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Sample records for 3-component bare soil

  1. Infiltration model for center pivot irrigation on bare soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The marked reduction in infiltration rate caused by formation of a soil surface seal due to water droplet impact on bare soil is a well known phenomenon but is rarely considered in infiltration models, especially under center pivot irrigation. The objective of this study was to develop a soil infil...

  2. Radar reflectivity of bare and vegetation-covered soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Dobson, M. C.; Bradley, G. A.

    1981-01-01

    Radar sensitivity to soil moisture content has been investigated experimentally for bare and vegetation-covered soil using detailed spectral measurements obtained by a truck-mounted radar spectrometer in the 1-8 GHz band and by airborne scatterometer observations at 1.6, 4.75, and 13.3 GHz. It is shown that radar can provide quantitative information on the soil moisture content of both bare and vegetation-covered soil. The observed soil moisture is in the form of the soil matric potential or a related quantity such as the percent of field capacity. The depth of the monitored layer varies from 1 cm for very wet soil to about 15 cm for very dry soil.

  3. Evaporation Dynamics of Moss and Bare Soil in Boreal Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dempster, S.; Young, J. M.; Barron, C. G.; Bolton, W. R.

    2013-12-01

    Evaporation dynamics of mosses is a critical process in boreal and arctic systems and represents a key uncertainty in hydrology and climate models. At this point, moss evaporation is not well quantified at the plot or landscape scale. Relative to bare soil or litter evaporation, moss evaporation can be challenging to predict because the water flux is not isolated to the moss surface. Evaporation can originate from nearly 10 cm below the surface. Some mosses can wick moisture from even deeper than 10 cm, which subsequently evaporates. The goal of this study was to use field measurements to quantify the moss evaporation dynamics in a coniferous forest relative to bare ground or litter evaporation dynamics in a deciduous forest in Interior Alaska. Measurements were made in two ecosystem types within the boreal forest of Interior Alaska: a deciduous forest devoid of moss and a coniferous forest with a thick moss layer. A small clear chamber was attached to a LiCor 840 infrared gas analyzer in a closed loop system with a low flow rate. Water fluxes were measured for ~ 90 seconds on each plot in dry and wet soil and moss conditions. Additional measurements included: soil temperature, soil moisture, air temperature, barometric pressure, dew point, relative humidity, and wind speed. Thermal infrared images were also captured in congruence with water flux measurements to determine skin temperature. We found that the moss evaporation rate was over 100% greater than the soil evaporation rate (0.057 g/min vs. 0.024 g/min), and evaporation rates in both systems were most strongly driven by relative humidity and surface temperature. Surface temperature was lower at the birch site than the black spruce site because trees shade the surface beneath the birch. High fluxes associated with high water content were sustained for a longer period of time over the mosses compared to the bare soil. The thermal IR data showed that skin temperature lagged the evaporation flux, such that the

  4. Transient soil surface sealing and infiltration model for bare soil under droplet impact

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The marked reduction in infiltration rate caused by formation of a soil surface seal due to water droplet impact on bare soil is a well known phenomenon but is rarely considered in infiltration models, especially under center pivot irrigation. Water application rates under center pivot irrigation c...

  5. Karst bare slope soil erosion and soil quality: a simulation case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Q.; Liu, Z.; Shao, H.; Yang, Z.

    2015-06-01

    The influence on soil erosion by different bedrock bareness ratios, different rainfall intensities, different underground pore fissure degrees and rainfall duration are researched through manual simulation of microrelief characteristics of karst bare slopes and underground karst crack construction in combination with artificial simulation of rainfall experiment. The results show that firstly, when the rainfall intensity is small (30 and 50 mm h-1), no bottom load loss is produced on the surface, and surface and underground runoff and sediment production is increased with the increasing of rainfall intensity; secondly, surface runoff and sediment production reduced with increased underground pore fissure degree, while underground runoff and sediment production increased; thirdly, raindrops hit the surface, forming a crust with rainfall duration. The formation of crusts increases surface runoff erosion and reduces soil infiltration rate. Increasing of surface runoff erosion damaged crust and increased soil seepage rate. Raindrops continued to hit the surface, leading the formation of crust. Soil permeability showed volatility which were from reduction to increases and reduction, and so on. Surface and subsurface runoff were volatility with rainfall duration; fourthly, when rock bareness ratio is 50% and rainfall intensities are 30 and 50 mm h-1, runoff is not produced on the surface, and the slope runoff and sediment production presents a fluctuating change with increased rock bareness ratio; fifthly, the correlation degree between the slope runoff and sediment production and all factors are as follows: rainfall intensity > rainfall duration > underground pore fissure degree > bed rock bareness ratio.

  6. Karst bare slope soil erosion and soil quality: a simulation case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Q.; Liu, Z.; Shao, H.; Yang, Z.

    2015-07-01

    The influence on soil erosion by different bedrock bareness ratios, different rainfall intensities, different underground pore fissure degrees and rainfall duration are researched through manual simulation of microrelief characteristics of karst bare slopes and underground karst crack construction in combination with artificial simulation of rainfall experiment. The results show that firstly, when the rainfall intensity is small (30 and 50 mm h-1), no bottom load loss is produced on the surface, and surface runoff, underground runoff and sediment production are increased with the increasing of rainfall intensity. Secondly, surface runoff and sediment production reduced with increased underground pore fissure degree, while underground runoff and sediment production increased. Thirdly, raindrops hit the surface, forming a crust with rainfall duration. The formation of crusts increases surface runoff erosion and reduces soil infiltration rate. This formation also increases surface-runoff-erosion-damaged crust and increased soil seepage rate. Raindrops continued to hit the surface, leading the formation of crust. Soil permeability showed volatility which was from reduction to increases, reduction, and so on. Surface and subsurface runoff were volatile with rainfall duration. Fourthly, when rock bareness ratio is 50 % and rainfall intensities are 30 and 50 mm h-1, runoff is not produced on the surface, and the slope runoff and sediment production present a fluctuating change with increased rock bareness ratio. Fifthly, the correlation degree between the slope runoff and sediment production and all factors are as follows: rainfall intensity-rainfall duration-underground pore fissure degree-bedrock bareness ratio.

  7. Field Investigations of Evaporation from a Bare Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evett, Steven Roy

    Selected components of the water and energy balances at the surface of a bare clay loam were measured at 57 locations in a 1 ha field. Spatial and temporal variability of these components were also studied. Components included evaporation, irrigation, moisture storage, sensible heat flux and long wave radiation. Sub-studies were conducted on irrigation uniformity under low pressure sprinklers; and, on steel versus plastic microlysimeters (ML) of various lengths. An energy balance model of evaporation, requiring minimal inputs, was developed and validated giving an r ^2 value of 0.78. Model improvements included an easy method of accurately estimating soil surface temperature at many points in a field, and an empirically fitted transfer coefficient function for the sensible heat flux from the reference dry soil. The omission of soil heat flux and reflected shortwave radiation terms was shown to reduce model accuracy. Steel ML underestimated cumulative evaporation compared to plastic ML at 20 and 30 cm lengths. Cumulative evaporation increased with ML length. The 10 and 20 cm ML were too short for use over multiple days but 30 cm ML may not be long enough for extended periods. Daily net soil heat flux for steel ML averaged 44% higher than that for both plastic ML and undisturbed field soil. Christiansen's uniformity coefficient (UCC) was close to 0.83 for each of 3 irrigations when measured by both catch cans and by profile water contents. But UCC for the change in storage due to irrigation averaged only 0.43 indicating than the high uniformity of profile water contents was more due to surface and subsurface redistribution than to the uniformity of application. Profile water contents and catch can depths were time invariant across at least 3 irrigations. Midday soil surface temperatures and daily evaporation were somewhat less time invariant. Variogram plots for evaporation and surface temperature showed mostly random behavior. Relative variograms represented well

  8. Soil carbon dioxide fluxes with time and depth in a bare field

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil carbon dioxide (CO2) efflux is an important component of the terrestrial carbon cycle. The amount of CO2 emitted from soil to the atmosphere has significant effects on the soil-atmosphere system. The objectives of this study are 1) to determine bare soil CO2 fluxes continuously with time and de...

  9. Soil microbial activities beneath Stipa tenacissima L. and in surrounding bare soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novosadová, I.; Ruiz Sinoga, J. D.; Záhora, J.; Fišerová, H.

    2010-05-01

    Open steppes dominated by Stipa tenacissima L. constitute one of the most representative ecosystems of the semi-arid zones of Eastern Mediterranean Basin (Iberian Peninsula, North of Africa). These steppes show a higher degree of variability in composition and structure. Ecosystem functioning is strongly related to the spatial pattern of grass tussocks. Soils beneath S. tenacissima grass show higher fertility and improved microclimatic conditions, favouring the formation of "resource islands" (Maestre et al., 2007). On the other hand in "resource islands" and in surrounding bare soil exists the belowground zone of influence. The competition for water and resources between plants and microorganisms is strong and mediated trough an enormous variety of exudates and resource depletion intended to regulate soil microbial communities in the rhizosphere, control herbivory, encourage beneficial symbioses, and change chemical and physical properties in soil (Pugnaire et Armas, 2008). Secondary compounds and allelopathy restrict other species growth and contribute to patchy plant distribution. Active root segregation affects not only neighbourś growth but also soil microbial activities. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of Stipa tenacissima on the key soil microbial activities under controlled incubation conditions (basal and potential respiration; net nitrogen mineralization). The experimental plots were located in the province Almería in Sierra de los Filabres Mountains near the village Gérgal (southeast Spain) in the small catchment which is situated between 1090 - 1165 m a.s.l. The area with extent of 82 000 m2 is affected by soil degradation. The climate is semiarid Mediterranean. The mean annual rainfall is of about 240 mm mostly concentrated in autumn and spring. The mean annual temperature is 13.9° C. The studied soil has a loam to sandy clay texture and is classified as Lithosol (FAO-ISRIC and ISSS, 1998). The vegetation of these areas is an

  10. Implications of climate change for evaporation from bare soils in a Mediterranean environment.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Mehmet; Yano, Tomohisa; Evrendilek, Fatih; Uygur, Veli

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to predict quantitative changes in evaporation from bare soils in the Mediterranean climate region of Turkey in response to the projections of a regional climate model developed in Japan (hereafter RCM). Daily RCM data for the estimation of reference evapotranspiration (ETr) and soil evaporation were obtained for the periods of 1994--2003 and 2070--2079. Potential evaporation (Ep) from bare soils was calculated using the Penman-Monteith equation with a surface resistance of zero. Simulation of actual soil evaporation (Ea) was carried out using Aydin model (Aydin et al., Ecological Modelling 182:91-105, 2005) combined with Aydin and Uygur (2006, A model for estimating soil water potential of bare fields. In Proceedings of the 18th International Soil Meeting (ISM) on Soils Sustaining Life on Earth, Managing Soil and Technology, Sanliurfa, 477-480pp.) model of predicting soil water potential at the top surface layer of a bare soil, after performances of Aydin model (R2 = 94.0%) and Aydin and Uygur model (R2 = 97.6) were tested. The latter model is based on the relations among potential soil evaporation, hydraulic diffusivity, and soil wetness, with some simplified assumptions. Input parameters of the model are simple and easily obtainable such as climatic parameters used to compute the potential soil evaporation, average diffusivity for the drying soil, and volumetric water content at field capacity. The combination of Aydin and Aydin and Uygur models appeared to be useful in estimating water potential of soils and Ea from bare soils, with only a few parameters. Unlike ETr and Ep projected to increase by 92 and 69 mm (equivalent to 8.0 and 7.3% increases) due to the elevated evaporative demand of the atmosphere, respectively, Ea from bare soils is projected to reduce by 50 mm (equivalent to a 16.5% decrease) in response to a decrease in rainfall by 46% in the Mediterranean region of Turkey by the 2070s predicted by RCM, and consequently

  11. Detection of soil properties with airborne hyperspectral measurements of bare fields.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Airborne remote sensing data, using a hyperspectral (HSI) camera, were collected for a flight over two fields with a total of 128 ha. of recently seeded and nearly bare soil. The within-field spatial distribution of several soil properties was found by using multiple linear regression to select the ...

  12. The contribution of vegetation cover and bare soil to pixel reflectance in an arid ecosystem

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The heterogeneity of vegetation and soils in arid and semi-arid environments complicates the analysis of medium spatial resolution remotely sensed imagery. A single pixel may contain several different types of vegetation, as well as a sizeable proportion of bare soil. We have used linear mixture mod...

  13. Infiltration characteristics of bare soil under sequential water application events

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The marked reduction in infiltration rate caused by formation of a soil surface seal is a well known phenomenon but often ignored in infiltration models. The effect sequential water application events have on infiltration rate and soil surface seal formation has rarely been investigated. The objecti...

  14. Estimation of bare soil evaporation using multifrequency airborne SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soares, Joao V.; Shi, Jiancheng; Van Zyl, Jakob; Engman, E. T.

    1992-01-01

    It is shown that for homogeneous areas soil moisture can be derived from synthetic aperture radar (SAR) measurements, so that the use of microwave remote sensing can given realistic estimates of energy fluxes if coupled to a simple two-layer model repesenting the soil. The model simulates volumetric water content (Wg) using classical meterological data, provided that some of the soil thermal and hydraulic properties are known. Only four parameters are necessary: mean water content, thermal conductivity and diffusitivity, and soil resistance to evaporation. They may be derived if a minimal number of measured values of Wg and surface layer temperature (Tg) are available together with independent measurements of energy flux to compare with the estimated values. The estimated evaporation is shown to be realistic and in good agreement with drying stage theory in which the transfer of water in the soil is in vapor form.

  15. Occupation of bare habitats, an evolutionary precursor to soil specialization in plants.

    PubMed

    Cacho, N Ivalú; Strauss, Sharon Y

    2014-10-21

    Plant soil specialists contribute greatly to global diversity; however, the ecoevolutionary forces responsible for generating this diversity are poorly understood. We integrate molecular phylogenies with descriptive and experimental ecological data, creating a powerful framework with which to elucidate forces driving soil specialization. Hypotheses explaining edaphic specialization have historically focused on costs of adaptation to elements (e.g., nickel, calcium/magnesium) and accompanying tradeoffs in competitive ability in benign soils. We combine in situ microhabitat data for 37 streptanthoid species (Brassicaceae), soil analyses, and competition experiments with their phylogeny to reconstruct selective forces generating serpentine soil endemism, which has four to five independent origins in this group. Coupling ancestral state reconstruction with phylogenetic independent contrasts, we examine the magnitude and timing of changes in soil and habitat attributes relative to inferred shifts to serpentine. We find large changes in soil chemistry at nodes associated with soil shifts, suggesting that elemental changes occurred concomitantly with soil transitions. In contrast, the amount of bare ground surrounding plants in the field ("bareness"), which is greater in serpentine environments, is conserved across soil-type shifts. Thus, occupation of bare environments preceded shifts to serpentine, and may serve as an evolutionary precursor to harsh elemental soils and environments. In greenhouse experiments, taxa from barer environments are poorer competitors, a tradeoff that may contribute to soil endemism. The hypothesis of occupation of bare habitats as a precursor of soil specialization can be tested in other systems with a similar integrative ecophylogenetic approach, thereby providing deeper insights into this rich source of biodiversity. PMID:25267640

  16. Dual frequency microwave radiometer measurements of soil moisture for bare and vegetated rough surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. L.

    1974-01-01

    Controlled ground-based passive microwave radiometric measurements on soil moisture were conducted to determine the effects of terrain surface roughness and vegetation on microwave emission. Theoretical predictions were compared with the experimental results and with some recent airborne radiometric measurements. The relationship of soil moisture to the permittivity for the soil was obtained in the laboratory. A dual frequency radiometer, 1.41356 GHz and 10.69 GHz, took measurements at angles between 0 and 50 degrees from an altitude of about fifty feet. Distinct surface roughnesses were studied. With the roughness undisturbed, oats were later planted and vegetated and bare field measurements were compared. The 1.4 GHz radiometer was less affected than the 10.6 GHz radiometer, which under vegetated conditions was incapable of detecting soil moisture. The bare surface theoretical model was inadequate, although the vegetation model appeared to be valid. Moisture parameters to correlate apparent temperature with soil moisture were compared.

  17. Occupation of bare habitats, an evolutionary precursor to soil specialization in plants

    PubMed Central

    Cacho, N. Ivalú; Strauss, Sharon Y.

    2014-01-01

    Plant soil specialists contribute greatly to global diversity; however, the ecoevolutionary forces responsible for generating this diversity are poorly understood. We integrate molecular phylogenies with descriptive and experimental ecological data, creating a powerful framework with which to elucidate forces driving soil specialization. Hypotheses explaining edaphic specialization have historically focused on costs of adaptation to elements (e.g., nickel, calcium/magnesium) and accompanying tradeoffs in competitive ability in benign soils. We combine in situ microhabitat data for 37 streptanthoid species (Brassicaceae), soil analyses, and competition experiments with their phylogeny to reconstruct selective forces generating serpentine soil endemism, which has four to five independent origins in this group. Coupling ancestral state reconstruction with phylogenetic independent contrasts, we examine the magnitude and timing of changes in soil and habitat attributes relative to inferred shifts to serpentine. We find large changes in soil chemistry at nodes associated with soil shifts, suggesting that elemental changes occurred concomitantly with soil transitions. In contrast, the amount of bare ground surrounding plants in the field (“bareness”), which is greater in serpentine environments, is conserved across soil-type shifts. Thus, occupation of bare environments preceded shifts to serpentine, and may serve as an evolutionary precursor to harsh elemental soils and environments. In greenhouse experiments, taxa from barer environments are poorer competitors, a tradeoff that may contribute to soil endemism. The hypothesis of occupation of bare habitats as a precursor of soil specialization can be tested in other systems with a similar integrative ecophylogenetic approach, thereby providing deeper insights into this rich source of biodiversity. PMID:25267640

  18. A multi-frequency radiometric measurement of soil moisture content over bare and vegetated fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. R.; Schmugge, T. J.; Gould, W. I.; Glazar, W. S.; Fuchs, J. E.; Mcmurtrey, J. E., III

    1982-01-01

    An experiment on soil moisture remote sensing was conducted during July to September 1981 on bare, grass, and alfalfa fields at frequencies of 0.6, 1.4, 5.0, and 10.6 GHz with radiometers mounted on mobile towers. The results confirm the frequency dependence of sensitivity reduction due to the presence of vegetation cover. For the type of vegetated fields reported here, the vegetation effect is appreciable even at 0.6 GHz. Measurements over bare soil show that when the soil is wet, the measured brightness temperature is lowest at 5.0 GHz and highest at 0.6 GHz, a result contrary to the expectation based on the estimated dielectric permittivity of soil-water mixtures and the current radiative transfer model in that frequency range.

  19. Improvement of Bare Surface Soil Moisture Estimation with L-Band Dual-Polarization Radar

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study demonstrates a new algorithm development for estimating bare surface soil moisture using dual-polarization L-band backscattering measurements. Through our analyses on the numerically simulated surface backscattering database by Advanced Integral Equation Model (AIEM) with a wide range of ...

  20. Estimating the broadband longwave emissivity of global bare soil from the MODIS shortwave albedo product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jie; Liang, Shunlin

    2014-01-01

    A constant land surface longwave emissivity value, or very simple parameterization, has been adopted by current land surface models because of a current lack of reliable observations. Of all the various Earth surface types, bare soil has the highest variations in broadband emissivity (BBE). We propose here a new algorithm to estimate BBE in the 8-13.5 µm spectral range based on the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) albedo product for bare soil. This algorithm takes advantage of both Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) longwave emissivity and MODIS shortwave albedo products, as well as the established linear relationship between ASTER BBE and seven MODIS spectral albedos for bare soil. In order to mitigate step discontinuities in the global land surface BBE product, a transition zone was established and the BBE estimation method was also provided. Three linear formulae were derived for bare soil and transition zones, respectively. Given the accuracy of 0.01 for MODIS spectral albedo, the absolute accuracy of BBE retrieval is better than 0.017. The validation results obtained from the three field trials conducted in China and one field trial in western/southwestern U.S. indicated that the average difference between the estimated BBE and the measured BBE was 0.016. We have introduced a new strategy to generate global land surface BBE using MODIS data. This strategy was used to generate global 8 day 1 km land surface BBE products from 2000 through 2010.

  1. Grazing intensity and spatial heterogeneity in bare soil in a grazing-resistant grassland

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spatial patterns in rangeland vegetation serve as indicators of rangeland condition and are an important component of wildlife habitat. We illustrate the use of very-large-scale aerial photography (VLSA) to quantify spatial patterns in bare soil of the northeastern Colorado shortgrass steppe. Using ...

  2. A physical model for predicting bidirectional reflectances over bare soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinty, Bernard; Verstraete, Michel M.; Dickinson, Robert E.

    1989-01-01

    While most previous attempts to retrieve soil surface optical property characteristics have proceeded through a fitting of empirical functions to the data, an optimization technique is presently applied to a physically-based surface reflectance model developed for the study of planetary surfaces. This inversion procedure is shown to allow the direct estimation of the single-scattering coefficient, two parameters describing the 'hot spot' phenomenon, and two parameters describing the scattering phase function. A comparison of inversion technique results with both synthetic data and actual observations shows the model to be capable of predicting the observed bidirectional reflectances as well as directional-hemispherical reflectances; it can also build the complete radiance field over the upward hemisphere.

  3. Data documentation for the bare soil experiment at the University of Arkansas, June - August 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadeghi, A. M.

    1984-01-01

    The primary objective of this study is to evaluate the relationships between soil moisture and reflectivity of a bare soil, using microwave techniques. A drainage experiment was conducted on a Captina silt loam in cooperation with personnel in the Electrical Engineering Department. Measurements included soil moisture pressures at various depths, neutron probe measurements, gravimetric moisture samples, and reflectivity of the soil surface at selected frequencies including 1.5 and 6.0 GHz and at the incident angle of 45 deg. All measurements were made in conjuction with that of reflectivity data.

  4. Diurnal fluctuations of water and heat flows in a bare soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schelde, K.; Thomsen, A.; Heidmann, T.; SchjøNning, P.; Jansson, P.-E.

    1998-11-01

    The complexity of coupled transport of heat and moisture at the soil surface necessitates a combination of field and numerical experiments to evaluate the interactions between liquid and vapor phase flow. The near-surface moisture and temperature conditions of a bare soil were investigated experimentally and by using the SOIL model to assess the importance of water vapor flow. During a 1-month period in early fall, intensive measurements of water content, water tension, and temperature were made in a bare soil plot. Soil thermal conductivity, measured on soil cores extracted for laboratory analysis, was found to agree with estimates based on the Kersten equation. Simulated water content and soil temperature agreed well with observations. Modeled soil vapor flow was significant compared to liquid flow only during the initial dry days when the inclusion of vapor flow improved the predicted diurnal variation in water tension. Model predictions were sensitive to an accurate representation of the soil surface energy balance, including the consideration of steep gradients in tension near the soil surface, and to the enhancement of vapor flow.

  5. Radar backscattering measurement of bare soil and vegetation covered soil using X-band and full polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, B.; Kalita, M.

    2014-11-01

    The objective of the study is to measure backscattered power of bare soil and vegetation covered soil using X-band scatterometer system with full polarization and various angles during monsoon season and relate backscattered power to the density of vegetation over soil. The measurement was conducted at an experimental field located in the campus of Assam Engineering College, Guwahati, India. The soil sample consists of Silt and Clay in higher proportions as compared to Sand. The scatterometer system consists of dual-polarimetric square horn antennas, Power meter, Klystron, coaxial cables, isolator and waveguide detector. The polarization of the horn antennas as well as the look angle can be changed in the set-up. The backscattering coefficients were calculated by applying a radar equation for the measured values at incident angles between 30° and 60° for full polarization (HH, VV, HV, VH), respectively, and compared with vegetation cover over soil for each scatterometer measurement simultaneously. The VH polarization and 60° look angle are found to be the most suitable combination of configuration of an X-band scatterometer for distinguishing the land cover targets such as bare soil and vegetation covered soil. From the analysis of the results, polarimetric scatterometer data appear to be promising to distinguish the land cover types such as bare soil and soil completely covered by vegetation. The results of this study will help the scientists working in the field of active microwave remote sensing.

  6. Estimating steady-state evaporation rates from bare soils under conditions of high water table

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ripple, C.D.; Rubin, J.; Van Hylckama, T. E. A.

    1970-01-01

    A procedure that combines meteorological and soil equations of water transfer makes it possible to estimate approximately the steady-state evaporation from bare soils under conditions of high water table. Field data required include soil-water retention curves, water table depth and a record of air temperature, air humidity and wind velocity at one elevation. The procedure takes into account the relevant atmospheric factors and the soil's capability to conduct 'water in liquid and vapor forms. It neglects the effects of thermal transfer (except in the vapor case) and of salt accumulation. Homogeneous as well as layered soils can be treated. Results obtained with the method demonstrate how the soil evaporation rates·depend on potential evaporation, water table depth, vapor transfer and certain soil parameters.

  7. A radiative transfer model for microwave emissions from bare agricultural soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, W. J.; Paris, J. F.

    1975-01-01

    A radiative transfer model for microwave emissions from bare, stratified agricultural soils was developed to assist in the analysis of data gathered in the joint soil moisture experiment. The predictions of the model were compared with preliminary X band (2.8 cm) microwave and ground based observations. Measured brightness temperatures at vertical and horizontal polarizations can be used to estimate the moisture content of the top centimeter of soil with + or - 1 percent accuracy. It is also shown that the Stokes parameters can be used to distinguish between moisture and surface roughness effects.

  8. An evaluation of the simulated bare soil evaporation of an atmospheric model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Jan-Peter; Vogel, Gerd

    2016-04-01

    Land surface processes have a significant impact on near-surface atmospheric phenomena. They determine, among others, near-surface sensible and latent heat fluxes and the radiation budget, and thus influence atmosphere and land characteristics, such as temperature and humidity, the structure of the planetary boundary layer, and even cloud formation processes. It is therefore important to simulate the land surface processes in atmospheric models as realistically as possible. Verifications have shown that the bare soil evaporation computed by the land surface scheme TERRA of the COSMO atmospheric model is systematically overestimated. Since this flux is part of the surface water and energy balance it affects, for instance, the other components of the turbulent heat fluxes as well as the soil water content and the surface temperature. Data from the Meteorological Observatory Lindenberg of the German Meteorological Service were used to analyse this model behaviour. In the standard model configuration of TERRA, the formulation of bare soil evaporation is based on the Biosphere Atmosphere Transfer Scheme (BATS), following the work by R. E. Dickinson. In order to reduce the excessive evaporation simulated by BATS, other formulations for the bare soil evaporation were tested in TERRA. In turned out that a scheme based on a resistance formulation efficiently reduces the simulated vapour flux, leading to a better agreement with the measurements.

  9. The contribution of vegetation cover and bare soil to pixel reflectance in an arid ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, C. M.; Smith, A.; Campanella, A.; Rango, A.

    2008-12-01

    The heterogeneity of vegetation and soils in arid and semi-arid environments complicates the analysis of medium spatial resolution remotely sensed imagery. A single pixel may contain several different types of vegetation, as well as a sizeable proportion of bare soil. We have used linear mixture modeling to explore the contribution of vegetation cover and bare soil to pixel reflectance. In October, 2006, aerial imagery (0.25 m spatial resolution) was acquired for our study sites in the Jornada Experimental Range, southern New Mexico. Imagery was also acquired from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) for June and November, 2006. These data corresponded with pre- and post monsoon conditions. Object-based feature extraction was used to classify the aerial imagery to shrub, grass and bare ground cover classes. Percent cover was then calculated for each cover class. Visible-near-infrared and shortwave infrared ASTER reflectance data from both dates were combined into a single 18-band dataset (30 m spatial resolution). A vector overlay from the classification results of the aerial imagery was used to define pure endmember pixels in the ASTER imagery. Estimates of the proportions of shrub, grass and bare ground cover from the linear mixture modeling approach were compared with cover calculated using feature extraction from the aerial imagery. The results indicate that reflectance in ASTER pixels is likely to be a linear combination of the cover proportions of the three main cover types (shrubs, grass, bare ground). However, noticeable outliers in the relationship between cover calculated from each method, indicate there may be other variables that affect the accuracy with which we can estimate cover using linear mixture modeling.

  10. Synergism of active and passive microwave data for estimating bare surface soil moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saatchi, Sasan S.; Njoku, Eni G.; Wegmueller, Urs

    1993-01-01

    Active and passive microwave sensors were applied effectively to the problem of estimating the surface soil moisture in a variety of environmental conditions. Research to date has shown that both types of sensors are also sensitive to the surface roughness and the vegetation cover. In estimating the soil moisture, the effect of the vegetation and roughness are often corrected either by acquiring multi-configuration (frequency and polarization) data or by adjusting the surface parameters in order to match the model predictions to the measured data. Due to the limitations on multi-configuration spaceborne data and the lack of a priori knowledge of the surface characteristics for parameter adjustments, it was suggested that the synergistic use of the sensors may improve the estimation of the soil moisture over the extreme range of naturally occurring soil and vegetation conditions. To investigate this problem, the backscattering and emission from a bare soil surface using the classical rough surface scattering theory were modeled. The model combines the small perturbation and the Kirchhoff approximations in conjunction with the Peak formulation to cover a wide range of surface roughness parameters with respect to frequency for both active and passive measurements. In this approach, the same analytical method was used to calculate the backscattering and emissivity. Therefore, the active and passive simulations can be combined at various polarizations and frequencies in order to estimate the soil moisture more actively. As a result, it is shown that (1) the emissivity is less dependent on the surface correlation length, (2) the ratio of the backscattering coefficient (HH) over the surface reflectivity (H) is almost independent of the soil moisture for a wide range of surface roughness, and (3) this ratio can be approximated as a linear function of the surface rms height. The results were compared with the data obtained by a multi-frequency radiometer

  11. Infrared temperature measurements over bare soil and vegetation - A HAPEX perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Toby N.; Perry, Eileen M.; Taconet, Odile

    1987-01-01

    Preliminary analyses of aircraft and ground measurements made in France during the HAPEX experiment show that horizontal radiometric surface temperature variations, as viewed by aircraft, can reflect the vertical profile of soil moisture (soil versus root zone) because of horizontal variations in vegetation density. Analyses based on one day's data show that, although horizontal variations in soil moisture were small, the vertical differences between a dry surface and a wet root zone were large. Horizontal temperature differences between bare soil, corn and oats reflect differences in the fractional vegetation cover, as seen by the radiometer. On the other hand, these horizontal variations in radiometric surface temperature seem to reflect real horizontal variations in surface turbulent energy fluxes.

  12. CONSERVB: A numerical method to compute soil water content and temperature profiles under a bare surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanbavel, C. H. M.; Lascano, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    A comprehensive, yet fairly simple model of water disposition in a bare soil profile under the sequential impact of rain storms and other atmospheric influences, as they occur from hour to hour is presented. This model is intended mostly to support field studies of soil moisture dynamics by our current team, to serve as a background for the microwave measurements, and, eventually, to serve as a point of departure for soil moisture predictions for estimates based in part upon airborne measurements. The main distinction of the current model is that it accounts not only for the moisture flow in the soil-atmosphere system, but also for the energy flow and, hence, calculates system temperatures. Also, the model is of a dynamic nature, capable of supporting any required degree of resolution in time and space. Much critical testing of the sample is needed before the complexities of the hydrology of a vegetated surface can be related meaningfully to microwave observations.

  13. A multi-frequency radiometric measurement of soil moisture content over bare and vegetated fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. R.; Schmugge, T. J.; Mcmurtrey, J. E., III; Gould, W. I.; Glazar, W. S.; Fuchs, J. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    A USDA Beltsville Agricultural Research Center site was used for an experiment in which soil moisture remote sensing over bare, grass, and alfalfa fields was conducted over a three-month period using 0.6 GHz, 1.4 GHz, and 10.6 GHz Dicke-type microwave radiometers mounted on mobile towers. Ground truth soil moisture content and ambient air and sil temperatures were obtained concurrently with the radiometric measurements. Biomass of the vegetation cover was sampled about once a week. Soil density for each of the three fields was measured several times during the course of the experiment. Results of the radiometric masurements confirm the frequency dependence of moisture sensing sensitivity reduction reported earlier. Observations over the bare, wet field show that the measured brightness temperature is lowest at 5.0 GHz and highest of 0.6 GHz frequency, a result contrary to expectation based on the estimated dielectric permittivity of soil water mixtures and current radiative transfer model in that frequency range.

  14. Simple equation to approximate the bidirectional reflectance from vegetative canopies and bare soil surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walthall, C. L.; Norman, J. M.; Blad, B. L.; Welles, J. M.; Campbell, G.

    1985-01-01

    A simple equation has been developed for describing the bidirectional reflectance of some vegetative canopies and bare soil surfaces. The equation describes directional reflectance as a function of zenith and azimuth view angles and solar azimuth angle. The equation works for simulated and field measured red and IR reflectance under clear sky conditions. Hemispherical reflectance can be calculated as a function of the simple equation coefficients by integrating the equation over the hemisphere of view angles. A single equation for estimating soil bidirectional reflectance was obtained using the relationships between solar zenith angles and the simple equation coefficients for medium and rough soil distributions. The equation has many useful applications such as providing a lower level boundary condition in complex plant canopy models and providing an additional tool for studying bidirectional effects on pointable sensors.

  15. A comparison of simulation models for predicting soil water dynamics in bare and vegetated lysimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Link, S.O.; Kickert, R.N.; Fayer, M.J.; Gee, G.W.

    1993-06-01

    This report describes the results of simulation models used to predict soil water storage dynamics at the Field Lysimeter Test Facility (FLTF) weighing lysimeters. The objectives of this research is to develop the capability to predict soil water storage dynamics with plants in support of water infiltration control studies for the Hanford Permanent Isolation Barrier Development Program. It is important to gain confidence in one`s ability to simulate soil water dynamics over long time periods to assess the barrier`s ability to prevent drainage. Two models were compared for their ability to simulate soil water storage dynamics with and without plants in weighing lysimeters, the soil water infiltration and movement (SWIM) and the simulation of production and utilization of rangelands (SPUR-91) models. These models adequately simulated soil water storage dynamics for the weighing lysimeters. The range of root mean square error values for the two models was 7.0 to 19.8. This compares well with the range reported by Fayer et al. (1992) for the bare soil data sets of 8.1 to 22.1. Future research will test the predictive capability of these models for longer term lysimeter data sets and for historical data sets collected in various plant community types.

  16. Benefits and limitations of pig slurry to reclaim bare mine soils under Mediterranean semiarid conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zornoza, Raúl; Faz, Ángel; Acosta, Jose A.; Kabas, Sebla; Martínez-Martínez, Silvia; Ángeles Muñoz, M.

    2013-04-01

    In this study, the effects of pig slurry application on reclamation of mine soils from Cartagena-La Unión Mining District (SE Spain) were investigated in a field experiment. Exchangeable metals (Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn), total organic carbon, total nitrogen, soluble carbon, microbial biomass and three enzyme activities were periodically monitored during 67 days. In addition, one year after the application of the pig slurry, soil and developed vegetation was sampled. Results showed that only exchangeable Cd and Zn significantly decreased in the amended plots, mainly for Cd, with decreases of 98%. The rest of metals and chemical properties did not change with time after application of amendments, showing values not significantly different than those present before pig slurry application. Soluble carbon, microbial biomass carbon and the enzyme activities increased after the application of pig slurry. However, after various days these parameters started a decreasing trend until reaching values similar to the control from approximately day 25. Thus, mainly precipitation as phosphate from the waste was very effective for Cd immobilization. No increments were observed in soil organic carbon because the organic carbon applied with the slurry was too low to be significantly detected. Nonetheless, pig slurry is a good fertilizer owing to the high quantity of nutrients provided, needed to promote the development of vegetation. One year after application, a native vegetation cover (25-30%) was reached by spontaneous colonization. Triggered plant growth by the effect of amendment improved soil conditions, particularly by the help of the medium created by their rhizosphere systems. Increments in soil organic carbon and total nitrogen, and decreases in the exchangeable metals fraction concentration were observed in rhizospheric soils when compared to the bare soils. This improvement in soil quality mediated by vegetation was more efficient than the direct effect of the amendment. In

  17. Measurements, interpretation and climate change effects evaluation for pyroclastic bare soil evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rianna, G.; Pagano, L.; Mercogliano, P.; Montesarchio, M.

    2012-12-01

    A physical model has been designed to achieve the following goals: to mark out the main features of the soil-atmosphere interaction; to quantify the water and energy fluxes through the soil surface during several years; to monitor the trends of the main variables regulating the hydraulic and thermal conditions. It is constituted by a soil volume (about 1mc) exposed to weather forcing; it is instrumented at four depths by sensors for measuring suction, water content and temperature. Therefore, a station allows knowing the meteo variables (rainfall, wind velocity and direction, air temperature, air pressure and relative humidity) and the two directly measurable components of the energy balance at the soil surface (net radiation and soil heat flux). Under the soil specimen, three shear beam load cells measure the soil weight and, hence, because the soil particles weight can be assumed as constant, the sample water storage. As first attempt, the soil surface is kept bare to avoid the complications led by overlapping processes induced by vegetation (interception, transpiration). Since May 2010, the soil involved in testing is pyroclastic material (silty sand) representative of air fall deposits covering a large part of Campania (South Italy) and erupted in the last 10,000 years by different volcanic centres (Phlegrean fields, Vesuvius). Because of their genesis, these soils show peculiar features: high porosity, low weight of soil unit volume, high water retention capacity; they cause an unusual hydraulic behaviour, halfway between coarse and fine soils in terms of saturated hydraulic permeability and mean slope of soil-water characteristic curve. In turn, these elements induce, among other things, that the currently adopted predictive approaches to estimate, for example, infiltration and evaporation processes are not directly suitable for these soils as the available parameters, even for grain sizes comparable to those of pyroclastic soils, fail to reproduce the

  18. Co-polarization channel imbalance determination by the use of bare soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lei; Yang, Jie; Li, Pingxiang

    2014-09-01

    This paper describes a novel technique which determines the co-polarization channel imbalance by the use of natural bare soil, instead of a trihedral corner reflector (CR). In polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (PolSAR) remote sensing, the polarimetric calibration (PolCAL) is the key technique in quantitative earth parameter measurement. In general, the current PolCAL process can be separated into two parts. The first part tries to estimate the crosstalk and the cross-polarization (x-pol) channel imbalance components by the reflection symmetry and the reciprocity properties, without a CR. Then, at least one trihedral CR is required to determine the co-polarization (co-pol) channel imbalance; however, it is not always possible to deploy a CR in difficult terrain such as desert. In this paper, we utilize bare soil as a stable reference target, and four common natural constraints of bare soil are evaluated to determine the co-pol channel imbalance, without the use of a CR. It should be mentioned that we do not propose to replace the CR by a natural target, but we utilize the natural target to enhance the PolCAL accuracy when a CR is missing. The four constraints are: (1) the consistency of the polarimetric orientation angle (CPOA) between the PolSAR POA and the digital elevation model (DEM) derived POA; (2) the unitary zero POA (UZPOA) of a flat ground surface; (3) the zero helix (ZHEX) component of the ground surface; and (4) the unitary version of the previous zero helix (UZHEX). In the theoretical part of this paper, we demonstrate that the forth constraint is the most suitable in different scenes. We then propose a multi-scale algorithm to further improve the robustness of the co-pol channel imbalance determination. In the experimental part, we apply our new methods to simulated airborne SAR (AIRSAR) and real uninhabited aerial vehicle SAR (UAVSAR) data. Without the use of any CR, the recovered results show that the estimated amplitude and phase error of the co

  19. Can we monitor the bare soil freeze-thaw process using GNSS-R?: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xuerui; Jin, Shuanggen

    2014-11-01

    GNSS-R has recently emerged as a new prosperous remote sensing tool in ocean surface, snow/ice surface and land surface. In this paper, the possible application in sensing the bare soil freeze-thaw process is investigated with GNSS-R. The Fresnel reflectivity from the wave synthesis technique is used to get the circular polarization reflectivity. Large differences are found for the Fresnel reflectivities at V, H, RR polarizations during bare soil freeze-thaw process, but there are almost no differences as for LR polarization. Therefore if a special GNSS-R receiver is designed, the reflected signals of RR polarization should be efficiently used. For GPS multipath reflectometry, the improved Fresnel reflectivity is inserted into the fully polarimetric forward multipath model to get the simulated GPS L1 observables: SNR, carrier phase multipath error and pseudorange code multipath error, which are used to estimate the bare soil freeze-thaw process. Compared to the thawed soil, the amplitudes of GPS observables are smaller for the frozen soil. Therefore, it is possible to monitor bare soil freeze-thaw process with ground geodetic GPS receivers.

  20. Microwave bistatic reflectivity dependence on the moisture content and matric potential of bare soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waite, W. P.; Sadeghi, A. M.; Scott, H. D.

    1984-01-01

    Results are presented of an experimental program to determine the functional dependence of the microwave reflectivity of nonvegetated soil surfaces upon volumetric soil moisture and matric potential. A combination evaporation-drainage field experiment was conducted on a bare Captina slit loam with reflectivity, soil moisture content, and matric potential monitored for extended time periods. Results show that for a restricted pressure range (approximately -0.05 to -0.75 bar) there is excellent linear correlation between the log of bistatic reflectivity and both volumetric moisture content and matric potential. Layering effects due to steep moisture content (and matric potential) gradients in the profile are demonstrated to have two distinct and significant effects on the reflectivity response. At near saturation of rough surfaces a very thin dry surface layer appears to modify the effective roughness. This leads to a saturation of reflectivity at high moisture contents. As the surface proceeds to dry further, deeper layers produce coherent interference patterns in the reflectivity response, particularly at the higher frequencies.

  1. Mercury flux from naturally enriched bare soils during simulated cold weather cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, Nicholas E.; Glassford, Shannon M.; Van Heyst, Bill J.

    2016-03-01

    Elemental mercury flux released from terrestrial surfaces is a critical area of research due to mercury's potent toxicity and persistency on a global scale. However, there is significant uncertainty surrounding mercury flux in colder environments. The objective of this research was to investigate and identify the potential mechanisms responsible for the release of elemental mercury flux from bare soils in cold weather temperature cycling under simulated laboratory conditions. Seasonal cycling scenarios, including freeze-thaw and sub-zero, were utilized to simulate Fall, Winter, and Spring. The results for both freeze-thaw and sub-zero cycles indicated that there are separate and distinct mechanisms present that promote elemental mercury flux at temperatures below 0°C. During the freeze-thaw cycles, the amount of flux released was linked to the amount of energy leaving and entering the system, respectively. During the sub-zero cycles, flux spikes were produced by the thin surface layer of soil and corresponded to air temperature minimums rather than soil temperature minimums. This rapid drop in temperature was speculated to force mercury from the ice structure, due to further freezing of the liquid water content, increasing the mercury concentration within the remaining water and creating a pathway that encourages volatilization to the atmosphere. This was not observed in the thin layer clean soil trials. Additionally, as the soil water content approached a field capacity of approximately 20%, the flux pattern was suppressed during freeze-thaw cycles, as the number of available interstitial pore spaces decreased. However, this pattern was not observed during sub-zero cycling, as the largest response was triggered with the highest water content.

  2. A study on zinc distribution in calcareous soils for cowpea (Vigna Unguiculata L.) and barely ( Hordeum Vulgare L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boroomand, Naser; Maleki, Mohammad Reza

    2010-05-01

    Compared to other cereals, such as wheat and barley cultivars which have low sensitivity to Zn deficiency, cowpea is sensitive to zinc (Zn) deficiency, however it extensively grows even in soils with deficient in Zn. A 8-week greenhouse experiment was conducted to study the response of cowpea and barely to Zn in calcareous soils with different DTPA- Zn. The soil samples were taken from soil surface up to 0.3 m in which their DTPA- Zn ranged from 0.5 to 3.5 mg kg-1. Shoot dry matter, concentration and uptake of Zn were found to be significantly correlated with soil DTPA- Zn in cowpea and barely. Critical deficiency level of Zn in cowpea was 1.3 mg kg-1 in soil and 28.5 mg kg-1 in shoot dry matter, however, to barely symptoms of Zn deficiency was not observed and concentration of Zn was higher than the critical level reported in literatures. Organic carbon (OC), calcium carbonate equivalent (CCE), pH and field capacity soil moisture content(FC) were significantly correlated with plant responses to Zn which were the most influenced characteristics to Zn uptake by plants.

  3. Bare soil erosion modelling with rainfall simulations: experiments on crop and recently burned areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catani, F.; Menci, S.; Moretti, S.; Keizer, J.

    2006-12-01

    The use of numerical models is of fundamental importance in the comprehension and prediction of soil erosion. At the very basis of the calibration process of the numerical models are the direct measurements of the governing parameters, carried out during field or laboratory tests. To measure and model soil erosion rainfall simulations can be used, that allow the reproduction of project rainfall having chosen characteristics of intensity and duration. The main parameters that rainfall simulators can measure are hydraulic conductivity, parameters of soil erodibility, rate and features of splash erosion, discharge coefficient and sediment yield. Other important parameters can be estimated during the rainfall simulations through the use of photogrammetric instruments able to memorize high definition stereographic models of the soil plot under analysis at different time steps. In this research rainfall simulator experiments (rse) were conducted to measure and quantify runoff and erosion processes on selected bare soil plots. The selected plots are located in some vineyards, olive groves and crops in central Italy and in some recently burned areas in north-central Portugal, affected by a wildfire during early July 2005 and, at the time, largely covered by commercial eucalypt plantations. On the Italian crops the choice of the rainfall intensities and durations were performed on the basis of the previous knowledge of the selected test areas. The procedure was based on an initial phase of soil wetting and a following phase of 3 erosion cycles. The first should reproduce the effects of a normal rainfall with a return time of 2 years (23 mm/h). The second should represent a serious episode with a return time of 10 years (34 mm/h). The third has the objective to reproduce and understand the effects of an intense precipitation event, with a return time of 50 years (41 mm/h). During vineyards experiments some photogrammetric surveys were carried out as well. In the Portugal

  4. Marble waste and pig manure amendments decrease metal availability, increase soil quality and facilitate vegetation development in bare mine soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zornoza, Raúl; Faz, Ángel; Martínez-Martínez, Silvia; Acosta, José A.; Gómez, M. Dolores; Ángeles Muñoz, M.

    2013-04-01

    In order to bring out a functional and sustainable land use in a highly contaminated mine tailing, firstly environmental risks have to be reduced or eliminated by suitable reclamation activities. Tailing ponds pose environmental hazards, such as acidity and toxic metals reaching to waters through wind and water erosions and leaching. As a consequence, soils have no vegetation and low soil organic matter and nutrients. Various physicochemical and biochemical properties, together with exchangeable metals were measured before, 6 months and 12 months after the application of marble waste and pigs manure as reclamation strategy in a tailing pond from SE Spain to reduce hazards for environment and human health. Three months after the last addition of amendments, eight different native shrub species where planted for phytostabilization. Results showed the pH increased up to neutrality. Aggregates stability, organic carbon, total nitrogen, cation exchange capacity, bioavailable phosphorus and potassium, microbial biomass and microbial activity increased with the application of the amendments, while exchangeable metals drastically decreased (~90%). After one year of plantation, only 20% planted species died, with a high growth of survivals reaching flowering and fructification. This study confirms the high effectiveness of initial applications of marble wastes together with pig manure and plantation of shrub species to initialize the recovery of the ecosystem in bare mine soils under Mediterranean semiarid conditions. Key Words: pig manure, marble waste, heavy metals, mine soil. Acknowledgements This work has been funded by the European Union LIFE+ project MIPOLARE (LIFE09 ENV/ES/000439). J.A. Acosta acknowledges a "Saavedra Fajardo" contract from Comunidad Autónoma de Murcia (Spain)

  5. Sensitivity of long-term bare soil infiltration simulations to hydraulic properties in an arid environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stothoff, Stuart A.

    1997-04-01

    The suitability of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for emplacement of a high-level nuclear waste geologic repository is currently being evaluated. Assessments of the repository performance suggest that the uncertainty in infiltration rates strongly affects predicted repository performance. Most of the ground surface over the potential repository footprint is characterized by shallow to deep colluvium/alluvium overlying densely fractured, welded tuffs. In order to identify characteristic behavior of infiltration that might be expected at the site, two idealizations of this situation are examined: an effectively semi-infinite column of alluvium and a two-layer column of alluvium over a fractured impermeable matrix. For each idealization the impact of hydraulic properties is assessed. Examining the sensitivity of bare soil simulator predictions for an effectively semi-infinite column, it is found that decreasing the air entry pressure while holding all other parameters at a fixed level tends to increase both the long-term average moisture content and the long-term average net infiltration flux for homogeneous media. In contrast, increasing the van Genuchten scale parameter (m=1 - 17sol;n) or decreasing the porosity tends to decrease the average soil moisture but increase the infiltration. Most interestingly, three regimes are found for permeability. For relatively high permeabilities, there is a trend toward increasing average infiltration and increasing average moisture content with decreasing permeability. For relatively low permeabilities, vapor transport dominates over liquid transport, runoff and evaporation overwhelm infiltration, and the soil becomes very dry with essentially no infiltration flux. Between the extreme cases of high and low permeability, there is a zone where decreasing permeability results in decreased infiltration but increased moisture content, which is explained by the capacity of more permeable media to maintain surface wetness for longer periods of

  6. Evolution of soil organic matter composition during long-term bare fallow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plante, A. F.; Barre, P.; Cecillon, L.

    2012-12-01

    Much of our understanding of soil organic matter (SOM) dynamics stems from results of isotopic (stable and radiocarbon) analyses and decomposition studies. The large majority of decomposition studies involve laboratory incubation experiments, which have several limitations that provide an incomplete picture of SOM dynamics due to their short duration compared to the mean turnover times estimated from isotopic analyses, and due to the constant and optimal conditions typically used. Long-term bare fallow (LTBF) experiments (in which C inputs have been stopped for several decades) provide a unique opportunity to study the evolution of SOM during extended periods of decomposition without fresh organic inputs from growing plants. These experiments are essentially decades-long incubation experiments conducted under field conditions. The objective of the current study was to examine the evolution of SOM composition under LTBF conditions in order to better understand SOM stabilization mechanisms and to better predict the vulnerability of SOM to disturbance and climate change. The evolution of energetic and chemical characteristics of bulk SOM was studied in five LTBF experiments across Europe: Askov (DK), Grignon (FR), Rothamsted (UK), Ultuna (SW) and Versailles (FR), using simultaneous thermal analysis (i.e., thermogravimetry (TG), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and evolved CO2 gas analysis (CO2-EGA)) and diffuse reflectance Fourier transformed mid-infrared spectroscopy (DRIFT-MIRS). Our results showed that in spite of the heterogeneity of the soils at the LTBF sites, generalized energetic and chemical pathways exist for SOM decomposition and stabilization. The DRIFT-MIRS indices demonstrated that long-term SOM decomposition is accompanied by a consistent evolution of its bulk chemical composition across most sites. The increased burning temperature and lower energy density of stable SOM suggest that SOM stability may be a function of high activation energy cost

  7. Estimation of ground heat flux from soil temperature over a bare soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Kedong; Wang, Wenke; Wang, Zhoufeng; Zhao, Yaqian; Yang, Zeyuan; Chen, Li; Zhang, Zaiyong; Duan, Lei

    2016-05-01

    Ground soil heat flux, G 0, is a difficult-to-measure but important component of the surface energy budget. Over the past years, many methods were proposed to estimate G 0; however, the application of these methods was seldom validated and assessed under different weather conditions. In this study, three popular models (force-restore, conduction-convection, and harmonic) and one widely used method (plate calorimetric), which had well performance in publications, were investigated using field data to estimate daily G 0 on clear, cloudy, and rainy days, while the gradient calorimetric method was regarded as the reference for assessing the accuracy. The results showed that harmonic model was well reproducing the G 0 curve for clear days, but it yielded large errors on cloudy and rainy days. The force-restore model worked well only under rainfall condition, but it was poor to estimate G 0 under rain-free conditions. On the contrary, the conduction-convection model was acceptable to determine G 0 under rain-free conditions, but it generated large errors on rainfall days. More importantly, the plate calorimetric method was the best to estimate G 0 under different weather conditions compared with the three models, but the performance of this method is affected by the placement depth of the heat flux plate. As a result, the heat flux plate was recommended to be buried as close as possible to the surface under clear condition. But under cloudy and rainy conditions, the plate placed at depth of around 0.075 m yielded G 0 well. Overall, the findings of this paper provide guidelines to acquire more accurate estimation of G 0 under different weather conditions, which could improve the surface energy balance in field.

  8. Comparison of diurnal dynamics in evaporation rate between bare soil and moss-crusted soil within a revegetated desert ecosystem of northwestern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ya-Feng; Wang, Xin-Ping; Pan, Yan-Xia; Hu, Rui

    2016-02-01

    Effects of biological soil crusts (BSCs) on soil evaporation is quite controversial in literature, being either facilitative or inhibitive, and therein few studies have actually conducted direct evaporation measurements. Continuous field measurements of soil water evaporation were conducted on two microlysimeters, i.e., one with sand soil collected from bare sand dune area and the other with moss-crusted soil collected from an area that was revegetated in 1956, from field capacity to dry, at the southeastern edge of the Tengger Desert. We mainly aimed to quantify the diurnal variations of evaporation rate from two soils, and further comparatively discuss the effects of BSCs on soil evaporation after revegetation. Results showed that in clear days with high soil water content (Day 1 and 2), the diurnal variation of soil evaporation rate followed the typical convex upward parabolic curve, reaching its peak around mid-day. Diurnal evaporation rate and the accumulated evaporation amount of moss-crusted soil were lower (an average of 0.90 times) than that of sand soil in this stage. However, as soil water content decreased to a moderately low level (Day 3 and 4), the diurnal evaporation rate from moss-crusted soil was pronouncedly higher (an average of 3.91 times) than that of sand soil, prolonging the duration of this higher evaporation rate stage; it was slightly higher in the final stage (Day 5 and 6) when soil moisture was very low. We conclude that the effects of moss crusts on soil evaporation vary with different evaporation stages, which is closely related to soil water content, and the variation and transition of evaporation rate between bare soil and moss-crusted soil are expected to be predicted by soil water content.

  9. Estimation of soil parameters over bare agriculture areas from C-band polarimetric SAR data using neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baghdadi, N.; Cresson, R.; El Hajj, M.; Ludwig, R.; La Jeunesse, I.

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an approach to estimate soil surface parameters from C-band polarimetric SAR data in the case of bare agricultural soils. An inversion technique based on multi-layer perceptron (MLP) neural networks was introduced. The neural networks were trained and validated on a noisy simulated dataset generated from the Integral Equation Model (IEM) on a wide range of surface roughness and soil moisture, as it is encountered in agricultural contexts for bare soils. The performances of neural networks in retrieving soil moisture and surface roughness were tested for several inversion cases using or not using a-priori knowledge on soil parameters. The inversion approach was then validated using RADARSAT-2 images in polarimetric mode. The introduction of expert knowledge on the soil moisture (dry to wet soils or very wet soils) improves the soil moisture estimates, whereas the precision on the surface roughness estimation remains unchanged. Moreover, the use of polarimetric parameters α1 and anisotropy were used to improve the soil parameters estimates. These parameters provide to neural networks the probable ranges of soil moisture (lower or higher than 0.30 cm3 cm-3) and surface roughness (root mean square surface height lower or higher than 1.0 cm). Soil moisture can be retrieved correctly from C-band SAR data by using the neural networks technique. Soil moisture errors were estimated at about 0.098 cm3 cm-3 without a-priori information on soil parameters and 0.065 cm3 cm-3 (RMSE) applying a-priori information on the soil moisture. The retrieval of surface roughness is possible only for low and medium values (lower than 2 cm). Results show that the precision on the soil roughness estimates was about 0.7 cm. For surface roughness lower than 2 cm, the precision on the soil roughness is better with an RMSE about 0.5 cm. The use of polarimetric parameters improves only slightly the soil parameters estimates.

  10. Mapping of bare soil surface parameters from TerraSAR-X radar images over a semi-arid region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorrab, A.; Zribi, M.; Baghdadi, N.; Lili Chabaane, Z.

    2015-10-01

    The goal of this paper is to analyze the sensitivity of X-band SAR (TerraSAR-X) signals as a function of different physical bare soil parameters (soil moisture, soil roughness), and to demonstrate that it is possible to estimate of both soil moisture and texture from the same experimental campaign, using a single radar signal configuration (one incidence angle, one polarization). Firstly, we analyzed statistically the relationships between X-band SAR (TerraSAR-X) backscattering signals function of soil moisture and different roughness parameters (the root mean square height Hrms, the Zs parameter and the Zg parameter) at HH polarization and for an incidence angle about 36°, over a semi-arid site in Tunisia (North Africa). Results have shown a high sensitivity of real radar data to the two soil parameters: roughness and moisture. A linear relationship is obtained between volumetric soil moisture and radar signal. A logarithmic correlation is observed between backscattering coefficient and all roughness parameters. The highest dynamic sensitivity is obtained with Zg parameter. Then, we proposed to retrieve of both soil moisture and texture using these multi-temporal X-band SAR images. Our approach is based on the change detection method and combines the seven radar images with different continuous thetaprobe measurements. To estimate soil moisture from X-band SAR data, we analyzed statistically the sensitivity between radar measurements and ground soil moisture derived from permanent thetaprobe stations. Our approaches are applied over bare soil class identified from an optical image SPOT / HRV acquired in the same period of measurements. Results have shown linear relationship for the radar signals as a function of volumetric soil moisture with high sensitivity about 0.21 dB/vol%. For estimation of change in soil moisture, we considered two options: (1) roughness variations during the three-month radar acquisition campaigns were not accounted for; (2) a simple

  11. An evaluation of models of bare soil evaporation formulated with different land surface boundary conditions and assumptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smits, Kathleen M.; Ngo, Viet V.; Cihan, Abdullah; Sakaki, Toshihiro; Illangasekare, Tissa H.

    2012-12-01

    Bare soil evaporation is a key process for water exchange between the land and the atmosphere and an important component of the water balance. However, there is no agreement on the best modeling methodology to determine evaporation under different atmospheric boundary conditions. Also, there is a lack of directly measured soil evaporation data for model validation to compare these methods to establish the validity of their mathematical formulations. Thus, a need exists to systematically compare evaporation estimates using existing methods to experimental observations. The goal of this work is to test different conceptual and mathematical formulations that are used to estimate evaporation from bare soils to critically investigate various formulations and surface boundary conditions. Such a comparison required the development of a numerical model that has the ability to incorporate these boundary conditions. For this model, we modified a previously developed theory that allows nonequilibrium liquid/gas phase change with gas phase vapor diffusion to better account for dry soil conditions. Precision data under well-controlled transient heat and wind boundary conditions were generated, and results from numerical simulations were compared with experimental data. Results demonstrate that the approaches based on different boundary conditions varied in their ability to capture different stages of evaporation. All approaches have benefits and limitations, and no one approach can be deemed most appropriate for every scenario. Comparisons of different formulations of the surface boundary condition validate the need for further research on heat and vapor transport processes in soil for better modeling accuracy.

  12. Data documentation for the bare soil experiment at the University of Arkansas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waite, W. P.; Scott, H. D. (Principal Investigator); Hancock, G. D.

    1980-01-01

    The reflectivities of several controlled moisture test plots were investigated. These test plots were of a similar soil texture which was clay loam and were prepared to give a desired initial soil moisture and density profile. Measurements were conducted on the plots as the soil water redistributed for both long term and diurnal cycles. These measurements included reflectivity, gravimetric and volumetric soil moisture, soil moisture potential, and soil temperature.

  13. SIMULATING HERBICIDE VOLATILIZATION FROM BARE SOIL AFFECTED BY ATMOSPHERIC CONDITIONS AND LIMITED SOLUBILITY IN WATER

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A numerical model was developed to predict the behavior of triallate after application to a field soil. The model simulates pesticide fate and transport in soil, movement in the vapor phase and volatilization from the soil surface. The model has options to allow water and/or heat transport and can ...

  14. Linking evaporative fluxes from bare soil across surface viscous sublayer with the Monin-Obukhov atmospheric flux-profile estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghighi, Erfan; Or, Dani

    2015-06-01

    The Monin-Obukhov similarity theory (MOST) provides the theoretical basis for many "atmospheric-based" methods (such as eddy covariance and flux-profile methods) that are widely used for quantifying surface-atmosphere exchange processes. The turbulence driven and highly nonlinear profiles of momentum, air temperature, and vapor densities require complex resistance expressions applied to simple gradients deduced from a single or few height measurements. Notwithstanding the success of these atmospheric-based methods, they often leave a gap at the immediate vicinity of terrestrial surfaces where fluxes emanate. A complementary approach for quantifying surface fluxes relies on diffusive interactions across a viscous sublayer next to the surface, referred to as the "surface boundary layer (BL)" approach. This study (for bare soil) establishes formal links between these two approaches thereby offering a physically based lower boundary condition (BC) for flux-profile methods while improving the top BC for surface BL-based formulations to include atmospheric stability. The modified lower BC for flux-profile relationships links characteristics of drying evaporating surfaces considering nonlinearities between wetness and evaporative fluxes and obviates reliance on both profile measurements and empirical surface resistances. The revised top BC for surface BL methods greatly improves the agreement with published field-scale experimental measurements. The proposed reconciliation procedure improves estimation capabilities of both flux-profile and surface BL formulations, and considerably enhances their accuracy of flux estimation when applied theoretically (in the absence of measured profiles) to drying bare soil surfaces.

  15. On the remote measurement of evaporation rates from bare wet soil under variable cloud cover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auer, S.

    1976-01-01

    Evaporation rates from a natural wet soil surface are calculated from an energy balance equation at 0.1-hour intervals. A procedure is developed for calculating the heat flux through the soil surface from a harmonic analysis of the surface temperature curve. The evaporation integrated over an entire 24-hour period is compared with daily evaporation rates obtained from published models.

  16. Retrieval of Surface and Subsurface Moisture of Bare Soil Using Simulated Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabatabaeenejad, A.; Moghaddam, M.

    2009-12-01

    Soil moisture is of fundamental importance to many hydrological and biological processes. Soil moisture information is vital to understanding the cycling of water, energy, and carbon in the Earth system. Knowledge of soil moisture is critical to agencies concerned with weather and climate, runoff potential and flood control, soil erosion, reservoir management, water quality, agricultural productivity, drought monitoring, and human health. The need to monitor the soil moisture on a global scale has motivated missions such as Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) [1]. Rough surface scattering models and remote sensing retrieval algorithms are essential in study of the soil moisture, because soil can be represented as a rough surface structure. Effects of soil moisture on the backscattered field have been studied since the 1960s, but soil moisture estimation remains a challenging problem and there is still a need for more accurate and more efficient inversion algorithms. It has been shown that the simulated annealing method is a powerful tool for inversion of the model parameters of rough surface structures [2]. The sensitivity of this method to measurement noise has also been investigated assuming a two-layer structure characterized by the layers dielectric constants, layer thickness, and statistical properties of the rough interfaces [2]. However, since the moisture profile varies with depth, it is sometimes necessary to model the rough surface as a layered structure with a rough interface on top and a stratified structure below where each layer is assumed to have a constant volumetric moisture content. In this work, we discretize the soil structure into several layers of constant moisture content to examine the effect of subsurface profile on the backscattering coefficient. We will show that while the moisture profile could vary in deeper layers, these layers do not affect the scattered electromagnetic field significantly. Therefore, we can use just a few layers

  17. Estimation of Bare Surface Soil Moisture and Surface Roughness Parameter Using L-Band SAR Image Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, Jian-Cheng; Wang, James; Hsu, Ann Y.; ONeill, Peggy E.; Engman, Edwin T.

    1997-01-01

    An algorithm based on a fit of the single-scattering Integral Equation Method (IEM) was developed to provide estimation of soil moisture and surface roughness parameter (a combination of rms roughness height and surface power spectrum) from quad-polarized synthetic aperture radar (SAR) measurements. This algorithm was applied to a series of measurements acquired at L-band (1.25 GHz) from both AIRSAR (Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory) and SIR-C (Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C) over a well- managed watershed in southwest Oklahoma. Prior to its application for soil moisture inversion, a good agreement was found between the single-scattering IEM simulations and the L band measurements of SIR-C and AIRSAR over a wide range of soil moisture and surface roughness conditions. The sensitivity of soil moisture variation to the co-polarized signals were then examined under the consideration of the calibration accuracy of various components of SAR measurements. It was found that the two co-polarized backscattering coefficients and their combinations would provide the best input to the algorithm for estimation of soil moisture and roughness parameter. Application of the inversion algorithm to the co-polarized measurements of both AIRSAR and SIR-C resulted in estimated values of soil moisture and roughness parameter for bare and short-vegetated fields that compared favorably with those sampled on the ground. The root-mean-square (rms) errors of the comparison were found to be 3.4% and 1.9 dB for soil moisture and surface roughness parameter, respectively.

  18. Estimation of Bare Surface Soil Moisture and Surface Roughness Parameter Using L-Band SAR Image Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, Jian-Cheng; Wang, James; Hsu, Ann; ONeill, Peggy; Engman, Edwin T.

    1997-01-01

    An algorithm based on a fit of the single-scattering Integral Equation Method (IEM) was developed to provide estimation of soil moisture and surface roughness parameter (a combination of rms roughness height and surface power spectrum) from quasi-polarized synthetic aperture radar (SAR) measurements. This algorithm was applied to a series of measurements acquired at L-band (1.25 GHz) from both AIRSAR (Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar operated by Jet Propulsion Laboratory) and SIR-C (Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C) over a well-managed watershed in southwest Oklahoma. It was found that the two co-polarized backscattering coefficients and their combinations would provide the best input to the algorithm for estimation of soil moisture and roughness parameter. Application of the inversion algorithm to the co-polarized measurements of both AIRSAR and SIR-C resulted in estimated values of soil moisture and roughness parameter for bare and short-vegetated fields that compared favorably with those sampled on the ground. The root-mean-square (rms) errors of the comparison were found to be 3.4% and 1.9 dB for soil moisture and surface roughness parameter, respectively.

  19. Nighttime water absorption by a bare loess soil in a coastal desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ninari, N.; Berliner, P. R.

    2003-04-01

    The role of dew in arid and semi-arid ecosystems is considered to be of great importance. It can serve as a water source for the bacteria of biological crust, for plants and for small insects. The Negev Desert is a semiarid region characterized by winter rainfall with a very large inter-annual variability. Reports on measurements carried out in this area mention that up to 180 nights a year with dew were registered by a conventional Hiltner Dew Balance, with intensities that ranged from 0.1 to 0.2 mm per night (yielding a total of 15 mm per year, which is more than 10% of the total rainfall). The Hiltner dew balance is based on the continuous weighing of an artificial condensation plate that has a completely different energy balance from that of the soil surface above which it is installed. The Hiltner dew balance could, therefore, be considered as a ``potential dew" gauge, whose results are probably mainly correlated to atmospheric conditions. The prime objective of this work was, therefore, to quantify the amounts of dew deposition on the soil surface, and to compare these amounts to those measured by the Hiltner balance. Measurements were carried out at the Wadi Mashash Experimental Farm in the Negev. To estimate deposition and evaporation of dew, a micro-lysimeter (diameter: 20 cm; soil depth: 50 cm) with an undisturbed soil sample was installed flush with the soil surface. The following were continuously monitored: micro-lysimeter weight, incoming and reflected short wave radiation, net radiation, dry and wet bulb temperatures, wind speed, and soil heat flux. A Hiltner Dew Balance was placed close by as a reference to compare with previous measurements. Throughout the ``dew period" (spring, summer and fall), and at random intervals, soil samples were taken hourly during the whole night. The uppermost 10 cm of the soil was divided into 1 cm intervals, and the soil moisture content was measured (oven dry). During the above-mentioned night campaigns, no dew

  20. Assessment of an efficient numerical solution of the 1D Richards' equation on bare soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varado, N.; Braud, I.; Ross, P. J.; Haverkamp, R.

    2006-05-01

    A new numerical scheme has been proposed by Ross [Ross, P.J., 2003. Modeling soil water and solute transport—fast, simplified numerical solutions. Agronomy Journal 95, 1352-1361] to solve the 1D Richards' equation [Richards, L.A., 1931. Capillary conduction of liquids through porous medium. Physics 1, 318-333]. This non-iterative solution uses the description of soil properties proposed by Brooks and Corey [Brooks, R.H., Corey, A.T., 1964. Hydraulic properties of porous media. Colorado State University, Fort Collins]. It allows the derivation of an analytical expression for the Kirchhoff potential used in the calculation of water fluxes. The degree of saturation is used as the dependent variable when the soil is unsaturated and the Kirchhoff potential is used in case of saturation. A space and time discretisation scheme leads to a tridiagonal set of linear equations that is solved non-iteratively. We propose in this paper an extensive test of this numerical method, evaluated only on a single case by Ross. The tests are conducted in two steps. First, the solution is assessed against two analytical solutions. The first one [Basha, H.A., 1999. Multidimensional linearized nonsteady infiltration with prescribed boundary conditions at the soil surface. Water Resources Research 35(1), 75-93] provides the water content profile when simplified soil characteristics such as the exponential law of Gardner [Gardner, W.R., 1958. Some steady-state solutions of the unsaturated moisture flow equations with application to evaporation from a water table. Soil Science 85, 228-232] are used. The Ross solution is compared to this solution on eight different soils that were fitted to this law. Analytical solution with the Brooks and Corey models is not available at the moment for the moisture profile but some exist for cumulative infiltration. Therefore, the second analytical solution, used in this study, is the one developed by Parlange et al. [Parlange, J.-Y., Haverkamp, R., Touma, J

  1. Modeling and measurement of microwave emission and backscattering from bare soil surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saatchi, S.; Wegmuller, U.

    1992-01-01

    A multifrequency ground-based radiometer-scatterometer system working at frequencies between 3.0 GHz and 11.0 GHz has been used to study the effect of soil moisture and roughness on microwave emission and backscattering. The freezing and thawing effect of the soil surface and the changes of the surface roughness due to rain and erosion are reported. To analyze the combined active and passive data, a scattering model based on physical optics approximation for the low frequency and geometrical optics approximation for high frequency has been developed. The model is used to calculate the bistatic scattering coefficients from the surface. By considering the conservation of energy, the result has been integrated over a hemisphere above the surface to calculate the emissivity. The backscattering and emission model has been coupled with the observed data in order to extract soil moisture and surface roughness.

  2. Variation of Phreatic Evaporation of Bare Soil and Integration Application in Water Allocation in Shule Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Huang, P.; Gong, G.

    2011-12-01

    Phreatic evaporation is a key element in regional water balance, but it is hardly measured directly. Recently the development of some new technologies brings new dawn to phreatic evaporation measurement, such as eddy covariance, remote sensing ET and so on. But the new technologies have no ability to connect to groundwater yet. Conventional groundwater balance equipment was set up in Shule basin in northwestern China, with located E97°01', N45°13' , altitude 1520m, annual average precipitation 61.8mm and annual evaporation 2600mm (pan 20cm). The experiment field contains 45 lysimeters (65cm diameter). 11 different water table depths are set in the lysimeters, which are 0.5m, 0.75m, 1.0m, 1.25m, 1.5m, 2.0m, 2.5m, 3.0m, 4.0m, 5.0m and 6.0m. The water table in the lysimeter is controlled by Marriott Bottle System. The evaporation and percolation is measured for three different soil types (silt sandy soil, loam soil and clay soil) in the 11 different water table depths. Based on the data from 2006 to 2010, the influences of atmosphere evaporation capacity, phreatic water depth and soil textures are analyzed. Empirical formulae for estimating phreatic evaporation are regressed. The fitting precision of the different formulae are evaluated. The results show that, fitting effect of common empirical formulae is good in Shule river basin. For the different soil types, fitting effect of silt soil is the best, while that of clay soil is relatively low. At last, formulae fitted in other areas and phreatic evaporation tests are summarized. The reasons of difference of fitted coefficients lie in three aspects: the range of depth of groundwater, choice of the value of water evaporation, method to optimize coefficients. Physical meaning of the coefficients in empirical formulae is analyzed. The features, fitting effect and notes in application of formulae are evaluated. The results are applied in water requirement calculation of ecological conservation Dunhuang Xihu Nature

  3. On the Soil Roughness Parameterization Problem in Soil Moisture Retrieval of Bare Surfaces from Synthetic Aperture Radar

    PubMed Central

    Verhoest, Niko E.C; Lievens, Hans; Wagner, Wolfgang; Álvarez-Mozos, Jesús; Moran, M. Susan; Mattia, Francesco

    2008-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar has shown its large potential for retrieving soil moisture maps at regional scales. However, since the backscattered signal is determined by several surface characteristics, the retrieval of soil moisture is an ill-posed problem when using single configuration imagery. Unless accurate surface roughness parameter values are available, retrieving soil moisture from radar backscatter usually provides inaccurate estimates. The characterization of soil roughness is not fully understood, and a large range of roughness parameter values can be obtained for the same surface when different measurement methodologies are used. In this paper, a literature review is made that summarizes the problems encountered when parameterizing soil roughness as well as the reported impact of the errors made on the retrieved soil moisture. A number of suggestions were made for resolving issues in roughness parameterization and studying the impact of these roughness problems on the soil moisture retrieval accuracy and scale.

  4. Influence of soil water content on the thermal infrared emissivity of bare soils: Implication for land surface temperature determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mira, M.; Valor, E.; Boluda, R.; Caselles, V.; Coll, C.

    2007-12-01

    The influence of soil water content in thermal infrared emissivity is a known fact but has been poorly studied in the past. A laboratory study for quantifying the dependence of emissivity on soil moisture was carried out. Six samples of surface horizons of different soil types were selected for the experiment. The gravimetric method was chosen for determining the soil moisture, whereas the emissivity was measured at different soil water contents using the two-lid variant of the box method. As a result, the study showed that emissivity increases from 1.7% to 16% when water content becomes higher, especially in sandy soils in the 8.2-9.2 μm range. Accordingly, a set of equations was derived to obtain emissivity from soil moisture at different spectral bands for the analyzed mineral soils. Moreover, results showed that the spectral ratio decreases with increasing soil water content. Finally, the study showed that systematic errors from 0.1 to 2 K can be caused by soil moisture influence on emissivity.

  5. Land surface temperature inversion of bare soil and vegetation cover based on MODIS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingwen; Zhou, Song; Wang, Zhezhen; Lv, Nan; Jiang, Jianwu; Wang, Ke

    2015-12-01

    Land surface temperature is one of the most important parameters in hydrology and agricultural production research . Split-window algorithm based on MODIS data was briefly introduced in this paper and applied in Hetao Irrigation District. Comparison between data retrieval and field collected data showed that data retrieval could reflect land surface temperature basic accurately .Linear fitting of different time series data can improve retrieval precision effectively. The results provide support for drought forecast, soil moisture monitoring etc. in the future.

  6. Baring high-albedo soils by overgrazing: a hypothesized desertification mechanism.

    PubMed

    Otterman, J

    1974-11-01

    Observations are reported of high-albedo soils denuded by overgrazing which appear bright, in high contrast to regions covered by natural vegetation. Measurements and modeling show that the denuded surfaces are cooler, when compared under sunlit conditions. This observed "thermal depression" eflect should, on theoretical grounds, result in a decreased lifting of air necessary for cloud formation and precipitation, and thus lead to regional climatic desertification. PMID:17790382

  7. Baring high-albedo soils by overgrazing - A hypothesized desertification mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otterman, J.

    1974-01-01

    Observations are reported of high-albedo soils denuded by overgrazing which appear bright, in high contrast to regions covered by natural vegetation. Measurements and modeling show that the denuded surfaces are cooler, when compared under sunlit conditions. This observed 'thermal depression' effect should, on theoretical grounds, result in a decreased lifting of air necessary for cloud formation and precipitation, and thus lead to regional climatic desertification.

  8. Calculations of microwave brightness temperature of rough soil surfaces: Bare field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mo, T.; Schmugge, T. J.; Wang, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    A model for simulating the brightness temperatures of soils with rough surfaces is developed. The surface emissivity of the soil media is obtained by the integration of the bistatic scattering coefficients for rough surfaces. The roughness of a soil surface is characterized by two parameters, the surface height standard deviation sigma and its horizontal correlation length l. The model calculations are compared to the measured angular variations of the polarized brightness temperatures at both 1.4 GHz and 5 GHz frequences. A nonlinear least-squares fitting method is used to obtain the values of delta and l that best characterize the surface roughness. The effect of shadowing is incorporated by introducing a function S(theta), which represents the probability that a point on a rough surface is not shadowed by other parts of the surface. The model results for the horizontal polarization are in excellent agreement with the data. However, for the vertical polarization, some discrepancies exist between the calculations and data, particularly at the 1.4 GHz frequency. Possible causes of the discrepancy are discussed.

  9. Effect of deep injection on field-scale emissions of 1,3-dichloropropene and chloropicrin from bare soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, S. R.; Ashworth, D. J.; Zheng, W.; Knuteson, J.; van Wesenbeeck, I. J.

    2016-07-01

    Fumigating soil is important for the production of many high-value vegetable, fruit, and tree crops, but fumigants are toxic pesticides with relatively high volatility, which can lead to significant atmospheric emissions. A field experiment was conducted to measure emissions and subsurface diffusion of a mixture of 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-D) and chloropicrin after shank injection to bare soil at 61 cm depth (i.e., deep injection). Three on-field methods, the aerodynamic (ADM), integrated horizontal flux (IHF), and theoretical profile shape (TPS) methods, were used to obtain fumigant flux density and cumulative emission values. Two air dispersion models (CALPUFF and ISCST3) were also used to back-calculate the flux density using air concentration measurements surrounding the fumigated field. Emissions were continuously measured for 16 days and the daily peak emission rates for the five methods ranged from 13 to 33 μg m-2 s-1 for 1,3-D and 0.22-3.2 μg m-2 s-1 for chloropicrin. Total 1,3-D mass lost to the atmosphere was approximately 23-41 kg ha-1, or 15-27% of the applied active ingredient and total mass loss of chloropicrin was <2%. Based on the five methods, deep injection reduced total emissions by approximately 2-24% compared to standard fumigation practices where fumigant injection is at 46 cm depth. Given the relatively wide range in emission-reduction percentages, a fumigant diffusion model was used to predict the percentage reduction in emissions by injecting at 61 cm, which yielded a 21% reduction in emissions. Significant reductions in emissions of 1,3-D and chloropicrin are possible by injecting soil fumigants deeper in soil.

  10. Mapping bare soil in South West Wales, UK, using high resolution colour infra-red aerial photography for water quality and flood risk management applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sykes, Helena; Neale, Simon; Coe, Sarah

    2016-04-01

    Natural Resources Wales is a UK government body responsible for environmental regulation, among other areas. River walks in Water Framework Directive (WFD) priority catchments in South West Wales, UK, identified soil entering water courses due to poaching and bank erosion, leading to deterioration in the water quality and jeopardising the water quality meeting legal minimum standards. Bare soil has also been shown to cause quicker and higher hydrograph peaks in rural catchments than if those areas were vegetated, which can lead to flooding of domestic properties during peak storm flows. The aim was to target farm visits by operational staff to advise on practices likely to improve water quality and to identify areas where soft engineering solutions such as revegetation could alleviate flood risk in rural areas. High resolution colour-infrared aerial photography, 25cm in the three colour bands and 50cm in the near infrared band, was used to map bare soil in seven catchments using supervised classification of a five band stack including the Normalised Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). Mapping was combined with agricultural land use and field boundary data to filter out arable fields, which are supposed to bare soil for part of their cycle, and was very successful when compared to ground truthing, with the exception of silage fields which contained sparse, no or unproductive vegetation at the time the imagery was acquired leading to spectral similarity to bare soil. A raindrop trace model was used to show the path sediment from bare soil areas would take when moving through the catchment to a watercourse, with hedgerows inserted as barriers following our observations from ground truthing. The findings have been used to help farmers gain funding for improvements such as fencing to keep animals away from vulnerable river banks. These efficient and automated methods can be rolled out to more catchments in Wales and updated using aerial imagery acquired more recently to

  11. Appropriate scale of soil moisture retrieval from high-resolution radar imagery for bare and minimally vegetated soils 1859

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This research investigates the appropriate scale for watershed averaged and site specific soil moisture retrieval from high resolution radar imagery. The first approach involved filtering backscatter for input to a retrieval model that was compared against field measures of soil moisture. The seco...

  12. On the soil roughness parameterization problem in soil moisture retrieval of bare surfaces from Synthetic Aperture Radar 1959

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Synthetic Aperture Radar has shown its large potential for retrieving soil moisture maps at regional scales. However, since the backscattered signal is determined by several surface characteristics, the retrieval of soil moisture is an ill-posed problem when using single configuration imagery. Unles...

  13. Food Web Responses to Augmenting the Entomopathogenic Nematodes in Bare and Animal Manure-Mulched Soil

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, L. W.; Graham, J. H.; Zellers, J.; Bright, D.; Dunn, D. C.; El-Borai, F. E.; Porazinska, D. L.

    2007-01-01

    Factorial treatments of entomopathogenic nematodes (EPN) and composted, manure mulches were evaluated for two years in a central Florida citrus orchard to study the post-application biology of EPN used to manage the root weevil, Diaprepes abbreviatus. Mulch treatments were applied once each year to study the effects of altering the community of EPN competitors (free-living bactivorous nematodes) and antagonists (nematophagous fungi (NF), predaceous nematodes and some microarthro-pods). EPN were augmented once with Steinernema riobrave in 2004 and twice in 2005. Adding EPN to soil affected the prevalence of organisms at several trophic levels, but the effects were often ephemeral and sometimes inconsistent. EPN augmentation always increased the mortality of sentinel weevil larvae, the prevalence of free-living nematodes in sentinel cadavers and the prevalence of trapping NF. Subsequent to the insecticidal effects of EPN augmentation in 2004, but not 2005, EPN became temporarily less prevalent, and fewer sentinel weevil larvae died in EPN-augmented compared to non-augmented plots. Manure mulch had variable effects on endoparasitic NF, but consistently decreased the prevalence of trapping NF and increased the prevalence of EPN and the sentinel mortality. Both temporal and spatial abundance of NF were inversely related to the prevalence of Steinernema diaprepesi, whereas Heterorhabditis zealandica prevalence was positively correlated with NF over time. The number of weevil larvae killed by EPN was likely greatest in 2005, due in part to non-target effects of augmentation on the endemic EPN community in 2004 that occurred during a period of peak weevil recruitment into the soil. PMID:19259487

  14. Evolution of soil organic matter energetic and chemical composition during long-term bare fallow: implications for soil carbon vulnerability to global change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barré, P.; Cécillon, L.; Plante, A. F.; Chenu, C.; Christensen, B. T.; Fernandez, J. M.; Gherardi, C. M.; Houot, S.; Kätterer, T.; van Oort, F.; Peltre, C.; Poulton, P. R.

    2012-04-01

    Determining the relative stability of soil organic carbon (SOC) is a critical step to better understanding its vulnerability to global change. The absence of convincing physical or chemical procedures to define, characterize or isolate relatively labile versus stable pools of SOC makes it difficult to study. Long-term bare fallow (LTBF) experiments, in which C inputs have been stopped for several decades, provide a unique opportunity to study stable SOC without the inherent artefacts induced by extraction procedures, the hypothesis being that SOC is gradually enriched in stable C with time as labile components decompose. We determined the evolution of energetic and chemical characteristics of bulk SOC in five LTBF experiments across Europe: Askov (DK), Grignon (FR), Rothamsted (UK), Ultuna (SW) and Versailles (FR), using simultaneous thermal analysis (i.e., thermogravimetry (TG), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and evolved CO2 gas analysis (CO2-EGA)) and diffuse reflectance Fourier transformed mid-infrared spectroscopy (DRIFT-MIRS). Results of TG analyses showed that the temperature needed to combust the first half of the SOC (i.e., TG-T50) increased with bare fallow duration at all sites. Conversely, the energy density (in mJ mg-1 C) decreased with bare fallow duration. Combined together, these results provide a means to contrast the stable, mineral-associated SOC pool from any potential pyrogenic C, which would have much greater energy density. DRIFT-MIRS results showed that the "carboxylation index" (the ratio of C=O bonds peak area over (C=C + C=O) bonds peak areas) decreased with bare fallow duration, that aromaticity (C=C bond peak area over C content) increased with bare-fallow duration, and that the "reticulation index" (CH3 peak area over CH2 peak area) decreased with increasing bare fallow duration at Rothamsted, Versailles and Ultuna. These trends were less clear or not observed at Grignon due to the presence of carbonates or at Askov due to

  15. Effect of soil type patterns on the variability of bare soil evaporation within a field: comparison of eddy covariance measurements with potential and actual evaporation calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderborght, J.; Graf, A.; Steenpass, C.; Scharnagl, B.; Prolingheuer, N.; Herbst, M.; Vereecken, H.

    2009-12-01

    Bare soil evaporation was measured with the eddy-covariance method at the Selhausen field site. The site has a distinct gradient in soil texture with a considerably higher stone content at the upper part of the field. Because of this gradient, a spatial variation in evaporation fluxes in the field is expected. Because of the higher stone content at the upper part of the field, it is expected that the water that is stored in the soil surface layer and can be evaporated at a maximal evaporation rate, which is determined by the energy that is available for evaporation, is considerable smaller in the upper than in the lower part of the field. We investigated whether this hypothesis is supported by eddy covariance (EC) measurements of the evaporation fluxes at the field site. The EC measurements were combined with a footprint model that predicts the location of the soil surface that contributes to the measured evaporation flux. In this way, evaporation measurements of the two parts of the field site could be distinguished. However, since only one EC station was available, simultaneous evaporation measurements for the two field parts were not available. As a consequence, the datasets of measurements had to be interpreted and put into context of the meteorological and soil hydrological conditions. The potential evapotranspiration was calculated using the FAO method (Allen et al., 1998) to represent the meteorological conditions whereas a simple soil evaporation model (Boesten and Stroosnijder, 1986) was used to represent the influence of the precipitation and soil hydrological conditions on the actual evaporation rate. Since different soil parameters were required to describe the evaporation measurements for the upper and lower part of the plot, our starting hypothesis that more water is evaporated in the lower part of the field could be confirmed. Allen, R. G., L. S. Pereira, D. Raes, and M. Smith (1998), Crop evapotranspiration: Guidelines for computing crop water

  16. Estimation of Soil Moisture Content from the Spectral Reflectance of Bare Soils in the 0.4–2.5 μm Domain

    PubMed Central

    Fabre, Sophie; Briottet, Xavier; Lesaignoux, Audrey

    2015-01-01

    This work aims to compare the performance of new methods to estimate the Soil Moisture Content (SMC) of bare soils from their spectral signatures in the reflective domain (0.4–2.5 μm) in comparison with widely used spectral indices like Normalized Soil Moisture Index (NSMI) and Water Index SOIL (WISOIL). Indeed, these reference spectral indices use wavelengths located in the water vapour absorption bands and their performance are thus very sensitive to the quality of the atmospheric compensation. To reduce these limitations, two new spectral indices are proposed which wavelengths are defined using the determination matrix tool by taking into account the atmospheric transmission: Normalized Index of Nswir domain for Smc estimatiOn from Linear correlation (NINSOL) and Normalized Index of Nswir domain for Smc estimatiOn from Non linear correlation (NINSON). These spectral indices are completed by two new methods based on the global shape of the soil spectral signatures. These methods are the Inverse Soil semi-Empirical Reflectance model (ISER), using the inversion of an existing empirical soil model simulating the soil spectral reflectance according to soil moisture content for a given soil class, and the convex envelope model, linking the area between the envelope and the spectral signature to the SMC. All these methods are compared using a reference database built with 32 soil samples and composed of 190 spectral signatures with five or six soil moisture contents. Half of the database is used for the calibration stage and the remaining to evaluate the performance of the SMC estimation methods. The results show that the four new methods lead to similar or better performance than the one obtained by the reference indices. The RMSE is ranging from 3.8% to 6.2% and the coefficient of determination R2 varies between 0.74 and 0.91 with the best performance obtained with the ISER model. In a second step, simulated spectral radiances at the sensor level are used to

  17. Modeling soil water fluxes in two arable Chernozems with different depth to carbonates after fifty years under bare fallow and under corn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhangelskaya, Tatiana; Khokhlova, Olga

    2014-05-01

    Arable Chernozems of the East European Plain were studied in Voronezh region (51°36' N, 38°58' E, 180-185 m AMSL). The studied soils were formed on calcareous loess-like loam parent material in well-drained position with groundwater level at 8-10 m depth. The mean annual air temperature at the site is 6.9 °C, mean annual precipitation is 587 mm. The weather conditions are highly variable: the extreme values of monthly precipitation registered in June were 7 (in 1960) and 219 mm (in 1988); the extreme daily value of precipitation was 95 mm (in 1988); the extreme air temperatures registered in June were -1.6 and 38.9 °C. The first experimental plot was under corn monocrop and another one was under bare fallow for 50 years. The depth to the top of the carbonate horizon was 1.4-1.6 m under corn and 0.8 m under bare fallow. We supposed that this difference in carbonate depths is due to carbonate accumulation in the upper soil layers under bare fallow and that it can be explained by the repeating upward water fluxes, which are much greater under bare fallow than those under corn. To test this hypothesis a series of simulations was carried out using the Hydrus-1D modeling environment. Simulation of soil hydrology was performed for the vegetation period. The depth of modeled soil profile was 2 m. Sand, silt and clay contents were about 20, 40 and 40 % and were similar for both plots. The lower boundary condition was free drainage. Monthly precipitation was set equal to (1) long-term average norm, (2) half-norm, (3) two norms and (4) three norms. The monthly distribution of precipitation was either (a) two rainy days at the beginning of each month followed by 28-days dry period or (b) one rainy day at the beginning of each decade followed by 9-days dry period. Evapotranspiration during dry periods was estimated using the standardized FAO56 Penman - Monteith model. Simulations were performed for each combination of (1)-(4) and (a)-(b) conditions and for the real

  18. Soil hydraulic parameters and surface soil moisture of a tilled bare soil plot inversely derived from l-band brightness temperatures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We coupled a radiative transfer approach with a soil hydrological model (HYDRUS 1D) and a global optimization routine SCE-UA to derive soil hydraulic parameters and soil surface roughness from measured brightness temperatures at 1.4 GHz (L-band) and measured rainfall and calculated potential soil ev...

  19. Estimating photosynthetic vegetation, non-photosynthetic vegetation and bare soil fractions using Landsat and MODIS data: Effects of site heterogeneity, soil properties and land cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerschman, J. P.; Scarth, P.; McVicar, T.; Malthus, T. J.; Stewart, J.; Rickards, J.; Trevithick, R.; Renzullo, L. J.

    2013-12-01

    Vegetation fractional cover is a key indicator for land management monitoring, both in pastoral and agricultural settings. Maintaining adequate vegetation cover protects the soil from the effects of water and wind erosion and also ensures that carbon is returned to soil through decomposition. Monitoring vegetation fractional cover across large areas and continuously in time needs good remote sensing techniques underpinned by high quality ground data to calibrate and validate algorithms. In this study we used Landsat and MODIS reflectance data together with field measurements from 1476 observations across Australia to produce estimates of vegetation fractional cover using a linear unmixing technique. Specifically, we aimed at separating fractions of photosynthetic vegetation (PV), non-photosynthetic vegetation (NPV) and bare soil (B). We used Landsat reflectance averaged over a 3x3 pixel window representing the area actually measured on the ground and also a 'degraded' Landsat reflectance 40x40 pixel window to simulate the effect of a coarser sensor. Using these two Landsat reflectances we quantified the heterogeneity of each site. We used data from two MODIS-derived reflectance products: the Nadir BRDF-Adjusted surface Reflectance product (MCD43A4) and the MODIS 8-day surface reflectance (MOD09A1). We derived endmembers from the data and estimated fractional cover using a linear unmixing technique. Log transforms and band interaction terms were added to account for non-linearities in the spectral mixing. For each reflectance source we investigated if the residuals were correlated with site heterogeneity, soil colour, soil moisture and land cover type. As expected, the best model was obtained when Landsat data for a small region around each site was used. We obtained root mean square error (RMSE) values of 0.134, 0.175 and 0.153 for PV, NPV and B respectively. When we degraded the Landsat data to an area of ~1 km2 around each site the model performance decreased to

  20. An Experimental and Modeling Study of Evaporation from Bare Soils Subjected to Natural Boundary Conditions at the Land-Atmospheric Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smits, K. M.; Ngo, V. V.; Cihan, A.; Sakaki, T.; Illangasekare, T. H.; kathleen m smits

    2011-12-01

    Bare soil evaporation is a key process for water exchange between the land and the atmosphere and an important component of the water balance in semiarid and arid regions. However, there is no agreement on the best methodology to determine evaporation under different boundary conditions. Because it is difficult to measure evaporation from soil,with the exception of using lysimeters, numerous formulations have been proposed to establish a relationship between the rate of evaporation and soil moisture and/or soil temperature and thermal properties. Different formulations vary in how they partition available energy and include, among others, a classical bulk aerodynamic formulation which requires knowledge of the relative humidity at the soil surface and a more non-traditional heat balance method which requires knowledge of soil temperature and soil thermal properties. A need exists to systematically compare existing methods to experimental data under highly controlled conditions not achievable in the field. The goal of this work is to perform controlled experiments under transient conditions of soil moisture, temperature and wind at the land/atmospheric interface to test different conceptual and mathematical formulations for evaporation rate estimates and to develop appropriate numerical models to be used in simulations. In this study, to better understand the coupled water-vapor-heat flow processes in the shallow subsurface near the land surface, we modified a previously developed theory that allows non-equilibrium liquid/gas phase change with gas phase vapor diffusion to better account for evaporation under dry soil conditions. This theory was used to compare estimates of evaporation based on different formulations of the bulk aerodynamic and heat balance methods. In order to experimentally validate the numerical formulations/code, we performed a series of two-dimensional physical model experiments under varying boundary conditions using test sand for which the

  1. Estimating net rainfall, evaporation and water storage of a bare soil from sequential L-band emissivities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroosnijder, L.; Lascano, R. J.; Newton, R. W.; Vanbavel, C. H. M.

    1984-01-01

    A general method to use a time series of L-band emissivities as an input to a hydrological model for continuously monitoring the net rainfall and evaporation as well as the water content over the entire soil profile is proposed. The model requires a sufficiently accurate and general relation between soil emissivity and surface moisture content. A model which requires the soil hydraulic properties as an additional input, but does not need any weather data was developed. The method is shown to be numerically consistent.

  2. ESTIMATION OF BARE-SOIL EVAPORATION USING A CALORIMETRIC APPROACH WITH HEAT FLUX MEASURED AT MULTIPLE DEPTHS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An assumption in calorimetric methods for soil heat flux is that sensible heat terms can be balanced (i.e., if the heat flux is known at one depth, the heat flux at another depth may be determined by monitoring the change in heat storage). Latent heat from water evaporation is assigned to the energy...

  3. Shallow groundwater effect on land surface temperature and surface energy balance under bare soil conditions: modeling and description

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Appreciating when and how groundwater affects surface temperature and energy fluxes is important for utilizing remote sensing in groundwater studies and for integrating aquifers within land surface models. To explore the shallow groundwater effect, we numerically exposed two soil profiles – one havi...

  4. Effect of deep injection on field-scale emissions of 1,3-dichloropropene and chloropicrin from bare soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fumigating soil is important for the production of many high-value vegetable, fruit, and tree crops, but fumigants are toxic and highly volatile which can lead to significant atmospheric emissions. A field experiment was conducted to measure emissions and subsurface diffusion of a mixture of 1,3-di...

  5. Continuum-scale investigation of evaporation from bare soil under different boundary and initial conditions: An evaluation of nonequilibrium phase change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trautz, Andrew C.; Smits, Kathleen M.; Cihan, Abdullah

    2015-09-01

    Evaporation and condensation in bare soils govern water and energy fluxes between the land and atmosphere. Phase change between liquid water and water vapor is commonly evaluated in soil hydrology using an assumption of instantaneous phase change (i.e., chemical equilibrium). Past experimental studies have shown that finite volatilization and condensation times can be observed under certain environmental conditions, thereby questioning the validity of this assumption. A comparison between equilibrium and nonequilibrium phase change modeling approaches showed that the latter is able to provide better estimates of evaporation, justifying the need for more research on this topic. Several formulations based on irreversible thermodynamics, first-order reaction kinetics, or the kinetic theory of gases have been employed to describe nonequilibrium phase change at the continuum scale. In this study, results from a fully coupled nonisothermal heat and mass transfer model applying four different nonequilibrium phase change formulations were compared with experimental data generated under different initial and boundary conditions. Results from a modified Hertz-Knudsen formulation based on kinetic theory of gases, proposed herein, were consistently in best agreement in terms of preserving both magnitude and trends of experimental data under all environmental conditions analyzed. Simulation results showed that temperature-dependent formulations generally better predict evaporation than formulations independent of temperature. Analysis of vapor concentrations within the porous media showed that conditions were not at equilibrium under the experimental conditions tested.

  6. Closure of the energy balance equation over bare soil during the formation and evaporation of non-rainfall water inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florentin, Anat; Agam, Nurit

    2015-04-01

    The Negev desert is characterized by an arid climate (annual mean precipitation is 90 mm) with sea breeze carrying moisture from the Mediterranean Sea during the afternoon regularly. Non-rainfall water inputs (NRWIs) are thus of great importance to the hydrometeorology and the ecological functioning of the region. The small magnitude of NRWIs challenges attempts to quantify these processes. The aim of this research was to test commonly used micrometeorological methods to quantify the energy balance components during the deposition and evaporation of NRWIs. A fully equipped micrometeorological station was set up near the Blaustein Institutes for Desert Research of the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (30o 51' 35.6" N; 34o 46' 24.8" E) during September-October 2014. Net-radiation was measured with a 4-way net radiometer, and soil heat flux was quantified by the calorimetric method in three replicates. Latent heat was measured using an eddy-covariance (EC) and compared to a micro-lysimeter (ML); sensible heat flux was measured with an EC and a surface layer scintillometer (SLS). Sensible heat fluxes measured by the EC and the SLS showed good agreement. EC latent heat fluxes were in good agreement with those derived by the ML. Nevertheless, derivation of latent heat flux from the SLS measurements through the energy balance equation showed a relatively large deviation from the directly measured latent heat flux. This deviation is likely attributed to measurement errors of the soil heat flux.

  7. Short-term temporal changes of bare soil CO2 fluxes after tillage described by a first-order decay model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A model is proposed to explain soil carbon (C) emission after tillage as a function of the non-disturbed emission. The model is based on a first order soil C decay assumption and assumes that tillage introduces an additional labile C to the mineralization process due to aggregate disruption. Predict...

  8. SiSPAT-Isotope, a coupled heat, water and stable isotope (HDO and H 218O) transport model for bare soil. Part II. Evaluation and sensitivity tests using two laboratory data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braud, I.; Bariac, T.; Vauclin, M.; Boujamlaoui, Z.; Gaudet, J. P.; Biron, Ph.; Richard, P.

    2005-07-01

    Stable water isotopes are tracers of water movement within the soil-vegetation-atmosphere system. They have the potential for a better understanding of water vapour transport within soils, evaporation and transpiration processes. To better understand those potentialities and possible lack of knowledge, a coupled heat-water and stable isotope transport model, called SiSPAT-Isotope was developed for bare soil. We presented the theoretical basis of the model in the first part of the paper, including a first validation of the likelihood of model results and a comparison with existing analytical solutions. In this companion paper, we go a step further by comparing the model results with two data sets collected on laboratory columns. In both cases, five soil columns were saturated and let drying during 173 and 253 days, respectively. At selected dates, one of the column was cut into slices and analysed to determine the volumetric water content, the deuterium and oxygen 18 concentrations profiles. The first data set was acquired on disturbed soil columns. The second one was collected on non-disturbed soil columns and it included a complete monitoring of atmospheric variables. It was not the case for the first one and a sensitivity analysis of model results to the air humidity was performed, showing its large influence on surface isotope concentrations. For both data sets, we also conducted a sensitivity analysis to the formulation of the kinetic fractionation factor, conditioning the resistance to isotope transport between the soil surface and the atmosphere, and to the value of soil tortuosity. The results showed that the model was able to reproduce the behaviour of the observed concentration profiles. A fair agreement between measured and calculated values was obtained for all profiles for the disturbed soil. Near surface concentrations were in general overestimated for the undisturbed soil, raising the question of possible influence of immobile water on concentrations

  9. Wind, rain and soil erosion rates on bare and plant covered agriculture plots at the experimental station of El Teularet -Sierra de Enguera, Eastern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerdà, A.; Azorin-Molina, C.; Iserloh, Th.

    2012-04-01

    Soil erosion is being scientifically researched for more tan one century, but there is some knowledge lacks that should be researched. Within the factors of the soil erosion wind and rain were studied, but little is know about the impact of the combination of both. Soil erosion by wind was mainly studied on drylands and agriculture land (Sterk and Spaan, 1997; Bielders et al., 2002; Rajot et al., 2003; Zobeck et al., 2003). Soil erosion by water was studied in many ecosystems but it is especially active on agriculture land (Cerdà et al., 2009) and under Mediterranean climatic conditions (Cerdà et al., 2010). The importance of wind on soil erosion is base in the fact that rainstorms occurs with wind, adding a driving component to the falling raindrops. The influence of wind on raindrops is clear, but there is not measurements and there is no information of this influence under field conditions with natural rainfall events.This paper aims to determine the interaction between wind and rain as factors of the soil losses under Mediterranean climatic conditions and different agriculture managements and land uses. Since 2003, the El Teularet-Serra de Enguera Soil Erosion Experimental Station located in Eastern Spain is measuring the soil losses in plots under different land uses and land managements. The station is devoted to study the soil water erosion processes under rain-fed agriculture fields and the rangelands by means of simulated rainfall experiments and plots of different sizes. The soil erosion measure ments are done by means of 13 plots, each of them composed of 5 subplots of 1, 2, 4, 16 and 48 m2 under different land uses and managements. Two plots are covered by two different types of shrubs: Quercus coccifera and Ulex parviflorus, respectively. Three plots reproduce the use of herbicides, one is ploughed, and three plots follow conservation practices (oats and beans with no-tillage, with tillage, and with a vege- tation cover of weeds). Other plots are

  10. Evaluation of the ground heat flux simulated by a multi-layer land surface scheme using high-quality observations at grass land and bare soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Jan-Peter; Vogel, Gerd; Becker, Claudia; Kothe, Steffen; Ahrens, Bodo

    2015-04-01

    Two parameterisations for the dependence of the soil thermal conductivity on the soil water content are compared, using the multi-layer land surface scheme TERRA of the Consortium for Small-scale Modeling (COSMO) atmospheric model. The simulations were carried out in offline mode with identical atmospheric forcing data from the Meteorological Observatory Lindenberg of the German Meteorological Service (Deutscher Wetterdienst). The results show that the ground heat flux computed by the reference version of TERRA is systematically overestimated under dry conditions. In this version, the thermal conductivity does not depend on the simulated water content of the soil. Since the ground heat flux is part of the surface energy balance it affects the other components such as turbulent heat fluxes and surface temperature. An overestimation of the ground heat flux during daytime leads to an underestimation of the other surface fluxes and to a reduced surface warming, during afternoon and night this behaviour is reversed. The two formulations for soil thermal conductivity, presented by O. Johansen on the one hand and M. C. McCumber and R. A. Pielke on the other hand, both reduce the ground heat flux in TERRA under dry conditions, the former yielding good results while the latter is even leading to underestimations. In addition to this, the former is also applied in coupled mode in the climate version of the COSMO model, the COSMO-CLM, for Africa, resulting in improved diurnal cycles of near-surface temperature in dry regions. Furthermore, it is shown with the Lindenberg measurements that the soil temperature and hence the ground heat flux are particularly influenced by the effects of shading of the incoming solar radiation due to the vegetation cover, leading to a significantly reduced solar radiation at the sub-canopy land surface, even under a layer of grass. For future improvements of TERRA these effects should be represented.

  11. Spiral Galaxies Stripped Bare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-10-01

    Six spectacular spiral galaxies are seen in a clear new light in images from ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) at the Paranal Observatory in Chile. The pictures were taken in infrared light, using the impressive power of the HAWK-I camera, and will help astronomers understand how the remarkable spiral patterns in galaxies form and evolve. HAWK-I [1] is one of the newest and most powerful cameras on ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT). It is sensitive to infrared light, which means that much of the obscuring dust in the galaxies' spiral arms becomes transparent to its detectors. Compared to the earlier, and still much-used, VLT infrared camera ISAAC, HAWK-I has sixteen times as many pixels to cover a much larger area of sky in one shot and, by using newer technology than ISAAC, it has a greater sensitivity to faint infrared radiation [2]. Because HAWK-I can study galaxies stripped bare of the confusing effects of dust and glowing gas it is ideal for studying the vast numbers of stars that make up spiral arms. The six galaxies are part of a study of spiral structure led by Preben Grosbøl at ESO. These data were acquired to help understand the complex and subtle ways in which the stars in these systems form into such perfect spiral patterns. The first image shows NGC 5247, a spiral galaxy dominated by two huge arms, located 60-70 million light-years away. The galaxy lies face-on towards Earth, thus providing an excellent view of its pinwheel structure. It lies in the zodiacal constellation of Virgo (the Maiden). The galaxy in the second image is Messier 100, also known as NGC 4321, which was discovered in the 18th century. It is a fine example of a "grand design" spiral galaxy - a class of galaxies with very prominent and well-defined spiral arms. About 55 million light-years from Earth, Messier 100 is part of the Virgo Cluster of galaxies and lies in the constellation of Coma Berenices (Berenice's Hair, named after the ancient Egyptian queen Berenice II). The third

  12. Acquisition of Structure and Interpretation: Cases from Mandarin Bare and Non-Bare Noun Phrases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Hsiang-Hua

    2011-01-01

    Children's production of bare nominals is universal. When acquiring languages disallowing bare nominals, children will develop from the bare to the non-bare stage. However, Mandarin nominals may appear bare or non-bare in various positions with all kinds of interpretations. This dissertation conducts two acquisition studies to examine the…

  13. Robust bearing estimation for 3-component stations

    SciTech Connect

    CLAASSEN,JOHN P.

    2000-02-01

    A robust bearing estimation process for 3-component stations has been developed and explored. The method, called SEEC for Search, Estimate, Evaluate and Correct, intelligently exploits the inherent information in the arrival at every step of the process to achieve near-optimal results. In particular the approach uses a consistent framework to define the optimal time-frequency windows on which to make estimates, to make the bearing estimates themselves, to construct metrics helpful in choosing the better estimates or admitting that the bearing is immeasurable, and finally to apply bias corrections when calibration information is available to yield a single final estimate. The algorithm was applied to a small but challenging set of events in a seismically active region. It demonstrated remarkable utility by providing better estimates and insights than previously available. Various monitoring implications are noted from these findings.

  14. Robust Bearing Estimation for 3-Component Stations

    SciTech Connect

    Claassen, John P.

    1999-06-03

    A robust bearing estimation process for 3-component stations has been developed and explored. The method, called SEEC for Search, Estimate, Evaluate and Correct, intelligently exploits the in- herent information in the arrival at every step of the process to achieve near-optimal results. In particular, the approach uses a consistent framework to define the optimal time-frequency windows on which to make estimates, to make the bearing estimates themselves, to construct metrics helpful in choosing the better estimates or admitting that the bearing is immeasurable, andjinally to apply bias corrections when calibration information is available to yield a single final estimate. The method was applied to a small but challenging set of events in a seismically active region. The method demonstrated remarkable utility by providing better estimates and insights than previously available. Various monitoring implications are noted fiom these findings.

  15. Very Late Bare Metal Stent Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Soto Herrera, Mariana; Restrepo, José A.; Felipe Buitrago, Andrés; Gómez Mejía, Mabel; Díaz, Jesús H.

    2013-01-01

    Very late stent thrombosis is a rare and not-well-understood complication after bare metal stent implantation. It usually presents as an ST elevation acute coronary syndrome and it is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Pathophysiologic mechanisms are not well defined; nevertheless, recent studies have proposed a neoatherosclerotic process as the triggering mechanism. We present the case of a patient with bare metal very late stent thrombosis 12 years after implantation. PMID:24829831

  16. 30 CFR 57.12080 - Bare conductor guards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bare conductor guards. 57.12080 Section 57... Underground Only § 57.12080 Bare conductor guards. Trolley wires and bare power conductors shall be guarded at mantrip loading and unloading points, and at shaft stations. Where such trolley wires and bare...

  17. 30 CFR 57.12080 - Bare conductor guards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bare conductor guards. 57.12080 Section 57... Underground Only § 57.12080 Bare conductor guards. Trolley wires and bare power conductors shall be guarded at mantrip loading and unloading points, and at shaft stations. Where such trolley wires and bare...

  18. 30 CFR 57.12080 - Bare conductor guards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bare conductor guards. 57.12080 Section 57... Underground Only § 57.12080 Bare conductor guards. Trolley wires and bare power conductors shall be guarded at mantrip loading and unloading points, and at shaft stations. Where such trolley wires and bare...

  19. 30 CFR 57.12080 - Bare conductor guards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bare conductor guards. 57.12080 Section 57... Underground Only § 57.12080 Bare conductor guards. Trolley wires and bare power conductors shall be guarded at mantrip loading and unloading points, and at shaft stations. Where such trolley wires and bare...

  20. 30 CFR 57.12080 - Bare conductor guards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bare conductor guards. 57.12080 Section 57... Underground Only § 57.12080 Bare conductor guards. Trolley wires and bare power conductors shall be guarded at mantrip loading and unloading points, and at shaft stations. Where such trolley wires and bare...

  1. Diurnal emissivity dynamics in bare versus biocrusted sand dunes.

    PubMed

    Rozenstein, Offer; Agam, Nurit; Serio, Carmine; Masiello, Guido; Venafra, Sara; Achal, Stephen; Puckrin, Eldon; Karnieli, Arnon

    2015-02-15

    Land surface emissivity (LSE) in the thermal infrared depends mainly on the ground cover and on changes in soil moisture. The LSE is a critical variable that affects the prediction accuracy of geophysical models requiring land surface temperature as an input, highlighting the need for an accurate derivation of LSE. The primary aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that diurnal changes in emissivity, as detected from space, are larger for areas mostly covered by biocrusts (composed mainly of cyanobacteria) than for bare sand areas. The LSE dynamics were monitored from geostationary orbit by the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) over a sand dune field in a coastal desert region extending across both sides of the Israel-Egypt political borderline. Different land-use practices by the two countries have resulted in exposed, active sand dunes on the Egyptian side (Sinai), and dunes stabilized by biocrusts on the Israeli side (Negev). Since biocrusts adsorb more moisture from the atmosphere than bare sand does, and LSE is affected by the soil moisture, diurnal fluctuations in LSE were larger for the crusted dunes in the 8.7 μm channel. This phenomenon is attributed to water vapor adsorption by the sand/biocrust particles. The results indicate that LSE is sensitive to minor changes in soil water content caused by water vapor adsorption and can, therefore, serve as a tool for quantifying this effect, which has a large spatial impact. As biocrusts cover vast regions in deserts worldwide, this discovery has repercussions for LSE estimations in deserts around the globe, and these LSE variations can potentially have considerable effects on geophysical models from local to regional scales. PMID:25437760

  2. Diurnal emissivity dynamics in bare versus biocrusted sand dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozenstein, O.

    2015-12-01

    Land surface emissivity (LSE) in the thermal infrared depends mainly on the ground cover and on changes in soil moisture. The LSE is a critical variable that affects the prediction accuracy of geophysical models requiring land surface temperature as an input, highlighting the need for an accurate derivation of LSE. The primary aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that diurnal changes in emissivity, as detected from space, are larger for areas mostly covered by biocrusts (composed mainly of cyanobacteria) than for bare sand areas. The LSE dynamics were monitored from geostationary orbit by the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) over a sand dune field in a coastal desert region extending across both sides of the Israel-Egypt political borderline. Different land-use practices by the two countries have resulted in exposed, active sand dunes on the Egyptian side (Sinai), and dunes stabilized by biocrusts on the Israeli side (Negev). Since biocrusts adsorb more moisture from the atmosphere than bare sand does, and LSE is affected by the soil moisture, diurnal fluctuations in LSE were larger for the crusted dunes in the 8.7 μm channel. This phenomenon is attributed to water vapor adsorption by the sand / biocrust particles. The results indicate that LSE is sensitive to minor changes in soil water content caused by water vapor adsorption and can, therefore, serve as a tool for quantifying this effect, which has a large spatial impact. As biocrusts cover vast regions in deserts worldwide, this discovery has repercussions for LSE estimations in deserts around the globe, and these LSE variations can potentially have considerable effects on geophysical models from local to regional scales.

  3. Bare metal stenting of the iliac arteries.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tanner I; Schneider, Peter A

    2016-06-01

    A significant subset of patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) has iliac artery involvement that requires treatment. The development of bare metal stents has improved the short- and long-term outcomes of endovascular repair and has become first line therapy. Open surgical bypass has been reserved for extremely complex anatomic morphologies or endovascular failures. It is unclear whether primary stenting is superior to angioplasty with provisional stenting but if angioplasty is used alone, it is likely only appropriate for the most focal lesions. Self-expanding and balloon-expandable stents have unique characteristics that are suitable to different lesion morphologies. Both stent-types have demonstrated similar outcomes. Herein, we review the practice and results of bare metal stents in the iliac arteries. PMID:27035892

  4. Water Accommodation on Bare and Coated Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiangrui

    2015-04-01

    A good understanding of water accommodation on ice surfaces is essential for quantitatively predicting the evolution of clouds, and therefore influences the effectiveness of climate models. However, the accommodation coefficient is poorly constrained within the literature where reported values vary by up to three orders of magnitude. In addition, the complexity of the chemical composition of the atmosphere plays an important role in ice phase behavior and dynamics. We employ an environmental molecular beam (EMB) technique to investigate molecular water interactions with bare and impurity coated ice at temperatures from 170 K to 200 K. In this work, we summarize results of water accommodation experiments on bare ice (Kong et al., 2014) and on ice coated by methanol (Thomson et al., 2013), butanol (Thomson et al., 2013) and acetic acid (Papagiannakopoulos et al., 2014), and compare those results with analogous experiments using hexanol and nitric acid coatings. Hexanol is chosen as a complementary chain alcohol to methanol and butanol, while nitric acid is a common inorganic compound in the atmosphere. The results show a strong negative temperature dependence of water accommodation on bare ice, which can be quantitatively described by a precursor model. Acidic adlayers tend to enhance water uptake indicating that the system kinetics are thoroughly changed compared to bare ice. Adsorbed alcohols influence the temperature dependence of the accommodation coefficient and water molecules generally spend less time on the surfaces before desorbing, although the measured accommodation coefficients remain high and comparable to bare ice for the investigated systems. We conclude that impurities can either enhance or restrict water uptake in ways that are influenced by several factors including temperature and type of adsorbant, with potential implications for the description of ice particle growth in the atmosphere. This work was supported by the Swedish Research Council and

  5. 30 CFR 57.12012 - Bare signal wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bare signal wires. 57.12012 Section 57.12012 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... and Underground § 57.12012 Bare signal wires. The potential on bare signal wires accessible to...

  6. 30 CFR 57.12012 - Bare signal wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bare signal wires. 57.12012 Section 57.12012 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... and Underground § 57.12012 Bare signal wires. The potential on bare signal wires accessible to...

  7. 30 CFR 57.12012 - Bare signal wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bare signal wires. 57.12012 Section 57.12012 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... and Underground § 57.12012 Bare signal wires. The potential on bare signal wires accessible to...

  8. Bare PCB test method based on AI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Aihua; Zhou, Huiyang; Wan, Nianhong; Qu, Liangsheng

    1995-08-01

    The shortcomings of conventional methods used for developing test sets on current automated printed circuit board (PCB) test machines consist of overlooking the information from CAD, historical test data, and the experts' knowledge. Thus, the generated test sets and proposed test sequence may be sub-optimal and inefficient. This paper presents a weighting bare PCB test method based on analysis and utilization of the CAD information. AI technique is applied for faults statistics and faults identification. Also, the generation of test sets and the planning of test procedure are discussed. A faster and more efficient test system is achieved.

  9. Stereo viewing 3-component, planar PIV utilizing fuzzy inference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.

    1996-01-01

    An all electronic 3-D Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV) system has been developed for use in high velocity (supersonic) flows. Two high resolution CCD cameras mounted in a stereo viewing configuration are used to determine the out-of-plane velocity component from the difference of the in-plane velocity measurements. Double exposure image frames are acquired and Fuzzy inference techniques are used to maximize the validity of the velocity estimates obtained from the auto-correlation analysis. The CCD cameras are tilted relative to their respective lens axes to satisfy Scheimpflug's condition. Tilting the camera film plane ensures that the entire image plane is in focus. Perspective distortion still results, but can be corrected by proper calibration of the optical system. A calibration fixture is used to determine the experimental setup parameters and to assess the accuracy to which the z-plane displacements can be estimated. The details of the calibration fixture and procedure are discussed in the text. A pair of pulsed Nd:YAG lasers operating at 532 nm are used to illuminate the seeded flow from a convergent nozzle operated in an underexpanded condition. The light sheet was oriented perpendicular to the nozzle flow, yielding planar cross-sections of the 3-component velocity field at several axial stations. The key features of the supersonic jet are readily observed in the cross-plane vector plots.

  10. Locating Local Earthquakes Using Single 3-Component Broadband Seismological Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, S. B.; Mitra, S.

    2015-12-01

    We devised a technique to locate local earthquakes using single 3-component broadband seismograph and analyze the factors governing the accuracy of our result. The need for devising such a technique arises in regions of sparse seismic network. In state-of-the-art location algorithms, a minimum of three station recordings are required for obtaining well resolved locations. However, the problem arises when an event is recorded by less than three stations. This may be because of the following reasons: (a) down time of stations in a sparse network; (b) geographically isolated regions with limited logistic support to setup large network; (c) regions of insufficient economy for financing multi-station network and (d) poor signal-to-noise ratio for smaller events at most stations, except the one in its closest vicinity. Our technique provides a workable solution to the above problematic scenarios. However, our methodology is strongly dependent on the velocity model of the region. Our method uses a three step processing: (a) ascertain the back-azimuth of the event from the P-wave particle motion recorded on the horizontal components; (b) estimate the hypocentral distance using the S-P time; and (c) ascertain the emergent angle from the vertical and radial components. Once this is obtained, one can ray-trace through the 1-D velocity model to estimate the hypocentral location. We test our method on synthetic data, which produces results with 99% precision. With observed data, the accuracy of our results are very encouraging. The precision of our results depend on the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and choice of the right band-pass filter to isolate the P-wave signal. We used our method on minor aftershocks (3 < mb < 4) of the 2011 Sikkim earthquake using data from the Sikkim Himalayan network. Location of these events highlight the transverse strike-slip structure within the Indian plate, which was observed from source mechanism study of the mainshock and larger aftershocks.

  11. The effect of the dynamic surface bareness on dust source function, emission, and distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dongchul; Chin, Mian; Bian, Huisheng; Tan, Qian; Brown, Molly E.; Zheng, Tai; You, Renjie; Diehl, Tomas; Ginoux, Paul; Kucsera, Tom

    2013-01-01

    In this study we report the development of a time dependency of global dust source and its impact on dust simulation in the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model. We determine the surface bareness using the 8 km normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) observed from the advanced very high resolution radiometer satellite. The results are used to analyze the temporal variations of surface bareness in 22 global dust source regions. One half of these regions can be considered permanent dust source regions where NDVI is always less than 0.15, while the other half shows substantial seasonality of NDVI. This NDVI-based surface bareness map is then used, along with the soil and topographic characteristics, to construct a dynamic dust source function for simulating dust emissions with the GOCART model. We divide the 22 dust source regions into three groups of (I) permanent desert, (II) seasonally changing bareness that regulates dust emissions, and (III) seasonally changing bareness that has little effect on dust emission. Compared with the GOCART results with the previously employed static dust source function, the simulation with the new dynamic source function shows significant improvements in category II regions. Even though the global improvement of the aerosol optical depth (AOD) is rather small when compared with satellite and ground-based remote sensing observations, we found a clear and significant effect of the new dust source on seasonal variation of dust emission and dust optical depth near the source regions. Globally, we have found that the permanent bare land contributes to 88% of the total dust emission, whereas the grassland and cultivated crops land contribute to about 12%. Our results suggest the potential of using NDVI over a vegetated area to link the dust emission with land cover and land use change for air quality and climate change studies.

  12. Natural Suppression of Rhizoctonia Bare Patch in a Long-Term No-Till Cropping Systems Experiment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The soil-borne fungus Rhizoctonia solani AG-8 is a major concern for farmers who practice no-till in the inland Pacific Northwest, USA. Bare patches caused by Rhizoctonia first appeared in 1999 during year 3 of a 15-year no-till cropping systems experiment near Ritzville, WA (269 mm annual precipit...

  13. Fire testing of bare uranium hexafluoride cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Pryor, W.A.

    1991-12-31

    In 1965, the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP), now the K-25 Site, conducted a series of tests in which bare cylinders of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) were exposed to engulfing oil fires for the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), now the US Department of Energy (DOE). The tests are described and the results, conclusions, and observations are presented. Two each of the following types of cylinders were tested: 3.5-in.-diam {times} 7.5-in.-long cylinders of Monel (Harshaw), 5.0-in.-diam {times} x 30-in.-long cylinders of Monel, and 8-in.-diam {times} 48-in.-long cylinders of nickel. The cylinders were filled approximately to the standard UF{sub 6} fill limits of 5, 55, and 250 lb, respectively, with a U-235 content of 0.22%. The 5-in.- and 8-in.-diam cylinders were tested individually with and without their metal valve covers. For the 3.5-in.-diam Harshaw cylinders and the 5.0-in.-diam cylinder without a valve cover, the valves failed and UF{sub 6} was released. The remaining 6 cylinders ruptured explosively in time intervals ranging from about 8.5 to 11 min.

  14. Fire testing of bare uranium hexafluoride cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Pryor, W.A.

    1991-12-31

    In 1965, the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP), now the K-25 Site, conducted a series of tests in which bare cylinders of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) were exposed to engulfing oil fires for the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), now the US Department of Energy (DOE). The tests are described and the results, conclusions, and observations are presented. Two each of the following types of cylinders were tested: 3.5-in.-diam {times} 7.5-in.-long cylinders of Monel (Harshaw), 5.0-in.-diam {times} 30-in.-long cylinders of Monel, and 8-in.-diam {times} 48-in.-long cylinders of nickel. The cylinders were filled approximately to the standard UF{sub 6} fill limits of 5, 55, and 250 lb, respectively, with a U-235 content of 0.22%. The 5-in.- and 8-in.-diam cylinders were tested individually with and without their metal valve covers. For the 3.5-in.-diam Harshaw cylinders and the 5.0-in.-diam cylinder without a valve cover the valves failed and UF{sub 6} was released. The remaining cylinders ruptured explosively in time intervals ranging from about 8.5 to 11 min.

  15. The Semantics of Proper Names and Other Bare Nominals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Izumi, Yu

    2012-01-01

    This research proposes a unified approach to the semantics of the so-called bare nominals, which include proper names (e.g., "Mary"), mass and plural terms (e.g., "water," "cats"), and articleless noun phrases in Japanese. I argue that bare nominals themselves are monadic predicates applicable to more than one…

  16. Reduction of Rhizoctonia bare patch win wheat with barley rotations.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia bare patch caused by Rhizoctonia solani AG-8 is a major fungal root disease in no-till cropping systems. In an 8-year experiment comparing various dryland no-till cropping systems near Ritzville, Washington, Rhizoctonia bare patch first appeared in year 3 and continued through year 8. ...

  17. Runoff and Sediment Delivery from Bare and Graveled Forest Road Approaches to Stream Crossings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, K. R.; McGuire, K. J.; Aust, W. M.

    2012-12-01

    Forested watersheds are typically associated with high quality water yield, yet forest roads and trails can adversely impact water quality draining forested watersheds. Increased stream sedimentation from forest road stream crossings often represents the most significant water quality threat associated with forestry operations. Quantification of sediment delivery rates is essential for the prescription of Best Management Practices (BMPs) that adequately address forest road stormwater runoff. Two different field experiments were implemented in the Virginia Piedmont to achieve the objectives of quantifying sediment delivery from forest roads where the road meets the stream (the road approach) and evaluating the sediment reduction efficacy of partially graveling road approaches. A forest operational experiment that included sediment traps and differential leveling was used to measure sediment delivery from five bare and four fully graveled road approaches for one year (August 2011 through July 2012). Rainfall simulation experiments were performed on six additional approaches to measure stormwater runoff volume, infiltration, and sediment delivery for 10 to 50-minute rain events with rainfall recurrence intervals of < 1 to 5-year return periods. Rainfall simulations were performed on newly-reopened bare approaches, with subsequent simulations on partially graveled approaches. The sediment trap study provides annual sediment delivery rates for bare and fully graveled road approaches. The rainfall simulation experiments characterize sediment delivery during storm events and provide an evaluation of different levels of Best Management Practice (BMP) implementation (i.e. ¼ to full gravel coverage) to minimize sediment inputs from road approaches. Sediment delivery from both experiments was related to rainfall amount, timing, and intensity, as well as road approach characteristics such as length, slope, and percentage of bare soil through stepwise multiple regression

  18. Resolving the anomaly of bare habitable ground in Daisyworld

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hankin, Robin K. S.; Mitchell, Neil

    2011-02-01

    The parable of Daisyworld places biological homeostasis on a non-teleological basis. However, one feature of Daisyworld is that, at equilibrium, the system appears to require habitable but bare ground. The presence of bare ground is an unavoidable consequence of the death rate parameter γ. Here, we simplify Watson and Lovelock's original formulation by removing γ and allowing instead the black and white daisies to infiltrate each others' territory. This device furnishes a model in which the area of bare ground asymptotically approaches zero. The infiltration process is modelled in terms of a parameter that is ecologically interpretable as a quantification of the incumbent advantage enjoyed by the dominant species.

  19. Corrosion of Bare and Galvanized Mild Steel in Arabian Gulf Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saricimen, H.; Ahmad, A.; Quddus, A.; Aksakal, A.; Ul-Hamid, A.; Siddique, T. A.

    2010-10-01

    Corrosion performance of bare and galvanized mild steel in atmospheric, soil and splash zone exposure conditions was evaluated at a Khaleej Mardumah test station (KMTS) in Jubail Industrial City (JIC) located at Arabian Gulf coast. The samples were exposed for a period of 15 months. During the exposure, the environmental conditions were periodically monitored by analysis of air, soil, groundwater, and seawater samples. The corroded mild steel and galvanized steel samples were examined by SEM, XRD and XRF to identify the corrosion products and study their surface morphology. Weight loss method was employed to determine the corrosion rates. The experimental results showed that intense temperature and humidity variations as well as high chloride and sulfate concentrations in the region result in severe corrosion of bare mild steel especially under the splash zone conditions. A comparison with the corrosion data for other parts of the world shows that atmospheric and soil environments at the selected test site are significantly corrosive to mild steel. The splash zone, on the other hand, is much more corrosive to mild and galvanized steel than the other parts of the world.

  20. 38. BARED MASONRY WALL USED TO FASTEN CLAPBOARDS. THE WOODEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. BARED MASONRY WALL USED TO FASTEN CLAPBOARDS. THE WOODEN VERTICAL MEMBER IS A STUD. THE WOODEN BLOCK IS A MORTISE-AND-TENON JOINT. - Andalusia, State Road vicinity (Bensalem Township), Andalusia, Bucks County, PA

  1. 5. American elevator looking east barely visible behind American malt ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. American elevator looking east barely visible behind American malt house with Russell-Miller flour mill to right (now Eonacara and idle). - American Elevator, 87 Childs Street, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

  2. Chernozem aggregate waterstability loss investigation in a long-term bare fallow experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilyeva, N. A.; Milanovskiy, E. Y.

    2009-04-01

    The research is focused on mechanisms of aggregate waterstability controlled by soil organic matter (SOM). The objects of the research are two contrast variants of typical chernozem - under native grassland and under a 60-year bare fallow experimental plot (100 m2) on the territory of Central Chernozem Biosphere Reserve, Russia. Seasonal plowing and deficiency of fresh plant residues (due to weeding out) resulted in a rapid mineralization of SOM. The Corg content in the 0-20 cm topsoil under native grassland is 6-4.5 %. For the last two decades Corg content under bare fallow has stabilized on the 2.6% level and is therefore assumed to represent stable SOM pool. However excellent aggregate waterstability of chernozem is completely lost under bare fallow. Therefore the aim of our study is to reveal the role of different SOM pools spatial and functional organization in aggregate waterstability formation. Bulk soil samples were collected from 2 m grassland profile and 1.5 m bare fallow profile with 10 cm interval and simultaneous measurements of soil field density and moisture. Following samples were analysed: bulk samples, dry and wet-sieving aggregates, undisturbed and pulverized aggregates, granule-densimetric fractions obtained by sedimentation of bulk samples (clay 5 mkm) with following densimetric fractionation in bromoform (light ? 2.4 g/cm3), and above mentioned samples after removal of SOM by hydrogen peroxide. Isolation of aggregates and granule-densimetric fractionation were carried out for bulk soils at 0-20, 40-50 and 80-90 cm depth. We use elemental analysis (C, H, N), size exclusion and hydrophobic interaction chromatography of humic substances (HS), laser diffraction particle size analysis, specific surface area (SSA) measurements by nitrogen adsorption and micromorphological examination of thin sections. Detailed characteristics obtained for aggregates and granule-densimetric fractions from a typical chernozem soil under native grassland and under 60

  3. Effect of soil hydraulic properties on the relationship between soil moisture variability and its mean value

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of soil moisture and its variability is needed for many environmental applications. We analyzed dependencies of soil moisture variability on average soil moisture contents in bare soils using ensembles of non-stationary water flow simulations by varying soil hydraulic properties under diff...

  4. Preliminary study of quaternary faulting on the east side of Bare Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Reheis, M.C.

    1986-12-31

    Active faults bound the east side of Bare Mountain. Geomorphic features, stratigraphy, and soil development indicate that two 3-km-long segments of the range-front fault probably last moved in Holocene or late Pleistocene time. Other segments of the fault have been quiescent since the late Pleistocene. Both late Pleistocene and Holocene deposits bury many faults east of the northern end of Bare Mountain. Two prospect pits on the range-front fault reveal evidence of recurrent late Quaternary movements. Both older and younger deposits in one pit are faulted, but fractures in the older unit do not extend up into the younger unit. Based on soil development, the older and younger fault episodes respectively are probably late Pleistocene and Holocene in age. Another pit shows carbonate-cemented fractures with slickensides in a late Pleistocene deposit, suggesting at least two late Pleistocene or Holocene fault movements. Middle to early Pleistocene and Tertiary deposits show evidence of recurrent faulting in many locations. Faults in these deposits are pervaded by secondary CaCO{sub 3} and silica that commonly exhibit slickensides.

  5. Development of a 'bare-earth' SRTM DEM product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Loughlin, Fiachra; Paiva, Rodrigo; Durand, Michael; Alsdorf, Douglas; Bates, Paul

    2015-04-01

    We present the methodology and results from the development of a near-global 'bare-earth' Digital Elevation Model (DEM) derived from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) data. Digital Elevation Models are the most important input for hydraulic modelling, as the DEM quality governs the accuracy of the model outputs. While SRTM is currently the best near-globally [60N to 60S] available DEM, it requires adjustments to reduce the vegetation contamination and make it useful for hydrodynamic modelling over heavily vegetated areas (e.g. tropical wetlands). Unlike previous methods of accounting for vegetation contamination, which concentrated on correcting relatively small areas and usually applied a static adjustment, we account for vegetation contamination globally and apply a spatial varying correction, based on information about canopy height and density. In creating the final 'bare-earth' SRTM DEM dataset, we produced three different 'bare-earth' SRTM products. The first applies global parameters, while the second and third products apply parameters that are regionalised based on either climatic zones or vegetation types, respectively. We also tested two different canopy density proxies of different spatial resolution. Using ground elevations obtained from the ICESat GLA14 satellite altimeter, we calculate the residual errors for the raw SRTM and the three 'bare-earth' SRTM products and compare performances. The three 'bare-earth' products all show large improvements over the raw SRTM in vegetated areas with the overall mean bias reduced by between 75 and 92% from 4.94 m to 0.40 m. The overall standard deviation is reduced by between 29 and 33 % from 7.12 m to 4.80 m. As expected, improvements are higher in areas with denser vegetation. The final 'bare-earth' SRTM dataset is available at 3 arc-second with lower vertical height errors and less noise than the original SRTM product.

  6. Microwave backscatter dependence on surface roughness, soil moisture, and soil texture. II - Vegetation-covered soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Bradley, G. A.; Dobson, M. C.

    1979-01-01

    Results are presented for an experimental investigation to determine the relationship between radar backscatter coefficient (sigma) and soil moisture for vegetation-covered soil. These results extend a previous report which showed the experimental relationship between sigma and soil moisture for bare soil. It is shown that the highest correlation between sigma and soil moisture is 0.92 for the combined response of four crop types measured at 4.25 GHz, 10 deg incidence angle, and HH polarization. Radar look direction, relative to the crop row direction, is shown to have an insignificant effect on soil-moisture estimation if the radar frequency is higher than 4 GHz. The dependence on soil type can be minimized by expressing soil moisture in units of percent of field capacity. The possibility of using a single radar for measuring soil moisture for both bare and vegetated fields is demonstrated with a linear estimation algorithm having an experimental correlation coefficinet of 0.8.

  7. 30 CFR 56.12012 - Bare signal wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bare signal wires. 56.12012 Section 56.12012 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity §...

  8. 30 CFR 56.12012 - Bare signal wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bare signal wires. 56.12012 Section 56.12012 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity §...

  9. 30 CFR 57.12012 - Bare signal wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bare signal wires. 57.12012 Section 57.12012 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity...

  10. 30 CFR 56.12012 - Bare signal wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bare signal wires. 56.12012 Section 56.12012 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity §...

  11. 30 CFR 56.12012 - Bare signal wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bare signal wires. 56.12012 Section 56.12012 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity §...

  12. 30 CFR 56.12012 - Bare signal wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bare signal wires. 56.12012 Section 56.12012 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity §...

  13. 30 CFR 57.12012 - Bare signal wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bare signal wires. 57.12012 Section 57.12012 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity...

  14. Evaluation of Bare Ground on Rangelands using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Robert P. Breckenridge; Maxine Dakins

    2011-01-01

    Attention is currently being given to methods that assess the ecological condition of rangelands throughout the United States. There are a number of different indicators that assess ecological condition of rangelands. Bare Ground is being considered by a number of agencies and resource specialists as a lead indicator that can be evaluated over a broad area. Traditional methods of measuring bare ground rely on field technicians collecting data along a line transect or from a plot. Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) provide an alternative to collecting field data, can monitor a large area in a relative short period of time, and in many cases can enhance safety and time required to collect data. In this study, both fixed wing and helicopter UAVs were used to measure bare ground in a sagebrush steppe ecosystem. The data were collected with digital imagery and read using the image analysis software SamplePoint. The approach was tested over seven different plots and compared against traditional field methods to evaluate accuracy for assessing bare ground. The field plots were located on the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) site west of Idaho Falls, Idaho in locations where there is very little disturbance by humans and the area is grazed only by wildlife. The comparison of fixed-wing and helicopter UAV technology against field estimates shows good agreement for the measurement of bare ground. This study shows that if a high degree of detail and data accuracy is desired, then a helicopter UAV may be a good platform. If the data collection objective is to assess broad-scale landscape level changes, then the collection of imagery with a fixed-wing system is probably more appropriate.

  15. Residual herbicide dissipation for bare soil versus soil under low density polyethylene mulch

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yellow nutsedge and purple nutsedge are the most common and troublesome vegetable weeds in the Southern US. Herbicides in low density polyethylene (LDPE) mulch systems are potential methyl bromide alternatives for nutsedge control. Halosulfuron-methyl, sulfentrazone, and s-metolachlor all have nutse...

  16. Assembling Bare Au Nanoparticles at Positively Charged Templates

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenjie; Zhang, Honghu; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Mallapragada, Surya; Vaknin, David

    2016-01-01

    In-situ X-ray reflectivity (XRR) and grazing incidence X-ray small-angle scattering (GISAXS) reveal that unfunctionalized (bare) gold nanoparticles (AuNP) spontaneously adsorb to a cationic lipid template formed by a Langmuir monolayer of DPTAP (1,2-dihexadecanoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane) at vapor/aqueous interfaces. Analysis of the XRR yields the electron density profile across the charged-interfaces along the surface normal showing the AuNPs assemble with vertical thickness comparable to the particle size. The GISAXS analysis indicates that the adsorbed mono-particle layer exhibits short-range in-plane correlations. By contrast, single-stranded DNA-functionalized AuNPs, while attracted to the positively charged surface (more efficiently with the addition of salt to the solution), display less in-plane regular packing compared to bare AuNPs. PMID:27225047

  17. Evaluation of cover effects on bare stent mechanical response.

    PubMed

    McGrath, D J; O'Brien, B; Bruzzi, M; Kelly, N; Clauser, J; Steinseifer, U; McHugh, P E

    2016-08-01

    Covered tracheobronchial stents are used to prevent tumour growth from reoccluding the airways. In the present work a combination of experimental and computational methods are used to present the mechanical effects that adhered covers can have on stent performance. A prototype tracheobronchial stent is characterised in bare and covered configurations using radial force, flat plate and a novel non-uniform radial force test, while computational modelling is performed in parallel to extensively inform the physical testing. Results of the study show that cover configuration can have a significant structural effect on stent performance, and that stent response (bare or covered) is especially loading specific, highlighting that the loading configuration that a stent is about to be subjected to should be considered before stent implantation. PMID:27140523

  18. Low cost bare-plate solar air collector

    SciTech Connect

    Maag, W.L.; Wenzler, C.J.; Rom, F.E.; VanArsdale, D.R.

    1980-09-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop a low cost, bare-plate collector, determine its performance for a variety of climatic conditions, analyze the economics of this type of solar collector and evaluate specific applications. Two prototype collectors were designed, fabricated and installed into an instrumented test system. Tests were conducted for a period of five months. Results of the tests showed consistent operating efficiencies of 60% or greater with air preheat temperature uses up to 20/sup 0/F for one of the prototypes. The economic analyses indicated that an installed cost of between $5 and $10 per square foot would make this type of solar system economically viable. For the materials of construction and the type of fabrication and installation perceived, these costs for the bare-plate solar collector are believed to be attainable. Specific applications for preheating ventilation air for schools were evaluated and judged to be economically viable.

  19. Assembling Bare Au Nanoparticles at Positively Charged Templates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenjie; Zhang, Honghu; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Mallapragada, Surya; Vaknin, David

    2016-01-01

    In-situ X-ray reflectivity (XRR) and grazing incidence X-ray small-angle scattering (GISAXS) reveal that unfunctionalized (bare) gold nanoparticles (AuNP) spontaneously adsorb to a cationic lipid template formed by a Langmuir monolayer of DPTAP (1,2-dihexadecanoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane) at vapor/aqueous interfaces. Analysis of the XRR yields the electron density profile across the charged-interfaces along the surface normal showing the AuNPs assemble with vertical thickness comparable to the particle size. The GISAXS analysis indicates that the adsorbed mono-particle layer exhibits short-range in-plane correlations. By contrast, single-stranded DNA-functionalized AuNPs, while attracted to the positively charged surface (more efficiently with the addition of salt to the solution), display less in-plane regular packing compared to bare AuNPs. PMID:27225047

  20. Assembling Bare Au Nanoparticles at Positively Charged Templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenjie; Zhang, Honghu; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Mallapragada, Surya; Vaknin, David

    2016-05-01

    In-situ X-ray reflectivity (XRR) and grazing incidence X-ray small-angle scattering (GISAXS) reveal that unfunctionalized (bare) gold nanoparticles (AuNP) spontaneously adsorb to a cationic lipid template formed by a Langmuir monolayer of DPTAP (1,2-dihexadecanoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane) at vapor/aqueous interfaces. Analysis of the XRR yields the electron density profile across the charged-interfaces along the surface normal showing the AuNPs assemble with vertical thickness comparable to the particle size. The GISAXS analysis indicates that the adsorbed mono-particle layer exhibits short-range in-plane correlations. By contrast, single-stranded DNA-functionalized AuNPs, while attracted to the positively charged surface (more efficiently with the addition of salt to the solution), display less in-plane regular packing compared to bare AuNPs.

  1. Geological map of Bare Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Monsen, S.A.; Carr, M.D.; Reheis, M.C.; Orkild, P.P.

    1992-12-31

    Bare Mountain comprises the isolated complex of mountain peaks southeast of the town of Beatty in southern Nye County, Nevada. This small mountain range lies between the alluvial basins of Crater Flat to the east and the northern Amargosa Desert to the southwest. The northern boundary of the range is less well defined, but for this report, the terrane of faulted Miocene volcanic rocks underlying Beatty Mountain and the unnamed hills to the east are considered to be the northernmost part of Bare Mountain. The southern tip of the mountain range is at Black Marble, the isolated hill at the southeast corner of the map. The main body of the range, between Fluorspar Canyon and Black Marble, is a folded and complexly faulted, but generally northward-dipping (or southward-dipping and northward-overturned), sequence of weakly to moderately metamorphosed upper Proterozoic and Paleozoic marine strata, mostly miogeoclinal (continental shelf) rocks. The geology of Bare Mountain is mapped at a scale of 1:24,000.

  2. Bare magnetic nanoparticles as fluorescence quenchers for detection of thrombin.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiemiao; Yang, Liangrong; Liang, Xiangfeng; Dong, Tingting; Liu, Huizhou

    2015-06-21

    Rapid and sensitive detection of thrombin has very important significance in clinical diagnosis. In this work, bare magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (magnetic nanoparticles) without any modification were used as fluorescence quenchers. In the absence of thrombin, a fluorescent dye (CY3) labeled thrombin aptamer (named CY3-aptamer) was adsorbed on the surface of magnetic nanoparticles through interaction between a phosphate backbone of the CY3-aptamer and hydroxyl groups on the bare magnetic nanoparticles in binding solution, leading to fluorescence quenching. Once thrombin was introduced, the CY3-aptamer formed a G-quartet structure and combined with thrombin, which resulted in the CY3-aptamer being separated from the magnetic nanoparticles and restoration of fluorescence. This proposed assay took advantage of binding affinity between the CY3-aptamer and thrombin for specificity, and bare magnetic nanoparticles for fluorescence quenching. The fluorescence signal had a good linear relationship with thrombin concentration in the range of 1-60 nM, and the limit of detection for thrombin was estimated as low as 0.5 nM. Furthermore, this method could be applied for other target detection using the corresponding fluorescence labeled aptamer. PMID:25894923

  3. Nitrogen controls spatial and temporal variability of substrate-induced respiration within seven years of bare fallow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Nele; Bornemann, Ludger; Welp, Gerhard; Amelung, Wulf

    2015-04-01

    Bare fallow management goes along with lacking supply of new C sources; yet, little is known on the spatio-temporal controls of microbial adaptation processes. Here we hypothesized that microbial activity parameters decline upon bare fallow but that their spatial patterns are increasingly controlled by nutrient status as fallow management proceeds. To test these hypotheses, we investigated spatial and temporal patterns of substrate-induced respiration (SIR) and basal respiration curves in an arable field after 1, 3, and 7 years of bare fallow but with large within-field heterogeneity of physicochemical soil parameters. The analyses comprised the contents of SOC, mineral nitrogen (Nmin), particulate organic matter (POM), texture of the fine earth, and the proportion of rock fragments as well as basal respiration and several SIR fitting parameters (microbial biomass, microbial growth rates, peak respiration rates, cumulative CO2 release) each with and without additions of mineral N and P. We also repeated substrate (i.e. glucose) additions following the first SIR measurement. The results revealed that most respiration parameters like basal respiration, microbial biomass, and growth rates showed no or inconsistent responses to spatial and temporal patterns of basic soil properties like SOC, Nmin or texture. However, bare fallow changed the shape of the SIR curves; it developed two distinct microbial growth peaks at advanced stages of fallow, i.e. a delayed CO2 release. Likewise, the maximum respiration rate during the first growth phase declined during 7 years of fallow by 47% but its spatial distribution was always correlated with Nmin contents (r = 0.43 - 0.79). The nutrient additions suggested that these changes in SIR curves were caused by N deficiency; the first peak increased after N additions while the second growth phase diminished. Intriguingly, a repeated glucose addition had a similar effect on the SIR curves as the glucose+N addition. Thus, N deficiency

  4. Radiometric measurements over bare and vegetated fields at 1.4 GHz and 5 GHz frequencies. [Beltsville Agricultural Research Center, Maryland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. R.; Mcmurtrey, J. E., III; Engman, E. T.; Jackson, T. J.; Schmugge, T. J.; Gould, W. I.; Glazar, W. S.; Fuchs, J. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    Microwave emission from bare and vegetated fields was measured with dual polarized radiometers at 1.4 GHz and 5 GHz frequencies. The measured brightness temperatures over bare fields are shown to compare favorably with those calculated from radiative transfer theory with two constant parameters characterizing surface roughness effect. The presence of vegetation cover is found to reduce the sensitivity to soil moisture variation. This sensitivity reduction is generally pronounced the denser, the vegetation cover and the higher the frequency of observation. The effect of vegetation cover is also examined with respect to the measured polarization factor at both frequencies. With the exception of dry corn fields, the measured polarization factor over vegetated fields is found appreciably reduced compared to that over bare fields. A much larger reduction in this factor is found at 5GHz than at 1.4GHz frequency.

  5. Meta-analytic review of P3 components in posttraumatic stress disorder and their clinical utility.

    PubMed

    Johnson, J D; Allana, T N; Medlin, M D; Harris, E W; Karl, A

    2013-04-01

    Patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) exhibiting disturbances in information processing, including trouble with attention, were studied. Event-related potentials (ERPs)-specifically, the P3 components (P3a, P3b, and P3 working memory {P3wm})-provide an objective, non-invasive, and cost-effective method for evaluating such disturbances. We evaluated the potential clinical utility of P3 components by examining the differences between PTSD and several control groups: normal participants, non-PTSD patients with trauma, and medicated patients with PTSD. We performed a meta-analysis of the ERP literature between 1990 and 2010 using a random effects model. P3a amplitude was larger in patients with PTSD compared to non-PTSD patients having trauma in the context of trauma-related distracters. P3b amplitude was also larger in patients with PTSD than in patients having trauma without PTSD, but in the context of trauma-related stimuli. P3b amplitude was smaller in patients with PTSD compared to normal controls in the context of neutral stimuli. P3wm signals were smaller with shorter latencies in patients with PTSD compared to normal controls or medicated patients with PTSD. The receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) analysis revealed that each P3 component had some potential to accurately classify patients, typically using amplitude for at least one lead. In conclusion, differences in P3 amplitude and latency between patients with PTSD and control patients confirm the results of Karl et al and extend our understanding of P3 as a neural correlate of working memory. These results further provide guidance on the potential design of future clinical trials supporting the development of P3 components as a PTSD diagnostic aid. PMID:23545246

  6. Supersonic Bare Metal Cluster Beams. Technical Progress Report, March 16, 1984 - April 1, 1985

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Smalley, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    There have been four major areas of concentration for the study of bare metal cluster beams: neutral cluster, chemical reactivity, cold cluster ion source development (both positive and negative), bare cluster ion ICR (ion cyclotron resonance) development, and photofragmentation studies of bare metal cluster ions.

  7. 30 CFR 75.517-2 - Plans for insulation of existing bare power wires and cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Plans for insulation of existing bare power... Equipment-General § 75.517-2 Plans for insulation of existing bare power wires and cables. (a) On or before December 31, 1970, plans for the insulation of existing bare power wires and cables installed prior...

  8. 30 CFR 75.517-2 - Plans for insulation of existing bare power wires and cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Plans for insulation of existing bare power... Equipment-General § 75.517-2 Plans for insulation of existing bare power wires and cables. (a) On or before December 31, 1970, plans for the insulation of existing bare power wires and cables installed prior...

  9. 30 CFR 75.517-2 - Plans for insulation of existing bare power wires and cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Plans for insulation of existing bare power... Equipment-General § 75.517-2 Plans for insulation of existing bare power wires and cables. (a) On or before December 31, 1970, plans for the insulation of existing bare power wires and cables installed prior...

  10. 30 CFR 75.517-2 - Plans for insulation of existing bare power wires and cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Plans for insulation of existing bare power... Equipment-General § 75.517-2 Plans for insulation of existing bare power wires and cables. (a) On or before December 31, 1970, plans for the insulation of existing bare power wires and cables installed prior...

  11. 30 CFR 75.517-2 - Plans for insulation of existing bare power wires and cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Plans for insulation of existing bare power... Equipment-General § 75.517-2 Plans for insulation of existing bare power wires and cables. (a) On or before December 31, 1970, plans for the insulation of existing bare power wires and cables installed prior...

  12. 30 CFR 57.12066 - Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines. 57... MINES Electricity Surface Only § 57.12066 Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines. Where metallic tools or equipment can come in contact with trolley wires or bare powerlines, the lines shall be...

  13. 30 CFR 56.12066 - Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines. 56... Electricity § 56.12066 Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines. Where metallic tools or equipment can come in contact with trolley wires or bare powerlines, the lines shall be guarded or deenergized....

  14. 30 CFR 56.12066 - Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines. 56... Electricity § 56.12066 Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines. Where metallic tools or equipment can come in contact with trolley wires or bare powerlines, the lines shall be guarded or deenergized....

  15. 30 CFR 77.515 - Bare signal or control wires; voltage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bare signal or control wires; voltage. 77.515... COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 77.515 Bare signal or control wires; voltage. The voltage on bare signal or control wires accessible to personal contact shall not exceed 40 volts....

  16. 30 CFR 77.515 - Bare signal or control wires; voltage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bare signal or control wires; voltage. 77.515... COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 77.515 Bare signal or control wires; voltage. The voltage on bare signal or control wires accessible to personal contact shall not exceed 40 volts....

  17. 30 CFR 56.12066 - Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines. 56... Electricity § 56.12066 Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines. Where metallic tools or equipment can come in contact with trolley wires or bare powerlines, the lines shall be guarded or deenergized....

  18. 30 CFR 77.515 - Bare signal or control wires; voltage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bare signal or control wires; voltage. 77.515... COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 77.515 Bare signal or control wires; voltage. The voltage on bare signal or control wires accessible to personal contact shall not exceed 40 volts....

  19. 30 CFR 56.12066 - Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines. 56... Electricity § 56.12066 Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines. Where metallic tools or equipment can come in contact with trolley wires or bare powerlines, the lines shall be guarded or deenergized....

  20. 30 CFR 56.12066 - Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines. 56... Electricity § 56.12066 Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines. Where metallic tools or equipment can come in contact with trolley wires or bare powerlines, the lines shall be guarded or deenergized....

  1. 30 CFR 57.12066 - Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines. 57... MINES Electricity Surface Only § 57.12066 Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines. Where metallic tools or equipment can come in contact with trolley wires or bare powerlines, the lines shall be...

  2. 30 CFR 77.515 - Bare signal or control wires; voltage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bare signal or control wires; voltage. 77.515... COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 77.515 Bare signal or control wires; voltage. The voltage on bare signal or control wires accessible to personal contact shall not exceed 40 volts....

  3. 30 CFR 57.12066 - Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines. 57... MINES Electricity Surface Only § 57.12066 Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines. Where metallic tools or equipment can come in contact with trolley wires or bare powerlines, the lines shall be...

  4. 30 CFR 77.515 - Bare signal or control wires; voltage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bare signal or control wires; voltage. 77.515... COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 77.515 Bare signal or control wires; voltage. The voltage on bare signal or control wires accessible to personal contact shall not exceed 40 volts....

  5. 30 CFR 57.12066 - Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines. 57... MINES Electricity Surface Only § 57.12066 Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines. Where metallic tools or equipment can come in contact with trolley wires or bare powerlines, the lines shall be...

  6. 30 CFR 57.12066 - Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines. 57... MINES Electricity Surface Only § 57.12066 Guarding trolley wires and bare powerlines. Where metallic tools or equipment can come in contact with trolley wires or bare powerlines, the lines shall be...

  7. Nanocrystal Inks without Ligands: Stable Colloids of Bare Germanium Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Holman, Zachary C.; Kortshagen, Uwe R.

    2011-05-11

    Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals typically have ligands attached to their surfaces that afford solubility in common solvents but hinder charge transport in nanocrystal films. Here, an alternative route is explored in which bare germanium nanocrystals are solubilized by select solvents to form stable colloids without the use of ligands. A survey of candidate solvents shows that germanium nanocrystals are completely solubilized by benzonitrile, likely because of electrostatic stabilization. Films cast from these dispersions are uniform, dense, and smooth, making them suitable for device applications without postdeposition treatment.

  8. Negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy of bare transition metal dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Beau J.

    This thesis contains gas phase negative ion photoelectron spectra of Mo2, MoV, CrCu, MoCu and Cu2. Spectra were taken with 488 nm and 514 nm light at a resolution of 4-5 meV. Information such as electron affinities, vibrational frequencies, anharmonicities and bond dissociation energies are reported for the ground and excited electronic states of both the anion and neutral species. Theoretical calculations at the density functional level are also reported for these species. Experiment and theory are used to analyze the bonding in these bare transition metal dimers.

  9. Bare-metal stent thrombosis two decades after stenting.

    PubMed

    Acibuca, Aynur; Gerede, Demet Menekse; Vurgun, Veysel Kutay

    2015-01-01

    Very late bare-metal stent (BMS) thrombosis is unusual in clinical practice. To the best of our knowledge, the latest that the thrombosis of a BMS has been reported is 14 years after implantation. Here, we describe a case of BMS thrombosis that occurred two decades after stenting. A 68-year-old male patient was admitted with acute anterior myocardial infarction. This patient had a history of BMS implantation in the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) 20 years previously. Immediate coronary angiography demonstrated acute thrombotic occlusion of the stent in the LAD. With this case, we are recording the latest reported incidence of BMS thrombosis after implantation. PMID:26407330

  10. Is Bare Band Description of Carrier Transport Appropriate in Pentacene?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, John D.; Giuggioli, Luca; Kenkre, V. M.

    2002-03-01

    Experiments on injected charges in pentacene single crystals reveal mobilities typical of inorganic semiconductors and temperature dependence (for T<430K) suggesting bandlike behavior.(J. H. Schon, C. Kloc, and B. Batlogg, Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 3843 (2001)) Polaronic bands, particularly their narrowing with increasing temperature, were invoked(V. M. Kenkre, John D. Andersen, D.H. Dunlap, and C.B. Duke, Phys. Rev. Lett. 62, 1165 (1989)) in the related naphthalene problem.(L. B. Schein, C. B. Duke, and A.R. McGhie, Phys. Rev. Lett. 40, 197 (1978); L. B. Schein, W. Warta, and N. Karl, Chem. Phys. Lett. 100, 34 (1983)) Because the low temperature mobility values in pentacene suggest moderately large bandwidths, we address two questions. Does a bare wide (effectively infinite) band description work for pentacene for T<400K? And, is a bare finite band description compatible with those data? These questions are answered by modifications of a theory originally constructed for inorganic materials and a newly developed mobility theory.

  11. Current Collection in Plasmas by a Static Bare Tether

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, T. X.; Hwang, K. S.; Wu, S. T.; Stone, N. H.; Sorenson, J.; Wright, K. H.

    1997-01-01

    Current collection in plasmas by a static bare tether is studied. Considering the geometry effect, we modify the static Parker-Murphy current collection model to accommodate a cylindrical probe. It is shown that a long cylindrical configuration (length is much greater than diameter) can collect more current than the spherical configuration whose effective surface area and surface potential are identical. However, when the cylinder is not long (length and diameter are same order), it collects less current than the effective sphere. This indicates that Myers et al. might over estimate the PM current when they neglected the geometry effect. Compared to the orbit limit model and the chamber experiment, our predictions are in the range of the adiabatic limits and the upper-bound currents obtained by Rubinstein and Laframboise. It shows that the present results are in agreement with the bare tether chamber test experimental data given by Sorenson, Stone, and Wright. In addition we have applied this model to study the IR drop and the orientation effects which are important in the space condition.

  12. Bare Metal Stenting for Endovascular Exclusion of Aortic Arch Thrombi

    SciTech Connect

    Mahnken, Andreas H.; Hoffman, Andras; Autschbach, Ruediger; Damberg, Anneke L. M.

    2013-08-01

    BackgroundAortic thrombi in the ascending aorta or aortic arch are rare but are associated with a relevant risk of major stroke or distal embolization. Although stent grafting is commonly used as a treatment option in the descending aorta, only a few case reports discuss stenting of the aortic arch for the treatment of a thrombus. The use of bare metal stents in this setting has not yet been described.MethodsWe report two cases of ascending and aortic arch thrombus that were treated by covering the thrombus with an uncovered stent. Both procedures were performed under local anesthesia via a femoral approach. A femoral cutdown was used in one case, and a total percutaneous insertion was possible in the second case.ResultsBoth procedures were successfully performed without any periprocedural complications. Postoperative recovery was uneventful. In both cases, no late complications or recurrent embolization occurred at midterm follow-up, and control CT angiography at 1 respectively 10 months revealed no stent migration, freely perfused supra-aortic branches, and no thrombus recurrence.ConclusionTreating symptomatic thrombi in the ascending aorta or aortic arch with a bare metal stent is feasible. This technique could constitute a minimally invasive alternative to a surgical intervention or complex endovascular therapy with fenestrated or branched stent grafts.

  13. Laser impingement on bare and encased high explosives: safety limits

    SciTech Connect

    Roeske, F

    1999-03-15

    During the course of experiments involving high explosives, (HE), alignment lasers are often employed where the laser beam impinges upon a metal encased HE sample or on the bare HE itself during manned operations. While most alignment lasers are of low enough power so as not to be of concern, safety questions arise when considering the maximum credible power output of the laser in a failure mode, or when multiple laser spots are focused onto the experiment simultaneously. Safety questions also arise when the focused laser spot size becomes very small, on the order of 100 {micro}m or less. This paper addresses these concerns by describing a methodology for determining safety margins for laser impingement on metal encased HE as well as one for bare HE. A variety of explosives encased in Al, Cu, Ta and stainless steel were tested using the first of these techniques. Additional experiments were performed using the second method where the laser beam was focused directly on eight different samples of pressed-powder HE.

  14. Bare-Bones Teaching-Learning-Based Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Feng; Wang, Lei; Hei, Xinhong; Chen, Debao; Jiang, Qiaoyong; Li, Hongye

    2014-01-01

    Teaching-learning-based optimization (TLBO) algorithm which simulates the teaching-learning process of the class room is one of the recently proposed swarm intelligent (SI) algorithms. In this paper, a new TLBO variant called bare-bones teaching-learning-based optimization (BBTLBO) is presented to solve the global optimization problems. In this method, each learner of teacher phase employs an interactive learning strategy, which is the hybridization of the learning strategy of teacher phase in the standard TLBO and Gaussian sampling learning based on neighborhood search, and each learner of learner phase employs the learning strategy of learner phase in the standard TLBO or the new neighborhood search strategy. To verify the performance of our approaches, 20 benchmark functions and two real-world problems are utilized. Conducted experiments can been observed that the BBTLBO performs significantly better than, or at least comparable to, TLBO and some existing bare-bones algorithms. The results indicate that the proposed algorithm is competitive to some other optimization algorithms. PMID:25013844

  15. Long term effect of higher soil penetrometer resistance in cow congregation zone: Implication on soils and forage quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Higher degree of soil penetrometer resistance (SPR) can reduce crop yields and can lead to water and soil quality degradation due to increased runoff and soil structure destruction. The effect of trampling appears to be less severe on vegetated grasslands than on poor or bare soil. Understanding cat...

  16. A gyro-oriented 3-component borehole magnetometer for mineral prospecting, with examples of its application

    SciTech Connect

    Bosum, W.; Eberle, D.; Rehli, H.J.

    1988-11-01

    A triple axis borehole magnetometer is described that consists of a Foerster-probe (fluxgate) triplet (sensitivity 1 nT), a Foerster-probe gradiometer (sensitivity 2 nT/40 cm), a gyro unit (mean angular drift approx 0.5/sup 0//h) which is equipped with accelerometers (sensitivity 1/100/sup 0/), and a data transmission unit (with multiplexer and 16-bit AD converter). The sensitive fluxgate-magnetometer can detect weakly magnetic or small source bodies. Data from the gyro and the accelerometers allow the 3-component magnetic field values to be transformed to north, east and vertical components. Since they do not rely on magnetically-determined directional data, the results are not disturbed by local anomalies of the magnetic declination. Furthermore, the magnetometer can also be used in vertical boreholes. 3-component measurements are carried out at discrete points in the neighbourhood of a source body to locate its position, and within the source body to determine the direction of magnetization. The strength of magnetization and information on magnetic classification are obtained by continuous measurement of one or more components within the source body. Calculation algorithms and computer programs are available to simplify data processing and interpretation. Survey examples are discussed.

  17. Shock initiation of bare and covered explosives by projectile impact

    SciTech Connect

    Bahl, K L; Vantine, H C; Weingart, R C

    1981-04-22

    Shock initiation thresholds of bare and covered PBX-9404 and an HMX/TATB explosive called RX-26-AF were measured. The shocks were produced by the impact of flat-nosed and round-nosed steel projectiles in the velocity range of 0.5 to 2.2 km/s. Three types of coverings were used, 2 or 6 mm of tantalum, and a composite of aluminum and plastic. An Eulerian code containing material-strength and explosive-initiation models was used to evaluate our ability to calculate the shock initiation thresholds. These code calculations agreed well with the flat-nosed experimental data, but not so well with the round-nosed data.

  18. Regular step distribution of the bare Si(553) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopciuszyński, M.; Dyniec, P.; Zdyb, R.; Jałochowski, M.

    2015-06-01

    Vicinal Si(111) surfaces are known to undergo faceting when the temperature is lowered below the (1 ×1 ) to (7 ×7 ) phase transition temperature. Depending on the cutoff angle value and direction with respect to the crystallographic axis, various facets, together with low Miller index terraces, are formed. Here, we report the formation of regularly distributed steps over macroscopic sample regions of the bare Si(553) surface. The surface morphology is studied with scanning tunneling microscopy and reflection high energy electron diffraction techniques. The (111) terraces of 2.88 nm in width, which are separated by double atomic height steps, reveal an unusual reconstruction. However, the electronic structure determined with angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy shows bands very similar to those observed for the Si (111 )-(7 ×7 ) surface.

  19. Achievement of a superpolish on bare stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Howells, M.R.; Casstevens, J.

    1997-08-01

    We report the achievement of a superpolished surface, suitable for x-ray reflection, on bare stainless steel. The rms roughness obtained on various samples varied from 2.2 to 4.2 {angstrom}, as measured by an optical profiler with a bandwidth 0.29-100 mm{sup -1}. The type 17-4 PH precipitation-hardening stainless steel used to make the mirrors is also capable of ultrastability and has good manufactureability. This combination of properties makes it an excellent candidate material for mirror substrates. We describe the successful utilization of this type of steel in making elliptical-cylinder mirrors for a soft-x-ray microprobe system at the Advanced Light Source, and discuss possible for its unusual stability and polishability.

  20. Plant soil interactions alter carbon cycling in an upland grassland soil

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Bruce C.; Ostle, Nick J.; McNamara, Niall P.; Oakley, Simon; Whiteley, Andrew S.; Bailey, Mark J.; Griffiths, Robert I.

    2013-01-01

    Soil carbon (C) storage is dependent upon the complex dynamics of fresh and native organic matter cycling, which are regulated by plant and soil-microbial activities. A fundamental challenge exists to link microbial biodiversity with plant-soil C cycling processes to elucidate the underlying mechanisms regulating soil carbon. To address this, we contrasted vegetated grassland soils with bare soils, which had been plant-free for 3 years, using stable isotope (13C) labeled substrate assays and molecular analyses of bacterial communities. Vegetated soils had higher C and N contents, biomass, and substrate-specific respiration rates. Conversely, following substrate addition unlabeled, native soil C cycling was accelerated in bare soil and retarded in vegetated soil; indicative of differential priming effects. Functional differences were reflected in bacterial biodiversity with Alphaproteobacteria and Acidobacteria dominating vegetated and bare soils, respectively. Significant isotopic enrichment of soil RNA was found after substrate addition and rates varied according to substrate type. However, assimilation was independent of plant presence which, in contrast to large differences in 13CO2 respiration rates, indicated greater substrate C use efficiency in bare, Acidobacteria-dominated soils. Stable isotope probing (SIP) revealed most community members had utilized substrates with little evidence for competitive outgrowth of sub-populations. Our findings support theories on how plant-mediated soil resource availability affects the turnover of different pools of soil carbon, and we further identify a potential role of soil microbial biodiversity. Specifically we conclude that emerging theories on the life histories of dominant soil taxa can be invoked to explain changes in soil carbon cycling linked to resource availability, and that there is a strong case for considering microbial biodiversity in future studies investigating the turnover of different pools of soil

  1. Application of multispectral remote sensing to soil survey research in Indiana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zachary, A. L.; Cipra, J. E.; Diderickson, R. I.; Kristof, S. J.; Baumgardner, M. F.

    1972-01-01

    Computer-implemented mappings based on spectral properties of bare soil surfaces were compared with mapping units of interest to soil surveyors. Some soil types could be differentiated by their spectral properties. In other cases, soils with similar surface colors and textures could not be distinguished spectrally. The spectral maps seemed useful for delineating boundaries between soils in many cases.

  2. Chemically selective NMR imaging of a 3-component (solid-solid-liquid) sedimenting system.

    PubMed

    Beyea, Steven D; Altobelli, Stephen A; Mondy, Lisa A

    2003-04-01

    A novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique which resolves the separate components of the evolving vertical concentration profiles of 3-component non-colloidal suspensions is described. This method exploits the sensitivity of MRI to chemical differences between the three phases to directly image the fluid phase and one of the solid phases, with the third phase obtained by subtraction. 19F spin-echo imaging of a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) oil was interlaced with 1H SPRITE imaging of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) particles. The third phase was comprised of borosilicate glass spheres, which were not visible while imaging the PTFE or LDPE phases. The method is demonstrated by performing measurements on 2-phase materials containing only the floating (LDPE) particles, with the results contrasted to the experimental behaviour of the individual phases in the full 3-phase system. All experiments were performed using nearly monodisperse particles, with initial suspension volume fractions, phi(i), of 0.1. PMID:12713970

  3. EAARL Coastal Topography-Chandeleur Islands, Louisiana, 2010: Bare Earth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Bonisteel-Cormier, Jamie M.; Brock, John C.; Sallenger, A.H.; Wright, C. Wayne; Nagle, David B.; Vivekanandan, Saisudha; Yates, Xan; Klipp, Emily S.

    2010-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of lidar-derived bare-earth (BE) and submerged topography datasets were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center, St. Petersburg, FL, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of a portion of the Chandeleur Islands, acquired March 3, 2010. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural-resource managers. An innovative airborne lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multispectral color-infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers, and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for sub-meter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the EAARL system, and the resulting data were then processed using the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS), a custom

  4. EAARL Topography - Vicksburg National Military Park 2008: Bare Earth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Segura, Martha; Yates, Xan

    2008-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of Lidar-derived bare earth (BE) topography were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL; the National Park Service (NPS), Gulf Coast Network, Lafayette, LA; and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of the Vicksburg National Military Park in Mississippi, acquired on March 6, 2008. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural resource managers. An innovative airborne Lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) Lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive Lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multi-spectral color infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers, and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for submeter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a Lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the EAARL system, and the resulting data were then processed

  5. EAARL Coastal Topography-Pearl River Delta 2008: Bare Earth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Miner, Michael D.; Yates, Xan; Bonisteel, Jamie M.

    2009-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of Lidar-derived bare earth (BE) topography were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL; the University of New Orleans (UNO), Pontchartrain Institute for Environmental Sciences (PIES), New Orleans, LA; and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of a portion of the Pearl River Delta in Louisiana and Mississippi, acquired March 9-11, 2008. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural resource managers. An innovative airborne Lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) Lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive Lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multi-spectral color infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers, and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for submeter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a Lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the

  6. EAARL Coastal Topography - Northern Gulf of Mexico, 2007: Bare Earth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Kathryn E.L.; Nayegandhi, Amar; Wright, C. Wayne; Bonisteel, Jamie M.; Brock, John C.

    2009-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of Lidar-derived bare earth (BE) topography were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL; the National Park Service (NPS), Gulf Coast Network, Lafayette, LA; and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. The purpose of this project is to provide highly detailed and accurate datasets of select barrier islands and peninsular regions of Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida, acquired on June 27-30, 2007. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural resource managers. An innovative airborne Lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) Lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive Lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multi-spectral color infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers, and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit which provide for submeter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a Lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using

  7. EAARL Coastal Topography - Northeast Barrier Islands 2007: Bare Earth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John C.; Sallenger, A.H.; Wright, C. Wayne; Yates, Xan; Bonisteel, Jamie M.

    2008-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of Lidar-derived bare earth (BE) topography were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of the northeast coastal barrier islands in New York and New Jersey, acquired April 29-30 and May 15-16, 2007. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural resource managers. An innovative airborne Lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) Lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive Lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multi-spectral color infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for submeter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a Lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the EAARL system, and the resulting data were then processed using the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS), a custom

  8. Evaluation of soil heat flux density as a function of soil management practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moratiel Yugueros, R.; García Moreno, R.

    2012-04-01

    Soil energy is an important parameter in order to understand the flux of energy between the plant and the soil. This parameter could determine the potential for future production of soil. Pattern of surface energy flux varies depending on several factors, mainly on coverage. Also, this behaviour is strongly conditioned by the physical condition of soil. In order to evaluate the trend and behaviour of soil energy depending on soil coverage the aim of the present study was to evaluate soil heat flux density (G) in three different soil conditions depending on seasonal weather temperatures. Therefore, the authors monitored soil energy every half hour from soil located on bare soil, on soil covered by crops at root level and in between crop rows. The selected crop was corn. Soil heat flux density was measured with a heat flux plate sensor buried at a depth of 0.05 m in experimental sites. The change in heat storage in the soil layer above the heat flux plates was measured by inserting temperature sensors at an angle from near the bottom to near the top of the soil layer (above the plate sensor). The results indicated that the soil energy flux depends mainly on radiation and soil conditions. Although net radiation (Rn) was the same for all the sites, the evolution for G is different. Greater G fluctuation is produced in bared soils and decreases as soil is covered by the crops, especially at root level.

  9. Space Test of Bare-Wire Anode Tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, L.; Fujii, H. A.; Sanmartin, J. R.

    2007-01-01

    An international team, lead by Tokyo Metropolitan University, is developing a mission concept for a suborbital test of orbital-motion-limited (OML) bare-wire anode current collection for application to electrodynamic tether propulsion. The tether is a tape with a 50-mm width, 0.05-mm thickness, and 1-km length. This will be the first space test of the OML theory. In addition, by being an engineering demonstration (of space tethers), the mission will demonstrate electric beam generation for "sounding" determination of the neutral density profile in the ionospheric "E-layer." If selected by the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science/Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), the mission will launch in early 2009 using an $520 Sounding Rocket. During ascent, and above =100 km in attitude, the 1-km tape tether will be deployed at a rate of 8 m/s. Once deployed, the tape tether will serve as an anode, collecting ionospheric electrons. The electrons will be expelled into space by a hollow cathode device, thereby completing the circuit and allowing current to flow.This paper will describe the objectives of the proposed mission, the technologies to be employed, and the application of the results to future space missions using electrodynamic tethers for propulsion or power generation.

  10. Delaminations of barely visible impact damage in CFRP laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Prashant; Rai, Badri

    CFRP laminates were impacted by projectiles of low masses, accelerated in an air gun, to have barely visible impact damage (BVID) to simulate damage to aircraft by runway debris. The delamination damage on individual interfaces was revealed by the destructive method of thin strips. In sub-BVID and BVID specimens, the damage was confined mostly to the front 30 percent of the laminate thickness. Delamination areas in the BVID specimens were found to be considerable - the largest dimension exceeding 12 mm on several interfaces. Nucleation of delamination damage was observed in interfaces adjacent to the mid plane in BVID specimens. At higher impact energies, about 110 to 150 percent more, the delamination damage was observed on almost all the interfaces with no sign of spalling at the rear surfaces. In comparison with a lightweight projectile of aluminum (4.4 g), a higher density steel projectile ( 11.8 g) caused more delamination damage for the same impact energy and an identical geometry of projectiles.

  11. A Bare Molecular Cloud at z ~ 0.45

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Therese M.; Misawa, Toru; Charlton, Jane C.; Mshar, Andrew C.; Ferland, Gary J.

    2010-06-01

    Several neutral species (Mg I, Si I, Ca I, Fe I) have been detected in a weak Mg II absorption line system (Wr (2796) ~ 0.15 Å) at z ~ 0.45 along the sightline toward HE0001-2340. These observations require extreme physical conditions, as noted in D'Odorico. We place further constraints on the properties of this system by running a wide grid of photoionization models, determining that the absorbing cloud that produces the neutral absorption is extremely dense (~100-1000 cm-3), cold (<100 K), and has significant molecular content (~72%-94%). Structures of this size and temperature have been detected in Milky Way CO surveys and have been predicted in hydrodynamic simulations of turbulent gas. In order to explain the observed line profiles in all neutral and singly ionized chemical transitions, the lines must suffer from unresolved saturation and/or the absorber must partially cover the broad emission line region of the background quasar. In addition to this highly unusual cloud, three other ordinary weak Mg II clouds (within densities of ~0.005 cm-3 and temperatures of ~10, 000 K) lie within 500 km s-1 along the same sightline. We suggest that the "bare molecular cloud," which appears to reside outside of a galaxy disk, may have had in situ star formation and may evolve into an ordinary weak Mg II absorbing cloud. Based on public data obtained from the ESO archive of observations from the UVES spectrograph at the VLT, Paranal, Chile.

  12. Properties of bare strange stars associated with surface electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Picanco Negreiros, Rodrigo; Mishustin, Igor N.; Schramm, Stefan; Weber, Fridolin

    2010-11-15

    In this paper we investigate the electrodynamic surface properties of bare strange quark stars. The surfaces of such objects are characterized by the formation of ultrahigh electric surface fields which might be as high as {approx}10{sup 19} V/cm. These fields result from the formation of electric dipole layers at the stellar surfaces. We calculate the increase in gravitational mass associated with the energy stored in the electric dipole field, which turns out to be only significant if the star possesses a sufficiently strong net electric charge distribution. In the second part of the paper, we explore the intriguing possibility of what happens when the electron layer (sphere) rotates with respect to the stellar strange matter body. We find that in this event magnetic fields can be generated which, for moderate effective rotational frequencies between the electron layer and the stellar body, agree with the magnetic fields inferred for several central compact objects. These objects could thus be comfortably interpreted as strange stars whose electron atmospheres rotate at frequencies that are moderately different ({approx}10 Hz) from the rotational frequencies of the strange star itself.

  13. Electron capture by bare ions on water molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivarola, Roberto; Montenegro, Pablo; Monti, Juan; Fojón, Omar

    2016-05-01

    Single electron capture from water molecules by impact of bare ions is theoretically investigated at intermediate and high collision energies. This reaction is of fundamental importance to determine the deposition of energy in biological matter irradiated with ion beams (hadrontherapy), dominating other ionizing processes of the target at low-intermediate impact velocities and giving principal contributions to the energetic region where electronic stopping power maximizes. The dynamics of the interaction between the aggregates is described within the one active-electron continuum distorted wave-eikonal initial state theory. The orbitals of the target in the ground state are represented using the approximate self-consistent complete neglect of differential orbitals (SC-CNDO) model. The contribution of different molecular orbitals on the partial cross sections to selected n-principal quantum number projectile states is discriminated as well as the collaboration of these n-states on total cross sections. The latter ones are dominated by capture to n=1 states at high enough energies decreasing their contribution as n increases.

  14. Fortissimo: A Japanese Space Test Of Bare Wire Anode Tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les; Fujii, H. A.; Sanmartin, J. R.

    2008-01-01

    A Japanese led international team is developing a suborbital test of orbital-motion-limited (OML) bare wire anode current collection for application to electrodynamic tether (EDT) propulsion. The tether is a tape with a width of 25 mm, thickness of 0.05 mm, and is 300 m in length. This will be the first space test of OML theory. The mission will launch in the summer of 2009 using an S520 Sounding Rocket. During ascent, and above approx. 100 km in attitude, the tape tether will be deployed at a rate of approx. 8 m/s. Once deployed, the tape tether will serve as an anode, collecting ionospheric electrons. The electrons will be expelled into space by a hollow cathode device, thereby completing the circuit and allowing current to flow. The total amount of current collected will be used to assess the validity of OML theory. This paper will describe the objectives of the proposed mission, the technologies to be employed, and the application of the results to future space missions using EDTs for propulsion or power generation.

  15. Ectomycorrhizal fungal communities of pedunculate and sessile oak seedlings from bare-root forest nurseries.

    PubMed

    Leski, Tomasz; Pietras, Marcin; Rudawska, Maria

    2010-03-01

    In this study, we present the detailed molecular investigation of the ectomycorrhizal (ECM) community of Quercus petraea and Quercus robur seedlings grown in bare-root forest nurseries. In all tested oak samples, mycorrhizal colonization was nearly 100%. Morphological observation and molecular investigations (sequencing of fungal ITS rDNA) revealed a total of 23 mycorrhizal taxa. The most frequent and abundant fungal taxa were Hebeloma sacchariolens, Tuber sp., and Peziza sp.; from the detected fungal taxa, 20 were noted for Q. petraea and 23 for Q. robur. Depending on the nursery, the species richness of identified ECM fungal taxa for both oak species ranged from six to 11 taxa. The mean species richness for all nurseries was 5.36 and 5.82 taxa per Q. petraea and Q. robur sample, respectively. According to the analysis of similarity, ECM fungal communities were similar for Q. petraea and Q. robur (R = 0.019; p = 0.151). On the other hand, detected fungal communities were significantly different between nurseries (R = 0.927; p < 0.0001). Using the Spearman rank correlation, it was determined that the ectomycorrhizal diversity (in terms of richness, the Shannon diversity, evenness, and Simpson dominance indices) is significantly related to the soil parameters of each nursery. We conclude that individual nursery may be considered as separate ecological niches that strongly discriminate diversity of ECM fungi. PMID:19756776

  16. Lactobacillus acidophilus binds to MUC3 component of cultured intestinal epithelial cells with highest affinity.

    PubMed

    Das, Jugal Kishore; Mahapatra, Rajani Kanta; Patro, Shubhransu; Goswami, Chandan; Suar, Mrutyunjay

    2016-04-01

    Lactobacillus strains have been shown to adhere to the mucosal components of intestinal epithelial cells. However, established in vitro adhesion assays have several drawbacks in assessing the adhesion of new Lactobacillus strains. The present study aimed to compare the adhesion of four different Lactobacillus strains and select the most adherent microbe, based on in silico approach supported by in vitro results. The mucus-binding proteins in Lactobacillus acidophilus, L. plantarum, L. brevis and L. fermentum were identified and their capacities to interact with intestinal mucin were compared by molecular docking analysis. Lactobacillus acidophilus had the maximal affinity of binding to mucin with predicted free energy of -6.066 kcal mol(-1) Further, in vitro experimental assay of adhesion was performed to validate the in silico results. The adhesion of L. acidophilus to mucous secreting colon epithelial HT-29 MTX cells was highest at 12%, and it formed biofilm with maximum depth (Z = 84 μm). Lactobacillus acidophilus was determined to be the most adherent strain in the study. All the Lactobacillus strains tested in this study, displayed maximum affinity of binding to MUC3 component of mucus as compared to other gastrointestinal mucins. These findings may have importance in the design of probiotics and health care management. PMID:26946538

  17. A 3-Component Mixture of Rayleigh Distributions: Properties and Estimation in Bayesian Framework

    PubMed Central

    Aslam, Muhammad; Tahir, Muhammad; Hussain, Zawar; Al-Zahrani, Bander

    2015-01-01

    To study lifetimes of certain engineering processes, a lifetime model which can accommodate the nature of such processes is desired. The mixture models of underlying lifetime distributions are intuitively more appropriate and appealing to model the heterogeneous nature of process as compared to simple models. This paper is about studying a 3-component mixture of the Rayleigh distributionsin Bayesian perspective. The censored sampling environment is considered due to its popularity in reliability theory and survival analysis. The expressions for the Bayes estimators and their posterior risks are derived under different scenarios. In case the case that no or little prior information is available, elicitation of hyperparameters is given. To examine, numerically, the performance of the Bayes estimators using non-informative and informative priors under different loss functions, we have simulated their statistical properties for different sample sizes and test termination times. In addition, to highlight the practical significance, an illustrative example based on a real-life engineering data is also given. PMID:25993475

  18. SPOT5 imagery for soil salinity assessment in Iraq

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teggi, S.; Costanzini, S.; Despini, F.; Chiodi, P.; Immordino, F.

    2012-10-01

    Soil salinization is a form of topsoil degradation due to the formation of soluble salts at deleterious levels. This phenomenon can seriously compromise vegetation health and agricultural productivity, and represents a worldwide environmental problem. Remote sensing is a very useful tool for soil salinization monitoring and assessment. In this work we show some results of a study aimed to define a methodology for soil salinity assessment in Iraq based on SPOT 5 imagery. This methodology allows the identification of salinized soils primarily on bare soils. Subsequently some soil salinity assessment can be done on vegetated soils. On bare soil the identification of salt is based on spectral analysis, using the Minimum Noise Fraction transformation and several indexes found in literature. In case of densely vegetated soils the methodology for the discrimination of salinized soils has been integrated with the results obtained from the classification of vegetation coverage.

  19. Field-measured, hourly soil water evaporation stages in relation to reference evapotranspiration rate and soil to air temperature ratio

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil water evaporation takes critical water supplies away from crops, especially in areas where both rainfall and irrigation water are limited. This study measured bare soil water evaporation from clay loam, silt loam, sandy loam, and fine sand soils. It found that on average almost half of the ir...

  20. Impact of soil vertical water movement on the energy balance of different land surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhiqiu; Chen, George Tai-Jen; Hu, Yanbing

    2007-08-01

    The soil heat flux determination method proposed by Gao (Boundary-Layer Meteorol 114:165-178, 2005) is discussed for (1) dry surfaces, (2) bare soil or sparse short-grass lands, and (3) dense-grass surfaces or forest. Our analysis shows that, when neglecting the contribution of soil vertical water movement to soil heat flux, the energy components measured independently will (1) still achieve balance over dry surfaces, and (2) be significantly in imbalance over bare soil or sparse short-grass lands. The mean of bare ground evaporation modeled by SiB2 is 1.58 x 10(-5) m(3) s(-1) m(-2), and the mean of soil water flux obtained by the method of Gao is 1.22 x 10(-5) m(3) s(-1) m(-2) for the Naqu site in the summer of 1998. Comparison of the bare ground evaporation with the mean of soil water flux shows a difference, the causes of which are investigated. Physically, the bare ground evaporation is equal to the sum of soil water flux and water content change in the soil surface layer. Because the bare ground evaporation is very limited for the dense-grass surfaces or forest, our analysis implies that the energy imbalance encountered over the dense-grass or forest is not caused by the fact that previous researchers neglected soil water movements in their energy budget analyses. PMID:17429698

  1. [Seasonal dynamics of soil net nitrogen mineralization under moss crust in Shapotou region, northern China].

    PubMed

    Hu, Rui; Wang, Xin-ping; Pan, Yan-xia; Zhang, Ya-feng; Zhang, Hao; Cheng, Ning

    2015-04-01

    Seasonal variations of soil inorganic nitrogen (N) pool and net N transformation rate in moss-covered soil and in the bare soil were comparatively observed by incubating intact soil columns with parafilm capping in the field in a natural vegetation area of Shapotou, southeastern fringe of the Tengger Desert. We found pronounced seasonal variations in soil available N content and net N transformation rate in both moss-covered soil and bare soil, with significant differences among different months. In non-growing season, soil available N content and net N transformation rate were significantly higher in March and October than in other months. Furthermore, immobilization was the dominant form of N mineralization, and no significant difference in net soil N mineralization rate was found between the two sampling soils. In growing season, soil available N content and net N transformation rate markedly increased and reached their peak values during June to August (17.18 mg x kg(-1) and 0.11 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1), respectively). Both soil net nitrification and N mineralization rates in moss-covered soil were significantly higher than in bare soil. Soil ammonium and nitrate N content in April and May were higher in moss-covered soil (2.66 and 3.16 mg x kg(-1), respectively) than in bare soil (1.02 and 2.37 mg x kg(-1), respectively); while the tendency was the converse in June and September, with 7.01 mg x kg(-1) for soil ammonium content and 7.40 mg x kg(-1) for nitrate N content in bare soil, and they were 6.39 and 6.36 mg x kg(-1) in moss-covered soil, respectively. Therefore, the existence and succession of moss crusts could be considered as one of the important biological factors affecting soil N cycling through regulating soil available N content and promoting soil N mineralization process. PMID:26259453

  2. Soil Water Balance and Vegetation Dynamics in two Contrasting Water-limited Mediterranean Ecosystems on Sardinia, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montaldo, N.; Albertson, J. D.; Corona, R.

    2011-12-01

    eddy correlation technique based micrometeorological towers. Soil moisture profiles were also continuously estimated using water content reflectometers and gravimetric method, and periodically leaf area index PFTs are estimated during the Spring-Summer 2005. The following objectives are addressed:1) pointing out the dynamics of land surface fluxes, soil moisture, CO2 and vegetation cover for two contrasting water-limited ecosystems; 2) assess the impact of the soil depth and type on the CO2 and water balance dynamics. For reaching the objectives an ecohydrologic model is also successfully used and applied to the case studies. It couples a vegetation dynamic model, which computes the change in biomass over time for the PFTs, and a 3-component (bare soil, grass and woody vegetation) land surface model.

  3. Soil permeability as a function of vegetation type and soil water content

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, R.C.; Fraley, L. Jr.

    1994-06-01

    Soil permeability is important for estimating the rate of mass transport of {sup 222}Rn through soils and into basements. We measured permeability and soil water content on a set of nine plots consisting of three plots vegetated with common barley (Hordeum vulgare), three plots vegetated with Russian thistle (Salsola kali), and three bare plots. Soil moisture was consistently highest on the bare plots and lowest on the Russian thistle plots. Plots with vegetation had lower soil water content during the growing season. Permeability was consistently higher on Russian thistle plots. ANOVA showed that both soil water content and presence of Russian thistle had a significant impact on permeability but that presence of barley did not. The effect of vegetation and moisture on permeability may have significant effects on {sup 222}Rn transport in soils. 18 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Exploiting Defect Clustering to Screen Bare Die for Infant Mortality Failure: An Experimental Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakin, David R., II; Singh, Adit D.

    1999-01-01

    We present the first experimental results to establish that a binning strategy based on defect clustering can be used to screen bare die for early life failures. The data for this study comes from the SEMATECH test methods experiment.

  5. Dynamic weakening of serpentinite gouges and bare surfaces at seismic slip rates

    PubMed Central

    Proctor, B P; Mitchell, T M; Hirth, G; Goldsby, D; Zorzi, F; Platt, J D; Di Toro, G

    2014-01-01

    To investigate differences in the frictional behavior between initially bare rock surfaces of serpentinite and powdered serpentinite (“gouge”) at subseismic to seismic slip rates, we conducted single-velocity step and multiple-velocity step friction experiments on an antigorite-rich and lizardite-rich serpentinite at slip rates (V) from 0.003 m/s to 6.5 m/s, sliding displacements up to 1.6 m, and normal stresses (σn) up to 22 MPa for gouge and 97 MPa for bare surfaces. Nominal steady state friction values (μnss) in gouge at V = 1 m/s are larger than in bare surfaces for all σn tested and demonstrate a strong σn dependence; μnss decreased from 0.51 at 4.0 MPa to 0.39 at 22.4 MPa. Conversely, μnss values for bare surfaces remained ∼0.1 with increasing σn and V. Additionally, the velocity at the onset of frictional weakening and the amount of slip prior to weakening were orders of magnitude larger in gouge than in bare surfaces. Extrapolation of the normal stress dependence for μnss suggests that the behavior of antigorite gouge approaches that of bare surfaces at σn ≥ 60 MPa. X-ray diffraction revealed dehydration reaction products in samples that frictionally weakened. Microstructural analysis revealed highly localized slip zones with melt-like textures in some cases gouge experiments and in all bare surfaces experiments for V ≥ 1 m/s. One-dimensional thermal modeling indicates that flash heating causes frictional weakening in both bare surfaces and gouge. Friction values for gouge decrease at higher velocities and after longer displacements than bare surfaces because strain is more distributed. Key Points Gouge friction approaches that of bare surfaces at high normal stress Dehydration reactions and bulk melting in serpentinite in < 1 m of slip Flash heating causes dynamic frictional weakening in gouge and bare surfaces PMID:26167425

  6. Retrotransposon BARE-1 and Its Role in Genome Evolution in the Genus Hordeum.

    PubMed Central

    Vicient, CM; Suoniemi, A; Anamthawat-Jónsson, K; Tanskanen, J; Beharav, A; Nevo, E; Schulman, AH

    1999-01-01

    The replicative retrotransposon life cycle offers the potential for explosive increases in copy number and consequent inflation of genome size. The BARE-1 retrotransposon family of barley is conserved, disperse, and transcriptionally active. To assess the role of BARE-1 in genome evolution, we determined the copy number of its integrase, its reverse transcriptase, and its long terminal repeat (LTR) domains throughout the genus Hordeum. On average, BARE-1 contributes 13.7 x 10(3) full-length copies, amounting to 2.9% of the genome. The number increases with genome size. Two LTRs are associated with each internal domain in intact retrotransposons, but surprisingly, BARE-1 LTRs were considerably more prevalent than would be expected from the numbers of intact elements. The excess in LTRs increases as both genome size and BARE-1 genomic fraction decrease. Intrachromosomal homologous recombination between LTRs could explain the excess, removing BARE-1 elements and leaving behind solo LTRs, thereby reducing the complement of functional retrotransposons in the genome and providing at least a partial "return ticket from genomic obesity." PMID:10488242

  7. a Near-Global Bare-Earth dem from Srtm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallant, J. C.; Read, A. M.

    2016-06-01

    The near-global elevation product from NASA's Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission (SRTM) has been widely used since its release in 2005 at 3 arcsecond resolution and the release of the 1 arcsecond version in late 2014 means that the full potential of the SRTM DEM can now be realised. However the routine use of SRTM for analytical purposes such as catchment hydrology, flood inundation, habitat mapping and soil mapping is still seriously impeded by the presence of artefacts in the data, primarily the offsets due to tree cover and the random noise. This paper describes the algorithms being developed to remove those offsets, based on the methods developed to produce the Australian national elevation model from SRTM data. The offsets due to trees are estimated using the GlobeLand30 (National Geomatics Center of China) and Global Forest Change (University of Maryland) products derived from Landsat, along with the ALOS PALSAR radar image data (JAXA) and the global forest canopy height map (NASA). The offsets are estimated using several processes and combined to produce a single continuous tree offset layer that is subtracted from the SRTM data. The DEM products will be made freely available on completion of the first draft product, and the assessment of that product is expected to drive further improvements to the methods.

  8. Contrasts among bidirectional reflectance of leaves, canopies, and soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, J. M.; Walter, E. A.; Welles, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    Simple models are presented for predicting the bidirectional reflectance distribution functions (BRDFs) for soils and plant canopies viewed from various directions. BRDFs are predicted for bare soil, individual leaves, and plant canopies, and the results are compared with measurements and a three coefficient empirical equation. BRDF measurements for corn and soybean leaves are presented to contrast with canopy and soil distributions. Estimates of the soil, canopy, and leaf BRDFs are combined into a model called Cupid to predict BRDFs for complex natural surfaces.

  9. Joint microwave and infrared studies for soil moisture determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Njoku, E. G.; Schieldge, J. P.; Kahle, A. B. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility of using a combined microwave-thermal infrared system to determine soil moisture content is addressed. Of particular concern are bare soils. The theoretical basis for microwave emission from soils and the transport of heat and moisture in soils is presented. Also, a description is given of the results of two field experiments held during vernal months in the San Joaquin Valley of California.

  10. Biochar Amendment to the Soil Surface Reduces Fumigant Emissions and Enhances Soil Microorganism Recovery.

    PubMed

    Shen, Guoqing; Ashworth, Daniel J; Gan, Jay; Yates, Scott R

    2016-02-01

    During soil fumigation, it is ideal to mitigate soil fumigant emissions, ensure pest control efficacy, and speed up the recovery of the soil microorganism population established postapplication. However, no current fumigant emission reduction strategy can meet all these requirements. In the present study, replicated soil columns were used to study the effect of biochar derived from rice husk (BR) and green waste (BG) applied to the soil surface on 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-D) and chloropicrin (CP) emissions and soil gas distribution, and on microorganism population re-establishment. Relative to fumigated bare soil (no emission reduction strategy), high-density polyethylene (HDPE), and ammonium thiosulfate (ATS) treatments, BR gave dramatic emission reductions for both fumigants with no obvious emission peak, whereas BG was very effective only for 1,3-D. With BR application, the concentration of fumigant in the soil gas was higher than in the bare soil and ATS treatment. After the soil column experiment, mixing the BR with the fumigated soil resulted in higher soil respiration rates than were observed for HDPE and ATS treatments. Therefore, biochar amendment to the soil surface may be an effective strategy for fumigant emission reduction and the recovery of soil microorganism populations established postapplication. PMID:26726779

  11. Differential Toxicity of Bare and Hybrid ZnO Nanoparticles in Green Pea (Pisum sativum L.): A Life Cycle Study

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Arnab; Sun, Youping; Morelius, Erving; Tamez, Carlos; Bandyopadhyay, Susmita; Niu, Genhua; White, Jason C.; Peralta-Videa, Jose R.; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of surface or lattice modification of nanoparticles (NPs) on terrestrial plants is poorly understood. We investigated the impact of different zinc oxide (ZnO) NPs on green pea (Pisum sativum L.), one of the highest consumed legumes globally. Pea plants were grown for 65 d in soil amended with commercially available bare ZnO NPs (10 nm), 2 wt% alumina doped (Al2O3@ZnO NPs, 15 nm), or 1 wt% aminopropyltriethoxysilane coated NPs (KH550@ZnO NP, 20 nm) at 250 and 1000 mg NP/kg soil inside a greenhouse. Bulk (ZnO) and ionic Zn (zinc chloride) were included as controls. Plant fresh and dry biomass, changes in leaf pigment concentrations, elements (Zn, Al, Si), and protein and carbohydrate profile of green pees were quantified upon harvest at 65 days. With the exception of the coated 1000 mg/kg NP treatment, fresh and dry weight were unaffected by Zn exposure. Although, all treated plants showed higher tissue Zn than controls, those exposed to Al2O3@ZnO NPs at 1000 mg/kg had greater Zn concentration in roots and seeds, compared to bulk Zn and the other NP treatments, keeping Al and Si uptake largely unaffected. Higher Zn accumulation in green pea seeds were resulted in coated ZnO at 250 mg/kg treatments. In leaves, Al2O3@ZnO NP at 250 mg/kg significantly increased Chl-a and carotenoid concentrations relative to the bulk, ionic, and the other NP treatments. The protein and carbohydrate profiles remained largely unaltered across all treatments with the exception of Al2O3@ZnO NPs at 1000 mg/kg where sucrose concentration of green peas increased significantly, which is likely a biomarker of stress. Importantly, these findings demonstrate that lattice and surface modification can significantly alter the fate and phytotoxic effects of ZnO NPs in food crops and seed nutritional quality. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of a life cycle study on comparative toxicity of bare, coated, and doped ZnO NPs on a soil-grown food crop. PMID:26793219

  12. Irrigation scheduling, freeze warning and soil salinity detecting. [in Cameron County Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegand, C. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Correlations of multispectral scanner (MSS) digital data differences between vegetated and bare soil areas with salinity levels from the eight saline areas using MSS bands seven and ten in the infrared region were significant. Correlations were derived for Cameron County, Texas. Detection of saline soils may be possible, using either film density readings or multispectral scanner data, when the lower reflectance of vegetation on highly saline soil and the higher reflectance of vegetation on lower saline soil are considered by using film on MSS contrasts between vegetation and bare soil.

  13. Microwave remote sensing of soil water content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cihlar, J.; Ulaby, F. T.

    1975-01-01

    Microwave remote sensing of soils to determine water content was considered. A layered water balance model was developed for determining soil water content in the upper zone (top 30 cm), while soil moisture at greater depths and near the surface during the diurnal cycle was studied using experimental measurements. Soil temperature was investigated by means of a simulation model. Based on both models, moisture and temperature profiles of a hypothetical soil were generated and used to compute microwave soil parameters for a clear summer day. The results suggest that, (1) soil moisture in the upper zone can be predicted on a daily basis for 1 cm depth increments, (2) soil temperature presents no problem if surface temperature can be measured with infrared radiometers, and (3) the microwave response of a bare soil is determined primarily by the moisture at and near the surface. An algorithm is proposed for monitoring large areas which combines the water balance and microwave methods.

  14. Changes in Mercury Volatilization between Planted and Unplanted Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, C.; Gustin, M. S.

    2010-12-01

    An important question with respect to the Hg biogeochemical cycle is how does the presence of plants affect the flux of Hg from a soil? Previous research has shown that with leaf development over a growing season and increased soil shading Hg emission decreases, while others have suggested that increased activity of rhizosphere bacteria due to the presence of plants would result in the increased Hg emission from soils. This study examined Hg release to the air associated with low Hg containing soils from three states—Indiana, Alabama, and Ohio over 24 h periods. Hg flux was quantified on a seasonal time step over one year for bare soil and for soil when planted with perennial rye grass (Lolium perennel). For the latter fluxes were measured 5 and 10 weeks after planting. Preliminary data assessment suggests that both planted and unplanted substrates in the summer are generally a net source of Hg to the atmosphere with total daily flux ranging from -50 to 1000 ng/m2 day. Fluxes observed for planted soils exhibited diel trends that were the opposite of that measured for bare soils, that is maximum Hg flux was observed during the night instead of at midday. Planted Indiana and Ohio soils emitted a lower Hg flux than the bare soils while the Alabama soils were not consistent. Good correlations were observed between flux versus soil moisture, soil temperature, local ozone concentration, and solar radiation for bare soils however correlation coefficients were not as strong for the planted materials. Mercury concentration of foliar material showed that plant uptake could not account for reduced flux at midday. This work suggests that the presence of plants does alter the flux of Hg occurring from soils.

  15. Relationship between soil erodibility and modeled infiltration rate in different soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guoqiang; Fang, Qingqing; Wu, Binbin; Yang, Huicai; Xu, Zongxue

    2015-09-01

    The relationship between soil erodibility, which is hard to measure, and modeled infiltration rate were rarely researched. Here, the soil erodibility factors (K and Ke in the USLE, Ki and K1 in the WEPP) were calculated and the infiltration rates were modeled based on the designed laboratory simulation experiments and proposed infiltration model, in order to build their relationship. The impacts of compost amendment on the soil erosion characteristics and relationship were also studied. Two contrasting agricultural soils (bare and cultivated fluvo-aquic soils) were used, and different poultry compost contents (control, low and high) were applied to both soils. The results indicated that the runoff rate, sediment yield rate and soil erodibility of the bare soil treatments were generally higher than those of the corresponding cultivated soil treatments. The application of composts generally decreased sediment yield and soil erodibility but did not always decrease runoff. The comparison of measured and modeled infiltration rates indicated that the model represented the infiltration processes well with an N-S coefficient of 0.84 for overall treatments. Significant negative logarithmic correlations have been found between final infiltration rate (FIR) and the four soil erodibility factors, and the relationship between USLE-K and FIR demonstrated the best correlation. The application of poultry composts would not influence the logarithmic relationship between FIR and soil erodibility. Our study provided a useful tool to estimate soil erodibility.

  16. Modelling increased soil cohesion by plant roots with EUROSEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Baets, S.; Poesen, J.; Torri, D.; Salvador, M. P.

    2009-04-01

    Soil cohesion is an important variable to model soil detachment by runoff (Morgan et al., 1998a). As soil particles are not loose, soil detachment by runoff will be limited by the cohesion of the soil material. It is generally recognized that plant roots contribute to the overall cohesion of the soil. Determination of this increased cohesion and soil roughness however is complicated and measurements of shear strength and soil reinforcement by plant roots are very time- and labour consuming. A model approach offers an alternative for the assessment of soil cohesion provided by plant roots However, few erosion models account for the effects of the below-ground biomass in their calculation of erosion rates. Therefore, the main objectives of this study is to develop an approach to improve an existing soil erosion model (EUROSEM) accounting for the erosion-reducing effects of roots. The approach for incorporating the root effects into this model is based on a comparison of measured soil detachment rates for bare and for root-permeated topsoil samples with predicted erosion rates under the same flow conditions using the erosion equation of EUROSEM. Through backwards calculation, transport capacity efficiencies and corresponding soil cohesion values can be assessed for bare and root-permeated topsoils respectively. The results are promising and show that grass roots provide a larger increase in soil cohesion as compared with tap-rooted species and that the increase in soil cohesion is not significantly different under wet and dry soil conditions, either for fibrous root systems or for tap root systems. Relationships are established between measured root density values and the corresponding calculated soil cohesion values, reflecting the effects of roots on the resistance of the topsoil to concentrated flow incision. These relationships enable one to incorporate the root effect into the soil erosion model EUROSEM, through adapting the soil cohesion input value. A scenario

  17. The Life Cycle of Bare Branch Families in China---A Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    JIANG, Quanbao; GUO, Zhen; LI, Shuzhuo; FELDMAN, Marcus W.

    2013-01-01

    China is and will be characterized by a large number of men who are unable to marry: these men are often referred to as “bare branches.” In this paper we define the bare branch family and divide its life cycle into three stages: the unmarried co-resident with both parents, co-resident with a surviving parent, and living alone. Using life tables and probability methods, we find that up to age 60, the bare branch male faces cumulative probabilities of 0.8 and 0.6, for his father's and mother's death, respectively. The definition of the age at which bare branch status is initialized influences the length of these stages. As the childbearing age of parents increases, the age of a bare branch at the death of his parents decreases, and the duration of his living alone lengthens. An increase in the mother's childbearing age, holding that of the father constant, shortens the stage of co-residence with both parents, and lengthens the stage of living alone. PMID:24174704

  18. Effect of swift heavy ion irradiation on bare and coated ZnS quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, S. Hussain, A.M.P.; Ahmed, G.A.; Singh, F.; Avasthi, D.K.; Choudhury, A.

    2008-12-01

    The present study compares structural and optical modifications of bare and silica (SiO{sub 2}) coated ZnS quantum dots under swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation. Bare and silica coated ZnS quantum dots were prepared following an inexpensive chemical route using polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as the dielectric host matrix. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study of the samples show the formation of almost spherical ZnS quantum dots. The UV-Vis absorption spectra reveal blue shift relative to bulk material in absorption energy while photoluminescence (PL) spectra suggests that surface state and near band edge emissions are dominating in case of bare and coated samples, respectively. Swift heavy ion irradiation of the samples was carried out with 160 MeV Ni{sup 12+} ion beam with fluences 10{sup 12} to 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}. Size enhancement of bare quantum dots after irradiation has been indicated in XRD and TEM analysis of the samples which has also been supported by optical absorption spectra. However similar investigations on irradiated coated quantum dots revealed little change in quantum dot size and emission. The present study thus shows that the coated ZnS quantum dots are stable upon SHI irradiation compared to the bare one.

  19. On the effect of soil hydraulic properties on the relationship between spatial variation and spatial mean of soil water contents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding soil moisture variability and its relationship with water content at various scales is a key issue in hydrological research. In this work we analyze this relationship by using the Monte-Carlo simulations of unsaturated flow in bare soils for eleven USDA textural classes. Parameters of ...

  20. Employing UAVs to Acquire Detailed Vegetation and Bare Ground Data for Assessing Rangeland Health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rango, A.; Laliberte, A.; Herrick, J. E.; Winters, C.

    2007-12-01

    Because of its value as a historical record (extending back to the mid 1930s), aerial photography is an important tool used in many rangeland studies. However, these historical photos are not very useful for detailed analysis of rangeland health because of inadequate spatial resolution and scheduling limitations. These issues are now being resolved by using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) over rangeland study areas. Spatial resolution improvements have been rapid in the last 10 years from the QuickBird satellite through improved aerial photography to the new UAV coverage and have utilized improved sensors and the more simplistic approach of low altitude flights. Our rangeland health experiments have shown that the low altitude UAV digital photography is preferred by rangeland scientists because it allows, for the first time, their identification of vegetation and land surface patterns and patches, gap sizes, bare soil percentages, and vegetation type. This hyperspatial imagery (imagery with a resolution finer than the object of interest) is obtained at about 5cm resolution by flying at an altitude of 150m above the surface of the Jornada Experimental Range in southern New Mexico. Additionally, the UAV provides improved temporal flexibility, such as flights immediately following fires, floods, and other catastrophic disturbances, because the flight capability is located near the study area and the vehicles are under the direct control of the users, eliminating the additional steps associated with budgets and contracts. There are significant challenges to improve the data to make them useful for operational agencies, namely, image distortion with inexpensive, consumer grade digital cameras, difficulty in detecting sufficient ground control points in small scenes (152m by 114m), accuracy of exterior UAV information on X,Y, Z, roll, pitch, and heading, the sheer number of images collected, and developing reliable relationships with ground-based data across a broad

  1. Effects of soil management techniques on soil water erosion in apricot orchards.

    PubMed

    Keesstra, Saskia; Pereira, Paulo; Novara, Agata; Brevik, Eric C; Azorin-Molina, Cesar; Parras-Alcántara, Luis; Jordán, Antonio; Cerdà, Artemi

    2016-05-01

    Soil erosion is extreme in Mediterranean orchards due to management impact, high rainfall intensities, steep slopes and erodible parent material. Vall d'Albaida is a traditional fruit production area which, due to the Mediterranean climate and marly soils, produces sweet fruits. However, these highly productive soils are left bare under the prevailing land management and marly soils are vulnerable to soil water erosion when left bare. In this paper we study the impact of different agricultural land management strategies on soil properties (bulk density, soil organic matter, soil moisture), soil water erosion and runoff, by means of simulated rainfall experiments and soil analyses. Three representative land managements (tillage/herbicide/covered with vegetation) were selected, where 20 paired plots (60 plots) were established to determine soil losses and runoff. The simulated rainfall was carried out at 55mmh(-1) in the summer of 2013 (<8% soil moisture) for one hour on 0.25m(2) circular plots. The results showed that vegetation cover, soil moisture and organic matter were significantly higher in covered plots than in tilled and herbicide treated plots. However, runoff coefficient, total runoff, sediment yield and soil erosion were significantly higher in herbicide treated plots compared to the others. Runoff sediment concentration was significantly higher in tilled plots. The lowest values were identified in covered plots. Overall, tillage, but especially herbicide treatment, decreased vegetation cover, soil moisture, soil organic matter, and increased bulk density, runoff coefficient, total runoff, sediment yield and soil erosion. Soil erosion was extremely high in herbicide plots with 0.91Mgha(-1)h(-1) of soil lost; in the tilled fields erosion rates were lower with 0.51Mgha(-1)h(-1). Covered soil showed an erosion rate of 0.02Mgha(-1)h(-1). These results showed that agricultural management influenced water and sediment dynamics and that tillage and herbicide

  2. Influence of Soil Properties on Soldierless Termite Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Bourguignon, Thomas; Drouet, Thomas; Šobotník, Jan; Hanus, Robert; Roisin, Yves

    2015-01-01

    In tropical rainforests, termites constitute an important part of the soil fauna biomass, and as for other soil arthropods, variations in soil composition create opportunities for niche partitioning. The aim of this study was twofold: first, we tested whether soil-feeding termite species differ in the foraging substrate; second, we investigated whether soil-feeding termites select their foraging sites to enhance nutrients intake. To do so, we collected termites and analysed the composition and structure of their feeding substrates. Although Anoplotermes-group members are all considered soil-feeders, our results show that some species specifically feed on abandoned termite nests and very rotten wood, and that this substrate selection is correlated with previous stable isotope analyses, suggesting that one component of niche differentiation among species is substrate selection. Our results show that the composition and structure of bare soils on which different termite species foraged do not differ, suggesting that there is no species specialization for a particular type of bare soil. Finally, the bare soil on which termites forage does not differ from random soil samples. Overall, our results suggest that few species of the Anoplotermes-group are specialized toward substrates rich in organic matter, but that the vast majority forage on soil independently of its structural and chemical composition, being ecologically equivalent for this factor. PMID:26270057

  3. Influence of Soil Properties on Soldierless Termite Distribution.

    PubMed

    Bourguignon, Thomas; Drouet, Thomas; Šobotník, Jan; Hanus, Robert; Roisin, Yves

    2015-01-01

    In tropical rainforests, termites constitute an important part of the soil fauna biomass, and as for other soil arthropods, variations in soil composition create opportunities for niche partitioning. The aim of this study was twofold: first, we tested whether soil-feeding termite species differ in the foraging substrate; second, we investigated whether soil-feeding termites select their foraging sites to enhance nutrients intake. To do so, we collected termites and analysed the composition and structure of their feeding substrates. Although Anoplotermes-group members are all considered soil-feeders, our results show that some species specifically feed on abandoned termite nests and very rotten wood, and that this substrate selection is correlated with previous stable isotope analyses, suggesting that one component of niche differentiation among species is substrate selection. Our results show that the composition and structure of bare soils on which different termite species foraged do not differ, suggesting that there is no species specialization for a particular type of bare soil. Finally, the bare soil on which termites forage does not differ from random soil samples. Overall, our results suggest that few species of the Anoplotermes-group are specialized toward substrates rich in organic matter, but that the vast majority forage on soil independently of its structural and chemical composition, being ecologically equivalent for this factor. PMID:26270057

  4. Comparison of buried soil sensors, surface chambers and above ground measurements of carbon dioxide fluxes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil carbon dioxide (CO2) flux is an important component of the terrestrial carbon cycle. Accurate measurements of soil CO2 flux aids determinations of carbon budgets. In this study, we investigated soil CO2 fluxes with time and depth and above ground CO2 fluxes in a bare field. CO2 concentrations w...

  5. ESTIMATING WITHIN-FIELD VARIATIONS IN SOIL PROPERTIES FROM AIRBORNE HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability of hyperspectral image (HSI) data to provide estimates of soil electrical conductivity (EC) and soil fertility levels without requiring extensive field data collection was investigated. Bare soil images were acquired using a prism grating pushbroom scanner in April 2000 and May 2001 for ...

  6. Use of airborne hyperspectral imagery to map soil parameters in tilled agricultural fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil hyperspectral reflectance imagery was obtained from an airborne imaging spectrometer (400 to 2450 nm with ~10 nm resolution, 2.5 m spatial resolution) flown over six tilled (bare soil) agricultural fields on the Eastern Shore of the Chesapeake Bay (Queen Anne’s county, MD). Surface soil samples...

  7. Field test of an air-to-ground communication link using a bare optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juarez, Juan C.; Dwivedi, Anurag; Sova, Raymond M.; Sluz, Joseph E.; Young, David W.

    2007-04-01

    Results of a field demonstration of an air-to-ground communication link using an airborne bare optical fiber are presented. The demonstration was conducted by the Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory at the TCOM, L.P. Test Facility in Elizabeth City, NC in May 2006 using a 38 m, tethered aerostat raised to an altitude of 2100 ft. A bare, single mode optical fiber attached between the aerostat and its mooring station was evaluated as an optical link for several hours. Wavelength Division Multiplexed channels operating in the 1550 nm band with data rates of 1 and 10 Gbps were tested to achieve error free data transfers. A separate, continuous wave channel was also multiplexed for performance monitoring. BER vs. link power measurements and eye diagrams will be analyzed for data transfer performance over the airborne bare optical fiber.

  8. Evaluating the impacts of re-vegetation of bare peat on blanket peat water tables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuttleworth, Emma; Richards, Rebecca; Evans, Martin; Agnew, Clive; Pilkington, Mike; Maskill, Rachael; Allott, Tim

    2015-04-01

    Studies of the hydrological impacts of peat restoration in blanket peat systems have focused on the impacts of drain and gully blocking on water tables. However, in the South Pennines of the UK large areas of previously bare blanket peat have been restored by re-vegetation. The effects of this restoration treatment on water table behaviour have not been fully evaluated. Preliminary data from space-for-time studies indicate that re-vegetation leads to significant rises in water tables and decreases in water table variability. Here we present additional data from a before-after-control-intervention (BACI) study to validate these preliminary observations. We also present meteorological, net radiation and evapotranspiration data to test the hypothesis that water table changes associated with re-vegetation are driven by changing evapotranspiration rates as bare peat surfaces re-vegetate. The wider ecosystem service benefits of water table increases associated with re-vegetation of bare peat are discussed.

  9. Microwave soil moisture measurements and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newton, R. W.; Howell, T. A.; Nieber, J. L.; Vanbavel, C. H. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    An effort to develop a model that simulates the distribution of water content and of temperature in bare soil is documented. The field experimental set up designed to acquire the data to test this model is described. The microwave signature acquisition system (MSAS) field measurements acquired in Colby, Kansas during the summer of 1978 are pesented.

  10. Criticality analysis for weapon disassembly at the Pantex Plant - part I: Bare pits

    SciTech Connect

    Knief, R.A.

    1997-06-01

    This paper briefly describes criticality investigations for weapon assembly and dismantlement at the Pantex Plant. Results are summarized for calculations performed for safety analyses, radiological hazards assessments, and a study to justify the criticality alarm exemption. Pits and pits in containers were modeled in their most reactive configuration. Criticality calculations were performed with the KENO and MCNP code packages. Configurations involving bare pits were subcritical by a substantial amount even with very conservative model assumptions. Thus, it is concluded that a critical configuration involving the bare pits is not credible.

  11. Purulent pericardial effusion and mycotic pseudoaneurysm following insertion of a bare metal stent.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Go; Nakano, Kiyoharu; Asano, Ryota; Sato, Atsuhiko; Kodera, Kojiro; Tatsuishi, Wataru

    2015-05-01

    A 65-year-old male was diagnosed with purulent pericarditis, caused by Staphylococcus aureus five weeks after bare metal stenting for a 90% stenosis of the right coronary artery ostium. Subsequently, he developed a pseudoaneurysm in the right coronary sinus of Valsalva (CSV) requiring surgical intervention during the treatment of the pericarditis. Bacteremia after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) occurs in < 1% of patients and usually has insignificant clinical sequelae. We present an infected coronary bare metal stent of the proximal right coronary artery after PCI that resulted in a purulent pericardial effusion and mycotic pseudoaneurysm of the right coronary sinus of Valsalva (CSV). The patient successfully underwent surgical treatment. PMID:25783563

  12. Soil carbon sequestration by three perennial legume pastures is greater in deeper soil layers than in the surface soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, X.-K.; Turner, N. C.; Song, L.; Gu, Y.-J.; Wang, T.-C.; Li, F.-M.

    2016-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) plays a vital role as both a sink for and source of atmospheric carbon. Revegetation of degraded arable land in China is expected to increase soil carbon sequestration, but the role of perennial legumes on soil carbon stocks in semiarid areas has not been quantified. In this study, we assessed the effect of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) and two locally adapted forage legumes, bush clover (Lespedeza davurica S.) and milk vetch (Astragalus adsurgens Pall.) on the SOC concentration and SOC stock accumulated annually over a 2 m soil profile. The results showed that the concentration of SOC in the bare soil decreased slightly over the 7 years, while 7 years of legume growth substantially increased the concentration of SOC over the 0-2.0 m soil depth. Over the 7-year growth period the SOC stocks increased by 24.1, 19.9 and 14.6 Mg C ha-1 under the alfalfa, bush clover and milk vetch stands, respectively, and decreased by 4.2 Mg C ha-1 in the bare soil. The sequestration of SOC in the 1-2 m depth of the soil accounted for 79, 68 and 74 % of the SOC sequestered in the 2 m deep soil profile under alfalfa, bush clover and milk vetch, respectively. Conversion of arable land to perennial legume pasture resulted in a significant increase in SOC, particularly at soil depths below 1 m.

  13. Nitrate distribution in Mojave Desert soils

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, R.B.; Romney, E.M.; Wallace, A.

    1982-07-01

    Extensive sampling shows high variability in nitrate concentration within profiles of Mojave Desert soils. This high variability greatly complicates studies of desert soil N and its ecological role. Patterns in nitrate distribution suggest effects of litter decomposition under shrubs, surface leaching in bare areas, and plant uptake in the root zone. Two mechanisms proposed to explain high concentrations found at seemingly random depths are concentration at drying fronts and distribution along water potential gradients.

  14. Deconvolution enhanced direction of arrival estimation using 1- and 3-component seismic arrays applied to ocean induced microseisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal, M.; Reading, A. M.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Koper, K. D.; Burlacu, R.; Gibbons, S. J.

    2016-04-01

    Microseisms in the period of 2 - 10 seconds are generated in deep oceans and near coastal regions. It is common for microseisms from multiple sources to arrive at the same time at a given seismometer. It is therefore desirable to be able to measure multiple slowness vectors accurately. Popular ways to estimate the direction of arrival of ocean induced microseisms are the conventional (fk) or adaptive (Capon) beamformer. These techniques give robust estimates, but are limited in their resolution capabilities and hence do not always detect all arrivals. One of the limiting factors in determining direction of arrival with seismic arrays is the array response, which can strongly influence the estimation of weaker sources. In this work, we aim to improve the resolution for weaker sources and evaluate the performance of two deconvolution algorithms, Richardson-Lucy deconvolution and a new implementation of CLEAN-PSF. The algorithms are tested with 3 arrays of different aperture (ASAR, WRA and NORSAR) using 1 month of real data each and compared with the conventional approaches. We find an improvement over conventional methods from both algorithms and the best performance with CLEAN-PSF. We then extend the CLEAN-PSF framework to 3 components and evaluate 1 year of data from the Pilbara Seismic Array (PSAR) in north-west Australia. The 3 component CLEAN-PSF analysis is capable in resolving a previously undetected Sn phase.

  15. In vivo comparative study of tissue reaction to bare and antimicrobial polymer coated transcutaneous implants.

    PubMed

    Calliess, Tilman; Bartsch, Ivonne; Haupt, Maike; Reebmann, Mattias; Schwarze, Michael; Stiesch, Meike; Pfaffenroth, Cornelia; Sluszniak, Magda; Dempwolf, Wibke; Menzel, Henning; Witte, Frank; Willbold, Elmar

    2016-04-01

    We coated transcutaneous implants made of titanium alloy Ti6Al4V with copolymer dimethyl (2-methacryloyloxy-ethyl) phosphonate and 4-vinylpyridine and investigated the tissue reaction with respect to its biocompatible and antimicrobial properties in vivo. We distinguished between clinically observable superficial inflammations and histologically detectable deep infections. The vinylpyridine moieties were transferred into cationic pyridinium groups by reaction with hexyl bromide. Thus polymers with both antimicrobial capacity and good biocompatibility were obtained. In a short-term study, we implanted specially designed bare or coated implants in hairless but immunocompetent mice and analyzed the tissue reaction histologically. No difference was found between bare and coated implants in the initial healing phase of up to 14days; however, after 21days the scar tissue formation was higher in the bare implant group. The degree of epithelial downgrowth was comparable in both groups at any time point. In a long-term study of up to 168days, we analyzed resistance to infection. In the bare implant group, 7 of the 12 implantation sites became infected deep whereas in the coated implant group only two deep infections were observed. The other implantation sites showed only superficial signs of inflammation. These results generally accord with previous in-vitro studies. PMID:26838901

  16. Bare Pedagogy and the Scourge of Neoliberalism: Rethinking Higher Education as a Democratic Public Sphere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giroux, Henry A.

    2010-01-01

    A new form of bare pedagogy is emerging in higher education focused on market-driven competitiveness and even militaristic goal-setting, while critical pedagogy, with its emphasis on the hard work of critical analysis, moral judgments, and social responsibility (critical pedagogy that goes to the very heart of what it means to address real…

  17. Introducing the Notion of Bare and Effective Mass via Newton's Second Law of Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinto, Marcus Benghi

    2007-01-01

    The concepts of bare and effective mass are widely used within modern physics. Their meaning is discussed in advanced undergraduate and graduate courses such as solid state physics, nuclear physics and quantum field theory. Here I discuss how these concepts may be introduced together with the discussion of Newton's second law of motion. The…

  18. Bare Forms and Lexical Insertions in Code-Switching: A Processing-Based Account

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Jonathan

    2005-01-01

    Bare forms (or [slashed O] forms), uninflected lexical L2 insertions in contexts where the matrix language expects morphological marking, have been recognized as an anomaly in different approaches to code-switching. Myers-Scotton (1997, 2002) has explained their existence in terms of structural incongruity between the matrix and embedded…

  19. Estimation of the bed shear stress in vegetated and bare channels with smooth beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Judy Q.; Kerger, Francois; Nepf, Heidi M.

    2015-05-01

    The shear stress at the bed of a channel influences important benthic processes such as sediment transport. Several methods exist to estimate the bed shear stress in bare channels without vegetation, but most of these are not appropriate for vegetated channels due to the impact of vegetation on the velocity profile and turbulence production. This study proposes a new model to estimate the bed shear stress in both vegetated and bare channels with smooth beds. The model, which is supported by measurements, indicates that for both bare and vegetated channels with smooth beds, within a viscous sublayer at the bed, the viscous stress decreases linearly with increasing distance from the bed, resulting in a parabolic velocity profile at the bed. For bare channels, the model describes the velocity profile in the overlap region of the Law of the Wall. For emergent canopies of sufficient density (frontal area per unit canopy volume a≥4.3 m-1), the thickness of the linear-stress layer is set by the stem diameter, leading to a simple estimate for bed shear stress.

  20. Electroless deposition of palladium at bare and templated liquid/liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Dryfe, Robert A W; Simm, Andrew O; Kralj, Brett

    2003-10-29

    A simple, electroless approach to metallize the liquid/liquid interface is reported. The method is illustrated with the deposition of Pd at the bare water/1,2-dichloroethane interface, and for the "templated" deposition of Pd within the 100 nm diameter pores of gamma-alumina membranes. PMID:14570460

  1. 10 CFR 429.35 - Bare or covered (no reflector) medium base compact fluorescent lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Bare or covered (no reflector) medium base compact fluorescent lamps. 429.35 Section 429.35 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION CERTIFICATION... units per basic model must be used when testing for the average rated lamp life. Half the sample...

  2. 10 CFR 429.35 - Bare or covered (no reflector) medium base compact fluorescent lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Bare or covered (no reflector) medium base compact fluorescent lamps. 429.35 Section 429.35 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION CERTIFICATION... units per basic model must be used when testing for the average rated lamp life. Half the sample...

  3. The Bare Facts about the Listener's Responsibility in Understanding Semantic Meaning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohlken, Bob

    The bare fact is that the speaker's words are nothing until the listener gives them meaning. The denotation of a word is developed through association with other words. The connotation is the more difficult concept to establish for the critical/comprehensive listener studying word meaning. The common explanation is that "connotation refers to the…

  4. Characterization of diamond film and bare metal photocathodes as a function of temperature and surface preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Shurter, R.P.; Moir, D.C.; Devlin, D.J.

    1996-07-01

    High current photocathodes using bare metal and polycrystalline diamond films illuminated by ultraviolet lasers are being developed at Los Alamos for use in a new generation of linear induction accelerators. These photocathodes must be able to produce multiple 60 ns pulses separated by several to tens of nanoseconds. The vacuum environment in which the photocathodes must operate is 10{sup -5} torr.

  5. DETAIL VIEW, SOUTH PORTICO. THE BARE GROUND BENEATH THE PORTICO’S ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW, SOUTH PORTICO. THE BARE GROUND BENEATH THE PORTICO’S CENTER BAY DISCLOSES THE LOCATION OF A REMOVED STAIR. THE ORIGINAL FRAME STAIRCASES UP TO THE PORTICO EXTENDED FROM THE EAST AND WEST SIDES - The Woodlands, 4000 Woodlands Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  6. Soil Loss From Tillage Ridge as Affected by Waste Materials and Soil Amendments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In semi-arid regions with low crop residues, tillage ridges are used to mitigate wind and water erosion. Unfortunately, without sufficient immobile soil aggregates, bare ridges also often need additional protection. From late winter through early summer of 2006-2008 the reduction in erosion by vario...

  7. Soil processes parameterization in meteorological model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, Andrzej; Duniec, Grzegorz

    2014-05-01

    In August 2012 Polish Institute Meteorology and Water Management - National Research Institute (IMWM-NRI) started a collaboration with the Institute of Agrophysics - Polish Academy of Science (IA-PAS) in order to improve soil processes parameterization in COSMO meteorological model of high resolution (horizontal grid size equal to 2,8 km). This cooperation turned into a project named "New approach to parameterization of physical processes in soil in numerical model". The new set of soil processes parameterizations is being developed considering many physical and microphysical processes in soil. Currently, main effort is focused on description of bare soil evaporation, soil water transport and the runoff from soil layers. The preliminary results from new mathematical formulation of bare soil evaporation implemented in COSMO model will be presented. Moreover, during the Conference authors (realizing a constant need for further improvement) would like to show future plans and topics for further studies. It is planned to combine the mentioned new approach with TILE and MOSAIC parameterizations, previously investigated as a part of TERRA-MultiLevel module of COSMO model, and to use measurements data received from IA-PAS and from Satellite Remote Sensing Center in soil-related COSMO model numerical experiments.

  8. Freeze-thaw effects on phosphorus loss in runoff from manured and catch-cropped soils.

    PubMed

    Bechmann, Marianne E; Kleinman, Peter J A; Sharpley, Andrew N; Saporito, Lou S

    2005-01-01

    Concern over nonpoint source P losses from agricultural lands to surface waters in frigid climates has focused attention on the role of freezing and thawing on P loss from catch crops (cover crops). This study evaluated the effect of freezing and thawing on the fate of P in bare soils, soils mixed with dairy manure, and soils with an established catch crop of annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum L.). Experiments were conducted to evaluate changes in P runoff from packed soil boxes (100 by 20 by 5 cm) and P leaching from intact soil columns (30 cm deep). Before freezing and thawing, total P (TP) in runoff from catch-cropped soils was lower than from manured and bare soils due to lower erosion. Repeated freezing and thawing significantly increased water-extractable P (WEP) from catch crop biomass and resulted in significantly elevated concentrations of dissolved P in runoff (9.7 mg L(-1)) compared with manured (0.18 mg L(-1)) and bare soils (0.14 mg L(-1)). Catch crop WEP was strongly correlated with the number of freeze-thaw cycles. Freezing and thawing did not change the WEP of soils mixed with manures, nor were differences observed in subsurface losses of P between catch-cropped and bare soils before or after manure application. This study illustrates the trade-offs of establishing catch crops in frigid climates, which can enhance P uptake by biomass and reduce erosion potential but increase dissolved P runoff. PMID:16275731

  9. Impact of the soil hydrology scheme on simulated soil moisture memory in a GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagemann, Stefan; Stacke, Tobias

    2013-04-01

    Soil moisture-atmosphere feedback effects play an important role in several regions of the globe. For some of these regions, soil moisture memory may contribute significantly to the development of the regional climate. Identifying those regions can help to improve predictability in seasonal to decadal climate forecasts. The present study investigates how different setups of the soil hydrology scheme affect soil moisture memory simulated by the global climate model of the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology (MPI-M), ECHAM6/JSBACH. First, the standard setup applied for the CMIP5 exercise is used, in which soil water is represented by a single soil moisture reservoir. Second, a new five soil layer hydrology scheme is utilized where the previous bucket soil moisture now corresponds to the root zone soil moisture. In the standard setup, transpiration may access the whole soil moisture that is exceeding the wilting point over vegetated areas. However, in the five layer scheme, soil water below the root zone cannot be accessed by transpiration directly, but only be transported upwards into the root zone by diffusion following the Richard's equation. Thus, this below the root zone, which is not present in the standard setup, can act as buffer in the transition between wet and dry periods. A second notable difference between the two setups is the formulation of bare soil evaporation. In the standard setup, it may only occur if the whole soil moisture bucket is almost completely saturated, while in the new setup, it depends only on the saturation of the upper most soil layer. As the latter is much thinner than the root zone (bucket), bare soil evaporation can occur more frequently, especially after rainfall events. For the second setup, two further variants are considered: one where the bare soil evaporation was modified and one where a new parameter dataset of soil water holding capacities was used. Soil moisture memory of the different setups will be analysed from global

  10. 30 CFR 75.1003 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 75.1003 Section 75.1003... Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires...

  11. 30 CFR 75.1003 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 75.1003 Section 75.1003... Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires...

  12. 30 CFR 75.1003 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 75.1003 Section 75.1003... Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires...

  13. 30 CFR 75.1003 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 75.1003 Section 75.1003... Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires...

  14. 30 CFR 75.1003 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 75.1003 Section 75.1003... Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires...

  15. Multifrequency measurements of the effects of soil moisture, soil texture, and surface roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. R.; Oneill, P. E.; Jackson, T. J.; Engman, E. T.

    1983-01-01

    An experiment on remote sensing of soil moisture content was conducted over bare fields with microwave radiometers at the frequencies of 1.4, 5, and 10.7 GHz, during July-September of 1981. Three bare fields with different surface roughnesses and soil textures were prepared for the experiment. The experimental results show that the effect of surface roughness is to increase the soil's brightness temperature and to reduce the slope of regression between brightness temperature and moisture content. The slopes of regression for soils with different textures are found to be comparable and the effect of soil texture is reflected in the difference of regression line intercepts at brightness-temperature axis. Measurements on wet smooth bare fields give lower brightness temperatures at 5 than at 1.4 GHz. This phenomenon is not expected from current radiative transfer theory, using laboratory measurements of the relationship between permittivity and moisture content for different soil-water mixtures at frequencies of not greater than 5 GHz.

  16. Oxidation, Creep And Fatigue Properties of Bare and Coated 31V alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Dryepondt, Sebastien N.; Jones, Samuel J.; Zhang, Ying; Maziasz, Philip J.; Pint, Bruce A.

    2014-12-06

    Increasing the efficiency of natural gas reciprocating engines will require materials with better mechanical and corrosion resistance at high temperatures. One solution to increase the lifetime of exhaust valves is to apply an aluminide coating to prevent corrosion assisted fatigue cracking, but the impact of the coating on the valve material mechanical properties needs to be assessed. Creep and high cycle fatigue (HCF) testing were conducted at 816°C on bare and slurry or pack-coated 31V alloy. After annealing according to the 31V standard heat treatment, the coated and bare creep specimens exhibited very similar creep rupture lives. The HCF behavior of the pack-coated alloy was close to the behavior of the bar alloy, but fatigue lifetimes of slurry-coated 31V specimens had higher variability. Aluminide coatings have the potential to improve the valve performance at high temperature, but the coating deposition process needs to be tailored for the substrate standard heat treatment.

  17. Development of Ferromagnetic Superspins in Bare Cu Nanoparticles by Electronic Charge Redistribution

    PubMed Central

    Batsaikhan, Erdembayalag; Chen, Yen-Cheng; Lee, Chi-Hung; Li, Hsiao-Chi; Li, Wen-Hsien

    2015-01-01

    We report on the results of investigating the ferromagnetic properties of bare Cu nanoparticles. Three sets of bare Cu nanoparticle assemblies with mean particle diameters of 6.6, 8.1, and 11.1 nm were fabricated, employing the gas condensation method. Curie-Weiss paramagnetic responses to a weak driving magnetic field were detected, showing the appearance of particle superspins that overcomes the diamagnetic responses from the inner core. The isothermal magnetization displays a Langevin field profile together with magnetic hysteresis appearing even at 300 K, demonstrating the existence of ferromagnetic superspins in the Cu nanoparticles. Shifting of a noticeable amount of electronic charge from being distributed near the lattice sites in bulk form toward their neighboring ions in nanoparticles was found. The extended 3d and 4s band mixture are the main sources for the development of localized 3d holes for the development of ferromagnetic particle superspins in Cu nanoparticles. PMID:26404237

  18. Oblique shock wave calculations for detonation waves in brass confined and bare PBXN-111 cylindrical charges

    SciTech Connect

    Lemar, E.R.; Forbes, J.W.; Cowperthwaite, M.

    1998-07-01

    Shock polar theory is used to calculate the angles detonation fronts make with the cylinder wall for brass cased and bare PBXN-111 cylinders. Two extrapolated unreacted PBXN-111 Hugoniot curves are used to calculate these angles. Measured and calculated angles for bare PBXN-111 cylinders are in good agreement for one of the unreacted PBXN-111 Hugoniots. Except for the 100 mm diameter charge, the differences between calculated and measured angles for brass cased charges are beyond experimental error. Limited data suggests that the wave front curvature exhibits a large change right at the brass wall and the resolution in the experiments may not be fine enough to show it clearly. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Soft Landing of Bare Nanoparticles with Controlled Size, Composition, and Morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Grant E.; Colby, Robert J.; Laskin, Julia

    2015-01-01

    A kinetically-limited physical synthesis method based on magnetron sputtering and gas aggregation has been coupled with size-selection and ion soft landing to prepare bare metal nanoparticles on surfaces with controlled coverage, size, composition, and morphology. Employing atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), it is demonstrated that the size and coverage of bare nanoparticles soft landed onto flat glassy carbon and silicon as well as stepped graphite surfaces may be controlled through size-selection with a quadrupole mass filter and the length of deposition, respectively. The bare nanoparticles are observed with AFM to bind randomly to the flat glassy carbon surface when soft landed at relatively low coverage (1012 ions). In contrast, on stepped graphite surfaces at intermediate coverage (1013 ions) the soft landed nanoparticles are shown to bind preferentially along step edges forming extended linear chains of particles. At the highest coverage (5 x 1013 ions) examined in this study the nanoparticles are demonstrated with both AFM and SEM to form a continuous film on flat glassy carbon and silicon surfaces. On a graphite surface with defects, however, it is shown with SEM that the presence of localized surface imperfections results in agglomeration of nanoparticles onto these features and the formation of neighboring depletion zones that are devoid of particles. Employing high resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy in the high angular annular dark field imaging mode (STEM-HAADF) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) it is demonstrated that the magnetron sputtering/gas aggregation synthesis technique produces single metal particles with controlled morphology as well as bimetallic alloy nanoparticles with clearly defined core-shell structure. Therefore, this kinetically-limited physical synthesis technique, when combined with ion soft landing, is a versatile complementary method for preparing a wide range of

  20. Optical coupling of bare optoelectronic components and flexographically printed polymer waveguides in planar optronic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yixiao; Wolfer, Tim; Lange, Alex; Overmeyer, Ludger

    2016-05-01

    Large scale, planar optronic systems allowing spatially distributed functionalities can be well used in diverse sensor networks, such as for monitoring the environment by measuring various physical quantities in medicine or aeronautics. In these systems, mechanically flexible and optically transparent polymeric foils, e.g. polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET), are employed as carrier materials. A benefit of using these materials is their low cost. The optical interconnections from light sources to light transmission structures in planar optronic systems occupy a pivotal position for the sensing functions. As light sources, we employ the optoelectronic components, such as edgeemitting laser diodes, in form of bare chips, since their extremely small structures facilitate a high integration compactness and ensure sufficient system flexibility. Flexographically printed polymer optical waveguides are deployed as light guiding structures for short-distance communication in planar optronic systems. Printing processes are utilized for this generation of waveguides to achieve a cost-efficient large scale and high-throughput production. In order to attain a high-functional optronic system for sensing applications, one of the most essential prerequisites is the high coupling efficiency between the light sources and the waveguides. Therefore, in this work, we focus on the multimode polymer waveguide with a parabolic cross-section and investigate its optical coupling with the bare laser diode. We establish the geometrical model of the alignment based on the previous works on the optodic bonding of bare laser diodes and the fabrication process of polymer waveguides with consideration of various parameters, such as the beam profile of the laser diode, the employed polymer properties of the waveguides as well as the carrier substrates etc. Accordingly, the optical coupling of the bare laser diodes and the polymer waveguides was simulated

  1. Analysis of ProSEDS Test of Bare-Tether Collection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanmartin, J. R.; Lorenzini, E. C.; Estes, R. D.; Charro, M.; Cosmo, M. L.

    2003-01-01

    NASA's tether experiment ProSEDS will be placed in orbit on board a Delta-II rocket to test bare-tether electron collection, deorbiting of the rocket second stage, and the system dynamic stability. ProSEDS performance will vary because ambient conditions change along the orbit and tether-circuit bulk elements at the cathodic end follow the step-by-step sequence for the current cycles of operating modes (open-circuit, shunt and resistor modes for primary cycles; shunt and battery modes for secondary cycles). In this work we discuss expected ProSEDS values of the ratio L,/L*, which jointly with cathodic bulk elements determines bias and current tether profiles; L, is tether length, and L* (changing with tether temperature and ionospheric plasma density and magnetic field) is a characteristic length gauging ohmic versus baretether collection impedances. We discuss how to test bare-tether electron collection during primary cycles, using probe measurements of plasma density, measurements of cathodic current in resistor and shunt modes, and an estimate of tether temperature based on ProSEDS orbital position at the particular cycle concerned. We discuss how a temperature misestimate might occasionally affect the test of bare-tether collection, and how introducing the battery mode in some primary cycles, for an additional current measurement, could obviate the need of a temperature estimate. We also show how to test bare-tether collection by estimating orbit-decay rate from measurements of cathodic current for the shunt and battery modes of secondary cycles.

  2. Neoatherosclerosis in Very Late Stenosis of Bare Metal Stent by Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Iskandar, Aline

    2016-01-01

    Bare metal stents (BMS) continue to be widely used in patients with coronary artery disease undergoing percutaneous revascularization. Progressive luminal renarrowing has been reported late after BMS implantation resulting in a significant rate of stent failure events. We present a case of very late BMS failure due to in-stent restenosis where optical coherence tomography (OCT) was used to demonstrate neoatherosclerosis as the underlying mechanism. We provide a brief review of neoatherosclerosis and showcase salient features on OCT evaluation. PMID:27034852

  3. Swiss bare mice: a suitable model for transcutaneous in vivo Raman spectroscopic studies of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, T; Kumar, Piyush; Maru, G; Ingle, A; Krishna, C Murali

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer affecting females worldwide. As early detection results in better prognosis, screening tools for breast cancer are being explored. Raman spectroscopy, a rapid, objective, and noninvasive tool, has shown promising results in the diagnosis of several cancers including breast cancer. For development as a screening tool, a study of spectral signatures associated with breast cancer progression is imperative. However, such studies are not possible in human subjects. Hence, there is a need for a suitable animal model, which is conducive to transcutaneous in vivo Raman spectroscopic measurements of breast with minimal interference from skin and hair and has contribution from functional mammary epithelium of breast. In this study, rodent models like C57, Swiss albino, Swiss bare, agouti mice, and Sprague-Dawley rats were evaluated. Among these models, transcutaneous breast spectra of hairless Swiss bare mice have the best signal-to-noise ratio and were closest to reported ex vivo as well as intraoperative in vivo human breast spectra. Principal component-linear discriminant analysis of several anatomical sites confirms minimal skin interference and suggests contribution from functional mammary epithelium of breast. Moreover, transcutaneous spectra from normal breast and breast tumors of Swiss bare mice could be classified with 99% efficiency, which is better than the previous reports. Thus, Swiss bare mice model may be better suited for transcutaneous in vivo Raman spectroscopic studies of breast physiology and pathology, especially breast cancer. Prospectively, in addition to cancer progression, breast-to-bone metastasis can also be studied, since these anatomical sites can be uniquely classified. PMID:23708992

  4. R-mode Instability of Low-mass Bare Strange Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun-mei, Pi; Shu-hua, Yang

    2016-04-01

    The r-mode instability window of low-mass strange stars is studied using the modified bag model of strange quark matter and reasonable sets of parameters. The results show that the ultimate spin frequency of strange stars increases with the decreasing stellar mass, and the highest spin frequency (716 Hz) of pulsars observed sofar can be explained by the bare strange stars with a mass lower than about 0.1∼0.2 M⊙, depending on the selected parameters.

  5. Acute coronary syndrome due to complete bare metal stent fracture in the right coronary artery.

    PubMed

    Bilen, Emine; Saatci Yasar, Ayse; Bilge, Mehmet; Karakas, Fatih; Kırbas, Ozgur; Ipek, Gokturk

    2010-03-18

    Stent fracture (SF) was suggested to be an unusual cause of restenosis after drug eluting-stent implantation. However, angiographically visible complete SF after bare metal stent (BMS) implantation is extremely rare. Here we report a case of SF of a BMS representing with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). To our knowledge, this is the first report of early fracture of a BMS in the right coronary artery, resulting in ACS. PMID:19042043

  6. Acute coronary syndrome due to bare metal stent fracture in the right coronary artery.

    PubMed

    Şatiroğlu, Ömer; Bostan, Mehmet; Bozkur, Engin

    2011-01-01

    Stent fracture (SF) has been suggested to be an unusual cause of restenosis after drug eluting-stent implantation. However, angiographically visible SF after bare metal stent (BMS) implantation is extremely rare. We present a case of a 58 year-old male patient who presented with unstable angina secondary to a SF of a BMS within two months of elective percutaneous coronary intervention for right coronary artery associated with a muscle bridge and atherosclerotic stenosis. PMID:21850640

  7. Concerning the relationship between evapotranspiration and soil moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetzel, Peter J.; Chang, Jy-Tai

    1987-01-01

    The relationship between the evapotranspiration and soil moisture during the drying, supply-limited phase is studied. A second scaling parameter, based on the evapotranspirational supply and demand concept of Federer (1982), is defined; the parameter, referred to as the threshold evapotranspiration, occurs in vegetation-covered surfaces just before leaf stomata close and when surface tension restricts moisture release from bare soil pores. A simple model for evapotranspiration is proposed. The effects of natural soil heterogeneities on evapotranspiration computed from the model are investigated. It is observed that the natural variability in soil moisture, caused by the heterogeneities, alters the relationship between regional evapotranspiration and the area average soil moisture.

  8. Patches of Bare Ground as a Staple Commodity for Declining Ground-Foraging Insectivorous Farmland Birds

    PubMed Central

    Schaub, Michael; Martinez, Nicolas; Tagmann-Ioset, Aline; Weisshaupt, Nadja; Maurer, Melanie L.; Reichlin, Thomas S.; Abadi, Fitsum; Zbinden, Niklaus; Jenni, Lukas; Arlettaz, Raphaël

    2010-01-01

    Conceived to combat widescale biodiversity erosion in farmland, agri-environment schemes have largely failed to deliver their promises despite massive financial support. While several common species have shown to react positively to existing measures, rare species have continued to decline in most European countries. Of particular concern is the status of insectivorous farmland birds that forage on the ground. We modelled the foraging habitat preferences of four declining insectivorous bird species (hoopoe, wryneck, woodlark, common redstart) inhabiting fruit tree plantations, orchards and vineyards. All species preferred foraging in habitat mosaics consisting of patches of grass and bare ground, with an optimal, species-specific bare ground coverage of 30–70% at the foraging patch scale. In the study areas, birds thrived in intensively cultivated farmland where such ground vegetation mosaics existed. Not promoted by conventional agri-environment schemes until now, patches of bare ground should be implemented throughout grassland in order to prevent further decline of insectivorous farmland birds. PMID:20949083

  9. Oceanic corrosion test of bare and zinc-protected aluminum alloys for seawater heat exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sasscer, D. S.; Morgan, T. O.; Rivera, C.; Ernst, R.; Scott, A. C.; Summerson, T. J.

    1982-01-01

    Bare 3004 tubes, 7072 Alclad 3004 tubes, and bare and zinc diffusion treated 3003 extrusions from a brazed aluminum, plate-fin heat exchanger were exposed to 1.8 m/sec flowing seawater aboard an open ocean test facility moored 3.4 km off the southeast coast of Puerto Rico. After six months exposure, the average corrosion rates for most varieties of aluminum materials converged to a low value of 0.015 mm/yr (0.6 mils/yr). Pitting did not occur in bare 3003 and 3004 samples during the six month test. Pitting did occur to varying degrees in the Alclad and zinc diffusion treated material, but did not penetrate to the base metal. Biofouling countermeasures (intermittent chlorination and brushing) did not affect the corrosion rates to any significant extent. Intermittent chlorination at a level of 0.5 ppm for 28 minutes daily controlled microbiofouling of the samples but did not prevent the development of a macrobiofouling community in areas of the plumbing with low flow.

  10. Percutaneous Creation of Bare Intervascular Tunnels for Salvage of Thrombosed Hemodialysis Fistulas Without Recanalizable Outflow

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Matt Chiung-Yu; Wang, Yen-Chi; Weng, Mei-Jui

    2015-08-15

    PurposeThis study aimed to retrospectively assess the efficacy of a bare intervascular tunnel for salvage of a thrombosed hemodialysis fistula. We examined the clinical outcomes and provided follow-up images of the bare intervascular tunnel.Materials and MethodsEight thrombosed fistulas lacked available recanalizable outflow veins were included in this study. These fistulas were salvaged by re-directing access site flow to a new outflow vein through a percutaneously created intervascular tunnel without stent graft placement. The post-intervention primary and secondary access patency rates were calculated using the Kaplan–Meier method.ResultsThe procedural and clinical success rates were 100 %. Post-intervention primary and secondary access patency at 300 days were 18.7 ± 15.8 and 87.5 ± 11.7 %, respectively. The mean follow-up period was 218.7 days (range 10–368 days). One patient died of acute myocardial infarction 10 days after the procedure. No other major complications were observed. Minor complications, such as swelling, ecchymosis, and pain around the tunnel, occurred in all of the patients.ConclusionsPercutaneous creation of a bare intervascular tunnel is a treatment option for thrombosed hemodialysis fistulas without recanalizable outflow in selected patients.

  11. Patches of bare ground as a staple commodity for declining ground-foraging insectivorous farmland birds.

    PubMed

    Schaub, Michael; Martinez, Nicolas; Tagmann-Ioset, Aline; Weisshaupt, Nadja; Maurer, Melanie L; Reichlin, Thomas S; Abadi, Fitsum; Zbinden, Niklaus; Jenni, Lukas; Arlettaz, Raphaël

    2010-01-01

    Conceived to combat widescale biodiversity erosion in farmland, agri-environment schemes have largely failed to deliver their promises despite massive financial support. While several common species have shown to react positively to existing measures, rare species have continued to decline in most European countries. Of particular concern is the status of insectivorous farmland birds that forage on the ground. We modelled the foraging habitat preferences of four declining insectivorous bird species (hoopoe, wryneck, woodlark, common redstart) inhabiting fruit tree plantations, orchards and vineyards. All species preferred foraging in habitat mosaics consisting of patches of grass and bare ground, with an optimal, species-specific bare ground coverage of 30-70% at the foraging patch scale. In the study areas, birds thrived in intensively cultivated farmland where such ground vegetation mosaics existed. Not promoted by conventional agri-environment schemes until now, patches of bare ground should be implemented throughout grassland in order to prevent further decline of insectivorous farmland birds. PMID:20949083

  12. Topographic accuracy assessment of bare earth lidar-derived unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilskie, Matthew V.; Hagen, Scott C.

    2013-02-01

    This study is focused on the integration of bare earth lidar (Light Detection and Ranging) data into unstructured (triangular) finite element meshes and the implications on simulating storm surge inundation using a shallow water equations model. A methodology is developed to compute root mean square error (RMSE) and the 95th percentile of vertical elevation errors using four different interpolation methods (linear, inverse distance weighted, natural neighbor, and cell averaging) to resample bare earth lidar and lidar-derived digital elevation models (DEMs) onto unstructured meshes at different resolutions. The results are consolidated into a table of optimal interpolation methods that minimize the vertical elevation error of an unstructured mesh for a given mesh node density. The cell area averaging method performed most accurate when DEM grid cells within 0.25 times the ratio of local element size and DEM cell size were averaged. The methodology is applied to simulate inundation extent and maximum water levels in southern Mississippi due to Hurricane Katrina, which illustrates that local changes in topography such as adjusting element size and interpolation method drastically alter simulated storm surge locally and non-locally. The methods and results presented have utility and implications to any modeling application that uses bare earth lidar.

  13. Analysis of heel pad tissues mechanics at the heel strike in bare and shod conditions.

    PubMed

    Fontanella, C G; Forestiero, A; Carniel, E L; Natali, A N

    2013-04-01

    A combined experimental and numerical approach is used to investigate the interaction phenomena occurring between foot and footwear during the heel strike phase of the gait. Two force platforms are utilised to evaluate the ground reaction forces of a subject in bare and shod walking. The reaction forces obtained from the experimental tests are assumed as loading conditions for the numerical analyses using three dimensional models of the heel region and of the running shoe. The heel pad region, as fat and skin tissues, is described by visco-hyperelastic and fibre-reinforced hyperelastic formulations respectively and bone region by a linear orthotropic formulation. Different elastomeric foams are considered with regard to the outsole, the midsole and the insole layers. The mechanical properties are described by a hyperfoam formulation. The evaluation of the mechanical behaviour of the heel pad tissues at the heel strike in bare and shod conditions is performed considering different combinations of materials for midsole and insole layers. Results allow for the definition of the influence of different material characteristics on the mechanical response of the heel pad region, in particular showing the compressive stress differentiation in the bare and shod conditions. PMID:22789809

  14. Estimation of Soil Erosion Rates in Oil Palm Plantation with Different Land Cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahat, S.; Yusop, Z.; Askari, M.; Ziegler, A. D.

    2016-07-01

    Soil losses from hill slopes in oil palm plantation in Sedenak Estate, Johor were measured using runoff plot and rainfall simulator. The plot was designed to be removable but the size was fixed at 8 x 3.75m. Four types of surface covers were investigated for the plots, i.e. half bare soil and half grass cover (HGC), half bare soil and half dry frond (HDF), fully grass cover (FG), and fully bare soil (BS). The influence of initial soil moisture, saturated hydraulics conductivity, Ks, bulk density and slope on rates of soil loss were also evaluated. The rainfall simulator produced rainfall intensities between 90 and 160 mm/hr with durations from 45 to 60 min per run. BS plot exhibited the highest Ks value among all plots but the percentage of initial soil moisture on this surface was low. BS plot recorded the highest runoff coefficient (C) and soil loss values of 73.6 ± 4 percent and 5.26 ± 3.2 t/ha respectively, while the lowest was from plot FG with 41.7 ± 5.7 percent and soil loss of 2.85 ± 2.1 t/ha. Meanwhile, the results suggested that the ground cover had the ability to reduce soil loss by 67% and 17%, respectively for plots BS-HGC and BS-HDF. Overall, soil erosion control such as surface is effective measures in reducing level of runoff and soil erosion.

  15. Effect of the disturbance of plateau pika (Ochotona curzoniae) on soil water and soil temperature characteristics at Alpine Meadows in Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yujun; Wu, Yinan; Wang, Xiaoxing; Li, Xiaoyan

    2015-04-01

    The plateau pika (Ochotona curzoniae) is one of main small rodents at Alpine Meadows in Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, and has a positive effect on the maintenance of regional soil biodiversity. But, its excessive disturbance was also known as an important factor that leads to the vegetation degradation. Based on the field experiment, sampling analysis and continuous observation, this study compared the difference of soil water and soil temperature characteristics at different disturbance stages, which included native grassland, new mound, old mound and bare land formed by old mound. The findings of this study revealed that, after the disturbance of plateau pika, the soil bulk density at the shallow layer (0-20 cm) increased with the time-lapse. At the 20-30 cm depth, the soil bulk density of old mound, bare land and native grassland were similar, and were all higher than that of new mound. At the deep layer (under 30 cm), the soil bulk density had no significant difference between four stages, which showed that the disturbance of plateau pika mainly distributed within the shallow 30 cm depth. The unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of new mound was higher than old mound, bare soil and native grassland, with the multiple of 3.08-8.71, 4.63-16.27 and 3.70-15.25, respectively, and led to the obvious variance of soil water change for different types of land surface. After the precipitation, the soil water content change of new mound and old mound were more significant than that of bare land and native grassland. Because of the disturbance of plateau pika, the soil temperature characteristics changed, too. The heat conductivity rate of new mound and old mound decreased, significantly, and their daily temperature difference were obvious higher than bare land and native grassland. These results were essential for the study of vegetation recovery after the disturbance of plateau pika.

  16. Impact of wind erosion on soils in arid and semi-arid landscapes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wind erosion is a significant aeolian process that produces many effects on the soils and landscapes in dryland systems, comprising almost forty percent of the Earth’s land surface. Wind erosion often occurs when coarse-textured soils are bare, loose, dry and subjected to erosive winds. Although w...

  17. Long-term effects of soil management on ecosystem services and soil loss estimation in olive grove top soils.

    PubMed

    Parras-Alcántara, Luis; Lozano-García, Beatriz; Keesstra, Saskia; Cerdà, Artemi; Brevik, Eric C

    2016-11-15

    Soil management has important effects on soil properties, runoff, soil losses and soil quality. Traditional olive grove (OG) management is based on reduced tree density, canopy size shaped by pruning and weed control by ploughing. In addition, over the last several decades, herbicide use has been introduced into conventional OG management. These management strategies cause the soil surface to be almost bare and subsequently high erosion rates take place. To avoid these high erosion rates several soil management strategies can be applied. In this study, three strategies were assessed in OG with conventional tillage in three plots of 1ha each. Soil properties were measured and soil erosion rates were estimated by means of the RUSLE model. One plot was managed with no amendments (control), and the other two were treated with olive leaves mulch and oil mill pomace applied yearly from 2003 until 2013. The control plot experienced the greatest soil loss while the use of olive leaves as mulch and olive mill pomace as an amendment resulted in a soil loss reduction of 89.4% and 65.4% respectively (assuming a 5% slope). In addition, the chemical and physical soil properties were improved with the amendments. This combined effect will created a higher quality soil over the long term that it is more resilient to erosion and can provide better ecosystem services, as its functions are improved. PMID:27405516

  18. Effects of Vegetation Removal and Soil Disturbance on Soil Organic and Inorganic Carbon Dynamics in California Desert Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, A. C.; Allen, E. B.; Allen, M. F.; Hernandez, R. R.

    2015-12-01

    Solar energy developments are projected to be deployed over desert wildland areas with deep soil inorganic carbon (SIC) deposits, which often involves elimination of deep-rooted vegetation. This land cover change may systemically alter SIC pools since respired CO2 is the carbon (C) source during SIC formation. We sought to understand how removal of creosote bush scrub affects soil C pools. We hypothesized that vegetation is important for maintaining SIC and soil organic C (SOC) pools and that disturbance to the vegetation and soil will change CO2 flux with increased losses from SIC. Soils were collected from sites that had intact creosote bush scrub habitat adjacent to disturbed, bare areas where the native vegetation had been previously removed. Samples were taken from beneath shrub canopies and interspaces in intact areas, and from random points in the disturbed area. Soils were analyzed for SIC, SOC, microbial and labile C, and δ13C. Soils were also incubated to determine the potential CO2 flux from disturbed and undisturbed soils along with the sources of CO2. Three replicates per soil underwent a control and water addition treatment and flux and δ13C of CO2 were measured continuously. Control replicates yielded no significant CO2 flux. CO2 flux from watered soils was higher beneath shrub canopy (18.57µmol g soil-1 day-1±1.86) than the interspace soils (0.86 µmol g soil-1 day-1±0.17). Soils collected from bare areas had an intermediate flux (5.41 µmol g soil-1 day-1±2.68 and 3.68 µmol g soil-1 day-1±0.85, respectively) lying between shrub canopy and interspace soils. There was no significant difference between the δ13C values of CO2 from shrub canopy and interspace soils, both of which had a very low δ13C values (-22.60‰±0.64 and -23.88‰±0.89, respectively), resembling that of organic C. However, the isotopic values of CO2 from disturbed soils were significantly higher (-16.68‰±1.36 and -15.22‰±2.12, respectively) suggesting that these

  19. The brief accessibility, responsiveness, and engagement (BARE) scale: a tool for measuring attachment behavior in couple relationships.

    PubMed

    Sandberg, Jonathan G; Busby, Dean M; Johnson, Susan M; Yoshida, Keitaro

    2012-12-01

    This article describes the purpose, reliability, validity, and potential clinical applications of the brief accessibility, responsiveness, and engagement (BARE) scale. In addition to focusing on the central attachment behaviors of accessibility and responsiveness, this instrument highlights the key role of engagement in couple bonding. The BARE is a short, systemic, self-report measure of attachment behaviors in couple relationships. Both classical testing theory and item response theory were used to test the psychometric properties of the instrument. The BARE demonstrated appropriate reliability and validity while maintaining its brevity and potential usefulness for clinicians and researchers. The BARE also accurately predicted the key relationship outcomes of stability and satisfaction. The data for this study were collected from the RELATE assessment (see www.relate-institute.org). PMID:23230982

  20. Soil carbon sequestration by three perennial legume pastures is greater in deeper soil layers than in the surface soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, X.-K.; Turner, N. C.; Song, L.; Gu, Y.-J.; Wang, T.-C.; Li, F.-M.

    2015-07-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) plays a vital role as both a sink for and source of atmospheric carbon. Revegetation of degraded arable land in China is expected to increase soil carbon sequestration, but the role of perennial legumes on soil carbon stocks in semiarid areas has not been quantified. In this study, we assessed the effect of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) and two locally adapted forage legumes, bush clover (Lespedeza davurica S.) and milk vetch (Astragalus adsurgens Pall.) on the SOC concentration and SOC stock accumulated annually over a 2 m soil profile, and to estimate the long-term potential for SOC sequestration in the soil under the three forage legumes. The results showed that the concentration of SOC of the bare soil decreased slightly over the 7 years, while 7 years of legume growth substantially increased the concentration of SOC over the 0-2.0 m soil depth measured. Over the 7 year growth period the SOC stocks increased by 24.1, 19.9 and 14.6 Mg C ha-1 under the alfalfa, bush clover and milk vetch stands, respectively, and decreased by 4.2 Mg C ha-1 under bare soil. The sequestration of SOC in the 1-2 m depth of soil accounted for 79, 68 and 74 % of SOC sequestered through the upper 2 m of soil under alfalfa, bush clover and milk vetch, respectively. Conversion of arable land to perennial legume pasture resulted in a significant increase in SOC, particularly at soil depths below 1 m.

  1. Quantum thermalization of two coupled two-level systems in eigenstate and bare-state representations

    SciTech Connect

    Liao Jieqiao; Huang Jinfeng; Kuang Leman

    2011-05-15

    We study analytically the quantum thermalization of two coupled two-level systems (TLSs), which are connected with either two independent heat baths (IHBs) or a common heat bath (CHB). We understand the quantum thermalization in eigenstate and bare-state representations when the coupling between the two TLSs is stronger and weaker than the TLS-bath couplings, respectively. In the IHB case, we find that, when the two IHBs have the same temperatures, the two coupled TLSs in eigenstate representation can be thermalized with the same temperature as those of the IHBs. However, in the case of two IHBs at different temperatures, just when the energy detuning between the two TLSs satisfies a special condition, the two coupled TLSs in eigenstate representation can be thermalized with an immediate temperature between those of the two IHBs. In bare-state representation, we find a counterintuitive phenomenon that, under some conditions, the temperature of the TLS connected with the high-temperature bath is lower than that of the other TLS, which is connected with the low-temperature bath. In the CHB case, the coupled TLSs in eigenstate representation can be thermalized with the same temperature as that of the CHB in nonresonant cases. In bare-state representation, the TLS with a larger energy separation can be thermalized to a thermal equilibrium with a lower temperature. In the resonant case, we find a phenomenon of antithermalization. We also study the steady-state entanglement between the two TLSs in both the IHB and CHB cases.

  2. Assembly and integration of thin bare die using laser direct-write

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piqué, Alberto; Charipar, Nicholas A.; Auyeung, Ray C. Y.; Kim, Heungsoo; Mathews, Scott A.

    2007-02-01

    Laser-based direct-write (LDW) processes offer unique advantages for the transfer of unpackaged semiconductor bare die for microelectronics assembly applications. Using LDW it is possible to release individual devices from a carrier substrate and transfer them inside a pocket or recess in a receiving substrate using a single UV laser pulse, thus per-forming the same function as pick-and-place machines currently employed in microelectronics assembly. However, conventional pick-and-place systems have difficulty handling small (< 1mm2) and thin (< 100 μm) components. At the Naval Research Laboratory, we have demonstrated the laser release and transfer of intact 1 mm2 wafers with thicknesses down to 10 microns and with high placement accuracy using LDW techniques. Furthermore, given the gentle nature of the laser forward transfer process it is possible to transfer semiconductor bare die of sizes ranging from 0.5 to 10 mm2 without causing any damage to their circuits. Once the devices have been transferred, the same LDW system can then be used to print the metal patterns required to interconnect each device. The implementation of this technique is ideally suited for the assembly of microelectronic components and systems while allowing the overall circuit design and layout to be easily modified or adapted to any specific application or form factor including 3-D architectures. This paper describes how the LDW process can be used as an effective laser die transfer tool and will present analysis of the laser-driven release process as applied to various types of silicon bare dies.

  3. Seawater recharge into oceanic crust: IODP Exp 327 Site U1363 Grizzly Bare outcrop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheat, C. Geoffrey; Hulme, Samuel M.; Fisher, Andrew T.; Orcutt, Beth N.; Becker, Keir

    2013-06-01

    Systematic differences in sediment thermal and pore water chemical profiles from Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Site U1363 document mixing and reaction within the basaltic crust adjacent to Grizzly Bare outcrop, a site of hydrothermal recharge into 3.6 My-old basaltic crust. A transect of seven holes was drilled ~50 m to ~750 m away from the base of the outcrop. Temperatures at the sediment-basement interface increase from ~6°C to >30°C with increasing distance from the outcrop, and heat flow is suppressed within several hundred meters from the outcrop. Calculated fluid compositions at the sediment-basement interface are generally explained by mixing between bottom seawater and altered crustal basement fluids, with a composition similar but not identical to fluids from seeps at Baby Bare outcrop, located ~45 km to the northeast. Reactions within upper basement and overlying sediment affect a variety of ions (Mn, Fe, Mo, Si, PO43-, V, and U) and δ13DIC, indicating a diagenetic influence and diffusive exchange with overlying sediment pore waters. The apparent 14C age of basal pore fluids is much older than bottom seawater. Collectively, these results are consistent with seawater recharge at Grizzly Bare outcrop; however, there are strong gradients in fluid composition within 50 m of the outcrop, providing evidence for complex flow paths and vigorous mixing of young, recently recharged seawater with much older, more reacted basement fluid. The proximity of these altered fluids to the edge of the outcrop raises the possibility for fluid seepage from the outcrop in addition to seawater recharge.

  4. Ecotoxicity of bare and coated silver nanoparticles in the aquatic midge, Chironomus riparius.

    PubMed

    Park, Sun-Young; Chung, Jiwoong; Colman, Benjamin P; Matson, Cole W; Kim, Younghun; Lee, Byung-Cheon; Kim, Phil-Je; Choi, Kyunghee; Choi, Jinhee

    2015-09-01

    Although sediment is generally considered to be the major sink for nanomaterials in aquatic environments, few studies have addressed the ecotoxicity of nanomaterials in the presence of sediment. In the present study, the ecotoxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) with a range of organic coatings was examined in a freshwater sediment-dwelling organism, Chironomus riparius, using acute and chronic ecotoxicity endpoints, including molecular indicators. The toxicity of AgNPs coated with different organic materials, such as polyvinylpyrrolidone, gum arabic, and citrate, to C. riparius was compared with that of bare-AgNPs and AgNO3 (ionic silver). Total silver concentration was also measured to monitor the behavior of the AgNPs in water and sediment and to determine how ion dissolution affects the toxicity of all AgNPs. The coated- and bare-AgNPs caused DNA damage and oxidative stress-related gene expression. In addition, the bare-AgNPs and AgNO3 had a significant effect on development and reproduction. The surface coatings generally mitigated the toxicity of AgNPs to C. riparius, which can be explained by the reduced number of ions released from coated-AgNPs. Citrate-AgNPs caused the most significant alteration at the molecular level, but this did not translate to higher-level effects. Finally, comparing previously conducted studies on AgNP-induced gene expression without sediments, the authors show that the presence of sediment appears to mitigate the toxicity of AgNPs. PMID:25892495

  5. A multi-frequency measurement of thermal microwave emission from soils: The effects of soil texture and surface roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. R.; Oneill, P. E.; Jackson, T. J.; Engman, E. T. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    An experiment on remote sensing of soil moisture content was conducted over bare fields with microwave radiometers at the frequencies of 1.4 GHz, 5 GHz, and 10.7 GHz during July - September of 1981. Three bare fields with different surface roughnesses and soil textures were prepared for the experiment. Ground truth acquisition of soil temperatures and moisture contents for 5 layers down to the depths of 15 cm was made concurrently with radiometric measurements. The experimental results show that the effect of surface roughness is to increase the soils' brightness temperature and to reduce the slope of regression between brightness temperature and moisture content. The slopes of regression for soils with different textures are found to be comparable, and the effect of soil texture is reflected in the difference of regression line intercepts at brightness temperature axis. The result is consistent with laboratory measurement of soils' dielectric permittivity. Measurements on wet smooth bare fields give lower brightness temperatures at 5 GHz than at 1.4 GHz.

  6. A multi-frequency measurement of thermal microwave emission from soils - The effect of soil texture and surface roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. R.; Oneill, P. E.; Jackson, T. J.; Engman, E. T.

    1982-01-01

    An experiment on remote sensing of soil moisture content was conducted over bare fields with microwave radiometers at the frequencies of 1.4 GHz, 5 GHz, and 10.7 GHz during July September of 1981. Three bare fields with different surface roughneses and soil textures were prepared for the experiment. Ground truth acquisition of soil temperatures and moisture contents for 5 layers down to the depth of 15 cm was made concurrently with radiometric measurements. The experimental results show that the effect of surface roughness is to increase the soils' brightness temperature and to reduce the slope of regression between brightness temperature and moisture content. The slopes of regression for soils with different textures are found to be comparable, and the effect of soil texture is reflected in the difference of regression line intercepts at brightness temperature axis. The result is consistent with laboratory measurement of soils' dielectric permittivity. Measurements on wet smooth bare fields give lower brightness temperatures at 5 GHz than at 1.4 GHz. Previously announced in STAR as N82-24550

  7. Outcomes of Prosthetic Hemodialysis Grafts after Deployment of Bare Metal versus Covered Stents at the Venous Anastomosis

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Charles Y. Tandberg, Daniel J.; Rosenberg, Michael D.; Miller, Michael J.; Suhocki, Paul V.; Smith, Tony P.

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To compare postintervention patency rates after deployment of bare metal versus covered stents across the venous anastomosis of prosthetic arteriovenous (AV) grafts. Methods: Review of our procedural database over a 6 year period revealed 377 procedures involving stent deployment in an AV access circuit. After applying strict inclusion criteria, our study group consisted of 61 stent deployments in 58 patients (median age 58 years, 25 men, 33 women) across the venous anastomosis of an upper extremity AV graft circuit that had never been previously stented. Both patent and thrombosed AV access circuits were retrospectively analyzed. Within the bare metal stent group, 20 of 32 AV grafts were thrombosed at initial presentation compared to 18 of 29 AV grafts in the covered stent group. Results: Thirty-two bare metal stents and 29 covered stents were deployed across the venous anastomosis. The 3, 6, and 12 months primary access patency rates for bare metal stents were not significantly different than for covered stents: 50, 41, and 22 % compared to 59, 52, and 29 %, respectively (p = 0.21). The secondary patency rates were also not significantly different: 78, 78, and 68 % for bare metal stents compared to 76, 69, and 61 % for covered stents, respectively (p = 0.85). However, covered stents demonstrated a higher primary stent patency rate than bare metal stents: 100, 85, and 70 % compared to 75, 67, and 49 % at 3, 6, and 12 months (p < 0.01). Conclusion: The primary and secondary access patency rates after deployment of bare metal versus covered stents at the venous anastomosis were not significantly different. However, bare metal stents developed in-stent stenoses significantly sooner.

  8. Active Power Rescheduling for Avoiding Voltage Collapse Using Modified Bare Bones Particle Swarm Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arya, Rajesh; Purey, Pradeep

    2016-06-01

    MW-generation rescheduling is being considered for voltage stability improvement under stressed operating condition. At times it can avoid voltage collapse. This paper describes an algorithm for determination of optimum MW-generation participation pattern for static voltage stability margin enhancement. The optimum search direction has been obtained by employing modified bare born particle swarm optimization technique. Optimum search direction is based on maximization of distance to point of collapse in generation space. Developed algorithm has been implemented on a standard 25 bus test system. Results obtained have been compared with those obtained using standard particle swarm optimization.

  9. Active Power Rescheduling for Avoiding Voltage Collapse Using Modified Bare Bones Particle Swarm Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arya, Rajesh; Purey, Pradeep

    2015-06-01

    MW-generation rescheduling is being considered for voltage stability improvement under stressed operating condition. At times it can avoid voltage collapse. This paper describes an algorithm for determination of optimum MW-generation participation pattern for static voltage stability margin enhancement. The optimum search direction has been obtained by employing modified bare born particle swarm optimization technique. Optimum search direction is based on maximization of distance to point of collapse in generation space. Developed algorithm has been implemented on a standard 25 bus test system. Results obtained have been compared with those obtained using standard particle swarm optimization.

  10. The origins of French boxing: bare-knuckle duelling, savate and chausson, 1820-45.

    PubMed

    Loudcher, J F

    2001-01-01

    Savate, also called chausson, or French boxing is a combat activity characterized by kicking and punching. Its inception reaches back to the Restoration and the monarchy of Louis-Philippe (1818-48) although it was not recognised as a combat sport until the twentieth century. This article, based on a variety of rich sources (police reports, newspapers, books, etc.) demonstrates how, on the one hand, the origins of savate can be traced back to the bare-fisted duels of the Restoration and, on the other hand, its emergence corresponds to the mutation of structural order as put forth by M. Foucault. PMID:18646392

  11. Winter soil respiration from different vegetation patches in the Yellow River Delta, China.

    PubMed

    Han, Guangxuan; Yu, Junbao; Li, Huabing; Yang, Liqiong; Wang, Guangmei; Mao, Peili; Gao, Yongjun

    2012-07-01

    Vegetation type and density exhibited a considerable patchy distribution at very local scales in the Yellow River Delta, due to the spatial variation of soil salinity and water scarcity. We proposed that soil respiration is affected by the spatial variations in vegetation type and soil chemical properties and tested this hypothesis in three different vegetation patches (Phragmites australis, Suaeda heteroptera and bare soil) in winter (from November 2010 to April 2011). At diurnal scale, soil respiration all displayed single-peak curves and asymmetric patterns in the three vegetation patches; At seasonal scale, soil respiration all declined steadily until February, and then increased to a peak in next April. But, the magnitude of soil respiration showed significant differences among the three sites. Mean soil respiration rates in winter were 0.60, 0.45 and 0.17 μmol CO(2) m(-2) s(-1) for the Phragmites australis, Suaeda heteroptera and bare soil, respectively. The combined effect of soil temperature and soil moisture accounted for 58-68 % of the seasonal variation of winter soil respiration. The mean soil respiration revealed positive and linear correlations with total N, total N and SOC storages at 0-20 cm depth, and plant biomass among the three sites. We conclude that the patchy distribution of plant biomass and soil chemical properties (total C, total N and SOC) may affect decomposition rate of soil organic matter in winter, thereby leading to spatial variations in soil respiration. PMID:22576142

  12. Maps of averaged spectral deviations from soil lines and their comparison with traditional soil maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rukhovich, D. I.; Rukhovich, A. D.; Rukhovich, D. D.; Simakova, M. S.; Kulyanitsa, A. L.; Bryzzhev, A. V.; Koroleva, P. V.

    2016-07-01

    The analysis of 34 cloudless fragments of Landsat 5, 7, and 8 images (1985-2014) on the territory of Plavsk, Arsen'evsk, and Chern districts of Tula oblast has been performed. It is shown that bare soil surface on the RED-NIR plots derived from the images cannot be described in the form of a sector of spectral plane as it can be done for the NDVI values. The notion of spectral neighborhood of soil line (SNSL) is suggested. It is defined as the sum of points of the RED-NIR spectral space, which are characterized by spectral characteristics of the bare soil applied for constructing soil lines. The way of the SNSL separation along the line of the lowest concentration density of points on the RED-NIR spectral space is suggested. This line separates bare soil surface from vegetating plants. The SNSL has been applied to construct soil line (SL) for each of the 34 images and to delineate bare soil surface on them. Distances from the points with averaged RED-NIR coordinates to the SL have been calculated using the method of moving window. These distances can be referred to as averaged spectral deviations (ASDs). The calculations have been performed strictly for the SNSL areas. As a result, 34 maps of ASDs have been created. These maps contain ASD values for 6036 points of a grid used in the study. Then, the integral map of normalized ASD values has been built with due account for the number of points participating in the calculation (i.e., lying in the SNSL) within the moving window. The integral map of ASD values has been compared with four traditional soil maps on the studied territory. It is shown that this integral map can be interpreted in terms of soil taxa: the areas of seven soil subtypes (soddy moderately podzolic, soddy slightly podzolic, light gray forest. gray forest, dark gray forest, podzolized chernozems, and leached chernozems) belonging to three soil types (soddy-podzolic, gray forest, and chernozemic soils) can be delineated on it.

  13. Climatic controls on carbon storage in seasonally frozen soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2013-05-01

    When soil goes through an annual freeze-thaw cycle, the expansion and shrinkage of underground water causes a second cycle, one of heaving and sinking, that can produce unusual geometric patterns on the surface. Known as cryoturbation, this process drives buried boulders to the surface and lets fine particles settle in the holes left behind. In some regions, cryoturbation gives rise to circles on the surface (some a few meters wide): patches of bare soil ringed by rocks. In others, such as a site in northern Sweden analyzed by Becher et al., cryoturbation creates nonsorted circles: bare soil surrounded by trees or shrubs. The churning soil is inhospitable for the plants' roots, and if anything, only a light dusting of moss or lichen covers the centers of the circles.

  14. Soil microbial respiration from various microhabitats in Arctic landscape: impact of soil type, environmental conditions and soil age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biasi, Christina; Jokinen, Simo; Marushchak, Maija; Trubnikova, Tatiana; Hämäläinen, Kai; Oinonen, Markku; Martikainen, Pertti

    2014-05-01

    Soil respiration is the second largest C flux between atmosphere and terrestrial ecosystems after gross primary production. Carbon dioxide released from soils is thus a major contributor to the atmospheric CO2 concentration. Despite the global importance, soil respiration and its components (heterotrophic and autotrophic respiration) remain poorly understood and not well constrained fluxes of the terrestrial C cycle. This is particularly true for the Arctic, where huge amounts of the Earth's soil carbon is stored. Here, we report on heterotrophic soil respiration rates from various Arctic tundra microhabitats measured in situ. The study site was Seida (67°07'N, 62°57'E, 100 m a.s.l.) which is characterized by typical sub-arctic permafrost landscape which comprises raised, vegetated permafrost peat plateaus, interspersed with spots of bare peat surfaces (peat circles), and upland mineral soils. We used isotope partitioning approach based on differences in natural abundance of 14C between soil and plants to separate sources of soil-respired CO2. In addition, the tradition trenching approach was employed. Complementary laboratory incubations with homogenized soil were conducted to assess primary decomposability of the soils and to identify age of the CO2 released and thus get more information on the nature of the sources of respiration. The major aim was to link SMR rates with of soil type, land cover class, soil physic-chemical properties (e.g. water content), soil C stocks and age of soil. Results show that, despite profound differences in soil characteristics and primary decomposability of organic matter, surface CO2 fluxes derived from soil microbial respiration rates were rather similar between microhabitats. The only factor which influenced, at least to some extent, the respiration rates was total soil C (and N) stocks in surface soils. There was some evidence for reduced soil-related CO2 emissions from peatlands, though results were not consistent between the

  15. Characterization of stainless steel assisted bare gold nanoparticles and their analytical potential.

    PubMed

    López-Lorente, A I; Simonet, B M; Valcárcel, M; Eppler, S; Schindl, R; Kranz, C; Mizaikoff, B

    2014-01-01

    A simple, environmentally friendly, one-pot method to synthesize highly stable bare gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) has been developed. AuNPs have been synthesized from tetrachloroauric acid solution using steel or stainless steel as solid reducing agent, which can be reused. The proposed method yields bare gold nanoparticles at atmospheric pressure and room temperature for potentially producing large quantities. The obtained AuNPs have been characterized by SEM, TEM and AFM finding an average diameter of around 20 nm, polygonal yet nearly spherical shape and a narrow size distribution. The mechanism of reaction has been investigated by UV-vis spectroscopy, ICP-OES and EDX analysis. The obtained dispersed gold nanoparticles proved to be stable if stored a 4 °C for over four months without the addition of a stabilizing agent. Their analytical potential as SERS substrate has been demonstrated and their performance compared with that showed by citrate-coated gold nanoparticles. Thanks to their unique properties, their use as analytical tools provides analytical processes with enhanced selectivity and precision. PMID:24274303

  16. Laser damage of HR, AR-coatings, monolayers and bare surfaces at 1064 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garnov, S. V.; Klimentov, S. M.; Said, A. A.; Soileau, M. J.

    1993-01-01

    Laser induced damage thresholds and morphologies were investigated in a variety of uncoated and coated surfaces, including monolayers and multi-layers of different chemical compositions. Both antireflective (AR) and highly reflective (HR) were tested. Testing was done at 1064 nm with 25 picosecond and 8 nanosecond YAG/Nd laser single pulses. Spot diameter in the experiments varied from 0.09 to 0.22 mm. The laser damage measurement procedure consisted of 1-on-1 (single laser pulse in the selected site) and N-on-1 experiments including repeated irradiation by pulses of the same fluence and subsequently raised from pulse to pulse fluence until damage occurred. The highest picosecond damage thresholds of commercially available coatings averaged 12 - 14 J/sq cm, 50 percent less than thresholds obtained in bare fused silica. Some coatings and bare surfaces revealed a palpable preconditioning effect (an increase in threshold of 1.2 to 1.8 times). Picosecond and nanosecond data were compared to draw conclusions about pulse width dependence. An attempt was made to classify damage morphologies according to the type of coating, class of irradiating, and damage level.

  17. Oxidation, Creep And Fatigue Properties of Bare and Coated 31V alloy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dryepondt, Sebastien N.; Jones, Samuel J.; Zhang, Ying; Maziasz, Philip J.; Pint, Bruce A.

    2014-12-06

    Increasing the efficiency of natural gas reciprocating engines will require materials with better mechanical and corrosion resistance at high temperatures. One solution to increase the lifetime of exhaust valves is to apply an aluminide coating to prevent corrosion assisted fatigue cracking, but the impact of the coating on the valve material mechanical properties needs to be assessed. Creep and high cycle fatigue (HCF) testing were conducted at 816°C on bare and slurry or pack-coated 31V alloy. After annealing according to the 31V standard heat treatment, the coated and bare creep specimens exhibited very similar creep rupture lives. The HCF behaviormore » of the pack-coated alloy was close to the behavior of the bar alloy, but fatigue lifetimes of slurry-coated 31V specimens had higher variability. Aluminide coatings have the potential to improve the valve performance at high temperature, but the coating deposition process needs to be tailored for the substrate standard heat treatment.« less

  18. Hemodynamic study of overlapping bare-metal stents intervention to aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Sun, Anqiang; Zhan, Fan; Luan, Jingyuan; Deng, Xiaoyan

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the hemodynamic performance of overlapping bare-metal stents intervention treatment to thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAA), three simplified TAA models, representing, no stent, with a single stent and 2 overlapped stents deployed in the aneurismal sac, were studied and compared in terms of flow velocity, wall shear stress (WSS) and pressure distributions by means of computational fluid dynamics. The results showed that overlapping stents intervention induced a flow field of slow velocity near the aneurismal wall. Single stent deployment in the sac reduced the jet-like flow formed prior to the proximal neck of the aneurysm, which impinged on the internal wall of the aneurysm. This jet-like flow vanished completely in the overlapping double stents case. Overlapping stents intervention led to an evident decrease in WSS; meanwhile, the pressure acting on the wall of the aneurysm was reduced slightly and presented more uniform distribution. The results therefore indicated that overlapping stents intervention may effectively isolate the thoracic aortic aneurysm, protecting it from rupture. In conclusion, overlapping bare-metal stents may serve a purpose similar to that of the multilayer aneurysm repair system (MARS) manufactured by Cardiatis SA (Isnes, Belgium). PMID:25262876

  19. Gamma-ray bursts and the birthrate of bare neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Dar, A.; Nussinov, S.; Kozlovsky, B.

    1992-01-01

    Accretion of matter onto the surface of a white dwarf in a binary system can push it over the Chandrasekhar mass limit and may cause it to collapse into a neutron star without mass ejection or with the ejection of only a small mass. Such an optically quiet stellar collapse should be accompanied by a neutrino burst which could be detected with underground neutrino detectors if the collapse took place in our own Galaxy or in very close nearby galaxies. However, the frequency of such collapses is not known. Here we show that, if the ejected mass is less than 3 x 10 exp -4 solar mass, the electron-positron pairs resulting from neutrino-antineutrino annihilations outside the neutrinosphere produce a gamma-ray burst which could be observed out to distances of at least 300 Mpc, and that the observed rate of gamma-ray bursts sets stringent upper limits on the frequency of bare or nearlly bare neutron star births.

  20. Reforesting "bare hills" in Vietnam: social and environmental consequences of the 5 million hectare reforestation program.

    PubMed

    McElwee, Pamela

    2009-09-01

    In recent years, forestry has been strongly promoted by the government of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam through large-scale projects to rehabilitate and reforest millions of hectares of land. One project to reforest 5 million hectares has received hundreds of millions of US dollars for implementation. Yet based on a case study in one area of northern Vietnam, this project appears to have had a number of unforeseen consequences. Large areas of land classified as "bare hills" have been targeted for reforestation, despite the fact that these lands already harbor a number of species that were used by local communities. The bare hills were especially economically important to poor households and to women who collected a variety of nontimber forest products there. Because the reforestation project focused most efforts on establishing new plantations rather than supporting natural regeneration, diverse sources of non-timber forest products were being replaced with monocrop exotic tree plantations. A strong inequity in the allocation of private lands for reforestation has characterized the regreening projects to date, and this may have continuing unwelcome social, environmental, and economic impacts into the future, particularly for the poor. PMID:19860156

  1. Similar Success Rates with Bivalirudin and Unfractionated Heparin in Bare-Metal Stent Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Hallak, Omar; Shams, S. Ali; Broce, Mike; Lavigne, P. Scott; Lucas, B. Daniel; Elhabyan, Abdul-Karim; Reyes, Bernardo J.

    2007-09-15

    Background. Unfractionated heparin (UFH) is the traditional agent utilized during percutaneous peripheral interventions (PPIs) despite its well-known limitations. Bivalirudin, a thrombin-specific anticoagulant, overcomes many of the limitations of UFH and has consistently demonstrated comparable efficacy with significantly fewer bleeding complications. The purpose of this study was to compare procedural success in patients undergoing bare-metal stent implantation for atherosclerotic blockage of the renal, iliac, and femoral arteries and receiving either bivalirudin (0.75 mg/kg bolus/1.75 mg/kg/hr infusion) or UFH (50-70 U/kg/hr bolus) as the primary anticoagulant. Methods. This study was an open-label, nonrandomized retrospective registry with the primary endpoint of procedural success. Secondary endpoints included incidence of: death, myocardial infarction (MI), urgent revascularization, amputation, and major and minor bleeding. Results. One hundred and five consecutive patients were enrolled (bivalirudin = 53; heparin = 52). Baseline demographics were comparable between groups. Patients were pretreated with clopidogrel (approx. 71%) and aspirin (approx. 79%). Procedural success was achieved in 97% and 96% of patients in the bivalirudin- and heparin-treated groups, respectively. Event rates were low and similar between groups. Conclusion. Bivalirudin maintained an equal rate of procedural success in this cohort without sacrificing patient safety. Results of this study add to the growing body of evidence supporting the safety and efficacy of bivalirudin as a possible substitute for UFH in anticoagulation during peripheral vascular bare-metal stent implantation.

  2. Matching the BtA line to the bare-AGS (Part 1)

    SciTech Connect

    Tsoupas,N.; Glenn, J. W.; Huan, H.; MacKay, W. W.; Raparia, D.; Zeno, K.

    2008-11-01

    The Booster to AGS (BtA) transfer line [Ref for BtA line] transports the beam bunches from the AGS-Booster to the AGS synchrotron, and also matches the beam parameters ({beta}{sub x,y}, {alpha}{sub x,y}) and dispersion functions ({eta}{sub x,y}, {eta}{prime}{sub x,y}) of the transported beam to the corresponding quantities of the circulating beam in AGS, at the AGS injection point. In this technical note we describe in details, the calculations of the matching procedure of the BtA line to the bare-AGS, and provide magnet settings for the MAD-model of the BtA transfer line which is 'matched' to the bare-AGS. In a separate but more concise technical note (Part II) we will present results on the beam optics of the BtA beam line which is 'matched' to the AGS with two helical snakes.

  3. Photo-physical properties enhancement of bare and core-shell quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumin, Md Abdul; Akhter, Kazi Farida; Charpentier, Paul A.

    2014-03-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) (also known as quantum dots, QDs) have attracted immense attention for their size-tunable optical properties that makes them impressive candidates for solar cells, light emitting devices, lasers, as well as biomedical imaging. However monodispersity, high and consistent photoluminescence, photostability, and biocompatibility are still major challenges. This work focuses on optimizing the photophysical properties and biocompatibility of QDs by forming core-shell nanostructures and their encapsulation by a carrier. Highly luminescent CdS and CdS-ZnS core-shell QDs with 5 nm sizes were synthesized using a facile approach based on pyrolysis of the single molecule precursors. After capping the CdS QDs with a thin layer of ZnS to reduce toxicity, the photoluminescence and photostability of the core-shell QDs was significantly enhanced. To make both the bare and core/shell structure QDs more resistant against photochemical reactions, a mesoporous silica layer was grown on the QDs through a reverse microemulsion technique based on hydrophobic interaction. This encapsulation enhanced the quantum yield and photostability compared to the bare QDs by providing much stronger resistance to oxidation and Oswald ripening of QDs. Encapsulation also improved biocompatibility of QDs that was evaluated with human umbilical vein endothelial cell lines (HUVEC).

  4. Imparting Barely Visible Impact Damage to a Stitched Composite Large-Scale Pressure Box

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Przekop, Adam

    2016-01-01

    The Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) is a concept that was developed by The Boeing Company to address the complex structural design aspects associated with a pressurized hybrid wing body (HWB) aircraft configuration, which has been a focus of the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project. The NASA-Boeing structural development for the HWB aircraft culminated in testing of the multi-bay box, which is an 80%-scale representation of the pressurized center-body section. This structure was tested in the NASA Langley Research Center Combined Loads Test System facility. As part of this testing, barely visible impact damage was imparted to the interior and exterior of the test article to demonstrate compliance with a condition representative of the requirements for Category 1 damaged composite structure as defined by the Federal Aviation Regulations. Interior impacts were imparted using an existing spring-loaded impactor, while the exterior impacts were imparted using a newly designed, gravity-driven impactor. This paper describes the impacts to the test article, and the design of the gravitydriven guided-weight impactor. The guided-weight impactor proved to be a very reliable method to impart barely visible impact damage in locations which are not easily accessible for a traditional drop-weight impactor, while at the same time having the capability to be highly configurable for use on other aircraft structures.

  5. Photo-physical properties enhancement of bare and core-shell quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Mumin, Md Abdul Akhter, Kazi Farida Charpentier, Paul A.

    2014-03-31

    Semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) (also known as quantum dots, QDs) have attracted immense attention for their size-tunable optical properties that makes them impressive candidates for solar cells, light emitting devices, lasers, as well as biomedical imaging. However monodispersity, high and consistent photoluminescence, photostability, and biocompatibility are still major challenges. This work focuses on optimizing the photophysical properties and biocompatibility of QDs by forming core-shell nanostructures and their encapsulation by a carrier. Highly luminescent CdS and CdS-ZnS core-shell QDs with 5 nm sizes were synthesized using a facile approach based on pyrolysis of the single molecule precursors. After capping the CdS QDs with a thin layer of ZnS to reduce toxicity, the photoluminescence and photostability of the core-shell QDs was significantly enhanced. To make both the bare and core/shell structure QDs more resistant against photochemical reactions, a mesoporous silica layer was grown on the QDs through a reverse microemulsion technique based on hydrophobic interaction. This encapsulation enhanced the quantum yield and photostability compared to the bare QDs by providing much stronger resistance to oxidation and Oswald ripening of QDs. Encapsulation also improved biocompatibility of QDs that was evaluated with human umbilical vein endothelial cell lines (HUVEC)

  6. Oralloy (93.2 235U) Bare Metal Annuli And Disks

    SciTech Connect

    Hummel, Andrew John

    2015-09-01

    A multitude of critical experiments with highly enriched uranium metal were conducted in the 1960s and 1970s at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) in support of criticality safety operations at the Y-12 Plant. These experiments served to evaluate the storage, casting, and handling limits for the Y-12 Plant while also providing data for verification of different calculation methods and associated cross-sections for nuclear criticality safety applications. These included both solid cylinders and annuli of various diameters, interacting cylinders of various diameters, parallelepipeds, and reflected cylinders and annuli. The experiments described here involve a series of delayed critical stacks of bare oralloy HEU annuli and disks. Three of these experiments consist of stacking bare HEU annuli of varying diameters to obtain critical configurations. These annuli have nominal inner and outer diameters (ID/OD) including: 7 inches (") ID – 9" OD, 9" ID – 11" OD, 11" ID – 13" OD, and 13? ID – 15" OD. The nominal heights range from 0.125" to 1.5". The three experiments themselves range from 7" – 13", 7" – 15", and 9" – 15" in diameter, respectively. The fourth experiment ranges from 7" – 11", and along with different annuli, it also includes an 11" disk and several 7" diameter disks. All four delayed critical experiments were configured and evaluated by J. T. Mihalczo, J. J. Lynn, and D. E. McCarty from December of 1962 to February 1963 with additional information in their corresponding logbook.

  7. Ultrasonic Guided Wave Focus Inspection Potential of Bare and Coated Pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, J.; Hua, J.; Rose, J. L.

    2010-02-01

    Ultrasonic guided waves in elastic bare pipes are studied from a theoretical point of view. Dispersion curves of both axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric waves are presented. The parameters of 4-channel focusing are calculated by a phased array focusing algorithm. Experimentally four defects are detected in a cased pipe inspection. The defect probability of detection is highly improved by applying the phased array focusing technique. Guided wave dispersion curves in coated pipes are calculated using a 1-D Semi-Analytical Finite Element (SAFE) technique. This theoretically driven hybrid SAFE method has perfectly tackled the guided wave problem in coated pipes, including dispersion curves (phase velocity dispersion curves and attenuation dispersion curves) and wave structures. The time delays and amplitudes of the 8-channel focusing in an 8 in sch40 coated pipe are calculated by the SAFE algorithm and input to the FEM simulation in ABAQUS®. Focusing performance is improved up to 67% by applying the coated pipe parameters compared with the bare pipe parameters.

  8. Clinical utility of platinum chromium bare-metal stents in coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Jorge, Claudia; Dubois, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Coronary stents represent a key development for the treatment of obstructive coronary artery disease since the introduction of percutaneous coronary intervention. While drug-eluting stents gained wide acceptance in contemporary percutaneous coronary intervention practice, further developments in bare-metal stents remain crucial for patients who are not candidates for drug-eluting stents, or to improve metallic platforms for drug elution. Initially, stent platforms used biologically inert stainless steel, restricting stent performance due to limitations in flexibility and strut thickness. Later, cobalt chromium stent alloys outperformed steel as the material of choice for stents, allowing latest generation stents to be designed with significantly thinner struts, while maintaining corrosion resistance and radial strength. Most recently, the introduction of the platinum chromium alloy refined stent architecture with thin struts, high radial strength, conformability, and improved radiopacity. This review will provide an overview of the novel platinum chromium bare-metal stent platforms available for coronary intervention. Mechanical properties, clinical utility, and device limitations will be summarized and put into perspective. PMID:26345228

  9. Trajectories of water table recovery following the re-vegetation of bare peat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuttleworth, Emma; Evans, Martin; Allott, Tim; Maskill, Rachael; Pilkington, Michael; Walker, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    The hydrological status of blanket peat influences a wide range of peatland functions, such as runoff generation, water quality, vegetation distribution, and rates of carbon sequestration. The UK supports 15% of the world's blanket peat cover, but much of this vital resource is significantly degraded, impacted by industrial pollution, overgrazing, wildfire, and climatic shifts. These pressures have produced a unique landscape characterised by severe gully erosion and extensive areas of bare peat. This in turn has led water tables to become substantially drawn down, impacting peatland function and limiting the resilience of these landscapes to future changes in climate. The restoration of eroding UK peatlands is a major conservation concern, and landscape-scale interventions through the re-vegetation of bare peat is becoming increasingly extensive in areas of upland Britain. Water table is the primary physical parameter considered in the monitoring of many peatland restoration projects, and there is a wealth of data on individual monitoring programmes which indicates that re-vegetation significantly raises water tables. This paper draws on data from multiple restoration projects carried out by the Moors for the Future Partnership in the Southern Pennines, UK, covering a range of stages in the erosion-restoration continuum, to assess the trajectories of water table recovery following re-vegetation. This will allow us to generate projections of future water table recovery, which will be of benefit to land managers and conservation organisations to inform future restoration initiatives.

  10. Second stable regime of internal kink modes excited by barely passing energetic ions in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, H. D.; Dong, J. Q.; Fu, G. Y.; Zheng, G. Y.; Sheng, Z. M.; Long, Y. X.; He, Z. X.; Jiang, H. B.; Shen, Y.; Wang, L. F.

    2010-08-01

    The internal kink (fishbone) modes, driven by barely passing energetic ions (EIs), are numerically studied with the spatial distribution of the EIs taking into account. It is found that the modes with frequencies comparable to the toroidal precession frequencies are excited by resonant interaction with the EIs. Positive and negative density gradient dominating cases, corresponding to off- and near-axis depositions of neutral beam injection (NBI), respectively, are analyzed in detail. The most interesting and important feature of the modes is that there exists a second stable regime in higher βh (=pressure of EIs/toroidal magnetic pressure) range, and the modes may only be excited by the barely passing EIs in a region of βth1<βh<βth2 (βth is threshold or critical beta of EIs). Besides, the unstable modes require minimum density gradients and minimum radial positions of NBI deposition. The physics mechanism for the existence of the second stable regime is discussed. The results may provide a means of reducing or even preventing the loss of NBI energetic ions and increasing the heating efficiency by adjusting the pitch angle and driving the system into the second stable regime fast enough.

  11. Exciton Emission from Bare and Alq3/Gold Coated GaN Nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, Fatemesadat; Kuhnert, Gerd; Hommel, Detlef; Schmitzer, Heidrun; Wagner, Hans-Peter

    We study the excitonic and impurity related emission in bare and aluminum quinoline (Alq3)/gold coated wurtzite GaN nanorods by temperature-dependent time-integrated (TI) and time-resolved (TR) photoluminescence (PL). The GaN nanorods were grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Alq3 as well as Alq3/gold covered nanorods were synthesized by organic molecular beam deposition. In the near-band edge region a donor-bound-exciton (D0X) emission is observed at 3.473 eV. Another emission band at 3.275 eV reveals LO-phonon replica and is attributed to a donor-acceptor-pair (DAP) luminescence. TR PL traces at 20 K show a nearly biexponential decay for the D0X with lifetimes of approximately 180 and 800 ps for both bare and Alq3 coated nanorods. In GaN nanorods which were coated with an Alq3 film and subsequently with a 10 nm thick gold layer we observe a PL quenching of D0X and DAP band and the lifetimes of the D0X transition shorten. The quenching behaviour is partially attributed to the energy-transfer from free excitons and donor-bound-excitons to plasmon oscillations in the gold layer.

  12. SERS detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons using a bare gold nanoparticles coupled film system.

    PubMed

    Gu, Hai-Xin; Hu, Kai; Li, Da-Wei; Long, Yi-Tao

    2016-07-21

    A facile approach based on a bare gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) coupled film system as the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate was developed for the effective detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). A smooth gold film (Au film) was self-assembled with a hydrophobic layer of an alkyl chain in order to capture the PAHs molecules from bulk solution to its surface. Next, the bare gold nanoparticles, about 60 nm in diameter without functional modification, were paved onto the PAHs-molecule-coated Au film. This was aimed at generating a plasmon coupling effect to illuminate a stronger electromagnetic field within the gaps between particles and film, exactly where the absorbed molecules were located. The effects of the Au film, alkyl chain, and Au NPs on the SERS response to PAHs were respectively investigated. Through utilizing this simple system, a reproducible and interference-free SERS detection was demonstrated. Furthermore, the excellent detection ability to sense a series of PAHs was achieved with low concentrations of 1.2 × 10(-8) M, 2.0 × 10(-8) M, 5.5 × 10(-8) M, and 6.3 × 10(-8) M for benzo[b]fluoranthene, fluoranthene, benzo[a]anthracene, and pyrene, respectively. This method, capable of sample preparation and SERS measurement on a portable carrier, would be an ideal candidate for practical applications under field conditions. PMID:27169487

  13. Estimating preseason irrigation losses by characterizing evaporation of effective precipitation under bare soil conditions using large weighing lysimeters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Irrigation scheduling is one of the most cost effective means of conserving limited groundwater resources, particularly in semi-arid regions. Effective precipitation, or the net amount of water from precipitation that can be used in field water balance equations, is essential to accurate and effecti...

  14. Short-term temporal changes of bare soil CO2 fluxes described by first-order decay models

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To further understand the impact of tillage on carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, we compare the performance of two conceptual models that describes the CO2 emission after tillage as a function of the non-tilled emission plus a correction due to the tillage disturbance. Our hypothesis is that an additi...

  15. Heat flux in soil amended with biochar: modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usowicz, Boguslaw; Lipiec, Jerzy; Lukowski, Mateusz; Marczewski, Wojciech; Usowicz, Jerzy

    2016-04-01

    Temperature of soil has important influences on many soil processes and plant growth. It depends on the energy balance on the active surface, where the process of energy exchange between the Earth's surface and the atmosphere occurs. Heat flux is one of the components of the energy balance and can be influenced by biochar application to the soil, along with inherent texture and variables: moisture, density, and temperature of soil, as well as external conditions like climate, topography and surface properties related to the land use and vegetation cover. In this work we present the statistical-physical modelling approach for predicting the thermal conductivity and soil heat flux dynamics, based on temperature and soil moisture measurements, obtained from bare and grass fields with different rates of biochar. Adding biochar caused significant reduction of the thermal conductivity, diffusivity and heat capacity of the soil in the dry state and their significant increase in the wet state. The soil heat fluxes in bare and grassed soil were similar or different, depending on weather conditions, insolation, plant growth stage and changed with the soil depth, moisture as well as the rate of biochar applied.

  16. The effects of different soil cover management practices on plant biodiversity and soil properties in Mediterranean ancient olive orchards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madzaric, Suzana; Aly, Adel; Ladisa, Gaetano; Calabrese, Generosa

    2014-05-01

    The effects of different soil cover management practices on plant biodiversity and soil properties in Mediterranean ancient olive orchards Madzaric S., Aly A., Ladisa G. and Calabrese G. The loss of natural plant cover due to the inappropriate soil cover management is often a decisive factor for soil degradation in Mediterranean area. This accompanied with typical climate, characterized by cool, wet winters and hot and dry summers leads to soil erosion and loss of productivity. Due to simplification of agricultural practice and to the attempt to decrease cost of production, keeping soil bare is a widespread agricultural practice in Mediterranean ancient olive orchards (AOOs). The consequences of this are degradation of soil quality and reduction of plant biodiversity. In last year's some alternative practices are proposed in order to protect soil and biodiversity. One of these practices is the "grassing" i.e. covering the soil by selected autochthonous plant species. Objectives of our study are: (1) to evaluate impact of different soil cover management practices on soil properties and plant biodiversity in AOOs and (2) to define a minimum indicators' set (Minimum Data Set - MDS) to evaluate the effectiveness of different agricultural practices in environmental performance of AOOs. A comparison was carried on considering two management systems (conventional vs. organic) and three agricultural practices: conventional with bare soil (CON), organic with soil covered by selected autochthonous species (MIX) and organic left to the native vegetation (NAT). In general a clear positive influence of organic management system was recognized. Some soil quality indicators (physical, chemical and biological) showed responsiveness in describing the effects of management system and agricultural practices on soil properties. The both approaches with vegetation cover on the soil surface (either sowing of mixture or soil left to the natural plant cover) performed better than

  17. Gas-Phase Reactions of Bare and Ligated Uranium Ions with Sulfer Hexafluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Glen P.; Gibson, John K; Duckworth, Douglas {Doug} C

    2004-01-01

    Reactions of bare and ligated uranium ions with sulfur hexafluoride were studied in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. Bare U{sup +} was found to react rather efficiently with SF{sub 6} (k/k{sub ADO} {approx} 0.4) to produce both UF{sub n}{sup +} (n = 1, 2, 3, 4) and SF{sub n}{sup +} (n = 1, 2, 3). Whereas the UF{sup +}/SF{sub 6} reaction rate was essentially the same as that for U{sup +}/SF{sub 6}, both UF{sub 2}{sup +} and UF{sub 3}{sup +} were inert; this is attributed to a repulsive interaction between UF{sub n}{sup +} and SF{sub 6} when n exceeds 1. Reactions of UF{sup +} (k/k{sub ADO} {approx} 0.2) and UF{sub 2}{sup +} (k/k{sub ADO} {approx} 0.05) with H{sub 2}O resulted in both F {yields} OH exchange and oxidation. In contrast, UF{sub 3}{sup +} reacted very efficiently with H{sub 2}O (k/k{sub ADO} {approx} 1), exhibiting only F {yields} OH exchange. The primary ion products of the UO{sup +}/SF{sub 6} reaction (k/k{sub ADO} {approx} 0.2) were SF{sub 3}{sup +} and UOF{sub 2}{sup +}; those of the UOH{sup +}/SF{sub 6} reaction (k/k{sub ADO} {approx} 0.3) were SF{sub 3}{sup +} and UOF{sup +}. The reaction results are discussed in the context of a previously proposed reaction model, the distinctive chemistry of uranium, and thermodynamic considerations. The results illuminate the nature of uranium as well as general aspects of the interaction of bare and ligated transition-metal ions with SF{sub 6}. Results for collision-induced dissociation (CID) of selected uranium molecular ions support the concept of CID being a quasithermal process under these experimental conditions, with rearrangements prior to fragmentation possible for certain ions.

  18. Soft Landing of Bare PtRu Nanoparticles for Electrochemical Reduction of Oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Grant E.; Colby, Robert J.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Moon, DaeWon; Laskin, Julia

    2015-08-07

    Magnetron sputtering of two independent Pt and Ru targets coupled with inert gas aggregation in a modified commercial source has been combined with soft landing of mass-selected ions to prepare bare 4.5 nm diameter PtRu alloy nanoparticles on glassy carbon electrodes with controlled size and morphology for electrochemical reduction of oxygen in solution. Employing atomic force microscopy (AFM) it is shown that the nanoparticles bind randomly to the glassy carbon electrode at a relatively low coverage of 7 x 104 ions µm-2 and that their average height is centered at 4 nm. Scanning transmission electron microscopy images obtained in the high-angle annular dark field mode (STEM-HAADF) further confirm that the soft-landed PtRu alloy nanoparticles are uniform in size and have a Ru core decorated with small regions of Pt on the surface. Wide-area scans of the electrodes using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) reveal the presence of both Pt and Ru in relative atomic concentrations of ~9% and ~33%, respectively. Deconvolution of the high energy resolution XPS spectra in the Pt4f and Ru3d regions indicates the presence of both oxidized Pt and Ru. The substantially higher loading of Ru compared to Pt and enrichment of Pt at the surface of the alloy nanoparticles is confirmed by wide-area analysis of the electrodes using time-of-flight medium energy ion scattering (TOF-MEIS) employing both 80 keV He+ and O+ ions. The activity of electrodes containing 7 x 104 ions µm-2 of bare 4.5 nm PtRu nanoparticles toward the electrochemical reduction of oxygen was evaluated employing cyclic voltammetry (CV) in 0.1 M HClO4 and 0.5 M H2SO4 solutions. In both electrolytes a pronounced reduction peak was observed during O2 purging of the solution that was not evident during purging with Ar. Repeated electrochemical cycling of the electrodes revealed little evolution in the shape or position of the voltammograms indicating high stability of the alloy nanoparticles supported on glassy

  19. Soft landing of bare PtRu nanoparticles for electrochemical reduction of oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Grant E.; Colby, Robert; Engelhard, Mark; Moon, Daewon; Laskin, Julia

    2015-07-01

    Magnetron sputtering of two independent Pt and Ru targets coupled with inert gas aggregation in a modified commercial source has been combined with soft landing of mass-selected ions to prepare bare 4.5 nm diameter PtRu nanoparticles on glassy carbon electrodes with controlled size and morphology for electrochemical reduction of oxygen in solution. Employing atomic force microscopy (AFM) it is shown that the nanoparticles bind randomly to the glassy carbon electrode at a relatively low coverage of 7 × 104 ions μm-2 and that their average height is centered at 4.5 nm. Scanning transmission electron microscopy images obtained in the high-angle annular dark field mode (HAADF-STEM) further confirm that the soft-landed PtRu nanoparticles are uniform in size. Wide-area scans of the electrodes using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) reveal the presence of both Pt and Ru in atomic concentrations of ~9% and ~33%, respectively. Deconvolution of the high energy resolution XPS spectra in the Pt 4f and Ru 3d regions indicates the presence of both oxidized Pt and Ru. The substantially higher loading of Ru compared to Pt and enrichment of Pt at the surface of the nanoparticles is confirmed by wide-area analysis of the electrodes using time-of-flight medium energy ion scattering (TOF-MEIS) employing both 80 keV He+ and O+ ions. The activity of electrodes containing 7 × 104 ions μm-2 of bare 4.5 nm PtRu nanoparticles toward the electrochemical reduction of oxygen was evaluated employing cyclic voltammetry (CV) in 0.1 M HClO4 and 0.5 M H2SO4 solutions. In both electrolytes a pronounced reduction peak was observed during O2 purging of the solution that was not evident during purging with Ar. Repeated electrochemical cycling of the electrodes revealed little evolution in the shape or position of the voltammograms indicating high stability of the nanoparticles supported on glassy carbon. The reproducibility of the nanoparticle synthesis and deposition was evaluated by

  20. Soft landing of bare PtRu nanoparticles for electrochemical reduction of oxygen.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Grant E; Colby, Robert; Engelhard, Mark; Moon, Daewon; Laskin, Julia

    2015-08-01

    Magnetron sputtering of two independent Pt and Ru targets coupled with inert gas aggregation in a modified commercial source has been combined with soft landing of mass-selected ions to prepare bare 4.5 nm diameter PtRu nanoparticles on glassy carbon electrodes with controlled size and morphology for electrochemical reduction of oxygen in solution. Employing atomic force microscopy (AFM) it is shown that the nanoparticles bind randomly to the glassy carbon electrode at a relatively low coverage of 7 × 10(4) ions μm(-2) and that their average height is centered at 4.5 nm. Scanning transmission electron microscopy images obtained in the high-angle annular dark field mode (HAADF-STEM) further confirm that the soft-landed PtRu nanoparticles are uniform in size. Wide-area scans of the electrodes using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) reveal the presence of both Pt and Ru in atomic concentrations of ∼9% and ∼33%, respectively. Deconvolution of the high energy resolution XPS spectra in the Pt 4f and Ru 3d regions indicates the presence of both oxidized Pt and Ru. The substantially higher loading of Ru compared to Pt and enrichment of Pt at the surface of the nanoparticles is confirmed by wide-area analysis of the electrodes using time-of-flight medium energy ion scattering (TOF-MEIS) employing both 80 keV He(+) and O(+) ions. The activity of electrodes containing 7 × 10(4) ions μm(-2) of bare 4.5 nm PtRu nanoparticles toward the electrochemical reduction of oxygen was evaluated employing cyclic voltammetry (CV) in 0.1 M HClO4 and 0.5 M H2SO4 solutions. In both electrolytes a pronounced reduction peak was observed during O2 purging of the solution that was not evident during purging with Ar. Repeated electrochemical cycling of the electrodes revealed little evolution in the shape or position of the voltammograms indicating high stability of the nanoparticles supported on glassy carbon. The reproducibility of the nanoparticle synthesis and deposition was

  1. Influence of Disturbance on Soil Respiration in Biologically Crusted Soil during the Dry Season

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Wei; Zhang, Yu-qing; Wu, Bin; Zha, Tian-shan; Jia, Xin; Qin, Shu-gao; Shao, Chen-xi; Liu, Jia-bin; Lai, Zong-rui; Fa, Ke-yu

    2013-01-01

    Soil respiration (Rs) is a major pathway for carbon cycling and is a complex process involving abiotic and biotic factors. Biological soil crusts (BSCs) are a key biotic component of desert ecosystems worldwide. In desert ecosystems, soils are protected from surface disturbance by BSCs, but it is unknown whether Rs is affected by disturbance of this crust layer. We measured Rs in three types of disturbed and undisturbed crusted soils (algae, lichen, and moss), as well as bare land from April to August, 2010, in Mu Us desert, northwest China. Rs was similar among undisturbed soils but increased significantly in disturbed moss and algae crusted soils. The variation of Rs in undisturbed and disturbed soil was related to soil bulk density. Disturbance also led to changes in soil organic carbon and fine particles contents, including declines of 60–70% in surface soil C and N, relative to predisturbance values. Once BSCs were disturbed, Q10 increased. Our findings indicate that a loss of BSCs cover will lead to greater soil C loss through respiration. Given these results, understanding the disturbance sensitivity impact on Rs could be helpful to modify soil management practices which promote carbon sequestration. PMID:24453845

  2. Self-Assembly of Graphene Nanoblisters Sealed to a Bare Metal Surface.

    PubMed

    Larciprete, Rosanna; Colonna, Stefano; Ronci, Fabio; Flammini, Roberto; Lacovig, Paolo; Apostol, Nicoleta; Politano, Antonio; Feulner, Peter; Menzel, Dietrich; Lizzit, Silvano

    2016-03-01

    The possibility to intercalate noble gas atoms below epitaxial graphene monolayers coupled with the instability at high temperature of graphene on the surface of certain metals has been exploited to produce Ar-filled graphene nanosized blisters evenly distributed on the bare Ni(111) surface. We have followed in real time the self-assembling of the nanoblisters during the thermal annealing of the Gr/Ni(111) interface loaded with Ar and characterized their morphology and structure at the atomic scale. The nanoblisters contain Ar aggregates compressed at high pressure arranged below the graphene monolayer skin that is decoupled from the Ni substrate and sealed only at the periphery through stable C-Ni bonds. Their in-plane truncated triangular shapes are driven by the crystallographic directions of the Ni surface. The nonuniform strain revealed along the blister profile is explained by the inhomogeneous expansion of the flexible graphene lattice that adjusts to envelop the Ar atom stacks. PMID:26829243

  3. Paradoxical switching to a barely-mastered second language by an aphasic patient.

    PubMed

    Leemann, B; Laganaro, M; Schwitter, V; Schnider, A

    2007-06-01

    Polyglot speakers who become aphasics are not necessarily affected to the same extent in each language. In some cases there is a mixing of the different languages or a switching between languages and in very rare cases the switch is to the language seldom if ever used in everyday live. We report a French-speaking aphasic, who switched paradoxically from his mother tongue (French) to a second language (German) which he had learned at school but barely mastered and hardly ever spoke, and kept using German most of the time. We tried to understand the mechanism responsible for that phenomenon by reviewing the actual hypothesis of multi-language organization. We concluded, in line with previous reports, that our case used his metalinguistic knowledge to compensate for his inability to access his linguistic skills. PMID:17786781

  4. Morphology and Optical Properties of Bare and Silica Coated Hybrid Silver Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ghimire, Sushant; Lebek, Werner; Godehardt, Reinhold; Lee, Wan In; Adhikari, Rameshwar

    2016-05-01

    Owing to their wide applications in the field of optoelectronics, photonics, catalysis, and medicine; plasmonic metal nanoparticles are attaining considerable interest nowadays. The optical properties of these metal nanoparticles depend upon their size, shape, and surrounding medium. The present work studies the morphology and optical properties of bare silver nanoparticles and silica coated hybrid silver nanoparticles. Aqueous phase mediated synthesis and water-in-oil microemulsion mediated synthesis are two different wet chemical routes employed for nanosynthesis. Direct coating of silica is performed in water-in-oil microemulsion on pre-synthesized silver nanoparticles using tetraethyl orthosilicate as silica precursor. This study shows that using different wet chemical routes the size of the synthesized nanoparticles could be tuned. In addition, using reverse micelles as nanoreactors, the thickness of the silica shell around the core silver nanoparticles could be significantly controlled. Further, the optical properties of silver nanoparticles could be adjusted through the size and the surface coating. PMID:27483900

  5. Strongly confining bare core CdTe quantum dots in polymeric microdisk resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Flatae, Assegid Grossmann, Tobias; Beck, Torsten; Wiegele, Sarah; Kalt, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    We report on a simple route to the efficient coupling of optical emission from strongly confining bare core CdTe quantum dots (QDs) to the eigenmodes of a micro-resonator. The quantum emitters are embedded into QD/polymer sandwich microdisk cavities. This prevents photo-oxidation and yields the high dot concentration necessary to overcome Auger enhanced surface trapping of carriers. In combination with the very high cavity Q-factors, interaction of the QDs with the cavity modes in the weak coupling regime is readily observed. Under nanosecond pulsed excitation the CdTe QDs in the microdisks show lasing with a threshold energy as low as 0.33 μJ.

  6. The Integrity bare-metal stent made by continuous sinusoid technology.

    PubMed

    Turco, Mark A

    2011-05-01

    The Integrity Coronary Stent System (Medtronic Vascular, CA, USA) is a low-profile, open-cell, cobalt-chromium-alloy advanced bare-metal iteration of the well-known Driver/Micro-Driver Coronary Stent System (Medtronic Vascular). The Integrity stent is made with a process called continuous sinusoid technology. This process allows stent construction via wrapping a single thin strand of wire around a mandrel in a sinusoid configuration, with laser fusion of adjacent crowns. The wire-forming process and fusion pattern provide the stent with a continuous preferential bending plane, intended to allow easier access to, and smoother tracking within, distal and tortuous vessels while radial strength is maintained. Continuous sinusoid technology represents innovation in the design of stent platforms and will provide a future stent platform for newer technology, including drug-eluting stent platforms, drug-filled stents and core wire stents. PMID:21542702

  7. Reliability Optimization of Radial Distribution Systems Employing Differential Evolution and Bare Bones Particle Swarm Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kela, K. B.; Arya, L. D.

    2014-09-01

    This paper describes a methodology for determination of optimum failure rate and repair time for each section of a radial distribution system. An objective function in terms of reliability indices and their target values is selected. These indices depend mainly on failure rate and repair time of a section present in a distribution network. A cost is associated with the modification of failure rate and repair time. Hence the objective function is optimized subject to failure rate and repair time of each section of the distribution network considering the total budget allocated to achieve the task. The problem has been solved using differential evolution and bare bones particle swarm optimization. The algorithm has been implemented on a sample radial distribution system.

  8. Atomistic electrodynamics simulations of bare and ligand-coated nanoparticles in the quantum size regime.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xing; Moore, Justin E; Zekarias, Meserret; Jensen, Lasse

    2015-01-01

    The optical properties of metallic nanoparticles with nanometre dimensions exhibit features that cannot be described by classical electrodynamics. In this quantum size regime, the near-field properties are significantly modified and depend strongly on the geometric arrangements. However, simulating realistically sized systems while retaining the atomistic description remains computationally intractable for fully quantum mechanical approaches. Here we introduce an atomistic electrodynamics model where the traditional description of nanoparticles in terms of a macroscopic homogenous dielectric constant is replaced by an atomic representation with dielectric properties that depend on the local chemical environment. This model provides a unified description of bare and ligand-coated nanoparticles, as well as strongly interacting nanoparticle dimer systems. The non-local screening owing to an inhomogeneous ligand layer is shown to drastically modify the near-field properties. This will be important to consider in optimization of plasmonic nanostructures for near-field spectroscopy and sensing applications. PMID:26555179

  9. Differential cross sections for ionization of water vapor by high-velocity bare ions and electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.H.; Wilson, W.E.; Manson, S.T.; Rudd, M.E.

    1987-01-01

    A semiempirical model of single differential cross sections (SDCS) for ionization of water vapor by fast electrons and bare ions is presented. At low secondary-electron energy, the model is based on an asymptotic expansion of the first Born approximation with coefficients, that are independent of projectile properties, evaluated from experimental photoabsorption and proton-impact ionization data. As the secondary-electron energy increases, the model converges to a binary-encounter approximation. Comparisons with measured differential, total, and dissociative cross sections for ionization of water by fast electrons are used to test the model. For primary electrons with energy greater than about 500 eV, agreement with these data is generally within experimental uncertainty; however, some discrepancies of uncertain origin exist.

  10. Peculiar Betulia Re-visited: A Near-Earth Asteroid with a Bare-Rock Surface?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, A. W.; Mueller, M.; Delbo, M.; Bus, S. J.

    2005-08-01

    The small C-type asteroid (1580) Betulia is an unusual near-Earth object (NEO) with a lightcurve that changes dramatically with changing solar phase angle, presumably due to a highly irregular shape and/or unusual topographic features. Earlier thermal-infrared observations indicated a surface of high thermal inertia, which is consistent with a lack of thermally insulating regolith. Absence of regolith might be expected in the case of small NEOs with weak gravities, which may be unable to retain collisional debris. However, recent infrared observations of other asteroids of comparable size indicate that regolith is normally present. Knowledge of the thermal properties of NEOs is crucial for meaningful calculations of the Yarkovsky effect, which is invoked to explain the delivery of collisional fragments from the main belt into near-Earth orbits, and apparently has a significant influence on the orbital evolution of potentially hazardous NEOs. We observed Betulia in June 2002 with the 3-m NASA Infrared Telescope Facility. Our database is sufficiently broad to allow the use of more sophisticated thermal models than were available for earlier radiometric observations. It is important to bear the unusual nature of Betulia in mind when interpreting observational data. Fits to our data obtained with a new thermophysical model imply an effective diameter of 4.57+/-0.46 km and an albedo of 0.077+/-0.015, and indicate a moderate surface thermal inertia of around 180 Jm-2s-0.5K-1. It is difficult to reconcile our results with those of earlier work, which indicate a larger diameter for Betulia and a high-thermal-inertia surface of bare rock. While the thermal inertias of NEOs appear to be significantly higher than those of large main-belt asteroids, to our knowledge no convincing evidence has yet been found for very high-thermal-inertia ``bare-rock" surfaces amongst NEOs: further observations are required to probe smaller objects.

  11. Spectral Analysis Related to Bare-Metal and Drug-Eluting Coronary Stent Implantation

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Rose Mary Ferreira Lisboa; Silva, Carlos Augusto Bueno; Greco, Otaviano José; Moreira, Maria da Consolação Vieira

    2014-01-01

    Background The autonomic nervous system plays a central role in cardiovascular regulation; sympathetic activation occurs during myocardial ischemia. Objective To assess the spectral analysis of heart rate variability during stent implantation, comparing the types of stent. Methods This study assessed 61 patients (mean age, 64.0 years; 35 men) with ischemic heart disease and indication for stenting. Stent implantation was performed under Holter monitoring to record the spectral analysis of heart rate variability (Fourier transform), measuring the low-frequency (LF) and high-frequency (HF) components, and the LF/HF ratio before and during the procedure. Results Bare-metal stent was implanted in 34 patients, while the others received drug-eluting stents. The right coronary artery was approached in 21 patients, the left anterior descending, in 28, and the circumflex, in 9. As compared with the pre-stenting period, all patients showed an increase in LF and HF during stent implantation (658 versus 185 ms2, p = 0.00; 322 versus 121, p = 0.00, respectively), with no change in LF/HF. During stent implantation, LF was 864 ms2 in patients with bare-metal stents, and 398 ms2 in those with drug-eluting stents (p = 0.00). The spectral analysis of heart rate variability showed no association with diabetes mellitus, family history, clinical presentation, beta-blockers, age, and vessel or its segment. Conclusions Stent implantation resulted in concomitant sympathetic and vagal activations. Diabetes mellitus, use of beta-blockers, and the vessel approached showed no influence on the spectral analysis of heart rate variability. Sympathetic activation was lower during the implantation of drug-eluting stents. PMID:25029473

  12. Soil carbon pools, nitrogen supply, and tree performance under several groundcovers and compost rates in a newly planted apple orchard

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organic mulches and cover crops add organic C and nutrients to soil, potentially affecting soil C and N pools and crop performance. This study evaluated the effects of in-row ground cover treatment (bare ground, brassica seed meal, cultivation, wood chip mulch, and legume and non-legume cover crops)...

  13. Soil physical conditions as livestock treading effect in tropical Agroecosystem of dryland and strategies to mitigate desertification risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florentino, A.; Torres, D.; Ospina, A.; Contreras, J.; Palma, Z.; Silvera, J.

    2012-04-01

    Soil degradation in natural ecosystem of arid and semi-arid zones of Venezuela due to livestock treading (goats) it is an important problem that affect their environment functions; increase soil erodibility, bulk density, water losses and reduce porosity, water infiltration rate and soil structural stability. The presence of biological crust (BSC) in this type of soil it is very common. The objective of this study was to evaluate the soil surface physical quality through the use of selected indicators, mainly some of that related to structural stability, infiltrability and the prediction of soil erosion risk in two zones of Lara state: 1) Quíbor (QUI) and 2) Humocaro Bajo (HB). The study was conducted on two selected plots (30 m x 20 m) in each zone, with natural vegetation and BSC cover, with areas affected by different degree of compaction due to treading in the paths where the goats are moving. Five sites per plot (50 cm x 50 cm) under vegetation cover and five sites over the path with bare soil were sampled (0-7,5 and 7,5-15 cm depth). The results showed that soil macroaggregate stability (equivalent diameter of aggregates >0,25 mm) was significantly higher (p<0,05 %) in soil with vegetation cover and BSC compared with bare soil. Sealing index, as a measure of aggregate stability, determined in laboratory under simulated rain and expressed as hydraulic conductivity of soil surface sealing (Kse), decreased with decreasing soil vegetation cover and the presence of BSC. However, Ksei (i: inicial) and Ksef (f: final) were significantly greater in soil with more than 75 % of BSC in comparison to bare soils. The sealing index it is used to for to estimate changes in soil water losses. As the sealing index increases, the susceptibility of the soil to undergo surface sealing or slaking decrease. These results suggested that soil physical properties are potential indicators of soil quality with regard to soil erodibility and showed that soils under vegetation cover had

  14. Identification of independent risk factors for restenosis following bare-metal stent implantation: Role of bare-metal stents in the era of drug-eluting stents

    PubMed Central

    PARK, CHANG-BUM; PARK, HOON-KI

    2013-01-01

    In the era of drug-eluting stents (DESs), the ability of clinicians to predict which patients have a low risk of coronary restenosis following bare-metal stent (BMS) implantion is likely to be of benefit. The study population consisted of 2,711 patients who underwent BMS implantation in 3,770 lesions between 1995 and 2004. With clinical and 6 month follow-up angiographic data, we retrospectively sought to identify the independent risk predictors of restenosis, applied a previously proposed prediction model and assessed the characteristics of patients with a low likelihood of coronary restenosis within 6 months of BMS implantation. A 6-month follow-up coronary angiography was performed in 65.0% of the patients who had undergone the BMS implantation and the rate of restenosis was 26.6%. Using multivariate analysis, diabetes [odds ratio (OR), 1.294; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.094–1.483; P=0.005], current smoking (OR, 1.294; 95% CI, 1.094–1.483; P=0.002), a reference vessel diameter of <3.25 mm (OR, 1.238; 95% CI, 1.021–1.501; P<0.001), a lesion length of >30 mm (OR, 1.645; 95% CI, 1.336–2.026; P<0.001), ostial lesion (OR, 1.858; 95% CI, 1.437–2.402; P<0.001), post-stenting minimal luminal diameter (OR, 0.576; 95% CI, 0.484–0.685; P<0.001) and bifurcation lesion (OR, 1.353; 95% CI, 1.070–1.711; P=0.012) were identified as significant independent predictors of restenosis. However, the accuracy of the prediction obtained with the current model, which used the clinical and angiographic variables correlated with the risk of restenosis, was poor. Various clinical and angiographic independent risk variables were revealed to be correlated with the risk of restenosis following BMS implantation in the present large dataset. Certain groups of patients with a relatively low risk of restenosis may be considered for BMS implantation as an alternative to DESs. However, the prediction models used at present are incomplete and further studies are required. PMID

  15. Quantifying the influence of deep soil moisture on ecosystem albedo: The role of vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Mejia, Zulia Mayari; Papuga, Shirley Anne; Swetish, Jessica Blaine; van Leeuwen, Willem Jan Dirk; Szutu, Daphne; Hartfield, Kyle

    2014-05-01

    As changes in precipitation dynamics continue to alter the water availability in dryland ecosystems, understanding the feedbacks between the vegetation and the hydrologic cycle and their influence on the climate system is critically important. We designed a field campaign to examine the influence of two-layer soil moisture control on bare and canopy albedo dynamics in a semiarid shrubland ecosystem. We conducted this campaign during 2011 and 2012 within the tower footprint of the Santa Rita Creosote Ameriflux site. Albedo field measurements fell into one of four Cases within a two-layer soil moisture framework based on permutations of whether the shallow and deep soil layers were wet or dry. Using these Cases, we identified differences in how shallow and deep soil moisture influence canopy and bare albedo. Then, by varying the number of canopy and bare patches within a gridded framework, we explore the influence of vegetation and soil moisture on ecosystem albedo. Our results highlight the importance of deep soil moisture in land surface-atmosphere interactions through its influence on aboveground vegetation characteristics. For instance, we show how green-up of the vegetation is triggered by deep soil moisture, and link deep soil moisture to a decrease in canopy albedo. Understanding relationships between vegetation and deep soil moisture will provide important insights into feedbacks between the hydrologic cycle and the climate system.

  16. Spartina alterniflora invasion alters soil microbial community composition and microbial respiration following invasion chronosequence in a coastal wetland of China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen; Jeelani, Nasreen; Leng, Xin; Cheng, Xiaoli; An, Shuqing

    2016-01-01

    The role of exotic plants in regulating soil microbial community structure and activity following invasion chronosequence remains unclear. We investigated soil microbial community structure and microbial respiration following Spartina alterniflora invasion in a chronosequence of 6-, 10-, 17-, and 20-year-old by comparing with bare flat in a coastal wetland of China. S. alterniflora invasion significantly increased soil moisture and salinity, the concentrations of soil water-soluble organic carbon and microbial biomass carbon (MBC), the quantities of total and various types of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs), the fungal:bacterial PLFAs ratio and cumulative microbial respiration compared with bare flat. The highest MBC, gram-negative bacterial and saturated straight-chain PLFAs were found in 10-year-old S. alterniflora soil, while the greatest total PLFAs, bacterial and gram-positive bacterial PLFAs were found in 10- and 17-year-old S. alterniflora soils. The monounsaturated:branched PLFAs ratio declined, and cumulative microbial respiration on a per-unit-PLFAs increased following S. alterniflora invasion in the chronosequence. Our results suggest that S. alterniflora invasion significantly increased the biomass of soil various microbial groups and microbial respiration compared to bare flat soil by increasing soil available substrate, and modifying soil physiochemical properties. Soil microbial community reached the most enriched condition in the 10-year-old S. alterniflora community. PMID:27241173

  17. Spartina alterniflora invasion alters soil microbial community composition and microbial respiration following invasion chronosequence in a coastal wetland of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wen; Jeelani, Nasreen; Leng, Xin; Cheng, Xiaoli; An, Shuqing

    2016-05-01

    The role of exotic plants in regulating soil microbial community structure and activity following invasion chronosequence remains unclear. We investigated soil microbial community structure and microbial respiration following Spartina alterniflora invasion in a chronosequence of 6-, 10-, 17-, and 20-year-old by comparing with bare flat in a coastal wetland of China. S. alterniflora invasion significantly increased soil moisture and salinity, the concentrations of soil water-soluble organic carbon and microbial biomass carbon (MBC), the quantities of total and various types of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs), the fungal:bacterial PLFAs ratio and cumulative microbial respiration compared with bare flat. The highest MBC, gram-negative bacterial and saturated straight-chain PLFAs were found in 10-year-old S. alterniflora soil, while the greatest total PLFAs, bacterial and gram-positive bacterial PLFAs were found in 10- and 17-year-old S. alterniflora soils. The monounsaturated:branched PLFAs ratio declined, and cumulative microbial respiration on a per-unit-PLFAs increased following S. alterniflora invasion in the chronosequence. Our results suggest that S. alterniflora invasion significantly increased the biomass of soil various microbial groups and microbial respiration compared to bare flat soil by increasing soil available substrate, and modifying soil physiochemical properties. Soil microbial community reached the most enriched condition in the 10-year-old S. alterniflora community.

  18. Spartina alterniflora invasion alters soil microbial community composition and microbial respiration following invasion chronosequence in a coastal wetland of China

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wen; Jeelani, Nasreen; Leng, Xin; Cheng, Xiaoli; An, Shuqing

    2016-01-01

    The role of exotic plants in regulating soil microbial community structure and activity following invasion chronosequence remains unclear. We investigated soil microbial community structure and microbial respiration following Spartina alterniflora invasion in a chronosequence of 6-, 10-, 17-, and 20-year-old by comparing with bare flat in a coastal wetland of China. S. alterniflora invasion significantly increased soil moisture and salinity, the concentrations of soil water-soluble organic carbon and microbial biomass carbon (MBC), the quantities of total and various types of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs), the fungal:bacterial PLFAs ratio and cumulative microbial respiration compared with bare flat. The highest MBC, gram-negative bacterial and saturated straight-chain PLFAs were found in 10-year-old S. alterniflora soil, while the greatest total PLFAs, bacterial and gram-positive bacterial PLFAs were found in 10- and 17-year-old S. alterniflora soils. The monounsaturated:branched PLFAs ratio declined, and cumulative microbial respiration on a per-unit-PLFAs increased following S. alterniflora invasion in the chronosequence. Our results suggest that S. alterniflora invasion significantly increased the biomass of soil various microbial groups and microbial respiration compared to bare flat soil by increasing soil available substrate, and modifying soil physiochemical properties. Soil microbial community reached the most enriched condition in the 10-year-old S. alterniflora community. PMID:27241173

  19. The interactive effects of soil transplant into colder regions and cropping on soil microbiology and biogeochemistry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shanshan; Wang, Feng; Xue, Kai; Sun, Bo; Zhang, Yuguang; He, Zhili; Van Nostrand, Joy D; Zhou, Jizhong; Yang, Yunfeng

    2015-03-01

    Soil transplant into warmer regions has been shown to alter soil microbiology. In contrast, little is known about the effects of soil transplant into colder regions, albeit that climate cooling has solicited attention in recent years. To address this question, we transplanted bare fallow soil over large transects from southern China (subtropical climate zone) to central (warm temperate climate zone) and northern China (cold temperate climate zone). After an adaptation period of 4 years, soil nitrogen components, microbial biomass and community structures were altered. However, the effects of soil transplant on microbial communities were dampened by maize cropping, unveiling a negative interaction between cropping and transplant. Further statistical analyses with Canonical correspondence analysis and Mantel tests unveiled annual average temperature, relative humidity, aboveground biomass, soil pH and NH4 (+) -N content as environmental attributes closely correlated with microbial functional structures. In addition, average abundances of amoA-AOA (ammonia-oxidizing archaea) and amoA-AOB (ammonia-oxidizing bacteria) genes were significantly (P < 0.05) correlated with soil nitrification capacity, hence both AOA and AOB contributed to the soil functional process of nitrification. These results suggested that the soil nitrogen cycle was intimately linked with microbial community structure, and both were subjected to disturbance by soil transplant to colder regions and plant cropping. PMID:24548455

  20. Shallow Subsurface Soil Moisture Dynamics in the Root-Zone and Bulk Soil of Sparsely Vegetated Land Surfaces as Impacted by Near-Surface Atmospheric State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trautz, A.; Illangasekare, T. H.; Tilton, N.

    2015-12-01

    Soil moisture is a fundamental state variable that provides the water necessary for plant growth and evapotranspiration. Soil moisture has been extensively studied in the context of bare surface soils and root zones. Less attention has focused on the effects of sparse vegetation distributions, such as those typical of agricultural cropland and other natural surface environments, on soil moisture dynamics. The current study explores root zone, bulk soil, and near-surface atmosphere interactions in terms of soil moisture under different distributions of sparse vegetation using multi-scale laboratory experimentation and numerical simulation. This research is driven by the need to advance our fundamental understanding of soil moisture dynamics in the context of improving water conservation and next generation heat and mass transfer numerical models. Experimentation is performed in a two-dimensional 7.3 m long intermediate scale soil tank interfaced with a climate-controlled wind tunnel, both of which are outfitted with current sensor technologies for measuring atmospheric and soil variables. The soil tank is packed so that a sparsely vegetated soil is surrounded by bulk bare soil; the two regions are separated by porous membranes to isolate the root zone from the bulk soil. Results show that in the absence of vegetation, evaporation rates vary along the soil tank in response to longitudinal changes in humidity; soil dries fastest upstream where evaporation rates are highest. In the presence of vegetation, soil moisture in the bulk soil closest to a vegetated region decreases more rapidly than the bulk soil farther away. Evapotranspiration rates in this region are also higher than the bulk soil region. This study is the first step towards the development of more generalized models that account for non-uniformly distributed vegetation and land surfaces exhibiting micro-topology.

  1. Determining soil moisture and soil properties in vegetated areas by assimilating soil temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Jianzhi; Steele-Dunne, Susan C.; Ochsner, Tyson E.; van de Giesen, Nick

    2016-06-01

    This study addresses two critical barriers to the use of Passive Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) for large-scale, high-resolution monitoring of soil moisture. In recent research, a particle batch smoother (PBS) was developed to assimilate sequences of temperature data at two depths into Hydrus-1D to estimate soil moisture as well as soil thermal and hydraulic properties. However, this approach was limited to bare soil and assumed that the cable depths were perfectly known. In order for Passive DTS to be more broadly applicable as a soil hydrology research and remote sensing soil moisture product validation tool, it must be applicable in vegetated areas. To address this first limitation, the forward model (Hydrus-1D) was improved through the inclusion of a canopy energy balance scheme. Synthetic tests were used to demonstrate that without the canopy energy balance scheme, the PBS estimated soil moisture could be even worse than the open loop case (no assimilation). When the improved Hydrus-1D model was used as the forward model in the PBS, vegetation impacts on the soil heat and water transfer were well accounted for. This led to accurate and robust estimates of soil moisture and soil properties. The second limitation is that, cable depths can be highly uncertain in DTS installations. As Passive DTS uses the downward propagation of heat to extract moisture-related variations in thermal properties, accurate estimates of cable depths are essential. Here synthetic tests were used to demonstrate that observation depths can be jointly estimated with other model states and parameters. The state and parameter results were only slightly poorer than those obtained when the cable depths were perfectly known. Finally, in situ temperature data from four soil profiles with different, but known, soil textures were used to test the proposed approach. Results show good agreement between the observed and estimated soil moisture, hydraulic properties, thermal properties, and

  2. Erosion, Weathering and Stepped Topography in the Sierra Nevada, California; Quantifying the Dynamics of Hybrid (Soil-Bedrock) Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jessup, B. S.; Miller, S. N.; Kirchner, J. W.; Riebe, C. S.

    2010-12-01

    The dynamics of granitic landscapes are regulated, in part, by bimodal weathering, which produces granular soils and expanses of bare rock ranging from meter-scale boulders to mountain-scale domes. Conceptual models for the evolution of granitic landscapes date back to Gilbert and Penck. Yet few studies have been able to realistically predict the co-occurrence of bedrock and granular soil and its implications for mountain-scale topography -- despite marked advances in quantitative landscape evolution modeling over the last few decades. Here we use terrain analysis, together with cosmogenic-nuclide measurements of erosion and weathering, to quantitatively explore Wahrhaftig's decades-old hypothesis for the development of “stepped topography” by differential weathering of bare and soil-mantled granite. According to this hypothesis, soil-mantled granite weathers much faster than bare granite; thus random erosional exposure of bare rock leads to an alternating sequence of steep, slowly weathering bedrock “steps” and gently sloped, but rapidly weathering, soil-mantled “treads”. Such treads and steps are purported to collectively account for ~2000 m of relief in the southern Sierra Nevada, California, implying that the mechanisms behind the formation of stepped topography may also account for development of mountain-scale relief in granitic landscapes. Our preliminary analysis of granitic terrain in the Sierra Nevada range suggests that steep steps often grade into gentle treads, consistent with the stepped topography hypothesis. Our data and analysis further corroborate the hypothesis with indications that bare granitic rocks erode much more slowly than their soil-mantled counterparts. This suggests that the coupling between soil production and denudation in granitic landscapes harbors a crucial tipping point; if soils are stripped to bedrock, erosion slows and soil formation is restrained to the point that bare rock can persist and rise in relief relative

  3. Microwave remote sensing of soil moisture, volume 1. [Guymon, Oklahoma and Dalhart, Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfarland, M. J. (Principal Investigator); Theis, S. W.; Rosenthal, W. D.; Jones, C. L.

    1982-01-01

    Multifrequency sensor data from NASA's C-130 aircraft were used to determine which of the all weather microwave sensors demonstrated the highest correlation to surface soil moisture over optimal bare soil conditions, and to develop and test techniques which use visible/infrared sensors to compensate for the vegetation effect in this sensor's response to soil moisture. The L-band passive microwave radiometer was found to be the most suitable single sensor system to estimate soil moisture over bare fields. The perpendicular vegetation index (PVI) as determined from the visible/infrared sensors was useful as a measure of the vegetation effect on the L-band radiometer response to soil moisture. A linear equation was developed to estimate percent field capacity as a function of L-band emissivity and the vegetation index. The prediction algorithm improves the estimation of moisture significantly over predictions from L-band emissivity alone.

  4. Attenuation of soil microwave emissivity by corn and soybeans at 1.4 and 5 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Thomas J.; O'Neill, Peggy E.

    1989-01-01

    Theory and experiments have shown that passive microwave radiometers can be used to measure soil moisture. However, the presence of a vegetative cover alters the measurement that might be obtained under bare conditions. Deterministically accounting for the effect of vegetation and developing algorithms for extracting soil moisture from observations of a vegetable-soil complex present significant obstacles to the practical use of this approach. The presence of a vegetation canopy reduces the sensitivity of passive microwave instruments to soil moisture variations. The reduction in sensitivity, as compared to a bare-soil relationship, increases as microwave frequency increases, implying that the longest wavelength sensors should provide the most information. Sensitivity also decreases as the amount of vegetative wet biomass increases for a given type of vegetation.

  5. A Comparison of Soil Moisture Retrieval Models Using SIR-C Measurements over the Little Washita River Watershed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. R.; Hsu, A.; Shi, J. C.; ONeill, P. E.; Engman, E. T.

    1997-01-01

    Six SIR-C L-band measurements over the Little Washita River watershed in Chickasha, Oklahoma during 11-17 April 1994 have been analyzed for studying the change of soil moisture in the region. Two algorithms developed recently for estimation of moisture content in bare soil were applied to these measurements and the results were compared with those sampled on the ground. There is a good agreement between the values of soil moisture estimated by either one of the algorithms and those measured from ground sampling for bare or sparsely vegetated fields. The standard error from this comparison is on the order of 0.05-0.06 cu cm/cu cm, which is comparable to that expected from a regression between backscattering coefficients and measured soil moisture. Both algorithms provide a poor estimation of soil moisture or fail to give solutions to areas covered with moderate or dense vegetation. Even for bare soils the number of pixels that bear no numerical solution from the application of either one of the two algorithms to the data is not negligible. Results from using one of these algorithms indicate that the fraction of these pixels becomes larger as the bare soils become drier. The other algorithm generally gives a larger fraction of these pixels when the fields are vegetation-covered. The implication and impact of these features are discussed in this article.

  6. EAARL Coastal Topography-Assateague Island National Seashore, 2008: Bare Earth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bonisteel, Jamie M.; Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Stevens, Sara; Yates, Xan; Klipp, Emily S.

    2009-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of lidar-derived bare-earth (BE) topography were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL; the National Park Service (NPS), Northeast Coastal and Barrier Network, Kingston, RI; and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of the Assateague Island National Seashore in Maryland and Virginia, acquired March 24-25, 2008. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural-resource managers. An innovative airborne lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL) was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multi-spectral color infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers, and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for sub-meter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the EAARL system, and the

  7. Evaluation of a Compression-Loaded-Stitched-Multi-Bay Fuselage Panel With Barely Visible Impact Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Donald J.; Li, Ji-An

    2005-01-01

    The experimental results from a stitched VaRTM carbon-epoxy composite panel tested under uni-axial compression loading are presented along with nonlinear finite element analysis prediction of the response. The curved panel is divided by frames and stringers into six bays with a column of three bays along the compressive loading direction. The frames are supported at the frame ends to resist out-of-plane translation. Back-to-back strain gages are used to record the strain and displacement transducers were used to record the out-of-plane displacements. In addition a full-field-displacement measurement technique that utilizes a camera-based-stereo-vision system was used to record the displacements. The panel was loaded to 1.5 times the predicted initial buckling load (1st bay buckling load, P(sub er) from the nonlinear finite element analysis and then was removed from the test machine for impact testing. After impacting with 20 ft-lbs of energy using a spherical impactor to produce barely visible damage the panel was loaded in compression until failure. The buckling load of the first bay to buckle was 97% of the buckling load before impact. The stitching constrained the impact damage from growing during the loading to failure. Impact damage had very little overall effect on panel stiffness. Panel stiffness measured by the full-field-displacement technique indicated a 13% loss in stiffness after impact. The panel failed at 1.64 times the first panel buckling load. The barely visible impact damage did not grow noticeably as the panel failed by global instability due to stringer-web terminations at the frame locations. The predictions from the nonlinear analysis of the finite element modeling of the entire specimen were very effective in the capture of the initial buckling and global behavior of the panel. In addition, the prediction highlighted the weakness of the panel under compression due to stringer web terminations. Both the test results and the nonlinear

  8. [Effects of biological soil crust at different succession stages in hilly region of Loess Plateau on soil CO2 flux].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ai-Guo; Zhao, Yun-Ge; Xu, Ming-Xiang; Yang, Li-Na; Ming, Jiao

    2013-03-01

    Biological soil crust (biocrust) is a compact complex layer of soil, which has photosynthetic activity and is one of the factors affecting the CO2flux of soil-atmosphere interface. In this paper, the soil CO, flux under the effects of biocrust at different succession stages on the re-vegetated grassland in the hilly region of Loess Plateau was measured by a modified LI-8100 automated CO, flux system. Under light condition, the soil CO2 flux under effects of cyanobacteria crust and moss crust was significantly decreased by 92% and 305%, respectively, as compared with the flux without the effects of the biocrusts. The decrement of the soil CO, flux by the biocrusts was related to the biocrusts components and their biomass. Under the effects of dark colored cyanobacteria crust and moss crust, the soil CO2 flux was decreased by 141% and 484%, respectively, as compared with that in bare land. The diurnal curve of soil CO2 flux under effects of biocrusts presented a trend of 'drop-rise-drop' , with the maximum carbon uptake under effects of cyanobacteria crust and moss crust being 0.13 and -1.02 micromol CO2.m-2.s-1 and occurred at about 8:00 and 9:00 am, respectively, while that in bare land was unimodal. In a day (24 h) , the total CO2 flux under effects of cyanobacteria crust was increased by 7.7% , while that under effects of moss crust was decreased by 29.6%, as compared with the total CO2 flux in bare land. This study suggested that in the hilly region of Loess Plateau, biocrust had significant effects on soil CO2 flux, which should be taken into consideration when assessing the carbon budget of the 'Grain for Green' eco-project. PMID:23755478

  9. 30 CFR 77.1802 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 77.1802 Section 77.1802... Wires and Trolley Feeder Wires § 77.1802 Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and...

  10. 30 CFR 77.1802 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 77.1802 Section 77.1802... Wires and Trolley Feeder Wires § 77.1802 Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and...

  11. 30 CFR 77.1802 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 77.1802 Section 77.1802... Wires and Trolley Feeder Wires § 77.1802 Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and...

  12. 30 CFR 77.1802 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 77.1802 Section 77.1802... Wires and Trolley Feeder Wires § 77.1802 Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and...

  13. 30 CFR 77.1802 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 77.1802 Section 77.1802... Wires and Trolley Feeder Wires § 77.1802 Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and...

  14. The role of bacterial communities in the natural suppression of Rhizoctonia bare patch of wheat Triticum aestivum L

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia bare patch and root rot of wheat, caused by Rhizoctonia solani AG-8, develops as distinct patches of stunted plants, and limits the yield of direct-seeded wheat in the Pacific Northwest (PNW) of the United States. At a long-term wheat cropping systems study site near Ritzville, WA, conve...

  15. Soil Evaporation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil evaporation can significantly influence energy flux partitioning of partially vegetated surfaces, ultimately affecting plant transpiration. While important, quantification of soil evaporation, separately from canopy transpiration, is challenging. Techniques for measuring soil evaporation exis...

  16. Vertical and horizontal soil CO2 transport and its exchanges with the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Cañete, Enrique P.; Serrano-Ortíz, Penélope; Kowalski, Andrew S.; Curiel Yuste, Jorge; Domingo, Francisco; Oyonarte, Cecilio

    2015-04-01

    The CO2 efflux from soils to the atmosphere constitutes one of the major fluxes of the terrestrial carbon cycle and is a key determinant for sources and sinks of CO2 in land-atmosphere exchanges. Because of their large global magnitude, even small changes in soil CO2 effluxes directly affect the atmospheric CO2 content. Despite much research, models of soil CO2 efflux rates are highly uncertain, with the positive or negative feedbacks between underground carbon pools and fluxes and their temperature sensitivities in future climate scenarios largely unknown. Now it is necessary to change the point of view regarding CO2 exchange studies from an inappropriately conceived static system in which all respired CO2 is directly emitted by molecular processes to the atmosphere, to a dynamic system with gas transport by three different processes: convection, advection and molecular diffusion. Here we study the effects of wind-induced advection on the soil CO2 molar fraction during two years in a shrubland plateau situated in the Southeast of Spain. A borehole and two subterranean profiles (vertical and horizontal) were installed to study CO2 transport in the soil. Exchanges with the atmosphere were measured by an eddy covariance tower. In the vertical profile, two CO2 sensors (GMP-343, Vaisala) were installed at 0.15m and 1.5m along with soil temperature and humidity probes. The horizontal profile was designed to measure horizontal movements in the soil CO2 molar fraction due to down-gradient CO2 from the plant, where the majority CO2 is produced, towards bare soil. Three CO2 sensors (GMM-222, Vaisala) were installed, the first below plant (under-plant), the second in bare soil separated 25 cm from the first sensor (near-plant) and the third in bare soil at 25 cm from the second sensor (bare soil). The results show how the wind induces the movement of subterranean air masses both horizontally and vertically, affecting atmospheric CO2 exchanges. The eddy covariance tower

  17. Design and Use of a Guided Weight Impactor to Impart Barely Visible Impact Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Przekop, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Aircraft structure is required to demonstrate satisfaction of the FAR requirements for Category 1, such as barely visible impact damage (BVID). Typical aircraft structure is impacted using a dropped weight impactor, which can impart BVID to the top surface of the structure. A recent test of a multi-bay box (MBB) composite test article, that represents an 80% scale center section of a hybrid wing body aircraft, required impact to be in a direction other than vertical from above, but still in an direction that is normal to the surface. This requirement eliminated the use of the conventional dropped weight impactor. Therefore, a design study was undertaken to determine the most effective way to efficiently and reliably impact the MBB. The chosen design was a guided weight impactor that is gravity driven. This paper describes the design of the guided weight impactor, and presents the results of its use for imparting BVID to the MBB. The guided weight impactor was seen to be a very reliable method to impart BVID, while at the same time having the capability to be highly configurable for use on other aircraft structure that is impacted at a variety of impact energies and from a variety of directions.

  18. Bare-tether cathodic contact through thermionic emission by low-work-function materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Xin; Sanmartin, J. R.

    2012-07-15

    A new material, C12A7:e{sup -} electride, which might present a work function as low as 0.6 eV and moderately high temperature stability, was recently proposed as coating for floating bare tethers. Arising from heating under space operation, current is emitted by thermionic emission along a thus coated cathodic segment. A preliminary study on the space-charge-limited (SCL) double layer in front of the cathodic segment is presented using Langmuir's SCL electron current between cylindrical electrodes and orbital-motion-limited ion-collection sheath. A detailed calculation of current and bias profiles along the entire tether length is carried out with ohmic effects and the transition from SCL to full Richardson-Dushman emission included. Analysis shows that in the simplest drag mode, under typical orbital and tether conditions, thermionic emission leads to a short cathodic section and may eliminate the need for an active cathodic device and its corresponding gas feed requirements and power subsystem, which results in a truly 'propellant-less' tether system for such basic applications as de-orbiting low earth orbit satellites.

  19. Microbial Life in Ridge Flank Crustal Fluids at Baby Bare Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, J. A.; Johnson, H. P.; Butterfield, D. A.; Baross, J. A.

    2005-12-01

    To determine the microbial community diversity within old oceanic crust, a novel sampling strategy was used to collect crustal fluids at Baby Bare Seamount, a 3.5 Ma old outcrop located in the northeast Pacific Ocean on the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Stainless steel probes were driven directly into the igneous ocean crust to obtain samples of ridge flank crustal fluids. Genetic signatures and enrichment cultures of microorganisms demonstrate that these crustal fluids host a microbial community composed of species indigenous to the subseafloor, including anaerobic thermophiles, and species from other deep-sea habitats, such as seawater and sediments. Evidence using molecular techniques indicates the presence of a relatively small but active microbial population, dominated by bacteria. The microbial community diversity found in the crustal fluids may indicate habitat variability in old oceanic crust, with inputs of nutrients from seawater, sediment pore-water fluids and possibly hydrothermal sources. This report further supports the presence of an indigenous microbial community in ridge flank crustal fluids and advances our understanding of the potential physiological and phylogenetic diversity of this community.

  20. Bare-tether cathodic contact through thermionic emission by low-work-function materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xin; Sanmartín, J. R.

    2012-07-01

    A new material, C12A7:e- electride, which might present a work function as low as 0.6 eV and moderately high temperature stability, was recently proposed as coating for floating bare tethers. Arising from heating under space operation, current is emitted by thermionic emission along a thus coated cathodic segment. A preliminary study on the space-charge-limited (SCL) double layer in front of the cathodic segment is presented using Langmuir's SCL electron current between cylindrical electrodes and orbital-motion-limited ion-collection sheath. A detailed calculation of current and bias profiles along the entire tether length is carried out with ohmic effects and the transition from SCL to full Richardson-Dushman emission included. Analysis shows that in the simplest drag mode, under typical orbital and tether conditions, thermionic emission leads to a short cathodic section and may eliminate the need for an active cathodic device and its corresponding gas feed requirements and power subsystem, which results in a truly "propellant-less" tether system for such basic applications as de-orbiting low earth orbit satellites.

  1. Psychophysical Detection of Inclusions with the Bare Finger amidst Softness Differentials

    PubMed Central

    Baumgart, Leigh A.; Gerling, Gregory J.; Bass, Ellen J.

    2010-01-01

    Softness discrimination and the detection of inclusions are important in surgery and other medical tasks. To better understand how the characteristics of an inclusion (size, depth, hardness) and substrate (stiffness) affect their tactile detection and discrimination with the bare finger, we conducted a psychophysics experiment with eighteen participants. The results indicate that within a more pliant substrate (21 kPa), inclusions of 4 mm diameter (20 mm3 volume) and greater were consistently detectable (above 75% of the time) but only at a depth of 5 mm. Inclusions embedded in stiffer substrates (82 kPa) had to be twice that volume (5 mm diameter, 40 mm3 volume) to be detectable at the same rate. To analyze which tactile cues most impact stimulus detectability, we utilized logistic regression and generalized estimating equations. The results indicate that substrate stiffness most contributes to inclusion detectability, while the size, depth, and hardness of the stimulus follow in individual importance, respectively. The results seek to aid in the development of clinical tools and information displays and more accurate virtual haptic environments in discrimination of soft tissue. PMID:21132051

  2. Empirical formulas for direct double ionization by bare ions: Z = - 1 to 92

    DOE PAGESBeta

    DuBois, R. D.; Santos, A. C. F.; Manson, S. T.

    2014-11-25

    Experimental cross sections and cross-section ratios reported in the literature for direct double ionization of the outer shells of helium, neon, and argon atoms resulting from bare ions ranging from protons to uranium and for antiprotons are analyzed in terms of a first- and second-order interference model originally proposed by McGuire [J. H. McGuire, Phys. Rev. Lett. 49, 1153 (1982)]. Empirical formulas for the various contributions to double ionization plus information about the phase difference between the first- and second-order mechanisms are extracted from the data. Projectile and target scalings are also extracted. Total cross sections and their ratios determinedmore » using these formulas and scalings are shown to be in very good agreement with experimental data for lower-Z projectiles and impact velocities larger than 1 a.u. For very-high-Z projectiles, the amount of double ionization is overestimated, probably due to saturation of probabilities that is not accounted for in scaling formulas.« less

  3. Directly Grafting Alkanethiol on Bare Si (111) by UV-assisted Photochemical Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Lo-Yueh; Shiu, Hung-Wei; Gwo, Shangjr; Chen, Chia-Hao

    2014-03-01

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) are organic molecules that self-assembled and closely packed on substrate surface. The surface physic and chemical properties are dependent on the controllable tail of SAMs. Therefore, SAMs is attracting a lot of attention in bio-sensing, nano-manipulating, and microfluidic field. The alkanethiol on noble metal surface, such as gold and silver, is a well-known SAM system to understand the fundamental properties. However, alkanethiols grown on semiconductor surfaces was less systematically studied, especially on bare silicon surface, despite their prospective applications. To have in-depth understanding of such system, we tried to grow alkanethiol SAMs on hydrogen-terminated Si surface by UV-assisted photochemical reaction. The resulting monolayer was studied by means of water contact angle measurement, synchrotron radiation based X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, and polarization dependent near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure. The combined characterization probes revealed a hydrophobic ambient surface, and the n-alkanethiols were directly attached on Si through Si-S bond that formed a highly order monolayer to prevent the air oxidation and contamination.

  4. Gas Sensing with Bare and Graphene-covered Optical Nano-Antenna Structures

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Bhaven; Benkstein, Kurt D.; Semancik, Steve; Zaghloul, Mona E.

    2016-01-01

    The motivation behind this work is to study the gas phase chemical sensing characteristics of optical (plasmonic) nano-antennas (ONA) and graphene/graphene oxide-covered versions of these structures. ONA are devices that have their resonating frequency in the visible range. The basic principle governing the detection mechanism for ONA is refractive index sensing. The change in the concentration of the analyte results in a differing amount of adsorbate and correlated shifts in the resonance wavelength of the device. In this work, bare and graphene or graphene oxide covered ONA have been evaluated for gas sensing performance. Four different analytes (ethanol, acetone, nitrogen dioxide and toluene) were used in testing. ONA response behavior to different analytes was modified by adsorption within the graphene and graphene oxide overlayers. This work is a preliminary study to understand resonance wavelength shift caused by different analytes. Results imply that the combination of well-structured ONA functionalized by graphene-based adsorbers can give sensitive and selective sensors but baseline drift effects identified in this work must be addressed for applied measurements. PMID:26883289

  5. Gas Sensing with Bare and Graphene-covered Optical Nano-Antenna Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Bhaven; Benkstein, Kurt D.; Semancik, Steve; Zaghloul, Mona E.

    2016-02-01

    The motivation behind this work is to study the gas phase chemical sensing characteristics of optical (plasmonic) nano-antennas (ONA) and graphene/graphene oxide-covered versions of these structures. ONA are devices that have their resonating frequency in the visible range. The basic principle governing the detection mechanism for ONA is refractive index sensing. The change in the concentration of the analyte results in a differing amount of adsorbate and correlated shifts in the resonance wavelength of the device. In this work, bare and graphene or graphene oxide covered ONA have been evaluated for gas sensing performance. Four different analytes (ethanol, acetone, nitrogen dioxide and toluene) were used in testing. ONA response behavior to different analytes was modified by adsorption within the graphene and graphene oxide overlayers. This work is a preliminary study to understand resonance wavelength shift caused by different analytes. Results imply that the combination of well-structured ONA functionalized by graphene-based adsorbers can give sensitive and selective sensors but baseline drift effects identified in this work must be addressed for applied measurements.

  6. Is HE 0436-4717 Anemic? A deep look at a bare Seyfert 1 galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonson, K.; Gallo, L. C.; Vasudevan, R.

    2015-06-01

    A multi-epoch, multi-instrument analysis of the Seyfert 1 galaxy HE 0436-4717 is conducted using optical to X-ray data from XMM-Newton and Swift (including the Burst Alert Telescope). Fitting of the UV-to-X-ray spectral energy distribution shows little evidence of extinction and the X-ray spectral analysis does not confirm previous reports of deep absorption edges from O VIII. HE 0436-4717 is a `bare' Seyfert with negligible line-of-sight absorption making it ideal to study the central X-ray emitting region. Three scenarios were considered to describe the X-ray data: partial covering absorption, blurred reflection, and soft Comptonization. All three interpretations describe the 0.5-10.0 keV spectra well. Extrapolating the models to 100 keV results in poorer fits for the partial covering model. When also considering the rapid variability during one of the XMM-Newton observations, the blurred reflection model appears to describe all the observations in the most self-consistent manner. If adopted, the blurred reflection model requires a very low iron abundance in HE 0436-4717. We consider the possibilities that this is an artefact of the fitting process, but it appears possible that it is intrinsic to the object.

  7. FOUR PI CALIBRATION AND MODELING OF A BARE GERMANIUM DETECTOR IN A CYLINDRICAL FIELD SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Dewberry, R.; Young, J.

    2011-04-29

    In reference 1 the authors described {gamma}-ray holdup assay of a Mossbauer spectroscopy instrument where they utilized two axial symmetric cylindrical shell acquisitions and two disk source acquisitions to determine Am-241 and Np-237 contamination. The measured contents of the two species were determined using a general detector efficiency calibration taken from a 12-inch point source.2 The authors corrected the raw spectra for container absorption as well as for geometry corrections to transform the calibration curve to the applicable axial symmetric cylindrical source - and disk source - of contamination. The authors derived the geometry corrections with exact calculus that are shown in equations (1) and (2) of our Experimental section. A cylindrical shell (oven source) acquisition configuration is described in reference 3, where the authors disclosed this configuration to gain improved sensitivity for holdup measure of U-235 in a ten-chamber oven. The oven was a piece of process equipment used in the Savannah River Plant M-Area Uranium Fuel Fabrication plant for which a U-235 holdup measurement was necessary for its decontamination and decommissioning in 2003.4 In reference 4 the authors calibrated a bare NaI detector for these U-235 holdup measurements. In references 5 and 6 the authors calibrated a bare HpGe detector in a cylindrical shell configuration for improved sensitivity measurements of U-235 in other M-Area process equipment. Sensitivity was vastly improved compared to a close field view of the sample, with detection efficiency of greater than 1% for the 185.7-keV {gamma}-ray from U-235. In none of references 3 - 7 did the authors resolve the exact calculus descriptions of the acquisition configurations. Only the empirical efficiency for detection of the 185.7-keV photon from U-235 decay was obtained. Not until the 2010 paper of reference 1 did the authors derive a good theoretical description of the flux of photons onto the front face of a detector

  8. An electrochemical study of hydrogen uptake and elimination by bare and gold-plated waspaloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.; Deramus, G. E., Jr.; Lowery, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    Two electrochemical methods for the determination of hydrogen concentrations in metals are discussed and evaluated. The take-up of hydrogen at a pressure of 5000 psi by Waspaloy metal was determined experimentally at 24 C. It was found that the metal becomes saturated with hydrogen after an exposure time of about 1 hr. For samples charged with hydrogen at high pressure, most of the hydrogen is contained in the interstitial solid solution of the metal. For electrolytically charged samples, most of the hydrogen is contained as surface and subsurface hydrides. Hydrogen elimination rates were determined for these two cases, with the rate for electrolytically charged samples being greater by over a factor of two. Theoretical effects of high temperature and pressure on hydrogen take-up and elimination by bare and gold plated Waspaloy metal was considered. The breakthrough point for hydrogen at 5000 psi, determined experimentally, lies between a gold thickness of 0.0127 mm (0.0005 in.) and 0.0254 mm (0.001 in.) at 24 C. Electropolishing was found to greatly reduce the uptake of hydrogen at high pressure by Waspaloy metal at 24 C. Possible implications of the results obtained, as they apply to the turbine disk of the space shuttle main engine, are discussed.

  9. Toxicity of bare and surfaced functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles towards microalgae.

    PubMed

    Toh, Pey Yi; Tai, Wan Yii; Ahmad, Abdul Latif; Lim, Jit Kang; Chan, Derek Juinn Chieh

    2016-06-01

    This study investigates the toxicity of bare iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) and surface functionalization iron oxide nanoparticles (SF-IONPs) to the growth of freshwater microalgae Chlorella sp. This study is important due to the increased interest on the application of the magnetic responsive IONPs in various fields, such as biomedical, wastewater treatment, and microalgae harvesting. This study demonstrated that the toxicity of IONPs was mainly contributed by the indirect light shading effect from the suspending nanoparticles which is nanoparticles concentration-dependent, direct light shading effect caused by the attachment of IONPs on cell and the cell aggregation, and the oxidative stress from the internalization of IONPs into the cells. The results showed that the layer of poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) tended to mask the IONPs and hence eliminated oxidative stress toward the protein yield but it in turn tended to enhance the toxicity of IONPs by enabling the IONPs to attach on cell surfaces and cause cell aggregation. Therefore, the choice of the polymer that used for surface functionalize the IONPs is the key factor to determine the toxicity of the IONPs. PMID:26389846

  10. Gas Sensing with Bare and Graphene-covered Optical Nano-Antenna Structures.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Bhaven; Benkstein, Kurt D; Semancik, Steve; Zaghloul, Mona E

    2016-01-01

    The motivation behind this work is to study the gas phase chemical sensing characteristics of optical (plasmonic) nano-antennas (ONA) and graphene/graphene oxide-covered versions of these structures. ONA are devices that have their resonating frequency in the visible range. The basic principle governing the detection mechanism for ONA is refractive index sensing. The change in the concentration of the analyte results in a differing amount of adsorbate and correlated shifts in the resonance wavelength of the device. In this work, bare and graphene or graphene oxide covered ONA have been evaluated for gas sensing performance. Four different analytes (ethanol, acetone, nitrogen dioxide and toluene) were used in testing. ONA response behavior to different analytes was modified by adsorption within the graphene and graphene oxide overlayers. This work is a preliminary study to understand resonance wavelength shift caused by different analytes. Results imply that the combination of well-structured ONA functionalized by graphene-based adsorbers can give sensitive and selective sensors but baseline drift effects identified in this work must be addressed for applied measurements. PMID:26883289

  11. Bare Below the Elbows: A comparative study of a tertiary and district general hospital.

    PubMed

    Collins, A M; Connaughton, J; Ridgway, P F

    2013-10-01

    A 'Bare Below the Elbows' (BBTE) dress code policy has been introduced by the majority of NHS trusts in the UK. The aim of this Irish study was to evaluate the impact of an educational intervention on perception of medical attire. The study was carried out in two centres: a tertiary referral centre (Beaumont Hospital) and a district hospital (MRH, Portlaoise). Two questionnaires, incorporating photographic evaluation of appropriate attire for consultants and junior doctors, were completed pre and post BBTE education. One hundred and five patients participated. Analysis pre BBTE education indicated patients considered formal attire and white coats most appropriate for consultants and junior doctors respectively. Post-intervention analysis revealed a significant reduction in the popularity of both (p <0.001), with scrubs and smart casual attire gaining significant support in both cohorts (p <0.001). Our findings demonstrated that patient opinion on medical attire is malleable. The support of such a policy may be achieved if patients are informed that the aim is to reduce the spread of healthcare-associated infections. PMID:24416849

  12. Transient surface photovoltage studies of bare and Ni-filled porous silicon performed in different ambients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granitzer, Petra; Rumpf, Klemens; Strzhemechny, Yuri; Chapagain, Puskar

    2014-08-01

    Mesoporous silicon and porous silicon/Ni nanocomposites have been investigated in this work employing light-dark surface photovoltage (SPV) transients to monitor the response of surface charge dynamics to illumination changes. The samples were prepared by anodization of a highly n-doped silicon wafer and a subsequent electrodepositing of Ni into the pores. The resulting pores were oriented towards the surface with an average pore diameter of 60 nm and the thickness of the porous layer of approximately 40 μm. SPV was performed on a bare porous silicon as well as on a Ni-filled porous silicon in vacuum and in different gaseous environments (O2, N2, Ar). A significant difference was observed between the `light-on' and `light-off' SPV transients obtained in vacuum and those observed in gaseous ambiences. Such behavior could be explained by the contribution to the charge exchange in gas environments from chemisorbed and physisorbed species at the semiconductor surface.

  13. Behavior of mammalian cells on magnesium substituted bare and hydroxyapatite deposited (Ti,Mg)N coatings.

    PubMed

    Onder, Sakip; Calikoglu-Koyuncu, Ayse Ceren; Kazmanli, Kursat; Urgen, Mustafa; Torun Kose, Gamze; Kok, Fatma Nese

    2015-12-25

    TiN and (Ti,Mg)N thin film coatings were deposited on titanium substrates by using cathodic arc physical vapor deposition (arc-PVD) technique with magnesium contents of 0, 4.24 at% (low Mg) and 10.42 at% (high Mg). The presence of magnesium on both normal (hFOB) and cancer (SaOS-2) osteoblast cell behavior was investigated in (Ti,Mg)N surfaces with or without prior hydroxyapatite (HA) deposition (in simulated body fluid, SBF). Mg incorporation on TiN films was found to have no apparent effect on the cell proliferation in bare surfaces but cell spreading was better on low Mg content surface for hFOB cells. SaOS-2 cells, on the other hand, showed an increased extra cellular matrix (ECM) deposition on low Mg surfaces but ECM deposition almost disappeared when Mg content was increased above 10 at%. HA deposited surfaces with high Mg content was shown to cause a significant decrease in cell viability. While the cells were flattened, elongated and spread over the surface in contact with each other via cellular extensions on unmodified and low Mg doped surfaces, unhealthy morphologies of cells with round shape with a limited number of extended arms was visualized on high Mg containing samples. In summary, Mg incorporation into the TiN coatings by arc-PVD technique and successive HA deposition led to promising cell responses on low Mg content surfaces for a better osteointegration performance. PMID:25556119

  14. Transport of bare and capped zinc oxide nanoparticles is dependent on porous medium composition.

    PubMed

    Kurlanda-Witek, H; Ngwenya, B T; Butler, I B

    2014-07-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles are one of the most frequently used nanoparticles in industry and hence are likely to be introduced to the groundwater environment. The mobility of these nanoparticles in different aquifer materials has not been assessed. While some studies have been published on the transport of ZnO nanoparticles in individual porous media, these studies do not generally account for varying porous medium composition both within and between aquifers. As a first step towards understanding the impact of this variability, this paper compares the transport of bare ZnO nanoparticles (bZnO-NPs) and capped ZnO nanoparticles, coated with tri-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (cZnO-NPs), in saturated columns packed with glass beads, fine grained sand and fine grained calcite, at near-neutral pH and groundwater salinity levels. With the exception of cZnO-NPs in sand columns, ZnO nanoparticles are highly immobile in all three types of studied porous media, with most retention taking place near the column inlet. Results are in general agreement with DLVO theory, and the deviation in experiments with cZnO-NPs flowing through columns packed with sand is linked to variability in zeta potential of the capped nanoparticles and sand grains. Therefore, differences in surface charge of nanoparticles and porous media are demonstrated to be key drivers in nanoparticle transport. PMID:24796515

  15. Low temperature Silicon epitaxy on bare Si (100) and H terminated Si (100) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Xiao; Namboodiri, Pradeep; Li, Kai; Wang, Xiqiao; Li, Tongbao; Silver, Richard

    Silicon on Silicon growth morphology is studied using an ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy (UHV-STM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Sub-monolayer to 18 nm of silicon was evaporated using an all-silicon sublimation source (SUSI) onto a UHV prepared Si (100) sample at 250°C. The results are compared with the growth characteristics on hydrogen passivated surfaces (H: Si) under identical experimental conditions. STM images indicate that growth morphology of both Si on Si and Si on H: Si is of epitaxial nature at temperatures as low as 250°C. For Si on bare Si growth at 250°C, there exists a stable thickness regime where Si epitaxial growth front keeps the same morphology. Although the mobility of silicon is modestly affected on the H: Si surface because of the H atoms during the initial sub-monolayer regime, the growth proceeds epitaxially with the 3D island growth mode and noticeable surface roughening.

  16. Utilization of satellite and close range digital data for mapping soils and soil properties in arid rangeland and agricultural rainfed and irrigated lands, Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naimi, Mustapha

    significant when wetness was expressed as AWC fraction for sugarcane, bare soil, and bare soil plus sunflower (0.60*, 0.88**, 0.85**). When sigmasp0 was related to roughness parameters, Rsp2 was 0.51* for sugarcane fields, and 0.61* when 1/Ssp2 was used (0.61*). Multiple regressions Rsp2 was 0.49* for sugarcane and 0.73* for bare soil. The use of transformed variables improved the relationship (0.74*, 0.55*).

  17. Thermography for estimating near-surface soil moisture under developing crop canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heilman, J. L.; Moore, D. G.

    1980-01-01

    Previous investigations of thermal infrared techniques using remote sensors (thermography) for estimating soil water content have been limited primarily to bare soil. Ground-based and aircraft investigations were conducted to evaluate the potential for extending the thermography approach to developing crop canopies. A significant exponential relationship was found between the volumetric soil water content in the 0-4 cm soil layer and the diurnal difference between surface soil temperature measured at 0230 and 1330 LST (satellite overpass times of NASA's Heat Capacity Mapping Mission - HCMM). Surface soil temperatures were estimated using minimum air temperature, percent cover of the canopy and remote measurements of canopy temperature. Results of the investigation demonstrated that thermography can potentially be used to estimate soil temperature and soil moisture throughout a complete growing season for a number of different crops and soils.

  18. Comparison of bacterial communities from inside and outside of Rhizoctonia bare patches in wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia solani AG-8 causes distinct patches of stunted wheat in the field. Bacterial communities from bulk soil and rhizospheres of wheat were analyzed with pyrosequencing. Replicated samples were taken from inside and outside of patches; and from patches that had recovered the previous 1–2 year...

  19. In situ sensors, weighing lysimeters and COSMOS under vegetated and bare conditions with subsurface drip irrigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long term weighing lysimeter records may have utility for assessment of climate changes occurring during the period of record. They typically enclose a depth of soil that exceeds the root zone of vegetation normally grown on them and have drainagy systems so that more or less natural hydrologic flux...

  20. Vegetation Types Alter Soil Respiration and Its Temperature Sensitivity at the Field Scale in an Estuary Wetland

    PubMed Central

    Han, Guangxuan; Xing, Qinghui; Luo, Yiqi; Rafique, Rashad; Yu, Junbao; Mikle, Nate

    2014-01-01

    Vegetation type plays an important role in regulating the temporal and spatial variation of soil respiration. Therefore, vegetation patchiness may cause high uncertainties in the estimates of soil respiration for scaling field measurements to ecosystem level. Few studies provide insights regarding the influence of vegetation types on soil respiration and its temperature sensitivity in an estuary wetland. In order to enhance the understanding of this issue, we focused on the growing season and investigated how the soil respiration and its temperature sensitivity are affected by the different vegetation (Phragmites australis, Suaeda salsa and bare soil) in the Yellow River Estuary. During the growing season, there were significant linear relationships between soil respiration rates and shoot and root biomass, respectively. On the diurnal timescale, daytime soil respiration was more dependent on net photosynthesis. A positive correlation between soil respiration and net photosynthesis at the Phragmites australis site was found. There were exponential correlations between soil respiration and soil temperature, and the fitted Q10 values varied among different vegetation types (1.81, 2.15 and 3.43 for Phragmites australis, Suaeda salsa and bare soil sites, respectively). During the growing season, the mean soil respiration was consistently higher at the Phragmites australis site (1.11 µmol CO2 m−2 s−1), followed by the Suaeda salsa site (0.77 µmol CO2 m−2 s−1) and the bare soil site (0.41 µmol CO2 m−2 s−1). The mean monthly soil respiration was positively correlated with shoot and root biomass, total C, and total N among the three vegetation patches. Our results suggest that vegetation patchiness at a field scale might have a large impact on ecosystem-scale soil respiration. Therefore, it is necessary to consider the differences in vegetation types when using models to evaluate soil respiration in an estuary wetland. PMID:24608636

  1. Land cover heterogeneity and soil respiration in a west Greenland tundra landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley-Cook, J. I.; Burzynski, A.; Hammond, C. R.; Virginia, R. A.

    2011-12-01

    Multiple direct and indirect pathways underlie the association between land cover classification, temperature and soil respiration. Temperature is a main control of the biological processes that constitute soil respiration, yet the effect of changing atmospheric temperatures on soil carbon flux is unresolved. This study examines associations amongst land cover, soil carbon characteristics, soil respiration, and temperature in an Arctic tundra landscape in western Greenland. We used a 1.34 meter resolution multi-spectral WorldView2 satellite image to conduct an unsupervised multi-staged ISODATA classification to characterize land cover heterogeneity. The four band image was taken on July 10th, 2010, and captures an 18 km by 15 km area in the vicinity of Kangerlussuaq. The four major terrestrial land cover classes identified were: shrub-dominated, graminoid-dominated, mixed vegetation, and bare soil. The bare soil class was comprised of patches where surface soil has been deflated by wind and ridge-top fellfield. We hypothesize that soil respiration and soil carbon storage are associated with land cover classification and temperature. We set up a hierarchical field sampling design to directly observe spatial variation between and within land cover classes along a 20 km temperature gradient extending west from Russell Glacier on the margin of the Greenland Ice Sheet. We used the land cover classification map and ground verification to select nine sites, each containing patches of the four land cover classes. Within each patch we collected soil samples from a 50 cm pit, quantified vegetation, measured active layer depth and determined landscape characteristics. From a subset of field sites we collected additional 10 cm surface soil samples to estimate soil heterogeneity within patches and measured soil respiration using a LiCor 8100 Infrared Gas Analyzer. Soil respiration rates varied with land cover classes, with values ranging from 0.2 mg C/m^2/hr in the bare soil

  2. EAARL coastal topography-western Florida, post-Hurricane Charley, 2004: seamless (bare earth and submerged.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Bonisteel, Jamie M.; Wright, C. Wayne; Sallenger, A.H.; Brock, John C.; Yates, Xan

    2010-01-01

    Project Description These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of lidar-derived seamless (bare-earth and submerged) topography were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Coastal and Marine Geology Program (CMGP), St. Petersburg, FL, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of a portion of the western Florida coastline beachface, acquired post-Hurricane Charley on August 17 and 18, 2004. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural-resource managers. An innovative airborne lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multispectral color infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers, and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for sub-meter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the EAARL system, and the resulting data were then

  3. In vivo penetration of bare and lipid-coated silica nanoparticles across the human stratum corneum.

    PubMed

    Iannuccelli, Valentina; Bertelli, Davide; Romagnoli, Marcello; Scalia, Santo; Maretti, Eleonora; Sacchetti, Francesca; Leo, Eliana

    2014-10-01

    Skin penetration of silica nanoparticles (NP) currently used in pharmaceutical and cosmetic products is a topic of interest not only to evaluate their possible toxicity, but also to understand their behaviour upon contact with the skin and to exploit their potential positive effects in drug or cosmetic delivery field. Therefore, the present work aimed to elucidate the in vivo mechanism by which amorphous hydrophilic silica NP enter human stratum corneum (SC) through the evaluation of the role played by the nanoparticle surface polarity and the human hair follicle density. Two silica samples, bare hydrophilic silica (B-silica, 162±51nm in size) and hydrophobic lipid-coated silica (LC-silica, 363±74nm in size) were applied on both the volar and dorsal side of volunteer forearms. Twelve repetitive stripped tapes were removed from the human skin and evaluated for elemental composition by Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis and for silicon content by Inductively Coupled Plasma quadrupole Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). All the stripped tapes revealed nanosized structures generally located in the broad spaces between corneocytes and characterized by the same elemental composition (relative weight percentage of silicon and silicon to oxygen weight ratio) than that of the applied samples. However, only about 10% B-silica permeated until the deepest SC layers considered in the study indicating a silica retention in the upper layers of SC, regardless of the hair follicle density. Otherwise, the exposure to LC-silica led to a greater silica skin penetration extent into the deeper SC layers (about 42% and 18% silica following volar and dorsal forearm application, respectively) indicating that the NP surface polarity played a predominant role on that of their size in determining the route and the extent of penetration. PMID:25139292

  4. Automated laser-based barely visible impact damage detection in honeycomb sandwich composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girolamo, D.; Girolamo, L.; Yuan, F. G.

    2015-03-01

    Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) for detection and quantification of damage in composite materials is fundamental in the assessment of the overall structural integrity of modern aerospace systems. Conventional NDE systems have been extensively used to detect the location and size of damages by propagating ultrasonic waves normal to the surface. However they usually require physical contact with the structure and are time consuming and labor intensive. An automated, contactless laser ultrasonic imaging system for barely visible impact damage (BVID) detection in advanced composite structures has been developed to overcome these limitations. Lamb waves are generated by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, raster scanned by a set of galvano-mirrors over the damaged area. The out-of-plane vibrations are measured through a laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV) that is stationary at a point on the corner of the grid. The ultrasonic wave field of the scanned area is reconstructed in polar coordinates and analyzed for high resolution characterization of impact damage in the composite honeycomb panel. Two methodologies are used for ultrasonic wave-field analysis: scattered wave field analysis (SWA) and standing wave energy analysis (SWEA) in the frequency domain. The SWA is employed for processing the wave field and estimate spatially dependent wavenumber values, related to discontinuities in the structural domain. The SWEA algorithm extracts standing waves trapped within damaged areas and, by studying the spectrum of the standing wave field, returns high fidelity damage imaging. While the SWA can be used to locate the impact damage in the honeycomb panel, the SWEA produces damage images in good agreement with X-ray computed tomographic (X-ray CT) scans. The results obtained prove that the laser-based nondestructive system is an effective alternative to overcome limitations of conventional NDI technologies.

  5. Spin tracking simulations in AGS based on ray-tracing methods - bare lattice, no snakes -

    SciTech Connect

    Meot, F.; Ahrens, L.; Gleen, J.; Huang, H.; Luccio, A.; MacKay, W. W.; Roser, T.; Tsoupas, N.

    2009-09-01

    This Note reports on the first simulations of and spin dynamics in the AGS using the ray-tracing code Zgoubi. It includes lattice analysis, comparisons with MAD, DA tracking, numerical calculation of depolarizing resonance strengths and comparisons with analytical models, etc. It also includes details on the setting-up of Zgoubi input data files and on the various numerical methods of concern in and available from Zgoubi. Simulations of crossing and neighboring of spin resonances in AGS ring, bare lattice, without snake, have been performed, in order to assess the capabilities of Zgoubi in that matter, and are reported here. This yields a rather long document. The two main reasons for that are, on the one hand the desire of an extended investigation of the energy span, and on the other hand a thorough comparison of Zgoubi results with analytical models as the 'thin lens' approximation, the weak resonance approximation, and the static case. Section 2 details the working hypothesis : AGS lattice data, formulae used for deriving various resonance related quantities from the ray-tracing based 'numerical experiments', etc. Section 3 gives inventories of the intrinsic and imperfection resonances together with, in a number of cases, the strengths derived from the ray-tracing. Section 4 gives the details of the numerical simulations of resonance crossing, including behavior of various quantities (closed orbit, synchrotron motion, etc.) aimed at controlling that the conditions of particle and spin motions are correct. In a similar manner Section 5 gives the details of the numerical simulations of spin motion in the static case: fixed energy in the neighboring of the resonance. In Section 6, weak resonances are explored, Zgoubi results are compared with the Fresnel integrals model. Section 7 shows the computation of the {rvec n} vector in the AGS lattice and tuning considered. Many details on the numerical conditions as data files etc. are given in the Appendix Section

  6. Electron emission in collisions of fast highly charged bare ions with helium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Abhoy; Mandal, Chittranjan; Purkait, Malay

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the electron emission from ground state helium atom in collision with fast bare heavy ions at intermediate and high incident energies. In the present study, we have applied the present three-body formalism of the three Coulomb wave (3C-3B) model and the previously adopted four-body formalism of the three Coulomb wave (3C-4B). To represent the active electron in the helium atom in the 3C-3B model, the initial bound state wavefunction is chosen to be hydrogenic with an effective nuclear charge. The wavefunction for the ejected electron in the exit channel has been approximated to be a Coulomb continuum wavefunction with same effective nuclear charge. Effectively the continuum-continuum correlation effect has been considered in the present investigation. Here we have calculated the energy and angular distribution of double differential cross sections (DDCS) at low and high energy electron emission from helium atom. The large forward-backward asymmetry is observed in the angular distribution which is explained in terms of the two-center effect (TCE). Our theoretical results are compared with available experimental results as well as other theoretical calculations based on the plain wave Born approximation (PWBA), continuum-distorted wave (CDW) approximation, continuum-distorted wave eikonal-initial state (CDW-EIS) approximation, and the corresponding values obtained from the 3C-4B model [S. Jana, R. Samanta, M. Purkait, Phys. Scr. 88, 055301 (2013)] respectively. It is observed that the four-body version of the present investigation produces results which are in better agreement with experimental observations for all cases.

  7. Four-body charge transfer processes in collisions of bare projectile ions with helium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, S.; Mandal, C. R.; Purkait, M.

    2015-02-01

    Single-electron capture by a bare ion from a helium atom at intermediate and high energies in the framework of four-body distorted wave (DW-4B) approximation in both prior and post form has been considered. In the entrance channel, the initial bound state wave function is distorted by the incoming projectile ion, and the corresponding distortion is related to the Coulomb continuum states of the active electron and the residual target ion in the field of the projectile ion respectively. Continuum states of the active electron and the projectile ion in the field of the residual target ion are also included in the exit channel. It may be mentioned that the effect of dynamic electron correlation is explicitly taken into account through the complete perturbation potential. The total single-electron capture cross sections are obtained by summing over all contributions up to n = 3 shells and sub-shells respectively. In addition, the differential cross sections for alpha particle-helium collision are calculated at impact energies of 60, 150, 300, 450, and 630 keV amu-1, respectively. The cross sections exhibit a monotonically decreasing angular dependence, with clear peak structures around 0.1 to 0.2 mrad being found at low impact energies. The current theoretical results, both in prior and post forms of the transition amplitude for symmetric and asymmetric collision, are compared with the available theoretical and experimental results. Current computed results have been found to be satisfactory in comparison with other theoretical and experimental findings.

  8. In vivo enhancement of anticancer therapy using bare or chemotherapeutic drug-bearing nanodiamond particles

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yingqi; Tong, Yaoli; Cao, Ruixia; Tian, Zhimei; Yang, Binsheng; Yang, Pin

    2014-01-01

    Background This study investigated the use of nanodiamond particles (NDs) as a promising material for drug delivery in vivo and in vitro. Methods HepG2 cells (a human hepatic carcinoma cell line) were used to determine the characteristics of a nanodiamond-doxorubicin complex (ND-DOX) when taken up by cells in vitro using laser scanning confocal microscopy and dialysis experiments. We also compared the survival rate and histopathology of tumor-bearing mice after treatment with NDs or ND-DOX in vivo. Results In vitro investigation showed that ND-DOX has slow and sustained drug release characteristics compared with free doxorubicin. In vivo, the survival rate of tumor-bearing mice treated with ND-DOX was four times greater than that of mice treated with free doxorubicin. Interestingly, the survival rate in mice treated with NDs alone was close to that of mice treated with free doxorubicin. This indicates that treatment with ND-DOX can prolong the lifespan of tumor-bearing mice significantly compared with conventional doxorubicin and that NDs can have this effect as well. Histopathological analysis showed that neither the NDs nor ND-DOX were toxic to the kidney, liver, or spleen in contrast with the well-known toxic effects of free doxorubicin on the kidney and liver. Further, both the bare NDs and ND-DOX could suppress tumor growth effectively. Conclusion NDs can potentially prolong survival, and ND-DOX may act as a nanodrug with promising chemotherapeutic efficacy and safety. PMID:24591828

  9. Automated laser-based barely visible impact damage detection in honeycomb sandwich composite structures

    SciTech Connect

    Girolamo, D. Yuan, F. G.; Girolamo, L.

    2015-03-31

    Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) for detection and quantification of damage in composite materials is fundamental in the assessment of the overall structural integrity of modern aerospace systems. Conventional NDE systems have been extensively used to detect the location and size of damages by propagating ultrasonic waves normal to the surface. However they usually require physical contact with the structure and are time consuming and labor intensive. An automated, contactless laser ultrasonic imaging system for barely visible impact damage (BVID) detection in advanced composite structures has been developed to overcome these limitations. Lamb waves are generated by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, raster scanned by a set of galvano-mirrors over the damaged area. The out-of-plane vibrations are measured through a laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV) that is stationary at a point on the corner of the grid. The ultrasonic wave field of the scanned area is reconstructed in polar coordinates and analyzed for high resolution characterization of impact damage in the composite honeycomb panel. Two methodologies are used for ultrasonic wave-field analysis: scattered wave field analysis (SWA) and standing wave energy analysis (SWEA) in the frequency domain. The SWA is employed for processing the wave field and estimate spatially dependent wavenumber values, related to discontinuities in the structural domain. The SWEA algorithm extracts standing waves trapped within damaged areas and, by studying the spectrum of the standing wave field, returns high fidelity damage imaging. While the SWA can be used to locate the impact damage in the honeycomb panel, the SWEA produces damage images in good agreement with X-ray computed tomographic (X-ray CT) scans. The results obtained prove that the laser-based nondestructive system is an effective alternative to overcome limitations of conventional NDI technologies.

  10. Optimum sizing of bare-tape tethers for de-orbiting satellites at end of mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanmartín, J. R.; Sánchez-Torres, A.; Khan, S. B.; Sánchez-Arriaga, G.; Charro, M.

    2015-10-01

    De-orbiting satellites at end of mission would prevent generation of new space debris. A proposed de-orbit technology involves a bare conductive tape-tether, which uses neither propellant nor power supply while generating power for on-board use during de-orbiting. The present work shows how to select tape dimensions for a generic mission so as to satisfy requirements of very small tether-to-satellite mass ratio mt/MS and probability Nf of tether cut by small debris, while keeping de-orbit time tf short and product tf × tether length low to reduce maneuvers in avoiding collisions with large debris. Design is here discussed for particular missions (initial orbit of 720 km altitude and 63° and 92° inclinations, and 3 disparate MS values, 37.5, 375, and 3750 kg), proving it scalable. At mid-inclination and a mass-ratio of a few percent, de-orbit time takes about 2 weeks and Nf is a small fraction of 1%, with tape dimensions ranging from 1 to 6 cm, 10 to 54 μ m, and 2.8 to 8.6 km. Performance drop from middle to high inclination proved moderate: if allowing for twice as large mt/MS, increases are reduced to a factor of 4 in tf and a slight one in Nf, except for multi-ton satellites, somewhat more requiring because efficient orbital-motion-limited electron collection restricts tape-width values, resulting in tape length (slightly) increasing too.

  11. Hemocompatibility Improvement of Chromium-Bearing Bare-Metal Stent Platform After Magnetoelectropolishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokicki, Ryszard; Haider, Waseem; Maffi, Shivani Kaushal

    2015-01-01

    Research was undertaken to determine the influence of the increased content of chromium in the outermost passive layer of magneto-electrochemically refined Co-Cr alloy L-605 surface on its hemocompatibility. The chemistry, roughness, surface energy, and wettability of conventionally electropolished (EP) and magnetoelectropolished (MEP) samples were studied with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), open circuit potential, atomic force microscopy, and contact angle meter. In vitro hemocompatibility of tested material surfaces was assessed using two important indicators of vascular responses to biomaterial, namely endothelialization and platelets adhesion. The endothelialization was assessed by seeding and incubating samples with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) for 3 days before counting and observing them under a fluorescent microscope. The platelet (rich plasma blood) adhesion and activation test on EP and MEP L-605 alloy surfaces was assessed using a laser scanning confocal microscope. The XPS analysis of MEP samples showed significant enrichment of the passive layer with Cr and O when compared with the EP one. The amount of other elements in the passive layer did not show a significant difference between EP and MEP treatments. The adhesion of HUVEC cells shows remarkable affinity to surfaces enriched in Cr (MEP) with almost 100% confluency. In addition, the number of platelets that adhered to standard EP surfaces was higher compared to the MEP surface. The present study shows that the chromium-enriched surface of cobalt-chromium alloy L-605 by the magnetoelectropolishing process tremendously improves surface hemocompatibility with regard to stent functionality by enhanced endothelialization and lower platelet adhesion and should be taken under consideration as an alternative surface of biodegradable polymer drug-eluting stents, polymer-free drug-eluting stents as well as bare-metal stents.

  12. Bare and Polymer-Coated Indium Tin Oxide as Working Electrodes for Manganese Cathodic Stripping Voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Rusinek, Cory A; Bange, Adam; Warren, Mercedes; Kang, Wenjing; Nahan, Keaton; Papautsky, Ian; Heineman, William R

    2016-04-19

    Though an essential metal in the body, manganese (Mn) has a number of health implications when found in excess that are magnified by chronic exposure. These health complications include neurotoxicity, memory loss, infertility in males, and development of a neurologic psychiatric disorder, manganism. Thus, trace detection in environmental samples is increasingly important. Few electrode materials are able to reach the negative reductive potential of Mn required for anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV), so cathodic stripping voltammetry (CSV) has been shown to be a viable alternative. We demonstrate Mn CSV using an indium tin oxide (ITO) working electrode both bare and coated with a sulfonated charge selective polymer film, polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene-ran-butylene)-block-polystyrene-sulfonate (SSEBS). ITO itself proved to be an excellent electrode material for Mn CSV, achieving a calculated detection limit of 5 nM (0.3 ppb) with a deposition time of 3 min. Coating the ITO with the SSEBS polymer was found to increase the sensitivity and lower the detection limit to 1 nM (0.06 ppb). This polymer modified electrode offers excellent selectivity for Mn as no interferences were observed from other metal ions tested (Zn(2+), Cd(2+), Pb(2+), In(3+), Sb(3+), Al(3+), Ba(2+), Co(2+), Cu(2+), Ni(3+), Bi(3+), and Sn(2+)) except Fe(2+), which was found to interfere with the analytical signal for Mn(2+) at a ratio 20:1 (Fe(2+)/Mn(2+)). The applicability of this procedure to the analysis of tap, river, and pond water samples was demonstrated. This simple, sensitive analytical method using ITO and SSEBS-ITO could be applied to a number of electroactive transition metals detectable by CSV. PMID:26980322

  13. Rhizosphere priming effects in two contrasting soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Davidson; Kirk, Guy; Ritz, Karl

    2015-04-01

    Inputs of fresh plant-derived carbon may stimulate the turnover of existing soil organic matter by so-called priming effects. Priming may occur directly, as a result of nutrient 'mining' by existing microbial communities, or indirectly via population adjustments. However the mechanisms are poorly understood. We planted C4 Kikuyu grass (Pennisetum clandestinum) in pots with two contrasting C3 soils (clayey, fertile TB and sandy, acid SH), and followed the soil CO2 efflux and its δ13C. The extent of C deposition in the rhizosphere was altered by intermittently clipping the grass in half the pots; there were also unplanted controls. At intervals, pots were destructively sampled for root and shoot biomass. Total soil CO2 efflux was measured using a gas-tight PVC chamber fitted over bare soil, and connected to an infra-red gas analyser; the δ13C of efflux was measured in air sub-samples withdrawn by syringe. The extent of priming was inferred from the δ13C of efflux and the δ13C of the plant and soil end-members. In unclipped treatments, in both soils, increased total soil respiration and rhizosphere priming effects (RPE) were apparent compared to the unplanted controls. The TB soil had greater RPE overall. The total respiration in clipped TB soil was significantly greater than in the unplanted controls, but in the clipped SH soil it was not significantly different from the controls. Clipping affected plant C partitioning with greater allocation to shoot regrowth from about 4 weeks after planting. Total plant biomass decreased in the order TB unclipped > SH unclipped >TB clipped > SH clipped. The results are consistent with priming driven by microbial activation stimulated by rhizodeposits and by nitrogen demand from the growing plants under N limited conditions. Our data suggest that photosynthesis drives RPE and soil differences may alter the rate and intensity of RPE but not the direction.

  14. Conserving Soil.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soil Conservation Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    Designed as enrichment materials for grades six through nine, this program is an interdisciplinary study of soils. As part of the program students: (1) examine soil organisms; (2) research history of local Native Americans to see how they and others have used the land and its soils; (3) investigate how soils are degraded and how they are conserved…

  15. Composition of pore and spring waters from Baby Bare: global implications of geochemical fluxes from a ridge flank hydrothermal system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheat, C. Geoffrey; Mottl, Michael J.

    2000-02-01

    Warm hydrothermal springs were discovered on Baby Bare, which is an isolated basement outcrop on 3.5 Ma-old crust on the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. We have sampled these spring waters from a manned submersible, along with associated sediment pore waters from 48 gravity and piston cores. Systematic variations in the chemical composition of these waters indicate that hydrothermal reactions in basement at moderate temperatures (63°C in uppermost basement at this site) remove Na, K, Li, Rb, Mg, TCO 2, alkalinity, and phosphate from the circulating seawater and leach Ca, Sr, Si, B, and Mn from the oceanic crust; and that reactions with the turbidite sediment surrounding Baby Bare remove Na, Li, Mg, Ca, Sr, and sulfate from the pore water while producing ammonium and Si and both producing and consuming phosphate, nitrate, alkalinity, Mn, and Fe. K, Rb, and B are relatively unreactive in the sediment column. These data confirm the earlier inference that sediment pore waters from areas of upwelling can be used to estimate the composition of altered seawater in the underlying basement, even for those elements that are reactive in the sediment column or are affected by sampling artifacts. The composition of altered seawater in basement at Baby Bare is similar to the inferred composition of 58°C formation water from crust nearly twice as old (5.9 Ma) on the southern flank of the Costa Rica Rift. The Baby Bare fluids also exhibit the same directions of net elemental transfer between basalt and seawater as solutions produced in laboratory experiments at a similar temperature, and complement compositional changes from seawater observed in seafloor basalts altered at cool to moderate temperatures. The common parameter among the two ridge flanks and experiments is temperature, suggesting that the residence time of seawater in basement at the two ridge-flank sites is sufficiently long for the solutions to equilibrate with altered basalt. This conclusion is supported

  16. Composition of pore and spring waters from Baby Bare: Global implications of geochemical fluxes from a ridge flank hydrothermal system

    SciTech Connect

    Wheat, C.G.; Mottl, M.J.

    2000-02-01

    Warm hydrothermal springs were discovered on Baby Bare, which is an isolated basement outcrop on 3.5 Ma-old crust on the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The authors have sampled these spring waters from a manned submersible, along with associated sediment pore waters from 48 gravity and piston cores. Systematic variations in the chemical composition of these waters indicate that hydrothermal reactions in basement at moderate temperatures remove Na, K, Li, Rb, Mg, TCO{sub 2}, alkalinity, and phosphate from the circulating seawater and leach Ca, Sr, Si, B, and Mn from the oceanic crust; and that reactions with the turbidite sediment surrounding Baby Bare remove Na, Li, Mg, Ca, Sr, and sulfate from the pore water while producing ammonium and Si and both producing and consuming phosphate, nitrate, alkalinity, Mn, and Fe. K, Rb, and B are relatively unreactive in the sediment column. The composition of altered seawater in basement at Baby Bare is similar to the inferred composition of 58 C formation water from crust nearly twice as old (5.9 Ma) on the southern flank of the Costa Rica Rift. The Baby Bare fluids also exhibit the same directions of net elemental transfer between basalt and seawater as solutions produced in laboratory experiments at a similar temperature, and complement compositional changes form seawater observed in seafloor basalts altered at cool to moderate temperatures. The common parameter among the two ridge flanks and experiments is temperature, suggesting that the residence time of seawater in the two ridge-flank sites is sufficiently long for the solutions to equilibrate with altered basalt. The authors use the Baby Bare spring water to estimate upper limits on the global fluxes of 14 elements at warm ridge-flank sites such as Baby Bare. Maximum calculated fluxes of Mg, Ca, sulfate, B, and K may equal or exceed 25% of the riverine flux, and such sites may represent the missing, high K/Rb sink required for the K budget.

  17. Impact of soil water property parameterization on atmospheric boundary layer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuenca, Richard H.; Ek, Michael; Mahrt, Larry

    1996-03-01

    Both the form of functional relationships applied for soil water properties and the natural field-scale variability of such properties can significantly impact simulation of the soil-plant-atmosphere system on a diurnal timescale. Various input parameters for soil water properties including effective saturation, residual water content, anerobiosis point, field capacity, and permanent wilting point are incorporated into functions describing soil water retention, hydraulic conductivity, diffusivity, sorptivity, and the plant sink function. The perception of the meaning of these values and their variation within a natural environment often differs from the perspective of the soil physicist, plant physiologist, and atmospheric scientist. This article investigates the sensitivity of energy balance and boundary layer simulation to different soil water property functions using the Oregon State University coupled atmosphere-plant-soil (CAPS) simulation model under bare soil conditions. The soil parameterizations tested in the CAPS model include those of Clapp and Hornberger [1978], van Genuchten [1980], and Cosby et al. [1984] using initial atmospheric conditions from June 16, 1986 in Hydrologic Atmospheric Pilot Experiment-Modélisation du Bilan Hydrique (HAPEX-MOBILHY). For the bare soil case these results demonstrate unexpected model sensitivity to soil water property parameterization in partitioning all components of the diurnal energy balance and corresponding boundary layer development.

  18. The influence of biological soil crusts on dew deposition in Gurbantunggut Desert, Northwestern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Yuan-ming; Downing, Alison; Cheng, Jun-hui; Zhou, Xiao-bing; Zhang, Bing-chang

    2009-12-01

    SummaryDew is an important source of moisture for plants, biological soil crusts, invertebrates and small vertebrates in desert environments. In this paper, measurements were taken to investigate the effects of three different types of biological soil crusts (cyanobacteria, lichen and moss) and bare sand on dew deposition in the Gurbantunggut Desert. Dew quantities were measured using micro-lysimeters with a diameter of 6 cm and a height of 3.5 cm. The results showed that the total amount of dew deposited increased with the development of soil crusts, from bare sand to cyanobacterial crust to lichen crust to moss crust. The average amount of dew deposited daily on the moss crust was the highest of all and it was significant higher than the other three soil surfaces (lichen crust, cyanobacterial crust and bare sand) ( p < 0.05). During the period of the study, for each type of crust studied, the maximum amount of dew recorded was several times greater than the minimum. Moss crust was characterized by having the greatest amount of dew at dawn and also the maximum amount of dew deposited, whereas bare sand yielded the lowest amount of dew, with lichen crust and cyanobacterial crust exhibiting intermediate values. However, this was not the case for dew duration, as bare sand retained moisture for the longest period of time, followed by cyanobacterial crust, moss crust and finally lichen crust. Dew continued to condense even after sunrise. Furthermore, the differences in dew deposition may be partially attributed to an effect of the biological soil crusts on surface area. This study demonstrates the important effect of biological soil crusts upon dew deposition and may assist in evaluating the role of dew in arid and semi-arid environments.

  19. Soil pyrogenic carbon lacks long-term persistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutfalla, Suzanne; Abiven, Samuel; Barré, Pierre; Wiedemeier, Daniel; Christensen, Bent; Houot, Sabine; Kätterer, Thomas; Macdonald, Andy; van Oort, Fok; Chenu, Claire

    2015-04-01

    In the context of climate change, one mitigation technique currently investigated is the use of pyrogenic organic carbon (PyOC) -which is biomass turned into charcoal- to sequester carbon in soils with the hypothesis that PyOC is persistent and will not be biodegraded (or mineralized). In this study, we use the unique opportunity offered by five long term bare fallow (LTBF) experiments across Europe (Askov in Denmark, Grignon and Versailles in France, Ultuna in Sweden and Rothamsted in the United Kingdom) to compare the dynamics of PyOC and soil organic carbon (SOC) in the same plots at the decadal time scale (from 25 to 80 years of bare fallow depending on the site). Bare fallow plots were regularly sampled throughout the bare fallow duration and these samples were carefully archived. In bare fallow plots, with negligible external carbon input and with continuing biodegradation, SOC is depleting. Using the Benzene Polycarboxylic Acid (BPCA) technique to estimate the PyOC quantity and quality in the soils at different sampling dates, we investigated if PyOC content was also decreasing and compared the rates of depletion of PyOC and SOC. We found that PyOC contents decreased rapidly in soils at all sites. The loss of PyOC between the first and the last soil sampling ranged from 19.8 to 57.3% of the initial PyOC content. Furthermore, PyOC quality exhibited a similar evolution at all sites, becoming more enriched in condensed material with time. We applied a one pool model with mono-exponential decay to our data and found an average mean residence time of native PyOC of 116 years across the different sites, with a standard deviation of 15 years, just 1.6 times longer than that of SOC. Our results show that, though having a longer residence time than total SOC, PyOC content can decrease rapidly in soils suggesting that the potential for long-term C storage in soil by PyOC amendments is less than currently anticipated. Our results therefore question the concept of

  20. Radar measurement of soil moisture content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.

    1973-01-01

    The effect of soil moisture on the radar backscattering coefficient was investigated by measuring the 4-8 GHz spectral response from two types of bare-soil fields: slightly rough and very rough, in terms of the wavelength. An FM-CW radar system was used to measure the return at 10 frequency points across the 4-8 GHz band, at different look angles, and for all polarization combinations. The results indicate that the radar response to soil moisture content is highly dependent on the surface roughness, microwave frequency, and look angle. The response seems to be linear over the range 15%-30% moisture content for all angles, frequencies, polarizations and surface conditions.

  1. Soil Evaporation Response to Lehmann Lovegrass (Eragrostis lehmanniana) Invasion in a Semiarid Watershed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Across the western United States, warm-season grasslands are being invaded by the exotic perennial grass, Eragrostis lehmanniana (Lehmann lovegrass). The objective of this study was to quantify the change in surface water balance, particularly the evaporation from bare soil, associated with E. lehm...

  2. Mulch your tomatoes to fight weeds, retain soil moisture and save money

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An on-farm experiment was conducted to determine whether different types of mulches were a cost-effective means of weed management in organic tomato production. Three mulch treatment, bare soil, straw and grass, were applied to drip-irrigated tomatoes at a depth of 7.5 cm. Weed biomass was reduced s...

  3. Soil carbonates and soil water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The presence of soil carbonates occurring as solidified masses or dispersed particles can alter soil water dynamics from what would be expected based on non-carbonate soil properties. Carbonate minerals in the soil can be derived from high carbonate parent material, additions in the form of carbonat...

  4. Role of surfaces and interfaces in mechanical and piezoresistive properties of bare Si/Ge heterostructure nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Shuang-ying; Luan, Shan; Li, Yi; Yu, Hong; Huang, Qing-An

    2016-09-01

    Mechanical and piezoresistive properties of bare Si3 - x/Gex heterostructure nanowires (HNWs) have been investigated by using first-principles calculations. It is found that Young's modulus of Si2/Ge1 HNW is much smaller than that of other Si3 - x/Gex, attributed to the partial surface reconstruction. Moreover, Si3 - x/Gex HNWs with clear interfaces exhibit semiconductor-like band, while those with mixed interfaces are of metal-like band. Enhanced piezoresistive coefficients can be obtained for HNWs with clear interfaces, as compared with those with mixed interfaces. Our results indicate that bare Si3 - x/Gex HNWs with clear interfaces have potential applications as pressure sensors due to the enhanced piezoresistance.

  5. Finding the bare band: Electron coupling to two phonon modes in potassium-doped graphene on Ir(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletikosić, I.; Kralj, M.; Milun, M.; Pervan, P.

    2012-04-01

    We analyze renormalization of the π* band of n-doped epitaxial graphene on Ir(111) induced by electron-phonon coupling. Our procedure of extracting the bare band relies on recursive self-consistent refining of the functional form of the bare band until the convergence. We demonstrate that the components of the self-energy, as well as the spectral intensity obtained from angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy, show that the renormalization is due to the coupling to two distinct phonon excitations. From the velocity renormalization and an increase of the imaginary part of the self-energy we find the electron-phonon coupling constant to be ˜0.2, which is in fair agreement with a previous study of the same system, despite the notable difference in the width of spectroscopic curves. Our experimental results also suggest that potassium intercalated between graphene and Ir(111) does not introduce any additional increase of the quasiparticle scattering rate.

  6. Bare- and Dressed-Ion Impact Collisions from Neon Atoms Studied Within a Nonperturbative Mean-Field Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenk, Gerald; Kirchner, Tom

    We study electron removal processes in collisions of bare and dressed doubly charged ions with neon atoms in the 20 keV/u to 1 MeV/u impact energy regime. The many-electron problem is represented by a single mean field, which in the case of dressed-ion impact includes the projectile electrons. Moreover, the same basis is used to propagate all active orbitals thereby ensuring orthogonality at all times and allowing for a final-state analysis in terms of standard Slater determinantal wave functions. The same approach was used in a recent work for B2+ -Ne collisions [Phys. Rev. A 88 012712], in which we examined the role of the projectile electrons for target-recoil-charge-state production. The present study expands on that work by considering additional collision channels and comparing results of equicharged dressed and bare ions in order to shed more light on the role of the projectile electrons.

  7. Soil Erosion Protection Potential of Young Paulownia Plantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepchich, Avgusta; Djodjov, Christo

    2014-05-01

    Soil erosion is removal of soil and rock particles by water, wind, ice and gravity. It is widely recognized as a global soil threat. Soils impacted by different forms of erosion cover large areas around the world. While landscape, soil and climate conditions trigger soil erosion processes, the vegetation cover reduces the soil erosion risk. About 60 % of the area of agricultural land in Bulgaria is under erosion risk, which necessitates implementation of series of measures for soil erosion control. The aim of this study is to determine the erosion protection potential and the loss of soil nutrients of young Paulownia plantation. Field experiments have been set up under unirrigated conditions at the experimental field for soil erosion studies of the N. Poushkarov Institute of Soil Science, Agrotechnology and Plant Protection near Suhodol. The local soils are Chromic Luvisols, moderately eroded. The altitude is 750 m and the slope gradient is 80. The experiment consists of four field plots for soil erosion studies, three of which planted with Paulownia Bellissima and a reference one with bare soil. The plants have been planted at a distance of 2 m between adjacent rows and 1 m between each two plants within the row. The size of each field plot is 32 m2 (4 m width and 8 m length). The plots are equipped with containers for collecting the surface runoff caused by erosive rainfall events. Biometrics, including the root-striking of the plants, their growth in height, foliage cover (projection) and stem diameter, was studied from May 13th to October 21st. The data reported cover the results from the studies during the first vegetation period after planting in the Spring of 2013. During the year four erosive rainfalls were observed with a total amount of 79.2 mm, resulting to a total amount of soil loss of 772 kg/ha from a planted plot and 551 kg/ha from bear soil. The total surface runoff is 156.7 m3/ha from planted plot and 153.1 m3/ha from bare soil. The total losses of

  8. Effect of some surface and subsurface attributes on soil water erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertol, Ildegardis; César Ramos, Júlio; Vidal Vázquez, Eva; Mirás Avalos, José Manuel

    2013-04-01

    Soil erosion is a complex phenomenon depending on climate, topography, soil intrinsic characteristics, crop and residue cover, and management and conservation practices that may be accelerated by man activities. Within the above mentioned factors, soil cover and soil management most influence soil erosion. Soil management includes mechanical mobilization and in soil conservationist systems soil residues are mobilized for increasing soil surface roughness. Even if soil roughness is ephemeral, it increases soil water storage and sediment retention in surface microdepressions, which contributes to decrease water erosion. Conservationist soil management systems also maintain the soil surface covered by crop residues, which are more persistent than roughness and contribute to dissipate kinetic energy from raindrops and partly also from runoff. Crop residues are more efficient than soil roughness in controlling water erosion because of its ability to retain detached soil particles. The objective of this study was to assess the efficiency of both soil cover by crop residues and soil surface roughness in controlling water erosion. A field experiments was performed on an Inceptisol in South Brazil under simulated rainfall conditions during 2012. The following treatments were evaluated: 1) residues of Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum), 2) residues of common vetch (Vicia sativa), 3) scarification after cultivation of Italian ryegrass, 4) scarification after cultivation of common vetch, 5) scarified bare soil with high roughness as a control. Treatments #1 and 2 involved no-tilled soil with a rather smooth soil surface, where roots and crop residues of the previous crop were maintained. Treatments # 3 and 4 involved a rather high roughness, absence of previous crop residues and maintenance of antecedent roots. Experimental plots were 11 m long and 3.5 m wide with an area of 38.5 m2. Six successive simulated rainfall tests were applied using a rotating-boom rain simulator

  9. Evaluation of barely visible indentation damage (BVID) in CF/EP sandwich composites using guided wave signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustapha, Samir; Ye, Lin; Dong, Xingjian; Alamdari, Mehrisadat Makki

    2016-08-01

    Barely visible indentation damage after quasi-static indentation in sandwich CF/EP composites was assessed using ultrasonic guided wave signals. Finite element analyses were conducted to investigate the interaction between guided waves and damage, further to assist in the selection process of the Lamb wave sensitive modes for debonding identification. Composite sandwich beams and panels structures were investigated. Using the beam structure, a damage index was defined based on the change in the peak magnitude of the captured wave signals before and after the indentation, and the damage index was correlated with the residual deformation (defined as the depth of the dent), that was further correlated with the amount of crushing within the core. Both A0 and S0 Lamb wave modes showed high sensitivity to the presence of barely visible indentation damage with residual deformation of 0.2 mm. Furthermore, barely visible indentation damage was assessed in composite sandwich panels after indenting to 3 and 5 mm, and the damage index was defined, based on (a) the peak magnitude of the wave signals before and after indentation or (b) the mismatch between the original and reconstructed wave signals based on a time-reversal algorithm, and was subsequently applied to locate the position of indentation.

  10. Ice Nucleation of Bare and Sulfuric Acid-coated Mineral Dust Particles and Implication for Cloud Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Sanders, Cassandra N.; Zhang, Kai; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhao, Chun

    2014-08-27

    Ice nucleation properties of different dust species coated with soluble material are not well understood. We determined the ice nucleation ability of bare and sulfuric acid coated mineral dust particles as a function of temperature (-25 to -35 deg C) and relative humidity with respect to water (RHw). Five different mineral dust species: Arizona test dust (ATD), illite, montmorillonite, quartz and kaolinite were dry dispersed and size-selected at 150 nm and exposed to sulfuric acid vapors in the coating apparatus. The condensed sulfuric acid soluble mass fraction per particle was estimated from the cloud condensation nuclei activated fraction measurements. The fraction of dust particles nucleating ice at various temperatures and RHw was determined using a compact ice chamber. In water-subsaturated conditions, compared to bare dust particles, we found that only coated ATD particles showed suppression of ice nucleation ability while other four dust species did not showed the effect of coating on the fraction of particles nucleating ice. The results suggest that interactions between the dust surface and sulfuric acid vapor are important, such that interactions may or may not modify the surface via chemical reactions with sulfuric acid. At water-supersaturated conditions we did not observed the effect of coating, i.e. the bare and coated dust particles had similar ice nucleation behavior.

  11. Seal glass compatibility with bare and (Mn,Co) 3O 4 coated Crofer 22 APU alloy in different atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahapatra, M. K.; Lu, K.

    To prevent gas mixing and leakage during solid oxide fuel/electrolyzer cell operation, the interconnect/seal glass interface should bond well and remain stable. A SrO-La 2O 3-Al 2O 3-SiO 2 (SABS-0) seal glass has been bonded to bare Crofer 22 APU alloy and (Mn,Co) 3O 4 coated Crofer 22 APU alloy. The stability of the interconnect/SABS-0 interface has been studied in air and H 2/H 2O atmospheres at 800 °C for 1000 h. The interconnect/seal glass interaction involves the oxidation of the bare and (Mn,Co) 3O 4 coated Crofer 22 APU alloy surfaces, inter-diffusion of elements, chemical reaction, and the devitrification of the SABS-0 glass. The study shows that the thermal treatment atmosphere greatly affects the interfacial stability of both bare Crofer 22 APU/SABS-0 and (Mn,Co) 3O 4 coated Crofer 22 APU/SABS-0 samples. The interfacial stability is better in the H 2/H 2O atmosphere for both samples. The instability of the (Mn,Co) 3O 4 coating under the thermal treatment conditions degrades the interfacial compatibility of the (Mn,Co) 3O 4 coated Crofer 22 APU/SABS-0 sample.

  12. Dispersion and stability of bare hematite nanoparticles: effect of dispersion tools, nanoparticle concentration, humic acid and ionic strength

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, Dionne; Liu, Guangliang; Li, Chenzhong; Tachiev, Georgio; Cai, Yong

    2012-01-01

    The aggregation and sedimentation of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) can significantly affect the mobility and reactivity of IONPs and subsequently influence the interaction between IONPs and environmental contaminants. Dispersing bare IONPs into a stable suspension within nanoscale range is an important step for studying the interaction of IONPs with contaminants (e.g., toxic metals). In this study, different techniques to disperse bare IONPs (vortex, bath sonication and probe ultrasonication) and the effects of important environmental factors such as dissolved organic matter and ionic strength on the stability of IONPs dispersions were investigated. Vortex minimally dispersed IONPs with hydrodynamic diameter outside the “nanosize range” (698–2400nm). Similar to vortex, bath sonication could not disperse IONPs efficiently. Probe ultrasonication was more effective at dispersing IONPs (50% or more) with hydrodynamic diameters ranging from 120–140 nm with minimal changes in size and sedimentation of IONPs for a prolonged period of time. Over the course of 168 hours, considerable amounts of IONPs remained dispersed in the presence and absence of low ionic strength (0.1 mM of NaCl) and 100 mg/L of humic acid (HA). These results indicate that IONPs can be broken down efficiently into “nanosize range” by probe ultrasonication and a degree of stability can be achieved without the use of synthetic modifiers to enhance colloidal stability. This dispersion tool could be used to develop a laboratory method to study the adsorption mechanism between dispersed bare IONPs and toxic contaminants. PMID:22289174

  13. Evidences of large soil losses in soils with low LS&K factors in central Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshel, G.; Egozi, R.

    2009-04-01

    Over the last decade significant soil losses have been observed in orchards and row crops fields that are managed by conventional tillage practices. These soil losses occur due to high frequency low intensity rain fall events which over time result in large amount of soil losses. This process is commonly ignored because cultivation erases any evidences of erosion. This study focus on soil losses occur at low LS (less than 1) and K factors (USLE factors) of brown loamy sand to sandy loam soils in central coastal aria of Israel. The present of swelling clay (less than 5%) combined with coarse particle cause to weak structure and sensitivity to sealing formation, which accelerate the erosion processes of those soils. Three main processes have been identified at this region: (1) Unpaved service roads used by farmers become conduit of concentrated runoff and sediments from the fields. Often you can find these roads more than 1 m below the level of the adjacent field. (2) A cumulative long-term erosion process (around 30 years) observed in orange orchards, where the trees cover about 40-50% of the soil surface. The rest of the soil surface is exposed (weeds controlled mainly by herbicides) to the rain drops impact. Over the years, incised channels 1 m deep and 4 m wide formed in the middle of orchard with catchment area of less than 1 hectare. (3) Soil erosion from row crops fields (mainly potatoes and carrots) occur as soil is left crumbled and bare during the first rain events of the season. This process increases as land cover changes from orchards to rows crops result in large amount of sediments mobilized from the fields to the channel network. Making farmers to adopt soil conservation practices is a big challenge as the low profit threshold on the one hand and low awareness on the soil loss on the other. Several practices for reducing the large soil loss show limited success and some other tested in those days.

  14. Soil experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Linton; Butler, Todd; Smith, Mike; Cline, Charles; Scruggs, Steve; Zakhia, Nadim

    1987-01-01

    An experimental procedure was devised to investigate the effects of the lunar environment on the physical properties of simulated lunar soil. The test equipment and materials used consisted of a vacuum chamber, direct shear tester, static penetrometer, and fine grained basalt as the simulant. The vacuum chamber provides a medium for applying the environmental conditions to the soil experiment with the exception of gravity. The shear strength parameters are determined by the direct shear test. Strength parameters and the resistance of soil penetration by static loading will be investigated by the use of a static cone penetrometer. In order to conduct a soil experiment without going to the moon, a suitable lunar simulant must be selected. This simulant must resemble lunar soil in both composition and particle size. The soil that most resembles actual lunar soil is basalt. The soil parameters, as determined by the testing apparatus, will be used as design criteria for lunar soil engagement equipment.

  15. Soil texture drives responses of soil respiration to precipitation pulses in the sonoran desert: Implications for climate change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cable, J.M.; Ogle, K.; Williams, D.G.; Weltzin, J.F.; Huxman, T. E.

    2008-01-01

    Climate change predictions for the desert southwestern U.S. are for shifts in precipitation patterns. The impacts of climate change may be significant, because desert soil processes are strongly controlled by precipitation inputs ('pulses') via their effect on soil water availability. This study examined the response of soil respiration-an important biological process that affects soil carbon (C) storage-to variation in pulses representative of climate change scenarios for the Sonoran Desert. Because deserts are mosaics of different plant cover types and soil textures-which create patchiness in soil respiration-we examined how these landscape characteristics interact to affect the response of soil respiration to pulses. Pulses were applied to experimental plots of bare and vegetated soil on contrasting soil textures typical of Sonoran Desert grasslands. The data were analyzed within a Bayesian framework to: (1) determine pulse size and antecedent moisture (soil moisture prior to the pulse) effects on soil respiration, (2) quantify soil texture (coarse vs. fine) and cover type (bare vs. vegetated) effects on the response of soil respiration and its components (plant vs. microbial) to pulses, and (3) explore the relationship between long-term variation in pulse regimes and seasonal soil respiration. Regarding objective (1), larger pulses resulted in higher respiration rates, particularly from vegetated fine-textured soil, and dry antecedent conditions amplified respiration responses to pulses (wet antecedent conditions dampened the pulse response). Regarding (2), autotrophic (plant) activity was a significant source (???60%) of respiration and was more sensitive to pulses on coarse- versus fine-textured soils. The sensitivity of heterotrophic (microbial) respiration to pulses was highly dependent on antecedent soil water. Regarding (3), seasonal soil respiration was predicted to increase with both growing season precipitation and mean pulse size (but only for pulses

  16. Cross sections for bare and dressed carbon ions in water and neon.

    PubMed

    Liamsuwan, Thiansin; Nikjoo, Hooshang

    2013-02-01

    The paper presents calculated cross sections for bare and dressed carbon projectiles of charge states q (0 to 6) with energies 1-10(4) keV u(-1) impacting on molecular water and atomic neon targets. The cross sections of water are of interest for radiobiological studies, but there are very few experimental data for water in any phase, while those for liquid water are non-existent. The more extensive experimental database for the neon target made it possible to test the reliability of the model calculations for the many-electron collision system. The current calculations cover major single and double electronic interactions of low and intermediate energy carbon projectiles. The three-body classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) method was used for the calculation of one-electron transition probabilities for target ionization, electron capture and projectile electron loss. The many-electron problem was taken into account using statistical methods: a modified independent event model was used for pure (direct) and simultaneous target and projectile ionizations, and the independent particle model for pure electron capture and electron capture accompanied by target ionization. Results are presented for double differential cross sections (DDCS) for total electron emission by carbon projectile impact on neon. For the water target, we present the following: single differential cross sections (SDCS) and DDCS for single target ionization; total cross sections (TCS) for electron emission; TCS for the pure single electronic interactions; equilibrium charge state fractions; and stopping cross sections. The results were found to be in satisfactory agreement with the experimental data in many cases, including DDCS and SDCS for the single target ionization, TCS for the total electron emission and TCS for the pure single electron capture. The stopping cross sections of this work are consistent with the other model calculations for projectile energies ≥800 keV u(-1), but smaller

  17. Cross sections for bare and dressed carbon ions in water and neon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liamsuwan, Thiansin; Nikjoo, Hooshang

    2013-02-01

    The paper presents calculated cross sections for bare and dressed carbon projectiles of charge states q (0 to 6) with energies 1-104 keV u-1 impacting on molecular water and atomic neon targets. The cross sections of water are of interest for radiobiological studies, but there are very few experimental data for water in any phase, while those for liquid water are non-existent. The more extensive experimental database for the neon target made it possible to test the reliability of the model calculations for the many-electron collision system. The current calculations cover major single and double electronic interactions of low and intermediate energy carbon projectiles. The three-body classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) method was used for the calculation of one-electron transition probabilities for target ionization, electron capture and projectile electron loss. The many-electron problem was taken into account using statistical methods: a modified independent event model was used for pure (direct) and simultaneous target and projectile ionizations, and the independent particle model for pure electron capture and electron capture accompanied by target ionization. Results are presented for double differential cross sections (DDCS) for total electron emission by carbon projectile impact on neon. For the water target, we present the following: single differential cross sections (SDCS) and DDCS for single target ionization; total cross sections (TCS) for electron emission; TCS for the pure single electronic interactions; equilibrium charge state fractions; and stopping cross sections. The results were found to be in satisfactory agreement with the experimental data in many cases, including DDCS and SDCS for the single target ionization, TCS for the total electron emission and TCS for the pure single electron capture. The stopping cross sections of this work are consistent with the other model calculations for projectile energies ≥800 keV u-1, but smaller than the

  18. Application of IEM model on soil moisture and surface roughness estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, Jiancheng; Wang, J. R.; Oneill, P. E.; Hsu, A. Y.; Engman, E. T.

    1995-01-01

    Monitoring spatial and temporal changes of soil moisture are of importance to hydrology, meteorology, and agriculture. This paper reports a result on study of using L-band SAR imagery to estimate soil moisture and surface roughness for bare fields. Due to limitations of the Small Perturbation Model, it is difficult to apply this model on estimation of soil moisture and surface roughness directly. In this study, we show a simplified model derived from the Integral Equation Model for estimation of soil moisture and surface roughness. We show a test of this model using JPL L-band AIRSAR data.

  19. Extension of laboratory-measured soil spectra to field conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoner, E. R.; Baumgardner, M. F.; Weismiller, R. A.; Biehl, L. L.; Robinson, B. F.

    1982-01-01

    Spectral responses of two glaciated soils, Chalmers silty clay loam and Fincastle silt loam, formed under prairie grass and forest vegetation, respectively, were measured in the laboratory under controlled moisture equilibria using an Exotech Model 20C spectroradiometer to obtain spectral data in the laboratory under artificial illumination. The same spectroradiometer was used outdoors under solar illumination to obtain spectral response from dry and moistened field plots with and without corn residue cover, representing the two different soils. Results indicate that laboratory-measured spectra of moist soil are directly proportional to the spectral response of that same field-measured moist bare soil over the 0.52 micrometer to 1.75 micrometer wavelength range. The magnitudes of difference in spectral response between identically treated Chalmers and Fincastle soils are greatest in the 0.6 micrometers to 0.8 micrometer transition region between the visible and near infrared, regardless of field condition or laboratory preparation studied.

  20. The diurnal course of soil moisture as measured by various dielectric sensors: Effects of soil temperature and the implications for evaporation estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhoef, A.; Fernández-Gálvez, J.; Diaz-Espejo, A.; Main, B. E.; El-Bishti, M.

    2006-04-01

    Soil moisture content, θ, of a bare and vegetated UK gravelly sandy loam soil (in situ and repacked in small lysimeters) was measured using various dielectric instruments (single-sensor ThetaProbes, multi-sensor Profile Probes, and Aquaflex Sensors), at depths ranging between 0.03 and 1 m, during the summers of 2001 (in situ soil) and 2002 (mini-lysimeters). Half-hourly values of evaporation, E, were calculated from diurnal changes in total soil profile water content, using the soil water balance equation. For the bare soil field, Profile Probes and ML2x ThetaProbes indicated a diurnal course of θ that did not concur with typical soil physical observations: surface layer soil moisture content increased from early morning until about midday, after which θ declined, generally until the early evening. The unexpected course of θ was positively correlated to soil temperature, Ts, also at deeper depths. Aquaflex and ML1 ThetaProbe (older models) outputs, however, reflected common observations: θ increased slightly during the night (capillary rise) and decreased from the morning until late afternoon (as a result of evaporation). For the vegetated plot, the spurious diurnal θ fluctuations were less obvious, because canopy shading resulted in lower amplitudes of Ts. The unrealistic θ profiles measured for the bare and vegetated field sites caused diurnal estimates of E to attain downward daytime and upward night-time values. In the mini-lysimeters, at medium to high moisture contents, θ values measured by (ML2x) ThetaProbes followed a relatively realistic course, and predictions of E from diurnal changes in vertically integrated θ generally compared well with lysimeter estimates of E. However, time courses of θ and E became comparable to those observed for the field plots when the soil in the lysimeters reached relatively low values of θ. Attempts to correct measured θ for fluctuations in Ts revealed that no generally applicable formula could be derived.

  1. Regional prediction of soil organic carbon content over croplands using airborne hyperspectral data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaudour, Emmanuelle; Gilliot, Jean-Marc; Bel, Liliane; Lefebvre, Josias; Chehdi, Kacem

    2015-04-01

    This study was carried out in the framework of the Prostock-Gessol3 and the BASC-SOCSENSIT projects, dedicated to the spatial monitoring of the effects of exogenous organic matter land application on soil organic carbon storage. It aims at identifying the potential of airborne hyperspectral AISA-Eagle data for predicting the topsoil organic carbon (SOC) content of bare cultivated soils over a large peri-urban area (221 km2) with both contrasted soils and SOC contents, located in the western region of Paris, France. Soils comprise hortic or glossic luvisols, calcaric, rendzic cambisols and colluvic cambisols. Airborne AISA-Eagle data (400-1000 nm, 126 bands) with 1 m-resolution were acquired on 17 April 2013 over 13 tracks which were georeferenced. Tracks were atmospherically corrected using a set of 22 synchronous field spectra of both bare soils, black and white targets and impervious surfaces. Atmospherically corrected track tiles were mosaicked at a 2 m-resolution resulting in a 66 Gb image. A SPOT4 satellite image was acquired the same day in the framework of the SPOT4-Take Five program of the French Space Agency (CNES) which provided it with atmospheric correction. The land use identification system layer (RPG) of 2012 was used to mask non-agricultural areas, then NDVI calculation and thresholding enabled to map agricultural fields with bare soil. All 18 sampled sites known to be bare at this very date were correctly included in this map. A total of 85 sites sampled in 2013 or in the 3 previous years were identified as bare by means of this map. Predictions were made from the mosaic spectra which were related to topsoil SOC contents by means of partial least squares regression (PLSR). Regression robustness was evaluated through a series of 1000 bootstrap data sets of calibration-validation samples. The use of the total sample including 27 sites under cloud shadows led to non-significant results. Considering 43 sites outside cloud shadows only, median

  2. Microbial responses to southward and northward Cambisol soil transplant

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Mengmeng; Liu, Shanshan; Wang, Feng; Sun, Bo; Zhou, Jizhong; Yang, Yunfeng

    2015-10-26

    We report that soil transplant serves as a proxy to simulate climate changes. Recently, we have shown that southward transplant of black soil and northward transplant of red soil altered soil microbial communities and biogeochemical variables. However, fundamental differences in soil types have prevented direct comparison between southward and northward transplants. To tackle it, herein we report an analysis of microbial communities of Cambisol soil in an agriculture field after 4 years of adaptation to southward and northward soil transplants over large transects. Analysis of bare fallow soils revealed concurrent increase in microbial functional diversity and coarse-scale taxonomic diversity at both transplanted sites, as detected by GeoChip 3.0 and DGGE, respectively. Furthermore, a correlation between microbial functional diversity and taxonomic diversity was detected, which was masked in maize cropped soils. Mean annual temperature, soil moisture, and nitrate (NO3¯-N) showed strong correlations with microbial communities. In addition, abundances of ammonium-oxidizing genes (amoA) and denitrification genes were correlated with nitrification capacity and NO3¯-N contents, suggesting that microbial responses to soil transplant could alter microbe-mediated biogeochemical cycle at the ecosystem level.

  3. Microbial responses to southward and northward Cambisol soil transplant

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Mengmeng; Liu, Shanshan; Wang, Feng; Sun, Bo; Zhou, Jizhong; Yang, Yunfeng

    2015-10-26

    We report that soil transplant serves as a proxy to simulate climate changes. Recently, we have shown that southward transplant of black soil and northward transplant of red soil altered soil microbial communities and biogeochemical variables. However, fundamental differences in soil types have prevented direct comparison between southward and northward transplants. To tackle it, herein we report an analysis of microbial communities of Cambisol soil in an agriculture field after 4 years of adaptation to southward and northward soil transplants over large transects. Analysis of bare fallow soils revealed concurrent increase in microbial functional diversity and coarse-scale taxonomic diversity atmore » both transplanted sites, as detected by GeoChip 3.0 and DGGE, respectively. Furthermore, a correlation between microbial functional diversity and taxonomic diversity was detected, which was masked in maize cropped soils. Mean annual temperature, soil moisture, and nitrate (NO3¯-N) showed strong correlations with microbial communities. In addition, abundances of ammonium-oxidizing genes (amoA) and denitrification genes were correlated with nitrification capacity and NO3¯-N contents, suggesting that microbial responses to soil transplant could alter microbe-mediated biogeochemical cycle at the ecosystem level.« less

  4. Effectiveness of biological geotextiles in reducing runoff and soil loss under different environmental conditions using laboratory and field plot data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smets, T.

    2009-04-01

    Preliminary investigations suggest biological geotextiles could be an effective and inexpensive soil conservation method, with enormous global potential. Biological geotextiles are a possible temporary alternative for vegetation cover and can offer immediate soil protection. However, limited data are available on the erosion-reducing effects of biological geotextiles. Therefore, the objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of selected types of biological geotextile in reducing runoff and soil loss under controlled laboratory conditions and under field conditions reflecting different environments (i.e. continental, temperate and tropical). In laboratory experiments, interrill runoff, interrill erosion and concentrated flow erosion were simulated using various rainfall intensities, flow shear stresses and slope gradients. Field plot data on the effects of biological geotextiles on sheet and rill erosion were collected in several countries under natural rainfall (U.K., Hungary, Lithuania, South Africa, Brazil, China and Thailand). The laboratory experiments indicate that all tested biological geotextiles were effective in reducing interrill runoff (on average 59% of the value for bare soil) and interrill erosion rates (on average 16% of the value for bare soil). Since simulated concentrated flow discharge sometimes flowed below the geotextiles, the effectiveness in reducing concentrated flow erosion was significantly less (on average 59% of the value for bare soil). On field plots, where both interrill and rill erosion occur, all tested geotextiles reduced runoff depth by a mean of 54% of the control value for bare soil and in some cases, runoff depth increased compared to bare soil surfaces, which can be attributed to the impermeable and hydrophobic characteristics of some biological geotextiles. In the field, soil loss rates due to interrill and rill erosion were reduced by a mean of 21% of the value of bare soil by biological geotextiles. This study

  5. Soil surface protection by Biocrusts: effects of functional groups on textural properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Concostrina-Zubiri, Laura; Huber-Sannwald, Elisabeth; Martínez, Isabel; Flores Flores, José Luis; Escudero, Adrián

    2015-04-01

    In drylands, where vegetation cover is commonly scarce, soil surface is prone to wind and water soil erosion, with the subsequent loss of topsoil structure and chemical properties. These processes are even more pronounced in ecosystems subjected to extra erosive forces, such as grasslands and rangelands that support livestock production. However, some of the physiological and functional traits of biocrusts (i.e., complex association of cyanobacteria, lichens, mosses, fungi and soil particles) make them ideal to resist in disturbed environments and at the same time to protect soil surface from mechanical perturbations. In particular, the filaments and exudates of soil cyanobacteria and the rhizines of lichen can bind together soil particles, forming soil aggregates at the soil surface and thus enhancing soil stability. Also, they act as "biological covers" that preserve the most vulnerable soil layer from wind and runoff erosion and raindrop impact, maintaining soil structure and composition. In this work, we evaluated soil textural properties and organic matter content under different functional groups of biocrusts (i.e., cyanobacteria crust, 3 lichen species, 1 moss species) and in bare soil. In order to assess the impact of livestock trampling on soil properties and on Biocrust function, we sampled three sites conforming a disturbance gradient (low, medium and high impact sites) and a long-term livestock exclusion as control site. We found that the presence of biocrusts had little effects on soil textural properties and organic matter content in the control site, while noticeable differences were found between bare soil and soil under biocrusts (e.g., up to 16-37% higher clay content, compared to bare soil and up to 10% higher organic matter content). In addition, we found that depending on morphological traits and grazing regime, the effects of biocrusts changed along the gradient. For example, soil under the lichen Diploschistes diacapsis, with thick thallus

  6. The preliminary checkout, evaluation and calibration of a 3-component force measurement system for calibrating propulsion simulators for wind tunnel models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, W. A.

    1984-01-01

    The propulsion simulator calibration laboratory (PSCL) in which calibrations can be performed to determine the gross thrust and airflow of propulsion simulators installed in wind tunnel models is described. The preliminary checkout, evaluation and calibration of the PSCL's 3 component force measurement system is reported. Methods and equipment were developed for the alignment and calibration of the force measurement system. The initial alignment of the system demonstrated the need for more efficient means of aligning system's components. The use of precision alignment jigs increases both the speed and accuracy with which the system is aligned. The calibration of the force measurement system shows that the methods and equipment for this procedure can be successful.

  7. Structural bases for the specific interactions between the E2 and E3 components of the Thermus thermophilus 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase complexes.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Tadashi; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Kamiya, Nobuo

    2008-06-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), branched-chain 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase (BCDH) and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase (OGDH) are multienzyme complexes that play crucial roles in several common metabolic pathways. These enzymes belong to a family of 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase complexes that contain multiple copies of three different components (E1, E2 and E3). For the Thermus thermophilus enzymes, depending on its substrate specificity (pyruvate, branched-chain 2-oxo acid or 2-oxoglutarate), each complex has distinctive E1 (E1p, E1b or E1o) and E2 (E2p, E2b or E2o) components and one of the two possible E3 components (E3b and E3o). (The suffixes, p, b and o identify their respective enzymes, PDH, BCDH and OGDH.) Our biochemical characterization demonstrates that only three specific E3*E2 complexes can form (E3b*E2p, E3b*E2b and E3o*E2o). X-ray analyses of complexes formed between the E3 components and the peripheral subunit-binding domains (PSBDs), derived from the corresponding E2-binding partners, reveal that E3b interacts with E2p and E2b in essentially the same manner as observed for Geobacillus stearothermophilus E3*E2p, whereas E3o interacts with E2o in a novel fashion. The buried intermolecular surfaces of the E3b*PSBDp/b and E3o*PSBDo complexes differ in size, shape and charge distribution and thus, these differences presumably confer the binding specificities for the complexes. PMID:18316329

  8. Passive Microwave Remote Sensing of Soil Moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Njoku, Eni G.; Entekhabi, Dara

    1996-01-01

    Microwave remote sensing provides a unique capability for direct observation of soil moisture. Remote measurements from space afford the possibility of obtaining frequent, global sampling of soil moisture over a large fraction of the Earth's land surface. Microwave measurements have the benefit of being largely unaffected by cloud cover and variable surface solar illumination, but accurate soil moisture estimates are limited to regions that have either bare soil or low to moderate amounts of vegetation cover. A particular advantage of passive microwave sensors is that in the absence of significant vegetation cover soil moisture is the dominant effect on the received signal. The spatial resolutions of passive Microwave soil moisture sensors currently considered for space operation are in the range 10-20 km. The most useful frequency range for soil moisture sensing is 1-5 GHz. System design considerations include optimum choice of frequencies, polarizations, and scanning configurations, based on trade-offs between requirements for high vegetation penetration capability, freedom from electromagnetic interference, manageable antenna size and complexity, and the requirement that a sufficient number of information channels be available to correct for perturbing geophysical effects. This paper outlines the basic principles of the passive microwave technique for soil moisture sensing, and reviews briefly the status of current retrieval methods. Particularly promising are methods for optimally assimilating passive microwave data into hydrologic models. Further studies are needed to investigate the effects on microwave observations of within-footprint spatial heterogeneity of vegetation cover and subsurface soil characteristics, and to assess the limitations imposed by heterogeneity on the retrievability of large-scale soil moisture information from remote observations.

  9. Bioextraction of soil boron by tall fescue.

    PubMed

    Bañuelos, G S; Mackey, B; Wu, L; Zambrzuski, S; Akohoue, S

    1995-07-01

    High concentrations of soil B are detrimental to crop productivity in certain arid and semiarid regions of the western United States. Production of tall fescue on B-affected soils may be a viable strategy to reduce and maintain soil B concentrations at nontoxic levels for most agronomic crops. A 2-year field experiment was conducted to study B uptake in tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea) Schreb. cv. Au Triumph grown in soil containing potentially toxic levels of native soil B. The soil B concentrations (water-extractable B greater than 5 mg B liter-1) did not affect the dry matter (DM) yield of tall fescue. Boron concentrations in shoot tissue for both years ranged from 88 to 121 mg B kg-1 DM. whereas in root tissue, concentrations ranged from 50 to 60 mg B kg-1 DM. For both years of the study, soil samples were taken at depth of 0-45 and 45-90 cm at the beginning and end of the designated growing season and analyzed for water-extractable B. Summary data from all cropped plots at the two soil depths indicated that the mean water-extractable B concentrations were reduced by 35% after 2 years in the tall fescue plots, whereas losses of extractable B from bare plots did not exceed 13% for both years. Tall fescue apparently can be used as a component in an overall strategy to lower extractable soil native B levels in irrigated agriculture soils and potentially reduce leaching of B into shallow ground water. PMID:8521775

  10. Global Soil Moisture Analysis at DWD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, M.

    2012-04-01

    Small errors in the daily forecast of precipitation, evaporation and runoff accumulate to uncertainties of soil water content and lead to systematic biases of temperature and humidity profiles in the boundary layer if no corrections are applied. A new soil moisture assimilation scheme has been developed for the global GME model and runs operationally since March 2011. As many other variational schemes implemented at NWP centers (e.g. Canadian Met Service, DWD, ECMWF,, Meteo France) the scheme is based on minimisation of screen level forecast errors by adjusting the soil water content implicitly correcting the partitioning of available energy into latent and sensible heat. The original method proposed by Mahfouf (1991) and described in Hess, 2001 requires at least two additional model forecast runs to calculate the gradient of the cost function i.e. the sensitivity dT2m/dwb with T2m as 2m temperature and wb as the soil water content of the respective top and bottom soil layers. To overcome this computational costly approach in the new scheme the sensitivity of screen level temperature on soil moisture changes is parameterized with derivatives of analytical relations for transpiration from vegetation and bare soil evaporation as motivated by Jacobs and De Bruin (1992). The comparison of both methods shows high correlation of the temperature sensitivity that justifies the approximation. The method will be described in detail and verification results will be presented to demonstrate the impact of soil moisture analysis in GME. Hess, R. 2001: Assimilation of screen-level observations by variational soil moisture analysis. Meteorol. Atmos. Phys. 77, 145-154. Jacobs, C.M.M. and H.A.R. De Bruin, 1992: The Sensitivity of Regional Transpiration to Land-Surface Characteristics: Significance of Feedback. J. Clim. 5, 683-698. Mahfouf, J-F. 1991. Analysis of soil moisture from near-surface parameters: A feasibility study. J. Appl. Meteorol. 30: 1534-1547.

  11. Soil penetrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, E. A.; Hotz, G. M.; Bryson, R. P. (Inventor)

    1968-01-01

    An auger-type soil penetrometer for burrowing into soil formations is described. The auger, while initially moving along a predetermined path, may deviate from the path when encountering an obstruction in the soil. Alterations and modifications may be made in the structure so that it may be used for other purposes.

  12. A parameterization of Bowen ratio with respect to soil moisture availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuojia, Ye; Pielke, Roger A.

    1995-11-01

    The Bowen ratio ( B) is impacted by 5 environmental elements: soil moisture availabillity, m, the ratio of resistances between atmosphere and soil pores, r a/rD, atmospheric relative humidity, h, atmospheric stability, δT, and environment temperature. These impacts have been investigated over diverse surfaces, including bare soil, free water surface, and vegetation covered land, using an analytical approach. It was concluded that: (a) B is not a continuous function. The singularity exists at the condition ahcb = h, occurring preferably in the following conditions: weak turbulence, stable stratified stability, dry soil, and humid air, where hcb, defined by Eq.(11) is a critical variable. The existence of a singularity makes the dependence of B on the five variables very complicated. The value of B approaches being inversely proportional to m under the conditions m ≥ mfc (the soil capacity) and / or r a/rD→ 0. The proportional coefficient changes with season and latitude with relatively high values in winter and over the poles; (b) B is nearly independent of-during the day. The impact of m on B is much larger as compared to that of r a/rD on B; (c) when h increases, the absolute value of B also increases; (d) over bare soil, when the absolute surface net radiation increases, the absolute value of B will increase. The impact of RN on B is larger at night than during the day, and (e) over plant canopy, the singularity and the dependcies of B on m,ra, and h are modified as compared to that over bare soil. Also (i) during the daytime unstable condition, m exerts an even stronger impact on B; at night, however, B changes are weak in response to the change in m; (ii) the value of B is much more sensitive in response to the changes of turbulent intensity; (iii) the B response to the variation of h over a vegetation covered area is weaker; and (iv) the singularity exists at the condition hcp = h instead of αhcb =h as over bare soil, where hcp is defined by Eq.(49). The

  13. Use of ERS SAR interferometric coherence and PRI images to evaluate crop height and soil moisture and to identify crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeremans, Benoit; Dautrebande, Sylvia

    1998-12-01

    The aim of the present project was to identify the capabilities of multitemporal ERS SAR interferometric coherence and PRI images to evaluate soil moisture, to estimate crop height and to identify crops for four crop types (winter wheat, potato, sugar beet and maize) and for different pilot fields. The coherence images acquired during the winter and spring seasons can be used to identify bare or nearly bare fields with a threshold value, and then PRI images were used to quantify soil moisture value for each bare field. The coherence images acquired during the growing season were used to evaluate crop height for each studied crop type. Moreover, the coherence image provided some additional information to PRI images for the crop type identification. This study was carried out in the framework of the PRODEX program financed by the Belgian Federal Office for Scientific, Technical and Cultural affairs (OSTC) and the European Space Agency (ESA).

  14. Estimating Surface Soil Moisture in Simulated AVIRIS Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiting, Michael L.; Li, Lin; Ustin, Susan L.

    2004-01-01

    Soil albedo is influenced by many physical and chemical constituents, with moisture being the most influential on the spectra general shape and albedo (Stoner and Baumgardner, 1981). Without moisture, the intrinsic or matrix reflectance of dissimilar soils varies widely due to differences in surface roughness, particle and aggregate sizes, mineral types, including salts, and organic matter contents. The influence of moisture on soil reflectance can be isolated by comparing similar soils in a study of the effects that small differences in moisture content have on reflectance. However, without prior knowledge of the soil physical and chemical constituents within every pixel, it is nearly impossible to accurately attribute the reflectance variability in an image to moisture or to differences in the physical and chemical constituents in the soil. The effect of moisture on the spectra must be eliminated to use hyperspectral imagery for determining minerals and organic matter abundances of bare agricultural soils. Accurate soil mineral and organic matter abundance maps from air- and space-borne imagery can improve GIS models for precision farming prescription, and managing irrigation and salinity. Better models of soil moisture and reflectance will also improve the selection of soil endmembers for spectral mixture analysis.

  15. Examination of Soil Moisture Retrieval Using SIR-C Radar Data and a Distributed Hydrological Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, A. Y.; ONeill, P. E.; Wood, E. F.; Zion, M.

    1997-01-01

    A major objective of soil moisture-related hydrological-research during NASA's SIR-C/X-SAR mission was to determine and compare soil moisture patterns within humid watersheds using SAR data, ground-based measurements, and hydrologic modeling. Currently available soil moisture-inversion methods using active microwave data are only accurate when applied to bare and slightly vegetated surfaces. Moreover, as the surface dries down, the number of pixels that can provide estimated soil moisture by these radar inversion methods decreases, leading to less accuracy and, confidence in the retrieved soil moisture fields at the watershed scale. The impact of these errors in microwave- derived soil moisture on hydrological modeling of vegetated watersheds has yet to be addressed. In this study a coupled water and energy balance model operating within a topographic framework is used to predict surface soil moisture for both bare and vegetated areas. In the first model run, the hydrological model is initialized using a standard baseflow approach, while in the second model run, soil moisture values derived from SIR-C radar data are used for initialization. The results, which compare favorably with ground measurements, demonstrate the utility of combining radar-derived surface soil moisture information with basin-scale hydrological modeling.

  16. RNDSI: A ratio normalized difference soil index for remote sensing of urban/suburban environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yingbin; Wu, Changshan; Li, Miao; Chen, Renrong

    2015-07-01

    Understanding land use land cover change (LULCC) is a prerequisite for urban planning and environment management. For LULCC studies in urban/suburban environments, the abundance and spatial distributions of bare soil are essential due to its biophysically different properties when compared to anthropologic materials. Soil, however, is very difficult to be identified using remote sensing technologies majorly due to its complex physical and chemical compositions, as well as the lack of a direct relationship between soil abundance and its spectral signatures. This paper presents an empirical approach to enhance soil information through developing the ratio normalized difference soil index (RNDSI). The first step involves the generation of random samples of three major land cover types, namely soil, impervious surface areas (ISAs), and vegetation. With spectral signatures of these samples, a normalized difference soil index (NDSI) was proposed using the combination of bands 7 and 2 of Landsat Thematic Mapper Image. Finally, a ratio index was developed to further highlight soil covers through dividing the NDSI by the first component of tasseled cap transformation (TC1). Qualitative (e.g., frequency histogram and box charts) and quantitative analyses (e.g., spectral discrimination index and classification accuracy) were adopted to examine the performance of the developed RNDSI. Analyses of results and comparative analyses with two other relevant indices, biophysical composition index (BCI) and enhanced built-up and bareness Index (EBBI), indicate that RNDSI is promising in separating soil from ISAs and vegetation, and can serve as an input to LULCC models.

  17. Retrieval of Soil Moisture and Roughness from the Polarimetric Radar Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarabandi, Kamal; Ulaby, Fawwaz T.

    1997-01-01

    The main objective of this investigation was the characterization of soil moisture using imaging radars. In order to accomplish this task, a number of intermediate steps had to be undertaken. In this proposal, the theoretical, numerical, and experimental aspects of electromagnetic scattering from natural surfaces was considered with emphasis on remote sensing of soil moisture. In the general case, the microwave backscatter from natural surfaces is mainly influenced by three major factors: (1) the roughness statistics of the soil surface, (2) soil moisture content, and (3) soil surface cover. First the scattering problem from bare-soil surfaces was considered and a hybrid model that relates the radar backscattering coefficient to soil moisture and surface roughness was developed. This model is based on extensive experimental measurements of the radar polarimetric backscatter response of bare soil surfaces at microwave frequencies over a wide range of moisture conditions and roughness scales in conjunction with existing theoretical surface scattering models in limiting cases (small perturbation, physical optics, and geometrical optics models). Also a simple inversion algorithm capable of providing accurate estimates of soil moisture content and surface rms height from single-frequency multi-polarization radar observations was developed. The accuracy of the model and its inversion algorithm is demonstrated using independent data sets. Next the hybrid model for bare-soil surfaces is made fully polarimetric by incorporating the parameters of the co- and cross-polarized phase difference into the model. Experimental data in conjunction with numerical simulations are used to relate the soil moisture content and surface roughness to the phase difference statistics. For this purpose, a novel numerical scattering simulation for inhomogeneous dielectric random surfaces was developed. Finally the scattering problem of short vegetation cover above a rough soil surface was

  18. Self-catalysed InAs{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x} nanowires grown directly on bare Si substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Anyebe, E.A. Zhuang, Q.

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Self-catalysed InAs{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x} nanowires grown directly on bare Si substrates. • InAs{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x} nanowires directly grown on bare Si substrates without employing the commonly used nucleation nanowire stems which could be problematic in device applications. • Pre-deposited Indium droplets were employed to facilitate InAs{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x} nanowire nucleation and growth. • Unravels a promising route for the direct integration of InAs{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x} nanowires with the well-established Silicon platform. - Abstract: We report the self-catalysed growth of InAs{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x} nanowires directly on bare Si substrates. Vertically aligned and non-tapered InAs{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x} nanowires were realized via indium-assisted nucleation without using nanowire stems. The compositions of the InAs{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x} nanowires were determined by high resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD). It is observed that the geometry of the nanowires is modified by the Sb flux resulting in an almost doubling of the lateral dimension and a corresponding suppression in the axial growth of the InAs{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x} nanowires. This observation unravels a method to modify the geometry of InAs nanowire and open up a promising route for the direct integration of InAs{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x} nanowires with the well-established Si platform.

  19. The underlying biological mechanisms of biocompatibility differences between bare and TiN-coated NiTi alloys.

    PubMed

    Lifeng, Zhao; Yan, Hong; Dayun, Yang; Xiaoying, Lü; Tingfei, Xi; Deyuan, Zhang; Ying, Hong; Jinfeng, Yuan

    2011-04-01

    TiN coating has been demonstrated to improve the biocompatibility of bare NiTi alloys; however, essential biocompatibility differences between NiTi alloys before and after TiN coating are not known so far. In this study, to explore the underlying biological mechanisms of biocompatibility differences between them, the changes of bare and TiN-coated NiTi alloys in surface chemical composition, morphology, hydrophilicity, Ni ions release, cytotoxicity, apoptosis, and gene expression profiles were compared using energy-dispersive spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, contact angle, surface energy, Ni ions release analysis, the methylthiazoltetrazolium (MTT) method, flow cytometry and microarray methods, respectively. Pathways binding to networks and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were employed to analyze and validate the microarray data, respectively. It was found that, compared with the bare NiTi alloys, TiN coating significantly decreased Ni ions content on the surfaces of the NiTi alloys and reduced the release of Ni ions from the alloys, attenuated the inhibition of Ni ions to the expression of genes associated with anti-inflammatory, and also suppressed the promotion of Ni ions to the expression of apoptosis-related genes. Moreover, TiN coating distinctly improved the hydrophilicity and uniformity of the surfaces of the NiTi alloys, and contributed to the expression of genes participating in cell adhesion and other physiological activities. These results indicate that the TiN-coated NiTi alloys will help overcome the shortcomings of NiTi alloys used in clinical application currently, and can be expected to be a replacement of biomaterials for a medical device field. PMID:21441653

  20. Molecular markers based on LTR retrotransposons BARE-1 and Jeli uncover different strata of evolutionary relationships in diploid wheats.

    PubMed

    Konovalov, Fedor A; Goncharov, Nikolay P; Goryunova, Svetlana; Shaturova, Aleksandra; Proshlyakova, Tatyana; Kudryavtsev, Alexander

    2010-06-01

    Molecular markers based on retrotransposon insertions are widely used for various applications including phylogenetic analysis. Multiple cases were described where retrotransposon-based markers, namely sequence-specific amplification polymorphism (SSAP), were superior to other marker types in resolving the phylogenetic relationships due to their higher variability and informativeness. However, the patterns of evolutionary relationships revealed by SSAP may be dependent on the underlying retrotransposon activity in different periods of time. Hence, the proper choice of retrotransposon family is essential for obtaining significant results. We compared the phylogenetic trees for a diverse set of diploid A-genome wheat species (Triticum boeoticum, T. urartu and T. monococcum) based on two unrelated retrotransposon families, BARE-1 and Jeli. BARE-1 belongs to Copia class and has a uniform distribution between common wheat (T. aestivum) genomes of different origin (A, B and D), indicating similar activity in the respective diploid genome donors. Gypsy-class family Jeli was found by us to be an A-genome retrotransposon with >70% copies residing in A genome of hexaploid common wheat, suggesting a burst of transposition in the history of A-genome progenitors. The results indicate that a higher Jeli transpositional activity was associated with T. urartu versus T. boeoticum speciation, while BARE-1 produced more polymorphic insertions during subsequent intraspecific diversification; as an outcome, each retrotransposon provides more informative markers at the corresponding level of phylogenetic relationships. We conclude that multiple retroelement families should be analyzed for an image of evolutionary relationships to be solid and comprehensive. PMID:20407790

  1. Comparison of Bare-Tip and Radial Fiber in Endovenous Laser Ablation with 1470 nm Diode Laser

    PubMed Central

    Kurihara, Nobuhisa

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Major side effects after endovenous laser ablation (EVLA) are pain and bruising. The aim of this study was to compare outcome and side effects after EVLA for primary varicose veins with 1470 nm diode laser using bare-tip orradial fiber. Methods: From October 2007 to December 2010, 385 patients (453 limbs) with primary varicose veins treated with 1470 nm laser were studied. Bare-tip fiber was used in 215 patients (242 limbs) (BF group) and radial fiber (ELVeSTMRadial, Biolitec AG, Germany) was used in 177 patients (211 limbs) (RF group). This study is a retrospective study and radial fiber was started for use from November 2008. Laser energy was administered at 6–12 W of power in the BF group and 10 W of power in the RF group with constant pullback of laser fiber under tumescent local anesthesia. The patients were assessed by clinical examination and venous duplex ultrasonography at 24–48 h, one week, one month, 4 months and one year follow-up postoperatively. Results: Mean operating time, length of treated vein and linear endovenous laser energy of all cases were 42.6 min, 36.2 cm and 83.4 J/cm, respectively. Major complications such as deep vein thrombosis and skin burns were not noted. Bruising (1.9% vs. 19.4%) and pain (0.9% vs. 7.4%) were significantly lower in the RF group. Cumulative occlusion rates by Kaplan-Meier method were 100% at 32 months in the RF group and 99.5% at 4 years in the BF group. Conclusion: EVLA using 1470 nm laser with the radial fiber minimized adverse effects compared with bare-tip laser fiber. (*English translation of Jpn J Vasc Surg 2013; 22: 615-621) PMID:25298824

  2. Efficacy of covered and bare stent in TIPS for cirrhotic portal hypertension: A single-center randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Zhibo; Yue, Zhendong; Zhao, Hongwei; Fan, Zhenhua; Zhao, Mengfei; He, Fuliang; Dai, Shan; Qiu, Bin; Yao, Jiannan; Lin, Qiushi; Dong, Xiaoqun; Liu, Fuquan

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a single-center randomized trial to compare the efficacy of 8 mm Fluency covered stent and bare stent in transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) for cirrhotic portal hypertension. From January 2006 to December 2010, the covered (experimental group) or bare stent (control group) was used in 131 and 127 patients, respectively. The recurrence rates of gastrointestinal bleeding (18.3% vs. 33.9%, P = 0.004) and refractory hydrothorax/ascites (6.9% vs. 16.5%, P = 0.019) in the experimental group were significantly lower than those in the control group. The cumulative restenosis rates in 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5-years in the experimental group (6.9%, 11.5%, 19.1%, 26.0%, and 35.9%, respectively) were significantly lower (P < 0.001) than those in the control group (27.6%, 37.0%, 49.6%, 59.8%, 74.8%, respectively). Importantly, the 4 and 5-year survival rates in the experimental group (83.2% and 76.3%, respectively) were significantly higher (P = 0.001 and 0.02) than those in the control group (71.7% and 62.2%, respectively). The rate of secondary interventional therapy in the experimental group was significantly lower than that in the control group (20.6% vs. 49.6%; P < 0.001). Therefore, Fluency covered stent has advantages over the bare stent in terms of reducing the restenosis, recurrence, and secondary interventional therapy, whereas improving the long-term survival for post-TIPS patients. PMID:26876503

  3. Microscopic calculation and local approximation of the spatial dependence of the pairing field with bare and induced interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Pastore, A.; Barranco, F.; Vigezzi, E.

    2008-08-15

    The bare nucleon-nucleon interaction is essential for the production of pair correlations in nuclei, but an important contribution also arises from the induced interaction resulting from the exchange of collective vibrations between nucleons moving in time reversal states close to the Fermi energy. The pairing field resulting from the summed interaction is strongly peaked at the nuclear surface. It is possible to reproduce the detailed spatial dependence of this field by using either a local approximation, which fully takes into account finite size effects, or a contact interaction, with parameters that are quite different from those commonly used in more phenomenological approaches.

  4. A New Concept for Carotid Artery Stenting: Coating the Atherosclerotic Plaque by Covered Stent before Bare Stent Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Akgul, Erol

    2016-01-01

    In carotid artery stenting (CAS) procedures, distal embolism, periprocedural stent thrombosis, and 30-day stroke due to the plaque fragmentation and protrusion caused by stent implantation and balloon dilation are frequent complications. In this technical case report, a case is presented of extracranial carotid artery stenosis treated with a covered stent and subsequent implantation of a bare stent. In addition, the possibility is discussed that this new technique prevents the distal microembolic complications, periprocedural stent thrombosis, and 30-day stroke of extracranial CAS. PMID:26949556

  5. Global distribution of plant-extractable water capacity of soil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dunne, K.A.; Willmott, C.J.

    1996-01-01

    Plant-extractable water capacity of soil is the amount of water that can be extracted from the soil to fulfill evapotranspiration demands. It is often assumed to be spatially invariant in large-scale computations of the soil-water balance. Empirical evidence, however, suggests that this assumption is incorrect. In this paper, we estimate the global distribution of the plant-extractable water capacity of soil. A representative soil profile, characterized by horizon (layer) particle size data and thickness, was created for each soil unit mapped by FAO (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations)/Unesco. Soil organic matter was estimated empirically from climate data. Plant rooting depths and ground coverages were obtained from a vegetation characteristic data set. At each 0.5?? ?? 0.5?? grid cell where vegetation is present, unit available water capacity (cm water per cm soil) was estimated from the sand, clay, and organic content of each profile horizon, and integrated over horizon thickness. Summation of the integrated values over the lesser of profile depth and root depth produced an estimate of the plant-extractable water capacity of soil. The global average of the estimated plant-extractable water capacities of soil is 8??6 cm (Greenland, Antarctica and bare soil areas excluded). Estimates are less than 5, 10 and 15 cm - over approximately 30, 60, and 89 per cent of the area, respectively. Estimates reflect the combined effects of soil texture, soil organic content, and plant root depth or profile depth. The most influential and uncertain parameter is the depth over which the plant-extractable water capacity of soil is computed, which is usually limited by root depth. Soil texture exerts a lesser, but still substantial, influence. Organic content, except where concentrations are very high, has relatively little effect.

  6. Long-term toxicity assessment of soils in a recovered area affected by a mining spill.

    PubMed

    Romero-Freire, A; García Fernández, I; Simón Torres, M; Martínez Garzón, F J; Martín Peinado, F J

    2016-01-01

    Residual pollution in the Guadiamar Green Corridor still remains after Aználcollar mine spill in 1998. The polluted areas are identified by the absence of vegetation, soil acidic pH and high concentrations of As, Pb, Zn and Cu. Soil toxicity was assessed by lettuce root elongation and induced soil respiration bioassays. In bare soils, total As and Pb concentrations and water-extractable levels for As, Zn and Cu exceeded the toxicity guidelines. Pollutants responsible for toxicity were different depending on the tested organism, with arsenic being most toxic for lettuce and the metal mixture to soil respiration. Soil properties, such as pH or organic carbon content, are key factors to control metal availability and toxicity in the area. According to our results, there is a risk of pollution to living organisms and the soil quality criteria established in the area should be revised to reduce the risk of toxicity. PMID:26608875

  7. Estimation of effective hydrologic properties of soils from observations of vegetation density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tellers, T. E.; Eagleson, P. S.

    1980-01-01

    A one-dimensional model of the annual water balance is reviewed. Improvements are made in the method of calculating the bare soil component of evaporation, and in the way surface retention is handled. A natural selection hypothesis, which specifies the equilibrium vegetation density for a given, water limited, climate soil system, is verified through comparisons with observed data. Comparison of CDF's of annual basin yield derived using these soil properties with observed CDF's provides verification of the soil-selection procedure. This method of parameterization of the land surface is useful with global circulation models, enabling them to account for both the nonlinearity in the relationship between soil moisture flux and soil moisture concentration, and the variability of soil properties from place to place over the Earth's surface.

  8. Soil stabilization by biological soil crusts in arid Tunisia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidez, Sabine; Couté, Alain; Bardat, Jacques

    2015-04-01

    ability to extend them horizontally on the soil surface. Despite the water capture for their metabolism, the water flows; it isn't released in the depth. The moss crusts show an opposite process with an increased infiltration thanks to the possibility of a vertical transit of water through their sheets, stem and roots. So, in relation to bare soils, a crust with a good microbial and cryptogamic development causes more runoff. As part of the fight against the desertification in arid Tunisia, hydrological impact of BSC may lead to elaborate some ecosystem strategies in water and soils management. Indeed, climate aridity is not synonymous with edaphic aridity.

  9. A process-based evapotranspiration model incorporating coupled soil water-atmospheric controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghighi, Erfan; Kirchner, James

    2016-04-01

    Despite many efforts to develop evapotranspiration models (in the framework of the Penman-Monteith equation) with improved parametrizations of various resistance terms to water vapor transfer into the atmosphere, evidence suggests that estimates of evapotranspiration and its partitioning are prone to bias. Much of this bias could arise from the exclusion of surface hydro-thermal properties and of physical interactions close to the surface where heat and water vapor fluxes originate. Recent progress has been made in mechanistic modeling of surface-turbulence interactions, accounting for localized heat and mass exchange rates from bare soil surfaces covered by protruding obstacles. We seek to extend these results partially vegetated surfaces, to improve predictive capabilities and accuracy of remote sensing techniques quantifying evapotranspiration fluxes. The governing equations of liquid water, water vapor, and energy transport dynamics in the soil-plant-atmosphere system are coupled to resolve diffusive vapor fluxes from isolated pores (plant stomata and soil pores) across a near-surface viscous sublayer, explicitly accounting for pore-scale transport mechanisms and environmental forcing. Preliminary results suggest that this approach offers unique opportunities for directly linking transport properties in plants and adjacent bare soil with resulting plant transpiration and localized bare soil evaporation rates. It thus provides an essential building block for interpreting and upscaling results to field and landscape scales for a range of vegetation cover and atmospheric conditions.

  10. Daytime and nighttime groundwater contributions to soils with different surface conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Xuguang; Ma, Xiaoyi; Shi, Wenjuan

    2015-12-01

    Contributions of groundwater to the soil-water balance play an important role in areas with shallow water tables. The characteristics of daytime and nighttime water flux using non-weighing lysimeters were studied from June to September 2012 and 2013 in the extremely arid Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region in northwestern China. The study consisted of nine treatments: three surface conditions, bare soil and cotton plants, each with water tables at depths of 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 m; and plastic mulch with a water table at 1.5 m but with three percentages of open areas (POAs) in the plastic. The groundwater supply coefficient (SC) and the groundwater contribution (GC) generally varied with surface conditions. Both SC and GC decreased in the bare-soil and cotton treatments with increasing depth of the groundwater. Both SC and GC increased in the plastic-mulch treatment with increasing POA. Average nighttime GCs in the bare-soil treatments in July and August (the midsummer months) were 50.8-60.8 and 53.2-65.3 %, respectively, of the total daily contributions. Average nighttime GCs in the cotton treatments in July and August were 51.4-60.2 and 51.5-58.1 %, respectively, of the total daily contributions. The average GCs in June and September, however, were lower at night than during the daytime. Soil temperature may thus play a more important role than air temperature in the upflow of groundwater.

  11. Effect of Grazing on Soil Temperature and Moisture and Subsequent Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolchansky, J.; Blanken, P.; Morgan, J.; Alfieri, J.; Grossman, R.

    2004-12-01

    Cattle grazing, a common form of land use on grasslands, may affect transpiration and evaporation from soil by defoliation and, in turn, could alter the climate at the surface. This study focused on whether physical landscape changes associated with grazing could have a significant impact on soil temperature and moisture, and thereby affect the microclimate. Objectives were to analyze how soil temperature and moisture vary with simulated grazing treatments. Climatological data were collected at a USDA shortgrass steppe in northeastern Colorado. Eight (1 x 1 meter) plots were selected to represent variations in the fraction of bare ground, while two (1 x 1 meter) plots were used to measure the impact of the arrangement of bare ground. Soil temperature and soil moisture measurements were recorded under a vegetated and bare area in each plot. Additionally, the eddy covariance method was used in the recommended practice of moderate grazing (40% reduction in above-ground biomass). Results from the plots were used to discuss implications for the effect of different grazing densities on the microclimate and water budgets of moderate grazing management and the accuracy of remote sensing images (using large pixels). In addition, the results were used to suggest potential impacts on the summer nesting habitat for the Mountain Plover (Charadrius montanus), an endangered bird found at the site.

  12. Mixed artificial grasslands with more roots improved mine soil infiltration capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Gao-Lin; Yang, Zheng; Cui, Zeng; Liu, Yu; Fang, Nu-Fang; Shi, Zhi-Hua

    2016-04-01

    Soil water is one of the critical limiting factors in achieving sustainable revegetation. Soil infiltration capacity plays a vital role in determining the inputs from precipitation and enhancing water storage, which are important for the maintenance and survival of vegetation patches in arid and semi-arid areas. Our study investigated the effects of different artificial grasslands on soil physical properties and soil infiltration capacity. The artificial grasslands were Medicago sativa, Astragalus adsurgens, Agropyron mongolicum, Lespedeza davurica, Bromus inermis, Hedysarum scoparium, A. mongolicum + Artemisia desertorum, A. adsurgens + A. desertorum and M. sativa + B. inermis. The soil infiltration capacity index (SICI), which was based on the average infiltration rate of stage I (AIRSI) and the average infiltration rate of stage III (AIRS III), was higher (indicating that the infiltration capacity was greater) under the artificial grasslands than that of the bare soil. The SICI of the A. adsurgens + A. desertorum grassland had the highest value (1.48) and bare soil (-0.59) had the lowest value. It was evident that artificial grassland could improve soil infiltration capacity. We also used principal component analysis (PCA) to determine that the main factors that affected SICI were the soil water content at a depth of 20 cm (SWC20), the below-ground root biomasses at depths of 10 and 30 cm (BGB10, BGB30), the capillary porosity at a depth of 10 cm (CP10) and the non-capillary porosity at a depth of 20 cm (NCP20). Our study suggests that the use of Legume-poaceae mixtures and Legume-shrub mixtures to create grasslands provided an effective ecological restoration approach to improve soil infiltration properties due to their greater root biomasses. Furthermore, soil water content, below-ground root biomass, soil capillary porosity and soil non-capillary porosity were the main factors that affect the soil infiltration capacity.

  13. Effect of Soils from Six Management Systems on Root-knot Nematodes and Plant Growth in Greenhouse Assays

    PubMed Central

    Kokalis-Burelle, N.; Chellemi, D. O.; Périès, X.

    2005-01-01

    The effects of soil management systems on root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) eggs and gall incidence on tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) and cucumber (Cucumis sativus) following tomato were evaluated. Soil was collected from a replicated field experiment in which six management systems were being assessed for vegetable production. Soil management systems were conventional production, organic production, bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum) pasture, bahiagrass: Stylosanthes (Stylosanthes guianensis) pasture, bare ground fallow, and weed fallow. Soil was collected from field plots and used in greenhouse experiments. Identification of egg-parasitic fungi and the incidence of root-knot nematode galling were assessed both on tomato and cucumber planted in the same pots following the removal of tomato plants. Organic, bare ground fallow and conventional production treatments reduced galling both on tomato and on cucumber following tomato. Although no treatment consistently enhanced egg-parasitic fungi, management system did affect egg viability and the types of fungi isolated from parasitized eggs. PMID:19262892

  14. Effects of A Killed-Cover Crop Mulching System on Sweetpotato Production, Soil Pests, and Insect Predators in South Carolina

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sweetpotato, Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam., is typically grown bare soils where weeds and erosion can be problematic before plants become established. Conservation tillage systems for sweetpotato may help alleviate these problems. Therefore, one insect-resistant (‘Ruddy’) and two insect-susceptible (‘...

  15. Soil water content and evaporation determined by thermal parameters obtained from ground-based and remote measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reginato, R.; Idso, S.; Vedder, J.; Jackson, R.; Blanchard, M.; Goettelman, R.

    1975-01-01

    A procedure is presented for calculating 24-hour totals of evaporation from wet and drying soils. Its application requires a knowledge of the daily solar radiation, the maximum and minimum, air temperatures, moist surface albedo, and maximum and minimum surface temperatures. Tests of the technique on a bare field of Avondale loam at Phoenix, Arizona showed it to be independent of season.

  16. The effects of vegetation and soil hydraulic properties on passive microwave sensing of soil moisture: Data report for the 1982 fiels experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oneill, P.; Jackson, T.; Blanchard, B. J.; Vandenhoek, R.; Gould, W.; Wang, J.; Glazar, W.; Mcmurtrey, J., III

    1983-01-01

    Field experiments to (1) study the biomass and geometrical structure properties of vegetation canopies to determine their impact on microwave emission data, and (2) to verify whether time series microwave data can be related to soil hydrologic properties for use in soil type classification. Truck mounted radiometers at 1.4 GHz and 5 GHz were used to obtain microwave brightness temperatures of bare vegetated test plots under different conditions of soil wetness, plant water content and canopy structure. Observations of soil moisture, soil temperature, vegetation biomass and other soil and canopy parameters were made concurrently with the microwave measurements. The experimental design and data collection procedures for both experiments are documented and the reduced data are presented in tabular form.

  17. Dynamics of Soil Heat Flux in Lowland Area: Estimating the Soil Thermal Conductivy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, T.; Silveira, M. V.; Roberti, D. R.

    2013-05-01

    In this work, it is shown soil thermal conductivity estimates in a flooded irrigated rice culture located at the Paraíso do Sul city for two distinct periods. The thermal conductivity is higher when the heat storage is higher and the soil surface temperature is lower. The soil thermal conductivity is also dependant on the soil texture, porosity and moisture. Therefore, it varies from soil to soil and in the same soil, depending on its soil moisture. For approximately 80% of its growing season, lowland flooded irrigated rice ecosystems stay under a 5 - 10 cm water layer. It affects the partitioning of the energy and water balance components. Furthermore this planting technique differs substantially from any other upland non-irrigated or irrigated crop ecosystems where the majority of observational studies have been conducted. In the present work, the dynamic of soil heat flux (G) is analyzed and the soil thermal conductivity (Ks) is estimated using experimental data form soil heat flux and soil temperature in a rice paddy farm in a subtropical location in Southern Brazil. In this region, rice grows once a year at river lowlands and wetlands while the ground is kept bare during the remaining of the year. The soil type is Planossolo Hidromórfico Distrófico, characterized as a mix between sandy and clay soil. The soil heat flux (G) was experimentally estimated with the sensor Hukseflux (HFP01SC-L) at 7 cm bellow the soil surface. The soil temperature at 5 cm and 10 cm was experimentally estimated using the sensor STP01. The experimental soil heat flux was compared with estimated soil heat flux by two forms: (1) using a know Ks from literature for this type of soil in saturated conditions (Ks=1.58); (2) using Ks estimated using the inversion of the equation Qg=-ks* ((T10-T5)/ (Z2-Z1)), where T10 and T5 are the temperature in 10 and 5 cm above the soil and Z2-Z1 is the difference between the positions in temperature measurement. The study period for estimating the Ks

  18. Soil Moisture Estimation under Vegetation Applying Polarimetric Decomposition Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagdhuber, T.; Schön, H.; Hajnsek, I.; Papathanassiou, K. P.

    2009-04-01

    Polarimetric decomposition techniques and inversion algorithms are developed and applied on the OPAQUE data set acquired in spring 2007 to investigate their potential and limitations for soil moisture estimation. A three component model-based decomposition is used together with an eigenvalue decomposition in a combined approach to invert for soil moisture over bare and vegetated soils at L-band. The applied approach indicates a feasible capability to invert soil moisture after decomposing volume and ground scattering components over agricultural land surfaces. But there are still deficiencies in modeling the volume disturbance. The results show a root mean square error below 8.5vol.-% for the winter crop fields (winter wheat, winter triticale and winter barley) and below 11.5Vol-% for the summer crop field (summer barley) whereas all fields have a distinct volume layer of 55-85cm height.

  19. Lateral-coupling coplanar-gate oxide-based thin-film transistors on bare paper substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guodong; Wan, Xiang; Yang, Yi; Jiang, Shuanghe

    2014-11-01

    For conventional thin-film transistors (TFTs), bottom-gate or top-gate configuration is always adopted because the channel current is generally controlled by vertical capacitive coupling. In this article, depending on huge lateral electric-double-layer (EDL) capacitor induced by spatial movement of protons in phosphosilicate glass (PSG) solid electrolyte dielectrics, coplanar-gate indium-zinc-oxide (IZO)-TFTs based on the lateral capacitive coupling were fabricated on bare paper substrates. The PSG solid electrolyte films here were used at the same time as gate dielectrics and smooth buffer layers. These TFTs showed a low-voltage operation of only 1 V with a large field-effect mobility of 13.4 cm2 V-1·s, a high current on/off ratio of 6  ×  106 and a small subthreshold swing of 75 mV/decade. Furthermore, with introducing another coplanar gate, AND logic operation was also demonstrated on the coplanar dual-gate TFTs. These simple lateral-coupling coplanar-gate IZO-TFTs on bare paper substrates are very promising for low-cost portable sensors and bio-electronics.

  20. The electronic properties of bare and alkali metal adsorbed two-dimensional GeSi alloy sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Wenhao; Ye, Han; Yu, Zhongyuan; Liu, Yumin

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, the structural and electronic properties of both bare and alkali metal (AM) atoms adsorbed two-dimensional GeSi alloy sheet (GeSiAS) are investigated by means of first-principles calculations. The band gaps of bare GeSiAS are shown slightly opened at Dirac point with the energy dispersion remain linear due to the spin-orbit coupling effect at all concentrations of Ge atoms. For metal adsorption, AM atoms (including Li, Na and K) prefer to occupy the hexagonal hollow site of GeSiAS and the primary chemical bond between AM adatom and GeSiAS is ionic. The adsorption energy has an increase tendency with the increase of the Ge concentration in supercell. Besides, single-side adsorption of AM atoms introduces band gap at Dirac point, which can be tuned by the Ge concentration and the species of AM atoms. The strong relation between the band gaps and the distribution of Si and Ge atoms inside GeSiAS are also demonstrated. The opened band gaps of AM covered GeSiAS range from 14.8 to 269.1 meV along with the effective masses of electrons ranging from 0.013 to 0.109 me, indicating the high tunability of band gap as well as high mobility of carriers. These results provide a development in two-dimensional alloys and show potential applications in novel micro/nano-electronic devices.

  1. Drainage density, slope angle, and relative basin position in Japanese bare lands from high-resolution DEMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhou; Oguchi, Takashi

    2004-12-01

    Relationships between drainage density and slope angle for three bare lands in Japan were analyzed with special attention to channels at early erosion stages and channels in a badland-type terrain. Two of the bare lands were caused by volcanic eruptions 1 or 30-40 years ago, and the other one is a landslide scar formed more than 100 years ago. Raster digital elevation models (DEMs) with a 1-m resolution and ortho aerial photos were generated using digital photogrammetry to enable detailed stream-net extraction and topographic analyses. Data for drainage density, slope angle, and relative height for 88 subwatersheds were obtained from the DEMs and derived stream-nets. The relationship between drainage density and slope angle for each subwatershed can be divided into two types: downward sloping and convex upward. Although previous studies suggested that drainage density positively correlates with slope angle if overland flow is dominant, this correlation seldom occurs in the study areas. The two types of drainage density-slope angle relationships correspond to differing channelization stages that reflect the extension and integration of existing channels, as well as the formation of new low-order streams in response to base-level lowering. The location of subwatersheds within each study area seems to play a major role in determining the stages of channel development and, in turn, the types of drainage density-slope angle relationships.

  2. Temperature Dependent Low Energy Electron Microscopy Study of Ge Island Growth on Bare and Ga Terminated Si(112)

    SciTech Connect

    Speckmann, M.; Schmidt, T; Flege, J; Sadowski, J; Sutter, P; Falta, J

    2009-01-01

    The pre-adsorption of Ga on Si(112) leads to a drastic change of the morphology of subsequently grown Ge islands. In contrast to the case for Ge growth on bare Si(112), even nanowire growth can be achieved on Ga terminated Si(112). Employing low energy electron microscopy and low energy electron diffraction, the initial phase of Ge nucleation and Ge island growth was systematically analysed for growth temperatures between 420 and 610 C, both on clean and on Ga terminated Si(112). In both cases the island density exhibits an Arrhenius-like behaviour, from which diffusion barrier heights of about 1.3 and 1.0 eV can be estimated for growth with and without Ga pre-adsorption, respectively. The Ge island shape on the bare Si(112) surface is found to be nearly circular over the whole temperature range, whereas the shapes of the Ge islands on the Ga terminated Si(112) become highly anisotropic for higher temperatures. Ge nanowires with sizes of up to 2 um along the direction are observed.

  3. Construction of LRET-based nanoprobe using upconversion nanoparticles with confined emitters and bared surface as luminophore.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Lv, Songwei; Wang, Yali; Chen, Shiyu; Liu, Zhihong

    2015-03-11

    Upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) are promising energy donors for luminescence resonance energy transfer (LRET) and have widely been used to construct nanoprobes. To improve the LRET efficiency, which is currently a limiting factor for UCNPs-based bioassay, we herein propose a strategy to construct LRET-based nanoprobe using UCNPs with confined emitters and bared surface as the luminophore, with Ca(2+) as the proof-of-concept target. The sandwich-structure upconversion nanoparticles (SWUCNPs) are designed with a core-inner shell-outer shell architecture, in which the emitting ions (Ln(3+)) are precisely located in the inner shell near the particle surface, which is close enough to external energy acceptors. The target receptor (Fluo-4) is directly tagged on bared surface of SWUCNPs, which further reduces the donor-to-acceptor distance. Our strategy contributes to significantly improved LRET efficiency and hence affords an ultrahigh sensitivity for Ca(2+) detection. The as-constructed nanoprobe is structurally stable and exhibits good biocompatibility, which ensures uptake and reliable observation in living cells. The nanoprobe can be used for monitoring the different levels of cytosol [Ca(2+)] in living cells. Furthermore, it is applicable in Ca(2+) imaging in mice liver tissues. PMID:25707940

  4. The 'soil' of Mars /Viking 1/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shorthill, R. W.; Moore, H. J., II; Scott, R. F.; Hutton, R. E.; Liebes, S., Jr.; Spitzer, C. R.

    1976-01-01

    The immediate environs of the Viking 1 lander are described, and the techniques employed to deduce the properties of the two different 'soil' types there are summarized. It is shown that the surface in the immediate vicinity of the lander consists of an area with fine-grained materials ('Sandy Flats') and a rocky area set in a matrix of finer-grained material ('Rocky Flats'). Estimates are given for the bulk density, particle density, particle size distribution, cohesion, angle of internal friction, and penetration resistance of the surface layer in each area. Footpad penetration into the surface layer is discussed, and wind removal of particles is examined. It is concluded that the surface layer of the Viking 1 landing site contains loess, dune sand, lunar nominal soil, lag gravel, and bare rock.

  5. Reflectance of vegetation, soil, and water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegand, C. L. (Principal Investigator); Gausman, H. W.; Leamer, R. W.; Richardson, A. J.; Gerbermann, A. H.; Torline, R. J.; Gautreaux, M. R.; Everitt, J. H.; Guellar, J. A.; Rodriguez, R. R.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Bands 4, 5, and 7 and 5, 6, and 7 were best for distinguishing among crop and soil categories in ERTS-1 SCENES 1182-16322 (1-21-73) and 1308-16323 (5-21-73) respectively. Chlorotic sorghum areas 2.8 acres or larger in size were identified on a computer printout of band 5 data. Reflectance of crop residues was more often different from bare soil in band 4 than in bands 5, 6, and 7. Simultaneously acquired aircraft and spacecraft MSS data indicated that spacecraft surveys are as reliable as aircraft surveys. ERTS-1 data were successfully used to estimate acreage of citrus, cotton, and sorghum as well as idle crop land.

  6. Reflectance of vegetation, soil, and water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegand, C. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The ability to read the 24-channel MSS CCT tapes, select specified agricultural land use areas from the CCT, and perform multivariate statistical and pattern recognition analyses has been demonstrated. The 5 optimum channels chosen for classifying an agricultural scene were, in the order of their selection the far red visible, short reflective IR, visible blue, thermal infrared, and ultraviolet portions of the electromagnetic spectrum, respectively. Although chosen by a training set containing only vegetal categories, the optimum 4 channels discriminated pavement, water, bare soil, and building roofs, as well as the vegetal categories. Among the vegetal categories, sugar cane and cotton had distinctive signatures that distinguished them from grass and citrus. Acreages estimated spectrally by the computer for the test scene were acceptably close to acreages estimated from aerial photographs for cotton, sugar cane, and water. Many nonfarmable land resolution elements representing drainage ditch, field road, and highway right-of-way as well as farm headquarters area fell into the grass, bare soil plus weeds, and citrus categories and lessened the accuracy of the farmable acreage estimates in these categories. The expertise developed using the 24-channel data will be applied to the ERTS-1 data.

  7. The fate of silver nanoparticles in soil solution--Sorption of solutes and aggregation.

    PubMed

    Klitzke, Sondra; Metreveli, George; Peters, Andre; Schaumann, Gabriele E; Lang, Friederike

    2015-12-01

    Nanoparticles enter soils through various pathways. In the soil, they undergo various interactions with the solution and the solid phase. We tested the following hypotheses using batch experiments: i) the colloidal stability of Ag NP increases through sorption of soil-borne dissolved organic matter (DOM) and thus inhibits aggregation; ii) the presence of DOM suppresses Ag oxidation; iii) the surface charge of Ag NP governs sorption onto soil particles. Citrate-stabilized and bare Ag NPs were equilibrated with (colloid-free) soil solution extracted from a floodplain soil for 24h. Nanoparticles were removed through centrifugation. Concentrations of free Ag ions and DOC, the specific UV absorbance at a wavelength of 254 nm, and the absorption ratio α254/α410 were determined in the supernatant. Nanoparticle aggregation was studied using time-resolved dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurement following the addition of soil solution and 1.5mM Ca(2+) solution. To study the effect of surface charge on the adsorption of Ag NP onto soil particles, bare and citrate-stabilized Ag NP, differing in the zeta potential, were equilibrated with silt at a solid-to-solution ratio of 1:10 and an initial Ag concentration range of 30 to 320 μg/L. Results showed that bare Ag NPs sorb organic matter, with short-chained organic matter being preferentially adsorbed over long-chained, aromatic organic matter. Stabilizing effects of organic matter only come into play at higher Ag NP concentrations. Soil solution inhibits the release of Ag(+) ions, presumably due to organic matter coatings. Sorption to silt particles was very similar for the two particle types, suggesting that the surface charge does not control Ag NP sorption. Besides, sorption was much lower than in comparable studies with sand and glass surfaces. PMID:25434472

  8. A microwave systems approach to measuring root zone soil moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newton, R. W.; Paris, J. F.; Clark, B. V.

    1983-01-01

    Computer microwave satellite simulation models were developed and the program was used to test the ability of a coarse resolution passive microwave sensor to measure soil moisture over large areas, and to evaluate the effect of heterogeneous ground covers with the resolution cell on the accuracy of the soil moisture estimate. The use of realistic scenes containing only 10% to 15% bare soil and significant vegetation made it possible to observe a 60% K decrease in brightness temperature from a 5% soil moisture to a 35% soil moisture at a 21 cm microwave wavelength, providing a 1.5 K to 2 K per percent soil moisture sensitivity to soil moisture. It was shown that resolution does not affect the basic ability to measure soil moisture with a microwave radiometer system. Experimental microwave and ground field data were acquired for developing and testing a root zone soil moisture prediction algorithm. The experimental measurements demonstrated that the depth of penetration at a 21 cm microwave wavelength is not greater than 5 cm.

  9. Spatial and Temporal Variability of Soil Redistribution in a Heterogeneous Shrub Dominated Landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Pelt, R. S.; Zobeck, T. M.

    2015-12-01

    Redistribution of soil by wind results when the erosive force of the wind impacts bare, susceptible soil surfaces. In semi-arid and arid environments, many grasslands with protected surfaces are being replaced by heterogeneous shrub communities with bare, susceptible soil surfaces between the individual shrubs. The development of nutrient islands and the increases of fugitive dust in these areas is indicative of increases of soil redistribution, but few quantitative measurements have been made to date. We fenced three 1 ha areas in an approximately 100 ha coppice dune area of southeast New Mexico dominated by shinnery oak, sand sage, and mesquite and installed a 4 X 4 grid of MWAC sampler masts spaced at 20 m from each other. Weather data were collected at an automated weather station in each of the fenced areas. We found the patterns of soil redistribution to be highly variable in space and time. Differences in vegetation patterns and wind fields were noted among the plots for the same discrete time period that could explain some of the spatial variability. We also noted seasonality of wind fields that accounted for the temporally variable spatial patterns of soil redistribution. We conclude that accurate measurement of soil redistribution patterns in a heterogeneous shrub community requires a very large number of samplers and a long period of study and we believe that net soil loss from an area is limited to fine dust emissions.

  10. Multifrequency remote sensing of soil moisture. [Guymon, Oklahoma and Dalhart, Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theis, S. W.; Mcfarland, M. J.; Rosenthal, W. D.; Jones, C. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    Multifrequency sensor data collected at Guymon, Oklahoma and Dalhart, Texas using NASA's C-130 aircraft were used to determine which of the all-weather microwave sensors demonstrated the highest correlation to surface soil moisture over optimal bare soil conditions, and to develop and test techniques which use visible/infrared sensors to compensate for the vegetation effect in this sensor's response to soil moisture. The L-band passive microwave radiometer was found to be the most suitable single sensor system to estimate soil moisture over bare fields. In comparison to other active and passive microwave sensors the L-band radiometer (1) was influenced least by ranges in surface roughness; (2) demonstrated the most sensitivity to soil moisture differences in terms of the range of return from the full range of soil moisture; and (3) was less sensitive to errors in measurement in relation to the range of sensor response. L-band emissivity related more strongly to soil moisture when moisture was expressed as percent of field capacity. The perpendicular vegetation index as determined from the visible/infrared sensors was useful as a measure of the vegetation effect on the L-band radiometer response to soil moisture.

  11. (Contaminated soil)

    SciTech Connect

    Siegrist, R.L.

    1991-01-08

    The traveler attended the Third International Conference on Contaminated Soil, held in Karlsruhe, Germany. The Conference was a status conference for worldwide research and practice in contaminated soil assessment and environmental restoration, with more than 1500 attendees representing over 26 countries. The traveler made an oral presentation and presented a poster. At the Federal Institute for Water, Soil and Air Hygiene, the traveler met with Dr. Z. Filip, Director and Professor, and Dr. R. Smed-Hildmann, Research Scientist. Detailed discussions were held regarding the results and conclusions of a collaborative experiment concerning humic substance formation in waste-amended soils.

  12. Towards high resolution soil property maps for Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schürz, Christoph; Klotz, Daniel; Herrnegger, Mathew; Schulz, Karsten

    2015-04-01

    Soil hydraulic properties, such as soil texture, soil water retention characteristics, hydraulic conductivity, or soil depth are important inputs for hydrologic catchment modelling. However, the availability of such data in Austria is often insufficient to fulfill requirements of well-established hydrological models. Either, soil data is available in sufficient spatial resolution but only covers a small extent of the considered area, or the data is comprehensive but rather coarse in its spatial resolution. Furthermore, the level of detail and quality of the data differs between the available data sets. In order to generate a comprehensive soil data set for whole Austria that includes main soil physical properties, as well as soil depth and organic carbon content in a high spatial resolution (10x10 to 100x100m²) several available soil data bases are merged and harmonized. Starting point is a high resolution soil texture map that only covers agricultural areas and is available due to Austrian land appraisal. Soil physical properties for those areas are derived by applying pedotransfer functions (e.g. Saxton and Rawls, 2006) resulting in expectation values and quantiles of the respective property for each soil texture class. For agricultural areas where no texture information is available, the most likely soil texture is assigned applying a Bayesian network approach incorporating information such as elevation, soil slope, soil type, or hydro-geology at different spatial scales. Soil data for forested areas, that cover a large extent of the state territory, are rather sparse in Austria. For such areas a similar approach as for agricultural areas is applied by using a Bayesian network for prediction of the soil texture. Additionally, information to various soil parameters taken from literature is incorporated. For areas that are covered by land use different to agriculture or forestry, such as bare rock surfaces, or wetland areas, solely literature information is used

  13. Soil water content and evaporation determined by thermal parameters obtained from ground-based and remote measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reginato, R. J.; Idso, S. B.; Jackson, R. D.; Vedder, J. F.; Blanchard, M. B.; Goettelman, R.

    1976-01-01

    Soil water contents from both smooth and rough bare soil were estimated from remotely sensed surface soil and air temperatures. An inverse relationship between two thermal parameters and gravimetric soil water content was found for Avondale loam when its water content was between air-dry and field capacity. These parameters, daily maximum minus minimum surface soil temperature and daily maximum soil minus air temperature, appear to describe the relationship reasonably well. These two parameters also describe relative soil water evaporation (actual/potential). Surface soil temperatures showed good agreement among three measurement techniques: in situ thermocouples, a ground-based infrared radiation thermometer, and the thermal infrared band of an airborne multispectral scanner.

  14. Measuring soil moisture with imaging radars

    SciTech Connect

    Dubois, P.C.; Zyl, J. van; Engman, T.

    1995-07-01

    An empirical algorithm for the retrieval of soil moisture content and surface Root Mean Square (RMS) height from remotely sensed radar data was developed using scatterometer data. The algorithm is optimized for bare surfaces and requires two copolarized channels at a frequency between 1.5 and 11 GHz. It gives best results for kh {le} 2.5, {mu}{sub {upsilon}}{le}35%, and {theta}{ge}30{degree}. Omitting the usually weaker hv-polarized returns makes the algorithm less sensitive to system cross-talk and system noise, simplify the calibration process and adds robustness to the algorithm in the presence of vegetation. However, inversion results indicate that significant amounts of vegetation (NDVI>0.4) cause the algorithm to underestimate soil moisture and overestimate RMS height. A simple criteria based on the {sigma}{sub hv}{sup 0}/{sigma}{sub vv}{sup 0} ratio is developed to select the areas where the inversion is not impaired by the vegetation. The inversion accuracy is assessed on the original scatterometer data sets but also on several SAR data sets by comparing the derived soil moisture values with in-situ measurements collected over a variety of scenes between 1991 and 1994. Both spaceborne (SIR-C) and airborne (AIRSAR) data are used in the test. Over this large sample of conditions, the RMS error in the soil moisture estimate is found to be less than 4.2% soil moisture.

  15. A long-term soil structure observatory for post-compaction soil structure evolution: design and initial soil structure recovery observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Thomas; Colombi, Tino; Ruiz, Siul; Grahm, Lina; Reiser, René; Rek, Jan; Oberholzer, Hans-Rudolf; Schymanski, Stanislaus; Walter, Achim; Or, Dani

    2016-04-01

    Soil compaction due to agricultural vehicular traffic alters the geometrical arrangement of soil constituents, thereby modifying mechanical properties and pore spaces that affect a range of soil hydro-ecological functions. The ecological and economic costs of soil compaction are dependent on the immediate impact on soil functions during the compaction event, and a function of the recovery time. In contrast to a wealth of soil compaction information, mechanisms and rates of soil structure recovery remain largely unknown. A long-term (>10-yr) soil structure observatory (SSO) was established in 2014 on a loamy soil in Zurich, Switzerland, to quantify rates and mechanisms of structure recovery of compacted arable soil under different post-compaction management treatments. We implemented three initial compaction treatments (using a two-axle agricultural vehicle with 8 Mg wheel load): compaction of the entire plot area (i.e. track-by-track), compaction in wheel tracks, and no compaction. After compaction, we implemented four post-compaction soil management systems: bare soil (BS), permanent grass (PG), crop rotation without mechanical loosening (NT), and crop rotation under conventional tillage (CT). BS and PG provide insights into uninterrupted natural processes of soil structure regeneration under reduced (BS) and normal biological activity (PG). The two cropping systems (NT and CT) enable insights into soil structure recovery under common agricultural practices with minimal (NT) and conventional mechanical soil disturbance (CT). Observations include periodic sampling and measurements of soil physical properties, earthworm abundance, crop measures, electrical resistivity and ground penetrating radar imaging, and continuous monitoring of state variables - soil moisture, temperature, CO2 and O2 concentrations, redox potential and oxygen diffusion rates - for which a network of sensors was installed at various depths (0-1 m). Initial compaction increased soil bulk density

  16. Quantifying the influence of deep soil moisture on ecosystem albedo: the role of vegetation Zulia M. Sánchez-Mejía 1 and Shirley A. Papuga1 1School of Natural Resources and the Environment, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Mejia, Z. M.; Papuga, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    Water limited ecosystems in arid and semiarid regions are characterized by sparse vegetation and a relatively large fraction of bare soil. Importantly, the land surface in these dryland regions is highly sensitive to pulses of moisture that affect the vegetation canopy in density and color, as well as the soil color. Changes in surface conditions due to these pulses have been shown to affect the surface energy fluxes and atmospheric processes in these regions. For instance, previous studies have shown that shallow soil moisture ( < 20 cm below the surface) significantly changes surface albedo (a= SWup/ SWin). Recent studies have highlighted the importance of deep soil moisture ( > 20 cm below the surface) for vegetation dynamics in these regions. We hypothesize that deep soil moisture will change vegetation canopy density and color enough that changes in albedo will be observable at the surface, therefore linking deep soil moisture and albedo. We adopt a conceptual framework to address this hypothesis, where at any point in time the soil profile falls into one of four cases: (1) dry shallow soil and dry deep soil; (2) wet shallow soil and dry deep soil; (3) wet shallow soil and wet deep soil; and (4) dry shallow soil and wet deep soil. At a creosotebush dominated ecosystem of the Santa Rita Experimental Range, southern Arizona during summers of 2011 and 2012, we took albedo measurements during these cases at multiple bare and vegetated patches within the footprint of an eddy covariance tower. We found that when the soil is completely dry (Case 1) albedo is highest in both bare and vegetated patches. Likewise, when the soil is wet in both the shallow and deep regions (Case 3), albedo is lowest in both bare and vegetated patches. Interestingly, we also found that albedo is significantly lower for vegetated patches when the deep soil is wet and shallow soil is dry (Case 4). These results imply that deep soil moisture can be important in altering ecosystem level albedo

  17. Variations in thematic mapper spectra of soil related to tillage and crop residue management - Initial evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seeley, M. W.; Ruschy, D. L.; Linden, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    A cooperative research project was initiated in 1982 to study differences in thematic mapper spectral characteristics caused by variable tillage and crop residue practices. Initial evaluations of radiometric data suggest that spectral separability of variably tilled soils can be confounded by moisture and weathering effects. Separability of bare tilled soils from those with significant amounts of corn residue is enhanced by wet conditions, but still possible under dry conditions when recent tillage operations have occurred. In addition, thematic mapper data may provide an alternative method to study the radiant energy balance at the soil surface in conjunction with variable tillage systems.

  18. Analysis of soil moisture extraction algorithm using data from aircraft experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, H. H. K.; Ho, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    A soil moisture extraction algorithm is developed using a statistical parameter inversion method. Data sets from two aircraft experiments are utilized for the test. Multifrequency microwave radiometric data surface temperature, and soil moisture information are contained in the data sets. The surface and near surface ( or = 5 cm) soil moisture content can be extracted with accuracy of approximately 5% to 6% for bare fields and fields with grass cover by using L, C, and X band radiometer data. This technique is used for handling large amounts of remote sensing data from space.

  19. A modified hood infiltrometer to estimate the soil hydraulic properties from the transient water flow measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moret-Fernández, D.; González-Cebollada, C.; Latorre, B.; Pérez, V.

    2015-11-01

    In-situ measurements of soil hydraulic properties on covered soil surfaces (i.e. vegetated or residue covered surfaces) are of paramount importance in many agronomic or hydrological researches. These soil parameters are commonly estimated with the tension infiltrometry technique. This paper presents a portable and modified design of the hood infiltrometer (MHI) that, unlike to the original hood infiltrometer, allows estimating the soil hydraulic properties from the transient cumulative infiltration curve. The MHI consists of a water-supply reservoir attaches to a hat-shaped base placed on the soil surface. The base of the hat is closed by a system of sticks and a malleable material ring. To test the viability of this new design, the hydraulic conductivity (Ks) estimated with MHI in a loam soil using the multiple head approach was compared to the corresponding values calculated from the transient infiltration curve analysis. Next, the MHI was tested on three different soils at saturated conditions, and the sorptivity (S) and Ks estimated by the transient infiltration curve analysis were compared to the corresponding values obtained with a disc infiltrometer (DI). An additional field experiment was performed to compare the hydraulic properties measured with MHI on a bare soil and a soil covered with plants. Results demonstrated that this design allows hermetically closing the base of the hat without disturbing the soil surface. The Ks estimated with the multiple head approach was not statistically different (p = 0.61) to that obtained with the transient infiltration curve analysis. No significant differences between the Ks (p = 0.66) and S (p = 0.50) values estimated with DI and MHI were observed. The S values measured with MHI on the covered soil surface were significantly higher than that measured on the adjacent bare soil. These results indicate that MHI can be a viable alternative to estimate the hydraulic properties of covered soils from the measured transient

  20. Sensing water from subsurface drip irrigation laterals: In situ sensors, weighing lysimeters and COSMOS under vegetated and bare conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Characterization of soil water dynamics in the root zone under subsurface drip irrigated (SDI) is complicated by the three dimensional nature of water fluxes from drip emitters plus the fluxes, if any, of water from precipitation. In addition, soil water sensing systems may differ in their operating...

  1. [Characteristics of soil salinity profiles and their electromagnetic response under various vegetation types in coastal saline area].

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing-Song; Yao, Rong-Jiang; Zou, Ping; Liu, Guang-Ming

    2008-10-01

    Aiming at the intrinsic relationships between vegetation type and soil salinity in coastal saline area, and by using electromagnetic induction EM38 and field sampling method, the characteristics of soil salinity profiles under various vegetation types in typical coastal saline region of the Yellow River Delta were analyzed, and the electromagnetic response characters of the salinity profiles were compared. The results showed that across the study area, soil salinity exhibited the characteristics of top enrichment and strong spatial variation. The horizontal electromagnetic conductivity EM(h) responded well to soil salinity at upper layers, and the response of vertical electromagnetic conductivity EM(v) to soil salinity at deeper layers was superior to that of EM(h). Soil salinity profiles were classified into inverted, normal, and uniform types. The vegetation types of inverted salinity profiles were mainly bare land and Suaeda salsa, while those of normal and uniform salinity profiles were cotton and weed, respectively. The sequence of top enrichment intensity was bare land > S. salsa land > weed land > cotton land. With the change of vegetation type of cotton-weed-S. salsa-bare land, the EM(v)/EM(h) value of salinity profiles decreased gradually. Nonparametric test results showed that there was a significant correlation between vegetation type and electromagnetic response characters, and the distribution characters of EM(v)/EM(h) under various vegetation types varied significantly. PMID:19123343

  2. Soil Tilth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tilth has and continues to be an interesting term. The term intrigues people because of its connection with the soil and yet confuses people because of the inability to provide an exact definition or measurement. As a term that describes a soil property it is better visualized than quantified; howev...

  3. [Soil infiltration characteristics under main vegetation types in Anji County of Zhejiang Province].

    PubMed

    Liu, Dao-Ping; Chen, San-Xiong; Zhang, Jin-Chi; Xie, Li; Jiang, Jiang

    2007-03-01

    The study on the soil infiltration under different main vegetation types in Anji County of Zhejiang Province showed that the characteristics of soil infiltration differed significantly with land use type, and the test eight vegetation types could be classified into four groups, based on soil infiltration capability. The first group, deciduous broadleaved forest, had the strongest soil infiltration capability, and the second group with a stronger soil infiltration capability was composed of grass, pine forest, shrub community and tea bush. Bamboo and evergreen broadleaved forest were classified into the third group with a relatively strong soil infiltration capability, while bare land belonged to the fourth group because of the bad soil structure and poorest soil infiltration capability. The comprehensive parameters of soil infiltration (alpha) and root (beta) were obtained by principal component analysis, and the regression model of alpha and beta could be described as alpha = 0. 1708ebeta -0. 3122. Soil infiltration capability was greatly affected by soil physical and chemical characteristics and root system. Fine roots (< or = 1 mm in diameter) played effective roles on the improvement of soil physical and chemical properties, and the increase of soil infiltration capability was closely related to the amount of the fine roots. PMID:17552181

  4. Development, calibration, and performance of a novel biocrust wetness probe (BWP) measuring the water content of biological soil crusts and surface soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Bettina; Berkemeier, Thomas; Ruckteschler, Nina; Caesar, Jennifer; Ritter, Holger; Heintz, Henno; Brass, Henning

    2015-04-01

    The surface layer of soils as transition zone between pedosphere and atmosphere plays a crucial role in exchange processes of nutrients, atmospheric gases and water. In arid and semiarid regions, this uppermost soil layer is commonly colonized by biological soil crusts (biocrusts), which cover about 46 million km2 worldwide being highly relevant in the global terrestrial carbon and nitrogen cycles. Their water status is of major concern, as activity of these poikilohydric organisms is directly controlled by their water content. On-site analyses of both bare and crusted soils thus are urgently needed to correctly model exchange processes of water, nutrients and trace gases at the soil surface. In this study we present the biocrust wetness probe (BWP), which is the first low-cost sensor to reliably measure the water content within biocrusts or the uppermost 5 mm of the substrate. Using a weak alternating current, the electrical conductivity is assessed and an automatic calibration routine allows calculating the water content and precipitation equivalent of the surface layer over time. During one year of continuous field measurements, 60 BWPs were installed in different types of biocrusts and bare soil to measure at 5-minute intervals in the Succulent Karroo, South Africa. All sensors worked reliably and responded immediately and individually upon precipitation events. Upon completion of field measurements, soil and biocrust samples were collected from all measurement spots to compile calibration curves in the lab. In most soil and biocrust samples the water content rose linearly with increasing electrical conductivity values and only for few samples an exponential relationship was observed. Measurements revealed characteristic differences in biocrust and soil wetness patterns, which affect both the water regime and physiological processes in desert regions. Thus BWPs turned out to be well suited sensors for spatio-temporal monitoring of soil water content, allowing

  5. Finite element solution of axial turbulent flow in a bare rod bundle using a one-equation turbulence model

    SciTech Connect

    Slagter, W.

    1982-11-01

    A new form of the one-equation turbulence model has been developed and verified by application to fully developed turbulent flow in smooth, bare rod bundles. The present model allows for the effect of anisotropic eddy viscosities on turbulent flow quantities. The finite element method has been used to predict local values of velocity and turbulent kinetic energy right up to the wall. A variational principle is applied to develop the finite element relationships. The resulting set of nonlinear algebraic equations for the nodal parameters is linearized by the successive-substitution scheme and solved by the frontal solution technique. The numerical results are shown to be in good agreement with available experimental data.

  6. Primary role of the barely occupied states in the charge density wave formation of NbSe2.

    PubMed

    Shen, D W; Zhang, Y; Yang, L X; Wei, J; Ou, H W; Dong, J K; Xie, B P; He, C; Zhao, J F; Zhou, B; Arita, M; Shimada, K; Namatame, H; Taniguchi, M; Shi, J; Feng, D L

    2008-11-28

    NbSe2 is a prototypical charge-density-wave (CDW) material, whose mechanism remains mysterious so far. With angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we recovered the long-lost nesting condition over a large broken-honeycomb region in the Brillouin zone, which consists of six saddle band point regions with high density of states (DOS), and large regions away from Fermi surfaces with negligible DOS at the Fermi energy. We show that the major contributions to the CDW formation come from these barely occupied states rather than the saddle band points. Our findings not only resolve a long-standing puzzle, but also overthrow the conventional wisdom that CDW is dominated by regions with high DOS. PMID:19113497

  7. Transport properties of bare and hydrogenated zigzag silicene nanoribbons: Negative differential resistances and perfect spin-filtering effects

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, X. F.; Liu, Y. S. Feng, J. F.; Wang, X. F.; Zhang, C. W.; Chi, F.

    2014-09-28

    Ab initio calculations are performed to investigate the spin-polarized transport properties of the bare and hydrogenated zigzag silicene nanoribbons (ZSiNRs). The results show that the ZSiNRs with symmetric (asymmetric) edges prefer the ferromagnetic (antiferromagnetic) as their ground states with the semiconductor properties, while the accordingly antiferromagnetic (ferromagnetic) states exhibit the metallic behaviors. These facts result in a giant magnetoresistance behavior between the ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic states in the low bias-voltage regime. Moreover, in the ferromagnetic ZSiNRs with asymmetric edges, a perfect spin-filtering effect with 100% positive electric current polarization can be achieved by altering the bias voltage. In addition, we also find that the negative differential resistances prefer the metastable states. The findings here indicate that the asymmetric and symmetric ZSiNRs are promising materials for spintronic applications.

  8. Experiments with highly charged ions up to bare U{sup 92+} on the electron beam ion trap

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, P.

    1994-07-01

    An overview is given of the current experimental effort to investigate the level structure of highly charged ions with the Livermore electron beam ion trap (EBIT) facility. The facility allows the production and study of virtually any ionization state of any element up to bare U{sup 92+}. Precision spectroscopic measurements have been performed for a range of {Delta}n = 0 and {Delta}n = 1 transitions. Examples involving 3-4 and 2-3 as well as 3-3 and 2-2 transitions in uranium ions are discussed that illustrated some of the measurement and analysis techniques employed. The measurements have allowed tests of calculations of the the quantum electrodynamical contributions to the transitions energies at the 0.4% level in a regime where (Z{alpha}) {approx} 1.

  9. Ultrafast Exciton Hopping Observed in Bare Semiconducting Carbon Nanotube Thin Films with Two-Dimensional White-Light Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mehlenbacher, Randy D; Wang, Jialiang; Kearns, Nicholas M; Shea, Matthew J; Flach, Jessica T; McDonough, Thomas J; Wu, Meng-Yin; Arnold, Michael S; Zanni, Martin T

    2016-06-01

    We observe ultrafast energy transfer between bare carbon nanotubes in a thin film using two-dimensional (2D) white-light spectroscopy. Using aqueous two-phase separation, semiconducting carbon nanotubes are purified from their metallic counterparts and condensed into a 10 nm thin film with no residual surfactant. Cross peak intensities put the time scale for energy transfer at <60 fs, and 2D anisotropy measurements determine that energy transfer is most efficient between parallel nanotubes, thus favoring directional energy flow. Lifetimes are about 300 fs. Thus, these results are in sharp contrast to thin films prepared from nanotubes that are wrapped by polymers, which exhibit picosecond energy transfer and randomize the direction of energy flow. Ultrafast energy flow and directionality are exciting properties for next-generation photovoltaics, photodetectors, and other devices. PMID:27182690

  10. Interface trap density evaluation on bare silicon-on-insulator wafers using the quasi-static capacitance technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirro, L.; Ionica, I.; Ghibaudo, G.; Mescot, X.; Faraone, L.; Cristoloveanu, S.

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a detailed investigation of the quasi-static capacitance-voltage (QSCV) technique in pseudo-metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (pseudo-MOSFET) configuration for evaluating the interface quality of bare silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers, without processing dedicated metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) test devices. A physical model is developed that is capable of explaining the experimental results. In addition, frequency effects are used to validate the equations by a systematic comparison between experimental and calculated characteristics, as well as by a direct comparison with the standard high-low frequency approach. An extraction procedure for interface trap density based solely on QSCV experimental results is proposed, and limits of the procedure are discussed. The proposed experimental and analytical procedure is demonstrated by characterizing SOI structures with different geometries and with different qualities of surface passivation of the top silicon film.

  11. Prediction of soil properties using imaging spectroscopy: Considering fractional vegetation cover to improve accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franceschini, M. H. D.; Demattê, J. A. M.; da Silva Terra, F.; Vicente, L. E.; Bartholomeus, H.; de Souza Filho, C. R.

    2015-06-01

    Spectroscopic techniques have become attractive to assess soil properties because they are fast, require little labor and may reduce the amount of laboratory waste produced when compared to conventional methods. Imaging spectroscopy (IS) can have further advantages compared to laboratory or field proximal spectroscopic approaches such as providing spatially continuous information with a high density. However, the accuracy of IS derived predictions decreases when the spectral mixture of soil with other targets occurs. This paper evaluates the use of spectral data obtained by an airborne hyperspectral sensor (ProSpecTIR-VS - Aisa dual sensor) for prediction of physical and chemical properties of Brazilian highly weathered soils (i.e., Oxisols). A methodology to assess the soil spectral mixture is adapted and a progressive spectral dataset selection procedure, based on bare soil fractional cover, is proposed and tested. Satisfactory performances are obtained specially for the quantification of clay, sand and CEC using airborne sensor data (R2 of 0.77, 0.79 and 0.54; RPD of 2.14, 2.22 and 1.50, respectively), after spectral data selection is performed; although results obtained for laboratory data are more accurate (R2 of 0.92, 0.85 and 0.75; RPD of 3.52, 2.62 and 2.04, for clay, sand and CEC, respectively). Most importantly, predictions based on airborne-derived spectra for which the bare soil fractional cover is not taken into account show considerable lower accuracy, for example for clay, sand and CEC (RPD of 1.52, 1.64 and 1.16, respectively). Therefore, hyperspectral remotely sensed data can be used to predict topsoil properties of highly weathered soils, although spectral mixture of bare soil with vegetation must be considered in order to achieve an improved prediction accuracy.

  12. The effects of a realistic hollow cathode plasma contactor model on the simulation of bare electrodynamic tether systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blash, Derek M.

    The region known as Low-Earth Orbit (LEO) has become populated with artificial satellites and space debris since humanities initial venture into the region. This has turned LEO into a hazardous region. Since LEO is very valuable to many different countries, there has been a push to prevent further buildup and talk of even deorbiting spent satellites and debris already in LEO. One of the more attractive concepts available for deorbiting debris and spent satellites is a Bare Electrodynamic Tether (BET). A BET is a propellantless propulsion technique in which two objects are joined together by a thin conducting material. When these tethered objects are placed in LEO, the tether sweeps across the magnetic field lines of the Earth and induces an electromotive force (emf) along the tether. Current from the space plasma is collected on the bare tether under the action of the induced emf, and this current interacts with the Earth's magnetic field to create a drag force that can be used to deorbit spent satellites and space debris. A Plasma Contactor (PC) is used to close the electrical circuit between the BET and the ionospheric plasma. The PC requires a voltage and, depending on the device, a gas flow to emit electrons through a plasma bridge to the ionospheric plasma. The PC also can require a plasma discharge electrode and a heater to condition the PC for operation. These parameters as well as the PC performance are required to build an accurate simulation of a PC and, therefore, a BET deorbiting system. This thesis focuses on the development, validation, and implementation of a simulation tool to model the effects of a realistic hollow cathode PC system model on a BET deorbit system.

  13. Long-term Outcomes of Drug-eluting versus Bare-metal stent for ST-elevation Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liping; Wang, Hongyun; Dong, Pingshuan; Li, Zhuanzhen; Wang, Yanyu; Duan, Nana; Zhao, Yuwei; Wang, Shaoxin

    2014-01-01

    Background Long-term outcomes of drug-eluting stents (DES) versus bare-metal stents (BMS) in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) remain uncertain. Objective To investigate long-term outcomes of drug-eluting stents (DES) versus bare-metal stents (BMS) in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Methods We performed search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane library, and ISI Web of Science (until February 2013) for randomized trials comparing more than 12-month efficacy or safety of DES with BMS in patients with STEMI. Pooled estimate was presented with risk ratio (RR) and its 95% confidence interval (CI) using random-effects model. Results Ten trials with 7,592 participants with STEMI were included. The overall results showed that there was no significant difference in the incidence of all-cause death and definite/probable stent thrombosis between DES and BMS at long-term follow-up. Patients receiving DES implantation appeared to have a lower 1-year incidence of recurrent myocardial infarction than those receiving BMS (RR = 0.75, 95% CI 0.56 to 1.00, p= 0.05). Moreover, the risk of target vessel revascularization (TVR) after receiving DES was consistently lowered during long-term observation (all p< 0.01). In subgroup analysis, the use of everolimus-eluting stents (EES) was associated with reduced risk of stent thrombosis in STEMI patients (RR = 0.37, p=0.02). Conclusions DES did not increase the risk of stent thrombosis in patients with STEMI compared with BMS. Moreover, the use of DES did lower long-term risk of repeat revascularization and might decrease the occurrence of reinfarction. PMID:25004414

  14. Soil biology for resilient healthy soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    What is a resilient healthy soil? A resilient soil is capable of recovering or adapting to stress; the health of the living/biological component of the soil is crucial for soil resiliency. Soil health is tightly coupled to the concept of soil quality (Text Box 1) and the terms are frequently used ...

  15. SOIL BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The term "Soil Biology", the study of organism groups living in soil, (plants, lichens, algae, moss, bacteria, fungi, protozoa, nematodes, and arthropods), predates "Soil Ecology", the study of interactions between soil organisms as mediated by the soil physical environment. oil ...

  16. Response of Surface Soil Hydrology to the Micro-Pattern of Bio-Crust in a Dry-Land Loess Environment, China

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Yu, Yun; Chen, Liding

    2015-01-01

    The specific bio-species and their spatial patterns play crucial roles in regulating eco-hydrologic process, which is significant for large-scale habitat promotion and vegetation restoration in many dry-land ecosystems. Such effects, however, are not yet fully studied. In this study, 12 micro-plots, each with size of 0.5 m in depth and 1 m in length, were constructed on a gentle grassy hill-slope with a mean gradient of 8° in a semiarid loess hilly area of China. Two major bio-crusts, including mosses and lichens, had been cultivated for two years prior to the field simulation experiments, while physical crusts and non-crusted bare soils were used for comparison. By using rainfall simulation method, four designed micro-patterns (i.e., upper bio-crust and lower bare soil, scattered bio-crust, upper bare soil and lower bio-crust, fully-covered bio-crust) to the soil hydrological response were analyzed. We found that soil surface bio-crusts were more efficient in improving soil structure, water holding capacity and runoff retention particularly at surface 10 cm layers, compared with physical soil crusts and non-crusted bare soils. We re-confirmed that mosses functioned better than lichens, partly due to their higher successional stage and deeper biomass accumulation. Physical crusts were least efficient in water conservation and erosion control, followed by non-crusted bare soils. More importantly, there were marked differences in the efficiency of the different spatial arrangements of bio-crusts in controlling runoff and sediment generation. Fully-covered bio-crust pattern provides the best option for soil loss reduction and runoff retention, while a combination of upper bio-crust and lower bare soil pattern is the least one. These findings are suggested to be significant for surface-cover protection, rainwater infiltration, runoff retention, and erosion control in water-restricted and degraded natural slopes. PMID:26207757

  17. Fate of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts within soil, water, and plant environment.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Stephen J; Kalita, Prasanta K; Kuhlenschmidt, Mark S

    2013-12-15

    Vegetative Filter Strips (VFS) have long been used to control the movement of agricultural nutrients and prevent them from reaching receiving waters. Earlier studies have shown that VFS also dramatically reduce both the kinetics and extent of Cryptosporidium parvum (C. parvum) oocysts overland transport. In this study, we investigated possible mechanisms responsible for the ability of VFS to reduce oocyst overland transport. Measurement of the kinetics of C. parvum adhesion to individual sand, silt, and clay soil particles revealed that oocysts associate over time, albeit relatively slow, with clay but not silt or sand particles. Measurement of oocyst overland transport kinetics, soil infiltration depth, distance of travel, and adhesion to vegetation on bare and vegetated soil surfaces indicate that oocysts move more slowly, and penetrate the soil profile to a greater extent on a vegetated surface than on a bare soil surface. Furthermore, we demonstrate a small fraction of the oocysts become attached to vegetation at the soil-vegetation interface on VFS. These results suggest VFS function to reduce oocyst overland transport by primarily decreasing oocyst surface flow enough to allow penetration within the soil profile followed by subsequent adhesion to or entrapment within clay particle aggregates, and to a lesser extent, adhesion to the surface vegetation. PMID:24157412

  18. Reducing Methyl Halide Emissions from Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, S. R.; Xuan, R.; Ashworth, D.; Luo, L.

    2011-12-01

    losses, respectively, for a soil covered with HDPE or for a bare soil surface. These findings demonstrate that several methods are available to reduce atmospheric emissions of MeBr and other halogenated fumigants.

  19. Soil mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, J. K.; Carrier, W. D., III; Houston, W. N.; Scott, R. F.; Bromwell, L. G.; Durgunoglu, H. T.; Hovland, H. J.; Treadwell, D. D.; Costes, N. C.

    1972-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented of an investigation of the physical and mechanical properties of lunar soil on the Descartes slopes, and the Cayley Plains in the vicinity of the LM for Apollo 16. The soil mechanics data were derived form (1) crew commentary and debriefings, (2) television, (3) lunar surface photography, (4) performance data and observations of interactions between soil and lunar roving vehicle, (5) drive-tube and deep drill samples, (6) sample characteristics, and (7) measurements using the SRP. The general characteristics, stratigraphy and variability are described along with the core samples, penetrometer test results, density, porosity and strength.

  20. Modelling Soil respiration in agro-ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delogu, Emilie; LeDantec, Valerie; Mordelet, Patrick; Buysse, Pauline; Aubinet, Marc; Pattey, Elizabeth

    2013-04-01

    A soil respiration model was developed to simulate soil respiration in crops on a daily time step. The soil heterotrophic respiration component was derived from Century (Parton et al., 1987). Soil organic carbon is divided into three major components including active, slow and passive soil carbon. Each pool has its own decomposition rate coefficient. Carbon flows between these pools are controlled by carbon inputs (crop residues), decomposition rate and microbial respiration loss parameters, both of which are a function of soil texture, soil temperature and soil water content. The model assumes that all C decompositions flows are associated with microbial activity and that microbial respiration occurs for each of these flows. Heterotrophic soil respiration is the sum of all these microbial respiration processes. To model the soil autotrophic respiration component, maintenance respiration is calculated from the nitrogen content and assuming an exponential relationship to account for temperature dependence (Ryan et al., 1991). Growth respiration is calculated assuming a dependence on both growth rate and construction cost of the considered organ (MacCree et al., 1982) A database, made of four different soil and climate conditions in mid-latitude was used to study the two components of the soil respiration model in wheat fields. Soil respiration were measured in three winter wheat fields at Lamasquère (43°49'N, 01°23'E, 2007) and Auradé (43°54'N, 01°10'E, 2008), South-West France and Lonzée (50°33'N, 4°44'E, 2007), Belgium, and in a spring wheat field at Ottawa (45°22'N, 75°43'W, 2007, 2011), Ontario, Canada. Manual closed chambers were used in the French sites. The Belgium and Canadian sites were equipped with automated closed chamber systems, which continuously collected 30-min soil respiration exchanges. All the sites were also equipped with eddy flux towers. When eddy flux data were collected over bare soil, the net ecosystem exchange (NEE) was equal to