Science.gov

Sample records for 2q b2y 2q

  1. Deletion (2)(q37)

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, R.F.; Tolworthy, J.A.; Young, R.S.

    1994-06-01

    We report on a 5-month-old girl with widely spaced nipples, redundant nuchal skin, coarctation of the aorta, anal atresia with distal fistula, postnatal growth retardation, hypotonia, and sparse scalp hair. Initial clinical assessment suggested the diagnosis of Ullrich-Turner syndrome. Chromosome analysis showed a 46,XX,del(2)(q37) karyotype in peripheral lymphocytes. We compare her findings to those of other reported patients with terminal deletions of 2q. 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Regional mapping of loci from human chromosome 2q to sheep chromosome 2q

    SciTech Connect

    Ansari, H.A.; Pearce, P.D.; Maher, D.W.; Malcolm, A.A.; Wood, N.J.; Phua, S.H.; Broad, T.E. )

    1994-03-01

    The human chromosome 2q loci, fibronectin 1 (FN1), the [alpha]1 chain of type III collagen (COL3A1), and the [delta] subunit of the muscle acetylcholine receptor (CHRND) have been regionally assigned to sheep chromosome 2q by in situ hybridization. COL3A1 is pericentromeric (2q12-q21), while FN1 and CHRND are in the subterminal region at 2q41-q44 and 2q42-qter, respectively. The mapping of FN1 assigns the sheep synthenic group U11, which contains FN1, villin 1 (VIL1), isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1), and [gamma] subunit of the muscle acetylcholine receptor (CHRNG), to sheep chromosome 2q. Inhibin-[alpha] (INHA) is also assigned to sheep chromosome 2q as FN1 and INHA compose sheep linkage group 3. These seven loci are members of a conserved chromosomal segment in human, mouse, and sheep. 23 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  3. The 5-HT2B receptor gene maps to 2q36.3-2q37.1

    SciTech Connect

    Le Coniat, M.; Berger, R.; Choi, Doo-Sup; Maroteaux, L.

    1996-02-15

    This article reports on the localization of the serotonin 5-HT2B receptor to human chromosome 2q36.3-2q37.1 using fluorescence in situ hybridization. The structure and function of this gene, as well as its expression, remain to be investigated in the human. 9 refs.

  4. Trisomy 2q11.2-->q21.1 resulting from an unbalanced insertion in two generations.

    PubMed Central

    Glass, I A; Stormer, P; Oei, P T; Hacking, E; Cotter, P D

    1998-01-01

    In this communication, we describe two cases of proximal 2q trisomy (2q11.2--> q21.1) resulting from an interchromosomal insertion. The chromosomal origin of the insertion was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridisation. An unbalanced karyotype, 46,XX,der(8) ,ins(8;2) (p21.3; q21.1q11.2), was found in the proband and her mother, who both have mild mental retardation, short stature, dysmorphic features, insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, and a psychotic illness. This family is a rare example of direct transmission of a partial autosomal trisomy. Images PMID:9598728

  5. Paroxysmal dystonic choreoathetosis: Tight linkage to chromosome 2q

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, J.K.; Rainier, S.; Wilkowski, J.; Jones, S.M.

    1996-07-01

    Paroxysmal dystonic choreoathetosis (PDC) is characterized by attacks of involuntary movements that last up to several hours and occur at rest both spontaneously and following caffeine or alcohol consumption. We analyzed a Polish-American kindred with autosomal dominant PDC and identified tight linkage between the disorder and microsatellite markers on chromosome 2q (maximum two-point LOD score 4.77; recombination fraction 0). Our results clearly establish the existence of a locus for autosomal dominant PDC on distal chromosome 2q. The fact that three other paroxysmal neurological disorders (periodic ataxia with myokymia and hypo- and hyperkalemic periodic paralysis) are due to mutation in ion-channel genes raises the possibility that PDC is also due to an ion-channel gene mutation. It is noteworthy that a cluster of sodium-channel genes is located on distal chromosome 2q, near the PDC locus. Identifying the PDC locus on chromosome 2q will facilitate discovery whether PDC is genetically homogeneous and whether other paroxysmal movement disorders are also genetically linked to the PDC locus. 28 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Delineation of a characteristic phenotype in distal trisomy 2q.

    PubMed

    Kyllerman, M; Wahlström, J; Westerberg, B; Gustavson, K H

    1984-12-01

    A recombinant chromosome change with dup(2)(q34----qter) secondary to a paternal inv(2) (pter----q34) was found in a 19-year-old boy and his 12-year-old sister. Both were born at term with normal birth weight and head circumference. Hypertelorism, irregular nystagmus, broad flat nasal bridge, and short beaked nose with anteverted nostrils were noted neonatally. Both developed microcephaly and brachycephaly. Cardiac, urogenital, retinal, and optic disc anomalies and onset of progressive kyphosis in adolescence were detected. Their facial appearance, with birdlike "Muppet Gonzo" features, was increasingly accentuated with age. Both had mild mental retardation with IQ's around 70. The clinical findings in these siblings were compared with those described in 23 cases with various 2q partial trisomies. The results of the present study and previous studies indicate a characteristic clinical presentation in children and adults. The reluctance to define the specific phenotype for distal 2q trisomy might be due to the fact that the clinical features tend to be considerably more pronounced towards adolescence than neonatally. PMID:6543860

  7. 2Q-LEBT Prototype for the RIA Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Vinogradov, N.E.; Aseev, V.N.; Kern, M.R.L.; Ostroumov, P.N.; Pardo, R.C.; Scott, R.; Vondrasek, R.C.

    2005-03-15

    The Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) facility utilizes the concept of simultaneous acceleration of two charge states from the ion source. We are building a prototype two charge-state (2Q) injector of the RIA Driver Linac, which includes an ECR ion source, a LEBT and one-segment of the prototype RFQ. Currently, the 2Q-LEBT Facility consists of Berkeley Ion Equipment Corporation BIE-100 ECR ion source. The rf transmitters, high voltage power supplies, turbo pumps and other related equipment were received with the source. BIE-100 is an all-permanent-magnet source and has the highest magnetic field strengths for an ECR ion source of this type ever built. The magnetic field achieves a maximum strength of 11 kG at the plasma chamber surface and 13 kG on the axis. The source can operate with two-frequency plasma heating of 12.75 and 14.5 GHz. The reassembly of the source has been completed and beam production was achieved in the June 2004. This report includes measured beam current and emittance for 16O from the source along with the beam dynamics simulations. Detailed design of the 2Q-LEBT and the current project status are also presented.

  8. Linkage to chromosome 2q32.2-q33.3 in familial serrated neoplasia (Jass syndrome).

    PubMed

    Roberts, Aedan; Nancarrow, Derek; Clendenning, Mark; Buchanan, Daniel D; Jenkins, Mark A; Duggan, David; Taverna, Darin; McKeone, Diane; Walters, Rhiannon; Walsh, Michael D; Young, Bruce W; Jass, Jeremy R; Rosty, Christophe; Gattas, Michael; Pelzer, Elise; Hopper, John L; Goldblatt, Jack; George, Jill; Suthers, Graeme K; Phillips, Kerry; Parry, Susan; Woodall, Sonja; Arnold, Julie; Tucker, Kathy; Muir, Amanda; Drini, Musa; Macrae, Finlay; Newcomb, Polly; Potter, John D; Pavluk, Erika; Lindblom, Annika; Young, Joanne P

    2011-06-01

    Causative genetic variants have to date been identified for only a small proportion of familial colorectal cancer (CRC). While conditions such as Familial Adenomatous Polyposis and Lynch syndrome have well defined genetic causes, the search for variants underlying the remainder of familial CRC is plagued by genetic heterogeneity. The recent identification of families with a heritable predisposition to malignancies arising through the serrated pathway (familial serrated neoplasia or Jass syndrome) provides an opportunity to study a subset of familial CRC in which heterogeneity may be greatly reduced. A genome-wide linkage screen was performed on a large family displaying a dominantly-inherited predisposition to serrated neoplasia genotyped using the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping 10 K SNP Array. Parametric and nonparametric analyses were performed and resulting regions of interest, as well as previously reported CRC susceptibility loci at 3q22, 7q31 and 9q22, were followed up by finemapping in 10 serrated neoplasia families. Genome-wide linkage analysis revealed regions of interest at 2p25.2-p25.1, 2q24.3-q37.1 and 8p21.2-q12.1. Finemapping linkage and haplotype analyses identified 2q32.2-q33.3 as the region most likely to harbour linkage, with heterogeneity logarithm of the odds (HLOD) 2.09 and nonparametric linkage (NPL) score 2.36 (P = 0.004). Five primary candidate genes (CFLAR, CASP10, CASP8, FZD7 and BMPR2) were sequenced and no segregating variants identified. There was no evidence of linkage to previously reported loci on chromosomes 3, 7 and 9.

  9. Paracentric inversion of chromosome 2 associated with cryptic duplication of 2q14 and deletion of 2q37 in a patient with autism.

    PubMed

    Devillard, Françoise; Guinchat, Vincent; Moreno-De-Luca, Daniel; Tabet, Anne-Claude; Gruchy, Nicolas; Guillem, Pascale; Nguyen Morel, Marie-Ange; Leporrier, Nathalie; Leboyer, Marion; Jouk, Pierre-Simon; Lespinasse, James; Betancur, Catalina

    2010-09-01

    We describe a patient with autism and a paracentric inversion of chromosome 2q14.2q37.3, with a concurrent duplication of the proximal breakpoint at 2q14.1q14.2 and a deletion of the distal breakpoint at 2q37.3. The abnormality was derived from his mother with a balanced paracentric inversion. The inversion in the child appeared to be cytogenetically balanced but subtelomere FISH revealed a cryptic deletion at the 2q37.3 breakpoint. High-resolution single nucleotide polymorphism array confirmed the presence of a 3.5 Mb deletion that extended to the telomere, and showed a 4.2 Mb duplication at 2q14.1q14.2. FISH studies using a 2q14.2 probe showed that the duplicated segment was located at the telomeric end of chromosome 2q. This recombinant probably resulted from breakage of a dicentric chromosome. The child had autism, mental retardation, speech and language delay, hyperactivity, growth retardation with growth hormone deficiency, insulin-dependent diabetes, and mild facial dysmorphism. Most of these features have been previously described in individuals with simple terminal deletion of 2q37. Pure duplications of the proximal chromosome 2q are rare and no specific syndrome has been defined yet, so the contribution of the 2q14.1q14.2 duplication to the phenotype of the patient is unknown. These findings underscore the need to explore apparently balanced chromosomal rearrangements inherited from a phenotypically normal parent in subjects with autism and/or developmental delay. In addition, they provide further evidence indicating that chromosome 2q terminal deletions are among the most frequently reported cytogenetic abnormalities in individuals with autism.

  10. Status of the 2Q-LEBT facility at ANL.

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, R. H.; Asseev, V. N.; Kulevoy, T. V.; Ostroumov, P. N.; Poklonskaya, E. A.; Sengupta, M.; Vinogradov, N. E.; Physics; ITEP; St. Petersburg Electrochemical Univ.; Northern Illinois Univ.

    2007-07-01

    The concept for a 2 charge state injector for a 'RIA type' accelerator has been presented. Progress toward an operational prototype 2Q-LEBT system at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is under way. The existing BIE 100 all permanent magnet ECR has been placed on a high voltage platform capable of a combined >100kV with q/m separation at ground level. Remote control of the devices on the platform has been implemented. Other components of the facility are currently being tested. The components of an achromatic bending system are currently being procured. This paper will present recent work at the facility as well as preliminary development of solid materials using the BIE 100.

  11. A unique phenotype of 2q24.3-2q32.1 duplication: early infantile epileptic encephalopathy without mesomelic dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Lim, Byung Chan; Min, Byung-Joo; Park, Woong-Yang; Oh, Sun Kyung; Woo, Mi Jung; Choi, Jin Sun; Kim, Ki Joong; Hwang, Yong Seung; Chae, Jong Hee

    2014-02-01

    The voltage-gated sodium channel genes and HOXD genes are clustered on chromosome 2q, and duplication of this region is associated with 2 clinical phenotypes: early-onset epilepsy and mesomelic dysplasia Kantaputra type, respectively. We report a case involving 2q24.3-2q32.1 duplication encompassing both the voltage-gated sodium channel and HOXD gene clusters, which were detected by a comparative genomic hybridization array. The associated clinical features were early-infantile-onset epilepsy, hypoplastic left heart syndrome, and global developmental delay. However, no features of mesomelic dysplasia were found. A fluorescent in situ hybridization study showed that the noncontiguous insertion of the duplicated chromosome 2q segment into chromosome 6q was inherited from the father, who has a balanced insertional translocation. The unique genotype-phenotype correlation in the present case suggests that dosage-sensitive effects might apply only to the voltage-gated sodium channel genes.

  12. 2Q NMR of 2H2O ordering at solid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivokhizhina, Tatiana V.; Wittebort, R. J.

    2014-06-01

    Solvent ordering at an interface can be studied by multiple-quantum NMR. Quantitative studies of 2H2O ordering require clean double-quantum (2Q) filtration and an analysis of 2Q buildup curves that accounts for relaxation and, if randomly oriented samples are used, the distribution of residual couplings. A pulse sequence with absorption mode detection is extended for separating coherences by order and measuring relaxation times such as the 2Q filtered T2. Coherence separation is used to verify 2Q filtration and the 2Q filtered T2 is required to extract the coupling from the 2Q buildup curve when it is unresolved. With our analysis, the coupling extracted from the buildup curve in 2H2O hydrated collagen was equivalent to the resolved coupling measured in the usual 1D experiment and the 2Q to 1Q signal ratio was in accord with theory. Application to buildup curves from 2H2O hydrated elastin, which has an unresolved coupling, revealed a large increase in the 2Q signal upon mechanical stretch that is due to an increase in the ordered water fraction while changes in the residual coupling and T2 are small.

  13. Severe pulmonary emphysema in a girl with interstitial deletion of 2q24.2q24.3 including ITGB6.

    PubMed

    Takatsuki, Shinichi; Nakamura, Rina; Haga, Youichi; Mitsui, Kazumasa; Hashimoto, Takuji; Shimojima, Keiko; Saji, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2010-04-01

    Owing to the large size of chromosome 2, partial monosomy of the long arm of this chromosome gives rise to many specific phenotypes. We report on a 2-month-old girl with an interstitial deletion of 2q24.2q24.3, which was confirmed by microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization analysis. The patient showed delayed growth and mental retardation, early myoclonic seizures, and characteristic dysmorphic features including thick arched eyebrows, upslanting palpebral fissures, long eyelashes, depressed nasal bridge, short nose, long philtrum, small mouth, micrognathia, and low set ears. Her early myoclonic seizures were likely due to haploinsufficiency of SCN1A and SCN2A, which are included in the deletion region. When she experienced acute bronchopneumonia, she showed severe pulmonary emphysema. The deletion region of 2q24.2 includes the integrin beta6 gene (ITGB6), which may prevent acute lung injury and pulmonary emphysema. Many previously reported patients with deletions of 2q24.2 showed poor outcomes because of respiratory failure. These observations suggest the possibility of a strong relationship between haploinsufficiency of ITGB6 and pulmonary dysfunction. PMID:20358620

  14. A de novo 2.3 Mb deletion in 2q24.2q24.3 in a 20-month-old developmentally delayed girl.

    PubMed

    Belengeanu, V; Gamage, T H; Farcas, S; Stoian, M; Andreescu, N; Belengeanu, A; Frengen, E; Misceo, D

    2014-04-10

    We report a 20-month-old girl ascertained at the age of 11 months for developmental delay. She presented with hypotonia and delayed motor development. The patient had severe language impairment and showed behaviour consistent with autism spectrum disorder. She was microcephalic with mild dysmorphic features and had joint hyperlaxity. We detected a 2.3 Mb de novo deletion in 2q24.2q24.3 on her paternal chromosome. We compare the clinical features of our patient to six previously published patients with a deletion in 2q24.2q24.3, and one patient reported in the ECARUCA database. Although the clinical presentation of these patients is not highly consistent, likely due to the different deletion size and gene content, the following features seem to be recurrent: disturbance in the central nervous system, poor growth, hypotonia, and joint hyperlaxity. The region deleted in our patient contains 13 genes including PSMD14, TBR1, SLC4A10, DPP4, KCNH7, and FIGN. We briefly review the knowledge of these genes and their possible involvement in the aetiology of this developmental delay syndrome. PMID:24508274

  15. 49 CFR 178.33a - Specification 2Q; inner nonrefillable metal receptacles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Specification 2Q; inner nonrefillable metal receptacles. 178.33a Section 178.33a Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued... nonrefillable metal receptacles....

  16. 49 CFR 178.33a - Specification 2Q; inner nonrefillable metal receptacles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Specification 2Q; inner nonrefillable metal receptacles. 178.33a Section 178.33a Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued... nonrefillable metal receptacles....

  17. 49 CFR 178.33a - Specification 2Q; inner nonrefillable metal receptacles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Specification 2Q; inner nonrefillable metal receptacles. 178.33a Section 178.33a Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... nonrefillable metal receptacles....

  18. 49 CFR 178.33a - Specification 2Q; inner nonrefillable metal receptacles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Specification 2Q; inner nonrefillable metal receptacles. 178.33a Section 178.33a Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued... nonrefillable metal receptacles....

  19. Progress with the 2Q-LEBT facility for the RIA project.

    SciTech Connect

    Vinogradov, N.; Aseev, V. N.; Kern, M. R. L.; Ostroumov, P. N.; Pardo, R. C.; Scott, R.; Physics

    2005-01-01

    The design goal of 400 kW uranium beam in the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) Driver Linac can be achieved employing a concept of simultaneous acceleration of two charge states. It has been undertaken to build a prototype 2Q-injector of the RIA Driver Linac which includes an ECR ion source, a LEBT and one-segment of the prototype RFQ. The project called the 2Q-LEBT Facility is being developed in the Physics Division of ANL. Currently, the 2Q-LEBT Facility consists of BIE-100 ECR ion source. The reassembly and commissioning of the source has been completed. During the commissioning process we redesigned and manufactured a few components of the source to increase the beam production performance. A new diagnostic station has been designed and built for accurate measurements of the output beam emittance. The further development of the 2Q-LEBT Facility comprises installation of the source on 100 kV high-voltage platform, building an achromatic bending and transport system including the multi-harmonic buncher, and a full power 57.5 MHz RFQ segment. This report includes a detailed description of the 2Q-LEBT design and beam dynamics simulations along with emittance measurements for various beams.

  20. Severe intellectual disability and autistic features associated with microduplication 2q23.1.

    PubMed

    Chung, Brian H Y; Mullegama, Sureni; Marshall, Christian R; Lionel, Anath C; Weksberg, Rosanna; Dupuis, Lucie; Brick, Lauren; Li, Chumei; Scherer, Stephen W; Aradhya, Swaroop; Stavropoulos, D James; Elsea, Sarah H; Mendoza-Londono, Roberto

    2012-04-01

    We report on two patients with developmental delay, hypotonia, and autistic features associated with duplications of chromosome region 2q23.1-2q23.2 detected by chromosome microarray analysis. The duplications include one OMIM Morbid Map gene, MBD5, as well as seven known RefSeq genes (ACVR2A, ORC4L, EPC2, KIF5C, MIR1978, LYPD6B, and LYPD6). MBD5 lies in the minimum area of overlap of the 2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome. This report provides the first detailed clinical examination of two individuals with a duplication of this region and suggests that brain development and cognitive function may be affected by an increased dosage of the genes involved.

  1. Trapping MBD5 to understand 2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Deborah Y; Zhou, Zhaolan

    2014-01-01

    Despite genetic evidence implicating MBD5 as the only overlapping gene between various 2q23.1 microdeletions, the function of MBD5 and its causality to 2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome, a disorder characterized by developmental delay and autistic features, has yet to be determined. In this issue of EMBO Molecular Medicine, Camarena et al generate an Mbd5 gene-trap mouse model and show for the first time that mice with reduced MBD5 expression develop behavioral abnormalities with neuronal function deficits, mimicking symptoms in 2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome, thus supporting a causal role for MBD5 haploinsufficiency in the disorder. PMID:25001217

  2. Severe intellectual disability and autistic features associated with microduplication 2q23.1

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Brian HY; Mullegama, Sureni; Marshall, Christian R; Lionel, Anath C; Weksberg, Rosanna; Dupuis, Lucie; Brick, Lauren; Li, Chumei; Scherer, Stephen W; Aradhya, Swaroop; Stavropoulos, D James; Elsea, Sarah H; Mendoza-Londono, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    We report on two patients with developmental delay, hypotonia, and autistic features associated with duplications of chromosome region 2q23.1–2q23.2 detected by chromosome microarray analysis. The duplications include one OMIM Morbid Map gene, MBD5, as well as seven known RefSeq genes (ACVR2A, ORC4L, EPC2, KIF5C, MIR1978, LYPD6B, and LYPD6). MBD5 lies in the minimum area of overlap of the 2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome. This report provides the first detailed clinical examination of two individuals with a duplication of this region and suggests that brain development and cognitive function may be affected by an increased dosage of the genes involved. PMID:22085900

  3. The 2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome: clinical and behavioural phenotype

    PubMed Central

    van Bon, Bregje WM; Koolen, David A; Brueton, Louise; McMullan, Dominic; Lichtenbelt, Klaske D; Adès, Lesley C; Peters, Gregory; Gibson, Kate; Novara, Francesca; Pramparo, Tiziano; Bernardina, Bernardo Dalla; Zoccante, Leonardo; Balottin, Umberto; Piazza, Fausta; Pecile, Vanna; Gasparini, Paolo; Guerci, Veronica; Kets, Marleen; Pfundt, Rolph; de Brouwer, Arjan P; Veltman, Joris A; de Leeuw, Nicole; Wilson, Meredith; Antony, Jayne; Reitano, Santina; Luciano, Daniela; Fichera, Marco; Romano, Corrado; Brunner, Han G; Zuffardi, Orsetta; de Vries, Bert BA

    2010-01-01

    Six submicroscopic deletions comprising chromosome band 2q23.1 in patients with severe mental retardation (MR), short stature, microcephaly and epilepsy have been reported, suggesting that haploinsufficiency of one or more genes in the 2q23.1 region might be responsible for the common phenotypic features in these patients. In this study, we report the molecular and clinical characterisation of nine new 2q23.1 deletion patients and a clinical update on two previously reported patients. All patients were mentally retarded with pronounced speech delay and additional abnormalities including short stature, seizures, microcephaly and coarse facies. The majority of cases presented with stereotypic repetitive behaviour, a disturbed sleep pattern and a broad-based gait. These features led to the initial clinical impression of Angelman, Rett or Smith–Magenis syndromes in several patients. The overlapping 2q23.1 deletion region in all 15 patients comprises only one gene, namely, MBD5. Interestingly, MBD5 is a member of the methyl CpG-binding domain protein family, which also comprises MECP2, mutated in Rett's syndrome. Another gene in the 2q23.1 region, EPC2, was deleted in 12 patients who had a broader phenotype than those with a deletion of MBD5 only. EPC2 is a member of the polycomb protein family, involved in heterochromatin formation and might be involved in causing MR. Patients with a 2q23.1 microdeletion present with a variable phenotype and the diagnosis should be considered in mentally retarded children with coarse facies, seizures, disturbed sleeping patterns and additional specific behavioural problems. PMID:19809484

  4. The 2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome: clinical and behavioural phenotype.

    PubMed

    van Bon, Bregje W M; Koolen, David A; Brueton, Louise; McMullan, Dominic; Lichtenbelt, Klaske D; Adès, Lesley C; Peters, Gregory; Gibson, Kate; Moloney, Susan; Novara, Francesca; Pramparo, Tiziano; Dalla Bernardina, Bernardo; Zoccante, Leonardo; Balottin, Umberto; Piazza, Fausta; Pecile, Vanna; Gasparini, Paolo; Guerci, Veronica; Kets, Marleen; Pfundt, Rolph; de Brouwer, Arjan P; Veltman, Joris A; de Leeuw, Nicole; Wilson, Meredith; Antony, Jayne; Reitano, Santina; Luciano, Daniela; Fichera, Marco; Romano, Corrado; Brunner, Han G; Zuffardi, Orsetta; de Vries, Bert B A

    2010-02-01

    Six submicroscopic deletions comprising chromosome band 2q23.1 in patients with severe mental retardation (MR), short stature, microcephaly and epilepsy have been reported, suggesting that haploinsufficiency of one or more genes in the 2q23.1 region might be responsible for the common phenotypic features in these patients. In this study, we report the molecular and clinical characterisation of nine new 2q23.1 deletion patients and a clinical update on two previously reported patients. All patients were mentally retarded with pronounced speech delay and additional abnormalities including short stature, seizures, microcephaly and coarse facies. The majority of cases presented with stereotypic repetitive behaviour, a disturbed sleep pattern and a broad-based gait. These features led to the initial clinical impression of Angelman, Rett or Smith-Magenis syndromes in several patients. The overlapping 2q23.1 deletion region in all 15 patients comprises only one gene, namely, MBD5. Interestingly, MBD5 is a member of the methyl CpG-binding domain protein family, which also comprises MECP2, mutated in Rett's syndrome. Another gene in the 2q23.1 region, EPC2, was deleted in 12 patients who had a broader phenotype than those with a deletion of MBD5 only. EPC2 is a member of the polycomb protein family, involved in heterochromatin formation and might be involved in causing MR. Patients with a 2q23.1 microdeletion present with a variable phenotype and the diagnosis should be considered in mentally retarded children with coarse facies, seizures, disturbed sleeping patterns and additional specific behavioural problems.

  5. 31 CFR 30.2 - Q-2: To what entities does this part apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Q-2: To what entities does this part apply? 30.2 Section 30.2 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TARP STANDARDS FOR COMPENSATION AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE § 30.2 Q-2: To what entities does this part apply?...

  6. De novo 2q+ masquerading as Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Donnenfeld, A E; Zackai, E H; McDonald, D M; Aquino, R; Emanuel, B S

    1987-01-01

    We report a female infant diagnosed shortly after birth as having Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome. Despite previously reported normal G banded karyotypes, a high resolution banded chromosome analysis identified 46,XX,2q+. The importance of attention to established features of clinical syndromes, as well as persistence in investigation when diagnostic uncertainties exist, are discussed. Images PMID:3612721

  7. 2q37.3 Deletion Syndrome: Two Cases with Highly Distinctive Facial Phenotype, Discordant Association with Schizophrenic Psychosis, and Shared Deletion Breakpoint Region on 2q37.3.

    PubMed

    Mehraein, Yasmin; Pfob, Martina; Steinlein, Ortrud; Aichinger, Eric; Eggert, Marlene; Bubendorff, Valerie; Mannhart, Adelina; Müller, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    2q37.3 deletion syndrome belongs to the chromosomal 2q37 deletion spectrum which clinically resembles Albright hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO) syndrome. It is is mainly characterized by short stature, obesity, round face, brachydactyly type E, intellectual disability, behavioral problems, and variable intellectual deficits. Different from classical AHO syndrome, patients with 2q37 deletion syndrome lack renal parathyroid hormone resistance (pseudohypoparathyroidism) and soft tissue ossification. So far, deletion mapping or molecular breakpoint analyses of 2q37 have been performed in only few patients. Here, we report on 2 patients with 2q37.3 deletion syndrome. In both patients the breakpoint of the 5.5-Mb terminal microdeletion could be narrowed down to the same ∼ 200-kb interval on 2q37.3 by BAC-FISH and/or array-CGH. Flanking low-copy repeats may indicate a classical microdeletion syndrome genesis for the 2q37.3 microdeletion subgroup. Clinical evaluation revealed intellectual deficits and type E brachydactyly typical for classical AHO syndrome together with distinctive facial dysmorphisms not present in the former. Furthermore, one patient presented with schizophrenic psychosis, an observation that would be in accordance with previous reports about an association between schizophrenia susceptibility and an unknown gene within the chromosomal region 2q37. PMID:26112830

  8. The human insulin receptor substrate-1 gene (IRS1) is localized on 2q36

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiyama, Masaki; Matsufuji, Senya; Hayashi, Shin-ichi; Furusaka, Akihiro; Tanaka, Teruji ); Inazawa, J.; Nakamura, Yusuke ); Ariyama, Takeshi ); Wands, J.R. )

    1994-03-01

    The chromosomal localization of some of the genes participating in the insulin signaling pathway is known. The insulin and insulin receptor genes have been mapped to chromosomes 11 and 19, respectively. To identify the chromosomal localization of the human IRS1 gene, the fluorescence in situ hybridization technique was employed with Genomic Clone B-10. A total of 50 metaphase cells exhibiting either single or double spots of hybridization signals were examined. Among them, 32 showed the specific signals on 2q36. Therefore, the authors assigned the human IRS1 gene to 2q36. The genes for homeobox sequence (HOX4), fibronectin 1, alkaline phosphatase (intestinal), transition protein 1, villin 1, collagen (type IV), Waardenburg syndrome (type 1), alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase, and glucagon have been localized in the vicinity of the IRS1 gene.

  9. New Attacks on RSA with Modulus N = p2q Using Continued Fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asbullah, M. A.; Ariffin, M. R. K.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we propose two new attacks on RSA with modulus N = p2q using continued fractions. Our first attack is based on the RSA key equation ed - ϕ(N)k = 1 where ϕ(N) = p(p - 1)(q - 1). Assuming that and , we show that can be recovered among the convergents of the continued fraction expansion of . Our second attack is based on the equation eX - (N - (ap2 + bq2)) Y = Z where a,b are positive integers satisfying gcd(a,b) = 1, |ap2 - bq2| < N1/2 and ap2 + bq2 = N2/3+α with 0 < α < 1/3. Given the conditions , we show that one can factor N = p2q in polynomial time.

  10. The Human Epilepsy Mutation GABRG2(Q390X) Causes Chronic Subunit Accumulation and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jing-Qiong; Shen, Wangzhen; Zhou, Chengwen; Xu, Dong; Macdonald, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic epilepsy and neurodegenerative diseases are two common neurological disorders conventionally viewed as being unrelated. A subset of patients with severe genetic epilepsies with impaired development and often death respond poorly to anticonvulsant drug therapy, suggesting a need for new therapeutic targets. Previously, we reported that multiple GABAA receptor epilepsy mutations caused protein misfolding and abnormal receptor trafficking. Here we establish in a novel model of a severe human genetic epileptic encephalopathy, the Gabrg2+/Q390X knock-in mouse, that in addition to impairing inhibitory neurotransmission, mutant GABAA receptor γ2(Q390X) subunits accumulated and aggregated intracellularly, activated caspase 3 and caused widespread, age-dependent neurodegeneration. These novel findings suggest that the fundamental protein metabolism and cellular consequences of the epilepsy-associated mutant γ2(Q390X) ion channel subunit are not fundamentally different from those associated with neurodegeneration. The study has far-reaching significance for identification of conserved pathological cascades and mechanism-based therapies that overlap genetic epilepsies and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26005849

  11. Discordant phenotype of two overlapping deletions involving the PAX3 gene in chromosome 2q35.

    PubMed

    Pasteris, N G; Trask, B J; Sheldon, S; Gorski, J L

    1993-07-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS), the most common form of inherited congenital deafness, is a pleiotropic, autosomal dominant condition with variable penetrance and expressivity. WS is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. The basis for the phenotypic variability observed among and between WS families is unknown. However, mutations within the paired-box gene, PAX3, have been associated with a subset of WS patients. In this report we use cytogenetic and molecular genetic techniques to study a patient with WS type 3, a form of WS consisting of typical WS type 1 features plus mental retardation, microcephaly, and severe skeletal anomalies. Our results show that the WS3 patient has a de novo paternally derived deletion, del (2)(q35q36), that spans the genetic loci PAX3 and COL4A3. A molecular analysis of a chromosome 2 deletional mapping panel maps the PAX3 locus to 2q35 and suggests the locus order: centromere-(INHA, DES)-PAX3-COL4A3-(ALPI, CHRND)-telomere. Our analyses also show that a patient with a cleft palate and lip pits, but lacking diagnostic WS features, has a deletion, del (2)(q33q35), involving the PAX3 locus. This result suggests that not all PAX3 mutations are associated with a WS phenotype and that additional regional loci may modify or regulate the PAX3 locus and/or the development of a WS phenotype. PMID:8103404

  12. De novo interstitial deletion q16.2q21 on chromosome 6

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, A.; Urioste, M.; Luisa, M.

    1995-01-30

    A de novo interstitial deletion of 6q16.2q21 was observed in a 23-month-old boy with mental and psychomotor delay, obese appearance, minor craniofacial anomalies, and brain anomalies. We compare clinical manifestations of this patient with those observed in previously reported cases with similar 6q interstitial deletions. It is interesting to note the clinical similarities between some patients with interstitial deletions of 6q16 or q21 bands and patients with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and it may help to keep in mind cytogenetic studies of patients with some PWS findings. 24 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Capitulation in Abelian extensions of some fields ℚ (√{p1p2q , }i )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizi, Abdelmalek; Zekhnini, Abdelkader; Taous, Mohammed

    2016-02-01

    We study the capitulation of the 2-ideal classes of an infinite family of imaginary biquadratic number fields consisting of fields k =ℚ (√{p1p2q , }i ), where i =√{-1 } and p1 ≡ p2 ≡ -q ≡ 1 (mod 4) are different primes. For each of the three quadratic extensions K /k inside the absolute genus field k(*) of k , we compute the capitulation kernel of K /k . Then we deduce that each strongly ambiguous class of k /ℚ (i ) capitulates already in k(*), which is smaller than the relative genus field (k/ℚ (i )) *.

  14. inv(12)(p11.2q13) in an endometrial polyp.

    PubMed

    Walter, T A; Fan, S X; Medchill, M T; Berger, C S; Decker, H J; Sandberg, A A

    1989-08-01

    A benign endometrial polyp from a 50-year-old postmenopausal woman has been cytogenetically investigated. A single clonal karyotypic anomaly, inv(12)(p11.2q13), was found in about 30% of cells analyzed after short-term culture. This finding contributes further to the hypothesis that the chromosomal segment 12q13-q14, which is also involved in chromosomal rearrangements in uterine leiomyomas, pleomorphic adenomas of the salivary glands, lipomas, and myxoid liposarcomas, contains a gene or genes that are related to cellular proliferation rather than to malignant transformation.

  15. Albright hereditary osteodystrophy and del(2)(q37.3) in four unrelated individuals

    SciTech Connect

    Phelan, M.C.; Rogers, R.C.; Clarkson, K.B.

    1995-07-31

    Albright hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO) is a condition with characteristic physical findings (short stature, obesity, round face, brachydactyly) but variable biochemical changes (pseudohypoparathyroidism, pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism). Most patients with AHO have decreased activity of the guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G{sub s} protein) that stimulates adenylyl cyclase. The gene encoding the a subunit of the G{sub s} protein (GNAS1) has been mapped to the long arm of chromosome 20. We describe 4 unrelated individuals with apparent AHO, associated with small terminal deletions of chromosome 2. All 4 patients had normal serum calcium levels consistent with pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism. Del(2)(q37) is the first consistent karyotypic abnormality that has been documented in AHO. The finding of the same small terminal deletion in 4 unrelated individuals with a similar phenotype suggests that a gene locus in the 2q37 region is important in the pathogenesis of Albright syndrome. The association of Albright syndrome and the GNAS1 locus on chromosome 20 is well documented. The observation of a second potential disease locus on chromosome 2 may help explain the heterogeneity observed in this disorder. 44 refs., 7 figs.

  16. The tyrosinase-positive oculocutaneous albinism locus maps to chromosome 15q11. 2-q12

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsay, M.; Colman, M.A.; Stevens, G.; Zwane, E.; Kromberg, J.; Jenkins, T. ); Garral, M.

    1992-10-01

    Tyrosinase-positive oculocutaneous albinism (ty-pos OCA), an autosomal recessive disorder of the melanin biosynthetic pathway, is the most common type of albinism occurring worldwide. In southern African Bantu-speaking negroids it has an overall prevalence of about 1/3,900. Since the basic biochemical defect is unknown, a linkage study with candidate loci, candidate chromosomal regions, and random loci was undertaken. The ty-pos OCA locus was found to be linked to two arbitrary loci, D15S10 and D15S13, in the Prader-Willi/Angelman chromosomal region on chromosome 15q11.2-q12. The pink-eyed dilute locus, p, on mouse chromosome 7, maps close to a region of homology on human chromosome 15q, and we postulate that the ty-pos OCA and p loci are homologous. 43 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  17. A gene for familial paroxysmal dyskinesia (FPD1) maps to chromosome 2q

    SciTech Connect

    Fouad, G.T.; Durcan, S.; Ptacek, L.J.

    1996-07-01

    Dyskinesias are hyperkinetic and involuntary movements that may result from any of a number of different genetic, infectious, and drug-induced causes. Some of the hereditary dyskinetic syndromes are characterized by paroxysmal onset of the abnormal movements. The classification of the familial paroxysmal dyskinesias (FPD) recognizes several distinct, although overlapping, phenotypes. Different forms of the disorder include attacks that are (1) induced by sudden movement (kinesiogenic); (2) spontaneous (non-kinesiogenic); and (3) induced by prolonged periods of exertion. Linkage analysis was pursued in a family segregating an autosomal dominant allele for non-kinesiogenic FPD. The disease allele was mapped to a locus on chromosome 2q31-36 (LOD score 4.64, {theta} = 0). Identification of distinct genetic loci for the paroxysmal dyskinesias will lead to a new genetic classification and to better understanding of these disorders. 26 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Failure to thrive as primary feature in two patients with subtle chromosomal aneuploidy: Interstitial deletion 2q33

    SciTech Connect

    Grace, K.; Mulla, W.; Stump, T.

    1994-09-01

    It is well known that patients with chromosomal aneuploidy present with multiple congenital anomalies and dysmorphia, and that they may have associated failure to thrive. However, rarely is failure to thrive the predominant presenting feature. We report two such patients. Patient 1 had a marked history of failure to thrive, (weight 50% for 5 1/2 months at 20 months, length 50% for 15 months at 20 months). Patient 2 was noted to be growth retarded at 2 months upon presenting to the hospital with respiratory symptoms (weight 50% for a newborn, length 50% for 36 weeks gestation). There was relative head sparing in both patients. Chromosome analysis in patient 1, prompted by a negative work-up for the failure to thrive, and emerging evidence of developmental delay, revealed a 46,XY,del(2)(q32.2q33) karyotype. Chromosome analysis in patient 2, done as part of a complete workup for the failure to thrive, revealed a 46,XX,del(2)(q33.2q33.2 or q33.2q33.3) karyotype. On careful examination, subtle dysmorphic features were seen. In both patients these included a long flat philtrum, thin upper lip and high arched palate. Patient 1 also had a small posterior cleft of the palate. These patients have the smallest interstitial deletions of chromosome 2 so far reported. Their deletions overlap within 2q33 although they are not identical. Review of the literature reveals 15 patients with interstitial deletions which include 2q33. Marked growth retardation is reported in 14 of these cases. Cleft palate/abnormal uvula were frequently associated. These cases illustrate the need to include high resolution chromosomal studies as part of a complete work-up for unexplained failure to thrive.

  19. Deletion 2q37.3 and autism: molecular cytogenetic mapping of the candidate region for autistic disorder.

    PubMed

    Lukusa, T; Vermeesch, J R; Holvoet, M; Fryns, J P; Devriendt, K

    2004-01-01

    Fine mapping of deletion regions in autistic patients represents a valuable screening tool for identifying candidate genes for autism. A number of studies have ascertained associations between autism and terminal 2q deletion with the breakpoint within 2q37. Here we describe a 12-year-old female patient with terminal 2q37.3 cryptic deletion and autistic behaviour. Her clinical features included hypotonia and feeding difficulties during infancy, coarse face with notably prominent forehead, prominent eyebrows, broad flat nasal bridge and round cheeks, small hands and feet with bilateral brachymetaphalangism, proximal implantation of the thumbs and short toenails, mild mental retardation and autistic behaviour. Recorded autistic features included early lack of eye contact and, during infancy, little social interactions, propensity to be stereotypically busy and to get anxious. In order to more closely delineate the linkage region for autism within 2q37, the findings in this patient were combined to those in 2 previously reported siblings with a well documented 2q37.3 deletion, but without autistic disorder. The exact size of the deleted segment was determined by mapping the deleted region in each group with a series of specific BAC clones linearly ordered on the 2q37 region. The deletion in the autistic patient appeared to be larger [breakpoint flanked by more centromeric clones RP11-680016 (236.9 Mb) and 201F21 (237.4 Mb)] than in the non autistic siblings [more telomeric clones RP11-205L13 (237.8 Mb) and 346114 (238.2 Mb)], revealing a distance of maximum 1.3 Mb between the breakpoints. Accordingly, the extent of the candidate region for susceptibility genes for autism on distal 2q is reduced to maximum 1.3 Mb. Comparison with another well documented autistic patient from the literature results in the same conclusion. These findings represent thus a further step towards identifying genes predisposing to autism.

  20. Regional assignment of the human homebox-containing gene EN1 to chromosome 2q13-q21

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, A.; Muenke, M. ); Logan, C. ); Joyner, A.L. Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Toronto )

    1993-01-01

    The human homeobox-containing genes EN1 and EN2 are closely related to the Drosophila pattern formation gene engrailed (en), which may be important in brain development, as shown by gene expression studies during mouse embryogenesis. Here, we have refined the localization of EN1 to human chromosome 2q13-q21 using a mapping panel of rodent/human cell hybrids containing different regions of chromosome 2 and a lymphoblastoid cell line with an interstitial deletion, del(2) (q21-q23.2). This regional assignment of EN1 increases to 22 the number of currently known genes on human chromosome 2q that have homologs on the proximal region of mouse chromosome 1. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  1. Reciprocal deletion and duplication at 2q23.1 indicates a role for MBD5 in autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Mullegama, Sureni V; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Orellana, Carmen; van Bon, Bregje W M; Halbach, Sara; Repnikova, Elena A; Brick, Lauren; Li, Chumei; Dupuis, Lucie; Rosello, Monica; Aradhya, Swaroop; Stavropoulos, D James; Manickam, Kandamurugu; Mitchell, Elyse; Hodge, Jennelle C; Talkowski, Michael E; Gusella, James F; Keller, Kory; Zonana, Jonathan; Schwartz, Stuart; Pyatt, Robert E; Waggoner, Darrel J; Shaffer, Lisa G; Lin, Angela E; de Vries, Bert B A; Mendoza-Londono, Roberto; Elsea, Sarah H

    2014-01-01

    Copy number variations associated with abnormal gene dosage have an important role in the genetic etiology of many neurodevelopmental disorders, including intellectual disability (ID) and autism. We hypothesize that the chromosome 2q23.1 region encompassing MBD5 is a dosage-dependent region, wherein deletion or duplication results in altered gene dosage. We previously established the 2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome and report herein 23 individuals with 2q23.1 duplications, thus establishing a complementary duplication syndrome. The observed phenotype includes ID, language impairments, infantile hypotonia and gross motor delay, behavioral problems, autistic features, dysmorphic facial features (pinnae anomalies, arched eyebrows, prominent nose, small chin, thin upper lip), and minor digital anomalies (fifth finger clinodactyly and large broad first toe). The microduplication size varies among all cases and ranges from 68 kb to 53.7 Mb, encompassing a region that includes MBD5, an important factor in methylation patterning and epigenetic regulation. We previously reported that haploinsufficiency of MBD5 is the primary causal factor in 2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome and that mutations in MBD5 are associated with autism. In this study, we demonstrate that MBD5 is the only gene in common among all duplication cases and that overexpression of MBD5 is likely responsible for the core clinical features present in 2q23.1 microduplication syndrome. Phenotypic analyses suggest that 2q23.1 duplication results in a slightly less severe phenotype than the reciprocal deletion. The features associated with a deletion, mutation or duplication of MBD5 and the gene expression changes observed support MBD5 as a dosage-sensitive gene critical for normal development.

  2. Reciprocal deletion and duplication at 2q23.1 indicates a role for MBD5 in autism spectrum disorder

    PubMed Central

    Mullegama, Sureni V; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Orellana, Carmen; van Bon, Bregje W M; Halbach, Sara; Repnikova, Elena A; Brick, Lauren; Li, Chumei; Dupuis, Lucie; Rosello, Monica; Aradhya, Swaroop; Stavropoulos, D James; Manickam, Kandamurugu; Mitchell, Elyse; Hodge, Jennelle C; Talkowski, Michael E; Gusella, James F; Keller, Kory; Zonana, Jonathan; Schwartz, Stuart; Pyatt, Robert E; Waggoner, Darrel J; Shaffer, Lisa G; Lin, Angela E; de Vries, Bert B A; Mendoza-Londono, Roberto; Elsea, Sarah H

    2014-01-01

    Copy number variations associated with abnormal gene dosage have an important role in the genetic etiology of many neurodevelopmental disorders, including intellectual disability (ID) and autism. We hypothesize that the chromosome 2q23.1 region encompassing MBD5 is a dosage-dependent region, wherein deletion or duplication results in altered gene dosage. We previously established the 2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome and report herein 23 individuals with 2q23.1 duplications, thus establishing a complementary duplication syndrome. The observed phenotype includes ID, language impairments, infantile hypotonia and gross motor delay, behavioral problems, autistic features, dysmorphic facial features (pinnae anomalies, arched eyebrows, prominent nose, small chin, thin upper lip), and minor digital anomalies (fifth finger clinodactyly and large broad first toe). The microduplication size varies among all cases and ranges from 68 kb to 53.7 Mb, encompassing a region that includes MBD5, an important factor in methylation patterning and epigenetic regulation. We previously reported that haploinsufficiency of MBD5 is the primary causal factor in 2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome and that mutations in MBD5 are associated with autism. In this study, we demonstrate that MBD5 is the only gene in common among all duplication cases and that overexpression of MBD5 is likely responsible for the core clinical features present in 2q23.1 microduplication syndrome. Phenotypic analyses suggest that 2q23.1 duplication results in a slightly less severe phenotype than the reciprocal deletion. The features associated with a deletion, mutation or duplication of MBD5 and the gene expression changes observed support MBD5 as a dosage-sensitive gene critical for normal development. PMID:23632792

  3. Investigation of TBR1 Hemizygosity: Four Individuals with 2q24 Microdeletions

    PubMed Central

    Traylor, R.N.; Dobyns, W.B.; Rosenfeld, J.A.; Wheeler, P.; Spence, J.E.; Bandholz, A.M.; Bawle, E.V.; Carmany, E.P.; Powell, C.M.; Hudson, B.; Schultz, R.A.; Shaffer, L.G.; Ballif, B.C.

    2012-01-01

    TBR1 encodes a transcription factor with critical roles in corticogenesis, including cortical neuron migration and axon pathfinding, establishment of regional and laminar identity of cortical neurons, and control of glutamatergic neuronal cell fate. Based upon TBR1's role in cortical development, we sought to investigate TBR1 hemizygosity in individuals referred for genetic evaluation of intellectual disability and developmental delay. We describe 4 patients with microdeletions identified by molecular cytogenetic techniques, encompassing TBR1 and spanning 2q24.1q31.1, ranging in size from 2.17 to 12.34 Mb. Only the patient with the largest deletion had a possible cortical malformation. Mild ventriculomegaly is the only common brain anomaly, present in all patients; a Chiari I malformation is seen in 2 patients, and mega cisterna magna is seen in a third. Our findings are consistent with Tbr1 mouse models showing that hemizygosity of the gene requires additional genetic factors for the manifestation of severe structural brain malformations. Other syndromic features are present in these patients, including autism spectrum disorders, ocular colobomas, and craniosynostosis, features that are likely affected by the deletion of genes other than TBR1. PMID:23112752

  4. Small Deletions of SATB2 Cause Some of the Clinical Features of the 2q33.1 Microdeletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rosenfeld, Jill A.; Ballif, Blake C.; Lucas, Ann; Spence, Edward J.; Powell, Cynthia; Aylsworth, Arthur S.; Torchia, Beth A.; Shaffer, Lisa G.

    2009-01-01

    Recurrent deletions of 2q32q33 have recently been reported as a new microdeletion syndrome. Clinical features of this syndrome include severe mental retardation, growth retardation, dysmorphic features, thin and sparse hair, feeding difficulties and cleft or high palate. The commonly deleted region contains at least seven genes. Haploinsufficiency of one of these genes, SATB2, a DNA-binding protein that regulates gene expression, has been implicated as causative in the cleft or high palate of individuals with 2q32q33 microdeletion syndrome. In this study we describe three individuals with smaller microdeletions of this region, within 2q33.1. The deletions ranged in size from 173.1 kb to 185.2 kb and spanned part of SATB2. Review of clinical records showed similar clinical features among these individuals, including severe developmental delay and tooth abnormalities. Two of the individuals had behavioral problems. Only one of the subjects presented here had a cleft palate, suggesting reduced penetrance for this feature. Our results suggest that deletion of SATB2 is responsible for several of the clinical features associated with 2q32q33 microdeletion syndrome. PMID:19668335

  5. Chromosome 2q31.1 associates with ESRD in women with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sandholm, Niina; McKnight, Amy Jayne; Salem, Rany M; Brennan, Eoin P; Forsblom, Carol; Harjutsalo, Valma; Mäkinen, Ville-Petteri; McKay, Gareth J; Sadlier, Denise M; Williams, Winfred W; Martin, Finian; Panduru, Nicolae Mircea; Tarnow, Lise; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Tryggvason, Karl; Zerbini, Gianpaolo; Comeau, Mary E; Langefeld, Carl D; Godson, Catherine; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Maxwell, Alexander P; Florez, Jose C; Groop, Per-Henrik

    2013-10-01

    Sex and genetic variation influence the risk of developing diabetic nephropathy and ESRD in patients with type 1 diabetes. We performed a genome-wide association study in a cohort of 3652 patients from the Finnish Diabetic Nephropathy (FinnDiane) Study with type 1 diabetes to determine whether sex-specific genetic risk factors for ESRD exist. A common variant, rs4972593 on chromosome 2q31.1, was associated with ESRD in women (P<5×10(-8)) but not in men (P=0.77). This association was replicated in the meta-analysis of three independent type 1 diabetes cohorts (P=0.02) and remained significant for women (P<5×10(-8); odds ratio, 1.81 [95% confidence interval, 1.47 to 2.24]) upon combined meta-analysis of the discovery and replication cohorts. rs4972593 is located between the genes that code for the Sp3 transcription factor, which interacts directly with estrogen receptor α and regulates the expression of genes linked to glomerular function and the pathogenesis of nephropathy, and the CDCA7 transcription factor, which regulates cell proliferation. Further examination revealed potential transcription factor-binding sites within rs4972593 and predicted eight estrogen-responsive elements within 5 kb of this locus. Moreover, we found sex-specific differences in the glomerular expression levels of SP3 (P=0.004). Overall, these results suggest that rs4972593 is a sex-specific genetic variant associated with ESRD in patients with type 1 diabetes and may underlie the sex-specific protection against ESRD.

  6. PB2-Q591K Mutation Determines the Pathogenicity of Avian H9N2 Influenza Viruses for Mammalian Species

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Congrong; Lee, Horace Hok Yeung; Yang, Zi Feng; Mok, Chris Ka Pun; Zhang, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Background Influenza A subtype H9N2 is widespread and prevalent in poultry. It has repeatedly transmitted zoonotically to cause mild influenza-like illness in humans and is regarded as a potential pandemic candidate. In additon, the six internal genes of H7N9 and H10N8 viruses which caused infection in human in China as well as some of the highly pathogenic H5N1 strains are origined from H9N2. Previous studies have shown that the mammalian adaptation PB2-Q591K contributes to the pathogenicity of H5N1 and H7N9 viruses. However, the role of the PB2-Q591K mutation in H9N2 subtype is still not well understood. Methods To define and compare the individual role of PB2-Q591K substitution in the PB2 gene segment of H9N2 in relation to polymerase activity, replication competence and the pathogenicity using in vitro and in vivo models. Results The PB2-Q591K mutation in H9N2 virus enhanced the polymerase activity and virus replication in human NHBE cells when compared to the wild type strain. Mice infected with the PB2 mutant showed significant weight loss, higher virus replication and immune responses in the lungs. Conclusions Our evidences suggest that the PB2-Q591K, in addition to the -E627K mutation in H9N2 enhanced the pathogenicity in mammalian host. PMID:27684944

  7. Angelman syndrome and severe infections in a patient with de novo 15q11.2-q13.1 deletion and maternally inherited 2q21.3 microdeletion.

    PubMed

    Neubert, Gerda; von Au, Katja; Drossel, Katrin; Tzschach, Andreas; Horn, Denise; Nickel, Renate; Kaindl, Angela M

    2013-01-10

    Angelman syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by mental retardation, severe speech disorder, facial dysmorphism, secondary microcephaly, ataxia, seizures, and abnormal behaviors such as easily provoked laughter. It is most frequently caused by a de novo maternal deletion of chromosome 15q11-q13 (about 70-90%), but can also be caused by paternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 15q11-q13 (3-7%), an imprinting defect (2-4%) or in mutations in the ubiquitin protein ligase E3A gene UBE3A mostly leading to frame shift mutation. In addition, for patients with overlapping clinical features (Angelman-like syndrome), mutations in methyl-CpG binding protein 2 gene MECP2 and cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 gene CDKL5 as well as a microdeletion of 2q23.1 including the methyl-CpG binding domain protein 5 gene MBD5 have been described. Here, we describe a patient who carries a de novo 5Mb-deletion of chromosome 15q11.2-q13.1 known to be associated with Angelman syndrome and a further, maternally inherited deletion 2q21.3 (~364kb) of unknown significance. In addition to classic features of Angelman syndrome, she presented with severe infections in the first year of life, a symptom that has not been described in patients with Angelman syndrome. The 15q11.2-q13.1 deletion contains genes critical for Prader-Willi syndrome, the Angelman syndrome causing genes UBE3A and ATP10A/C, and several non-imprinted genes: GABRB3 and GABRA5 (both encoding subunits of GABA A receptor), GOLGA6L2, HERC2 and OCA2 (associated with oculocutaneous albinism II). The deletion 2q21.3 includes exons of the genes RAB3GAP1 (associated with Warburg Micro syndrome) and ZRANB3 (not disease-associated). Despite the normal phenotype of the mother, the relevance of the 2q21.3 microdeletion for the phenotype of the patient cannot be excluded, and further case reports will need to address this point.

  8. Parental Origin of Interstitial Duplications at 15q11.2-q13.3 in Schizophrenia and Neurodevelopmental Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Isles, Anthony R.; Ingason, Andrés; Lowther, Chelsea; Gawlick, Micha; Stöber, Gerald; Potter, Harry; Georgieva, Lyudmila; Pizzo, Lucilla; Ozaki, Norio; Kushima, Itaru; Ikeda, Masashi; Iwata, Nakao; Levinson, Douglas F.; Gejman, Pablo V.; Shi, Jianxin; Sanders, Alan R.; Duan, Jubao; Sisodiya, Sanjay; Costain, Gregory; Degenhardt, Franziska; Giegling, Ina; Rujescu, Dan; Hreidarsson, Stefan J.; Saemundsen, Evald; Ahn, Joo Wook; Ogilvie, Caroline; Stefansson, Hreinn; Stefansson, Kari; O’Donovan, Michael C.; Owen, Michael J.; Bassett, Anne; Kirov, George

    2016-01-01

    Duplications at 15q11.2-q13.3 overlapping the Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome (PWS/AS) region have been associated with developmental delay (DD), autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and schizophrenia (SZ). Due to presence of imprinted genes within the region, the parental origin of these duplications may be key to the pathogenicity. Duplications of maternal origin are associated with disease, whereas the pathogenicity of paternal ones is unclear. To clarify the role of maternal and paternal duplications, we conducted the largest and most detailed study to date of parental origin of 15q11.2-q13.3 interstitial duplications in DD, ASD and SZ cohorts. We show, for the first time, that paternal duplications lead to an increased risk of developing DD/ASD/multiple congenital anomalies (MCA), but do not appear to increase risk for SZ. The importance of the epigenetic status of 15q11.2-q13.3 duplications was further underlined by analysis of a number of families, in which the duplication was paternally derived in the mother, who was unaffected, whereas her offspring, who inherited a maternally derived duplication, suffered from psychotic illness. Interestingly, the most consistent clinical characteristics of SZ patients with 15q11.2-q13.3 duplications were learning or developmental problems, found in 76% of carriers. Despite their lower pathogenicity, paternal duplications are less frequent in the general population with a general population prevalence of 0.0033% compared to 0.0069% for maternal duplications. This may be due to lower fecundity of male carriers and differential survival of embryos, something echoed in the findings that both types of duplications are de novo in just over 50% of cases. Isodicentric chromosome 15 (idic15) or interstitial triplications were not observed in SZ patients or in controls. Overall, this study refines the distinct roles of maternal and paternal interstitial duplications at 15q11.2-q13.3, underlining the critical importance of maternally

  9. Parental Origin of Interstitial Duplications at 15q11.2-q13.3 in Schizophrenia and Neurodevelopmental Disorders.

    PubMed

    Isles, Anthony R; Ingason, Andrés; Lowther, Chelsea; Walters, James; Gawlick, Micha; Stöber, Gerald; Rees, Elliott; Martin, Joanna; Little, Rosie B; Potter, Harry; Georgieva, Lyudmila; Pizzo, Lucilla; Ozaki, Norio; Aleksic, Branko; Kushima, Itaru; Ikeda, Masashi; Iwata, Nakao; Levinson, Douglas F; Gejman, Pablo V; Shi, Jianxin; Sanders, Alan R; Duan, Jubao; Willis, Joseph; Sisodiya, Sanjay; Costain, Gregory; Werge, Thomas M; Degenhardt, Franziska; Giegling, Ina; Rujescu, Dan; Hreidarsson, Stefan J; Saemundsen, Evald; Ahn, Joo Wook; Ogilvie, Caroline; Girirajan, Santhosh D; Stefansson, Hreinn; Stefansson, Kari; O'Donovan, Michael C; Owen, Michael J; Bassett, Anne; Kirov, George

    2016-05-01

    Duplications at 15q11.2-q13.3 overlapping the Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome (PWS/AS) region have been associated with developmental delay (DD), autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and schizophrenia (SZ). Due to presence of imprinted genes within the region, the parental origin of these duplications may be key to the pathogenicity. Duplications of maternal origin are associated with disease, whereas the pathogenicity of paternal ones is unclear. To clarify the role of maternal and paternal duplications, we conducted the largest and most detailed study to date of parental origin of 15q11.2-q13.3 interstitial duplications in DD, ASD and SZ cohorts. We show, for the first time, that paternal duplications lead to an increased risk of developing DD/ASD/multiple congenital anomalies (MCA), but do not appear to increase risk for SZ. The importance of the epigenetic status of 15q11.2-q13.3 duplications was further underlined by analysis of a number of families, in which the duplication was paternally derived in the mother, who was unaffected, whereas her offspring, who inherited a maternally derived duplication, suffered from psychotic illness. Interestingly, the most consistent clinical characteristics of SZ patients with 15q11.2-q13.3 duplications were learning or developmental problems, found in 76% of carriers. Despite their lower pathogenicity, paternal duplications are less frequent in the general population with a general population prevalence of 0.0033% compared to 0.0069% for maternal duplications. This may be due to lower fecundity of male carriers and differential survival of embryos, something echoed in the findings that both types of duplications are de novo in just over 50% of cases. Isodicentric chromosome 15 (idic15) or interstitial triplications were not observed in SZ patients or in controls. Overall, this study refines the distinct roles of maternal and paternal interstitial duplications at 15q11.2-q13.3, underlining the critical importance of maternally

  10. Brief clinical report: interstitial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 10: del(10)(q11.2q21).

    PubMed

    Holden, J J; MacDonald, E A

    1985-02-01

    A de novo interstitial deletion of part of the long arm of chromosome 10 [del(10)(q11.2q21)] was identified by GTG (G-bands by trypsin using Giemsa) banding in a 9-year-old girl with mental retardation and minor anomalies. Only one other case of a similar deletion has been reported [Ray et al, 1980] and the phenotypic findings of the two cases are compared. PMID:2579554

  11. Mild phenotype associated with Inv Dup 8 (q21.2-q22.3) of maternal origin

    SciTech Connect

    Tupler, R.; Pagliano, E.; Barbierato, L.

    1996-03-15

    We report on a girl with a de novo inverted duplication of chromosome 8 (q21.2-q22.3) associated with a mild phenotype. We were able to establish the maternal origin of the rearranged chromosome. We discuss the correlation between genotype and phenotype on the basis of a review of the findings from individuals with partial dup(8q). 6 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Frequent loss of heterozygosity on chromosome 17 at 17q11.2-q12 in Barrett's adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Swift, A.; Risk, J. M.; Kingsnorth, A. N.; Wright, T. A.; Myskow, M.; Field, J. K.

    1995-01-01

    Allelic loss on chromosome 17 in 18 Barrett's oesophageal tumours was analysed with 17 polymorphic microsatellite markers. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of one or more markers was seen in 72% (13 of 18) tumours on 17p and 56% (10 of 18) on 17q. The highest 17p losses were found at D17S799 (62%, five of eight) and D17S261 (55%, five of nine), while loss at the p53 locus was 31% (5 of 16). The highest loss on 17q was found at the TCF-2 (17q11.2-q12) locus with 66% (8 of 12) LOH. TCF-2 was the only marker lost in two of the tumour samples; furthermore, TCF-2 was lost in four other tumours which retained heterozygosity at the markers on either side of it, D17S261 and D17S740. Six markers were used to assess LOH at 17q11.2-q12, and five of eight of the tumour specimens which had LOH at TCF-2 had no other loss on 17q. No statistically significant correlations were found between loss on 17q or 17p and any clinicopathological parameters. We propose from these data that the 17q11.2-q12 region contains a novel predisposing gene in Barrett's adenocarcinomas and may represent the site of a tumour-suppressor gene. PMID:7734326

  13. Genome-Wide Association Study for Type 2 Diabetes in Indians Identifies a New Susceptibility Locus at 2q21

    PubMed Central

    Tabassum, Rubina; Chauhan, Ganesh; Dwivedi, Om Prakash; Mahajan, Anubha; Jaiswal, Alok; Kaur, Ismeet; Bandesh, Khushdeep; Singh, Tejbir; Mathai, Benan John; Pandey, Yogesh; Chidambaram, Manickam; Sharma, Amitabh; Chavali, Sreenivas; Sengupta, Shantanu; Ramakrishnan, Lakshmi; Venkatesh, Pradeep; Aggarwal, Sanjay K.; Ghosh, Saurabh; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Srinath, Reddy K.; Saxena, Madhukar; Banerjee, Monisha; Mathur, Sandeep; Bhansali, Anil; Shah, Viral N.; Madhu, Sri Venkata; Marwaha, Raman K.; Basu, Analabha; Scaria, Vinod; McCarthy, Mark I.; Venkatesan, Radha; Mohan, Viswanathan; Tandon, Nikhil; Bharadwaj, Dwaipayan

    2013-01-01

    Indians undergoing socioeconomic and lifestyle transitions will be maximally affected by epidemic of type 2 diabetes (T2D). We conducted a two-stage genome-wide association study of T2D in 12,535 Indians, a less explored but high-risk group. We identified a new type 2 diabetes–associated locus at 2q21, with the lead signal being rs6723108 (odds ratio 1.31; P = 3.32 × 10−9). Imputation analysis refined the signal to rs998451 (odds ratio 1.56; P = 6.3 × 10−12) within TMEM163 that encodes a probable vesicular transporter in nerve terminals. TMEM163 variants also showed association with decreased fasting plasma insulin and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance, indicating a plausible effect through impaired insulin secretion. The 2q21 region also harbors RAB3GAP1 and ACMSD; those are involved in neurologic disorders. Forty-nine of 56 previously reported signals showed consistency in direction with similar effect sizes in Indians and previous studies, and 25 of them were also associated (P < 0.05). Known loci and the newly identified 2q21 locus altogether explained 7.65% variance in the risk of T2D in Indians. Our study suggests that common susceptibility variants for T2D are largely the same across populations, but also reveals a population-specific locus and provides further insights into genetic architecture and etiology of T2D. PMID:23209189

  14. 2q23.1 microdeletion identified by array comparative genomic hybridisation: an emerging phenotype with Angelman-like features?

    PubMed Central

    Jaillard, Sylvie; Dubourg, Christèle; Gérard-Blanluet, Marion; Delahaye, Andrée; Pasquier, Laurent; Dupont, Céline; Henry, Catherine; Tabet, Anne-Claude; Lucas, Josette; Aboura, Azzedine; David, Véronique; Benzacken, Brigitte; Odent, Sylvie; Pipiras, Eva

    2009-01-01

    Background Genome-wide screening of patients with mental retardation using Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization (array-CGH) has identified several novel imbalances. With this genotype-first approach, the 2q22.3q23.3 deletion was recently described as a novel microdeletion syndrome. We report two unrelated patients with a de novo interstitial deletion mapping in this genomic region and presenting similar “pseudo-Angelman” phenotypes, including severe psychomotor retardation, speech impairment, epilepsy, microcephaly, ataxia and behavioural disabilities. Methods The microdeletions were identified by array-CGH using oligonucleotide and BAC-arrays, and further confirmed by Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) and semi-quantitative PCR. Results The boundaries and sizes of the deletions in the two patients were different but an overlapping region of about 250 kb was defined, which mapped to 2q23.1 and included two genes: MBD5 and EPC2. The SIP1 gene associated with the Mowat Wilson syndrome was not included in the deleted genomic region. Discussion Haploinsufficiency of one of the deleted genes (MBD5 or EPC2) could be responsible for the common clinical features observed in the 2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome and this hypothesis needs further investigation. PMID:18812405

  15. Genome-wide association study for type 2 diabetes in Indians identifies a new susceptibility locus at 2q21.

    PubMed

    Tabassum, Rubina; Chauhan, Ganesh; Dwivedi, Om Prakash; Mahajan, Anubha; Jaiswal, Alok; Kaur, Ismeet; Bandesh, Khushdeep; Singh, Tejbir; Mathai, Benan John; Pandey, Yogesh; Chidambaram, Manickam; Sharma, Amitabh; Chavali, Sreenivas; Sengupta, Shantanu; Ramakrishnan, Lakshmi; Venkatesh, Pradeep; Aggarwal, Sanjay K; Ghosh, Saurabh; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Srinath, Reddy K; Saxena, Madhukar; Banerjee, Monisha; Mathur, Sandeep; Bhansali, Anil; Shah, Viral N; Madhu, Sri Venkata; Marwaha, Raman K; Basu, Analabha; Scaria, Vinod; McCarthy, Mark I; Venkatesan, Radha; Mohan, Viswanathan; Tandon, Nikhil; Bharadwaj, Dwaipayan

    2013-03-01

    Indians undergoing socioeconomic and lifestyle transitions will be maximally affected by epidemic of type 2 diabetes (T2D). We conducted a two-stage genome-wide association study of T2D in 12,535 Indians, a less explored but high-risk group. We identified a new type 2 diabetes-associated locus at 2q21, with the lead signal being rs6723108 (odds ratio 1.31; P = 3.32 × 10⁻⁹). Imputation analysis refined the signal to rs998451 (odds ratio 1.56; P = 6.3 × 10⁻¹²) within TMEM163 that encodes a probable vesicular transporter in nerve terminals. TMEM163 variants also showed association with decreased fasting plasma insulin and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance, indicating a plausible effect through impaired insulin secretion. The 2q21 region also harbors RAB3GAP1 and ACMSD; those are involved in neurologic disorders. Forty-nine of 56 previously reported signals showed consistency in direction with similar effect sizes in Indians and previous studies, and 25 of them were also associated (P < 0.05). Known loci and the newly identified 2q21 locus altogether explained 7.65% variance in the risk of T2D in Indians. Our study suggests that common susceptibility variants for T2D are largely the same across populations, but also reveals a population-specific locus and provides further insights into genetic architecture and etiology of T2D. PMID:23209189

  16. Deletion 2q37 syndrome: Cognitive-behavioral trajectories and autistic features related to breakpoint and deletion size.

    PubMed

    Fisch, Gene S; Falk, Rena E; Carey, John C; Imitola, Jaime; Sederberg, Maria; Caravalho, Karen S; South, Sarah

    2016-09-01

    Subtelomeric deletions have been reported in ∼2.5% of individuals with developmental disabilities. Subtelomeric deletion 2q37 has been detected in many individuals diagnosed with intellectual disabilities (ID) and autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Previously, genotype-phenotype correspondences were examined for their relationship to breakpoints 37.1, 37.2, or 37.3. Our purpose was to ascertain whether there were phenotypic differences at these breakpoints, elucidate the cognitive-behavioral phenotype in del2q37, and examine the genotype-phenotype association in the deletion with respect to cognitive-behavioral profiles and ASD. We administered a comprehensive cognitive-behavioral battery to nine children diagnosed with del 2q37, ages 3.9-17.75 years. ID for five tested with the Stanford-Binet (4th Edition) (SBFE) ranged from severe to mild [IQ Range: 36-59]. Adaptive behavior scores from the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale (VABS) were much below adequate levels (DQ Range: floor value ["19"] to 55). Autism scores from the Child Autism Rating Scale (CARS) ranged from 22 [non-autistic] to 56 [extremely autistic]; 5/8 [63%] children received scores on the autism spectrum. Participants with the largest deletions, 10.1 and 9.5 Mb, attained the highest IQ and DQ scores while those with the smallest deletions, 7.9 and 6.6 Mb, made the lowest IQ and DQ scores. No association between deletion breakpoint and phenotype were found. Assessment of the various deleted regions suggested histone deacetylase 4 gene (HDAC4) was a likely candidate gene for ASD in our sample. However, two earlier reports found no association between HDAC4 haploinsufficiency and ASD. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27282419

  17. Deletion 2q37 syndrome: Cognitive-behavioral trajectories and autistic features related to breakpoint and deletion size.

    PubMed

    Fisch, Gene S; Falk, Rena E; Carey, John C; Imitola, Jaime; Sederberg, Maria; Caravalho, Karen S; South, Sarah

    2016-09-01

    Subtelomeric deletions have been reported in ∼2.5% of individuals with developmental disabilities. Subtelomeric deletion 2q37 has been detected in many individuals diagnosed with intellectual disabilities (ID) and autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Previously, genotype-phenotype correspondences were examined for their relationship to breakpoints 37.1, 37.2, or 37.3. Our purpose was to ascertain whether there were phenotypic differences at these breakpoints, elucidate the cognitive-behavioral phenotype in del2q37, and examine the genotype-phenotype association in the deletion with respect to cognitive-behavioral profiles and ASD. We administered a comprehensive cognitive-behavioral battery to nine children diagnosed with del 2q37, ages 3.9-17.75 years. ID for five tested with the Stanford-Binet (4th Edition) (SBFE) ranged from severe to mild [IQ Range: 36-59]. Adaptive behavior scores from the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale (VABS) were much below adequate levels (DQ Range: floor value ["19"] to 55). Autism scores from the Child Autism Rating Scale (CARS) ranged from 22 [non-autistic] to 56 [extremely autistic]; 5/8 [63%] children received scores on the autism spectrum. Participants with the largest deletions, 10.1 and 9.5 Mb, attained the highest IQ and DQ scores while those with the smallest deletions, 7.9 and 6.6 Mb, made the lowest IQ and DQ scores. No association between deletion breakpoint and phenotype were found. Assessment of the various deleted regions suggested histone deacetylase 4 gene (HDAC4) was a likely candidate gene for ASD in our sample. However, two earlier reports found no association between HDAC4 haploinsufficiency and ASD. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Partial trisomy 2q due to a maternal balanced translocation t(2;22) (q31;p12)

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, L.S.; Bleiman, M.; Punnett, H.H.

    1994-09-01

    Features consistent among reported patients with 2q duplications due to familial translocations or de novo duplications include pre- and postnatal growth failure, ocular defects such as congenital glaucoma, cardiac defects, micrognathia, urogenital defects, renal defects, connective tissue laxity, neurologic defects, and dermatologic abnormalities. Genotype/phenotype correlations of patients with trisomy 2q due to familial translocations are complicated by the presence of the deletions of the other chromosome involved. We have had the opportunity to observe `pure` trisomy 2q31-qter resulting from adjacent-1 segregation from 46,XX,t(2;22)(q31;p12) in a carrier mother with apparent loss of the 22 NOR region. He was the 2453 gm product of a gestation complicated by gestational diabetes to a 29-year-old G1 P0 mother and a 30-year-old father. At birth, he was noted to have hypotonia, micrognathia, microphthalmia, left cryptorchidism, hypospadias, bilateral clinodactyly of the fifth digits, mild hyperextensibility of the joints, dry skin disorder, and bilateral hydronephrosis by ultrasound. He was treated for hypoglycemia in the nursery and had a vesicostomy at two months for vesicoureteral reflux. A hearing test at two months found moderate hearing loss in the right ear and mild to moderate hearing loss in the left ear. At 3 months he had surgery for a PDA and bilateral glaucoma and was treated for periods of hypothermia and type IV renal tubular acidosis. This patient and others with unbalanced translocations involving the NOR region of an acrocentric chromosome allow for genotype/phenotype correlation of the `pure` trisomic region.

  19. Partial trisomy 22 (q11.2-q13.1) as a result of duplication and pericentric inversion.

    PubMed Central

    Prasher, V P; Roberts, E; Norman, A; Butler, A C; Krishnan, V H; McMullan, D J

    1995-01-01

    A case of a 27 year old male with a duplication of part of the long arm of chromosome 22 (22q11.2-q13.1) together with a pericentric inversion of the same chromosome is reported. Particular phenotypic features of note include absence of speech, persistent self-injury, lack of daily living skills, colobomata, and very poor vision. Similarities between this case and other case reports of duplications of the long arm of chromosome 22 are discussed. Images PMID:7643363

  20. The Comorbidity of Autism with the Genomic Disorders of Chromosome 15q11.2-q13

    PubMed Central

    Hogart, Amber; Wu, David; LaSalle, Janine M.; Schanen, N. Carolyn

    2010-01-01

    A cluster of low copy repeats on the proximal long arm of chromosome 15 mediate various forms of stereotyped deletions and duplication events that cause a group of neurodevelopmental disorders that are associated with autism or autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The region is subject to genomic imprinting and the behavioral phenotypes associated with the chromosome 15q11.2-q13 disorders show a parent-of-origin specific effect that suggests that increased copy number of maternally derived alleles contributes to autism susceptibility. Notably, nonimprinted, biallellically expressed genes within the interval also have been shown to be misexpressed in brains of patients with chromosome 15q11.2-q13 genomic disorders, indicating that they also likely play a role in the phenotypic outcome. This review provides an overview of the phenotypes of these disorders and their relationships with ASD and outlines the regional genes that may contribute to the autism susceptibility imparted by copy number variation of the region. PMID:18840528

  1. Localization of a novel gene for congenital nonsyndromic simple microphthalmia to chromosome 2q11-14.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Wang, Jia-Xin; Wang, Cheng-Ye; Yu, Ping; Zhou, Qiang; Chen, Yong-Gang; Zhao, Lu-Hang; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2008-01-01

    Microphthalmia is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder of eye development. The genetic basis of nonsyndromic microphthalmia is not yet fully understood. Previous studies indicated that disease pedigrees from different genetic backgrounds could be attributed to completely different gene loci. To investigate the etiology in a large autosomal-dominant inherited simple microphthalmia (nanophthalmia) pedigree, which is the first genetically analyzed Chinese microphthalmia pedigree, we performed a whole-genome scan using 382 micro-satellite DNA markers after the exclusion of reported candidates associated with microphthalmia. Strong evidence indicated that microphthalmia in this family was mapped to an unreported new locus on chromosome 2q. A significantly positive two-point LOD score was obtained with a maximum 3.290 at a recombination fraction of 0.00 for marker D2S2265. Subsequent haplotype analysis and recombination data further confined the disease-causing gene to a 15-cM interval between D2S1890 and D2S347 on 2q11-14. Our results further underlined the degree of heterogeneity in microphthalmia from Chinese background and localized a novel gene which regulates eye embryogenesis.

  2. HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY OF SALTSTONE FORMULATED USING 1Q11, 2Q11 AND 3Q11 TANK 50 SLURRY SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Reigel, M.; Nichols, R.

    2012-06-27

    As part of the Saltstone formulation work requested by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked with preparing Saltstone samples for fresh property analysis and hydraulic conductivity measurements using actual Tank 50 salt solution rather than simulated salt solution. Samples of low level waste salt solution collected from Tank 50H during the first, second, and third quarters of 2011 were used to formulate the Saltstone samples. The salt solution was mixed with premix (45 wt % slag, 45 wt % fly ash, and 10 wt % cement), in a ratio consistent with facility operating conditions during the quarter of interest. The fresh properties (gel, set, bleed) of each mix were evaluated and compared to the recommended acceptance criteria for the Saltstone Production Facility. ASTM D5084-03, Method C was used to measure the hydraulic conductivity of the Saltstone samples. The hydraulic conductivity of Saltstone samples prepared from 1Q11 and 2Q11 samples of Tank 50H is 4.2E-9 cm/sec and 2.6E-9 cm/sec, respectively. Two additional 2Q11 and one 3Q11 sample were not successfully tested due to the inability to achieve stable readings during saturation and testing. The hydraulic conductivity of the samples made from Tank 50H salt solution compare well to samples prepared with simulated salt solution and cured under similar conditions (1.4E-9 - 4.9E-8 cm/sec).

  3. Induction of cell proliferation, clonogenicity and cell accumulation in S phase as a consequence of human UBE2Q1 overexpression

    PubMed Central

    Fahmidehkar, Mohammad Ali; Shafiee, Sayed Mohammad; Eftekhar, Ebrahim; Mahbudi, Laleh; Seghatoleslam, Atefeh

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitination is an important cellular mechanism with a pivotal role in the degradation of abnormal or short-lived proteins and the regulation of cell cycle and cell growth. The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is altered in multiple types of human malignancies, including colorectal cancer (CRC). The alteration in the expression of the novel human gene ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2 Q1 (UBE2Q1), as a putative member of the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme family, has been reported in several malignancies, including carcinoma of the breast, hepatocellular and colorectal cancer, and pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In the present study, the effect of UBE2Q1 overexpression on cell growth, clonogenicity, motility and cell cycle was investigated in a CRC cell line. The UBE2Q1 gene was cloned in the pCMV6-AN-GFP expression vector. A series of stable transfectants of SW1116 cells overexpressing UBE2Q1 protein were established and confirmed by fluorescence microscopy and western blotting. Using these cells, MTT assay was performed to evaluate cell growth and proliferation, while crystal violet staining was used for clonogenicity assay. Cell cycle analysis was also performed to survey the ratio of cells accumulated in different phases of the cell cycle upon transfection. The motility of these cells was also studied using wound healing assay. UBE2Q1 transfectants exhibited a faster growth in cell culture, increased colony formation capacity and enhanced motility compared with control non-transfected cells and cells transfected with empty vector (mock-transfected cells). UBE2Q1 overexpression also resulted in a significant decrease in the number of cells accumulated in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. The present findings suggest that UBE2Q1 may function as an oncogene that induces proliferation of cancer cells, and could be a novel diagnostic tool and a potential therapeutic target for CRC. PMID:27602158

  4. Terminal deletion of the long arm of chromosome 2 in a premature infant with karyotype: 46,XY, del(2)(q37)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.H.; Johnston, K.; Hsieh, C.L.; Dennery, P.A.

    1994-02-15

    The authors present a premature newborn boy with multiple congenital anomalies, including craniofacial anomalies, syndactyly, cardiac defects, and a horseshoe kidney associated with terminal deletion of 2q. The infant`s karyotype was 46,XY,del(2)(q37). Clinical, cytogenetic, and autopsy findings are presented in this report. Clinical manifestations in this infant are compared with those four other known patients with terminal deletion of chromosome 2. 5 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  5. Induction of cell proliferation, clonogenicity and cell accumulation in S phase as a consequence of human UBE2Q1 overexpression

    PubMed Central

    Fahmidehkar, Mohammad Ali; Shafiee, Sayed Mohammad; Eftekhar, Ebrahim; Mahbudi, Laleh; Seghatoleslam, Atefeh

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitination is an important cellular mechanism with a pivotal role in the degradation of abnormal or short-lived proteins and the regulation of cell cycle and cell growth. The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is altered in multiple types of human malignancies, including colorectal cancer (CRC). The alteration in the expression of the novel human gene ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2 Q1 (UBE2Q1), as a putative member of the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme family, has been reported in several malignancies, including carcinoma of the breast, hepatocellular and colorectal cancer, and pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In the present study, the effect of UBE2Q1 overexpression on cell growth, clonogenicity, motility and cell cycle was investigated in a CRC cell line. The UBE2Q1 gene was cloned in the pCMV6-AN-GFP expression vector. A series of stable transfectants of SW1116 cells overexpressing UBE2Q1 protein were established and confirmed by fluorescence microscopy and western blotting. Using these cells, MTT assay was performed to evaluate cell growth and proliferation, while crystal violet staining was used for clonogenicity assay. Cell cycle analysis was also performed to survey the ratio of cells accumulated in different phases of the cell cycle upon transfection. The motility of these cells was also studied using wound healing assay. UBE2Q1 transfectants exhibited a faster growth in cell culture, increased colony formation capacity and enhanced motility compared with control non-transfected cells and cells transfected with empty vector (mock-transfected cells). UBE2Q1 overexpression also resulted in a significant decrease in the number of cells accumulated in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. The present findings suggest that UBE2Q1 may function as an oncogene that induces proliferation of cancer cells, and could be a novel diagnostic tool and a potential therapeutic target for CRC.

  6. A new case of 13q12.2q13.1 microdeletion syndrome contributes to phenotype delineation.

    PubMed

    Mandrile, Giorgia; Di Gregorio, Eleonora; Calcia, Alessandro; Brussino, Alessandro; Grosso, Enrico; Savin, Elisa; Giachino, Daniela Francesca; Brusco, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    A recently described genetic disorder has been associated with 13q12.3 microdeletion spanning three genes, namely, KATNAL1, LINC00426, and HMGB1. Here, we report a new case with similar clinical features that we have followed from birth to 5 years old. The child carried a complex rearrangement with a double translocation: 46,XX,t(7;13)(p15;q14),t(11;15)(q23;q22). Array-CGH identified a de novo microdeletion at 13q12.2q13.1 spanning 3-3.4 Mb and overlapping 13q12.3 critical region. Clinical features resembling those reported in the literature confirm the existence of a distinct 13q12.3 microdeletion syndrome and provide further evidence that is useful to characterize its phenotypic expression during the 5 years of development.

  7. Congenital thrombocytopenia in a neonate with an interstitial microdeletion of 3q26.2q26.31.

    PubMed

    Bouman, Arjan; Knegt, Lia; Gröschel, Stefan; Erpelinck, Claudia; Sanders, Mathijs; Delwel, Ruud; Kuijpers, Taco; Cobben, Jan Maarten

    2016-02-01

    Interstitial deletions encompassing the 3q26.2 region are rare. Only one case-report was published this far describing a patient with an interstitial deletion of 3q26.2 (involving the MDS1-EVI1 complex (MECOM)) and congenital thrombocytopenia. In this report we describe a case of a neonate with congenital thrombocytopenia and a constitutional 4.52 Mb deletion of 3q26.2q26.31 including TERC and the first 2 exons of MECOM, involving MDS1 but not EVI1. The deletion was demonstrated by array-CGH on lymphocytes. Our report confirms that congenital thrombocytopenia can be due to a constitutional deletion of 3q26.2 involving MECOM. We suggest that in case of unexplained neonatal thrombocytopenia, with even just slight facial dysmorphism, DNA microarray on peripheral blood should be considered early in the diagnostic work-up.

  8. Familial Klippel-Feil syndrome and paracentric inversion inv(8)(q22.2q23.3)

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, R.A.; Kearsley, J.H.; Singh, S.

    1995-12-01

    Klippel-Feil syndrome (KFS) is characterized by congenital vertebral fusion believed to result from faulty segmentation along the embryo`s developing axis. KFS appears to be a heterogeneous disease often associated with craniofacial malformation. Here we provide the first evidence of a familial KFS gene locus on 8q, where an inv(8)(q22.2q23.3) has been found segregating with congenital vertebral fusion. The four-generation KF2-01 family present with a dominant form of the KFS where the sequence of vertebral fusion was confined to the cervical spine (always including the C2-3 fusion and reduced expression of the C4-5 and C6-7 fusions) in association with malformation of laryngeal cartilages and mild-to-severe vocal impairment. 32 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Human tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) gene: Complete genomic structure and localization on the genetic map of chromosome 2q

    SciTech Connect

    Enjyoji, Kei-ichi; Emi, Mitsuru; Mukai, Tsunehiro; Imada, Motohiro; Kato, Hisao ); Leppert, M.L.; Lalouel, J.M. Univ. of Utah Medical School, Salt Lake City, UT )

    1993-08-01

    Tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI), a protease inhibitor that circulates in association with plasma lipoproteins (VLDL, LDL and HDL), helps to regulate the extrinsic blood coagulation cascade. The authors have cloned a 125-kb genomic region containing the entire human TFPI gene on six overlapping cosmids and prepared a restriction map of this contig to clarify gene structure. More than half (45 kb) of the 85-kb gene is occupied with 5[prime] noncoding elements: coding begins at exon 3. A HindIII RFLP identified with one cosmid was genotyped in the CEPH panel of 559 reference families. Linkage analysis using markers on human chromosome 2 located the TFPI gene on 2q, 36 cM proximal to D2S43(pYNZ15) and 13 cM distal to the crystalline [gamma]-polypeptide locus CRYGP1(p5G1). 31 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Localization of the Gene for Distal Hereditary Motor Neuronopathy VII (dHMN-VII) to Chromosome 2q14

    PubMed Central

    McEntagart, Meriel; Norton, Nadine; Williams, Hywel; Teare, M. Dawn; Dunstan, Melanie; Baker, Philip; Houlden, Henry; Reilly, Mary; Wood, Nick; Harper, Peter S.; Futreal, P. Andrew; Williams, Nigel; Rahman, Nazneen

    2001-01-01

    Distal hereditary motor neuronopathy type VII (dHMN-VII) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by distal muscular atrophy and vocal cord paralysis. We performed a genomewide linkage search in a large Welsh pedigree with dHMN-VII and established linkage to chromosome 2q14. Analyses of a second family with dHMN-VII confirmed the location of the gene and provided evidence for a founder mutation segregating in both pedigrees. The maximum three-point LOD score in the combined pedigree was 7.49 at D2S274. Expansion of a polyalanine tract in Engrailed-1, a transcription factor strongly expressed in the spinal cord, was excluded as the cause of dHMN-VII. PMID:11294660

  11. Normal phenotype with maternal isodisomy in a female with two isochromosomes: i(2p) and i(2q)

    SciTech Connect

    Bernasconi, F.; Dutly, F.; Schinzel, A.A.

    1996-11-01

    A 36-year-old normal healthy female was karyotyped because all of her five pregnancies had terminated in spontaneous abortions during the first 3 mo. Cytogenetic investigation disclosed a female karyotype with isochromosomes of 2p and 2q replacing the two normal chromosomes 2. Her husband and both of her parents had normal karyotypes. Molecular studies revealed maternal only inheritance for chromosome 2 markers. Reduction to homozygosity of all informative markers indicated that the isochromosomes derived from a single maternal chromosome 2. Except for the possibility of homozygosity for recessive mutations, maternal uniparental disomy 2 appears to have no adverse impact on the phenotype. Our data indicate that no maternally imprinted genes with major effect map to chromosome 2. 17 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Recurrent 70.8 Mb 4q22.2q32.3 duplication due to ovarian germinal mosaicism.

    PubMed

    Tosca, Lucie; Brisset, Sophie; Petit, François M; Lecerf, Laure; Rousseau, Ghislaine; Bas, Cécile; Laroudie, Mireille; Maurin, Marie-Laure; Tapia, Sylvie; Picone, Olivier; Prevot, Sophie; Goossens, Michel; Labrune, Philippe; Tachdjian, Gérard

    2010-08-01

    A mosaicism is defined by the presence of two or more populations of cells with different genotypes in one individual. Chromosomal germinal mosaicism occurs in germ cells before the onset of meiosis. Previously, few studies have described germinal mosaicism. In this study, we report on two siblings who carried identical pure and direct interstitial 4q22.2q32.3 duplication. Procedure investigations included complete clinical description, conventional cytogenetic analysis, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) array experiments and microsatellite study searching for parental origin of the duplication. Microarray CGH and further FISH experiments with BAC clones showed the same 70.8 Mb direct duplication, dup(4)(q22.2q32.3). Molecular studies of the 4q duplication were consistent with maternal origin associated with mitotic or meiotic rearrangements. This structural chromosomal aberration was associated in both cases with increased nuchal translucency, growth retardation and dysmorphy. Cardiopathy and lung malformations were only evident in the first case. These clinical manifestations are similar to those previously reported in previous studies involving pure 4q trisomy of the same region, except for thumb and renal abnormalities that were not obvious in the presented cases. The amplified region included genes involved in neurological development (NEUROG2, MAB21L2, PCDH10/18 and GRIA2). The recurrent 4q duplication in these siblings is consistent with a maternal ovarian germinal mosaicism. This is the first description of germinal mosaicism for a large chromosomal duplication and highlights that genetic counselling for apparently de novo chromosome aberration should be undertaken with care.

  13. The First Genomewide Interaction and Locus-Heterogeneity Linkage Scan in Bipolar Affective Disorder: Strong Evidence of Epistatic Effects between Loci on Chromosomes 2q and 6q

    PubMed Central

    Abou Jamra, Rami ; Fuerst, Robert ; Kaneva, Radka ; Orozco Diaz, Guillermo ; Rivas, Fabio ; Mayoral, Fermin ; Gay, Eudoxia ; Sans, Sebastian ; González, Maria Jose ; Gil, Susana ; Cabaleiro, Francisco ; del Rio, Francisco ; Perez, Fermin ; Haro, Jesus ; Auburger, Georg ; Milanova, Vihra ; Kostov, Christian ; Chorbov, Vesselin ; Stoyanova, Vessela ; Nikolova-Hill, Amelia ; Onchev, George ; Kremensky, Ivo ; Jablensky, Assen ; Schulze, Thomas G. ; Propping, Peter ; Rietschel, Marcella ; Nöthen, Markus M. ; Cichon, Sven ; Wienker, Thomas F. ; Schumacher, Johannes 

    2007-01-01

    We present the first genomewide interaction and locus-heterogeneity linkage scan in bipolar affective disorder (BPAD), using a large linkage data set (52 families of European descent; 448 participants and 259 affected individuals). Our results provide the strongest interaction evidence between BPAD genes on chromosomes 2q22-q24 and 6q23-q24, which was observed symmetrically in both directions (nonparametric LOD [NPL] scores of 7.55 on 2q and 7.63 on 6q; P<.0001 and P=.0001, respectively, after a genomewide permutation procedure). The second-best BPAD interaction evidence was observed between chromosomes 2q22-q24 and 15q26. Here, we also observed a symmetrical interaction (NPL scores of 6.26 on 2q and 4.59 on 15q; P=.0057 and .0022, respectively). We covered the implicated regions by genotyping additional marker sets and performed a detailed interaction linkage analysis, which narrowed the susceptibility intervals. Although the heterogeneity analysis produced less impressive results (highest NPL score of 3.32) and a less consistent picture, we achieved evidence of locus heterogeneity at chromosomes 2q, 6p, 11p, 13q, and 22q, which was supported by adjacent markers within each region and by previously reported BPAD linkage findings. Our results provide systematic insights in the framework of BPAD epistasis and locus heterogeneity, which should facilitate gene identification by the use of more-comprehensive cloning strategies. PMID:17924339

  14. Synthesis and characterization of a new photoluminescent material (8-hydroxy quinoline) bis (2-2'bipyridine) lanthanum La(Bpy)2q

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rahul; Bhargava, Parag

    2016-05-01

    A new photoluminescence material, (8-hydroxy quinoline) bis (2-2'bipyridine) lanthanum has been synthesized and characterized by different techniques. The prepared material La(Bpy)2q was characterized for structural, thermal and photoluminescence analysis. Structural analysis of this material was done by Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and mass spectroscopy. Thermal analysis of this material was done by thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) shows the thermal stability up to 190°C.Absorption and emission spectra of the material was measured by UV-visible spectroscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy. Solution of this material La(Bpy)2q in ethanol showed absorption peak at 385nm, which may be attributed due to (π - π*) transitions. The photoluminescence spectra of La(Bpy)2q in ethanol solution showed intense peak at 490 nm

  15. Recognition of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) Class Ib Molecule H2-Q10 by the Natural Killer Cell Receptor Ly49C.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Lucy C; Berry, Richard; Sosnin, Natasha; Widjaja, Jacqueline M L; Deuss, Felix A; Balaji, Gautham R; LaGruta, Nicole L; Mirams, Michiko; Trapani, Joseph A; Rossjohn, Jamie; Brooks, Andrew G; Andrews, Daniel M

    2016-09-01

    Murine natural killer (NK) cells are regulated by the interaction of Ly49 receptors with major histocompatibility complex class I molecules (MHC-I). Although the ligands for inhibitory Ly49 were considered to be restricted to classical MHC (MHC-Ia), we have shown that the non-classical MHC molecule (MHC-Ib) H2-M3 was a ligand for the inhibitory Ly49A. Here we establish that another MHC-Ib, H2-Q10, is a bona fide ligand for the inhibitory Ly49C receptor. H2-Q10 bound to Ly49C with a marginally lower affinity (∼5 μm) than that observed between Ly49C and MHC-Ia (H-2K(b)/H-2D(d), both ∼1 μm), and this recognition could be prevented by cis interactions with H-2K in situ To understand the molecular details underpinning Ly49·MHC-Ib recognition, we determined the crystal structures of H2-Q10 and Ly49C bound H2-Q10. Unliganded H2-Q10 adopted a classical MHC-I fold and possessed a peptide-binding groove that exhibited features similar to those found in MHC-Ia, explaining the diverse peptide binding repertoire of H2-Q10. Ly49C bound to H2-Q10 underneath the peptide binding platform to a region that encompassed residues from the α1, α2, and α3 domains, as well as the associated β2-microglobulin subunit. This docking mode was conserved with that previously observed for Ly49C·H-2K(b) Indeed, structure-guided mutation of Ly49C indicated that Ly49C·H2-Q10 and Ly49C·H-2K(b) possess similar energetic footprints focused around residues located within the Ly49C β4-stand and L5 loop, which contact the underside of the peptide-binding platform floor. Our data provide a structural basis for Ly49·MHC-Ib recognition and demonstrate that MHC-Ib represent an extended family of ligands for Ly49 molecules. PMID:27385590

  16. 2q23 de novo microdeletion involving the MBD5 gene in a patient with developmental delay, postnatal microcephaly and distinct facial features.

    PubMed

    Chung, Brian H Y; Stavropoulos, James; Marshall, Christian R; Weksberg, Rosanna; Scherer, Stephen W; Yoon, Grace

    2011-02-01

    We report on a female patient with a de novo interstitial deletion of chromosome region 2q23.1-23.3 identified by array-CGH. She had significant global delay with developmental regression at age 6 years. She developed seizures at age 3 years with progressive difficulties with balance, loss of fine motor skills and aggressive behavior. She had short stature, microcephaly, and distinct facial features. Her speech was dysarthric, and she demonstrated repetitive hand movements. In this article, we compare the clinical features of our patient with previously reported cases with a 2q23.1 deletion.

  17. Direct Measurements of Line-Mixing Coefficients in the nu1 + nu2 Q Branch of CO2

    PubMed

    Berman; Duggan; Sinclair; May; Drummond

    1997-04-01

    High-resolution measurements of the (nu1 + nu2) Q branch of pure CO2 were made using a difference frequency spectrometer with resolution of 5 x 10(-5) cm-1 and a signal-to-noise ratio of 2000:1. Lines Q(2) through Q(32) were measured with up to 14 lines in a single spectrum. The analysis of the branch has been performed on data taken at 301 K and pressures less than 11 kPa. The spectra were analyzed on a line-by-line basis within the Rosenkranz approximation of weak overlap [P. W. Rosenkranz, IEEE Trans. Antennas Propagation AP-23, 498 (1975)]. The lineshape profile included Doppler broadening and Dicke narrowing [R. H. Dicke, Phys. Rev. 89, 472 (1953)] using a modified hard collision model [S. G. Rautian and I. I. Sobel'man, Sov. Phys. Uspekh. 9, 701 (1967)] with line mixing. For each line the broadening, Dicke narrowing, and line-mixing coefficients were determined. The broadening coefficients are in good agreement with measurements of lines belonging to different CO2 bands. Our measured line-mixing parameters are compared to those predicted by a relaxation matrix which was calculated from an exponential power gap (EPG) law [L. L. Strow, D. C. Tobin, and S. E. Hannon, J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer 52, 281 (1994)]. The vibrational band intensity and the linear pressure shift of the branch were also measured. Copyright 1997Academic Press

  18. Evidence that breast cancer risk at the 2q35 locus is mediated through IGFBP5 regulation

    PubMed Central

    Ghoussaini, Maya; Edwards, Stacey L.

    2015-01-01

    GWAS have identified a breast cancer susceptibility locus on 2q35. Here we report the fine mapping of this locus using data from 101,943 subjects from 50 case-control studies. We genotype 276 SNPs using the ‘iCOGS’ genotyping array and impute genotypes for a further 1,284 using 1000 Genomes Project data. All but two, strongly correlated SNPs (rs4442975 G/T and rs6721996 G/A) are excluded as candidate causal variants at odds against > 100:1. The best functional candidate, rs4442975, is associated with oestrogen receptor positive (ER + ) disease with an odds ratio (OR) in Europeans of 0.85 (95% confidence interval = 0.84 – 0.87; P = 1.7 × 10 −43) per t-allele. This SNP flanks a transcriptional enhancer that physically interacts with the promoter of IGFBP5 (encoding insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 5) and displays allele-specific gene expression, FOXA1 binding and chromatin looping. Evidence suggests that the g-allele confers increased breast cancer susceptibility through relative downregulation of IGFBP5, a gene with known roles in breast cell biology. PMID:25248036

  19. 2q36.3 is associated with prognosis for oestrogen receptor-negative breast cancer patients treated with chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jingmei; Lindström, Linda S.; Foo, Jia N.; Rafiq, Sajjad; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Dennis, Joe; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Van ‘t Veer, Laura J.; Cornelissen, Sten; Rutgers, Emiel; Southey, Melissa C.; Apicella, Carmel; Dite, Gillian S.; Hopper, John L.; Fasching, Peter A.; Haeberle, Lothar; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Blomqvist, Carl; Muranen, Taru A.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Kataja, Vesa; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Investigators, kConFab; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; McLachlan, Sue-Anne; Lambrechts, Diether; Thienpont, Bernard; Smeets, Ann; Wildiers, Hans; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Seibold, Petra; Rudolph, Anja; Giles, Graham G.; Baglietto, Laura; Severi, Gianluca; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Kristensen, Vessela; Alnæs, Grethe I. Grenaker; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Nord, Silje; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert; Seynaeve, Caroline; Hooning, Maartje; Kriege, Mieke; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van den Ouweland, Ans; Li, Yi; Hamann, Ute; Torres, Diana; Ulmer, Hans U.; Rüdiger, Thomas; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Chen, Shou-Tung; Teo, Soo Hwang; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd; Har Yip, Cheng; Fuang Ho, Gwo; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Tajima, Kazuo; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Park, Sue K.; Yoo, Keun-Young; Maishman, Tom; Tapper, William J.; Dunning, Alison; Shah, Mitul; Luben, Robert; Brown, Judith; Chuen Khor, Chiea; Eccles, Diana M.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Easton, Douglas; Humphreys, Keith; Liu, Jianjun; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila

    2014-01-01

    Large population-based registry studies have shown that breast cancer prognosis is inherited. Here we analyse single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of genes implicated in human immunology and inflammation as candidates for prognostic markers of breast cancer survival involving 1,804 oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative patients treated with chemotherapy (279 events) from 14 European studies in a prior large-scale genotyping experiment, which is part of the Collaborative Oncological Gene-environment Study (COGS) initiative. We carry out replication using Asian COGS samples (n=522, 53 events) and the Prospective Study of Outcomes in Sporadic versus Hereditary breast cancer (POSH) study (n=315, 108 events). Rs4458204_A near CCL20 (2q36.3) is found to be associated with breast cancer-specific death at a genome-wide significant level (n=2,641, 440 events, combined allelic hazard ratio (HR)=1.81 (1.49–2.19); P for trend=1.90 × 10−9). Such survival-associated variants can represent ideal targets for tailored therapeutics, and may also enhance our current prognostic prediction capabilities. PMID:24937182

  20. Array-CGH analysis and clinical description of 2q37.3 de novo subtelomeric deletion.

    PubMed

    Kitsiou-Tzeli, Sofia; Sismani, Carolina; Ioannides, Marios; Bashiardes, Stavros; Ketoni, Andria; Touliatou, Vassiliki; Kolialexi, Aggeliki; Mavrou, Ariadni; Kanavakis, Emanuel; Patsalis, Philippos C

    2007-01-01

    We report on a 13-year-old girl with normal karyotype and a de novo cryptic terminal deletion of chromosome 2q, detected by subtelomeric FISH analysis. Further investigation with array-CGH analysis using the 1Mb resolution Spectral Chip 2600 (Spectral Genomics) confirmed the deletion and also showed a deletion of four additional clones. No other abnormalities were detected by array-CGH. FISH studies using 8 BAC-probes were performed for fine mapping of the deletion and confirmed the array results. FISH analysis showed that the deletion breakpoint lies between clones RP11-84G18 and RP11-83N2 (physical distance between clones 0.36Mb) and extends to the telomere. The size of the deletion was estimated to be about 6.4-6.7Mb. Clinical findings include: developmental delay, severe behavioural disturbances, growth-pubertal retardation, congenital conductive mild hearing loss, growth hormone deficiency, compensate hypothyroidism, dysmorphic facial features, excessive joint hypermobility, brachymetaphalangy, abnormal dermatoglyphics and a history of neonatal laryngomalacia, hypotonia and umbilical hernia. The phenotype of our patient is in keeping with those of the literature, with the exception of cardiovascular, urogenital, neurological anomalies and eczema, which were not observed. The report of the clinical and molecular presentation of similar cases will allow accurate phenotype-genotype correlation and proper genetic counseling of the family.

  1. 2q36.3 is associated with prognosis for oestrogen receptor-negative breast cancer patients treated with chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingmei; Lindström, Linda S; Foo, Jia N; Rafiq, Sajjad; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Pharoah, Paul D P; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Dennis, Joe; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Van 't Veer, Laura J; Cornelissen, Sten; Rutgers, Emiel; Southey, Melissa C; Apicella, Carmel; Dite, Gillian S; Hopper, John L; Fasching, Peter A; Haeberle, Lothar; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Blomqvist, Carl; Muranen, Taru A; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Kataja, Vesa; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; McLachlan, Sue-Anne; Lambrechts, Diether; Thienpont, Bernard; Smeets, Ann; Wildiers, Hans; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Seibold, Petra; Rudolph, Anja; Giles, Graham G; Baglietto, Laura; Severi, Gianluca; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Kristensen, Vessela; Alnæs, Grethe I Grenaker; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Nord, Silje; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert; Seynaeve, Caroline; Hooning, Maartje; Kriege, Mieke; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van den Ouweland, Ans; Li, Yi; Hamann, Ute; Torres, Diana; Ulmer, Hans U; Rüdiger, Thomas; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Chen, Shou-Tung; Teo, Soo Hwang; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd; Har Yip, Cheng; Fuang Ho, Gwo; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Tajima, Kazuo; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Park, Sue K; Yoo, Keun-Young; Maishman, Tom; Tapper, William J; Dunning, Alison; Shah, Mitul; Luben, Robert; Brown, Judith; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Eccles, Diana M; Nevanlinna, Heli; Easton, Douglas; Humphreys, Keith; Liu, Jianjun; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila

    2014-01-01

    Large population-based registry studies have shown that breast cancer prognosis is inherited. Here we analyse single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of genes implicated in human immunology and inflammation as candidates for prognostic markers of breast cancer survival involving 1,804 oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative patients treated with chemotherapy (279 events) from 14 European studies in a prior large-scale genotyping experiment, which is part of the Collaborative Oncological Gene-environment Study (COGS) initiative. We carry out replication using Asian COGS samples (n=522, 53 events) and the Prospective Study of Outcomes in Sporadic versus Hereditary breast cancer (POSH) study (n=315, 108 events). Rs4458204_A near CCL20 (2q36.3) is found to be associated with breast cancer-specific death at a genome-wide significant level (n=2,641, 440 events, combined allelic hazard ratio (HR)=1.81 (1.49-2.19); P for trend=1.90 × 10(-9)). Such survival-associated variants can represent ideal targets for tailored therapeutics, and may also enhance our current prognostic prediction capabilities.

  2. Evidence that breast cancer risk at the 2q35 locus is mediated through IGFBP5 regulation.

    PubMed

    Ghoussaini, Maya; Edwards, Stacey L; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Nord, Silje; Cowper-Sal Lari, Richard; Desai, Kinjal; Kar, Siddhartha; Hillman, Kristine M; Kaufmann, Susanne; Glubb, Dylan M; Beesley, Jonathan; Dennis, Joe; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dicks, Ed; Guo, Qi; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Shah, Mitul; Luben, Robert; Brown, Judith; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Klevebring, Daniel; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Flyger, Henrik; Lambrechts, Diether; Thienpont, Bernard; Neven, Patrick; Wildiers, Hans; Broeks, Annegien; Van't Veer, Laura J; Th Rutgers, Emiel J; Couch, Fergus J; Olson, Janet E; Hallberg, Emily; Vachon, Celine; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Peto, Julian; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Gibson, Lorna; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Hall, Per; Li, Jingmei; Liu, Jianjun; Humphreys, Keith; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Park, Sue K; Noh, Dong-Young; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Yatabe, Yasushi; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Menegaux, Florence; Sanchez, Marie; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Wu, Anna H; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O; Benitez, Javier; Zamora, M Pilar; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Menéndez, Primitiva; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Qiuyin; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Reed, Malcolm W R; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Sawyer, Elinor J; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J; Miller, Nicola; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Teo, Soo Hwang; Yip, Cheng Har; Lee, Daphne S C; Wong, Tien Y; Hooning, Maartje J; Martens, John W M; Collée, J Margriet; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Tsimiklis, Helen; Kapuscinski, Miroslav K; Shen, Chen-Yang; Wu, Pei-Ei; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Chen, Shou-Tung; Alnæs, Grethe Grenaker; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Giles, Graham G; Milne, Roger L; McLean, Catriona; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Hartman, Mikael; Miao, Hui; Buhari, Shaik Ahmad Bin Syed; Teo, Yik Ying; Fasching, Peter A; Haeberle, Lothar; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nick; Schoemaker, Minouk J; García-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J; Lissowska, Jolanta; Simard, Jacques; Goldberg, Mark S; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Koto, Yon-Dschun; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Bonanni, Bernardo; Volorio, Sara; Dörk, Thilo; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Helbig, Sonja; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert A E M; Seynaeve, Caroline; Van Asperen, Christi J; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Slager, Susan; Toland, Amanda E; Ambrosone, Christine B; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James; Hamann, Ute; Torres, Diana; Zheng, Wei; Long, Jirong; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Ahmed, Shahana; Maranian, Mel; Healey, Catherine S; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M Rosario; Alvarez, Nuria; Herrero, Daniel; Tessier, Daniel C; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; de Santiago, Ines; Carroll, Jason; Caldas, Carlos; Brown, Melissa A; Lupien, Mathieu; Kristensen, Vessela N; Pharoah, Paul D P; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; French, Juliet D; Easton, Douglas F; Dunning, Alison M

    2014-01-01

    GWAS have identified a breast cancer susceptibility locus on 2q35. Here we report the fine mapping of this locus using data from 101,943 subjects from 50 case-control studies. We genotype 276 SNPs using the 'iCOGS' genotyping array and impute genotypes for a further 1,284 using 1000 Genomes Project data. All but two, strongly correlated SNPs (rs4442975 G/T and rs6721996 G/A) are excluded as candidate causal variants at odds against >100:1. The best functional candidate, rs4442975, is associated with oestrogen receptor positive (ER+) disease with an odds ratio (OR) in Europeans of 0.85 (95% confidence interval=0.84-0.87; P=1.7 × 10(-43)) per t-allele. This SNP flanks a transcriptional enhancer that physically interacts with the promoter of IGFBP5 (encoding insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 5) and displays allele-specific gene expression, FOXA1 binding and chromatin looping. Evidence suggests that the g-allele confers increased breast cancer susceptibility through relative downregulation of IGFBP5, a gene with known roles in breast cell biology.

  3. 2q36.3 is associated with prognosis for oestrogen receptor-negative breast cancer patients treated with chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingmei; Lindström, Linda S; Foo, Jia N; Rafiq, Sajjad; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Pharoah, Paul D P; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Dennis, Joe; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Van 't Veer, Laura J; Cornelissen, Sten; Rutgers, Emiel; Southey, Melissa C; Apicella, Carmel; Dite, Gillian S; Hopper, John L; Fasching, Peter A; Haeberle, Lothar; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Blomqvist, Carl; Muranen, Taru A; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Kataja, Vesa; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; McLachlan, Sue-Anne; Lambrechts, Diether; Thienpont, Bernard; Smeets, Ann; Wildiers, Hans; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Seibold, Petra; Rudolph, Anja; Giles, Graham G; Baglietto, Laura; Severi, Gianluca; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Kristensen, Vessela; Alnæs, Grethe I Grenaker; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Nord, Silje; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert; Seynaeve, Caroline; Hooning, Maartje; Kriege, Mieke; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van den Ouweland, Ans; Li, Yi; Hamann, Ute; Torres, Diana; Ulmer, Hans U; Rüdiger, Thomas; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Chen, Shou-Tung; Teo, Soo Hwang; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd; Har Yip, Cheng; Fuang Ho, Gwo; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Tajima, Kazuo; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Park, Sue K; Yoo, Keun-Young; Maishman, Tom; Tapper, William J; Dunning, Alison; Shah, Mitul; Luben, Robert; Brown, Judith; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Eccles, Diana M; Nevanlinna, Heli; Easton, Douglas; Humphreys, Keith; Liu, Jianjun; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila

    2014-01-01

    Large population-based registry studies have shown that breast cancer prognosis is inherited. Here we analyse single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of genes implicated in human immunology and inflammation as candidates for prognostic markers of breast cancer survival involving 1,804 oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative patients treated with chemotherapy (279 events) from 14 European studies in a prior large-scale genotyping experiment, which is part of the Collaborative Oncological Gene-environment Study (COGS) initiative. We carry out replication using Asian COGS samples (n=522, 53 events) and the Prospective Study of Outcomes in Sporadic versus Hereditary breast cancer (POSH) study (n=315, 108 events). Rs4458204_A near CCL20 (2q36.3) is found to be associated with breast cancer-specific death at a genome-wide significant level (n=2,641, 440 events, combined allelic hazard ratio (HR)=1.81 (1.49-2.19); P for trend=1.90 × 10(-9)). Such survival-associated variants can represent ideal targets for tailored therapeutics, and may also enhance our current prognostic prediction capabilities. PMID:24937182

  4. Evidence that breast cancer risk at the 2q35 locus is mediated through IGFBP5 regulation.

    PubMed

    Ghoussaini, Maya; Edwards, Stacey L; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Nord, Silje; Cowper-Sal Lari, Richard; Desai, Kinjal; Kar, Siddhartha; Hillman, Kristine M; Kaufmann, Susanne; Glubb, Dylan M; Beesley, Jonathan; Dennis, Joe; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dicks, Ed; Guo, Qi; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Shah, Mitul; Luben, Robert; Brown, Judith; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Klevebring, Daniel; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Flyger, Henrik; Lambrechts, Diether; Thienpont, Bernard; Neven, Patrick; Wildiers, Hans; Broeks, Annegien; Van't Veer, Laura J; Th Rutgers, Emiel J; Couch, Fergus J; Olson, Janet E; Hallberg, Emily; Vachon, Celine; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Peto, Julian; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Gibson, Lorna; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Hall, Per; Li, Jingmei; Liu, Jianjun; Humphreys, Keith; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Park, Sue K; Noh, Dong-Young; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Yatabe, Yasushi; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Menegaux, Florence; Sanchez, Marie; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Wu, Anna H; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O; Benitez, Javier; Zamora, M Pilar; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Menéndez, Primitiva; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Qiuyin; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Reed, Malcolm W R; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Sawyer, Elinor J; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J; Miller, Nicola; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Teo, Soo Hwang; Yip, Cheng Har; Lee, Daphne S C; Wong, Tien Y; Hooning, Maartje J; Martens, John W M; Collée, J Margriet; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Tsimiklis, Helen; Kapuscinski, Miroslav K; Shen, Chen-Yang; Wu, Pei-Ei; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Chen, Shou-Tung; Alnæs, Grethe Grenaker; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Giles, Graham G; Milne, Roger L; McLean, Catriona; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Hartman, Mikael; Miao, Hui; Buhari, Shaik Ahmad Bin Syed; Teo, Yik Ying; Fasching, Peter A; Haeberle, Lothar; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nick; Schoemaker, Minouk J; García-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J; Lissowska, Jolanta; Simard, Jacques; Goldberg, Mark S; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Koto, Yon-Dschun; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Bonanni, Bernardo; Volorio, Sara; Dörk, Thilo; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Helbig, Sonja; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert A E M; Seynaeve, Caroline; Van Asperen, Christi J; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Slager, Susan; Toland, Amanda E; Ambrosone, Christine B; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James; Hamann, Ute; Torres, Diana; Zheng, Wei; Long, Jirong; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Ahmed, Shahana; Maranian, Mel; Healey, Catherine S; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M Rosario; Alvarez, Nuria; Herrero, Daniel; Tessier, Daniel C; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; de Santiago, Ines; Carroll, Jason; Caldas, Carlos; Brown, Melissa A; Lupien, Mathieu; Kristensen, Vessela N; Pharoah, Paul D P; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; French, Juliet D; Easton, Douglas F; Dunning, Alison M

    2014-01-01

    GWAS have identified a breast cancer susceptibility locus on 2q35. Here we report the fine mapping of this locus using data from 101,943 subjects from 50 case-control studies. We genotype 276 SNPs using the 'iCOGS' genotyping array and impute genotypes for a further 1,284 using 1000 Genomes Project data. All but two, strongly correlated SNPs (rs4442975 G/T and rs6721996 G/A) are excluded as candidate causal variants at odds against >100:1. The best functional candidate, rs4442975, is associated with oestrogen receptor positive (ER+) disease with an odds ratio (OR) in Europeans of 0.85 (95% confidence interval=0.84-0.87; P=1.7 × 10(-43)) per t-allele. This SNP flanks a transcriptional enhancer that physically interacts with the promoter of IGFBP5 (encoding insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 5) and displays allele-specific gene expression, FOXA1 binding and chromatin looping. Evidence suggests that the g-allele confers increased breast cancer susceptibility through relative downregulation of IGFBP5, a gene with known roles in breast cell biology. PMID:25248036

  5. Disruption of Mbd5 in mice causes neuronal functional deficits and neurobehavioral abnormalities consistent with 2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Camarena, Vladimir; Cao, Lei; Abad, Clemer; Abrams, Alexander; Toledo, Yaima; Araki, Kimi; Araki, Masatake; Walz, Katherina; Young, Juan I

    2014-01-01

    2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome is characterized by intellectual disability, motor delay, autistic-like behaviors, and a distinctive craniofacial phenotype. All patients carry a partial or total deletion of methyl-CpG-binding domain protein 5 (MBD5), suggesting that haploinsufficiency of this gene is responsible for the phenotype. To confirm this hypothesis and to examine the role of MBD5 in vivo, we have generated and characterized an Mbd5 gene-trap mouse model. Our study indicates that the Mbd5+/GT mouse model recapitulates most of the hallmark phenotypes observed in 2q23.1 deletion carriers including abnormal social behavior, cognitive impairment, and motor and craniofacial abnormalities. In addition, neuronal cultures uncovered a deficiency in neurite outgrowth. These findings support a causal role of MBD5 in 2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome and suggest a role for MBD5 in neuronal processes. The Mbd5+/GT mouse model will advance our understanding of the abnormal brain development underlying the emergence of 2q23.1 deletion-associated behavioral and cognitive symptoms. Subject Categories Genetics, Gene Therapy & Genetic Disease; Neuroscience PMID:25001218

  6. Assignment of the gastric inhibitory polypeptide receptor gene (GIPR) to chromosome bands 19q13.2-q13.3 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Stoffel, M.; Fernald, A.A.; Bell, G.I.; Le Beau, M.M.

    1995-08-10

    The gastric inhibitory polypeptide receptor gene (GIPR) was localized, using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), to human chromosome bands 19q13.2-q13.3. Gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) is a potent stimulator of insulin secretion and mutations in the GIPR gene may be related to non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). 13 refs., 1 fig.

  7. Disruption of Mbd5 in mice causes neuronal functional deficits and neurobehavioral abnormalities consistent with 2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Camarena, Vladimir; Cao, Lei; Abad, Clemer; Abrams, Alexander; Toledo, Yaima; Araki, Kimi; Araki, Masatake; Walz, Katherina; Young, Juan I

    2014-01-01

    2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome is characterized by intellectual disability, motor delay, autistic-like behaviors, and a distinctive craniofacial phenotype. All patients carry a partial or total deletion of methyl-CpG-binding domain protein 5 (MBD5), suggesting that haploinsufficiency of this gene is responsible for the phenotype. To confirm this hypothesis and to examine the role of MBD5 in vivo, we have generated and characterized an Mbd5 gene-trap mouse model. Our study indicates that the Mbd5(+/) (GT) mouse model recapitulates most of the hallmark phenotypes observed in 2q23.1 deletion carriers including abnormal social behavior, cognitive impairment, and motor and craniofacial abnormalities. In addition, neuronal cultures uncovered a deficiency in neurite outgrowth. These findings support a causal role of MBD5 in 2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome and suggest a role for MBD5 in neuronal processes. The Mbd5(+/) (GT) mouse model will advance our understanding of the abnormal brain development underlying the emergence of 2q23.1 deletion-associated behavioral and cognitive symptoms.

  8. Assignment of the locus for Waardenburg syndrome type I to human chromosome 2q37 and possible homology to the Splotch mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Foy, C; Newton, V; Wellesley, D; Harris, R; Read, A P

    1990-01-01

    We have demonstrated close linkage between the locus for the autosomal dominant Waardenburg syndrome type I and the placental alkaline phosphatase locus on chromosome 2q37. In five families the peak lod score was 4.76 at a recombination fraction of .023. In the mouse the Splotch locus maps to near the homologous position. Splotch mice have white spotting and hearing defects, suggesting that Splotch may be the murine homologue of Waardenburg syndrome type I. PMID:2339698

  9. Phenotypic and Molecular Convergence of 2q23.1 Deletion Syndrome with Other Neurodevelopmental Syndromes Associated with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Mullegama, Sureni V.; Alaimo, Joseph T.; Chen, Li; Elsea, Sarah H.

    2015-01-01

    Roughly 20% of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are syndromic with a well-established genetic cause. Studying the genes involved can provide insight into the molecular and cellular mechanisms of ASD. 2q23.1 deletion syndrome (causative gene, MBD5) is a recently identified genetic neurodevelopmental disorder associated with ASD. Mutations in MBD5 have been found in ASD cohorts. In this study, we provide a phenotypic update on the prevalent features of 2q23.1 deletion syndrome, which include severe intellectual disability, seizures, significant speech impairment, sleep disturbance, and autistic-like behavioral problems. Next, we examined the phenotypic, molecular, and network/pathway relationships between nine neurodevelopmental disorders associated with ASD: 2q23.1 deletion Rett, Angelman, Pitt-Hopkins, 2q23.1 duplication, 5q14.3 deletion, Kleefstra, Kabuki make-up, and Smith-Magenis syndromes. We show phenotypic overlaps consisting of intellectual disability, speech delay, seizures, sleep disturbance, hypotonia, and autistic-like behaviors. Molecularly, MBD5 possibly regulates the expression of UBE3A, TCF4, MEF2C, EHMT1 and RAI1. Network analysis reveals that there could be indirect protein interactions, further implicating function for these genes in common pathways. Further, we show that when MBD5 and RAI1 are haploinsufficient, they perturb several common pathways that are linked to neuronal and behavioral development. These findings support further investigations into the molecular and pathway relationships among genes linked to neurodevelopmental disorders and ASD, which will hopefully lead to common points of regulation that may be targeted toward therapeutic intervention. PMID:25853262

  10. Phenotypic and molecular convergence of 2q23.1 deletion syndrome with other neurodevelopmental syndromes associated with autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Mullegama, Sureni V; Alaimo, Joseph T; Chen, Li; Elsea, Sarah H

    2015-01-01

    Roughly 20% of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are syndromic with a well-established genetic cause. Studying the genes involved can provide insight into the molecular and cellular mechanisms of ASD. 2q23.1 deletion syndrome (causative gene, MBD5) is a recently identified genetic neurodevelopmental disorder associated with ASD. Mutations in MBD5 have been found in ASD cohorts. In this study, we provide a phenotypic update on the prevalent features of 2q23.1 deletion syndrome, which include severe intellectual disability, seizures, significant speech impairment, sleep disturbance, and autistic-like behavioral problems. Next, we examined the phenotypic, molecular, and network/pathway relationships between nine neurodevelopmental disorders associated with ASD: 2q23.1 deletion Rett, Angelman, Pitt-Hopkins, 2q23.1 duplication, 5q14.3 deletion, Kleefstra, Kabuki make-up, and Smith-Magenis syndromes. We show phenotypic overlaps consisting of intellectual disability, speech delay, seizures, sleep disturbance, hypotonia, and autistic-like behaviors. Molecularly, MBD5 possibly regulates the expression of UBE3A, TCF4, MEF2C, EHMT1 and RAI1. Network analysis reveals that there could be indirect protein interactions, further implicating function for these genes in common pathways. Further, we show that when MBD5 and RAI1 are haploinsufficient, they perturb several common pathways that are linked to neuronal and behavioral development. These findings support further investigations into the molecular and pathway relationships among genes linked to neurodevelopmental disorders and ASD, which will hopefully lead to common points of regulation that may be targeted toward therapeutic intervention. PMID:25853262

  11. Phenotypic and molecular convergence of 2q23.1 deletion syndrome with other neurodevelopmental syndromes associated with autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Mullegama, Sureni V; Alaimo, Joseph T; Chen, Li; Elsea, Sarah H

    2015-01-01

    Roughly 20% of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are syndromic with a well-established genetic cause. Studying the genes involved can provide insight into the molecular and cellular mechanisms of ASD. 2q23.1 deletion syndrome (causative gene, MBD5) is a recently identified genetic neurodevelopmental disorder associated with ASD. Mutations in MBD5 have been found in ASD cohorts. In this study, we provide a phenotypic update on the prevalent features of 2q23.1 deletion syndrome, which include severe intellectual disability, seizures, significant speech impairment, sleep disturbance, and autistic-like behavioral problems. Next, we examined the phenotypic, molecular, and network/pathway relationships between nine neurodevelopmental disorders associated with ASD: 2q23.1 deletion Rett, Angelman, Pitt-Hopkins, 2q23.1 duplication, 5q14.3 deletion, Kleefstra, Kabuki make-up, and Smith-Magenis syndromes. We show phenotypic overlaps consisting of intellectual disability, speech delay, seizures, sleep disturbance, hypotonia, and autistic-like behaviors. Molecularly, MBD5 possibly regulates the expression of UBE3A, TCF4, MEF2C, EHMT1 and RAI1. Network analysis reveals that there could be indirect protein interactions, further implicating function for these genes in common pathways. Further, we show that when MBD5 and RAI1 are haploinsufficient, they perturb several common pathways that are linked to neuronal and behavioral development. These findings support further investigations into the molecular and pathway relationships among genes linked to neurodevelopmental disorders and ASD, which will hopefully lead to common points of regulation that may be targeted toward therapeutic intervention.

  12. Genetic and physical mapping of 2q35 in the region of NRAMP and IL8R genes: Identification of a polymorphic repeat in exon 2 of NRAMP

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.K.; Shaw, M.A.; Barton, C.H.

    1994-11-15

    Recent interest has focused on the region of conserved synteny between mouse chromosome 1 and human 2q33-q37, particularly over the region encoding the murine macrophage resistance gene Ity/Lsh/Bcg (candidate Nramp) and members of the Il8r interleukin-8 (IL8) receptor gene cluster. In this paper, identification of a restriction fragment length polymorphism in the Il8RB gene in 35 pedigrees previously typed for markers in the 2q33-37 interval provided evidence (lod scores > 3) for linkage between Il8RB and the 2q34-135 markers FN1, TNP1, VIL1, and DES. Physical mapping, using yeast artificial chromosomes isolated with VIL1, confirmed that IL8RA, IL8RB and the IL8RB pseudogene map within the NRAMP-VIL1 interval, with the physical distance (155 kb) from 5{prime} LSH to 3{prime} VIL1 representing {approx}3-fold that observed in the mouse. Partial sequencing of NRAMP confirmed the presence of the N-terminal proline/serine-rich putative SH3 binding domain in exon 2 of the human gene. Further analysis of Brazilian leprosy and visceral leishmaniasis pedigrees identified a rare second allele varying in a 9-nucleotide repeat motif of the exon 2 sequence but segregating independently of the disease phenotype. 38 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Synthesis and electroluminescence characterization of a new aluminum complex, [8-hydroxyquinoline] bis [2, 2'bipyridine] aluminum Al(Bpy)2q

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahul, Kumar; Ritu, Srivastava; Punita, Singh

    2016-01-01

    We have synthesized and characterized a new electroluminescent material, [8-hydroxyquinoline] bis [2,2'bipyridine] aluminum. A solution of this material Al(Bpy)2q in toluene showed absorption maxima at 380 nm, which was attributed to the moderate energy (π-π*) transitions of the aromatic rings. The photoluminescence spectrum of Al(Bpy)2q in the toluene solution showed a peak at 518 nm. This material shows thermal stability up to 300 °C. The structure of the device is ITO/F4-TCNQ (1 nm)/α-NPD (35 nm)/Al(Bpy)2q (35 nm)/ BCP (6 nm)/Alq3 (28 nm)/LiF (1 nm)/Al (150 nm). This device exhibited a luminescence peak at 515 nm (CIE coordinates, x = 0.32, y = 0.49). The maximum luminescence of the device was 214 cd/m2 at 21 V. The maximum current efficiency of OLED was 0.12 cd/A at 13 V and the maximum power efficiency was 0.03 lm/W at 10 V.

  14. Epilepsy phenotype associated with a chromosome 2q24.3 deletion involving SCN1A: Migrating partial seizures of infancy or atypical Dravet syndrome?

    PubMed

    Lim, Byung Chan; Hwang, Hee; Kim, Hunmin; Chae, Jong-Hee; Choi, Jieun; Kim, Ki Joong; Hwang, Yong Seung; Yum, Mi-Sun; Ko, Tae-Sung

    2015-01-01

    The deletion of a sodium channel gene cluster located on chromosome 2q24.3 is associated with variable epilepsy phenotypes, including Dravet syndrome and migrating partial seizures of infancy. Although SCN1A is considered as the major contributor to the epilepsy phenotype, the role of other sodium channel genes that map within this cluster has not been delineated. We presented five new cases with a chromosome 2q24.3 deletion involving SCN1A and investigated their epilepsy phenotype in relation to the extent of the deletion. Three cases with deletion of the whole sodium channel gene cluster (SCN3A, SCN2A, SCN1A, SCN9A, and SCN7A) exhibited a complex epilepsy phenotype that was atypical for Dravet syndrome and suggestive of migrating partial seizures of infancy: early seizure onset (before 2 months of age), severe developmental delay from seizure onset, multifocal interictal spikes, polymorphous focal seizures, and acquired microcephaly. Two cases with partial deletion of SCN1A and SCN9A and whole SCN1A deletion had an epilepsy phenotype of Dravet syndrome. A literature review of cases with chromosome 2q24.3 deletion revealed that, in most Dravet syndrome cases, it does not involve SCN2A and SCN3A, whereas a complex epilepsy phenotype that is shared with migrating partial seizures of infancy was associated with cases of deletion of the whole sodium channel gene cluster.

  15. De Novo 17q24.2-q24.3 microdeletion presenting with generalized hypertrichosis terminalis, gingival fibromatous hyperplasia, and distinctive facial features.

    PubMed

    Afifi, Hanan H; Fukai, Ryoko; Miyake, Noriko; Gamal El Din, Amina A; Eid, Maha M; Eid, Ola M; Thomas, Manal M; El-Badry, Tarek H; Tosson, Angie M S; Abdel-Salam, Ghada M H; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2015-10-01

    Generalized hypertrichosis is a feature of several genetic disorders, and the nosology of these entities is still provisional. Recent studies have implicated chromosome 17q24.2-q24.3 microdeletion and the reciprocal microduplication in a very rare form of congenital generalized hypertrichosis terminalis (CGHT) with or without gingival hyperplasia. Here, we report on a 5-year-old Egyptian girl born to consanguineous parents. The girl presented with CGHT and gingival hyperplasia for whom we performed detailed clinical, pathological, and molecular studies. The girl had coarse facies characterized by bilateral epicanthic folds, thick and abundant eyelashes, a broad nose, full cheeks, and lips that constituted the distinctive facial features for this syndrome. Biopsy of the gingiva showed epithelial marked acanthosis and hyperkeratosis with hyperplastic thick collagen bundles and dense fibrosis in the underlying tissues. Array analysis indicated a 17q24.2-q24.3 chromosomal microdeletion. We validated this microdeletion by real-time quantitative PCR and confirmed a perfect co-segregation of the disease phenotype within the family. In summary, this study indicates that 17q24.2-q24.3 microdeletion caused CGHT with gingival hyperplasia and distinctive facies, which should be differentiated from the autosomal recessive type that lacks the distinctive facies.

  16. Assessment of 2q23.1 Microdeletion Syndrome Implicates MBD5 as a Single Causal Locus of Intellectual Disability, Epilepsy, and Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Talkowski, Michael E.; Mullegama, Sureni V.; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; van Bon, Bregje W.M.; Shen, Yiping; Repnikova, Elena A.; Gastier-Foster, Julie; Thrush, Devon Lamb; Kathiresan, Sekar; Ruderfer, Douglas M.; Chiang, Colby; Hanscom, Carrie; Ernst, Carl; Lindgren, Amelia M.; Morton, Cynthia C.; An, Yu; Astbury, Caroline; Brueton, Louise A.; Lichtenbelt, Klaske D.; Ades, Lesley C.; Fichera, Marco; Romano, Corrado; Innis, Jeffrey W.; Williams, Charles A.; Bartholomew, Dennis; Van Allen, Margot I.; Parikh, Aditi; Zhang, Lilei; Wu, Bai-Lin; Pyatt, Robert E.; Schwartz, Stuart; Shaffer, Lisa G.; de Vries, Bert B.A.; Gusella, James F.; Elsea, Sarah H.

    2011-01-01

    Persons with neurodevelopmental disorders or autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often harbor chromosomal microdeletions, yet the individual genetic contributors within these regions have not been systematically evaluated. We established a consortium of clinical diagnostic and research laboratories to accumulate a large cohort with genetic alterations of chromosomal region 2q23.1 and acquired 65 subjects with microdeletion or translocation. We sequenced translocation breakpoints; aligned microdeletions to determine the critical region; assessed effects on mRNA expression; and examined medical records, photos, and clinical evaluations. We identified a single gene, methyl-CpG-binding domain 5 (MBD5), as the only locus that defined the critical region. Partial or complete deletion of MBD5 was associated with haploinsufficiency of mRNA expression, intellectual disability, epilepsy, and autistic features. Fourteen alterations, including partial deletions of noncoding regions not typically captured or considered pathogenic by current diagnostic screening, disrupted MBD5 alone. Expression profiles and clinical characteristics were largely indistinguishable between MBD5-specific alteration and deletion of the entire 2q23.1 interval. No copy-number alterations of MBD5 were observed in 7878 controls, suggesting MBD5 alterations are highly penetrant. We surveyed MBD5 coding variations among 747 ASD subjects compared to 2043 non-ASD subjects analyzed by whole-exome sequencing and detected an association with a highly conserved methyl-CpG-binding domain missense variant, p.79Gly>Glu (c.236G>A) (p = 0.012). These results suggest that genetic alterations of MBD5 cause features of 2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome and that this epigenetic regulator significantly contributes to ASD risk, warranting further consideration in research and clinical diagnostic screening and highlighting the importance of chromatin remodeling in the etiology of these complex disorders. PMID:21981781

  17. Assessment of 2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome implicates MBD5 as a single causal locus of intellectual disability, epilepsy, and autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Talkowski, Michael E; Mullegama, Sureni V; Rosenfeld, Jill A; van Bon, Bregje W M; Shen, Yiping; Repnikova, Elena A; Gastier-Foster, Julie; Thrush, Devon Lamb; Kathiresan, Sekar; Ruderfer, Douglas M; Chiang, Colby; Hanscom, Carrie; Ernst, Carl; Lindgren, Amelia M; Morton, Cynthia C; An, Yu; Astbury, Caroline; Brueton, Louise A; Lichtenbelt, Klaske D; Ades, Lesley C; Fichera, Marco; Romano, Corrado; Innis, Jeffrey W; Williams, Charles A; Bartholomew, Dennis; Van Allen, Margot I; Parikh, Aditi; Zhang, Lilei; Wu, Bai-Lin; Pyatt, Robert E; Schwartz, Stuart; Shaffer, Lisa G; de Vries, Bert B A; Gusella, James F; Elsea, Sarah H

    2011-10-01

    Persons with neurodevelopmental disorders or autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often harbor chromosomal microdeletions, yet the individual genetic contributors within these regions have not been systematically evaluated. We established a consortium of clinical diagnostic and research laboratories to accumulate a large cohort with genetic alterations of chromosomal region 2q23.1 and acquired 65 subjects with microdeletion or translocation. We sequenced translocation breakpoints; aligned microdeletions to determine the critical region; assessed effects on mRNA expression; and examined medical records, photos, and clinical evaluations. We identified a single gene, methyl-CpG-binding domain 5 (MBD5), as the only locus that defined the critical region. Partial or complete deletion of MBD5 was associated with haploinsufficiency of mRNA expression, intellectual disability, epilepsy, and autistic features. Fourteen alterations, including partial deletions of noncoding regions not typically captured or considered pathogenic by current diagnostic screening, disrupted MBD5 alone. Expression profiles and clinical characteristics were largely indistinguishable between MBD5-specific alteration and deletion of the entire 2q23.1 interval. No copy-number alterations of MBD5 were observed in 7878 controls, suggesting MBD5 alterations are highly penetrant. We surveyed MBD5 coding variations among 747 ASD subjects compared to 2043 non-ASD subjects analyzed by whole-exome sequencing and detected an association with a highly conserved methyl-CpG-binding domain missense variant, p.79Gly>Glu (c.236G>A) (p = 0.012). These results suggest that genetic alterations of MBD5 cause features of 2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome and that this epigenetic regulator significantly contributes to ASD risk, warranting further consideration in research and clinical diagnostic screening and highlighting the importance of chromatin remodeling in the etiology of these complex disorders.

  18. Observation of a sequential process in charge-asymmetric dissociation of CO2q + (q =4 ,5 ) upon the impact of highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Arnab; Tribedi, Lokesh C.; Misra, Deepankar

    2015-09-01

    The dynamics involved in three-body breakup of carbon dioxide upon the impact of 1-MeV Ar8 + ions is investigated. Among the six possible fragmentation channels of CO2q + (q =4 ,5 ) , where all fragments are charged, two charge-asymmetric fragmentation channels show evidence of a sequential breakup process. It has been observed that the molecular structures tend towards deformed geometry as the initial charge on the precursor molecular ion increases. The total energy deposition to the system is found to play a key role in deciding between different breakup pathways.

  19. Mild Phenotype in a Patient with a De Novo 6.3 Mb Distal Deletion at 10q26.2q26.3

    PubMed Central

    Tanteles, George A.; Nikolaou, Elpiniki; Christou, Yiolanda; Alexandrou, Angelos; Evangelidou, Paola; Christophidou-Anastasiadou, Violetta; Sismani, Carolina; Papacostas, Savvas S.

    2015-01-01

    We report on a 29-year-old Greek-Cypriot female with a de novo 6.3 Mb distal 10q26.2q26.3 deletion. She had a very mild neurocognitive phenotype with near normal development and intellect. In addition, she had certain distinctive features and postural orthostatic tachycardia. We review the relevant literature and postulate that certain of her features can be diagnostically relevant. This report illustrates the powerful diagnostic ability of array-CGH in the elucidation of relatively mild phenotypes. PMID:26294985

  20. Unique de novo interstitial deletion of chromosome 17, del(17) (q23.2q24.3) in a female newborn with multiple congenital anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, M.L.; Shaffer, L.G.; Lewis, R.L.

    1995-01-02

    We describe a newborn with a novel interstitial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 17 (del(17) (q23.2q24.3)) who died on day of life 17 during a recurrent apneic episode. Her phenotype included severe growth retardation, multiple facial anomalies, maldeveloped oralpharyngeal structures, and digital and widespread skeletal anomalies. This patient`s phenotype was compared to two other reported patients with deletion 17q with minor clinical overlap consistent with a unique deletion. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  1. Co-occurrence of mosaic supernumerary isochromosome 18p and intermittent 2q13 deletions in a child with multiple congenital anomalies.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Sushil Kumar; Kumar, Ashok; Ali, Akhtar; Rai, Amit Kumar

    2015-03-15

    The present study deals with karyotpye-phenotype correlations in a six month old child with multiple congenital abnormalities. Cytogenetic analysis revealed mosaicism of a small metacentric supernumerary marker chromosome with a karyotype mos 47,XY+mar[34]/46,XY[31]. Cytogenetic microarray result showed three copies of chromosome 18p (15,400 kb in size). Moreover, 255 kbp intermittent deletion of chromosome 2q13 involving RGPD5, RGPD6, LIMS3, and LIMS3-LOC440895 was also observed. Correlating microarray data with the mosaic karyotype, the marker chromosome was identified as mosaic isochromosome 18p and was found to be 32,600 kbp in size. Baby resembled clinical characteristics of trisomy chromosome 18p, isochromosome 18p and trisomy chromosome 18. The present study suggested that deletion of evolutionarily conserved developmental genes (RGPD5, RGPD and LIMS3) in the 2q13 region might have contributed to more severity in phenotype as compared to so far such reported cases of 18p trisomy's, as these are involved in nuclear-cytoplasm trafficking, signaling for tissue patterning and differentiation.

  2. Ab-initio study of structural and electronic properties of thin film and bulk forms of Bi2Q3 (Q = Se, Te) as topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjbardizaj, Ahmad; Mizuseki, Hiroshi; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2013-03-01

    Bi2Q3 (Q =Se, Te) are the best-known bulk thermoelectric materials, which have been demonstrated to be topological insulators (TI). TI's are insulators with conductive surface states consisting of a single Dirac cones. These materials have layered structures consisting of stacked quintuple layers (QL), with relatively weak coupling between the QL's. Therefore, it might be easy to prepare the Bi2Q3 in the form of thin films with particular thicknesses using the available experimental techniques. In this study, the electronic and structural properties of bulk Bi2Se3 are investigated using density functional theory. Our results show that the Bi2Se3 is an indirect semiconductor with energy gap of ~ 0.27 eV. Additionally, the electronic structure dependence of Bi2Se3to the thicknesses of thin films (n-QL's with n =1,2...9) is considered. It is observed that the electronic structure of this kind of thin films depends on the number of QL's. For n-QL's with n larger than three, the thin film has a bulk band gap and has protected conducting states on its surface. Moreover, the effect of number of layers (n) on band-gap energy is studied. Similar calculations and discussions are carried out for Bi2Te3 and the results are compared to the Bi2Se3 case and also the available theoretical and experimental results.

  3. Atypical Association of Angelman Syndrome and Klinefelter Syndrome in a Boy with 47,XXY Karyotype and Deletion 15q11.2-q13.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Javier; Peciña, Ana; Alonso-Luengo, Olga; González-Meneses, Antonio; Vázquez, Rocío; Antiñolo, Guillermo; Borrego, Salud

    2014-01-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS, OMIM 105830) is a neurogenetic disorder with firm clinical diagnostic guidelines, characterized by severe developmental delay and speech impairment, balanced and behavioral disturbance as well as microcephaly, seizures, and a characteristic electroencephalogram (EEG). The majority of AS cases (70%) are caused by a 15q11.2-q13 deletion on the maternally derived chromosome. The frequency of AS has been estimated to be between 1/10000 and 1/20000. Klinefelter syndrome (KS) occurs due to the presence of an extra X chromosome (karyotype 47,XXY). The main features in KS are small testes, hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, gynecomastia, learning difficulties, and infertility. We present what is, to our knowledge, the first case of a patient with both KS and AS due to a 15q11.2-q13 deletion on the maternally derived chromosome and an extra X chromosome of paternal origin. He showed dysmorphic features, axial hypotonia, and delayed acquisition of motor skills. Early diagnosis is essential for optimal treatment of AS children; this is one of the earliest diagnosed cases of AS probably due to the presence of two syndromes. Clinical findings in this patient here described may be helpful to identify any other cases and to evaluate recurrence risks in these families. PMID:25379297

  4. The methyl binding domain containing protein MBD5 is a transcriptional regulator responsible for 2q23.1 deletion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Walz, Katherina; Young, Juan I

    2014-01-01

    2Iq23.1 microdeletion syndrome is a recently described rare disease that includes intellectual disability, motor delay, autistic-like behaviors, and craniofacial abnormalities. Dosage insufficiency of the methyl-CpG-binding domain protein 5 (MBD5) gene was suggested as the genetic cause, since all the described patients carry a partial or total heterozygous deletion of MBD5. We reported the generation and characterization of a mouse model with haploinsufficiency for Mbd5 that confirmed this hypothesis. As in human 2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome, the MBD5+/GT mouse model exhibited abnormal social behavior, cognitive impairment, and motor and craniofacial abnormalities, supporting a causal role for MBD5 in 2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome. The use of mouse neuronal cultures uncovered a deficiency in neurite outgrowth, suggesting the participation of MBD5 in neuronal processes. The study of the MBD5+/GT mouse advanced our understanding of the abnormal brain development associated with behavioral and cognitive symptoms. PMID:26942102

  5. 2q23.1 microdeletion of the MBD5 gene in a female with seizures, developmental delay and distinct dysmorphic features.

    PubMed

    Noh, Grace J; Graham, John M

    2012-01-01

    We report a 2-year-old female who initially presented with seizures, developmental delay and dysmorphic features and was found to have a 0.3 Mb deletion at chromosome 2q23.1 encompassing the critical seizure gene, MBD5. Her distinct physical features include bifrontal narrowing with brachycephaly, low anterior hairline, hypotonic facial features with short upturned nose, flat nasal bridge, hypertelorism, tented upper lip with everted lower lip, downturned corners of her mouth, and relatively coarse facial features including thickened tongue. She also had a short neck, brachytelephalangy, clinodactyly, and hypertrichosis. At 3½ years she developed progressive ataxia and lost vocabulary at the age of 4. Regression has been reported in one other case of MBD5 deletion. MBD5 is a member of the methyl binding gene family and appears to be responsible for regulating DNA methylation in the central nervous system. Our patient was entirely deleted for the MBD5 gene with partial loss of the EPC2 gene, which suggests that haploinsufficiency of MBD5 is responsible for the distinct phenotype observed. This supports the hypothesis that MBD5 is indeed the critical gene implicated for the findings seen in patients with deletions of chromosome 2q23.1. Further studies are necessary to delineate the role that the MBD5 gene plays in the development of the brain and these specific physical characteristics.

  6. 2q23.1 microdeletion of the MBD5 gene in a female with seizures, developmental delay and distinct dysmorphic features.

    PubMed

    Noh, Grace J; Graham, John M

    2012-05-01

    We report a 2-year-old female who initially presented with seizures, developmental delay and dysmorphic features and was found to have a 0.3 Mb deletion at chromosome 2q23.1 encompassing the critical seizure gene, MBD5. Her distinct physical features include bifrontal narrowing with brachycephaly, low anterior hairline, hypotonic facial features with short upturned nose, flat nasal bridge, hypertelorism, tented upper lip with everted lower lip, downturned corners of her mouth, and relatively coarse facial features including thickened tongue. She also had a short neck, brachytelephalangy, clinodactyly, and hypertrichosis. At 3½ years she developed progressive ataxia and lost vocabulary at the age of 4. Regression has been reported in one other case of MBD5 deletion. MBD5 is a member of the methyl binding gene family and appears to be responsible for regulating DNA methylation in the central nervous system. Our patient was entirely deleted for the MBD5 gene with partial loss of the EPC2 gene, which suggests that haploinsufficiency of MBD5 is responsible for the distinct phenotype observed. This supports the hypothesis that MBD5 is indeed the critical gene implicated for the findings seen in patients with deletions of chromosome 2q23.1. Further studies are necessary to delineate the role that the MBD5 gene plays in the development of the brain and these specific physical characteristics.

  7. The methyl binding domain containing protein MBD5 is a transcriptional regulator responsible for 2q23.1 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Walz, Katherina; Young, Juan I

    2014-01-01

    2Iq23.1 microdeletion syndrome is a recently described rare disease that includes intellectual disability, motor delay, autistic-like behaviors, and craniofacial abnormalities. Dosage insufficiency of the methyl-CpG-binding domain protein 5 (MBD5) gene was suggested as the genetic cause, since all the described patients carry a partial or total heterozygous deletion of MBD5. We reported the generation and characterization of a mouse model with haploinsufficiency for Mbd5 that confirmed this hypothesis. As in human 2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome, the MBD5 (+/GT) mouse model exhibited abnormal social behavior, cognitive impairment, and motor and craniofacial abnormalities, supporting a causal role for MBD5 in 2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome. The use of mouse neuronal cultures uncovered a deficiency in neurite outgrowth, suggesting the participation of MBD5 in neuronal processes. The study of the MBD5 (+/GT) mouse advanced our understanding of the abnormal brain development associated with behavioral and cognitive symptoms.

  8. Neurodevelopmental features in 2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome: report of a new patient with intractable seizures and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Motobayashi, Mitsuo; Nishimura-Tadaki, Akira; Inaba, Yuji; Kosho, Tomoki; Miyatake, Satoko; Niimi, Taemi; Nishimura, Takafumi; Wakui, Keiko; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Koike, Kenichi

    2012-04-01

    2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome is a recently characterized chromosomal aberration disorder uncovered through array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH). Although the cardinal feature is intellectual disability (ID), neurodevelopmental features of the syndrome have not been systematically reviewed. We present a 5-year-old boy with severe psychomotor developmental delay/ID, progressive microcephaly with brain atrophy, growth retardation, and several external anomalies. He manifested intractable epilepsy, effectively treated with combined antiepileptic drug therapy including topiramate. Array CGH demonstrated a de novo interstitial deletion of approximately 1 Mb at 2q23.1-q23.2, involving four genes including MBD5. Nineteen patients have been reported to have the syndrome, including present patient. All patients whose data were available had ID, 17 patients (89%) had seizures, and microcephaly was evident in 9 of 18 patients (50%). Deletion sizes ranged from 200 kb to 5.5 Mb, comprising 1-15 genes. MBD5, the only gene deleted in all patients, is considered to be responsible for ID and epilepsy. Furthermore, the deletion junction was sequenced for the first time in a patient with the syndrome; and homology of three nucleotides, identified at the distal and proximal breakpoints, suggested that the deletion might have been mediated by recently-delineated genomic rearrangement mechanism Fork Stalling and Template Switching (FoSTeS)/microhomology-mediated break-induced replication (MMBIR).

  9. Characterization of Redox States of Ru(OH2)(Q)(tpy)2+ (Q = 3,5-di-tert-butyl-1,2-benzoquinone, tpy = 2,2#:6#,2#-terpyridine)and Related Species through Experimental and Theoretical Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Muckerman, J.T.; Tsai, M.-K.; , Rochford, J.; Polyansky, D.E.; Wada, T.; Tanaka, K.; Fujita, E.

    2009-04-27

    The redox states of Ru(OH{sub 2})(Q)(tpy){sup 2+} (Q = 3,5-di-tert-butyl-1,2-benzoquinone, tpy = 2,2':6',2''-terpyridine) are investigated through experimental and theoretical UV-vis spectra and Pourbaix diagrams. The electrochemical properties are reported for the species resulting from deprotonation and redox processes in aqueous solution. The formal oxidation states of the redox couples in the various intermediate complexes are systematically assigned using electronic structure theory. The controversy over the electronic assignment of ferromagnetic vs. antiferromagnetic coupling is investigated through comparison of ab initio methods and the broken-symmetry density functional theory (DFT) approach. The various pK{sub a} values and reduction potentials, including the consideration of proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET) processes, are calculated, and the theoretical version of the Pourbaix diagram is constructed in order to elucidate and assign several previously ambiguous regions in the experimental diagram.

  10. Common variants in LSP1, 2q35 and 8q24 and breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Sinilnikova, Olga M; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Nevanlinna, Heli; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Simard, Jacques; Spurdle, Amanda B; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Neuhausen, Susan L; Ding, Yuan C; Couch, Fergus J; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peissel, Bernard; Bonanni, Bernardo; Viel, Alessandra; Bernard, Loris; Radice, Paolo; Szabo, Csilla I; Foretova, Lenka; Zikan, Michal; Claes, Kathleen; Greene, Mark H; Mai, Phuong L; Rennert, Gad; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Andrulis, Irene L; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Glendon, Gord; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Thomassen, Mads; Sunde, Lone; Caligo, Maria A; Laitman, Yael; Kontorovich, Tair; Cohen, Shimrit; Kaufman, Bella; Dagan, Efrat; Baruch, Ruth Gershoni; Friedman, Eitan; Harbst, Katja; Barbany-Bustinza, Gisela; Rantala, Johanna; Ehrencrona, Hans; Karlsson, Per; Domchek, Susan M; Nathanson, Katherine L; Osorio, Ana; Blanco, Ignacio; Lasa, Adriana; Benítez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Rookus, Matti A; Collee, J Margriet; Devilee, Peter; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J; van der Luijt, Rob B; Aalfs, Cora M; Waisfisz, Quinten; Wijnen, Juul; van Roozendaal, Cornelis E P; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Frost, Debra; Oliver, Clare; Platte, Radka; Evans, D Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Eeles, Rosalind; Izatt, Louise; Davidson, Rosemarie; Chu, Carol; Eccles, Diana; Cole, Trevor; Hodgson, Shirley; Godwin, Andrew K; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Buecher, Bruno; Léoné, Mélanie; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Remenieras, Audrey; Caron, Olivier; Lenoir, Gilbert M; Sevenet, Nicolas; Longy, Michel; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Prieur, Fabienne; Goldgar, David; Miron, Alexander; John, Esther M; Buys, Saundra S; Daly, Mary B; Hopper, John L; Terry, Mary Beth; Yassin, Yosuf; Singer, Christian; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Staudigl, Christine; Hansen, Thomas v O; Barkardottir, Rosa Bjork; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Pal, Prodipto; Kosarin, Kristi; Offit, Kenneth; Piedmonte, Marion; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Wakeley, Katie; Boggess, John F; Basil, Jack; Schwartz, Peter E; Blank, Stephanie V; Toland, Amanda E; Montagna, Marco; Casella, Cinzia; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Allavena, Anna; Schmutzler, Rita K; Versmold, Beatrix; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Niederacher, Dieter; Deissler, Helmut; Fiebig, Britta; Suttner, Christian; Schönbuchner, Ines; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Pooley, Karen A; Easton, Douglas F; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2009-11-15

    Genome-wide association studies of breast cancer have identified multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with increased breast cancer risks in the general population. In a previous study, we demonstrated that the minor alleles at three of these SNPs, in FGFR2, TNRC9 and MAP3K1, also confer increased risks of breast cancer for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. Three additional SNPs rs3817198 at LSP1, rs13387042 at 2q35 and rs13281615 at 8q24 have since been reported to be associated with breast cancer in the general population, and in this study we evaluated their association with breast cancer risk in 9442 BRCA1 and 5665 BRCA2 mutation carriers from 33 study centres. The minor allele of rs3817198 was associated with increased breast cancer risk only for BRCA2 mutation carriers [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.16, 95% CI: 1.07-1.25, P-trend = 2.8 x 10(-4)]. The best fit for the association of SNP rs13387042 at 2q35 with breast cancer risk was a dominant model for both BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers (BRCA1: HR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.04-1.25, P = 0.0047; BRCA2: HR = 1.18 95% CI: 1.04-1.33, P = 0.0079). SNP rs13281615 at 8q24 was not associated with breast cancer for either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers, but the estimated association for BRCA2 mutation carriers (per-allele HR = 1.06, 95% CI: 0.98-1.14) was consistent with odds ratio estimates derived from population-based case-control studies. The LSP1 and 2q35 SNPs appear to interact multiplicatively on breast cancer risk for BRCA2 mutation carriers. There was no evidence that the associations vary by mutation type depending on whether the mutated protein is predicted to be stable or not.

  11. Two unusual hepatitis C virus subtypes, 2j and 2q, in Spain: Identification by nested-PCR and sequencing of a NS5B region.

    PubMed

    Margall, N; March, F; Español, M; Torras, X; Gallego, A; Coll, P

    2015-10-01

    Many studies have reported the use of the NS5B gene to subtype hepatitis C virus (HCV). Other HCV genes, such as HCV-5' UTR, Core (C) and E1, have also been used. In some studies, NS5B have been used together with 5'-UTR or C genes to improve genotyping results obtained using commercial procedures. Only two studies in Spain have compared molecular techniques versus commercial procedures regarding the efficacy of HCV subtyping. The aim of this study was to determine whether nested PCR and sequencing of a NS5B region was more reliable than commercial procedures to subtype HCV. We analyzed the results of HCV genotyping in [726] serum specimens collected from 2001 to 2013. From 2001 to 2011, we used PCR and INNO-LiPA hybridization or its new version Versant HCV Genotype 2.0 assay (471 samples). From 2012 to 2013, we used nested PCR and sequencing of a NS5B region (255 cases). This method used two pairs of primers to amplify the RNA of the sample converted to DNA by retrotranscription. The amplification product of 270 base pairs was further sequenced. To identify the subtype, the sequences obtained were compared to those in the international database: http://hcv.lanl.gov./content/sequence/, HCV/ToolsOutline.html and Geno2pheno[hcv] http://hcv.bioinf.mpi-inf.mpg.de/index.php. Nested PCR of a NS5B region and sequencing identified all but one subtype (0.4%, 1/255), differentiated all 1a subtypes from 1b subtypes, and characterized all HCV 2-4 subtypes. This approach also distinguished two subtypes, 2j and 2q, that had rarely been detected previously in Spain. However, commercial procedures failed to subtype 12.7% (60/471) of samples and to genotype 0.6% of specimens (3/471). Nested PCR and sequencing of a NS5B region improved the subtyping of HCV in comparison with classical procedures and identified two rare subtypes in Spain: 2j and 2q. However, full length genome sequencing is recommended to confirm HCV 2j and 2q subtypes.

  12. Common variants in LSP1, 2q35 and 8q24 and breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Sinilnikova, Olga M; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Nevanlinna, Heli; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Simard, Jacques; Spurdle, Amanda B; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Neuhausen, Susan L; Ding, Yuan C; Couch, Fergus J; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peissel, Bernard; Bonanni, Bernardo; Viel, Alessandra; Bernard, Loris; Radice, Paolo; Szabo, Csilla I; Foretova, Lenka; Zikan, Michal; Claes, Kathleen; Greene, Mark H; Mai, Phuong L; Rennert, Gad; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Andrulis, Irene L; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Glendon, Gord; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Thomassen, Mads; Sunde, Lone; Caligo, Maria A; Laitman, Yael; Kontorovich, Tair; Cohen, Shimrit; Kaufman, Bella; Dagan, Efrat; Baruch, Ruth Gershoni; Friedman, Eitan; Harbst, Katja; Barbany-Bustinza, Gisela; Rantala, Johanna; Ehrencrona, Hans; Karlsson, Per; Domchek, Susan M; Nathanson, Katherine L; Osorio, Ana; Blanco, Ignacio; Lasa, Adriana; Benítez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Rookus, Matti A; Collee, J Margriet; Devilee, Peter; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J; van der Luijt, Rob B; Aalfs, Cora M; Waisfisz, Quinten; Wijnen, Juul; van Roozendaal, Cornelis E P; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Frost, Debra; Oliver, Clare; Platte, Radka; Evans, D Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Eeles, Rosalind; Izatt, Louise; Davidson, Rosemarie; Chu, Carol; Eccles, Diana; Cole, Trevor; Hodgson, Shirley; Godwin, Andrew K; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Buecher, Bruno; Léoné, Mélanie; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Remenieras, Audrey; Caron, Olivier; Lenoir, Gilbert M; Sevenet, Nicolas; Longy, Michel; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Prieur, Fabienne; Goldgar, David; Miron, Alexander; John, Esther M; Buys, Saundra S; Daly, Mary B; Hopper, John L; Terry, Mary Beth; Yassin, Yosuf; Singer, Christian; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Staudigl, Christine; Hansen, Thomas v O; Barkardottir, Rosa Bjork; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Pal, Prodipto; Kosarin, Kristi; Offit, Kenneth; Piedmonte, Marion; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Wakeley, Katie; Boggess, John F; Basil, Jack; Schwartz, Peter E; Blank, Stephanie V; Toland, Amanda E; Montagna, Marco; Casella, Cinzia; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Allavena, Anna; Schmutzler, Rita K; Versmold, Beatrix; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Niederacher, Dieter; Deissler, Helmut; Fiebig, Britta; Suttner, Christian; Schönbuchner, Ines; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Pooley, Karen A; Easton, Douglas F; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2009-11-15

    Genome-wide association studies of breast cancer have identified multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with increased breast cancer risks in the general population. In a previous study, we demonstrated that the minor alleles at three of these SNPs, in FGFR2, TNRC9 and MAP3K1, also confer increased risks of breast cancer for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. Three additional SNPs rs3817198 at LSP1, rs13387042 at 2q35 and rs13281615 at 8q24 have since been reported to be associated with breast cancer in the general population, and in this study we evaluated their association with breast cancer risk in 9442 BRCA1 and 5665 BRCA2 mutation carriers from 33 study centres. The minor allele of rs3817198 was associated with increased breast cancer risk only for BRCA2 mutation carriers [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.16, 95% CI: 1.07-1.25, P-trend = 2.8 x 10(-4)]. The best fit for the association of SNP rs13387042 at 2q35 with breast cancer risk was a dominant model for both BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers (BRCA1: HR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.04-1.25, P = 0.0047; BRCA2: HR = 1.18 95% CI: 1.04-1.33, P = 0.0079). SNP rs13281615 at 8q24 was not associated with breast cancer for either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers, but the estimated association for BRCA2 mutation carriers (per-allele HR = 1.06, 95% CI: 0.98-1.14) was consistent with odds ratio estimates derived from population-based case-control studies. The LSP1 and 2q35 SNPs appear to interact multiplicatively on breast cancer risk for BRCA2 mutation carriers. There was no evidence that the associations vary by mutation type depending on whether the mutated protein is predicted to be stable or not. PMID:19656774

  13. Common variants in LSP1, 2q35 and 8q24 and breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Antoniou, Antonis C.; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Nevanlinna, Heli; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Simard, Jacques; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan C.; Couch, Fergus J.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peissel, Bernard; Bonanni, Bernardo; Viel, Alessandra; Bernard, Loris; Radice, Paolo; Szabo, Csilla I.; Foretova, Lenka; Zikan, Michal; Claes, Kathleen; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Rennert, Gad; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Andrulis, Irene L.; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Glendon, Gord; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Thomassen, Mads; Sunde, Lone; Caligo, Maria A.; Laitman, Yael; Kontorovich, Tair; Cohen, Shimrit; Kaufman, Bella; Dagan, Efrat; Baruch, Ruth Gershoni; Friedman, Eitan; Harbst, Katja; Barbany-Bustinza, Gisela; Rantala, Johanna; Ehrencrona, Hans; Karlsson, Per; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Osorio, Ana; Blanco, Ignacio; Lasa, Adriana; Benítez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Hogervorst, Frans B.L.; Rookus, Matti A.; Collee, J. Margriet; Devilee, Peter; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Waisfisz, Quinten; Wijnen, Juul; van Roozendaal, Cornelis E.P.; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Frost, Debra; Oliver, Clare; Platte, Radka; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Eeles, Rosalind; Izatt, Louise; Davidson, Rosemarie; Chu, Carol; Eccles, Diana; Cole, Trevor; Hodgson, Shirley; Godwin, Andrew K.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Buecher, Bruno; Léoné, Mélanie; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Remenieras, Audrey; Caron, Olivier; Lenoir, Gilbert M.; Sevenet, Nicolas; Longy, Michel; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Prieur, Fabienne; Goldgar, David; Miron, Alexander; John, Esther M.; Buys, Saundra S.; Daly, Mary B.; Hopper, John L.; Terry, Mary Beth; Yassin, Yosuf; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Staudigl, Christine; Hansen, Thomas v. O.; Barkardottir, Rosa Bjork; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Pal, Prodipto; Kosarin, Kristi; Offit, Kenneth; Piedmonte, Marion; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Wakeley, Katie; Boggess, John F.; Basil, Jack; Schwartz, Peter E.; Blank, Stephanie V.; Toland, Amanda E.; Montagna, Marco; Casella, Cinzia; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Allavena, Anna; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Versmold, Beatrix; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Niederacher, Dieter; Deißler, Helmut; Fiebig, Britta; Suttner, Christian; Schönbuchner, Ines; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Pooley, Karen A.; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2009-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies of breast cancer have identified multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with increased breast cancer risks in the general population. In a previous study, we demonstrated that the minor alleles at three of these SNPs, in FGFR2, TNRC9 and MAP3K1, also confer increased risks of breast cancer for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. Three additional SNPs rs3817198 at LSP1, rs13387042 at 2q35 and rs13281615 at 8q24 have since been reported to be associated with breast cancer in the general population, and in this study we evaluated their association with breast cancer risk in 9442 BRCA1 and 5665 BRCA2 mutation carriers from 33 study centres. The minor allele of rs3817198 was associated with increased breast cancer risk only for BRCA2 mutation carriers [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.16, 95% CI: 1.07–1.25, P-trend = 2.8 × 10−4]. The best fit for the association of SNP rs13387042 at 2q35 with breast cancer risk was a dominant model for both BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers (BRCA1: HR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.04–1.25, P = 0.0047; BRCA2: HR = 1.18 95% CI: 1.04–1.33, P = 0.0079). SNP rs13281615 at 8q24 was not associated with breast cancer for either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers, but the estimated association for BRCA2 mutation carriers (per-allele HR = 1.06, 95% CI: 0.98–1.14) was consistent with odds ratio estimates derived from population-based case–control studies. The LSP1 and 2q35 SNPs appear to interact multiplicatively on breast cancer risk for BRCA2 mutation carriers. There was no evidence that the associations vary by mutation type depending on whether the mutated protein is predicted to be stable or not. PMID:19656774

  14. Is t(10;11)(p11.2;q23) involving MLL and ABI-1 genes associated with congenital acute monocytic leukemia?

    PubMed

    Morerio, Cristina; Rosanda, Cristina; Rapella, Annamaria; Micalizzi, Concetta; Panarello, Claudio

    2002-11-01

    Congenital, or perinatal, leukemias are rarely observed, but retrospective molecular studies seem to suggest a more frequent onset in prenatal life. Myelocytic types are common, and chromosome band 11q23 rearrangements at the MLL locus are characteristic genetic markers. The fusion of the MLL gene with one of its partners, ABI-1, has recently been described in two infant leukemia patients with monocytic involvement and good clinical outcome. We report a case of congenital monocytic leukemia with the same gene involvement and good response to chemotherapy. The blast metaphases were probed by fluorescence in situ hybridization, and t(10;11)(p11.2;q23) involving MLL and ABI-1 genes was demonstrated with the same breakpoint in ABI-1. The congenital presentation of this case suggests a possible relationship of this genetic event with in utero leukemogenesis.

  15. Recurrent 70.8 Mb 4q22.2q32.3 duplication due to ovarian germinal mosaicism

    PubMed Central

    Tosca, Lucie; Brisset, Sophie; Petit, François M; Lecerf, Laure; Rousseau, Ghislaine; Bas, Cécile; Laroudie, Mireille; Maurin, Marie-Laure; Tapia, Sylvie; Picone, Olivier; Prevot, Sophie; Goossens, Michel; Labrune, Philippe; Tachdjian, Gérard

    2010-01-01

    A mosaicism is defined by the presence of two or more populations of cells with different genotypes in one individual. Chromosomal germinal mosaicism occurs in germ cells before the onset of meiosis. Previously, few studies have described germinal mosaicism. In this study, we report on two siblings who carried identical pure and direct interstitial 4q22.2q32.3 duplication. Procedure investigations included complete clinical description, conventional cytogenetic analysis, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) array experiments and microsatellite study searching for parental origin of the duplication. Microarray CGH and further FISH experiments with BAC clones showed the same 70.8 Mb direct duplication, dup(4)(q22.2q32.3). Molecular studies of the 4q duplication were consistent with maternal origin associated with mitotic or meiotic rearrangements. This structural chromosomal aberration was associated in both cases with increased nuchal translucency, growth retardation and dysmorphy. Cardiopathy and lung malformations were only evident in the first case. These clinical manifestations are similar to those previously reported in previous studies involving pure 4q trisomy of the same region, except for thumb and renal abnormalities that were not obvious in the presented cases. The amplified region included genes involved in neurological development (NEUROG2, MAB21L2, PCDH10/18 and GRIA2). The recurrent 4q duplication in these siblings is consistent with a maternal ovarian germinal mosaicism. This is the first description of germinal mosaicism for a large chromosomal duplication and highlights that genetic counselling for apparently de novo chromosome aberration should be undertaken with care. PMID:20424646

  16. Linkage mapping of the gene for Type III collagen (COL3A1) to human chromosome 2q using a VNTR polymorphism

    SciTech Connect

    Tiller, G.E.; Polumbo, P.A.; Summar, M.L. )

    1994-03-15

    The gene for the [alpha]1(III) chain of type III collagen, COL3A1, has been previously mapped to human chromosome 2q24.3-q31 by in situ hybridization. Physical mapping by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis has demonstrated that COL3A1 lies within 35 kb of COL5A2. The authors genotyped the CEPH families at the COL3A2 locus using a pentanucleotide repeat polymorphism within intron 25. They demonstrated significant linkage to 18 anonymous markers as well as the gene for carbamyl phosphate synthetase (CPSI), which had been previously mapped to this region. No recombination was seen between COL3A1 and COL5A2 (Z = 9.93 at [theta] = 0) or D2S24 (Z = 10.55 at [theta] = 0). The locus order is (D2S32-D2S138-D2S148)-(D2S24-COL5A2-COL3A1)-(D2S118-D2S161), with odds of 1:2300 for the next most likely order. These relationships are consistent with the physical mapping of COL3A1 to the distal portion of 2q and place it proximal to CPSI by means of multipoint analysis. These linkage relationships should prove useful in further studies of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV and carbamyl phosphate synthetase I deficiency and provide an additional framework for localizing other genes in this region. 13 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Array-CGH in patients with Kabuki-like phenotype: Identification of two patients with complex rearrangements including 2q37 deletions and no other recurrent aberration

    PubMed Central

    Cuscó, Ivon; del Campo, Miguel; Vilardell, Mireia; González, Eva; Gener, Blanca; Galán, Enrique; Toledo, Laura; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A

    2008-01-01

    Background Kabuki syndrome (KS) is a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome characterized by specific facial features, mild to moderate mental retardation, postnatal growth delay, skeletal abnormalities, and unusual dermatoglyphic patterns with prominent fingertip pads. A 3.5 Mb duplication at 8p23.1-p22 was once reported as a specific alteration in KS but has not been confirmed in other patients. The molecular basis of KS remains unknown. Methods We have studied 16 Spanish patients with a clinical diagnosis of KS or KS-like to search for genomic imbalances using genome-wide array technologies. All putative rearrangements were confirmed by FISH, microsatellite markers and/or MLPA assays, which also determined whether the imbalance was de novo or inherited. Results No duplication at 8p23.1-p22 was observed in our patients. We detected complex rearrangements involving 2q in two patients with Kabuki-like features: 1) a de novo inverted duplication of 11 Mb with a 4.5 Mb terminal deletion, and 2) a de novo 7.2 Mb-terminal deletion in a patient with an additional de novo 0.5 Mb interstitial deletion in 16p. Additional copy number variations (CNV), either inherited or reported in normal controls, were identified and interpreted as polymorphic variants. No specific CNV was significantly increased in the KS group. Conclusion Our results further confirmed that genomic duplications of 8p23 region are not a common cause of KS and failed to detect other recurrent rearrangement causing this disorder. The detection of two patients with 2q37 deletions suggests that there is a phenotypic overlap between the two conditions, and screening this region in the Kabuki-like patients should be considered. PMID:18405349

  18. The link between intraneuronal N-truncated amyloid-β peptide and oxidatively modified lipids in idiopathic autism and dup(15q11.2-q13)/autism

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder of unknown etiopathogenesis associated with structural and functional abnormalities of neurons and increased formation of reactive oxygen species. Our previous study revealed enhanced accumulation of amino-terminally truncated amyloid-β (Aβ) in brain neurons and glia in children and adults with autism. Verification of the hypothesis that intraneuronal Aβ may cause oxidative stress was the aim of this study. Results The relationships between neuronal Aβ and oxidative stress markers—4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) and malondialdehyde (MDA)—were examined in the frontal cortex from individuals aged 7–32 years with idiopathic autism or with chromosome 15q11.2-q13 duplications (dup(15)) with autism, and age-matched controls. Quantification of confocal microscopy images revealed significantly higher levels of neuronal N-truncated Aβ and HNE and MDA in idiopathic autism and dup(15)/autism than in controls. Lipid peroxidation products were detected in all mitochondria and lipofuscin deposits, in numerous autophagic vacuoles and lysosomes, and in less than 5% of synapses. Neuronal Aβ was co-localized with HNE and MDA, and increased Aβ levels correlated with higher levels of HNE and MDA. Conclusions The results suggest a self-enhancing pathological process in autism that is initiated by intraneuronal deposition of N-truncated Aβ in childhood. The cascade of events includes altered APP metabolism and abnormal intracellular accumulation of N-terminally truncated Aβ which is a source of reactive oxygen species, which in turn increase the formation of lipid peroxidation products. The latter enhance Aβ deposition and sustain the cascade of changes contributing to metabolic and functional impairments of neurons in autism of an unknown etiology and caused by chromosome 15q11.2-q13 duplication. PMID:24252310

  19. Small rare recurrent deletions and reciprocal duplications in 2q21.1, including brain-specific ARHGEF4 and GPR148

    PubMed Central

    Dharmadhikari, Avinash V.; Kang, Sung-Hae L.; Szafranski, Przemyslaw; Person, Richard E.; Sampath, Srirangan; Prakash, Siddharth K.; Bader, Patricia I.; Phillips, John A.; Hannig, Vickie; Williams, Misti; Vinson, Sherry S.; Wilfong, Angus A.; Reimschisel, Tyler E.; Craigen, William J.; Patel, Ankita; Bi, Weimin; Lupski, James R.; Belmont, John; Cheung, Sau Wai; Stankiewicz, Pawel

    2012-01-01

    We have identified a rare small (∼450 kb unique sequence) recurrent deletion in a previously linked attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) locus at 2q21.1 in five unrelated families with developmental delay (DD)/intellectual disability (ID), ADHD, epilepsy and other neurobehavioral abnormalities from 17 035 samples referred for clinical chromosomal microarray analysis. Additionally, a DECIPHER (http://decipher.sanger.ac.uk) patient 2311 was found to have the same deletion and presented with aggressive behavior. The deletion was not found in either six control groups consisting of 13 999 healthy individuals or in the DGV database. We have also identified reciprocal duplications in five unrelated families with autism, developmental delay (DD), seizures and ADHD. This genomic region is flanked by large, complex low-copy repeats (LCRs) with directly oriented subunits of ∼109 kb in size that have 97.7% DNA sequence identity. We sequenced the deletion breakpoints within the directly oriented paralogous subunits of the flanking LCR clusters, demonstrating non-allelic homologous recombination as a mechanism of formation. The rearranged segment harbors five genes: GPR148, FAM123C, ARHGEF4, FAM168B and PLEKHB2. Expression of ARHGEF4 (Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor 4) is restricted to the brain and may regulate the actin cytoskeletal network, cell morphology and migration, and neuronal function. GPR148 encodes a G-protein-coupled receptor protein expressed in the brain and testes. We suggest that small rare recurrent deletion of 2q21.1 is pathogenic for DD/ID, ADHD, epilepsy and other neurobehavioral abnormalities and, because of its small size, low frequency and more severe phenotype might have been missed in other previous genome-wide screening studies using single-nucleotide polymorphism analyses. PMID:22543972

  20. An investigation of structural parameters and magnetic and optical properties of EuLn{sub 2}Q{sub 4} (Ln=Tb-Lu, Q=S, Se)

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Gengbang; Choi, Eun Sang; Guertin, Robert P.; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2008-01-15

    EuLn{sub 2}Q{sub 4} (Ln=Tb-Lu; Q=S, Se) has been synthesized using Sb{sub 2}Q{sub 3} (Q=S, Se) fluxes at 1000 deg. C. These compounds crystallize in a CaFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-type three-dimensional channel structure that is built from edge-shared double rutile chains of [LnQ{sub 6}] octahedra running down the b-axis. Each double chain is connected at the vertices to four other double chains to form open channels where bicapped trigonal prismatic Eu{sup 2+} ions reside. All of these compounds show antiferromagnetic ordering with Neel temperatures, T{sub N}{approx}3-4 K. The optical band gaps for EuTb{sub 2}Se{sub 4}, EuDy{sub 2}Se{sub 4}, EuHo{sub 2}Se{sub 4}, EuEr{sub 2}Se{sub 4}, EuTm{sub 2}Se{sub 4}, EuYb{sub 2}Se{sub 4} EuLu{sub 2}Se{sub 4}, and EuYb{sub 2}S{sub 4} are found to be 2.0, 1.8, 1.8, 1.7, 1.8, 1.3, 1.7, and 1.6 eV, respectively. - Graphical abstract: A view of the three-dimensional channel structure of EuYb{sub 2}S{sub 4} down the b-axis.

  1. Oxidation state analysis of a four-component redox series [Os(pap)2(Q)]n involving two different non-innocent ligands on a redox-active transition metal.

    PubMed

    Das, Dipanwita; Sarkar, Biprajit; Mondal, Tapan Kumar; Mobin, Shaikh M; Fiedler, Jan; Kaim, Wolfgang; Lahiri, Goutam Kumar

    2011-08-01

    Complexes [Os(pap)(2)(Q)] (1-4) have been obtained and structurally characterized for pap = 2-phenylazopyridine and Q = 4,6-di-tert-butyl-N-aryl-o-iminobenzoquinone (aryl = phenyl (1), 3,5-dichlorophenyl (2), 3,5-dimethoxyphenyl (3), or 3,5-di-tert-butylphenyl (4)). The oxidized form (3)(ClO(4))(2) was also crystallographically characterized while the odd-electron intermediates [Os(pap)(2)(Q)](+) (1(+)-4(+)) and [Os(pap)(2)(Q)](-) (2(-)) were investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and UV-vis-NIR spectroelectrochemistry in conjunction with density functional theory (DFT) spin density and time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) calculations. The results from the structural, spectroscopic, and electrochemical experiments and from the computational studies allow for the assignments [Os(II)(pap(0))(2)(Q(0))](2+), [Os(II)(pap(0))(2)(Q(•-))](+), [Os(IV)(pap(•-))(2)(Q(2-))], and [Os(II)(pap(•-))(pap(0))(Q(2-))](-), with comproportionation constants K(c) ≈ 10(3.5), 10(10), 10(18), and 10(5), respectively. The redox potentials and the comproportionation constants exhibit similarities and differences between Ru and Os analogues. While the Q-based redox reactions show identical potentials, the more metal-involving processes exhibit cathodic shifts for the osmium systems, leading to distinctly different comproportionation constants for some intermediates, especially to a stabilization of the neutral osmium compounds described in this article. The example [Os(pap)(2)(Q)](n) illustrates especially the power of combined structural and EPR analysis with support from DFT towards the valence state description of transition metal complexes incorporating redox non-innocent ligands. PMID:21699145

  2. A novel interstitial deletion of 2q22.3 q23.3 in a patient with dysmorphic features, epilepsy, aganglionosis, pure red cell aplasia, and skeletal malformations.

    PubMed

    Bravo-Oro, Antonio; Lurie, Iosif W; Elizondo-Cárdenas, Gabriela; Peña-Zepeda, Claudia; Salazar-Martínez, Abel; Correa-González, Cecilia; Castrillo, José Luis; Avila, Silvia; Esmer, Carmen

    2015-08-01

    Many chromosomal deletions encompassing the 2q23.1 region have been described ranging from small deletions of 38 kb up to >19 Mb. Most phenotypic features of the 2q23.1 deletion syndrome are due to a MBD5 gene loss independent of the size of the deletion. Here, we describe a male patient harboring a novel interstitial deletion encompassing the 2q22.3 q23.3 chromosomal region. Array-CGH revealed a 7.1 Mb deletion causing haploinsufficiency of several genes including MBD5, ACVR2, KIF5C, and EPC2. This patient presents with additional findings to those already described in individuals who have deletions of MBD5 including toes absence of halluces, pure red cell aplasia, and intestinal aganglionosis. Interestingly, in the deleted region there are previously identified regulatory sequences which are located upstream to ZEB2, which is associated with Hirschsprung disease (HSCR). Several genes have been associated with pure red cell aplasia, but to our knowledge, this is the first time that 2q deletion is associated with this phenotype. These additional findings should be added to the list of manifestations associated with 2q deletion, and provide support for the hypothesis that this individual has a true contiguous gene deletion syndrome. PMID:25988649

  3. A novel interstitial deletion of 2q22.3 q23.3 in a patient with dysmorphic features, epilepsy, aganglionosis, pure red cell aplasia, and skeletal malformations.

    PubMed

    Bravo-Oro, Antonio; Lurie, Iosif W; Elizondo-Cárdenas, Gabriela; Peña-Zepeda, Claudia; Salazar-Martínez, Abel; Correa-González, Cecilia; Castrillo, José Luis; Avila, Silvia; Esmer, Carmen

    2015-08-01

    Many chromosomal deletions encompassing the 2q23.1 region have been described ranging from small deletions of 38 kb up to >19 Mb. Most phenotypic features of the 2q23.1 deletion syndrome are due to a MBD5 gene loss independent of the size of the deletion. Here, we describe a male patient harboring a novel interstitial deletion encompassing the 2q22.3 q23.3 chromosomal region. Array-CGH revealed a 7.1 Mb deletion causing haploinsufficiency of several genes including MBD5, ACVR2, KIF5C, and EPC2. This patient presents with additional findings to those already described in individuals who have deletions of MBD5 including toes absence of halluces, pure red cell aplasia, and intestinal aganglionosis. Interestingly, in the deleted region there are previously identified regulatory sequences which are located upstream to ZEB2, which is associated with Hirschsprung disease (HSCR). Several genes have been associated with pure red cell aplasia, but to our knowledge, this is the first time that 2q deletion is associated with this phenotype. These additional findings should be added to the list of manifestations associated with 2q deletion, and provide support for the hypothesis that this individual has a true contiguous gene deletion syndrome.

  4. The human MCP-3 gene (SCYA7): Cloning, sequence analysis, and assignment to the C-C chemokine gene cluster on chromosome 17q11. 2-q12

    SciTech Connect

    Opdenakker, G.; Fiten, P.; Nys, G.; Froyen, G.; Van Damme, J. ); Van Roy, N.; Speleman, F.; Laureys, G. )

    1994-05-15

    Monocyte chemotactic proteins (MCPs) are chemokines involved in macrophage recruitment during inflammation and cancer. A full-size MCP-3 cDNA was used to isolate the functional human MCP-3 gene. Based on restriction analysis, subclones were selected and the MCP-3 gene sequence was completed. In addition to a dense region with direct and inverted repeats and palindromic sequences, a double microsatellite (CA)[sub n]-(GA)[sub n] was found at the 5[prime]-end of the MCP-3 gene, and an RFLP was detected. The gene was regionally mapped by fluorescence in situ hybridization to human chromosome 17, subbands q11.2-q12. This site contains the MCP-subset of C-C chemokines and can be distinguished from the syntenic MIP-1[alpha] locus. SCYA7 was assigned as the locus symbol of the MCP-3 gene. Double-labeling experiments confirmed the regional assignment of the MCP-3 gene close to the ERBB2 locus on human chromosome 17. 36 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Organization of the human gene for nucleobindin (NUC) and its chromosomal assignment to 19q13.2-q13.4.

    PubMed

    Miura, K; Hirai, M; Kanai, Y; Kurosawa, Y

    1996-06-01

    Nucleobindin (Nuc) was first identified as a secreted protein of 55 kDa that promotes production of DNA-specific antibodies in lupus-prone MRL/lpr mice. Analysis of cDNA that encoded Nuc revealed that the protein is composed of a signal peptide, a DNA-binding site, two calcium-binding motifs (EF-hand motifs), and a leucine zipper. In the present study, we analyzed the organization of the human gene for Nuc (NUC). It consists of 13 exons that are distributed in a region of 32 kb. The functional motifs listed above are encoded in corresponding exons. NUC was expressed in all organs examined. Comparison of nucleotide sequences in the promoter regions between human and mouse NUC genes revealed several conserved sequences. Among them, two Sp1-binding sites and a CCAAT box are of particular interest. The promoter is of the TATA-less type, and transcription starts at multiple sites in both the human and the mouse genes. These features suggest that NUC might normally play a role as a housekeeping gene. NUC was located at human chromosome 19q13.2-q13.4.

  6. Inherited Xq13.2-q21.31 duplication in a boy with recurrent seizures and pubertal gynecomastia: Clinical, chromosomal and aCGH characterization.

    PubMed

    Linhares, Natália D; Valadares, Eugênia R; da Costa, Silvia S; Arantes, Rodrigo R; de Oliveira, Luiz Roberto; Rosenberg, Carla; Vianna-Morgante, Angela M; Svartman, Marta

    2016-09-01

    We report on a 16-year-old boy with a maternally inherited ~ 18.3 Mb Xq13.2-q21.31 duplication delimited by aCGH. As previously described in patients with similar duplications, his clinical features included intellectual disability, developmental delay, speech delay, generalized hypotonia, infantile feeding difficulties, self-injurious behavior, short stature and endocrine problems. As additional findings, he presented recurrent seizures and pubertal gynecomastia. His mother was phenotypically normal and had completely skewed inactivation of the duplicated X chromosome, as most female carriers of such duplications. Five previously reported patients with partial Xq duplications presented duplication breakpoints similar to those of our patient. One of them, a fetus with multiple congenital abnormalities, had the same cytogenetic duplication breakpoint. Three of the reported patients shared many features with our proband but the other had some clinical features of the Prader-Willi syndrome. It was suggested that ATRX overexpression could be involved in the major clinical features of patients with partial Xq duplications. We propose that this gene could also be involved with the obesity of the patient with the Prader-Willi-like phenotype. Additionally, we suggest that the PCDH11X gene could be a candidate for our patient's recurrent seizures. In males, the Xq13-q21 duplication should be considered in the differential diagnosis of Prader-Willi syndrome, as previously suggested, and neuromuscular diseases, particularly mitochondriopathies. PMID:27617217

  7. Inherited Xq13.2-q21.31 duplication in a boy with recurrent seizures and pubertal gynecomastia: Clinical, chromosomal and aCGH characterization.

    PubMed

    Linhares, Natália D; Valadares, Eugênia R; da Costa, Silvia S; Arantes, Rodrigo R; de Oliveira, Luiz Roberto; Rosenberg, Carla; Vianna-Morgante, Angela M; Svartman, Marta

    2016-09-01

    We report on a 16-year-old boy with a maternally inherited ~ 18.3 Mb Xq13.2-q21.31 duplication delimited by aCGH. As previously described in patients with similar duplications, his clinical features included intellectual disability, developmental delay, speech delay, generalized hypotonia, infantile feeding difficulties, self-injurious behavior, short stature and endocrine problems. As additional findings, he presented recurrent seizures and pubertal gynecomastia. His mother was phenotypically normal and had completely skewed inactivation of the duplicated X chromosome, as most female carriers of such duplications. Five previously reported patients with partial Xq duplications presented duplication breakpoints similar to those of our patient. One of them, a fetus with multiple congenital abnormalities, had the same cytogenetic duplication breakpoint. Three of the reported patients shared many features with our proband but the other had some clinical features of the Prader-Willi syndrome. It was suggested that ATRX overexpression could be involved in the major clinical features of patients with partial Xq duplications. We propose that this gene could also be involved with the obesity of the patient with the Prader-Willi-like phenotype. Additionally, we suggest that the PCDH11X gene could be a candidate for our patient's recurrent seizures. In males, the Xq13-q21 duplication should be considered in the differential diagnosis of Prader-Willi syndrome, as previously suggested, and neuromuscular diseases, particularly mitochondriopathies.

  8. Organization of the human gene for nucleobindin (NUC) and its chromosomal assignment to 19q13.2-q13.4

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, Keiji; Kurosawa, Yoshikazu; Hirai, Momoki

    1996-06-01

    Nucleobindin (Nuc) was first identified as a secreted protein of 55 kDa that promotes production of DNA-specific antibodies in lupus-prone MRL/lpr mice. Analysis of cDNA that encoded Nuc revealed that the protein is composed of a signal peptide, a DNA-binding site, two calcium-binding motifs (EF-hand motifs), and a leucine zipper. In the present study, we analysed the organization of the human gene for Nuc (NUC). It consists of 13 exons that are distributed in a region of 32 kb. The functional motifs listed above are encoded in corresponding exons. NUC was expressed in all organs examined. Comparison of nucleotide sequences in the promotre regions between human and mouse NCU genes revealed several conserved sequences. Among them, two Sp1-binding sites and a CCAAT box are of particular interest. The promoter is of the TATA-less type, and transcription starts at multiple sites in both the human and the mouse genes. These features suggest that NUC might normally play a role as a housekeeping gene. NUC was located at human chromosome 19q13.2-q13.4. 25 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. A de novo interstitial deletion of 7q31.2q31.31 identified in a girl with developmental delay and hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianhua; Noon, Sarah E; Krantz, Ian D; Wu, Yaning

    2016-06-01

    We report on a 4-year-old female who presented with unilateral sensorineural hearing loss and a concern for developmental delay. A genome-wide SNP array analysis was performed and revealed a de novo 3.2 Mb interstitial deletion of chromosome 7q31.2q31.31. This region contains thirteen protein-encoding genes. It is unknown whether haploinsufficiency of any of these genes is responsible for the clinical features of our patient. We reviewed, the clinical phenotype of a previously published 7q31.3 deletion patient and 18 additional patients with overlapping 7q31 deletions listed in the DECIPHER database. The most consistent feature in these patients and our proband is delayed speech and language development. Hearing loss is presented both in our proband and the published 7q31.3 patient. Our study suggests that a small region on chromosome 7q31.3 encompassing four genes, CFTR, CTTNBP2, NAA38, and ANKRD7, may represent a new locus for congenital hearing loss and/or speech development. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27075776

  10. A novel locus for alopecia with mental retardation syndrome (APMR2) maps to chromosome 3q26.2-q26.31.

    PubMed

    Wali, A; John, P; Gul, A; Lee, K; Chishti, M S; Ali, G; Hassan, M J; Leal, S M; Ahmad, W

    2006-09-01

    Congenital alopecia may occur either alone or in association with ectodermal and other abnormalities. On the bases of such associations, several different syndromes featuring congenital alopecia can be distinguished. Alopecia with mental retardation syndrome (APMR) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder, clinically characterized by total or partial hair loss and mental retardation. In the present study, a five-generation Pakistani family with multiple affected individuals with APMR was ascertained. Patients in this family exhibited typical features of APMR syndrome. The disease locus was mapped to chromosome 3q26.2-q26.31 by carrying out a genome scan followed by fine mapping. A maximum two-point logarithm of odds (LOD) score of 2.93 at theta=0.0 was obtained at markers D3S3053 and D3S2309. Multipoint linkage analysis resulted in a maximum LOD score of 4.57 with several markers, which supports the linkage. The disease locus was flanked by markers D3S1564 and D3S2427, which corresponds to 9.6-cM region according to the Rutgers combined linkage-physical map of the human genome (build 35) and contains 5.6 Mb. The linkage interval of the APMR locus identified here does not overlap with the one described previously; therefore, this locus has been designated as APMR2.

  11. Structural, half-metallic magnetism and elastic properties of the KMnQ2 (Q=O, S, Se, Te) chalcogenides from first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benmakhlouf, A.; Bentabet, A.; Bouhemadou, A.; Maabed, S.; Benghia, A.; Khenata, R.; Bin-Omran, S.

    2016-06-01

    The structural, electronic, magnetic and elastic properties of the ternary chalcogenides KMnQ2 (Q=O, S, Se, Te) crystals were investigated by means of spin-polarized density functional theory calculations. The 3d orbitals of the Mn atoms were treated using the GGA+U approach. The calculated equilibrium structural parameters agree well with the experimental data. Based on the analysis of the spin-polarized band structures and density of states, we predict the half-metallic character of the studied compounds, with a half-metallic gap of 1.38 eV, 0.53 eV, 0.37 eV and 0.14 eV for KMnO2, KMnS2, KMnSe2 and KMnTe2, respectively, and a total magnetic moment of 4.00μB per unit-cell for all considered structures. The examined properties for the title compounds include also the single-crystal elastic constants, bulk modulus, shear modulus, Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio.

  12. Variation at 2q35 (PNKD and TMBIM1) influences colorectal cancer risk and identifies a pleiotropic effect with inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Orlando, Giulia; Law, Philip J.; Palin, Kimmo; Tuupanen, Sari; Gylfe, Alexandra; Hänninen, Ulrika A.; Cajuso, Tatiana; Tanskanen, Tomas; Kondelin, Johanna; Kaasinen, Eevi; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Kaprio, Jaakko; Eriksson, Johan G.; Rissanen, Harri; Knekt, Paul; Pukkala, Eero; Jousilahti, Pekka; Salomaa, Veikko; Ripatti, Samuli; Palotie, Aarno; Järvinen, Heikki; Renkonen-Sinisalo, Laura; Lepistö, Anna; Böhm, Jan; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka; Al-Tassan, Nada A.; Palles, Claire; Martin, Lynn; Barclay, Ella; Tenesa, Albert; Farrington, Susan; Timofeeva, Maria N.; Meyer, Brian F.; Wakil, Salma M.; Campbell, Harry; Smith, Christopher G.; Idziaszczyk, Shelley; Maughan, Timothy S.; Kaplan, Richard; Kerr, Rachel; Kerr, David; Buchanan, Daniel D.; Ko Win, Aung; Hopper, John; Jenkins, Mark; Lindor, Noralane M.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Gallinger, Steve; Conti, David; Schumacher, Fred; Casey, Graham; Taipale, Jussi; Cheadle, Jeremy P.; Dunlop, Malcolm G.; Tomlinson, Ian P.; Aaltonen, Lauri A.; Houlston, Richard S.

    2016-01-01

    To identify new risk loci for colorectal cancer (CRC), we conducted a meta-analysis of seven genome-wide association studies (GWAS) with independent replication, totalling 13 656 CRC cases and 21 667 controls of European ancestry. The combined analysis identified a new risk association for CRC at 2q35 marked by rs992157 (P = 3.15 × 10−8, odds ratio = 1.10, 95% confidence interval = 1.06–1.13), which is intronic to PNKD (paroxysmal non-kinesigenic dyskinesia) and TMBIM1 (transmembrane BAX inhibitor motif containing 1). Intriguingly this susceptibility single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) is in strong linkage disequilibrium (r2 = 0.90, D′ = 0.96) with the previously discovered GWAS SNP rs2382817 for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Following on from this observation we examined for pleiotropy, or shared genetic susceptibility, between CRC and the 200 established IBD risk loci, identifying an additional 11 significant associations (false discovery rate [FDR]) < 0.05). Our findings provide further insight into the biological basis of inherited genetic susceptibility to CRC, and identify risk factors that may influence the development of both CRC and IBD. PMID:27005424

  13. A unique de novo interstitial deletion of chromosome 17, del(17)(q23.2q24.3) in a female newborn with multiple congenital anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, M.L.; Shaffer, L.G.; Lewis, R.A.

    1994-09-01

    Contiguous gene or microdeletion syndromes occurring on chromosome 17p include the Smith-Magenis and Miller-Dieker syndromes associated with interstitial deletions of 17p11.2 and 17p13.3, respectively. Other cytogenetically visible interstitial deletions on chromosome 17 are quite rare or unique. We describe a newborn with a novel interstitial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 17 [del(17)(q23.2q24.3)] who died on day of life 17 during a recurrent apneic episode. We have compared our patient`s phenotype and karyotype to two reported patients with deletion 17q with minor clinical overlap. The most striking clinical features of this patient were severe intrauterine growth retardation, widespread skeletal malformations (split sutures, hypoplastic acetabulae and scapulae, vertebral anomalies, and digital hypoplasia), cutis verticis gyrata, dysmorphic facial features, and oropharyngeal malformations (absent uvula and submucous cleft palate). Mild congenital heart disease and anomalous optic nerves were also present. Parental karyotyps were normal. DNA from parents and patient has been collected and cell lines established on both parents. Genes which have been previously mapped to the region that is apparently deleted in this patient include: chorionic somatomammotropin A, growth hormone (normal), acid alpha-glucosidase, apolipoprotein H, and the alpha peptide of type 4 voltage gated sodium channel. As in other clinical cytogenetic syndromes, further descriptions of patients with similar or overlapping rearrangements in this region will be necessary to delineate genotype/phenotype correlations for chromosome 17.

  14. 1q25.2-q31.3 Deletion in a female with mental retardation, clinodactyly, minor facial anomalies but no growth retardation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The reports of 1q25-32 deletion cases are rare. We reported here an 11-year-old Chinese Han female with an interstitial 1q25 deletion displaying mental retardation, clinodactyly of the 5th finger and minor facial anomalies. Notably, the patient did not present growth retardation which is quite common in patients with 1q25-32 deletion encompassing LHX4. The heterozygous deletion in this patient was characterized as 46,XX,del(1)(q25.2-q31.3) with a length of 20.5 Mb according to SNP-array test results. STRP (Short Tandem Repeat Polymorphism) analysis of the family trio indicated the genomic abnormality was de novo with paternal origin. After a genotype-phenotype analysis, we proposed here the loss of a 3.1 Mb critical region including 24 genes within 1q25.2 (chr1:174.5-177.6 Mb, build 36) may account for the mental retardation in patients with 1q25-32 deletion. PMID:23915434

  15. Broader utilization of origins of DNA replication in cancer cell lines along a 78 kb region of human chromosome 2q34.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Manuel S; Hu, Lan; Lueders, John; Walker, Robert; Meltzer, Paul S

    2012-01-01

    Human DNA replication depends on the activation of thousands of origins distributed within the genome. The actual distribution of origins is not known, nor whether this distribution is unique to a cell type, or if it changes with the proliferative state of the cell. In this study, we have employed a real-time PCR-based nascent strand DNA abundance assay, to determine the location of origins along a 78 kb region on Chr2q34. Preliminary studies using nascent DNA strands isolated from either HeLa and normal skin fibroblast cells showed that in both cell lines peaks of high origin activity mapped in similar locations. However, the overall origin profile in HeLa cells corresponded to broad origin activation zones, whereas in fibroblasts a more punctuated profile of origin activation was observed. To investigate the relevance of this differential origin profile, we compared the origin distribution profiles in breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231, BT-474, and MCF-7, to their normal counterpart MCF-10A. In addition, the CRL7250 cell line was also used as a normal control. Our results validated our earlier observation and showed that the origin profile in normal cell lines exhibited a punctuated pattern, in contrast to broader zone profiles observed in the cancer cell lines. A quantitative analysis of origin peaks revealed that the number of activated origins in cancer cells is statistically larger than that obtained in normal cells, suggesting that the flexibility of origin usage is significantly increased in cancer cells compared to their normal counterparts.

  16. Assignment of the locus for congenital lactase deficiency to 2q21, in the vicinity of but separate from the lactase-phlorizin hydrolase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Järvelä, I; Enattah, N S; Kokkonen, J; Varilo, T; Savilahti, E; Peltonen, L

    1998-01-01

    Congenital lactase deficiency (CLD) is an autosomal recessive, gastrointestinal disorder characterized by watery diarrhea starting during the first 1-10 d of life, in infants fed lactose-containing milks. Since 1966, 42 patients have been diagnosed in Finland. CLD is the most severe form of lactase deficiency, with an almost total lack of lactase-phlorizin hydrolase (LPH) activity on jejunal biopsy. In adult-type hypolactasia, the most common genetic enzyme deficiency in humans, this enzyme activity is reduced to 5%-10%. Although the activity of intestinal LPH has been found to be greatly reduced in both forms, the molecular pathogenesis of lactase deficiencies is unknown. On the basis of the initial candidate-gene approach, we assigned the CLD locus to an 8-cM interval on chromosome 2q21 in 19 Finnish families. At the closest marker locus, a specific allele 2 was present in 92% of disease alleles. On the basis of a genealogical study, the CLD mutation was found to be enriched in sparsely populated eastern and northern Finland, because of a founder effect. The results of both the genealogical study and the haplotype analysis indicate that one major mutation in a novel gene causes CLD in the Finnish population. Consequently, the critical region could be restricted further, to an approximately 350-kb interval, by ancient-haplotype and linkage-disequilibrium analyses. Surprisingly, the LPH gene was shown to lie outside the critical CLD region, excluding it as a causative gene for CLD. The LPH locus was found to reside >2 Mb from the critical CLD region. PMID:9758622

  17. Paracentric inversion of chromosome 7 (46,XX,inv(7)(q21.2q22)) in a newborn with hypoplastic left heart syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Kuforjii, T.A.; Pillers, D.M.; Silberbach, M.

    1994-09-01

    Hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) is a severe congenital heart disease that is uniformly fatal without surgical intervention. Fetal echocardiography allows prenatal diagnosis, but this condition may not become apparent until after the mid-second trimester. We report a term baby with severe HLHS who had an 18 week fetal ultrasound that reportedly demonstrated a normal heart. There was no family history of congenital heart disease. She was phenotypically female with no dysmorphic features. Physical examination was otherwise normal. She expired at 48 hours of age. The autopsy was noncontributory. The karyotype was 46,XX, but there was an apparently balanced paracentric inversion of the long arm of chromosome 7 (46,XX,inv(7)(q21.2q22)). The mother`s chromosome study was normal without any inversion, and the father was not available for study. Hypoplastic left heart syndrome has been associated with extracardiac anomalies and chromosomal abnormalities including 45,XO,11q-, and trisomy 18. It has also been reported in 5 members spanning 3 generations of a family with a spectrum of left heart defects suggesting an autosomal dominant pattern with high penetrance. First-degree relatives of infants with HLHS have a thirteen percent incidence of related cardiovascular malformations, a frequency higher than predicted by a multifactorial model of inheritance, suggesting that at least a portion of HLHS have a genetic basis. Karyotype analysis, including high resolution banding, may help define the etiology of this condition. Chromosome 7 has not been implicated in HLHS. This case emphasizes the need for genetic analysis, including a pedigree, of affected families. It also underscores the importance of screening by karyotype analysis to determine whether defects of the long arm of chromosome 7 are important in the pathogenesis of hypoplastic left heart syndrome.

  18. Identity by descent fine mapping of familial adult myoclonus epilepsy (FAME) to 2p11.2-2q11.2.

    PubMed

    Henden, Lyndal; Freytag, Saskia; Afawi, Zaid; Baldassari, Sara; Berkovic, Samuel F; Bisulli, Francesca; Canafoglia, Laura; Casari, Giorgio; Crompton, Douglas Ewan; Depienne, Christel; Gecz, Jozef; Guerrini, Renzo; Helbig, Ingo; Hirsch, Edouard; Keren, Boris; Klein, Karl Martin; Labauge, Pierre; LeGuern, Eric; Licchetta, Laura; Mei, Davide; Nava, Caroline; Pippucci, Tommaso; Rudolf, Gabrielle; Scheffer, Ingrid Eileen; Striano, Pasquale; Tinuper, Paolo; Zara, Federico; Corbett, Mark; Bahlo, Melanie

    2016-10-01

    Familial adult myoclonus epilepsy (FAME) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by adult onset, involuntary muscle jerks, cortical myoclonus and occasional seizures. FAME is genetically heterogeneous with more than 70 families reported worldwide and five potential disease loci. The efforts to identify potential causal variants have been unsuccessful in all but three families. To date, linkage analysis has been the main approach to find and narrow FAME critical regions. We propose an alternative method, pedigree free identity-by-descent (IBD) mapping, that infers regions of the genome between individuals that have been inherited from a common ancestor. IBD mapping provides an alternative to linkage analysis in the presence of allelic and locus heterogeneity by detecting clusters of individuals who share a common allele. Succeeding IBD mapping, gene prioritization based on gene co-expression analysis can be used to identify the most promising candidate genes. We performed an IBD analysis using high-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array data followed by gene prioritization on a FAME cohort of ten European families and one Australian/New Zealander family; eight of which had known disease loci. By identifying IBD regions common to multiple families, we were able to narrow the FAME2 locus to a 9.78 megabase interval within 2p11.2-q11.2. We provide additional evidence of a founder effect in four Italian families and allelic heterogeneity with at least four distinct founders responsible for FAME at the FAME2 locus. In addition, we suggest candidate disease genes using gene prioritization based on gene co-expression analysis.

  19. A Constitutional Translocation t(1;17)(p36.2;q11.2) in a Neuroblastoma Patient Disrupts the Human NBPF1 and ACCN1 Genes

    PubMed Central

    Staes, Katrien; Vandesompele, Jo; Laureys, Geneviève; De Smet, Els; Berx, Geert; Speleman, Frank; van Roy, Frans

    2008-01-01

    The human 1p36 region is deleted in many different types of tumors, and so it probably harbors one or more tumor suppressor genes. In a Belgian neuroblastoma patient, a constitutional balanced translocation t(1;17)(p36.2;q11.2) may have led to the development of the tumor by disrupting or activating a gene. Here, we report the cloning of both translocation breakpoints and the identification of a novel gene that is disrupted by this translocation. This gene, named NBPF1 for Neuroblastoma BreakPoint Family member 1, belongs to a recently described gene family encoding highly similar proteins, the functions of which are unknown. The translocation truncates NBPF1 and gives rise to two chimeric transcripts of NBPF1 sequences fused to sequences derived from chromosome 17. On chromosome 17, the translocation disrupts one of the isoforms of ACCN1, a potential glioma tumor suppressor gene. Expression of the NBPF family in neuroblastoma cell lines is highly variable, but it is decreased in cell lines that have a deletion of chromosome 1p. More importantly, expression profiling of the NBPF1 gene showed that its expression is significantly lower in cell lines with heterozygous NBPF1 loss than in cell lines with a normal 1p chromosome. Meta-analysis of the expression of NBPF and ACCN1 in neuroblastoma tumors indicates a role for the NBPF genes and for ACCN1 in tumor aggressiveness. Additionally, DLD1 cells with inducible NBPF1 expression showed a marked decrease of clonal growth in a soft agar assay. The disruption of both NBPF1 and ACCN1 genes in this neuroblastoma patient indicates that these genes might suppress development of neuroblastoma and possibly other tumor types. PMID:18493581

  20. Targeted gene walking by low stringency polymerase chain reaction: assignment of a putative human brain sodium channel gene (SCN3A) to chromosome 2q24-31.

    PubMed

    Malo, M S; Srivastava, K; Andresen, J M; Chen, X N; Korenberg, J R; Ingram, V M

    1994-04-12

    We have developed a low stringency polymerase chain reaction (LSPCR) to isolate the unknown neighboring region around a known DNA sequence, thus allowing efficient targeted gene walking. The method involves the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with a single primer under conditions of low stringency for primer annealing (40 degrees C) for the first few cycles followed by more cycles at high stringency (55 degrees C). This enables the amplification of a targeted DNA fragment along with other nontargeted fragments. High stringency (55 degrees C) nested PCRs with end-labeled primers are then used to generate a ladder of radioactive bands, which accurately identifies the targeted fragment(s). We performed LSPCR on human placental DNA using a highly conserved sodium channel-specific primer for 5 cycles at 40 degrees C followed by 27 cycles at 55 degrees C for primer annealing. Subsequently, using higher stringency (55 degrees C) PCR with radiolabeled nested primers for 8 cycles, we have isolated a 0.66-kb fragment of a putative human sodium channel gene. Partial sequence (325 bp) of this fragment revealed a 270-bp region (exon) with homology to the rat brain sodium channel III alpha (RBIII) gene at the nucleotide (87%) and amino acid (92%) levels. Therefore, we putatively assign this sequence as a part of a gene coding the alpha-subunit of a human brain type III sodium channel (SCN3A). Using PCR on two human/rodent somatic cell hybrid panels with primers specific to this putative SCN3A gene, we have localized this gene to chromosome 2. Fluorescence in situ hybridization to human metaphase chromosomes was used to sublocalize the SCN3A gene to chromosome at 2q24-31. In conclusion, LSPCR is an efficient and sensitive method for targeted gene walking and is also useful for the isolation of homologous genes in related species. PMID:8159690

  1. Identity by descent fine mapping of familial adult myoclonus epilepsy (FAME) to 2p11.2-2q11.2.

    PubMed

    Henden, Lyndal; Freytag, Saskia; Afawi, Zaid; Baldassari, Sara; Berkovic, Samuel F; Bisulli, Francesca; Canafoglia, Laura; Casari, Giorgio; Crompton, Douglas Ewan; Depienne, Christel; Gecz, Jozef; Guerrini, Renzo; Helbig, Ingo; Hirsch, Edouard; Keren, Boris; Klein, Karl Martin; Labauge, Pierre; LeGuern, Eric; Licchetta, Laura; Mei, Davide; Nava, Caroline; Pippucci, Tommaso; Rudolf, Gabrielle; Scheffer, Ingrid Eileen; Striano, Pasquale; Tinuper, Paolo; Zara, Federico; Corbett, Mark; Bahlo, Melanie

    2016-10-01

    Familial adult myoclonus epilepsy (FAME) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by adult onset, involuntary muscle jerks, cortical myoclonus and occasional seizures. FAME is genetically heterogeneous with more than 70 families reported worldwide and five potential disease loci. The efforts to identify potential causal variants have been unsuccessful in all but three families. To date, linkage analysis has been the main approach to find and narrow FAME critical regions. We propose an alternative method, pedigree free identity-by-descent (IBD) mapping, that infers regions of the genome between individuals that have been inherited from a common ancestor. IBD mapping provides an alternative to linkage analysis in the presence of allelic and locus heterogeneity by detecting clusters of individuals who share a common allele. Succeeding IBD mapping, gene prioritization based on gene co-expression analysis can be used to identify the most promising candidate genes. We performed an IBD analysis using high-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array data followed by gene prioritization on a FAME cohort of ten European families and one Australian/New Zealander family; eight of which had known disease loci. By identifying IBD regions common to multiple families, we were able to narrow the FAME2 locus to a 9.78 megabase interval within 2p11.2-q11.2. We provide additional evidence of a founder effect in four Italian families and allelic heterogeneity with at least four distinct founders responsible for FAME at the FAME2 locus. In addition, we suggest candidate disease genes using gene prioritization based on gene co-expression analysis. PMID:27368338

  2. Genome-wide association scan identifies a risk locus for preeclampsia on 2q14, near the inhibin, beta B gene.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Matthew P; Brennecke, Shaun P; East, Christine E; Göring, Harald H H; Kent, Jack W; Dyer, Thomas D; Said, Joanne M; Roten, Linda T; Iversen, Ann-Charlotte; Abraham, Lawrence J; Heinonen, Seppo; Kajantie, Eero; Kere, Juha; Kivinen, Katja; Pouta, Anneli; Laivuori, Hannele; Austgulen, Rigmor; Blangero, John; Moses, Eric K

    2012-01-01

    Elucidating the genetic architecture of preeclampsia is a major goal in obstetric medicine. We have performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) for preeclampsia in unrelated Australian individuals of Caucasian ancestry using the Illumina OmniExpress-12 BeadChip to successfully genotype 648,175 SNPs in 538 preeclampsia cases and 540 normal pregnancy controls. Two SNP associations (rs7579169, p = 3.58×10(-7), OR = 1.57; rs12711941, p = 4.26×10(-7), OR = 1.56) satisfied our genome-wide significance threshold (modified Bonferroni p<5.11×10(-7)). These SNPs reside in an intergenic region less than 15 kb downstream from the 3' terminus of the Inhibin, beta B (INHBB) gene on 2q14.2. They are in linkage disequilibrium (LD) with each other (r(2) = 0.92), but not (r(2)<0.80) with any other genotyped SNP ±250 kb. DNA re-sequencing in and around the INHBB structural gene identified an additional 25 variants. Of the 21 variants that we successfully genotyped back in the case-control cohort the most significant association observed was for a third intergenic SNP (rs7576192, p = 1.48×10(-7), OR = 1.59) in strong LD with the two significant GWAS SNPs (r(2)>0.92). We attempted to provide evidence of a putative regulatory role for these SNPs using bioinformatic analyses and found that they all reside within regions of low sequence conservation and/or low complexity, suggesting functional importance is low. We also explored the mRNA expression in decidua of genes ±500 kb of INHBB and found a nominally significant correlation between a transcript encoded by the EPB41L5 gene, ∼250 kb centromeric to INHBB, and preeclampsia (p = 0.03). We were unable to replicate the associations shown by the significant GWAS SNPs in case-control cohorts from Norway and Finland, leading us to conclude that it is more likely that these SNPs are in LD with as yet unidentified causal variant(s). PMID:22432041

  3. Genome-wide association meta-analyses identified 1q43 and 2q32.2 for hip Ward's triangle areal bone mineral density.

    PubMed

    Pei, Yu-Fang; Hu, Wen-Zhu; Hai, Rong; Wang, Xiu-Yan; Ran, Shu; Lin, Yong; Shen, Hui; Tian, Qing; Lei, Shu-Feng; Zhang, Yong-Hong; Papasian, Christopher J; Deng, Hong-Wen; Zhang, Lei

    2016-10-01

    Aiming to identify genomic variants associated with osteoporosis, we performed a genome-wide association meta-analysis of bone mineral density (BMD) at Ward's triangle of the hip in 7175 subjects from 6 samples. We performed in silico replications with femoral neck, trochanter, and inter-trochanter BMDs in 6912 subjects from the Framingham heart study (FHS), and with forearm, femoral neck and lumbar spine BMDs in 32965 subjects from the GEFOS summary results. Combining the evidence from all samples, we identified 2 novel loci for areal BMD: 1q43 (rs1414660, discovery p=1.20×10(-8), FHS p=0.05 for trochanter BMD; rs9287237, discovery p=3.55×10(-7), FHS p=9.20×10(-3) for trochanter BMD, GEFOS p=0.02 for forearm BMD, nearest gene FMN2) and 2q32.2 (rs56346965, discovery p=7.48×10(-7), FHS p=0.10 for inter-trochanter BMD, GEFOS p=0.02 for spine BMD, nearest gene NAB1). The two lead SNPs rs1414660 and rs56346965 are eQTL sites for the genes GREM2 and NAB1 respectively. Functional annotation of GREM2 and NAB1 illustrated their involvement in BMP signaling pathway and in bone development. We also replicated three previously reported loci: 5q14.3 (rs10037512, discovery p=3.09×10(-6), FHS p=8.50×10(-3), GEFOS p=1.23×10(-24) for femoral neck BMD, nearest gene MEF2C), 6q25.1 (rs3020340, discovery p=1.64×10(-6), GEFOS p=1.69×10(-3) for SPN-BMD, nearest gene ESR1) and 7q21.3 (rs13310130, discovery p=8.79×10(-7), GEFOS p=2.61×10(-7) for spine BMD, nearest gene SHFM1). Our findings provide additional insights that further enhance our understanding of bone development, osteoporosis, and fracture pathogenesis. PMID:27397699

  4. Genome-Wide Association Scan Identifies a Risk Locus for Preeclampsia on 2q14, Near the Inhibin, Beta B Gene

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Matthew P.; Brennecke, Shaun P.; East, Christine E.; Göring, Harald H. H.; Kent, Jack W.; Dyer, Thomas D.; Said, Joanne M.; Roten, Linda T.; Iversen, Ann-Charlotte; Abraham, Lawrence J.; Heinonen, Seppo; Kajantie, Eero; Kere, Juha; Kivinen, Katja; Pouta, Anneli; Laivuori, Hannele; Austgulen, Rigmor; Blangero, John; Moses, Eric K.

    2012-01-01

    Elucidating the genetic architecture of preeclampsia is a major goal in obstetric medicine. We have performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) for preeclampsia in unrelated Australian individuals of Caucasian ancestry using the Illumina OmniExpress-12 BeadChip to successfully genotype 648,175 SNPs in 538 preeclampsia cases and 540 normal pregnancy controls. Two SNP associations (rs7579169, p = 3.58×10−7, OR = 1.57; rs12711941, p = 4.26×10−7, OR = 1.56) satisfied our genome-wide significance threshold (modified Bonferroni p<5.11×10−7). These SNPs reside in an intergenic region less than 15 kb downstream from the 3′ terminus of the Inhibin, beta B (INHBB) gene on 2q14.2. They are in linkage disequilibrium (LD) with each other (r2 = 0.92), but not (r2<0.80) with any other genotyped SNP ±250 kb. DNA re-sequencing in and around the INHBB structural gene identified an additional 25 variants. Of the 21 variants that we successfully genotyped back in the case-control cohort the most significant association observed was for a third intergenic SNP (rs7576192, p = 1.48×10−7, OR = 1.59) in strong LD with the two significant GWAS SNPs (r2>0.92). We attempted to provide evidence of a putative regulatory role for these SNPs using bioinformatic analyses and found that they all reside within regions of low sequence conservation and/or low complexity, suggesting functional importance is low. We also explored the mRNA expression in decidua of genes ±500 kb of INHBB and found a nominally significant correlation between a transcript encoded by the EPB41L5 gene, ∼250 kb centromeric to INHBB, and preeclampsia (p = 0.03). We were unable to replicate the associations shown by the significant GWAS SNPs in case-control cohorts from Norway and Finland, leading us to conclude that it is more likely that these SNPs are in LD with as yet unidentified causal variant(s). PMID:22432041

  5. Abnormal Intracellular Accumulation and Extracellular Aβ Deposition in Idiopathic and Dup15q11.2-q13 Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Wegiel, Jerzy; Frackowiak, Janusz; Mazur-Kolecka, Bozena; Schanen, N. Carolyn; Cook, Edwin H.; Sigman, Marian; Brown, W. Ted; Kuchna, Izabela; Wegiel, Jarek; Nowicki, Krzysztof; Imaki, Humi; Ma, Shuang Yong; Chauhan, Abha; Chauhan, Ved; Miller, David L.; Mehta, Pankaj D.; Flory, Michael; Cohen, Ira L.; London, Eric; Reisberg, Barry; de Leon, Mony J.; Wisniewski, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Background It has been shown that amyloid ß (Aβ), a product of proteolytic cleavage of the amyloid β precursor protein (APP), accumulates in neuronal cytoplasm in non-affected individuals in a cell type–specific amount. Methodology/Principal Findings In the present study, we found that the percentage of amyloid-positive neurons increases in subjects diagnosed with idiopathic autism and subjects diagnosed with duplication 15q11.2-q13 (dup15) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). In spite of interindividual differences within each examined group, levels of intraneuronal Aβ load were significantly greater in the dup(15) autism group than in either the control or the idiopathic autism group in 11 of 12 examined regions (p<0.0001 for all comparisons; Kruskall-Wallis test). In eight regions, intraneuronal Aβ load differed significantly between idiopathic autism and control groups (p<0.0001). The intraneuronal Aβ was mainly N-terminally truncated. Increased intraneuronal accumulation of Aβ17–40/42 in children and adults suggests a life-long enhancement of APP processing with α-secretase in autistic subjects. Aβ accumulation in neuronal endosomes, autophagic vacuoles, Lamp1-positive lysosomes and lipofuscin, as revealed by confocal microscopy, indicates that products of enhanced α-secretase processing accumulate in organelles involved in proteolysis and storage of metabolic remnants. Diffuse plaques containing Aβ1–40/42 detected in three subjects with ASD, 39 to 52 years of age, suggest that there is an age-associated risk of alterations of APP processing with an intraneuronal accumulation of a short form of Aβ and an extracellular deposition of full-length Aβ in nonfibrillar plaques. Conclusions/Significance The higher prevalence of excessive Aβ accumulation in neurons in individuals with early onset of intractable seizures, and with a high risk of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy in autistic subjects with dup(15) compared to subjects with idiopathic

  6. Discovery of a potentially deleterious variant in TMEM87B in a patient with a hemizygous 2q13 microdeletion suggests a recessive condition characterized by congenital heart disease and restrictive cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Coughlin, Curtis R.; Geiger, Elizabeth A.; Salvador, Blake J.; Elias, Ellen R.; Cavanaugh, Jean L.; Chatfield, Kathryn C.; Miyamoto, Shelley D.; Shaikh, Tamim H.

    2016-01-01

    Restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM) is a rare cause of heart muscle disease with the highest mortality rate among cardiomyopathy types. The etiology of RCM is poorly understood, although genetic causes have been implicated, and syndromic associations have been described. Here, we describe a patient with an atrial septal defect and restrictive cardiomyopathy along with craniofacial anomalies and intellectual disabilities. Initial screening using chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) identified a maternally inherited 2q13 microdeletion. The patient had many of the features reported in previous cases with the recurrent 2q13 microdeletion syndrome. However, the inheritance of the microdeletion from an unaffected mother combined with the low incidence (10%) and milder forms of cardiac defects in previously reported cases made the clinical significance of the CMA results unclear. Whole-exome sequencing (WES) with trio-based analysis was performed and identified a paternally inherited TMEM87B mutation (c.1366A>G, p.Asn456Asp) in the patient. TMEM87B, a highly conserved, transmembrane protein of currently unknown function, lies within the critical region of the recurrent 2q13 microdeletion syndrome. Furthermore, a recent study had demonstrated that depletion of TMEM87B in zebrafish embryos affected cardiac development and led to cardiac hypoplasia. Thus, by combining CMA and WES, we potentially uncover an autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by a severe cardiac phenotype caused by mutations in TMEM87B. This study expands the spectrum of phenotypes associated with the recurrent 2q13 microdeletion syndrome and also further suggests the role of TMEM87B in its etiology, especially the cardiac pathology. PMID:27148590

  7. Discovery of a potentially deleterious variant in TMEM87B in a patient with a hemizygous 2q13 microdeletion suggests a recessive condition characterized by congenital heart disease and restrictive cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hung-Chun; Coughlin, Curtis R; Geiger, Elizabeth A; Salvador, Blake J; Elias, Ellen R; Cavanaugh, Jean L; Chatfield, Kathryn C; Miyamoto, Shelley D; Shaikh, Tamim H

    2016-05-01

    Restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM) is a rare cause of heart muscle disease with the highest mortality rate among cardiomyopathy types. The etiology of RCM is poorly understood, although genetic causes have been implicated, and syndromic associations have been described. Here, we describe a patient with an atrial septal defect and restrictive cardiomyopathy along with craniofacial anomalies and intellectual disabilities. Initial screening using chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) identified a maternally inherited 2q13 microdeletion. The patient had many of the features reported in previous cases with the recurrent 2q13 microdeletion syndrome. However, the inheritance of the microdeletion from an unaffected mother combined with the low incidence (10%) and milder forms of cardiac defects in previously reported cases made the clinical significance of the CMA results unclear. Whole-exome sequencing (WES) with trio-based analysis was performed and identified a paternally inherited TMEM87B mutation (c.1366A>G, p.Asn456Asp) in the patient. TMEM87B, a highly conserved, transmembrane protein of currently unknown function, lies within the critical region of the recurrent 2q13 microdeletion syndrome. Furthermore, a recent study had demonstrated that depletion of TMEM87B in zebrafish embryos affected cardiac development and led to cardiac hypoplasia. Thus, by combining CMA and WES, we potentially uncover an autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by a severe cardiac phenotype caused by mutations in TMEM87B. This study expands the spectrum of phenotypes associated with the recurrent 2q13 microdeletion syndrome and also further suggests the role of TMEM87B in its etiology, especially the cardiac pathology. PMID:27148590

  8. A genomic copy number variant analysis implicates the MBD5 and HNRNPU genes in Chinese children with infantile spasms and expands the clinical spectrum of 2q23.1 deletion

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Infantile spasms (IS) is a specific type of epileptic encephalopathy associated with severe developmental disabilities. Genetic factors are strongly implicated in IS, however, the exact genetic defects remain unknown in the majority of cases. Rare mutations in a single gene or in copy number variants (CNVs) have been implicated in IS of children in Western countries. The objective of this study was to dissect the role of copy number variations in Chinese children with infantile spasms. Methods We used the Agilent Human Genome CGH microarray 180 K for genome-wide detection of CNVs. Real-time qPCR was used to validate the CNVs. We performed genomic and medical annotations for individual CNVs to determine the pathogenicity of CNVs related to IS. Results We report herein the first genome-wide CNV analysis in children with IS, detecting a total of 14 CNVs in a cohort of 47 Chinese children with IS. Four CNVs (4/47 = 8.5%) (1q21.1 gain; 1q44, 2q31.1, and 17p13 loss) are considered to be pathogenic. The CNV loss at 17p13.3 contains PAFAH1B1 (LIS1), a causative gene for lissencephaly. Although the CNVs at 1q21.1, 1q44, and 2q23.1 have been previously implicated in a wide spectrum of clinical features including autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and generalized seizure, our study is the first report identifying them in individuals with a primary diagnosis of IS. The CNV loss in the 1q44 region contains HNRNPU, a strong candidate gene recently suggested in IS by the whole exome sequencing of children with IS. The CNV loss at 2q23.1 includes MBD5, a methyl-DNA binding protein that is a causative gene of ASD and a candidate gene for epileptic encephalopathy. We also report a distinct clinical presentation of IS, microcephaly, intellectual disability, and absent hallux in a case with the 2q23.1 deletion. Conclusion Our findings strongly support the role of CNVs in infantile spasms and expand the clinical spectrum associate with 2q23.1 deletion. In particular, our

  9. Female patient with autistic disorder, intellectual disability, and co-morbid anxiety disorder: Expanding the phenotype associated with the recurrent 3q13.2-q13.31 microdeletion.

    PubMed

    Quintela, Ines; Gomez-Guerrero, Lorena; Fernandez-Prieto, Montse; Resches, Mariela; Barros, Francisco; Carracedo, Angel

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, the advent of comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays and its use as a first genetic test for the diagnosis of patients with neurodevelopmental phenotypes has allowed the identification of novel submicroscopic chromosomal abnormalities (namely, copy number variants or CNVs), imperceptible by conventional cytogenetic techniques. The 3q13.31 microdeletion syndrome (OMIM #615433) has been defined as a genomic disorder mainly characterized by developmental delay, postnatal overgrowth, hypotonia, genital abnormalities in males, and characteristic craniofacial features. Although the 3q13.31 CNVs are variable in size, a 3.4 Mb recurrently altered region at 3q13.2-q13.31 has been recently described and non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR) mediated by flanking human endogenous retrovirus (HERV-H) elements has been suggested as the mechanism of deletion formation. We expand the phenotypic spectrum associated with this recurrent deletion performing the clinical description of a 9-year-old female patient with autistic disorder, total absence of language, intellectual disability, anxiety disorder and disruptive, and compulsive eating behaviors. The array-based molecular karyotyping allowed the identification of a de novo recurrent 3q13.2-q13.31 deletion encompassing 25 genes. In addition, we compare her clinical phenotype with previous reports of patients with neurodevelopmental and behavioral disorders and proximal 3q microdeletions. Finally, we also review the candidate genes proposed so far for these phenotypes.

  10. Single pi+ Electroproduction on the Proton in the First and Second Resonance Regions at 0.25GeV^2 < Q^2 < 0.65GeV^2 Using CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    H. Egiyan; I.G. Aznauryan; V.D. Burkert; K.A. Griffioen; K. Joo; R. Minehart; L.C. Smith

    2006-01-05

    The ep {yields} e'pi{sup +}n reaction was studied in the first and second nucleon resonance regions in the 0.25 GeV{sup 2} < Q{sup 2} < 0.65 GeV{sup 2} range using the CLAS detector at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. For the first time the absolute cross sections were measured covering nearly the full angular range in the hadronic center-of-mass frame. The structure functions {sigma}{sub TL}, {sigma}{sub TT} and the linear combination {sigma}{sub T} + {epsilon}{sigma}{sub L} were extracted by fitting the {phi}-dependence of the measured cross sections, and were compared to the MAID and Sato-Lee models.

  11. Distinction in binding of peptides (P2E) and its mutations (P2G, P2Q) to a graphene sheet via a hierarchical coarse-grained Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Pandey, R B; Farmer, B L

    2013-10-28

    A hierarchical coarse-grained approach is used to study the binding of peptides (P2E: (1)E(2)P(3)L(4)Q(5)L(6)K(7)M) and variants (P2G: (1)G(2)P(3)L(4)Q(5)L(6)K(7)M and P2Q: (1)Q(2)L(3)P(4)M(5)E(6)K(7)L) with a graphene sheet. Simulation-based residue-substrate and hydropathy index-based residue-residue interaction is used as input to a phenomenological interaction potential for peptide chains to execute the stochastic motion with a graphene sheet at the center of a box. Large-scale Monte Carlo simulations are performed at a range (low to high) of temperatures to identify peptides binding with the graphene sheet with a constant peptide concentration (Cp = 0.01). A number of local (energy, mobility, and substrate contact profiles) and global (density profiles, mean square displacement of the center of mass of a peptide and its radius of gyration) physical quantities are examined to monitor the patterns. We find that each peptide can bind to a graphene sheet at low temperatures but the residues that can anchor their binding vary among these three peptides. For example, P2E is anchored by (1)E, (4)Q, and (6)K, P2Q by (1)Q, (5)E, and (6)K, and P2G by nearly all its residues with about the same strength except (1)G and (2)P. The site-specific binding is reflected in the thermal response of the radius of gyration of the peptides. Despite the lack of a large difference in binding patterns, a systematic variation in radius of gyration and surface binding profile with the temperature reveals the distinction in their binding: the probability of P2E binding is the highest and that of P2G is the lowest.

  12. Improved molecular diagnosis of unparental disomy 15 in Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes utilizing new short tandem repeats (STRs) mapped to chromosome 15q11.2-q12

    SciTech Connect

    Christian, S.L.; Kubota, T.; Ledbetter, D.H.

    1994-09-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) are distinct mental retardation disorders caused by paternal (PWS) or maternal (AS) deficiencies of chromosome 15q11.2-q12. Three STRs (D15S11, GABRB3, and D15S113) were previously developed utilizing YACs from this region as a molecular diagnostic test for PWS/AS. Since then twenty-three new STRs have been developed by several groups which map to 15q11.2-q12. Fine mapping of some of these markers was accomplished utilizing a 3.5 Mb YAC contig of this region. Three new CEPH-Genethon markers, D15S122, D15S128, and D15S210 were mapped within the smallest PWS/AS critical regions. D15S122 mapped to YACs 230H12 and 132D4, D15S128 mapped to YACs 457B4, 11H11, and B58C7, and D15S210 mapped to 132D4 and B230E3. To improve molecular diagnosis of uniparental disomy in PWS/AS, D15S122 and D15S128 with >70% hetrozygosities were placed in a new multiplex PCR reaction with D15S11. Additionally, three CEPH-Genethon markers with high heterozygosities from distal 15q, D15S123, D15S125, and D15S131, were used establish a second multiplex to increase the total number of markers analyzed to six. Twenty-three patients with uniparental disomy 15 were compared using the original multiplex and the two new multiplexes. The results indicated that 16/23 had at least one fully informative marker with the original multiplex and 23/23 using the two new multiplexes. Using a more rigorous diagnostic criterion of two fully informative markers, only 8/23 were informative with the original multiplex and 21/23 with the two new multiplexes. These results demonstrate that these two new multiplexes composed of a total of six polymorphic STRs provide an improved diagnostic test for uniparental disomy 15.

  13. A prenatally ascertained, maternally inherited 14.8 Mb duplication of chromosomal bands Xq13.2-q21.31 associated with multiple congenital abnormalities in a male fetus.

    PubMed

    Sismani, C; Donoghue, J; Alexandrou, A; Karkaletsi, M; Christopoulou, S; Konstantinidou, A E; Livanos, P; Patsalis, P C; Velissariou, V

    2013-11-01

    Duplications of the X chromosome are rare cytogenetic findings, and have been associated with an abnormal phenotype in the male offspring of apparently normal or near normal female carriers. We report on the prenatal diagnosis of a duplication on the long arm of chromosome X from chromosomal band Xq13.2 to q21.31 in a male fetus with increased nuchal translucency in the first trimester and polyhydramnios at 22 weeks of gestation. Amniocentesis was undertaken and cytogenetic analysis revealed additional chromosomal material in the long arm of chromosome X at position Xq13. Analysis with high resolution array CGH revealed the additional material is in fact a duplication of the region Xq13.2-q21.13. The duplication is 14.8 Mb in size and includes fourteen genes: SLC16A2, KIAA2022, ABCB7, ZDHHC15, ATRX, MAGT1, ATP7A, PGK1, TBX22, BRWD3, POU3F4, ZNF711, POF1B and CHM. Analysis of the parents revealed the mother to be a carrier of the same duplication. After elected termination of the pregnancy at 28 weeks a detailed autopsy of the fetus allowed for genotype-phenotype correlations.

  14. Sperm FISH analysis of a 46,XY,t(3;6)(p24;p21.2),inv (8)(p11;2q21.2) double chromosomal rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Ferfouri, Fatma; Boitrelle, Florence; Tapia, Sylvie; Molina Gomes, Denise; Selva, Jacqueline; Vialard, François

    2012-02-01

    A complex chromosome rearrangement (CCR) can be defined as a structural chromosomal aberration that involves at least three breakpoints located on two or more chromosomes. Highly unbalanced gametes may lead to infertility or congenital malformations. Here is reported a double rearrangement considered as the simplest possible CCR and, in a sense, not a true CCR, meiotic segregation for a 46,XY,t(3;6)(p24;p21.2),inv(8)(p11;2q21.2) male patient referred after his partner had undergone three early miscarriages. Sperm fluorescence in-situ hybridization was used to screen for translocation and inversion segregation and an interchromosomal effect (ICE) for 13 chromosomes not involved in CCR. The malsegregation rates for the reciprocal translocation and pericentric inversion were 61.2% and 1.7%, respectively. ICE analysis revealed that the observed chromosome aneuploidy rates of between 0.1% and 0.8% did not differ significantly from control values. A slight increase in cumulative ICE (P=0.049) was observed in the patient, relative to control spermatozoa (with rates of 4.6% and 3.1%). The sperm DNA fragmentation rate differed significantly from control values (5.0%; P=0.001). Reciprocal translocation had no impact on meiotic segregation of the pericentric inversion in this double rearrangement. No conclusion could be drawn regarding the impact of pericentric inversion on translocation.

  15. Association of polymorphism at COL3A and CTLA4 loci on chromosome 2q31-33 with the clinical phenotype and in-vitro CMI status in healthy and leprosy subjects: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Kaur, G; Sachdeva, G; Bhutani, L K; Bamezai, R

    1997-07-01

    Two genetic loci, viz. COL3A and CTLA4, located within the chromosome 2q31-33 region in the vicinity of the proposed syntenic site of the mouse "Bcg" locus were genotyped by the polymerase chain reaction in leprosy patients and healthy individuals. All the subjects studied were assessed as in-vitro responders/non-responders to mycobacterial antigens. Simple sequence length polymorphism analysis revealed five (236 to 312 bp) and eight (84 to 120 bp) allelomorphs for COL3A and CTLA4, respectively. Our preliminary analysis showed a significant association between the 250-bp COL3A allelomorph in the homozygous condition and the multibacillary form of leprosy (P < 0.05: relative risk = 5.5). Another allelic (312 bp) variant of COL3A was significantly correlated with non-responsiveness to M. leprae antigens in vitro (P < 0.01). The 104-bp allelomorph of CTLA4 was not observed in any of the 25 cases of leprosy. This absence was statistically significant (P < 0.05) when compared with normal healthy controls and depicted a high relative risk (RR = 25.83). An additional observation of the predominance of a unique 84-bp CTLA4/CTLA4-like allelomorph was observed in the Indian subjects studied. PMID:9225967

  16. The high-affinity interleukin 8 receptor gene (IL8RA) maps to the 2q33-q36 region of the human genome: Cloning of a pseudogene (IL8RBP) for the low-affinity receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Mollereau, C. Laboratoire de Pharmacologie et Toxicologie Fondamentale du CNRS, Toulouse ); Muscatelli, F.; Mattei, M.G. ); Vassart, G. Universite libre de Bruxelles ); Parmentier, M. )

    1993-04-01

    The selective amplification by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of gene fragments corresponding to new G-protein-coupled receptors resulted in the cloning of 18 orphan members of this gene family. Of these, three human clones amplified from genomic DNA (HGMP03, HGMP04, and HGMP05) were shown to be structurally related. Genomic clones corresponding to HGMP03 and HGMP05 were isolated and their putative coding region sequenced. Following the characterization of two interleukin 8 (IL-8) receptors, HGMP03 appeared to encode the high-affinity IL-8 receptor, whereas the partial clone HGMP04 encodes the low-affinity IL-8 receptor. Comparison with the cDNA sequence suggests that the high-affinity receptor gene is split by an intron in the 5[prime] untranslated region. The high-affinity receptor gene was mapped by in situ hybridization to the 2q33-q36 region of the human genome. The HGMP05 locus turned out to be a pseudogene for the low-affinity IL-8 receptor (87% identity), with multiple frameshifts and point mutations introducing stop codons. Southern blotting on genomic DNA did not allow the further detection of related loci in the human genome. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Deletions of the PRKAR1A Locus at 17q24.2-q24.3 in Carney Complex: Genotype-Phenotype Correlations and Implications for Genetic Testing

    PubMed Central

    Salpea, Paraskevi; Horvath, Anelia; London, Edra; Faucz, Fabio R.; Vetro, Annalisa; Levy, Isaac; Gourgari, Evgenia; Dauber, Andrew; Holm, Ingrid A.; Morrison, Patrick J.; Keil, Margaret F.; Lyssikatos, Charalampos; Smith, Eric D.; Sanidad, Marc A.; Kelly, JoAnn C.; Dai, Zunyan; Mowrey, Philip; Forlino, Antonella; Zuffardi, Orsetta

    2014-01-01

    Background: Carney complex (CNC) is a multiple neoplasia syndrome caused by PRKAR1A-inactivating mutations. One-third of the patients, however, have no detectable PRKAR1A coding sequence defects. Small deletions of the gene were previously reported in few patients, but large deletions of the chromosomal PRKAR1A locus have not been studied systematically in a large cohort of patients with CNC. Setting: A tertiary care referral center was the setting for analysis of an international cohort of patients with CNC. Methods: Methods included genome-wide array analysis followed by fluorescent in situ hybridization, mRNA, and other studies as well as a retrospective analysis of clinical information and phenotype-genotype correlation. Results: We detected 17q24.2-q24.3 deletions of varying size that included the PRKAR1A gene in 11 CNC patients (of 51 tested). Quantitative PCR showed that these patients had significantly lower PRKAR1A mRNA levels. Phenotype varied but was generally severe and included manifestations that are not commonly associated with CNC, presumably due to haploinsufficiency of other genes in addition to PRKAR1A. Conclusions: A significant number (21.6%) of patients with CNC that are negative in currently available testing may have PRKAR1A haploinsufficiency due to genomic defects that are not detected by Sanger sequencing. Array-based studies are necessary for diagnostic confirmation of these defects and should be done in patients with unusual and severe phenotypes who are PRKAR1A mutation-negative. PMID:24170103

  18. X-linked ichthyosis and Crigler-Najjar syndrome I: Coexistence in a male patient with two copy number variable regions of 2q37.1 and Xp22.3

    PubMed Central

    BAI, JINLI; QU, YUJIN; CAO, YANYAN; LI, YAN; ZHANG, WENHUI; JIN, YUWEI; WANG, HONG; SONG, FANG

    2016-01-01

    X-linked ichthyosis (XLI) is an X-linked recessive skin disorder generally restricted to males, which arises from mutations in the steroid sulfatase (STS) gene located on Xp22.3. Crigler-Najjar syndrome (CN-I) is a rare autosomal recessive disease caused by the homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in the UPD-glucuronosyltransferase 1 family, polypeptide A1 (UGT1A1) gene on chromosome 2q37. A male patient was referred to the Department of Medical Genetics with of severe icterus and ichthyosis. The patient and his family members underwent genetic tests related to XLI and CN-I. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction on genomic DNA was performed to determine the gene copy number, while single nucleotide polymorphism array analysis was conducted to identify deletion mutations. Family pedigree analysis showed that the patient and his two cousins were all affected by ichthyosis, which was in accordance with the inheritance pattern of an X-linked recessive disease. In addition, the patient's serum bilirubin concentration (>340 mmol/l) was markedly greater than the normal level. The patient presented with kernicterus and phenobarbital treatment was ineffective. The clinical diagnosis of XLI was confirmed molecularly by laboratory evidence of a maternal 1.61 M deletion (including the STS gene) on ChrXp22.31. Coincidentally, the male patient was also confirmed to carry a rare maternal inherited microdeletion (374 Kb) comprising the entire UGT1A1 gene combined with a paternal UGT1A1 mutation (c.1253delT), a causative event of CN-I. To the best of our knowledge, this study reported for the first time the comorbidity of XLI and CN-I in a male patient. The results suggested that co-occurrence of these two recessive diseases in a patient may be incidental. PMID:26676689

  19. A Whole-Genome Scan and Fine-Mapping Linkage Study of Auditory-Visual Synesthesia Reveals Evidence of Linkage to Chromosomes 2q24, 5q33, 6p12, and 12p12

    PubMed Central

    Asher, Julian E.; Lamb, Janine A.; Brocklebank, Denise; Cazier, Jean-Baptiste; Maestrini, Elena; Addis, Laura; Sen, Mallika; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Monaco, Anthony P.

    2009-01-01

    Synesthesia, a neurological condition affecting between 0.05%–1% of the population, is characterized by anomalous sensory perception and associated alterations in cognitive function due to interference from synesthetic percepts. A stimulus in one sensory modality triggers an automatic, consistent response in either another modality or a different aspect of the same modality. Familiality studies show evidence of a strong genetic predisposition; whereas initial pedigree analyses supported a single-gene X-linked dominant mode of inheritance with a skewed F:M ratio and a notable absence of male-to-male transmission, subsequent analyses in larger samples indicated that the mode of inheritance was likely to be more complex. Here, we report the results of a whole-genome linkage scan for auditory-visual synesthesia with 410 microsatellite markers at 9.05 cM density in 43 multiplex families (n = 196) with potential candidate regions fine-mapped at 5 cM density. Using NPL and HLOD analysis, we identified four candidate regions. Significant linkage at the genome-wide level was detected to chromosome 2q24 (HLOD = 3.025, empirical genome-wide p = 0.047). Suggestive linkage was found to chromosomes 5q33, 6p12, and 12p12. No support was found for linkage to the X chromosome; furthermore, we have identified two confirmed cases of male-to-male transmission of synesthesia. Our results demonstrate that auditory-visual synesthesia is likely to be an oligogenic disorder subject to multiple modes of inheritance and locus heterogeneity. This study comprises a significant step toward identifying the genetic substrates underlying synesthesia, with important implications for our understanding of the role of genes in human cognition and perception. PMID:19200526

  20. A whole-genome scan and fine-mapping linkage study of auditory-visual synesthesia reveals evidence of linkage to chromosomes 2q24, 5q33, 6p12, and 12p12.

    PubMed

    Asher, Julian E; Lamb, Janine A; Brocklebank, Denise; Cazier, Jean-Baptiste; Maestrini, Elena; Addis, Laura; Sen, Mallika; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Monaco, Anthony P

    2009-02-01

    Synesthesia, a neurological condition affecting between 0.05%-1% of the population, is characterized by anomalous sensory perception and associated alterations in cognitive function due to interference from synesthetic percepts. A stimulus in one sensory modality triggers an automatic, consistent response in either another modality or a different aspect of the same modality. Familiality studies show evidence of a strong genetic predisposition; whereas initial pedigree analyses supported a single-gene X-linked dominant mode of inheritance with a skewed F:M ratio and a notable absence of male-to-male transmission, subsequent analyses in larger samples indicated that the mode of inheritance was likely to be more complex. Here, we report the results of a whole-genome linkage scan for auditory-visual synesthesia with 410 microsatellite markers at 9.05 cM density in 43 multiplex families (n = 196) with potential candidate regions fine-mapped at 5 cM density. Using NPL and HLOD analysis, we identified four candidate regions. Significant linkage at the genome-wide level was detected to chromosome 2q24 (HLOD = 3.025, empirical genome-wide p = 0.047). Suggestive linkage was found to chromosomes 5q33, 6p12, and 12p12. No support was found for linkage to the X chromosome; furthermore, we have identified two confirmed cases of male-to-male transmission of synesthesia. Our results demonstrate that auditory-visual synesthesia is likely to be an oligogenic disorder subject to multiple modes of inheritance and locus heterogeneity. This study comprises a significant step toward identifying the genetic substrates underlying synesthesia, with important implications for our understanding of the role of genes in human cognition and perception.

  1. Human fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase gene (FBP1): Exon-intron organization, localization to chromosome bands 9q22.2-q22.3, and mutation screening in subjects with fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    El-Maghrabi, M.R.; Jiang, W.

    1995-06-10

    Fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (EC 3.1.3.11) is a key regulatory enzyme of gluconeogenesis that catalyzes the hydrolysis of fructose-1,6-bisphosphate to generate fructose-6-phosphate and inorganic phosphate. Deficiency of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase is associated with fasting hypoglycemia and metabolic acidosis because of impaired gluconeogenesis. We have cloned and characterized the human liver fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase gene (FBP1). FBP1, localized to chromosome bands 9q22.2-q22.3 by fluorescence in situ hybridization, consists of seven exons that span > 31 kb, and the six introns are in the same position as in the rat gene. FBP1 was screened for mutations in two subjects with fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase deficiency. Four nucleotide substitutions were identified, two of which were silent mutations in the codons for Ala-216 (GCT {yields} GCC) and Gly-319 (GGG {yields} GGA). The other substitutions were in intron 3, a C {yields} T substitution 7 nucleotides downstream from the splice donor site, and in the promoter region, an A {yields} T substitution 188 nucleotides upstream from the start of transcription. These nucleotide substitutions were also found in normal unaffected subjects and thus are not the cause of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase deficiency in the two subjects studied. The molecular basis of hepatic fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase deficiency in these subjects remains undetermined but could result from unidentified mutations in the promoter that decrease expression or from mutations in another gene that indirectly lead to decreased fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase activity. 18 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Molecular characterization of an X(p21.2;q28) chromosomal inversion in a Duchenne muscular dystrophy patient with mental retardation reveals a novel long non-coding gene on Xq28.

    PubMed

    Tran, Thi Hoai Thu; Zhang, Zhujun; Yagi, Mariko; Lee, Tomoko; Awano, Hiroyuki; Nishida, Atsushi; Okinaga, Takeshi; Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Matsuo, Masafumi

    2013-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common inherited muscular disease and is characterized by progressive muscle wasting. DMD is caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene on Xp21.2. One-third of DMD cases are complicated by mental retardation, but the pathogenesis of this is unknown. We have identified an intrachromosomal inversion, inv(X)(p21.2;q28) in a DMD patient with mental retardation. We hypothesized that a gene responsible for the mental retardation in this patient would be disrupted by the inversion. We localized the inversion break point by analysis of dystrophin complementary DNA (cDNA) and fluorescence in situ hybridization. We used 5' and 3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends to extend the known transcripts, and reverse transcription-PCR to analyze tissue-specific expression. The patient's dystrophin cDNA was separated into two fragments between exons 18 and 19. Exon 19 was dislocated to the long arm of the X-chromosome. We identified a novel 109-bp sequence transcribed upstream of exon 19, and a 576-bp sequence including a poly(A) tract transcribed downstream of exon 18. Combining the two novel sequences, we identified a novel gene, named KUCG1, which comprises three exons spanning 50 kb on Xq28. The 685-bp transcript has no open-reading frame, classifying it as a long non-coding RNA. KUCG1 mRNA was identified in brain. We cloned a novel long non-coding gene from a chromosomal break point. It was supposed that this gene may have a role in causing mental retardation in the index case.

  3. An 8.9 Mb 19p13 duplication associated with precocious puberty and a sporadic 3.9 Mb 2q23.3q24.1 deletion containing NR4A2 in mentally retarded members of a family with an intrachromosomal 19p-into-19q between-arm insertion

    PubMed Central

    Lybæk, Helle; ørstavik, Karen Helene; Prescott, Trine; Hovland, Randi; Breilid, Harald; Stansberg, Christine; Steen, Vidar Martin; Houge, Gunnar

    2009-01-01

    In a 2 and a half-year-old girl with onset of puberty before the age of 5 months, short stature, hand anomalies and severe mental retardation, an 8.9 Mb interstitial 19p13 duplication containing 215 predicted genes was detected. It was initially assumed that the duplication involved the kisspeptin receptor gene, GPR54, known to stimulate induction of puberty, but more refined duplication mapping excluded this possibility. In an attempt to further understand the genotype–phenotype correlation, global gene expression was measured in skin fibroblasts. The overall expression pattern was quite similar to controls, and only about 25% of the duplicated genes had an expression level that was increased by more than 1.3-fold, with no obvious changes that could explain the precocious puberty. The proband's mother carried a balanced between-arm insertion of the duplicated segment that resembled a pericentric inversion. The same insertion was found in several other family members, including one who had lost a daughter with severe mental retardation and menarche at the age of 10 years. Another close relative was severely mentally retarded, but neither dysmorphic nor microcephalic. His phenotype was initially ascribed to a presumed cryptic chromosome 19 imbalance caused by the 19p-into19q insertion, but subsequent array-CGH detected a 3.9-Mb deletion of 2q23.3q24.1. This novel microdeletion involves seven genes, of which FMNL2, a suggested regulator of Rho-GTPases, and NR4A2, an essential gene for differentiation of dopaminergic neurons, may be critical genes for the proposed 2q23q24 microdeletion syndrome. PMID:19156171

  4. Shorepower Truck Electrification Project (STEP) - 1Q - 2Q 2013

    SciTech Connect

    2014-02-01

    The Fleet Test and Evaluation Team at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory is evaluating and documenting the use of shorepower at 50 planned American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA)-funded truck stop electrification (TSE) sites across the nation. Trucks participating in the study have idle-reduction equipment installed that was purchased with rebates through the ARRA. A total of 5,000 rebates will be approved. the ARRA. A total of 5,000 rebates will be approved.

  5. Brief Report: A Case of Autism Associated with del(2)(q32.1q32.2) or (q32.2q32.3).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, Louise; Becker, Kristin; Kearney, Geraldine; Dunlop, Adam; Stallings, Ray; Green, Andrew; Fitzgerald, Michael; Gill, Michael

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports a clinical case of autism with a deletion on chromosome 2 in a young male with high functioning autism. The deletion seems to correspond with regions emerging from linkage studies. The paper proposes this chromosomal region as a possible candidate region in the search for autism genes. (Contains references.) (Author/DB)

  6. De novo direct duplication of chromosome segment 22q11.2-q13.1

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimoto, Atsuko; Lin, Ming S.

    1996-03-29

    Lindsay et al. [1995] reported a case of de novo duplication of the segment 22q11-q12. Molecular cytogenetics studies showed that the segment includes the regions responsible for the {open_quotes}cat eye,{close_quotes} DiGeorge, and velo-cardio-facial syndrome, and extends distal to the breakpoint cluster region. The phenotype was milder than that of complete trisomy 22 and der(22)t(11;22) (q23;q11) syndrome and was similar in type and severity to that of {open_quotes}cat eye{close_quotes} syndrome (CES). They suggested that trisomy of gene(s) responsible for the CES might have a predominant phenotypic effect over other genes present in the region duplicated in their patient. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  7. A de novo interstitial deletion of chromosome 6 (q22.2q23.1).

    PubMed

    Park, J P; Graham, J M; Berg, S Z; Wurster-Hill, D H

    1988-02-01

    A unique interstitial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 6 involving bands q22.2 and q23.1 was observed in a patient referred for craniostenosis and developmental delay. The associated phenotypic anomalies are compared with other reported cases of deletion 6q involving adjacent regions.

  8. Xq26.2-q26.3 microduplication in two brothers with intellectual disabilities: clinical and molecular characterization.

    PubMed

    Madrigal, Irene; Fernández-Burriel, Miguel; Rodriguez-Revenga, Laia; Cabrera, Jose Carlos; Martí, Milagros; Mur, Antonio; Milà, Montserrat

    2010-12-01

    Partial duplications involving the long arm of the X chromosome are associated with mental retardation, short stature, microcephaly, hypopituitarism and a wide range of physical findings. We identified an inherited Xq26.2-Xq26.3 duplication in two brothers with severe mental retardation, hypotonia, growth delay, craniofacial disproportion and dental malocclusion. Chromosome analysis was normal and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification analysis detected duplication on Xq26. Further characterization by array comparative genomic hybridization and quantitative PCR helped to determine proximal and distal duplication breakpoints giving a size of approximately 2.8 Mb. The duplication encompasses 24 known genes, including the X-linked mental retardation genes ARHGEF6, PHF6, HPRT1 and SLC9A6. Clinical and molecular characterization of Xq duplications will shed more light into the phenotypic implication of functional disomy of X-chromosome genes.

  9. Localization of the human gene for inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) to chromosome 17q11. 2-q12

    SciTech Connect

    Marsden, P.A.; Hall, A.V. ); Heng, H.Q.; Duff, C.L.; Shi, X.M.; Tsui, L.C. Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto )

    1994-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a simple molecule implicated in neuronal transmission, endothelium-dependent vasodilatation, and macrophage immunologic activation. Enzymes responsible for NO synthesis constitute a family with at least three distinct isoforms - neuronal (NOS1), endothelial (NOS3), and inducible tissue. NO synthase enzymatic activity is constitutively expressed but activation of the calcium/calmodulin signaling pathway is required for maximal activity. Constitutive NO synthases contrast with a pathway for NO synthesis evident in macrophages, Kupffer cells, hepatocytes, vascular smooth muscle, and mesangial cells, among others. NO synthase activity is induced in these cell types by cytokines or bacterial wall products over a period of many hours. 14 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Evidence for an exotic S= -2, Q= -2 baryon resonance in proton-proton collisions at the CERN SPS.

    PubMed

    Alt, C; Anticic, T; Baatar, B; Barna, D; Bartke, J; Betev, L; Białkowska, H; Billmeier, A; Blume, C; Boimska, B; Botje, M; Bracinik, J; Bramm, R; Brun, R; Buncić, P; Cerny, V; Christakoglou, P; Chvala, O; Cramer, J G; Csató, P; Darmenov, N; Dimitrov, A; Dinkelaker, P; Eckardt, V; Farantatos, G; Filip, P; Flierl, D; Fodor, Z; Foka, P; Freund, P; Friese, V; Gál, J; Gaździcki, M; Georgopoulos, G; Gładysz, E; Hegyi, S; Höhne, C; Kadija, K; Karev, A; Kniege, S; Kolesnikov, V I; Kollegger, T; Korus, R; Kowalski, M; Kraus, I; Kreps, M; van Leeuwen, M; Lévai, P; Litov, L; Makariev, M; Malakhov, A I; Markert, C; Mateev, M; Mayes, B W; Melkumov, G L; Meurer, C; Mischke, A; Mitrovski, M; Molnár, J; Mrówczyński, St; Pálla, G; Panagiotou, A D; Panayotov, D; Perl, K; Petridis, A; Pikna, M; Pinsky, L; Pühlhofer, F; Reid, J G; Renfordt, R; Retyk, W; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rybczyński, M; Rybicki, A; Sandoval, A; Sann, H; Schmitz, N; Seyboth, P; Siklér, F; Sitar, B; Skrzypczak, E; Stefanek, G; Stock, R; Ströbele, H; Susa, T; Szentpétery, I; Sziklai, J; Trainor, T A; Varga, D; Vassiliou, M; Veres, G I; Vesztergombi, G; Vranić, D; Wetzler, A; Włodarczyk, Z; Yoo, I K; Zaranek, J; Zimányi, J

    2004-01-30

    Results of resonance searches in the Xi(-)pi(-), Xi(-)pi(+), Xi;(+)pi(-), and Xi;(+)pi(+) invariant mass spectra in proton-proton collisions at sqrt[s]=17.2 GeV are presented. Evidence is shown for the existence of a narrow Xi(-)pi(-) baryon resonance with mass of 1.862+/-0.002 GeV/c(2) and width below the detector resolution of about 0.018 GeV/c(2). The significance is estimated to be above 4.2sigma. This state is a candidate for the hypothetical exotic Xi(--)(3/2) baryon with S=-2, I=3 / 2, and a quark content of (dsdsū). At the same mass, a peak is observed in the Xi(-)pi(+) spectrum which is a candidate for the Xi(0)(3/2) member of this isospin quartet with a quark content of (dsus[-]d). The corresponding antibaryon spectra also show enhancements at the same invariant mass.

  11. Angelman syndrome associated with an inversion of chromosome 15q11.2q24.3

    SciTech Connect

    Greger, V.; Knoll, J.H.M.; Wagstaff, J.; Lalande, M.

    1997-03-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) most frequently results from large ({ge}5 Mb) de novo deletions of chromosome 15q11-q13. The deletions are exclusively of maternal origin, and a few cases of paternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 15 have been reported. The latter finding indicates that AS is caused by the absence of a maternal contribution to the imprinted 15q11-q13 region. Failure to inherit a paternal 15q11-q13 contribution results in the clinically distinct disorder of Prader-Willi syndrome. Cases of AS resulting from translocations or pericentric inversions have been observed to be associated with deletions, and there have been no confirmed reports of balanced rearrangements in AS. We report the first such case involving a paracentric inversion with a breakpoint located {approximately}25 kb proximal to the reference marker D15S10. This inversion has been inherited from a phenotypically normal mother. No deletion is evident by molecular analysis in this case, by use of cloned fragments mapped to within {approximately}1 kb of the inversion breakpoint. Several hypotheses are discussed to explain the relationship between the inversion and the AS phenotype. 47 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Structural, elastic, electronic and optical properties of KAlQ2 (Q = Se, Te): A DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benmakhlouf, A.; Bentabet, A.; Bouhemadou, A.; Maabed, S.; Khenata, R.; Bin-Omran, S.

    2015-10-01

    First-principles calculations in the framework of density functional theory have been conducted to explore the structural, elastic, electronic and optical properties of two layered ternary compounds chalcogenides of aluminum KAlSe2 and KAlTe2. We have calculated all of the equilibrium structural parameters; the lattice parameters (a, b and c), angle β and twenty three internal atomic coordinates. The obtained results are in excellent agreement with the available experimental data. We have predicted the single-crystal elastic constants Cij of the title materials using stress-strain approach and then derived the elastic moduli of the polycrystalline aggregates and related properties via the Voigt-Reuss-Hill approximations. The band structure and density of states diagrams have been calculated and analyzed. Both compounds demonstrate semiconducting behavior with direct band gap. The linear optical properties, namely the frequency-dependent dielectric function, absorption coefficient, refractive index, extinction coefficient, reflectivity and energy-loss function, have been calculated and analyzed in a wide energy range up to 20 eV.

  13. Chromosome 4q deletion syndrome: narrowing the cardiovascular critical region to 4q32.2-q34.3.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenbo; Ahmad, Ayesha; Dagenais, Susan; Iyer, Ramaswamy K; Innis, Jeffrey W

    2012-03-01

    The 4q deletion syndrome is a rare chromosome deletion syndrome with a wide range of clinical phenotypes. There is limited clinical phenotype and molecular correlation for congenital heart defects (CHDs) reported so far for this region primarily because many cases are large deletions, often terminal, and because high-resolution array has not been reported in the evaluation of this group of patients. CHDs are reported in about 60% of patients with 4q deletion syndrome, occurring in the presence or absence of dHAND deletion, implying the existence of additional genes in 4q whose dosage influences cardiac development. We report an 8-month-old patient with a large mid-muscular to outlet ventricular septal defect (VSD), moderate-sized secundum-type atrial septal defect (ASD), thickened, dysplastic pulmonary valve with mild stenosis and moderate pulmonic regurgitation, and patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). Illumina CytoSNP array analysis disclosed a de novo, heterozygous, interstitial deletion of 11.6 Mb of genomic material from the long arm of chromosome 4, at 4q32.3-q34.3 (Chr4:167236114-178816031; hg18). The deleted region affects 37 RefSeq genes (hg18), including two provisional microRNA stemloops. Three genes in this region, namely TLL1 (Tolloid-like-1), HPGD (15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase), and HAND2 (Heart and neural crest derivatives-expressed protein 2), are known to be involved in cardiac morphogenesis. This report narrows the critical region responsible for CHDs seen in 4q deletion syndrome. PMID:22302627

  14. Assignment of the DPP4 gene encoding adenosine deaminase binding protein (CD26/dipeptidylpeptidase IV) to 2q23

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, S.; Morrison, M.E.; Murty, V.V.V.S.

    1994-07-01

    FISH was performed on chromosome preparations obtained from phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human blood lymphocytes. cDNA encoding ADAbp was isolated from the SK-RC-28 human renal cell carcinomas cell line using PCR technique and was cloned in pSVK3 plasmid for use as a probe. The PCR primers were constructed from the known nucleotide sequence of CD26, and the cDNA product was extracted from nucleotides 1 to 2344. The vector containing the probe was labeled by nick-translation with biotin-11-dUTP. Hybridization to chromosome spreads, washings, detection with FITC-conjugated avidin, selection and photography of metaphases, analysis of signals, and banding were performed according to the described method.

  15. The cannabinoid receptor type 2 Q63R variant increases the risk of celiac disease: implication for a novel molecular biomarker and future therapeutic intervention.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Francesca; Bellini, Giulia; Tolone, Carlo; Luongo, Livio; Mancusi, Silvia; Papparella, Alfonso; Sturgeon, Craig; Fasano, Alessio; Nobili, Bruno; Perrone, Laura; Maione, Sabatino; del Giudice, Emanuele Miraglia

    2012-07-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the small bowel that occurs with the ingestion of gluten, found in several grains products. Although HLA-DQ2 variant is required for the gluten-derived peptide gliadin presentation by antigen-presenting cells to T-cells, non-HLA genetic factors account for the majority of heritable risk. Several genome-wide association studies have identified susceptibility loci for CD on chromosome 1. Cells of the immune system express the cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2), a plasma-membrane receptor activated by both endogenous and exogenous cannabinoids. Consistent data evidence that CB2 is linked to a variety of immune functional events and that, in the course of an inflammatory process, an increased number of receptors becomes available for activation. The cannabinoid receptor type 2 gene (CNR2; GeneID1269) maps on 1p36.11. In order to investigate the possible involvement of CB2 in CD establishment, immunohistochemistry toward CB2 receptor and CD4+ cells in small bowel biopsies from celiac children and association analysis, through TaqMan assay, of a CNR2 common missense variant, rs35761398 (CAA/CGG), resulting in the aminoacidic substitution of Glutamine at codon 63 with Arginine (Q63R), in a cohort of 327 South Italian children have been performed. We observed in this study that CB2 is up-regulated in CD small bowel biopsies and CNR2 rs35761398 is significantly associated with CD (χ(2) = 37.064; d.f. 1; p = 1.14 × 10(-9)). Our findings suggest a role of CB2 in CD. The Q63R variant, increasing more than six-fold the risk for CD susceptibility, might eventually represent a novel molecular biomarker for CD risk stratification. Indeed, we provide here further evidence that CB2 receptor plays a critical role in autoimmunity susceptibility and indicates that it represents a molecular target to pharmacologically modulate the immune components in CD.

  16. Room-temperature synthesis of CuInQ2 (Q = S or Se) in non-aqueous solution using an organoindium reagent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepp, Aloysius F.; Andras, Maria T.; Landry, Christopher C.; Barron, Andrew R.

    1994-01-01

    We have discovered a novel two-phase synthesis of CuInSe2 at 25 deg C from Cu2Se and (C5H5)3In in 4-methylpyridine (4-MePy). An analogous reaction to produce CuInS2 must be run at 140 deg C in refluxing 4-MePy in the presence of 2-mercaptopyridine. Microscopy of CuInSe2 produced at 25 deg C shows it to be platelet-shaped crystallites with an approximate particle size of 10 microns, less than 2 percent C and H, with a small amount of unidentified crystalline impurity. Our results demonstrate that it is possible to produce from solution a material that is ordinarily synthesized in bulk or films at much higher temperatures or using extraneous reagents and/or electrons.

  17. Deep Inelastic Structure Functions from Electron Scattering on Hydrogen, Deuterium, and Iron at 0.6 GEV(2) <= Q('2) <= 30.0 GEV(2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitlow, Larry W.

    1990-01-01

    We report the final results from experiment E140, a recent deep inelastic electron-deuterium and electron -iron scattering experiment at SLAC. In addition, we present the results of a combined global analysis of all SLAC deep inelastic electron-hydrogen and electron-deuterium cross section measurements between 1970 and 1983. Data from seven earlier experiments are re-radiatively corrected and normalized to experiment E140. We report extractions of R(x,Q^2) and F_2(x,Q ^2) for hydrogen and deuterium over the entire SLAC kinematic range:.06 <= x <=.90 and 0.6 <= Q^2 <= 30.0 (GeV^2). We find that R^{p} = R^{d}, as expected by QCD. Extracted values of R(x,Q^2) are significantly larger than predictions based on QCD and on QCD with the inclusion of kinematic target mass terms. This difference indicates that dynamical higher twist effects may be important in the SLAC kinematic range. A best fit empirical model of R(x,Q^2) is used to extract F_2 from each cross section measurement. These F_2 extractions are compared with F_2 data from EMC and BCDMS. Agreement is observed with EMC when the EMC data are multiplied by times 1.07. Agreement is observed with BCDMS over a limited range in x. The ratios of F_sp{2} {d}/F_sp{2}{p} are examined for Q^2 dependence. We observe a significant negative slope for x<= .6, and a significant positive slope above x>.7 , in excellent agreement with predictions based on QCD with the inclusion of kinematic target mass terms.

  18. Velocardiofacial syndrome in father and daughter: What is the mechanism for the deletion 22(q11.2q11.2) in only the daughter?

    SciTech Connect

    Magenis, R.E.; Gunter, K.; Toth-Fejel, S.

    1994-09-01

    E.G. had marked feeding difficulty noted at birth; the cause was determined to be a paralyzed palate. In 1992 chromosome studies were performed because of the provisional diagnosis of velocardiofacial syndrome, and a small interstitial deletion of chromosome 22 was found. Recently the family was seen in our Genetics Clinic. The father had unusual facial features shared by his daughter, a paralyzed upper lip and a history of repaired Tetralogy of Fallot. His chromosomes appeared normal. FISH studies were performed on the child`s peripheral blood using the ONCOR DiGeorge region probe (D22S75) and the deletion verified. However, the father`s chromosomes were not deleted for the ONCOR probe (D22S75) and probe DO832 sent to us by Peter Scambler. Skin cells were then obtained and no deletion was detected in a total of 66 cells examined using both probes. Several questions arise from these data: does the father have velocardiofacial syndrome? Does he have occult mosaicism? Does he have a molecular deletion not detected by the probes used? And was this deletion somehow {open_quotes}amplified{close_quotes} in his daughter?

  19. Identification of a Sudden Cardiac Death Susceptibility Locus at 2q24.2 through Genome-Wide Association in European Ancestry Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Reinier, Kyndaron; Teodorescu, Carmen; Uy-Evanado, Audrey; Carter-Monroe, Naima; Kaikkonen, Kari S.; Kortelainen, Marja-Leena; Boucher, Gabrielle; Lagacé, Caroline; Moes, Anna; Zhao, XiaoQing; Kolodgie, Frank; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hofman, Albert; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Marsman, Roos F.; Pazoki, Raha; Bardai, Abdennasser; Koster, Rudolph W.; Dehghan, Abbas; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Bhatnagar, Pallav; Post, Wendy; Hilton, Gina; Prineas, Ronald J.; Li, Man; Köttgen, Anna; Ehret, Georg; Boerwinkle, Eric; Coresh, Josef; Kao, W. H. Linda; Psaty, Bruce M.; Tomaselli, Gordon F.; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Siscovick, David S.; Burke, Greg L.; Marbán, Eduardo; Spooner, Peter M.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Jui, Jonathan; Gunson, Karen; Kesäniemi, Y. Antero; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Tardif, Jean-Claude; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Bezzina, Connie R.; Virmani, Renu; Stricker, Bruno H. C. h.; Tan, Hanno L.; Albert, Christine M.; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Rioux, John D.; Huikuri, Heikki V.; Chugh, Sumeet S.

    2011-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) continues to be one of the leading causes of mortality worldwide, with an annual incidence estimated at 250,000–300,000 in the United States and with the vast majority occurring in the setting of coronary disease. We performed a genome-wide association meta-analysis in 1,283 SCD cases and >20,000 control individuals of European ancestry from 5 studies, with follow-up genotyping in up to 3,119 SCD cases and 11,146 controls from 11 European ancestry studies, and identify the BAZ2B locus as associated with SCD (P = 1.8×10−10). The risk allele, while ancestral, has a frequency of ∼1.4%, suggesting strong negative selection and increases risk for SCD by 1.92–fold per allele (95% CI 1.57–2.34). We also tested the role of 49 SNPs previously implicated in modulating electrocardiographic traits (QRS, QT, and RR intervals). Consistent with epidemiological studies showing increased risk of SCD with prolonged QRS/QT intervals, the interval-prolonging alleles are in aggregate associated with increased risk for SCD (P = 0.006). PMID:21738491

  20. Cloning of the breakpoints of a de novo inversion of chromosome 8, inv (8)(p11.2q23.1) in a patient with Ambras syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tadin-Strapps, M; Warburton, D; Baumeister, F A M; Fischer, S G; Yonan, J; Gilliam, T C; Christiano, A M

    2004-01-01

    Ambras syndrome (AMS) is a unique form of universal congenital hypertrichosis. In patients with this syndrome, the whole body is covered with fine long hair, except for areas where normally no hair grows. There is accompanying facial dysmorphism and teeth abnormalities, including retarded first and second dentition and absence of teeth. In 1993, Baumeister et al. reported an isolated case of Ambras syndrome in association with a pericentric inversion of chromosome 8. Subsequently, another patient with congenital hypertrichosis and rearrangement of chromosome 8 was reported by Balducci et al. (1998). Both of these patients have a breakpoint in 8q22 in common suggesting that this region of chromosome 8 contains a gene involved in regulation of hair growth. In order to precisely determine the nature of the rearrangement in the case of Ambras syndrome, we have used fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis. We have cloned the inversion breakpoints in this patient and generated a detailed physical map of the inversion breakpoint interval. Analysis of the transcripts that map in the vicinity of the breakpoints revealed that the inversion does not disrupt a gene, and suggests that the phenotype is caused by a position effect.

  1. Rs11892031[A] on chromosome 2q37 in an intronic region of the UGT1A locus is associated with urinary bladder cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Selinski, Silvia; Lehmann, Marie-Louise; Blaszkewicz, Meinolf; Ovsiannikov, Daniel; Moormann, Oliver; Guballa, Christoph; Kress, Alexander; Truss, Michael C; Gerullis, Holger; Otto, Thomas; Barski, Dimitri; Niegisch, Günter; Albers, Peter; Frees, Sebastian; Brenner, Walburgis; Thüroff, Joachim W; Angeli-Greaves, Miriam; Seidel, Thilo; Roth, Gerhard; Volkert, Frank; Ebbinghaus, Rainer; Prager, Hans M; Bolt, Hermann M; Falkenstein, Michael; Zimmermann, Anna; Klein, Torsten; Reckwitz, Thomas; Roemer, Hermann C; Hartel, Mark; Weistenhöfer, Wobbeke; Schöps, Wolfgang; Rizvi, S Adibul Hassan; Aslam, Muhammad; Bánfi, Gergely; Romics, Imre; Ickstadt, Katja; Hengstler, Jan G; Golka, Klaus

    2012-09-01

    Recently, rs11892031[A] has been identified in a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to confer increased risk of urinary bladder cancer (UBC). To confirm this association and additionally study a possible relevance of exposure to urinary bladder carcinogens, we investigated the IfADo UBC study group, consisting of eight case-control series from different regions including 1,805 cases and 2,141 controls. This analysis was supplemented by a meta-analysis of all published data, including 13,395 cases and 54,876 controls. Rs11892031 A/A was significantly associated with UBC risk in the IfADo case-control series adjusted to cigarette smoking, gender, age and ethnicity (OR = 1.18; 95% CI = 1.02-1.37; P = 0.026). In the meta-analysis, a convincing association with UBC risk was obtained (OR = 1.19; 95% Cl = 1.12-1.26; P < 0.0001). Interestingly, the highest odds ratios were obtained for individual case-control series with a high degree of occupational exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and aromatic amines: cases with suspected occupational UBC (OR = 1.41) and cases from the highly industrialized Ruhr area (OR = 1.98) compared with Ruhr area controls (all combined OR = 1.46). Odds ratios were lower for study groups with no or a lower degree of occupational exposure to bladder carcinogens, such as the Hungary (OR = 1.02) or the ongoing West German case-control series (OR = 1.06). However, the possible association of rs11892031[A] with exposure to bladder carcinogens still should be interpreted with caution, because in contrast to the differences between the individual study groups, interview-based data on occupational exposure were not significantly associated with rs11892031. In conclusion, the association of rs11892031[A] with UBC risk could be confirmed in independent study groups.

  2. Tunable deep ultraviolet single-longitudinal-mode laser generated with Ba(1-x)B(2-y-z)O4Si(x)Al(y)Ga(z) crystal.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui; Teng, Hao; Wang, Nan; Han, Hainian; Wang, Zhaohua; Wei, Zhiyi; Hong, Maochun; Lin, Wenxiong

    2014-04-01

    We report a new nonlinear crystal, Ba(1-x)B(2-y-z)O4Si(x)Al(y)Ga(z), and employ it to a compact 1 kHz single-longitudinal-mode Ti:Sapphire master oscillator power amplifier system for fourth harmonic generation. A maximum output power of 130 mW is obtained in the tunable range of 195-205 nm with linewidth of less than 0.1 pm.

  3. A novel pseudo-dicentric variant of 16p11.2-q11.2 contains euchromatin from 16p11.2-p11.1 and resembles pathogenic duplications of proximal 16q.

    PubMed

    Barber, J C K; Brasch-Andersen, C; Maloney, V K; Huang, S; Bateman, M S; Graakjaer, J; Heinl, U D; Fagerberg, C

    2013-01-01

    An unusually large G-light band between 2 G-dark bands in the proximal long arm of chromosome 16 was found in a boy of 5 years of age ascertained with growth retardation, microcephaly, and dysmorphic features. Dual color bacterial artificial chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization (BAC FISH) and oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridization (oaCGH) were used to show that these bands contained a euchromatic duplication of a minimum of 940 kb between base pairs 34,197,413-35,137,025 in 16p11.2-p11.1 as well as a duplication of the centromere and major 16qh/16p11.2 heterochromatic block, covering a minimum of 12.3 Mb. The same pseudo-dicentric chromosome was found in the father who has attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The euchromatic region is not known to be subject to imprinting and overlaps multiple large copy number variations (CNVs) in the Database of Genomic Variants as well as similar CNVs that are benign or of uncertain significance in the International Standards for Cytogenomic Arrays database. We conclude that this family has a novel pseudo-dicentric euchromatic variant of chromosome 16 that is unlikely to be the cause of the variable phenotype in father and son but needs to be distinguished from heterochromatic variants or pathogenic duplications of proximal 16q. PMID:23038475

  4. Pre- and postnatal findings in a patient with a novel rec(8)dup(8q)inv(8)(p23.2q22.3) associated with San Luis Valley syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vera-Carbonell, Ascensión; López-González, Vanesa; Bafalliu, Juan Antonio; Piñero-Fernández, Juan; Susmozas, Joaquín; Sorli, Moisés; López-Pérez, Rocío; Fernández, Asunción; Guillén-Navarro, Encarna; López-Expósito, Isabel

    2013-09-01

    San Luis Valley syndrome, which is due to a recombinant chromosome 8 (SLV Rec8) found in Hispanic individuals from Southwestern United States, is a well-established syndrome associated with intellectual disabilities and, frequently, severe cardiac anomalies. We report for the first time on a Moroccan girl with a recombinant chromosome 8 prenatally diagnosed as SLV Rec8 by conventional cytogenetic studies. At birth, an oligo array-CGH (105 K) defined the breakpoints and the size of the imbalanced segments, with a deletion of ≈ 2.27 Mb (8p23.2-pter) and a duplication of ≈ 41.93 Mb (8q22.3-qter); thus this recombinant chromosome 8 differed from that previously reported in SLV Rec8 syndrome. The phenotypic characteristics associated with this SLV Rec8 genotype overlap those commonly found in patients with 8q duplication reported in the literature. We review SLV Rec8 and other chromosome 8 aberrations and suggest that the overexpression of cardiogenic genes located at 8q may be the cause of the cardiac defects in this patient.

  5. 1Q/2Q00 M-Area and Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facilities Groundwater Monitoring and Corrective-Action Report - First and Second Quarters 2000 - Volumes I, II, and II

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, J.

    2000-10-24

    This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) and the Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) HWMF at the Savannah River site (SRS) during first and second quarters of 2000.

  6. A Cluster-Randomized Controlled Trial Evaluating the Effectiveness and Cost-Effectiveness of Tobacco Cessation on Prescription in Swedish Primary Health Care: A Protocol of the Motivation 2 Quit (M2Q) Study

    PubMed Central

    Lindgren, Peter; Sundberg, Carl Johan; Petzold, Max; Tomson, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    Background In Sweden, the prevalence of tobacco use is disproportionately high among socioeconomically disadvantaged groups. Previous research and clinical experience suggest that prescribed lifestyle interventions in the primary health care (PHC) setting such as Physical Activity on Prescription are effective in changing behavior. However, there is a lack of evidence for if and how such a prescription approach could be effectively transferred into the tobacco cessation context. Objective The aim of this trial is to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of Tobacco Cessation on Prescription (TCP) compared to current practice for tobacco cessation targeting socioeconomically disadvantaged groups in the PHC setting in Sweden. Methods The design is a pragmatic cluster-randomized controlled trial. The sample will consist of 928 daily tobacco users with Swedish social security numbers and permanent resident permits, recruited from 14-20 PHC centers located in socioeconomically disadvantaged areas in Stockholm County. The primary outcome will be measured in self-reported 7-day abstinence at 6 and 12 months after the intervention. The secondary outcomes will be measured in daily tobacco consumption, number of quit attempts, and health-related quality of life at 6 and 12 months after the intervention. Data will be collected through questionnaires and review of electronic medical records. Cost-effectiveness will be estimated through decision analytic modeling and measured by the incremental cost per quality-adjusted life year. Results In the first set of PHC centers participating in the study, eight centers have been included. Recruitment of individual study participants is currently ongoing. Inclusion of a second set of PHC centers is ongoing with expected study start in September 2016. Conclusions If TCP is found effective and cost-effective compared to standard treatment, the method could be implemented to facilitate tobacco cessation for socioeconomically disadvantaged groups in the PHC setting in Sweden. Trial Registration International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Number (ISRCTN): 11498135; http://www.isrctn.com/ISRCTN11498135 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6kTu6giYQ) PMID:27637517

  7. Transformed aggressive γδ-variant T-cell large granular lymphocytic leukemia with acquired copy neutral loss of heterozygosity at 17q11.2q25.3 and additional aberrations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Ramchandren, Radhakrishnan; Papenhausen, Peter; Loughran, Thomas P; Sokol, Lubomir

    2014-09-01

    T-cell large granular lymphocytic leukemia (T-LGLL) is a rare indolent lymphoproliferative disorder characterized by cytopenias, splenomegaly, and various degrees of T-cell lymphocytosis, due to a clonal expansion of CD8-positive cytotoxic T-cells. Phenotypic variants of T-LGLL include CD4(+) /CD8(-) T-cells, with dual CD4(-) /CD8(-) /γδ(+) T-cells being even rarer. Cytogenetic abnormalities in T-LGLL have rarely been reported, and there is scientific debate regarding the existence of aggressive or transformed variants of T-LGLL. We report a patient with T-LGLL, γδ variant, with nearly 20-year-long duration of cytopenias before transformation to an unusual clinical scenario, manifesting with marked lymphocytosis >100 × 10(9) /L and infiltration of lymph nodes, tonsils, and subcutaneous tissue. Single-nucleotide polymorphism assays revealed acquired copy neutral loss of heterozygosity at 17q and deletion of 3p21.31, in addition to trisomy 5, monosomy X, and monosomy 21. These genetic abnormalities provided a better understanding of the molecular nature and the potentiality of disease transformation. PMID:24635703

  8. In situ localization of the genetic locus encoding the lysosomal acid lipase/cholesteryl esterase (LIPA) deficient in wolman disease to chromosome 10q23. 2-q23. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.A.; Rao, N.; Byrum, R.S.; Rothschild, C.B.; Bowden, D.W.; Hayworth, R.; Pettenati, M. )

    1993-01-01

    Human acid lipase/cholesteryl esterase (EC 3.1.1.13) is a 46-kDa glycoprotein required for the lysosomal hydrolysis of cholesteryl esters and triglycerides that cells acquire through the receptor-mediated endocytosis of low-density lipoproteins. This activity is essential in the provision of free cholesterol for cell metabolism as well as for the feedback signal that modulates endogenous cellular cholesterol production. The extremely low level of lysosomal acid lipase in patients afflicted with the hereditary, allelic lysosomal storage disorders Woman disease (WD) and cholesteryl ester storage disease (CESD) (MIM Number 278000 (6)) is associated with the massive intralysosomal lipid storage and derangements in the regulation of cellular cholesterol production (10). Both WD and CESD cells lack a specific acid lipase isoenzyme and it is thought that the different mutations associated with WD and CESD are in the structural gene for this isoenzyme, LIPA. Analysis of the activity of the acid lipase isoenzyme in cell extracts from human-Chinese hamster somatic cell hybrids (4, 11) demonstrated the concordant segregation of the gene locus for lysosomal acid lipase with the glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase-1 (GOT1) enzyme marker for human chromosome 10 which was subsequently localized to 10q24.1 q25.1 (8). 11 refs., 1 figs.

  9. Measurement of the Deuteron Spin Structure Function g{sub 1}{sup d}(x) for 1 (GeV/c){sup 2} < Q{sup 2} < 40 (GeV/c){sup 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Perry Anthony; R.G. Arnold; Todd Averett; H.R. Band; M.C. Berisso; H. Borel; Peter Bosted; Stephen Bueltmann; M. Buenerd; T. Chupp; Steve Churchwell; G.R. Court; Donald Crabb; Donal Day; Piotr Decowski; P. DePietro; R. Erbacher; R. Erickson; Andrew Feltham; Helene Fonvieille; Emil Frlez; R. Gearhart; V. Ghazikhanian; Javier Gomez; Keith Griffioen; C. Harris; M.A. Houlden; E.W. Hughes; Charles Hyde-Wright; G. Igo; Sebastien Incerti; John Jensen; J.R. Johnson; Paul King; Yu.G. Kolomensky; Sebastian Kuhn; Richard Lindgren; R.M. Lombard-Nelsen; Jacques Marroncle; James Mccarthy; Paul McKee; W. Meyer; G.S. Mitchell; Joseph Mitchell; Michael Olson; S. Penttila; Gerald Peterson; Gerassimos Petratos; R. Pitthan; Dinko Pocanic; R. Prepost; C. Prescott; Liming Qin; Brian Raue; D. Reyna; L.S. Rochester; Stephen Rock; Oscar Rondon-Aramayo; Franck Sabatie; Ingo Sick; T. Smith; L. Sorrell; F. Staley; S. St. Lorant; L.M. Stuart; Z. Szalata; Y. Terrien; William Tobias; Luminita Todor; T. Toole; S. Trentalange; Dieter Walz; Robert Welsh; Frank Wesselmann; T.R. Wright; C.C. Young; Markus Zeier; Hong Guo Zhu; Benedikt Zihlmann

    1999-09-30

    New measurements are reported on the deuteron spin structure function g{sub 1}{sup d}. These results were obtained from deep inelastic scattering of 48.3 GeV electrons on polarized deuterons in the kinematic range 0.01 < x < 0.9 and 1 < Q{sup 2} < 40 (GeV/c){sup 2}. These are the first high dose electron scattering data obtained using lithium deuteride ({sup 6}Li{sup 2}H) as the target material. Extrapolations of the data were performed to obtain moments of g{sub 1}{sup d}, including {Gamma}{sub 1}{sup d}, and the net quark polarization {Delta} {Sigma}.

  10. A new locus (SPG46) maps to 9p21.2-q21.12 in a Tunisian family with a complicated autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia with mental impairment and thin corpus callosum.

    PubMed

    Boukhris, Amir; Feki, Imed; Elleuch, Nizar; Miladi, Mohamed Imed; Boland-Augé, Anne; Truchetto, Jérémy; Mundwiller, Emeline; Jezequel, Nadia; Zelenika, Diana; Mhiri, Chokri; Brice, Alexis; Stevanin, Giovanni

    2010-10-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) with thin corpus callosum (TCC) and mental impairment is a frequent subtype of complicated HSP, often inherited as an autosomal recessive (AR) trait. It is clear from molecular genetic analyses that there are several underlying causes of this syndrome, with at least six genetic loci identified to date. However, SPG11 and SPG15 are the two major genes for this entity. To map the responsible gene in a large AR-HSP-TCC family of Tunisian origin, we investigated a consanguineous family with a diagnosis of AR-HSP-TCC excluded for linkage to the SPG7, SPG11, SPG15, SPG18, SPG21, and SPG32 loci. A genome-wide scan was undertaken using 6,090 SNP markers covering all chromosomes. The phenotypic presentation in five patients was suggestive of a complex HSP that associated an early-onset spastic paraplegia with mild handicap, mental deterioration, congenital cataract, cerebellar signs, and TCC. The genome-wide search identified a single candidate region on chromosome 9, exceeding the LOD score threshold of +3. Fine mapping using additional markers narrowed the candidate region to a 45.1-Mb interval (15.4 cM). Mutations in three candidate genes were excluded. The mapping of a novel AR-HSP-TCC locus further demonstrates the extensive genetic heterogeneity of this condition. We propose that testing for this locus should be performed, after exclusion of mutations in SPG11 and SPG15 genes, in AR-HSP-TCC families, especially when cerebellar ataxia and cataract are present.

  11. Localization of the genes encoding the melanocortin-2 (Adrenocorticotropic hormone) and melanocortin-3 receptors to chromosomes 18p11. 2 and 20q13. 2-q13. 3 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Gantz, I.; Tashiro, Takao; Konda, Yoshitaka; Shimoto, Yoshimasa; Miwa, Hiroto; Munzert, G.; Barcroft, C.; Glover, T.; Yamada, Tadataka )

    1993-10-01

    Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and [alpha]-, [beta]-, and [gamma]-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH) are products of propiomelanocortin post-translational processing. These compounds are collectively labeled as melanocortins (MC). Aside from their established effects on the regulation of the adrenal cortex (ACTH) and melanocytes ([alpha]-MSH), the melanocortins have been implicated in a broad array of physiological events. Melanocortins mediate their effects through cell membrane receptors belonging to the superfamily of seven transmembrane G-protein-linked receptors. Using the technique of polymerase chain reaction with primers based on conserved areas of the seven transmembrane G-protein-linked receptor family, the authors recently isolated an [open quotes]orphan[close quotes] subfamily of this receptor group. Within the past year, two of these receptors were identified as specific for [alpha]-MSH (MC1) and ACTH (MC2). They have recently described a third melanocortin receptor (MC3) that appears to recognize the core heptapeptide sequence of melanocortins with equal potency and efficacy and identified its presence in the brain, placenta, and gut. Using the FISH technique, they localized the ACTH and the melanocortin-3 receptors to chromosome loci 18p11.2 and 20q12.3-q13.2, respectively. 19 refs., 1 fig.

  12. SYT-SSX is critical for cyclin D1 expression in synovial sarcoma cells: a gain of function of the t(X;18)(p11.2;q11.2) translocation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yuntao; Skytting, Björn; Nilsson, Gunnar; Gasbarri, Alessandra; Haslam, Karl; Bartolazzi, Armando; Brodin, Bertha; Mandahl, Nils; Larsson, Olle

    2002-07-01

    The SYT-SSX fusion gene has been implicated in the malignant tumor cell growth of synovial sarcoma, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are still poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that SYT-SSX is critical for the protein level of cyclin D1 in synovial sarcoma cells. Antisense oligonucleotides to SYT-SSX mRNA rapidly and drastically decreased cyclin D1 and subsequently inhibited cell growth. This effect is specific for SYT-SSX, without involving the wild-type genes SYT or SSX. The decrease in cyclin D1 expression, which occurred shortly after inhibition of SYT-SSX expression, was found to be primarily dependent on an increased degradation of the cyclin D1 protein, as assessed by pulse-chase experiments using [(35)S]methionine. Furthermore, transfection of mouse fibroblasts with SYT-SSX cDNA increased the stability of cyclin D1. Because treatment with a proteasome inhibitor restored cyclin D1 expression, it seems like SYT-SSX interferes with ubiquitin-dependent degradation of cyclin D1. However, SYT-SSX-regulated cyclin D1 expression was proven to be independent of the glycogen synthetase kinase-3beta pathway. Taken together, our study provides evidence that SYT-SSX stabilizes cyclin D1 and is critical for cyclin D1 expression in synovial sarcoma cells. SYT-SSX-dependent expression of cyclin D1 may be an important mechanism in the development and progression of synovial sarcoma and also raises the possibility for targeted therapy.

  13. De novo interstitial duplication of 15q11.2-q13.1 with complex maternal uniparental trisomy for the 15q11-q13 region in a patient with Prader-Willi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Burrage, Lindsay C; Person, Richard E; Flores, Angela; Villanos, Maria Theresa M; Bi, Weimin; Wiszniewska, Joanna; Bacino, Carlos A

    2012-10-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome is caused by the lack of paternal contribution for the imprinted 15q11-q13 region that originates through a number of mechanisms such as paternal deletion of 15q11-q13, maternal uniparental disomy, or by an imprinting defect due to epimutations in the paternal imprinting center. In the present report, we describe a female patient with complex maternal uniparental trisomy for the 15q11-q13 Prader-Willi syndrome critical region due to a de novo interstitial duplication of 15q11-q13 region that is present in one of the maternal homologs. As a result, the patient has three maternally derived copies of the Prader-Willi syndrome critical region and absence of paternal 15 contribution and thus, presents with a Prader-Willi syndrome phenotype with risk for developing additional phenotypes (e.g., autism and psychiatric phenotypes) characteristic of maternally derived duplications of this region. We suggest that this is a rather unique mechanism leading to Prader-Willi syndrome that has not been previously reported.

  14. Three-region specific microdissection libraries for the long arm of human chromosome 2, regions q33-q35, q31-q32, and q23-q24

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, J.; Tong, S.; Whittier, A.

    1995-09-01

    Three region-specific libraries have been constructed from the long arm of human chromosome 2, including regions 2q33-35 (2Q2 library), 2q31-32 (2Q3) and 2q23-24 (2Q4). Chromosome microdissection and the MboI linker-adaptor microcloning techniques were used in constructing these libraries. The libraries comprised hundreds of thousands of microclones in each library. Approximately half of the microclones in the library contained unique or low-copy number sequence inserts. The insert sizes ranged between 50 and 800 bp, with a mean of 130-190 bp. Southern blot analysis of individual unique sequence microclones showed that 70-94% of the microclones were derived from the dissected region. 31 unique sequence microclones from the 2Q2 library, 31 from 2Q3, and 30 from 2Q4, were analyzed for insert sizes, the hybridizing genomic HindIII fragment sizes, and cross-hybridization to rodent species. These libraries and the short insert microclones derived from the libraries should be useful for high resolution physical mapping, sequence-ready reagents for large scale genomic sequencing, and positional cloning of disease-related genes assigned to these regions, e.g. the recessive familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis assigned to 2q33-q35, and a type I diabetes susceptibility gene to 2q31-q33. 17 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Ultrabroadband two-quantum two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gellen, Tobias A.; Bizimana, Laurie A.; Carbery, William P.; Breen, Ilana; Turner, Daniel B.

    2016-08-01

    A recent theoretical study proposed that two-quantum (2Q) two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy should be a background-free probe of post-Hartree-Fock electronic correlations. Testing this theoretical prediction requires an instrument capable of not only detecting multiple transitions among molecular excited states but also distinguishing molecular 2Q signals from nonresonant response. Herein we describe a 2Q 2D spectrometer with a spectral range of 300 nm that is passively phase stable and uses only beamsplitters and mirrors. We developed and implemented a dual-chopping balanced-detection method to resolve the weak molecular 2Q signals. Experiments performed on cresyl violet perchlorate and rhodamine 6G revealed distinct 2Q signals convolved with nonresonant response. Density functional theory computations helped reveal the molecular origin of these signals. The experimental and computational results demonstrate that 2Q electronic spectra can provide a singular probe of highly excited electronic states.

  16. In the Chapman-Enskog Expansionthe Burnett Coefficients Satisfythe Universal Relation ω3+ω4+θ3= 0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slemrod, M.

    The Chapman-Enskog expansion when applied to a gas of spherical molecules yields formal expressions for the stress deviator P and energy-flux vector q, P=μP(1)+μ2P(2)+..., q=μq(1)+μ2q(2)+.... The Burnett terms P(2), q(2) depend on 11 coefficients ωi, 1<=i<=6, θ&i, 1<=i<= 5. This paper shows that ω3+ω4+θ3= 0.

  17. Brief Report: Peculiar Evolution of Autistic Behaviors in Two Unrelated Children with Brachidactyly-Mental Retardation Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazzone, Luigi; Vassena, Lia; Ruta, Liliana; Mugno, Diego; Galesi, Ornella; Fichera, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Brachidactyly-Mental Retardation (BDMR) Syndrome (MIM 600430) is associated with terminal deletions at chromosome 2q37 and a limited number of studies also reported an association between 2q37 [right arrow] qter deletion and autism. Herein we describe two cases of autism in unrelated children with BDMR Syndrome, showing physical, cognitive,…

  18. Delivery of QTIiv2 Question Types

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wills, Gary B.; Davis, Hugh C.; Gilbert, Lester; Hare, Jonathon; Howard, Yvonne; Jeyes, Steve; Millard, David; Sherratt, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The IMS Question and Test Interoperability (QTI) standard identifies 16 different question types which may be used in online assessment. While some partial implementations exist, the R2Q2 project has developed a complete solution that renders and responds to all 16 question types as specified. In addition, care has been taken in the R2Q2 project…

  19. Preparation and application of a novel electrochemical sensing material based on surface chemistry of polyhydroquinone.

    PubMed

    Dang, Xueping; Wang, Yingkai; Hu, Chengguo; Huang, Jianlin; Chen, Huaixia; Wang, Shengfu; Hu, Shengshui

    2014-07-01

    A new analogue of polydopamine (PDA), i.e., polyhydroquinone (PH2Q), was polymerized and its surface chemistry was studied by different ways of characterization. PH2Q was produced by the self-polymerization of H2Q mediated by dissolved oxygen, and the self-polymerization process was strongly dependent on the type and the pH value of the buffer solutions. PH2Q can not only achieve surface hydrophilization of different substrates like polyethylene terephthalate (PET) film, graphite strip, C12SH/Au and wax slice, but also possess several unique properties like reversible adsorption, good solubility and low cost. These properties made PH2Q an ideal polymeric modifier for the noncovalent functionalization of some nanomaterials. By simply grinding with PH2Q, pristine multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) can be readily dispersed in water with high solubility and good stability. The resulting MWNT-PH2Q composite exhibited excellent electrochemical performance, which was employed for the simultaneous determination of dopamine (DA) and uric acid (UA).

  20. Application of the FIDAP code to the 8:1 thermal cavity problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gresho, P. M.; Sutton, S. B.

    2002-11-01

    We present results using FIDAP on 3 meshes with 3 different elements (Q1Q0, Q2P-1, Q2Q-1) employed on each. Whereas the bulk of the results were obtained via the classical Galerkin finite element method (GFEM) and the trapezoidal (TR) time integrator, we also tested several alternative options: flux-conservative formulation, energy-conservative formulation, streamline upwinding, mass lumping, backward Euler time stepping, and one additional element (Q2Q1). The most accurate of these options was the Q2Q-1 element in the advective formulation, no upwinding, trapezoidal time integration, and consistent mass; i.e. straight GFEM.

  1. Clinical and Molecular Aspects of MBD5-Associated Neurodevelopmental Disorder (MAND).

    PubMed

    Mullegama, Sureni V; Elsea, Sarah H

    2016-08-01

    MBD5-associated neurodevelopmental disorder (MAND) is an umbrella term that describes a group of disorders, 2q23.1 deletion syndrome, 2q23.1 duplication syndrome, and MBD5 variants, that affect the function of methyl-binding domain 5 (MBD5) and share a common set of neurodevelopmental, cognitive, and behavioral impairments. This review provides a comprehensive clinical and molecular synopsis of 2q23.1 deletion syndrome. Approaches to diagnosis, genetic counseling, and up-to-date management are summarized, followed by a discussion of the molecular and functional role of MBD5. Finally, we also include a brief summary of MBD5 variants that affect function of MBD5 and 2q23.1 duplication syndrome.

  2. Genome-wide significant risk associations for mucinous ovarian carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kelemen, Linda E; Lawrenson, Kate; Tyrer, Jonathan; Li, Qiyuan; Lee, Janet M; Seo, Ji-Heui; Phelan, Catherine M; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Spindler, Tassja J; Aben, Katja K H; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia

    2015-08-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified several risk associations for ovarian carcinomas but not for mucinous ovarian carcinomas (MOCs). Our analysis of 1,644 MOC cases and 21,693 controls with imputation identified 3 new risk associations: rs752590 at 2q13 (P = 3.3 × 10(-8)), rs711830 at 2q31.1 (P = 7.5 × 10(-12)) and rs688187 at 19q13.2 (P = 6.8 × 10(-13)). We identified significant expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) associations for HOXD9 at 2q31.1 in ovarian (P = 4.95 × 10(-4), false discovery rate (FDR) = 0.003) and colorectal (P = 0.01, FDR = 0.09) tumors and for PAX8 at 2q13 in colorectal tumors (P = 0.03, FDR = 0.09). Chromosome conformation capture analysis identified interactions between the HOXD9 promoter and risk-associated SNPs at 2q31.1. Overexpressing HOXD9 in MOC cells augmented the neoplastic phenotype. These findings provide the first evidence for MOC susceptibility variants and insights into the underlying biology of the disease. PMID:26075790

  3. Genome-wide significant risk associations for mucinous ovarian carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kelemen, Linda E.; Lawrenson, Kate; Tyrer, Jonathan; Li, Qiyuan; M. Lee, Janet; Seo, Ji-Heui; Phelan, Catherine M.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqin; Spindler, Tassja J.; Aben, Katja K.H.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia; Baker, Helen; Bandera, Elisa V.; Bean, Yukie; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Bisogna, Maria; Bjorge, Line; Bogdanova, Natalia; Brinton, Louise A.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Bruinsma, Fiona; Butzow, Ralf; Campbell, Ian G.; Carty, Karen; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chen, Y. Ann; Chen, Zhihua; Cook, Linda S.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Cybulski, Cezary; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Dennis, Joe; Dicks, Ed; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Dörk, Thilo; du Bois, Andreas; Dürst, Matthias; Eccles, Diana; Easton, Douglas T.; Edwards, Robert P.; Eilber, Ursula; Ekici, Arif B.; Engelholm, Svend Aage; Fasching, Peter A.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Giles, Graham G.; Glasspool, Rosalind; Goode, Ellen L.; Goodman, Marc T.; Grownwald, Jacek; Harrington, Patricia; Harter, Philipp; Hasmad, Hanis Nazihah; Hein, Alexander; Heitz, Florian; Hildebrandt, Michelle A.T.; Hillemanns, Peter; Hogdall, Estrid; Hogdall, Claus; Hosono, Satoyo; Iversen, Edwin S.; Jakubowska, Anna; Jensen, Allan; Ji, Bu-Tian; Karlan, Beth Y; Kellar, Melissa; Kelley, Joseph L.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Krakstad, Camilla; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Lambrechts, Diether; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Le, Nhu D.; Lee, Alice W.; Lele, Shashi; Leminen, Arto; Lester, Jenny; Levine, Douglas A.; Liang, Dong; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Karen; Lubinski, Jan; Lundvall, Lene; Massuger, Leon F.A.G.; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGuire, Valerie; McLaughlin, John R.; McNeish, Iain; Menon, Usha; Modugno, Francesmary; Moes-Sosnowska, Joanna; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Narod, Steven A.; Nedergaard, Lotte; Ness, Roberta B.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Azmi, Mat Adenan Noor; Odunsi, Kunle; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Orsulic, Sandra; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Paul, James; Pearce, Celeste Leigh; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Pike, Malcolm C.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Ramus, Susan J.; Risch, Harvey A.; Rosen, Barry; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo B.; Rzepecka, Iwona K.; Salvesen, Helga B.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Schwaab, Ira; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shvetsov, Yurii B; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Sieh, Weiva; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa C.; Sucheston, Lara; Tangen, Ingvild L.; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Kathryn L.; Thompson, Pamela J; Tworoger, Shelley S.; van Altena, Anne M.; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; Vergote, Ignace; Vierkant, Robert A.; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Walsh, Christine; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S.; Wicklund, Kristine G.; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Wlodzimierz, Sawicki; Woo, Yin-Ling; Wu, Xifeng; Wu, Anna H.; Yang, Hannah; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Sellers, Thomas A.; Freedman, Matthew L.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pharoah, Paul D.; Gayther, Simon A.; Berchuck, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified several risk associations for ovarian carcinomas (OC) but not for mucinous ovarian carcinomas (MOC). Genotypes from OC cases and controls were imputed into the 1000 Genomes Project reference panel. Analysis of 1,644 MOC cases and 21,693 controls identified three novel risk associations: rs752590 at 2q13 (P = 3.3 × 10−8), rs711830 at 2q31.1 (P = 7.5 × 10−12) and rs688187 at 19q13.2 (P = 6.8 × 10−13). Expression Quantitative Trait Locus (eQTL) analysis in ovarian and colorectal tumors (which are histologically similar to MOC) identified significant eQTL associations for HOXD9 at 2q31.1 in ovarian (P = 4.95 × 10−4, FDR = 0.003) and colorectal (P = 0.01, FDR = 0.09) tumors, and for PAX8 at 2q13 in colorectal tumors (P = 0.03, FDR = 0.09). Chromosome conformation capture analysis identified interactions between the HOXD9 promoter and risk SNPs at 2q31.1. Overexpressing HOXD9 in MOC cells augmented the neoplastic phenotype. These findings provide the first evidence for MOC susceptibility variants and insights into the underlying biology of the disease. PMID:26075790

  4. Localization of extended brain sources from EEG/MEG: the ExSo-MUSIC approach.

    PubMed

    Birot, Gwénaël; Albera, Laurent; Wendling, Fabrice; Merlet, Isabelle

    2011-05-01

    We propose a new MUSIC-like method, called 2q-ExSo-MUSIC (q ≥ 1). This method is an extension of the 2q-MUSIC (q ≥ 1) approach for solving the EEG/MEG inverse problem, when spatially-extended neocortical sources ("ExSo") are considered. It introduces a novel ExSo-MUSIC principle. The novelty is two-fold: i) the parameterization of the spatial source distribution that leads to an appropriate metric in the context of distributed brain sources and ii) the introduction of an original, efficient and low-cost way of optimizing this metric. In 2q-ExSo-MUSIC, the possible use of higher order statistics (q ≥ 2) offers a better robustness with respect to Gaussian noise of unknown spatial coherence and modeling errors. As a result we reduced the penalizing effects of both the background cerebral activity that can be seen as a Gaussian and spatially correlated noise, and the modeling errors induced by the non-exact resolution of the forward problem. Computer results on simulated EEG signals obtained with physiologically-relevant models of both the sources and the volume conductor show a highly increased performance of our 2q-ExSo-MUSIC method as compared to the classical 2q-MUSIC algorithms.

  5. PWS/AS MS-MLPA Confirms Maternal Origin of 15q11.2 Microduplication.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Angelika J; Cox, Janice; Hovanes, Karine; Spriggs, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    The proximal region of the long arm of chromosome 15q11.2-q13 is associated with various neurodevelopmental disorders, including Prader-Willi (PWS) and Angelman (AS) syndromes, autism, and other developmental abnormalities resulting from deletions and duplications. In addition, this region encompasses imprinted genes that cause PWS or AS, depending on the parent-of-origin. This imprinting allows for diagnosis of PWS or AS based on methylation status using methylation sensitive (MS) multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification (MLPA). Maternally derived microduplications at 15q11.2-q13 have been associated with autism and other neuropsychiatric disorders. Multiple methods have been used to determine the parent-of-origin for 15q11.2-q13 microdeletions and microduplications. In the present study, a four-year-old nondysmorphic female patient with developmental delay was found to have a de novo ~5 Mb duplication within 15q11.2 by oligonucleotide genomic array. In order to determine the significance of this microduplication to the clinical phenotype, the parent-of-origin needed to be identified. The PWS/AS MS-MLPA assay is generally used to distinguish between deletion and uniparental disomy (UPD) of 15q11.2-q13, resulting in either PWS or AS. However, our study shows that PWS/AS MS-MLPA can also efficiently distinguish the parental origin of duplications of 15q11.2-q13. PMID:26064710

  6. Differential transcript profiles of MHC class Ib(Qa-1, Qa-2, and Qa-10) and Aire genes during the ontogeny of thymus and other tissues.

    PubMed

    Melo-Lima, Breno Luiz; Evangelista, Adriane Feijó; de Magalhães, Danielle Aparecida Rosa; Passos, Geraldo Aleixo; Moreau, Philippe; Donadi, Eduardo Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Qa-2 and Qa-1 are murine nonclassical MHC class I molecules involved in the modulation of immune responses by interacting with T CD8(+) and NK cell inhibitory receptors. During thymic education, the Aire gene imposes the expression of thousands of tissue-related antigens in the thymic medulla, permitting the negative selection events. Aiming to characterize the transcriptional profiles of nonclassical MHC class I genes in spatial-temporal association with the Aire expression, we evaluated the gene expression of H2-Q7(Qa-2), H2-T23(Qa-1), H2-Q10(Qa-10), and Aire during fetal and postnatal development of thymus and other tissues. In the thymus, H2-Q7(Qa-2) transcripts were detected at high levels throughout development and were positively correlated with Aire expression during fetal ages. H2-Q7(Qa-2) and H2-T23(Qa-1) showed distinct expression patterns with gradual increasing levels according to age in most tissues analyzed. H2-Q10(Qa-10) was preferentially expressed by the liver. The Aire transcriptional profile showed increased levels during the fetal period and was detectable in postnatal ages in the thymus. Overall, nonclassical MHC class I genes started to be expressed early during the ontogeny. Their levels varied according to age, tissue, and mouse strain analyzed. This differential expression may contribute to the distinct patterns of mouse susceptibility/resistance to infectious and noninfectious disorders.

  7. Efficient symmetry-based homonuclear dipolar recoupling of quadrupolar spins: double-quantum NMR correlations in amorphous solids.

    PubMed

    Lo, Andy Y H; Edén, Mattias

    2008-11-28

    We report novel symmetry-based pulse sequences for exciting double-quantum (2Q) coherences between the central transitions of half-integer spin quadrupolar nuclei in the NMR of rotating solids. Compared to previous 2Q-recoupling techniques, numerical simulations and 23Na and 27Al NMR experiments on Na2SO4 and the open-framework aluminophosphate AlPO-CJ19 verify that the new dipolar recoupling schemes display higher robustness to both radio-frequency field inhomogeneity and to spreads in resonance frequencies. These advances allowed for the first demonstration of 2Q-recoupling in an amorphous solid for revealing its intermediate-range structural features, in the context of mapping 27Al-27Al connectivities between the aluminium polyhedra (AlO4, AlO5 and AlO6) of a lanthanum aluminate glass (La0.18Al0.82O1.5).

  8. Application of a gold electrode, modified by a self-assembled monolayer of 2-mercaptodecylhydroquinone, to the electroanalysis of hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingdong; Seo, Kyoungja; Jeon, Il Cheol

    2003-02-01

    A gold electrode modified by a self-assembled monolayer of 2-mercaptodecylhydroquinone (H(2)Q(CH(2))(10)SH) was applied to investigate the electrochemical response of hemoglobin in aerated buffer solutions. Compared with a bare gold electrode, the monolayer of H(2)Q(CH(2))(10)SH could suppress the reduction wave of dissolved oxygen in the buffer while effectively promoting the rate of electron transfer between hemoglobin and the electrode. Thus, a convenient way for electroanalysis of hemoglobin in air was achieved at the H(2)Q(CH(2))(10)SH/Au electrode. A linear relationship existed between peak current and concentration of hemoglobin in the range 1 x 10(-7)-1 x 10(-6) mol L(-1).

  9. Intragenic MBD5 familial deletion variant does not negatively impact MBD5 mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Mullegama, Sureni V; Elsea, Sarah H

    2014-01-01

    2q23.1 deletion syndrome is characterized by intellectual disability, speech impairment, seizures, disturbed sleep pattern, behavioral problems, and hypotonia. Core features of this syndrome are due to haploinsufficiency of MBD5. Deletions that include coding and noncoding exons show reduced MBD5 mRNA expression. We report a patient with a neurological and behavioral phenotype similar to 2q23.1 deletion syndrome with an inherited intronic deletion in the 5-prime untranslated region of MBD5. Our data show that this patient has normal MBD5 mRNA expression; therefore, this deletion is likely not causative for 2q23.1 deletion syndrome. Overall, it is important to validate intronic deletions for pathogenicity.

  10. Duplex quantitative real-time PCR assay for the detection and discrimination of the eggs of Toxocara canis and Toxocara cati (Nematoda, Ascaridoidea) in soil and fecal samples

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Toxocarosis is a zoonotic disease caused by Toxocara canis (T. canis) and/or Toxocara cati (T. cati), two worldwide distributed roundworms which are parasites of canids and felids, respectively. Infections of humans occur through ingestion of embryonated eggs of T. canis or T. cati, when playing with soils contaminated with dogs or cats feces. Accordingly, the assessment of potential contamination of these areas with these roundworms eggs is paramount. Methods A duplex quantitative real-time PCR (2qPCR) targeting the ribosomal RNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) has been developed and used for rapid and specific identification of T. canis and T. cati eggs in fecal and soil samples. The assay was set up on DNA samples extracted from 53 adult worms including T. canis, T. cati, T. leonina, Ascaris suum (A. suum) and Parascaris equorum (P. equorum). The assay was used to assess the presence of T. cati eggs in several samples, including 12 clean soil samples spiked with eggs of either T. cati or A. suum, 10 actual soil samples randomly collected from playgrounds in Brussels, and fecal samples from cats, dogs, and other animals. 2qPCR results on dogs and cats fecal samples were compared with results from microscopic examination. Results 2qPCR assay allowed specific detection of T. canis and T. cati, whether adult worms, eggs spiked in soil or fecal samples. The 2qPCR limit of detection (LOD) in spiked soil samples was 2 eggs per g of soil for a turnaround time of 3 hours. A perfect concordance was observed between 2qPCR assay and microscopic examination on dogs and cats feces. Conclusion The newly developed 2qPCR assay can be useful for high throughput prospective or retrospective detection of T.canis and/or T. cati eggs in fecal samples as well as in soil samples from playgrounds, parks and sandpits. PMID:23216873

  11. Haploinsufficiency of MBD5 associated with a syndrome involving microcephaly, intellectual disabilities, severe speech impairment, and seizures.

    PubMed

    Williams, Stephen R; Mullegama, Sureni V; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Dagli, Aditi I; Hatchwell, Eli; Allen, William P; Williams, Charles A; Elsea, Sarah H

    2010-04-01

    Microdeletion of chromosome 2q23.1 results in a novel syndrome previously reported in five individuals. Many of the del(2)(q23.1) cases were thought to have other syndromes such as Angelman, Prader-Willi, or Smith-Magenis because of certain overlapping clinical features. We report two new cases of the 2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome, describe the syndrome phenotype, define the minimal critical region, and analyze the expression of critical region genes toward identification of the causative gene(s) for the disorder. Individuals with del(2)(q23.1) have severe developmental and cognitive delays, minimal speech, seizures, microcephaly, mild craniofacial dysmorphism, behavioral disorders, and short stature. The deletions encompassing 2q23.1 range from >4 Mb to <200 kb, as identified by oligonucleotide and BAC whole-genome array comparative hybridization. The minimal critical region includes a single gene, MBD5, deleted in all cases, whereas all but one case also include deletion of EPC2. Quantitative real-time PCR of patient lymphoblasts/lymphocytes showed an approximately 50% reduced expression of MBD5 and EPC2 compared with controls. With similar phenotypes among the 2q23.1 deletion patients, the idea of one or more common genes causing the pathological defect seen in these patients becomes evident. As all five previous cases and the two cases in this report share one common gene, MBD5, we strongly suspect that haploinsufficiency of MBD5 causes most of the features observed in this syndrome.

  12. Haploinsufficiency of MBD5 associated with a syndrome involving microcephaly, intellectual disabilities, severe speech impairment, and seizures

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Stephen R; Mullegama, Sureni V; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Dagli, Aditi I; Hatchwell, Eli; Allen, William P; Williams, Charles A; Elsea, Sarah H

    2010-01-01

    Microdeletion of chromosome 2q23.1 results in a novel syndrome previously reported in five individuals. Many of the del(2)(q23.1) cases were thought to have other syndromes such as Angelman, Prader–Willi, or Smith–Magenis because of certain overlapping clinical features. We report two new cases of the 2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome, describe the syndrome phenotype, define the minimal critical region, and analyze the expression of critical region genes toward identification of the causative gene(s) for the disorder. Individuals with del(2)(q23.1) have severe developmental and cognitive delays, minimal speech, seizures, microcephaly, mild craniofacial dysmorphism, behavioral disorders, and short stature. The deletions encompassing 2q23.1 range from >4 Mb to <200 kb, as identified by oligonucleotide and BAC whole-genome array comparative hybridization. The minimal critical region includes a single gene, MBD5, deleted in all cases, whereas all but one case also include deletion of EPC2. Quantitative real-time PCR of patient lymphoblasts/lymphocytes showed an ∼50% reduced expression of MBD5 and EPC2 compared with controls. With similar phenotypes among the 2q23.1 deletion patients, the idea of one or more common genes causing the pathological defect seen in these patients becomes evident. As all five previous cases and the two cases in this report share one common gene, MBD5, we strongly suspect that haploinsufficiency of MBD5 causes most of the features observed in this syndrome. PMID:19904302

  13. Gene expression profiling of R6/2 transgenic mice with different CAG repeat lengths reveals genes associated with disease onset and progression in Huntington's disease

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Bin; Seredenina, Tamara; Coppola, Giovanni; Kuhn, Alexandre; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Luthi-Carter, Ruth; Thomas, Elizabeth A.

    2011-01-01

    R6/2 transgenic mice with expanded CAG repeats (>300) have a surprisingly prolonged disease progression and longer lifespan than prototypical parent R6/2 mice (carrying 150 CAGs), however, the mechanism of this phenotype amelioration is unknown. We compared gene expression profiles in the striatum of R6/2 transgenic mice carrying ~300 CAG repeats (R6/2Q300 transgenic mice), those carrying ~150 CAG repeats (R6/2Q150 transgenic mice) and littermate wt controls in order to identify genes that may play determinant roles in the time course of phenotypic expression in these mice. Of the top genes showing concordant expression changes in the striatum of both R6/2 lines, 85% were decreased in expression, while discordant expression changes were observed mostly for genes upregulated in R6/2Q300 transgenic mice. Upregulated genes in the R6/2Q300 mice were associated with the ubiquitin ligase complex, cell adhesion, protein folding and establishment of protein localization. We qPCR-validated increases in expression of genes related to the latter category, including Lrsam1, Erp29, Nasp, Tap1, Rab9b and Pfdn5 in R6/2Q300 mice, changes that were not observed in R6/2 mice with shorter CAG repeats, even in late stages (i.e. 12 weeks of age). We further tested Lrsam1 and Erp29, the two genes showing the greatest upregulation in R6/2Q300 transgenic mice, for potential neuroprotective effects in primary striatal cultures overexpressing a mutated human huntingtin (htt) fragment. Overexpression of Lrsam1 prevented the loss of NeuN-positive cell bodies in htt171-82Q cultures, concomitant with a reduction of nuclear htt aggregates. Erp29 showed no significant effects in this model. This is consistent with the distinct pattern of htt inclusion localization observed in R6/2Q300 transgenic mice, in which smaller cytoplasmic inclusions represent the major form of insoluble htt in the cell, as opposed to large nuclear inclusions observed in R6/2Q150 transgenic mice. We suggest that the

  14. ADAR2-dependent GluA2 editing regulates cocaine seeking.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, H D; McFarland, K N; Darnell, S B; Huizenga, M N; Sangrey, G R; Cha, J-H J; Pierce, R C; Sadri-Vakili, G

    2015-11-01

    Activation of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) in the nucleus accumbens is necessary for the reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior, an animal model of drug craving and relapse. AMPARs are tetrameric protein complexes that consist of GluA1-4 subunits, of which GluA2 imparts calcium permeability. Adenosine deaminase acting on RNA 2 (ADAR2) is a nuclear enzyme that is essential for editing GluA2 pre-mRNA at Q/R site 607. Unedited GluA2(Q) subunits form calcium-permeable AMPARs (CP-AMPARs), whereas edited GluA2(R) subunits form calcium-impermeable channels (CI-AMPARs). Emerging evidence suggests that the reinstatement of cocaine seeking is associated with increased synaptic expression of CP-AMPARs in the nucleus accumbens. However, the role of GluA2 Q/R site editing and ADAR2 in cocaine seeking is unclear. In the present study, we investigated the effects of forced cocaine abstinence on GluA2 Q/R site editing and ADAR2 expression in the nucleus accumbens. Our results demonstrate that 7 days of cocaine abstinence is associated with decreased GluA2 Q/R site editing and reduced ADAR2 expression in the accumbens shell, but not core, of cocaine-experienced rats compared with yoked saline controls. To examine the functional significance of ADAR2 and GluA2 Q/R site editing in cocaine seeking, we used viral-mediated gene delivery to overexpress ADAR2b in the accumbens shell. Increased ADAR2b expression in the shell attenuated cocaine priming-induced reinstatement of drug seeking and was associated with increased GluA2 Q/R site editing and surface expression of GluA2-containing AMPARs. Taken together, these findings support the novel hypothesis that an increased contribution of accumbens shell CP-AMPARs containing unedited GluA2(Q) promotes cocaine seeking. Therefore, CP-AMPARs containing unedited GluA2(Q) represent a novel target for cocaine addiction pharmacotherapies.

  15. Breakpoint mapping by whole genome sequencing identifies PTH2R gene disruption in a patient with midline craniosynostosis and a de novo balanced chromosomal rearrangement

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Juwon; Won, Hong-Hee; Kim, Yoonjung; Choi, Jong Rak; Yu, Nae; Lee, Kyung-A

    2015-01-01

    Background Craniosynostosis (CRS) is a premature closure of calvarial sutures caused by gene mutation or environmental factors or interaction between the two. Only a small proportion of non-syndromic CRS (NSC) patients have a known genetic cause, and thus, it would be meaningful to search for a causative gene disruption for the development NSC. We applied a whole genome sequencing approach on a 15-month-old boy with sagittal and metopic synostosis to identify a gene responsible for the development of the disease. Methods and results Conventional chromosome study revealed a complex paracentric inversion involving 2q14.3 and 2q34. Array comparative genomic hybridisation did not show any copy number variation. Multicolour banding analysis was carried out and the breakpoints were refined to 2q14 and 2q34. An intronic break of the PTH2R gene was detected by whole genome sequencing and fluorescence in situ hybridisation analysis confirmed disruption of PTH2R. Conclusions We report PTH2R as a gene that is disrupted in NSC. The disruption of the PTH2R gene may cause uncontrolled proliferation and differentiation of chondrocytes, which in turn results in premature closure of sutures. This addition of PTH2R to the list of genes associated with NSC expands our understanding of the development of NSC. PMID:26044810

  16. Validation of linkage between BCWD resistance and spleen size QTL on Omy19 in rainbow trout: Pleiotropy versus linkage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial cold water disease (BCWD) is caused by infection with Flavobacterium psychrophilum, and results in significant economic losses in salmonid aquaculture. Previously, we identified a major QTL for BCWD resistance on Omy19 (h2q=0.57-0.67) as well as a QTL for surrogate measures of disease resi...

  17. De novo ring chromosome 3: a new case with a mild phenotype.

    PubMed

    McKinley, M; Colley, A; Sinclair, P; Donnai, D; Andrews, T

    1991-08-01

    We report an 18 year old female with a de novo ring chromosome 3 found after investigation for short stature. Her karyotype was interpreted as 46,XX, r(3)(p26.2q29). Her phenotype is milder than previously reported cases and illustrates the mild end of the spectrum of the ring chromosome 3 phenotype.

  18. APPLICATION OF A TIERED SURROGATE APPROACH TO IDENTIFY TOXICITY SURROGATES FOR HUMAN HEALTH RISK ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    APPLICATION OF A TIERED SURROGATE APPROACH TO IDENTIFY TOXICITY SURROGATES FOR HUMAN HEALTH RISK ASSESSMENT. P.R. Dodmane1, L.E. Lizarraga1, J.P. Kaiser2, S.C. Wesselkamper2, Q.J. Zhao2. 1ORISE Participant, U.S. EPA, National Center for Environmental Assessment (NCEA), Cincinnati...

  19. 42 CFR 414.1001 - Basis of payment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... a pharmacy for the first prescription of drugs and biologicals described in sections 1861(s)(2)(J), 1861(s)(2)(Q), and 1861(s)(2)(T) of the Act, that the pharmacy provided to a beneficiary during a 30-day period. (2) A supplying fee of $16 is paid to a pharmacy for each prescription following the...

  20. The Order of the Antipode of Finite-dimensional Hopf Algebra

    PubMed Central

    Taft, Earl J.

    1971-01-01

    Examples of finite-dimensional Hopf algebras over a field, whose antipodes have arbitrary even orders ≥4 as mappings, are furnished. The dimension of the Hopf algebra is qn+1, where the antipode has order 2q, q ≥ 2, and n is an arbitrary positive integer. The algebras are not semisimple, and neither they nor their dual algebras are unimodular. PMID:16591950

  1. 26 CFR 1.401(a)(9)-6 - Required minimum distributions for defined benefit plans and annuity contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... benefit plans and annuity contracts. Q-1. How must distributions under a defined benefit plan be paid in... in the Internal Revenue Bulletin. See § 601.601(d)(2)(ii)(b) of this chapter. Q-2. How must... distribution incidental benefit requirement of this A-2. Q-3. How long is a period certain under a...

  2. REAL-TIME MEASUREMENT OF AIRWAY RESPONSES TO SULOFUR DIOXIDE (SO2) IN AN INTACT, AWAKE GUINEA PIG MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Real-time measurment of airway responses to Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) in an intact, awake guinea pig model. J Stanek1,2, Q Krantz2, J Nolan2, D Winsett2, W Watkinson2, and D Costa2. 1College of Veterinary Medicine, NCSU, Raleigh, NC, USA; 2Pulmonary Toxicology Branch, ETD, NHEERL, US...

  3. 26 CFR 1.401(a)(9)-6 - Required minimum distributions for defined benefit plans and annuity contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... benefit plans and annuity contracts. Q-1. How must distributions under a defined benefit plan be paid in... in the Internal Revenue Bulletin. See § 601.601(d)(2)(ii)(b) of this chapter. Q-2. How must... distribution incidental benefit requirement of this A-2. Q-3. How long is a period certain under a...

  4. 26 CFR 1.401(a)(9)-6 - Required minimum distributions for defined benefit plans and annuity contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... benefit plans and annuity contracts. Q-1. How must distributions under a defined benefit plan be paid in... in the Internal Revenue Bulletin. See § 601.601(d)(2)(ii)(b) of this chapter. Q-2. How must... distribution incidental benefit requirement of this A-2. Q-3. How long is a period certain under a...

  5. xi-scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Gunion, J.F.

    1980-04-01

    A class of purely kinematical corrections to xi-scaling is exposed. These corrections are inevitably present in any realistic hadron model with spin and gauge invariance and lead to phenomenologically important M/sub hadron//sup 2//Q/sup 2/ corrections to Nachtmann moments.

  6. The Order of the Antipode of Finite-dimensional Hopf Algebra.

    PubMed

    Taft, E J

    1971-11-01

    Examples of finite-dimensional Hopf algebras over a field, whose antipodes have arbitrary even orders >/=4 as mappings, are furnished. The dimension of the Hopf algebra is q(n+1), where the antipode has order 2q, q >/= 2, and n is an arbitrary positive integer. The algebras are not semisimple, and neither they nor their dual algebras are unimodular.

  7. Comparison of gull-specific assays targeting 16S rRNA gene of Catellicoccus marimammalium and Streptococcus spp.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gulls have been implicated as a source of fecal contamination in inland and coastal waters. Only one gull-specific assay is currently available (i.e., gull2 qPCR assay). This assay is based on the 16S rRNA gene of Catellicocclls marimammalium and has showed a high level of host-s...

  8. 40 CFR 98.173 - Calculating GHG emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... associated requirements for Tier 4 in subpart C of this part (General Stationary Fuel Combustion Sources). (b..., dry basis (% CO2). Q = Hourly stack gas volumetric flow rate (scfh). %H2O = Hourly moisture percentage... part (General Stationary Fuel Combustion Sources), then the calculation methodology in paragraph (b)...

  9. 40 CFR 168.65 - Pesticide export label and labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... section 2(q)(2)(A) and (D) must appear in English and in the appropriate foreign languages, on the label... caution statements must appear in English and in the appropriate foreign languages, as described in... Use in the United States of America.” The statement must appear in English and in appropriate...

  10. 40 CFR 168.65 - Pesticide export label and labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... section 2(q)(2)(A) and (D) must appear in English and in the appropriate foreign languages, on the label... caution statements must appear in English and in the appropriate foreign languages, as described in... Use in the United States of America.” The statement must appear in English and in appropriate...

  11. 40 CFR 168.65 - Pesticide export label and labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... section 2(q)(2)(A) and (D) must appear in English and in the appropriate foreign languages, on the label... caution statements must appear in English and in the appropriate foreign languages, as described in... Use in the United States of America.” The statement must appear in English and in appropriate...

  12. Gender-Based Violence Prevention. Issues in Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higher Education Center for Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Violence Prevention, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This issue of "Issues in Prevention" focuses on gender-based violence prevention. This issue contains the following articles: (1) Preventing Gender-Based Violence: An Overview (Linda Langford); (2) Q&A With Amelia Cobb; (3) Denim Day at HBCUs; (4) Dear Colleague Letter; (5) ED Grants for Violence Prevention; and (6) Higher Education Center…

  13. Community Colleges--Prevention Challenges. Issues in Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higher Education Center for Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Violence Prevention, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This issue of "Issues in Prevention" focuses on prevention challenges facing community colleges. This issue contains the following articles: (1) Prevention at Community Colleges; (2) Q&A With William Auvenshine; (3) Chancellor's Initiative at the University of Wisconsin-Stout; (4) Alcohol Marketing in the Digital Age; and (5) Higher Education…

  14. Chromosome region-specific libraries for human genome analysis. Final progress report, 1 March 1991--28 February 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, F.T.

    1994-04-01

    The objectives of this grant proposal include (1) development of a chromosome microdissection and PCR-mediated microcloning technology, (2) application of this microtechnology to the construction of region-specific libraries for human genome analysis. During this grant period, the authors have successfully developed this microtechnology and have applied it to the construction of microdissection libraries for the following chromosome regions: a whole chromosome 21 (21E), 2 region-specific libraries for the long arm of chromosome 2, 2q35-q37 (2Q1) and 2q33-q35 (2Q2), and 4 region-specific libraries for the entire short arm of chromosome 2, 2p23-p25 (2P1), 2p21-p23 (2P2), 2p14-p16 (wP3) and 2p11-p13 (2P4). In addition, 20--40 unique sequence microclones have been isolated and characterized for genomic studies. These region-specific libraries and the single-copy microclones from the library have been used as valuable resources for (1) isolating microsatellite probes in linkage analysis to further refine the disease locus; (2) isolating corresponding clones with large inserts, e.g. YAC, BAC, P1, cosmid and phage, to facilitate construction of contigs for high resolution physical mapping; and (3) isolating region-specific cDNA clones for use as candidate genes. These libraries are being deposited in the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) for general distribution.

  15. Abnormalities in synaptic dynamics during development in a mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 1

    PubMed Central

    Hatanaka, Yusuke; Watase, Kei; Wada, Keiji; Nagai, Yoshitaka

    2015-01-01

    Late-onset neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by neurological symptoms and progressive neuronal death. Accumulating evidence suggests that neuronal dysfunction, rather than neuronal death, causes the symptoms of neurodegenerative diseases. However, the mechanisms underlying the dysfunction that occurs prior to cell death remain unclear. To investigate the synaptic basis of this dysfunction, we employed in vivo two-photon imaging to analyse excitatory postsynaptic dendritic protrusions. We used Sca1154Q/2Q mice, an established knock-in mouse model of the polyglutamine disease spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1), which replicates human SCA1 features including ataxia, cognitive impairment, and neuronal death. We found that Sca1154Q/2Q mice exhibited greater synaptic instability than controls, without synaptic loss, in the cerebral cortex, where obvious neuronal death is not observed, even before the onset of distinct symptoms. Interestingly, this abnormal synaptic instability was evident in Sca1154Q/2Q mice from the synaptic developmental stage, and persisted into adulthood. Expression of synaptic scaffolding proteins was also lower in Sca1154Q/2Q mice than controls before synaptic maturation. As symptoms progressed, synaptic loss became evident. These results indicate that aberrant synaptic instability, accompanied by decreased expression of scaffolding proteins during synaptic development, is a very early pathology that precedes distinct neurological symptoms and neuronal cell death in SCA1. PMID:26531852

  16. A twin sibling with Prader-Willi syndrome caused by type 2 microdeletion following assisted reproductive technology: A case report

    PubMed Central

    HAN, JI YOON; PARK, JOONHONG; JANG, WOORI; CHAE, HYOJIN; KIM, MYUNGSHIN; KIM, YONGGOO

    2016-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a neurobehavioral imprinting disorder, which arises due to an absence of paternally expressed genes within the 15q11.2-q13 region. This occurs via one of the three main genetic mechanisms, as follows: Deletion of the paternally inherited 15q11.2-q13 region, maternal uniparental disomy and imprinting defect. Recent studies have reported an association between imprinting disorders and assisted reproductive technologies (ART). The current study presents a 6-year-old female patient who is a dizygotic twin, in which one was born with de novo microdeletion at 15q11.2-q13.1 following in vitro fertilization. The patient had characteristic facial features including narrow bifrontal diameter, strabismus, downturned mouth, feeding problems and generalized hypotonia during infancy, developmental delay, mental retardation and rapid weight gain. Based upon phenotypic resemblance and the medical records, methylation-specific multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and array-based comparative genome hybridization analyses demonstrate type 2 microdeletion between breaking point 2 (BP2) and BP3, which occur from MKRN3 through HERC2 at 15q11.2-q13.1. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to report a PWS case born following ART reported in South Korea. In addition to previous studies, the present study contributes to the consensus regarding genotype-phenotype comparisons in this respect. PMID:27330749

  17. Abusing the privelege to care: shame on us.

    PubMed

    Churchill, Karin M

    Ian Peate, Consultant Editor of BJN, wrote the editorial 'Abusing the privelege: to care - shame on us' which was adapted and published on the BBC website (http://tinyurl.com/6cf2q5t). There was an overwhelming response to Ian's piece and some examples are shown here.

  18. The global cell therapy industry continues to rise during the second and third quarters of 2012.

    PubMed

    Mason, Chris; McCall, Mark J; Culme-Seymour, Emily J; Suthasan, Shalini; Edwards-Parton, Simon; Bonfiglio, Gregory A; Reeve, Brock C

    2012-12-01

    During Q2-Q3 2012, the cell therapy industry benefited from a number of positive external influences including advantageous changes to future FDA regulation, but stock market activity was highly mixed. The FDA approved two more products and an appreciable number of public-company-sponsored clinical trials are progressing through phases 1-3. PMID:23217418

  19. The global cell therapy industry continues to rise during the second and third quarters of 2012.

    PubMed

    Mason, Chris; McCall, Mark J; Culme-Seymour, Emily J; Suthasan, Shalini; Edwards-Parton, Simon; Bonfiglio, Gregory A; Reeve, Brock C

    2012-12-01

    During Q2-Q3 2012, the cell therapy industry benefited from a number of positive external influences including advantageous changes to future FDA regulation, but stock market activity was highly mixed. The FDA approved two more products and an appreciable number of public-company-sponsored clinical trials are progressing through phases 1-3.

  20. Drug Abuse on College Campuses: Emerging Issues. Issues in Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higher Education Center for Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Violence Prevention, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This "Issues in Prevention" focuses on emerging issues concerning drug abuse on college campuses. This issue contains the following articles: (1) Drug Abuse Trends; (2) Q&A With Jim Lange; (3) Bath Salts; (4) Refuse to Abuse; (5) Related Federal Resource; and (6) Higher Education Center Resources.

  1. 16 CFR 1500.82 - Exemption from full labeling and other requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES AND ARTICLES; ADMINISTRATION AND ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS... from full labeling compliance otherwise applicable under the act because of the size of the package or... being classified as a “banned hazardous substance” as defined by section 2(q)(1)(A) of the act...

  2. 16 CFR 1500.82 - Exemption from full labeling and other requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES AND ARTICLES; ADMINISTRATION AND ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS... from full labeling compliance otherwise applicable under the act because of the size of the package or... being classified as a “banned hazardous substance” as defined by section 2(q)(1)(A) of the act...

  3. 16 CFR 1500.82 - Exemption from full labeling and other requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES AND ARTICLES; ADMINISTRATION AND ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS... from full labeling compliance otherwise applicable under the act because of the size of the package or... being classified as a “banned hazardous substance” as defined by section 2(q)(1)(A) of the act...

  4. 16 CFR 1500.82 - Exemption from full labeling and other requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES AND ARTICLES; ADMINISTRATION AND ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS... from full labeling compliance otherwise applicable under the act because of the size of the package or... being classified as a “banned hazardous substance” as defined by section 2(q)(1)(A) of the act...

  5. 16 CFR 1500.82 - Exemption from full labeling and other requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES AND ARTICLES; ADMINISTRATION AND ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS... from full labeling compliance otherwise applicable under the act because of the size of the package or... being classified as a “banned hazardous substance” as defined by section 2(q)(1)(A) of the act...

  6. Abnormalities in synaptic dynamics during development in a mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 1.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, Yusuke; Watase, Kei; Wada, Keiji; Nagai, Yoshitaka

    2015-11-04

    Late-onset neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by neurological symptoms and progressive neuronal death. Accumulating evidence suggests that neuronal dysfunction, rather than neuronal death, causes the symptoms of neurodegenerative diseases. However, the mechanisms underlying the dysfunction that occurs prior to cell death remain unclear. To investigate the synaptic basis of this dysfunction, we employed in vivo two-photon imaging to analyse excitatory postsynaptic dendritic protrusions. We used Sca1(154Q/2Q) mice, an established knock-in mouse model of the polyglutamine disease spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1), which replicates human SCA1 features including ataxia, cognitive impairment, and neuronal death. We found that Sca1(154Q/2Q) mice exhibited greater synaptic instability than controls, without synaptic loss, in the cerebral cortex, where obvious neuronal death is not observed, even before the onset of distinct symptoms. Interestingly, this abnormal synaptic instability was evident in Sca1(154Q/2Q) mice from the synaptic developmental stage, and persisted into adulthood. Expression of synaptic scaffolding proteins was also lower in Sca1(154Q/2Q) mice than controls before synaptic maturation. As symptoms progressed, synaptic loss became evident. These results indicate that aberrant synaptic instability, accompanied by decreased expression of scaffolding proteins during synaptic development, is a very early pathology that precedes distinct neurological symptoms and neuronal cell death in SCA1.

  7. "Give Me a Name for What's Wrong with Him": A Case Study of a Rare Chromosome Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilmore, Linda; Campbell, Marilyn

    2006-01-01

    The case is presented of a young boy with a rare chromosome disorder involving an interstitial deletion on chromosome 16 (16q11.2q13). Background information on chromosome disorders is presented along with a review of previous findings about the developmental consequences of chromosome 16q deletions. The case description illustrates the…

  8. A cryptic microdeletion including MBD5 occurring within the breakpoint of a reciprocal translocation between chromosomes 2 and 5 in a patient with developmental delay and obesity.

    PubMed

    Shichiji, Minobu; Ito, Yasushi; Shimojima, Keiko; Nakamu, Hidetsugu; Oguni, Hirokazu; Osawa, Makiko; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2013-04-01

    The 2q23.1 deletion syndrome has been recently recognized as a neurodevelopmental disorder associated with intellectual disability, epilepsy, and autism spectrum disorder. Recently, methyl-CpG-binding domain 5 gene (MBD5), located in the 2q23.1 region, has been considered as a single causative gene of this syndrome. We report on a female patient with a de novo reciprocal translocation between chromosomes 2 and 5. Chromosomal microarray testing revealed a cryptic 896 kb deletion that included MBD5. Although clinical manifestations of this patient are compatible with those of patients with 2q23.1 deletion syndrome, a focal pachygyria revealed by brain magnetic resonance imaging has never been observed in the previously reported cases. Obesity caused by hyperphagia was observed in our patient and 28% of the previously reported patients with the 2q23.1 deletion syndrome. For better medical management, appropriate dietary guidance against hyperphagia should be given to the patients' family.

  9. Kinetics and mechanism of auto- and copper-catalyzed oxidation of 1,4-naphthohydroquinone.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiu; Miller, Christopher J; Pham, A Ninh; Waite, T David

    2014-06-01

    Although quinones represent a class of organic compounds that may exert toxic effects both in vitro and in vivo, the molecular mechanisms involved in quinone species toxicity are still largely unknown, especially in the presence of transition metals, which may both induce the transformation of the various quinone species and result in generation of harmful reactive oxygen species. In this study, the oxidation of 1,4-naphthohydroquinone (NH2Q) in the absence and presence of nanomolar concentrations of Cu(II) in 10 mM NaCl solution over a pH range of 6.5-7.5 has been investigated, with detailed kinetic models developed to describe the predominant mechanisms operative in these systems. In the absence of copper, the apparent oxidation rate of NH2Q increased with increasing pH and initial NH2Q concentration, with concomitant oxygen consumption and peroxide generation. The doubly dissociated species, NQ(2-), has been shown to be the reactive species with regard to the one-electron oxidation by O2 and comproportionation with the quinone species, both generating the semiquinone radical (NSQ(·-)). The oxidation of NSQ(·-) by O2 is shown to be the most important pathway for superoxide (O2(·-)) generation with a high intrinsic rate constant of 1.0×10(8)M(-1)s(-1). Both NSQ(·-) and O2(·-) served as chain-propagating species in the autoxidation of NH2Q. Cu(II) is capable of catalyzing the oxidation of NH2Q in the presence of O2 with the oxidation also accelerated by increasing the pH. Both the uncharged (NH2Q(0)) and the mono-anionic (NHQ(-)) species were found to be the kinetically active forms, reducing Cu(II) with an intrinsic rate constant of 4.0×10(4) and 1.2×10(7)M(-1)s(-1), respectively. The presence of O2 facilitated the catalytic role of Cu(II) by rapidly regenerating Cu(II) via continuous oxidation of Cu(I) and also by efficient removal of NSQ(·-) resulting in the generation of O2(·-). The half-cell reduction potentials of various redox couples at neutral p

  10. Low-power broadband homonuclear dipolar recoupling in MAS NMR by two-fold symmetry pulse schemes for magnetization transfers and double-quantum excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teymoori, Gholamhasan; Pahari, Bholanath; Edén, Mattias

    2015-12-01

    We provide an experimental, numerical, and high-order average Hamiltonian evaluation of an open-ended series of homonuclear dipolar recoupling sequences, SR2 2p 1 with p = 1, 2, 3, … . While operating at a very low radio-frequency (rf) power, corresponding to a nutation frequency of 1/2 of the magic-angle spinning (MAS) rate (ωnut =ωr / 2), these recursively generated double-quantum (2Q) dipolar recoupling schemes offer a progressively improved compensation to resonance offsets and rf inhomogeneity for increasing pulse-sequence order p. The excellent recoupling robustness to these experimental obstacles, as well as to CSA, is demonstrated for 2Q filtering (2QF) experiments and for driving magnetization transfers in 2D NMR correlation spectroscopy, where the sequences may provide either double or zero quantum dipolar Hamiltonians during mixing. Experimental and numerical demonstrations, which mostly target conditions of "ultra-fast" MAS (≳50 kHz) and high magnetic fields, are provided for recoupling of 13C across a wide range of isotropic and anisotropic chemical shifts, as well as dipolar coupling constants, encompassing [2,3-13C2 ]alanine, [1,3-13C2 ]alanine, diammonium [1,4-13C2 ]fumarate, and [U-13 C]tyrosine. When compared at equal power levels, a superior performance is observed for the SR2p 1 sequences with p ⩾ 3 relative to existing and well-established 2Q recoupling techniques. At ultra-fast MAS, proton decoupling is redundant during the homonuclear dipolar recoupling of dilute spins in organic solids, which renders the family of SR2p 1 schemes the first efficient 2Q recoupling option for general applications, such as 2Q-1Q correlation NMR and high-order multiple-quantum excitation, under truly low-power rf conditions.

  11. Polymer scaffolds with no skin-effect for tissue engineering applications fabricated by thermally induced phase separation.

    PubMed

    Kasoju, Naresh; Kubies, Dana; Sedlačík, Tomáš; Janoušková, Olga; Koubková, Jana; Kumorek, Marta M; Rypáček, František

    2016-01-11

    Thermally induced phase separation (TIPS) based methods are widely used for the fabrication of porous scaffolds for tissue engineering and related applications. However, formation of a less-/non-porous layer at the scaffold's outer surface at the air-liquid interface, often known as the skin-effect, restricts the cell infiltration inside the scaffold and therefore limits its efficacy. To this end, we demonstrate a TIPS-based process involving the exposure of the just quenched poly(lactide-co-caprolactone):dioxane phases to the pure dioxane for a short time while still being under the quenching strength, herein after termed as the second quenching (2Q). Scanning electron microscopy, mercury intrusion porosimetry and contact angle analysis revealed a direct correlation between the time of 2Q and the gradual disappearance of the skin, followed by the widening of the outer pores and the formation of the fibrous filaments over the surface, with no effect on the internal pore architecture and the overall porosity of scaffolds. The experiments at various quenching temperatures and polymer concentrations revealed the versatility of 2Q in removing the skin. In addition, the in vitro cell culture studies with the human primary fibroblasts showed that the scaffolds prepared by the TIPS based 2Q process, with the optimal exposure time, resulted in a higher cell seeding and viability in contrast to the scaffolds prepared by the regular TIPS. Thus, TIPS including the 2Q step is a facile, versatile and innovative approach to fabricate the polymer scaffolds with a skin-free and fully open porous surface morphology for achieving a better cell response in tissue engineering and related applications.

  12. MBD5 haploinsufficiency is associated with sleep disturbance and disrupts circadian pathways common to Smith-Magenis and fragile X syndromes.

    PubMed

    Mullegama, Sureni V; Pugliesi, Loren; Burns, Brooke; Shah, Zalak; Tahir, Raiha; Gu, Yanghong; Nelson, David L; Elsea, Sarah H

    2015-06-01

    Individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) who have an identifiable single-gene neurodevelopmental disorder (NDD), such as fragile X syndrome (FXS, FMR1), Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS, RAI1), or 2q23.1 deletion syndrome (del 2q23.1, MBD5) share phenotypic features, including a high prevalence of sleep disturbance. We describe the circadian deficits in del 2q23.1 through caregiver surveys in which we identify several frequent sleep anomalies, including night/early awakenings, coughing/snoring loudly, and difficulty falling asleep. We couple these findings with studies on the molecular analysis of the circadian deficits associated with haploinsufficiency of MBD5 in which circadian gene mRNA levels of NR1D2, PER1, PER2, and PER3 were altered in del 2q23.1 lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), signifying that haploinsufficiency of MBD5 can result in dysregulation of circadian rhythm gene expression. These findings were further supported by expression microarrays of MBD5 siRNA knockdown cells that showed significantly altered expression of additional circadian rhythm signaling pathway genes. Based on the common sleep phenotypes observed in del 2q23.1, SMS, and FXS patients, we explored the possibility that MBD5, RAI1, and FMR1 function in overlapping circadian rhythm pathways. Bioinformatic analysis identified conserved putative E boxes in MBD5 and RAI1, and expression levels of NR1D2 and CRY2 were significantly reduced in patient LCLs. Circadian and mTOR signaling pathways, both associated with sleep disturbance, were altered in both MBD5 and RAI1 knockdown microarray data, overlapping with findings associated with FMR1. These data support phenotypic and molecular overlaps across these syndromes that may be exploited to provide therapeutic intervention for multiple disorders.

  13. MBD5 haploinsufficiency is associated with sleep disturbance and disrupts circadian pathways common to Smith–Magenis and fragile X syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Mullegama, Sureni V; Pugliesi, Loren; Burns, Brooke; Shah, Zalak; Tahir, Raiha; Gu, Yanghong; Nelson, David L; Elsea, Sarah H

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) who have an identifiable single-gene neurodevelopmental disorder (NDD), such as fragile X syndrome (FXS, FMR1), Smith–Magenis syndrome (SMS, RAI1), or 2q23.1 deletion syndrome (del 2q23.1, MBD5) share phenotypic features, including a high prevalence of sleep disturbance. We describe the circadian deficits in del 2q23.1 through caregiver surveys in which we identify several frequent sleep anomalies, including night/early awakenings, coughing/snoring loudly, and difficulty falling asleep. We couple these findings with studies on the molecular analysis of the circadian deficits associated with haploinsufficiency of MBD5 in which circadian gene mRNA levels of NR1D2, PER1, PER2, and PER3 were altered in del 2q23.1 lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), signifying that haploinsufficiency of MBD5 can result in dysregulation of circadian rhythm gene expression. These findings were further supported by expression microarrays of MBD5 siRNA knockdown cells that showed significantly altered expression of additional circadian rhythm signaling pathway genes. Based on the common sleep phenotypes observed in del 2q23.1, SMS, and FXS patients, we explored the possibility that MBD5, RAI1, and FMR1 function in overlapping circadian rhythm pathways. Bioinformatic analysis identified conserved putative E boxes in MBD5 and RAI1, and expression levels of NR1D2 and CRY2 were significantly reduced in patient LCLs. Circadian and mTOR signaling pathways, both associated with sleep disturbance, were altered in both MBD5 and RAI1 knockdown microarray data, overlapping with findings associated with FMR1. These data support phenotypic and molecular overlaps across these syndromes that may be exploited to provide therapeutic intervention for multiple disorders. PMID:25271084

  14. Form of 15q proximal duplication appears to be a normal euchromatic variant

    SciTech Connect

    Jalal, S.M.; Persons, D.L.; DeWald, G.W.; Lindor, N.M.

    1994-10-01

    Deletions involving often leads to either Prader-Willi or Angelman syndrome, depending on the hereditary path of the deletion (paternal or maternal). A number of cases have been reported in which duplications involving 15q11.2-q13 have not been associated with any detectable phenotypic abnormalities. Ludowese et al. (1991) have summarized 25 such cases that include 10 of their own cases from 5 unrelated families. They conclude that duplication of 15q12-13 does not have an adverse phenotypic effect, though they do not completely rule out the possibility that, instead of 15q12-13 duplication, the extra material could be an insertion from another chromosome. Thus, the dilemma is when duplication of 15q11.2-q13 is clinically significant. We suggest that certain kinds of amplification or duplication involving distal 15q12 and 15q13 may represent a normal variant. 14 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  15. First Principles Study of Nuclear Quadrupole Interactions in Single and Double Chain DNA and Solid Nucleobases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, T. P.; Pink, R. H.; Badu, S. R.; Dubey, Archana; Scheicher, R. H.; Saha, H. P.; Chow, Lee; Huang, M. B.

    2009-03-01

    Nuclear Quadrupole Interactions (NQI) of ^17O, ^14N and ^2H nuclei have been studied for free nucleobases and nucleobases in single strand and double strand DNA and in solid state. Our first-principles investigations were carried out using the Gaussian 2003 set of programs to implement the Hartree-Fock procedure combined with many-body effects included using many-body perturbation theory. As expected for NQI in general, many-body effects are found to be small. Results will be presented for the quadrupole coupling constants (e^2qQ) and asymmetry parameters (η) for the nucleobases in the various environments. Trends in e^2qQ and η in the different environments will be discussed. In the case of the solid nucleobases, comparisons will be made with available experimental data [1] for ^17O nuclei.[3pt] [1] Gang Wu et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 124, 1768 (2002)

  16. Two-dimensional MAS NMR correlation protocols involving double-quantum filtering of quadrupolar spin-pairs.

    PubMed

    Edén, Mattias

    2010-05-01

    Three two-dimensional (2D) NMR homonuclear correlation techniques invoking double-quantum (2Q) filtration of the central transitions of half-integer spins are evaluated numerically and experimentally. They correlate directly detected single-quantum (1Q) coherences in the t(2) domain with either of 1Q, two-spin 2Q or single-spin multiple-quantum coherence-evolutions in the indirect (t(1)) dimension. We employ experimental (23)Na and (27)Al NMR on sodium sulfite and the natural mineral sillimanite (SiAl(2)O(5)), in conjunction with simulated 2D spectra from pairs of dipolar-recoupled spins-3/2 and 5/2 at different external magnetic fields, to compare the correlation strategies from the viewpoints of 2D spectral resolution, signal sensitivity, implementational aspects and their relative merits for establishing internuclear proximities and quadrupolar tensor orientations. PMID:20202872

  17. The Color Dipole Picture and the Ratio of the Longitudinal to the Transverse Photoabsorption Cross Section

    SciTech Connect

    Schildknecht, Dieter

    2009-03-23

    The transverse size of qq-bar fluctuations of a longitudinally polarized photon is reduced relative to the transverse size of qq-bar fluctuations of a transversely polarized photon. This implies a model-independent prediction of the ratio R(W{sup 2},Q{sup 2}){identical_to}{sigma}{sub L}/{sigma}{sub T} = 0.375, or, equivalently, F{sub L}/F{sub 2} = 0.27, for x congruent with Q{sup 2}/W{sup 2}<<1 and Q{sup 2} sufficiently large, while R(W{sup 2},Q{sup 2}) 0.50, if this effect is ignored. Experimental data from HERA confirm the transverse-size reduction.

  18. Electronic Structure of the Aqueous Vanadyl Ion Probed by 9 and 94 GHz EPR and Pulsed ENDOR Spectroscopies and Density Functional Theory Calculations

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Christopher V.; Cope, William; Ball, James A.; Maresch, Guenter G.; Gaffney, Betty J.; Fink, William

    2005-01-01

    The aqueous vanadyl ion ([VO(H2O)5]2+) has been investigated by X-band EPR, 94 GHz W-band EPR, and ESE-ENDOR. These experiments reveal information about the hyperfine (|Axx| = 208.5 MHz, |Ayy| = 208.5 MHz, |Azz| = 547.0 MHz), and nuclear quadrupole coupling (|e2qQ| = 5.6 MHz) of the 51V nucleus. The measured nuclear quadrupole coupling parameters are compared to values determined by density functional theory calculations (|e2qQ| = 5.2 MHz). These theoretical calculations illustrate that axial ligands and molecular distortions can alter the magnitude of the nuclear quadrupole interaction. PMID:16467924

  19. Three novel polymorphic microsatellite markers for the glaucoma locus GLC1B by datamining tetranucleotide repeats on chromosome 2p12-q12

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    In order to identify new markers around the glaucoma locus GLC1B as a tool to refine its critical region at 2p11.2-2q11.2, we searched the critical region sequence obtained from the UCSC database for tetranucleotide (GATA)n and (GTCT)n repeats of at least 10 units in length. Three out of four potential microsatellite loci were found to be polymorphic, heterozygosity ranging from 64.56% to 79.59%. The identified markers are useful not only for GLC1B locus but also for the study of other disease loci at 2p11.2-2q11.2, a region with scarcity of microsatellite markers. PMID:21637444

  20. Two-dimensional MAS NMR correlation protocols involving double-quantum filtering of quadrupolar spin-pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edén, Mattias

    2010-05-01

    Three two-dimensional (2D) NMR homonuclear correlation techniques invoking double-quantum (2Q) filtration of the central transitions of half-integer spins are evaluated numerically and experimentally. They correlate directly detected single-quantum (1Q) coherences in the t2 domain with either of 1Q, two-spin 2Q or single-spin multiple-quantum coherence-evolutions in the indirect (t1) dimension. We employ experimental 23Na and 27Al NMR on sodium sulfite and the natural mineral sillimanite (SiAl2O5), in conjunction with simulated 2D spectra from pairs of dipolar-recoupled spins-3/2 and 5/2 at different external magnetic fields, to compare the correlation strategies from the viewpoints of 2D spectral resolution, signal sensitivity, implementational aspects and their relative merits for establishing internuclear proximities and quadrupolar tensor orientations.

  1. A Model of Direct Gauge Mediation of Supersymmetry Breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murayama, Hitoshi

    1997-07-01

    We present the first phenomenologically viable model of gauge meditation of supersymmetry breaking without a messenger sector or gauge singlet fields. The standard model gauge groups couple directly to the sector which breaks supersymmetry dynamically. Despite the direct coupling, it can preserve perturbative gauge unification thanks to the inverted hierarchy mechanism. There is no dangerous negative contribution to m2q~, m2l~ due to two-loop renormalization group equation. The potentially nonuniversal supergravity contribution to m2q~ and m2l~ can be suppressed enough. The model is completely chiral, and one does not need to forbid mass terms for the messenger fields by hand. Cosmology of the model is briefly discussed.

  2. Co-GISAXS technique for investigating surface growth dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Rainville, Meliha G.; Hoskin, Christa; Ulbrandt, Jeffrey G.; Narayanan, Suresh; Sandy, Alec R.; Zhou, Hua; Headrick, Randall L.; Ludwig, Jr., Karl F.

    2015-12-08

    Detailed quantitative measurement of surface dynamics during thin film growth is a major experimental challenge. Here X-ray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy with coherent hard X-rays is used in a Grazing-Incidence Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (i.e. Co-GISAXS) geometry as a new tool to investigate nanoscale surface dynamics during sputter deposition of a-Si and a-WSi2 thin films. For both films, kinetic roughening during surface growth reaches a dynamic steady state at late times in which the intensity autocorrelation function g2(q,t) becomes stationary. The g2(q,t) functions exhibit compressed exponential behavior at all wavenumbers studied. The overall dynamics are complex, but the most surface sensitive sections of the structure factor and correlation time exhibit power law behaviors consistent with dynamical scaling.

  3. Overlap amplitude and localization properties in aperiodic diluted and non-diluted direct electric transmission lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazo, E.; Castro, C. E.; Cortés-Cortés, F.

    2016-09-01

    In this work we study the relationship existing between the localization properties of the diluted and non-diluted direct electrical transmission lines with the overlap amplitude Cijω = 2 | Iiω Ijω | , where Ijω is the amplitude of the electric current function at jth cell of the transmission line for the state with frequency ω. We distribute two values of inductances LA and LB, according to the generalized aperiodic Thue-Morse m-tupling sequence. We find that the behavior of Ci,jω is directly related to the localization properties of the aperiodic sequences measured by the ξ normalized participation number, the Rq Rényi entropies and the μq moments. In addition, we generalize the scaling relationship for the overlap amplitude Ci,jω, i.e., <(Ci,jω) 2 q > =(2/N) 2 q.

  4. Analytic formula for quadrupole-quadrupole matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosensteel, G.

    1990-12-01

    An analytic formula is reported for general matrix elements of the microscopic quadrupole-quadrupole operator in the U(3)-boson approximation. The complete infinite-dimensional basis of A-fermion wave functions is compatible with the harmonic-oscillator shell model and consists of np-nh configurations, with spurious center-of-mass excitations removed, which are symmetry adapted to the Elliott U(3) and symplectic Sp(3,R) models. The formula expresses the general Q2.Q2 matrix element with respect to this complete orthonormal basis as a Racah SU(3) U coefficient times a closed-shell matrix element. An oscillator closed-shell matrix element of Q2.Q2 is a square root of a rational function of the integer quantum numbers of the U(3) basis.

  5. Epigenetic regulation of UBE3A and roles in human neurodevelopmental disorders.

    PubMed

    LaSalle, Janine M; Reiter, Lawrence T; Chamberlain, Stormy J

    2015-10-01

    The E3 ubiquitin ligase UBE3A, also known as E6-AP, has a multitude of ascribed functions and targets relevant to human health and disease. Epigenetic regulation of the UBE3A gene by parentally imprinted noncoding transcription within human chromosome 15q11.2-q13.3 is responsible for the maternal-specific effects of 15q11.2-q13.3 deletion or duplication disorders. Here, we review the evidence for diverse and emerging roles for UBE3A in the proteasome, synapse and nucleus in regulating protein stability and transcription as well as the current mechanistic understanding of UBE3A imprinting in neurons. Angelman and Dup15q syndromes as well as experimental models of these neurodevelopmental disorders are highlighted as improving understanding of UBE3A and its complex regulation for improving therapeutic strategies. PMID:26585570

  6. Quadratic Herman-Wallis factors in the fundamental bands of linear molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, James K. G.

    1987-10-01

    General theoretical formulas are derived for the coefficients in the terms M˜12 and M˜13 of the effective molecular dipole moment operator, and applied to the parallel and perpendicular fundamentals of linear molecules. The Herman-Wallis factors for P- and R-branch lines are F PR = [1 + A 1m + A 2PRm 2] 2, m = δ J( J' + J″ + 1)/2 and for Q-branch lines F Q = [1 + A 2QJ ( J + 1)] 2 The quadratic coefficients A2PR and A2Q depend on up to cubic potential derivatives and quadratic dipole derivatives. Calculated A2PR and A2Q values for the fundamentals of CO 2 do not agree well with recent measurements of Johns, and possible reasons for the discrepancies are discussed.

  7. Multiscale Talbot effects in Fibonacci geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, I.-Lin; Chang, Yia-Chung

    2015-04-01

    This article investigates the Talbot effects in Fibonacci geometry by introducing the cut-and-projection construction, which allows for capturing the entire infinite Fibonacci structure in a single computational cell. Theoretical and numerical calculations demonstrate the Talbot foci of Fibonacci geometry at distances that are multiples (τ +2){{({{F}μ }+τ {{F}μ +1})}-1}p/(2q) or (τ +2){{({{L}μ }+τ {{L}μ +1})}-1}p/(2q) of the Talbot distance. Here (p, q) are coprime integers, μ is an integer, τ is the golden mean, and {{F}μ } and {{L}μ } are Fibonacci and Lucas numbers, respectively. The image of a single Talbot focus exhibits a multiscale-interval pattern due to the self-similarity of the scaling Fourier spectrum.

  8. 49 CFR 173.309 - Fire extinguishers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... “This extinguisher meets all requirements of 49 CFR 173.306” may be displayed on fire extinguishers... the Department of Labor, 29 CFR 1910.157. (4) Specification 2P or 2Q (§§ 178.33 and 178.33a of this... one and one-half times the equilibrium pressure of the contents at 55 °C (130 °F); and (iii)...

  9. Chromosomal aberrations in oral solitary fibrous tumor.

    PubMed

    Manor, Esther; Bodner, Lipa

    2007-04-15

    The results of cytogenetic analysis of a solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) of the oral cavity in a 43-year-old man is reported. The abnormal cells carried a complex translocation with the karyotype 46,XY [15 cells]/46,XYt(1;17;18)(p13;q11.2;q21)[5 cells]. This is the first case reporting chromosomal aberrations in an oral SFT.

  10. The expression of fragile sites in lymphocytes of patients with rectum cancer and their first-degree relatives.

    PubMed

    Tunca, B; Egeli, U; Zorluoğlu, A; Yilmazlar, T; Yerci, O; Kizil, A

    2000-05-01

    Fragile sites are non-staining gaps and breaks in specific points of chromosomes. These sites also include acentric fragments, triradial figures and several rearrangements. Although this issue has been controversial recently, they may be related to structural chromosomal rearrangement in some neoplasms. In this study, the expression of fragile sites induced by aphidicolin (Apc), 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and caffeine was investigated on prometaphase chromosomes obtained from the peripheral blood lymphocytes of 36 patients with rectum cancer, 30 first-degree relatives and 30 normal healthy controls. The results of the structural chromosome aberrations determined in patients and their first-degree relatives were significantly higher than those in control subjects (P<0.001). We determined aphidicolin type common fragile sites (1p36, 1p31, 1p21, 1q21, 1q25, 1q44, 2p24, 2q21, 2q33, 2q37, 3p14, 5q21, 5q33, 13q13, 14q24, 16q23 and 18q21). When the rates of sites such as 1p21, 1q25, 2q33, 3p14, 5q21 and 14q24 in patients and in their first-degree relatives were compared with the control group, the difference was statistically significant. Our results indicated an increased genetic instability in patients with rectum cancer and their first-degree relatives. Therefore, the increase of fragile site expression may be an important marker showing genetic predisposition to rectum cancer.

  11. 49 CFR 173.309 - Fire extinguishers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... “This extinguisher meets all requirements of 49 CFR 173.306” may be displayed on fire extinguishers... the Department of Labor, 29 CFR 1910.157. (4) Specification 2P or 2Q (§§ 178.33 and 178.33a of this... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fire extinguishers. 173.309 Section...

  12. Dressed skeleton expansion and the coupling scale ambiguity problem

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Hung Jung

    1992-09-01

    Perturbative expansions in quantum field theories are usually expressed in powers of a coupling constant. In principle, the infinite sum of the expansion series is independent of the renormalization scale of the coupling constant. In practice, there is a remnant dependence of the truncated series on the renormalization scale. This scale ambiguity can severely restrict the predictive power of theoretical calculations. The dressed skeleton expansion is developed as a calculational method which avoids the coupling scale ambiguity problem. In this method, physical quantities are expressed as functional expansions in terms of a coupling vertex function. The arguments of the vertex function are given by the physical momenta of each process. These physical momenta effectively replace the unspecified renormalization scale and eliminate the ambiguity problem. This method is applied to various field theoretical models and its main features and limitations are explored. For quantum chromodynamics, an expression for the running coupling constant of the three-gluon vertex is obtained. The effective coupling scale of this vertex is shown to be essentially given by {mu}{sup 2} {approximately} Q{sub min}{sup 2}Q{sub med}{sup 2}/Q{sub max}{sup 2} where Q{sub min}{sup 2}Q{sub med}{sup 2}/Q{sub max}{sup 2} are respectively the smallest, the next-to-smallest and the largest scale among the three gluon virtualities. This functional form suggests that the three-gluon vertex becomes non-perturbative at asymmetric momentum configurations. Implications for four-jet physics is discussed.

  13. Combined genome-wide linkage and association analyses of fasting glucose level in healthy twins and families of Korea.

    PubMed

    Suh, Young Ju; Kim, Sunghwan; Kim, So Hun; Park, Jia; Lim, Hyun Ae; Park, Hyun Ju; Choi, Hangseok; Ng, Daniel; Lee, Mi Kyeong; Nam, Moonsuk

    2013-03-01

    This study was undertaken to identify genetic polymorphisms that are associated with the risk of an elevated fasting glucose (FG) level using genome-wide analyses. We explored a quantitative trait locus (QTL) for FG level in a genome-wide study from a Korean twin-family cohort (the Healthy Twin Study) using a combined linkage and family-based association analysis approach. We investigated 1,754 individuals, which included 432 families and 219 pairs of monozygotic twins. Regions of chromosomes 2q23.3-2q31.1, 15q26.1-15q26.3, 16p12.1, and 20p13-20p12.2, were found to show evidence of linkage with FG level, and several markers in these regions were found to be significantly associated with FG level using family-based or general association tests. In particular, a single-nucleotide polymorphism (rs6138953) on the PTPRA gene in the 20p13 region (combined P = 1.8 × 10(-6)) was found to be associated with FG level, and the PRKCB1 gene (in 16p12.1) to be possibly associated with FG level. In conclusion, multiple regions of chromosomes 2q23.3-2q31.1, 15q26.1-15q26.3, 16p12.1, and 20p13-20p12.2 are associated with FG level in our Korean twin-family cohort. The combined approach of genome-wide linkage and family-based association analysis is useful to identify novel or known genetic regions concerning FG level in a family cohort study.

  14. Down syndrome due to a recombination of a chromosome 21 paracentric inversion in 1 of 2 cases with a review of paracentric recombinants

    SciTech Connect

    Jewett, T.; Rao, P.N.; Berry, M.

    1994-09-01

    We recently identified 2 paracentric inversions (PAI) of chromosome 21. Case 1 was identified prenatally and paternally inherited: 46,XY,inv(21)(q21.2q22.13). The outcome is pending. Case 2 was a newborn male infant with clinical features of Down syndrome and an apparent inversion-duplication within chromosome 21. Parental chromosome analysis showed a maternal PAI: 46,XX,inv(21)(q21.2q22.3). The resulting child`s karyotype was: 46,XY,rec(21)(pter{yields}q21.2::q22.3{yields}q21.2::q22.3{yields}pter). Duplication of chromosome region q22.3{yields}qter was confirmed by FISH using a Down syndrome region specific probe (Cambio). Cytologically, the cornerstone of meiotic recombination from a paracentric inversion is the {open_quotes}reverse loop{close_quotes} model. In this model, a crossover event in the inversion loop results in the formation of gametes carrying either a dicentric chromatid, an acentric fragment, a normal chromatid or a chromatid with an inversion. However, a literature review of 326 PAI identified only 2 dicentrics and 15 other recombinants: 1 duplication/deletion; 6 deletions; 8 duplications. A U-type exchange model during meiosis within the inversion loop may best account for duplication/deletion recombinants. In contrast, the recombination in our case 2 would have occurred outside the loop. It is possible that no single explanation for PAI recombination may account for all outcomes. Alternative models of PAI recominational events will be presented. The literature suggests a low risk for prenatal loss due to abnormal PAI recombinants. In our review, viable offspring with recombinant chromosomes occurred in 3.8% of the PAI. Considering the potential for an increased incidence of recombination, prenatal diagnosis for all PAI carriers is warranted.

  15. Another look at abundance correlations among comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, Anita L.

    1987-01-01

    Abundance correlations among comets are examined using three different data sets. The C2 and C3 production rates prove to be well correlated with CN production rates, but large scatter exists. It is concluded that a 'normal' comet is one for which Q(C3)/Q(CN) = 0.19 + or - 0.13 and Q(C2)/Q(CN) = 1.46 + or 0.68.

  16. Transformerless dc-Isolated Converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rippel, Wally E.

    1987-01-01

    Efficient voltage converter employs capacitive instead of transformer coupling to provide dc isolation. Offers buck/boost operation, minimal filtering, and low parts count, with possible application in photovoltaic power inverters, power supplies and battery charges. In photovoltaic inverter circuit with transformerless converter, Q2, Q3, Q4, and Q5 form line-commutated inverter. Switching losses and stresses nil because switching performed when current is zero.

  17. 49 CFR 173.309 - Fire extinguishers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... “This extinguisher meets all requirements of 49 CFR 173.306” may be displayed on fire extinguishers... the Department of Labor, 29 CFR 1910.157. (4) Specification 2P or 2Q (§§ 178.33 and 178.33a of this... extinguishers charged with a limited quantity of compressed gas to not more than 1660 kPa (241 psig) at 21...

  18. P T phase transition in multidimensional quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Carl M.; Weir, David J.

    2012-10-01

    Non-Hermitian P T-symmetric quantum-mechanical Hamiltonians generally exhibit a phase transition that separates two parametric regions, (i) a region of unbroken P T symmetry in which the eigenvalues are all real, and (ii) a region of broken P T symmetry in which some of the eigenvalues are complex. This transition has recently been observed experimentally in a variety of physical systems. Until now, theoretical studies of the P T phase transition have generally been limited to one-dimensional models. Here, four nontrivial coupled P T-symmetric Hamiltonians, H=\\textstyle {\\frac{1}{2}}p^2+\\textstyle {\\frac{1}{2}}x^2+\\textstyle {\\frac{1}{2}}q^2+\\textstyle {\\frac{1}{2}}y^2+igx^2y, H=\\textstyle {\\frac{1}{2}}p^2+\\textstyle {\\frac{1}{2}}x^2+\\textstyle {\\frac{1}{2}}q^2+y^2+igx^2y, H=\\textstyle {\\frac{1}{2}}p^2+\\textstyle {\\frac{1}{2}}x^2+\\textstyle {\\frac{1}{2}}q^2+\\textstyle {\\frac{1}{2}}y^2+\\textstyle {\\frac{1}{2}}r^2+\\textstyle {\\frac{1}{2}}z^2+igxyz, and H=\\textstyle {\\frac{1}{2}}p^2+ \\textstyle {\\frac{1}{2}}x^2+\\textstyle {\\frac{1}{2}}q^2+y^2+\\textstyle {\\frac{1}{2}}r^2+\\textstyle {\\frac{3}{2}}z^2+igxyz are examined. Based on extensive numerical studies, this paper conjectures that all four models exhibit a phase transition. The transitions are found to occur at g ≈ 0.1, g ≈ 0.04, g ≈ 0.1 and g ≈ 0.05. These results suggest that the P T phase transition is a robust phenomenon not limited to systems having one degree of freedom.

  19. Non-invasive detection of neurochemical changes prior to overt pathology in a mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 1.

    PubMed

    Emir, Uzay E; Brent Clark, Howard; Vollmers, Manda L; Eberly, Lynn E; Öz, Gülin

    2013-12-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) is a hereditary, progressive and fatal movement disorder that primarily affects the cerebellum. Non-invasive imaging markers to detect early disease in SCA1 will facilitate testing and implementation of potential therapies. We have previously demonstrated the sensitivity of neurochemical levels measured by (1) H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to progressive neurodegeneration using a transgenic mouse model of SCA1. In order to investigate very early neurochemical changes related to neurodegeneration, here we utilized a knock-in mouse model, the Sca1(154Q/2Q) line, which displays milder cerebellar pathology than the transgenic model. We measured cerebellar neurochemical profiles of Sca1(154Q/2Q) mice and wild-type littermates using 9.4T MRS at ages 6, 12, 24, and 39 weeks and assessed the cerebellar pathology of a subset of the mice at each time point. The Sca1(154Q/2Q) mice displayed very mild cerebellar pathology even at 39 weeks, however, were distinguished from wild types by MRS starting at 6 weeks. Taurine and total choline levels were significantly lower at all ages and glutamine and total creatine levels were higher starting at 12 weeks in Sca1(154Q/2Q) mice than controls, demonstrating the sensitivity of neurochemical levels to neurodegeneration related changes in the absence of overt pathology. We measured cerebellar neurochemical alterations in a knock-in mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 1, a hereditary movement disorder, using ultra-high field magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Very early neurochemical alterations were detectable prior to overt pathology in the volume-of-interest for MRS. Alterations were indicative of osmolytic changes and of disturbances in membrane phospholipid and energy metabolism.

  20. A molecular model for neurodevelopmental disorders.

    PubMed

    Gigek, C O; Chen, E S; Ota, V K; Maussion, G; Peng, H; Vaillancourt, K; Diallo, A B; Lopez, J P; Crapper, L; Vasuta, C; Chen, G G; Ernst, C

    2015-01-01

    Genes implicated in neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs) important in cognition and behavior may have convergent function and several cellular pathways have been implicated, including protein translational control, chromatin modification, and synapse assembly and maintenance. Here, we test the convergent effects of methyl-CpG binding domain 5 (MBD5) and special AT-rich binding protein 2 (SATB2) reduced dosage in human neural stem cells (NSCs), two genes implicated in 2q23.1 and 2q33.1 deletion syndromes, respectively, to develop a generalized model for NDDs. We used short hairpin RNA stably incorporated into healthy neural stem cells to supress MBD5 and SATB2 expression, and massively parallel RNA sequencing, DNA methylation sequencing and microRNA arrays to test the hypothesis that a primary etiology of NDDs is the disruption of the balance of NSC proliferation and differentiation. We show that reduced dosage of either gene leads to significant overlap of gene-expression patterns, microRNA patterns and DNA methylation states with control NSCs in a differentiating state, suggesting that a unifying feature of 2q23.1 and 2q33.1 deletion syndrome may be a lack of regulation between proliferation and differentiation in NSCs, as we observed previously for TCF4 and EHMT1 suppression following a similar experimental paradigm. We propose a model of NDDs whereby the balance of NSC proliferation and differentiation is affected, but where the molecules that drive this effect are largely specific to disease-causing genetic variation. NDDs are diverse, complex and unique, but the optimal balance of factors that determine when and where neural stem cells differentiate may be a major feature underlying the diverse phenotypic spectrum of NDDs.

  1. A molecular model for neurodevelopmental disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gigek, C O; Chen, E S; Ota, V K; Maussion, G; Peng, H; Vaillancourt, K; Diallo, A B; Lopez, J P; Crapper, L; Vasuta, C; Chen, G G; Ernst, C

    2015-01-01

    Genes implicated in neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs) important in cognition and behavior may have convergent function and several cellular pathways have been implicated, including protein translational control, chromatin modification, and synapse assembly and maintenance. Here, we test the convergent effects of methyl-CpG binding domain 5 (MBD5) and special AT-rich binding protein 2 (SATB2) reduced dosage in human neural stem cells (NSCs), two genes implicated in 2q23.1 and 2q33.1 deletion syndromes, respectively, to develop a generalized model for NDDs. We used short hairpin RNA stably incorporated into healthy neural stem cells to supress MBD5 and SATB2 expression, and massively parallel RNA sequencing, DNA methylation sequencing and microRNA arrays to test the hypothesis that a primary etiology of NDDs is the disruption of the balance of NSC proliferation and differentiation. We show that reduced dosage of either gene leads to significant overlap of gene-expression patterns, microRNA patterns and DNA methylation states with control NSCs in a differentiating state, suggesting that a unifying feature of 2q23.1 and 2q33.1 deletion syndrome may be a lack of regulation between proliferation and differentiation in NSCs, as we observed previously for TCF4 and EHMT1 suppression following a similar experimental paradigm. We propose a model of NDDs whereby the balance of NSC proliferation and differentiation is affected, but where the molecules that drive this effect are largely specific to disease-causing genetic variation. NDDs are diverse, complex and unique, but the optimal balance of factors that determine when and where neural stem cells differentiate may be a major feature underlying the diverse phenotypic spectrum of NDDs. PMID:25966365

  2. Modeling Neutron Star Stability with a Modified Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaykov, Spasen; O'Brien, James

    2016-03-01

    The Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff (TOV) equation represents the solution to the Einstein field equations where the source of curvature is given by the stress-energy tensor of a perfect fluid. In flat space it has the form Tμν = (ρ + p) UμUν + pημν and the convention for curved space-time is to just replace the Minkowski metric with gμν. For our research we instead use a modified stress-energy tensor of the form Tμν = (ρ + p) UμUν + pgμν +πμν where the anisotropic πμν is a symmetric, traceless rank two tensor which obeys Uμπμν = 0 . The motivation is that such a term in the stress-energy tensor can account for effects due to the curvature of space-time and would not be present in the tensor describing flat space.The final revised TOV equation is of the form -r2p' = GMρ [ 1 +p/- 2 q ρ ] [ 1 +4/πr3 (p - 2 q) M ] [ 1 -2/GM r ] - 1 - 2r2q' - 6 rq where the primes indicate differentiation with respect to the radial coordinate and the q terms arise from the components of πμν. The equation was then solved numerically with both a polytropic and a MIT bag model equations of state. The result is a changed prediction for the stability range of neutron stars.

  3. Well-differentiated angiosarcoma of spleen: a teaching case mimicking hemagioma and cytogenetic analysis with array comparative genomic hybridization.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lichen; Zhang, Yimin; Zhao, Hong; Chen, Qingxiao; Ma, Weihang; Li, Lanjuan

    2015-01-01

    Primary splenic angiosarcoma is extremely rare but aggressive malignant vascular neoplasm. Here, we report a case of vascular tumor in spleen that was initially misinterpreted as hemangioma. Two years after splenectomy, the patient admitted again with aggravated abdomen pain and severe anemia. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan showed widely metastases. The ensuing biopsy for lesion both in liver and in bone marrow showed the similar pathological findings as that in spleen, which supported the final diagnosis of well-differentiated splenic angiosarcoma with extensive metastases. The patient was dead in 3 months after discharge without chemotherapy. The copy number changes for spleen lesion detected by array comparative genome hybridization showed copy number gain at 11q23.2, 11q24.3, 12q24.33, 13q34, copy number loss at 1q24.2-q31.3, 1q41-q42.2, 1 q42.3-q43, 2q36.3-q37.3, 2q37.7, 3q13.33-q26.2, 3q28 - q29, 9p11.2, 13q11, 15q11, homozygous copy loss at 8p11.22, 22q11.23. Less than 200 cases of splenic angiosarcoma have been published in literature of English. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time analyzed cytogenetic alteration in a well-differentiated primary splenic angiosarcoma. PMID:26462621

  4. Significant In Vivo Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Pytren4Q-Mn a Superoxide Dismutase 2 (SOD2) Mimetic Scorpiand-Like Mn (II) Complex

    PubMed Central

    Serena, Carolina; Calvo, Enrique; Clares, Mari Paz; Diaz, María Luisa; Chicote, Javier U.; Beltrán-Debon, Raúl; Fontova, Ramón; Rodriguez, Alejandro; García-España, Enrique; García-España, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Background The clinical use of purified SOD enzymes has strong limitations due to their large molecular size, high production cost and immunogenicity. These limitations could be compensated by using instead synthetic SOD mimetic compounds of low molecular weight. Background/Methodology We have recently reported that two SOD mimetic compounds, the MnII complexes of the polyamines Pytren2Q and Pytren4Q, displayed high antioxidant activity in bacteria and yeast. Since frequently molecules with antioxidant properties or free-radical scavengers also have anti-inflammatory properties we have assessed the anti-inflammatory potential of Pytren2Q and Pytren4Q MnII complexes, in cultured macrophages and in a murine model of inflammation, by measuring the degree of protection they could provide against the cellular injury produced by lipopolisacharide, a bacterial endotoxin. Principal Findings In this report we show that the MnII complex of Pytren4Q but not that of Pytren2Q effectively protected human cultured THP-1 macrophages and whole mice from the inflammatory effects produced by LPS. These results obtained with two molecules that are isomers highlight the importance of gathering experimental data from animal models of disease in assessing the potential of candidate molecules. Conclusion/Significance The effective anti-inflammatory activity of the MnII complex of Pytren4Q in addition to its low toxicity, water solubility and ease of production would suggest it is worth taking into consideration for future pharmacological studies. PMID:25742129

  5. Generalized Sum Rules of the Nucleon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorshteyn, Mikhail; Szczepaniak, Adam

    2008-10-01

    We consider doubly virtual Compton scattering (VVCS) off the nucleon with the photon virtualities q1^2=q2^2=-Q^2 and formulate the low energy theorem (LET) for this process. We show that the LET can only be defined at finite momentum transfer t=-2Q^2 which is at variance with existing studies in the literature. Combining LET with dispersion relations for the forward VVCS amplitude, we obtain the new, correct version of the generalized sum rules of the nucleon that state a correspondence between the low energy constants of VVCS and the moments of the DIS structure functions. We notice that the t-channel unitarity is necessary to translate the forward dispersion relations to the low energy limit. This approach leads to a substantial modification of the generalized GDH sum rule at finite Q^2 that undergoes extensive studies at JLab. For the spin-independent VVCS amplitude, the new sum rule for the generalized magnetic susceptibility β(Q^2) is obtained. Our approach provides a consistent, Lorentz invariant formulation of LET for the most general VVCS process that removes inconsistencies that stain the previous studies of the generalized polarizabilities of virtual Compton scattering and the generalized sum rules of the nucleon.

  6. Simple contour analysis of ignition conditions and plasma operating regimes in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Uckan, N.A.; Sheffield, J.; Selcow, E.C.

    1985-01-01

    Contour plots of ignition, auxiliary power requirements, heating and operating windows, optimal path to ignition, ignition margin, etc., are generated analytically in terms of a small number of parameters (aB/sub 0//sup 2//q/sub */, R/sub 0//B/sub 0/, , etc.) for classes of devices with equivalent performance. Numerical studies are carried out to map the physics design space. Considering both the Murakami density limit (approx.B/sub 0//R/sub 0/) and the Troyon beta limit (approx.I/aB/sub 0/), results from analytic calculations indicate that in a standard tokamak geometry (A approx. 2.5 to 3.5, kappa = b/a approx. 1.6 to 1.7, q/sub psi/ approx. 2.6) devices with aB/sub 0//sup 2//q/sub */ approx. 20 should be ignitable provided confinement does not degrade with heating (ohmic + alpha + auxiliary, etc.) power; however, aB/sub 0//sup 2//q/sub */ approx. 30 (25) may be required for minimal ignition for a typical L- (H-) mode confinement scaling. Increased plasma elongation (kappa approx. 2) may help to reduce these requirements.

  7. Well-differentiated angiosarcoma of spleen: a teaching case mimicking hemagioma and cytogenetic analysis with array comparative genomic hybridization.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lichen; Zhang, Yimin; Zhao, Hong; Chen, Qingxiao; Ma, Weihang; Li, Lanjuan

    2015-10-13

    Primary splenic angiosarcoma is extremely rare but aggressive malignant vascular neoplasm. Here, we report a case of vascular tumor in spleen that was initially misinterpreted as hemangioma. Two years after splenectomy, the patient admitted again with aggravated abdomen pain and severe anemia. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan showed widely metastases. The ensuing biopsy for lesion both in liver and in bone marrow showed the similar pathological findings as that in spleen, which supported the final diagnosis of well-differentiated splenic angiosarcoma with extensive metastases. The patient was dead in 3 months after discharge without chemotherapy. The copy number changes for spleen lesion detected by array comparative genome hybridization showed copy number gain at 11q23.2, 11q24.3, 12q24.33, 13q34, copy number loss at 1q24.2-q31.3, 1q41-q42.2, 1 q42.3-q43, 2q36.3-q37.3, 2q37.7, 3q13.33-q26.2, 3q28 - q29, 9p11.2, 13q11, 15q11, homozygous copy loss at 8p11.22, 22q11.23. Less than 200 cases of splenic angiosarcoma have been published in literature of English. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time analyzed cytogenetic alteration in a well-differentiated primary splenic angiosarcoma.

  8. Construction and accuracy of partial differential equation approximations to the chemical master equation.

    PubMed

    Grima, Ramon

    2011-11-01

    The mesoscopic description of chemical kinetics, the chemical master equation, can be exactly solved in only a few simple cases. The analytical intractability stems from the discrete character of the equation, and hence considerable effort has been invested in the development of Fokker-Planck equations, second-order partial differential equation approximations to the master equation. We here consider two different types of higher-order partial differential approximations, one derived from the system-size expansion and the other from the Kramers-Moyal expansion, and derive the accuracy of their predictions for chemical reactive networks composed of arbitrary numbers of unimolecular and bimolecular reactions. In particular, we show that the partial differential equation approximation of order Q from the Kramers-Moyal expansion leads to estimates of the mean number of molecules accurate to order Ω(-(2Q-3)/2), of the variance of the fluctuations in the number of molecules accurate to order Ω(-(2Q-5)/2), and of skewness accurate to order Ω(-(Q-2)). We also show that for large Q, the accuracy in the estimates can be matched only by a partial differential equation approximation from the system-size expansion of approximate order 2Q. Hence, we conclude that partial differential approximations based on the Kramers-Moyal expansion generally lead to considerably more accurate estimates in the mean, variance, and skewness than approximations of the same order derived from the system-size expansion.

  9. Molecular magnets based on homometallic hexanuclear lanthanide(III) complexes.

    PubMed

    Das, Sourav; Hossain, Sakiat; Dey, Atanu; Biswas, Sourav; Sutter, Jean-Pascal; Chandrasekhar, Vadapalli

    2014-05-19

    The reaction of lanthanide(III) chloride salts (Gd(III), Dy(III), Tb(III), and Ho(III)) with the hetero donor chelating ligand N'-(2-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzylidene)-6-(hydroxymethyl)picolinohydrazide (LH3) in the presence of triethylamine afforded the hexanuclear Ln(III) complexes [{Ln6(L)2(LH)2}(μ3-OH)4][MeOH]p[H2O]q[Cl]4·xH2O·yCH3OH (1, Ln = Gd(III), p = 4, q = 4, x = 8, y = 2; 2, Ln = Dy(III), p = 2, q = 6, x = 8, y = 4; 3, Ln = Tb(III), p = 2, q = 6, x = 10, y = 4; 4, Ln = Ho(III), p = 2, q = 6, x = 10, y = 2). X-ray diffraction studies revealed that these compounds possess a hexanuclear [Ln6(OH)4](14+) core consisting of four fused [Ln3(OH)](8+) subunits. Both static (dc) and dynamic (ac) magnetic properties of 1-4 have been studied. Single-molecule magnetic behavior has been observed in compound 2 with an effective energy barrier and relaxation time pre-exponential parameters of Δ/kB = 46.2 K and τ0 = 2.85 × 10(-7) s, respectively. PMID:24766539

  10. Deletion of UBE3A in brothers with Angelman syndrome at the breakpoint with an inversion at 15q11.2.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Yukiko; Ohashi, Ikuko; Saito, Toshiyuki; Nagai, Jun-Ichi; Ida, Kazumi; Naruto, Takuya; Wada, Takahito; Kurosawa, Kenji

    2014-11-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is characterized by severe intellectual disability with ataxia, epilepsy, and behavioral uniqueness. The underlining molecular deficit is the absence of the maternal copy of the imprinted UBE3A gene due to maternal deletions, which is observed in 70-75% of cases, and can be detected using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) of the UBE3A region. Only a few familial AS cases have been reported with a complete deletion of UBE3A. Here, we report on siblings with AS caused by a microdeletion of 15q11.2-q12 encompassing UBE3A at the breakpoint of an inversion at 15q11.2 and 15q26.1. Karyotyping revealed an inversion of 15q, and FISH revealed the deletion of the UBE3A region. Array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) demonstrated a 467 kb deletion at 15q11.2-q12, encompassing only UBE3A, SNORD115, and PAR1, and a 53 kb deletion at 15q26.1, encompassing a part of SLCO3A1. Their mother had a normal karyotype and array CGH detected no deletion of 15q11.2-q12, so we assumed gonadal mosaicism. This report describes a rare type of familial AS detected using the D15S10 FISH test. PMID:25099823

  11. Deletion of UBE3A in brothers with Angelman syndrome at the breakpoint with an inversion at 15q11.2.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Yukiko; Ohashi, Ikuko; Saito, Toshiyuki; Nagai, Jun-Ichi; Ida, Kazumi; Naruto, Takuya; Wada, Takahito; Kurosawa, Kenji

    2014-11-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is characterized by severe intellectual disability with ataxia, epilepsy, and behavioral uniqueness. The underlining molecular deficit is the absence of the maternal copy of the imprinted UBE3A gene due to maternal deletions, which is observed in 70-75% of cases, and can be detected using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) of the UBE3A region. Only a few familial AS cases have been reported with a complete deletion of UBE3A. Here, we report on siblings with AS caused by a microdeletion of 15q11.2-q12 encompassing UBE3A at the breakpoint of an inversion at 15q11.2 and 15q26.1. Karyotyping revealed an inversion of 15q, and FISH revealed the deletion of the UBE3A region. Array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) demonstrated a 467 kb deletion at 15q11.2-q12, encompassing only UBE3A, SNORD115, and PAR1, and a 53 kb deletion at 15q26.1, encompassing a part of SLCO3A1. Their mother had a normal karyotype and array CGH detected no deletion of 15q11.2-q12, so we assumed gonadal mosaicism. This report describes a rare type of familial AS detected using the D15S10 FISH test.

  12. Complex chromosomal rearrangement in a girl with psychomotor-retardation and a de novo inversion: inv(2)(p15;q24.2).

    PubMed

    Granot-Hershkovitz, Einat; Raas-Rothschild, Annick; Frumkin, Ayala; Granot, David; Silverstein, Shira; Abeliovich, Dvorah

    2011-08-01

    Cytogenetic analysis of DNA from a girl with severe psychomotor retardation revealed a de novo pericentric inversion of chromosome 2: 46,XX,inv(2)(p15q24.2). In order to elucidate the possible role of the inversion in the girl's abnormal phenotype, we analyzed the inversion breakpoints. FISH analysis revealed BAC clones spanning the breakpoints at 2p and 2q of the inversion. Southern blot hybridization with DNA probes from the BAC regions was used to refine the localization of the breakpoints, followed by inverse-PCR which enabled us to sequence the inversion breakpoints. We found a complex chromosomal rearrangement, including five breakpoints, four at 2q and one at 2p joined with minor insertions/deletions of a few bases. The breakpoint at 2p was within the NRXN1 gene that has previously been associated with autism, intellectual disabilities, and psychiatric disorders. In 2q, the breakpoints disrupted two genes, TANC1 and RBMS1; the phenotypic effect of these genes is not currently known.

  13. Chromosome region-specific libraries for human genome analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, Fa-Ten.

    1992-08-01

    During the grant period progress has been made in the successful demonstration of regional mapping of microclones derived from microdissection libraries; successful demonstration of the feasibility of converting microclones with short inserts into yeast artificial chromosome clones with very large inserts for high resolution physical mapping of the dissected region; Successful demonstration of the usefulness of region-specific microclones to isolate region-specific cDNA clones as candidate genes to facilitate search for the crucial genes underlying genetic diseases assigned to the dissected region; and the successful construction of four region-specific microdissection libraries for human chromosome 2, including 2q35-q37, 2q33-q35, 2p23-p25 and 2p2l-p23. The 2q35-q37 library has been characterized in detail. The characterization of the other three libraries is in progress. These region-specific microdissection libraries and the unique sequence microclones derived from the libraries will be valuable resources for investigators engaged in high resolution physical mapping and isolation of disease-related genes residing in these chromosomal regions.

  14. Chromosome region-specific libraries for human genome analysis. Progress report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, Fa-Ten

    1992-08-01

    During the grant period progress has been made in the successful demonstration of regional mapping of microclones derived from microdissection libraries; successful demonstration of the feasibility of converting microclones with short inserts into yeast artificial chromosome clones with very large inserts for high resolution physical mapping of the dissected region; Successful demonstration of the usefulness of region-specific microclones to isolate region-specific cDNA clones as candidate genes to facilitate search for the crucial genes underlying genetic diseases assigned to the dissected region; and the successful construction of four region-specific microdissection libraries for human chromosome 2, including 2q35-q37, 2q33-q35, 2p23-p25 and 2p2l-p23. The 2q35-q37 library has been characterized in detail. The characterization of the other three libraries is in progress. These region-specific microdissection libraries and the unique sequence microclones derived from the libraries will be valuable resources for investigators engaged in high resolution physical mapping and isolation of disease-related genes residing in these chromosomal regions.

  15. Deficient RNA-editing enzyme ADAR2 in an amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patient with a FUS(P525L) mutation.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Hitoshi; Hideyama, Takuto; Yamashita, Takenari; Kimura, Takashi; Suzuki, Naoki; Aoki, Masashi; Kwak, Shin

    2016-10-01

    Mutations in the fused in sarcoma (FUS) gene can cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and FUS gene mutations have been reported in sporadic ALS patients with basophilic cytoplasmic inclusions. Deficiency of adenosine deaminase acting on RNA 2 (ADAR2), an enzyme that specifically catalyzes GluA2 Q/R site-editing, has been reported in considerable proportions of spinal motor neurons of the majority of sporadic ALS patients. We describe the relationship between GluA2 Q/R site-editing efficiency and FUS-positive inclusions in a patient with FUS(P525L). A 24-year-old woman with ALS presented with basophilic cytoplasmic inclusions, significantly reduced GluA2 Q/R site-editing efficiency in the spinal motor neurons, and markedly decreased ADAR2 mRNA levels. Neuropathologic examination showed that not all spinal motor neurons expressed ADAR2 and revealed FUS-positive cytoplasmic inclusions in motor neurons irrespective of ADAR2 immunoreactivity. There were no phosphorylated transactive response (TAR) DNA-binding protein 43 kDa (TDP-43)-positive inclusions, indicating that there was no tight correlation between ADAR2 deficiency and TDP-43 deposition. ADAR2 deficiency can occur in ALS patients with a FUS(P525L) mutation and is unrelated to the presence of FUS-positive inclusions. FUS-associated ALS may share neurodegenerative characteristics with classical sporadic ALS.

  16. Modulating the Redox Potential of the Stable Electron Acceptor, QB, in Mutagenized Photosystem II Reaction Centers.

    SciTech Connect

    Perrine, Zoee; Sayre, Richard

    2011-02-10

    One of the unique features of electron transfer processes in photosystem II (PSII) reaction centers (RC) is the exclusive transfer of electrons down only one of the two parallel cofactor branches. In contrast to the RC core polypeptides (psaA and psaB) of photosystem I (PSI), where electron transfer occurs down both parallel redox-active cofactor branches, there is greater protein-cofactor asymmetry between the PSII RC core polypeptides (D1 and D2). We have focused on the identification of protein-cofactor relationships that determine the branch along which primary charge separation occurs (P680+/pheophytin-(Pheo)). We have previously shown that mutagenesis of the strong hydrogen-bonding residue, D1-E130, to less polar residues (D1-E130Q,H,L) shifted the midpoint potential of the PheoD1/PheoD1- couple to more negative values, reducing the quantum yield of primary charge separation. We did not observe, however, electron transfer down the inactive branch in D1-E130 mutants. The protein residue corresponding to D1-E130 on the inactive branch is D2-Q129 which presumably has a reduced hydrogen-bonding interaction with PheoD2 relative to the D1-E130 residue with PheoD1. Analysis of the recent 2.9 Å cyanobacterial PSII crystal structure indicated, however, that the D2-Q129 residue was too distant from the PheoD2 headgroup to serve as a possible hydrogen bond donor and directly impact its midpoint potential as well as potentially determine the directionality of electron transfer. Our objective was to characterize the function of this highly conserved inactive branch residue by replacing it with a nonconservative leucine or a conservative histidine residue. Measurements of Chl fluorescence decay kinetics and thermoluminescence studies indicate that the mutagenesis of D2-Q129 decreases the redox gap between QA and QB due to a lowering of the redox potential of QB. The

  17. Chromosome loci vary by juvenile myoclonic epilepsy subsyndromes: linkage and haplotype analysis applied to epilepsy and EEG 3.5-6.0 Hz polyspike waves.

    PubMed

    Wight, Jenny E; Nguyen, Viet-Huong; Medina, Marco T; Patterson, Christopher; Durón, Reyna M; Molina, Yolly; Lin, Yu-Chen; Martínez-Juárez, Iris E; Ochoa, Adriana; Jara-Prado, Aurelio; Tanaka, Miyabi; Bai, Dongsheng; Aftab, Sumaya; Bailey, Julia N; Delgado-Escueta, Antonio V

    2016-03-01

    Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME), the most common genetic epilepsy, remains enigmatic because it is considered one disease instead of several diseases. We ascertained three large multigenerational/multiplex JME pedigrees from Honduras with differing JME subsyndromes, including Childhood Absence Epilepsy evolving to JME (CAE/JME; pedigree 1), JME with adolescent onset pyknoleptic absence (JME/pA; pedigree 2), and classic JME (cJME; pedigree 3). All phenotypes were validated, including symptomatic persons with various epilepsies, asymptomatic persons with EEG 3.5-6.0 Hz polyspike waves, and asymptomatic persons with normal EEGs. Two-point parametric linkage analyses were performed with 5185 single-nucleotide polymorphisms on individual pedigrees and pooled pedigrees using four diagnostic models based on epilepsy/EEG diagnoses. Haplotype analyses of the entire genome were also performed for each individual. In pedigree 1, haplotyping identified a 34 cM region in 2q21.2-q31.1 cosegregating with all affected members, an area close to 2q14.3 identified by linkage (Z max = 1.77; pedigree 1). In pedigree 2, linkage and haplotyping identified a 44 cM cosegregating region in 13q13.3-q31.2 (Z max = 3.50 at 13q31.1; pooled pedigrees). In pedigree 3, haplotyping identified a 6 cM cosegregating region in 17q12. Possible cosegregation was also identified in 13q14.2 and 1q32 in pedigree 3, although this could not be definitively confirmed due to the presence of uninformative markers in key individuals. Differing chromosome regions identified in specific JME subsyndromes may contain separate JME disease-causing genes, favoring the concept of JME as several distinct diseases. Whole-exome sequencing will likely identify a CAE/JME gene in 2q21.2-2q31.1, a JME/pA gene in 13q13.3-q31.2, and a cJME gene in 17q12. PMID:27066514

  18. Partial trisomy 5q resulting from chromosome 7 insertion: An expansion of the phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Fries, M.H.; Reilly, P.A.; Williams, T.C.

    1994-09-01

    Partial trisomy 5q has been categorized into three separate phenotypes; however, a distinctive phenotype has not been described for duplications spanning 5q23-q35. We report a case of partial trisomy 5q for this region as a result of a ins(7,5)(q31.3;q23.2q35.1)mat. The liveborn male infant was delivered by emergency cesarean section at 37 weeks after a pregnancy notable for oligohydramnios, with birth weight 1792 g (<3%). Postnatal course was marked by psychomotor delay, failure to thrive, and biopsy demonstrated neonatal giant cell hepatitis with a paucity of intrahepatic bile ducts. His appearance was remarkable for lack of subcutaneous fat, midline displaced hair whorl, bitemporal narrowing with frontal bossing, wide anterior fontanel, widow`s peak, protuberant eyes with periorbital and lid edema, short flat nasal bridge with broad flattened nasal tip, long smooth philtrum, wide mouth with thin lips, wide gingival ridges, micrognathia, posteriorly rotated low-set ears, hepatomegaly, flexion contractions of elbows, and generalized hypertonicity. Urine organic acids, oligosaccharide/mucopolysaccharide screen, and plasma amino acids were negative. GTG-banding on prometaphase chromosomes showed an unbalanced translocation involving chr. 7. This was identified as an insertion of chr. 5 (q23.2q35.1) into distal 7q after FISH using chr. 5 and chr. 7 painting probes. The infant`s mother carries the balanced insertional rearrangement: 46,XX,dir ins(7,5)(q31.3;q23.2q35.1). This phenotype overlaps that of previously described duplications with the addition of giant cell hepatitis, coarsened facial features, gingival thickening, and flexion contractures, suggestive of a yet undiagnosed storage disorder.

  19. Large-scale polymorphism near the ends of several human chromosomes analyzed by using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)

    SciTech Connect

    Trask, B.J.; Friedman, C.; Giorgi, D.

    1994-09-01

    We have discovered a large DNA segment that is polymorphically present at the ends of several human chromosomes. The segment, f7501, was originally derived form a human chromosome 19-specific cosmid library. FISH was used to determine the cosmid`s chromosomal distribution on 44 unrelated humans and several closely related primates. The human subjects represent a diversity of reproductively isolated ethnic populations. FISH analysis revealed that sequences highly homologous to the cosmid`s insert are present on both homologs at 3q, 15q,. and 19p in almost all individuals (88, 85, and 87 of 88 homologs, respectively). Other chromosomes sites were labeled much more rarely in the sampled individuals. For example, 56 of the 88 analyzed chromosomes 11 were labeled (18+/+, 6-/-, and 20+/- individuals). In contrast, 2q was labeled on only 1/88 sampled chromosomes. The termini of 2q, 5q, 6p, 6q, 7p, 8p, 9p, 9q, 11p, 12q, 16p, 19q, and 20q and an interstitial site at 2q13-14 were labeled in at least one individual of the set. EcoR1-fragments derived from the cosmid showed the same hybridization pattern as the entire cosmid, indicating that at least 40 kbp is shared by these chromosome ends. Ethnic differences in the allele frequency of these polymorphic variants was observed. For example, signals were observed on 8/10 and 7/10 of the chromosomes 7p and 16q, respectively, derived form Biakan Pygmies, but these sites were infrequently labeled in non-Pygmy human populations (2/68, respectively). This region has undergone significant changes in chromosome location during human evolution. Strong signal was seen on chimpanzee and gorilla chromosome 3, which is homologous to human chromosome 4, a chromosome unlabeled in any of the humans we have analyzed.

  20. Chromophore-modified bis-benzo[g]indole carboxamides: synthesis and antiproliferative activity of bis-benzo[g]indazole-3-carboxamides and related dimers.

    PubMed

    Pinna, Gérard A; Pirisi, Maria A; Mussinu, Jean-Mario; Murineddu, Gabriele; Loriga, Giovanni; Pau, Amedeo; Grella, Giuseppe E

    2003-09-01

    Tricyclic pyrazole dimers that comprise two kinds of CONH-(CH(2))(n)-N(CH(3))-(CH(2))(n)-NHCO bridges to which are linked potential DNA-intercalating groups such as 1H-benzo[g]indazole, 2H-benzo[g]indazole and 1,4-dihydroindeno[1,2-c]pyrazole were designed, synthesized and some of them evaluated in vitro by NCI (Bethesda, USA) against nine types of cancer cells. Compounds 2a, 2f-i and 2o-r demonstrated significant antiproliferative activity, all with GI(50) values in the low micromolar range. Preliminary analysis of the structure-activity relationship for dimers 2 indicated that: (i) in the ground terms (2a and 2k) antitumor activities were strongly related to the type of chromophore, (ii) in contrast, either 1H-benzo[g]indazole- or 1,4-dihydroindeno[1,2-c]pyrazole-dimers when bore a N(1)-aryl group (2g, 2h, 2i, 2o, 2p, 2q and 2r) generally showed a good level of antitumor potency and (iii) for the most representative compounds (pairs of compounds: 2g,2h; 2o,2p and 2q,2r) the length of the bridges did not significantly contribute to the variations in cytotoxicity. Two members of this series, 2f and 2q, were selected and tested in the hollow fiber cell assay to evaluate in a preliminary fashion their in vivo antitumor activity. Finally, viscosity measurement of 2f with poly(dA-dT)(2), confirmed that these promising compounds behaved as typical DNA-intercalating agents.

  1. Thermoelectric misfit-layered cobalt oxides with interlayers of hydroxide and peroxide species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Ta-Lei; Lybeck, Jenni; Chan, Ting-Shan; Hsu, Ying-Ya; Tewari, Girish C.; Rautama, Eeva-Leena; Yamauchi, Hisao; Karppinen, Maarit

    2013-12-01

    Among the thermoelectric misfit-layered cobalt oxides, [MmA2Om+2]qCoO2, the parent m=0 phases exhibit divergent chemical features but are less understood than the more common m>0 members of the series. Here we synthesize Sr-for-Ca substituted [(Ca1-xSrx)z(O,OH)2]qCoO2 zero phases up to x=0.2 through low-temperature hydrothermal conversion of precursor powders of the m=1 misfit system, [Co(Ca1-xSrx)2O3]qCoO2. In the zero-phase [(Ca1-xSrx)z(O,OH)2]qCoO2 system, as the Sr content x increases the lattice expands anisotropically along the c axis such that the ab-plane dimension and the misfit parameter q remain essentially constant. X-ray absorption spectroscopy data suggest the presence of peroxide-type oxygen species in the (Ca1-xSrx)z(O,OH)2 rock-salt block and together with infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric and low-temperature resistivity and thermopower measurements evidence that the isovalent Sr-for-Ca substitution controls the balance between the peroxide and hydroxide species in the (Ca1-xSrx)z(O,OH)2 block but leaves the valence of Co essentially intact in the CoO2 block. The higher electrical conductivity of the Sr-substituted phases is explained as a consequence of increased carrier mobility.

  2. A girl with incomplete Prader-Willi syndrome and negative MS-PCR, found to have mosaic maternal UPD-15 at SNP array.

    PubMed

    Morandi, Anita; Bonnefond, Amélie; Lobbens, Stéphane; Carotenuto, Marco; Del Giudice, Emanuele Miraglia; Froguel, Philippe; Maffeis, Claudio

    2015-11-01

    The Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is caused by lack of expression of paternal allele of the 15q11.2-q13 region, due to deletions at paternal 15q11.2-q13 (<70%), maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 15 (mat-UPD 15) (30%) or imprinting defects (1%). Hyperphagia, intellectual disabilities/behavioral disorders, neonatal hypotonia, and hypogonadism are cardinal features for PWS. Methylation sensitive PCR (MS-PCR) of the SNRPN locus, which assesses the presence of both the unmethylated (paternal) and the methylated (maternal) allele of 15q11.2-q13, is considered a sensitive reference technique for PWS diagnosis regardless of genetic subtype. We describe a 17-year-old girl with severe obesity, short stature, and intellectual disability, without hypogonadism and history of neonatal hypotonia, who was suspected to have an incomplete PWS. The MS-PCR showed a normal pattern with similar maternal and paternal electrophoretic bands. Afterwards, a SNP array showed the presence of iso-UPD 15, that is, UPD15 with two copies of the same chromosome 15, in about 50% of cells, suggesting a diagnosis of partial PWS due to mosaic maternal iso-UPD15 arisen as rescue of a post-fertilization error. A quantitative methylation analysis confirmed the presence of mosaic UPD15 in about 50% of cells. We propose that complete clinical criteria for PWS and MS-PCR should not be considered sensitive in suspecting and diagnosing partial PWS due to mosaic UPD15. In contrast, clinical suspicion based on less restrictive criteria followed by SNP array is a more powerful approach to diagnose atypical PWS due to UPD15 mosaicism. PMID:26109092

  3. A genome-wide search for linkage to allergic rhinitis in Danish sib-pair families.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Lisbeth Venø; Nyegaard, Mette; Christensen, Ulla; Møller-Larsen, Steffen; Haagerup, Annette; Deleuran, Mette; Hansen, Lars Gudmund; Venø, Stine Krogh; Goossens, Dirk; Del-Favero, Jurgen; Børglum, Anders Dupont

    2012-09-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) is a complex disorder with a polygenic, multifactorial aetiology. Twin studies have found the genetic contribution to be substantial. We collected and clinically characterised a sample consisting of 127 Danish nuclear families with at least two siblings suffering from AR or allergic conjunctivitis including 540 individuals (286 children and 254 parents). A whole-genome linkage scan, using 424 microsatellite markers, was performed on both this sample and an earlier collected sample consisting of 130 families with atopic dermatitis and other atopic disorders. A third sib-pair family sample, which was previously collected and genotyped, was added to the analysis increasing the total sample size to 357 families consisting of 1508 individuals. In total, 190 families with AR was included. The linkage analysis software Genehunter NPL, Genehunter MOD, and Genehunter Imprinting were used to obtain nonparametric and parametric linkage results. Family-based association analysis of positional candidate SNPs was carried out using the FBAT program. We obtained genome-wide significant linkage to a novel AR locus at 1p13 and suggestive linkage to two novel regions at 1q31-q32 and 20p12, respectively. Family-based association analysis of SNPs in the candidate locus DNND1B/CRB1 at 1q31 showed no significant association and could not explain the linkage signal observed. Suggestive evidence of linkage was also obtained at three AR loci previously reported (2q14-q23, 2q23, and 12p13) and indication of linkage was observed at a number of additional loci. Likely maternal imprinting was observed at 2q23, and possible maternal imprinting at 3q28. PMID:22419170

  4. Meta-analysis of 32 genome-wide linkage studies of schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Ng, MYM; Levinson, DF; Faraone, SV; Suarez, BK; DeLisi, LE; Arinami, T; Riley, B; Paunio, T; Pulver, AE; Irmansyah; Holmans, PA; Escamilla, M; Wildenauer, DB; Williams, NM; Laurent, C; Mowry, BJ; Brzustowicz, LM; Maziade, M; Sklar, P; Garver, DL; Abecasis, GR; Lerer, B; Fallin, MD; Gurling, HMD; Gejman, PV; Lindholm, E; Moises, HW; Byerley, W; Wijsman, EM; Forabosco, P; Tsuang, MT; Hwu, H-G; Okazaki, Y; Kendler, KS; Wormley, B; Fanous, A; Walsh, D; O’Neill, FA; Peltonen, L; Nestadt, G; Lasseter, VK; Liang, KY; Papadimitriou, GM; Dikeos, DG; Schwab, SG; Owen, MJ; O’Donovan, MC; Norton, N; Hare, E; Raventos, H; Nicolini, H; Albus, M; Maier, W; Nimgaonkar, VL; Terenius, L; Mallet, J; Jay, M; Godard, S; Nertney, D; Alexander, M; Crowe, RR; Silverman, JM; Bassett, AS; Roy, M-A; Mérette, C; Pato, CN; Pato, MT; Roos, J Louw; Kohn, Y; Amann-Zalcenstein, D; Kalsi, G; McQuillin, A; Curtis, D; Brynjolfson, J; Sigmundsson, T; Petursson, H; Sanders, AR; Duan, J; Jazin, E; Myles-Worsley, M; Karayiorgou, M; Lewis, CM

    2009-01-01

    A genome scan meta-analysis (GSMA) was carried out on 32 independent genome-wide linkage scan analyses that included 3255 pedigrees with 7413 genotyped cases affected with schizophrenia (SCZ) or related disorders. The primary GSMA divided the autosomes into 120 bins, rank-ordered the bins within each study according to the most positive linkage result in each bin, summed these ranks (weighted for study size) for each bin across studies and determined the empirical probability of a given summed rank (PSR) by simulation. Suggestive evidence for linkage was observed in two single bins, on chromosomes 5q (142-168 Mb) and 2q (103-134 Mb). Genome-wide evidence for linkage was detected on chromosome 2q (119-152 Mb) when bin boundaries were shifted to the middle of the previous bins. The primary analysis met empirical criteria for ‘aggregate’ genome-wide significance, indicating that some or all of 10 bins are likely to contain loci linked to SCZ, including regions of chromosomes 1, 2q, 3q, 4q, 5q, 8p and 10q. In a secondary analysis of 22 studies of European-ancestry samples, suggestive evidence for linkage was observed on chromosome 8p (16-33 Mb). Although the newer genome-wide association methodology has greater power to detect weak associations to single common DNA sequence variants, linkage analysis can detect diverse genetic effects that segregate in families, including multiple rare variants within one locus or several weakly associated loci in the same region. Therefore, the regions supported by this meta-analysis deserve close attention in future studies. PMID:19349958

  5. Theory of 14N and 17O Nuclear Quadrupole Interactions in the Single Amino Acids Occurring in the Protein Chain of Cytochrome c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheicher, R. H.; Cammarere, D.; Sahoo, N.; Nagamine, K.; Das, T. P.

    2002-07-01

    The understanding of electron transport in proteins based on a novel technique involving muon spin rotation (μSR)measurements is a topic of great current interest. The technique, which involves study of spin relaxation of a positive muon (μ+) trapped in amino acids in protein chains due to the fluctuating magnetic field that the moving electron produces, is based on the premise that the electron is generated by ionization of a muonium (Mu) which was trapped at the same site as the μ+ left behind. In attempting to test this premise from first-principles for the Cytochrome c (Cyt c) system in which recent μSR measurements have been made, we have carried out Hartree- Fock investigations of the electronic structures of the bare amino acids and amino acids with + and Mu trapped at the oxygen of the C=O group common to all amino acids. With the aim that the comparison of theoretically predicted experimental nuclear quadrupole interaction (NQI) parameters will provide a useful test of the electron distribution in the amino acids of Cyt c, we present results for the nuclear quadrupole coupling constants (e2qQ) and asymmetry parameters (η) for the bare amino acids and the amino acids with trapped μ+ and Mu. The trends in 2 and for 14N and 17O between the various amino acids, as well as the changes in these parameters in the presence of μ+ and Mu are being analyzed. It would be helpful to have experimental data for e2qQ and to η compare with our predictions for the amino acids as they occur in vitro in polycrystalline Cyt c in which the SR measurements have been carried out. It is also hoped that the μSR technique will be able to provide experimental data on e2qQ and for the 14N and 17O nuclei to compare with our predictions

  6. Polymorphism in the beta chain of IAq versus IAp influences presentation of protein but not peptide antigens.

    PubMed

    Lambert, L E; Berling, J S; Thompson, S D; Harton, J A; Bishop, G A; Choi, E

    1995-10-15

    T cells play a critical role in the development of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Immunization with heterologous (chick) type II collagen (cII) results in chronic inflammation with progressive damage to the joints. The expression of specific MHC Class II alpha beta dimers, including IAq, is critical to induction of disease. The alpha chains of IAq and IAp are identical in sequence. The IAq and IAp beta chains differ by only four amino acid residues: 85, 86, 88, and 89. However, mice of the H-2p haplotype are not susceptible to CIA. To examine the impact of these structural differences in IA molecules on T cell Ag recognition, we studied presentation of cII peptides and denatured cII by APCs obtained from H-2q and H-2p mice. We also assessed presentation of ovalbumin, myelin basic protein (MBP), and MBP peptides by these APC populations. H-2q APCs presented both peptides and proteins to our T cell hybrids. In contrast, APCs obtained from H-2p mice presented peptides, but were defective in the processing and/or presentation of protein Ags. We then altered pairs of the residues in IAq to those found in IAp using site-directed mutagenesis and transfected these constructs into M 12.C3 B cells. All transfectants were able to present peptides, but those expressing IAp were unable to present protein Ags. The use of transfectants expressing hybrid molecules (residues 85 and 86 from IAp, 88 and 89 from IAq, or vice versa) allowed us to localize the region responsible for this defect to residues 85 and 86 of the beta chain. The presence of IAp residues (glu and thr versus gly and val in IAq) at these sites severely compromised the capacity for protein presentation. Resistance to CIA in H-2p haplotype mice may be a reflection of the limited repertoire of epitopes to which these mice can respond relative to susceptible H-2q mice.

  7. Mars’ Low Dissipation Factor at 11-h - Interpretation from Anelasticity-Based Dissipation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo-Rogez, Julie; Choukroun, M.

    2010-10-01

    We explore the information contained in the ratio of the tidal Love number k2 to the dissipation factor Q characterizing the response of Mars to the tides exerted by its satellite Phobos (11-h period). Assuming that Mars can be approximated as a Maxwell body, Bills et al. [1] have inferred an average viscosity of the Martian mantle 8.7x1014 Pa s. Such a low viscosity appears inconsistent with Mars’ thermal evolution and current heat budget models. Alternative explanations include the presence of partial melt in the mantle [2], or the presence of an aquifer in the crust [3]. We revisit the interpretation of Mars’ k2/Q using a laboratory-based attenuation model that accounts for material viscoelasticity and anelasticity. As a first step, we have computed Mars’ k2/Q for an interior model that includes a solid inner core, a liquid core layer, a mantle, and crust (consistent with the observed moment of inertia, and k2 measured at the orbital period), and searched for the range of mantle viscosities that can explain the observed k2/Q. Successful models are characterized by an average mantle viscosity between 1018 and 1022 Pa s, which rules out the presence of partial melt in the mantle. We can narrow down that range by performing a more detailed calculation of the mineralogy and temperature profiles. Preliminary results will be presented at the meeting. References: [1] Bills et al. (2005) JGR 110, E00704; [2] Ruedas et al. (2009 White paper to the NRC Planetary Science decadal survey; [3] Bills et al. (2009) LPS 40, 1712. MC is supported by a NASA Postdoctoral Program Fellowship, administered by Oak Ridge Associated Universities. This work has been conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract to NASA. Government sponsorship acknowledged.

  8. Laminar and turbulent incompressible fluid flow analysis with heat transfer by the finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, R.J.

    1992-01-01

    A study of the finite element method applied to two-dimensional incompressible fluid flow analysis with heat transfer is performed using a mixed Galerkin finite element method with the primitive variable form of the model equations. Four biquadratic, quadrilateral elements are compared in this study--the serendipity biquadratic element with bilinear continuous pressure interpolation (Q2(8)-Q1) and the Lagrangian biquadratic element with bilinear continuous pressure interpolation (Q2-Q1) of the Taylor-Hood form. A modified form of the Q2-Q1 element is also studied. The pressure interpolation is augmented by a discontinuous constant shape function for pressure (Q2-Q1+). The discontinuous pressure element formulation makes use of biquadratic shape functions and a discontinuous linear interpolation of the pressure (Q2-P1(3)). Laminar flow solutions, with heat transfer, are compared to analytical and computational benchmarks for flat channel, backward-facing step and buoyancy driven flow in a square cavity. It is shown that the discontinuous pressure elements provide superior solution characteristics over the continuous pressure elements. Highly accurate heat transfer solutions are obtained and the Q2-P1(3) element is chosen for extension to turbulent flow simulations. Turbulent flow solutions are presented for both low turbulence Reynolds number and high Reynolds number formulations of two-equation turbulence models. The following three forms of the length scale transport equation are studied; the turbulence energy dissipation rate ([var epsilon]), the turbulence frequency ([omega]) and the turbulence time scale (tau). It is shown that the low turbulence Reynolds number model consisting of the K - [tau] transport equations, coupled with the damping functions of Shih and Hsu, provides an optimal combination of numerical stability and solution accuracy for the flat channel flow.

  9. Thermodynamic and kinetic considerations for the reaction of semiquinone radicals to form superoxide and hydrogen peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yang; Buettner, Garry R.

    2010-01-01

    The quinone/semiquinone/hydroquinone triad (Q/SQ•−/H2Q) represents a class of compounds that has great importance in a wide range of biological processes. The half-cell reduction potentials of these redox couples in aqueous solutions at neutral pH, E°′, provide a window to understanding the thermodynamic and kinetic characteristics of this triad and their associated chemistry and biochemistry in vivo. Substituents on the quinone ring can significantly influence the electron density “on the ring” and thus modify E°′ dramatically. E°′ of the quinone governs the reaction of semiquinone with dioxygen to form superoxide. At near-neutral pH the pKa's of the hydroquinone are outstanding indicators of the electron density in the aromatic ring of the members of these triads (electrophilicity) and thus are excellent tools to predict half-cell reduction potentials for both the one-electron and two-electron couples, which in turn allow estimates of rate constants for the reactions of these triads. For example, the higher the pKa's of H2Q, the lower the reduction potentials and the higher the rate constants for the reaction of SQ•− with dioxygen to form superoxide. However, hydroquinone autoxidation is controlled by the concentration of di-ionized hydroquinone; thus, the lower the pKa's the less stable H2Q to autoxidation. Catalysts, e.g., metals and quinone, can accelerate oxidation processes; by removing superoxide and increasing the rate of formation of quinone, superoxide dismutase can accelerate oxidation of hydroquinones and thereby increase the flux of hydrogen peroxide. The principal reactions of quinones are with nucleophiles via Michael addition, for example, with thiols and amines. The rate constants for these addition reactions are also related to E°′. Thus, pKa's of a hydroquinone and E°′ are central to the chemistry of these triads. PMID:20493944

  10. Containment of Clostridium difficile infection without reduction in antimicrobial use in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Cheng, V C C; Chau, P H; So, S Y C; Chen, J H K; Poon, R W S; Wong, S C Y; Hung, I F N; Lee, W M; Tai, J W M; Ho, P L; Yam, W C; Yuen, K Y

    2015-07-01

    Clostridium difficile ribotype 002 with hypersporulating capacity has been increasingly identified in Hong Kong. Proactive infection control measures are important to prevent the establishment of endemicity of C. difficile ribotype 002. A total of 329 patients with healthcare-associated C. difficile infection (CDI) were recruited in our healthcare network between 1 January 2008 and 30 June 2012 in this study. The incidence rates of healthcare-associated CDI per 10,000 admissions and 10,000 patient-days increased significantly by 15.3 and 17.0%, respectively, per quarter (p < 0.001) from 2008 1Q to 2010 1Q by segmented Poisson regression. With the full implementation of enhanced infection control interventions, there was an immediate significant reduction in both healthcare-associated CDI rates per 10,000 admissions and per 10,000 patient-days by 47% (p < 0.001) in 2010 2Q, followed by a further decline of CDI per 10,000 admissions and CDI per 10,000 patient-days by -19.4 and -19.8% from 2010 2Q to 2012 2Q, respectively (p < 0.001), despite a replacement of hand washing with soap and water by alcohol-based hand rub in the healthcare network. The proportion of C. difficile ribotype 002 was not statistically different (34/177, 19.2% vs. 25/152, 16.4%, p = 0.515), and the consumption of broad-spectrum antibiotics presented as divided daily dose per 1,000 acute bed-day occupancy per quarter remained unchanged (140.9 vs. 152.3) before and after infection control interventions. Our results suggested that the reduction of healthcare-associated CDI was attributable to infection control interventions instead of replacement of ribotypes or reduction in antimicrobial selective pressure. PMID:25800414

  11. Replication of five GWAS-identified loci and breast cancer risk among Hispanic and non-Hispanic white women living in the Southwestern United States

    PubMed Central

    Baumgartner, Kathy B.; Giuliano, Anna R.; Byers, Tim; Herrick, Jennifer S.; Wolff, Roger K.

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified several loci as being associated with breast cancer in mostly European populations. We focus on TNRC9 rs3803662, FGFR2 rs1219648 and rs2981582, MAP3K1 rs889312, and 2q35 rs13387042, to replicate in the 4-Corner’s Breast Cancer Study of Hispanic (N = 565 cases and 714 controls) and non-Hispanic white (NHW) women (N = 1177 cases and 1330 controls). We evaluate associations by ethnicity, menopausal status, and tumor ER/PR status after adjusting for genetic admixture. TNRC9 AA genotype was associated with significant increased risk among NHW women (OR 1.54, 95% CI 1.14, 2.08; P trend 0.003). Both polymorphisms of FGFR2 were associated with statistically significant increased risk for NHW and Hispanic women; MAP3K1 was not associated with risk among either ethnic group. The polymorphism on 2q35 was associated with a statistically significant increased risk among Hispanic women (OR 1.53, 95% CI 1.08, 2.15 for the AA genotype; P trend = 0.004). Associations were significantly different among pre/peri-menopausal women for TNRC9 (P heterogeneity 0.008) and for 2q35 (P heterogeneity 0.08) for NHW and Hispanic women. Both FGFR2 polymorphisms reduced risk of ER−/PR− tumors in the presence of the minor allele among NHW women. Among Hispanic women, polymorphisms of the FGFR2 gene were associated with almost a twofold increase risk of an ER+/PR+ tumor, while non-significantly inversely associated with ER−/PR− tumors. Our data replicated some of the previously reported GWAS findings. Differences in associations were detected for NHW and Hispanic women by menopausal status and by ER/PR status of tumors. PMID:21475998

  12. Association of Height with Elevated Mortality Risk in ESRD: Variation by Race and Gender.

    PubMed

    Elsayed, Mohamed E; Ferguson, John P; Stack, Austin G

    2016-02-01

    The association of adult height with mortality has been extensively investigated in the general population, but little is known about this relationship among dialysis patients. We explored the relationship between height and mortality in a retrospective cohort study of 1,171,842 adults who began dialysis in the United States from 1995 to 2008 and were followed until December 31, 2010. We evaluated height-mortality associations in sex-specific quintiles of increasing height (Q1-Q5) using multivariable Cox regression models adjusted for demographics, comorbid conditions, lifestyle and disability indicators, socioeconomic status, and body weight. For men, compared with the referent quintile (Q1 <167 cm), successive height quintiles had significantly increased hazard ratios (HRs [95% confidence interval]) for mortality: 1.04 (1.02-1.06), 1.08 (1.06-1.10), 1.12 (1.11-1.14), and 1.18 (1.16-1.20) for Q2-Q5, respectively. For women (referent Q1 <155 cm), HRs for mortality were 1.00 (0.99-1.02), 1.05 (1.03-1.06), 1.05 (1.03-1.07), and 1.08 (1.06-1.10) for Q2-Q5, respectively. However, stratification by race showed the pattern of association differed significantly by race (P<0.001 for interaction). For black men, unlike other race groups, height only associated with mortality in Q5, with an HR of 1.06 (1.02-1.09). For black women, HRs for mortality were 0.94 (0.91-0.97), 0.98 (0.95-1.02), 0.96 (0.93-0.99), and 0.99 (0.96-1.02) for Q2-Q5, respectively. These results indicate tallness is associated with higher mortality risks for adults starting dialysis, but this association did not extend to black patients.

  13. Genomewide Scan for Affective Disorder Susceptibility Loci in Families of a Northern Swedish Isolated Population

    PubMed Central

    Venken, Tine; Claes, Stephan; Sluijs, Samuël; Paterson, Andrew D.; van Duijn, Cornelia; Adolfsson, Rolf; Del-Favero, Jurgen; Van Broeckhoven, Christine

    2005-01-01

    We analyzed nine multigenerational families with ascertained affective spectrum disorders in northern Sweden's geographically isolated population of Västerbotten. This northern Swedish population, which originated from a limited number of early settlers ∼8,000 years ago, is genetically more homogeneous than outbred populations. In a genomewide linkage analysis, we identified three chromosomal loci with multipoint LOD scores (MPLOD) ⩾2 at 9q31.1-q34.1 (MPLOD 3.24), 6q22.2-q24.2 (MPLOD 2.48), and 2q33-q36 (MPLOD 2.26) under a recessive affected-only model. Follow-up genotyping with application of a 2-cM density simple-tandem-repeat (STR) map confirmed linkage at 9q31.1-q34.1 (MPLOD 3.22), 6q23-q24 (MPLOD 3.25), and 2q33-q36 (MPLOD 2.2). In an initial analysis aimed at identification of the underlying susceptibility genes, we focused our attention on the 9q locus. We fine mapped this region at a 200-kb STR density, with the result of an MPLOD of 3.70. Genealogical studies showed that three families linked to chromosome 9q descended from common founder couples ∼10 generations ago. In this ∼10-generation pedigree, a common ancestral haplotype was inherited by the patients, which reduced the 9q candidate region to 1.6 Mb. Further, the shared haplotype was observed in 4.2% of patients with bipolar disorder with alternating episodes of depression and mania, but it was not observed in control individuals in a patient-control sample from the Västerbotten isolate. These results suggest a susceptibility locus on 9q31-q33 for affective disorder in this common ancestral region. PMID:15614721

  14. Low penetrance breast cancer susceptibility loci are associated with specific breast tumor subtypes: findings from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Broeks, Annegien; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Sherman, Mark E.; Couch, Fergus J.; Hopper, John L.; Dite, Gillian S.; Apicella, Carmel; Smith, Letitia D.; Hammet, Fleur; Southey, Melissa C.; Van ’t Veer, Laura J.; de Groot, Renate; Smit, Vincent T.H.B.M.; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Jud, Sebastian; Ekici, Arif B.; Hartmann, Arndt; Hein, Alexander; Schulz-Wendtland, Ruediger; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sinn, Hans-Peter; Sohn, Christof; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Flyger, Henrik; Ørsted, David D.; Kaur-Knudsen, Diljit; Milne, Roger L.; Pérez, Jose I. Arias; Zamora, Pilar; Rodríguez, Primitiva Menéndez; Benítez, Javier; Brauch, Hiltrud; Justenhoven, Christina; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Hamann, Ute; Fischer, Hans-Peter; Brüning, Thomas; Pesch, Beate; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Bremer, Michael; Karstens, Johann H.; Hillemanns, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Nevanlinna, Heli A.; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Heikkilä, Päivi; Blomqvist, Carl; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Aaltonen, Kirsimari; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kauppinen, Jaana M.; Kataja, Vesa; Auvinen, Päivi; Eskelinen, Matti; Soini, Ylermi; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Holland, Helene; Lambrechts, Diether; Claes, Bart; Vandorpe, Thijs; Neven, Patrick; Wildiers, Hans; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Hein, Rebecca; Löning, Thomas; Kosel, Matthew; Fredericksen, Zachary S.; Wang, Xianshu; Giles, Graham G.; Baglietto, Laura; Severi, Gianluca; McLean, Catriona; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Le Marchand, Loic; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Grenaker Alnæs, Grethe; Kristensen, Vessela; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Hunter, David J.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Marie Mulligan, Anna; O'Malley, Frances P.; Devilee, Peter; Huijts, Petra E.A.; Tollenaar, Rob A.E.M.; Van Asperen, Christi J.; Seynaeve, Caroline S.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Brinton, Louise; Peplonska, Beata; Figueroa, Jonine; Yang, Xiaohong R.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Oldenburg, Rogier A.; Jager, Agnes; Kriege, Mieke; Ozturk, Bahar; van Leenders, Geert J.L.H.; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Humphreys, Keith; Liu, Jianjun; Cox, Angela; Connley, Daniel; Cramp, Helen E.; Cross, Simon S.; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy P.; Reed, Malcolm W.R.; Dunning, Alison M.; Easton, Douglas F.; Humphreys, Manjeet K.; Caldas, Carlos; Blows, Fiona; Driver, Kristy; Provenzano, Elena; Lubinski, Jan; Jakubowska, Anna; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Gorski, Bohdan; Gronwald, Jacek; Brennan, Paul; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Chen, Shou-Tung; Hsu, Giu-Cheng; Hou, Ming-Feng; Huang, Chiun-Sheng; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancers demonstrate substantial biological, clinical and etiological heterogeneity. We investigated breast cancer risk associations of eight susceptibility loci identified in GWAS and two putative susceptibility loci in candidate genes in relation to specific breast tumor subtypes. Subtypes were defined by five markers (ER, PR, HER2, CK5/6, EGFR) and other pathological and clinical features. Analyses included up to 30 040 invasive breast cancer cases and 53 692 controls from 31 studies within the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. We confirmed previous reports of stronger associations with ER+ than ER− tumors for six of the eight loci identified in GWAS: rs2981582 (10q26) (P-heterogeneity = 6.1 × 10−18), rs3803662 (16q12) (P = 3.7 × 10−5), rs13281615 (8q24) (P = 0.002), rs13387042 (2q35) (P = 0.006), rs4973768 (3p24) (P = 0.003) and rs6504950 (17q23) (P = 0.002). The two candidate loci, CASP8 (rs1045485, rs17468277) and TGFB1 (rs1982073), were most strongly related with the risk of PR negative tumors (P = 5.1 × 10−6 and P = 4.1 × 10−4, respectively), as previously suggested. Four of the eight loci identified in GWAS were associated with triple negative tumors (P ≤ 0.016): rs3803662 (16q12), rs889312 (5q11), rs3817198 (11p15) and rs13387042 (2q35); however, only two of them (16q12 and 2q35) were associated with tumors with the core basal phenotype (P ≤ 0.002). These analyses are consistent with different biological origins of breast cancers, and indicate that tumor stratification might help in the identification and characterization of novel risk factors for breast cancer subtypes. This may eventually result in further improvements in prevention, early detection and treatment. PMID:21596841

  15. Shared and Distinct Genetic Variants in Type 1 Diabetes and Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, Deborah J; Plagnol, Vincent; Walker, Neil M; Cooper, Jason D; Downes, Kate; Yang, Jennie HM; Howson, Joanna MM; Stevens, Helen; McManus, Ross; Wijmenga, Cisca; Heap, Graham A.; Dubois, Patrick C.; Clayton, David G.; Hunt, Karen A; van Heel, David A; Todd, John A

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND The inflammatory disorders type 1 diabetes (T1D) and celiac disease co-segregate in populations, suggesting a common genetic origin. Both are associated with the HLA class II genes on chromosome 6p21, and the present paper tested whether non-HLA loci are shared. METHODS We evaluated eight celiac disease risk loci in T1D by genotyping and statistical analyses of 8,064 T1D cases, 9,339 controls and 2,519 families. We also investigated 18 T1D loci in 2,560 celiac disease cases and 9,339 controls. RESULTS Three celiac disease loci, listed as chromosome/candidate gene: 1q31/RGS1, 2q12/IL18RAP and 6q25/TAGAP, were associated with T1D (P < 10−4). The 3p21/CCR5 32 base pair insertion/deletion variant was newly identified as a T1D locus (P = 1.81 × 10−8), and was also associated with celiac disease, as were 18p11/PTPN2 and 2q33/CTLA4, bringing the total loci shared to seven, including 12q24/SH2B3. The 2q12/IL18RAP and 6q25/TAGAP allele associations were in the opposite direction in T1D as compared to celiac disease. Distinct effects included 11p15/INS, 10p15/IL2RA and 1q13/PTPN22 in T1D and 3q25/IL12A and 3q28/LPP in celiac disease. CONCLUSIONS Genetic susceptibility to T1D and celiac disease shares common alleles. These data suggest that common biological mechanisms, such as autoimmunity related tissue damage and intolerance to dietary antigens may be a feature of T1D. PMID:19073967

  16. Evidence for Cation-Controlled Excited-State Localization in a Ruthenium Polypyridyl Compound.

    PubMed

    Beauvilliers, Evan E; Meyer, Gerald J

    2016-08-01

    The visible absorption and photoluminescence (PL) properties of the four neutral ruthenium diimine compounds [Ru(bpy)2(dcb)] (B2B), [Ru(dtb)2(dcb)] (D2B), [Ru(bpy)2(dcbq)] (B2Q), and [Ru(dtb)2(dcbq)] (D2Q), where bpy is 2,2'-bipyridine, dcb is 4,4'-(CO2(-))2-bpy, dtb is 4,4'-(tert-butyl)2-bpy, and dcbq is 4,4'-(CO2(-))2-2,2'-biquinoline, are reported in the presence of Lewis acidic cations present in fluid solutions at room temperature. In methanol solutions, the measured spectra were insensitive to the presence of these cations, while in acetonitrile a significant red shift in the PL spectra (≤1400 cm(-1)) was observed consistent with stabilization of the metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) excited state through Lewis acid-base adduct formation. No significant spectral changes were observed in control experiments with the tetrabutylammonium cation. Titration data with Li(+), Na(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Zn(2+), Al(3+), Y(3+), and La(3+) showed that the extent of stabilization saturated at high cation concentration with magnitudes that scaled roughly with the cation charge-to-size ratio. The visible absorption spectra of D2Q was particularly informative due to the presence of two well-resolved MLCT absorption bands: (1) Ru → bpy, λmax ≈ 450 nm; and (2) Ru → dcbq, λmax ≈ 540 nm. The higher-energy band blue-shifted and the lower-energy band red-shifted upon cation addition. The PL intensity and lifetime of the excited state of B2B first increased with cation addition without significant shifts in the measured spectra, behavior attributed to a cation-induced change in the localization of the emissive excited state from bpy to dcb. The importance of excited-state localization and stabilization for solar energy conversion is discussed.

  17. Non-hamiltonian 3-connected cubic planar graphs with only two types of faces besides 4-gons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, Siew-Hui; Abidin, Nornadia Zainal

    2015-10-01

    Let G(p,q,r) denote the class of all 3-connected cubic planar graphs whose faces are of only three types, namely p-gon, q-gon and r-gon. Here, we show that there exist non-hamiltonian members for the following classes of graphs: (i) G(3,4,r) for r ≥ 7, (ii) G(4,5,r) for r ≥ 8, (iii) G(4,q,r) for q ∈ {7,9,11} and r ≥ 6 and (iv) G(4,q,q + 5) and G(4,q,q + 2,q + 5) for q ≥ 5.

  18. Tsallis entropy and entanglement constraints in multiqubit systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jeong San

    2010-06-15

    We show that the restricted shareability and distribution of multiqubit entanglement can be characterized by Tsallis-q entropy. We first provide a class of bipartite entanglement measures named Tsallis-q entanglement, and provide its analytic formula in two-qubit systems for 1{<=}q{<=}4. For 2{<=}q{<=}3, we show a monogamy inequality of multiqubit entanglement in terms of Tsallis-q entanglement, and we also provide a polygamy inequality using Tsallis-q entropy for 1{<=}q{<=}2 and 3{<=}q{<=}4.

  19. Ring 2 chromosome associated with failure to thrive, microcephaly and dysmorphic facial features.

    PubMed

    López-Uriarte, Arelí; Quintero-Rivera, Fabiola; de la Fuente Cortez, Beatriz; Puente, Viviana Gómez; Campos, María Del Roble Velazco; de Villarreal, Laura E Martínez

    2013-10-15

    We report here a child with a ring chromosome 2 [r(2)] associated with failure to thrive, microcephaly and dysmorphic features. The chromosomal aberration was defined by chromosome microarray analysis, revealing two small deletions of 2p25.3 (139 kb) and 2q37.3 (147 kb). We show the clinical phenotype of the patient, using a conventional approach and the molecular cytogenetics of a male with a history of prenatal intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), failure to thrive, microcephaly and dysmorphic facial features. The phenotype is very similar to that reported in other clinical cases with ring chromosome 2. PMID:23895799

  20. The algebra of supertraces for 2+1 super de Sitter gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urrutia, L. F.; Waelbroeck, H.; Zertuche, F.

    1993-01-01

    The algebra of the observables for 2+1 super de Sitter gravity, for one genus of the spatial surface is calculated. The algebra turns out to be an infinite Lie algebra subject to non-linear constraints. The constraints are solved explicitly in terms of five independent complex supertraces. These variables are the true degrees of freedom of the system and their quantized algebra generates a new structure which is referred to as a 'central extension' of the quantum algebra SU(2)q.

  1. In vitro monodisperse aerosol deposition in a mouth and throat with six different inhalation devices.

    PubMed

    DeHaan, W H; Finlay, W H

    2001-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the effect of different pharmaceutical aerosol inhalation devices on the deposition of monodisperse aerosols in an idealized mouth and throat geometry. The devices included two dry powder inhalers (Diskus and Turbuhaler), two nebulizers (Pari LC STAR and Hudson T-Updraft), and a metered dose inhaler with attached holding chamber (Aerochamber), in addition to a straight tube (1.7 cm inner diameter). Aerosol particles (DL-alpha tocopheryl acetate) of diameters of 2.5, 5, and 7 microm generated by a vibrating orifice generator were inhaled at steady air flow rates of Q = 5-90 L/min through the devices and into the mouth-throat. Deposition in the mouth-throat and after-filter were determined by ultraviolet (UV) spectrophotometric assay. The amount of deposition in the mouth and throat region was found to depend on the type of device that the aerosol entered through. Deposition in the extrathoracic region with the two types of jet nebulizers did not differ significantly (p > 0.1) from that of a straight tube or each other over their entire tested range of 590 > or = pd2Q > or = 11,375, where p is particle density (in g/cm3), d is particle diameter (in microm), and Q is flow rate (in cm3/s). The metered dose inhaler with attached holding chamber was found to differ from the straight tube only at two intermediate values of pd2Q = 5,145 and 16,033. The deposition occurring for the dry powder inhalers was found to be significantly greater than for the straight tube for all values of pd2Q > or = 10,954 for the Diskus and pd2Q > or = 9,435 for the Turbuhaler. Deposition with the dry powder inhalers was found to be up to 14 times greater than that with the straight tube. Thus, the inhaler geometry that the aerosol passes through prior to entering the mouth and throat region can greatly affect the deposition in the mouth-throat.

  2. An improved AFS phase for AdS3 string integrability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, Michael C.; Aniceto, Inês

    2015-04-01

    We propose a number of modifications to the classical term in the dressing phase for integrable strings in AdS3 ×S3 ×S3 ×S1, and check these against existing perturbative calculations, crossing symmetry, and the semiclassical limit of the Bethe equations. The principal change is that the phase for different masses should start with a term Q1Q2, like the one-loop AdS3 dressing phase, rather than Q2Q3 as for the original AdS5 AFS phase.

  3. De novo translocation involving chromosomes 1 and 4 resulting in partial duplication of 4q and partial deletion of 1p

    SciTech Connect

    Legare, J.M.; Sekhon, G.S.; Laxova, R.

    1994-11-15

    We describe an infant boy with a unique de novo translocation involving chromosomes 1 and 4, resulting in dup(4q) and del(1p). His karyotype was 46,XY,-1,+der(1)t(1;4) (p36.2;q31.2). He had minor anomalies, congenital heart defect, respiratory distress, seizures, and central nervous system abnormalities. He died at age 11 weeks. The patient had manifestations of dup(4q) del(1p), and he was more seriously affected than patients having only one of these. No other patient with an identical chromosomal finding has been reported. 27 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Chromosomal localization of murine and human oligodendrocyte-specific protein genes

    SciTech Connect

    Bronstein, J.M.; Wu, S.; Korenberg, J.R.

    1996-06-01

    Oligodendrocyte-specific protein (OSP) is a recently described protein present only in myelin of the central nervous system. Several inherited disorders of myelin are caused by mutations in myelin genes but the etiology of many remain unknown. We mapped the location of the mouse OSP gene to the proximal region of chromosome 3 using two sets of multilocus crosses and to human chromosome 3 using somatic cell hybrids. Fine mapping with fluorescence in situ hybridization placed the OSP gene at human chromosome 3q26.2-q26.3. To date, there are no known inherited neurological disorders that localize to these regions. 24 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Superposition of super-integrable pseudo-Euclidean potentials in N = 2 with a fundamental constant of motion of arbitrary order in the momenta

    SciTech Connect

    Campoamor-Stursberg, R.

    2014-04-15

    It is shown that for any α,β∈R and k∈Z, the Hamiltonian H{sub k}=p{sub 1}p{sub 2}−αq{sub 2}{sup (2k+1)}q{sub 1}{sup (−2k−3)}−(β)/2 q{sub 2}{sup k}q{sub 1}{sup (−k−2)} is super-integrable, possessing fundamental constants of motion of degrees 2 and 2k + 2 in the momenta.

  6. Investigation of the paramagnetic phase of bcc iron using polarized neutron scattering. [Fe (4%-Si)

    SciTech Connect

    Wicksted, J.P.; Shirane, G.; Steinsvoll, O.

    1983-01-01

    Recent neutron scattering experiments on Ni and Fe (4%-Si) above T/sub c/ have demonstrated that a simple paramagnetic scattering function S(Q..omega..) proportional to 1/(kappa/sub 1//sup 2/ + q/sup 2/).GAMMA/(GAMMA/sup 2/ + ..omega../sup 2/) can explain the persistent spin wave ridges previously reported by Lynn and Mook. We present our new polarized beam results on pure Fe and describe in some detail the special problems associated with the unpolarized beam studies of magnetic cross sections at high temperatures.

  7. Nondiagonal parton distributions at small x

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankfurt, L. L.; Freund, A.; Guzey, V.; Strikman, M.

    1997-04-01

    In this paper we make predictions for nondiagonal parton distributions in a proton in the LLA. We calculate the DGLAP-type evolution kernels in the LLA, solve the nondiagonal GLAP evolution equations with a modified version of the CTEQ-package and comment on the range of applicability of the LLA in the asymmetric regime. We show that the nondiagonal gluon distribution x2G(x1,x2,Q2) can be well approximated at small x by the conventional gluon density xG(x,Q2) and explain that the cross sections of hard diffractive processes are determined by x2G(x1,x2).

  8. Small terminal deletions of the long arm of chromosome 2: Two new cases

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A.M.; Ellis, K.H.; Browne, C.E.; Barber, J.C.K.; Barker, M.; Kennedy, C.R.; Foley, H.; Patton, M.A.

    1994-12-01

    We report on 2 girls with small de novo terminal deletions of the long arm of chromosome 2 and breakpoints within q37. Four cases with similar or more extensive deletions have been previously reported in full. Hypotonia and psychomotor retardation were the only manifestations common to all 6 cases. The phenotype associated with small terminal 2q deletions is variable and clearly not always as mild as indicated in previous reports. The abnormality may also be more common than has been assumed. 12 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Study on the effect of the impeller and diffuser blade number on reactor coolant pump performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Y.; Yin, J. L.; Wang, D. Z.; Li, T. B.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, CFD approach was employed to study how the blade number of impeller and diffuser influences reactor coolant pump performances. The three-dimensional pump internal flow channel was modelled by pro/E software, Reynolds-averaged Naiver-Stokes equations with the k-ε turbulence model were solved by the computational fluid dynamics software CFX. By post-processing on the numerical results, the performance curves of reactor coolant pump were obtained. The results are as follows, with the blade number of the impeller increasing, the head of the pump with different diffuser universally increases in the 8Q n∼1.2Q n conditions, and at different blade number of the diffuser, the head increases with the blade number of the impeller increasing. In 1.0Q n condition, when the blades number combination of impeller and diffuser chooses 4+16, 7+14 and 6+18, the head curves exist singular points. In 1.2Q n condition, the head curve still exists singular point in 6+18. With the blade number of the impeller increasing, the efficiency of the pump with different diffuser universally decreases in the 0.8Q n and 1.0Q n conditions, but in 1.2Q n condition, the efficiency of the pump with different diffuser universally increases. In 1.0Q n condition, the impellers of 4 and 5 blades are better. When the blade number combination of impeller and diffuser choose 4+11, 4+17, 4+18, 5+12, 5+17 and 5+18, the efficiencies relatively have higher values. With the blade number of the impeller increasing, the hydraulic shaft power of the pump with different diffuser universally increases in the 0.8Q n∼1.2Q n conditions, and with the blade number of the diffuser increasing, the power of different impeller overall has small fluctuation, but tends to be uniform. This means the increase of the diffuser blade number has less influence on shaft power.The influence on the head and flow by the matching relationship of the blades number between impeller and diffuser is very complicated, which

  10. From decay to complete breaking: pulling the strings in SU(2) Yang-Mills theory.

    PubMed

    Pepe, M; Wiese, U-J

    2009-05-15

    We study {2Q+1} strings connecting two static charges Q in (2+1)D SU(2) Yang-Mills theory. While the fundamental {2} string between two charges Q=1/2 is unbreakable, the adjoint {3} string connecting two charges Q=1 can break. When a {4} string is stretched beyond a critical length, it decays into a {2} string by gluon pair creation. When a {5} string is stretched, it first decays into a {3} string, which eventually breaks completely. The energy of the screened charges at the ends of a string is well described by a phenomenological constituent gluon model.

  11. Entanglement dynamics of spin systems in pure states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furman, G. B.; Meerovich, V. M.; Sokolovsky, V. L.

    2009-09-01

    We investigate numerically the appearance and evolution of entanglement in spin systems prepared initially in a pure state. We consider the dipolar coupling spin systems of different molecular structures: benzene C6H6 , cyclopentane C5H10 , sodium butyrate CH3(CH2)2CO2Na , and calcium hydroxyapatite Ca5(OH)(PO4)3 . Numerical simulations show that the close relationship exists between the intensity of second order (2Q) coherences and concurrences of nearest spins in a cyclopentane molecule.

  12. New results from the studies of the Ν (1440) 1/2+, Ν (1520) 3/2–, and Δ (1620) 1/2– resonances in exclusive ep → e'p'π+π– electroproduction with the CLAS detector

    DOE PAGES

    Mokeev, Viktor I.; Burkert, Volker D.; Carman, Daniel S.; Elouadrhiri, Latifa; Fedotov, Gleb V.; Golovatch, Evgeny N.; Gothe, Ralf W.; Hicks, Ken; Ishkhanov, Boris S.; Isupov, Evgeny L.; et al

    2016-02-25

    In this study, the transition helicity amplitudes from the proton ground state to the N(1440)1/2+, N(1520)3/2–, and Δ(1620)1/2– resonances (γvpN* electrocouplings) were determined from the analysis of nine independent onefold differential π+π–p electroproduction cross sections off a proton target, taken with CLAS at photon virtualities 0.5GeV2 < Q2 < 1.5 GeV2. The phenomenological reaction model employed for separation of the resonant and nonresonant contributions to this exclusive channel was further developed.

  13. From decay to complete breaking: pulling the strings in SU(2) Yang-Mills theory.

    PubMed

    Pepe, M; Wiese, U-J

    2009-05-15

    We study {2Q+1} strings connecting two static charges Q in (2+1)D SU(2) Yang-Mills theory. While the fundamental {2} string between two charges Q=1/2 is unbreakable, the adjoint {3} string connecting two charges Q=1 can break. When a {4} string is stretched beyond a critical length, it decays into a {2} string by gluon pair creation. When a {5} string is stretched, it first decays into a {3} string, which eventually breaks completely. The energy of the screened charges at the ends of a string is well described by a phenomenological constituent gluon model. PMID:19518940

  14. Unstable flip-flopping spinning binary black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lousto, Carlos O.; Healy, James

    2016-06-01

    We provide a unified description of the flip-flop and the antialignment instability effects in spinning black hole binaries in terms of real and imaginary flip-flop frequencies. We find that this instability is only effective for mass ratios 0.5 2;q ). This restricts the priors of parameter estimation techniques for the observation of gravitational waves from quasialigned spinning binary black holes and it is relevant for their astrophysical modeling and final recoil computations.

  15. Recombinant chromosome 18 resulting from a maternal pericentric inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Ayukawa, Hiroshi; Tsukahara, Masato; Fukuda, Masamichi; Kondoh, Osamu

    1994-05-01

    We report on a newborn girl with duplication of 18q12.2{yields}18 qter and deficiency of 18p11.2{yields}18pter which resulted from meiotic recombination of the maternal pericentric inversion, inv(18)(p11.2q12.2). Her clinical manifestations were compatible with those of partial trisomy 18q syndrome. We review the previously reported 9 cases in 8 families of rec(18) resulting from recombination of a parental pericentric inversion. 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Valence quark contributions for the gamma N -> P11(1440) transition

    SciTech Connect

    G. Ramalho, K. Tsushima

    2011-03-01

    A covariant spectator quark model is applied to estimate the valence quark contributions to the$ F1*(Q2) and F2*(Q2) transition form factors for the gamma N -> P11(1440) reaction. The Roper resonance, P11(1440), is assumed to be the first radial excitation of the nucleon. The model requires no extra parameters except for those already fixed by the previous studies for the nucleon. The results are consistent with the experimental data in the high Q2 region, and those from the lattice QCD. Finally the model is also applied to estimate the meson cloud contributions from the CLAS and MAID analysis.

  17. Valence quark contributions for the gamma N -> P11(1440) form factors

    SciTech Connect

    Gilberto Ramalho, Kazuo Tsushima

    2010-04-01

    Using a covariant spectator quark model we estimate valence quark contributions to the F_1*(Q2) and F2*(Q2) transition form factors for the gamma N -> P11(1440) reaction. The Roper resonance, P11(1440), is assumed to be the first radial excitation of the nucleon. The present model requires no extra parameters except for those already fixed by the previous studies for the nucleon. Our results are consistent with the experimental data in the high Q2 region, and those from lattice QCD. We also estimate the meson cloud contributions, focusing on the low Q2 region, where they are expected to be dominant.

  18. Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva in South Africa: difficulties in management in a developing country.

    PubMed

    Scott, Chris; Urban, Mike; Arendse, Regan; Dandara, Collet; Beighton, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva is a rare genetic disorder in which progressive ossification of connective tissue leads to severe disability. The condition is an autosomal dominant trait, and most of the affected persons represent new mutations for the determinant gene, ACVR1, chromosomal locus 2q23-24. Although fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva has a worldwide distribution, there are only a few reports of affected persons of indigenous African stock. We studied and documented 3 affected individuals in the African (Xhosa) community from South Africa. In addition to describing the manifestations and natural history of the disorder in Africa, we discuss the challenge of management of this condition in the South African context.

  19. The fibulin-1 gene (FBLN1) is located on human chromosome 22 and on mouse chromosome 15

    SciTech Connect

    Mattei, M.G.; Pan, T.C.; Zhang, R.Z.

    1994-07-15

    Fibulin-1 is a calcium-binding glycoprotein present in the extracellular matrix and in the serum. The gene coding for fibulin-1 (FBLN1) was located by in situ hybridization of {sup 3}H-labeled cDNA probes to human and mouse metaphase chromosomes. The gene was assigned to the q13.2-q13.3 region of human chromosome 22 and to the E-F band of mouse chromosome 15. The finding extends the evolutionary conservation between human chromosome 22 and mouse chromosome 15. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Recurrent proximal 18p monosomy and 18q trisomy in a family due to a pericentric inversion.

    PubMed

    Zamani, Ayse Gul; Acar, Aynur; Durakbasi-Dursun, Gul; Yildirim, M Selman; Ceylaner, Serdar; Tuncez, Ebru

    2014-05-01

    Here, we report on a family with pericentric inversion of chromosome 18 [inv(18)(p11.2q21)] and two recombinants with a duplication of q21 → qter and a deletion of p11.2 → pter regions in a four-generation family. This chromosomal abnormality was inherited in our first patient from the father, while it was transmitted to the second patient from the mother. Array-CGH analysis were used to better characterize duplicated and deleted chromosomal regions and showed no genomic copy number variation (CNV) differences between these two relatives. We discussed genotype-phenotype correlations including previously reported.

  1. Identity-by-descent approaches identify regions of importance for genetic susceptibility to hereditary esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ko, Josephine My; Zhang, Peng; Law, Simon; Fan, Yanhui; Song, You-Qiang; Zhao, Xue Ke; Wong, Elibe H W; Tang, Sa; Song, Xin; Lung, Maria Li; Wang, Li Dong

    2014-08-01

    Worldwide, the highest prevalence of esophageal cancer (EC) occurs in Northern China. High-density SNP arrays allow identification of identity-by-descent (IBD) segments in genomic DNAs representative of shared common ancestral regions. We utilized IBD approaches to map susceptibility loci associated with low-penetrance SNPs in high-risk Henan hereditary esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) patients. Affymetrix GeneChip Human mapping SNP array IBD analysis was performed in 32 Henan family history-positive (FH+) ESCC patients, 18 Henan healthy unrelated individuals, and 45 Chinese individuals from a CHB HapMap dataset using PLink (scoring IBD segments individually) and Beagle (scoring of shared IBD segments among case/case vs. control/control pairs) software. Both analyses identified longer IBD segment lengths associated with FH+ ESCC compared to controls. However, there was no strong evidence for a genetic founder effect. Pairing IBD analysis with BEAGLE identified 8 critical IBD segments residing at 2q32.1-q32.2, 3p22.3-p22.2, 4q21.1-q21.21, 7p22.2, 8q23.2-q23.3, 10q23.33-q24.1, 14q24.3 and 16q11.2-q12.1, which were more significantly shared among case/case compared to control/control. The shared IBD segments in FH+ ESCC samples with no overlap with control/CHB Hapmap may encompass potential cancer susceptibility loci. Selected targeted genes, PLCE1, GPT2, SIAH1 and CYP2C-18, residing within the IBD segments at 10q23.33-q24.1 and 16q11.2-q12.1, had statistically significant differential expression in primary ESCC tissues and are likely involved in ESCC carcinogenesis. The importance of these IBD segments to the etiology and development of ESCC in high-risk areas requires further study with expanded sample sizes. This is the first report employing the pairing IBD approach for elucidation of the genetic basis of hereditary ESCC in Henan by applying high throughput SNP array analysis.

  2. Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Studies in MICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, S.; Rhadakrishna, S.; Marino, R. A.

    1986-02-01

    Aluminum-27 NQR transitions were detected in Muscovite Mica at room temperature using double resonance by level crossing (DRLC) techniques. Three lines were observed with frequencies of 572.5, 1052.0, and 1624.5 kHz. These lines are assigned to the octahedrally coordinated site, AlO4(OH)2. The corresponding quadrupole coupling constant, e2q Q/h, and asymmetry parameter, η, are 3554.8 kHz and 0.265, respectively. The remaining tetrahedrally coordinated sites, AlO4, gave no discernible signal, perhaps due to the greater 27Al- 1H distance.

  3. Deletion of the long arm of chromosome 6: two new patients and literature review.

    PubMed

    Evers, L J; Schrander-Stumpel, C T; Engelen, J J; Hoorntje, T M; Pulles-Heintzberger, C F; Schrander, J J; Albrechts, J C; Peters, J; Fryns, J P

    1996-09-01

    Two children with a partial monosomy 6q are reported: a girl with an interstitial deletion [46,XX,del(6)(q16.2q23.1)], and a boy with a terminal deletion [46,XY,del(6)(q25.1)]. Both children presented with developmental delay, facial dysmorphism and a cardiac defect. The patients have been studied using G banding and cosmid probes specific for the long arm of chromosome 6. Clinical data are compared with patients reported in the literature.

  4. Bose-Einstein correlations in e/sup +/e/sup -/ collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Juricic, I.

    1987-12-01

    The MARK II detector is used to study the Bose-Einstein correlation between pairs and triplets of charged pions produced in hadronic decays of the J)psi), the ..sqrt..s = 4 to 7 GeV continuum above the J)psi), two photon events at ..sqrt..s = 29 GeV, and e/sup )plus/)e/sup )minus/) annihilation events at ..sqrt..s = 29 GeV as a function of Q/sup 2/, the four-momentum transfer squared. After corrections for Coulomb effects and pion misidentification, we find a nearly full Bose-Einstein enhancement ..cap alpha.. in the J)psi) and the two photon data and about half the maximum value in the other two data sets. The radius parameter )tau)(an average over space and time) given by pion pair analyses lies within a band of +-0.10 fm around 0.73 fm and is the same, within errors, for all four data sets. Pion triplet analyses also give a consistent radius of approx. 0.54 fm. fits to two-dimensional distributions R(q/sub T//sup 2/, q/sub C//sup 2/) of invariant components of Q/sup 2/ = q/sub T//sup 2/ )plus) q/sub C//sup 2/ give )tau)/sub T/ approx. )tau)C approx. )tau), where q/sub T/ is the transverse three-momentum difference calculated with respect to the net pair three-momentum, and q/sub C/ is in effect the longitudinal three-momentum difference in the pion pair rest frame. When q/sub T/ is calculated with respect to the jet axis for two-jet events in the e/sup )plus/)e/sup )minus/) annihilation data at ..sqrt..s = 29 GeV, a fit to R(q/sub T//sup 2/, q/sub C//sup 2/) also gives )tau)/sub T/ approx. )tau)/sub C/ approx. )tau). Noting that q/sub L/ and q/sub 0/ are not invariant, we make fits to R(/sub T//sup T/, q/sub L//sup 2/) and to R(q/sub T//sup 2/, q/sub 0//sup 2/) (Kopylov formulation), and we find )tau)/sub 0/ approx. )tau)/sub L/ approx. )23))tau)/sub T/ to )12))tau)/sub T/. 44 refs., 43 figs., 15 tabs

  5. Measurement of the cross-section ratio σψ(2S)/σJ/ψ(1S) in deep inelastic exclusive ep scattering at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Antonelli, S.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Bertolin, A.; Bloch, I.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Brock, I.; Brook, N. H.; Brugnera, R.; Bruni, A.; Bussey, P. J.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Catterall, C. D.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Dementiev, R. K.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dolinska, G.; Dusini, S.; Figiel, J.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Hain, W.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ishitsuka, M.; Iudin, A.; Januschek, F.; Jomhari, N. Z.; Kadenko, I.; Kananov, S.; Karshon, U.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Kisielewska, D.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Krupa, B.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Mohammad Nasir, N.; Myronenko, V.; Nagano, K.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Paul, E.; Perlański, W.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Przybycień, M.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shevchenko, R.; Shkola, O.; Shyrma, Yu.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Solano, A.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stopa, P.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tassi, E.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Trofymov, A.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.; Wolf, G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2016-08-01

    The exclusive deep inelastic electroproduction of ψ (2 S) and J / ψ (1 S) at an ep centre-of-mass energy of 317 GeV has been studied with the ZEUS detector at HERA in the kinematic range 2 <Q2 < 80 GeV2, 30 < W < 210 GeV and | t | < 1 GeV2, where Q2 is the photon virtuality, W is the photon-proton centre-of-mass energy and t is the squared four-momentum transfer at the proton vertex. The data for 2 <Q2 < 5 GeV2 were taken in the HERA I running period and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 114 pb-1. The data for 5

  6. Mitochondrial impairments contribute to Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 progression and can be ameliorated by the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant MitoQ.

    PubMed

    Stucki, David M; Ruegsegger, Céline; Steiner, Silvio; Radecke, Julika; Murphy, Michael P; Zuber, Benoît; Saxena, Smita

    2016-08-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1), due to an unstable polyglutamine expansion within the ubiquitously expressed Ataxin-1 protein, leads to the premature degeneration of Purkinje cells (PCs), decreasing motor coordination and causing death within 10-15 years of diagnosis. Currently, there are no therapies available to slow down disease progression. As secondary cellular impairments contributing to SCA1 progression are poorly understood, here, we focused on identifying those processes by performing a PC specific proteome profiling of Sca1(154Q/2Q) mice at a symptomatic stage. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed prominent alterations in mitochondrial proteins. Immunohistochemical and serial block-face scanning electron microscopy analyses confirmed that PCs underwent age-dependent alterations in mitochondrial morphology. Moreover, colorimetric assays demonstrated impairment of the electron transport chain complexes (ETC) and decrease in ATPase activity. Subsequently, we examined whether the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant MitoQ could restore mitochondrial dysfunction and prevent SCA1-associated pathology in Sca1(154Q/2Q) mice. MitoQ treatment both presymptomatically and when symptoms were evident ameliorated mitochondrial morphology and restored the activities of the ETC complexes. Notably, MitoQ slowed down the appearance of SCA1-linked neuropathology such as lack of motor coordination as well as prevented oxidative stress-induced DNA damage and PC loss. Our work identifies a central role for mitochondria in PC degeneration in SCA1 and provides evidence for the supportive use of mitochondria-targeted therapeutics in slowing down disease progression. PMID:27394174

  7. Follow-up to genome-wide linkage and admixture mapping studies implicates components of the extracellular matrix in susceptibility to and size of uterine fibroids

    PubMed Central

    Aissani, Brahim; Zhang, Kui; Wiener, Howard

    2014-01-01

    Objective To conduct a follow-up association mapping to independent genome-wide linkage and admixture mapping studies of uterine leiomyoma. Design Case-control study. Setting Cross sectional study. Patients A total of 1,045 premenopausal North American women participants to the NIEHS uterine fibroid study. Intervention(s) None. Main Outcome Measure(s) We genotyped 2,772 single nucleotide polymorphisms from candidate genes located in peaks from linkage mapping (2q37, 3p21, 5p13, 10p11, 11p15, 12q14, 17q25) or admixture linkage disequilibrium mapping (2q37, 4p16.1, 10q26) and reported to have regulated expression in uterine fibroids. Results We report significant associations of variant members of the collagen gene family with the risk and tumor size, including missense variants in COL6A3 and COL13A, with replications in the African and European American study groups. Furthermore, the cell-matrix Rho GTPase-encoding ARHGAP26 gene and MAN1C1, a gene encoding a Golgi mannosidase involved in the maturation of procollagens emerged as new candidate UL genes affecting both the risk and tumor size. Conclusion Our data converge onto a model of UL pathogenesis possibly resulting from altered regulation, maintenance and/or renewal of the extracellular matrix. PMID:25455875

  8. Identification of four novel susceptibility loci for oestrogen receptor negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Couch, Fergus J.; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Mendoza-Fandino, Gustavo A.; Nord, Silje; Lilyquist, Janna; Olswold, Curtis; Hallberg, Emily; Agata, Simona; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Ambrosone, Christine; Andrulis, Irene L.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Arun, Banu K.; Arver, Brita; Barile, Monica; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Barrowdale, Daniel; Beckmann, Lars; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Benitez, Javier; Blank, Stephanie V.; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Burwinkel, Barbara; Buys, Saundra S.; Caldes, Trinidad; Caligo, Maria A.; Canzian, Federico; Carpenter, Jane; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J.; Chung, Wendy K.; Claes, Kathleen B. M.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Czene, Kamila; Daly, Mary B.; Damiola, Francesca; Darabi, Hatef; de la Hoya, Miguel; Devilee, Peter; Diez, Orland; Ding, Yuan C.; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Domchek, Susan M.; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dumont, Martine; Dunning, Alison M.; Eccles, Diana M.; Ehrencrona, Hans; Ekici, Arif B.; Eliassen, Heather; Ellis, Steve; Fasching, Peter A.; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Försti, Asta; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D.; Friebel, Tara; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Gabrielson, Marike; Gammon, Marilie D.; Ganz, Patricia A.; Gapstur, Susan M.; Garber, Judy; Gaudet, Mia M.; Gayther, Simon A.; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ghoussaini, Maya; Giles, Graham G.; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K.; Goldberg, Mark S.; Goldgar, David E.; González-Neira, Anna; Greene, Mark H.; Gronwald, Jacek; Guénel, Pascal; Gunter, Marc; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Hart, Steven; Healey, Sue; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Henderson, Brian E.; Herzog, Josef; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hoover, Robert N.; Hopper, John L.; Humphreys, Keith; Hunter, David J.; Huzarski, Tomasz; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Isaacs, Claudine; Jakubowska, Anna; James, Paul; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M.; Jones, Michael; Kabisch, Maria; Kar, Siddhartha; Karlan, Beth Y.; Khan, Sofia; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kibriya, Muhammad G.; Knight, Julia A.; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kristensen, Vessela; Kwong, Ava; Laitman, Yael; Lambrechts, Diether; Lazaro, Conxi; Lee, Eunjung; Le Marchand, Loic; Lester, Jenny; Lindblom, Annika; Lindor, Noralane; Lindstrom, Sara; Liu, Jianjun; Long, Jirong; Lubinski, Jan; Mai, Phuong L.; Makalic, Enes; Malone, Kathleen E.; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Martens, John W. M.; McGuffog, Lesley; Meindl, Alfons; Miller, Austin; Milne, Roger L.; Miron, Penelope; Montagna, Marco; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Mulligan, Anna M.; Muranen, Taru A.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Offit, Kenneth; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Olson, Janet E.; Osorio, Ana; Park, Sue K.; Peeters, Petra H.; Peissel, Bernard; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Phelan, Catherine M.; Pilarski, Robert; Poppe, Bruce; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rahman, Nazneen; Rantala, Johanna; Rappaport, Christine; Rennert, Gad; Richardson, Andrea; Robson, Mark; Romieu, Isabelle; Rudolph, Anja; Rutgers, Emiel J.; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Santella, Regina M.; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Scott, Rodney; Senter, Leigha; Sharma, Priyanka; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F.; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa; Steinemann, Doris; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Swerdlow, Anthony; Szabo, Csilla I.; Tamimi, Rulla; Tapper, William; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary B.; Thomassen, Mads; Thompson, Deborah; Tihomirova, Laima; Toland, Amanda E.; Tollenaar, Robert A. E. M.; Tomlinson, Ian; Truong, Thérèse; Tsimiklis, Helen; Teulé, Alex; Tumino, Rosario; Tung, Nadine; Turnbull, Clare; Ursin, Giski; van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wang, Zhaoming; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Whittemore, Alice; Wildiers, Hans; Winqvist, Robert; Yang, Xiaohong R.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Yao, Song; Zamora, M Pilar; Zheng, Wei; Hall, Per; Kraft, Peter; Vachon, Celine; Slager, Susan; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Monteiro, Alvaro A. N.; García-Closas, Montserrat; Easton, Douglas F.; Antoniou, Antonis C.

    2016-01-01

    Common variants in 94 loci have been associated with breast cancer including 15 loci with genome-wide significant associations (P<5 × 10−8) with oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer and BRCA1-associated breast cancer risk. In this study, to identify new ER-negative susceptibility loci, we performed a meta-analysis of 11 genome-wide association studies (GWAS) consisting of 4,939 ER-negative cases and 14,352 controls, combined with 7,333 ER-negative cases and 42,468 controls and 15,252 BRCA1 mutation carriers genotyped on the iCOGS array. We identify four previously unidentified loci including two loci at 13q22 near KLF5, a 2p23.2 locus near WDR43 and a 2q33 locus near PPIL3 that display genome-wide significant associations with ER-negative breast cancer. In addition, 19 known breast cancer risk loci have genome-wide significant associations and 40 had moderate associations (P<0.05) with ER-negative disease. Using functional and eQTL studies we implicate TRMT61B and WDR43 at 2p23.2 and PPIL3 at 2q33 in ER-negative breast cancer aetiology. All ER-negative loci combined account for ∼11% of familial relative risk for ER-negative disease and may contribute to improved ER-negative and BRCA1 breast cancer risk prediction. PMID:27117709

  9. Enhanced inhibition of prostate cancer xenograft tumor growth by combining quercetin and green tea.

    PubMed

    Wang, Piwen; Vadgama, Jaydutt V; Said, Jonathan W; Magyar, Clara E; Doan, Ngan; Heber, David; Henning, Susanne M

    2014-01-01

    The chemopreventive activity of green tea (GT) is limited by the low bioavailability and extensive methylation of GT polyphenols (GTPs) in vivo. We determined whether a methylation inhibitor quercetin (Q) will enhance the chemoprevention of prostate cancer in vivo. Androgen-sensitive LAPC-4 prostate cancer cells were injected subcutaneously into severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice one week before the intervention. The concentration of GTPs in brewed tea administered as drinking water was 0.07% and Q was supplemented in diet at 0.2% or 0.4%. After 6-weeks of intervention tumor growth was inhibited by 3% (0.2% Q), 15% (0.4% Q), 21% (GT), 28% (GT+0.2% Q) and 45% (GT+0.4% Q) compared to control. The concentration of non-methylated GTPs was significantly increased in tumor tissue with GT+0.4% Q treatment compared to GT alone, and was associated with a decreased protein expression of catechol-O-methyltransferase and multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP)-1. The combination treatment was also associated with a significant increase in the inhibition of proliferation, androgen receptor and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt signaling, and stimulation of apoptosis. The combined effect of GT+0.4% Q on tumor inhibition was further confirmed in another experiment where the intervention started prior to tumor inoculation. These results provide a novel regimen by combining GT and Q to improve chemoprevention in a non-toxic manner and warrant future studies in humans.

  10. Genome-wide association study and targeted metabolomics identifies sex-specific association of CPS1 with coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Hartiala, Jaana A.; Wilson Tang, W. H.; Wang, Zeneng; Crow, Amanda L.; Stewart, Alexandre F. R.; Roberts, Robert; McPherson, Ruth; Erdmann, Jeanette; Willenborg, Christina; Hazen, Stanley L.; Allayee, Hooman

    2016-01-01

    Metabolites derived from dietary choline and L-carnitine, such as trimethylamine N-oxide and betaine, have recently been identified as novel risk factors for atherosclerosis in mice and humans. We sought to identify genetic factors associated with plasma betaine levels and determine their effect on risk of coronary artery disease (CAD). A two-stage genome-wide association study (GWAS) identified two significantly associated loci on chromosomes 2q34 and 5q14.1. The lead variant on 2q24 (rs715) localizes to carbamoyl-phosphate synthase 1 (CPS1), which encodes a mitochondrial enzyme that catalyses the first committed reaction and rate-limiting step in the urea cycle. Rs715 is also significantly associated with decreased levels of urea cycle metabolites and increased plasma glycine levels. Notably, rs715 yield a strikingly significant and protective association with decreased risk of CAD in only women. These results suggest that glycine metabolism and/or the urea cycle represent potentially novel sex-specific mechanisms for the development of atherosclerosis. PMID:26822151

  11. Dipion decays of heavy quarkonium in the field correlator method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonov, Yu. A.

    2008-06-01

    The mechanism of dipion transitions nS → n'Sππ ( n = 3, 2; n' = 2, 1) in bottomonium and charmonium is studied with the use of the chiral string-breaking Lagrangian allowing for the emission of any number of π( K, ν), and not containing fitting parameters. The transition amplitude contains two terms: M = a - b, where the first term ( a) refers to subsequent one-pion emission, Upsilon (nS) to π Bbar B^ * to π Upsilon (n'S)π , and the second term ( b) refers to two-pion emission, Upsilon (nS) to π π Bbar B to π π Upsilon (n'S) . The one parameter formula for the dipion mass distribution is derived, dw/dq˜ (phase space) × | η - x|2, where x = ( q 2 - 4 m {π/2})/( q {max/2} - 4 m {π/2}), q 2 m= M {ππ/2}. The parameter ν dependent on the process is calculated, using SHO wave functions and imposing PCAC restrictions (Adler zero) on amplitudes a and b. The resulting dipion mass distributions are in agreement with experimental data.

  12. Differential protein structural disturbances and suppression of assembly partners produced by nonsense GABRG2 epilepsy mutations: implications for disease phenotypic heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Juexin; Shen, Dingding; Xia, Geqing; Shen, Wangzhen; Macdonald, Robert L.; Xu, Dong; Kang, Jing-Qiong

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in GABAA receptor subunit genes are frequently associated with epilepsy, and nonsense mutations in GABRG2 are associated with several epilepsy syndromes including childhood absence epilepsy, generalized tonic clonic seizures and the epileptic encephalopathy, Dravet syndrome. The molecular basis for the phenotypic heterogeneity of mutations is unclear. Here we focused on three nonsense mutations in GABRG2 (GABRG2(R136*), GABRG2(Q390*) and GABRG2(W429*)) associated with epilepsies of different severities. Structural modeling and structure-based analysis indicated that the surface of the wild-type γ2 subunit was naturally hydrophobic, which is suitable to be buried in the cell membrane. Different mutant γ2 subunits had different stabilities and different interactions with their wild-type subunit binding partners because they adopted different conformations and had different surface hydrophobicities and different tendency to dimerize. We utilized flow cytometry and biochemical approaches in combination with lifted whole cell patch-clamp recordings. We demonstrated that the truncated subunits had no to minimal surface expression and unchanged or reduced surface expression of wild-type partnering subunits. The amplitudes of GABA-evoked currents from the mutant α1β2γ2(R136*), α1β2γ2(Q390*) and α1β2γ2(W429*) receptors were reduced compared to the currents from α1β2γ2 receptors but with differentially reduced levels. This thus suggests differential protein structure disturbances are correlated with disease severity. PMID:27762395

  13. Isolation of region-specific cosmids by hybridization with microdissection clones from human chromosome 10q11. 1-q21. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Karakawa, Katsu; Takami, Koji; Fujita, Shoichi Osaka Univ. Medical School, Fukushima-ku, Osaka ); Nakamura, Tsutomu; Takai, Shin-ichiro; Nishisho, Isamu ); Jones, C. ); Ohta, Tohru; Jinno, Yoshihiro; Niikawa, Norio )

    1993-08-01

    A region-specific plasmid library composed of 20,000 recombinants was constructed by microdissection of human chromosome 10 (10q11.2-q21.1) and subsequent amplification with the primer-linker method of polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Hybridization with total human DNA showed that 32 of 217 microclones studied contained highly repetitive sequences. Further analysis of the remaining 185 microclones proved that 43 microclones, each having an insert longer than 200 bp, contained unique sequences of human chromosome 10 origin. Twenty-five microclones randomly selected from the 43 were used directly as probes to isolate corresponding cosmid clones, resulting in 32 cosmids corresponding to 14 microclones. Of the 25 cosmids that could be mapped by fluorescence in situ hybridization, 24 proved to originate from the microdissected or adjacent region (10p11.2-q22.3)and 1 from a rather distal region (10q24.3-q25.1). In addition, 15 of the 32 cosmids revealed restriction fragment length polymorphisms, including 1 with a variable number of tandem repeats marker. The microdissection library and the obtained cosmids are valuable resources for constructing high-resolution physical and linkage maps of the pericentromeric region of chromosome 10, where the gene predisposing to multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN2A) has been mapped. 30 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. E2C(R2) Periodic Benefit-Risk Evaluation Report and E2C(R2) Periodic Benefit-Risk Evaluation Report--Questions and Answers; International Council for Harmonisation; Guidances for Industry; Availability. Notice.

    PubMed

    2016-07-19

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or Agency) is announcing the availability of guidances for industry entitled ``E2C(R2) Periodic Benefit-Risk Evaluation'' (E2C(R2) guidance) and ``E2C(R2) Periodic Benefit-Risk Evaluation Report--Questions and Answers'' (E2C(R2) Q&A guidance). These guidances were prepared under the auspices of the International Council for Harmonisation (ICH), formerly the International Conference on Harmonisation. The E2C(R2) draft guidance, issued April 11, 2012, updated and combined two ICH guidances, ``E2C Clinical Safety Data Management: Periodic Safety Update Reports for Marketed Drugs'' (E2C guidance) and ``Addendum to E2C Clinical Safety Data Management: Periodic Safety Update Reports for Marketed Drugs'' (addendum to the E2C guidance). The E2C(R2) guidance is intended to describe the format, content, and timing of a Periodic Benefit-Risk Evaluation Report (PBRER) for an approved drug or biologic, and it finalizes the draft guidance. The E2C(R2) Q&A guidance is a supplementary guidance that is intended to clarify key issues in the E2C(R2) guidance.

  15. A multi-stage genome-wide association study of bladder cancer identifies multiple susceptibility loci

    PubMed Central

    Rothman, Nathaniel; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Malats, Nuria; Wu, Xifeng; Figueroa, Jonine; Real, Francisco X; Van Den Berg, David; Matullo, Giuseppe; Baris, Dalsu; Thun, Michael; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Vineis, Paolo; De Vivo, Immaculata; Albanes, Demetrius; Purdue, Mark P; Rafnar, Thorunn; Hildebrandt, Michelle A T; Kiltie, Anne E; Cussenot, Olivier; Golka, Klaus; Kumar, Rajiv; Taylor, Jack A; Mayordomo, Jose I; Jacobs, Kevin B; Kogevinas, Manolis; Hutchinson, Amy; Wang, Zhaoming; Fu, Yi-Ping; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Burdette, Laurie; Yeager, Meredith; Wheeler, William; Tardón, Adonina; Serra, Consol; Carrato, Alfredo; García-Closas, Reina; Lloreta, Josep; Johnson, Alison; Schwenn, Molly; Karagas, Margaret R; Schned, Alan; Andriole, Gerald; Grubb, Robert; Black, Amanda; Jacobs, Eric J; Diver, W Ryan; Gapstur, Susan M; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Virtamo, Jarmo; Cortessis, Victoria K; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Pike, Malcolm C; Stern, Mariana C; Yuan, Jian-Min; Hunter, David; McGrath, Monica; Dinney, Colin P; Czerniak, Bogdan; Chen, Meng; Yang, Hushan; Vermeulen, Sita H; Aben, Katja K; Witjes, J Alfred; Makkinje, Remco R; Sulem, Patrick; Besenbacher, Soren; Stefansson, Kari; Riboli, Elio; Brennan, Paul; Panico, Salvatore; Navarro, Carmen; Allen, Naomi E; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Caporaso, Neil; Landi, Maria Teresa; Canzian, Federico; Ljungberg, Borje; Tjonneland, Anne; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Bishop, David T; Teo, Mark T W; Knowles, Margaret A; Guarrera, Simonetta; Polidoro, Silvia; Ricceri, Fulvio; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Allione, Alessandra; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Selinski, Silvia; Hengstler, Jan G; Dietrich, Holger; Fletcher, Tony; Rudnai, Peter; Gurzau, Eugen; Koppova, Kvetoslava; Bolick, Sophia C E; Godfrey, Ashley; Xu, Zongli; Sanz-Velez, José I; García-Prats, María D; Sanchez, Manuel; Valdivia, Gabriel; Porru, Stefano; Benhamou, Simone; Hoover, Robert N; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Silverman, Debra T; Chanock, Stephen J

    2010-01-01

    We conducted a multi-stage, genome-wide association study (GWAS) of bladder cancer with a primary scan of 589,299 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 3,532 cases and 5,120 controls of European descent (5 studies) followed by a replication strategy, which included 8,381 cases and 48,275 controls (16 studies). In a combined analysis, we identified three new regions associated with bladder cancer on chromosomes 22q13.1, 19q12 and 2q37.1; rs1014971, (P=8×10−12) maps to a non-genic region of chromosome 22q13.1; rs8102137 (P=2×10−11) on 19q12 maps to CCNE1; and rs11892031 (P=1×10−7) maps to the UGT1A cluster on 2q37.1. We confirmed four previous GWAS associations on chromosomes 3q28, 4p16.3, 8q24.21 and 8q24.3, validated previous candidate associations for the GSTM1 deletion (P=4×10−11) and a tag SNP for NAT2 acetylation status (P=4×10−11), as well as demonstrated smoking interactions with both regions. Our findings on common variants associated with bladder cancer risk should provide new insights into mechanisms of carcinogenesis. PMID:20972438

  16. Whole-genome copy number variation analysis in anophthalmia and microphthalmia.

    PubMed

    Schilter, K F; Reis, L M; Schneider, A; Bardakjian, T M; Abdul-Rahman, O; Kozel, B A; Zimmerman, H H; Broeckel, U; Semina, E V

    2013-11-01

    Anophthalmia/microphthalmia (A/M) represent severe developmental ocular malformations. Currently, mutations in known genes explain less than 40% of A/M cases. We performed whole-genome copy number variation analysis in 60 patients affected with isolated or syndromic A/M. Pathogenic deletions of 3q26 (SOX2) were identified in four independent patients with syndromic microphthalmia. Other variants of interest included regions with a known role in human disease (likely pathogenic) as well as novel rearrangements (uncertain significance). A 2.2-Mb duplication of 3q29 in a patient with non-syndromic anophthalmia and an 877-kb duplication of 11p13 (PAX6) and a 1.4-Mb deletion of 17q11.2 (NF1) in two independent probands with syndromic microphthalmia and other ocular defects were identified; while ocular anomalies have been previously associated with 3q29 duplications, PAX6 duplications, and NF1 mutations in some cases, the ocular phenotypes observed here are more severe than previously reported. Three novel regions of possible interest included a 2q14.2 duplication which cosegregated with microphthalmia/microcornea and congenital cataracts in one family, and 2q21 and 15q26 duplications in two additional cases; each of these regions contains genes that are active during vertebrate ocular development. Overall, this study identified causative copy number mutations and regions with a possible role in ocular disease in 17% of A/M cases.

  17. A recurrent 11q aberration pattern characterizes a subset of MYC-negative high-grade B-cell lymphomas resembling Burkitt lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Salaverria, Itziar; Martin-Guerrero, Idoia; Wagener, Rabea; Kreuz, Markus; Kohler, Christian W; Richter, Julia; Pienkowska-Grela, Barbara; Adam, Patrick; Burkhardt, Birgit; Claviez, Alexander; Damm-Welk, Christine; Drexler, Hans G; Hummel, Michael; Jaffe, Elaine S; Küppers, Ralf; Lefebvre, Christine; Lisfeld, Jasmin; Löffler, Markus; Macleod, Roderick A F; Nagel, Inga; Oschlies, Ilske; Rosolowski, Maciej; Russell, Robert B; Rymkiewicz, Grzegorz; Schindler, Detlev; Schlesner, Matthias; Scholtysik, René; Schwaenen, Carsten; Spang, Rainer; Szczepanowski, Monika; Trümper, Lorenz; Vater, Inga; Wessendorf, Swen; Klapper, Wolfram; Siebert, Reiner

    2014-02-20

    The genetic hallmark of Burkitt lymphoma (BL) is the t(8;14)(q24;q32) and its variants leading to activation of the MYC oncogene. It is a matter of debate whether true BL without MYC translocation exists. Here, we identified 59 lymphomas concordantly called BL by 2 gene expression classifiers among 753 B-cell lymphomas. Only 2 (3%) of these 59 molecular BL lacked a MYC translocation, which both shared a peculiar pattern of chromosome 11q aberration characterized by interstitial gains including 11q23.2-q23.3 and telomeric losses of 11q24.1-qter. We extended our analysis to 17 MYC-negative high-grade B-cell lymphomas with a similar 11q aberration and showed this aberration to be recurrently associated with morphologic and clinical features of BL. The minimal region of gain was defined by high-level amplifications in 11q23.3 and associated with overexpression of genes including PAFAH1B2 on a transcriptional and protein level. The recurrent region of loss contained a focal homozygous deletion in 11q24.2-q24.3 including the ETS1 gene, which was shown to be mutated in 4 of 16 investigated cases. These findings indicate the existence of a molecularly distinct subset of B-cell lymphomas reminiscent of BL, which is characterized by deregulation of genes in 11q.

  18. Thermal conduction by dark matter with velocity and momentum-dependent cross-sections

    SciTech Connect

    Vincent, Aaron C.; Scott, Pat E-mail: patscott@physics.mcgill.ca

    2014-04-01

    We use the formalism of Gould and Raffelt [1] to compute the dimensionless thermal conduction coefficients for scattering of dark matter particles with standard model nucleons via cross-sections that depend on the relative velocity or momentum exchanged between particles. Motivated by models invoked to reconcile various recent results in direct detection, we explicitly compute the conduction coefficients α and κ for cross-sections that go as v{sub rel}{sup 2}, v{sub rel}{sup 4}, v{sub rel}{sup −2}, q{sup 2}, q{sup 4} and q{sup −2}, where v{sub rel} is the relative DM-nucleus velocity and q is the momentum transferred in the collision. We find that a v{sub rel}{sup −2} dependence can significantly enhance energy transport from the inner solar core to the outer core. The same can true for any q-dependent coupling, if the dark matter mass lies within some specific range for each coupling. This effect can complement direct searches for dark matter; combining these results with state-of-the-art solar simulations should greatly increase sensitivity to certain DM models. It also seems possible that the so-called Solar Abundance Problem could be resolved by enhanced energy transport in the solar core due to such velocity- or momentum-dependent scatterings.

  19. Updates on the Studies of {\\varvec{N}}^* Structure with CLAS and the Prospects with CLAS12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokeev, V. I.

    2016-10-01

    The recent results on γ _vpN^* electrocouplings from analyses of the data on exclusive meson electroproduction off protons measured with the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab are presented. The impact of these results on the exploration of the excited nucleon state structure and non-perturbative strong interaction dynamics behind its formation is outlined. The future extension of these studies in the experiments with the CLAS12 detector in the upgraded Hall-B at JLab will provide for the first time γ _vpN^* electrocouplings of all prominent resonances at the still unexplored distance scales that correspond to extremely low (0.05 GeV^2 < Q^2< 0.5 GeV^2) and the highest photon virtualities (5.0 GeV^2 < Q^2< 12.0 GeV^2) ever achieved in the exclusive electroproduction measurements. The expected results will address the most important open problems of the Standard Model: on the nature of more than 98 % of hadron mass, quark-gluon confinement and emergence of the excited nucleon state structure from the QCD Lagrangian, as well as allowing a search for the new states of hadron matter predicted from the first principles of QCD, the so-called hybrid baryons.

  20. Updates on the Studies of $$${\\varvec{N}}^\\mathbf{*}$$$ N * Structure with CLAS and the Prospects with CLAS12

    DOE PAGES

    Mokeev, V. I.

    2016-06-16

    Here, the recent results onmore » $$\\gamma_vpN^*$$ electrocouplings from analyses of the data on exclusive meson electroproduction off protons measured with the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab are presented. The impact of these results on the exploration of the excited nucleon state structure and non-perturbative strong interaction dynamics behind its formation is outlined. The future extension of these studies in the experiments with the CLAS12 detector in the upgraded Hall-B at JLab will provide for the first time $$\\gamma_vpN^*$$ electrocouplings of all prominent resonances at the still unexplored distance scales that correspond to extremely low (0.05~GeV$^2 < Q^2 <$ 0.5~GeV$^2$) and the highest photon virtualities (5.0~GeV$^2 < Q^2 <$ 12.0~GeV$^2$) ever achieved in the exclusive electroproduction measurements. The expected results will address the most important open problems of the Standard Model: on the nature of more than 98\\% of hadron mass, quark-gluon confinement and emergence of the excited nucleon state structure from the QCD Lagrangian, as well as allowing a search for the new states of hadron matter predicted from the first principles of QCD, the so-called hybrid baryons.« less

  1. Measurements of the Electron-Helicity Dependent Cross Sections of Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering with CEBAF at 12 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    J. Roche; C. E. Hyde-Wright; B. Michel; C. Munoz Camacho; et al.

    2006-09-11

    We propose precision measurements of the helicity-dependent and helicity independent cross sections for the ep {yields} ep{gamma} reaction in Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) kinematics. DVCS scaling is obtained in the limits Q{sup 2} >> {Lambda}{sub QCD}{sup 2}, x{sub Bj} fixed, and -{Delta}{sup 2} = -(q-q{prime}){sup 2} << Q{sup 2}. We consider the specific kinematic range Q{sup 2} > 2 GeV{sup 2}, W > 2 GeV, and -{Delta}{sup 2} {le} 1 GeV{sup 2}. We will use our successful technique from the 5.75 GeV Hall A DVCS experiment (E00-110). With polarized 6.6, 8.8, and 11 GeV beams incident on the liquid hydrogen target, we will detect the scattered electron in the Hall A HRS-L spectrometer (maximum central momentum 4.3 GeV/c) and the emitted photon in a slightly expanded PbF{sub 2} calorimeter. In general, we will not detect the recoil proton. The H(e,e{prime}{gamma})X missing mass resolution is sufficient to isolate the exclusive channel with 3% systematic precision.

  2. Relation between minimum-error discrimination and optimum unambiguous discrimination

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu Daowen; Li Lvjun

    2010-09-15

    In this paper, we investigate the relationship between the minimum-error probability Q{sub E} of ambiguous discrimination and the optimal inconclusive probability Q{sub U} of unambiguous discrimination. It is known that for discriminating two states, the inequality Q{sub U{>=}}2Q{sub E} has been proved in the literature. The main technical results are as follows: (1) We show that, for discriminating more than two states, Q{sub U{>=}}2Q{sub E} may not hold again, but the infimum of Q{sub U}/Q{sub E} is 1, and there is no supremum of Q{sub U}/Q{sub E}, which implies that the failure probabilities of the two schemes for discriminating some states may be narrowly or widely gapped. (2) We derive two concrete formulas of the minimum-error probability Q{sub E} and the optimal inconclusive probability Q{sub U}, respectively, for ambiguous discrimination and unambiguous discrimination among arbitrary m simultaneously diagonalizable mixed quantum states with given prior probabilities. In addition, we show that Q{sub E} and Q{sub U} satisfy the relationship that Q{sub U{>=}}(m/m-1)Q{sub E}.

  3. Host guest inclusion complexes of four partial alkyl-substituted cucurbit[6]urils with some probe guests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Da-Hai; Ni, Xin-Long; Tian, Zhong-Cheng; Zhang, Yun-Qin; Xue, Sai-Feng; Tao, Zhu; Zhu, Qing-Jiang

    2008-11-01

    Using probe guests, three host-guest inclusion complexes of two new alkyl-substituted cucurbit[6]uril hosts, ortho-tetramethyl cucurbit[6]uril ( o-TMeQ[6]) and symmetrical tetracyclohexano cucurbit[6]uril (TCyHQ[6]) have been characterized successfully by single crystal X-ray diffractions. They are { o-TMeQ[6]-5,5'dimethyl-2,2'-bispyridine ( DMBPY) +}Cl -21H 2O( 1), {( o-TMeQ[6]) 2-1,6-bisbenzoimidazolylhexane ( SBH) 2+} 2Cl -52H 2O ( 2) and {TCyHQ[6]- dioxane}14H 2O ( 3). Moreover, two similar crystal structure of two inclusion complexes of other two partial substituted cucurbit[6]urils, meta-hexamethyl cucurbit[6]uril ( m-HMeQ[6]) and symmetrical dicyclohexano cucurbit[6]uril ( p-(CyH) 2Q[6]) with HCl salt of DMBPY were also reported. They were { p-(CyH) 2Q[6]- DMBPY+}Cl -16H 2O ( 4) and { m-HMeQ[6]- DMBPY+}Cl -15H 2O ( 5). The driving force for the information of the host-guest inclusion complexes can be attributed to not only the cavity interaction (host), but also the hydrogen bonding and ion-dipole interaction between the carbonyl oxygen at the portals of the host and the protonated nitrogen of the guest.

  4. Detection of a complex translocation using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH)

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, B.A.; Abuelo, D.N.; Mark, H.F.

    1994-09-01

    The use of fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) allowed the detection of a complex 3-way translocation in a patient with multiple congenital malformations and mental retardation. The patient was a 10-year-old girl with mental retardation, seizures, repaired cleft palate, esotropia, epicanthal folds, broad nasal bridge, upward slanting palpebral fissures, single transverse palmar crease, brachydactyly, hypoplastic nails, ectrodactyly between the third and fourth right toes, and hypoplasia of the left third toe. Chromosome analysis performed at birth was reported as normal. We performed high resolution banding analysis which revealed an apparently balanced translocation between chromosomes 2 and 9. However, because of her multiple abnormalities, further studies were ordered. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) using chromosome painting probes revealed a karyotype of 46,XX,t(2;8;9) (2pter{yields}q31::8q21.2{yields}8qter; 8pter{yields}q21.2::2q31{yields}q34::9q34{yields}qter; 9pter{yields}q34::2q34{yields}qter). The 3-way translocation appears to be de novo, as neither parent is a translocation carrier. This case illustrates the importance of using FISH to further investigate cases of apparently balanced translocations in the presence of phenotypic abnormalities and/or mental retardation.

  5. The relationship between sister chromatid exchanges and chromosome aberrations in Bloom's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Y; Sandberg, A A

    1977-01-01

    The distribution of the break points of sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) was compared with that of chromosome aberrations in Bloom's syndrome by using differential sister chromatid staining and banding techniques. A comparison was made of the distribution in chromosomes 1, 2, and 3, since the exact identification of other chromosomes is difficult with the differential sister-chromatid staining technique. It was shown that SCE and chromosome breaks do not necessarily correlate as to location. Some chromosome break points, e.g., 1q21, 1p36, 2q31, 3q12, and 3p13, were common with those of SCE, whereas others (at 1p13, 2p11, 2q11, and 3q11) showed little or no SCE. SCE breaks were not observed in the centromeric regions. In addition, the SCE frequency was examined in Bloom's syndrome cells with and without chromosome aberrations, and no significant differences of SCE frequency were observed between cells with chromatid- or chromosome-type of aberrations and those with normal complements. Banding analyses indicated a nonrandom distribution of chromosome breaks in the lymphocytes and marrow cells of the Bloom's syndrome patient.

  6. Remote detection of OH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdermid, I. Stuart; Laudenslager, James B.

    1986-01-01

    This is a remote measurement technique utilizing a XeCl excimer laser tuned to the Q sub 21 1 rotational transition of the 0-0, A-X band at 307.847 nm. A wavemeter is under development to monitor, on a pulse-to-pulse basis, both the laser lineshape and absolute wavelength. Fluorescence is detected with a multiple Fabry-Perot type filter with a spectral resolution on the order of 0.001 nm. This is tuned to the overlapping Q sub 2 2, Q sub 12 2, Q sub 2 3, and Q sub 12 3 rotational transitions at 308.986 nm. The fringe pattern from this filter is imaged using a discrete, multi-anode detector which has a photon gain of 10 to the 8th power. This permits the simultaneous monitoring of OH fluorescence, N2 and/or O2 rotational Raman scattering and broadband background levels. The use of three etalons in series provides sufficient rejection, approx. greater than 10 to the 10th power, against the laser radiation only 1.2 nm away.

  7. Analysis of the CIA Spectra of the Second Overtone Band of D2 at 77 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Kharma, M.; Shawagfeh, Naseem; Gillard, P.

    2010-10-01

    Quantitative measurements of the collision induced absorption (CIA) spectra of pure D2 gas in the second overtone (v = 3←0) region were made for gas densities in the range 500 to 950 amagat at 77 K for the first time. The observed spectra were modeled with a synthetic profiles; which are composed of the superposition of an overlap-induced profile Q3(overlap)(J = 0 to 3) and a quadrupolar induced profile. The quadrupolar profile is formed of three profiles: a single vibrational transitions of the type X3(J)+X0(J), where X is O(ΔJ = -2), Q(ΔJ = 0) and S(ΔJ = 2) transition, a double vibrational transitions of the type X2(J)+X1(J) and a triple vibrational transitions Q1(J1)+Q1(J2)+Q1(J3) of D2; resulting from simultaneous collision of three D2 molecules. Profile analysis of the spectra was carried out using the Birnbaum—Cohen (BC) line shape function for the quadrupolar transitions and the Levine—Birnbaum (LB) line shape function for the overlap transitions. The fitting parameters were determined from the analysis. The agreement between the experimental and the calculated profiles is satisfactory.

  8. Clonal deletion of self-reactive T cells in irradiation bone marrow chimeras and neonatally tolerant mice. Evidence for intercellular transfer of Mlsa

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Tolerance to Mlsa has been shown to be associated with clonal deletion of cells carrying TCR beta chain variable regions V beta 6 or V beta 8.1 in mice possessing I-E antigens. To evaluate the rules of tolerance induction to Mlsa we prepared irradiation bone marrow chimeras expressing Mlsa or Mlsb and I-E by different cell types. Deletion of V beta 6+, Mlsa-reactive T cells required the presence of Mlsa and I-E products either on bone marrow-derived cells or on irradiated recipient cells. Tolerance was induced when Mlsa and I-E were expressed by distinct cells of the chimera. Also neonatally tolerized mice exhibited depletion of V beta 6+ cells after injection of I-E- Mlsa spleen cells (DBA/1) into newborn I-E+ Mlsb mice (BALB/c x B10.G)F1. These results suggest that the product of the Mlsa locus is soluble and/or may be transferred from cell to cell and bound to I-E antigens. The chimera experiments also showed that tolerance to Mlsa is H-2 allele independent, i.e., is apparently unrestricted. Differentiation of chimeric (H-2d/Mlsa x H-2q/Mlsb)F1 stem cells in either an H-2d or an H- 2q thymus revealed that tolerance assessed by absence of V beta 6+ T cells is not dependent on the thymically determined restriction specificity of T cells. PMID:2526850

  9. Linkage approach and direct COL4A5 gene mutation screening in Alport syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Turco, A.E.; Rossetti, S.; Biasi, O.

    1994-09-01

    Alport Syndrome (AS) is transmitted as an X-linked dominant trait in the majority of families, the defective gene being COL4A5 at Xq22. In the remaining cases AS appears to be autosomally inherited. Recently, mutations in COL4A3 and COL4A4 genes at 2q35-q37 were identified in families with autosomal recessive AS. Mutation detection screening is being performed by non-radioactive single stand conformation polymorphism (SSCP), heteroduplex analysis, and automated DNA sequencing in over 170 AS patients enrolled in the ongoing Italian Multicenter Study on AS. So far twenty-five different mutations have been found, including missense, splicing, and frameshifts. Moreover, by using six tightly linked COL4A5 informative makers, we have also typed two larger AS families, and have shown compatible sex-linked transmission in one other, suggesting autosomal recessive inheritance. In this latter three-generation COL4A5-unlinked family we are now looking for linkage and for mutations in the candidate COL4A3 and COL4A4 genes on chromosome 2q.

  10. Report of a patient with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, ptosis and ophthalmoparesis caused by plectinopathy.

    PubMed

    Fattahi, Zohreh; Kahrizi, Kimia; Nafissi, Shahriar; Fadaee, Mahsa; Abedini, Seyedeh Sedigheh; Kariminejad, Ariana; Akbari, Mohammad R; Najmabadi, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in plectin, a widely expressed giant cytolinker protein can lead to different diseases mostly with signs of muscular dystrophy (MD) and skin blistering. The only report of plectin-related disease without skin involvement is limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2Q (LGMD2Q) phenotype, showing early-onset limb-girdle muscular dystrophy symptoms with progressive manner and no cranial muscle involvement. Here, we report a non-consanguineous Iranian family with two affected sisters showing progressive limb and ocular muscle weakness. Whole Exome Sequencing (WES) led to identification of a compound heterozygous mutations, p.Gln1022Ter (c.3064C>T) and p.Gly3835Ser (c.11503G>A), in PLEC gene. To the best of our knowledge, this would be the first report of a patient with LGMD and myasthenic symptoms without any skin involvement, caused by plectinopathy. This observation extends the phenotypic spectrum of PLEC related diseases and suggests a variable expression of the PLEC- related symptoms.

  11. 14q13 distal microdeletion encompassing NKX2-1 and PAX9: Patient report and refinement of the associated phenotype.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Mattia; De Mattia, Delia; Pansini, Angela; Schettini, Federico; Buonadonna, Antonia Lucia; Capozza, Manuela; Ficarella, Romina; Laforgia, Nicola

    2016-07-01

    Chromosome 14q11-q22 deletion syndrome (OMIM 613457) is a rare genomic disorder whose associated phenotype is heterogeneous, depending on the size, and, mostly, on the deleted region. We report the clinical and molecular characterization of a female newborn, whose phenotype was characterized by poor growth, dysmorphic facial features, subclinical hypothyroidism, and mild reduction of CD3CD8 Lymphocytes with increased CD4/CD8 ratio. By array-CGH, we identified a 4.08 de novo interstitial deletion of the 14q13.2q21.1 region, which includes 16 OMIM genes.Our patient phenotype is compared with other published cases, for a better classification of the 14q11-q22 deletion syndrome. We demonstrated that the 14q13.2q21.1 deletion, which encompasses NKX2-1, but not FOXG1 gene and HPE8 region, identifies a well defined, more benign, microdeletion syndrome. This report confirms that an early identification with accurate characterization of the genomic disorders is of great relevance, enabling proper genetic counseling of the reproductive risk, as well as disease prognosis, and patient management. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27148860

  12. A genome-wide association scan implicates DCHS2, RUNX2, GLI3, PAX1 and EDAR in human facial variation.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Kaustubh; Fuentes-Guajardo, Macarena; Quinto-Sánchez, Mirsha; Mendoza-Revilla, Javier; Camilo Chacón-Duque, Juan; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Jaramillo, Claudia; Arias, William; Lozano, Rodrigo Barquera; Pérez, Gastón Macín; Gómez-Valdés, Jorge; Villamil-Ramírez, Hugo; Hunemeier, Tábita; Ramallo, Virginia; Silva de Cerqueira, Caio C; Hurtado, Malena; Villegas, Valeria; Granja, Vanessa; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Schuler-Faccini, Lavinia; Salzano, Francisco M; Bortolini, Maria-Cátira; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Cheeseman, Michael; Rosique, Javier; Bedoya, Gabriel; Rothhammer, Francisco; Headon, Denis; González-José, Rolando; Balding, David; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    We report a genome-wide association scan for facial features in ∼6,000 Latin Americans. We evaluated 14 traits on an ordinal scale and found significant association (P values<5 × 10(-8)) at single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in four genomic regions for three nose-related traits: columella inclination (4q31), nose bridge breadth (6p21) and nose wing breadth (7p13 and 20p11). In a subsample of ∼3,000 individuals we obtained quantitative traits related to 9 of the ordinal phenotypes and, also, a measure of nasion position. Quantitative analyses confirmed the ordinal-based associations, identified SNPs in 2q12 associated to chin protrusion, and replicated the reported association of nasion position with SNPs in PAX3. Strongest association in 2q12, 4q31, 6p21 and 7p13 was observed for SNPs in the EDAR, DCHS2, RUNX2 and GLI3 genes, respectively. Associated SNPs in 20p11 extend to PAX1. Consistent with the effect of EDAR on chin protrusion, we documented alterations of mandible length in mice with modified Edar funtion. PMID:27193062

  13. Loss of C9ORF72 impairs autophagy and synergizes with polyQ Ataxin-2 to induce motor neuron dysfunction and cell death.

    PubMed

    Sellier, Chantal; Campanari, Maria-Letizia; Julie Corbier, Camille; Gaucherot, Angeline; Kolb-Cheynel, Isabelle; Oulad-Abdelghani, Mustapha; Ruffenach, Frank; Page, Adeline; Ciura, Sorana; Kabashi, Edor; Charlet-Berguerand, Nicolas

    2016-06-15

    An intronic expansion of GGGGCC repeats within the C9ORF72 gene is the most common genetic cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia (ALS-FTD). Ataxin-2 with intermediate length of polyglutamine expansions (Ataxin-2 Q30x) is a genetic modifier of the disease. Here, we found that C9ORF72 forms a complex with the WDR41 and SMCR8 proteins to act as a GDP/GTP exchange factor for RAB8a and RAB39b and to thereby control autophagic flux. Depletion of C9orf72 in neurons partly impairs autophagy and leads to accumulation of aggregates of TDP-43 and P62 proteins, which are histopathological hallmarks of ALS-FTD SMCR8 is phosphorylated by TBK1 and depletion of TBK1 can be rescued by phosphomimetic mutants of SMCR8 or by constitutively active RAB39b, suggesting that TBK1, SMCR8, C9ORF72, and RAB39b belong to a common pathway regulating autophagy. While depletion of C9ORF72 only has a partial deleterious effect on neuron survival, it synergizes with Ataxin-2 Q30x toxicity to induce motor neuron dysfunction and neuronal cell death. These results indicate that partial loss of function of C9ORF72 is not deleterious by itself but synergizes with Ataxin-2 toxicity, suggesting a double-hit pathological mechanism in ALS-FTD.

  14. Identification of four novel susceptibility loci for oestrogen receptor negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Couch, Fergus J; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Mendoza-Fandino, Gustavo A; Nord, Silje; Lilyquist, Janna; Olswold, Curtis; Hallberg, Emily; Agata, Simona; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Ambrosone, Christine; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Arun, Banu K; Arver, Brita; Barile, Monica; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Barrowdale, Daniel; Beckmann, Lars; Beckmann, Matthias W; Benitez, Javier; Blank, Stephanie V; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Burwinkel, Barbara; Buys, Saundra S; Caldes, Trinidad; Caligo, Maria A; Canzian, Federico; Carpenter, Jane; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J; Chung, Wendy K; Claes, Kathleen B M; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Cunningham, Julie M; Czene, Kamila; Daly, Mary B; Damiola, Francesca; Darabi, Hatef; de la Hoya, Miguel; Devilee, Peter; Diez, Orland; Ding, Yuan C; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Domchek, Susan M; Dorfling, Cecilia M; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dumont, Martine; Dunning, Alison M; Eccles, Diana M; Ehrencrona, Hans; Ekici, Arif B; Eliassen, Heather; Ellis, Steve; Fasching, Peter A; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Försti, Asta; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D; Friebel, Tara; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Gabrielson, Marike; Gammon, Marilie D; Ganz, Patricia A; Gapstur, Susan M; Garber, Judy; Gaudet, Mia M; Gayther, Simon A; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ghoussaini, Maya; Giles, Graham G; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K; Goldberg, Mark S; Goldgar, David E; González-Neira, Anna; Greene, Mark H; Gronwald, Jacek; Guénel, Pascal; Gunter, Marc; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V O; Hart, Steven; Healey, Sue; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Henderson, Brian E; Herzog, Josef; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hooning, Maartje J; Hoover, Robert N; Hopper, John L; Humphreys, Keith; Hunter, David J; Huzarski, Tomasz; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Isaacs, Claudine; Jakubowska, Anna; James, Paul; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M; Jones, Michael; Kabisch, Maria; Kar, Siddhartha; Karlan, Beth Y; Khan, Sofia; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kibriya, Muhammad G; Knight, Julia A; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kristensen, Vessela; Kwong, Ava; Laitman, Yael; Lambrechts, Diether; Lazaro, Conxi; Lee, Eunjung; Le Marchand, Loic; Lester, Jenny; Lindblom, Annika; Lindor, Noralane; Lindstrom, Sara; Liu, Jianjun; Long, Jirong; Lubinski, Jan; Mai, Phuong L; Makalic, Enes; Malone, Kathleen E; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Martens, John W M; McGuffog, Lesley; Meindl, Alfons; Miller, Austin; Milne, Roger L; Miron, Penelope; Montagna, Marco; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Mulligan, Anna M; Muranen, Taru A; Nathanson, Katherine L; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nussbaum, Robert L; Offit, Kenneth; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Olson, Janet E; Osorio, Ana; Park, Sue K; Peeters, Petra H; Peissel, Bernard; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Phelan, Catherine M; Pilarski, Robert; Poppe, Bruce; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rahman, Nazneen; Rantala, Johanna; Rappaport, Christine; Rennert, Gad; Richardson, Andrea; Robson, Mark; Romieu, Isabelle; Rudolph, Anja; Rutgers, Emiel J; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Santella, Regina M; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmidt, Daniel F; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schmutzler, Rita K; Schumacher, Fredrick; Scott, Rodney; Senter, Leigha; Sharma, Priyanka; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa; Steinemann, Doris; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Swerdlow, Anthony; Szabo, Csilla I; Tamimi, Rulla; Tapper, William; Teixeira, Manuel R; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary B; Thomassen, Mads; Thompson, Deborah; Tihomirova, Laima; Toland, Amanda E; Tollenaar, Robert A E M; Tomlinson, Ian; Truong, Thérèse; Tsimiklis, Helen; Teulé, Alex; Tumino, Rosario; Tung, Nadine; Turnbull, Clare; Ursin, Giski; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wang, Zhaoming; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Whittemore, Alice; Wildiers, Hans; Winqvist, Robert; Yang, Xiaohong R; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Yao, Song; Zamora, M Pilar; Zheng, Wei; Hall, Per; Kraft, Peter; Vachon, Celine; Slager, Susan; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pharoah, Paul D P; Monteiro, Alvaro A N; García-Closas, Montserrat; Easton, Douglas F; Antoniou, Antonis C

    2016-04-27

    Common variants in 94 loci have been associated with breast cancer including 15 loci with genome-wide significant associations (P<5 × 10(-8)) with oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer and BRCA1-associated breast cancer risk. In this study, to identify new ER-negative susceptibility loci, we performed a meta-analysis of 11 genome-wide association studies (GWAS) consisting of 4,939 ER-negative cases and 14,352 controls, combined with 7,333 ER-negative cases and 42,468 controls and 15,252 BRCA1 mutation carriers genotyped on the iCOGS array. We identify four previously unidentified loci including two loci at 13q22 near KLF5, a 2p23.2 locus near WDR43 and a 2q33 locus near PPIL3 that display genome-wide significant associations with ER-negative breast cancer. In addition, 19 known breast cancer risk loci have genome-wide significant associations and 40 had moderate associations (P<0.05) with ER-negative disease. Using functional and eQTL studies we implicate TRMT61B and WDR43 at 2p23.2 and PPIL3 at 2q33 in ER-negative breast cancer aetiology. All ER-negative loci combined account for ∼11% of familial relative risk for ER-negative disease and may contribute to improved ER-negative and BRCA1 breast cancer risk prediction.

  15. E2C(R2) Periodic Benefit-Risk Evaluation Report and E2C(R2) Periodic Benefit-Risk Evaluation Report--Questions and Answers; International Council for Harmonisation; Guidances for Industry; Availability. Notice.

    PubMed

    2016-07-19

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or Agency) is announcing the availability of guidances for industry entitled ``E2C(R2) Periodic Benefit-Risk Evaluation'' (E2C(R2) guidance) and ``E2C(R2) Periodic Benefit-Risk Evaluation Report--Questions and Answers'' (E2C(R2) Q&A guidance). These guidances were prepared under the auspices of the International Council for Harmonisation (ICH), formerly the International Conference on Harmonisation. The E2C(R2) draft guidance, issued April 11, 2012, updated and combined two ICH guidances, ``E2C Clinical Safety Data Management: Periodic Safety Update Reports for Marketed Drugs'' (E2C guidance) and ``Addendum to E2C Clinical Safety Data Management: Periodic Safety Update Reports for Marketed Drugs'' (addendum to the E2C guidance). The E2C(R2) guidance is intended to describe the format, content, and timing of a Periodic Benefit-Risk Evaluation Report (PBRER) for an approved drug or biologic, and it finalizes the draft guidance. The E2C(R2) Q&A guidance is a supplementary guidance that is intended to clarify key issues in the E2C(R2) guidance. PMID:27459749

  16. Strong tidal dissipation in Io and Jupiter from astrometric observations.

    PubMed

    Lainey, Valéry; Arlot, Jean-Eudes; Karatekin, Ozgür; Van Hoolst, Tim

    2009-06-18

    Io is the volcanically most active body in the Solar System and has a large surface heat flux. The geological activity is thought to be the result of tides raised by Jupiter, but it is not known whether the current tidal heat production is sufficiently high to generate the observed surface heat flow. Io's tidal heat comes from the orbital energy of the Io-Jupiter system (resulting in orbital acceleration), whereas dissipation of energy in Jupiter causes Io's orbital motion to decelerate. Here we report a determination of the tidal dissipation in Io and Jupiter through its effect on the orbital motions of the Galilean moons. Our results show that the rate of internal energy dissipation in Io (k(2)/Q = 0.015 +/- 0.003, where k(2) is the Love number and Q is the quality factor) is in good agreement with the observed surface heat flow, and suggest that Io is close to thermal equilibrium. Dissipation in Jupiter (k(2)/Q = (1.102 +/- 0.203) x 10(-5)) is close to the upper bound of its average value expected from the long-term evolution of the system, and dissipation in extrasolar planets may be higher than presently assumed. The measured secular accelerations indicate that Io is evolving inwards, towards Jupiter, and that the three innermost Galilean moons (Io, Europa and Ganymede) are evolving out of the exact Laplace resonance.

  17. A genome-wide association scan implicates DCHS2, RUNX2, GLI3, PAX1 and EDAR in human facial variation

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Kaustubh; Fuentes-Guajardo, Macarena; Quinto-Sánchez, Mirsha; Mendoza-Revilla, Javier; Camilo Chacón-Duque, Juan; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Jaramillo, Claudia; Arias, William; Lozano, Rodrigo Barquera; Pérez, Gastón Macín; Gómez-Valdés, Jorge; Villamil-Ramírez, Hugo; Hunemeier, Tábita; Ramallo, Virginia; Silva de Cerqueira, Caio C.; Hurtado, Malena; Villegas, Valeria; Granja, Vanessa; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Schuler-Faccini, Lavinia; Salzano, Francisco M.; Bortolini, Maria- Cátira; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Cheeseman, Michael; Rosique, Javier; Bedoya, Gabriel; Rothhammer, Francisco; Headon, Denis; González-José, Rolando; Balding, David; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    We report a genome-wide association scan for facial features in ∼6,000 Latin Americans. We evaluated 14 traits on an ordinal scale and found significant association (P values<5 × 10−8) at single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in four genomic regions for three nose-related traits: columella inclination (4q31), nose bridge breadth (6p21) and nose wing breadth (7p13 and 20p11). In a subsample of ∼3,000 individuals we obtained quantitative traits related to 9 of the ordinal phenotypes and, also, a measure of nasion position. Quantitative analyses confirmed the ordinal-based associations, identified SNPs in 2q12 associated to chin protrusion, and replicated the reported association of nasion position with SNPs in PAX3. Strongest association in 2q12, 4q31, 6p21 and 7p13 was observed for SNPs in the EDAR, DCHS2, RUNX2 and GLI3 genes, respectively. Associated SNPs in 20p11 extend to PAX1. Consistent with the effect of EDAR on chin protrusion, we documented alterations of mandible length in mice with modified Edar funtion. PMID:27193062

  18. Sequence variants affecting eosinophil numbers associate with asthma and myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Bjornsdottir, Unnur S; Halapi, Eva; Helgadottir, Anna; Sulem, Patrick; Jonsdottir, Gudrun M; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Helgadottir, Hafdis; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stefansson, Hreinn; Williams, Carolyn; Hui, Jennie; Beilby, John; Warrington, Nicole M; James, Alan; Palmer, Lyle J; Koppelman, Gerard H; Heinzmann, Andrea; Krueger, Marcus; Boezen, H Marike; Wheatley, Amanda; Altmuller, Janine; Shin, Hyoung Doo; Uh, Soo-Taek; Cheong, Hyun Sub; Jonsdottir, Brynja; Gislason, David; Park, Choon-Sik; Rasmussen, Linda M; Porsbjerg, Celeste; Hansen, Jakob W; Backer, Vibeke; Werge, Thomas; Janson, Christer; Jönsson, Ulla-Britt; Ng, Maggie C Y; Chan, Juliana; So, Wing Yee; Ma, Ronald; Shah, Svati H; Granger, Christopher B; Quyyumi, Arshed A; Levey, Allan I; Vaccarino, Viola; Reilly, Muredach P; Rader, Daniel J; Williams, Michael J A; van Rij, Andre M; Jones, Gregory T; Trabetti, Elisabetta; Malerba, Giovanni; Pignatti, Pier Franco; Boner, Attilio; Pescollderungg, Lydia; Girelli, Domenico; Olivieri, Oliviero; Martinelli, Nicola; Ludviksson, Bjorn R; Ludviksdottir, Dora; Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur I; Arnar, David; Thorgeirsson, Gudmundur; Deichmann, Klaus; Thompson, Philip J; Wjst, Matthias; Hall, Ian P; Postma, Dirkje S; Gislason, Thorarinn; Gulcher, Jeffrey; Kong, Augustine; Jonsdottir, Ingileif; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Stefansson, Kari

    2009-03-01

    Eosinophils are pleiotropic multifunctional leukocytes involved in initiation and propagation of inflammatory responses and thus have important roles in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases. Here we describe a genome-wide association scan for sequence variants affecting eosinophil counts in blood of 9,392 Icelanders. The most significant SNPs were studied further in 12,118 Europeans and 5,212 East Asians. SNPs at 2q12 (rs1420101), 2q13 (rs12619285), 3q21 (rs4857855), 5q31 (rs4143832) and 12q24 (rs3184504) reached genome-wide significance (P = 5.3 x 10(-14), 5.4 x 10(-10), 8.6 x 10(-17), 1.2 x 10(-10) and 6.5 x 10(-19), respectively). A SNP at IL1RL1 associated with asthma (P = 5.5 x 10(-12)) in a collection of ten different populations (7,996 cases and 44,890 controls). SNPs at WDR36, IL33 and MYB that showed suggestive association with eosinophil counts were also associated with atopic asthma (P = 4.2 x 10(-6), 2.2 x 10(-5) and 2.4 x 10(-4), respectively). We also found that a nonsynonymous SNP at 12q24, in SH2B3, associated significantly (P = 8.6 x 10(-8)) with myocardial infarction in six different populations (6,650 cases and 40,621 controls).

  19. Identification of four novel susceptibility loci for oestrogen receptor negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Couch, Fergus J; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Mendoza-Fandino, Gustavo A; Nord, Silje; Lilyquist, Janna; Olswold, Curtis; Hallberg, Emily; Agata, Simona; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Ambrosone, Christine; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Arun, Banu K; Arver, Brita; Barile, Monica; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Barrowdale, Daniel; Beckmann, Lars; Beckmann, Matthias W; Benitez, Javier; Blank, Stephanie V; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Burwinkel, Barbara; Buys, Saundra S; Caldes, Trinidad; Caligo, Maria A; Canzian, Federico; Carpenter, Jane; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J; Chung, Wendy K; Claes, Kathleen B M; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Cunningham, Julie M; Czene, Kamila; Daly, Mary B; Damiola, Francesca; Darabi, Hatef; de la Hoya, Miguel; Devilee, Peter; Diez, Orland; Ding, Yuan C; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Domchek, Susan M; Dorfling, Cecilia M; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dumont, Martine; Dunning, Alison M; Eccles, Diana M; Ehrencrona, Hans; Ekici, Arif B; Eliassen, Heather; Ellis, Steve; Fasching, Peter A; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Försti, Asta; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D; Friebel, Tara; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Gabrielson, Marike; Gammon, Marilie D; Ganz, Patricia A; Gapstur, Susan M; Garber, Judy; Gaudet, Mia M; Gayther, Simon A; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ghoussaini, Maya; Giles, Graham G; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K; Goldberg, Mark S; Goldgar, David E; González-Neira, Anna; Greene, Mark H; Gronwald, Jacek; Guénel, Pascal; Gunter, Marc; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V O; Hart, Steven; Healey, Sue; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Henderson, Brian E; Herzog, Josef; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hooning, Maartje J; Hoover, Robert N; Hopper, John L; Humphreys, Keith; Hunter, David J; Huzarski, Tomasz; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Isaacs, Claudine; Jakubowska, Anna; James, Paul; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M; Jones, Michael; Kabisch, Maria; Kar, Siddhartha; Karlan, Beth Y; Khan, Sofia; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kibriya, Muhammad G; Knight, Julia A; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kristensen, Vessela; Kwong, Ava; Laitman, Yael; Lambrechts, Diether; Lazaro, Conxi; Lee, Eunjung; Le Marchand, Loic; Lester, Jenny; Lindblom, Annika; Lindor, Noralane; Lindstrom, Sara; Liu, Jianjun; Long, Jirong; Lubinski, Jan; Mai, Phuong L; Makalic, Enes; Malone, Kathleen E; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Martens, John W M; McGuffog, Lesley; Meindl, Alfons; Miller, Austin; Milne, Roger L; Miron, Penelope; Montagna, Marco; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Mulligan, Anna M; Muranen, Taru A; Nathanson, Katherine L; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nussbaum, Robert L; Offit, Kenneth; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Olson, Janet E; Osorio, Ana; Park, Sue K; Peeters, Petra H; Peissel, Bernard; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Phelan, Catherine M; Pilarski, Robert; Poppe, Bruce; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rahman, Nazneen; Rantala, Johanna; Rappaport, Christine; Rennert, Gad; Richardson, Andrea; Robson, Mark; Romieu, Isabelle; Rudolph, Anja; Rutgers, Emiel J; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Santella, Regina M; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmidt, Daniel F; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schmutzler, Rita K; Schumacher, Fredrick; Scott, Rodney; Senter, Leigha; Sharma, Priyanka; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa; Steinemann, Doris; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Swerdlow, Anthony; Szabo, Csilla I; Tamimi, Rulla; Tapper, William; Teixeira, Manuel R; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary B; Thomassen, Mads; Thompson, Deborah; Tihomirova, Laima; Toland, Amanda E; Tollenaar, Robert A E M; Tomlinson, Ian; Truong, Thérèse; Tsimiklis, Helen; Teulé, Alex; Tumino, Rosario; Tung, Nadine; Turnbull, Clare; Ursin, Giski; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wang, Zhaoming; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Whittemore, Alice; Wildiers, Hans; Winqvist, Robert; Yang, Xiaohong R; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Yao, Song; Zamora, M Pilar; Zheng, Wei; Hall, Per; Kraft, Peter; Vachon, Celine; Slager, Susan; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pharoah, Paul D P; Monteiro, Alvaro A N; García-Closas, Montserrat; Easton, Douglas F; Antoniou, Antonis C

    2016-01-01

    Common variants in 94 loci have been associated with breast cancer including 15 loci with genome-wide significant associations (P<5 × 10(-8)) with oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer and BRCA1-associated breast cancer risk. In this study, to identify new ER-negative susceptibility loci, we performed a meta-analysis of 11 genome-wide association studies (GWAS) consisting of 4,939 ER-negative cases and 14,352 controls, combined with 7,333 ER-negative cases and 42,468 controls and 15,252 BRCA1 mutation carriers genotyped on the iCOGS array. We identify four previously unidentified loci including two loci at 13q22 near KLF5, a 2p23.2 locus near WDR43 and a 2q33 locus near PPIL3 that display genome-wide significant associations with ER-negative breast cancer. In addition, 19 known breast cancer risk loci have genome-wide significant associations and 40 had moderate associations (P<0.05) with ER-negative disease. Using functional and eQTL studies we implicate TRMT61B and WDR43 at 2p23.2 and PPIL3 at 2q33 in ER-negative breast cancer aetiology. All ER-negative loci combined account for ∼11% of familial relative risk for ER-negative disease and may contribute to improved ER-negative and BRCA1 breast cancer risk prediction. PMID:27117709

  20. Identification, expression, and immuno-reactivity of Sol i 2 & Sol i 4 venom proteins of queen red imported fire ants, Solenopsis invicta Buren (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).

    PubMed

    Lockwood, Stephanie A; Haghipour-Peasley, Jilla; Hoffman, Donald R; Deslippe, Richard J

    2012-10-01

    We report on two low-molecular weight proteins that are stored in the venom of queen red imported fire ants (Solenopsis invicta). Translated amino acid sequences identified one protein to have 74.8% identity with the Sol i 2w worker allergen, and the other protein was found to have 96/97% identity with Sol i 4.01w/4.02w worker allergens. Both Sol i 2 and Sol i 4 queen and worker proteins were expressed using pEXP1-DEST vector in SHuffle™ T7 Express lysY Escherichia coli. Proteins were expressed at significant concentrations, as opposed to the μg/ml amounts by our previous expression methods, enabling further study of these proteins. Sol i 2q protein bound weakly to human IgE, sera pooled from allergic patients, whereas Sol i 2w, Sol i 4.01w, and Sol i 4q proteins bound strongly. Despite Sol i 2w and Sol i 2q proteins having 74.8% identity, the queen protein is less immuno-reactive than the worker allergen. This finding is consistent with allergic individuals being less sensitive to queen than worker venom.

  1. Treatment of a slaughterhouse wastewater: effect of internal recycle rate on chemical oxygen demand, total Kjeldahl nitrogen and total phosphorus removal.

    PubMed

    Fongsatitkul, P; Wareham, D G; Elefsiniotis, P; Charoensuk, P

    2011-12-01

    This study investigated the ability of an anaerobic/anoxic/oxic (A2/O) system to treat a slaughterhouse wastewater. The system employed two identical continuous-flow reactors (101 total liquid volume each) running in parallel with the main operational variable, being the internal recycle (IR) rate. The chemical oxygen demand (COD), total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN) and total phosphorus (TP) performance was evaluated as the IR flowrate was increased from a Q of 151d(-1) to 4Q at a system hydraulic retention time of 16 h and a solids retention time of 10 d. The COD:TKN and COD:TP ratios were 8.2:1 and 54:1, which supported both nitrogen and phosphorus removal. For all IR multiples of Q, the COD removal was in excess of 90%. The TKN removal showed a modest improvement (a 4-5% increase, depending on the dissolved oxygen (DO)) as the IR doubled from Q to 2Q, but no further increase was observed at the 4Q IR rate. The TP removal reached its optimum (around 85%-89% (again depending on the DO)) at the 2Q rate.

  2. An investigation of genetic heterogeneity and linkage disequilibrium in 161 families with spinal muscular atrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Merette, C.; Gilliam, T.C.; Brzustowicz, L.M. ); Daniels, R.J.; Davies, K.E. ); Melki, J.; Munnich, A. ); Pericak-Vance, M.A. ); Siddique, T. ); Voosen, B. )

    1994-05-01

    The authors performed linkage analysis of 161 families with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) in which affected individuals suffer from the intermediate or mild form of the disease (Types II or III). Markers for six loci encompassing the chromosome 5q11.2-q13.3 region were typed. The best map location for the disease locus was found to be between D5S6 and MAP1B. The corresponding 1 lod unit support interval is confined to this interval and spans 0.5 cM. The data strongly support the hypothesis of linkage heterogeneity (likelihood ratio, 1.14 [times] 10[sup 4]), with 5% of the families unlinked. Four families have a probability of less than 50% of segregating the SMA gene linked to the region 5q11.2-q13.3. A likelihood approach to test for linkage disequilibrium revealed no significant departure from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium with any marker under study. 28 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. A genome-wide association scan implicates DCHS2, RUNX2, GLI3, PAX1 and EDAR in human facial variation.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Kaustubh; Fuentes-Guajardo, Macarena; Quinto-Sánchez, Mirsha; Mendoza-Revilla, Javier; Camilo Chacón-Duque, Juan; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Jaramillo, Claudia; Arias, William; Lozano, Rodrigo Barquera; Pérez, Gastón Macín; Gómez-Valdés, Jorge; Villamil-Ramírez, Hugo; Hunemeier, Tábita; Ramallo, Virginia; Silva de Cerqueira, Caio C; Hurtado, Malena; Villegas, Valeria; Granja, Vanessa; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Schuler-Faccini, Lavinia; Salzano, Francisco M; Bortolini, Maria-Cátira; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Cheeseman, Michael; Rosique, Javier; Bedoya, Gabriel; Rothhammer, Francisco; Headon, Denis; González-José, Rolando; Balding, David; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2016-05-19

    We report a genome-wide association scan for facial features in ∼6,000 Latin Americans. We evaluated 14 traits on an ordinal scale and found significant association (P values<5 × 10(-8)) at single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in four genomic regions for three nose-related traits: columella inclination (4q31), nose bridge breadth (6p21) and nose wing breadth (7p13 and 20p11). In a subsample of ∼3,000 individuals we obtained quantitative traits related to 9 of the ordinal phenotypes and, also, a measure of nasion position. Quantitative analyses confirmed the ordinal-based associations, identified SNPs in 2q12 associated to chin protrusion, and replicated the reported association of nasion position with SNPs in PAX3. Strongest association in 2q12, 4q31, 6p21 and 7p13 was observed for SNPs in the EDAR, DCHS2, RUNX2 and GLI3 genes, respectively. Associated SNPs in 20p11 extend to PAX1. Consistent with the effect of EDAR on chin protrusion, we documented alterations of mandible length in mice with modified Edar funtion.

  4. Phenotype of a child with Angelman syndrome born to a woman with Prader-Willi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ostergaard, John R

    2015-09-01

    This report describes the phenotype, from early childhood to adolescence, of a girl with Angelman syndrome (AS) born following a maternal transmission of a germline paternal 15q11.2-q13 deletion. During early childhood, she showed a typical AS phenotype, such as jerky movements, poor sleep, high voltage electroencephalography pattern, epilepsy, and a severe developmental disability. As she grew older, indications of phenotypical traits similar to Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) appeared, in particular hyperphagic behavior and a body fat distribution similar to that reported in PWS. She generally showed cheerful AS behavior and had the characteristic outbursts of laughter, but her attitude to other people did not reflect the usual shared enjoyment of interaction seen in children with AS. In unfamiliar surroundings, she withdrew socially, similar to children with PWS, and her insistence on the same, rigid routines was similar to behavior patterns in PWS. The dysmorphic facial features that characterize AS were blurred in adolescence. The specified features that this AS patient had in common with PWS were hardly incidental and, if verified by upcoming case reports of children born to women with a paternal 15q11.2-q13 deletion, they may show new aspects of genetic imprinting. PMID:25832033

  5. Q2 Evolution of the Neutron Spin Structure Moments using a 3He Target

    SciTech Connect

    M. Amarian; L. Auerbach; T. Averett; J. Berthot; P. Bertin; B. Bertozzi; T. Black; E. Brash; D. Brown; E. Burtin; J. Calarco; G. Cates; Z. Chai; J.P. Chen; Seon-ho Choi; E. Chudakov; E. Cisbani; C.W. de Jager; A. Deur; R. DiSalvo; S. Dieterich; P. Djawotho; M. Finn; K. Fissum; H. Fonvieille; S. Frullani; H. Gao; J. Gao; F. Garibaldi; A. Gasparian; S. Gilad; R. Gilman; A. Glamazdin; C. Glashausser; E. Goldberg; J. Gomez; V. Gorbenko; J.O. Hansen; B. Hersman; R. Holmes; G.M. Huber; E. Hughes; B. Humensky; S. Incerti; M. Iodice; S. Jensen; X. Jiang; C. Jones; G. Jones; M. Jones; C. Jutier; A. Ketikyan; I. Kominis; W. Korsch; K. Kramer; K. Kumar; G. Kumbartzki; M. Kuss; E. Lakuriqi; G. Laveissiere; J. Lerose; M. Liang; N. Liyanage; G. Lolos; S. Malov; J. Marroncle; K. McCormick; R. Mckeown; Z.E. Meziani; R. Michaels; J. Mitchell; Z. Papandreou; T. Pavlin; G.G. Petratos; D. Pripstein; D. Prout; R. Ransome; Y. Roblin; D. Rowntree; M. Rvachev; F. Sabatie; A. Saha; K. Slifer; P. Souder; T. Saito; S. Strauch; R. Suleiman; K. Takahashi; S. Teijiro; L. Todor; H. Tsubota; H. Ueno; G. Urciuoli; R. Van der Meer; P. Vernin; H. Voskanian; B. Wojtsekhowski; F. Xiong; W. Xu; J.C. Yang; B. Zhang; P. Zolnierczuk

    2004-01-01

    We have measured the spin structure functions g{sub 1} and g{sub 2} of {sup 3}He in a double-spin experiment by inclusively scattering polarized electrons at energies ranging from 0.862 to 5.07 GeV off a polarized {sup 3}He target at a 15.5{sup o} scattering angle. Excitation energies covered the resonance and the onset of the deep inelastic regions. We have determined for the first time the Q{sup 2} evolution of {Gamma}{sub 1}(Q{sup 2})=/int{sub 0}{sup 1} g{sub 1}(x,Q{sup 2}) dx, {Gamma}{sub 2}(Q{sup 2})=/int{sub 0}{sup 1} g{sub 2}(x,Q{sup 2}) dx and d{sub 2} (Q{sup 2}) = /int{sub 0}{sup 1} x {sup 2}[2g{sub 1}(x,Q{sup 2}) + 3g{sub 2}(x,Q{sup 2})] dx for the neutron in the range 0.1 GeV{sup 2} /leq Q{sup 2} /leq 0.9 GeV{sup 2} with good precision. {Gamma}{sub 1}(Q{sup 2}) displays a smooth variation from high to low Q{sup 2}. The Burkhardt-Cottingham sum rule holds within uncertainties and d{sub 2} is non-zero over the measured range.

  6. A recurrent 11q aberration pattern characterizes a subset of MYC-negative high-grade B-cell lymphomas resembling Burkitt lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Salaverria, Itziar; Martin-Guerrero, Idoia; Wagener, Rabea; Kreuz, Markus; Kohler, Christian W; Richter, Julia; Pienkowska-Grela, Barbara; Adam, Patrick; Burkhardt, Birgit; Claviez, Alexander; Damm-Welk, Christine; Drexler, Hans G; Hummel, Michael; Jaffe, Elaine S; Küppers, Ralf; Lefebvre, Christine; Lisfeld, Jasmin; Löffler, Markus; Macleod, Roderick A F; Nagel, Inga; Oschlies, Ilske; Rosolowski, Maciej; Russell, Robert B; Rymkiewicz, Grzegorz; Schindler, Detlev; Schlesner, Matthias; Scholtysik, René; Schwaenen, Carsten; Spang, Rainer; Szczepanowski, Monika; Trümper, Lorenz; Vater, Inga; Wessendorf, Swen; Klapper, Wolfram; Siebert, Reiner

    2014-02-20

    The genetic hallmark of Burkitt lymphoma (BL) is the t(8;14)(q24;q32) and its variants leading to activation of the MYC oncogene. It is a matter of debate whether true BL without MYC translocation exists. Here, we identified 59 lymphomas concordantly called BL by 2 gene expression classifiers among 753 B-cell lymphomas. Only 2 (3%) of these 59 molecular BL lacked a MYC translocation, which both shared a peculiar pattern of chromosome 11q aberration characterized by interstitial gains including 11q23.2-q23.3 and telomeric losses of 11q24.1-qter. We extended our analysis to 17 MYC-negative high-grade B-cell lymphomas with a similar 11q aberration and showed this aberration to be recurrently associated with morphologic and clinical features of BL. The minimal region of gain was defined by high-level amplifications in 11q23.3 and associated with overexpression of genes including PAFAH1B2 on a transcriptional and protein level. The recurrent region of loss contained a focal homozygous deletion in 11q24.2-q24.3 including the ETS1 gene, which was shown to be mutated in 4 of 16 investigated cases. These findings indicate the existence of a molecularly distinct subset of B-cell lymphomas reminiscent of BL, which is characterized by deregulation of genes in 11q. PMID:24398325

  7. Gαi2 Signaling Is Required for Skeletal Muscle Growth, Regeneration, and Satellite Cell Proliferation and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Minetti, Giulia C.; Feige, Jerome N.; Bombard, Florian; Heier, Annabelle; Morvan, Fredric; Nürnberg, Bernd; Leiss, Veronika; Birnbaumer, Lutz

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that activation of Gαi2, an α subunit of the heterotrimeric G protein complex, induces skeletal muscle hypertrophy and myoblast differentiation. To determine whether Gαi2 is required for skeletal muscle growth or regeneration, Gαi2-null mice were analyzed. Gαi2 knockout mice display decreased lean body mass, reduced muscle size, and impaired skeletal muscle regeneration after cardiotoxin-induced injury. Short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated knockdown of Gαi2 in satellite cells (SCs) leads to defective satellite cell proliferation, fusion, and differentiation ex vivo. The impaired differentiation is consistent with the observation that the myogenic regulatory factors MyoD and Myf5 are downregulated upon knockdown of Gαi2. Interestingly, the expression of microRNA 1 (miR-1), miR-27b, and miR-206, three microRNAs that have been shown to regulate SC proliferation and differentiation, is increased by a constitutively active mutant of Gαi2 [Gαi2(Q205L)] and counterregulated by Gαi2 knockdown. As for the mechanism, this study demonstrates that Gαi2(Q205L) regulates satellite cell differentiation into myotubes in a protein kinase C (PKC)- and histone deacetylase (HDAC)-dependent manner. PMID:24298018

  8. Suppression laws for multiparticle interference in Sylvester interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespi, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Quantum interference of correlated particles is a fundamental quantum phenomenon which carries signatures of the statistics properties of the particles, such as bunching or antibunching. In the presence of particular symmetries, interference effects take place with high visibility, one of the simplest cases being the suppression of coincident detection in the Hong-Ou-Mandel effect. Tichy et al., [Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 220405 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.104.220405] recently demonstrated a simple sufficient criterion for the suppression of output events in the more general case of Fourier multiport beam splitters. Here we study the case in which 2q particles (either bosonic or fermionic) are injected simultaneously in different ports of a Sylvester interferometer with 2p≥2q modes. In particular, we prove a necessary and sufficient criterion for a significant fraction of output states to be suppressed, for specific input configurations. This may find application in assessing the indistinguishability of multiple single-photon sources and in the validation of boson sampling machines.

  9. On fractional Schro{sup ¨}dinger equation in R{sup N} with critical growth

    SciTech Connect

    Shang, Xudong E-mail: yynjnu@126.com; Zhang, Jihui; Yang, Yang E-mail: yynjnu@126.com

    2013-12-15

    In this paper, we study the following nonlinear fractional Schro{sup ¨}dinger equation with critical exponent h{sup 2α}(−Δ){sup α}u+V(x)u=|u|{sup 2{sub α}{sup *−2}}u+λ|u|{sup q−2}u,x∈R{sup N}, where h is a small positive parameter, 0 < α < 1, 2<q<2{sub α}{sup *}, 2{sub α}{sup *}=(2N)/(N−2α) is the critical Sobolev exponent, and N > 2α, λ > 0 is a parameter. The potential V:R{sup N}→R is a positive continuous function satisfying some natural assumptions. By using variational methods, we obtain the existence of solutions in the following case: if 2<q<2{sub α}{sup *}, there exists λ{sub 0} > 0 such that for all λ ⩾ λ{sub 0}, we show that it has one nontrivial solution and there exist at least cat{sub Λ{sub δ}}(Λ) nontrivial solutions; if max(2,(4α)/(N−2α) ) 0.

  10. A novel locus for split-hand/foot malformation associated with tibial hemimelia (SHFLD syndrome) maps to chromosome region 17p13.1-17p13.3.

    PubMed

    Lezirovitz, Karina; Maestrelli, Sylvia Regina Pedrosa; Cotrim, Nelson Henderson; Otto, Paulo A; Pearson, Peter L; Mingroni-Netto, Regina Celia

    2008-07-01

    Split-hand/foot malformation (SHFM) associated with aplasia of long bones, SHFLD syndrome or Tibial hemimelia-ectrodactyly syndrome is a rare condition with autosomal dominant inheritance, reduced penetrance and an incidence estimated to be about 1 in 1,000,000 liveborns. To date, three chromosomal regions have been reported as strong candidates for harboring SHFLD syndrome genes: 1q42.2-q43, 6q14.1 and 2q14.2. We characterized the phenotype of nine affected individuals from a large family with the aim of mapping the causative gene. Among the nine affected patients, four had only SHFM of the hands and no tibial defects, three had both defects and two had only unilateral tibial hemimelia. In keeping with previous publications of this and other families, there was clear evidence of both variable expression and incomplete penetrance, the latter bearing hallmarks of anticipation. Segregation analysis and multipoint Lod scores calculations (maximum Lod score of 5.03 using the LINKMAP software) using all potentially informative family members, both affected and unaffected, identified the chromosomal region 17p13.1-17p13.3 as the best and only candidate for harboring a novel mutated gene responsible for the syndrome in this family. The candidate gene CRK located within this region was sequenced but no pathogenic mutation was detected.

  11. Karyotypic relationships in Asiatic asses (kulan and kiang) as defined using horse chromosome arm-specific and region-specific probes.

    PubMed

    Musilova, Petra; Kubickova, Svatava; Horin, Petr; Vodicka, Roman; Rubes, Jiri

    2009-01-01

    Cross-species chromosome painting has been applied to most of the species making up the numerically small family Equidae. However, comparative mapping data were still lacking in Asiatic asses kulan (Equus hemionus kulan) and kiang (E. kiang). The set of horse arm-specific probes generated by laser microdissection was hybridized onto kulan (E. hemionus kulan) and kiang (E. kiang) chromosomes in order to establish a genome-wide chromosomal correspondence between these Asiatic asses and the horse. Moreover, region-specific probes were generated to determine fusion configuration and orientation of conserved syntenic blocks. The kulan karyotype (2n = 54) was ascertained to be almost identical to the previously investigated karyotype of onager E. h. onager (2n = 56). The only difference is in fusion/fission of chromosomes homologous to horse 2q/3q, which are involved in chromosome number polymorphism in many Equidae species. E. kiang karyotype differs from the karyotype of E. hemionus by two additional fusions 8q/15 and 7/25. Chromosomes equivalent to 2q and 3q are not fused in kiang individuals with 2n = 52. Several discrepancies in centromere positions among kulan, kiang and horse chromosomes have been described. Most of the chromosome fusions in Asiatic asses are of centromere-centromere type. Comparative chromosome painting in kiang completed the efforts to establish chromosomal homologies in all representatives of the family Equidae. Application of region-specific probes allows refinement comparative maps of Asiatic asses.

  12. Duplication and deletion of CFC1 associated with heterotaxy syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ruixue; Long, Fei; Wang, Liping; Xu, Yuejuan; Guo, Ying; Li, Fen; Chen, Sun; Sun, Kun; Xu, Rang

    2015-02-01

    Heterotaxy syndrome, which causes significant morbidity and mortality, is a class of congenital disorders, in which normal left-right asymmetry cannot be properly established. To explore the role of copy number variants (CNVs) in the occurrence of heterotaxy syndrome, we recruited 93 heterotaxy patients and studied 12 of them by the Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP 6.0 Array. The results were confirmed in the remaining 81 patients and 500 healthy children by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The analysis of the SNP6.0 array showed a duplication of chromosome 2q21.1, which was verified by qPCR. The result of qPCR in the other 81 patients showed that 8/81 patients had the CNVs of 2q21.1 and the only overlapping gene in these patients is CFC1. However, in the 500 healthy children, only one carried the duplication of CFC1 (p=3.5×10(-7)). The duplication and deletion of CFC1 may play key roles in the occurrence of heterotaxy syndrome. Moreover, the transposed great arteries, double outlet right ventricle, single atrium, and single ventricle may share a common genetic etiology with the heterotaxy syndrome. PMID:25423076

  13. Interphase study by fluorescence in situ hybridization of spermatozoa of a paracentric inversion heterozygote

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, J.K.; Best, R.G.

    1994-09-01

    Cytogenetic studies of peripheral lymphocytes were initiated on a couple with a history of three spontaneous 1st trimester losses and oligospermia. The results revealed the woman to have a normal female karyotype. The man had a karyotype of 46,XY,inv(2)(q14.2q24.3). Interphase sperm studies were offered as an attempt to quantify the relative proportion of sperm with acentric and dicentric chromosome No. 2 in response to the couple`s concern that chromosomally unbalanced sperm resulting from recombination of the inversion was the primary cause of pregnancy losses. Slides were prepared and processed as previously described. A two-color probe cocktail consisting of a biotinylated {alpha}-satellite probe for No. 2 and a digoxigenin-labeled probe for {alpha}-satellite No. 17 as an internal control was employed. Among 496 cells with a single signal for chromosome No. 17, we observed 2 with no signal for chromsome No. 2, 492 with a single signal for No. 2, and 2 cells with 2 signals for No. 2. These findings indicate that the proportion of unbalanced recombinant sperm is probably under 1%, and that other factors are likely to be involved in the etiology of this couple`s pregnancy losses.

  14. Model for the {Delta}(1600) resonance and {gamma}N{yields}{Delta}(1600) transition

    SciTech Connect

    Ramalho, G.; Tsushima, K.

    2010-10-01

    A covariant spectator constituent quark model is applied to study the {gamma}N{yields}{Delta}(1600) transition. Two processes are important in the transition: a photon couples to the individual quarks of the {Delta}(1600) core (quark core), and a photon couples to the intermediate pion-baryon states (pion cloud). While the quark core contributions are estimated assuming {Delta}(1600) as the first radial excitation of {Delta}(1232), the pion cloud contributions are estimated based on an analogy with the {gamma}N{yields}{Delta}(1232) transition. To estimate the pion cloud contributions in the {gamma}N{yields}{Delta}(1600) transition, we include the relevant intermediate states, {pi}N, {pi}{Delta}, {pi}N(1440) and {pi}{Delta}(1600). Dependence on the four-momentum transfer squared, Q{sup 2}, is predicted for the magnetic dipole transition form factor, G{sub M}*(Q{sup 2}), as well as the helicity amplitudes, A{sub 1/2}(Q{sup 2}) and A{sub 3/2}(Q{sup 2}). The results at Q{sup 2}=0 are compared with the existing data.

  15. A model for the Delta(1600) resonance and gamma N -> Delta(1600) transition

    SciTech Connect

    G. Ramalho, K. Tsushima

    2010-10-01

    A covariant spectator constituent quark model is applied to study the gamma N -> Delta(1600) transition. Two processes are important in the transition: a photon couples to the individual quarks of the Delta(1600) core (quark core), and a photon couples to the intermediate pion-baryon states (pion cloud). While the quark core contributions are estimated assuming Delta(1600) as the first radial excitation of Delta(1232), the pion cloud contributions are estimated based on an analogy with the gamma N -> Delta(1232) transition. To estimate the pion cloud contributions in the gamma N -> Delta(1600) transition, we include the relevant intermediate states, pi-N, pi-Delta, pi-N(1440) and pi-Delta(1600). Dependence on the four-momentum transfer squared, Q2, is predicted for the magnetic dipole transition form factor, GM*(Q2), as well as the helicity amplitudes, A_1/2(Q2) and A_3/2(Q2). The results at Q2=0 are compared with the existing data.

  16. Mitochondrial impairments contribute to Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 progression and can be ameliorated by the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant MitoQ.

    PubMed

    Stucki, David M; Ruegsegger, Céline; Steiner, Silvio; Radecke, Julika; Murphy, Michael P; Zuber, Benoît; Saxena, Smita

    2016-08-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1), due to an unstable polyglutamine expansion within the ubiquitously expressed Ataxin-1 protein, leads to the premature degeneration of Purkinje cells (PCs), decreasing motor coordination and causing death within 10-15 years of diagnosis. Currently, there are no therapies available to slow down disease progression. As secondary cellular impairments contributing to SCA1 progression are poorly understood, here, we focused on identifying those processes by performing a PC specific proteome profiling of Sca1(154Q/2Q) mice at a symptomatic stage. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed prominent alterations in mitochondrial proteins. Immunohistochemical and serial block-face scanning electron microscopy analyses confirmed that PCs underwent age-dependent alterations in mitochondrial morphology. Moreover, colorimetric assays demonstrated impairment of the electron transport chain complexes (ETC) and decrease in ATPase activity. Subsequently, we examined whether the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant MitoQ could restore mitochondrial dysfunction and prevent SCA1-associated pathology in Sca1(154Q/2Q) mice. MitoQ treatment both presymptomatically and when symptoms were evident ameliorated mitochondrial morphology and restored the activities of the ETC complexes. Notably, MitoQ slowed down the appearance of SCA1-linked neuropathology such as lack of motor coordination as well as prevented oxidative stress-induced DNA damage and PC loss. Our work identifies a central role for mitochondria in PC degeneration in SCA1 and provides evidence for the supportive use of mitochondria-targeted therapeutics in slowing down disease progression.

  17. Asymmetry parameter studies for systems containing the 35Cl nucleus from Zeeman NQR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, K. V.

    1995-02-01

    A review of Zeeman nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) work on systems containing the 35Cl nucleus is presented. In the case of the 35cl nucleus with spin I = {3}/{2}, owing to the existence of ± m degeneracy in the absence of a magnetic field (Kramer's degeneracy), there exists only one pure NQR frequency which is related to the two electric field gradient (EFG) parameters, η and e2qQ, by the formula, v = ( {e 2qQ }/{2h})(1 + ( {η 2}/{3})) {1}/{2}. Hence it is necessary to study the Zeeman effect to obtain both these parameters. Zeeman NQR studies have been carried out by many workers using single crystals and powder specimens, and these are discussed here. The computer simulation method for powder η values is also presented in this paper. The numerical computation program for an IBM 370-158 computer used to simulate the powder Zeeman spectrum is also discussed briefly. The paper also presents two-dimensional Zeeman NQR and Zeeman perturbed spin-echo envelope modulation (ZSEEM) studies on 35Cl systems. Very recently, two-dimensional NQR experiments based on the principle of nutation spectroscopy have been carried out with zero applied magnetic field on {3}/{2} spin nuclei. This method is also discussed in this review. The relationship between the asymmetry parameter (η) and bond properties is also discussed.

  18. Quantum transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Faraggi, A.E.; Matone, M.

    1998-01-09

    We show that the quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation can be written in the classical form with the spatial derivative {partial_derivative}{sub q} replaced by {partial_derivative}{sub q} with dq = dq/{radical}1{minus}{beta}{sup 2}(q), where {beta}{sup 2}(q) is strictly related to the quantum potential. This can be seen as the opposite of the problem of finding the wave function representation of classical mechanics as formulated by Schiller and Rosen. The structure of the above {open_quotes}quantum transformation{close_quotes}, related to the recently formulated equivalence principle, indicates that the potential deforms space geometry. In particular, a result by Flanders implies that both W(q) = V(q) {minus} E and the quantum potential Q are proportional to the curvatures {kappa}{sub W} and {kappa}{sub Q} which arise as natural invariants in an equivalence problem for curves in the projective line. In this formulation the Schroedinger equation takes the geometrical form ({partial_derivative}{sub q}{sup 2} + {kappa}{sub W}){psi} = 0.

  19. Mutations in CNNM4 Cause Jalili Syndrome, Consisting of Autosomal-Recessive Cone-Rod Dystrophy and Amelogenesis Imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Parry, David A.; Mighell, Alan J.; El-Sayed, Walid; Shore, Roger C.; Jalili, Ismail K.; Dollfus, Hélène; Bloch-Zupan, Agnes; Carlos, Roman; Carr, Ian M.; Downey, Louise M.; Blain, Katharine M.; Mansfield, David C.; Shahrabi, Mehdi; Heidari, Mansour; Aref, Parissa; Abbasi, Mohsen; Michaelides, Michel; Moore, Anthony T.; Kirkham, Jennifer; Inglehearn, Chris F.

    2009-01-01

    The combination of recessively inherited cone-rod dystrophy (CRD) and amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) was first reported by Jalili and Smith in 1988 in a family subsequently linked to a locus on chromosome 2q11, and it has since been reported in a second small family. We have identified five further ethnically diverse families cosegregating CRD and AI. Phenotypic characterization of teeth and visual function in the published and new families reveals a consistent syndrome in all seven families, and all link or are consistent with linkage to 2q11, confirming the existence of a genetically homogenous condition that we now propose to call Jalili syndrome. Using a positional-candidate approach, we have identified mutations in the CNNM4 gene, encoding a putative metal transporter, accounting for the condition in all seven families. Nine mutations are described in all, three missense, three terminations, two large deletions, and a single base insertion. We confirmed expression of Cnnm4 in the neural retina and in ameloblasts in the developing tooth, suggesting a hitherto unknown connection between tooth biomineralization and retinal function. The identification of CNNM4 as the causative gene for Jalili syndrome, characterized by syndromic CRD with AI, has the potential to provide new insights into the roles of metal transport in visual function and biomineralization. PMID:19200525

  20. Identification of gene copy number variations in patients with mental retardation using array-CGH: Novel syndromes in a large French series.

    PubMed

    Jaillard, Sylvie; Drunat, Séverine; Bendavid, Claude; Aboura, Azzedine; Etcheverry, Amandine; Journel, Hubert; Delahaye, Andrée; Pasquier, Laurent; Bonneau, Dominique; Toutain, Annick; Burglen, Lydie; Guichet, Agnès; Pipiras, Eva; Gilbert-Dussardier, Brigitte; Benzacken, Brigitte; Martin-Coignard, Dominique; Henry, Catherine; David, Albert; Lucas, Josette; Mosser, Jean; David, Véronique; Odent, Sylvie; Verloes, Alain; Dubourg, Christèle

    2010-01-01

    Array-CGH has revealed a large number of copy number variations (CNVs) in patients with multiple congenital anomalies and/or mental retardation (MCA/MR). According to criteria recently listed, pathogenicity was clearly suspected for some CNVs but benign CNVs, considered as polymorphisms, have complicated the interpretation of the results. In this study, genomic DNAs from 132 French patients with unexplained mental retardation were analysed by genome wide high-resolution Agilent 44K oligonucleotide arrays. The results were in accordance with those observed in previous studies: the detection rate of pathogenic CNVs was 14.4%. A non-random involvement of several chromosomal regions was observed. Some of the microimbalances recurrently involved regions (1q21.1, 2q23.1, 2q32q33, 7p13, 17p13.3, 17p11.2, 17q21.31) corresponding to known or novel syndromes. For all the pathogenic CNVs, further cases are needed to allow more accurate genotype-phenotype correlations underscoring the importance of databases to group patients with similar molecular data.

  1. Extended spectrum of MBD5 mutations in neurodevelopmental disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bonnet, Céline; Ali Khan, Asma; Bresso, Emmanuel; Vigouroux, Charlène; Béri, Mylène; Lejczak, Sarah; Deemer, Bénédicte; Andrieux, Joris; Philippe, Christophe; Moncla, Anne; Giurgea, Irina; Devignes, Marie-Dominique; Leheup, Bruno; Jonveaux, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Intellectual disability (ID) is a clinical sign reflecting diverse neurodevelopmental disorders that are genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous. Just recently, partial or complete deletion of methyl-CpG-binding domain 5 (MBD5) gene has been implicated as causative in the phenotype associated with 2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome. In the course of systematic whole-genome screening of individuals with unexplained ID by array-based comparative genomic hybridization, we identified de novo intragenic deletions of MBD5 in three patients leading, as previously documented, to haploinsufficiency of MBD5. In addition, we described a patient with an unreported de novo MBD5 intragenic duplication. Reverse transcriptase-PCR and sequencing analyses showed the presence of numerous aberrant transcripts leading to premature termination codon. To further elucidate the involvement of MBD5 in ID, we sequenced ten coding, five non-coding exons and an evolutionary conserved region in intron 2, in a selected cohort of 78 subjects with a phenotype reminiscent of 2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome. Besides variants most often inherited from an healthy parent, we identified for the first time a de novo nonsense mutation associated with a much more damaging phenotype. Taken together, these results extend the mutation spectrum in MBD5 gene and contribute to refine the associated phenotype of neurodevelopmental disorder. PMID:23422940

  2. Extended spectrum of MBD5 mutations in neurodevelopmental disorders.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Céline; Ali Khan, Asma; Bresso, Emmanuel; Vigouroux, Charlène; Béri, Mylène; Lejczak, Sarah; Deemer, Bénédicte; Andrieux, Joris; Philippe, Christophe; Moncla, Anne; Giurgea, Irina; Devignes, Marie-Dominique; Leheup, Bruno; Jonveaux, Philippe

    2013-12-01

    Intellectual disability (ID) is a clinical sign reflecting diverse neurodevelopmental disorders that are genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous. Just recently, partial or complete deletion of methyl-CpG-binding domain 5 (MBD5) gene has been implicated as causative in the phenotype associated with 2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome. In the course of systematic whole-genome screening of individuals with unexplained ID by array-based comparative genomic hybridization, we identified de novo intragenic deletions of MBD5 in three patients leading, as previously documented, to haploinsufficiency of MBD5. In addition, we described a patient with an unreported de novo MBD5 intragenic duplication. Reverse transcriptase-PCR and sequencing analyses showed the presence of numerous aberrant transcripts leading to premature termination codon. To further elucidate the involvement of MBD5 in ID, we sequenced ten coding, five non-coding exons and an evolutionary conserved region in intron 2, in a selected cohort of 78 subjects with a phenotype reminiscent of 2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome. Besides variants most often inherited from an healthy parent, we identified for the first time a de novo nonsense mutation associated with a much more damaging phenotype. Taken together, these results extend the mutation spectrum in MBD5 gene and contribute to refine the associated phenotype of neurodevelopmental disorder.

  3. Trends in U.S. Venture Capital Investments Related to Energy: 1980 through the Third Quarter of 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Dooley, James J.

    2010-11-08

    This report documents trends in U.S. venture capital investments over the period 1980 through the third quarter of calendar year 2010 (2010 Q1+Q2+Q3). Particular attention is given to U.S. venture capital investments in the energy/industrial sector over the period 1980-2010 Q1+Q2+Q3 as well as in the more recently created cross-cutting category of CleanTech over the period 1995-2010 Q1+Q2+Q3. During the early 1980s, U.S. venture capital investments in the energy/industrial sector accounted for more than 20% of all venture capital investments. However subsequent periods of low energy prices, the deregulation of large aspects of the energy industry, and the emergence of fast growing new industries like computers (both hardware and software), biotechnology and the Internet quickly reduced the priority accorded to energy/industrial investments. To wit, venture capital investments related to the energy/industrial sector accounted for only 1% of the $132 billion (in real 2010 US$) invested in 2000 by the U.S. venture capital community. The significant increase in the real price of oil that began in 2003-2004 correlates with renewed interest and increased investment by the venture capital community in energy/industrial investment opportunities. Venture capital investments for 2009 for the energy/industrial sector accounted for $2.4 billion or slightly more than 13% of all venture capital invested that year. The total venture capital invested in energy/industrial during the first three quarters of 2010 is close to $2.4 billion accounting for slightly less than 15% of all venture capital investments during the first three quarters of 2010. In 2009, the aggregate amount invested in CleanTech was $2.1 billion (11% of the total US venture capital invested in that lean year) and for the first three quarters of 2010 US venture capital investments in CleanTech have already exceeded $2.8 billion (18% of all US venture capital investments made during the first three quarters of

  4. Mutations in MAB21L2 Result in Ocular Coloboma, Microcornea and Cataracts

    PubMed Central

    Deml, Brett; Kariminejad, Ariana; Borujerdi, Razieh H. R.; Muheisen, Sanaa; Reis, Linda M.; Semina, Elena V.

    2015-01-01

    Ocular coloboma results from abnormal embryonic development and is often associated with additional ocular and systemic features. Coloboma is a highly heterogeneous disorder with many cases remaining unexplained. Whole exome sequencing from two cousins affected with dominant coloboma with microcornea, cataracts, and skeletal dysplasia identified a novel heterozygous allele in MAB21L2, c.151 C>G, p.(Arg51Gly); the mutation was present in all five family members with the disease and appeared de novo in the first affected generation of the three-generational pedigree. MAB21L2 encodes a protein similar to C. elegans mab-21 cell fate-determining factor; the molecular function of MAB21L2 is largely unknown. To further evaluate the role of MAB21L2, zebrafish mutants carrying a p.(Gln48Serfs*5) frameshift truncation (mab21l2Q48Sfs*5) and a p.(Arg51_Phe52del) in-frame deletion (mab21l2R51_F52del) were developed with TALEN technology. Homozygous zebrafish embryos from both lines developed variable lens and coloboma phenotypes: mab21l2Q48Sfs*5 embryos demonstrated severe lens and retinal defects with complete lethality while mab21l2R51_F52del mutants displayed a milder lens phenotype and severe coloboma with a small number of fish surviving to adulthood. Protein studies showed decreased stability for the human p.(Arg51Gly) and zebrafish p.(Arg51_Phe52del) mutant proteins and predicted a complete loss-of-function for the zebrafish p.(Gln48Serfs*5) frameshift truncation. Additionally, in contrast to wild-type human MAB21L2 transcript, mutant p.(Arg51Gly) mRNA failed to efficiently rescue the ocular phenotype when injected into mab21l2Q48Sfs*5 embryos, suggesting this allele is functionally deficient. Histology, immunohistochemistry, and in situ hybridization experiments identified retinal invagination defects, an increase in cell death, abnormal proliferation patterns, and altered expression of several ocular markers in the mab21l2 mutants. These findings support the

  5. STRONG TIDAL DISSIPATION IN SATURN AND CONSTRAINTS ON ENCELADUS' THERMAL STATE FROM ASTROMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Lainey, Valery; Desmars, Josselin; Arlot, Jean-Eudes; Emelyanov, Nicolai; Remus, Francoise; Karatekin, Oezguer; Charnoz, Sebastien; Mathis, Stephane; Tobie, Gabriel; Zahn, Jean-Paul

    2012-06-10

    Tidal interactions between Saturn and its satellites play a crucial role in both the orbital migration of the satellites and the heating of their interiors. Therefore, constraining the tidal dissipation of Saturn (here the ratio k{sub 2}/Q) opens the door to the past evolution of the whole system. If Saturn's tidal ratio can be determined at different frequencies, it may also be possible to constrain the giant planet's interior structure, which is still uncertain. Here, we try to determine Saturn's tidal ratio through its current effect on the orbits of the main moons, using astrometric data spanning more than a century. We find an intense tidal dissipation (k{sub 2}/Q = (2.3 {+-} 0.7) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4}), which is about 10 times higher than the usual value estimated from theoretical arguments. As a consequence, eccentricity equilibrium for Enceladus can now account for the huge heat emitted from Enceladus' south pole. Moreover, the measured k{sub 2}/Q is found to be poorly sensitive to the tidal frequency, on the short frequency interval considered. This suggests that Saturn's dissipation may not be controlled by turbulent friction in the fluid envelope as commonly believed. If correct, the large tidal expansion of the moon orbits due to this strong Saturnian dissipation would be inconsistent with the moon formations 4.5 Byr ago above the synchronous orbit in the Saturnian subnebulae. But it would be compatible with a new model of satellite formation in which the Saturnian satellites formed possibly over a longer timescale at the outer edge of the main rings. In an attempt to take into account possible significant torques exerted by the rings on Mimas, we fitted a constant rate da/dt on Mimas' semi-major axis as well. We obtained an unexpected large acceleration related to a negative value of da/dt = -(15.7 {+-} 4.4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -15} AU day{sup -1}. Such acceleration is about an order of magnitude larger than the tidal deceleration rates

  6. Strong Tidal Dissipation in Saturn and Constraints on Enceladus' Thermal State from Astrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lainey, Valéry; Karatekin, Özgür; Desmars, Josselin; Charnoz, Sébastien; Arlot, Jean-Eudes; Emelyanov, Nicolai; Le Poncin-Lafitte, Christophe; Mathis, Stéphane; Remus, Françoise; Tobie, Gabriel; Zahn, Jean-Paul

    2012-06-01

    Tidal interactions between Saturn and its satellites play a crucial role in both the orbital migration of the satellites and the heating of their interiors. Therefore, constraining the tidal dissipation of Saturn (here the ratio k 2/Q) opens the door to the past evolution of the whole system. If Saturn's tidal ratio can be determined at different frequencies, it may also be possible to constrain the giant planet's interior structure, which is still uncertain. Here, we try to determine Saturn's tidal ratio through its current effect on the orbits of the main moons, using astrometric data spanning more than a century. We find an intense tidal dissipation (k 2/Q = (2.3 ± 0.7) × 10-4), which is about 10 times higher than the usual value estimated from theoretical arguments. As a consequence, eccentricity equilibrium for Enceladus can now account for the huge heat emitted from Enceladus' south pole. Moreover, the measured k 2/Q is found to be poorly sensitive to the tidal frequency, on the short frequency interval considered. This suggests that Saturn's dissipation may not be controlled by turbulent friction in the fluid envelope as commonly believed. If correct, the large tidal expansion of the moon orbits due to this strong Saturnian dissipation would be inconsistent with the moon formations 4.5 Byr ago above the synchronous orbit in the Saturnian subnebulae. But it would be compatible with a new model of satellite formation in which the Saturnian satellites formed possibly over a longer timescale at the outer edge of the main rings. In an attempt to take into account possible significant torques exerted by the rings on Mimas, we fitted a constant rate da/dt on Mimas' semi-major axis as well. We obtained an unexpected large acceleration related to a negative value of da/dt = -(15.7 ± 4.4) × 10-15 AU day-1. Such acceleration is about an order of magnitude larger than the tidal deceleration rates observed for the other moons. If not coming from an astrometric

  7. Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles and the risk of breast cancer for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: implications for risk prediction

    PubMed Central

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Beesley, Jonathan; McGuffog, Lesley; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Healey, Sue; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Lynch, Henry T.; Isaacs, Claudine; Ganz, Patricia A.; Tomlinson, Gail; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Couch, Fergus J.; Wang, Xianshu; Lindor, Noralane M.; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Radice, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Barile, Monica; Viel, Alessandra; Allavena, Anna; Dall’Olio, Valentina; Peterlongo, Paolo; Szabo, Csilla I.; Zikan, Michal; Claes, Kathleen; Poppe, Bruce; Foretova, Lenka; Mai, Phuong L.; Greene, Mark H.; Rennert, Gad; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Andrulis, Irene L.; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Sunde, Lone; Cruger, Dorthe; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Caligo, Maria; Friedman, Eitan; Kaufman, Bella; Laitman, Yael; Milgrom, Roni; Dubrovsky, Maya; Cohen, Shimrit; Borg, Ake; Jernström, Helena; Lindblom, Annika; Rantala, Johanna; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Melin, Beatrice; Nathanson, Kate; Domchek, Susan; Jakubowska, Ania; Lubinski, Jan; Huzarski, Tomasz; Osorio, Ana; Lasa, Adriana; Durán, Mercedes; Tejada, Maria-Isabel; Godino, Javier; Benitez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Kriege, Mieke; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; van der Luijt, Rob B; van Asperen, Christi J; Devilee, Peter; Meijers-Heijboer, E.J.; Blok, Marinus J; Aalfs, Cora M.; Hogervorst, Frans; Rookus, Matti; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Conroy, Don; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Pichert, Gabriella; Davidson, Rosemarie; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Paterson, Joan; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J.; Porteous, Mary E.; Walker, Lisa; Kennedy, M. John; Dorkins, Huw; Peock, Susan; Godwin, Andrew K.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; de Pauw, Antoine; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Bonadona, Valérie; Lasset, Christine; Dreyfus, Hélène; Leroux, Dominique; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Faivre, Laurence; Loustalot, Catherine; Noguchi, Tetsuro; Sobol, Hagay; Rouleau, Etienne; Nogues, Catherine; Frénay, Marc; Vénat-Bouvet, Laurence; Hopper, John L.; Daly, Mary B.; Terry, Mary B.; John, Esther M.; Buys, Saundra S.; Yassin, Yosuf; Miron, Alex; Goldgar, David; Singer, Christian F.; Dressler, Anne Catharina; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Pfeiler, Georg; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Jønson, Lars; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Offit, Kenneth; Devlin, Vincent; Dutra-Clarke, Ana; Piedmonte, Marion; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Wakeley, Katie; Boggess, John F.; Basil, Jack; Schwartz, Peter E.; Blank, Stephanie V.; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Montagna, Marco; Casella, Cinzia; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Tihomirova, Laima; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Ramus, Susan J.; Sucheston, Lara; Karlan, Beth Y.; Gross, Jenny; Schmutzler, Rita; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Lochmann, Magdalena; Arnold, Norbert; Heidemann, Simone; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Deissler, Helmut; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Kast, Karin; Schönbuchner, Ines; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Nevanlinna, Heli; Simard, Jacques; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Holland, Helene; Chen, Xiaoqing; Platte, Radka; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.

    2010-01-01

    The known breast cancer (BC) susceptibility polymorphisms in FGFR2, TNRC9/TOX3, MAP3K1,LSP1 and 2q35 confer increased risks of BC for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. We evaluated the associations of three additional SNPs, rs4973768 in SLC4A7/NEK10, rs6504950 in STXBP4/COX11 and rs10941679 at 5p12 and reanalyzed the previous associations using additional carriers in a sample of 12,525 BRCA1 and 7,409 BRCA2 carriers. Additionally, we investigated potential interactions between SNPs and assessed the implications for risk prediction. The minor alleles of rs4973768 and rs10941679 were associated with increased BC risk for BRCA2 carriers (per-allele Hazard Ratio (HR)=1.10, 95%CI:1.03-1.18, p=0.006 and HR=1.09, 95%CI:1.01-1.19, p=0.03, respectively). Neither SNP was associated with BC risk for BRCA1 carriers and rs6504950 was not associated with BC for either BRCA1 or BRCA2 carriers. Of the nine polymorphisms investigated, seven were associated with BC for BRCA2 carriers (FGFR2, TOX3, MAP3K1, LSP1, 2q35, SLC4A7, 5p12, p-values:7×10−11-0.03), but only TOX3 and 2q35 were associated with the risk for BRCA1 carriers (p=0.0049, 0.03 respectively). All risk associated polymorphisms appear to interact multiplicatively on BC risk for mutation carriers. Based on the joint genotype distribution of the seven risk associated SNPs in BRCA2 mutation carriers, the 5% of BRCA2 carriers at highest risk (i.e. between 95th and 100th percentiles) were predicted to have a probability between 80% and 96% of developing BC by age 80, compared with 42-50% for the 5% of carriers at lowest risk. Our findings indicated that these risk differences may be sufficient to influence the clinical management of mutation carriers. PMID:21118973

  8. Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles and the risk of breast cancer for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: implications for risk prediction.

    PubMed

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Beesley, Jonathan; McGuffog, Lesley; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Healey, Sue; Neuhausen, Susan L; Ding, Yuan Chun; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Lynch, Henry T; Isaacs, Claudine; Ganz, Patricia A; Tomlinson, Gail; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Couch, Fergus J; Wang, Xianshu; Lindor, Noralane M; Pankratz, Vernon S; Radice, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Barile, Monica; Viel, Alessandra; Allavena, Anna; Dall'Olio, Valentina; Peterlongo, Paolo; Szabo, Csilla I; Zikan, Michal; Claes, Kathleen; Poppe, Bruce; Foretova, Lenka; Mai, Phuong L; Greene, Mark H; Rennert, Gad; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Andrulis, Irene L; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Sunde, Lone; Cruger, Dorthe; Birk Jensen, Uffe; Caligo, Maria; Friedman, Eitan; Kaufman, Bella; Laitman, Yael; Milgrom, Roni; Dubrovsky, Maya; Cohen, Shimrit; Borg, Ake; Jernström, Helena; Lindblom, Annika; Rantala, Johanna; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Melin, Beatrice; Nathanson, Kate; Domchek, Susan; Jakubowska, Ania; Lubinski, Jan; Huzarski, Tomasz; Osorio, Ana; Lasa, Adriana; Durán, Mercedes; Tejada, Maria-Isabel; Godino, Javier; Benitez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Kriege, Mieke; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; van der Luijt, Rob B; van Asperen, Christi J; Devilee, Peter; Meijers-Heijboer, E J; Blok, Marinus J; Aalfs, Cora M; Hogervorst, Frans; Rookus, Matti; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Conroy, Don; Evans, D Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Pichert, Gabriella; Davidson, Rosemarie; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Paterson, Joan; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J; Porteous, Mary E; Walker, Lisa; Kennedy, M John; Dorkins, Huw; Peock, Susan; Godwin, Andrew K; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; de Pauw, Antoine; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Bonadona, Valérie; Lasset, Christine; Dreyfus, Hélène; Leroux, Dominique; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Faivre, Laurence; Loustalot, Catherine; Noguchi, Tetsuro; Sobol, Hagay; Rouleau, Etienne; Nogues, Catherine; Frénay, Marc; Vénat-Bouvet, Laurence; Hopper, John L; Daly, Mary B; Terry, Mary B; John, Esther M; Buys, Saundra S; Yassin, Yosuf; Miron, Alexander; Goldgar, David; Singer, Christian F; Dressler, Anne Catharina; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Pfeiler, Georg; Hansen, Thomas V O; Jønson, Lars; Agnarsson, Bjarni A; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Offit, Kenneth; Devlin, Vincent; Dutra-Clarke, Ana; Piedmonte, Marion; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Wakeley, Katie; Boggess, John F; Basil, Jack; Schwartz, Peter E; Blank, Stephanie V; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Montagna, Marco; Casella, Cinzia; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Tihomirova, Laima; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Ramus, Susan J; Sucheston, Lara; Karlan, Beth Y; Gross, Jenny; Schmutzler, Rita; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Lochmann, Magdalena; Arnold, Norbert; Heidemann, Simone; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Deissler, Helmut; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Kast, Karin; Schönbuchner, Ines; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Nevanlinna, Heli; Simard, Jacques; Spurdle, Amanda B; Holland, Helene; Chen, Xiaoqing; Platte, Radka; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F

    2010-12-01

    The known breast cancer susceptibility polymorphisms in FGFR2, TNRC9/TOX3, MAP3K1, LSP1, and 2q35 confer increased risks of breast cancer for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. We evaluated the associations of 3 additional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs4973768 in SLC4A7/NEK10, rs6504950 in STXBP4/COX11, and rs10941679 at 5p12, and reanalyzed the previous associations using additional carriers in a sample of 12,525 BRCA1 and 7,409 BRCA2 carriers. Additionally, we investigated potential interactions between SNPs and assessed the implications for risk prediction. The minor alleles of rs4973768 and rs10941679 were associated with increased breast cancer risk for BRCA2 carriers (per-allele HR = 1.10, 95% CI: 1.03-1.18, P = 0.006 and HR = 1.09, 95% CI: 1.01-1.19, P = 0.03, respectively). Neither SNP was associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 carriers, and rs6504950 was not associated with breast cancer for either BRCA1 or BRCA2 carriers. Of the 9 polymorphisms investigated, 7 were associated with breast cancer for BRCA2 carriers (FGFR2, TOX3, MAP3K1, LSP1, 2q35, SLC4A7, 5p12, P = 7 × 10(-11) - 0.03), but only TOX3 and 2q35 were associated with the risk for BRCA1 carriers (P = 0.0049, 0.03, respectively). All risk-associated polymorphisms appear to interact multiplicatively on breast cancer risk for mutation carriers. Based on the joint genotype distribution of the 7 risk-associated SNPs in BRCA2 mutation carriers, the 5% of BRCA2 carriers at highest risk (i.e., between 95th and 100th percentiles) were predicted to have a probability between 80% and 96% of developing breast cancer by age 80, compared with 42% to 50% for the 5% of carriers at lowest risk. Our findings indicated that these risk differences might be sufficient to influence the clinical management of mutation carriers. PMID:21118973

  9. Evidence for Cation-Controlled Excited-State Localization in a Ruthenium Polypyridyl Compound.

    PubMed

    Beauvilliers, Evan E; Meyer, Gerald J

    2016-08-01

    The visible absorption and photoluminescence (PL) properties of the four neutral ruthenium diimine compounds [Ru(bpy)2(dcb)] (B2B), [Ru(dtb)2(dcb)] (D2B), [Ru(bpy)2(dcbq)] (B2Q), and [Ru(dtb)2(dcbq)] (D2Q), where bpy is 2,2'-bipyridine, dcb is 4,4'-(CO2(-))2-bpy, dtb is 4,4'-(tert-butyl)2-bpy, and dcbq is 4,4'-(CO2(-))2-2,2'-biquinoline, are reported in the presence of Lewis acidic cations present in fluid solutions at room temperature. In methanol solutions, the measured spectra were insensitive to the presence of these cations, while in acetonitrile a significant red shift in the PL spectra (≤1400 cm(-1)) was observed consistent with stabilization of the metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) excited state through Lewis acid-base adduct formation. No significant spectral changes were observed in control experiments with the tetrabutylammonium cation. Titration data with Li(+), Na(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Zn(2+), Al(3+), Y(3+), and La(3+) showed that the extent of stabilization saturated at high cation concentration with magnitudes that scaled roughly with the cation charge-to-size ratio. The visible absorption spectra of D2Q was particularly informative due to the presence of two well-resolved MLCT absorption bands: (1) Ru → bpy, λmax ≈ 450 nm; and (2) Ru → dcbq, λmax ≈ 540 nm. The higher-energy band blue-shifted and the lower-energy band red-shifted upon cation addition. The PL intensity and lifetime of the excited state of B2B first increased with cation addition without significant shifts in the measured spectra, behavior attributed to a cation-induced change in the localization of the emissive excited state from bpy to dcb. The importance of excited-state localization and stabilization for solar energy conversion is discussed. PMID:27391279

  10. Correlation between pH dependence of O2 evolution and sensitivity of Mn cations in the oxygen-evolving complex to exogenous reductants.

    PubMed

    Semin, Boris K; Davletshina, Lira N; Rubin, Andrei B

    2015-08-01

    Effects of pH, Ca(2+), and Cl(-) ions on the extraction of Mn cations from oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) in Ca-depleted photosystem II (PSII(-Ca)) by exogenous reductants hydroquinone (H2Q) and H2O2 were studied. Two of 4 Mn cations are released by H2Q and H2O2 at pHs 5.7, 6.5, and 7.5, and their extraction does not depend on the presence of Ca(2+) and Cl(-) ions. One of Mn cations ("resistant" Mn cation) cannot be extracted by H2Q and H2O2 at any pH. Extraction of 4th Mn ion ("flexible" Mn cation) is sensitive to pH, Ca(2+), and Cl(-). This Mn cation is released by reductants at pH 6.5 but not at pHs 5.7 and 7.5. A pH dependence curve of the oxygen-evolving activity in PSII(-Ca) membranes (in the presence of exogenous Ca(2+)) has a bell-shaped form with the maximum at pH 6.5. Thus, the increase in the resistance of flexible Mn cation in OEC to the action of reductants at acidic and alkaline pHs coincides with the decrease in oxygen evolution activity at these pHs. Exogenous Ca(2+) protects the extraction of flexible Mn cation at pH 6.5. High concentration of Cl(-) anions (100 mM) shifts the pH optimum of oxygen evolution to alkaline region (around pH 7.5), while the pH of flexible Mn extraction is also shifted to alkaline pH. This result suggests that flexible Mn cation plays a key role in the water-splitting reaction. The obtained results also demonstrate that only one Mn cation in Mn4 cluster is under strong control of calcium. The change in the flexible Mn cation resistance to exogenous reductants in the presence of Ca(2+) suggests that Ca(2+) can control the redox potential of this cation. PMID:25975707

  11. The function of D1-H332 in Photosystem II electron transport studied by thermoluminescence and chlorophyll fluorescence in site-directed mutants of Synechocystis 6803.

    PubMed

    Allahverdiyeva, Yagut; Deák, Zsuzsanna; Szilárd, András; Diner, Bruce A; Nixon, Peter J; Vass, Imre

    2004-09-01

    The His332 residue of the D1 protein has been identified as the likely ligand of the catalytic Mn ions in the water oxidizing complex (Ferreira, K.N., Iverson, T.M., Maghlaoui, K., Barber, J. & Iwata, S. (2004) Science 303, 1831-1838). However, its function has not been fully clarified. Here we used thermoluminescence and flash-induced chlorophyll fluorescence measurements to characterize the effect of the D1-H333E, D1-H332D and D1-H332S mutations on the electron transport of Photosystem II in intact cells of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis 6803. Although the mutants are not photoautotrophic they all show flash-induced thermoluminescence and chlorophyll fluorescence, which originate from the S(2)Q(A) (-) and S(2)Q(B) (-) recombinations demonstrating that charge stabilization takes place in the water oxidizing complex. However, the conversion of S(2) to higher S states is inhibited and the energetic stability of the S(2)Q(A) (-) charge pair is increased by 75, 50 and 7 mV in the D1-H332D, D1-H332E and D1-H332S mutants, respectively. This is most probably caused by a decrease of E(m)(S(2)/S(1)). Concomitantly, the rate of electron donation from Mn to Tyr-Z(b) during the S(1) to S(2) transition is slowed down, relative to the wild type, 350- and 60-fold in the D1-H332E and D1-H332D mutants, respectively, but remains essentially unaffected in D1-H332S. A further effect of the D1-H332E and D1-H332D mutations is the retardation of the Q(A) to Q(B) electron transfer step as an indirect consequence of the donor side modification. Our data show that although the His residue in the D1-332 position can be substituted by other metal binding residues for binding photo-oxidisable Mn it is required for controlling the functional redox energetics of the Mn cluster.

  12. Ataxin-2 Regulates RGS8 Translation in a New BAC-SCA2 Transgenic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, Karla P.; Rinehart, Marc D.; Wiest, Shaina; Pflieger, Lance T.; Scoles, Daniel R.; Pulst, Stefan M.

    2015-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) is an autosomal dominant disorder with progressive degeneration of cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs) and other neurons caused by expansion of a glutamine (Q) tract in the ATXN2 protein. We generated BAC transgenic lines in which the full-length human ATXN2 gene was transcribed using its endogenous regulatory machinery. Mice with the ATXN2 BAC transgene with an expanded CAG repeat (BAC-Q72) developed a progressive cellular and motor phenotype, whereas BAC mice expressing wild-type human ATXN2 (BAC-Q22) were indistinguishable from control mice. Expression analysis of laser-capture microdissected (LCM) fractions and regional expression confirmed that the BAC transgene was expressed in PCs and in other neuronal groups such as granule cells (GCs) and neurons in deep cerebellar nuclei as well as in spinal cord. Transcriptome analysis by deep RNA-sequencing revealed that BAC-Q72 mice had progressive changes in steady-state levels of specific mRNAs including Rgs8, one of the earliest down-regulated transcripts in the Pcp2-ATXN2[Q127] mouse line. Consistent with LCM analysis, transcriptome changes analyzed by deep RNA-sequencing were not restricted to PCs, but were also seen in transcripts enriched in GCs such as Neurod1. BAC-Q72, but not BAC-Q22 mice had reduced Rgs8 mRNA levels and even more severely reduced steady-state protein levels. Using RNA immunoprecipitation we showed that ATXN2 interacted selectively with RGS8 mRNA. This interaction was impaired when ATXN2 harbored an expanded polyglutamine. Mutant ATXN2 also reduced RGS8 expression in an in vitro coupled translation assay when compared with equal expression of wild-type ATXN2-Q22. Reduced abundance of Rgs8 in Pcp2-ATXN2[Q127] and BAC-Q72 mice supports our observations of a hyper-excitable mGluR1-ITPR1 signaling axis in SCA2, as RGS proteins are linked to attenuating mGluR1 signaling. PMID:25902068

  13. Lattice Boltzmann technique for heat transport phenomena coupled with melting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahem, A. M.; El-Amin, M. F.; Mohammadein, A. A.; Gorla, Rama Subba Reddy

    2016-04-01

    In this work, the heat transport phenomena coupled with melting process are studied by using the enthalpy-based lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). The proposed model is a modified version of thermal LB model, where could avoid iteration steps and ensures high accuracy. The Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (BGK) approximation with a D1Q2 lattice was used to determine the temperature field for one-dimensional melting by conduction and multi-distribution functions (MDF) with D2Q9 lattice was used to determine the density, velocity and temperature fields for two-dimensional melting by natural convection. Different boundary conditions including Dirichlet, adiabatic and bounce-back boundary conditions were used. The influence of increasing Rayleigh number (from 103 to 105) on temperature distribution and melting process is studied. The obtained results show that a good agreement with the analytical solution for melting by conduction case and with the benchmark solution for melting by convection.

  14. Discrete unified gas kinetic scheme for all Knudsen number flows: low-speed isothermal case.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhaoli; Xu, Kun; Wang, Ruijie

    2013-09-01

    Based on the Boltzmann-BGK (Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook) equation, in this paper a discrete unified gas kinetic scheme (DUGKS) is developed for low-speed isothermal flows. The DUGKS is a finite-volume scheme with the discretization of particle velocity space. After the introduction of two auxiliary distribution functions with the inclusion of collision effect, the DUGKS becomes a fully explicit scheme for the update of distribution function. Furthermore, the scheme is an asymptotic preserving method, where the time step is only determined by the Courant-Friedricks-Lewy condition in the continuum limit. Numerical results demonstrate that accurate solutions in both continuum and rarefied flow regimes can be obtained from the current DUGKS. The comparison between the DUGKS and the well-defined lattice Boltzmann equation method (D2Q9) is presented as well.

  15. Jorunnamycins A-C, new stabilized renieramycin-type bistetrahydroisoquinolines isolated from the Thai nudibranch Jorunna funebris.

    PubMed

    Charupant, Kornvika; Suwanborirux, Khanit; Amnuoypol, Surattana; Saito, Emi; Kubo, Akinori; Saito, Naoki

    2007-01-01

    Jorunnamycins A-C (1a-c), three stabilized renieramycin-type bistetrahydroisoquinolines, were isolated from the mantles, the visceral organs, and the egg ribbons of the Thai nudibranch Jorunna funebris that was pretreated with potassium cyanide (KCN), along with five known compounds, renieramycins M (2m), N (2n), O (2o), and Q (2q) and mimosamycin (3). The structures of 1a-c were elucidated from spectroscopic data and by chemical conversion of renieramycin M (2m) into 1c via 1a. The chemical stability and the oxidative degradation generating simple isoquinoline alkaloids of a carbinolamine analog 1d, which was easily prepared by reacting 1c with silver nitrate in aqueous acetonitrile, are discussed. The results of cytotoxicity studies are also presented. PMID:17202706

  16. Parity Violation in Deep Inelastic Scattering at JLab 6 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Xiaochao Zheng

    2006-05-16

    The parity-violating asymmetry in e-$^2$H deep inelastic scattering (DIS) can be used to extract the weak neutral-current coupling constants $C_{2q}$. A measurement of this asymmetry at two $Q^2$ values is planned at Jefferson Lab. Results from this experiment will provide a value of $2C_{2u}-C_{2d}$ to a precision of $\\pm 0.03$, a factor of eight improvement over our current knowledge. If all hadronic effects can be understood, this results will provide information on possible extensions of the Standard Model, complementary to other experiments dedicated to new physics searches. Presented here are the physics motivation, experimental setup, potential hadronic effects and their implications, and the future of PV DIS at Jefferson Lab.

  17. Nonstandard conserved Hamiltonian structures in dissipative/damped systems: Nonlinear generalizations of damped harmonic oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Pradeep, R. Gladwin; Chandrasekar, V. K.; Senthilvelan, M.; Lakshmanan, M.

    2009-05-15

    In this paper we point out the existence of a remarkable nonlocal transformation between the damped harmonic oscillator and a modified Emden-type nonlinear oscillator equation with linear forcing, xe+{alpha}xx+{beta}x{sup 3}+{gamma}x=0, which preserves the form of the time independent integral, conservative Hamiltonian, and the equation of motion. Generalizing this transformation we prove the existence of nonstandard conservative Hamiltonian structure for a general class of damped nonlinear oscillators including Lienard-type systems. Further, using the above Hamiltonian structure for a specific example, namely, the generalized modified Emden equation xe+{alpha}x{sup q}x+{beta}x{sup 2q+1}=0, where {alpha}, {beta}, and q are arbitrary parameters, the general solution is obtained through appropriate canonical transformations. We also present the conservative Hamiltonian structure of the damped Mathews-Lakshmanan oscillator equation. The associated Lagrangian description for all the above systems is also briefly discussed.

  18. Mechanical properties of warped membranes.

    PubMed

    Košmrlj, Andrej; Nelson, David R

    2013-07-01

    We explore how a frozen background metric affects the mechanical properties of planar membranes with a shear modulus. We focus on a special class of "warped membranes" with a preferred random height profile characterized by random Gaussian variables h(q) in Fourier space with zero mean and variance <|h(q)|(2)>~q(-d(h)) and show that in the linear response regime the mechanical properties depend dramatically on the system size L for d(h)≥2. Membranes with d(h)=4 could be produced by flash polymerization of lyotropic smectic liquid crystals. Via a self-consistent screening approximation we find that the renormalized bending rigidity increases as κ(R)~L((d(h)-2)/2) for membranes of size L, while the Young and shear moduli decrease according to Y(R),μ(R)~L(-(d(h)-2)/2) resulting in a universal Poisson ratio. Numerical results show good agreement with analytically determined exponents.

  19. High recurrence of recombinants in a family with pericentric inversion of chromosome 18.

    PubMed

    Mejía-Baltodano, G; Bobadilla, L; Gonzalez, R M; Barros-Núñez, P

    1997-01-01

    We report a family in which the father carries a pericentric inversion involving two third of the chromosome 18 (p11.2q22). Of his three children, the proposita and her youngest brother show partial duplication of the short arm and partial deficiency of the long arm; the oldest sister shows the other recombinant (partial duplication of the long arm and partial deficiency of the short arm). In the literature, we found only one family in which both recombinants of a parental pericentric inversion were present in the same offspring and none with three affected and both kinds of recombinants. A review of the reported familial cases reveals that the risk of aneusomy of recombination, at least for chromosome-18 inversion carriers, may be close to 20% and no only 5-10% as previously reported.

  20. Measurement of R = {sigma}{sub L}/{sigma}{sub T} and the Separated Longitudinal and Transverse Structure Functions in the Nucleon Resonance Region

    SciTech Connect

    Yongguang Liang; Michael Christy; Abdellah Ahmidouch; Christopher Armstrong; John Arrington; Arshak Asaturyan; Steven Avery; O. Baker; Douglas Beck; Henk Blok; C.W. Bochna; Werner Boeglin; Peter Bosted; Maurice Bouwhuis; Herbert Breuer; Daniel Brown; Antje Bruell; Roger Carlini; Jinseok Cha; Nicholas Chant; Anthony Cochran; Leon Cole; Samuel Danagoulian; Donal Day; James Dunne; Dipangkar Dutta; Rolf Ent; Howard Fenker; B. Fox; Liping Gan; Haiyan Gao; Kenneth Garrow; David Gaskell; Ashot Gasparian; Don Geesaman; Ronald Gilman; Paul Gueye; Mark Harvey; Roy Holt; Xiaodong Jiang; Mark Jones; Cynthia Keppel; Edward Kinney; Wolfgang Lorenzon; Allison Lung; David Mack; Pete Markowitz; J.W. Martin; Kevin McIlhany; Daniella Mckee; David Meekins; M.A. Miller; Richard Milner; Joseph Mitchell; Hamlet Mkrtchyan; Robert Mueller; Alan Nathan; Gabriel Niculescu; Maria-Ioana Niculescu; Thomas O'neill; Vassilios Papavassiliou; Stephen Pate; Rodney Piercey; David Potterveld; Ronald Ransome; Joerg Reinhold; E. Rollinde; Oscar Rondon-Aramayo; Philip Roos; Adam Sarty; Reyad Sawafta; Elaine Schulte; Edwin Segbefia; C. Smith; Samuel Stepanyan; Steffen Strauch; Vardan Tadevosyan; Liguang Tang; Raphael Tieulent; Vladas Tvaskis; Alicia Uzzle; William Vulcan; Stephen Wood; Feng Xiong; Lulin Yuan; Markus Zeier; Benedikt Zihlmann; Vitaliy Ziskin

    2004-10-01

    We report on a detailed study of longitudinal strength in the nucleon resonance region, presenting new results from inclusive electron-proton cross sections measured at Jefferson Lab Hall C in the four-momentum transfer range 0.2 < Q{sup 2} < 5.5 GeV{sup 2}. The data have been used to accurately perform over 170 Rosenbluth-type longitudinal/transverse separations. The precision R = {sigma}{sub L}/{sigma}{sub T} data are presented here, along with the first separate values of the inelastic structure functions F{sub 1} and F{sub L} in this regime. The resonance longitudinal component is found to be significant. With the new data, quark-hadron duality is observed above Q{sup 2} = 1 GeV{sup 2} in the separated structure functions independently.

  1. Calibration graphs in isotope dilution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pagliano, Enea; Mester, Zoltán; Meija, Juris

    2015-10-01

    Isotope-based quantitation is routinely employed in chemical measurements. Whereas most analysts seek for methods with linear theoretical response functions, a unique feature that distinguishes isotope dilution from many other analytical methods is the inherent possibility for a nonlinear theoretical response curve. Most implementations of isotope dilution calibration today either eliminate the nonlinearity by employing internal standards with markedly different molecular weight or they employ empirical polynomial fits. Here we show that the exact curvature of any isotope dilution curve can be obtained from three-parameter rational function, y = f(q) = (a0 + a1q)/(1 + a2q), known as the Padé[1,1] approximant. The use of this function allows eliminating an unnecessary source of error in isotope dilution analysis when faced with nonlinear calibration curves. In addition, fitting with Padé model can be done using linear least squares.

  2. Double-quantum homonuclear rotary resonance: Efficient dipolar recovery in magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, N. C.; Bildsøe, H.; Jakobsen, H. J.; Levitt, M. H.

    1994-08-01

    We describe an efficient method for the recovery of homonuclear dipole-dipole interactions in magic-angle spinning NMR. Double-quantum homonuclear rotary resonance (2Q-HORROR) is established by fulfilling the condition ωr=2ω1, where ωr is the sample rotation frequency and ω1 is the nutation frequency around an applied resonant radio frequency (rf) field. This resonance can be used for double-quantum filtering and measurement of homonuclear dipolar interactions in the presence of magic-angle spinning. The spin dynamics depend only weakly on crystallite orientation allowing good performance for powder samples. Chemical shift effects are suppressed to zeroth order. The method is demonstrated for singly and doubly 13C labeled L-alanine.

  3. Paternal isodisomy for chromosome 2 as the cause of Crigler-Najjar type I syndrome.

    PubMed

    Petit, François M; Gajdos, Vincent; Parisot, Frédéric; Capel, Liliane; Aboura, Azzedine; Lachaux, Alain; Tachdjian, Gérard; Poüs, Christian; Labrune, Philippe

    2005-03-01

    Crigler-Najjar syndrome type I (CN-I) is a rare and severe autosomal recessive metabolic disease due to a total deficiency of bilirubin uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase located on chromosome 2. We report on a child with CN-I due to a phenylalanine residue deletion inherited only from the father carrying this deletion at the heterozygous state. Cytogenetic analyses showed no deletion of the chromosomal 2q37 region. Microsatellite analysis of the child and his parents was consistent with paternal isodisomy for chromosome 2 in the child. This report demonstrates that uniparental disomy may be at the origin of very rare diseases transmitted as autosomal recessive traits and emphasizes the need for parental DNA analysis in such cases.

  4. Calculation of collisionally narrowed coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Koszykowski, M.L.; Farrow, R.L.; Palmer, R.E.

    1985-10-01

    High-resolution coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy spectra of the N/sub 2/ Q branch at 294 K have been obtained at 1, 5, and 10 atm. Even at 1-atm pressure, disagreements with spectra calculated using the isolated line approximation were observed, indicating the importance of collisional narrowing effects in describing these spectra. A method of using the full G-matrix approach for the calculation of these spectra that is both exact and computationally efficient (requiring only one matrix diagonalization and inversion per spectrum) is discussed. Excellent agreement with experimental data is obtained using this method and a simple exponential gap model for the off-diagonal G-matrix elements.

  5. Discovering colorons at the early stage LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Dicus, Duane A.; Kao, Chung; Sayre, Joshua; Nandi, S.

    2011-05-01

    Prospects are investigated for the discovery of massive hypergluons using data from the early runs of the Large Hadron Collider. A center of mass energy of 7 TeV and an integrated luminosity of 1 fb{sup -1} or 5 fb{sup -1} are assumed. A phenomenological Lagrangian is adopted to evaluate the cross section of a pair of colored vector bosons (colorons, {rho}-tilde) decaying into four colored scalar resonances (hyperpions, {pi}-tilde), which then decay into eight gluons. The dominant eight-jet background from the production of 8g, 7g1q, 6g2q, and 5g3q is included. We find an abundance of signal events and that realistic cuts reduce the background enough to establish a 5{sigma} signal for the coloron mass of up to 733 GeV with 1 fb{sup -1} or 833 GeV with 5 fb{sup -1}.

  6. Transient and residual stresses in dental porcelains as affected by cooling rates.

    PubMed

    Asaoka, K; Tesk, J A

    1989-06-01

    The development of either transient or residual stress in a slab of dental porcelain during cooling was simulated by use of a super-computer. The temperature dependences of the elastic modulus, the thermal expansion coefficient, and the shear viscosity, and the cooling rate dependence of the glass transition temperature, Tg, were considered in this calculation. Internal stress and viscoelastic creep were computed for several cooling rates. Calculated results display stress profiles which agree reasonably well with reported measured profiles in quenched, tempered glasses. The calculated residual surface stress, sigma, could be fit by the following empirical formula, sigma = kl2(q/q0)n, q is the cooling rate, q0 is a reference cooling rate and l is the half-thickness of the porcelain. The method by which residual stress develops is also discussed. This discussion suggests a method for strengthening of the porcelain by the development of high-compressive residual stress on the surface. PMID:2638963

  7. Solid-state 29Si MAS NMR studies of diatoms: structural characterization of biosilica deposits.

    PubMed

    Bertermann, R; Kröger, N; Tacke, R

    2003-03-01

    Four different diatom species (Chaetoceros debilis, Chaetoceros didymum, Cylindrotheca fusiformis, Nitzschia angularis) were studied by solid-state (29)Si MAS NMR spectroscopy. To determine the Q(2):Q(3):Q(4) ratios in the biosilica deposits of the diatoms, quantitative (29)Si MAS NMR experiments were performed. This analysis did not reveal any differences regarding the molecular architecture of the silica (i.e. the degree of condensation of the SiOH units (2 identical with SiOH --> identical with Si-O-Si identical with + H(2)O)) from the different diatom species. However, complete cells showed significantly smaller Q(4):Q(3) ratios (1.8-1.9) than extracted cell walls (2.5-2.8), indicating the existence of intracellular pools of less condensed silica.

  8. Measurements of Thermal Conductivity of Superfluid Helium Near its Transition Temperature T(sub lambda) in a 2D Confinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jerebets, Sergei

    2004-01-01

    We report our recent experiments on thermal conductivity measurements of superfluid He-4 near its phase transition in a two-dimensional (2D) confinement under saturated vapor pressure. A 2D confinement is created by 2-mm- and 1-mm-thick glass capillary plates, consisting of densely populated parallel microchannels with cross-sections of 5 x 50 and 1 x 10 microns, correspondingly. A heat current (2 < Q < 400 nW/sq cm) was applied along the channels long direction. High-resolution measurements were provided by DC SQUID-based high-resolution paramagnetic salt thermometers (HRTs) with a nanokelvin resolution. We might find that thermal conductivity of confined helium is finite at the bulk superfluid transition temperature. Our 2D results will be compared with those in a bulk and 1D confinement.

  9. Density functional theory study of multiply ionized weakly bound fullerene dimers.

    PubMed

    Zettergren, Henning; Wang, Yang; Lamsabhi, Al Mokhtar; Alcamí, Manuel; Martín, Fernando

    2009-06-14

    Multiply ionized fullerene dimers ([C(60)](2) (q+),q=1-6) have been studied by means of state-of-the-art density functional theory methods. We found that the singly charged dimer is more strongly bound than the corresponding neutral van der Waals dimer at the binding distance of the latter; in contrast, multiply charged dimers (q>or=2) are unstable. For the latter dimers, the calculated kinetic energy release in the binary fission yielding intact fullerenes is lower than those reported in recent experimental work. This implies that, in such experiments, there are significant internal excitations in the separating monomers. We also show that electron transfer within the charged dimers occurs on the subfemtosecond time scale, in accordance with the high charge mobility observed in dimers and larger clusters of fullerenes. This provides an explanation for the even-odd effects in the measured multiple ionization yields of fullerene dimers.

  10. Quantification of tidal parameters from Solar System data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lainey, Valéry

    2016-11-01

    Tidal dissipation is the main driver of orbital evolution of natural satellites and a key point to understand the exoplanetary system configurations. Despite its importance, its quantification from observations still remains difficult for most objects of our own Solar System. In this work, we overview the method that has been used to determine, directly from observations, the tidal parameters, with emphasis on the Love number k_2 and the tidal quality factor Q. Up-to-date values of these tidal parameters are summarized. Last, an assessment on the possible determination of the tidal ratio k_2/Q of Uranus and Neptune is done. This may be particularly relevant for coming astrometric campaigns and future space missions focused on these systems.

  11. Structure and chromosomal localization of the human homeobox gene Prox 1

    SciTech Connect

    Zinovieva, R.D.; Duncan, M.K.; Johnson, T.R.

    1996-08-01

    The genomic organization and nucleotide sequence of the human homeobox gene Prox 1 as well as its chromosomal localization have been determined. This gene spans more than 40 kb, consists of at least 5 exons, and encodes an 83-kDa protein. It shows 89% identity with the chicken sequence at the nucleotide level in the coding region, while the human and chicken proteins are 94% identical. Among the embryonic tissues analyzed (lens, brain, lung, liver, and kidney), the human Prox 1 gene is most actively expressed i the developing lens, similar to the expression pattern of the chicken Prox 1 gene. The Prox 1 gene was mapped to human chromosome 1q32.2-q32.3. 26 refs., 6 figs.

  12. Sequence analysis of the 2009 pandemic influenza A H1N1 virus haemagglutinin gene from 2009-2010 Brazilian clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, João Leandro de Paula; Borborema, Samanta Etel Treiger; Brígido, Luis Fernando de Macedo; Oliveira, Maria Isabel de; Paiva, Terezinha Maria de; Santos, Cecília Luiza Simões dos

    2011-08-01

    In this paper, we analysed the haemagglutinin (HA) gene identified by polymerase chain reaction from 90 influenza A H1N1 virus strains that circulated in Brazil from April 2009-June 2010. A World Health Organization sequencing protocol allowed us to identify amino acid mutations in the HA protein at positions S220T (71%), D239G/N/S (20%), Y247H (4.5%), E252K (3.3%), M274V (2.2%), Q310H (26.7%) and E391K (12%). A fatal outcome was associated with the D239G mutation (p < 0.0001). Brazilian HA genetic diversity, in comparison to a reference strain from California, highlights the role of influenza virus surveillance for study of viral evolution, in addition to monitoring the spread of the virus worldwide.

  13. Peptide Immunization Elicits Polyomavirus-Specific MHC Class Ib-Restricted CD8 T Cells in MHC Class Ia Allogeneic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hofstetter, Amelia R.; Evavold, Brian D.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Unlike the polymorphic MHC class Ia molecules, MHC class Ib molecules are oligomorphic or nonpolymorphic. We recently discovered a protective CD8 T cell response to mouse polyomavirus (MPyV) in H-2b haplotype mice that is restricted by H2-Q9, a member of the Qa-2 MHC class Ib family. Here, we demonstrate that immunization with a peptide corresponding to a virus capsid-derived peptide presented by Q9 also elicits MHC class Ib-restricted MPyV-specific CD8 T cells in mice of H-2s and H-2g7 strains. These findings support the concept that immunization with a single MHC class Ib-restricted peptide can expand CD8 T cells in MHC class Ia allogeneic hosts. PMID:23374150

  14. Involving undergraduates in interdisciplinary research: The physics of biomineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Pupa

    2011-03-01

    Biominerals include mollusk shells, the skeletons of sea urchins, corals, mammals, etc. Their formation mechanisms fascinate physicists, materials scientists, and chemists because they result in materials more robust than their components, with exquisitely intricate nano-structures, fill space more than synthetic nanoparticles, and directly control phase transitions. Because of the fundamental nature of research on the physical aspects of biominerals, their formation mechanisms, the potential for future bio-inspired materials synthesis, and the aesthetic beauty of biomineral structures, students of all ages are interested in biomineralization. While describing the involvement of undergraduates in this research, my talk will address two key questions: Q: How do biominerals achieve the beautiful morphologies we observe? A: By forming through amorphous precursor phases, with morphology and phase transitions directly under biological control [1, 2]. Q: How do organisms order their biominerals to be single-crystalline? A: By controlling crystal growth at the nanoscale, not atom by atom [3, 4].

  15. Structure and chromosomal localization of a human water channel (AQP3) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Ishibashi, Kenichi; Sasaki, Sei; Saito, Fumiko

    1995-05-20

    A cDNA encoding rat AQP3, a water channel and a member of the MIP family, that is expressed predominantly in kidney medulla and colon was cloned recently. To determine the structure, tissue distribution, and chromosomal localization of the human AQP3 gene, the authors screened a human kidney cDNA library with rat AQP3 probe and isolated a cDNA coding for human AQP3 protein. The deduced amino acid sequence of human AQP3 was 91% identical to rat AQP3. Human AQP3 mRNA was expressed in colon, kidney, liver, pancreas, lung, peripheral leukocytes, spleen, and prostate. The human AQP3 gene was mapped to 7q36.2-q36.3 by chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization. 10 refs., 3 figs.

  16. A candidate gene approach for the genetic analysis of susceptibility to tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, K.; Liu, J.; Boothroyd, L.

    1994-09-01

    Tuberculosis is the most frequent and severe human disease caused by mycobacteria. In the mouse a candidate gene for innate resistance to mycobacteria (Bcg) was recently isolated and termed Nramp. We used SSCA and DNA sequencing to identify mutations in the human homologue, NRAMP, in chromosome region 2q35 in order to test if NRAMP contributes to susceptibility to tuberculosis. We have identified 16 sequence variants in or near NRAMP and defined haplotypes segregating in multiplex tuberculosis families from Canada, Columbia and Hong Kong. We defined a recessive susceptibility model for linkage analysis with four liability classes which take into account clinical status, age, exposure, and BCG vaccination. Our preliminary results support a role of NRAMP in tuberculosis susceptibility in an epidemic situation. This research was supported by grants from the Medical Research Council of Canada and the Canadian Genetic Diseases Network.

  17. Physical Principles of Skeletal Minerals Revealed with Spectromicroscopy

    ScienceCinema

    Gilbert, Pupa [U of Wisconsin-Madison, Wisconsin, United States

    2016-07-12

    Skeletal elements of marine and terrestrial organisms have the most fascinating nano-to-macro-structures, attracting the attention of physicists, biologists, chemists, and materials scientists. Using X-PEEM spectromicroscopy we revealed some of the fundamental mechanisms leading to the formation of these biominerals. Specifically, we addressed the following questions and provided the answers: 1Q) How do teeth, bones, and echinoderm and mollusk shells acquire their unusual, curved and complex morphology, if they are composed of single crystals? 1A) Via amorphous precursor phases; 2Q) How does crystallinity propagate through the amorophous precursor phases in sea urchin spicules and teeth? 2A) By secondary nucleation, following random walk patterns; 3Q) How does iridescent mother-of-pearl become ordered? 3A) Gradually, through a kinetic mechanisms in which fastest growing single-crystals win the competition for space, thus end up being approximately co-oriented.

  18. Utility Advanced Turbine System (ATS) technology readiness testing and pre-commercial demonstration -- Phase 3. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detailed design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which will be sited and operated in Phase 4. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. This report summarizes work accomplished during the period 2Q96.

  19. SNP microarray abnormalities in a cohort of 28 infants with congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Stark, Zornitza; Behrsin, Joanna; Burgess, Trent; Ritchie, Anna; Yeung, Alison; Tan, Tiong Y; Brown, Natasha J; Savarirayan, Ravi; Patel, Neil

    2015-10-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities are an important factor in the pathogenesis of congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH), a relatively common congenital defect associated with high morbidity and mortality. The adoption of array-based platforms for chromosome analysis has resulted in the identification of numerous copy number variants (CNVs) in infants with CDH, highlighting the potential pathogenic role of many novel genes. We identified a retrospective cohort of 28 infants treated for CDH at a single institution who had microarray testing to determine the proportion of microarray abnormalities and whether these were contributory to CDH pathogenesis. Eight patients (29%) had microarray abnormality. Seven (25%) were considered likely contributory to CDH pathogenesis, including two mosaic trisomy 9s, a 9q22.31q22.32 microduplication, two atypical 22q11.21 microdeletions, a 2q35q36.1 microdeletion, and a 15q11.2 microdeletion, offering insights into the genetic mechanisms underlying CDH development.

  20. Lactose intolerance and other disaccharidase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Balvir S

    2014-09-01

    Intolerance to foods which contain lactose can cause a range of intestinal and systemic symptoms. These symptoms are caused by Lactase deficiency which is encoded by a single gene (LCT) of ≈ 50 kb located on chromosome 2q21. In some food items, lactose has been missed because of "hidden" lactose due to inadequately labeled, confusing diagnosis of lactose intolerance based on dietary restriction of dairy foods. Two polymorphisms, C/T13910 and G/A22018, linked to hypolactasia, correlate with breath hydrogen and symptoms after lactose. The key in the management of lactose intolerance is the dietary removal of lactose. Patients diagnosed as lactose intolerant must be advised of "risk" foods, inadequately labeled, including processed meats, bread, cake mixes, soft drinks, and lagers. This review highlights the types, symptoms and management of lactose intolerance and also highlights differences from milk allergy which closely mimics the symptoms of lactose intolerance.

  1. Q-switched fiber laser based on transition metal dichalcogenides MoS(2), MoSe(2), WS(2), and WSe(2).

    PubMed

    Chen, Bohua; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Wu, Kan; Wang, Hao; Wang, Jun; Chen, Jianping

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we report 4 different saturable absorbers based on 4 transition metal dichalcogenides (MoS(2), MoSe(2), WS(2), WSe(2)) and utilize them to Q-switch a ring-cavity fiber laser with identical cavity configuration. It is found that MoSe(2) exhibits highest modulation depth with similar preparation process among four saturable absorbers. Q-switching operation performance is compared from the aspects of RF spectrum, optical spectrum, repetition rate and pulse duration. WS(2) Q-switched fiber laser generates the most stable pulse trains compared to other 3 fiber lasers. These results demonstrate the feasibility of TMDs to Q-switch fiber laser effectively and provide a meaningful reference for further research in nonlinear fiber optics with these TMDs materials.

  2. M. Riesz-Schur-type inequalities for entire functions of exponential type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganzburg, M. I.; Nevai, P.; Erdélyi, T.

    2015-01-01

    We prove a general M. Riesz-Schur-type inequality for entire functions of exponential type. If f and Q are two functions of exponential types σ > 0 and τ ≥ 0, respectively, and if Q is real-valued and the real zeros of Q, not counting multiplicities, are bounded away from each other, then \\displaystyle \\vert f(x)\\vert≤ (σ+τ) (Aσ+τ(Q))-1/2\\Vert Q f\\Vert C( R),\\qquad x\\in R, where \\displaystyle A_s(Q) \\stackrel{{def}}{=}\\infx\\in R \\bigl( \\lbrack Q'(x) \\rbrack ^2+s2 [Q(x)]^2\\bigr). We apply this inequality to the weights Q(x)\\stackrel{{def}}{=} \\sin (τ x) and Q(x) \\stackrel{{def}}{=} x and describe the extremal functions in the corresponding inequalities. Bibliography: 7 titles.

  3. Quantification of tidal parameters from Solar System data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lainey, Valéry

    2016-05-01

    Tidal dissipation is the main driver of orbital evolution of natural satellites and a key point to understand the exoplanetary system configurations. Despite its importance, its quantification from observations still remains difficult for most objects of our own Solar System. In this work, we overview the method that has been used to determine, directly from observations, the tidal parameters, with emphasis on the Love number k_2 and the tidal quality factor Q. Up-to-date values of these tidal parameters are summarized. Last, an assessment on the possible determination of the tidal ratio k_2/Q of Uranus and Neptune is done. This may be particularly relevant for coming astrometric campaigns and future space missions focused on these systems.

  4. Origin of human chromosome 2: An ancestral telomere-telomere fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Ijdo, J.W.; Baldini, A.; Ward, D.C.; Reeders, S.T.; Wells, R.A. )

    1991-10-15

    The authors identified two allelic genomic cosmids from human chromosome 2, c8.1 and c29B, each containing two inverted arrays of the vertebrate telomeric repeat in a head-to-head arrangement, 5{prime}(TTAGGG){sub n}-(CCCTAA){sub m}3{prime}. Sequences flanking this telomeric repeat are characteristic of present-day human pretelomeres. BAL-31 nuclease experiments with yeast artificial chromosome clones of human telomeres and fluorescence in situ hybridization reveal that sequences flanking these inverted repeats hybridize both to band 2q13 and to different, but overlapping, subsets of human chromosome ends. They conclude that the locus cloned in cosmids c8.1 and c29B is the relic of an ancient telomere-telomere fusion and marks the point at which two ancestral ape chromosomes fused to give rise to human chromosome 2.

  5. Abnormal cerebellar development and axonal decussation due to mutations in AHI1 in Joubert syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ferland, Russell J; Eyaid, Wafaa; Collura, Randall V; Tully, Laura D; Hill, R Sean; Al-Nouri, Doha; Al-Rumayyan, Ahmed; Topcu, Meral; Gascon, Generoso; Bodell, Adria; Shugart, Yin Yao; Ruvolo, Maryellen; Walsh, Christopher A

    2004-09-01

    Joubert syndrome is a congenital brain malformation of the cerebellar vermis and brainstem with abnormalities of axonal decussation (crossing in the brain) affecting the corticospinal tract and superior cerebellar peduncles. Individuals with Joubert syndrome have motor and behavioral abnormalities, including an inability to walk due to severe clumsiness and 'mirror' movements, and cognitive and behavioral disturbances. Here we identified a locus associated with Joubert syndrome, JBTS3, on chromosome 6q23.2-q23.3 and found three deleterious mutations in AHI1, the first gene to be associated with Joubert syndrome. AHI1 is most highly expressed in brain, particularly in neurons that give rise to the crossing axons of the corticospinal tract and superior cerebellar peduncles. Comparative genetic analysis of AHI1 indicates that it has undergone positive evolutionary selection along the human lineage. Therefore, changes in AHI1 may have been important in the evolution of human-specific motor behaviors.

  6. Simple Beam-Optic Simulations and Proposed Mechanical Mitigation for the Triplet Oscillation Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Thieberger,P.; Montag, C.; Snydstrup, L.; Trbojevic, D.; Tuozzolo, J.

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of these simulations is to gain a better understanding of the relative contributions to the beam perturbation from the main horizontal oscillation modes (yawing and rolling) of Q1, Q2, and Q3. For this purpose, a simple beam transport program was implemented with an EXCEL spreadsheet to calculate the horizontal beam envelop through the Q1, Q2, Q3 triplet up to the IP, with the possibility of specifying horizontal displacements of the singlets. For now, the weak focusing properties of D0 and DX have been ignored, but could easily be included in the future if necessary. In a first simulation, quadrupole strengths have been adopted that correspond to {beta}* = 2m at the IP. The parameters used listed in Table 1 were obtained from references [1] and [2].

  7. Temperature variation of the structure factor of liquid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isihara, A.

    1981-07-01

    The temperature variation of the structure factor S( q) of liquid helium follows S(q) = h̷2q 2{{1 + 2f(ɛ)}}/{2}mɛ , where f(ɛ) is the Bose distribution function of the quasiparticles of energy ɛ( q). For very low temperatures, the formula predicts that S( q) increases linearly with q starting from a constant, S(0) = {kT}/{mc 2}. This trend changes at temperatures higher than T I = {c h̷}/{k}√24δ 1, where δ 1 is the coefficient to q2 of the energy dispersion relation. Therefore, above around 2.78 K, a minimum of S( q) is expected. These theoretical predictions are in good agreement with the recent experimental data of Sears, Svensson, Woods and Martel based on neutron diffraction and of Hallock obtained by X-ray scattering.

  8. A YAC contig encompassing the XRCC5 (Ku80) DNA repair gene and complementation of defective cells by YAC protoplast fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Blunt, T.; Priestley, A.; Hafezparast, M.; McMillan, T.

    1995-11-20

    The Chinese hamster ovary xrs mutants are sensitive to ionizing radiation, defective in DNA double-strand break rejoining, and unable to carry out V(D)J recombination effectively. Recently, the gene defective in these mutants, XRCC5, has been shown to encode Ku80, a component of the Ku protein and DNA-dependent protein kinase. We present here a YAC contig involving 25 YACs mapping to the region 2q33-q34, which encompasses the XRCC5 gene. Eight new markers for this region of chromosome 2 are identified. YACs encoding the Ku80 gene were transferred to xrs cells by protoplast fusion, and complementation of all the defective phenotypes has been obtained with two YACs. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of this approach as a strategy for cloning human genes complementing defective rodent cell lines. 44 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Constitutional inversion of chromosome 7 and hematologic cancers.

    PubMed

    Stanley, W S; Burkett, S S; Segel, B; Quiery, A; George, B; Lobel, J; Shah, N

    1997-07-01

    Nonrandom aberrations of chromosome 7 have been described in various hematopoietic disorders. We describe here two unrelated families with the same constitutional inversion of chromosome 7 [inv(7)(q11.2q22)]. The probands in both families had acute leukemia and cytogenetic analysis revealed that the inversion was the sole cytogenetic abnormality in the bone marrow at diagnosis. There is a history of hematologic diseases in one of these families that included a son who is a carrier of this constitutional inversion. The distal inversion breakpoint lies within the common region of chromosome loss identified in some myeloid diseases. These observations raise the possibility that this inherited chromosome rearrangement could result in a mutation of a tumor suppressor gene and possibly represent a predisposing event for the development of leukemia in these individuals.

  10. Logarithmical regularity criterion of the three-dimensional Boussinesq equations in terms of the pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mechdene, Mohamed; Gala, Sadek; Guo, Zhengguang; Ragusa, Alessandra Maria

    2016-10-01

    This work establishes a sufficient condition for the regularity criterion of the Boussinesq equation in terms of the derivative of the pressure in one direction. It is shown that if the partial derivative of the pressure {partial 3π } satisfies the logarithmical Serrin-type condition int0TVert partial 3π (s)Vert_{L^{λ }}q/1+ln (1+Vert θ Vert_{L4)} {d}s < ∞ quad {with}quad2/q+3/λ =7/4quad {and}quad12/7 < λ ≤ ∞, then the solution {(u,θ )} remains smooth on {[0,T]}. Compared to the Navier-Stokes result, there is a logarithmic correction involving {θ} in the denominator.

  11. Shot noise of large charge quanta in superconductor/semiconductor/superconductor junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camino, F. E.; Kuznetsov, V. V.; Mendez, E. E.; Schäpers, Th.; Guzenko, V. A.; Hardtdegen, H.

    2005-01-01

    We have found experimentally that the noise of ballistic electron transport in a superconductor/semiconductor/superconductor junction is enhanced relative to the value given by the general relation, SV=2eIR2coth(eV/2kT) , for two voltage regions in which this expression reduces to its thermal and shot noise limits. The noise enhancement is explained by the presence of large charge quanta, with an effective charge q*=(1+2Δ/eV)e , that generate a noise spectrum SV=2q*IR2 , as predicted by Averin and Imam [Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 3814 (1996)]. These charge quanta result from multiple Andreev reflections at each junction interface, which are also responsible for the subharmonic gap structure observed in the voltage dependence of the junction’s conductance.

  12. An hPer2 phosphorylation site mutation in familial advanced sleep phase syndrome.

    PubMed

    Toh, K L; Jones, C R; He, Y; Eide, E J; Hinz, W A; Virshup, D M; Ptácek, L J; Fu, Y H

    2001-02-01

    Familial advanced sleep phase syndrome (FASPS) is an autosomal dominant circadian rhythm variant; affected individuals are "morning larks" with a 4-hour advance of the sleep, temperature, and melatonin rhythms. Here we report localization of the FASPS gene near the telomere of chromosome 2q. A strong candidate gene (hPer2), a human homolog of the period gene in Drosophila, maps to the same locus. Affected individuals have a serine to glycine mutation within the casein kinase Iepsilon (CKIepsilon) binding region of hPER2, which causes hypophosphorylation by CKIepsilon in vitro. Thus, a variant in human sleep behavior can be attributed to a missense mutation in a clock component, hPER2, which alters the circadian period. PMID:11232563

  13. Some nitrogen-14 NMR studies in solids

    SciTech Connect

    Pratum, T.K.

    1983-11-01

    The first order quadrupolar perturbation of the /sup 14/N NMR spectrum yields information regarding the static and dynamic properties of the surrounding electronic environment. Signal to noise problems caused by long /sup 14/N longitudinal relaxation times (T/sub 1/) and small equilibrium polarizations are reduced by rotating frame cross polarization (CP) experiments between /sup 14/N and /sup 1/H. Using quadrupolar echo and CP techniques, the /sup 14/N quadrupolar coupling constants (e/sup 2/qQ/h) and asymmetry parameters (eta) have been obtained for a variety of tetraalkylammonium compounds by observation of their quadrupolar powder patterns at various temperatures. For choline chloride and iodide the /sup 14/N NMR powder patterns exhibit the effects of anisotropic molecular motion, while choline bromide spectra show no such effects.

  14. Interstitial duplication of proximal 22q: Phenotypic overlap with cat eye syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Knoll, J.H.M.; Asamoah, A.; Wagstaff, J.

    1995-01-16

    We describe a child with downslanting palpebral fissures, preauricular malfunctions, congenital heart defect (total anomalous pulmonary venous return), unilateral absence of a kidney, and developmental delay with an apparent interstitial duplication of proximal 22q. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis showed duplication of the IGLC locus, and C-banding of the duplicated region was negative. The duplication appears to involve 22q11.2-q12. Although the child has neither colobomas nor microphthalmia, he shows phenotypic overlap with with the cat eye syndrome, which is caused by a supernumerary bisatellited chromosome arising from inverted duplication of the short arm and proximal long arm of chromosome 22. Further molecular studies of this patient should help to define the regions responsible for the manifestations of cat eye syndrome. 17 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Voigt line infrared atmospheric transmittance calculations by Fourier transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuendorffer, A. C.

    1980-04-01

    The absorption coefficient space of an IR atmospheric path contains the linear superposition of many Voigt spectral lines. This paper discusses the practical application of Karp's method to the simulation of satellite transmittance and radiance observations by using fast Fourier transforms on the recursively generated Voigt transforms. Although the procedure is physically straightforward, it is nonetheless computationally demanding and suited primarily to narrow isolated Q-branch regions. Performing the calculation on a 2.4/cm wide 15-micron CO2 Q-branch region demonstrates that 4% of the total absorption takes place above 0.1 mb. This absorption is in the cold mesopause and results in a 1-2% radiation deficit with its inclusion in a satellite radiation calculation.

  16. A note for Riesz transforms associated with Schrödinger operators on the Heisenberg Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu; Tang, Guobin

    2016-03-01

    Let {{H}^n} be the Heisenberg group and Q=2n+2 be its homogeneous dimension. The Schrödinger operator is denoted by - {Δ _{{{H}^n}}} + V , where {Δ _{{{H}^n}}} is the sub-Laplacian and the nonnegative potential V belongs to the reverse Hölder class {B_{{q_1}}} for {q_1} ≥ Q/2 . Let H^p_L({H}^n) be the Hardy space associated with the Schrödinger operator for Q/Q+δ _02-Q/q_1} . In this note we show that the operators {T_1} = V{( - {Δ _{{{H}^n}}} + V)^{ - 1}} and {T_2} = {V^{1/2}}{( - {Δ _{{{H}^n}}} + V)^{ - 1/2}} are bounded from H_L^p({{H}^n}) into {L^p}({{H}^n}) . Our results are also valid on the stratified Lie group.

  17. Utility advanced turbine systems (ATS) technology readiness testing and pre-commercial demonstration. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which will be sited and operated in Phase 4. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown. This report summarizes work accomplished in 2Q97.

  18. Wetting on rough self-affine surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palasantzas, George

    1995-05-01

    In this paper, we present a general investigation of the effective potential for complete wetting on self-affine rough surfaces. The roughness effect is investigated by means of the height-height correlation model in Fourier space ~(1+aξ2q2)-1-H. The parameters H and ξ are, respectively, the roughness exponent and the substrate in-plane correlation length. It is observed that the effect of H on the free interface profile is significant for ξ>ξ) regime is characterized by a power-law scaling ~Y-2.

  19. New asymmetric quantum codes over Fq

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yuena; Feng, Xiaoyi; Xu, Gen

    2016-07-01

    Two families of new asymmetric quantum codes are constructed in this paper. The first family is the asymmetric quantum codes with length n=qm-1 over Fq, where qge 5 is a prime power. The second one is the asymmetric quantum codes with length n=3m-1. These asymmetric quantum codes are derived from the CSS construction and pairs of nested BCH codes. Moreover, let the defining set T1=T2^{-q}, then the real Z-distance of our asymmetric quantum codes are much larger than δ _max+1, where δ _max is the maximal designed distance of dual-containing narrow-sense BCH code, and the parameters presented here have better than the ones available in the literature.

  20. Magnetic excitations in single crystal PrNiSn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beirne, E. D.; McEwen, K. A.; Habicht, K.; Fort, D.

    Inelastic neutron scattering results from a single crystal of the rare earth intermetallic PrNiSn are presented. Crystalline electric field excitations are found at 0.5, 2.4 and around 3.5 meV. The lower modes show little dispersion over q, but the 3.5 meV splits into two excitations, most clearly seen along the c* direction. Fitting the modes with gaussian functions allows us to show the pronounced dispersion to be of the form E(q)=E0+J1cos(qπ) for the upper mode, and E(q)=E0+J1cos(qπ)+J2cos(2qπ) for the lower mode. This suggests a longer range interaction for the lower mode. The lowest excitation at 0.5 meV confirms predictions made from previous measurements on polycrystalline samples that indicate a low lying CEF level.

  1. Physical mapping of the holoprosencephaly critical region in 21q22.3, exclusion of SIM2 as a candidate gene for holoprosencephaly, and mapping of SIM2 to a region of chromosome 21 important for Down syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Muenke, M.; Bone, L.J.; Mitchell, H.F.

    1995-11-01

    We set out to define the holoprosencephaly (HPE) critical region on chromosome 21 and also to determine whether there were human homologues of the Drosophila single-minded (sim) gene that might be involved in HPE. Analysis of somatic cell hybrid clones that contained rearranged chromosomes 21 from HPE patients defined the HPE minimal critical region in 21q22.3 as D21S113 to qter. We used established somatic cell hybrid mapping panels to map SIM2 to chromosome 21 within subbands q22.2-q22.3. Analysis of the HPE patient-derived somatic cell hybrids showed that SIM2 is not deleted in two of three patients and thus is not a likely candidate for HPE1, the HPE gene on chromosome 21. However, SIM2 does map within the Down syndrome critical region and thus is a candidate gene that might contribute to the Down syndrome phenotype. 31 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Partial monosomy 3p (3p26.2 --> pter) and partial trisomy 5q (5q34 --> qter) in a girl with coarctation of the aorta, congenital heart defects, short stature, microcephaly and developmental delay.

    PubMed

    Chen, C P; Lin, S P; Chen, M R; Su, Y N; Chern, S R; Liu, Y P; Su, J W; Lee, M S; Wang, W

    2012-01-01

    A 1-year-and-3-month-old girl presented with psychomotor retardation, developmental delay, clinodactyly of the thumb, coarctation of the aorta, patent ductus arteriosus, peripheral pulmonary stenosis, atrial septal defect, microcephaly, brachycephaly, a small oval face, almond-shaped eyes, a down-turned mouth, a widened nasal bridge, hypertelorism, epicanthic folds, long philtrum, low-set large ears and but no craniosynostosis. Oligonucleotide-based array comparative genomic hybridization revealed a -4.79-Mb deletion of 3p26.2 --> pter encompassing CHL1 and CNTN4, and a -19.56-Mb duplication of 5q34 --> qter encompassing MSX2, NKX2-5 and NSD1. The karyotype of the girl was 46,XX,der(3)t(3;5)(p26.2;q34) pat. The present case adds distal 5q duplication to the list of chromosome aberrations associated with coarctation of the aorta. PMID:23072190

  3. Diffraction at the Tevatron: CDF results

    SciTech Connect

    Goulianos, Konstantin; /Rockefeller U.

    2006-11-01

    The diffractive program of the CDF Collaboration at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} Collider is reviewed with emphasis on recent results from Run II at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Updated results on the x{sub B{sub j}} and Q{sup 2} dependence of the diffractive structure function obtained from dijet production, and on the slope parameter of the t-distribution of diffractive events as a function of Q{sup 2} in the range 1 GeV{sup 2} < Q{sup 2} < 10{sup 4} GeV{sup 2}, are presented and compared with theoretical expectations. Results on cross sections for exclusive dijet and diphoton production are also presented and used to calibrate theoretical estimates for exclusive Higgs production at the Large Hadron Collider.

  4. Magnetic charge, black holes, and cosmic censorship

    SciTech Connect

    Hiscock, W.H.

    1981-02-01

    The possibility of converting a Reissner-Nordstroem black hole into a naked singularity by means of test particle accretion is considered. The dually charged Reissner-Nordstroem metric describes a black hole only when M/sup 2/>Q/sup 2/+P/sup 2/. The test particle equations of motion are shown to allow test particles with arbitrarily large magnetic charge/mass ratios to fall radially into electrically charged black holes. To determine the nature of the final state (black hole or naked singularity) an exact solution of Einstein's equations representing a spherical shell of magnetically charged dust falling into an electrically charged black hole is studied. Naked singularities are never formed so long as the weak energy condition is obeyed by the infalling matter. The differences between the spherical shell model and an infalling point test particle are examined and discussed.

  5. The impact of stochastic variables on the rock blasting results

    SciTech Connect

    Agreda, C.

    1996-12-01

    It is widely accepted that the rock blasting results are a function of several stochastic variables given by: The natural geological structure of the rock mass (joint spacings, discontinuities length orientation and characteristics, physical-mechanical properties, such as: ultimate strengths and elastic properties, etc.); the detonation and explosion parameters of the explosive mixture (V.O.D., P2, T2, Q3, etc.); and the drilling and blasting pattern dimensions. In this paper the most important stochastic variables regarding the rock mass and the blast design dimensions are identified, described, and discussed. A non linear programming method to calculate the optimum burden is proposed and discussed. The great impact of the stochastic variable called burden on the rock blasting results is emphasized. A comparison between burden theoretical calculations and some field blast results is also shown.

  6. A novel human gene encoding a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPR15) is located on chromosome 3

    SciTech Connect

    Heiber, M.; Marchese, A.; O`Dowd, B.F.

    1996-03-05

    We used sequence similarities among G-protein-coupled receptor genes to discover a novel receptor gene. Using primers based on conserved regions of the opioid-related receptors, we isolated a PCR product that was used to locate the full-length coding region of a novel human receptor gene, which we have named GPR15. A comparison of the amino acid sequence of the receptor gene, which we have named GPR15. A comparison of the amino acid sequence of the receptor encoded by GPR15 with other receptors revealed that it shared sequence identity with the angiotensin II AT1 and AT2 receptors, the interleukin 8b receptor, and the orphan receptors GPR1 and AGTL1. GPR15 was mapped to human chromosome 3q11.2-q13.1. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  7. LRP4 mutations alter Wnt/beta-catenin signaling and cause limb and kidney malformations in Cenani-Lenz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Li, Yun; Pawlik, Barbara; Elcioglu, Nursel; Aglan, Mona; Kayserili, Hülya; Yigit, Gökhan; Percin, Ferda; Goodman, Frances; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Cenani, Asim; Urquhart, Jill; Chung, Boi-Dinh; Ismail, Samira; Amr, Khalda; Aslanger, Ayca D; Becker, Christian; Netzer, Christian; Scambler, Pete; Eyaid, Wafaa; Hamamy, Hanan; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Hennekam, Raoul; Nürnberg, Peter; Herz, Joachim; Temtamy, Samia A; Wollnik, Bernd

    2010-05-14

    Cenani-Lenz syndrome (CLS) is an autosomal-recessive congenital disorder affecting distal limb development. It is characterized mainly by syndactyly and/or oligodactyly and is now shown to be commonly associated with kidney anomalies. We used a homozygosity-mapping approach to map the CLS1 locus to chromosome 11p11.2-q13.1. By sequencing candidate genes, we identified recessive LRP4 mutations in 12 families with CLS. LRP4 belongs to the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-related proteins (LRPs), which are essential for various developmental processes. LRP4 is known to antagonize LRP6-mediated activation of canonical Wnt signaling, a function that is lost by the identified mutations. Our findings increase the spectrum of congenital anomalies associated with abnormal lipoprotein receptor-dependent signaling.

  8. Physical Principles of Skeletal Minerals Revealed with Spectromicroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, Pupa

    2009-08-05

    Skeletal elements of marine and terrestrial organisms have the most fascinating nano-to-macro-structures, attracting the attention of physicists, biologists, chemists, and materials scientists. Using X-PEEM spectromicroscopy we revealed some of the fundamental mechanisms leading to the formation of these biominerals. Specifically, we addressed the following questions and provided the answers: 1Q) How do teeth, bones, and echinoderm and mollusk shells acquire their unusual, curved and complex morphology, if they are composed of single crystals? 1A) Via amorphous precursor phases; 2Q) How does crystallinity propagate through the amorophous precursor phases in sea urchin spicules and teeth? 2A) By secondary nucleation, following random walk patterns; 3Q) How does iridescent mother-of-pearl become ordered? 3A) Gradually, through a kinetic mechanisms in which fastest growing single-crystals win the competition for space, thus end up being approximately co-oriented.

  9. Collective excitations in liquid CD4: Neutron scattering and molecular-dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guarini, E.; Bafile, U.; Barocchi, F.; Demmel, F.; Formisano, F.; Sampoli, M.; Venturi, G.

    2005-12-01

    We have investigated the dynamic structure factor S(Q,ω) of liquid CD4 at T = 97.7 K in the wave vector range 2 <= Q/nm-1 <= 15 by means of neutron scattering and molecular-dynamics simulation, in order to study the centre-of-mass collective dynamics. The agreement between the experimental spectra and those simulated using a recent ab initio based intermolecular potential is good, particularly at low Q. Underdamped collective excitations, detected in the whole experimental Q-range, characterize the dynamics of liquid CD4 as markedly different from that of other molecular liquids. Also, the energy and damping of collective excitations in methane are shown to differ considerably, even at the lowest measured Q-values, from those of linearized hydrodynamic modes. An empirical relation, able to reconcile the different wave vector ranges of mode propagation observed in disparate liquids, is investigated.

  10. Ballistic Motion in One-Dimensional Quasi-Periodic Discrete Schrödinger Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhiyan

    2016-10-01

    For the solution {q(t)=(q_n(t))_{nin{{Z}}}} to one-dimensional discrete Schrödinger equation idot{q}_n=-(q_{n+1}+q_{n-1})+ V(θ+nω) q_n, quad nin{{Z}}, with {ωin{{R}}^d} Diophantine, and {V} a real-analytic function on {{{T}}^d}, we consider the growth rate of the diffusion norm {|q(t)|D:=(sumnn^2|q_n(t)|^2)^{1/2}} for any non-zero {q(0)} with {|q(0)|D < ∞}. We prove that {|q(t)|D} grows linearly with the time {t} for any {θin{{T}}^d} if {V} is sufficiently small.

  11. Familial 10p trisomy resulting from a maternal pericentric inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Kozma, C.; Meck, J.M.

    1994-02-01

    The authors report a familial recombination of a pericentric inversion of chromosome 10 resulting in 2 affected relatives who had 10p trisomy and 10q monosomy with the karyotypic abnormality designated rec(10) dup p,inv(10) (p11.2q26). Both of these individuals had the typical characteristics of 10p trisomy, however, at birth the proposita had mild facial anomalies suggesting that the distinct facial characteristics may be of postnatal onset in some cases. In addition, the proposita had gastroesophageal reflux causing severe anemia. The phenotype of the patients is compared to 41 patients with 10p trisomy reported in the literature. 37 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Fractional vortex molecules and vortex polygons in a baby Skyrme model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Michikazu; Nitta, Muneto

    2013-06-01

    We construct a molecule of fractional vortices with fractional topological lump charges as a baby Skyrmion with the unit topological lump charge in the antiferromagnetic (or XY) baby Skyrme model, that is, an O(3) sigma model with a four-derivative term and an antiferromagnetic or XY-type potential term quadratic in fields. We further construct configurations with topological lump charges Q≤7 and find that bound states of vortex molecules constitute regular polygons with 2Q vertices as vortices, where the rotational symmetry SO(2) in real space is spontaneously broken into a discrete subgroup ZQ. We also find metastable and arrayed bound states of fractional vortices for Q=5, 6. On the other hand, we find for Q=7 that the regular polygon is metastable and the arrayed bound state is stable. We calculate binding energies of all configurations.

  13. High quality thin films of thermoelectric misfit cobalt oxides prepared by a chemical solution method.

    PubMed

    Rivas-Murias, Beatriz; Manuel Vila-Fungueiriño, José; Rivadulla, Francisco

    2015-07-08

    Misfit cobaltates ([Bi/Ba/Sr/Ca/CoO]n(RS)[CoO2]q) constitute the most promising family of thermoelectric oxides for high temperature energy harvesting. However, their complex structure and chemical composition makes extremely challenging their deposition by high-vacuum physical techniques. Therefore, many of them have not been prepared as thin films until now. Here we report the synthesis of high-quality epitaxial thin films of the most representative members of this family of compounds by a water-based chemical solution deposition method. The films show an exceptional crystalline quality, with an electrical conductivity and thermopower comparable to single crystals. These properties are linked to the epitaxial matching of the rock-salt layers of the structure to the substrate, producing clean interfaces free of amorphous phases. This is an important step forward for the integration of these materials with complementary n-type thermoelectric oxides in multilayer nanostructures.

  14. High quality thin films of thermoelectric misfit cobalt oxides prepared by a chemical solution method

    PubMed Central

    Rivas-Murias, Beatriz; Manuel Vila-Fungueiriño, José; Rivadulla, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Misfit cobaltates ([Bi/Ba/Sr/Ca/CoO]nRS[CoO2]q) constitute the most promising family of thermoelectric oxides for high temperature energy harvesting. However, their complex structure and chemical composition makes extremely challenging their deposition by high-vacuum physical techniques. Therefore, many of them have not been prepared as thin films until now. Here we report the synthesis of high-quality epitaxial thin films of the most representative members of this family of compounds by a water-based chemical solution deposition method. The films show an exceptional crystalline quality, with an electrical conductivity and thermopower comparable to single crystals. These properties are linked to the epitaxial matching of the rock-salt layers of the structure to the substrate, producing clean interfaces free of amorphous phases. This is an important step forward for the integration of these materials with complementary n-type thermoelectric oxides in multilayer nanostructures. PMID:26153533

  15. Numerical simulation of tidal evolution of a viscoelastic body modelled with a mass-spring network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frouard, Julien; Quillen, Alice C.; Efroimsky, Michael; Giannella, David

    2016-05-01

    We use a damped mass-spring model within an N-body code to simulate the tidal evolution of the spin and orbit of a self-gravitating viscoelastic spherical body moving around a point-mass perturber. The damped mass-spring model represents a Kelvin-Voigt viscoelastic solid. We measure the tidal quality function (the dynamical Love number k2 divided by the tidal quality factor Q) from the numerically computed tidal drift of the semimajor axis of the binary. The shape of k2/Q, as a function of the principal tidal frequency, reproduces the kink shape predicted by Efroimsky for the tidal response of near-spherical homogeneous viscoelastic rotators. We demonstrate that we can directly simulate the tidal evolution of spinning viscoelastic objects. In future, the mass-spring N-body model can be generalized to inhomogeneous and/or non-spherical bodies.

  16. Signs of divided differences yield least squares data fitting with constrained monotonicity or convexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demetriou, I. C.

    2002-09-01

    Methods are presented for least squares data smoothing by using the signs of divided differences of the smoothed values. Professor M.J.D. Powell initiated the subject in the early 1980s and since then, theory, algorithms and FORTRAN software make it applicable to several disciplines in various ways. Let us consider n data measurements of a univariate function which have been altered by random errors. Then it is usual for the divided differences of the measurements to show sign alterations, which are probably due to data errors. We make the least sum of squares change to the measurements, by requiring the sequence of divided differences of order m to have at most q sign changes for some prescribed integer q. The positions of the sign changes are integer variables of the optimization calculation, which implies a combinatorial problem whose solution can require about O(nq) quadratic programming calculations in n variables and n-m constraints. Suitable methods have been developed for the following cases. It has been found that a dynamic programming procedure can calculate the global minimum for the important cases of piecewise monotonicity m=1,q[greater-or-equal, slanted]1 and piecewise convexity/concavity m=2,q[greater-or-equal, slanted]1 of the smoothed values. The complexity of the procedure in the case of m=1 is O(n2+qn log2 n) computer operations, while it is reduced to only O(n) when q=0 (monotonicity) and q=1 (increasing/decreasing monotonicity). The case m=2,q[greater-or-equal, slanted]1 requires O(qn2) computer operations and n2 quadratic programming calculations, which is reduced to one and n-2 quadratic programming calculations when m=2,q=0, i.e. convexity, and m=2,q=1, i.e. convexity/concavity, respectively. Unfortunately, the technique that receives this efficiency cannot generalize for the highly nonlinear case m[greater-or-equal, slanted]3,q[greater-or-equal, slanted]2. However, the case m[greater-or-equal, slanted]3,q=0 is solved by a special strictly

  17. Associations between attempted suicide, violent life events, depressive symptoms, and resilience in adolescents and young adults.

    PubMed

    Nrugham, Latha; Holen, Are; Sund, Anne Mari

    2010-02-01

    Were violent/nonviolent traumatic life events and victimization by/witnessing violence associates of attempted suicide among depressed adolescents who were also less resilient at early adulthood? The present study examined a subset of mainly depressed, age- and gender-matched, adolescents derived from a representative sample of 2464 students (T1, mean age = 13.7 years) followed up after 1 year (T2Q) and reassessed 5 years later (T3, n = 252, mean age = 20.0 years, 73% participation), with a questionnaire, including the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale and The Kiddie-Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia-Present and Lifetime version psychiatric interviews, which also tapped traumatic life events. Logistic regression analyses revealed that attempters were victims, not witnesses of violence, more depressed, and less resilient than nonattempters, and that resilience was a moderator of lifetime violent events and attempted suicide, even in the presence of antecedent depression. PMID:20145488

  18. Parity Violation Inelastic Scattering Experiments at 6 GeV and 12 GeV Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Sulkosky, Vincent A.; et. al.,

    2015-03-01

    We report on the measurement of parity-violating asymmetries in the deep inelastic scattering and nucleon resonance regions using inclusive scattering of longitudinally polarized electrons from an unpolarized deuterium target. The effective weak couplings C$_{2q}$ are accessible through the deep-inelastic scattering measurements. Here we report a measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry, which yields a determination of 2C$_{2u}$ - C$_{2d}$ with an improved precision of a factor of five relative to the previous result. This result indicates evidence with 95% confidence that the 2C$_{2u}$ - C$_{2d}$ is non-zero. This experiment also provides the first parity-violation data covering the whole resonance region, which provide constraints on nucleon resonance models. Finally, the program to extend these measurements at Jefferson Lab in the 12 GeV era using the Solenoidal Large Intensity Device was also discussed.

  19. Quasistationary parameters of the small bodies of the solar system

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, E.N.; Shestaka, I.S.

    1987-07-01

    The following quasistationary parameters of the small bodies of the solar system are introduced: P = 0.6/a -(a(1 - e/sup 2/))cos/sup 2/i - 2, Q = 0.4 + (2a - 1) (1 - e/sup 2/)cos/sup 2/i - e/sup 2/ (0.4 - sin/sup 2/ omega x sin/sup 2/i). They are investigated on the basis of data of photographic and radar observations of meteors, comets, and asteroids of the Apollo - Amur group. The quasistationary parameters P and Q can be applied to judge the genetic relationship between the bodies under investigation and to determine the probabilities of their encounter with the planets and the influx of meteoric material onto the planets of the solar system.

  20. Measurement of the tensor structure function b1 of the deuteron.

    PubMed

    Airapetian, A; Akopov, N; Akopov, Z; Amarian, M; Ammosov, V V; Andrus, A; Aschenauer, E C; Augustyniak, W; Avakian, R; Avetissian, A; Avetissian, E; Bailey, P; Balin, D; Baturin, V; Beckmann, M; Belostotski, S; Bernreuther, S; Bianchi, N; Blok, H P; Böttcher, H; Borissov, A; Borysenko, A; Bouwhuis, M; Brack, J; Brüll, A; Bryzgalov, V; Capitani, G P; Chen, T; Chiang, H C; Ciullo, G; Contalbrigo, M; Dalpiaz, P F; De Leo, R; Demey, M; De Nardo, L; De Sanctis, E; Devitsin, E; Di Nezza, P; Dreschler, J; Düren, M; Ehrenfried, M; Elalaoui-Moulay, A; Elbakian, G; Ellinghaus, F; Elschenbroich, U; Fabbri, R; Fantoni, A; Fechtchenko, A; Felawka, L; Fox, B; Frullani, S; Gapienko, G; Gapienko, V; Garibaldi, F; Garrow, K; Garutti, E; Gaskell, D; Gavrilov, G; Gharibyan, V; Graw, G; Grebeniouk, O; Greeniaus, L G; Gregor, I M; Hafidi, K; Hartig, M; Hasch, D; Heesbeen, D; Henoch, M; Hertenberger, R; Hesselink, W H A; Hillenbrand, A; Hoek, M; Holler, Y; Hommez, B; Iarygin, G; Ivanilov, A; Izotov, A; Jackson, H E; Jgoun, A; Kaiser, R; Kinney, E; Kisselev, A; Kopytin, M; Korotkov, V; Kozlov, V; Krauss, B; Krivokhijine, V G; Lagamba, L; Lapikás, L; Laziev, A; Lenisa, P; Liebing, P; Linden-Levy, L A; Lipka, K; Lorenzon, W; Lu, H; Lu, J; Lu, S; Ma, B-Q; Maiheu, B; Makins, N C R; Mao, Y; Marianski, B; Marukyan, H; Masoli, F; Mexner, V; Meyners, N; Mikloukho, O; Miller, C A; Miyachi, Y; Muccifora, V; Nagaitsev, A; Nappi, E; Naryshkin, Y; Nass, A; Negodaev, M; Nowak, W-D; Oganessyan, K; Ohsuga, H; Pickert, N; Potashov, S; Potterveld, D H; Raithel, M; Reggiani, D; Reimer, P E; Reischl, A; Reolon, A R; Riedl, C; Rith, K; Rosner, G; Rostomyan, A; Rubacek, L; Rubin, J; Ryckbosch, D; Salomatin, Y; Sanjiev, I; Savin, I; Schäfer, A; Schill, C; Schnell, G; Schüler, K P; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Seitz, B; Shanidze, R; Shearer, C; Shibata, T-A; Shutov, V; Simani, M C; Sinram, K; Stancari, M; Statera, M; Steffens, E; Steijger, J J M; Stenzel, H; Stewart, J; Stinzing, F; Stösslein, U; Tait, P; Tanaka, H; Taroian, S; Tchuiko, B; Terkulov, A; Tkabladze, A; Trzcinski, A; Tytgat, M; Vandenbroucke, A; van der Nat, P B; van der Steenhoven, G; Vetterli, M C; Vikhrov, V; Vincter, M G; Vogel, C; Vogt, M; Volmer, J; Weiskopf, C; Wendland, J; Wilbert, J; Ye, Y; Ye, Z; Yen, S; Zihlmann, B; Zupranski, P

    2005-12-01

    The Hermes experiment has investigated the tensor spin structure of the deuteron using the 27.6 GeV/c positron beam of DESY HERA. The use of a tensor-polarized deuteron gas target with only a negligible residual vector polarization enabled the first measurement of the tensor asymmetry A(d)zz and the tensor structure function b(d)1 for average values of the Bjorken variable 0.01< <0.45 and of the negative of the squared four-momentum transfer 0.5 GeV2 < <Q2> <5 GeV2. The quantities A(d)zz and b(d)1 are found to be nonzero. The rise of b(d)1 for decreasing values of x can be interpreted to originate from the same mechanism that leads to nuclear shadowing in unpolarized scattering. PMID:16384369

  1. Transport properties of rigid bent-rod macromolecules and of semiflexible broken rods in the rigid-body treatment. Analysis of the flexibility of myosin rod.

    PubMed Central

    Iniesta, A; Díaz, F G; García de la Torre, J

    1988-01-01

    The translational diffusion coefficients, rotational relaxation times and intrinsic viscosities of rigid bent rods, composed by two rodlike arms joined rigidly at an angle alpha, have been evaluated for varying conformation using the latest advances in hydrodynamic theory. We have considered semiflexible rods in which the joint is an elastic hinge or swivel, with a potential V(alpha) = 1/2Q alpha 2 with constant Q. Accepting the rigid-body treatment, we calculate properties of broken rods by averaging alpha-dependent values for rigid rods. The results are finally used to interpret literature values of the properties of myosin rod. Q is regarded as an adjustable parameter, and the value fitted is such that the average bending angle of myosin rod is approximately 60 degrees. PMID:3207825

  2. Congenital stridor and wheezing as harbingers of the del22q11.2 syndrome presenting cardiovascular malformations of right aortic arch, aberrant left subclavian artery, Kommerell's diverticulum, and left ligamentum arteriosum.

    PubMed

    Lee, Meng-Luen; Chen, Ming; Tsao, Lon-Yen; Chiu, Han-Yao; Chiu, Ing-Sh; Yang, Albert D; Tsai, Pei-Ling

    2011-01-01

    A complete vascular ring composed of right aortic arch, aberrant left subclavian artery with Kommerell's diverticulum, and left ligamentum arteriosum was diagnosed by barium esophagography, echocardiography, angiography, and multidetector computed tomography of chest in an 18-day-old male neonate who presented with remarkable inspiratory stridor, expiratory wheezing, postprandial vomiting, and dysphagia since birth, and survived surgical division of the left ligamentum arteriosum, resection of the Kommerell's diverticulum, and reimplanation of the left subclavian artery to the left common carotid artery. Cytogenetic analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization study of his blood revealed chromosome 22q11.2 deletion, with a karyotype of 46,XY.ish del(22)(q11.2 q11.2). A constellation of right aortic arch, aberrant left subclavian artery with Kommerell's diverticulum, and left ligamentum arteriosum in neonates may cause refractory stridor, wheezing, vomiting, and dysphagia, which can serve as harbingers of the del22q11.2 syndrome.

  3. Classification of knotted tori in 2-metastable dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Cencelj, Matija; Repovs, Dusan; Skopenkov, Mihail B

    2012-11-30

    This paper is devoted to the classical Knotting Problem: for a given manifold N and number m describe the set of isotopy classes of embeddings N{yields}S{sup m}. We study the specific case of knotted tori, that is, the embeddings S{sup p} Multiplication-Sign S{sup q}{yields}S{sup m}. The classification of knotted tori up to isotopy in the metastable dimension range m {>=} p + 3/2q + 2, p{<=}q, was given by Haefliger, Zeeman and A. Skopenkov. We consider the dimensions below the metastable range and give an explicit criterion for the finiteness of this set of isotopy classes in the 2-metastable dimension. Bibliography: 35 titles.

  4. Gene, Stem Cell, and Alternative Therapies for SCA 1

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Jacob L.; O'Connor, Deirdre M.; Donsante, Anthony; Boulis, Nicholas M.

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia 1 is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by neurodegeneration and motor dysfunction. In disease pathogenesis, polyglutamine expansion within Ataxin-1, a gene involved in transcriptional repression, causes protein nuclear inclusions to form. Most notably, neuronal dysfunction presents in Purkinje cells. However, the effect of mutant Ataxin-1 is not entirely understood. Two mouse models are employed to represent spinocerebellar ataxia 1, a B05 transgenic model that specifically expresses mutant Ataxin-1 in Purkinje cells, and a Sca1 154Q/2Q model that inserts the polyglutamine expansion into the mouse Ataxin-1 locus so that the mutant Ataxin-1 is expressed in all cells that express Ataxin-1. This review aims to summarize and evaluate the wide variety of therapies proposed for spinocerebellar ataxia 1, specifically gene and stem cell therapies. PMID:27570504

  5. Sorting photons of different rotational Doppler shifts (RDS) by orbital angular momentum of single-photon with spin-orbit-RDS entanglement.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lixiang; She, Weilong

    2008-09-15

    We demonstrate that single photons from a rotating q-plate exhibit an entanglement in three degrees of freedom of spin, orbital angular momentum, and the rotational Doppler shift (RDS) due to the nonconservation of total spin and orbital angular momenta. We find that the rotational Doppler shift deltaomega = Omega((delta)s + deltal) , where s, l and Omega are quantum numbers of spin, orbital angular momentum, and rotating velocity of the q-plate, respectively. Of interest is that the rotational Doppler shift directly reflects the rotational symmetry of q-plates and can be also expressed as deltaomega = (Omega)n , where n = 2(q-1) denotes the fold number of rotational symmetry. Besides, based on this single-photon spin-orbit-RDS entanglement, we propose an experimental scheme to sort photons of different frequency shifts according to individual orbital angular momentum.

  6. Isolation and characterization of the human MRE11 homologue

    SciTech Connect

    Petrini, J.H.J.; Walsh, M.E.; DiMare, C.

    1995-09-01

    Mutation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD52 epistasis group gene, MRE11, blocks meiotic recombination, confers profound sensitivity to double-strand break damage, and has a hyperrecombinational phenotype in mitotic cells. We isolated a highly conserved human MRE11 homologue using a two-hybrid screen for DNA ligase I-interacting proteins. Human MRE11 shares approximately 50% identity with its yeast counterpart over the N-terminal half of the protein. MRE11 is expressed at the highest levels in proliferating tissues, but is also observed in other tissues. The MRE11 locus maps to human chromosome 11q21 in a region frequently associated with cancer-related chromosomal abnormalities. A MRE11-related locus was found on chromosome 7q11.2-q11.3. 60 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Lactose intolerance and other disaccharidase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Balvir S

    2014-09-01

    Intolerance to foods which contain lactose can cause a range of intestinal and systemic symptoms. These symptoms are caused by Lactase deficiency which is encoded by a single gene (LCT) of ≈ 50 kb located on chromosome 2q21. In some food items, lactose has been missed because of "hidden" lactose due to inadequately labeled, confusing diagnosis of lactose intolerance based on dietary restriction of dairy foods. Two polymorphisms, C/T13910 and G/A22018, linked to hypolactasia, correlate with breath hydrogen and symptoms after lactose. The key in the management of lactose intolerance is the dietary removal of lactose. Patients diagnosed as lactose intolerant must be advised of "risk" foods, inadequately labeled, including processed meats, bread, cake mixes, soft drinks, and lagers. This review highlights the types, symptoms and management of lactose intolerance and also highlights differences from milk allergy which closely mimics the symptoms of lactose intolerance. PMID:24596060

  8. Equiconvergence of eigenfunction expansions for Sturm-Liouville operators with a distributional potential

    SciTech Connect

    Sadovnichaya, Inna V

    2010-11-11

    The Sturm-Liouville operator L=-d{sup 2}/dx{sup 2}+q(x) in the space L{sub 2}[0,{pi}] under Dirichlet boundary conditions is investigated. It is assumed that q(x)=u'(x), u(x) element of L{sub 2}[0,{pi}] (here, differentiation is used in the distributional sense). The problem of when the expansion of a function f(x) in terms of a series of eigenfunctions and associated functions of the operator L is uniformly equiconvergent on the whole of the interval [0,{pi}] with its Fourier sine series expansion is considered. It is shown that such uniform convergence holds for any function f(x) in the space L{sub 2}[0,{pi}]. Bibliography: 22 titles.

  9. Parity violation in deep inelastic scattering at JLab 6 GeV.

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, X.; Arrington, J.; Geesaman, D. F.; Hafidi, K.; Holt, R. J.; Jackson, H. E.; Potterveld, D. H.; Reimer, P. E.; Schulte, E.; Zeidman, B.; Physics

    2007-01-01

    The parity-violating asymmetry in e-2H deep inelastic scattering (DIS) can be used to extract the weak neutral-current coupling constants C 2q . A measurement of this asymmetry at two Q 2 values is planned at Jefferson Lab. Results from this experiment will provide a value of 2C 2u - C 2d to a precision of {+-}0.03, a factor of eight improvement over our current knowledge. If all hadronic effects can be understood, this result will provide information on possible extensions of the Standard Model, complementary to other experiments dedicated to new physics searches. Presented here are the physics motivation, experimental setup, potential hadronic effects and their implications, and the future of PV DIS at Jefferson Lab.

  10. Schwinger mechanism and graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Allor, Danielle; Cohen, Thomas D.; McGady, David A.

    2008-11-01

    The Schwinger mechanism, the production of charged particle-antiparticle pairs in a macroscopic external electric field, is derived for 2+1-dimensional theories. The rate of pair production per unit area for four species of massless fermions, with charge q, in a constant electric field E is given by {pi}{sup -2}({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){sup -3/2}c-tilde{sup -1/2}(qE){sup 3/2} where c-tilde is the speed of light for the two-dimensional system. To the extent undoped graphene behaves like the quantum field-theoretic vacuum for massless fermions in 2+1 dimensions, the Schwinger mechanism should be testable experimentally. A possible experimental configuration for this is proposed. Effects due to deviations from this idealized picture of graphene are briefly considered. It is argued that with present day samples of graphene, tests of the Schwinger formula may be possible.

  11. Density and correlation integrals in deep-inelastic muon-nucleon scattering at 490 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, M. R.; Aïd, S.; Anthony, P. L.; Baker, M. D.; Bartlett, J.; Bhatti, A. A.; Botterweck, F.; Braun, H. M.; Busza, W.; Conrad, J. M.; Coutrakon, G.; Davisson, R.; Derado, I.; Dhawan, S. K.; Dougherty, W.; Dreyer, T.; Dziunikowska, K.; Eckardt, V.; Ecker, U.; Erdmann, M.; Eskreys, A.; Figiel, J.; Gebauer, H. J.; Geesaman, D. F.; Gilman, R.; Green, M. C.; Haas, J.; Halliwell, C.; Hanlon, J.; Hantke, D.; Hughes, V. W.; Jackson, H. E.; Jaffe, D. E.; Jancso, G.; Jansen, D. M.; Kadija, K.; Kaufman, S.; Kennedy, R. D.; Kirk, T.; Kobrak, H. G. E.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kunori, S.; Lord, J. J.; Lubatti, H. J.; McLeod, D.; Magill, S.; Malecki, P.; Manz, A.; Melanson, H.; Michael, D. G.; Mohr, W.; Montgomery, H. E.; Morfin, J. G.; Nickerson, R. B.; O'Day, S.; Olkiewicz, K.; Osborne, L.; Papavassiliou, V.; Pawlik, B.; Pipkin, F. M.; Ramberg, E. J.; Röser, A.; Ryan, J. J.; Salgado, C. W.; Salvarani, A.; Schellman, H.; Schmitt, M.; Schmitz, N.; Schüler, K. P.; Seyerlein, H. J.; Skuja, A.; Snow, G. A.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Steinberg, P. H.; Stier, H. E.; Stopa, P.; Swanson, R. A.; Talaga, R.; Tentindo-Repond, S.; Trost, H.-J.; Venkataramania, H.; Wilhelm, M.; Wilkes, J.; Wilson, Richard; Wittek, W.; Wolbers, S. A.; Zhao, T.; Fermilab E665 Collaboration

    1994-09-01

    Results on density integrals Fq( Q2) and correlation integrals Kq( Q2) are presented for the first time in muon-nucleon scattering at ∼ 490 GeV, using data from the E665 experiment at the Tevatron of Fermilab. A clear rise of the Fq integrals with decreasing size of the phase-space cells (“intermittency”) is observed for pairs and triplets of negative hadrons whereas the effect is much weaker for mixed charge combinations. From these findings it is concluded that the observed intermittency signal is mainly caused by Bose-Einstein interference. Furthermore, no energy ( W) dependence of F2( Q2) is observed within the W range of the E665 experiment. Finally, the third-order correlation integrals K3( Q2) are found to be significantly different from zero which implies the presence of genuine three-particle correlations in muon-nucleon interactions.

  12. Scaling in tournaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Naim, E.; Redner, S.; Vazquez, F.

    2007-02-01

    We study a stochastic process that mimics single-game elimination tournaments. In our model, the outcome of each match is stochastic: the weaker player wins with upset probability q<=1/2, and the stronger player wins with probability 1-q. The loser is eliminated. Extremal statistics of the initial distribution of player strengths governs the tournament outcome. For a uniform initial distribution of strengths, the rank of the winner, x*, decays algebraically with the number of players, N, as x*~N-β. Different decay exponents are found analytically for sequential dynamics, βseq=1-2q, and parallel dynamics, \\beta_par=1+\\frac{\\ln (1-q)}{\\ln 2} . The distribution of player strengths becomes self-similar in the long time limit with an algebraic tail. Our theory successfully describes statistics of the US college basketball national championship tournament.

  13. Measurement Of Differential Cross Sections Of p(e,e'{pi}{sup +})n For High-Lying Resonances At Q{sup 2} < 5 GeV{sup 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Kijun

    2014-01-01

    The exclusive electro-production process ep -> e'n{pi}{sup +} was measured in the range of the invariant mass for n{pi}{sup +} system 1.6 GeV <= W <= 2.0 GeV, and the photon virtuality 1.8 GeV{sup 2} <= Q{sup 2} <= 4.0 GeV{sup 2} using CLAS. For the first time, these kinematics are probed in exclusive {pi}{sup +} production from the protons with nearly full coverage in the azimuthal and polar angles of the n{pi}{sup +} center-of-mass system. In this experiment, approximately 39,000 differential cross-section data points were measured. In this proceeding, preliminary results of our latest analysis work are presented on differential cross sections and structure functions as well as Legendre Moments.

  14. Gene, Stem Cell, and Alternative Therapies for SCA 1.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Jacob L; O'Connor, Deirdre M; Donsante, Anthony; Boulis, Nicholas M

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia 1 is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by neurodegeneration and motor dysfunction. In disease pathogenesis, polyglutamine expansion within Ataxin-1, a gene involved in transcriptional repression, causes protein nuclear inclusions to form. Most notably, neuronal dysfunction presents in Purkinje cells. However, the effect of mutant Ataxin-1 is not entirely understood. Two mouse models are employed to represent spinocerebellar ataxia 1, a B05 transgenic model that specifically expresses mutant Ataxin-1 in Purkinje cells, and a Sca1 154Q/2Q model that inserts the polyglutamine expansion into the mouse Ataxin-1 locus so that the mutant Ataxin-1 is expressed in all cells that express Ataxin-1. This review aims to summarize and evaluate the wide variety of therapies proposed for spinocerebellar ataxia 1, specifically gene and stem cell therapies. PMID:27570504

  15. A Construction of MDS Quantum Convolutional Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guanghui; Chen, Bocong; Li, Liangchen

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, two new families of MDS quantum convolutional codes are constructed. The first one can be regarded as a generalization of [36, Theorem 6.5], in the sense that we do not assume that q≡1 (mod 4). More specifically, we obtain two classes of MDS quantum convolutional codes with parameters: (i) [( q 2+1, q 2-4 i+3,1;2,2 i+2)] q , where q≥5 is an odd prime power and 2≤ i≤( q-1)/2; (ii) , where q is an odd prime power with the form q=10 m+3 or 10 m+7 ( m≥2), and 2≤ i≤2 m-1.

  16. Precision Hyperfine Structure of 2;^3P State of ^3He with External Magnetic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qixue; Drake, G. W. F.

    2007-06-01

    The theory of the Zeeman effect can be used to extrapolate precise measurements for the fine structure or the hyperfine structure to zero-field strength. In the present work, the hyperfine structure of 2;^3P state of ^3He with external magnetic fields is precisely calculated. The values of the fields for 32 crossings and five anticrossings of the magnetic sublevels are theoretically predicted for magnetic field strengths up to 1 Tesla. The results are compared with experimental work. We include the linear terms, diamagnetic terms, and the 2̂ relativistic correction terms in the Zeeman Hamiltonian. All related matrix elements are calculated with high accuracy by the use of double basis set Hylleraas type variational wave functions[1,2].[1] Z. -C. Yan and G.W.F. Drake, Phys. Rev. A 50, R1980 (1994).[2] Q. Wu and G.W.F. Drake, J. Phys. B 40, 393 (2007).

  17. A 5 Micron of beta Pictoris B at a Sub-Jupiter Projected Separation: Evidence for a Misalignment Between the Planet and the Inner, Warped Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Currie, Thayne; Thalmann, Christian; Matsumura, Soko; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Burrows, Adam; Kuchner, Marc

    2011-01-01

    We present and analyze a new M' detection of the young exoplanet Beta Pictoris b from 2008 VLT/NaCo data at a separation of approx. = 4 AU and a high signal-to-noise rereduction of L' data taken in December 2Q09. Based on our orbital analysis, the planet's orbit is viewed almost perfectly edge-on (i approx. 89 degrees) and has a Saturn-like semimajor axis of 9.50AU(+3.93 AU)/-(1.7AU) . Intriguingly, the planet's orbit is aligned with the major axis of the outer disk (Omega approx.31 degrees) but probably misaligned with the warp/inclined disk at 80 AU often cited as a signpost for the planet's existence. Our results motivate new studies to clarify how Beta Pic b sculpts debris disk structures and whether a second planet is required to explain the warp/inclined disk

  18. Mutations in UNC80, Encoding Part of the UNC79-UNC80-NALCN Channel Complex, Cause Autosomal-Recessive Severe Infantile Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Shamseldin, Hanan E.; Faqeih, Eissa; Alasmari, Ali; Zaki, Maha S.; Gleeson, Joseph G.; Alkuraya, Fowzan S.

    2016-01-01

    Brain channelopathies represent a growing class of brain disorders that usually result in paroxysmal disorders, although their role in other neurological phenotypes, including the recently described NALCN-related infantile encephalopathy, is increasingly recognized. In three Saudi Arabian families and one Egyptian family all affected by a remarkably similar phenotype (infantile encephalopathy and largely normal brain MRI) to that of NALCN-related infantile encephalopathy, we identified a locus on 2q34 in which whole-exome sequencing revealed three, including two apparently loss-of-function, recessive mutations in UNC80. UNC80 encodes a large protein that is necessary for the stability and function of NALCN and for bridging NALCN to UNC79 to form a functional complex. Our results expand the clinical relevance of the UNC79-UNC80-NALCN channel complex. PMID:26708753

  19. Computational study of the reactions of methanol with the hydroperoxyl and methyl radicals. 1. Accurate thermochemistry and barrier heights.

    PubMed

    Alecu, I M; Truhlar, Donald G

    2011-04-01

    The reactions of CH(3)OH with the HO(2) and CH(3) radicals are important in the combustion of methanol and are prototypes for reactions of heavier alcohols in biofuels. The reaction energies and barrier heights for these reaction systems are computed with CCSD(T) theory extrapolated to the complete basis set limit using correlation-consistent basis sets, both augmented and unaugmented, and further refined by including a fully coupled treatment of the connected triple excitations, a second-order perturbative treatment of quadruple excitations (by CCSDT(2)(Q)), core-valence corrections, and scalar relativistic effects. It is shown that the M08-HX and M08-SO hybrid meta-GGA density functionals can achieve sub-kcal mol(-1) agreement with the high-level ab initio results, identifying these functionals as important potential candidates for direct dynamics studies on the rates of these and homologous reaction systems. PMID:21405059

  20. A 250 GHz Gyrotron with a 3 GHz Tuning Bandwidth for Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Alexander B.; Nanni, Emilio A.; Herzfeld, Judith; Griffin, Robert G.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    We describe the design and implementation of a novel tunable 250 GHz gyrotron oscillator with >10 W output power over most of a 3 GHz band and >35 W peak power. The tuning bandwidth and power are sufficient to generate a >1 MHz nutation frequency across the entire nitroxide EPR lineshape for cross effect DNP, as well as to excite solid effect transitions utilizing other radicals, without the need for sweeping the NMR magnetic field. Substantially improved tunability is achieved by implementing a long (23 mm) interaction cavity that can excite higher order axial modes by changing either the magnetic field of the gyrotron or the cathode potential. This interaction cavity excites the rotating TE5,2,q mode, and an internal mode converter outputs a high-quality microwave beam with >94% Gaussian content. The gyrotron was integrated into a DNP spectrometer, resulting in a measured DNP enhancement of 54 on the membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin. PMID:22743211