Science.gov

Sample records for 3-d depth migration

  1. Prestack depth migration for 3D offshore methane hydrates data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Seonghyung; Kim, Tae-yeon

    2015-04-01

    One of the indicators for the existence of methane hydrates on seismic data is BSR (bottom simulated reflector), which shows the base of the gas hydrate stability zone. It shows a reversed phase polarity compared to that of the water bottom reflections and high amplitude reflections. It is well known acoustic velocity decrease at the contact between gas hydrates and free-gas-bearing sediments. Prestack reverse time migration (RTM) is a method for imaging the subsurface in depth domain using inner product of source wavefield extrapolation in forward and receiver wavefield extrapolation in backward. It is widely used for imaging the complex subsurface structures with keeping amplitude. We applied RTM to 3D offshore seismic data for methane hydrates exploration. The study area is 12 x 25 km with 120 survey lines offshore. The shot gathers were acquired with 2 streamers and each one has 240 channels. Shot and receiver spacing is 25 m and 12.5 m. The line spacing is 100 m. Near offset is 150 m and maximum far offset is 3137.5 m. The record length is 7 second with a sampling rate of 1 ms. Shot gathers after resampled with 4 ms were processed to enhance signal to noise ratio using conventional basic processing such as amplitude recovery, deconvolution, and band-pass filtering. Interval velocities which were calculated from conventional stack velocities were used for velocity model for RTM. The basic-processed shot gathers and a velocity model were used for input data to obtain 3D image using RTM. For RTM, 20 Hz Ricker wavelet were used and grid size of x, y and z direction is 20x20x20 m. The total number of shot gathers is 176,387 and every 10th shot gather was chosen for reducing computer times and storage. The result is 3D image with inline, cross-line and depth slice image. High amplitude events are shown around (6 km, 4 km, 2.3 km) of in-line image. Each depth slice shows amplitude variation according to different depth steps. Especially channel structure variation

  2. 3-D prestack Kirchhoff depth migration: From prototype to production in a massively parallel processor environment

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, H.; Solano, M.; VanDyke, J.P.; McMechan, G.A.; Epili, D.

    1998-03-01

    Portable, production-scale 3-D prestack Kirchhoff depth migration software capable of full-volume imaging has been successfully implemented and applied to a six-million trace (46.9 Gbyte) marine data set from a salt/subsalt play in the Gulf of Mexico. Velocity model building and updates use an image-driven strategy and were performed in a Sun Sparc environment. Images obtained by 3-D prestack migration after three velocity iterations are substantially better focused and reveal drilling targets that were not visible in images obtained from conventional 3-D poststack time migration. Amplitudes are well preserved, so anomalies associated with known reservoirs conform to the petrophysical predictions. Prototype development was on an 8-node Intel iPSC860 computer; the production version was run on an 1824-node Intel Paragon computer. The code has been successfully ported to CRAY (T3D) and Unix workstation (PVM) environments.

  3. Imaging the Juan de Fuca subduction plate using 3D Kirchoff Prestack Depth Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, C.; Bodin, T.; Allen, R. M.; Tauzin, B.

    2014-12-01

    We propose a new Receiver Function migration method to image the subducting plate in the western US that utilizes the US array and regional network data. While the well-developed CCP (common conversion point) poststack migration is commonly used for such imaging; our method applies a 3D prestack depth migration approach. The traditional CCP and post-stack depth mapping approaches implement the ray tracing and moveout correction for the incoming teleseismic plane wave based on a 1D earth reference model and the assumption of horizontal discontinuities. Although this works well in mapping the reflection position of relatively flat discontinuities (such as the Moho or the LAB), CCP is known to give poor results in the presence of lateral volumetric velocity variations and dipping layers. Instead of making the flat layer assumption and 1D moveout correction, seismic rays are traced in a 3D tomographic model with the Fast Marching Method. With travel time information stored, our Kirchoff migration is done where the amplitude of the receiver function at a given time is distributed over all possible conversion points (i.e. along a semi-elipse) on the output migrated depth section. The migrated reflectors will appear where the semicircles constructively interfere, whereas destructive interference will cancel out noise. Synthetic tests show that in the case of a horizontal discontinuity, the prestack Kirchoff migration gives similar results to CCP, but without spurious multiples as this energy is stacked destructively and cancels out. For 45 degree and 60 degree dipping discontinuities, it also performs better in terms of imaging at the right boundary and dip angle. This is especially useful in the Western US case, beneath which the Juan de Fuca plate subducted to ~450km with a dipping angle that may exceed 50 degree. While the traditional CCP method will underestimate the dipping angle, our proposed imaging method will provide an accurate 3D subducting plate image without

  4. 3D Kirchhoff depth migration algorithm: A new scalable approach for parallelization on multicore CPU based cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastogi, Richa; Londhe, Ashutosh; Srivastava, Abhishek; Sirasala, Kirannmayi M.; Khonde, Kiran

    2017-03-01

    In this article, a new scalable 3D Kirchhoff depth migration algorithm is presented on state of the art multicore CPU based cluster. Parallelization of 3D Kirchhoff depth migration is challenging due to its high demand of compute time, memory, storage and I/O along with the need of their effective management. The most resource intensive modules of the algorithm are traveltime calculations and migration summation which exhibit an inherent trade off between compute time and other resources. The parallelization strategy of the algorithm largely depends on the storage of calculated traveltimes and its feeding mechanism to the migration process. The presented work is an extension of our previous work, wherein a 3D Kirchhoff depth migration application for multicore CPU based parallel system had been developed. Recently, we have worked on improving parallel performance of this application by re-designing the parallelization approach. The new algorithm is capable to efficiently migrate both prestack and poststack 3D data. It exhibits flexibility for migrating large number of traces within the available node memory and with minimal requirement of storage, I/O and inter-node communication. The resultant application is tested using 3D Overthrust data on PARAM Yuva II, which is a Xeon E5-2670 based multicore CPU cluster with 16 cores/node and 64 GB shared memory. Parallel performance of the algorithm is studied using different numerical experiments and the scalability results show striking improvement over its previous version. An impressive 49.05X speedup with 76.64% efficiency is achieved for 3D prestack data and 32.00X speedup with 50.00% efficiency for 3D poststack data, using 64 nodes. The results also demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the improved algorithm with high scalability and efficiency on a multicore CPU cluster.

  5. Preliminary 3d depth migration of a network of 2d seismic lines for fault imaging at a Pyramid Lake, Nevada geothermal prospect

    SciTech Connect

    Frary, R.; Louie, J.; Pullammanappallil, S.; Eisses, A.

    2016-08-01

    Roxanna Frary, John N. Louie, Sathish Pullammanappallil, Amy Eisses, 2011, Preliminary 3d depth migration of a network of 2d seismic lines for fault imaging at a Pyramid Lake, Nevada geothermal prospect: presented at American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting, San Francisco, Dec. 5-9, abstract T13G-07.

  6. Quantifying modes of 3D cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, Meghan K.; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2015-01-01

    Although it is widely appreciated that cells migrate in a variety of diverse environments in vivo, we are only now beginning to use experimental workflows that yield images with sufficient spatiotemporal resolution to study the molecular processes governing cell migration in 3D environments. Since cell migration is a dynamic process, it is usually studied via microscopy, but 3D movies of 3D processes are difficult to interpret by visual inspection. In this review, we discuss the technologies required to study the diversity of 3D cell migration modes with a focus on the visualization and computational analysis tools needed to study cell migration quantitatively at a level comparable to the analyses performed today on cells crawling on flat substrates. PMID:26603943

  7. Quantifying Modes of 3D Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, Meghan K; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2015-12-01

    Although it is widely appreciated that cells migrate in a variety of diverse environments in vivo, we are only now beginning to use experimental workflows that yield images with sufficient spatiotemporal resolution to study the molecular processes governing cell migration in 3D environments. Since cell migration is a dynamic process, it is usually studied via microscopy, but 3D movies of 3D processes are difficult to interpret by visual inspection. In this review, we discuss the technologies required to study the diversity of 3D cell migration modes with a focus on the visualization and computational analysis tools needed to study cell migration quantitatively at a level comparable to the analyses performed today on cells crawling on flat substrates.

  8. Imaging Shallow Salt With 3D Refraction Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanschuyver, C. J.; Hilterman, F. J.

    2005-05-01

    In offshore West Africa, numerous salt walls are within 200 m of sea level. Because of the shallowness of these salt walls, reflections from the salt top can be difficult to map, making it impossible to build an accurate velocity model for subsequent pre-stack depth migration. An accurate definition of salt boundaries is critical to any depth model where salt is present. Unfortunately, when a salt body is very shallow, the reflection from the upper interface can be obscured due to large offsets between the source and near receivers and also due to the interference from multiples and other near-surface noise events. A new method is described using 3D migration of the refraction waveforms which is simplified because of several constraints in the model definition. The azimuth and dip of the refractor is found by imaging with Kirchhoff theory. A Kirchhoff migration is performed where the traveltime values are adjusted to use the CMP refraction traveltime equation. I assume the sediment and salt velocities to be known such that once the image time is specified, then the dip and azimuth of the refraction path can be found. The resulting 3D refraction migrations are in excellent depth agreement with available well control. In addition, the refraction migration time picks of deeper salt events are in agreement with time picks of the same events on the reflection migration.

  9. Modeling cell migration in 3D: Status and challenges.

    PubMed

    Rangarajan, Rajagopal; Zaman, Muhammad H

    2008-01-01

    Cell migration is a multi-scale process that integrates signaling, mechanics and biochemical reaction kinetics. Various mathematical models accurately predict cell migration on 2D surfaces, but are unable to capture the complexities of 3D migration. Additionally, quantitative 3D cell migration models have been few and far between. In this review we look and characterize various mathematical models available in literature to predict cell migration in 3D matrices and analyze their strengths and possible changes to these models that could improve their predictive capabilities.

  10. Depth-fused 3D imagery on an immaterial display.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cha; Diverdi, Stephen; Höllerer, Tobias

    2009-01-01

    We present an immaterial display that uses a generalized form of depth-fused 3D (DFD) rendering to create unencumbered 3D visuals. To accomplish this result, we demonstrate a DFD display simulator that extends the established depth-fused 3D principle by using screens in arbitrary configurations and from arbitrary viewpoints. The feasibility of the generalized DFD effect is established with a user study using the simulator. Based on these results, we developed a prototype display using one or two immaterial screens to create an unencumbered 3D visual that users can penetrate, examining the potential for direct walk-through and reach-through manipulation of the 3D scene. We evaluate the prototype system in formative and summative user studies and report the tolerance thresholds discovered for both tracking and projector errors.

  11. Myosin IIA dependent retrograde flow drives 3D cell migration.

    PubMed

    Shih, Wenting; Yamada, Soichiro

    2010-04-21

    Epithelial cell migration is an essential part of embryogenesis and tissue regeneration, yet their migration is least understood. Using our three-dimensional (3D) motility analysis, migrating epithelial cells formed an atypical polarized cell shape with the nucleus leading the cell front and a contractile cell rear. Migrating epithelial cells exerted traction forces to deform both the anterior and posterior extracellular matrix toward the cell body. The cell leading edge exhibited a myosin II-dependent retrograde flow with the magnitude and direction consistent with surrounding network deformation. Interestingly, on a two-dimensional substrate, myosin IIA-deficient cells migrated faster than wild-type cells, but in a 3D gel, these myosin IIA-deficient cells were unpolarized and immobile. In contrast, the migration rates of myosin IIB-deficient cells were similar to wild-type cells. Therefore, myosin IIA, not myosin IIB, is required for 3D epithelial cell migration.

  12. Depth propagation and surface construction in 3-D vision.

    PubMed

    Georgeson, Mark A; Yates, Tim A; Schofield, Andrew J

    2009-01-01

    In stereo vision, regions with ambiguous or unspecified disparity can acquire perceived depth from unambiguous regions. This has been called stereo capture, depth interpolation or surface completion. We studied some striking induced depth effects suggesting that depth interpolation and surface completion are distinct stages of visual processing. An inducing texture (2-D Gaussian noise) had sinusoidal modulation of disparity, creating a smooth horizontal corrugation. The central region of this surface was replaced by various test patterns whose perceived corrugation was measured. When the test image was horizontal 1-D noise, shown to one eye or to both eyes without disparity, it appeared corrugated in much the same way as the disparity-modulated (DM) flanking regions. But when the test image was 2-D noise, or vertical 1-D noise, little or no depth was induced. This suggests that horizontal orientation was a key factor. For a horizontal sine-wave luminance grating, strong depth was induced, but for a square-wave grating, depth was induced only when its edges were aligned with the peaks and troughs of the DM flanking surface. These and related results suggest that disparity (or local depth) propagates along horizontal 1-D features, and then a 3-D surface is constructed from the depth samples acquired. The shape of the constructed surface can be different from the inducer, and so surface construction appears to operate on the results of a more local depth propagation process.

  13. 3D printing of biomimetic microstructures for cancer cell migration.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tina Qing; Qu, Xin; Liu, Justin; Chen, Shaochen

    2014-02-01

    To understand the physical behavior and migration of cancer cells, a 3D in vitro micro-chip in hydrogel was created using 3D projection printing. The micro-chip has a honeycomb branched structure, aiming to mimic 3D vascular morphology to test, monitor, and analyze differences in the behavior of cancer cells (i.e. HeLa) vs. non-cancerous cell lines (i.e. 10 T1/2). The 3D Projection Printing system can fabricate complex structures in seconds from user-created designs. The fabricated microstructures have three different channel widths of 25, 45, and 120 microns wide to reflect a range of blood vessel diameters. HeLa and 10 T1/2 cells seeded within the micro-chip were then analyzed for morphology and cell migration speed. 10 T1/2 cells exhibited greater changes in morphology due to channel size width than HeLa cells; however, channel width had a limited effect on 10 T1/2 cell migration while HeLa cancer cell migration increased as channel width decreased. This physiologically relevant 3D cancer tissue model has the potential to be a powerful tool for future drug discoveries and cancer migration studies.

  14. 3D printing of biomimetic microstructures for cancer cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tina Qing; Qu, Xin; Liu, Justin; Chen, Shaochen

    2013-01-01

    To understand the physical behavior and migration of cancer cells, a 3D in vitro micro-chip in hydrogel was created using 3D projection printing. The micro-chip has a honeycomb branched structure, aiming to mimic 3D vascular morphology to test, monitor, and analyze differences in the behavior of cancer cells (i.e. HeLa) vs. non-cancerous cell lines (i.e. 10T1/2). The 3D Projection Printing system can fabricate complex structures in seconds from user-created designs. The fabricated microstructures have three different channel widths of 25, 45, and 120 microns wide to reflect a range of blood vessel diameters. HeLa and 10T1/2 cells seeded within the micro-chip were then analyzed for morphology and cell migration speed. 10T1/2 cells exhibited greater changes in morphology due to channel size width than HeLa cells; however, channel width had a limited effect on 10T1/2 cell migration while HeLa cancer cell migration increased as channel width decreased. This physiologically relevant 3D cancer tissue model has the potential to be a powerful tool for future drug discoveries and cancer migration studies PMID:24150602

  15. Visual fatigue evaluation based on depth in 3D videos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feng-jiao; Sang, Xin-zhu; Liu, Yangdong; Shi, Guo-zhong; Xu, Da-xiong

    2013-08-01

    In recent years, 3D technology has become an emerging industry. However, visual fatigue always impedes the development of 3D technology. In this paper we propose some factors affecting human perception of depth as new quality metrics. These factors are from three aspects of 3D video--spatial characteristics, temporal characteristics and scene movement characteristics. They play important roles for the viewer's visual perception. If there are many objects with a certain velocity and the scene changes fast, viewers will feel uncomfortable. In this paper, we propose a new algorithm to calculate the weight values of these factors and analyses their effect on visual fatigue.MSE (Mean Square Error) of different blocks is taken into consideration from the frame and inter-frame for 3D stereoscopic videos. The depth frame is divided into a number of blocks. There are overlapped and sharing pixels (at half of the block) in the horizontal and vertical direction. Ignoring edge information of objects in the image can be avoided. Then the distribution of all these data is indicated by kurtosis with regard of regions which human eye may mainly gaze at. Weight values can be gotten by the normalized kurtosis. When the method is used for individual depth, spatial variation can be achieved. When we use it in different frames between current and previous one, we can get temporal variation and scene movement variation. Three factors above are linearly combined, so we can get objective assessment value of 3D videos directly. The coefficients of three factors can be estimated based on the liner regression. At last, the experimental results show that the proposed method exhibits high correlation with subjective quality assessment results.

  16. Depth estimation from multiple coded apertures for 3D interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Sungjoo; Choi, Changkyu; Park, Dusik

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel depth estimation method from multiple coded apertures for 3D interaction. A flat panel display is transformed into lens-less multi-view cameras which consist of multiple coded apertures. The sensor panel behind the display captures the scene in front of the display through the imaging pattern of the modified uniformly redundant arrays (MURA) on the display panel. To estimate the depth of an object in the scene, we first generate a stack of synthetically refocused images at various distances by using the shifting and averaging approach for the captured coded images. And then, an initial depth map is obtained by applying a focus operator to a stack of the refocused images for each pixel. Finally, the depth is refined by fitting a parametric focus model to the response curves near the initial depth estimates. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm, we construct an imaging system to capture the scene in front of the display. The system consists of a display screen and an x-ray detector without a scintillator layer so as to act as a visible sensor panel. Experimental results confirm that the proposed method accurately determines the depth of an object including a human hand in front of the display by capturing multiple MURA coded images, generating refocused images at different depth levels, and refining the initial depth estimates.

  17. 3D Face Hallucination from a Single Depth Frame

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Shu; Kemelmacher-Shlizerman, Ira; Shapiro, Linda G.

    2015-01-01

    We present an algorithm that takes a single frame of a person’s face from a depth camera, e.g., Kinect, and produces a high-resolution 3D mesh of the input face. We leverage a dataset of 3D face meshes of 1204 distinct individuals ranging from age 3 to 40, captured in a neutral expression. We divide the input depth frame into semantically significant regions (eyes, nose, mouth, cheeks) and search the database for the best matching shape per region. We further combine the input depth frame with the matched database shapes into a single mesh that results in a highresolution shape of the input person. Our system is fully automatic and uses only depth data for matching, making it invariant to imaging conditions. We evaluate our results using ground truth shapes, as well as compare to state-of-the-art shape estimation methods. We demonstrate the robustness of our local matching approach with high-quality reconstruction of faces that fall outside of the dataset span, e.g., faces older than 40 years old, facial expressions, and different ethnicities. PMID:26280021

  18. Multiple mechanisms of 3D migration: the origins of plasticity.

    PubMed

    Petrie, Ryan J; Yamada, Kenneth M

    2016-10-01

    Cells migrate through 3D environments using a surprisingly wide variety of molecular mechanisms. These distinct modes of migration often rely on the same intracellular components, which are used in different ways to achieve cell motility. Recent work reveals that how a cell moves can be dictated by the relative amounts of cell-matrix adhesion and actomyosin contractility. A current concept is that the level of difficulty in squeezing the nucleus through a confining 3D environment determines the amounts of adhesion and contractility required for cell motility. Ultimately, determining how the nucleus controls the mode of cell migration will be essential for understanding both physiological and pathological processes dependent on cell migration in the body.

  19. 3D hand tracking using Kalman filter in depth space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sangheon; Yu, Sunjin; Kim, Joongrock; Kim, Sungjin; Lee, Sangyoun

    2012-12-01

    Hand gestures are an important type of natural language used in many research areas such as human-computer interaction and computer vision. Hand gestures recognition requires the prior determination of the hand position through detection and tracking. One of the most efficient strategies for hand tracking is to use 2D visual information such as color and shape. However, visual-sensor-based hand tracking methods are very sensitive when tracking is performed under variable light conditions. Also, as hand movements are made in 3D space, the recognition performance of hand gestures using 2D information is inherently limited. In this article, we propose a novel real-time 3D hand tracking method in depth space using a 3D depth sensor and employing Kalman filter. We detect hand candidates using motion clusters and predefined wave motion, and track hand locations using Kalman filter. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, we compare the performance of the proposed method with the visual-based method. Experimental results show that the performance of the proposed method out performs visual-based method.

  20. Cell proliferation and migration in silk fibroin 3D scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Biman B; Kundu, Subhas C

    2009-05-01

    Pore architecture in 3D polymeric scaffolds is known to play a critical role in tissue engineering as it provides the vital framework for the seeded cells to organize into a functioning tissue. In this report, we investigated the effects of different freezing temperature regimes on silk fibroin protein 3D scaffold pore microstructure. The fabricated scaffolds using freeze-dry technique were used as a 3D model to monitor cell proliferation and migration. Pores of 200-250microm diameter were formed by slow cooling at temperatures of -20 and -80 degrees C but were found to be limited in porosity and pore interconnectivity as observed through scanning electron microscopic images. In contrast, highly interconnected pores with 96% porosity were observed when silk solutions were rapidly frozen at -196 degrees C. A detailed study was conducted to assess the affect of pore size, porosity and interconnectivity on human dermal fibroblast cell proliferation and migration on these 3D scaffolds using confocal microscopy. The cells were observed to migrate within the scaffold interconnectivities and were found to reach scaffold periphery within 28 days of culture. Confocal images further confirmed normal cell attachment and alignment of actin filaments within the porous scaffold matrix with well-developed nuclei. This study indicates rapid freeze-drying technique as an alternative method to fabricate highly interconnected porous scaffolds for developing functional 3D silk fibroin matrices for potential tissue engineering, biomedical and biotechnological applications.

  1. Computational model of mesenchymal migration in 3D under chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, F. O.; Gómez-Benito, M. J.; Folgado, J.; Fernandes, P. R.; García-Aznar, J. M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Cell chemotaxis is an important characteristic of cellular migration, which takes part in crucial aspects of life and development. In this work, we propose a novel in silico model of mesenchymal 3D migration with competing protrusions under a chemotactic gradient. Based on recent experimental observations, we identify three main stages that can regulate mesenchymal chemotaxis: chemosensing, dendritic protrusion dynamics and cell–matrix interactions. Therefore, each of these features is considered as a different module of the main regulatory computational algorithm. The numerical model was particularized for the case of fibroblast chemotaxis under a PDGF-bb gradient. Fibroblasts migration was simulated embedded in two different 3D matrices – collagen and fibrin – and under several PDGF-bb concentrations. Validation of the model results was provided through qualitative and quantitative comparison with in vitro studies. Our numerical predictions of cell trajectories and speeds were within the measured in vitro ranges in both collagen and fibrin matrices. Although in fibrin, the migration speed of fibroblasts is very low, because fibrin is a stiffer and more entangling matrix. Testing PDGF-bb concentrations, we noticed that an increment of this factor produces a speed increment. At 1 ng mL−1 a speed peak is reached after which the migration speed diminishes again. Moreover, we observed that fibrin exerts a dampening behavior on migration, significantly affecting the migration efficiency. PMID:27336322

  2. Computational model of mesenchymal migration in 3D under chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, F O; Gómez-Benito, M J; Folgado, J; Fernandes, P R; García-Aznar, J M

    2017-01-01

    Cell chemotaxis is an important characteristic of cellular migration, which takes part in crucial aspects of life and development. In this work, we propose a novel in silico model of mesenchymal 3D migration with competing protrusions under a chemotactic gradient. Based on recent experimental observations, we identify three main stages that can regulate mesenchymal chemotaxis: chemosensing, dendritic protrusion dynamics and cell-matrix interactions. Therefore, each of these features is considered as a different module of the main regulatory computational algorithm. The numerical model was particularized for the case of fibroblast chemotaxis under a PDGF-bb gradient. Fibroblasts migration was simulated embedded in two different 3D matrices - collagen and fibrin - and under several PDGF-bb concentrations. Validation of the model results was provided through qualitative and quantitative comparison with in vitro studies. Our numerical predictions of cell trajectories and speeds were within the measured in vitro ranges in both collagen and fibrin matrices. Although in fibrin, the migration speed of fibroblasts is very low, because fibrin is a stiffer and more entangling matrix. Testing PDGF-bb concentrations, we noticed that an increment of this factor produces a speed increment. At 1 ng mL(-1) a speed peak is reached after which the migration speed diminishes again. Moreover, we observed that fibrin exerts a dampening behavior on migration, significantly affecting the migration efficiency.

  3. 3D cancer cell migration in a confined matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alobaidi, Amani; Sun, Bo

    Cancer cell migration is widely studied in 2D motion, which does not mimic the invasion processes in vivo. More recently, 3D cell migration studies have been performed. The ability of cancer cells to migrate within the extracellular matrix depends on the physical and biochemical features of the extracellular matrix. We present a model of cell motility in confined matrix geometry. The aim of the study is to study cancer migration in collagen matrix, as a soft tissue, to investigate their motility within the confined and surrounding collagen environment. Different collagen concentrations have been used to show the ability of these cancer cells to move through such a complex structure by measuring Cancer cell migration velocity as well as the displacement. Graduate student physics department.

  4. Stereoscopic 3D display with color interlacing improves perceived depth.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joohwan; Johnson, Paul V; Banks, Martin S

    2014-12-29

    Temporal interlacing is a method for presenting stereoscopic 3D content whereby the two eyes' views are presented at different times and optical filtering selectively delivers the appropriate view to each eye. This approach is prone to distortions in perceived depth because the visual system can interpret the temporal delay between binocular views as spatial disparity. We propose a novel color-interlacing display protocol that reverses the order of binocular presentation for the green primary but maintains the order for the red and blue primaries: During the first sub-frame, the left eye sees the green component of the left-eye view and the right eye sees the red and blue components of the right-eye view, and vice versa during the second sub-frame. The proposed method distributes the luminance of each eye's view more evenly over time. Because disparity estimation is based primarily on luminance information, a more even distribution of luminance over time should reduce depth distortion. We conducted a psychophysical experiment to test these expectations and indeed found that less depth distortion occurs with color interlacing than temporal interlacing.

  5. Controlled architectural and chemotactic studies of 3D cell migration.

    PubMed

    Tayalia, Prakriti; Mazur, Eric; Mooney, David J

    2011-04-01

    Chemotaxis plays a critical role in tissue development and wound repair, and is widely studied using ex vivo model systems in applications such as immunotherapy. However, typical chemotactic models employ 2D systems that are less physiologically relevant or use end-point assays, that reveal little about the stepwise dynamics of the migration process. To overcome these limitations, we developed a new model system using microfabrication techniques, sustained drug delivery approaches, and theoretical modeling of chemotactic agent diffusion. This model system allows us to study the effects of 3D architecture and chemotactic agent gradient on immune cell migration in real time. We find that dendritic cell migration is characterized by a strong interplay between matrix architecture and chemotactic gradients, and migration is also influenced dramatically by the cell activation state. Our results indicate that Lipopolysaccharide-activated dendritic cells studied in a traditional transwell system actually exhibit anomalous migration behavior. Such a 3D ex vivo system lends itself for analyzing cell migratory behavior in response to single or multiple competitive cues and could prove useful in vaccine development.

  6. Prestack reverse time migration for 3D marine reflection seismic data

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Seonghyung; Kim, Taeyoun

    2015-03-10

    Prestack reverse time migration (RTM) is a method for imaging the subsurface using the inner product of wavefield extrapolation in shot domain and in receiver domain. It is well known that RTM is better for preserving amplitudes and phases than other prestack migrations. Since 3D seismic data is huge data volume and it needs heavy computing works, it requires parallel computing in order to have a meaningful depth image of the 3D subsurface. We implemented a parallelized version of 3D RTM for prestack depth migration. The results of numerical example for 3D SEG/EAGE salt model showed good agreement with the original geological model. We applied RTM to offshore 3D seismic reflection data. The study area is 12 × 25 km with 120 survey lines. Shot and receiver spacing is 25 m and 12.5 m. The line spacing is 100 m. Shot gathers were preprocessed to enhance signal to noise ratio and velocity model was calculated from conventional stack velocity. Both of them were used to obtain 3D image using RTM. The results show reasonable subsurface image.

  7. Clinically Normal Stereopsis Does Not Ensure Performance Benefit from Stereoscopic 3D Depth Cues

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-28

    Stereopsis, Binocular Vision, Optometry, Depth Perception , 3D vision, 3D human factors, Stereoscopic displays, S3D, Virtual environment 16...Binocular Vision, Optometry, Depth Perception , 3D vision, 3D human factors, Stereoscopic displays, S3D, Virtual environment 1 Distribution A: Approved...disparities (up to ~20 arc min) that are fused into a single binocular percept when presented briefly, and that result in increased perceptions of depth

  8. Protrusive waves guide 3D cell migration along nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Guetta-Terrier, Charlotte; Monzo, Pascale; Zhu, Jie; Long, Hongyan; Venkatraman, Lakshmi; Zhou, Yue; Wang, PeiPei; Chew, Sing Yian; Mogilner, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    In vivo, cells migrate on complex three-dimensional (3D) fibrous matrices, which has made investigation of the key molecular and physical mechanisms that drive cell migration difficult. Using reductionist approaches based on 3D electrospun fibers, we report for various cell types that single-cell migration along fibronectin-coated nanofibers is associated with lateral actin-based waves. These cyclical waves have a fin-like shape and propagate up to several hundred micrometers from the cell body, extending the leading edge and promoting highly persistent directional movement. Cells generate these waves through balanced activation of the Rac1/N-WASP/Arp2/3 and Rho/formins pathways. The waves originate from one major adhesion site at leading end of the cell body, which is linked through actomyosin contractility to another site at the back of the cell, allowing force generation, matrix deformation and cell translocation. By combining experimental and modeling data, we demonstrate that cell migration in a fibrous environment requires the formation and propagation of dynamic, actin based fin-like protrusions. PMID:26553933

  9. Protrusive waves guide 3D cell migration along nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Guetta-Terrier, Charlotte; Monzo, Pascale; Zhu, Jie; Long, Hongyan; Venkatraman, Lakshmi; Zhou, Yue; Wang, PeiPei; Chew, Sing Yian; Mogilner, Alexander; Ladoux, Benoit; Gauthier, Nils C

    2015-11-09

    In vivo, cells migrate on complex three-dimensional (3D) fibrous matrices, which has made investigation of the key molecular and physical mechanisms that drive cell migration difficult. Using reductionist approaches based on 3D electrospun fibers, we report for various cell types that single-cell migration along fibronectin-coated nanofibers is associated with lateral actin-based waves. These cyclical waves have a fin-like shape and propagate up to several hundred micrometers from the cell body, extending the leading edge and promoting highly persistent directional movement. Cells generate these waves through balanced activation of the Rac1/N-WASP/Arp2/3 and Rho/formins pathways. The waves originate from one major adhesion site at leading end of the cell body, which is linked through actomyosin contractility to another site at the back of the cell, allowing force generation, matrix deformation and cell translocation. By combining experimental and modeling data, we demonstrate that cell migration in a fibrous environment requires the formation and propagation of dynamic, actin based fin-like protrusions.

  10. Object-adaptive depth compensated inter prediction for depth video coding in 3D video system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Min-Koo; Lee, Jaejoon; Lim, Ilsoon; Ho, Yo-Sung

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays, the 3D video system using the MVD (multi-view video plus depth) data format is being actively studied. The system has many advantages with respect to virtual view synthesis such as an auto-stereoscopic functionality, but compression of huge input data remains a problem. Therefore, efficient 3D data compression is extremely important in the system, and problems of low temporal consistency and viewpoint correlation should be resolved for efficient depth video coding. In this paper, we propose an object-adaptive depth compensated inter prediction method to resolve the problems where object-adaptive mean-depth difference between a current block, to be coded, and a reference block are compensated during inter prediction. In addition, unique properties of depth video are exploited to reduce side information required for signaling decoder to conduct the same process. To evaluate the coding performance, we have implemented the proposed method into MVC (multiview video coding) reference software, JMVC 8.2. Experimental results have demonstrated that our proposed method is especially efficient for depth videos estimated by DERS (depth estimation reference software) discussed in the MPEG 3DV coding group. The coding gain was up to 11.69% bit-saving, and it was even increased when we evaluated it on synthesized views of virtual viewpoints.

  11. Vel-IO 3D: A tool for 3D velocity model construction, optimization and time-depth conversion in 3D geological modeling workflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maesano, Francesco E.; D'Ambrogi, Chiara

    2017-02-01

    We present Vel-IO 3D, a tool for 3D velocity model creation and time-depth conversion, as part of a workflow for 3D model building. The workflow addresses the management of large subsurface dataset, mainly seismic lines and well logs, and the construction of a 3D velocity model able to describe the variation of the velocity parameters related to strong facies and thickness variability and to high structural complexity. Although it is applicable in many geological contexts (e.g. foreland basins, large intermountain basins), it is particularly suitable in wide flat regions, where subsurface structures have no surface expression. The Vel-IO 3D tool is composed by three scripts, written in Python 2.7.11, that automate i) the 3D instantaneous velocity model building, ii) the velocity model optimization, iii) the time-depth conversion. They determine a 3D geological model that is consistent with the primary geological constraints (e.g. depth of the markers on wells). The proposed workflow and the Vel-IO 3D tool have been tested, during the EU funded Project GeoMol, by the construction of the 3D geological model of a flat region, 5700 km2 in area, located in the central part of the Po Plain. The final 3D model showed the efficiency of the workflow and Vel-IO 3D tool in the management of large amount of data both in time and depth domain. A 4 layer-cake velocity model has been applied to a several thousand (5000-13,000 m) thick succession, with 15 horizons from Triassic up to Pleistocene, complicated by a Mesozoic extensional tectonics and by buried thrusts related to Southern Alps and Northern Apennines.

  12. 3D finite-difference seismic migration with parallel computers

    SciTech Connect

    Ober, C.C.; Gjertsen, R.; Minkoff, S.; Womble, D.E.

    1998-11-01

    The ability to image complex geologies such as salt domes in the Gulf of Mexico and thrusts in mountainous regions is essential for reducing the risk associated with oil exploration. Imaging these structures, however, is computationally expensive as datasets can be terabytes in size. Traditional ray-tracing migration methods cannot handle complex velocity variations commonly found near such salt structures. Instead the authors use the full 3D acoustic wave equation, discretized via a finite difference algorithm. They reduce the cost of solving the apraxial wave equation by a number of numerical techniques including the method of fractional steps and pipelining the tridiagonal solves. The imaging code, Salvo, uses both frequency parallelism (generally 90% efficient) and spatial parallelism (65% efficient). Salvo has been tested on synthetic and real data and produces clear images of the subsurface even beneath complicated salt structures.

  13. Optimizing visual comfort for stereoscopic 3D display based on color-plus-depth signals.

    PubMed

    Shao, Feng; Jiang, Qiuping; Fu, Randi; Yu, Mei; Jiang, Gangyi

    2016-05-30

    Visual comfort is a long-facing problem in stereoscopic 3D (S3D) display. In this paper, targeting to produce S3D content based on color-plus-depth signals, a general framework for depth mapping to optimize visual comfort for S3D display is proposed. The main motivation of this work is to remap the depth range of color-plus-depth signals to a new depth range that is suitable to comfortable S3D display. Towards this end, we first remap the depth range globally based on the adjusted zero disparity plane, and then present a two-stage global and local depth optimization solution to solve the visual comfort problem. The remapped depth map is used to generate the S3D output. We demonstrate the power of our approach on perceptually uncomfortable and comfortable stereoscopic images.

  14. Retrospective sputter depth profiling using 3D mass spectral imaging.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Leiliang; Wucher, Andreas; Winograd, Nicholas

    2011-02-01

    A molecular multilayer stack composed of alternating Langmuir-Blodgett films was analyzed by ToF-SIMS imaging in combination with intermediate sputter erosion using a focused C60(+) cluster ion beam. From the resulting dataset, depth profiles of any desired lateral portion of the analyzed field-of-view can be extracted in retrospect, allowing the influence of the gating area on the apparent depth resolution to be assessed. In a similar way, the observed degradation of depth resolution with increasing depth of the analyzed interface can be analyzed in order to determine the 'intrinsic' depth resolution of the method.

  15. Vinculin Regulates Directionality and Cell Polarity in 2D, 3D Matrix and 3D Microtrack Migration.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Aniqua; Carey, Shawn P; Kraning-Rush, Casey M; Goldblatt, Zachary E; Bordeleau, Francois; Lampi, Marsha C; Lin, Deanna Y; García, Andrés J; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A

    2016-03-09

    During metastasis, cells can use proteolytic activity to form tube-like "microtracks" within the extracellular matrix (ECM). Using these microtracks, cells can migrate unimpeded through the stroma. To investigate the molecular mechanisms of microtrack migration, we developed an in vitro 3D micromolded collagen platform. When in microtracks, cells tend to migrate unidirectionally. Since focal adhesions are the primary mechanism by which cells interact with the ECM, we examined the roles of several focal adhesion molecules in driving unidirectional motion. Vinculin knockdown results in the repeated reversal of migration direction compared with control cells. Tracking the position of the Golgi centroid relative to the position of the nucleus centroid reveals that vinculin knockdown disrupts cell polarity in microtracks. Vinculin also directs migration on 2D substrates and in 3D uniform collagen matrices, indicated by reduced speed, shorter net displacement and decreased directionality in vinculin-deficient cells. In addition, vinculin is necessary for Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) activation in 3D as vinculin knockdown results in reduced FAK activation in both 3D uniform collagen matrices and microtracks, but not on 2D substrates, and accordingly, FAK inhibition halts cell migration in 3D microtracks. Together, these data indicate that vinculin plays a key role in polarization during migration.

  16. Automated Mosaicking of Multiple 3d Point Clouds Generated from a Depth Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.; Yoon, W.; Kim, T.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we propose a method for automated mosaicking of multiple 3D point clouds generated from a depth camera. A depth camera generates depth data by using ToF (Time of Flight) method and intensity data by using intensity of returned signal. The depth camera used in this paper was a SR4000 from MESA Imaging. This camera generates a depth map and intensity map of 176 x 44 pixels. Generated depth map saves physical depth data with mm of precision. Generated intensity map contains texture data with many noises. We used texture maps for extracting tiepoints and depth maps for assigning z coordinates to tiepoints and point cloud mosaicking. There are four steps in the proposed mosaicking method. In the first step, we acquired multiple 3D point clouds by rotating depth camera and capturing data per rotation. In the second step, we estimated 3D-3D transformation relationships between subsequent point clouds. For this, 2D tiepoints were extracted automatically from the corresponding two intensity maps. They were converted into 3D tiepoints using depth maps. We used a 3D similarity transformation model for estimating the 3D-3D transformation relationships. In the third step, we converted local 3D-3D transformations into a global transformation for all point clouds with respect to a reference one. In the last step, the extent of single depth map mosaic was calculated and depth values per mosaic pixel were determined by a ray tracing method. For experiments, 8 depth maps and intensity maps were used. After the four steps, an output mosaicked depth map of 454x144 was generated. It is expected that the proposed method would be useful for developing an effective 3D indoor mapping method in future.

  17. Introducing the depth transfer curve for 3D capture system characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goma, Sergio R.; Atanassov, Kalin; Ramachandra, Vikas

    2011-03-01

    3D technology has recently made a transition from movie theaters to consumer electronic devices such as 3D cameras and camcorders. In addition to what 2D imaging conveys, 3D content also contains information regarding the scene depth. Scene depth is simulated through the strongest brain depth cue, namely retinal disparity. This can be achieved by capturing an image by horizontally separated cameras. Objects at different depths will be projected with different horizontal displacement on the left and right camera images. These images, when fed separately to either eye, leads to retinal disparity. Since the perception of depth is the single most important 3D imaging capability, an evaluation procedure is needed to quantify the depth capture characteristics. Evaluating depth capture characteristics subjectively is a very difficult task since the intended and/or unintended side effects from 3D image fusion (depth interpretation) by the brain are not immediately perceived by the observer, nor do such effects lend themselves easily to objective quantification. Objective evaluation of 3D camera depth characteristics is an important tool that can be used for "black box" characterization of 3D cameras. In this paper we propose a methodology to evaluate the 3D cameras' depth capture capabilities.

  18. Subpixel Resolution In Depth Perceived Via 3-D Television

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diner, Daniel B.; Von Sydow, Marika; Fender, Derek H.

    1993-01-01

    Report describes experiment in which two black vertical bars on featureless white background placed near intersection of optical axes of two charge-coupled-device video cameras positioned to give stereoscopic views. Trained human observers found to perceive depths at subpixel resolutions in stereoscopic television images. This finding significant for remote stereoscopic monitoring, expecially during precise maneuvers of remotely controlled manipulators. Also significant for research in processing of visual information by human brain.

  19. Increasing the depth of field in Multiview 3D images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Beom-Ryeol; Son, Jung-Young; Yano, Sumio; Jung, Ilkwon

    2016-06-01

    A super-multiview condition simulator which can project up to four different view images to each eye is introduced. This simulator with the image having both disparity and perspective informs that the depth of field (DOF) will be extended to more than the default DOF values as the number of simultaneously but separately projected different view images to each eye increase. The DOF range can be extended to near 2 diopters with the four simultaneous view images. However, the DOF value increments are not prominent as the image with both disparity and perspective with the image with disparity only.

  20. 3D Pre-stack depth imaging of the Nankai Trough accretionary prism off Shikoku Island, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa Pisani, P.; Ike, T.; Moore, G.; Reshef, M.; Bangs, N.; Gulick, S.; Shipley, T.; Kuramoto, S.

    2003-12-01

    During 1999 we acquired an 8x90 km 3D seismic dataset across the toe of the Nankai Through accretionary prism south of Shikoku. Previous processing steps have focused on 3D pre-stack time migration of the entire survey and 2D pre-stack depth migration (PSDM) of two in-lines that cross the Leg 190/196 drill sites. In this study, we conducted 3D PSDM of the seaward half of the data set to improve structural images and to derive the velocity structure of the underthrust sedimentary section in order to better understand its 3D compaction and dewatering history. Velocities derived from pre-stack depth migration are considered to most accurately reflect actual in-situ formation velocities. Our processing procedure started with pre-stack time migration in the cross-line direction to image the data into 2D inlines, allowing us to use 2D migration velocity analysis (MVA) techniques to update the velocity field. 3D imaging of target volumes of data around the leg 190/196 drill holes using several distinctive reflections as depth marker horizons provided constraints for the migration input velocity model. We then 2D MVA on every 5th inline (total of 32 lines), using a top-down, layer stripping technique with Residual Move Out picking to iteratively update the velocity model and flatten the Common Reflection Point (CRP) gathers. We also compared CRP gathers with image gathers in order to detect dipping events and velocity anisotropy. We then used the resulting 3D velocity field as input to a full 3D PSDM of the entire data set. The depth image clarified the accretionary prism's structure, including the numerous thrust faults, the basal décollement, and the underthrusting Shikoku Basin sedimentary unit. The thickness of the underthrust section decreases landward because of compaction. The velocity model shows that the underthrust section's velocity increases about 20% over the first 15 km landward. Along strike variations in velocity are generally less than about 5-10%.

  1. Fast seismic velocity analysis using parsimonious Kirchhoff depth migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Weihong

    Migration-based velocity analysis is the most efficient, and accurate velocity inversion technique. It generally involves time-consuming prestack depth migration, and picking of the depth residuals in common-image gathers (CIGs) in each iteration. Two modifications are proposed to minimize the time of prestack depth migration and the picking work in velocity analysis: one approach is to invert the velocity model in layer-stripping style; the other is based on a grid parametrization of the velocity model. Both approaches are based on the idea of parsimonious depth migration, which is the fastest depth migration currently available. Both approaches have four basic steps: (1) Picking the primary, most consistent reflection events from one reference seismic section or volume. (2) Depending on whether the reference data is 2-D poststack, 2-D common-offset, 3-D poststack, or 3-D common-offset, the corresponding parsimonious depth migration is used to migrate all the picked time samples to their spatial locations and to give their orientations. (3) Ray-tracing defines the CRP gathers for each reflection point. (4) Velocity updating. For the layer-stripping approach, a small (2-3) number of iterations converge to a 2-D model of layer shape and interval velocity. The computation time of this layer-stripping approach is of the same order as that of the standard (1-D) rms velocity scan method, and is much faster than current iterative prestack depth migration velocity analysis methods for typical field data. For the grid-based approach, it is not necessary to define continuous reflectors and that the time at any offset (not only zero offset) can be used as the reference time for a reflection. Truncations, and multi-valued layers, which need much effort in the layer-stripping approach, are handled naturally and implicitly in the grid-based approach. Two important features of the proposed algorithms are: the traveltime picking is limited to only a stacked or common

  2. An efficient 3D traveltime calculation using coarse-grid mesh for shallow-depth source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Woohyun; Pyun, Sukjoon; Lee, Ho-Young; Koo, Nam-Hyung; Shin, Changsoo

    2016-10-01

    3D Kirchhoff pre-stack depth migration requires an efficient algorithm to compute first-arrival traveltimes. In this paper, we exploited a wave-equation-based traveltime calculation algorithm, which is called the suppressed wave equation estimation of traveltime (SWEET), and the equivalent source distribution (ESD) algorithm. The motivation of using the SWEET algorithm is to solve the Laplace-domain wave equation using coarse grid spacing to calculate first-arrival traveltimes. However, if a real source is located at shallow-depth close to free surface, we cannot accurately calculate the wavefield using coarse grid spacing. So, we need an additional algorithm to correctly simulate the shallow source even for the coarse grid mesh. The ESD algorithm is a method to define a set of distributed nodal sources that approximate a point source at the inter-nodal location in a velocity model with large grid spacing. Thanks to the ESD algorithm, we can efficiently calculate the first-arrival traveltimes of waves emitted from shallow source point even when we solve the Laplace-domain wave equation using a coarse-grid mesh. The proposed algorithm is applied to the SEG/EAGE 3D salt model. From the result, we note that the combination of SWEET and ESD algorithms can be successfully used for the traveltime calculation under the condition of a shallow-depth source. We also confirmed that our algorithm using coarse-grid mesh requires less computational time than the conventional SWEET algorithm using relatively fine-grid mesh.

  3. Lamina 3D display: projection-type depth-fused display using polarization-encoded depth information.

    PubMed

    Park, Soon-gi; Yoon, Sangcheol; Yeom, Jiwoon; Baek, Hogil; Min, Sung-Wook; Lee, Byoungho

    2014-10-20

    In order to realize three-dimensional (3D) displays, various multiplexing methods have been proposed to add the depth dimension to two-dimensional scenes. However, most of these methods have faced challenges such as the degradation of viewing qualities, the requirement of complicated equipment, and large amounts of data. In this paper, we further developed our previous concept, polarization distributed depth map, to propose the Lamina 3D display as a method for encoding and reconstructing depth information using the polarization status. By adopting projection optics to the depth encoding system, reconstructed 3D images can be scaled like images of 2D projection displays. 3D reconstruction characteristics of the polarization-encoded images are analyzed with simulation and experiment. The experimental system is also demonstrated to show feasibility of the proposed method.

  4. Nonpolarized signaling reveals two distinct modes of 3D cell migration.

    PubMed

    Petrie, Ryan J; Gavara, Núria; Chadwick, Richard S; Yamada, Kenneth M

    2012-04-30

    We search in this paper for context-specific modes of three-dimensional (3D) cell migration using imaging for phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate (PIP3) and active Rac1 and Cdc42 in primary fibroblasts migrating within different 3D environments. In 3D collagen, PIP3 and active Rac1 and Cdc42 were targeted to the leading edge, consistent with lamellipodia-based migration. In contrast, elongated cells migrating inside dermal explants and the cell-derived matrix (CDM) formed blunt, cylindrical protrusions, termed lobopodia, and Rac1, Cdc42, and PIP3 signaling was nonpolarized. Reducing RhoA, Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK), or myosin II activity switched the cells to lamellipodia-based 3D migration. These modes of 3D migration were regulated by matrix physical properties. Specifically, experimentally modifying the elasticity of the CDM or collagen gels established that nonlinear elasticity supported lamellipodia-based migration, whereas linear elasticity switched cells to lobopodia-based migration. Thus, the relative polarization of intracellular signaling identifies two distinct modes of 3D cell migration governed intrinsically by RhoA, ROCK, and myosin II and extrinsically by the elastic behavior of the 3D extracellular matrix.

  5. In vitro analysis of chemotactic leukocyte migration in 3D environments.

    PubMed

    Sixt, Michael; Lämmermann, Tim

    2011-01-01

    Cell migration on two-dimensional (2D) substrates follows entirely different rules than cell migration in three-dimensional (3D) environments. This is especially relevant for leukocytes that are able to migrate in the absence of adhesion receptors within the confined geometry of artificial 3D extracellular matrix scaffolds and within the interstitial space in vivo. Here, we describe in detail a simple and economical protocol to visualize dendritic cell migration in 3D collagen scaffolds along chemotactic gradients. This method can be adapted to other cell types and may serve as a physiologically relevant paradigm for the directed locomotion of most amoeboid cells.

  6. Volume Attenuation and High Frequency Loss as Auditory Depth Cues in Stereoscopic 3D Cinema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manolas, Christos; Pauletto, Sandra

    2014-09-01

    Assisted by the technological advances of the past decades, stereoscopic 3D (S3D) cinema is currently in the process of being established as a mainstream form of entertainment. The main focus of this collaborative effort is placed on the creation of immersive S3D visuals. However, with few exceptions, little attention has been given so far to the potential effect of the soundtrack on such environments. The potential of sound both as a means to enhance the impact of the S3D visual information and to expand the S3D cinematic world beyond the boundaries of the visuals is large. This article reports on our research into the possibilities of using auditory depth cues within the soundtrack as a means of affecting the perception of depth within cinematic S3D scenes. We study two main distance-related auditory cues: high-end frequency loss and overall volume attenuation. A series of experiments explored the effectiveness of these auditory cues. Results, although not conclusive, indicate that the studied auditory cues can influence the audience judgement of depth in cinematic 3D scenes, sometimes in unexpected ways. We conclude that 3D filmmaking can benefit from further studies on the effectiveness of specific sound design techniques to enhance S3D cinema.

  7. Vinculin is required for cell polarization, migration, and extracellular matrix remodeling in 3D collagen.

    PubMed

    Thievessen, Ingo; Fakhri, Nikta; Steinwachs, Julian; Kraus, Viola; McIsaac, R Scott; Gao, Liang; Chen, Bi-Chang; Baird, Michelle A; Davidson, Michael W; Betzig, Eric; Oldenbourg, Rudolf; Waterman, Clare M; Fabry, Ben

    2015-11-01

    Vinculin is filamentous (F)-actin-binding protein enriched in integrin-based adhesions to the extracellular matrix (ECM). Whereas studies in 2-dimensional (2D) tissue culture models have suggested that vinculin negatively regulates cell migration by promoting cytoskeleton-ECM coupling to strengthen and stabilize adhesions, its role in regulating cell migration in more physiologic, 3-dimensional (3D) environments is unclear. To address the role of vinculin in 3D cell migration, we analyzed the morphodynamics, migration, and ECM remodeling of primary murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) with cre/loxP-mediated vinculin gene disruption in 3D collagen I cultures. We found that vinculin promoted 3D cell migration by increasing directional persistence. Vinculin was necessary for persistent cell protrusion, cell elongation, and stable cell orientation in 3D collagen, but was dispensable for lamellipodia formation, suggesting that vinculin-mediated cell adhesion to the ECM is needed to convert actin-based cell protrusion into persistent cell shape change and migration. Consistent with this finding, vinculin was necessary for efficient traction force generation in 3D collagen without affecting myosin II activity and promoted 3D collagen fiber alignment and macroscopical gel contraction. Our results suggest that vinculin promotes directionally persistent cell migration and tension-dependent ECM remodeling in complex 3D environments by increasing cell-ECM adhesion and traction force generation.

  8. Depth enhancement of S3D content and the psychological effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirahara, Masahiro; Shiraishi, Saki; Kawai, Takashi

    2012-03-01

    Stereoscopic 3D (S3D) imaging technologies are widely used recently to create content for movies, TV programs, games, etc. Although S3D content differs from 2D content by the use of binocular parallax to induce depth sensation, the relationship between depth control and the user experience remains unclear. In this study, the user experience was subjectively and objectively evaluated in order to determine the effectiveness of depth control, such as an expansion or reduction or a forward or backward shift in the range of maximum parallactic angles in the cross and uncross directions (depth bracket). Four types of S3D content were used in the subjective and objective evaluations. The depth brackets of comparison stimuli were modified in order to enhance the depth sensation corresponding to the content. Interpretation Based Quality (IBQ) methodology was used for the subjective evaluation and the heart rate was measured to evaluate the physiological effect. The results of the evaluations suggest the following two points. (1) Expansion/reduction of the depth bracket affects preference and enhances positive emotions to the S3D content. (2) Expansion/reduction of the depth bracket produces above-mentioned effects more notable than shifting the cross/uncross directions.

  9. Integrin associated proteins differentially regulate neutrophil polarity and directed migration in 2D and 3D.

    PubMed

    Yamahashi, Yukie; Cavnar, Peter J; Hind, Laurel E; Berthier, Erwin; Bennin, David A; Beebe, David; Huttenlocher, Anna

    2015-10-01

    Directed neutrophil migration in blood vessels and tissues is critical for proper immune function; however, the mechanisms that regulate three-dimensional neutrophil chemotaxis remain unclear. It has been shown that integrins are dispensable for interstitial three-dimensional (3D) leukocyte migration; however, the role of integrin regulatory proteins during directed neutrophil migration is not known. Using a novel microfluidic gradient generator amenable to 2D and 3D analysis, we found that the integrin regulatory proteins Kindlin-3, RIAM, and talin-1 differentially regulate neutrophil polarization and directed migration to gradients of chemoattractant in 2D versus 3D. Both talin-1-deficient and RIAM-deficient neutrophil-like cells had impaired adhesion, polarization, and migration on 2D surfaces whereas in 3D the cells polarized but had impaired 3D chemotactic velocity. Kindlin-3 deficient cells were able to polarize and migrate on 2D surfaces but had impaired directionality. In a 3D environment, Kindlin-3 deficient cells displayed efficient chemotaxis. These findings demonstrate that the role of integrin regulatory proteins in cell polarity and directed migration can be different in 2D and 3D.

  10. Edge-based intramode selection for depth-map coding in 3D-HEVC.

    PubMed

    Park, Chun-Su

    2015-01-01

    The 3D video extension of High Efficiency Video Coding (3D-HEVC) is the state-of-the-art video coding standard for the compression of the multiview video plus depth format. In the 3D-HEVC design, new depth-modeling modes (DMMs) are utilized together with the existing intraprediction modes for depth intracoding. The DMMs can provide more accurate prediction signals and thereby achieve better compression efficiency. However, testing the DMMs in the intramode decision process causes a drastic increase in the computational complexity. In this paper, we propose a fast mode decision algorithm for depth intracoding. The proposed algorithm first performs a simple edge classification in the Hadamard transform domain. Then, based on the edge classification results, the proposed algorithm selectively omits unnecessary DMMs in the mode decision process. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm speeds up the mode decision process by up to 37.65% with negligible loss of coding efficiency.

  11. A novel 3D integrated platform for the high-resolution study of cell migration plasticity.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Julian; Bachmann, Tobias; Franco, Davide; Richner, Patrizia; Galliker, Patrick; Tiwari, Manish K; Ferrari, Aldo; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2013-08-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of interstitial cancer migration is of great scientific and medical interest. Creating 3D platforms, conducive to optical microscopy and mimicking the physical parameters (in plane and out of plane) involved in interstitial migration, is a major step forward in this direction. Here, a novel approach is used to directly print free-form, 3D micropores on basal scaffolds containing microgratings optimized for contact guidance. The platforms so formed are validated by monitoring cancer cell migration and micropore penetration with high-resolution optical microscopy. The shapes, sizes and deformability of the micropores are controllable, paving the way to decipher their role in interstitial migration.

  12. Can the perception of depth in stereoscopic images be influenced by 3D sound?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Amy; Berry, Jonathan; Holliman, Nick

    2011-03-01

    The creation of binocular images for stereoscopic display has benefited from significant research and commercial development in recent years. However, perhaps surprisingly, the effect of adding 3D sound to stereoscopic images has rarely been studied. If auditory depth information can enhance or extend the visual depth experience it could become an important way to extend the limited depth budget on all 3D displays and reduce the potential for fatigue from excessive use of disparity. Objective: As there is limited research in this area our objective was to ask two preliminary questions. First what is the smallest difference in forward depth that can be reliably detected using 3D sound alone? Second does the addition of auditory depth information influence the visual perception of depth in a stereoscopic image? Method: To investigate auditory depth cues we use a simple sound system to test the experimental hypothesis that: participants will perform better than chance at judging the depth differences between two speakers a set distance apart. In our second experiment investigating both auditory and visual depth cues we setup a sound system and a stereoscopic display to test the experimental hypothesis that: participants judge a visual stimulus to be closer if they hear a closer sound when viewing the stimulus. Results: In the auditory depth cue trial every depth difference tested gave significant results demonstrating that the human ear can hear depth differences between physical sources as short as 0.25 m at 1 m. In our trial investigating whether audio information can influence the visual perception of depth we found that participants did report visually perceiving an object to be closer when the sound was played closer to them even though the image depth remained unchanged. Conclusion: The positive results in the two trials show that we can hear small differences in forward depth between sound sources and suggest that it could be practical to extend the apparent

  13. N-cadherin as a key regulator of collective cell migration in a 3D environment.

    PubMed

    Shih, Wenting; Yamada, Soichiro

    2012-01-01

    Cell migration is a critical step of normal developmental processes and disease progression. Often, migrating cells interact and maintain contact with neighboring cells. However, the precise roles of cell-cell adhesion in cell migration have thus far been poorly defined. Often in aggressive cancers, N-cadherin is prominently upregulated, yet, these highly motile cells have limited cell-cell adhesion when plated on a stiff 2D substrate. But, the same cells in a 3D matrix migrate as a multicellular cluster. This new observation suggests that N-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion supports cell interactions between migrating cells in a more physiologically relevant 3D matrix, but not on a 2D substrate. While N-cadherin is an integral part of neural synapses, the ectopic expression of N-cadherin in transformed epithelial cells plays an equally important part in initiating pro-migratory signaling, and providing strong yet flexible cell cohesion essential for persistent cell migration in a 3D matrix. The 3D cell migration analysis for studying cell-to-cell interactions exposes the roles of N-cadherin in multicellular migration, and reveals novel insights into cell migration-dependent normal and pathological processes.

  14. Role of dynamin in elongated cell migration in a 3D matrix.

    PubMed

    Lees, Justin G; Gorgani, Nick N; Ammit, Alaina J; McCluskey, Adam; Robinson, Phillip J; O'Neill, Geraldine M

    2015-03-01

    The use of 3-dimensional (3D) collagen gels has yielded new insights into the migratory behaviour of cancer cells. While the large GTPase dynamin has emerged as an important regulator of cancer cell migration and invasion under 2D conditions, its role in 3D migration is unclear. We have used a potent dynamin modulator, a bis-tyrphostin derivative, Ryngo® 1-23, to investigate the role of dynamin in 3D migration in 3 different cell lines. The compound specifically inhibits persistent, elongated 3D migration in U87MG and SMA-560 cells. Treated U87MG cells adopt a rounded morphology that is not due to apoptosis, loss of matrix metalloprotease activity or inhibition of clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Given that Ryngo 1-23 is known to regulate dynamin oligomerisation and actin dynamics at the leading edge, we analysed actin filament distribution. Ryngo 1-23 induced a switch in actin filament organization in 3D cultures resulting in the generation of multiple short actin-rich microspikes. Correlated with the change in actin filament distribution, cells displayed reduced collagen gel contraction. Since acto-myosin force transmission to the extra-cellular matrix underpins persistent, elongated migration, our results suggest that Ryngo 1-23 modulates this process in 3D migration via dynamin-mediated regulation of acto-myosin force transmission to the extra-cellular matrix.

  15. Integration of 3D structure from disparity into biological motion perception independent of depth awareness.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Jiang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Images projected onto the retinas of our two eyes come from slightly different directions in the real world, constituting binocular disparity that serves as an important source for depth perception - the ability to see the world in three dimensions. It remains unclear whether the integration of disparity cues into visual perception depends on the conscious representation of stereoscopic depth. Here we report evidence that, even without inducing discernible perceptual representations, the disparity-defined depth information could still modulate the visual processing of 3D objects in depth-irrelevant aspects. Specifically, observers who could not discriminate disparity-defined in-depth facing orientations of biological motions (i.e., approaching vs. receding) due to an excessive perceptual bias nevertheless exhibited a robust perceptual asymmetry in response to the indistinguishable facing orientations, similar to those who could consciously discriminate such 3D information. These results clearly demonstrate that the visual processing of biological motion engages the disparity cues independent of observers' depth awareness. The extraction and utilization of binocular depth signals thus can be dissociable from the conscious representation of 3D structure in high-level visual perception.

  16. Local 3D matrix microenvironment regulates cell migration through spatiotemporal dynamics of contractility-dependent adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Andrew D.; Carvajal, Nicole; Jin, Albert; Matsumoto, Kazue; Yamada, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    The physical properties of two-dimensional (2D) extracellular matrices (ECMs) modulate cell adhesion dynamics and motility, but little is known about the roles of local microenvironmental differences in three-dimensional (3D) ECMs. Here we generate 3D collagen gels of varying matrix microarchitectures to characterize their regulation of 3D adhesion dynamics and cell migration. ECMs containing bundled fibrils demonstrate enhanced local adhesion-scale stiffness and increased adhesion stability through balanced ECM/adhesion coupling, whereas highly pliable reticular matrices promote adhesion retraction. 3D adhesion dynamics are locally regulated by ECM rigidity together with integrin/ECM association and myosin II contractility. Unlike 2D migration, abrogating contractility stalls 3D migration regardless of ECM pore size. We find force is not required for clustering of activated integrins on 3D native collagen fibrils. We propose that efficient 3D migration requires local balancing of contractility with ECM stiffness to stabilize adhesions, which facilitates the detachment of activated integrins from ECM fibrils. PMID:26548801

  17. Local 3D matrix microenvironment regulates cell migration through spatiotemporal dynamics of contractility-dependent adhesions.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Andrew D; Carvajal, Nicole; Jin, Albert; Matsumoto, Kazue; Yamada, Kenneth M

    2015-11-09

    The physical properties of two-dimensional (2D) extracellular matrices (ECMs) modulate cell adhesion dynamics and motility, but little is known about the roles of local microenvironmental differences in three-dimensional (3D) ECMs. Here we generate 3D collagen gels of varying matrix microarchitectures to characterize their regulation of 3D adhesion dynamics and cell migration. ECMs containing bundled fibrils demonstrate enhanced local adhesion-scale stiffness and increased adhesion stability through balanced ECM/adhesion coupling, whereas highly pliable reticular matrices promote adhesion retraction. 3D adhesion dynamics are locally regulated by ECM rigidity together with integrin/ECM association and myosin II contractility. Unlike 2D migration, abrogating contractility stalls 3D migration regardless of ECM pore size. We find force is not required for clustering of activated integrins on 3D native collagen fibrils. We propose that efficient 3D migration requires local balancing of contractility with ECM stiffness to stabilize adhesions, which facilitates the detachment of activated integrins from ECM fibrils.

  18. Local 3D matrix microenvironment regulates cell migration through spatiotemporal dynamics of contractility-dependent adhesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Andrew D.; Carvajal, Nicole; Jin, Albert; Matsumoto, Kazue; Yamada, Kenneth M.

    2015-11-01

    The physical properties of two-dimensional (2D) extracellular matrices (ECMs) modulate cell adhesion dynamics and motility, but little is known about the roles of local microenvironmental differences in three-dimensional (3D) ECMs. Here we generate 3D collagen gels of varying matrix microarchitectures to characterize their regulation of 3D adhesion dynamics and cell migration. ECMs containing bundled fibrils demonstrate enhanced local adhesion-scale stiffness and increased adhesion stability through balanced ECM/adhesion coupling, whereas highly pliable reticular matrices promote adhesion retraction. 3D adhesion dynamics are locally regulated by ECM rigidity together with integrin/ECM association and myosin II contractility. Unlike 2D migration, abrogating contractility stalls 3D migration regardless of ECM pore size. We find force is not required for clustering of activated integrins on 3D native collagen fibrils. We propose that efficient 3D migration requires local balancing of contractility with ECM stiffness to stabilize adhesions, which facilitates the detachment of activated integrins from ECM fibrils.

  19. Comparative mechanisms of cancer cell migration through 3D matrix and physiological microtracks.

    PubMed

    Carey, Shawn P; Rahman, Aniqua; Kraning-Rush, Casey M; Romero, Bethsabe; Somasegar, Sahana; Torre, Olivia M; Williams, Rebecca M; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A

    2015-03-15

    Tumor cell invasion through the stromal extracellular matrix (ECM) is a key feature of cancer metastasis, and understanding the cellular mechanisms of invasive migration is critical to the development of effective diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. Since cancer cell migration is highly adaptable to physiochemical properties of the ECM, it is critical to define these migration mechanisms in a context-specific manner. Although extensive work has characterized cancer cell migration in two- and three-dimensional (3D) matrix environments, the migration program employed by cells to move through native and cell-derived microtracks within the stromal ECM remains unclear. We previously reported the development of an in vitro model of patterned type I collagen microtracks that enable matrix metalloproteinase-independent microtrack migration. Here we show that collagen microtracks closely resemble channel-like gaps in native mammary stroma ECM and examine the extracellular and intracellular mechanisms underlying microtrack migration. Cell-matrix mechanocoupling, while critical for migration through 3D matrix, is not necessary for microtrack migration. Instead, cytoskeletal dynamics, including actin polymerization, cortical tension, and microtubule turnover, enable persistent, polarized migration through physiological microtracks. These results indicate that tumor cells employ context-specific mechanisms to migrate and suggest that selective targeting of cytoskeletal dynamics, but not adhesion, proteolysis, or cell traction forces, may effectively inhibit cancer cell migration through preformed matrix microtracks within the tumor stroma.

  20. Electrophysiological evidence of separate pathways for the perception of depth and 3D objects.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng; Cao, Bihua; Cao, Yunfei; Li, Fuhong; Li, Hong

    2015-05-01

    Previous studies have investigated the neural mechanism of 3D perception, but the neural distinction between 3D-objects and depth processing remains unclear. In the present study, participants viewed three types of graphics (planar graphics, perspective drawings, and 3D objects) while event-related potentials (ERP) were recorded. The ERP results revealed the following: (1) 3D objects elicited a larger and delayed N1 component than the other two types of stimuli; (2) during the P2 time window, significant differences between 3D objects and the perspective drawings were found mainly over a group of electrode sites in the left lateral occipital region; and (3) during the N2 complex, differences between planar graphics and perspective drawings were found over a group of electrode sites in the right hemisphere, whereas differences between perspective drawings and 3D objects were observed at another group of electrode sites in the left hemisphere. These findings support the claim that depth processing and object identification might be processed by separate pathways and at different latencies.

  1. 3D inverted colloidal crystals in realistic cell migration assays for drug screening applications.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Joakim; Lautenschläger, Franziska; Kuo, Cheng-Hwa R; Guck, Jochen; Sivaniah, Easan

    2011-12-01

    Screening drugs for their specific impact on cell mechanics, in addition to targeting adhesion and proteolysis, will be important for successfully moderating migration in infiltrative disorders including cancer metastasis. We present 3D inverted colloidal crystals made of hydrogel as a realistic cell migration assay, where the geometry and stiffness can be set independently to mimic the tissue requirements in question. We show the utility of this 3D assay for drug screening purposes, specifically in contrast to conventional 2D migration studies, by surveying the effects of commonly used cytoskeletal toxins that impact cell mechanics. This assay allows studying large cell numbers for good statistics but at single-cell resolution.

  2. Controlled surface topography regulates collective 3D migration by epithelial-mesenchymal composite embryonic tissues.

    PubMed

    Song, Jiho; Shawky, Joseph H; Kim, YongTae; Hazar, Melis; LeDuc, Philip R; Sitti, Metin; Davidson, Lance A

    2015-07-01

    Cells in tissues encounter a range of physical cues as they migrate. Probing single cell and collective migratory responses to physically defined three-dimensional (3D) microenvironments and the factors that modulate those responses are critical to understanding how tissue migration is regulated during development, regeneration, and cancer. One key physical factor that regulates cell migration is topography. Most studies on surface topography and cell mechanics have been carried out with single migratory cells, yet little is known about the spreading and motility response of 3D complex multi-cellular tissues to topographical cues. Here, we examine the response to complex topographical cues of microsurgically isolated tissue explants composed of epithelial and mesenchymal cell layers from naturally 3D organized embryos of the aquatic frog Xenopus laevis. We control topography using fabricated micropost arrays (MPAs) and investigate the collective 3D migration of these multi-cellular systems in these MPAs. We find that the topography regulates both collective and individual cell migration and that dense MPAs reduce but do not eliminate tissue spreading. By modulating cell size through the cell cycle inhibitor Mitomycin C or the spacing of the MPAs we uncover how 3D topographical cues disrupt collective cell migration. We find surface topography can direct both single cell motility and tissue spreading, altering tissue-scale processes that enable efficient conversion of single cell motility into collective movement.

  3. Migration dynamics of breast cancer cells in a tunable 3D interstitial flow chamber.

    PubMed

    Haessler, Ulrike; Teo, Jeremy C M; Foretay, Didier; Renaud, Philippe; Swartz, Melody A

    2012-04-01

    The migration of cells such as leukocytes, tumor cells, and fibroblasts through 3D matrices is critical for regulating homeostasis and immunity and for driving pathogenesis. Interstitial flow through the extracellular matrix, which can substantially increase during inflammation and in the tumor microenvironment, can influence cell migration in multiple ways. Leukocytes and tumor cells are heterogeneous in their migration responses to flow, yet most 3D migration studies use endpoint measurements representing average characteristics. Here we present a robust new microfluidic device for 3D culture with live imaging under well-controlled flow conditions, along with a comparison of analytical methods for describing the migration behavior of heterogeneous cell populations. We then use the model to provide new insight on how interstitial flow affects MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell invasion, phenomena that are not seen from averaged or endpoint measurements. Specifically, we find that interstitial flow increases the percentage of cells that become migratory, and increases migrational speed in about 20% of the cells. It also increases the migrational persistence of a subpopulation (5-10% of cells) in the positive or negative flow direction. Cells that migrated upstream moved faster but with less directedness, whereas cells that migrated in the direction of flow moved at slower speeds but with higher directedness. These findings demonstrate how fluid flow in the tumor microenvironment can enhance tumor cell invasion by directing a subpopulation of tumor cells in the flow direction; i.e., towards the draining lymphatic vessels, a major route of metastasis.

  4. 3D planar representation of stereo depth images for 3DTV applications.

    PubMed

    Özkalaycı, Burak O; Alatan, A Aydın

    2014-12-01

    The depth modality of the multiview video plus depth (MVD) format is an active research area, whose main objective is to develop depth image based rendering friendly efficient compression methods. As a part of this research, a novel 3D planar-based depth representation is proposed. The planar approximation of multiple depth images are formulated as an energy-based co-segmentation problem by a Markov random field model. The energy terms of this problem are designed to mimic the rate-distortion tradeoff for a depth compression application. A novel algorithm is developed for practical utilization of the proposed planar approximations in stereo depth compression. The co-segmented regions are also represented as layered planar structures forming a novel single-reference MVD format. The ability of the proposed layered planar MVD representation in decoupling the texture and geometric distortions make it a promising approach. Proposed 3D planar depth compression approaches are compared against the state-of-the-art image/video coding standards by objective and visual evaluation and yielded competitive performance.

  5. Depth-of-Focus Affects 3D Perception in Stereoscopic Displays.

    PubMed

    Vienne, Cyril; Blondé, Laurent; Mamassian, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Stereoscopic systems present binocular images on planar surface at a fixed distance. They induce cues to flatness, indicating that images are presented on a unique surface and specifying the relative depth of that surface. The center of interest of this study is on a second problem, arising when a 3D object distance differs from the display distance. As binocular disparity must be scaled using an estimate of viewing distance, object depth can thus be affected through disparity scaling. Two previous experiments revealed that stereoscopic displays can affect depth perception due to conflicting accommodation and vergence cues at near distances. In this study, depth perception is evaluated for farther accommodation and vergence distances using a commercially available 3D TV. In Experiment I, we evaluated depth perception of 3D stimuli at different vergence distances for a large pool of participants. We observed a strong effect of vergence distance that was bigger for younger than for older participants, suggesting that the effect of accommodation was reduced in participants with emerging presbyopia. In Experiment 2, we extended 3D estimations by varying both the accommodation and vergence distances. We also tested the hypothesis that setting accommodation open loop by constricting pupil size could decrease the contribution of focus cues to perceived distance. We found that the depth constancy was affected by accommodation and vergence distances and that the accommodation distance effect was reduced with a larger depth-of-focus. We discuss these results with regard to the effectiveness of focus cues as a distance signal. Overall, these results highlight the importance of appropriate focus cues in stereoscopic displays at intermediate viewing distances.

  6. Subjective evaluation of mobile 3D video content: depth range versus compression artifacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jumisko-Pyykkö, Satu; Haustola, Tomi; Boev, Atanas; Gotchev, Atanas

    2011-02-01

    Mobile 3D television is a new form of media experience, which combines the freedom of mobility with the greater realism of presenting visual scenes in 3D. Achieving this combination is a challenging task as greater viewing experience has to be achieved with the limited resources of the mobile delivery channel such as limited bandwidth and power constrained handheld player. This challenge sets need for tight optimization of the overall mobile 3DTV system. Presence of depth and compression artifacts in the played 3D video are two major factors that influence viewer's subjective quality of experience and satisfaction. The primary goal of this study has been to examine the influence of varying depth and compression artifacts on the subjective quality of experience for mobile 3D video content. In addition, the influence of the studied variables on simulator sickness symptoms has been studied and vocabulary-based descriptive quality of experience has been conducted for a sub-set of variables in order to understand the perceptual characteristics in detail. In the experiment, 30 participants have evaluated the overall quality of different 3D video contents with varying depth ranges and compressed with varying quantization parameters. The test video content has been presented on a portable autostereoscopic LCD display with horizontal double density pixel arrangement. The results of the psychometric study indicate that compression artifacts are a dominant factor determining the quality of experience compared to varying depth range. More specifically, contents with strong compression has been rejected by the viewers and deemed unacceptable. The results of descriptive study confirm the dominance of visible spatial artifacts along the added value of depth for artifact-free content. The level of visual discomfort has been determined as not offending.

  7. Display depth analyses with the wave aberration for the auto-stereoscopic 3D display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xin; Sang, Xinzhu; Yu, Xunbo; Chen, Duo; Chen, Zhidong; Zhang, Wanlu; Yan, Binbin; Yuan, Jinhui; Wang, Kuiru; Yu, Chongxiu; Dou, Wenhua; Xiao, Liquan

    2016-07-01

    Because the aberration severely affects the display performances of the auto-stereoscopic 3D display, the diffraction theory is used to analyze the diffraction field distribution and the display depth through aberration analysis. Based on the proposed method, the display depth of central and marginal reconstructed images is discussed. The experimental results agree with the theoretical analyses. Increasing the viewing distance or decreasing the lens aperture can improve the display depth. Different viewing distances and the LCD with two lens-arrays are used to verify the conclusion.

  8. Depth cues in human visual perception and their realization in 3D displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichelt, Stephan; Häussler, Ralf; Fütterer, Gerald; Leister, Norbert

    2010-04-01

    Over the last decade, various technologies for visualizing three-dimensional (3D) scenes on displays have been technologically demonstrated and refined, among them such of stereoscopic, multi-view, integral imaging, volumetric, or holographic type. Most of the current approaches utilize the conventional stereoscopic principle. But they all lack of their inherent conflict between vergence and accommodation since scene depth cannot be physically realized but only feigned by displaying two views of different perspective on a flat screen and delivering them to the corresponding left and right eye. This mismatch requires the viewer to override the physiologically coupled oculomotor processes of vergence and eye focus that may cause visual discomfort and fatigue. This paper discusses the depth cues in the human visual perception for both image quality and visual comfort of direct-view 3D displays. We concentrate our analysis especially on near-range depth cues, compare visual performance and depth-range capabilities of stereoscopic and holographic displays, and evaluate potential depth limitations of 3D displays from a physiological point of view.

  9. Nuclear lamin stiffness is a barrier to 3D migration, but softness can limit survival.

    PubMed

    Harada, Takamasa; Swift, Joe; Irianto, Jerome; Shin, Jae-Won; Spinler, Kyle R; Athirasala, Avathamsa; Diegmiller, Rocky; Dingal, P C Dave P; Ivanovska, Irena L; Discher, Dennis E

    2014-03-03

    Cell migration through solid tissue often involves large contortions of the nucleus, but biological significance is largely unclear. The nucleoskeletal protein lamin-A varies both within and between cell types and was shown here to contribute to cell sorting and survival in migration through constraining micropores. Lamin-A proved rate-limiting in 3D migration of diverse human cells that ranged from glioma and adenocarcinoma lines to primary mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Stoichiometry of A- to B-type lamins established an activation barrier, with high lamin-A:B producing extruded nuclear shapes after migration. Because the juxtaposed A and B polymer assemblies respectively conferred viscous and elastic stiffness to the nucleus, subpopulations with different A:B levels sorted in 3D migration. However, net migration was also biphasic in lamin-A, as wild-type lamin-A levels protected against stress-induced death, whereas deep knockdown caused broad defects in stress resistance. In vivo xenografts proved consistent with A:B-based cell sorting, and intermediate A:B-enhanced tumor growth. Lamins thus impede 3D migration but also promote survival against migration-induced stresses.

  10. Depth-color fusion strategy for 3-D scene modeling with Kinect.

    PubMed

    Camplani, Massimo; Mantecon, Tomas; Salgado, Luis

    2013-12-01

    Low-cost depth cameras, such as Microsoft Kinect, have completely changed the world of human-computer interaction through controller-free gaming applications. Depth data provided by the Kinect sensor presents several noise-related problems that have to be tackled to improve the accuracy of the depth data, thus obtaining more reliable game control platforms and broadening its applicability. In this paper, we present a depth-color fusion strategy for 3-D modeling of indoor scenes with Kinect. Accurate depth and color models of the background elements are iteratively built, and used to detect moving objects in the scene. Kinect depth data is processed with an innovative adaptive joint-bilateral filter that efficiently combines depth and color by analyzing an edge-uncertainty map and the detected foreground regions. Results show that the proposed approach efficiently tackles main Kinect data problems: distance-dependent depth maps, spatial noise, and temporal random fluctuations are dramatically reduced; objects depth boundaries are refined, and nonmeasured depth pixels are interpolated. Moreover, a robust depth and color background model and accurate moving objects silhouette are generated.

  11. Depth migration in transversely isotropic media with explicit operators

    SciTech Connect

    Uzcategui, Omar

    1994-12-01

    The author presents and analyzes three approaches to calculating explicit two-dimensional (2D) depth-extrapolation filters for all propagation modes (P, SV, and SH) in transversely isotropic media with vertical and tilted axis of symmetry. These extrapolation filters are used to do 2D poststack depth migration, and also, just as for isotropic media, these 2D filters are used in the McClellan transformation to do poststack 3D depth migration. Furthermore, the same explicit filters can also be used to do depth-extrapolation of prestack data. The explicit filters are derived by generalizations of three different approaches: the modified Taylor series, least-squares, and minimax methods initially developed for isotropic media. The examples here show that the least-squares and minimax methods produce filters with accurate extrapolation (measured in the ability to position steep reflectors) for a wider range of propagation angles than that obtained using the modified Taylor series method. However, for low propagation angles, the modified Taylor series method has smaller amplitude and phase errors than those produced by the least-squares and minimax methods. These results suggest that to get accurate amplitude estimation, modified Taylor series filters would be somewhat preferred in areas with low dips. In areas with larger dips, the least-squares and minimax methods would give a distinctly better delineation of the subsurface structures.

  12. Enhanced 3D prestack depth imaging of broadband data from the South China Sea: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Xu, Jincheng; Li, Jinbo

    2016-08-01

    We present a case study of prestack depth imaging for data from the South China Sea using an enhanced work flow with cutting edge technologies. In the survey area, the presence of complex geologies such as carbonate pinnacles and gas pockets creates challenges for processing and imaging: the complex geometry of carbonates exhibits 3D effect for wave propagation; deriving velocity inside carbonates and gas pockets is difficult and laborious; and localised strong attenuation effect from gas pockets may lead to absorption and dispersion problems. In the course of developing the enhanced work flow to tackle these issues, the following processing steps have the most significant impact on improving the imaging quality: (1) 3D ghost wavefield attenuation, in particular to remove the ghost energy associated with complex structures; (2) 3D surface-related multiple elimination (SRME) to remove multiples, in particular multiples related to complex carbonate structures; (3) full waveform inversion (FWI) and tomography-based velocity model building, to derive a geologically plausible velocity model for imaging; (4) Q-tomography to estimate the Q model which describes the intrinsic attenuation of the subsurface media; (5) de-absorption prestack depth migration (Q-PSDM) to compensate the earth absorption and dispersion effect during imaging especially for the area below gas pockets. The case study with the data from the South China Sea shows that the enhanced work flow consisting of cutting edge technologies is effective when the complex geologies are present.

  13. Depth cues versus the simplicity principle in 3D shape perception.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunfeng; Pizlo, Zygmunt

    2011-10-01

    Two experiments were performed to explore the mechanisms of human 3D shape perception. In Experiment 1, the subjects' performance in a shape constancy task in the presence of several cues (edges, binocular disparity, shading and texture) was tested. The results show that edges and binocular disparity, but not shading or texture, are important in 3D shape perception. Experiment 2 tested the effect of several simplicity constraints, such as symmetry and planarity on subjects' performance in a shape constancy task. The 3D shapes were represented by edges or vertices only. The results show that performance with or without binocular disparity is at chance level, unless the 3D shape is symmetric and/or its faces are planar. In both experiments, there was a correlation between the subjects' performance with and without binocular disparity. Our study suggests that simplicity constraints, not depth cues, play the primary role in both monocular and binocular 3D shape perception. These results are consistent with our computational model of 3D shape recovery.

  14. Clinically Normal Stereopsis Does Not Ensure a Performance Benefit from Stereoscopic 3D Depth Cues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntire, John P.; Havig, Paul R.; Harrington, Lawrence K.; Wright, Steve T.; Watamaniuk, Scott N. J.; Heft, Eric L.

    2014-09-01

    To investigate the effect of manipulating disparity on task performance and viewing comfort, twelve participants were tested on a virtual object precision placement task while viewing a stereoscopic 3D (S3D) display. All participants had normal or corrected-to-normal visual acuity, passed the Titmus stereovision clinical test, and demonstrated normal binocular function, including phorias and binocular fusion ranges. Each participant completed six experimental sessions with different maximum binocular disparity limits. The results for ten of the twelve participants were generally as expected, demonstrating a large performance advantage when S3D cues were provided. The sessions with the larger disparity limits typically resulted in the best performance, and the sessions with no S3D cues the poorest performance. However, one participant demonstrated poorer performance in sessions with smaller disparity limits but improved performance in sessions with the larger disparity limits. Another participant's performance declined whenever any S3D cues were provided. Follow-up testing suggested that the phenomenon of pseudo-stereoanomaly may account for one viewer's atypical performance, while the phenomenon of stereoanomaly might account for the other. Overall, the results demonstrate that a subset of viewers with clinically normal binocular and stereoscopic vision may have difficulty performing depth-related tasks on S3D displays. The possibility of the vergence-accommodation conflict contributing to individual performance differences is also discussed.

  15. A range/depth modulation transfer function (RMTF) framework for characterizing 3D imaging LADAR performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staple, Bevan; Earhart, R. P.; Slaymaker, Philip A.; Drouillard, Thomas F., II; Mahony, Thomas

    2005-05-01

    3D imaging LADARs have emerged as the key technology for producing high-resolution imagery of targets in 3-dimensions (X and Y spatial, and Z in the range/depth dimension). Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. continues to make significant investments in this technology to enable critical NASA, Department of Defense, and national security missions. As a consequence of rapid technology developments, two issues have emerged that need resolution. First, the terminology used to rate LADAR performance (e.g., range resolution) is inconsistently defined, is improperly used, and thus has become misleading. Second, the terminology does not include a metric of the system"s ability to resolve the 3D depth features of targets. These two issues create confusion when translating customer requirements into hardware. This paper presents a candidate framework for addressing these issues. To address the consistency issue, the framework utilizes only those terminologies proposed and tested by leading LADAR research and standards institutions. We also provide suggestions for strengthening these definitions by linking them to the well-known Rayleigh criterion extended into the range dimension. To address the inadequate 3D image quality metrics, the framework introduces the concept of a Range/Depth Modulation Transfer Function (RMTF). The RMTF measures the impact of the spatial frequencies of a 3D target on its measured modulation in range/depth. It is determined using a new, Range-Based, Slanted Knife-Edge test. We present simulated results for two LADAR pulse detection techniques and compare them to a baseline centroid technique. Consistency in terminology plus a 3D image quality metric enable improved system standardization.

  16. Depth representation of moving 3-D objects in apparent-motion path.

    PubMed

    Hidaka, Souta; Kawachi, Yousuke; Gyoba, Jiro

    2008-01-01

    Apparent motion is perceived when two objects are presented alternately at different positions. The internal representations of apparently moving objects are formed in an apparent-motion path which lacks physical inputs. We investigated the depth information contained in the representation of 3-D moving objects in an apparent-motion path. We examined how probe objects-briefly placed in the motion path-affected the perceived smoothness of apparent motion. The probe objects comprised 3-D objects which were defined by being shaded or by disparity (convex/concave) or 2-D (flat) objects, while the moving objects were convex/concave objects. We found that flat probe objects induced a significantly smoother motion perception than concave probe objects only in the case of the convex moving objects. However, convex probe objects did not lead to smoother motion as the flat objects did, although the convex probe objects contained the same depth information for the moving objects. Moreover, the difference between probe objects was reduced when the moving objects were concave. These counterintuitive results were consistent in conditions when both depth cues were used. The results suggest that internal representations contain incomplete depth information that is intermediate between that of 2-D and 3-D objects.

  17. Depth-based coding of MVD data for 3D video extension of H.264/AVC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusanovskyy, Dmytro; Hannuksela, Miska M.; Su, Wenyi

    2013-06-01

    This paper describes a novel approach of using depth information for advanced coding of associated video data in Multiview Video plus Depth (MVD)-based 3D video systems. As a possible implementation of this conception, we describe two coding tools that have been developed for H.264/AVC based 3D Video Codec as response to Moving Picture Experts Group (MPEG) Call for Proposals (CfP). These tools are Depth-based Motion Vector Prediction (DMVP) and Backward View Synthesis Prediction (BVSP). Simulation results conducted under JCT-3V/MPEG 3DV Common Test Conditions show, that proposed in this paper tools reduce bit rate of coded video data by 15% of average delta bit rate reduction, which results in 13% of bit rate savings on total for the MVD data over the state-of-the-art MVC+D coding. Moreover, presented in this paper conception of depth-based coding of video has been further developed by MPEG 3DV and JCT-3V and this work resulted in even higher compression efficiency, bringing about 20% of delta bit rate reduction on total for coded MVD data over the reference MVC+D coding. Considering significant gains, proposed in this paper coding approach can be beneficial for development of new 3D video coding standards. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  18. Nucleus and nucleus-cytoskeleton connections in 3D cell migration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lingling; Luo, Qing; Sun, Jinghui; Song, Guanbin

    2016-10-15

    Cell migration plays an important role in many physiological and pathological settings, ranging from embryonic development to cancer metastasis. Currently, accumulating data suggest that cells migrating in three-dimensional (3D) environments show well-defined differences compared to their well-established two-dimensional (2D) counterparts. During 3D migration, the cell body and nucleus must deform to allow cellular passage through the available spaces, and the deformability of the relatively rigid nucleus may constitute a limiting step. Here, we highlight the key evidence regarding the role of the nuclear mechanics in 3D migration, including the molecular components that govern the stiffness of the nucleus and review how the nuclear dynamics are connected to and controlled by cytoskeleton-based migration machinery. Intriguingly, nuclear movement must be coordinated with the cytoskeletal dynamics at the leading and trailing edges, which in turn impact the cytoplasmic dynamics that affect the migration efficiency. Thus, we suggest that alterations in the nuclear structure may facilitate cellular reorganizations that are necessary for efficient migration.

  19. Depth map coding using residual segmentation for 3D video system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Cheon; Ho, Yo-Sung

    2013-06-01

    Advanced 3D video systems employ multi-view video-plus-depth data to support the free-viewpoint navigation and comfortable 3D viewing; thus efficient depth map coding becomes an important issue. Unlike the color image, the depth map has a property that depth values of the inner part of an object are monotonic, but those of object boundaries change abruptly. Therefore, residual data generated by prediction errors around object boundaries consume many bits in depth map coding. Representing them with segment data can be better than the use of the conventional transformation around the boundary regions. In this paper, we propose an efficient depth map coding method using a residual segmentation instead of using transformation. The proposed residual segmentation divides residual data into two regions with a segment map and two mean values. If the encoder selects the proposed method in terms of rates, two quantized mean values and an index of the segment map are transmitted. Simulation results show significant gains of up to 10 dB compared to the state-of-the-art coders, such as JPEG2000 and H.264/AVC. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  20. Estimation of foot pressure from human footprint depths using 3D scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wibowo, Dwi Basuki; Haryadi, Gunawan Dwi; Priambodo, Agus

    2016-03-01

    The analysis of normal and pathological variation in human foot morphology is central to several biomedical disciplines, including orthopedics, orthotic design, sports sciences, and physical anthropology, and it is also important for efficient footwear design. A classic and frequently used approach to study foot morphology is analysis of the footprint shape and footprint depth. Footprints are relatively easy to produce and to measure, and they can be preserved naturally in different soils. In this study, we need to correlate footprint depth with corresponding foot pressure of individual using 3D scanner. Several approaches are used for modeling and estimating footprint depths and foot pressures. The deepest footprint point is calculated from z max coordinate-z min coordinate and the average of foot pressure is calculated from GRF divided to foot area contact and identical with the average of footprint depth. Evaluation of footprint depth was found from importing 3D scanner file (dxf) in AutoCAD, the z-coordinates than sorted from the highest to the lowest value using Microsoft Excel to make footprinting depth in difference color. This research is only qualitatif study because doesn't use foot pressure device as comparator, and resulting the maximum pressure on calceneus is 3.02 N/cm2, lateral arch is 3.66 N/cm2, and metatarsal and hallux is 3.68 N/cm2.

  1. Statistical analysis of cell migration in 3D using the anisotropic persistent random walk model.

    PubMed

    Wu, Pei-Hsun; Giri, Anjil; Wirtz, Denis

    2015-03-01

    Cell migration through 3D extracellular matrices (ECMs) is crucial to the normal development of tissues and organs and in disease processes, yet adequate analytical tools to characterize 3D migration are lacking. The motility of eukaryotic cells on 2D substrates in the absence of gradients has long been described using persistent random walks (PRWs). Recent work shows that 3D migration is anisotropic and features an exponential mean cell velocity distribution, rendering the PRW model invalid. Here we present a protocol for the analysis of 3D cell motility using the anisotropic PRW model. The software, which is implemented in MATLAB, enables statistical profiling of experimentally observed 2D and 3D cell trajectories, and it extracts the persistence and speed of cells along primary and nonprimary directions and an anisotropic index of migration. Basic computer skills and experience with MATLAB software are recommended for successful use of the protocol. This protocol is highly automated and fast, taking <30 min to analyze trajectory data per biological condition.

  2. Filopodia in cell adhesion, 3D migration and cancer cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Jacquemet, Guillaume; Hamidi, Hellyeh; Ivaska, Johanna

    2015-10-01

    This review discusses recent advances in our understanding of the role filopodia and filopodia-like structures in cell adhesion and three dimensional (3D) cell migration both in vitro and in vivo. In particular, we focus on recent advances demonstrating that filopodia are involved in substrate tethering and environment sensing in vivo. We further discuss the emerging role of filopodia and filopodial proteins in tumor dissemination as mounting in vitro, in vivo and clinical evidence suggest that filopodia drive cancer cell invasion and highlight filopodia proteins as attractive therapeutic targets. Finally, we outline outstanding questions that remain to be addressed to elucidate the role of filopodia during 3D cell migration.

  3. Activating the nuclear piston mechanism of 3D migration in tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Petrie, Ryan J; Harlin, Heather M; Korsak, Lulu I T; Yamada, Kenneth M

    2017-01-02

    Primary human fibroblasts have the remarkable ability to use their nucleus like a piston, switching from low- to high-pressure protrusions in response to the surrounding three-dimensional (3D) matrix. Although migrating tumor cells can also change how they migrate in response to the 3D matrix, it is not clear if they can switch between high- and low-pressure protrusions like primary fibroblasts. We report that unlike primary fibroblasts, the nuclear piston is not active in fibrosarcoma cells. Protease inhibition rescued the nuclear piston mechanism in polarized HT1080 and SW684 cells and generated compartmentalized pressure. Achieving compartmentalized pressure required the nucleoskeleton-cytoskeleton linker protein nesprin 3, actomyosin contractility, and integrin-mediated adhesion, consistent with lobopodia-based fibroblast migration. In addition, this activation of the nuclear piston mechanism slowed the 3D movement of HT1080 cells. Together, these data indicate that inhibiting protease activity during polarized tumor cell 3D migration is sufficient to restore the nuclear piston migration mechanism with compartmentalized pressure characteristic of nonmalignant cells.

  4. Podosomes in space: macrophage migration and matrix degradation in 2D and 3D settings.

    PubMed

    Wiesner, Christiane; Le-Cabec, Véronique; El Azzouzi, Karim; Maridonneau-Parini, Isabelle; Linder, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Migration of macrophages is a key process for a variety of physiological functions, such as pathogen clearance or tissue homeostasis. However, it can also be part of pathological scenarios, as in the case of tumor-associated macrophages. This review presents an overview of the different migration modes macrophages can adopt, depending on the physical and chemical properties of specific environments, and the constraints they impose upon cells. We discuss the importance of these environmental and also of cellular parameters, as well as their relative impact on macrophage migration and on the formation of matrix-lytic podosomes in 2D and 3D. Moreover, we present an overview of routinely used and also newly developed assays for the study of macrophage migration in both 2D and 3D contexts, their respective advantages and limitations, and also their potential to reliably mimic in vivo situations.

  5. A Novel 2D-to-3D Video Conversion Method Using Time-Coherent Depth Maps

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Shouyi; Dong, Hao; Jiang, Guangli; Liu, Leibo; Wei, Shaojun

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel 2D-to-3D video conversion method for 3D entertainment applications. 3D entertainment is getting more and more popular and can be found in many contexts, such as TV and home gaming equipment. 3D image sensors are a new method to produce stereoscopic video content conveniently and at a low cost, and can thus meet the urgent demand for 3D videos in the 3D entertaiment market. Generally, 2D image sensor and 2D-to-3D conversion chip can compose a 3D image sensor. Our study presents a novel 2D-to-3D video conversion algorithm which can be adopted in a 3D image sensor. In our algorithm, a depth map is generated by combining global depth gradient and local depth refinement for each frame of 2D video input. Global depth gradient is computed according to image type while local depth refinement is related to color information. As input 2D video content consists of a number of video shots, the proposed algorithm reuses the global depth gradient of frames within the same video shot to generate time-coherent depth maps. The experimental results prove that this novel method can adapt to different image types, reduce computational complexity and improve the temporal smoothness of generated 3D video. PMID:26131674

  6. 3D mapping of neuronal migration in the embryonic mouse brain with magnetic resonance microimaging.

    PubMed

    Deans, Abby E; Wadghiri, Youssef Zaim; Aristizábal, Orlando; Turnbull, Daniel H

    2015-07-01

    A prominent feature of the developing mammalian brain is the widespread migration of neural progenitor (NP) cells during embryogenesis. A striking example is provided by NP cells born in the ventral forebrain of mid-gestation stage mice, which subsequently migrate long distances to their final positions in the cortex and olfactory bulb. Previous studies have used two-dimensional histological methods, making it difficult to analyze three-dimensional (3D) migration patterns. Unlike histology, magnetic resonance microimaging (micro-MRI) is a non-destructive, quantitative and inherently 3D imaging method for analyzing mouse embryos. To allow mapping of migrating NP cells with micro-MRI, cells were labeled in situ in the medial (MGE) and lateral (LGE) ganglionic eminences, using targeted in utero ultrasound-guided injection of micron-sized particles of iron-oxide (MPIO). Ex vivo micro-MRI and histology were then performed 5-6days after injection, demonstrating that the MPIO had magnetically labeled the migrating NP populations, which enabled 3D visualization and automated segmentation of the labeled cells. This approach was used to analyze the distinct patterns of migration from the MGE and LGE, and to construct rostral-caudal migration maps from each progenitor region. Furthermore, abnormal migratory phenotypes were observed in Nkx2.1(-/-) embryos, most notably a significant increase in cortical neurons derived from the Nkx2.1(-/-) LGE. Taken together, these results demonstrate that MPIO labeling and micro-MRI provide an efficient and powerful approach for analyzing 3D cell migration patterns in the normal and mutant mouse embryonic brain.

  7. Quantitative 3D analysis of complex single border cell behaviors in coordinated collective cell migration.

    PubMed

    Cliffe, Adam; Doupé, David P; Sung, HsinHo; Lim, Isaac Kok Hwee; Ong, Kok Haur; Cheng, Li; Yu, Weimiao

    2017-04-04

    Understanding the mechanisms of collective cell migration is crucial for cancer metastasis, wound healing and many developmental processes. Imaging a migrating cluster in vivo is feasible, but the quantification of individual cell behaviours remains challenging. We have developed an image analysis toolkit, CCMToolKit, to quantify the Drosophila border cell system. In addition to chaotic motion, previous studies reported that the migrating cells are able to migrate in a highly coordinated pattern. We quantify the rotating and running migration modes in 3D while also observing a range of intermediate behaviours. Running mode is driven by cluster external protrusions. Rotating mode is associated with cluster internal cell extensions that could not be easily characterized. Although the cluster moves slower while rotating, individual cells retain their mobility and are in fact slightly more active than in running mode. We also show that individual cells may exchange positions during migration.

  8. Precision depth measurement of through silicon vias (TSVs) on 3D semiconductor packaging process.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jonghan; Kim, Jae Wan; Kang, Chu-Shik; Kim, Jong-Ahn; Lee, Sunghun

    2012-02-27

    We have proposed and demonstrated a novel method to measure depths of through silicon vias (TSVs) at high speed. TSVs are fine and deep holes fabricated in silicon wafers for 3D semiconductors; they are used for electrical connections between vertically stacked wafers. Because the high-aspect ratio hole of the TSV makes it difficult for light to reach the bottom surface, conventional optical methods using visible lights cannot determine the depth value. By adopting an optical comb of a femtosecond pulse laser in the infra-red range as a light source, the depths of TSVs having aspect ratio of about 7 were measured. This measurement was done at high speed based on spectral resolved interferometry. The proposed method is expected to be an alternative method for depth inspection of TSVs.

  9. Structured light 3D depth map enhancement and gesture recognition using image content adaptive filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandra, Vikas; Nash, James; Atanassov, Kalin; Goma, Sergio

    2013-03-01

    A structured-light system for depth estimation is a type of 3D active sensor that consists of a structured-light projector that projects an illumination pattern on the scene (e.g. mask with vertical stripes) and a camera which captures the illuminated scene. Based on the received patterns, depths of different regions in the scene can be inferred. In this paper, we use side information in the form of image structure to enhance the depth map. This side information is obtained from the received light pattern image reflected by the scene itself. The processing steps run real time. This post-processing stage in the form of depth map enhancement can be used for better hand gesture recognition, as is illustrated in this paper.

  10. ROI-preserving 3D video compression method utilizing depth information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ti, Chunli; Xu, Guodong; Guan, Yudong; Teng, Yidan

    2015-09-01

    Efficiently transmitting the extra information of three dimensional (3D) video is becoming a key issue of the development of 3DTV. 2D plus depth format not only occupies the smaller bandwidth and is compatible transmission under the condition of the existing channel, but also can provide technique support for advanced 3D video compression in some extend. This paper proposes an ROI-preserving compression scheme to further improve the visual quality at a limited bit rate. According to the connection between the focus of Human Visual System (HVS) and depth information, region of interest (ROI) can be automatically selected via depth map progressing. The main improvement from common method is that a meanshift based segmentation is executed to the depth map before foreground ROI selection to keep the integrity of scene. Besides, the sensitive areas along the edges are also protected. The Spatio-temporal filtering adapting to H.264 is used to the non-ROI of both 2D video and depth map before compression. Experiments indicate that, the ROI extracted by this method is more undamaged and according with subjective feeling, and the proposed method can keep the key high-frequency information more effectively while the bit rate is reduced.

  11. Depth-based representations: Which coding format for 3D video broadcast applications?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerbiriou, Paul; Boisson, Guillaume; Sidibé, Korian; Huynh-Thu, Quan

    2011-03-01

    3D Video (3DV) delivery standardization is currently ongoing in MPEG. Now time is to choose 3DV data representation format. What is at stake is the final quality for end-users, i.e. synthesized views' visual quality. We focus on two major rival depth-based formats, namely Multiview Video plus Depth (MVD) and Layered Depth Video (LDV). MVD can be considered as the basic depth-based 3DV format, generated by disparity estimation from multiview sequences. LDV is more sophisticated, with the compaction of multiview data into color- and depth-occlusions layers. We compare final views quality using MVD2 and LDV (both containing two color channels plus two depth components) coded with MVC at various compression ratios. Depending on the format, the appropriate synthesis process is performed to generate final stereoscopic pairs. Comparisons are provided in terms of SSIM and PSNR with respect to original views and to synthesized references (obtained without compression). Eventually, LDV outperforms significantly MVD when using state-of-the-art reference synthesis algorithms. Occlusions management before encoding is advantageous in comparison with handling redundant signals at decoder side. Besides, we observe that depth quantization does not induce much loss on the final view quality until a significant degradation level. Improvements in disparity estimation and view synthesis algorithms are therefore still expected during the remaining standardization steps.

  12. Augmented depth perception visualization in 2D/3D image fusion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Kreiser, Matthias; Wang, Lejing; Navab, Nassir; Fallavollita, Pascal

    2014-12-01

    2D/3D image fusion applications are widely used in endovascular interventions. Complaints from interventionists about existing state-of-art visualization software are usually related to the strong compromise between 2D and 3D visibility or the lack of depth perception. In this paper, we investigate several concepts enabling improvement of current image fusion visualization found in the operating room. First, a contour enhanced visualization is used to circumvent hidden information in the X-ray image. Second, an occlusion and depth color-coding scheme is considered to improve depth perception. To validate our visualization technique both phantom and clinical data are considered. An evaluation is performed in the form of a questionnaire which included 24 participants: ten clinicians and fourteen non-clinicians. Results indicate that the occlusion correction method provides 100% correctness when determining the true position of an aneurysm in X-ray. Further, when integrating an RGB or RB color-depth encoding in the image fusion both perception and intuitiveness are improved.

  13. Monocular display unit for 3D display with correct depth perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Kunio; Hosomi, Takashi

    2009-11-01

    A study of virtual-reality system has been popular and its technology has been applied to medical engineering, educational engineering, a CAD/CAM system and so on. The 3D imaging display system has two types in the presentation method; one is a 3-D display system using a special glasses and the other is the monitor system requiring no special glasses. A liquid crystal display (LCD) recently comes into common use. It is possible for this display unit to provide the same size of displaying area as the image screen on the panel. A display system requiring no special glasses is useful for a 3D TV monitor, but this system has demerit such that the size of a monitor restricts the visual field for displaying images. Thus the conventional display can show only one screen, but it is impossible to enlarge the size of a screen, for example twice. To enlarge the display area, the authors have developed an enlarging method of display area using a mirror. Our extension method enables the observers to show the virtual image plane and to enlarge a screen area twice. In the developed display unit, we made use of an image separating technique using polarized glasses, a parallax barrier or a lenticular lens screen for 3D imaging. The mirror can generate the virtual image plane and it enlarges a screen area twice. Meanwhile the 3D display system using special glasses can also display virtual images over a wide area. In this paper, we present a monocular 3D vision system with accommodation mechanism, which is useful function for perceiving depth.

  14. Control of macrophage 3D migration: a therapeutic challenge to limit tissue infiltration.

    PubMed

    Maridonneau-Parini, Isabelle

    2014-11-01

    Macrophages are professional migrating cells found in all body tissues from the early embryonic stages till the end of the adult life. Tissue macrophages do not only play beneficial roles. In several diseases, macrophages recruited from blood monocytes have a deleterious action such as favoring cancer progression and destroying tissues in chronic inflammation. To migrate in 3D environments, all leukocytes use the amoeboid movement while macrophages use the amoeboid and the mesenchymal migration modes. Mesenchymal migration takes place in dense matrices and involves podosomes and proteolysis of the extracellular matrix to create paths. Podosome disruption has been correlated with reduced mesenchymal migration of macrophages and unaffected amoeboid migration. Therefore, podosomes are proposed as a therapeutic target. Inhibiting podosome regulators that are only expressed in macrophages and few cell types would avoid collateral effects often encountered when ubiquitous proteins are used as drug targets. With the current status of our knowledge on human macrophage podosomes and 3D migration, the tyrosine kinase Hck appears to be a good candidate.

  15. A Kosloff/Basal method, 3D migration program implemented on the CYBER 205 supercomputer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pyle, L. D.; Wheat, S. R.

    1984-01-01

    Conventional finite difference migration has relied on approximations to the acoustic wave equation which allow energy to propagate only downwards. Although generally reliable, such approaches usually do not yield an accurate migration for geological structures with strong lateral velocity variations or with steeply dipping reflectors. An earlier study by D. Kosloff and E. Baysal (Migration with the Full Acoustic Wave Equation) examined an alternative approach based on the full acoustic wave equation. The 2D, Fourier type algorithm which was developed was tested by Kosloff and Baysal against synthetic data and against physical model data. The results indicated that such a scheme gives accurate migration for complicated structures. This paper describes the development and testing of a vectorized, 3D migration program for the CYBER 205 using the Kosloff/Baysal method. The program can accept as many as 65,536 zero offset (stacked) traces.

  16. Individual versus collective fibroblast spreading and migration: regulation by matrix composition in 3D culture.

    PubMed

    Miron-Mendoza, Miguel; Lin, Xihui; Ma, Lisha; Ririe, Peter; Petroll, W Matthew

    2012-06-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) supplies both physical and chemical signals to cells and provides a substrate through which fibroblasts migrate during wound repair. To directly assess how ECM composition regulates this process, we used a nested 3D matrix model in which cell-populated collagen buttons were embedded in cell-free collagen or fibrin matrices. Time-lapse microscopy was used to record the dynamic pattern of cell migration into the outer matrices, and 3D confocal imaging was used to assess cell connectivity and cytoskeletal organization. Corneal fibroblasts stimulated with PDGF migrated more rapidly into collagen as compared to fibrin. In addition, the pattern of fibroblast migration into fibrin and collagen ECMs was strikingly different. Corneal fibroblasts migrating into collagen matrices developed dendritic processes and moved independently, whereas cells migrating into fibrin matrices had a more fusiform morphology and formed an interconnected meshwork. A similar pattern was observed when using dermal fibroblasts, suggesting that this response is not unique to corneal cells. We next cultured corneal fibroblasts within and on top of standard collagen and fibrin matrices to assess the impact of ECM composition on the cell spreading response. Similar differences in cell morphology and connectivity were observed – cells remained separated on collagen but coalesced into clusters on fibrin. Cadherin was localized to junctions between interconnected cells, whereas fibronectin was present both between cells and at the tips of extending cell processes. Cells on fibrin matrices also developed more prominent stress fibers than those on collagen matrices. Importantly, these spreading and migration patterns were consistently observed on both rigid and compliant substrates, thus differences in ECM mechanical stiffness were not the underlying cause. Overall, these results demonstrate for the first time that ECM protein composition alone (collagen vs. fibrin) can induce

  17. Combining depth and gray images for fast 3D object recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Wang; Zhu, Feng; Hao, Yingming

    2016-10-01

    Reliable and stable visual perception systems are needed for humanoid robotic assistants to perform complex grasping and manipulation tasks. The recognition of the object and its precise 6D pose are required. This paper addresses the challenge of detecting and positioning a textureless known object, by estimating its complete 6D pose in cluttered scenes. A 3D perception system is proposed in this paper, which can robustly recognize CAD models in cluttered scenes for the purpose of grasping with a mobile manipulator. Our approach uses a powerful combination of two different camera technologies, Time-Of-Flight (TOF) and RGB, to segment the scene and extract objects. Combining the depth image and gray image to recognize instances of a 3D object in the world and estimate their 3D poses. The full pose estimation process is based on depth images segmentation and an efficient shape-based matching. At first, the depth image is used to separate the supporting plane of objects from the cluttered background. Thus, cluttered backgrounds are circumvented and the search space is extremely reduced. And a hierarchical model based on the geometry information of a priori CAD model of the object is generated in the offline stage. Then using the hierarchical model we perform a shape-based matching in 2D gray images. Finally, we validate the proposed method in a number of experiments. The results show that utilizing depth and gray images together can reach the demand of a time-critical application and reduce the error rate of object recognition significantly.

  18. Autostereoscopic 3D Display with Long Visualization Depth Using Referential Viewing Area-Based Integral Photography.

    PubMed

    Hongen Liao; Dohi, Takeyoshi; Nomura, Keisuke

    2011-11-01

    We developed an autostereoscopic display for distant viewing of 3D computer graphics (CG) images without using special viewing glasses or tracking devices. The images are created by employing referential viewing area-based CG image generation and pixel distribution algorithm for integral photography (IP) and integral videography (IV) imaging. CG image rendering is used to generate IP/IV elemental images. The images can be viewed from each viewpoint within a referential viewing area and the elemental images are reconstructed from rendered CG images by pixel redistribution and compensation method. The elemental images are projected onto a screen that is placed at the same referential viewing distance from the lens array as in the image rendering. Photographic film is used to record the elemental images through each lens. The method enables 3D images with a long visualization depth to be viewed from relatively long distances without any apparent influence from deviated or distorted lenses in the array. We succeeded in creating an actual autostereoscopic images with an image depth of several meters in front of and behind the display that appear to have 3D even when viewed from a distance.

  19. 3D Sorghum Reconstructions from Depth Images Identify QTL Regulating Shoot Architecture1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Dissecting the genetic basis of complex traits is aided by frequent and nondestructive measurements. Advances in range imaging technologies enable the rapid acquisition of three-dimensional (3D) data from an imaged scene. A depth camera was used to acquire images of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), an important grain, forage, and bioenergy crop, at multiple developmental time points from a greenhouse-grown recombinant inbred line population. A semiautomated software pipeline was developed and used to generate segmented, 3D plant reconstructions from the images. Automated measurements made from 3D plant reconstructions identified quantitative trait loci for standard measures of shoot architecture, such as shoot height, leaf angle, and leaf length, and for novel composite traits, such as shoot compactness. The phenotypic variability associated with some of the quantitative trait loci displayed differences in temporal prevalence; for example, alleles closely linked with the sorghum Dwarf3 gene, an auxin transporter and pleiotropic regulator of both leaf inclination angle and shoot height, influence leaf angle prior to an effect on shoot height. Furthermore, variability in composite phenotypes that measure overall shoot architecture, such as shoot compactness, is regulated by loci underlying component phenotypes like leaf angle. As such, depth imaging is an economical and rapid method to acquire shoot architecture phenotypes in agriculturally important plants like sorghum to study the genetic basis of complex traits. PMID:27528244

  20. A porous 3D cell culture micro device for cell migration study.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liang; Zhou, Changchun; Lin, Biaoyang; Li, Wei

    2010-08-01

    Cell migration under chemoattractant is an important biological step in cancer metastasis that causes the spread of malignant tumor cells. Porous polymeric materials are widely used to mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM) environment for applications such as three dimensional (3D) cell culturing and tissue engineering. In this paper we report a novel 3D cell culture device based on porous polymeric material to study cancer migration. We fabricated a porous channel on a polymeric chip using a selective ultrasonic foaming method. We demonstrate that a chemical concentration gradient could be established through the porous channel due to the slow diffusion process. We show that significant cell migration could be observed through the porous channel within 1-2 weeks of cell culturing when metastatic M4A4-GFP breast cancer cells were induced by 20% fetal bovine serum (FBS).We also developed a mathematical model to evaluate the diffusivity and concentration gradient through the fabricated porous structure.

  1. Mechano-sensing and cell migration: a 3D model approach.

    PubMed

    Borau, C; Kamm, R D; García-Aznar, J M

    2011-12-01

    Cell migration is essential for tissue development in different physiological and pathological conditions. It is a complex process orchestrated by chemistry, biological factors, microstructure and surrounding mechanical properties. Focusing on the mechanical interactions, cells do not only exert forces on the matrix that surrounds them, but they also sense and react to mechanical cues in a process called mechano-sensing. Here, we hypothesize the involvement of mechano-sensing in the regulation of directional cell migration through a three-dimensional (3D) matrix. For this purpose, we develop a 3D numerical model of individual cell migration, which incorporates the mechano-sensing process of the cell as the main mechanism regulating its movement. Consistent with this hypothesis, we found that factors, such as substrate stiffness, boundary conditions and external forces, regulate specific and distinct cell movements.

  2. The role of phosphoinositide 3-kinases in neutrophil migration in 3D collagen gels.

    PubMed

    Martin, Kayleigh J S; Muessel, Michelle J; Pullar, Christine E; Willars, Gary B; Wardlaw, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    The entry of neutrophils into tissue has been well characterised; however the fate of these cells once inside the tissue microenvironment is not fully understood. A variety of signal transduction pathways including those involving class I PI3 Kinases have been suggested to be involved in neutrophil migration. This study aims to determine the involvement of PI3 Kinases in chemokinetic and chemotactic neutrophil migration in response to CXCL8 and GM-CSF in a three-dimensional collagen gel, as a model of tissue. Using a three-dimensional collagen assay chemokinetic and chemotactic migration induced by CXCL8 was inhibited with the pan PI3 Kinase inhibitor wortmannin. Analysis of the specific Class I PI3 Kinase catalytic isoforms alpha, delta and gamma using the inhibitors PIK-75, PIK-294 and AS-605240 respectively indicated differential roles in CXCL8-induced neutrophil migration. PIK-294 inhibited both chemokinetic and chemotactic CXCL8-induced migration. AS-605240 markedly reduced CXCL8 induced chemokinetic migration but had no effect on CXCL8 induced chemotactic migration. In contrast PIK-75 inhibited chemotactic migration but not chemokinetic migration. At optimal concentrations of GM-CSF the inhibitors had no effect on the percentage of neutrophil migration in comparison to the control however at suboptimal concentrations wortmannin, AS-605240 and PIK-294 inhibited chemokinesis. This study suggests that PI3 Kinase is necessary for CXCL8 induced migration in a 3D tissue environment but that chemokinetic and chemotactic migration may be controlled by different isoforms with gamma shown to be important in chemokinesis and alpha important in chemotaxis. Neutrophil migration in response to suboptimal concentrations of GM-CSF is dependent on PI3 Kinase, particularly the gamma and delta catalytic isoforms.

  3. Fabrication of microfluidic system for the assessment of cell migration on 3D micropatterned substrates.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Joong; Hwang, Chang-Mo; Baek, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Sang-Hoon

    2009-01-01

    Cell migration and proliferation are major process in wound healing, cancer metastasis and organogenesis during development. Many cells are related to recovery process of wound. Especially, fibroblasts act an important role in wound healing. Various cytokines such as platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) can induce fibroblast migration and widely studied to investigate the cell response under controlled cytokine microenvironments during wound healing. In real tissue healing process, cell microenvironments change with tissue types and anatomical characteristics of organs. With microfluidic system, we tried to mimic the natural microenvironment of wound healing, with gradient of PDGF, a fibroblast migration inducing cytokine, and patterned substrate with different orientation to PDGF gradient. Fibroblasts cultured in PDGF gradient micro fluidic chip showed cell migration under various micro environmental gradient conditions. Cells were cultured under PDGF gradient condition and different substrate pattern. Mouse fibroblast L929 cells were cultured in the microfluidic gradient. The results showed that most cells migrated along the substrate topological patterns under high concentration of PDGF. We developed long range sustaining micro fluidic channel and could analyze cell migration along the gradient of PDGF. Also, the cell migration on patterned extracellular environment shows that cells migrate along the extracellular 3D pattern rather than directly along the cytokine gradient when the pattern height is less than 1 microm. In this study, we could demonstrate that the extracellular pattern is more dominant to cell migration in combination with cytokine gradient in the wounded tissue when the environmental cues are 20 microm.

  4. Full-field 3D shape measurement of specular surfaces by direct phase to depth relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zonghua; Liu, Yue; Huang, Shujun; Niu, Zhenqi; Guo, Jiao; Gao, Nan; Gao, Feng; Jiang, Xiangqian

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents a new Phase Measuring Deflectometry (PMD) method to measure specular object having discontinuous surfaces. A mathematical model is established to directly relate absolute phase and depth, instead of phase and gradient. Based on the model, a hardware measuring system has been set up, which consists of a beam splitter to change the optical path, and two LCD screens to display the same sinusoidal fringe patterns. By using model-based and machine vision method, system calibration is accomplished to provide the required parameters and conditions. The verification tests are given to evaluate the effectiveness of the developed system. The 3D shape of an artificial step having multiple specular surfaces and a concave mirror has been measured. Initial experimental results show that the proposed measurement method can obtain 3D shape of specular objects with discontinuous surface effectively.

  5. Multi-layer 3D imaging using a few viewpoint images and depth map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suginohara, Hidetsugu; Sakamoto, Hirotaka; Yamanaka, Satoshi; Suyama, Shiro; Yamamoto, Hirotsugu

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a new method that makes multi-layer images from a few viewpoint images to display a 3D image by the autostereoscopic display that has multiple display screens in the depth direction. We iterate simple "Shift and Subtraction" processes to make each layer image alternately. The image made in accordance with depth map like a volume slicing by gradations is used as the initial solution of iteration process. Through the experiments using the prototype stacked two LCDs, we confirmed that it was enough to make multi-layer images from three viewpoint images to display a 3D image. Limiting the number of viewpoint images, the viewing area that allows stereoscopic view becomes narrow. To broaden the viewing area, we track the head motion of the viewer and update screen images in real time so that the viewer can maintain correct stereoscopic view within +/- 20 degrees area. In addition, we render pseudo multiple viewpoint images using depth map, then we can generate motion parallax at the same time.

  6. Concentric gel system to study the biophysical role of matrix microenvironment on 3D cell migration.

    PubMed

    Kurniawan, Nicholas Agung; Chaudhuri, Parthiv Kant; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2015-04-03

    The ability of cells to migrate is crucial in a wide variety of cell functions throughout life from embryonic development and wound healing to tumor and cancer metastasis. Despite intense research efforts, the basic biochemical and biophysical principles of cell migration are still not fully understood, especially in the physiologically relevant three-dimensional (3D) microenvironments. Here, we describe an in vitro assay designed to allow quantitative examination of 3D cell migration behaviors. The method exploits the cell's mechanosensing ability and propensity to migrate into previously unoccupied extracellular matrix (ECM). We use the invasion of highly invasive breast cancer cells, MDA-MB-231, in collagen gels as a model system. The spread of cell population and the migration dynamics of individual cells over weeks of culture can be monitored using live-cell imaging and analyzed to extract spatiotemporally-resolved data. Furthermore, the method is easily adaptable for diverse extracellular matrices, thus offering a simple yet powerful way to investigate the role of biophysical factors in the microenvironment on cell migration.

  7. Concentric Gel System to Study the Biophysical Role of Matrix Microenvironment on 3D Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Kurniawan, Nicholas Agung; Chaudhuri, Parthiv Kant; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2015-01-01

    The ability of cells to migrate is crucial in a wide variety of cell functions throughout life from embryonic development and wound healing to tumor and cancer metastasis. Despite intense research efforts, the basic biochemical and biophysical principles of cell migration are still not fully understood, especially in the physiologically relevant three-dimensional (3D) microenvironments. Here, we describe an in vitro assay designed to allow quantitative examination of 3D cell migration behaviors. The method exploits the cell’s mechanosensing ability and propensity to migrate into previously unoccupied extracellular matrix (ECM). We use the invasion of highly invasive breast cancer cells, MDA-MB-231, in collagen gels as a model system. The spread of cell population and the migration dynamics of individual cells over weeks of culture can be monitored using live-cell imaging and analyzed to extract spatiotemporally-resolved data. Furthermore, the method is easily adaptable for diverse extracellular matrices, thus offering a simple yet powerful way to investigate the role of biophysical factors in the microenvironment on cell migration. PMID:25867104

  8. Fresnel Volume Migration of the ISO89-3D data set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hloušek, F.; Buske, S.

    2016-11-01

    This paper demonstrates the capabilities of Fresnel Volume Migration (FVM) for 3-D single-component seismic data in a crystalline environment. We show its application to the ISO89-3D data set, which was acquired in 1989 at the German continental deep drilling site (KTB) near Windischeschenbach (Southeast Germany). A key point in FVM is the derivation of the emergent angle for the recorded wavefield. This angle is used as the initial condition of the ray-tracing-algorithm within FVM. In order to limit the migration operator to the physically relevant part of a reflector, it is restricted to the Fresnel-volume around the backpropagated ray. We discuss different possibilities for an adequate choice of the used aperture for a local slant-stack algorithm using the semblance as a measure of the coherency for different emergent angles. Furthermore, we reduce the number of used receivers for this procedure using the Voronoi diagram, thereby leading to a more equal distribution of the receivers within the selected aperture. We demonstrate the performance of these methods for a simple 3-D synthetic example and show the results for the ISO89-3D data set. For the latter, our approach yields images of significantly better quality compared to previous investigations and allows for a detailed characterization of the subsurface. Even in migrated single shot gathers, structures are clearly visible due to the focusing achieved by FVM.

  9. Using 2D and 3D Modeling to Infer the Depth of the Okavango Dyke Swarm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dailey, M. K.; Mortimer, D.; Atekwana, E. A.

    2009-12-01

    The 179 Ma N110°-striking Okavango Dyke swarm (ODS) extends from southern Zimbabwe for approximately 1500 km northwest into Namibia. The emplacement of dyke swarms is typically associated with the initiation of continental breakup and has been suggested that ODS was emplaced during the breakup of Gondwana along an existing zone of weakness. However, the understanding of how these giant dyke swarms are emplaced over large distances for hundreds of kilometers is limited- do these giant dike swarms propagate from a single source for hundreds of kilometers or do they propagate from sub-crustal magma chambers along a zone of weakness? To address these questions we investigated the ODS in northern Botswana. The dyke swarm is exposed at the surface in the east close to its origin but is buried in the northwest within the Okavango Rift Zone. Using airborne magnetic and ground gravity survey data along with rock property data from the exposed sections, 2D and 3D models were created in order to determine the depth of the dyke swarm. Initially several 2D models were used to test hypothesis of varying depths and rock parameters. The 2D models were then used to ‘seed’ the 3D models with similar density, susceptibility, and depth parameters. The dykes appear to have relatively shallow and finite depths, in the range of 2 to 5 km deep. These results are consistent with a lateral emplacement stemming from the failed triple junction and thus ruling out an infinite depth extent which would have been the case if the dykes were propagated vertically from sub-crustal magma chambers.

  10. Fusion of 3D laser scanner and depth images for obstacle recognition in mobile applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budzan, Sebastian; Kasprzyk, Jerzy

    2016-02-01

    The problem of obstacle detection and recognition or, generally, scene mapping is one of the most investigated problems in computer vision, especially in mobile applications. In this paper a fused optical system using depth information with color images gathered from the Microsoft Kinect sensor and 3D laser range scanner data is proposed for obstacle detection and ground estimation in real-time mobile systems. The algorithm consists of feature extraction in the laser range images, processing of the depth information from the Kinect sensor, fusion of the sensor information, and classification of the data into two separate categories: road and obstacle. Exemplary results are presented and it is shown that fusion of information gathered from different sources increases the effectiveness of the obstacle detection in different scenarios, and it can be used successfully for road surface mapping.

  11. Depth quantificaton for inhomogeneities within semisolid materials using 3D pulsed digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Montes, Maria del Socorro; Mendoza Santoyo, Fernando; Pérez-López, Carlos; Rodríguez Vera, Ramón

    2006-06-01

    A 3D experimental arrangement for pulsed digital holography is used to measure the depth position for both a glass sphere and tumor tissue, immersed in a semi-solid gel model. A master gel, one without inhomogeneities, is set to resonate via sound waves generated with a conventional speaker placed a few centimeters away from the gel container. Later an identical prepared gel with an inhomogeneity is placed in the original set up and interrogated at the same resonant frequency. On comparison and using only an out of plane sensitive set up it is possible to measure the displacement of the gel surface, indicating the presence of an internal inhomogeneity. However the depth position cannot be measured accurately since the out of plane component has also the contribution of the in-plane surface displacements. With the information gathered from the 3D pulsed digital holography set up it is possible to obtain three sensitivity vectors that serve to independently separate the contributions from each of the three x, y and z components of the vibration displacement, for the same exciting mechanical wave. It is then possible to build individual maps of displacement along the three rectangular axes and thus measure accurately the depth position of the inhomogeneity. Results from the optical data were correlated to the measured position for different inhomogeneity types, sizes and depths and on comparison an error in the position of less than 1% was found. This optical non invasive method is able to accurately find the inhomogeneity and its position within the gel making it a promising method for the study of mammal tumors, representing and alternative to the traditional invasive methods.

  12. Volumetric 3D display with multi-layered active screens for enhanced the depth perception (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hak-Rin; Park, Min-Kyu; Choi, Jun-Chan; Park, Ji-Sub; Min, Sung-Wook

    2016-09-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) display technology has been studied actively because it can offer more realistic images compared to the conventional 2D display. Various psychological factors such as accommodation, binocular parallax, convergence and motion parallax are used to recognize a 3D image. For glass-type 3D displays, they use only the binocular disparity in 3D depth cues. However, this method cause visual fatigue and headaches due to accommodation conflict and distorted depth perception. Thus, the hologram and volumetric display are expected to be an ideal 3D display. Holographic displays can represent realistic images satisfying the entire factors of depth perception. But, it require tremendous amount of data and fast signal processing. The volumetric 3D displays can represent images using voxel which is a physical volume. However, it is required for large data to represent the depth information on voxel. In order to simply encode 3D information, the compact type of depth fused 3D (DFD) display, which can create polarization distributed depth map (PDDM) image having both 2D color image and depth image is introduced. In this paper, a new volumetric 3D display system is shown by using PDDM image controlled by polarization controller. In order to introduce PDDM image, polarization states of the light through spatial light modulator (SLM) was analyzed by Stokes parameter depending on the gray level. Based on the analysis, polarization controller is properly designed to convert PDDM image into sectioned depth images. After synchronizing PDDM images with active screens, we can realize reconstructed 3D image. Acknowledgment This work was supported by `The Cross-Ministry Giga KOREA Project' grant from the Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning, Korea

  13. The Rho family GEF Asef2 regulates cell migration in three dimensional (3D) collagen matrices through myosin II.

    PubMed

    Jean, Léolène; Yang, Lijie; Majumdar, Devi; Gao, Yandong; Shi, Mingjian; Brewer, Bryson M; Li, Deyu; Webb, Donna J

    2014-01-01

    Cell migration is fundamental to a variety of physiological processes, including tissue development, homeostasis, and regeneration. Migration has been extensively studied with cells on 2-dimensional (2D) substrates, but much less is known about cell migration in 3D environments. Tissues and organs are 3D, which is the native environment of cells in vivo, pointing to a need to understand migration and the mechanisms that regulate it in 3D environments. To investigate cell migration in 3D environments, we developed microfluidic devices that afford a controlled, reproducible platform for generating 3D matrices. Using these devices, we show that the Rho family guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) Asef2 inhibits cell migration in 3D type I collagen (collagen I) matrices. Treatment of cells with the myosin II (MyoII) inhibitor blebbistatin abolished the decrease in migration by Asef2. Moreover, Asef2 enhanced MyoII activity as shown by increased phosphorylation of serine 19 (S19). Furthermore, Asef2 increased activation of Rac, which is a Rho family small GTPase, in 3D collagen I matrices. Inhibition of Rac activity by treatment with the Rac-specific inhibitor NSC23766 abrogated the Asef2-promoted increase in S19 MyoII phosphorylation. Thus, our results indicate that Asef2 regulates cell migration in 3D collagen I matrices through a Rac-MyoII-dependent mechanism.

  14. Amoeboid migration mode adaption in quasi-3D spatial density gradients of varying lattice geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelashvili, Mari; Emmert, Martin; Hodeck, Kai F.; Heinrich, Doris

    2014-07-01

    Cell migration processes are controlled by sensitive interaction with external cues such as topographic structures of the cell’s environment. Here, we present systematically controlled assays to investigate the specific effects of spatial density and local geometry of topographic structure on amoeboid migration of Dictyostelium discoideum cells. This is realized by well-controlled fabrication of quasi-3D pillar fields exhibiting a systematic variation of inter-pillar distance and pillar lattice geometry. By time-resolved local mean-squared displacement analysis of amoeboid migration, we can extract motility parameters in order to elucidate the details of amoeboid migration mechanisms and consolidate them in a two-state contact-controlled motility model, distinguishing directed and random phases. Specifically, we find that directed pillar-to-pillar runs are found preferably in high pillar density regions, and cells in directed motion states sense pillars as attractive topographic stimuli. In contrast, cell motion in random probing states is inhibited by high pillar density, where pillars act as obstacles for cell motion. In a gradient spatial density, these mechanisms lead to topographic guidance of cells, with a general trend towards a regime of inter-pillar spacing close to the cell diameter. In locally anisotropic pillar environments, cell migration is often found to be damped due to competing attraction by different pillars in close proximity and due to lack of other potential stimuli in the vicinity of the cell. Further, we demonstrate topographic cell guidance reflecting the lattice geometry of the quasi-3D environment by distinct preferences in migration direction. Our findings allow to specifically control amoeboid cell migration by purely topographic effects and thus, to induce active cell guidance. These tools hold prospects for medical applications like improved wound treatment, or invasion assays for immune cells.

  15. Understanding the effects of dielectric medium, substrate, and depth on electric fields and SERS of quasi-3D plasmonic nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiajie; Kvasnička, Pavel; Idso, Matthew; Jordan, Roger W; Gong, Heng; Homola, Jiří; Yu, Qiuming

    2011-10-10

    The local electric field distribution and the effect of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) were investigated on the quasi-3D (Q3D) plasmonic nanostructures formed by gold nanohole and nanodisc array layers physically separated by a dielectric medium. The local electric fields at the top gold nanoholes and bottom gold nanodiscs as a function of the dielectric medium, substrate, and depth of Q3D plasmonic nanostructures upon the irradiation of a 785 nm laser were calculated using the three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain (3D-FDTD) method. The intensity of the maximum local electric fields was shown to oscillate with the depth and the stronger local electric fields occurring at the top or bottom gold layer strongly depend on the dielectric medium, substrate, and depth of the nanostructure. This phenomenon was determined to be related to the Fabry-Pérot interference effect and the interaction of localized surface plasmons (LSPs). The enhancement factors (EFs) of SERS obtained from the 3D-FDTD simulations were compared to those calculated from the SERS experiments conducted on the Q3D plasmonic nanostructures fabricated on silicon and ITO coated glass substrates with different depths. The same trend was obtained from both methods. The capabilities of tuning not only the intensity but also the location of the maximum local electric fields by varying the depth, dielectric medium, and substrate make Q3D plasmonic nanostructures well suited for highly sensitive and reproducible SERS detection and analysis.

  16. 3-D resistivity imaging of buried concrete infrastructure with application to unknown bridge foundation depth determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everett, M. E.; Arjwech, R.; Briaud, J.; Hurlebaus, S.; Medina-Cetina, Z.; Tucker, S.; Yousefpour, N.

    2010-12-01

    Bridges are always vulnerable to scour and those mainly older ones with unknown foundations constitute a significant risk to public safety. Geophysical testing of bridge foundations using 3-D resistivity imaging is a promising non-destructive technology but its execution and reliable interpretation remains a challenging task. A major difficulty to diagnosing foundation depth is that a single linear electrode profile generally does not provide adequate 3—D illumination to provide a useful image of the bottom of the foundation. To further explore the capabilities of resistivity tomography, we conducted a 3—D resistivity survey at a geotechnical test area which includes groups of buried, steel—reinforced concrete structures, such as slabs and piles, with cylindrical and square cross—sections that serve as proxies for bridge foundations. By constructing a number of 3—D tomograms using selected data subsets and comparing the resulting images, we have identified efficient combinations of data acquired in the vicinity of a given foundation which enable the most cost-effective and reliable depth determination. The numerous issues that are involved in adapting this methodology to actual bridge sites is discussed.

  17. Cancer Cell Migration within 3D Layer-By-Layer Microfabricated Photocrosslinked PEG Scaffolds with Tunable Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Soman, Pranav; Kelber, Jonathan A.; Lee, Jin Woo; Wright, Tracy; Vecchio, Kenneth S.; Klemke, Richard L.; Chen, Shaochen

    2012-01-01

    Our current understanding of 3-dimensional (3D) cell migration is primarily based on results from fibrous scaffolds with randomly organized internal architecture. Manipulations that change the stiffness of these 3D scaffolds often alter other matrix parameters that can modulate cell motility independently or synergistically, making observations less predictive of how cells behave when migrating in 3D. In order to decouple microstructural influences and stiffness effects, we have designed and fabricated 3D polyethylene glycol (PEG) scaffolds that permit orthogonal tuning of both elastic moduli and microstructure. Scaffolds with log-pile architectures were used to compare the 3D migration properties of normal breast epithelial cells (HMLE) and Twist-transformed cells (HMLET). Our results indicate that the nature of cell migration is significantly impacted by the ability of cells to migrate in the third dimension. 2D ECM-coated PEG substrates revealed no statistically significant difference in cell migration between HMLE and HMLET cells among substrates of different stiffness. However, when cells were allowed to move along the third dimension, substantial differences were observed for cell displacement, velocity and path straightness parameters. Furthermore, these differences were sensitive to both substrate stiffness and the presence of the Twist oncogene. Importantly, these 3D modes of migration provide insight into the potential for oncogene-transformed cells to migrate within and colonize tissues of varying stiffness. PMID:22809641

  18. Cancer cell migration within 3D layer-by-layer microfabricated photocrosslinked PEG scaffolds with tunable stiffness.

    PubMed

    Soman, Pranav; Kelber, Jonathan A; Lee, Jin Woo; Wright, Tracy N; Vecchio, Kenneth S; Klemke, Richard L; Chen, Shaochen

    2012-10-01

    Our current understanding of 3-dimensional (3D) cell migration is primarily based on results from fibrous scaffolds with randomly organized internal architecture. Manipulations that change the stiffness of these 3D scaffolds often alter other matrix parameters that can modulate cell motility independently or synergistically, making observations less predictive of how cells behave when migrating in 3D. In order to decouple microstructural influences and stiffness effects, we have designed and fabricated 3D polyethylene glycol (PEG) scaffolds that permit orthogonal tuning of both elastic moduli and microstructure. Scaffolds with log-pile architectures were used to compare the 3D migration properties of normal breast epithelial cells (HMLE) and Twist-transformed cells (HMLET). Our results indicate that the nature of cell migration is significantly impacted by the ability of cells to migrate in the third dimension. 2D ECM-coated PEG substrates revealed no statistically significant difference in cell migration between HMLE and HMLET cells among substrates of different stiffness. However, when cells were allowed to move along the third dimension, substantial differences were observed for cell displacement, velocity and path straightness parameters. Furthermore, these differences were sensitive to both substrate stiffness and the presence of the Twist oncogene. Importantly, these 3D modes of migration provide insight into the potential for oncogene-transformed cells to migrate within and colonize tissues of varying stiffness.

  19. In-chip fabrication of free-form 3D constructs for directed cell migration analysis.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Mark Holm; Hjortø, Gertrud Malene; Hansen, Morten; Met, Özcan; Svane, Inge Marie; Larsen, Niels B

    2013-12-21

    Free-form constructs with three-dimensional (3D) microporosity were fabricated by two-photon polymerization inside the closed microchannel of an injection-molded, commercially available polymer chip for analysis of directed cell migration. Acrylate constructs were produced as woodpile topologies with a range of pore sizes from 5 × 5 μm to 15 × 15 μm and prefilled with fibrillar collagen. Dendritic cells seeded into the polymer chip in a concentration gradient of the chemoattractant CCL21 efficiently negotiated the microporous maze structure for pore sizes of 8 × 8 μm or larger. The cells migrating through smaller pore sizes made significantly more turns than those through larger pores. The introduction of additional defined barriers in the microporous structure resulted in dendritic cells making more turns while still being able to follow the chemoattractant concentration gradient.

  20. The impact of stereo 3D sports TV broadcasts on user's depth perception and spatial presence experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigelt, K.; Wiemeyer, J.

    2014-03-01

    This work examines the impact of content and presentation parameters in 2D versus 3D on depth perception and spatial presence, and provides guidelines for stereoscopic content development for 3D sports TV broadcasts and cognate subjects. Under consideration of depth perception and spatial presence experience, a preliminary study with 8 participants (sports: soccer and boxing) and a main study with 31 participants (sports: soccer and BMX-Miniramp) were performed. The dimension (2D vs. 3D) and camera position (near vs. far) were manipulated for soccer and boxing. In addition for soccer, the field of view (small vs. large) was examined. Moreover, the direction of motion (horizontal vs. depth) was considered for BMX-Miniramp. Subjective assessments, behavioural tests and qualitative interviews were implemented. The results confirm a strong effect of 3D on both depth perception and spatial presence experience as well as selective influences of camera distance and field of view. The results can improve understanding of the perception and experience of 3D TV as a medium. Finally, recommendations are derived on how to use various 3D sports ideally as content for TV broadcasts.

  1. Migration of bone marrow stromal cells in 3D: 4 color methodology reveals spatially and temporally coordinated events.

    PubMed

    Thibault, Marc M; Buschmann, Michael D

    2006-12-01

    The cytoskeleton plays a central role in many cell processes including directed cell migration. Since most previous work has investigated cell migration in two dimensions (2D), new methods are required to study movement in three dimensions (3D) while preserving 3D structure of the cytoskeleton. Most previous studies have labeled two cytoskeletal networks simultaneously, impeding an appreciation of their complex and dynamic interconnections. Here we report the development of a 4 color method to simultaneously image vimentin, actin, tubulin and the nucleus for high-resolution confocal microscopy of bone-marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) migrating through a porous membrane. Several methods were tested for structural preservation and labeling intensity resulting in identification of an optimized simultaneous fixation and permeabilization method using glutaraldehyde, paraformaldehyde and Triton X-100 followed by a quadruple fluorescent labeling method. This procedure was then applied at a sequence of time points to migrating cells, allowing temporal progression of migration to be assessed by visualizing all three networks plus the nucleus, providing new insights into 3D directed cell migration including processes such as leading edge structure, cytoskeletal distribution and nucleokinesis. Colocalization of actin and microtubules with distinct spatial arrangements at the cellular leading edge during migration, together with microtubule axial polarization supports recent reports indicating the pivotal role of microtubules in directed cell migration. This study also provides a foundation for 3D migration studies versus 2D studies, providing precise and robust methods to attain new insights into the cellular mechanisms of motility.

  2. Fibroblast Migration in 3D is Controlled by Haptotaxis in a Non-muscle Myosin II-Dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Arotzena, O; Borau, C; Movilla, N; Vicente-Manzanares, M; García-Aznar, J M

    2015-12-01

    Cell migration in 3D is a key process in many physiological and pathological processes. Although valuable knowledge has been accumulated through analysis of various 2D models, some of these insights are not directly applicable to migration in 3D. In this study, we have confined biomimetic hydrogels within microfluidic platforms in the presence of a chemoattractant (platelet-derived growth factor-BB). We have characterized the migratory responses of human fibroblasts within them, particularly focusing on the role of non-muscle myosin II. Our results indicate a prominent role for myosin II in the integration of chemotactic and haptotactic migratory responses of fibroblasts in 3D confined environments.

  3. An extracellular-matrix-specific GEF-GAP interaction regulates Rho GTPase crosstalk for 3D collagen migration.

    PubMed

    Kutys, Matthew L; Yamada, Kenneth M

    2014-09-01

    Rho-family GTPases govern distinct types of cell migration on different extracellular matrix proteins in tissue culture or three-dimensional (3D) matrices. We searched for mechanisms selectively regulating 3D cell migration in different matrix environments and discovered a form of Cdc42-RhoA crosstalk governing cell migration through a specific pair of GTPase activator and inhibitor molecules. We first identified βPix, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), as a specific regulator of migration in 3D collagen using an affinity-precipitation-based GEF screen. Knockdown of βPix specifically blocks cell migration in fibrillar collagen microenvironments, leading to hyperactive cellular protrusion accompanied by increased collagen matrix contraction. Live FRET imaging and RNAi knockdown linked this βPix knockdown phenotype to loss of polarized Cdc42 but not Rac1 activity, accompanied by enhanced, de-localized RhoA activity. Mechanistically, collagen phospho-regulates βPix, leading to its association with srGAP1, a GTPase-activating protein (GAP), needed to suppress RhoA activity. Our results reveal a matrix-specific pathway controlling migration involving a GEF-GAP interaction of βPix with srGAP1 that is critical for maintaining suppressive crosstalk between Cdc42 and RhoA during 3D collagen migration.

  4. 3-D Prestack-migration of Wide-angle Data from a Variscan Transition Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleibinhaus, F.; Bopp, M.; Simon, M.; Gebrande, H.

    1999-09-01

    In addition to the near normal-incidence observations within the German DEKORP 2 project in 1984, wide-angle observations have been carried out on a parallel profile across the boundary between the Saxothuringian and Moldanubian crust, approximately 50 km NE of the main transect to control three-dimensional variations. Explosion sources have been used for the entire survey, providing excellent conditions for wide-angle registrations. A velocity model has been derived on the basis of in- and off-line refraction measurements using a kinematic raytracer which was extended to three dimensions by interpolation of 2-D velocity fields between parallel sections. Although prestack-migration of the data led to aliasing effects due to large shot and geophone spacing, stable results were obtained by forming envelopes after single-shot migration. The migrated sections reveal a strongly reflective Moho at about 31 km depth and a steeply (50°) dipping intracrustal reflector, which seems to be related to the border between the two Variscan units.

  5. Combinative in vitro studies and computational model to predict 3D cell migration response to drug insult.

    PubMed

    Maffei, Joseph S; Srivastava, Jaya; Fallica, Brian; Zaman, Muhammad H

    2014-10-01

    The development of drugs to counter diseases related to cell migration has resulted in a multi-billion dollar endeavor. Unfortunately, few drugs have emerged from this effort highlighting the need for new methods to enhance assays to study, analyze and control cell migration. In response to this complex process, computational models have emerged as potent tools to describe migration providing a high throughput and low cost method. However, most models are unable to predict migration response to drug with direct application to in vitro experiments. In addition to this, no model to date has attempted to describe migration in response to drugs while incorporating simultaneously protein signaling, proteolytic activity, and 3D culture. In this paper, we describe an integrated computational approach, in conjunction with in vitro observations, to serve as a platform to accurately predict migration in 3D matrices incorporating the function of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their interaction with the Extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK) signaling pathway. Our results provide biological insight into how matrix density, MMP activity, integrin adhesions, and p-ERK expression all affect speed and persistence in 3D. Predictions from the model provide insight toward improving drug combinations to more effectively reduce both speed and persistence during migration and the role of integrin adhesions in motility. In this way our integrated platform provides future potential to streamline and improve throughput toward the testing and development of migration targeting drugs with tangible application to current in vitro assays.

  6. 3D insight into fault geometries, deformation, and fluid-migration within the Hosgri Fault Zone offshore central California: Results from high-resolution 3D seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluesner, J.; Brothers, D. S.; Johnson, S. Y.; Watt, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    High-resolution 3D seismic P-Cable data and advanced seismic attribute analyses were used to detect and interpret complex strike-slip fault geometries, deformation patterns, and fluid-pathways across a portion of the Hosgri Fault Zone (HFZ) offshore central California. Combination of the fault attribute results with structural analysis provides 3D insight into the geometry and internal structure of restraining and releasing bends, step-over zones, fault convergence zones, and apparent paired fault bends. The 3D seismic volume covers a 13.7 km2 region along the HFZ offshore of Point Sal and was collected in 2012 as part of the PG&E Central California Seismic Imaging Project (PG&E, 2014). Application of the fault attribute workflow isolated and delineated fault strands within the 3D volume. These results revealed that the northern and southern edges of the survey region are characterized by single fault strands that exhibit an approximate 6° change in strike across the 3D volume. Between these single faults strands is a complex network of fault splays, bends, stepovers, and convergence zones. Structural analysis reveals that the southern portion of the HFZ in the region is characterized by transtensional deformation, whereas transpressional-related folding dominates the central and northern portions of the HFZ. In the central region, convergence of the Lions Head Fault from the southeast results in an apparent impinging block, leading to development of a "paired fault bend" to the west. Combination of the fault and "chimney" attribute results indicates a strong connection between faults and fluid-migration pathways. Fluid-pathways are concentrated along discrete faults in the transtensional zones, but appear to be more broadly distributed amongst fault bounded anticlines and structurally controlled traps in the transpressional zones.

  7. 1-integrin and MT1-MMP promote tumor cell migration in 2D but not in 3D fibronectin microenvironments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corall, Silke; Haraszti, Tamas; Bartoschik, Tanja; Spatz, Joachim Pius; Ludwig, Thomas; Cavalcanti-Adam, Elisabetta Ada

    2014-03-01

    Cell migration is a crucial event for physiological processes, such as embryonic development and wound healing, as well as for pathological processes, such as cancer dissemination and metastasis formation. Cancer cell migration is a result of the concerted action of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), expressed by cancer cells to degrade the surrounding matrix, and integrins, the transmembrane receptors responsible for cell binding to matrix proteins. While it is known that cell-microenvironment interactions are essential for migration, the role of the physical state of such interactions remains still unclear. In this study we investigated human fibrosarcoma cell migration in two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) fibronectin (FN) microenvironments. By using antibody blocking approach and cell-binding site mutation, we determined that -integrin is the main mediator of fibrosarcoma cell migration in 2D FN, whereas in 3D fibrillar FN, the binding of - and -integrins is not necessary for cell movement in the fibrillar network. Furthermore, while the general inhibition of MMPs with GM6001 has no effect on cell migration in both 2D and 3D FN matrices, we observed opposing effect after targeted silencing of a membrane-bound MMP, namely MT1-MMP. In 2D fibronectin, silencing of MT1-MMP results in decreased migration speed and loss of directionality, whereas in 3D FN matrices, cell migration speed is increased and integrin-mediated signaling for actin dynamics is promoted. Our results suggest that the fibrillar nature of the matrix governs the migratory behavior of fibrosarcoma cells. Therefore, to hinder migration and dissemination of diseased cells, matrix molecules should be directly targeted, rather than specific subtypes of receptors at the cell membrane.

  8. 3D airflow dynamics over transverse ridges Mpekweni, South Africa: implications for dune field migration behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Derek; Cooper, Andrew; Green, Andrew; Beyers, Meiring; Wiles, Errol; Benallack, Keegan

    2016-04-01

    Un-vegetated dune fields provide excellent opportunities to examine airflow dynamics over various types and scales of dune landforms. The three dimensional surface over which lower boundary layers travel, help adjust surface airflow and consequently the aeolian response of the dunes themselves. The use of computational fluid dynamic (CFD) modelling in recent studies now enables investigation of the 3D behaviour of airflow over complex terrain, providing new insights into heterogeneous surface flow and aeolian response of dune surfaces on a large (dunefield) scale. Using a largely un-vegetated coastal dune field site at Mpekweni, Eastern Cape, South Africa, a detailed (0.1m gridded) terrestrial laser scanning survey was conducted to create a high resolution topographical surface. Using local wind flow measurements and local met station records as input, CFD modelling was performed for a number of scenarios involving variable direction and magnitude to examine surface flow patterns across multiple dune forms. Near surface acceleration, expansion and separation of airflow inducing convergence and divergence (steering) of flow velocity streamlines are investigated. Flow acceleration over dune crests/brink lines is a key parameter in driving dune migration and slip face dynamics. Dune aspect ratio (height to length) is also important in determining the degree of crestal flow acceleration, with an increase in flow associated with increasing aspect ratios. Variations in dune height appear to be the most important parameter in driving general flow acceleration. The results from the study provide new insights into dune migration behaviour at this site as well as surface flow behaviour across multiple dune configurations and length scales within un-vegetated dune fields.

  9. 2D protrusion but not motility predicts growth factor-induced cancer cell migration in 3D collagen.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Aaron S; Hughes-Alford, Shannon K; Kay, Jennifer E; Castillo, Amalchi; Wells, Alan; Gertler, Frank B; Lauffenburger, Douglas A

    2012-06-11

    Growth factor-induced migration is a critical step in the dissemination and metastasis of solid tumors. Although differences in properties characterizing cell migration on two-dimensional (2D) substrata versus within three-dimensional (3D) matrices have been noted for particular growth factor stimuli, the 2D approach remains in more common use as an efficient surrogate, especially for high-throughput experiments. We therefore were motivated to investigate which migration properties measured in various 2D assays might be reflective of 3D migratory behavioral responses. We used human triple-negative breast cancer lines stimulated by a panel of receptor tyrosine kinase ligands relevant to mammary carcinoma progression. Whereas 2D migration properties did not correlate well with 3D behavior across multiple growth factors, we found that increased membrane protrusion elicited by growth factor stimulation did relate robustly to enhanced 3D migration properties of the MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-157 lines. Interestingly, we observed this to be a more reliable relationship than cognate receptor expression or activation levels across these and two additional mammary tumor lines.

  10. An MEK-cofilin signalling module controls migration of human T cells in 3D but not 2D environments.

    PubMed

    Klemke, Martin; Kramer, Elisabeth; Konstandin, Mathias H; Wabnitz, Guido H; Samstag, Yvonne

    2010-09-01

    T cells infiltrate peripheral tissues to execute immunosurveillance and effector functions. For this purpose, T cells first migrate on the two-dimensional (2D) surface of endothelial cells to undergo transendothelial migration. Then they change their mode of movement to undergo migration within the three-dimensional (3D)-extracellular matrix of the infiltrated tissue. As yet, no molecular mechanisms are known, which control migration exclusively in either 2D or 3D environments. Here, we describe a signalling module that controls T-cell chemotaxis specifically in 3D environments. In chemotaxing T cells, Ras activity is spatially restricted to the lamellipodium. There, Ras initiates activation of MEK, which in turn inhibits LIM-kinase 1 activity, thereby allowing dephosphorylation of the F-actin-remodelling protein cofilin. Interference with this MEK-cofilin module by either inhibition of MEK or by knockdown of cofilin reduces speed and directionality of chemotactic migration in 3D-extracellular matrices, but not on 2D substrates. This MEK-cofilin module may have an important function in the tissue positioning of T cells during an immune response.

  11. 3D arrays for high throughput assay of cell migration and electrotaxis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Sanjun; Gao, Runchi; Devreotes, Peter N; Mogilner, Alex; Zhao, Min

    2013-09-01

    Cell behaviour in 3D environments can be significantly different from those in 2D cultures. With many different 3D matrices being developed and many experimental modalities used to modulate cell behaviour in 3D, it is necessary to develop high throughput techniques to study behaviour in 3D. We report on a 3D array on slide and have adapted this to our electrotaxis chamber, thereby offering a novel approach to quantify cellular responses to electric fields (EFs) in 3D conditions, in different matrices, with different strains of cells, under various field strengths. These developments used Dictyostelium cells to illustrate possible applications and limitations.

  12. Exogenous orienting of crossmodal attention in 3-D space: support for a depth-aware crossmodal attentional system.

    PubMed

    Van der Stoep, Nathan; Nijboer, Tanja C W; Van der Stigchel, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate exogenous crossmodal orienting of attention in three-dimensional (3-D) space. Most studies in which the orienting of attention has been examined in 3-D space concerned either exogenous intramodal or endogenous crossmodal attention. Evidence for exogenous crossmodal orienting of attention in depth is lacking. Endogenous and exogenous attention are behaviorally different, suggesting that they are two different mechanisms. We used the orthogonal spatial-cueing paradigm and presented auditory exogenous cues at one of four possible locations in near or far space before the onset of a visual target. Cues could be presented at the same (valid) or at a different (invalid) depth from the target (radial validity), and on the same (valid) or on a different (invalid) side (horizontal validity), whereas we blocked the depth at which visual targets were presented. Next to an overall validity effect (valid RTs < invalid RTs) in horizontal space, we observed an interaction between the horizontal and radial validity of the cue: The horizontal validity effect was present only when the cue and the target were presented at the same depth. No horizontal validity effect was observed when the cue and the target were presented at different depths. These results suggest that exogenous crossmodal attention is "depth-aware," and they are discussed in the context of the supramodal hypothesis of attention.

  13. Migration in Confined 3D Environments Is Determined by a Combination of Adhesiveness, Nuclear Volume, Contractility, and Cell Stiffness.

    PubMed

    Lautscham, Lena A; Kämmerer, Christoph; Lange, Janina R; Kolb, Thorsten; Mark, Christoph; Schilling, Achim; Strissel, Pamela L; Strick, Reiner; Gluth, Caroline; Rowat, Amy C; Metzner, Claus; Fabry, Ben

    2015-09-01

    In cancer metastasis and other physiological processes, cells migrate through the three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix of connective tissue and must overcome the steric hindrance posed by pores that are smaller than the cells. It is currently assumed that low cell stiffness promotes cell migration through confined spaces, but other factors such as adhesion and traction forces may be equally important. To study 3D migration under confinement in a stiff (1.77 MPa) environment, we use soft lithography to fabricate polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) devices consisting of linear channel segments with 20 μm length, 3.7 μm height, and a decreasing width from 11.2 to 1.7 μm. To study 3D migration in a soft (550 Pa) environment, we use self-assembled collagen networks with an average pore size of 3 μm. We then measure the ability of four different cancer cell lines to migrate through these 3D matrices, and correlate the results with cell physical properties including contractility, adhesiveness, cell stiffness, and nuclear volume. Furthermore, we alter cell adhesion by coating the channel walls with different amounts of adhesion proteins, and we increase cell stiffness by overexpression of the nuclear envelope protein lamin A. Although all cell lines are able to migrate through the smallest 1.7 μm channels, we find significant differences in the migration velocity. Cell migration is impeded in cell lines with larger nuclei, lower adhesiveness, and to a lesser degree also in cells with lower contractility and higher stiffness. Our data show that the ability to overcome the steric hindrance of the matrix cannot be attributed to a single cell property but instead arises from a combination of adhesiveness, nuclear volume, contractility, and cell stiffness.

  14. Studying methane migration mechanisms at Walker Ridge, Gulf of Mexico, via 3D methane hydrate reservoir modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Nole, Michael; Daigle, Hugh; Mohanty, Kishore; Cook, Ann; Hillman, Jess

    2015-12-15

    We have developed a 3D methane hydrate reservoir simulator to model marine methane hydrate systems. Our simulator couples highly nonlinear heat and mass transport equations and includes heterogeneous sedimentation, in-situ microbial methanogenesis, the influence of pore size contrast on solubility gradients, and the impact of salt exclusion from the hydrate phase on dissolved methane equilibrium in pore water. Using environmental parameters from Walker Ridge in the Gulf of Mexico, we first simulate hydrate formation in and around a thin, dipping, planar sand stratum surrounded by clay lithology as it is buried to 295mbsf. We find that with sufficient methane being supplied by organic methanogenesis in the clays, a 200x pore size contrast between clays and sands allows for a strong enough concentration gradient to significantly drop the concentration of methane hydrate in clays immediately surrounding a thin sand layer, a phenomenon that is observed in well log data. Building upon previous work, our simulations account for the increase in sand-clay solubility contrast with depth from about 1.6% near the top of the sediment column to 8.6% at depth, which leads to a progressive strengthening of the diffusive flux of methane with time. By including an exponentially decaying organic methanogenesis input to the clay lithology with depth, we see a decrease in the aqueous methane supplied to the clays surrounding the sand layer with time, which works to further enhance the contrast in hydrate saturation between the sand and surrounding clays. Significant diffusive methane transport is observed in a clay interval of about 11m above the sand layer and about 4m below it, which matches well log observations. The clay-sand pore size contrast alone is not enough to completely eliminate hydrate (as observed in logs), because the diffusive flux of aqueous methane due to a contrast in pore size occurs slower than the rate at which methane is supplied via organic methanogenesis

  15. Microfluidic assay of endothelial cell migration in 3D interpenetrating polymer semi-network HA-Collagen hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Gi Seok; Kwon, Gu Han; Kang, Ah Ran; Jung, Bo Young; Park, Yongdoo; Chung, Seok; Lee, Sang-Hoon

    2011-08-01

    Cell migration through the extracellular matrix (ECM) is one of the key features for physiological and pathological processes such as angiogenesis, cancer metastasis, and wound healing. In particular, the quantitative assay of endothelial cell migration under the well-defined three dimensional (3D) microenvironment is important to analyze the angiogenesis mechanism. In this study, we report a microfluidic assay of endothelial cell sprouting and migration into an interpenetrating polymer semi-network HA-Collagen (SIPNs CH) hydrogel as ECM providing an enhanced in vivo mimicking 3D microenvironment to cells. The microfluidic chip could provide a well-controlled gradient of growth factor to cells, whereas the hydrogel could mimic a well-defined 3D microenvironment in vivo. (In addition/Furthermore, the microfluidic chip gives a well-controlled gradient of growth factor to cells) For this reason, three types of hydrogel, composed of semi-interpenetrating networks of collagen and hyaluronic acid were prepared, and firstly we proved the role of the hydrogel in endothelial cell migration. The diffusion property and swelling ratio of the hydrogel were characterized. It modulated the migration of endothelial cells in quantified manner, also being influenced by additional synthesis of Matrix metalloproteinase(MMP)-sensitive remodeling peptides and Arginine-glycine-lycinee (RGD) cell adhesion peptides. We successfully established a novel cell migration platform by changing major determinants such as ECM material under biochemical synthesis and under growth factor gradients in a microfluidic manner.

  16. 2D-3D MIGRATION AND CONFORMATIONAL MULTIPLICATION OF CHEMICALS IN LARGE CHEMICAL INVENTORIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical interactions are three-dimensional (3D) in nature and require modeling chemicals as 3D entities. In turn, using 3D models of chemicals leads to the realization that a single 2D structure can have hundreds of different conformations, and the electronic properties of these...

  17. Controlling depth of focus in 3D image reconstructions by flexible and adaptive deformation of digital holograms.

    PubMed

    Ferraro, P; Paturzo, M; Memmolo, P; Finizio, A

    2009-09-15

    We show here that through an adaptive deformation of digital holograms it is possible to manage the depth of focus in 3D imaging reconstruction. Deformation is applied to the original hologram with the aim to put simultaneously in focus, and in one reconstructed image plane, different objects lying at different distances from the hologram plane (i.e., CCD sensor). In the same way, by adapting the deformation it is possible to extend the depth of field having a tilted object entirely in focus. We demonstrate the method in both lensless as well as in microscope configuration.

  18. Lamellipodin promotes invasive 3D cancer cell migration via regulated interactions with Ena/VASP and SCAR/WAVE

    PubMed Central

    Carmona, Guillaume; Perera, Upamali; Gillett, Cheryl; Naba, Alexandra; Law, Ah-Lai; Sharma, Ved P.; Wang, Jian; Wyckoff, Jeffrey; Balsamo, Michele; Mosis, Fuad; De Piano, Mario; Monypenny, James; Woodman, Natalie; McConnell, Russell E.; Mouneimne, Ghassan; Van Hemelrijck, Mieke; Cao, Yihai; Condeelis, John; Hynes, Richard O.; Gertler, Frank B.; Krause, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Cancer invasion is a hallmark of metastasis. The mesenchymal mode of cancer cell invasion is mediated by elongated membrane protrusions driven by the assembly of branched F-actin networks. How deregulation of actin regulators promotes cancer cell invasion is still enigmatic. We report that increased expression and membrane localization of the actin regulator Lamellipodin correlates with reduced metastasis-free survival and poor prognosis in breast cancer patients. In agreement we find that Lamellipodin depletion reduced lung metastasis in an orthotopic mouse breast cancer model. Invasive 3D cancer cell migration as well as invadopodia formation, and matrix degradation were impaired upon Lamellipodin depletion. Mechanistically, we show that Lamellipodin promotes invasive 3D cancer cell migration via both actin-elongating Ena/VASP proteins and the Scar/WAVE complex, which stimulates actin branching. In contrast, Lamellipodin interaction with Scar/WAVE but not Ena/VASP is required for random 2D cell migration. We identify a phosphorylation-dependent mechanism that regulates selective recruitment of these effectors to Lamellipodin: Abl-mediated Lamellipodin phosphorylation promotes its association with both Scar/WAVE and Ena/VASP, while Src-dependent phosphorylation enhances binding to Scar/WAVE but not Ena/VASP. Through these selective, regulated interactions Lamellipodin mediates directional sensing of EGF gradients and invasive 3D migration of breast cancer cells. Our findings imply that increased Lamellipodin levels enhance Ena/VASP and Scar/WAVE activities at the plasma membrane to promote 3D invasion and metastasis. PMID:26996666

  19. Depth-expression characteristics of multi-projection 3D display systems [invited].

    PubMed

    Park, Soon-gi; Hong, Jong-Young; Lee, Chang-Kun; Miranda, Matheus; Kim, Youngmin; Lee, Byoungho

    2014-09-20

    A multi-projection display consists of multiple projection units. Because of the large amount of data, a multi-projection system shows large, high-quality images. According to the projection geometry and the optical configuration, multi-projection systems show different viewing characteristics for generated three-dimensional images. In this paper, we analyzed the various projection geometries of multi-projection systems, and explained the different depth-expression characteristics for each individual projection geometry. We also demonstrated the depth-expression characteristic of an experimental multi-projection system.

  20. Assessing Methane Migration Mechanisms at Walker Ridge, Gulf of Mexico, via 3D Methane Hydrate Reservoir Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nole, M.; Daigle, H.; Mohanty, K. K.; Hillman, J. I. T.; Cook, A.

    2015-12-01

    We employ a 3D methane hydrate reservoir simulator to model marine methane hydrate systems. Our simulator couples highly nonlinear heat and mass transport equations and includes heterogeneous sedimentation, in-situ organic methanogenesis, and the influences of both pore size contrast and salt exclusion from the hydrate phase on solubility gradients. Using environmental parameters of Walker Ridge, Gulf of Mexico, we first simulate hydrate formation in and around a thin, dipping, planar sand stratum surrounded by clay lithology as it is buried to 295mbsf. With sufficient methane supplied by methanogenesis in the clays, a 200x sand-clay pore size contrast allows for a strong enough concentration gradient to significantly drop the concentration of hydrate in clays immediately surrounding a thin sand, a phenomenon observed in corresponding well log data. Building upon previous work, our simulations account for a depth-wise increase in sand-clay solubility contrast from about 1.6% near the seafloor to 8.6% at depth, progressively strengthening the diffusive flux of methane with time. An exponentially decaying methanogenesis input to the clay lithology decreases the methane supplied to clays surrounding the sand layer with time, further enhancing the sand-clay hydrate saturation contrast. Significant diffusive methane transport occurs in a clay interval of about 11m above the sand and 4m below it, matching well log observations. Clay-sand pore size contrast alone is not enough to create hydrate-free zones seen in logs, because the corresponding diffusive methane flux is slower than the rate at which methanogenesis supplies methane. Therefore, it is likely that additional mechanisms are at play, notably bound water activity reduction in clays. Three-dimensionality allows for inclusion of lithologic heterogeneities, which focus flow and allow for heterogeneity in locally dominant methane migration mechanisms. Incorporating recent 3D seismic data to inform the model

  1. Depth-image-based rendering (DIBR), compression, and transmission for a new approach on 3D-TV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fehn, Christoph

    2004-05-01

    This paper presents details of a system that allows for an evolutionary introduction of depth perception into the existing 2D digital TV framework. The work is part of the European Information Society Technologies (IST) project "Advanced Three-Dimensional Television System Technologies" (ATTEST), an activity, where industries, research centers and universities have joined forces to design a backwards-compatible, flexible and modular broadcast 3D-TV system. At the very heart of the described new concept is the generation and distribution of a novel data representation format, which consists of monoscopic color video and associated per-pixel depth information. From these data, one or more "virtual" views of a real-world scene can be synthesized in real-time at the receiver side (i.e. a 3D-TV set-top box) by means of so-called depth-image-based rendering (DIBR) techniques. This publication will provide: (1) a detailed description of the fundamentals of this new approach on 3D-TV; (2) a comparison with the classical approach of "stereoscopic" video; (3) a short introduction to DIBR techniques in general; (4) the development of a specific DIBR algorithm that can be used for the efficient generation of high-quality "virtual" stereoscopic views; (5) a number of implementation details that are specific to the current state of the development; (6) research on the backwards-compatible compression and transmission of 3D imagery using state-of-the-art MPEG (Moving Pictures Expert Group) tools.

  2. Lapse-time-dependent coda-wave depth sensitivity to local velocity perturbations in 3-D heterogeneous elastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obermann, Anne; Planès, Thomas; Hadziioannou, Céline; Campillo, Michel

    2016-10-01

    In the context of seismic monitoring, recent studies made successful use of seismic coda waves to locate medium changes on the horizontal plane. Locating the depth of the changes, however, remains a challenge. In this paper, we use 3-D wavefield simulations to address two problems: first, we evaluate the contribution of surface- and body-wave sensitivity to a change at depth. We introduce a thin layer with a perturbed velocity at different depths and measure the apparent relative velocity changes due to this layer at different times in the coda and for different degrees of heterogeneity of the model. We show that the depth sensitivity can be modelled as a linear combination of body- and surface-wave sensitivity. The lapse-time-dependent sensitivity ratio of body waves and surface waves can be used to build 3-D sensitivity kernels for imaging purposes. Second, we compare the lapse-time behaviour in the presence of a perturbation in horizontal and vertical slabs to address, for instance, the origin of the velocity changes detected after large earthquakes.

  3. Extended depth-of-focus 3D micro integral imaging display using a bifocal liquid crystal lens.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xin; Wang, Yu-Jen; Chen, Hung-Shan; Xiao, Xiao; Lin, Yi-Hsin; Javidi, Bahram

    2015-02-15

    We present a three dimensional (3D) micro integral imaging display system with extended depth of focus by using a polarized bifocal liquid crystal lens. This lens and other optical components are combined as the relay optical element. The focal length of the relay optical element can be controlled to project an elemental image array in multiple positions with various lenslet image planes, by applying different voltages to the liquid crystal lens. The depth of focus of the proposed system can therefore be extended. The feasibility of our proposed system is experimentally demonstrated. In our experiments, the depth of focus of the display system is extended from 3.82 to 109.43 mm.

  4. An in-depth spectroscopic examination of molecular bands from 3D hydrodynamical model atmospheres. II. Carbon-enhanced metal-poor 3D model atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, A. J.; Caffau, E.; Bonifacio, P.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Steffen, M.; Homeier, D.; Plez, B.

    2017-02-01

    Context. Tighter constraints on metal-poor stars we observe are needed to better understand the chemical processes of the early Universe. Computing a stellar spectrum in 3D allows one to model complex stellar behaviours, which cannot be replicated in 1D. Aims: We examine the effect that the intrinsic CNO abundances have on a 3D model structure and the resulting 3D spectrum synthesis. Methods: Model atmospheres were computed in 3D for three distinct CNO chemical compositions using the CO5BOLD model atmosphere code, and their internal structures were examined. Synthetic spectra were computed from these models using Linfor3D and they were compared. New 3D abundance corrections for the G-band and a selection of UV OH lines were also computed. Results: The varying CNO abundances change the metal content of the 3D models. This had an effect on the model structure and the resulting synthesis. However, it was found that the C/O ratio had a larger effect than the overall metal content of a model. Conclusions: Our results suggest that varying the C/O ratio has a substantial impact on the internal structure of the 3D model, even in the hot turn-off star models explored here. This suggests that bespoke 3D models, for specific CNO abundances should be sought. Such effects are not seen in 1D at these temperature regimes.

  5. Rnd3 Regulation of the Actin Cytoskeleton Promotes Melanoma Migration and Invasive Outgrowth in 3-D

    PubMed Central

    Klein, R. Matthew; Aplin, Andrew E.

    2009-01-01

    Depth of cell invasion into the dermis is a clinical determinant for poor prognosis in cutaneous melanoma. The signaling events that promote the switch from a non-invasive to invasive tumor phenotype remain obscure. Activating mutations in the serine/threonine kinase B-RAF are prevalent in melanoma. Mutant B-RAF is required for melanoma cell invasion. The expression of Rnd3, a Rho family GTPase, is regulated by mutant B-RAF, although its role in melanoma progression is unknown. In this study, we determined the functional contribution of Rnd3 to invasive melanoma. Endogenous Rnd3 was targeted for knockdown using a doxycyclineinducible shRNA system in invasive human melanoma cells. Depletion of Rnd3 promoted prominent actin stress fibers and enlarged focal adhesions. Mechanistically, stress fiber formation induced by Rnd3 knockdown required the specific involvement of RhoA and ROCK1/2 activity but not RhoB or RhoC. Rnd3 expression in human melanoma cell lines was strongly associated with elevated ERK phosphorylation and invasive behavior in a 3-D dermal-like environment. A functional role for Rnd3 was demonstrated in the invasive outgrowth of melanoma tumor spheroids. Knockdown of Rnd3 reduced invasive outgrowth of spheroids embedded in collagen gels. Additionally, Rnd3 depletion inhibited collective and border cell movement out from spheroids in a ROCK1/2-dependent manner. Collectively, these findings implicate Rnd3 as a major suppressor of RhoA mediated actin cytoskeletal organization and in the acquisition of an invasive melanoma phenotype. PMID:19244113

  6. Depth-resolved 3D visualization of coronary microvasculature with optical microangiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Wan; Roberts, Meredith A.; Qi, Xiaoli; Murry, Charles E.; Zheng, Ying; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2016-11-01

    In this study, we propose a novel implementation of optical coherence tomography-based angiography combined with ex vivo perfusion of fixed hearts to visualize coronary microvascular structure and function. The extracorporeal perfusion of Intralipid solution allows depth-resolved angiographic imaging, control of perfusion pressure, and high-resolution optical microangiography. The imaging technique offers new opportunities for microcirculation research in the heart, which has been challenging due to motion artifacts and the lack of independent control of pressure and flow. With the ability to precisely quantify structural and functional features, this imaging platform has broad potential for the study of the pathophysiology of microvasculature in the heart as well as other organs.

  7. 2-D and 3-D Difraction Stake Migration Method Using GPR: A Case Study in Canakkale (Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çaǧlar Yalçiner, Cahit

    In this study, ground-penetrating radar (GPR) method was applied for Clandestine cemetery detection in Ηanakkale (Dardanelles), west Turkey. Investigated area was a historical area which was used as tent hospitals during the World War I. The study area was also used to bury soldiers who died during the treatment process in tent hospitals. Because of agricultural activity grave stones were used by local people, thus, most of the graves were lost in the field. 45 GPR profiles were applied with a GPR system (RAMAC) equipped with 250 MHz central frequency shielded antenna. After main processing steps on raw data, migration was applied to improve section resolution and develop the realism of the subsurface images. Although the GPR in results before migration the anomalous zones are visible, after migration the results became much more visible both in the profiles and 3D illustrations, thus, migrated GPR data were preferred to locate the buried martyrdoms.

  8. Operational Retrieval of aerosol optical depth over Indian subcontinent and Indian Ocean using INSAT-3D/Imager product validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, M. K.; Rastogi, G.; Chauhan, P.

    2014-11-01

    Aerosol optical depth (AOD) over Indian subcontinent and Indian Ocean region is derived operationally for the first time from the geostationary earth orbit (GEO) satellite INSAT-3D Imager data at 0.65 μm wavelength. Single visible channel algorithm based on clear sky composites gives larger retrieval error in AOD than other multiple channel algorithms due to errors in estimating surface reflectance and atmospheric property. However, since MIR channel signal is insensitive to the presence of most aerosols, therefore in present study, AOD retrieval algorithm employs both visible (centred at 0.65 μm) and mid-infrared (MIR) band (centred at 3.9 μm) measurements, and allows us to monitor transport of aerosols at higher temporal resolution. Comparisons made between INSAT-3D derived AOD (τI) and MODIS derived AOD (τM) co-located in space (at 1° resolution) and time during January, February and March (JFM) 2014 encompasses 1165, 1052 and 900 pixels, respectively. Good agreement found between τI and τM during JFM 2014 with linear correlation coefficients (R) of 0.87, 0.81 and 0.76, respectively. The extensive validation made during JFM 2014 encompasses 215 co-located AOD in space and time derived by INSAT 3D (τI) and 10 sun-photometers (τA) that includes 9 AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) and 1 handheld sun-photometer site. INSAT-3D derived AOD i.e. τI, is found within the retrieval errors of τI = ±0.07 ±0.15τA with linear correlation coefficient (R) of 0.90 and root mean square error equal (RMSE) to 0.06. Present work shows that INSAT-3D aerosol products can be used quantitatively in many applications with caution for possible residual clouds, snow/ice, and water contamination.

  9. Robust incremental compensation of the light attenuation with depth in 3D fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kervrann, C; Legland, D; Pardini, L

    2004-06-01

    Summary Fluorescent signal intensities from confocal laser scanning microscopes (CLSM) suffer from several distortions inherent to the method. Namely, layers which lie deeper within the specimen are relatively dark due to absorption and scattering of both excitation and fluorescent light, photobleaching and/or other factors. Because of these effects, a quantitative analysis of images is not always possible without correction. Under certain assumptions, the decay of intensities can be estimated and used for a partial depth intensity correction. In this paper we propose an original robust incremental method for compensating the attenuation of intensity signals. Most previous correction methods are more or less empirical and based on fitting a decreasing parametric function to the section mean intensity curve computed by summing all pixel values in each section. The fitted curve is then used for the calculation of correction factors for each section and a new compensated sections series is computed. However, these methods do not perfectly correct the images. Hence, the algorithm we propose for the automatic correction of intensities relies on robust estimation, which automatically ignores pixels where measurements deviate from the decay model. It is based on techniques adopted from the computer vision literature for image motion estimation. The resulting algorithm is used to correct volumes acquired in CLSM. An implementation of such a restoration filter is discussed and examples of successful restorations are given.

  10. Lamellipodin promotes invasive 3D cancer cell migration via regulated interactions with Ena/VASP and SCAR/WAVE.

    PubMed

    Carmona, G; Perera, U; Gillett, C; Naba, A; Law, A-L; Sharma, V P; Wang, J; Wyckoff, J; Balsamo, M; Mosis, F; De Piano, M; Monypenny, J; Woodman, N; McConnell, R E; Mouneimne, G; Van Hemelrijck, M; Cao, Y; Condeelis, J; Hynes, R O; Gertler, F B; Krause, M

    2016-09-29

    Cancer invasion is a hallmark of metastasis. The mesenchymal mode of cancer cell invasion is mediated by elongated membrane protrusions driven by the assembly of branched F-actin networks. How deregulation of actin regulators promotes cancer cell invasion is still enigmatic. We report that increased expression and membrane localization of the actin regulator Lamellipodin correlate with reduced metastasis-free survival and poor prognosis in breast cancer patients. In agreement, we find that Lamellipodin depletion reduced lung metastasis in an orthotopic mouse breast cancer model. Invasive 3D cancer cell migration as well as invadopodia formation and matrix degradation was impaired upon Lamellipodin depletion. Mechanistically, we show that Lamellipodin promotes invasive 3D cancer cell migration via both actin-elongating Ena/VASP proteins and the Scar/WAVE complex, which stimulates actin branching. In contrast, Lamellipodin interaction with Scar/WAVE but not with Ena/VASP is required for random 2D cell migration. We identified a phosphorylation-dependent mechanism that regulates selective recruitment of these effectors to Lamellipodin: Abl-mediated Lamellipodin phosphorylation promotes its association with both Scar/WAVE and Ena/VASP, whereas Src-dependent phosphorylation enhances binding to Scar/WAVE but not to Ena/VASP. Through these selective, regulated interactions Lamellipodin mediates directional sensing of epidermal growth factor (EGF) gradients and invasive 3D migration of breast cancer cells. Our findings imply that increased Lamellipodin levels enhance Ena/VASP and Scar/WAVE activities at the plasma membrane to promote 3D invasion and metastasis.

  11. Phenotypic changes in proliferation, differentiation, and migration of chondrocytes: 3D in vitro models for joint wound healing.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yu-Hui; Chen, Chun-Wei; Lai, Wen-Fu T; Tang, Ja-Reng; Deng, Win-Ping; Yeh, Shauh-Der; Chung, Andrew; Zuo, Chun S; Bowley, John F

    2010-03-01

    We aim to establish a 3D model of cartilage wound healing, and explore the involvement of chondrocytes in its repair. To characterize chondrocyte involvement in wound healing, an in vitro 3D model composed of chondrocyte mixing with either type II/I collagen or type I collagen matrix was established. The "defects" measuring 5 mm in diameter were made on each collagen matrix-chondrocyte construct to mimic in vivo cartilage defects. The effects of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) on chondrocytes migration and differentiation were studied. The migration and Glucosaminoglycan (GAG) synthesis of chondrocytes in the defect areas were observed by microscopy after Alcian-blue staining. In the presence of bFGF, GAG expression increased significantly when chondrocytes were cultured in type II/I collagen matrix compared to type I collagen matrix. However, mild GAG accumulation was also found when cells were cultured in either type I or type II/I collagens without bFGF. In a 3D model of cartilage wound healing, bFGF promote chondrocyte proliferation, migration and differentiation in the presence of type II/I collagen matrix, and showed potential to regulate wound healing. These wound healing models may provide feasible methods to explore various drugs prior to human trials.

  12. Trichobilharzia regenti (Schistosomatidae): 3D imaging techniques in characterization of larval migration through the CNS of vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Bulantová, Jana; Macháček, Tomáš; Panská, Lucie; Krejčí, František; Karch, Jakub; Jährling, Nina; Saghafi, Saiedeh; Dodt, Hans-Ulrich; Horák, Petr

    2016-04-01

    Migration of parasitic worms through the host tissues, which may occasionally result in fatal damage to the internal organs, represents one of the major risks associated with helminthoses. In order to track the parasites, traditionally used 2D imaging techniques such as histology or squash preparation do not always provide sufficient data to describe worm location/behavior in the host. On the other hand, 3D imaging methods are widely used in cell biology, medical radiology, osteology or cancer research, but their use in parasitological research is currently occasional. Thus, we aimed at the evaluation of suitability of selected 3D methods to monitor migration of the neuropathogenic avian schistosome Trichobilharzia regenti in extracted spinal cord of experimental vertebrate hosts. All investigated methods, two of them based on tracking of fluorescently stained larvae with or without previous chemical clearing of tissue and one based on X-ray micro-CT, exhibit certain limits for in vivo observation. Nevertheless, our study shows that the tested methods as ultramicroscopy (used for the first time in parasitology) and micro-CT represent promising tool for precise analyzing of parasite larvae in the CNS. Synthesis of these 3D imaging techniques can provide more comprehensive look at the course of infection, host immune response and pathology caused by migrating parasites within entire tissue samples, which would not be possible with traditional approaches.

  13. Epidermal growth factor improves the migration and contractility of aged fibroblasts cultured on 3D collagen matrices.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daehwan; Kim, So Young; Mun, Seog Kyun; Rhee, Sangmyung; Kim, Beom Joon

    2015-04-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) plays a critical role in fibroblasts by stimulating the production of collagen and supports cell renewal through the interaction between keratinocytes and fibroblasts. It is well known that the contractile activity of fibroblasts is required for the remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM), which contributes to skin elasticity. However, the role of EGF in the contraction of aged fibroblasts under 3-dimensional (3D) culture conditions is not yet fully understood. In the present study, we demonstrated that young fibroblasts spread and proliferated more rapidly than aged fibroblasts under 2-dimensional (2D) culture conditions. Cell migration assay using a nested collagen matrix revealed that the migration of young fibroblasts was also greater than that of aged fibroblasts under 3D culture conditions. However, the addition of recombinant human EGF (rhEGF) resulted in the enhanced migration of aged fibroblasts; the migration rate was similar to that of the young fibroblasts. The aged fibroblasts showed decreased cluster formation compared with the young fibroblasts on the collagen matrix, which was improved by the addition of rhEGF. Furthermore, cell contraction assay revealed that the basal contractility of the aged fibroblasts was lower than that of the young fibroblasts; however, following treatment with rhEGF, the contractility was restored to levels similar or even higher to those of the young fibroblasts. Taken together, our results suggest that rhEGF is a potential renewal agent that acts to improve the migration and contraction of aged fibroblasts more efficiently than young fibroblasts under 3D culture conditions; thus, EGF may have valuable regenerative effects on aged skin.

  14. Depth position measurement of inhomogeneities in semi-solid organic materials using 3D pulsed digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Socorro Hernández-Montes, María; Mendoza Santoyo, Fernando; Pérez-López, C.

    2006-02-01

    We show experimental results to determine the depth of inhomogeneities such as glass spheres and biological human tumors, in semi-solids organic materials, like gels (phantom), using the non invasive optical technique called 3D Pulsed Digital Holography (PDH). We reported previously that this technique may be used for the detection of biological tissues1. 3D Pulsed Digital Holography allowed us to make a quantitative analysis of the changes that the phantom suffers when it contains inhomogeneities as compared to a phantom that does not have one. The results obtained there showed quite remarkably the internal fault in semi-solids. In here we report early results obtained from three different object illumination positions that gave 3 wrapped phase maps that allowed the calculation of the depth position of the inhomogeneity within the phantom. The optical technique used looks at the phantom surface micro displacement, where measurements are correlated to the z position of the inhomogeneity inside the phantom. Likewise, the technique is able to show the deformation that the material undergoes in x, y, and z.

  15. Elucidating the role of matrix stiffness in 3D cell migration and remodeling.

    PubMed

    Ehrbar, M; Sala, A; Lienemann, P; Ranga, A; Mosiewicz, K; Bittermann, A; Rizzi, S C; Weber, F E; Lutolf, M P

    2011-01-19

    Reductionist in vitro model systems which mimic specific extracellular matrix functions in a highly controlled manner, termed artificial extracellular matrices (aECM), have increasingly been used to elucidate the role of cell-ECM interactions in regulating cell fate. To better understand the interplay of biophysical and biochemical effectors in controlling three-dimensional cell migration, a poly(ethylene glycol)-based aECM platform was used in this study to explore the influence of matrix cross-linking density, represented here by stiffness, on cell migration in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, the migration behavior of single preosteoblastic cells within hydrogels of varying stiffness and susceptibilities to degradation by matrix metalloproteases was assessed by time-lapse microscopy. Migration behavior was seen to be strongly dependent on matrix stiffness, with two regimes identified: a nonproteolytic migration mode dominating at relatively low matrix stiffness and proteolytic migration at higher stiffness. Subsequent in vivo experiments revealed a similar stiffness dependence of matrix remodeling, albeit less sensitive to the matrix metalloprotease sensitivity. Therefore, our aECM model system is well suited to unveil the role of biophysical and biochemical determinants of physiologically relevant cell migration phenomena.

  16. Substrate Topography Induces a Crossover from 2D to 3D Behavior in Fibroblast Migration

    PubMed Central

    Ghibaudo, Marion; Trichet, Léa; Le Digabel, Jimmy; Richert, Alain; Hersen, Pascal; Ladoux, Benoît

    2009-01-01

    Abstract In a three-dimensional environment, cells migrate through complex topographical features. Using microstructured substrates, we investigate the role of substrate topography in cell adhesion and migration. To do so, fibroblasts are plated on chemically identical substrates composed of microfabricated pillars. When the dimensions of the pillars (i.e., the diameter, length, and spacing) are varied, migrating cells encounter alternating flat and rough surfaces that depend on the spacing between the pillars. Consequently, we show that substrate topography affects cell shape and migration by modifying cell-to-substrate interactions. Cells on micropillar substrates exhibit more elongated and branched shapes with fewer actin stress fibers compared with cells on flat surfaces. By analyzing the migration paths in various environments, we observe different mechanisms of cell migration, including a persistent type of migration, that depend on the organization of the topographical features. These responses can be attributed to a spatial reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton due to physical constraints and a preferential formation of focal adhesions on the micropillars, with an increased lifetime compared to that observed on flat surfaces. By changing myosin II activity, we show that actomyosin contractility is essential in the cellular response to micron-scale topographic signals. Finally, the analysis of cell movements at the frontier between flat and micropillar substrates shows that cell transmigration through the micropillar substrates depends on the spacing between the pillars. PMID:19580774

  17. Correction of Depth-Dependent Aberrations in 3D Single Molecule Localization and Super-resolution Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    McGorty, Ryan; Schnitzbauer, Joerg; Zhang, Wei; Huang, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Single molecule switching based super-resolution microscopy techniques have been extended into three dimensions through various 3D single molecule localization methods. However, the localization accuracy in z can be severely degraded by the presence of aberrations, particularly the spherical aberration introduced by the refractive-index-mismatch when imaging into an aqueous sample with an oil immersion objective. This aberration confines the imaging depth in most experiments to regions close to the coverslip. Here, we show a method to obtain accurate, depth dependent z calibrations by measuring the point spread function (PSF) at the coverslip surface, calculating the microscope pupil function through phase retrieval, and then computing the depth dependent PSF with the addition of spherical aberrations. We demonstrate experimentally that this method can maintain z localization accuracy over a large range of imaging depths. Our super-resolution images of a mammalian cell nucleus acquired between 0 and 2.5 μm past the coverslip show that this method produces accurate z localizations even in the deepest focal plane. PMID:24562125

  18. Variation of repeating earthquake activities depending on their focal depths as inferred from 3-D numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariyoshi, K.; Matsuzawa, T.; Hino, R.; Hasegawa, A.; Hori, T.; Kaneda, Y.

    2007-12-01

    We investigated depth dependence of the slip velocity of small repeating earthquakes using 3-D numerical simulations for a subduction zone involving large and small asperities based on a rate- and state-dependent friction law. In this study, we examined slip at small asperity located at depth of 5, 10 and 15 km. Our results reveal that the postseismic slip of a large earthquake trigger 'slow' slip (with slip velocity lower than that of the spontaneous rupture of the small asperity) rupture of the small asperity located at a depth of 15 km, whereas 'rapid' slip (with higher slip velocity) one at a depth of 5 km where the small asperity usually occur slow repeating earthquakes. In case of the small asperity at a depth of 10 km, all of events are seismic and recurrence intervals are temporally shorter in the passage of postseismic slip. Uchida et al. [2003; GRL] showed that the repeating earthquakes in the NE Japan subduction zones occur constantly, conforming with the rate of the plate convergence in the depth range of > ~40 km. On the other hand, shallow (< ~10 km) focus repeating earthquakes tend to be activated only in the postseismic period of nearby large interplate earthquakes and cumulative slip estimated from them is less than that expected from the plate convergence rate. In general, asperities in the shallower part are more stable than deeper ones because of low effective normal stress. Thus, most of the observed shallow repeating earthquakes may be 'rapid' slip events triggered by the postseismic slip of the neighboring large asperities, and the corresponding small asperities give rise to (aseismic) slow slip events usually.

  19. 3D computational modelling of cell migration: a mechano-chemo-thermo-electrotaxis approach.

    PubMed

    Mousavi, Seyed Jamaleddin; Doweidar, Mohamed Hamdy; Doblaré, Manuel

    2013-07-21

    Single cell migration constitutes a fundamental phenomenon involved in many biological events such as wound healing, cancer development and tissue regeneration. Several experiments have demonstrated that, besides the mechanical driving force (mechanotaxis), cell migration may be also influenced by chemical, thermal and/or electrical cues. In this paper, we present an extension of a previous model of the same authors adding the effects of chemotaxis, thermotaxis and electrotaxis to the initial mechanotaxis model of cell migration, allowing us to predict cell migration behaviour under different conditions and substrate properties. The present model is based on the balance of effective forces during cell motility in the presence of the several guiding cues. This model has been applied to several numerical experiments to demonstrate the effect of the different drivers onto the cell path and final location within a certain three-dimensional substrate with heterogeneous properties. Our findings indicate that the presence of the chemotaxis, thermotaxis and/or electrotaxis reduce, in general, the random component of cell movement, being this reduction more important in the case of electrotaxis that can be considered a dominating signal during cell migration (besides the underlying mechanical effects). These results are qualitatively in agreement with well-known experimental ones.

  20. Iterative methods for 3D implicit finite-difference migration using the complex Padé approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Carlos A. N.; Campos, Itamara S.; Costa, Jessé C.; Neto, Francisco A.; Schleicher, Jörg; Novais, Amélia

    2013-08-01

    Conventional implementations of 3D finite-difference (FD) migration use splitting techniques to accelerate performance and save computational cost. However, such techniques are plagued with numerical anisotropy that jeopardises the correct positioning of dipping reflectors in the directions not used for the operator splitting. We implement 3D downward continuation FD migration without splitting using a complex Padé approximation. In this way, the numerical anisotropy is eliminated at the expense of a computationally more intensive solution of a large-band linear system. We compare the performance of the iterative stabilized biconjugate gradient (BICGSTAB) and that of the multifrontal massively parallel direct solver (MUMPS). It turns out that the use of the complex Padé approximation not only stabilizes the solution, but also acts as an effective preconditioner for the BICGSTAB algorithm, reducing the number of iterations as compared to the implementation using the real Padé expansion. As a consequence, the iterative BICGSTAB method is more efficient than the direct MUMPS method when solving a single term in the Padé expansion. The results of both algorithms, here evaluated by computing the migration impulse response in the SEG/EAGE salt model, are of comparable quality.

  1. Three-dimensional pre-stack depth migration of receiver functions with the fast marching method: a Kirchhoff approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Cheng; Bodin, Thomas; Allen, Richard M.

    2016-05-01

    We present a novel 3-D pre-stack Kirchhoff depth migration (PKDM) method for teleseismic receiver functions. The proposed algorithm considers the effects of diffraction, scattering and traveltime alteration caused by 3-D volumetric heterogeneities. It is therefore particularly useful for imaging complex 3-D structures such as dipping discontinuities, which is hard to accomplish with traditional methods. The scheme is based on the acoustic wave migration principle, where at each time step of the receiver function, the energy is migrated back to the ensemble of potential conversion points in the image, given a smooth 3-D reference model. Traveltimes for P and S waves are computed with an efficient eikonal solver, the fast marching method. We also consider elastic scattering patterns, where the amplitude of converted S waves depends on the angle between the incident P wave and the scattered S wave. Synthetic experiments demonstrate the validity of the method for a variety of dipping angle discontinuities. Comparison with the widely used common conversion point (CCP) stacking method reveals that our migration shows considerable improvement. For example, the effect of multiple reflections that usually produce apparent discontinuities is avoided. The proposed approach is practical, computationally efficient, and is therefore a potentially powerful alternative to standard CCP methods for imaging large-scale continental structure under dense networks.

  2. Electric field-controlled directed migration of neural progenitor cells in 2D and 3D environments.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiaoting; Li, Wenfei; Young, Fraser; Gao, Runchi; Chalmers, Laura; Zhao, Min; Song, Bing

    2012-02-16

    Endogenous electric fields (EFs) occur naturally in vivo and play a critical role during tissue/organ development and regeneration, including that of the central nervous system(1,2). These endogenous EFs are generated by cellular regulation of ionic transport combined with the electrical resistance of cells and tissues. It has been reported that applied EF treatment can promote functional repair of spinal cord injuries in animals and humans(3,4). In particular, EF-directed cell migration has been demonstrated in a wide variety of cell types(5,6), including neural progenitor cells (NPCs)(7,8). Application of direct current (DC) EFs is not a commonly available technique in most laboratories. We have described detailed protocols for the application of DC EFs to cell and tissue cultures previously(5,11). Here we present a video demonstration of standard methods based on a calculated field strength to set up 2D and 3D environments for NPCs, and to investigate cellular responses to EF stimulation in both single cell growth conditions in 2D, and the organotypic spinal cord slice in 3D. The spinal cordslice is an ideal recipient tissue for studying NPC ex vivo behaviours, post-transplantation, because the cytoarchitectonic tissue organization is well preserved within these cultures(9,10). Additionally, this ex vivo model also allows procedures that are not technically feasible to track cells in vivo using time-lapse recording at the single cell level. It is critically essential to evaluate cell behaviours in not only a 2D environment, but also in a 3D organotypic condition which mimicks the in vivo environment. This system will allow high-resolution imaging using cover glass-based dishes in tissue or organ culture with 3D tracking of single cell migration in vitro and ex vivo and can be an intermediate step before moving onto in vivo paradigms.

  3. Cancer cell migration in 3D tissue: negotiating space by proteolysis and nuclear deformability.

    PubMed

    Krause, Marina; Wolf, Katarina

    2015-01-01

    Efficient tumor cell invasion into the surrounding desmoplastic stroma is a hallmark of cancer progression and involves the navigation through available small tissue spaces existent within the dense stromal network. Such navigation includes the reciprocal adaptation of the moving tumor cell, including the nucleus as largest and stiffest organelle, to pre-existent or de-novo generated extracellular matrix (ECM) gaps, pores and trails within stromal compartments. Within the context of migration, we briefly summarize physiological and tumor-related changes in ECM geometries as well as tissue proteolysis. We then focus on mechanisms that ensure the successful translocation of a nucleus through a confining pore by cytoskeleton-mediated coupling, as well as regulators of cell and nuclear deformability such as chromatin organization and nuclear lamina expression. In summary, understanding dynamic nuclear mechanics during migration in response to confined space will add to a better conceptual appreciation of cancer invasion and progression.

  4. Topographical guidance of 3D tumor cell migration at an interface of collagen densities.

    PubMed

    Bordeleau, Francois; Tang, Lauren N; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A

    2013-12-01

    During cancer progression, metastatic cells leave the primary tumor and invade into the fibrous extracellular matrix (ECM) within the surrounding stroma. This ECM network is highly heterogeneous, and interest in understanding how this network can affect cell behavior has increased in the past several decades. However, replicating this heterogeneity has proven challenging. Here, we designed and utilized a method to create a well-defined interface between two distinct regions of high- and low-density collagen gels to mimic the heterogeneities in density found in the tumor stroma. We show that cells will invade preferentially from the high-density side into the low-density side. We also demonstrate that the net cell migration is a function of the density of the collagen in which the cells are embedded, and the difference in density between the two regions has minimal effect on cell net displacement and distance travelled. Our data further indicate that a low-to-high density interface promotes directional migration and induces formation of focal adhesion on the interface surface. Together, the current results demonstrate how ECM heterogeneities, in the form of interfacial boundaries, can affect cell migration.

  5. Depth to the Juan De Fuca slab beneath the Cascadia subduction margin - a 3-D model for sorting earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCrory, Patricia A.; Blair, J. Luke; Oppenheimer, David H.; Walter, Stephen R.

    2004-01-01

    We present an updated model of the Juan de Fuca slab beneath southern British Columbia, Washington, Oregon, and northern California, and use this model to separate earthquakes occurring above and below the slab surface. The model is based on depth contours previously published by Fluck and others (1997). Our model attempts to rectify a number of shortcomings in the original model and update it with new work. The most significant improvements include (1) a gridded slab surface in geo-referenced (ArcGIS) format, (2) continuation of the slab surface to its full northern and southern edges, (3) extension of the slab surface from 50-km depth down to 110-km beneath the Cascade arc volcanoes, and (4) revision of the slab shape based on new seismic-reflection and seismic-refraction studies. We have used this surface to sort earthquakes and present some general observations and interpretations of seismicity patterns revealed by our analysis. For example, deep earthquakes within the Juan de Fuca Plate beneath western Washington define a linear trend that may mark a tear within the subducting plate Also earthquakes associated with the northern stands of the San Andreas Fault abruptly terminate at the inferred southern boundary of the Juan de Fuca slab. In addition, we provide files of earthquakes above and below the slab surface and a 3-D animation or fly-through showing a shaded-relief map with plate boundaries, the slab surface, and hypocenters for use as a visualization tool.

  6. Vegetation Height Estimation Near Power transmission poles Via satellite Stereo Images using 3D Depth Estimation Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qayyum, A.; Malik, A. S.; Saad, M. N. M.; Iqbal, M.; Abdullah, F.; Rahseed, W.; Abdullah, T. A. R. B. T.; Ramli, A. Q.

    2015-04-01

    Monitoring vegetation encroachment under overhead high voltage power line is a challenging problem for electricity distribution companies. Absence of proper monitoring could result in damage to the power lines and consequently cause blackout. This will affect electric power supply to industries, businesses, and daily life. Therefore, to avoid the blackouts, it is mandatory to monitor the vegetation/trees near power transmission lines. Unfortunately, the existing approaches are more time consuming and expensive. In this paper, we have proposed a novel approach to monitor the vegetation/trees near or under the power transmission poles using satellite stereo images, which were acquired using Pleiades satellites. The 3D depth of vegetation has been measured near power transmission lines using stereo algorithms. The area of interest scanned by Pleiades satellite sensors is 100 square kilometer. Our dataset covers power transmission poles in a state called Sabah in East Malaysia, encompassing a total of 52 poles in the area of 100 km. We have compared the results of Pleiades satellite stereo images using dynamic programming and Graph-Cut algorithms, consequently comparing satellites' imaging sensors and Depth-estimation Algorithms. Our results show that Graph-Cut Algorithm performs better than dynamic programming (DP) in terms of accuracy and speed.

  7. Psychophysical estimation of 3D virtual depth of united, synthesized and mixed type stereograms by means of simultaneous observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iizuka, Masayuki; Ookuma, Yoshio; Nakashima, Yoshio; Takamatsu, Mamoru

    2007-02-01

    Recently, many types of computer-generated stereograms (CGSs), i.e. various works of art produced by using computer are published for hobby and entertainment. It is said that activation of brain, improvement of visual eye sight, decrease of mental stress, effect of healing, etc. are expected when properly appreciating a kind of CGS as the stereoscopic view. There is a lot of information on the internet web site concerning all aspects of stereogram history, science, social organization, various types of stereograms, and free software for generating CGS. Generally, the CGS is classified into nine types: (1) stereo pair type, (2) anaglyph type, (3) repeated pattern type, (4) embedded type, (5) random dot stereogram (RDS), (6) single image stereogram (SIS), (7) united stereogram, (8) synthesized stereogram, and (9) mixed or multiple type stereogram. Each stereogram has advantages and disadvantages when viewing directly the stereogram with two eyes by training with a little patience. In this study, the characteristics of united, synthesized and mixed type stereograms, the role and composition of depth map image (DMI) called hidden image or picture, and the effect of irregular shift of texture pattern image called wall paper are discussed from the viewpoint of psychophysical estimation of 3D virtual depth and visual quality of virtual image by means of simultaneous observation in the case of the parallel viewing method.

  8. Reconstruction and Visualization of Coordinated 3D Cell Migration Based on Optical Flow.

    PubMed

    Kappe, Christopher P; Schütz, Lucas; Gunther, Stefan; Hufnagel, Lars; Lemke, Steffen; Leitte, Heike

    2016-01-01

    Animal development is marked by the repeated reorganization of cells and cell populations, which ultimately determine form and shape of the growing organism. One of the central questions in developmental biology is to understand precisely how cells reorganize, as well as how and to what extent this reorganization is coordinated. While modern microscopes can record video data for every cell during animal development in 3D+t, analyzing these videos remains a major challenge: reconstruction of comprehensive cell tracks turned out to be very demanding especially with decreasing data quality and increasing cell densities. In this paper, we present an analysis pipeline for coordinated cellular motions in developing embryos based on the optical flow of a series of 3D images. We use numerical integration to reconstruct cellular long-term motions in the optical flow of the video, we take care of data validation, and we derive a LIC-based, dense flow visualization for the resulting pathlines. This approach allows us to handle low video quality such as noisy data or poorly separated cells, and it allows the biologists to get a comprehensive understanding of their data by capturing dynamic growth processes in stills. We validate our methods using three videos of growing fruit fly embryos.

  9. Optimization, pharmacophore modeling and 3D-QSAR studies of sipholanes as breast cancer migration and proliferation inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Foudah, Ahmed I; Sallam, Asmaa A; Akl, Mohamed R; El Sayed, Khalid A

    2014-02-12

    Sipholenol A, a triterpene isolated from the Red Sea sponge Callyspongia siphonella, was previously shown to reverse multidrug resistance in P-glycoprotein-overexpressing cancer cells. Moreover, sipholanes showed promising in vitro inhibitory effects against the invasion and migration of the metastatic human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231. The breast tumor kinase (Brk), a mediator of cancer cell phenotypes important for proliferation, survival, and migration, was proposed as a potential target. This study reports additional semisynthetic optimization of sipholenol A esters to improve the breast cancer antimigratory and antiproliferative activities as well as Brk phosphorylation inhibition. Fifteen new sipholenol A analogs (25-39) were semisynthesized. Sipholenol A 4β-4',5'-dichlorobenzoate ester (29) was the most potent, with an IC50 value of 1.3 μM in the migration assay. The level of Brk phosphorylation inhibition of 29 was assessed using the Z'-LYTE™ kinase assay and Western blot analysis. Active analogs showed no toxicity on the non-tumorigenic epithelial breast cell line MCF10A at doses equal to their IC50 values or higher in migration and proliferation assays, suggesting their selectivity towards malignant cells. Pharmacophore modeling and 3D-QSAR studies were conducted to identify important pharmacophoric features and correlate 3D-chemical structure with activity. These studies provided the evidence for future design of novel antimigratory compounds based on a simplified sipholane structure possessing rings A and B (perhydrobenzoxepine) connected to substituted aromatic esters, with the elimination of rings C and D ([5,3,0]bicyclodecane system). This will enable the future synthesis of the new active entities feasibly and cost-effectively. These results demonstrate the potential of marine natural products for the discovery of novel scaffolds for the control and management of metastatic breast cancer.

  10. Fast and Forceful: Modulation of Response Activation Induced by Shifts of Perceived Depth in Virtual 3D Space

    PubMed Central

    Plewan, Thorsten; Rinkenauer, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    Reaction time (RT) can strongly be influenced by a number of stimulus properties. For instance, there was converging evidence that perceived size rather than physical (i.e., retinal) size constitutes a major determinant of RT. However, this view has recently been challenged since within a virtual three-dimensional (3D) environment retinal size modulation failed to influence RT. In order to further investigate this issue in the present experiments response force (RF) was recorded as a supplemental measure of response activation in simple reaction tasks. In two separate experiments participants’ task was to react as fast as possible to the occurrence of a target located close to the observer or farther away while the offset between target locations was increased from Experiment 1 to Experiment 2. At the same time perceived target size (by varying the retinal size across depth planes) and target type (sphere vs. soccer ball) were modulated. Both experiments revealed faster and more forceful reactions when targets were presented closer to the observers. Perceived size and target type barely affected RT and RF in Experiment 1 but differentially affected both variables in Experiment 2. Thus, the present findings emphasize the usefulness of RF as a supplement to conventional RT measurement. On a behavioral level the results confirm that (at least) within virtual 3D space perceived object size neither strongly influences RT nor RF. Rather the relative position within egocentric (body-centered) space presumably indicates an object’s behavioral relevance and consequently constitutes an important modulator of visual processing. PMID:28018273

  11. Involvement of 3D osteoblast migration and bone apatite during in vitro early osteocytogenesis.

    PubMed

    Robin, Marc; Almeida, Claudia; Azaïs, Thierry; Haye, Bernard; Illoul, Corinne; Lesieur, Julie; Giraud-Guille, Marie-Madeleine; Nassif, Nadine; Hélary, Christophe

    2016-07-01

    The transition from osteoblast to osteocyte is described to occur through passive entrapment mechanism (self-buried, or embedded by neighboring cells). Here, we provide evidence of a new pathway where osteoblasts are "more" active than generally assumed. We demonstrate that osteoblasts possess the ability to migrate and differentiate into early osteocytes inside dense collagen matrices. This step involves MMP-13 simultaneously with IBSP and DMP1 expression. We also show that osteoblast migration is enhanced by the presence of apatite bone mineral. To reach this conclusion, we used an in vitro hybrid model based on both the structural characteristics of the osteoid tissue (including its density, texture and three-dimensional order), and the use of bone-like apatite. This finding highlights the mutual dynamic influence of osteoblast cell and bone extra cellular matrix. Such interactivity extends the role of physicochemical effects in bone morphogenesis complementing the widely studied molecular signals. This result represents a conceptual advancement in the fundamental understanding of bone formation.

  12. A novel device to concurrently assess leukocyte extravasation and interstitial migration within a defined 3D environment.

    PubMed

    Molteni, Raffaella; Bianchi, Elena; Patete, Paolo; Fabbri, Monica; Baroni, Guido; Dubini, Gabriele; Pardi, Ruggero

    2015-01-07

    Leukocyte extravasation and interstitial migration are key events during inflammation. Traditional in vitro techniques address only specific steps of cell recruitment to tissues and fail to recapitulate the whole process in an appropriate three-dimensional (3D) microenvironment. Herein, we describe a device that enables us to qualitatively and quantitatively assess in 4D the interdependent steps underlying leukocyte trafficking in a close-to-physiology in vitro context. Real-time tracking of cells, from initial adhesion to the endothelium and subsequent diapedesis to interstitial migration towards the source of the chemoattractant within the 3D collagen matrix, is enabled by the use of optically transparent porous membranes laid over the matrix. Unique features of the device, such as the use of non-planar surfaces and the contribution of physiological flow to the establishment of a persistent chemoattractant gradient, were assessed by numerical simulations and validated by proof-of-concept, simultaneous testing of differentially treated primary mouse neutrophils. This microfluidic platform offers new and versatile tools to thoroughly investigate the stepwise process of circulating cell recruitment to target tissues in vitro and to test novel therapeutics targeting various steps of the process.

  13. Measuring dynamic cell-material interactions and remodeling during 3D human mesenchymal stem cell migration in hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Kelly M; Kyburz, Kyle A; Anseth, Kristi S

    2015-07-21

    Biomaterials that mimic aspects of the extracellular matrix by presenting a 3D microenvironment that cells can locally degrade and remodel are finding increased applications as wound-healing matrices, tissue engineering scaffolds, and even substrates for stem cell expansion. In vivo, cells do not simply reside in a static microenvironment, but instead, they dynamically reengineer their surroundings. For example, cells secrete proteases that degrade extracellular components, attach to the matrix through adhesive sites, and can exert traction forces on the local matrix, causing its spatial reorganization. Although biomaterials scaffolds provide initially well-defined microenvironments for 3D culture of cells, less is known about the changes that occur over time, especially local matrix remodeling that can play an integral role in directing cell behavior. Here, we use microrheology as a quantitative tool to characterize dynamic cellular remodeling of peptide-functionalized poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels that degrade in response to cell-secreted matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). This technique allows measurement of spatial changes in material properties during migration of encapsulated cells and has a sensitivity that identifies regions where cells simply adhere to the matrix, as well as the extent of local cell remodeling of the material through MMP-mediated degradation. Collectively, these microrheological measurements provide insight into microscopic, cellular manipulation of the pericellular region that gives rise to macroscopic tracks created in scaffolds by migrating cells. This quantitative and predictable information should benefit the design of improved biomaterial scaffolds for medically relevant applications.

  14. Osteoblasts and Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Control Hematopoietic Stem Cell Migration and Proliferation in 3D In Vitro Model

    PubMed Central

    de Barros, Ana Paula D. N.; Takiya, Christina M.; Garzoni, Luciana R.; Leal-Ferreira, Mona Lisa; Dutra, Hélio S.; Chiarini, Luciana B.; Meirelles, Maria Nazareth; Borojevic, Radovan; Rossi, Maria Isabel D.

    2010-01-01

    Background Migration, proliferation, and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are dependent upon a complex three-dimensional (3D) bone marrow microenvironment. Although osteoblasts control the HSC pool, the subendosteal niche is complex and its cellular composition and the role of each cell population in HSC fate have not been established. In vivo models are complex and involve subtle species-specific differences, while bidimensional cultures do not reflect the 3D tissue organization. The aim of this study was to investigate in vitro the role of human bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSC) and active osteoblasts in control of migration, lodgment, and proliferation of HSCs. Methodology/Principal Findings A complex mixed multicellular spheroid in vitro model was developed with human BMSC, undifferentiated or induced for one week into osteoblasts. A clear limit between the two stromal cells was established, and deposition of extracellular matrix proteins fibronectin, collagens I and IV, laminin, and osteopontin was similar to the observed in vivo. Noninduced BMSC cultured as spheroid expressed higher levels of mRNA for the chemokine CXCL12, and the growth factors Wnt5a and Kit ligand. Cord blood and bone marrow CD34+ cells moved in and out the spheroids, and some lodged at the interface of the two stromal cells. Myeloid colony-forming cells were maintained after seven days of coculture with mixed spheroids, and the frequency of cycling CD34+ cells was decreased. Conclusions/Significance Undifferentiated and one-week osteo-induced BMSC self-assembled in a 3D spheroid and formed a microenvironment that is informative for hematopoietic progenitor cells, allowing their lodgment and controlling their proliferation. PMID:20161704

  15. Developments in molecular SIMS depth profiling and 3D imaging of biological systems using polyatomic primary ions.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, John S; Lockyer, Nicholas P; Vickerman, John C

    2011-01-01

    In principle mass spectral imaging has enormous potential for discovery applications in biology. The chemical specificity of mass spectrometry combined with spatial analysis capabilities of liquid metal cluster beams and the high yields of polyatomic ion beams should present unprecedented ability to spatially locate molecular chemistry in the 100 nm range. However, although metal cluster ion beams have greatly increased yields in the m/z range up to 1000, they still have to be operated under the static limit and even in most favorable cases maximum yields for molecular species from 1 µm pixels are frequently below 20 counts. However, some very impressive molecular imaging analysis has been accomplished under these conditions. Nevertheless although molecular ions of lipids have been detected and correlation with biology is obtained, signal levels are such that lateral resolution must be sacrificed to provide a sufficient signal to image. To obtain useful spatial resolution detection below 1 µm is almost impossible. Too few ions are generated! The review shows that the application of polyatomic primary ions with their low damage cross-sections offers hope of a new approach to molecular SIMS imaging by accessing voxels rather than pixels to thereby increase the dynamic signal range in 2D imaging and to extend the analysis to depth profiling and 3D imaging. Recent data on cells and tissue analysis suggest that there is, in consequence, the prospect that a wider chemistry might be accessible within a sub-micron area and as a function of depth. However, these advances are compromised by the pulsed nature of current ToF-SIMS instruments. The duty cycle is very low and results in excessive analysis times, and maximum mass resolution is incompatible with maximum spatial resolution. New instrumental directions are described that enable a dc primary beam to be used that promises to be able to take full advantage of all the capabilities of the polyatomic ion beam. Some new

  16. Rho/ROCK pathway inhibition by the CDK inhibitor p27(kip1) participates in the onset of macrophage 3D-mesenchymal migration.

    PubMed

    Gui, Philippe; Labrousse, Arnaud; Van Goethem, Emeline; Besson, Arnaud; Maridonneau-Parini, Isabelle; Le Cabec, Véronique

    2014-09-15

    Infiltration of macrophages into tissue can promote tumour development. Depending on the extracellular matrix architecture, macrophages can adopt two migration modes: amoeboid migration--common to all leukocytes, and mesenchymal migration--restricted to macrophages and certain tumour cells. Here, we investigate the initiating mechanisms involved in macrophage mesenchymal migration. We show that a single macrophage is able to use both migration modes. Macrophage mesenchymal migration is correlated with decreased activity of Rho/Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) and is potentiated when ROCK is inhibited, suggesting that amoeboid inhibition participates in mechanisms that initiate mesenchymal migration. We identify the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor p27(kip1) (also known as CDKN1B) as a new effector of macrophage 3D-migration. By using p27(kip1) mutant mice and small interfering RNA targeting p27(kip1), we show that p27(kip1) promotes mesenchymal migration and hinders amoeboid migration upstream of the Rho/ROCK pathway, a process associated with a relocation of the protein from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Finally, we observe that cytoplasmic p27(kip1) is required for in vivo infiltration of macrophages within induced tumours in mice. This study provides the first evidence that silencing of amoeboid migration through inhibition of the Rho/ROCK pathway by p27(kip1) participates in the onset of macrophage mesenchymal migration.

  17. Methods to improve the resolution of prestack migrated images, with application to a 3D dataset from a fractured reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Gabriel

    I present three different methods to achieve increased definition in images from conventional seismic data, as illustrated with 3D data from the Fort Worth Basin's Barnett Shale fractured reservoir play, currently one of the hottest exploration and production trends in continental U.S. First, I present a method to correct for wavelet stretch in common-angle prestack migrated data. Wavelet stretch adversely influences contributions to the image from large angle or long offset data. Increasing the fidelity of large angles improves the vertical and lateral resolution in images from seismic data and from derived attributes, and positively impact AVA/AVO analysis. Achieving the greatest potential of this technique demands that I address the increased sensitivity to velocity errors and anisotropy. The other two methods presented here benefit from the balance in spectral content of the imaged data across angles and the increased resolution that are achieved from correcting for wavelet stretch. Then I introduce a new way to define azimuth binning in Kirchhoff prestack migration. This approach avoids mixing the typically weaker side-scattered energy with the stronger reflections from the sagittal plane. With the modified binning, signal and noise events are preferentially imaged in azimuth orientations normal to their apparent strike orientation, in surface- or map-views. This modified azimuthal binning also results in improved detection of out-of-the-plane steeply dipping reflectors, fractures and faults and their orientation, especially when combined with attributes such as curvature and coherence. Finally, I present an approach to measure lateral misalignment in prestack migrated seismic images and then correct for it by applying a warping procedure to these images. Though velocity errors are the most likely source for misalignment between images, it can also result from other imperfections in the imaging procedure. Lateral misalignment is most easily recognized and

  18. Integrating focal adhesion dynamics, cytoskeleton remodeling, and actin motor activity for predicting cell migration on 3D curved surfaces of the extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Cheol; Kim, Choong; Wood, Levi; Neal, Devin; Kamm, Roger D; Asada, H Harry

    2012-11-01

    An integrative cell migration model incorporating focal adhesion (FA) dynamics, cytoskeleton and nucleus remodeling and actin motor activity is developed for predicting cell migration behaviors on 3-dimensional curved surfaces, such as cylindrical lumens in the 3-D extracellular matrix (ECM). The work is motivated by 3-D microfluidic migration experiments suggesting that the migration speed and direction may vary depending on the cross sectional shape of the lumen along which the cell migrates. In this paper, the mechanical structure of the cell is modeled as double elastic membranes of cell and nucleus. The two elastic membranes are connected by stress fibers, which are extended from focal adhesions on the cell surface to the nuclear membrane. The cell deforms and gains traction as transmembrane integrins distributed over the outer cell membrane bind to ligands on the ECM, form focal adhesions, and activate stress fibers. Probabilities at which integrin ligand-receptor bonds are formed as well as ruptures are affected by the surface geometry, resulting in diverse migration behaviors that depend on the curvature of the surface. Monte Carlo simulations of the integrative model reveal that (a) the cell migration speed is dependent on the cross sectional area of the lumen with a maximum speed at a particular diameter or width, (b) as the lumen diameter increases, the cell tends to spread and migrate around the circumference of the lumen, while it moves in the longitudinal direction as the lumen diameter narrows, (c) once the cell moves in one direction, it tends to stay migrating in the same direction despite the stochastic nature of migration. The relationship between the cell migration speed and the lumen width agrees with microfluidic experimental data for cancer cell migration.

  19. Migration of tumor cells in 3D matrices is governed by matrix stiffness along with cell-matrix adhesion and proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, Muhammad H.; Trapani, Linda M.; Sieminski, Alisha; MacKellar, Drew; Gong, Haiyan; Kamm, Roger D.; Wells, Alan; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Matsudaira, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Cell migration on 2D surfaces is governed by a balance between counteracting tractile and adhesion forces. Although biochemical factors such as adhesion receptor and ligand concentration and binding, signaling through cell adhesion complexes, and cytoskeletal structure assembly/disassembly have been studied in detail in a 2D context, the critical biochemical and biophysical parameters that affect cell migration in 3D matrices have not been quantitatively investigated. We demonstrate that, in addition to adhesion and tractile forces, matrix stiffness is a key factor that influences cell movement in 3D. Cell migration assays in which Matrigel density, fibronectin concentration, and β1 integrin binding are systematically varied show that at a specific Matrigel density the migration speed of DU-145 human prostate carcinoma cells is a balance between tractile and adhesion forces. However, when biochemical parameters such as matrix ligand and cell integrin receptor levels are held constant, maximal cell movement shifts to matrices exhibiting lesser stiffness. This behavior contradicts current 2D models but is predicted by a recent force-based computational model of cell movement in a 3D matrix. As expected, this 3D motility through an extracellular environment of pore size much smaller than cellular dimensions does depend on proteolytic activity as broad-spectrum matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitors limit the migration of DU-145 cells and also HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cells. Our experimental findings here represent, to our knowledge, discovery of a previously undescribed set of balances of cell and matrix properties that govern the ability of tumor cells to migration in 3D environments. PMID:16832052

  20. Migration of tumor cells in 3D matrices is governed by matrix stiffness along with cell-matrix adhesion and proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Zaman, Muhammad H; Trapani, Linda M; Sieminski, Alisha L; Siemeski, Alisha; Mackellar, Drew; Gong, Haiyan; Kamm, Roger D; Wells, Alan; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Matsudaira, Paul

    2006-07-18

    Cell migration on 2D surfaces is governed by a balance between counteracting tractile and adhesion forces. Although biochemical factors such as adhesion receptor and ligand concentration and binding, signaling through cell adhesion complexes, and cytoskeletal structure assembly/disassembly have been studied in detail in a 2D context, the critical biochemical and biophysical parameters that affect cell migration in 3D matrices have not been quantitatively investigated. We demonstrate that, in addition to adhesion and tractile forces, matrix stiffness is a key factor that influences cell movement in 3D. Cell migration assays in which Matrigel density, fibronectin concentration, and beta1 integrin binding are systematically varied show that at a specific Matrigel density the migration speed of DU-145 human prostate carcinoma cells is a balance between tractile and adhesion forces. However, when biochemical parameters such as matrix ligand and cell integrin receptor levels are held constant, maximal cell movement shifts to matrices exhibiting lesser stiffness. This behavior contradicts current 2D models but is predicted by a recent force-based computational model of cell movement in a 3D matrix. As expected, this 3D motility through an extracellular environment of pore size much smaller than cellular dimensions does depend on proteolytic activity as broad-spectrum matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitors limit the migration of DU-145 cells and also HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cells. Our experimental findings here represent, to our knowledge, discovery of a previously undescribed set of balances of cell and matrix properties that govern the ability of tumor cells to migration in 3D environments.

  1. Optical full-depth refocusing of 3-D objects based on subdivided-elemental images and local periodic δ-functions in integral imaging.

    PubMed

    Ai, Ling-Yu; Dong, Xiao-Bin; Jang, Jae-Young; Kim, Eun-Soo

    2016-05-16

    We propose a new approach for optical refocusing of three-dimensional (3-D) objects on their real depth without a pickup-range limitation based on subdivided-elemental image arrays (sub-EIAs) and local periodic δ-function arrays (L-PDFAs). The captured EIA from the 3-D objects locating out of the pickup-range, is divided into a number of sub-EIAs depending on the object distance from the lens array. Then, by convolving these sub-EIAs with each L-PDFA whose spatial period corresponds to the specific object's depth, as well as whose size is matched to that of the sub-EIA, arrays of spatially-filtered sub-EIAs (SF-sub-EIAs) for each object depth can be uniquely extracted. From these arrays of SF-sub-EIAs, 3-D objects can be optically reconstructed to be refocused on their real depth. Operational principle of the proposed method is analyzed based on ray-optics. In addition, to confirm the feasibility of the proposed method in the practical application, experiments with test objects are carried out and the results are comparatively discussed with those of the conventional method.

  2. Computer power fathoms the depths: billion-bit data processors illuminate the subsurface. [3-D Seismic techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    Some of the same space-age signal technology being used to track events 200 miles above the earth is helping petroleum explorationists track down oil and natural gas two miles and more down into the earth. The breakthroughs, which have come in a technique called three-dimensional seismic work, could change the complexion of exploration for oil and natural gas. Thanks to this 3-D seismic approach, explorationists can make dynamic maps of sites miles beneath the surface. Then explorationists can throw these maps on space-age computer systems and manipulate them every which way - homing in sharply on salt domes, faults, sands and traps associated with oil and natural gas. ''The 3-D seismic scene has exploded within the last two years,'' says, Peiter Tackenberg, Marathon technical consultant who deals with both domestic and international exploration. The 3-D technique has been around for more than a decade, he notes, but recent achievements in space-age computer hardware and software have unlocked its full potential.

  3. NEDD9 stabilizes focal adhesions, increases binding to the extra-cellular matrix and differentially effects 2D versus 3D cell migration.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jessie; Baquiran, Jaime B; Bonakdar, Navid; Lees, Justin; Ching, Yu Wooi; Pugacheva, Elena; Fabry, Ben; O'Neill, Geraldine M

    2012-01-01

    The speed of cell migration on 2-dimensional (2D) surfaces is determined by the rate of assembly and disassembly of clustered integrin receptors known as focal adhesions. Different modes of cell migration that have been described in 3D environments are distinguished by their dependence on integrin-mediated interactions with the extra-cellular matrix. In particular, the mesenchymal invasion mode is the most dependent on focal adhesion dynamics. The focal adhesion protein NEDD9 is a key signalling intermediary in mesenchymal cell migration, however whether NEDD9 plays a role in regulating focal adhesion dynamics has not previously been reported. As NEDD9 effects on 2D migration speed appear to depend on the cell type examined, in the present study we have used mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) from mice in which the NEDD9 gene has been depleted (NEDD9 -/- MEFs). This allows comparison with effects of other focal adhesion proteins that have previously been demonstrated using MEFs. We show that focal adhesion disassembly rates are increased in the absence of NEDD9 expression and this is correlated with increased paxillin phosphorylation at focal adhesions. NEDD9-/- MEFs have increased rates of migration on 2D surfaces, but conversely, migration of these cells is significantly reduced in 3D collagen gels. Importantly we show that myosin light chain kinase is activated in 3D in the absence of NEDD9 and is conversely inhibited in 2D cultures. Measurement of adhesion strength reveals that NEDD9-/- MEFs have decreased adhesion to fibronectin, despite upregulated α5β1 fibronectin receptor expression. We find that β1 integrin activation is significantly suppressed in the NEDD9-/-, suggesting that in the absence of NEDD9 there is decreased integrin receptor activation. Collectively our data suggest that NEDD9 may promote 3D cell migration by slowing focal adhesion disassembly, promoting integrin receptor activation and increasing adhesion force to the ECM.

  4. SU-C-213-04: Application of Depth Sensing and 3D-Printing Technique for Total Body Irradiation (TBI) Patient Measurement and Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M; Suh, T; Han, B; Xing, L; Jenkins, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop and validate an innovative method of using depth sensing cameras and 3D printing techniques for Total Body Irradiation (TBI) treatment planning and compensator fabrication. Methods: A tablet with motion tracking cameras and integrated depth sensing was used to scan a RANDOTM phantom arranged in a TBI treatment booth to detect and store the 3D surface in a point cloud (PC) format. The accuracy of the detected surface was evaluated by comparison to extracted measurements from CT scan images. The thickness, source to surface distance and off-axis distance of the phantom at different body section was measured for TBI treatment planning. A 2D map containing a detailed compensator design was calculated to achieve uniform dose distribution throughout the phantom. The compensator was fabricated using a 3D printer, silicone molding and tungsten powder. In vivo dosimetry measurements were performed using optically stimulated luminescent detectors (OSLDs). Results: The whole scan of the anthropomorphic phantom took approximately 30 seconds. The mean error for thickness measurements at each section of phantom compare to CT was 0.44 ± 0.268 cm. These errors resulted in approximately 2% dose error calculation and 0.4 mm tungsten thickness deviation for the compensator design. The accuracy of 3D compensator printing was within 0.2 mm. In vivo measurements for an end-to-end test showed the overall dose difference was within 3%. Conclusion: Motion cameras and depth sensing techniques proved to be an accurate and efficient tool for TBI patient measurement and treatment planning. 3D printing technique improved the efficiency and accuracy of the compensator production and ensured a more accurate treatment delivery.

  5. Multifunctional bioscaffolds for 3D culture of melanoma cells reveal increased MMP activity and migration with BRAF kinase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Leight, Jennifer L; Tokuda, Emi Y; Jones, Caitlin E; Lin, Austin J; Anseth, Kristi S

    2015-04-28

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are important for many different types of cancer-related processes, including metastasis. Understanding the functional impact of changes in MMP activity during cancer treatment is an important facet not typically evaluated as part of preclinical research. With MMP activity being a critical component of the metastatic cascade, we designed a 3D hydrogel system to probe whether pharmacological inhibition affected human melanoma cell proteolytic activity; metastatic melanoma is a highly aggressive and drug-resistant form of skin cancer. The relationship between MMP activity and drug treatment is unknown, and therefore we used an in situ fluorogenic MMP sensor peptide to determine how drug treatment affects melanoma cell MMP activity in three dimensions. We encapsulated melanoma cells from varying stages of progression within PEG-based hydrogels to examine the relationship between drug treatment and MMP activity. From these results, a metastatic melanoma cell line (A375) and two inhibitors that inhibit RAF (PLX4032 and sorafenib) were studied further to determine whether changes in MMP activity led to a functional change in cell behavior. A375 cells exhibited increased MMP activity despite an overall decrease in metabolic activity with PLX4032 treatment. The changes in proteolytic activity correlated with increased cell elongation and increased single-cell migration. In contrast, sorafenib did not alter MMP activity or cell motility, showing that the changes induced by PLX4032 were not a universal response to small-molecule inhibition. Therefore, we argue the importance of studying MMP activity with drug treatment and its possible implications for unwanted side effects.

  6. Expanding the degree of freedom of observation on depth-direction by the triple-separated slanted parallax barrier in autostereoscopic 3D display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kwang-Hoon; Choe, Yeong-Seon; Lee, Dong-Kil; Kim, Yang-Gyu; Park, Youngsik; Park, Min-Chul

    2013-05-01

    Autostereoscopic multi-views 3D display system has a narrow freedom of degrees to the observational directions such as horizontal and perpendicular direction to the display plane than the glasses on type. In this paper, we proposed an innovative method that expanding a width of formed viewing zone on the depth direction keeping with the number of views on horizontal direction by using the triple segmented-slanted parallax barrier (TS-SPB) in the glasses-off type of 3D display. The validity of the proposal is verified by optical simulation based on the environment similar to an actual case. In benefits, the maximum number of views to display on horizontal direction is to be 2n and the width of viewing zone on depth direction is to be increased up to 3.36 times compared to the existing one-layered parallax barrier system.

  7. Soft Hydrogels Featuring In-Depth Surface Density Gradients for the Simple Establishment of 3D Tissue Models for Screening Applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning; Milleret, Vincent; Thompson-Steckel, Greta; Huang, Ning-Ping; Vörös, János; Simona, Benjamin R; Ehrbar, Martin

    2017-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell culture models are gaining increasing interest for use in drug development pipelines due to their closer resemblance to human tissues. Hydrogels are the first-choice class of materials to recreate in vitro the 3D extra-cellular matrix (ECM) environment, important in studying cell-ECM interactions and 3D cellular organization and leading to physiologically relevant in vitro tissue models. Here we propose a novel hydrogel platform consisting of a 96-well plate containing pre-cast synthetic PEG-based hydrogels for the simple establishment of 3D (co-)culture systems without the need for the standard encapsulation method. The in-depth density gradient at the surface of the hydrogel promotes the infiltration of cells deposited on top of it. The ability to decouple hydrogel production and cell seeding is intended to simplify the use of hydrogel-based platforms and thus increase their accessibility. Using this platform, we established 3D cultures relevant for studying stem cell differentiation, angiogenesis, and neural and cancer models.

  8. Extended depth-of-field 3D endoscopy with synthetic aperture integral imaging using an electrically tunable focal-length liquid-crystal lens.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Jen; Shen, Xin; Lin, Yi-Hsin; Javidi, Bahram

    2015-08-01

    Conventional synthetic-aperture integral imaging uses a lens array to sense the three-dimensional (3D) object or scene that can then be reconstructed digitally or optically. However, integral imaging generally suffers from a fixed and limited range of depth of field (DOF). In this Letter, we experimentally demonstrate a 3D integral-imaging endoscopy with tunable DOF by using a single large-aperture focal-length-tunable liquid crystal (LC) lens. The proposed system can provide high spatial resolution and an extended DOF in synthetic-aperture integral imaging 3D endoscope. In our experiments, the image plane in the integral imaging pickup process can be tuned from 18 to 38 mm continuously using a large-aperture LC lens, and the total DOF is extended from 12 to 51 mm. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on synthetic aperture integral imaging 3D endoscopy with a large-aperture LC lens that can provide high spatial resolution 3D imaging with an extend DOF.

  9. Differential effects of MAPK pathway inhibitors on migration and invasiveness of BRAF(V600E) mutant thyroid cancer cells in 2D and 3D culture.

    PubMed

    Ingeson-Carlsson, Camilla; Martinez-Monleon, Angela; Nilsson, Mikael

    2015-11-01

    Tumor microenvironment influences targeted drug therapy. In this study we compared drug responses to RAF and MEK inhibitors on tumor cell migration in 2D and 3D culture of BRAF(V600E) mutant cell lines derived from human papillary (BCPAP) and anaplastic (SW1736) thyroid carcinomas. Scratch wounding was compared to a double-layered collagen gel model developed for analysis of directed tumor cell invasion during prolonged culture. In BCPAP both PLX4720 and U0126 inhibited growth and migration in 2D and decreased tumor cell survival in 3D. In SW1736 drugs had no effect on migration in 2D but decreased invasion in 3D, however this related to reduced growth. Dual inhibition of BRAF(V600E) and MEK reduced but did not prevent SW1736 invasion although rebound phosphorylation of ERK in response to PLX4720 was blocked by U0126. These findings indicate that anti-tumor drug effects in vitro differ depending on culture conditions (2D vs. 3D) and that the invasive features of anaplastic thyroid cancer depend on non-MEK mechanism(s).

  10. The interplay of fibronectin functionalization and TGF-β1 presence on fibroblast proliferation, differentiation and migration in 3D matrices.

    PubMed

    Sapudom, Jiranuwat; Rubner, Stefan; Martin, Steve; Thoenes, Stephan; Anderegg, Ulf; Pompe, Tilo

    2015-09-01

    Defined biomimetic three-dimensional (3D) matrices are needed to decipher the complex cellular signalling during wound healing at high resolution in vitro. Soluble factors like TGF-β1 and adhesion promoting structural components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) are known to be key regulators of fibroblast behaviour. The ECM component fibronectin (FN) bears a complex function as adhesion promoter, fibrillar element and soluble factor binder. However, its implementation in biomimetic 3D matrices is frequently ill defined. To study the impact of FN on fibroblast cellular function under differentiating conditions (TGF-β1 stimulation), we functionalized 3D collagen I matrices with FN using two strategies: co-assembly and adsorptive immobilization. In comparison to co-assembly, adsorptive immobilization provided no alteration in collagen microstructure as well as mechanical properties. Moreover, this approach provided a controllable FN amount and a homogenous distribution of FN throughout collagen networks. A strong interplay of FN amount and TGF-β1 stimulation on fibroblast function was found in terms of proliferation, migration and myofibroblast differentiation. High levels of FN alone reduced proliferation and showed no effect on differentiation of fibroblasts, but increased migration. In contrast, fibroblast stimulation with high amounts of FN together with TGF-β1 increased proliferation. Independent of FN, the TGF-β1 stimulation enhanced mRNA expression of matrix components like collagen type I alpha 1 chain (Coll I(a1), FN with extra domain A (EDA-FN) and reduced cell migration. The latter cell behaviour indicated a FN independent differentiation into a myofibroblast phenotype. Overall, our 3D biomimetic matrices allow dissecting the overlapping action of the ECM protein FN and the soluble factor TGF-β1 on fibroblast proliferation, migration and differentiation in 3D microenvironments. Furthermore, this model enables the mimicking of important steps of the

  11. Depth-varying density and organization of chondrocytes in immature and mature bovine articular cartilage assessed by 3d imaging and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jadin, Kyle D.; Wong, Benjamin L.; Bae, Won C.; Li, Kelvin W.; Williamson, Amanda K.; Schumacher, Barbara L.; Price, Jeffrey H.; Sah, Robert L.

    2005-01-01

    Articular cartilage is a heterogeneous tissue, with cell density and organization varying with depth from the surface. The objectives of the present study were to establish a method for localizing individual cells in three-dimensional (3D) images of cartilage and quantifying depth-associated variation in cellularity and cell organization at different stages of growth. Accuracy of nucleus localization was high, with 99% sensitivity relative to manual localization. Cellularity (million cells per cm3) decreased from 290, 310, and 150 near the articular surface in fetal, calf, and adult samples, respectively, to 120, 110, and 50 at a depth of 1.0 mm. The distance/angle to the nearest neighboring cell was 7.9 microm/31 degrees , 7.1 microm/31 degrees , and 9.1 microm/31 degrees for cells at the articular surface of fetal, calf, and adult samples, respectively, and increased/decreased to 11.6 microm/31 degrees , 12.0 microm/30 degrees , and 19.2 microm/25 degrees at a depth of 0.7 mm. The methodologies described here may be useful for analyzing the 3D cellular organization of cartilage during growth, maturation, aging, degeneration, and regeneration.

  12. Biomimetic 3D Clusters Using Human Adipose Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Breast Cancer Cells: A Study on Migration and Invasion of Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Min Hee; Song, Boa; Hong, Seungpyo; Kim, Sang Heon; Lee, Kangwon

    2016-07-05

    Invasion and metastasis of cancer directly related to human death have been associated with interactions among many different types of cells and three-dimensional (3D) tissue matrices. Precise mechanisms related to cancer invasion and metastasis still remain unknown due to their complexities. Development of tumor microenvironment (TME)-mimicking system could play a key role in understanding cancer environments and in elucidating the relating phenomena and their driving forces. Here we report a facile and novel platform of 3D cancer cell-clusters using human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hASCs) and breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231) within a collagen gel matrix to show cancer invasion in the cell and extracellular matrix (ECM). Both clusters A (hASC only) and AC (hASC and MDA-MB-231) exhibited different behaviors and expressions of migration and invasion, as observed by the relating markers such as fibronectin, α-SMA, and CXCR4. hASCs showed a protrusive migration from a cluster center, whereas MDA-MB-231 spread out radially followed by hASC migration. Finally, the effect of matrix was further discussed by varying collagen gel densities. The new biomimetic system of 3D cancer clusters developed here has the potential to be utilized for research on migration and invasion of cancer cells in extracellular matrices.

  13. Analysis of shallow gas and fluid migration within the Plio-Pleistocene sedimentary succession of the SW Barents Sea continental margin using 3D seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreassen, Karin; Nilssen, Espen Glad; Ødegaard, Christian M.

    2007-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) seismic data acquired for hydrocarbon exploration reveal that gas accumulations are common within the 2 3 km thick Plio-Pleistocene stratigraphic column of the south-western Barents Sea continental margin. The 3D seismic data have relatively low-frequency content (<40 Hz) but, due to dense spatial sampling, long source-receiver offsets, 3D migration and advanced interpretation techniques, they provide surprisingly detailed images of inferred gas accumulations and the sedimentary environments in which they occur. The presence of gas is inferred from seismic reflection segments with anomalously high amplitude and reversed phase, compared with the seafloor reflection, so-called bright spots. Fluid migration is inferred from vertical zones of acoustic masking and acoustic pipes. The 3D seismic volume allows a spatial analysis of amplitude anomalies inferred to reflect the presence of gas and fluids. At several locations, seismic attribute maps reveal detailed images of flat spots, inferred to represent gas water interfaces. The data indicate a focused fluid migration system, where sub-vertical faults and zones of highly fractured sediments are conduits for the migration of gas-bearing fluids in Plio-Pleistocene sediments. Gas is interpreted to appear in high-porosity fan-shaped sediment lobes, channel and delta deposits, glacigenic debris flows and sediment blocks, probably sealed by low-permeability, clayey till and/or (glacio)marine sediments. Gas and fluid flow are here attributed mainly to rapid Plio-Pleistocene sedimentation that loaded large amounts of sedimentary material over lower-density, fine-grained Eocene oozes. This probably caused pore-fluid dewatering of the high-fluid content oozes through a network of polygonal faults. The study area is suggested to have experienced cycles of fluid expulsion and hydrocarbon migration associated with glacial interglacial cycles.

  14. Breaking the Crowther limit: combining depth-sectioning and tilt tomography for high-resolution, wide-field 3D reconstructions.

    PubMed

    Hovden, Robert; Ercius, Peter; Jiang, Yi; Wang, Deli; Yu, Yingchao; Abruña, Héctor D; Elser, Veit; Muller, David A

    2014-05-01

    To date, high-resolution (<1 nm) imaging of extended objects in three-dimensions (3D) has not been possible. A restriction known as the Crowther criterion forces a tradeoff between object size and resolution for 3D reconstructions by tomography. Further, the sub-Angstrom resolution of aberration-corrected electron microscopes is accompanied by a greatly diminished depth of field, causing regions of larger specimens (>6 nm) to appear blurred or missing. Here we demonstrate a three-dimensional imaging method that overcomes both these limits by combining through-focal depth sectioning and traditional tilt-series tomography to reconstruct extended objects, with high-resolution, in all three dimensions. The large convergence angle in aberration corrected instruments now becomes a benefit and not a hindrance to higher quality reconstructions. A through-focal reconstruction over a 390 nm 3D carbon support containing over 100 dealloyed and nanoporous PtCu catalyst particles revealed with sub-nanometer detail the extensive and connected interior pore structure that is created by the dealloying instability.

  15. Macrophage-Secreted TNFα and TGFβ1 Influence Migration Speed and Persistence of Cancer Cells in 3D Tissue Culture via Independent Pathways.

    PubMed

    Li, Ran; Hebert, Jess D; Lee, Tara A; Xing, Hao; Boussommier-Calleja, Alexandra; Hynes, Richard O; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Kamm, Roger D

    2017-01-15

    The ability of a cancer cell to migrate through the dense extracellular matrix within and surrounding the solid tumor is a critical determinant of metastasis. Macrophages enhance invasion and metastasis in the tumor microenvironment, but the basis for their effects is not fully understood. Using a microfluidic 3D cell migration assay, we found that the presence of macrophages enhanced the speed and persistence of cancer cell migration through a 3D extracellular matrix in a matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-dependent fashion. Mechanistic investigations revealed that macrophage-released TNFα and TGFβ1 mediated the observed behaviors by two distinct pathways. These factors synergistically enhanced migration persistence through a synergistic induction of NF-κB-dependent MMP1 expression in cancer cells. In contrast, macrophage-released TGFβ1 enhanced migration speed primarily by inducing MT1-MMP expression. Taken together, our results reveal new insights into how macrophages enhance cancer cell metastasis, and they identify TNFα and TGFβ1 dual blockade as an antimetastatic strategy in solid tumors. Cancer Res; 77(2); 279-90. ©2016 AACR.

  16. Implementation of wireless 3D stereo image capture system and synthesizing the depth of region of interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, Woonchul; Song, Chulgyu; Kwon, Hyeokjae; Badarch, Luubaatar

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we introduce the mobile embedded system implemented for capturing stereo image based on two CMOS camera module. We use WinCE as an operating system and capture the stereo image by using device driver for CMOS camera interface and Direct Draw API functions. We send the raw captured image data to the host computer by using WiFi wireless communication and then use GPU hardware and CUDA programming for implementation of real time three-dimensional stereo image by synthesizing the depth of ROI(region of interest). We also try to find and declare the mechanism of deblurring of CMOS camera module based on the Kirchhoff diffraction formula and propose a deblurring model. Synthesized stereo image is real time monitored on the shutter glass type three-dimensional LCD monitor and disparity values of each segment are analyzed to prove the validness of emphasizing effect of ROI.

  17. Analysis of the effects of stromal cells on the migration of lymphocytes into and through inflamed tissue using 3-D culture models.

    PubMed

    Jeffery, Hannah C; Buckley, Christopher D; Moss, Paul; Rainger, G Ed; Nash, Gerard B; McGettrick, Helen M

    2013-12-31

    Stromal cells may regulate the recruitment and behaviour of leukocytes during an inflammatory response, potentially through interaction with the endothelial cells (EC) and the leukocytes themselves. Here we describe new in vitro methodologies to characterise the effects of stromal cells on the migration of lymphocytes through endothelium and its underlying matrix. Three-dimensional tissue-like constructs were created in which EC were cultured above a stromal layer incorporating fibroblasts either as a monolayer on a porous filter or dispersed within a matrix of collagen type 1. A major advantage of these constructs is that they enable each step in leukocyte migration to be analysed in sequence (migration through EC and then stroma), as would occur in vivo. Migrated cells can also be retrieved from the constructs to identify which subsets traffic more effectively and how their functional responses evolve during migration. We found that culture of EC with dermal fibroblasts promoted lymphocyte transendothelial migration but not onward transit through matrix. A critical factor influencing the effect of fibroblasts on recruitment proved to be their proximity to the EC, with direct contact tending to disrupt migration. Comparison of the different approaches indicates that choice of an appropriate 3-D model enables the steps in lymphocyte entry into tissue to be studied in sequence, the regulatory mechanism to be dissected, and the effects of changes in stroma to be investigated.

  18. The cavity-to-cavity migration of leukaemic cells through 3D honey-combed hydrogels with adjustable internal dimension and stiffness.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Joakim; Lautenschläger, Franziska; Sivaniah, Easan; Guck, Jochen R

    2010-03-01

    Whilst rigid, planar surfaces are often used to study cell migration, a physiological scenario requires three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds with tissue-like stiffness. This paper presents a method for fabricating periodic hydrogel scaffolds with a 3D honeycomb-like structure from colloidal crystal templates. The scaffolds, made of hydrogel-walled cavities interconnected by pores, have separately tuneable internal dimensions and adjustable gel stiffness down to that of soft tissues. In conjunction with confocal microscopy, these scaffolds were used to study the importance of cell compliance on invasive potential. Acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL) cells were differentiated with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and treated with paclitaxel. Their migration ability into the scaffolds' size-restricted pores, enabled by cell softening during ATRA differentiation, was significantly reduced by paclitaxel treatment, which interferes with cell shape recovery. These findings demonstrate the usability of the scaffolds for investigating factors that affect cell migration, and potentially other cell functions, in a realistic 3D tissue model.

  19. In-depth characterization and computational 3D reconstruction of flagellar filament protein layer structure based on in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozma, Peter; Kozma, Daniel; Nemeth, Andrea; Jankovics, Hajnalka; Kurunczi, Sandor; Horvath, Robert; Vonderviszt, Ferenc; Fried, Miklos; Petrik, Peter

    2011-06-01

    In this study, we have reconstructed the statistical 3D structure of hundreds of nanometers thick surface immobilized flagellar filament protein layers in their native environment, in buffer solution. The protein deposition onto the surface activated Ta 2O 5 film was performed in a flow cell, and the immobilization process was followed by in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry. A multilayer optical model was developed, in that the protein layer was described by five effective medium sublayers. Applying this method, an in-depth analysis of the protein layer formation was performed. Based on the kinetics in the distribution of the surface mass density, the statistical properties of the filamentous film could be determined computationally as a function of the measurement time. It was also demonstrated that the 3D structure of the protein layer can be reconstructed based on the calculated in-depth mass density profile. The computational investigation revealed that the filaments can be classified into two individual groups in approximately equal ratio according to their orientation. In the first group the filaments are close to laying position, whereas in the second group they are in a standing position, resulting in a significantly denser sublayer close to the substrate than at a larger distance.

  20. A quantitative comparison of human HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cells and primary human dermal fibroblasts identifies a 3D migration mechanism with properties unique to the transformed phenotype.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Michael P; Rogers, Robert E; Singh, Samir P; Lee, Justin Y; Loveland, Samuel G; Koepsel, Justin T; Witze, Eric S; Montanez-Sauri, Sara I; Sung, Kyung E; Tokuda, Emi Y; Sharma, Yasha; Everhart, Lydia M; Nguyen, Eric H; Zaman, Muhammad H; Beebe, David J; Ahn, Natalie G; Murphy, William L; Anseth, Kristi S

    2013-01-01

    Here, we describe an engineering approach to quantitatively compare migration, morphologies, and adhesion for tumorigenic human fibrosarcoma cells (HT-1080s) and primary human dermal fibroblasts (hDFs) with the aim of identifying distinguishing properties of the transformed phenotype. Relative adhesiveness was quantified using self-assembled monolayer (SAM) arrays and proteolytic 3-dimensional (3D) migration was investigated using matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-degradable poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels ("synthetic extracellular matrix" or "synthetic ECM"). In synthetic ECM, hDFs were characterized by vinculin-containing features on the tips of protrusions, multipolar morphologies, and organized actomyosin filaments. In contrast, HT-1080s were characterized by diffuse vinculin expression, pronounced β1-integrin on the tips of protrusions, a cortically-organized F-actin cytoskeleton, and quantitatively more rounded morphologies, decreased adhesiveness, and increased directional motility compared to hDFs. Further, HT-1080s were characterized by contractility-dependent motility, pronounced blebbing, and cortical contraction waves or constriction rings, while quantified 3D motility was similar in matrices with a wide range of biochemical and biophysical properties (including collagen) despite substantial morphological changes. While HT-1080s were distinct from hDFs for each of the 2D and 3D properties investigated, several features were similar to WM239a melanoma cells, including rounded, proteolytic migration modes, cortical F-actin organization, and prominent uropod-like structures enriched with β1-integrin, F-actin, and melanoma cell adhesion molecule (MCAM/CD146/MUC18). Importantly, many of the features observed for HT-1080s were analogous to cellular changes induced by transformation, including cell rounding, a disorganized F-actin cytoskeleton, altered organization of focal adhesion proteins, and a weakly adherent phenotype. Based on our results, we

  1. Cooperative roles of SDF-1α and EGF gradients on tumor cell migration revealed by a robust 3D microfluidic model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Beum Jun; Hannanta-anan, Pimkhuan; Chau, Michelle; Kim, Yoon Soo; Swartz, Melody A; Wu, Mingming

    2013-01-01

    Chemokine-mediated directed tumor cell migration within a three dimensional (3D) matrix, or chemoinvasion, is an important early step in cancer metastasis. Despite its clinical importance, it is largely unknown how cytokine and growth factor gradients within the tumor microenvironment regulate chemoinvasion. We studied tumor cell chemoinvasion in well-defined and stable chemical gradients using a robust 3D microfluidic model. We used CXCL12 (also known as SDF-1α) and epidermal growth factor (EGF), two well-known extracellular signaling molecules that co-exist in the tumor microenvironment (e.g. lymph nodes or intravasation sites), and a malignant breast tumor cell line, MDA-MB-231, embedded in type I collagen. When subjected to SDF-1α gradients alone, MDA-MB-231 cells migrated up the gradient, and the measured chemosensitivity (defined as the average cell velocity along the direction of the gradient) followed the ligand - receptor (SDF-1α - CXCR4) binding kinetics. On the other hand, when subjected to EGF gradients alone, tumor cells increased their overall motility, but without statistically significant chemotactic (directed) migration, in contrast to previous reports using 2D chemotaxis assays. Interestingly, we found that the chemoinvasive behavior to SDF-1α gradients was abrogated or even reversed in the presence of uniform concentrations of EGF; however, the presence of SDF-1α and EGF together modulated tumor cell motility cooperatively. These findings demonstrate the capabilities of our microfluidic model in re-creating complex microenvironments for cells, and the importance of cooperative roles of multiple cytokine and growth factor gradients in regulating cell migration in 3D environments.

  2. Cooperative Roles of SDF-1α and EGF Gradients on Tumor Cell Migration Revealed by a Robust 3D Microfluidic Model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Beum Jun; Hannanta-anan, Pimkhuan; Chau, Michelle; Kim, Yoon Soo; Swartz, Melody A.; Wu, Mingming

    2013-01-01

    Chemokine-mediated directed tumor cell migration within a three dimensional (3D) matrix, or chemoinvasion, is an important early step in cancer metastasis. Despite its clinical importance, it is largely unknown how cytokine and growth factor gradients within the tumor microenvironment regulate chemoinvasion. We studied tumor cell chemoinvasion in well-defined and stable chemical gradients using a robust 3D microfluidic model. We used CXCL12 (also known as SDF-1α) and epidermal growth factor (EGF), two well-known extracellular signaling molecules that co-exist in the tumor microenvironment (e.g. lymph nodes or intravasation sites), and a malignant breast tumor cell line, MDA-MB-231, embedded in type I collagen. When subjected to SDF-1α gradients alone, MDA-MB-231 cells migrated up the gradient, and the measured chemosensitivity (defined as the average cell velocity along the direction of the gradient) followed the ligand – receptor (SDF-1α – CXCR4) binding kinetics. On the other hand, when subjected to EGF gradients alone, tumor cells increased their overall motility, but without statistically significant chemotactic (directed) migration, in contrast to previous reports using 2D chemotaxis assays. Interestingly, we found that the chemoinvasive behavior to SDF-1α gradients was abrogated or even reversed in the presence of uniform concentrations of EGF; however, the presence of SDF-1α and EGF together modulated tumor cell motility cooperatively. These findings demonstrate the capabilities of our microfluidic model in re-creating complex microenvironments for cells, and the importance of cooperative roles of multiple cytokine and growth factor gradients in regulating cell migration in 3D environments. PMID:23869217

  3. The use of nanoimprinted scaffolds as 3D culture models to facilitate spontaneous tumor cell migration and well-regulated spheroid formation.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, Yukie; Waki, Atsuo; Yoshida, Kaori; Kakezuka, Anna; Kobayashi, Maki; Namiki, Hideo; Kuroda, Yusei; Kiyono, Yasushi; Yoshii, Hiroshi; Furukawa, Takako; Asai, Tatsuya; Okazawa, Hidehiko; Gelovani, Juri G; Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa

    2011-09-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) cell cultures are essential for drug development and tumor research. However, the limitations of 2D cultures are widely recognized, and a better technique is needed. Recent studies have indicated that a strong physical contact between cells and 2D substrates induces cellular characteristics that differ from those of tumors growing in vivo. 3D cell cultures using various substrates are then developing; nevertheless, conventional approaches have failed in maintenance of cellular proliferation and viability, uniformity, reproducibility, and/or simplicity of these assays. Here, we developed a 3D culture system with inorganic nanoscale scaffolding using nanoimprinting technology (nano-culture plates), which reproduced the characteristics of tumor cells growing in vivo. Diminished cell-to-substrate physical contact facilitated spontaneous tumor cell migration, intercellular adhesion, and multi-cellular 3D-spheroid formation while maintaining cellular proliferation and viability. The resulting multi-cellular spheroids formed hypoxic core regions similar to tumors growing in vivo. This technology allows creating uniform and highly-reproducible 3D cultures, which is easily applicable for microscopic and spectrophotometric assays, which can be used for high-throughput/high-content screening of anticancer drugs and should accelerate discovery of more effective anticancer therapies.

  4. Depth migration of seasonally induced seismicity at The Geysers geothermal field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Christopher W.; Totten, Eoghan J.; Bürgmann, Roland

    2016-06-01

    Seismicity from injected fluids provides insight into the hydraulically conductive fracture network at The Geysers (TG), California, geothermal reservoir. Induced earthquakes at TG result from both thermoelastic and poroelastic stresses as injected fluids cool the rocks and increase pore pressure. The spatiotemporal evolution of M ≥ 1.5 seismicity is characterized as a function of depth in the northwest and southeast regions of TG to develop time-dependent earthquake rates using an epidemic-type aftershock sequence model. The seismicity and injection follow an annual cycle that peaks in the winter months and is correlated by depth. The results indicate a time lag of ≤6 months for fluids to migrate >3 km below the injection depth. Water injection is the main cause of seismicity as fluids penetrate into the reservoir. Our results suggest that a steeply dipping fracture network of hydraulically conductive faults allows fluid migration to a few kilometers below the point of injection.

  5. Integrin {beta}1-dependent invasive migration of irradiation-tolerant human lung adenocarcinoma cells in 3D collagen matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Ishihara, Seiichiro; Haga, Hisashi; Yasuda, Motoaki; Mizutani, Takeomi; Kawabata, Kazushige; Shirato, Hiroki; Nishioka, Takeshi

    2010-06-04

    Radiotherapy is one of the effective therapies used for treating various malignant tumors. However, the emergence of tolerant cells after irradiation remains problematic due to their high metastatic ability, sometimes indicative of poor prognosis. In this study, we showed that subcloned human lung adenocarcinoma cells (A549P-3) that are irradiation-tolerant indicate high invasive activity in vitro, and exhibit an integrin {beta}1 activity-dependent migratory pattern. In collagen gel overlay assay, majority of the A549P-3 cells displayed round morphology and low migration activity, whereas a considerable number of A549P-3IR cells surviving irradiation displayed a spindle morphology and high migration rate. Blocking integrin {beta}1 activity reduced the migration rate of A549P-3IR cells and altered the cell morphology allowing them to assume a round shape. These results suggest that the A549P-3 cells surviving irradiation acquire a highly invasive integrin {beta}1-dependent phenotype, and integrin {beta}1 might be a potentially effective therapeutic target in combination with radiotherapy.

  6. Human pancreatic stellate cells modulate 3D collagen alignment to promote the migration of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Drifka, Cole R; Loeffler, Agnes G; Esquibel, Corinne R; Weber, Sharon M; Eliceiri, Kevin W; Kao, W John

    2016-12-01

    A hallmark of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the ability for cancer cells to aggressively infiltrate and navigate through a dense stroma during the metastatic process. Key features of the PDAC stroma include an abundant population of activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) and highly aligned collagen fibers; however, important questions remain regarding how collagen becomes aligned and what the biological manifestations are. To better understand how PSCs, aligned collagen, and PDAC cells might cooperate during the transition to invasion, we utilized a microchannel-based in vitro tumor model and advanced imaging technologies to recreate and examine in vivo-like heterotypic interactions. We found that PSCs participate in a collaborative process with cancer cells by orchestrating the alignment of collagen fibers that, in turn, are permissive to enhanced cell migration. Additionally, direct contact between PSCs, collagen, and PDAC cells is critical to invasion and co-migration of both cell types. This suggests PSCs may accompany and assist in navigating PDAC cells through the stromal terrain. Together, our data provides a new role for PSCs in stimulating the metastatic process and underscores the importance of collagen alignment in cancer progression.

  7. SU-E-T-678: Response Calibration Using Electron Depth-Dose Data for MRI-Based 3D Polymer Gel Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Y; Warmington, L; Gopishankar, N

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate a calibration method using the depth-dose data of an electron beam for MRI-based polymer gel dosimetry. Methods: MAGAT was manufactured in-house to fill two 400mL-cylindrical phantoms and nine 22mL-glass vials. Phantom-A was irradiated along the cylinder axis with a 9MeV electron beam of 6 cm x 6 cm field size (FS). Phantom-B was irradiated with a 6MV photon beam of 3 cm x 3 cm FS by a 360-degree arc technique. Eight vials were irradiated in a water-bath to various doses with a 20 cm x 20 cm FS 6MV photon beam. All irradiated phantoms and one un-irradiated vial were scanned with a 3T MRI scanner to obtain the spin-spin relaxation rate (R2) distributions. By comparing the measured R2-to-depth data with the known depth-dose data for Phantom-A, R2-to-dose calibration data were obtained (e-beam method). Another calibration data were obtained from the 9 vials data (9-vial method). We tested two regression equations, i.e., third-order polynomial and tangent functions, and two dose normalization methods, i.e., one-point and two-point methods. Then, these two calibration methods were used to obtain the 3D dose distribution of Phantom-B and evaluated by comparing the measured data with the dose distribution from a treatment planning system. The comparison was made with gamma passing rate (2%/2mm criteria). Results: We did not observe a clear advantage of the e-beam method over the 9-vial method for the 3D dose comparison with the test case. Nevertheless, we found that the e-beam method required a smaller dose scaling for the dose comparison. Furthermore, the tangent function showed better data fitting than the polynomial function with smaller uncertainty of the estimated coefficients. Conclusions: Considering the overall superior performance, we recommend the e-beam method with the tangent function as the regression equation and one-point dose normalization for the MRI-based polymer gel dosimetry.

  8. Cartilage repair and subchondral bone migration using 3D printing osteochondral composites: a one-year-period study in rabbit trochlea.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weijie; Lian, Qin; Li, Dichen; Wang, Kunzheng; Hao, Dingjun; Bian, Weiguo; He, Jiankang; Jin, Zhongmin

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidences show that subchondral bone may play a significant role in the repair or progression of cartilage damage in situ. However, the exact change of subchondral bone during osteochondral repair is still poorly understood. In this paper, biphasic osteochondral composite scaffolds were fabricated by 3D printing technology using PEG hydrogel and β-TCP ceramic and then implanted in rabbit trochlea within a critical size defect model. Animals were euthanized at 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 24, and 52 weeks after implantation. Histological results showed that hyaline-like cartilage formed along with white smooth surface and invisible margin at 24 weeks postoperatively, typical tidemark formation at 52 weeks. The repaired subchondral bone formed from 16 to 52 weeks in a "flow like" manner from surrounding bone to the defect center gradually. Statistical analysis illustrated that both subchondral bone volume and migration area percentage were highly correlated with the gross appearance Wayne score of repaired cartilage. Therefore, subchondral bone migration is related to cartilage repair for critical size osteochondral defects. Furthermore, the subchondral bone remodeling proceeds in a "flow like" manner and repaired cartilage with tidemark implies that the biphasic PEG/β-TCP composites fabricated by 3D printing provides a feasible strategy for osteochondral tissue engineering application.

  9. Cartilage Repair and Subchondral Bone Migration Using 3D Printing Osteochondral Composites: A One-Year-Period Study in Rabbit Trochlea

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dichen; Wang, Kunzheng; Hao, Dingjun; Bian, Weiguo; He, Jiankang; Jin, Zhongmin

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidences show that subchondral bone may play a significant role in the repair or progression of cartilage damage in situ. However, the exact change of subchondral bone during osteochondral repair is still poorly understood. In this paper, biphasic osteochondral composite scaffolds were fabricated by 3D printing technology using PEG hydrogel and β-TCP ceramic and then implanted in rabbit trochlea within a critical size defect model. Animals were euthanized at 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 24, and 52 weeks after implantation. Histological results showed that hyaline-like cartilage formed along with white smooth surface and invisible margin at 24 weeks postoperatively, typical tidemark formation at 52 weeks. The repaired subchondral bone formed from 16 to 52 weeks in a “flow like” manner from surrounding bone to the defect center gradually. Statistical analysis illustrated that both subchondral bone volume and migration area percentage were highly correlated with the gross appearance Wayne score of repaired cartilage. Therefore, subchondral bone migration is related to cartilage repair for critical size osteochondral defects. Furthermore, the subchondral bone remodeling proceeds in a “flow like” manner and repaired cartilage with tidemark implies that the biphasic PEG/β-TCP composites fabricated by 3D printing provides a feasible strategy for osteochondral tissue engineering application. PMID:25177697

  10. 3D Chirp Sonar Images on Fluid Migration Pathways and Their Implications on Seafloor Stability East of the Fangliao Submarine Canyon Offshore SW Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Y. W.; Liu, C. S.; Su, C. C.; Hsu, H. H.; Chen, Y. H.

    2015-12-01

    This study utilizes both chirp sonar images and coring results to investigate the unstable seafloor strata east of the Fangliao Submarine Canyon offshore southwestern Taiwan. We have constructed 3D chirp sonar images from a densely surveyed block to trace the attitude of an acoustic transparent layer and features caused by fluid activities. Based on the distribution of this transparent layer and fluid-related features, we suggest that this transparent layer forms a pathway for fluid migration which induces fluid-related characters such as acoustic blanking and fluid chimneys in the 3D chirp sonar images. Cored seafloor samples are used in this study to investigate the sediment compositions. The 210Pb activity profiles of the cores show oscillating and unsteady values at about 20~25 cm from core top. The bulk densities of the core samples in the same section (about 20~25 cm from core top) give values lower than those at deeper parts of the cores. These results indicate that the water content is much higher in the shallow sediments than in the deeper strata. From core sample analyses, we deduce that the local sediments are disturbed by liquefaction. From the analyses of 3D chirp sonar images and core data, we suggest that the seafloor east of the Fangliao Submarine Canyon is in an unstable condition, if disturbed by earthquakes, submarine landslides and gravity flows could be easily triggered and cause some geohazards, like breaking submarine cables during the 2006 Pingtung earthquake event.

  11. Walker Ranch 3D seismic images

    SciTech Connect

    Robert J. Mellors

    2016-03-01

    Amplitude images (both vertical and depth slices) extracted from 3D seismic reflection survey over area of Walker Ranch area (adjacent to Raft River). Crossline spacing of 660 feet and inline of 165 feet using a Vibroseis source. Processing included depth migration. Micro-earthquake hypocenters on images. Stratigraphic information and nearby well tracks added to images. Images are embedded in a Microsoft Word document with additional information. Exact location and depth restricted for proprietary reasons. Data collection and processing funded by Agua Caliente. Original data remains property of Agua Caliente.

  12. Loss of p53 promotes RhoA-ROCK-dependent cell migration and invasion in 3D matrices.

    PubMed

    Gadea, Gilles; de Toledo, Marion; Anguille, Christelle; Roux, Pierre

    2007-07-02

    In addition to its role in controlling cell cycle progression, the tumor suppressor protein p53 can also affect other cellular functions such as cell migration. In this study, we show that p53 deficiency in mouse embryonic fibroblasts cultured in three-dimensional matrices induces a switch from an elongated spindle morphology to a markedly spherical and flexible one associated with highly dynamic membrane blebs. These rounded, motile cells exhibit amoeboid-like movement and have considerably increased invasive properties. The morphological transition requires the RhoA-ROCK (Rho-associated coil-containing protein kinase) pathway and is prevented by RhoE. A similar p53-mediated transition is observed in melanoma A375P cancer cells. Our data suggest that genetic alterations of p53 in tumors are sufficient to promote motility and invasion, thereby contributing to metastasis.

  13. Prestack depth migration for seismic reflection data in the southern offshore of Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, S.

    2009-12-01

    Since exploration seismic problems consist of function of time, velocity, source & receiver position, frequency, and wave-number, these have intrinsically parallel characteristic. Though prestack depth migration is widely used for imaging the complex subsurface structure such as salt dome, fault, and fold, it is needed high performance computers and parallelizing techniques because of huge data volume and large amount of computing time. In this study, we have developed reverse time migration on a low-cost PC cluster using the Message Passing Interface (MPI) and we applied it to seismic reflection data in the southern offshore of Korea. This sturdy area is a northern margin of the East China Sea Basin and several subbasins characterized by low gravity anomalies exist in the southern offshore of Korea. The basement structures in the basins are characterized by a series of tilted fault blocks bounded by basement involved listric normal faults. The depth to the basement ranges from about 1.0 s to more than 3.5 s in two-way travel time. We tried conventional data processing for a study line and estimated velocity model from interval velocities which were calculated from stack velocities. In the prestack depth migration, we use inner product of back-propagated wavefields and virtual sources. The observed wavefields were extrapolated backward to the subsurface in order to calculate back-propagated wavefields. When we conduct inner product, we used the virtual sources instead of partial derivative wavefields because of the heavy computing hours and disk storage problem. The virtual source is a forward modeled-wavefield with a source term which results from taking partial derivative wave equation with respect to a velocity. These two wavefields were calculated simultaneously after distributing tasks to every computing node by domain decomposition method. The calculated geological model is 27 km × 4 km with a grid size 12.5 m × 12.5 m. The results of prestack depth

  14. Integration of microfluidic chip with biomimetic hydrogel for 3D controlling and monitoring of cell alignment and migration.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang Ho; Lee, Ki Hwa; Lee, Jeonghoon; Choi, Hyuk; Lee, Donghee; Park, Yongdoo; Lee, Sang-Hoon

    2014-04-01

    A biomimetic hydrogel was integrated into microfluidic chips to monitor glioma cell alignment and migration. The extracellular matrix-based biomimetic hydrogel was remodeled by matrix metalloprotease (MMP) secreted by glioma cells and the hydrogel could thus be used to assess cellular behavior. Both static and dynamic cell growth conditions (flow rate of 0.1 mL/h) were used. Cell culture medium with and without vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), insensitive VEGF and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP) were employed to monitor cell behavior. A concentration gradient formed in the hydrogel resulted in differences in cell behavior. Glioma cell viability in the microchannel was 75-85%. Cells in the VEGF-loaded microchannels spread extensively, degrading the MMP-sensitive hydrogel, and achieved cell sizes almost fivefold larger than seen in the control medium. Our integrated system can be used as a model for the study of cellular behavior in a controlled microenvironment generated by fluidic conditions in a biomimetic matrix.

  15. 3D Gravity Inversion using Tikhonov Regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toushmalani, Reza; Saibi, Hakim

    2015-08-01

    Subsalt exploration for oil and gas is attractive in regions where 3D seismic depth-migration to recover the geometry of a salt base is difficult. Additional information to reduce the ambiguity in seismic images would be beneficial. Gravity data often serve these purposes in the petroleum industry. In this paper, the authors present an algorithm for a gravity inversion based on Tikhonov regularization and an automatically regularized solution process. They examined the 3D Euler deconvolution to extract the best anomaly source depth as a priori information to invert the gravity data and provided a synthetic example. Finally, they applied the gravity inversion to recently obtained gravity data from the Bandar Charak (Hormozgan, Iran) to identify its subsurface density structure. Their model showed the 3D shape of salt dome in this region.

  16. Comparison of publically available Moho depth and crustal thickness grids with newly derived grids by 3D gravity inversion for the High Arctic region.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedeva-Ivanova, Nina; Gaina, Carmen; Minakov, Alexander; Kashubin, Sergey

    2016-04-01

    We derived Moho depth and crustal thickness for the High Arctic region by 3D forward and inverse gravity modelling method in the spectral domain (Minakov et al. 2012) using lithosphere thermal gravity anomaly correction (Alvey et al., 2008); a vertical density variation for the sedimentary layer and lateral crustal variation density. Recently updated grids of bathymetry (Jakobsson et al., 2012), gravity anomaly (Gaina et al, 2011) and dynamic topography (Spasojevic & Gurnis, 2012) were used as input data for the algorithm. TeMAr sedimentary thickness grid (Petrov et al., 2013) was modified according to the most recently published seismic data, and was re-gridded and utilized as input data. Other input parameters for the algorithm were calibrated using seismic crustal scale profiles. The results are numerically compared with publically available grids of the Moho depth and crustal thickness for the High Arctic region (CRUST 1 and GEMMA global grids; the deep Arctic Ocean grids by Glebovsky et al., 2013) and seismic crustal scale profiles. The global grids provide coarser resolution of 0.5-1.0 geographic degrees and not focused on the High Arctic region. Our grids better capture all main features of the region and show smaller error in relation to the seismic crustal profiles compare to CRUST 1 and GEMMA grids. Results of 3D gravity modelling by Glebovsky et al. (2013) with separated geostructures approach show also good fit with seismic profiles; however these grids cover the deep part of the Arctic Ocean only. Alvey A, Gaina C, Kusznir NJ, Torsvik TH (2008). Integrated crustal thickness mapping and plate recon-structions for the high Arctic. Earth Planet Sci Lett 274:310-321. Gaina C, Werner SC, Saltus R, Maus S (2011). Circum-Arctic mapping project: new magnetic and gravity anomaly maps of the Arctic. Geol Soc Lond Mem 35, 39-48. Glebovsky V.Yu., Astafurova E.G., Chernykh A.A., Korneva M.A., Kaminsky V.D., Poselov V.A. (2013). Thickness of the Earth's crust in the

  17. Characterisation of natural organic matter (NOM) in depth profile of Mediterranean Sea by 3D-Fluorescence following with PARAFAC treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huiyu, Z.; Durrieu, G.; Redon, R.; Heimbuerger, L.; Mounier, S.

    2009-12-01

    A periodic series of samplings have made during one year(2008) organized by Ifremer into the central Ligurian Sea(DYFAMED site, 43°25’N, 07°52’E, Mediterranean Sea). Spectra were mesured by spectrofluorimetry(HITACHI 4500) at excitation wavelengths from 250nm to 500nm and emission wavelengths from 200nm to 550nm, both wavelength slits for 5nm, scan speed is 2400nm/min. Parallel factors analysis(PARAFAC) software is a powerful statistical technique to treat the 3D-fluorescence spectra leading to the decomposition by a number of independent fluorescent compounds 1 and 2. Found 4 fluorescent components representing the fluorescence maxima of previously identified moieties: [Tyr] maximal excitation wavelength and emission wavelength 265nm/305nm (tyrosine-like); [Trp] maximal λEX/λEM=280nm/340nm(Peak T, tryptophan-like group); [M] maximal λEX/λEM=295nm/410nm(Peak M, marine humic-like substance) and a double maximum component [CA] with maximal λEX/λEM=335nm/445nm(Peak C, visible humic-like group) and λEX/λEM=250nm/445nm(Peak A, UV humic-like substance). Fluorescence contribution of each component at different logarithmic depths(Fig.2) shows that the most concentrated fluorophores zone is deeper than 100m, which is different from the results of dissolved organic carbon(DOC) concentration which the most concentrated zone is on the seasurface(B.Avril,2002).The humic-like substances are generally less fluorescent, particularly the M compound. An important peak contribution of marine humic-like substance has appeared in May at the profound 100m and 2200m, although the other fluorophores kept their values reasonable. The intensity maxima was closed to 100m, while an augmentation of protein substances in the deep sea(about 400 m) following by a shut immediate at 600 m in the months July, August and September. It is probably due to the sufficient heat from the sea surface; micro-organism could modify their position in the depth profile in the seawater. Thanks to

  18. Method for identifying subsurface fluid migration and drainage pathways in and among oil and gas reservoirs using 3-D and 4-D seismic imaging

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, R.N.; Boulanger, A.; Bagdonas, E.P.; Xu, L.; He, W.

    1996-12-17

    The invention utilizes 3-D and 4-D seismic surveys as a means of deriving information useful in petroleum exploration and reservoir management. The methods use both single seismic surveys (3-D) and multiple seismic surveys separated in time (4-D) of a region of interest to determine large scale migration pathways within sedimentary basins, and fine scale drainage structure and oil-water-gas regions within individual petroleum producing reservoirs. Such structure is identified using pattern recognition tools which define the regions of interest. The 4-D seismic data sets may be used for data completion for large scale structure where time intervals between surveys do not allow for dynamic evolution. The 4-D seismic data sets also may be used to find variations over time of small scale structure within individual reservoirs which may be used to identify petroleum drainage pathways, oil-water-gas regions and, hence, attractive drilling targets. After spatial orientation, and amplitude and frequency matching of the multiple seismic data sets, High Amplitude Event (HAE) regions consistent with the presence of petroleum are identified using seismic attribute analysis. High Amplitude Regions are grown and interconnected to establish plumbing networks on the large scale and reservoir structure on the small scale. Small scale variations over time between seismic surveys within individual reservoirs are identified and used to identify drainage patterns and bypassed petroleum to be recovered. The location of such drainage patterns and bypassed petroleum may be used to site wells. 22 figs.

  19. Method for identifying subsurface fluid migration and drainage pathways in and among oil and gas reservoirs using 3-D and 4-D seismic imaging

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Roger N.; Boulanger, Albert; Bagdonas, Edward P.; Xu, Liqing; He, Wei

    1996-01-01

    The invention utilizes 3-D and 4-D seismic surveys as a means of deriving information useful in petroleum exploration and reservoir management. The methods use both single seismic surveys (3-D) and multiple seismic surveys separated in time (4-D) of a region of interest to determine large scale migration pathways within sedimentary basins, and fine scale drainage structure and oil-water-gas regions within individual petroleum producing reservoirs. Such structure is identified using pattern recognition tools which define the regions of interest. The 4-D seismic data sets may be used for data completion for large scale structure where time intervals between surveys do not allow for dynamic evolution. The 4-D seismic data sets also may be used to find variations over time of small scale structure within individual reservoirs which may be used to identify petroleum drainage pathways, oil-water-gas regions and, hence, attractive drilling targets. After spatial orientation, and amplitude and frequency matching of the multiple seismic data sets, High Amplitude Event (HAE) regions consistent with the presence of petroleum are identified using seismic attribute analysis. High Amplitude Regions are grown and interconnected to establish plumbing networks on the large scale and reservoir structure on the small scale. Small scale variations over time between seismic surveys within individual reservoirs are identified and used to identify drainage patterns and bypassed petroleum to be recovered. The location of such drainage patterns and bypassed petroleum may be used to site wells.

  20. An in-depth spectroscopic examination of molecular bands from 3D hydrodynamical model atmospheres. I. Formation of the G-band in metal-poor dwarf stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, A. J.; Caffau, E.; Bonifacio, P.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Steffen, M.; Spite, M.

    2016-09-01

    Context. Recent developments in the three-dimensional (3D) spectral synthesis code Linfor3D have meant that for the first time, large spectral wavelength regions, such as molecular bands, can be synthesised with it in a short amount of time. Aims: A detailed spectral analysis of the synthetic G-band for several dwarf turn-off-type 3D atmospheres (5850 ≲ Teff [ K ] ≲ 6550, 4.0 ≤ log g ≤ 4.5, - 3.0 ≤ [Fe/H] ≤-1.0) was conducted, under the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium. We also examine carbon and oxygen molecule formation at various metallicity regimes and discuss the impact it has on the G-band. Methods: Using a qualitative approach, we describe the different behaviours between the 3D atmospheres and the traditional one-dimensional (1D) atmospheres and how the different physics involved inevitably leads to abundance corrections, which differ over varying metallicities. Spectra computed in 1D were fit to every 3D spectrum to determine the 3D abundance correction. Results: Early analysis revealed that the CH molecules that make up the G-band exhibited an oxygen abundance dependency; a higher oxygen abundance leads to weaker CH features. Nitrogen abundances showed zero impact to CH formation. The 3D corrections are also stronger at lower metallicity. Analysis of the 3D corrections to the G-band allows us to assign estimations of the 3D abundance correction to most dwarf stars presented in the literature. Conclusions: The 3D corrections suggest that A(C) in carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars with high A(C) would remain unchanged, but would decrease in CEMP stars with lower A(C). It was found that the C/O ratio is an important parameter to the G-band in 3D. Additional testing confirmed that the C/O ratio is an equally important parameter for OH transitions under 3D. This presents a clear interrelation between the carbon and oxygen abundances in 3D atmospheres through their molecular species, which is not seen in 1D.

  1. Prestack depth migration for complex 2D structure using phase-screen propagators

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, P.; Huang, Lian-Jie; Burch, C.; Fehler, M.; Hildebrand, S.

    1997-11-01

    We present results for the phase-screen propagator method applied to prestack depth migration of the Marmousi synthetic data set. The data were migrated as individual common-shot records and the resulting partial images were superposed to obtain the final complete Image. Tests were performed to determine the minimum number of frequency components required to achieve the best quality image and this in turn provided estimates of the minimum computing time. Running on a single processor SUN SPARC Ultra I, high quality images were obtained in as little as 8.7 CPU hours and adequate images were obtained in as little as 4.4 CPU hours. Different methods were tested for choosing the reference velocity used for the background phase-shift operation and for defining the slowness perturbation screens. Although the depths of some of the steeply dipping, high-contrast features were shifted slightly the overall image quality was fairly insensitive to the choice of the reference velocity. Our jests show the phase-screen method to be a reliable and fast algorithm for imaging complex geologic structures, at least for complex 2D synthetic data where the velocity model is known.

  2. Venus in 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plaut, Jeffrey J.

    1993-01-01

    Stereographic images of the surface of Venus which enable geologists to reconstruct the details of the planet's evolution are discussed. The 120-meter resolution of these 3D images make it possible to construct digital topographic maps from which precise measurements can be made of the heights, depths, slopes, and volumes of geologic structures.

  3. Depth.

    PubMed

    Koenderink, Jan J; van Doorn, Andrea J; Wagemans, Johan

    2011-01-01

    Depth is the feeling of remoteness, or separateness, that accompanies awareness in human modalities like vision and audition. In specific cases depths can be graded on an ordinal scale, or even measured quantitatively on an interval scale. In the case of pictorial vision this is complicated by the fact that human observers often appear to apply mental transformations that involve depths in distinct visual directions. This implies that a comparison of empirically determined depths between observers involves pictorial space as an integral entity, whereas comparing pictorial depths as such is meaningless. We describe the formal structure of pictorial space purely in the phenomenological domain, without taking recourse to the theories of optics which properly apply to physical space-a distinct ontological domain. We introduce a number of general ways to design and implement methods of geodesy in pictorial space, and discuss some basic problems associated with such measurements. We deal mainly with conceptual issues.

  4. Depth-integrated modelling on onshore and offshore sandbar migration: Revision of fall velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dae-Hong; Sanchez-Arcilla, Agustin; Caceres, Ivan

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents the results of morphodynamic modelling and analysis of onshore and offshore sandbar migration based on a depth-integrated approach. The coastal flow was modeled using the Boussinesq equation and the morphological evolution was modeled using the suspended sediment transport equation and bed load formulae based on the instantaneous velocity and acceleration. The proposed model was applied to the accretive and erosive conditions and the model reproduced the onshore and offshore sandbar migration and the formation of a berm around the shoreline reasonably. An analysis of the computed results revealed the following. (i) The vertical flow velocity can affect the suspension time of the sediments considerably and the bottom evolution. (ii) The suspended load is the main contributor to the morphological changes in terms of the quantity and quality, regardless of the accretive or erosive conditions. (iii) Regardless of accretive or erosive conditions, in terms of the time-average, the instantaneous flow velocity and acceleration-based bed load models always yielded an offshore and onshore direction sediment flux, respectively, except in the swash zone. On the other hand, the suspended sediment flux calculated by the advection-diffusion equation results in the sediment transport in either direction depending on the flow field.

  5. A fast algorithm for depth migration by the Gaussian beam summation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhenghui; Sun, Jianguo; Sun, Xu; Wang, Xueqiu; Sun, Zhangqing; Liu, Zhiqiang

    2017-02-01

    Depth migration by the Gaussian beam summation method has no limitation on the seismic acquisition configuration. In the past, this migration method applied the steepest descent approximation to reduce the dimension of the integrals over the ray parameters at the cost of a precision loss. However, the simplified formula was still in the frequency domain, thereby impairing the computational efficiency. We present a new fast algorithm which can increase the computational efficiency without losing precision. To develop the fast algorithm, we change the order of the integrals and treat the two innermost integrals as a couple of two-dimensional continuous functions with respect to the real and imaginary parts of the total traveltime. A couple of lookup tables corresponding to the values of the two innermost integrals are constructed at the sampling points. The results of the two innermost integrals at a certain imaging point can be obtained through interpolation in the two constructed lookup tables. Both the numerical analysis and examples validate the precision and efficiency of the fast algorithm. With the advantage of handling rugged topography, we apply the fast algorithm to the 2D Canadian Foothills velocity model.

  6. 7-cyclopentyl-5-(4-phenoxyphenyl)-7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d] pyrimidin-4-ylamine inhibits the proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells by suppressing ERK and Akt pathways.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hyang-Hee; Kim, Sang Woo; Lee, Chang Youn; Lim, Kyu Hee; Lee, Jiyun; Lim, Soyeon; Lee, Seahyoung; Hwang, Ki-Chul

    2017-03-05

    Excessive vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation and migration after vascular injury significantly contributes to the development of occlusive vascular disease. Therefore, inhibiting the proliferation and migration of VSMCs is a validated therapeutic modality for occlusive vascular disease such as atherosclerosis and restenosis. In the present study, we screened chemical compounds for their anti-proliferative effects on VSMCs using multiple approaches, such as MTT assays, wound healing assays, and trans-well migration assays. Our data indicate that 7-cyclopentyl-5-(4-phenoxyphenyl)-7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d] pyrimidin-4-ylamine, a lymphocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase (Lck) inhibitor, significantly inhibited both VSMC proliferation and migration. 7-cyclopentyl-5-(4-phenoxyphenyl)-7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4-ylamine suppresses VSMC proliferation and migration via down-regulating the protein kinase B (Akt) and extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) pathways, and it significantly decreased the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and cyclin D1 and, the phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein (pRb). Additionally, 7-cyclopentyl-5-(4-phenoxyphenyl)-7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d] pyrimidin-4-ylamine suppressed the migration of VSMCs from endothelium-removed aortic rings, as well as neointima formation following rat carotid balloon injury. The present study identified 7-cyclopentyl-5-(4-phenoxyphenyl)-7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4-ylamine as a potent VSMC proliferation and migration inhibitor and warrants further studies to elucidate its more detailed molecular mechanisms, such as its primary target, and to further validate its in vivo efficacy as a therapeutic agent for pathologic vascular conditions, such as restenosis and atherosclerosis.

  7. Autostereoscopic 3D display system on the properties of both the expanded depth directional viewing zone and the removed structural crosstalk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kwang-Hoon; Park, Anjin; Lee, Dong-Kil; Kim, Yang-Gyu; Jang, Wongun; Park, Youngsik

    2014-06-01

    To expand the suitable stereoscopic viewing zone on depth directional and remove the crosstalk induced by the structures of the existing slanted lenticular lens sheet, Segmented Lenticular lens having Varying Optical Power (SL-VOP) is proposed.

  8. 3-D Seismic Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Gregory F.

    2009-05-01

    This volume is a brief introduction aimed at those who wish to gain a basic and relatively quick understanding of the interpretation of three-dimensional (3-D) seismic reflection data. The book is well written, clearly illustrated, and easy to follow. Enough elementary mathematics are presented for a basic understanding of seismic methods, but more complex mathematical derivations are avoided. References are listed for readers interested in more advanced explanations. After a brief introduction, the book logically begins with a succinct chapter on modern 3-D seismic data acquisition and processing. Standard 3-D acquisition methods are presented, and an appendix expands on more recent acquisition techniques, such as multiple-azimuth and wide-azimuth acquisition. Although this chapter covers the basics of standard time processing quite well, there is only a single sentence about prestack depth imaging, and anisotropic processing is not mentioned at all, even though both techniques are now becoming standard.

  9. Anatomy of the western Java plate interface from depth-migrated seismic images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kopp, H.; Hindle, D.; Klaeschen, D.; Oncken, O.; Reichert, C.; Scholl, D.

    2009-01-01

    Newly pre-stack depth-migrated seismic images resolve the structural details of the western Java forearc and plate interface. The structural segmentation of the forearc into discrete mechanical domains correlates with distinct deformation styles. Approximately 2/3 of the trench sediment fill is detached and incorporated into frontal prism imbricates, while the floor sequence is underthrust beneath the d??collement. Western Java, however, differs markedly from margins such as Nankai or Barbados, where a uniform, continuous d??collement reflector has been imaged. In our study area, the plate interface reveals a spatially irregular, nonlinear pattern characterized by the morphological relief of subducted seamounts and thicker than average patches of underthrust sediment. The underthrust sediment is associated with a low velocity zone as determined from wide-angle data. Active underplating is not resolved, but likely contributes to the uplift of the large bivergent wedge that constitutes the forearc high. Our profile is located 100 km west of the 2006 Java tsunami earthquake. The heterogeneous d??collement zone regulates the friction behavior of the shallow subduction environment where the earthquake occurred. The alternating pattern of enhanced frictional contact zones associated with oceanic basement relief and weak material patches of underthrust sediment influences seismic coupling and possibly contributed to the heterogeneous slip distribution. Our seismic images resolve a steeply dipping splay fault, which originates at the d??collement and terminates at the sea floor and which potentially contributes to tsunami generation during co-seismic activity. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  10. Pre-stack depth migration for improved imaging under seafloor canyons: 2D case study of Browse Basin, Australia*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debenham, Helen 124Westlake, Shane

    2014-06-01

    In the Browse Basin, as in many areas of the world, complex seafloor topography can cause problems with seismic imaging. This is related to complex ray paths, and sharp lateral changes in velocity. This paper compares ways in which 2D Kirchhoff imaging can be improved below seafloor canyons, using both time and depth domain processing. In the time domain, to improve on standard pre-stack time migration (PSTM) we apply removable seafloor static time shifts in order to reduce the push down effect under seafloor canyons before migration. This allows for better event continuity in the seismic imaging. However this approach does not fully solve the problem, still giving sub-optimal imaging, leaving amplitude shadows and structural distortion. Only depth domain processing with a migration algorithm that honours the paths of the seismic energy as well as a detailed velocity model can provide improved imaging under these seafloor canyons, and give confidence in the structural components of the exploration targets in this area. We therefore performed depth velocity model building followed by pre-stack depth migration (PSDM), the result of which provided a step change improvement in the imaging, and provided new insights into the area.

  11. Migration depths of adult steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss in relation to dissolved gas supersaturation in a regulated river system

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Eric L.; Clabough, Tami S.; Caudill, Christopher C.; keefer, matthew L.; Peery, Christopher A.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2010-04-01

    Adult steelhead tagged with archival transmitters primarily migrated through a large river corridor at depths > 2 m, interspersed with frequent but short (< 5 min) periods closer to the surface. The recorded swimming depths and behaviours probably provided adequate hydrostatic compensation for the encountered supersaturated dissolved gas conditions and probably limited development of gas bubble disease (GBD). Results parallel those from a concurrent adult Chinook salmon study, except steelhead experienced greater seasonal variability and were more likely to have depth-uncompensated supersaturation exposure in some dam tailraces, perhaps explaining the higher incidence of GBD in this species.

  12. 3D World Building System

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  13. 3D World Building System

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-30

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  14. Studies of 3D-cloud optical depth from small to very large values, and of the radiation and remote sensing impacts of larger-drop clustering

    SciTech Connect

    Wiscombe, Warren; Marshak, Alexander; Knyazikhin, Yuri; Chiu, Christine

    2007-05-04

    We have basically completed all the goals stated in the previous proposal and published or submitted journal papers thereon, the only exception being First-Principles Monte Carlo which has taken more time than expected. We finally finished the comprehensive book on 3D cloud radiative transfer (edited by Marshak and Davis and published by Springer), with many contributions by ARM scientists; this book was highlighted in the 2005 ARM Annual Report. We have also completed (for now) our pioneering work on new models of cloud drop clustering based on ARM aircraft FSSP data, with applications both to radiative transfer and to rainfall. This clustering work was highlighted in the FY07 “Our Changing Planet” (annual report of the US Climate Change Science Program). Our group published 22 papers, one book, and 5 chapters in that book, during this proposal period. All are listed at the end of this section. Below, we give brief highlights of some of those papers.

  15. Seismic imaging of the Waltham Canyon fault, California: comparison of ray‐theoretical and Fresnel volume prestack depth migration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bauer, Klaus; Ryberg, Trond; Fuis, Gary S.; Lüth, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Near‐vertical faults can be imaged using reflected refractions identified in controlled‐source seismic data. Often theses phases are observed on a few neighboring shot or receiver gathers, resulting in a low‐fold data set. Imaging can be carried out with Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in which migration noise is suppressed by constructive stacking of large amounts of multifold data. Fresnel volume migration can be used for low‐fold data without severe migration noise, as the smearing along isochrones is limited to the first Fresnel zone around the reflection point. We developed a modified Fresnel volume migration technique to enhance imaging of steep faults and to suppress noise and undesired coherent phases. The modifications include target‐oriented filters to separate reflected refractions from steep‐dipping faults and reflections with hyperbolic moveout. Undesired phases like multiple reflections, mode conversions, direct P and S waves, and surface waves are suppressed by these filters. As an alternative approach, we developed a new prestack line‐drawing migration method, which can be considered as a proxy to an infinite frequency approximation of the Fresnel volume migration. The line‐drawing migration is not considering waveform information but requires significantly shorter computational time. Target‐oriented filters were extended by dip filters in the line‐drawing migration method. The migration methods were tested with synthetic data and applied to real data from the Waltham Canyon fault, California. The two techniques are applied best in combination, to design filters and to generate complementary images of steep faults.

  16. Large depth-high resolution full 3D imaging of the anterior segments of the eye using high speed optical frequency domain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerbage, C.; Lim, H.; Sun, W.; Mujat, M.; de Boer, J. F.

    2007-06-01

    Three dimensional rapid large depth range imaging of the anterior segments of the human eye by an optical frequency domain imaging system is presented. The tunable source spans from 1217 to 1356 nm with an average output power of 60 mW providing a measured axial resolution of 10 μm in air based on the coherence envelope. The effective depth range is 4 mm, defined as the distance over which the sensitivity drops by 6 dB, achieved by frequency shifting the optical signal using acousto-optic modulators. The measured maximum sensitivity is 109 dB at a sample arm power of 14.7mW and A-lines rate of 43,900 per second. Images consisting of 512 depth profiles are acquired at an acquisition rate of 85 frames per second. We demonstrate an optical frequency domain imaging system capable of mapping in vivo the entire area of the human anterior segment (13.4 x 12 x 4.2 mm) in 1.4 seconds.

  17. Macrophage podosomes go 3D.

    PubMed

    Van Goethem, Emeline; Guiet, Romain; Balor, Stéphanie; Charrière, Guillaume M; Poincloux, Renaud; Labrousse, Arnaud; Maridonneau-Parini, Isabelle; Le Cabec, Véronique

    2011-01-01

    Macrophage tissue infiltration is a critical step in the immune response against microorganisms and is also associated with disease progression in chronic inflammation and cancer. Macrophages are constitutively equipped with specialized structures called podosomes dedicated to extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation. We recently reported that these structures play a critical role in trans-matrix mesenchymal migration mode, a protease-dependent mechanism. Podosome molecular components and their ECM-degrading activity have been extensively studied in two dimensions (2D), but yet very little is known about their fate in three-dimensional (3D) environments. Therefore, localization of podosome markers and proteolytic activity were carefully examined in human macrophages performing mesenchymal migration. Using our gelled collagen I 3D matrix model to obligate human macrophages to perform mesenchymal migration, classical podosome markers including talin, paxillin, vinculin, gelsolin, cortactin were found to accumulate at the tip of F-actin-rich cell protrusions together with β1 integrin and CD44 but not β2 integrin. Macrophage proteolytic activity was observed at podosome-like protrusion sites using confocal fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy. The formation of migration tunnels by macrophages inside the matrix was accomplished by degradation, engulfment and mechanic compaction of the matrix. In addition, videomicroscopy revealed that 3D F-actin-rich protrusions of migrating macrophages were as dynamic as their 2D counterparts. Overall, the specifications of 3D podosomes resembled those of 2D podosome rosettes rather than those of individual podosomes. This observation was further supported by the aspect of 3D podosomes in fibroblasts expressing Hck, a master regulator of podosome rosettes in macrophages. In conclusion, human macrophage podosomes go 3D and take the shape of spherical podosome rosettes when the cells perform mesenchymal migration. This work

  18. A 3-dimensional micro- and nanoparticle transport and filtration model (MNM3D) applied to the migration of carbon-based nanomaterials in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianco, Carlo; Tosco, Tiziana; Sethi, Rajandrea

    2016-10-01

    Engineered nanoparticles (NPs) in the environment can act both as contaminants, when they are unintentionally released, and as remediation agents when injected on purpose at contaminated sites. In this work two carbon-based NPs are considered, namely CARBO-IRON®, a new material developed for contaminated site remediation, and single layer graphene oxide (SLGO), a potential contaminant of the next future. Understanding and modeling the transport and deposition of such NPs in aquifer systems is a key aspect in both cases, and numerical models capable to simulate NP transport in groundwater in complex 3D scenarios are necessary. To this aim, this work proposes a modeling approach based on modified advection-dispersion-deposition equations accounting for the coupled influence of flow velocity and ionic strength on particle transport. A new modeling tool (MNM3D - Micro and Nanoparticle transport Model in 3D geometries) is presented for the simulation of NPs injection and transport in 3D scenarios. MNM3D is the result of the integration of the numerical code MNMs (Micro and Nanoparticle transport, filtration and clogging Model - Suite) in the well-known transport model RT3D (Clement et al., 1998). The injection in field-like conditions of CARBO-IRON® (20 g/l) amended by CMC (4 g/l) in a 2D vertical tank (0.7 × 1.0 × 0.12 m) was simulated using MNM3D, and compared to experimental results under the same conditions. Column transport tests of SLGO at a concentration (10 mg/l) representative of a possible spill of SLGO-containing waste water were performed at different values of ionic strength (0.1 to 35 mM), evidencing a strong dependence of SLGO transport on IS, and a reversible blocking deposition. The experimental data were fitted using the numerical code MNMs and the ionic strength-dependent transport was up-scaled for a full scale 3D simulation of SLGO release and long-term transport in a heterogeneous aquifer. MNM3D showed to potentially represent a valid tool for

  19. Analyzing the roles of Rho GTPases in cancer cell migration with a live cell imaging 3D-morphology-based assay.

    PubMed

    Colomba, Audrey; Ridley, Anne J

    2014-01-01

    Rho GTPases are master regulators of cytoskeleton dynamics and therefore regulate cell motility. Rho GTPases, as well as their regulators and effectors, are often deregulated in cancers and thus contribute to tumor progression to metastasis. Cancer progression involves multiple steps, including invasion of the surrounding tissues. Several methods to investigate the invasion of tumors cells in 3D matrices in vitro have been developed. In this chapter we describe a 3D-based morphology assay that can be used for medium-throughput microscopy-based screening to identify regulators of cancer cell invasion. We use this method coupled to RNAi to investigate how Rho GTPases affect prostate cancer cell morphology in 3D Matrigel.

  20. Migration and Proliferative Activity of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in 3D Polylactide Scaffolds Depends on Cell Seeding Technique and Collagen Modification.

    PubMed

    Rodina, A V; Tenchurin, T Kh; Saprykin, V P; Shepelev, A D; Mamagulashvili, V G; Grigor'ev, T E; Lukanina, K I; Orekhov, A S; Moskaleva, E Yu; Chvalun, S N

    2016-11-01

    We analyzed viability of mesenchymal stem cells seeded by static and dynamic methods to highly porous fibrous 3D poly-L-lactide scaffolds with similar physical and chemical properties, but different spatial organization modified with collagen. Standard collagen coating promoted protein adsorption on the scaffold surface and improved adhesive properties of 100 μ-thick scaffolds. Modification of 600-μ scaffolds with collagen under pressure increased proliferative activity of mesenchymal stem cells seeded under static and dynamic (delivery of 100,000 cells in 10 ml medium in a perfusion system at a rate of 1 ml/min) conditions by 47 and 648%, respectively (measured after 120-h culturing by MTT test). Dynamic conditions provide more uniform distribution of collagen on scaffold fibers and promote cell penetration into 3D poly-L-lactide scaffolds with thickness >600 μ.

  1. 3D vision system assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzaniti, J. Larry; Edmondson, Richard; Vaden, Justin; Hyatt, Bryan; Chenault, David B.; Kingston, David; Geulen, Vanilynmae; Newell, Scott; Pettijohn, Brad

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, we report on the development of a 3D vision system consisting of a flat panel stereoscopic display and auto-converging stereo camera and an assessment of the system's use for robotic driving, manipulation, and surveillance operations. The 3D vision system was integrated onto a Talon Robot and Operator Control Unit (OCU) such that direct comparisons of the performance of a number of test subjects using 2D and 3D vision systems were possible. A number of representative scenarios were developed to determine which tasks benefited most from the added depth perception and to understand when the 3D vision system hindered understanding of the scene. Two tests were conducted at Fort Leonard Wood, MO with noncommissioned officers ranked Staff Sergeant and Sergeant First Class. The scenarios; the test planning, approach and protocols; the data analysis; and the resulting performance assessment of the 3D vision system are reported.

  2. Rapid assessment of migration and proliferation: a novel 3D high-throughput platform for rational and combinatorial screening of tissue-specific biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Courtney M; Karande, Pankaj; Thompson, Deanna M

    2014-08-01

    Designing an ideal biomaterial supportive of multicellular tissue repair is challenging, especially with a poor understanding of the synergy between constituent proteins and growth factors. A brute-force approach, based on screening all possible combinations of proteins and growth factors, is inadequate due to the prohibitively large experimental space coupled with current low-throughput screening techniques. A high-throughput screening platform based on rational and combinatorial strategies for design and testing of proteins and growth factors can significantly impact the discovery of novel tissue-specific biomaterials. Here, we report the development of a flexible high-throughput screening platform, Rapid Assessment of Migration and Proliferation (RAMP), to rapidly investigate cell viability, proliferation, and migration in response to highly miniaturized three-dimensional biomaterial cultures (4-20 μL) with sparingly low cell densities (63-1000 cells per μL for cell arrays; 1 μL of 1000-10,000 cells per μL for migration arrays). The predictions made by RAMP on the efficacy and potency of the biomaterials are in agreement with the predictions made by conventional assays but at a throughput that is at least 100-1000-fold higher. The RAMP assay is therefore a novel approach for the rapid discovery of tissue-specific biomaterials for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  3. Satellite and Surface Data Synergy for Developing a 3D Cloud Structure and Properties Characterization Over the ARM SGP. Stage 1: Cloud Amounts, Optical Depths, and Cloud Heights Reconciliation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Genkova, I.; Long, C. N.; Heck, P. W.; Minnis, P.

    2003-01-01

    One of the primary Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program objectives is to obtain measurements applicable to the development of models for better understanding of radiative processes in the atmosphere. We address this goal by building a three-dimensional (3D) characterization of the cloud structure and properties over the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP). We take the approach of juxtaposing the cloud properties as retrieved from independent satellite and ground-based retrievals, and looking at the statistics of the cloud field properties. Once these retrievals are well understood, they will be used to populate the 3D characterization database. As a first step we determine the relationship between surface fractional sky cover and satellite viewing angle dependent cloud fraction (CF). We elaborate on the agreement intercomparing optical depth (OD) datasets from satellite and ground using available retrieval algorithms with relation to the CF, cloud height, multi-layer cloud presence, and solar zenith angle (SZA). For the SGP Central Facility, where output from the active remote sensing cloud layer (ARSCL) valueadded product (VAP) is available, we study the uncertainty of satellite estimated cloud heights and evaluate the impact of this uncertainty for radiative studies.

  4. Fast 3-D seismic modeling and prestack depth migration using generalized screen methods. Final report for period January 1, 1998 - December 31, 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Toksoz, M. Nafi

    2001-03-31

    Completed a theoretical analysis of phase screen propagators to answer several critical questions: the existence of a singularity in the Green's function for the case of a zero vertical wavenumber, the stability and accuracy of such propagators, and the effects of backscattering for large contrast heterogeneous media. The theory is based on separating the wavefield into forescattering and backscattering parts. The approach is robust and appropriate for earth structures with high velocity contrast. This theory also resolves the apparent singularity problem that has persisted in generalized screen propagator formulations. With this formulation we studied the effects of the commonly used approximations as a function of the degree of velocity contrast in the media.

  5. Migration depths of juvenile Chinook salmon and steelhead relative to total dissolved gas supersaturation in a Columbia River reservoir

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beeman, J.W.; Maule, A.G.

    2006-01-01

    The in situ depths of juvenile salmonids Oncorhynchus spp. were studied to determine whether hydrostatic compensation was sufficient to protect them from gas bubble disease (GBD) during exposure to total dissolved gas (TDG) supersaturation from a regional program of spill at dams meant to improve salmonid passage survival. Yearling Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha and juvenile steelhead O. mykiss implanted with pressure-sensing radio transmitters were monitored from boats while they were migrating between the tailrace of Ice Harbor Dam on the Snake River and the forebay of McNary Dam on the Columbia River during 1997-1999. The TDG generally decreased with distance from the tailrace of the dam and was within levels known to cause GBD signs and mortality in laboratory bioassays. Results of repeated-measures analysis of variance indicated that the mean depths of juvenile steelhead were similar throughout the study area, ranging from 2.0 m in the Snake River to 2.3 m near the McNary Dam forebay. The mean depths of yearling Chinook salmon generally increased with distance from Ice Harbor Dam, ranging from 1.5 m in the Snake River to 3.2 m near the forebay. Juvenile steelhead were deeper at night than during the day, and yearling Chinook salmon were deeper during the day than at night. The TDG level was a significant covariate in models of the migration depth and rates of each species, but no effect of fish size was detected. Hydrostatic compensation, along with short exposure times in the area of greatest TDG, reduced the effects of TDG exposure below those generally shown to elicit GBD signs or mortality. Based on these factors, our results indicate that the TDG limits of the regional spill program were safe for these juvenile salmonids.

  6. Studies of Grounding Line Migration Over Rutofrd Ice Stream Using 3D Short Repeat-Time Series From Multi-Track InSAR Acquisitions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milillo, P.; Minchew, B. M.; Riel, B. V.; Simons, M.; Gardner, A. S.; Agram, P. S.

    2015-12-01

    It has long been known that basal mechanics of ice streams are sensitive to short- timescale hourly to seasonal forcings, such as water pressure fluctuations and tidal loading as well as long-timescale (yearly to decadal) thinning. Designing SAR short repeat time observations to cover nearly an entire test-site in Antarctica from ascending and descending orbital directions, using every available SAR satellite is fundamental for understanding a new class of phenomena, underlying the physics of glaciers and ice streams. Understanding grounding-line dynamics is necessary for predictions of long-term ice-sheet stability. However, despite growing observations of the tidal influence on grounding-line migration, this short-timescale migration is poorly understood, with most modeling attempts assuming beam theory to calculate displacements. Knowing the position of the grounding line with accuracy is important for the global mass balance of ice sheets or for quantitatively modeling the mechanical interaction between ice shelves and ice sheets. Here we present a general method for retrieving three dimensional displacement vector given a set of multiple tracks, multiple geometry SAR acquisitions. The algorithm extends the single line of sight mathematical framework to the four spatial and temporal dimensions including both range and azimuth measurements. We designed COSMO-SkyMed (CSK) observations of Rutford Ice Stream to cover nearly the grounding zone from ascending and descending orbital directions using every available CSK satellite This spatially comprehensive observational scheme allowed us to derive time series of the 3-dimensional surface displacement for the grounding zone, facilitating studies of ice stream mechanics and tidally induced grounding line migrations with unprecedented spatial extent and temporal resolution. Having a constellation with occasional 1- day repeat time and an average 4-days repeat time is beneficial when looking at displacements of more than

  7. Optimal arrangements of fiber optic probes to enhance the spatial resolution in depth for 3D reflectance diffuse optical tomography with time-resolved measurements performed with fast-gated single-photon avalanche diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puszka, Agathe; Di Sieno, Laura; Dalla Mora, Alberto; Pifferi, Antonio; Contini, Davide; Boso, Gianluca; Tosi, Alberto; Hervé, Lionel; Planat-Chrétien, Anne; Koenig, Anne; Dinten, Jean-Marc

    2014-02-01

    Fiber optic probes with a width limited to a few centimeters can enable diffuse optical tomography (DOT) in intern organs like the prostate or facilitate the measurements on extern organs like the breast or the brain. We have recently shown on 2D tomographic images that time-resolved measurements with a large dynamic range obtained with fast-gated single-photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) could push forward the imaged depth range in a diffusive medium at short source-detector separation compared with conventional non-gated approaches. In this work, we confirm these performances with the first 3D tomographic images reconstructed with such a setup and processed with the Mellin- Laplace transform. More precisely, we investigate the performance of hand-held probes with short interfiber distances in terms of spatial resolution and specifically demonstrate the interest of having a compact probe design featuring small source-detector separations. We compare the spatial resolution obtained with two probes having the same design but different scale factors, the first one featuring only interfiber distances of 15 mm and the second one, 10 mm. We evaluate experimentally the spatial resolution obtained with each probe on the setup with fast-gated SPADs for optical phantoms featuring two absorbing inclusions positioned at different depths and conclude on the potential of short source-detector separations for DOT.

  8. YouDash3D: exploring stereoscopic 3D gaming for 3D movie theaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schild, Jonas; Seele, Sven; Masuch, Maic

    2012-03-01

    Along with the success of the digitally revived stereoscopic cinema, events beyond 3D movies become attractive for movie theater operators, i.e. interactive 3D games. In this paper, we present a case that explores possible challenges and solutions for interactive 3D games to be played by a movie theater audience. We analyze the setting and showcase current issues related to lighting and interaction. Our second focus is to provide gameplay mechanics that make special use of stereoscopy, especially depth-based game design. Based on these results, we present YouDash3D, a game prototype that explores public stereoscopic gameplay in a reduced kiosk setup. It features live 3D HD video stream of a professional stereo camera rig rendered in a real-time game scene. We use the effect to place the stereoscopic effigies of players into the digital game. The game showcases how stereoscopic vision can provide for a novel depth-based game mechanic. Projected trigger zones and distributed clusters of the audience video allow for easy adaptation to larger audiences and 3D movie theater gaming.

  9. Europeana and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletinckx, D.

    2011-09-01

    The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  10. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    five groups: 1) Grid Functions for grids, grid-checking, etc.; 2) Scalar Functions for contour or carpet plots of density, pressure, temperature, Mach number, vorticity magnitude, helicity, etc.; 3) Vector Functions for vector plots of velocity, vorticity, momentum, and density gradient, etc.; 4) Particle Trace Functions for rake-like plots of particle flow or vortex lines; and 5) Shock locations based on pressure gradient. TURB3D is a modification of PLOT3D which is used for viewing CFD simulations of incompressible turbulent flow. Input flow data consists of pressure, velocity and vorticity. Typical quantities to plot include local fluctuations in flow quantities and turbulent production terms, plotted in physical or wall units. PLOT3D/TURB3D includes both TURB3D and PLOT3D because the operation of TURB3D is identical to PLOT3D, and there is no additional sample data or printed documentation for TURB3D. Graphical capabilities of PLOT3D version 3.6b+ vary among the implementations available through COSMIC. Customers are encouraged to purchase and carefully review the PLOT3D manual before ordering the program for a specific computer and graphics library. There is only one manual for use with all implementations of PLOT3D, and although this manual generally assumes that the Silicon Graphics Iris implementation is being used, informative comments concerning other implementations appear throughout the text. With all implementations, the visual representation of the object and flow field created by PLOT3D consists of points, lines, and polygons. Points can be represented with dots or symbols, color can be used to denote data values, and perspective is used to show depth. Differences among implementations impact the program's ability to use graphical features that are based on 3D polygons, the user's ability to manipulate the graphical displays, and the user's ability to obtain alternate forms of output. The Apollo implementation of PLOT3D uses some of the capabilities of

  11. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    five groups: 1) Grid Functions for grids, grid-checking, etc.; 2) Scalar Functions for contour or carpet plots of density, pressure, temperature, Mach number, vorticity magnitude, helicity, etc.; 3) Vector Functions for vector plots of velocity, vorticity, momentum, and density gradient, etc.; 4) Particle Trace Functions for rake-like plots of particle flow or vortex lines; and 5) Shock locations based on pressure gradient. TURB3D is a modification of PLOT3D which is used for viewing CFD simulations of incompressible turbulent flow. Input flow data consists of pressure, velocity and vorticity. Typical quantities to plot include local fluctuations in flow quantities and turbulent production terms, plotted in physical or wall units. PLOT3D/TURB3D includes both TURB3D and PLOT3D because the operation of TURB3D is identical to PLOT3D, and there is no additional sample data or printed documentation for TURB3D. Graphical capabilities of PLOT3D version 3.6b+ vary among the implementations available through COSMIC. Customers are encouraged to purchase and carefully review the PLOT3D manual before ordering the program for a specific computer and graphics library. There is only one manual for use with all implementations of PLOT3D, and although this manual generally assumes that the Silicon Graphics Iris implementation is being used, informative comments concerning other implementations appear throughout the text. With all implementations, the visual representation of the object and flow field created by PLOT3D consists of points, lines, and polygons. Points can be represented with dots or symbols, color can be used to denote data values, and perspective is used to show depth. Differences among implementations impact the program's ability to use graphical features that are based on 3D polygons, the user's ability to manipulate the graphical displays, and the user's ability to obtain alternate forms of output. The Apollo implementation of PLOT3D uses some of the capabilities of

  12. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    DOE PAGES

    Chung, Hee -Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; ...

    2016-04-21

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d N = 2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. As a result, we also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  13. 'Diamond' in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D, microscopic imager mosaic of a target area on a rock called 'Diamond Jenness' was taken after NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity ground into the surface with its rock abrasion tool for a second time.

    Opportunity has bored nearly a dozen holes into the inner walls of 'Endurance Crater.' On sols 177 and 178 (July 23 and July 24, 2004), the rover worked double-duty on Diamond Jenness. Surface debris and the bumpy shape of the rock resulted in a shallow and irregular hole, only about 2 millimeters (0.08 inch) deep. The final depth was not enough to remove all the bumps and leave a neat hole with a smooth floor. This extremely shallow depression was then examined by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

    On Sol 178, Opportunity's 'robotic rodent' dined on Diamond Jenness once again, grinding almost an additional 5 millimeters (about 0.2 inch). The rover then applied its Moessbauer spectrometer to the deepened hole. This double dose of Diamond Jenness enabled the science team to examine the rock at varying layers. Results from those grindings are currently being analyzed.

    The image mosaic is about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across.

  14. 3D and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulien Ohlmann, Odile

    2013-02-01

    Today the industry offers a chain of 3D products. Learning to "read" and to "create in 3D" becomes an issue of education of primary importance. 25 years professional experience in France, the United States and Germany, Odile Meulien set up a personal method of initiation to 3D creation that entails the spatial/temporal experience of the holographic visual. She will present some different tools and techniques used for this learning, their advantages and disadvantages, programs and issues of educational policies, constraints and expectations related to the development of new techniques for 3D imaging. Although the creation of display holograms is very much reduced compared to the creation of the 90ies, the holographic concept is spreading in all scientific, social, and artistic activities of our present time. She will also raise many questions: What means 3D? Is it communication? Is it perception? How the seeing and none seeing is interferes? What else has to be taken in consideration to communicate in 3D? How to handle the non visible relations of moving objects with subjects? Does this transform our model of exchange with others? What kind of interaction this has with our everyday life? Then come more practical questions: How to learn creating 3D visualization, to learn 3D grammar, 3D language, 3D thinking? What for? At what level? In which matter? for whom?

  15. 3D Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, S. K.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses 3 D imaging as it relates to digital representations in virtual library collections. Highlights include X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT); the National Science Foundation (NSF) Digital Library Initiatives; output peripherals; image retrieval systems, including metadata; and applications of 3 D imaging for libraries and museums. (LRW)

  16. 3D seismic imaging on massively parallel computers

    SciTech Connect

    Womble, D.E.; Ober, C.C.; Oldfield, R.

    1997-02-01

    The ability to image complex geologies such as salt domes in the Gulf of Mexico and thrusts in mountainous regions is a key to reducing the risk and cost associated with oil and gas exploration. Imaging these structures, however, is computationally expensive. Datasets can be terabytes in size, and the processing time required for the multiple iterations needed to produce a velocity model can take months, even with the massively parallel computers available today. Some algorithms, such as 3D, finite-difference, prestack, depth migration remain beyond the capacity of production seismic processing. Massively parallel processors (MPPs) and algorithms research are the tools that will enable this project to provide new seismic processing capabilities to the oil and gas industry. The goals of this work are to (1) develop finite-difference algorithms for 3D, prestack, depth migration; (2) develop efficient computational approaches for seismic imaging and for processing terabyte datasets on massively parallel computers; and (3) develop a modular, portable, seismic imaging code.

  17. 3-D physical modeling of a complex salt canopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wiley, R.W.; Sekharan, K.K.

    1996-12-31

    Recent drilling has confirmed both significant reservoir potential and the presence of commercial hydrocarbons below salt structures in the Gulf of Mexico. Obtaining definitive seismic images with standard processing schemes beneath these salt structures is very difficult if not impossible. Because of the complicated seismic behavior of these structures, full volume 3-D prestack depth migration is required. Unfortunately, carrying out the multitude of calculations needed to create a proper image requires the largest and fastest supercomputers and rather complex numerical algorithms. Furthermore, developing and testing the imaging algorithms is quite involved and requires appropriate test data sets. To better understand the problems and issues of subsalt imaging, Marathon Oil Company and Louisiana Land and Exploration Company contracted with the University of Houston`s Allied Geophysical Laboratories (AGL) to construct a salt canopy physical model. The model is patterned after the SEG/EAEG Salt Model and is made from synthetic materials. It is a full three-dimensional model with an irregularly shaped, lateral salt structure embedded in five distinct sedimentary layers. The model was used to acquire a multi-offset 3-D marine-style survey. These data are being used to address problems of subsalt imaging. In addition to standard processing techniques, the authors investigate algorithms for multiple removal and prestack depth migration.

  18. Estimating 3D variation in active-layer thickness beneath arctic streams using ground-penetrating radar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brosten, T.R.; Bradford, J.H.; McNamara, J.P.; Gooseff, M.N.; Zarnetske, J.P.; Bowden, W.B.; Johnston, M.E.

    2009-01-01

    We acquired three-dimensional (3D) ground-penetrating radar (GPR) data across three stream sites on the North Slope, AK, in August 2005, to investigate the dependence of thaw depth on channel morphology. Data were migrated with mean velocities derived from multi-offset GPR profiles collected across a stream section within each of the 3D survey areas. GPR data interpretations from the alluvial-lined stream site illustrate greater thaw depths beneath riffle and gravel bar features relative to neighboring pool features. The peat-lined stream sites indicate the opposite; greater thaw depths beneath pools and shallower thaw beneath the connecting runs. Results provide detailed 3D geometry of active-layer thaw depths that can support hydrological studies seeking to quantify transport and biogeochemical processes that occur within the hyporheic zone.

  19. Dimensional accuracy of 3D printed vertebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogden, Kent; Ordway, Nathaniel; Diallo, Dalanda; Tillapaugh-Fay, Gwen; Aslan, Can

    2014-03-01

    3D printer applications in the biomedical sciences and medical imaging are expanding and will have an increasing impact on the practice of medicine. Orthopedic and reconstructive surgery has been an obvious area for development of 3D printer applications as the segmentation of bony anatomy to generate printable models is relatively straightforward. There are important issues that should be addressed when using 3D printed models for applications that may affect patient care; in particular the dimensional accuracy of the printed parts needs to be high to avoid poor decisions being made prior to surgery or therapeutic procedures. In this work, the dimensional accuracy of 3D printed vertebral bodies derived from CT data for a cadaver spine is compared with direct measurements on the ex-vivo vertebra and with measurements made on the 3D rendered vertebra using commercial 3D image processing software. The vertebra was printed on a consumer grade 3D printer using an additive print process using PLA (polylactic acid) filament. Measurements were made for 15 different anatomic features of the vertebral body, including vertebral body height, endplate width and depth, pedicle height and width, and spinal canal width and depth, among others. It is shown that for the segmentation and printing process used, the results of measurements made on the 3D printed vertebral body are substantially the same as those produced by direct measurement on the vertebra and measurements made on the 3D rendered vertebra.

  20. AE3D

    SciTech Connect

    Spong, Donald A

    2016-06-20

    AE3D solves for the shear Alfven eigenmodes and eigenfrequencies in a torodal magnetic fusion confinement device. The configuration can be either 2D (e.g. tokamak, reversed field pinch) or 3D (e.g. stellarator, helical reversed field pinch, tokamak with ripple). The equations solved are based on a reduced MHD model and sound wave coupling effects are not currently included.

  1. Radiochromic 3D Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Radiochromic materials exhibit a colour change when exposed to ionising radiation. Radiochromic film has been used for clinical dosimetry for many years and increasingly so recently, as films of higher sensitivities have become available. The two principle advantages of radiochromic dosimetry include greater tissue equivalence (radiologically) and the lack of requirement for development of the colour change. In a radiochromic material, the colour change arises direct from ionising interactions affecting dye molecules, without requiring any latent chemical, optical or thermal development, with important implications for increased accuracy and convenience. It is only relatively recently however, that 3D radiochromic dosimetry has become possible. In this article we review recent developments and the current state-of-the-art of 3D radiochromic dosimetry, and the potential for a more comprehensive solution for the verification of complex radiation therapy treatments, and 3D dose measurement in general.

  2. [3D display of sequential 2D medical images].

    PubMed

    Lu, Yisong; Chen, Yazhu

    2003-12-01

    A detailed review is given in this paper on various current 3D display methods for sequential 2D medical images and the new development in 3D medical image display. True 3D display, surface rendering, volume rendering, 3D texture mapping and distributed collaborative rendering are discussed in depth. For two kinds of medical applications: Real-time navigation system and high-fidelity diagnosis in computer aided surgery, different 3D display methods are presented.

  3. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    DOE PAGES

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; ...

    2016-03-17

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions <ψψψψ> in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge CT. We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N. Finally, we also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  4. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; Pufu, Silviu S.; Simmons-Duffin, David; Yacoby, Ran

    2016-03-17

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions <ψψψψ> in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge CT. We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N. Finally, we also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  5. A microfluidic device for 2D to 3D and 3D to 3D cell navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamloo, Amir; Amirifar, Leyla

    2016-01-01

    Microfluidic devices have received wide attention and shown great potential in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Investigating cell response to various stimulations is much more accurate and comprehensive with the aid of microfluidic devices. In this study, we introduced a microfluidic device by which the matrix density as a mechanical property and the concentration profile of a biochemical factor as a chemical property could be altered. Our microfluidic device has a cell tank and a cell culture chamber to mimic both 2D to 3D and 3D to 3D migration of three types of cells. Fluid shear stress is negligible on the cells and a stable concentration gradient can be obtained by diffusion. The device was designed by a numerical simulation so that the uniformity of the concentration gradients throughout the cell culture chamber was obtained. Adult neural cells were cultured within this device and they showed different branching and axonal navigation phenotypes within varying nerve growth factor (NGF) concentration profiles. Neural stem cells were also cultured within varying collagen matrix densities while exposed to NGF concentrations and they experienced 3D to 3D collective migration. By generating vascular endothelial growth factor concentration gradients, adult human dermal microvascular endothelial cells also migrated in a 2D to 3D manner and formed a stable lumen within a specific collagen matrix density. It was observed that a minimum absolute concentration and concentration gradient were required to stimulate migration of all types of the cells. This device has the advantage of changing multiple parameters simultaneously and is expected to have wide applicability in cell studies.

  6. Real-time monitoring of 3D cell culture using a 3D capacitance biosensor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Mi; Han, Nalae; Lee, Rimi; Choi, In-Hong; Park, Yong-Beom; Shin, Jeon-Soo; Yoo, Kyung-Hwa

    2016-03-15

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures have recently received attention because they represent a more physiologically relevant environment compared to conventional two-dimensional (2D) cell cultures. However, 2D-based imaging techniques or cell sensors are insufficient for real-time monitoring of cellular behavior in 3D cell culture. Here, we report investigations conducted with a 3D capacitance cell sensor consisting of vertically aligned pairs of electrodes. When GFP-expressing human breast cancer cells (GFP-MCF-7) encapsulated in alginate hydrogel were cultured in a 3D cell culture system, cellular activities, such as cell proliferation and apoptosis at different heights, could be monitored non-invasively and in real-time by measuring the change in capacitance with the 3D capacitance sensor. Moreover, we were able to monitor cell migration of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) with our 3D capacitance sensor.

  7. 3D photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, Jeffrey J. L.; Roumeliotis, Michael; Chaudhary, Govind; Stodilka, Robert Z.; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2010-06-01

    Our group has concentrated on development of a 3D photoacoustic imaging system for biomedical imaging research. The technology employs a sparse parallel detection scheme and specialized reconstruction software to obtain 3D optical images using a single laser pulse. With the technology we have been able to capture 3D movies of translating point targets and rotating line targets. The current limitation of our 3D photoacoustic imaging approach is its inability ability to reconstruct complex objects in the field of view. This is primarily due to the relatively small number of projections used to reconstruct objects. However, in many photoacoustic imaging situations, only a few objects may be present in the field of view and these objects may have very high contrast compared to background. That is, the objects have sparse properties. Therefore, our work had two objectives: (i) to utilize mathematical tools to evaluate 3D photoacoustic imaging performance, and (ii) to test image reconstruction algorithms that prefer sparseness in the reconstructed images. Our approach was to utilize singular value decomposition techniques to study the imaging operator of the system and evaluate the complexity of objects that could potentially be reconstructed. We also compared the performance of two image reconstruction algorithms (algebraic reconstruction and l1-norm techniques) at reconstructing objects of increasing sparseness. We observed that for a 15-element detection scheme, the number of measureable singular vectors representative of the imaging operator was consistent with the demonstrated ability to reconstruct point and line targets in the field of view. We also observed that the l1-norm reconstruction technique, which is known to prefer sparseness in reconstructed images, was superior to the algebraic reconstruction technique. Based on these findings, we concluded (i) that singular value decomposition of the imaging operator provides valuable insight into the capabilities of

  8. Are 3-D Movies Bad for Your Eyes?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the viewer has a problem with focusing or depth perception. Also, the techniques used to create the 3- ... eyes), or other conditions that persistently inhibit focusing, depth perception or normal 3-D vision, would have difficulty ...

  9. Twin Peaks - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The two hills in the distance, approximately one to two kilometers away, have been dubbed the 'Twin Peaks' and are of great interest to Pathfinder scientists as objects of future study. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. The white areas on the left hill, called the 'Ski Run' by scientists, may have been formed by hydrologic processes.

    The IMP is a stereo imaging system with color capability provided by 24 selectable filters -- twelve filters per 'eye.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  10. 3D and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, Y. C.

    1995-05-01

    This conference on physiology and function covers a wide range of subjects, including the vasculature and blood flow, the flow of gas, water, and blood in the lung, the neurological structure and function, the modeling, and the motion and mechanics of organs. Many technologies are discussed. I believe that the list would include a robotic photographer, to hold the optical equipment in a precisely controlled way to obtain the images for the user. Why are 3D images needed? They are to achieve certain objectives through measurements of some objects. For example, in order to improve performance in sports or beauty of a person, we measure the form, dimensions, appearance, and movements.

  11. 3D Audio System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Ames Research Center research into virtual reality led to the development of the Convolvotron, a high speed digital audio processing system that delivers three-dimensional sound over headphones. It consists of a two-card set designed for use with a personal computer. The Convolvotron's primary application is presentation of 3D audio signals over headphones. Four independent sound sources are filtered with large time-varying filters that compensate for motion. The perceived location of the sound remains constant. Possible applications are in air traffic control towers or airplane cockpits, hearing and perception research and virtual reality development.

  12. Time-lapse analysis of sparse 3D seismic data from the CO2 storage pilot site at Ketzin, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivandic, M.; Yang, C.; Lüth, S.; Cosma, C.; Juhlin, C.

    2012-04-01

    Capture and geological storage of CO2 is considered to be a feasible method for reducing carbon emissions. In April 2004, a research pilot project in the German town of Ketzin started as the first onshore CO2 storage project in Europe. Injection started in June 2008 and until the latest repeat survey in February 2011 around 45 kilotons of CO2 had been injected into a saline aquifer at approximately 630-650 m depth. Different seismic methods, such as time-lapse Vertical Seismic Profiling (VSP), Crosswell, Moving Source Profiling (MSP) and surface seismics have been employed to detect and monitor changes in the reservoir. We present here time-lapse results from sparse 3D seismic surveying with a "star" geometry, i.e. with a radial distribution of acquisition profiles directed towards the approximate location of the injection well, which were acquired to link downhole surveys with full 3D surface seismic surveys. The main objectives of the sparse 3D surveys were (1) to identify changes in the seismic response related to the injection of CO2 between the repeat surveys and baseline survey and (2) to compare these results with those from the repeat 3D seismic survey. The results are consistent with the 3D seismic time-lapse studies over the injection site and show that the sparse 3D geometry can be used to qualitatively map the migration of the CO2 plume within the saline reservoir, as well as potential migration out of the reservoir rock at a significantly lower effort than the full 3D surveying. The latest repeat survey indicates preferential migration of the CO2 to the west. Both sparse 3D repeat surveys show that the CO2 is being confined within the aquifer, implying that there is no leakage into the caprock at the time of the repeat surveys. The same observation was obtained from the 3D dataset.

  13. 3D Surgical Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Cevidanes, Lucia; Tucker, Scott; Styner, Martin; Kim, Hyungmin; Chapuis, Jonas; Reyes, Mauricio; Proffit, William; Turvey, Timothy; Jaskolka, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of methods for computer-aided jaw surgery. Computer-aided jaw surgery allows us to incorporate the high level of precision necessary for transferring virtual plans into the operating room. We also present a complete computer-aided surgery (CAS) system developed in close collaboration with surgeons. Surgery planning and simulation include construction of 3D surface models from Cone-beam CT (CBCT), dynamic cephalometry, semi-automatic mirroring, interactive cutting of bone and bony segment repositioning. A virtual setup can be used to manufacture positioning splints for intra-operative guidance. The system provides further intra-operative assistance with the help of a computer display showing jaw positions and 3D positioning guides updated in real-time during the surgical procedure. The CAS system aids in dealing with complex cases with benefits for the patient, with surgical practice, and for orthodontic finishing. Advanced software tools for diagnosis and treatment planning allow preparation of detailed operative plans, osteotomy repositioning, bone reconstructions, surgical resident training and assessing the difficulties of the surgical procedures prior to the surgery. CAS has the potential to make the elaboration of the surgical plan a more flexible process, increase the level of detail and accuracy of the plan, yield higher operative precision and control, and enhance documentation of cases. Supported by NIDCR DE017727, and DE018962 PMID:20816308

  14. Martian terrain - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    An area of rocky terrain near the landing site of the Sagan Memorial Station can be seen in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. This image is part of a 3D 'monster' panorama of the area surrounding the landing site.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  15. Visual search is influenced by 3D spatial layout.

    PubMed

    Finlayson, Nonie J; Grove, Philip M

    2015-10-01

    Many activities necessitate the deployment of attention to specific distances and directions in our three-dimensional (3D) environment. However, most research on how attention is deployed is conducted with two dimensional (2D) computer displays, leaving a large gap in our understanding about the deployment of attention in 3D space. We report how each of four parameters of 3D visual space influence visual search: 3D display volume, distance in depth, number of depth planes, and relative target position in depth. Using a search task, we find that visual search performance depends on 3D volume, relative target position in depth, and number of depth planes. Our results demonstrate an asymmetrical preference for targets in the front of a display unique to 3D search and show that arranging items into more depth planes reduces search efficiency. Consistent with research using 2D displays, we found slower response times to find targets in displays with larger 3D volumes compared with smaller 3D volumes. Finally, in contrast to the importance of target depth relative to other distractors, target depth relative to the fixation point did not affect response times or search efficiency.

  16. Pathways for Learning from 3D Technology

    PubMed Central

    Carrier, L. Mark; Rab, Saira S.; Rosen, Larry D.; Vasquez, Ludivina; Cheever, Nancy A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to find out if 3D stereoscopic presentation of information in a movie format changes a viewer's experience of the movie content. Four possible pathways from 3D presentation to memory and learning were considered: a direct connection based on cognitive neuroscience research; a connection through "immersion" in that 3D presentations could provide additional sensorial cues (e.g., depth cues) that lead to a higher sense of being surrounded by the stimulus; a connection through general interest such that 3D presentation increases a viewer’s interest that leads to greater attention paid to the stimulus (e.g., "involvement"); and a connection through discomfort, with the 3D goggles causing discomfort that interferes with involvement and thus with memory. The memories of 396 participants who viewed two-dimensional (2D) or 3D movies at movie theaters in Southern California were tested. Within three days of viewing a movie, participants filled out an online anonymous questionnaire that queried them about their movie content memories, subjective movie-going experiences (including emotional reactions and "presence") and demographic backgrounds. The responses to the questionnaire were subjected to path analyses in which several different links between 3D presentation to memory (and other variables) were explored. The results showed there were no effects of 3D presentation, either directly or indirectly, upon memory. However, the largest effects of 3D presentation were on emotions and immersion, with 3D presentation leading to reduced positive emotions, increased negative emotions and lowered immersion, compared to 2D presentations. PMID:28078331

  17. Design of monocular multiview stereoscopic 3D display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Kunio; Saruta, Kazuki; Takeda, Kazutoki

    2001-06-01

    A 3D head mounted display (HMD) system is useful for constructing a virtual space. The authors have developed a 3D HMD system using the monocular stereoscopic display. This paper shows that the 3D vision system using the monocular stereoscopic display and capturing camera builds a 3D virtual space for a telemanipulation using a captured real 3D image. In this paper, we propose the monocular stereoscopic 3D display and capturing camera for a tele- manipulation system. In addition, we describe the result of depth estimation using the multi-focus retinal images.

  18. Nonlaser-based 3D surface imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Shin-yee; Johnson, R.K.; Sherwood, R.J.

    1994-11-15

    3D surface imaging refers to methods that generate a 3D surface representation of objects of a scene under viewing. Laser-based 3D surface imaging systems are commonly used in manufacturing, robotics and biomedical research. Although laser-based systems provide satisfactory solutions for most applications, there are situations where non laser-based approaches are preferred. The issues that make alternative methods sometimes more attractive are: (1) real-time data capturing, (2) eye-safety, (3) portability, and (4) work distance. The focus of this presentation is on generating a 3D surface from multiple 2D projected images using CCD cameras, without a laser light source. Two methods are presented: stereo vision and depth-from-focus. Their applications are described.

  19. What is 3D good for? A review of human performance on stereoscopic 3D displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntire, John P.; Havig, Paul R.; Geiselman, Eric E.

    2012-06-01

    This work reviews the human factors-related literature on the task performance implications of stereoscopic 3D displays, in order to point out the specific performance benefits (or lack thereof) one might reasonably expect to observe when utilizing these displays. What exactly is 3D good for? Relative to traditional 2D displays, stereoscopic displays have been shown to enhance performance on a variety of depth-related tasks. These tasks include judging absolute and relative distances, finding and identifying objects (by breaking camouflage and eliciting perceptual "pop-out"), performing spatial manipulations of objects (object positioning, orienting, and tracking), and navigating. More cognitively, stereoscopic displays can improve the spatial understanding of 3D scenes or objects, improve memory/recall of scenes or objects, and improve learning of spatial relationships and environments. However, for tasks that are relatively simple, that do not strictly require depth information for good performance, where other strong cues to depth can be utilized, or for depth tasks that lie outside the effective viewing volume of the display, the purported performance benefits of 3D may be small or altogether absent. Stereoscopic 3D displays come with a host of unique human factors problems including the simulator-sickness-type symptoms of eyestrain, headache, fatigue, disorientation, nausea, and malaise, which appear to effect large numbers of viewers (perhaps as many as 25% to 50% of the general population). Thus, 3D technology should be wielded delicately and applied carefully; and perhaps used only as is necessary to ensure good performance.

  20. Medical 3D Printing for the Radiologist.

    PubMed

    Mitsouras, Dimitris; Liacouras, Peter; Imanzadeh, Amir; Giannopoulos, Andreas A; Cai, Tianrun; Kumamaru, Kanako K; George, Elizabeth; Wake, Nicole; Caterson, Edward J; Pomahac, Bohdan; Ho, Vincent B; Grant, Gerald T; Rybicki, Frank J

    2015-01-01

    While use of advanced visualization in radiology is instrumental in diagnosis and communication with referring clinicians, there is an unmet need to render Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) images as three-dimensional (3D) printed models capable of providing both tactile feedback and tangible depth information about anatomic and pathologic states. Three-dimensional printed models, already entrenched in the nonmedical sciences, are rapidly being embraced in medicine as well as in the lay community. Incorporating 3D printing from images generated and interpreted by radiologists presents particular challenges, including training, materials and equipment, and guidelines. The overall costs of a 3D printing laboratory must be balanced by the clinical benefits. It is expected that the number of 3D-printed models generated from DICOM images for planning interventions and fabricating implants will grow exponentially. Radiologists should at a minimum be familiar with 3D printing as it relates to their field, including types of 3D printing technologies and materials used to create 3D-printed anatomic models, published applications of models to date, and clinical benefits in radiology. Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  1. Medical 3D Printing for the Radiologist

    PubMed Central

    Mitsouras, Dimitris; Liacouras, Peter; Imanzadeh, Amir; Giannopoulos, Andreas A.; Cai, Tianrun; Kumamaru, Kanako K.; George, Elizabeth; Wake, Nicole; Caterson, Edward J.; Pomahac, Bohdan; Ho, Vincent B.; Grant, Gerald T.

    2015-01-01

    While use of advanced visualization in radiology is instrumental in diagnosis and communication with referring clinicians, there is an unmet need to render Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) images as three-dimensional (3D) printed models capable of providing both tactile feedback and tangible depth information about anatomic and pathologic states. Three-dimensional printed models, already entrenched in the nonmedical sciences, are rapidly being embraced in medicine as well as in the lay community. Incorporating 3D printing from images generated and interpreted by radiologists presents particular challenges, including training, materials and equipment, and guidelines. The overall costs of a 3D printing laboratory must be balanced by the clinical benefits. It is expected that the number of 3D-printed models generated from DICOM images for planning interventions and fabricating implants will grow exponentially. Radiologists should at a minimum be familiar with 3D printing as it relates to their field, including types of 3D printing technologies and materials used to create 3D-printed anatomic models, published applications of models to date, and clinical benefits in radiology. Online supplemental material is available for this article. ©RSNA, 2015 PMID:26562233

  2. 3D field harmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Helm, M.; Laslett, L.J.

    1991-03-30

    We have developed an harmonic representation for the three dimensional field components within the windings of accelerator magnets. The form by which the field is presented is suitable for interfacing with other codes that make use of the 3D field components (particle tracking and stability). The field components can be calculated with high precision and reduced cup time at any location (r,{theta},z) inside the magnet bore. The same conductor geometry which is used to simulate line currents is also used in CAD with modifications more readily available. It is our hope that the format used here for magnetic fields can be used not only as a means of delivering fields but also as a way by which beam dynamics can suggest correction to the conductor geometry. 5 refs., 70 figs.

  3. Volumetric 3D display using a DLP projection engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Jason

    2012-03-01

    In this article, we describe a volumetric 3D display system based on the high speed DLPTM (Digital Light Processing) projection engine. Existing two-dimensional (2D) flat screen displays often lead to ambiguity and confusion in high-dimensional data/graphics presentation due to lack of true depth cues. Even with the help of powerful 3D rendering software, three-dimensional (3D) objects displayed on a 2D flat screen may still fail to provide spatial relationship or depth information correctly and effectively. Essentially, 2D displays have to rely upon capability of human brain to piece together a 3D representation from 2D images. Despite the impressive mental capability of human visual system, its visual perception is not reliable if certain depth cues are missing. In contrast, volumetric 3D display technologies to be discussed in this article are capable of displaying 3D volumetric images in true 3D space. Each "voxel" on a 3D image (analogous to a pixel in 2D image) locates physically at the spatial position where it is supposed to be, and emits light from that position toward omni-directions to form a real 3D image in 3D space. Such a volumetric 3D display provides both physiological depth cues and psychological depth cues to human visual system to truthfully perceive 3D objects. It yields a realistic spatial representation of 3D objects and simplifies our understanding to the complexity of 3D objects and spatial relationship among them.

  4. Development of 3D video and 3D data services for T-DMB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Kugjin; Lee, Hyun; Hur, Namho; Kim, Jinwoong

    2008-02-01

    In this paper, we present motivation, system concept, and implementation details of stereoscopic 3D visual services on T-DMB. We have developed two types of 3D visual service : one is '3D video service', which provides 3D depth feeling for a video program by sending left and right view video streams, and the other is '3D data service', which provides presentation of 3D objects overlaid on top of 2D video program. We have developed several highly efficient and sophisticated transmission schemes for the delivery of 3D visual data in order to meet the system requirements such as (1) minimization of bitrate overhead to comply with the strict constraint of T-DMB channel bandwidth; (2) backward and forward compatibility with existing T-DMB; (3) maximize the eye-catching effect of 3D visual representation while reducing eye fatigue. We found that, in contrast to conventional way of providing a stereo version of a program as a whole, the proposed scheme can lead to variety of efficient and effective 3D visual services which can be adapted to many business models.

  5. Planetary Torque in 3D Isentropic Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, Jeffrey; Masset, Frédéric; Lega, Elena; Velasco, David

    2017-03-01

    Planetary migration is inherently a three-dimensional (3D) problem, because Earth-size planetary cores are deeply embedded in protoplanetary disks. Simulations of these 3D disks remain challenging due to the steep resolution requirements. Using two different hydrodynamics codes, FARGO3D and PEnGUIn, we simulate disk–planet interaction for a one to five Earth-mass planet embedded in an isentropic disk. We measure the torque on the planet and ensure that the measurements are converged both in resolution and between the two codes. We find that the torque is independent of the smoothing length of the planet’s potential (r s), and that it has a weak dependence on the adiabatic index of the gaseous disk (γ). The torque values correspond to an inward migration rate qualitatively similar to previous linear calculations. We perform additional simulations with explicit radiative transfer using FARGOCA, and again find agreement between 3D simulations and existing torque formulae. We also present the flow pattern around the planets that show active flow is present within the planet’s Hill sphere, and meridional vortices are shed downstream. The vertical flow speed near the planet is faster for a smaller r s or γ, up to supersonic speeds for the smallest r s and γ in our study.

  6. Intraoral 3D scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühmstedt, Peter; Bräuer-Burchardt, Christian; Munkelt, Christoph; Heinze, Matthias; Palme, Martin; Schmidt, Ingo; Hintersehr, Josef; Notni, Gunther

    2007-09-01

    Here a new set-up of a 3D-scanning system for CAD/CAM in dental industry is proposed. The system is designed for direct scanning of the dental preparations within the mouth. The measuring process is based on phase correlation technique in combination with fast fringe projection in a stereo arrangement. The novelty in the approach is characterized by the following features: A phase correlation between the phase values of the images of two cameras is used for the co-ordinate calculation. This works contrary to the usage of only phase values (phasogrammetry) or classical triangulation (phase values and camera image co-ordinate values) for the determination of the co-ordinates. The main advantage of the method is that the absolute value of the phase at each point does not directly determine the coordinate. Thus errors in the determination of the co-ordinates are prevented. Furthermore, using the epipolar geometry of the stereo-like arrangement the phase unwrapping problem of fringe analysis can be solved. The endoscope like measurement system contains one projection and two camera channels for illumination and observation of the object, respectively. The new system has a measurement field of nearly 25mm × 15mm. The user can measure two or three teeth at one time. So the system can by used for scanning of single tooth up to bridges preparations. In the paper the first realization of the intraoral scanner is described.

  7. Prominent rocks - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Many prominent rocks near the Sagan Memorial Station are featured in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. Wedge is at lower left; Shark, Half-Dome, and Pumpkin are at center. Flat Top, about four inches high, is at lower right. The horizon in the distance is one to two kilometers away.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  8. Compressible magma/mantle dynamics: 3-D, adaptive simulations in ASPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dannberg, Juliane; Heister, Timo

    2016-12-01

    Melt generation and migration are an important link between surface processes and the thermal and chemical evolution of the Earth's interior. However, their vastly different timescales make it difficult to study mantle convection and melt migration in a unified framework, especially for 3-D global models. And although experiments suggest an increase in melt volume of up to 20 per cent from the depth of melt generation to the surface, previous computations have neglected the individual compressibilities of the solid and the fluid phase. Here, we describe our extension of the finite element mantle convection code ASPECT that adds melt generation and migration. We use the original compressible formulation of the McKenzie equations, augmented by an equation for the conservation of energy. Applying adaptive mesh refinement to this type of problems is particularly advantageous, as the resolution can be increased in areas where melt is present and viscosity gradients are high, whereas a lower resolution is sufficient in regions without melt. Together with a high-performance, massively parallel implementation, this allows for high-resolution, 3-D, compressible, global mantle convection simulations coupled with melt migration. We evaluate the functionality and potential of this method using a series of benchmarks and model setups, compare results of the compressible and incompressible formulation, and show the effectiveness of adaptive mesh refinement when applied to melt migration. Our model of magma dynamics provides a framework for modelling processes on different scales and investigating links between processes occurring in the deep mantle and melt generation and migration. This approach could prove particularly useful applied to modelling the generation of komatiites or other melts originating in greater depths. The implementation is available in the Open Source ASPECT repository.

  9. Auto convergence for stereoscopic 3D cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Buyue; Kothandaraman, Sreenivas; Batur, Aziz Umit

    2012-03-01

    Viewing comfort is an important concern for 3-D capable consumer electronics such as 3-D cameras and TVs. Consumer generated content is typically viewed at a close distance which makes the vergence-accommodation conflict particularly pronounced, causing discomfort and eye fatigue. In this paper, we present a Stereo Auto Convergence (SAC) algorithm for consumer 3-D cameras that reduces the vergence-accommodation conflict on the 3-D display by adjusting the depth of the scene automatically. Our algorithm processes stereo video in realtime and shifts each stereo frame horizontally by an appropriate amount to converge on the chosen object in that frame. The algorithm starts by estimating disparities between the left and right image pairs using correlations of the vertical projections of the image data. The estimated disparities are then analyzed by the algorithm to select a point of convergence. The current and target disparities of the chosen convergence point determines how much horizontal shift is needed. A disparity safety check is then performed to determine whether or not the maximum and minimum disparity limits would be exceeded after auto convergence. If the limits would be exceeded, further adjustments are made to satisfy the safety limits. Finally, desired convergence is achieved by shifting the left and the right frames accordingly. Our algorithm runs real-time at 30 fps on a TI OMAP4 processor. It is tested using an OMAP4 embedded prototype stereo 3-D camera. It significantly improves 3-D viewing comfort.

  10. The rendering context for stereoscopic 3D web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qinshui; Wang, Wenmin; Wang, Ronggang

    2014-03-01

    3D technologies on the Web has been studied for many years, but they are basically monoscopic 3D. With the stereoscopic technology gradually maturing, we are researching to integrate the binocular 3D technology into the Web, creating a stereoscopic 3D browser that will provide users with a brand new experience of human-computer interaction. In this paper, we propose a novel approach to apply stereoscopy technologies to the CSS3 3D Transforms. Under our model, each element can create or participate in a stereoscopic 3D rendering context, in which 3D Transforms such as scaling, translation and rotation, can be applied and be perceived in a truly 3D space. We first discuss the underlying principles of stereoscopy. After that we discuss how these principles can be applied to the Web. A stereoscopic 3D browser with backward compatibility is also created for demonstration purposes. We take advantage of the open-source WebKit project, integrating the 3D display ability into the rendering engine of the web browser. For each 3D web page, our 3D browser will create two slightly different images, each representing the left-eye view and right-eye view, both to be combined on the 3D display to generate the illusion of depth. And as the result turns out, elements can be manipulated in a truly 3D space.

  11. 3D integral imaging with optical processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Corral, Manuel; Martínez-Cuenca, Raúl; Saavedra, Genaro; Javidi, Bahram

    2008-04-01

    Integral imaging (InI) systems are imaging devices that provide auto-stereoscopic images of 3D intensity objects. Since the birth of this new technology, InI systems have faced satisfactorily many of their initial drawbacks. Basically, two kind of procedures have been used: digital and optical procedures. The "3D Imaging and Display Group" at the University of Valencia, with the essential collaboration of Prof. Javidi, has centered its efforts in the 3D InI with optical processing. Among other achievements, our Group has proposed the annular amplitude modulation for enlargement of the depth of field, dynamic focusing for reduction of the facet-braiding effect, or the TRES and MATRES devices to enlarge the viewing angle.

  12. 3D object recognition based on local descriptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakab, Marek; Benesova, Wanda; Racev, Marek

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an enhanced method of 3D object description and recognition based on local descriptors using RGB image and depth information (D) acquired by Kinect sensor. Our main contribution is focused on an extension of the SIFT feature vector by the 3D information derived from the depth map (SIFT-D). We also propose a novel local depth descriptor (DD) that includes a 3D description of the key point neighborhood. Thus defined the 3D descriptor can then enter the decision-making process. Two different approaches have been proposed, tested and evaluated in this paper. First approach deals with the object recognition system using the original SIFT descriptor in combination with our novel proposed 3D descriptor, where the proposed 3D descriptor is responsible for the pre-selection of the objects. Second approach demonstrates the object recognition using an extension of the SIFT feature vector by the local depth description. In this paper, we present the results of two experiments for the evaluation of the proposed depth descriptors. The results show an improvement in accuracy of the recognition system that includes the 3D local description compared with the same system without the 3D local description. Our experimental system of object recognition is working near real-time.

  13. Salt distribution in the Louisiana South Additions area from 3D seismic data

    SciTech Connect

    Jamieson, G.A.

    1996-12-31

    This paper outlines some preliminary observations based on a large interpretation project that was carried out with a grid of 3D time migrated seismic data, covering over 7,500 mi{sup 2} of the South Additions region of offshore Louisiana. Depth migrated data, covering a smaller subset of the study area, was also utilized in the interpretation. Top and base of salt were interpreted and the resulting maps have identified patterns of salt and weld geometry that show some regional trends. Historically, 2D time migrated seismic has been the primary dataset of most of the published regional salt studies. This paper focuses on areas where 3D time migrated data potentially shows most improvement over 2D data, specifically in the subsalt regions. In particular, relationships between base-of-salt keels, welds, basins, regional faulting and basement architecture are investigated. A generalized model is outlined to help explain the current salt geometry in the study area and comparisons are made with recently published salt evolution models.

  14. A 3D Seismic Case: Shooting around a CCS Drill Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.

    2013-12-01

    The reduction of carbon dioxide emission to lessen the global warming has become an important international issue in recent years. The CCS technique (Carbon-dioxide Capture and Storage) is among the most recommended methods. The capture of CO2 during its manufacturing process in the electric power plant and storing in the adjacent area is considered to be an economical and feasible choice. This research uses the 2D and 3D high-resolution seismic reflection method to investigate possible CCS sites along the coast in Taiwan. The site is near an electric power plant and is planned to be a CCS experiment laboratory. The main objective is to detect the proper geologic structure and to prepare the baseline data for the future CO2 monitoring. The size of the high-resolution method applied in this study is much smaller than that used in the oil exploration. The obtained high quality and high resolution data can resolve very detailed structures. The survey parameters in 2D are 4m interval, 240 channels. The bin size in 3D seismic is 8m x 4m, 288 channels. Both 2D and 3D used the Minivibe as a source with 40Hz geophones, and having an average of 30 folds. The 3D seismic survey was conducted around the planned drill site. A surrounding type of 3D data acquisition was taken with sources at outside and receivers at the center. Such a deployment design is quite suitable for the drill site investigation. The structural layer as thin as 4m is able to be detected even under a depth of 3000m. Such a high resolution allows us not only to estimate the structure, but also able to monitor the migration of CO 2 after storage. The results of seismic survey after comparing with a nearby borehole data show that : 1) the caprock is Chinshui shale which is at a depth of 880m to 1000m with a thickness about 120m, 2) the Nanchuang formation and Kueichulin formation with high porosity can be proper reservoir layers which are located at the depth between 1000m to 1700m. In conclusion, this site

  15. Automated Serial Sectioning for 3D Reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alkemper, Jen; Voorhees, Peter W.

    2003-01-01

    Some aspects of an apparatus and method for automated serial sectioning of a specimen of a solder, aluminum, or other relatively soft opaque material are discussed. The apparatus includes a small milling machine (micromiller) that takes precise, shallow cuts (increments of depth as small as 1 micron) to expose successive sections. A microscope equipped with an electronic camera, mounted in a fixed position on the micromiller, takes pictures of the newly exposed specimen surface at each increment of depth. The images are digitized, and the resulting data are subsequently processed to reconstruct three-dimensional (3D) features of the specimen.

  16. Multiple footprint stereo algorithms for 3D display content generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boughorbel, Faysal

    2007-02-01

    This research focuses on the conversion of stereoscopic video material into an image + depth format which is suitable for rendering on the multiview auto-stereoscopic displays of Philips. The recent interest shown in the movie industry for 3D significantly increased the availability of stereo material. In this context the conversion from stereo to the input formats of 3D displays becomes an important task. In this paper we present a stereo algorithm that uses multiple footprints generating several depth candidates for each image pixel. We characterize the various matching windows and we devise a robust strategy for extracting high quality estimates from the resulting depth candidates. The proposed algorithm is based on a surface filtering method that employs simultaneously the available depth estimates in a small local neighborhood while ensuring correct depth discontinuities by the inclusion of image constraints. The resulting highquality image-aligned depth maps proved an excellent match with our 3D displays.

  17. 3D Spectroscopy in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mediavilla, Evencio; Arribas, Santiago; Roth, Martin; Cepa-Nogué, Jordi; Sánchez, Francisco

    2011-09-01

    Preface; Acknowledgements; 1. Introductory review and technical approaches Martin M. Roth; 2. Observational procedures and data reduction James E. H. Turner; 3. 3D Spectroscopy instrumentation M. A. Bershady; 4. Analysis of 3D data Pierre Ferruit; 5. Science motivation for IFS and galactic studies F. Eisenhauer; 6. Extragalactic studies and future IFS science Luis Colina; 7. Tutorials: how to handle 3D spectroscopy data Sebastian F. Sánchez, Begona García-Lorenzo and Arlette Pécontal-Rousset.

  18. Spherical 3D isotropic wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanusse, F.; Rassat, A.; Starck, J.-L.

    2012-04-01

    Context. Future cosmological surveys will provide 3D large scale structure maps with large sky coverage, for which a 3D spherical Fourier-Bessel (SFB) analysis in spherical coordinates is natural. Wavelets are particularly well-suited to the analysis and denoising of cosmological data, but a spherical 3D isotropic wavelet transform does not currently exist to analyse spherical 3D data. Aims: The aim of this paper is to present a new formalism for a spherical 3D isotropic wavelet, i.e. one based on the SFB decomposition of a 3D field and accompany the formalism with a public code to perform wavelet transforms. Methods: We describe a new 3D isotropic spherical wavelet decomposition based on the undecimated wavelet transform (UWT) described in Starck et al. (2006). We also present a new fast discrete spherical Fourier-Bessel transform (DSFBT) based on both a discrete Bessel transform and the HEALPIX angular pixelisation scheme. We test the 3D wavelet transform and as a toy-application, apply a denoising algorithm in wavelet space to the Virgo large box cosmological simulations and find we can successfully remove noise without much loss to the large scale structure. Results: We have described a new spherical 3D isotropic wavelet transform, ideally suited to analyse and denoise future 3D spherical cosmological surveys, which uses a novel DSFBT. We illustrate its potential use for denoising using a toy model. All the algorithms presented in this paper are available for download as a public code called MRS3D at http://jstarck.free.fr/mrs3d.html

  19. 3D Elevation Program—Virtual USA in 3D

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lukas, Vicki; Stoker, J.M.

    2016-04-14

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) uses a laser system called ‘lidar’ (light detection and ranging) to create a virtual reality map of the Nation that is very accurate. 3D maps have many uses with new uses being discovered all the time.  

  20. Azimuthally Anisotropic 3D Velocity Continuation

    DOE PAGES

    Burnett, William; Fomel, Sergey

    2011-01-01

    We extend time-domain velocity continuation to the zero-offset 3D azimuthally anisotropic case. Velocity continuation describes how a seismic image changes given a change in migration velocity. This description turns out to be of a wave propagation process, in which images change along a velocity axis. In the anisotropic case, the velocity model is multiparameter. Therefore, anisotropic image propagation is multidimensional. We use a three-parameter slowness model, which is related to azimuthal variations in velocity, as well as their principal directions. This information is useful for fracture and reservoir characterization from seismic data. We provide synthetic diffraction imaging examples to illustratemore » the concept and potential applications of azimuthal velocity continuation and to analyze the impulse response of the 3D velocity continuation operator.« less

  1. 3-D seismic imaging of complex geologies

    SciTech Connect

    Womble, D.E.; Dosanjh, S.S.; VanDyke, J.P.; Oldfield, R.A.; Greenberg, D.S.

    1995-02-01

    We present three codes for the Intel Paragon that address the problem of three-dimensional seismic imaging of complex geologies. The first code models acoustic wave propagation and can be used to generate data sets to calibrate and validate seismic imaging codes. This code reported the fastest timings for acoustic wave propagation codes at a recent SEG (Society of Exploration Geophysicists) meeting. The second code implements a Kirchhoff method for pre-stack depth migration. Development of this code is almost complete, and preliminary results are presented. The third code implements a wave equation approach to seismic migration and is a Paragon implementation of a code from the ARCO Seismic Benchmark Suite.

  2. Velocity-depth model estimation for a subsalt target from the Southern Gas Basin of the North Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Yilmaz, O.; Rutledge, J.; Sandvin, O.; Godfrey, B. )

    1996-01-01

    The Southern Gas Basin of the North Sea has been subjected to extensional tectonics, primarily in the east-west direction. Subsequent occurrence of the salt diapirism gave rise to the presence of complex structures. By doing a depth-domain analysis of a 3-D seismic survey data from an area in the Southern Gas Basin, we delineated the structural geometry of the top Rotliegendes formation beneath the complex Zechstein diapiric formation. This required an accurate estimate of the velocity-depth model above the Zechstein diapiric formation and removal of its deleterious effect on the underlying Permian sands of Rotliegendes and deeper targets. We conducted a layer-by-layer depth-domain analysis, and used coherency inversion to estimate layer velocities and 3-D poststack depth migration to delineate reflector geometries down to top Zechstein. We verified the accuracy of the velocity-depth model for the overburden above Zechstein by analyzing image gathers from prestack depth migration. We then analyzed constant-half-space image-gather stacks to estimate velocities for the substratum including Zechstein and the underlying Carboniferous sequence. Finally, we performed 3-D prestack depth migration to delineate the base Zechstein - top Rotliegendes geometry. This study demonstrates the need for depth-domain analysis of seismic data to derive accurate structure maps for targets beneath complex structures associated with salt and overthrust tectonics. The final output from depth-domain analysis -- a velocity-depth model, can then be used as a canvas for a reservoir model.

  3. Velocity-depth model estimation for a subsalt target from the Southern Gas Basin of the North Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Yilmaz, O.; Rutledge, J.; Sandvin, O.; Godfrey, B.

    1996-12-31

    The Southern Gas Basin of the North Sea has been subjected to extensional tectonics, primarily in the east-west direction. Subsequent occurrence of the salt diapirism gave rise to the presence of complex structures. By doing a depth-domain analysis of a 3-D seismic survey data from an area in the Southern Gas Basin, we delineated the structural geometry of the top Rotliegendes formation beneath the complex Zechstein diapiric formation. This required an accurate estimate of the velocity-depth model above the Zechstein diapiric formation and removal of its deleterious effect on the underlying Permian sands of Rotliegendes and deeper targets. We conducted a layer-by-layer depth-domain analysis, and used coherency inversion to estimate layer velocities and 3-D poststack depth migration to delineate reflector geometries down to top Zechstein. We verified the accuracy of the velocity-depth model for the overburden above Zechstein by analyzing image gathers from prestack depth migration. We then analyzed constant-half-space image-gather stacks to estimate velocities for the substratum including Zechstein and the underlying Carboniferous sequence. Finally, we performed 3-D prestack depth migration to delineate the base Zechstein - top Rotliegendes geometry. This study demonstrates the need for depth-domain analysis of seismic data to derive accurate structure maps for targets beneath complex structures associated with salt and overthrust tectonics. The final output from depth-domain analysis -- a velocity-depth model, can then be used as a canvas for a reservoir model.

  4. 3D Buckligami: Digital Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hecke, Martin; de Reus, Koen; Florijn, Bastiaan; Coulais, Corentin

    2014-03-01

    We present a class of elastic structures which exhibit collective buckling in 3D, and create these by a 3D printing/moulding technique. Our structures consist of cubic lattice of anisotropic unit cells, and we show that their mechanical properties are programmable via the orientation of these unit cells.

  5. LLNL-Earth3D

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-01

    Earth3D is a computer code designed to allow fast calculation of seismic rays and travel times through a 3D model of the Earth. LLNL is using this for earthquake location and global tomography efforts and such codes are of great interest to the Earth Science community.

  6. Market study: 3-D eyetracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A market study of a proposed version of a 3-D eyetracker for initial use at NASA's Ames Research Center was made. The commercialization potential of a simplified, less expensive 3-D eyetracker was ascertained. Primary focus on present and potential users of eyetrackers, as well as present and potential manufacturers has provided an effective means of analyzing the prospects for commercialization.

  7. Euro3D Science Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, J. R.

    2004-02-01

    The Euro3D RTN is an EU funded Research Training Network to foster the exploitation of 3D spectroscopy in Europe. 3D spectroscopy is a general term for spectroscopy of an area of the sky and derives its name from its two spatial + one spectral dimensions. There are an increasing number of instruments which use integral field devices to achieve spectroscopy of an area of the sky, either using lens arrays, optical fibres or image slicers, to pack spectra of multiple pixels on the sky (``spaxels'') onto a 2D detector. On account of the large volume of data and the special methods required to reduce and analyse 3D data, there are only a few centres of expertise and these are mostly involved with instrument developments. There is a perceived lack of expertise in 3D spectroscopy spread though the astronomical community and its use in the armoury of the observational astronomer is viewed as being highly specialised. For precisely this reason the Euro3D RTN was proposed to train young researchers in this area and develop user tools to widen the experience with this particular type of data in Europe. The Euro3D RTN is coordinated by Martin M. Roth (Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam) and has been running since July 2002. The first Euro3D science conference was held in Cambridge, UK from 22 to 23 May 2003. The main emphasis of the conference was, in keeping with the RTN, to expose the work of the young post-docs who are funded by the RTN. In addition the team members from the eleven European institutes involved in Euro3D also presented instrumental and observational developments. The conference was organized by Andy Bunker and held at the Institute of Astronomy. There were over thirty participants and 26 talks covered the whole range of application of 3D techniques. The science ranged from Galactic planetary nebulae and globular clusters to kinematics of nearby galaxies out to objects at high redshift. Several talks were devoted to reporting recent observations with newly

  8. 3D printing in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Dawood, A; Marti Marti, B; Sauret-Jackson, V; Darwood, A

    2015-12-01

    3D printing has been hailed as a disruptive technology which will change manufacturing. Used in aerospace, defence, art and design, 3D printing is becoming a subject of great interest in surgery. The technology has a particular resonance with dentistry, and with advances in 3D imaging and modelling technologies such as cone beam computed tomography and intraoral scanning, and with the relatively long history of the use of CAD CAM technologies in dentistry, it will become of increasing importance. Uses of 3D printing include the production of drill guides for dental implants, the production of physical models for prosthodontics, orthodontics and surgery, the manufacture of dental, craniomaxillofacial and orthopaedic implants, and the fabrication of copings and frameworks for implant and dental restorations. This paper reviews the types of 3D printing technologies available and their various applications in dentistry and in maxillofacial surgery.

  9. PLOT3D user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walatka, Pamela P.; Buning, Pieter G.; Pierce, Larry; Elson, Patricia A.

    1990-01-01

    PLOT3D is a computer graphics program designed to visualize the grids and solutions of computational fluid dynamics. Seventy-four functions are available. Versions are available for many systems. PLOT3D can handle multiple grids with a million or more grid points, and can produce varieties of model renderings, such as wireframe or flat shaded. Output from PLOT3D can be used in animation programs. The first part of this manual is a tutorial that takes the reader, keystroke by keystroke, through a PLOT3D session. The second part of the manual contains reference chapters, including the helpfile, data file formats, advice on changing PLOT3D, and sample command files.

  10. Towards Single Cell Traction Microscopy within 3D Collagen Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Matthew S.; Long, Rong; Feng, Xinzeng; Huang, YuLing; Hui, Chung-Yuen; Wu, Mingming

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical interaction between the cell and its extracellular matrix (ECM) regulates cellular behaviors, including proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, and migration. Cells require the three dimensional (3D) architectural support of the ECM to perform physiologically realistic functions. However, current understanding of cell-ECM and cell-cell mechanical interactions is largely derived from 2D cell traction force microscopy, in which cells are cultured on a flat substrate. 3D cell traction microscopy is emerging for mapping traction fields of single animal cells embedded in either synthetic or natively derived fibrous gels. We discuss here the development of 3D cell traction microscopy, its current limitations, and perspectives on the future of this technology. Emphasis is placed on strategies for applying 3D cell traction microscopy to individual tumor cells migration within collagen gels. PMID:23806281

  11. Unassisted 3D camera calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanassov, Kalin; Ramachandra, Vikas; Nash, James; Goma, Sergio R.

    2012-03-01

    With the rapid growth of 3D technology, 3D image capture has become a critical part of the 3D feature set on mobile phones. 3D image quality is affected by the scene geometry as well as on-the-device processing. An automatic 3D system usually assumes known camera poses accomplished by factory calibration using a special chart. In real life settings, pose parameters estimated by factory calibration can be negatively impacted by movements of the lens barrel due to shaking, focusing, or camera drop. If any of these factors displaces the optical axes of either or both cameras, vertical disparity might exceed the maximum tolerable margin and the 3D user may experience eye strain or headaches. To make 3D capture more practical, one needs to consider unassisted (on arbitrary scenes) calibration. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that relies on detection and matching of keypoints between left and right images. Frames containing erroneous matches, along with frames with insufficiently rich keypoint constellations, are detected and discarded. Roll, pitch yaw , and scale differences between left and right frames are then estimated. The algorithm performance is evaluated in terms of the remaining vertical disparity as compared to the maximum tolerable vertical disparity.

  12. 3D Scan Systems Integration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    AGENCY USE ONLY (Leave Blank) 2. REPORT DATE 5 Feb 98 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 3D Scan Systems Integration REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED...2-89) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39-1 298-102 [ EDO QUALITY W3PECTEDI DLA-ARN Final Report for US Defense Logistics Agency on DDFG-T2/P3: 3D...SCAN SYSTEMS INTEGRATION Contract Number SPO100-95-D-1014 Contractor Ohio University Delivery Order # 0001 Delivery Order Title 3D Scan Systems

  13. Visualizing realistic 3D urban environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Aaron; Chen, Tuolin; Brunig, Michael; Schmidt, Hauke

    2003-05-01

    Visualizing complex urban environments has been an active research topic due to its wide variety of applications in city planning: road construction, emergency facilities planning, and optimal placement of wireless carrier base stations. Traditional 2D visualizations have been around for a long time but they only provide a schematic line-drawing bird's eye view and are sometimes confusing to understand due to the lack of depth information. Early versions of 3D systems have been developed for very expensive graphics workstations which seriously limited the availability. In this paper we describe a 3D visualization system for a desktop PC which integrates multiple resolutions of data and provides a realistic view of the urban environment.

  14. Illustrative visualization of 3D city models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doellner, Juergen; Buchholz, Henrik; Nienhaus, Marc; Kirsch, Florian

    2005-03-01

    This paper presents an illustrative visualization technique that provides expressive representations of large-scale 3D city models, inspired by the tradition of artistic and cartographic visualizations typically found in bird"s-eye view and panoramic maps. We define a collection of city model components and a real-time multi-pass rendering algorithm that achieves comprehensible, abstract 3D city model depictions based on edge enhancement, color-based and shadow-based depth cues, and procedural facade texturing. Illustrative visualization provides an effective visual interface to urban spatial information and associated thematic information complementing visual interfaces based on the Virtual Reality paradigm, offering a huge potential for graphics design. Primary application areas include city and landscape planning, cartoon worlds in computer games, and tourist information systems.

  15. 3D polymer scaffold arrays.

    PubMed

    Simon, Carl G; Yang, Yanyin; Dorsey, Shauna M; Ramalingam, Murugan; Chatterjee, Kaushik

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a combinatorial platform for fabricating tissue scaffold arrays that can be used for screening cell-material interactions. Traditional research involves preparing samples one at a time for characterization and testing. Combinatorial and high-throughput (CHT) methods lower the cost of research by reducing the amount of time and material required for experiments by combining many samples into miniaturized specimens. In order to help accelerate biomaterials research, many new CHT methods have been developed for screening cell-material interactions where materials are presented to cells as a 2D film or surface. However, biomaterials are frequently used to fabricate 3D scaffolds, cells exist in vivo in a 3D environment and cells cultured in a 3D environment in vitro typically behave more physiologically than those cultured on a 2D surface. Thus, we have developed a platform for fabricating tissue scaffold libraries where biomaterials can be presented to cells in a 3D format.

  16. Autofocus for 3D imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee-Elkin, Forest

    2008-04-01

    Three dimensional (3D) autofocus remains a significant challenge for the development of practical 3D multipass radar imaging. The current 2D radar autofocus methods are not readily extendable across sensor passes. We propose a general framework that allows a class of data adaptive solutions for 3D auto-focus across passes with minimal constraints on the scene contents. The key enabling assumption is that portions of the scene are sparse in elevation which reduces the number of free variables and results in a system that is simultaneously solved for scatterer heights and autofocus parameters. The proposed method extends 2-pass interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR) methods to an arbitrary number of passes allowing the consideration of scattering from multiple height locations. A specific case from the proposed autofocus framework is solved and demonstrates autofocus and coherent multipass 3D estimation across the 8 passes of the "Gotcha Volumetric SAR Data Set" X-Band radar data.

  17. Combinatorial 3D Mechanical Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulais, Corentin; Teomy, Eial; de Reus, Koen; Shokef, Yair; van Hecke, Martin

    2015-03-01

    We present a class of elastic structures which exhibit 3D-folding motion. Our structures consist of cubic lattices of anisotropic unit cells that can be tiled in a complex combinatorial fashion. We design and 3d-print this complex ordered mechanism, in which we combine elastic hinges and defects to tailor the mechanics of the material. Finally, we use this large design space to encode smart functionalities such as surface patterning and multistability.

  18. Regional salt distribution from 3D data across the South Additions, offshore Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Jamieson, G.A. )

    1996-01-01

    A contiguous 3D dataset comprising 20 surveys covering over 800 OCS blocks in the offshore Louisiana South Additions region formed the primary database for a regional interpretation of top and base salt surfaces. The interpretation was performed on a 800m by 800m grid of 3D time migrated lines extracted from each survey and loaded into a single project on a workstation. After completing the interpretation the top and base salt horizons were depth converted, incorporating representative well velocity information across the study area. The use of 3D data has significantly improved interpretation confidence, particularly of the base salt, compared to 2D data, which, to date, has been the most commonly utilized regional tool. However, 2D data suffers from out-of-plane effects which can lead to erroneous interpretations of the base of salt and deep welds. A number of significant regional salt-related features and trends have been identified from the top and base salt time and depth maps. Significant identified features on the base of salt and below include keels, welds, fault zones and possible ramps which, in places, display significantly differing trends to those of the suprasalt section. The 3D data allows the mapping of feeders associated with large counter-regional fault systems down to extreme depths, in places to over 7 kms, as well as the location of feeder stock and wall locations beneath salt canopies. This has shown that many large sheets comprise several salt masses which have coalesced along suture zones, for example in the Vermilion and Ship Shoal regions.

  19. Regional salt distribution from 3D data across the South Additions, offshore Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Jamieson, G.A.

    1996-12-31

    A contiguous 3D dataset comprising 20 surveys covering over 800 OCS blocks in the offshore Louisiana South Additions region formed the primary database for a regional interpretation of top and base salt surfaces. The interpretation was performed on a 800m by 800m grid of 3D time migrated lines extracted from each survey and loaded into a single project on a workstation. After completing the interpretation the top and base salt horizons were depth converted, incorporating representative well velocity information across the study area. The use of 3D data has significantly improved interpretation confidence, particularly of the base salt, compared to 2D data, which, to date, has been the most commonly utilized regional tool. However, 2D data suffers from out-of-plane effects which can lead to erroneous interpretations of the base of salt and deep welds. A number of significant regional salt-related features and trends have been identified from the top and base salt time and depth maps. Significant identified features on the base of salt and below include keels, welds, fault zones and possible ramps which, in places, display significantly differing trends to those of the suprasalt section. The 3D data allows the mapping of feeders associated with large counter-regional fault systems down to extreme depths, in places to over 7 kms, as well as the location of feeder stock and wall locations beneath salt canopies. This has shown that many large sheets comprise several salt masses which have coalesced along suture zones, for example in the Vermilion and Ship Shoal regions.

  20. 3D-Printing for Analytical Ultracentrifugation

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Abhiksha; Krynitsky, Jonathan; Pohida, Thomas J.; Zhao, Huaying

    2016-01-01

    Analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) is a classical technique of physical biochemistry providing information on size, shape, and interactions of macromolecules from the analysis of their migration in centrifugal fields while free in solution. A key mechanical element in AUC is the centerpiece, a component of the sample cell assembly that is mounted between the optical windows to allow imaging and to seal the sample solution column against high vacuum while exposed to gravitational forces in excess of 300,000 g. For sedimentation velocity it needs to be precisely sector-shaped to allow unimpeded radial macromolecular migration. During the history of AUC a great variety of centerpiece designs have been developed for different types of experiments. Here, we report that centerpieces can now be readily fabricated by 3D printing at low cost, from a variety of materials, and with customized designs. The new centerpieces can exhibit sufficient mechanical stability to withstand the gravitational forces at the highest rotor speeds and be sufficiently precise for sedimentation equilibrium and sedimentation velocity experiments. Sedimentation velocity experiments with bovine serum albumin as a reference molecule in 3D printed centerpieces with standard double-sector design result in sedimentation boundaries virtually indistinguishable from those in commercial double-sector epoxy centerpieces, with sedimentation coefficients well within the range of published values. The statistical error of the measurement is slightly above that obtained with commercial epoxy, but still below 1%. Facilitated by modern open-source design and fabrication paradigms, we believe 3D printed centerpieces and AUC accessories can spawn a variety of improvements in AUC experimental design, efficiency and resource allocation. PMID:27525659

  1. 3D-Printing for Analytical Ultracentrifugation.

    PubMed

    Desai, Abhiksha; Krynitsky, Jonathan; Pohida, Thomas J; Zhao, Huaying; Schuck, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) is a classical technique of physical biochemistry providing information on size, shape, and interactions of macromolecules from the analysis of their migration in centrifugal fields while free in solution. A key mechanical element in AUC is the centerpiece, a component of the sample cell assembly that is mounted between the optical windows to allow imaging and to seal the sample solution column against high vacuum while exposed to gravitational forces in excess of 300,000 g. For sedimentation velocity it needs to be precisely sector-shaped to allow unimpeded radial macromolecular migration. During the history of AUC a great variety of centerpiece designs have been developed for different types of experiments. Here, we report that centerpieces can now be readily fabricated by 3D printing at low cost, from a variety of materials, and with customized designs. The new centerpieces can exhibit sufficient mechanical stability to withstand the gravitational forces at the highest rotor speeds and be sufficiently precise for sedimentation equilibrium and sedimentation velocity experiments. Sedimentation velocity experiments with bovine serum albumin as a reference molecule in 3D printed centerpieces with standard double-sector design result in sedimentation boundaries virtually indistinguishable from those in commercial double-sector epoxy centerpieces, with sedimentation coefficients well within the range of published values. The statistical error of the measurement is slightly above that obtained with commercial epoxy, but still below 1%. Facilitated by modern open-source design and fabrication paradigms, we believe 3D printed centerpieces and AUC accessories can spawn a variety of improvements in AUC experimental design, efficiency and resource allocation.

  2. PLOT3D/AMES, UNIX SUPERCOMPUTER AND SGI IRIS VERSION (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    five groups: 1) Grid Functions for grids, grid-checking, etc.; 2) Scalar Functions for contour or carpet plots of density, pressure, temperature, Mach number, vorticity magnitude, helicity, etc.; 3) Vector Functions for vector plots of velocity, vorticity, momentum, and density gradient, etc.; 4) Particle Trace Functions for rake-like plots of particle flow or vortex lines; and 5) Shock locations based on pressure gradient. TURB3D is a modification of PLOT3D which is used for viewing CFD simulations of incompressible turbulent flow. Input flow data consists of pressure, velocity and vorticity. Typical quantities to plot include local fluctuations in flow quantities and turbulent production terms, plotted in physical or wall units. PLOT3D/TURB3D includes both TURB3D and PLOT3D because the operation of TURB3D is identical to PLOT3D, and there is no additional sample data or printed documentation for TURB3D. Graphical capabilities of PLOT3D version 3.6b+ vary among the implementations available through COSMIC. Customers are encouraged to purchase and carefully review the PLOT3D manual before ordering the program for a specific computer and graphics library. There is only one manual for use with all implementations of PLOT3D, and although this manual generally assumes that the Silicon Graphics Iris implementation is being used, informative comments concerning other implementations appear throughout the text. With all implementations, the visual representation of the object and flow field created by PLOT3D consists of points, lines, and polygons. Points can be represented with dots or symbols, color can be used to denote data values, and perspective is used to show depth. Differences among implementations impact the program's ability to use graphical features that are based on 3D polygons, the user's ability to manipulate the graphical displays, and the user's ability to obtain alternate forms of output. In addition to providing the advantages of performing complex

  3. PLOT3D/AMES, UNIX SUPERCOMPUTER AND SGI IRIS VERSION (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    five groups: 1) Grid Functions for grids, grid-checking, etc.; 2) Scalar Functions for contour or carpet plots of density, pressure, temperature, Mach number, vorticity magnitude, helicity, etc.; 3) Vector Functions for vector plots of velocity, vorticity, momentum, and density gradient, etc.; 4) Particle Trace Functions for rake-like plots of particle flow or vortex lines; and 5) Shock locations based on pressure gradient. TURB3D is a modification of PLOT3D which is used for viewing CFD simulations of incompressible turbulent flow. Input flow data consists of pressure, velocity and vorticity. Typical quantities to plot include local fluctuations in flow quantities and turbulent production terms, plotted in physical or wall units. PLOT3D/TURB3D includes both TURB3D and PLOT3D because the operation of TURB3D is identical to PLOT3D, and there is no additional sample data or printed documentation for TURB3D. Graphical capabilities of PLOT3D version 3.6b+ vary among the implementations available through COSMIC. Customers are encouraged to purchase and carefully review the PLOT3D manual before ordering the program for a specific computer and graphics library. There is only one manual for use with all implementations of PLOT3D, and although this manual generally assumes that the Silicon Graphics Iris implementation is being used, informative comments concerning other implementations appear throughout the text. With all implementations, the visual representation of the object and flow field created by PLOT3D consists of points, lines, and polygons. Points can be represented with dots or symbols, color can be used to denote data values, and perspective is used to show depth. Differences among implementations impact the program's ability to use graphical features that are based on 3D polygons, the user's ability to manipulate the graphical displays, and the user's ability to obtain alternate forms of output. In addition to providing the advantages of performing complex

  4. 3D visualization of polymer nanostructure

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, James H

    2009-01-01

    at {approx} 10 nm resolution over hundreds of microns in 3 spatial dimensions. Super-resolution microcopy methods based upon single molecule localization were originally limited to 2D slices. Recent advances in this field have extended these methods to three dimensions. However, the 3D rendering was limited to viewing sparsely labeled cellular structures over a z-depth of less than 1 micron. Our first goal is to extend super resolution microscopy to z-depths of hundreds of microns. This substantial improvement is needed to image polymer nanostructure over functionally relevant length scales. (2) Benchmark this instrument by studying the 3D nanostructure of diblock co-polymer morphologies. We will test and benchmark our instrument by imaging fluorescently labeled diblock copolymers, molecules that self-assemble into a variety of 3D nano-structures. We reiterate these polymers are useful for a variety of applications ranging from lithography to light harvesting.

  5. PLOT3D/AMES, DEC VAX VMS VERSION USING DISSPLA (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    five groups: 1) Grid Functions for grids, grid-checking, etc.; 2) Scalar Functions for contour or carpet plots of density, pressure, temperature, Mach number, vorticity magnitude, helicity, etc.; 3) Vector Functions for vector plots of velocity, vorticity, momentum, and density gradient, etc.; 4) Particle Trace Functions for rake-like plots of particle flow or vortex lines; and 5) Shock locations based on pressure gradient. TURB3D is a modification of PLOT3D which is used for viewing CFD simulations of incompressible turbulent flow. Input flow data consists of pressure, velocity and vorticity. Typical quantities to plot include local fluctuations in flow quantities and turbulent production terms, plotted in physical or wall units. PLOT3D/TURB3D includes both TURB3D and PLOT3D because the operation of TURB3D is identical to PLOT3D, and there is no additional sample data or printed documentation for TURB3D. Graphical capabilities of PLOT3D version 3.6b+ vary among the implementations available through COSMIC. Customers are encouraged to purchase and carefully review the PLOT3D manual before ordering the program for a specific computer and graphics library. There is only one manual for use with all implementations of PLOT3D, and although this manual generally assumes that the Silicon Graphics Iris implementation is being used, informative comments concerning other implementations appear throughout the text. With all implementations, the visual representation of the object and flow field created by PLOT3D consists of points, lines, and polygons. Points can be represented with dots or symbols, color can be used to denote data values, and perspective is used to show depth. Differences among implementations impact the program's ability to use graphical features that are based on 3D polygons, the user's ability to manipulate the graphical displays, and the user's ability to obtain alternate forms of output. The VAX/VMS/DISSPLA implementation of PLOT3D supports 2-D polygons as

  6. PLOT3D/AMES, DEC VAX VMS VERSION USING DISSPLA (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P. G.

    1994-01-01

    five groups: 1) Grid Functions for grids, grid-checking, etc.; 2) Scalar Functions for contour or carpet plots of density, pressure, temperature, Mach number, vorticity magnitude, helicity, etc.; 3) Vector Functions for vector plots of velocity, vorticity, momentum, and density gradient, etc.; 4) Particle Trace Functions for rake-like plots of particle flow or vortex lines; and 5) Shock locations based on pressure gradient. TURB3D is a modification of PLOT3D which is used for viewing CFD simulations of incompressible turbulent flow. Input flow data consists of pressure, velocity and vorticity. Typical quantities to plot include local fluctuations in flow quantities and turbulent production terms, plotted in physical or wall units. PLOT3D/TURB3D includes both TURB3D and PLOT3D because the operation of TURB3D is identical to PLOT3D, and there is no additional sample data or printed documentation for TURB3D. Graphical capabilities of PLOT3D version 3.6b+ vary among the implementations available through COSMIC. Customers are encouraged to purchase and carefully review the PLOT3D manual before ordering the program for a specific computer and graphics library. There is only one manual for use with all implementations of PLOT3D, and although this manual generally assumes that the Silicon Graphics Iris implementation is being used, informative comments concerning other implementations appear throughout the text. With all implementations, the visual representation of the object and flow field created by PLOT3D consists of points, lines, and polygons. Points can be represented with dots or symbols, color can be used to denote data values, and perspective is used to show depth. Differences among implementations impact the program's ability to use graphical features that are based on 3D polygons, the user's ability to manipulate the graphical displays, and the user's ability to obtain alternate forms of output. The VAX/VMS/DISSPLA implementation of PLOT3D supports 2-D polygons as

  7. A 3-D SAR approach to IFSAR processing

    SciTech Connect

    DOERRY,ARMIN W.; BICKEL,DOUGLAS L.

    2000-03-01

    Interferometric SAR (IFSAR) can be shown to be a special case of 3-D SAR image formation. In fact, traditional IFSAR processing results in the equivalent of merely a super-resolved, under-sampled, 3-D SAR image. However, when approached as a 3-D SAR problem, a number of IFSAR properties and anomalies are easily explained. For example, IFSAR decorrelation with height is merely ordinary migration in 3-D SAR. Consequently, treating IFSAR as a 3-D SAR problem allows insight and development of proper motion compensation techniques and image formation operations to facilitate optimal height estimation. Furthermore, multiple antenna phase centers and baselines are easily incorporated into this formulation, providing essentially a sparse array in the elevation dimension. This paper shows the Polar Format image formation algorithm extended to 3 dimensions, and then proceeds to apply it to the IFSAR collection geometry. This suggests a more optimal reordering of the traditional IFSAR processing steps.

  8. Joint pre-stack depth migration and travel-time tomography applied to a deep seismic profile across the northern Barents Sea igneous province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minakov, Alexander; Faleide, Jan Inge; Sakulina, Tamara; Krupnova, Natalia; Dergunov, Nikolai

    2015-04-01

    The mainly Permo-Triassic North Barents Sea Basin is considered as a superdeep intracratonic basin containing over 20 km of sedimentary material. This basin was strongly affected by magmatism attributed to the formation of the Early Cretaceous High Arctic Large Igneous Province. Dolerite dikes, sills, and lava flows are observed in the northern Barents Sea and on the islands of Svalbard and Franz Josef Land. Some dike swarms can be traced over hundreds of kilometers using high-resolution airborne magnetic data. In the North Barents Sea Basin, the dikes fed giant sill complex emplaced into organic-rich Triassic siliciclastic rocks. The sill complex creates a major challenge for seismic imaging masking the underlying strata. In this contribution, we first perform refraction and reflection travel-time tomography using wide-angle ocean-bottom seismometer data (with receivers deployed every 10 km) along the 4-AR profile (Sakulina et al. 2007, Ivanova et al. 2011). The resulting tomographic model is then used to construct a background velocity model for the pre-stack depth migration. We show that the use of a combined velocity model for the time and depth imaging based on travel-time tomography and RMS velocities constitutes a substantial improvement with respect to a standard processing workflow providing a more coherent seismic structure of this volcanic province. The interpretation of multichannel seismic and high-resolution magnetic data together with P-wave velocity and density anomalies allow to create a model for the system of magmatic feeders in the crystalline basement of the northern Barents Sea region. Sakulina, T.S., Verba, M.L., Ivanova, N.M., Krupnova, N.A., Belyaev I.V., 2007. Deep structure of the north Barents-Kara Region along 4AR transect (Taimyr Peninsula - Franz Joseph Land). In: Models of the Earth's crust and upper mantle after deep seismic profiling. Proceedings of the international scientific-practical seminar. Rosnedra, VSEGEI. St

  9. PLOT3D/AMES, SGI IRIS VERSION (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    five groups: 1) Grid Functions for grids, grid-checking, etc.; 2) Scalar Functions for contour or carpet plots of density, pressure, temperature, Mach number, vorticity magnitude, helicity, etc.; 3) Vector Functions for vector plots of velocity, vorticity, momentum, and density gradient, etc.; 4) Particle Trace Functions for rake-like plots of particle flow or vortex lines; and 5) Shock locations based on pressure gradient. TURB3D is a modification of PLOT3D which is used for viewing CFD simulations of incompressible turbulent flow. Input flow data consists of pressure, velocity and vorticity. Typical quantities to plot include local fluctuations in flow quantities and turbulent production terms, plotted in physical or wall units. PLOT3D/TURB3D includes both TURB3D and PLOT3D because the operation of TURB3D is identical to PLOT3D, and there is no additional sample data or printed documentation for TURB3D. Graphical capabilities of PLOT3D version 3.6b+ vary among the implementations available through COSMIC. Customers are encouraged to purchase and carefully review the PLOT3D manual before ordering the program for a specific computer and graphics library. There is only one manual for use with all implementations of PLOT3D, and although this manual generally assumes that the Silicon Graphics Iris implementation is being used, informative comments concerning other implementations appear throughout the text. With all implementations, the visual representation of the object and flow field created by PLOT3D consists of points, lines, and polygons. Points can be represented with dots or symbols, color can be used to denote data values, and perspective is used to show depth. Differences among implementations impact the program's ability to use graphical features that are based on 3D polygons, the user's ability to manipulate the graphical displays, and the user's ability to obtain alternate forms of output. In each of these areas, the IRIS implementation of PLOT3D offers

  10. PLOT3D/AMES, SGI IRIS VERSION (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    five groups: 1) Grid Functions for grids, grid-checking, etc.; 2) Scalar Functions for contour or carpet plots of density, pressure, temperature, Mach number, vorticity magnitude, helicity, etc.; 3) Vector Functions for vector plots of velocity, vorticity, momentum, and density gradient, etc.; 4) Particle Trace Functions for rake-like plots of particle flow or vortex lines; and 5) Shock locations based on pressure gradient. TURB3D is a modification of PLOT3D which is used for viewing CFD simulations of incompressible turbulent flow. Input flow data consists of pressure, velocity and vorticity. Typical quantities to plot include local fluctuations in flow quantities and turbulent production terms, plotted in physical or wall units. PLOT3D/TURB3D includes both TURB3D and PLOT3D because the operation of TURB3D is identical to PLOT3D, and there is no additional sample data or printed documentation for TURB3D. Graphical capabilities of PLOT3D version 3.6b+ vary among the implementations available through COSMIC. Customers are encouraged to purchase and carefully review the PLOT3D manual before ordering the program for a specific computer and graphics library. There is only one manual for use with all implementations of PLOT3D, and although this manual generally assumes that the Silicon Graphics Iris implementation is being used, informative comments concerning other implementations appear throughout the text. With all implementations, the visual representation of the object and flow field created by PLOT3D consists of points, lines, and polygons. Points can be represented with dots or symbols, color can be used to denote data values, and perspective is used to show depth. Differences among implementations impact the program's ability to use graphical features that are based on 3D polygons, the user's ability to manipulate the graphical displays, and the user's ability to obtain alternate forms of output. In each of these areas, the IRIS implementation of PLOT3D offers

  11. PLOT3D/AMES, GENERIC UNIX VERSION USING DISSPLA (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    five groups: 1) Grid Functions for grids, grid-checking, etc.; 2) Scalar Functions for contour or carpet plots of density, pressure, temperature, Mach number, vorticity magnitude, helicity, etc.; 3) Vector Functions for vector plots of velocity, vorticity, momentum, and density gradient, etc.; 4) Particle Trace Functions for rake-like plots of particle flow or vortex lines; and 5) Shock locations based on pressure gradient. TURB3D is a modification of PLOT3D which is used for viewing CFD simulations of incompressible turbulent flow. Input flow data consists of pressure, velocity and vorticity. Typical quantities to plot include local fluctuations in flow quantities and turbulent production terms, plotted in physical or wall units. PLOT3D/TURB3D includes both TURB3D and PLOT3D because the operation of TURB3D is identical to PLOT3D, and there is no additional sample data or printed documentation for TURB3D. Graphical capabilities of PLOT3D version 3.6b+ vary among the implementations available through COSMIC. Customers are encouraged to purchase and carefully review the PLOT3D manual before ordering the program for a specific computer and graphics library. There is only one manual for use with all implementations of PLOT3D, and although this manual generally assumes that the Silicon Graphics Iris implementation is being used, informative comments concerning other implementations appear throughout the text. With all implementations, the visual representation of the object and flow field created by PLOT3D consists of points, lines, and polygons. Points can be represented with dots or symbols, color can be used to denote data values, and perspective is used to show depth. Differences among implementations impact the program's ability to use graphical features that are based on 3D polygons, the user's ability to manipulate the graphical displays, and the user's ability to obtain alternate forms of output. The UNIX/DISSPLA implementation of PLOT3D supports 2-D polygons as

  12. PLOT3D/AMES, GENERIC UNIX VERSION USING DISSPLA (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    five groups: 1) Grid Functions for grids, grid-checking, etc.; 2) Scalar Functions for contour or carpet plots of density, pressure, temperature, Mach number, vorticity magnitude, helicity, etc.; 3) Vector Functions for vector plots of velocity, vorticity, momentum, and density gradient, etc.; 4) Particle Trace Functions for rake-like plots of particle flow or vortex lines; and 5) Shock locations based on pressure gradient. TURB3D is a modification of PLOT3D which is used for viewing CFD simulations of incompressible turbulent flow. Input flow data consists of pressure, velocity and vorticity. Typical quantities to plot include local fluctuations in flow quantities and turbulent production terms, plotted in physical or wall units. PLOT3D/TURB3D includes both TURB3D and PLOT3D because the operation of TURB3D is identical to PLOT3D, and there is no additional sample data or printed documentation for TURB3D. Graphical capabilities of PLOT3D version 3.6b+ vary among the implementations available through COSMIC. Customers are encouraged to purchase and carefully review the PLOT3D manual before ordering the program for a specific computer and graphics library. There is only one manual for use with all implementations of PLOT3D, and although this manual generally assumes that the Silicon Graphics Iris implementation is being used, informative comments concerning other implementations appear throughout the text. With all implementations, the visual representation of the object and flow field created by PLOT3D consists of points, lines, and polygons. Points can be represented with dots or symbols, color can be used to denote data values, and perspective is used to show depth. Differences among implementations impact the program's ability to use graphical features that are based on 3D polygons, the user's ability to manipulate the graphical displays, and the user's ability to obtain alternate forms of output. The UNIX/DISSPLA implementation of PLOT3D supports 2-D polygons as

  13. From 3D view to 3D print

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dima, M.; Farisato, G.; Bergomi, M.; Viotto, V.; Magrin, D.; Greggio, D.; Farinato, J.; Marafatto, L.; Ragazzoni, R.; Piazza, D.

    2014-08-01

    In the last few years 3D printing is getting more and more popular and used in many fields going from manufacturing to industrial design, architecture, medical support and aerospace. 3D printing is an evolution of bi-dimensional printing, which allows to obtain a solid object from a 3D model, realized with a 3D modelling software. The final product is obtained using an additive process, in which successive layers of material are laid down one over the other. A 3D printer allows to realize, in a simple way, very complex shapes, which would be quite difficult to be produced with dedicated conventional facilities. Thanks to the fact that the 3D printing is obtained superposing one layer to the others, it doesn't need any particular work flow and it is sufficient to simply draw the model and send it to print. Many different kinds of 3D printers exist based on the technology and material used for layer deposition. A common material used by the toner is ABS plastics, which is a light and rigid thermoplastic polymer, whose peculiar mechanical properties make it diffusely used in several fields, like pipes production and cars interiors manufacturing. I used this technology to create a 1:1 scale model of the telescope which is the hardware core of the space small mission CHEOPS (CHaracterising ExOPlanets Satellite) by ESA, which aims to characterize EXOplanets via transits observations. The telescope has a Ritchey-Chrétien configuration with a 30cm aperture and the launch is foreseen in 2017. In this paper, I present the different phases for the realization of such a model, focusing onto pros and cons of this kind of technology. For example, because of the finite printable volume (10×10×12 inches in the x, y and z directions respectively), it has been necessary to split the largest parts of the instrument in smaller components to be then reassembled and post-processed. A further issue is the resolution of the printed material, which is expressed in terms of layers

  14. 3D and 4D Seismic Imaging in the Oilfield; the state of the art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strudley, A.

    2005-05-01

    Seismic imaging in the oilfield context has seen enormous changes over the last 20 years driven by a combination of improved subsurface illumination (2D to 3D), increased computational power and improved physical understanding. Today Kirchhoff Pre-stack migration (in time or depth) is the norm with anisotropic parameterisation and finite difference methods being increasingly employed. In the production context Time-Lapse (4D) Seismic is of growing importance as a tool for monitoring reservoir changes to facilitate increased productivity and recovery. In this paper we present an overview of state of the art technology in 3D and 4D seismic and look at future trends. Pre-stack Kirchhoff migration in time or depth is the imaging tool of choice for the majority of contemporary 3D datasets. Recent developments in 3D pre-stack imaging have been focussed around finite difference solutions to the acoustic wave equation, the so-called Wave Equation Migration methods (WEM). Application of finite difference solutions to imaging is certainly not new, however 3D pre-stack migration using these schemes is a relatively recent development driven by the need for imaging complex geologic structures such as sub salt, and facilitated by increased computational resources. Finally there are a class of imaging methods referred to as beam migration. These methods may be based on either the wave equation or rays, but all operate on a localised (in space and direction) part of the wavefield. These methods offer a bridge between the computational efficiency of Kirchhoff schemes and the improved image quality of WEM methods. Just as 3D seismic has had a radical impact on the quality of the static model of the reservoir, 4D seismic is having a dramatic impact on the dynamic model. Repeat shooting of seismic surveys after a period of production (typically one to several years) reveals changes in pressure and saturation through changes in the seismic response. The growth in interest in 4D seismic

  15. Speaking Volumes About 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In 1999, Genex submitted a proposal to Stennis Space Center for a volumetric 3-D display technique that would provide multiple users with a 360-degree perspective to simultaneously view and analyze 3-D data. The futuristic capabilities of the VolumeViewer(R) have offered tremendous benefits to commercial users in the fields of medicine and surgery, air traffic control, pilot training and education, computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing, and military/battlefield management. The technology has also helped NASA to better analyze and assess the various data collected by its satellite and spacecraft sensors. Genex capitalized on its success with Stennis by introducing two separate products to the commercial market that incorporate key elements of the 3-D display technology designed under an SBIR contract. The company Rainbow 3D(R) imaging camera is a novel, three-dimensional surface profile measurement system that can obtain a full-frame 3-D image in less than 1 second. The third product is the 360-degree OmniEye(R) video system. Ideal for intrusion detection, surveillance, and situation management, this unique camera system offers a continuous, panoramic view of a scene in real time.

  16. Laminar optical tomography: high-resolution 3D functional imaging of superficial tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillman, Elizabeth M. C.; Devor, Anna; Dunn, Andrew K.; Boas, David A.

    2006-03-01

    Laminar Optical Tomography (LOT) is a new medical imaging modality for high-resolution, depth-resolved, functional imaging of superficial tissue such as rodent cortex, skin and the retina. LOT uses visible laser light to image to depths of >2mm (far deeper than microscopy) and is highly sensitive to absorption and fluorescence contrast, enabling spectroscopic functional information such as hemoglobin oxygenation to be imaged with 100-200 micron resolution. LOT has been used to image the hemodynamic response to stimulus in the somatosensory cortex of rats. The resulting three-dimensional (3D) images through the depth of the cortex can be used to delineate the arterial, capillary and venous responses, revealing new information about the intricacies of the oxygenation and blood flow dynamics related to neuronal activation. Additional applications of LOT are being explored, including the integration of 3D Voltage Sensitive Dye fluorescence imaging. LOT imaging uses a system similar to a confocal microscope, quickly scanning a focused beam of light over the surface of the tissue (~8Hz frame rate). Light is detected from both the focus of the scanning beam, and also at increasing distances from the beam's focus. This scattered light has penetrated more deeply into the tissue, and allows features at different depths to be distinguished. An algorithm that includes photon migration modeling of light scattering converts the raw data into 3D images. The motivation for functional optical imaging will be outlined, the basic principles of LOT imaging will be described, and the latest in-vivo results will be presented.

  17. Multizone Paper Platform for 3D Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Derda, Ratmir; Hong, Estrella; Mwangi, Martin; Mammoto, Akiko; Ingber, Donald E.; Whitesides, George M.

    2011-01-01

    In vitro 3D culture is an important model for tissues in vivo. Cells in different locations of 3D tissues are physiologically different, because they are exposed to different concentrations of oxygen, nutrients, and signaling molecules, and to other environmental factors (temperature, mechanical stress, etc). The majority of high-throughput assays based on 3D cultures, however, can only detect the average behavior of cells in the whole 3D construct. Isolation of cells from specific regions of 3D cultures is possible, but relies on low-throughput techniques such as tissue sectioning and micromanipulation. Based on a procedure reported previously (“cells-in-gels-in-paper” or CiGiP), this paper describes a simple method for culture of arrays of thin planar sections of tissues, either alone or stacked to create more complex 3D tissue structures. This procedure starts with sheets of paper patterned with hydrophobic regions that form 96 hydrophilic zones. Serial spotting of cells suspended in extracellular matrix (ECM) gel onto the patterned paper creates an array of 200 micron-thick slabs of ECM gel (supported mechanically by cellulose fibers) containing cells. Stacking the sheets with zones aligned on top of one another assembles 96 3D multilayer constructs. De-stacking the layers of the 3D culture, by peeling apart the sheets of paper, “sections” all 96 cultures at once. It is, thus, simple to isolate 200-micron-thick cell-containing slabs from each 3D culture in the 96-zone array. Because the 3D cultures are assembled from multiple layers, the number of cells plated initially in each layer determines the spatial distribution of cells in the stacked 3D cultures. This capability made it possible to compare the growth of 3D tumor models of different spatial composition, and to examine the migration of cells in these structures. PMID:21573103

  18. Representation and classification of 3-D objects.

    PubMed

    Csakany, P; Wallace, A M

    2003-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of generic object classification from three-dimensional depth or meshed data. First, surface patches are segmented on the basis of differential geometry and quadratic surface fitting. These are represented by a modified Gaussian image that includes the well-known shape index. Learning is an interactive process in which a human teacher indicates corresponding patches, but the formation of generic classes is unaided. Classification of unknown objects is based on the measurement of similarities between feature sets of the objects and the generic classes. The process is demonstrated on a group of three-dimensional (3-D) objects built from both CAD and laser-scanned depth data.

  19. 3D Printed Bionic Nanodevices.

    PubMed

    Kong, Yong Lin; Gupta, Maneesh K; Johnson, Blake N; McAlpine, Michael C

    2016-06-01

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological and functional materials could enable the creation of bionic devices possessing unique and compelling geometries, properties, and functionalities. Indeed, interfacing high performance active devices with biology could impact a variety of fields, including regenerative bioelectronic medicines, smart prosthetics, medical robotics, and human-machine interfaces. Biology, from the molecular scale of DNA and proteins, to the macroscopic scale of tissues and organs, is three-dimensional, often soft and stretchable, and temperature sensitive. This renders most biological platforms incompatible with the fabrication and materials processing methods that have been developed and optimized for functional electronics, which are typically planar, rigid and brittle. A number of strategies have been developed to overcome these dichotomies. One particularly novel approach is the use of extrusion-based multi-material 3D printing, which is an additive manufacturing technology that offers a freeform fabrication strategy. This approach addresses the dichotomies presented above by (1) using 3D printing and imaging for customized, hierarchical, and interwoven device architectures; (2) employing nanotechnology as an enabling route for introducing high performance materials, with the potential for exhibiting properties not found in the bulk; and (3) 3D printing a range of soft and nanoscale materials to enable the integration of a diverse palette of high quality functional nanomaterials with biology. Further, 3D printing is a multi-scale platform, allowing for the incorporation of functional nanoscale inks, the printing of microscale features, and ultimately the creation of macroscale devices. This blending of 3D printing, novel nanomaterial properties, and 'living' platforms may enable next-generation bionic systems. In this review, we highlight this synergistic integration of the unique properties of nanomaterials with the

  20. Petal, terrain & airbags - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Portions of the lander's deflated airbags and a petal are at the lower area of this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. The metallic object at lower right is part of the lander's low-gain antenna. This image is part of a 3D 'monster

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  1. 3D Computations and Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Couch, R; Faux, D; Goto, D; Nikkel, D

    2004-04-05

    This project consists of two activities. Task A, Simulations and Measurements, combines all the material model development and associated numerical work with the materials-oriented experimental activities. The goal of this effort is to provide an improved understanding of dynamic material properties and to provide accurate numerical representations of those properties for use in analysis codes. Task B, ALE3D Development, involves general development activities in the ALE3D code with the focus of improving simulation capabilities for problems of mutual interest to DoD and DOE. Emphasis is on problems involving multi-phase flow, blast loading of structures and system safety/vulnerability studies.

  2. Rifting-to-drifting transition of the South China Sea: early Cenozoic syn-rifting deposition imaged with prestack depth migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, T.; Li, C.; Li, J.

    2012-12-01

    One of the major unsolved questions of the opening of the South China Sea (SCS) is its opening sequences and episodes. It has been suggested, for example, that the opening of the East and Northwest Sub-basins predated, or at least synchronized with, that of the Southwest Sub-basin, a model contrasting with some others in which an earlier opening in the Southwest Sub-basin is preferred. Difficulties in understanding the perplexing relationships between different sub-basins are often compounded by contradicting evidences leading to different interpretations. Here we carry out pre-stack depth migration of a recently acquired multichannel reflection seismic profile from the Southwest Sub-basin of the SCS in order to reveal complicated subsurface structures and strong lateral velocity variations associated with a thick syn-rifting sequence on the southern margin of the Southwest Sub-basin. Combined with gravimetric and magnetic inversion and modeling, this depth section helps us understand the complicated transitional processes from continental rifting to seafloor spreading. This syn-rifting sequence is found to be extremely thick, over 2 seconds in two-way travel time, and is located directly within the continent-ocean transition zone. It is bounded landwards by a seaward dipping fault, and tapers out seaward. The top of this sequence is an erosional truncation, representing mainly the Oligocene-Miocene unconformity landward but slightly an older unconformity on the seaward side. Stronger erosions of this sequence are found toward the ocean basin. The sequence itself is severely faulted by a group of seaward dipping faults developed mainly within the sequence. The overall deformation style suggests a successive episode of rifting, faulting, compression, tilting, and erosion, prior to seafloor spreading. Integrating information from gravity anomalies and seismic velocities, we interpret that this sequence represents a syn-rifting sequence developed during a long period

  3. Insect stereopsis demonstrated using a 3D insect cinema.

    PubMed

    Nityananda, Vivek; Tarawneh, Ghaith; Rosner, Ronny; Nicolas, Judith; Crichton, Stuart; Read, Jenny

    2016-01-07

    Stereopsis - 3D vision - has become widely used as a model of perception. However, all our knowledge of possible underlying mechanisms comes almost exclusively from vertebrates. While stereopsis has been demonstrated for one invertebrate, the praying mantis, a lack of techniques to probe invertebrate stereopsis has prevented any further progress for three decades. We therefore developed a stereoscopic display system for insects, using miniature 3D glasses to present separate images to each eye, and tested our ability to deliver stereoscopic illusions to praying mantises. We find that while filtering by circular polarization failed due to excessive crosstalk, "anaglyph" filtering by spectral content clearly succeeded in giving the mantis the illusion of 3D depth. We thus definitively demonstrate stereopsis in mantises and also demonstrate that the anaglyph technique can be effectively used to deliver virtual 3D stimuli to insects. This method opens up broad avenues of research into the parallel evolution of stereoscopic computations and possible new algorithms for depth perception.

  4. 3D face recognition by projection-based methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutagaci, Helin; Sankur, Bülent; Yemez, Yücel

    2006-02-01

    In this paper, we investigate recognition performances of various projection-based features applied on registered 3D scans of faces. Some features are data driven, such as ICA-based features or NNMF-based features. Other features are obtained using DFT or DCT-based schemes. We apply the feature extraction techniques to three different representations of registered faces, namely, 3D point clouds, 2D depth images and 3D voxel. We consider both global and local features. Global features are extracted from the whole face data, whereas local features are computed over the blocks partitioned from 2D depth images. The block-based local features are fused both at feature level and at decision level. The resulting feature vectors are matched using Linear Discriminant Analysis. Experiments using different combinations of representation types and feature vectors are conducted on the 3D-RMA dataset.

  5. The World of 3-D.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayshark, Robin K.

    1991-01-01

    Students explore three-dimensional properties by creating red and green wall decorations related to Christmas. Students examine why images seem to vibrate when red and green pieces are small and close together. Instructions to conduct the activity and construct 3-D glasses are given. (MDH)

  6. 3D Printing: Exploring Capabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Kyle; Flowers, Jim

    2015-01-01

    As 3D printers become more affordable, schools are using them in increasing numbers. They fit well with the emphasis on product design in technology and engineering education, allowing students to create high-fidelity physical models to see and test different iterations in their product designs. They may also help students to "think in three…

  7. SNL3dFace

    SciTech Connect

    Russ, Trina; Koch, Mark; Koudelka, Melissa; Peters, Ralph; Little, Charles; Boehnen, Chris; Peters, Tanya

    2007-07-20

    This software distribution contains MATLAB and C++ code to enable identity verification using 3D images that may or may not contain a texture component. The code is organized to support system performance testing and system capability demonstration through the proper configuration of the available user interface. Using specific algorithm parameters the face recognition system has been demonstrated to achieve a 96.6% verification rate (Pd) at 0.001 false alarm rate. The system computes robust facial features of a 3D normalized face using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis (FLDA). A 3D normalized face is obtained by alighning each face, represented by a set of XYZ coordinated, to a scaled reference face using the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm. The scaled reference face is then deformed to the input face using an iterative framework with parameters that control the deformed surface regulation an rate of deformation. A variety of options are available to control the information that is encoded by the PCA. Such options include the XYZ coordinates, the difference of each XYZ coordinates from the reference, the Z coordinate, the intensity/texture values, etc. In addition to PCA/FLDA feature projection this software supports feature matching to obtain similarity matrices for performance analysis. In addition, this software supports visualization of the STL, MRD, 2D normalized, and PCA synthetic representations in a 3D environment.

  8. Making Inexpensive 3-D Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manos, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Visual aids are important to student learning, and they help make the teacher's job easier. Keeping with the "TPT" theme of "The Art, Craft, and Science of Physics Teaching," the purpose of this article is to show how teachers, lacking equipment and funds, can construct a durable 3-D model reference frame and a model gravity…

  9. 3D resolution gray-tone lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumbravescu, Niculae

    2000-04-01

    With the conventional micro machining technologies: isotropic and anisotropic, dry and wet etching, a few shapes can be done. To overcome this limitation, both binary multi- tasking technique or direct EB writing were used, but an inexpensive one-step UV-lithographic method, using a so- called 'gray-tone reticle', seems to be the best choice to produce local intensity modulation during exposure process. Although, by using this method and common technologies in standard IC fabrication it is easy to obtain an arbitrarily 3D shaping of positive thick resists, there are some limitations, too. The maximum number of gray-levels, on projection reticle, achieved by e-beam writing, are only 200. Also, for very thick resists, the limited focus depth of the projection objective gives a poor lateral resolution. These are the reasons why the author prose da new approach to enhance the 3D resolution of gray-tone lithography applied for thick resist. By a high resolution, both for vertical direction, as well as for horizontal direction. Particular emphasis was put on the design, manufacturing and use of halftone transmission masks, required for UV- lithographic step in the fabrication process of mechanical, optical or electronics components. The original design and fabrication method for the gray-tone test reticle were supported by experiments showing the main advantage of this new technology: the 3D structuring of thick resist in a single exposure step and also a very promising aspect ratio obtained of over 9:1. Preliminary experimental results are presented for positive thick resists in SEM micrographs. A future optimization of the lithographic process opens interesting perspectives for application of this high 3D resolution structuring method in the fabrication process of different products, with imposed complex smooth profiles, such as: x-ray LiGA-masks, refractive optics and surface- relief DOEs.

  10. 3D GPR Imaging of Wooden Logs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halabe, Udaya B.; Pyakurel, Sandeep

    2007-03-01

    There has been a lack of an effective NDE technique to locate internal defects within wooden logs. The few available elastic wave propagation based techniques are limited to predicting E values. Other techniques such as X-rays have not been very successful in detecting internal defects in logs. If defects such as embedded metals could be identified before the sawing process, the saw mills could significantly increase their production by reducing the probability of damage to the saw blade and the associated downtime and the repair cost. Also, if the internal defects such as knots and decayed areas could be identified in logs, the sawing blade can be oriented to exclude the defective portion and optimize the volume of high valued lumber that can be obtained from the logs. In this research, GPR has been successfully used to locate internal defects (knots, decays and embedded metals) within the logs. This paper discusses GPR imaging and mapping of the internal defects using both 2D and 3D interpretation methodology. Metal pieces were inserted in a log and the reflection patterns from these metals were interpreted from the radargrams acquired using 900 MHz antenna. Also, GPR was able to accurately identify the location of knots and decays. Scans from several orientations of the log were collected to generate 3D cylindrical volume. The actual location of the defects showed good correlation with the interpreted defects in the 3D volume. The time/depth slices from 3D cylindrical volume data were useful in understanding the extent of defects inside the log.

  11. Neural computations underlying depth perception

    PubMed Central

    Anzai, Akiyuki; DeAngelis, Gregory C.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Neural mechanisms underlying depth perception are reviewed with respect to three computational goals: determining surface depth order, gauging depth intervals, and representing 3D surface geometry and object shape. Accumulating evidence suggests that these three computational steps correspond to different stages of cortical processing. Early visual areas appear to be involved in depth ordering, while depth intervals, expressed in terms of relative disparities, are likely represented at intermediate stages. Finally, 3D surfaces appear to be processed in higher cortical areas, including an area in which individual neurons encode 3D surface geometry, and a population of these neurons may therefore represent 3D object shape. How these processes are integrated to form a coherent 3D percept of the world remains to be understood. PMID:20451369

  12. Toward single cell traction microscopy within 3D collagen matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Matthew S.; Long, Rong; Feng, Xinzeng; Huang, YuLing; Hui, Chung-Yuen; Wu, Mingming

    2013-10-01

    Mechanical interaction between the cell and its extracellular matrix (ECM) regulates cellular behaviors, including proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, and migration. Cells require the three-dimensional (3D) architectural support of the ECM to perform physiologically realistic functions. However, current understanding of cell–ECM and cell–cell mechanical interactions is largely derived from 2D cell traction force microscopy, in which cells are cultured on a flat substrate. 3D cell traction microscopy is emerging for mapping traction fields of single animal cells embedded in either synthetic or natively derived fibrous gels. We discuss here the development of 3D cell traction microscopy, its current limitations, and perspectives on the future of this technology. Emphasis is placed on strategies for applying 3D cell traction microscopy to individual tumor cell migration within collagen gels. - Highlights: • Review of the current state of the art in 3D cell traction force microscopy. • Bulk and micro-characterization of remodelable fibrous collagen gels. • Strategies for performing 3D cell traction microscopy within collagen gels.

  13. 3D Finite Difference Modelling of Basaltic Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engell-Sørensen, L.

    2003-04-01

    The main purpose of the work was to generate realistic data to be applied for testing of processing and migration tools for basaltic regions. The project is based on the three - dimensional finite difference code (FD), TIGER, made by Sintef. The FD code was optimized (parallelized) by the author, to run on parallel computers. The parallel code enables us to model large-scale realistic geological models and to apply traditional seismic and micro seismic sources. The parallel code uses multiple processors in order to manipulate subsets of large amounts of data simultaneously. The general anisotropic code uses 21 elastic coefficients. Eight independent coefficients are needed as input parameters for the general TI medium. In the FD code, the elastic wave field computation is implemented by a higher order FD solution to the elastic wave equation and the wave fields are computed on a staggered grid, shifted half a node in one or two directions. The geological model is a gridded basalt model, which covers from 24 km to 37 km of a real shot line in horizontal direction and from the water surface to the depth of 3.5 km. The 2frac {1}{2}D model has been constructed using the compound modeling software from Norsk Hydro. The vertical parameter distribution is obtained from observations in two wells. At The depth of between 1100 m to 1500 m, a basalt horizon covers the whole sub surface layers. We have shown that it is possible to simulate a line survey in realistic (3D) geological models in reasonable time by using high performance computers. The author would like to thank Norsk Hydro, Statoil, GEUS, and SINTEF for very helpful discussions and Parallab for being helpful with the new IBM, p690 Regatta system.

  14. Case study: The Avengers 3D: cinematic techniques and digitally created 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Graham D.

    2013-03-01

    Marvel's THE AVENGERS was the third film Stereo D collaborated on with Marvel; it was a summation of our artistic development of what Digitally Created 3D and Stereo D's artists and toolsets affords Marvel's filmmakers; the ability to shape stereographic space to support the film and story, in a way that balances human perception and live photography. We took our artistic lead from the cinematic intentions of Marvel, the Director Joss Whedon, and Director of Photography Seamus McGarvey. In the digital creation of a 3D film from a 2D image capture, recommendations to the filmmakers cinematic techniques are offered by Stereo D at each step from pre-production onwards, through set, into post. As the footage arrives at our facility we respond in depth to the cinematic qualities of the imagery in context of the edit and story, with the guidance of the Directors and Studio, creating stereoscopic imagery. Our involvement in The Avengers was early in production, after reading the script we had the opportunity and honor to meet and work with the Director Joss Whedon, and DP Seamus McGarvey on set, and into post. We presented what is obvious to such great filmmakers in the ways of cinematic techniques as they related to the standard depth cues and story points we would use to evaluate depth for their film. Our hope was any cinematic habits that supported better 3D would be emphasized. In searching for a 3D statement for the studio and filmmakers we arrived at a stereographic style that allowed for comfort and maximum visual engagement to the viewer.

  15. TACO3D. 3-D Finite Element Heat Transfer Code

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, W.E.

    1992-03-04

    TACO3D is a three-dimensional, finite-element program for heat transfer analysis. An extension of the two-dimensional TACO program, it can perform linear and nonlinear analyses and can be used to solve either transient or steady-state problems. The program accepts time-dependent or temperature-dependent material properties, and materials may be isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time-dependent and temperature-dependent boundary conditions and loadings are available including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation boundary conditions and internal heat generation. Additional specialized features treat enclosure radiation, bulk nodes, and master/slave internal surface conditions (e.g., contact resistance). Data input via a free-field format is provided. A user subprogram feature allows for any type of functional representation of any independent variable. A profile (bandwidth) minimization option is available. The code is limited to implicit time integration for transient solutions. TACO3D has no general mesh generation capability. Rows of evenly-spaced nodes and rows of sequential elements may be generated, but the program relies on separate mesh generators for complex zoning. TACO3D does not have the ability to calculate view factors internally. Graphical representation of data in the form of time history and spatial plots is provided through links to the POSTACO and GRAPE postprocessor codes.

  16. High-speed optical 3D sensing and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Yoshihiro

    2016-12-01

    This paper reviews high-speed optical 3D sensing technologies for obtaining the 3D shape of a target using a camera. The focusing speed is from 100 to 1000 fps, exceeding normal camera frame rates, which are typically 30 fps. In particular, contactless, active, and real-time systems are introduced. Also, three example applications of this type of sensing technology are introduced, including surface reconstruction from time-sequential depth images, high-speed 3D user interaction, and high-speed digital archiving.

  17. 3D augmented reality with integral imaging display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xin; Hua, Hong; Javidi, Bahram

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a three-dimensional (3D) integral imaging display for augmented reality is presented. By implementing the pseudoscopic-to-orthoscopic conversion method, elemental image arrays with different capturing parameters can be transferred into the identical format for 3D display. With the proposed merging algorithm, a new set of elemental images for augmented reality display is generated. The newly generated elemental images contain both the virtual objects and real world scene with desired depth information and transparency parameters. The experimental results indicate the feasibility of the proposed 3D augmented reality with integral imaging.

  18. Recovering physical property information from subduction plate boundaries using 3D full-waveform seismic inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, R. E.; Morgan, J. V.; Warner, M.

    2013-12-01

    Our understanding of subduction margin seismogenesis has been revolutionised in the last couple of decades with the discovery that the size of the seismogenic zone may not be controlled simply by temperature and a broad spectrum of seismic behaviour exists from stick-slip to stable sliding. Laboratory and numerical experiments suggest that physical properties, particularly fluid pressure may play an important role in controlling the seismic behaviour of subduction margins. Although drilling can provide information on physical properties along subduction thrust faults at point locations at relatively shallow depths, correlations between physical properties and seismic velocity using rock physics relationships are required to resolve physical properties along the margin and down-dip. Therefore, high resolution seismic velocity models are key to recovering physical property information at subduction plate boundaries away from drill sites. 3D Full waveform inversion (FWI) is a technique pioneered by the oil industry to obtain high-resolution high-fidelity models of physical properties in the sub-surface. 3D FWI involves the inversion of low-frequency (>2 to <7 Hz), early arriving (principally transmitted) seismic data, to recover the macro (intermediate to long-wavelength) velocity structure. Although 2D FWI has been used to improve velocity models of subduction plate boundaries before, 3D FWI has not yet been attempted. 3D inversions have superior convergence and accuracy, as they sample the subsurface with multi-azimuth multiply-crossing wavefields. In this contribution we perform a suite of synthetic tests to investigate if 3D FWI could be used to better resolve physical property information along subduction margin plate boundaries using conventionally collected 3D seismic data. We base our analysis on the Muroto Basin area of the Nankai margin and investigate if the acquisition parameters and geometry of the subduction margin render 3D seismic data collected across

  19. Accommodation response measurements for integral 3D image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiura, H.; Mishina, T.; Arai, J.; Iwadate, Y.

    2014-03-01

    We measured accommodation responses under integral photography (IP), binocular stereoscopic, and real object display conditions, and viewing conditions of binocular and monocular viewing conditions. The equipment we used was an optometric device and a 3D display. We developed the 3D display for IP and binocular stereoscopic images that comprises a high-resolution liquid crystal display (LCD) and a high-density lens array. The LCD has a resolution of 468 dpi and a diagonal size of 4.8 inches. The high-density lens array comprises 106 x 69 micro lenses that have a focal length of 3 mm and diameter of 1 mm. The lenses are arranged in a honeycomb pattern. The 3D display was positioned 60 cm from an observer under IP and binocular stereoscopic display conditions. The target was presented at eight depth positions relative to the 3D display: 15, 10, and 5 cm in front of the 3D display, on the 3D display panel, and 5, 10, 15 and 30 cm behind the 3D display under the IP and binocular stereoscopic display conditions. Under the real object display condition, the target was displayed on the 3D display panel, and the 3D display was placed at the eight positions. The results suggest that the IP image induced more natural accommodation responses compared to the binocular stereoscopic image. The accommodation responses of the IP image were weaker than those of a real object; however, they showed a similar tendency with those of the real object under the two viewing conditions. Therefore, IP can induce accommodation to the depth positions of 3D images.

  20. Interpretation of a 3D Seismic-Reflection Volume in the Basin and Range, Hawthorne, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louie, J. N.; Kell, A. M.; Pullammanappallil, S.; Oldow, J. S.; Sabin, A.; Lazaro, M.

    2009-12-01

    A collaborative effort by the Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy at the University of Nevada, Reno, and Optim Inc. of Reno has interpreted a 3d seismic data set recorded by the U.S. Navy Geothermal Programs Office (GPO) at the Hawthorne Army Depot, Nevada. The 3d survey incorporated about 20 NNW-striking lines covering an area of approximately 3 by 10 km. The survey covered an alluvial area below the eastern flank of the Wassuk Range. In the reflection volume the most prominent events are interpreted to be the base of Quaternary alluvium, the Quaternary Wassuk Range-front normal fault zone, and sequences of intercalated Tertiary volcanic flows and sediments. Such a data set is rare in the Basin and Range. Our interpretation reveals structural and stratigraphic details that form a basis for rapid development of the geothermal-energy resources underlying the Depot. We interpret a map of the time-elevation of the Wassuk Range fault and its associated splays and basin-ward step faults. The range-front fault is the deepest, and its isochron map provides essentially a map of "economic basement" under the prospect area. There are three faults that are the most readily picked through vertical sections. The fault reflections show an uncertainty in the time-depth that we can interpret for them of 50 to 200 ms, due to the over-migrated appearance of the processing contractor’s prestack time-migrated data set. Proper assessment of velocities for mitigating the migration artifacts through prestack depth migration is not possible from this data set alone, as the offsets are not long enough for sufficiently deep velocity tomography. The three faults we interpreted appear as gradients in potential-field maps. In addition, the southern boundary of a major Tertiary graben may be seen within the volume as the northward termination of the strong reflections from older Tertiary volcanics. Using a transparent volume view across the survey gives a view of the volcanics in full

  1. Forensic 3D scene reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Charles Q.; Small, Daniel E.; Peters, Ralph R.; Rigdon, J. B.

    2000-05-01

    Traditionally law enforcement agencies have relied on basic measurement and imaging tools, such as tape measures and cameras, in recording a crime scene. A disadvantage of these methods is that they are slow and cumbersome. The development of a portable system that can rapidly record a crime scene with current camera imaging, 3D geometric surface maps, and contribute quantitative measurements such as accurate relative positioning of crime scene objects, would be an asset to law enforcement agents in collecting and recording significant forensic data. The purpose of this project is to develop a fieldable prototype of a fast, accurate, 3D measurement and imaging system that would support law enforcement agents to quickly document and accurately record a crime scene.

  2. 3D Printed Robotic Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizarro, Yaritzmar Rosario; Schuler, Jason M.; Lippitt, Thomas C.

    2013-01-01

    Dexterous robotic hands are changing the way robots and humans interact and use common tools. Unfortunately, the complexity of the joints and actuations drive up the manufacturing cost. Some cutting edge and commercially available rapid prototyping machines now have the ability to print multiple materials and even combine these materials in the same job. A 3D model of a robotic hand was designed using Creo Parametric 2.0. Combining "hard" and "soft" materials, the model was printed on the Object Connex350 3D printer with the purpose of resembling as much as possible the human appearance and mobility of a real hand while needing no assembly. After printing the prototype, strings where installed as actuators to test mobility. Based on printing materials, the manufacturing cost of the hand was $167, significantly lower than other robotic hands without the actuators since they have more complex assembly processes.

  3. Comparing swimsuits in 3D.

    PubMed

    van Geer, Erik; Molenbroek, Johan; Schreven, Sander; deVoogd-Claessen, Lenneke; Toussaint, Huib

    2012-01-01

    In competitive swimming, suits have become more important. These suits influence friction, pressure and wave drag. Friction drag is related to the surface properties whereas both pressure and wave drag are greatly influenced by body shape. To find a relationship between the body shape and the drag, the anthropometry of several world class female swimmers wearing different suits was accurately defined using a 3D scanner and traditional measuring methods. The 3D scans delivered more detailed information about the body shape. On the same day the swimmers did performance tests in the water with the tested suits. Afterwards the result of the performance tests and the differences found in body shape was analyzed to determine the deformation caused by a swimsuit and its effect on the swimming performance. Although the amount of data is limited because of the few test subjects, there is an indication that the deformation of the body influences the swimming performance.

  4. Forensic 3D Scene Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    LITTLE,CHARLES Q.; PETERS,RALPH R.; RIGDON,J. BRIAN; SMALL,DANIEL E.

    1999-10-12

    Traditionally law enforcement agencies have relied on basic measurement and imaging tools, such as tape measures and cameras, in recording a crime scene. A disadvantage of these methods is that they are slow and cumbersome. The development of a portable system that can rapidly record a crime scene with current camera imaging, 3D geometric surface maps, and contribute quantitative measurements such as accurate relative positioning of crime scene objects, would be an asset to law enforcement agents in collecting and recording significant forensic data. The purpose of this project is to develop a feasible prototype of a fast, accurate, 3D measurement and imaging system that would support law enforcement agents to quickly document and accurately record a crime scene.

  5. 3D-graphite structure

    SciTech Connect

    Belenkov, E. A. Ali-Pasha, V. A.

    2011-01-15

    The structure of clusters of some new carbon 3D-graphite phases have been calculated using the molecular-mechanics methods. It is established that 3D-graphite polytypes {alpha}{sub 1,1}, {alpha}{sub 1,3}, {alpha}{sub 1,5}, {alpha}{sub 2,1}, {alpha}{sub 2,3}, {alpha}{sub 3,1}, {beta}{sub 1,2}, {beta}{sub 1,4}, {beta}{sub 1,6}, {beta}{sub 2,1}, and {beta}{sub 3,2} consist of sp{sup 2}-hybridized atoms, have hexagonal unit cells, and differ in regards to the structure of layers and order of their alternation. A possible way to experimentally synthesize new carbon phases is proposed: the polymerization and carbonization of hydrocarbon molecules.

  6. Natural 3D content on glasses-free light-field 3D cinema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balogh, Tibor; Nagy, Zsolt; Kovács, Péter Tamás.; Adhikarla, Vamsi K.

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents a complete framework for capturing, processing and displaying the free viewpoint video on a large scale immersive light-field display. We present a combined hardware-software solution to visualize free viewpoint 3D video on a cinema-sized screen. The new glasses-free 3D projection technology can support larger audience than the existing autostereoscopic displays. We introduce and describe our new display system including optical and mechanical design considerations, the capturing system and render cluster for producing the 3D content, and the various software modules driving the system. The indigenous display is first of its kind, equipped with front-projection light-field HoloVizio technology, controlling up to 63 MP. It has all the advantages of previous light-field displays and in addition, allows a more flexible arrangement with a larger screen size, matching cinema or meeting room geometries, yet simpler to set-up. The software system makes it possible to show 3D applications in real-time, besides the natural content captured from dense camera arrangements as well as from sparse cameras covering a wider baseline. Our software system on the GPU accelerated render cluster, can also visualize pre-recorded Multi-view Video plus Depth (MVD4) videos on this light-field glasses-free cinema system, interpolating and extrapolating missing views.

  7. [Real time 3D echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, F.; Shiota, T.; Thomas, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    Three-dimensional representation of the heart is an old concern. Usually, 3D reconstruction of the cardiac mass is made by successive acquisition of 2D sections, the spatial localisation and orientation of which require complex guiding systems. More recently, the concept of volumetric acquisition has been introduced. A matricial emitter-receiver probe complex with parallel data processing provides instantaneous of a pyramidal 64 degrees x 64 degrees volume. The image is restituted in real time and is composed of 3 planes (planes B and C) which can be displaced in all spatial directions at any time during acquisition. The flexibility of this system of acquisition allows volume and mass measurement with greater accuracy and reproducibility, limiting inter-observer variability. Free navigation of the planes of investigation allows reconstruction for qualitative and quantitative analysis of valvular heart disease and other pathologies. Although real time 3D echocardiography is ready for clinical usage, some improvements are still necessary to improve its conviviality. Then real time 3D echocardiography could be the essential tool for understanding, diagnosis and management of patients.

  8. 3-D radial gravity gradient inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Vanderlei C.; Barbosa, Valéria C. F.

    2013-11-01

    We have presented a joint inversion of all gravity-gradient tensor components to estimate the shape of an isolated 3-D geological body located in subsurface. The method assumes the knowledge about the depth to the top and density contrast of the source. The geological body is approximated by an interpretation model formed by an ensemble of vertically juxtaposed 3-D right prisms, each one with known thickness and density contrast. All prisms forming the interpretation model have a polygonal horizontal cross-section that approximates a depth slice of the body. Each polygon defining a horizontal cross-section has the same fixed number of vertices, which are equally spaced from 0° to 360° and have their horizontal locations described in polar coordinates referred to an arbitrary origin inside the polygon. Although the number of vertices forming each polygon is known, the horizontal coordinates of these vertices are unknown. To retrieve a set of juxtaposed depth slices of the body, and consequently, its shape, our method estimates the radii of all vertices and the horizontal Cartesian coordinates of all arbitrary origins defining the geometry of all polygons describing the horizontal cross-sections of the prisms forming the interpretation model. To obtain a stable estimate that fits the observed data, we impose constraints on the shape of the estimated body. These constraints are imposed through the well-known zeroth- and first-order Tikhonov regularizations allowing, for example, the estimate of vertical or dipping bodies. If the data do not have enough in-depth resolution, the proposed inverse method can obtain a set of stable estimates fitting the observed data with different maximum depths. To analyse the data resolution and deal with this possible ambiguity, we plot the ℓ2-norm of the residuals (s) against the estimated volume (vp) produced by a set of estimated sources having different maximum depths. If this s × vp curve (s as a function of vp) shows a well

  9. Volumetric 3D Display System with Static Screen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geng, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Current display technology has relied on flat, 2D screens that cannot truly convey the third dimension of visual information: depth. In contrast to conventional visualization that is primarily based on 2D flat screens, the volumetric 3D display possesses a true 3D display volume, and places physically each 3D voxel in displayed 3D images at the true 3D (x,y,z) spatial position. Each voxel, analogous to a pixel in a 2D image, emits light from that position to form a real 3D image in the eyes of the viewers. Such true volumetric 3D display technology provides both physiological (accommodation, convergence, binocular disparity, and motion parallax) and psychological (image size, linear perspective, shading, brightness, etc.) depth cues to human visual systems to help in the perception of 3D objects. In a volumetric 3D display, viewers can watch the displayed 3D images from a completely 360 view without using any special eyewear. The volumetric 3D display techniques may lead to a quantum leap in information display technology and can dramatically change the ways humans interact with computers, which can lead to significant improvements in the efficiency of learning and knowledge management processes. Within a block of glass, a large amount of tiny dots of voxels are created by using a recently available machining technique called laser subsurface engraving (LSE). The LSE is able to produce tiny physical crack points (as small as 0.05 mm in diameter) at any (x,y,z) location within the cube of transparent material. The crack dots, when illuminated by a light source, scatter the light around and form visible voxels within the 3D volume. The locations of these tiny voxels are strategically determined such that each can be illuminated by a light ray from a high-resolution digital mirror device (DMD) light engine. The distribution of these voxels occupies the full display volume within the static 3D glass screen. This design eliminates any moving screen seen in previous

  10. GPU-Accelerated Denoising in 3D (GD3D)

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-01

    The raw computational power GPU Accelerators enables fast denoising of 3D MR images using bilateral filtering, anisotropic diffusion, and non-local means. This software addresses two facets of this promising application: what tuning is necessary to achieve optimal performance on a modern GPU? And what parameters yield the best denoising results in practice? To answer the first question, the software performs an autotuning step to empirically determine optimal memory blocking on the GPU. To answer the second, it performs a sweep of algorithm parameters to determine the combination that best reduces the mean squared error relative to a noiseless reference image.

  11. Vision models for 3D surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Sunanda

    1992-11-01

    Different approaches to computational stereo to represent human stereo vision have been developed over the past two decades. The Marr-Poggio theory of human stereo vision is probably the most widely accepted model of the human stereo vision. However, recently developed motion stereo models which use a sequence of images taken by either a moving camera or a moving object provide an alternative method of achieving multi-resolution matching without the use of Laplacian of Gaussian operators. While using image sequences, the baseline between two camera positions for a image pair is changed for the subsequent image pair so as to achieve different resolution for each image pair. Having different baselines also avoids the inherent occlusion problem in stereo vision models. The advantage of using multi-resolution images acquired by camera positioned at different baselines over those acquired by LOG operators is that one does not have to encounter spurious edges often created by zero-crossings in the LOG operated images. Therefore in designing a computer vision system, a motion stereo model is more appropriate than a stereo vision model. However, in some applications where only a stereo pair of images are available, recovery of 3D surfaces of natural scenes are possible in a computationally efficient manner by using cepstrum matching and regularization techniques. Section 2 of this paper describes a motion stereo model using multi-scale cepstrum matching for the detection of disparity between image pairs in a sequence of images and subsequent recovery of 3D surfaces from depth-map obtained by a non convergent triangulation technique. Section 3 presents a 3D surface recovery technique from a stereo pair using cepstrum matching for disparity detection and cubic B-splines for surface smoothing. Section 4 contains the results of 3D surface recovery using both of the techniques mentioned above. Section 5 discusses the merit of 2D cepstrum matching and cubic B

  12. 3-D movies using microprocessor-controlled optoelectronic spectacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Ken; Karpf, Ron

    2012-02-01

    Despite rapid advances in technology, 3-D movies are impractical for general movie viewing. A new approach that opens all content for casual 3-D viewing is needed. 3Deeps--advanced microprocessor controlled optoelectronic spectacles--provides such a new approach to 3-D. 3Deeps works on a different principle than other methods for 3-D. 3-D movies typically use the asymmetry of dual images to produce stereopsis, necessitating costly dual-image content, complex formatting and transmission standards, and viewing via a corresponding selection device. In contrast, all 3Deeps requires to view movies in realistic depth is an illumination asymmetry--a controlled difference in optical density between the lenses. When a 2-D movie has been projected for viewing, 3Deeps converts every scene containing lateral motion into realistic 3-D. Put on 3Deeps spectacles for 3-D viewing, or remove them for viewing in 2-D. 3Deeps works for all analogue and digital 2-D content, by any mode of transmission, and for projection screens, digital or analogue monitors. An example using aerial photography is presented. A movie consisting of successive monoscopic aerial photographs appears in realistic 3-D when viewed through 3Deeps spectacles.

  13. Magmatic Systems in 3-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, G. M.; Harding, A. J.; Babcock, J. M.; Orcutt, J. A.; Bazin, S.; Singh, S.; Detrick, R. S.; Canales, J. P.; Carbotte, S. M.; Diebold, J.

    2002-12-01

    Multichannel seismic (MCS) images of crustal magma chambers are ideal targets for advanced visualization techniques. In the mid-ocean ridge environment, reflections originating at the melt-lens are well separated from other reflection boundaries, such as the seafloor, layer 2A and Moho, which enables the effective use of transparency filters. 3-D visualization of seismic reflectivity falls into two broad categories: volume and surface rendering. Volumetric-based visualization is an extremely powerful approach for the rapid exploration of very dense 3-D datasets. These 3-D datasets are divided into volume elements or voxels, which are individually color coded depending on the assigned datum value; the user can define an opacity filter to reject plotting certain voxels. This transparency allows the user to peer into the data volume, enabling an easy identification of patterns or relationships that might have geologic merit. Multiple image volumes can be co-registered to look at correlations between two different data types (e.g., amplitude variation with offsets studies), in a manner analogous to draping attributes onto a surface. In contrast, surface visualization of seismic reflectivity usually involves producing "fence" diagrams of 2-D seismic profiles that are complemented with seafloor topography, along with point class data, draped lines and vectors (e.g. fault scarps, earthquake locations and plate-motions). The overlying seafloor can be made partially transparent or see-through, enabling 3-D correlations between seafloor structure and seismic reflectivity. Exploration of 3-D datasets requires additional thought when constructing and manipulating these complex objects. As numbers of visual objects grow in a particular scene, there is a tendency to mask overlapping objects; this clutter can be managed through the effective use of total or partial transparency (i.e., alpha-channel). In this way, the co-variation between different datasets can be investigated

  14. Stereopsis has the edge in 3-D displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piantanida, T. P.

    The results of studies conducted at SRI International to explore differences in image requirements for depth and form perception with 3-D displays are presented. Monocular and binocular stabilization of retinal images was used to separate form and depth perception and to eliminate the retinal disparity input to stereopsis. Results suggest that depth perception is dependent upon illumination edges in the retinal image that may be invisible to form perception, and that the perception of motion-in-depth may be inhibited by form perception, and may be influenced by subjective factors such as ocular dominance and learning.

  15. Automatic detection of artifacts in converted S3D video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokov, Alexander; Vatolin, Dmitriy; Zachesov, Anton; Belous, Alexander; Erofeev, Mikhail

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we present algorithms for automatically detecting issues specific to converted S3D content. When a depth-image-based rendering approach produces a stereoscopic image, the quality of the result depends on both the depth maps and the warping algorithms. The most common problem with converted S3D video is edge-sharpness mismatch. This artifact may appear owing to depth-map blurriness at semitransparent edges: after warping, the object boundary becomes sharper in one view and blurrier in the other, yielding binocular rivalry. To detect this problem we estimate the disparity map, extract boundaries with noticeable differences, and analyze edge-sharpness correspondence between views. We pay additional attention to cases involving a complex background and large occlusions. Another problem is detection of scenes that lack depth volume: we present algorithms for detecting at scenes and scenes with at foreground objects. To identify these problems we analyze the features of the RGB image as well as uniform areas in the depth map. Testing of our algorithms involved examining 10 Blu-ray 3D releases with converted S3D content, including Clash of the Titans, The Avengers, and The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader. The algorithms we present enable improved automatic quality assessment during the production stage.

  16. Ultrashallow seismic imaging of the causative fault of the 1980, M6.9, southern Italy earthquake by pre-stack depth migration of dense wide-aperture data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, Pier Paolo; Castiello, Antonio; Improta, Luigi

    2010-10-01

    A two-step imaging procedure, including pre-stack depth migration (PSDM) and non-linear multiscale refraction tomography, was applied to dense wide-aperture data with the aim of imaging the causative fault of the 1980, M6.9, Irpinia normal faulting earthquake in a very complex geologic environment. PSDM is often ineffective for ultrashallow imaging (100 m of depth and less) of laterally heterogeneous media because of the difficulty in estimating a correct velocity model for migration. Dense wide-aperture profiling allowed us to build accurate velocity models across the fault zone by multiscale tomography and to record wide-angle reflections from steep reflectors. PSDM provided better imaging with respect to conventional post-stack depth migration, and improved definition of fault geometry and apparent cumulative displacement. Results indicate that this imaging strategy can be very effective for near-surface fault detection and characterization. Fault location and geometry are in agreement with paleoseismic data from two nearby trenches. The estimated vertical fault throw is only 29-38 m. This value, combined with the vertical slip rate determined by trench data, suggests a young age (97-127 kyr) of fault inception.

  17. New insights into the North Taranaki Basin from New Zealand's first broadband 3D survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzcategui, Marjosbet; Francis, Malcolm; Kong, Wai Tin Vincent; Patenall, Richard; Fell, Dominic; Paxton, Andrea; Allen, Tristan

    2016-06-01

    The Taranaki Basin is the only hydrocarbon producing basin in New Zealand. The North Taranaki Basin has widespread two-dimensional (2D) seismic coverage and numerous wells that have not encountered commercial accumulations. This is attributed to the structural complexity in the central graben and the absence of necessary information to help understand the basin's evolution. An active petroleum system has been confirmed by hydrocarbon shows and non-commercial oil and gas discoveries (Karewa-1 and Kora-1). A broadband long offset three-dimensional (3D) seismic survey was acquired and processed by Schlumberger in 2013 to evaluate the hydrocarbon potential of the North Taranaki Basin. Innovative acquisition techniques were combined with advanced processing and imaging methods. Raypath distortions and depth uncertainty were significantly reduced by processing through tilted transverse isotropy (TTI) anisotropic Kirchhoff prestack depth migration with a geologically constrained velocity model. The survey provided the necessary information to understand the petroleum system and provide evidence for material hydrocarbon accumulations. In this investigation, we assessed the hydrocarbon potential of the North Taranaki Basin using the newly acquired data. 3D seismic interpretation and amplitude-versus-offset (AVO) analysis support the renewed potential of the basin and demonstrate effectiveness of these technologies that together can achieve encouraging results for hydrocarbon exploration.

  18. 3D annotation and manipulation of medical anatomical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitanovski, Dime; Schaller, Christian; Hahn, Dieter; Daum, Volker; Hornegger, Joachim

    2009-02-01

    Although the medical scanners are rapidly moving towards a three-dimensional paradigm, the manipulation and annotation/labeling of the acquired data is still performed in a standard 2D environment. Editing and annotation of three-dimensional medical structures is currently a complex task and rather time-consuming, as it is carried out in 2D projections of the original object. A major problem in 2D annotation is the depth ambiguity, which requires 3D landmarks to be identified and localized in at least two of the cutting planes. Operating directly in a three-dimensional space enables the implicit consideration of the full 3D local context, which significantly increases accuracy and speed. A three-dimensional environment is as well more natural optimizing the user's comfort and acceptance. The 3D annotation environment requires the three-dimensional manipulation device and display. By means of two novel and advanced technologies, Wii Nintendo Controller and Philips 3D WoWvx display, we define an appropriate 3D annotation tool and a suitable 3D visualization monitor. We define non-coplanar setting of four Infrared LEDs with a known and exact position, which are tracked by the Wii and from which we compute the pose of the device by applying a standard pose estimation algorithm. The novel 3D renderer developed by Philips uses either the Z-value of a 3D volume, or it computes the depth information out of a 2D image, to provide a real 3D experience without having some special glasses. Within this paper we present a new framework for manipulation and annotation of medical landmarks directly in three-dimensional volume.

  19. Comparing a quasi-3D to a full 3D nearshore circulation model: SHORECIRC and ROMS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haas, K.A.; Warner, J.C.

    2009-01-01

    Predictions of nearshore and surf zone processes are important for determining coastal circulation, impacts of storms, navigation, and recreational safety. Numerical modeling of these systems facilitates advancements in our understanding of coastal changes and can provide predictive capabilities for resource managers. There exists many nearshore coastal circulation models, however they are mostly limited or typically only applied as depth integrated models. SHORECIRC is an established surf zone circulation model that is quasi-3D to allow the effect of the variability in the vertical structure of the currents while maintaining the computational advantage of a 2DH model. Here we compare SHORECIRC to ROMS, a fully 3D ocean circulation model which now includes a three dimensional formulation for the wave-driven flows. We compare the models with three different test applications for: (i) spectral waves approaching a plane beach with an oblique angle of incidence; (ii) monochromatic waves driving longshore currents in a laboratory basin; and (iii) monochromatic waves on a barred beach with rip channels in a laboratory basin. Results identify that the models are very similar for the depth integrated flows and qualitatively consistent for the vertically varying components. The differences are primarily the result of the vertically varying radiation stress utilized by ROMS and the utilization of long wave theory for the radiation stress formulation in vertical varying momentum balance by SHORECIRC. The quasi-3D model is faster, however the applicability of the fully 3D model allows it to extend over a broader range of processes, temporal, and spatial scales. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd.

  20. 3D sensitivity of 6-electrode Focused Impedance Method (FIM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masum Iquebal, A. H.; Siddique-e Rabbani, K.

    2010-04-01

    The present work was taken up to have an understanding of the depth sensitivity of the 6 electrode FIM developed by our laboratory earlier, so that it may be applied judiciously for the measurement of organs in 3D, with electrodes on the skin surface. For a fixed electrode geometry sensitivity is expected to depend on the depth, size and conductivity of the target object. With current electrodes 18 cm apart and potential electrodes 5 cm apart, depth sensitivity of spherical conductors, insulators and of pieces of potato of different diameters were measured. The sensitivity dropped sharply with depth gradually leveling off to background, and objects could be sensed down to a depth of about twice their diameters. The sensitivity at a certain depth increases almost linearly with volume for objects with the same conductivity. Thus these results increase confidence in the use of FIM for studying organs at depths of the body.

  1. Interactive 3D Mars Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    The Interactive 3D Mars Visualization system provides high-performance, immersive visualization of satellite and surface vehicle imagery of Mars. The software can be used in mission operations to provide the most accurate position information for the Mars rovers to date. When integrated into the mission data pipeline, this system allows mission planners to view the location of the rover on Mars to 0.01-meter accuracy with respect to satellite imagery, with dynamic updates to incorporate the latest position information. Given this information so early in the planning process, rover drivers are able to plan more accurate drive activities for the rover than ever before, increasing the execution of science activities significantly. Scientifically, this 3D mapping information puts all of the science analyses to date into geologic context on a daily basis instead of weeks or months, as was the norm prior to this contribution. This allows the science planners to judge the efficacy of their previously executed science observations much more efficiently, and achieve greater science return as a result. The Interactive 3D Mars surface view is a Mars terrain browsing software interface that encompasses the entire region of exploration for a Mars surface exploration mission. The view is interactive, allowing the user to pan in any direction by clicking and dragging, or to zoom in or out by scrolling the mouse or touchpad. This set currently includes tools for selecting a point of interest, and a ruler tool for displaying the distance between and positions of two points of interest. The mapping information can be harvested and shared through ubiquitous online mapping tools like Google Mars, NASA WorldWind, and Worldwide Telescope.

  2. 3D Nanostructuring of Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blick, Robert

    2000-03-01

    Modern semiconductor technology allows to machine devices on the nanometer scale. I will discuss the current limits of the fabrication processes, which enable the definition of single electron transistors with dimensions down to 8 nm. In addition to the conventional 2D patterning and structuring of semiconductors, I will demonstrate how to apply 3D nanostructuring techniques to build freely suspended single-crystal beams with lateral dimension down to 20 nm. In transport measurements in the temperature range from 30 mK up to 100 K these nano-crystals are characterized regarding their electronic as well as their mechanical properties. Moreover, I will present possible applications of these devices.

  3. What Lies Ahead (3-D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D cylindrical-perspective mosaic taken by the navigation camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on sol 82 shows the view south of the large crater dubbed 'Bonneville.' The rover will travel toward the Columbia Hills, seen here at the upper left. The rock dubbed 'Mazatzal' and the hole the rover drilled in to it can be seen at the lower left. The rover's position is referred to as 'Site 22, Position 32.' This image was geometrically corrected to make the horizon appear flat.

  4. Making Inexpensive 3-D Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manos, Harry

    2016-03-01

    Visual aids are important to student learning, and they help make the teacher's job easier. Keeping with the TPT theme of "The Art, Craft, and Science of Physics Teaching," the purpose of this article is to show how teachers, lacking equipment and funds, can construct a durable 3-D model reference frame and a model gravity well tailored to specific class lessons. Most of the supplies are readily available in the home or at school: rubbing alcohol, a rag, two colors of spray paint, art brushes, and masking tape. The cost of these supplies, if you don't have them, is less than 20.

  5. A Clean Adirondack (3-D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This is a 3-D anaglyph showing a microscopic image taken of an area measuring 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across on the rock called Adirondack. The image was taken at Gusev Crater on the 33rd day of the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's journey (Feb. 5, 2004), after the rover used its rock abrasion tool brush to clean the surface of the rock. Dust, which was pushed off to the side during cleaning, can still be seen to the left and in low areas of the rock.

  6. 3D Printed Shelby Cobra

    SciTech Connect

    Love, Lonnie

    2015-01-09

    ORNL's newly printed 3D Shelby Cobra was showcased at the 2015 NAIAS in Detroit. This "laboratory on wheels" uses the Shelby Cobra design, celebrating the 50th anniversary of this model and honoring the first vehicle to be voted a national monument. The Shelby was printed at the Department of Energy’s Manufacturing Demonstration Facility at ORNL using the BAAM (Big Area Additive Manufacturing) machine and is intended as a “plug-n-play” laboratory on wheels. The Shelby will allow research and development of integrated components to be tested and enhanced in real time, improving the use of sustainable, digital manufacturing solutions in the automotive industry.

  7. 3D Stratigraphic Modeling of Central Aachen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, M.; Neukum, C.; Azzam, R.; Hu, H.

    2010-05-01

    Since 1980s, advanced computer hardware and software technologies, as well as multidisciplinary research have provided possibilities to develop advanced three dimensional (3D) simulation software for geosciences application. Some countries, such as USA1) and Canada2) 3), have built up regional 3D geological models based on archival geological data. Such models have played huge roles in engineering geology2), hydrogeology2) 3), geothermal industry1) and so on. In cooperating with the Municipality of Aachen, the Department of Engineering Geology of RWTH Aachen University have built up a computer-based 3D stratigraphic model of 50 meter' depth for the center of Aachen, which is a 5 km by 7 km geologically complex area. The uncorrelated data from multi-resources, discontinuous nature and unconformable connection of the units are main challenges for geological modeling in this area. The reliability of 3D geological models largely depends on the quality and quantity of data. Existing 1D and 2D geological data were collected, including 1) approximately 6970 borehole data of different depth compiled in Microsoft Access database and MapInfo database; 2) a Digital Elevation Model (DEM); 3) geological cross sections; and 4) stratigraphic maps in 1m, 2m and 5m depth. Since acquired data are of variable origins, they were managed step by step. The main processes are described below: 1) Typing errors of borehole data were identified and the corrected data were exported to Variowin2.2 to distinguish duplicate points; 2) The surface elevation of borehole data was compared to the DEM, and differences larger than 3m were eliminated. Moreover, where elevation data missed, it was read from the DEM; 3) Considerable data were collected from municipal constructions, such as residential buildings, factories, and roads. Therefore, many boreholes are spatially clustered, and only one or two representative points were picked out in such areas; After above procedures, 5839 boreholes with -x

  8. Low Complexity Mode Decision for 3D-HEVC

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nana; Gan, Yong

    2014-01-01

    High efficiency video coding- (HEVC-) based 3D video coding (3D-HEVC) developed by joint collaborative team on 3D video coding (JCT-3V) for multiview video and depth map is an extension of HEVC standard. In the test model of 3D-HEVC, variable coding unit (CU) size decision and disparity estimation (DE) are introduced to achieve the highest coding efficiency with the cost of very high computational complexity. In this paper, a fast mode decision algorithm based on variable size CU and DE is proposed to reduce 3D-HEVC computational complexity. The basic idea of the method is to utilize the correlations between depth map and motion activity in prediction mode where variable size CU and DE are needed, and only in these regions variable size CU and DE are enabled. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm can save about 43% average computational complexity of 3D-HEVC while maintaining almost the same rate-distortion (RD) performance. PMID:25254237

  9. Positional Awareness Map 3D (PAM3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Monica; Allen, Earl L.; Yount, John W.; Norcross, April Louise

    2012-01-01

    The Western Aeronautical Test Range of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s Dryden Flight Research Center needed to address the aging software and hardware of its current situational awareness display application, the Global Real-Time Interactive Map (GRIM). GRIM was initially developed in the late 1980s and executes on older PC architectures using a Linux operating system that is no longer supported. Additionally, the software is difficult to maintain due to its complexity and loss of developer knowledge. It was decided that a replacement application must be developed or acquired in the near future. The replacement must provide the functionality of the original system, the ability to monitor test flight vehicles in real-time, and add improvements such as high resolution imagery and true 3-dimensional capability. This paper will discuss the process of determining the best approach to replace GRIM, and the functionality and capabilities of the first release of the Positional Awareness Map 3D.

  10. Implementation of active-type Lamina 3D display system.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sangcheol; Baek, Hogil; Min, Sung-Wook; Park, Soon-Gi; Park, Min-Kyu; Yoo, Seong-Hyeon; Kim, Hak-Rin; Lee, Byoungho

    2015-06-15

    Lamina 3D display is a new type of multi-layer 3D display, which utilizes the polarization state as a new dimension of depth information. Lamina 3D display system has advanced properties - to reduce the data amount representing 3D image, to be easily made using the conventional projectors, and to have a potential being applied to the many applications. However, the system might have some limitations in depth range and viewing angle due to the properties of the expressive volume components. In this paper, we propose the volume using the layers of switchable diffusers to implement the active-type Lamina 3D display system. Because the diffusing rate of the layers has no relation with the polarization state, the polarizer wheel is applied to the proposed system in purpose of making the sectioned image synchronized with the diffusing layer at the designated location. The imaging volume of the proposed system consists of five layers of polymer dispersed liquid crystal and the total size of the implemented volume is 24x18x12 mm3(3). The proposed system can achieve the improvements of viewing qualities such as enhanced depth expression and widened viewing angle.

  11. 3D printed bionic ears.

    PubMed

    Mannoor, Manu S; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A; Soboyejo, Winston O; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H; McAlpine, Michael C

    2013-06-12

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing.

  12. 3D Printable Graphene Composite

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiaojun; Li, Dong; Jiang, Wei; Gu, Zheming; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Zengxing; Sun, Zhengzong

    2015-01-01

    In human being’s history, both the Iron Age and Silicon Age thrived after a matured massive processing technology was developed. Graphene is the most recent superior material which could potentially initialize another new material Age. However, while being exploited to its full extent, conventional processing methods fail to provide a link to today’s personalization tide. New technology should be ushered in. Three-dimensional (3D) printing fills the missing linkage between graphene materials and the digital mainstream. Their alliance could generate additional stream to push the graphene revolution into a new phase. Here we demonstrate for the first time, a graphene composite, with a graphene loading up to 5.6 wt%, can be 3D printable into computer-designed models. The composite’s linear thermal coefficient is below 75 ppm·°C−1 from room temperature to its glass transition temperature (Tg), which is crucial to build minute thermal stress during the printing process. PMID:26153673

  13. 3D Printed Bionic Ears

    PubMed Central

    Mannoor, Manu S.; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A.; Soboyejo, Winston O.; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H.; McAlpine, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the precise anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing. PMID:23635097

  14. Martian terrain & airbags - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Portions of the lander's deflated airbags and a petal are at lower left in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. This image is part of a 3D 'monster' panorama of the area surrounding the landing site.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  15. Martian terrain & airbags - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Portions of the lander's deflated airbags and a petal are at the lower area of this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. This image is part of a 3D 'monster' panorama of the area surrounding the landing site.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  16. 3D structured illumination microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dougherty, William M.; Goodwin, Paul C.

    2011-03-01

    Three-dimensional structured illumination microscopy achieves double the lateral and axial resolution of wide-field microscopy, using conventional fluorescent dyes, proteins and sample preparation techniques. A three-dimensional interference-fringe pattern excites the fluorescence, filling in the "missing cone" of the wide field optical transfer function, thereby enabling axial (z) discrimination. The pattern acts as a spatial carrier frequency that mixes with the higher spatial frequency components of the image, which usually succumb to the diffraction limit. The fluorescence image encodes the high frequency content as a down-mixed, moiré-like pattern. A series of images is required, wherein the 3D pattern is shifted and rotated, providing down-mixed data for a system of linear equations. Super-resolution is obtained by solving these equations. The speed with which the image series can be obtained can be a problem for the microscopy of living cells. Challenges include pattern-switching speeds, optical efficiency, wavefront quality and fringe contrast, fringe pitch optimization, and polarization issues. We will review some recent developments in 3D-SIM hardware with the goal of super-resolved z-stacks of motile cells.

  17. X-ray Laue Diffraction Microscopy in 3D at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, W.; Zschack, P.; Tischler, Jonathan Zachary; Ice, Gene E; Larson, Ben C

    2011-01-01

    Studies of materials on mesoscopic length-scales require a penetrating structural probe with submicron point-to-point spatial resolution. The principle research activities at beamline 34-ID-E of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) involve development of exciting new micro-/nano-diffraction techniques for characterization and microscopy in support of both applied engineering and fundamental materials research. Taking advantage of the high brightness of the source, advanced focusing mirrors, a novel depth profiling technique, and high-speed area detectors, three-dimensional scanning Laue diffraction microscopy provides detailed local structural information of crystalline materials, such as crystallographic orientation, orientation gradients, and strain tensors. It is general and applicable to single-crystal, polycrystalline, composite, deformed, and functionally graded materials. Applications include 3D diffraction investigations for a diverse and growing user community with interests in materials deformation, electro-migration, recrystallization, fatigue, solid-solution precipitation, high-pressure environments, and condensed matter physics.

  18. [Evaluation of Motion Sickness Induced by 3D Video Clips].

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Yasuyuki; Takada, Hiroki

    2016-01-01

    The use of stereoscopic images has been spreading rapidly. Nowadays, stereoscopic movies are nothing new to people. Stereoscopic systems date back to 280 A.D. when Euclid first recognized the concept of depth perception by humans. Despite the increase in the production of three-dimensional (3D) display products and many studies on stereoscopic vision, the effect of stereoscopic vision on the human body has been insufficiently understood. However, symptoms such as eye fatigue and 3D sickness have been the concerns when viewing 3D films for a prolonged period of time; therefore, it is important to consider the safety of viewing virtual 3D contents as a contribution to society. It is generally explained to the public that accommodation and convergence are mismatched during stereoscopic vision and that this is the main reason for the visual fatigue and visually induced motion sickness (VIMS) during 3D viewing. We have devised a method to simultaneously measure lens accommodation and convergence. We used this simultaneous measurement device to characterize 3D vision. Fixation distance was compared between accommodation and convergence during the viewing of 3D films with repeated measurements. Time courses of these fixation distances and their distributions were compared in subjects who viewed 2D and 3D video clips. The results indicated that after 90 s of continuously viewing 3D images, the accommodative power does not correspond to the distance of convergence. In this paper, remarks on methods to measure the severity of motion sickness induced by viewing 3D films are also given. From the epidemiological viewpoint, it is useful to obtain novel knowledge for reduction and/or prevention of VIMS. We should accumulate empirical data on motion sickness, which may contribute to the development of relevant fields in science and technology.

  19. 3-D object-oriented image analysis of geophysical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadel, I.; Kerle, N.; van der Meijde, M.

    2014-07-01

    Geophysical data are the main source of information about the subsurface. Geophysical techniques are, however, highly non-unique in determining specific physical parameters and boundaries of subsurface objects. To obtain actual physical information, an inversion process is often applied, in which measurements at or above the Earth surface are inverted into a 2- or 3-D subsurface spatial distribution of the physical property. Interpreting these models into structural objects, related to physical processes, requires a priori knowledge and expert analysis which is susceptible to subjective choices and is therefore often non-repeatable. In this research, we implemented a recently introduced object-based approach to interpret the 3-D inversion results of a single geophysical technique using the available a priori information and the physical and geometrical characteristics of the interpreted objects. The introduced methodology is semi-automatic and repeatable, and allows the extraction of subsurface structures using 3-D object-oriented image analysis (3-D OOA) in an objective knowledge-based classification scheme. The approach allows for a semi-objective setting of thresholds that can be tested and, if necessary, changed in a very fast and efficient way. These changes require only changing the thresholds used in a so-called ruleset, which is composed of algorithms that extract objects from a 3-D data cube. The approach is tested on a synthetic model, which is based on a priori knowledge on objects present in the study area (Tanzania). Object characteristics and thresholds were well defined in a 3-D histogram of velocity versus depth, and objects were fully retrieved. The real model results showed how 3-D OOA can deal with realistic 3-D subsurface conditions in which the boundaries become fuzzy, the object extensions become unclear and the model characteristics vary with depth due to the different physical conditions. As expected, the 3-D histogram of the real data was

  20. 3D object recognition in TOF data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Holger; Albrecht, Martin; Grothof, Markus; Hussmann, Stephan; Oikonomidis, Nikolaos; Schwarte, Rudolf

    2003-08-01

    In the last years 3D-Vision systems based on the Time-Of-Flight (TOF) principle have gained more importance than Stereo Vision (SV). TOF offers a direct depth-data acquisition, whereas SV involves a great amount of computational power for a comparable 3D data set. Due to the enormous progress in TOF-techniques, nowadays 3D cameras can be manufactured and be used for many practical applications. Hence there is a great demand for new accurate algorithms for 3D object recognition and classification. This paper presents a new strategy and algorithm designed for a fast and solid object classification. A challenging example - accurate classification of a (half-) sphere - demonstrates the performance of the developed algorithm. Finally, the transition from a general model of the system to specific applications such as Intelligent Airbag Control and Robot Assistance in Surgery are introduced. The paper concludes with the current research results in the above mentioned fields.

  1. Migration Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crida, Aurélien

    2015-08-01

    The great variety of the architectures of the extra-solar planetary systems has revealed the fundamental role played by planetary migration: the interactions between the planets and the gaseous disk in which they form leads to a modification of their orbits. Here, I will review the basic processes and the most recent results in this area.Planets up to ~50 Earth masses are prone to so-called type I migration.I will describe the processes at play, namely the Lindblad and corotation torques, and explain how the total torque depends on the planet mass and the local disk structure. Application to realistic disks shows one or two sweet spot(s) for outward migration of planets roughly between 5 and 30 Earth masses around the snowline ; this is confirmed by dedicated 3D numerical simulations. This has strong consequences on the formation of hot Super-Earths or mini-Neptunes.For smaller mass planets, it has been recently proposed that the heating of the neighboring gas by the luminous planet can lead to a positive torque, hence promoting outward migration. On the other hand, if the planet is not a heat source, a cold finger appears, whose resulting torque is negative. Applications of these two recent results should be discussed.Giant planets open gaps in the proto-planetary disk, and then are supposedly subject to type II migration, following the viscous accretion of the disk. This standard picture has been questioned recently, as gas appears to drift through the gap. Although the gap opening process is well understood in 2D for a planet on a fixed orbit, recent results on 3D simulations or migrating planets make the picture more accurate.Our ever better understanding of planet-disk interactions is of crucial importance as the statistics on extra solar systems keep growing and the results of these interactions are now imaged.

  2. Volumetric image display for complex 3D data visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsao, Che-Chih; Chen, Jyh Shing

    2000-05-01

    A volumetric image display is a new display technology capable of displaying computer generated 3D images in a volumetric space. Many viewers can walk around the display and see the image from omni-directions simultaneously without wearing any glasses. The image is real and possesses all major elements in both physiological and psychological depth cues. Due to the volumetric nature of its image, the VID can provide the most natural human-machine interface in operations involving 3D data manipulation and 3D targets monitoring. The technology creates volumetric 3D images by projecting a series of profiling images distributed in the space form a volumetric image because of the after-image effect of human eyes. Exemplary applications in biomedical image visualization were tested on a prototype display, using different methods to display a data set from Ct-scans. The features of this display technology make it most suitable for applications that require quick understanding of the 3D relations, need frequent spatial interactions with the 3D images, or involve time-varying 3D data. It can also be useful for group discussion and decision making.

  3. Recent Advances in Visualizing 3D Flow with LIC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Interrante, Victoria; Grosch, Chester

    1998-01-01

    Line Integral Convolution (LIC), introduced by Cabral and Leedom in 1993, is an elegant and versatile technique for representing directional information via patterns of correlation in a texture. Although most commonly used to depict 2D flow, or flow over a surface in 3D, LIC methods can equivalently be used to portray 3D flow through a volume. However, the popularity of LIC as a device for illustrating 3D flow has historically been limited both by the computational expense of generating and rendering such a 3D texture and by the difficulties inherent in clearly and effectively conveying the directional information embodied in the volumetric output textures that are produced. In an earlier paper, we briefly discussed some of the factors that may underlie the perceptual difficulties that we can encounter with dense 3D displays and outlined several strategies for more effectively visualizing 3D flow with volume LIC. In this article, we review in more detail techniques for selectively emphasizing critical regions of interest in a flow and for facilitating the accurate perception of the 3D depth and orientation of overlapping streamlines, and we demonstrate new methods for efficiently incorporating an indication of orientation into a flow representation and for conveying additional information about related scalar quantities such as temperature or vorticity over a flow via subtle, continuous line width and color variations.

  4. 3D Printing of Graphene Aerogels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Feng; Medarametla, Sai Pradeep; Li, Hui; Zhou, Chi; Lin, Dong

    2016-04-06

    3D printing of a graphene aerogel with true 3D overhang structures is highlighted. The aerogel is fabricated by combining drop-on-demand 3D printing and freeze casting. The water-based GO ink is ejected and freeze-cast into designed 3D structures. The lightweight (<10 mg cm(-3) ) 3D printed graphene aerogel presents superelastic and high electrical conduction.

  5. Quasi 3D dispersion experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakucz, P.

    2003-04-01

    This paper studies the problem of tracer dispersion in a coloured fluid flowing through a two-phase 3D rough channel-system in a 40 cm*40 cm plexi-container filled by homogen glass fractions and colourless fluid. The unstable interface between the driving coloured fluid and the colourless fluid develops viscous fingers with a fractal structure at high capillary number. Five two-dimensional fractal fronts have been observed at the same time using four cameras along the vertical side-walls and using one camera located above the plexi-container. In possession of five fronts the spatial concentration contours are determined using statistical models. The concentration contours are self-affine fractal curves with a fractal dimension D=2.19. This result is valid for disperison at high Péclet numbers.

  6. ShowMe3D

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, Michael B

    2012-01-05

    ShowMe3D is a data visualization graphical user interface specifically designed for use with hyperspectral image obtained from the Hyperspectral Confocal Microscope. The program allows the user to select and display any single image from a three dimensional hyperspectral image stack. By moving a slider control, the user can easily move between images of the stack. The user can zoom into any region of the image. The user can select any pixel or region from the displayed image and display the fluorescence spectrum associated with that pixel or region. The user can define up to 3 spectral filters to apply to the hyperspectral image and view the image as it would appear from a filter-based confocal microscope. The user can also obtain statistics such as intensity average and variance from selected regions.

  7. 3D Printed Shelby Cobra

    ScienceCinema

    Love, Lonnie

    2016-11-02

    ORNL's newly printed 3D Shelby Cobra was showcased at the 2015 NAIAS in Detroit. This "laboratory on wheels" uses the Shelby Cobra design, celebrating the 50th anniversary of this model and honoring the first vehicle to be voted a national monument. The Shelby was printed at the Department of Energy’s Manufacturing Demonstration Facility at ORNL using the BAAM (Big Area Additive Manufacturing) machine and is intended as a “plug-n-play” laboratory on wheels. The Shelby will allow research and development of integrated components to be tested and enhanced in real time, improving the use of sustainable, digital manufacturing solutions in the automotive industry.

  8. Supernova Remnant in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    wavelengths. Since the amount of the wavelength shift is related to the speed of motion, one can determine how fast the debris are moving in either direction. Because Cas A is the result of an explosion, the stellar debris is expanding radially outwards from the explosion center. Using simple geometry, the scientists were able to construct a 3-D model using all of this information. A program called 3-D Slicer modified for astronomical use by the Astronomical Medicine Project at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass. was used to display and manipulate the 3-D model. Commercial software was then used to create the 3-D fly-through.

    The blue filaments defining the blast wave were not mapped using the Doppler effect because they emit a different kind of light synchrotron radiation that does not emit light at discrete wavelengths, but rather in a broad continuum. The blue filaments are only a representation of the actual filaments observed at the blast wave.

    This visualization shows that there are two main components to this supernova remnant: a spherical component in the outer parts of the remnant and a flattened (disk-like) component in the inner region. The spherical component consists of the outer layer of the star that exploded, probably made of helium and carbon. These layers drove a spherical blast wave into the diffuse gas surrounding the star. The flattened component that astronomers were unable to map into 3-D prior to these Spitzer observations consists of the inner layers of the star. It is made from various heavier elements, not all shown in the visualization, such as oxygen, neon, silicon, sulphur, argon and iron.

    High-velocity plumes, or jets, of this material are shooting out from the explosion in the plane of the disk-like component mentioned above. Plumes of silicon appear in the northeast and southwest, while those of iron are seen in the southeast and north. These jets were already known and Doppler velocity measurements have been made for these

  9. Phase mask optimization for 3D parallax EDF microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckers, Ingeborg E.; Gierlack, Michael; Höppel, Robert; Landskron, Jürgen

    2014-03-01

    Extended depth-of-field (EDF) microscopy is a well-investigated and very simple method to obtain projection images with an extended depth of focus. Despite its advantages of being a real-time method applicable to any microscopic mode with high lateral resolution that can be simply realized by extending a commercial microscope, the lack of z-correlation is still a problem. In this work we present a combined technique of EDF and stereomicroscopy. By cross-correlation depth information is obtained. Finally, 3D images are reconstructed for best phase masks and simulation results are evaluated experimentally.

  10. 3D P-wave velocity structure of the deep Galicia rifted margin: A first analysis of the Galicia 3D wide-angle seismic dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayrakci, Gaye; Minshull, Timothy A.; Davy, Richard G.; Karplus, Marianne S.; Kaeschen, Dirk; Papenberg, Cord; Krabbenhoeft, Anne; Sawyer, Dale; Reston, Timothy J.; Shillington, Donna J.; Ranero, César R.

    2014-05-01

    Galicia 3D, a reflection-refraction and long offset seismic experiment was carried out from May through September 2013, at the Galicia rifted margin (in the northeast Atlantic Ocean, west of Spain) as a collaboration between US, UK, German and Spanish groups. The 3D multichannel seismic acquisition conducted by R/V Marcus Langseth covered a 64 km by 20 km (1280 km2) zone where the main geological features are the Peridotite Ridge (PR), composed of serpentinized peridotite and thought be upper mantle exhumed to the seafloor during rifting, and the S reflector which has been interpreted to be a low angle detachment fault overlain by fault bounded, rotated, continental crustal blocks. In the 3D box, two airgun arrays of 3300 cu.in. were fired alternately (in flip-flop configuration) every 37.5 m. All shots are recorded by 44 short period four component ocean bottom seismometers (OBS) and 26 ocean bottom hydrophones (OBH) deployed and recovered by R/V Poseidon, as well as four 6 km hydrophone streamers with 12.5 m channel spacing towed by R/V Marcus Langseth. We present the preliminary results of the first arrival time tomography study which is carried out with a subset of the wide-angle dataset, in order to generate a 3D P-wave velocity volume for the entire depth sampled by the reflection data. After the relocation of OBSs and OBHs, an automatic first-arrival time picking approach is applied to a subset of the dataset, which comprises more than 5.5 million source-receiver pairs. Then, the first-arrival times are checked visually, in 3-dimensions. The a priori model used for the first-arrival time tomography is built up using information from previous seismic surveys carried out at the Galicia margin (e.g. ISE, 1997). The FAST algorithm of Zelt and Barton (1998) is used for the first-arrival time inversion. The 3D P-wave velocity volume can be used in interpreting the reflection dataset, as a starting point for migration, to quantify the thinning of the crustal layers

  11. How 3D immersive visualization is changing medical diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koning, Anton H. J.

    2011-03-01

    Originally the only way to look inside the human body without opening it up was by means of two dimensional (2D) images obtained using X-ray equipment. The fact that human anatomy is inherently three dimensional leads to ambiguities in interpretation and problems of occlusion. Three dimensional (3D) imaging modalities such as CT, MRI and 3D ultrasound remove these drawbacks and are now part of routine medical care. While most hospitals 'have gone digital', meaning that the images are no longer printed on film, they are still being viewed on 2D screens. However, this way valuable depth information is lost, and some interactions become unnecessarily complex or even unfeasible. Using a virtual reality (VR) system to present volumetric data means that depth information is presented to the viewer and 3D interaction is made possible. At the Erasmus MC we have developed V-Scope, an immersive volume visualization system for visualizing a variety of (bio-)medical volumetric datasets, ranging from 3D ultrasound, via CT and MRI, to confocal microscopy, OPT and 3D electron-microscopy data. In this talk we will address the advantages of such a system for both medical diagnostics as well as for (bio)medical research.

  12. D3D augmented reality imaging system: proof of concept in mammography

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, David B; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Liotta, Lance; Wilson, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this article is to present images from simulated breast microcalcifications and assess the pattern of the microcalcifications with a technical development called “depth 3-dimensional (D3D) augmented reality”. Materials and methods A computer, head display unit, joystick, D3D augmented reality software, and an in-house script of simulated data of breast microcalcifications in a ductal distribution were used. No patient data was used and no statistical analysis was performed. Results The D3D augmented reality system demonstrated stereoscopic depth perception by presenting a unique image to each eye, focal point convergence, head position tracking, 3D cursor, and joystick fly-through. Conclusion The D3D augmented reality imaging system offers image viewing with depth perception and focal point convergence. The D3D augmented reality system should be tested to determine its utility in clinical practice. PMID:27563261

  13. 3D Kitaev spin liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanns, Maria

    The Kitaev honeycomb model has become one of the archetypal spin models exhibiting topological phases of matter, where the magnetic moments fractionalize into Majorana fermions interacting with a Z2 gauge field. In this talk, we discuss generalizations of this model to three-dimensional lattice structures. Our main focus is the metallic state that the emergent Majorana fermions form. In particular, we discuss the relation of the nature of this Majorana metal to the details of the underlying lattice structure. Besides (almost) conventional metals with a Majorana Fermi surface, one also finds various realizations of Dirac semi-metals, where the gapless modes form Fermi lines or even Weyl nodes. We introduce a general classification of these gapless quantum spin liquids using projective symmetry analysis. Furthermore, we briefly outline why these Majorana metals in 3D Kitaev systems provide an even richer variety of Dirac and Weyl phases than possible for electronic matter and comment on possible experimental signatures. Work done in collaboration with Kevin O'Brien and Simon Trebst.

  14. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-01

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K+ channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44+ EGFR+ KV1.1+ MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44- EGFR- KV1.1+ 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third, the developed

  15. Crowdsourcing Based 3d Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somogyi, A.; Barsi, A.; Molnar, B.; Lovas, T.

    2016-06-01

    Web-based photo albums that support organizing and viewing the users' images are widely used. These services provide a convenient solution for storing, editing and sharing images. In many cases, the users attach geotags to the images in order to enable using them e.g. in location based applications on social networks. Our paper discusses a procedure that collects open access images from a site frequently visited by tourists. Geotagged pictures showing the image of a sight or tourist attraction are selected and processed in photogrammetric processing software that produces the 3D model of the captured object. For the particular investigation we selected three attractions in Budapest. To assess the geometrical accuracy, we used laser scanner and DSLR as well as smart phone photography to derive reference values to enable verifying the spatial model obtained from the web-album images. The investigation shows how detailed and accurate models could be derived applying photogrammetric processing software, simply by using images of the community, without visiting the site.

  16. Regular patterns of Cs-137 distribution in natural conjugated elementary landscapes as a result of a balanced surface and depth water migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobova, Elena; Romanov, Sergey

    2016-04-01

    Distribution of artificial radionuclides in the environment has long been used successfully for revealing migration pathways of their stable analogues. Migration of water in natural conjugated elementary landscapes characterizing the system of top-slope-resulting depression, has a specific structure and the radionuclide tracer is inevitably reflecting it by specific sorption and exchange processes. Other important issues are the concentration levels and the difference in characteristic time of chemical element dispersion. Modern biosphere has acquired its sustainable structure within a long period of time and is formed by basic macroelements allowing the water soluble portion of elements functioning as activators of chemical exchange. Water migration is controlled by gravitation, climate and relief while fixation depends upon the parameters of surfaces and chemical composition. The resulting structure depends on specificity and duration of the process. The long-term redistribution of chemical elements in terrestrial environment has led to a distinct geochemical structure of conjugated landscapes with a specific geometry of redistribution and accumulation of chemical elements. Migration of the newly born anthropogenic radionuclides followed natural pathways in biosphere. The initial deposition of the Chernobyl's radionuclides within the elementary landscape-geochemical system was even by condition of aerial deposition. But further exchange process is controlled by the strength of fixation and migration ability of the carriers. Therefore patterns of spatial distribution of artificial radionuclides in natural landscapes are considerably different as compared to those of the long-term forming the basic structure of chemical fields in biosphere. Our monitoring of Cs-137 radial and lateral distribution in the test plots characterizing natural undisturbed conjugated elementary landscapes performed in the period from 2005 until now has revealed a stable and specifically

  17. The role of the cytoskeleton in cellular force generation in 2D and 3D environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraning-Rush, Casey M.; Carey, Shawn P.; Califano, Joseph P.; Smith, Brooke N.; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A.

    2011-02-01

    To adhere and migrate, cells generate forces through the cytoskeleton that are transmitted to the surrounding matrix. While cellular force generation has been studied on 2D substrates, less is known about cytoskeletal-mediated traction forces of cells embedded in more in vivo-like 3D matrices. Recent studies have revealed important differences between the cytoskeletal structure, adhesion, and migration of cells in 2D and 3D. Because the cytoskeleton mediates force, we sought to directly compare the role of the cytoskeleton in modulating cell force in 2D and 3D. MDA-MB-231 cells were treated with agents that perturbed actin, microtubules, or myosin, and analyzed for changes in cytoskeletal organization and force generation in both 2D and 3D. To quantify traction stresses in 2D, traction force microscopy was used; in 3D, force was assessed based on single cell-mediated collagen fibril reorganization imaged using confocal reflectance microscopy. Interestingly, even though previous studies have observed differences in cell behaviors like migration in 2D and 3D, our data indicate that forces generated on 2D substrates correlate with forces within 3D matrices. Disruption of actin, myosin or microtubules in either 2D or 3D microenvironments disrupts cell-generated force. These data suggest that despite differences in cytoskeletal organization in 2D and 3D, actin, microtubules and myosin contribute to contractility and matrix reorganization similarly in both microenvironments.

  18. Lithospheric Structure of the Western North Anatolian Fault Zone from 3-D Teleseismic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papaleo, E.

    2015-12-01

    The North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ) is a 1500 km long active strike-slip fault that spans northern Turkey. During the past century a series of migrating earthquakes have sequentially activated different segments of the fault. The last major events of this sequence are the 1999 Izmit and Düzce earthquakes, which are consistent with a gradual westward migration in seismicity. The next active segment of the fault may be close to the city of Istanbul, posing a major risk for its population. Historically, the NAFZ exhibits a recurrent migrating sequence of high magnitude earthquakes along the fault zone, suggesting that it accommodates most of the plate motion between Anatolian and Eurasian plates in a narrow shear zone. From GPS studies following the Izmit and Düzce events, this motion does not appear to be constrained to the upper crust, and may extend at least to the lower crust. However, the geometry of the fault in the lower crust and upper mantle is at present poorly understood and previous tomographic studies do not provide a consistent picture of the velocity structure in this region. To better constrain the geometry of the shear zone at depth, in particular beneath the most recently active segment of the fault, an array of 70 temporary seismic stations with a 7 km spacing was deployed for 18 months as part of the FaultLab project. Amongst all the events recorded, those of magnitude ≥ 5 and situated between 27 and 98 degrees from the centre of the array were selected to perform 3D teleseismic tomography. Synthetic resolution tests indicate that structures as small as the average station spacing can be recovered to a depth of approximately 80 km. The work aims to provide a higher resolution image of the velocity structure beneath the western segment of the NAFZ, leading to a better understanding of the shear zone in the lower crust and upper mantle.

  19. Patient specific 3D printed phantom for IMRT quality assurance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehler, Eric D.; Barney, Brett M.; Higgins, Patrick D.; Dusenbery, Kathryn E.

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of a patient specific phantom for patient specific dosimetric verification. Using the head and neck region of an anthropomorphic phantom as a substitute for an actual patient, a soft-tissue equivalent model was constructed with the use of a 3D printer. Calculated and measured dose in the anthropomorphic phantom and the 3D printed phantom was compared for a parallel-opposed head and neck field geometry to establish tissue equivalence. A nine-field IMRT plan was constructed and dose verification measurements were performed for the 3D printed phantom as well as traditional standard phantoms. The maximum difference in calculated dose was 1.8% for the parallel-opposed configuration. Passing rates of various dosimetric parameters were compared for the IMRT plan measurements; the 3D printed phantom results showed greater disagreement at superficial depths than other methods. A custom phantom was created using a 3D printer. It was determined that the use of patient specific phantoms to perform dosimetric verification and estimate the dose in the patient is feasible. In addition, end-to-end testing on a per-patient basis was possible with the 3D printed phantom. Further refinement of the phantom construction process is needed for routine use.

  20. 3-D Imaging Systems for Agricultural Applications—A Review

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez-Arellano, Manuel; Griepentrog, Hans W.; Reiser, David; Paraforos, Dimitris S.

    2016-01-01

    Efficiency increase of resources through automation of agriculture requires more information about the production process, as well as process and machinery status. Sensors are necessary for monitoring the status and condition of production by recognizing the surrounding structures such as objects, field structures, natural or artificial markers, and obstacles. Currently, three dimensional (3-D) sensors are economically affordable and technologically advanced to a great extent, so a breakthrough is already possible if enough research projects are commercialized. The aim of this review paper is to investigate the state-of-the-art of 3-D vision systems in agriculture, and the role and value that only 3-D data can have to provide information about environmental structures based on the recent progress in optical 3-D sensors. The structure of this research consists of an overview of the different optical 3-D vision techniques, based on the basic principles. Afterwards, their application in agriculture are reviewed. The main focus lays on vehicle navigation, and crop and animal husbandry. The depth dimension brought by 3-D sensors provides key information that greatly facilitates the implementation of automation and robotics in agriculture. PMID:27136560

  1. Patient specific 3D printed phantom for IMRT quality assurance.

    PubMed

    Ehler, Eric D; Barney, Brett M; Higgins, Patrick D; Dusenbery, Kathryn E

    2014-10-07

    The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of a patient specific phantom for patient specific dosimetric verification.Using the head and neck region of an anthropomorphic phantom as a substitute for an actual patient, a soft-tissue equivalent model was constructed with the use of a 3D printer. Calculated and measured dose in the anthropomorphic phantom and the 3D printed phantom was compared for a parallel-opposed head and neck field geometry to establish tissue equivalence. A nine-field IMRT plan was constructed and dose verification measurements were performed for the 3D printed phantom as well as traditional standard phantoms.The maximum difference in calculated dose was 1.8% for the parallel-opposed configuration. Passing rates of various dosimetric parameters were compared for the IMRT plan measurements; the 3D printed phantom results showed greater disagreement at superficial depths than other methods.A custom phantom was created using a 3D printer. It was determined that the use of patient specific phantoms to perform dosimetric verification and estimate the dose in the patient is feasible. In addition, end-to-end testing on a per-patient basis was possible with the 3D printed phantom. Further refinement of the phantom construction process is needed for routine use.

  2. Research of 3D display using anamorphic optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Kenji; Honda, Toshio

    1997-05-01

    This paper describes the auto-stereoscopic display which can reconstruct more reality and viewer friendly 3-D image by increasing the number of parallaxes and giving motion parallax horizontally. It is difficult to increase number of parallaxes to give motion parallax to the 3-D image without reducing the resolution, because the resolution of display device is insufficient. The magnification and the image formation position can be selected independently in horizontal direction and the vertical direction by projecting between the display device and the 3-D image with the anamorphic optics. The anamorphic optics is an optics system with different magnification in horizontal direction and the vertical direction. It consists of the combination of cylindrical lenses with different focal length. By using this optics, even if we use a dynamic display such as liquid crystal display (LCD), it is possible to display the realistic 3-D image having motion parallax. Motion parallax is obtained by assuming width of the single parallax at the viewing position to be about the same size as the pupil diameter of viewer. In addition, because the focus depth of the 3-D image is deep in this method, conflict of accommodation and convergence is small, and natural 3-D image can be displayed.

  3. 3D visualization for research and teaching in geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manea, Marina; Constantin Manea, Vlad

    2010-05-01

    Today, we are provided with an abundance of visual images from a variety of sources. In doing research, data visualization represents an important part, and sophisticated models require special tools that should enhance the comprehension of modeling results. Also, helping our students gain visualization skills is an important way to foster greater comprehension when studying geosciences. For these reasons we build a 3D stereo-visualization system, or a GeoWall, that permits to explore in depth 3D modeling results and provide for students an attractive way for data visualization. In this study, we present the architecture of such low cost system, and how is used. The system consists of three main parts: a DLP-3D capable display, a high performance workstation and several pairs of wireless liquid crystal shutter eyewear. The system is capable of 3D stereo visualization of Google Earth and/or 3D numeric modeling results. Also, any 2D image or movie can be instantly viewed in 3D stereo. Such flexible-easy-to-use visualization system proved to be an essential research and teaching tool.

  4. 3-D Imaging Systems for Agricultural Applications-A Review.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Arellano, Manuel; Griepentrog, Hans W; Reiser, David; Paraforos, Dimitris S

    2016-04-29

    Efficiency increase of resources through automation of agriculture requires more information about the production process, as well as process and machinery status. Sensors are necessary for monitoring the status and condition of production by recognizing the surrounding structures such as objects, field structures, natural or artificial markers, and obstacles. Currently, three dimensional (3-D) sensors are economically affordable and technologically advanced to a great extent, so a breakthrough is already possible if enough research projects are commercialized. The aim of this review paper is to investigate the state-of-the-art of 3-D vision systems in agriculture, and the role and value that only 3-D data can have to provide information about environmental structures based on the recent progress in optical 3-D sensors. The structure of this research consists of an overview of the different optical 3-D vision techniques, based on the basic principles. Afterwards, their application in agriculture are reviewed. The main focus lays on vehicle navigation, and crop and animal husbandry. The depth dimension brought by 3-D sensors provides key information that greatly facilitates the implementation of automation and robotics in agriculture.

  5. 3D cinema to 3DTV content adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasakethu, L.; Blondé, L.; Doyen, D.; Huynh-Thu, Q.

    2012-03-01

    3D cinema and 3DTV have grown in popularity in recent years. Filmmakers have a significant opportunity in front of them given the recent success of 3D films. In this paper we investigate whether this opportunity could be extended to the home in a meaningful way. "3D" perceived from viewing stereoscopic content depends on the viewing geometry. This implies that the stereoscopic-3D content should be captured for a specific viewing geometry in order to provide a satisfactory 3D experience. However, although it would be possible, it is clearly not viable, to produce and transmit multiple streams of the same content for different screen sizes. In this study to solve the above problem, we analyze the performance of six different disparity-based transformation techniques, which could be used for cinema-to-3DTV content conversion. Subjective tests are performed to evaluate the effectiveness of the algorithms in terms of depth effect, visual comfort and overall 3D quality. The resultant 3DTV experience is also compared to that of cinema. We show that by applying the proper transformation technique on the content originally captured for cinema, it is possible to enhance the 3DTV experience. The selection of the appropriate transformation is highly dependent on the content characteristics.

  6. [3D emulation of epicardium dynamic mapping].

    PubMed

    Lu, Jun; Yang, Cui-Wei; Fang, Zu-Xiang

    2005-03-01

    In order to realize epicardium dynamic mapping of the whole atria, 3-D graphics are drawn with OpenGL. Some source codes are introduced in the paper to explain how to produce, read, and manipulate 3-D model data.

  7. An interactive multiview 3D display system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaoxing; Geng, Zheng; Zhang, Mei; Dong, Hui

    2013-03-01

    The progresses in 3D display systems and user interaction technologies will help more effective 3D visualization of 3D information. They yield a realistic representation of 3D objects and simplifies our understanding to the complexity of 3D objects and spatial relationship among them. In this paper, we describe an autostereoscopic multiview 3D display system with capability of real-time user interaction. Design principle of this autostereoscopic multiview 3D display system is presented, together with the details of its hardware/software architecture. A prototype is built and tested based upon multi-projectors and horizontal optical anisotropic display structure. Experimental results illustrate the effectiveness of this novel 3D display and user interaction system.

  8. 3D Scene Restoration Using One Active PTZ Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexiev, K. M.; Nikolova, I. N.; Zapryanov, G. S.

    2009-10-01

    The paper considers the task of recovery of 3D information about the scene from single camera images. The basic idea is to extract the useful depth information from the images automatically and efficiently. Depth perception with single standard video surveillance camera is a challenging problem. The difficulties in deriving the distance to the observed objects in the scene can be partially overcome using active PTZ cameras and suitable control of camera parameters. There are several techniques for depth recovery. Here, the task of depth estimation in the context of the well known depth from defocus approach is considered. In this paper, it is proposed the problem to be solved as classical nonlinear line fitting optimization problem. The characteristics of the approach are discussed. Experimental studies, using test patterns and real objects are presented.

  9. Laser Based 3D Volumetric Display System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-01

    Literature, Costa Mesa, CA July 1983. 3. "A Real Time Autostereoscopic Multiplanar 3D Display System", Rodney Don Williams, Felix Garcia, Jr., Texas...8217 .- NUMBERS LASER BASED 3D VOLUMETRIC DISPLAY SYSTEM PR: CD13 0. AUTHOR(S) PE: N/AWIU: DN303151 P. Soltan, J. Trias, W. Robinson, W. Dahlke 7...laser generated 3D volumetric images on a rotating double helix, (where the 3D displays are computer controlled for group viewing with the naked eye

  10. True 3d Images and Their Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; wang@hzgeospace., zheng.

    2012-07-01

    A true 3D image is a geo-referenced image. Besides having its radiometric information, it also has true 3Dground coordinates XYZ for every pixels of it. For a true 3D image, especially a true 3D oblique image, it has true 3D coordinates not only for building roofs and/or open grounds, but also for all other visible objects on the ground, such as visible building walls/windows and even trees. The true 3D image breaks the 2D barrier of the traditional orthophotos by introducing the third dimension (elevation) into the image. From a true 3D image, for example, people will not only be able to read a building's location (XY), but also its height (Z). true 3D images will fundamentally change, if not revolutionize, the way people display, look, extract, use, and represent the geospatial information from imagery. In many areas, true 3D images can make profound impacts on the ways of how geospatial information is represented, how true 3D ground modeling is performed, and how the real world scenes are presented. This paper first gives a definition and description of a true 3D image and followed by a brief review of what key advancements of geospatial technologies have made the creation of true 3D images possible. Next, the paper introduces what a true 3D image is made of. Then, the paper discusses some possible contributions and impacts the true 3D images can make to geospatial information fields. At the end, the paper presents a list of the benefits of having and using true 3D images and the applications of true 3D images in a couple of 3D city modeling projects.

  11. 3D Printing and Its Urologic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Youssef; Feibus, Allison H; Baum, Neil

    2015-01-01

    3D printing is the development of 3D objects via an additive process in which successive layers of material are applied under computer control. This article discusses 3D printing, with an emphasis on its historical context and its potential use in the field of urology. PMID:26028997

  12. Teaching Geography with 3-D Visualization Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anthamatten, Peter; Ziegler, Susy S.

    2006-01-01

    Technology that helps students view images in three dimensions (3-D) can support a broad range of learning styles. "Geo-Wall systems" are visualization tools that allow scientists, teachers, and students to project stereographic images and view them in 3-D. We developed and presented 3-D visualization exercises in several undergraduate courses.…

  13. Expanding Geometry Understanding with 3D Printing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran, Jill A.; Cochran, Zane; Laney, Kendra; Dean, Mandi

    2016-01-01

    With the rise of personal desktop 3D printing, a wide spectrum of educational opportunities has become available for educators to leverage this technology in their classrooms. Until recently, the ability to create physical 3D models was well beyond the scope, skill, and budget of many schools. However, since desktop 3D printers have become readily…

  14. Beowulf 3D: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, Rob

    2008-02-01

    This paper discusses the creative and technical challenges encountered during the production of "Beowulf 3D," director Robert Zemeckis' adaptation of the Old English epic poem and the first film to be simultaneously released in IMAX 3D and digital 3D formats.

  15. 3D Flow Visualization Using Texture Advection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David; Zhang, Bing; Kim, Kwansik; Pang, Alex; Moran, Pat (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Texture advection is an effective tool for animating and investigating 2D flows. In this paper, we discuss how this technique can be extended to 3D flows. In particular, we examine the use of 3D and 4D textures on 3D synthetic and computational fluid dynamics flow fields.

  16. Joint calibration of 3D resist image and CDSEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, C. S.; He, Y. Y.; Tang, Y. P.; Chang, Y. T.; Huang, W. C.; Liu, R. G.; Gau, T. S.

    2013-04-01

    Traditionally, an optical proximity correction model is to evaluate the resist image at a specific depth within the photoresist and then extract the resist contours from the image. Calibration is generally implemented by comparing resist contours with the critical dimensions (CD). The wafer CD is usually collected by a scanning electron microscope (SEM), which evaluates the CD based on some criterion that is a function of gray level, differential signal, threshold or other parameters set by the SEM. However, the criterion does not reveal which depth the CD is obtained at. This depth inconsistency between modeling and SEM makes the model calibration difficult for low k1 images. In this paper, the vertical resist profile is obtained by modifying the model from planar (2D) to quasi-3D approach and comparing the CD from this new model with SEM CD. For this quasi-3D model, the photoresist diffusion along the depth of the resist is considered and the 3D photoresist contours are evaluated. The performance of this new model is studied and is better than the 2D model.

  17. Subjective evaluation of a 3D videoconferencing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizek, Hadi; Brunnström, Kjell; Wang, Kun; Andrén, Börje; Johanson, Mathias

    2014-03-01

    A shortcoming of traditional videoconferencing systems is that they present the user with a flat, two-dimensional image of the remote participants. Recent advances in autostereoscopic display technology now make it possible to develop video conferencing systems supporting true binocular depth perception. In this paper, we present a subjective evaluation of a prototype multiview autostereoscopic video conferencing system and suggest a number of possible improvements based on the results. Whereas methods for subjective evaluation of traditional 2D videoconferencing systems are well established, the introduction of 3D requires an extension of the test procedures to assess the quality of depth perception. For this purpose, two depth-based test tasks have been designed and experiments have been conducted with test subjects comparing the 3D system to a conventional 2D video conferencing system. The outcome of the experiments show that the perception of depth is significantly improved in the 3D system, but the overall quality of experience is higher in the 2D system.

  18. GPR data processing for 3D fracture mapping in a marble quarry (Thassos, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandjean, G.; Gourry, J. C.

    1996-11-01

    Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) has been successfully applied to detect and map fractures in marble quarries. The aim was to distinguish quickly intact marketable marble areas from fractured ones in order to improve quarry management. The GPR profiling method was chosen because it is non destructive and quickly provides a detailed image of the subsurface. It was performed in domains corresponding to future working areas in real quarry-exploitation conditions. Field surveying and data processing were adapted to the local characteristics of the fractures: E-W orientation, sub-vertical dip, and karst features. After the GPR profiles had been processed, using methods adapted from seismics (amplitude compensation, filtering and Fourier migration), the interpreted fractures from a 12 × 24 × 15 m zone were incorporated into a 3D model. Due to the low electrical conductivity of the marble, GPR provides penetration depths of about 8 and 15 m, and resolutions of about 1 and 5 cm for frequencies of 900 and 300 MHz respectively. The detection power thus seems to be sufficient to recommend use of this method. As requested by the quarriers, the 3D representation can be used directly by themselves to locate high- or low-quality marble areas. Comparison between the observed surface fractures and the fractures detected using GPR showed reasonable correlation.

  19. 3-D Perspective Pasadena, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This perspective view shows the western part of the city of Pasadena, California, looking north towards the San Gabriel Mountains. Portions of the cities of Altadena and La Canada, Flintridge are also shown. The image was created from three datasets: the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) supplied the elevation data; Landsat data from November 11, 1986 provided the land surface color (not the sky) and U.S. Geological Survey digital aerial photography provides the image detail. The Rose Bowl, surrounded by a golf course, is the circular feature at the bottom center of the image. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory is the cluster of large buildings north of the Rose Bowl at the base of the mountains. A large landfill, Scholl Canyon, is the smooth area in the lower left corner of the scene. This image shows the power of combining data from different sources to create planning tools to study problems that affect large urban areas. In addition to the well-known earthquake hazards, Southern California is affected by a natural cycle of fire and mudflows. Wildfires strip the mountains of vegetation, increasing the hazards from flooding and mudflows for several years afterwards. Data such as shown on this image can be used to predict both how wildfires will spread over the terrain and also how mudflows will be channeled down the canyons. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11, 2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission was designed to collect three dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency

  20. 3D fold growth in transpression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frehner, Marcel

    2016-12-01

    Geological folds in transpression are inherently 3D structures; hence their growth and rotation behavior is studied using 3D numerical finite-element simulations. Upright single-layer buckle folds in Newtonian materials are considered, which grow from an initial point-like perturbation due to a combination of in-plane shortening and shearing (i.e., transpression). The resulting fold growth exhibits three components: (1) fold amplification (vertical), (2) fold elongation (parallel to fold axis), and (3) sequential fold growth (perpendicular to axial plane) of new anti- and synforms adjacent to the initial fold. Generally, the fold growth rates are smaller for shearing-dominated than for shortening-dominated transpression. In spite of the growth rate, the folding behavior is very similar for the different convergence angles. The two lateral directions always exhibit similar growth rates implying that the bulk fold structure occupies an increasing roughly circular area. Fold axes are always parallel to the major horizontal principal strain axis (λ→max, i.e., long axis of the horizontal finite strain ellipse), which is initially also parallel to the major horizontal instantaneous stretching axis (ISA→max). After initiation, the fold axes rotate together with λ→max. Sequential folds appearing later do not initiate parallel to ISA→max, but parallel to λ→max, i.e. parallel to the already existing folds, and also rotate with λ→max. Therefore, fold axes do not correspond to passive material lines and hinge migration takes place as a consequence. The fold axis orientation parallel to λ→max is independent of convergence angle and viscosity ratio. Therefore, a triangular relationship between convergence angle, amount of shortening, and fold axis orientation exists. If two of these values are known, the third can be determined. This relationship is applied to the Zagros fold-and-thrust-belt to estimate the degree of strain partitioning between the Simply

  1. 3D GPR Modeling and Imaging of Burials: Mueschke Historic Cemetery, Houston, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul Aziz, A.; Stewart, R.; Green, S. L.

    2014-12-01

    3D ground-penetrating radar (GPR) surveys consisting of 6 grids were conducted from October 2013 until April 2014 to delineate burials at the historic Mueschke Cemetery in Houston, Texas. The surveys were primarily to assist historians and archeologists from the Mueschke Cemetery Association and Lone Star College in locating some 13 postulated unmarked burials. Antenna with three frequencies were used: 100 MHz, 250 MHz and 1000 MHz. Most surveys were conducted with the 250 MHz Sensors and Software NOGGIN System which has a maximum penetration of about 3 m. Three methods were used to estimate the soil velocity for time-to-depth conversion: Common mid-point (CMP) surveys, time-to-known depth matching, and hyperbola fitting. All three methods gave an average velocity of 0.06 m/ns in the upper 2 m of the soil. The time-to-known depth method was accomplished by digging a trench (1.5 m deep by 1.5 m wide by 3 m long) about 10 m from the cemetery entrance using a back-hoe. Rebar was hammered horizontally into the trench wall at 0.25 m increments from depths of 1.5 m to 0.25 m. The excavation also allowed us to observe soil strata which transitions from loam, to silty clay to mostly clay with increasing depth. We used finite-difference, time-domain computer modeling to synthesize the response of two types of burials: vaulted or concrete enclosed (post-1940) and non-vaulted or casket only (pre-1940). Modeling results indicate that vaulted burials have a flattened apex signature while non-vaulted burials have signatures that are more hyperbolic. The data were processed using gain, dewow, background removal, filtering, and migration. Survey data over known burials show distinct diffractions and a rectangular shape-correspondent to the computer modeling results. Burials before 1940 have weaker diffractions which complicates their detection. Tree roots, clay patches, and rocks can also present anomalies that must be carefully investigated. Nonetheless, several strong burial

  2. Geological evolution of the North Sea: a dynamic 3D model including petroleum system elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabine, Heim; Rüdiger, Lutz; Dirk, Kaufmann; Lutz, Reinhardt

    2013-04-01

    This study investigates the sedimentary basin evolution of the German North Sea with a focus on petroleum generation, migration and accumulation. The study is conducted within the framework of the project "Geoscientific Potential of the German North Sea (GPDN)", a joint project of federal (BGR, BSH) and state authorities (LBEG) with partners from industry and scientific institutions. Based on the structural model of the "Geotektonischer Atlas 3D" (GTA3D, LBEG), this dynamic 3D model contains additionally the northwestern part ("Entenschnabel" area) of the German North Sea. Geological information, e.g. lithostratigraphy, facies and structural data, provided by industry, was taken from published research projects, or literature data such as the Southern Permian Basin Atlas (SPBA; Doornenbal et al., 2010). Numerical modeling was carried out for a sedimentary succession containing 17 stratigraphic layers and several sublayers, representing the sedimentary deposition from the Devonian until Present. Structural details have been considered in terms of simplified faults and salt structures, as well as main erosion and salt movement events. Lithology, facies and the boundary conditions e.g. heat flow, paleo water-depth and sediment water interface temperature were assigned. The system calibration is based on geochemical and petrological data, such as maturity of organic matter (VRr) and present day temperature. Due to the maturity of the sedimentary organic matter Carboniferous layers are the major source rocks for gas generation. Main reservoir rocks are the Rotliegend sandstones, furthermore, sandstones of the Lower Triassic and Jurassic can serve as reservoir rocks in areas where the Zechstein salts are absent. The model provides information on the temperature and maturity distribution within the main source rock layers as well as information of potential hydrocarbon generation based on kinetic data for gas liberation. Finally, this dynamic 3D model offers a first

  3. Complex patterns of faulting revealed by 3D seismic data at the West Galicia rifted margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reston, Timothy; Cresswell, Derren; Sawyer, Dale; Ranero, Cesar; Shillington, Donna; Morgan, Julia; Lymer, Gael

    2015-04-01

    The west Galicia margin is characterised by crust thinning to less than 3 km, well-defined fault blocks, which overlie a bright reflection (the S reflector) generally interpreted as a tectonic Moho. The margin exhibits neither voluminous magmatism nor thick sediment piles to obscure the structures and the amount of extension. As such is represents an ideal location to study the process of continental breakup both through seismic imaging and potentially through drilling. Prestack depth migration of existing 2D profiles has strongly supported the interpretation of the S reflector as both a detachment and as the crust-mantle boundary; wide-angle seismic has also shown that the mantle beneath S is serpentinised. Despite the quality of the existing 2D seismic images, a number of competing models have been advanced to explain the formation of this margin, including sequential faulting, polyphase faulting, multiple detachments and the gravitational collapse of the margin over exhumed mantle. As these models, all developed for the Galicia margin, have been subsequently applied to other margins, distinguishing between them has implications not only for the structure of the Galicia margin but for the process of rifting through to breakup more generally. To address these issues in summer of 2013 we collected a 3D combined seismic reflection and wide-angle dataset over this margin. Here we present some of the results of ongoing processing of the 3D volume, focussing on the internal structure of some of the fault blocks that overlies the S detachment. 2D processing of the data shows a relatively simple series of tilted fault block, bound by west-dipping faults that detach downwards onto the bright S reflector. However, inspection of the 3D volume produced by 3D pre-stack time migration reveals that the fault blocks contain a complex set of sedimentary packages, with strata tilted to the east, west, north and south, each package bound by faults. Furthermore, the top of crustal

  4. Case study: Beauty and the Beast 3D: benefits of 3D viewing for 2D to 3D conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handy Turner, Tara

    2010-02-01

    From the earliest stages of the Beauty and the Beast 3D conversion project, the advantages of accurate desk-side 3D viewing was evident. While designing and testing the 2D to 3D conversion process, the engineering team at Walt Disney Animation Studios proposed a 3D viewing configuration that not only allowed artists to "compose" stereoscopic 3D but also improved efficiency by allowing artists to instantly detect which image features were essential to the stereoscopic appeal of a shot and which features had minimal or even negative impact. At a time when few commercial 3D monitors were available and few software packages provided 3D desk-side output, the team designed their own prototype devices and collaborated with vendors to create a "3D composing" workstation. This paper outlines the display technologies explored, final choices made for Beauty and the Beast 3D, wish-lists for future development and a few rules of thumb for composing compelling 2D to 3D conversions.

  5. Reservoir geology using 3D modelling tools

    SciTech Connect

    Dubrule, O.; Samson, P.; Segonds, D.

    1996-12-31

    The last decade has seen tremendous developments in the area of quantitative geological modelling. These developments have a significant impact on the current practice of constructing reservoir models. A structural model can first be constructed on the basis of depth-converted structural interpretations produced on a seismic interpretation workstation. Surfaces and faults can be represented as geological objects, and interactively modified. Once the tectonic framework has been obtained, intermediate stratigraphic surfaces can be constructed between the main structural surfaces. Within each layer, reservoir attributes can be represented using various techniques. Examples show how the distribution of different facies (i.e. from fine to coarse grain) can be represented, or how various depositional units (for instance channels, crevasses and lobes in a turbidite setting) can be modelled as geological {open_quotes}objects{close_quotes} with complex geometries. Elf Aquitaine, in close co-operation with the GOCAD project in Nancy (France) is investigating how geological models can be made more realistic by developing interactive functionalities. Examples show that, contrary to standard deterministic or geostatistical modelling techniques (which tend to be difficult to control) the use of new 3D tools allows the geologist to interactively modify geological surfaces (including faults) or volumetric properties. Thus, the sensitivity of various economic parameters (oil in place, connected volumes, reserves) to major geological uncertainties can be evaluated. It is argued that future breakthroughs in geological modelling techniques are likely to happen in the development of interactive approaches rather than in the research of new mathematical algorithms.

  6. Reservoir geology using 3D modelling tools

    SciTech Connect

    Dubrule, O. ); Samson, P. ); Segonds, D. )

    1996-01-01

    The last decade has seen tremendous developments in the area of quantitative geological modelling. These developments have a significant impact on the current practice of constructing reservoir models. A structural model can first be constructed on the basis of depth-converted structural interpretations produced on a seismic interpretation workstation. Surfaces and faults can be represented as geological objects, and interactively modified. Once the tectonic framework has been obtained, intermediate stratigraphic surfaces can be constructed between the main structural surfaces. Within each layer, reservoir attributes can be represented using various techniques. Examples show how the distribution of different facies (i.e. from fine to coarse grain) can be represented, or how various depositional units (for instance channels, crevasses and lobes in a turbidite setting) can be modelled as geological [open quotes]objects[close quotes] with complex geometries. Elf Aquitaine, in close co-operation with the GOCAD project in Nancy (France) is investigating how geological models can be made more realistic by developing interactive functionalities. Examples show that, contrary to standard deterministic or geostatistical modelling techniques (which tend to be difficult to control) the use of new 3D tools allows the geologist to interactively modify geological surfaces (including faults) or volumetric properties. Thus, the sensitivity of various economic parameters (oil in place, connected volumes, reserves) to major geological uncertainties can be evaluated. It is argued that future breakthroughs in geological modelling techniques are likely to happen in the development of interactive approaches rather than in the research of new mathematical algorithms.

  7. Mini 3D for shallow gas reconnaissance

    SciTech Connect

    Vallieres, T. des; Enns, D.; Kuehn, H.; Parron, D.; Lafet, Y.; Van Hulle, D.

    1996-12-31

    The Mini 3D project was undertaken by TOTAL and ELF with the support of CEPM (Comite d`Etudes Petrolieres et Marines) to define an economical method of obtaining 3D seismic HR data for shallow gas assessment. An experimental 3D survey was carried out with classical site survey techniques in the North Sea. From these data 19 simulations, were produced to compare different acquisition geometries ranging from dual, 600 m long cables to a single receiver. Results show that short offset, low fold and very simple streamer positioning are sufficient to give a reliable 3D image of gas charged bodies. The 3D data allow a much more accurate risk delineation than 2D HR data. Moreover on financial grounds Mini-3D is comparable in cost to a classical HR 2D survey. In view of these results, such HR 3D should now be the standard for shallow gas surveying.

  8. 3-D Technology Approaches for Biological Ecologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liyu; Austin, Robert; U. S-China Physical-Oncology Sciences Alliance (PS-OA) Team

    Constructing three dimensional (3-D) landscapes is an inevitable issue in deep study of biological ecologies, because in whatever scales in nature, all of the ecosystems are composed by complex 3-D environments and biological behaviors. Just imagine if a 3-D technology could help complex ecosystems be built easily and mimic in vivo microenvironment realistically with flexible environmental controls, it will be a fantastic and powerful thrust to assist researchers for explorations. For years, we have been utilizing and developing different technologies for constructing 3-D micro landscapes for biophysics studies in in vitro. Here, I will review our past efforts, including probing cancer cell invasiveness with 3-D silicon based Tepuis, constructing 3-D microenvironment for cell invasion and metastasis through polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) soft lithography, as well as explorations of optimized stenting positions for coronary bifurcation disease with 3-D wax printing and the latest home designed 3-D bio-printer. Although 3-D technologies is currently considered not mature enough for arbitrary 3-D micro-ecological models with easy design and fabrication, I hope through my talk, the audiences will be able to sense its significance and predictable breakthroughs in the near future. This work was supported by the State Key Development Program for Basic Research of China (Grant No. 2013CB837200), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11474345) and the Beijing Natural Science Foundation (Grant No. 7154221).

  9. 3D gravity modeling of the Triassic salt diapirs of the Cubeta Alavesa (northern Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, V.; Casas, A.; Rivero, L.; Torné, M.

    2005-08-01

    Up to now subsurface information permitted the delineation of the top of the Triassic salt, all throughout the Cantabro-Navarro domain, although little was known on the