacterial action. PCA at 40 μg/mL was highly active against R. solanacearum and significantly inhibited its growth. The minimum bactericidal concentration and minimum inhibitory concentration values for PCA were 40 μg/mL and 20 μg/mL, respectively. Further investigation of the mechanism of action of PCA via transmission electron microscopy and biological assays indicated that the destruction of the cell structure, the shapes and the inhibition of biofilm formation were important. In addition, the application of PCA effectively reduced the incidence of bacterial wilt on tobacco under greenhouse conditions, and the control efficiency was as high as 92.01% at nine days after inoculation. Taken together, these findings suggest that PCA exhibits strong antibacterial activity against R. solanacearum and has the potential to be applied as an effective antibacterial agent for controlling bacterial wilt caused by R. solanacearum. PMID:27294898

  1. [The action of ionotropic glutamate receptor channel blockers on effects of sleep deprivation in rats].

    PubMed

    Vataev, S I; Oganesian, G A; Lukomskaia, N Ia; Magazanik, L G

    2013-05-01

    The action of non-competitive glutamate receptor antagonists on the effects of sleep deprivation has been studied on Krushinskii-Molodkina rats having an inherited predisposition to audiogenic seizures and Wistar rats deprived to this respond. Two types of glutamate receptor open channels blockers were used: the selective blockers of NMDA-receptors (memantine and IEM-1921) and blockers of mixed type, impacting both on the NMDA- and presumably Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA/kainate receptors (IEM-1754 and IEM 1925). Rats were subjected to 12 hours long sleep deprivation. Immediatly after that memantine and IEM-1921 were injected, and during the first 3 hours the total or partial reduction of fast-wave (paradoxical) sleep and a significant increase of the representation of wakefulness at the cost of reducing the total time of slow-wave sleep were observed. These effects are most likely to be a consequence of the blockade of NMDA-receptors functioning in the systems of the rat brain responsible for the launch and maintenance of fast-wave sleep. Injection of IEM-1754 and IEM-1925 on background of sleep deprivation did not affect the organization of sleep during the first 3 hours of their action. During the second three-hour period the rebound effect was observed. The obtained results indicate the involvement of NMDA glutamate receptors in the functioning of various parts of the sleep system of both rat lines.

  2. Evaluation of the Antibacterial Effects and Mechanism of Action of Protocatechualdehyde against Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Li, Shili; Yu, Yanmei; Chen, Juanni; Guo, Bing; Yang, Liang; Ding, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Protocatechualdehyde (PCA) is an important plant-derived natural product that has been associated with a wide variety of biological activities and has been widely used in medicine as an antioxidant, anti-aging and an anti-inflammatory agent. However, fewer reports concerning its antibacterial effects on plant-pathogenic bacteria exist. Therefore, in this study, protocatechualdehyde was evaluated for its antibacterial activity against plant pathogens along with the mechanism of its antibacterial action. PCA at 40 μg/mL was highly active against R. solanacearum and significantly inhibited its growth. The minimum bactericidal concentration and minimum inhibitory concentration values for PCA were 40 μg/mL and 20 μg/mL, respectively. Further investigation of the mechanism of action of PCA via transmission electron microscopy and biological assays indicated that the destruction of the cell structure, the shapes and the inhibition of biofilm formation were important. In addition, the application of PCA effectively reduced the incidence of bacterial wilt on tobacco under greenhouse conditions, and the control efficiency was as high as 92.01% at nine days after inoculation. Taken together, these findings suggest that PCA exhibits strong antibacterial activity against R. solanacearum and has the potential to be applied as an effective antibacterial agent for controlling bacterial wilt caused by R. solanacearum.

  3. The effective action of warped M-theory reductions with higher derivative terms — part I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimm, Thomas W.; Pugh, Tom G.; Weissenbacher, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    M-theory accessed via eleven-dimensional supergravity admits globally consistent warped solutions with eight-dimensional compact spaces if background fluxes and higher derivative terms are considered. The internal background is conformally Kähler with vanishing first Chern class. We perturb these solutions including a finite number of Kähler deformations of the metric and vector deformations of the M-theory three-form. Special emphasis is given to the field-dependence of the warp-factor and the higher-derivative terms. We show that the three-dimensional two-derivative effective action takes a surprisingly simple form in terms of a single higher-curvature building block due to numerous non-trivial cancellations. Both the ansatz and the effective action admit a moduli dependent scaling symmetry of the internal metric. Furthermore, we find that the required departure from Ricci-flatness and harmonicity of the zero-mode eigenforms does not alter the effective theory.

  4. Effect of drugs modulating serotonergic system on the analgesic action of paracetamol in mice

    PubMed Central

    Karandikar, Yogita S.; Belsare, Peeyush; Panditrao, Aditi

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The underlying mechanisms for the analgesic action of paracetamol (PCT) are still under considerable debate. It has been recently proposed that PCT may act by modulating the Serotonin system. This study was conducted to verify the influence of Serotonin modulating drugs (buspirone, ondansetron, and fluoxetine) on the analgesic effect of PCT. Materials and Methods: Thirty adult albino mice were assigned to five groups: Normal saline, PCT, fluoxetine selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) + PCT, buspirone (5-HT1A Agonist) + PCT, and ondansetron (5HT3 antagonist) + PCT. Hot-plate and formalin test were used to determine pain threshold, tests being conducted 60 min after the last treatment. Statistical analysis was done using analysis of variance followed by Dunnet's test. Results: Coadministration of buspirone with PCT attenuated the antinociceptive activity of PCT (P < 0.001), whereas fluoxetine + PCT increased pain threshold in the hot-plate and formalin test (P = 0.0046). Analgesic effect of PCT was not affected by ondansetron in formalin models. It attenuated analgesic action of PCT in hot-plate test (P = 0.0137). Conclusion: The results suggest that 5-HT1 receptors could also be responsible for the analgesic effect of PCT. Also, higher analgesia is produced by co-administration of SSRI (fluoxetine) + PCT. PMID:27298498

  5. Quantum scattering studies of electronically inelastic collisions of N + 2(X 2Sigma + g, A 2Pi u) with He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berning, Andreas; Werner, Hans-Joachim

    1994-02-01

    The potential energy surfaces (PESs) of the three lowest electronic states of the system N+2+He have been computed using accurate multiconfiguration-reference configuration (MRCI) wave functions and a large basis set. The approach of the He atom leads to nonadiabatic mixing of the A 2Πu(A') and X 2Σ+g(A') states of N+2. The three adiabatic interaction potentials have been transformed into a set of four diabatic potentials, one of which describes the collision-induced nonadiabatic coupling between the two A' states. The computed potentials have been fitted to analytical functions and used in quantum scattering calculations for electronically inelastic transitions between individual rovibrational levels of the A 2Πu and the X 2Σ+g states of N+2. Our results are compared to transitions observed experimentally by Katayama and co-workers between the rotational levels of the A,v=3 and 4 and X,v=6, 7, and 8 vibrational manifolds. In general, good agreement is found for transitions between nearly isoenergetic vibrational states. However, for transitions which traverse large energy gaps, we obtained cross sections which are several orders of magnitude smaller than experimentally observed. Inclusion of the vibrational degree of freedom of the N+2 molecule in the scattering calculations was found to have only an insignificant effect on the transition probabilities.

  6. Black applicants' reactions to affirmative action plans: effects of plan content and previous experience with discrimination.

    PubMed

    Slaughter, Jerel E; Sinar, Evan F; Bachiochi, Peter D

    2002-04-01

    This study examined the effects of plan content and previous experience with discrimination on Black respondents' reactions to affirmative action plans. Black engineering students (N = 1,173) were randomly assigned to 1 of 6 plans implemented by a hypothetical organization and were asked to provide ratings of perceived fairness and intention to pursue a position at the organization. There were significant effects of plan content on perceived faimess and job pursuit intentions. Perceived fairness mediated the effect of content on intentions. Furthermore, previous experience with discrimination interacted with content to affect intentions. Individuals who had experienced relatively more discrimination in the workplace reported stronger intentions to pursue a position at an organization whose plan specified special training opportunities for minorities. PMID:12002961

  7. Novel insights into lithium's mechanism of action: neurotrophic and neuroprotective effects.

    PubMed

    Quiroz, Jorge A; Machado-Vieira, Rodrigo; Zarate, Carlos A; Manji, Husseini K

    2010-01-01

    The monovalent cation lithium partially exerts its effects by activating neurotrophic and neuroprotective cellular cascades. Here, we discuss the effects of lithium on oxidative stress, programmed cell death (apoptosis), inflammation, glial dysfunction, neurotrophic factor functioning, excitotoxicity, and mitochondrial stability. In particular, we review evidence demonstrating the action of lithium on cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-mediated signal transduction, cAMP response element binding activation, increased expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, the phosphatidylinositide cascade, protein kinase C inhibition, glycogen synthase kinase 3 inhibition, and B-cell lymphoma 2 expression. Notably, we also review data from clinical studies demonstrating neurotrophic effects of lithium. We expect that a better understanding of the clinically relevant pathophysiological targets of lithium will lead to improved treatments for those who suffer from mood as well as neurodegenerative disorders.

  8. Effect of Cardiac Tissue Anisotropy on Three-Dimensional Electrical Action Potential Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhi Zhu; Liu, Jing

    A three-dimensional (3D) electrical action potential propagation model is developed to characterize the integrated effect of cardiac tissue structure using a homogenous function with a spatial inhomogeneity. This method may be more effective for bridging the gap between computational models and experimental data for cardiac tissue anisotropy. A generalized 3D eikonal relation considering anisotropy and a self-similar evolution solution of such a relation are derived to identify the effect of anisotropy and predict the anisotropy-induced electrical wave propagation instabilities. Furthermore, the phase field equation is introduced to obtain the complex three-dimensional numerical solution of the new correlation. The present results are expected to be valuable for better understanding the physiological behavior of cardiac tissues.

  9. Trimebutine: mechanism of action, effects on gastrointestinal function and clinical results.

    PubMed

    Delvaux, M; Wingate, D

    1997-01-01

    The actions of trimebutine [3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoic acid 2-(dimethylamino)-2-phenylbutylester] on the gastrointestinal tract are mediated via (i) an agonist effect on peripheral mu, kappa and delta opiate receptors and (ii) release of gastrointestinal peptides such as motilin and modulation of the release of other peptides, including vasoactive intestinal peptide, gastrin and glucagon. Trimebutine accelerates gastric emptying, induces premature phase III of the migrating motor complex in the intestine and modulates the contractile activity of the colon. Recently, trimebutine has also been shown to decrease reflexes induced by distension of the gut lumen in animals and it may therefore modulate visceral sensitivity. Clinically, trimebutine has proved to be effective in the treatment of both acute and chronic abdominal pain in patients with functional bowel disorders, especially irritable bowel syndrome, at doses ranging from 300 to 600 mg/day. It is also effective in children presenting with abdominal pain. PMID:9364286

  10. Antipyretic and antinociceptive effects of Nauclea latifolia root decoction and possible mechanisms of action

    PubMed Central

    Taïwe, Germain Sotoing; Bum, Elisabeth Ngo; Talla, Emmanuel; Dimo, Théophile; Weiss, Norbert; Sidiki, Neteydji; Dawe, Amadou; Okomolo Moto, Fleur Clarisse; Dzeufiet, Paul Désiré; Waard, Michel De

    2011-01-01

    Context Nauclea latifolia Smith (Rubiacea) is a small tree, found in tropical areas in Africa. It is used in traditional medicine to treat malaria, epilepsy, anxiety, pain, fever etc. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Nauclea latifolia roots decoction on the peripheral and central nervous systems and its possible mechanisms of action. Materials and methods The analgesic investigation was carried out against acetic acid-induced writhing, formalin-induced pain, hot-plate and tail immersion tests. The antipyretic activity was studied in Brewer’s yeast-induced pyrexia in mice. Rota-rod test and bicuculline-induced hyperactivity were used for the assessment of locomotor activity. Results Nauclea latifolia induced hypothermia and had antipyretic effects in mice. The plant decoction produced significant antinociceptive activity in all analgesia animal models used. The antinociceptive effect exhibited by the decoction in the formalin test was reversed by the systemic administration of naloxone, Nω-L-nitro-arginine methyl ester or glibenclamide. In contrast, theophylline did not reverse this effect. Nauclea latifolia (antinociceptive doses) did not exhibit significant effect on motor coordination of the mice in rota-rod performance. Nauclea latifolia protected mice against bicuculline-induced behavioural excitation. Discussion and conclusion Overall, these results demonstrate that the central and peripheral effects of Nauclea latifolia roots decoction might partially or wholly be due to the stimulation of peripheric opioid receptors through the action of the nitric oxide-cyclic GMP-ATP-sensitive K+ (NO/cGMP/ATP)-channel pathway and/or facilitation of the GABAergic transmission. PMID:20822326

  11. Endocrine disrupting chemicals in fish: developing exposure indicators and predictive models of effects based on mechanism of action

    EPA Science Inventory

    Knowledge of possible toxic mechanisms/modes of action (MOA) of chemicals can provide valuable insights as to appropriate methods for assessing exposure and effects, such as reducing uncertainties related to extrapolation across species, endpoints and chemical structure. However,...

  12. Effects of muscle action type with equal impulse of conditioning activity on postactivation potentiation.

    PubMed

    Bogdanis, Gregory C; Tsoukos, Athanasios; Veligekas, Panagiotis; Tsolakis, Charilaos; Terzis, Gerasimos

    2014-09-01

    This study investigated the effects of muscle action type during conditioning activity (half-squat) on subsequent vertical jump performance. Fourteen track and field athletes (relative half-squat of 2.3 ± 0.3 times their body weight) completed 4 main trials in a randomized and counterbalanced order 5-7 days apart: (a) concentric (CON) half-squats: 7.5 ± 1.2 repetitions against 90% of 1 repetition maximum (1RM), (b) eccentric (ECC) half-squats: 9.3 ± 1.5 repetitions against 70% of 1RM, and (c) 3 sets of 3-second maximal isometric (ISO) half-squats, (d) a control (CTRL) trial, where subjects rested for 10 minutes. The number of repetitions in CON and ECC was adjusted so that the impulse of the vertical ground reaction force was similar to ISO. Countermovement vertical jump (CMJ) performance was evaluated for 21 minutes after each main trial. Countermovement vertical jump performance in ISO was higher than CTRL from the second to the 10th minute of recovery, whereas CMJ performance in ECC was higher than CTRL from the sixth and 10th minute of recovery. Analysis of the peak individual responses revealed an increase in CMJ performance compared with baseline only in ISO (3.0 ± 1.2%; p = 0.045), whereas no significant increases were observed in ECC and CON. Peak CMJ performance for all subjects in ISO and ECC was achieved within 2-10 minutes after the conditioning muscle actions. Isometric were more effective than CON and ECC muscle actions in increasing explosive leg performance when the impulse of the ground reaction force of the conditioning exercise was equated.

  13. Action perception predicts action performance

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Heather R.; Kurby, Christopher A.; Giovannetti, Tania; Zacks, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    Everyday action impairments often are observed in demented older adults, and they are common potential barriers to functional independence. We evaluated whether the ability to segment and efficiently encode activities is related to the ability to execute activities. Further, we evaluated whether brain regions important for segmentation also were important for action performance. Cognitively healthy older adults and those with very mild or mild dementia of the Alzheimer's type watched and segmented movies of everyday activities and then completed the Naturalistic Action Test. Structural MRI was used to measure volume in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), medial temporal lobes (MTL), posterior cortex, and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Dementia status and the ability to segment everyday activities strongly predicted naturalistic action performance, and MTL volume largely accounted for this relationship. In addition, the current results supported the Omission-Commission Model: Different cognitive and neurological mechanisms predicted different types of action error. Segmentation, dementia severity, and MTL volume predicted everyday omission errors, DLPFC volume predicted commission errors, and ACC volume predicted action additions. These findings suggest that event segmentation may be critical for effective action production, and that the segmentation and production of activities may recruit the same event representation system. PMID:23851113

  14. Action perception predicts action performance.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Heather R; Kurby, Christopher A; Giovannetti, Tania; Zacks, Jeffrey M

    2013-09-01

    Everyday action impairments often are observed in demented older adults, and they are common potential barriers to functional independence. We evaluated whether the ability to segment and efficiently encode activities is related to the ability to execute activities. Further, we evaluated whether brain regions important for segmentation also were important for action performance. Cognitively healthy older adults and those with very mild or mild dementia of the Alzheimer's type watched and segmented movies of everyday activities and then completed the Naturalistic Action Test. Structural MRI was used to measure volume in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), medial temporal lobes (MTL), posterior cortex, and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Dementia status and the ability to segment everyday activities strongly predicted naturalistic action performance, and MTL volume largely accounted for this relationship. In addition, the current results supported the Omission-Commission Model: Different cognitive and neurological mechanisms predicted different types of action error. Segmentation, dementia severity, and MTL volume predicted everyday omission errors, DLPFC volume predicted commission errors, and ACC volume predicted action additions. These findings suggest that event segmentation may be critical for effective action production, and that the segmentation and production of activities may recruit the same event representation system.

  15. Toxicity, sublethal effects, and potential modes of action of select fungicides on freshwater fish and invertebrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elskus, Adria A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite decades of agricultural and urban use of fungicides and widespread detection of these pesticides in surface waters, relatively few data are available on the effects of fungicides on fish and invertebrates in the aquatic environment. Nine fungicides are reviewed in this report: azoxystrobin, boscalid, chlorothalonil, fludioxonil, myclobutanil, fenarimol, pyraclostrobin, pyrimethanil, and zoxamide. These fungicides were identified as emerging chemicals of concern because of their high or increasing global use rates, detection frequency in surface waters, or likely persistence in the environment. A review of the literature revealed significant sublethal effects of fungicides on fish, aquatic invertebrates, and ecosystems, including zooplankton and fish reproduction, fish immune function, zooplankton community composition, metabolic enzymes, and ecosystem processes, such as leaf decomposition in streams, among other biological effects. Some of these effects can occur at fungicide concentrations well below single-species acute lethality values (48- or 96-hour concentration that effects a response in 50 percent of the organisms, that is, effective concentration killing 50 percent of the organisms in 48 or 96 hours) and chronic sublethal values (for example, 21-day no observed adverse effects concentration), indicating that single-species toxicity values may dramatically underestimate the toxic potency of some fungicides. Fungicide modes of toxic action in fungi can sometimes reflect the biochemical and (or) physiological effects of fungicides observed in vertebrates and invertebrates; however, far more studies are needed to explore the potential to predict effects in nontarget organisms based on specific fungicide modes of toxic action. Fungicides can also have additive and (or) synergistic effects when used with other fungicides and insecticides, highlighting the need to study pesticide mixtures that occur in surface waters. For fungicides that partition to

  16. The mechanisms of action of flavonoids in the brain: Direct versus indirect effects.

    PubMed

    Rendeiro, Catarina; Rhodes, Justin S; Spencer, Jeremy P E

    2015-10-01

    The projected increase in the incidence of dementia in the population highlights the urgent need for a more comprehensive understanding of how different aspects of lifestyle, in particular exercise and diet, may affect neural function and consequent cognitive performance throughout the life course. In this regard, flavonoids, found in a variety of fruits, vegetables and derived beverages, have been identified as a group of promising bioactive compounds capable of influencing different aspects of brain function, including cerebrovascular blood flow and synaptic plasticity, both resulting in improvements in learning and memory in mammalian species. However, the precise mechanisms by which flavonoids exert these actions are yet to be fully established, although accumulating data indicate an ability to interact with neuronal receptors and kinase signaling pathways which are key to neuronal activation and communication and synaptic strengthening. Alternatively or concurrently, there is also compelling evidence derived from human clinical studies suggesting that flavonoids can positively affect peripheral and cerebrovascular blood flow, which may be an indirect effective mechanism by which dietary flavonoids can impact on brain health and cognition. The current review examines the beneficial effects of flavonoids on both human and animal brain function and attempts to address and link direct and indirect actions of flavonoids and their derivatives within the central nervous system (CNS).

  17. Calcium Channel Blockers as Tocolytics: Principles of Their Actions, Adverse Effects and Therapeutic Combinations

    PubMed Central

    Gáspár, Róbert; Hajagos-Tóth, Judit

    2013-01-01

    Dihydropyridine Ca2+ channel blockers (CCBs) are widely accepted in the treatment of premature labour. Their mechanism of action in tocolysis involves the blockade of L-type Ca2+ channels, influenced by the Ca2+-activated K+ channels, beta-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs) and sexual hormones. In clinical practice, most experience has been gained with the use of nifedipine, whose efficacy is superior or comparable to those of β-agonists and oxytocin antagonists. Additionally, it has a favourable adverse effect profile as compared with the majority of other tocolytics. The most frequent and well-tolerated side-effects of CCBs are tachycardia, headache and hypotension. In tocolytic therapy efforts are currently being made to find combinations of tocolytic agents that yield better therapeutic action. The available human and animal studies suggest that the combination of CCBs with β-AR agonists is beneficial, although such combinations can pose risk of pulmonary oedema in multiple pregnancies and maternal cardiovascular diseases. Preclinical data indicate the potential benefit of combinations of CCBs and oxytocin antagonists. However, the combinations of CCBs with progesterone or cyclooxygenase inhibitors may decrease their efficacy. The CCBs are likely to remain one of the most important groups of drugs for the rapid inhibition of premature uterine contractions. Their significance may be magnified by further clinical studies on their combined use for tocolysis. PMID:24276256

  18. Modelling the differential effects of prisms on perception and action in neglect.

    PubMed

    Leigh, Steven; Danckert, James; Eliasmith, Chris

    2015-03-01

    Damage to the right parietal cortex often leads to a syndrome known as unilateral neglect in which the patient fails to attend or respond to stimuli in left space. Recent work attempting to rehabilitate the disorder has made use of rightward-shifting prisms that displace visual input further rightward. After a brief period of adaptation to prisms, many of the symptoms of neglect show improvements that can last for hours or longer, depending on the adaptation procedure. Recent work has shown, however, that differential effects of prisms can be observed on actions (which are typically improved) and perceptual biases (which often remain unchanged). Here, we present a computational model capable of explaining some basic symptoms of neglect (line bisection behaviour), the effects of prism adaptation in both healthy controls and neglect patients and the observed dissociation between action and perception following prisms. The results of our simulations support recent contentions that prisms primarily influence behaviours normally thought to be controlled by the dorsal stream.

  19. [Effects and molecular mechanisms of the biological action of weak and extremely weak magnetic fields].

    PubMed

    Novikov, V V; Ponomarev, V O; Novikov, G V; Kuvichkin, V V; Iablokova, E V; Fesenko, E E

    2010-01-01

    A number of effects of weak combined (static and alternating) magnetic fields with an alternating component of tens and hundreds nT at a collinear static field of 42 microT, which is equivalent to the geomagnetic field, have been found: the activation of fission and regeneration of planarians Dugesia tigrina, the inhibition of the growth of the Ehrlich ascites carcinoma in mice, the stimulation of the production of the tumor necrosis factor by macrophages, a decrease in the protection of chromatin against the action of DNase 1, and the enhancement of protein hydrolysis in systems in vivo and in vitro. The frequency and amplitude ranges for the alternating component of weak combined magnetic fields have been determined at which it affects various biological systems. Thus, the optimal amplitude at a frequency of 4.4 Hz is 100 nT (effective value); at a frequency of 16.5 Hz, the range of effective amplitudes is broader, 150-300 nT; and at a frequency of 1 (0.5) Hz, it is 300 nT. The sum of close frequencies (e.g., 16 and 17 Hz) produces a similar biological effect as the product of the modulating (0.5 Hz) and carrying frequencies (16.5 Hz), which is explained by the ratio A = A0sin omega1t + A0sin omega2t = A0sin(omega1 + omega2)t/2cos(omega1 - omega2)t/2. The efficiency of magnetic signals with pulsations (the sum of close frequencies) is more pronounced than that of sinusoidal frequencies. These data may indicate the presence of several receptors of weak magnetic fields in biological systems and, as a consequence, a higher efficiency of the effect at the simultaneous adjustment to these frequencies by the field. Even with consideration of these facts, the mechanism of the biological action of weak combined magnetic fields remains still poorly understood. PMID:20968074

  20. Bisphosphonates: Pharmacokinetics, bioavailability, mechanisms of action, clinical applications in children, and effects on tooth development.

    PubMed

    Soares, Ana Prates; do Espírito Santo, Renan Fernandes; Line, Sérgio Roberto Peres; Pinto, Maria das Graças Farias; Santos, Pablo de Moura; Toralles, Maria Betânia Pereira; do Espírito Santo, Alexandre Ribeiro

    2016-03-01

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) avidly bind to calcium crystals and inhibit osteoclastic bone resorption, making them useful for treatment of skeletal disorders such as osteoporosis, Paget's disease, osteogenesis imperfecta and metastatic bone diseases. BPs therapeutically act by causing toxic effects on osteoclasts or interfering with specific intracellular pathways in those cells. BPs that possess nitrogen in their composition are called nitrogen-containing BPs (NBPs) and include alendronate, pamidronate, risedronate, ibandronate, and zoledronate. Simple BPs or non-NBPs do not have nitrogen in their composition, include etiodronate and clodronate, and were the first to be tested in animals and clinically used. Because BPs may be administered to pregnant women or children during deciduous and permanent teeth development, it is expected that they might disturb tooth eruption and development. A review of current literature on pharmacokinetics, bioavailability, mechanisms of action, and clinical applications of BPs in children, and their effects on tooth eruption and development is presented.

  1. The Action-Sentence Compatibility Effect in ASL: the role of semantics vs. perception*

    PubMed Central

    SECORA, KRISTEN; EMMOREY, KAREN

    2015-01-01

    Embodied theories of cognition propose that humans use sensorimotor systems in processing language. The Action-Sentence Compatibility Effect (ACE) refers to the finding that motor responses are facilitated after comprehending sentences that imply movement in the same direction. In sign languages there is a potential conflict between sensorimotor systems and linguistic semantics: movement away from the signer is perceived as motion toward the comprehender. We examined whether perceptual processing of sign movement or verb semantics modulate the ACE. Deaf ASL signers performed a semantic judgment task while viewing signed sentences expressing toward or away motion. We found a significant congruency effect relative to the verb’s semantics rather than to the perceived motion. This result indicates that (a) the motor system is involved in the comprehension of a visual–manual language, and (b) motor simulations for sign language are modulated by verb semantics rather than by the perceived visual motion of the hands. PMID:26052352

  2. Unintended Consequences of Management Actions in Salt Pond Restoration: Cascading Effects in Trophic Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Takekawa, John Y.; Ackerman, Joshua T.; Brand, L. Arriana; Graham, Tanya R.; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Herzog, Mark P.; Topping, Brent R.; Shellenbarger, Gregory G.; Kuwabara, James S.; Mruz, Eric; Piotter, Sara L.; Athearn, Nicole D.

    2015-01-01

    Salt evaporation ponds have played an important role as habitat for migratory waterbirds across the world, however, efforts to restore and manage these habitats to maximize their conservation value has proven to be challenging. For example, salinity reduction has been a goal for restoring and managing former salt evaporation ponds to support waterbirds in the South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project in San Francisco Bay, California, USA. Here, we describe a case study of unexpected consequences of a low-dissolved oxygen (DO) event on trophic interactions in a salt pond system following management actions to reduce salinity concentrations. We document the ramifications of an anoxic event in water quality including salinity, DO, and temperature, and in the response of the biota including prey fish biomass, numerical response by California Gulls (Larus californicus), and chick survival of Forster's Tern (Sterna forsteri). Management actions intended to protect receiving waters resulted in decreased DO concentrations that collapsed to zero for ≥ 4 consecutive days, resulting in an extensive fish kill. DO depletion likely resulted from an algal bloom that arose following transition of the pond system from high to low salinity as respiration and decomposition outpaced photosynthetic production. We measured a ≥ 6-fold increase in biomass of fish dropped on the levee by foraging avian predators compared with weeks prior to and following the low-DO event. California Gulls rapidly responded to the availability of aerobically-stressed and vulnerable fish and increased in abundance by two orders of magnitude. Mark-recapture analysis of 254 Forster's Tern chicks indicated that their survival declined substantially following the increase in gull abundance. Thus, management actions to reduce salinity concentrations resulted in cascading effects in trophic interactions that serves as a cautionary tale illustrating the importance of understanding the interaction of water quality

  3. The effect of neutral nonadditive gene action on the quantitative index of population divergence.

    PubMed Central

    López-Fanjul, Carlos; Fernández, Almudena; Toro, Miguel A

    2003-01-01

    For neutral additive genes, the quantitative index of population divergence (Q(ST)) is equivalent to Wright's fixation index (F(ST)). Thus, divergent or convergent selection is usually invoked, respectively, as a cause of the observed increase (Q(ST) > F(ST)) or decrease (Q(ST) < F(ST)) of Q(ST) from its neutral expectation (Q(ST) = F(ST)). However, neutral nonadditive gene action can mimic the additive expectations under selection. We have studied theoretically the effect of consecutive population bottlenecks on the difference F(ST) - Q(ST) for two neutral biallelic epistatic loci, covering all types of marginal gene action. With simple dominance, Q(ST) < F(ST) for only low to moderate frequencies of the recessive alleles; otherwise, Q(ST) > F(ST). Additional epistasis extends the condition Q(ST) < F(ST) to a broader range of frequencies. Irrespective of the type of nonadditive action, Q(ST) < F(ST) generally implies an increase of both the within-line additive variance after bottlenecks over its ancestral value (V(A)) and the between-line variance over its additive expectation (2F(ST)V(A)). Thus, both the redistribution of the genetic variance after bottlenecks and the F(ST) - Q(ST) value are governed largely by the marginal properties of single loci. The results indicate that the use of the F(ST) - Q(ST) criterion to investigate the relative importance of drift and selection in population differentiation should be restricted to pure additive traits. PMID:12930766

  4. Unintended consequences of management actions in salt pond restoration: cascading effects in trophic interactions.

    PubMed

    Takekawa, John Y; Ackerman, Joshua T; Brand, L Arriana; Graham, Tanya R; Eagles-Smith, Collin A; Herzog, Mark P; Topping, Brent R; Shellenbarger, Gregory G; Kuwabara, James S; Mruz, Eric; Piotter, Sara L; Athearn, Nicole D

    2015-01-01

    Salt evaporation ponds have played an important role as habitat for migratory waterbirds across the world, however, efforts to restore and manage these habitats to maximize their conservation value has proven to be challenging. For example, salinity reduction has been a goal for restoring and managing former salt evaporation ponds to support waterbirds in the South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project in San Francisco Bay, California, USA. Here, we describe a case study of unexpected consequences of a low-dissolved oxygen (DO) event on trophic interactions in a salt pond system following management actions to reduce salinity concentrations. We document the ramifications of an anoxic event in water quality including salinity, DO, and temperature, and in the response of the biota including prey fish biomass, numerical response by California Gulls (Larus californicus), and chick survival of Forster's Tern (Sterna forsteri). Management actions intended to protect receiving waters resulted in decreased DO concentrations that collapsed to zero for ≥ 4 consecutive days, resulting in an extensive fish kill. DO depletion likely resulted from an algal bloom that arose following transition of the pond system from high to low salinity as respiration and decomposition outpaced photosynthetic production. We measured a ≥ 6-fold increase in biomass of fish dropped on the levee by foraging avian predators compared with weeks prior to and following the low-DO event. California Gulls rapidly responded to the availability of aerobically-stressed and vulnerable fish and increased in abundance by two orders of magnitude. Mark-recapture analysis of 254 Forster's Tern chicks indicated that their survival declined substantially following the increase in gull abundance. Thus, management actions to reduce salinity concentrations resulted in cascading effects in trophic interactions that serves as a cautionary tale illustrating the importance of understanding the interaction of water quality

  5. Unintended consequences of management actions in salt pond restoration: cascading effects in trophic interactions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Takekawa, John Y.; Ackerman, Joshua T.; Brand, Arriana; Graham, Tanya R.; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Herzog, Mark; Topping, Brent R.; Shellenbarger, Gregory; Kuwabara, James S.; Mruz, Eric; Piotter, Sara L.; Athearn, Nicole D.

    2015-01-01

    Salt evaporation ponds have played an important role as habitat for migratory waterbirds across the world, however, efforts to restore and manage these habitats to maximize their conservation value has proven to be challenging. For example, salinity reduction has been a goal for restoring and managing former salt evaporation ponds to support waterbirds in the South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project in San Francisco Bay, California, USA. Here, we describe a case study of unexpected consequences of a low-dissolved oxygen (DO) event on trophic interactions in a salt pond system following management actions to reduce salinity concentrations. We document the ramifications of an anoxic event in water quality including salinity, DO, and temperature, and in the response of the biota including prey fish biomass, numerical response by California Gulls (Larus californicus), and chick survival of Forster's Tern (Sterna forsteri). Management actions intended to protect receiving waters resulted in decreased DO concentrations that collapsed to zero for ≥ 4 consecutive days, resulting in an extensive fish kill. DO depletion likely resulted from an algal bloom that arose following transition of the pond system from high to low salinity as respiration and decomposition outpaced photosynthetic production. We measured a ≥ 6-fold increase in biomass of fish dropped on the levee by foraging avian predators compared with weeks prior to and following the low-DO event. California Gulls rapidly responded to the availability of aerobically-stressed and vulnerable fish and increased in abundance by two orders of magnitude. Mark-recapture analysis of 254 Forster's Tern chicks indicated that their survival declined substantially following the increase in gull abundance. Thus, management actions to reduce salinity concentrations resulted in cascading effects in trophic interactions that serves as a cautionary tale illustrating the importance of understanding the interaction of water quality

  6. Carbon monoxide effects on human ventricle action potential assessed by mathematical simulations

    PubMed Central

    Trenor, Beatriz; Cardona, Karen; Saiz, Javier; Rajamani, Sridharan; Belardinelli, Luiz; Giles, Wayne R.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) that is produced in a number of different mammalian tissues is now known to have significant effects on the cardiovascular system. These include: (i) vasodilation, (ii) changes in heart rate and strength of contractions, and (iii) modulation of autonomic nervous system input to both the primary pacemaker and the working myocardium. Excessive CO in the environment is toxic and can initiate or mediate life threatening cardiac rhythm disturbances. Recent reports link these ventricular arrhythmias to an increase in the slowly inactivating, or “late” component of the Na+ current in the mammalian heart. The main goal of this paper is to explore the basis of this pro-arrhythmic capability of CO by incorporating changes in CO-induced ion channel activity with intracellular signaling pathways in the mammalian heart. To do this, a quite well-documented mathematical model of the action potential and intracellular calcium transient in the human ventricular myocyte has been employed. In silico iterations based on this model provide a useful first step in illustrating the cellular electrophysiological consequences of CO that have been reported from mammalian heart experiments. Specifically, when the Grandi et al. model of the human ventricular action potential is utilized, and after the Na+ and Ca2+ currents in a single myocyte are modified based on the experimental literature, early after-depolarization (EAD) rhythm disturbances appear, and important elements of the underlying causes of these EADs are revealed/illustrated. Our modified mathematical model of the human ventricular action potential also provides a convenient digital platform for designing future experimental work and relating these changes in cellular cardiac electrophysiology to emerging clinical and epidemiological data on CO toxicity. PMID:24146650

  7. Multi-species occurrence models to evaluate the effects of conservation and management actions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zipkin, E.F.; Andrew, Royle J.; Dawson, D.K.; Bates, S.

    2010-01-01

    Conservation and management actions often have direct and indirect effects on a wide range of species. As such, it is important to evaluate the impacts that such actions may have on both target and non-target species within a region. Understanding how species richness and composition differ as a result of management treatments can help determine potential ecological consequences. Yet it is difficult to estimate richness because traditional sampling approaches detect species at variable rates and some species are never observed. We present a framework for assessing management actions on biodiversity using a multi-species hierarchical model that estimates individual species occurrences, while accounting for imperfect detection of species. Our model incorporates species-specific responses to management treatments and local vegetation characteristics and a hierarchical component that links species at a community-level. This allows for comprehensive inferences on the whole community or on assemblages of interest. Compared to traditional species models, occurrence estimates are improved for all species, even for those that are rarely observed, resulting in more precise estimates of species richness (including species that were unobserved during sampling). We demonstrate the utility of this approach for conservation through an analysis comparing bird communities in two geographically similar study areas: one in which white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) densities have been regulated through hunting and one in which deer densities have gone unregulated. Although our results indicate that species and assemblage richness were similar in the two study areas, point-level richness was significantly influenced by local vegetation characteristics, a result that would have been underestimated had we not accounted for variability in species detection.

  8. Unintended consequences of management actions in salt pond restoration: cascading effects in trophic interactions.

    PubMed

    Takekawa, John Y; Ackerman, Joshua T; Brand, L Arriana; Graham, Tanya R; Eagles-Smith, Collin A; Herzog, Mark P; Topping, Brent R; Shellenbarger, Gregory G; Kuwabara, James S; Mruz, Eric; Piotter, Sara L; Athearn, Nicole D

    2015-01-01

    Salt evaporation ponds have played an important role as habitat for migratory waterbirds across the world, however, efforts to restore and manage these habitats to maximize their conservation value has proven to be challenging. For example, salinity reduction has been a goal for restoring and managing former salt evaporation ponds to support waterbirds in the South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project in San Francisco Bay, California, USA. Here, we describe a case study of unexpected consequences of a low-dissolved oxygen (DO) event on trophic interactions in a salt pond system following management actions to reduce salinity concentrations. We document the ramifications of an anoxic event in water quality including salinity, DO, and temperature, and in the response of the biota including prey fish biomass, numerical response by California Gulls (Larus californicus), and chick survival of Forster's Tern (Sterna forsteri). Management actions intended to protect receiving waters resulted in decreased DO concentrations that collapsed to zero for ≥ 4 consecutive days, resulting in an extensive fish kill. DO depletion likely resulted from an algal bloom that arose following transition of the pond system from high to low salinity as respiration and decomposition outpaced photosynthetic production. We measured a ≥ 6-fold increase in biomass of fish dropped on the levee by foraging avian predators compared with weeks prior to and following the low-DO event. California Gulls rapidly responded to the availability of aerobically-stressed and vulnerable fish and increased in abundance by two orders of magnitude. Mark-recapture analysis of 254 Forster's Tern chicks indicated that their survival declined substantially following the increase in gull abundance. Thus, management actions to reduce salinity concentrations resulted in cascading effects in trophic interactions that serves as a cautionary tale illustrating the importance of understanding the interaction of water quality

  9. [Central effect of Ca2+ channel blockers: multiple sites of action].

    PubMed

    Shibuya, T; Watanabe, Y

    1992-09-01

    To develop a new concept of central acting drugs, the modulation of brain Ca2+ flux must be considered as one of the important factors. This is because excessive Ca2+ influx to neuronal cells damages or kills these cells, and also because abnormal intracellular Ca2+ concentrations induce several types of mental disorders. Recently, both pre-clinical and clinical studies indicated that some Ca2+ channel blockers (Ca antagonists) will be useful for the treatment of grand mal, manic depressive insanity, panic disorder and anxiety. Furthermore, it has been estimated by animal studies and clinical pharmacology that ischemia-induced neuronal death can be prevented by the treatment with a Ca antagonist. However, the latter data, especially, has been mainly explained by pharmacological effects on the cerebrovascular system, not because of possible direct central actions. To invoke the notion of direct central action, it must be assumed that Ca antagonists might pass the blood-brain barrier (BBB). This potentiality that some Ca antagonists (i.e., flunarizine, nicardipine, nimodipine, etc.) can pass the BBB has been initially explored. If substantiated, such direct central effects of Ca antagonists may explain both the psychotropic effects and neuronal protection by these agents. To investigate the actual therapeutic effects of Ca2+ antagonists on psychotropic disorders and neuronal death, a suitable animal model and reasonable methods and criteria must be established. Then, both preclinical and clinical studies can be expected to relate to atypical central acting drugs modulating the brain Ca2+ channels, and also to the development of new pharmacological properties of Ca2+ antagonists.

  10. Differential effects of fluoxetine and venlafaxine on memory recognition: possible mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Carlini, Valeria Paola; Poretti, María Belén; Rask-Andersen, Mathias; Chavan, Rohit A; Ponzio, Marina F; Sawant, Rahul S; de Barioglio, Susana Rubiales; Schiöth, Helgi B; de Cuneo, Marta Fiol

    2012-08-01

    Serotonin-specific reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRI) are antidepressant drugs commonly used to treat a wide spectrum of mood disorders (Wong and Licinio, 2001). Although they have been clinically used for more than 50 years, the molecular and cellular basis for the action of SSRIs and SNRIs is not clear. Considering that the changes in gene expression involved in the action of antidepressant drugs on memory have not been identified, in this study we investigated the impact of chronic treatment with a SSRI (fluoxetine) and a SNRI (venlafaxine) on the mRNA expression of genes related to memory cascade in the mouse hippocampus, namely, α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA), nitric oxide synthase 1 (NOS1), neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor type 2 (TrKB), mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK/ERK) and serotonin transporter (SERT). Animals treated with fluoxetine 10 mg/Kg/day for 28 days showed a significant decrease in the percentage of time spent in the novel object recognition test (p≤0.005) and induced MAPK1/ERK2 down-regulation (p=0.005). Our results suggest that the effect on cognition could probably be explained by fluoxetine interference in the MAPK/ERK memory pathway. In contrast, chronic treatment with venlafaxine did not reduce MAPK1/ERK2 expression, suggesting that MAPK1/ERK2 down-regulation is not a common effect of all antidepressant drugs. Further studies are needed to examine the effect of chronic fluoxetine treatment on the ERK-CREB system, and to determine whether there is a causal relationship between the disruption of the ERK-CREB system and the effect of this antidepressant on memory performance. PMID:22449479

  11. Differential effects of fluoxetine and venlafaxine on memory recognition: possible mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Carlini, Valeria Paola; Poretti, María Belén; Rask-Andersen, Mathias; Chavan, Rohit A; Ponzio, Marina F; Sawant, Rahul S; de Barioglio, Susana Rubiales; Schiöth, Helgi B; de Cuneo, Marta Fiol

    2012-08-01

    Serotonin-specific reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRI) are antidepressant drugs commonly used to treat a wide spectrum of mood disorders (Wong and Licinio, 2001). Although they have been clinically used for more than 50 years, the molecular and cellular basis for the action of SSRIs and SNRIs is not clear. Considering that the changes in gene expression involved in the action of antidepressant drugs on memory have not been identified, in this study we investigated the impact of chronic treatment with a SSRI (fluoxetine) and a SNRI (venlafaxine) on the mRNA expression of genes related to memory cascade in the mouse hippocampus, namely, α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA), nitric oxide synthase 1 (NOS1), neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor type 2 (TrKB), mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK/ERK) and serotonin transporter (SERT). Animals treated with fluoxetine 10 mg/Kg/day for 28 days showed a significant decrease in the percentage of time spent in the novel object recognition test (p≤0.005) and induced MAPK1/ERK2 down-regulation (p=0.005). Our results suggest that the effect on cognition could probably be explained by fluoxetine interference in the MAPK/ERK memory pathway. In contrast, chronic treatment with venlafaxine did not reduce MAPK1/ERK2 expression, suggesting that MAPK1/ERK2 down-regulation is not a common effect of all antidepressant drugs. Further studies are needed to examine the effect of chronic fluoxetine treatment on the ERK-CREB system, and to determine whether there is a causal relationship between the disruption of the ERK-CREB system and the effect of this antidepressant on memory performance.

  12. Empowering America's Communities to Prepare for the Effects of Climate Change: Developing Actionable Climate Science Under the President's Climate Action Plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffy, P. B.; Colohan, P.; Driggers, R.; Herring, D.; Laurier, F.; Petes, L.; Ruffo, S.; Tilmes, C.; Venkataraman, B.; Weaver, C. P.

    2014-12-01

    Effective adaptation to impacts of climate change requires best-available information. To be most useful, this information should be easily found, well-documented, and translated into tools that decision-makers use and trust. To meet these needs, the President's Climate Action Plan includes efforts to develop "actionable climate science". The Climate Data Initiative (CDI) leverages the Federal Government's extensive, open data resources to stimulate innovation and private-sector entrepreneurship in support of actions to prepare for climate change. The Initiative forges commitments and partnerships from the private, NGO, academic, and public sectors to create data-driven tools. Open data from Federal agencies to support this innovation is available on Climate.Data.gov, initially focusing on coastal flooding but soon to expand to topics including food, energy, water, energy, transportation, and health. The Climate Resilience Toolkit (CRT) will facilitate access to data-driven resilience tools, services, and best practices, including those accessible through the CDI. The CRT will also include access to training and tutorials, case studies, engagement forums, and other information sources. The Climate Action Plan also calls for a public-private partnership on extreme weather risk, with the goal of generating improved assessments of risk from different types of extreme weather events, using methods and data that are transparent and accessible. Finally, the U.S. Global Change Research Program and associated agencies work to advance the science necessary to inform decisions and sustain assessments. Collectively, these efforts represent increased emphasis across the Federal Government on the importance of information to support climate resilience.

  13. A discharge flow-photoionization mass spectrometric study of the FO(X 2 Pi i) radical. Photoionization efficiency spectrum and ionization energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Zhengyu; Kuo, Szu-Cherng; Klemm, R. Bruce; Monks, Paul S.; Stief, Louis J.

    1994-01-01

    Photoionization efficiency spectra of FO were measured over the wavelength range 80.0-100.0 nm and in the ionization threshold region, 94.0-100.0 nm, using a discharge flow-photoionization mass spectrometer apparatus coupled to a synchrotron radiation source. FO was generated by the reaction of F2P atoms with NO3 and via a F2O2 discharge. A value of 12.78 +/- 0.03 eV was obtained for the adiabatic ionization energy of FO from photoion thresholds which corresponds to FO(+)(X 3 Sigma -) from FO(X 2 Pi i). These results, which are the first to be obtained by direct Photo-ionization mass spectrometry (PIMS) measurements, corroborate those of a photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) study; however, the ionization energy determined here is free from interferences due to other species which complicated the PES measurement. A value of 109.5 +/- 8.0 kJ/mol for Delta f H 0 298(FO) is computed from the present value of IE(FO) and a previous appearance energy measurement, and a value for the proton affinity of FO is calculated to be 511.5 +/- 10.0 kJ/mol.

  14. Search for the OH (X(2)Pi) Meinel band emission in meteors as a tracer of mineral water in comets: detection of N(2)(+) (A-X).

    PubMed

    Jenniskens, Peter; Laux, Christophe O

    2004-01-01

    We report the discovery of the N(2)(+) A-X Meinel band in the 780-840 nm meteor emission from two Leonid meteoroids that were ejected less than 1000 years ago by comet 55P/Tempel-Tuttle. Our analysis indicates that the N(2)(+) molecule is at least an order of magnitude less abundant than expected, possibly as a result of charge transfer reactions with meteoric metal atoms. This new band was found while searching for rovibrational transitions in the X(2)Pi electronic ground state of OH (the OH Meinel band), a potential tracer of water bound to minerals in cometary matter. The electronic A-X transition of OH has been identified in other Leonid meteors. We did not detect this OH Meinel band, which implies that the excited A state is not populated by thermal excitation but by a mechanism that directly produces OH in low vibrational levels of the excited A(2)Sigma state. Ultraviolet dissociation of atmospheric or meteoric water vapor is such a mechanism, as is the possible combustion of meteoric organics.

  15. Search for the OH (X(2)Pi) Meinel band emission in meteors as a tracer of mineral water in comets: detection of N(2)(+) (A-X)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenniskens, Peter; Laux, Christophe O.

    2004-01-01

    We report the discovery of the N(2)(+) A-X Meinel band in the 780-840 nm meteor emission from two Leonid meteoroids that were ejected less than 1000 years ago by comet 55P/Tempel-Tuttle. Our analysis indicates that the N(2)(+) molecule is at least an order of magnitude less abundant than expected, possibly as a result of charge transfer reactions with meteoric metal atoms. This new band was found while searching for rovibrational transitions in the X(2)Pi electronic ground state of OH (the OH Meinel band), a potential tracer of water bound to minerals in cometary matter. The electronic A-X transition of OH has been identified in other Leonid meteors. We did not detect this OH Meinel band, which implies that the excited A state is not populated by thermal excitation but by a mechanism that directly produces OH in low vibrational levels of the excited A(2)Sigma state. Ultraviolet dissociation of atmospheric or meteoric water vapor is such a mechanism, as is the possible combustion of meteoric organics.

  16. The Cognitive Representation of Intending Not to Act: Evidence for Specific Non-Action-Effect Binding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhn, Simone; Brass, Marcel

    2010-01-01

    The question how we represent voluntary action on a cognitive level has recently become of increasing interest to researchers studying motor control. However, so far it has been neglected how we represent the voluntary omission of an action. In our attempt to investigate the representation of voluntary non-actions we demonstrated binding effects…

  17. Action Research in Special Education: An Inquiry Approach for Effective Teaching and Learning. Practitioner Inquiry Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, Susan M.; Pine, Gerald J.

    2010-01-01

    This is the first book about action research devoted to the complex issues faced by children with disabilities and their teachers. The authors begin by providing the historical and philosophical underpinnings of action research and then present a framework for conducting action research in special education. In addition, they feature four examples…

  18. Phototaxis in the ciliated protozoan Ophryoglena flava: dose-effect curves and action spectrum determination.

    PubMed

    Cadetti, L; Marroni, F; Marangoni, R; Kuhlmann, H W; Gioffré, D; Colombetti, G

    2000-08-01

    The sensitivity of positive phototactic orientation of cells of the ciliated protozoan Ophryoglena flava has been measured for white light, broad-band blue and red light, and narrow-band monochromatic light, using a laboratory-developed computer aided system. The white-light fluence rate-response curve shows that there is no negative phototaxis in the fluence rate range investigated (0-15 W/m2) and no adaptation phenomena; it is very well fitted by a hyperbolic function; the fluence rate curves under broad band blue and red light (full width at half maximum, FWHM= 100 nm) can be fitted by the same model. The saturation level is, within experimental errors, the same for the three curves, indicating that there are no chromaticity effects and that if there is more than one photoreceptor pigment, they act independently of each other. The fluence rate-response curves determined under narrow band monochromatic light (FWHM = 10 nm) can also be fitted by the same model and show, within experimental errors, the same saturation level. An action spectrum for positive phototaxis at 10-nm intervals has been calculated from fluence rate-response curves: it shows three maxima, at 420, 540 and 590 nm. This action spectrum is significantly different from the ones for photomotile responses in Blepharisma japonicum, Stentor coeruleus and Chlamydodon mnemosyne, whereas it resembles the ones of Paramecium bursaria and Fabrea salina. PMID:11100836

  19. Differential effects of forward and backward masks on the relationship between perception and action.

    PubMed

    Deplancke, A; Madelain, L; Coello, Y

    2016-03-01

    A recent series of experiments has shown that the effects of near-threshold stimuli on perceptual and motor responses are highly dependent on experimental conditions. In particular, motor influences of near-threshold distractors were observed when using low-contrast unmasked stimuli and high-contrast masked stimuli although only the latter affected motor responses in the absence of stimulus awareness. These results are compatible with neurophysiological models of visual masking, suggesting that early neural responses to a visual stimulus can be decomposed in feedforward activations to-and feedback activations from-higher visual areas, correlating respectively with the actual presence of the stimulus and its conscious perception. We tested the compatibility between these neurophysiological models and the behavioural data obtained in near-threshold experiments. We recorded fast reaching movements directed to a highly visible target followed by a report of the presence of a near-threshold distractor presented either at low contrast without mask or at high contrast with a backward or forward mask. Analysis of hand trajectories revealed that deviations toward the distractor were observed in the no-mask condition when the distractor was present and reported, and when it was present but not reported in the backward and forward mask conditions, although the effect was weaker in the latter condition. These data reveal that the presence or absence of perception-action dissociations in behavioural studies are well accounted for by neurophysiological models of visual masking and that behavioural effects of near-threshold distractors cannot result merely from on a dichotomic visual system for perception and action.

  20. Action at an Attentional Distance: A Study of Children's Reasoning about Causes and Effects Involving Spatial and Attentional Discontinuity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grotzer, Tina A.; Solis, S. Lynneth

    2015-01-01

    Spatial discontinuity between causes and effects is a feature of many scientific concepts, particularly those in the environmental and ecological sciences. Causes can be spatially separated from their effects by great distances. Action at a distance, the idea that causes and effects can be separated in physical space, is a well-studied concept in…

  1. H + O3 Fourier-transform infrared emission and laser absorption studies of OH(X2Pi) radical - An experimental dipole moment function and state-to-state Einstein A coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, David D., Jr.; Schiffman, Aram; Nesbitt, David J.; Orlando, John J.; Burkholder, James B.

    1990-01-01

    FTIR emission/absorption spectroscopy is used to measure the relative intensities of 88 pairs of rovibrational transitions of OH(X2Pi) distributed over 16 vibrational bands. The experimental technique used to obtain the Einstein A ratios is discussed. The dipole moment function which follows from the intensity ratios along with Einstein A coefficients calculated from mu(r) is presented.

  2. The effect of nicotinic acid on the depressant action of ethanol and pentobarbital.

    PubMed

    Basilio, C M; Toro, A; Bernstein, J; Yojay, L

    1987-01-01

    The effect of nicotinic acid (NA) on sleeping time induced by a single dose of ethanol or pentobarbital was studied in rats. It was found that sleeping time was markedly reduced by NA in a dose-dependent manner. The effect was observed when NA was administered 10 min before or after ethanol or pentobarbital, but not when given 60 min in advance. NA did not affect the rate of ethanol elimination measured up to 5 hr after ethanol administration. Rats pretreated with NA 60 min before ethanol slept longer than controls. This latter effect was not observed with pentobarbital. These observations, together with the known lack of effect of high liver NAD+ levels on ethanol metabolism and the rather stable NAD+ concentration in brain cells, suggest that the effect of NA on sleeping time is not mediated by an increase in ethanol metabolism in liver or by NAD+ or NAD+-dependent reactions in brain. Our results are consistent with a direct action of NA, or some rapidly formed derivative, on a structure or process associated with brain cell functions or membranes.

  3. Protective action of low-intensity laser radiation relative to the toxic effect of metals (experimental study in vitro)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dejneka, S. Y.

    1997-12-01

    The study of a possible cytotoxic effect of different doses of low-insensitive laser radiation and protective action of low-intensive laser radiation relative to the toxic effect of metals was carried out by means of the alternative method of investigation in vitro on cell cultura Hela. It was established that the investigated doses of low-intensive laser radiation had not produced any toxic effect on cell culture Hela, so the mentioned doses were not cytotoxic. It was revealed that laser radiation reduced the level of the cytotoxic effect of the studied metal salts on the cell culture, and possessed the protective action against the toxic effect of metals. This action has a clear-cut dose- related character.

  4. The effect of animation on learning action symbols by individuals with intellectual disabilities.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Kazuko; Inoue, Tomoyoshi; Yamana, Yuko; Hayashi, Humirhiro

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether participants with intellectual impairments could benefit from the movement associated with animated pictures while they were learning symbol names. Sixteen school students, whose linguistic-developmental age ranged from 38?91 months, participated in the experiment. They were taught 16 static visual symbols and the corresponding action words (naming task) in two sessions conducted one week apart. In the experimental condition, animation was employed to facilitate comprehension, whereas no animation was used in the control condition. Enhancement of learning was shown in the experimental condition, suggesting that the participants benefited from animated symbols. Furthermore, it was found that the lower the linguistic developmental age, the more effective the animated cue was in learning static visual symbols.

  5. Magnetic Back Action Effect of Magnetic Sensors for eLISA/NGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateos, I.; Diaz-Aguiló, M.; Gibert, F.; Lloro, I.; Lobo, A.; Nofrarias, M.; Ramos-Castro, J.

    2013-01-01

    The fluxgate magnetometers used in LISA Pathfinder mission are able to perform very low noise measurements at milli-Hertz frequency, however they need to be kept somehow away from the Test Masses (TMs) due to the quantity of ferromagnetic material contained in the fluxgate's core, which constitutes a potential source of disturbance to the performance. As a result, the estimation of the magnetic field and gradient in the TMs is very problematic, despite the excellent quality of the readout data. The design of a magnetic diagnostic measuring system able to deal with the magnetic constraints for eLISA/NGO will imply the magnetic characterization of the sensors in order to estimate the magnetic back action effect on their environment. The magnetic impact caused by the magnetometers also depends on the noise reduction techniques used in the signal conditioning circuit, which is being studied to develop criteria for the best choice of magnetic sensors for eLISA/NGO.

  6. Antifungal effect and action mechanism of antimicrobial peptide polybia-CP.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kairong; Jia, Fengjing; Dang, Wen; Zhao, Yanyan; Zhu, Ranran; Sun, Mengyang; Qiu, Shuai; An, Xiaoping; Ma, Zelin; Zhu, Yuanyuan; Yan, Jiexi; Kong, Ziqing; Yan, Wenjin; Wang, Rui

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of life-threatening invasive fungal infections increased significantly in recent years. However, the antifungal therapeutic options are very limited. Antimicrobial peptides are a class of potential lead chemical for the development of novel antifungal agents. Antimicrobial peptide polybia-CP was purified from the venom of the social wasp Polybia paulista. In this study, we synthesized polybia-CP and determined its antifungal effects against a series of Candidian species. Our results showed that polybia-CP has potent antifungal activity and fungicidal activity against the tested fungal cells with a proposed membrane-active action mode. In addition, polybia-CP could induce the increase of cellular reactive oxygen species production, which would attribute to its antifungal activity. In conclusion, the present study suggests that polybia-CP has potential as an antifungal agent or may offer a new strategy for antifungal therapeutic option. PMID:26680221

  7. Effective Wess Zumino Witten action for edge states of quantum Hall systems on Bergman ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daoud, Mohammed; Jellal, Ahmed

    2007-03-01

    Using a group theory approach, we investigate the basic features of the Landau problem on the Bergman ball B. This can be done by considering a system of particles living on B in the presence of an uniform magnetic field B and realizing the ball as the coset space SU(k,1)/U(k). In quantizing the theory on B, we define the wavefunctions as the Wigner D-functions satisfying a set of suitable constraints. The corresponding Hamiltonian is mapped in terms of the right translation generators. In the lowest Landau level, we obtain the wavefunctions as the SU(k,1) coherent states. This are used to define the star product, density matrix and excitation potential in higher dimensions. With these ingredients, we construct a generalized effective Wess-Zumino-Witten action for the edge states and discuss their nature.

  8. The probable effects of Federal Trade Commission actions on dentistry and dental education.

    PubMed

    Conrad, D A; Milgrom, P

    1982-03-01

    For the last several years the Federal Trade Commission has been actively involved in investigation and legal action within the market for dental services. The essence of FTC policy has been to promote competitive market forces in the dental care sector. This intervention has produced and will continue to produce several direct and indirect effects on dental education. By shaping the rules of the game for the dental services market and by influencing the income prospects for dental practice, the FTC's forays will alter the type of training and knowledge demanded by dental school applicants, the quality of the applicant pool, the mix of practice settings selected by newly graduated practitioners, the nature of school-based clinical practice, and the process and content of the dental school curriculum.

  9. Covariant computation of effective actions in Hořava-Lifshitz gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Odorico, Giulio; Goossens, Jan-Willem; Saueressig, Frank

    2015-10-01

    We initiate the systematic computation of the heat-kernel coefficients for Laplacian operators obeying anisotropic dispersion relations in curved spacetime. Our results correctly reproduce the limit where isotropy is restored and special anisotropic cases considered previously in the literature. Subsequently, the heat kernel is used to derive the scalar-induced one-loop effective action and beta functions of Hořava-Lifshitz gravity. We identify the Gaussian fixed point which is supposed to provide the UV completion of the theory. In the present setting, this fixed point acts as an infrared attractor for the renormalization group flow of Newton's constant and the high-energy phase of the theory is screened by a Landau pole. We comment on the consequences of these findings for the renormalizability of the theory.

  10. Effective action approach and Carlson-Goldman mode in d-wave superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharapov, Sergei G.; Beck, Hans

    2002-04-01

    We theoretically investigate the Carlson-Goldman (CG) mode in two-dimensional clean d-wave superconductors using the effective ``phase-only'' action formalism. In conventional s-wave superconductors, it is known that the CG mode is observed as a peak in the structure factor of the pair susceptibility S(Ω,K) only just below the transition temperature Tc and only in dirty systems. On the other hand, our analytical results support the statement by Ohashi and Takada [Phys. Rev. B 62, 5971 (2000)] that in d-wave superconductors the CG mode can exist in clean systems down to much lower temperatures, T~0.1Tc. We also consider the manifestations of the CG mode in the density-density and current-current correlators and discuss the gauge independence of the obtained results.

  11. Nonlinear refractive index measurements and self-action effects in Roselle-Hibiscus Sabdariffa solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henari, F. Z.; Al-Saie, A.

    2006-12-01

    We report the observation of self-action phenomena, such as self-focusing, self-defocusing, self-phase modulation and beam fanning in Roselle-Hibiscus Sabdariffa solutions. This material is found to be a new type of natural nonlinear media, and the nonlinear reflective index coefficient has been determined using a Z-scan technique and by measuring the critical power for the self-trapping effect. Z-scan measurements show that this material has a large negative nonlinear refractive index, n 2 = 1 × 10-4 esu. A comparison between the experimental n 2 values and the calculated thermal value for n 2 suggests that the major contribution to nonlinear response is of thermal origin.

  12. String states, loops and effective actions in noncommutative field theory and matrix models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinacker, Harold C.

    2016-09-01

    Refining previous work by Iso, Kawai and Kitazawa, we discuss bi-local string states as a tool for loop computations in noncommutative field theory and matrix models. Defined in terms of coherent states, they exhibit the stringy features of noncommutative field theory. This leads to a closed form for the 1-loop effective action in position space, capturing the long-range non-local UV/IR mixing for scalar fields. The formalism applies to generic fuzzy spaces. The non-locality is tamed in the maximally supersymmetric IKKT or IIB model, where it gives rise to supergravity. The linearized supergravity interactions are obtained directly in position space at one loop using string states on generic noncommutative branes.

  13. Antifungal effect and action mechanism of antimicrobial peptide polybia-CP.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kairong; Jia, Fengjing; Dang, Wen; Zhao, Yanyan; Zhu, Ranran; Sun, Mengyang; Qiu, Shuai; An, Xiaoping; Ma, Zelin; Zhu, Yuanyuan; Yan, Jiexi; Kong, Ziqing; Yan, Wenjin; Wang, Rui

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of life-threatening invasive fungal infections increased significantly in recent years. However, the antifungal therapeutic options are very limited. Antimicrobial peptides are a class of potential lead chemical for the development of novel antifungal agents. Antimicrobial peptide polybia-CP was purified from the venom of the social wasp Polybia paulista. In this study, we synthesized polybia-CP and determined its antifungal effects against a series of Candidian species. Our results showed that polybia-CP has potent antifungal activity and fungicidal activity against the tested fungal cells with a proposed membrane-active action mode. In addition, polybia-CP could induce the increase of cellular reactive oxygen species production, which would attribute to its antifungal activity. In conclusion, the present study suggests that polybia-CP has potential as an antifungal agent or may offer a new strategy for antifungal therapeutic option.

  14. Vasodilating effect of norethisterone and its 5 alpha metabolites: a novel nongenomic action.

    PubMed

    Perusquía, Mercedes; Villalón, Carlos M; Navarrete, Erika; García, Gustavo A; Pérez-Palacios, Gregorio; Lemus, Ana E

    2003-08-15

    Estrogens are generally administered in hormone replacement therapy in combination with synthetic progestins. Studies of cardiovascular risk factors in postmenopausal women have shown a variety of responses according to the molecular structure of the progestin used in hormone replacement therapy schemes. The present study sets out to determine the vasoactive effects of norethisterone and its 5alpha-dihydro (5alpha-norethisterone) and -tetrahydro (3alpha,5alpha-norethisterone and 3beta,5alpha-norethisterone) metabolites in isolated precontracted rat thoracic aorta. The addition of norethisterone and 3alpha,5alpha-norethisterone in rat aorta exhibited a potent, concentration-response inhibition of noradrenaline-induced contraction, while 5alpha- and 3beta,5alpha-norethisterone had very little, if any, vasorelaxing effect. Relaxation to norethisterone and 3alpha,5alpha-norethisterone had very rapid time-courses and it was neither affected by the absence of endothelium nor by the inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME). The addition of specific anti-androgen, anti-progestin and anti-estrogen compounds and protein synthesis inhibitors did not preclude the vasorelaxing effect of norethisterone and its 3alpha,5alpha-reduced metabolite. The results strongly suggest that these effects are not mediated by nuclear sex steroid hormone receptors. The overall data document a novel nongenomic endothelium-independent vasorelaxing action of a 19-nor synthetic progestin and one of its A-ring-reduced derivatives.

  15. Antispasmodic Effects and Action Mechanism of Essential Oil of Chrysactinia mexicana A. Gray on Rabbit Ileum.

    PubMed

    Zavala-Mendoza, Daniel; Grasa, Laura; Zavala-Sánchez, Miguel Ángel; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Salud; Murillo, María Divina

    2016-01-01

    The Chrysactinia mexicana A. Gray (C. mexicana) plant is used in folk medicine to treat fever and rheumatism; it is used as a diuretic, antispasmodic; and it is used for its aphrodisiac properties. This study investigates the effects of the essential oil of C. mexicana (EOCM) on the contractility of rabbit ileum and the mechanisms of action involved. Muscle contractility studies in vitro in an organ bath to evaluate the response to EOCM were performed in the rabbit ileum. EOCM (1-100 µg·mL(-1)) reduced the amplitude and area under the curve of spontaneous contractions of the ileum. The contractions induced by carbachol 1 µM, potassium chloride (KCl) 60 mM or Bay K8644 1 µM were reduced by EOCM (30 µg·mL(-1)). Apamin 1 µM and charybdotoxin 0.01 µM decreased the inhibition induced by EOCM. The d-cAMP 1 µM decreased the inhibition induced by EOCM. l-NNA 10 µM, Rp-8-Br-PET-cGMPS 1 µM, d,l-propargylglycine 2 mM, or aminooxyacetic acid hemihydrochloride 2 mM did not modify the EOCM effect. In conclusion, EOCM induces an antispasmodic effect and could be used in the treatment of intestinal spasms or diarrhea processes. This effect would be mediated by Ca(2+), Ca(2+)-activated K⁺ channels and cAMP. PMID:27322223

  16. Structual Effects of Cytidine 2^' Ribose Modifications as Determined by Irmpd Action Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamlow, Lucas; He, Chenchen; Fan, Lin; Wu, Ranran; Yang, Bo; Rodgers, M. T.; Berden, Giel; Oomens, J.

    2015-06-01

    Modified nucleosides, both naturally occurring and synthetic play an important role in understanding and manipulating RNA and DNA. Naturally occurring modified nucleosides are commonly found in functionally important regions of RNA and also affect antibiotic resistance or sensitivity. Synthetic modifications of nucleosides such as fluorinated and arabinosyl nucleosides have found uses as anti-virals and chemotherapy agents. Understanding the effect that modifications have on structure and glycosidic bond stability may lend insight into the functions of these modified nucleosides. Modifications such as the naturally occurring 2^'-O-methylation and the synthetic 2^'-fluorination are believed to help stabilize the nucleoside through the glycosidic bond stability and intramolecular hydrogen bonding. Changing the sugar from ribose to arabinose alters the stereochemistry at the 2^' position and thus shifts the 3D orientation of the 2^'-hydroxyl group, which also affects intramolecular hydrogen bonding and glycosidic bond stability. The structures of 2^'-deoxy-2^'-fluorocytidine, 2^'-O-methylcytidine and cytosine arabinoside are examined in the current work by measuring the infrared spectra in the IR fingerprint region using infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) action spectroscopy. The structures accessed in the experiments were determined via comparison of the measured IRMPD action spectra to the theoretical linear IR spectra determined by density functional theory and molecular modeling for the stable low-energy structures. Although glycosidic bond stability cannot be quantitatively determined from this data, complementary TCID studies will establish the effect of these modifications. Comparison of these modified nucleosides with their RNA and DNA analogues will help elucidate differences in their intrinsic chemistry.

  17. Effects of covert subject actions on percent body fat by air-displacement plethsymography.

    PubMed

    Tegenkamp, Michelle H; Clark, R Randall; Schoeller, Dale A; Landry, Greg L

    2011-07-01

    Air-displacement plethysmography (ADP) is used for estimation of body composition, however, some individuals, such as athletes in weight classification sports, may use covert methods during ADP testing to alter their apparent percent body fat. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of covert subject actions on percent body fat measured by ADP. Subjects underwent body composition analysis in the Bod Pod following the standard procedure using the manufacturer's guidelines. The subjects then underwent 8 more measurements while performing the following intentional manipulations: 4 breathing patterns altering lung volume, foot movement to disrupt air, hand cupping to trap air, and heat and cold exposure before entering the chamber. Increasing and decreasing lung volume during thoracic volume measurement and during body density measurement altered the percent body fat assessment (p < 0.001). High lung volume during thoracic gas measures overestimated fat by 3.7 ± 2.1 percentage points. Lowered lung volume during body volume measures overestimated body fat by an additional 2.2 ± 2.1 percentage points. The heat and cold exposure, tapping, and cupping treatments provided similar estimates of percent body fat when compared with the standard condition. These results demonstrate the subjects were able to covertly change their estimated ADP body composition value by altering breathing when compared with the standard condition. We recommend that sports conditioning coaches, athletic trainers, and technicians administering ADP should be aware of the potential effects of these covert actions. The individual responsible for administering ADP should remain vigilant during testing to detect deliberate altered breathing patterns by athletes in an effort to gain a competitive advantage by manipulating their body composition assessment.

  18. Effects of pancreatic polypeptide on insulin action in exocrine secretion of isolated rat pancreas.

    PubMed Central

    Park, H J; Lee, Y L; Kwon, H Y

    1993-01-01

    1. Effects of pancreatic polypeptide (PP) on insulin action in pancreatic exocrine secretion was investigated by using an isolated rat pancreas that was perfused with Krebs-Henseleit solution containing 2.5 mM glucose, 0.1% bovine serum albumin and 3% Dextran T-70 at a vascular flow rate of 1.2 ml min-1. 2. Cholecystokinin-8 (CCK-8) at a concentration of 14 pM stimulated basal flow rate and amylase output of the isolated pancreas. Twenty-five millimolar glucose not only increased the basal flow rate and amylase output but also potentiated the CCK-stimulated flow rate and amylase output. 3. Porcine insulin, administered intra-arterially at a concentration of 100 nM, also increased the basal flow rate and amylase output, and also potentiated the CCK-stimulated flow rate and amylase output. 4. Rat PP, given intra-arterially at a concentration of 10 pM, completely abolished the potentiation effects of both the 25 mM glucose and the exogenous insulin on the CCK-stimulated flow rate and amylase output. Rat PP also inhibited the flow rate and amylase output increased by either 25 mM glucose alone or exogenous insulin alone. However, rat PP did not change the flow rate and amylase output stimulated by CCK-8 alone. 5. These results indicate that insulin is an important stimulatory hormone of pancreatic exocrine secretion, and that PP exerts the inhibitory role in pancreatic exocrine secretion by modulating the insulin action. PMID:7504106

  19. Effective action and electromagnetic response of topological superconductors and Majorana-mass Weyl fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Michael; Lopes, Pedro L. e. S.

    2016-05-01

    Motivated by an apparent paradox in [X.-L. Qi, E. Witten, and S.-C. Zhang, Phys. Rev. B 87, 134519 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevB.87.134519], we use the method of gauged Wess-Zumino-Witten functionals to construct an effective action for a Weyl fermion with a Majorana mass that arises from coupling to a charged condensate. We obtain expressions for the current induced by an external gauge field and observe that the topological part of the current is only one-third of that that might have been expected from the gauge anomaly. The anomaly is not changed by the induced mass gap, however. The topological current is supplemented by a conventional supercurrent that provides the remaining two-thirds of the anomaly once the equation of motion for the Goldstone mode is satisfied. We apply our formula for the current to resolve the apparent paradox and also to the chiral magnetic effect (CME), where it predicts a reduction of the CME current to one-third of its value for a free Weyl gas in thermal equilibrium. We attribute this reduction to a partial cancellation of the CME by a chiral vortical effect current arising from the persistent rotation of the fluid induced by the external magnetic field.

  20. The action of mimetic peptides on connexins protects fibroblasts from the negative effects of ischemia reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Glass, Beverley J.; Hu, Rebecca G.; Phillips, Anthony R. J.; Becker, David L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Connexins have been proposed as a target for therapeutic treatment of a variety of conditions. The main approaches have been by antisense or small peptides specific against connexins. Some of these peptides enhance communication while others interfere with connexin binding partners or bind to the intracellular and extracellular loops of connexins. Here, we explored the mechanism of action of a connexin mimetic peptide by evaluating its effect on gap junction channels, connexin protein levels and hemichannel activity in fibroblast cells under normal conditions and following ischemia reperfusion injury which elevates Cx43 levels, increases hemichannel activity and causes cell death. Our results showed that the effects of the mimetic peptide were concentration-dependent. High concentrations (100-300 μM) significantly reduced Cx43 protein levels and GJIC within 2 h, while these effects did not appear until 6 h when using lower concentrations (10-30 μM). Cell death can be reduced when hemichannel opening and GJIC were minimised. PMID:26471768

  1. Infrared divergences and harmonic anomalies in the two-loop superstring effective action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pioline, Boris; Russo, Rodolfo

    2015-12-01

    We analyze the pertubative contributions to the {D}^4{R}^4 and {D}^6{R}^4 couplings in the low-energy effective action of type II string theory compactified on a torus T d , with particular emphasis on two-loop corrections. In general, it is necessary to introduce an infrared cut-off Λ to separate local interactions from non-local effects due to the exchange of massless states. We identify the degenerations of the genus-two Riemann surface which are responsible for power-like dependence on Λ, and give an explicit prescription for extracting the Λ-independent effective couplings. These renormalized couplings are then shown to be eigenmodes of the Laplace operator with respect to the torus moduli, up to computable anomalous source terms arising in the presence of logarithmic divergences, in precise agreement with predictions from U-duality. Our results for the two-loop {D}^6{R}^4 contribution also probe essential properties of the Kawazumi-Zhang invariant.

  2. Anesthetic action on extra-synaptic receptors: effects in neural population models of EEG activity

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi, Meysam; Hutt, Axel; Sleigh, Jamie

    2014-01-01

    The role of extra-synaptic receptors in the regulation of excitation and inhibition in the brain has attracted increasing attention. Because activity in the extra-synaptic receptors plays a role in regulating the level of excitation and inhibition in the brain, they may be important in determining the level of consciousness. This paper reviews briefly the literature on extra-synaptic GABA and NMDA receptors and their affinity to anesthetic drugs. We propose a neural population model that illustrates how the effect of the anesthetic drug propofol on GABAergic extra-synaptic receptors results in changes in neural population activity and the electroencephalogram (EEG). Our results show that increased tonic inhibition in inhibitory cortical neurons cause a dramatic increase in the power of both δ− and α− bands. Conversely, the effects of increased tonic inhibition in cortical excitatory neurons and thalamic relay neurons have the opposite effect and decrease the power in these bands. The increased δ-activity is in accord with observed data for deepening propofol anesthesia; but is absolutely dependent on the inclusion of extrasynaptic (tonic) GABA action in the model. PMID:25540612

  3. Inelastic scattering of He atoms and NO(X2Pi) molecules: the role of parity on the differential cross section.

    PubMed

    Aoiz, F J; Verdasco, J E; Brouard, M; Kłos, J; Marinakis, S; Stolte, S

    2009-12-31

    Quasiclassical trajectory (QCT) and quantum mechanical (QM) close-coupling calculations have been used to study the state-resolved rotationally inelastic scattering of NO(X(2)Pi(1/2),v = 0,j = 1/2,e/f) by He on the most recent ab initio potential energy surface of J. Kłos et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 2000, 112, 2195.]. Opacity functions, and integral and differential cross sections are reported at collision energies of 63 and 147 meV and compared with previous theoretical calculations and experimental measurements on this and other systems. The existence of double peaks in the QCT and QM differential cross sections is examined in detail. While at a collision energy of 147 meV two rotational peaks appear in both the QCT and open-shell QM results, only a single peak is found in the QM calculations at the lower collision energy. The double peaks in the quantum-state-resolved differential cross sections (DCS) are found to be closely related to structure found in the corresponding state-resolved opacity functions. The structure in the QCT and QM DCSs is attributed to a flattening of the potential energy surface for sideways approach of He to the near-symmetric NO(X) molecule, and in both sets of calculations, it is shown to arise from a specific odd term in the expansion of the intermolecular potential. Although significant differences are found between the QCT and QM data in the forward scattered direction, and for higher final rotational levels, reflecting differences in the nature of the rotational rainbows observed in these two methods, in general, the QCT calculations are shown to give similar results to quantum theory. Furthermore, they provide valuable clues as to the mechanism of rotational energy transfer in this system. PMID:19673507

  4. Unexpected events induce motor slowing via a brain mechanism for action-stopping with global suppressive effects.

    PubMed

    Wessel, Jan R; Aron, Adam R

    2013-11-20

    When an unexpected event occurs in everyday life (e.g., a car honking), one experiences a slowing down of ongoing action (e.g., of walking into the street). Motor slowing following unexpected events is a ubiquitous phenomenon, both in laboratory experiments as well as such everyday situations, yet the underlying mechanism is unknown. We hypothesized that unexpected events recruit the same inhibition network in the brain as does complete cancellation of an action (i.e., action-stopping). Using electroencephalography and independent component analysis in humans, we show that a brain signature of successful outright action-stopping also exhibits activity following unexpected events, and more so in blocks with greater motor slowing. Further, using transcranial magnetic stimulation to measure corticospinal excitability, we show that an unexpected event has a global motor suppressive effect, just like outright action-stopping. Thus, unexpected events recruit a common mechanism with outright action-stopping, moreover with global suppressive effects. These findings imply that we can now leverage the considerable extant knowledge of the neural architecture and functional properties of the stopping system to better understand the processing of unexpected events, including perhaps how they induce distraction via global suppression.

  5. Unexpected Events Induce Motor Slowing via a Brain Mechanism for Action-Stopping with Global Suppressive Effects

    PubMed Central

    Aron, Adam R.

    2013-01-01

    When an unexpected event occurs in everyday life (e.g., a car honking), one experiences a slowing down of ongoing action (e.g., of walking into the street). Motor slowing following unexpected events is a ubiquitous phenomenon, both in laboratory experiments as well as such everyday situations, yet the underlying mechanism is unknown. We hypothesized that unexpected events recruit the same inhibition network in the brain as does complete cancellation of an action (i.e., action-stopping). Using electroencephalography and independent component analysis in humans, we show that a brain signature of successful outright action-stopping also exhibits activity following unexpected events, and more so in blocks with greater motor slowing. Further, using transcranial magnetic stimulation to measure corticospinal excitability, we show that an unexpected event has a global motor suppressive effect, just like outright action-stopping. Thus, unexpected events recruit a common mechanism with outright action-stopping, moreover with global suppressive effects. These findings imply that we can now leverage the considerable extant knowledge of the neural architecture and functional properties of the stopping system to better understand the processing of unexpected events, including perhaps how they induce distraction via global suppression. PMID:24259571

  6. Multinational corporations and health care in the United States and Latin America: strategies, actions, and effects.

    PubMed

    Jasso-Aguilar, Rebeca; Waitzkin, Howard; Landwehr, Angela

    2004-01-01

    In this article we analyze the corporate dominance of health care in the United States and the dynamics that have motivated the international expansion of multinational health care corporations, especially to Latin America. We identify the strategies, actions, and effects of multinational corporations in health care delivery and public health policies. Our methods have included systematic bibliographical research and in-depth interviews in the United States, Mexico, and Brazil. Influenced by public policy makers in the United States, such organizations as the World Bank, International Monetary Fund, and World Trade Organization have advocated policies that encourage reduction and privatization of health care and public health services previously provided in the public sector. Multinational managed care organizations have entered managed care markets in several Latin American countries at the same time as they were withdrawing from managed care activities in Medicaid and Medicare within the United States. Corporate strategies have culminated in a marked expansion of corporations' access to social security and related public sector funds for the support of privatized health services. International financial institutions and multinational corporations have influenced reforms that, while favorable to corporate interests, have worsened access to needed services and have strained the remaining public sector institutions. A theoretical approach to these problems emphasizes the falling rate of profit as an economic motivation of corporate actions, silent reform, and the subordination of polity to economy. Praxis to address these problems involves opposition to policies that enhance corporate interests while reducing public sector services, as well as alternative models that emphasize a strengthened public sector

  7. Multinational corporations and health care in the United States and Latin America: strategies, actions, and effects.

    PubMed

    Jasso-Aguilar, Rebeca; Waitzkin, Howard; Landwehr, Angela

    2004-01-01

    In this article we analyze the corporate dominance of health care in the United States and the dynamics that have motivated the international expansion of multinational health care corporations, especially to Latin America. We identify the strategies, actions, and effects of multinational corporations in health care delivery and public health policies. Our methods have included systematic bibliographical research and in-depth interviews in the United States, Mexico, and Brazil. Influenced by public policy makers in the United States, such organizations as the World Bank, International Monetary Fund, and World Trade Organization have advocated policies that encourage reduction and privatization of health care and public health services previously provided in the public sector. Multinational managed care organizations have entered managed care markets in several Latin American countries at the same time as they were withdrawing from managed care activities in Medicaid and Medicare within the United States. Corporate strategies have culminated in a marked expansion of corporations' access to social security and related public sector funds for the support of privatized health services. International financial institutions and multinational corporations have influenced reforms that, while favorable to corporate interests, have worsened access to needed services and have strained the remaining public sector institutions. A theoretical approach to these problems emphasizes the falling rate of profit as an economic motivation of corporate actions, silent reform, and the subordination of polity to economy. Praxis to address these problems involves opposition to policies that enhance corporate interests while reducing public sector services, as well as alternative models that emphasize a strengthened public sector PMID:15779471

  8. Multinational Corporations and Health Care in the United States and Latin America: Strategies, Actions, and Effects*

    PubMed Central

    JASSO-AGUILAR, REBECA; WAITZKIN, HOWARD; LANDWEHR, ANGELA

    2010-01-01

    In this article we analyze the corporate dominance of health care in the United States and the dynamics that have motivated the international expansion of multinational health care corporations, especially to Latin America. We identify the strategies, actions, and effects of multinational corporations in health care delivery and public health policies. Our methods have included systematic bibliographical research and in-depth interviews in the United States, Mexico, and Brazil. Influenced by public policy makers in the United States, such organizations as the World Bank, International Monetary Fund, and World Trade Organization have advocated policies that encourage reduction and privatization of health care and public health services previously provided in the public sector. Multinational managed care organizations have entered managed care markets in several Latin American countries at the same time as they were withdrawing from managed care activities in Medicaid and Medicare within the United States. Corporate strategies have culminated in a marked expansion of corporations’ access to social security and related public sector funds for the support of privatized health services. International financial institutions and multinational corporations have influenced reforms that, while favorable to corporate interests, have worsened access to needed services and have strained the remaining public sector institutions. A theoretical approach to these problems emphasizes the falling rate of profit as an economic motivation of corporate actions, silent reform, and the subordination of polity to economy. Praxis to address these problems involves opposition to policies that enhance corporate interests while reducing public sector services, as well as alternative models that emphasize a strengthened public sector. PMID:15779471

  9. Bactericidal Effects and Mechanism of Action of Olanexidine Gluconate, a New Antiseptic.

    PubMed

    Hagi, Akifumi; Iwata, Koushi; Nii, Takuya; Nakata, Hikaru; Tsubotani, Yoshie; Inoue, Yasuhide

    2015-08-01

    Olanexidine gluconate [1-(3,4-dichlorobenzyl)-5-octylbiguanide gluconate] (development code OPB-2045G) is a new monobiguanide compound with bactericidal activity. In this study, we assessed its spectrum of bactericidal activity and mechanism of action. The minimal bactericidal concentrations of the compound for 30-, 60-, and 180-s exposures were determined with the microdilution method using a neutralizer against 320 bacterial strains from culture collections and clinical isolates. Based on the results, the estimated bactericidal olanexidine concentrations with 180-s exposures were 869 μg/ml for Gram-positive cocci (155 strains), 109 μg/ml for Gram-positive bacilli (29 strains), and 434 μg/ml for Gram-negative bacteria (136 strains). Olanexidine was active against a wide range of bacteria, especially Gram-positive cocci, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant enterococci, and had a spectrum of bactericidal activity comparable to that of commercial antiseptics, such as chlorhexidine and povidone-iodine. In vitro experiments exploring its mechanism of action indicated that olanexidine (i) interacts with the bacterial surface molecules, such as lipopolysaccharide and lipoteichoic acid, (ii) disrupts the cell membranes of liposomes, which are artificial bacterial membrane models, (iii) enhances the membrane permeability of Escherichia coli, (iv) disrupts the membrane integrity of S. aureus, and (v) denatures proteins at relatively high concentrations (≥160 μg/ml). These results indicate that olanexidine probably binds to the cell membrane, disrupts membrane integrity, and its bacteriostatic and bactericidal effects are caused by irreversible leakage of intracellular components. At relatively high concentrations, olanexidine aggregates cells by denaturing proteins. This mechanism differs slightly from that of a similar biguanide compound, chlorhexidine.

  10. Dietary garlic and hip osteoarthritis: evidence of a protective effect and putative mechanism of action

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Patterns of food intake and prevalent osteoarthritis of the hand, hip, and knee were studied using the twin design to limit the effect of confounding factors. Compounds found in associated food groups were further studied in vitro. Methods Cross-sectional study conducted in a large population-based volunteer cohort of twins. Food intake was evaluated using the Food Frequency Questionnaire; OA was determined using plain radiographs. Analyses were adjusted for age, BMI and physical activity. Subsequent in vitro studies examined the effects of allium-derived compounds on the expression of matrix-degrading proteases in SW1353 chondrosarcoma cells. Results Data were available, depending on phenotype, for 654-1082 of 1086 female twins (median age 58.9 years; range 46-77). Trends in dietary analysis revealed a specific pattern of dietary intake, that high in fruit and vegetables, showed an inverse association with hip OA (p = 0.022). Consumption of 'non-citrus fruit' (p = 0.015) and 'alliums' (p = 0.029) had the strongest protective effect. Alliums contain diallyl disulphide which was shown to abrogate cytokine-induced matrix metalloproteinase expression. Conclusions Studies of diet are notorious for their confounding by lifestyle effects. While taking account of BMI, the data show an independent effect of a diet high in fruit and vegetables, suggesting it to be protective against radiographic hip OA. Furthermore, diallyl disulphide, a compound found in garlic and other alliums, represses the expression of matrix-degrading proteases in chondrocyte-like cells, providing a potential mechanism of action. PMID:21143861

  11. Progestogens Used in Postmenopausal Hormone Therapy: Differences in Their Pharmacological Properties, Intracellular Actions, and Clinical Effects

    PubMed Central

    Hapgood, Janet P.; Winer, Sharon; Mishell, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    The safety of progestogens as a class has come under increased scrutiny after the publication of data from the Women's Health Initiative trial, particularly with respect to breast cancer and cardiovascular disease risk, despite the fact that only one progestogen, medroxyprogesterone acetate, was used in this study. Inconsistency in nomenclature has also caused confusion between synthetic progestogens, defined here by the term progestin, and natural progesterone. Although all progestogens by definition have progestational activity, they also have a divergent range of other properties that can translate to very different clinical effects. Endometrial protection is the primary reason for prescribing a progestogen concomitantly with postmenopausal estrogen therapy in women with a uterus, but several progestogens are known to have a range of other potentially beneficial effects, for example on the nervous and cardiovascular systems. Because women remain suspicious of the progestogen component of postmenopausal hormone therapy in the light of the Women's Health Initiative trial, practitioners should not ignore the potential benefits to their patients of some progestogens by considering them to be a single pharmacological class. There is a lack of understanding of the differences between progestins and progesterone and between individual progestins differing in their effects on the cardiovascular and nervous systems, the breast, and bone. This review elucidates the differences between the substantial number of individual progestogens employed in postmenopausal hormone therapy, including both progestins and progesterone. We conclude that these differences in chemical structure, metabolism, pharmacokinetics, affinity, potency, and efficacy via steroid receptors, intracellular action, and biological and clinical effects confirm the absence of a class effect of progestogens. PMID:23238854

  12. Dosage-Dependent Modifiers of Position Effect Variegation in Drosophila and a Mass Action Model That Explains Their Effect

    PubMed Central

    Locke, J.; Kotarski, M. A.; Tartof, K. D.

    1988-01-01

    Twelve dominant enhancers of position effect variegation, representing four loci on the second and third chromosomes of Drosophila melanogaster, have been induced by P-element mutagenesis. Instead of simple transposon insertions, seven of these mutations are cytologically visible duplications and three are deficiencies. The duplications define two distinct regions, each coinciding with a locus that also behaves as a dominant haplo-dependent suppressor of variegation. Conversely, two of the deficiencies overlap with a region that contains a haplo-dependent enhancer of variegation while duplications of this same region act to suppress variegation. The third deficiency defines another haplo-dependent enhancer. These data indicate that loci capable of modifying variegation do so in an antipodal fashion through changes in the wild-type gene copy number and may be divided into two reciprocally acting classes. Class I modifiers enhance variegation when duplicated or suppress variegation when deficient. Class II modifiers enhance when deficient but suppress when duplicated. From our data, and those of others, we propose that in Drosophila there are about 20 to 30 dominant loci that modify variegation. Most appear to be of the class I type whereas only two class II modifiers have been identified so far. From these observations we put forth a model, based on the law of mass action, for understanding how such suppressor-enhancer loci function. We propose that each class I modifier codes for a structural protein component of heterochromatin and their effects on variegation are a consequence of their dosage dependent influence on the extent of the assembly of heterochromatin at the chromosomal site of the position effect. It is further proposed that class II modifiers may inhibit the class I products directly, bind to hypothetical termination sites that define heterochromatin boundaries or promote euchromatin formation. Consistent with our mass action model we find that

  13. The action of creatinol 0-phosphate on the inotropic effect of isoprenaline in isolated rat atria and in anesthetized dogs.

    PubMed

    Godfraind, T; Ghysel-Burton, J; Merlo, L

    1979-01-01

    The action of N-methyl-N-(beta-hydroxyethyl) guanidine O-phosphate (creatinol O-phosphate) was studied on the contractility of the heart, in vitro on isolated rat atria and in vivo in anesthetized dogs. Creatinol O-phosphate was without action on the contractility of isolated rat atria stimulated by isoprenaline 10(-8) mol/l which produced the maximum inotropic effect. Creatinol O-phosphate increased the contractility evoked by isoprenaline 10(-5) mol/l and impaired the development of the negative inotropic effect evoked by prolonged treatment with this large dose. In dogs, creatinol O-phosphate pretreatment increased the positive inotropic effect of large but not low isoprenaline dosages. It is concluded that creatinol O-phosphate increased the contractile efficiency of the heart submitted to the action of an excess of catecholamines.

  14. Androgen actions in mouse wound healing: Minimal in vivo effects of local antiandrogen delivery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiwei; Simanainen, Ulla; Cheer, Kenny; Suarez, Francia G; Gao, Yan Ru; Li, Zhe; Handelsman, David; Maitz, Peter

    2016-05-01

    The aims of this work were to define the role of androgens in female wound healing and to develop and characterize a novel wound dressing with antiandrogens. Androgens retard wound healing in males, but their role in female wound healing has not been established. To understand androgen receptor (AR)-mediated androgen actions in male and female wound healing, we utilized the global AR knockout (ARKO) mouse model, with a mutated AR deleting the second zinc finger to disrupt DNA binding and transcriptional activation. AR inactivation enhanced wound healing rate in males by increasing re-epithelialization and collagen deposition even when wound contraction was eliminated. Cell proliferation and migration in ARKO male fibroblasts was significantly increased compared with wild-type (WT) fibroblasts. However, ARKO females showed a similar healing rate compared to WT females. To exploit local antiandrogen effects in wound healing, while minimizing off-target systemic effects, we developed a novel electrospun polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffold wound dressing material for sustained local antiandrogen delivery. Using the antiandrogen hydroxyl flutamide (HF) at 1, 5, and 10 mg/mL in PCL scaffolds, controlled HF delivery over 21 days significantly enhanced in vitro cell proliferation of human dermal fibroblasts and human keratinocytes. HF-PCL scaffolds also promoted in vivo wound healing in mice compared with open wounds but not to PCL scaffolds. PMID:26873751

  15. Action is immune to the effects of Weber's law throughout the entire grasping trajectory.

    PubMed

    Ganel, Tzvi; Freud, Erez; Meiran, Nachshon

    2014-01-01

    Vision for action and vision for perception have been suggested to be mediated by overlapping yet dissociable mechanisms. Recent evidence provided basic psychophysical support for this suggestion. In particular, it has been shown that Weber's law, the decrease in visual resolution with object size, does not affect the maximum grip aperture (MGA) between the fingers prior to grasp. Several studies replicated this result, but have argued that grasping may still obey Weber's law at early movement stages. Here, we show that this apparent adherence to Weber's law was confounded by task demands. Specifically, subjects were asked to keep their fingers closed prior to grasp, which encouraged them to open their fingers faster for larger compared to smaller objects. In two experiments, we tested this proposal by disentangling the effects of velocity from those of Weber's law. In Experiment 1, subjects were asked to keep their fingers open wide-apart prior to grasp, which encouraged them to close their fingers faster, rather than slower, to smaller objects. Now, the apparent adherence to Weber's law was reversed, and higher resolution was found for larger compared to smaller objects, thus indicating a "reversed" Weber's law. In Experiment 2, we manipulated task demands to equate aperture velocities across different objects sizes. When velocity was equated, no effects of Weber's law were found throughout the movement. These findings show that previous studies have confounded visual resolution with fingers' velocity, which led to an erroneous conclusion that Weber's law affected grasping at early stages of the movement.

  16. Designing Effective Natural Hazards Preparedness Communications: Factors that Influence Perceptions and Action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong-Parodi, G.; Fischhoff, B.

    2012-12-01

    Even though most people believe that natural hazards preparation is important for mitigating damage to their homes and basic survival in the aftermath of a disaster, few actually disaster-proof their homes, create plans, or obtain supplies recommended by agencies such as the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Several observational studies suggest that socio-demographic characteristics such as income and psychological characteristics such as self-efficacy affect whether or not an individual takes action to prepare for a natural hazard. These studies, however, only suggest that these characteristics may play a role. There has been little research that systematically investigates how these characteristics play a role in people's perceptions of recommended preparatory activities and decisions to perform them. Therefore, in Study 1, we explore people's perceptions of natural hazards preparedness measures on four dimensions: time, cost, helpfulness, and sense of preparedness. We further investigate if these responses vary by the socio-demographic and psychological characteristics of self-efficacy, knowledge, and income level. In Study 2, we experimentally test whether people's sense of self-efficacy, as it relates to natural hazards, can be manipulated through exposure to an "easy-and-effective" versus a "hard-and-effective" set of preparation measures. Our findings have implications for the design of natural hazards communication materials for the general public.

  17. Effects of staggered fermions and mixed actions on the scalar correlator

    SciTech Connect

    Prelovsek, S.

    2006-01-01

    We provide the analytic predictions for the flavor nonsinglet scalar correlator, which will enable determination of the scalar meson mass from the lattice scalar correlator. We consider simulations with 2+1 staggered sea quarks and staggered or chiral valence quarks. At small u/d masses the correlator is dominated by the bubble contribution, which is the intermediate state with two pseudoscalar mesons. We determine the bubble contribution within staggered and mixed chiral perturbation theory. Its effective mass is smaller than the mass of {pi}{eta}, which is the lightest intermediate state in proper 2+1 QCD. The unphysical effective mass is a consequence of the taste breaking that makes possible the intermediate state with mass 2M{sub {pi}}. We find that the scalar correlator can be negative in the simulations with mixed quark actions if the sea- and valence-quark masses are tuned by matching the pion masses M{sub val,val}=M{sub {pi}{sub 5}}.

  18. Effect of hypoxia on specific dynamic action and postprandial cardiovascular physiology in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Eliason, Erika J; Farrell, Anthony P

    2014-05-01

    Fish routinely encounter hypoxic environments, which may have detrimental effects on digestion and performance. The present study measured oxygen consumption (MO2), gastrointestinal blood flow (GBF), cardiac output (Vb) and heart rate (f(H)) in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss at 10°C-11.5°C while exposed to a 1.5-h step-wise hypoxia treatment (80%, 60% and 40% saturation=16.7, 12.6 and 8.4 kPa, respectively), which began 4 h after being fed 1% of their body mass. GBF and f(H) significantly decreased by 41 and 25%-29%, respectively, at the most severe hypoxia step (40% saturation), while MO2 and Vb were maintained throughout the entire hypoxia exposure. Thus, GBF and f(H) were more sensitive to hypoxia than MO2 or Vb in digesting rainbow trout. Subsequent to the hypoxic exposure, the fish were returned to normoxia and monitored for a total of 50h after feeding. While the magnitude of SDA was unaffected, peak postprandial MO2 was reduced by 17%, and the duration of specific dynamic action (SDA) was prolonged by 6h in hypoxia-treated fish when compared to control fish. In conclusion, digestive performance was compromised both during and after the hypoxic exposure, which could lead to negative effects on growth.

  19. Biological actions of silver nanoparticles embedded in titanium controlled by micro-galvanic effects.

    PubMed

    Cao, Huiliang; Liu, Xuanyong; Meng, Fanhao; Chu, Paul K

    2011-01-01

    Titanium embedded with silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) using a single step silver plasma immersion ion implantation (Ag-PIII) demonstrate micro-galvanic effects that give rise to both controlled antibacterial activity and excellent compatibility with osteoblasts. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) shows that nanoparticles with average sizes of about 5 nm and 8 nm are formed homogeneously on the titanium surface after undergoing Ag-PIII for 0.5 h and 1 h, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicate that those nanoparticles are metallic silver produced on and underneath the titanium surface via a local nucleation process from the solid solution of α-Ti(Ag). The Ag-PIII samples inhibit the growth of both Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli while enhancing proliferation of the osteoblast-like cell line MG63. Electrochemical polarization and Zeta potential measurements demonstrate that the low surface toxicity and good cytocompatibility are related to the micro-galvanic effect between the Ag NPs and titanium matrix. Our results show that the physico-chemical properties of the Ag NPs are important in the control of the cytotoxicity and this study opens a new window for the design of nanostructured surfaces on which the biological actions of the Ag NPs can be accurately tailored.

  20. Action of trimebutine in cat and rabbit colon: evidence of an opioid-like effect.

    PubMed

    Blanquet, F; Bouvier, M; Gonella, J

    1985-09-01

    Because trimebutine (TMB) is a drug that modulates colonic motility, we have attempted to determine the modifications of electrical activity underlying the motor effects of this drug. Experiments have been carried out on cat colon in vivo and on rabbit proximal colon in vivo and in vitro. The action of TMB (0.5-2 mg/kg in vivo; 10(-7) M-10(-6) M in vitro) consisted of an initiation or of an increase of spike potential activity that was unaffected by atropine (0.1 mg/kg for the cat, 2-3 mg/kg in vivo and 10(-6) M in vitro for the rabbit) and by hexamethonium (1.5 mg/kg for the cat and 2 mg/kg in vivo or 10(-6) M in vitro for the rabbit). In the cat under atropine, spike activity became cyclical, i.e., bursts of spikes were interrupted by periods of electrical silence. In the cat, TMB decreased the amplitude of excitatory junction potentials. Under atropine, TMB induced rhythmic variations in the amplitude of inhibitory junction potentials for 30 to 40 min. In the rabbit under TMB, excitatory junction potentials were enhanced whereas inhibitory junction potential amplitude was decreased. All the effects of TMB on spontaneous activity as well as on junction potentials are very similar to those observed in a previous work with morphine and enkephalins. The effects of TMB, unaffected by guanethidine, were antagonized by naloxone (2 mg/kg in vivo, 10(-6) M in vitro). These results suggest that opiate receptors, presumably located on intramural neurons, are involved in the effects of TMB.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2993591

  1. Naming Action in Japanese: Effects of Semantic Similarity and Grammatical Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iwasaki, Noriko; Vinson, David P.; Vigliocco, Gabriella; Watanabe, Masumi; Arciuli, Joanne

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated whether the semantic similarity and grammatical class of distracter words affects the naming of pictured actions (verbs) in Japanese. Three experiments used the picture-word interference paradigm with participants naming picturable actions while ignoring distracters. In all three experiments, we manipulated the semantic…

  2. Organising Collective Action for Effective Environmental Management and Social Learning in Wales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Jane; Gibbon, David; Ingram, Julie; Reed, Matt; Short, Christopher; Dwyer, Janet

    2011-01-01

    The paper explored key factors that might lead to successful agri-environmental social learning and collective action in order to deliver landscape-scale resource management within agri-environment schemes. Using the theory of collective action as an analytical framework the paper examined findings from in-depth interviews with 20 members of two…

  3. The Action-Sentence Compatibility Effect: It's All in the Timing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borreggine, Kristin L.; Kaschak, Michael P.

    2006-01-01

    When participants are asked to make sensibility judgments on sentences that describe action toward the body (i.e., "Mark dealt the cards to you") or away from the body (i.e., "You dealt the cards to Mark"), they are faster to respond when the response requires an arm movement in the same direction as the action described by the sentence. This…

  4. Action-Specific Effects in a Social Context: Others' Abilities Influence Perceived Speed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witt, Jessica K.; Sugovic, Mila; Taylor, J. Eric T.

    2012-01-01

    According to the action-specific account of perception, perceivers see the environment relative to their ability to perform the intended action. For example, in a modified version of the computer game Pong, balls that were easier to block looked to be moving slower than balls that were more difficult to block (Witt & Sugovic, 2010). It is unknown,…

  5. The Self in Action Effects: Selective Attenuation of Self-Generated Sounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Carmen; Herwig, Arvid; Schutz-Bosbach, Simone

    2011-01-01

    The immediate experience of self-agency, that is, the experience of generating and controlling our actions, is thought to be a key aspect of selfhood. It has been suggested that this experience is intimately linked to internal motor signals associated with the ongoing actions. These signals should lead to an attenuation of the sensory consequences…

  6. Effects of Brief Imitative Experience on EEG Desynchronization during Action Observation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Peter J.; Bouquet, Cedric A.; Shipley, Thomas F.; Young, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    There is a good deal of evidence that observing the actions of other people is associated with activation of the observer's motor system, which may reflect involvement of the mirror neuron system (MNS) in certain aspects of action processing in humans. Furthermore, variation in the extent of this activation appears to be partly dependent on…

  7. The effects of heart rate on the action potential of guinea-pig and human ventricular muscle.

    PubMed

    Attwell, D; Cohen, I; Eisner, D A

    1981-01-01

    1. On increasing the stimulation frequency of isolated pieces of guinea-pig ventricular muscle, the resting potential depolarizes, and the action potential duration and amplitude are reduced. On termination of the high frequency train of action potentials, these changes are reversed. 2. The resting potential changes are roughly exponential, with a time constant of the order of 10 sec, and are attributable to K+ accumulation in the extracellular space. They are not explicable in terms of known gating variables. 3. The action potential duration and amplitude recover much more slowly than the resting potential, after a high frequency train (half-time approximately 5 min). The time course of these recoveries is not exponential, and is slower after trains which produce more shortening of the action potential. The slow time course suggests that K+ accumulation is not the main cause of the changes in action potential shape. Furthermore, when a certain depolarization of the resting potential is produced by a high frequency train, there is a greater reduction of the action potential duration than that which occurs when the bathing [K+] is raised to produce the same depolarization (Reiter & Stickel, 1968). This is so even when a gradient of extracellular [K+] is induced in the preparation, to mimic non-uniform K+ accumulation. 4. Similarly, the shortening of the action potential produced by toxic doses or cardiotonic steroids is probably not the result of K+ accumulation. 5. The slow changes of the action potential shape produced by a high frequency train are not attributable to the effects of gating variables, nor (solely) to a rise in the intracellular Na concentration stimulating the electrogenic Na/K pump. The dye 3,3'-diethylthiadicarbocyanine, which blocks the Ca2+-activated K conductance in the erythrocyte, has no significant effect on the shape changes. 6. After a sudden change in heart rate, the QT interval of the human electrocardiogram (e.c.g.) changes slowly to a

  8. Symmetry improvement of 3PI effective actions for O (N ) scalar field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Michael J.; Whittingham, Ian B.

    2015-04-01

    N-particle irreducible effective actions (nPIEA) are a powerful tool for extracting nonperturbative and nonequilibrium physics from quantum field theories. Unfortunately, practical truncations of nPIEA can unphysically violate symmetries. Pilaftsis and Teresi (PT) addressed this by introducing a "symmetry improvement" scheme in the context of the 2PIEA for an O (2) scalar theory, ensuring that the Goldstone boson is massless in the broken symmetry phase [A. Pilaftsis and D. Teresi, Nucl. Phys. B874, 594 (2013)]. We extend this idea by introducing a symmetry improved 3PIEA for O (N ) theories, for which the basic variables are the one-, two- and three-point correlation functions. This requires the imposition of a Ward identity involving the three-point function. We find that the method leads to an infinity of physically distinct schemes, though a field theoretic analogue of d'Alembert's principle is used to single out a unique scheme. The standard equivalence hierarchy of nPIEA no longer holds with symmetry improvement, and we investigate the difference between the symmetry improved 3PIEA and 2PIEA. We present renormalized equations of motion and counterterms for two- and three-loop truncations of the effective action, though we leave their numerical solution to future work. We solve the Hartree-Fock approximation and find that our method achieves a middle ground between the unimproved 2PIEA and PT methods. The phase transition predicted by our method is weakly first order and the Goldstone theorem is satisfied, while the PT method correctly predicts a second-order phase transition. In contrast, the unimproved 2PIEA predicts a strong first-order transition with large violations of the Goldstone theorem. We also show that, in contrast to PT, the two-loop truncation of the symmetry improved 3PIEA does not predict the correct Higgs decay rate, although the three-loop truncation does, at least to leading order. These results suggest that symmetry improvement should not

  9. The effect of behavioral preferences on skill acquisition in determining unspecified, suitable action patterns to control humanoid robots.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Taiki; Watanabe, Tetsuyou

    2015-01-01

    This research investigated the effect of behavioral preferences on learning efficiency when attempting to determine unspecified, but suitable action sequences for unfamiliar tasks. The goal of this research was to develop a skill acquisition support system for the elderly to aid them in using unfamiliar IT products, particularly those of welfare systems. Here, behavioral preference is defined as the type of action sequences that people would prefer to adopt for completing unfamiliar tasks. To achieve this goal, this research investigated the action sequences of participants when they attempt to control the posture of an unfamiliar humanoid robot with an unfamiliar controller. The participants were assigned the task of making the humanoid stand on one foot. Machine-learning-based methods were presented for analyzing the behavioral preferences. The analysis results indicate that participants having behavioral preferences of adopting random action sequences can complete the task in a much shorter time, compared to participants having a behavioral preference of adopting action sequences similar to those of previous actions.

  10. Mechanisms of action underlying the antiandrogenic effects of the fungicide prochloraz

    SciTech Connect

    Laier, Peter; Metzdorff, Stine Broeng; Borch, Julie; Hagen, Marie Louise; Hass, Ulla; Christiansen, Sofie; Axelstad, Marta; Kledal, Thuri; Dalgaard, Majken; McKinnell, Chris; Brokken, Leon J.S.; Vinggaard, Anne Marie . E-mail: amv@dfvf.dk

    2006-06-01

    The fungicide prochloraz has got multiple mechanisms of action that may influence the demasculinizing and reproductive toxic effects of the compound. In the present study, Wistar rats were dosed perinatally with prochloraz (50 and 150 mg/kg/day) from gestational day (GD) 7 to postnatal day (PND) 16. Caesarian sections were performed on selected dams at GD 21, while others were allowed to give birth to pups that were followed until PND 16. Prochloraz caused mild dysgenesis of the male external genitalia as well as reduced anogenital distance and retention of nipples in male pups. An increased anogenital distance indicated virilization of female pups. Effects on steroidogenesis in male fetuses became evident as decreased testicular and plasma levels of testosterone and increased levels of progesterone. Ex vivo synthesis of both steroid hormones was qualitatively similarly affected by prochloraz. Immunohistochemistry of fetal testes showed increased expression of 17{alpha}-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase (P450c17) and a reduction in 17{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (type 10) expression, whereas no changes in expression of genes involved in testicular steroidogenesis were observed. Increased expression of P450c17 mRNA was observed in fetal male adrenals, and the androgen-regulated genes ornithine decarboxylase, prostatic binding protein C3 as well as insulin-like growth factor I mRNA were reduced in ventral prostates PND 16. These results indicate that reduced activity of P450c17 may be a primary cause of the disrupted fetal steroidogenesis and that an altered androgen metabolism may play a role as well. In vitro studies on human adrenocortical carcinoma cells supported the findings in vivo as reduced testosterone and increased progesterone levels were observed. Overall, these results together indicate that prochloraz acts directly on the fetal testis to inhibit steroidogenesis and that this effect is exhibited at protein, and not at genomic, level.

  11. Antitumor effects of the partially purified polysaccharides from Antrodia camphorata and the mechanism of its action

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.-J.; Huang, T.-S.; Hsu, M.-L.; Chen, C.-C.; Lin, W.-S.; Lu, F.-J. . E-mail: fjlu@csmu.edu.tw; Chang, W.-H. . E-mail: whchang@csmu.edu.tw

    2004-12-01

    Antrodia camphorata is a popular folk medicine that has attracted great attention due to its fame for antitumor activity against cancer. However, there is little information available about its action. In the present study, we purified a unique polysaccharide component from A. camphorata mycelia (AC-PS) and found that it has pronounced anti-tumor effects on both in vitro and in vivo model. Our results showed that AC-PS alone did not show any direct cytotoxic effect to human leukemic U937 cells, even at high concentration (200 {mu}g/ml). However, it could inhibit the proliferation of U937 cells via activation of mononuclear cells (MNCs). Treatment of U937 cells with AC-PS-stimulated-MNC-CM could significantly inhibit its proliferation with 55.3% growth inhibition rate. The in vitro antitumor activity was substantiated by the in vivo therapeutical study of AC-PS in sarcoma 180-bearing mice. Intraperitoneal and oral administration of AC-PS, 100 and 200 mg/kg significantly suppressed the tumor growth with the inhibition rate of 69.1% and 58.8%, respectively. In vivo studies also showed that several immunoparameters, such as the spontaneous proliferation of spleen cells, after AC-PS administration, were two-fold higher than in control mice. Furthermore, the cytolytic activity of spleen cells also increased from 9.8 {+-} 1.1% in control mice to 34.2 {+-} 5.5% and 48.2 {+-} 2.5%, after oral and intraperitoneal treatment, respectively. Besides, the mice serum interleukin-12 levels increased significantly by AC-PS treatment. Considering all these results, it is suggested that AC-PS elicit its anti-tumor effect by promoting a Th1-dominant state and killer activities.

  12. Effects of Action Video Game on Attention Distribution: A Cognitive Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuemin; Yan, Bin; Shu, Hua

    Based on the previous researches, Flanker compatibility effect paradigm was applied to explore the degree where people process the visual information presented on to-be-ignored locations. In present study, this paradigm was used to investigate attention distribution of Video Game Players (VGPs) and Non Video Game Players (NVGPs). The results suggested, under low perceptual load, VGPs tried to focus their attention on the task at-hand whereas the NVGPs tried to explore the adjacent locations with the left-over resources from the research task; however, under high perceptual load, the players would process the visual information at the adjacent locations of the target with the left-over resources, because they had comparatively greater attention capability, whereas the non-players focused their attention on the target locations to finish the search task. To conclude, the present study suggested that action video game play could not only enhance the attention capacity but also cause a different way of attention distribution in different perceptual load situations.

  13. Mechanisms of action of the anti-atherogenic effect of magnesium: lessons from a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Sherer, Y; Bitzur, R; Cohen, H; Shaish, A; Varon, D; Shoenfeld, Y; Harats, D

    2001-09-01

    Magnesium (Mg) fortification of drinking water succeeded in inhibition of atherogenesis development in a transgenic model of atherosclerosis-prone mice fed a high-cholesterol content diet. In order to delineate possible mechanisms of action of the anti-atherogenic effect of Mg, the involvement of LDL oxidation was studied. We determined the susceptibility of LDL to Cu+2 oxidation, anti-oxidized LDL antibody levels, and liver content of retinol and retinyl-palmitate. In order to study another possible mechanism we tested platelets interaction with extracellular matrix in both male and female mice with or without Mg fortification of drinking water. No difference was found in susceptibility of LDL to undergo oxidation. Female mice that received Mg had decreased anti-oxidized LDL antibody levels compared with control female mice, while there was no significant difference among male groups. On the other hand, only in the male group with Mg was a higher content of retinol and retinyl-palmitate found in the livers. Platelets coverage area on extracellular matrix was similar between groups. These results suggest that Mg might affect LDL oxidation, and thus atherogenesis.

  14. Conservation without borders: building communication and action across disciplinary boundaries for effective conservation.

    PubMed

    Margles, Shawn W; Peterson, Richard B; Ervin, Jamison; Kaplin, Beth A

    2010-01-01

    Interdisciplinary approaches to conservation research and environmental management continue to garner interest among practitioners, academics, and students. Yet, cases of practitioners and researchers from different disciplines successfully working in concert towards an integrated conservation approach are rare. What is preventing practitioners of multiple disciplines from harmoniously working together? Why are practitioners and academics struggling to apply their graduate training to real world conservation? What is preventing the benefits of cooperation and partnerships between different disciplines addressing conservation from being realized? This special issue "Conservation without Borders: Building Communication and Action across Disciplinary Boundaries for Effective Conservation" asks readers to consider the numerous interpretations and implications of the phrase "Conservation without Borders" and to reflect on how different academic and disciplinary lenses can contribute to a more integrated approach to tackling conservation challenges. The articles that comprise this special issue offer readers insights into the ways in which different disciplines view conservation work and interdisciplinary approaches to environmental problems. Bringing these perspectives and approaches together in one place is a step towards improving communication across disciplines for the purpose of achieving more successful biodiversity conservation. PMID:19967365

  15. Conservation Without Borders: Building Communication and Action Across Disciplinary Boundaries for Effective Conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margles, Shawn W.; Peterson, Richard B.; Ervin, Jamison; Kaplin, Beth A.

    2010-01-01

    Interdisciplinary approaches to conservation research and environmental management continue to garner interest among practitioners, academics, and students. Yet, cases of practitioners and researchers from different disciplines successfully working in concert towards an integrated conservation approach are rare. What is preventing practitioners of multiple disciplines from harmoniously working together? Why are practitioners and academics struggling to apply their graduate training to real world conservation? What is preventing the benefits of cooperation and partnerships between different disciplines addressing conservation from being realized? This special issue “Conservation without Borders: Building Communication and Action across Disciplinary Boundaries for Effective Conservation” asks readers to consider the numerous interpretations and implications of the phrase “Conservation without Borders” and to reflect on how different academic and disciplinary lenses can contribute to a more integrated approach to tackling conservation challenges. The articles that comprise this special issue offer readers insights into the ways in which different disciplines view conservation work and interdisciplinary approaches to environmental problems. Bringing these perspectives and approaches together in one place is a step towards improving communication across disciplines for the purpose of achieving more successful biodiversity conservation.

  16. The effect and action mechanism of resveratrol on the vascular endothelial cell by high glucose treatment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xun; Tian, Jie; Bai, Quanhao; Ashraf, Muhammad Aqeel; Sarfraz, Maliha; Zhao, Bojun

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effect and action mechanism of resveratrol on the vascular endothelial cell by high glucose treatment. Primarily cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were pretreated by resveratrol (0.2 μmol/L) and holding for 6 h, and then cultured in Dulbecco Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM) within 0.45 mmol/L of palmimte acid and 32.8 mmol/L of glucose, which is holding for 12 h. The cells were collected to analyze the expression of E-selected element. Supernatant of cultured cells, induced by 100 nmol/L insulin for 30 min, was used to analyze the nitric oxide content. Compared with normal control cells, the secretion of nitric oxide is stimulated by insulin decrease, however, the expression of E-selected element increased in HUVEC. Resveratrol treatment increased the secretion of nitric oxide stimulated by insulin and decreased the expression of E-selected element and partly counteracts the impairment of high glucose and palmitate acid on the function of endothelial cells. Resveratrol can improve and protect the function of high glucose and fatty acid cultured endothelial cell, and therefore may be a promising medicine in the prevention or therapy of diabetic macrovascular diseases. PMID:26858561

  17. Is India's policy framework geared for effective action on avoidable blindness from diabetes?

    PubMed Central

    Gaiha, Shivani M.; Shukla, Rajan; Gilbert, Clare E.; Anchala, Raghupathy; Gudlavalleti, Murthy V. S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The growing burden of avoidable blindness caused by diabetic retinopathy (DR) needs an effective and holistic policy that reflects mechanisms for early detection and treatment of DR to reduce the risk of blindness. Materials and Methods: We performed a comprehensive health policy review to highlight the existing systemic issues that enable policy translation and to assess whether India's policy architecture is geared to address the mounting challenge of DR. We used a keyword-based Internet search for documents available in the last 15 years. Two reviewers independently assessed retrieved policies and extracted contextual and program-oriented information and components delineated in national policy documents. Using a “descriptive analytical” method, the results were collated and summarized as per themes to present status quo, gaps, and recommendations for the future. Results: Lack of focus on building sustainable synergies that require well laid out mechanisms for collaboration within and outside the health sector and poor convergence between national health programs appears to be the weakest links across policy documents. Conclusions: To reasonably address the issues of consistency, comprehensiveness, clarity, context, connectedness, and sustainability, policies will have to rely more strongly on evidence from operational research to support decisions. There is a need to involve multiple stakeholders from multiple sectors, recognize contributions from not-for-profit sector and private health service providers, and finally bring about a nuanced holistic perspective that has a voice with implementable multiple sector actions. PMID:27144136

  18. Immunomodulatory effects of fluoxetine: A new potential pharmacological action for a classic antidepressant drug?

    PubMed

    Di Rosso, María Emilia; Palumbo, María Laura; Genaro, Ana María

    2016-07-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are frequently used antidepressants. In particular, fluoxetine is usually chosen for the treatment of the symptoms of depression, obsessive-compulsive, panic attack and bulimia nervosa. Antidepressant therapy has been associated with immune dysfunction. However, there is contradictory evidence about the effect of fluoxetine on the immune system. Experimental findings indicate that lymphocytes express the serotonin transporter. Moreover it has been shown that fluoxetine is able to modulate the immune function through a serotonin-dependent pathway and through a novel independent mechanism. In addition, several studies have shown that fluoxetine can alter tumor cell viability. Thus, it was recently demonstrated in vivo that chronic fluoxetine treatment inhibits tumor growth by increasing antitumor T-cell activity. Here we briefly review some of the literature referring to how fluoxetine is able to modify, for better or worse, the functionality of the immune system. These results of our analysis point to the relevance of the novel pharmacological action of this drug as an immunomodulator helping to treat several pathologies in which immune deficiency and/or deregulation is present.

  19. Effect of the combined action of Faradaic currents and mobility differences in ac electro-osmosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, A.; Ramos, A.; García-Sánchez, P.; Castellanos, A.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, we extend previous analyses of ac electro-osmosis to account for the combined action of two experimentally relevant effects: (i) Faradaic currents from electrochemical reactions at the electrodes and (ii) differences in ion mobilities of the electrolyte. In previous works, the ac electro-osmotic motion has been analyzed theoretically under the assumption that only forces in the diffuse (Debye) layer are relevant. Here, we first show that if the ion mobilities of a 1-1 aqueous solution are different, the charged zone expands from the Debye layer to include the diffusion layer. We later include the Faradaic currents and, as an attempt to explore both factors simultaneously, we perform a thin-layer, low-frequency, linear analysis of the system. Finally, the model is applied to the case of an electrolyte actuated by a traveling-wave signal. A steady liquid motion in opposite direction to the applied signal is predicted for some ranges of the parameters. This could serve as a partial explanation for the observed flow reversal in some experiments.

  20. Silver nanoparticles: mechanism of antimicrobial action, synthesis, medical applications, and toxicity effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhu, Sukumaran; Poulose, Eldho K.

    2012-10-01

    Silver nanoparticles are nanoparticles of silver which are in the range of 1 and 100 nm in size. Silver nanoparticles have unique properties which help in molecular diagnostics, in therapies, as well as in devices that are used in several medical procedures. The major methods used for silver nanoparticle synthesis are the physical and chemical methods. The problem with the chemical and physical methods is that the synthesis is expensive and can also have toxic substances absorbed onto them. To overcome this, the biological method provides a feasible alternative. The major biological systems involved in this are bacteria, fungi, and plant extracts. The major applications of silver nanoparticles in the medical field include diagnostic applications and therapeutic applications. In most of the therapeutic applications, it is the antimicrobial property that is being majorly explored, though the anti-inflammatory property has its fair share of applications. Though silver nanoparticles are rampantly used in many medical procedures and devices as well as in various biological fields, they have their drawbacks due to nanotoxicity. This review provides a comprehensive view on the mechanism of action, production, applications in the medical field, and the health and environmental concerns that are allegedly caused due to these nanoparticles. The focus is on effective and efficient synthesis of silver nanoparticles while exploring their various prospective applications besides trying to understand the current scenario in the debates on the toxicity concerns these nanoparticles pose.

  1. [Effect of trimebutine on the motility of the normal human small intestines: mechanism of action].

    PubMed

    Chaussade, S; Grandjouan, S; Couturier, D; Thierman-Duffaud, D; Henry, J F

    1987-01-01

    The effects of intravenous trimebutine (TMB) on duodenojejunal motility were investigated in normal subjects in fed and fasted states. The motility was recorded manometrically. In the fasting state TMB 100 mg, 25 min after a spontaneous phase 3 (P3) constantly induced a premature P3. The mean period (means +/- SE) of the migrating motor complex (MMC) cycle decreased from 84 +/- 10.9 to 32.5 +/- 1.0 min. TMB 50 mg, 3 and 25 min after a spontaneous P3 did not significantly modify the periodicity of MMC. TMB 100 mg initiated P3-like activity in post-prandial state. Previous administration of a low dose of naloxone suppressed the stimulating action of TMB. After a TMB injection the motilin plasma level did not vary; a brief increated of PP plasma level was observed. It may be concluded that in the human small intestine TMB included a typical modification of the motility pattern. Opiate receptors might be involved. PMID:3609631

  2. Effect of meal size on the specific dynamic action of the juvenile snakehead (Channa argus).

    PubMed

    Wang, Qianqian; Wang, Wen; Huang, Qingda; Zhang, Yurong; Luo, Yiping

    2012-04-01

    The effect of meal size on the specific dynamic action (SDA) of the juvenile snakehead (Channa argus) was assessed at 25 °C. The fish were fed with test diets at meal sizes of 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5% body mass and the postprandial oxygen consumption rate was determined at 1-h intervals until it returned to the pre-prandial level. The peak metabolic rate increased from 237.4 to 283.2 mg O(2) kg(-1) h(-1) as the relative meal size increased from 0.5% to 3% and leveled off at 4% and 5%. Factorial metabolic scope increased from 1.53 to 1.99 and SDA duration increased from 11.7 to 32.3h as the relative meal size increased from 0.5% to 5%. The relationship between SDA duration (D) and relative meal size (M) was described as: D=4.28 M+10.62 (r(2)=0.752, P<0.05, n=50). The energy expended on SDA increased while the SDA coefficient decreased with increasing meal size. The results of the present study suggest that the snakehead may adopt different feeding strategies when taking in different amounts of food.

  3. Immunomodulatory effects of fluoxetine: A new potential pharmacological action for a classic antidepressant drug?

    PubMed

    Di Rosso, María Emilia; Palumbo, María Laura; Genaro, Ana María

    2016-07-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are frequently used antidepressants. In particular, fluoxetine is usually chosen for the treatment of the symptoms of depression, obsessive-compulsive, panic attack and bulimia nervosa. Antidepressant therapy has been associated with immune dysfunction. However, there is contradictory evidence about the effect of fluoxetine on the immune system. Experimental findings indicate that lymphocytes express the serotonin transporter. Moreover it has been shown that fluoxetine is able to modulate the immune function through a serotonin-dependent pathway and through a novel independent mechanism. In addition, several studies have shown that fluoxetine can alter tumor cell viability. Thus, it was recently demonstrated in vivo that chronic fluoxetine treatment inhibits tumor growth by increasing antitumor T-cell activity. Here we briefly review some of the literature referring to how fluoxetine is able to modify, for better or worse, the functionality of the immune system. These results of our analysis point to the relevance of the novel pharmacological action of this drug as an immunomodulator helping to treat several pathologies in which immune deficiency and/or deregulation is present. PMID:26644208

  4. Low-energy effective action for pions and a dilatonic meson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golterman, Maarten; Shamir, Yigal

    2016-09-01

    Numerical simulations of QCD-like theories in which the number of flavors is adjusted so that the beta function is very small, but confinement and chiral symmetry breaking nevertheless take place, appear to reveal the presence of a flavor-singlet scalar meson which can be as light as the pions. Because the breaking of dilatation symmetry, quantified by the beta function, is small relative to QCD, a possible explanation is that the scalar meson is a pseudo Nambu-Goldstone boson associated with the approximate dilatation symmetry. We use this observation to systematically develop a low-energy effective action that accounts for both the pions and the "dilatonic" scalar meson. In order to justify the power counting that controls the couplings of the dilatonic meson we invoke the Veneziano limit, in which the number of fundamental-representation flavors Nf grows in proportion with the number of colors Nc, while the ratio Nf/Nc is kept close to, but below, the critical value where the conformal window is entered.

  5. Effect of Green Tea Extract on Doxorubicin Induced Cardiovascular Abnormalities: Antioxidant Action

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Leena; Balaraman, R

    2011-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) induces oxidative stress leading to cardiovascular abnormalities. Green tea extract (GTE) is reported to possess antioxidant activity mainly by means of its polyphenolic constituent, catechins. Our study was aimed to find out the effect of GTE (100 mg/kg / day p.o. for 28 days) on DOX induced (3 mg/kg, IP on days 1, 7, 14, 21, 28) cardiovascular abnormalities in rat heart. DOX treatment led to significant increase in blood pressure, ST interval, serum levels of LDH, CK, SGOT, lipid peroxidation .The antioxidant enzymes such as super oxide dismutase, catalase and reduced-glutathione were decreased considerably in the heart of DOX treated rats as compared to the normal control. A combined treatment with GTE and DOX showed a considerable decrease in serum markers of cardiotoxicity such as LDH, CK, SGOT and lipid peroxides. There was significant increase in the activities of antioxidant enzymes and also showed improvement in hemodynamic parameters and ECG changes as compared to DOX treated animals. DOX treatment caused disorganization of myocardial tissue which was restored in animals treated with GTE along with DOX. Thus it can be concluded that GTE possesses an antioxidant activity and by virtue of this action it can protect the heart from DOX induced cardiovascular abnormalities. PMID:24363686

  6. The rotational spectrum of the CCP (X 2Pi(r)) radical and its 13C isotopologues at microwave, millimeter, and submillimeter wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Halfen, D T; Sun, M; Clouthier, D J; Ziurys, L M

    2009-01-01

    The pure rotational spectrum of CCP (X (2)Pi(r)) has been measured at microwave, millimeter, and submillimeter wavelengths (17-545 GHz), along with its (13)C isotopologues ((13)C(13)CP, C(13)CP, and (13)CCP). The spectra of these species were recorded using a combination of millimeter/submillimeter direct absorption methods and Fourier transform microwave (FTMW) techniques. The phosphorus dicarbides were created in the gas phase from the reaction of red phosphorus and acetylene or methane in argon in an ac discharge for the direct absorption experiments, and using PCl(3) as the phosphorus source in a pulsed dc nozzle discharge for the FTMW measurements. A total of 35 rotational transitions were recorded for the main isotopologue, and between 2 and 8 for the (13)C-substituted species. Both spin-orbit components were identified for CCP, while only the Omega = 12 ladder was observed for (13)C(13)CP, C(13)CP, and (13)CCP. Hyperfine splittings due to phosphorus were observed for each species, as well as carbon-13 hyperfine structure for each of the (13)C-substituted isotopologues. The data were fitted with a Hund's case (a) Hamiltonian, and rotational, fine structure, and hyperfine parameters were determined for each species. The r(m)(1) bond lengths established for CCP, r(C-C) = 1.289(1) A and r(C-P) = 1.621(1) A, imply that there are double bonds between both the two carbon atoms and the carbon and phosphorus atoms. The hyperfine constants suggest that the unpaired electron in this radical is primarily located on the phosphorus nucleus, but with some electron density also on the terminal carbon atom. There appears to be a minor resonance structure where the unpaired electron is on the nucleus of the end carbon. The multiple double bond structure forces the molecule to be linear, as opposed to other main group dicarbides, such as SiC(2), which have cyclic geometries.

  7. Intracellular recordings of action potentials by an extracellular nanoscale field-effect transistor

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Xiaojie; Gao, Ruixuan; Xie, Ping; Cohen-Karni, Tzahi; Qing, Quan; Choe, Hwan Sung; Tian, Bozhi; Jiang, Xiaocheng; Lieber, Charles M.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to make electrical measurements inside cells has led to many important advances in electrophysiology1-6. The patch clamp technique, in which a glass micropipette filled with electrolyte is inserted into a cell, offers both high signal-to-noise ratio and temporal resolution1,2. Ideally the micropipette should be as small as possible to increase the spatial resolution and reduce the invasiveness of the measurement, but the overall performance of the technique depends on the impedance of the interface between the micropipette and the cell interior1,2, which limits how small the micropipette can be. Techniques that involve inserting metal or carbon microelectrodes into cells are subject to similar constraints4,7-9. Field-effect transistors (FETs) can also record electric potentials inside cells10, and since their performance does not depend on impedance11,12, they can be made much smaller than micropipettes and microelectrodes. Moreover, FET arrays are better suited for multiplexed measurements. Previously we have demonstrated FET-based intracellular recording with kinked nanowire structures10, but the kink configuration and device design places limits on the probe size and the potential for multiplexing. Here we report a new approach where a SiO2 nanotube is synthetically integrated on top of a nanoscale FET. After penetrating the cell membrane, the SiO2 nanotube brings the cell cytosol into contact with the FET and enables the recording of intracellular transmembrane potential. Simulations show that the bandwidth of this branched intracellular nanotube FET (BIT-FET) is high enough for it to record fast action potentials even when the nanotube diameter is decreased to 3 nm, a length scale which is well below that accessible with other methods1,2,4. Studies of cardiomyocyte cells demonstrate that when brought close, the nanotubes of phospholipid-modified BIT-FETs spontaneously penetrate the cell membrane to yield stable, full-amplitude intracellular action

  8. Intracellular recordings of action potentials by an extracellular nanoscale field-effect transistor.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xiaojie; Gao, Ruixuan; Xie, Ping; Cohen-Karni, Tzahi; Qing, Quan; Choe, Hwan Sung; Tian, Bozhi; Jiang, Xiaocheng; Lieber, Charles M

    2012-03-01

    The ability to make electrical measurements inside cells has led to many important advances in electrophysiology. The patch clamp technique, in which a glass micropipette filled with electrolyte is inserted into a cell, offers both high signal-to-noise ratio and temporal resolution. Ideally, the micropipette should be as small as possible to increase the spatial resolution and reduce the invasiveness of the measurement, but the overall performance of the technique depends on the impedance of the interface between the micropipette and the cell interior, which limits how small the micropipette can be. Techniques that involve inserting metal or carbon microelectrodes into cells are subject to similar constraints. Field-effect transistors (FETs) can also record electric potentials inside cells, and because their performance does not depend on impedance, they can be made much smaller than micropipettes and microelectrodes. Moreover, FET arrays are better suited for multiplexed measurements. Previously, we have demonstrated FET-based intracellular recording with kinked nanowire structures, but the kink configuration and device design places limits on the probe size and the potential for multiplexing. Here, we report a new approach in which a SiO2 nanotube is synthetically integrated on top of a nanoscale FET. This nanotube penetrates the cell membrane, bringing the cell cytosol into contact with the FET, which is then able to record the intracellular transmembrane potential. Simulations show that the bandwidth of this branched intracellular nanotube FET (BIT-FET) is high enough for it to record fast action potentials even when the nanotube diameter is decreased to 3 nm, a length scale well below that accessible with other methods. Studies of cardiomyocyte cells demonstrate that when phospholipid-modified BIT-FETs are brought close to cells, the nanotubes can spontaneously penetrate the cell membrane to allow the full-amplitude intracellular action potential to be

  9. Effects of naloxone and flumazenil on antinociceptive action of acetaminophen in rats

    PubMed Central

    Madenoğlu, Halit; Kaçmaz, Mustafa; Aksu, Recep; Bicer, Cihangir; Yaba, Gülay; Yildiz, Karamehmet; Doğru, Kudret; Boyaci, Adem

    2010-01-01

    Background: Studies of acetaminophen suggest that multiple nociceptive pathways are involved in the drug's analgesic action. Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine whether naloxone and flumazenil were able to modify or antagonize the antinociceptive effect of acetaminophen in rats. Methods: Adult albino Wistar rats were used in the study and randomly allocated to 1 of 4 groups. The acetaminophen group (A group) was administered IP saline and then 300 mg/kg IP acetaminophen 5 minutes thereafter. The acetaminophen + naloxone group (AN group) was pretreated with 1 mg/kg IP naloxone, followed by 300 mg/kg IP acetaminophen 5 minutes later. The acetaminophen + flumazenil group (AF group) was pretreated with 1 mg/kg IP flumazenil, followed by 300 mg/kg IP acetaminophen 5 minutes later. The control group received 2.5 mL IP saline, followed by an additional 2.5 mL IP injection of saline 5 minutes later. The paw-withdrawal latency period of the rats was assessed by an investigator blinded to treatment using the hot-plate test at 30, 45, 60, and 90 minutes after administration of acetaminophen. Results: Thirty-two rats were evenly randomized by envelope method into 4 groups of 8 rats each. Baseline values for the A, AN, AF, and control groups were not significantly different (9.1 [2.3], 10.5 [2.7], 9.8 [3.0], and 8.9 [1.4] sec, respectively). In the AF group, flumazenil appeared to antagonize the analgesic effect exerted by the acetaminophen in the hot-plate test (30 min, 10.3 [3.7] sec; 45 min, 11.7 [5.1] sec; 60 min, 12.1 [5.1] sec; and 90 min, 12.2 [4.9] sec) and values were not significantly different from those obtained in the control group (30 min, 9.8 [2.2] sec; 45 min, 9.0 [1.6] sec; 60 min, 9.2 [1.6] sec; and 90 min, 8.5 [2.0] sec). In the AN group, naloxone did not significantly affect the values observed in the hot-plate test (30 min, 18.0 [4.5] sec; 45 min, 21.5 [7.8] sec; 60 min, 20.5 [5.9] sec; and 90 min, 22.3 [7.4] sec) and values at all time

  10. Superselective Particle Embolization Enhances Efficacy of Radiofrequency Ablation: Effects of Particle Size and Sequence of Action

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Toshihiro; Isfort, Peter; Braunschweig, Till Westphal, Saskia; Woitok, Anna; Penzkofer, Tobias Bruners, Philipp; Kichikawa, Kimihiko; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas Mahnken, Andreas H.

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the effects of particle size and course of action of superselective bland transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) on the efficacy of radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Methods. Twenty pigs were divided into five groups: group 1a, 40-{mu}m bland TAE before RFA; group 1b, 40-{mu}m bland TAE after RFA; group 2a, 250-{mu}m bland TAE before RFA; group 2b, 250-{mu}m bland TAE after RFA and group 3, RFA alone. A total of 40 treatments were performed with a combined CT and angiography system. The sizes of the treated zones were measured from contrast-enhanced CTs on days 1 and 28. Animals were humanely killed, and the treated zones were examined pathologically. Results. There were no complications during procedures and follow-up. The short-axis diameter of the ablation zone in group 1a (mean {+-} standard deviation, 3.19 {+-} 0.39 cm) was significantly larger than in group 1b (2.44 {+-} 0.52 cm; P = 0.021), group 2a (2.51 {+-} 0.32 cm; P = 0.048), group 2b (2.19 {+-} 0.44 cm; P = 0.02), and group 3 (1.91 {+-} 0.55 cm; P < 0.001). The greatest volume of ablation was achieved by performing embolization with 40-{mu}m particles before RFA (group 1a; 20.97 {+-} 9.65 cm{sup 3}). At histology, 40-{mu}m microspheres were observed to occlude smaller and more distal arteries than 250-{mu}m microspheres. Conclusion. Bland TAE is more effective before RFA than postablation embolization. The use of very small 40-{mu}m microspheres enhances the efficacy of RFA more than the use of larger particles.

  11. Prescription omega-3 fatty acids and their lipid effects: physiologic mechanisms of action and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Bays, Harold E; Tighe, Ann P; Sadovsky, Richard; Davidson, Michael H

    2008-03-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia is a risk factor for atherosclerotic coronary heart disease. Very high triglyceride (TG) levels (> or =500 mg/dl [5.65 mmol/l]) increase the risk of pancreatitis. One therapeutic option to lower TG levels is omega-3 fatty acids, which are derived from the oil of fish and other seafood. The American Heart Association has acknowledged that fish oils may decrease dysrhythmias, decrease sudden death, decrease the rate of atherosclerosis and slightly lower blood pressure, and has recommended fish consumption or fish oil supplementation as a therapeutic strategy to reduce cardiovascular disease. A prescription omega-3-acid ethyl esters (P-OM3) preparation has been available in many European nations for at least a decade, and was approved by the US FDA in 2004 to reduce very high TG levels (> or =500 mg/dl [5.65 mmol/l]). Mechanistically, most evidence suggests that omega-3 fatty acids reduce the synthesis and secretion of very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) particles, and increase TG removal from VLDL and chylomicron particles through the upregulation of enzymes, such as lipoprotein lipase. Omega-3 fatty acids differ mechanistically from other lipid-altering drugs, which helps to explain why therapies such as P-OM3 have complementary mechanisms of action and, thus, complementary lipid benefits when administered with statins. Additional human studies are needed to define more clearly the cellular and molecular basis for the TG-lowering effects of omega-3 fatty acids and their favorable cardiovascular effects, particularly in patients with hypertriglyceridemia. PMID:18327998

  12. Effects of temperature on specific dynamic action in Atlantic cod Gadus morhua.

    PubMed

    Tirsgaard, Bjørn; Svendsen, Jon Christian; Steffensen, John Fleng

    2015-02-01

    Growth requires that energy is directed towards ingestion, digestion, absorption and assimilation of a meal; energy expenditures are often expressed as the specific dynamic action (SDA). While SDA is an important part of fish energy budgets and strongly affected by water temperature, temperature effects are not known across a wide temperature range in Atlantic cod Gadus morhua. The objective of this study was to examine effects of temperature (2, 5, 10, 15 or 20 °C) on the energetic cost and time used for SDA in juvenile G. morhua by intermittent flow respirometry. At each temperature, G. morhua were fed a meal of herring (Clupea harengus) corresponding to 5 % of the body mass. Standard metabolic rates measured pre-feeding and post-feeding metabolic rates were measured to determine SDA. The study showed that SDA coefficients (%, SDA energy divided by meal energy) were significantly lower at 2 and 10 °C (5.4-6.3 %) compared to 5, 15 and 20 °C (10.4-12.4 %), while SDA duration increased significantly from 80 h at 10 °C to 130-160 h at 2, 15 and 20 °C and reached a maximum of 250 h at 5 °C. The significant decrease in SDA duration at 10 °C combined with a low SDA coefficient suggests that water temperatures close to 10 °C may represent the optimum temperatures for SDA in this population of G. morhua. Our results suggest that SDA is not a simple function of temperature, but may vary with temperature in a more complex fashion. PMID:25343877

  13. Escalation of Commitment to an Ineffective Course of Action: The Effect of Feedback Having Negative Implications for Self-Identity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brockner, Joel; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Examines entrapment, the process by which organizational decision makers escalate commitment to an ineffective course of action to justify allocation of previous resources. Two laboratory experiments exploring individuals' perceptions of entrapment and its effect on their self identity are described. Also discusses practical theoretical…

  14. 76 FR 2705 - Notice of Realty Action; Modification of the Segregative Effect of Recreation and Public Purposes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-14

    ... were classified for R&PP lease on November 3, 1978, and published in the Federal Register (62 FR 9446) which included segregation of the lands from the public land laws. In order for the R&PP leased land to... County, Wyoming. This action will modify the segregation to open the lands only to effect this...

  15. Estimating Individual Influences of Behavioral Intentions: An Application of Random-Effects Modeling to the Theory of Reasoned Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedeker, Donald; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Methods are proposed and described for estimating the degree to which relations among variables vary at the individual level. As an example, M. Fishbein and I. Ajzen's theory of reasoned action is examined. This article illustrates the use of empirical Bayes methods based on a random-effects regression model to estimate individual influences…

  16. 10 CFR 2.1327 - Application for a stay of the effectiveness of NRC staff action on license transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Application for a stay of the effectiveness of NRC staff action on license transfer. 2.1327 Section 2.1327 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION AGENCY RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Procedures for Hearings on License Transfer Applications § 2.1327 Application for...

  17. 10 CFR 2.1327 - Application for a stay of the effectiveness of NRC staff action on license transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Application for a stay of the effectiveness of NRC staff action on license transfer. 2.1327 Section 2.1327 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION RULES OF PRACTICE FOR DOMESTIC LICENSING PROCEEDINGS AND ISSUANCE OF ORDERS Procedures for Hearings on License...

  18. 10 CFR 2.1327 - Application for a stay of the effectiveness of NRC staff action on license transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Application for a stay of the effectiveness of NRC staff action on license transfer. 2.1327 Section 2.1327 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION RULES OF PRACTICE FOR DOMESTIC LICENSING PROCEEDINGS AND ISSUANCE OF ORDERS Procedures for Hearings on License...

  19. 10 CFR 2.1327 - Application for a stay of the effectiveness of NRC staff action on license transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Application for a stay of the effectiveness of NRC staff action on license transfer. 2.1327 Section 2.1327 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION AGENCY RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Procedures for Hearings on License Transfer Applications § 2.1327 Application for...

  20. 10 CFR 2.1327 - Application for a stay of the effectiveness of NRC staff action on license transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Application for a stay of the effectiveness of NRC staff action on license transfer. 2.1327 Section 2.1327 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION RULES OF PRACTICE FOR DOMESTIC LICENSING PROCEEDINGS AND ISSUANCE OF ORDERS Procedures for Hearings on License...

  1. Hawking radiation from a Reissner-Nordstroem black hole with a global monopole via covariant anomalies and effective action

    SciTech Connect

    Gangopadhyay, Sunandan

    2008-08-15

    We adopt the covariant anomaly cancellation method as well as the effective action approach to obtain the Hawking radiation from the Reissner-Nordstroem blackhole with a global monopole falling in the class of the most general spherically symmetric charged blackhole ({radical}(-g){ne}1), using only covariant boundary conditions at the event horizon.

  2. Parent Drug Education: A Participatory Action Research Study into Effective Communication about Drugs between Parents and Unrelated Young People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mallick, Jane

    2007-01-01

    Parent drug education is considered a key aspect of drug prevention. Effective communication acts as protective factor for drug misuse in young people. This study is a Participatory Action Research study of "Drugsbridge", a drug education programme that has an emphasis on facilitating intergenerational communication about drugs between parents and…

  3. Effect of honey on multidrug resistant organisms and its synergistic action with three common antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Karayil, S; Deshpande, S D; Koppikar, G V

    1998-01-01

    A total of 15 bacterial strains (7 Pseudomonas & 8 Klebsiella species) isolated from various samples which showed multi-drug resistance were studied to verify in vitro antibacterial action of honey on the principle of Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) & its synergism with 3 common antibiotics--Gentamicin, Amikacin & Ceftazidime. The MIC of honey with saline for both organisms was found to be 1:2. The synergistic action was seen in the case of Pseudomonas spp. and not with Klebsiella spp. PMID:10703581

  4. High resolution pulsed field ionization-photoelectron study of CO{sub 2}{sup +}(X {sup 2}{pi}{sub g}) in the energy range of 13.6-14.7 eV

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jianbo; Chen, Wenwu; Hsu, C.-W.; Hochlaf, M.; Evans, M.; Stimson, S. [Ames Laboratory, USDOE; Ng, C. Y. [Ames Laboratory, USDOE

    2000-06-22

    The vacuum ultraviolet pulsed field ionization-photoelectron (PFI-PE) spectra for CO{sub 2} have been measured in the energy range of 13.6-14.7 eV, revealing complex vibronic structures for the ground CO{sub 2}{sup +}(X {sup 2}{pi}{sub g}) state. Many vibronic bands for CO{sub 2}{sup +}(X {sup 2}{pi}{sub g}), which were not resolved in previous photoelectron studies, are identified in the present measurement based on comparison with available optical data and theoretical predictions. As observed in the HeI photoelectron spectrum of CO{sub 2}, the PFI-PE spectrum is dominated by the symmetry allowed {nu}{sub 1}{sup +} (symmetric stretch) vibrational progression for CO{sub 2}{sup +}(X {sup 2}{pi}{sub g}). However, PFI-PE vibronic bands due to excitation of the symmetry disallowed {nu}{sub 2}{sup +} (bending) and {nu}{sub 3}{sup +} (asymmetric stretch) modes with both odd quanta, together with the symmetry allowed even quanta excitations, are clearly discernible. The simulation of rotational contours resolved in PFI-PE vibronic bands associated with excitation to the ({nu}{sub 1}{sup +}=0-1, {nu}{sub 2}{sup +}=0-2, {nu}{sub 3}{sup +}=0) vibrational levels has yielded accurate ionization energies for the formation of these vibronic states from CO{sub 2}(X {sup 1}{sigma}{sub g}{sup +}). (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  5. Estrogen effects on the brain: actions beyond the hypothalamus via novel mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    McEwen, Bruce S.; Akama, Keith T.; Spencer-Segal, Joanna L.; Milner, Teresa A.; Waters, Elizabeth M.

    2012-01-01

    From its origins in how the brain controls the endocrine system via the hypothalamus and pituitary gland, neuroendocrinology has evolved into a science that now includes hormone action on many aspects of brain function. These actions involve the whole central nervous system and not just the hypothalamus. Advances in our understanding of cellular and molecular actions of steroid hormones have gone beyond the important cell nuclear actions of steroid hormone receptors to include signaling pathways that intersect with other mediators such as neurotransmitters and neuromodulators. This has, in turn, broadened the search for and identification of steroid receptors to include non-nuclear sites in synapses, dendrites, mitochondria and glial cells, as well as cell nuclei. The study of estrogen receptors and estrogen actions on processes related to cognition, mood, autonomic regulation, pain and neuroprotection, among other functions, has led the way in this new view of hormone actions on the brain. In this review we summarize past and current work in our laboratory on this topic. This exciting and growing field involving many laboratories continues to reshape our ideas and approaches to neuroendocrinology both at the bench and the bedside. PMID:22289042

  6. Effect of Zn2+ on the proteolytic inhibitory action of insulin and biguanide antihyperglycemic drugs.

    PubMed

    Thorne, D P; Lockwood, T D

    1991-05-01

    The involvement of Zn2+ in the inhibitory action of insulin and phenformin on bulk proteolysis was studied in the Langendorff rat heart with a Zn(2+)-buffering perfusate (0.1 mM citrate, physiological complete amino acids and 0.2% albumin). Proteins were biosynthetically labeled in vitro for 10 min with [3H]leucine. Rapidly degraded proteins were eliminated during a 3-h preliminary degradation without insulin or added Zn2+ (2 mM nonradioactive leucine). Insulin (5 nM), the lysosomal inhibitor chloroquine (30 microM), and the biguanide antihyperglycemic agent phenformin (2 microns) each caused a sustained 35-40% inhibition of [3H]leucine release beginning within 1-2 min and reaching a maximum at 1-1.5 h. When these agents were combined, their simultaneous proteolytic inhibitory effects were not appreciably greater than the effect of chloroquine alone. Infusion of supraphysiological perfusate Zn2+ (greater than 15 microM) mimicked the inhibitory effect of insulin and chloroquine on lysosomal proteolysis. Infusion of supraphysiological Co2+, Mn2+, Fe2+, and Cr3+ (30 microM, 0.5 h) caused no change in proteolysis; however, 30 microM Cu2+ caused a slight inhibition. Presumptive chelation of the background (approximately 20 nM) Zn2+ by infusion of 3 microM CaNa2 EDTA caused no change in protein degradation over 1-2 h. The infusion of a physiological concentration of 1 or 5 microM Zn2+ (as ZnCl2) caused no change in protein degradation over 1-2 h. Biguanides are known to reversibly form a Zn2+ complex with affinity less than that of Zn2+ for EDTA. Prior infusion of 3 microM CaNa2 EDTA inactivated the proteolytic inhibitory effect of maximal (2 microM) phenformin over at least 1.25 h of concurrent infusion.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. ENDOCRINE DISRUPTERS: A REVIEW OF SOME SOURCES, EFFECTS, AND MECHANISMS OF ACTIONS ON BEHAVIOR AND NEUROENDOCRINE SYSTEMS

    PubMed Central

    Frye, C.; Bo, E.; Calamandrei, G.; Calzà, L.; Dessì-Fulgheri, F.; Fernández, M.; Fusani, L.; Kah, O.; Kajta, M.; Le Page, Y.; Patisaul, H.B.; Venerosi, A.; Wojtowicz, A.K.; Panzica, G.C.

    2011-01-01

    Some environmental contaminants interact with hormones and may exert adverse consequences due to their actions as endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Exposure in people is typically due to contamination of the food chain, inhalation of contaminated house dust, or occupational exposure. EDCs include pesticides and herbicides (such as diphenyl-dichloro-trichloroethane, DDT, or its metabolites), methoxychlor, biocides, heat stabilizers and chemical catalysts (such as tributyltin, TBT), plastic contaminants (e.g. bisphenol A, BPA), pharmaceuticals (i.e. diethylstilbestrol, DES; 17alpha-ethynilestradiol, EE2), or dietary components (such as phytoestrogens). The goal of this review is to address sources, effects and actions of EDCs, with an emphasis on topics discussed at the International Congress on Steroids and the Nervous System. EDCs may alter reproductively-relevant or non-reproductive, sexually-dimorphic behaviors. In addition, EDCs may have significant effects on neurodevelopmental processes, influencing morphology of sexually-dimorphic cerebral circuits. Exposure to EDCs is more dangerous if it occurs during specific “critical periods” of life, such as intrauterine, perinatal, juvenile or puberty periods, when organisms are more sensitive to hormonal disruption, than in other periods. However, exposure to EDCs in adulthood also can alter physiology. Several EDCs are xenoestrogens, may alter serum lipid concentrations, or metabolism enzymes that are necessary for converting cholesterol to steroid hormones, ultimately altering production of E2 and/or other steroids. Finally, many EDCs may have actions via, or independent of, classic actions at cognate steroid receptors. EDCs may have effects through numerous other substrates, such as the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) and retinoid X receptor (RXR), signal transduction pathways, calcium influx, and/or neurotransmitter receptors. Thus, EDCs, from varied

  8. Systemic and coronary hemodynamic actions and left ventricular functional effects of levosimendan in conscious dogs.

    PubMed

    Harkin, C P; Pagel, P S; Tessmer, J P; Warltier, D C

    1995-08-01

    control to 29 +/- 1 ms at the high dose) and increased the magnitude of LV -dP/dtmin in dogs with intact but not blocked ANS reflexes, suggesting that relaxation was enhanced by favorable changes in systemic hemodynamics or ANS activation and direct effects of this drug on lusitropic state. Levosimendan also increased dL/dtmax to a greater degree in ANS-intact dogs, indicating that improvement of rapid ventricular filling was also partially dependent on ANS tone. No changes in Kp were observed in either experimental group. The results indicate that levosimendan decreases preload and afterload and has positive inotropic and lusitropic properties. The actions of levosimendan on diastolic function are largely mediated by the ANS. PMID:7475041

  9. Systemic and coronary hemodynamic actions and left ventricular functional effects of levosimendan in conscious dogs.

    PubMed

    Harkin, C P; Pagel, P S; Tessmer, J P; Warltier, D C

    1995-08-01

    control to 29 +/- 1 ms at the high dose) and increased the magnitude of LV -dP/dtmin in dogs with intact but not blocked ANS reflexes, suggesting that relaxation was enhanced by favorable changes in systemic hemodynamics or ANS activation and direct effects of this drug on lusitropic state. Levosimendan also increased dL/dtmax to a greater degree in ANS-intact dogs, indicating that improvement of rapid ventricular filling was also partially dependent on ANS tone. No changes in Kp were observed in either experimental group. The results indicate that levosimendan decreases preload and afterload and has positive inotropic and lusitropic properties. The actions of levosimendan on diastolic function are largely mediated by the ANS.

  10. Time for actions in lucid dreams: effects of task modality, length, and complexity.

    PubMed

    Erlacher, Daniel; Schädlich, Melanie; Stumbrys, Tadas; Schredl, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between time in dreams and real time has intrigued scientists for centuries. The question if actions in dreams take the same time as in wakefulness can be tested by using lucid dreams where the dreamer is able to mark time intervals with prearranged eye movements that can be objectively identified in EOG recordings. Previous research showed an equivalence of time for counting in lucid dreams and in wakefulness (LaBerge, 1985; Erlacher and Schredl, 2004), but Erlacher and Schredl (2004) found that performing squats required about 40% more time in lucid dreams than in the waking state. To find out if the task modality, the task length, or the task complexity results in prolonged times in lucid dreams, an experiment with three different conditions was conducted. In the first condition, five proficient lucid dreamers spent one to three non-consecutive nights in the sleep laboratory. Participants counted to 10, 20, and 30 in wakefulness and in their lucid dreams. Lucidity and task intervals were time stamped with left-right-left-right eye movements. The same procedure was used for the second condition where eight lucid dreamers had to walk 10, 20, or 30 steps. In the third condition, eight lucid dreamers performed a gymnastics routine, which in the waking state lasted the same time as walking 10 steps. Again, we found that performing a motor task in a lucid dream requires more time than in wakefulness. Longer durations in the dream state were present for all three tasks, but significant differences were found only for the tasks with motor activity (walking and gymnastics). However, no difference was found for relative times (no disproportional time effects) and a more complex motor task did not result in more prolonged times. Longer durations in lucid dreams might be related to the lack of muscular feedback or slower neural processing during REM sleep. Future studies should explore factors that might be associated with prolonged durations. PMID:24474942

  11. Time for actions in lucid dreams: effects of task modality, length, and complexity.

    PubMed

    Erlacher, Daniel; Schädlich, Melanie; Stumbrys, Tadas; Schredl, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between time in dreams and real time has intrigued scientists for centuries. The question if actions in dreams take the same time as in wakefulness can be tested by using lucid dreams where the dreamer is able to mark time intervals with prearranged eye movements that can be objectively identified in EOG recordings. Previous research showed an equivalence of time for counting in lucid dreams and in wakefulness (LaBerge, 1985; Erlacher and Schredl, 2004), but Erlacher and Schredl (2004) found that performing squats required about 40% more time in lucid dreams than in the waking state. To find out if the task modality, the task length, or the task complexity results in prolonged times in lucid dreams, an experiment with three different conditions was conducted. In the first condition, five proficient lucid dreamers spent one to three non-consecutive nights in the sleep laboratory. Participants counted to 10, 20, and 30 in wakefulness and in their lucid dreams. Lucidity and task intervals were time stamped with left-right-left-right eye movements. The same procedure was used for the second condition where eight lucid dreamers had to walk 10, 20, or 30 steps. In the third condition, eight lucid dreamers performed a gymnastics routine, which in the waking state lasted the same time as walking 10 steps. Again, we found that performing a motor task in a lucid dream requires more time than in wakefulness. Longer durations in the dream state were present for all three tasks, but significant differences were found only for the tasks with motor activity (walking and gymnastics). However, no difference was found for relative times (no disproportional time effects) and a more complex motor task did not result in more prolonged times. Longer durations in lucid dreams might be related to the lack of muscular feedback or slower neural processing during REM sleep. Future studies should explore factors that might be associated with prolonged durations.

  12. Effect of knockout of α2δ-1 on action potentials in mouse sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Margas, Wojciech; Ferron, Laurent; Nieto-Rostro, Manuela; Schwartz, Arnold; Dolphin, Annette C.

    2016-01-01

    Gene deletion of the voltage-gated calcium channel auxiliary subunit α2δ-1 has been shown previously to have a cardiovascular phenotype, and a reduction in mechano- and cold sensitivity, coupled with delayed development of neuropathic allodynia. We have also previously shown that dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuron calcium channel currents were significantly reduced in α2δ-1 knockout mice. To extend our findings in these sensory neurons, we have examined here the properties of action potentials (APs) in DRG neurons from α2δ-1 knockout mice in comparison to their wild-type (WT) littermates, in order to dissect how the calcium channels that are affected by α2δ-1 knockout are involved in setting the duration of individual APs and their firing frequency. Our main findings are that there is reduced Ca2+ entry on single AP stimulation, particularly in the axon proximal segment, reduced AP duration and reduced firing frequency to a 400 ms stimulation in α2δ-1 knockout neurons, consistent with the expected role of voltage-gated calcium channels in these events. Furthermore, lower intracellular Ca2+ buffering also resulted in reduced AP duration, and a lower frequency of AP firing in WT neurons, mimicking the effect of α2δ-1 knockout. By contrast, we did not obtain any consistent evidence for the involvement of Ca2+-activation of large conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) and small conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK) channels in these events. In conclusion, the reduced Ca2+ elevation as a result of single AP stimulation is likely to result from the reduced duration of the AP in α2δ-1 knockout sensory neurons. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Evolution brings Ca2+ and ATP together to control life and death’. PMID:27377724

  13. Hormonal effects of lead acetate in the male rat: mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Sokol, R Z

    1987-12-01

    Environmental exposure to toxic levels of lead occurs in a number of industries with potential adverse effects on the reproductive capacity of exposed men. Using a rat model, we previously reported that dietary exposure to lead resulted in suppressed spermatogenesis and testosterone levels without significant changes in luteinizing hormone (LH). In this study, to identify more specifically the site of lead's toxic actions on the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis, the response of lead-treated male rats as compared to control animals to naloxone, gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), and LH stimulation was studied. Three groups of 52-day-old Wistar rats were allowed access to either deionized distilled water containing no lead acetate or a 0.3% lead acetate solution for 30 days. In each study group, 10 control and 10 lead-treated animals were anesthetized prior to cardiac puncture and collection of serum for the measurement of lead level and baseline LH (Groups I and II) or testosterone levels (Group III). In Group I, 20 min after an i.p. injection of naloxone (1.5 mg/kg/BW), the animals were killed by decapitation, and serum was collected for LH measurement. Thirty minutes after an i.p. injection of GnRH (100 ng/100 gm BW), Group II animals were killed by decapitation, and serum was collected for LH. Sixty minutes after an injection of LH (100 mg/100 mg BW), serum was collected from Group III animals for testosterone measurement. All control animals and lead-treated animals consumed similar volumes of water. Control animals had undetectable levels of lead in their blood. Lead-treated animals had mean blood lead values of 30 micrograms/dl +/- 5 micrograms/dl.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. An integrated approach for prospectively investigating a mode-of-action for rodent liver effects.

    PubMed

    LeBaron, Matthew J; Geter, David R; Rasoulpour, Reza J; Gollapudi, B Bhaskar; Thomas, Johnson; Murray, Jennifer; Kan, H Lynn; Wood, Amanda J; Elcombe, Cliff; Vardy, Audrey; McEwan, Jillian; Terry, Claire; Billington, Richard

    2013-07-15

    Registration of new plant protection products (e.g., herbicide, insecticide, or fungicide) requires comprehensive mammalian toxicity evaluation including carcinogenicity studies in two species. The outcome of the carcinogenicity testing has a significant bearing on the overall human health risk assessment of the substance and, consequently, approved uses for different crops across geographies. In order to understand the relevance of a specific tumor finding to human health, a systematic, transparent, and hypothesis-driven mode of action (MoA) investigation is, appropriately, an expectation by the regulatory agencies. Here, we describe a novel approach of prospectively generating the MoA data by implementing additional end points to the standard guideline toxicity studies with sulfoxaflor, a molecule in development. This proactive MoA approach results in a more robust integration of molecular with apical end points while minimizing animal use. Sulfoxaflor, a molecule targeting sap-feeding insects, induced liver effects (increased liver weight due to hepatocellular hypertrophy) in an initial palatability probe study for selecting doses for subsequent repeat-dose dietary studies. This finding triggered the inclusion of dose-response investigations of the potential key events for rodent liver carcinogenesis, concurrent with the hazard assessment studies. As predicted, sulfoxaflor induced liver tumors in rats and mice in the bioassays. The MoA data available by the time of the carcinogenicity finding supported the conclusion that the carcinogenic potential of sulfoxaflor was due to CAR/PXR nuclear receptor activation with subsequent hepatocellular proliferation. This MoA was not considered to be relevant to humans as sulfoxaflor is unlikely to induce hepatocellular proliferation in humans and therefore would not be a human liver carcinogen.

  15. Diarrhetic effect of okadaic acid could be related with its neuronal action: Changes in neuropeptide Y.

    PubMed

    Louzao, M Carmen; Fernández, Diego A; Abal, Paula; Fraga, Maria; Vilariño, Natalia; Vieytes, Mercedes R; Botana, Luis M

    2015-09-01

    Okadaic acid (OA) and dinophysistoxins (DTXs) are a group of marine toxins that cause diarrheic shellfish poisoning (DSP) in humans and animals. These compounds are produced by dinoflagellates of the Prorocentrum and Dinophysis genera and can accumulate in filter-feeding bivalves, posing a serious health risk for shellfish consumers. The enteric nervous system (ENS) plays a crucial role in the regulation of the gastrointestinal tract. In addition, neuropeptides produced by ENS affects the epithelial barrier functions. In the present work we used a two-compartment human coculture model containing the SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell line and polarized colonic epithelial monolayers (Caco-2) to study the OA intestinal permeability. First, we have determined OA cytotoxicity and we have found that OA reduces the viability of SH-SY5Y in a dose-dependent way, even though DTX1 is 4 to 5 times more potent than OA. Besides DTX1 is 15 to 18 orders of magnitude more potent than OA in decreasing transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) of caco-2 cells without inducing cytotoxicity. Permeability assays indicate that OA cross the monolayer and modulates the neuropeptide Y (NPY) secretion by neuroblastoma cells. This NPY also affects the permeability of OA. This offers a novel approach to establish the influence of OA neuronal action on their diarrheic effects through a cross talk between ENS and intestine via OA induced NPY secretion. Therefore, the OA mechanisms of toxicity that were long attributed only to the inhibition of protein phosphatases, would require a reevaluation.

  16. Time for actions in lucid dreams: effects of task modality, length, and complexity

    PubMed Central

    Erlacher, Daniel; Schädlich, Melanie; Stumbrys, Tadas; Schredl, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between time in dreams and real time has intrigued scientists for centuries. The question if actions in dreams take the same time as in wakefulness can be tested by using lucid dreams where the dreamer is able to mark time intervals with prearranged eye movements that can be objectively identified in EOG recordings. Previous research showed an equivalence of time for counting in lucid dreams and in wakefulness (LaBerge, 1985; Erlacher and Schredl, 2004), but Erlacher and Schredl (2004) found that performing squats required about 40% more time in lucid dreams than in the waking state. To find out if the task modality, the task length, or the task complexity results in prolonged times in lucid dreams, an experiment with three different conditions was conducted. In the first condition, five proficient lucid dreamers spent one to three non-consecutive nights in the sleep laboratory. Participants counted to 10, 20, and 30 in wakefulness and in their lucid dreams. Lucidity and task intervals were time stamped with left-right-left-right eye movements. The same procedure was used for the second condition where eight lucid dreamers had to walk 10, 20, or 30 steps. In the third condition, eight lucid dreamers performed a gymnastics routine, which in the waking state lasted the same time as walking 10 steps. Again, we found that performing a motor task in a lucid dream requires more time than in wakefulness. Longer durations in the dream state were present for all three tasks, but significant differences were found only for the tasks with motor activity (walking and gymnastics). However, no difference was found for relative times (no disproportional time effects) and a more complex motor task did not result in more prolonged times. Longer durations in lucid dreams might be related to the lack of muscular feedback or slower neural processing during REM sleep. Future studies should explore factors that might be associated with prolonged durations. PMID:24474942

  17. Effect of knockout of α2δ-1 on action potentials in mouse sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Margas, Wojciech; Ferron, Laurent; Nieto-Rostro, Manuela; Schwartz, Arnold; Dolphin, Annette C

    2016-08-01

    Gene deletion of the voltage-gated calcium channel auxiliary subunit α2δ-1 has been shown previously to have a cardiovascular phenotype, and a reduction in mechano- and cold sensitivity, coupled with delayed development of neuropathic allodynia. We have also previously shown that dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuron calcium channel currents were significantly reduced in α2δ-1 knockout mice. To extend our findings in these sensory neurons, we have examined here the properties of action potentials (APs) in DRG neurons from α2δ-1 knockout mice in comparison to their wild-type (WT) littermates, in order to dissect how the calcium channels that are affected by α2δ-1 knockout are involved in setting the duration of individual APs and their firing frequency. Our main findings are that there is reduced Ca(2+) entry on single AP stimulation, particularly in the axon proximal segment, reduced AP duration and reduced firing frequency to a 400 ms stimulation in α2δ-1 knockout neurons, consistent with the expected role of voltage-gated calcium channels in these events. Furthermore, lower intracellular Ca(2+) buffering also resulted in reduced AP duration, and a lower frequency of AP firing in WT neurons, mimicking the effect of α2δ-1 knockout. By contrast, we did not obtain any consistent evidence for the involvement of Ca(2+)-activation of large conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) and small conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK) channels in these events. In conclusion, the reduced Ca(2+) elevation as a result of single AP stimulation is likely to result from the reduced duration of the AP in α2δ-1 knockout sensory neurons.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evolution brings Ca(2+) and ATP together to control life and death'. PMID:27377724

  18. AdS{sub 3} backgrounds from 10D effective action of heterotic string theory

    SciTech Connect

    Dominis Prester, Predrag

    2010-02-15

    We present a method for calculating solutions and corresponding central charges for backgrounds with AdS{sub 3} and S{sup k} factors in {alpha}{sup '}-exact fashion from the full tree-level low-energy effective action of heterotic string theory. Three examples are explicitly presented: AdS{sub 3}xS{sup 3}xT{sup 4}, AdS{sub 3}xS{sup 2}xS{sup 1}xT{sup 4}, and AdS{sub 3}xS{sup 3}xS{sup 3}xS{sup 1}. Crucial property which enabled our analysis is vanishing of the Riemann tensor calculated from connection with ''{sigma}-model torsion.'' We show the following: (i) Chern-Simons terms are the only source of {alpha}{sup '} corrections not only in BPS, but also in non-BPS cases, suggesting a possible extension of general method of Kraus and Larsen, (ii) our results are in agreement with some conjectures on the form of the part of tree-level Lagrangian not connected to a mixed Chern-Simons term by supersymmetry (and present in all supersymmetric string theories), (iii) new {alpha}{sup '}-exact result for central charges in AdS{sub 3}xS{sup 3}xS{sup 3}xS{sup 1} geometry. As a tool we used our generalization of Sen's E-function formalism to AdS{sub p} with p>2, and paid special attention to proper definition of asymptotic charges.

  19. Different mechanisms for role relations versus verb-action congruence effects: evidence from ERPs in picture-sentence verification.

    PubMed

    Knoeferle, Pia; Urbach, Thomas P; Kutas, Marta

    2014-10-01

    Extant accounts of visually situated language processing do make general predictions about visual context effects on incremental sentence comprehension; these, however, are not sufficiently detailed to accommodate potentially different visual context effects (such as a scene-sentence mismatch based on actions versus thematic role relations, e.g., (Altmann & Kamide, 2007; Knoeferle & Crocker, 2007; Taylor & Zwaan, 2008; Zwaan & Radvansky, 1998)). To provide additional data for theory testing and development, we collected event-related brain potentials (ERPs) as participants read a subject-verb-object sentence (500 ms SOA in Experiment 1 and 300 ms SOA in Experiment 2), and post-sentence verification times indicating whether or not the verb and/or the thematic role relations matched a preceding picture (depicting two participants engaged in an action). Though incrementally processed, these two types of mismatch yielded different ERP effects. Role-relation mismatch effects emerged at the subject noun as anterior negativities to the mismatching noun, preceding action mismatch effects manifest as centro-parietal N400s greater to the mismatching verb, regardless of SOAs. These two types of mismatch manipulations also yielded different effects post-verbally, correlated differently with a participant's mean accuracy, verbal working memory and visual-spatial scores, and differed in their interactions with SOA. Taken together these results clearly implicate more than a single mismatch mechanism for extant accounts of picture-sentence processing to accommodate.

  20. Different mechanisms for role relations versus verb-action congruence effects: evidence from ERPs in picture-sentence verification.

    PubMed

    Knoeferle, Pia; Urbach, Thomas P; Kutas, Marta

    2014-10-01

    Extant accounts of visually situated language processing do make general predictions about visual context effects on incremental sentence comprehension; these, however, are not sufficiently detailed to accommodate potentially different visual context effects (such as a scene-sentence mismatch based on actions versus thematic role relations, e.g., (Altmann & Kamide, 2007; Knoeferle & Crocker, 2007; Taylor & Zwaan, 2008; Zwaan & Radvansky, 1998)). To provide additional data for theory testing and development, we collected event-related brain potentials (ERPs) as participants read a subject-verb-object sentence (500 ms SOA in Experiment 1 and 300 ms SOA in Experiment 2), and post-sentence verification times indicating whether or not the verb and/or the thematic role relations matched a preceding picture (depicting two participants engaged in an action). Though incrementally processed, these two types of mismatch yielded different ERP effects. Role-relation mismatch effects emerged at the subject noun as anterior negativities to the mismatching noun, preceding action mismatch effects manifest as centro-parietal N400s greater to the mismatching verb, regardless of SOAs. These two types of mismatch manipulations also yielded different effects post-verbally, correlated differently with a participant's mean accuracy, verbal working memory and visual-spatial scores, and differed in their interactions with SOA. Taken together these results clearly implicate more than a single mismatch mechanism for extant accounts of picture-sentence processing to accommodate. PMID:25216075

  1. Protective effect of dietary potassium against cardiovascular damage in salt-sensitive hypertension: possible role of its antioxidant action.

    PubMed

    Ando, Katsuyuki; Matsui, Hiromitsu; Fujita, Megumi; Fujita, Toshiro

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that high salt intake induces hypertension and cardiovascular damage, while dietary potassium supplementation counteracts these harmful effects. Actually, the protective effect of potassium is strengthened with excess salt as compared with salt depletion. Although the precise mechanisms have not been fully elucidated, in our previous reports, the antihypertensive effect of dietary potassium was accompanied by sympathetic nerve inhibition in salt-sensitive hypertension. Also, potassium supplement suppressed salt-induced insulin resistance. These effects of dietary potassium can explain its cardio- and vasculo-protective action in addition to the potassium supplementation induced decreased salt-induced rise in blood pressure. On the other hand, salt-sensitive hypertension is associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction. Moreover, sympathoexcitation can be induced by central ROS upregulation and insulin resistance can be caused by ROS excess in the target organs of insulin, such as skeletal muscle. Conversely, the seemingly different actions of potassium can be explained by the antioxidant effect of dietary potassium; in our recent studies, potassium supplementation inhibits salt-induced progress of cardiac diastolic dysfunction and vascular neointima formation by cuff placement around arteries, associated with the inhibition of regional ROS overproduction, in salt-sensitive hypertension. Thus, it is possible that dietary potassium protects against salt-induced cardiovascular damage by the reduction of ROS generation and by central sympatholytic action and amelioration of insulin resistance induced through its antioxidant effect.

  2. Exploring perceptual processing of ASL and human actions: effects of inversion and repetition priming.

    PubMed

    Corina, David P; Grosvald, Michael

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, we compare responses of deaf signers and hearing non-signers engaged in a categorization task of signs and non-linguistic human actions. We examine the time it takes to make such categorizations under conditions of 180° stimulus inversion and as a function of repetition priming, in an effort to understand whether the processing of sign language forms draws upon special processing mechanisms or makes use of mechanisms used in recognition of non-linguistic human actions. Our data show that deaf signers were much faster in the categorization of both linguistic and non-linguistic actions, and relative to hearing non-signers, show evidence that they were more sensitive to the configural properties of signs. Our study suggests that sign expertise may lead to modifications of a general-purpose human action recognition system rather than evoking a qualitatively different mode of processing, and supports the contention that signed languages make use of perceptual systems through which humans understand or parse human actions and gestures more generally. PMID:22153323

  3. Dissociable effects of salience on attention and goal-directed action.

    PubMed

    Moher, Jeff; Anderson, Brian A; Song, Joo-Hyun

    2015-08-01

    Everyday behavior frequently involves encounters with multiple objects that compete for selection. For example, driving a car requires constant shifts of attention between oncoming traffic, rearview mirrors, and traffic signs and signals, among other objects. Behavioral goals often drive this selection process [1, 2]; however, they are not the sole determinant of selection. Physically salient objects, such as flashing, brightly colored hazard signs, or objects that are salient by virtue of learned associations with reward, such as pictures of food on a billboard, often capture attention regardless of the individual's goals [3-6]. It is typically thought that strongly salient distractor objects capture more attention and are more disruptive than weakly salient distractors [7, 8]. Counterintuitively, though, we found that this is true for perception, but not for goal-directed action. In a visually guided reaching task [9-11], we required participants to reach to a shape-defined target while trying to ignore salient distractors. We observed that strongly salient distractors produced less disruption in goal-directed action than weakly salient distractors. Thus, a strongly salient distractor triggers suppression during goal-directed action, resulting in enhanced efficiency and accuracy of target selection relative to when weakly salient distractors are present. In contrast, in a task requiring no goal-directed action, we found greater attentional interference from strongly salient distractors. Thus, while highly salient stimuli interfere strongly with perceptual processing, increased physical salience or associated value attenuates action-related interference.

  4. Exploring perceptual processing of ASL and human actions: Effects of inversion and repetition priming

    PubMed Central

    Corina, David P.; Grosvald, Michael

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we compare responses of deaf signers and hearing non-signers engaged in a categorization task of signs and non-linguistic human actions. We examine the time it takes to make such categorizations under conditions of 180-degree stimulus inversion and as a function of repetition priming, in an effort to understand whether the processing of sign language forms draws upon special processing mechanisms or makes use of mechanisms used in recognition of non-linguistic human actions. Our data show that deaf signers were much faster in the categorization of both linguistic and non-linguistic actions, and relative to hearing non-signers, show evidence that they were more sensitive to the configural properties of signs. Our study suggests that sign expertise may lead to modifications of a general-purpose human action recognition system rather than evoking a qualitatively different mode of processing, and supports the contention that signed languages make use of perceptual systems through which humans understand or parse human actions and gestures more generally. PMID:22153323

  5. The effect of modifying automatic action tendencies on overt avoidance behaviors.

    PubMed

    Amir, Nader; Kuckertz, Jennie M; Najmi, Sadia

    2013-06-01

    We used the Approach-Avoidance Task (AAT) to examine the role of automatic action tendencies. We hypothesized that, after manipulation of automatic action tendencies, participants would be more likely to approach feared objects when compared with participants in a control condition. Participants were instructed to push or pull a joystick, resulting in contamination-related and neutral pictures moving progressively away from or toward them, respectively. We manipulated approach by building a contingency between the arm movement and the picture type in the active condition but not in the control condition. Consistent with our hypothesis, participants in the active manipulation group showed facilitated automatic approach tendencies and reduced avoidance tendencies for contamination-related stimuli and completed more steps approaching their feared objects in a behavioral approach test compared with participants in the control group. Our results suggest that automatic action tendencies may play an important role in the maintenance of fear-related behavioral avoidance.

  6. The effect of action observation training on knee joint function and gait ability in total knee replacement patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seong Doo; Song, Hyun Seung; Kim, Jin Young

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate that effect of action observation training (AOT) on knee joint function and balance in total knee replacement (TKR) patients. The subjects consisted of eighteen post-TKR patients. All participants underwent conventional physical therapy. In addition, patients in the AOT group (n= 9) were asked to observe video clips showing daily actions and to imitate them afterward. Patients in the control group (n= 9) were asked to execute the same actions as patients in the AOT group. Outcome measures Western Ontario and Mc-Master Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) included pain, stiffness, function and Timed Up and Go (TUG) test. After intervention, patients in the AOT group score better than patients in the control group. After TUG test, patients in the AOT group and control group were no significant difference between two groups. In addition to conventional physical therapy, AOT is effective in the rehabilitation of post-TKR patients. Action observation training is considered conducive to improving knee functions and ameliorating pain and stiffness, of patients who underwent TKR. PMID:25061596

  7. The effect of the action observation physical training on the upper extremity function in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Young; Kim, Jong-Man; Ko, Eun-Young

    2014-06-01

    The purpose this study was to investigate the effect of action observation physical training (AOPT) on the functioning of the upper extremities in children with cerebral palsy (CP), using an evaluation framework based on that of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). The subjects were divided into an AOPT group and a physical training (PT) group. AOPT group practiced repeatedly the actions they observed on video clips, in which normal child performed an action with their upper extremities. PT group performed the same actions as the AOPT group did after observing landscape photographs. The subjects participated in twelve 30-min sessions, 3 days a week, for 4 weeks. Evaluation of upper extremity function using the following: the power of grasp and Modified Ashworth Scale for body functions and structures, a Box and Block test, an ABILHAND-Kids questionnaire, and the WeeFIM scale for activity and participation. Measurements were performed before and after the training, and 2 weeks after the end of training. The results of this study showed that, in comparison with the PT group, the functioning of the upper extremities in the AOPT group was significantly improved in body functions and activity and participation according to the ICF framework. This study demonstrates that AOPT has a positive influence on the functioning of the upper extremities in children with CP. It is suggested that this alternative approach for functioning of the upper extremities could be an effective method for rehabilitation in children with CP. PMID:25061598

  8. Actionable Nuggets

    PubMed Central

    McColl, Mary Ann; Aiken, Alice; Smith, Karen; McColl, Alexander; Green, Michael; Godwin, Marshall; Birtwhistle, Richard; Norman, Kathleen; Brankston, Gabrielle; Schaub, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To present the results of a pilot study of an innovative methodology for translating best evidence about spinal cord injury (SCI) for family practice. Design Review of Canadian and international peer-reviewed literature to develop SCI Actionable Nuggets, and a mixed qualitative-quantitative evaluation to determine Nuggets’ effect on physician knowledge of and attitudes toward patients with SCI, as well as practice accessibility. Setting Ontario, Newfoundland, and Australia. Participants Forty-nine primary care physicians. Methods Twenty Actionable Nuggets (pertaining to key health issues associated with long-term SCI) were developed. Nugget postcards were mailed weekly for 20 weeks to participating physicians. Prior knowledge of SCI was self-rated by participants; they also completed an online posttest to assess the information they gained from the Nugget postcards. Participants’ opinions about practice accessibility and accommodations for patients with SCI, as well as the acceptability and usefulness of Nuggets, were assessed in interviews. Main findings With Actionable Nuggets, participants’ knowledge of the health needs of patients with SCI improved, as knowledge increased from a self-rating of fair (58%) to very good (75%) based on posttest quiz results. The mean overall score for accessibility and accommodations in physicians’ practices was 72%. Participants’ awareness of the need for screening and disease prevention among this population also increased. The usefulness and acceptability of SCI Nugget postcards were rated as excellent. Conclusion Actionable Nuggets are a knowledge translation tool designed to provide family physicians with concise, practical information about the most prevalent and pressing primary care needs of patients with SCI. This evidence-based resource has been shown to be an excellent fit with information consumption processes in primary care. They were updated and adapted for distribution by the Canadian

  9. Assessment of the influence of histaminergic actions on cocaine-like effects of 3alpha-diphenylmethoxytropane analogs.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Vera C; Kopajtic, Theresa A; Newman, Amy Hauck; Katz, Jonathan L

    2005-11-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that analogs of benztropine (BZT) possess high affinity for the dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT) but generally have behavioral effects different from those of cocaine, suggesting either unique actions at the DA transporter or that another action of these drugs interferes with cocaine-like effects. Because the parent compound has histamine-antagonistic effects, the affinity of its analogs for histamine H(1), H(2), and H(3) receptors were compared with DA transporter affinity to assess whether those differences predicted the amount of cocaine-like activity. All of the compounds displaced [(3)H]mepyramine from H(1), [(125)I]iodoaminopotentidine from H(2), and [(3)H]N-alpha-methylhistamine from H(3) histamine receptors with affinities ranging from 15.7 to 37,600, 218 to >4430, and 4040 to >150,000 nM, respectively. Affinities at histamine H(1) receptors were, respectively, approximately 25- or 300-fold greater than those at H(2) or H(3) histamine receptors. Relative affinities for H(1) and DAT binding did not reliably predict the degree of cocaine-like stimulation of locomotor activity. In addition, interactions of various histaminic agents with cocaine assessed whether an action at any of the histamine sites could interfere with cocaine-like effects. None of the histaminic agents fully substituted for cocaine in rats trained to discriminate 10 mg/kg cocaine from saline nor did any of the compounds antagonize or otherwise diminish the discriminative stimulus effects of cocaine. The results suggest that affinity for histamine receptors cannot account for the diminished cocaine-like effects of the BZT analogs and suggest alternatively that these compounds have actions different from those of cocaine but likely mediated by their interaction with the DAT.

  10. Choosing Actions

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, David A.; Chapman, Kate M.; Coelho, Chase J.; Gong, Lanyun; Studenka, Breanna E.

    2013-01-01

    Actions that are chosen have properties that distinguish them from actions that are not. Of the nearly infinite possible actions that can achieve any given task, many of the unchosen actions are irrelevant, incorrect, or inappropriate. Others are relevant, correct, or appropriate but are disfavored for other reasons. Our research focuses on the question of what distinguishes actions that are chosen from actions that are possible but are not. We review studies that use simple preference methods to identify factors that contribute to action choices, especially for object-manipulation tasks. We can determine which factors are especially important through simple behavioral experiments. PMID:23761769

  11. Action and Object Processing in Aphasia: From Nouns and Verbs to the Effect of Manipulability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arevalo, A.; Perani, D.; Cappa, S. F.; Butler, A.; Bates, E.; Dronkers, N.

    2007-01-01

    The processing of words and pictures representing actions and objects was tested in 21 aphasic patients and 20 healthy controls across three word production tasks: picture-naming (PN), single word reading (WR) and word repetition (WRP). Analysis (1) targeted task and lexical category (noun-verb), revealing worse performance on PN and verb items…

  12. Observing Children's Learning: Informing Effective Intervention. A Personal Story of Investigative Research in Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockett, Andrew

    This paper outlines the underlying principles that have guided the development of an observational orientation to assessing children's learning. The development of an observation orientation was achieved through a process of a number of action-type research projects within a range of early years settings in the United Kingdom. The paper outlines a…

  13. An Action Research Study on the Effect of Interactive Technology and Active Learning on Student Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bear, Teresa J.

    2013-01-01

    This quantitative action science research study utilized a causal-comparative experimental research design in order to determine if the use of student response systems (clickers), as an active learning strategy in a community college course, improved student performance in the course. Students in the experimental group (n = 26) used clickers to…

  14. Res Judicata and Section 1983: The Effect of State Court Judgments on Federal Civil Rights Actions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levenson, Laurie L.

    1979-01-01

    Argues for a consistent approach to determining when Section 1983 litigation may follow state proceedings. Provides guidelines similar to those applied in habeas corpus proceedings for deciding when federal action will be barred. Available from UCLA Law Review, 405 Hilgard Ave., Los Angeles, CA 90024. (IRT)

  15. The Effects of Varied Inquiry Experiences on Teacher and Student Questions and Actions in STS Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yager, Robert E.; Abd-Hamid, Nor Hashidah; Akcay, Hakan

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how different inquiry experiences affect in-service science teachers' performance in terms of their questions and classroom actions. Teachers in a workshop experience proceeded through structured, guided, and full inquiry stations where materials to make foam were provided. Participants were 26 in-service…

  16. Synergistic action of photosensitizers and normal human serum in a bactericidal process. I. Effect of chlorophylls.

    PubMed

    Jankowski, Andrzej; Jankowski, Stanisław; Mirończyk, Agnieszka

    2003-01-01

    Susceptibility of some Gram-negative strains against the bactericidal action of normal human serum (NHS) and of chlorophyll, which induces production of reactive oxygen species by light, was studied. A synergistic bactericidal activity of NHS and chlorophyll against E. coli K1 and Shigella flexneri strains was observed.

  17. Understanding Teacher Effectiveness: Providing Feedback to Teacher Preparation Programs. Data for Action 2013

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Data Quality Campaign, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Teachers need longitudinal student-level data, such as attendance history, course-taking patterns, grades, and test scores, to tailor instruction to individual students' strengths and weaknesses.This factsheet uses the findings from the Data for Action 2013 analysis to discuss how states can provide teachers with student-level longitudinal data,…

  18. Exploring Perceptual Processing of ASL and Human Actions: Effects of Inversion and Repetition Priming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corina, David P.; Grosvald, Michael

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we compare responses of deaf signers and hearing non-signers engaged in a categorization task of signs and non-linguistic human actions. We examine the time it takes to make such categorizations under conditions of 180 degrees stimulus inversion and as a function of repetition priming, in an effort to understand whether the…

  19. Effects of a Long-Term Participatory Action Research Project on Science Teachers' Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eilks, Ingo; Markic, Silvija

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the potential of long-term co-operation between science educators and science teachers concerning the teachers' continuous professional development, based on Participatory Action Research in science education. The discussion is based on a six-year case study observing a group of about ten German chemistry teachers by chemistry…

  20. When will collective action be effective? Violent and non-violent protests differentially influence perceptions of legitimacy and efficacy among sympathizers.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Emma F; Louis, Winnifred R

    2014-02-01

    Collective action will be effective in achieving broader social change goals to the extent that it influences public opinion yet the degree to which collective action "works" in changing opinion is rarely studied. Experiment 1 (n = 158) showed that, consistent with a logic of strategic non-violence, non-violent collective action more effectively conveys a sense of the illegitimacy of the issue and the efficacy of the group, thereby promoting support for future non-violent actions. Experiment 2 (n = 139) explored the moderating role of allegations of corruption. A social context of corruption effectively undermined the efficacy and legitimacy of non-violent collective action, relative to support for violence, thereby promoting (indirectly) support for future extreme action. The implications of this research, for the logic of strategic non-violence and mobilizing supportive public opinion, are discussed.

  1. Effects of temperature on the specific dynamic action of the southern catfish, Silurus meridionalis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yiping; Xie, Xiaojun

    2008-02-01

    Specific dynamic action (SDA), the energy expended on all physiological processes that is associated with meal digestion and assimilation, is strongly affected by temperature. We assessed the effects of temperature on the postprandial metabolic response and calculated SDA of the southern catfish, Silurus meridionalis. The fish was fed with experimental diets at a meal size of 4% body mass, and by using an 8-chamber, continuous-flow respirometer the oxygen consumption rate was determined at a 2 h interval until the postprandial oxygen consumption rate returning to the preprandial level, at four different temperatures. The energy expended on SDA (SDA(E)) were 2.71, 3.07, 3.16, and 3.62 kJ, the SDA(coefficients) (energy expended on SDA quantified as a percentage of the digestible energy content of the meal) were 7.70, 9.44, 10.36, and 11.12%, and the peak metabolic rates (R(peak)) of SDA were 3.48, 4.31, 5.96, and 7.30 mg O2 h(-1), at 17.5, 22.5, 27.5, and 32.5 degrees C respectively. The relationships between those parameters and temperature were: SDA(E)=1.74+0.0559T (n=26, r(2)=0.676), SDA(coefficient)=4.10+0.223T (n=26, r(2)=0.726), and R(peak)=-1.34+0.264T (n=26, r(2)=0.896). The SDA durations showed a slow-fast-slow tendency of decrease with increasing temperature, and were 88.00, 85.71, 67.71, and 66.50 h at 17.5, 22.5, 27.5 and 32.5 degrees C respectively. Two separate peaks appeared during the SDA response at 17.5 degrees C, and it might be due to a rapid startup of the mechanical process with a lag of the biochemical process, which suggested that the peaks of "mechanical component" and "biochemical component" of SDA might be separated when temperature was low enough.

  2. An integrated approach for prospectively investigating a mode-of-action for rodent liver effects

    SciTech Connect

    LeBaron, Matthew J.; Geter, David R.; Rasoulpour, Reza J.; Gollapudi, B. Bhaskar; Thomas, Johnson; Murray, Jennifer; Kan, H. Lynn; Wood, Amanda J.; Elcombe, Cliff; Vardy, Audrey; McEwan, Jillian; Terry, Claire; Billington, Richard

    2013-07-15

    Registration of new plant protection products (e.g., herbicide, insecticide, or fungicide) requires comprehensive mammalian toxicity evaluation including carcinogenicity studies in two species. The outcome of the carcinogenicity testing has a significant bearing on the overall human health risk assessment of the substance and, consequently, approved uses for different crops across geographies. In order to understand the relevance of a specific tumor finding to human health, a systematic, transparent, and hypothesis-driven mode of action (MoA) investigation is, appropriately, an expectation by the regulatory agencies. Here, we describe a novel approach of prospectively generating the MoA data by implementing additional end points to the standard guideline toxicity studies with sulfoxaflor, a molecule in development. This proactive MoA approach results in a more robust integration of molecular with apical end points while minimizing animal use. Sulfoxaflor, a molecule targeting sap-feeding insects, induced liver effects (increased liver weight due to hepatocellular hypertrophy) in an initial palatability probe study for selecting doses for subsequent repeat-dose dietary studies. This finding triggered the inclusion of dose-response investigations of the potential key events for rodent liver carcinogenesis, concurrent with the hazard assessment studies. As predicted, sulfoxaflor induced liver tumors in rats and mice in the bioassays. The MoA data available by the time of the carcinogenicity finding supported the conclusion that the carcinogenic potential of sulfoxaflor was due to CAR/PXR nuclear receptor activation with subsequent hepatocellular proliferation. This MoA was not considered to be relevant to humans as sulfoxaflor is unlikely to induce hepatocellular proliferation in humans and therefore would not be a human liver carcinogen. - Highlights: • We prospectively generated MoA data into standard guideline toxicity studies. • A proactive MoA approach

  3. Effect of meal type on specific dynamic action in the green shore crab, Carcinus maenas.

    PubMed

    McGaw, Iain J; Penney, Chantelle M

    2014-05-01

    The effect of meal type on specific dynamic action was investigated in the green shore crab, Carcinus maenas. When the crabs were offered a meal of fish, shrimp, or mussel of 3 % of their body mass the duration of the SDA response and thus the resultant SDA was lower for the mussel, compared with the shrimp or fish meals. In feeding behaviour experiments the crabs consumed almost twice as much mussel compared with fish or shrimp. When the animals were allowed to feed on each meal until satiated, the differences in the SDA response were abolished. The mussel was much softer (compression test) than the fish or shrimp meal, and meal texture is known to affect the SDA response in amphibians and reptiles. When the crabs were offered a meal of homogenized fish muscle or whole fish muscle, the SDA for the homogenized meal was approximately 35 % lower. This suggested that a significant portion of the SDA budget in decapod crustaceans may be related to mechanical digestion. This is not unexpected since the foregut is supplied by over forty muscles which control the cutting and grinding movements of the gastric mill apparatus. There were slight, but significant differences in protein, lipid, moisture and total energy content of each meal type. Three prepared meals that were high in either protein, lipid or carbohydrate were offered to the crabs to determine if the nutrient content was also a contributing factor to the observed differences in the SDA. The crabs did not eat the prepared meals as readily as the natural food items and as they are messy feeders there was a large variation in the amount of food eaten. The lack of significant differences in the SDA response as a function of nutrient content was likely due to differences in amount of food eaten, which is a major factor determining the SDA response. The differences in SDA when consuming natural food items were likely due to a combination of the costs of mechanical digestion, variation in nutrient content and food

  4. Diosgenin, 4-Hydroxyisoleucine, and Fiber from Fenugreek: Mechanisms of Actions and Potential Effects on Metabolic Syndrome12

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, Scott; Stephens, Jacqueline M

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome and its complications continue to rise in prevalence and show no signs of abating in the immediate future. Therefore, the search for effective treatments is a high priority in biomedical research. Products derived from botanicals have a time-honored history of use in the treatment of metabolic diseases including type 2 diabetes. Trigonella foenum-graecum, commonly known as fenugreek, is an annual herbaceous plant that has been a staple of traditional herbal medicine in many cultures. Although fenugreek has been studied in both clinical and basic research settings, questions remain about its efficacy and biologic mechanisms of action. Diosgenin, 4-hydroxyisoleucine, and the fiber component of the plant are the most intensively studied bioactive constituents present in fenugreek. These compounds have been demonstrated to exert beneficial effects on several physiologic markers including glucose tolerance, inflammation, insulin action, liver function, blood lipids, and cardiovascular health. Although insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the favorable effects of fenugreek have been gained, we still do not have definitive evidence establishing its role as a therapeutic agent in metabolic disease. This review aims to summarize the currently available evidence on the physiologic effects of the 3 best-characterized bioactive compounds of fenugreek, with particular emphasis on biologic mechanisms of action relevant in the context of metabolic syndrome. PMID:25770257

  5. Effect of adjuvants on the action of local anesthetics in isolated rat sciatic nerves

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Eser; Gold, Michael S.; Hough, Karen A.; Gebhart, G.F.; Williams, Brian A.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives There is increasing clinical use of adjuvant drugs to prolong the duration of local anesthetic-induced block of peripheral nerves. However, the mechanistic understanding regarding drug interactions between these compounds in the periphery is quite limited. Accordingly, we undertook this study to determine whether selected adjuvants are efficacious in blocking action potential propagation in peripheral nerves at concentrations used clinically, and whether these drugs influence peripheral nerve block produced by local anesthetics. Methods Isolated rat sciatic nerves were used to assess (1) the efficacy of buprenorphine, clonidine, dexamethasone, or midazolam, alone and in combination, on action potential propagation; and (2) their influence on the blocking actions of local anesthetics ropivacaine and lidocaine. Compound action potentials (CAPs) from A- and C-fibers were studied before and after drug application. Results At estimated clinical concentrations, neither buprenorphine nor dexamethasone affected either A- or C-waves of the CAP. Clonidine produced a small, but significant attenuation of the C-wave amplitude. Midazolam attenuated both A- and C-wave amplitudes, but with greater potency on the C-wave. The combination of clonidine, buprenorphine, and dexamethasone had no influence on the potency or duration of local anesthetic- or midazolam-induced block of A-and C-waves of the CAP. Conclusions These results suggest that the reported clinical efficacy of clonidine, buprenorphine, and dexamethasone influence the actions of local anesthetics via indirect mechanisms. Further identification of these indirect mechanisms may enable the development of novel approaches to achieve longer duration, modality-specific peripheral nerve block. PMID:22430023

  6. From primed concepts to action: A meta-analysis of the behavioral effects of incidentally presented words.

    PubMed

    Weingarten, Evan; Chen, Qijia; McAdams, Maxwell; Yi, Jessica; Hepler, Justin; Albarracín, Dolores

    2016-05-01

    A meta-analysis assessed the behavioral impact of and psychological processes associated with presenting words connected to an action or a goal representation. The average and distribution of 352 effect sizes (analyzed using fixed-effects and random-effects models) was obtained from 133 studies (84 reports) in which word primes were incidentally presented to participants, with a nonopposite control group, before measuring a behavioral dependent variable. Findings revealed a small behavioral priming effect (dFE = 0.332, dRE = 0.352), which was robust across methodological procedures and only minimally biased by the publication of positive (vs. negative) results. Theory testing analyses indicated that more valued behavior or goal concepts (e.g., associated with important outcomes or values) were associated with stronger priming effects than were less valued behaviors. Furthermore, there was some evidence of persistence of goal effects over time. These results support the notion that goal activation contributes over and above perception-behavior in explaining priming effects. In summary, theorizing about the role of value and satisfaction in goal activation pointed to stronger effects of a behavior or goal concept on overt action. There was no evidence that expectancy (ease of achieving the goal) moderated priming effects. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26689090

  7. Exploration of Daphnia behavioral effect profiles induced by a broad range of toxicants with different modes of action.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Julie; Harscoët, Elodie; Keller, Merlin; Pandard, Pascal; Cachot, Jérôme; Grote, Matthias

    2015-08-01

    Behavior is increasingly reported as a sensitive and early indicator of toxicant stress in aquatic organisms. However, the systematic understanding of behavioral effects and comparisons between effect profiles is hampered because the available studies are limited to few chemicals and differ in the exposure conditions and effect parameters examined. The aims of the present study were 1) to explore behavioral responses of Daphnia magna exposed to different toxicants, 2) to compare behavioral effect profiles with regard to chemical modes of action, and 3) to determine the sensitivity and response time of behavioral parameters in a new multi-cell exposure system named Multi-DaphTrack compared with currently utilized tests. Twelve compounds covering different modes of toxic action were selected to sample a wide range of potential effect profiles. Acute standard immobilization tests and 48 h of behavioral tracking were performed in the customized Multi-DaphTrack system and a single-cell commercialized biological early warning system. Contrasting behavioral profiles were observed for average speed (i.e., intensity, time of effect onset, effect duration), but no distinct behavioral profiles could be drawn from the chemical mode of action. Most compounds tested in the Multi-DaphTrack system induced an early and significant average speed increase at concentrations near or below the 10% effective concentration (48 h) of the acute immobilization test, demonstrating that the Multi-DaphTrack system is fast and sensitive. To conclude, behavior endpoints could be used as an alternative or complement to the current acute standard test or chemical analysis for the predictive evaluation of ecotoxic effects of effluents or water bodies.

  8. Renormalized effective actions for the O(N) model at next-to-leading order of the 1/N expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Fejos, G.; Patkos, A.; Szep, Zs.

    2009-07-15

    A fully explicit renormalized quantum action functional is constructed for the O(N) model in the auxiliary field formulation at next-to-leading order (NLO) of the 1/N expansion. Counterterms are consistently and explicitly derived for arbitrary constant vacuum expectation value of the scalar and auxiliary fields. The renormalized NLO pion propagator is exact at this order and satisfies Goldstone's theorem. Elimination of the auxiliary field sector at the level of the functional provides with O(N{sup 0}) accuracy the renormalized effective action of the model in terms of the original variables. Alternative elimination of the pion and sigma propagators provides the renormalized NLO effective potential for the expectation values of the N vector and of the auxiliary field with the same accuracy.

  9. Human prosaccades and antisaccades under risk: effects of penalties and rewards on visual selection and the value of actions.

    PubMed

    Ross, M; Lanyon, L J; Viswanathan, J; Manoach, D S; Barton, J J S

    2011-11-24

    Monkey studies report greater activity in the lateral intraparietal area and more efficient saccades when targets coincide with the location of prior reward cues, even when cue location does not indicate which responses will be rewarded. This suggests that reward can modulate spatial attention and visual selection independent of the "action value" of the motor response. Our goal was first to determine whether reward modulated visual selection similarly in humans, and next, to discover whether reward and penalty differed in effect, if cue effects were greater for cognitively demanding antisaccades, and if financial consequences that were contingent on stimulus location had spatially selective effects. We found that motivational cues reduced all latencies, more for reward than penalty. There was an "inhibition-of-return"-like effect at the location of the cue, but unlike the results in monkeys, cue valence did not modify this effect in prosaccades, and the inhibition-of-return effect was slightly increased rather than decreased in antisaccades. When financial consequences were contingent on target location, locations without reward or penalty consequences lost the benefits seen in noncontingent trials, whereas locations with consequences maintained their gains. We conclude that unlike monkeys, humans show reward effects not on visual selection but on the value of actions. The human saccadic system has both the capacity to enhance responses to multiple locations simultaneously, and the flexibility to focus motivational enhancement only on locations with financial consequences. Reward is more effective than penalty, and both interact with the additional attentional demands of the antisaccade task.

  10. Computational modeling of inhibition of voltage-gated Ca channels: identification of different effects on uterine and cardiac action potentials

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Wing-Chiu; Ghouri, Iffath; Taggart, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The uterus and heart share the important physiological feature whereby contractile activation of the muscle tissue is regulated by the generation of periodic, spontaneous electrical action potentials (APs). Preterm birth arising from premature uterine contractions is a major complication of pregnancy and there remains a need to pursue avenues of research that facilitate the use of drugs, tocolytics, to limit these inappropriate contractions without deleterious actions on cardiac electrical excitation. A novel approach is to make use of mathematical models of uterine and cardiac APs, which incorporate many ionic currents contributing to the AP forms, and test the cell-specific responses to interventions. We have used three such models—of uterine smooth muscle cells (USMC), cardiac sinoatrial node cells (SAN), and ventricular cells—to investigate the relative effects of reducing two important voltage-gated Ca currents—the L-type (ICaL) and T-type (ICaT) Ca currents. Reduction of ICaL (10%) alone, or ICaT (40%) alone, blunted USMC APs with little effect on ventricular APs and only mild effects on SAN activity. Larger reductions in either current further attenuated the USMC APs but with also greater effects on SAN APs. Encouragingly, a combination of ICaL and ICaT reduction did blunt USMC APs as intended with little detriment to APs of either cardiac cell type. Subsequent overlapping maps of ICaL and ICaT inhibition profiles from each model revealed a range of combined reductions of ICaL and ICaT over which an appreciable diminution of USMC APs could be achieved with no deleterious action on cardiac SAN or ventricular APs. This novel approach illustrates the potential for computational biology to inform us of possible uterine and cardiac cell-specific mechanisms. Incorporating such computational approaches in future studies directed at designing new, or repurposing existing, tocolytics will be beneficial for establishing a desired uterine specificity of action

  11. The mass-action law based algorithm for cost-effective approach for cancer drug discovery and development.

    PubMed

    Chou, Ting-Chao

    2011-01-01

    The mass-action law based system analysis via mathematical induction and deduction lead to the generalized theory and algorithm that allows computerized simulation of dose-effect dynamics with small size experiments using a small number of data points in vitro, in animals, and in humans. The median-effect equation of the mass-action law deduced from over 300 mechanism specific-equations has been shown to be the unified theory that serves as the common-link for complicated biomedical systems. After using the median-effect principle as the common denominator, its applications are mechanism-independent, drug unit-independent, and dynamic order-independent; and can be used generally for single drug analysis or for multiple drug combinations in constant-ratio or non-constant ratios. Since the "median" is the common link and universal reference point in biological systems, these general enabling lead to computerized quantitative bio-informatics for econo-green bio-research in broad disciplines. Specific applications of the theory, especially relevant to drug discovery, drug combination, and clinical trials, have been cited or illustrated in terms of algorithms, experimental design and computerized simulation for data analysis. Lessons learned from cancer research during the past fifty years provide a valuable opportunity to reflect, and to improve the conventional divergent approach and to introduce a new convergent avenue, based on the mass-action law principle, for the efficient cancer drug discovery and the low-cost drug development.

  12. Prevention effects of ND-07, a novel drug candidate with a potent antioxidative action and anti-inflammatory action, in animal models of severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Hwan; An, Chun San; Yun, Bok Sun; Kang, Kum Suk; Lee, Young Ae; Won, Sun Mi; Gwag, Byoung Joo; Cho, Sung Ig; Hahm, Ki-Baik

    2012-07-15

    Oxidative stress and inflammation both play major roles in the development of the acute pancreatitis. Currently, a pancreatic enzyme inhibitor with limited efficacy is only clinically available in a few countries, and antioxidants or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) provide only partial tissue protection in acute pancreatitis animal models. Here, we introduce a new drug candidate for treating acute pancreatitis named ND-07 [chemical name: 2-acetoxy-5-(2-4-(trifluoromethyl)-phenethylamino)-benzoic acid] that exhibits both potent antioxidative and anti-inflammatory activities. In an electron spin resonance (ESR) study, ND-07 almost blocked hydroxyl radical generation as low as 0.05 μM and significantly suppressed DNA oxidation and cell death in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated pancreatic cell line. In a cerulein plus LPS-induced acute pancreatitis model, ND-07 pretreatment showed significant tissue protective effects, with reductions of serum amylase and lipase levels and pancreatic wet weights. ND-07 not only diminished the plasma levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide but also significantly decreased prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) and expression of tumor necrotizing factor-alpha (TNF-α) in the pancreatic tissue. In a severe acute necrotizing pancreatitis model induced by a choline deficient, ethionine-supplemented (CDE) diet, ND-07 dramatically protected the mortality even without any death, providing attenuation of pancreas, lung, and liver damages as well as the reductions in serum levels of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), amylase and lipase, MDA levels in the plasma and pancreatic tissues, plasma levels of TNF-α, and interleukin-1 (IL-1β). These findings suggest that current dual synergistic action mechanisms of ND-07 might provide a superior protection for acute pancreatitis than conventional drug treatments. PMID:22575522

  13. Kinetics of drug action in disease states. XLIII: Potentiating effect of L-tryptophan on the hypnotic action of phenobarbital and ethanol in rats.

    PubMed

    Wilson, T C; Levy, G

    1994-10-01

    The essential amino acid L-tryptophan has been widely used as a sleeping aid because it can produce drowsiness and decrease sleep latency. Its concentrations in plasma and brain and its binding to plasma protein are markedly altered in hepatic encephalopathy and renal failure. The purpose of this investigation was to determine if L-tryptophan can enhance the sensitivity of the central nervous system to the hypnotic actions of a barbiturate and an alcohol. Female rats weighing approximately 200 g received an intravenous infusion of L-tryptophan (0.8 or 0.08 mg/min) for 30 min and then an infusion of phenobarbital (0.824 mg/min) with L-tryptophan (0.8 or 0.08 mg min-1) until the onset of loss of righting reflex (LRR). Control animals received an infusion of saline solution for 30 min and then phenobarbital without the amino acid. Similar experiments were performed with ethanol (16.3 mg/min), with and without L-tryptophan (0.8 mg/min). L-Tryptophan infused alone at a rate of 3.8 mg/min for 84 min did not cause LRR. Administration of L-tryptophan at a rate of 0.8 mg/min with phenobarbital was associated with statistically significant reductions in the total dose and concentrations of phenobarbital in serum, serum water, brain, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) at onset of LRR. The 0.08 mg/min infusion of L-tryptophan had a less pronounced effect, with statistically significant reductions of phenobarbital concentrations at onset of LRR in brain and CSF. L-Tryptophan also significantly reduced the total dose and the concentrations of ethanol in serum, brain, and CSF required to produce LRR.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Nutridynamics: mechanism(s) of action of bioactive compounds and their effects.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Jose C E; Jove, Mariona; Gonzalo, Hugo; Pamplona, Reinald; Portero-Otin, Manuel

    2015-07-01

    Mechanism of action of bioactive compounds may be multiple, especially in the food matrix. Therefore, the interplay between these compounds and hosts' physiology, and the consequences of its continuous intake should be considered. In analogy with pharmacodynamics, the bioactive compounds should have both defined targets and mechanisms of action. However, several essential differences arise when considering the heterogeneous nature of the food matrix, the multiplicity of mechanisms and the variety of responses. In order to ascertain a potential mechanism of activity, one should consider both the intended use of the food, the biomarker that will support this claim and previous evidences, examined from current information sources. Once these have been examined, several experimental strategies should be considered, ranging from the choice of preclinical or experimental model, the use of samples from pilot interventional studies and the application of system's biology derived techniques, such as transcriptomics or metabolomics.

  15. Multi-Scale Action Effectiveness Research in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Gary E.; Sather, Nichole K.; Storch, Adam; Johnson, Jeff; Skalski, J. R.; Teel, D. J.; Brewer, Taylor; Bryson, Amanda J.; Dawley, Earl M.; Kuligowski, D. R.; Whitesel, T.; Mallette, Christine

    2013-11-30

    The study reported herein was conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE) by researchers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), University of Washington (UW), and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). The goal of the study was to evaluate the ecological benefits of restoration actions for juvenile salmon in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE; rkm 0–234).

  16. Joint Action of a Pair of Rowers in a Race: Shared Experiences of Effectiveness Are Shaped by Interpersonal Mechanical States.

    PubMed

    R'Kiouak, Mehdi; Saury, Jacques; Durand, Marc; Bourbousson, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand how a single pair of expert individual rowers experienced their crew functioning in natural conditions when asked to practice a joint movement for the first time. To fulfill this objective, we conducted a field study of interpersonal coordination that combined phenomenological and mechanical data from a coxless pair activity, to analyze the dynamics of the (inter)subjective experience compared with the dynamics of the team coordination. Using an enactivist approach to social couplings, these heterogeneous data were combined to explore the salience (and accuracy) of individuals' shared experiences of their joint action. First, we determined how each rower experienced the continuous crew functioning states (e.g., feelings of the boat's glide). Second, the phenomenological data helped us to build several categories of oar strokes (i.e., cycles), experienced by the rowers as either detrimentally or effectively performed strokes. Third, the mechanical signatures that correlated with each phenomenological category were tracked at various level of organization (i.e., individual-, interpersonal-, and boat-levels). The results indicated that (a) the two rowers did not pay attention to their joint action during most of the cycles, (b) some cycles were simultaneously lived as a salient, meaningful experience of either a detrimental (n = 15 cycles) or an effective (n = 18 cycles) joint action, and (c) the mechanical signatures diverged across the delineated phenomenological categories, suggesting that the way in which the cycles were experienced emerged from the variance in some mechanical parameters (i.e., differences in peak force level and mean force). Notably, the mechanical measures that helped to explain differences within the phenomenological categories were found at the interpersonal level of analysis, thus suggesting an intentional inter-personal mode of regulation of their joint action. This result is further challenged and

  17. The effect of action video game experience on task-switching

    PubMed Central

    Green, C.Shawn; Sugarman, Michael A.; Medford, Katherine; Klobusicky, Elizabeth; Daphne Bavelier

    2012-01-01

    There is now a substantial body of work demonstrating that action video game experience results in enhancements in a wide variety of perceptual skills. More recently, several groups have also demonstrated improvements in abilities that are more cognitive in nature, in particular, the ability to efficiently switch between tasks. In a series of four experiments, we add to this body of work, demonstrating that the action video game player advantage is not exclusively due to an ability to map manual responses onto arbitrary buttons, but rather generalizes to vocal responses, is not restricted to tasks that are perceptual in nature (e.g. respond to a physical dimension of the stimulus such as its color), but generalizes to more cognitive tasks (e.g. is a number odd or even), and is present whether the switch requires a goal-switch or only a motor switch. Finally, a training study establishes that the relationship between the reduction in switch cost and action game playing is causal. PMID:22393270

  18. Effect of ethylene action inhibitors upon wound-induced gene expression in tomato pericarp

    SciTech Connect

    Henstrand, J.M.; Handa, A.K. )

    1989-09-01

    The contribution of wound-ethylene to wound-induced gene expression was investigated in unripe tomato pericarp using inhibitors of ethylene action. Wounded unripe tomato pericarp was treated with 2,5-norbornadiene or silver thiosulfate to inhibit specifically the induction of ethylene-dependent mRNA species. Poly(A){sup +} RNAs isolated from these tissues after 12 hours of wounding were translated in vitro in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate system and ({sup 35}S)methionine-labeled polypeptides were compared to unwounded controls after separation by one and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Results show that mechanical wounding induces a dramatic shift in gene expression (over 50 mRNA species) but expression of less than 15% of these genes is affected by the treatment with ethylene action inhibitors. A selective decrease in mRNAs coding for a 37 kilodalton doublet and 75 kilodalton polypeptides is observed in 2,5-norbornadiene and silver thiosulfate treated wounded pericarp. Levels of hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein mRNAs induced in wounded tissue were not influenced by inhibitors of ethylene action.

  19. Effectiveness of vocational problem-solving skills on motivation and job-seeking action steps.

    PubMed

    Coviello, Donna M; Zanis, David A; Lynch, Kevin

    2004-01-01

    Most research on employment interventions focuses on job acquisition as the sole outcome measure, despite the fact that there are many intermediate steps to obtaining work. This article examines the impact of a vocational problem solving skills (VPSS) intervention to increase motivation and action step activities that lead to employment. Over a 1-year period between 1995 and 1996, a sample of 109 methadone maintained treatment clients were randomly assigned to either a 10-session vocational problem solving intervention (N= 62) or a time and attention control condition (N=47). The Addiction Severity Index (ASI) and a Vocational Motivational Assessment Checklist (VMAC) were administered upon enrollment in the study and at 6 months postbaseline. The VMAC was completed on a biweekly basis over the 12-week intervention period. The VMAC measures both the behavioral actions to obtain employment (e.g., reading want ads, completing job applications) and client perceived motivation to obtain a job. There were no differences by condition in the level of motivation to secure employment and the number of job seeking activities during the intervention period. However, motivation to work and number of action steps did predict obtaining employment for the sample as a whole at the 6-month follow-up. Although the intervention did not increase motivation and job seeking activities, information regarding reasonable outcomes for this population of chronically unemployed persons was identified. Also, practical and methodological implications are discussed.

  20. Transforming Conflict into Effective Action: A Case Study on the Effects of Anthropogenic Sound on Marine Mammals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewandowski, Jill K.

    Like many wicked environmental problems of our time, marine sound and its potential effects on marine mammals is characterized by high levels of scientific uncertainty, diversified values across many stakeholder groups, political and regulatory complexities, and a continually evolving ecological and social environment. Further, the history of conflict and the relationships between major actors has rooted the issue firmly in identity conflict where prejudices lead to avoidance of working together. What results is continuing controversy, failed management decisions, litigation and an increasing frustration by all parties on why a better solution cannot be found. Ultimately, the intractability of the issue is not about the science, nor will the science ever tame the issue on its own. Rather, the issue is intractable because of the conflict between people about the most appropriate path forward. It is then imperative to understand, address, and transform this conflict in order to move off the decision carousel toward improved conservation outcomes and sustainable decisions for all. This research used an explanatory case study approach to quantitatively and qualitatively investigate the context and reasoning underlying conflict on this issue. Three methods were used in order to triangulate the data, and thus add rigor, including: (1) a document review of 230 publications: (2) exploratory interviews with 10 collaborative action experts and semi-structured interviews with 58 marine mammals and sound stakeholders; and (3) participant review of selected analyses. Data elucidate how different stakeholder groups define the problem and potential solutions, how they see their role and view the role of other stakeholders, specific experiences that increased or decrease conflict, and design preferences for a collaborative effort. These data are combined with conflict transformation principles to provide recommendations for a collaborative, transformative framework designed to

  1. The disembodiment effect of negation: negating action-related sentences attenuates their interference on congruent upper limb movements.

    PubMed

    Bartoli, Eleonora; Tettamanti, Andrea; Farronato, Paolo; Caporizzo, Armanda; Moro, Andrea; Gatti, Roberto; Perani, Daniela; Tettamanti, Marco

    2013-04-01

    Human languages can express opposite propositions by means of the negative operator "not," which turns affirmative sentences into negative ones. Psycholinguistic research has indicated that negative meanings are formed by transiently reducing the access to mental representations of negated conceptual information. Neuroimaging studies have corroborated these findings, showing reduced activation of concept-specific embodied neural systems by negative versus affirmative sentences. This "disembodiment effect" of sentential negation should have two distinct consequences: first, the embodied systems should be computationally more free to support concurrent tasks when processing negative than affirmative sentences; second, the computational interference should only be reduced when there is a strict semantic congruency between the negated concept and the referent targeted by concurrent tasks. We tested these two predictions in two complementary experiments involving the comprehension of action-related sentences and kinematic measurements of its effects on concurrent, congruent actions. Sentences referred to actions involving either proximal or distal arm musculature. In experiment 1, requiring a proximal arm movement, we found interference reduction for negative proximal sentences. In experiment 2, requiring a distal arm movement, we found interference reduction for negative distal sentences. This dissociation provides the first conclusive evidence in support of a disembodiment theory of negation. We conclude that the computational cost resulting from the insertion of an additional lexical item ("not") in negative sentences is compensated by solely storing a concept in affirmative form in semantic memory, since its negative counterpart can be produced by transiently reducing the access to such stored semantic information. PMID:23307950

  2. Blood pressure-lowering effect and duration of action of bedtime administration of doxazosin determined by home blood pressure measurement.

    PubMed

    Gonokami, Kenta; Obara, Taku; Kobayashi, Mitsuru; Katada, Sakiko; Hara, Azusa; Metoki, Hirohito; Asayama, Kei; Kikuya, Masahiro; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Imai, Yutaka

    2010-01-01

    The effects and duration of action of bedtime administration of doxazosin 2 mg for 4 weeks on uncontrolled morning home hypertension were investigated. Morning home blood pressure (HBP) was significantly lowered by bedtime administration of doxazosin. Doxazosin significantly lowered evening HBP only in the subgroup of patients with an uncontrolled evening HBP. The evening (E)/morning (M) ratio was greater in patients with an uncontrolled evening HBP than in those with a controlled evening HBP. The results suggest that bedtime administration of doxazosin effectively suppresses morning HBP in uncontrolled morning hypertensives and lowers evening HBP in uncontrolled evening hypertensives.

  3. Religion and action control: Faith-specific modulation of the Simon effect but not Stop-Signal performance.

    PubMed

    Hommel, Bernhard; Colzato, Lorenza S; Scorolli, Claudia; Borghi, Anna M; van den Wildenberg, Wery P M

    2011-08-01

    Previous findings suggest that religion has a specific impact on attentional processes. Here we show that religion also affects action control. Experiment 1 compared Dutch Calvinists and Dutch atheists, matched for age, sex, intelligence, education, and cultural and socio-economic background, and Experiment 2 compared Italian Catholics with matched Italian seculars. As expected, Calvinists showed a smaller and Catholics a larger Simon effect than nonbelievers, while performance of the groups was comparable in the Stop-Signal task. This pattern suggests that religions emphasizing individualism or collectivism affects action control in specific ways, presumably by inducing chronic biases towards a more "exclusive" or "inclusive" style of decision-making. Interestingly, there was no evidence that religious practice affects inhibitory skills.

  4. The effect of intervention based on Health Action Model to promote workers’ safe behavior in Isfahan Steel Company

    PubMed Central

    Mazaheri, Maryam Amidi; Heidarnia, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Background: The worldwide concern for safety has created the need for new and effective methods to improve safety in the workplace. This study was designed to determine the effect of educational intervention based on Health Action Model on the safe behavior among workers in Isfahan Steel Company. Materials and Methods: This study was designed as a quasi-experimental research with experimental and control groups with pre- and post- intervention measurements. The experimental group received intervention based on the Health Action Model. The control group did not receive any intervention except that they participated in the current safety courses of the company. The sample size was 270 workers who were randomly selected and divided into two groups: Experimental (n = 135) and control (n = 135). Data were collected using a questionnaire and a checklist after and before the intervention and were analyzed. Based on the distribution of variables, parametric (t-test, paired t-test) or nonparametric (Chi-square, Wilcoxon) tests were utilized to analyze data. P value less than 0.05 was considered significant. Results: The results indicated that before intervention, the experimental and control groups were similar in model structures. After intervention, the mean scores of knowledge, attitude, and behaviors in relation to safety in the experimental group increased statistically significantly and the observed difference in the control group was not significant. The results also indicated that unsafe behaviors in the experimental group decreased following the educational intervention. This difference also was not statistically significant in the control group. Conclusion: The results showed that application of Health Action Model has an acceptable and positive influence on promoting safe behaviors, knowledge, normative system, and facilitating factors among workers in Isfahan Steel Company. It is, therefore, recommended that Health Action Model based intervention be used for

  5. Reflecting on mirror mechanisms: motor resonance effects during action observation only present with low-intensity transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Loporto, Michela; Holmes, Paul S; Wright, David J; McAllister, Craig J

    2013-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) studies indicate that the observation of other people's actions influences the excitability of the observer's motor system. Motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitudes typically increase in muscles which would be active during the execution of the observed action. This 'motor resonance' effect is thought to result from activity in mirror neuron regions, which enhance the excitability of the primary motor cortex (M1) via cortico-cortical pathways. The importance of TMS intensity has not yet been recognised in this area of research. Low-intensity TMS predominately activates corticospinal neurons indirectly, whereas high-intensity TMS can directly activate corticospinal axons. This indicates that motor resonance effects should be more prominent when using low-intensity TMS. A related issue is that TMS is typically applied over a single optimal scalp position (OSP) to simultaneously elicit MEPs from several muscles. Whether this confounds results, due to differences in the manner that TMS activates spatially separate cortical representations, has not yet been explored. In the current study, MEP amplitudes, resulting from single-pulse TMS applied over M1, were recorded from the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) and abductor digiti minimi (ADM) muscles during the observation of simple finger abductions. We tested if the TMS intensity (110% vs. 130% resting motor threshold) or stimulating position (FDI-OSP vs. ADM-OSP) influenced the magnitude of the motor resonance effects. Results showed that the MEP facilitation recorded in the FDI muscle during the observation of index-finger abductions was only detected using low-intensity TMS. In contrast, changes in the OSP had a negligible effect on the presence of motor resonance effects in either the FDI or ADM muscles. These findings support the hypothesis that MN activity enhances M1 excitability via cortico-cortical pathways and highlight a methodological framework by which the neural

  6. Dynamical speckles patterns of action potential transmission effects in squid giant axon membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llovera-González, Juan J.; Moreno-Yeras, Alfredo B.; Muramatsu, Mikiya; Soga, Diogo; Serra-Toledo, Rolando L.; Magalhães, Daniel S. F.

    2013-11-01

    Undoubtedly the most important result of the investigations in physiology and biophysics was the discovery of the electrochemical mechanism of propagation of the action potential in nerves that was made by Hodgkin and Huxley during the first half of the past century. Since some decades ago diverse experiments about the electro optical properties of the axon membrane there was published using the most diverse optical experimental procedures6-10. In this paper some results of a dynamical speckle technique applied for obtaining microscopic images of a section of a squid giant axon membrane during the activation by electrical impulses and his digital process are presented.

  7. A systematic review of the serotonergic effects of mirtazapine in humans: implications for its dual action status.

    PubMed

    Gillman, P Ken

    2006-03-01

    A systematic review of published work concerning mirtazapine was undertaken to assess possible evidence of serotonergic effects or serotonin toxicity (ST) in humans, because drug toxicity and interaction data from human over-doses is an useful source of information about the nature and potency of drug effects. There is a paucity of evidence for mirtazapine having effects on any indicator of serotonin elevation, which leads to an emphasis on ST as an important line of evidence. Mirtazapine is compared with its analogue mianserin, and other serotonergic drugs. Although mirtazapine is referred to as a dual-action 'noradrenergic and specific serotonergic drug' (NaSSA) little evidence to support that idea exists, except from initial microdialysis studies in animals showing small effects; those have not subsequently been replicated or substantiated by independent researchers. Also, new data indicate its affinity for Alpha 2 adrenoceptors is not different to mianserin. It appears to exhibit no serotonergic symptoms or toxicity in over-dose by itself, nor is there evidence that it precipitates ST in combination with monoamine oxidase inhibitors, as would be expected if it raises intra-synaptic serotonin levels. Mirtazapine has no demonstrable serotonergic effects in humans and there is insufficient evidence to designate it as a dual-action drug. PMID:16342227

  8. Effect of low-frequency electrical stimulation parameters on its anticonvulsant action during rapid perforant path kindling in rat.

    PubMed

    Shahpari, Marzieh; Mirnajafi-Zadeh, Javad; Firoozabadi, Seyed Mohammad P; Yadollahpour, Ali

    2012-03-01

    Low frequency stimulation (LFS) may be considered as a new potential therapy for drug-resistant epilepsy. However, the relation between LFS parameters and its anticonvulsant effects is not completely determined. In this study, the effect of some LFS parameters on its anticonvulsant action was investigated in rats. In all animals, stimulating and recording electrodes were implanted into the perforant path and dentate gyrus, respectively. In one group of animals, kindling stimulations were applied until rats achieved a fully kindled state. In other groups, different patterns of LFS were applied at the end of kindling stimulations during twenty consecutive days. In the first experiment the effect of LFS pulse numbers was investigated on its anticonvulsant action. Animals were divided randomly into three groups and 1, 4, and 8 packages of LFS (each pack contains 200 pulses, 0.1 ms pulse duration at 1 Hz) were applied five minutes after termination of kindling stimulations. Obtained results showed that 4 packages of LFS had the strongest anticonvulsant effects. Therefore, this pattern (4 packages) was used in the next experiment. In the second experiment, 4 packages of LFS were applied at intervals of 30 s and 30 min after termination of kindling stimulations. The strongest anticonvulsant effect was observed in the group received LFS at the interval of 30 s. Therefore, this pattern was selected for the third experiment. In the third experiment the effect of LFS at frequencies of 0.25 Hz and 5 Hz was investigated. The group of animals which received LFS at the frequency of 0.25 Hz showed somehow stronger anticonvulsant effect. The results indicate that different parameters of LFS have important role in induction of LFS anticonvulsant effects. Regarding this view, it seems that the slower LFS frequency and the shorter interval between LFS and kindling stimulations, the stronger anticonvulsant effect will be observed. But there is no direct relation between number of

  9. Action physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGinness, Lachlan P.; Savage, C. M.

    2016-09-01

    More than a decade ago, Edwin Taylor issued a "call to action" that presented the case for basing introductory university mechanics teaching around the principle of stationary action [E. F. Taylor, Am. J. Phys. 71, 423-425 (2003)]. We report on our response to that call in the form of an investigation of the teaching and learning of the stationary action formulation of physics in a first-year university course. Our action physics instruction proceeded from the many-paths approach to quantum physics to ray optics, classical mechanics, and relativity. Despite the challenges presented by action physics, students reported it to be accessible, interesting, motivational, and valuable.

  10. Joint Action of a Pair of Rowers in a Race: Shared Experiences of Effectiveness Are Shaped by Interpersonal Mechanical States

    PubMed Central

    R’Kiouak, Mehdi; Saury, Jacques; Durand, Marc; Bourbousson, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand how a single pair of expert individual rowers experienced their crew functioning in natural conditions when asked to practice a joint movement for the first time. To fulfill this objective, we conducted a field study of interpersonal coordination that combined phenomenological and mechanical data from a coxless pair activity, to analyze the dynamics of the (inter)subjective experience compared with the dynamics of the team coordination. Using an enactivist approach to social couplings, these heterogeneous data were combined to explore the salience (and accuracy) of individuals’ shared experiences of their joint action. First, we determined how each rower experienced the continuous crew functioning states (e.g., feelings of the boat’s glide). Second, the phenomenological data helped us to build several categories of oar strokes (i.e., cycles), experienced by the rowers as either detrimentally or effectively performed strokes. Third, the mechanical signatures that correlated with each phenomenological category were tracked at various level of organization (i.e., individual-, interpersonal-, and boat-levels). The results indicated that (a) the two rowers did not pay attention to their joint action during most of the cycles, (b) some cycles were simultaneously lived as a salient, meaningful experience of either a detrimental (n = 15 cycles) or an effective (n = 18 cycles) joint action, and (c) the mechanical signatures diverged across the delineated phenomenological categories, suggesting that the way in which the cycles were experienced emerged from the variance in some mechanical parameters (i.e., differences in peak force level and mean force). Notably, the mechanical measures that helped to explain differences within the phenomenological categories were found at the interpersonal level of analysis, thus suggesting an intentional inter-personal mode of regulation of their joint action. This result is further challenged

  11. Exploring perception-action relations in music production: The asymmetric effect of tonal class.

    PubMed

    Jebb, Andrew T; Pfordresher, Peter Q

    2016-05-01

    When playing musical passages, performers integrate the pitch content of auditory feedback with current action plans. However, this process depends on the degree to which the musical structure of the feedback melody is perceived as similar to the structure of what is planned. Four experiments reported here explored the relationship between the tonal class of planned melodies (tonal or atonal) and the sequence of events formed by auditory feedback. Participants produced short melodies from memory that were either tonal (Experiments 1 and 3) or atonal (Experiments 2 and 4). Auditory feedback matched the planned melody with respect to contour but could vary in tonal class. The results showed that when participants planned a tonal melody, atonal feedback was treated as unrelated to the planned sequence. However, when planning an atonal melody, tonal feedback was still treated as similar to the planned sequence. This asymmetric similarity mirrors findings found within the music perception literature and implies that schematic musical knowledge is highly active in determining perception-action relations during music performance. PMID:26594878

  12. Deleterious effects of lard-enriched diet on tissues fatty acids composition and hypothalamic insulin actions.

    PubMed

    Dornellas, A P S; Watanabe, R L H; Pimentel, G D; Boldarine, V T; Nascimento, C M O; Oyama, L M; Ghebremeskel, K; Wang, Y; Bueno, A A; Ribeiro, E B

    2015-12-01

    Altered tissue fatty acid (FA) composition may affect mechanisms involved in the control of energy homeostasis, including central insulin actions. In rats fed either standard chow or a lard-enriched chow (high in saturated/low in polyunsaturated FA, HS-LP) for eight weeks, we examined the FA composition of blood, hypothalamus, liver, and retroperitoneal, epididymal and mesenteric adipose tissues. Insulin-induced hypophagia and hypothalamic signaling were evaluated after intracerebroventricular insulin injection. HS-LP feeding increased saturated FA content in adipose tissues and serum while it decreased polyunsaturated FA content of adipose tissues, serum, and liver. Hypothalamic C20:5n-3 and C20:3n-6 contents increased while monounsaturated FA content decreased. HS-LP rats showed hyperglycemia, impaired insulin-induced hypophagia and hypothalamic insulin signaling. The results showed that, upon HS-LP feeding, peripheral tissues underwent potentially deleterious alterations in their FA composition, whist the hypothalamus was relatively preserved. However, hypothalamic insulin signaling and hypophagia were drastically impaired. These findings suggest that impairment of hypothalamic insulin actions by HS-LP feeding was not related to tissue FA composition. PMID:26525379

  13. Effects of bath resistance on action potentials in the squid giant axon: myocardial implications.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, J; Wikswo, J P

    1997-01-01

    This study presents a simplified version of the quasi-one-dimensional theory (Wu, J., E. A. Johnson, and J. M. Kootsey. 1996. A quasi-one-dimensional theory for anisotropic propagation of excitation in cardiac muscle. Biophys. J. 71:2427-2439) with two components of the extracellular current, along and perpendicular to the axis, and a simulation and its experimental confirmation for the giant axon of the squid. By extending the one-dimensional core conductor cable equations, this theory predicts, as confirmed by the experiment, that the shapes of the intracellular and the extracellular action potentials are related to the resistance of the bath. Such a result was previously only expected by the field theories. The correlation between the shapes of the intracellular and the extracellular potentials of the giant axon of the squid resembles that observed during the anisotropic propagation of excitation in cardiac muscle. Therefore, this study not only develops a quasi-one-dimensional theory for a squid axon, but also provides one possible factor contributing to the anisotropic propagation of action potentials in cardiac muscle. PMID:9370430

  14. Effects of bath resistance on action potentials in the squid giant axon: myocardial implications.

    PubMed

    Wu, J; Wikswo, J P

    1997-11-01

    This study presents a simplified version of the quasi-one-dimensional theory (Wu, J., E. A. Johnson, and J. M. Kootsey. 1996. A quasi-one-dimensional theory for anisotropic propagation of excitation in cardiac muscle. Biophys. J. 71:2427-2439) with two components of the extracellular current, along and perpendicular to the axis, and a simulation and its experimental confirmation for the giant axon of the squid. By extending the one-dimensional core conductor cable equations, this theory predicts, as confirmed by the experiment, that the shapes of the intracellular and the extracellular action potentials are related to the resistance of the bath. Such a result was previously only expected by the field theories. The correlation between the shapes of the intracellular and the extracellular potentials of the giant axon of the squid resembles that observed during the anisotropic propagation of excitation in cardiac muscle. Therefore, this study not only develops a quasi-one-dimensional theory for a squid axon, but also provides one possible factor contributing to the anisotropic propagation of action potentials in cardiac muscle.

  15. Action and object processing in aphasia: from nouns and verbs to the effect of manipulability.

    PubMed

    Arévalo, A; Perani, D; Cappa, S F; Butler, A; Bates, E; Dronkers, N

    2007-01-01

    The processing of words and pictures representing actions and objects was tested in 21 aphasic patients and 20 healthy controls across three word production tasks: picture-naming (PN), single word reading (WR) and word repetition (WRP). Analysis 1 targeted task and lexical category (noun-verb), revealing worse performance on PN and verb items for both patients and control participants. For Analysis 2 we used data collected in a concurrent gesture norming study to re-categorize the noun-verb items along hand imagery parameters (i.e., objects that can/cannot be manipulated and actions which do/do not involve fine hand movements). Here, patients displayed relative difficulty with the 'manipulable' items, while controls displayed the opposite pattern. Therefore, whereas the noun-verb distinction resulted simply in lower verb accuracy across groups, the 'manipulability' distinction revealed a 'double-dissociation' between patients and control participants. These results carry implications for theories of embodiment, lexico-semantic dissociations, and the organization of meaning in the brain. PMID:16949143

  16. Exploring perception-action relations in music production: The asymmetric effect of tonal class.

    PubMed

    Jebb, Andrew T; Pfordresher, Peter Q

    2016-05-01

    When playing musical passages, performers integrate the pitch content of auditory feedback with current action plans. However, this process depends on the degree to which the musical structure of the feedback melody is perceived as similar to the structure of what is planned. Four experiments reported here explored the relationship between the tonal class of planned melodies (tonal or atonal) and the sequence of events formed by auditory feedback. Participants produced short melodies from memory that were either tonal (Experiments 1 and 3) or atonal (Experiments 2 and 4). Auditory feedback matched the planned melody with respect to contour but could vary in tonal class. The results showed that when participants planned a tonal melody, atonal feedback was treated as unrelated to the planned sequence. However, when planning an atonal melody, tonal feedback was still treated as similar to the planned sequence. This asymmetric similarity mirrors findings found within the music perception literature and implies that schematic musical knowledge is highly active in determining perception-action relations during music performance.

  17. Action Effects and Task Knowledge: The Influence of Anticipatory Priming on the Identification of Task-Related Stimuli in Experts.

    PubMed

    Land, William M

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the extent to which anticipation of an action's perceptual effect primes identification of task-related stimuli. Specifically, skilled (n = 16) and novice (n = 24) tennis players performed a choice-reaction time (CRT) test in which they identified whether the presented stimulus was a picture of a baseball bat or tennis racket. Following their response, auditory feedback associated with either baseball or tennis was presented. The CRT test was performed in blocks in which participants predictably received the baseball sound or tennis sound irrespective of which stimulus picture was displayed. Results indicated that skilled tennis players responded quicker to tennis stimuli when the response was predictably followed by the tennis auditory effect compared to the baseball auditory effect. These findings imply that, within an individual's area of expertise, domain-relevant knowledge is primed by anticipation of an action's perceptual effect, thus allowing the cognitive system to more quickly identify environmental information. This finding provides a more complete picture of the influence that anticipation can have on the cognitive-motor system. No differences existed for novices.

  18. Action Effects and Task Knowledge: The Influence of Anticipatory Priming on the Identification of Task-Related Stimuli in Experts.

    PubMed

    Land, William M

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the extent to which anticipation of an action's perceptual effect primes identification of task-related stimuli. Specifically, skilled (n = 16) and novice (n = 24) tennis players performed a choice-reaction time (CRT) test in which they identified whether the presented stimulus was a picture of a baseball bat or tennis racket. Following their response, auditory feedback associated with either baseball or tennis was presented. The CRT test was performed in blocks in which participants predictably received the baseball sound or tennis sound irrespective of which stimulus picture was displayed. Results indicated that skilled tennis players responded quicker to tennis stimuli when the response was predictably followed by the tennis auditory effect compared to the baseball auditory effect. These findings imply that, within an individual's area of expertise, domain-relevant knowledge is primed by anticipation of an action's perceptual effect, thus allowing the cognitive system to more quickly identify environmental information. This finding provides a more complete picture of the influence that anticipation can have on the cognitive-motor system. No differences existed for novices. PMID:27272987

  19. Effects of the imidazobenzodiazepine R015-4513 on the stimulant and depressant actions of ethanol on spontaneous locomotor activity

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, H.C.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the imidazobenzodiazepine R015-4513, a partial inverse agonist at benzodiazepine (BDZ) receptors, on the stimulant and depressant actions of ethanol in mice. For comparative purposes, another BDZ inverse agonist, FG-7142, was examined as well. Neither R015-4513 nor FG-7142 influenced the low-dose excitatory effects of ethanol on spontaneous locomotor activity. However, both R015-4513 and FG-7142 significantly antagonized the depressant effects of ethanol, and this antagonism was completely reversed by pretreatment with the BDZ receptor antagonist, R015-1788. These data suggest that R015-4513 is capable of antagonizing only some of the behavioral effects of ethanol, and in particular, those responses to ethanol that are mediated by modulation of the GABA/BDZ-chloride channel receptor complex.

  20. [Effects of sulfomethylation on the mechanism of action of colimycin towards "Escherichia coli" B (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Cornu, J

    1980-01-01

    Colimycin is sulfomethylated in order to inactivate it temporarily in vivo. In vitro, this process may have unexpected results because the experiment is carried out within a closed system. The time required to activate the antibiotic varies according to incubation conditions. The freed sulfomethyl groups are probably eliminated in vivo. In vitro, these residues may interact with the outer membrane of Escherichia coli B which is charged with badly positioned molecules of colimycin, thus creating a barrier for the active molecules. As the expected mechanism of polymyxin B or E action include first electrostatic interactions, it is not surprising that a modification of the ionic balance of the medium should be of such importance. PMID:6257156