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Sample records for 3-d atom probe

  1. Spatial decomposition of molecular ions within 3D atom probe reconstructions.

    PubMed

    Breen, Andrew; Moody, Michael P; Gault, Baptiste; Ceguerra, Anna V; Xie, Kelvin Y; Du, Sichao; Ringer, Simon P

    2013-09-01

    Two methods for separating the constituent atoms of molecular ions within atom probe tomography reconstructions are presented. The Gaussian Separation Method efficiently deconvolutes molecular ions containing two constituent atoms and is tested on simulated data before being applied to an experimental HSLA steel dataset containing NbN. The Delaunay Separation Method extends separation to larger complex ions and is also tested on simulated data before being applied to an experimental GaAs dataset containing many large (>3 atoms) complex ions. First nearest neighbour (1NN) distributions and images of the reconstruction before and after the separations are used to show the effect of the algorithms and their validity and practicality are also discussed. PMID:23522847

  2. 3D compositional characterization of Si/SiO2 vertical interface structure by atom probe tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. H.; Kim, Y. T.; Kim, J. J.; Lee, S. Y.; Park, C. G.

    2013-11-01

    Precise interpretation of three-dimensional atom probe tomography (3D-APT) data is necessary to reconstruct semiconductor-device structures. In particular, it is difficult to reconstruct the hetero-structure of conductors and insulators using APT analysis, due to the preferential evaporation of low-evaporation field-material. In this paper, shallow-trench isolation (STI) structure, consisting of a Si column and a SiO2 region, is analyzed using APT. The dimensional artifact known as the local-magnification-effect occurring as a result of the geometric deviation from the ideal hemisphere was successfully calibrated by `high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) tomography' and Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS). In the direction of the width, the Si layer was compressed by 50%, and the interface was expanded by 250% with respect to the reference data obtained for the same sample. A 5-nm-thick transition layer was observed at the interface between Si and SiO2. The composition of the transition layer follows the well-developed sequence Si-Si2O-SiO-SiO2 from the Si area to the SiO2 area. Atoms at the interface were likely to evaporate with a bit wider angle than atoms in the Si area due to the preferentially evaporated Si layer, which caused the interface area to appear locally magnified.

  3. Three-Dimensional (3-D) Atom Probe Tomography of a Cu-Precipitation-Strengthened, Ultrahigh-Strength Carburized Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiemens, Benjamin L.; Sachdev, Anil K.; Mishra, Raja K.; Olson, Gregory B.

    2012-10-01

    In an effort to reduce material cost, experimental steel alloys were developed that incorporated Cu precipitation in lieu of costly Co alloying additions in secondary hardening carburizing gear steels. This work utilizes three-dimensional atom probe tomography to study one of these prototype alloys and quantify the nanoscale dispersions of body-centered cubic (bcc) Cu and M2C alloy carbides used to strengthen these steels. The temporal evolution of precipitate, size, morphology, and interprecipitate interactions were studied for various tempering times. Findings suggest that Cu precipitation does act as a catalyst for heterogeneous nucleation of M2C carbides at relatively high hardness levels; however, the resultant volume fraction of strengthening carbides was noticeably less than that predicted by thermodynamic equilibrium calculations, indicating a reduced potency compared with Co-assisted precipitation. Microstructural information such as precipitate size and volume fraction was measured at the peak hardness condition and successfully used to recalibrate alloy design models for subsequent alloy design iterations.

  4. Directing Matter: Toward Atomic-Scale 3D Nanofabrication.

    PubMed

    Jesse, Stephen; Borisevich, Albina Y; Fowlkes, Jason D; Lupini, Andrew R; Rack, Philip D; Unocic, Raymond R; Sumpter, Bobby G; Kalinin, Sergei V; Belianinov, Alex; Ovchinnikova, Olga S

    2016-06-28

    Enabling memristive, neuromorphic, and quantum-based computing as well as efficient mainstream energy storage and conversion technologies requires the next generation of materials customized at the atomic scale. This requires full control of atomic arrangement and bonding in three dimensions. The last two decades witnessed substantial industrial, academic, and government research efforts directed toward this goal through various lithographies and scanning-probe-based methods. These technologies emphasize 2D surface structures, with some limited 3D capability. Recently, a range of focused electron- and ion-based methods have demonstrated compelling alternative pathways to achieving atomically precise manufacturing of 3D structures in solids, liquids, and at interfaces. Electron and ion microscopies offer a platform that can simultaneously observe dynamic and static structures at the nano- and atomic scales and also induce structural rearrangements and chemical transformation. The addition of predictive modeling or rapid image analytics and feedback enables guiding these in a controlled manner. Here, we review the recent results that used focused electron and ion beams to create free-standing nanoscale 3D structures, radiolysis, and the fabrication potential with liquid precursors, epitaxial crystallization of amorphous oxides with atomic layer precision, as well as visualization and control of individual dopant motion within a 3D crystal lattice. These works lay the foundation for approaches to directing nanoscale level architectures and offer a potential roadmap to full 3D atomic control in materials. In this paper, we lay out the gaps that currently constrain the processing range of these platforms, reflect on indirect requirements, such as the integration of large-scale data analysis with theory, and discuss future prospects of these technologies. PMID:27183171

  5. Directing Matter: Towards Atomic Scale 3D Nanofabrication

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jesse, Stephen; Borisevich, Albina Y; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Lupini, Andrew R; Rack, Philip D; Unocic, Raymond R; Sumpter, Bobby G; Kalinin, Sergei V; Ovchinnikova, Olga S

    2016-01-01

    Enabling memristive, neuromorphic, and quantum based computing as well as efficient mainstream energy storage and conversion technologies requires next generation of materials customized at the atomic scale. This requires full control of atomic arrangement and bonding in three dimensions. The last two decades witnessed substantial industrial, academic, and government research efforts directed towards this goal through various lithographies and scanning probe based methods. These technologies emphasize 2D surface structures, with some limited 3D capability. Recently, a range of focused electron and ion based methods have demonstrated compelling alternative pathways to achieving atomically precise manufacturing of 3D structures in solids, liquids,more » and at interfaces. Electron and ion microscopies offer a platform that can simultaneously observe dynamic and static structures at the nano and atomic scales, and also induce structural rearrangements and chemical transformation. The addition of predictive modeling or rapid image analytics and feedback enables guiding these in a controlled manner. Here, we review the recent results that used focused electron and ion beams to create free-standing nanoscale 3D structures, radiolysis and the fabrication potential with liquid precursors, epitaxial crystallization of amorphous oxides with atomic layer precision, as well as visualization and control of individual dopant motion within a 3D crystal lattice. These works lay the foundation for new approaches to directing nanoscale level architectures and offer a potential roadmap to full 3D atomic control in materials. In this perspective we lay out the gaps that currently constrain the processing range of these platforms, reflect on indirect requirements, such as the integration of large scale data analysis with theory, and discuss future prospects of these technologies.« less

  6. Directing Matter: Toward Atomic-Scale 3D Nanofabrication

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jesse, Stephen; Borisevich, Albina Y.; Fowlkes, Jason D.; Lupini, Andrew R.; Rack, Philip D.; Unocic, Raymond R.; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Belianinov, Alex; Ovchinnikova, Olga S.

    2016-05-16

    Here we report that enabling memristive, neuromorphic, and quantum based computing as well as efficient mainstream energy storage and conversion technologies requires next generation of materials customized at the atomic scale. This requires full control of atomic arrangement and bonding in three dimensions. The last two decades witnessed substantial industrial, academic, and government research efforts directed towards this goal through various lithographies and scanning probe based methods. These technologies emphasize 2D surface structures, with some limited 3D capability. Recently, a range of focused electron and ion based methods have demonstrated compelling alternative pathways to achieving atomically precise manufacturing of 3Dmore » structures in solids, liquids, and at interfaces. Electron and ion microscopies offer a platform that can simultaneously observe dynamic and static structures at the nano and atomic scales, and also induce structural rearrangements and chemical transformation. The addition of predictive modeling or rapid image analytics and feedback enables guiding these in a controlled manner. Here, we review the recent results that used focused electron and ion beams to create free-standing nanoscale 3D structures, radiolysis and the fabrication potential with liquid precursors, epitaxial crystallization of amorphous oxides with atomic layer precision, as well as visualization and control of individual dopant motion within a 3D crystal lattice. These works lay the foundation for new approaches to directing nanoscale level architectures and offer a potential roadmap to full 3D atomic control in materials. Lastly, in this perspective we lay out the gaps that currently constrain the processing range of these platforms, reflect on indirect requirements, such as the integration of large scale data analysis with theory, and discuss future prospects of these technologies.« less

  7. Microfabrication of 3D neural probes with combined electrical and chemical interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Jessin; Li, Yuefa; Zhang, Jinsheng; Loeb, Jeffrey A.; Xu, Yong

    2011-10-01

    This paper reports a novel neural probe technology for the manufacture of 3D arrays of electrodes with integrated microchannels. This new technology is based on a silicon island structure and a simple folding procedure. This method simplifies the assembly or packaging process of 3D neural probes, leading to higher yield and lower cost. Prototypes with 3D arrays of electrodes have been successfully developed. Microchannels have been successfully integrated into the 3D neural probes via isotropic XeF2 gas phase etching and a parylene resealing process. The probes have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy imaging, optical imaging, impedance analysis, and atomic force microscopy characterization of the electrode surface. Preliminary animal tests have been carried out to demonstrate the recording functionality of the probes. Flow characteristics of the microchannels were also preliminarily measured.

  8. Robust 3D DNA FISH using directly labeled probes.

    PubMed

    Bolland, Daniel J; King, Michelle R; Reik, Wolf; Corcoran, Anne E; Krueger, Christel

    2013-01-01

    3D DNA FISH has become a major tool for analyzing three-dimensional organization of the nucleus, and several variations of the technique have been published. In this article we describe a protocol which has been optimized for robustness, reproducibility, and ease of use. Brightly fluorescent directly labeled probes are generated by nick-translation with amino-allyldUTP followed by chemical coupling of the dye. 3D DNA FISH is performed using a freeze-thaw step for cell permeabilization and a heating step for simultaneous denaturation of probe and nuclear DNA. The protocol is applicable to a range of cell types and a variety of probes (BACs, plasmids, fosmids, or Whole Chromosome Paints) and allows for high-throughput automated imaging. With this method we routinely investigate nuclear localization of up to three chromosomal regions. PMID:23978815

  9. Robust 3D DNA FISH Using Directly Labeled Probes

    PubMed Central

    Bolland, Daniel J.; King, Michelle R.; Reik, Wolf; Corcoran, Anne E.; Krueger, Christel

    2013-01-01

    3D DNA FISH has become a major tool for analyzing three-dimensional organization of the nucleus, and several variations of the technique have been published. In this article we describe a protocol which has been optimized for robustness, reproducibility, and ease of use. Brightly fluorescent directly labeled probes are generated by nick-translation with amino-allyldUTP followed by chemical coupling of the dye. 3D DNA FISH is performed using a freeze-thaw step for cell permeabilization and a heating step for simultaneous denaturation of probe and nuclear DNA. The protocol is applicable to a range of cell types and a variety of probes (BACs, plasmids, fosmids, or Whole Chromosome Paints) and allows for high-throughput automated imaging. With this method we routinely investigate nuclear localization of up to three chromosomal regions. PMID:23978815

  10. 3D Parylene sheath neural probe for chronic recordings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, B. J.; Kuo, J. T. W.; Hara, S. A.; Lee, C. D.; Yu, L.; Gutierrez, C. A.; Hoang, T. Q.; Pikov, V.; Meng, E.

    2013-08-01

    Objective. Reliable chronic recordings from implanted neural probes remain a significant challenge; current silicon-based and microwire technologies experience a wide range of biotic and abiotic failure modes contributing to loss of signal quality. Approach. A multi-prong alternative strategy with potential to overcome these hurdles is introduced that combines a novel three dimensional (3D), polymer-based probe structure with coatings. Specifically, the Parylene C sheath-based neural probe is coated with neurotrophic and anti-inflammatory factors loaded onto a Matrigel carrier to encourage the ingrowth of neuronal processes for improved recording quality, reduce the immune response, and promote improved probe integration into brain tissue for reliable, long-term implementation compared to its rigid counterparts. Main results. The 3D sheath structure of the probe was formed by thermal molding of a surface micromachined Parylene C microchannel, with electrode sites lining the interior and exterior regions of the lumen. Electrochemical characterization of the probes via cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was performed and indicated suitable electrode properties for neural recordings (1 kHz electrical impedance of ∼200 kΩ in vitro). A novel introducer tool for the insertion of the compliant polymer probe into neural tissue was developed and validated both in vitro using agarose gel and in vivo in the rat cerebral cortex. In vivo electrical functionality of the Parylene C-based 3D probes and their suitability for recording the neuronal activity over a 28-day period was demonstrated by maintaining the 1 kHz electrical impedance within a functional range (<400 kΩ) and achieving a reasonably high signal-to-noise ratio for detection of resolvable multi-unit neuronal activity on most recording sites in the probe. Immunohistochemical analysis of the implant site indicated strong correlations between the quality of recorded activity and the

  11. Progress in sorting individual atoms in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tsung-Yao; Kumar, Aishwarya; Wang, Yang; Weiss, David

    2016-05-01

    An exactly unity filled optical lattice is a desirable initial state for a neutral atom quantum computer. We have previously proposed an efficient way to compact a partially filled lattice into a perfectly filled one, by combining site-resolved imaging, site-selective qubit rotations and state-selective motion steps. We have previously demonstrated site-resolved imaging and site-selective rotations in our system of cesium atoms in a 40% filled 5x5x5 3D lattice. We have now demonstrated the final element, state-selective motion steps in 3D produced by rotating the polarizations of one of the lattice beams in each pair. We will present our progress in putting all the elements together to reach perfect unity filling. Supported by NSF.

  12. Atomic-Resolution 3D Electron Microscopy with Dynamic Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    O'Keefe, Michael A.; Downing, Kenneth H.; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf; Meisheng, Hu

    2005-02-15

    Achievement of atomic-resolution electron-beam tomography will allow determination of the three-dimensional structure of nanoparticles (and other suitable specimens) at atomic resolution. Three-dimensional reconstructions will yield ''section'' images that resolve atoms overlapped in normal electron microscope images (projections), resolving lighter atoms such as oxygen in the presence of heavier atoms, and atoms that lie on non-lattice sites such as those in non-periodic defect structures. Lower-resolution electron microscope tomography has been used to produce reconstructed 3D images of nanoparticles [1] but extension to atomic resolution is considered not to be straightforward. Accurate three-dimensional reconstruction from two-dimensional projections generally requires that intensity in the series of 2-D images be a monotonic function of the specimen structure (often specimen density, but in our case atomic potential). This condition is not satisfied in electron microscopy when specimens with strong periodicity are tilted close to zone-axis orientation and produce ''anomalous'' image contrast because of strong dynamic diffraction components. Atomic-resolution reconstructions from tilt series containing zone-axis images (with their contrast enhanced by strong dynamical scattering) can be distorted when the stronger zone-axis images overwhelm images obtained in other ''random'' orientations in which atoms do not line up in neat columns. The first demonstrations of 3-D reconstruction to atomic resolution used five zone-axis images from test specimens of staurolite consisting of a mix of light and heavy atoms [2,3]. Initial resolution was to the 1.6{angstrom} Scherzer limit of a JEOL-ARM1000. Later experiments used focal-series reconstruction from 5 to 10 images to produce staurolite images from the ARM1000 with resolution extended beyond the Scherzer limit to 1.38{angstrom} [4,5]. To obtain a representation of the three-dimensional structure, images were obtained

  13. DIII-D Equilibrium Reconstructions with New 3D Magnetic Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lao, Lang; Strait, E. J.; Ferraro, N. M.; Ferron, J. R.; King, J. D.; Lee, X.; Meneghini, O.; Turnbull, A. D.; Huang, Y.; Qian, J. G.; Wingen, A.

    2015-11-01

    DIII-D equilibrium reconstructions with the recently installed new 3D magnetic diagnostic are presented. In addition to providing information to allow more accurate 2D reconstructions, the new 3D probes also provide useful information to guide computation of 3D perturbed equilibria. A new more comprehensive magnetic compensation has been implemented. Algorithms are being developed to allow EFIT to reconstruct 3D perturbed equilibria making use of the new 3D probes and plasma responses from 3D MHD codes such as GATO and M3D-C1. To improve the computation efficiency, all inactive probes in one of the toroidal planes in EFIT have been replaced with new probes from other planes. Other 3D efforts include testing of 3D reconstructions using V3FIT and a new 3D variational moment equilibrium code VMOM3D. Other EFIT developments include a GPU EFIT version and new safety factor and MSE-LS constraints. The accuracy and limitation of the new probes for 3D reconstructions will be discussed. Supported by US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698 and DE-FG02-95ER54309.

  14. Probing Quantum Capacitance in a 3D Topological Insulator.

    PubMed

    Kozlov, D A; Bauer, D; Ziegler, J; Fischer, R; Savchenko, M L; Kvon, Z D; Mikhailov, N N; Dvoretsky, S A; Weiss, D

    2016-04-22

    We measure the quantum capacitance and probe thus directly the electronic density of states of the high mobility, Dirac type two-dimensional electron system, which forms on the surface of strained HgTe. Here we show that observed magnetocapacitance oscillations probe-in contrast to magnetotransport-primarily the top surface. Capacitance measurements constitute thus a powerful tool to probe only one topological surface and to reconstruct its Landau level spectrum for different positions of the Fermi energy. PMID:27152818

  15. Probing Quantum Capacitance in a 3D Topological Insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, D. A.; Bauer, D.; Ziegler, J.; Fischer, R.; Savchenko, M. L.; Kvon, Z. D.; Mikhailov, N. N.; Dvoretsky, S. A.; Weiss, D.

    2016-04-01

    We measure the quantum capacitance and probe thus directly the electronic density of states of the high mobility, Dirac type two-dimensional electron system, which forms on the surface of strained HgTe. Here we show that observed magnetocapacitance oscillations probe—in contrast to magnetotransport—primarily the top surface. Capacitance measurements constitute thus a powerful tool to probe only one topological surface and to reconstruct its Landau level spectrum for different positions of the Fermi energy.

  16. Atom Probe Tomography of Nanoscale Electronic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, David J.; Prosa, Ty J.; Perea, Daniel E.; Inoue, Hidekazu; Mangelinck, D.

    2016-01-01

    Atom probe tomography (APT) is a mass spectrometry based on time-of-flight measurements which also concurrently produces 3D spatial information. The reader is referred to any of the other papers in this volume or to the following references for further information 4–8. The current capabilities of APT, such as detecting a low number of dopant atoms in nanoscale devices or segregation at a nanoparticle interface, make this technique an important component in the nanoscale metrology toolbox. In this manuscript, we review some of the applications of APT to nanoscale electronic materials, including transistors and finFETs, silicide contact microstructures, nanowires, and nanoparticles.

  17. Mapping interfacial excess in atom probe data.

    PubMed

    Felfer, Peter; Scherrer, Barbara; Demeulemeester, Jelle; Vandervorst, Wilfried; Cairney, Julie M

    2015-12-01

    Using modern wide-angle atom probes, it is possible to acquire atomic scale 3D data containing 1000 s of nm(2) of interfaces. It is therefore possible to probe the distribution of segregated species across these interfaces. Here, we present techniques that allow the production of models for interfacial excess (IE) mapping and discuss the underlying considerations and sampling statistics. We also show, how the same principles can be used to achieve thickness mapping of thin films. We demonstrate the effectiveness on example applications, including the analysis of segregation to a phase boundary in stainless steel, segregation to a metal-ceramic interface and the assessment of thickness variations of the gate oxide in a fin-FET. PMID:26346774

  18. Tracking 3D Picometer-Scale Motions of Single Nanoparticles with High-Energy Electron Probes

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Naoki; Hoshisashi, Kentaro; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Ichiyanagi, Kouhei; Matsushita, Yufuku; Hirohata, Yasuhisa; Suzuki, Seiichi; Ishikawa, Akira; Sasaki, Yuji C.

    2013-01-01

    We observed the high-speed anisotropic motion of an individual gold nanoparticle in 3D at the picometer scale using a high-energy electron probe. Diffracted electron tracking (DET) using the electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD) patterns of labeled nanoparticles under wet-SEM allowed us to super-accurately measure the time-resolved 3D motion of individual nanoparticles in aqueous conditions. The highly precise DET data corresponded to the 3D anisotropic log-normal Gaussian distributions over time at the millisecond scale. PMID:23868465

  19. Preparation of Complex DNA Probe Sets for 3D FISH with up to Six Different Fluorochromes.

    PubMed

    Müller, Stefan; Neusser, Michaela; Köhler, Daniela; Cremer, Marion

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTIONDNA probes for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) can be generated and labeled by various methods. This protocol describes the conjugation of dUTPs with haptens or fluorochromes, as well as the generation and labeling of DNA probes using those modified dUTPs. Sources of probe DNA include genomic DNA, DNA from flow-sorted chromosomes, bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs), and cosmids. DNA amplification and labeling procedures involving degenerate oligonucleotide-primed PCR (DOP-PCR) and multiple displacement amplification (MDA) are provided. Advice is given for setting up complex probe pools, such as those containing large pools of BAC probes. Also included is a method for probe precipitation and preparation of a hybridization mix ready to be used for 3D fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) experiments. PMID:21357075

  20. 3D visualization of tissue microstructures using optical coherence tomography needle probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, Rodney W.; McLaughlin, Robert A.; Quirk, Bryden C.; Curatolo, Andrea; Sampson, David D.

    2011-05-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) needle probes use miniaturized focusing optics encased in a hypodermic needle. Needle probes can scan areas of the body that are too deep to be imaged by other OCT systems. This paper presents an OCT needle probe-based system that is capable of acquiring three-dimensional scans of tissue structures. The needle can be guided to a target area and scans acquired by rotating and pulling-back the probe. The system is demonstrated using ex vivo human lymph node and sheep lung samples. Multiplanar reconstructions are shown of both samples, as well as the first published 3D volume rendering of lung tissue acquired with an OCT needle probe.

  1. 3D probe array integrated with a front-end 100-channel neural recording ASIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ming-Yuan; Yao, Lei; Tan, Kwan Ling; Lim, Ruiqi; Li, Peng; Chen, Weiguo

    2014-12-01

    Brain-machine interface technology can improve the lives of spinal cord injury victims and amputees. A neural interface system, consisting of a 3D probe array and a custom low-power (1 mW) 100-channel (100-ch) neural recording application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC), was designed and implemented to monitor neural activity. In this study, a microassembly 3D probe array method using a novel lead transfer technique was proposed to overcome the bonding plane mismatch encountered during orthogonal assembly. The proposed lead transfer technique can be completed using standard micromachining and packaging processes. The ASIC can be stacking-integrated with the probe array, minimizing the form factor of the assembled module. To minimize trauma to brain cells, the profile of the integrated probe array was controlled within 730 μm. The average impedance of the assembled probe was approximately 0.55 MΩ at 1 kHz. To verify the functionality of the integrated neural probe array, bench-top signal acquisitions were performed and discussed.

  2. Imaging of oxygenation in 3D tissue models with multi-modal phosphorescent probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papkovsky, Dmitri B.; Dmitriev, Ruslan I.; Borisov, Sergei

    2015-03-01

    Cell-penetrating phosphorescence based probes allow real-time, high-resolution imaging of O2 concentration in respiring cells and 3D tissue models. We have developed a panel of such probes, small molecule and nanoparticle structures, which have different spectral characteristics, cell penetrating and tissue staining behavior. The probes are compatible with conventional live cell imaging platforms and can be used in different detection modalities, including ratiometric intensity and PLIM (Phosphorescence Lifetime IMaging) under one- or two-photon excitation. Analytical performance of these probes and utility of the O2 imaging method have been demonstrated with different types of samples: 2D cell cultures, multi-cellular spheroids from cancer cell lines and primary neurons, excised slices from mouse brain, colon and bladder tissue, and live animals. They are particularly useful for hypoxia research, ex-vivo studies of tissue physiology, cell metabolism, cancer, inflammation, and multiplexing with many conventional fluorophors and markers of cellular function.

  3. Sandwich-format 3D printed microfluidic mixers: a flexible platform for multi-probe analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kise, Drew P; Reddish, Michael J; Dyer, R Brian

    2015-01-01

    We report on a microfluidic mixer fabrication platform that increases the versatility and flexibility of mixers for biomolecular applications. A sandwich-format design allows the application of multiple spectroscopic probes to the same mixer. A polymer spacer is ‘sandwiched’ between two transparent windows, creating a closed microfluidic system. The channels of the mixer are defined by regions in the polymer spacer that lack material and therefore the polymer need not be transparent in the spectral region of interest. Suitable window materials such as CaF2 make the device accessible to a wide range of optical probe wavelengths, from the deep UV to the mid-IR. In this study, we use a commercially available 3D printer to print the polymer spacers to apply three different channel designs into the passive, continuous-flow mixer, and integrated them with three different spectroscopic probes. All three spectroscopic probes are applicable to each mixer without further changes. The sandwich-format mixer coupled with cost-effective 3D printed fabrication techniques could increase the applicability and accessibility of microfluidic mixing to intricate kinetic schemes and monitoring chemical synthesis in cases where only one probe technique proves insufficient. PMID:26855478

  4. A cone-shaped 3D carbon nanotube probe for neural recording.

    PubMed

    Su, Huan-Chieh; Lin, Chia-Min; Yen, Shiang-Jie; Chen, Yung-Chan; Chen, Chang-Hsiao; Yeh, Shih-Rung; Fang, Weileun; Chen, Hsin; Yao, Da-Jeng; Chang, Yen-Chung; Yew, Tri-Rung

    2010-09-15

    A novel cone-shaped 3D carbon nanotube (CNT) probe is proposed as an electrode for applications in neural recording. The electrode consists of CNTs synthesized on the cone-shaped Si (cs-Si) tip by catalytic thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD). This probe exhibits a larger CNT surface area with the same footprint area and higher spatial resolution of neural recording compared to planar-type CNT electrodes. An approach to improve CNT characteristics by O(2) plasma treatment to modify the CNT surface will be also presented. Electrochemical characterization of O(2) plasma-treated 3D CNT (OT-CNT) probes revealed low impedance per unit area (∼64.5 Ω mm(-2)) at 1 kHz and high specific capacitance per unit area (∼2.5 mF cm(-2)). Furthermore, the OT-CNT probes were employed to record the neural signals of a crayfish nerve cord. Our findings suggest that OT-CNT probes have potential advantages as high spatial resolution and superb electrochemical properties which are suitable for neural recording applications. PMID:20685101

  5. Sandwich-format 3D printed microfluidic mixers: a flexible platform for multi-probe analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kise, Drew P.; Reddish, Michael J.; Dyer, R. Brian

    2015-12-01

    We report on a microfluidic mixer fabrication platform that increases the versatility and flexibility of mixers for biomolecular applications. A sandwich-format design allows the application of multiple spectroscopic probes to the same mixer. A polymer spacer is ‘sandwiched’ between two transparent windows, creating a closed microfluidic system. The channels of the mixer are defined by regions in the polymer spacer that lack material and therefore the polymer need not be transparent in the spectral region of interest. Suitable window materials such as CaF2 make the device accessible to a wide range of optical probe wavelengths, from the deep UV to the mid-IR. In this study, we use a commercially available 3D printer to print the polymer spacers to apply three different channel designs into the passive, continuous-flow mixer, and integrated them with three different spectroscopic probes. All three spectroscopic probes are applicable to each mixer without further changes. The sandwich-format mixer coupled with cost-effective 3D printed fabrication techniques could increase the applicability and accessibility of microfluidic mixing to intricate kinetic schemes and monitoring chemical synthesis in cases where only one probe technique proves insufficient.

  6. Template for 3D Printing a Low-Temperature Plasma Probe.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Jarquín, Sandra; Moreno-Pedraza, Abigail; Guillén-Alonso, Héctor; Winkler, Robert

    2016-07-19

    Low-temperature plasma (LTP) ionization represents an emerging technology in ambient mass spectrometry. LTP enables the solvent-free direct detection of a broad range of molecules and mass spectrometry imaging (MSI). The low energy consumption and modest technical requirements of these ion sources favors their employment in mobile applications and as a means to upgrade existing mass analyzers. However, the broad adoption of LTP is hindered by the lack of commercial devices, and constructing personal devices is tricky. Improper setup can result in equipment malfunction or may cause serious damage to instruments due to strong electromagnetic fields or arcing. With this in mind, we developed a reproducible LTP probe, which is designed exclusively from commercial and 3D printed components. The plasma jet generated by the device has a diameter of about 200 μm, which is satisfactory for the ambient imaging of macroscopic samples. We coupled the 3D-LTP probe to an ion trap analyzer and demonstrated the functionality of the ion source by detecting organic and chemical compounds from pure reference standards, biological substances, and pharmaceutical samples. Molecules were primarily detected in their protonated form or as water/ammonium adducts. The identification of compounds was possible by standard collision-induced dissociation (CID) fragmentation spectra. The files necessary to reproduce the 3D parts are available from the project page ( http://lababi.bioprocess.org/index.php/3d-ltp ) under a dual license model, which permits reproduction of the probe and further community-driven development for noncommercial use ("peer production"). Our reproducible probe design thus contributes to a facilitated adaption and evolution of low-temperature plasma technologies in analytical chemistry. PMID:27302654

  7. Application of 3D electrical capacitance tomography in probing anomalous blocks in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Aimin; Zhou, Qiyou; Zhang, Yun

    2015-06-01

    Water usually acts as a high-permittivity dielectric in many fields such as geophysics, hydrology, hydrogeology, aquaculture, etc. Thus, it may be of significance to adapt ECT to the fields with a high permittivity in which the conventional ECT is scarcely involved. To achieve this objective, a simplified 3D-ECT system was constructed with a high-precision inductance capacitance resistance meter and programmable logic controllers. In the aspect of sensing unit of the system, two geometries (i.e. cylinder and cube) of 3D sensors were constructed to probe anomalous blocks in water. Numerical simulations and physical experiments for both the sensors were performed to test the effectiveness of the constructed system to probe anomalous blocks in water. Furthermore, to justify the availability of this system in some possible fields, two experiments associated with applications of the 3D-ECT system were performed to measure the distribution of a plant root system in water, and to monitor the infiltration of water in soil in field. The experimental results demonstrate that the ECT system is capable of probing the location and rough size of anomalous blocks in water with both the sensors, determining the distribution of a plant root system in water, and monitoring the infiltration process of water in soil.

  8. Atom Probe Tomography of Geomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parman, S. W.; Diercks, D.; Gorman, B.; Cooper, R. F.

    2013-12-01

    From the electron microprobe to the secondary ion microprobe to laser-ablation ICP-MS, steady improvements in the spatial resolution and detection limits of geochemical micro-analysis have been central to generating new discoveries. Atom probe tomography (APT) is a relatively new technology that promises nm-scale spatial resolution (in three dimensions) with ppm level detection limits. The method is substantially different from traditional beam-based (electron, ion, laser) methods. In APT, the sample is shaped (usually with a dual-beam FIB) into a needle with typical dimensions of 1-2 μm height and 100-200 nm diameter. Within the atom probe, the needle is evaporated one atom (ideally) at a time by a high electric field (ten's of V per square nm at the needle tip). A femtosecond laser (12 ps pulse width) is used to assist in evaporating non-conducting samples. The two-dimensional detector locates where the atom was released from the needle's surface and so can reconstruct the positions of all detected atoms in three dimensions. It also records the time of flight of the ion, which is used to calculate the mass/charge ratio of the ion. We will discuss our results analyzing a range of geologic materials. In one case, naturally occurring platinum group alloys (PGA) from the Josephine Ophiolite have been imaged. Such alloys are of interest as recorders of the Os heterogeneity of the mantle [1,2]. Optimal ablation was achieved with a laser power of 120-240 pJ and laser pulse rates 500 kHz. Runs were stopped after 10 million atoms were imaged. An example analysis is: Pt 61(1), Fe 26.1(9), Rh 1.20(4), Ir 7.0(7), Ni 2.65(8), Ru 0.20(9), Cu 1.22(8), Co 0.00029(5). Values are in atomic %; values in parentheses are one-sigma standard deviations on five separate needles from the same FIB lift-out, which was 30 μm long. Assuming the sample is homogenous over the 30 μm from which the needle was extracted, the analyses suggest relative errors for major elements below 5% and for

  9. Elucidating the higher-order structure of biopolymers by structural probing and mass spectrometry: MS3D

    PubMed Central

    Fabris, Daniele; Yu, Eizadora T.

    2010-01-01

    Chemical probing represents a very versatile alternative for studying the structure and dynamics of substrates that are intractable by established high-resolution techniques. The implementation of MS-based strategies for the characterization of probing products has not only extended the range of applicability to virtually all types of biopolymers, but has also paved the way for the introduction of new reagents that would not have been viable with traditional analytical platforms. As the availability of probing data is steadily increasing on the wings of the development of dedicated interpretation aids, powerful computational approaches have been explored to enable the effective utilization of such information to generate valid molecular models. This combination of factors has contributed to making the possibility of obtaining actual 3D structures by MS-based technologies (MS3D) a reality. Although approaches for achieving structure determination of unknown substrates or assessing the dynamics of known structures may share similar reagents and development trajectories, they clearly involve distinctive experimental strategies, analytical concerns, and interpretation paradigms. This Perspective offers a commentary on methods aimed at obtaining distance constraints for the modeling of full-fledged structures, while highlighting common elements, salient distinctions, and complementary capabilities exhibited by methods employed in dynamics studies. We discuss critical factors to be addressed for completing effective structural determinations and expose possible pitfalls of chemical methods. We survey programs developed for facilitating the interpretation of experimental data and discuss possible computational strategies for translating sparse spatial constraints into all-atom models. Examples are provided to illustrate how the concerted application of very diverse probing techniques can lead to the solution of actual biological substrates. PMID:20648672

  10. Designing and building a permanent magnet Zeeman slower for calcium atoms using a 3D printer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsagian, Alexandria; Kleinert, Michaela

    2015-10-01

    We present the design of a Zeeman slower for calcium atoms using permanent magnets instead of more traditional electromagnets and the novel technique of 3D printing to create a very robust and flexible structure for these magnets. Zeeman slowers are ideal tools to slow atoms from several hundreds of meters per second to just a few tens of meters per second. These slower atoms can then easily be trapped in a magneto-optical trap, making Zeeman slowers a very valuable tool in many cold atom labs. The use of permanent magnets and 3D printing results in a highly stable and robust slower that is suitable for undergraduate laboratories. In our design, we arranged 28 magnet pairs, 2.0 cm apart along the axis of the slower and at varying radial distances from the axis. We determined the radial position of the magnets by simulating the combined field of all magnet pairs using Mathematica and comparing it to the ideal theoretical field for a Zeeman slower. Finally, we designed a stable, robust, compact, and easy-to-align mounting structure for the magnets in Google Sketchup, which we then printed using a commercially available 3D printer by Solidoodle. The resulting magnetic field is well suited to slow calcium atoms from the 770 m/s rms velocity at a temperature of 950 K, down to the capture velocity of the magneto-optical trap.

  11. Atomically thin layered NiFe double hydroxides assembled 3D microspheres with promoted electrochemical performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaomin; Zai, Jiantao; Liu, Yuanyuan; He, Xiaobo; Xiang, Shijie; Ma, Zifeng; Qian, Xuefeng

    2016-09-01

    LDHs in atomic thickness (mono-/bi-layers) usually exhibit novel physicochemical properties, especially in surface-dependent energy storage and catalysis areas. However, the thickness of the commonly reported 2D LDHs is in nanoscale and the bottom-up synthesis of atomically thin LDHs is rarely reported. Herein, high-quality atomically thin layered NiFe-LDHs assembled 3D microspheres were synthesized via a rational designed reaction system, where the formation of atomically thin building blocks was controlled by the synergetic effects of released carbonate anions and butanol. Furthermore, the complexant and solvents played important effects on the process of coprecipitation and the assembling of LDHs. Due to the nature of atomically thin LDHs nanosheets and unique 3D hierarchical structures, the obtained microspheres exhibited excellent electrocatalytic oxygen evolution reaction (OER) activity in alkaline medium with an onset overpotential (0.435 V, which is lower than that of common LDHs) and good durability. The as-prepared 3D NiFe-LDHs microspheres were also firstly used as supercapacitor materials and displayed a high specific capacitance of 1061 F g-1 at the current density of 1 A g-1.

  12. Universal gates based on targeted phase shifts in a 3D neutral atom array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Aishwarya; Wang, Yang; Wu, Tsung-Yao; Weiss, David

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a new approach to making targeted single qubit gates using Cesium atoms in a 5x5x5 3D neutral atom array. It combines targeted AC Zeeman phase shifts with global microwave pulses to produce arbitrary single qubit gates. Non-targeted atoms are left virtually untouched by the gates. We have addressed 48 sites, targeted individually, in a 40% full array. We have also performed Randomized Benchmarking to characterize the fidelity and crosstalk errors of this gate. These gates are highly insensitive to addressing beam imperfections and can be applied to other systems and geometries. Supported by NSF.

  13. The Relationship Between Human Nucleolar Organizer Regions and Nucleoli, Probed by 3D-ImmunoFISH.

    PubMed

    van Sluis, Marjolein; van Vuuren, Chelly; McStay, Brian

    2016-01-01

    3D-immunoFISH is a valuable technique to compare the localization of DNA sequences and proteins in cells where three-dimensional structure has been preserved. As nucleoli contain a multitude of protein factors dedicated to ribosome biogenesis and form around specific chromosomal loci, 3D-immunoFISH is a particularly relevant technique for their study. In human cells, nucleoli form around transcriptionally active ribosomal gene (rDNA) arrays termed nucleolar organizer regions (NORs) positioned on the p-arms of each of the acrocentric chromosomes. Here, we provide a protocol for fixing and permeabilizing human cells grown on microscope slides such that nucleolar proteins can be visualized using antibodies and NORs visualized by DNA FISH. Antibodies against UBF recognize transcriptionally active rDNA/NORs and NOP52 antibodies provide a convenient way of visualizing the nucleolar volume. We describe a probe designed to visualize rDNA and introduce a probe comprised of NOR distal sequences, which can be used to identify or count individual NORs. PMID:27576706

  14. Reaching the magnetic anisotropy limit of a 3d metal atom.

    PubMed

    Rau, Ileana G; Baumann, Susanne; Rusponi, Stefano; Donati, Fabio; Stepanow, Sebastian; Gragnaniello, Luca; Dreiser, Jan; Piamonteze, Cinthia; Nolting, Frithjof; Gangopadhyay, Shruba; Albertini, Oliver R; Macfarlane, Roger M; Lutz, Christopher P; Jones, Barbara A; Gambardella, Pietro; Heinrich, Andreas J; Brune, Harald

    2014-05-30

    Designing systems with large magnetic anisotropy is critical to realize nanoscopic magnets. Thus far, the magnetic anisotropy energy per atom in single-molecule magnets and ferromagnetic films remains typically one to two orders of magnitude below the theoretical limit imposed by the atomic spin-orbit interaction. We realized the maximum magnetic anisotropy for a 3d transition metal atom by coordinating a single Co atom to the O site of an MgO(100) surface. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy reveals a record-high zero-field splitting of 58 millielectron volts as well as slow relaxation of the Co atom's magnetization. This striking behavior originates from the dominating axial ligand field at the O adsorption site, which leads to out-of-plane uniaxial anisotropy while preserving the gas-phase orbital moment of Co, as observed with x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. PMID:24812206

  15. Fully analytical integration over the 3D volume bounded by the β sphere in topological atoms.

    PubMed

    Popelier, Paul L A

    2011-11-17

    Atomic properties of a topological atom are obtained by 3D integration over the volume of its atomic basin. Algorithms that compute atomic properties typically integrate over two subspaces: the volume bounded by the so-called β sphere, which is centered at the nucleus and completely contained within the atomic basin, and the volume of the remaining part of the basin. Here we show how the usual quadrature over the β sphere volume can be replaced by a fully analytical 3D integration leading to the atomic charge (monopole moment) for s, p, and d functions. Spherical tensor multipole moments have also been implemented and tested up to hexadecupole for s functions only, and up to quadrupole for s and p functions. The new algorithm is illustrated by operating on capped glycine (HF/6-31G, 35 molecular orbitals (MOs), 322 Gaussian primitives, 19 nuclei), the protein crambin (HF/3-21G, 1260 MOs, 5922 primitives and 642 nuclei), and tin (Z = 50) in Sn(2)(CH(3))(2) (B3LYP/cc-pVTZ and LANL2DZ, 59 MOs, 1352 primitives). PMID:21978204

  16. Single qubit gates on neutral atoms in a 3d Optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Aishwarya; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Xianli; Corcovilos, Theodore A.; Weiss, David S.

    2015-05-01

    Neutral atoms are especially promising candidates for quantum computing because of their inherent scalability. To realize this scalability requires being able to manipulate the quantum information at target qubits with high fidelity and low crosstalk. We will present two single qubit gate addressing protocols. We have experimentally applied them both to targeted sites in a 5 × 5 × 5 3D array. The two distinct approaches both use crossed MEMS-mirror directed addressing beams along with microwave pulses to target atoms at single sites, while having minimal impact on the quantum information at non-target sites. Supported by DARPA, QUEST and ARO.

  17. All-atom 3D structure prediction of transmembrane β-barrel proteins from sequences

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Sikander; Sander, Chris; Marks, Debora S.

    2015-01-01

    Transmembrane β-barrels (TMBs) carry out major functions in substrate transport and protein biogenesis but experimental determination of their 3D structure is challenging. Encouraged by successful de novo 3D structure prediction of globular and α-helical membrane proteins from sequence alignments alone, we developed an approach to predict the 3D structure of TMBs. The approach combines the maximum-entropy evolutionary coupling method for predicting residue contacts (EVfold) with a machine-learning approach (boctopus2) for predicting β-strands in the barrel. In a blinded test for 19 TMB proteins of known structure that have a sufficient number of diverse homologous sequences available, this combined method (EVfold_bb) predicts hydrogen-bonded residue pairs between adjacent β-strands at an accuracy of ∼70%. This accuracy is sufficient for the generation of all-atom 3D models. In the transmembrane barrel region, the average 3D structure accuracy [template-modeling (TM) score] of top-ranked models is 0.54 (ranging from 0.36 to 0.85), with a higher (44%) number of residue pairs in correct strand–strand registration than in earlier methods (18%). Although the nonbarrel regions are predicted less accurately overall, the evolutionary couplings identify some highly constrained loop residues and, for FecA protein, the barrel including the structure of a plug domain can be accurately modeled (TM score = 0.68). Lower prediction accuracy tends to be associated with insufficient sequence information and we therefore expect increasing numbers of β-barrel families to become accessible to accurate 3D structure prediction as the number of available sequences increases. PMID:25858953

  18. Floor Probe/Contamination Monitor (NE Model FLP3D) Test and Evaluation Report

    SciTech Connect

    Shourbaji, A.A.

    2003-06-27

    A floor contamination monitor model FLP3D manufactured by Saint-Gobain Crystals and Detectors UK Ltd. was tested at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The purpose of the test is to evaluate the monitor's performance as a mobile instrument capable of detecting alpha and/or beta contamination that may exist on a flat surface such as a floor. The monitor consists of a large area scintillation probe (600 cm{sup 2}) and a rate meter mounted on heavy-duty wheels with a 22 mm separation between the monitored surface and the probe. Performance was evaluated under normal and severe environmental conditions in terms of temperature and humidity variations, and exposure to RF and magnetic fields. Sensitivity measurements were also made to determine the probe's efficiency for detecting alpha and beta contamination. The overall performance of the floor monitor is considered satisfactory under the various environmental conditions with no major problems observed. The monitor is approximately 50% efficiency for {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y with the source placed in contact with the detector's protective grille (0 mm) and at a distance of 22 mm. However, in its present physical configuration, the floor monitor is inefficient in detecting alpha contamination due to the 22 mm separation between the surface to be monitored and the detector's surface. The alpha detection efficiency can be enhanced to a reasonable vale by redesigning the brackets holding the heavy-duty wheels to reduce the height between the surface to be monitored and the surface of the probe to a few millimeters. For use at ORNL, this change is recommended.

  19. Perspective: Probing 2-D magnetic structures in a 3-D world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grutter, A. J.

    2016-03-01

    Magnetic interfaces have been identified as promising systems upon which to base next-generation spintronic devices. In these nearly two-dimensional systems, deviations from bulk electronic structure and competition between nearly degenerate magnetic ground states allow the stabilization of widely tunable emergent properties. However, ever smaller length scales pose new challenges which must be overcome in order to understand and control magnetic properties at the atomic level. Using recent examples in oxide heterostructures and topological insulators, we discuss how combining techniques such as neutron scattering, X-ray scattering, X-ray spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy enables the probing of magnetism on the Angstrom scale.

  20. The Future of Atom Probe Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Michael K; Kelly, T. F.; Rajan, Krishna; Ringer, S. P.

    2012-01-01

    The dream of the microscopy and materials science communities is to see, identify, accurately locate, and determine the fundamental physical properties of every atom in a specimen. With this knowledge together with modern computer models and simulations, a full understanding of the properties of a material can be determined. This fundamental knowledge leads to the design and development of more advanced materials for solving the needs of society. The technique of atom probe tomography is the closest to fulfilling this dream but is still significantly short of the goal. The future of atomic probe tomography, and the prospects for achieving this ultimate goal are outlined.

  1. A 3D fiber probe based on orthogonal micro focal-length collimation and fiber Bragg grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Jiwen; Li, Junying; Feng, Kunpeng; Tan, Jiubin; Zhang, Jian

    2016-07-01

    A 3D fiber probe is proposed for the precision measurement of micro parts with high aspect ratios. The probing system consists of two measuring systems: two mutually orthogonal micro focal-length collimation optical paths for the radial tactile probing measurement, and a matched fiber Bragg grating (FBG) pair interrogation system for the axial tactile probing measurement. The fiber probe consists of a fiber stylus and a probe tip, the fiber stylus works as a micro focal-length cylindrical lens, and the FBG inscribed in the fiber stylus works as a measuring FBG. The radial displacement of the probe tip is transformed into the centroid position shift of the two mutually orthogonal micro focal-length collimation optical paths; the axial displacement of the probe tip is transformed into the power ratio change of the matched FBG pair interrogation system. Experimental results indicate that the probe has a radial sensitivity of 71 pixel μm‑1 in both X and Y directions, and an axial sensitivity of 4.9% μm‑1 in Z direction; the probe can reach a radial resolution of 5 nm, and an axial resolution of 8 nm. The probe has a capability of decoupling the 3D tactility and it can be applied in the measurement of micro parts.

  2. Barrier-free subsurface incorporation of 3 d metal atoms into Bi(111) films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, C.; Vollmers, N. J.; Gerstmann, U.; Zahl, P.; Lükermann, D.; Jnawali, G.; Pfnür, H.; Tegenkamp, C.; Sutter, P.; Schmidt, W. G.; Horn-von Hoegen, M.

    2015-05-01

    By combining scanning tunneling microscopy with density functional theory it is shown that the Bi (111 ) surface provides a well-defined incorporation site in the first bilayer that traps highly coordinating atoms such as transition metals (TMs) or noble metals. All deposited atoms assume exactly the same specific sevenfold coordinated subsurface interstitial site while the surface topography remains nearly unchanged. Notably, 3 d TMs show a barrier-free incorporation. The observed surface modification by barrier-free subsorption helps to suppress aggregation in clusters. It allows a tuning of the electronic properties not only for the pure Bi (111 ) surface, but may also be observed for topological insulators formed by substrate-stabilized Bi bilayers.

  3. Barrier-free subsurface incorporation of 3d metal atoms into Bi(111) films

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Klein, C.; Vollmers, N. J.; Gerstmann, U.; Zahl, P.; Lukermann, D.; Jnawali, G.; Pfnur, H.; Sutter, P.; Tegenkamp, C.; Schmidt, W. G.; et al

    2015-05-27

    By combining scanning tunneling microscopy with density functional theory it is shown that the Bi(111) surface provides a well-defined incorporation site in the first bilayer that traps highly coordinating atoms such as transition metals (TMs) or noble metals. All deposited atoms assume exactly the same specific sevenfold coordinated subsurface interstitial site while the surface topography remains nearly unchanged. Notably, 3d TMs show a barrier-free incorporation. The observed surface modification by barrier-free subsorption helps to suppress aggregation in clusters. Thus, it allows a tuning of the electronic properties not only for the pure Bi(111) surface, but may also be observed formore » topological insulators formed by substrate-stabilized Bi bilayers.« less

  4. First-principles calculations of the interaction between hydrogen and 3d alloying atom in nickel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenguan; Qian, Yuan; Zhang, Dongxun; Liu, Wei; Han, Han

    2015-10-01

    Knowledge of the behavior of hydrogen (H) in Ni-based alloy is essential for the prediction of Tritium behavior in Molten Salt Reactor. First-principles calculations were performed to investigate the interaction between H and 3d transition metal (TM) alloying atom in Ni-based alloy. H prefers the octahedral interstitial site to the tetrahedral interstitial site energetically. Most of the 3d TM elements (except Zn) attract H. The attraction to H in the Ni-TM-H system can be mainly attributed to the differences in electronegativity. With the large electronegativity, H and Ni gain electrons from the other TM elements, resulting in the enhanced Ni-H bonds which are the source of the attraction to H in the Ni-TM-H system. The obviously covalent-like Cr-H and Co-H bindings are also beneficial to the attraction to H. On the other hand, the repulsion to H in the Ni-Zn-H system is due to the stable electronic configuration of Zn. We mainly utilize the results calculated in 32-atom supercell which corresponds to the case of a relatively high concentration of hydrogen. Our results are in good agreement with the experimental ones.

  5. Atomic Scale Characterization of Compound Semiconductors Using Atom Probe Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Gorman, B. P.; Norman, A. G.; Lawrence, D.; Prosa, T.; Guthrey, H.; Al-Jassim, M.

    2011-01-01

    Internal interfaces are critical in determining the performance of III-V multijunction solar cells. Studying these interfaces with atomic resolution using a combination of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atom probe tomography (APT), and density functional calculations enables a more fundamental understanding of carrier dynamics in photovoltaic (PV) device structures. To achieve full atomic scale spatial and chemical resolution, data acquisition parameters in laser pulsed APT must be carefully studied to eliminate surface diffusion. Atom probe data with minimized group V ion clustering and expected stoichiometry can be achieved by adjusting laser pulse power, pulse repetition rate, and specimen preparation parameters such that heat flow away from the evaporating surface is maximized. Applying these improved analysis conditions to III-V based PV gives an atomic scale understanding of compositional and dopant profiles across interfaces and tunnel junctions and the initial stages of alloy clustering and dopant accumulation. Details on APT experimental methods and future in-situ instrumentation developments are illustrated.

  6. Optical probing of cold trapped atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, R. W.; Gilbert, S. L.; Hollberg, L.; Marquardt, J. H.; Robinson, H. G.

    1993-01-01

    Transitions between excited states of laser-cooled and laser-trapped rubidium and cesium atoms are probed by use of fiber and diode lasers. High-resolution Doppler-free spectra are detected by observation of the absorption and fluorescence of light from the intermediate level of two-step cascade systems. The optical double-resonance spectra show Autler-Townes splitting in the weak probe limit and more complicated spectra for a strongly coupled three-level system.

  7. New approaches to nanoparticle sample fabrication for atom probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Felfer, P; Li, T; Eder, K; Galinski, H; Magyar, A P; Bell, D C; Smith, G D W; Kruse, N; Ringer, S P; Cairney, J M

    2015-12-01

    Due to their unique properties, nano-sized materials such as nanoparticles and nanowires are receiving considerable attention. However, little data is available about their chemical makeup at the atomic scale, especially in three dimensions (3D). Atom probe tomography is able to answer many important questions about these materials if the challenge of producing a suitable sample can be overcome. In order to achieve this, the nanomaterial needs to be positioned within the end of a tip and fixed there so the sample possesses sufficient structural integrity for analysis. Here we provide a detailed description of various techniques that have been used to position nanoparticles on substrates for atom probe analysis. In some of the approaches, this is combined with deposition techniques to incorporate the particles into a solid matrix, and focused ion beam processing is then used to fabricate atom probe samples from this composite. Using these approaches, data has been achieved from 10-20 nm core-shell nanoparticles that were extracted directly from suspension (i.e. with no chemical modification) with a resolution of better than ± 1 nm. PMID:25980894

  8. Developing detection efficiency standards for atom probe tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosa, Ty J.; Geiser, Brian P.; Lawrence, Dan; Olson, David; Larson, David J.

    2014-08-01

    Atom Probe Tomography (APT) is a near-atomic-scale analytical technique which, due to recent advances in instrumentation and sample preparation techniques, is being used on a variety of 3D applications. Total system detection efficiency is a key parameter for obtaining accurate spatial reconstruction of atomic coordinates from detected ions, but experimental determination of efficiency can be difficult. This work explores new ways to measure total system detection efficiency as well as the specimen characteristics necessary for such measurements. Composite specimens composed of a nickel/chromium multilayer core, National Institute of Standards and Technology Standard Reference Material 2135c, encapsulated with silver, silicon, or nickel were used to demonstrate the suitability of this approach for providing a direct measurement of APT efficiency. Efficiency measurements based on this multilayer encapsulated in nickel are reported.

  9. The effect of object speed and direction on the performance of 3D speckle tracking using a 3D swept-volume ultrasound probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Emma J.; Miller, Naomi R.; Bamber, Jeffrey C.; Symonds-Tayler, J. Richard N.; Evans, Philip M.

    2011-11-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) soft tissue tracking using 3D ultrasound is of interest for monitoring organ motion during therapy. Previously we demonstrated feature tracking of respiration-induced liver motion in vivo using a 3D swept-volume ultrasound probe. The aim of this study was to investigate how object speed affects the accuracy of tracking ultrasonic speckle in the absence of any structural information, which mimics the situation in homogenous tissue for motion in the azimuthal and elevational directions. For object motion prograde and retrograde to the sweep direction of the transducer, the spatial sampling frequency increases or decreases with object speed, respectively. We examined the effect object motion direction of the transducer on tracking accuracy. We imaged a homogenous ultrasound speckle phantom whilst moving the probe with linear motion at a speed of 0-35 mm s-1. Tracking accuracy and precision were investigated as a function of speed, depth and direction of motion for fixed displacements of 2 and 4 mm. For the azimuthal direction, accuracy was better than 0.1 and 0.15 mm for displacements of 2 and 4 mm, respectively. For a 2 mm displacement in the elevational direction, accuracy was better than 0.5 mm for most speeds. For 4 mm elevational displacement with retrograde motion, accuracy and precision reduced with speed and tracking failure was observed at speeds of greater than 14 mm s-1. Tracking failure was attributed to speckle de-correlation as a result of decreasing spatial sampling frequency with increasing speed of retrograde motion. For prograde motion, tracking failure was not observed. For inter-volume displacements greater than 2 mm, only prograde motion should be tracked which will decrease temporal resolution by a factor of 2. Tracking errors of the order of 0.5 mm for prograde motion in the elevational direction indicates that using the swept probe technology speckle tracking accuracy is currently too poor to track homogenous tissue over

  10. Closed-loop high-speed 3D thermal probe nanolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoll, A. W.; Zientek, M.; Cheong, L. L.; Rawlings, C.; Paul, P.; Holzner, F.; Hedrick, J. L.; Coady, D. J.; Allen, R.; Dürig, U.

    2014-03-01

    Thermal Scanning Probe Lithography (tSPL) is an AFM based patterning technique, which uses heated tips to locally evaporate organic resists such as molecular glasses [1] or thermally sensitive polymers.[2][3] Organic resists offer the versatility of the lithography process known from the CMOS environment and simultaneously ensure a highly stable and low wear tip-sample contact due to the soft nature of the resists. Patterning quality is excellent up to a resolution of sub 15 nm,[1] at linear speeds of up to 20 mm/s and pixel rates of up to 500 kHz.[4] The patterning depth is proportional to the applied force which allows for the creation of 3-D profiles in a single patterning run.[2] In addition, non-destructive imaging can be done at pixel rates of more than 500 kHz.[4] If the thermal stimulus for writing the pattern is switched off the same tip can be used to record the written topography with Angstrom depth resolution. We utilize this unique feature of SPL to implement an efficient control system for reliable patterning at high speed and high resolution. We combine the writing and imaging process in a single raster scan of the surface. In this closed loop lithography (CLL) approach, we use the acquired data to optimize the writing parameters on the fly. Excellent control is in particular important for an accurate reproduction of complex 3D patterns. These novel patterning capabilities are equally important for a high quality transfer of two-dimensional patterns into the underlying substrate. We utilize an only 3-4 nm thick SiOx hardmask to amplify the 8±0.5 nm deep patterns created by tSPL into a 50 nm thick transfer polymer. The structures in the transfer polymer can be used to create metallic lines by a lift-off process or to further process the pattern into the substrate. Here we demonstrate the fabrication of 27 nm wide lines and trenches 60 nm deep into the Silicon substrate.[5] In addition, the combined read and write approach ensures that the lateral

  11. Room temperature strong light-matter coupling in 3D THz meta-atoms (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulillo, Bruno; Manceau, Jean-Michel; Li, Lianhe; Linfield, Edmund; Colombelli, Raffaele

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate strong light-matter coupling at room temperature in the terahertz (THz) spectral region using 3D meta-atoms with extremely sub-wavelength volumes. Using an air-bridge fabrication scheme, we have implemented sub-wavelength 3D THz micro-resonators that rely on suspended loop antennas connected to semiconductor-filled patch cavities. We have experimentally shown that they possess the functionalities of lumped LC resonators: their frequency response can be adjusted by independently tuning the inductance associated the antenna element or the capacitance provided by the metal-semiconductor-metal cavity. Moreover, the radiation coupling and efficiency can be engineered acting on the design of the loop antenna, similarly to conventional RF antennas. Here we take advantage of this rich playground in the context of cavity electrodynamics/intersubband polaritonics. In the strong light-matter coupling regime, a cavity and a two-level system exchange energy coherently at a characteristic rate called the vacuum Rabi frequency ΩR which is dominant with respect to all other loss mechanisms involved. The signature, in the frequency domain, is the appearance of a splitting between the bare cavity and material system resonances: the new states are called upper and a lower polariton branches. So far, most experimental demonstrations of strong light-matter interaction between an intersubband transition and a deeply sub-wavelength mode in the THz or mid-infrared ranges rely on wavelength-scale or larger resonators such as photonic crystals, diffractive gratings, dielectric micro-cavities or patch cavities. Lately, planar metamaterials have been used to enhance the light-matter interaction and strongly reduce the interaction volume by engineering the electric and magnetic resonances of the individual subwavelength constituents. In this contribution we provide evidence of strong coupling between a THz intersubband transition and an extremely sub-wavelength mode (≈λ/10

  12. Electron crystallography of ultrathin 3D protein crystals: atomic model with charges.

    PubMed

    Yonekura, Koji; Kato, Kazuyuki; Ogasawara, Mitsuo; Tomita, Masahiro; Toyoshima, Chikashi

    2015-03-17

    Membrane proteins and macromolecular complexes often yield crystals too small or too thin for even the modern synchrotron X-ray beam. Electron crystallography could provide a powerful means for structure determination with such undersized crystals, as protein atoms diffract electrons four to five orders of magnitude more strongly than they do X-rays. Furthermore, as electron crystallography yields Coulomb potential maps rather than electron density maps, it could provide a unique method to visualize the charged states of amino acid residues and metals. Here we describe an attempt to develop a methodology for electron crystallography of ultrathin (only a few layers thick) 3D protein crystals and present the Coulomb potential maps at 3.4-Å and 3.2-Å resolution, respectively, obtained from Ca(2+)-ATPase and catalase crystals. These maps demonstrate that it is indeed possible to build atomic models from such crystals and even to determine the charged states of amino acid residues in the Ca(2+)-binding sites of Ca(2+)-ATPase and that of the iron atom in the heme in catalase. PMID:25730881

  13. Electron crystallography of ultrathin 3D protein crystals: Atomic model with charges

    PubMed Central

    Yonekura, Koji; Kato, Kazuyuki; Ogasawara, Mitsuo; Tomita, Masahiro; Toyoshima, Chikashi

    2015-01-01

    Membrane proteins and macromolecular complexes often yield crystals too small or too thin for even the modern synchrotron X-ray beam. Electron crystallography could provide a powerful means for structure determination with such undersized crystals, as protein atoms diffract electrons four to five orders of magnitude more strongly than they do X-rays. Furthermore, as electron crystallography yields Coulomb potential maps rather than electron density maps, it could provide a unique method to visualize the charged states of amino acid residues and metals. Here we describe an attempt to develop a methodology for electron crystallography of ultrathin (only a few layers thick) 3D protein crystals and present the Coulomb potential maps at 3.4-Å and 3.2-Å resolution, respectively, obtained from Ca2+-ATPase and catalase crystals. These maps demonstrate that it is indeed possible to build atomic models from such crystals and even to determine the charged states of amino acid residues in the Ca2+-binding sites of Ca2+-ATPase and that of the iron atom in the heme in catalase. PMID:25730881

  14. C12/C13-ratio determination in nanodiamonds by atom-probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Josiah B; Isheim, Dieter; Floss, Christine; Seidman, David N

    2015-12-01

    The astrophysical origins of ∼ 3 nm-diameter meteoritic nanodiamonds can be inferred from the ratio of C12/C13. It is essential to achieve high spatial and mass resolving power and minimize all sources of signal loss in order to obtain statistically significant measurements. We conducted atom-probe tomography on meteoritic nanodiamonds embedded between layers of Pt. We describe sample preparation, atom-probe tomography analysis, 3D reconstruction, and bias correction. We present new data from meteoritic nanodiamonds and terrestrial standards and discuss methods to correct isotopic measurements made with the atom-probe tomograph. PMID:26095824

  15. Billion-atom synchronous parallel kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of critical 3D Ising systems

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, E.; Monasterio, P.R.; Marian, J.

    2011-02-20

    An extension of the synchronous parallel kinetic Monte Carlo (spkMC) algorithm developed by Martinez et al. [J. Comp. Phys. 227 (2008) 3804] to discrete lattices is presented. The method solves the master equation synchronously by recourse to null events that keep all processors' time clocks current in a global sense. Boundary conflicts are resolved by adopting a chessboard decomposition into non-interacting sublattices. We find that the bias introduced by the spatial correlations attendant to the sublattice decomposition is within the standard deviation of serial calculations, which confirms the statistical validity of our algorithm. We have analyzed the parallel efficiency of spkMC and find that it scales consistently with problem size and sublattice partition. We apply the method to the calculation of scale-dependent critical exponents in billion-atom 3D Ising systems, with very good agreement with state-of-the-art multispin simulations.

  16. Comparison of different techniques in optical trap for generating picokelvin 3D atom cloud in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Hepeng; Luan, Tian; Li, Chen; Zhang, Yin; Ma, Zhaoyuan; Chen, Xuzong

    2016-01-01

    Pursuing ultralow temperature 3D atom gas under microgravity conditions is one of the popular topics in the field of ultracold research. Many groups around the world are using, or are planning to use, delta-kick cooling (DKC) in microgravity. Our group has also proposed a two-stage crossed beam cooling (TSCBC) method that also provides a path to picokelvin temperatures. In this paper, we compare the characteristics of TSCBC and DKC for producing a picokelvin system in microgravity. Using a direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method, we simulate the cooling process of 87Rb using the two different cooling techniques. Under the same initial conditions, 87Rb can reach 7 pK in 15 s using TSCBC and 75 pK in 5.1 s with DKC. The simulation results show that TSCBC can reach lower temperatures compared with DKC, but needs more time and a more stable laser.

  17. Billion-atom synchronous parallel kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of critical 3D Ising systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, E.; Monasterio, P. R.; Marian, J.

    2011-02-01

    An extension of the synchronous parallel kinetic Monte Carlo (spkMC) algorithm developed by Martinez et al. [J. Comp. Phys. 227 (2008) 3804] to discrete lattices is presented. The method solves the master equation synchronously by recourse to null events that keep all processors' time clocks current in a global sense. Boundary conflicts are resolved by adopting a chessboard decomposition into non-interacting sublattices. We find that the bias introduced by the spatial correlations attendant to the sublattice decomposition is within the standard deviation of serial calculations, which confirms the statistical validity of our algorithm. We have analyzed the parallel efficiency of spkMC and find that it scales consistently with problem size and sublattice partition. We apply the method to the calculation of scale-dependent critical exponents in billion-atom 3D Ising systems, with very good agreement with state-of-the-art multispin simulations.

  18. Creating and probing coherent atomic states

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhold, C.O.; Burgdoerfer, J. |; Frey, M.T.; Dunning, F.B.

    1997-06-01

    The authors present a brief review of recent experimental and theoretical time resolved studies of the evolution of atomic wavepackets. In particular, wavepackets comprising a superposition of very-high-lying Rydberg states which are created either using a short half-cycle pulse (HCP) or by rapid application of a DC field. The properties of the wavepackets are probed using a second HCP that is applied following a variable time delay and ionizes a fraction of the atoms, much like a passing-by ion in atomic collisions.

  19. An analogue contact probe using a compact 3D optical sensor for micro/nano coordinate measuring machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rui-Jun; Fan, Kuang-Chao; Miao, Jin-Wei; Huang, Qiang-Xian; Tao, Sheng; Gong, Er-min

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents a new analogue contact probe based on a compact 3D optical sensor with high precision. The sensor comprises an autocollimator and a polarizing Michelson interferometer, which can detect two angles and one displacement of the plane mirror at the same time. In this probe system, a tungsten stylus with a ruby tip-ball is attached to a floating plate, which is supported by four V-shape leaf springs fixed to the outer case. When a contact force is applied to the tip, the leaf springs will experience elastic deformation and the plane mirror mounted on the floating plate will be displaced. The force-motion characteristics of this probe were investigated and optimum parameters were obtained with the constraint of allowable physical size of the probe. Simulation results show that the probe is uniform in 3D and its contacting force gradient is within 1 mN µm - 1. Experimental results indicate that the probe has 1 nm resolution,  ± 10 µm measuring range in X - Y plane, 10 µm measuring range in Z direction and within 30 nm measuring standard deviation. The feasibility of the probe has been preliminarily verified by testing the flatness and step height of high precision gauge blocks.

  20. Accurate nonrelativistic ground-state energies of 3d transition metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Scemama, A.; Applencourt, T.; Giner, E.; Caffarel, M.

    2014-12-28

    We present accurate nonrelativistic ground-state energies of the transition metal atoms of the 3d series calculated with Fixed-Node Diffusion Monte Carlo (FN-DMC). Selected multi-determinantal expansions obtained with the CIPSI (Configuration Interaction using a Perturbative Selection made Iteratively) method and including the most prominent determinants of the full configuration interaction expansion are used as trial wavefunctions. Using a maximum of a few tens of thousands determinants, fixed-node errors on total DMC energies are found to be greatly reduced for some atoms with respect to those obtained with Hartree-Fock nodes. To the best of our knowledge, the FN-DMC/(CIPSI nodes) ground-state energies presented here are the lowest variational total energies reported so far. They differ from the recently recommended non-variational values of McCarthy and Thakkar [J. Chem. Phys. 136, 054107 (2012)] only by a few percents of the correlation energy. Thanks to the variational property of FN-DMC total energies, our results provide exact lower bounds for the absolute value of all-electron correlation energies, |E{sub c}|.

  1. 3D Visualization of Solar Data: Preparing for Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, D.; Felix, S.; Meier, S.; Csillaghy, A.; Nicula, B.; Verstringe, F.; Bourgoignie, B.; Berghmans, D.; Jiggens, P.

    2014-12-01

    The next generation of ESA/NASA heliophysics missions, Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus, will focus on exploring the linkage between the Sun and the heliosphere. These new missions will collect unique data that will allow us to study, e.g., the coupling between macroscopic physical processes to those on kinetic scales, the generation of solar energetic particles and their propagation into the heliosphere and the origin and acceleration of solar wind plasma. Since 2010, NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory returns 1.4 TB/day of high-resolution solar images, magnetograms and EUV irradiance data. Within a few years, the scientific community will thus have access to petabytes of multi­dimensional remote­sensing and complex in-situ observations from different vantage points, complemented by petabytes of simulation data. Answering overarching science questions like "How do solar transients drive heliospheric variability and space weather?" will only be possible if the community has the necessary tools at hand. As of today, there is an obvious lack of capability to both visualize these data and assimilate them into sophisticated models to advance our knowledge. A key piece needed to bridge the gap between observables, derived quantities like magnetic field extrapolations and model output is a tool to routinely and intuitively visualize large heterogeneous, multidimensional, time­dependent data sets. As of today, the space science community is lacking the means to do this (i) on a routine basis, (ii) for complex multi­dimensional data sets from various instruments and vantage points and (iii) in an extensible and modular way that is open for future improvements and interdisciplinary usage. In this contribution, we will present recent progress in visualizing the Sun and its magnetic field in 3D using the open-source JHelioviewer framework, which is part of the ESA/NASA Helioviewer Project. Among other features, JHelioviewer offers efficient region-of-interest-based data

  2. Towards an accurate volume reconstruction in atom probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Beinke, Daniel; Oberdorfer, Christian; Schmitz, Guido

    2016-06-01

    An alternative concept for the reconstruction of atom probe data is outlined. It is based on the calculation of realistic trajectories of the evaporated ions in a recursive refinement process. To this end, the electrostatic problem is solved on a Delaunay tessellation. To enable the trajectory calculation, the order of reconstruction is inverted with respect to previous reconstruction schemes: the last atom detected is reconstructed first. In this way, the emitter shape, which controls the trajectory, can be defined throughout the duration of the reconstruction. A proof of concept is presented for 3D model tips, containing spherical precipitates or embedded layers of strongly contrasting evaporation thresholds. While the traditional method following Bas et al. generates serious distortions in these cases, a reconstruction with the proposed electrostatically informed approach improves the geometry of layers and particles significantly. PMID:27062338

  3. Moment coupling in the interaction of atoms and their ions with a 3d-electron shell

    SciTech Connect

    Kosarim, A. V.; Smirnov, B. M.; Capitelli, M.; Laricchiuta, A.

    2011-09-15

    The moment coupling of an interacting ion and an atom with a 3d-electron shell is analyzed for the ground state of identical atoms and ions where resonant charge exchange proceeds with transition of a 4s-electron. The interaction of the ion charge with the atom quadrupole moment is important for this system along with the exchange interactions and spin-orbit interactions inside an isolated atom and an ion. The quadrupole moment for 3d-atoms in the ground states is evaluated. The hierarchy of interactions in a molecular ion is analyzed depending on ion-atom distances and is compared with the standard Hund scheme. The resonant charge exchange proceeds effectively at separations corresponding to an intermediate case between cases 'a' and 'c' of the Hund coupling scheme.

  4. Carbon nanotube atomic force microscopy probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, Shigenobu; Okawa, Takashi; Akita, Seiji; Nakayama, Yoshikazu

    2005-05-01

    We have developed a carbon nanotube atomic force microscope probe. Because the carbon nanotube are well known to have high aspect ratios, small tip radii and high stiffness, carbon nanotube probes have a long lifetime and can be applied for the observation deep trenches. Carbon nanotubes were synthesized by a well-controlled DC arc discharge method, because this method can make nanotubes to have straight shape and high crystalline. The nanotubes were aligned on the knife-edge using an alternating current electrophoresis technique. A commercially available Si probe was used for the base of the nanotube probe. The nanotube probe was fabricated by the SEM manipulation method. The nanotube was then attached tightly to the Si probe by deposition of amorphous carbon. We demonstrate the measurement of a fine pith grating that has vertical walls. However, a carbon nanotube has a problem that is called "Sticking". The sticking is a chatter image on vertical like region in a sample. We solved this problem by applying 2 methods, 1. a large cantilever vibration amplitude in tapping mode, 2. an attractive mode measurement. We demonstrate the non-sticking images by these methods.

  5. Atom-probe for FinFET dopant characterization.

    PubMed

    Kambham, A K; Mody, J; Gilbert, M; Koelling, S; Vandervorst, W

    2011-05-01

    With the continuous shrinking of transistors and advent of new transistor architectures to keep in pace with Moore's law and ITRS goals, there is a rising interest in multigate 3D-devices like FinFETs where the channel is surrounded by gates on multiple surfaces. The performance of these devices depends on the dimensions and the spatial distribution of dopants in source/drain regions of the device. As a result there is a need for new metrology approach/technique to characterize quantitatively the dopant distribution in these devices with nanometer precision in 3D. In recent years, atom probe tomography (APT) has shown its ability to analyze semiconductor and thin insulator materials effectively with sub-nm resolution in 3D. In this paper we will discuss the methodology used to study FinFET-based structures using APT. Whereas challenges and solutions for sample preparation linked to the limited fin dimensions already have been reported before, we report here an approach to prepare fin structures for APT, which based on their processing history (trenches filled with Si) are in principle invisible in FIB and SEM. Hence alternative solutions in locating and positioning them on the APT-tip are presented. We also report on the use of the atom probe results on FinFETs to understand the role of different dopant implantation angles (10° and 45°) when attempting conformal doping of FinFETs and provide a quantitative comparison with alternative approaches such as 1D secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and theoretical model values. PMID:21288644

  6. Atom probe tomography analysis of WC powder.

    PubMed

    Weidow, Jonathan

    2013-09-01

    A tantalum doped tungsten carbide powder, (W,Ta)C, was prepared with the purpose to maximise the amount of Ta in the hexagonal mixed crystal carbide. Atom probe tomography (APT) was considered to be the best technique to quantitatively measure the amount of Ta within this carbide. As the carbide powder consisted in the form of very small particles (<1 μm), a method to produce APT specimens of such a powder was developed. The powder was at first embedded in copper and a FIB-SEM workstation was used to make an in-situ lift-out from a selected powder particle. The powder particle was then deposited on a post made from a WC-Co based cemented carbide specimen. With the use of a laser assisted atom probe, it was shown that the method is working and the Ta content of the (W,Ta)C could be measured quantitatively. PMID:23507029

  7. Azo-Based Iridium(III) Complexes as Multicolor Phosphorescent Probes to Detect Hypoxia in 3D Multicellular Tumor Spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lingli; Li, Guanying; Chen, Xiang; Chen, Yu; Jin, Chengzhi; Ji, Liangnian; Chao, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia is an important characteristic of malignant solid tumors and is considered as a possible causative factor for serious resistance to chemo- and radiotherapy. The exploration of novel fluorescent probes capable of detecting hypoxia in solid tumors will aid tumor diagnosis and treatment. In this study, we reported the design and synthesis of a series of “off-on” phosphorescence probes for hypoxia detection in adherent and three-dimensional multicellular spheroid models. All of the iridium(III) complexes incorporate an azo group as an azo-reductase reactive moiety to detect hypoxia. Reduction of non-phosphorescent probes Ir1-Ir8 by reductases under hypoxic conditions resulted in the generation of highly phosphorescent corresponding amines for detection of hypoxic regions. Moreover, these probes can penetrate into 3D multicellular spheroids over 100 μm and image the hypoxic regions. Most importantly, these probes display a high selectivity for the detection of hypoxia in 2D cells and 3D multicellular spheroids. PMID:26423609

  8. High speed 3D endoscopic optical frequency domain imaging probe for lung cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianan; Feroldi, Fabio; Mo, Jianhua; Helderman, Frank; de Groot, Mattijs; de Boer, Johannes F.

    2013-06-01

    We present a miniature motorized endoscopic probe for Optical Frequency Domain Imaging with an outer diameter of 1.65 mm and a rotation speed of 3,000 - 12,500 rpm. The probe has a motorized distal end which provides a significant advantage over proximally driven probes since it does not require a drive shaft to transfer the rotational torque to the distal end of the probe and functions without a fiber rotary junction. The probe has a focal Full Width at Half Maximum of 9.6 μm and a working distance of 0.47 mm. We analyzed the non-uniform rotation distortion and found a location fluctuation of only 1.87° in repeated measurements of the same object. The probe was integrated in a high-speed Optical Frequency Domain Imaging setup at 1310 nm. We demonstrated its performance with imaging ex vivo pig bronchial and in vivo goat lung.

  9. A visual probe localization and calibration system for cost-effective computer-aided 3D ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Ali, Aziah; Logeswaran, Rajasvaran

    2007-08-01

    The 3D ultrasound systems produce much better reproductions than 2D ultrasound, but their prohibitively high cost deprives many less affluent organization this benefit. This paper proposes using the conventional 2D ultrasound equipment readily available in most hospitals, along with a single conventional digital camera, to construct 3D ultrasound images. The proposed system applies computer vision to extract position information of the ultrasound probe while the scanning takes place. The probe, calibrated in order to calculate the offset of the ultrasound scan from the position of the marker attached to it, is used to scan a number of geometrical objects. Using the proposed system, the 3D volumes of the objects were successfully reconstructed. The system was tested in clinical situations where human body parts were scanned. The results presented, and confirmed by medical staff, are very encouraging for cost-effective implementation of computer-aided 3D ultrasound using a simple setup with 2D ultrasound equipment and a conventional digital camera. PMID:17126314

  10. Electronic and spectroscopic properties of early 3d metal atoms on a graphite surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakotomahevitra, A.; Garreau, G.; Demangeat, C.; Parlebas, J. C.

    1995-07-01

    High-sensitivity magneto-optic Kerr effect experiments failed to detect manifestations of magnetism in epitaxial films of V on Ag(100) substrates. More recently V 3s XPS of freshly evaporated V clusters on graphite exhibited the appearance of a satellite structure which has then been interpreted by the effect of surface magnetic moments on V. It is the absence of unambiguous results on the electronic properties of early 3d supported metals that prompts us to examine the problem. Our purpose is twofold. In a first part, after a total energy calculation within a tight-binding method which yields the equilibrium position of a given adatom, we use the Hartree-Fock approximation to find out a possible magnetic solution of V (or Cr) upon graphite for a reasonable value of the exchange integral Jdd. In a second part the informations given by the density of states of the graphite surface as well as the additional states of the adsorbed atom are taken into account through a generalised impurity Anderson Hamiltonian which incorporates the various Coulomb and exchange interactions necessary to analyse the 3s XPS results.

  11. Predicting the Electronic Properties of 3D, Million-atom Semiconductor nanostructure Architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Jack Dongarra; Stanimire Tomov

    2012-03-15

    This final report describes the work done by Jack Dongarra (University Distinguished Professor) and Stanimire Tomov (Research Scientist) related to the DOE project entitled Predicting the Electronic Properties of 3D, Million-Atom Semiconductor Nanostructure Architectures. In this project we addressed the mathematical methodology required to calculate the electronic and transport properties of large nanostructures with comparable accuracy and reliability to that of current ab initio methods. This capability is critical for further developing the field, yet it is missing in all the existing computational methods. Additionally, quantitative comparisons with experiments are often needed for a qualitative understanding of the physics, and for guiding the design of new nanostructures. We focused on the mathematical challenges of the project, in particular on solvers and preconditioners for large scale eigenvalue problems that occur in the computation of electronic states of large nanosystems. Usually, the states of interest lie in the interior of the spectrum and their computation poses great difficulties for existing algorithms. The electronic properties of a semiconductor nanostructure architecture can be predicted/determined by computing its band structure. Of particular importance are the 'band edge states' (electronic states near the energy gap) which can be computed from a properly defined interior eigenvalue problem. Our primary mathematics and computational challenge here has been to develop an efficient solution methodology for finding these interior states for very large systems. Our work has produced excellent results in terms of developing both new and extending current state-of-the-art techniques.

  12. Beyond optical molasses: 3D raman sideband cooling of atomic cesium to high phase-space density

    PubMed

    Kerman; Vuletic; Chin; Chu

    2000-01-17

    We demonstrate a simple, general purpose method to cool neutral atoms. A sample containing 3x10(8) cesium atoms prepared in a magneto-optical trap is cooled and simultaneously spin polarized in 10 ms at a density of 1.1x10(11) cm (-3) to a phase space density nlambda(3)(dB) = 1/500, which is almost 3 orders of magnitude higher than attainable in free space with optical molasses. The technique is based on 3D degenerate Raman sideband cooling in optical lattices and remains efficient even at densities where the mean lattice site occupation is close to unity. PMID:11015933

  13. Mining information from atom probe data.

    PubMed

    Cairney, Julie M; Rajan, Krishna; Haley, Daniel; Gault, Baptiste; Bagot, Paul A J; Choi, Pyuck-Pa; Felfer, Peter J; Ringer, Simon P; Marceau, Ross K W; Moody, Michael P

    2015-12-01

    Whilst atom probe tomography (APT) is a powerful technique with the capacity to gather information containing hundreds of millions of atoms from a single specimen, the ability to effectively use this information creates significant challenges. The main technological bottleneck lies in handling the extremely large amounts of data on spatial-chemical correlations, as well as developing new quantitative computational foundations for image reconstruction that target critical and transformative problems in materials science. The power to explore materials at the atomic scale with the extraordinary level of sensitivity of detection offered by atom probe tomography has not been not fully harnessed due to the challenges of dealing with missing, sparse and often noisy data. Hence there is a profound need to couple the analytical tools to deal with the data challenges with the experimental issues associated with this instrument. In this paper we provide a summary of some key issues associated with the challenges, and solutions to extract or "mine" fundamental materials science information from that data. PMID:26095825

  14. Probing 3D Collective Cancer Invasion Using Double-Stranded Locked Nucleic Acid Biosensors.

    PubMed

    Dean, Zachary S; Elias, Paul; Jamilpour, Nima; Utzinger, Urs; Wong, Pak Kin

    2016-09-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide and metastases are responsible for over 90% of human cancer deaths. There is an urgent need to develop novel therapeutics for suppressing cancer invasion, the initial step of metastasis. Nevertheless, the regulation of cancer invasion is poorly understood due to a paucity of tools for monitoring the invasion process in 3D microenvironments. Here, we report a double-stranded locked nucleic acid (dsLNA) biosensor for investigating 3D collective cancer invasion. By incorporating multiphoton microscopy and the dsLNA biosensor, we perform dynamic single cell gene expression analysis while simultaneously characterizing the biomechanical interaction between the invading sprouts and the extracellular matrix. Gene profiling of invasive leader cells and detached cells suggest distinctive signaling mechanisms involved in collective and individual invasion in the 3D microenvironment. Our results underscore the involvement of Notch signaling in 3D collective cancer invasion, which warrants further investigation toward antimetastasis therapy in the future. PMID:27529634

  15. Tailored probes for atomic force microscopy fabricated by two-photon polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göring, Gerald; Dietrich, Philipp-Immanuel; Blaicher, Matthias; Sharma, Swati; Korvink, Jan G.; Schimmel, Thomas; Koos, Christian; Hölscher, Hendrik

    2016-08-01

    3D direct laser writing based on two-photon polymerization is considered as a tool to fabricate tailored probes for atomic force microscopy. Tips with radii of 25 nm and arbitrary shape are attached to conventionally shaped micro-machined cantilevers. Long-term scanning measurements reveal low wear rates and demonstrate the reliability of such tips. Furthermore, we show that the resonance spectrum of the probe can be tuned for multi-frequency applications by adding rebar structures to the cantilever.

  16. High speed miniature motorized endoscopic probe for 3D optical frequency domain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianan; Feroldi, Fabio; Mo, Jianhua; Helderman, Frank; de Groot, Mattijs; de Boer, Johannes F.

    2013-03-01

    We present a miniature motorized endoscopic probe for Optical Frequency Domain Imaging with an outer diameter of 1.65 mm and a rotation speed of 3,000 - 12,500 rpm. This is the smallest motorized high speed OCT probe to our knowledge. The probe has a motorized distal end which provides a significant advantage over proximally driven probes since it does not require a drive shaft to transfer the rotational torque to the distal end of the probe and functions without a fiber rotary junction. The probe has a focal Full Width at Half Maximum of 9.6 μm and a working distance of 0.47 mm. We analyzed the non-uniform rotation distortion and found a location fluctuation of only 1.87° in repeated measurements of the same object. The probe was integrated in a high-speed Optical Frequency Domain Imaging setup at 1310 nm We demonstrated its performance with imaging ex vivo pig bronchial and in vivo goat lung.

  17. Plasma-material interactions: A Langmuir probe analysis of a cylindrical SiO(2) deposition system and a computational study using VFTRIM3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turkot, Robert Bruce, Jr.

    This dissertation is broken into two sections describing, first, a computer code simulating ion-surface interactions, VFTRIM3D, and, second, an experimental Langmuir probe analysis of a cylindrical SiOsb2 deposition system. VFTRIM3D is a 3-dimensional, Monte-Carlo, binary collision code employing fractal algorithms used to simulate atomic-scale surface roughness. This work applies this code to studies of incident ion energies in the 10's to 100's of eV on various targets and comparisons to experimental data prove its dependability for such simulations. The experimental portion of this thesis includes the development and investigation of a cylindrical SiOsb2 deposition system used to deposit gas permeation barrier thin films onto PET bottles. The plasma analysis is done utilizing time- and spatially resolved Langmuir probe techniques. In order to study the characteristics of the dielectric deposition plasma, a "hot" Langmuir probe was developed to acquire typical Langmuir probe data during SiOsb2 deposition. The SiOsb2 films deposited in this system are analyzed for their gas permeation qualities and are correlated to the plasma properties gathered using Langmuir probes as well as the gas, pressure, and time recipes used to produce them. It is found in this work that the application of SiOsb2 films onto flexible PET bottles using the fashion explained herein results in a decrease in the gas permeation characteristics of the SiOsb2-PET membrane as desired, but is found to be independent of the thickness of the SiOsb2 present. This limit is found to be caused by cracks and pinhole defects across the SiOsb2 film that permit uninhibited gas flow directly to the PET bottle.

  18. Performance of ultrasound based measurement of 3D displacement using a curvilinear probe for organ motion tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Emma J.; Miller, Naomi R.; Bamber, Jeffrey C.; Evans, Phillip M.; Symonds-Tayler, J. Richard N.

    2007-09-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) soft tissue tracking is of interest for monitoring organ motion during therapy. Our goal is to assess the tracking performance of a curvilinear 3D ultrasound probe in terms of the accuracy and precision of measured displacements. The first aim was to examine the depth dependence of the tracking performance. This is of interest because the spatial resolution varies with distance from the elevational focus and because the curvilinear geometry of the transducer causes the spatial sampling frequency to decrease with depth. Our second aim was to assess tracking performance as a function of the spatial sampling setting (low, medium or high sampling). These settings are incorporated onto 3D ultrasound machines to allow the user to control the trade-off between spatial sampling and temporal resolution. Volume images of a speckle-producing phantom were acquired before and after the probe had been moved by a known displacement (1, 2 or 8 mm). This allowed us to assess the optimum performance of the tracking algorithm, in the absence of motion. 3D speckle tracking was performed using 3D cross-correlation and sub-voxel displacements were estimated. The tracking performance was found to be best for axial displacements and poorest for elevational displacements. In general, the performance decreased with depth, although the nature of the depth dependence was complex. Under certain conditions, the tracking performance was sufficient to be useful for monitoring organ motion. For example, at the highest sampling setting, for a 2 mm displacement, good accuracy and precision (an error and standard deviation of <0.4 mm) were observed at all depths and for all directions of displacement. The trade-off between spatial sampling, temporal resolution and size of the field of view (FOV) is discussed.

  19. mutation3D: Cancer Gene Prediction Through Atomic Clustering of Coding Variants in the Structural Proteome.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Michael J; Lapcevic, Ryan; Romero, Alfonso E; Yoon, Mark; Das, Jishnu; Beltrán, Juan Felipe; Mort, Matthew; Stenson, Peter D; Cooper, David N; Paccanaro, Alberto; Yu, Haiyuan

    2016-05-01

    A new algorithm and Web server, mutation3D (http://mutation3d.org), proposes driver genes in cancer by identifying clusters of amino acid substitutions within tertiary protein structures. We demonstrate the feasibility of using a 3D clustering approach to implicate proteins in cancer based on explorations of single proteins using the mutation3D Web interface. On a large scale, we show that clustering with mutation3D is able to separate functional from nonfunctional mutations by analyzing a combination of 8,869 known inherited disease mutations and 2,004 SNPs overlaid together upon the same sets of crystal structures and homology models. Further, we present a systematic analysis of whole-genome and whole-exome cancer datasets to demonstrate that mutation3D identifies many known cancer genes as well as previously underexplored target genes. The mutation3D Web interface allows users to analyze their own mutation data in a variety of popular formats and provides seamless access to explore mutation clusters derived from over 975,000 somatic mutations reported by 6,811 cancer sequencing studies. The mutation3D Web interface is freely available with all major browsers supported. PMID:26841357

  20. Visualization, analysis, and design of COMBO-FISH probes in the grid-based GLOBE 3D genome platform.

    PubMed

    Kepper, Nick; Schmitt, Eberhard; Lesnussa, Michael; Weiland, Yanina; Eussen, Hubert B; Grosveld, Frank G; Hausmann, Michael; Knoch, Tobias A

    2010-01-01

    The genome architecture in cell nuclei plays an important role in modern microscopy for the monitoring of medical diagnosis and therapy since changes of function and dynamics of genes are interlinked with changing geometrical parameters. The planning of corresponding diagnostic experiments and their imaging is a complex and often interactive IT intensive challenge and thus makes high-performance grids a necessity. To detect genetic changes we recently developed a new form of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) - COMBinatorial Oligonucleotide FISH (COMBO-FISH) - which labels small nucleotide sequences clustering at a desired genomic location. To achieve a unique hybridization spot other side clusters have to be excluded. Therefore, we have designed an interactive pipeline using the grid-based GLOBE 3D Genome Viewer and Platform to design and display different labelling variants of candidate probe sets. Thus, we have created a grid-based virtual "paper" tool for easy interactive calculation, analysis, management, and representation for COMBO-FISH probe design with many an advantage: Since all the calculations and analysis run in a grid, one can instantly and with great visual ease locate duplications of gene subsequences to guide the elimination of side clustering sequences during the probe design process, as well as get at least an impression of the 3D architectural embedding of the respective chromosome region, which is of major importance to estimate the hybridization probe dynamics. Beyond, even several people at different locations could work on the same process in a team wise manner. Consequently, we present how a complex interactive process can profit from grid infrastructure technology using our unique GLOBE 3D Genome Platform gateway towards a real interactive curative diagnosis planning and therapy monitoring. PMID:20543436

  1. Microfabricated Tepui: probing into cancer invasion, metastasis and evolution in a 3D environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liyu

    2011-03-01

    Cancer metastasis and chemotherapeutic resistance are the major reasons why cancer remains recalcitrant to long-term therapy. We are interested to know: 1. How cancer cells invade tissues and metastasize in a 3D spatial environment? 2. How cancer cells evolve resistance to chemotherapeutic therapy? Answering these fundamental questions will require spatially propagating cancer cells in a 3D in vitro micro environment with dynamically controlled chemical stress. Here we attempt to realize this micro environment with a three-dimentional topology on a micro-chip which consist of isolated highlands (Tepui) and deep lower lands. Cancer cells are patterned in the lower lands and their spatial invasion to the mesas of Tepui is observed continuously with a microscope. Experiments have demonstrated that the cell invasion potential is time dependent, which is not only determined by cell motility, but also cell number and spatial stress. Quantitative analysis shows that the invasion rate fits logistic equation. Further more, we have also imbedded collagen based Extracellular Matrix (ECM) inside these structures and established a robust chemical gradient in a vertical space. With merit of real-time confocal imaging, cell propagation, metastasis and evolution in the 3D environment are studied with time as a model for cell behavior inside tissues. NCI grant: U54CA143803.

  2. Full tip imaging in atom probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Du, Sichao; Burgess, Timothy; Loi, Shyeh Tjing; Gault, Baptiste; Gao, Qiang; Bao, Peite; Li, Li; Cui, Xiangyuan; Kong Yeoh, Wai; Tan, Hark Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati; Ringer, Simon P; Zheng, Rongkun

    2013-01-01

    Atom probe tomography (APT) is capable of simultaneously revealing the chemical identities and three dimensional positions of individual atoms within a needle-shaped specimen, but suffers from a limited field-of-view (FOV), i.e., only the core of the specimen is effectively detected. Therefore, the capacity to analyze the full tip is crucial and much desired in cases that the shell of the specimen is also the region of interest. In this paper, we demonstrate that, in the analysis of III-V nanowires epitaxially grown from a substrate, the presence of the flat substrate positioned only micrometers away from the analyzed tip apex alters the field distribution and ion trajectories, which provides extra image compression that allows for the analysis of the entire specimen. An array of experimental results, including field desorption maps, elemental distributions, and crystallographic features clearly demonstrate the fact that the whole tip has been imaged, which is confirmed by electrostatic simulations. PMID:23142750

  3. Probing Local Mineralogy in 3D with Dual Energy X-Ray Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelb, J.; Yun, S.; Doerr, D.; Hunter, L.; Johnson, B.; Merkle, A.; Fahey, K.

    2013-12-01

    In recent years, 3D imaging of rock microstructures has become routine practice for determining pore-scale properties in the geosciences. X-Ray imaging techniques, such as X-Ray Microscopy (XRM), have demonstrated several unique capabilities: namely, the ability to characterize the same sample across a range of length scales and REVs (from millimeters to nanometers), and to perform these characterizations on the same sample over a range of times/treatments (e.g., to observe fluid transporting through the pore networks in a flow cell). While the XRM technique is a popular choice for structural (i.e., pore) characterization, historically it has provided little mineralogical information. This means that resulting simulations are either based on pore structure alone, or rely on correlative chemical mapping techniques for compositionally-sensitive models. Recent advancements in XRM techniques are now enabling compositional sensitivity for a variety of geological sample types. By collecting high-resolution 3D tomography data sets at two different source settings (energies), results may be mixed together to enhance the appearance (contrast) of specific materials. This approach is proving beneficial, for example, to mining applications to locate and identify precious metals, as well as for oil & gas applications to map local hydrophobicity. Here, we will introduce the technique of dual energy X-Ray microscopy, showing how it extends the capabilities of traditional XRM techniques, affording the same high resolution structural information while adding 3D compositional data. Application examples will be shown to illustrate its effectiveness at both the single to sub-micron length scale for mining applications as well as at the 150 nm length scale for shale rock analysis.

  4. The study of dual camera 3D coordinate vision measurement system using a special probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shugui; Peng, Kai; Zhang, Xuefei; Zhang, Haifeng; Huang, Fengshan

    2006-11-01

    Due to high precision and convenient operation, the vision coordinate measurement machine with one probe has become the research focus in visual industry. In general such a visual system can be setup conveniently with just one CCD camera and probe. However, the price of the system will surge up too high to accept while the top performance hardware, such as CCD camera, image captured card and etc, have to be applied in the system to obtain the high axis-oriented measurement precision. In this paper, a new dual CCD camera vision coordinate measurement system based on redundancy principle is proposed to achieve high precision by moderate price. Since two CCD cameras are placed with the angle of camera axis like about 90 degrees to build the system, two sub-systems can be built by each CCD camera and the probe. With the help of the probe the inner and outer parameters of camera are first calibrated, the system by use of redundancy technique is set up now. When axis-oriented error is eliminated within the two sub-systems, which is so large and always exits in the single camera system, the high precision measurement is obtained by the system. The result of experiment compared to that from CMM shows that the system proposed is more excellent in stableness and precision with the uncertainty beyond +/-0.1 mm in xyz orient within the distance of 2m using two common CCD cameras.

  5. 3D-Spectroscopy of Extragalactic Planetary Nebulae as Diagnostic Probes for Galaxy Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelz, A.; Monreal-Ibero, A.; Roth, M. M.; Sandin, C.; Schönberner, D.; Steffen, M.

    In addition to study extragalactic stellar populations in their integrated light, the detailed analysis of individual resolved objects has become feasible, mainly for luminous giant stars and for extragalactic planetary nebulae (XPNe) in nearby galaxies. A recently started project at the Astrophysical Institute Potsdam (AIP), called ``XPN--Physics'', aims to verify if XPNe are useful probes to measure the chemical abundances of their parent stellar population. The project involves theoretical and observational work packages.

  6. Hard and soft probe medium interactions in a 3D hydro+micro approach at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, S. A.; Renk, T.; Ruppert, J.; Nonaka, C.

    2007-08-01

    We utilize a 3D hybrid hydro+micro model for a comprehensive and consistent description of soft and hard particle production in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions at RHIC. In the soft sector we focus on the dynamics of (multi-) strange baryons, where a clear strangeness dependence of their collision rates and freeze-out is observed. In the hard sector we study the radiative energy loss of hard partons in a soft medium in the multiple soft scattering approximation. While the nuclear suppression factor RAA does not reflect the high quality of the medium description (except in a reduced systematic uncertainty in extracting the quenching power of the medium), the hydrodynamical model also allows us to study different centralities and in particular the angular variation of RAA with respect to the reaction plane, allowing for a controlled variation of the in-medium path length.

  7. Probing the intrinsic optical Bloch-mode emission from a 3D photonic crystal.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Mei-Li; Bur, James A; Du, Qingguo; John, Sajeev; Lin, Shawn-Yu

    2016-10-14

    We report experimental observation of intrinsic Bloch-mode emission from a 3D tungsten photonic crystal at low thermal excitation. After the successful removal of conventional metallic emission (normal emission), it is possible to make an accurate comparison of the Bloch-mode and the normal emission. For all biases, we found that the emission intensity of the Bloch-mode is higher than that of the normal emission. The Bloch-mode emission also exhibits a slower dependence on [Formula: see text] than that of the normal emission. The observed higher emission intensity and a different T-dependence is attributed to Bloch-mode assisted emission where emitters have been located into a medium having local density of states different than the isotropic case. Furthermore, our finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation shows the presence of localized spots at metal-air boundaries and corners, having intense electric field. The enhanced plasmonic field and local non-equilibrium could induce a strong thermally stimulated emission and may be the cause of our unusual observation. PMID:27606574

  8. Preparation of Regular Specimens for Atom Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, Kim; Wishard, James

    2003-01-01

    A method of preparation of specimens of non-electropolishable materials for analysis by atom probes is being developed as a superior alternative to a prior method. In comparison with the prior method, the present method involves less processing time. Also, whereas the prior method yields irregularly shaped and sized specimens, the present developmental method offers the potential to prepare specimens of regular shape and size. The prior method is called the method of sharp shards because it involves crushing the material of interest and selecting microscopic sharp shards of the material for use as specimens. Each selected shard is oriented with its sharp tip facing away from the tip of a stainless-steel pin and is glued to the tip of the pin by use of silver epoxy. Then the shard is milled by use of a focused ion beam (FIB) to make the shard very thin (relative to its length) and to make its tip sharp enough for atom-probe analysis. The method of sharp shards is extremely time-consuming because the selection of shards must be performed with the help of a microscope, the shards must be positioned on the pins by use of micromanipulators, and the irregularity of size and shape necessitates many hours of FIB milling to sharpen each shard. In the present method, a flat slab of the material of interest (e.g., a polished sample of rock or a coated semiconductor wafer) is mounted in the sample holder of a dicing saw of the type conventionally used to cut individual integrated circuits out of the wafers on which they are fabricated in batches. A saw blade appropriate to the material of interest is selected. The depth of cut and the distance between successive parallel cuts is made such that what is left after the cuts is a series of thin, parallel ridges on a solid base. Then the workpiece is rotated 90 and the pattern of cuts is repeated, leaving behind a square array of square posts on the solid base. The posts can be made regular, long, and thin, as required for samples

  9. Extracting chemical information from plane wave calculations by a 3D 'fuzzy atoms' analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakó, I.; Stirling, A.; Seitsonen, A. P.; Mayer, I.

    2013-03-01

    Bond order and valence indices have been calculated by the method of the three-dimensional 'fuzzy atoms' analysis, using the numerical molecular orbitals obtained from plane wave DFT calculations, i.e., without introducing any external atom-centered functions. Weight functions of both Hirshfeld and Becke types have been applied. The results are rather close to the similar 'fuzzy atoms' ones obtained by using atom-centered basis sets and agree well with the chemical expectations, stressing the power of the genuine chemical concepts.

  10. Atom-scale compositional distribution in InAlAsSb-based triple junction solar cells by atom probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Saz, J; Herrera, M; Delgado, F J; Duguay, S; Philippe, T; Gonzalez, M; Abell, J; Walters, R J; Molina, S I

    2016-07-29

    The analysis by atom probe tomography (APT) of InAlAsSb layers with applications in triple junction solar cells (TJSCs) has shown the existence of In- and Sb-rich regions in the material. The composition variation found is not evident from the direct observation of the 3D atomic distribution and because of this a statistical analysis has been required. From previous analysis of these samples, it is shown that the small compositional fluctuations determined have a strong effect on the optical properties of the material and ultimately on the performance of TJSCs. PMID:27306098

  11. Atom-scale compositional distribution in InAlAsSb-based triple junction solar cells by atom probe tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Saz, J.; Herrera, M.; Delgado, F. J.; Duguay, S.; Philippe, T.; Gonzalez, M.; Abell, J.; Walters, R. J.; Molina, S. I.

    2016-07-01

    The analysis by atom probe tomography (APT) of InAlAsSb layers with applications in triple junction solar cells (TJSCs) has shown the existence of In- and Sb-rich regions in the material. The composition variation found is not evident from the direct observation of the 3D atomic distribution and because of this a statistical analysis has been required. From previous analysis of these samples, it is shown that the small compositional fluctuations determined have a strong effect on the optical properties of the material and ultimately on the performance of TJSCs.

  12. Two versions of holography vie to show atoms in 3D

    SciTech Connect

    Nadis, S.

    1996-05-03

    In 1948 Dennis Gabor had an idea nearly 50 years ahead of his time, laying the theoretical groundwork for holography, a technique for making three dimensional images from interference patterns created when beams of coherent light or other radiation are shined on the object. Two research groups have developed holography on an atomic scale. One group from Budapest used atoms within a specimen itself as sources of coherent x-rays, a hologram can be made inside a solid - a crystal of the mineral perovskite, and by using atoms to detect rather than generate signals another groups has achieved an atomic-scale hologram. This article discusses the development and progress of the research.

  13. Atomic force microscopy imaging and 3-D reconstructions of serial thin sections of a single cell and its interior structures

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yong; Cai, Jiye; Zhao, Tao; Wang, Chenxi; Dong, Shuo; Luo, Shuqian; Chen, Zheng W.

    2010-01-01

    The thin sectioning has been widely applied in electron microscopy (EM), and successfully used for an in situ observation of inner ultrastructure of cells. This powerful technique has recently been extended to the research field of atomic force microscopy (AFM). However, there have been no reports describing AFM imaging of serial thin sections and three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction of cells and their inner structures. In the present study, we used AFM to scan serial thin sections approximately 60nm thick of a mouse embryonic stem (ES) cell, and to observe the in situ inner ultrastructure including cell membrane, cytoplasm, mitochondria, nucleus membrane, and linear chromatin. The high-magnification AFM imaging of single mitochondria clearly demonstrated the outer membrane, inner boundary membrane and cristal membrane of mitochondria in the cellular compartment. Importantly, AFM imaging on six serial thin sections of a single mouse ES cell showed that mitochondria underwent sequential changes in the number, morphology and distribution. These nanoscale images allowed us to perform 3-D surface reconstruction of interested interior structures in cells. Based on the serial in situ images, 3-D models of morphological characteristics, numbers and distributions of interior structures of the single ES cells were validated and reconstructed. Our results suggest that the combined AFM and serial-thin-section technique is useful for the nanoscale imaging and 3-D reconstruction of single cells and their inner structures. This technique may facilitate studies of proliferating and differentiating stages of stem cells or somatic cells at a nanoscale. PMID:15850704

  14. Low-temperature post-deposition annealing investigation for 3D charge trap flash memory by Kelvin probe force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Zongliang; Jin, Lei; Han, Yulong; Li, Xinkai; Ye, Tianchun; Liu, Ming

    2015-01-01

    The influence of post-deposition annealing (PDA) temperature condition on charge distribution behavior of HfO2 thin films was systematically investigated by various-temperature Kelvin probe force microscopy technology. Contact potential difference profiles demonstrated that charge storage capability shrinks with decreasing annealing temperature from 1,000 to 500 °C and lower. Compared to 1,000 °C PDA, it was found that 500 °C PDA causes deeper effective trap energy level, suppresses lateral charge spreading, and improves the retention characteristics. It is concluded that low-temperature PDA can be adopted in 3D HfO2-based charge trap flash memory to improve the thermal treatment compatibility of the bottom peripheral logic and upper memory arrays.

  15. Integration of a 3D hydrogel matrix within a hollow core photonic crystal fibre for DNA probe immobilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutowska, Monika S.; Garcia Gunning, Fatima C.; Kivlehan, Francine; Moore, Eric; Brennan, Des; Galvin, Paul; Ellis, Andrew D.

    2010-09-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the integration of a 3D hydrogel matrix within a hollow core photonic crystal fibre (HC-PCF). In addition, we also show the fluorescence of Cy5-labelled DNA molecules immobilized within the hydrogel formed in two different types of HC-PCF. The 3D hydrogel matrix is designed to bind with the amino groups of biomolecules using an appropriate cross-linker, providing higher sensitivity and selectivity than the standard 2D coverage, enabling a greater number of probe molecules to be available per unit area. The HC-PCFs, on the other hand, can be designed to maximize the capture of fluorescence to improve sensitivity and provide longer interaction lengths. This could enable the development of fibre-based point-of-care and remote systems, where the enhanced sensitivity would relax the constraints placed on sources and detectors. In this paper, we will discuss the formation of such polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogels within a HC-PCF, including their optical properties such as light propagation and auto-fluorescence.

  16. ESPript/ENDscript: extracting and rendering sequence and 3D information from atomic structures of proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gouet, Patrice; Robert, Xavier; Courcelle, Emmanuel

    2003-01-01

    The fortran program ESPript was created in 1993, to display on a PostScript figure multiple sequence alignments adorned with secondary structure elements. A web server was made available in 1999 and ESPript has been linked to three major web tools: ProDom which identifies protein domains, PredictProtein which predicts secondary structure elements and NPS@ which runs sequence alignment programs. A web server named ENDscript was created in 2002 to facilitate the generation of ESPript figures containing a large amount of information. ENDscript uses programs such as BLAST, Clustal and PHYLODENDRON to work on protein sequences and such as DSSP, CNS and MOLSCRIPT to work on protein coordinates. It enables the creation, from a single Protein Data Bank identifier, of a multiple sequence alignment figure adorned with secondary structure elements of each sequence of known 3D structure. Similar 3D structures are superimposed in turn with the program PROFIT and a final figure is drawn with BOBSCRIPT, which shows sequence and structure conservation along the Cα trace of the query. ESPript and ENDscript are available at http://genopole.toulouse.inra.fr/ESPript. PMID:12824317

  17. Performance of a Multispectral Optoacoustic Tomography (MSOT) System equipped with 2D vs. 3D Handheld Probes for Potential Clinical Translation

    PubMed Central

    Neuschmelting, Volker; Burton, Neal C.; Lockau, Hannah; Urich, Alexander; Harmsen, Stefan; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Kircher, Moritz F.

    2015-01-01

    A handheld approach to optoacoustic imaging is essential for the clinical translation. The first 2- and 3-dimensional handheld multispectral optoacoustic tomography (MSOT) probes featuring real-time unmixing have recently been developed. Imaging performance of both probes was determined in vitro and in a brain melanoma metastasis mouse model in vivo. T1-weighted MR images were acquired for anatomical reference. The limit of detection of melanoma cells in vitro was significantly lower using the 2D than the 3D probe. The signal decrease was more profound in relation to depth with the 3D versus the 2D probe. Both approaches were capable of imaging the melanoma tumors qualitatively at all time points. Quantitatively, the 2D approach enabled closer anatomical resemblance of the tumor compared to the 3D probe, particularly at depths beyond 3 mm. The 3D probe was shown to be superior for rapid 3D imaging and, thus, holds promise for more superficial target structures. PMID:27069872

  18. Probe-rotating atomic force microscopy for determining material properties

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang Heon

    2014-03-15

    In this paper, we propose a probe-rotating atomic force microscope that enables scan in an arbitrary direction in the contact imaging mode, which is difficult to achieve using a conventional atomic force microscope owing to the orientation-dependent probe and the inability to rotate the probe head. To enable rotation of the probe about its vertical axis, we employed a compact and light probe head, the sensor of which is made of an optical disk drive pickup unit. Our proposed mechanical configuration, operating principle, and control system enables axial and lateral scan in various directions.

  19. Efficient Nonlinear Atomization Model for Thin 3D Free Liquid Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehring, Carsten

    2007-03-01

    Reviewed is a nonlinear reduced-dimension thin-film model developed by the author and aimed at the prediction of spray formation from thin films such as those found in gas-turbine engines (e.g., prefilming air-blast atomizers), heavy-fuel-oil burners (e.g., rotary-cup atomizers) and in the paint industry (e.g., flat-fan atomizers). Various implementations of the model focusing on different model-aspects, i.e., effect of film geometry, surface tension, liquid viscosity, coupling with surrounding gas-phase flow, influence of long-range intermolecular forces during film rupture are reviewed together with a validation of the nonlinear wave propagation characteristics predicted by the model for inviscid planar films using a two-dimensional vortex- method. An extension and generalization of the current nonlinear film model for implementation into a commercial flow- solver is outlined.

  20. Intraoperative handheld probe for 3D imaging of pediatric benign vocal fold lesions using optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benboujja, Fouzi; Garcia, Jordan; Beaudette, Kathy; Strupler, Mathias; Hartnick, Christopher J.; Boudoux, Caroline

    2016-02-01

    Excessive and repetitive force applied on vocal fold tissue can induce benign vocal fold lesions. Children affected suffer from chronic hoarseness. In this instance, the vibratory ability of the folds, a complex layered microanatomy, becomes impaired. Histological findings have shown that lesions produce a remodeling of sup-epithelial vocal fold layers. However, our understanding of lesion features and development is still limited. Indeed, conventional imaging techniques do not allow a non-invasive assessment of sub-epithelial integrity of the vocal fold. Furthermore, it remains challenging to differentiate these sub-epithelial lesions (such as bilateral nodules, polyps and cysts) from a clinical perspective, as their outer surfaces are relatively similar. As treatment strategy differs for each lesion type, it is critical to efficiently differentiate sub-epithelial alterations involved in benign lesions. In this study, we developed an optical coherence tomography (OCT) based handheld probe suitable for pediatric laryngological imaging. The probe allows for rapid three-dimensional imaging of vocal fold lesions. The system is adapted to allow for high-resolution intra-operative imaging. We imaged 20 patients undergoing direct laryngoscopy during which we looked at different benign pediatric pathologies such as bilateral nodules, cysts and laryngeal papillomatosis and compared them to healthy tissue. We qualitatively and quantitatively characterized laryngeal pathologies and demonstrated the added advantage of using 3D OCT imaging for lesion discrimination and margin assessment. OCT evaluation of the integrity of the vocal cord could yield to a better pediatric management of laryngeal diseases.

  1. Approximating the 3D Character of a Van Der Waals Atom-Solid Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruch, L. W.

    2016-04-01

    A truncated Fourier decomposition of the atom-substrate potential energy is developed for three-dimensional models of van der Waals systems, specifically for adsorption on the basal plane surface of graphite or the (111) face of a face-centered-cubic lattice. This provides a framework for analysis of a priori calculations of physical adsorption energies.

  2. Determination of mass attenuation coefficients and effective atomic numbers for compounds of the 3d transition elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yılmaz, Demet; Boydaş, Elif; Cömert, Esra

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we aimed to determine mass attenuation coefficient (μm) and effective atomic number (Zeff) for some compounds of the 3d transition elements such as CoO, CoF2, CoF3, Cr2O3, CrF2, CrF3, FeO, Fe2O3, MnO2, TiO2, V2O3, VF3, V2O5, VF4 and ZnO at 19.63 and 22.10 keV photon energies by using an HPGe detector with a resolution of 182 eV at 5.9 keV. The experimental results of μm are compared with the theoretical results. Also, effective atomic numbers of compounds of the 3d transition elements have been determined by using experimental and theoretical mass attenuation coefficients. The agreement of measured values of effective atomic numbers with theoretical calculations is quite satisfactory.

  3. Comparison of high harmonic generation and attosecond pulse from 3D hydrogen atom in three kinds of inhomogeneous fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Huiying; Guo, Jing; Feng, Wei; Li, Peng-Cheng; Liu, Xue-Shen

    2016-01-01

    The high harmonic generation (HHG) from 3D hydrogen (H) atom in three kinds of inhomogeneous fields are investigated by solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE) accurately with time-dependent generalized pseudospectral method (TDGPS), and compared together. The corresponding time-frequency and three-step model is also presented to explain the differences between three cases. We will also calculate the ionization probability and electron wavepacket as functions of time to further illustrate this phenomenon. By superposing a series of properly selected harmonics, the isolated attosecond pulses can be obtained straightforwards the shortest of which is 64 as.

  4. Single-qubit gates based on targeted phase shifts in a 3D neutral atom array.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Kumar, Aishwarya; Wu, Tsung-Yao; Weiss, David S

    2016-06-24

    Although the quality of individual quantum bits (qubits) and quantum gates has been steadily improving, the number of qubits in a single system has increased quite slowly. Here, we demonstrate arbitrary single-qubit gates based on targeted phase shifts, an approach that can be applied to atom, ion, or other atom-like systems. These gates are highly insensitive to addressing beam imperfections and have little cross-talk, allowing for a dramatic scaling up of qubit number. We have performed gates in series on 48 individually targeted sites in a 40% full 5 by 5 by 5 three-dimensional array created by an optical lattice. Using randomized benchmarking, we demonstrate an average gate fidelity of 0.9962(16), with an average cross-talk fidelity of 0.9979(2) (numbers in parentheses indicate the one standard deviation uncertainty in the final digits). PMID:27339984

  5. Atomic identification of fluorescent Q-dots on tau-positive fibrils in 3D-reconstructed pick bodies.

    PubMed

    Uematsu, Miho; Adachi, Eijiro; Nakamura, Ayako; Tsuchiya, Kuniaki; Uchihara, Toshiki

    2012-04-01

    Pick body disease, characterized by the presence of Pick bodies, is distinguished from neurofibrillary tangles in Alzheimer disease on the basis of their smooth, spherical shape. Quantum dots (QDs) are nanometer-scale, water-soluble fluorophores that are detectable both as a fluorescent signal by light microscopy and as electron-dense particles under electron microscopy. In this study, tau-positive Pick bodies were immunofluorescently labeled with QD nanocrystals composed of cadmium selenide for three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction and subsequently subjected to electron microscopic observation to identify QD immunolabeling on the same Pick body for comparison in detail. The identity of the QD nanocrystals, which label the tau-positive fibrils, was confirmed by the presence of both cadmium and selenium on these nanocrystals, demonstrated as parallel peaks corresponding to these atoms on energy-dispersive X-ray spot analysis under super-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy. This confirmation of the specificity of the QD labeling through both its fluorescence and energy-dispersive X-ray spectra reinforces the reliability of the labeling. In addition, this exact comparison of the same structure by electron microscopy and 3D light microscopy demonstrates how its ultrastructural details are related to its surrounding structures on a 3D basis, providing further insights into how molecules woven into specific pathological ultrastructures are at work in situ. PMID:22322305

  6. Adsorption of alkali, alkaline-earth, and 3d transition metal atoms on silicene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin, H.; Peeters, F. M.

    2013-02-01

    The adsorption characteristics of alkali, alkaline-earth, and transition metal adatoms on silicene, a graphene-like monolayer structure of silicon are analyzed by means of first-principles calculations. In contrast to graphene, interaction between the metal atoms and the silicene surface is quite strong due to its highly reactive buckled hexagonal structure. In addition to structural properties, we also calculate the electronic band dispersion, net magnetic moment, charge transfer, work function, and dipole moment of the metal adsorbed silicene sheets. Alkali metals, Li, Na, and K, adsorb to hollow sites without any lattice distortion. As a consequence of the significant charge transfer from alkalis to silicene, metalization of silicene takes place. Trends directly related to atomic size, adsorption height, work function, and dipole moment of the silicene/alkali adatom system are also revealed. We found that the adsorption of alkaline-earth metals on silicene is entirely different from their adsorption on graphene. The adsorption of Be, Mg, and Ca turns silicene into a narrow gap semiconductor. Adsorption characteristics of eight transition metals Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Mo, and W are also investigated. As a result of their partially occupied d orbital, transition metals show diverse structural, electronic, and magnetic properties. Upon the adsorption of transition metals, depending on the adatom type and atomic radius, the system can exhibit metal, half-metal, and semiconducting behavior. For all metal adsorbates, the direction of the charge transfer is from adsorbate to silicene, because of its high surface reactivity. Our results indicate that the reactive crystal structure of silicene provides a rich playground for functionalization at nanoscale.

  7. Atomic-resolution 3D structure of amyloid β fibrils: The Osaka mutation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Schutz, Anne K.; Wall, Joseph; Vagt, Toni; Huber, Matthias; Ovchinnikova, Oxana Y.; Cadalbert, Riccardo; Guntert, Peter; Bockmann, Anja; Glockshuber, Rudi; Meier, Beat H.

    2014-11-13

    Despite its central importance for understanding the molecular basis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), high-resolution structural information on amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) fibrils, which are intimately linked with AD, is scarce. We report an atomic-resolution fibril structure of the Aβ 1-40 peptide with the Osaka mutation (E22Δ), associated with early-onset AD. The structure, which differs substantially from all previously proposed models, is based on a large number of unambiguous intra- and intermolecular solid-state NMR distance restraints

  8. Embrittlement of RPV steels; An atom probe tomography perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Michael K; Russell, Kaye F

    2007-01-01

    Atom probe tomography has played a key role in the understanding of the embrittlement of neutron irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels through the atomic level characterization of the microstructure. Atom probe tomography has been used to demonstrate the importance of the post weld stress relief treatment in reducing the matrix copper content in high copper alloys, the formation of {approx}-nm-diameter copper-, nickel-, manganese- and silicon-enriched precipitates during neutron irradiation in copper containing RPV steels, and the coarsening of these precipitates during post irradiation heat treatments. Atom probe tomography has been used to detect {approx}2-nm-diameter nickel-, silicon- and manganese-enriched clusters in neutron irradiated low copper and copper free alloys. Atom probe tomography has also been used to quantify solute segregation to, and precipitation on, dislocations and grain boundaries.

  9. 3D electron tomography of pretreated biomass informs atomic modeling of cellulose microfibrils.

    PubMed

    Ciesielski, Peter N; Matthews, James F; Tucker, Melvin P; Beckham, Gregg T; Crowley, Michael F; Himmel, Michael E; Donohoe, Bryon S

    2013-09-24

    Fundamental insights into the macromolecular architecture of plant cell walls will elucidate new structure-property relationships and facilitate optimization of catalytic processes that produce fuels and chemicals from biomass. Here we introduce computational methodology to extract nanoscale geometry of cellulose microfibrils within thermochemically treated biomass directly from electron tomographic data sets. We quantitatively compare the cell wall nanostructure in corn stover following two leading pretreatment strategies: dilute acid with iron sulfate co-catalyst and ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX). Computational analysis of the tomographic data is used to extract mathematical descriptions for longitudinal axes of cellulose microfibrils from which we calculate their nanoscale curvature. These nanostructural measurements are used to inform the construction of atomistic models that exhibit features of cellulose within real, process-relevant biomass. By computational evaluation of these atomic models, we propose relationships between the crystal structure of cellulose Iβ and the nanoscale geometry of cellulose microfibrils. PMID:23988022

  10. Probing Protein 3D Structures and Conformational Changes Using Electrochemistry-Assisted Isotope Labeling Cross-Linking Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qiuling; Zhang, Hao; Wu, Shiyong; Chen, Hao

    2016-05-01

    This study presents a new chemical cross-linking mass spectrometry (MS) method in combination with electrochemistry and isotope labeling strategy for probing both protein three-dimensional (3D) structures and conformational changes. For the former purpose, the target protein/protein complex is cross-linked with equal mole of premixed light and heavy isotope labeled cross-linkers carrying electrochemically reducible disulfide bonds (i.e., DSP-d0 and DSP-d8 in this study, DSP = dithiobis[succinimidyl propionate]), digested and then electrochemically reduced followed with online MS analysis. Cross-links can be quickly identified because of their reduced intensities upon electrolysis and the presence of doublet isotopic peak characteristics. In addition, electroreduction converts cross-links into linear peptides, facilitating MS/MS analysis to gain increased information about their sequences and modification sites. For the latter purpose of probing protein conformational changes, an altered procedure is adopted, in which the protein in two different conformations is cross-linked using DSP-d0 and DSP-d8 separately, and then the two protein samples are mixed in 1:1 molar ratio. The merged sample is subjected to digestion and electrochemical mass spectrometric analysis. In such a comparative cross-linking experiment, cross-links could still be rapidly recognized based on their responses to electrolysis. More importantly, the ion intensity ratios of light and heavy isotope labeled cross-links reveal the conformational changes of the protein, as exemplified by examining the effect of Ca(2+) on calmodulin conformation alternation. This new cross-linking MS method is fast and would have high value in structural biology. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26902947

  11. Probing Protein 3D Structures and Conformational Changes Using Electrochemistry-Assisted Isotope Labeling Cross-Linking Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Qiuling; Zhang, Hao; Wu, Shiyong; Chen, Hao

    2016-05-01

    This study presents a new chemical cross-linking mass spectrometry (MS) method in combination with electrochemistry and isotope labeling strategy for probing both protein three-dimensional (3D) structures and conformational changes. For the former purpose, the target protein/protein complex is cross-linked with equal mole of premixed light and heavy isotope labeled cross-linkers carrying electrochemically reducible disulfide bonds (i.e., DSP-d0 and DSP-d8 in this study, DSP = dithiobis[succinimidyl propionate]), digested and then electrochemically reduced followed with online MS analysis. Cross-links can be quickly identified because of their reduced intensities upon electrolysis and the presence of doublet isotopic peak characteristics. In addition, electroreduction converts cross-links into linear peptides, facilitating MS/MS analysis to gain increased information about their sequences and modification sites. For the latter purpose of probing protein conformational changes, an altered procedure is adopted, in which the protein in two different conformations is cross-linked using DSP-d0 and DSP-d8 separately, and then the two protein samples are mixed in 1:1 molar ratio. The merged sample is subjected to digestion and electrochemical mass spectrometric analysis. In such a comparative cross-linking experiment, cross-links could still be rapidly recognized based on their responses to electrolysis. More importantly, the ion intensity ratios of light and heavy isotope labeled cross-links reveal the conformational changes of the protein, as exemplified by examining the effect of Ca2+ on calmodulin conformation alternation. This new cross-linking MS method is fast and would have high value in structural biology.

  12. Probing Protein 3D Structures and Conformational Changes Using Electrochemistry-Assisted Isotope Labeling Cross-Linking Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Qiuling; Zhang, Hao; Wu, Shiyong; Chen, Hao

    2016-02-01

    This study presents a new chemical cross-linking mass spectrometry (MS) method in combination with electrochemistry and isotope labeling strategy for probing both protein three-dimensional (3D) structures and conformational changes. For the former purpose, the target protein/protein complex is cross-linked with equal mole of premixed light and heavy isotope labeled cross-linkers carrying electrochemically reducible disulfide bonds (i.e., DSP-d0 and DSP-d8 in this study, DSP = dithiobis[succinimidyl propionate]), digested and then electrochemically reduced followed with online MS analysis. Cross-links can be quickly identified because of their reduced intensities upon electrolysis and the presence of doublet isotopic peak characteristics. In addition, electroreduction converts cross-links into linear peptides, facilitating MS/MS analysis to gain increased information about their sequences and modification sites. For the latter purpose of probing protein conformational changes, an altered procedure is adopted, in which the protein in two different conformations is cross-linked using DSP-d0 and DSP-d8 separately, and then the two protein samples are mixed in 1:1 molar ratio. The merged sample is subjected to digestion and electrochemical mass spectrometric analysis. In such a comparative cross-linking experiment, cross-links could still be rapidly recognized based on their responses to electrolysis. More importantly, the ion intensity ratios of light and heavy isotope labeled cross-links reveal the conformational changes of the protein, as exemplified by examining the effect of Ca2+ on calmodulin conformation alternation. This new cross-linking MS method is fast and would have high value in structural biology.

  13. 3D Atomic Arrangement at Functional Interfaces Inside Nanoparticles by Resonant High-Energy X-ray Diffraction.

    PubMed

    Petkov, Valeri; Prasai, Binay; Shastri, Sarvjit; Chen, Tsan-Yao

    2015-10-21

    With current science and technology moving rapidly into smaller scales, nanometer-sized materials, often referred to as NPs, are produced in increasing numbers and explored for numerous useful applications. Evidence is mounting, however, that useful properties of NPs can be improved further and even new NP functionality achieved by not only controlling the NP size and shape but also interfacing chemically or structurally distinct entities into single, so-called "composite" NPs. A typical example is core-shell NPs wherein the synergy of distinct atoms at the core\\shell interface endows the NPs with otherwise unachievable functionality. However, though advantageous, the concept of functional interfaces inside NPs is still pursued largely by trial-and-error. That is because it is difficut to assess the interfaces precisely at the atomic level using traditional experimental techniques and, hence, difficult to take control of. Using the core\\shell interface in less than 10 nm in size Ru core-Pt shells NPs as an example, we demonstrate that precise knowledge of the 3D atomic arrangement at functional interfaces inside NPs can be obtained by resonant high-energy X-ray diffraction (XRD) coupled to element-specific atomic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis. On the basis of the unique structure knowledge obtained, we scrutinize the still-debatable influence of core\\shell interface on the catalytic functionality of Ru core-Pt shell NPs, thus evidencing the usefulness of this nontraditional technique for practical applications. PMID:26415142

  14. 3-D Raman Imagery and Atomic Force Microscopy of Ancient Microscopic Fossils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schopf, J.

    2003-12-01

    Investigations of the Precambrian (~540- to ~3,500-Ma-old) fossil record depend critically on identification of authentic microbial fossils. Combined with standard paleontologic studies (e.g., of paleoecologic setting, population structure, cellular morphology, preservational variants), two techniques recently introduced to such studies -- Raman imagery and atomic force microscopy -- can help meet this need. Laser-Raman imagery is a non-intrusive, non-destructive technique that can be used to demonstrate a micron-scale one-to-one correlation between optically discernable morphology and the organic (kerogenous) composition of individual microbial fossils(1,2), a prime indicator of biogencity. Such analyses can be used to characterize the molecular-structural makeup of organic-walled microscopic fossils both in acid-resistant residues and in petrographic thin sections, and whether the fossils analyzed are exposed at the upper surface of, or are embedded within (to depths >65 microns), the section studied. By providing means to map chemically, in three dimensions, whole fossils or parts of such fossils(3), Raman imagery can also show the presence of cell lumina, interior cellular cavities, another prime indicator of biogenicity. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to visualize the nanometer-scale structure of the kerogenous components of single Precambrian microscopic fossils(4). Capable of analyzing minute fragments of ancient organic matter exposed at the upper surface of thin sections (or of kerogen particles deposited on flat surfaces), such analyses hold promise not only for discriminating between biotic and abiotic micro-objects but for elucidation of the domain size -- and, thus, the degree of graphitization -- of the graphene subunits of the carbonaceous matter analyzed. These techniques -- both new to paleobiology -- can provide useful insight into the biogenicity and geochemical maturity of ancient organic matter. References: (1) Kudryavtsev, A.B. et

  15. Advances in the calibration of atom probe tomographic reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Gault, Baptiste; Moody, Michael P.; La Fontaine, Alexandre; Stephenson, Leigh T.; Haley, Daniel; Ringer, Simon P.; Geuser, Frederic de; Tsafnat, Guy

    2009-02-01

    Modern wide field-of-view atom probes permit observation of a wide range of crystallographic features that can be used to calibrate the tomographic reconstruction of the analyzed volume. In this study, methodologies to determine values of the geometric parameters involved in the tomographic reconstruction of atom probe data sets are presented and discussed. The influence of the tip to electrode distance and specimen temperature on these parameters is explored. Significantly, their influence is demonstrated to be very limited, indicating a relatively wide regime of experimental parameters space for sound atom probe tomography (APT) experiments. These methods have been used on several specimens and material types, and the results indicate that the reconstruction parameters are specific to each specimen. Finally, it is shown how an accurate calibration of the reconstruction enables improvements to the quality and reliability of the microscopy and microanalysis capabilities of the atom probe.

  16. Probing the shape of atoms in real space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herz, M.; Giessibl, F. J.; Mannhart, J.

    2003-07-01

    The structure of single atoms in real space is investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy. Very high resolution can be obtained by a dramatic reduction of the tip-sample distance. The instabilities which are normally encountered while using small tip-sample distances are avoided by oscillating the tip of the scanning tunneling microscope vertically with respect to the sample. The surface atoms of Si(111)-(7×7) with their well-known electronic configuration are used to image individual samarium, cobalt, iron, and silicon atoms. The resulting images resemble the charge density corresponding to 4f, 3d, and 3p atomic orbitals.

  17. Metastable atom probe for measuring electron beam density profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockhart, J. M.; Zorn, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    Metastable atom probe was developed for measuring current density in electron beam as function of two arbitrary coordinates, with spatial resolution better than 0.5 mm. Probe shows effects of space charge, magnetic fields, and other factors which influence electron current density, but operates with such low beam densities that introduced perturbation is very small.

  18. First data from a commercial local electrode atom probe (LEAP).

    PubMed

    Kelly, Thomas F; Gribb, Tye T; Olson, Jesse D; Martens, Richard L; Shepard, Jeffrey D; Wiener, Scott A; Kunicki, Thomas C; Ulfig, Robert M; Lenz, Daniel R; Strennen, Eric M; Oltman, Edward; Bunton, Joseph H; Strait, David R

    2004-06-01

    The first dedicated local electrode atom probes (LEAP [a trademark of Imago Scientific Instruments Corporation]) have been built and tested as commercial prototypes. Several key performance parameters have been markedly improved relative to conventional three-dimensional atom probe (3DAP) designs. The Imago LEAP can operate at a sustained data collection rate of 1 million atoms/minute. This is some 600 times faster than the next fastest atom probe and large images can be collected in less than 1 h that otherwise would take many days. The field of view of the Imago LEAP is about 40 times larger than conventional 3DAPs. This makes it possible to analyze regions that are about 100 nm diameter by 100 nm deep containing on the order of 50 to 100 million atoms with this instrument. Several example applications that illustrate the advantages of the LEAP for materials analysis are presented. PMID:15233856

  19. Atom probe tomography of a commercial light emitting diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, D. J.; Prosa, T. J.; Olson, D.; Lefebvre, W.; Lawrence, D.; Clifton, P. H.; Kelly, T. F.

    2013-11-01

    The atomic-scale analysis of a commercial light emitting diode device purchased at retail is demonstrated using a local electrode atom probe. Some of the features are correlated with transmission electron microscopy imaging. Subtle details of the structure that are revealed have potential significance for the design and performance of this device.

  20. Quantum metrology with a scanning probe atom interferometer.

    PubMed

    Ockeloen, Caspar F; Schmied, Roman; Riedel, Max F; Treutlein, Philipp

    2013-10-01

    We use a small Bose-Einstein condensate on an atom chip as an interferometric scanning probe to map out a microwave field near the chip surface with a few micrometers resolution. With the use of entanglement between the atoms, our interferometer overcomes the standard quantum limit of interferometry by 4 dB and maintains enhanced performance for interrogation times up to 10 ms. This corresponds to a microwave magnetic field sensitivity of 77 pT/√Hz in a probe volume of 20 μm(3). Quantum metrology with entangled atoms is useful in measurements with high spatial resolution, since the atom number in the probe volume is limited by collisional loss. High-resolution measurements of microwave near fields, as demonstrated here, are important for the development of integrated microwave circuits for quantum information processing and applications in communication technology. PMID:24138235

  1. In situ geomechanics of crystalline and sedimentary rocks; Part IV, continued field testing of the modified U.S. Geological Survey 3-D borehole stress probe

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, Thomas C.

    1983-01-01

    Two modified and calibrated U.S. Geological Survey 3-D borehole probes were successfully tested in the field at a site on South Table Mountain, near Golden, Colo. The probes were installed in separate core holes at depths of 84 and 99 cm in the latite cap rock and subsequently stress relieved with overcoring techniques. The determined stresses from both probes are very low and contain both tensile and compressive components. Magnitudes range from 1196 KPa in tension to 832 KPa in compression. The principal stress orientations are in fair agreement whereas the horizontal secondary principal stress directions are in good agreement; the maximum horizontal compressive stress is oriented N. 76? W.-S. 76? E. for one probe and N. 63? W.-S. 63? E. for the second probe. The greatest determined Young's modulus of the rock is in the N. 89? E. direction, only 15? from the maximum horizontal compressive stress direction.

  2. Probing dark energy with atom interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrage, Clare; Copeland, Edmund J.; Hinds, E. A.

    2015-03-01

    Theories of dark energy require a screening mechanism to explain why the associated scalar fields do not mediate observable long range fifth forces. The archetype of this is the chameleon field. Here we show that individual atoms are too small to screen the chameleon field inside a large high-vacuum chamber, and therefore can detect the field with high sensitivity. We derive new limits on the chameleon parameters from existing experiments, and show that most of the remaining chameleon parameter space is readily accessible using atom interferometry.

  3. Quantum metrology to probe atomic parity nonconservation

    SciTech Connect

    Mandal, P.; Mukherjee, M.

    2010-11-15

    An entangled state prepared in a decoherence-free subspace, together with a Ramsey-type measurement, can probe parity violation in heavy alkali-metal ions such as Ba{sup +} or Ra{sup +}. Here we propose an experiment with Ba{sup +} as an example to measure the small parity-violating effect in this system. It has been shown that a measurement on a maximally correlated system will reduce the uncertainty as compared to that on a single ion measurement, and also provides a feasible solution to measure the nuclear-spin-dependent part of the total parity-violating light shift in an ionic system.

  4. Detecting magnetic ordering with atomic size electron probes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Idrobo, Juan Carlos; Rusz, Ján; Spiegelberg, Jakob; McGuire, Michael A.; Symons, Christopher T.; Vatsavai, Ranga Raju; Cantoni, Claudia; Lupini, Andrew R.

    2016-05-27

    While magnetism originates at the atomic scale, the existing spectroscopic techniques sensitive to magnetic signals only produce spectra with spatial resolution on a larger scale. However, recently, it has been theoretically argued that atomic size electron probes with customized phase distributions can detect magnetic circular dichroism. Here, we report a direct experimental real-space detection of magnetic circular dichroism in aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Using an atomic size-aberrated electron probe with a customized phase distribution, we reveal the checkerboard antiferromagnetic ordering of Mn moments in LaMnAsO by observing a dichroic signal in the Mn L-edge. The novel experimental setupmore » presented here, which can easily be implemented in aberration-corrected STEM, opens new paths for probing dichroic signals in materials with unprecedented spatial resolution.« less

  5. Investigation of dopant clustering and segregation to defects in semiconductors using atom probe tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blavette, D.; Duguay, S.

    2016-05-01

    The role of atom probe tomography in the investigation of clustering and segregation of dopants to lattice defects in semiconductors is highlighted on the basis of some selected salient illustrations obtained at the Groupe de Physique des Matériaux of Rouen (France). The instrument is shown to be able to map out the 3D distribution of chemical species in the three dimensions of space at the ultimate scale. Results related to clustering, segregation of dopants (As, B, and P) to grain boundaries, dislocation loops, and extended defects in silicon are discussed.

  6. Cation-Exchange Porosity Tuning in a Dynamic 4d-4f-3d Framework for Ni(II) Ion-Selective Luminescent Probe.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Wang, Xiu-Guang; Yuan, Bin; Shao, Cheng-Yuan; Chen, Yuan-Yuan; Zhou, Bing-Bing; Li, Ming-Shu; An, Xiao-Mai; Cheng, Peng; Zhao, Xiao-Jun

    2015-05-01

    A heterometallic complex {[Yb2(L)6Cd2][Cd(H2O)6]·6H2O}n (Yb-Cd) (H2L = oxidiacetic acid) was synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. In Yb-Cd, each L chelates to one Yb(3+) center and bonds to two Cd(2+) ions in an anti-anti configuration. Yb and Cd atoms are arrayed alternatively and connected by O-C-O bridges to form a cubic octahedral cage as the secondary building unit. Consequently, topological NaCl nets with high symmetry in the cubic space group Fd-3c have been constructed. The [Cd(H2O)6](2+) moieties lying in the porosity of anionic metal-organic framework (MOF) act as the thermodynamically stable species, required to balance the two negative charges of [Yb2(L)6Cd2](2-) in Yb-Cd. Interestingly, when Yb-Cd was employed as a precursor and emerged in the aqueous solution of Mn(ClO4)2·6H2O or Zn(ClO4)2·6H2O, a reversible single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation process driven by [Cd(H2O)6](2+) cations has been exhibited to generate the heterotrimetallic coordination polymer {[Yb2(L)6Cd2][Mn(H2O)6]·6H2O}n (Yb-Cd-Mn) or {[Yb2(L)6Cd2][Zn(H2O)6]·6H2O}n (Yb-Cd-Zn). To the best of out knowledge, Yb-Cd-Mn and Yb-Cd-Zn are the first examples representing 4d-4f-3d polymers based on multicarboxylic acid. Luminescent studies reveal that Yb-Cd-Zn may serve as a good candidate of Ni(2+) a luminescent probe. To our knowledge, Yb-Cd-Zn represent the fist example of the 4d-4f-3d framework to exhibit luminescent selectivity for Ni(2+). PMID:25885253

  7. 3D-nanoarchitectured Pd/Ni catalysts prepared by atomic layer deposition for the electrooxidation of formic acid

    PubMed Central

    Assaud, Loïc; Monyoncho, Evans; Pitzschel, Kristina; Allagui, Anis; Petit, Matthieu; Hanbücken, Margrit

    2014-01-01

    Summary Three-dimensionally (3D) nanoarchitectured palladium/nickel (Pd/Ni) catalysts, which were prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on high-aspect-ratio nanoporous alumina templates are investigated with regard to the electrooxidation of formic acid in an acidic medium (0.5 M H2SO4). Both deposition processes, Ni and Pd, with various mass content ratios have been continuously monitored by using a quartz crystal microbalance. The morphology of the Pd/Ni systems has been studied by electron microscopy and shows a homogeneous deposition of granularly structured Pd onto the Ni substrate. X-ray diffraction analysis performed on Ni and NiO substrates revealed an amorphous structure, while the Pd coating crystallized into a fcc lattice with a preferential orientation along the [220]-direction. Surface chemistry analysis by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed both metallic and oxide contributions for the Ni and Pd deposits. Cyclic voltammetry of the Pd/Ni nanocatalysts revealed that the electrooxidation of HCOOH proceeds through the direct dehydrogenation mechanism with the formation of active intermediates. High catalytic activities are measured for low masses of Pd coatings that were generated by a low number of ALD cycles, probably because of the cluster size effect, electronic interactions between Pd and Ni, or diffusion effects. PMID:24605281

  8. Artemisinin activity-based probes identify multiple molecular targets within the asexual stage of the malaria parasites Plasmodium falciparum 3D7

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Hanafy M.; Barton, Victoria; Phanchana, Matthew; Charoensutthivarakul, Sitthivut; Wong, Michael H. L.; Hemingway, Janet; Biagini, Giancarlo A.; O’Neill, Paul M.; Ward, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    The artemisinin (ART)-based antimalarials have contributed significantly to reducing global malaria deaths over the past decade, but we still do not know how they kill parasites. To gain greater insight into the potential mechanisms of ART drug action, we developed a suite of ART activity-based protein profiling probes to identify parasite protein drug targets in situ. Probes were designed to retain biological activity and alkylate the molecular target(s) of Plasmodium falciparum 3D7 parasites in situ. Proteins tagged with the ART probe can then be isolated using click chemistry before identification by liquid chromatography–MS/MS. Using these probes, we define an ART proteome that shows alkylated targets in the glycolytic, hemoglobin degradation, antioxidant defense, and protein synthesis pathways, processes essential for parasite survival. This work reveals the pleiotropic nature of the biological functions targeted by this important class of antimalarial drugs. PMID:26858419

  9. Artemisinin activity-based probes identify multiple molecular targets within the asexual stage of the malaria parasites Plasmodium falciparum 3D7.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Hanafy M; Barton, Victoria; Phanchana, Matthew; Charoensutthivarakul, Sitthivut; Wong, Michael H L; Hemingway, Janet; Biagini, Giancarlo A; O'Neill, Paul M; Ward, Stephen A

    2016-02-23

    The artemisinin (ART)-based antimalarials have contributed significantly to reducing global malaria deaths over the past decade, but we still do not know how they kill parasites. To gain greater insight into the potential mechanisms of ART drug action, we developed a suite of ART activity-based protein profiling probes to identify parasite protein drug targets in situ. Probes were designed to retain biological activity and alkylate the molecular target(s) of Plasmodium falciparum 3D7 parasites in situ. Proteins tagged with the ART probe can then be isolated using click chemistry before identification by liquid chromatography-MS/MS. Using these probes, we define an ART proteome that shows alkylated targets in the glycolytic, hemoglobin degradation, antioxidant defense, and protein synthesis pathways, processes essential for parasite survival. This work reveals the pleiotropic nature of the biological functions targeted by this important class of antimalarial drugs. PMID:26858419

  10. Neuron Biomechanics Probed by Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Spedden, Elise; Staii, Cristian

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical interactions play a key role in many processes associated with neuronal growth and development. Over the last few years there has been significant progress in our understanding of the role played by the substrate stiffness in neuronal growth, of the cell-substrate adhesion forces, of the generation of traction forces during axonal elongation, and of the relationships between the neuron soma elastic properties and its health. The particular capabilities of the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), such as high spatial resolution, high degree of control over the magnitude and orientation of the applied forces, minimal sample damage, and the ability to image and interact with cells in physiologically relevant conditions make this technique particularly suitable for measuring mechanical properties of living neuronal cells. This article reviews recent advances on using the AFM for studying neuronal biomechanics, provides an overview about the state-of-the-art measurements, and suggests directions for future applications. PMID:23921683

  11. Neuron biomechanics probed by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Spedden, Elise; Staii, Cristian

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical interactions play a key role in many processes associated with neuronal growth and development. Over the last few years there has been significant progress in our understanding of the role played by the substrate stiffness in neuronal growth, of the cell-substrate adhesion forces, of the generation of traction forces during axonal elongation, and of the relationships between the neuron soma elastic properties and its health. The particular capabilities of the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), such as high spatial resolution, high degree of control over the magnitude and orientation of the applied forces, minimal sample damage, and the ability to image and interact with cells in physiologically relevant conditions make this technique particularly suitable for measuring mechanical properties of living neuronal cells. This article reviews recent advances on using the AFM for studying neuronal biomechanics, provides an overview about the state-of-the-art measurements, and suggests directions for future applications. PMID:23921683

  12. Characterisation of embroidered 3D electrodes by use of anthraquinone-1,5-disulfonic acid as probe system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiló-Aguayo, Noemí; Bechtold, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    New electrode designs are required for electrochemical applications such as batteries or fuel cells. Embroidered 3D Cu porous electrodes with a geometric surface of 100 cm2 are presented and characterised by means of the anthraquinone-1,5-disfulfonic acid (AQDS2-) redox system in alkaline solution. The electrochemical behaviour of the 3D electrode is established by the comparison of cyclic voltammetry responses using a micro cell and a 100 cm2 plane Cu-plate electrode. Dependencies of the peak currents and peak-to-peak potential separation on scan rate and AQDS2- concentration are studied. The AQDS2- characterisation is also performed by means of spectroelectrochemical experiments.

  13. Imaging of radiation damage using complementary field ion microscopy and atom probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Dagan, Michal; Hanna, Luke R; Xu, Alan; Roberts, Steve G; Smith, George D W; Gault, Baptiste; Edmondson, Philip D; Bagot, Paul A J; Moody, Michael P

    2015-12-01

    Radiation damage in tungsten and a tungsten-tantalum alloy, both of relevance to nuclear fusion research, has been characterized using a combination of field ion microscopy (FIM) imaging and atom probe tomography (APT). While APT provides 3D analytical imaging with sub-nanometer resolution, FIM is capable of imaging the arrangements of single atoms on a crystal lattice and has the potential to provide insights into radiation induced crystal damage, all the way down to its smallest manifestation--a single vacancy. This paper demonstrates the strength of combining these characterization techniques. In ion implanted tungsten, it was found that atomic scale lattice damage is best imaged using FIM. In certain cases, APT reveals an identifiable imprint in the data via the segregation of solute and impurities and trajectory aberrations. In a W-5at%Ta alloy, a combined APT-FIM study was able to determine the atomic distribution of tantalum inside the tungsten matrix. An indirect method was implemented to identify tantalum atoms inside the tungsten matrix in FIM images. By tracing irregularities in the evaporation sequence of atoms imaged with FIM, this method enables the benefit of FIM's atomic resolution in chemical distinction between the two species. PMID:25794822

  14. 3D Cell-SELEX: Development of RNA aptamers as molecular probes for PC-3 tumor cell line.

    PubMed

    Souza, Aline G; Marangoni, Karina; Fujimura, Patrícia T; Alves, Patrícia T; Silva, Márcio J; Bastos, Victor Alexandre F; Goulart, Luiz R; Goulart, Vivian A

    2016-02-15

    Human prostate cancer (PCa) is a highly heterogeneous and multifactorial disease. Current clinical biomarkers are not sufficiently accurate, thus being unable to predict the clinical outcome. Therefore, searching for new biomarkers aiming to improve diagnosis, prognosis and therapy is still required. In this study, we performed 3D Cell-SELEX against PC-3 prostate cancer cell line, a novel strategy to select specific nucleic acid ligands against spheroid cells in 3D cell culture. This original system combines Cell-SELEX, a process that exploits the cellular structure to generate specific ligands, and 3D cell culture, an approach that mimics the tissue microenvironment in vitro. In the first round of 3D Cell-SELEX, a negative selection against RWPE-1, non-tumor cell line, was performed to subtract non-tumor specific aptamers. The supernatant was used in eight additional rounds of selection, which were performed against PC-3 cell line. After nine selection cycles, eight PC-3 specific RNA aptamers were selected and sequenced. The aptamers presented sizes between 20 and 50 nucleotides-long, with low free energy (∆G<-13.6), which contributed for their spontaneous folding and high stability. Furthermore, our results showed the aptamer A4 as a specific ligand to prostate tumor cells, with dissociation constant in the nanomolar scale. Therefore, the novel 3D Cell-SELEX procedure improved the selection of PCa cell-surface ligands and the aptamer A4 has shown potential for the identification of prostate tumor cells, suggesting the application of this molecule in further screening assays for PCa. PMID:26821206

  15. Atom probe tomographic mapping directly reveals the atomic distribution of phosphorus in resin embedded ferritin

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Perea, Daniel E.; Liu, Jia; Bartrand, Jonah A. G.; Dicken, Quinten G.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai Theva; Browning, Nigel D.; Evans, James E.

    2016-02-29

    In this study, we report the atomic-scale analysis of biological interfaces using atom probe tomography. Embedding the protein ferritin in an organic polymer resin lacking nitrogen provided chemical contrast to visualize atomic distributions and distinguish organic-organic and organic-inorganic interfaces. The sample preparation method can be directly extended to further enhance the study of biological, organic and inorganic nanomaterials relevant to health, energy or the environment.

  16. Towards 3D charge localization by a method derived from atomic force microscopy: the electrostatic force distance curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villeneuve-Faure, C.; Boudou, L.; Makasheva, K.; Teyssedre, G.

    2014-11-01

    Charges injection and accumulation in the dielectric remains a critical issue, mainly because these phenomena are involved in a great number of failure mechanisms in cables or electronic components. Achieving a better understanding of the mechanisms leading to charge injection, transport and trapping under electrical stress and of the relevant interface phenomena is a high priority. The classical methods used for space charge density profile measurements have a limited spatial resolution, which prevents them being used for investigating thin dielectric layers or interface processes. Thus, techniques derived from atomic force microscopy (AFM) have been investigated more and more for this kind of application, but so far they have been limited by their lack of in-depth sensitivity. In this paper a new method for space charge probing is described, the electrostatic force distance curve (EFDC), which is based on electrostatic force measurements using AFM. A comparison with the results obtained using kelvin force microscopy (KFM) allowed us to highlight the fact that EFDC is sensitive to charges localized in the third-dimension.

  17. Atomic Scale Characterization of Compound Semiconductors using Atom Probe Tomography: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Gorman, B. P.; Guthrey, H.; Norman, A. G.; Al-Jassim, M.; Lawrence, D.; Prosa, T.

    2011-07-01

    Internal interfaces are critical in determining the performance of III-V multijunction solar cells. Studying these interfaces with atomic resolution using a combination of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atom probe tomography (APT), and density functional calculations enables a more fundamental understanding of carrier dynamics in photovoltaic (PV) device structures. To achieve full atomic scale spatial and chemical resolution, data acquisition parameters in laser pulsed APT must be carefully studied to eliminate surface diffusion. Atom probe data with minimized group V ion clustering and expected stoichiometry can be achieved by adjusting laser pulse power, pulse repetition rate, and specimen preparation parameters such that heat flow away from the evaporating surface is maximized. Applying these improved analysis conditions to III-V based PV gives an atomic scale understanding of compositional and dopant profiles across interfaces and tunnel junctions and the initial stages of alloy clustering and dopant accumulation. Details on APT experimental methods and future in-situ instrumentation developments are illustrated.

  18. High-Resolution B Dot Probe for Measuring 3D Magnetic Fields in the MOCHI Labjet Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuara Rosales, Manuel; von der Linden, Jens; You, Setthivoine

    2014-10-01

    The MOCHI Labjet experiment will use a triple electrode planar plasma gun to explore canonical helicity transport in laboratory astrophysical jets. Canonical helicity transport suggests that destabilizing magnetic energy can be converted into stabilizing shear flows at two-fluid spatial scales li ~c/wpi . A high-resolution . B probe array, capable of measuring magnetic field dynamics at length and time scales important to canonical helicity transport is being built. The probe array consists of three tridents, made of 5 . 13 mm OD and 4 . 32 mm ID stainless steel tubes of 102 cm length, enclosing a total of 1215 commercial inductor chips with a three axis spatial resolution of 11 mm. The average value for the effective NA of each inductor chip is 1 . 21 .10-4 m2. The probe array lays in a plane perpendicular to the jet, and is axially translatable. This work is supported by US DOE Grant DE-SC0010340.

  19. Probing stem cell differentiation using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xiaobin; Shi, Xuetao; Ostrovidov, Serge; Wu, Hongkai; Nakajima, Ken

    2016-03-01

    A real-time method using atomic force microscopy (AFM) was developed to probe stem cell differentiation by measuring the mechanical properties of cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM). The mechanical properties of stem cells and their ECMs can be used to clearly distinguish specific stem cell-differentiated lineages. It is clear that AFM is a facile and useful tool for monitoring the differentiation of stem cells in a non-invasive manner.

  20. Probing the improbable: imaging carbon atoms in alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Marquis, E A; Yahia, Noor; Larson, David J.; Miller, Michael K; Todd, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Atom-probe tomography has proven very powerful to analyze the detailed structure and chemistry of metallic alloys and semiconductor structures while ceramic materials have remained outside its standard purview. In the current work, we demonstrate that bulk alumina can be quantitatively analyzed and microstructural features observed. The analysis of grain boundary carbon segregation - barely achievable by electron microscopy - opens the possibility of understanding the mechanistic effects of dopants on mechanical properties, fracture and wear properties of bulk oxides.

  1. Free vibrations of U-shaped atomic force microscope probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei, E.; Turner, J. A.

    2014-05-01

    Contact resonance atomic force microscope (AFM) methods have been used to quantify the elastic and viscoelastic properties of a variety of materials such as polymers, ceramics, biological materials, and metals with spatial resolution on the order of tens of nanometers. This approach involves measurement of the resonant frequencies of the AFM probe both for the free case and the case for which the tip is in contact with a sample. Vibration models of the probe and tip-sample contact models are then used to determine the sample properties from the frequency behavior and to create images of the sample properties. This work has been primarily focused on rectangular, single-beam probes for which the vibration models are relatively simple. Recently, U-shaped AFM probes have been developed to allow local heating of samples and the resonances of these probes are much more complex. In this article, a simplified analytical model of these U-shaped probes is described. This three beam model includes two beams clamped at one end and connected with a perpendicular cross beam at the other end. The beams are assumed only to bend in flexure and twist but their coupling allows a wide range of possible dynamic behavior. Results are presented for the first ten modes and the mode shapes are shown to have complex coupling between the flexure and twisting of the beams, particularly for the higher modes. All resonant frequency results are in good agreement with finite element results for the three probe designs and two values of thickness considered (all wavenumbers are within 3.0%). This work is anticipated to allow U-shaped probes to be used eventually for quantitative measurements of sample material properties during heating using a contact resonance approach.

  2. The Interaction of the Solar Wind with Solar Probe Plus - 3D Hybrid Simulation. Report 2: The Study for the Distance 9.5Rs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipatov, Alexander S.; Sittler, Edward C.; Hartle, Richard E.; Cooper, John F.

    2010-01-01

    Our paper is a 2.5D and 3D numerical plasma models of the interaction of the solar wind (SW) with the Solar Probe Plus spacecraft (SPPSC). These results should be interpreted as a basic plasma model for which the derived SW interaction with spacecraft (SC) could have consequences for both plasma wave and electron plasma measurements on board SC in the inner heliosphere. We observe an excitation of the low frequency Alfven and whistler type wave directed by the magnetic field with an amplitude of the electromagnetic field oscillation about of (0.015-0.06) V/m. The compression waves and the jumps in an electric field with an amplitude of about 1.5 V/m and (12-18) V/m were also observed. The observed strong electromagnetic perturbations may be a crucial point in the electromagnetic measurements, which were planned in future Solar Probe Plus mission.

  3. Generation of a cold pulsed beam of Rb atoms by transfer from a 3D magneto-optic trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanu, Sapam Ranjita; Rathod, Ketan D.; Natarajan, Vasant

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate a technique for producing a cold pulsed beam of atoms by transferring a cloud of atoms trapped in a three dimensional magneto-optic trap (MOT). The MOT is loaded by heating a getter source of Rb atoms. We show that it is advantageous to transfer with two beams (with a small angle between them) compared to a single beam, because the atoms stop interacting with the beams in the two-beam technique, which results in a Gaussian velocity distribution. The atoms are further cooled in optical molasses by turning off the MOT magnetic field before the transfer beams are turned on.

  4. Contact resonances of U-shaped atomic force microscope probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei, E.; Turner, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    Recent approaches used to characterize the elastic or viscoelastic properties of materials with nanoscale resolution have focused on the contact resonances of atomic force microscope (CR-AFM) probes. The experiments for these CR-AFM methods involve measurement of several contact resonances from which the resonant frequency and peak width are found. The contact resonance values are then compared with the noncontact values in order for the sample properties to be evaluated. The data analysis requires vibration models associated with the probe during contact in order for the beam response to be deconvolved from the measured spectra. To date, the majority of CR-AFM research has used rectangular probes that have a relatively simple vibration response. Recently, U-shaped AFM probes have created much interest because they allow local sample heating. However, the vibration response of these probes is much more complex such that CR-AFM is still in its infancy. In this article, a simplified analytical model of U-shaped probes is evaluated for contact resonance applications relative to a more complex finite element (FE) computational model. The tip-sample contact is modeled using three orthogonal Kelvin-Voigt elements such that the resonant frequency and peak width of each mode are functions of the contact conditions. For the purely elastic case, the frequency results of the simple model are within 8% of the FE model for the lowest six modes over a wide range of contact stiffness values. Results for the viscoelastic contact problem for which the quality factor of the lowest six modes is compared show agreement to within 13%. These results suggest that this simple model can be used effectively to evaluate CR-AFM experimental results during AFM scanning such that quantitative mapping of viscoelastic properties may be possible using U-shaped probes.

  5. Probing electronic transport of individual nanostructures with atomic precision

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Shengyong; Li, An-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Accessing individual nanostructures with atomic precision is an important process in the bottom-up fabrication and characterization of electronic nanodevices. Local electrical contacts, namely nanoelectrodes, are often fabricated by using top-down lithography and chemical etching techniques. These processes however lack atomic precision and introduce the possibility of contamination. Here, we review recent reports on the application of a field-induced emission process in the fabrication of local contacts onto individual nanowires and nanotubes with atomic spatial precision. In this method, gold nanoislands are deposited onto nanostructures precisely by using a scanning tunneling microscope tip, which provides a clean and controllable process to ensure both electrically conductive and mechanically reliable contacts. The applicability of the technique has been demonstrated in a wide variety of nanostructures, including silicide atomic wires, carbon nanotubes, and copper nanowires. These local contacts bridge the nanostructures and the transport probes, allowing for the measurements of both electrical transport and scanning tunneling microscopy on the same nanostructures in situ. The direct correlation between electronic and transport properties and atomic structures can be explored on individual nanostructures at the unprecedented atomic level.

  6. Analysis of structural correlations in a model binary 3D liquid through the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the atomic stress tensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levashov, V. A.

    2016-03-01

    It is possible to associate with every atom or molecule in a liquid its own atomic stress tensor. These atomic stress tensors can be used to describe liquids' structures and to investigate the connection between structural and dynamic properties. In particular, atomic stresses allow to address atomic scale correlations relevant to the Green-Kubo expression for viscosity. Previously correlations between the atomic stresses of different atoms were studied using the Cartesian representation of the stress tensors or the representation based on spherical harmonics. In this paper we address structural correlations in a 3D model binary liquid using the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the atomic stress tensors. This approach allows to interpret correlations relevant to the Green-Kubo expression for viscosity in a simple geometric way. On decrease of temperature the changes in the relevant stress correlation function between different atoms are significantly more pronounced than the changes in the pair density function. We demonstrate that this behaviour originates from the orientational correlations between the eigenvectors of the atomic stress tensors. We also found correlations between the eigenvalues of the same atomic stress tensor. For the studied system, with purely repulsive interactions between the particles, the eigenvalues of every atomic stress tensor are positive and they can be ordered: λ1 ≥ λ2 ≥ λ3 ≥ 0. We found that, for the particles of a given type, the probability distributions of the ratios (λ2/λ1) and (λ3/λ2) are essentially identical to each other in the liquids state. We also found that λ2 tends to be equal to the geometric average of λ1 and λ3. In our view, correlations between the eigenvalues may represent "the Poisson ratio effect" at the atomic scale.

  7. Analysis of structural correlations in a model binary 3D liquid through the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the atomic stress tensors.

    PubMed

    Levashov, V A

    2016-03-01

    It is possible to associate with every atom or molecule in a liquid its own atomic stress tensor. These atomic stress tensors can be used to describe liquids' structures and to investigate the connection between structural and dynamic properties. In particular, atomic stresses allow to address atomic scale correlations relevant to the Green-Kubo expression for viscosity. Previously correlations between the atomic stresses of different atoms were studied using the Cartesian representation of the stress tensors or the representation based on spherical harmonics. In this paper we address structural correlations in a 3D model binary liquid using the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the atomic stress tensors. This approach allows to interpret correlations relevant to the Green-Kubo expression for viscosity in a simple geometric way. On decrease of temperature the changes in the relevant stress correlation function between different atoms are significantly more pronounced than the changes in the pair density function. We demonstrate that this behaviour originates from the orientational correlations between the eigenvectors of the atomic stress tensors. We also found correlations between the eigenvalues of the same atomic stress tensor. For the studied system, with purely repulsive interactions between the particles, the eigenvalues of every atomic stress tensor are positive and they can be ordered: λ1 ≥ λ2 ≥ λ3 ≥ 0. We found that, for the particles of a given type, the probability distributions of the ratios (λ2/λ1) and (λ3/λ2) are essentially identical to each other in the liquids state. We also found that λ2 tends to be equal to the geometric average of λ1 and λ3. In our view, correlations between the eigenvalues may represent "the Poisson ratio effect" at the atomic scale. PMID:26957166

  8. Ordering of atoms in 3d sublattice of the intermetallic quasibinary system Dy(Fe/sub 1-x/Mn/sub x/)/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect

    Ilyushin, A.S.; Kastro, D.A.; Makhmud, I.A.

    1986-12-01

    Methods of x-ray analysis and nuclear ..gamma..-resonance (Moessbauer effect) have been used to study the distribution of iron and manganese atoms in the intermetallic quaisbinary system Dy(Fe/sub 1-x/Mn/sub x/)/sub 2/, which is isostructural to the Laves phase C15. Ordering of atoms of transition metals has been found in 3d sublattice of intermetallic compounds Dy(Fe/sub 1-x/Mn/sub x/)/sub 2/ with the formation of triple superstructure having the stoichiometric composition Dy(Fe/sub 0 x 25/Mn/sub 0 x 75/)/sub 2/

  9. 3D-calibration of three- and four-sensor hot-film probes based on collocated sonic using neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kit, Eliezer; Liberzon, Dan

    2016-09-01

    High resolution measurements of turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) are critical to the understanding of physical processes and parameterization of important quantities, such as the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation. Low spatio-temporal resolution of standard atmospheric instruments, sonic anemometers and LIDARs, limits their suitability for fine-scale measurements of ABL. The use of miniature hot-films is an alternative technique, although such probes require frequent calibration, which is logistically untenable in field setups. Accurate and truthful calibration is crucial for the multi-hot-films applications in atmospheric studies, because the ability to conduct calibration in situ ultimately determines the turbulence measurements quality. Kit et al (2010 J. Atmos. Ocean. Technol. 27 23–41) described a novel methodology for calibration of hot-film probes using a collocated sonic anemometer combined with a neural network (NN) approach. An important step in the algorithm is the generation of a calibration set for NN training by an appropriate low-pass filtering of the high resolution voltages, measured by the hot-film-sensors and low resolution velocities acquired by the sonic. In Kit et al (2010 J. Atmos. Ocean. Technol. 27 23–41), Kit and Grits (2011 J. Atmos. Ocean. Technol. 28 104–10) and Vitkin et al (2014 Meas. Sci. Technol. 25 75801), the authors reported on successful use of this approach for in situ calibration, but also on the method’s limitations and restricted range of applicability. In their earlier work, a jet facility and a probe, comprised of two orthogonal x-hot-films, were used for calibration and for full dataset generation. In the current work, a comprehensive laboratory study of 3D-calibration of two multi-hot-film probes (triple- and four-sensor) using a grid flow was conducted. The probes were embedded in a collocated sonic, and their relative pitch and yaw orientation to the mean flow was changed by means of

  10. Nanoscale Cluster Detection in Massive Atom Probe Tomography Data

    SciTech Connect

    Seal, Sudip K; Yoginath, Srikanth B; Miller, Michael K

    2014-01-01

    Recent technological advances in atom probe tomography (APT) have led to unprecedented data acquisition capabilities that routinely generate data sets containing hundreds of millions of atoms. Detecting nanoscale clusters of different atom types present in these enormous amounts of data and analyzing their spatial correlations with one another are fundamental to understanding the structural properties of the material from which the data is derived. Extant algorithms for nanoscale cluster detection do not scale to large data sets. Here, a scalable, CUDA-based implementation of an autocorrelation algorithm is presented. It isolates spatial correlations amongst atomic clusters present in massive APT data sets in linear time using a linear amount of storage. Correctness of the algorithm is demonstrated using large synthetically generated data with known spatial distributions. Benefits and limitations of using GPU-acceleration for autocorrelation-based APT data analyses are presented with supporting performance results on data sets with up to billions of atoms. To our knowledge, this is the first nanoscale cluster detection algorithm that scales to massive APT data sets and executes on commodity hardware.

  11. Multifunctional hydrogel nano-probes for atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae Seol; Song, Jungki; Kim, Seong Oh; Kim, Seokbeom; Lee, Wooju; Jackman, Joshua A.; Kim, Dongchoul; Cho, Nam-Joon; Lee, Jungchul

    2016-05-01

    Since the invention of the atomic force microscope (AFM) three decades ago, there have been numerous advances in its measurement capabilities. Curiously, throughout these developments, the fundamental nature of the force-sensing probe--the key actuating element--has remained largely unchanged. It is produced by long-established microfabrication etching strategies and typically composed of silicon-based materials. Here, we report a new class of photopolymerizable hydrogel nano-probes that are produced by bottom-up fabrication with compressible replica moulding. The hydrogel probes demonstrate excellent capabilities for AFM imaging and force measurement applications while enabling programmable, multifunctional capabilities based on compositionally adjustable mechanical properties and facile encapsulation of various nanomaterials. Taken together, the simple, fast and affordable manufacturing route and multifunctional capabilities of hydrogel AFM nano-probes highlight the potential of soft matter mechanical transducers in nanotechnology applications. The fabrication scheme can also be readily utilized to prepare hydrogel cantilevers, including in parallel arrays, for nanomechanical sensor devices.

  12. Multifunctional hydrogel nano-probes for atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Seol; Song, Jungki; Kim, Seong Oh; Kim, Seokbeom; Lee, Wooju; Jackman, Joshua A; Kim, Dongchoul; Cho, Nam-Joon; Lee, Jungchul

    2016-01-01

    Since the invention of the atomic force microscope (AFM) three decades ago, there have been numerous advances in its measurement capabilities. Curiously, throughout these developments, the fundamental nature of the force-sensing probe-the key actuating element-has remained largely unchanged. It is produced by long-established microfabrication etching strategies and typically composed of silicon-based materials. Here, we report a new class of photopolymerizable hydrogel nano-probes that are produced by bottom-up fabrication with compressible replica moulding. The hydrogel probes demonstrate excellent capabilities for AFM imaging and force measurement applications while enabling programmable, multifunctional capabilities based on compositionally adjustable mechanical properties and facile encapsulation of various nanomaterials. Taken together, the simple, fast and affordable manufacturing route and multifunctional capabilities of hydrogel AFM nano-probes highlight the potential of soft matter mechanical transducers in nanotechnology applications. The fabrication scheme can also be readily utilized to prepare hydrogel cantilevers, including in parallel arrays, for nanomechanical sensor devices. PMID:27199165

  13. Atom chip microscopy: A novel probe for strongly correlated materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lev, Benjamin L

    2011-11-03

    Improved measurements of strongly correlated systems will enable the predicative design of the next generation of supermaterials. In this program, we are harnessing recent advances in the quantum manipulation of ultracold atomic gases to expand our ability to probe these technologically important materials in heretofore unexplored regions of temperature, resolution, and sensitivity parameter space. We are working to demonstrate the use of atom chips to enable single-shot, large area detection of magnetic flux at the 10^-7 flux quantum level and below. By harnessing the extreme sensitivity of atomic clocks and Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) to external perturbations, the cryogenic atom chip technology developed here will provide a magnetic flux detection capability that surpasses other techniques---such as scanning SQUIDs---by a factor of 10--1000. We are testing the utility of this technique by using rubidium BECs to image the magnetic fields emanating from charge transport and magnetic domain percolation in strongly correlated materials as they undergo temperature-tuned metal--to--insulator phase transitions. Cryogenic atom chip microscopy introduces three very important features to the toolbox of high-resolution, strongly correlated material microscopy: simultaneous detection of magnetic and electric fields (down to the sub-single electron charge level); no invasive large magnetic fields or gradients; simultaneous micro- and macroscopic spatial resolution; freedom from 1/f flicker noise at low frequencies; and, perhaps most importantly, the complete decoupling of probe and sample temperatures. The first of these features will play an important role in studying the interplay between magnetic and electric domain structure. The last two are crucial for low frequency magnetic noise detection in, e.g., the cuprate pseudogap region and for precision measurements of transport in the high temperature, technologically relevant regime inaccessible to other techniques

  14. Pharmacophore modeling and atom-based 3D-QSAR studies on amino derivatives of indole as potent isoprenylcysteine carboxyl methyltransferase (Icmt) inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhadoriya, Kamlendra Singh; Sharma, Mukesh C.; Jain, Shailesh V.

    2015-02-01

    Icmt enzymes are of particular importance in the post-translational modification of proteins that are involved in the regulation of cell growth. Thus, effective Icmt inhibitors may be of significant therapeutic importance in oncogenesis. To determine the structural requirements responsible for high affinity of previously reported amino derivatives of indole as Icmt inhibitors, a successful pharmacophore generation and atom-based 3D-QSAR analysis have been carried out. The best four-point pharmacophore model with four features HHRR: two hydrophobic groups (H) and two aromatic rings (R) as pharmacophore features was developed by PHASE module of Schrodinger suite. In this study, highly predictive 3D-QSAR models have been developed for Icmt inhibition using HHRR.191 hypothesis. The pharmacophore hypothesis yielded a 3D-QSAR model with good partial least-square (PLS) statistics results. The validation of the PHASE model was done by dividing the dataset into training and test set. The statistically significant the four-point pharmacophore hypothesis yielded a 3D-QSAR model with good PLS statistics results (R2 = 0.9387, Q2 = 0.8132, F = 114.8, SD = 0.1567, RMSE = 0.2682, Pearson-R = 0.9147). The generated model showed excellent predictive power, with a correlation coefficient of Q2 = 0.8132. The results of ligand-based pharmacophore hypothesis and atom-based 3D-QSAR provide detailed structural insights as well as highlights important binding features of novel amino derivatives of indole as Icmt inhibitors which can afford guidance for the rational drug design of novel, potent and promising Icmt inhibitors with enhanced potencies and may prove helpful for further lead optimization and virtual screening.

  15. Probing cell-matrix interactions in RGD-decorated macroporous poly (ethylene glycol) hydrogels for 3D chondrocyte culture.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingjing; Mujeeb, Ayeesha; Du, Yanan; Lin, Jianhao; Ge, Zigang

    2015-06-01

    Macroporous hydrogels have shown great promise as scaffolds for cartilage engineering by facilitating nutrition transport and tissue in growth. Cell-matrix adhesion-a fundamental process in tissue engineering-has shown a profound effect on subsequent cell phenotype, extracellular matrix (ECM) accumulation, and tissue reorganization. In this study, arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) was introduced to macroporous hydrogels of poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) to fabricate PEG-G400 (with 0.4mM RGD) and PEG-G2000 (2mM RGD) to probe the cell-matrix interactions within hydrogels. Primary chondrocytes demonstrated a slightly stretched morphology with increasing RGD concentration and PEG-G2000 hydrogels boosted cell viability, proliferation, and deposition of collagen II and GAG, in comparison to the PEG-G400 and PEG-RED groups. Results also revealed chondrocytes within the cell aggregates underwent dedifferentiation and hypertrophy within RGD incorporated hydrogels, as evidenced by the high level of gene expression of collagen I on day 14 and strong immunohistological staining of collagen X and collagen I on day 35. Evidently, a high concentration of RGD (2mM RGD) enhanced cell-matrix interactions through elevating the expression of integrin β1 and vinculin. Thus, the integration of RGD in macroporous hydrogels with a concentration of 2 mM may be sufficient for improving cell functionality, with a slight probability of dedifferentiation and hypertrophy of chondrocytes. PMID:26107534

  16. Clustered field evaporation of metallic glasses in atom probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Zemp, J; Gerstl, S S A; Löffler, J F; Schönfeld, B

    2016-03-01

    Field evaporation of metallic glasses is a stochastic process combined with spatially and temporally correlated events, which are referred to as clustered evaporation (CE). This phenomenon is investigated by studying the distance between consecutive detector hits. CE is found to be a strongly localized phenomenon (up to 3nm in range) which also depends on the type of evaporating ions. While a similar effect in crystals is attributed to the evaporation of crystalline layers, CE of metallic glasses presumably has a different - as yet unknown - physical origin. The present work provides new perspectives on quantification methods for atom probe tomography of metallic glasses. PMID:26724469

  17. He-diamond interaction probed by atom beam scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidali, G.; Frankl, D. R.

    1983-02-01

    A 4He atomic beam was used to probe the He-C (diamond) interaction. Selective adsorption features have been measured and three energy levels identified: 6.4, 3.0, and 1.1 meV with a standard deviation of 0.1 meV. Diffraction patterns showed weak diffraction up to the second order; a corrugation parameter of 0.021 Å was obtained with the use of a hard-wall model in the eikonal approximation. An extensive study of surface preparation was carried out and the results of 4He diffraction for different methods of surface cleaning are reported.

  18. Basis set limit electronic excitation energies, ionization potentials, and electron affinities for the 3d transition metal atoms: Coupled cluster and multireference methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balabanov, Nikolai B.; Peterson, Kirk A.

    2006-08-01

    Recently developed correlation consistent basis sets for the first row transition metal elements Sc-Zn have been utilized to determine complete basis set (CBS) scalar relativistic electron affinities, ionization potentials, and 4s23dn -2-4s1dn -1 electronic excitation energies with single reference coupled cluster methods [CCSD(T), CCSDT, and CCSDTQ] and multireference configuration interaction with three reference spaces: 3d4s, 3d4s4p, and 3d4s4p3d'. The theoretical values calculated with the highest order coupled cluster techniques at the CBS limit, including extrapolations to full configuration interaction, are well within 1kcal/mol of the corresponding experimental data. For the early transition metal elements (Sc-Mn) the internally contracted multireference averaged coupled pair functional method yielded excellent agreement with experiment; however, the atomic properties for the late transition metals (Mn-Zn) proved to be much more difficult to describe with this level of theory, even with the largest reference function of the present work.

  19. Atom Probe Tomographic Mapping Directly Reveals the Atomic Distribution of Phosphorus in Resin Embedded Ferritin

    PubMed Central

    Perea, Daniel E.; Liu, Jia; Bartrand, Jonah; Dicken, Quinten; Thevuthasan, S. Theva; Browning, Nigel D.; Evans, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Here we report the atomic-scale analysis of biological interfaces within the ferritin protein using atom probe tomography that is facilitated by an advanced specimen preparation approach. Embedding ferritin in an organic polymer resin lacking nitrogen provided chemical contrast to visualise atomic distributions and distinguish the inorganic-organic interface of the ferrihydrite mineral core and protein shell, as well as the organic-organic interface between the ferritin protein shell and embedding resin. In addition, we definitively show the atomic-scale distribution of phosphorus as being at the surface of the ferrihydrite mineral with the distribution of sodium mapped within the protein shell environment with an enhanced distribution at the mineral/protein interface. The sample preparation method is robust and can be directly extended to further enhance the study of biological, organic and inorganic nanomaterials relevant to health, energy or the environment. PMID:26924804

  20. Adsorption of alkali, alkaline-earth, simple and 3d transition metal, and nonmetal atoms on monolayer MoS{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X. D.; Fang, Y. M.; Wu, S. Q. E-mail: wsq@xmu.edu.cn; Zhu, Z. Z. E-mail: wsq@xmu.edu.cn

    2015-05-15

    Single adsorption of different atoms on pristine two-dimensional monolayer MoS{sub 2} have been systematically investigated by using density functional calculations with van der Waals correction. The adatoms cover alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, main group metal, 3d-transition metals, coinage metal and nonmetal atoms. Depending on the adatom type, metallic, semimetallic or semiconducting behavior can be found in direct bandgap monolayer MoS{sub 2}. Additionally, local or long-range magnetic moments of two-dimensional MoS{sub 2} sheet can also attained through the adsorption. The detailed atomic-scale knowledge of single adsorption on MoS{sub 2} monolayer is important not only for the sake of a theoretical understanding, but also device level deposition technological application.

  1. A Superconducting Ion Detection Scheme for Atom Probe Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suttle, Joseph; Kelly, Thomas; McDermott, Robert

    Superconducting detectors are a promising avenue for improving the performance of Atom Probe Microscopes. Many types of superconducting detectors have been developed within the past several decades, each with its own strengths and weaknesses. Many of these detectors are inherently slow, bulky, require complex multiplexing schemes to attain position sensitivity, or require complex read-out electronics. In response to the rigorous demands of atom probe technology, and with the goal of developing an elegant, simple to use solution, we have developed a novel superconducting delay line detector. The principal of detection is to use the kinetic energy of incoming ions to generate excess quasiparticles in a superconducting stripline. These quasiparticles generate a measurable signal which propagates along the delay line. By measuring the timing of the output signals from this delay line, we are able to measure the time of flight for the ion and the position of its impact on the detector. We will be presenting on the performance of this detector as measured in a Field Ion Microscope.

  2. Multifunctional hydrogel nano-probes for atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Seol; Song, Jungki; Kim, Seong Oh; Kim, Seokbeom; Lee, Wooju; Jackman, Joshua A.; Kim, Dongchoul; Cho, Nam-Joon; Lee, Jungchul

    2016-01-01

    Since the invention of the atomic force microscope (AFM) three decades ago, there have been numerous advances in its measurement capabilities. Curiously, throughout these developments, the fundamental nature of the force-sensing probe—the key actuating element—has remained largely unchanged. It is produced by long-established microfabrication etching strategies and typically composed of silicon-based materials. Here, we report a new class of photopolymerizable hydrogel nano-probes that are produced by bottom-up fabrication with compressible replica moulding. The hydrogel probes demonstrate excellent capabilities for AFM imaging and force measurement applications while enabling programmable, multifunctional capabilities based on compositionally adjustable mechanical properties and facile encapsulation of various nanomaterials. Taken together, the simple, fast and affordable manufacturing route and multifunctional capabilities of hydrogel AFM nano-probes highlight the potential of soft matter mechanical transducers in nanotechnology applications. The fabrication scheme can also be readily utilized to prepare hydrogel cantilevers, including in parallel arrays, for nanomechanical sensor devices. PMID:27199165

  3. Mapping magnetism with atomic resolution using aberrated electron probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idrobo, Juan; Rusz, Ján; McGuire, Michael A.; Symons, Christopher T.; Vatsavai, Ranga Raju; Lupini, Andrew R.

    2015-03-01

    In this talk, we report a direct experimental real-space mapping of magnetic circular dichroism with atomic resolution in aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Using an aberrated electron probe with customized phase distribution, we reveal with electron energy-loss (EEL) spectroscopy the checkerboard antiferromagnetic ordering of Mn moments in LaMnAsO by observing a dichroic signal in the Mn L-edge. The aberrated probes allow the collection of EEL spectra using the transmitted beam, which results in a magnetic circular dichroic signal with intrinsically larger signal-to-noise ratios than those obtained via nanodiffraction techniques (where most of the transmitted electrons are discarded). The novel experimental setup presented here, which can easily be implemented in aberration-corrected STEM, opens new paths for probing dichroic signals in materials with unprecedented spatial resolution. This research was supported by DOE SUFD MSED, by UT-Battelle, LLC, under Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725 with the US DOE, and by the Swedish Research Council and Swedish National Infrastructure for Computing (NSC center)

  4. Probing modified gravity with atom-interferometry: A numerical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlögel, Sandrine; Clesse, Sébastien; Füzfa, André

    2016-05-01

    Refined constraints on chameleon theories are calculated for atom-interferometry experiments, using a numerical approach consisting in solving for a four-region model the static and spherically symmetric Klein-Gordon equation for the chameleon field. By modeling not only the test mass and the vacuum chamber but also its walls and the exterior environment, the method allows one to probe new effects on the scalar field profile and the induced acceleration of atoms. In the case of a weakly perturbing test mass, the effect of the wall is to enhance the field profile and to lower the acceleration inside the chamber by up to 1 order of magnitude. In the thin-shell regime, results are found to be in good agreement with the analytical estimations, when measurements are realized in the immediate vicinity of the test mass. Close to the vacuum chamber wall, the acceleration becomes negative and potentially measurable. This prediction could be used to discriminate between fifth-force effects and systematic experimental uncertainties, by doing the experiment at several key positions inside the vacuum chamber. For the chameleon potential V (ϕ )=Λ4 +α/ϕα and a coupling function A (ϕ )=exp (ϕ /M ), one finds M ≳7 ×1016 GeV , independently of the power-law index. For V (ϕ )=Λ4(1 +Λ /ϕ ), one finds M ≳1014 GeV . A sensitivity of a ˜10-11 m /s2 would probe the model up to the Planck scale. Finally, a proposal for a second experimental setup, in a vacuum room, is presented. In this case, Planckian values of M could be probed provided that a ˜10-10 m /s2 , a limit reachable by future experiments. Our method can easily be extended to constrain other models with a screening mechanism, such as symmetron, dilaton and f(R) theories.

  5. The Interaction of the Solar Wind with Solar Probe Plus - 3D Hybrid Simulation. Report 1; The Study for the Distance 4.5Rs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipatov, Alexander S.; Sittler, Edward C.; Hartle, Richard E.; Cooper, John F.

    2010-01-01

    Our report devotes a 3D numerical hybrid model of the interaction of the solar wind with the Solar Probe spacecraft. The Solar Probe Plus (SPP) model includes 3 main parts, namely, a non-conducting heat shield, a support system, and cylindrical section or spacecraft bus that contains the particle analysis devices and antenna. One observes an excitation of the low frequency Alfven and whistler type wave directed by the magnetic field with an amplitude of about (0.06-0.6) V/m. The compression waves and the jumps in an electric field with an amplitude of about (0.15-0.7) V/m were also observed. The wave amplitudes are comparable to or greater than previously estimated max wave amplitudes that SPP is expected to measure. The results of our hybrid simulation will be useful for understanding the plasma environment near the SPP spacecraft at the distance 4.5 Rs. Future simulation will take into account the charging of the spacecraft, the charge separation effects, an outgassing from heat shield, a photoionization and an electron impact ionization effects near the spacecraft.

  6. A Bright Fluorescent Probe for H2S Enables Analyte-Responsive, 3D Imaging in Live Zebrafish Using Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a critical gaseous signaling molecule emerging at the center of a rich field of chemical and biological research. As our understanding of the complexity of physiological H2S in signaling pathways evolves, advanced chemical and technological investigative tools are required to make sense of this interconnectivity. Toward this goal, we have developed an azide-functionalized O-methylrhodol fluorophore, MeRho-Az, which exhibits a rapid >1000-fold fluorescence response when treated with H2S, is selective for H2S over other biological analytes, and has a detection limit of 86 nM. Additionally, the MeRho-Az scaffold is less susceptible to photoactivation than other commonly used azide-based systems, increasing its potential application in imaging experiments. To demonstrate the efficacy of this probe for H2S detection, we demonstrate the ability of MeRho-Az to detect differences in H2S levels in C6 cells and those treated with AOAA, a common inhibitor of enzymatic H2S synthesis. Expanding the use of MeRho-Az to complex and heterogeneous biological settings, we used MeRho-Az in combination with light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) to visualize H2S in the intestinal tract of live zebrafish. This application provides the first demonstration of analyte-responsive 3D imaging with LSFM, highlighting the utility of combining new probes and live imaging methods for investigating chemical signaling in complex multicellular systems. PMID:26061541

  7. A Bright Fluorescent Probe for H2S Enables Analyte-Responsive, 3D Imaging in Live Zebrafish Using Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hammers, Matthew D; Taormina, Michael J; Cerda, Matthew M; Montoya, Leticia A; Seidenkranz, Daniel T; Parthasarathy, Raghuveer; Pluth, Michael D

    2015-08-19

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a critical gaseous signaling molecule emerging at the center of a rich field of chemical and biological research. As our understanding of the complexity of physiological H2S in signaling pathways evolves, advanced chemical and technological investigative tools are required to make sense of this interconnectivity. Toward this goal, we have developed an azide-functionalized O-methylrhodol fluorophore, MeRho-Az, which exhibits a rapid >1000-fold fluorescence response when treated with H2S, is selective for H2S over other biological analytes, and has a detection limit of 86 nM. Additionally, the MeRho-Az scaffold is less susceptible to photoactivation than other commonly used azide-based systems, increasing its potential application in imaging experiments. To demonstrate the efficacy of this probe for H2S detection, we demonstrate the ability of MeRho-Az to detect differences in H2S levels in C6 cells and those treated with AOAA, a common inhibitor of enzymatic H2S synthesis. Expanding the use of MeRho-Az to complex and heterogeneous biological settings, we used MeRho-Az in combination with light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) to visualize H2S in the intestinal tract of live zebrafish. This application provides the first demonstration of analyte-responsive 3D imaging with LSFM, highlighting the utility of combining new probes and live imaging methods for investigating chemical signaling in complex multicellular systems. PMID:26061541

  8. NiO nanoarrays of a few atoms thickness on 3D nickel network for enhanced pseudocapacitive electrode applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senthilkumar, Velusamy; Kadumudi, Firoz Babu; Ho, Nhu Thuy; Kim, Ji-Woong; Park, Sungkyun; Bae, Jong-Seong; Choi, Won Mook; Cho, Shinuk; Kim, Yong Soo

    2016-01-01

    The present work focuses on the development of template-free mesoporous NiO nanoarrays with large surface area grown on 3D nickel foam networks by a seed mediated aqueous chemical growth technique and subsequent annealing process. The resultant binder-free, well-aligned and vertically grown NiO nanoarrays exhibits a micron-sized planar structure as well as an ultrathin thickness (˜7 nm). The unique surface and electronic structure facilitates surface-dependent electrochemical reaction processes with no dead volume. They deliver a high capacitance of 2065 F g-1 at a current density of 16 A g-1 as a three electrode system. A specific capacitance of 1247 F g-1 is maintained at a higher current rate of 70 A g-1 with 88.9% retention after 5000 cycles. Finally, in a solid-state asymmetric supercapacitor configuration using NiO//activated carbon, the device delivers an enhanced supercapacitive performance, with an energy density of 43.5 Wh kg-1 and power density of 2.1 kW kg-1. Thus, the current research paves the way for the use of NiO nanoarrays as an electrode material for practical supercapacitor devices with higher cycling retention and rate capacity.

  9. Synthesis-atomic structure-properties relationships in metallic nanoparticles by total scattering experiments and 3D computer simulations: case of Pt-Ru nanoalloy catalysts.

    PubMed

    Prasai, Binay; Ren, Yang; Shan, Shiyao; Zhao, Yinguang; Cronk, Hannah; Luo, Jin; Zhong, Chuan-Jian; Petkov, Valeri

    2015-05-01

    An approach to determining the 3D atomic structure of metallic nanoparticles (NPs) in fine detail and using the unique knowledge obtained for rationalizing their synthesis and properties targeted for optimization is described and exemplified on Pt-Ru alloy NPs of importance to the development of devices for clean energy conversion such as fuel cells. In particular, PtxRu100-x alloy NPs, where x = 31, 49 and 75, are synthesized by wet chemistry and activated catalytically by a post-synthesis treatment involving heating under controlled N2-H2 atmosphere. So-activated NPs are evaluated as catalysts for gas-phase CO oxidation and ethanol electro-oxidation reactions taking place in fuel cells. Both as-synthesized and activated NPs are characterized structurally by total scattering experiments involving high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction coupled to atomic pair distribution functions (PDFs) analysis. 3D structure models both for as-synthesized and activated NPs are built by molecular dynamics simulations based on the archetypal for current theoretical modelling Sutton-Chen method. Models are refined against the experimental PDF data by reverse Monte Carlo simulations and analysed in terms of prime structural characteristics such as metal-to-metal bond lengths, bond angles and first coordination numbers for Pt and Ru atoms. Analysis indicates that, though of a similar type, the atomic structure of as-synthesized and respective activated NPs differ in several details of importance to NP catalytic properties. Structural characteristics of activated NPs and data for their catalytic activity are compared side by side and strong evidence found that electronic effects, indicated by significant changes in Pt-Pt and Ru-Ru metal bond lengths at NP surface, and practically unrecognized so far atomic ensemble effects, indicated by distinct stacking of atomic layers near NP surface and prevalence of particular configurations of Pt and Ru atoms in these layers, contribute to the

  10. Multivariate statistical analysis of atom probe tomography data

    SciTech Connect

    Parish, Chad M; Miller, Michael K

    2010-01-01

    The application of spectrum imaging multivariate statistical analysis methods, specifically principal component analysis (PCA), to atom probe tomography (APT) data has been investigated. The mathematical method of analysis is described and the results for two example datasets are analyzed and presented. The first dataset is from the analysis of a PM 2000 Fe-Cr-Al-Ti steel containing two different ultrafine precipitate populations. PCA properly describes the matrix and precipitate phases in a simple and intuitive manner. A second APT example is from the analysis of an irradiated reactor pressure vessel steel. Fine, nm-scale Cu-enriched precipitates having a core-shell structure were identified and qualitatively described by PCA. Advantages, disadvantages, and future prospects for implementing these data analysis methodologies for APT datasets, particularly with regard to quantitative analysis, are also discussed.

  11. Multivariate statistical analysis of atom probe tomography data.

    PubMed

    Parish, Chad M; Miller, Michael K

    2010-10-01

    The application of spectrum imaging multivariate statistical analysis methods, specifically principal component analysis (PCA), to atom probe tomography (APT) data has been investigated. The mathematical method of analysis is described and the results for two example datasets are analyzed and presented. The first dataset is from the analysis of a PM 2000 Fe-Cr-Al-Ti steel containing two different ultrafine precipitate populations. PCA properly describes the matrix and precipitate phases in a simple and intuitive manner. A second APT example is from the analysis of an irradiated reactor pressure vessel steel. Fine, nm-scale Cu-enriched precipitates having a core-shell structure were identified and qualitatively described by PCA. Advantages, disadvantages, and future prospects for implementing these data analysis methodologies for APT datasets, particularly with regard to quantitative analysis, are also discussed. PMID:20650566

  12. Characterization of Nanoporous Materials with Atom Probe Tomography.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Björn; Erichsen, Torben; Epler, Eike; Volkert, Cynthia A; Trompenaars, Piet; Nowak, Carsten

    2015-06-01

    A method to characterize open-cell nanoporous materials with atom probe tomography (APT) has been developed. For this, open-cell nanoporous gold with pore diameters of around 50 nm was used as a model system, and filled by electron beam-induced deposition (EBID) to obtain a compact material. Two different EBID precursors were successfully tested-dicobalt octacarbonyl [Co2(CO)8] and diiron nonacarbonyl [Fe2(CO)9]. Penetration and filling depth are sufficient for focused ion beam-based APT sample preparation. With this approach, stable APT analysis of the nanoporous material can be performed. Reconstruction reveals the composition of the deposited precursor and the nanoporous material, as well as chemical information of the interfaces between them. Thus, it is shown that, using an appropriate EBID process, local chemical information in three dimensions with sub-nanometer resolution can be obtained from nanoporous materials using APT. PMID:25990813

  13. Accuracy of analyses of microelectronics nanostructures in atom probe tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vurpillot, F.; Rolland, N.; Estivill, R.; Duguay, S.; Blavette, D.

    2016-07-01

    The routine use of atom probe tomography (APT) as a nano-analysis microscope in the semiconductor industry requires the precise evaluation of the metrological parameters of this instrument (spatial accuracy, spatial precision, composition accuracy or composition precision). The spatial accuracy of this microscope is evaluated in this paper in the analysis of planar structures such as high-k metal gate stacks. It is shown both experimentally and theoretically that the in-depth accuracy of reconstructed APT images is perturbed when analyzing this structure composed of an oxide layer of high electrical permittivity (higher-k dielectric constant) that separates the metal gate and the semiconductor channel of a field emitter transistor. Large differences in the evaporation field between these layers (resulting from large differences in material properties) are the main sources of image distortions. An analytic model is used to interpret inaccuracy in the depth reconstruction of these devices in APT.

  14. Implementing Transmission Electron Backscatter Diffraction for Atom Probe Tomography.

    PubMed

    Rice, Katherine P; Chen, Yimeng; Prosa, Ty J; Larson, David J

    2016-06-01

    There are advantages to performing transmission electron backscattering diffraction (tEBSD) in conjunction with focused ion beam-based specimen preparation for atom probe tomography (APT). Although tEBSD allows users to identify the position and character of grain boundaries, which can then be combined with APT to provide full chemical and orientation characterization of grain boundaries, tEBSD can also provide imaging information that improves the APT specimen preparation process by insuring proper placement of the targeted grain boundary within an APT specimen. In this report we discuss sample tilt angles, ion beam milling energies, and other considerations to optimize Kikuchi diffraction pattern quality for the APT specimen geometry. Coordinated specimen preparation and analysis of a grain boundary in a Ni-based Inconel 600 alloy is used to illustrate the approach revealing a 50° misorientation and trace element segregation to the grain boundary. PMID:27329309

  15. Coke Formation in a Zeolite Crystal During the Methanol-to-Hydrocarbons Reaction as Studied with Atom Probe Tomography.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Joel E; Poplawsky, Jonathan D; Mazumder, Baishakhi; Attila, Özgün; Fu, Donglong; de Winter, D A Matthijs; Meirer, Florian; Bare, Simon R; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the formation of carbon deposits in zeolites is vital to developing new, superior materials for various applications, including oil and gas conversion processes. Herein, atom probe tomography (APT) has been used to spatially resolve the 3D compositional changes at the sub-nm length scale in a single zeolite ZSM-5 crystal, which has been partially deactivated by the methanol-to-hydrocarbons reaction using (13) C-labeled methanol. The results reveal the formation of coke in agglomerates that span length scales from tens of nanometers to atomic clusters with a median size of 30-60 (13) C atoms. These clusters correlate with local increases in Brønsted acid site density, demonstrating that the formation of the first deactivating coke precursor molecules occurs in nanoscopic regions enriched in aluminum. This nanoscale correlation underscores the importance of carefully engineering materials to suppress detrimental coke formation. PMID:27485276

  16. Coke formation in a zeolite crystal during the methanol-to-hydrocarbons reaction as studied with atom probe tomography

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Schmidt, Joel E.; Poplawsky, Jonathan D.; Mazumder, Baishakhi; Attila, Özgün; Fu, Donglong; de Winter, D. A. Matthijs; Meirer, Florian; Bare, Simon R.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2016-08-03

    Understanding the formation of carbon deposits in zeolites is vital to developing new, superior materials for various applications, including oil and gas conversion processes. Herein, atom probe tomography (APT) has been used to spatially resolve the 3D compositional changes at the sub-nm length scale in a single zeolite ZSM-5 crystal, which has been partially deactivated by the methanol-to-hydrocarbons reaction using 13C-labeled methanol. The results reveal the formation of coke in agglomerates that span length scales from tens of nanometers to atomic clusters with a median size of 30–60 13C atoms. These clusters correlate with local increases in Brønsted acid sitemore » density, demonstrating that the formation of the first deactivating coke precursor molecules occurs in nanoscopic regions enriched in aluminum. Here, this nanoscale correlation underscores the importance of carefully engineering materials to suppress detrimental coke formation.« less

  17. Imaging and force probing RNA by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Schön, Peter

    2016-07-01

    In the past 30years, the atomic force microscope (AFM) has become a true enabling platform in the life sciences opening entire novel avenues for structural and dynamic studies of biological systems. It enables visualization, probing and manipulation across the length scales, from single molecules to living cells in buffer solution under physiological conditions without the need for labeling or staining of the specimen. In particular, for structural studies of nucleic acids and assemblies thereof, the AFM has matured into a routinely used tool providing nanometer spatial resolution. This includes ssRNA, dsRNA and nucleoprotein complexes thereof, as well as RNA aggregates and 2D RNA assemblies. By AFM unique information can be obtained on RNA based assemblies which are becoming increasingly important as novel unique building blocks in the emerging field of RNA nanotechnology. In addition, the AFM is of fundamental relevance to study biological relevant RNA interactions and dynamics. In this short review first the basic functioning principles of commonly used AFM modes including AFM based force spectroscopy will be briefly described. Next a brief overview will be given on structural studies that have been done related to AFM topographic imaging of RNA, RNA assemblies and aggregates. Finally, an overview on AFM beyond imaging will be provided. This includes force spectroscopy of RNA under physiological conditions in aqueous buffer to probe RNA interaction with proteins and ligands as well as other AFM tip based RNA probing. The main intention of this short review to give the reader a flavor of what AFM contributes to RNA research and engineering. PMID:27222101

  18. A theoretical study of dopant atom detection and probe behavior in STEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, Anudha

    functional-based tight-binding model revealed that a stress-free single-walled (14,6) MoS2 nanotube has a torsional deformation of 0.87 °/nm. Comparison between simulated electron diffraction patterns and atomic-resolution ADF-STEM images of nanotubes with and without the small twist suggested that these experimental techniques are viable routes for detecting presence of the torsional deformation. 2. Development of theory to cast light on aspects of scattering behavior that affect STEM data.. STEM probe intensity oscillates as the probe transmits through a crystalline sample. The oscillatory behavior of the probe is extremely similar during transmission through 3-D crystals and the hypothetical structure of an isolated column of atoms, a 1-D crystal. This indicates that the physical origin of oscillation in intensity is not due to scattering of electrons away from one atomic column and subsequent scattering back from neighboring columns. It leaves in question what the physical origin or intensity oscillation is. This question was answered here by analysis of electron beam behavior in isolated atomic columns, examined via multislice-based simulations. Two physical origins, changes in angular distribution of the probe and phase shift between the angular components, were shown to cause oscillation in beam intensity. Sensitivity of frequency of oscillation to different probe and sample parameters was used to better understand the influence of the two physical origins on probe oscillation. 3. Acquisition of atomic-scale STEM data to answer specific questions about a material.. Graphene, due to its 2-Dimensionality, and due to its thermal, optical, electrical, and mechanical properties, which are conducive to providing a unique material for incorporation in devices, has gained a lot of interest in the research world and even spurred start-ups. There are several feasible routes of graphene synthesis, among which chemical exfoliation of graphite is a promising method for mass

  19. Probe knots and Hopf insulators with ultracold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Dong-Ling; Wang, Sheng-Tao; Sun, Kai; Duan, Lu-Ming

    2015-05-01

    Knots and links are fascinating and intricate topological objects that have played a prominent role in physical and life sciences. Their influence spans from DNA and molecular chemistry to vortices in superfluid helium, defects in liquid crystals and cosmic strings in the early universe. Here, we show that knotted structures also exist in a peculiar class of three dimensional topological insulators--the Hopf insulators. In particular, we demonstrate that the spin textures of Hopf insulators in momentum space are twisted in a nontrivial way, which implies various knot and link structures. We further illustrate that the knots and nontrivial spin textures can be probed via standard time-of-flight images in cold atoms as preimage contours of spin orientations in stereographic coordinates. The extracted Hopf invariants, knots, and links are validated to be robust to typical experimental imperfections. Our work establishes the existence of knotted structures in cold atoms and may have potential applications in spintronics and quantum information processings. We thank X.-J. Liu and G. Ortiz for helpful discussions. S.T.W., D.L.D., and L.M.D. are supported by the NBRPC 2011CBA00300, the IARPA MUSIQC program, the ARO and the AFOSR MURI program. K.S. acknowledges support from NSF under Grant No. PHY1402971.

  20. Fingering convection induced by atomic diffusion in stars: 3D numerical computations and applications to stellar models

    SciTech Connect

    Zemskova, Varvara; Garaud, Pascale; Deal, Morgan; Vauclair, Sylvie

    2014-11-10

    Iron-rich layers are known to form in the stellar subsurface through a combination of gravitational settling and radiative levitation. Their presence, nature, and detailed structure can affect the excitation process of various stellar pulsation modes and must therefore be modeled carefully in order to better interpret Kepler asteroseismic data. In this paper, we study the interplay between atomic diffusion and fingering convection in A-type stars, as well as its role in the establishment and evolution of iron accumulation layers. To do so, we use a combination of three-dimensional idealized numerical simulations of fingering convection (which neglect radiative transfer and complex opacity effects) and one-dimensional realistic stellar models. Using the three-dimensional simulations, we first validate the mixing prescription for fingering convection recently proposed by Brown et al. (within the scope of the aforementioned approximation) and identify what system parameters (total mass of iron, iron diffusivity, thermal diffusivity, etc.) play a role in the overall evolution of the layer. We then implement the Brown et al. prescription in the Toulouse-Geneva Evolution Code to study the evolution of the iron abundance profile beneath the stellar surface. We find, as first discussed by Théado et al., that when the concurrent settling of helium is ignored, this accumulation rapidly causes an inversion in the mean molecular weight profile, which then drives fingering convection. The latter mixes iron with the surrounding material very efficiently, and the resulting iron layer is very weak. However, taking helium settling into account partially stabilizes the iron profile against fingering convection, and a large iron overabundance can accumulate. The opacity also increases significantly as a result, and in some cases it ultimately triggers dynamical convection. The direct effects of radiative acceleration on the dynamics of fingering convection (especially in the

  1. Mechanics of interaction and atomic-scale wear of amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy probes.

    PubMed

    Vahdat, Vahid; Grierson, David S; Turner, Kevin T; Carpick, Robert W

    2013-04-23

    Wear is one of the main factors that hinders the performance of probes for atomic force microscopy (AFM), including for the widely used amplitude modulation (AM-AFM) mode. Unfortunately, a comprehensive scientific understanding of nanoscale wear is lacking. We have developed a protocol for conducting consistent and quantitative AM-AFM wear experiments. The protocol involves controlling the tip-sample interaction regime during AM-AFM scanning, determining the tip-sample contact geometry, calculating the peak repulsive force and normal stress over the course of the wear test, and quantifying the wear volume using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy imaging. The peak repulsive tip-sample interaction force is estimated from a closed-form equation accompanied by an effective tip radius measurement procedure, which combines transmission electron microscopy and blind tip reconstruction. The contact stress is estimated by applying Derjaguin-Müller-Toporov contact mechanics model and also numerically solving a general contact mechanics model recently developed for the adhesive contact of arbitrary axisymmetric punch shapes. We discuss the important role that the assumed tip shape geometry plays in calculating both the interaction forces and the contact stresses. Contact stresses are significantly affected by the tip geometry while the peak repulsive force is mainly determined by experimentally controlled parameters, specifically, the free oscillation amplitude and amplitude ratio. The applicability of this protocol is demonstrated experimentally by assessing the performance of diamond-like carbon-coated and silicon-nitride-coated silicon probes scanned over ultrananocrystalline diamond substrates in repulsive mode AM-AFM. There is no sign of fracture or plastic deformation in the case of diamond-like carbon; wear could be characterized as a gradual atom-by-atom process. In contrast, silicon nitride wears through removal of the cluster of atoms and plastic

  2. The Interaction of the Solar Wind with Solar Probe Plus - 3D Hybrid Simulation. Report 1; The Study for the Distance 4.5Rs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipatov, Alexander S.; Sittler, Edward C.; Hartle, Richard E.; Cooper, John F.

    2010-01-01

    Our report devotes a 3D numerical hybrid model of the interaction of the solar wind with the Solar Probe spacecraft. The SPP model includes 3 main parts, namely, a non-conducting heat shield, a support system, and cylindrical section or spacecraft bus that contains the particle analysis devices and antenna. One observes an excitation of the low frequency Alfven and whistler type wave directed by the magnetic field with an amplitude of about (0.06-0.6) V/m. The compression waves and the jumps in an electric field with an amplitude of about (0.15-0.7) V/m were also observed. The wave amplitudes are comparable to or greater than previously estimated max wave amplitudes that SPP is expected to measure. The results of our hybrid simulation will be useful for understanding the plasma environment near the SPP spacecraft at the distance 4.5 Rs. Future simulation will take into account the charging of the spacecraft, the charge separation effects, an outgassing from heat shield, a photoionization and an electron impact ionization effects near the spacecraft.

  3. Probing physical properties at the nanoscale using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditzler, Lindsay Rachel

    Techniques that measure physical properties at the nanoscale with high sensitivity are significantly limited considering the number of new nanomaterials being developed. The development of atomic force microscopy (AFM) has lead to significant advancements in the ability to characterize physical properties of materials in all areas of science: chemistry, physics, engineering, and biology have made great scientific strides do to the versatility of the AFM. AFM is used for quantification of many physical properties such as morphology, electrical, mechanical, magnetic, electrochemical, binding interactions, and protein folding. This work examines the electrical and mechanical properties of materials applicable to the field of nano-electronics. As electronic devices are miniaturized the demand for materials with unique electrical properties, which can be developed and exploited, has increased. For example, discussed in this work, a derivative of tetrathiafulvalene, which exhibits a unique loss of conductivity upon compression of the self-assembled monolayer could be developed into a molecular switch. This work also compares tunable organic (tetraphenylethylene tetracarboxylic acid and bis(pyridine)s assemblies) and metal-organic (Silver-stilbizole coordination compounds) crystals which show high electrical conductivity. The electrical properties of these materials vary depending on their composition allowing for the development of compositionally tunable functional materials. Additional work was done to investigate the effects of molecular environment on redox active 11-ferroceneyl-1 undecanethiol (Fc) molecules. The redox process of mixed monolayers of Fc and decanethiol was measured using conductive probe atomic force microscopy and force spectroscopy. As the concentration of Fc increased large, variations in the force were observed. Using these variations the number of oxidized molecules in the monolayer was determined. AFM is additionally capable of investigating

  4. Synthesis-atomic structure-properties relationships in metallic nanoparticles by total scattering experiments and 3D computer simulations: case of Pt-Ru nanoalloy catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasai, Binay; Ren, Yang; Shan, Shiyao; Zhao, Yinguang; Cronk, Hannah; Luo, Jin; Zhong, Chuan-Jian; Petkov, Valeri

    2015-04-01

    An approach to determining the 3D atomic structure of metallic nanoparticles (NPs) in fine detail and using the unique knowledge obtained for rationalizing their synthesis and properties targeted for optimization is described and exemplified on Pt-Ru alloy NPs of importance to the development of devices for clean energy conversion such as fuel cells. In particular, PtxRu100-x alloy NPs, where x = 31, 49 and 75, are synthesized by wet chemistry and activated catalytically by a post-synthesis treatment involving heating under controlled N2-H2 atmosphere. So-activated NPs are evaluated as catalysts for gas-phase CO oxidation and ethanol electro-oxidation reactions taking place in fuel cells. Both as-synthesized and activated NPs are characterized structurally by total scattering experiments involving high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction coupled to atomic pair distribution functions (PDFs) analysis. 3D structure models both for as-synthesized and activated NPs are built by molecular dynamics simulations based on the archetypal for current theoretical modelling Sutton-Chen method. Models are refined against the experimental PDF data by reverse Monte Carlo simulations and analysed in terms of prime structural characteristics such as metal-to-metal bond lengths, bond angles and first coordination numbers for Pt and Ru atoms. Analysis indicates that, though of a similar type, the atomic structure of as-synthesized and respective activated NPs differ in several details of importance to NP catalytic properties. Structural characteristics of activated NPs and data for their catalytic activity are compared side by side and strong evidence found that electronic effects, indicated by significant changes in Pt-Pt and Ru-Ru metal bond lengths at NP surface, and practically unrecognized so far atomic ensemble effects, indicated by distinct stacking of atomic layers near NP surface and prevalence of particular configurations of Pt and Ru atoms in these layers, contribute to the

  5. Effect of Laser Power on Atom Probe Tomography of Silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parman, S. W.; Gorman, B.; Jackson, C.; Cooper, R. F.; Diercks, D.

    2011-12-01

    Atom probe tomography (APT) is an emerging analytical method that has the potential to produce nm-scale spatial resolution of atom positions with ppm-level detection limits. Until recently, APT has been limited to analysis of conducting samples due to the high pulsed electrical fields previously required. The recent development of laser-assisted APT now allows much lower laser powers to be used, opening the door to analysis of geologic minerals. The potential applications are many, ranging from diffusion profiles to the distribution of nano-phases to grain boundary chemical properties. We reported the first analysis of natural olivine using APT last year (Parman et al, 2010). While the spatial resolution was good (nm-scale), the accuracy of the compositional analysis was not. Two of the primary barriers to accurate ion identification in APT are: 1) Specimen overheating - This is caused by the interaction of the laser with the low thermal conductivity insulating specimens. Ions are assumed to have left the surface of the sample at the time the laser is pulsed during the analysis (laser pulse width = 12 ps). If the laser power is too high, the surface remains heated for an appreciable time (greater than 5 ns in some cases) after the laser pulse, causing atoms to field evaporate from the surface well after the laser pulse. Since they hit the detector later than the atoms that were released during the pulse, they are interpreted to be higher mass. Thus overheating appears in the analysis as a smearing of mass/charge peaks to higher mass/charge ratios (thermal tails). For well separated peaks, this is not a substantial problem, but for closely spaced peaks, overheating causes artificial mass interferences. 2) Molecular evaporation or clustering - This is also caused by overheating by the laser. Ideally, atoms are field evaporated individually from the surface of the cylindrical specimen. However, if the absorbed energy is high enough, clusters of atoms will be formed

  6. Conductive-probe atomic force microscopy characterization of silicon nanowire

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The electrical conduction properties of lateral and vertical silicon nanowires (SiNWs) were investigated using a conductive-probe atomic force microscopy (AFM). Horizontal SiNWs, which were synthesized by the in-plane solid-liquid-solid technique, are randomly deployed into an undoped hydrogenated amorphous silicon layer. Local current mapping shows that the wires have internal microstructures. The local current-voltage measurements on these horizontal wires reveal a power law behavior indicating several transport regimes based on space-charge limited conduction which can be assisted by traps in the high-bias regime (> 1 V). Vertical phosphorus-doped SiNWs were grown by chemical vapor deposition using a gold catalyst-driving vapor-liquid-solid process on higly n-type silicon substrates. The effect of phosphorus doping on the local contact resistance between the AFM tip and the SiNW was put in evidence, and the SiNWs resistivity was estimated. PMID:21711623

  7. New Methods of Sample Preparation for Atom Probe Specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, Kimberly, R.; Kowalczyk, Robert S.; Ward, Jennifer R.; Wishard, James L.; Martens, Richard L.; Kelly, Thomas F.

    2003-01-01

    Magnetite is a common conductive mineral found on Earth and Mars. Disk-shaped precipitates approximately 40 nm in diameter have been shown to have manganese and aluminum concentrations. Atom-probe field-ion microscopy (APFIM) is the only technique that can potentially quantify the composition of these precipitates. APFIM will be used to characterize geological and planetary materials, analyze samples of interest for geomicrobiology; and, for the metrology of nanoscale instrumentation. Prior to APFIM sample preparation was conducted by electropolishing, the method of sharp shards (MSS), or Bosch process (deep reactive ion etching) with focused ion beam (FIB) milling as a final step. However, new methods are required for difficult samples. Many materials are not easily fabricated using electropolishing, MSS, or the Bosch process, FIB milling is slow and expensive, and wet chemistry and the reactive ion etching are typically limited to Si and other semiconductors. APFIM sample preparation using the dicing saw is commonly used to section semiconductor wafers into individual devices following manufacture. The dicing saw is a time-effective method for preparing high aspect ratio posts of poorly conducting materials. Femtosecond laser micromachining is also suitable for preparation of posts. FIB time required is reduced by about a factor of 10 and multi-tip specimens can easily be fabricated using the dicing saw.

  8. Antiferromagnetic half metallicity in codoped chalcopyrite semiconductors Cu(Al 1 - 2 xAxBx)Se2 (A and B are 3d transition-metal atoms)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahjahan, M.; Oguchi, T.

    2016-06-01

    Electronic structures and magnetic properties of group I-III-VI2 chalcopyrite-type compounds Cu(Al 1 - 2 xAxBx)Se2 are calculated using the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker Green's function method, where A (Ti, V, Cr, Mn) and B (Fe, Co, Ni) are 3d transition metal atoms, and x is atomic concentration. We found that codoping of Cr-Co and V-Ni pairs at Al site of host CuAlSe2 exhibit antiferromagnetic (AF) half metallicity with low Curie temperature (TC). The AF half metallic property is supported by nullified net magnetic moment and compensated density of states in the minority spin direction. On the other hand, codoping of Cr-Ni, Mn-Co, V-Co, and Ti-Co pairs at Al site of host CuAlSe2 manifest ferrimagnetic half metallicity with a small net magnetization and keeping antiparallel local spin moments. In Mn-Co case TC is close to room temperature. Besides, Cr-Fe, V-Fe, and Ti-Ni codoping cases lead to an instable magnetic ordering and therefore obtain a disordered local moment (spin-glass like) state.

  9. Atomic-scale characterization of germanium isotopic multilayers by atom probe tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, Y.; Takamizawa, H.; Toyama, T.; Inoue, K.; Nagai, Y.; Kawamura, Y.; Uematsu, M.; Itoh, K. M.; Haller, E. E.

    2013-01-14

    We report comparison of the interfacial sharpness characterization of germanium (Ge) isotopic multilayers between laser-assisted atom probe tomography (APT) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). An alternating stack of 8-nm-thick naturally available Ge layers and 8-nm-thick isotopically enriched {sup 70}Ge layers was prepared on a Ge(100) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. The APT mass spectra consist of clearly resolved peaks of five stable Ge isotopes ({sup 70}Ge, {sup 72}Ge, {sup 73}Ge, {sup 74}Ge, and {sup 76}Ge). The degree of intermixing at the interfaces between adjacent layers was determined by APT to be around 0.8 {+-} 0.1 nm which was much sharper than that obtained by SIMS.

  10. Ligand-based Pharmacophore Modeling; Atom-based 3D-QSAR Analysis and Molecular Docking Studies of Phosphoinositide-Dependent Kinase-1 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Kirubakaran, P.; Muthusamy, K.; Singh, K. H. D.; Nagamani, S.

    2012-01-01

    Phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 plays a vital role in the PI3-kinase signaling pathway that regulates gene expression, cell cycle growth and proliferation. The common human cancers include lung, breast, blood and prostate possess over stimulation of the phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 signaling and making phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 an interesting therapeutic target in oncology. A ligand-based pharmacophore and atom-based 3D-QSAR studies were carried out on a set of 82 inhibitors of PDK1. A six point pharmacophore with two hydrogen bond acceptors (A), three hydrogen bond donors (D) and one hydrophobic group (H) was obtained. The pharmacophore hypothesis yielded a 3D-QSAR model with good partial least square statistics results. The training set correlation is characterized by partial least square factors (R2 = 0.9557, SD = 0.2334, F = 215.5, P = 1.407e-32). The test set correlation is characterized by partial least square factors (Q2 ext = 0.7510, RMSE = 0.5225, Pearson-R =0.8676). The external validation indicated that our QSAR model possess high predictive power with good value of 0.99 and value of 0.88. The docking results show the binding orientations of these inhibitors at active site amino acid residues (Ala162, Thr222, Glu209 and Glu166) of phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 protein. The binding free energy interactions of protein-ligand complex have been calculated, which plays an important role in molecular recognition and drug design approach. PMID:23325995

  11. Geochemical Proxy Distribution at the Atomic-Scale: Atom Probe Tomography of Foraminiferal Calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branson, O.; Perea, D. E.; Winters, M. A.; Fehrenbacher, J. S.; Russell, A. D.; Spero, H. J.; Gagnon, A. C.

    2014-12-01

    Biomineral composition reflects a complex interplay between minute-scale biological control, mineral growth processes, and the influence of environmental conditions. For this reason, the mechanisms responsible for the formation of these minerals, as well as the incorporation of trace elements during biomineral growth, are poorly understood. Potential mechanisms governing the production and composition of biominerals can be organized into two distinct groups: a) biological mechanisms controlling the calcifying environment and b) mineral growth processes from this controlled environment. Despite significant advances in both these areas, critical gaps remain in our understanding of biomineral production and geochemical tracer incorporation. We are adapting Atom Probe Tomography (APT), a technique that maps the arrangement and identity of individual atoms within a bulk material, to analyze foraminiferal calcite for the first time. These data-rich atom-scale chemical maps provide a unique opportunity to deconvolve the effects of biological and crystal growth processes in the incorporation of geochemical tracers. Our first experiments have examined the influence of the biological-mineral interface on geochemical proxy element incorporation. Preliminary measurements show that (1) we can successfully map impurities in calcite biominerals, while also distinguishing between mineral and organic zones, overcoming a major technical hurdle; and (2) that elements like sodium appear to be recruited to the organic-mineral interface. The high-resolution chemical data from the APT will further allow us to investigate the fundamental basis for geochemical proxy behavior. For example, we can determine for a certain set of conditions whether the substitution of trace elements into the calcite follows ideal solid-solution behavior, as tacitly assumed in many geochemical proxy systems, or is modulated by intra-shell organics, or coupled-substitution interactions. Collectively, the

  12. Probing Atomic Dynamics and Structures Using Optical Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmittberger, Bonnie L.; Gauthier, Daniel J.

    2015-05-01

    Pattern formation is a widely studied phenomenon that can provide fundamental insights into nonlinear systems. Emergent patterns in cold atoms are of particular interest in condensed matter physics and quantum information science because one can relate optical patterns to spatial structures in the atoms. In our experimental system, we study multimode optical patterns generated from a sample of cold, thermal atoms. We observe this nonlinear optical phenomenon at record low input powers due to the highly nonlinear nature of the spatial bunching of atoms in an optical lattice. We present a detailed study of the dynamics of these bunched atoms during optical pattern formation. We show how small changes in the atomic density distribution affect the symmetry of the generated patterns as well as the nature of the nonlinearity that describes the light-atom interaction. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the National Science Foundation through Grant #PHY-1206040.

  13. Atom probe field ion microscopy and related topics: A bibliography 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, K.F.; Miller, M.K.

    1993-01-01

    This report contains a bibliography for 1991 on the following topics: Atom probe field ion microscopy; field desorption mass spectrometry; field emission; field ion microscopy; and field emission theory.

  14. Effect of site preference of 3d atoms on the electronic structure and half-metallicity of Heusler alloy Mn2YAl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Hongzhi; Zhu, Zhiyong; Ma, Li; Xu, Shifeng; Zhu, Xiaoxi; Jiang, Chengbao; Xu, Huibin; Wu, Guangheng

    2008-03-01

    The site preference of 3d atoms Y in Mn2YAl (Y = V, Fe, Co) alloys and its influence on their electronic structures and magnetism have been studied by first-principles calculations. The results prove that elements with more valence electrons than Mn tend to enter the A (0, 0, 0) and C (½, ½, ½) sites and elements with fewer electrons prefer the B (¼, ¼, ¼) site (Wyckoff positions). Meanwhile, it is found that for Mn2VAl and Mn2FeAl, a high spin polarization can be obtained whether the Y atom enters the (A, C) or the B site. In particular, Mn2VAl is half-metallic whether it forms the Cu2MnAl type or the Hg2CuTi type of structure. And a 100% spin polarization can be retained even when a 25% Mn-V antisite disorder occurs. This is quite preferable in practical applications. It is also found that the higher-valent element such as Co at the B (¼, ¼, ¼) site has opposite effects and tends to close the energy gap. Finally, a systemic summarization on the electronic and magnetic properties of Mn2YAl (Y = Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe and Co) alloys was made. All of them except for Mn2TiAl are predicted as half-metals. The calculated total spin moment is an integral value and increases from -3µB/f.u. for Mn2TiAl to +2µB/f.u. for Mn2CoAl with increasing number of valence electrons. This agrees with the Slater-Pauling curve quite well. All the Mn2YAl alloys studied here are ferrimagnets.

  15. Aberrated electron probes for magnetic spectroscopy with atomic resolution: Theory and practical aspects

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rusz, Ján; Idrobo, Juan Carlos

    2016-03-24

    It was recently proposed that electron magnetic circular dichroism (EMCD) can be measured in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with atomic resolution by tuning the phase distribution of a electron beam. Here, we describe the theoretical and practical aspects for the detection of out-of-plane and in-plane magnetization utilizing atomic size electron probes. Here we present the calculated optimized astigmatic probes and discuss how to achieve them experimentally.

  16. Solid-state electrochemistry on the nanometer and atomic scales: the scanning probe microscopy approach.

    PubMed

    Strelcov, Evgheni; Yang, Sang Mo; Jesse, Stephen; Balke, Nina; Vasudevan, Rama K; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2016-08-01

    Energy technologies of the 21(st) century require an understanding and precise control over ion transport and electrochemistry at all length scales - from single atoms to macroscopic devices. This short review provides a summary of recent studies dedicated to methods of advanced scanning probe microscopy for probing electrochemical transformations in solids at the meso-, nano- and atomic scales. The discussion presents the advantages and limitations of several techniques and a wealth of examples highlighting peculiarities of nanoscale electrochemistry. PMID:27146961

  17. Solid-state electrochemistry on the nanometer and atomic scales: the scanning probe microscopy approach

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Strelcov, Evgheni; Yang, Sang Mo; Jesse, Stephen; Balke, Nina; Vasudevan, Rama K.; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2016-04-21

    Energy technologies of the 21st century require an understanding and precise control over ion transport and electrochemistry at all length scales – from single atoms to macroscopic devices. Our short review provides a summary of recent studies dedicated to methods of advanced scanning probe microscopy for probing electrochemical transformations in solids at the meso-, nano- and atomic scales. In this discussion we present the advantages and limitations of several techniques and a wealth of examples highlighting peculiarities of nanoscale electrochemistry.

  18. Solid-state electrochemistry on the nanometer and atomic scales: the scanning probe microscopy approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strelcov, Evgheni; Yang, Sang Mo; Jesse, Stephen; Balke, Nina; Vasudevan, Rama K.; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2016-07-01

    Energy technologies of the 21st century require an understanding and precise control over ion transport and electrochemistry at all length scales - from single atoms to macroscopic devices. This short review provides a summary of recent studies dedicated to methods of advanced scanning probe microscopy for probing electrochemical transformations in solids at the meso-, nano- and atomic scales. The discussion presents the advantages and limitations of several techniques and a wealth of examples highlighting peculiarities of nanoscale electrochemistry.

  19. Aberrated electron probes for magnetic spectroscopy with atomic resolution: Theory and practical aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusz, Ján; Idrobo, Juan Carlos

    2016-03-01

    It was recently proposed that electron magnetic circular dichroism can be measured in scanning transmission electron microscopy with atomic resolution by tuning the phase distribution of an electron beam. Here, we describe the theoretical and practical aspects for the detection of out-of-plane and in-plane magnetization utilizing atomic size electron probes. We present the calculated optimized astigmatic probes and discuss how to achieve them experimentally.

  20. Aberrated electron probes for novel spectroscopy with atomic resolution: theory and practical aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Rusz, Jan; Idrobo Tapia, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    It was recently proposed that electron magnetic circular dichroism (EMCD) can be measured in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with atomic resolution by tuning the phase distribution of a electron beam. Here, we describe the theoretical and practical aspects for the detection of out-of-plane and in-plane magnetization utilizing atomic size electron probes. We present the calculated optimized astigmatic probes and discuss how to achieve them experimentally.

  1. Understanding proton-conducting perovskite interfaces using atom probe tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Daniel R.

    Proton-conducting ceramics are under intense scientific investigation for a number of exciting applications, including fuel cells, electrolyzers, hydrogen separation membranes, membrane reactors, and sensors. However, commercial application requires deeper understanding and improvement of proton conductivity in these materials. It is well-known that proton conductivity in these materials is often limited by highly resistive grain boundaries (GBs). While these conductivity-limiting GBs are still not well understood, it is hypothesized that their blocking nature stems from the formation of a positive (proton-repelling) space-charge zone. Furthermore, it has been observed that the strength of the blocking behavior can change dramatically depending on the fabrication process used to make the ceramic. This thesis applies laser-assisted atom probe tomography (LAAPT) to provide new insights into the GB chemistry and resulting space-charge behavior of BaZr0.9Y0.1O 3--delta (BZY10), a prototypical proton-conducting ceramic. LAAPT is an exciting characterization technique that allows for three-dimensional nm-scale spatial resolution and very high chemical resolution (up to parts-per-million). While it is challenging to quantitatively apply LAAPT to complex, multi-cation oxide materials, this thesis successfully develops a method to accurately quantify the stoichiometry of BZY10 and maintain minimal quantitative cationic deviation at a laser energies of approximately 10--20 pJ. With the analysis technique specifically optimized for BZY10, GB chemistry is then examined for BZY10 samples prepared using four differing processing methods: (1) spark plasma sintering (SPS), (2) conventional sintering using powder prepared by solid-state reaction followed by high-temperature annealing (HT), (3) conventional sintering using powder prepared by solid-state reaction with NiO used as a sintering aid (SSR-Ni), and (4) solid-state reactive sintering directly from BaCO3, ZrO2, and Y2O3

  2. Atomic Resolution Imaging with a sub-50 pm Electron Probe

    SciTech Connect

    Erni, Rolf P.; Rossell, Marta D.; Kisielowski, Christian; Dahmen, Ulrich

    2009-03-02

    Using a highly coherent focused electron probe in a 5th order aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope, we report on resolving a crystal spacing less than 50 pm. Based on the geometrical source size and residual coherent and incoherent axial lens aberrations, an electron probe is calculated, which is theoretically capable of resolving an ideal 47 pm spacing with 29percent contrast. Our experimental data show the 47 pm spacing of a Ge 114 crystal imaged with 11-18percent contrast at a 60-95percent confidence level, providing the first direct evidence for sub 50-pm resolution in ADF STEM imaging.

  3. Dopant distributions in n-MOSFET structure observed by atom probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Inoue, K; Yano, F; Nishida, A; Takamizawa, H; Tsunomura, T; Nagai, Y; Hasegawa, M

    2009-11-01

    The dopant distributions in an n-type metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) structure were analyzed by atom probe tomography. The dopant distributions of As, P, and B atoms in a MOSFET structure (gate, gate oxide, channel, source/drain extension, and halo) were obtained. P atoms were segregated at the interface between the poly-Si gate and the gate oxide, and on the grain boundaries of the poly-Si gate, which had an elongated grain structure along the gate height direction. The concentration of B atoms was enriched near the edge of the source/drain extension where the As atoms were implanted. PMID:19775815

  4. Bragg scattering as a probe of atomic wave functions and quantum phase transitions in optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Hirokazu; Siviloglou, Georgios A; Puentes, Graciana; Pritchard, David E; Ketterle, Wolfgang; Weld, David M

    2011-10-21

    We have observed Bragg scattering of photons from quantum degenerate ^{87}Rb atoms in a three-dimensional optical lattice. Bragg scattered light directly probes the microscopic crystal structure and atomic wave function whose position and momentum width is Heisenberg limited. The spatial coherence of the wave function leads to revivals in the Bragg scattered light due to the atomic Talbot effect. The decay of revivals across the superfluid to Mott insulator transition indicates the loss of superfluid coherence. PMID:22107532

  5. Restoring the lattice of Si-based atom probe reconstructions for enhanced information on dopant positioning.

    PubMed

    Breen, Andrew J; Moody, Michael P; Ceguerra, Anna V; Gault, Baptiste; Araullo-Peters, Vicente J; Ringer, Simon P

    2015-12-01

    The following manuscript presents a novel approach for creating lattice based models of Sb-doped Si directly from atom probe reconstructions for the purposes of improving information on dopant positioning and directly informing quantum mechanics based materials modeling approaches. Sophisticated crystallographic analysis techniques are used to detect latent crystal structure within the atom probe reconstructions with unprecedented accuracy. A distortion correction algorithm is then developed to precisely calibrate the detected crystal structure to the theoretically known diamond cubic lattice. The reconstructed atoms are then positioned on their most likely lattice positions. Simulations are then used to determine the accuracy of such an approach and show that improvements to short-range order measurements are possible for noise levels and detector efficiencies comparable with experimentally collected atom probe data. PMID:26190007

  6. Measurement of the mobility edge for 3D Anderson localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semeghini, Giulia; Landini, Manuele; Castilho, Patricia; Roy, Sanjukta; Spagnolli, Giacomo; Trenkwalder, Andreas; Fattori, Marco; Inguscio, Massimo; Modugno, Giovanni

    2016-05-01

    An outstanding problem of Anderson localization (AL) in 3D systems is the determination of the mobility edge, i.e. the energy threshold that separates localized and extended states. In our experiment we use a Bose-Einstein condensate of 39 K atoms and study its transport properties in a disordered optical potential. By tuning the inter-particle interactions to zero via magnetic Feshbach resonances, we study the single-particle phenomenon of AL. A novel technique to measure and control the atomic energy distribution allows us to measure for the first time the position of the localization threshold as a function of the disorder strength. We also study how the addition of finite repulsive or attractive interactions breaks the localized regime and triggers subdiffusive expansion of the atoms. In the future, similar experiments might also probe the existence of many-body localization in 3D.

  7. Laser-cooled atomic ions as probes of molecular ions

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Kenneth R.; Viteri, C. Ricardo; Clark, Craig R.; Goeders, James E.; Khanyile, Ncamiso B.; Vittorini, Grahame D.

    2015-01-22

    Trapped laser-cooled atomic ions are a new tool for understanding cold molecular ions. The atomic ions not only sympathetically cool the molecular ions to millikelvin temperatures, but the bright atomic ion fluorescence can also serve as a detector of both molecular reactions and molecular spectra. We are working towards the detection of single molecular ion spectra by sympathetic heating spectroscopy. Sympathetic heating spectroscopy uses the coupled motion of two trapped ions to measure the spectra of one ion by observing changes in the fluorescence of the other ion. Sympathetic heating spectroscopy is a generalization of quantum logic spectroscopy, but does not require ions in the motional ground state or coherent control of the ion internal states. We have recently demonstrated this technique using two isotopes of Ca{sup +} [Phys. Rev. A, 81, 043428 (2010)]. Limits of the method and potential applications for molecular spectroscopy are discussed.

  8. Generating and probing entangled states for optical atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braverman, Boris; Kawasaki, Akio; Vuletic, Vladan

    2016-05-01

    The precision of quantum measurements is inherently limited by projection noise caused by the measurement process itself. Spin squeezing and more complex forms of entanglement have been proposed as ways of surpassing this limitation. In our system, a high-finesse asymmetric micromirror-based optical cavity can mediate the atom-atom interaction necessary for generating entanglement in an 171 Yb optical lattice clock. I will discuss approaches for creating, characterizing, and optimally utilizing these nonclassical states for precision measurement, as well as recent progress toward their realization. This research is supported by DARPA QuASAR, NSF, and NSERC.

  9. Influence of probe contamination on recombination of atomic hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, L. W.; Downs, W. R.

    1975-01-01

    Atomic hydrogen concentration profiles were measured through a screen-stabilized one-dimensional propane/oxygen front using a specially modified electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrometer. The ESR line occurring at 3075.5 G at 9261.2 MHz was monitored in the presence and absence of various halogenated hydrocarbons. A significant cumulative decrease in peak intensity occurred with addition of any halogenated compound. Further results suggest that the effect is due to inhibitor action on the transport tube walls followed by changes in atomic hydrogen interaction with the walls, and that hydrogen decay is nonlinear in the halogenated tube.

  10. Probing atomic positions of adsorbed ammonia molecules in zeolite.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lin; Lo, Benedict T W; Qu, Jin; Wilkinson, Ian; Hughes, Tim; Murray, Claire A; Tang, Chiu C; Tsang, Shik Chi Edman

    2016-02-25

    Atomic positions and interactions between adsorbed guest molecules, such as ammonia in H-ZSM-5 microporous solids, are for the first time revealed by making use of the change in the periodical scattering parameter using in situ synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction combined with refinement within experimental errors. PMID:26833032

  11. Distributed force probe bending model of critical dimension atomic force microscopy bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukraintsev, Vladimir A.; Orji, Ndubuisi G.; Vorburger, Theodore V.; Dixson, Ronald G.; Fu, Joseph; Silver, Rick M.

    2013-04-01

    Critical dimension atomic force microscopy (CD-AFM) is a widely used reference metrology technique. To characterize modern semiconductor devices, small and flexible probes, often 15 to 20 nm in diameter, are used. Recent studies have reported uncontrolled and significant probe-to-probe bias variation during linewidth and sidewall angle measurements. To understand the source of these variations, tip-sample interactions between high aspect ratio features and small flexible probes, and their influence on measurement bias, should be carefully studied. Using theoretical and experimental procedures, one-dimensional (1-D) and two-dimensional (2-D) models of cylindrical probe bending relevant to carbon nanotube (CNT) AFM probes were developed and tested. An earlier 1-D bending model was refined, and a new 2-D distributed force (DF) model was developed. Contributions from several factors were considered, including: probe misalignment, CNT tip apex diameter variation, probe bending before snapping, and distributed van der Waals-London force. A method for extracting Hamaker probe-surface interaction energy from experimental probe-bending data was developed. Comparison of the new 2-D model with 1-D single point force (SPF) model revealed a difference of about 28% in probe bending. A simple linear relation between biases predicted by the 1-D SPF and 2-D DF models was found. The results suggest that probe bending can be on the order of several nanometers and can partially explain the observed CD-AFM probe-to-probe variation. New 2-D and three-dimensional CD-AFM data analysis software is needed to take full advantage of the new bias correction modeling capabilities.

  12. Nanoscale isotope mapping of terrestrial and lunar zircons by atom probe tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, T.; Reinhard, D. A.; Spicuzza, M. J.; Olson, D.; Coble, M. A.; Cavosie, A. J.; Ushikubo, T.; Larson, D. J.; Kelly, T. F.; Valley, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    Atom Probe Tomography (APT) allows 3D mapping of elements and isotopes with near atomic resolution, at concentrations down to the 10's of ppma. Direct characterization of nanoscale chemical heterogeneity down to trace element levels permits novel interrogations of geochemical processes acting at the nm-scale, and further informs us about elemental or isotopic data gathered by larger-scale techniques. We have studied four zircons including a 2.5 Ga xenocryst from a 29 Ma granitoid (ARG2.5), a 4.3 Ga zircon from the quartz monzodiorite clast of lunar sample 15405 (15Q4), and two Jack Hills zircons dated at 4.0 Ga (JH4.0) and 4.4 Ga (JH4.4) (Valley et al. 2014, Nat. Geosci.). JH4.4 and ARG2.5 contain enrichments of Y, REE, and Pb in ~10 nm clusters, in contrast to the uniform distribution of these elements in JH4.0 and 15Q4. Despite varying amounts of nanoscale trace element heterogeneity, all terrestrial zircons have total 207Pb/206Pb ratios consistent with concordant U-Pb ages obtained by SIMS. This proves that zircon cores remained closed U-Pb systems at the micron scale. In JH4.4 and ARG2.5, the 207Pb/206Pb ratio within clusters is a function of the timing of cluster formation, and precludes clusters from being primary features. Instead, the timing of element mobility and cluster formation is linked with known high temperature geological events. The lack of clustering within JH4.0 and lunar zircon 15Q4 suggests no nm-scale element mobility has occurred, and supports the concordant ages obtained by SIMS. The size, shape, distribution and composition of clusters reflect the time-integrated influence of radiation damage, annealing, and temperature on intracrystalline trace element mobility, and can be used to further understand the thermal history of zircons and their structural evolution since crystallization. The combination of spatial resolution and detection limits for APT has exciting potential for many geochemistry and mineralogy studies.

  13. Fabrication of specimens of metamorphic magnetite crystals for field ion microscopy and atom probe microanalysis.

    PubMed

    Kuhlman, K R; Martens, R L; Kelly, T F; Evans, N D; Miller, M K

    2001-10-01

    Field ion specimens have been successfully fabricated from samples of metamorphic magnetite crystals (Fe3O4) extracted from a polymetamorphosed, granulite-facies marble with the use of a focused ion beam. These magnetite crystals contain nanometer-scale, disk-shaped inclusions making this magnetite particularly attractive for investigating the capabilities of atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM) for geological materials. Field ion microscope images of these magnetite crystals were obtained in which the observed size and morphology of the precipitates agree with previous results. Samples were analyzed in the energy compensated optical position-sensitive atom probe. Mass spectra were obtained in which peaks for singly ionized 16O, 56Fe and 56FeO and doubly ionized 54Fe, 56Fe and 57Fe peaks were fully resolved. Manganese and aluminum were observed in a limited analysis of a precipitate in an energy compensated position sensitive atom probe. PMID:11770743

  14. Atom probe tomography studies on the Cu(In,ga)Se2 grain boundaries.

    PubMed

    Cojocaru-Mirédin, Oana; Schwarz, Torsten; Choi, Pyuck-Pa; Herbig, Michael; Wuerz, Roland; Raabe, Dierk

    2013-01-01

    Compared with the existent techniques, atom probe tomography is a unique technique able to chemically characterize the internal interfaces at the nanoscale and in three dimensions. Indeed, APT possesses high sensitivity (in the order of ppm) and high spatial resolution (sub nm). Considerable efforts were done here to prepare an APT tip which contains the desired grain boundary with a known structure. Indeed, site-specific sample preparation using combined focused-ion-beam, electron backscatter diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy is presented in this work. This method allows selected grain boundaries with a known structure and location in Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin-films to be studied by atom probe tomography. Finally, we discuss the advantages and drawbacks of using the atom probe tomography technique to study the grain boundaries in Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin-film solar cells. PMID:23629452

  15. Preparation and Analysis of Atom Probe Tips by Xenon Focused Ion Beam Milling.

    PubMed

    Estivill, Robert; Audoit, Guillaume; Barnes, Jean-Paul; Grenier, Adeline; Blavette, Didier

    2016-06-01

    The damage and ion distribution induced in Si by an inductively coupled plasma Xe focused ion beam was investigated by atom probe tomography. By using predefined patterns it was possible to prepare the atom probe tips with a sub 50 nm end radius in the ion beam microscope. The atom probe reconstruction shows good agreement with simulated implantation profiles and interplanar distances extracted from spatial distribution maps. The elemental profiles of O and C indicate co-implantation during the milling process. The presence of small disc-shaped Xe clusters are also found in the three-dimensional reconstruction. These are attributed to the presence of Xe nanocrystals or bubbles that open during the evaporation process. The expected accumulated dose points to a loss of >95% of the Xe during analysis, which escapes undetected. PMID:27056544

  16. Atom Probe Tomography Studies on the Cu(In,Ga)Se2 Grain Boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Cojocaru-Mirédin, Oana; Schwarz, Torsten; Choi, Pyuck-Pa; Herbig, Michael; Wuerz, Roland; Raabe, Dierk

    2013-01-01

    Compared with the existent techniques, atom probe tomography is a unique technique able to chemically characterize the internal interfaces at the nanoscale and in three dimensions. Indeed, APT possesses high sensitivity (in the order of ppm) and high spatial resolution (sub nm). Considerable efforts were done here to prepare an APT tip which contains the desired grain boundary with a known structure. Indeed, site-specific sample preparation using combined focused-ion-beam, electron backscatter diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy is presented in this work. This method allows selected grain boundaries with a known structure and location in Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin-films to be studied by atom probe tomography. Finally, we discuss the advantages and drawbacks of using the atom probe tomography technique to study the grain boundaries in Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin-film solar cells. PMID:23629452

  17. Probing starch-iodine interaction by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Du, Xiongwei; An, Hongjie; Liu, Zhongdong; Yang, Hongshun; Wei, Lijuan

    2014-01-01

    We explored the interaction of iodine with three crystalline type starches, corn, potato, and sweet potato starches using atomic force microscopy. Results revealed that starch molecules aggregated through interaction with iodine solution as well as iodine vapor. Detailed fine structures such as networks, chains, and super-helical structures were found in iodide solution tests. The nanostructures formed due to iodine adsorption could help to understand the formation and properties of the starch-iodine complex. PMID:24338992

  18. Singlet-triplet energy splitting between 1D and 3D (1s2 2s nd), n = 3, 4, 5, and 6, Rydberg states of the beryllium atom (9Be) calculated with all-electron explicitly correlated Gaussian functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharkey, Keeper L.; Bubin, Sergiy; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2014-11-01

    Accurate variational nonrelativistic quantum-mechanical calculations are performed for the five lowest 1D and four lowest 3D states of the 9Be isotope of the beryllium atom. All-electron explicitly correlated Gaussian (ECG) functions are used in the calculations and their nonlinear parameters are optimized with the aid of the analytical energy gradient determined with respect to these parameters. The effect of the finite nuclear mass is directly included in the Hamiltonian used in the calculations. The singlet-triplet energy gaps between the corresponding 1D and 3D states, are reported.

  19. Laser assisted atom probe analysis of thin film on insulating substrate.

    PubMed

    Kodzuka, M; Ohkubo, T; Hono, K

    2011-05-01

    We demonstrate that the atom probe analyses of metallic thin films on insulating substrates are possible using laser assisted field evaporation. The tips with metallic thin film and insulating substrate (0.6-3 μm in thickness) were prepared by the lift-out and annular ion beam milling techniques on tungsten supports. In spite of the existence of thick insulating layer between the metallic film and the tungsten support, atom probe tomography with practical mass resolution, signal-to-noise ratio and spatial resolution was found to be possible using laser assisted field evaporation. PMID:21172729

  20. Design of a laser-assisted tomographic atom probe at Muenster University

    SciTech Connect

    Schlesiger, Ralf; Oberdorfer, Christian; Greiwe, Gerd; Stender, Patrick; Artmeier, Michael; Pelka, Patrick; Spaleck, Frank; Schmitz, Guido; Wuerz, Roland

    2010-04-15

    To benefit from the latest technical improvements in atom probe analysis, a new tomographic atom probe has been built at the University of Muenster, Germany. The instrument utilizes a femtosecond laser system with a high repetition rate combined with the ability of using a micrometer-sized extraction electrode and a wide angle configuration. Since field evaporation is triggered by laser pulses instead of high-voltage pulses, the instrument offers the ability to expand the range of analyzed materials to poorly conducting or insulating materials such as oxides, glasses, ceramics, and polymeric materials. The article describes the design of the instrument and presents characterizing measurements on metals, semiconductors, and oxide ceramic.

  1. Europeana and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletinckx, D.

    2011-09-01

    The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  2. Probing mechanical quantum coherence with an ultracold-atom meter

    SciTech Connect

    Lo Gullo, N.; Busch, Th.; Palma, G. M.; Paternostro, M.

    2011-12-15

    We propose a scheme to probe quantum coherence in the state of a nanocantilever based on its magnetic coupling (mediated by a magnetic tip) with a spinor Bose Einstein condensate (BEC). By mapping the BEC into a rotor, its coupling with the cantilever results in a gyroscopic motion whose properties depend on the state of the cantilever: the dynamics of one of the components of the rotor angular momentum turns out to be strictly related to the presence of quantum coherence in the state of the cantilever. We also suggest a detection scheme relying on Faraday rotation, which produces only a very small back-action on the BEC and is thus suitable for a continuous detection of the cantilever's dynamics.

  3. Magnetoencephalography with a two-color pump probe atomic magnetometer.

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Cort N.

    2010-07-01

    The authors have detected magnetic fields from the human brain with a compact, fiber-coupled rubidium spin-exchange-relaxation-free magnetometer. Optical pumping is performed on the D1 transition and Faraday rotation is measured on the D2 transition. The beams share an optical axis, with dichroic optics preparing beam polarizations appropriately. A sensitivity of <5 fT/{radical}Hz is achieved. Evoked responses resulting from median nerve and auditory stimulation were recorded with the atomic magnetometer. Recordings were validated by comparison with those taken by a commercial magnetoencephalography system. The design is amenable to arraying sensors around the head, providing a framework for noncryogenic, whole-head magnetoencephalography.

  4. Simulation and signal analysis of Akiyama probe applied to atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Longlong; Lu, Mingzhen; Guo, Tong; Gao, Sitian; Zhang, Huakun

    2013-10-01

    Atomic force microscope is one of indispensable measurement tools in nano/micronano precision manufacture and critical dimension measurement. To expand its industry application, a novel head and system are newly designed combined with Nanosensors cooperation's patented probe — Akiyama probe, which is a self-sensing probe. The modal analysis and resonance frequency are obtained by finite element(FE) simulations. Using the Locked-in amplifier, the effective and available signal can be abtained. Through the experiment analysis, the retracting and extending curve reflects the tip and sample interaction. Furthermore, the measurement on the calibrated position system demonstrates that the whole system resolution can reach the nanometer scale.

  5. Design and optimization of a harmonic probe with step cross section in multifrequency atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jiandong; Wang, Michael Yu; Zhang, Li

    2015-12-01

    In multifrequency atomic force microscopy (AFM), probe's characteristic of assigning resonance frequencies to integer harmonics results in a remarkable improvement of detection sensitivity at specific harmonic components. The selection criterion of harmonic order is based on its amplitude's sensitivity on material properties, e.g., elasticity. Previous studies on designing harmonic probe are unable to provide a large design capability along with maintaining the structural integrity. Herein, we propose a harmonic probe with step cross section, in which it has variable width in top and bottom steps, while the middle step in cross section is kept constant. Higher order resonance frequencies are tailored to be integer times of fundamental resonance frequency. The probe design is implemented within a structural optimization framework. The optimally designed probe is micromachined using focused ion beam milling technique, and then measured with an AFM. The measurement results agree well with our resonance frequency assignment requirement. PMID:26724066

  6. Optimal arrangements of fiber optic probes to enhance the spatial resolution in depth for 3D reflectance diffuse optical tomography with time-resolved measurements performed with fast-gated single-photon avalanche diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puszka, Agathe; Di Sieno, Laura; Dalla Mora, Alberto; Pifferi, Antonio; Contini, Davide; Boso, Gianluca; Tosi, Alberto; Hervé, Lionel; Planat-Chrétien, Anne; Koenig, Anne; Dinten, Jean-Marc

    2014-02-01

    Fiber optic probes with a width limited to a few centimeters can enable diffuse optical tomography (DOT) in intern organs like the prostate or facilitate the measurements on extern organs like the breast or the brain. We have recently shown on 2D tomographic images that time-resolved measurements with a large dynamic range obtained with fast-gated single-photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) could push forward the imaged depth range in a diffusive medium at short source-detector separation compared with conventional non-gated approaches. In this work, we confirm these performances with the first 3D tomographic images reconstructed with such a setup and processed with the Mellin- Laplace transform. More precisely, we investigate the performance of hand-held probes with short interfiber distances in terms of spatial resolution and specifically demonstrate the interest of having a compact probe design featuring small source-detector separations. We compare the spatial resolution obtained with two probes having the same design but different scale factors, the first one featuring only interfiber distances of 15 mm and the second one, 10 mm. We evaluate experimentally the spatial resolution obtained with each probe on the setup with fast-gated SPADs for optical phantoms featuring two absorbing inclusions positioned at different depths and conclude on the potential of short source-detector separations for DOT.

  7. Probing non-Hermitian physics with flying atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Jianming; Xiao, Yanhong; Peng, Peng; Cao, Wanxia; Shen, Ce; Qu, Weizhi; Jiang, Liang

    2016-05-01

    Non-Hermtian optical systems with parity-time (PT) symmetry provide new means for light manipulation and control. To date, most of experimental demonstrations on PT symmetry rely on advanced nanotechnologies and sophisticated fabrication techniques to manmade solid-state materials. Here, we report the first experimental realization of optical anti-PT symmetry, a counterpart of conventional PT symmetry, in a warm atomic-vapor cell. By exploiting rapid coherence transport via flying atoms, we observe essential features of anti-PT symmetry with an unprecedented precision on phase-transition threshold. Moreover, our system allows nonlocal interference of two spatially-separated fields as well as anti-PT assisted four-wave mixing. Besides, another intriguing feature offered by the system is refractionless (or unit-refraction) light propagation. Our results thus represent a significant advance in non-Hermitian physics by bridging a firm connection with the AMO field, where novel phenomena and applications in quantum and nonlinear optics aided by (anti-)PT symmetry can be anticipated.

  8. Probing Individual Atoms and Molecules on Pt(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Zhu; Surface; Interface Science Laboratory, Riken, JAPAN Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    A low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (LT-STM) is used to investigate the structure and reactivity of atomic nitrogen on Pt surfaces, which is important to a variety of catalytic processes. The adsorption of ammonia on an oxygen covered Pt surface leads to the formation of an NH3-O2 complex. Such a complex serves as a precursor to ammonia oxydehydrogenation, which produces an ordered atomic N layer on the surface when annealed to temperatures above 300 K. (√{ 3} ×√{ 3})R30°-N and p(2 × 2)-N phases are found to coexist at temperatures between 360 and 400 K. After exposing the N-covered surface to hydrogen gas at 300 K, NH molecules are present as scattered molecules, as well as in dense islands. Mechanisms of dissociation of NH and lateral movement of H have been explored by examining the threshold energies and reaction rates. Measuring the response of the motion against applied bias voltage reveals the threshold energy, which is the energy of the vibrational mode that is responsible for activating a given motion. A theoretical model is used to fit the spectra, from which an estimate of reaction rate is obtained. ND dissociation and D hopping have also been investigated to examine the role of tunneling in these reactions. Hyowon Kim, Hyun Jin Yang, and Junepyo Oh are acknowledged for their contributions to this work. Support and supervision by professor Yousoo Kim and professor Michael Trenary are gratefully acknowledged.

  9. Probing the spin states of a single acceptor atom.

    PubMed

    van der Heijden, Joost; Salfi, Joe; Mol, Jan A; Verduijn, Jan; Tettamanzi, Giuseppe C; Hamilton, Alex R; Collaert, Nadine; Rogge, Sven

    2014-03-12

    We demonstrate a single-hole transistor using an individual acceptor dopant embedded in a silicon channel. Magneto-transport spectroscopy reveals that the ground state splits as a function of magnetic field into four states, which is unique for a single hole bound to an acceptor in a bulk semiconductor. The two lowest spin states are heavy (|m(j)| = 3/2) and light (|m(j)| = 1/2) hole-like, a two-level system that can be electrically driven and is characterized by a magnetic field dependent and long relaxation time, which are properties of interest for qubits. Although the bulklike spin splitting of a boron atom is preserved in our nanotransistor, the measured Landé g-factors, |g(hh)| = 0.81 ± 0.06 and |g(lh)| = 0.85 ± 0.21 for heavy and light holes respectively, are lower than the bulk value. PMID:24571637

  10. Field Ion Microscopy and Atom Probe Tomography of Metamorphic Magnetite Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, K.; Martens, R. L.; Kelly, T. F.; Evans, N. D.; Miller, M. K.

    2001-01-01

    Magnetite has been analysed using Field Ion Microscopy (FIM) and Atom Probe Tomography (APT), highly attractive techniques for the nanoanalysis of geological materials despite the difficulties inherent in analyzing semiconducting and insulating materials. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  11. Atom probe field ion microscopy and related topics: A bibliography 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, K.F.; Godfrey, R.D.; Miller, M.K.

    1993-12-01

    This bibliography contains citations of books, conference proceedings, journals, and patents published in 1992 on the following types of microscopy: atom probe field ion microscopy (108 items); field emission microscopy (101 items); and field ion microscopy (48 items). An addendum of 34 items missed in previous bibliographies is included.

  12. Cavity-Enhanced Light Scattering in Optical Lattices to Probe Atomic Quantum Statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Mekhov, Igor B.; Maschler, Christoph; Ritsch, Helmut

    2007-03-09

    Different quantum states of atoms in optical lattices can be nondestructively monitored by off-resonant collective light scattering into a cavity. Angle resolved measurements of photon number and variance give information about atom-number fluctuations and pair correlations without single-site access. Observation at angles of diffraction minima provides information on quantum fluctuations insensitive to classical noise. For transverse probing, no photon is scattered into a cavity from a Mott insulator phase, while the photon number is proportional to the atom number for a superfluid.

  13. A variable-width harmonic probe for multifrequency atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Jiandong; Zhang, Li; Xia, Qi E-mail: michael.wang@nus.edu.sg; Luo, Yangjun; Wang, Michael Yu E-mail: michael.wang@nus.edu.sg

    2015-02-16

    In multifrequency atomic force microscopy (AFM) to simultaneously measure topography and material properties of specimens, it is highly desirable that the higher order resonance frequencies of the cantilever probe are assigned to be integer harmonics of the excitation frequency. The harmonic resonances are essential for significant enhancement of the probe's response at the specified harmonic frequencies. In this letter, a structural optimization technique is employed to design cantilever probes so that the ratios between one or more higher order resonance frequencies and the fundamental natural frequency are ensured to be equal to specified integers and, in the meantime, that the fundamental natural frequency is maximized. Width profile of the cantilever probe is the design variable in optimization. Thereafter, the probes were prepared by modifying a commercial probe through the focused ion beam (FIB) milling. The resonance frequencies of the FIB fabricated probes were measured with an AFM. Results of the measurement show that the optimal design of probe is as effective as design prediction.

  14. Soft-Landing Ion Deposition of Isolated Radioactive Probe Atoms on Surfaces: A Novel Method

    SciTech Connect

    Laurens, C.R.; Rosu, M.F.; Pleiter, F.; Niesen, L.

    1997-05-01

    We present a method to deposit a wide range of radioactive probe atoms on surfaces, without introducing lattice damage or contaminating the surface with other elements or isotopes. In this method, the probe atoms are mass separated using an isotope separator, decelerated to 5eV, and directly deposited on the surface. The method allows for performing hyperfine interactions experiments using trace amounts of radioactive probes located at surfaces and interfaces. The characteristics of the deposition method were studied by performing perturbed angular correlation experiments on the system In on Cu(17,1,1). The results are in agreement with molecular dynamics simulations of the deposition process. The potential of this novel technique is briefly discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  15. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Hee-Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d {N}=2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. We also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  16. Characterization of Probe Dynamic Behaviors in Critical Dimension Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shaw C; Joung, Che Bong; Vorburger, Theodore V

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a detailed computational model of the interaction between an atomic force microscope probe tip and a sample surface. The model provides analyses of dynamic behaviors of the tip to estimate the probe deflections due to surface intermittent contact and the resulting dimensional biases and uncertainties. Probe tip and cantilever beam responses to intermittent contact between the probe tip and sample surface are computed using the finite element method. Intermittent contacts with a wall and a horizontal surface are computed and modeled, respectively. Using a 75 nm Critical Dimension (CD) tip as an example, the responses of the probe to interaction forces between the sample surface and the probe tip are shown in both time and frequency domains. In particular, interaction forces between the tip and both a vertical wall and a horizontal surface of a silicon sample are modeled using Lennard-Jones theory. The Snap-in and Snap-out of the probe tip in surface scanning are calculated and shown in the time domain. Based on the given tip-sample interaction force model, the calculation includes the compliance of the probe and dynamic forces generated by an excitation. Cantilever and probe tip deflections versus interaction forces in the time domain can be derived for both vertical contact with a plateau and horizontal contact with a side wall. Dynamic analysis using the finite element method and Lennard-Jones model provide a unique means to analyze the interaction of the probe and sample, including calculation of the deflection and the gap between the probe tip and the measured sample surface. PMID:27504222

  17. Characterization of Probe Dynamic Behaviors in Critical Dimension Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Shaw C.; Joung, Che Bong; Vorburger, Theodore V.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a detailed computational model of the interaction between an atomic force microscope probe tip and a sample surface. The model provides analyses of dynamic behaviors of the tip to estimate the probe deflections due to surface intermittent contact and the resulting dimensional biases and uncertainties. Probe tip and cantilever beam responses to intermittent contact between the probe tip and sample surface are computed using the finite element method. Intermittent contacts with a wall and a horizontal surface are computed and modeled, respectively. Using a 75 nm Critical Dimension (CD) tip as an example, the responses of the probe to interaction forces between the sample surface and the probe tip are shown in both time and frequency domains. In particular, interaction forces between the tip and both a vertical wall and a horizontal surface of a silicon sample are modeled using Lennard-Jones theory. The Snap-in and Snap-out of the probe tip in surface scanning are calculated and shown in the time domain. Based on the given tip-sample interaction force model, the calculation includes the compliance of the probe and dynamic forces generated by an excitation. Cantilever and probe tip deflections versus interaction forces in the time domain can be derived for both vertical contact with a plateau and horizontal contact with a side wall. Dynamic analysis using the finite element method and Lennard-Jones model provide a unique means to analyze the interaction of the probe and sample, including calculation of the deflection and the gap between the probe tip and the measured sample surface. PMID:27504222

  18. Submolecular Imaging by Noncontact Atomic Force Microscopy with an Oxygen Atom Rigidly Connected to a Metallic Probe.

    PubMed

    Mönig, Harry; Hermoso, Diego R; Díaz Arado, Oscar; Todorović, Milica; Timmer, Alexander; Schüer, Simon; Langewisch, Gernot; Pérez, Rubén; Fuchs, Harald

    2016-01-26

    In scanning probe microscopy, the imaging characteristics in the various interaction channels crucially depend on the chemical termination of the probe tip. Here we analyze the contrast signatures of an oxygen-terminated copper tip with a tetrahedral configuration of the covalently bound terminal O atom. Supported by first-principles calculations we show how this tip termination can be identified by contrast analysis in noncontact atomic force and scanning tunneling microscopy (NC-AFM, STM) on a partially oxidized Cu(110) surface. After controlled tip functionalization by soft indentations of only a few angstroms in an oxide nanodomain, we demonstrate that this tip allows imaging an organic molecule adsorbed on Cu(110) by constant-height NC-AFM in the repulsive force regime, revealing its internal bond structure. In established tip functionalization approaches where, for example, CO or Xe is deliberately picked up from a surface, these probe particles are only weakly bound to the metallic tip, leading to lateral deflections during scanning. Therefore, the contrast mechanism is subject to image distortions, artifacts, and related controversies. In contrast, our simulations for the O-terminated Cu tip show that lateral deflections of the terminating O atom are negligible. This allows a detailed discussion of the fundamental imaging mechanisms in high-resolution NC-AFM experiments. With its structural rigidity, its chemically passivated state, and a high electron density at the apex, we identify the main characteristics of the O-terminated Cu tip, making it a highly attractive complementary probe for the characterization of organic nanostructures on surfaces. PMID:26605698

  19. Nondestructive probing of means, variances, and correlations of ultracold-atomic-system densities via qubit impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, T. J.; Johnson, T. H.

    2016-04-01

    We show how impurity atoms can measure moments of ultracold-atomic-gas densities, using the example of bosons in a one-dimensional lattice. This builds on a body of work regarding the probing of systems by measuring the dephasing of an immersed qubit. We show that this dephasing is captured by a function resembling characteristic functions of probability theory, of which the derivatives at short times reveal moments of the system operator to which the qubit couples. For a qubit formed by an impurity atom, in a system of ultracold atoms, this operator can be the density of the system at the location of the impurity, and thus means, variances, and correlations of the atomic densities are accessible.

  20. A new systematic framework for crystallographic analysis of atom probe data.

    PubMed

    Araullo-Peters, Vicente J; Breen, Andrew; Ceguerra, Anna V; Gault, Baptiste; Ringer, Simon P; Cairney, Julie M

    2015-07-01

    In this article, after a brief introduction to the principles behind atom probe crystallography, we introduce methods for unambiguously determining the presence of crystal planes within atom probe datasets, as well as their characteristics: location; orientation and interplanar spacing. These methods, which we refer to as plane orientation extraction (POE) and local crystallography mapping (LCM) make use of real-space data and allow for systematic analyses. We present here application of POE and LCM to datasets of pure Al, industrial aluminium alloys and doped-silicon. Data was collected both in DC voltage mode and laser-assisted mode (in the latter of which extracting crystallographic information is known to be more difficult due to distortions). The nature of the atomic planes in both datasets was extracted and analysed. PMID:25747179

  1. Differential and integrated cross sections for excitation to the 3s, 3p, and 3d states of atomic hydrogen by electron impact below the n=4 threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Bartlett, Philip L.; Bray, Igor; Stelbovics, Andris T.; Williams, J. F.; Mikosza, A. G.

    2006-08-15

    Integrated cross sections for the electron-impact excitation of ground-state hydrogen to the 3s, 3p, and 3d final states have been calculated using propagating exterior complex scaling and convergent close-coupling methods at energies between the n=3 and 4 excitation thresholds. The calculations are in excellent agreement and demonstrate that exterior complex scaling methods can accurately reproduce the resonance structure and magnitude of the excitation cross sections below the ionization threshold. Measurements of the separate 3s, 3p, and 3d differential cross sections were made at 12.24 eV, and are consistent with both calculations within a total experimental uncertainty of about 35%.

  2. Probing tumor-stroma interactions and response to photodynamic therapy in a 3D pancreatic cancer-fibroblast co-culture model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glidden, Michael D.; Massodi, Iqbal; Rizvi, Imran; Celli, Jonathan P.; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2012-02-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is a lethal disease that is often unresectable by the time of diagnosis and is typically non-responsive to chemo- and radiotherapy, resulting in a five year survival of only 3%. Tumors of the pancreas are characterized by a dense fibrous stroma rich in extracellular matrix proteins, which is implicated in poor therapeutic response, though its precise roles remain poorly understood. Indeed, while the use of therapeutics that target the stroma is an emerging paradigm in the clinical management of this disease, the primary focus of such efforts is to enhance drug penetration through dense fibrous stroma and it is unclear to what extent the characteristically rigid stroma of pancreatic tumors imparts drug resistance by acting as a complex signaling partner, or merely as a physical barrier for drug delivery. Here we use 3D in vitro co-cultures of pancreatic cancer cells and normal human fibroblasts as a model system to study heterotypic interactions between these populations. Leveraging this in vitro model along with image-based methods for quantification of growth and therapeutic endpoints, we characterize these co-cultures and examine the role of verteporfin-based photodynamic therapy (PDT) for targeting tumor-fibroblast interactions in pancreatic tumors.

  3. Optical probes of atomic and molecular decay processes.

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, S. T.

    2008-01-01

    characterize both the photoexcitation and subsequent decay processes. These techniques include mass spectrometry, dispersive and threshold photoelectron spectroscopy, laser-induced fluorescence, fluorescence-dip spectroscopy, and laser-induced grating spectroscopy. While the instrumentation is currently available for each of these techniques, two instruments deserve special mention. First, a high-resolution magnetic-bottle electron spectrometer has been developed that is equipped with a pulsed, skimmed molecular beam source. This instrument is capable of {approx}3-4 meV resolution in the electron kinetic energy while providing a collection efficiency of {approx}50%. Second, a time-of-flight mass spectrometer has been constructed with a similar molecular beam source. This instrument is currently being adapted to allow both ion- and electron-imaging studies. A typical experimental study is performed in three steps. First, resonant one-color multiphoton ionization is used to map out the transition between the ground state of the molecule of interest and the low-lying excited state to be used as an intermediate in the double-resonance process. The lasers used in these studies are Nd:YAG-pumped dye lasers with {approx}5 ns pulse durations. In general, this pump transition corresponds to a one- or two-photon process, and the laser output is frequency doubled, tripled, or mixed to generate light in the region of interest. In molecules such as ammonia and aniline, the pump transitions of interest are well characterized, allowing the unambiguous choice of pump transitions that access levels with the rovibronic character of interest. In other cases, the spectroscopy of the pump transition must be analyzed before it can be useful for the double-resonance experiments. In the second step, the pump laser is fixed on the pump transition of interest and a second laser is used to probe transitions from the upper state of the pump transition to the autoionizing or predissociating resonances in

  4. Switching surface polarization of atomic force microscopy probe utilizing photoisomerization of photochromic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Aburaya, Yoshihiro; Nomura, Hikaru; Kageshima, Masami; Naitoh, Yoshitaka; Li, Yan Jun; Sugawara, Yasuhiro

    2011-03-15

    An attempt to develop an atomic force microscopy (AFM) probe with optically switchable polarization is described. Modification with a single molecular layer of photochromic molecules was attempted onto a Si substrate that is a prototype for a probe surface. Polarization switching caused by alternate irradiation of UV and visible lights were detected using the electrostatic force?>spectroscopy (EFS) technique. Si substrates modified with spiropyran and azobenzene exhibited reversible polarization switching that caused changes in CPD of about 100 and 50 mV, respectively. Modification with spiropyran was also attempted onto a Si probe and resulted in a CPD change of about 100 mV. It was confirmed that modification of an AFM probe or substrate with a single molecular layer of photochromic molecules can generate surface polarization switching of a mechanically detectable level.

  5. Design and optimization of a harmonic probe with step cross section in multifrequency atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Jiandong; Zhang, Li; Wang, Michael Yu

    2015-12-15

    In multifrequency atomic force microscopy (AFM), probe’s characteristic of assigning resonance frequencies to integer harmonics results in a remarkable improvement of detection sensitivity at specific harmonic components. The selection criterion of harmonic order is based on its amplitude’s sensitivity on material properties, e.g., elasticity. Previous studies on designing harmonic probe are unable to provide a large design capability along with maintaining the structural integrity. Herein, we propose a harmonic probe with step cross section, in which it has variable width in top and bottom steps, while the middle step in cross section is kept constant. Higher order resonance frequencies are tailored to be integer times of fundamental resonance frequency. The probe design is implemented within a structural optimization framework. The optimally designed probe is micromachined using focused ion beam milling technique, and then measured with an AFM. The measurement results agree well with our resonance frequency assignment requirement.

  6. Prediction of atomic force microscope probe dynamics through the receptance coupling method

    SciTech Connect

    Mehrpouya, M.; Park, S. S.

    2011-12-15

    The increased growth in the use of tip-based sensing, manipulations, and fabrication of devices in atomic force microscopy (AFM) necessitates the accurate prediction of the dynamic behavior of the AFM probe. The chip holder, to which the micro-sensing device is attached, and the rest of the AFM system can affect the overall dynamics of the probe. In order to consider these boundary effects, we propose a novel receptance coupling method to mathematically combine the dynamics of the AFM setup and probe, based on the equilibrium and compatibility conditions at the joint. Once the frequency response functions of displacement over force at the tool tip are obtained, the dynamic interaction forces between the tip and the sample in nanoscale can be determined by measuring the probe tip displacement.

  7. 3D and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulien Ohlmann, Odile

    2013-02-01

    Today the industry offers a chain of 3D products. Learning to "read" and to "create in 3D" becomes an issue of education of primary importance. 25 years professional experience in France, the United States and Germany, Odile Meulien set up a personal method of initiation to 3D creation that entails the spatial/temporal experience of the holographic visual. She will present some different tools and techniques used for this learning, their advantages and disadvantages, programs and issues of educational policies, constraints and expectations related to the development of new techniques for 3D imaging. Although the creation of display holograms is very much reduced compared to the creation of the 90ies, the holographic concept is spreading in all scientific, social, and artistic activities of our present time. She will also raise many questions: What means 3D? Is it communication? Is it perception? How the seeing and none seeing is interferes? What else has to be taken in consideration to communicate in 3D? How to handle the non visible relations of moving objects with subjects? Does this transform our model of exchange with others? What kind of interaction this has with our everyday life? Then come more practical questions: How to learn creating 3D visualization, to learn 3D grammar, 3D language, 3D thinking? What for? At what level? In which matter? for whom?

  8. Fabrication of tungsten probe for hard tapping operation in atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Han, Guebum; Ahn, Hyo-Sok

    2016-02-01

    We propose a method of producing a tungsten probe with high stiffness for atomic force microscopy (AFM) in order to acquire enhanced phase contrast images and efficiently perform lithography. A tungsten probe with a tip radius between 20nm and 50nm was fabricated using electrochemical etching optimized by applying pulse waves at different voltages. The spring constant of the tungsten probe was determined by finite element analysis (FEA), and its applicability as an AFM probe was evaluated by obtaining topography and phase contrast images of a Si wafer sample partly coated with Au. Enhanced hard tapping performance of the tungsten probe compared with a commercial Si probe was confirmed by conducting hard tapping tests at five different oscillation amplitudes on single layer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). To analyze the damaged graphene sample, the test areas were investigated using tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). The test results demonstrate that the tungsten probe with high stiffness was capable of inducing sufficient elastic and plastic deformation to enable obtaining enhanced phase contrast images and performing lithography, respectively. PMID:26630069

  9. Lateral force calibration: accurate procedures for colloidal probe friction measurements in atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chung, Koo-Hyun; Pratt, Jon R; Reitsma, Mark G

    2010-01-19

    The colloidal probe technique for atomic force microscopy (AFM) has allowed the investigation of an extensive range of surface force phenomena, including the measurement of frictional (lateral) forces between numerous materials. The quantitative accuracy of such friction measurements is often debated, in part due to a lack of confidence in existing calibration strategies. Here we compare three in situ AFM lateral force calibration techniques using a single colloidal probe, seeking to establish a foundation for quantitative measurement by linking these techniques to accurate force references available at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. We introduce a procedure for calibrating the AFM lateral force response to known electrostatic forces applied directly to the conductive colloidal probe. In a second procedure, we apply known force directly to the colloidal probe using a precalibrated piezo-resistive reference cantilever. We found agreement between these direct methods on the order of 2% (within random uncertainty for both measurements). In a third procedure, we performed a displacement-based calibration using the piezo-resistive reference cantilever as a stiffness reference artifact. The method demonstrated agreement on the order of 7% with the direct force methods, with the difference attributed to an expected systematic uncertainty, caused by in-plane deflection in the cantilever during loading. The comparison establishes the existing limits of instrument accuracy and sets down a basis for selection criteria for materials and methods in colloidal probe friction (lateral) force measurements via atomic force microscopy. PMID:19827782

  10. Probing primordial non-Gaussianity: the 3D Bispectrum of Ly-α forest and the redshifted 21-cm signal from the post reionization epoch

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, Tapomoy Guha; Hazra, Dhiraj Kumar E-mail: dhiraj@apctp.org

    2013-04-01

    We explore possibility of using the three dimensional bispectra of the Ly-α forest and the redshifted 21-cm signal from the post-reionization epoch to constrain primordial non-Gaussianity. Both these fields map out the large scale distribution of neutral hydrogen and maybe treated as tracers of the underlying dark matter field. We first present the general formalism for the auto and cross bispectrum of two arbitrary three dimensional biased tracers and then apply it to the specific case. We have modeled the 3D Ly-α transmitted flux field as a continuous tracer sampled along 1D skewers which corresponds to quasars sight lines. For the post reionization 21-cm signal we have used a linear bias model. We use a Fisher matrix analysis to present the first prediction for bounds on f{sub NL} and the other bias parameters using the three dimensional 21-cm bispectrum and other cross bispectra. The bounds on f{sub NL} depend on the survey volume, and the various observational noises. We have considered a BOSS like Ly-α survey where the average number density of quasars n-bar = 10{sup −3}Mpc{sup −2} and the spectra are measured at a 2-σ level. For the 21-cm signal we have considered a 4000 hrs observation with a futuristic SKA like radio array. We find that bounds on f{sub NL} obtained in our analysis (6 ≤ Δf{sub NL} ≤ 65) is competitive with CMBR and galaxy surveys and may prove to be an important alternative approach towards constraining primordial physics using future data sets. Further, we have presented a hierarchy of power of the bispectrum-estimators towards detecting the f{sub NL}. Given the quality of the data sets, one may use this method to optimally choose the right estimator and thereby provide better constraints on f{sub NL}. We also find that by combining the various cross-bispectrum estimators it is possible to constrain f{sub NL} at a level Δf{sub NL} ∼ 4.7. For the equilateral and orthogonal template we obtain Δf{sub NL}{sup equ} ∼ 17 and

  11. Characterization of microfabricated probes for combined atomic force and high-resolution scanning electrochemical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Gullo, Maurizio R; Frederix, Patrick L T M; Akiyama, Terunobu; Engel, Andreas; deRooij, Nico F; Staufer, Urs

    2006-08-01

    A combined atomic force and scanning electrochemical microscope probe is presented. The probe is electrically insulated except at the very apex of the tip, which has a radius of curvature in the range of 10-15 nm. Steady-state cyclic voltammetry measurements for the reduction of Ru(NH3)6Cl3 and feedback experiments showed a distinct and reproducible response of the electrode. These experimental results agreed with finite element simulations for the corresponding diffusion process. Sequentially topographical and electrochemical studies of Pt lines deposited onto Si3N4 and spaced 100 nm apart (edge to edge) showed a lateral electrochemical resolution of 10 nm. PMID:16878880

  12. Interfacial micropore defect formation in PEDOT:PSS-Si hybrid solar cells probed by TOF-SIMS 3D chemical imaging.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Joseph P; Zhao, Liyan; Abd-Ellah, Marwa; Heinig, Nina F; Leung, K T

    2013-07-16

    Conducting p-type polymer layers on n-type Si have been widely studied for the fabrication of cost-effective hybrid solar cells. In this work, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) is used to provide three-dimensional chemical imaging of the interface between poly(3,4-ethylene-dioxythiophene):polystyrenesulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) and SiOx/Si in a hybrid solar cell. To minimize structural damage to the polymer layer, an Ar cluster sputtering source is used for depth profiling. The present result shows the formation of micropore defects in the interface region of the PEDOT:PSS layer on the SiOx/Si substrate. This interfacial micropore defect formation becomes more prominent with increasing thickness of the native oxide layer, which is a key device parameter that greatly affects the hybrid solar cell performance. Three-dimensional chemical imaging coupled with Ar cluster ion sputtering has therefore been demonstrated as an emerging technique for probing the interface of this and other polymer-inorganic systems. PMID:23745755

  13. A filtering method to reveal crystalline patterns from atom probe microscopy desorption maps

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Lan

    2016-01-01

    A filtering method to reveal the crystallographic information present in Atom Probe Microscopy (APM) data is presented. The method filters atoms based on the time difference between their evaporation and the evaporation of the previous atom. Since this time difference correlates with the location and the local structure of the evaporating atoms on the surface, it can be used to reveal any crystallographic information contained within APM data. The demonstration of this method is illustrated on: • A pure Al specimen for which crystallographic poles are clearly visible on the desorption patterns easily indexed. • Three Fe-15at.% Cr datasets where crystallographic patterns are less obvious and require this filtering method. PMID:27104149

  14. Dynamics of Hollow Atom Formation in Intense X-Ray Pulses Probed by Partial Covariance Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frasinski, L. J.; Zhaunerchyk, V.; Mucke, M.; Squibb, R. J.; Siano, M.; Eland, J. H. D.; Linusson, P.; v. d. Meulen, P.; Salén, P.; Thomas, R. D.; Larsson, M.; Foucar, L.; Ullrich, J.; Motomura, K.; Mondal, S.; Ueda, K.; Osipov, T.; Fang, L.; Murphy, B. F.; Berrah, N.; Bostedt, C.; Bozek, J. D.; Schorb, S.; Messerschmidt, M.; Glownia, J. M.; Cryan, J. P.; Coffee, R. N.; Takahashi, O.; Wada, S.; Piancastelli, M. N.; Richter, R.; Prince, K. C.; Feifel, R.

    2013-08-01

    When exposed to ultraintense x-radiation sources such as free electron lasers (FELs) the innermost electronic shell can efficiently be emptied, creating a transient hollow atom or molecule. Understanding the femtosecond dynamics of such systems is fundamental to achieving atomic resolution in flash diffraction imaging of noncrystallized complex biological samples. We demonstrate the capacity of a correlation method called “partial covariance mapping” to probe the electron dynamics of neon atoms exposed to intense 8 fs pulses of 1062 eV photons. A complete picture of ionization processes competing in hollow atom formation and decay is visualized with unprecedented ease and the map reveals hitherto unobserved nonlinear sequences of photoionization and Auger events. The technique is particularly well suited to the high counting rate inherent in FEL experiments.

  15. Probing Charges on the Atomic Scale by Means of Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, F.; Repp, J.; Fleischmann, M.; Scheer, M.; Ondráček, M.; Jelínek, P.

    2015-08-01

    Kelvin probe force spectroscopy was used to characterize the charge distribution of individual molecules with polar bonds. Whereas this technique represents the charge distribution with moderate resolution for large tip-molecule separations, it fails for short distances. Here, we introduce a novel local force spectroscopy technique which allows one to better disentangle electrostatic from other contributions in the force signal. It enables one to obtain charge-related maps at even closer tip-sample distances, where the lateral resolution is further enhanced. This enhanced resolution allows one to resolve contrast variations along individual polar bonds.

  16. Probing Charges on the Atomic Scale by Means of Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, F; Repp, J; Fleischmann, M; Scheer, M; Ondráček, M; Jelínek, P

    2015-08-14

    Kelvin probe force spectroscopy was used to characterize the charge distribution of individual molecules with polar bonds. Whereas this technique represents the charge distribution with moderate resolution for large tip-molecule separations, it fails for short distances. Here, we introduce a novel local force spectroscopy technique which allows one to better disentangle electrostatic from other contributions in the force signal. It enables one to obtain charge-related maps at even closer tip-sample distances, where the lateral resolution is further enhanced. This enhanced resolution allows one to resolve contrast variations along individual polar bonds. PMID:26317733

  17. Quantitative dopant distributions in GaAs nanowires using atom probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Du, Sichao; Burgess, Timothy; Gault, Baptiste; Gao, Qiang; Bao, Peite; Li, Li; Cui, Xiangyuan; Kong Yeoh, Wai; Liu, Hongwei; Yao, Lan; Ceguerra, Anna V; Hoe Tan, Hark; Jagadish, Chennupati; Ringer, Simon P; Zheng, Rongkun

    2013-09-01

    Controllable doping of semiconductor nanowires is critical to realize their proposed applications, however precise and reliable characterization of dopant distributions remains challenging. In this article, we demonstrate an atomic-resolution three-dimensional elemental mapping of pristine semiconductor nanowires on growth substrates by using atom probe tomography to tackle this major challenge. This highly transferrable method is able to analyze the full diameter of a nanowire, with a depth resolution better than 0.17 nm thanks to an advanced reconstruction method exploiting the specimen's crystallography, and an enhanced chemical sensitivity of better than 8-fold increase in the signal-to-noise ratio. PMID:23489910

  18. Methodology exploration of specimen preparation for atom probe tomography from nanowires.

    PubMed

    Qu, Jiangtao; Wong, Derek; Du, Sichao; Yang, Limei; Ringer, Simon; Zheng, Rongkun

    2015-12-01

    Semiconductor nanowires have been intensively explored for applications in electronics, photonics, energy conversion and storage. A fundamental and quantitative understanding of growth-structure-property relationships is central to applications where nanowires exhibit clear advantages. Atom Probe Tomography (APT) is able to provide 3 dimensional quantitative elemental distributions at atomic-resolution and is therefore unique in understanding the growth-structure-property relationships. However, the specimen preparation with nanowires is extremely challenging. In this paper, two ion beam free specimen preparation methods for APT are presented which are efficient for various nanowires. PMID:26119926

  19. Atom probe field ion microscopy investigation of boron containing martensitic 9 Pct chromium steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofer, P.; Miller, M. K.; Babu, S. S.; David, S. A.; Cerjak, H.

    2000-03-01

    The chemical compositions of the ferrite matrix and various other phases in an Fe-0.17 C-9 Cr-1.55 Mo-0.27 V-0.015 N-0.01B (mass pct) steel in as-received and crept conditions were measured with atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM). The results showed the presence of some residual boron within the ferrite matrix. Analyses showed that boron was distributed within M23C6, M6C, MX, and Laves phases. Phosphor atoms were detected at the M23C6-ferrite interface in the crept condition. The results are compared to predictions from thermodynamic calculations.

  20. Acoustic Attenuation Probe for Fermion Superfluidity in Ultracold-Atom Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Gaudio, Sergio; Mihaila, Bogdan; Blagoev, Krastan B.; Timmermans, Eddy; Bedell, Kevin S.

    2007-03-16

    Dilute gas Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC's), currently used to cool fermionic atoms in atom traps, can also probe the superfluidity of these fermions. The damping rate of BEC-acoustic excitations (phonon modes), measured in the middle of the trap as a function of the phonon momentum, yields an unambiguous signature of BCS-like superfluidity, provides a measurement of the superfluid gap parameter, and gives an estimate of the size of the Cooper pairs in the BEC-BCS crossover regime. We also predict kinks in the momentum dependence of the damping rate which can reveal detailed information about the fermion quasiparticle dispersion relation.

  1. 3D Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, S. K.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses 3 D imaging as it relates to digital representations in virtual library collections. Highlights include X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT); the National Science Foundation (NSF) Digital Library Initiatives; output peripherals; image retrieval systems, including metadata; and applications of 3 D imaging for libraries and museums. (LRW)

  2. Pulsed-laser atom probe studies of a precipitation hardened maraging TRIP steel.

    PubMed

    Dmitrieva, O; Choi, P; Gerstl, S S A; Ponge, D; Raabe, D

    2011-05-01

    A precipitation hardened maraging TRIP steel was analyzed using a pulsed laser atom probe. The laser pulse energy was varied from 0.3 to 1.9 nJ to study its effect on the measured chemical compositions and spatial resolution. Compositional analyses using proximity histograms did not show any significant variations in the average matrix and precipitate compositions. The only remarkable change in the atom probe data was a decrease in the ++/+ charge state ratios of the elements. The values of the evaporation field used for the reconstructions exhibit a linear dependence on the laser pulse energy. The adjustment of the evaporation fields used in the reconstructions for different laser pulse energies was based on the correlation of the obtained cluster shapes to the TEM observations. No influence of laser pulse energy on chemical composition of the precipitates and on the chemical sharpness of their interfaces was detected. PMID:21215524

  3. A computational geometry framework for the optimisation of atom probe reconstructions.

    PubMed

    Felfer, Peter; Cairney, Julie

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we present pathways for improving the reconstruction of atom probe data on a coarse (>10nm) scale, based on computational geometry. We introduce a way to iteratively improve an atom probe reconstruction by adjusting it, so that certain known shape criteria are fulfilled. This is achieved by creating an implicit approximation of the reconstruction through a barycentric coordinate transform. We demonstrate the application of these techniques to the compensation of trajectory aberrations and the iterative improvement of the reconstruction of a dataset containing a grain boundary. We also present a method for obtaining a hull of the dataset in both detector and reconstruction space. This maximises data utilisation, and can be used to compensate for ion trajectory aberrations caused by residual fields in the ion flight path through a 'master curve' and correct for overall shape deviations in the data. PMID:27449275

  4. Achieving atomic resolution magnetic dichroism by controlling the phase symmetry of an electron probe

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rusz, Jan; Idrobo, Juan -Carlos; Bhowmick, Somnath

    2014-09-30

    The calculations presented here reveal that an electron probe carrying orbital angular momentum is just a particular case of a wider class of electron beams that can be used to measure electron magnetic circular dichroism (EMCD) with atomic resolution. It is possible to obtain an EMCD signal with atomic resolution by simply breaking the symmetry of the electron probe phase front using the aberration-corrected optics of a scanning transmission electron microscope. The probe’s required phase distribution depends on the sample’s magnetic symmetry and crystal structure. The calculations indicate that EMCD signals that use the electron probe’s phase are as strongmore » as those obtained by nanodiffraction methods.« less

  5. Dicke superradiance as nondestructive probe for the state of atoms in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ten Brinke, Nicolai; Schützhold, Ralf

    2016-04-01

    We present a proposal for a probing scheme utilizing Dicke superradiance to obtain information about ultracold atoms in optical lattices. A probe photon is absorbed collectively by an ensemble of lattice atoms generating a Dicke state. The lattice dynamics (e.g., tunneling) affects the coherence properties of that Dicke state and thus alters the superradiant emission characteristics - which in turn provides insight into the lattice (dynamics). Comparing the Bose-Hubbard and the Fermi-Hubbard model, we find similar superradiance in the strongly interacting Mott insulator regime, but crucial differences in the weakly interacting (superfluid or metallic) phase. Furthermore, we study the possibility to detect whether a quantum phase transition between the two regimes can be considered adiabatic or a quantum quench.

  6. Dicke superradiance as nondestructive probe for the state of atoms in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinke, Nicolai ten; Schützhold, Ralf

    2016-05-01

    We present a proposal for a probing scheme utilizing Dicke superradiance to obtain information about ultracold atoms in optical lattices. A probe photon is absorbed collectively by an ensemble of lattice atoms generating a Dicke state. The lattice dynamics (e.g., tunneling) affects the coherence properties of that Dicke state and thus alters the superradiant emission characteristics - which in turn provides insight into the lattice (dynamics). Comparing the Bose-Hubbard and the Fermi-Hubbard model, we find similar superradiance in the strongly interacting Mott insulator regime, but crucial differences in the weakly interacting (superfluid or metallic) phase. Furthermore, we study the possibility to detect whether a quantum phase transition between the two regimes can be considered adiabatic or a quantum quench.

  7. Achieving atomic resolution magnetic dichroism by controlling the phase symmetry of an electron probe

    SciTech Connect

    Rusz, Jan; Idrobo, Juan -Carlos; Bhowmick, Somnath

    2014-09-30

    The calculations presented here reveal that an electron probe carrying orbital angular momentum is just a particular case of a wider class of electron beams that can be used to measure electron magnetic circular dichroism (EMCD) with atomic resolution. It is possible to obtain an EMCD signal with atomic resolution by simply breaking the symmetry of the electron probe phase front using the aberration-corrected optics of a scanning transmission electron microscope. The probe’s required phase distribution depends on the sample’s magnetic symmetry and crystal structure. The calculations indicate that EMCD signals that use the electron probe’s phase are as strong as those obtained by nanodiffraction methods.

  8. Nanomanipulation and nanofabrication with multi-probe STM: From individual atoms to nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Shengyong; Kim, Tae Hwan; Wang, Zhouhang; Li, An-Ping

    2012-01-01

    The wide variety of nanoscale structures and devices demands novel tools for handling, assembly, and fabrication at nanoscopic positioning precision. The manipulation tools should allow for in situ characterization and testing of fundamental building blocks, such as nanotubes and nanowires, as they are built into functional devices. In this paper, a bottom-up technique for nanomanipulation and nanofabrication is reported by using a 4-probe scanning tunneling microscope (STM) combined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The applications of this technique are demonstrated in a variety of nanosystems, from manipulating individual atoms to bending, cutting, breaking carbon nanofibers, and constructing nanodevices for electrical characterizations. The combination of the wide field of view of SEM, the atomic position resolution of STM, and the flexibility of multiple scanning probes is expected to be a valuable tool for rapid prototyping in the nanoscience and nanotechnology.

  9. Atom probe field ion microscopy and related topics: A bibliography 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.K.; Hawkins, A.R.; Russell, K.F.

    1990-12-01

    This bibliography includes references related to the following topics: atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM), field ion spectroscopy (FIM), field emission microscopy (FEM), liquid metal ion sources (LMIS), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), and theory. Technique-orientated studies and applications are included. This bibliography covers the period 1989. The references contained in this document were compiled from a variety of sources including computer searches and personal lists of publications.

  10. New atomic probes for dark matter detection: Axions, axion-like particles and topological defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadnik, Yevgeny V.; Flambaum, Victor V.

    2014-11-01

    We present a brief overview of recently proposed detection schemes for axion, axion-like pseudoscalar particle and topological defect dark matter. We focus mainly on the possibility of using atomic and molecular systems for dark matter detection. For axions and axion-like particles, these methods are complementary probes to ongoing photon-axion interconversion experiments and astrophysical observations. For topological defects, these methods are complementary to conventional astrophysical search schemes based on gravitational signatures.

  11. Accurate noncontact calibration of colloidal probe sensitivities in atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Koo-Hyun; Shaw, Gordon A.; Pratt, Jon R.

    2009-06-15

    The absolute force sensitivities of colloidal probes comprised of atomic force microscope, or AFM, cantilevers with microspheres attached to their distal ends are measured. The force sensitivities are calibrated through reference to accurate electrostatic forces, the realizations of which are described in detail. Furthermore, the absolute accuracy of a common AFM force calibration scheme, known as the thermal noise method, is evaluated. It is demonstrated that the thermal noise method can be applied with great success to colloidal probe calibration in air and in liquid to yield force measurements with relative standard uncertainties below 5%. Techniques to combine the electrostatics-based determination of the AFM force sensitivity with measurements of the colloidal probe's thermal noise spectrum to compute noncontact estimates of the displacement sensitivity and spring constant are also developed.

  12. Resistance of single polyaniline fibers and their junctions measured by double-probe atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi, Rintaro; Shingaya, Yoshitaka; Nakayama, Tomonobu

    2016-08-01

    Electrical properties of polyaniline (PANI) fibers are of our interest as a component of network materials. Using a multiple-probe atomic force microscope with tuning fork probes, we investigated the resistance of single PANI fibers and their cross-point junction where the fibers contact each other. The resistivity of single PANI fibers was measured to be on the order of 10 Ω cm, and the contact resistance between PANI fibers was on the order of GΩ. The resistances through single cross-point junctions between two PANI fibers were very much dependent on the experimental condition, that is, the cross-point junction is stabilized or destabilized by physically placing the probes onto the two fibers. This suggests the nanomechanical instability of the cross-point junctions and a possibility to construct strain-responsive PANI fiber networks.

  13. Proposal for efficient two-dimensional atom localization using probe absorption in a microwave-driven four-level atomic system

    SciTech Connect

    Ding Chunling; Li Jiahua; Yang Xiaoxue; Xiong Hao; Zhang Duo

    2011-10-15

    The behavior of two-dimensional (2D) atom localization is explored by monitoring the probe absorption in a microwave-driven four-level atomic medium under the action of two orthogonal standing-wave fields. Because of the position-dependent atom-field interaction, the information about the position of the atom can be obtained via the absorption measurement of the weak probe field. It is found that the localization behavior is significantly improved due to the joint quantum interference induced by the standing-wave and microwave-driven fields. Most importantly, the atom can be localized at a particular position and the maximal probability of finding the atom in one period of the standing-wave fields reaches unity by properly adjusting the system parameters. The proposed scheme may provide a promising way to achieve high-precision and high-resolution 2D atom localization.

  14. Effect of Additional 3d Elements M (M = Fe and Ni) on Atomic Ordered Structure in Cu-M-Pd alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Naseeb; Takahashi, Miwako; Bashir Ziya, Amer; Ohshima, Ken-ichi

    X-ray diffraction measurements were performed to elucidate the effect of ternary addition of Fe and Ni elements to Cu-rich Cu-Pd binary alloy system on the structure and an atomic ordering. X-ray polycrystalline diffraction patterns of the specimens quenched from 900 °C have shown that a single phase with face-centered cubic (fcc) structure is formed in all the specimens for Ni system and in specimens with Pd composition xPd (at. %) more than 10 for Fe system. After appropriate heat treatment, the Fe system a fcc single phase forms fcc-based Cu3Au-type ordered structure for xPd around 20, and body-centered-cubic based CsCl-type ordered structure xPd for around 40. Assuming that Fe atoms simply substitute for Cu atoms in the ordered structures, the atomic phase coincides well with that of Cu-Pd alloys for the Cu3Au-type structure, but there is a discrepancy for the CsCl-type structure on that it does not appear as a single phase in Cu-Fe-Pd alloys. As for Ni system, no ordered structures are formed except for the alloys with xPd more than 35, in which fcc and CsCl-type structures are found to coexist.

  15. Polarisation response of delay dependent absorption modulation in strong field dressed helium atoms probed near threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, E. R.; Sanchez-Gonzalez, A.; Austin, D. R.; Diveki, Z.; Hutchinson, S. E. E.; Siegel, T.; Ruberti, M.; Averbukh, V.; Miseikis, L.; Strüber, C. S.; Chipperfield, L.; Marangos, J. P.

    2016-08-01

    We present the first measurement of the vectorial response of strongly dressed helium atoms probed by an attosecond pulse train (APT) polarised either parallel or perpendicular to the dressing field polarisation. The transient absorption is probed as a function of delay between the APT and the linearly polarised 800 nm field of peak intensity 1.3× {10}14 {{W}} {{cm}}-2. The APT spans the photon energy range 16–42 eV, covering the first ionisation energy of helium (24.59 eV). With parallel polarised dressing and probing fields, we observe modulations with periods of one half and one quarter of the dressing field period. When the polarisation of the dressing field is altered from parallel to perpendicular with respect to the APT polarisation we observe a large suppression in the modulation depth of the above ionisation threshold absorption. In addition to this we present the intensity dependence of the harmonic modulation depth as a function of delay between the dressing and probe fields, with dressing field peak intensities ranging from 2 × 1012 to 2 × 1014 {{W}} {{cm}}-2. We compare our experimental results with a full-dimensional solution of the single-atom time-dependent (TD) Schrödinger equation obtained using the recently developed abinitio TD B-spline ADC method and find good qualitative agreement for the above threshold harmonics.

  16. The Rossiter-McLaughlin effect reloaded: Probing the 3D spin-orbit geometry, differential stellar rotation, and the spatially-resolved stellar spectrum of star-planet systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cegla, H. M.; Lovis, C.; Bourrier, V.; Beeck, B.; Watson, C. A.; Pepe, F.

    2016-04-01

    When a planet transits its host star, it blocks regions of the stellar surface from view; this causes a distortion of the spectral lines and a change in the line-of-sight (LOS) velocities, known as the Rossiter-McLaughlin (RM) effect. Since the LOS velocities depend, in part, on the stellar rotation, the RM waveform is sensitive to the star-planet alignment (which provides information on the system's dynamical history). We present a new RM modelling technique that directly measures the spatially-resolved stellar spectrum behind the planet. This is done by scaling the continuum flux of the (HARPS) spectra by the transit light curve, and then subtracting the in- from the out-of-transit spectra to isolate the starlight behind the planet. This technique does not assume any shape for the intrinsic local profiles. In it, we also allow for differential stellar rotation and centre-to-limb variations in the convective blueshift. We apply this technique to HD 189733 and compare to 3D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. We reject rigid body rotation with high confidence (>99% probability), which allows us to determine the occulted stellar latitudes and measure the stellar inclination. In turn, we determine both the sky-projected (λ ≈ -0.4 ± 0.2°) and true 3D obliquity (ψ ≈ 7+12-4°). We also find good agreement with the MHD simulations, with no significant centre-to-limb variations detectable in the local profiles. Hence, this technique provides a new powerful tool that can probe stellar photospheres, differential rotation, determine 3D obliquities, and remove sky-projection biases in planet migration theories. This technique can be implemented with existing instrumentation, but will become even more powerful with the next generation of high-precision radial velocity spectrographs.

  17. Template-Free 3D Microprinting of Metals Using a Force-Controlled Nanopipette for Layer-by-Layer Electrodeposition.

    PubMed

    Hirt, Luca; Ihle, Stephan; Pan, Zhijian; Dorwling-Carter, Livie; Reiser, Alain; Wheeler, Jeffrey M; Spolenak, Ralph; Vörös, János; Zambelli, Tomaso

    2016-03-23

    A novel 3D printing method for voxel-by-voxel metal printing is presented. Hollow atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers are used to locally supply metal ions in an electrochemical cell, enabling a localized electroplating reaction. By exploiting the deflection feedback of these probes, electrochemical 3D metal printing is, for the first time, demonstrated in a layer-by-layer fashion, enabling the fabrication of arbitrary-shaped geometries. PMID:26783090

  18. Comparison of atom probe tomography and transmission electron microscopy analysis of oxide dispersion strengthened steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    London, A. J.; Lozano-Perez, S.; Santra, S.; Amirthapandian, S.; Panigrahi, B. K.; Sundar, C. S.; Grovenor, C. R. M.

    2014-06-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened steels owe part of their high temperature stability to the nano-scale oxides they contain. These yttrium-titanium oxides are notoriously difficult to characterise since they are embedded in a magnetic-ferritic matrix and often <10 nm across. This study uses correlated transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography on the same material to explore the kind of information that can be gained on the character of the oxide particles. The influence of chromium in these alloys is of interest, therefore two model ODS steels Fe-(14Cr)-0.2Ti-0.3Y2O3 are compared. TEM is shown to accurately measure the size of the oxide particles and atom probe tomography is necessary to observe the smallest sub-1.5 nm particles. Larger Y2Ti2O7 and Y2TiO5 structured particles were identified by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, but the smallest oxides remain difficult to index. Chemical data from energy-filtered TEM agreed qualitatively with the atom probe findings. It was found that the majority of the oxide particles exhibit an unoxidised chromium shell which may be responsible for reducing the ultimate size of the oxide particles.

  19. Probing three-dimensional surface force fields with atomic resolution: Measurement strategies, limitations, and artifact reduction

    PubMed Central

    Dagdeviren, Omur E; Schwendemann, Todd C; Mönig, Harry; Altman, Eric I

    2012-01-01

    Summary Noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) is being increasingly used to measure the interaction force between an atomically sharp probe tip and surfaces of interest, as a function of the three spatial dimensions, with picometer and piconewton accuracy. Since the results of such measurements may be affected by piezo nonlinearities, thermal and electronic drift, tip asymmetries, and elastic deformation of the tip apex, these effects need to be considered during image interpretation. In this paper, we analyze their impact on the acquired data, compare different methods to record atomic-resolution surface force fields, and determine the approaches that suffer the least from the associated artifacts. The related discussion underscores the idea that since force fields recorded by using NC-AFM always reflect the properties of both the sample and the probe tip, efforts to reduce unwanted effects of the tip on recorded data are indispensable for the extraction of detailed information about the atomic-scale properties of the surface. PMID:23019560

  20. 3-D Technology Approaches for Biological Ecologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liyu; Austin, Robert; U. S-China Physical-Oncology Sciences Alliance (PS-OA) Team

    Constructing three dimensional (3-D) landscapes is an inevitable issue in deep study of biological ecologies, because in whatever scales in nature, all of the ecosystems are composed by complex 3-D environments and biological behaviors. Just imagine if a 3-D technology could help complex ecosystems be built easily and mimic in vivo microenvironment realistically with flexible environmental controls, it will be a fantastic and powerful thrust to assist researchers for explorations. For years, we have been utilizing and developing different technologies for constructing 3-D micro landscapes for biophysics studies in in vitro. Here, I will review our past efforts, including probing cancer cell invasiveness with 3-D silicon based Tepuis, constructing 3-D microenvironment for cell invasion and metastasis through polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) soft lithography, as well as explorations of optimized stenting positions for coronary bifurcation disease with 3-D wax printing and the latest home designed 3-D bio-printer. Although 3-D technologies is currently considered not mature enough for arbitrary 3-D micro-ecological models with easy design and fabrication, I hope through my talk, the audiences will be able to sense its significance and predictable breakthroughs in the near future. This work was supported by the State Key Development Program for Basic Research of China (Grant No. 2013CB837200), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11474345) and the Beijing Natural Science Foundation (Grant No. 7154221).

  1. Fe-implanted 6H-SiC: Direct evidence of Fe{sub 3}Si nanoparticles observed by atom probe tomography and {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Diallo, M. L.; Fnidiki, A. Lardé, R.; Cuvilly, F.; Blum, I.; Lechevallier, L.; Debelle, A.; Thomé, L.; Viret, M.; Marteau, M.; Eyidi, D.; Declémy, A.

    2015-05-14

    In order to understand ferromagnetic ordering in SiC-based diluted magnetic semiconductors, Fe-implanted 6H-SiC subsequently annealed was studied by Atom Probe Tomography, {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy and SQUID magnetometry. Thanks to its 3D imaging capabilities at the atomic scale, Atom Probe Tomography appears as the most suitable technique to investigate the Fe distribution in the 6H-SiC host semiconductor and to evidence secondary phases. This study definitely evidences the formation of Fe{sub 3}Si nano-sized clusters after annealing. These clusters are unambiguously responsible for the main part of the magnetic properties observed in the annealed samples.

  2. Measuring excited state lifetime of Rb atoms with pump-probe technique

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, X.; Boiko, D. L.

    2015-08-31

    A technique for measuring the excited state lifetime τ{sub ex} of optical transitions in alkali atoms is presented. It is a form of pump-probe technique based on time-resolved optical transmission through the atomic vapor cell. This technique can serve as an alternative to the traditionally used time-resolved photofluorescence methods when measuring alkali vapor cells with heavily quenched fluorescence, where the τ{sub ex} is expected to be on the order of a few nanoseconds, and the highly sensitive fluorescence detectors with sub-nanosecond temporal resolution that are required may not be available. We use this technique to measure the τ{sub ex} of Rb atoms in vapor cells with different buffer gas pressures.

  3. Grain boundary segregation in neutron-irradiated 304 stainless steel studied by atom probe tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyama, T.; Nozawa, Y.; Van Renterghem, W.; Matsukawa, Y.; Hatakeyama, M.; Nagai, Y.; Al Mazouzi, A.; Van Dyck, S.

    2012-06-01

    Radiation-induced segregation (RIS) of solute atoms at a grain boundary (GB) in 304 stainless steel (SS), neutron-irradiated to a dose of 24 dpa at 300 °C in the fuel wrapper plates of a commercial pressurized water reactor, was investigated using laser-assisted atom probe tomography (APT). Ni, Si, and P enrichment and Cr and Fe depletion at the GB were evident. The full-width at half-maximum of the RIS region was ˜3 nm for the concentration profile peaks of Ni and Si. The atomic percentages of Ni, Si, and Cr at the GB were ˜19%, ˜7%, and ˜14%, respectively, in agreement with previously-reported values for neutron-irradiated SS. A high number density of intra-granular Ni-Si rich precipitates formed in the matrix. A precipitate-denuded zone with a width of ˜10 nm appeared on both sides of the GB.

  4. Detecting and extracting clusters in atom probe data: a simple, automated method using Voronoi cells.

    PubMed

    Felfer, P; Ceguerra, A V; Ringer, S P; Cairney, J M

    2015-03-01

    The analysis of the formation of clusters in solid solutions is one of the most common uses of atom probe tomography. Here, we present a method where we use the Voronoi tessellation of the solute atoms and its geometric dual, the Delaunay triangulation to test for spatial/chemical randomness of the solid solution as well as extracting the clusters themselves. We show how the parameters necessary for cluster extraction can be determined automatically, i.e. without user interaction, making it an ideal tool for the screening of datasets and the pre-filtering of structures for other spatial analysis techniques. Since the Voronoi volumes are closely related to atomic concentrations, the parameters resulting from this analysis can also be used for other concentration based methods such as iso-surfaces. PMID:25497494

  5. Electron Affinity Calculations for Atoms: Sensitive Probe of Many-Body Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felfli, Z.; Msezane, A. Z.

    2016-05-01

    Electron-electron correlations and core-polarization interactions are crucial for the existence and stability of most negative ions. Therefore, they can be used as a sensitive probe of many-body effects in the calculation of the electron affinities (EAs) of atoms. The importance of relativistic effects in the calculation of the EAs of atoms has recently been assessed to be insignificant up to Z of 85. Here we use the complex angular momentum (CAM) methodology wherein is embedded fully the electron-electron correlations, to investigate core-polarization interactions in low-energy electron elastic scattering from the atoms In, Sn, Eu, Au and At through the calculation of their EAs. For the core-polarization interaction we use the rational function approximation of the Thomas-Fermi potential, which can be analytically continued into the complex plane. The EAs are extracted from the large resonance peaks in the CAM calculated low-energy electron-atom scattering total cross sections and compared with those from measurements and sophisticated theoretical methods. It is concluded that when the electron-electron correlations and core polarization interactions (both major many-body effects) are accounted for adequately the importance of relativity on the calculation of the EAs of atoms can be assessed. Even for the high Z (85) At atom relativistic effects are estimated to contribute a maximum of 3.6% to its EA calculation.

  6. Validation of formylchromane derivatives as protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitors by pharmacophore modeling, atom-based 3D-QSAR and docking studies.

    PubMed

    Malla, Priyanka; Kumar, Rajnish; Kumar, Manoj

    2013-07-01

    Formylchromane derivatives were reported to possess irreversible and selective inhibition on human protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP 1B). Inhibition of PTP 1B is a molecular level legitimate approach for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). 3D-QSAR studies were performed on a series of formylchromane derivatives using partial least square (PLS) analysis for correlating molecular architecture of the analogs with their PTP 1B inhibitory activity. A five-point pharmacophore hypothesis with three hydrogen bond acceptors (A) and two aromatic rings (R) as pharmacophoric features was developed using phase module of Schrödinger suite. The hypothesis AAARR.160 was considered as best hypothesis in this study characterized by survival score (3.483), the best cross-validated r² (Q²) (0.774), regression coefficient (0.960), Pearson-R (0.891), and F value (100.3). The results of hypothesis AAARR.160 complimented very closely to interactions witnessed in active site of the ligand-bound complex. The molecular docking simulations into PTP 1B active site also highlighted that biphenyl moiety favorably interacted with amino acid residues lining the lipophilic pocket, and provided hydrophobic interactions with receptor active site. These observations might be useful for further development and optimization of new chemical entities as potential PTP 1B inhibitors prior to its synthesis. PMID:23506477

  7. The role of amino acid electron-donor/acceptor atoms in host-cell binding peptides is associated with their 3D structure and HLA-binding capacity in sterile malarial immunity induction

    SciTech Connect

    Patarroyo, Manuel E.; Almonacid, Hannia; Moreno-Vranich, Armando

    2012-01-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fundamental residues located in some HABPs are associated with their 3D structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electron-donor atoms present in {beta}-turn, random, distorted {alpha}-helix structures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electron-donor atoms bound to HLA-DR53. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electron-acceptor atoms present in regular {alpha}-helix structure bound to HLA-DR52. -- Abstract: Plasmodium falciparum malaria continues being one of the parasitic diseases causing the highest worldwide mortality due to the parasite's multiple evasion mechanisms, such as immunological silence. Membrane and organelle proteins are used during invasion for interactions mediated by high binding ability peptides (HABPs); these have amino acids which establish hydrogen bonds between them in some of their critical binding residues. Immunisation assays in the Aotus model using HABPs whose critical residues had been modified have revealed a conformational change thereby enabling a protection-inducing response. This has improved fitting within HLA-DR{beta}1{sup Asterisk-Operator} molecules where amino acid electron-donor atoms present in {beta}-turn, random or distorted {alpha}-helix structures preferentially bound to HLA-DR53 molecules, whilst HABPs having amino acid electron-acceptor atoms present in regular {alpha}-helix structure bound to HLA-DR52. This data has great implications for vaccine development.

  8. TRACE 3-D documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, K.R.

    1987-08-01

    TRACE 3-D is an interactive beam-dynamics program that calculates the envelopes of a bunched beam, including linear space-charge forces, through a user-defined transport system. TRACE 3-D provides an immediate graphics display of the envelopes and the phase-space ellipses and allows nine types of beam-matching options. This report describes the beam-dynamics calculations and gives detailed instruction for using the code. Several examples are described in detail.

  9. 3D-graphite structure

    SciTech Connect

    Belenkov, E. A. Ali-Pasha, V. A.

    2011-01-15

    The structure of clusters of some new carbon 3D-graphite phases have been calculated using the molecular-mechanics methods. It is established that 3D-graphite polytypes {alpha}{sub 1,1}, {alpha}{sub 1,3}, {alpha}{sub 1,5}, {alpha}{sub 2,1}, {alpha}{sub 2,3}, {alpha}{sub 3,1}, {beta}{sub 1,2}, {beta}{sub 1,4}, {beta}{sub 1,6}, {beta}{sub 2,1}, and {beta}{sub 3,2} consist of sp{sup 2}-hybridized atoms, have hexagonal unit cells, and differ in regards to the structure of layers and order of their alternation. A possible way to experimentally synthesize new carbon phases is proposed: the polymerization and carbonization of hydrocarbon molecules.

  10. Large-Scale Fabrication of Carbon Nanotube Probe Tips For Atomic Force Microscopy Critical Dimension Imaging Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ye, Qi Laura; Cassell, Alan M.; Stevens, Ramsey M.; Meyyappan, Meyya; Li, Jun; Han, Jie; Liu, Hongbing; Chao, Gordon

    2004-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) probe tips for atomic force microscopy (AFM) offer several advantages over Si/Si3N4 probe tips, including improved resolution, shape, and mechanical properties. This viewgraph presentation discusses these advantages, and the drawbacks of existing methods for fabricating CNT probe tips for AFM. The presentation introduces a bottom up wafer scale fabrication method for CNT probe tips which integrates catalyst nanopatterning and nanomaterials synthesis with traditional silicon cantilever microfabrication technology. This method makes mass production of CNT AFM probe tips feasible, and can be applied to the fabrication of other nanodevices with CNT elements.

  11. 3D ultrafast ultrasound imaging in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Esteban Arango, Juan; Imbault, Marion; Fink, Mathias; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-10-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in 3D based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32  ×  32 matrix-array probe. Its ability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging, and, finally, 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler Imaging. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, at thousands of volumes per second, the complex 3D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, as well as the 3D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3D mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra—and inter-observer variability.

  12. Robust Electrografting on Self-Organized 3D Graphene Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Fortgang, Philippe; Tite, Teddy; Barnier, Vincent; Zehani, Nedjla; Maddi, Chiranjeevi; Lagarde, Florence; Loir, Anne-Sophie; Jaffrezic-Renault, Nicole; Donnet, Christophe; Garrelie, Florence; Chaix, Carole

    2016-01-20

    Improving graphene-based electrode fabrication processes and developing robust methods for its functionalization are two key research routes to develop new high-performance electrodes for electrochemical applications. Here, a self-organized three-dimensional (3D) graphene electrode processed by pulsed laser deposition with thermal annealing is reported. This substrate shows great performance in electron transfer kinetics regarding ferrocene redox probes in solution. A robust electrografting strategy for covalently attaching a redox probe onto these graphene electrodes is also reported. The modification protocol consists of a combination of diazonium salt electrografting and click chemistry. An alkyne-terminated phenyl ring is first electrografted onto the self-organized 3D graphene electrode by in situ electrochemical reduction of 4-ethynylphenyl diazonium. Then the ethynylphenyl-modified surface efficiently reacts with the redox probe bearing a terminal azide moiety (2-azidoethyl ferrocene) by means of Cu(I)-catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloaddition. Our modification strategy applied to 3D graphene electrodes was analyzed by means of atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). For XPS chemical surface analysis, special attention was paid to the distribution and chemical state of iron and nitrogen in order to highlight the functionalization of the graphene-based substrate by electrochemically grafting a ferrocene derivative. Dense grafting was observed, offering 4.9 × 10(-10) mol cm(-2) surface coverage and showing a stable signal over 22 days. The electrografting was performed in the form of multilayers, which offers higher ferrocene loading than a dense monolayer on a flat surface. This work opens highly promising perspectives for the development of self-organized 3D graphene electrodes with various sensing functionalities. PMID:26710829

  13. [Real time 3D echocardiography].

    PubMed

    Bauer, F; Shiota, T; Thomas, J D

    2001-07-01

    Three-dimensional representation of the heart is an old concern. Usually, 3D reconstruction of the cardiac mass is made by successive acquisition of 2D sections, the spatial localisation and orientation of which require complex guiding systems. More recently, the concept of volumetric acquisition has been introduced. A matricial emitter-receiver probe complex with parallel data processing provides instantaneous of a pyramidal 64 degrees x 64 degrees volume. The image is restituted in real time and is composed of 3 planes (planes B and C) which can be displaced in all spatial directions at any time during acquisition. The flexibility of this system of acquisition allows volume and mass measurement with greater accuracy and reproducibility, limiting inter-observer variability. Free navigation of the planes of investigation allows reconstruction for qualitative and quantitative analysis of valvular heart disease and other pathologies. Although real time 3D echocardiography is ready for clinical usage, some improvements are still necessary to improve its conviviality. Then real time 3D echocardiography could be the essential tool for understanding, diagnosis and management of patients. PMID:11494630

  14. [Real time 3D echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, F.; Shiota, T.; Thomas, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    Three-dimensional representation of the heart is an old concern. Usually, 3D reconstruction of the cardiac mass is made by successive acquisition of 2D sections, the spatial localisation and orientation of which require complex guiding systems. More recently, the concept of volumetric acquisition has been introduced. A matricial emitter-receiver probe complex with parallel data processing provides instantaneous of a pyramidal 64 degrees x 64 degrees volume. The image is restituted in real time and is composed of 3 planes (planes B and C) which can be displaced in all spatial directions at any time during acquisition. The flexibility of this system of acquisition allows volume and mass measurement with greater accuracy and reproducibility, limiting inter-observer variability. Free navigation of the planes of investigation allows reconstruction for qualitative and quantitative analysis of valvular heart disease and other pathologies. Although real time 3D echocardiography is ready for clinical usage, some improvements are still necessary to improve its conviviality. Then real time 3D echocardiography could be the essential tool for understanding, diagnosis and management of patients.

  15. Three-dimensional atom localization via electromagnetically induced transparency in a three-level atomic system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiping; Cao, Dewei; Yu, Benli

    2016-05-01

    We present a new scheme for three-dimensional (3D) atom localization in a three-level atomic system via measuring the absorption of a weak probe field. Owing to the space-dependent atom-field interaction, the position probability distribution of the atom can be directly determined by measuring the probe absorption. It is found that, by properly varying the parameters of the system, the probability of finding the atom in 3D space can be almost 100%. Our scheme opens a promising way to achieve high-precision and high-efficiency 3D atom localization, which provides some potential applications in laser cooling or atom nano-lithography via atom localization. PMID:27140374

  16. Probing the rupture of a Ag atomic junction in a Ag-Au mixed electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taekyeong

    2015-09-01

    We probed that the atomic junction in Ag part ruptures during stretching of atomic sized contacts of Ag-Au mixed electrodes, resulting in Ag-Ag electrodes through a scanning tunneling microscope breaking junction (STM-BJ) technique. We observed that the conductance and tunneling decay constant for a series of amine-terminated oligophenyl molecular junctions are essentially the same for the Ag-Au mixed and the Ag-Ag electrodes. We also found the molecular plateau length and the evolution patterns with the Ag-Au mixed electrodes are similar to those with Ag-Ag electrodes rather than the Au-Au electrodes in the molecular junction elongation. This result is attributed to the smaller binding energy of Ag atoms compared to that of Au atoms, so the Ag junction part is more easily broken than that of Au part in stretching of Ag-Au mixed electrodes. Furthermore, we successfully observed that the rupture force of the atomic junction for the Ag-Au mixed electrodes was identical to that for the Ag-Ag electrodes and smaller than that for the Au-Au electrodes. This study may advance the understanding of the electrical and the mechanical properties in molecular devices with Ag and Au electrodes in future.

  17. Atomic Force Microscope Controlled Topographical Imaging and Proximal Probe Thermal Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Kjoller, Kevin; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B; Pelletier, Dale A; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of a hybrid atmospheric pressure atomic force microscopy/mass spectrometry imaging system utilizing nano-thermal analysis probes for thermal desorption surface sampling with subsequent atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and mass analysis. The basic instrumental setup and the general operation of the system were discussed and optimized performance metrics were presented. The ability to correlate topographic images of a surface with atomic force microscopy and a mass spectral chemical image of the same surface, utilizing the same probe without moving the sample from the system, was demonstrated. Co-registered mass spectral chemical images and atomic force microscopy topographical images were obtained from inked patterns on paper as well as from a living bacterial colony on an agar gel. Spatial resolution of the topography images based on pixel size (0.2 m x 0.8 m) was better than the resolution of the mass spectral images (2.5 m x 2.0 m), which were limited by current mass spectral data acquisition rate and system detection levels.

  18. Atom probe tomography studies of Al₂O₃ gate dielectrics on GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Mazumder, Baishakhi Wu, Feng; Speck, James S.; Liu, Xiang; Yeluri, Ramya; Mishra, Umesh K.

    2014-10-07

    Atom probe tomography was used to achieve three-dimensional characterization of in situ Al₂O₃/GaN structures grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Al₂O₃ dielectrics grown at three different temperatures of 700, 900, and 1000 °C were analyzed and compared. A low temperature GaN cap layer grown atop Al₂O₃ enabled a high success rate in the atom probe experiments. The Al₂O₃/GaN interfaces were found to be intermixed with Ga, N, and O over the distance of a few nm. Impurity measurements data showed that the 1000 °C sample contains higher amounts of C (4 × 10¹⁹/cm³) and lower amounts of H (7 × 10¹⁹/cm³), whereas the 700 °C sample exhibits lower C impurities (<10¹⁷/cm³) and higher H incorporation (2.2 × 10²⁰/cm³). On comparing with Al₂O₃ grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD), it was found that the MOCVD Al₂O₃/GaN interface is comparatively abrupt. Scanning transmission electron microscopy data showed that the 900 °C and 1000 °C MOCVD films exhibit polycrystalline nature, while the ALD films were found to be amorphous.

  19. Improved in situ spring constant calibration for colloidal probe atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, Sean P.; Law, Bruce M.

    2010-11-15

    In colloidal probe atomic force microscopy (AFM) surface forces cannot be measured without an accurate determination of the cantilever spring constant. The effective spring constant k depends upon the cantilever geometry and therefore should be measured in situ; additionally, k may be coupled to other measurement parameters. For example, colloidal probe AFM is frequently used to measure the slip length b at solid/liquid boundaries by comparing the measured hydrodynamic force with Vinogradova slip theory (V-theory). However, in this measurement k and b are coupled, hence, b cannot be accurately determined without knowing k to high precision. In this paper, a new in situ spring constant calibration method based upon the residuals, namely, the difference between experimental force-distance data and V-theory is presented and contrasted with two other popular spring constant determination methods. In this residuals calibration method, V-theory is fitted to the experimental force-distance data for a range of systematically varied spring constants where the only adjustable parameter in V-theory is the slip length b. The optimal spring constant k is that value where the residuals are symmetrically displaced about zero for all colloidal probe separations. This residual spring constant calibration method is demonstrated by studying three different liquids (n-decanol, n-hexadecane, and n-octane) and two different silane coated colloidal probe-silicon wafer systems (n-hexadecyltrichlorosilane and n-dodecyltrichlorosilane).

  20. Pump-probe spectroscopy of cold rubidium atoms in an integrating sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wen-Li; Dong, Ri-Chang; Deng, Jian-Liao; Wang, Yu-Zhu

    2016-05-01

    Absorption spectra of cold rubidium atoms in an integrating sphere under the influence of a diffuse laser field have been systematically investigated. A pronounced dispersionlike structure centered at the light-shifted pump frequency is observed with a subnatural linewidth. In particular, two clearly resolved absorption resonances on the 5 S1 /2(F =2 ) →5 P3 /2(F'=3 ) transitions occur with variable probe beam intensity, which is consistent with our proposed theoretical model. Based on the two absorption resonances,we measure the dependence of light shifts, from which we can directly extract the effective Rabi frequency in a diffuse laser field, on the probe laser intensity, pump laser intensity, and pump laser detuning. Our work helps to identify the physical mechanisms behind these spectral features and is beneficial for studying the corresponding effect in a cold sample.

  1. Radiochromic 3D Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Radiochromic materials exhibit a colour change when exposed to ionising radiation. Radiochromic film has been used for clinical dosimetry for many years and increasingly so recently, as films of higher sensitivities have become available. The two principle advantages of radiochromic dosimetry include greater tissue equivalence (radiologically) and the lack of requirement for development of the colour change. In a radiochromic material, the colour change arises direct from ionising interactions affecting dye molecules, without requiring any latent chemical, optical or thermal development, with important implications for increased accuracy and convenience. It is only relatively recently however, that 3D radiochromic dosimetry has become possible. In this article we review recent developments and the current state-of-the-art of 3D radiochromic dosimetry, and the potential for a more comprehensive solution for the verification of complex radiation therapy treatments, and 3D dose measurement in general.

  2. Atom probe study of grain boundary segregation in technically pure molybdenum

    SciTech Connect

    Babinsky, K.; Weidow, J.; Knabl, W.; Lorich, A.; Leitner, H.; Primig, S.

    2014-01-15

    Molybdenum, a metal with excellent physical, chemical and high-temperature properties, is an interesting material for applications in lighting-technology, high performance electronics, high temperature furnace construction and coating technology. However, its applicability as a structural material is limited because of the poor oxidation resistance at high temperatures and a brittle-to-ductile transition around room temperature, which is influenced by the grain size and the content of interstitial impurities at the grain boundaries. Due to the progress of the powder metallurgical production during the last decades, the amount of impurities in the current quality of molybdenum has become so small that surface sensitive techniques are not applicable anymore. Therefore, the atom probe, which allows the detection of small amounts of impurities as well as their location, seems to be a more suitable technique. However, a site-specific specimen preparation procedure for grain boundaries in refractory metals with a dual focused ion beam/scanning electron microscope is still required. The present investigation describes the development and successful application of such a site-specific preparation technique for grain boundaries in molybdenum, which is significantly improved by a combination with transmission electron microscopy. This complimentary technique helps to improve the visibility of grain boundaries during the last preparation steps and to evidence the presence of grain and subgrain boundaries without segregants in atom probe specimens. Furthermore, in industrially processed and recrystallized molybdenum sheets grain boundary segregation of oxygen, nitrogen and potassium is successfully detected close to segregated regions which are believed to be former sinter pores. - Highlights: • First study of grain boundary segregation in molybdenum by atom probe • Site-specific preparation technique by FIB and TEM successfully developed • Grain boundary segregation of

  3. 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Arango, Juan Esteban; Imbault, Marion; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-01-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative real-time imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in three dimensions based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32×32 matrix-array probe. Its capability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3-D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3-D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging and finally 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3-D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3-D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, for the first time, the complex 3-D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, and the 3-D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3-D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3-D real-time mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra- and inter-observer variability. PMID:25207828

  4. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; Pufu, Silviu S.; Simmons-Duffin, David; Yacoby, Ran

    2016-03-01

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions < ψψψψ> in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge C T . We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N . We also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  5. Probing Local Ionic Dynamics in Functional Oxides: From Nanometer to Atomic Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinin, Sergei

    2014-03-01

    Vacancy-mediated electrochemical reactions in oxides underpin multiple applications ranging from electroresistive memories, to chemical sensors to energy conversion systems such as fuel cells. Understanding the functionality in these systems requires probing reversible (oxygen reduction/evolution reaction) and irreversible (cathode degradation and activation, formation of conductive filaments) electrochemical processes. In this talk, I summarize recent advances in probing and controlling these transformations locally on nanometer level using scanning probe microscopy. The localized tip concentrates the electric field in the nanometer scale volume of material, inducing local transition. Measured simultaneously electromechanical response (piezoresponse) or current (conductive AFM) provides the information on the bias-induced changes in material. Here, I illustrate how these methods can be extended to study local electrochemical transformations, including vacancy dynamics in oxides such as titanates, LaxSr1-xCoO3, BiFeO3, and YxZr1-xO2. The formation of electromechanical hysteresis loops and their bias-, temperature- and environment dependences provide insight into local electrochemical mechanisms. In materials such as lanthanum-strontium cobaltite, mapping both reversible vacancy motion and vacancy ordering and static deformation is possible, and can be corroborated by post mortem STEM/EELS studies. In ceria, a broad gamut of electrochemical behaviors is observed as a function of temperature and humidity. The possible strategies for elucidation ionic motion at the electroactive interfaces in oxides using high-resolution electron microscopy and combined ex-situ and in-situ STEM-SPM studies are discussed. In the second part of the talk, probing electrochemical phenomena on in-situ grown surfaces with atomic resolution is illustrated. I present an approach based on the multivariate statistical analysis of the coordination spheres of individual atoms to reveal

  6. Note: Seesaw actuation of atomic force microscope probes for improved imaging bandwidth and displacement range

    SciTech Connect

    Torun, H.; Torello, D.; Degertekin, F. L.

    2011-08-15

    The authors describe a method of actuation for atomic force microscope (AFM) probes to improve imaging speed and displacement range simultaneously. Unlike conventional piezoelectric tube actuation, the proposed method involves a lever and fulcrum ''seesaw'' like actuation mechanism that uses a small, fast piezoelectric transducer. The lever arm of the seesaw mechanism increases the apparent displacement range by an adjustable gain factor, overcoming the standard tradeoff between imaging speed and displacement range. Experimental characterization of a cantilever holder implementing the method is provided together with comparative line scans obtained with contact mode imaging. An imaging bandwidth of 30 kHz in air with the current setup was demonstrated.

  7. Probing Non-Abelian Statistics of Majorana Fermions in Ultracold Atomic Superfluid

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Shiliang; Shao, L.-B.; Wang, Z. D.; Duan, L.-M.

    2011-03-11

    We propose an experiment to directly probe the non-Abelian statistics of Majorana fermions by braiding them in an s-wave superfluid of ultracold atoms. We show that different orders of braiding operations give orthogonal output states that can be distinguished through Raman spectroscopy. Realization of Majorana states in an s-wave superfluid requires strong spin-orbital coupling and a controllable Zeeman field in the perpendicular direction. We present a simple laser configuration to generate the artificial spin-orbital coupling and the required Zeeman field in the dark-state subspace.

  8. Atom probe field ion microscopy and related topics: A bibliography 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, K.F.; Miller, M.K.

    1991-12-01

    This bibliography includes references related to the following topics: atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM), field ion microscopy (FIM), field emission (FE), ion sources, and field desorption mass microscopy (FDMM). Technique-orientated studies and applications are included. The bibliography covers the period 1990. The references contained in this document were compiled from a variety of sources including computer searches and personal lists of publications. To reduce the length of this document, the references have been reduced to the minimum necessary to locate the articles. The references, listed alphabetically by authors, are subdivided into the categories listed in paragraph one above. An Addendum of references missed in previous bibliographies is included.

  9. The mystery of missing species in atom probe tomography of composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Karahka, M.; Xia, Y.; Kreuzer, H. J.

    2015-08-10

    There is a serious problem in atom probe tomography of composite materials such as oxides that even from stoichiometric samples one observes non-stoichiometric ion yields. We present a quantitative model that explains the non-stoichiometry allowing a fit to experimental data of ion yields as a function of applied field to extract activation barriers and prefactors. The numbers are confirmed by density functional theory. We also show that for oxides the missing oxygen is thermally desorbed as neutral O{sub 2}, either directly or associatively. Finally, we suggest methods to improve the experimental setup.

  10. SISGR: Atom chip microscopy: A novel probe for strongly correlated materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lev, Benjamin L.

    2014-05-31

    Microscopy techniques co-opted from nonlinear optics and high energy physics have complemented solid-state probes in elucidating the order manifest in condensed matter materials. Up until now, however, no attempts have been made to use modern techniques of ultracold atomic physics to directly explore properties of strongly correlated or topologically protected materials. Our current program is focused on introducing a novel magnetic field microscopy technique into the toolbox of imaging probes. Our prior DOE ESPM program funded the development of a novel instrument using a dilute gas Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) as a scanning probe capable of measuring tiny magnetic (and electric) DC and AC fields above materials. We successfully built the world's first “scanning cryogenic atom chip microscope” [1], and we now are in the process of characterizing its performance before using the instrument to take the first wide-area images of transport flow within unconventional superconductors, pnictides and oxide interfaces (LAO/STO), topological insulators, and colossal magnetoresistive manganites. We will do so at temperatures outside the capability of scanning SQUIDs, with ~10x better resolution and without 1/f-noise. A notable goal will be to measure the surface-to-bulk conductivity ratio in topological insulators in a relatively model-independent fashion [2]. We have completed the construction of this magnetic microscope, shown in Figure 1. The instrument uses atom chips—substrates supporting micron-sized current-carrying wires that create magnetic microtraps near surfaces for ultracold thermal gases and BECs—to enable single-shot and raster-scanned large-field-of-view detection of magnetic fields. The fields emanating from electronic transport may be detected at the 10-7 flux quantum (Φ0) level and below (see Fig. 2); that is, few to sub-micron resolution of sub-nanotesla fields over single-shot, millimeter-long detection lengths. By harnessing the extreme

  11. Atom probe, AFM, and STM studies on vacuum-fired stainless steels.

    PubMed

    Stupnik, A; Frank, P; Leisch, M

    2009-04-01

    The surface morphology of grades 304L and 316LN stainless steels, after low-temperature bake-out process and vacuum annealing, has been studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM). The local elemental composition on the surface before and after thermal treatment has been investigated by atom probe (AP) depth profiling measurements. After vacuum annealing, AFM and STM show significant changes in the surface structure and topology. Recrystallization and surface reconstruction is less pronounced on the 316LN stainless steel. AP depth profiling analyses result in noticeable nickel enrichment on the surface of grade 304L samples. Since hydrogen recombination is almost controlled by surface structure and composition, a strong influence on the outgassing behaviour by the particular surface microstructure can be deduced. PMID:19167824

  12. Probing atomic-scale friction on reconstructed surfaces of single-crystal semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goryl, M.; Budzioch, J.; Krok, F.; Wojtaszek, M.; Kolmer, M.; Walczak, L.; Konior, J.; Gnecco, E.; Szymonski, M.

    2012-02-01

    Friction force microscopy (FFM) investigations have been performed on reconstructed (001) surfaces of InSb and Ge in an ultrahigh vacuum. On the c(8×2) reconstruction of InSb(001) atomic resolution is achieved under superlubric conditions, and the features observed in the lateral force images are precisely reproduced by numerical simulations, taking into account possible decorations of the probing tip. On the simultaneously acquired (1×3) reconstruction a significant disorder of the surface atoms is observed. If the loading force increases, friction becomes much larger on this reconstruction compared to the c(8×2) one. In FFM images acquired on the Ge(001)(2×1) characteristic substructures are resolved within the unit cells. In such a case, a strong dependence of the friction pattern on the scan direction is observed.

  13. Microstructural characterization of irradiated PWR steels using the atom probe field-ion microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.K.; Burke, M.G.

    1987-08-01

    Atom probe field-ion microscopy has been used to characterize the microstructure of a neutron-irradiated A533B pressure vessel steel weld. The atomic spatial resolution of this technique permits a complete structural and chemical description of the ultra-fine features that control the mechanical properties to be made. A variety of fine scale features including roughly spherical copper precipitates and clusters, spherical and rod-shaped molybdenum carbide and disc-shaped molybdenum nitride precipitates were observed to be inhomogeneously distributed in the ferrite. The copper content of the ferrite was substantially reduced from the nominal level. A thin film of molybdenum carbides and nitrides was observed on grain boundaries in addition to a coarse copper-manganese precipitate. Substantial enrichment of manganese and nickel were detected at the copper-manganese precipitate-ferrite interface and this enrichment extended into the ferrite. Enrichment of nickel, manganese and phosphorus were also measured at grain boundaries.

  14. Resolving the morphology of niobium carbonitride nano-precipitates in steel using atom probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Breen, Andrew J; Xie, Kelvin Y; Moody, Michael P; Gault, Baptiste; Yen, Hung-Wei; Wong, Christopher C; Cairney, Julie M; Ringer, Simon P

    2014-08-01

    Atom probe is a powerful technique for studying the composition of nano-precipitates, but their morphology within the reconstructed data is distorted due to the so-called local magnification effect. A new technique has been developed to mitigate this limitation by characterizing the distribution of the surrounding matrix atoms, rather than those contained within the nano-precipitates themselves. A comprehensive chemical analysis enables further information on size and chemistry to be obtained. The method enables new insight into the morphology and chemistry of niobium carbonitride nano-precipitates within ferrite for a series of Nb-microalloyed ultra-thin cast strip steels. The results are supported by complementary high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. PMID:25410602

  15. BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model

    SciTech Connect

    Lazerson, Samuel

    2014-04-14

    With the advent of applied 3D fi elds in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous velocity reduction, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database [1]. Benchmark calculations are presented to validate the collisionless particle orbits, neutral beam injection model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields.

  16. Atom probe tomography characterization of radiation-sensitive KS-01 weld

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, M. K.; Russell, K. F.; Sokolov, M. A.; Nanstad, R. K.

    2003-08-01

    The microstructure of a radiation-sensitive KS-01 test weld has been characterized by atom probe tomography. The levels of copper, manganese, nickel and chromium in this weld were amongst the highest of all the steels used in Western reactor pressure vessels. After neutron irradiation to a fluence of 0.8 × 10 23 n m -2 ( E>1 MeV) at a temperature of 288 °C, this weld exhibited a large Charpy T41J shift of 169 K, a large shift of the fracture toughness transition temperature of 160 K, a decrease in upper shelf energy from 118 to ˜78 J, and an increase in the yield strength from 600 to 826 MPa. However, the mechanical properties data conformed to the master curve. Atom probe tomography revealed a high number density (˜3 × 10 24 m -3) of Cu-, Mn-, Ni-, Si- and P-enriched precipitates and a lower number density (˜1 × 10 23 m -3) of P clusters.

  17. Atom probe field ion microscopy of type 308 CRE stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    Babu, S.S.; David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.; Miller, M.K.

    1994-09-01

    Additions of controlled residual elements (CRE) such as titanium, boron and phosphorus, to the commercial 308 type stainless steel welds have been found to improve the creep-rupture properties. In both conventional and CRE-type stainless steel welds, during high temperature service, various microstructural changes take place such as the formation of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbide networks along austenite({gamma})-ferrite ({delta}) interface, the formation of sigma ({sigma}) phase, and the dissolution of ferrite. Boron-containing CRE welds exhibit similar microstructural evolution as that of conventional types 308 stainless steel welds. As boron may segregate to ferrite-austenite interface and thereby modify the austenite-M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbide interface, the distribution of boron was measured with an atom probe field ion microscope. Atom probe analysis revealed significant boron and carbon enrichments along the ferrite-austenite boundary in the as-welded state. The ratio of carbon to boron concentration at the interface was found to be {approximately} 4.

  18. Attosecond probing of state-resolved ionization and superpositions of atoms and molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leone, Stephen

    2016-05-01

    Isolated attosecond pulses in the extreme ultraviolet are used to probe strong field ionization and to initiate electronic and vibrational superpositions in atoms and small molecules. Few-cycle 800 nm pulses produce strong-field ionization of Xe atoms, and the attosecond probe is used to measure the risetimes of the two spin orbit states of the ion on the 4d inner shell transitions to the 5p vacancies in the valence shell. Step-like features in the risetimes due to the subcycles of the 800 nm pulse are observed and compared with theory to elucidate the instantaneous and effective hole dynamics. Isolated attosecond pulses create massive superpositions of electronic states in Ar and nitrogen as well as vibrational superpositions among electronic states in nitrogen. An 800 nm pulse manipulates the superpositions, and specific subcycle interferences, level shifting, and quantum beats are imprinted onto the attosecond pulse as a function of time delay. Detailed outcomes are compared to theory for measurements of time-dynamic superpositions by attosecond transient absorption. Supported by DOE, NSF, ARO, AFOSR, and DARPA.

  19. Probing poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-butylacrylate)/cell interactions by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Natalia, Becerra; Henry, Andrade; Betty, López; Marina, Restrepo Luz; Roberto, Raiteri

    2015-01-01

    Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) based hydrogels have been proposed as cell culture supports in cell sheet engineering. Toward this goal, we characterized the poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-butylacrylate) copolymer thermo-sensitivity and the cell/copolymer interactions above and below the copolymer lower critical solution temperature. We did that by direct force measurements at different temperatures using an atomic force microscope with either a polystyrene or a glass microbead as probes. We used a copolymer-coated microbead to measure adhesion after a short contact time with a single fibroblast in culture. Statistical analysis of the maximum adhesion force and the mechanical work necessary to separate the probe from the cell surface confirmed the hydrophilic/hydrophobic behavior of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-butylacrylate) as a function of temperature in the range 20-37°C and, consequently, a reversible increase/decrease in cell adhesion with the copolymer. As control experiments we measured interactions between uncoated microbeads with the copolymer hydrogel or cells as well as interaction of the Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) homopolymer with cells. These results show the potential of an assay based on atomic force microscopy for an in situ and quantitative assessment of cell/substrate interactions and support the use of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-butylacrylate) copolymer as an efficient culture substrate in cell sheet engineering. PMID:24619976

  20. Boosting the local anodic oxidation of silicon through carbon nanofiber atomic force microscopy probes

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzoni, Matteo; Matsui, Soichiro; Tanemura, Masaki; Perez-Murano, Francesc

    2015-01-01

    Summary Many nanofabrication methods based on scanning probe microscopy have been developed during the last decades. Local anodic oxidation (LAO) is one of such methods: Upon application of an electric field between tip and surface under ambient conditions, oxide patterning with nanometer-scale resolution can be performed with good control of dimensions and placement. LAO through the non-contact mode of atomic force microscopy (AFM) has proven to yield a better resolution and tip preservation than the contact mode and it can be effectively performed in the dynamic mode of AFM. The tip plays a crucial role for the LAO-AFM, because it regulates the minimum feature size and the electric field. For instance, the feasibility of carbon nanotube (CNT)-functionalized tips showed great promise for LAO-AFM, yet, the fabrication of CNT tips presents difficulties. Here, we explore the use of a carbon nanofiber (CNF) as the tip apex of AFM probes for the application of LAO on silicon substrates in the AFM amplitude modulation dynamic mode of operation. We show the good performance of CNF-AFM probes in terms of resolution and reproducibility, as well as demonstration that the CNF apex provides enhanced conditions in terms of field-induced, chemical process efficiency. PMID:25671165

  1. Customized atomic force microscopy probe by focused-ion-beam-assisted tip transfer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Andrew; Butte, Manish J.

    2014-01-01

    We present a technique for transferring separately fabricated tips onto tipless atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers, performed using focused ion beam-assisted nanomanipulation. This method addresses the need in scanning probe microscopy for certain tip geometries that cannot be achieved by conventional lithography. For example, in probing complex layered materials or tall biological cells using AFM, a tall tip with a high-aspect-ratio is required to avoid artifacts caused by collisions of the tip's sides with the material being probed. We show experimentally that tall (18 μm) cantilever tips fabricated by this approach reduce squeeze-film damping, which fits predictions from hydrodynamic theory, and results in an increased quality factor (Q) of the fundamental flexural mode. We demonstrate that a customized tip's well-defined geometry, tall tip height, and aspect ratio enable improved measurement of elastic moduli by allowing access to low-laying portions of tall cells (T lymphocytes). This technique can be generally used to attach tips to any micromechanical device when conventional lithography of tips cannot be accomplished. PMID:25161320

  2. Customized atomic force microscopy probe by focused-ion-beam-assisted tip transfer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Andrew; Butte, Manish J

    2014-08-01

    We present a technique for transferring separately fabricated tips onto tipless atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers, performed using focused ion beam-assisted nanomanipulation. This method addresses the need in scanning probe microscopy for certain tip geometries that cannot be achieved by conventional lithography. For example, in probing complex layered materials or tall biological cells using AFM, a tall tip with a high-aspect-ratio is required to avoid artifacts caused by collisions of the tip's sides with the material being probed. We show experimentally that tall (18 μm) cantilever tips fabricated by this approach reduce squeeze-film damping, which fits predictions from hydrodynamic theory, and results in an increased quality factor (Q) of the fundamental flexural mode. We demonstrate that a customized tip's well-defined geometry, tall tip height, and aspect ratio enable improved measurement of elastic moduli by allowing access to low-laying portions of tall cells (T lymphocytes). This technique can be generally used to attach tips to any micromechanical device when conventional lithography of tips cannot be accomplished. PMID:25161320

  3. Customized atomic force microscopy probe by focused-ion-beam-assisted tip transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Andrew; Butte, Manish J.

    2014-08-04

    We present a technique for transferring separately fabricated tips onto tipless atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers, performed using focused ion beam-assisted nanomanipulation. This method addresses the need in scanning probe microscopy for certain tip geometries that cannot be achieved by conventional lithography. For example, in probing complex layered materials or tall biological cells using AFM, a tall tip with a high-aspect-ratio is required to avoid artifacts caused by collisions of the tip's sides with the material being probed. We show experimentally that tall (18 μm) cantilever tips fabricated by this approach reduce squeeze-film damping, which fits predictions from hydrodynamic theory, and results in an increased quality factor (Q) of the fundamental flexural mode. We demonstrate that a customized tip's well-defined geometry, tall tip height, and aspect ratio enable improved measurement of elastic moduli by allowing access to low-laying portions of tall cells (T lymphocytes). This technique can be generally used to attach tips to any micromechanical device when conventional lithography of tips cannot be accomplished.

  4. 3D microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iizuka, Keigo

    2008-02-01

    In order to circumvent the fact that only one observer can view the image from a stereoscopic microscope, an attachment was devised for displaying the 3D microscopic image on a large LCD monitor for viewing by multiple observers in real time. The principle of operation, design, fabrication, and performance are presented, along with tolerance measurements relating to the properties of the cellophane half-wave plate used in the design.

  5. Measurement of atomic oxygen in the middle atmosphere using solid electrolyte sensors and catalytic probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberhart, M.; Löhle, S.; Steinbeck, A.; Binder, T.; Fasoulas, S.

    2015-09-01

    The middle- and upper-atmospheric energy budget is largely dominated by reactions involving atomic oxygen (O). Modeling of these processes requires detailed knowledge about the distribution of this oxygen species. Understanding the mutual contributions of atomic oxygen and wave motions to the atmospheric heating is the main goal of the rocket project WADIS (WAve propagation and DISsipation in the middle atmosphere). It includes, amongst others, our instruments for the measurement of atomic oxygen that have both been developed with the aim of resolving density variations on small vertical scales along the trajectory. In this paper the instrument based on catalytic effects (PHLUX: Pyrometric Heat Flux Experiment) is introduced briefly. The experiment employing solid electrolyte sensors (FIPEX: Flux φ(Phi) Probe Experiment) is presented in detail. These sensors were laboratory calibrated using a microwave plasma as a source of atomic oxygen in combination with mass spectrometer reference measurements. The spectrometer was in turn calibrated for O with a method based on methane. In order to get insight into the horizontal variability, the rocket payload had instrument decks at both ends. Each housed several sensor heads measuring during both the up- and downleg of the trajectory. The WADIS project comprises two rocket flights during different geophysical conditions. Results from WADIS-1 are presented, which was successfully launched in June 2013 from the Andøya Space Center, Norway. FIPEX data were sampled at 100 Hz and yield atomic oxygen density profiles with a vertical resolution better than 9 m. This allows density variations to be studied on very small spatial scales. Numerical simulations of the flow field around the rocket were done at several points of the trajectory to assess the influence of aerodynamic effects on the measurement results. Density profiles peak at 3 × 1010 cm-3 at altitudes of 93.6 and 96 km for the up- and downleg, respectively.

  6. Development of dual-probe atomic force microscopy system using optical beam deflection sensors with obliquely incident laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunemi, Eika; Kobayashi, Kei; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2011-03-01

    We developed a dual-probe (DP) atomic force microscopy (AFM) system that has two independently controlled probes. The deflection of each cantilever is measured by the optical beam deflection (OBD) method. In order to keep a large space over the two probes for an objective lens with a large numerical aperture, we employed the OBD sensors with obliquely incident laser beams. In this paper, we describe the details of our developed DP-AFM system, including analysis of the sensitivity of the OBD sensor for detection of the cantilever deflection. We also describe a method to eliminate the crosstalk caused by the vertical translation of the cantilever. In addition, we demonstrate simultaneous topographic imaging of a test sample by the two probes and surface potential measurement on an α-sexithiophene (α-6T) thin film by one probe while electrical charges were injected by the other probe.

  7. Development of dual-probe atomic force microscopy system using optical beam deflection sensors with obliquely incident laser beams.

    PubMed

    Tsunemi, Eika; Kobayashi, Kei; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2011-03-01

    We developed a dual-probe (DP) atomic force microscopy (AFM) system that has two independently controlled probes. The deflection of each cantilever is measured by the optical beam deflection (OBD) method. In order to keep a large space over the two probes for an objective lens with a large numerical aperture, we employed the OBD sensors with obliquely incident laser beams. In this paper, we describe the details of our developed DP-AFM system, including analysis of the sensitivity of the OBD sensor for detection of the cantilever deflection. We also describe a method to eliminate the crosstalk caused by the vertical translation of the cantilever. In addition, we demonstrate simultaneous topographic imaging of a test sample by the two probes and surface potential measurement on an α-sexithiophene (α-6T) thin film by one probe while electrical charges were injected by the other probe. PMID:21456752

  8. 3D Ion Temperature Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Hiroshi; You, Setthivoine; Balandin, Alexander; Inomoto, Michiaki; Ono, Yasushi

    2009-11-01

    The TS-4 experiment at the University of Tokyo collides two spheromaks to form a single high-beta compact toroid. Magnetic reconnection during the merging process heats and accelerates the plasma in toroidal and poloidal directions. The reconnection region has a complex 3D topology determined by the pitch of the spheromak magnetic fields at the merging plane. A pair of multichord passive spectroscopic diagnostics have been established to measure the ion temperature and velocity in the reconnection volume. One setup measures spectral lines across a poloidal plane, retrieving velocity and temperature from Abel inversion. The other, novel setup records spectral lines across another section of the plasma and reconstructs velocity and temperature from 3D vector and 2D scalar tomography techniques. The magnetic field linking both measurement planes is determined from in situ magnetic probe arrays. The ion temperature is then estimated within the volume between the two measurement planes and at the reconnection region. The measurement is followed over several repeatable discharges to follow the heating and acceleration process during the merging reconnection.

  9. Determining the location and nearest neighbours of aluminium in zeolites with atom probe tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Perea, Daniel E.; Arslan, Ilke; Liu, Jia; Ristanović, Zoran; Kovarik, Libor; Arey, Bruce W.; Lercher, Johannes A.; Bare, Simon R.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2015-07-02

    Zeolite catalysis is determined by a combination of pore architecture and Brønsted acidity. As Brønsted acid sites are formed by the substitution of AlO4 for SiO4 tetrahedra, it is of utmost importance to have information on the number as well as the location and neighbouring sites of framework aluminium. Unfortunately, such detailed information has not yet been obtained, mainly due to the lack of suitable characterization methods. Here we report, using the powerful atomic-scale analysis technique known as atom probe tomography, the quantitative spatial distribution of individual aluminium atoms, including their three-dimensional extent of segregation. Ultimately, using a nearest-neighbour statistical analysis, we precisely determine the short-range distribution of aluminium over the different T-sites and determine the most probable Al–Al neighbouring distance within parent and steamed ZSM-5 crystals, as well as assess the long-range redistribution of aluminium upon zeolite steaming.

  10. Determining the location and nearest neighbours of aluminium in zeolites with atom probe tomography

    PubMed Central

    Perea, Daniel E.; Arslan, Ilke; Liu, Jia; Ristanović, Zoran; Kovarik, Libor; Arey, Bruce W.; Lercher, Johannes A.; Bare, Simon R.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2015-01-01

    Zeolite catalysis is determined by a combination of pore architecture and Brønsted acidity. As Brønsted acid sites are formed by the substitution of AlO4 for SiO4 tetrahedra, it is of utmost importance to have information on the number as well as the location and neighbouring sites of framework aluminium. Unfortunately, such detailed information has not yet been obtained, mainly due to the lack of suitable characterization methods. Here we report, using the powerful atomic-scale analysis technique known as atom probe tomography, the quantitative spatial distribution of individual aluminium atoms, including their three-dimensional extent of segregation. Using a nearest-neighbour statistical analysis, we precisely determine the short-range distribution of aluminium over the different T-sites and determine the most probable Al–Al neighbouring distance within parent and steamed ZSM-5 crystals, as well as assess the long-range redistribution of aluminium upon zeolite steaming. PMID:26133270

  11. Determining the location and nearest neighbours of aluminium in zeolites with atom probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Perea, Daniel E; Arslan, Ilke; Liu, Jia; Ristanović, Zoran; Kovarik, Libor; Arey, Bruce W; Lercher, Johannes A; Bare, Simon R; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2015-01-01

    Zeolite catalysis is determined by a combination of pore architecture and Brønsted acidity. As Brønsted acid sites are formed by the substitution of AlO4 for SiO4 tetrahedra, it is of utmost importance to have information on the number as well as the location and neighbouring sites of framework aluminium. Unfortunately, such detailed information has not yet been obtained, mainly due to the lack of suitable characterization methods. Here we report, using the powerful atomic-scale analysis technique known as atom probe tomography, the quantitative spatial distribution of individual aluminium atoms, including their three-dimensional extent of segregation. Using a nearest-neighbour statistical analysis, we precisely determine the short-range distribution of aluminium over the different T-sites and determine the most probable Al-Al neighbouring distance within parent and steamed ZSM-5 crystals, as well as assess the long-range redistribution of aluminium upon zeolite steaming. PMID:26133270

  12. Determining the location and nearest neighbours of aluminium in zeolites with atom probe tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perea, Daniel E.; Arslan, Ilke; Liu, Jia; Ristanović, Zoran; Kovarik, Libor; Arey, Bruce W.; Lercher, Johannes A.; Bare, Simon R.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2015-07-01

    Zeolite catalysis is determined by a combination of pore architecture and Brønsted acidity. As Brønsted acid sites are formed by the substitution of AlO4 for SiO4 tetrahedra, it is of utmost importance to have information on the number as well as the location and neighbouring sites of framework aluminium. Unfortunately, such detailed information has not yet been obtained, mainly due to the lack of suitable characterization methods. Here we report, using the powerful atomic-scale analysis technique known as atom probe tomography, the quantitative spatial distribution of individual aluminium atoms, including their three-dimensional extent of segregation. Using a nearest-neighbour statistical analysis, we precisely determine the short-range distribution of aluminium over the different T-sites and determine the most probable Al-Al neighbouring distance within parent and steamed ZSM-5 crystals, as well as assess the long-range redistribution of aluminium upon zeolite steaming.

  13. Determining the location and nearest neighbours of aluminium in zeolites with atom probe tomography

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Perea, Daniel E.; Arslan, Ilke; Liu, Jia; Ristanović, Zoran; Kovarik, Libor; Arey, Bruce W.; Lercher, Johannes A.; Bare, Simon R.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2015-07-02

    Zeolite catalysis is determined by a combination of pore architecture and Brønsted acidity. As Brønsted acid sites are formed by the substitution of AlO4 for SiO4 tetrahedra, it is of utmost importance to have information on the number as well as the location and neighbouring sites of framework aluminium. Unfortunately, such detailed information has not yet been obtained, mainly due to the lack of suitable characterization methods. Here we report, using the powerful atomic-scale analysis technique known as atom probe tomography, the quantitative spatial distribution of individual aluminium atoms, including their three-dimensional extent of segregation. Ultimately, using a nearest-neighbour statisticalmore » analysis, we precisely determine the short-range distribution of aluminium over the different T-sites and determine the most probable Al–Al neighbouring distance within parent and steamed ZSM-5 crystals, as well as assess the long-range redistribution of aluminium upon zeolite steaming.« less

  14. Implementation and characterization of a quartz tuning fork based probe consisted of discrete resonators for dynamic mode atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Terunobu; de Rooij, Nicolaas F.; Staufer, Urs; Detterbeck, Manfred; Braendlin, Dominik; Waldmeier, Simon; Scheidiger, Martin

    2010-06-01

    The quartz tuning fork based probe {e.g., Akiyama et al. [Appl. Surf. Sci. 210, 18 (2003)]}, termed "A-Probe," is a self-sensing and self-actuating (exciting) probe for dynamic mode atomic force microscope (AFM) operation. It is an oscillatory force sensor consisting of the two discrete resonators. This paper presents the investigations on an improved A-Probe: its batch fabrication and assembly, mounting on an AFM head, electrical setup, characterization, and AFM imaging. The fundamental features of the A-Probe are electrically and optically characterized in "approach-withdraw" experiments. Further investigations include the frequency response of an A-Probe to small mechanical vibrations externally applied to the tip and the effective loading force yielding between the tip and the sample during the periodic contact. Imaging of an electronic chip, a compact disk stamper, carbon nanotubes, and Si beads is demonstrated with this probe at ambient conditions in the so-called frequency modulation mode. A special probe substrate, which can snap on a receptacle fixed on an AFM head, and a special holder including a preamplifier electronic are introduced. We hope that the implementation and characterization of the A-Probe described in this paper will provide hints for new scanning probe techniques.

  15. Improving the calculation of rovibrational spectra of five-atom molecules with three identical atoms by using a C3upsilonG6 symmetry-adapted grid: applied to CH3D and CHD3.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Gang; Carrington, Tucker

    2005-10-15

    In this paper we report two improvements on the approach we have used to compute rovibrational levels of methane and apply the new ideas to calculate rovibrational levels of two methane isotopomers CH3D and CHD3. Both improvements make the bend calculation better. The first improvement is a G6-invariant (or C3upsilon-invariant) grid which is designed such that each point on the grid is mapped to another point on the grid by any of the G6 operations. The second improvement is the use of fast Fourier transform (FFT) to compute the bend potential matrix-vector products. The FFT matrix-vector product is about three and ten times faster than the previous sequential summation method for the J=0 and J>0 cases, respectively. The calculated J=1 rovibrational levels of CH3D and CHD3 on the Schwenke and Partridge [Spectrochim. Acta, Part A 57, 887 (2001)] ab initio potential are in good agreement (within 6 cm(-1) for the levels up to 3000 cm(-1)) with the experimental data. The agreement is even better (within 0.1 cm(-1) for the levels up to 6000 cm(-1)) if the associated J=0 energies are subtracted. PMID:16252944

  16. Multiviewer 3D monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostrzewski, Andrew A.; Aye, Tin M.; Kim, Dai Hyun; Esterkin, Vladimir; Savant, Gajendra D.

    1998-09-01

    Physical Optics Corporation has developed an advanced 3-D virtual reality system for use with simulation tools for training technical and military personnel. This system avoids such drawbacks of other virtual reality (VR) systems as eye fatigue, headaches, and alignment for each viewer, all of which are due to the need to wear special VR goggles. The new system is based on direct viewing of an interactive environment. This innovative holographic multiplexed screen technology makes it unnecessary for the viewer to wear special goggles.

  17. 3D Audio System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Ames Research Center research into virtual reality led to the development of the Convolvotron, a high speed digital audio processing system that delivers three-dimensional sound over headphones. It consists of a two-card set designed for use with a personal computer. The Convolvotron's primary application is presentation of 3D audio signals over headphones. Four independent sound sources are filtered with large time-varying filters that compensate for motion. The perceived location of the sound remains constant. Possible applications are in air traffic control towers or airplane cockpits, hearing and perception research and virtual reality development.

  18. Spectroscopy and isotope shifts of the 4s3d {sup 1}D{sub 2}-4s5p {sup 1}P{sub 1} repumping transition in magneto-optically trapped calcium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Dammalapati, U.; Norris, I.; Burrows, C.; Arnold, A. S.; Riis, E.

    2010-02-15

    We investigate a repumping scheme for magneto-optically trapped calcium atoms. It is based on excitation of the 4s3d{sup 1}D{sub 2}-4s5p{sup 1}P{sub 1} transition at 672 nm with an extended cavity diode laser. The effect of the repumping is approximately a factor of three increase in trap lifetime and a doubling of the trapping efficiency from a Zeeman slowed thermal beam. Added to this, the 672-nm laser repumps atoms from an otherwise dark state to yield an overall increase in detected fluorescence signal from the magneto-optic trap (MOT) of more than an order of magnitude. Furthermore, we report isotope shift measurements of the 672-nm transition, for the first time, for four naturally occurring even isotopes. Using available charge radii data, the observed shifts, extending up to 4.3 GHz, display the expected linear dependence in a King plot analysis. The measured shifts are used to determine the isotope shifts of the remaining {sup 41,43,46}Ca isotopes. These might be of interest where less abundant isotopes are used enabling isotope selective repumping, resulting in enhanced trapping and detection efficiencies.

  19. Shape-dependent adhesion and friction of Au nanoparticles probed with atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yuk, Youngji; Hong, Jong Wook; Lee, Hyunsoo; Han, Sang Woo; Young Park, Jeong

    2015-03-27

    The relation between surface structure and friction and adhesion is a long-standing question in tribology. Tuning the surface structure of the exposed facets of metal nanoparticles is enabled by shape control. We investigated the effect of the shape of Au nanoparticles on friction and adhesion. Two nanoparticle systems, cubic nanoparticles with a low-index (100) surface and hexoctahedral nanoparticles with a high-index (321) surface, were used as model nanoparticle surfaces. Atomic force microscopy was used to probe the nanoscale friction and adhesion on the nanoparticle surface. Before removing the capping layers, the friction results include contributions from both the geometric factor and the presence of capping layers. After removing the capping layers, we can see the exclusive effect of the surface atomic structure while the geometric effect is maintained. We found that after removing the capping layer, the cubic Au nanoparticles exhibited higher adhesion and friction, compared with cubes capped with layers covering 25% and 70%, respectively. On the other hand, the adhesion and friction of hexoctahedral Au nanoparticles decreased after removing the capping layers, compared with nanoparticles with capping layers. The difference in adhesion and friction forces between the bare Au surfaces and Au nanoparticles with capping layers cannot be explained by geometric factors, such as the slope of the nanoparticle surfaces. The higher adhesion and friction forces on cubic nanoparticles after removing the capping layers is associated with the atomic structure of (100) and (321) (i.e., the flat (100) surfaces of the cubic nanoparticles have a larger contact area, compared with the rough (321) surfaces of the hexoctahedral nanoparticles). This study implies an intrinsic relation between atomic structure and nanomechanical properties, with potential applications for controlling nanoscale friction and adhesion via colloid chemistry. PMID:25765817

  20. Shape-dependent adhesion and friction of Au nanoparticles probed with atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuk, Youngji; Hong, Jong Wook; Lee, Hyunsoo; Han, Sang Woo; Park, Jeong Young

    2015-03-01

    The relation between surface structure and friction and adhesion is a long-standing question in tribology. Tuning the surface structure of the exposed facets of metal nanoparticles is enabled by shape control. We investigated the effect of the shape of Au nanoparticles on friction and adhesion. Two nanoparticle systems, cubic nanoparticles with a low-index (100) surface and hexoctahedral nanoparticles with a high-index (321) surface, were used as model nanoparticle surfaces. Atomic force microscopy was used to probe the nanoscale friction and adhesion on the nanoparticle surface. Before removing the capping layers, the friction results include contributions from both the geometric factor and the presence of capping layers. After removing the capping layers, we can see the exclusive effect of the surface atomic structure while the geometric effect is maintained. We found that after removing the capping layer, the cubic Au nanoparticles exhibited higher adhesion and friction, compared with cubes capped with layers covering 25% and 70%, respectively. On the other hand, the adhesion and friction of hexoctahedral Au nanoparticles decreased after removing the capping layers, compared with nanoparticles with capping layers. The difference in adhesion and friction forces between the bare Au surfaces and Au nanoparticles with capping layers cannot be explained by geometric factors, such as the slope of the nanoparticle surfaces. The higher adhesion and friction forces on cubic nanoparticles after removing the capping layers is associated with the atomic structure of (100) and (321) (i.e., the flat (100) surfaces of the cubic nanoparticles have a larger contact area, compared with the rough (321) surfaces of the hexoctahedral nanoparticles). This study implies an intrinsic relation between atomic structure and nanomechanical properties, with potential applications for controlling nanoscale friction and adhesion via colloid chemistry.

  1. RF Pulse Signal Integrity Analysis for Nonlinear Ended Microstrip Line Atom-Probe Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L.; Delamare, A.; Normand, A.; Delaroche, F.; Latry, O.; Vurpillot, F.; Ravelo, B.

    2016-03-01

    A signal integrity (SI) analysis of high voltage rectangular short pulses for the atom- probe system is explored in this paper. The operated RF transient pulse is considered for exciting on material sample inside an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) cryogenic chamber. The ns- duration pulse signal is injected into the cryogenic analysis chamber through the transmitting system mainly constituted by a microstrip interconnect line ended by optical controlled nonlinear load. The whole system frequency characterization is performed based on the S- parameter measurements. As expected, a challenging ultra-short rectangular shape pulse is exhibited by the pulser. Promising experimental results with the improvement of ion mass spectrum is demonstrated with the designed RF pulser.

  2. Atom probe tomography of compositional fluctuation in GaInN layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanitani, Yuya; Tanaka, Shinji; Tomiya, Shigetaka; Ohkubo, Tadakatsu; Hono, Kazuhiro

    2016-05-01

    Thin Ga1‑ x In x N layers with various indium compositions x (0.08,0.15,0.25) were examined by high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. Although nanoscale compositional fluctuation was observed in all Ga1‑ x In x N layers, no appreciable phase separation was observed. Since Ga1‑ x In x N layers were coherently grown on underlying GaN layers, it is considered that the elastic strain constrains phase separation in the Ga1‑ x In x N layers and that compositional fluctuations develop in order to minimize the local strain energy. The measured period of compositional fluctuations ranged from 3.4 to 4.9 nm and decreased with growth temperature (T growth). This tendency is suggested to be dominated by the surface migration length of the adatom during the crystal growth.

  3. Atom Probe Tomography Analysis of the Distribution of Rhenium in Nickel Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Mottura, A.; Warnken, N; Miller, Michael K; Reed, R. C.; Finnis, M.

    2010-01-01

    Atom probe tomography (APT) is used to characterise the distributions of rhenium in a binary Ni-Re alloy and the nickel-based single-crystal CMSX-4 superalloy. A purpose-built algorithm is developed to quantify the size distribution of solute clusters, and applied to the APT datasets to critique the hypothesis that rhenium is prone to the formation of clusters in these systems. No evidence is found to indicate that rhenium forms solute clusters above the level expected from random fluctuations. In CMSX-4, enrichment of Re is detected in the matrix phase close to the matrix/precipitate ({gamma}/{gamma}{prime}) phase boundaries. Phase field modelling indicates that this is due to the migration of the {gamma}/{gamma}{prime} interface during cooling from the temperature of operation. Thus, neither clustering of rhenium nor interface enrichments can be the cause of the enhancement in high temperature mechanical properties conferred by rhenium alloying.

  4. Information storage materials: nanoscale characterisation by three-dimensional atom probe analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, D.J.; Petford-Long, A.K.; Ma, Y.Q; Cerezo, A

    2004-06-07

    The development of nanoscale magnetic materials for applications in information storage systems relies heavily on the ability to engineer the properties of the layered structures from which such materials are fabricated. These properties are strongly dependent on the nature of the interfaces between the individual nanoscale magnetic layers, so knowledge of the interface chemistry is crucial. In this paper, we discuss the application of three-dimensional atom probe analysis to the characterisation of layered magnetic materials, including details of specimen preparation techniques required for this type of analysis. Recent results are presented on the characterisation of interfaces in Co/Cu or CoFe/Cu multilayers, which form part of the read sensor in magnetic recording heads, and Co/Pd multilayers, which are being considered for use as perpendicular recording media.

  5. THERMAL EFFECTS ON MASS AND SPATIAL RESOLUTION DURING LASER PULSE ATOM PROBE TOMOGRAPHY OF CERIUM OXIDE

    SciTech Connect

    Rita Kirchhofer; Melissa C. Teague; Brian P. Gorman

    2013-05-01

    Cerium oxide (CeO2) is an ideal surrogate material for trans-uranic elements and fission products found in nuclear fuels due to similarities in their thermal properties; therefore, cerium oxide was used to determine the best run condition for atom probe tomography (APT). Laser pulse APT is a technique that allows for spatial resolution in the nm scale and isotopic/elemental chemical identification. A systematic study of the impact of laser pulse energy and specimen base temperature on the mass resolution, measurement of stoichiometry, multiples, and evaporation mechanisms are reported in this paper. It was demonstrated that using laser pulse APT stoichiometric field evaporation of cerium oxide was achieved at 1 pJ laser pulse energy and 20 K specimen base temperature.

  6. Conducting Probe Atomic Force Microscope as a Relevant Tool for Studying Some Phenomena in MEMS Switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peschot, A.; Vincent, M.; Poulain, C.; Mariolle, D.; Houzé, F.; Delamare, J.

    2015-12-01

    As the reliability of electrical microcontacts has proved to be the main limitation to a fast-growing production of ultraminiaturized switches, a thorough understanding of their failure mechanisms is an all-important purpose. This paper aims at showing that conducting-probe Atomic Force Microscopy (cp-AFM) is an adequate tool to actuate and study electrical contacts. By choosing relevant cantilevers and operating mode of the cp-AFM, dimensions, gap and force level representative of existing microelectromechanical switches (MEMS switches) are obtained. With two examples, the advantages of using a cp-AFM in force mode for studying physical phenomena at very low scale are highlighted. The reported investigations concern material transfer between contact parts and contact bounces. Those two undesirable phenomena induce surface damages and impinge reliability of MEMS switches. In both cases an explanatory scenario of phenomena occurring at nanoscale is proposed and preventive recommendations for improving the lifetime of such devices are suggested.

  7. Quantitative analysis of Si/SiGeC superlattices using atom probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Estivill, Robert; Grenier, Adeline; Duguay, Sébastien; Vurpillot, François; Terlier, Tanguy; Barnes, Jean-Paul; Hartmann, Jean-Michel; Blavette, Didier

    2015-12-01

    SiGe and its alloys are used as key materials in innovative electronic devices. The analysis of these materials together with the localisation of dopants and impurities on a very fine scale is of crucial importance for better understanding their electronic properties. The quantification of carbon and germanium in an as-grown Si/SiGeC superlattice has been investigated using Atom Probe Tomography as a function of analysis conditions and sample anneal temperature. The mass spectrum is heavily influenced by the analysis conditions and chemical identification is needed. It was found that quantitative results are obtained using a intermediate electric field. The evaporation of carbon ions shows a strong spatial and temporal correlation. A series of annealed samples have been analysed, presenting an inhomogeneous carbon distribution, appearing in the shape of small clusters. These findings confirm previous results and give a better understanding of the processes occurring in these technologically important materials. PMID:25814020

  8. Probing dark energy with an atom interferometer in an optical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffe, Matthew; Haslinger, Philipp; Hamilton, Paul; Mueller, Holger; Khoury, Justin; Elder, Benjamin

    2016-05-01

    If dark energy -- which drives the accelerated expansion of the universe -- consists of a light scalar field, it might be detectable as a ``fifth force'' between normal-matter objects, in potential conflict with precision tests of gravity. Chameleon fields and other theories with screening mechanisms can evade such tests by suppressing this force in regions of high density, such as the laboratory. Our experiments constrain these dark energy models using atoms in an ultrahigh-vacuum chamber as probes to expose the screened fields. Using a cesium matter wave interferometer in an optical cavity, we set stringent bounds on coupling screened theories to matter. A further 4 to 5 orders of magnitude would completely rule out chameleon and f(R) theories. I will describe this first tabletop dark energy search, and present the hundredfold boost in sensitivity we have since achieved.

  9. Atom Probe Tomography Analysis of Precipitation during Tempering of a Nanostructured Bainitic Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Caballero, Francesca G.; Miller, Michael K; Garcia-Mateo, C.

    2011-01-01

    Carbon distribution during tempering of a nanostructured bainitic steel was analyzed by atom probe tomography (APT). Three different types of particles are detected on samples tempered at 673 K (400 C) for 30 minutes: lower bainite cementite with a carbon content of {approx}25 at. pct, {var_epsilon}-carbides with a carbon content close to 30 at. pct, and carbon clusters, small features with a carbon content of {approx}14 at. pct indicative of a stage of tempering prior to precipitation of {var_epsilon}-carbide. After tempering at 773 K (500 C) for 30 minutes, the {var_epsilon}-carbide-to-cementite transition was observed. Solute concentration profiles across carbide/ferrite interfaces showed the distribution of substitutional elements in {var_epsilon}-carbide and cementite for all the tempering conditions.

  10. Atom-probe and field emission electron spectroscope studies of Ge on Ir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashino, Makoto; Tomitori, Masahiko; Nishikawa, Osamu

    1993-04-01

    The combination of an atom-probe (AP) and a field emission electron spectroscope (FEES) was employed to investigate the electronic structure of Ge layers on an Ir substrate. Germanium forms a thin film with a fairly uniform thickness, possibly owing to a small activation energy for diffusion on Ir or the lattice matching between Ge and Ir. The FEES spectrum obtained from Ge layers thicker than 8-9 ML exhibits a semiconductive energy gap and a peak at 0.7 eV below the Fermi level as for Si on Mo. However, the minimum layer thickness to exhibit the semiconductive spectrum profile is significantly thicker than that for Si on Mo. The observed difference could be attributed to the layer structure of the deposited Ge and to the narrower energy gap of Ge than that of Si.

  11. Atom probe and field emission electron spectroscopy studies of semiconductor films on metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashino, Makoto; Tomitori, Masahiko; Nishikawa, Osamu

    1995-03-01

    The surface morphology and the electronic states of Ge overlayers deposited on Ir-and Mo-tips were investigated by a combined instrument of an atom probe (AP) and a field emission electron spectroscope (FEES). The overlayers were deposited on the tips while observing field emission microscope (FEM) images of the surfaces. The FEM images of thin Ge overlayers on the Ir-tips show layer-like structures. In field emission electron distribution (FEED) of a Ge overlayer on the Ir-tip, about 5 ML thick, an energy gap near the Fermi level was clearly widened by low temperature annealing. After the thickness was reduced to 3 ML by field evaporation, the energy gap still remained wide. The FEEDs of the Ge overlayers on the Mo-tips exhibit several peaks distinct from those on the Ir-tip. This may be attributed to the local strong electric field surrounding the Ge clusters formed on the Mo-tips.

  12. Real time drift measurement for colloidal probe atomic force microscope: a visual sensing approach

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yuliang Bi, Shusheng; Wang, Huimin

    2014-05-15

    Drift has long been an issue in atomic force microscope (AFM) systems and limits their ability to make long time period measurements. In this study, a new method is proposed to directly measure and compensate for the drift between AFM cantilevers and sample surfaces in AFM systems. This was achieved by simultaneously measuring z positions for beads at the end of an AFM colloidal probe and on sample surface through an off-focus image processing based visual sensing method. The working principle and system configuration are presented. Experiments were conducted to validate the real time drift measurement and compensation. The implication of the proposed method for regular AFM measurements is discussed. We believe that this technique provides a practical and efficient approach for AFM experiments requiring long time period measurement.

  13. 3D Surgical Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Cevidanes, Lucia; Tucker, Scott; Styner, Martin; Kim, Hyungmin; Chapuis, Jonas; Reyes, Mauricio; Proffit, William; Turvey, Timothy; Jaskolka, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of methods for computer-aided jaw surgery. Computer-aided jaw surgery allows us to incorporate the high level of precision necessary for transferring virtual plans into the operating room. We also present a complete computer-aided surgery (CAS) system developed in close collaboration with surgeons. Surgery planning and simulation include construction of 3D surface models from Cone-beam CT (CBCT), dynamic cephalometry, semi-automatic mirroring, interactive cutting of bone and bony segment repositioning. A virtual setup can be used to manufacture positioning splints for intra-operative guidance. The system provides further intra-operative assistance with the help of a computer display showing jaw positions and 3D positioning guides updated in real-time during the surgical procedure. The CAS system aids in dealing with complex cases with benefits for the patient, with surgical practice, and for orthodontic finishing. Advanced software tools for diagnosis and treatment planning allow preparation of detailed operative plans, osteotomy repositioning, bone reconstructions, surgical resident training and assessing the difficulties of the surgical procedures prior to the surgery. CAS has the potential to make the elaboration of the surgical plan a more flexible process, increase the level of detail and accuracy of the plan, yield higher operative precision and control, and enhance documentation of cases. Supported by NIDCR DE017727, and DE018962 PMID:20816308

  14. Nanogeochronology of discordant zircon measured by atom probe microscopy of Pb-enriched dislocation loops

    PubMed Central

    Peterman, Emily M.; Reddy, Steven M.; Saxey, David W.; Snoeyenbos, David R.; Rickard, William D. A.; Fougerouse, Denis; Kylander-Clark, Andrew R. C.

    2016-01-01

    Isotopic discordance is a common feature in zircon that can lead to an erroneous age determination, and it is attributed to the mobilization and escape of radiogenic Pb during its post-crystallization geological evolution. The degree of isotopic discordance measured at analytical scales of ~10 μm often differs among adjacent analysis locations, indicating heterogeneous distributions of Pb at shorter length scales. We use atom probe microscopy to establish the nature of these sites and the mechanisms by which they form. We show that the nanoscale distribution of Pb in a ~2.1 billion year old discordant zircon that was metamorphosed c. 150 million years ago is defined by two distinct Pb reservoirs. Despite overall Pb loss during peak metamorphic conditions, the atom probe data indicate that a component of radiogenic Pb was trapped in 10-nm dislocation loops that formed during the annealing of radiation damage associated with the metamorphic event. A second Pb component, found outside the dislocation loops, represents homogeneous accumulation of radiogenic Pb in the zircon matrix after metamorphism. The 207Pb/206Pb ratios measured from eight dislocation loops are equivalent within uncertainty and yield an age consistent with the original crystallization age of the zircon, as determined by laser ablation spot analysis. Our results provide a specific mechanism for the trapping and retention of radiogenic Pb during metamorphism and confirm that isotopic discordance in this zircon is characterized by discrete nanoscale reservoirs of Pb that record different isotopic compositions and yield age data consistent with distinct geological events. These data may provide a framework for interpreting discordance in zircon as the heterogeneous distribution of discrete radiogenic Pb populations, each yielding geologically meaningful ages. PMID:27617295

  15. Probing interlayer interactions between graphene and metal substrates by supersonic rare-gas atom scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shichibe, H.; Satake, Y.; Watanabe, K.; Kinjyo, A.; Kunihara, A.; Yamada, Y.; Sasaki, M.; Hayes, W. W.; Manson, J. R.

    2015-04-01

    We demonstrate that highly surface-sensitive supersonic rare-gas (He, Ar, and Xe) atom scattering, in both the quantum and classical regimes, can probe and quantify the interlayer interactions between graphene monolayers and metal substrates in terms of the Debye temperature corresponding to the surface normal vibration, and the surface effective mass. As models of the strongly and weakly interacting graphene, we investigated two systems, graphene on Ru(0001) and Pt(111), respectively. The experimental data for Ar and Xe are compared with the results from theoretical simulations based on the classical smooth surface model. For gr/Pt(111) we find that the scattering pattern of the rare-gas beam, including the Debye-Waller attenuation of the He beam, are quite similar to that from highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG); this suggests that the graphene-Pt(111) interaction is much like a van der Waals interaction. On the contrary, for the gr/Ru(0001) system, we find a smaller Debye-Waller attenuation and a larger surface effective mass, indicating that graphene on Ru(0001) is tightly bonded to the substrate. Furthermore, asymmetrical spectral shapes in the Ar and Xe scattering spectra from gr/Ru(0001) are interpreted as a result of the lateral distribution of the interlayer interaction corresponding to the moiré pattern. It is found that the "valley" region of the moiré pattern has high effective mass reflecting stronger bonding to the substrate, contributing to the high reflectivity of the He beam reported for this system. On the other hand, the effective mass of the "hill" region is found to be similar to that of HOPG, indicating that this region is well decoupled from the substrate. These results demonstrate a unique capability of atom scattering to probe and evaluate the molecule-substrate interaction and its spatial distributions.

  16. Nanogeochronology of discordant zircon measured by atom probe microscopy of Pb-enriched dislocation loops.

    PubMed

    Peterman, Emily M; Reddy, Steven M; Saxey, David W; Snoeyenbos, David R; Rickard, William D A; Fougerouse, Denis; Kylander-Clark, Andrew R C

    2016-09-01

    Isotopic discordance is a common feature in zircon that can lead to an erroneous age determination, and it is attributed to the mobilization and escape of radiogenic Pb during its post-crystallization geological evolution. The degree of isotopic discordance measured at analytical scales of ~10 μm often differs among adjacent analysis locations, indicating heterogeneous distributions of Pb at shorter length scales. We use atom probe microscopy to establish the nature of these sites and the mechanisms by which they form. We show that the nanoscale distribution of Pb in a ~2.1 billion year old discordant zircon that was metamorphosed c. 150 million years ago is defined by two distinct Pb reservoirs. Despite overall Pb loss during peak metamorphic conditions, the atom probe data indicate that a component of radiogenic Pb was trapped in 10-nm dislocation loops that formed during the annealing of radiation damage associated with the metamorphic event. A second Pb component, found outside the dislocation loops, represents homogeneous accumulation of radiogenic Pb in the zircon matrix after metamorphism. The (207)Pb/(206)Pb ratios measured from eight dislocation loops are equivalent within uncertainty and yield an age consistent with the original crystallization age of the zircon, as determined by laser ablation spot analysis. Our results provide a specific mechanism for the trapping and retention of radiogenic Pb during metamorphism and confirm that isotopic discordance in this zircon is characterized by discrete nanoscale reservoirs of Pb that record different isotopic compositions and yield age data consistent with distinct geological events. These data may provide a framework for interpreting discordance in zircon as the heterogeneous distribution of discrete radiogenic Pb populations, each yielding geologically meaningful ages. PMID:27617295

  17. Phase stability and atom probe field ion microscopy of type 308 cre stainless steel weld metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, S. S.; David, S. A.; Vitek, J. M.; Miller, M. K.

    1996-03-01

    Improvement in high-temperature creep-rupture properties of type 308 stainless steel welds due to the controlled addition of boron is related to microstructural evolution during welding and thermal phase stability at creep service temperatures. The microstructure of boron-containing type 308 austenitic stainless steel welds, in the as-welded state, consisted of 8 to 10 pct ferrite in an austenite matrix. Atom probe field ion microscopy studies revealed segregation of boron and carbon to ferriteaustenite boundaries in the as-welded state; the segregation level was less than one monolayer coverage. On aging at 923 K for 100 hours, M23C6 carbides precipitated at ferrite-austenite boundaries. On further aging at 923 K for 1000 hours, the ferrite transformed into σ phase. Similar microstructural evolution was observed in a type 308 stainless steel weld without boron addition. The volume fractions of M23C6 carbides were identical in boron-containing and boron-free welds. Atom probe results from the welds with boron addition in the aged condition showed that the boron dissolved in the M23C6 carbides. However, lattice parameter analysis showed no apparent difference in the extracted carbides from the welds with and without boron. Creep property improvement due to boron addition could not be related to any change in the volume fraction of carbides. However, the results suggest that the incorporation of boron into M23C6 carbides may reduce the tendency for cavity formation along the M23C6 carbide-austenite boundaries and hence improve the resistance to creep fracture. The observed microstructural evolution in welds is consistent with thermodynamic calculations by THERMOCALC software.

  18. Probing the interaction between air bubble and sphalerite mineral surface using atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lei; Shi, Chen; Wang, Jingyi; Huang, Jun; Lu, Qiuyi; Liu, Qingxia; Zeng, Hongbo

    2015-03-01

    The interaction between air bubbles and solid surfaces plays important roles in many engineering processes, such as mineral froth flotation. In this work, an atomic force microscope (AFM) bubble probe technique was employed, for the first time, to directly measure the interaction forces between an air bubble and sphalerite mineral surfaces of different hydrophobicity (i.e., sphalerite before/after conditioning treatment) under various hydrodynamic conditions. The direct force measurements demonstrate the critical role of the hydrodynamic force and surface forces in bubble-mineral interaction and attachment, which agree well with the theoretical calculations based on Reynolds lubrication theory and augmented Young-Laplace equation by including the effect of disjoining pressure. The hydrophobic disjoining pressure was found to be stronger for the bubble-water-conditioned sphalerite interaction with a larger hydrophobic decay length, which enables the bubble attachment on conditioned sphalerite at relatively higher bubble approaching velocities than that of unconditioned sphalerite. Increasing the salt concentration (i.e., NaCl, CaCl2) leads to weakened electrical double layer force and thereby facilitates the bubble-mineral attachment, which follows the classical Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory by including the effects of hydrophobic interaction. The results provide insights into the basic understanding of the interaction mechanism between bubbles and minerals at nanoscale in froth flotation processes, and the methodology on probing the interaction forces of air bubble and sphalerite surfaces in this work can be extended to many other mineral and particle systems. PMID:25675101

  19. Probing mechanical properties of living cells by atomic force microscopy with blunted pyramidal cantilever tips.

    PubMed

    Rico, Félix; Roca-Cusachs, Pere; Gavara, Núria; Farré, Ramon; Rotger, Mar; Navajas, Daniel

    2005-08-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows the acquisition of high-resolution images and the measurement of mechanical properties of living cells under physiological conditions. AFM cantilevers with blunted pyramidal tips are commonly used to obtain images of living cells. Measurement of mechanical properties with these tips requires a contact model that takes into account their blunted geometry. The aim of this work was to develop a contact model of a blunted pyramidal tip and to assess the suitability of pyramidal tips for probing mechanical properties of soft gels and living cells. We developed a contact model of a blunted pyramidal tip indenting an elastic half-space. We measured Young's modulus (E) and the complex shear modulus (G*= G' +i G" ) of agarose gels and A549 alveolar epithelial cells with pyramidal tips and compared them with those obtained with spherical tips. The gels exhibited an elastic behavior with almost coincident loading and unloading force curves and negligible values of G". E fell sharply with indentation up to approximately 300 nm , showing a linear regime for deeper indentations. A similar indentation dependence of E with twofold lower values at the linear regime was obtained with the spherical tip fitted with Hertz's model. The dependence of E on indentation in cells paralleled that found in gels. Cells exhibited viscoelastic behavior with G"/G' approximately 1/4 . Pyramidal tips commonly used for AFM imaging are suitable for probing mechanical properties of soft gels and living cells. PMID:16196611

  20. Nanomechanical and topographical imaging of living cells by atomic force microscopy with colloidal probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puricelli, Luca; Galluzzi, Massimiliano; Schulte, Carsten; Podestà, Alessandro; Milani, Paolo

    2015-03-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) has a great potential as a tool to characterize mechanical and morphological properties of living cells; these properties have been shown to correlate with cells' fate and patho-physiological state in view of the development of novel early-diagnostic strategies. Although several reports have described experimental and technical approaches for the characterization of cellular elasticity by means of AFM, a robust and commonly accepted methodology is still lacking. Here, we show that micrometric spherical probes (also known as colloidal probes) are well suited for performing a combined topographic and mechanical analysis of living cells, with spatial resolution suitable for a complete and accurate mapping of cell morphological and elastic properties, and superior reliability and accuracy in the mechanical measurements with respect to conventional and widely used sharp AFM tips. We address a number of issues concerning the nanomechanical analysis, including the applicability of contact mechanical models and the impact of a constrained contact geometry on the measured Young's modulus (the finite-thickness effect). We have tested our protocol by imaging living PC12 and MDA-MB-231 cells, in order to demonstrate the importance of the correction of the finite-thickness effect and the change in Young's modulus induced by the action of a cytoskeleton-targeting drug.

  1. Nanomechanical and topographical imaging of living cells by atomic force microscopy with colloidal probes

    SciTech Connect

    Puricelli, Luca; Galluzzi, Massimiliano; Schulte, Carsten; Podestà, Alessandro Milani, Paolo

    2015-03-15

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) has a great potential as a tool to characterize mechanical and morphological properties of living cells; these properties have been shown to correlate with cells’ fate and patho-physiological state in view of the development of novel early-diagnostic strategies. Although several reports have described experimental and technical approaches for the characterization of cellular elasticity by means of AFM, a robust and commonly accepted methodology is still lacking. Here, we show that micrometric spherical probes (also known as colloidal probes) are well suited for performing a combined topographic and mechanical analysis of living cells, with spatial resolution suitable for a complete and accurate mapping of cell morphological and elastic properties, and superior reliability and accuracy in the mechanical measurements with respect to conventional and widely used sharp AFM tips. We address a number of issues concerning the nanomechanical analysis, including the applicability of contact mechanical models and the impact of a constrained contact geometry on the measured Young’s modulus (the finite-thickness effect). We have tested our protocol by imaging living PC12 and MDA-MB-231 cells, in order to demonstrate the importance of the correction of the finite-thickness effect and the change in Young’s modulus induced by the action of a cytoskeleton-targeting drug.

  2. Determination of solute site occupancies within γ' precipitates in nickel-base superalloys via orientation-specific atom probe tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Meher, Subhashish; Rojhirunsakool, Tanaporn; Nandwana, Peeyush; Tiley, Jamie; Banerjee, Rajarshi

    2015-04-28

    In this study, the analytical limitations in atom probe tomography such as resolving a desired set of atomic planes, for solving complex materials science problems, have been overcome by employing a well-developed unique and reproducible crystallographic technique, involving synergetic coupling of orientation microscopy with atom probe tomography. The crystallographic information in atom probe reconstructions has been utilized to determine the solute site occupancies in Ni-Al-Cr based superalloys accurately. The structural information in atom probe reveals that both Al and Cr occupy the same sub-lattice within the L12-ordered g precipitates to form Ni3(Al,Cr) precipitates in a Ni-14Al-7Cr(at.%) alloy. Interestingly, the addition of Co, which is a solid solution strengthener, to a Ni-14Al-7Cr alloy results in the partial reversal of Al site occupancy within g precipitates to form (Ni,Al)3(Al,Cr,Co) precipitates. This unique evidence of reversal of Al site occupancy, resulting from the introduction of other solutes within the ordered structures, gives insights into the relative energetics of different sub-lattice sites when occupied by different solutes.

  3. Determination of solute site occupancies within γ' precipitates in nickel-base superalloys via orientation-specific atom probe tomography

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Meher, Subhashish; Rojhirunsakool, Tanaporn; Nandwana, Peeyush; Tiley, Jamie; Banerjee, Rajarshi

    2015-04-28

    In this study, the analytical limitations in atom probe tomography such as resolving a desired set of atomic planes, for solving complex materials science problems, have been overcome by employing a well-developed unique and reproducible crystallographic technique, involving synergetic coupling of orientation microscopy with atom probe tomography. The crystallographic information in atom probe reconstructions has been utilized to determine the solute site occupancies in Ni-Al-Cr based superalloys accurately. The structural information in atom probe reveals that both Al and Cr occupy the same sub-lattice within the L12-ordered g precipitates to form Ni3(Al,Cr) precipitates in a Ni-14Al-7Cr(at.%) alloy. Interestingly, the additionmore » of Co, which is a solid solution strengthener, to a Ni-14Al-7Cr alloy results in the partial reversal of Al site occupancy within g precipitates to form (Ni,Al)3(Al,Cr,Co) precipitates. This unique evidence of reversal of Al site occupancy, resulting from the introduction of other solutes within the ordered structures, gives insights into the relative energetics of different sub-lattice sites when occupied by different solutes.« less

  4. Determination of solute site occupancies within γ' precipitates in nickel-base superalloys via orientation-specific atom probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Meher, S; Rojhirunsakool, T; Nandwana, P; Tiley, J; Banerjee, R

    2015-12-01

    The analytical limitations in atom probe tomography such as resolving a desired set of atomic planes, for solving complex materials science problems, have been overcome by employing a well-developed unique and reproducible crystallographic technique, involving synergetic coupling of orientation microscopy with atom probe tomography. The crystallographic information in atom probe reconstructions has been utilized to determine the solute site occupancies in Ni-Al-Cr based superalloys accurately. The structural information in atom probe reveals that both Al and Cr occupy the same sub-lattice within the L12-ordered γ' precipitates to form Ni3(Al,Cr) precipitates in a Ni-14Al-7Cr (at%) alloy. Interestingly, the addition of Co, which is a solid solution strengthener, to a Ni-14Al-7Cr alloy results in the partial reversal of Al site occupancy within γ' precipitates to form (Ni,Al)3(Al,Cr,Co) precipitates. This unique evidence of reversal of Al site occupancy, resulting from the introduction of other solutes within the ordered structures, gives insights into the relative energetics of different sub-lattice sites when occupied by different solutes. PMID:25952611

  5. Atom probe tomography of Ni-base superalloys Allvac 718Plus and Alloy 718.

    PubMed

    Viskari, L; Stiller, K

    2011-05-01

    Atom probe tomography (APT) allows near atomic scale compositional- and morphological studies of, e.g. matrix, precipitates and interfaces in a wide range of materials. In this work two Ni-base superalloys with similar compositions, Alloy 718 and its derivative Allvac 718Plus, are subject for investigation with special emphasis on the latter alloy. The structural and chemical nuances of these alloys are important for their properties. Of special interest are grain boundaries as their structure and chemistry are important for the materials' ability to resist rapid environmentally induced crack propagation. APT has proved to be suitable for analyses of these types of alloys using voltage pulsed APT. However, for investigations of specimens containing grain boundaries and other interfaces the risk for early specimen fracture is high. Analyses using laser pulsing impose lower electrical field on the specimen thereby significantly increasing the success rate of investigations. Here, the effect of laser pulsing was studied and the derived appropriate acquisition parameters were then applied for microstructural studies, from which initial results are shown. Furthermore, the influence of the higher evaporation field experienced by the hardening γ' Ni(3)(Al,Nb) precipitates on the obtained results is discussed. PMID:21295914

  6. Atom probe characterization of nano-scaled features in irradiated ODS Eurofer steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogozhkin, S. V.; Aleev, A. A.; Zaluzhnyi, A. G.; Nikitin, A. A.; Iskandarov, N. A.; Vladimirov, P.; Lindau, R.; Möslang, A.

    2011-02-01

    Our previous investigations of unirradiated ODS Eurofer by tomographic atom probe (TAP) revealed numerous nano-scaled features (nanoclusters) enriched in vanadium, yttrium and oxygen. In this work the effect of neutron irradiation on nanostructure behaviour of ODS Eurofer (9%-CrWVTa) was investigated. The irradiation was performed in the research reactor BOR-60 (Dimitrovgrad, Russia) where materials were irradiated at 330 °С to 32 dpa. TAP studies were performed on the needles prepared from parts of broken Charpy specimens. For all specimens except one, which was tested at 500 °C, the Charpy tests were performed at temperatures not exceeding the irradiation temperature. A high number density 2-4 × 10 24 m -3 of ultra fine 1-3 nm diameter nanoclusters enriched in yttrium, oxygen, manganese and chromium was observed in the irradiated state. The composition of detected clusters differs from that for unirradiated ODS Eurofer. It was observed in this work that after neutron irradiation vanadium atoms had left the clusters, moving from the core into solid solution. The concentrations of yttrium and oxygen in the matrix, as it was detected, increase several times under irradiation. In the samples tested at 500 °C both the number density of clusters and the yttrium concentration in the matrix decrease by a factor of two.

  7. Hadean age for a post-magma-ocean zircon confirmed by atom-probe tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valley, John W.; Cavosie, Aaron J.; Ushikubo, Takayuki; Reinhard, David A.; Lawrence, Daniel F.; Larson, David J.; Clifton, Peter H.; Kelly, Thomas F.; Wilde, Simon A.; Moser, Desmond E.; Spicuzza, Michael J.

    2014-03-01

    The only physical evidence from the earliest phases of Earth's evolution comes from zircons, ancient mineral grains that can be dated using the U-Th-Pb geochronometer. Oxygen isotope ratios from such zircons have been used to infer when the hydrosphere and conditions habitable to life were established. Chemical homogenization of Earth's crust and the existence of a magma ocean have not been dated directly, but must have occurred earlier. However, the accuracy of the U-Pb zircon ages can plausibly be biased by poorly understood processes of intracrystalline Pb mobility. Here we use atom-probe tomography to identify and map individual atoms in the oldest concordant grain from Earth, a 4.4-Gyr-old Hadean zircon with a high-temperature overgrowth that formed about 1 Gyr after the mineral's core. Isolated nanoclusters, measuring about 10 nm and spaced 10-50 nm apart, are enriched in incompatible elements including radiogenic Pb with unusually high 207Pb/206Pb ratios. We demonstrate that the length scales of these clusters make U-Pb age biasing impossible, and that they formed during the later reheating event. Our tomography data thereby confirm that any mixing event of the silicate Earth must have occurred before 4.4 Gyr ago, consistent with magma ocean formation by an early moon-forming impact about 4.5 Gyr ago.

  8. Deformation-induced trace element redistribution in zircon revealed using atom probe tomography

    PubMed Central

    Piazolo, Sandra; La Fontaine, Alexandre; Trimby, Patrick; Harley, Simon; Yang, Limei; Armstrong, Richard; Cairney, Julie M.

    2016-01-01

    Trace elements diffuse negligible distances through the pristine crystal lattice in minerals: this is a fundamental assumption when using them to decipher geological processes. For example, the reliable use of the mineral zircon (ZrSiO4) as a U-Th-Pb geochronometer and trace element monitor requires minimal radiogenic isotope and trace element mobility. Here, using atom probe tomography, we document the effects of crystal–plastic deformation on atomic-scale elemental distributions in zircon revealing sub-micrometre-scale mechanisms of trace element mobility. Dislocations that move through the lattice accumulate U and other trace elements. Pipe diffusion along dislocation arrays connected to a chemical or structural sink results in continuous removal of selected elements (for example, Pb), even after deformation has ceased. However, in disconnected dislocations, trace elements remain locked. Our findings have important implications for the use of zircon as a geochronometer, and highlight the importance of deformation on trace element redistribution in minerals and engineering materials. PMID:26868040

  9. Deformation-induced trace element redistribution in zircon revealed using atom probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Piazolo, Sandra; La Fontaine, Alexandre; Trimby, Patrick; Harley, Simon; Yang, Limei; Armstrong, Richard; Cairney, Julie M

    2016-01-01

    Trace elements diffuse negligible distances through the pristine crystal lattice in minerals: this is a fundamental assumption when using them to decipher geological processes. For example, the reliable use of the mineral zircon (ZrSiO4) as a U-Th-Pb geochronometer and trace element monitor requires minimal radiogenic isotope and trace element mobility. Here, using atom probe tomography, we document the effects of crystal-plastic deformation on atomic-scale elemental distributions in zircon revealing sub-micrometre-scale mechanisms of trace element mobility. Dislocations that move through the lattice accumulate U and other trace elements. Pipe diffusion along dislocation arrays connected to a chemical or structural sink results in continuous removal of selected elements (for example, Pb), even after deformation has ceased. However, in disconnected dislocations, trace elements remain locked. Our findings have important implications for the use of zircon as a geochronometer, and highlight the importance of deformation on trace element redistribution in minerals and engineering materials. PMID:26868040

  10. Deformation-induced trace element redistribution in zircon revealed using atom probe tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piazolo, Sandra; La Fontaine, Alexandre; Trimby, Patrick; Harley, Simon; Yang, Limei; Armstrong, Richard; Cairney, Julie M.

    2016-02-01

    Trace elements diffuse negligible distances through the pristine crystal lattice in minerals: this is a fundamental assumption when using them to decipher geological processes. For example, the reliable use of the mineral zircon (ZrSiO4) as a U-Th-Pb geochronometer and trace element monitor requires minimal radiogenic isotope and trace element mobility. Here, using atom probe tomography, we document the effects of crystal-plastic deformation on atomic-scale elemental distributions in zircon revealing sub-micrometre-scale mechanisms of trace element mobility. Dislocations that move through the lattice accumulate U and other trace elements. Pipe diffusion along dislocation arrays connected to a chemical or structural sink results in continuous removal of selected elements (for example, Pb), even after deformation has ceased. However, in disconnected dislocations, trace elements remain locked. Our findings have important implications for the use of zircon as a geochronometer, and highlight the importance of deformation on trace element redistribution in minerals and engineering materials.

  11. 3D polarimetric purity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, José J.; San José, Ignacio

    2010-11-01

    From our previous definition of the indices of polarimetric purity for 3D light beams [J.J. Gil, J.M. Correas, P.A. Melero and C. Ferreira, Monogr. Semin. Mat. G. de Galdeano 31, 161 (2004)], an analysis of their geometric and physical interpretation is presented. It is found that, in agreement with previous results, the first parameter is a measure of the degree of polarization, whereas the second parameter (called the degree of directionality) is a measure of the mean angular aperture of the direction of propagation of the corresponding light beam. This pair of invariant, non-dimensional, indices of polarimetric purity contains complete information about the polarimetric purity of a light beam. The overall degree of polarimetric purity is obtained as a weighted quadratic average of the degree of polarization and the degree of directionality.

  12. 3D field harmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Helm, M.; Laslett, L.J.

    1991-03-30

    We have developed an harmonic representation for the three dimensional field components within the windings of accelerator magnets. The form by which the field is presented is suitable for interfacing with other codes that make use of the 3D field components (particle tracking and stability). The field components can be calculated with high precision and reduced cup time at any location (r,{theta},z) inside the magnet bore. The same conductor geometry which is used to simulate line currents is also used in CAD with modifications more readily available. It is our hope that the format used here for magnetic fields can be used not only as a means of delivering fields but also as a way by which beam dynamics can suggest correction to the conductor geometry. 5 refs., 70 figs.

  13. 'Bonneville' in 3-D!

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took this 3-D navigation camera mosaic of the crater called 'Bonneville' after driving approximately 13 meters (42.7 feet) to get a better vantage point. Spirit's current position is close enough to the edge to see the interior of the crater, but high enough and far enough back to get a view of all of the walls. Because scientists and rover controllers are so pleased with this location, they will stay here for at least two more martian days, or sols, to take high resolution panoramic camera images of 'Bonneville' in its entirety. Just above the far crater rim, on the left side, is the rover's heatshield, which is visible as a tiny reflective speck.

  14. Reduced-density-matrix description for pump-probe optical phenomena in moving atomic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, V. L.

    2014-09-01

    Linear and nonlinear (especially coherent) electromagnetic interactions of moving many-electron atoms are investigated using a reduced-density-matrix description, which is applied to electromagnetically induced transparency and related resonant pump-probe optical phenomena. External magnetic fields are included on an equal footing with the electromagnetic fields and spin-Zeeman interactions are taken into account. Complimentary time-domain (equation-of-motion) and frequency-domain (resolvent-operator) formulations of the reduced-density-matrix description are self-consistently developed. The general nonperturbative and non-Markovian formulations provide a fundamental framework for systematic evaluations of corrections to the standard Born (lowest-order-perturbation) and Markov (short-memory-time) approximations. The macroscopic electromagnetic response is described semiclassically, employing a perturbation expansion of the reduced-density operator in powers of the classical electromagnetic field. Our primary results are compact Liouville-space operator expressions for the linear and general (nth-order) nonlinear macroscopic electromagnetic-response tensors, which can be evaluated for nonlocal and nonstationary optical media described by multilevel atomic-system representations. Interactions among atoms and with environmental photons are treated as line-broadening effects by means of a general Liouville-space self-energy operator, for which the tetradic-matrix elements are explicitly evaluated in the diagonal, lowest-order, and Markov approximations. The compact Liouville-space operator expressions that are derived for the macroscopic electromagnetic-response tensors are introduced into the dynamical description of the electromagnetic-field propagation. It is pointed out that a quantized-electromagnetic-field approach will be required for a fully self-consistent quantum-mechanical treatment of local-field effects and radiative corrections.

  15. Phosphorus and boron diffusion paths in polycrystalline silicon gate of a trench-type three-dimensional metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor investigated by atom probe tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Bin Takamizawa, Hisashi Shimizu, Yasuo; Inoue, Koji; Nagai, Yasuyoshi; Yano, Fumiko; Kunimune, Yorinobu; Inoue, Masao; Nishida, Akio

    2015-07-13

    The dopant (P and B) diffusion path in n- and p-types polycrystalline-Si gates of trench-type three-dimensional (3D) metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) were investigated using atom probe tomography, based on the annealing time dependence of the dopant distribution at 900 °C. Remarkable differences were observed between P and B diffusion behavior. In the initial stage of diffusion, P atoms diffuse into deeper regions from the implanted region along grain boundaries in the n-type polycrystalline-Si gate. With longer annealing times, segregation of P on the grain boundaries was observed; however, few P atoms were observed within the large grains or on the gate/gate oxide interface distant from grain boundaries. These results indicate that P atoms diffuse along grain boundaries much faster than through the bulk or along the gate/gate oxide interface. On the other hand, in the p-type polycrystalline-Si gate, segregation of B was observed only at the initial stage of diffusion. After further annealing, the B atoms became uniformly distributed, and no clear segregation of B was observed. Therefore, B atoms diffuse not only along the grain boundary but also through the bulk. Furthermore, B atoms diffused deeper than P atoms along the grain boundaries under the same annealing conditions. This information on the diffusion behavior of P and B is essential for optimizing annealing conditions in order to control the P and B distributions in the polycrystalline-Si gates of trench-type 3D MOSFETs.

  16. Prominent rocks - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Many prominent rocks near the Sagan Memorial Station are featured in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. Wedge is at lower left; Shark, Half-Dome, and Pumpkin are at center. Flat Top, about four inches high, is at lower right. The horizon in the distance is one to two kilometers away.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  17. 'Diamond' in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D, microscopic imager mosaic of a target area on a rock called 'Diamond Jenness' was taken after NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity ground into the surface with its rock abrasion tool for a second time.

    Opportunity has bored nearly a dozen holes into the inner walls of 'Endurance Crater.' On sols 177 and 178 (July 23 and July 24, 2004), the rover worked double-duty on Diamond Jenness. Surface debris and the bumpy shape of the rock resulted in a shallow and irregular hole, only about 2 millimeters (0.08 inch) deep. The final depth was not enough to remove all the bumps and leave a neat hole with a smooth floor. This extremely shallow depression was then examined by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

    On Sol 178, Opportunity's 'robotic rodent' dined on Diamond Jenness once again, grinding almost an additional 5 millimeters (about 0.2 inch). The rover then applied its Moessbauer spectrometer to the deepened hole. This double dose of Diamond Jenness enabled the science team to examine the rock at varying layers. Results from those grindings are currently being analyzed.

    The image mosaic is about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across.

  18. 3D optical measuring technologies and systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chugui, Yuri V.

    2005-02-01

    The results of the R & D activity of TDI SIE SB RAS in the field of the 3D optical measuring technologies and systems for noncontact 3D optical dimensional inspection applied to atomic and railway industry safety problems are presented. This activity includes investigations of diffraction phenomena on some 3D objects, using the original constructive calculation method. The efficient algorithms for precise determining the transverse and longitudinal sizes of 3D objects of constant thickness by diffraction method, peculiarities on formation of the shadow and images of the typical elements of the extended objects were suggested. Ensuring the safety of nuclear reactors and running trains as well as their high exploitation reliability requires a 100% noncontact precise inspection of geometrical parameters of their components. To solve this problem we have developed methods and produced the technical vision measuring systems LMM, CONTROL, PROFIL, and technologies for noncontact 3D dimensional inspection of grid spacers and fuel elements for the nuclear reactor VVER-1000 and VVER-440, as well as automatic laser diagnostic COMPLEX for noncontact inspection of geometric parameters of running freight car wheel pairs. The performances of these systems and the results of industrial testing are presented and discussed. The created devices are in pilot operation at Atomic and Railway Companies.

  19. Probing biofouling resistant polymer brush surfaces by atomic force microscopy based force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schön, Peter; Kutnyanszky, Edit; ten Donkelaar, Bas; Santonicola, M Gabriella; Tecim, Tugba; Aldred, Nick; Clare, Anthony S; Vancso, G Julius

    2013-02-01

    The protein repellency and biofouling resistance of zwitterionic poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate)(pSBMA) brushes grafted via surface initiated polymerization (SIP) from silicon and glass substrata was assessed using atomic force microscopy (AFM) adherence experiments. Laboratory settlement assays were conducted with cypris larvae of the barnacle Balanus amphitrite. AFM adherence includes the determination of contact rupture forces when AFM probe tips are withdrawn from the substratum. When the surface of the AFM tip is modified, adherence can be assessed with chemical specifity using a method known as chemical force microscopy (CFM). In this study, AFM tips were chemically functionalized with (a) fibronectin- here used as model for a nonspecifically adhering protein - and (b) arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide motifs covalently attached to poly(methacrylic acid) (PMAA) brushes as biomimics of cellular adhesion receptors. Fibronectin functionalized tips showed significantly reduced nonspecific adhesion to pSBMA-modified substrata compared to bare gold (2.3±0.75 nN) and octadecanethiol (ODT) self-assembled monolayers (1.3±0.75 nN). PMAA and PMAA-RGD modified probes showed no significant adhesion to pSBMA modified silicon substrata. The results gathered through AFM protein adherence studies were complemented by laboratory fouling studies, which showed no adhesion of cypris larvae of Balanus amphitrite on pSBMA. With regard to its unusually high non-specific adsorption to a wide variety of materials the behavior of fibronectin is analogous to the barnacle cyprid temporary adhesive that also binds well to surfaces differing in polarity, charge and free energy. The antifouling efficacy of pSBMA may, therefore, be directly related to the ability of this surface to resist nonspecific protein adsorption. PMID:23138001

  20. Optimisation of mass ranging for atom probe microanalysis and application to the corrosion processes in Zr alloys.

    PubMed

    Hudson, D; Smith, G D W; Gault, B

    2011-05-01

    Atom probe tomography uses time-of-flight mass spectrometry to identify the chemical nature of atoms from their mass-to-charge-state ratios. Within a mass spectrum, ranges are defined so as to attribute a chemical identity to each peak. The accuracy of atom probe microanalysis relies on the definition of these ranges. Here we propose and compare several automated ranging techniques, tested against simulated mass spectra. The performance of these metrics compare favourably with a trial of users asked to manually range a simplified simulated dataset. The optimised automated ranging procedure was then used to precisely evaluate the very low iron concentration (0.003-0.018 at%) in a zirconium alloy to reveal its behaviour in the matrix during corrosion; oxygen is injected into solution and has the effect of increasing the local iron concentration near the oxide-metal interface, which in turn affects the corrosion properties of the metal substrate. PMID:21163577

  1. Pump-probe study of atoms and small molecules with laser driven high order harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Wei

    A commercially available modern laser can emit over 1015 photons within a time window of a few tens of femtoseconds (10-15second), which can be focused into a spot size of about 10 mum, resulting in a peak intensity above 1014W/cm2. This paves the way for table-top strong field physics studies such as above threshold ionization (ATI), non-sequential double ionization (NSDI), high order harmonic generation (HHG), etc.. Among these strong laser-matter interactions, high order harmonic generation, which combines many photons of the fundamental laser field into a single photon, offers a unique way to generate light sources in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) or extreme ultraviolet (EUV) region. High order harmonic photons are emitted within a short time window from a few tens of femtoseconds down to a few hundreds of attoseconds (10 -18second). This highly coherent nature of HHG allows it to be synchronized with an infrared (IR) laser pulse, and the pump-probe technique can be adopted to study ultrafast dynamic processes in a quantum system. The major work of this thesis is to develop a table-top VUV(EUV) light source based on HHG, and use it to study dynamic processes in atoms and small molecules with the VUV(EUV)-pump IR-probe method. A Cold Target Recoil Ion Momentum Spectroscopy (COLTRIMS) apparatus is used for momentum imaging of the interaction products. Two types of high harmonic pump pulses are generated and applied for pump-probe studies. The first one consists of several harmonics forming a short attosecond pulse train (APT) in the EUV regime (around 40 eV). We demonstrate that, (1) the auto-ionization process triggered by the EUV in cation carbon-monoxide and oxygen molecules can be modified by scanning the EUV-IR delay, (2) the phase information of quantum trajectories in bifurcated high harmonics can be extracted by performing an EUV-IR cross-correlation experiment, thus disclosing the macroscopic quantum control in HHG. The second type of high harmonic source

  2. An atom probe perspective on phase separation and precipitation in duplex stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wei; Garfinkel, David A.; Tucker, Julie D.; Haley, Daniel; Young, George A.; Poplawsky, Jonathan D.

    2016-06-01

    Three-dimensional chemical imaging of Fe–Cr alloys showing Fe-rich (α)/Cr-rich (α‧) phase separation is reported using atom probe tomography techniques. The extent of phase separation, i.e., amplitude and wavelength, has been quantitatively assessed using the Langer-Bar-on-Miller, proximity histogram, and autocorrelation function methods for two separate Fe–Cr alloys, designated 2101 and 2205. Although the 2101 alloy possesses a larger wavelength and amplitude after annealing at 427 °C for 100–10 000 h, it exhibits a lower hardness than the 2205 alloy. In addition to this phase separation, ultra-fine Ni–Mn–Si–Cu-rich G-phase precipitates form at the α/α‧ interfaces in both alloys. For the 2101 alloy, Cu clusters act to form a nucleus, around which a Ni–Mn–Si shell develops during the precipitation process. For the 2205 alloy, the Ni and Cu atoms enrich simultaneously and no core–shell chemical distribution was found. This segregation phenomenon may arise from the exact Ni/Cu ratio inside the ferrite. After annealing for 10 000 h, the number density of the G-phase within the 2205 alloy was found to be roughly one order of magnitude higher than in the 2101 alloy. The G-phase precipitates have an additional deleterious effect on the thermal embrittlement, as evaluated by the Ashby–Orowan equation, which explains the discrepancy between the hardness and the rate of phase separation with respect to annealing time (Gladman T 1999 Mater. Sci. Tech. Ser. 15 30–36). ).

  3. An atom probe perspective on phase separation and precipitation in duplex stainless steels

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Garfinkel, David A.; Tucker, Julie D.; Haley, Daniel A.; Young, George A.; Guo, Wei; Poplawsky, Jonathan D.

    2016-05-16

    Here, three-dimensional chemical imaging of Fe–Cr alloys showing Fe-rich (α)/Cr-rich (α') phase separation is reported using atom probe tomography techniques. The extent of phase separation, i.e., amplitude and wavelength, has been quantitatively assessed using the Langer-Bar-on-Miller, proximity histogram, and autocorrelation function methods for two separate Fe–Cr alloys, designated 2101 and 2205. Although the 2101 alloy possesses a larger wavelength and amplitude after annealing at 427 °C for 100–10 000 h, it exhibits a lower hardness than the 2205 alloy. In addition to this phase separation, ultra-fine Ni–Mn–Si–Cu-rich G-phase precipitates form at the α/α' interfaces in both alloys. For the 2101more » alloy, Cu clusters act to form a nucleus, around which a Ni–Mn–Si shell develops during the precipitation process. For the 2205 alloy, the Ni and Cu atoms enrich simultaneously and no core–shell chemical distribution was found. This segregation phenomenon may arise from the exact Ni/Cu ratio inside the ferrite. After annealing for 10 000 h, the number density of the G-phase within the 2205 alloy was found to be roughly one order of magnitude higher than in the 2101 alloy. The G-phase precipitates have an additional deleterious effect on the thermal embrittlement, as evaluated by the Ashby–Orowan equation, which explains the discrepancy between the hardness and the rate of phase separation with respect to annealing time (Gladman T 1999 Mater. Sci. Tech. Ser. 15 30–36).« less

  4. An atom probe perspective on phase separation and precipitation in duplex stainless steels.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wei; Garfinkel, David A; Tucker, Julie D; Haley, Daniel; Young, George A; Poplawsky, Jonathan D

    2016-06-24

    Three-dimensional chemical imaging of Fe-Cr alloys showing Fe-rich (α)/Cr-rich (α') phase separation is reported using atom probe tomography techniques. The extent of phase separation, i.e., amplitude and wavelength, has been quantitatively assessed using the Langer-Bar-on-Miller, proximity histogram, and autocorrelation function methods for two separate Fe-Cr alloys, designated 2101 and 2205. Although the 2101 alloy possesses a larger wavelength and amplitude after annealing at 427 °C for 100-10 000 h, it exhibits a lower hardness than the 2205 alloy. In addition to this phase separation, ultra-fine Ni-Mn-Si-Cu-rich G-phase precipitates form at the α/α' interfaces in both alloys. For the 2101 alloy, Cu clusters act to form a nucleus, around which a Ni-Mn-Si shell develops during the precipitation process. For the 2205 alloy, the Ni and Cu atoms enrich simultaneously and no core-shell chemical distribution was found. This segregation phenomenon may arise from the exact Ni/Cu ratio inside the ferrite. After annealing for 10 000 h, the number density of the G-phase within the 2205 alloy was found to be roughly one order of magnitude higher than in the 2101 alloy. The G-phase precipitates have an additional deleterious effect on the thermal embrittlement, as evaluated by the Ashby-Orowan equation, which explains the discrepancy between the hardness and the rate of phase separation with respect to annealing time (Gladman T 1999 Mater. Sci. Tech. Ser. 15 30-36). PMID:27181108

  5. Atom probe tomography characterizations of high nickel, low copper surveillance RPV welds irradiated to high fluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, M. K.; Powers, K. A.; Nanstad, R. K.; Efsing, P.

    2013-06-01

    The Ringhals Units 3 and 4 reactors in Sweden are pressurized water reactors (PWRs) designed and supplied by Westinghouse Electric Company, with commercial operation in 1981 and 1983, respectively. The reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) for both reactors were fabricated with ring forgings of SA 508 class 2 steel. Surveillance blocks for both units were fabricated using the same weld wire heat, welding procedures, and base metals used for the RPVs. The primary interest in these weld metals is because they have very high nickel contents, with 1.58 and 1.66 wt.% for Unit 3 and Unit 4, respectively. The nickel content in Unit 4 is the highest reported nickel content for any Westinghouse PWR. Although both welds contain less than 0.10 wt.% copper, the weld metals have exhibited high irradiation-induced Charpy 41-J transition temperature shifts in surveillance testing. The Charpy impact 41-J shifts and corresponding fluences are 192 °C at 5.0 × 1023 n/m2 (>1 MeV) for Unit 3 and 162 °C at 6.0 × 1023 n/m2 (>1 MeV) for Unit 4. These relatively low-copper, high-nickel, radiation-sensitive welds relate to the issue of so-called late-blooming nickel-manganese-silicon phases. Atom probe tomography measurements have revealed ˜2 nm-diameter irradiation-induced precipitates containing manganese, nickel, and silicon, with phosphorus evident in some of the precipitates. However, only a relatively few number of copper atoms are contained within the precipitates. The larger increase in the transition temperature shift in the higher copper weld metal from the Ringhals R3 Unit is associated with copper-enriched regions within the manganese-nickel-silicon-enriched precipitates rather than changes in their size or number density.

  6. Atom probe microscopy of three-dimensional distribution of silicon isotopes in {sup 28}Si/{sup 30}Si isotope superlattices with sub-nanometer spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, Yasuo; Kawamura, Yoko; Uematsu, Masashi; Itoh, Kohei M.; Tomita, Mitsuhiro; Sasaki, Mikio; Uchida, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Mamoru

    2009-10-01

    Laser-assisted atom probe microscopy of 2 nm period {sup 28}Si/{sup 30}Si isotope superlattices (SLs) is reported. Three-dimensional distributions of {sup 28}Si and {sup 30}Si stable isotopes are obtained with sub-nanometer spatial resolution. The depth resolution of the present atom probe analysis is much higher than that of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) even when SIMS is performed with a great care to reduce the artifact due to atomic mixing. Outlook of Si isotope SLs as ideal depth scales for SIMS and three-dimensional position standards for atom probe microscopy is discussed.

  7. R3D-2-MSA: the RNA 3D structure-to-multiple sequence alignment server.

    PubMed

    Cannone, Jamie J; Sweeney, Blake A; Petrov, Anton I; Gutell, Robin R; Zirbel, Craig L; Leontis, Neocles

    2015-07-01

    The RNA 3D Structure-to-Multiple Sequence Alignment Server (R3D-2-MSA) is a new web service that seamlessly links RNA three-dimensional (3D) structures to high-quality RNA multiple sequence alignments (MSAs) from diverse biological sources. In this first release, R3D-2-MSA provides manual and programmatic access to curated, representative ribosomal RNA sequence alignments from bacterial, archaeal, eukaryal and organellar ribosomes, using nucleotide numbers from representative atomic-resolution 3D structures. A web-based front end is available for manual entry and an Application Program Interface for programmatic access. Users can specify up to five ranges of nucleotides and 50 nucleotide positions per range. The R3D-2-MSA server maps these ranges to the appropriate columns of the corresponding MSA and returns the contents of the columns, either for display in a web browser or in JSON format for subsequent programmatic use. The browser output page provides a 3D interactive display of the query, a full list of sequence variants with taxonomic information and a statistical summary of distinct sequence variants found. The output can be filtered and sorted in the browser. Previous user queries can be viewed at any time by resubmitting the output URL, which encodes the search and re-generates the results. The service is freely available with no login requirement at http://rna.bgsu.edu/r3d-2-msa. PMID:26048960

  8. R3D-2-MSA: the RNA 3D structure-to-multiple sequence alignment server

    PubMed Central

    Cannone, Jamie J.; Sweeney, Blake A.; Petrov, Anton I.; Gutell, Robin R.; Zirbel, Craig L.; Leontis, Neocles

    2015-01-01

    The RNA 3D Structure-to-Multiple Sequence Alignment Server (R3D-2-MSA) is a new web service that seamlessly links RNA three-dimensional (3D) structures to high-quality RNA multiple sequence alignments (MSAs) from diverse biological sources. In this first release, R3D-2-MSA provides manual and programmatic access to curated, representative ribosomal RNA sequence alignments from bacterial, archaeal, eukaryal and organellar ribosomes, using nucleotide numbers from representative atomic-resolution 3D structures. A web-based front end is available for manual entry and an Application Program Interface for programmatic access. Users can specify up to five ranges of nucleotides and 50 nucleotide positions per range. The R3D-2-MSA server maps these ranges to the appropriate columns of the corresponding MSA and returns the contents of the columns, either for display in a web browser or in JSON format for subsequent programmatic use. The browser output page provides a 3D interactive display of the query, a full list of sequence variants with taxonomic information and a statistical summary of distinct sequence variants found. The output can be filtered and sorted in the browser. Previous user queries can be viewed at any time by resubmitting the output URL, which encodes the search and re-generates the results. The service is freely available with no login requirement at http://rna.bgsu.edu/r3d-2-msa. PMID:26048960

  9. Atom probe tomography analysis of high dose MA957 at selected irradiation temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Nathan A.; Stergar, Erich; Toloczko, Mychailo; Hosemann, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys are meritable structural materials for nuclear reactor systems due to the exemplary resistance to radiation damage and high temperature creep. Summarized in this work are atom probe tomography (APT) investigations on a heat of MA957 that underwent irradiation in the form of in-reactor creep specimens in the Fast Flux Test Facility-Materials Open Test Assembly (FFTF-MOTA) for the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) program. The oxide precipitates appear stable under irradiation at elevated temperature over extended periods of time. Nominally, the precipitate chemistry is unchanged by the accumulated dose; although, evidence suggests that ballistic dissolution and reformation processes are occurring at all irradiation temperatures. At 412 °C-109 dpa, chromium enrichments - consistent with the α‧ phase - appear between the oxide precipitates, indicating radiation induced segregation. Grain boundaries, enriched with several elements including nickel and titanium, are observed at all irradiation conditions. At 412 °C-109 dpa, the grain boundaries are also enriched in molecular titanium oxide (TiO).

  10. Uranium isotopic ratio measurements of U3O8 reference materials by atom probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Fahey, Albert J; Perea, Daniel E; Bartrand, Jonah; Arey, Bruce W; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2016-03-01

    We report results of measurements of isotopic ratios obtained with atom probe tomography on U3O8 reference materials certified for their isotopic abundances of uranium. The results show good agreement with the certified values. High backgrounds due to tails from adjacent peaks complicate the measurement of the integrated peak areas as well as the fact that only oxides of uranium appear in the spectrum, the most intense of which is doubly charged. In addition, lack of knowledge of other instrumental parameters, such as the dead time, may bias the results. Isotopic ratio measurements can be performed at the nanometer-scale with the expectation of sensible results. The abundance sensitivity and mass resolving power of the mass spectrometer are not sufficient to compete with magnetic-sector instruments but are not far from measurements made by ToF-SIMS of other isotopic systems. The agreement of the major isotope ratios is more than sufficient to distinguish most anthropogenic compositions from natural. PMID:26774651

  11. Atom probe study of vanadium interphase precipitates and randomly distributed vanadium precipitates in ferrite.

    PubMed

    Nöhrer, M; Zamberger, S; Primig, S; Leitner, H

    2013-01-01

    Atom probe tomography and transmission electron microscopy were used to examine the precipitation reaction in the austenite and ferrite phases in vanadium micro-alloyed steel after a thermo-mechanical process. It was observed that only in the ferrite phase precipitates could be found, whereupon two different types were detected. Thus, the aim was to reveal the difference between these two types. The first type was randomly distributed precipitates from V supersaturated ferrite and the second type V interphase precipitates. Not only the arrangement of the particles was different also the chemical composition. The randomly distributed precipitates consisted of V, C and N in contrast to that the interphase precipitates showed a composition of V, C and Mn. Furthermore the randomly distributed precipitates had maximum size of 20 nm and the interphase precipitates a maximum size of 15 nm. It was assumed that the reason for these differences is caused by the site in which they were formed. The randomly distributed precipitates were formed in a matrix consisting mainly of 0.05 at% C, 0.68 at% Si, 0.03 at% N, 0.145 at% V and 1.51 at% Mn. The interphase precipitates were formed in a region with a much higher C, Mn and V content. PMID:24041583

  12. Trapping, cooling and probing fermionic atoms into the Mott and Neel states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georges, Antoine

    2011-03-01

    A new form of quantum condensed matter physics has emerged from the study of ultra-cold fermionic atoms in optical lattices. Experiments have recently reached the incompressible Mott regime. Detailed comparison to theory and computational studies at intermediate temperatures have validated the concept of optical lattice emulation of many-body fermionic systems. Cooling these systems deeper into the quantum degenerate regime, and devising new spectroscopic probes to investigate physical issues of interest such as quasiparticle properties, are key challenges in this context. The presentation will be based in part on the following references: L. De Leo, C.Kollath, A.Georges, M.Ferrero and O.Parcollet Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 210403(2008); J.-S. Bernier et al. Phys. Rev. A 79, 061601 (2009); R. Jördens et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 180401 (2010); J.-S. Bernier et al., Phys. Rev. A 81, 063618 (2010); L. De Leo et al., arXiv:1009.2761 Collaboration with J.S. Bernier, L. De Leo and C.Kollath is especially acknowledged. Work supported in part by CNRS, the ``Triangle de la Physique'' and the DARPA-OLE program.

  13. Practical Issues for Atom Probe Tomography Analysis of III-Nitride Semiconductor Materials.

    PubMed

    Tang, Fengzai; Moody, Michael P; Martin, Tomas L; Bagot, Paul A J; Kappers, Menno J; Oliver, Rachel A

    2015-06-01

    Various practical issues affecting atom probe tomography (APT) analysis of III-nitride semiconductors have been studied as part of an investigation using a c-plane InAlN/GaN heterostructure. Specimen preparation was undertaken using a focused ion beam microscope with a mono-isotopic Ga source. This enabled the unambiguous observation of implantation damage induced by sample preparation. In the reconstructed InAlN layer Ga implantation was demonstrated for the standard "clean-up" voltage (5 kV), but this was significantly reduced by using a lower voltage (e.g., 1 kV). The characteristics of APT data from the desorption maps to the mass spectra and measured chemical compositions were examined within the GaN buffer layer underlying the InAlN layer in both pulsed laser and pulsed voltage modes. The measured Ga content increased monotonically with increasing laser pulse energy and voltage pulse fraction within the examined ranges. The best results were obtained at very low laser energy, with the Ga content close to the expected stoichiometric value for GaN and the associated desorption map showing a clear crystallographic pole structure. PMID:25926083

  14. Atom Probe Tomography Examination of Carbon Redistribution in Quenched and Tempered 4340 Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Amy J.; Miller, Michael K.; Alexander, David J.; Field, Robert D.; Clarke, Kester D.

    2012-08-07

    Quenching and tempering produces a wide range of mechanical properties in medium carbon, low alloyed steels - Study fragmentation behavior as a function of heat-treatment. Subtle microstructural changes accompany the mechanical property changes that result from quenching and tempering - Characterize the location and distribution of carbon and alloying elements in the microstructure using atom probe tomography (APT). Perform complementary transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Tempering influences the mechanical properties and fragmentation of quenched 4340 (hemi-shaped samples). APT revealed carbon-enriched features that contain a maximum of {approx}12-14 at.% carbon after quenching to RT (the level of carbon is perhaps associated with the extent of autotempering). TEM confirmed the presence of twinned martensite and indicates {var_epsilon} ({eta}) transition carbides after oil quenching to RT. Tempering at 325 C resulted in carbon-enriched plates (> 25 at.% C) with no significant element partitioning (transition carbides?). Tempering at 450 C and 575 C resulted in cementite ({approx} 25 at.% C) during late stage tempering; Cr, Mn, Mo partitioned to cementite and Si partitioned to ferrite. Tempering at 575 C resulted in P segregation at cementite interfaces and the formation of Cottrell atmospheres.

  15. Thermal stability of TiAlN/CrN multilayer coatings studied by atom probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Choi, Pyuck-Pa; Povstugar, Ivan; Ahn, Jae-Pyeong; Kostka, Aleksander; Raabe, Dierk

    2011-05-01

    This study is about the microstructural evolution of TiAlN/CrN multilayers (with a Ti:Al ratio of 0.75:0.25 and average bilayer period of 9 nm) upon thermal treatment. Pulsed laser atom probe analyses were performed in conjunction with transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The layers are found to be thermally stable up to 600 °C. At 700 °C TiAlN layers begin to decompose into Ti- and Al-rich nitride layers in the out-of-plane direction. Further increase in temperature to 1000 °C leads to a strong decomposition of the multilayer structure as well as grain coarsening. Layer dissolution and grain coarsening appear to begin at the surface. Domains of AlN and TiCrN larger than 100 nm are found, together with smaller nano-sized AlN precipitates within the TiCrN matrix. Fe and V impurities are detected in the multilayers as well, which diffuse from the steel substrate into the coating along columnar grain boundaries. PMID:21146308

  16. Blind deconvolution of time-of-flight mass spectra from atom probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Johnson, L J S; Thuvander, M; Stiller, K; Odén, M; Hultman, L

    2013-09-01

    A major source of uncertainty in compositional measurements in atom probe tomography stems from the uncertainties of assigning peaks or parts of peaks in the mass spectrum to their correct identities. In particular, peak overlap is a limiting factor, whereas an ideal mass spectrum would have peaks at their correct positions with zero broadening. Here, we report a method to deconvolute the experimental mass spectrum into such an ideal spectrum and a system function describing the peak broadening introduced by the field evaporation and detection of each ion. By making the assumption of a linear and time-invariant behavior, a system of equations is derived that describes the peak shape and peak intensities. The model is fitted to the observed spectrum by minimizing the squared residuals, regularized by the maximum entropy method. For synthetic data perfectly obeying the assumptions, the method recovered peak intensities to within ±0.33 at%. The application of this model to experimental APT data is exemplified with Fe-Cr data. Knowledge of the peak shape opens up several new possibilities, not just for better overall compositional determination, but, e.g., for the estimation of errors of ranging due to peak overlap or peak separation constrained by isotope abundances. PMID:23607992

  17. Nanomechanical properties of lithiated Si nanowires probed with atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyunsoo; Shin, Weonho; Choi, Jang Wook; Park, Jeong Young

    2012-07-01

    The nanomechanical properties of fully lithiated and pristine Si nanowires (NWs) deposited on a Si substrate were studied with atomic force microscopy (AFM). Si NWs were synthesized using the vapour-liquid-solid process on stainless-steel substrates using an Au catalyst. Fully lithiated Si NWs were obtained using the electrochemical method, followed by drop-casting on a Si substrate. The roughness of the Si NWs, which was derived from AFM images, is greater for the lithiated Si NWs than for the pristine Si NWs. Force spectroscopy was used to study the influence of lithiation on the tip-surface adhesion force. The lithiated Si NWs revealed a smaller tip-surface adhesion force than the Si substrate by a factor of two, while the adhesion force of the Si NWs is similar to that of the Si substrate. Young's modulus, obtained from the force-distance curve, also shows that the pristine Si NWs have a relatively higher value than the lithiated Si NWs due to the elastically soft and amorphous structures of the lithiated region. These results suggest that force spectroscopy can be used to probe the degree of lithiation at nanometer scale during the charging and discharging processes.

  18. Atom probe tomography investigation of lath boundary segregation and precipitation in a maraging stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Thuvander, Mattias; Andersson, Marcus; Stiller, Krystyna

    2013-09-01

    Lath boundaries in a maraging stainless steel of composition 13Cr-8Ni-2Mo-2Cu-1Ti-0.7Al-0.3Mn-0.2Si-0.03C (at%) have been investigated using atom probe tomography following aging at 475 °C for up to 100 h. Segregation of Mo, Si and P to the lath boundaries was observed already after 5 min of aging, and the amount of segregation increases with aging time. At lath boundaries also precipitation of η-Ni₃(Ti, Al) and Cu-rich 9R, in contact with each other, takes place. These co-precipitates grow with time and because of coarsening the area number density decreases. After 100 h of aging a ∼5 nm thick film-like precipitation of a Mo-rich phase was observed at the lath boundaries. From the composition of the film it is suggested that the phase in question is the quasicrystalline R' phase. The film is perforated with Cu-rich 9R and η-Ni₃(Ti, Al) co-precipitates. Not all precipitate types present in the matrix do precipitate at the lath boundaries; the Si-containing G phase and γ'-Ni₃(Ti, Al, Si) and the Cr-rich α' phase were not observed at the lath boundaries. PMID:23234833

  19. Atom-probe investigation of precipitation in 12% Cr steel weld metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Guang-Jun; Lundin, Lars; Andrén, Hans-Olof; Svensson, Lars-Erik

    1994-03-01

    The microstructure of two types of 12% Cr steel weld metals, one with the composition of a common 12% Cr steel and the other with a higher nitrogen content, was studied using TEM (transmission electron microscopy) and APFIM (atom-probe field-ion microscopy) in post-weld heat-treated condition. The microstructure of the 12% Cr weld metals consisted of tempered martensite, retained δ-ferrite, an irregular low-dislocation α-ferrite and precipitates. Precipitates in the weld metals were dominantly M 23C 6 on different boundaries. Plate-like and fine cubic MN and M 2N were found inside the α-ferrite. APFIM analysis showed that M 23C 6 was almost a pure carbide and MN was almost a pure nitride. Carbon and nitrogen in the weld metals mainly existed in the precipitates. High nitrogen content did not change the composition of the precipitates, but increased the quantity of nitrides. Therefore, in the high nitrogen weld metal, the content of strong nitride-forming elements in the matrix decreased. These results are important in order to understand the strengthening mechanism of the high Cr steel weld metals, as well as of other high Cr heat-resistant steels.

  20. Fusion boundary precipitation in thermally aged dissimilar metal welds studied by atom probe tomography and nanoindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Kyoung Joon; Kim, Taeho; Yoo, Seung Chang; Kim, Seunghyun; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2016-04-01

    In this study, microstructural and mechanical characterizations were performed to investigate the effect of long-term thermal aging on the fusion boundary region between low-alloy steel and Nickel-based weld metal in dissimilar metal welds used in operating power plant systems. The effects of thermal aging treatment on the low-alloy steel side near the fusion boundary were an increase in the ratio of Cr constituents and Cr-rich precipitates and the formation and growth of Cr23C6. Cr concentrations were calculated using atom probe tomography. The accuracy of simulations of thermal aging effects of heat treatment was verified, and the activation energy for Cr diffusion in the fusion boundary region was calculated. The mechanical properties of fusion boundary region changed based on the distribution of Cr-rich precipitates, where the material initially hardened with the formation of Cr-rich precipitates and then softened because of the reduction of residual strain or coarsening of Cr-rich precipitates.

  1. Atomic force microscopy deep trench and sidewall imaging with an optical fiber probe

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Hui Hussain, Danish; Yang, Feng; Sun, Lining

    2014-12-15

    We report a method to measure critical dimensions of micro- and nanostructures using the atomic force microscope (AFM) with an optical fiber probe (OFP). This method is capable of scanning narrow and deep trenches due to the long and thin OFP tip, as well as imaging of steep sidewalls with unique profiling possibilities by laterally tilting the OFP without any modifications of the optical lever. A switch control scheme is developed to measure the sidewall angle by flexibly transferring feedback control between the Z- and Y-axis, for a serial scan of the horizontal surface (raster scan on XY-plane) and sidewall (raster scan on the YZ-plane), respectively. In experiments, a deep trench with tapered walls (243.5 μm deep) and a microhole (about 14.9 μm deep) have been imaged with the orthogonally aligned OFP, as well as a silicon sidewall (fabricated by deep reactive ion etching) has been characterized with the tilted OFP. Moreover, the sidewall angle of TGZ3 (AFM calibration grating) was accurately measured using the switchable scan method.

  2. Uranium Isotopic Ratio Measurements of U3O8 Reference Materials by Atom Probe Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Fahey, Albert J.; Perea, Daniel E.; Bartrand, Jonah AG; Arey, Bruce W.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2016-01-01

    We report results of measurements of isotopic ratios obtained with atom probe tomography on U3O8 reference materials certified for their isotopic abundances of uranium. The results show good agreement with the certified values. High backgrounds due to tails from adjacent peaks complicate the measurement of the integrated peak areas as well as the fact that only oxides of uranium appear in the spectrum, the most intense of which is doubly charged. In addition, lack of knowledge of other instrumental parameters, such as the dead time, may bias the results. Isotopic ratio measurements can be performed at the nanometer-scale with the expectation of sensible results. The abundance sensitivity and mass resolving power of the mass spectrometer are not sufficient to compete with magnetic-sector instruments but are not far from measurements made by ToF-SIMS of other isotopic systems. The agreement of the major isotope ratios is more than sufficient to distinguish most anthropogenic compositions from natural.

  3. Roles of Atomic Injection Rate and External Magnetic Field on Optical Properties of Elliptical Polarized Probe Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, R.; Asadpour, S. H.; Batebi, S.; Rahimpour Soleimani, H.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the optical properties of an open four-level tripod atomic system driven by an elliptically polarized probe field in the presence of the external magnetic field and compare its properties with the corresponding closed system. Our result reveals that absorption, dispersion and group velocity of probe field can be manipulated by adjusting the phase difference between the two circularly polarized components of a single coherent field, magnetic field and cavity parameters i.e. the atomic exit rate from cavity and atomic injection rates. We show that the system can exhibit multiple electromagnetically induced transparency windows in the presence of the external magnetic field. The numerical result shows that the probe field in the open system can be amplified by appropriate choice of cavity parameters, while in the closed system with introduce appropriate phase difference between fields the probe field can be enhanced. Also it is shown that the group velocity of light pulse can be controlled by external magnetic field, relative phase of applied fields and cavity parameters. By changing the parameters the group velocity of light pulse changes from subluminal to superluminal light propagation and vice versa.

  4. Development of Two-Photon Pump Polarization Spectroscopy Probe Technique Tpp-Psp for Measurements of Atomic Hydrogen .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satija, Aman; Lucht, Robert P.

    2015-06-01

    Atomic hydrogen (H) is a key radical in combustion and plasmas. Accurate knowledge of its concentration can be used to better understand transient phenomenon such as ignition and extinction in combustion environments. Laser induced polarization spectroscopy is a spatially resolved absorption technique which we have adapted for quantitative measurements of H atom. This adaptation is called two-photon pump, polarization spectroscopy probe technique (TPP-PSP) and it has been implemented using two different laser excitation schemes. The first scheme involves the two-photon excitation of 1S-2S transitions using a linearly polarized 243-nm beam. An anisotropy is created amongst Zeeman states in 2S-3P levels using a circularly polarized 656-nm pump beam. This anisotropy rotates the polarization of a weak, linearly polarized probe beam at 656 nm. As a result, the weak probe beam "leaks" past an analyzer in the detection channel and is measured using a PMT. This signal can be related to H atom density in the probe volume. The laser beams were created by optical parametric generation followed by multiple pulse dye amplification stages. This resulted in narrow linewidth beams which could be scanned in frequency domain and varied in energy. This allowed us to systematically investigate saturation and Stark effect in 2S-3P transitions with the goal of developing a quantitative H atom measurement technique. The second scheme involves the two-photon excitation of 1S-2S transitions using a linearly polarized 243-nm beam. An anisotropy is created amongst Zeeman states in 2S-4P transitions using a circularly polarized 486-nm pump beam. This anisotropy rotates the polarization of a weak, linearly polarized probe beam at 486 nm. As a result the weak probe beam "leaks" past an analyzer in the detection channel and is measured using a PMT. This signal can be related to H atom density in the probe volume. A dye laser was pumped by third harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser to create a laser beam

  5. Measuring Young's modulus of biological objects in a liquid medium using an atomic force microscope with a special probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, D. V.; Chuklanov, A. P.; Bukharaev, A. A.; Druzhinina, O. S.

    2009-04-01

    A special probe with a 5-μm-diameter ball fixed at the end is developed for an atomic force microscope (AFM), with the use of which it is possible to obtain more correct values of the Young’s moduli of biological objects in liquid media and eliminate the risk of damaging the sample surface. In particular, the AFM measurements with this probe in situ revealed an increase in the Young’s modulus of rat blood vessel under the action of chlorhexidine.

  6. Atomic arrangement at ZnTe/CdSe interfaces determined by high resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Bonef, Bastien; Rouvière, Jean-Luc; Jouneau, Pierre-Henri; Bellet-Amalric, Edith; Gérard, Lionel; Mariette, Henri; André, Régis; Bougerol, Catherine; Grenier, Adeline

    2015-02-02

    High resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography experiments reveal the presence of an intermediate layer at the interface between two binary compounds with no common atom, namely, ZnTe and CdSe for samples grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy under standard conditions. This thin transition layer, of the order of 1 to 3 atomic planes, contains typically one monolayer of ZnSe. Even if it occurs at each interface, the direct interface, i.e., ZnTe on CdSe, is sharper than the reverse one, where the ZnSe layer is likely surrounded by alloyed layers. On the other hand, a CdTe-like interface was never observed. This interface knowledge is crucial to properly design superlattices for optoelectronic applications and to master band-gap engineering.

  7. Charge transport and contact effects in nanoscale electrical junctions formed via conducting probe atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beebe, Jeremy Matthew

    This thesis describes the fabrication and characterization of nanoscale molecular junctions using conducting probe atomic force microscopy (CP-AFM). This technique involves using a metal-coated AFM tip to contact a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of an organic molecule tethered to a metal surface. This is one of several strategies for the formation of nanoscale electrical junctions designed to probe the current-voltage characteristics of very small numbers of organic molecules. The general goals of this research are to gain a better understanding of the nature of charge transport through molecules, and to begin to pave the way for their use in commercial electronic devices. Important concerns in molecular electronic research can be broken into two general categories, those being the metal contacts and the molecules themselves. In the contact subcategory, issues such as metal work function, electrode roughness, and electrode cleanliness are all important in determining the resistance of a given junction. The physical details of monolayer formation, such as surface coverage, tilt angle, and surface functionality combine with the electronic structure of the molecules to dictate how a given molecule performs in a junction. Included in this thesis is the first direct evidence that resistance in molecular junctions comprised of alkyl repeat units depends on the work function of the metal electrodes. Because an increase in metal work function corresponds to a smaller offset between the molecular HOMO and the junction Fermi level, this dependence also suggests that transport in these aliphatic systems occurs chiefly via hole tunneling. Also included is an analysis of the contribution to junction resistance that arises from each metal-molecule contact, and across the molecule in alkanethiol and alkanedithiol junctions. The aromatic phenylene and acene systems are examined briefly, and phenylenes are shown to be more efficient conduits for charge transport, contrary to

  8. Atomic structure and surface defects at mineral-water interfaces probed by in situ atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siretanu, Igor; van den Ende, Dirk; Mugele, Frieder

    2016-04-01

    Atomic scale details of surface structure play a crucial role for solid-liquid interfaces. While macroscopic characterization techniques provide averaged information about bulk and interfaces, high resolution real space imaging reveals unique insights into the role of defects that are believed to dominate many aspects of surface chemistry and physics. Here, we use high resolution dynamic Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to visualize and characterize in ambient water the morphology and atomic scale structure of a variety of nanoparticles of common clay minerals adsorbed to flat solid surfaces. Atomically resolved images of the (001) basal planes are obtained on all materials investigated, namely gibbsite, kaolinite, illite, and Na-montmorillonite of both natural and synthetic origin. Next to regions of perfect crystallinity, we routinely observe extended regions of various types of defects on the surfaces, including vacancies of one or few atoms, vacancy islands, atomic steps, apparently disordered regions, as well as strongly adsorbed seemingly organic and inorganic species. While their exact nature is frequently difficult to identify, our observations clearly highlight the ubiquity of such defects and their relevance for the overall physical and chemical properties of clay nanoparticle-water interfaces.Atomic scale details of surface structure play a crucial role for solid-liquid interfaces. While macroscopic characterization techniques provide averaged information about bulk and interfaces, high resolution real space imaging reveals unique insights into the role of defects that are believed to dominate many aspects of surface chemistry and physics. Here, we use high resolution dynamic Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to visualize and characterize in ambient water the morphology and atomic scale structure of a variety of nanoparticles of common clay minerals adsorbed to flat solid surfaces. Atomically resolved images of the (001) basal planes are obtained on all

  9. Imaging of a soft, weakly adsorbing, living cell with a colloid probe tapping atomic force microscope technique.

    PubMed

    McNamee, Cathy E; Pyo, Nayoung; Tanaka, Saaya; Kanda, Yoichi; Higashitani, Ko

    2006-01-15

    Here, we propose a new method to improve the atomic force microscopy (AFM) image resolution of soft samples, such as cells, in liquid. Attaching a colloid probe to a cantilever was seen improve the image resolution of a living cell in a physiological buffer solution, obtained by the normal tapping mode, when compared to an image obtained using a regular cantilever tip. This may be due to the averaging out of the cantilever tip swinging caused by the visco-elasticity of the cell. The resolution was best, when silica spheres with a 3.3 microm diameter were attached. Although larger spheres gave a resolution better than a bare cantilever tip, their resolution was less than that obtained for the 3.3 microm diameter silica colloid. This dependency of the image resolution on the colloid probe size may be a result of the increased macroscopic van der Waals attraction between the cell and probe, the decreased repulsive force dependence on the cantilever probe radius, and the decrease in resolution due to the increased probe size. The size of the colloid probe, which should be attached to the cantilever to give the best image resolution, would be the one that optimises the combined result of these facts. PMID:16406494

  10. High-purity 3D nano-objects grown by focused-electron-beam induced deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Córdoba, Rosa; Sharma, Nidhi; Kölling, Sebastian; Koenraad, Paul M.; Koopmans, Bert

    2016-09-01

    To increase the efficiency of current electronics, a specific challenge for the next generation of memory, sensing and logic devices is to find suitable strategies to move from two- to three-dimensional (3D) architectures. However, the creation of real 3D nano-objects is not trivial. Emerging non-conventional nanofabrication tools are required for this purpose. One attractive method is focused-electron-beam induced deposition (FEBID), a direct-write process of 3D nano-objects. Here, we grow 3D iron and cobalt nanopillars by FEBID using diiron nonacarbonyl Fe2(CO)9, and dicobalt octacarbonyl Co2(CO)8, respectively, as starting materials. In addition, we systematically study the composition of these nanopillars at the sub-nanometer scale by atom probe tomography, explicitly mapping the homogeneity of the radial and longitudinal composition distributions. We show a way of fabricating high-purity 3D vertical nanostructures of ∼50 nm in diameter and a few micrometers in length. Our results suggest that the purity of such 3D nanoelements (above 90 at% Fe and above 95 at% Co) is directly linked to their growth regime, in which the selected deposition conditions are crucial for the final quality of the nanostructure. Moreover, we demonstrate that FEBID and the proposed characterization technique not only allow for growth and chemical analysis of single-element structures, but also offers a new way to directly study 3D core–shell architectures. This straightforward concept could establish a promising route to the design of 3D elements for future nano-electronic devices.

  11. High-purity 3D nano-objects grown by focused-electron-beam induced deposition.

    PubMed

    Córdoba, Rosa; Sharma, Nidhi; Kölling, Sebastian; Koenraad, Paul M; Koopmans, Bert

    2016-09-01

    To increase the efficiency of current electronics, a specific challenge for the next generation of memory, sensing and logic devices is to find suitable strategies to move from two- to three-dimensional (3D) architectures. However, the creation of real 3D nano-objects is not trivial. Emerging non-conventional nanofabrication tools are required for this purpose. One attractive method is focused-electron-beam induced deposition (FEBID), a direct-write process of 3D nano-objects. Here, we grow 3D iron and cobalt nanopillars by FEBID using diiron nonacarbonyl Fe2(CO)9, and dicobalt octacarbonyl Co2(CO)8, respectively, as starting materials. In addition, we systematically study the composition of these nanopillars at the sub-nanometer scale by atom probe tomography, explicitly mapping the homogeneity of the radial and longitudinal composition distributions. We show a way of fabricating high-purity 3D vertical nanostructures of ∼50 nm in diameter and a few micrometers in length. Our results suggest that the purity of such 3D nanoelements (above 90 at% Fe and above 95 at% Co) is directly linked to their growth regime, in which the selected deposition conditions are crucial for the final quality of the nanostructure. Moreover, we demonstrate that FEBID and the proposed characterization technique not only allow for growth and chemical analysis of single-element structures, but also offers a new way to directly study 3D core-shell architectures. This straightforward concept could establish a promising route to the design of 3D elements for future nano-electronic devices. PMID:27454835

  12. Dopant characterization in self-regulatory plasma doped fin field-effect transistors by atom probe tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Takamizawa, H.; Shimizu, Y.; Nozawa, Y.; Toyama, T.; Nagai, Y.; Morita, H.; Yabuuchi, Y.; Ogura, M.

    2012-02-27

    Fin field-effect transistors are promising next-generation electronic devices, and the identification of dopant positions is important for their accurate characterization. We report atom probe tomography (APT) of silicon fin structures prepared by a recently developed self-regulatory plasma doping (SRPD) technique. Trenches between fin-arrays were filled using a low-energy focused ion beam to directly deposit silicon, which allowed the analysis of dopant distribution by APT near the surface of an actual fin transistor exposed to air. We directly demonstrate that SRPD can achieve a boron concentration above 1 x 10{sup 20} atoms/cm{sup 3} at the fin sidewall.

  13. BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Matthew; Lazerson, Samuel A.

    2014-09-01

    With the advent of applied 3D fields in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous slowing down, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database. Elementary benchmark calculations are presented to verify the collisionless particle orbits, NBI model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields. Notice: this manuscript has been authored by Princeton University under Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466 with the US Department of Energy. The United States Government retains and the publisher, by accepting the article for publication, acknowledges that the United States Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this manuscript, or allow others to do so, for United States Government purposes.

  14. Atomic structure and surface defects at mineral-water interfaces probed by in situ atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Siretanu, Igor; van den Ende, Dirk; Mugele, Frieder

    2016-04-21

    Atomic scale details of surface structure play a crucial role for solid-liquid interfaces. While macroscopic characterization techniques provide averaged information about bulk and interfaces, high resolution real space imaging reveals unique insights into the role of defects that are believed to dominate many aspects of surface chemistry and physics. Here, we use high resolution dynamic Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to visualize and characterize in ambient water the morphology and atomic scale structure of a variety of nanoparticles of common clay minerals adsorbed to flat solid surfaces. Atomically resolved images of the (001) basal planes are obtained on all materials investigated, namely gibbsite, kaolinite, illite, and Na-montmorillonite of both natural and synthetic origin. Next to regions of perfect crystallinity, we routinely observe extended regions of various types of defects on the surfaces, including vacancies of one or few atoms, vacancy islands, atomic steps, apparently disordered regions, as well as strongly adsorbed seemingly organic and inorganic species. While their exact nature is frequently difficult to identify, our observations clearly highlight the ubiquity of such defects and their relevance for the overall physical and chemical properties of clay nanoparticle-water interfaces. PMID:27030282

  15. Investigation of material property influenced stoichiometric deviations as evidenced during UV laser-assisted atom probe tomography in fluorite oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valderrama, Billy; Henderson, Hunter B.; Yablinsky, Clarissa A.; Gan, Jian; Allen, Todd R.; Manuel, Michele V.

    2015-09-01

    Oxide materials are used in numerous applications such as thermal barrier coatings, nuclear fuels, and electrical conductors and sensors, all applications where nanometer-scale stoichiometric changes can affect functional properties. Atom probe tomography can be used to characterize the precise chemical distribution of individual species and spatially quantify the oxygen to metal ratio at the nanometer scale. However, atom probe analysis of oxides can be accompanied by measurement artifacts caused by laser-material interactions. In this investigation, two technologically relevant oxide materials with the same crystal structure and an anion to cation ratio of 2.00, pure cerium oxide (CeO2) and uranium oxide (UO2) are studied. It was determined that electronic structure, optical properties, heat transfer properties, and oxide stability strongly affect their evaporation behavior, thus altering their measured stoichiometry, with thermal conductance and thermodynamic stability being strong factors.

  16. Characterization of phosphorus segregation in neutron-irradiated pressure vessel steels by atom probe field ion microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.K.; Jayaram, R.; Russell, K.F.

    1995-04-01

    An atom probe field ion microscopy characterization of A533B and Russian VVER 440 and 1000 pressure vessel steels has been performed to determine the phosphorus coverage of grain and lath boundaries. Field ion micrographs of grain and lath boundaries have revealed that they are decorated with a semi-continuous film of discrete brightly-imaging precipitates that were identified as molybdenum carbonitride precipitates. In addition, extremely high phosphorus levels were measured at the boundaries. The phosphorus segregation was found to be confined to an extremely narrow region indicative of monolayer-type segregation. The phosphorus coverages determined from the atom probe results of the unirradiated materials were in excellent agreement with predictions based on McLean`s equilibrium model of grain boundary segregation. The boundary phosphorus coverage of a neutron-irradiated weld material was significantly higher than that observed in the unirradiated material.

  17. 3D Spectroscopy in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mediavilla, Evencio; Arribas, Santiago; Roth, Martin; Cepa-Nogué, Jordi; Sánchez, Francisco

    2011-09-01

    Preface; Acknowledgements; 1. Introductory review and technical approaches Martin M. Roth; 2. Observational procedures and data reduction James E. H. Turner; 3. 3D Spectroscopy instrumentation M. A. Bershady; 4. Analysis of 3D data Pierre Ferruit; 5. Science motivation for IFS and galactic studies F. Eisenhauer; 6. Extragalactic studies and future IFS science Luis Colina; 7. Tutorials: how to handle 3D spectroscopy data Sebastian F. Sánchez, Begona García-Lorenzo and Arlette Pécontal-Rousset.

  18. Atom probe tomography characterisation of a laser diode structure grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Samantha E.; Humphreys, Colin J.; Oliver, Rachel A.; Smeeton, Tim M.; Hooper, Stewart E.; Heffernan, Jonathan; Saxey, David W.; Smith, George D. W.

    2012-03-01

    Atom probe tomography (APT) has been used to achieve three-dimensional characterization of a III-nitride laser diode (LD) structure grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Four APT data sets have been obtained, with fields of view up to 400 nm in depth and 120 nm in diameter. These data sets contain material from the InGaN quantum well (QW) active region, as well as the surrounding p- and n-doped waveguide and cladding layers, enabling comprehensive study of the structure and composition of the LD structure. Two regions of the same sample, with different average indium contents (18% and 16%) in the QW region, were studied. The APT data are shown to provide easy access to the p-type dopant levels, and the composition of a thin AlGaN barrier layer. Next, the distribution of indium within the InGaN QW was analyzed, to assess any possible inhomogeneity of the distribution of indium (''indium clustering''). No evidence for a statistically significant deviation from a random distribution was found, indicating that these MBE-grown InGaN QWs do not require indium clusters for carrier localization. However, the APT data show steps in the QW interfaces, leading to well-width fluctuations, which may act to localize carriers. Additionally, the unexpected presence of a small amount (x = 0.005) of indium in a layer grown intentionally as GaN was revealed. Finally, the same statistical method applied to the QW was used to show that the indium distribution within a thick InGaN waveguide layer in the n-doped region did not show any deviation from randomness.

  19. 3D Elevation Program—Virtual USA in 3D

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lukas, Vicki; Stoker, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) uses a laser system called ‘lidar’ (light detection and ranging) to create a virtual reality map of the Nation that is very accurate. 3D maps have many uses with new uses being discovered all the time.  

  20. Diamond-modified AFM probes: from diamond nanowires to atomic force microscopy-integrated boron-doped diamond electrodes.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, Waldemar; Kriele, Armin; Hoffmann, René; Sillero, Eugenio; Hees, Jakob; Williams, Oliver A; Yang, Nianjun; Kranz, Christine; Nebel, Christoph E

    2011-06-15

    In atomic force microscopy (AFM), sharp and wear-resistant tips are a critical issue. Regarding scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM), electrodes are required to be mechanically and chemically stable. Diamond is the perfect candidate for both AFM probes as well as for electrode materials if doped, due to diamond's unrivaled mechanical, chemical, and electrochemical properties. In this study, standard AFM tips were overgrown with typically 300 nm thick nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) layers and modified to obtain ultra sharp diamond nanowire-based AFM probes and probes that were used for combined AFM-SECM measurements based on integrated boron-doped conductive diamond electrodes. Analysis of the resonance properties of the diamond overgrown AFM cantilevers showed increasing resonance frequencies with increasing diamond coating thicknesses (i.e., from 160 to 260 kHz). The measured data were compared to performed simulations and show excellent correlation. A strong enhancement of the quality factor upon overgrowth was also observed (120 to 710). AFM tips with integrated diamond nanowires are shown to have apex radii as small as 5 nm and where fabricated by selectively etching diamond in a plasma etching process using self-organized metal nanomasks. These scanning tips showed superior imaging performance as compared to standard Si-tips or commercially available diamond-coated tips. The high imaging resolution and low tip wear are demonstrated using tapping and contact mode AFM measurements by imaging ultra hard substrates and DNA. Furthermore, AFM probes were coated with conductive boron-doped and insulating diamond layers to achieve bifunctional AFM-SECM probes. For this, focused ion beam (FIB) technology was used to expose the boron-doped diamond as a recessed electrode near the apex of the scanning tip. Such a modified probe was used to perform proof-of-concept AFM-SECM measurements. The results show that high-quality diamond probes can be fabricated, which are

  1. An atom probe investigation of the influence of trace impurities on the mechanical behavior of NiAl

    SciTech Connect

    Jayaram, R.; Liu, C.T.; Miller, M.K.

    1993-11-01

    Atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have been used to investigate the influence of trace metallic impurities on the enormous increase in the yield stress of boron-doped NiAl. Previous atom probe studies of NiAl containing 0.12 at. % boron had demonstrated that 0.026 at. % of the boron was in solid solution. The remainder reacted with trace metallic impurities, presumably present in high purity Ni, to form ultrafine MB{sub 2} precipitates ranging in size from less than 2 nm to 20 nm. Atom probe measurements had shown that their number densities were significant enough to make the dominant contribution to the observed increase in yield stress. An attempt was made in the present work to minimize the effect of these precipitates by an additional aging treatment. Field ion microscope (FIM) and TEM micrographs revealed that 2 nm precipitates coarsened significantly during aging. Microstructure of aged NiAl was consistent with observed mechanical behavior showing a significantly smaller increase in the yield stress. An approximate value of the Orowan stress, based on TEM estimates of the size and number density of the precipitates, is in reasonable agreement with the measured value. This APFIM/TEM investigation has indicated a practical approach to minimize the detrimental role of trace impurities in NiAl.

  2. Modular 3-D Transport model

    EPA Science Inventory

    MT3D was first developed by Chunmiao Zheng in 1990 at S.S. Papadopulos & Associates, Inc. with partial support from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). Starting in 1990, MT3D was released as a pubic domain code from the USEPA. Commercial versions with enhanced capab...

  3. Market study: 3-D eyetracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A market study of a proposed version of a 3-D eyetracker for initial use at NASA's Ames Research Center was made. The commercialization potential of a simplified, less expensive 3-D eyetracker was ascertained. Primary focus on present and potential users of eyetrackers, as well as present and potential manufacturers has provided an effective means of analyzing the prospects for commercialization.

  4. LLNL-Earth3D

    2013-10-01

    Earth3D is a computer code designed to allow fast calculation of seismic rays and travel times through a 3D model of the Earth. LLNL is using this for earthquake location and global tomography efforts and such codes are of great interest to the Earth Science community.

  5. [3-D ultrasound in gastroenterology].

    PubMed

    Zoller, W G; Liess, H

    1994-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) sonography represents a development of noninvasive diagnostic imaging by real-time two-dimensional (2D) sonography. The use of transparent rotating scans, comparable to a block of glass, generates a 3D effect. The objective of the present study was to optimate 3D presentation of abdominal findings. Additional investigations were made with a new volumetric program to determine the volume of selected findings of the liver. The results were compared with the estimated volumes of 2D sonography and 2D computer tomography (CT). For the processing of 3D images, typical parameter constellations were found for the different findings, which facilitated processing of 3D images. In more than 75% of the cases examined we found an optimal 3D presentation of sonographic findings with respect to the evaluation criteria developed by us for the 3D imaging of processed data. Great differences were found for the estimated volumes of the findings of the liver concerning the three different techniques applied. 3D ultrasound represents a valuable method to judge morphological appearance in abdominal findings. The possibility of volumetric measurements enlarges its potential diagnostic significance. Further clinical investigations are necessary to find out if definite differentiation between benign and malign findings is possible. PMID:7919882

  6. 3D World Building System

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-30

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  7. 3D World Building System

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2014-02-26

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  8. Toward single atom qubits on a surface: Pump-probe spectroscopy and electrically-driven spin resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, William

    We will discuss the characterization of spin dynamics by pump-probe spectroscopy and the use of gigahertz-frequency electric fields to drive spin resonance of a Fe atom on a MgO/Ag(001) surface. In the spirit of this session, the technical challenges in applying a precise voltage to the tip sample junction across a wide radio-frequency bandwidth will be described. The energy relaxation time, T1, of single spins on surfaces can be measured by spin-polarized pump-probe STM (scanning tunneling microscopy). To date, the relaxation times reported for Fe-Cu dimers on Cu2N insulating films have been of the order ~100 ns. A three-order-of-magnitude enhancement of lifetime, to ~200 μs, was recently demonstrated for Co on a single-monolayer of MgO. Here, we report on the tailoring of the T1 lifetime of single Fe atoms on single- and multi- layer MgO films grown on Ag(001). Next, we demonstrate electron spin resonance of an individual single Fe atom, driven by a gigahertz-frequency electric field applied across the tip-sample junction, and detected by a spin-polarized tunneling current. The principle parameters of the spin resonance experiment, namely the phase coherence time T2 and the Rabi rate, are characterized for Fe atoms adsorbed to the monolayer MgO film.

  9. Structural evolution and strain induced mixing in Cu–Co composites studied by transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Bachmaier, A.; Aboulfadl, H.; Pfaff, M.; Mücklich, F.; Motz, C.

    2015-02-15

    A Cu–Co composite material is chosen as a model system to study structural evolution and phase formations during severe plastic deformation. The evolving microstructures as a function of the applied strain were characterized at the micro-, nano-, and atomic scale-levels by combining scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy including energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. The amount of intermixing between the two phases at different strains was examined at the atomic scale using atom probe tomography as complimentary method. It is shown that Co particles are dissolved in the Cu matrix during severe plastic deformation to a remarkable extent and their size, number, and volume fraction were quantitatively determined during the deformation process. From the results, it can be concluded that supersaturated solid solutions up to 26 at.% Co in a fcc Cu–26 at.% Co alloy are obtained during deformation. However, the distribution of Co was found to be inhomogeneous even at the highest degree of investigated strain. - Highlights: • Structural evolution in a deformed Cu–Co composite is studied on all length scales. • Amount of intermixing is examined by atom-probe tomography. • Supersaturated solid solutions up to 26 at.% Co in Cu are observed.

  10. Euro3D Science Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, J. R.

    2004-02-01

    The Euro3D RTN is an EU funded Research Training Network to foster the exploitation of 3D spectroscopy in Europe. 3D spectroscopy is a general term for spectroscopy of an area of the sky and derives its name from its two spatial + one spectral dimensions. There are an increasing number of instruments which use integral field devices to achieve spectroscopy of an area of the sky, either using lens arrays, optical fibres or image slicers, to pack spectra of multiple pixels on the sky (``spaxels'') onto a 2D detector. On account of the large volume of data and the special methods required to reduce and analyse 3D data, there are only a few centres of expertise and these are mostly involved with instrument developments. There is a perceived lack of expertise in 3D spectroscopy spread though the astronomical community and its use in the armoury of the observational astronomer is viewed as being highly specialised. For precisely this reason the Euro3D RTN was proposed to train young researchers in this area and develop user tools to widen the experience with this particular type of data in Europe. The Euro3D RTN is coordinated by Martin M. Roth (Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam) and has been running since July 2002. The first Euro3D science conference was held in Cambridge, UK from 22 to 23 May 2003. The main emphasis of the conference was, in keeping with the RTN, to expose the work of the young post-docs who are funded by the RTN. In addition the team members from the eleven European institutes involved in Euro3D also presented instrumental and observational developments. The conference was organized by Andy Bunker and held at the Institute of Astronomy. There were over thirty participants and 26 talks covered the whole range of application of 3D techniques. The science ranged from Galactic planetary nebulae and globular clusters to kinematics of nearby galaxies out to objects at high redshift. Several talks were devoted to reporting recent observations with newly

  11. PLOT3D user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walatka, Pamela P.; Buning, Pieter G.; Pierce, Larry; Elson, Patricia A.

    1990-01-01

    PLOT3D is a computer graphics program designed to visualize the grids and solutions of computational fluid dynamics. Seventy-four functions are available. Versions are available for many systems. PLOT3D can handle multiple grids with a million or more grid points, and can produce varieties of model renderings, such as wireframe or flat shaded. Output from PLOT3D can be used in animation programs. The first part of this manual is a tutorial that takes the reader, keystroke by keystroke, through a PLOT3D session. The second part of the manual contains reference chapters, including the helpfile, data file formats, advice on changing PLOT3D, and sample command files.

  12. 3D printing in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Dawood, A; Marti Marti, B; Sauret-Jackson, V; Darwood, A

    2015-12-01

    3D printing has been hailed as a disruptive technology which will change manufacturing. Used in aerospace, defence, art and design, 3D printing is becoming a subject of great interest in surgery. The technology has a particular resonance with dentistry, and with advances in 3D imaging and modelling technologies such as cone beam computed tomography and intraoral scanning, and with the relatively long history of the use of CAD CAM technologies in dentistry, it will become of increasing importance. Uses of 3D printing include the production of drill guides for dental implants, the production of physical models for prosthodontics, orthodontics and surgery, the manufacture of dental, craniomaxillofacial and orthopaedic implants, and the fabrication of copings and frameworks for implant and dental restorations. This paper reviews the types of 3D printing technologies available and their various applications in dentistry and in maxillofacial surgery. PMID:26657435

  13. Atomic probes of surface structure and dynamics. Technical progress report, September 15, 1991--September 14, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Heller, E.J.; Jonsson, H.

    1992-12-31

    The following were studied: New semiclassical method for scattering calculations, He atom scattering from defective Pt surfaces, He atom scattering from Xe overlayers, thermal dissociation of H{sub 2} on Cu(110), spin flip scattering of atoms from surfaces, and Car-Parrinello simulations of surface processes.

  14. Noncontact atomic force and Kelvin probe force microscopy on MgO(100) and MgO(100)-supported Ba

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Chi Lun; Sasahara, Akira; Onishi, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    Atomically-flat MgO(100) surfaces were prepared by sputtering and annealing. Noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) were used to characterize the MgO(100) surfaces. The NC-AFM images revealed the presence of point defects on an atomically-resolved surface. The surface potential at these point defects, as well as features such as step edges and deposited Ba nanoparticles were mapped using KPFM. The Kelvin images show that the surface potential increases at the point defects and at the step edges. On the other hand, a decrease in the potential was found over Ba nanoparticles which can be explained by electron charge transfer from the Ba to the MgO.

  15. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  16. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  17. Probing quantum confinement at the atomic scale with optically detected nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempf, James G.

    2001-09-01

    Near-band-gap circularly polarized excitation in III-V semiconductors provides spin-polarized electrons that transfer spin order to lattice nuclei via fluctuations in the contact hyperfine interaction. This process of optical nuclear polarization and the complementary technique of optical detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) provide extreme sensitivity enhancement and spatial selectivity in structured samples, enabling collection of NMR spectra from samples such as single quantum wells or dots containing as few as ˜105 nuclei. Combining these advances with novel techniques for high spectral resolution, we have probed quantum-confined electronic states near the interface of a single epitaxially grown Al1-x As/GaAs (x = 0.36) heterojunction. Using a novel strategy that we refer to as POWER (p&barbelow;erturbations o&barbelow;bserved w&barbelow;ith e&barbelow;nhanced ṟesolution) NMR, multiple-pulse time suspension is synchronized with bandgap optical irradiation to reveal spectra of effective spin Hamiltonians that are differences between those of the occupied and unoccupied photoexcited electronic state. The underlying NMR linewidth is reduced by three orders of magnitude in these experiments, enabling resolution of an asymmetric line shape due to light-induced hyperfine interactions. The results are successfully fit with the coherent nuclear spin evolution and relaxation theoretically expected for sites distributed over the volume of an electronic excitation weakly localized at a point defect. This analysis establishes a one-to-one relationship, which can be used to follow nuclear spin diffusion, between optical Knight shift and the radial position of lattice nuclei. We have also introduced POWER NMR techniques to characterize the change in electric field associated with cycling from light-on to light-off states via a linear quadrupole Stark effect (LQSE) of the nuclear spins. Simulations of these NMR spectra in terms of the radial electric fields of

  18. Investigations of ion-irradiated uranium dioxide nuclear fuel with laser-assisted atom probe tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valderrama, Billy

    Performance in commercial light water reactors is dictated by the ability of its fuel material, uranium dioxide (UO2), to transport heat generated during the fission process. It is widely known that the service lifetime is limited by irradiation-induced microstructural changes that degrade the thermal performance of UO2. Studying the role of complex, often interacting mechanisms that occur during the early stages of microstructural evolution presents a challenge. Phenomena of particular interest are the segregation of fission products to form bubbles and their resultant effect on grain boundary (GB) mobility, and the effect of irradiation on fuel stoichiometry. Each mechanism has a profound consequence on fuel thermal conductivity. Several advanced analytical techniques, such as transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, etc. have been used to study these mechanisms. However, they each have limitations and cannot individually provide the necessary information for deeper understanding. One technique that has been under utilized is atom probe tomography (APT), which has a unique ability to spatially resolve small-scale chemical variations. APT uses the principle of field ionization to evaporate surface ions for chemical analysis. For low electrical conductivity systems, a pulsed laser is used to thermally assist in the evaporation process. One factor complicating the analysis is that laser-material interactions are poorly understood for oxide materials and literature using this technique with UO2 is lacking. Therefore, an initial systematic study to identify the optimal conditions for the analysis of UO2 using laser-assisted APT was conducted. A comparative study on the evaporation behavior between CeO2 and UO2 was followed. CeO2 was chosen due to its technological relevancy and availability of comparative studies with laser-assisted APT. Dissimilar evaporation behavior between these materials was identified and attributed

  19. The effect orientation of features in reconstructed atom probe data on the resolution and measured composition of T1 plates in an A2198 aluminium alloy.

    PubMed

    Mullin, Maria A; Araullo-Peters, Vicente J; Gault, Baptiste; Cairney, Julie M

    2015-12-01

    Artefacts in atom probe tomography can impact the compositional analysis of microstructure in atom probe studies. To determine the integrity of information obtained, it is essential to understand how the positioning of features influences compositional analysis. By investigating the influence of feature orientation within atom probe data on measured composition in microstructural features within an AA2198 Al alloy, this study shows differences in the composition of T1 (Al2CuLi) plates that indicates imperfections in atom probe reconstructions. The data fits a model of an exponentially-modified Gaussian that scales with the difference in evaporation field between solutes and matrix. This information provides a guide for obtaining the most accurate information possible. PMID:25896290

  20. Bioprinting of 3D hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Stanton, M M; Samitier, J; Sánchez, S

    2015-08-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting has recently emerged as an extension of 3D material printing, by using biocompatible or cellular components to build structures in an additive, layer-by-layer methodology for encapsulation and culture of cells. These 3D systems allow for cell culture in a suspension for formation of highly organized tissue or controlled spatial orientation of cell environments. The in vitro 3D cellular environments simulate the complexity of an in vivo environment and natural extracellular matrices (ECM). This paper will focus on bioprinting utilizing hydrogels as 3D scaffolds. Hydrogels are advantageous for cell culture as they are highly permeable to cell culture media, nutrients, and waste products generated during metabolic cell processes. They have the ability to be fabricated in customized shapes with various material properties with dimensions at the micron scale. 3D hydrogels are a reliable method for biocompatible 3D printing and have applications in tissue engineering, drug screening, and organ on a chip models. PMID:26066320

  1. Unassisted 3D camera calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanassov, Kalin; Ramachandra, Vikas; Nash, James; Goma, Sergio R.

    2012-03-01

    With the rapid growth of 3D technology, 3D image capture has become a critical part of the 3D feature set on mobile phones. 3D image quality is affected by the scene geometry as well as on-the-device processing. An automatic 3D system usually assumes known camera poses accomplished by factory calibration using a special chart. In real life settings, pose parameters estimated by factory calibration can be negatively impacted by movements of the lens barrel due to shaking, focusing, or camera drop. If any of these factors displaces the optical axes of either or both cameras, vertical disparity might exceed the maximum tolerable margin and the 3D user may experience eye strain or headaches. To make 3D capture more practical, one needs to consider unassisted (on arbitrary scenes) calibration. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that relies on detection and matching of keypoints between left and right images. Frames containing erroneous matches, along with frames with insufficiently rich keypoint constellations, are detected and discarded. Roll, pitch yaw , and scale differences between left and right frames are then estimated. The algorithm performance is evaluated in terms of the remaining vertical disparity as compared to the maximum tolerable vertical disparity.

  2. Arena3D: visualization of biological networks in 3D

    PubMed Central

    Pavlopoulos, Georgios A; O'Donoghue, Seán I; Satagopam, Venkata P; Soldatos, Theodoros G; Pafilis, Evangelos; Schneider, Reinhard

    2008-01-01

    Background Complexity is a key problem when visualizing biological networks; as the number of entities increases, most graphical views become incomprehensible. Our goal is to enable many thousands of entities to be visualized meaningfully and with high performance. Results We present a new visualization tool, Arena3D, which introduces a new concept of staggered layers in 3D space. Related data – such as proteins, chemicals, or pathways – can be grouped onto separate layers and arranged via layout algorithms, such as Fruchterman-Reingold, distance geometry, and a novel hierarchical layout. Data on a layer can be clustered via k-means, affinity propagation, Markov clustering, neighbor joining, tree clustering, or UPGMA ('unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic mean'). A simple input format defines the name and URL for each node, and defines connections or similarity scores between pairs of nodes. The use of Arena3D is illustrated with datasets related to Huntington's disease. Conclusion Arena3D is a user friendly visualization tool that is able to visualize biological or any other network in 3D space. It is free for academic use and runs on any platform. It can be downloaded or lunched directly from . Java3D library and Java 1.5 need to be pre-installed for the software to run. PMID:19040715

  3. Inhomogeneous distribution of manganese atoms in ferromagnetic ZnSnAs{sub 2}:Mn thin films on InP revealed by three-dimensional atom probe investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Uchitomi, Naotaka Inoue, Hiroaki; Kato, Takahiro; Toyota, Hideyuki; Uchida, Hiroshi

    2015-05-07

    Atomic-scale Mn distributions in ferromagnetic ZnSnAs{sub 2}:Mn thin films grown on InP substrates have been studied by applying three-dimensional atom probe (3DAP) microscopy. It is found that Mn atoms in cross-sectional 3DAP maps show the presence of inhomogeneities in Mn distribution, which is characteristic patterns of a spinoidal decomposition phase with slightly high and low concentration regions. The high Mn concentration regions are expected to be coherently clustered MnAs in the zinc-blende structure, resulting in the formation of Mn-As random connecting patterns. The origin of room-temperature ferromagnetism in ZnSnAs{sub 2}:Mn on InP can be well explained by the formation of atomic-scale magnetic clustering by spinoidal decomposition without breaking the continuity of the zinc-blende structure, which has been suggested by previous theoretical works. The lattice-matching between magnetic epi-layers and substrates should be one of the most important factors to avoid the formation of secondary hexagonal MnAs phase precipitates in preparing ferromagnetic semiconductor thin films.

  4. 3D Band Diagram and Photoexcitation of 2D–3D Semiconductor Heterojunctions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, Bo; Shi, Gang; Lei, Sidong; He, Yongmin; Gao, Weilu; Gong, Yongji; Ye, Gonglan; Zhou, Wu; Keyshar, Kunttal; Hao, Ji; et al

    2015-08-17

    The emergence of a rich variety of two-dimensional (2D) layered semiconductor materials has enabled the creation of atomically thin heterojunction devices. Junctions between atomically thin 2D layers and 3D bulk semiconductors can lead to junctions that are fundamentally electronically different from the covalently bonded conventional semiconductor junctions. In this paper, we propose a new 3D band diagram for the heterojunction formed between n-type monolayer MoS2 and p-type Si, in which the conduction and valence band-edges of the MoS2 monolayer are drawn for both stacked and in-plane directions. This new band diagram helps visualize the flow of charge carriers inside themore » device in a 3D manner. Our detailed wavelength-dependent photocurrent measurements fully support the diagrams and unambiguously show that the band alignment is type I for this 2D-3D heterojunction. Photogenerated electron–hole pairs in the atomically thin monolayer are separated and driven by an external bias and control the “on/off” states of the junction photodetector device. Finally, two photoresponse regimes with fast and slow relaxation are also revealed in time-resolved photocurrent measurements, suggesting the important role played by charge trap states.« less

  5. 3D Band Diagram and Photoexcitation of 2D–3D Semiconductor Heterojunctions

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Bo; Shi, Gang; Lei, Sidong; He, Yongmin; Gao, Weilu; Gong, Yongji; Ye, Gonglan; Zhou, Wu; Keyshar, Kunttal; Hao, Ji; Dong, Pei; Ge, Liehui; Lou, Jun; Kono, Junichiro; Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel M.

    2015-08-17

    The emergence of a rich variety of two-dimensional (2D) layered semiconductor materials has enabled the creation of atomically thin heterojunction devices. Junctions between atomically thin 2D layers and 3D bulk semiconductors can lead to junctions that are fundamentally electronically different from the covalently bonded conventional semiconductor junctions. In this paper, we propose a new 3D band diagram for the heterojunction formed between n-type monolayer MoS2 and p-type Si, in which the conduction and valence band-edges of the MoS2 monolayer are drawn for both stacked and in-plane directions. This new band diagram helps visualize the flow of charge carriers inside the device in a 3D manner. Our detailed wavelength-dependent photocurrent measurements fully support the diagrams and unambiguously show that the band alignment is type I for this 2D-3D heterojunction. Photogenerated electron–hole pairs in the atomically thin monolayer are separated and driven by an external bias and control the “on/off” states of the junction photodetector device. Finally, two photoresponse regimes with fast and slow relaxation are also revealed in time-resolved photocurrent measurements, suggesting the important role played by charge trap states.

  6. Fdf in US3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otis, Collin; Ferrero, Pietro; Candler, Graham; Givi, Peyman

    2013-11-01

    The scalar filtered mass density function (SFMDF) methodology is implemented into the computer code US3D. This is an unstructured Eulerian finite volume hydrodynamic solver and has proven very effective for simulation of compressible turbulent flows. The resulting SFMDF-US3D code is employed for large eddy simulation (LES) on unstructured meshes. Simulations are conducted of subsonic and supersonic flows under non-reacting and reacting conditions. The consistency and the accuracy of the simulated results are assessed along with appraisal of the overall performance of the methodology. The SFMDF-US3D is now capable of simulating high speed flows in complex configurations.

  7. Three-dimensional atom localization from spatial interference in a double two-level atomic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhonghu; Yang, Wen-Xing; Xie, Xiao-Tao; Liu, Shasha; Liu, Shaopeng; Lee, Ray-Kuang

    2016-07-01

    We propose a efficient scheme for high-precision three-dimensional (3D) atom localization via spatial interference in a generic double two-level atomic system driven by a weak probe field and three mutually perpendicular standing-wave fields. Because the spatial interference originates from the position-dependent atom-field interaction, the position information of the atom can be obtained by the measurement of the atom population. We find that the precision of 3D atom localization in volumes depends sensitively on the frequency detuning and the phase shifts associated with the standing-wave fields. Interestingly enough, we show that adjusting the frequency detuning and phase shifts can lead to a redistribution of the atoms and a significant change in the visibility of the interference pattern. As a result, the atom can be localized in volumes that are substantially smaller than a cubic optical wavelength.

  8. Local Probes of Strain Texture and Individual Atomic Dopant Sites in Monolayer MoS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fragapane, Alex H.; Contryman, Alex W.; Li, Hong; Qian, Xiaofeng; Ardakani, Sina Moeini; Gong, Yongji; Wang, Xingli; Weisse, Jeffrey M.; Lee, Chi Hwan; Zhao, Jiheng; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Li, Ju; Zheng, Xiaolin; Manoharan, Hari C.

    The 2D semiconductor MoS2 is an optically active material uniquely responsive to local perturbations. As an atomically thin membrane with exceptional strength, it can embed wide band gap variations overlapping the visible light spectrum when subjected to biaxial strain, where the modified electronic potential emanating from point-induced tensile strain perturbations mimics the Coulomb potential in a mesoscopic atom. We have realized this ``artificial atom'' concept via monolayer nanoindentation, and demonstrate that a synthetic superlattice of these building blocks forms an optoelectronic crystal capable of broadband light absorption and efficient funneling of photogenerated excitons to points of maximum strain at the artificial-atom nuclei. We also investigate the effects of individual atomic dopant sites through STM/STS, and visualize the atomic-scale local band structure changes. The modification of 2D semiconductors through methods such as strain texturing and doping connects to applications in next generation optoelectronics and photovoltaics.

  9. Understanding Atom Probe Tomography of Oxide-Supported Metal Nanoparticles by Correlation with Atomic Resolution Electron Microscopy and Field Evaporation Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Devaraj, Arun; Colby, Robert J.; Vurpillot, F.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2014-03-26

    Metal-dielectric composite materials, specifically metal nanoparticles supported on or embedded in metal oxides, are widely used in catalysis. The accurate optimization of such nanostructures warrants the need for detailed three-dimensional characterization. Atom probe tomography is uniquely capable of generating sub-nanometer structural and compositional data with part-per-million mass sensitivity, but there are reconstruction artifacts for composites containing materials with strongly differing fields of evaporation, as for oxide-supported metal nanoparticles. By correlating atom probe tomography with scanning transmission electron microscopy for Au nanoparticles embedded in an MgO support, deviations from an ideal topography during evaporation are demonstrated directly, and correlated with compositional errors in the reconstructed data. Finite element simulations of the field evaporation process confirm that protruding Au nanoparticles will evolve on the tip surface, and that evaporation field variations lead to an inaccurate assessment of the local composition, effectively lowering the spatial resolution of the final reconstructed dataset. Cross-correlating the experimental data with simulations results in a more detailed understanding of local evaporation aberrations during APT analysis of metal-oxide composites, paving the way towards a more accurate three-dimensional characterization of this technologically important class of materials.

  10. Concept and Demonstration of Individual Probe Actuation in Two-Dimensional Parallel Atomic Force Microscope System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Terunobu; Aeschimann, Laure; Chantada, Laura; de Rooij, Nico. F.; Heinzelmann, Harry; Herzig, Hans P.; Manzardo, Omar; Meister, André; Polesel-Maris, Jérôme; Pugin, Raphaël; Staufer, Urs; Vettiger, Peter

    2007-09-01

    A concept of an array actuator that is used to control the tip-sample separation of cantilevers in a two-dimensional (2D) probe array scanning system is proposed in this article. The feasibility of the concept is demonstrated with a 10× 10 array actuator with 500 μm xy-pitches. The array actuator is made by slicing a bulk piezoceramic block. The obtained maximum actuation of a single probe was 2.19 μmp-p at ± 168 Vp-p. A major issue for the actuator was the insufficient strength of the frame of the probe array chip. The demonstrated array actuator is highly compatible with previously developed parallel readout modules that use either a parallel optical beam or integrated piezoresistive deflection sensing. A large-scale 2D probe array is our ultimate target.

  11. Atom probe tomography study of alloying element distributions in Zr alloys and their oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yan; Motta, Arthur T.; Marquis, Emmanuelle A.

    2013-11-01

    A detailed study of alloying element distributions in the metal and oxygen rich regions of corroded Zr alloys and of the phases formed ahead of the oxide front was conducted using atom probe tomography (APT). A consistent sequence of sub-oxide phases is observed ahead of the ZrO2 oxide front, consisting of (i) a thin layer of equiatomic ZrO (occasionally slightly over and under stoichiometric) (ii) saturated solid solution Zr(O)sat, and (iii) a slowly decreasing oxygen profile into the metal. The results also show that the distribution of the alloying elements in the metal is more inhomogeneous than previously thought and that in the oxygen-rich phases enhanced segregation is observed, compared to the metal. the stable oxide ZrO2 (which is in contact with water), the equiatomic suboxide ZrO (both slightly sub and superstoichiometric, denoted here ZrO1+x and ZrO1-x), a saturated solution of constant oxygen content at about 30% O, denoted Zr(O)sat, and an undersaturated solid solution of O in Zr, denoted Zr(O), the oxygen content of which decreases with distance from the oxide-metal interface. As stated above, the field evaporation behavior of these phases is drastically different, resulting in characteristic ions being evaporated from each phase. As a result, the phases can be identified both by atomic concentrations and by the nature of the ionic species evaporating from each phase. The latter method was also used to visualize the distribution of phases within needles. For example, it was found in the present study that oxygen was evaporated as O+, O2+, ZrO2+, ZrO3+, ZrO2+,ZrO22+,ZrO3+ with occasional instances of ZrO23+ and ZrO33+ observed. Zr ions (Zr2+, Zr3+) become significant in the Zr(O)sat phase. O2+ is only observed in the oxide (ZrO2) phase, so it is considered a marker for that phase. ZrO2+ and ZrO22+ are present both in the ZrO2 and ZrO1+x phases but absent in the ZrO1-x, Zr(O)sat and Zr(O) phase. the equiatomic ZrO phase (observed as both ZrO1+x and Zr

  12. Wavefront construction in 3-D

    SciTech Connect

    Chilcoat, S.R. Hildebrand, S.T.

    1995-12-31

    Travel time computation in inhomogeneous media is essential for pre-stack Kirchhoff imaging in areas such as the sub-salt province in the Gulf of Mexico. The 2D algorithm published by Vinje, et al, has been extended to 3D to compute wavefronts in complicated inhomogeneous media. The 3D wavefront construction algorithm provides many advantages over conventional ray tracing and other methods of computing travel times in 3D. The algorithm dynamically maintains a reasonably consistent ray density without making a priori guesses at the number of rays to shoot. The determination of caustics in 3D is a straight forward geometric procedure. The wavefront algorithm also enables the computation of multi-valued travel time surfaces.

  13. Heterodyne 3D ghost imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xu; Zhang, Yong; Yang, Chenghua; Xu, Lu; Wang, Qiang; Zhao, Yuan

    2016-06-01

    Conventional three dimensional (3D) ghost imaging measures range of target based on pulse fight time measurement method. Due to the limit of data acquisition system sampling rate, range resolution of the conventional 3D ghost imaging is usually low. In order to take off the effect of sampling rate to range resolution of 3D ghost imaging, a heterodyne 3D ghost imaging (HGI) system is presented in this study. The source of HGI is a continuous wave laser instead of pulse laser. Temporal correlation and spatial correlation of light are both utilized to obtain the range image of target. Through theory analysis and numerical simulations, it is demonstrated that HGI can obtain high range resolution image with low sampling rate.

  14. Study of vertical Si/SiO2 interface using laser-assisted atom probe tomography and transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, J H; Lee, B H; Kim, Y T; Kim, J J; Lee, S Y; Lee, K P; Park, C G

    2014-03-01

    Laser-assisted atom probe tomography has opened the way to three-dimensional visualization of nanostructures. However, many questions related to the laser-matter interaction remain unresolved. We demonstrate that the interface reaction can be activated by laser-assisted field evaporation and affects the quantification of the interfacial composition. At a vertical interface between Si and SiO2, a SiO2 molecule tends to combine with a Si atom and evaporate as a SiO molecule, reducing the evaporation field. The features of the reaction depend on the direction of the laser illumination and the inner structure of tip. A high concentration of SiO is observed at a vertical interface between Si and SiO2 when the Si column is positioned at the center of the tip, whereas no significant SiO is detected when the SiO2 layer is at the center. The difference in the interfacial compositions of two samples was due to preferential evaporation of the Si layer. This was explained using transmission electron microscopy observations before and after atom probe experiments. PMID:24411275

  15. Combinatorial 3D Mechanical Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulais, Corentin; Teomy, Eial; de Reus, Koen; Shokef, Yair; van Hecke, Martin

    2015-03-01

    We present a class of elastic structures which exhibit 3D-folding motion. Our structures consist of cubic lattices of anisotropic unit cells that can be tiled in a complex combinatorial fashion. We design and 3d-print this complex ordered mechanism, in which we combine elastic hinges and defects to tailor the mechanics of the material. Finally, we use this large design space to encode smart functionalities such as surface patterning and multistability.

  16. Cross-Sectional Investigations on Epitaxial Silicon Solar Cells by Kelvin and Conducting Probe Atomic Force Microscopy: Effect of Illumination.

    PubMed

    Narchi, Paul; Alvarez, Jose; Chrétien, Pascal; Picardi, Gennaro; Cariou, Romain; Foldyna, Martin; Prod'homme, Patricia; Kleider, Jean-Paul; I Cabarrocas, Pere Roca

    2016-12-01

    Both surface photovoltage and photocurrent enable to assess the effect of visible light illumination on the electrical behavior of a solar cell. We report on photovoltage and photocurrent measurements with nanometer scale resolution performed on the cross section of an epitaxial crystalline silicon solar cell, using respectively Kelvin probe force microscopy and conducting probe atomic force microscopy. Even though two different setups are used, the scans were performed on locations within 100-μm distance in order to compare data from the same area and provide a consistent interpretation. In both measurements, modifications under illumination are observed in accordance with the theory of PIN junctions. Moreover, an unintentional doping during the deposition of the epitaxial silicon intrinsic layer in the solar cell is suggested from the comparison between photovoltage and photocurrent measurements. PMID:26831693

  17. Cross-Sectional Investigations on Epitaxial Silicon Solar Cells by Kelvin and Conducting Probe Atomic Force Microscopy: Effect of Illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narchi, Paul; Alvarez, Jose; Chrétien, Pascal; Picardi, Gennaro; Cariou, Romain; Foldyna, Martin; Prod'homme, Patricia; Kleider, Jean-Paul; i Cabarrocas, Pere Roca

    2016-02-01

    Both surface photovoltage and photocurrent enable to assess the effect of visible light illumination on the electrical behavior of a solar cell. We report on photovoltage and photocurrent measurements with nanometer scale resolution performed on the cross section of an epitaxial crystalline silicon solar cell, using respectively Kelvin probe force microscopy and conducting probe atomic force microscopy. Even though two different setups are used, the scans were performed on locations within 100-μm distance in order to compare data from the same area and provide a consistent interpretation. In both measurements, modifications under illumination are observed in accordance with the theory of PIN junctions. Moreover, an unintentional doping during the deposition of the epitaxial silicon intrinsic layer in the solar cell is suggested from the comparison between photovoltage and photocurrent measurements.

  18. Nanopatterning on silicon surface using atomic force microscopy with diamond-like carbon (DLC)-coated Si probe

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Atomic force microscope (AFM) equipped with diamond-like carbon (DLC)-coated Si probe has been used for scratch nanolithography on Si surfaces. The effect of scratch direction, applied tip force, scratch speed, and number of scratches on the size of the scratched geometry has been investigated. The size of the groove differs with scratch direction, which increases with the applied tip force and number of scratches but decreases slightly with scratch speed. Complex nanostructures of arrays of parallel lines and square arrays are further fabricated uniformly and precisely on Si substrates at relatively high scratch speed. DLC-coated Si probe has the potential to be an alternative in AFM-based scratch nanofabrication on hard surfaces. PMID:21888633

  19. Investigation of the interaction of atoms with lattice defects using probe methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruessler, M.; Groeger, V.; Ecker, K.; Petry, W.; Sakamoto, J.; Sassa, K.; Stehr, R.; Vogl, G.

    1984-03-01

    The physics of atomic vacancies were investigated using Mossbauer spectroscopy, perturbed gamma-gamma angular correlation and the backscattering of protons (channeling). Trapped interstitial atoms in the diluted alloy AgFe displace the Fe-atom in an interstitial cage which contributes essentially to radiation induced diffusion. The combination of alloy formation by ion implantation, defect production by particle radiation, and channeling measurements shows that interstitial atoms in Mo are trapped by Co strange atoms and form 110 dump-bells. The investigation of point defects shows that after cold working of Al and Ag no freely moving interstitial atoms are found. The anomalously fast diffusion of impurity atoms was investigated in the polycrystalline ZrFe by quasielastic Mossbauer spectroscopy, and in ZrCo by quasielastic incoherent neutron scattering. It is found that all Fe and Co atoms respectively, take part in the diffusion process. The evolution of the diffusion is divided in at least two jump mechanisms with strongly different jump probabilities.

  20. Probing the nanoscale Schottky barrier of metal/semiconductor interfaces of Pt/CdSe/Pt nanodumbbells by conductive-probe atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Sangku; Lee, Seon Joo; Kim, Sun Mi; Lee, Youngkeun; Song, Hyunjoon; Park, Jeong Young

    2015-08-01

    The electrical nature of the nanoscale contact between metal nanodots and semiconductor rods has drawn significant interest because of potential applications for metal-semiconductor hybrid nanostructures in energy conversion or heterogeneous catalysis. Here, we studied the nanoscale electrical character of the Pt/CdSe junction in Pt/CdSe/Pt nanodumbbells on connected Au islands by conductive-probe atomic force microscopy under ultra-high vacuum. Current-voltage plots measured in contact mode revealed Schottky barrier heights of individual nanojunctions of 0.41 ± 0.02 eV. The measured value of the Schottky barrier is significantly lower than that of planar thin-film diodes because of a reduction in the barrier width and enhanced tunneling probability at the interface. PMID:26136054

  1. Probing the quantum vacuum with an artificial atom in front of a mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoi, I.-C.; Kockum, A. F.; Tornberg, L.; Pourkabirian, A.; Johansson, G.; Delsing, P.; Wilson, C. M.

    2015-12-01

    Quantum fluctuations of the vacuum are both a surprising and fundamental phenomenon of nature. Understood as virtual photons, they still have a very real impact, for instance, in the Casimir effects and the lifetimes of atoms. Engineering vacuum fluctuations is therefore becoming increasingly important to emerging technologies. Here, we shape vacuum fluctuations using a superconducting circuit analogue of a mirror, creating regions in space where they are suppressed. Moving an artificial atom through these regions and measuring the spontaneous emission lifetime of the atom provides us with the spectral density of the vacuum fluctuations. Using the paradigm of waveguide quantum electrodynamics, we significantly improve over previous studies of the interaction of an atom with its mirror image, observing a spectral density as low as 0.02 quanta, a factor of 50 below the mirrorless result. This demonstrates that we can hide the atom from the vacuum, even though it is exposed in free space.

  2. Probing the nanoscale Schottky barrier of metal/semiconductor interfaces of Pt/CdSe/Pt nanodumbbells by conductive-probe atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Sangku; Lee, Seon Joo; Kim, Sun Mi; Lee, Youngkeun; Song, Hyunjoon; Park, Jeong Young

    2015-07-01

    The electrical nature of the nanoscale contact between metal nanodots and semiconductor rods has drawn significant interest because of potential applications for metal-semiconductor hybrid nanostructures in energy conversion or heterogeneous catalysis. Here, we studied the nanoscale electrical character of the Pt/CdSe junction in Pt/CdSe/Pt nanodumbbells on connected Au islands by conductive-probe atomic force microscopy under ultra-high vacuum. Current-voltage plots measured in contact mode revealed Schottky barrier heights of individual nanojunctions of 0.41 +/- 0.02 eV. The measured value of the Schottky barrier is significantly lower than that of planar thin-film diodes because of a reduction in the barrier width and enhanced tunneling probability at the interface.The electrical nature of the nanoscale contact between metal nanodots and semiconductor rods has drawn significant interest because of potential applications for metal-semiconductor hybrid nanostructures in energy conversion or heterogeneous catalysis. Here, we studied the nanoscale electrical character of the Pt/CdSe junction in Pt/CdSe/Pt nanodumbbells on connected Au islands by conductive-probe atomic force microscopy under ultra-high vacuum. Current-voltage plots measured in contact mode revealed Schottky barrier heights of individual nanojunctions of 0.41 +/- 0.02 eV. The measured value of the Schottky barrier is significantly lower than that of planar thin-film diodes because of a reduction in the barrier width and enhanced tunneling probability at the interface. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr02285a

  3. Role of Photoexcitation and Field Ionization in the Measurement of Accurate Oxide Stoichiometry by Laser-Assisted Atom Probe Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Devaraj, Arun; Colby, Robert J.; Hess, Wayne P.; Perea, Daniel E.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2013-03-06

    Pulsed lasers extend the high spatial and mass resolution of atom probe tomography (APT) to non-conducting materials, such as oxides. For prototypical metal oxide MgO, measured stoichiometry depends strongly upon pulse energy and applied voltage. Very low laser energies (0.02 pJ) and high electric fields yield optimal stoichiometric accuracy, attributed to the field-dependent ionization of photo-desorbed O or O2 neutrals. This emphasizes the importance of considering electronic excitations in APT analysis of oxides ionic materials.

  4. Sodium distribution in solar-grade Cu2ZnSnS4 layers using atom-probe tomographic technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajima, Shin; Asahi, Ryoji; Isheim, Dieter; Seidman, David N.; Itoh, Tadayoshi; Ohishi, Kei-ichiro

    2015-11-01

    To investigate the effect of alkali doping on Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) photovoltaic cells, we studied compositional distributions in CZTS layers using three-dimensional atom-probe tomography. The segregation of Na at a concentration of approximately 1 at. % was observed predominantly at CZTS grain boundaries. The concentration of Na in the interior of the CZTS grains was below the detection limit (approximately 40 ppm). Na ions may exist as sulfide compounds at CZTS grain boundaries, independent of the presence of oxygen.

  5. From 3D view to 3D print

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dima, M.; Farisato, G.; Bergomi, M.; Viotto, V.; Magrin, D.; Greggio, D.; Farinato, J.; Marafatto, L.; Ragazzoni, R.; Piazza, D.

    2014-08-01

    In the last few years 3D printing is getting more and more popular and used in many fields going from manufacturing to industrial design, architecture, medical support and aerospace. 3D printing is an evolution of bi-dimensional printing, which allows to obtain a solid object from a 3D model, realized with a 3D modelling software. The final product is obtained using an additive process, in which successive layers of material are laid down one over the other. A 3D printer allows to realize, in a simple way, very complex shapes, which would be quite difficult to be produced with dedicated conventional facilities. Thanks to the fact that the 3D printing is obtained superposing one layer to the others, it doesn't need any particular work flow and it is sufficient to simply draw the model and send it to print. Many different kinds of 3D printers exist based on the technology and material used for layer deposition. A common material used by the toner is ABS plastics, which is a light and rigid thermoplastic polymer, whose peculiar mechanical properties make it diffusely used in several fields, like pipes production and cars interiors manufacturing. I used this technology to create a 1:1 scale model of the telescope which is the hardware core of the space small mission CHEOPS (CHaracterising ExOPlanets Satellite) by ESA, which aims to characterize EXOplanets via transits observations. The telescope has a Ritchey-Chrétien configuration with a 30cm aperture and the launch is foreseen in 2017. In this paper, I present the different phases for the realization of such a model, focusing onto pros and cons of this kind of technology. For example, because of the finite printable volume (10×10×12 inches in the x, y and z directions respectively), it has been necessary to split the largest parts of the instrument in smaller components to be then reassembled and post-processed. A further issue is the resolution of the printed material, which is expressed in terms of layers

  6. Development of multi-environment dual-probe atomic force microscopy system using optical beam deflection sensors with vertically incident laser beams.

    PubMed

    Tsunemi, Eika; Kobayashi, Kei; Oyabu, Noriaki; Hirose, Masaharu; Takenaka, Yoshiko; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2013-08-01

    We developed a dual-probe atomic force microscopy (DP-AFM) system with two cantilever probes that can be operated in various environments such as in air, vacuum, and liquid. The system employs the optical beam deflection method for measuring the deflection of each cantilever mounted on a probe scanner. The cantilever probes mounted on the probe scanners are attached to inertia sliders, which allow independent control of the probe positions. We constructed three types of probe scanners (tube, shear-piezo, and tripod types) and characterized their performance. We demonstrated AFM imaging in ambient air, vacuum, and ultrapure water, and also performed electrical measurement and pick-up manipulation of a Au nanorod using the DP-AFM system. PMID:24007067

  7. Development of multi-environment dual-probe atomic force microscopy system using optical beam deflection sensors with vertically incident laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunemi, Eika; Kobayashi, Kei; Oyabu, Noriaki; Hirose, Masaharu; Takenaka, Yoshiko; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2013-08-01

    We developed a dual-probe atomic force microscopy (DP-AFM) system with two cantilever probes that can be operated in various environments such as in air, vacuum, and liquid. The system employs the optical beam deflection method for measuring the deflection of each cantilever mounted on a probe scanner. The cantilever probes mounted on the probe scanners are attached to inertia sliders, which allow independent control of the probe positions. We constructed three types of probe scanners (tube, shear-piezo, and tripod types) and characterized their performance. We demonstrated AFM imaging in ambient air, vacuum, and ultrapure water, and also performed electrical measurement and pick-up manipulation of a Au nanorod using the DP-AFM system.

  8. Variation of local atomic structure due to devitrification of Ni-Zr alloy thin films probed by EXAFS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Debarati; Tiwari, Nidhi; Bhattacharyya, Dibyendu; Jha, S. N.; Basu, S.

    2016-05-01

    Thin film metallic glasses (TFMGs) exhibit properties superior to their bulk counterparts allowing them to be potentially useful in many practical applications. Apart from their technological interest, when converted to crystallized state (devitrification) TFMGs can also act as precursors for partially crystallized or fully crystallized forms. Such devitrified forms are attractive due to their novel structural and magnetic properties. The amorphous-to-crystalline transformation of co-sputtered Ni-Zr alloy thin films through annealing was studied using EXAFS (Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure) measurements. Investigation through an atomic probe gives a better insight into the local environment of the atomic species, rendering a deeper understanding of thermal evolution of such materials.

  9. Absorption spectra of two-level atoms interacting with a strong polychromatic pump field and an arbitrarily intense probe field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Tai Hyun; Chung, Myung Sai; Lee, Hai-Woong

    1999-09-01

    A numerical method is introduced that solves the optical Bloch equations describing a two-level atom interacting with a strong polychromatic pump field with an equidistant spectrum and an arbitrarily intense monochromatic probe field. The method involves a transformation of the optical Bloch equations into a system of equations with time-independent coefficients at steady state via double harmonic expansion of the density-matrix elements, which is then solved by the method of matrix inversion. The solutions so obtained lead immediately to the determination of the polarization of the atomic medium and of the absorption and dispersion spectra. The method is applied to the case when the pump field is bichromatic and trichromatic, and the physical interpretation of the numerically computed spectra is given.

  10. Pressure/temperature fluid cell apparatus for the neutron powder diffractometer instrument: Probing atomic structure in situ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hsiu-Wen; Fanelli, Victor R.; Reiche, Helmut M.; Larson, Eric; Taylor, Mark A.; Xu, Hongwu; Zhu, Jinlong; Siewenie, Joan; Page, Katharine

    2014-12-01

    This contribution describes a new local structure compatible gas/liquid cell apparatus for probing disordered materials at high pressures and variable temperatures in the Neutron Powder Diffraction instrument at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory. The new sample environment offers choices for sample canister thickness and canister material type. Finite element modeling is utilized to establish maximum allowable working pressures of 414 MPa at 15 K and 121 MPa at 600 K. High quality atomic pair distribution function data extraction and modeling have been demonstrated for a calibration standard (Si powder) and for supercritical and subcritical CO2 measurements. The new sample environment was designed to specifically target experimental studies of the local atomic structures involved in geologic CO2 sequestration, but will be equally applicable to a wide variety of energy applications, including sorption of fluids on nano/meso-porous solids, clathrate hydrate formation, catalysis, carbon capture, and H2 and natural gas uptake/storage.

  11. Probing Membrane Order and Topography in Supported Lipid Bilayers by Combined Polarized Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence-Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Oreopoulos, John; Yip, Christopher M.

    2009-01-01

    Determining the local structure, dynamics, and conformational requirements for protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions in membranes is critical to understanding biological processes ranging from signaling to the translocating and membranolytic action of antimicrobial peptides. We report here the application of a combined polarized total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy-in situ atomic force microscopy platform. This platform's ability to image membrane orientational order was demonstrated on DOPC/DSPC/cholesterol model membranes containing the fluorescent membrane probe, DiI-C20 or BODIPY-PC. Spatially resolved order parameters and fluorophore tilt angles extracted from the polarized total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy images were in good agreement with the topographical details resolved by in situ atomic force microscopy, portending use of this technique for high-resolution characterization of membrane domain structures and peptide-membrane interactions. PMID:19254557

  12. Light scattering from ultracold atoms in optical lattices as an optical probe of quantum statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Mekhov, Igor B.; Maschler, Christoph; Ritsch, Helmut

    2007-11-15

    We study off-resonant collective light scattering from ultracold atoms trapped in an optical lattice. Scattering from different atomic quantum states creates different quantum states of the scattered light, which can be distinguished by measurements of the spatial intensity distribution, quadrature variances, photon statistics, or spectral measurements. In particular, angle-resolved intensity measurements reflect global statistics of atoms (total number of radiating atoms) as well as local statistical quantities (single-site statistics even without optical access to a single site) and pair correlations between different sites. As a striking example we consider scattering from transversally illuminated atoms into an optical cavity mode. For the Mott-insulator state, similar to classical diffraction, the number of photons scattered into a cavity is zero due to destructive interference, while for the superfluid state it is nonzero and proportional to the number of atoms. Moreover, we demonstrate that light scattering into a standing-wave cavity has a nontrivial angle dependence, including the appearance of narrow features at angles, where classical diffraction predicts zero. The measurement procedure corresponds to the quantum nondemolition measurement of various atomic variables by observing light.

  13. Probing of multiple magnetic responses in magnetic inductors using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seongjae; Seo, Hosung; Seol, Daehee; Yoon, Young-Hwan; Kim, Mi Yang; Kim, Yunseok

    2016-02-01

    Even though nanoscale analysis of magnetic properties is of significant interest, probing methods are relatively less developed compared to the significance of the technique, which has multiple potential applications. Here, we demonstrate an approach for probing various magnetic properties associated with eddy current, coil current and magnetic domains in magnetic inductors using multidimensional magnetic force microscopy (MMFM). The MMFM images provide combined magnetic responses from the three different origins, however, each contribution to the MMFM response can be differentiated through analysis based on the bias dependence of the response. In particular, the bias dependent MMFM images show locally different eddy current behavior with values dependent on the type of materials that comprise the MI. This approach for probing magnetic responses can be further extended to the analysis of local physical features.

  14. Probing of multiple magnetic responses in magnetic inductors using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Park, Seongjae; Seo, Hosung; Seol, Daehee; Yoon, Young-Hwan; Kim, Mi Yang; Kim, Yunseok

    2016-01-01

    Even though nanoscale analysis of magnetic properties is of significant interest, probing methods are relatively less developed compared to the significance of the technique, which has multiple potential applications. Here, we demonstrate an approach for probing various magnetic properties associated with eddy current, coil current and magnetic domains in magnetic inductors using multidimensional magnetic force microscopy (MMFM). The MMFM images provide combined magnetic responses from the three different origins, however, each contribution to the MMFM response can be differentiated through analysis based on the bias dependence of the response. In particular, the bias dependent MMFM images show locally different eddy current behavior with values dependent on the type of materials that comprise the MI. This approach for probing magnetic responses can be further extended to the analysis of local physical features. PMID:26852801

  15. Probing of multiple magnetic responses in magnetic inductors using atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seongjae; Seo, Hosung; Seol, Daehee; Yoon, Young-Hwan; Kim, Mi Yang; Kim, Yunseok

    2016-01-01

    Even though nanoscale analysis of magnetic properties is of significant interest, probing methods are relatively less developed compared to the significance of the technique, which has multiple potential applications. Here, we demonstrate an approach for probing various magnetic properties associated with eddy current, coil current and magnetic domains in magnetic inductors using multidimensional magnetic force microscopy (MMFM). The MMFM images provide combined magnetic responses from the three different origins, however, each contribution to the MMFM response can be differentiated through analysis based on the bias dependence of the response. In particular, the bias dependent MMFM images show locally different eddy current behavior with values dependent on the type of materials that comprise the MI. This approach for probing magnetic responses can be further extended to the analysis of local physical features. PMID:26852801

  16. Mg I as a probe of the solar chromosphere - The atomic model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauas, Pablo J.; Avrett, Eugene H.; Loeser, Rudolf

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents a complete atomic model for Mg I line synthesis, where all the atomic parameters are based on recent experimental and theoretical data. It is shown how the computed profiles at 4571 A and 5173 A are influenced by the choice of these parameters and the number of levels included in the model atom. In addition, observed profiles of the 5173 A b2 line and theoretical profiles for comparison (based on a recent atmospheric model for the average quiet sun) are presented.

  17. YouDash3D: exploring stereoscopic 3D gaming for 3D movie theaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schild, Jonas; Seele, Sven; Masuch, Maic

    2012-03-01

    Along with the success of the digitally revived stereoscopic cinema, events beyond 3D movies become attractive for movie theater operators, i.e. interactive 3D games. In this paper, we present a case that explores possible challenges and solutions for interactive 3D games to be played by a movie theater audience. We analyze the setting and showcase current issues related to lighting and interaction. Our second focus is to provide gameplay mechanics that make special use of stereoscopy, especially depth-based game design. Based on these results, we present YouDash3D, a game prototype that explores public stereoscopic gameplay in a reduced kiosk setup. It features live 3D HD video stream of a professional stereo camera rig rendered in a real-time game scene. We use the effect to place the stereoscopic effigies of players into the digital game. The game showcases how stereoscopic vision can provide for a novel depth-based game mechanic. Projected trigger zones and distributed clusters of the audience video allow for easy adaptation to larger audiences and 3D movie theater gaming.

  18. 3D face recognition based on a modified ICP method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Kankan; Xi, Jiangtao; Yu, Yanguang; Chicharo, Joe F.

    2011-11-01

    3D face recognition technique has gained much more attention recently, and it is widely used in security system, identification system, and access control system, etc. The core technique in 3D face recognition is to find out the corresponding points in different 3D face images. The classic partial Iterative Closest Point (ICP) method is iteratively align the two point sets based on repetitively calculate the closest points as the corresponding points in each iteration. After several iterations, the corresponding points can be obtained accurately. However, if two 3D face images with different scale are from the same person, the classic partial ICP does not work. In this paper we propose a modified partial Iterative Closest Point (ICP) method in which the scaling effect is considered to achieve 3D face recognition. We design a 3x3 diagonal matrix as the scale matrix in each iteration of the classic partial ICP. The probing face image which is multiplied by the scale matrix will keep the similar scale with the reference face image. Therefore, we can accurately determine the corresponding points even the scales of probing image and reference image are different. 3D face images in our experiments are acquired by a 3D data acquisition system based on Digital Fringe Projection Profilometry (DFPP). A 3D database consists of 30 group images, three images with the same scale, which are from the same person with different views, are included in each group. And in different groups, the scale of the 3 images may be different from other groups. The experiment results show that our proposed method can achieve 3D face recognition, especially in the case that the scales of probing image and referent image are different.

  19. Remote 3D Medical Consultation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Greg; Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Fuchs, Henry; Cairns, Bruce; Mayer-Patel, Ketan; Yang, Ruigang; State, Andrei; Towles, Herman; Ilie, Adrian; Krishnan, Srinivas; Söderholm, Hanna M.

    Two-dimensional (2D) video-based telemedical consultation has been explored widely in the past 15-20 years. Two issues that seem to arise in most relevant case studies are the difficulty associated with obtaining the desired 2D camera views, and poor depth perception. To address these problems we are exploring the use of a small array of cameras to synthesize a spatially continuous range of dynamic three-dimensional (3D) views of a remote environment and events. The 3D views can be sent across wired or wireless networks to remote viewers with fixed displays or mobile devices such as a personal digital assistant (PDA). The viewpoints could be specified manually or automatically via user head or PDA tracking, giving the remote viewer virtual head- or hand-slaved (PDA-based) remote cameras for mono or stereo viewing. We call this idea remote 3D medical consultation (3DMC). In this article we motivate and explain the vision for 3D medical consultation; we describe the relevant computer vision/graphics, display, and networking research; we present a proof-of-concept prototype system; and we present some early experimental results supporting the general hypothesis that 3D remote medical consultation could offer benefits over conventional 2D televideo.

  20. Speaking Volumes About 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In 1999, Genex submitted a proposal to Stennis Space Center for a volumetric 3-D display technique that would provide multiple users with a 360-degree perspective to simultaneously view and analyze 3-D data. The futuristic capabilities of the VolumeViewer(R) have offered tremendous benefits to commercial users in the fields of medicine and surgery, air traffic control, pilot training and education, computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing, and military/battlefield management. The technology has also helped NASA to better analyze and assess the various data collected by its satellite and spacecraft sensors. Genex capitalized on its success with Stennis by introducing two separate products to the commercial market that incorporate key elements of the 3-D display technology designed under an SBIR contract. The company Rainbow 3D(R) imaging camera is a novel, three-dimensional surface profile measurement system that can obtain a full-frame 3-D image in less than 1 second. The third product is the 360-degree OmniEye(R) video system. Ideal for intrusion detection, surveillance, and situation management, this unique camera system offers a continuous, panoramic view of a scene in real time.

  1. Atomic probe microscopy of 3C SiC films grown on 6H SiC substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steckl, A. J.; Roth, M. D.; Powell, J. A.; Larkin, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    The surface of 3C SiC films grown on 6H SiC substrates has been studied by atomic probe microscopy in air. Atomic-scale images of the 3C SiC surface have been obtained by STM which confirm the 111 line type orientation of the cubic 3C layer grown on the 0001 plane type surface of the hexagonal 6H substrate. The nearest-neighbor atomic spacing for the 3C layer has been measured to be 3.29 +/- 0.2 A, which is within 7 percent of the bulk value. Shallow terraces in the 3C layer have been observed by STM to separate regions of very smooth growth in the vicinity of the 3C nucleation point from considerably rougher 3C surface regions. These terraces are oriented at right angles to the growth direction. Atomic force microscopy has been used to study etch pits present on the 6H substrate due to high temperature HCl cleaning prior to CVD growth of the 3C layer. The etch pits have hexagonal symmetry and vary in depth from 50 nm to 1 micron.

  2. Slow-light probe of Fermi pairing through an atom-molecule dark state

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, H.; Deng, Y.; Meystre, P.

    2011-06-15

    We consider the two-color photoassociation of a quantum degenerate atomic gas into ground-state diatomic molecules via a molecular dark state. This process can be described in terms of a {Lambda} level scheme that is formally analogous to the situation in electromagnetically induced transparency in atomic systems and therefore can result in slow-light propagation. We show that the group velocity of the light field depends explicitly on whether the atoms are bosons or fermions, as well as on the existence or absence of a pairing gap in the case of fermions, so that the measurement of the group velocity realizes a nondestructive diagnosis of the atomic state and the pairing gap.

  3. Automated classification of RNA 3D motifs and the RNA 3D Motif Atlas

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Anton I.; Zirbel, Craig L.; Leontis, Neocles B.

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of atomic-resolution RNA three-dimensional (3D) structures reveals that many internal and hairpin loops are modular, recurrent, and structured by conserved non-Watson–Crick base pairs. Structurally similar loops define RNA 3D motifs that are conserved in homologous RNA molecules, but can also occur at nonhomologous sites in diverse RNAs, and which often vary in sequence. To further our understanding of RNA motif structure and sequence variability and to provide a useful resource for structure modeling and prediction, we present a new method for automated classification of internal and hairpin loop RNA 3D motifs and a new online database called the RNA 3D Motif Atlas. To classify the motif instances, a representative set of internal and hairpin loops is automatically extracted from a nonredundant list of RNA-containing PDB files. Their structures are compared geometrically, all-against-all, using the FR3D program suite. The loops are clustered into motif groups, taking into account geometric similarity and structural annotations and making allowance for a variable number of bulged bases. The automated procedure that we have implemented identifies all hairpin and internal loop motifs previously described in the literature. All motif instances and motif groups are assigned unique and stable identifiers and are made available in the RNA 3D Motif Atlas (http://rna.bgsu.edu/motifs), which is automatically updated every four weeks. The RNA 3D Motif Atlas provides an interactive user interface for exploring motif diversity and tools for programmatic data access. PMID:23970545

  4. Shot Noise as a Probe of Spin-Polarized Transport through Single Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burtzlaff, Andreas; Weismann, Alexander; Brandbyge, Mads; Berndt, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Single atoms on Au(111) surfaces have been contacted with the Au tip of a low temperature scanning tunneling microscope. The shot noise of the current through these contacts has been measured up to frequencies of 120 kHz and Fano factors have been determined to characterize the transport channels. The noise at Fe and Co atoms, the latter displaying a Kondo effect, indicates spin-polarized transport through a single channel. Transport calculations reproduce this observation.

  5. 3D-Printed Microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Au, Anthony K; Huynh, Wilson; Horowitz, Lisa F; Folch, Albert

    2016-03-14

    The advent of soft lithography allowed for an unprecedented expansion in the field of microfluidics. However, the vast majority of PDMS microfluidic devices are still made with extensive manual labor, are tethered to bulky control systems, and have cumbersome user interfaces, which all render commercialization difficult. On the other hand, 3D printing has begun to embrace the range of sizes and materials that appeal to the developers of microfluidic devices. Prior to fabrication, a design is digitally built as a detailed 3D CAD file. The design can be assembled in modules by remotely collaborating teams, and its mechanical and fluidic behavior can be simulated using finite-element modeling. As structures are created by adding materials without the need for etching or dissolution, processing is environmentally friendly and economically efficient. We predict that in the next few years, 3D printing will replace most PDMS and plastic molding techniques in academia. PMID:26854878

  6. Quantitative analysis of doped/undoped ZnO nanomaterials using laser assisted atom probe tomography: Influence of the analysis parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirifar, Nooshin; Lardé, Rodrigue; Talbot, Etienne; Pareige, Philippe; Rigutti, Lorenzo; Mancini, Lorenzo; Houard, Jonathan; Castro, Celia; Sallet, Vincent; Zehani, Emir; Hassani, Said; Sartel, Corine; Ziani, Ahmed; Portier, Xavier

    2015-12-01

    In the last decade, atom probe tomography has become a powerful tool to investigate semiconductor and insulator nanomaterials in microelectronics, spintronics, and optoelectronics. In this paper, we report an investigation of zinc oxide nanostructures using atom probe tomography. We observed that the chemical composition of zinc oxide is strongly dependent on the analysis parameters used for atom probe experiments. It was observed that at high laser pulse energies, the electric field at the specimen surface is strongly dependent on the crystallographic directions. This dependence leads to an inhomogeneous field evaporation of the surface atoms, resulting in unreliable measurements. We show that the laser pulse energy has to be well tuned to obtain reliable quantitative chemical composition measurements of undoped and doped ZnO nanomaterials.

  7. Quantitative analysis of doped/undoped ZnO nanomaterials using laser assisted atom probe tomography: Influence of the analysis parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Amirifar, Nooshin; Lardé, Rodrigue Talbot, Etienne; Pareige, Philippe; Rigutti, Lorenzo; Mancini, Lorenzo; Houard, Jonathan; Castro, Celia; Sallet, Vincent; Zehani, Emir; Hassani, Said; Sartel, Corine; Ziani, Ahmed; Portier, Xavier

    2015-12-07

    In the last decade, atom probe tomography has become a powerful tool to investigate semiconductor and insulator nanomaterials in microelectronics, spintronics, and optoelectronics. In this paper, we report an investigation of zinc oxide nanostructures using atom probe tomography. We observed that the chemical composition of zinc oxide is strongly dependent on the analysis parameters used for atom probe experiments. It was observed that at high laser pulse energies, the electric field at the specimen surface is strongly dependent on the crystallographic directions. This dependence leads to an inhomogeneous field evaporation of the surface atoms, resulting in unreliable measurements. We show that the laser pulse energy has to be well tuned to obtain reliable quantitative chemical composition measurements of undoped and doped ZnO nanomaterials.

  8. [Real time 3D echocardiography in congenital heart disease].

    PubMed

    Acar, P; Dulac, Y; Taktak, A; Villacèque, M

    2004-05-01

    The introduction of the 3D mode in echocardiography has led to its use in everyday clinical practice. One hundred and fifty real time 3D echocardiographic examinations were performed in 20 foetus, 110 children and 20 adults with various congenital heart lesions (shunts, valvular lesions, aortic diseases). The 4x matricial probe enables the instantaneous acquisition of transthoracic volumes. Four modes of 3D imaging were used: real time, total volume, colour Doppler and biplane. Quantitative measurements were performed at an outlying station. The feasibility of the method in the foetus, the child and the adult was respectively 90%, 99% and 85%. Real time 3D echocardiography did not affect the diagnoses made by standard echocardiography. The 3D imaging gave a more accurate description of atrial septal defects and congenital valvular lesions. Biplane imaging was decisive in the quantitative approach to aortic dilatation of Marfan's syndrome and in segmental analysis of the foetal heart. 3D colour Doppler imaging has been disappointing but the possibilities of volumic quantification of blood flow are very promising. The present limitations of the method are the inadequate resolution in the small child and the absence of quantitative measurement on the echograph. The facility of utilisation of the matricial probe should lead to routine usage of 3D echocardiography as with 2D and the Doppler modes. Its value should be decisive in many congenital cardiac lesions requiring surgery or interventional catheterisation. PMID:15214550

  9. 3D Computations and Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Couch, R; Faux, D; Goto, D; Nikkel, D

    2004-04-05

    This project consists of two activities. Task A, Simulations and Measurements, combines all the material model development and associated numerical work with the materials-oriented experimental activities. The goal of this effort is to provide an improved understanding of dynamic material properties and to provide accurate numerical representations of those properties for use in analysis codes. Task B, ALE3D Development, involves general development activities in the ALE3D code with the focus of improving simulation capabilities for problems of mutual interest to DoD and DOE. Emphasis is on problems involving multi-phase flow, blast loading of structures and system safety/vulnerability studies.

  10. 3D Computations and Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Couch, R; Faux, D; Goto, D; Nikkel, D

    2003-05-12

    This project is in its first full year after the combining of two previously funded projects: ''3D Code Development'' and ''Dynamic Material Properties''. The motivation behind this move was to emphasize and strengthen the ties between the experimental work and the computational model development in the materials area. The next year's activities will indicate the merging of the two efforts. The current activity is structured in two tasks. Task A, ''Simulations and Measurements'', combines all the material model development and associated numerical work with the materials-oriented experimental activities. Task B, ''ALE3D Development'', is a continuation of the non-materials related activities from the previous project.

  11. 3D Equilibrium Reconstructions in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lao, L. L.; Ferraro, N. W.; Strait, E. J.; Turnbull, A. D.; King, J. D.; Hirshman, H. P.; Lazarus, E. A.; Sontag, A. C.; Hanson, J.; Trevisan, G.

    2013-10-01

    Accurate and efficient 3D equilibrium reconstruction is needed in tokamaks for study of 3D magnetic field effects on experimentally reconstructed equilibrium and for analysis of MHD stability experiments with externally imposed magnetic perturbations. A large number of new magnetic probes have been recently installed in DIII-D to improve 3D equilibrium measurements and to facilitate 3D reconstructions. The V3FIT code has been in use in DIII-D to support 3D reconstruction and the new magnetic diagnostic design. V3FIT is based on the 3D equilibrium code VMEC that assumes nested magnetic surfaces. V3FIT uses a pseudo-Newton least-square algorithm to search for the solution vector. In parallel, the EFIT equilibrium reconstruction code is being extended to allow for 3D effects using a perturbation approach based on an expansion of the MHD equations. EFIT uses the cylindrical coordinate system and can include the magnetic island and stochastic effects. Algorithms are being developed to allow EFIT to reconstruct 3D perturbed equilibria directly making use of plasma response to 3D perturbations from the GATO, MARS-F, or M3D-C1 MHD codes. DIII-D 3D reconstruction examples using EFIT and V3FIT and the new 3D magnetic data will be presented. Work supported in part by US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698, DE-FG02-95ER54309 and DE-AC05-06OR23100.

  12. Atom probe tomography evaporation behavior of C-axis GaN nanowires: Crystallographic, stoichiometric, and detection efficiency aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Diercks, David R. Gorman, Brian P.; Kirchhofer, Rita; Sanford, Norman; Bertness, Kris; Brubaker, Matt

    2013-11-14

    The field evaporation behavior of c-axis GaN nanowires was explored in two different laser-pulsed atom probe tomography (APT) instruments. Transmission electron microscopy imaging before and after atom probe tomography analysis was used to assist in reconstructing the data and assess the observed evaporation behavior. It was found that the ionic species exhibited preferential locations for evaporation related to the underlying crystal structure of the GaN and that the species which evaporated from these locations was dependent on the pulsed laser energy. Additionally, the overall stoichiometry measured by APT was significantly correlated with the energy of the laser pulses. At the lowest laser energies, the apparent composition was nitrogen-rich, while higher laser energies resulted in measurements of predominantly gallium compositions. The percent of ions detected (detection efficiency) for these specimens was found to be considerably below that shown for other materials, even for laser energies which produced the expected Ga:N ratio. The apparent stoichiometry variation and low detection efficiency appear to be a result of evaporation of Ga ions between laser pulses at the lowest laser energies and evaporation of neutral N{sub 2} species at higher laser energies. All of these behaviors are tied to the formation of nitrogen-nitrogen bonds on the tip surface, which occurred under all analysis conditions. Similar field evaporation behaviors are therefore expected for other materials where the anionic species readily form a strong diatomic bond.

  13. Interplay between Fe 3d and Ce 4f magnetism and Kondo interaction in CeFeAs(1-x)P(x)O probed by 75As and 31P NMR.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, R; Baenitz, M; Jesche, A; Geibel, C; Steglich, F

    2012-04-01

    A detailed (31)P (I = 1/2) and (75)As (I = 3/2) NMR study on polycrystalline CeFeAs(1-x)P(x)O alloys is presented. The magnetism of CeFeAsO changes drastically upon P substitution on the As site. CeFePO is a heavy fermion system without long-range order whereas CeFeAsO exhibits an Fe 3d SDW type of ordering accompanied by a structural transition from tetragonal (TT) to orthorhombic (OT) structure. Furthermore, Ce 4f(1) orders antiferromagnetically (AFM) at low temperature. At the critical concentration where the Fe magnetism is diminished the Ce-Ce interaction changes to a ferromagnetic (FM) type of ordering. Three representative samples of the CeFeAs(1-x)P(x)O (x = 0.05, 0.3 and 0.9) series are systematically investigated. (1) For the x = 0.05 alloy a drastic change of the linewidth at 130 K indicates the AFM-SDW type of ordering of Fe and the structural change from the TT to the OT phase. The linewidth roughly measures the internal field in the ordered state and the transition is most likely first order. The small and nearly constant shift from (31)P and (75)As NMR suggests the presence of competing hyperfine interactions between the nuclear spins and the 4f and 3d ions of Ce and Fe. (2) For the x = 0.3 alloy, the evolution of the Fe-SDW type of order takes place at around 70 K corroborating the results of bulk measurement and μSR. Here we found evidence for phase separation of paramagnetic and magnetic SDW phases. (3) In contrast to the heavy fermion CeFePO for the x = 0.9 alloy a phase transition is found at 2 K. The field-dependent NMR shift gives evidence of FM ordering. Above the ordering the spin-lattice relaxation rate (31)(1/T(1)) shows unconventional, non-Korringa-like behaviour which indicates a complex interplay of Kondo and FM fluctuations. PMID:22407024

  14. Visualization of 3D optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hoseong; Clemens, James

    2016-05-01

    We describe the visualization of 3D optical lattices based on Sisyphus cooling implemented with open source software. We plot the adiabatic light shift potentials found by diagonalizing the effective Hamiltonian for the light shift operator. Our program incorporates a variety of atomic ground state configurations with total angular momentum ranging from j = 1 / 2 to j = 4 and a variety of laser beam configurations including the two-beam lin ⊥ lin configuration, the four-beam umbrella configuration, and four beams propagating in two orthogonal planes. In addition to visualizing the lattice the program also evaluates lattice parameters such as the oscillation frequency for atoms trapped deep in the wells. The program is intended to help guide experimental implementations of optical lattices.

  15. Probing quantum phases of ultracold atoms in optical lattices by transmission spectra in cavity quantum electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mekhov, Igor B.; Maschler, Christoph; Ritsch, Helmut

    2007-05-01

    Studies of ultracold gases in optical lattices provide a means for testing fundamental and application-oriented quantum many-body concepts of condensed-matter physics in well controllable atomic systems; examples include strongly correlated phases and quantum-information processing. Standard methods to observe quantum properties of Bose-Einstein condensates are based on matter-wave interference between atoms released from traps, a method that ultimately destroys the system. Here, we propose a new approach on the basis of optical measurements that conserves the number of atoms. We prove that atomic quantum statistics can be mapped on transmission spectra of high-Q cavities, where atoms create a quantum refractive index. This can be useful for studying phase transitions-for example, between Mott insulator and superfluid states-as various phases show qualitatively distinct light scattering. Joining the paradigms of cavity quantum electrodynamics and ultracold gases could enable conceptually new investigations of both light and matter at ultimate quantum levels. We predict effects accessible in experiments that recently became possible.

  16. SNL3dFace

    2007-07-20

    This software distribution contains MATLAB and C++ code to enable identity verification using 3D images that may or may not contain a texture component. The code is organized to support system performance testing and system capability demonstration through the proper configuration of the available user interface. Using specific algorithm parameters the face recognition system has been demonstrated to achieve a 96.6% verification rate (Pd) at 0.001 false alarm rate. The system computes robust facial featuresmore » of a 3D normalized face using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis (FLDA). A 3D normalized face is obtained by alighning each face, represented by a set of XYZ coordinated, to a scaled reference face using the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm. The scaled reference face is then deformed to the input face using an iterative framework with parameters that control the deformed surface regulation an rate of deformation. A variety of options are available to control the information that is encoded by the PCA. Such options include the XYZ coordinates, the difference of each XYZ coordinates from the reference, the Z coordinate, the intensity/texture values, etc. In addition to PCA/FLDA feature projection this software supports feature matching to obtain similarity matrices for performance analysis. In addition, this software supports visualization of the STL, MRD, 2D normalized, and PCA synthetic representations in a 3D environment.« less

  17. Making Inexpensive 3-D Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manos, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Visual aids are important to student learning, and they help make the teacher's job easier. Keeping with the "TPT" theme of "The Art, Craft, and Science of Physics Teaching," the purpose of this article is to show how teachers, lacking equipment and funds, can construct a durable 3-D model reference frame and a model gravity…

  18. SNL3dFace

    SciTech Connect

    Russ, Trina; Koch, Mark; Koudelka, Melissa; Peters, Ralph; Little, Charles; Boehnen, Chris; Peters, Tanya

    2007-07-20

    This software distribution contains MATLAB and C++ code to enable identity verification using 3D images that may or may not contain a texture component. The code is organized to support system performance testing and system capability demonstration through the proper configuration of the available user interface. Using specific algorithm parameters the face recognition system has been demonstrated to achieve a 96.6% verification rate (Pd) at 0.001 false alarm rate. The system computes robust facial features of a 3D normalized face using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis (FLDA). A 3D normalized face is obtained by alighning each face, represented by a set of XYZ coordinated, to a scaled reference face using the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm. The scaled reference face is then deformed to the input face using an iterative framework with parameters that control the deformed surface regulation an rate of deformation. A variety of options are available to control the information that is encoded by the PCA. Such options include the XYZ coordinates, the difference of each XYZ coordinates from the reference, the Z coordinate, the intensity/texture values, etc. In addition to PCA/FLDA feature projection this software supports feature matching to obtain similarity matrices for performance analysis. In addition, this software supports visualization of the STL, MRD, 2D normalized, and PCA synthetic representations in a 3D environment.

  19. 3D Printing: Exploring Capabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Kyle; Flowers, Jim

    2015-01-01

    As 3D printers become more affordable, schools are using them in increasing numbers. They fit well with the emphasis on product design in technology and engineering education, allowing students to create high-fidelity physical models to see and test different iterations in their product designs. They may also help students to "think in three…

  20. The extended wedge method: Atomic force microscope friction calibration for improved tolerance to instrument misalignments, tip offset, and blunt probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khare, H. S.; Burris, D. L.

    2013-05-01

    One of the major challenges in understanding and controlling friction is the difficulty in bridging the length and time scales of macroscale contacts and those of the single asperity interactions they comprise. While the atomic force microscope (AFM) offers a unique ability to probe tribological surfaces in a wear-free single-asperity contact, instrument calibration challenges have limited the usefulness of this technique for quantitative nanotribological studies. A number of lateral force calibration techniques have been proposed and used, but none has gained universal acceptance due to practical considerations, configuration limitations, or sensitivities to unknowable error sources. This paper describes a simple extension of the classic wedge method of AFM lateral force calibration which: (1) allows simultaneous calibration and measurement on any substrate, thus eliminating prior tip damage and confounding effects of instrument setup adjustments; (2) is insensitive to adhesion, PSD cross-talk, transducer/piezo-tube axis misalignment, and shear-center offset; (3) is applicable to integrated tips and colloidal probes; and (4) is generally applicable to any reciprocating friction coefficient measurement. The method was applied to AFM measurements of polished carbon (99.999% graphite) and single crystal MoS2 to demonstrate the technique. Carbon and single crystal MoS2 had friction coefficients of μ = 0.20 ± 0.04 and μ = 0.006 ± 0.001, respectively, against an integrated Si probe. Against a glass colloidal sphere, MoS2 had a friction coefficient of μ = 0.005 ± 0.001. Generally, the measurement uncertainties ranged from 10%-20% and were driven by the effect of actual frictional variation on the calibration rather than calibration error itself (i.e., due to misalignment, tip-offset, or probe radius).