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Sample records for 3-d fault geometry

  1. 3D insight into fault geometries, deformation, and fluid-migration within the Hosgri Fault Zone offshore central California: Results from high-resolution 3D seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluesner, J.; Brothers, D. S.; Johnson, S. Y.; Watt, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    High-resolution 3D seismic P-Cable data and advanced seismic attribute analyses were used to detect and interpret complex strike-slip fault geometries, deformation patterns, and fluid-pathways across a portion of the Hosgri Fault Zone (HFZ) offshore central California. Combination of the fault attribute results with structural analysis provides 3D insight into the geometry and internal structure of restraining and releasing bends, step-over zones, fault convergence zones, and apparent paired fault bends. The 3D seismic volume covers a 13.7 km2 region along the HFZ offshore of Point Sal and was collected in 2012 as part of the PG&E Central California Seismic Imaging Project (PG&E, 2014). Application of the fault attribute workflow isolated and delineated fault strands within the 3D volume. These results revealed that the northern and southern edges of the survey region are characterized by single fault strands that exhibit an approximate 6° change in strike across the 3D volume. Between these single faults strands is a complex network of fault splays, bends, stepovers, and convergence zones. Structural analysis reveals that the southern portion of the HFZ in the region is characterized by transtensional deformation, whereas transpressional-related folding dominates the central and northern portions of the HFZ. In the central region, convergence of the Lions Head Fault from the southeast results in an apparent impinging block, leading to development of a "paired fault bend" to the west. Combination of the fault and "chimney" attribute results indicates a strong connection between faults and fluid-migration pathways. Fluid-pathways are concentrated along discrete faults in the transtensional zones, but appear to be more broadly distributed amongst fault bounded anticlines and structurally controlled traps in the transpressional zones.

  2. 3-D geometry and physical property of the Mega-Splay Fault in Nankai trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masui, R.; Tsuji, T.; Yamada, Y.; Environmental Resource; System Engineering laboratory

    2011-12-01

    The Nankai trough is a subduction zone, where the Philippine Sea plate is being subducted beneath southwest Japan at a rate of ~4-6.5 cm/y at an azimuth of ~300°-315°. A lot of operations have been done in Nankai, such as three-dimensional seismic reflection surveys and Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP), Ocean Drilling Program (ODP), Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP). They revealed that there is a large splay fault, referred to as 'Mega-Splay'. The Mega-Splay Fault has caused a series of catastrophic earthquakes and submarine landslides, which may have led to TSUNAMI. Since fault development history may have affected the geometry of the Mega-Splay Fault and physical property within the fault zone, they need to be examined in detail. In this research, we used 3-D pre-stack depth migration (PSDM), 3-D pre-stack time migration (PSTM) and P-wave velocity in C0004B well (Logging data), in order to interpret 3-D structure of Mega-Splay Fault. The analysis in this research is basically divided into two parts. One is structural interpretation of Splay Fault, based on the high amplitude reflection surface on seismic profiles. The other part is acoustic impedance inversion (AI inversion), in which we inverted seismic waveform into physical property (in this study, acoustic impedance), with the P-wave velocity data at C0004B near Mega-Splay Fault. The 3-D PSDM (or PSTM) clearly images details of Splay Fault, with good continuity of reflections along the fault. It is possible on each seismic profile to trace the high amplitude lines, where rock-properties significantly change. Since Mega-Splay Fault has 45-59m width along the wells, we interpreted the upper limit and the lower limit of the Mega-Splay Fault, based on the high amplitude surfaces along 3-D PSDM. Our interpretation shows that the width of Mega-Splay Fault has variation along the fault, and the plan geometry of the fault toe has a salient at the middle of the 3D box area, suggesting the fault could be

  3. Disentangling Fault Scarp Geometry and Slip-Distribution in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackenzie, D.; Walker, R. T.

    2015-12-01

    We present a new and inherently 3D approach to the analysis of fault scarp geometry using high resolution topography. Recent advance in topographic measurement techniques (LiDAR and Structure from Motion) has allowed the extensive measurement of single earthquake scarps and multiple event cumulative scarps to draw conclusions about along-strike slip variation and characteristic slip. Present analysis of the resulting point clouds and digital elevation models is generally achieved by taking vertical or map view profiles of geomorphic markers across the scarp. Profiles are done at numerous locations along strike carefully chosen to avoid regions degraded by erosion/deposition. The resulting slip distributions are almost always extremely variable and "noisy", both for strike-slip and dip-slip faulting scarps and it is often unclear whether this reflects slip variation, noise/erosion, site effects or geometric variation. When observing palaeo-earthquake and even modern event scarps, the full geometry, such as the degree of oblique slip or the fault dip, is often poorly constrained. We first present the results of synthetic tests to demonstrate the introduction of significant apparent noise by simply varying terrain, fault and measurement geometry (slope angle, slope azimuth, fault dip and slip obliquity). Considering fully 3-dimensional marker surfaces (e.g. Planar or conical) we use the variation in apparent offset with terrain and measurement geometry, to constrain the slip geometry in 3D. Combining measurements windowed along strike, we show that determining the slip vector is reduced to a simple linear problem. We conclude that for scarps in regions of significant topography or with oblique slip, our method will give enhanced slip resolution while standard methods will give poor slip resolution. We test our method using a Structure from Motion pointcloud and digital elevation model covering a ~25 km stretch of a thrust fault scarp in the Kazakh Tien Shan.

  4. The Calaveras Fault, Northern California: A Geophysical Perspective on Offset and 3-D Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jachens, R. C.; Wentworth, C. M.; Graymer, R. W.; Walker, J. P.; Chuang, F. C.; Simpson, R. W.; McLaughlin, R. J.

    2002-12-01

    basin could indicate at least 10 km of offset. The 3-D CF geometry is also variable along its length. Near the south end of the CF in Hollister valley (km 150 to 130), a large buried magnetic body, presumably Coast Range Ophiolite, extends (SW to NE) beneath the CF to an edge 5 km NE of the trace and is not dismembered by the fault. This suggests that the fault dips NE, in agreement with seismicity patterns. Gravity and well information indicate that the Hollister valley is underlain by a basin >1.5 km deep, which may have formed as an extensional strike-slip basin resulting from the right bend in the fault trace between the San Andreas Fault and the northern Hollister valley. In the Diablo Range, the CF between San Felipe valley and Calaveras Reservoir (km 90 to 70) follows the Franciscan Complex-Great Valley sequence contact (equivalent to the Coast Range Fault) at the surface, and, according to the gravity, in the subsurface also. Here the CF dips steeply NE and coincides with the seismicity pattern. SE of San Felipe valley, deep seismicity appears to follow the Franciscan/Great Valley contact (the Madrone Springs Fault) for a few km even though the active CF deflects right (west) into San Felipe valley. Near Calaveras Reservoir (km 60) gravity indicates that the CF dips SW, in agreement with the magnetic data which define a concealed magnetic source body extending across the fault trace from the NE without being disrupted. West of Pleasanton (km 50 to 40), gravity data suggest that the CF dips steeply SW beneath the outcropping Great Valley sequence strata. Farther north, neither the gravity nor the magnetic data provide information about the fault attitude.

  5. Bayesian Estimation of 3D Non-planar Fault Geometry and Slip: An application to the 2011 Megathrust (Mw 9.1) Tohoku-Oki Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Rishabh; Jónsson, Sigurjón

    2016-04-01

    Earthquake faults are generally considered planar (or of other simple geometry) in earthquake source parameter estimations. However, simplistic fault geometries likely result in biases in estimated slip distributions and increased fault slip uncertainties. In case of large subduction zone earthquakes, these biases and uncertainties propagate into tsunami waveform modeling and other calculations related to postseismic studies, Coulomb failure stresses, etc. In this research, we parameterize 3D non-planar fault geometry for the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake (Mw 9.1) and estimate these geometrical parameters along with fault slip parameters from onland and offshore GPS using Bayesian inference. This non-planar fault is formed using several 3rd degree polynomials in along-strike (X-Y plane) and along-dip (X-Z plane) directions that are tied together using a triangular mesh. The coefficients of these polynomials constitute the fault geometrical parameters. We use the trench and locations of past seismicity as a priori information to constrain these fault geometrical parameters and the Laplacian to characterize the fault slip smoothness. Hyper-parameters associated to these a priori constraints are estimated empirically and the posterior probability distribution of the model (fault geometry and slip) parameters is sampled using an adaptive Metropolis Hastings algorithm. The across-strike uncertainties in the fault geometry (effectively the local fault location) around high-slip patches increases from 6 km at 10km depth to about 35 km at 50km depth, whereas around low-slip patches the uncertainties are larger (from 7 km to 70 km). Uncertainties in reverse slip are found to be higher at high slip patches than at low slip patches. In addition, there appears to be high correlation between adjacent patches of high slip. Our results demonstrate that we can constrain complex non-planar fault geometry together with fault slip from GPS data using past seismicity as a priori

  6. Mapping 3D fault geometry in earthquakes using high-resolution topography: Examples from the 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah (Mexico) and 2013 Balochistan (Pakistan) earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yu; Walker, Richard T.; Elliott, John R.; Parsons, Barry

    2016-04-01

    Fault dips are usually measured from outcrops in the field or inferred through geodetic or seismological modeling. Here we apply the classic structural geology approach of calculating dip from a fault's 3-D surface trace using recent, high-resolution topography. A test study applied to the 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake shows very good agreement between our results and those previously determined from field measurements. To obtain a reliable estimate, a fault segment ≥120 m long with a topographic variation ≥15 m is suggested. We then applied this method to the 2013 Balochistan earthquake, getting dips similar to previous estimates. Our dip estimates show a switch from north to south dipping at the southern end of the main trace, which appears to be a response to local extension within a stepover. We suggest that this previously unidentified geometrical complexity may act as the endpoint of earthquake ruptures for the southern end of the Hoshab fault.

  7. Tool 3D geometry measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Huijie; Ni, Jun; Sun, Yi; Lin, Xuewen

    2001-10-01

    A new non-contact tool 3D geometry measurement system based on machine vision is described. In this system, analytical and optimization methods are used respectively to achieve system calibration, which can determine the rotation center of the drill. The data merging method is fully studied which can translate the scattered different groups of raw data in sensor coordinates into drill coordinates and get 3-D topography of the drill body. Corresponding data processing methods for drill geometry are also studied. Statistical methods are used to remove the outliers. Laplacian of Gaussian operator are used to detect the boundary on drill cross-section and drill tip profile. The arithmetic method for calculating the parameters is introduced. The initial measurement results are presented. The cross-section profile, drill tips geometry are shown. Pictures of drill wear on drill tip are given. Parameters extracted from the cross-section are listed. Compared with the measurement results using CMM, the difference between this drill geometry measurement system and CMM is, Radius of drill: 0.020mm, Helix angle: 1.310, Web thickness: 0.034mm.

  8. Mapping the 3D Geometry of the San Leandro Block of the Hayward Fault Zone Using Geologic, Geophysical and Remote Sensing Data, California State University, East Bay Campus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEvilly, A.; Abimbola, A.; Chan, J. H.; Strayer, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    California State University, East Bay (CSUEB), located in Hayward, California, lies atop the San Leandro block (SLB) in the Hayward fault zone. The SLB is a J-K aged lithotectonic assemblage dominated by gabbro and intercalated with minor volcanics and sediments. It is bound by the subparallel northwest-trending western Hayward and eastern Chabot (CF) faults and pervasively cut by anastomosing secondary faults. The block itself is ~30 km along strike and 2-3 km wide. Previous studies suggest the block dips steeply to the northeast and extends to a depth of at least 7 km. In May of 2015, as part of an ongoing collaborative effort led by the USGS to create a 3D velocity model of the San Francisco Bay Area, researchers from CSUEB and the USGS conducted a seismic survey on the CSUEB campus. The primary goal of this pilot study was to locate the trace of the CF on the CSUEB campus and to determine bedrock depth. We deployed a 60-channel, 300m profile using 4.5Hz sensors spaced at 5m intervals. Active seismic sources were used at each geophone location. A 226kg accelerated weight-drop was used to generate P and Rayleigh waves for P-wave tomography and multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW), and a 3.5kg sledgehammer and block were used to generate S and Love waves for S-wave tomography and multichannel analysis of Love waves (MALW). Preliminary P-wave tomography, MASW, and MALW results from this pilot study suggest the location of an eastward-dipping CF as well as the presence of a high-velocity unit at about 20m depth, presumably an unmapped sliver of bedrock from the San Leandro block. Further studies planned for the fall of 2015 include additional seismic lines and surface mapping along the Chabot fault on and near the CSUEB campus. These new geophysical, GPS, and field geological data will be integrated with LiDAR imagery and existing geological, gravity and magnetic maps to create a 3-dimensional model of the portion of the SLB that contains the CSUEB campus.

  9. Discovering Structural Regularity in 3D Geometry

    PubMed Central

    Pauly, Mark; Mitra, Niloy J.; Wallner, Johannes; Pottmann, Helmut; Guibas, Leonidas J.

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a computational framework for discovering regular or repeated geometric structures in 3D shapes. We describe and classify possible regular structures and present an effective algorithm for detecting such repeated geometric patterns in point- or mesh-based models. Our method assumes no prior knowledge of the geometry or spatial location of the individual elements that define the pattern. Structure discovery is made possible by a careful analysis of pairwise similarity transformations that reveals prominent lattice structures in a suitable model of transformation space. We introduce an optimization method for detecting such uniform grids specifically designed to deal with outliers and missing elements. This yields a robust algorithm that successfully discovers complex regular structures amidst clutter, noise, and missing geometry. The accuracy of the extracted generating transformations is further improved using a novel simultaneous registration method in the spatial domain. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our algorithm on a variety of examples and show applications to compression, model repair, and geometry synthesis. PMID:21170292

  10. 3D geometry of growth strata in a fault-propagation fold: insights into space-time evolution of the Crevillente Fault (Abanilla-Alicante sector), Betic Cordillera, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Rojas, I.; Alfaro, P.; Estévez, A.

    2015-07-01

    This work presents a 3D geometric model of growth strata cropping out in a fault-propagation fold associated with the Crevillente Fault (Abanilla-Alicante sector) from the Bajo Segura Basin (eastern Betic Cordillera, southern Spain). The analysis of this 3D model enables us to unravel the along-strike and along-section variations of the growth strata, providing constraints to assess the fold development, and hence, the fault kinematic evolution in space and time. We postulate that the observed along-strike dip variations are related to lateral variation in fault displacement. Along-section variations of the progressive unconformity opening angles indicate greater fault slip in the upper Tortonian-Messinian time span; from the Messinian on, quantitative analysis of the unconformity indicate a constant or lower tectonic activity of the Crevillente Fault (Abanilla-Alicante sector); the minor abundance of striated pebbles in the Pliocene-Quaternary units could be interpreted as a decrease in the stress magnitude and consequently in the tectonic activity of the fault. At a regional scale, comparison of the growth successions cropping out in the northern and southern limits of the Bajo Segura Basin points to a southward migration of deformation in the basin. This means that the Bajo Segura Fault became active after the Crevillente Fault (Abanilla-Alicante sector), for which activity on the latter was probably decreasing according to our data. Consequently, we propose that the seismic hazard at the northern limit of the Bajo Segura Basin should be lower than at the southern limit.

  11. Recognizing Basement Fault Reactivation in 3D Seismic Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imber, J.; McCaffrey, K.; Holdsworth, R.; England, R.; Freeman, S.; Dore, T.; Geldjvik, G.

    2003-04-01

    3D seismic data are now widely used for hydrocarbon exploration and production, and because of its ability to image sub-surface structures, the technology represents one of the most important conceptual advances in the Earth Sciences in recent years. It provides an important tool capable of addressing fundamental questions concerning the way in which fault systems evolve in the continental crust, the effects of inherited crustal weakness on rifting style and the control of fault networks on reservoir properties. Preliminary analyses of published offshore seismic data demonstrate that there are quantifiable differences in the geometric evolution and growth of "thin-skinned" normal fault systems in which there is no direct basement involvement compared to those developed above little- and highly-reactivated basement structures. Reactivated fault systems are characterised by rapid strain localisation and fault lengths that are controlled by up-dip propagation of basement structures (Walsh et al. 2002). Thus, fault growth during reactivation is likely to be achieved by increasing cumulative displacement with negligible lateral propagation. Important questions remain, however, concerning the way in which faults grow and localise displacement during the earliest stages of reactivation. In particular, we have little detailed understanding of the extent to which basement fault geometry (e.g. polarity, segmentation) influences the pattern of faulting observed in the cover sequence, the kinematics of up-dip fault propagation and/or linkage, or the degree of displacement localisation at low bulk strains. Normal faults that developed in response to glacial retreat on the NE Atlantic Margin reactivate pre-existing Mesozoic, Caledonian and/or Precambrian structures and are characterised by low displacements (throws typically 100--101 m), thus representing the earliest stages in the development of a reactivated fault system. Spectacular images of postglacial and underlying

  12. Imaging fault zones using 3D seismic image processing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacopini, David; Butler, Rob; Purves, Steve

    2013-04-01

    Significant advances in structural analysis of deep water structure, salt tectonic and extensional rift basin come from the descriptions of fault system geometries imaged in 3D seismic data. However, even where seismic data are excellent, in most cases the trajectory of thrust faults is highly conjectural and still significant uncertainty exists as to the patterns of deformation that develop between the main faults segments, and even of the fault architectures themselves. Moreover structural interpretations that conventionally define faults by breaks and apparent offsets of seismic reflectors are commonly conditioned by a narrow range of theoretical models of fault behavior. For example, almost all interpretations of thrust geometries on seismic data rely on theoretical "end-member" behaviors where concepts as strain localization or multilayer mechanics are simply avoided. Yet analogue outcrop studies confirm that such descriptions are commonly unsatisfactory and incomplete. In order to fill these gaps and improve the 3D visualization of deformation in the subsurface, seismic attribute methods are developed here in conjunction with conventional mapping of reflector amplitudes (Marfurt & Chopra, 2007)). These signal processing techniques recently developed and applied especially by the oil industry use variations in the amplitude and phase of the seismic wavelet. These seismic attributes improve the signal interpretation and are calculated and applied to the entire 3D seismic dataset. In this contribution we will show 3D seismic examples of fault structures from gravity-driven deep-water thrust structures and extensional basin systems to indicate how 3D seismic image processing methods can not only build better the geometrical interpretations of the faults but also begin to map both strain and damage through amplitude/phase properties of the seismic signal. This is done by quantifying and delineating the short-range anomalies on the intensity of reflector amplitudes

  13. 3D fault drag characterization: an import tool in a fault description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spahić, Darko; Exner, Ulrike; Grasemann, Bernhard

    2010-05-01

    Using an industrial 3D seismic dataset from the central part of the Vienna Basin (Austria), we investigate marker horizons in the hanging wall and footwall of a large-scale normal fault. The throw of individual horizons shows a remarkable variability, both along strike and along dip of the fault. Since fault drag is a direct function of the displacement gradient quantification of this large scale fault drag allows identification of linked individual fault segments constraining the fault evolution. The investigated Markgrafneusiedl fault, crosscutting the Miocene sedimentary succession deposited from Carpathian up to the Pannonian age, represents the southeastern border of the Matzen oilfield. At depth, the Markgrafneusiedl fault displaces seismic horizons up to the decollement level, with a maximum throw of ~300 m. In order to visualize the three-dimensional distribution of fault drag throughout the seismic volume, six stratigraphic horizons were mapped in detail using the software package Seisvision (Landmark). An accurate stratigraphic correlation was achieved by integration of exploration well data located within the 3D seismic block. In order to document a greater number of marker horizons for the analysis of fault drag, the most distinctive seismic reflectors have been mapped throughout the entire cube in addition to the six well-documented formation tops. All horizons were mapped in TWT. Using the 3D modeling software Gocad (Paradigm), the mapped horizons tops were depth-converted, applying a generalized equation assuming an exponential increase of seismic velocity with depth. This conversion should ensure a better geometric representation of the fault drag geometries, which cannot be extracted from time-sections. The additional documentation of fault drag permits a more detailed identification of individual fault segments, which cannot be achieved by using conventional parameters, such as fault dip, azimuth and throw.

  14. Expanding Geometry Understanding with 3D Printing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran, Jill A.; Cochran, Zane; Laney, Kendra; Dean, Mandi

    2016-01-01

    With the rise of personal desktop 3D printing, a wide spectrum of educational opportunities has become available for educators to leverage this technology in their classrooms. Until recently, the ability to create physical 3D models was well beyond the scope, skill, and budget of many schools. However, since desktop 3D printers have become readily…

  15. Unit cell geometry of 3-D braided structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Du, Guang-Wu; Ko, Frank K.

    1993-01-01

    The traditional approach used in modeling of composites reinforced by three-dimensional (3-D) braids is to assume a simple unit cell geometry of a 3-D braided structure with known fiber volume fraction and orientation. In this article, we first examine 3-D braiding methods in the light of braid structures, followed by the development of geometric models for 3-D braids using a unit cell approach. The unit cell geometry of 3-D braids is identified and the relationship of structural parameters such as yarn orientation angle and fiber volume fraction with the key processing parameters established. The limiting geometry has been computed by establishing the point at which yarns jam against each other. Using this factor makes it possible to identify the complete range of allowable geometric arrangements for 3-D braided preforms. This identified unit cell geometry can be translated to mechanical models which relate the geometrical properties of fabric preforms to the mechanical responses of composite systems.

  16. 3D Spontaneous Rupture Models of Large Earthquakes on the Hayward Fault, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barall, M.; Harris, R. A.; Simpson, R. W.

    2008-12-01

    We are constructing 3D spontaneous rupture computer simulations of large earthquakes on the Hayward and central Calaveras faults. The Hayward fault has a geologic history of producing many large earthquakes (Lienkaemper and Williams, 2007), with its most recent large event a M6.8 earthquake in 1868. Future large earthquakes on the Hayward fault are not only possible, but probable (WGCEP, 2008). Our numerical simulation efforts use information about the complex 3D fault geometry of the Hayward and Calaveras faults and information about the geology and physical properties of the rocks that surround the Hayward and Calaveras faults (Graymer et al., 2005). Initial stresses on the fault surface are inferred from geodetic observations (Schmidt et al., 2005), seismological studies (Hardebeck and Aron, 2008), and from rate-and- state simulations of the interseismic interval (Stuart et al., 2008). In addition, friction properties on the fault surface are inferred from laboratory measurements of adjacent rock types (Morrow et al., 2008). We incorporate these details into forward 3D computer simulations of dynamic rupture propagation, using the FaultMod finite-element code (Barall, 2008). The 3D fault geometry is constructed using a mesh-morphing technique, which starts with a vertical planar fault and then distorts the entire mesh to produce the desired fault geometry. We also employ a grid-doubling technique to create a variable-resolution mesh, with the smallest elements located in a thin layer surrounding the fault surface, which provides the higher resolution needed to model the frictional behavior of the fault. Our goals are to constrain estimates of the lateral and depth extent of future large Hayward earthquakes, and to explore how the behavior of large earthquakes may be affected by interseismic stress accumulation and aseismic slip.

  17. A 3D Geometry Model Search Engine to Support Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tam, Gary K. L.; Lau, Rynson W. H.; Zhao, Jianmin

    2009-01-01

    Due to the popularity of 3D graphics in animation and games, usage of 3D geometry deformable models increases dramatically. Despite their growing importance, these models are difficult and time consuming to build. A distance learning system for the construction of these models could greatly facilitate students to learn and practice at different…

  18. Using 3D Geometric Models to Teach Spatial Geometry Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertoline, Gary R.

    1991-01-01

    An explanation of 3-D Computer Aided Design (CAD) usage to teach spatial geometry concepts using nontraditional techniques is presented. The software packages CADKEY and AutoCAD are described as well as their usefulness in solving space geometry problems. (KR)

  19. Interactive Retro-Deformation of Terrain for Reconstructing 3D Fault Displacements.

    PubMed

    Westerteiger, R; Compton, T; Bernadin, T; Cowgill, E; Gwinner, K; Hamann, B; Gerndt, A; Hagen, H

    2012-12-01

    Planetary topography is the result of complex interactions between geological processes, of which faulting is a prominent component. Surface-rupturing earthquakes cut and move landforms which develop across active faults, producing characteristic surface displacements across the fault. Geometric models of faults and their associated surface displacements are commonly applied to reconstruct these offsets to enable interpretation of the observed topography. However, current 2D techniques are limited in their capability to convey both the three-dimensional kinematics of faulting and the incremental sequence of events required by a given reconstruction. Here we present a real-time system for interactive retro-deformation of faulted topography to enable reconstruction of fault displacement within a high-resolution (sub 1m/pixel) 3D terrain visualization. We employ geometry shaders on the GPU to intersect the surface mesh with fault-segments interactively specified by the user and transform the resulting surface blocks in realtime according to a kinematic model of fault motion. Our method facilitates a human-in-the-loop approach to reconstruction of fault displacements by providing instant visual feedback while exploring the parameter space. Thus, scientists can evaluate the validity of traditional point-to-point reconstructions by visually examining a smooth interpolation of the displacement in 3D. We show the efficacy of our approach by using it to reconstruct segments of the San Andreas fault, California as well as a graben structure in the Noctis Labyrinthus region on Mars.

  20. Interactive Retro-Deformation of Terrain for Reconstructing 3D Fault Displacements.

    PubMed

    Westerteiger, R; Compton, T; Bernadin, T; Cowgill, E; Gwinner, K; Hamann, B; Gerndt, A; Hagen, H

    2012-12-01

    Planetary topography is the result of complex interactions between geological processes, of which faulting is a prominent component. Surface-rupturing earthquakes cut and move landforms which develop across active faults, producing characteristic surface displacements across the fault. Geometric models of faults and their associated surface displacements are commonly applied to reconstruct these offsets to enable interpretation of the observed topography. However, current 2D techniques are limited in their capability to convey both the three-dimensional kinematics of faulting and the incremental sequence of events required by a given reconstruction. Here we present a real-time system for interactive retro-deformation of faulted topography to enable reconstruction of fault displacement within a high-resolution (sub 1m/pixel) 3D terrain visualization. We employ geometry shaders on the GPU to intersect the surface mesh with fault-segments interactively specified by the user and transform the resulting surface blocks in realtime according to a kinematic model of fault motion. Our method facilitates a human-in-the-loop approach to reconstruction of fault displacements by providing instant visual feedback while exploring the parameter space. Thus, scientists can evaluate the validity of traditional point-to-point reconstructions by visually examining a smooth interpolation of the displacement in 3D. We show the efficacy of our approach by using it to reconstruct segments of the San Andreas fault, California as well as a graben structure in the Noctis Labyrinthus region on Mars. PMID:26357128

  1. Thrust fault segmentation and downward fault propagation in accretionary wedges: New Insights from 3D seismic reflection data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orme, Haydn; Bell, Rebecca; Jackson, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    The shallow parts of subduction megathrust faults are typically thought to be aseismic and incapable of propagating seismic rupture. The 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake, however, ruptured all the way to the trench, proving that in some locations rupture can propagate through the accretionary wedge. An improved understanding of the structural character and physical properties of accretionary wedges is therefore crucial to begin to assess why such anomalously shallow seismic rupture occurs. Despite its importance, we know surprisingly little regarding the 3D geometry and kinematics of thrust network development in accretionary prisms, largely due to a lack of 3D seismic reflection data providing high-resolution, 3D images of entire networks. Thus our current understanding is largely underpinned by observations from analogue and numerical modelling, with limited observational data from natural examples. In this contribution we use PSDM, 3D seismic reflection data from the Nankai margin (3D Muroto dataset, available from the UTIG Academic Seismic Portal, Marine Geoscience Data System) to examine how imbricate thrust fault networks evolve during accretionary wedge growth. We unravel the evolution of faults within the protothrust and imbricate thrust zones by interpreting multiple horizons across faults and measuring fault displacement and fold amplitude along-strike; by doing this, we are able to investigate the three dimensional accrual of strain. We document a number of local displacement minima along-strike of faults, suggesting that, the protothrust and imbricate thrusts developed from the linkage of smaller, previously isolated fault segments. Although we often assume imbricate faults are likely to have propagated upwards from the décollement we show strong evidence for fault nucleation at shallow depths and downward propagation to intersect the décollement. The complex fault interactions documented here have implications for hydraulic compartmentalisation and pore

  2. Thrust fault growth within accretionary wedges: New Insights from 3D seismic reflection data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orme, H.; Bell, R. E.; Jackson, C. A. L.

    2015-12-01

    The shallow parts of subduction megathrust faults are typically thought to be aseismic and incapable of propagating seismic rupture. The 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake, however, ruptured all the way to the trench, proving that in some locations rupture can propagate through the accretionary wedge. An improved understanding of the structural character and physical properties of accretionary wedges is therefore crucial to begin to assess why such anomalously shallow seismic rupture occurs. Despite its importance, we know surprisingly little regarding the 3D geometry and kinematics of thrust network development in accretionary prisms, largely due to a lack of 3D seismic reflection data providing high-resolution, 3D images of entire networks. Thus our current understanding is largely underpinned by observations from analogue and numerical modelling, with limited observational data from natural examples. In this contribution we use PSDM, 3D seismic reflection data from the Nankai margin (3D Muroto dataset, available from the UTIG Academic Seismic Portal, Marine Geoscience Data System) to examine how imbricate thrust fault networks evolve during accretionary wedge growth. Previous studies have reported en-echelon thrust fault geometries from the NW part of the dataset, and have related this complex structure to seamount subduction. We unravel the evolution of faults within the protothrust and imbricate thrust zones by interpreting multiple horizons across faults and measuring fault displacement and fold amplitude along-strike; by doing this, we are able to investigate the three dimensional accrual of strain. We document a number of local displacement minima along-strike of faults, suggesting that, the protothrust and imbricate thrusts developed from the linkage of smaller, previously isolated fault segments. We also demonstrate that the majority of faults grew upward from the décollement, although there is some evidence for downward fault propagation. Our observations

  3. Thermal 3D modeling system based on 3-view geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Sunjin; Kim, Joongrock; Lee, Sangyoun

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel thermal three-dimensional (3D) modeling system that includes 3D shape, visual, and thermal infrared information and solves a registration problem among these three types of information. The proposed system consists of a projector, a visual camera and, a thermal camera (PVT). To generate 3D shape information, we use a structured light technique, which consists of a visual camera and a projector. A thermal camera is added to the structured light system in order to provide thermal information. To solve the correspondence problem between the three sensors, we use three-view geometry. Finally, we obtain registered PVT data, which includes visual, thermal, and 3D shape information. Among various potential applications such as industrial measurements, biological experiments, military usage, and so on, we have adapted the proposed method to biometrics, particularly for face recognition. With the proposed method, we obtain multi-modal 3D face data that includes not only textural information but also data regarding head pose, 3D shape, and thermal information. Experimental results show that the performance of the proposed face recognition system is not limited by head pose variation which is a serious problem in face recognition.

  4. Understanding how Fault-bounded Blocks Deform in 3D by Inverse Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouen, G.; White, N.

    2004-05-01

    Normal faults play a crucial role in modifying basin stratigraphy. At the exploration scale, the internal deformation of tilted blocks is governed by the three-dimensional geometry of large-scale faults which bound these blocks. At the reservoir scale, the geometry and growth of normal faulting control the deformation of strata and the compartmentalisation of reservoir intervals. Despite their importance, large-scale normal faults are often difficult to image. The purpose of structural validation is two-fold: to determine the 3D shape of normal faults and to investigate the relationship between fault geometry and deformed stratigraphy including the intra-block faults. We have developed methods for tackling structural validation at a variety of scales in two and three dimensions. The cornerstone of our approach is the use of geophysical inverse theory to calculate optimal fault geometries from deformed strata. This approach allows us to focus on key questions: does a solution exist? Are there several possible solutions or just one unique one? In a complex normal fault system, which part of the fault controls the motion responsible for the deformation in the hanging-wall? Traditional forward modelling cannot answer these fundamental issues. We have applied the inversion on seismic data in particularly complex areas in the northern North Sea. The aims of this project are to determine the geometry of the basin-bounding fault, to assess the likelihood of out-of-plane motion as well as understanding the mode of deformation leading to the complexity of the present structure. Closely spaced inverse models show that the basin-bounding fault on the UK side is steeper and more planar than previously thought. This method also helped us to have a better view of what could have been the cause of the organisation and density of the intra-block faulting where it occurs. The North Cormorant study has shown how inverse modelling can yield important, quantitative, insights. Our

  5. Novel 3D Compression Methods for Geometry, Connectivity and Texture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddeq, M. M.; Rodrigues, M. A.

    2016-06-01

    A large number of applications in medical visualization, games, engineering design, entertainment, heritage, e-commerce and so on require the transmission of 3D models over the Internet or over local networks. 3D data compression is an important requirement for fast data storage, access and transmission within bandwidth limitations. The Wavefront OBJ (object) file format is commonly used to share models due to its clear simple design. Normally each OBJ file contains a large amount of data (e.g. vertices and triangulated faces, normals, texture coordinates and other parameters) describing the mesh surface. In this paper we introduce a new method to compress geometry, connectivity and texture coordinates by a novel Geometry Minimization Algorithm (GM-Algorithm) in connection with arithmetic coding. First, each vertex ( x, y, z) coordinates are encoded to a single value by the GM-Algorithm. Second, triangle faces are encoded by computing the differences between two adjacent vertex locations, which are compressed by arithmetic coding together with texture coordinates. We demonstrate the method on large data sets achieving compression ratios between 87 and 99 % without reduction in the number of reconstructed vertices and triangle faces. The decompression step is based on a Parallel Fast Matching Search Algorithm (Parallel-FMS) to recover the structure of the 3D mesh. A comparative analysis of compression ratios is provided with a number of commonly used 3D file formats such as VRML, OpenCTM and STL highlighting the performance and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  6. Simulation of human ischemic stroke in realistic 3D geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumont, Thierry; Duarte, Max; Descombes, Stéphane; Dronne, Marie-Aimée; Massot, Marc; Louvet, Violaine

    2013-06-01

    In silico research in medicine is thought to reduce the need for expensive clinical trials under the condition of reliable mathematical models and accurate and efficient numerical methods. In the present work, we tackle the numerical simulation of reaction-diffusion equations modeling human ischemic stroke. This problem induces peculiar difficulties like potentially large stiffness which stems from the broad spectrum of temporal scales in the nonlinear chemical source term as well as from the presence of steep spatial gradients in the reaction fronts, spatially very localized. Furthermore, simulations on realistic 3D geometries are mandatory in order to describe correctly this type of phenomenon. The main goal of this article is to obtain, for the first time, 3D simulations on realistic geometries and to show that the simulation results are consistent with those obtain in experimental studies or observed on MRI images in stroke patients. For this purpose, we introduce a new resolution strategy based mainly on time operator splitting that takes into account complex geometry coupled with a well-conceived parallelization strategy for shared memory architectures. We consider then a high order implicit time integration for the reaction and an explicit one for the diffusion term in order to build a time operator splitting scheme that exploits efficiently the special features of each problem. Thus, we aim at solving complete and realistic models including all time and space scales with conventional computing resources, that is on a reasonably powerful workstation. Consequently and as expected, 2D and also fully 3D numerical simulations of ischemic strokes for a realistic brain geometry, are conducted for the first time and shown to reproduce the dynamics observed on MRI images in stroke patients. Beyond this major step, in order to improve accuracy and computational efficiency of the simulations, we indicate how the present numerical strategy can be coupled with spatial

  7. Dynamic 3D simulations of earthquakes on en echelon faults

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, R.A.; Day, S.M.

    1999-01-01

    One of the mysteries of earthquake mechanics is why earthquakes stop. This process determines the difference between small and devastating ruptures. One possibility is that fault geometry controls earthquake size. We test this hypothesis using a numerical algorithm that simulates spontaneous rupture propagation in a three-dimensional medium and apply our knowledge to two California fault zones. We find that the size difference between the 1934 and 1966 Parkfield, California, earthquakes may be the product of a stepover at the southern end of the 1934 earthquake and show how the 1992 Landers, California, earthquake followed physically reasonable expectations when it jumped across en echelon faults to become a large event. If there are no linking structures, such as transfer faults, then strike-slip earthquakes are unlikely to propagate through stepovers >5 km wide. Copyright 1999 by the American Geophysical Union.

  8. The SCEC 3D Community Fault Model (CFM-v5): An updated and expanded fault set of oblique crustal deformation and complex fault interaction for southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, C.; Plesch, A.; Sorlien, C. C.; Shaw, J. H.; Hauksson, E.

    2014-12-01

    Southern California represents an ideal natural laboratory to investigate oblique deformation in 3D owing to its comprehensive datasets, complex tectonic history, evolving components of oblique slip, and continued crustal rotations about horizontal and vertical axes. As the SCEC Community Fault Model (CFM) aims to accurately reflect this 3D deformation, we present the results of an extensive update to the model by using primarily detailed fault trace, seismic reflection, relocated hypocenter and focal mechanism nodal plane data to generate improved, more realistic digital 3D fault surfaces. The results document a wide variety of oblique strain accommodation, including various aspects of strain partitioning and fault-related folding, sets of both high-angle and low-angle faults that mutually interact, significant non-planar, multi-stranded faults with variable dip along strike and with depth, and active mid-crustal detachments. In places, closely-spaced fault strands or fault systems can remain surprisingly subparallel to seismogenic depths, while in other areas, major strike-slip to oblique-slip faults can merge, such as the S-dipping Arroyo Parida-Mission Ridge and Santa Ynez faults with the N-dipping North Channel-Pitas Point-Red Mountain fault system, or diverge with depth. Examples of the latter include the steep-to-west-dipping Laguna Salada-Indiviso faults with the steep-to-east-dipping Sierra Cucapah faults, and the steep southern San Andreas fault with the adjacent NE-dipping Mecca Hills-Hidden Springs fault system. In addition, overprinting by steep predominantly strike-slip faulting can segment which parts of intersecting inherited low-angle faults are reactivated, or result in mutual cross-cutting relationships. The updated CFM 3D fault surfaces thus help characterize a more complex pattern of fault interactions at depth between various fault sets and linked fault systems, and a more complex fault geometry than typically inferred or expected from

  9. Visualization package for 3D laser-scanned geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Paul F.; Sadler, Lewis L.

    1993-06-01

    A computer software package named LEGO was designed and implemented to enable medical personnel to explore and manipulate laser scanned 3D geometry obtained from a Cyberware 4020PS scanner. This type of scanner reconstructs a real world object into a mathematical computer model by collecting thousands of depth measurement using a low powered laser. LEGO consists of a collection of tools that can be interactively combined to accomplish complex tasks. Tools fall into five major categories: viewing, simple, quantitative, manipulative, and miscellaneous. This paper is based on a masters thesis obtained from the University of Illinois at Chicago.

  10. A linguistic geometry for 3D strategic planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stilman, Boris

    1995-01-01

    This paper is a new step in the development and application of the Linguistic Geometry. This formal theory is intended to discover the inner properties of human expert heuristics, which have been successful in a certain class of complex control systems, and apply them to different systems. In this paper we investigate heuristics extracted in the form of hierarchical networks of planning paths of autonomous agents. Employing Linguistic Geometry tools the dynamic hierarchy of networks is represented as a hierarchy of formal attribute languages. The main ideas of this methodology are shown in this paper on the new pilot example of the solution of the extremely complex 3D optimization problem of strategic planning for the space combat of autonomous vehicles. This example demonstrates deep and highly selective search in comparison with conventional search algorithms.

  11. Variational Symplectic Orbit Code in 3-D Tokamak Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, Charles; Qin, Hong; Tang, William M.

    2011-10-01

    Since advanced tokamak experiments - including ITER - are long-pulse systems, it is important to develop accurate numerical methods to track plasma dynamics over an extended temporal period. When attempting to model the motion of individual particles, standard integrators (e.g. 4th order Runge-Kutta) discretize the differential equations of motion - but do not possess desired properties such as energy conservation. The variational symplectic integrator adopts instead a different approach via minimizing the action of the guiding center motion to determine iteration rules. Consequently, the Lagrangian symplectic structure is conserved, and the numerical energy error is bounded by a small number for all time-steps. In previous work, the theoretical basis for this method was introduced, but the implementation was for 2-D geometry. To address realistic experimental scenarios, the variational symplectic integrator has been implemented for 3-D tokamak geometry for the first time. Sample results will be presented and compared with those from standard Runge-Kutta-based 3-D tokamak orbit codes. This work was supported by the DOE contract # DE-AC02-09CH11466 and the DOE FES Fellowship.

  12. Magma rheology from 3D geometry of martian lava flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allemand, P.; Deschamps, A.; Lesaout, M.; Delacourt, C.; Quantin, C.; Clenet, H.

    2012-04-01

    Volcanism is an important geologic agent which has been recently active at the surface of Mars. The composition of individual lava flows is difficult to infer from spectroscopic data because of the absence of crystallized minerals and the possible cover of the flows by dust. The 3D geometry of lava flows provides an interesting alternative to infer the chemical composition of lavas and effusion rates. Indeed, chemical composition exerts a strong control on the viscosity and yield strength of the magma and global geometry of lava flow reflects its emplacement rate. Until recently, these studies where realized from 2D data. The third dimension, which is a key parameter, was deduced or supposed from local shadow measurements on MGS Themis IR images with an uncertainty of more than 500%. Recent CTX data (MRO mission) allow to compute Digital Elevation Model at a resolution of 1 or 2 pixels (5 to 10 m) with the help of Isis and the Ames Stereo Pipeline pipe line. The CTX images are first transformed in format readable by Isis. The external geometric parameters of the CTX camera are computed and added to the image header with Isis. During a correlation phase, the homologous pixels are searched on the pair of stereo images. Finally, the DEM is computed from the position of the homologous pixels and the geometrical parameters of the CTX camera. Twenty DEM have been computed from stereo images showing lava flows of various ages on the region of Cerberus, Elyseum, Daedalia and Amazonis planitia. The 3D parameters of the lava flows have been measured on the DEMs and tested against shadows measurement. These 3D parameters have been inverted to estimate the viscosity and the yield strength of the flow. The effusion rate has also been estimated. These parameters have been compared to those of similar lava flows of the East Pacific rise.

  13. Stochastic Modeling of Calcium in 3D Geometry

    PubMed Central

    Mazel, Tomáš; Raymond, Rebecca; Raymond-Stintz, Mary; Jett, Stephen; Wilson, Bridget S.

    2009-01-01

    Release of inflammatory mediators by mast cells in type 1 immediate-hypersensitivity allergic reactions relies on antigen-dependent increases in cytosolic calcium. Here, we used a series of electron microscopy images to build a 3D reconstruction representing a slice through a rat tumor mast cell, which then served as a basis for stochastic modeling of inositol-trisphosphate-mediated calcium responses. The stochastic approach was verified by reaction-diffusion modeling within the same geometry. Local proximity of the endoplasmic reticulum to either the plasma membrane or mitochondria is predicted to differentially impact local inositol trisphosphate receptor transport. The explicit consideration of organelle spatial relationships represents an important step toward building a comprehensive, realistic model of cellular calcium dynamics. PMID:19254531

  14. Joints at high angles to normal fault strike: an explanation using 3-D numerical models of fault-perturbed stress fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kattenhorn, Simon A.; Aydin, Atilla; Pollard, David D.

    2000-01-01

    Structural methods based on homogeneous stress states predict that joints growing in an extending crust form with strike orientations identical to normal faults. However, we document a field example where the strikes of genetically related normal faults and joints are almost mutually perpendicular. Field relationships allowed us to constrain the fracture sequence and tectonic environment for fault and joint growth. We hypothesize that fault slip can perturb the surrounding stress field in a manner that controls the orientations of induced secondary structures. Numerical models were used to examine the stress field around normal faults, taking into consideration the effects of 3-D fault shape, geometrical arrangement of overlapping faults, and a range of stress states. The calculated perturbed stress fields around model normal faults indicate that it is possible for joints to form at high angles to fault strike. Such joint growth may occur at the lateral tips of an isolated fault, but is most likely in a relay zone between overlapping faults. However, the angle between joints and faults is also influenced by the remote stress state, and is particularly sensitive to the ratio of fault-parallel to fault-perpendicular stress. As this ratio increases, joints can propagate away from faults at increasingly higher angles to fault strike. We conclude that the combined remote stress state and perturbed local stress field associated with overlapping fault geometries resulted in joint growth at high angles to normal fault strike at a field location in Arches National Park, Utah.

  15. 3D stochastic geophysical inversion for contact surface geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lelièvre, Peter; Farquharson, Colin; Bijani, Rodrigo

    2015-04-01

    Geologists' interpretations about the Earth typically involve distinct rock units with contacts (interfaces) between them. As such, 3D geological Earth models typically comprise wireframe contact surfaces of tessellated triangles or other polygonal planar facets. In contrast, standard minimum-structure geophysical inversions are performed on meshes of space-filling cells (typically prisms or tetrahedra) and recover smoothly varying physical property distributions that are inconsistent with typical geological interpretations. There are several approaches through which mesh-based geophysical inversion can help recover models with some of the desired characteristics. However, a more effective strategy is to consider a fundamentally different type of inversion that works directly with models that comprise surfaces representing contacts between rock units. We are researching such an approach, our goal being to perform geophysical forward and inverse modelling directly with 3D geological models of any complexity. Geological and geophysical models should be specified using the same parameterization such that they are, in essence, the same Earth model. We parameterize the wireframe contact surfaces in a 3D model as the coordinates of the nodes (facet vertices). The physical properties of each rock unit in a model remain fixed while the geophysical inversion controls the position of the contact surfaces via the control nodes, perturbing the surfaces as required to fit the geophysical data responses. This is essentially a "geometry inversion", which can be used to recover the unknown geometry of a target body or to investigate the viability of a proposed Earth model. We apply global optimization strategies to solve the inverse problem, including stochastic sampling to obtain statistical information regarding the likelihood of particular features in the model, helping to assess the viability of a proposed model. Jointly inverting multiple types of geophysical data is simple

  16. The Maradi fault zone: 3-D imagery of a classic wrench fault in Oman

    SciTech Connect

    Neuhaus, D. )

    1993-09-01

    The Maradi fault zone extends for almost 350 km in a north-northwest-south-southeast direction from the Oman Mountain foothills into the Arabian Sea, thereby dissecting two prolific hydrocarbon provinces, the Ghaba and Fahud salt basins. During its major Late Cretaceous period of movement, the Maradi fault zone acted as a left-lateral wrench fault. An early exploration campaign based on two-dimensional seismic targeted at fractured Cretaceous carbonates had mixed success and resulted in the discovery of one producing oil field. The structural complexity, rapidly varying carbonate facies, and uncertain fracture distribution prevented further drilling activity. In 1990 a three-dimensional (3-D) seismic survey covering some 500 km[sup 2] was acquired over the transpressional northern part of the Maradi fault zone. The good data quality and the focusing power of 3-D has enabled stunning insight into the complex structural style of a [open quotes]textbook[close quotes] wrench fault, even at deeper levels and below reverse faults hitherto unexplored. Subtle thickness changes within the carbonate reservoir and the unconformably overlying shale seal provided the tool for the identification of possible shoals and depocenters. Horizon attribute maps revealed in detail the various structural components of the wrench assemblage and highlighted areas of increased small-scale faulting/fracturing. The results of four recent exploration wells will be demonstrated and their impact on the interpretation discussed.

  17. 3-D fault development in a geothermal system in the German Molasse Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziesch, Jennifer; Tanner, David C.; Wawerzinek, Britta; Lüschen, Ewald; Krawczyk, Charlotte M.; Buness, Hermann; Thomas, Rüdiger

    2016-04-01

    The southern German Molasse Basin is one of the most promising areas for geothermal exploration in Germany. We aim for an optimized reservoir exploration for deep geothermal facilities in the Bavarian realm. To do this, we analyse seismic faults to characterise potential pathways between the Malm and its overburden, which consists of Molasse sediments. A 3-D seismic survey (27 km_2) was interpreted as part of the research project GeoParaMoL (Geophysical Parameters for facies interpretation and Modelling of Long-term behaviour), in the study area at Unterhaching, Munich, Germany. GeoParaMoL is a partner project of GRAME, which aims to explore the hydrothermal Malm carbonate reservoir (at a depth of ca. 3 km) as a source for deep geothermal energy. First, we interpreted five seismic horizons and over 20 major faults. Here we present preliminary results of the derived 3-D structural model. We determined fault geometries and displacement profiles using isopach and juxtaposition maps. We observe two different tectonic events: The faults within the Molasse sediments are unrelated to the faults of the underlying Malm carbonate platform. The faults within the Malm carbonate platform propagated up to the Top Eocene horizon (Lithothamien carbonates). The faults within the younger Miocene sediments developed subsequently. They dip, in part, with opposing dip direction, but mostly with the same strike. This basic information will be further used to predict fluid pathways by carrying out retro-deformation in the study area to help understand the structural development and regional tectonics. This work will support exploration of geothermal reservoirs in general. This project is funded by the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi).

  18. The COMET method in 3-D hexagonal geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, K. J.; Rahnema, F.

    2012-07-01

    The hybrid stochastic-deterministic coarse mesh radiation transport (COMET) method developed at Georgia Tech now solves reactor core problems in 3-D hexagonal geometry. In this paper, the method is used to solve three preliminary test problems designed to challenge the method with steep flux gradients, high leakage, and strong asymmetry and heterogeneity in the core. The test problems are composed of blocks taken from a high temperature test reactor benchmark problem. As the method is still in development, these problems and their results are strictly preliminary. Results are compared to whole core Monte Carlo reference solutions in order to verify the method. Relative errors are on the order of 50 pcm in core eigenvalue, and mean relative error in pin fission density calculations is less than 1% in these difficult test cores. The method requires the one-time pre-computation of a response expansion coefficient library, which may be compiled in a comparable amount of time to a single whole core Monte Carlo calculation. After the library has been computed, COMET may solve any number of core configurations on the order of an hour, representing a significant gain in efficiency over other methods for whole core transport calculations. (authors)

  19. Indoor Modelling Benchmark for 3D Geometry Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, C.; Boehm, J.

    2014-06-01

    A combination of faster, cheaper and more accurate hardware, more sophisticated software, and greater industry acceptance have all laid the foundations for an increased desire for accurate 3D parametric models of buildings. Pointclouds are the data source of choice currently with static terrestrial laser scanning the predominant tool for large, dense volume measurement. The current importance of pointclouds as the primary source of real world representation is endorsed by CAD software vendor acquisitions of pointcloud engines in 2011. Both the capture and modelling of indoor environments require great effort in time by the operator (and therefore cost). Automation is seen as a way to aid this by reducing the workload of the user and some commercial packages have appeared that provide automation to some degree. In the data capture phase, advances in indoor mobile mapping systems are speeding up the process, albeit currently with a reduction in accuracy. As a result this paper presents freely accessible pointcloud datasets of two typical areas of a building each captured with two different capture methods and each with an accurate wholly manually created model. These datasets are provided as a benchmark for the research community to gauge the performance and improvements of various techniques for indoor geometry extraction. With this in mind, non-proprietary, interoperable formats are provided such as E57 for the scans and IFC for the reference model. The datasets can be found at: http://indoor-bench.github.io/indoor-bench.

  20. Towards "realistic" fault zones in a 3D structure model of the Thuringian Basin, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kley, J.; Malz, A.; Donndorf, S.; Fischer, T.; Zehner, B.

    2012-04-01

    3D computer models of geological architecture are evolving into a standard tool for visualization and analysis. Such models typically comprise the bounding surfaces of stratigraphic layers and faults. Faults affect the continuity of aquifers and can themselves act as fluid conduits or barriers. This is one reason why a "realistic" representation of faults in 3D models is desirable. Still so, many existing models treat faults in a simplistic fashion, e.g. as vertical downward projections of fault traces observed at the surface. Besides being geologically and mechanically unreasonable, this also causes technical difficulties in the modelling workflow. Most natural faults are inclined and may change dips according to rock type or flatten into mechanically weak layers. Boreholes located close to a fault can therefore cross it at depth, resulting in stratigraphic control points allocated to the wrong block. Also, faults tend to split up into several branches, forming fault zones. Obtaining a more accurate representation of faults and fault zones is therefore challenging. We present work-in-progress from the Thuringian Basin in central Germany. The fault zone geometries are never fully constrained by data and must be extrapolated to depth. We use balancing of serial, parallel cross-sections to constrain subsurface extrapolations. The structure sections are checked for consistency by restoring them to an undeformed state. If this is possible without producing gaps or overlaps, the interpretation is considered valid (but not unique) for a single cross-section. Additional constraints are provided by comparison of adjacent cross-sections. Structures should change continuously from one section to another. Also, from the deformed and restored cross-sections we can measure the strain incurred during deformation. Strain should be compatible among the cross-sections: If at all, it should vary smoothly and systematically along a given fault zone. The stratigraphic contacts and

  1. 3D Seismic Flexure Analysis for Subsurface Fault Detection and Fracture Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di, Haibin; Gao, Dengliang

    2016-10-01

    Seismic flexure is a new geometric attribute with the potential of delineating subtle faults and fractures from three-dimensional (3D) seismic surveys, especially those overlooked by the popular discontinuity and curvature attributes. Although the concept of flexure and its related algorithms have been published in the literature, the attribute has not been sufficiently applied to subsurface fault detection and fracture characterization. This paper provides a comprehensive study of the flexure attribute, including its definition, computation, as well as geologic implications for evaluating the fundamental fracture properties that are essential to fracture characterization and network modeling in the subsurface, through applications to the fractured reservoir at Teapot Dome, Wyoming (USA). Specifically, flexure measures the third-order variation of the geometry of a seismic reflector and is dependent on the measuring direction in 3D space; among all possible directions, flexure is considered most useful when extracted perpendicular to the orientation of dominant deformation; and flexure offers new insights into qualitative/quantitative fracture characterization, with its magnitude indicating the intensity of faulting and fracturing, its azimuth defining the orientation of most-likely fracture trends, and its sign differentiating the sense of displacement of faults and fractures.

  2. Intensity of joints associated with an extensional fault zone: an estimation by poly3d .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minelli, G.

    2003-04-01

    ) of this project encourages other application of Poly3d. References WILLEMSE, E. J. M., 1997, Segmented normal faults: Correspondence between three-dimensional mechanical models and field data: Journal of Geophysical Research, v. 102, p. 675-692. MARTEL, S. J, AND BOGER, W. A, 1998, Geometry and mechanics of secondary fracturing around small three-dimensional faults in granitic rock: Journal of Geophysical Research, v. 103, p. 21,299-21,314. WILLEMSE, E. J. M., POLLARD, D. D., 2000, Normal fault growth: evolution of tipline shapes and slip distribution: in Lehner, F.K. &Urai, J.L. (eds.), Aspects of Tectonic Faulting, Springer -Verlag , Berlin, p. 193-226.

  3. Kinematics of a growth fault/raft system on the West African margin using 3-D restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouby, Delphine; Raillard, Stéphane; Guillocheau, François; Bouroullec, Renaud; Nalpas, Thierry

    2002-04-01

    The ability to quantify the movement history associated with growth structures is crucial in the understanding of fundamental processes such as the growth of folds or faults in 3-D. In this paper, we present an application of an original approach to restore in 3-D a listric growth fault system resulting from gravity-induced extension located on the West African margin. Our goal is to establish the 3-D structural framework and kinematics of the study area. We construct a 3-D geometrical model of the fault system (from 3-D seismic data), then restore six stratigraphic surfaces and reconstruct the 3-D geometry of the system at six incremental steps of its history. The evolution of the growth fault/raft system corresponds to the progressive separation of two rafts by regional extension, resulting in the development of an intervening basin located between them that evolved in three main stages: (1) the rise of an evaporite wall, (2) the development of a symmetric basin as the elevation of the diapir is reduced and buried, and (3) the development of asymmetric basins related to two systems of listric faults (the main fault F1 and the graben located between the rollovers and the lower raft). Important features of the growth fault/raft system could only be observed in 3-D and with increments of deformation restored. The rollover anticline (associated with the listric fault F1) is composed of two sub-units separated by an E-W oriented transverse graben indicating that the displacement field was divergent in map view. The rollover units are located within the overlap area of two fault systems and displays a 'mock-turtle' anticline structure. The seaward translation of the lower raft is associated with two successive vertical axis rotations in the opposite sense (clockwise then counter-clockwise by about 10°). This results from the fact that the two main fault systems developed successively. Fault system F1 formed during the Upper Albian, and the graben during the Cenomanian

  4. 3D Dynamics of Oblique Rift Systems: Fault Evolution from Rift to Break-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brune, S.

    2014-12-01

    Rift evolution and passive margin formation has been thoroughly investigated using conceptual and numerical models in two dimensions. However, the 2D assumption that the extension direction is perpendicular to the rift trend is often invalid. In fact, the majority of rift systems that lead to continental break-up during the last 150 My involved moderate to high rift obliquity. Yet, the degree to which oblique lithospheric extension affects first-order rift and passive margin properties like surface stress pattern, fault azimuths, and basin geometry, is still not entirely clear. This contribution provides insight in crustal stress patterns and fault orientations by applying a 3D numerical rift model to oblique extensional settings. The presented forward experiments cover the whole spectrum of oblique extension (i.e. rift-orthogonal extension, low obliquity, high obliquity, strike-slip deformation) from initial deformation to breakup. They are conducted using an elasto-visco-plastic finite element model and involve crustal and mantle layers accounting for self-consistent necking of the lithosphere. Even though the model setup is very simple (horizontally layered, no inherited faults), its evolution exhibits a variety of fault orientations that are solely caused by the interaction of far-field stresses with rift-intrinsic buoyancy and strength. Depending on rift obliquity, these orientations involve rift-parallel, extension-orthogonal, and intermediate normal fault directions as well as strike-slip faults. Allowing new insights on fault patterns of the proximal and distal margins, the model shows that individual fault populations are activated in a characteristic multi-phase evolution driven by lateral density variations of the evolving rift system. Model results are in very good agreement with inferences from the well-studied Gulf of Aden and provide testable predictions for other rifts and passive margins worldwide.

  5. FIT3D toolbox: multiple view geometry and 3D reconstruction for Matlab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteban, Isaac; Dijk, Judith; Groen, Frans

    2010-10-01

    FIT3D is a Toolbox built for Matlab that aims at unifying and distributing a set of tools that will allow the researcher to obtain a complete 3D model from a set of calibrated images. In this paper we motivate and present the structure of the toolbox in a tutorial and example based approach. Given its flexibility and scope we believe that FIT3D represents an exciting opportunity for researchers that want to apply one particular method with real data without the need for extensive additional programming.

  6. 3D Fault modeling of the active Chittagong-Myanmar fold belt, Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, D. E.; Hubbard, J.; Akhter, S. H.; Shamim, N.

    2013-12-01

    The Chittagong-Myanmar fold belt (CMFB), located in eastern Bangladesh, eastern India and western Myanmar, accommodates east-west shortening at the India-Burma plate boundary. Oblique subduction of the Indian Plate beneath the Burma Plate since the Eocene has led to the development of a large accretionary prism complex, creating a series of north-south trending folds. A continuous sediment record from ~55 Ma to the present has been deposited in the Bengal Basin by the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna rivers, providing an opportunity to learn about the history of tectonic deformation and activity in this fold-and-thrust belt. Surface mapping indicates that the fold-and-thrust belt is characterized by extensive N-S-trending anticlines and synclines in a belt ~150-200 km wide. Seismic reflection profiles from the Chittagong and Chittagong Hill Tracts, Bangladesh, indicate that the anticlines mapped at the surface narrow with depth and extend to ~3.0 seconds TWTT (two-way travel time), or ~6.0 km. The folds of Chittagong and Chittagong Hill Tracts are characterized by doubly plunging box-shaped en-echelon anticlines separated by wide synclines. The seismic data suggest that some of these anticlines are cored by thrust fault ramps that extend to a large-scale décollement that dips gently to the east. Other anticlines may be the result of detachment folding from the same décollement. The décollement likely deepens to the east and intersects with the northerly-trending, oblique-slip Kaladan fault. The CMFB region is bounded to the north by the north-dipping Dauki fault and the Shillong Plateau. The tectonic transition from a wide band of E-W shortening in the south to a narrow zone of N-S shortening along the Dauki fault is poorly understood. We integrate surface and subsurface datasets, including topography, geological maps, seismicity, and industry seismic reflection profiles, into a 3D modeling environment and construct initial 3D surfaces of the major faults in this

  7. Lithological Controls on 3D Fold Geometry in Mechanically Layered Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, M. A.; Jones, R. R.; Rock, G.

    2010-12-01

    Folding and thrusting are key processes in accommodating shortening in evolving orogens. In the outer parts of mountain belts, the combination of tectonism and sedimentation often leads to viable petroleum systems where folds trap migrating hydrocarbons. A key aspect of the success of these traps is the 3D fold geometry, which must prevent up-plunge hydrocarbon escape. Fold shapes in a multilayered system are governed by the fold mechanism, and the rheology of the layers. In sedimentary environments where laterally heterogeneous thicknesses of interbedded carbonates, clastics, and evaporates may be present, predicting the sub-surface geometry of structures is challenging. We present field data combined with satellite and seismic interpretation from the Zagros fold and thrust belt of SE Turkey where Neogene shortening has affected an Ordovician to Miocene aged sedimentary pile comprising shales, sandstones, carbonates and minor evaporites. Miocene carbonates capping the sequence allow 3D fold geometries to be ascertained at surface with a high degree of confidence, whilst the underlying ~1km of shales and mudstones allows folds to develop that depart substantially from standard “text-book” geometries. Beneath these incompetent units a further 1.7km of carbonates and clastics overlie Ordovician shales up to 1.5km thick. In relatively low strain sections asymmetric, angular, kink-like folds form long wavelength structures and thrust faults rarely reach the surface. With increasing strain, the wavelength/amplitude ratio decreases and thrusts cut through the fold limbs. Folds are interpreted to detach above a thick sequence of Ordovician shales. They originate by buckling of the competent units within the two weaker horizons, with initial perturbations probably provided by sedimentary heterogeneities. As the folds amplify, thrusts form in the more competent units above the shale. These then propagate upwards with fold amplification dominated by fault-tip

  8. Connecting multi-scale fault geometry with field observations: insights into fluid-fault rock relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherry, T. J.; Melosh, B. L.; Rowe, C. D.

    2012-12-01

    Fault geometry along with heterogenities in fluid pressure locally influences the mechanical behavior of faulting and the type of fault rock damage generated. The Naukluft Nappe Complex in central Namibia, southwest Africa features a well exposed basal foreland thrust fault emplaced during the 550 Ma Damara Orogen. Using differential GPS we walked and mapped the kilometer-scale dolomitic basal fault at two localities, the East and West side of the nappe complex. 3D fault geometry and orientation over each locality was interpolated using the high resolution GPS maps. The interpolated 3D geometry was then correlated with field observations of fault rock damage including cataclastic injection systems, brecciation, and alteration in the fault rock. 2D cross-sections were rendered using the interpolated 3D geometries. The eastern flank of the nappe complex locally exhibits ramp geometries and a prevalent granular fault rock known as "gritty dolomite". Cataclastic injection systems of gritty dolomite are observed injecting upsection off the basal thrust through opening mode fractures and are generally subvertical to the fault plane. The injectites are centimeter to meter scale, sometimes reach tens of meters in vertical extent, the width tapered towards the injection tip. Laminae interpreted as flow banding are oriented subparallel to the injectite walls and is also present in the basal thrust subparallel to the fault plane. Neocrystallized dolomite, quartz, and fracture filling calcite is observed within injectite systems suggesting the presence of super-saturated fluid. Bending strains create localized extension as the hanging wall enters the ramp, facilitating Mode I fractures and the formation of injectites which are observed at the base, within, and at the upper flat of the ramp structure, recording progressive hanging wall transport. Fault dip increases in the northern area of the eastern locality where a unit of shales directly overlies footwall limestone. The

  9. Improved Scanning Geometry to Collect 3D-Geometry Data in Flat Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Krueger, P.; Niese, S.; Zschech, E.; Gelb, J.; Feser, M.

    2011-09-09

    3D integration through silicon technology of integrated circuits challenges non-destructive testing methods. 3D x-ray methods are the techniques of choice to localize defects in interconnects. The development of high-power x-ray sources enabled the use of x-ray microscopy in laboratory tools. Those devices are able to resolve features down to 40 nm in an acceptable measurement time. However, the field of view is very limited to 16 {mu}m in high-resolution mode and to 65 {mu}m in large-field-of-view mode. To record tomography data, the size of the samples must not exceed the field of view to circumvent specific artifacts. Semiconductor samples usually do not fulfill the condition mentioned above since they have the shape of flat sheets. Therefore limited-angle tomography is typically used. The missing angles cause typical capping artifacts and poor signal-to-noise ratio. We present a modified scanning geometry that overcomes some of the artifacts and yields a better image quality. The geometry and potential applications are presented in comparison to the traditional limited-angle tomography.

  10. An Interactive, 3D Fault Editor for VR Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Aalsburg, J.; Yikilmaz, M. B.; Kreylos, O.; Kellogg, L. H.; Rundle, J. B.

    2008-12-01

    Digitial Fault Models (DFM) play a vital role in the study of earthquake dynamics, fault-earthquake interactions, and seismicity. DFMs serve as input for finite-element method (FEM) or other earthquake simulations such as Virtual California. Generally, digital fault models are generated by importing a digitized and georeferenced (2D) fault map and/or a hillshade image of the study area into a geographical information system (GIS) application, where individual fault lines are traced by the user. Data assimilation and creation of a DFM, or updating an existing DFM based on new observations, is a tedious and time-consuming process. In order to facilitate the creation process, we are developing an immersive virtual reality (VR) application to visualize and edit fault models. This program is designed to run in immersive environments such as a CAVE (walk-in VR environment), but also works in a wide range of other environments, including desktop systems and GeoWalls. It is being developed at the UC Davis W.M. Keck Center for Active Visualization in the Earth Sciences (KeckCAVES, http://www.keckcaves.org). Our program allows users to create new models or modify existing ones; for instance by repositioning individual fault-segments, by changing the dip angle, or by modifying (or assigning) the value of a property associated with a particular fault segment (i.e. slip rate). With the addition of high resolution Digital Elevation Models (DEM) , georeferenced active tectonic fault maps and earthquake hypocenters, the user can accurately add new segments to an existing model or create a fault model entirely from scratch. Interactively created or modified models can be written to XML files at any time; from there the data may easily be converted into various formats required by the analysis software or simulation. We believe that the ease of interaction provided by VR technology is ideally suited to the problem of creating and editing digital fault models. Our software provides

  11. Geometry of structures within crystalline bedrock constrained in 3D and their relevance for present day water infiltration.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneeberger, Raphael; de la Varga, Miguel; Florian Wellmann, J.; Kober, Florian; Berger, Alfons; Herwegh, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Fluid circulation in crystalline rocks is of key importance when exploring crystalline basement in light of, for example, deep-seated geothermal energy projects or selection of sites for nuclear waste repositories. Due to their enhanced permeability, fluid circulation within crystalline bedrock is mainly controlled by fault zones, which may originate from ductile mylonites but show a strong brittle overprint. In order to better constrain 3D flow paths, a well-founded knowledge on the 3D nature of the fault zone pattern is indispensable. We attempt to constrain the geometry of a complex 3D fault zone pattern in a case study of the Grimsel Test Site (GTS, central Switzerland). The constraints are based on mapping of both the surface as well as the GTS underground tunnel system, offering a unique opportunity to test the 3D model and associated uncertainties. We investigate the effect of increasing geoinformation on the quality and accuracy of the 3D model by using: (i) remote sensing surface data only, (ii) field surface mapping in combination with (i), and (iii) underground data combined with (i) and (ii). This approach allows for defining different steps in 3D geological modelling of a specific area, including a measure of the remaining uncertainty after each step. We obtain a best-estimate model by fitting results between surface and underground data by using a combination of field data and orientation obtained by Delaunay triangulation. We incorporate novel approaches to uncertainty analysis of fault orientations and investigate different fault planes showing the possible variation range of the structures investigated.

  12. Types of Reasoning in 3D Geometry Thinking and Their Relation with Spatial Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pittalis, Marios; Christou, Constantinos

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe and analyse the structure of 3D geometry thinking by identifying different types of reasoning and to examine their relation with spatial ability. To achieve this goal, two tests were administered to students in grades 5 to 9. The results of the study showed that 3D geometry thinking could be described by four…

  13. 3-D GPR data analysis for high-resolution imaging of shallow subsurface faults: the Mt Vettore case study (Central Apennines, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ercoli, Maurizio; Pauselli, Cristina; Frigeri, Alessandro; Forte, Emanuele; Federico, Costanzo

    2014-07-01

    The activation of Late Quaternary faults in the Central Apennines (Italy) could generate earthquakes with magnitude of about 6.5, and the Monte Vettore fault system probably belongs to the same category of seismogenetic faults. Such structure has been defined `silent', because of its geological and geomorphological evidences of past activation, but the absence of historical records in the seismic catalogues to be associated with its activation. The `Piano di Castelluccio' intramountain basin, resulting from the Quaternary activity of normal faults, is characterized by a secondary fault strand highlighted by a NW-SE fault scarp: it has been already studied through palaeoseismological trenches, which highlighted evidences of Quaternary shallow faulting due to strong earthquakes, and through a 2-D ground penetrating radar (GPR) survey, showing the first geophysical signature of faulting for this site. Within the same place, a 3-D GPR volume over a 20 × 20 m area has been collected. The collection of radar echoes in three dimensions allows to map both the vertical and lateral continuity of shallow geometries of the fault zone (Fz), imaging features with high resolution, ranging from few metres to centimetres and therefore imaging also local variations at the microscale. Several geophysical markers of faulting, already highlighted on this site, have been taken as reference to plan the 3-D survey. In this paper, we provide the first 3-D subsurface imaging of an active shallow fault belonging to the Umbria-Marche Apennine highlighting the subsurface fault geometry and the stratigraphic sequence up to a depth of about 5 m. From our data, geophysical faulting signatures are clearly visible in three dimensions: diffraction hyperbolas, truncations of layers, local attenuated zones and varying dip of the layers have been detected within the Fz. The interpretation of the 3-D data set provided qualitative and quantitative geological information in addition to the fault location

  14. A 3D Immersive Fault Visualizer and Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yikilmaz, M. B.; van Aalsburg, J.; Kreylos, O.; Kellogg, L. H.; Rundle, J. B.

    2007-12-01

    Digital fault models are an important resource for the study of earthquake dynamics, fault-earthquake interactions and seismicity. Once digitized these fault models can be used in Finite Element Model (FEM) programs or earthquake simulations such as Virtual California (VC). However, these models are often difficult to create, requiring a substantial amount of time to generate the fault topology and compute the properties of the individual segments. To aid in the construction of such models we have developed an immersive virtual reality (VR) application to visualize and edit fault models. Our program is designed to run in a CAVE (walk-in VR environment), but also works in a wide range of other environments, including desktop systems and GeoWalls. It is being developed at the UC Davis W.M. Keck Center for Active Visualization in the Earth Sciences (KeckCAVES, http://www.keckcaves.org). Immersive VR environments are ideal for visualizing and manipulating three- dimensional data sets. Our program allows users to create new models or modify existing ones; for example by repositioning individual fault-segments, by changing the dip angle, or by modifying (or assigning) the value of a property associated with a particular fault segment (i.e. slip rate). With the addition of high resolution Digital Elevation Models (DEM) the user can accurately add new segments to an existing model or create a fault model entirely from scratch. Interactively created or modified models can be written to XML files at any time; from there the data may easily be converted into various formats required by the analysis software or simulation. We believe that the ease of interaction provided by VR technology is ideally suited to the problem of creating and editing digital fault models. Our software provides the user with an intuitive environment for visualizing and editing fault model data. This translates not only into less time spent creating fault models, but also enables the researcher to

  15. Software-based geometry operations for 3D computer graphics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sima, Mihai; Iancu, Daniel; Glossner, John; Schulte, Michael; Mamidi, Suman

    2006-02-01

    In order to support a broad dynamic range and a high degree of precision, many of 3D renderings fundamental algorithms have been traditionally performed in floating-point. However, fixed-point data representation is preferable over floating-point representation in graphics applications on embedded devices where performance is of paramount importance, while the dynamic range and precision requirements are limited due to the small display sizes (current PDA's are 640 × 480 (VGA), while cell-phones are even smaller). In this paper we analyze the efficiency of a CORDIC-augmented Sandbridge processor when implementing a vertex processor in software using fixed-point arithmetic. A CORDIC-based solution for vertex processing exhibits a number of advantages over classical Multiply-and-Acumulate solutions. First, since a single primitive is used to describe the computation, the code can easily be vectorized and multithreaded, and thus fits the major Sandbridge architectural features. Second, since a CORDIC iteration consists of only a shift operation followed by an addition, the computation may be deeply pipelined. Initially, we outline the Sandbridge architecture extension which encompasses a CORDIC functional unit and the associated instructions. Then, we consider rigid-body rotation, lighting, exponentiation, vector normalization, and perspective division (which are some of the most important data-intensive 3D graphics kernels) and propose a scheme to implement them on the CORDIC-augmented Sandbridge processor. Preliminary results indicate that the performance improvement within the extended instruction set ranges from 3× to 10× (with the exception of rigid body rotation).

  16. Using 3D Computer Graphics Multimedia to Motivate Preservice Teachers' Learning of Geometry and Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodson-Espy, Tracy; Lynch-Davis, Kathleen; Schram, Pamela; Quickenton, Art

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the genesis and purpose of our geometry methods course, focusing on a geometry-teaching technology we created using NVIDIA[R] Chameleon demonstration. This article presents examples from a sequence of lessons centered about a 3D computer graphics demonstration of the chameleon and its geometry. In addition, we present data…

  17. Multi-sensor system for surface inspection and 3D-geometry assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Markus; Weber, Juergen; Schubert, Erhard

    1997-09-01

    This paper addresses an installed application in quality control where a 100% inspection of geometry (3D) and surface of cuboid (parallelpiped) and ring-shaped magnets is done using a system of 2 CCD matrix cameras, one of which is equipped with on-board processing components and a transmitted-light sensor with microcontroller based data processing for the measurement of the height of the objects. The geometry and surface properties are measured with a diffuse indirect IR-LED flash, mounted in a ring around the object and a telecentric lens to avoid perspective distortions due to different heights of the measured objects. The surface inspection looks for broken pieces, surface faults due to spalling/chipping and for cracks. The second CCD camera uses the same illumination and algorithm to inspect the surface of the other side of the objects after it has been turned around in a return conveyor belt. All components are triggered by separate light barriers and perform their tasks independently. The integration of the results of each measurement is done by an SPC which also controls the actors that handle the three different classes of objects (good, bad, rework). These actors are valves and the objects are separated by pressurized air. The main concern of this paper is the system aspect, how the measurement results are evaluated and combined to achieve a correct classification of the objects which are inspected by three independent sensors and arrive at unpredictable time intervals.

  18. Super Cooled Large Droplet Analysis of Several Geometries Using LEWICE3D Version 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bidwell, Colin S.

    2011-01-01

    Super Cooled Large Droplet (SLD) collection efficiency calculations were performed for several geometries using the LEWICE3D Version 3 software. The computations were performed using the NASA Glenn Research Center SLD splashing model which has been incorporated into the LEWICE3D Version 3 software. Comparisons to experiment were made where available. The geometries included two straight wings, a swept 64A008 wing tip, two high lift geometries, and the generic commercial transport DLR-F4 wing body configuration. In general the LEWICE3D Version 3 computations compared well with the 2D LEWICE 3.2.2 results and with experimental data where available.

  19. New High-Resolution 3D Seismic Imagery of Deformation and Fault Architecture Along Newport-Inglewood/Rose Canyon Fault in the Inner California Borderlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, J. J.; Bormann, J. M.; Driscoll, N. W.; Kent, G.; Harding, A. J.; Wesnousky, S. G.

    2014-12-01

    The tectonic deformation and geomorphology of the Inner California Borderlands (ICB) records the transition from a convergent plate margin to a predominantly dextral strike-slip system. Geodetic measurements of plate boundary deformation onshore indicate that approximately 15%, or 6-8 mm/yr, of the total Pacific-North American relative plate motion is accommodated by faults offshore. The largest near-shore fault system, the Newport-Inglewood/Rose Canyon (NI/RC) fault complex, has a Holocene slip rate estimate of 1.5-2.0 mm/yr, according to onshore trenching, and current models suggest the potential to produce an Mw 7.0+ earthquake. The fault zone extends approximately 120 km, initiating from the south near downtown San Diego and striking northwards with a constraining bend north of Mt. Soledad in La Jolla and continuing northwestward along the continental shelf, eventually stepping onshore at Newport Beach, California. In late 2013, we completed the first high-resolution 3D seismic survey (3.125 m bins) of the NI/RC fault offshore of San Onofre as part of the Southern California Regional Fault Mapping project. We present new constraints on fault geometry and segmentation of the fault system that may play a role in limiting the extent of future earthquake ruptures. In addition, slip rate estimates using piercing points such as offset channels will be explored. These new observations will allow us to investigate recent deformation and strain transfer along the NI/RC fault system.

  20. Shoreline and Oceano Fault Zones' Intersection Geometry, San Luis Obispo Bay, Offshore South Central Coastal California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, P. J.; Nishenko, S. P.; Greene, H. G.; Bergkamp, B.

    2015-12-01

    As part of the Central Coastal California Seismic Imaging Project, high-resolution 3D low energy marine seismic-reflection data were acquired within San Luis Obispo Bay in 2011 and 2012. Mapping of the sediment-buried bedrock surface using 2D and 3D data clearly reveals that the trace of the Shoreline fault zone bifurcates at Souza Rock. The eastern strand is a reverse fault that trends toward the east-southeast, connecting with the Oceano fault zone onshore. The Shoreline fault is a vertical dextral fault with a very linear geometry that continues south to near the Santa Maria river mouth, and may intersect the Casmalia fault onshore. Both of these fault strands are crossed by Pleistocene low-stand paleochannels eroded into bedrock, and are buried by marine and non-marine sediment. The 3D data show that both the Oceano and Shoreline faults are narrow, well defined fault zones. The reverse slip rate for the Oceano fault (~0.1 mm/y.) falls within published slip rate estimates for the Oceano fault onshore (0.01-0.20 mm/y). The dextral slip rate for the Shoreline fault southeast of Souza Rock is estimated to be 0.06 mm/y. Souza Rock is located on the hanging wall of the Oceano Fault, north of the point of intersection between the Shoreline and Oceano faults. Water depths shoal from 60 m on the surrounding seafloor to 5 m on top of Souza Rock. This structure is interpreted as a structural popup in a restraining bend where the N65°W-trending Oceano fault intersects the N25°W-trending Shoreline fault. The structural geometry near the point of intersection has several minor secondary fault strands, but is remarkably simple.

  1. KENO3D Visualization Tool for KENO V.a and KENO-VI Geometry Models

    SciTech Connect

    Horwedel, J.E.; Bowman, S.M.

    2000-06-01

    Criticality safety analyses often require detailed modeling of complex geometries. Effective visualization tools can enhance checking the accuracy of these models. This report describes the KENO3D visualization tool developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to provide visualization of KENO V.a and KENO-VI criticality safety models. The development of KENO3D is part of the current efforts to enhance the SCALE (Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluations) computer software system.

  2. Polyscale, polymodal fault geometries: evolution and predictive capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blenkinsop, T. G.; Carvell, J.; Clarke, G.; Tonelli, M.

    2012-12-01

    The Late Permian Rangal coal measures on the edge of the Nebo synclinorium in the Bowen basin, NE Queensland, Australia, are cut by normal faults. Mining operations allow 13 faults to be mapped in some detail to depths of 200m. These faults cut Tertiary intrusions and a reverse fault as well as the coal seams, and show no obvious signs of reactivation. The steeply dipping faults are clustered into groups of two to four, separated by hundreds of meters. The faults trend ENE and NE; both trends of faults dip in both directions, defining a quadrimodal geometry. The odd axis construction for these faults suggests that vertical shortening was accompanied by horizontal extension along both principal directions of 153° and 063°. The mapped extents of the faults are limited by erosion and the depth to which the faults have been drilled, but displacement profiles along the lengths of the faults show maxima within the fault planes. The displacement profiles suggest that the currently mapped faults have similar lengths to the total preserved lengths of the faults, and that they will continue into the unmined ground to a limited, but predictable extent. The fault planes have a complex geometry, with segments of individual faults showing a similar variability in orientation to the ensemble of fault planes: the fault planes themselves are polymodal. Displacement profiles show a good correlation with segment orientation. An odd axis construction based on fault segments, rather than individual faults, gives principal extension directions within 4° of the above results. The variable orientation of fault segments, the correlation of the displacement profiles with fault orientation, and the similarity between the segment and ensemble fault kinematics suggest that the faults have evolved by propagation and linking of smaller polymodal faults in the same bulk strain field.ross section of polymodal fault at Hail Creek coal mine

  3. Uncertainty assessment of imaging techniques for the 3D reconstruction of stent geometry.

    PubMed

    Cosentino, Daria; Zwierzak, Iwona; Schievano, Silvia; Díaz-Zuccarini, Vanessa; Fenner, John W; Narracott, Andrew J

    2014-08-01

    This paper presents a quantitative assessment of uncertainty for the 3D reconstruction of stents. This study investigates a CP stent (Numed, USA) used in congenital heart disease applications with a focus on the variance in measurements of stent geometry. The stent was mounted on a model of patient implantation site geometry, reconstructed from magnetic resonance images, and imaged using micro-computed tomography (CT), conventional CT, biplane fluoroscopy and optical stereo-photogrammetry. Image data were post-processed to retrieve the 3D stent geometry. Stent strut length, separation angle and cell asymmetry were derived and repeatability was assessed for each technique along with variation in relation to μCT data, assumed to represent the gold standard. The results demonstrate the performance of biplanar reconstruction methods is comparable with volumetric CT scans in evaluating 3D stent geometry. Uncertainty on the evaluation of strut length, separation angle and cell asymmetry using biplanar fluoroscopy is of the order ±0.2mm, 3° and 0.03, respectively. These results support the use of biplanar fluoroscopy for in vivo measurement of 3D stent geometry and provide quantitative assessment of uncertainty in the measurement of geometric parameters.

  4. 3D Dynamic Rupture Simulations Across Interacting Faults: the Mw7.0, 2010, Haiti Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douilly, R.; Aochi, H.; Calais, E.; Freed, A. M.; Aagaard, B.

    2014-12-01

    The mechanisms controlling rupture propagation between fault segments during an earthquake are key to the hazard posed by fault systems. Rupture initiation on a fault segment sometimes transfers to a larger fault, resulting in a significant event (e.g.i, 2002 M7.9Denali and 2010 M7.1 Darfield earthquakes). In other cases rupture is constrained to the initial segment and does not transfer to nearby faults, resulting in events of moderate magnitude. This is the case of the 1989 M6.9 Loma Prieta and 2010 M7.0 Haiti earthquakes which initiated on reverse faults abutting against a major strike-slip plate boundary fault but did not propagate onto it. Here we investigatethe rupture dynamics of the Haiti earthquake, seeking to understand why rupture propagated across two segments of the Léogâne fault but did not propagate to the adjacenent Enriquillo Plantain Garden Fault, the major 200 km long plate boundary fault cutting through southern Haiti. We use a Finite Element Model to simulate the nucleation and propagation of rupture on the Léogâne fault, varying friction and background stress to determine the parameter set that best explains the observed earthquake sequence. The best-fit simulation is in remarkable agreement with several finite fault inversions and predicts ground displacement in very good agreement with geodetic and geological observations. The two slip patches inferred from finite-fault inversions are explained by the successive rupture of two fault segments oriented favorably with respect to the rupture propagation, while the geometry of the Enriquillo fault did not allow shear stress to reach failure. Although our simulation results replicate well the ground deformation consistent with the geodetic surface observation but convolving the ground motion with the soil amplification from the microzonation study will correctly account for the heterogeneity of the PGA throughout the rupture area.

  5. Conformal geometry and its applications on 3D shape matching, recognition, and stitching.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sen; Wang, Yang; Jin, Miao; Gu, Xianfeng David; Samaras, Dimitris

    2007-07-01

    Three-dimensional shape matching is a fundamental issue in computer vision with many applications such as shape registration, 3D object recognition, and classification. However, shape matching with noise, occlusion, and clutter is a challenging problem. In this paper, we analyze a family of quasi-conformal maps including harmonic maps, conformal maps, and least-squares conformal maps with regards to 3D shape matching. As a result, we propose a novel and computationally efficient shape matching framework by using least-squares conformal maps. According to conformal geometry theory, each 3D surface with disk topology can be mapped to a 2D domain through a global optimization and the resulting map is a diffeomorphism, i.e., one-to-one and onto. This allows us to simplify the 3D shape-matching problem to a 2D image-matching problem, by comparing the resulting 2D parametric maps, which are stable, insensitive to resolution changes and robust to occlusion, and noise. Therefore, highly accurate and efficient 3D shape matching algorithms can be achieved by using the above three parametric maps. Finally, the robustness of least-squares conformal maps is evaluated and analyzed comprehensively in 3D shape matching with occlusion, noise, and resolution variation. In order to further demonstrate the performance of our proposed method, we also conduct a series of experiments on two computer vision applications, i.e., 3D face recognition and 3D nonrigid surface alignment and stitching. PMID:17496378

  6. Constraints on 3D fault and fracture distribution in layered volcanic- volcaniclastic sequences from terrestrial LIDAR datasets: Faroe Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raithatha, Bansri; McCaffrey, Kenneth; Walker, Richard; Brown, Richard; Pickering, Giles

    2013-04-01

    Hydrocarbon reservoirs commonly contain an array of fine-scale structures that control fluid flow in the subsurface, such as polyphase fracture networks and small-scale fault zones. These structures are unresolvable using seismic imaging and therefore outcrop-based studies have been used as analogues to characterize fault and fracture networks and assess their impact on fluid flow in the subsurface. To maximize recovery and enhance production, it is essential to understand the geometry, physical properties, and distribution of these structures in 3D. Here we present field data and terrestrial LIDAR-derived 3D, photo-realistic virtual outcrops of fault zones at a range of displacement scales (0.001- 4.5 m) within a volcaniclastic sand- and basaltic lava unit sequence in the Faroe Islands. Detailed field observations were used to constrain the virtual outcrop dataset, and a workflow has been developed to build a discrete fracture network (DFN) models in GOCAD® from these datasets. Model construction involves three main stages: (1) Georeferencing and processing of LIDAR datasets; (2) Structural interpretation to discriminate between faults, fractures, veins, and joint planes using CAD software and RiSCAN Pro; and (3) Building a 3D DFN in GOCAD®. To test the validity of this workflow, we focus here on a 4.5 m displacement strike-slip fault zone that displays a complex polymodal fracture network in the inter-layered basalt-volcaniclastic sequence, which is well-constrained by field study. The DFN models support our initial field-based hypothesis that fault zone geometry varies with increasing displacement through volcaniclastic units. Fracture concentration appears to be greatest in the upper lava unit, decreases into the volcaniclastic sediments, and decreases further into the lower lava unit. This distribution of fractures appears to be related to the width of the fault zone and the amount of fault damage on the outcrop. For instance, the fault zone is thicker in

  7. Geometry and earthquake potential of the shoreline fault, central California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hardebeck, Jeanne L.

    2013-01-01

    The Shoreline fault is a vertical strike‐slip fault running along the coastline near San Luis Obispo, California. Much is unknown about the Shoreline fault, including its slip rate and the details of its geometry. Here, I study the geometry of the Shoreline fault at seismogenic depth, as well as the adjacent section of the offshore Hosgri fault, using seismicity relocations and earthquake focal mechanisms. The Optimal Anisotropic Dynamic Clustering (OADC) algorithm (Ouillon et al., 2008) is used to objectively identify the simplest planar fault geometry that fits all of the earthquakes to within their location uncertainty. The OADC results show that the Shoreline fault is a single continuous structure that connects to the Hosgri fault. Discontinuities smaller than about 1 km may be undetected, but would be too small to be barriers to earthquake rupture. The Hosgri fault dips steeply to the east, while the Shoreline fault is essentially vertical, so the Hosgri fault dips towards and under the Shoreline fault as the two faults approach their intersection. The focal mechanisms generally agree with pure right‐lateral strike‐slip on the OADC planes, but suggest a non‐planar Hosgri fault or another structure underlying the northern Shoreline fault. The Shoreline fault most likely transfers strike‐slip motion between the Hosgri fault and other faults of the Pacific–North America plate boundary system to the east. A hypothetical earthquake rupturing the entire known length of the Shoreline fault would have a moment magnitude of 6.4–6.8. A hypothetical earthquake rupturing the Shoreline fault and the section of the Hosgri fault north of the Hosgri–Shoreline junction would have a moment magnitude of 7.2–7.5.

  8. Complex patterns of faulting revealed by 3D seismic data at the West Galicia rifted margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reston, Timothy; Cresswell, Derren; Sawyer, Dale; Ranero, Cesar; Shillington, Donna; Morgan, Julia; Lymer, Gael

    2015-04-01

    The west Galicia margin is characterised by crust thinning to less than 3 km, well-defined fault blocks, which overlie a bright reflection (the S reflector) generally interpreted as a tectonic Moho. The margin exhibits neither voluminous magmatism nor thick sediment piles to obscure the structures and the amount of extension. As such is represents an ideal location to study the process of continental breakup both through seismic imaging and potentially through drilling. Prestack depth migration of existing 2D profiles has strongly supported the interpretation of the S reflector as both a detachment and as the crust-mantle boundary; wide-angle seismic has also shown that the mantle beneath S is serpentinised. Despite the quality of the existing 2D seismic images, a number of competing models have been advanced to explain the formation of this margin, including sequential faulting, polyphase faulting, multiple detachments and the gravitational collapse of the margin over exhumed mantle. As these models, all developed for the Galicia margin, have been subsequently applied to other margins, distinguishing between them has implications not only for the structure of the Galicia margin but for the process of rifting through to breakup more generally. To address these issues in summer of 2013 we collected a 3D combined seismic reflection and wide-angle dataset over this margin. Here we present some of the results of ongoing processing of the 3D volume, focussing on the internal structure of some of the fault blocks that overlies the S detachment. 2D processing of the data shows a relatively simple series of tilted fault block, bound by west-dipping faults that detach downwards onto the bright S reflector. However, inspection of the 3D volume produced by 3D pre-stack time migration reveals that the fault blocks contain a complex set of sedimentary packages, with strata tilted to the east, west, north and south, each package bound by faults. Furthermore, the top of crustal

  9. Forward and Reverse Modeling Compressive Deformation in a 3D Geologic Model along the Central San Andreas Fault Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, M. A.; Graymer, R. W.; McPhee, D.

    2015-12-01

    During the late Miocene, a small change in the relative motion of the Pacific plate resulted in compressive as well as translational deformation along the central San Andreas Fault (SAF), creating thrust faults and folds throughout this region of California. We constructed a 3D model of an upper crustal volume between Pinnacles National Park and Gold Hill by assembling geologic map data and cross sections, geophysical data, and petroleum well logs in MoveTm, software which has the ability to forward and reverse model movement along faults and folds. For this study, we chose a blind thrust fault west of the SAF near Parkfield to compare deformation produced by MoveTm's forward modeling algorithm with that observed. We chose various synclines east of the SAF to explore the software's ability to unfold (reverse model) units. For the initial round of modeling, strike-slip movement has been omitted as the fault algorithm was designed primarily for extensional or compressional environments. Preliminary forward modeling of originally undeformed strata along the blind thrust produced geometries similar to those in the present-day 3D geologic model. The modeled amount of folding produced in hanging wall strata was less severe, suggesting these units were slightly folded before displacement. Based on these results, the algorithm shows potential in predicting deformation related to blind thrusts. Contraction in the region varies with fold axis location and orientation. MoveTm's unfolding algorithm can allow researchers to measure the amount of contraction a fold represents, and compare that amount across the modeled area as a way of observing regional stress patterns. The unfolding algorithm also allows for passive deformation of strata unconformably underlying the fold; one example reveals a steeper orientation of Cretaceous units prior to late Miocene deformation. Such modeling capabilities can allow for a better understanding of the structural history of the region.

  10. Experiments with Uas Imagery for Automatic Modeling of Power Line 3d Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jóźków, G.; Vander Jagt, B.; Toth, C.

    2015-08-01

    The ideal mapping technology for transmission line inspection is the airborne LiDAR executed from helicopter platforms. It allows for full 3D geometry extraction in highly automated manner. Large scale aerial images can be also used for this purpose, however, automation is possible only for finding transmission line positions (2D geometry), and the sag needs to be estimated manually. For longer lines, these techniques are less expensive than ground surveys, yet they are still expensive. UAS technology has the potential to reduce these costs, especially if using inexpensive platforms with consumer grade cameras. This study investigates the potential of using high resolution UAS imagery for automatic modeling of transmission line 3D geometry. The key point of this experiment was to employ dense matching algorithms to appropriately acquired UAS images to have points created also on wires. This allowed to model the 3D geometry of transmission lines similarly to LiDAR acquired point clouds. Results showed that the transmission line modeling is possible with a high internal accuracy for both, horizontal and vertical directions, even when wires were represented by a partial (sparse) point cloud.

  11. 3D geometry analysis of the medial meniscus--a statistical shape modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Vrancken, A C T; Crijns, S P M; Ploegmakers, M J M; O'Kane, C; van Tienen, T G; Janssen, D; Buma, P; Verdonschot, N

    2014-10-01

    The geometry-dependent functioning of the meniscus indicates that detailed knowledge on 3D meniscus geometry and its inter-subject variation is essential to design well functioning anatomically shaped meniscus replacements. Therefore, the aim of this study was to quantify 3D meniscus geometry and to determine whether variation in medial meniscus geometry is size- or shape-driven. Also we performed a cluster analysis to identify distinct morphological groups of medial menisci and assessed whether meniscal geometry is gender-dependent. A statistical shape model was created, containing the meniscus geometries of 35 subjects (20 females, 15 males) that were obtained from MR images. A principal component analysis was performed to determine the most important modes of geometry variation and the characteristic changes per principal component were evaluated. Each meniscus from the original dataset was then reconstructed as a linear combination of principal components. This allowed the comparison of male and female menisci, and a cluster analysis to determine distinct morphological meniscus groups. Of the variation in medial meniscus geometry, 53.8% was found to be due to primarily size-related differences and 29.6% due to shape differences. Shape changes were most prominent in the cross-sectional plane, rather than in the transverse plane. Significant differences between male and female menisci were only found for principal component 1, which predominantly reflected size differences. The cluster analysis resulted in four clusters, yet these clusters represented two statistically different meniscal shapes, as differences between cluster 1, 2 and 4 were only present for principal component 1. This study illustrates that differences in meniscal geometry cannot be explained by scaling only, but that different meniscal shapes can be distinguished. Functional analysis, e.g. through finite element modeling, is required to assess whether these distinct shapes actually influence

  12. 3D modeling of fault-zone architecture and hydraulic structure along a major Alpine wrench lineament: the Pusteria Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bistacchi, A.; Massironi, M.; Menegon, L.

    2007-05-01

    The E-W Pusteria (Pustertal) line is the eastern segment of the Periadriatic lineament, the > 600 km tectonic boundary between the Europe and Adria-vergent portions of the Alpine Collisional Orogen. The lithospheric-scale Periadriatic lineament is characterized by a transcurrent polyphase activity of Tertiary age, and is marked by an array of calcalkaline to shoshonitic magmatic bodies. At the map scale, the western edge of the Pusteria line is characterized by a complex network of generally transcurrent brittle fault zones, interconnected by a full spectrum of transtensional and transpressional features related to releasing and restraining bands respectively. An older ductile/brittle sinistral activity can be recognized in some segments of the fault thanks to their relationships with a strongly tectonized Oligocene tonalite/diorite body (Mules tonalitic "lamella"), emplaced along the Pusteria line, and minor related dikes. A late dextral activity involved the whole Pusteria Fault network and is consistent with the Eastward escape of a major lithospheric block of the Eastern Alps towards the Pannonian basin. During its polyphase activity, the fault network developed a complex architecture, showing different kinds of damage and core zones. Here we report the first results of a detailed mapping project in which, in addition to a traditional structural geology work, the spatial distribution of fault rocks in core zones and the degree and characteristics of fracturing (e.g. joint spacing and number of joint sets) in damage zones are taken into account. As regards the quantitative characterization of damage zones, a new description schema, partly inspired by engineering geology classifications, is proposed. The results of this work are implemented in a 3D structural model (developed with gOcad), allowing the study of the complex relationships among the various structural, mechanical and lithological parameters which concur in the development of the fault

  13. 3D FEM Geometry and Material Flow Optimization of Porthole-Die Extrusion

    SciTech Connect

    Ceretti, Elisabetta; Mazzoni, Luca; Giardini, Claudio

    2007-05-17

    The aim of this work is to design and to improve the geometry of a porthole-die for the production of aluminum components by means of 3D FEM simulations. In fact, the use of finite element models will allow to investigate the effects of the die geometry (webs, extrusion cavity) on the material flow and on the stresses acting on the die so to reduce the die wear and to improve the tool life. The software used to perform the simulations was a commercial FEM code, Deform 3D. The technological data introduced in the FE model have been furnished by METRA S.p.A. Company, partner in this research. The results obtained have been considered valid and helpful by the Company for building a new optimized extrusion porthole-die.

  14. Effect of geometry on drug release from 3D printed tablets.

    PubMed

    Goyanes, Alvaro; Robles Martinez, Pamela; Buanz, Asma; Basit, Abdul W; Gaisford, Simon

    2015-10-30

    The aim of this work was to explore the feasibility of combining hot melt extrusion (HME) with 3D printing (3DP) technology, with a view to producing different shaped tablets which would be otherwise difficult to produce using traditional methods. A filament extruder was used to obtain approx. 4% paracetamol loaded filaments of polyvinyl alcohol with characteristics suitable for use in fused-deposition modelling 3DP. Five different tablet geometries were successfully 3D-printed-cube, pyramid, cylinder, sphere and torus. The printing process did not affect the stability of the drug. Drug release from the tablets was not dependent on the surface area but instead on surface area to volume ratio, indicating the influence that geometrical shape has on drug release. An erosion-mediated process controlled drug release. This work has demonstrated the potential of 3DP to manufacture tablet shapes of different geometries, many of which would be challenging to manufacture by powder compaction. PMID:25934428

  15. Laboratory Study of Magnetic Reconnection in 3D Geometry Relevant to Magnetopause and Magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Y.; Lu, Q.; Ji, H.; Mao, A.; Wang, X.; E, P.; Wang, Z.; Xiao, Q.; Ding, W.; Zheng, J.

    2015-12-01

    Laboratory Study of Magnetic Reconnection in 3D Geometry Relevant to Magnetopause and Magnetotail Y. Ren1,2, Quaming Lu3, Hantao Ji1,2, Aohua Mao1, Xiaogang Wang1, Peng E1, Zhibin Wang1, Qingmei Xiao1, Weixing Ding4, Jinxing Zheng51 Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, China2 Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08543 3University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, China 4University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, 90095 5ASIPP, Hefei, China A new magnetic reconnection experiment, Harbin reconnection eXperiment (HRX), is currently being designed as a key part of Space Plasma Environment Research Facility (SPERF) at Harbin Institute of Technology in Harbin, China. HRX aims to provide a unique experimental platform for studying reconnections in 3D geometry relevant to magnetopause and magnetotail to address: the role of electron and ion-scale dynamics in the current sheet; particle and energy transfer from magnetosheath to magnetosphere; particle energization/heating mechanisms during magnetic reconnection; 3D effects in fast reconnection, e.g. the role of 3D magnetic null point. HRX employs a unique set of coils to generate the required 3D magnetic geometry and provides a wide range of plasma parameters. Here, important motivating scientific problems are reviewed and the physics design of HRX is presented, including plasma parameters determined from Vlasov scaling law, reconnection scenarios explored using vacuum magnetic field calculations and numerical simulations of HRX using hybrid and MHD codes. Plasma diagnostics plan and engineering design of important coils will also be briefly presented.

  16. 3D geometry of the strain-field at transform plate boundaries: Implications for seismic rupture

    SciTech Connect

    Bodin, P.; Bilham, R. |

    1994-11-01

    We examine the amplitude and distribution of slip on vertical frictionless faults in the zone of concentrated shear strain that is characteristic of transform plate boundaries. We study both a 2D and a 3D approximation to this strain field. Mean displacements on ruptures within the zone of concentrated shear strain are proportional to the shear strain at failure when they are short, and are limited by plate displacements since the last major earthquake when they are long. The transition between these two behaviors occurs when the length of the dislocation approaches twice the thickness of the seismogenic crust, approximately the breadth of the zone of concentrated shear strain observed geodetically at transform plate boundaries. This result explains the observed non-linear scaling relation between seismic moment and rupture length. A geometrical consequence of the 3D model, in which the strain-field tapers downward, is that moderate earthquakes with rupture lengths similar to the thickness of the crust tend to slip more at depth than near the surface. Seismic moments estimated from surface slip in moderate earthquakes (M less than or equal to 7) will thus be underestimated. Shallow creep, if its along-strike dimension is extensive, can reduce a surface slip deficit that would otherwise develop on faults on which M less than 7 events are typical. In the absence of surface creep or other forms of off-fault deformation great earthquakes may be necessary features of transform boundaries with downward-tapering strain-fields.

  17. Discovery of previously unrecognised local faults in London, UK, using detailed 3D geological modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldiss, Don; Haslam, Richard

    2013-04-01

    In parts of London, faulting introduces lateral heterogeneity to the local ground conditions, especially where construction works intercept the Palaeogene Lambeth Group. This brings difficulties to the compilation of a ground model that is fully consistent with the ground investigation data, and so to the design and construction of engineering works. However, because bedrock in the London area is rather uniform at outcrop, and is widely covered by Quaternary deposits, few faults are shown on the geological maps of the area. This paper discusses a successful resolution of this problem at a site in east central London, where tunnels for a new underground railway station are planned. A 3D geological model was used to provide an understanding of the local geological structure, in faulted Lambeth Group strata, that had not been possible by other commonly-used methods. This model includes seven previously unrecognised faults, with downthrows ranging from about 1 m to about 12 m. The model was constructed in the GSI3D geological modelling software using about 145 borehole records, including many legacy records, in an area of 850 m by 500 m. The basis of a GSI3D 3D geological model is a network of 2D cross-sections drawn by a geologist, generally connecting borehole positions (where the borehole records define the level of the geological units that are present), and outcrop and subcrop lines for those units (where shown by a geological map). When the lines tracing the base of each geological unit within the intersecting cross-sections are complete and mutually consistent, the software is used to generate TIN surfaces between those lines, so creating a 3D geological model. Even where a geological model is constructed as if no faults were present, changes in apparent dip between two data points within a single cross-section can indicate that a fault is present in that segment of the cross-section. If displacements of similar size with the same polarity are found in a series

  18. Earthquake Source Parameters Relationships from 3D Rough Fault Dynamic Rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Q.; Day, S. M.; Shi, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Fault surface roughness has a strong influence on the distribution of stress around the fault, and affects the dynamics of the earthquake process. In particular, roughness influences the distribution of the parameters conventionally used to describe fault slip in, for example, kinematic modeling of strong ground motion. We explore the effect of the fault roughness on earthquake source parameters through the statistical analysis of a large suite of 3D rupture simulations. We have built a database of more than 1000 simulated dynamic ruptures based on different rough fault profiles and relative-strength (S) ratios, and have quantitatively analyzed the correlation between earthquake source parameter pairs.. In the subshear propagation-speed regime, we find the following relationships: (1) Rise time, total slip and peak slip rate each decrease with increasing roughness. (2) Rupture velocity is weakly positively related to slip, and the relationship is stronger with increasing roughness. We also explore how peak slip rate, rise time and different pairs of source parameters correlations are affected by fault roughness. This work may give useful guidance for use in kinematic rupture-source generators and help improve methods for ground strong motion prediction.

  19. 3D coexisting modes of thermal convection in the faulted Lower Yarmouk Gorge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magri, Fabien; Inbar, Nimrod; Möller, Peter; Raggad, Marwan; Rödiger, Tino; Rosenthal, Eliyahu; Siebert, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Numerical investigations of 3D modes of large-scale convection in faulted aquifers are presented with the aim to infer possible transport mechanisms supporting the formation of thermal springs in the Lower Yarmouk Gorge (LYG), at the border between Israel and Jordan. The transient finite elements models are based on a geological model of the LYG that introduces more realistic structural features of the basin, compared to previous existing models of the area (Magri et al., submitted). The sensitivity analysis of the fault permeability showed that faults cross-cutting the main regional flow direction allow groundwater to be driven laterally by convective forces within the fault planes. Therein thermal waters can either discharge along the fault traces or exit the fault through adjacent permeable aquifers. The location of springs can migrate with time, is not strictly constrained to the damage zones and reflects the interplay between the wavelength of the multicellular regime in the fault zone and the regional flow toward discharge areas in the lowlands. The results presented here suggest that in the LYG case, crossing flow paths result from the coexistence of fault convection, that can develop for example along NE-SW oriented faults within the Gorge, and additional flow fields that can be induced either by topography N-S gradients, e.g. perpendicular to the major axe of the Gorge, or by local thermal convection in permeable aquifers below Eocene aquiclude. The sensitivity analysis is consistent with the analytical solutions based on viscous-dependent Rayleigh theory. It indicates that in the LYG coexisting transport processes likely occur at fault hydraulic conductivity ranging between 2.3e-7 m/s and 9.3e- 7 m/s (i.e. 7 m/yr and 30 m/yr). The LYG numerical example and the associated Rayleigh analysis can be applied to study the onset of thermal convection and resulting flow patterns of any fractured hydrothermal basin. References Magri F, Möller S, Inbar N, M

  20. Objective and subjective quality assessment of geometry compression of reconstructed 3D humans in a 3D virtual room

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mekuria, Rufael; Cesar, Pablo; Doumanis, Ioannis; Frisiello, Antonella

    2015-09-01

    Compression of 3D object based video is relevant for 3D Immersive applications. Nevertheless, the perceptual aspects of the degradation introduced by codecs for meshes and point clouds are not well understood. In this paper we evaluate the subjective and objective degradations introduced by such codecs in a state of art 3D immersive virtual room. In the 3D immersive virtual room, users are captured with multiple cameras, and their surfaces are reconstructed as photorealistic colored/textured 3D meshes or point clouds. To test the perceptual effect of compression and transmission, we render degraded versions with different frame rates in different contexts (near/far) in the scene. A quantitative subjective study with 16 users shows that negligible distortion of decoded surfaces compared to the original reconstructions can be achieved in the 3D virtual room. In addition, a qualitative task based analysis in a full prototype field trial shows increased presence, emotion, user and state recognition of the reconstructed 3D Human representation compared to animated computer avatars.

  1. 3-D world modeling with updating capability based on combinatorial geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, M.; Pin, F.G.; de Saussure, G.; Weisbin, C.R.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes a 3-D world modeling technique using range data. Range data quantify the distances from the sensor focal plane to the object surface, i.e., the 3-D coordinates of discrete points on the object surface are known. The approach proposed herein for 3-D world modeling is based on the Combinatorial Geometry (CG) Method which is widely used in Monte Carlo particle transport calculations. First, each measured point on the object surface is surrounded by a small sphere with a radius determined by the range to that point. Then, the 3-D shapes of the visible surfaces are obtained by taking the (Boolean) union of all the spheres. The result is an unambiguous representation of the object's boundary surfaces. The ''pre-learned'' partial knowledge of the environment can be also represented using the CG Method with a relatively small amount of data. Using the CG type of representation, distances in desired directions to boundary surfaces of various objects are efficiently calculated. This feature is particularly useful for continuously verifying the world model against the data provided by a range finder, and for integrating range data from successive locations of the robot during motion. The efficiency of the proposed approach is illustrated by simulations of a spherical robot in a 3-D room in the presence of moving obstacles and inadequate prelearned partial knowledge of the environment.

  2. 3-D world modeling based on combinatorial geometry for autonomous robot navigation

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, M.; Pin, F.G.; de Saussure, G.; Weisbin, C.R.

    1987-01-01

    In applications of robotics to surveillance and mapping at nuclear facilities, the scene to be described is fundamentally three-dimensional. Usually, only partial information concerning the 3-D environment is known a-priori. Using an autonomous robot, this information may be updated using range data to provide an accurate model of the environment. Range data quantify the distances from the sensor focal plane to the object surface. In other words, the 3-D coordinates of discrete points on the object surface are known. The approach proposed herein for 3-D world modeling is based on the Combinatorial Geometry (C.G.) Method which is widely used in Monte Carlo particle transport calculations. First, each measured point on the object surface is surrounded by a small solid sphere with a radius determined by the range to that point. Then, the 3-D shapes of the visible surfaces are obtained by taking the (Boolean) union of all the spheres. The result is a concise and unambiguous representation of the object's boundary surfaces. The distances from discrete points on the robot's boundary surface to various objects are calculated effectively using the C.G. type of representation. This feature is particularly useful for navigation purposes. The efficiency of the proposed approach is illustrated by a simulation of a spherical robot navigating in a 3-D room with several static obstacles.

  3. The 3-D world modeling with updating capability based on combinatorial geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M.; Pin, F. G.; Desaussure, G.; Weisbin, C. R.

    1987-01-01

    A 3-D world modeling technique using range data is discribed. Range data quantify the distances from the sensor focal plane to the object surface, i.e., the 3-D coordinates of discrete points on the object surface are known. The approach proposed herein for 3-D world modeling is based on the Combinatorial Geometry (CG) method which is widely used in Monte Carlo particle transport calculations. First, each measured point on the object surface is surrounded by a small sphere with a radius determined by the range to that point. Then, the 3-D shapes of the visible surfaces are obtained by taking the (Boolean) union of all the spheres. The result is an unambiguous representation of the object's boundary surfaces. The pre-learned partial knowledge of the environment can be also represented using the CG Method with a relatively small amount of data. Using the CG type of representation, distances in desired directions to boundary surfaces of various objects are efficiently calculated. This feature is particularly useful for continuously verifying the world model against the data provided by a range finder, and for integrating range data from successive locations of the robot during motion. The efficiency of the proposed approach is illustrated by simulations of a spherical robot in a 3-D room in the presence of moving obstacles and inadequate prelearned partial knowledge of the environment.

  4. 3D Geometry and Motion Estimations of Maneuvering Targets for Interferometric ISAR With Sparse Aperture.

    PubMed

    Xu, Gang; Xing, Mengdao; Xia, Xiang-Gen; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Qianqian; Bao, Zheng

    2016-05-01

    In the current scenario of high-resolution inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) imaging, the non-cooperative targets may have strong maneuverability, which tends to cause time-variant Doppler modulation and imaging plane in the echoed data. Furthermore, it is still a challenge to realize ISAR imaging of maneuvering targets from sparse aperture (SA) data. In this paper, we focus on the problem of 3D geometry and motion estimations of maneuvering targets for interferometric ISAR (InISAR) with SA. For a target of uniformly accelerated rotation, the rotational modulation in echo is formulated as chirp sensing code under a chirp-Fourier dictionary to represent the maneuverability. In particular, a joint multi-channel imaging approach is developed to incorporate the multi-channel data and treat the multi-channel ISAR image formation as a joint-sparsity constraint optimization. Then, a modified orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP) algorithm is employed to solve the optimization problem to produce high-resolution range-Doppler (RD) images and chirp parameter estimation. The 3D target geometry and the motion estimations are followed by using the acquired RD images and chirp parameters. Herein, a joint estimation approach of 3D geometry and rotation motion is presented to realize outlier removing and error reduction. In comparison with independent single-channel processing, the proposed joint multi-channel imaging approach performs better in 2D imaging, 3D imaging, and motion estimation. Finally, experiments using both simulated and measured data are performed to confirm the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. PMID:26930684

  5. 3D Geometry and Motion Estimations of Maneuvering Targets for Interferometric ISAR With Sparse Aperture.

    PubMed

    Xu, Gang; Xing, Mengdao; Xia, Xiang-Gen; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Qianqian; Bao, Zheng

    2016-05-01

    In the current scenario of high-resolution inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) imaging, the non-cooperative targets may have strong maneuverability, which tends to cause time-variant Doppler modulation and imaging plane in the echoed data. Furthermore, it is still a challenge to realize ISAR imaging of maneuvering targets from sparse aperture (SA) data. In this paper, we focus on the problem of 3D geometry and motion estimations of maneuvering targets for interferometric ISAR (InISAR) with SA. For a target of uniformly accelerated rotation, the rotational modulation in echo is formulated as chirp sensing code under a chirp-Fourier dictionary to represent the maneuverability. In particular, a joint multi-channel imaging approach is developed to incorporate the multi-channel data and treat the multi-channel ISAR image formation as a joint-sparsity constraint optimization. Then, a modified orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP) algorithm is employed to solve the optimization problem to produce high-resolution range-Doppler (RD) images and chirp parameter estimation. The 3D target geometry and the motion estimations are followed by using the acquired RD images and chirp parameters. Herein, a joint estimation approach of 3D geometry and rotation motion is presented to realize outlier removing and error reduction. In comparison with independent single-channel processing, the proposed joint multi-channel imaging approach performs better in 2D imaging, 3D imaging, and motion estimation. Finally, experiments using both simulated and measured data are performed to confirm the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  6. Seismicity and fault geometry of the San Andreas fault around Parkfield, California and their implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Woohan; Hong, Tae-Kyung; Lee, Junhyung; Taira, Taka'aki

    2016-05-01

    Fault geometry is a consequence of tectonic evolution, and it provides important information on potential seismic hazards. We investigated fault geometry and its properties in Parkfield, California on the basis of local seismicity and seismic velocity residuals refined by an adaptive-velocity hypocentral-parameter inversion method. The station correction terms from the hypocentral-parameter inversion present characteristic seismic velocity changes around the fault, suggesting low seismic velocities in the region east of the fault and high seismic velocities in the region to the west. Large seismic velocity anomalies are observed at shallow depths along the whole fault zone. At depths of 3-8 km, seismic velocity anomalies are small in the central fault zone, but are large in the northern and southern fault zones. At depths > 8 km, low seismic velocities are observed in the northern fault zone. High seismicity is observed in the Southwest Fracture Zone, which has developed beside the creeping segment of the San Andreas fault. The vertical distribution of seismicity suggests that the fault has spiral geometry, dipping NE in the northern region, nearly vertical in the central region, and SW in the southern region. The rapid twisting of the fault plane occurs in a short distance of approximately 50 km. The seismic velocity anomalies and fault geometry suggest location-dependent piecewise faulting, which may cause the periodic M6 events in the Parkfield region.

  7. Preliminary simulation of a M6.5 earthquake on the Seattle Fault using 3D finite-difference modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stephenson, William J.; Frankel, Arthur D.

    2000-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite-difference simulation of a moderate-sized (M 6.5) thrust-faulting earthquake on the Seattle fault demonstrates the effects of the Seattle Basin on strong ground motion in the Puget lowland. The model area includes the cities of Seattle, Bremerton and Bellevue. We use a recently developed detailed 3D-velocity model of the Seattle Basin in these simulations. The model extended to 20-km depth and assumed rupture on a finite fault with random slip distribution. Preliminary results from simulations of frequencies 0.5 Hz and lower suggest amplification can occur at the surface of the Seattle Basin by the trapping of energy in the Quaternary sediments. Surface waves generated within the basin appear to contribute to amplification throughout the modeled region. Several factors apparently contribute to large ground motions in downtown Seattle: (1) radiation pattern and directivity from the rupture; (2) amplification and energy trapping within the Quaternary sediments; and (3) basin geometry and variation in depth of both Quaternary and Tertiary sediments

  8. RV functional imaging: 3-D echo-derived dynamic geometry and flow field simulations.

    PubMed

    Pasipoularides, Ares D; Shu, Ming; Womack, Michael S; Shah, Ashish; Von Ramm, Olaf; Glower, Donald D

    2003-01-01

    We describe a novel functional imaging approach for quantitative analysis of right ventricular (RV) blood flow patterns in specific experimental animals (or humans) using real-time, three-dimensional (3-D) echocardiography (RT3D). The method is independent of the digital imaging modality used. It comprises three parts. First, a semiautomated segmentation aided by intraluminal contrast medium locates the RV endocardial surface. Second, a geometric scheme for dynamic RV chamber reconstruction applies a time interpolation procedure to the RT3D data to quantify wall geometry and motion at 400 Hz. A volumetric prism method validated the dynamic geometric reconstruction against simultaneous sonomicrometric canine measurements. Finally, the RV endocardial border motion information is used for mesh generation on a computational fluid dynamics solver to simulate development of the early RV diastolic inflow field. Boundary conditions (tessellated endocardial surface nodal velocities) for the solver are directly derived from the endocardial geometry and motion information. The new functional imaging approach may yield important kinematic information on the distribution of instantaneous velocities in the RV diastolic flow field of specific normal or diseased hearts. PMID:12388220

  9. The 3D geometry of regional-scale dolerite saucer complexes and their feeders in the Secunda Complex, Karoo Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coetzee, André; Kisters, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    Dolerites in the Karoo Basin of South Africa commonly represent kilometre-scale, interconnected saucer-shaped structures that consist of inner sills, bounded by inclined sheets connected to stratigraphically higher outer sills. Based on information from over 3000 boreholes and mining operations extending over an area of ca. 500 km2 and covering a > 3 km vertical section from Karoo strata into underlying basement rocks, this paper presents the results of a 3D modelling exercise that describes the geometry and spatial relationships of a regional-scale saucer complex, locally referred to as the number 8 sill, from the Secunda (coal mine) Complex in the northern parts of the Karoo Basin. The composite number 8 sill complex consists of three main dolerite saucers (dolerites A to C). These dolerite saucers are hosted by the Karoo Supergroup and the connectivity and geometry of the saucers support a lateral, sill-feeding-sill relationship between dolerite saucers A, B and C. The saucers are underlain and fed by a shallowly-dipping sheet (dolerite D) in the basement rocks below the Karoo sequence. The 3D geometric strata model agrees well with experimental results of saucer formation from underlying feeders in sedimentary basins, but demonstrates a more intricate relationship where a single feeder can give rise to several split level saucers in one regionally extensive saucer complex. More localised dome- or ridge-shape protrusions are common in the flat lying sill parts of the regional-scale saucers. We suggest a mode of emplacement for these kilometre-scale dome- and ridge structures having formed as a result of lobate magma flow processes. Magma lobes, propagating in different directions ahead of the main magma sheet, undergo successive episodes of lobe arrest and inflation. The inflation of lobes initiates failure of the overlying strata and the formation of curved faults. Magma exploiting these faults transgresses the stratigraphy and coalesces to form a ring

  10. IM3D: A parallel Monte Carlo code for efficient simulations of primary radiation displacements and damage in 3D geometry

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yong Gang; Yang, Yang; Short, Michael P.; Ding, Ze Jun; Zeng, Zhi; Li, Ju

    2015-01-01

    SRIM-like codes have limitations in describing general 3D geometries, for modeling radiation displacements and damage in nanostructured materials. A universal, computationally efficient and massively parallel 3D Monte Carlo code, IM3D, has been developed with excellent parallel scaling performance. IM3D is based on fast indexing of scattering integrals and the SRIM stopping power database, and allows the user a choice of Constructive Solid Geometry (CSG) or Finite Element Triangle Mesh (FETM) method for constructing 3D shapes and microstructures. For 2D films and multilayers, IM3D perfectly reproduces SRIM results, and can be ∼102 times faster in serial execution and > 104 times faster using parallel computation. For 3D problems, it provides a fast approach for analyzing the spatial distributions of primary displacements and defect generation under ion irradiation. Herein we also provide a detailed discussion of our open-source collision cascade physics engine, revealing the true meaning and limitations of the “Quick Kinchin-Pease” and “Full Cascades” options. The issues of femtosecond to picosecond timescales in defining displacement versus damage, the limitation of the displacements per atom (DPA) unit in quantifying radiation damage (such as inadequacy in quantifying degree of chemical mixing), are discussed. PMID:26658477

  11. Dynamic earthquake rupture simulation on nonplanar faults embedded in 3D geometrically complex, heterogeneous Earth models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duru, K.; Dunham, E. M.; Bydlon, S. A.; Radhakrishnan, H.

    2014-12-01

    Dynamic propagation of shear ruptures on a frictional interface is a useful idealization of a natural earthquake.The conditions relating slip rate and fault shear strength are often expressed as nonlinear friction laws.The corresponding initial boundary value problems are both numerically and computationally challenging.In addition, seismic waves generated by earthquake ruptures must be propagated, far away from fault zones, to seismic stations and remote areas.Therefore, reliable and efficient numerical simulations require both provably stable and high order accurate numerical methods.We present a numerical method for:a) enforcing nonlinear friction laws, in a consistent and provably stable manner, suitable for efficient explicit time integration;b) dynamic propagation of earthquake ruptures along rough faults; c) accurate propagation of seismic waves in heterogeneous media with free surface topography.We solve the first order form of the 3D elastic wave equation on a boundary-conforming curvilinear mesh, in terms of particle velocities and stresses that are collocated in space and time, using summation-by-parts finite differences in space. The finite difference stencils are 6th order accurate in the interior and 3rd order accurate close to the boundaries. Boundary and interface conditions are imposed weakly using penalties. By deriving semi-discrete energy estimates analogous to the continuous energy estimates we prove numerical stability. Time stepping is performed with a 4th order accurate explicit low storage Runge-Kutta scheme. We have performed extensive numerical experiments using a slip-weakening friction law on non-planar faults, including recent SCEC benchmark problems. We also show simulations on fractal faults revealing the complexity of rupture dynamics on rough faults. We are presently extending our method to rate-and-state friction laws and off-fault plasticity.

  12. Accurate 3D reconstruction of complex blood vessel geometries from intravascular ultrasound images: in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, K R; Thubrikar, M J; Fowler, B; Mostafavi, M T; Funk, M W

    2000-01-01

    We present a technique that accurately reconstructs complex three dimensional blood vessel geometry from 2D intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) images. Biplane x-ray fluoroscopy is used to image the ultrasound catheter tip at a few key points along its path as the catheter is pulled through the blood vessel. An interpolating spline describes the continuous catheter path. The IVUS images are located orthogonal to the path, resulting in a non-uniform structured scalar volume of echo densities. Isocontour surfaces are used to view the vessel geometry, while transparency and clipping enable interactive exploration of interior structures. The two geometries studied are a bovine artery vascular graft having U-shape and a constriction, and a canine carotid artery having multiple branches and a constriction. Accuracy of the reconstructions is established by comparing the reconstructions to (1) silicone moulds of the vessel interior, (2) biplane x-ray images, and (3) the original echo images. Excellent shape and geometry correspondence was observed in both geometries. Quantitative measurements made at key locations of the 3D reconstructions also were in good agreement with those made in silicone moulds. The proposed technique is easily adoptable in clinical practice, since it uses x-rays with minimal exposure and existing IVUS technology. PMID:11105284

  13. 3D Digital Surveying and Modelling of Cave Geometry: Application to Paleolithic Rock Art

    PubMed Central

    González-Aguilera, Diego; Muñoz-Nieto, Angel; Gómez-Lahoz, Javier; Herrero-Pascual, Jesus; Gutierrez-Alonso, Gabriel

    2009-01-01

    3D digital surveying and modelling of cave geometry represents a relevant approach for research, management and preservation of our cultural and geological legacy. In this paper, a multi-sensor approach based on a terrestrial laser scanner, a high-resolution digital camera and a total station is presented. Two emblematic caves of Paleolithic human occupation and situated in northern Spain, “Las Caldas” and “Peña de Candamo”, have been chosen to put in practise this approach. As a result, an integral and multi-scalable 3D model is generated which may allow other scientists, pre-historians, geologists…, to work on two different levels, integrating different Paleolithic Art datasets: (1) a basic level based on the accurate and metric support provided by the laser scanner; and (2) a advanced level using the range and image-based modelling. PMID:22399958

  14. A new algorithm for determining 3D biplane imaging geometry: theory and implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vikas; Xu, Jinhui; Hoffmann, Kenneth R.; Xu, Guang; Chen, Zhenming; Gopal, Anant

    2005-04-01

    Biplane imaging is a primary method for visual and quantitative assessment of the vasculature. A key problem called Imaging Geometry Determination problem (IGD for short) in this method is to determine the rotation-matrix R and the translation-vector t which relate the two coordinate systems. In this paper, we propose a new approach, called IG-Sieving, to calculate R and t using corresponding points in the two images. Our technique first generates an initial estimate of R and t from the gantry angles of the imaging system, and then optimizes them by solving an optimal-cell-search problem in a 6-D parametric space (three variables defining R plus the three variables of t). To efficiently find the optimal imaging geometry (IG) in 6-D, our approach divides the high dimensional search domain into a set of lower-dimensional regions, thereby reducing the optimal-cell-search problem to a set of optimization problems in 3D sub-spaces. For each such sub-space, our approach first applies efficient computational geometry techniques to identify "possibly-feasible"" IG"s, and then uses a criterion we call fall-in-number to sieve out good IGs. We show that in a bounded number of optimization steps, a (possibly infinite) set of near-optimal IGs can be determined. Simulation results indicate that our method can reconstruct 3D points with average 3D center-of-mass errors of about 0.8cm for input image-data errors as high as 0.1cm. More importantly, our algorithm provides a novel insight into the geometric structure of the solution-space, which could be exploited to significantly improve the accuracy of other biplane algorithms.

  15. Dynamic earthquake rupture simulations on nonplanar faults embedded in 3D geometrically complex, heterogeneous elastic solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duru, Kenneth; Dunham, Eric M.

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic propagation of shear ruptures on a frictional interface in an elastic solid is a useful idealization of natural earthquakes. The conditions relating discontinuities in particle velocities across fault zones and tractions acting on the fault are often expressed as nonlinear friction laws. The corresponding initial boundary value problems are both numerically and computationally challenging. In addition, seismic waves generated by earthquake ruptures must be propagated for many wavelengths away from the fault. Therefore, reliable and efficient numerical simulations require both provably stable and high order accurate numerical methods. We present a high order accurate finite difference method for: a) enforcing nonlinear friction laws, in a consistent and provably stable manner, suitable for efficient explicit time integration; b) dynamic propagation of earthquake ruptures along nonplanar faults; and c) accurate propagation of seismic waves in heterogeneous media with free surface topography. We solve the first order form of the 3D elastic wave equation on a boundary-conforming curvilinear mesh, in terms of particle velocities and stresses that are collocated in space and time, using summation-by-parts (SBP) finite difference operators in space. Boundary and interface conditions are imposed weakly using penalties. By deriving semi-discrete energy estimates analogous to the continuous energy estimates we prove numerical stability. The finite difference stencils used in this paper are sixth order accurate in the interior and third order accurate close to the boundaries. However, the method is applicable to any spatial operator with a diagonal norm satisfying the SBP property. Time stepping is performed with a 4th order accurate explicit low storage Runge-Kutta scheme, thus yielding a globally fourth order accurate method in both space and time. We show numerical simulations on band limited self-similar fractal faults revealing the complexity of rupture dynamics

  16. CasimirSim - A Tool to Compute Casimir Polder Forces for Nontrivial 3D Geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Sedmik, Rene; Tajmar, Martin

    2007-01-30

    The so-called Casimir effect is one of the most interesting macro-quantum effects. Being negligible on the macro-scale it becomes a governing factor below structure sizes of 1 {mu}m where it accounts for typically 100 kN m-2. The force does not depend on gravity, or electric charge but solely on the materials properties, and geometrical shape. This makes the effect a strong candidate for micro(nano)-mechanical devices M(N)EMS. Despite a long history of research the theory lacks a uniform description valid for arbitrary geometries which retards technical application. We present an advanced state-of-the-art numerical tool overcoming all the usual geometrical restrictions, capable of calculating arbitrary 3D geometries by utilizing the Casimir Polder approximation for the Casimir force.

  17. Development of an algorithm to measure defect geometry using a 3D laser scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilambi, S.; Tipton, S. M.

    2012-08-01

    Current fatigue life prediction models for coiled tubing (CT) require accurate measurements of the defect geometry. Three-dimensional (3D) laser imaging has shown promise toward becoming a nondestructive, non-contacting method of surface defect characterization. Laser imaging provides a detailed photographic image of a flaw, in addition to a detailed 3D surface map from which its critical dimensions can be measured. This paper describes algorithms to determine defect characteristics, specifically depth, width, length and projected cross-sectional area. Curve-fitting methods were compared and implicit algebraic fits have higher probability of convergence compared to explicit geometric fits. Among the algebraic fits, the Taubin circle fit has the least error. The algorithm was able to extract the dimensions of the flaw geometry from the scanned data of CT to within a tolerance of about 0.127 mm, close to the tolerance specified for the laser scanner itself, compared to measurements made using traveling microscopes. The algorithm computes the projected surface area of the flaw, which could previously only be estimated from the dimension measurements and the assumptions made about cutter shape. Although shadows compromised the accuracy of the shape characterization, especially for deep and narrow flaws, the results indicate that the algorithm with laser scanner can be used for non-destructive evaluation of CT in the oil field industry. Further work is needed to improve accuracy, to eliminate shadow effects and to reduce radial deviation.

  18. Crustal 3-D geometry of the Kristineberg area (Sweden) with implications on VMS deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skyttä, P.; Bauer, T.; Hermansson, T.; Dehghannejad, M.; Juhlin, C.; García Juanatey, M.; Hübert, J.; Weihed, P.

    2013-10-01

    Structural analysis of the Palaeoproterozoic volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) hosting Kristineberg area, Sweden, constrained by existing magnetotelluric (MT) and seismic reflection data, reveals that the complex geometry characterized by non-cylindrical antiformal structures is due to transpression along the termination of a major high-strain zone. Similar orientations of the host rock deformation fabrics and the VMS ore lenses indicate that the present-day geometry of the complex VMS deposits in the Kristineberg area may be attributed to tectonic transposition. The tectonic transposition was dominantly controlled by reverse shearing and related upright to overturned folding, with increasing contribution of strike-slip shearing and sub-horizontal flow towards greater crustal depths. Furthermore, the northerly dip of the previously recognized subsurface crustal reflector within the Kristineberg area is attributed to formation of crustal compartments with opposite polarities within the scale of the whole Skellefte district. The resulting structural framework of the main geological units is visualized in a 3-D model which is available as a 3-D PDF document through the publication website.

  19. SU-E-J-128: 3D Surface Reconstruction of a Patient Using Epipolar Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kotoku, J; Nakabayashi, S; Kumagai, S; Ishibashi, T; Kobayashi, T; Haga, A; Saotome, N; Arai, N

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To obtain a 3D surface data of a patient in a non-invasive way can substantially reduce the effort for the registration of patient in radiation therapy. To achieve this goal, we introduced the multiple view stereo technique, which is known to be used in a 'photo tourism' on the internet. Methods: 70 Images were taken with a digital single-lens reflex camera from different angles and positions. The camera positions and angles were inferred later in the reconstruction step. A sparse 3D reconstruction model was locating by SIFT features, which is robust for rotation and shift variance, in each image. We then found a set of correspondences between pairs of images by computing the fundamental matrix using the eight-point algorithm with RANSAC. After the pair matching, we optimized the parameter including camera positions to minimize the reprojection error by use of bundle adjustment technique (non-linear optimization). As a final step, we performed dense reconstruction and associate a color with each point using the library of PMVS. Results: Surface data were reconstructed well by visual inspection. The human skin is reconstructed well, althogh the reconstruction was time-consuming for direct use in daily clinical practice. Conclusion: 3D reconstruction using multi view stereo geometry is a promising tool for reducing the effort of patient setup. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI(25861128)

  20. Fault geometries in basement-induced wrench faulting under different initial stress states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naylor, M. A.; Mandl, G.; Supesteijn, C. H. K.

    Scaled sandbox experiments were used to generate models for relative ages, dip, strike and three-dimensional shape of faults in basement-controlled wrench faulting. The basic fault sequence runs from early en échelon Riedel shears and splay faults through 'lower-angle' shears to P shears. The Riedel shears are concave upwards and define a tulip structure in cross-section. In three dimensions, each Riedel shear has a helicoidal form. The sequence of faults and three-dimensional geometry are rationalized in terms of the prevailing stress field and Coulomb-Mohr theory of shear failure. The stress state in the sedimentary overburden before wrenching begins has a substantial influence on the fault geometries and on the final complexity of the fault zone. With the maximum compressive stress (∂ 1) initially parallel to the basement fault (transtension), Riedel shears are only slightly en échelon, sub-parallel to the basement fault, steeply dipping with a reduced helicoidal aspect. Conversely, with ∂ 1 initially perpendicular to the basement fault (transpression), Riedel shears are strongly oblique to the basement fault strike, have lower dips and an exaggerated helicoidal form; the final fault zone is both wide and complex. We find good agreement between the models and both mechanical theory and natural examples of wrench faulting.

  1. Quantification of Ground Motion Reductions by Fault Zone Plasticity with 3D Spontaneous Rupture Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roten, D.; Olsen, K. B.; Cui, Y.; Day, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    We explore the effects of fault zone nonlinearity on peak ground velocities (PGVs) by simulating a suite of surface rupturing earthquakes in a visco-plastic medium. Our simulations, performed with the AWP-ODC 3D finite difference code, cover magnitudes from 6.5 to 8.0, with several realizations of the stochastic stress drop for a given magnitude. We test three different models of rock strength, with friction angles and cohesions based on criteria which are frequently applied to fractured rock masses in civil engineering and mining. We use a minimum shear-wave velocity of 500 m/s and a maximum frequency of 1 Hz. In rupture scenarios with average stress drop (~3.5 MPa), plastic yielding reduces near-fault PGVs by 15 to 30% in pre-fractured, low-strength rock, but less than 1% in massive, high quality rock. These reductions are almost insensitive to the scenario earthquake magnitude. In the case of high stress drop (~7 MPa), however, plasticity reduces near-fault PGVs by 38 to 45% in rocks of low strength and by 5 to 15% in rocks of high strength. Because plasticity reduces slip rates and static slip near the surface, these effects can partially be captured by defining a shallow velocity-strengthening layer. We also perform a dynamic nonlinear simulation of a high stress drop M 7.8 earthquake rupturing the southern San Andreas fault along 250 km from Indio to Lake Hughes. With respect to the viscoelastic solution (a), nonlinearity in the fault damage zone and in near-surface deposits would reduce long-period (> 1 s) peak ground velocities in the Los Angeles basin by 15-50% (b), depending on the strength of crustal rocks and shallow sediments. These simulation results suggest that nonlinear effects may be relevant even at long periods, especially for earthquakes with high stress drop.

  2. Amoeboid migration mode adaption in quasi-3D spatial density gradients of varying lattice geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelashvili, Mari; Emmert, Martin; Hodeck, Kai F.; Heinrich, Doris

    2014-07-01

    Cell migration processes are controlled by sensitive interaction with external cues such as topographic structures of the cell’s environment. Here, we present systematically controlled assays to investigate the specific effects of spatial density and local geometry of topographic structure on amoeboid migration of Dictyostelium discoideum cells. This is realized by well-controlled fabrication of quasi-3D pillar fields exhibiting a systematic variation of inter-pillar distance and pillar lattice geometry. By time-resolved local mean-squared displacement analysis of amoeboid migration, we can extract motility parameters in order to elucidate the details of amoeboid migration mechanisms and consolidate them in a two-state contact-controlled motility model, distinguishing directed and random phases. Specifically, we find that directed pillar-to-pillar runs are found preferably in high pillar density regions, and cells in directed motion states sense pillars as attractive topographic stimuli. In contrast, cell motion in random probing states is inhibited by high pillar density, where pillars act as obstacles for cell motion. In a gradient spatial density, these mechanisms lead to topographic guidance of cells, with a general trend towards a regime of inter-pillar spacing close to the cell diameter. In locally anisotropic pillar environments, cell migration is often found to be damped due to competing attraction by different pillars in close proximity and due to lack of other potential stimuli in the vicinity of the cell. Further, we demonstrate topographic cell guidance reflecting the lattice geometry of the quasi-3D environment by distinct preferences in migration direction. Our findings allow to specifically control amoeboid cell migration by purely topographic effects and thus, to induce active cell guidance. These tools hold prospects for medical applications like improved wound treatment, or invasion assays for immune cells.

  3. Reliable and Fault-Tolerant Software-Defined Network Operations Scheme for Remote 3D Printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dongkyun; Gil, Joon-Min

    2015-03-01

    The recent wide expansion of applicable three-dimensional (3D) printing and software-defined networking (SDN) technologies has led to a great deal of attention being focused on efficient remote control of manufacturing processes. SDN is a renowned paradigm for network softwarization, which has helped facilitate remote manufacturing in association with high network performance, since SDN is designed to control network paths and traffic flows, guaranteeing improved quality of services by obtaining network requests from end-applications on demand through the separated SDN controller or control plane. However, current SDN approaches are generally focused on the controls and automation of the networks, which indicates that there is a lack of management plane development designed for a reliable and fault-tolerant SDN environment. Therefore, in addition to the inherent advantage of SDN, this paper proposes a new software-defined network operations center (SD-NOC) architecture to strengthen the reliability and fault-tolerance of SDN in terms of network operations and management in particular. The cooperation and orchestration between SDN and SD-NOC are also introduced for the SDN failover processes based on four principal SDN breakdown scenarios derived from the failures of the controller, SDN nodes, and connected links. The abovementioned SDN troubles significantly reduce the network reachability to remote devices (e.g., 3D printers, super high-definition cameras, etc.) and the reliability of relevant control processes. Our performance consideration and analysis results show that the proposed scheme can shrink operations and management overheads of SDN, which leads to the enhancement of responsiveness and reliability of SDN for remote 3D printing and control processes.

  4. Exploring the seismic expression of fault zones in 3D seismic volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacopini, David; Butler, Rob; Purves, Steve

    2016-04-01

    Mapping and understanding distributed deformation is a major challenge for the structural interpretation of seismic data. However, volumes of seismic signal disturbance with low signal/noise ratio are systematically observed within 3D seismic datasets around fault systems. These seismic disturbance zones (SDZ) are commonly characterized by complex perturbations of the signal and occur at the sub-seismic to seismic scale. They may store important information on deformation distributed around those larger scale structures that may be readily interpreted in conventional amplitude displays of seismic data scale. We introduce a method to detect fault-related disturbance zones and to discriminate between this and other noise sources such as those associated with the seismic acquisition (footprint noise). Two case studies, from the Taranaki basin and deep-water Niger delta are presented. These resolve structure within SDZs using tensor and semblance attributes along with conventional seismic mapping. The tensor attribute is more efficient in tracking volumes containing structural displacements while structurally-oriented semblance coherency is commonly disturbed by small waveform variations around the fault throw. We propose a workflow to map and cross-plot seismic waveform signal properties extracted from the seismic disturbance zone as a tool to investigate the seismic signature and explore seismic facies of a SDZ.

  5. Exploring the seismic expression of fault zones in 3D seismic volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacopini, D.; Butler, R. W. H.; Purves, S.; McArdle, N.; De Freslon, N.

    2016-08-01

    Mapping and understanding distributed deformation is a major challenge for the structural interpretation of seismic data. However, volumes of seismic signal disturbance with low signal/noise ratio are systematically observed within 3D seismic datasets around fault systems. These seismic disturbance zones (SDZ) are commonly characterized by complex perturbations of the signal and occur at the sub-seismic (10 s m) to seismic scale (100 s m). They may store important information on deformation distributed around those larger scale structures that may be readily interpreted in conventional amplitude displays of seismic data. We introduce a method to detect fault-related disturbance zones and to discriminate between this and other noise sources such as those associated with the seismic acquisition (footprint noise). Two case studies from the Taranaki basin and deep-water Niger delta are presented. These resolve SDZs using tensor and semblance attributes along with conventional seismic mapping. The tensor attribute is more efficient in tracking volumes containing structural displacements while structurally-oriented semblance coherency is commonly disturbed by small waveform variations around the fault throw. We propose a workflow to map and cross-plot seismic waveform signal properties extracted from the seismic disturbance zone as a tool to investigate the seismic signature and explore seismic facies of a SDZ.

  6. Relative Scale Estimation and 3D Registration of Multi-Modal Geometry Using Growing Least Squares.

    PubMed

    Mellado, Nicolas; Dellepiane, Matteo; Scopigno, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    The advent of low cost scanning devices and the improvement of multi-view stereo techniques have made the acquisition of 3D geometry ubiquitous. Data gathered from different devices, however, result in large variations in detail, scale, and coverage. Registration of such data is essential before visualizing, comparing and archiving them. However, state-of-the-art methods for geometry registration cannot be directly applied due to intrinsic differences between the models, e.g., sampling, scale, noise. In this paper we present a method for the automatic registration of multi-modal geometric data, i.e., acquired by devices with different properties (e.g., resolution, noise, data scaling). The method uses a descriptor based on Growing Least Squares, and is robust to noise, variation in sampling density, details, and enables scale-invariant matching. It allows not only the measurement of the similarity between the geometry surrounding two points, but also the estimation of their relative scale. As it is computed locally, it can be used to analyze large point clouds composed of millions of points. We implemented our approach in two registration procedures (assisted and automatic) and applied them successfully on a number of synthetic and real cases. We show that using our method, multi-modal models can be automatically registered, regardless of their differences in noise, detail, scale, and unknown relative coverage.

  7. 3-D geometry calibration and markerless electromagnetic tracking with a mobile C-arm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheryauka, Arvi; Barrett, Johnny; Wang, Zhonghua; Litvin, Andrew; Hamadeh, Ali; Beaudet, Daniel

    2007-03-01

    The design of mobile X-ray C-arm equipment with image tomography and surgical guidance capabilities involves the retrieval of repeatable gantry positioning in three-dimensional space. Geometry misrepresentations can cause degradation of the reconstruction results with the appearance of blurred edges, image artifacts, and even false structures. It may also amplify surgical instrument tracking errors leading to improper implant placement. In our prior publications we have proposed a C-arm 3D positioner calibration method comprising separate intrinsic and extrinsic geometry calibration steps. Following this approach, in the present paper, we extend the intrinsic geometry calibration of C-gantry beyond angular positions in the orbital plane into angular positions on a unit sphere of isocentric rotation. Our method makes deployment of markerless interventional tool guidance with use of high-resolution fluoro images and electromagnetic tracking feasible at any angular position of the tube-detector assembly. Variations of the intrinsic parameters associated with C-arm motion are measured off-line as functions of orbital and lateral angles. The proposed calibration procedure provides better accuracy, and prevents unnecessary workflow steps for surgical navigation applications. With a slight modification, the Misalignment phantom, a tool for intrinsic geometry calibration, is also utilized to obtain an accurate 'image-to-sensor' mapping. We show simulation results, image quality and navigation accuracy estimates, and feasibility data acquired with the prototype system. The experimental results show the potential of high-resolution CT imaging (voxel size below 0.5 mm) and confident navigation in an interventional surgery setting with a mobile C-arm.

  8. Geometry of the southern San Andreas fault and its implications for seismic hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langenheim, V. E.; Dorsey, R. J.; Fuis, G. S.; Cooke, M. L.; Fattaruso, L.; Barak, S.

    2015-12-01

    The southern San Andreas fault (SSAF) provides rich opportunities for studying the geometry and connectivity of fault stepovers and intersections, including recently recognized NE tilting of the Salton block between the SSAF and San Jacinto fault (SJF) that likely results from slight obliquity of relative plate motion to the strike of the SSAF. Fault geometry and predictions of whether the SSAF will rupture through the restraining bend in San Gorgonio Pass (SGP) are controversial, with significant implications for seismic hazard. The evolution of faulting in SGP has led to various models of strain accommodation, including clockwise rotation of fault-bounded blocks east of the restraining bend, and generation of faults that siphon strike slip away from the restraining bend onto the SJF (also parallel to the SSAF). Complex deformation is not restricted to the upper crust but extends to mid- and lower-crustal depths according to magnetic data and ambient-noise surface-wave tomography. Initiation of the SJF ~1.2 Ma led to formation of the relatively intact Salton block, and end of extension on the West Salton detachment fault on the west side of Coachella Valley. Geologic and geomorphic data show asymmetry of the southern Santa Rosa Mountains, with a steep fault-bounded SW flank produced by active uplift, and gentler topographic gradients on the NE flank with tilted, inactive late Pleistocene fans that are incised by modern upper fan channels. Gravity data indicate the basin floor beneath Coachella Valley is also asymmetric, with a gently NE-dipping basin floor bound by a steep SSAF; seismic-reflection data suggest that NE tilting took place during Quaternary time. 3D numerical modeling predicts gentle NE dips in the Salton block that result from the slight clockwise orientation of relative motion across a NE-dipping SSAF. A NE dip of the SSAF, supported by various geophysical datasets, would reduce shaking in Coachella Valley compared to a vertical fault.

  9. PDE constrained optimization of electrical defibrillation in a 3D ventricular slice geometry.

    PubMed

    Chamakuri, Nagaiah; Kunisch, Karl; Plank, Gernot

    2016-04-01

    A computational study of an optimal control approach for cardiac defibrillation in a 3D geometry is presented. The cardiac bioelectric activity at the tissue and bath volumes is modeled by the bidomain model equations. The model includes intramural fiber rotation, axially symmetric around the fiber direction, and anisotropic conductivity coefficients, which are extracted from a histological image. The dynamics of the ionic currents are based on the regularized Mitchell-Schaeffer model. The controls enter in the form of electrodes, which are placed at the boundary of the bath volume with the goal of dampening undesired arrhythmias. The numerical optimization is based on Newton techniques. We demonstrated the parallel architecture environment for the computation of potentials on multidomains and for the higher order optimization techniques.

  10. Effects of 3D geometries on cellular gradient sensing and polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spill, Fabian; Andasari, Vivi; Mak, Michael; Kamm, Roger D.; Zaman, Muhammad H.

    2016-06-01

    During cell migration, cells become polarized, change their shape, and move in response to various internal and external cues. Cell polarization is defined through the spatio-temporal organization of molecules such as PI3K or small GTPases, and is determined by intracellular signaling networks. It results in directional forces through actin polymerization and myosin contractions. Many existing mathematical models of cell polarization are formulated in terms of reaction-diffusion systems of interacting molecules, and are often defined in one or two spatial dimensions. In this paper, we introduce a 3D reaction-diffusion model of interacting molecules in a single cell, and find that cell geometry has an important role affecting the capability of a cell to polarize, or change polarization when an external signal changes direction. Our results suggest a geometrical argument why more roundish cells can repolarize more effectively than cells which are elongated along the direction of the original stimulus, and thus enable roundish cells to turn faster, as has been observed in experiments. On the other hand, elongated cells preferentially polarize along their main axis even when a gradient stimulus appears from another direction. Furthermore, our 3D model can accurately capture the effect of binding and unbinding of important regulators of cell polarization to and from the cell membrane. This spatial separation of membrane and cytosol, not possible to capture in 1D or 2D models, leads to marked differences of our model from comparable lower-dimensional models.

  11. Effects of 3D geometries on cellular gradient sensing and polarization.

    PubMed

    Spill, Fabian; Andasari, Vivi; Mak, Michael; Kamm, Roger D; Zaman, Muhammad H

    2016-01-01

    During cell migration, cells become polarized, change their shape, and move in response to various internal and external cues. Cell polarization is defined through the spatio-temporal organization of molecules such as PI3K or small GTPases, and is determined by intracellular signaling networks. It results in directional forces through actin polymerization and myosin contractions. Many existing mathematical models of cell polarization are formulated in terms of reaction-diffusion systems of interacting molecules, and are often defined in one or two spatial dimensions. In this paper, we introduce a 3D reaction-diffusion model of interacting molecules in a single cell, and find that cell geometry has an important role affecting the capability of a cell to polarize, or change polarization when an external signal changes direction. Our results suggest a geometrical argument why more roundish cells can repolarize more effectively than cells which are elongated along the direction of the original stimulus, and thus enable roundish cells to turn faster, as has been observed in experiments. On the other hand, elongated cells preferentially polarize along their main axis even when a gradient stimulus appears from another direction. Furthermore, our 3D model can accurately capture the effect of binding and unbinding of important regulators of cell polarization to and from the cell membrane. This spatial separation of membrane and cytosol, not possible to capture in 1D or 2D models, leads to marked differences of our model from comparable lower-dimensional models. PMID:27345945

  12. Effects of 3D geometries on cellular gradient sensing and polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spill, Fabian; Andasari, Vivi; Mak, Michael; Kamm, Roger D.; Zaman, Muhammad H.

    2016-06-01

    During cell migration, cells become polarized, change their shape, and move in response to various internal and external cues. Cell polarization is defined through the spatio-temporal organization of molecules such as PI3K or small GTPases, and is determined by intracellular signaling networks. It results in directional forces through actin polymerization and myosin contractions. Many existing mathematical models of cell polarization are formulated in terms of reaction–diffusion systems of interacting molecules, and are often defined in one or two spatial dimensions. In this paper, we introduce a 3D reaction–diffusion model of interacting molecules in a single cell, and find that cell geometry has an important role affecting the capability of a cell to polarize, or change polarization when an external signal changes direction. Our results suggest a geometrical argument why more roundish cells can repolarize more effectively than cells which are elongated along the direction of the original stimulus, and thus enable roundish cells to turn faster, as has been observed in experiments. On the other hand, elongated cells preferentially polarize along their main axis even when a gradient stimulus appears from another direction. Furthermore, our 3D model can accurately capture the effect of binding and unbinding of important regulators of cell polarization to and from the cell membrane. This spatial separation of membrane and cytosol, not possible to capture in 1D or 2D models, leads to marked differences of our model from comparable lower-dimensional models.

  13. Bispectrum feature extraction of gearbox faults based on nonnegative Tucker3 decomposition with 3D calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haijun; Xu, Feiyun; Zhao, Jun'ai; Jia, Minping; Hu, Jianzhong; Huang, Peng

    2013-11-01

    Nonnegative Tucker3 decomposition(NTD) has attracted lots of attentions for its good performance in 3D data array analysis. However, further research is still necessary to solve the problems of overfitting and slow convergence under the anharmonic vibration circumstance occurred in the field of mechanical fault diagnosis. To decompose a large-scale tensor and extract available bispectrum feature, a method of conjugating Choi-Williams kernel function with Gauss-Newton Cartesian product based on nonnegative Tucker3 decomposition(NTD_EDF) is investigated. The complexity of the proposed method is reduced from o( n N lg n) in 3D spaces to o( R 1 R 2 nlg n) in 1D vectors due to its low rank form of the Tucker-product convolution. Meanwhile, a simultaneously updating algorithm is given to overcome the overfitting, slow convergence and low efficiency existing in the conventional one-by-one updating algorithm. Furthermore, the technique of spectral phase analysis for quadratic coupling estimation is used to explain the feature spectrum extracted from the gearbox fault data by the proposed method in detail. The simulated and experimental results show that the sparser and more inerratic feature distribution of basis images can be obtained with core tensor by the NTD_EDF method compared with the one by the other methods in bispectrum feature extraction, and a legible fault expression can also be performed by power spectral density(PSD) function. Besides, the deviations of successive relative error(DSRE) of NTD_EDF achieves 81.66 dB against 15.17 dB by beta-divergences based on NTD(NTD_Beta) and the time-cost of NTD_EDF is only 129.3 s, which is far less than 1 747.9 s by hierarchical alternative least square based on NTD (NTD_HALS). The NTD_EDF method proposed not only avoids the data overfitting and improves the computation efficiency but also can be used to extract more inerratic and sparser bispectrum features of the gearbox fault.

  14. The growth of non-colinear normal fault systems; What can we learn from 3D seismic reflection data?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeve, Matthew T.; Bell, Rebecca E.; Duffy, Oliver B.; Jackson, Christopher A.-L.; Sansom, Eleanor

    2015-01-01

    Many rift zones exhibit a range of fault orientations, rather than simple colinear faults that strike orthogonal to the inferred least principal stress. The formation of non-colinear fault sets has implications for assessing rift-zone kinematics, as well as determining palaeo-stress state in extensional basins. Using 3D seismic reflection data, we deduce the likely mechanisms responsible for the formation of a population of non-colinear faults in the Måløy Slope area of the northern North Sea. Three basement-displacing fault populations exist on the Måløy Slope; (i) large (>1 km throw), N-S-striking faults, (ii) smaller (<250 m throw) N-S-striking faults and (iii) small (<250 m throw) NE-SW-striking faults. All were initiated in the Middle Jurassic. Coeval growth of these fault populations, and the apparent correlation between the NE-SW faults and a NE-SW-trending gravity and magnetic anomaly high lead us to suggest that the NE-SW faults are the result of deflection of the otherwise E-W-orientated least principal stress by NE-trending intrabasement weaknesses. Our study's results have implications for the large-scale kinematic evolution of the North Sea, arguing that major rotations in extension direction are not required to generate multiple fault sets locally or across the rift. This study also highlights the importance of using borehole-constrained 3D seismic data as a tool in understanding non-colinear fault growth, and its broader implications for regional tectonic history.

  15. 3D Modelling of Seismically Active Parts of Underground Faults via Seismic Data Mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frantzeskakis, Theofanis; Konstantaras, Anthony

    2015-04-01

    During the last few years rapid steps have been taken towards drilling for oil in the western Mediterranean sea. Since most of the countries in the region benefit mainly from tourism and considering that the Mediterranean is a closed sea only replenishing its water once every ninety years careful measures are being taken to ensure safe drilling. In that concept this research work attempts to derive a three dimensional model of the seismically active parts of the underlying underground faults in areas of petroleum interest. For that purpose seismic spatio-temporal clustering has been applied to seismic data to identify potential distinct seismic regions in the area of interest. Results have been coalesced with two dimensional maps of underground faults from past surveys and seismic epicentres, having followed careful reallocation processing, have been used to provide information regarding the vertical extent of multiple underground faults in the region of interest. The end product is a three dimensional map of the possible underground location and extent of the seismically active parts of underground faults. Indexing terms: underground faults modelling, seismic data mining, 3D visualisation, active seismic source mapping, seismic hazard evaluation, dangerous phenomena modelling Acknowledgment This research work is supported by the ESPA Operational Programme, Education and Life Long Learning, Students Practical Placement Initiative. References [1] Alves, T.M., Kokinou, E. and Zodiatis, G.: 'A three-step model to assess shoreline and offshore susceptibility to oil spills: The South Aegean (Crete) as an analogue for confined marine basins', Marine Pollution Bulletin, In Press, 2014 [2] Ciappa, A., Costabile, S.: 'Oil spill hazard assessment using a reverse trajectory method for the Egadi marine protected area (Central Mediterranean Sea)', Marine Pollution Bulletin, vol. 84 (1-2), pp. 44-55, 2014 [3] Ganas, A., Karastathis, V., Moshou, A., Valkaniotis, S., Mouzakiotis

  16. Constraints on the geometry of the Suasselkä post-glacial fault, northern Finland, based on reflection seismic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdi, Amir; Heinonen, Suvi; Juhlin, Christopher; Karinen, Tuomo

    2015-05-01

    Unloading of the ice during the last glacial period in northern Fennoscandia is believed to have generated major faulting. These faults, often referred to as post-glacial faults, typically have clear surface exposures, but their geometry at depth is poorly known. In order to better understand the geometry at depth of the Suasselkä post-glacial fault in Finland, three high resolution 2D reflection seismic profiles over the fault were reprocessed. Their total profile length is about 60 km and they were acquired as part of a major effort in Finland to map the uppermost crust in mining areas. The reprocessing led to significantly improved images that could be used to map the fault at depth. Two approximately N-S striking profiles and one E-W striking profile were reprocessed. The different azimuths and the crooked nature of the profiles allowed the fault geometry to be relatively well constrained. Clear reflections from the fault, dipping towards the SE, can be traced from the shallow subsurface down to about 3 km. The strike and dip of two sets of dipping reflections in the stacked data along with geometrical constraints and cross-dip analysis give a consistent dip of about 35-45° towards the SE for the fault. The strike and dip vary from N55E with a dip of 35° in the east to a strike of N48E with a dip of 45° in the west. Existence of the two sets of reflections indicates that the fault surface is non-planar. Aside from allowing the geometry of the fault to be determined, the seismic data show a complex reflectivity pattern in the area and indications of both reverse and normal movement along fault planes with similar orientation to the Suasselkä post-glacial fault. These images can be used as a basis for better characterizing the 3D geology of the area.

  17. Joint Cross-Range Scaling and 3D Geometry Reconstruction of ISAR Targets Based on Factorization Method.

    PubMed

    Lei Liu; Feng Zhou; Xue-Ru Bai; Ming-Liang Tao; Zi-Jing Zhang

    2016-04-01

    Traditionally, the factorization method is applied to reconstruct the 3D geometry of a target from its sequential inverse synthetic aperture radar images. However, this method requires performing cross-range scaling to all the sub-images and thus has a large computational burden. To tackle this problem, this paper proposes a novel method for joint cross-range scaling and 3D geometry reconstruction of steadily moving targets. In this method, we model the equivalent rotational angular velocity (RAV) by a linear polynomial with time, and set its coefficients randomly to perform sub-image cross-range scaling. Then, we generate the initial trajectory matrix of the scattering centers, and solve the 3D geometry and projection vectors by the factorization method with relaxed constraints. After that, the coefficients of the polynomial are estimated from the projection vectors to obtain the RAV. Finally, the trajectory matrix is re-scaled using the estimated rotational angle, and accurate 3D geometry is reconstructed. The two major steps, i.e., the cross-range scaling and the factorization, are performed repeatedly to achieve precise 3D geometry reconstruction. Simulation results have proved the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed method.

  18. Dissecting Oceanic Detachment Faults: Fault Zone Geometry, Deformation Mechanisms, and Nature of Fluid-Rock Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnemains, D.; Escartin, J.; Verlaguet, A.; Andreani, M.; Mevel, C.

    2015-12-01

    To understand the extreme strain localization at long-lived oceanic detachment faults rooting deeply below the axis, we present results of geological investigations at the 13°19'N detachment along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, conducted during the ODEMAR cruise (Nov-Dec13, NO Pourquoi Pas?) with ROV Victor6000 (IFREMER). During this cruise we investigated and sampled the corrugated fault to understand its geometry, nature of deformation, and links to fluid flow. We identified and explored 7 fault outcrops on the flanks of microbathymetric striations subparallel to extension. These outcrops expose extensive fault planes, with the most prominent ones extending 40-90m laterally, and up to 10 m vertically. These fault surfaces systematically show subhorizontal striations subparallel to extension, and define slabs of fault-rock that are flat and also striated at sample scale. Visual observations show a complex detachment fault zone, with anastomosing fault planes at outcrop scale (1-10 m), with a highly heterogeneous distribution of deformation. We observe heterogeneity in fault-rock nature at outcrop scale. In situ samples from striated faults are primarily basalt breccias with prior green-schist facies alteration, and a few ultramafic fault-rocks that show a complex deformation history, with early schistose textures, brittlely reworked as clasts within the fault. The basalt breccias show variable silicification and associated sulfides, recording important fluid-rock interactions during exhumation. To understand the link between fluid and deformation during exhumation, we will present microstructural observation of deformation textures, composition, and distribution and origin of quartz and sulfides, as well as constraints on the temperature of silicifying fluids from fluid inclusions in quartz. These results allow us to characterize in detail the detachment fault zone geometry, and investigate the timing of silicification relative to deformation.

  19. 3D modelling of the active normal fault network in the Apulian Ridge (Eastern Mediterranean Sea): Integration of seismic and bathymetric data with implicit surface methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bistacchi, Andrea; Pellegrini, Caludio; Savini, Alessandra; Marchese, Fabio

    2016-04-01

    The Apulian ridge (North-eastern Ionian Sea, Mediterranean), interposed between the facing Apennines and Hellenides subduction zones (to the west and east respectively), is characterized by thick cretaceous carbonatic sequences and discontinuous tertiary deposits crosscut by a penetrative network of NNW-SSE normal faults. These are exposed onshore in Puglia, and are well represented offshore in a dataset composed of 2D seismics and wells collected by oil companies from the '60s to the '80s, more recent seismics collected during research projects in the '90s, recent very high resolution seismics (VHRS - Sparker and Chirp-sonar data), multibeam echosounder bathymetry, and sedimentological and geo-chronological analyses of sediment samples collected on the seabed. Faults are evident in 2D seismics at all scales, and their along-strike geometry and continuity can be characterized with multibeam bathymetric data, which show continuous fault scarps on the seabed (only partly reworked by currents and covered by landslides). Fault scarps also reveal the finite displacement accumulated in the Holocene-Pleistocene. We reconstructed a 3D model of the fault network and suitable geological boundaries (mainly unconformities due to the discontinuous distribution of quaternary and tertiary sediments) with implicit surface methods implemented in SKUA/GOCAD. This approach can be considered very effective and allowed reconstructing in details complex structures, like the frequent relay zones that are particularly well imaged by seafloor geomorphology. Mutual cross-cutting relationships have been recognized between fault scarps and submarine mass-wasting deposits (Holocene-Pleistocene), indicating that, at least in places, these features are coeval, hence the fault network should be considered active. At the regional scale, the 3D model allowed measuring the horizontal WSW-ENE stretching, which can be associated to the bending moment applied to the Apulian Plate by the combined effect

  20. Which Fault Orientations Occur during Oblique Rifting? Combining Analog and Numerical 3d Models with Observations from the Gulf of Aden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Autin, J.; Brune, S.

    2013-12-01

    Oblique rift systems like the Gulf of Aden are intrinsically three-dimensional. In order to understand the evolution of these systems, one has to decode the fundamental mechanical similarities of oblique rifts. One way to accomplish this, is to strip away the complexity that is generated by inherited fault structures. In doing so, we assume a laterally homogeneous segment of Earth's lithosphere and ask how many different fault populations are generated during oblique extension inbetween initial deformation and final break-up. We combine results of an analog and a numerical model that feature a 3D segment of a layered lithosphere. In both cases, rift evolution is recorded quantitatively in terms of crustal fault geometries. For the numerical model, we adopt a novel post-processing method that allows to infer small-scale crustal fault orientation from the surface stress tensor. Both models involve an angle of 40 degrees between the rift normal and the extensional direction which allows comparison to the Gulf of Aden rift system. The resulting spatio-temporal fault pattern of our models shows three normal fault orientations: rift-parallel, extension-orthogonal, and intermediate, i.e. with a direction inbetween the two previous orientations. The rift evolution involves three distinct phases: (i) During the initial rift phase, wide-spread faulting with intermediate orientation occurs. (ii) Advanced lithospheric necking enables rift-parallel normal faulting at the rift flanks, while strike-slip faulting in the central part of the rift system indicates strain partitioning. (iii) During continental break-up, displacement-orthogonal as well as intermediate faults occur. We compare our results to the structural evolution of the Eastern Gulf of Aden. External parts of the rift exhibit intermediate and displacement-orthogonal faults while rift-parallel faults are present at the rift borders. The ocean-continent transition mainly features intermediate and displacement

  1. Estimating the detectability of faults in 3D-seismic data - A valuable input to Induced Seismic Hazard Assessment (ISHA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goertz, A.; Kraft, T.; Wiemer, S.; Spada, M.

    2012-12-01

    In the past several years, some geotechnical operations that inject fluid into the deep subsurface, such as oil and gas development, waste disposal, and geothermal energy development, have been found or suspected to cause small to moderate sized earthquakes. In several cases the largest events occurred on previously unmapped faults, within or in close vicinity to the operated reservoirs. The obvious conclusion drawn from this finding, also expressed in most recently published best practice guidelines and recommendations, is to avoid injecting into faults. Yet, how certain can we be that all faults relevant to induced seismic hazard have been identified, even around well studied sites? Here we present a probabilistic approach to assess the capability of detecting faults by means of 3D seismic imaging. First, we populate a model reservoir with seed faults of random orientation and slip direction. Drawing random samples from a Gutenberg-Richter distribution, each seed fault is assigned a magnitude and corresponding size using standard scaling relations based on a circular rupture model. We then compute the minimum resolution of a 3D seismic survey for given acquisition parameters and frequency bandwidth. Assuming a random distribution of medium properties and distribution of image frequencies, we obtain a probability that a fault of a given size is detected, or respectively overlooked, by the 3D seismic. Weighting the initial Gutenberg-Richter fault size distribution with the probability of imaging a fault, we obtain a modified fault size distribution in the imaged volume from which we can constrain the maximum magnitude to be considered in the seismic hazard assessment of the operation. We can further quantify the value of information associated with the seismic image by comparing the expected insured value loss between the image-weighted and the unweighted hazard estimates.

  2. Geometry of Thrust Faults Beneath Amenthes Rupes, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vidal, A.; Mueller, K. M.; Golombek, M. P.

    2005-01-01

    Amenthes Rupes is a 380 km-long lobate fault scarp located in the eastern hemisphere of Mars near the dichotomy boundary. The scarp is marked by about 1 km of vertical separation across a northeast dipping thrust fault (top to the SW) and offsets heavily-cratered terrain of Late Noachian age, the visible portion of which was in place by 3.92 Ga and the buried portion in place between 4.08 and 4.27 Ga. The timing of scarp formation is difficult to closely constrain. Previous geologic mapping shows that near the northern end of Amenthes Rupes, Hesperian age basalts terminate at the scarp, suggesting that fault slip predated the emplacement of these flows at 3.69 to 3.9 Ga. Maxwell and McGill also suggest the faulting ceased before the final emplacement of the Late Hesperian lavas on Isidis Planitia. The trend of the faults at Amenthes, like many thrust faults at the dichotomy boundary, parallels the boundary itself. Schultz and Watters used a dislocation modeling program to match surface topography and vertical offset of the scarp at Amenthes Rupes, varying the dip and depth of faulting, assuming a slip of 1.5 km on the fault. They modeled faulting below Amenthes Rupes as having a dip of between 25 and 30 degrees and a depth of 25 to 35 km, based on the best match to topography. Assuming a 25 degree dip and surface measurements of vertical offset of between 0.3 and 1.2 km, Watters later estimated the maximum displacement on the Amenthes Rupes fault to be 2.90 km. However, these studies did not determine the geometry of the thrust using quantitative constraints that included shortening estimates. Amenthes Rupes deforms large preexisting impact craters. We use these craters to constrain shortening across the scarp and combine this with vertical separation to infer fault geometry. Fault dip was also estimated using measurements of scarp morphology. Measurements were based on 460 m (1/128 per pixel) digital elevation data from the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA), an

  3. The contribution of 3D restoration for the reconstruction of pre-thrusting basin geometries in fold-and-thrust belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aquè, R.; Tavarnelli, E.

    2012-04-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of complex geological settings and of original, pre-thrusting basin geometry is one of the challenges for modern structural geology. It has indeed a critical role in many industrial applications, such as in the hydrocarbon exploration. By using commercial specific softwares to produce balanced cross-sections and inferred 3D reconstructions (2DMove™, Gocad™), we modelled a portion of the Umbria-Marche fold-and-thrust belt, in the outer zones of the Northern Apennines of Italy, in order to infer the pre-thrusting geometry of the Mesozoic-Cenozoic extensional basins and to test the applicability of existing computer tools in areas that have experienced the effects of positive tectonic inversion. In the study area, the accurate reconstruction of the structural setting, cross-cut relationships and timing of the deformation, was inferred by using field data, map analysis and cross-section balancing techniques. The structural overprinting relationships among the investigated thrusts made it possible to infer a general piggy-back thrusting sequence, with new thrust faults to the East, developed in the footwall of formerly emplaced thrust sheets, in the West. This allowed to sequentially remove the effects of the deformation for progressively older structures, and to back-strip the thrust sheets in sequential evolutionary steps, in order to reconstruct a viable pre-thrusting template. Four balanced cross-sections have been drawn, providing the initial skeleton for 3D modelling, together with the map trace of the major tectonic features. The cross-sections and the geological map have been digitized and geo-referred in 2D-Move™. Starting from the inferred geometries, a coherent 3D model was built in Gocad™. The surfaces represent post-thrust normal faults, thrust planes, and pre-thrust normal faults, and five key stratigraphic surfaces, from bottom; the base and top of the Calcare Massiccio fm. (Lower Liassic), the base of the

  4. Parallel 3D computation of unsteady wake flows with complex geometries and fluid-structure interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osawa, Yasuo

    New powerful parallel computational tools are developed for 3D simulation of unsteady wake flows with complex geometries and fluid-structure interactions. The base method for flow simulation is a finite element formulation for the Navier-Stokes equations. The finite element formulation is based on the streamline-upwind/Petrov-Galerkin (SUPG) and pressure-stabilizing/Petrov-Galerkin (PSPG) techniques. These stabilization techniques facilitate simulation of flows with high Reynolds numbers, and allow us to use equal-order interpolation functions for velocity and pressure without generating numerical oscillations. A multi-domain computational method is developed to simulate wake flow both in the near and far downstream. The formulations lead to coupled nonlinear equation systems which are solved, at every time step, with the Newton-Raphson method. The overall formulation and solution techniques are implemented on parallel platforms such as the CRAY T3E and SGI PowerChallenge. Two phases of vortex shedding for flow past a cylinder is simulated to verify the accuracy of this method. The Enhanced-Discretization Interface Capturing Technique (EDICT) is utilized to simulate wake flow accurately. Fluid-structure coupling solution method based on the Deforming-Spatial-Domain/Stabilized Space-Time (DSD/SST) formulation is applied to simulate a parachute behavior in the unsteady wake.

  5. General solution of 2D and 3D superconducting quasiclassical systems: coalescing vortices and nanoisland geometries

    PubMed Central

    Amundsen, Morten; Linder, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    An extension of quasiclassical Keldysh-Usadel theory to higher spatial dimensions than one is crucial in order to describe physical phenomena like charge/spin Hall effects and topological excitations like vortices and skyrmions, none of which are captured in one-dimensional models. We here present a numerical finite element method which solves the non-linearized 2D and 3D quasiclassical Usadel equation relevant for the diffusive regime. We show the application of this on three model systems with non-trivial geometries: (i) a bottlenecked Josephson junction with external flux, (ii) a nanodisk ferromagnet deposited on top of a superconductor and (iii) superconducting islands in contact with a ferromagnet. In case (i), we demonstrate that one may control externally not only the geometrical array in which superconducting vortices arrange themselves, but also to cause coalescence and tune the number of vortices. In case (iii), we show that the supercurrent path can be tailored by incorporating magnetic elements in planar Josephson junctions which also lead to a strong modulation of the density of states. The finite element method presented herein paves the way for gaining insight in physical phenomena which have remained largely unexplored due to the complexity of solving the full quasiclassical equations in higher dimensions. PMID:26961921

  6. 3D CFD modeling of subsonic and transonic flowing-gas DPALs with different pumping geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yacoby, Eyal; Sadot, Oren; Barmashenko, Boris D.; Rosenwaks, Salman

    2015-10-01

    Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (3D CFD) modeling of subsonic (Mach number M ~ 0.2) and transonic (M ~ 0.9) diode pumped alkali lasers (DPALs), taking into account fluid dynamics and kinetic processes in the lasing medium is reported. The performance of these lasers is compared with that of supersonic (M ~ 2.7 for Cs and M ~ 2.4 for K) DPALs. The motivation for this study stems from the fact that subsonic and transonic DPALs require much simpler hardware than supersonic ones where supersonic nozzle, diffuser and high power mechanical pump (due to a drop in the gas total pressure in the nozzle) are required for continuous closed cycle operation. For Cs DPALs with 5 x 5 cm2 flow cross section pumped by large cross section (5 x 2 cm2) beam the maximum achievable power of supersonic devices is higher than that of the transonic and subsonic devices by only ~ 3% and ~ 10%, respectively. Thus in this case the supersonic operation mode has no substantial advantage over the transonic one. The main processes limiting the power of Cs supersonic DPALs are saturation of the D2 transition and large ~ 60% losses of alkali atoms due to ionization, whereas the influence of gas heating is negligible. For K transonic DPALs both the gas heating and ionization effects are shown to be unimportant. The maximum values of the power are higher than those in Cs transonic laser by ~ 11%. The power achieved in the supersonic and transonic K DPAL is higher than for the subsonic version, with the same resonator and K density at the inlet, by ~ 84% and ~ 27%, respectively, showing a considerable advantaged of the supersonic device over the transonic one. For pumping by rectangular beams of the same (5 x 2 cm2) cross section, comparison between end-pumping - where the laser beam and pump beam both propagate at along the same axis, and transverse-pumping - where they propagate perpendicularly to each other, shows that the output power and optical-to-optical efficiency are not

  7. High-Performance and Omnidirectional Thin-Film Amorphous Silicon Solar Cell Modules Achieved by 3D Geometry Design.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dongliang; Yin, Min; Lu, Linfeng; Zhang, Hanzhong; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Zhu, Xufei; Che, Jianfei; Li, Dongdong

    2015-11-01

    High-performance thin-film hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cells are achieved by combining macroscale 3D tubular substrates and nanoscaled 3D cone-like antireflective films. The tubular geometry delivers a series of advantages for large-scale deployment of photovoltaics, such as omnidirectional performance, easier encapsulation, decreased wind resistance, and easy integration with a second device inside the glass tube. PMID:26418573

  8. A 3-D view of field-scale fault-zone cementation from geologically ground-truthed electrical resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, H.; Spinelli, G. A.; Mozley, P.

    2015-12-01

    Fault-zones are an important control on fluid flow, affecting groundwater supply, hydrocarbon/contaminant migration, and waste/carbon storage. However, current models of fault seal are inadequate, primarily focusing on juxtaposition and entrainment effects, despite the recognition that fault-zone cementation is common and can dramatically reduce permeability. We map the 3D cementation patterns of the variably cemented Loma Blanca fault from the land surface to ~40 m depth, using electrical resistivity and induced polarization (IP). The carbonate-cemented fault zone is a region of anomalously low normalized chargeability, relative to the surrounding host material. Zones of low-normalized chargeability immediately under the exposed cement provide the first ground-truth that a cemented fault yields an observable IP anomaly. Low-normalized chargeability extends down from the surface exposure, surrounded by zones of high-normalized chargeability, at an orientation consistent with normal faults in the region; this likely indicates cementation of the fault zone at depth, which could be confirmed by drilling and coring. Our observations are consistent with: 1) the expectation that carbonate cement in a sandstone should lower normalized chargeability by reducing pore-surface area and bridging gaps in the pore space, and 2) laboratory experiments confirming that calcite precipitation within a column of glass beads decreases polarization magnitude. The ability to characterize spatial variations in the degree of fault-zone cementation with resistivity and IP has exciting implications for improving predictive models of the hydrogeologic impacts of cementation within faults.

  9. 3D seismic analysis of gravity-driven and basement influenced normal fault growth in the deepwater Otway Basin, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robson, A. G.; King, R. C.; Holford, S. P.

    2016-08-01

    We use three-dimensional (3D) seismic reflection data to analyse the structural style and growth of a normal fault array located at the present-day shelf-edge break and into the deepwater province of the Otway Basin, southern Australia. The Otway Basin is a Late Jurassic to Cenozoic, rift-to-passive margin basin. The seismic reflection data images a NW-SE (128-308) striking, normal fault array, located within Upper Cretaceous clastic sediments and which consists of ten fault segments. The fault array contains two hard-linked fault assemblages, separated by only 2 km in the dip direction. The gravity-driven, down-dip fault assemblage is entirely contained within the 3D seismic survey, is located over a basement plateau and displays growth commencing and terminating during the Campanian-Maastrichtian, with up to 1.45 km of accumulated throw (vertical displacement). The up-dip normal fault assemblage penetrates deeper than the base of the seismic survey, but is interpreted to be partially linked along strike at depth to major basement-involved normal faults that can be observed on regional 2D seismic lines. This fault assemblage displays growth initiating in the Turonian-Santonian and has accumulated up to 1.74 km of throw. Our detailed analysis of the 3D seismic data constraints post-Cenomanian fault growth of both fault assemblages into four evolutionary stages: [1] Turonian-Santonian basement reactivation during crustal extension between Australia and Antarctica. This either caused the upward propagation of basement-involved normal faults or the nucleation of a vertically isolated normal fault array in shallow cover sediments directly above the reactivated basement-involved faults; [2] continued Campanian-Maastrichtian crustal extension and sediment loading eventually created gravitational instability on the basement plateau, nucleating a second, vertically isolated normal fault array in the cover sediments; [3] eventual hard-linkage of fault segments in both fault

  10. 3D Geometry and Kinematics of the Taiwan Arc-continent Collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carena, S.; Suppe, J.; Wu, Y. M.

    2015-12-01

    In Taiwan two subduction zones (Manila trench and Ryukyu trench) come together in a quasi-orthogonal, kinematically stable configuration. Subduction is ongoing in both trenches, even though the tectonic setting in the Manila trench is that of an arc-continent collision. The upper crust of Eurasia (EU) is decoupled from the rest of the lithosphere by a detachment horizon, which is the main subduction interface between EU and Philippine Sea plate (PSP). The interface is visible in both seismicity and crustal tomography at shallow depths, and it can be followed into the mantle to 450-500 km depth with global tomography. Shortening across the plate boundary is accomplished by a combination of subduction of EU lithosphere, folding and thrusting in the Eurasian upper crust, and a secondary subduction zone within the PSP. We hypothesize that: (1) once arc-continent collision occurs, subduction of Eurasian continental lower crust and upper mantle can continue by lithospheric delamination and by continuity with the much larger Eurasian slab to the south; (2) the upper crust of EU deforms by faulting and folding; (3) the present convergence rate of about 90 mm/yr is limited at most to the last 2 Ma, whereas the long-term rate is about 30 mm/yr and in Taiwan the difference is being taken up by secondary subduction within the PSP margin; (4) a margin-parallel STEP (Subduction-Transform-Edge-Propagator) fault forms the northern limit of Eurasian subduction, which allows the whole system to propagate self-similarly southwestward. No slab breakoff is required for the kinematics of the margin, and none is observed in geophysical or geological data either. This kinematics is consistent with geologic observations: from timing of opening of the southern Okinawa trough, to geometry of geologic boundaries within the Taiwan mountain belt, to geographic distribution, geochemical character, and timing of Quaternary volcanism in the northern Taiwan volcanic zone. We constrained the long

  11. 3D numerical simulations of negative hydrogen ion extraction using realistic plasma parameters, geometry of the extraction aperture and full 3D magnetic field map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochalskyy, S.; Wünderlich, D.; Ruf, B.; Franzen, P.; Fantz, U.; Minea, T.

    2014-02-01

    Decreasing the co-extracted electron current while simultaneously keeping negative ion (NI) current sufficiently high is a crucial issue on the development plasma source system for ITER Neutral Beam Injector. To support finding the best extraction conditions the 3D Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo Collision electrostatic code ONIX (Orsay Negative Ion eXtraction) has been developed. Close collaboration with experiments and other numerical models allows performing realistic simulations with relevant input parameters: plasma properties, geometry of the extraction aperture, full 3D magnetic field map, etc. For the first time ONIX has been benchmarked with commercial positive ions tracing code KOBRA3D. A very good agreement in terms of the meniscus position and depth has been found. Simulation of NI extraction with different e/NI ratio in bulk plasma shows high relevance of the direct negative ion extraction from the surface produced NI in order to obtain extracted NI current as in the experimental results from BATMAN testbed.

  12. Enabling Lorentz boosted frame particle-in-cell simulations of laser wakefield acceleration in quasi-3D geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Peicheng; Xu, Xinlu; Davidson, Asher; Tableman, Adam; Dalichaouch, Thamine; Li, Fei; Meyers, Michael D.; An, Weiming; Tsung, Frank S.; Decyk, Viktor K.; Fiuza, Frederico; Vieira, Jorge; Fonseca, Ricardo A.; Lu, Wei; Silva, Luis O.; Mori, Warren B.

    2016-07-01

    When modeling laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) using the particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm in a Lorentz boosted frame, the plasma is drifting relativistically at βb c towards the laser, which can lead to a computational speedup of ∼ γb2 = (1 - βb2)-1. Meanwhile, when LWFA is modeled in the quasi-3D geometry in which the electromagnetic fields and current are decomposed into a limited number of azimuthal harmonics, speedups are achieved by modeling three dimensional (3D) problems with the computational loads on the order of two dimensional r - z simulations. Here, we describe a method to combine the speedups from the Lorentz boosted frame and quasi-3D algorithms. The key to the combination is the use of a hybrid Yee-FFT solver in the quasi-3D geometry that significantly mitigates the Numerical Cerenkov Instability (NCI) which inevitably arises in a Lorentz boosted frame due to the unphysical coupling of Langmuir modes and EM modes of the relativistically drifting plasma in these simulations. In addition, based on the space-time distribution of the LWFA data in the lab and boosted frame, we propose to use a moving window to follow the drifting plasma, instead of following the laser driver as is done in the LWFA lab frame simulations, in order to further reduce the computational loads. We describe the details of how the NCI is mitigated for the quasi-3D geometry, the setups for simulations which combine the Lorentz boosted frame, quasi-3D geometry, and the use of a moving window, and compare the results from these simulations against their corresponding lab frame cases. Good agreement is obtained among these sample simulations, particularly when there is no self-trapping, which demonstrates it is possible to combine the Lorentz boosted frame and the quasi-3D algorithms when modeling LWFA. We also discuss the preliminary speedups achieved in these sample simulations.

  13. Do fault-related folds follow the same scaling law as their associated faults? A study using 3D seismic reflection data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitcher, Eleanor; Imber, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    Fractal distributions are largely agreed to follow a power-law distribution. Power-law scaling relationships describe the size distribution of fault lengths or displacements. Being able to identify these scaling properties provides a powerful tool for predicting the numbers of geological structures, such as small-scale faults in sedimentary basins that are below the resolution of seismic reflection data. The aim of this study is to determine whether fault-related folds follow the same power law scaling properties, or if they follow a different scaling law. We use TrapTester to interpret a 3D seismic volume from the Gulf of Mexico to construct fault planes and cut-off lines along selected horizons in the vicinity of fault upper tip lines. Fault-related folds are particularly well developed above steeply plunging tip lines, but are discontinuous along the strike of the fault plane. Folding is less well developed on horizons that intersect, or lie close to, the locus of maximum throw (bullseye) of the fault plane. We then measured fold amplitudes and fault throws across these same horizons using a one-dimensional multi-line sampling approach. Graphs of fault throw and fold amplitude vs. distance parallel to fault strike show that folds occur where there is no resolvable fault throw, and that fault throw and fold amplitudes show an approximately inverse relationship. Close to the locus of maximum throw, there is largely just faulting, whilst at the upper tip line folding predominates. By plotting cumulative frequency against throw for the fault and fold data we can investigate whether the data follow a power law, log normal or exponential distribution. Plotting the data on log vs. log (power law), linear vs. log (log normal) and log vs. linear (exponential) axes allow us to establish which displays the best "straight-line fit". We observed that the fault throw data satisfied a straight-line on a log vs. log graph - implying a power law distribution - and also returned

  14. Mechanisms of clay smear formation in unconsolidated sediments - insights from 3-D observations of excavated normal faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettermann, Michael; Thronberens, Sebastian; Juarez, Oscar; Lajos Urai, Janos; Ziegler, Martin; Asmus, Sven; Kruger, Ulrich

    2016-05-01

    Clay smears in normal faults can form seals for hydrocarbons and groundwater, and their prediction in the subsurface is an important problem in applied and basic geoscience. However, neither their complex 3-D structure, nor their processes of formation or destruction are well understood, and outcrop studies to date are mainly 2-D. We present a 3-D study of an excavated normal fault with clay smear, together with both source layers, in unlithified sand and clay of the Hambach open-cast lignite mine in Germany. The faults formed at a depth of 150 m, and have shale gouge ratios between 0.1 and 0.3. The fault zones are layered, with sheared sand, sheared clay and tectonically mixed sand-clay gouge. The thickness of clay smears in two excavated fault zones of 1.8 and 3.8 m2 is approximately log-normal, with values between 5 mm and 5 cm, without holes. The 3-D thickness distribution is heterogeneous. We show that clay smears are strongly affected by R and R' shears, mostly at the footwall side. These shears can locally cross and offset clay smears, forming holes in the clay smear, while thinning of the clay smear by shearing in the fault core is less important. The thinnest parts of the clay smears are often located close to source layer cut-offs. Locally, the clay smear consists of overlapping patches of sheared clay, separated by sheared sand. More commonly, it is one amalgamated zone of sheared sand and clay. A microscopic study of fault-zone samples shows that grain-scale mixing can lead to thickening of the low permeability smears, which may lead to resealing of holes.

  15. Gothic Churches in Paris ST Gervais et ST Protais Image Matching 3d Reconstruction to Understand the Vaults System Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capone, M.; Campi, M.; Catuogno, R.

    2015-02-01

    This paper is part of a research about ribbed vaults systems in French Gothic Cathedrals. Our goal is to compare some different gothic cathedrals to understand the complex geometry of the ribbed vaults. The survey isn't the main objective but it is the way to verify the theoretical hypotheses about geometric configuration of the flamboyant churches in Paris. The survey method's choice generally depends on the goal; in this case we had to study many churches in a short time, so we chose 3D reconstruction method based on image dense stereo matching. This method allowed us to obtain the necessary information to our study without bringing special equipment, such as the laser scanner. The goal of this paper is to test image matching 3D reconstruction method in relation to some particular study cases and to show the benefits and the troubles. From a methodological point of view this is our workflow: - theoretical study about geometrical configuration of rib vault systems; - 3D model based on theoretical hypothesis about geometric definition of the vaults' form; - 3D model based on image matching 3D reconstruction methods; - comparison between 3D theoretical model and 3D model based on image matching;

  16. Coupled Neutron-Photon, 3-D, Combinatorial Geometry, Time Dependent, Monte Carlo Transport Code System.

    2013-06-24

    Version 07 TART2012 is a coupled neutron-photon Monte Carlo transport code designed to use three-dimensional (3-D) combinatorial geometry. Neutron and/or photon sources as well as neutron induced photon production can be tracked. It is a complete system to assist you with input preparation, running Monte Carlo calculations, and analysis of output results. TART2012 is also incredibly FAST; if you have used similar codes, you will be amazed at how fast this code is compared tomore » other similar codes. Use of the entire system can save you a great deal of time and energy. TART2012 extends the general utility of the code to even more areas of application than available in previous releases by concentrating on improving the physics, particularly with regard to improved treatment of neutron fission, resonance self-shielding, molecular binding, and extending input options used by the code. Several utilities are included for creating input files and displaying TART results and data. TART2012 uses the latest ENDF/B-VI, Release 8, data. New for TART2012 is the use of continuous energy neutron cross sections, in addition to its traditional multigroup cross sections. For neutron interaction, the data are derived using ENDF-ENDL2005 and include both continuous energy cross sections and 700 group neutron data derived using a combination of ENDF/B-VI, Release 8, and ENDL data. The 700 group structure extends from 10-5 eV up to 1 GeV. Presently nuclear data are only available up to 20 MeV, so that only 616 of the groups are currently used. For photon interaction, 701 point photon data were derived using the Livermore EPDL97 file. The new 701 point structure extends from 100 eV up to 1 GeV, and is currently used over this entire energy range. TART2012 completely supersedes all older versions of TART, and it is strongly recommended that one use only the most recent version of TART2012 and its data files. Check author’s homepage for related information: http

  17. Self-calibration of cone-beam CT geometry using 3D-2D image registration.

    PubMed

    Ouadah, S; Stayman, J W; Gang, G J; Ehtiati, T; Siewerdsen, J H

    2016-04-01

    Robotic C-arms are capable of complex orbits that can increase field of view, reduce artifacts, improve image quality, and/or reduce dose; however, it can be challenging to obtain accurate, reproducible geometric calibration required for image reconstruction for such complex orbits. This work presents a method for geometric calibration for an arbitrary source-detector orbit by registering 2D projection data to a previously acquired 3D image. It also yields a method by which calibration of simple circular orbits can be improved. The registration uses a normalized gradient information similarity metric and the covariance matrix adaptation-evolution strategy optimizer for robustness against local minima and changes in image content. The resulting transformation provides a 'self-calibration' of system geometry. The algorithm was tested in phantom studies using both a cone-beam CT (CBCT) test-bench and a robotic C-arm (Artis Zeego, Siemens Healthcare) for circular and non-circular orbits. Self-calibration performance was evaluated in terms of the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the point spread function in CBCT reconstructions, the reprojection error (RPE) of steel ball bearings placed on each phantom, and the overall quality and presence of artifacts in CBCT images. In all cases, self-calibration improved the FWHM-e.g. on the CBCT bench, FWHM  =  0.86 mm for conventional calibration compared to 0.65 mm for self-calibration (p  <  0.001). Similar improvements were measured in RPE-e.g. on the robotic C-arm, RPE  =  0.73 mm for conventional calibration compared to 0.55 mm for self-calibration (p  <  0.001). Visible improvement was evident in CBCT reconstructions using self-calibration, particularly about high-contrast, high-frequency objects (e.g. temporal bone air cells and a surgical needle). The results indicate that self-calibration can improve even upon systems with presumably accurate geometric calibration and is

  18. Self-calibration of cone-beam CT geometry using 3D-2D image registration.

    PubMed

    Ouadah, S; Stayman, J W; Gang, G J; Ehtiati, T; Siewerdsen, J H

    2016-04-01

    Robotic C-arms are capable of complex orbits that can increase field of view, reduce artifacts, improve image quality, and/or reduce dose; however, it can be challenging to obtain accurate, reproducible geometric calibration required for image reconstruction for such complex orbits. This work presents a method for geometric calibration for an arbitrary source-detector orbit by registering 2D projection data to a previously acquired 3D image. It also yields a method by which calibration of simple circular orbits can be improved. The registration uses a normalized gradient information similarity metric and the covariance matrix adaptation-evolution strategy optimizer for robustness against local minima and changes in image content. The resulting transformation provides a 'self-calibration' of system geometry. The algorithm was tested in phantom studies using both a cone-beam CT (CBCT) test-bench and a robotic C-arm (Artis Zeego, Siemens Healthcare) for circular and non-circular orbits. Self-calibration performance was evaluated in terms of the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the point spread function in CBCT reconstructions, the reprojection error (RPE) of steel ball bearings placed on each phantom, and the overall quality and presence of artifacts in CBCT images. In all cases, self-calibration improved the FWHM-e.g. on the CBCT bench, FWHM  =  0.86 mm for conventional calibration compared to 0.65 mm for self-calibration (p  <  0.001). Similar improvements were measured in RPE-e.g. on the robotic C-arm, RPE  =  0.73 mm for conventional calibration compared to 0.55 mm for self-calibration (p  <  0.001). Visible improvement was evident in CBCT reconstructions using self-calibration, particularly about high-contrast, high-frequency objects (e.g. temporal bone air cells and a surgical needle). The results indicate that self-calibration can improve even upon systems with presumably accurate geometric calibration and is

  19. Self-calibration of cone-beam CT geometry using 3D-2D image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouadah, S.; Stayman, J. W.; Gang, G. J.; Ehtiati, T.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2016-04-01

    Robotic C-arms are capable of complex orbits that can increase field of view, reduce artifacts, improve image quality, and/or reduce dose; however, it can be challenging to obtain accurate, reproducible geometric calibration required for image reconstruction for such complex orbits. This work presents a method for geometric calibration for an arbitrary source-detector orbit by registering 2D projection data to a previously acquired 3D image. It also yields a method by which calibration of simple circular orbits can be improved. The registration uses a normalized gradient information similarity metric and the covariance matrix adaptation-evolution strategy optimizer for robustness against local minima and changes in image content. The resulting transformation provides a ‘self-calibration’ of system geometry. The algorithm was tested in phantom studies using both a cone-beam CT (CBCT) test-bench and a robotic C-arm (Artis Zeego, Siemens Healthcare) for circular and non-circular orbits. Self-calibration performance was evaluated in terms of the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the point spread function in CBCT reconstructions, the reprojection error (RPE) of steel ball bearings placed on each phantom, and the overall quality and presence of artifacts in CBCT images. In all cases, self-calibration improved the FWHM—e.g. on the CBCT bench, FWHM  =  0.86 mm for conventional calibration compared to 0.65 mm for self-calibration (p  <  0.001). Similar improvements were measured in RPE—e.g. on the robotic C-arm, RPE  =  0.73 mm for conventional calibration compared to 0.55 mm for self-calibration (p  <  0.001). Visible improvement was evident in CBCT reconstructions using self-calibration, particularly about high-contrast, high-frequency objects (e.g. temporal bone air cells and a surgical needle). The results indicate that self-calibration can improve even upon systems with presumably accurate geometric calibration and is

  20. Development and application of a 3-D geometry/mass model for LDEF satellite ionizing radiation assessments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colborn, B. L.; Armstrong, T. W.

    1992-01-01

    A computer model of the three dimensional geometry and material distributions for the LDEF spacecraft, experiment trays, and, for selected trays, the components of experiments within a tray was developed for use in ionizing radiation assessments. The model is being applied to provide 3-D shielding distributions around radiation dosimeters to aid in data interpretation, particularly in assessing the directional properties of the radiation exposure. Also, the model has been interfaced with radiation transport codes for 3-D dosimetry response predictions and for calculations related to determining the accuracy of trapped proton and cosmic ray environment models. The methodology is described used in developing the 3-D LDEF model and the level of detail incorporated. Currently, the trays modeled in detail are F2, F8, and H12 and H3. Applications of the model which are discussed include the 3-D shielding distributions around various dosimeters, the influence of shielding on dosimetry responses, and comparisons of dose predictions based on the present 3-D model vs those from 1-D geometry model approximations used in initial estimates.

  1. Using Geometry-Based Metrics as Part of Fitness-for-Purpose Evaluations of 3D City Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, K.; Ellul, C.

    2016-10-01

    Three-dimensional geospatial information is being increasingly used in a range of tasks beyond visualisation. 3D datasets, however, are often being produced without exact specifications and at mixed levels of geometric complexity. This leads to variations within the models' geometric and semantic complexity as well as the degree of deviation from the corresponding real world objects. Existing descriptors and measures of 3D data such as CityGML's level of detail are perhaps only partially sufficient in communicating data quality and fitness-for-purpose. This study investigates whether alternative, automated, geometry-based metrics describing the variation of complexity within 3D datasets could provide additional relevant information as part of a process of fitness-for-purpose evaluation. The metrics include: mean vertex/edge/face counts per building; vertex/face ratio; minimum 2D footprint area and; minimum feature length. Each metric was tested on six 3D city models from international locations. The results show that geometry-based metrics can provide additional information on 3D city models as part of fitness-for-purpose evaluations. The metrics, while they cannot be used in isolation, may provide a complement to enhance existing data descriptors if backed up with local knowledge, where possible.

  2. A 3D resistivity model derived from the transient electromagnetic data observed on the Araba fault, Jordan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rödder, A.; Tezkan, B.

    2013-01-01

    72 inloop transient electromagnetic soundings were carried out on two 2 km long profiles perpendicular and two 1 km and two 500 m long profiles parallel to the strike direction of the Araba fault in Jordan which is the southern part of the Dead Sea transform fault indicating the boundary between the African and Arabian continental plates. The distance between the stations was on average 50 m. The late time apparent resistivities derived from the induced voltages show clear differences between the stations located at the eastern and at the western part of the Araba fault. The fault appears as a boundary between the resistive western (ca. 100 Ωm) and the conductive eastern part (ca. 10 Ωm) of the survey area. On profiles parallel to the strike late time apparent resistivities were almost constant as well in the time dependence as in lateral extension at different stations, indicating a 2D resistivity structure of the investigated area. After having been processed, the data were interpreted by conventional 1D Occam and Marquardt inversion. The study using 2D synthetic model data showed, however, that 1D inversions of stations close to the fault resulted in fictitious layers in the subsurface thus producing large interpretation errors. Therefore, the data were interpreted by a 2D forward resistivity modeling which was then extended to a 3D resistivity model. This 3D model explains satisfactorily the time dependences of the observed transients at nearly all stations.

  3. geomIO: A tool for geodynamicists to turn 2D cross-sections into 3D geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Tobias; Bauville, Arthur

    2016-04-01

    In numerical deformation models, material properties are usually defined on elements (e.g., in body-fitted finite elements), or on a set of Lagrangian markers (Eulerian, ALE or mesh-free methods). In any case, geometrical constraints are needed to assign different material properties to the model domain. Whereas simple geometries such as spheres, layers or cuboids can easily be programmed, it quickly gets complex and time-consuming to create more complicated geometries for numerical model setups, especially in three dimensions. geomIO (geometry I/O, http://geomio.bitbucket.org/) is a MATLAB-based library that has two main functionalities. First, it can be used to create 3D volumes based on series of 2D vector drawings similar to a CAD program; and second, it uses these 3D volumes to assign material properties to the numerical model domain. The drawings can conveniently be created using the open-source vector graphics software Inkscape. Adobe Illustrator is also partially supported. The drawings represent a series of cross-sections in the 3D model domain, for example, cross-sectional interpretations of seismic tomography. geomIO is then used to read the drawings and to create 3D volumes by interpolating between the cross-sections. In the second part, the volumes are used to assign material phases to markers inside the volumes. Multiple volumes can be created at the same time and, depending on the order of assignment, unions or intersections can be built to assign additional material phases. geomIO also offers the possibility to create 3D temperature structures for geodynamic models based on depth dependent parameterisations, for example the half space cooling model. In particular, this can be applied to geometries of subducting slabs of arbitrary shape. Yet, geomIO is held very general, and can be used for a variety of applications. We present examples of setup generation from pictures of micro-scale tectonics and lithospheric scale setups of 3D present-day model

  4. Relating fault geometry and aseismic slip along the Haiyuan fault creeping segment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolivet, R.; Candela, T.; Lasserre, C.; Renard, F.; Doin, M.; Klinger, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Recent observations point out the relationship between the fault geometry and earthquake rupture processes. Bends, jogs and other geometric features along faults are known to influence the initiation, the propagation and the arrest of large earthquakes. Space-based geodetic techniques, such as GPS or InSAR, allow to locate seismic asperities along faults by mapping and inverting inter-, co- and post-seismic surface displacement fields. Such methods outline in particular a clear relationship between the coseismic slip distribution and the fault surface geometry. Here, we intend to relate the inter-seismic fault behavior with the fault geometry. We focus on the Haiyuan fault, China, one of the major left-lateral fault system that accommodates relative block motion in Tibet. We study the junction area in between the 240 km-long, 1920 Mw8 Haiyuan earthquake rupture trace, to the east, and the eastern end of the millennial Tianzhu seismic gap that ruptured in the past onto Mw8 type earthquakes, to the west. This junction is marked by a 35 km-long creeping segment recently revealed by InsAR, limited to the east by a km-scale pull-apart basin. The average creep rate over the 2003-2009 period is 5±1 mm/yr and is equivalent to the present day tectonic loading rate, suggesting no strain accumulation during this period. We analyze in details how the creep distribution is related to geometric features along this creeping section. Here, we use Envisat data, spanning the 2003-2009 period, to map the along strike distribution and the temporal evolution of the surface creep. We analyze data from 1 descending and 2 ascending tracks using the ROI PAC processing chain combined with the NSBAS chain, developed to enhance coherence in areas of rough topography. We focus SAR images using a common doppler value and combine them into interferograms using an adaptive topographic spectral range filtering technique. We assume a linear dependence of the LOS phase with the topography to remove

  5. Restoring complex folded geometries in 3D using paleomagnetic vectors; a new tool to validate underground reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    José Ramón, Mª; Pueyo, Emilio L.; Briz, José Luis; Caumon, Guillaume; Fernández, Óscar; Ciria, José Carlos; Pocovi, Andrés; Ros, Luis H.

    2013-04-01

    Three-dimensional reconstructions of the underground involve the integration of discrete and heterogeneous datasets and have significant socio- economic implications. The problem arises when there are limited data to build 3D models or when deformation processes are complex; these reasons inspired the development of restoration methods to validate subsurface reconstructions. The restoration is based on the application of simple geometric (or mechanic) laws that help reduce the uncertainty and increase geomodel accuracy. Apart from mechanical approaches, geometric methods are based on the initial assumption of global conservation of volume during deformation in addition to the paleo-horizontality of the stratigraphic horizons in the undeformed stage. The problem is that the bedding plane cannot be used as a three-dimensional reference system, because a single vector defines it and additional constraints are required. This is particularly important when dealing with complex structures, such as non-cylindrical structures and the superposition of non-coaxial geometries. In this context, paleomagnetism (known in both the deformed and undeformed stages) can contribute to building a more complete reference system and to reducing the uncertainty in restoration processes. The use of paleomagnetism in restoration tools was suggested in the early 1990's and only a few quantitative map-view applications have been developed since then. In this contribution, we introduce the two first surface restoration methods that use paleomagnetic vectors as a primary reference. The first one is a simple geometric approach based on the piecewise restoration of a triangulated surface into which paleomagnetic variables can be easily incorporated. It is valid for complexly folded structures. The surface is modelled by a mesh and the method starts from a pin-element. Triangles are laid flat and then fitted together to minimize distances between common vertices and paleomagnetic error. However

  6. Poly 3D fault modeling scripts/data for permeability potential of Washington State geothermal prospects

    DOE Data Explorer

    Michael Swyer

    2015-02-05

    Matlab scripts/functions and data used to build Poly3D models and create permeability potential GIS layers for 1) Mount St Helen's, 2) Wind River Valley, and 3) Mount Baker geothermal prospect areas located in Washington state.

  7. Geometry-based vs. intensity-based medical image registration: A comparative study on 3D CT data.

    PubMed

    Savva, Antonis D; Economopoulos, Theodore L; Matsopoulos, George K

    2016-02-01

    Spatial alignment of Computed Tomography (CT) data sets is often required in numerous medical applications and it is usually achieved by applying conventional exhaustive registration techniques, which are mainly based on the intensity of the subject data sets. Those techniques consider the full range of data points composing the data, thus negatively affecting the required processing time. Alternatively, alignment can be performed using the correspondence of extracted data points from both sets. Moreover, various geometrical characteristics of those data points can be used, instead of their chromatic properties, for uniquely characterizing each point, by forming a specific geometrical descriptor. This paper presents a comparative study reviewing variations of geometry-based, descriptor-oriented registration techniques, as well as conventional, exhaustive, intensity-based methods for aligning three-dimensional (3D) CT data pairs. In this context, three general image registration frameworks were examined: a geometry-based methodology featuring three distinct geometrical descriptors, an intensity-based methodology using three different similarity metrics, as well as the commonly used Iterative Closest Point algorithm. All techniques were applied on a total of thirty 3D CT data pairs with both known and unknown initial spatial differences. After an extensive qualitative and quantitative assessment, it was concluded that the proposed geometry-based registration framework performed similarly to the examined exhaustive registration techniques. In addition, geometry-based methods dramatically improved processing time over conventional exhaustive registration.

  8. Microdrop printing of hydrogel bioinks into 3D tissue-like geometries.

    PubMed

    Pataky, Kris; Braschler, Thomas; Negro, Andrea; Renaud, Philippe; Lutolf, Matthias P; Brugger, Juergen

    2012-01-17

    An optimized 3D inkjet printing process is demonstrated for structuring alginate into a tissue-like microvasculature capable of supporting physiological flow rates. Optimizing the reaction at the single-droplet level enables wet hydrogel droplets to be stacked, thus overcoming their natural tendancy to spread and coalesce. Live cells can be patterned using this process and it can be extended to a range of other hydrogels.

  9. Geodesy-based estimates of loading rates on faults beneath the Los Angeles basin with a new, computationally efficient method to model dislocations in 3D heterogeneous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollins, C.; Argus, D. F.; Avouac, J. P.; Landry, W.; Barbot, S.

    2015-12-01

    North-south compression across the Los Angeles basin is accommodated by slip on thrust faults beneath the basin that may present significant seismic hazard to Los Angeles. Previous geodesy-based efforts to constrain the distributions and rates of elastic strain accumulation on these faults [Argus et al 2005, 2012] have found that the elastic model used has a first-order impact on the inferred distribution of locking and creep, underlining the need to accurately incorporate the laterally heterogeneous elastic structure and complex fault geometries of the Los Angeles basin into this analysis. We are using Gamra [Landry and Barbot, in prep.], a newly developed adaptive-meshing finite-difference solver, to compute elastostatic Green's functions that incorporate the full 3D regional elastic structure provided by the SCEC Community Velocity Model. Among preliminary results from benchmarks, forward models and inversions, we find that: 1) for a modeled creep source on the edge dislocation geometry from Argus et al [2005], the use of the SCEC CVM material model produces surface velocities in the hanging wall that are up to ~50% faster than those predicted in an elastic halfspace model; 2) in sensitivity-modulated inversions of the Argus et al [2005] GPS velocity field for slip on the same dislocation source, the use of the CVM deepens the inferred locking depth by ≥3 km compared to an elastic halfspace model; 3) when using finite-difference or finite-element models with Dirichlet boundary conditions (except for the free surface) for problems of this scale, it is necessary to set the boundaries at least ~100 km away from any slip source or data point to guarantee convergence within 5% of analytical solutions (a result which may be applicable to other static dislocation modeling problems and which may scale with the size of the area of interest). Here we will present finalized results from inversions of an updated GPS velocity field [Argus et al, AGU 2015] for the inferred

  10. Mesoscopic hydrogel molding to control the 3D geometry of bioartificial muscle tissues

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Weining; Liau, Brian; Badie, Nima

    2010-01-01

    This protocol describes a cell/hydrogel molding method for precise and reproducible biomimetic fabrication of three-dimensional (3D) muscle tissue architectures in vitro. Using a high aspect ratio soft lithography technique, we fabricate polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) molds containing arrays of mesoscopic posts with defined size, elongation and spacing. On cell/hydrogel molding, these posts serve to enhance the diffusion of nutrients to cells by introducing elliptical pores in the cell-laden hydrogels and to guide local 3D cell alignment by governing the spatial pattern of mechanical tension. Instead of ultraviolet or chemical cross-linking, this method utilizes natural hydrogel polymerization and topographically constrained cell-mediated gel compaction to create the desired 3D tissue structures. We apply this method to fabricate several square centimeter large, few hundred micron-thick bioartificial muscle tissues composed of viable, dense, uniformly aligned and highly differentiated cardiac or skeletal muscle fibers. The protocol takes 4–5 d to fabricate PDMS molds followed by 2 weeks of cell culture. PMID:19798085

  11. Subsurface geometry of the San Andreas-Calaveras fault junction: Influence of serpentinite and the Coast Range Ophiolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt, Janet T.; Ponce, David A.; Graymer, Russell W.; Jachens, Robert C.; Simpson, Robert W.

    2014-10-01

    While an enormous amount of research has been focused on trying to understand the geologic history and neotectonics of the San Andreas-Calaveras fault (SAF-CF) junction, fundamental questions concerning fault geometry and mechanisms for slip transfer through the junction remain. We use potential-field, geologic, geodetic, and seismicity data to investigate the 3-D geologic framework of the SAF-CF junction and identify potential slip-transferring structures within the junction. Geophysical evidence suggests that the San Andreas and Calaveras fault zones dip away from each other within the northern portion of the junction, bounding a triangular-shaped wedge of crust in cross section. This wedge changes shape to the south as fault geometries change and fault activity shifts between fault strands, particularly along the Calaveras fault zone (CFZ). Potential-field modeling and relocated seismicity suggest that the Paicines and San Benito strands of the CFZ dip 65° to 70° NE and form the southwest boundary of a folded 1 to 3 km thick tabular body of Coast Range Ophiolite (CRO) within the Vallecitos syncline. We identify and characterize two steeply dipping, seismically active cross structures within the junction that are associated with serpentinite in the subsurface. The architecture of the SAF-CF junction presented in this study may help explain fault-normal motions currently observed in geodetic data and help constrain the seismic hazard. The abundance of serpentinite and related CRO in the subsurface is a significant discovery that not only helps constrain the geometry of structures but may also help explain fault behavior and the tectonic evolution of the SAF-CF junction.

  12. Subsurface geometry of the San Andreas-Calaveras fault junction: influence of serpentinite and the Coast Range Ophiolite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watt, Janet Tilden; Ponce, David A.; Graymer, Russell W.; Jachens, Robert C.; Simpson, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    While an enormous amount of research has been focused on trying to understand the geologic history and neotectonics of the San Andreas-Calaveras fault (SAF-CF) junction, fundamental questions concerning fault geometry and mechanisms for slip transfer through the junction remain. We use potential-field, geologic, geodetic, and seismicity data to investigate the 3-D geologic framework of the SAF-CF junction and identify potential slip-transferring structures within the junction. Geophysical evidence suggests that the San Andreas and Calaveras fault zones dip away from each other within the northern portion of the junction, bounding a triangular-shaped wedge of crust in cross section. This wedge changes shape to the south as fault geometries change and fault activity shifts between fault strands, particularly along the Calaveras fault zone (CFZ). Potential-field modeling and relocated seismicity suggest that the Paicines and San Benito strands of the CFZ dip 65° to 70° NE and form the southwest boundary of a folded 1 to 3 km thick tabular body of Coast Range Ophiolite (CRO) within the Vallecitos syncline. We identify and characterize two steeply dipping, seismically active cross structures within the junction that are associated with serpentinite in the subsurface. The architecture of the SAF-CF junction presented in this study may help explain fault-normal motions currently observed in geodetic data and help constrain the seismic hazard. The abundance of serpentinite and related CRO in the subsurface is a significant discovery that not only helps constrain the geometry of structures but may also help explain fault behavior and the tectonic evolution of the SAF-CF junction.

  13. The Need (?) for Descriptive Geometry in a World of 3D Modeling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croft, Frank M. Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Evaluates the use of modern CAD methods to solve geometric problems. Solves descriptive geometry problems using the layout and position of the successive auxiliary views from the projection of three-dimensional figures onto a two-dimensional plane of paper. (CCM)

  14. Comparison of parallel and spiral tagged MRI geometries in estimation of 3-D myocardial strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tustison, Nicholas J.; Amini, Amir A.

    2005-04-01

    Research involving the quantification of left ventricular myocardial strain from cardiac tagged magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is extensive. Two different imaging geometries are commonly employed by these methodologies to extract longitudinal deformation. We refer to these imaging geometries as either parallel or spiral. In the spiral configuration, four long-axis tagged image slices which intersect along the long-axis of the left ventricle are collected and in the parallel configuration, contiguous tagged long-axis images spanning the width of the left ventricle between the lateral wall and the septum are collected. Despite the number of methodologies using either or both imaging configurations, to date, no comparison has been made to determine which geometry results in more accurate estimation of strains. Using previously published work in which left ventricular myocardial strain is calculated from 4-D anatomical NURBS models, we compare the strain calculated from these two imaging geometries in both simulated tagged MR images for which ground truth strain is available as well as in in vivo data. It is shown that strains calculated using the parallel imaging protocol are more accurate than that calculated using spiral protocol.

  15. Particle size distribution of cataclastic fault materials from Southern California: A 3-D study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Lin-Ji; Sammis, Charles G.

    1994-03-01

    The particle size distributions of fault gouge from the San Andreas, the San Gabriel, and the Lopez Canyon faults in Southern California were measured using sieving and Coulter-Counter techniques over a range of particle sizes from 2 μm to 16 mm. The distributions were found to be power law (fractal) for the smaller fragments and log-normal by mass for sizes near and above the peak size. The apparent fractal dimension D of the smaller particles in gouge samples from the San Andreas fault, the San Gabriel fault and the Lopez Canyon gouge were 2.4 3.6, 2.6 2.9 and 2.4 3.0, respectively. The average D for the Lopez Canyon gouge was 2.7±0.2, which is in agreement with earlier studies of this gouge using planar 2-D sections. The fractal dimension of the finer fragments from all three faults is observed to be correlated with the peak fragment size, with finer gouges tending to have a larger D. A computer automaton is used to show that this observation may be explained as resulting from a fragmentation process which has a “grinding limit” at which particle reduction stops.

  16. Mechanical constraints imposed by 3D cellular geometry and arrangement modulate growth patterns in the Arabidopsis embryo.

    PubMed

    Bassel, George W; Stamm, Petra; Mosca, Gabriella; Barbier de Reuille, Pierre; Gibbs, Daniel J; Winter, Robin; Janka, Ales; Holdsworth, Michael J; Smith, Richard S

    2014-06-10

    Morphogenesis occurs in 3D space over time and is guided by coordinated gene expression programs. Here we use postembryonic development in Arabidopsis plants to investigate the genetic control of growth. We demonstrate that gene expression driving the production of the growth-stimulating hormone gibberellic acid and downstream growth factors is first induced within the radicle tip of the embryo. The center of cell expansion is, however, spatially displaced from the center of gene expression. Because the rapidly growing cells have very different geometry from that of those at the tip, we hypothesized that mechanical factors may contribute to this growth displacement. To this end we developed 3D finite-element method models of growing custom-designed digital embryos at cellular resolution. We used this framework to conceptualize how cell size, shape, and topology influence tissue growth and to explore the interplay of geometrical and genetic inputs into growth distribution. Our simulations showed that mechanical constraints are sufficient to explain the disconnect between the experimentally observed spatiotemporal patterns of gene expression and early postembryonic growth. The center of cell expansion is the position where genetic and mechanical facilitators of growth converge. We have thus uncovered a mechanism whereby 3D cellular geometry helps direct where genetically specified growth takes place.

  17. Large scale 3D geometry of deformation structures in the Aar massif and overlying Helvetic nappes (Central Alps, Switzerland) - A combined remote sensing and field work approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumberger, R.; Wehrens, Ph.; Herwegh, M.

    2012-04-01

    Allowing deep insight into the formation history of a rock complex, shear zones, faults and joint systems represent important sources of geological information. The granitic rocks of the Haslital valley (Switzerland) show very good outcrop conditions to study these mechanical anisotropies. Furthermore, they permit a quantitative characterisation of the above-mentioned deformation structures on the large-scale, in terms of their 3D orientation, 3D spatial distribution, kinematics and evolution in 3D. A key problem while developing valid geological 3D models is the three-dimensional spatial distribution of geological structures, particularly with increasing distance from the surface. That is especially true in regions, where only little or even no "hard" underground data (e.g. bore holes, tunnel mappings and seismics) is available. In the study area, many subsurface data are available (e.g. cross sections, tunnel and pipeline mappings, bore holes etc.). Therefore, two methods dealing with the problems mentioned are developed: (1) A data acquisition, processing and visualisation method, (2) A methodology to improve the reliability of 3D models regarding the spatial trend of geological structures with increasing depth: 1) Using aerial photographs and a high-resolution digital elevation model, a GIS-based remote-sensing structural map of large-scale structural elements (shear zones, faults) of the study area was elaborated. Based on that lineament map, (i) a shear zone map was derived and (ii) a geostatistical analysis was applied to identify sub regions applicable for serving as field areas to test the methodology presented above. During fieldwork, the shear zone map was evaluated by verifying the occurrence and spatial distribution of the structures designated by remote sensing. Additionally, the geometry of the structures (e.g. 3D orientation, width, kinematics) was characterised and parameterised accordingly. These tasks were partially done using a GPS based Slate

  18. Applying and validating the RANS-3D flow-solver for evaluating a subsonic serpentine diffuser geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, Michael J.; Won, Mark J.; Cosentino, Gary B.; Te, Alexander

    1993-01-01

    Subsonic inlet ducts for advanced, high-performance aircraft are evolving towards complex three-dimensional shapes for reasons of overall integration and weight. These factors lead to diffuser geometries that may sacrifice inlet performance, unless careful attention to design details and boundary layer management techniques are employed. The ability of viscous computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis of such geometries to aid the aircraft configurator in this complex design problem is herein examined. The RANS-3D Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes solver is applied to model the complex flowfield occurring in a representative diffuser geometry and the solutions are compared to experimental results from a static test of the inlet duct. The computational results are shown to compare very favorably with experimental results over a range of mass flow rates, including those involving large amounts of separation in the diffuser. In addition, a novel grid topology is presented, and two turbulence models are evaluated in this study as part of the RANS-3D code.

  19. Mathematical analysis of the accordion grating illusion: a differential geometry approach to introduce the 3D aperture problem.

    PubMed

    Yazdanbakhsh, Arash; Gori, Simone

    2011-12-01

    When an observer moves towards a square-wave grating display, a non-rigid distortion of the pattern occurs in which the stripes bulge and expand perpendicularly to their orientation; these effects reverse when the observer moves away. Such distortions present a new problem beyond the classical aperture problem faced by visual motion detectors, one we describe as a 3D aperture problem as it incorporates depth signals. We applied differential geometry to obtain a closed form solution to characterize the fluid distortion of the stripes. Our solution replicates the perceptual distortions and enabled us to design a nulling experiment to distinguish our 3D aperture solution from other candidate mechanisms (see Gori et al. (in this issue)). We suggest that our approach may generalize to other motion illusions visible in 2D displays. PMID:21782387

  20. Mathematical analysis of the accordion grating illusion: a differential geometry approach to introduce the 3D aperture problem.

    PubMed

    Yazdanbakhsh, Arash; Gori, Simone

    2011-12-01

    When an observer moves towards a square-wave grating display, a non-rigid distortion of the pattern occurs in which the stripes bulge and expand perpendicularly to their orientation; these effects reverse when the observer moves away. Such distortions present a new problem beyond the classical aperture problem faced by visual motion detectors, one we describe as a 3D aperture problem as it incorporates depth signals. We applied differential geometry to obtain a closed form solution to characterize the fluid distortion of the stripes. Our solution replicates the perceptual distortions and enabled us to design a nulling experiment to distinguish our 3D aperture solution from other candidate mechanisms (see Gori et al. (in this issue)). We suggest that our approach may generalize to other motion illusions visible in 2D displays.

  1. 3D simulations of the early stages of AGN jets: geometry, thermodynamics and backflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cielo, S.; Antonuccio-Delogu, V.; Macciò, A. V.; Romeo, A. D.; Silk, J.

    2014-04-01

    We investigate the interplay between jets from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and the surrounding interstellar medium (ISM) through full 3D, high-resolution, adaptive mesh refinement simulations performed with the FLASH code. We follow the jet-ISM system for several Myr in its transition from an early, compact source to an extended one including a large cocoon. During the jet evolution, we identify three major evolutionary stages and we find that, contrary to the prediction of popular theoretical models, none of the simulations shows a self-similar behaviour. We also follow the evolution of the energy budget, and find that the fraction of input power deposited into the ISM (the AGN coupling constant) is of the order of a few per cent during the first few Myr. This is in broad agreement with galaxy formation models employing AGN feedback. However, we find that in these early stages, this energy is deposited only in a small fraction (<1 per cent) of the total ISM volume. Finally, we demonstrate the relevance of backflows arising within the extended cocoon generated by a relativistic AGN jet within the ISM of its host galaxy, previously proposed as a mechanism for self-regulating the gas accretion on to the central object. These backflows tend later to be destabilized by the 3D dynamics, rather than by hydrodynamic (Kelvin-Helmholtz) instabilities. Yet, in the first few hundred thousand years, backflows may create a central accretion region of significant extent, and convey there as much as a few millions of solar masses.

  2. Fault geometries and deformation mechanisms in the evolution of low-angle normal faults (Kea, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglseder, C.; Grasemann, B.; Schneider, D.; Rice, A. H. N.; Stöckli, D.; Rockenschaub, M.

    2009-04-01

    The overall tectonic regime in the Cyclades since the Oligocene has been characterized by crustal extension, accommodated by movements on low-angle normal faults (LANFs). On Kea, structural investigations have demonstrated the existence of an island-wide LANF within a large-scale ductile-brittle shear-zone traceable over a distance of 19.5 km parallel to the stretching lineation. The tectonostratigraphy comprises Attic-Cycladic Crystalline lithologies with a shallowly-dipping schist-calcite marble unit overlain by calcitic and dolomitic fault rocks. Notably, the calcitic marbles have been mylonitized, with a mean NNE/NE-SSW/SW trending, pervasive stretching lineation and intense isoclinal folding with fold axes parallel to the stretching lineation. Numerous SC-SCĆ-fabrics and monoclinic clast-geometries show a consistent top-to-SSW shear-sense. Recorded within all lithologies is a consistent WNW/NW-ESE/SE and NNE/NE-SSW/SW striking network of conjugated brittle, brittle-ductile high-angle faults perpendicular and (sub)parallel to the main stretching direction. Field evidence and microstructural investigations indicate high-angle normal faults formed synchronously with movement on LANFs. This interplay of LANFs with high-angle structures, initiated and evolved from brittle-ductile to brittle conditions, indicates initial stages of movement below the calcite brittle-ductile transition but above the dolomite transition. Weakening processes related to syntectonic fluid-rock interactions highlight these observations. In particular, grain-size reduction and strain localisation in fine-grained (ultra)-cataclasites and fine-grained aggregates of phyllosilicate-rich fault-rocks promoted fluid-flow and pressure-solution-accommodated ‘frictional-viscous' creep. These mechanisms show the importance for LANF slip and movement in the progressive development and interaction between contemporaneous active normal faults in the Andersonian-Byerlee frictional mechanics.

  3. Determining the Through-Going Active Fault Geometry of the Western North Anatolian Fault Through Stress Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, B.; McQuarrie, N.

    2015-12-01

    The North Anatolian Fault (NAF) is a seismically active 1200 km long dextral strike-slip fault part of an east-west trending dextral shear zone (NAF system) between the Anatolian and Eurasian plates. This shear zone widens to the west, complicating potential earthquake rupture paths and highlighting the importance of understanding the geometry of active fault systems. West of the town of Bolu - the NAF bifurcates into the northern and southern strands, which converge and are linked through the Mudurnu Valley, then diverge to border the Marmara Sea. The westward continuation of these two fault traces is marked by further complexities in potential active fault geometry, particularly in the Marmara Sea (northern strand), and the Biga Peninsula (southern strand). We evaluate potential active fault geometries for both strands by comparing stress models of various fault geometries in these regions to a record of focal mechanisms and inferred paleostress from a lineament analysis. For the Marmara region, two of the three possible geometries matched the maximum horizontal stress (σH) orientations determined from a record of focal mechanisms; however, only one represented the northern and southern sidewalls associated with the principal zone of deformation of the developing Marmara basin. This suggests that it is the most likely representation of the active through-going fault geometry in the region. In the Biga Peninsula region, the active geometry of the southern strand has the southern component approaching and intersecting the northern component through a linking feature in a narrow topographic valley. This geometry was selected over two others as it overlaps the σH orientation determined from focal mechanism data and a lineament analysis. Additionally, this geometry does not develop a prominent mis-oriented NE-SW stress feature observed in the model results of the other two geometries, otherwise absent in the focal mechanism data or inferred from a lineament analysis.

  4. Analysis of complex faulting: Wavelet transform, multiple datasets and realistic fault geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Chen

    This thesis presents the studies of two recent large and well-recorded earthquakes, the 1999 Hector Mine and Chi-Chi earthquakes. A new procedure for the determination of rupture complexity from a joint inversion of static and seismic data was first developed. This procedure applies a wavelet transform to separate seismic information related to the spatial and temporal slip history, then uses a simulated annealing algorithm to determine the finite-fault model that minimizes the objective function described in terms of wavelet coefficients. This method is then applied to simultaneously invert the slip amplitude, slip direction, rise time and rupture velocity distributions of the Hector Mine and Chi-Chi earthquakes with both seismic and geodetic data. Two slip models are later verified with independent datasets. Results indicate that the seismic moment of the Hector Mine earthquake is 6.28 x 1019 Nm, which is distributed along a "Y" shape fault geometry with three segments. The average slip is 1.5 m with peak amplitudes as high as 7 m. The fault rupture has an average slip duration of 3.5 sec and a slow average rupture velocity of 1.9 km/sec, resulting in a 14 sec rupture propagation history. The rise time appears to be roughly proportional to slip, and the two branches of "Y" shape fault rupture together. The Chi-Chi earthquake is the best-recorded large earthquake so far. Its seismic moment of 2.7 x 1020 Nm is concentrated on the surface of a "wedge shaped" block. The rupture front propagates with a slow rupture velocity of about 2.0 km/sec. The average slip duration is 7.2 sec. Four interesting results are obtained: (1) The sinuous fault plane strongly affects both spatial and temporal variation in slip history; (2) Long-period peak slip velocity increases as the rupture propagates; (3) The peak slip velocity near the surface is in general higher than on the deeper portion of the fault plane as predicted by dynamic modeling [e.g., Oglesby et al., 1998]; and (4

  5. Refining seismic parameters in low seismicity areas by 3D trenching: The Alhama de Murcia fault, SE Iberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrater, Marta; Ortuño, Maria; Masana, Eulàlia; Pallàs, Raimon; Perea, Hector; Baize, Stephane; García-Meléndez, Eduardo; Martínez-Díaz, José J.; Echeverria, Anna; Rockwell, Thomas K.; Sharp, Warren D.; Medialdea, Alicia; Rhodes, Edward J.

    2016-06-01

    Three-dimensional paleoseismology in strike-slip faults with slip rates less than 1 mm per year involves a great methodological challenge. We adapted 3D trenching to track buried channels offset by the Alhama de Murcia seismogenic left-lateral strike-slip fault (SE Iberia). A fault net slip of 0.9 ± 0.1 mm/yr was determined using statistical analysis of piercing lines for one buried channel, whose age is constrained between 15.2 ± 1.1 ka and 21.9-22.3 cal BP. This value is larger and more accurate than the previously published slip rates for this fault. The minimum number of five paleo-earthquakes identified since the deposition of dated layers suggests a maximum average recurrence interval of approximately 5 ka. The combination of both seismic parameters yields a maximum slip per event between 5.3 and 6.3 m. We show that accurately planned trenching strategies and data processing may be key to obtaining robust paleoseismic parameters in low seismicity areas.

  6. Laser cone beam computed tomography scanner geometry for large volume 3D dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, K. J.; Turnbull, D.; Batista, J. J.

    2013-06-01

    A new scanner geometry for fast optical cone-beam computed tomography is reported. The system consists of a low power laser beam, raster scanned, under computer control, through a transparent object in a refractive index matching aquarium. The transmitted beam is scattered from a diffuser screen and detected by a photomultiplier tube. Modest stray light is present in the projection images since only a single ray is present in the object during measurement and there is no imaging optics to introduce further stray light in the form of glare. A scan time of 30 minutes was required for 512 projections with a field of view of 12 × 18 cm. Initial performance from scanning a 15 cm diameter jar with black solutions is presented. Averaged reconstruction coefficients are within 2% along the height of the jar and within the central 85% of diameter, due to the index mismatch of the jar. Agreement with spectrometer measurements was better than 0.5% for a minimum transmission of 4% and within 4% for a dark, 0.1% transmission sample. This geometry's advantages include high dynamic range and low cost of scaling to larger (>15 cm) fields of view.

  7. High-precision differential earthquake location in 3-D models: evidence for a rheological barrier controlling the microseismicity at the Irpinia fault zone in southern Apennines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Landro, Grazia; Amoroso, Ortensia; Stabile, Tony Alfredo; Matrullo, Emanuela; Lomax, Antony; Zollo, Aldo

    2015-12-01

    A non-linear, global-search, probabilistic, double-difference earthquake location technique is illustrated. The main advantages of this method are the determination of comprehensive and complete solutions through the probability density function (PDF), the use of differential arrival times as data and the possibility to use a 3-D velocity model both for absolute and double-difference locations, all of which help to obtain accurate differential locations in structurally complex geological media. The joint use of this methodology and an accurate differential time data set allowed us to carry out a high-resolution, earthquake location analysis, which helps to characterize the active fault geometries in the studied region. We investigated the recent microseismicity occurring at the Campanian-Lucanian Apennines in the crustal volume embedding the fault system that generated the 1980 MS 6.9 earthquake in Irpinia. In order to obtain highly accurate seismicity locations, we applied the method to the P and S arrival time data set from 1312 events (ML < 3.1) that occurred from August 2005 to April 2011 and used the 3-D P- and S-wave velocity models optimized for the area under study. Both manually refined and cross-correlation refined absolute arrival times have been used. The refined seismicity locations show that the events occur in a volume delimited by the faults activated during the 1980 MS 6.9 Irpinia earthquake on subparallel, predominantly normal faults. We find an abrupt interruption of the seismicity across an SW-NE oriented structural discontinuity corresponding to a contact zone between different rheology rock formations (carbonate platform and basin residuals). This `barrier' appears to be located in the area bounded by the fault segments activated during the first (0 s) and the second (18 s) rupture episodes of the 1980s Irpinia earthquake. We hypothesize that this geometrical barrier could have played a key role during the 1980 Irpinia event, and possibly

  8. Non-invasive 3D geometry extraction of a Sea lion foreflipper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Chen; Watson, Martha; Zhang, Pamela; Leftwich, Megan

    2015-11-01

    We are interested in underwater propulsion that leaves little traceable wake structure while producing high levels of thrust. A potential biological model is the California sea lion, a highly maneuverable aquatic mammal that produces thrust primarily with its foreflippers without a characteristic flapping frequency. The foreflippers are used for thrust, stability, and control during swimming motions. Recently, the flipper's kinematics during the thrust phase was extracted using 2D video tracking. This work extends the tracking ability to 3D using a non-invasive Direct Linear Transformation technique employed on non-research sea lions. marker-less flipper tracking is carried out manually for complete dorsal-ventral flipper motions. Two cameras are used (3840 × 2160 pixels resolution), calibrated in space using a calibration target inserted into the sea lion habitat, and synchronized in time using a simple light flash. The repeatability and objectivity of the tracked data is assessed by having two people tracking the same clap and comparing the results. The number of points required to track a flipper with sufficient detail is also discussed. Changes in the flipper pitch angle during the clap, an important feature for fluid dynamics modeling, will also be presented.

  9. Stress analysis of 3D complex geometries using the scaled boundary polyhedral finite elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talebi, Hossein; Saputra, Albert; Song, Chongmin

    2016-08-01

    While dominating the numerical stress analysis of solids, the finite element method requires a mesh to conform to the surface of the geometry. Thus the mesh generation of three dimensional complex structures often require tedious human interventions. In this paper, we present a formulation for arbitrary polyhedral elements based on the scaled boundary finite element method, which reduces the difficulties in automatic mesh generation. We also propose a simple method to generate polyhedral meshes with local refinements. The mesh generation method is based on combining an octree mesh with surfaces defined using signed distance functions. Through several numerical examples, we verify the results, study the convergence behaviour and depict the many advantages and capabilities of the presented method. This contribution is intended to assist us to eventually frame a set of numerical methods and associated tools for the full automation of the engineering analysis where minimal human interaction is needed.

  10. Stress analysis of 3D complex geometries using the scaled boundary polyhedral finite elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talebi, Hossein; Saputra, Albert; Song, Chongmin

    2016-10-01

    While dominating the numerical stress analysis of solids, the finite element method requires a mesh to conform to the surface of the geometry. Thus the mesh generation of three dimensional complex structures often require tedious human interventions. In this paper, we present a formulation for arbitrary polyhedral elements based on the scaled boundary finite element method, which reduces the difficulties in automatic mesh generation. We also propose a simple method to generate polyhedral meshes with local refinements. The mesh generation method is based on combining an octree mesh with surfaces defined using signed distance functions. Through several numerical examples, we verify the results, study the convergence behaviour and depict the many advantages and capabilities of the presented method. This contribution is intended to assist us to eventually frame a set of numerical methods and associated tools for the full automation of the engineering analysis where minimal human interaction is needed.

  11. Characterization of 3D filament dynamics in a MAST SOL flux tube geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walkden, N. R.; Dudson, B. D.; Fishpool, G.

    2013-10-01

    Non-linear simulations of filament propagation in a realistic MAST SOL flux tube geometry using the BOUT++ fluid modelling framework show an isolation of the dynamics of the filament in the divertor region from the midplane region due to three features of the magnetic geometry; the variation of magnetic curvature along the field line, the expansion of the flux tube and strong magnetic shear. Of the three effects, the latter two lead to a midplane ballooning feature of the filament, whilst the former leads to a ballooning around the X-points. In simulations containing all three effects the filament is observed to balloon at the midplane, suggesting that the role of curvature variation is sub-dominant to the flux expansion and magnetic shear. The magnitudes of these effects are all strongest near the X-point which leads to the formation of parallel density gradients. The filaments simulated, which represent filaments in MAST, are identified as resistive ballooning, meaning that their motion is inertially limited, not sheath limited. Parallel density gradients can drive the filament towards a Boltzmann response when the collisionalityof the plasma is low. The results here show that the formation of parallel density gradients is a natural and inevitable consequence of a realistic magnetic geometry and therefore the transition to the Boltzmann response is a consequence of the use of realistic magnetic geometry and does not require initializing specifically varying background profiles as in slab simulations. The filaments studied here are stable to the linear resistive drift-wave instability but are subject to the non-linear effects associated with the Boltzmann response, particularly Boltzmann spinning. The Boltzmann response causes the filament to spin on an axis. In later stages of its evolution a non-linear turbulent state develops where the vorticity evolves into a turbulent eddy field on the same length scale as the parallel current. The transition from interchange

  12. Relation Between the 3D-Geometry of the Coronal Wave and Associated CME During the 26 April 2008 Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temmer, M.; Veronig, A. M.; Gopalswamy, N.; Yashiro, S.

    2011-01-01

    We study the kinematical characteristics and 3D geometry of a large-scale coronal wave that occurred in association with the 26 April 2008 flare-CME event. The wave was observed with the EUVI instruments aboard both STEREO spacecraft (STEREO-A and STEREO-B) with a mean speed of approx 240 km/s. The wave is more pronounced in the eastern propagation direction, and is thus, better observable in STEREO-B images. From STEREO-B observations we derive two separate initiation centers for the wave, and their locations fit with the coronal dimming regions. Assuming a simple geometry of the wave we reconstruct its 3D nature from combined STEREO-A and STEREO-B observations. We find that the wave structure is asymmetric with an inclination toward East. The associated CME has a deprojected speed of approx 750 +/- 50 km/s, and it shows a non-radial outward motion toward the East with respect to the underlying source region location. Applying the forward fitting model developed by Thernisien, Howard, and Vourlidas we derive the CME flux rope position on the solar surface to be close to the dimming regions. We conclude that the expanding flanks of the CME most likely drive and shape the coronal wave.

  13. Predictive Modeling of the Evolution of Fault Structure: 3-D Modeling and Coupled Geomechanical/Flow Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, D. A.; Crook, A. J. L.

    2014-09-01

    Reconstruction of geological structures has the potential to provide additional insight into the effect of the depositional history on the current-day geomechanical and hydro-geologic state. Accurate modeling of the reconstruction process is, however, complex, necessitating advanced procedures for the prediction of fault formation and evolution within fully coupled geomechanical, fluid flow and temperature fields. In this paper, a 3-D computational approach is presented that is able to forward model complex structural evolution with multiple intersecting faults that exhibit large relative movement within a coupled geomechanical/flow environment. The approach adopts the Lagrangian method, complemented by robust and efficient automated adaptive meshing techniques, an elasto-plastic constitutive model based on critical state concepts, and global energy dissipation regularized by inclusion of fracture energy in the equations governing state variable evolution. The proposed model is validated by comparison of 2-D plane strain and 3-D thin-slice predictions of a bench-scale experiment, and then applied to two conceptual coupled geomechanical/fluid flow field-scale benchmarks.

  14. 3D architecture and structural characterization of the Lima Valley low-angle fault system (Northern Apennines, Italy).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemenzi, L.; Molli, G.; Botti, F.; Ungari, A.; Storti, F.

    2012-04-01

    The nappe pile of the northern Apennines is characterized, from bottom to top, by metamorphic units (Apuane and Massa), overlain by the anchimetamorphic cover unit (Tuscan Nappe), in turn overlain by remnants of former intraoceanic accretionary wedge (Subligurian and Ligurian units) and by the Epiligurian wedge-top sediments. The upper part of the structural edifice, in several areas, is dismembered and thinned by low-angle extensional fault systems, such as those described in southern Tuscany (Carmignani et al., 1994) and in southernmost Liguria (e.g. Tellaro detachment, Storti, 1995). Here we present another example of such low-angle fault systems, exposed in the Lima valley (northern Tuscany). It consists of a well developed bedding-parallel fault system which appears to be, in turn, affected by superimposed folds and late-stage normal faults (Botti et al., 2010). The original geometry of the low-angle fault system has been reconstructed and superimposed deformations have been restored. The fault system is composed by two first order segments, both of them showing bedding-parallel attitude and top-to-NE kinematics. The uppermost segment causes the tectonic repetition of the pelagic sediments of Scaglia fm. (Upper Cretaceous - Oligocene) and the sandstone of Macigno fm. (Oligocene - Miocene); the lowermost one causes the direct contact of the Macigno fm. on the pelagic carbonate of the Maiolica fm. (Upper Jurassic - Lower Cretaceous), via the elision of the Scaglia fm.. In the central part of the study area, other formations are elided by the lowermost fault segment, giving the direct contact of the Macigno fm. with the Calcare selcifero di Limano fm. (Lower Jurassic). The damage zone of the two main tectonic contacts has been studied in detail to investigate the role of the different lithologies involved. In the Macigno sandstone, a foliated cataclasite developed in the proximity of the fault core, intercalated with smaller lithons of less deformed rock

  15. On the application of focused ion beam nanotomography in characterizing the 3D pore space geometry of Opalinus clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Lukas M.; Holzer, Lorenz; Wepf, Roger; Gasser, Philippe; Münch, Beat; Marschall, Paul

    The evaluation and optimization of radioactive disposal systems requires a comprehensive understanding of mass transport processes. Among others, mass transport in porous geomaterials depends crucially on the topology and geometry of the pore space. Thus, understanding the mechanism of mass transport processes ultimately requires a 3D characterization of the pore structure. Here, we demonstrate the potential of focused ion beam nanotomography (FIB-nT) in characterizing the 3D geometry of pore space in clay rocks, i.e. Opalinus clay. In order to preserve the microstructure and to reduce sample preparation artefacts we used high pressure freezing and subsequent freeze drying to prepare the samples. Resolution limitations placed the lower limit in pore radii that can be analyzed by FIB-nT to about 10-15 nm. Image analysis and the calculation of pore size distribution revealed that pores with radii larger than 15 nm are related to a porosity of about 3 vol.%. To validate the method, we compared the pores size distribution obtained by FIB-nT with the one obtained by N 2 adsorption analysis. The latter yielded a porosity of about 13 vol.%. This means that FIB-nT can describe around 20-30% of the total pore space. For pore radii larger than 15 nm the pore size distribution obtained by FIB-nT and N 2 adsorption analysis were in good agreement. This suggests that FIB-nT can provide representative data on the spatial distribution of pores for pore sizes in the range of about 10-100 nm. Based on the spatial analysis of 3D data we extracted information on the spatial distribution of pore space geometrical properties.

  16. A Coupled Neutron-Photon 3-D Combinatorial Geometry Monte Carlo Transport Code

    1998-06-12

    TART97 is a coupled neutron-photon, 3 dimensional, combinatorial geometry, time dependent Monte Carlo transport code. This code can run on any modern computer. It is a complete system to assist you with input preparation, running Monte Carlo calculations, and analysis of output results. TART97 is also incredibly fast: if you have used similar codes, you will be amazed at how fast this code is compared to other similar codes. Use of the entire system canmore » save you a great deal of time and energy. TART 97 is distributed on CD. This CD contains on-line documentation for all codes included in the system, the codes configured to run on a variety of computers, and many example problems that you can use to familiarize yourself with the system. TART97 completely supersedes all older versions of TART, and it is strongly recommended that users only use the most recent version of TART97 and ist data files.« less

  17. Validation and Analysis of Forward Osmosis CFD Model in Complex 3D Geometries

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Mathias F.; Johnson, Carl J.; Tang, Chuyang; Jensen, Mogens H.; Yde, Lars; Hélix-Nielsen, Claus

    2012-01-01

    In forward osmosis (FO), an osmotic pressure gradient generated across a semi-permeable membrane is used to generate water transport from a dilute feed solution into a concentrated draw solution. This principle has shown great promise in the areas of water purification, wastewater treatment, seawater desalination and power generation. To ease optimization and increase understanding of membrane systems, it is desirable to have a comprehensive model that allows for easy investigation of all the major parameters in the separation process. Here we present experimental validation of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model developed to simulate FO experiments with asymmetric membranes. Simulations are compared with experimental results obtained from using two distinctly different complex three-dimensional membrane chambers. It is found that the CFD model accurately describes the solute separation process and water permeation through membranes under various flow conditions. It is furthermore demonstrated how the CFD model can be used to optimize membrane geometry in such as way as to promote the mass transfer. PMID:24958428

  18. Validation and Analysis of Forward Osmosis CFD Model in Complex 3D Geometries.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Mathias F; Johnson, Carl J; Tang, Chuyang; Jensen, Mogens H; Yde, Lars; Hélix-Nielsen, Claus

    2012-01-01

    In forward osmosis (FO), an osmotic pressure gradient generated across a semi-permeable membrane is used to generate water transport from a dilute feed solution into a concentrated draw solution. This principle has shown great promise in the areas of water purification, wastewater treatment, seawater desalination and power generation. To ease optimization and increase understanding of membrane systems, it is desirable to have a comprehensive model that allows for easy investigation of all the major parameters in the separation process. Here we present experimental validation of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model developed to simulate FO experiments with asymmetric membranes. Simulations are compared with experimental results obtained from using two distinctly different complex three-dimensional membrane chambers. It is found that the CFD model accurately describes the solute separation process and water permeation through membranes under various flow conditions. It is furthermore demonstrated how the CFD model can be used to optimize membrane geometry in such as way as to promote the mass transfer. PMID:24958428

  19. Algorithm of geometry correction for airborne 3D scanning laser radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuan; Chen, Siying; Zhang, Yinchao; Ni, Guoqiang

    2009-11-01

    Airborne three-dimensional scanning laser radar is used for wholesale scanning exploration to the target realm, then three-dimensional model can be established and target features can be identified with the characteristics of echo signals. So it is used widely and have bright prospect in the modern military, scientific research, agriculture and industry. At present, most researchers are focus on higher precision, more reliability scanning system. As the scanning platform is fixed on the aircraft, the plane cannot keep horizontal for a long time, also impossibly for a long time fly in the route without deviation. Data acquisition and the subsequence calibration rely on different equipments. These equipments bring errors both in time and space. Accurate geometry correction can amend the errors created by the process of assembly. But for the errors caused by the plane during the flight, whole imaging process should be analyzed. Take the side-roll as an example; scanning direction is inclined, so that the scanning point deviates from the original place. New direction and coordinate is the aim to us. In this paper, errors caused by the side-roll, pitch, yaw and assembly are analyzed and the algorithm routine is designed.

  20. Validation and Analysis of Forward Osmosis CFD Model in Complex 3D Geometries.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Mathias F; Johnson, Carl J; Tang, Chuyang; Jensen, Mogens H; Yde, Lars; Hélix-Nielsen, Claus

    2012-01-01

    In forward osmosis (FO), an osmotic pressure gradient generated across a semi-permeable membrane is used to generate water transport from a dilute feed solution into a concentrated draw solution. This principle has shown great promise in the areas of water purification, wastewater treatment, seawater desalination and power generation. To ease optimization and increase understanding of membrane systems, it is desirable to have a comprehensive model that allows for easy investigation of all the major parameters in the separation process. Here we present experimental validation of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model developed to simulate FO experiments with asymmetric membranes. Simulations are compared with experimental results obtained from using two distinctly different complex three-dimensional membrane chambers. It is found that the CFD model accurately describes the solute separation process and water permeation through membranes under various flow conditions. It is furthermore demonstrated how the CFD model can be used to optimize membrane geometry in such as way as to promote the mass transfer.

  1. Stratigraphic architecture and fault offsets of alluvial terraces at Te Marua, Wellington fault, New Zealand, revealed by pseudo-3D GPR investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beauprêtre, S.; Manighetti, I.; Garambois, S.; Malavieille, J.; Dominguez, S.

    2013-08-01

    earthquake slips on faults are commonly determined by measuring morphological offsets at current ground surface. Because those offsets might not always be well preserved, we examine whether the first 10 m below ground surface contains relevant information to complement them. We focus on the Te Marua site, New Zealand, where 11 alluvial terraces have been dextrally offset by the Wellington fault. We investigated the site using pseudo-3D Ground Penetrating Radar and also produced a high-resolution digital elevation model (DEM) of the zone to constrain the surface slip record. The GPR data reveal additional information: (1) they image the 3D stratigraphic architecture of the seven youngest terraces and show that they are strath terraces carved into graywacke bedrock. Each strath surface is overlain by 3-5 m of horizontally bedded gravel sheets, including two pronounced and traceable reflectors; (2) thanks to the multilayer architecture, terrace risers and channels are imaged at three depths and their lateral offsets can be measured three to four times, constraining respective offsets and their uncertainties more reliably; and (3) the offsets are better preserved in the subsurface than at the ground surface, likely due to subsequent erosion-deposition on the latter. From surface and subsurface data, we infer that Te Marua has recorded six cumulative offsets of 2.9, 7.6, 18, 23.2, 26, and 31 m (± 1-2 m). Large earthquakes on southern Wellington fault might produce 3-5 m of slip, slightly less than previously proposed. Pseudo-3D GPR thus provides a novel paleoseismological tool to complement and refine surface investigations.

  2. 3D Faulting Numerical Model Related To 2009 L'Aquila Earthquake Based On DInSAR Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castaldo, Raffaele; Tizzani, Pietro; Solaro, Giuseppe; Pepe, Susi; Lanari, Riccardo

    2014-05-01

    We investigate the surface displacements in the area affected by the April 6, 2009 L'Aquila earthquake (Central Italy) through an advanced 3D numerical modeling approach, by exploiting DInSAR deformation velocity maps based on ENVISAT (Ascending and Descending orbits) and COSMO-SkyMed data (Ascending orbit). We benefited from the available geological and geophysical information to investigate the impact of known buried structures on the modulation of the observed ground deformation field; in this context we implemented the a priori information in a Finite Element (FE) Environment considering a structural mechanical physical approach. The performed analysis demonstrate that the displacement pattern associated with the Mw 6.3 main-shock event is consistent with the activation of several fault segments of the Paganica fault. In particular, we analyzed the seismic events in a structural mechanical context under the plane stress mode approximation to solve for the retrieved displacements. We defined the sub-domain setting of the 3D FEM model using the information derived from the CROOP M-15 seismic line. We assumed stationarity and linear elasticity of the involved materials by considering a solution of classical equilibrium mechanical equations. We evolved our model through two stages: the model compacted under the weight of the rock successions (gravity loading) until it reached a stable equilibrium. At the second stage (co-seismic), where the stresses were released through a slip along the faults, by using an optimization procedure we retrieved: (i) the active seismogenic structures responsible for the observed ground deformation, (ii) the effects of the different mechanical constraints on the ground deformation pattern and (iii) the spatial distribution of the retrieved stress field. We evaluated the boundary setting best fit configuration responsible for the observed ground deformation. To this aim, we first generated several forward structural mechanical models

  3. Subsurface geometry and evolution of the Seattle fault zone and the Seattle Basin, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ten Brink, U.S.; Molzer, P.C.; Fisher, M.A.; Blakely, R.J.; Bucknam, R.C.; Parsons, T.; Crosson, R.S.; Creager, K.C.

    2002-01-01

    The Seattle fault, a large, seismically active, east-west-striking fault zone under Seattle, is the best-studied fault within the tectonically active Puget Lowland in western Washington, yet its subsurface geometry and evolution are not well constrained. We combine several analysis and modeling approaches to study the fault geometry and evolution, including depth-converted, deep-seismic-reflection images, P-wave-velocity field, gravity data, elastic modeling of shoreline uplift from a late Holocene earthquake, and kinematic fault restoration. We propose that the Seattle thrust or reverse fault is accompanied by a shallow, antithetic reverse fault that emerges south of the main fault. The wedge enclosed by the two faults is subject to an enhanced uplift, as indicated by the boxcar shape of the shoreline uplift from the last major earthquake on the fault zone. The Seattle Basin is interpreted as a flexural basin at the footwall of the Seattle fault zone. Basin stratigraphy and the regional tectonic history lead us to suggest that the Seattle fault zone initiated as a reverse fault during the middle Miocene, concurrently with changes in the regional stress field, to absorb some of the north-south shortening of the Cascadia forearc. Kingston Arch, 30 km north of the Seattle fault zone, is interpreted as a more recent disruption arising within the basin, probably due to the development of a blind reverse fault.

  4. 3D inclusion trail geometry determination within individual porphyroblasts using reflected light optical microscopy of oriented blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munro, Mark; Bowden, Douglas; Ord, Alison; Hobbs, Bruce

    2015-04-01

    It is vital to interpret porphyroblast microstructures accurately relative to both one another and to external matrix structures when using them to reconstruct the tectono-metamorphic evolution of orogenic terranes. Mis-interpretation may have profound implications for either the deformation component or the inferred metamorphic reactions resulting in erroneous Pressure-Temperature-time-Deformation (P-T-t-D) trajectories. A number of well-established approaches have been devised for measuring porphyroblast inclusion trails including pitch and strike measurement, 'FitPitch' best-fit plane assignment, and the radial asymmetry method. A long-standing limitation of these methods is that they generally permit only a single measurement to be extracted from each individual porphyroblast, and therefore provide mean 3D orientation data for an entire population. Alternatively, High-Resolution X-ray Computed Tomography (HRXCT) facilitates the imaging of 3D internal geometries within individuals. However, at present significant operating costs render it unviable for routine application to large numbers of samples required for extracting meaningful tectonic interpretations. Here, a new method is presented for the determination of 3D geometries within porphyroblasts using reflected light examination of polished schist material. Reflected light microscopy yields good quality representation of inclusion trails preserved within porphyroblasts. Sectioning oriented samples into small, oriented blocks allows multiple intersections through porphyroblasts (generally >5mm) to be measured via mechanical stage and amalgamated to reconstruct the plane in 3D. The method represents an accessible alternative to HRXCT, which is applicable to any porphyroblastic phase of adequate size to permit at least two intersections. The technique is demonstrated on garnets from the Mesoproterozoic Mount Barren Group, southern Albany-Fraser orogen of S. W. Australia. Porphyroblasts within a structural

  5. The Role of Faulting on the Growth of a Carbonate Platform: Evidence from 3D Seismic Analysis and Section Restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nur Fathiyah Jamaludin, Siti; Pubellier, Manuel; Prasad Ghosh, Deva; Menier, David; Pierson, Bernard

    2014-05-01

    Tectonics in addition to other environmental factors impacts the growth of carbonate platforms and plays an important role in shaping the internal architecture of the platforms. Detailed of faults and fractures development and healing in carbonate environment have not been explored sufficiently. Using 3D seismic and well data, we attempt to reconstruct the structural evolution of a Miocene carbonate platform in Central Luconia Province, offshore Malaysia. Luconia Province is located in the NW coast of Borneo and has become one of the largest carbonate factories in SE Asia. Seismic interpretations including seismic attribute analysis are applied to the carbonate platform to discern its sedimentology and structural details. Detailed seismic interpretations highlight the relationships of carbonate deposition with syn-depositional faulting. Branching conjugate faults are common in this carbonate platform and have become a template for reef growth, attesting lateral facies changes within the carbonate environments. Structural restoration was then appropriately performed on the interpreted seismic sections based on sequential restoration techniques, and provided images different from those of horizon flattening methods. This permits us to compensate faults' displacement, remove recent sediment layers and finally restore the older rock units prior to the fault motions. It allows prediction of platform evolution as a response to faulting before and after carbonate deposition and also enhances the pitfalls of interpretation. Once updated, the reconstructions allow unravelling of the un-seen geological features underneath the carbonate platform, such as paleo-structures and paleo-topography which in turn reflects the paleo-environment before deformations took place. Interestingly, sections balancing and restoration revealed the late-phase (Late Oligocene-Early Miocene) rifting of South China Sea, otherwise difficult to visualize on seismic sections. Later it is shown that

  6. DIF3D nodal neutronics option for two- and three-dimensional diffusion theory calculations in hexagonal geometry. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, R.D.

    1983-03-01

    A nodal method is developed for the solution of the neutron-diffusion equation in two- and three-dimensional hexagonal geometries. The nodal scheme has been incorporated as an option in the finite-difference diffusion-theory code DIF3D, and is intended for use in the analysis of current LMFBR designs. The nodal equations are derived using higher-order polynomial approximations to the spatial dependence of the flux within the hexagonal-z node. The final equations, which are cast in the form of inhomogeneous response-matrix equations for each energy group, involved spatial moments of the node-interior flux distribution plus surface-averaged partial currents across the faces of the node. These equations are solved using a conventional fission-source iteration accelerated by coarse-mesh rebalance and asymptotic source extrapolation. This report describes the mathematical development and numerical solution of the nodal equations, as well as the use of the nodal option and details concerning its programming structure. This latter information is intended to supplement the information provided in the separate documentation of the DIF3D code.

  7. QUANTIFYING UNCERTAINTIES IN GROUND MOTION SIMULATIONS FOR SCENARIO EARTHQUAKES ON THE HAYWARD-RODGERS CREEK FAULT SYSTEM USING THE USGS 3D VELOCITY MODEL AND REALISTIC PSEUDODYNAMIC RUPTURE MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, A; Xie, X

    2008-01-09

    This project seeks to compute ground motions for large (M>6.5) scenario earthquakes on the Hayward Fault using realistic pseudodynamic ruptures, the USGS three-dimensional (3D) velocity model and anelastic finite difference simulations on parallel computers. We will attempt to bound ground motions by performing simulations with suites of stochastic rupture models for a given scenario on a given fault segment. The outcome of this effort will provide the average, spread and range of ground motions that can be expected from likely large earthquake scenarios. The resulting ground motions will be based on first-principles calculations and include the effects of slip heterogeneity, fault geometry and directivity, however, they will be band-limited to relatively low-frequency (< 1 Hz).

  8. The formation of the Tyrrhenian Basin by 3-D interaction among faulting and magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranero, C. R.; Sallares, V.; Grevemeyer, I.; Zitellini, N.; Vendrell, M. G.; Prada, M.; Moeller, S.; de Franco, R.

    2012-12-01

    The Tyrrhenian basin has been formed by extension of overriding continental lithosphere driven by roll back of the Ionian slab across the mantle. The basin is not actively extending but the tectonic structure provides information of the processes that controlled rifting and formation of conjugate margins. The basin opened from west to east, with rifting stopping after progressively larger stretching factors from north to south. The northern region stopped opening at extension factors about 1.8. Towards the south extension continued until full crustal separation that produced first intense magmatism that subsequently was followed by mantle exhumation. The final structure displays two conjugate margins with structures that evolved from symmetric to asymmetric as extension rates increase and a complex tectonic structure in between. The basin provides a natural laboratory to investigate a full rift system with variable amounts of extension. We present observations from a two-ship wide-angle (WAS) and multichannel reflection seismic (MCS) experiment that took place in spring 2010. The experiment took place on two legs: The first leg with Spanish R/V Sarmiento de Gamboa and Italian R/V Urania collected five WAS profiles striking E-W across the entire basin recorded on ocean bottom seismic stations and land stations with a 4800 c.i. G-II gun array as source. The second leg with R/V Sarmiento de Gamboa collected 16 MCS profiles (about 1500 km) using a 3.75 km-long streamer and a 3100 c.i. G-II gun array as source. MCS profiles were shot coincident with WAS profiles. WAS - MCS transects were located in regions with different amount of extension the study the full structure including the two conjugate margins. Additional MCS lines were shot concentrated in the region where mantle exhumation has taken place. The seismic information is placed in a 3D context with the integration of the multibeam bathymetry that covers the entire basin. We present the interpretation of the

  9. Geometry and kinematics of adhesive wear in brittle strike-slip fault zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, Mark T.

    2005-05-01

    Detailed outcrop surface mapping in Late Paleozoic cataclastic strike-slip faults of coastal Maine shows that asymmetric sidewall ripouts, 0.1-200 m in length, are a significant component of many mapped faults and an important wall rock deformation mechanism during faulting. The geometry of these structures ranges from simple lenses to elongate slabs cut out of the sidewalls of strike-slip faults by a lateral jump of the active zone of slip during adhesion along a section of the main fault. The new irregular trace of the active fault after this jump creates an indenting asperity that is forced to plow through the adjoining wall rock during continued adhesion or be cut off by renewed motion along the main section of the fault. Ripout translation during adhesion sets up the structural asymmetry with trailing extensional and leading contractional ends to the ripout block. The inactive section of the main fault trace at the trailing end can develop a 'sag' or 'half-graben' type geometry due to block movement along the scallop-shaped connecting ramp to the flanking ripout fault. Leading contractional ramps can develop 'thrust' type imbrication and forces the 'humpback' geometry to the ripout slab due to distortion of the inactive main fault surface by ripout translation. Similar asymmetric ripout geometries are recognized in many other major crustal scale strike-slip fault zones worldwide. Ripout structures in the 5-500 km length range can be found on the Atacama fault system of northern Chile, the Qujiang and Xiaojiang fault zones in western China, the Yalakom-Hozameen fault zone in British Columbia and the San Andreas fault system in southern California. For active crustal-scale faults the surface expression of ripout translation includes a coupled system of extensional trailing ramps as normal oblique-slip faults with pull-apart basin sedimentation and contractional leading ramps as oblique thrust or high angle reverse faults with associated uplift and erosion. The

  10. 3-D palinspastic restoration of normal faults in the Inner Moray Firth: implications for extensional basin development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, David

    1985-10-01

    Balanced cross-section techniques, and the construction of a restored section, permit 2-dimensional palinspastic restorations to be made in both compressional and extensional terraines. In 3 dimensions, an equivalent restoration can be made by assuming conservation of bedding-plane area and considering the volume of a stratigraphic interval rather than its cross-sectional area. Extensional basins displaying upper crustal listric normal faulting are particularly amenable to this approach. Computerised 3-D restorations have been made of the Inner Moray Firth basin, offshore Scotland. This basin is not isostatically compensated, and was produced by 7-8% post-Triassic extension, of which 2.5-3% is post-Jurassic, above a detachment surface at 20-25 km depth, close to the base of the crust. Limited lower crustal thinning (and lithospheric stretching) has affected the eastern part of the basin, but this can account for no more than half of the measured upper crustal extension. Some of this shallow extension is probably coupled by low-angle faults or shear zones into major zones of lithospheric stretching such as the North Sea grabens, where it may help account for discrepancies between estimates of lithospheric thinning and upper crustal extension.

  11. Density structure and geometry of the Costa Rican subduction zone from 3-D gravity modeling and local earthquake data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lücke, O. H.; Arroyo, I. G.

    2015-10-01

    The eastern part of the oceanic Cocos Plate presents a heterogeneous crustal structure due to diverse origins and ages as well as plate-hot spot interactions which originated the Cocos Ridge, a structure that converges with the Caribbean Plate in southeastern Costa Rica. The complex structure of the oceanic plate directly influences the dynamics and geometry of the subduction zone along the Middle American Trench. In this paper an integrated interpretation of the slab geometry in Costa Rica is presented based on 3-D density modeling of combined satellite and surface gravity data, constrained by available geophysical and geological data and seismological information obtained from local networks. The results show the continuation of steep subduction geometry from the Nicaraguan margin into northwestern Costa Rica, followed by a moderate dipping slab under the Central Cordillera toward the end of the Central American Volcanic Arc. Contrary to commonly assumed, to the southeast end of the volcanic arc, our preferred model shows a steep, coherent slab that extends up to the landward projection of the Panama Fracture Zone. Overall, a gradual change in the depth of the intraplate seismicity is observed, reaching 220 km in the northwestern part, and becoming progressively shallower toward the southeast, where it reaches a maximum depth of 75 km. The changes in the terminal depth of the observed seismicity correlate with the increased density in the modeled slab. The absence of intermediate depth (> 75 km) intraplate seismicity in the southeastern section and the higher densities for the subducted slab in this area, support a model in which dehydration reactions in the subducted slab cease at a shallower depth, originating an anhydrous and thus aseismic slab.

  12. 3D geometrical inspection of complex geometry parts using a novel laser triangulation sensor and a robot.

    PubMed

    Brosed, Francisco Javier; Aguilar, Juan José; Guillomía, David; Santolaria, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses different non contact 3D measuring strategies and presents a model for measuring complex geometry parts, manipulated through a robot arm, using a novel vision system consisting of a laser triangulation sensor and a motorized linear stage. First, the geometric model incorporating an automatic simple module for long term stability improvement will be outlined in the article. The new method used in the automatic module allows the sensor set up, including the motorized linear stage, for the scanning avoiding external measurement devices. In the measurement model the robot is just a positioning of parts with high repeatability. Its position and orientation data are not used for the measurement and therefore it is not directly "coupled" as an active component in the model. The function of the robot is to present the various surfaces of the workpiece along the measurement range of the vision system, which is responsible for the measurement. Thus, the whole system is not affected by the robot own errors following a trajectory, except those due to the lack of static repeatability. For the indirect link between the vision system and the robot, the original model developed needs only one first piece measuring as a "zero" or master piece, known by its accurate measurement using, for example, a Coordinate Measurement Machine. The strategy proposed presents a different approach to traditional laser triangulation systems on board the robot in order to improve the measurement accuracy, and several important cues for self-recalibration are explored using only a master piece. Experimental results are also presented to demonstrate the technique and the final 3D measurement accuracy. PMID:22346569

  13. 3D Geometrical Inspection of Complex Geometry Parts Using a Novel Laser Triangulation Sensor and a Robot

    PubMed Central

    Brosed, Francisco Javier; Aguilar, Juan José; Guillomía, David; Santolaria, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses different non contact 3D measuring strategies and presents a model for measuring complex geometry parts, manipulated through a robot arm, using a novel vision system consisting of a laser triangulation sensor and a motorized linear stage. First, the geometric model incorporating an automatic simple module for long term stability improvement will be outlined in the article. The new method used in the automatic module allows the sensor set up, including the motorized linear stage, for the scanning avoiding external measurement devices. In the measurement model the robot is just a positioning of parts with high repeatability. Its position and orientation data are not used for the measurement and therefore it is not directly “coupled” as an active component in the model. The function of the robot is to present the various surfaces of the workpiece along the measurement range of the vision system, which is responsible for the measurement. Thus, the whole system is not affected by the robot own errors following a trajectory, except those due to the lack of static repeatability. For the indirect link between the vision system and the robot, the original model developed needs only one first piece measuring as a “zero” or master piece, known by its accurate measurement using, for example, a Coordinate Measurement Machine. The strategy proposed presents a different approach to traditional laser triangulation systems on board the robot in order to improve the measurement accuracy, and several important cues for self-recalibration are explored using only a master piece. Experimental results are also presented to demonstrate the technique and the final 3D measurement accuracy. PMID:22346569

  14. 3D geometrical inspection of complex geometry parts using a novel laser triangulation sensor and a robot.

    PubMed

    Brosed, Francisco Javier; Aguilar, Juan José; Guillomía, David; Santolaria, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses different non contact 3D measuring strategies and presents a model for measuring complex geometry parts, manipulated through a robot arm, using a novel vision system consisting of a laser triangulation sensor and a motorized linear stage. First, the geometric model incorporating an automatic simple module for long term stability improvement will be outlined in the article. The new method used in the automatic module allows the sensor set up, including the motorized linear stage, for the scanning avoiding external measurement devices. In the measurement model the robot is just a positioning of parts with high repeatability. Its position and orientation data are not used for the measurement and therefore it is not directly "coupled" as an active component in the model. The function of the robot is to present the various surfaces of the workpiece along the measurement range of the vision system, which is responsible for the measurement. Thus, the whole system is not affected by the robot own errors following a trajectory, except those due to the lack of static repeatability. For the indirect link between the vision system and the robot, the original model developed needs only one first piece measuring as a "zero" or master piece, known by its accurate measurement using, for example, a Coordinate Measurement Machine. The strategy proposed presents a different approach to traditional laser triangulation systems on board the robot in order to improve the measurement accuracy, and several important cues for self-recalibration are explored using only a master piece. Experimental results are also presented to demonstrate the technique and the final 3D measurement accuracy.

  15. 3D seismic detection of shallow faults and fluid migration pathways offshore Southern Costa Rica: Application of neural-network meta-attributes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluesner, J. W.; Silver, E. A.; Nale, S. M.; Bangs, N. L.; McIntosh, K. D.

    2013-12-01

    We employ a seismic meta-attribute workflow to detect and analyze probable faults and fluid-pathways in 3D within the sedimentary section offshore Southern Costa Rica. During the CRISP seismic survey in 2011 we collected an 11 x 55 km grid of 3D seismic reflection data and high-resolvability EM122 multibeam data, with coverage extending from the incoming plate to the outer-shelf. We mapped numerous seafloor seep indicators, with distributions ranging from the lower-slope to ~15 km landward of the shelf break [Kluesner et al., 2013, G3, doi:10.1002/ggge.20058; Silver et al., this meeting]. We used the OpendTect software package to calculate meta-attribute volumes from the 3D seismic data in order to detect and visualize seismic discontinuities in 3D. This methodology consists of dip-steered filtering to pre-condition the data, followed by combining a set of advanced dip-steered seismic attributes into a single object probability attribute using a user-trained neural-network pattern-recognition algorithm. The parameters of the advanced seismic attributes are set for optimal detection of the desired geologic discontinuity (e.g. faults or fluid-pathways). The product is a measure of probability for the desired target that ranges between 0 and 1, with 1 representing the highest probability. Within the sedimentary section of the CRISP survey the results indicate focused fluid-migration pathways along dense networks of intersecting normal faults with approximately N-S and E-W trends. This pattern extends from the middle slope to the outer-shelf region. Dense clusters of fluid-migration pathways are located above basement highs and deeply rooted reverse faults [see Bangs et al., this meeting], including a dense zone of fluid-pathways imaged below IODP Site U1413. In addition, fault intersections frequently show an increased signal of fluid-migration and these zones may act as major conduits for fluid-flow through the sedimentary cover. Imaged fluid pathways root into high

  16. Uncertainty Analysis of the Three Pagodas Fault-Source Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haller, K. M.

    2015-12-01

    Probabilistic seismic-hazard assessment generally relies on an earthquake catalog (to estimate future seismicity from the locations and rates of past earthquakes) and faults sources (to estimate future seismicity from the known paleoseismic history of surface rupture). The paleoseismic history of potentially active faults in Southeast Asia is addressed at few locations and spans only a few complete recurrence intervals; many faults remain unstudied. Even where the timing of a surface-rupturing earthquakes is known, the extent of rupture may not be well constrained. Therefore, subjective judgment of experts is often used to define the three-dimensional size of future ruptures; limited paleoseismic data can lead to large uncertainties in ground-motion hazard from fault sources due to the preferred models that underlie these judgments. The 300-km-long, strike-slip Three Pagodas fault in western Thailand is possibly one of the most active faults in the country. The fault parallels the plate boundary and may be characterized by a slip rate high enough to result in measurable ground-motion at periods of interest for building design. The known paleoseismic history is limited and likely does not include the largest possible earthquake on the fault. This lack of knowledge begs the question what sizes of earthquakes are expected? Preferred rupture models constrain possible magnitude-frequency distributions, and alternative rupture models can result in different ground-motion hazard near the fault. This analysis includes alternative rupture models for the Three Pagodas fault, a first-level check against gross modeling assumptions to assure the source model is a reasonable reflection of observed data, and resulting ground-motion hazard for each alternative. Inadequate paleoseismic data is an important source of uncertainty that could be compensated for by considering alternative rupture models for poorly known seismic sources.

  17. The foundation of 3D geometry model in omni-directional laser warning system based on diffuse reflection detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weian; Wang, Long; Dong, Qixin

    2011-06-01

    The omni-directional laser warning equipment based on infrared fish-eye lens and short-wave infrared FPA has been used to protect large-scale targets, which can detect the threat laser scattered by the attacked targets or the objects surrounding them, and image the laser spot on FPA, then fix the position of spot. The application offsets the disadvantage of direct interception warner which need disposed largely. Before study of imaging mechanism about the scattered laser spot, the definition of geometry relationship is needed firstly. In this paper we developed a 3D geometry model by analyzing the position relationships in typical battlefield environment among the enemy's threat laser source, the laser spot radiated on one flat surface and our omni-directional laser warning fish-eye lens. The model including R, α, β, d, θ, φ, ψ, δ etc. 8 parameters and 4 coordinate systems was suitable for any general situations. After achievement of the model foundation, we obtained analytic expression of the laser spot contour on flat surface, then attained analytic expression of spot contour on image surface by calculating the object space half-field angle and the azimuth angle relative to fish-eye lens of an arbitrary point at the spot edge on flat surface. The attainment of the expression makes possible that we can analyze the spot energy distributions on image surface and the imaging characteristic of the scattered laser spot via fish-eye lens, then can compute the transmission direction of the threat laser. The foundation of the model in this paper has an importantly basic and guiding meaning to the latter research on this aspect.

  18. Modelling of 3D fields due to ferritic inserts and test blanket modules in toroidal geometry at ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yueqiang; Äkäslompolo, Simppa; Cavinato, Mario; Koechl, Florian; Kurki-Suonio, Taina; Li, Li; Parail, Vassili; Saibene, Gabriella; Särkimäki, Konsta; Sipilä, Seppo; Varje, Jari

    2016-06-01

    Computations in toroidal geometry are systematically performed for the plasma response to 3D magnetic perturbations produced by ferritic inserts (FIs) and test blanket modules (TBMs) for four ITER plasma scenarios: the 15 MA baseline, the 12.5 MA hybrid, the 9 MA steady state, and the 7.5 MA half-field helium plasma. Due to the broad toroidal spectrum of the FI and TBM fields, the plasma response for all the n  =  1-6 field components are computed and compared. The plasma response is found to be weak for the high-n (n  >  4) components. The response is not globally sensitive to the toroidal plasma flow speed, as long as the latter is not reduced by an order of magnitude. This is essentially due to the strong screening effect occurring at a finite flow, as predicted for ITER plasmas. The ITER error field correction coils (EFCC) are used to compensate the n  =  1 field errors produced by FIs and TBMs for the baseline scenario for the purpose of avoiding mode locking. It is found that the middle row of the EFCC, with a suitable toroidal phase for the coil current, can provide the best correction of these field errors, according to various optimisation criteria. On the other hand, even without correction, it is predicted that these n  =  1 field errors will not cause substantial flow damping for the 15 MA baseline scenario.

  19. The Development of WARP - A Framework for Continuous Energy Monte Carlo Neutron Transport in General 3D Geometries on GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, Ryan

    general 3D geometries on GPUs, but compared to production codes like Serpent and MCNP, WARP ha

  20. 3D geological modeling of the Kasserine Aquifer System, Central Tunisia: New insights into aquifer-geometry and interconnections for a better assessment of groundwater resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassen, Imen; Gibson, Helen; Hamzaoui-Azaza, Fadoua; Negro, François; Rachid, Khanfir; Bouhlila, Rachida

    2016-08-01

    The challenge of this study was to create a 3D geological and structural model of the Kasserine Aquifer System (KAS) in central Tunisia and its natural extension into north-east Algeria. This was achieved using an implicit 3D method, which honors prior geological data for both formation boundaries and faults. A current model is presented which provides defendable predictions for the spatial distribution of geology and water resources in aquifers throughout the model-domain. This work has allowed validation of regional scale geology and fault networks in the KAS, and has facilitated the first-ever estimations of groundwater resources in this region by a 3D method. The model enables a preliminary assessment of the hydraulic significance of the major faults by evaluating their influence and role on groundwater flow within and between four compartments of the multi-layered, KAS hydrogeological system. Thus a representative hydrogeological model of the study area is constructed. The possible dual nature of faults in the KAS is discussed in the context that some faults appear to be acting both as barriers to horizontal groundwater flow, and simultaneously as conduits for vertical flow. Also discussed is the possibility that two flow directions occur within the KAS, at a small syncline area of near Feriana. In summary, this work evaluates the influence of aquifer connectivity and the role of faults and geology in groundwater flow within the KAS aquifer system. The current KAS geological model can now be used to guide groundwater managers on the best placement for drilling to test and further refine the understanding of the groundwater system, including the faults connectivity. As more geological data become available, the current model can be easily edited and re-computed to provide an updated model ready for the next stage of investigation by numerical flow modeling.

  1. San Andreas fault geometry in the Parkfield, California, region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simpson, R.W.; Barall, M.; Langbein, J.; Murray, J.R.; Rymer, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    In map view, aftershocks of the 2004 Parkfield earthquake lie along a line that forms a straighter connection between San Andreas fault segments north and south of the Parkfield reach than does the mapped trace of the fault itself. A straightedge laid on a geologic map of Central California reveals a ???50-km-long asymmetric northeastward warp in the Parkfield reach of the fault. The warp tapers gradually as it joins the straight, creeping segment of the San Andreas to the north-west, but bends abruptly across Cholame Valley at its southeast end to join the straight, locked segment that last ruptured in 1857. We speculate that the San Andreas fault surface near Parkfield has been deflected in its upper ???6 km by nonelastic behavior of upper crustal rock units. These units and the fault surface itself are warped during periods between large 1857-type earthquakes by the presence of the 1857-locked segment to the south, which buttresses intermittent coseismic and continuous aseismic slip on the Parkfield reach. Because of nonelastic behavior, the warping is not completely undone when an 1857-type event occurs, and the upper portion of the three-dimensional fault surface is slowly ratcheted into an increasingly prominent bulge. Ultimately, the fault surface probably becomes too deformed for strike-slip motion, and a new, more vertical connection to the Earth's surface takes over, perhaps along the Southwest Fracture Zone. When this happens a wedge of material currently west of the main trace will be stranded on the east side of the new main trace.

  2. New High-Resolution 3D Imagery of Fault Deformation and Segmentation of the San Onofre and San Mateo Trends in the Inner California Borderlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, J. J.; Driscoll, N. W.; Kent, G. M.; Bormann, J. M.; Harding, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Inner California Borderlands (ICB) is situated off the coast of southern California and northern Baja. The structural and geomorphic characteristics of the area record a middle Oligocene transition from subduction to microplate capture along the California coast. Marine stratigraphic evidence shows large-scale extension and rotation overprinted by modern strike-slip deformation. Geodetic and geologic observations indicate that approximately 6-8 mm/yr of Pacific-North American relative plate motion is accommodated by offshore strike-slip faulting in the ICB. The farthest inshore fault system, the Newport-Inglewood Rose Canyon (NIRC) fault complex is a dextral strike-slip system that extends primarily offshore approximately 120 km from San Diego to the San Joaquin Hills near Newport Beach, California. Based on trenching and well data, the NIRC fault system Holocene slip rate is 1.5-2.0 mm/yr to the south and 0.5-1.0 mm/yr along its northern extent. An earthquake rupturing the entire length of the system could produce an Mw 7.0 earthquake or larger. West of the main segments of the NIRC fault complex are the San Mateo and San Onofre fault trends along the continental slope. Previous work concluded that these were part of a strike-slip system that eventually merged with the NIRC complex. Others have interpreted these trends as deformation associated with the Oceanside Blind Thrust fault purported to underlie most of the region. In late 2013, we acquired the first high-resolution 3D P-Cable seismic surveys (3.125 m bin resolution) of the San Mateo and San Onofre trends as part of the Southern California Regional Fault Mapping project aboard the R/V New Horizon. Analysis of these volumes provides important new insights and constraints on the fault segmentation and transfer of deformation. Based on the new 3D sparker seismic data, our preferred interpretation for the San Mateo and San Onofre fault trends is they are transpressional features associated with westward

  3. Detailed characterization of 2D and 3D scatter-to-primary ratios of various breast geometries using a dedicated CT mammotomography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Jainil; Pachon, Jan H.; Madhav, Priti; Tornai, Martin P.

    2011-03-01

    With a dedicated breast CT system using a quasi-monochromatic x-ray source and flat-panel digital detector, the 2D and 3D scatter to primary ratios (SPR) of various geometric phantoms having different densities were characterized in detail. Projections were acquired using geometric and anthropomorphic breast phantoms. Each phantom was filled with 700ml of 5 different water-methanol concentrations to simulate effective boundary densities of breast compositions from 100% glandular (1.0g/cm3) to 100% fat (0.79g/cm3). Projections were acquired with and without a beam stop array. For each projection, 2D scatter was determined by cubic spline interpolating the values behind the shadow of each beam stop through the object. Scatter-corrected projections were obtained by subtracting the scatter, and the 2D SPRs were obtained as a ratio of the scatter to scatter-corrected projections. Additionally the (un)corrected data were individually iteratively reconstructed. The (un)corrected 3D volumes were subsequently subtracted, and the 3D SPRs obtained from the ratio of the scatter volume-to-scatter-corrected (or primary) volume. Results show that the 2D SPR values peak in the center of the volumes, and were overall highest for the simulated 100% glandular composition. Consequently, scatter corrected reconstructions have visibly reduced cupping regardless of the phantom geometry, as well as more accurate linear attenuation coefficients. The corresponding 3D SPRs have increased central density, which reduces radially. Not surprisingly, for both 2D and 3D SPRs there was a dependency on both phantom geometry and object density on the measured SPR values, with geometry dominating for 3D SPRs. Overall, these results indicate the need for scatter correction given different geometries and breast densities that will be encountered with 3D cone beam breast CT.

  4. How Fault Geometry Affects Dynamic Rupture Models of Earthquakes in San Gorgonio Pass, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarnowski, J. M.; Oglesby, D. D.; Cooke, M. L.; Kyriakopoulos, C.

    2015-12-01

    We use 3D dynamic finite element models to investigate potential rupture paths of earthquakes propagating along faults in the western San Gorgonio Pass (SGP) region of California. The SGP is a structurally complex area along the southern California portion of the San Andreas fault system (SAF). It has long been suspected that this structural knot, which consists of the intersection of various non-planar strike-slip and thrust fault segments, may inhibit earthquake rupture propagation between the San Bernardino and Banning strands of the SAF. The above condition may limit the size of potential earthquakes in the region. Our focus is on the San Bernardino strand of the SAF and the San Gorgonio Pass Fault zone, where the fault connectivity is not well constrained. We use the finite element code FaultMod (Barall, 2009) to investigate how fault connectivity, nucleation location, and initial stresses influence rupture propagation and ground motion, including the likelihood of through-going rupture in this region. Preliminary models indicate that earthquakes that nucleate on the San Bernardino strand and propagate southward do not easily transfer rupture to the thrust faults of the San Gorgonio Pass fault zone. However, under certain assumptions, earthquakes that nucleate along the San Gorgonio Pass fault zone can transfer rupture to the San Bernardino strand.

  5. The impact of fault zones on the 3D coupled fluid and heat transport for the area of Brandenburg (NE German Basin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yvonne, Cherubini; Mauro, Cacace; Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena

    2013-04-01

    Faults can provide permeable pathways for fluids at a variety of scales, from great depth in the crust to flow through fractured aquifers, geothermal fields, and hydrocarbon reservoirs (Barton et al. 1995). In terms of geothermal energy exploration, it is essential to understand the role of faults and their impact on the thermal field and fluid system. 3D numerical simulations provide a useful tool for investigating the active physical processes in the subsurface. To assess the influence of major fault zones on the thermal field and fluid system, 3D coupled fluid and heat transport simulations are carried out. The study is based on a recently published structural model of the Brandenburg area, which is located in the south-eastern part of the Northeast German Basin (NEGB) (Noack et al. 2010). Two major fault zones of the Elbe Fault System (Gardelegen and Lausitz Escarpments) vertically offset the pre-Permian basement against the Permian to Cenozoic basin fill at the southern margin by several km (Scheck et al. 2002). Within the numerical models, these two major fault zones are represented as equivalent porous media and vertical discrete elements. The coupled system of equations describing fluid flow and heat transport in saturated porous media are numerically solved by the Finite Element software FEFLOW® (Diersch, 2002). Different possible geological scenarios are modelled and compared to a simulation in which no faults are considered. In one scenario the fault zones are set as impermeable. In this case, the thermal field is similar to the no fault model. Fluid flow is redirected because the fault zones act as hydraulic barriers that prevent a lateral fluid advection into the fault zones. By contrast, modelled permeable fault zones induce a pronounced thermal signature with distinctly cooler temperatures than in the no fault model. Fluid motion within the fault is initially triggered by advection due to hydraulic head gradients, but may be even enhanced by

  6. Results of 3-D georadar surveying and trenching: the San Andreas fault near its northern landward limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, A.; Gross, R.; Holliger, K.; Horstmeyer, H.; Baldwin, J.

    2003-04-01

    As part of a program to determine the location and geometry of the San Andreas Fault (SAF) buried beneath shallow sediments near its northern landward limit, three >20 m long parallel trenches were constructed at positions distributed over a distance of ˜55 m. The majority of excavated material comprised unconsolidated fluvial sediments deposited in a number of paleochannels. Single zones of active faulting identified in each of the trenches were initially interpreted in terms of a solitary strand of the SAF. To map the SAF between and beyond the trenches and to detect other active fault zones hidden by the young sedimentary cover, we collected a dense ground-penetrating radar (georadar) data set across a 23.2 x 72 m area. The data were recorded using a semi-automated acquisition system that included a conventional georadar unit coupled to a self-tracking laser theodolite with automatic target recognition capabilities. Since these data were plagued by system ringing as a result of the moderate- to high-electrical conductivities of the surficial sediments, an extensive data processing scheme was required to extract meaningful subsurface information. The final processed georadar volume (cuboid) contained numerous subhorizontal and trough-shaped reflections that originated from the fluvial paleochannels. Using the geological interpretation of the trench walls as a guide to pick semi-automatically the times of the most important reflecting horizons, we discovered that alignments of the nearly linear boundaries of these horizons defined two NW-SE trending strands of the SAF within the survey area. The georadar expression of the eastern SAF strand could only be traced over a distance of ˜38 m. It had been intersected in the northern trench. In contrast, the western SAF strand extended over the entire length of the georadar volume and had been intersected in the central and southern trenches. Prominent reflections on georadar cross-sections were found to be vertically

  7. Results of 3-D georadar surveying and trenching the San Andreas fault near its northern landward limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Alan; Gross, Ralf; Holliger, Klaus; Horstmeyer, Heinrich; Baldwin, John

    2003-06-01

    As part of a program to determine the location and geometry of the San Andreas Fault (SAF) buried beneath shallow sediments near its northern landward limit, three >20-m-long parallel trenches were constructed at positions distributed over a distance of ˜55 m. The majority of excavated material comprised unconsolidated fluvial sediments deposited in a number of paleochannels. Single zones of active faulting identified in each of the trenches were initially interpreted in terms of a solitary strand of the SAF. To map the SAF between and beyond the trenches and to detect other active fault zones hidden by the young sedimentary cover, we collected a dense ground-penetrating radar (georadar) data set across a 23.2×72 m area. The data were recorded using a semi-automated acquisition system that included a conventional georadar unit coupled to a self-tracking laser theodolite with automatic target recognition capabilities. Since these data were plagued by system ringing as a result of the moderate-to-high electrical conductivities of the surficial sediments, an extensive data processing scheme was required to extract meaningful subsurface information. The final processed georadar volume (cuboid) contained numerous subhorizontal and trough-shaped reflections that originated from the fluvial paleochannels. Using the geological interpretation of the trench walls as a guide to pick semi-automatically the times of the most important reflecting horizons, we discovered that alignments of the nearly linear boundaries of these horizons defined two NW-SE trending strands of the SAF within the survey area. The georadar expression of the eastern SAF strand could only be traced over a distance of ˜38 m. It had been intersected in the northern trench. In contrast, the western SAF strand extended over the entire length of the georadar volume and had been intersected in the central and southern trenches. Prominent reflections on georadar cross sections were found to be vertically

  8. Influence of cratonic lithosphere on slab geometry and mantle flow: insights from 3D time-dependent modelling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taramón, Jorge M.; Rodríguez-González, Juan; Negredo, Ana M.

    2014-05-01

    Recent studies show a clear correlation between the occurrence of flat subduction and the proximity of areas of high elastic/thermal thickness in the overriding plate. A plausible explanation is that cold overriding plates lead to colder mantle wedge, increasing the hydrodynamic suction and decreasing the slab dip. In particular, recent numerical modeling has shown that the presence of cratonic lithosphere in the overriding plate has a significant effect on subducting slabs. In this study we quantify the influence of cratonic areas in the overriding plate on subduction dynamics. We present 3D thermo-mechanical and time-dependent numerical models of buoyancy-driven subduction processes. A non-Newtonian pseudo-plastic rheology is assumed. Different simulations have been performed to quantify the effect of different factors, such as the craton width, thermal thickness and distante to the trench. Modelling results indicate that presence of cratonic lithosphere in the overriding plate produces strong along-trench variations of the slab geometry. These variations are maintained and propagated at great depths as the slab sinks deeper into the mantle. Significant trench-parallel flow in the mantle wedge is generated by time-dependent changes in slab dip. For cases of reduced slab pull, the slab and the base of the craton become coupled, which causes a dramatic reduction of subduction velocity and the formation of a slab gap. The presence of cratons may have an important role on subduction episodicity and provide a new mechanism to explain slab gaps in areas where cratons have been located close to trenches, as is the case of South America and the Cenozoic subduction of North America. We further emphasize that the lithospheric structure of the overriding plate should be taken into account in analysis and modelling studies of subduction zones.

  9. Seismic tomography of the Canterbury Plains and the geometry and evolution of seismicity of the Greendale fault system, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syracuse, E. M.; Thurber, C. H.; Savage, M. K.

    2012-12-01

    The previously unknown Greendale fault produced the September 4, 2010 M 7.1 Darfield earthquake and later triggered the destructive February 22, 2011 M 6.3 Christchurch earthquake, as well as later M>5 aftershocks east of Christchurch. Surface rupture from the Darfield earthquake indicates up to 5 m of strike-slip motion along the main portion of the Greendale fault, while various geodetic and seismic models also indicate reverse faulting on surrounding smaller faults. We combine seismic data from a variety of sources (permanent network seismometers and strong motion instruments, temporary intermediate to broadband seismometers) to understand the geometry of these various sections of faults and the evolution of seismicity along them for the first four months of aftershocks from the Darfield earthquake. We identify 4 to 5 fault segments that were likely active in the Darfield earthquake and an additional 5 to 6 segments that were active during the study period, prior to the Christchurch earthquake. While relocating hypocenters, we also jointly invert for 3D Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs in the Canterbury region using an extended version of the double-difference tomography code tomoDD (Zhang et al., 2009). In the area of the Greendale and associated faults, Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs are generally reduced from the top 8 km of the average velocity model for the Canterbury region of New Zealand. from the surface to ~8 km depth, below which the resolution begins to decline. Beneath Christchurch and areas immediately to the south and west, Vp and Vs are elevated and Vp/Vs is reduced from the surface to ~8 km depth, corresponding to the location of a negative Bouguer gravity anomaly and an increase in depth to basement (Hicks, 1989). In the northwest portion of the model, Vp and Vs increase when approaching the foothills of the Southern Alps. There are no clearly defined features in the velocity model that cross or are offset by the Greendale fault and no apparent contrast in velocities

  10. High precision analysis of an embryonic extensional fault-related fold using 3D orthorectified virtual outcrops: The viewpoint importance in structural geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavani, Stefano; Corradetti, Amerigo; Billi, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    Image-based 3D modeling has recently opened the way to the use of virtual outcrop models in geology. An intriguing application of this method involves the production of orthorectified images of outcrops using almost any user-defined point of view, so that photorealistic cross-sections suitable for numerous geological purposes and measurements can be easily generated. These purposes include the accurate quantitative analysis of fault-fold relationships starting from imperfectly oriented and partly inaccessible real outcrops. We applied the method of image-based 3D modeling and orthorectification to a case study from the northern Apennines, Italy, where an incipient extensional fault affecting well-layered limestones is exposed on a 10-m-high barely accessible cliff. Through a few simple steps, we constructed a high-quality image-based 3D model of the outcrop. In the model, we made a series of measurements including fault and bedding attitudes, which allowed us to derive the bedding-fault intersection direction. We then used this direction as viewpoint to obtain a distortion-free photorealistic cross-section, on which we measured bed dips and thicknesses as well as fault stratigraphic separations. These measurements allowed us to identify a slight difference (i.e. only 0.5°) between the hangingwall and footwall cutoff angles. We show that the hangingwall strain required to compensate the upward-decreasing displacement of the fault was accommodated by this 0.5° rotation (i.e. folding) and coeval 0.8% thickening of strata in the hangingwall relatively to footwall strata. This evidence is consistent with trishear fault-propagation folding. Our results emphasize the viewpoint importance in structural geology and therefore the potential of using orthorectified virtual outcrops.

  11. How Plates Pull Transforms Apart: 3-D Numerical Models of Oceanic Transform Fault Response to Changes in Plate Motion Direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrow, T. A.; Mittelstaedt, E. L.; Olive, J. A. L.

    2015-12-01

    Observations along oceanic fracture zones suggest that some mid-ocean ridge transform faults (TFs) previously split into multiple strike-slip segments separated by short (<~50 km) intra-transform spreading centers and then reunited to a single TF trace. This history of segmentation appears to correspond with changes in plate motion direction. Despite the clear evidence of TF segmentation, the processes governing its development and evolution are not well characterized. Here we use a 3-D, finite-difference / marker-in-cell technique to model the evolution of localized strain at a TF subjected to a sudden change in plate motion direction. We simulate the oceanic lithosphere and underlying asthenosphere at a ridge-transform-ridge setting using a visco-elastic-plastic rheology with a history-dependent plastic weakening law and a temperature- and stress-dependent mantle viscosity. To simulate the development of topography, a low density, low viscosity 'sticky air' layer is present above the oceanic lithosphere. The initial thermal gradient follows a half-space cooling solution with an offset across the TF. We impose an enhanced thermal diffusivity in the uppermost 6 km of lithosphere to simulate the effects of hydrothermal circulation. An initial weak seed in the lithosphere helps localize shear deformation between the two offset ridge axes to form a TF. For each model case, the simulation is run initially with TF-parallel plate motion until the thermal structure reaches a steady state. The direction of plate motion is then rotated either instantaneously or over a specified time period, placing the TF in a state of trans-tension. Model runs continue until the system reaches a new steady state. Parameters varied here include: initial TF length, spreading rate, and the rotation rate and magnitude of spreading obliquity. We compare our model predictions to structural observations at existing TFs and records of TF segmentation preserved in oceanic fracture zones.

  12. The Development of WARP - A Framework for Continuous Energy Monte Carlo Neutron Transport in General 3D Geometries on GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, Ryan

    general 3D geometries on GPUs, but compared to production codes like Serpent and MCNP, WARP has limited capabilities. Despite WARP's lack of features, its novel algorithm implementations show that high performance can be achieved on a GPU despite the inherently divergent program flow and sparse data access patterns. WARP is not ready for everyday nuclear reactor calculations, but is a good platform for further development of GPU-accelerated Monte Carlo neutron transport. In it's current state, it may be a useful tool for multiplication factor searches, i.e. determining reactivity coefficients by perturbing material densities or temperatures, since these types of calculations typically do not require many flux tallies. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  13. The value of inclined coreholes for characterizing the geometry of 3-D fracture networks in bedrock aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munn, Jonathan; Parker, Beth

    2013-04-01

    In bedrock aquifers where matrix permeability is low, the nature and distribution of the fracture network has a strong impact on the transport and fate of contaminants. Accurate fracture characterization is therefore essential to fully understand the flow system and to predict contaminant migration. Powerful DFN models exist, yet the limitation is often on obtaining field data of sufficient quality to use as input parameters. One major contributing factor is the common practice of using only vertical coreholes to characterize bedrock aquifers. This can lead to datasets that are significantly biased toward fractures perpendicular to the corehole and are therefore not well suited for three-dimensional (3-D) fracture geometry characterization. This bias is particularly pronounced in flat-lying sedimentary strata where fracture networks are typically comprised of flat-lying bedding parallel fractures and vertical, or near vertical joints. An examination of such bias was conducted at a contaminated site in Guelph, Ontario, Canada, in a Silurian dolostone aquifer. Three inclined coreholes plunging 60 degrees with varying azimuths were drilled between 2010 and 2012 to supplement existing data from eleven vertical coreholes from previous investigations. Depth discrete datasets were collected in the coreholes including lithological and fracture logs from rock core, downhole geophysical surveys (e.g, acoustic televiewer, formation conductivity, temperature, natural gamma), and hydraulic testing including the first use of flexible liner profiling in inclined coreholes. These datasets were integrated to provide estimates of fracture frequency, orientation and aperture distributions and to estimate values of bulk effective fracture porosity. Orientation analysis revealed three dominant fracture sets on site that vary in intensity through mechanical layers. These sets consist of a horizontal, bedding-plane set with an average spacing of 0.3m, and two high-angle sets, NE-SW and

  14. Relationships between fault geometry, slip rate variability and earthquake recurrence in extensional settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowie, Patience A.; Roberts, Gerald P.; Bull, Jonathan M.; Visini, Francesco

    2012-04-01

    Field observations and modelling indicate that elastic interaction between active faults can lead to variations in earthquake recurrence intervals measured on timescales of 102-104 yr. Fault geometry strongly influences the nature of the interaction between adjacent structures as it controls the spatial redistribution of stress when rupture occurs. In this paper, we use a previously published numerical model for elastic interaction between spontaneously growing faults to investigate the relationships between fault geometry, fault slip rate variations and the statistics of earthquake recurrence. These relationships develop and become systematic as a long-term consequence of stress redistribution in individual rupture events even though on short timescales earthquake activity appears to be stochastic. We characterize fault behaviour using the coefficient of variation (CV) of earthquake recurrence intervals and introduce a new measure, slip-rate variability (SRV) that takes into account the size and time ordering of slip events. CV generally increases when the strain is partitioned on more than one fault but the relationship between long-term fault slip rate (SRmean) and CV is poorly defined. In contrast, SRV increases systematically where faulting is more distributed and SRmean is lower. To first order, SRV is inversely proportional to SRmean. We also extract earthquake recurrence statistics and compare these to previously published probability density functions used in earthquake forecasting. The histograms of earthquake recurrence vary systematically as a function of fault geometry and are best characterized by a Weibull distribution with fitting parameters that vary from site to site along the fault array. We explain these phenomena in terms of a time-varying, geometrical control on stress loading of individual faults arising from the history of elastic interactions and compare our results with published data on SRV and earthquake recurrence along normal faults in

  15. Fault strength in Marmara region inferred from the geometry of the principle stress axes and fault orientations: A case study for the Prince's Islands fault segment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinar, Ali; Coskun, Zeynep; Mert, Aydin; Kalafat, Dogan

    2015-04-01

    The general consensus based on historical earthquake data point out that the last major moment release on the Prince's islands fault was in 1766 which in turn signals an increased seismic risk for Istanbul Metropolitan area considering the fact that most of the 20 mm/yr GPS derived slip rate for the region is accommodated mostly by that fault segment. The orientation of the Prince's islands fault segment overlaps with the NW-SE direction of the maximum principle stress axis derived from the focal mechanism solutions of the large and moderate sized earthquakes occurred in the Marmara region. As such, the NW-SE trending fault segment translates the motion between the two E-W trending branches of the North Anatolian fault zone; one extending from the Gulf of Izmit towards Çınarcık basin and the other extending between offshore Bakırköy and Silivri. The basic relation between the orientation of the maximum and minimum principal stress axes, the shear and normal stresses, and the orientation of a fault provides clue on the strength of a fault, i.e., its frictional coefficient. Here, the angle between the fault normal and maximum compressive stress axis is a key parameter where fault normal and fault parallel maximum compressive stress might be a necessary and sufficient condition for a creeping event. That relation also implies that when the trend of the sigma-1 axis is close to the strike of the fault the shear stress acting on the fault plane approaches zero. On the other hand, the ratio between the shear and normal stresses acting on a fault plane is proportional to the coefficient of frictional coefficient of the fault. Accordingly, the geometry between the Prince's islands fault segment and a maximum principal stress axis matches a weak fault model. In the frame of the presentation we analyze seismological data acquired in Marmara region and interpret the results in conjuction with the above mentioned weak fault model.

  16. Fault geometries on Uranus' satellite Miranda: Implications for internal structure and heat flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beddingfield, C. B.; Burr, D. M.; Emery, J. P.

    2015-02-01

    Miranda, a ∼470-km-diameter uranian icy satellite, has a surface that exhibits evidence of a complex tectonic history. Tectonic structures are mostly localized in three regions termed coronae, but also form a rift system inferred to be global in extent. Ridges within the boundary of Arden Corona, and those that make up the 340° Chasma, part of the global rift system, have been interpreted as normal fault blocks. Using Voyager data, we test the hypothesis that these Arden Corona faults, as well as those at the northern edge of the 340° Chasma, are listric in geometry. For this testing, we use four geometric criteria for listric faults: (1) progressive down-dip decrease in fault scarp dip, (2) progressive down-dip increase in back-tilted face slope, (3) concavity of the exposed scarp surface, and (4) presence of a rollover structure. Results of this analysis support the hypothesis that the faults within the Arden Corona boundary are listric in geometry, but do not strongly support the hypothesis for the faults within the 340° Chasma. By analogy with terrestrial structures, the listric character of faults within the Arden Corona boundary suggests the presence of a subsurface detachment. This detachment likely occurred at Miranda's brittle-ductile transition zone at the time of faulting. Measurements of the Arden Corona fault system geometry are used to estimate depths to the proposed brittle-ductile transition zone at the time of faulting, resulting in values of 6.7-9.0 km. Those depths in turn are used to estimate a thermal gradient of 6-25 K km-1 and a surface heat flux of 31-112 mW m-2. The weaker evidence of a listric geometry for the faults of the 340° Chasma suggests that those faults did not interact with a brittle-ductile transition at the time of their formation. Our estimated thermal gradient of the Arden Corona region is consistent with a previous heating event on Miranda that was as significant as Europa's current resonance-induced tidal heating

  17. High-angle faults control the geometry and morphology of the Corinth Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Rebecca; Nixon, Casey; Duclaux, Guillaume; Gawthorpe, Robert; McNeill, Lisa

    2016-04-01

    The Corinth Rift is one of the most actively extending basins on Earth, with modern-day GPS extension rates of up to 15 mm/yr. The structure of the onshore and offshore parts of the rift has been intensely studied, however controversy remains as to the geometry of faults at depth. The rift has long been described as experiencing low-angle (< 30°) active faulting. The presence of an active low-angle detachment has been proposed from an interpreted cloud of microseismicity dipping at 12-20° at depths of 8-11 km. In contrast, others suggest that this microseismicity marks the brittle-ductile transition or that any detachment is incipient, and that low-angle faulting is not required to explain extension across the rift. This has led to an alternative interpretation where faults remain dipping at angles of 45-60°, as observed onshore, to the brittle-ductile transition depth. Other interpretations from seismic reflection data suggest that faults may be non-planar, being high angle at shallow depths (< ~3 km) and then shallowing in dip to 25-45° at greater depths. One observation that the various fault models must be able to honour is the long-term vertical deformation pattern and geomorphology across the Corinth Rift such as: high uplift rates along the southern margin (1-2 mm/yr); offshore basement descending to depths of 3 km; and a northern margin that is generally stable or subsiding. We compute the surface uplift and subsidence for faults of different geometries to assess which deep fault geometries can best recreate the first-order vertical deformation characteristics of the Corinth Rift. Slip rates appropriate for southern margin faults have been applied to model the deformation field over timescales of 1 Ma. We use PyLith, an open-source finite-element code for quasi-static viscoelastic simulations of crustal deformation. We model the uplift and subsidence fields associated with the following fault geometries: i) planar faults with dips of 45-60° that sole

  18. 3D Dynamic Rupture Simulation Across a Complex Fault System: the Mw7.0, 2010, Haiti Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douilly, R.; Aochi, H.; Calais, E.; Freed, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    Earthquakes ruptures sometimes take place on a secondary fault and surprisingly do not activate an adjacent major one. The 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake is a classic case where rupture occurred on a blind thrust while the adjacent San Andreas Fault was not triggered during the process. Similar to Loma Prieta, the Mw7.0, January 12 2010, Haiti earthquake also ruptured a secondary blind thrust, the Léogâne fault, adjacent to the main plate boundary, the Enriquillo Plantain Garden Fault, which did not rupture during this event. Aftershock relocalizations delineate the Léogâne rupture with two north dipping segments with slightly different dip, where the easternmost segment had mostly dip-slip motion and the westernmost one had mostly strike-slip motion. In addition, an offshore south dipping structure inferred from the aftershocks to the west of the rupture zone coincides with the offshore Trois Baies reverse fault, a region of increase in Coulomb stress increase. In this study, we investigate the rupture dynamics of the Haiti earthquake in a complex fault system of multiple segments identified by the aftershock relocations. We suppose a background stress regime that is consistent with the type of motion of each fault and with the regional tectonic regime. We initiate a nucleation on the east segment of the Léogâne fault by defining a circular region with a 2 km radius where shear stress is slightly greater than the yield stress. By varying friction on faults and background stress, we find a range of plausible scenarios. In the absence of near-field seismic records of the event, we score the different models against the static deformation field derived from GPS and InSAR at the surface. All the plausible simulations show that the rupture propagates from the eastern to the western segment along the Léogâne fault, but not on the Enriquillo fault nor on the Trois Baies fault. The best-fit simulation shows a significant increase of shear stresses on the Trois Baies

  19. How Students Solve Problems in Spatial Geometry while Using a Software Application for Visualizing 3D Geometric Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Widder, Mirela; Gorsky, Paul

    2013-01-01

    In schools, learning spatial geometry is usually dependent upon a student's ability to visualize three dimensional geometric configurations from two dimensional drawings. Such a process, however, often creates visual obstacles which are unique to spatial geometry. Useful software programs which realistically depict three dimensional geometric…

  20. Supra-salt normal fault growth during the rise and fall of a diapir: Perspectives from 3D seismic reflection data, Norwegian North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tvedt, Anette B. M.; Rotevatn, Atle; Jackson, Christopher A.-L.

    2016-10-01

    Normal faulting and the deep subsurface flow of salt are key processes controlling the structural development of many salt-bearing sedimentary basins. However, our detailed understanding of the spatial and temporal relationship between normal faulting and salt movement is poor due to a lack of natural examples constraining their geometric and kinematic relationship in three-dimensions. To improve our understanding of these processes, we here use 3D seismic reflection and borehole data from the Egersund Basin, offshore Norway, to determine the structure and growth of a normal fault array formed during the birth, growth and decay of an array of salt structures. We show that the fault array and salt structures developed in response to: (i) Late Triassic-to-Middle Jurassic extension, which involved thick-skinned, sub-salt and thin-skinned supra-salt faulting with the latter driving reactive diapirism; (ii) Early Cretaceous extensional collapse of the walls; and (iii) Jurassic-to-Neogene, active and passive diapirism, which was at least partly coeval with and occurred along-strike from areas of reactive diapirism and wall collapse. Our study supports physical model predictions, showcasing a three-dimensional example of how protracted, multiphase salt diapirism can influence the structure and growth of normal fault arrays.

  1. Contradicting Estimates of Location, Geometry, and Rupture History of Highly Active Faults in Central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, K.

    2011-12-01

    Accurate location and geometry of seismic sources are critical to estimate strong ground motion. Complete and precise rupture history is also critical to estimate the probability of the future events. In order to better forecast future earthquakes and to reduce seismic hazards, we should consider over all options and choose the most likely parameter. Multiple options for logic trees are acceptable only after thorough examination of contradicting estimates and should not be a result from easy compromise or epoche. In the process of preparation and revisions of Japanese probabilistic and deterministic earthquake hazard maps by Headquarters for Earthquake Research Promotion since 1996, many decisions were made to select plausible parameters, but many contradicting estimates have been left without thorough examinations. There are several highly-active faults in central Japan such as Itoigawa-Shizuoka Tectonic Line active fault system (ISTL), West Nagano Basin fault system (WNBF), Inadani fault system (INFS), and Atera fault system (ATFS). The highest slip rate and the shortest recurrence interval are respectively ~1 cm/yr and 500 to 800 years, and estimated maximum magnitude is 7.5 to 8.5. Those faults are very hazardous because almost entire population and industries are located above the fault within tectonic depressions. As to the fault location, most uncertainties arises from interpretation of geomorphic features. Geomorphological interpretation without geological and structural insight often leads to wrong mapping. Though non-existent longer fault may be a safer estimate, incorrectness harm reliability of the forecast. Also this does not greatly affect strong motion estimates, but misleading to surface displacement issues. Fault geometry, on the other hand, is very important to estimate intensity distribution. For the middle portion of the ISTL, fast-moving left-lateral strike-slip up to 1 cm/yr is obvious. Recent seismicity possibly induced by 2011 Tohoku

  2. Geometry and kinematics of non-colinear normal fault populations: The role of deep-seated crustal lineaments throughout multiphase rifting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Thomas B.; Jackson, Christopher A.-L.; Bell, Rebecca E.; Duffy, Oliver B.

    2016-04-01

    Non-colinear fault populations may form in rift basins subject to multiple phases of non-coaxial extension, producing a wide array of fault interactions and therefore more complex rift geometries than typically observed in single-phase rifts. However, the mechanism of formation for non-coaxial fault populations; e.g. a change in the regional extensional direction, the presence of crustal heterogeneities, or local stress perturbations; and their subsequent interactions during later tectonic events remain poorly understood. This study uses borehole-constrained 2D and 3D seismic reflection data to examine the structural style and evolution of N-S and E-W striking non-colinear fault populations within the Farsund Basin, located offshore southern Norway. The basin is situated at the proposed western extent of the Sorgenfrei-Tornquist Zone, a deep-seated, weak crustal lineament. This lineament has experienced repeated phases of reactivation throughout its history and has exerted a strong influence over the evolution of the overlying rift system. Using isochron and quantitative fault analysis, including throw-distance (T-x) and throw-depth (T-z) plots, we examine the interactions between the non-colinear E-W and N-S fault populations throughout the multiphase evolution of the Farsund Basin. From our analyses, we observe primarily cross-cutting and abutting fault intersections with some isolated faults. E-W striking faults predominately formed during Permo-Carboniferous extension. N-S striking faults formed during Triassic E-W extension, along with localised reactivation of E-W striking fault segments. E-W faults were then further reactivated during the Early Cretaceous, cross-cutting pre-existing structures. The underlying Sorgenfrei-Tornquist Zone controls the orientation of the E-W striking fault population. In addition, the oblique nature of the lineament to the regional tectonic regime acts to locally perturb the stress field. As a result, synchronous fault activity

  3. Modulating mechanical behaviour of 3D-printed cartilage-mimetic PCL scaffolds: influence of molecular weight and pore geometry.

    PubMed

    Olubamiji, Adeola D; Izadifar, Zohreh; Si, Jennifer L; Cooper, David M L; Eames, B Frank; Chen, Daniel X B

    2016-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D)-printed poly(ε)-caprolactone (PCL)-based scaffolds are increasingly being explored for cartilage tissue engineering (CTE) applications. However, ensuring that the mechanical properties of these PCL-based constructs are comparable to that of articular cartilage that they are meant to regenerate is an area that has been under-explored. This paper presents the effects of PCL's molecular weight (MW) and scaffold's pore geometric configurations; strand size (SZ), strand spacing (SS), and strand orientation (SO), on mechanical properties of 3D-printed PCL scaffolds. The results illustrate that MW has significant effect on compressive moduli and yield strength of 3D-printed PCL scaffolds. Specifically, PCL with MW of 45 K was a more feasible choice for fabrication of visco-elastic, flexible and load-bearing PCL scaffolds. Furthermore, pore geometric configurations; SZ, SS, and SO, all significantly affect on tensile moduli of scaffolds. However, only SZ and SS have statistically significant effects on compressive moduli and porosity of these scaffolds. That said, inverse linear relationship was observed between porosity and mechanical properties of 3D-printed PCL scaffolds in Pearson's correlation test. Altogether, this study illustrates that modulating MW of PCL and pore geometrical configurations of the scaffolds enabled design and fabrication of PCL scaffolds with mechanical and biomimetic properties that better mimic mechanical behaviour of human articular cartilage. Thus, the modulated PCL scaffold proposed in this study is a framework that offers great potentials for CTE applications. PMID:27328736

  4. Thin-skinned shortening geometries of the South Fork fault: Bighorn basin, Park County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Clarey, T.L. )

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a new interpretation of the South Fork fault in light of thin-skinned thrust theory. Cross sections and seismic data are presented which indicate that the South Fork fault is an allochthonous salient which was emplaced in the Bighorn basin during the early to middle Eocene. All observed structural geometries can be interpreted as developing under a compressional regime, similar to the Wyoming-Utah-Idaho thrust belt. Faults either follow bedding-plane surfaces, cut up section in the direction of tectonic transport or form backthrusts. A single decollement within the Jurassic Gypsum Spring Formation appears to dominate. Tectonic transport was approximately southeast, parallel to tear faults in the allochthonous plate.

  5. Crustal structure and fault geometry of the 2010 Haiti earthquake from temporary seismometer deployments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Douilly, Roby; Haase, Jennifer S.; Ellsworth, William L.; Bouin, Marie‐Paule; Calais, Eric; Symithe, Steeve J.; Armbruster, John G.; Mercier de Lépinay, Bernard; Deschamps, Anne; Mildor, Saint‐Louis; Meremonte, Mark E.; Hough, Susan E.

    2013-01-01

    Haiti has been the locus of a number of large and damaging historical earthquakes. The recent 12 January 2010 Mw 7.0 earthquake affected cities that were largely unprepared, which resulted in tremendous losses. It was initially assumed that the earthquake ruptured the Enriquillo Plantain Garden fault (EPGF), a major active structure in southern Haiti, known from geodetic measurements and its geomorphic expression to be capable of producing M 7 or larger earthquakes. Global Positioning Systems (GPS) and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data, however, showed that the event ruptured a previously unmapped fault, the Léogâne fault, a north‐dipping oblique transpressional fault located immediately north of the EPGF. Following the earthquake, several groups installed temporary seismic stations to record aftershocks, including ocean‐bottom seismometers on either side of the EPGF. We use data from the complete set of stations deployed after the event, on land and offshore, to relocate all aftershocks from 10 February to 24 June 2010, determine a 1D regional crustal velocity model, and calculate focal mechanisms. The aftershock locations from the combined dataset clearly delineate the Léogâne fault, with a geometry close to that inferred from geodetic data. Its strike and dip closely agree with the global centroid moment tensor solution of the mainshock but with a steeper dip than inferred from previous finite fault inversions. The aftershocks also delineate a structure with shallower southward dip offshore and to the west of the rupture zone, which could indicate triggered seismicity on the offshore Trois Baies reverse fault. We use first‐motion focal mechanisms to clarify the relationship of the fault geometry to the triggered aftershocks.

  6. Improving the resolution of the 2010 Haiti earthquake fault geometry using temporary seismometer deployments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douilly, R.; Haase, J. S.; Ellsworth, W. L.; Bouin, M.; Calais, E.; Symithe, S. J.; Armbruster, J. G.; Mercier De Lepinay, B. F.; Deschamps, A.; Meremonte, M. E.; Hough, S. E.; Saint Louis, M.

    2012-12-01

    Haiti has been the locus of a number of large and damaging historical earthquakes. The recent January 12, 2010, Mw 7.0 earthquake affected cities that were largely unprepared, which resulted in tremendous losses. It was initially assumed that the earthquake ruptured the Enriquillo Plantain Garden Fault (EPGF), a major active structure in southern Haiti, known from geodetic measurements and its geomorphic expression to be capable of producing M7 or larger earthquakes. However, GPS and InSAR data showed that the event ruptured a previously unmapped fault, the Léogâne fault, a north dipping oblique blind thrust located immediately north of the Enriquillo Fault. Following the earthquake several groups installed temporary seismic stations to record aftershocks, including ocean bottom seismometers on either side of the EPGF. We use data from the complete set of stations deployed after the event, on land and offshore, to relocate all aftershocks from 10 February to 24 June 2010, to determine a one-dimensional regional crustal velocity model, and calculate focal mechanisms. The aftershock locations from the combined data set clearly delineate the Léogâne fault, with a geometry close to that inferred from geodetic data. Its strike and dip closely agrees with that of the global centroid moment tensor solution of the mainshock, but it is more steeply dipping than the plane inferred from previously determined finite fault inversions. The aftershocks also delineate a structure with shallower southward dip offshore and to the west of the rupture zone, which could indicate triggered seismicity on the offshore Trois Baies reverse fault. We use first-motion focal mechanisms to clarify the relationship of the fault geometry to the triggered aftershocks.

  7. Development of kink bands in granodiorite: Effect of mechanical heterogeneities, fault geometry, and friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chheda, T. D.; Nevitt, J. M.; Pollard, D. D.

    2014-12-01

    The formation of monoclinal right-lateral kink bands in Lake Edison granodiorite (central Sierra Nevada, CA) is investigated through field observations and mechanics based numerical modeling. Vertical faults act as weak surfaces within the granodiorite, and vertical granodiorite slabs bounded by closely-spaced faults curve into a kink. Leucocratic dikes are observed in association with kinking. Measurements were made on maps of Hilgard, Waterfall, Trail Fork, Kip Camp (Pollard and Segall, 1983b) and Bear Creek kink bands (Martel, 1998). Outcrop scale geometric parameters such as fault length andspacing, kink angle, and dike width are used to construct a representative geometry to be used in a finite element model. Three orders of fault were classified, length = 1.8, 7.2 and 28.8 m, and spacing = 0.3, 1.2 and 3.6 m, respectively. The model faults are oriented at 25° to the direction of shortening (horizontal most compressive stress), consistent with measurements of wing crack orientations in the field area. The model also includes a vertical leucocratic dike, oriented perpendicular to the faults and with material properties consistent with aplite. Curvature of the deformed faults across the kink band was used to compare the effects of material properties, strain, and fault and dike geometry. Model results indicate that the presence of the dike, which provides a mechanical heterogeneity, is critical to kinking in these rocks. Keeping properties of the model granodiorite constant, curvature increased with decrease in yield strength and Young's modulus of the dike. Curvature increased significantly as yield strength decreased from 95 to 90 MPa, and below this threshold value, limb rotation for the kink band was restricted to the dike. Changing Poisson's ratio had no significant effect. The addition of small faults between bounding faults, decreasing fault spacing or increasing dike width increases the curvature. Increasing friction along the faults decreases slip, so

  8. Testing 3D fault configuration in the northern Los Angeles basin, California via patterns of rock uplift the since 2.9 Ma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, M.; Meigs, A.; Marshall, S.

    2004-12-01

    Competing models of three-dimensional fault topology, starting from the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) Community Fault Model (CFM), were tested for viability using numerical Boundary Element Method (BEM) models and patterns of rock uplift by folds in the northern Los Angeles basin Los Angeles basin. Thirteen structural cross-sections constrained by well and outcrop data were used to compile a structure contour map of the base of the Pico Formation (2.9 Ma) across about 50 km of the northern Los Angeles basin from the Coyote Hills on the east to Pacific Palisades on the west. A map of rock uplift rate was constructed from these data by measuring the structural relief relative to the central trough of the Los Angeles basin, a long-lived northwest-trending structural low that lies to the northeast of the Newport-Inglewood fault. BEM models of 3D fault topology were used to generate uplift rates over the same region using North-South contraction at 100 nanostrain/year. A suite of models investigate the sensitivity of uplift patterns to 1) dip of blind thrust faults (e.g. Las Cienegas and Elysian Park), 2) presence of low-angle (20 degree) thrust ramp below 10 km depths 3) regional extent of this low-angle ramp and 4) inclusion of near surface splays of the Santa Monica fault. Model-data compatibility was evaluated on the basis of structural trend, spatial variation in rates and location of major structures (i.e. key near surface folds). All models are consistent with the location and uplift pattern of the Coyote Hills and Santa Fe Springs structures, the location and orientation of the central trough, and a North-trending structure separating Santa Fe Springs on the east from Montebello to the northwest. Incorporation of the low-angle ramp below 10 km depth that is regionally extensive (i.e. many faults sole into this fault) improves model and geologic uplift compatibility. Furthermore, steepening the Las Cienegas and Elysian Park faults to 60 degrees

  9. A 3-D velocity model for earthquake location from combined geological and geophysical data: a case study from the TABOO near fault observatory (Northern Apennines, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latorre, Diana; Lupattelli, Andrea; Mirabella, Francesco; Trippetta, Fabio; Valoroso, Luisa; Lomax, Anthony; Di Stefano, Raffaele; Collettini, Cristiano; Chiaraluce, Lauro

    2014-05-01

    Accurate hypocenter location at the crustal scale strongly depends on our knowledge of the 3D velocity structure. The integration of geological and geophysical data, when available, should contribute to a reliable seismic velocity model in order to guarantee high quality earthquake locations as well as their consistency with the geological structure. Here we present a 3D, P- and S-wave velocity model of the Upper Tiber valley region (Northern Apennines) retrieved by combining an extremely robust dataset of surface and sub-surface geological data (seismic reflection profiles and boreholes), in situ and laboratory velocity measurements, and earthquake data. The study area is a portion of the Apennine belt undergoing active extension where a set of high-angle normal faults is detached on the Altotiberina low-angle normal fault (ATF). From 2010, this area hosts a scientific infrastructure (the Alto Tiberina Near Fault Observatory, TABOO; http://taboo.rm.ingv.it/), consisting of a dense array of multi-sensor stations, devoted to studying the earthquakes preparatory phase and the deformation processes along the ATF fault system. The proposed 3D velocity model is a layered model in which irregular shaped surfaces limit the boundaries between main lithological units. The model has been constructed by interpolating depth converted seismic horizons interpreted along 40 seismic reflection profiles (down to 4s two way travel times) that have been calibrated with 6 deep boreholes (down to 5 km depth) and constrained by detailed geological maps and structural surveys data. The layers of the model are characterized by similar rock types and seismic velocity properties. The P- and S-waves velocities for each layer have been derived from velocity measurements coming from both boreholes (sonic logs) and laboratory, where measurements have been performed on analogue natural samples increasing confining pressure in order to simulate crustal conditions. In order to test the 3D velocity

  10. Development and application of a 3-D geometry/mass model for LDEF satellite ionizing radiation assessments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colborn, B. L.; Armstong, T. W.

    1993-01-01

    A three-dimensional geometry and mass model of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) spacecraft and experiment trays was developed for use in predictions and data interpretation related to ionizing radiation measurements. The modeling approach, level of detail incorporated, example models for specific experiments and radiation dosimeters, and example applications of the model are described.

  11. The geometries and development of late orogenic strike-slip faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, M. W.; Peacock, D. C. P.

    2003-04-01

    Strike-slip faults are commonly the final phase of contraction in orogenic belts, occurring when the folds have locked-up and the thrusts have become too steep for further displacement to occur. Where the maximum stress axis (sigma1) is perpendicular to the orogenic belt (i.e. pure shear), the strike-slip faults are conjugate and represent strike-perpendicular shortening and necessary strike-parallel extension. An example of such behaviour occurs in the steeply dipping Silurian sandstones and shales in Kirkcudbrightshire, in the Southern Uplands of Scotland. If sigma1 is at ~ 70°; to the strike of the orogenic belt, the conjugate strike-slip faults become asymmetric. One set of strike-slip faults occurs at a high angle to the strike of bedding, and the conjugate set has a ramp-flat trajectory across steeply dipping beds. An example of this behaviour occurs in the steeply dipping Silurian turbidites at Ardglass, in the Longford-Down terrane of Northern Ireland. If sigma1 is at a lower angle to the orogenic belt (i.e. transpression), one set of strike-slip faults tends to dominate. In some cases, the dominant strike-slip fault set is parallel to the strike of the orogenic belt, the Caledonian-age Great Glen Fault of Scotland being such an example. In other cases, block rotation occurs on the set of strike-slip faults that are at a high angle to the orogenic belt, as in the Variscan Orogenic Belt of SW England. An annulus model is presented to illustrate the variations in geometries of late-orogenic strike-slip faults from pure shear to transpression.

  12. Effect of faulting on fluid flow in porous sandstones: Geometry and spatial distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Antonellini, M.; Aydin, A.

    1995-05-01

    We present a methodology to describe fault geometry at different scales and to characterize the distribution of these scales on the flanks of a salt intrusion in the Colorado Plateau (Arches National Park, United States). This methodology is based on the recognition of the physical processes of faulting and on the quantitative characterization of the structural and petrophysical properties of faults in porous sandstones. The methods used include a variety of mapping techniques (photography, aerial photography, string mapping, theodolite surveys, etc.), as well as techniques for determining fluid flow properties. The resulting study is a prototype for understanding seismic and subseismic scales of heterogeneity related to faulting and fracturing in subsurface reservoirs. Slip planes, which are not interconnected, may have poor geometric sealing characteristics. In the hanging wall of a major normal fault, the quantitative spatial distribution of the faults can be correlated with bending of the strata, probably associated with the salt intrusion. The number of deformation bands, the most ubiquitous element, is proportional to the amount of slip on a single major fault. Deformation bands also have a very high density (>100 m{sup -1}) in stepovers between slip planes. In these areas we find the largest anomalies in permeability. In zones of high strata curvature, the average orders of magnitude with respect to the host rock; if complex fault zones are present, the average permeability can drop more than four orders of magnitude in the direction normal to the faults. Finally, by using outcrop and laboratory data that describe the effect of distinctive structural units on fluid flow, we quantify the three-dimensional distribution of permeability in a reservoir analog at any scale, and we show that such permeability distribution could be implemented in a geology-based reservoir simulator.

  13. The role of salt layers in the hangingwall deformation of kinked-planar extensional faults: Insights from 3D analogue models and comparison with the Parentis Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer, O.; Roca, E.; Vendeville, B. C.

    2014-12-01

    Using an analogue modelling approach, this work investigates the role played by salt in the hangingwall deformation of an extensional fault. Models' set-up included a wooden block simulating the footwall of different kinked-planar fault geometries flattening at depth. Above these faults, the hangingwall was modelled using only sand or sand overlain by pre- or syn-kinematic silicone putty. Regardless of the stage at which was deposited, the silicone appears as an efficient decoupling level that changes the deformation mode of the overlying sand layers. Above the silicone layers, the rollover panels only continue to develop up to the welding of the underlying silicone. Afterwards, they do not grow anymore and all shearing induced by the underlying fault bends is accommodated along the tilted silicone layer that acts as an extensional shear band. Further fault slip produces near-horizontal growth stratal geometries that can be easily misinterpreted as a syn-rift/post-rift boundary. In addition, the differential sedimentary loading of syn-kinematic layers triggers the upslope silicone flow from the hangingwall depocenters towards the rollover shoulders. This migration results in the formation of silicone welds at the rollover limbs and the growth of gentle silicone-cored anticlines above or near the rollover shoulder that are locally pierced by diapirs and walls. These experimental results fit with the Parentis Basin structure that, formed from the motion of lithosphere-scale kinked-planar extensional faults, includes salt inflated anticlines above their rollover shoulders and an intra-Albian unconformity interpreted now as syn-kinematic.

  14. On 3d bulk geometry of Virasoro coadjoint orbits: orbit invariant charges and Virasoro hair on locally AdS_3 geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikh-Jabbari, M. M.; Yavartanoo, H.

    2016-09-01

    Expanding upon [arXiv:1404.4472, arXiv:1511.06079], we provide a further detailed analysis of Bañados geometries, the most general solutions to the AdS_3 Einstein gravity with Brown-Henneaux boundary conditions. We analyze in some detail the causal, horizon, and boundary structure, and the geodesic motion on these geometries, as well as the two classes of symplectic charges one can associate with these geometries: charges associated with the exact symmetries and the Virasoro charges. We elaborate on the one-to-one relation between the coadjoint orbits of two copies of the Virasoro group and Bañados geometries. We discuss that the information as regards the Bañados goemetries falls into two categories: "orbit invariant" information and "Virasoro hairs". The former concerns geometric quantities, while the latter are specified by the non-local surface integrals. We elaborate on multi-BTZ geometries which have a number of disconnected pieces at the horizon bifurcation curve. We study multi-BTZ black hole thermodynamics and discuss that the thermodynamic quantities are orbit invariants. We also comment on the implications of our analysis for a 2d CFT dual which could possibly be dual to AdS_3 Einstein gravity.

  15. R2OBBIE-3D, a Fast Robotic High-Resolution System for Quantitative Phenotyping of Surface Geometry and Colour-Texture

    PubMed Central

    Manukyan, Liana; Milinkovitch, Michel C.

    2015-01-01

    While recent imaging techniques provide insights into biological processes from the molecular to the cellular scale, phenotypes at larger scales remain poorly amenable to quantitative analyses. For example, investigations of the biophysical mechanisms generating skin morphological complexity and diversity would greatly benefit from 3D geometry and colour-texture reconstructions. Here, we report on R2OBBIE-3D, an integrated system that combines a robotic arm, a high-resolution digital colour camera, an illumination basket of high-intensity light-emitting diodes and state-of-the-art 3D-reconstruction approaches. We demonstrate that R2OBBIE generates accurate 3D models of biological objects between 1 and 100 cm, makes multiview photometric stereo scanning possible in practical processing times, and enables the capture of colour-texture and geometric resolutions better than 15 μm without the use of magnifying lenses. R2OBBIE has the potential to greatly improve quantitative analyses of phenotypes in addition to providing multiple new applications in, e.g., biomedical science. PMID:26039509

  16. R(2)OBBIE-3D, a Fast Robotic High-Resolution System for Quantitative Phenotyping of Surface Geometry and Colour-Texture.

    PubMed

    Martins, António F; Bessant, Michel; Manukyan, Liana; Milinkovitch, Michel C

    2015-01-01

    While recent imaging techniques provide insights into biological processes from the molecular to the cellular scale, phenotypes at larger scales remain poorly amenable to quantitative analyses. For example, investigations of the biophysical mechanisms generating skin morphological complexity and diversity would greatly benefit from 3D geometry and colour-texture reconstructions. Here, we report on R(2)OBBIE-3D, an integrated system that combines a robotic arm, a high-resolution digital colour camera, an illumination basket of high-intensity light-emitting diodes and state-of-the-art 3D-reconstruction approaches. We demonstrate that R(2)OBBIE generates accurate 3D models of biological objects between 1 and 100 cm, makes multiview photometric stereo scanning possible in practical processing times, and enables the capture of colour-texture and geometric resolutions better than 15 μm without the use of magnifying lenses. R(2)OBBIE has the potential to greatly improve quantitative analyses of phenotypes in addition to providing multiple new applications in, e.g., biomedical science. PMID:26039509

  17. FACET: a radiation view factor computer code for axisymmetric, 2D planar, and 3D geometries with shadowing

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, A.B.

    1983-08-01

    The computer code FACET calculates the radiation geometric view factor (alternatively called shape factor, angle factor, or configuration factor) between surfaces for axisymmetric, two-dimensional planar and three-dimensional geometries with interposed third surface obstructions. FACET was developed to calculate view factors for input to finite-element heat-transfer analysis codes. The first section of this report is a brief review of previous radiation-view-factor computer codes. The second section presents the defining integral equation for the geometric view factor between two surfaces and the assumptions made in its derivation. Also in this section are the numerical algorithms used to integrate this equation for the various geometries. The third section presents the algorithms used to detect self-shadowing and third-surface shadowing between the two surfaces for which a view factor is being calculated. The fourth section provides a user's input guide followed by several example problems.

  18. Thrust faulting and 3D ground deformation of the 3 July 2015 Mw 6.4 Pishan, China earthquake from Sentinel-1A radar interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jianbao; Shen, Zheng-Kang; Li, Tao; Chen, Jie

    2016-06-01

    Boosted by the launch of Sentinel-1A radar satellite from the European Space Agency (ESA), we now have the opportunity of fast, full and multiple coverage of the land based deformation field of earthquakes. Here we use the data to investigate a strong earthquake struck Pishan, western China on July 3, 2015. The earthquake fault is blind and no ground break features are found on-site, thus Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data give full play to its technical advantage for the recovery of coseismic deformation field. By using the Sentinel-1A radar data in the Interferometric Wide Swath mode, we obtain 3 tracks of InSAR data over the struck region, and resolve the 3D ground deformation generated by the earthquake. Then the Line-of-Sight (LOS) InSAR data are inverted for the slip-distribution of the seismogenic fault. The final model shows that the earthquake is completely blind with pure-thrust motion. The maximum slip is ~ 0.48 m at a depth of ~ 7 km, consistent with the depth estimate from seismic reflection data. In particular, the inverted model is also compatible with a south-dipping fault ramp among a group of fault interfaces detected by the seismic reflection profile over the region. The seismic moment obtained equals to a Mw 6.4 earthquake. The Pishan earthquake ruptured the frontal part of the thrust ramps under the Slik anticline, and unloaded the coulomb stress of them. However, it may have loaded stress to the back-thrust above the thrust ramps by ~ 1-4 bar, and promoted it for future failure. Moreover, the stress loading on the west side of the earthquake fault is much larger than that on the east side, indicating a higher risk for failure to the west of the Zepu fault.

  19. The 3D fault and vein architecture of strike-slip releasing- and restraining bends: Evidence from volcanic-centre-relatedmineral deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berger, B.R.; ,

    2007-01-01

    High-temperature, volcanic-centre-related hydrothermal systems involve large fluid-flow volumes and are observed to have high discharge rates in the order of 100-400 kg/s. The flows and discharge occur predominantly on networks of critically stressed fractures. The coupling of hydrothermal fluid flow with deformation produces the volumes of veins found in epithermal mineral deposits. Owing to this coupling, veins provide information on the fault-fracture architecture in existence at the time of mineralization. They therefore provide information on the nature of deformation within fault zones, and the relations between different fault sets. The Virginia City and Goldfield mining districts, Nevada, were localized in zones of strike-slip transtension in an Early to Mid-Miocene volcanic belt along the western margin of North America. The Camp Douglas mining area occurs within the same belt, but is localized in a zone of strike-slip transpression. The vein systems in these districts record the spatial evolution of strike-slip extensional and contractional stepovers, as well as geometry of faulting in and adjacent to points along strike-slip faults where displacement has been interrupted and transferred into releasing and restraining stepovers. ?? The Geological Society of London 2007.

  20. Lithological 3D grid model of the Vuonos area built by using geostatistical simulation honoring the 3D fault model and structural trends of the Outokumpu association rocks in Eastern Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laine, Eevaliisa

    2015-04-01

    The Outokumpu mining district - a metallogenic province about 100 km long x 60 km wide - hosts a Palaeoproterozoic sulfide deposit characterized by an unusual lithological association. It is located in the North Karelia Schist Belt , which was thrust on the late Archaean gneissic-granitoid basement of the Karelian craton during the early stages of the Svecofennian Orogeny between 1.92 and 1.87 Ga (Koistinen 1981). Two major tectono-stratigraphic units can be distinguished, a lower, parautochthonous 'Lower Kaleva' unit and an upper, allochthonous 'upper Kaleva' unit or 'Outokumpu allochthon'. The latter consists of tightly-folded deep marine turbiditic mica schists and metagraywackes containing intercalations of black schist, and the Outo¬kumpu assemblage, which comprises ca. 1950 Ma old, serpentinized peridotites surrounded by carbonate-calc-silicate ('skarn')-quartz rocks. The ore body is enclosed in the Outokumpu assemblage, which is thought to be part of a disrupted and incomplete ophiolite complex (Vuollo & Piirainen 1989) that can be traced to the Kainuu schist belt further north where the well-preserved Jormua ophiolite is ex¬posed (Kontinen 1987, Peltonen & Kontinen 2004). Outokumpu can be divided into blocks divided by faults and shear zones (Saalmann and Laine, 2014). The aim of this study was to make a 3D lithological model of a small part of the Outokumpu association rocks in the Vuonos area honoring the 3D fault model built by Saalmann and Laine (2014). The Vuonos study area is also a part of the Outokumpu mining camp area (Aatos et al. 2013, 2014). Fault and shear structures was used in geostatistical gridding and simulation of the lithologies. Several possible realizations of the structural grids, conforming the main lithological trends were built. Accordingly, it was possible to build a 3D structural grid containing information of the distribution of the possible lithologies and an estimation the associated uncertainties. References: Aatos, S

  1. Magma Emplacement and the 3D Geometry of Igneous Bodies in Rift Basins: Insights from the Bornu Basin, Onshore NE Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suleiman, A. A.; Jackson, C. A. L.; Magee, C.; Fraser, A.

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies of regional unconformities in the circum-South Atlantic tectonic plates have linked unconformity age to the timing of changes in the azimuth of oceanic fracture zones, caused by plate interactions during opening of the South Atlantic. This observation is significant, proposing that a plate boundary geodynamic processes are transmitted into and expressed in plate interiors. However, it is not yet clear if and how other geologic events, such as intra-plate magmatism, may be linked to changes in the oceanic fracture azimuthal geometry. Here we use 2D and 3D seismic reflection, geochemical, borehole datasets and outcrop observations from the Bornu Basin, one of several intra-continental rift basins located in NE Nigeria to constrain the 3D geometry of igneous bodies and magmatic emplacement processes. This allows us to link South Atlantic plate boundary geodynamics and magmatism in the surrounding continental rift basins. Seismic attributes, reflection intensity, relative acoustic impedance, were used to identify and map igneous intrusions. Saucer-shaped sills are the most common type of intrusion, although en-echelon sills, up to 1.4 km in length, were also identified. The 3D geometry of the sills reveals the detailed structural components like inner sill, inclined sheets and outer sill (Fig.1). A mapped bifurcating network of the sills suggests magma emplacement process through upward and outward propagation. Seismic-stratigraphic observations indicate that igneous activity occurred in the Early Cretaceous, Late Cretaceous and Paleogene corresponding to the timing of major azimuth changes observed in the Kane Oceanic fracture zone in the South Atlantic Ocean. Overall, our study, suggests a possible influence of plate boundary geodynamics on intra-plate magmatism as reflected in the link between the time of changes in the azimuth of oceanic fracture zones and magmatic emplacement observed in the tectono-stratigraphy of the intra-continental rift basins.

  2. Magma Emplacement and the 3D Geometry of Igneous Bodies in Rift Basins: Insights from the Bornu Basin, Onshore NE Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suleiman, Adamu; Jackson, Christopher; Magee, Craig; Fraser, Alastair

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies of regional unconformities in the circum-South Atlantic tectonic plates have linked unconformity age to the timing of changes in the azimuth of oceanic fracture zones, caused by plate interactions during opening of the South Atlantic. This observation is significant, proposing that a plate boundary geodynamic processes are transmitted into and expressed in plate interiors. However, it is not yet clear if and how other geologic events, such as intra-plate magmatism, may be linked to changes in the oceanic fracture azimuthal geometry. Here we use 2D and 3D seismic reflection, geochemical, borehole datasets and outcrop observations from the Bornu Basin, one of several intra-continental rift basins located in NE Nigeria to constrain the 3D geometry of igneous bodies and magmatic emplacement processes. This allows us to link South Atlantic plate boundary geodynamics and magmatism in the surrounding continental rift basins. Seismic attributes, reflection intensity, relative acoustic impedance, were used to identify and map igneous intrusions. Saucer-shaped sills are the most common type of intrusion, although en-echelon sills, up to 1.4 km in length, were also identified. The 3D geometry of the sills reveals the detailed structural components like inner sill, inclined sheets and outer sill. A mapped bifurcating network of the sills suggests magma emplacement process through upward and outward propagation. Seismic-stratigraphic observations indicate that igneous activity occurred in the Early Cretaceous, Late Cretaceous and Paleogene corresponding to the timing of major azimuth changes observed in the Kane Oceanic fracture zone in the South Atlantic Ocean. Overall, our study, suggests a possible influence of plate boundary geodynamics on intra-plate magmatism as reflected in the link between the time of changes in the azimuth of oceanic fracture zones and magmatic emplacement observed in the tectono-stratigraphy of the intra-continental rift basins.

  3. Density structure and geometry of the Costa Rican subduction zone from 3-D gravity modeling and local earthquake data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lücke, O. H.; Arroyo, I. G.

    2015-07-01

    The eastern part of the oceanic Cocos Plate presents a heterogeneous crustal structure due to diverse origins and ages as well as plate-hot spot interactions which originated the Cocos Ridge, a structure that converges with the Caribbean Plate in southeastern Costa Rica. The complex structure of the oceanic plate directly influences the dynamics and geometry of the subduction zone along the Middle American Trench. In this paper an integrated interpretation of the slab geometry is presented based on three-dimensional density modeling of combined satellite and surface gravity data, constrained by available geophysical and geological data and seismological information obtained from local networks. The results show the continuation of steep subduction geometry from the Nicaraguan margin into Northwestern Costa Rica, followed by a moderate dipping slab under the Central Cordillera toward the end of the Central American Volcanic Arc. To the southeast end of the volcanic arc, our preferred model shows a steep, coherent slab that extends up to the landward projection of the Panama Fracture Zone. Overall, a gradual change in the depth of the intraplate seismicity is observed, reaching 220 km in the northwestern part, and becoming progressively shallower toward the southeast, where it reaches a terminal depth of 75 km. The changes in the terminal depth of the observed seismicity correlate with the increased density in the modeled slab. The absence of intermediate depth intraplate seismicity in the southeastern section and the higher densities for the subducted slab in this area, support a model in which dehydration reactions in the subducted slab cease at a shallower depth, originating an anhydrous and thus aseismic slab.

  4. DG-AMMOS: A New tool to generate 3D conformation of small molecules using Distance Geometry and Automated Molecular Mechanics Optimization for in silico Screening

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Discovery of new bioactive molecules that could enter drug discovery programs or that could serve as chemical probes is a very complex and costly endeavor. Structure-based and ligand-based in silico screening approaches are nowadays extensively used to complement experimental screening approaches in order to increase the effectiveness of the process and facilitating the screening of thousands or millions of small molecules against a biomolecular target. Both in silico screening methods require as input a suitable chemical compound collection and most often the 3D structure of the small molecules has to be generated since compounds are usually delivered in 1D SMILES, CANSMILES or in 2D SDF formats. Results Here, we describe the new open source program DG-AMMOS which allows the generation of the 3D conformation of small molecules using Distance Geometry and their energy minimization via Automated Molecular Mechanics Optimization. The program is validated on the Astex dataset, the ChemBridge Diversity database and on a number of small molecules with known crystal structures extracted from the Cambridge Structural Database. A comparison with the free program Balloon and the well-known commercial program Omega generating the 3D of small molecules is carried out. The results show that the new free program DG-AMMOS is a very efficient 3D structure generator engine. Conclusion DG-AMMOS provides fast, automated and reliable access to the generation of 3D conformation of small molecules and facilitates the preparation of a compound collection prior to high-throughput virtual screening computations. The validation of DG-AMMOS on several different datasets proves that generated structures are generally of equal quality or sometimes better than structures obtained by other tested methods. PMID:19912625

  5. Kinematic modeling the 2014 Mw6 South Napa, California, earthquake using near-fault strong-motion data and 3D Green's functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallovic, F.; Imperatori, W.

    2015-12-01

    On 24 August 2014 an Mw 6.1 earthquake struck the Napa area in the north San Francisco Bay region. We perform slip inversion using method by Gallovič et al. (2015), employing low frequency data (0.05-0.5 Hz) recorded by 10 near-fault strong-motion stations and a 1D velocity model (GIL7). We reveal rupture propagating up-dip and unilaterally along the fault with dominant shallow asperity. While the fit of the data is good in terms of the first main pulses, the observed weaker secondary arrivals at some of the stations remain unexplained. We then perform forward simulation combining the revealed '1D' source model and detailed 3D USGS velocity model of the Bay region. While the 3D crustal model slightly improves the fit at stations located outside of major basin structures, it introduces strong spurious reverberations at stations inside the basins. These strong oscillations disappear when the 3D velocity model is smoothed. We also perform slip inversion using 3D Green's functions, obtaining a source model that effectively suppresses the oscillations, but also worsens the fit at stations outside the basins. Compared to the '1D' rupture model, the '3D' rupture model has longer rise times and lower peak slip rates, but it also contains more spurious features. Thus we conclude that the '1D' rupture model is more robust, suggesting that the 3D USGS velocity model for the Bay area should be improved in some of its parts. As a next step, based on the low-resolution slip models, we follow the approach of Ruiz (Ruiz et al., 2011) to build broadband kinematic source models to simulate deterministically ground motions up to 5Hz, including topography, intrinsic attenuation and random small-scale velocity heterogeneity. Calculations show an extremely complex wave field in comparison with 1D simulations. Finally, we check how our deterministic synthetics compare with those obtained using popular broadband hybrid techniques (e.g., Mai et al., 2010).

  6. Marrow-Derived Stem Cell Motility in 3D Synthetic Scaffold Is Governed by Geometry Along With Adhesivity and Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Peyton, Shelly R.; Kalcioglu, Z. Ilke; Cohen, Joshua C.; Runkle, Anne P.; Van Vliet, Krystyn J.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2012-01-01

    Design of 3D scaffolds that can facilitate proper survival, proliferation, and differentiation of progenitor cells is a challenge for clinical applications involving large connective tissue defects. Cell migration within such scaffolds is a critical process governing tissue integration. Here, we examine effects of scaffold pore diameter, in concert with matrix stiffness and adhesivity, as independently tunable parameters that govern marrow-derived stem cell motility. We adopted an “inverse opal” processing technique to create synthetic scaffolds by crosslinking poly(ethylene glycol) at different densities (controlling matrix elastic moduli or stiffness) and small doses of a heterobifunctional monomer (controlling matrix adhesivity) around templating beads of different radii. As pore diameter was varied from 7 to 17 µm (i.e., from significantly smaller than the spherical cell diameter to approximately cell diameter), it displayed a profound effect on migration of these stem cells—including the degree to which motility was sensitive to changes in matrix stiffness and adhesivity. Surprisingly, the highest probability for substantive cell movement through pores was observed for an intermediate pore diameter, rather than the largest pore diameter, which exceeded cell diameter. The relationships between migration speed, displacement, and total path length were found to depend strongly on pore diameter. We attribute this dependence to convolution of pore diameter and void chamber diameter, yielding different geometric environments experienced by the cells within. PMID:21449030

  7. TU-F-BRF-04: Registration of 3D Transesophageal Echocardiography and X-Ray Fluoroscopy Using An Inverse Geometry X-Ray System

    SciTech Connect

    Speidel, M; Hatt, C; Tomkowiak, M; Raval, A; Funk, T

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a method for the fusion of 3D echocardiography and Scanning-Beam Digital X-ray (SBDX) fluoroscopy to assist with catheter device and soft tissue visualization during interventional procedures. Methods: SBDX is a technology for low-dose inverse geometry x-ray fluoroscopy that performs digital tomosynthesis at multiple planes in real time. In this study, transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) images were fused with SBDX images by estimating the 3D position and orientation (the “pose”) of the TEE probe within the x-ray coordinate system and then spatially transforming the TEE image data to match this pose. An initial pose estimate was obtained through tomosynthesis-based 3D localization of points along the probe perimeter. Position and angle estimates were then iteratively refined by comparing simulated projections of a 3D probe model against SBDX x-ray images. Algorithm performance was quantified by imaging a TEE probe in different known orientations and locations within the x-ray field (0-30 degree tilt angle, up to 50 mm translation). Fused 3D TEE/SBDX imaging was demonstrated by imaging a tissue-mimicking polyvinyl alcohol cylindrical cavity as a catheter was navigated along the cavity axis. Results: Detected changes in probe tilt angle agreed with the known changes to within 1.2 degrees. For a 50 mm translation along the source-detector axis, the detected translation was 50.3 mm. Errors for in-plane translations ranged from 0.1 to 0.9 mm. In a fused 3D TEE/SBDX display, the catheter device was well visualized and coincident with the device shadow in the TEE images. The TEE images portrayed phantom boundaries that were not evident under x-ray. Conclusion: Registration of soft tissue anatomy derived from TEE imaging and device imaging from SBDX x-ray fluoroscopy is feasible. The simultaneous 3D visualization of these two modalities may be useful in interventional procedures involving the navigation of devices to soft tissue anatomy.

  8. RMT focal plane sensitivity to seismic network geometry and faulting style

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Kendra L.; Hayes, Gavin P.; Herrmann, Robert B.; Benz, Harley M.; McNamara, Dan E.; Bergman, Eric

    2016-07-01

    Modern tectonic studies often use regional moment tensors (RMTs) to interpret the seismotectonic framework of an earthquake or earthquake sequence; however, despite extensive use, little existing work addresses RMT parameter uncertainty. Here, we quantify how network geometry and faulting style affect RMT sensitivity. We examine how data-model fits change with fault plane geometry (strike and dip) for varying station configurations. We calculate the relative data fit for incrementally varying geometries about a best-fitting solution, applying our workflow to real and synthetic seismograms for both real and hypothetical station distributions and earthquakes. Initially, we conduct purely observational tests, computing RMTs from synthetic seismograms for hypothetical earthquakes and a series of well-behaved network geometries. We then incorporate real data and station distributions from the International Maule Aftershock Deployment (IMAD), which recorded aftershocks of the 2010 MW 8.8 Maule earthquake, and a set of regional stations capturing the ongoing earthquake sequence in Oklahoma and southern Kansas. We consider RMTs computed under three scenarios: (1) real seismic records selected for high data quality; (2) synthetic seismic records with noise computed for the observed source-station pairings and (3) synthetic seismic records with noise computed for all possible station-source pairings. To assess RMT sensitivity for each test, we observe the `fit falloff', which portrays how relative fit changes when strike or dip varies incrementally; we then derive the ranges of acceptable strikes and dips by identifying the span of solutions with relative fits larger than 90 per cent of the best fit. For the azimuthally incomplete IMAD network, Scenario 3 best constrains fault geometry, with average ranges of 45° and 31° for strike and dip, respectively. In Oklahoma, Scenario 3 best constrains fault dip with an average range of 46°; however, strike is best constrained by

  9. The evolution of fault geometry and lithosphere mechanical response to faulting during lithosphere hyper-extension at magma-poor rifted margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez Romeu, Júlia; Kusznir, Nick; Manatschal, Gianreto; Roberts, Alan

    2016-04-01

    The geometry of upper lithosphere extensional faulting and the mechanical response of the lithosphere during continental breakup are controversial. The lithosphere response to extensional faulting at magma-poor rifted margins controls the distribution of thinned continental crust, exhumed mantle, continental allochthons and syn-tectonic sediments leading to the complexity of heterogeneous structure of hyper-extended domain at these margins. In order to better understand the evolving fault geometry and lithosphere mechanics during magma-poor rifted margin formation, we investigate extensional faulting for the tectonic end-members of continental rifting and slow sea-floor spreading. We presume that these end-members faulting styles both contribute to lithosphere thinning during rifted margin evolution as continental rifting evolves into sea-floor spreading. For continental rifting, large extensional faults that rupture the seismogenic brittle upper lithosphere have been shown to be planar and steeply dipping by earthquake seismology and geodesy (Stein and Barrientos 1985; Jackson 1987). These results are supported by seismic reflection imaging and structural modelling of rift basins (Kusznir et al., 1991, 1995). Individual fault heaves for continental rifting seldom exceeds approximately 10 km. The effective elastic thickness, used to parameterize lithosphere flexural strength for syn-tectonic response to extensional faulting during continental rifting, are typically between 1.5 and 3 km. For slow-spreading ocean ridges we examine extensional fault geometry and lithosphere flexural response to cumulative faulting. We focus on the TAG area (deMartin et al., 2007) and the 15°N area (Schroeder et al., 2007) of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge using a flexural isostatic extensional faulting model (Buck 1988; Kusznir et al., 1991). Modelling of fault controlled bathymetry at slow-spreading ocean ridges shows that active extensional faults at depth have a steep dip (50° - 70

  10. The 3-D surface deformation, coseismic fault slip and after-slip of the 2010 Mw6.9 Yushu earthquake, Tibet, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guohong; Shan, Xinjian; Feng, Guangcai

    2016-07-01

    Using SAR interferometry on C band Envisat descending track and L band ALOS ascending track SAR images, respectively, we firstly obtain two coseismic deformation fields and one postseismic deformation of the 2010 Yushu earthquake, Tibet, China. In the meanwhile, we also obtain the azimuthal coseismic deformation of the Yushu event by Multi Aperture Interferometry (MAI) technique. With the 3 components of one-dimensional coseismic InSAR measurements, we resolve the complete 3-dimensional deformation of the 2010 Yushu event, which shows conformity and complexity to left lateral slip mechanism. The horizontal deformation is basically consistent with a sinistral slip event; whereas the vertical displacement does show certain level of complexity, which we argue is indicative of local fault geometry variation. Based on the InSAR data and elastic dislocation assumption, we invert for coseismic fault slip and early after-slip of the Yushu event. Our inversion results show major coseismic left lateral strike slip with only minor thrust component. The after-slip model fills most of the slip gaps left by the coseismic fault slip and finds a complementary slip distribution to the coseismic fault slip, which is a good indicator that future earthquake potential on the Yushu segment has been significantly reduced.

  11. A method to characterize the 3D geometry of complex landslides in clayey soils: the Valoria, Super-Sauze and La Valette case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daehne, A.; Travelletti, J.; Malet, J.-P.; Corsini, A.; Ronchetti, F.

    2009-04-01

    Bedrock geometry drastically influences the kinematic deformation pattern of slow-moving landslides exhibiting some flow characteristics. The development of extension and compression zones within the landslide body is largely controlled by the geometry (crests, bumps, hollows) and roughness of the topography covered by the moving mass. A challenge to progress in the forecast of such type of landslides is to precisely define 3D geometrical and geomechanical models. The objective of this work is to present a methodology for 3D geometrical modelling of the landslide structure, and to discuss the main possible errors in integrating multi-source and multi-resolution data in the modelling. The methodology is presented through the analysis of three landslides with similar geomorphological features (e.g. flow-like geomorphology) and development patterns (retrogression of the crown, roto-translational failures of the upper part, and translational movements in the lower part), and for which an extensive dataset of geophysical, geotechnical and geomorphological information is available. The three cases studies are the complex Valoria earth-slide-flow located in the Northern Apennines, the Super-Sauze and La Valette mudslides in the French South Alps. All three landslides are predominantly developed in a clay-shale soil formation. First, interpretation of the multi-data information, their resolution and accuracy is presented for the landslides. Second, a procedure to construct 3D geometrical models of the landslides is proposed (by using the Rockware's Rockworks geological modeller) and the influence of the interpolation algorithms is discussed. It is demonstrated that the model uncertainty is strongly depending on the density and distribution of the input data which vary for the three landslides. The quality of several geometrical models is then compared; a best-fit is achieved by using available geological and geomorphological site interpretation.

  12. Spread of excitation in 3-D models of the anisotropic cardiac tissue. II. Effects of fiber architecture and ventricular geometry.

    PubMed

    Franzone, P C; Guerri, L; Pennacchio, M; Taccardi, B

    1998-01-15

    We investigate a three-dimensional macroscopic model of wave-front propagation related to the excitation process in the left ventricular wall represented by an anisotropic bidomain. The whole left ventricle is modeled, whereas, in a previous paper, only a flat slab of myocardial tissue was considered. The direction of cardiac fibers, which affects the anisotropic conductivity of the myocardium, rotates from the epi- to the endocardium. If the ventricular wall is conceived as a set of packed surfaces, the fibers may be tangent to them or more generally may cross them obliquely; the latter case is described by an "imbrication angle." The effect of a simplified Purkinje network also is investigated. The cardiac excitation process, more particularly the depolarization phase, is modeled by a nonlinear elliptic equation, called an eikonal equation, in the activation time. The numerical solution of this equation is obtained by means of the finite element method, which includes an upwind treatment of the Hamiltonian part of the equation. By means of numerical simulations in an idealized model of the left ventricle, we try to establish whether the eikonal approach contains the essential basic elements for predicting the features of the activation patterns experimentally observed. We discuss and compare these results with those obtained in our previous papers for a flat part of myocardium. The general rules governing the spread of excitation after local stimulations, previously delineated for the flat geometry, are extended to the present, more realistic monoventricular model.

  13. Improving and validating 3D models for the leaf energy balance in canopy-scale problems with complex geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, B.; Stoll, R., II; Miller, N. E.; Pardyjak, E.; Mahaffee, W.

    2014-12-01

    Plants cover the majority of Earth's land surface, and thus play a critical role in the surface energy balance. Within individual plant communities, the leaf energy balance is a fundamental component of most biophysical processes. Absorbed radiation drives the energy balance and provides the means by which plants produce food. Available energy is partitioned into sensible and latent heat fluxes to determine surface temperature, which strongly influences rates of metabolic activity and growth. The energy balance of an individual leaf is coupled with other leaves in the community through longwave radiation emission and advection through the air. This complex coupling can make scaling models from leaves to whole-canopies difficult, specifically in canopies with complex, heterogeneous geometries. We present a new three-dimensional canopy model that simultaneously resolves sub-tree to whole-canopy scales. The model provides spatially explicit predictions of net radiation exchange, boundary-layer and stomatal conductances, evapotranspiration rates, and ultimately leaf surface temperature. The radiation model includes complex physics such as anisotropic emission and scattering. Radiation calculations are accelerated by leveraging graphics processing unit (GPU) technology, which allows canopy-scale problems to be performed on a standard desktop workstation. Since validating the three-dimensional distribution of leaf temperature can be extremely challenging, we used several independent measurement techniques to quantify errors in measured and modeled values. When compared with measured leaf temperatures, the model gave a mean error of about 2°C, which was close to the estimated measurement uncertainty.

  14. Geometry and Kinematics of Wrinkle Ridges on Lunae and Solis Plana, Mars: Implications for Fault/Fold Growth History

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tate, A.; Mueller, K. J.; Golombek, M. P.

    2002-01-01

    The three dimensional geometry of wrinkle ridges on Lunae and Solis Plana suggest they form by rapid lateral propagation and linkage of fault-propagation fold segments above reactivated blind thrust faults. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  15. Application of an inverse method for calculating three-dimensional fault geometries and clip vectors, Nun River Field, Nigeria

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, H.G.; White, N.

    1996-03-01

    A general, automatic method for determining the three-dimensional geometry of a normal fault of any shape and size is applied to a three-dimensional seismic reflection data set from the Nun River field, Nigeria. In addition to calculating fault geometry, the method also automatically retrieves the extension direction without requiring any previous information about either the fault shape or the extension direction. Solutions are found by minimizing the misfit between sets of faults that are calculated from the observed geometries of two or more hanging-wall beds. In the example discussed here, the predicted fault surface is in excellent agreement with the shape of the seismically imaged fault. Although the calculated extension direction is oblique to the average strike of the fault, the value of this parameter is not well resolved. Our approach differs markedly from standard section-balancing models in two important ways. First, we do not assume that the extension direction is known, and second, the use of inverse theory ensures that formal confidence bounds can be determined for calculated fault geometries. This ability has important implications for a range of geological problems encountered at both exploration and production scales. In particular, once the three-dimensional displacement field has been constrained, the difficult but important problem of three-dimensional palinspastic restoration of hanging-wall structures becomes tractable.

  16. Improving the resolution of the 2010 Haiti earthquake fault geometry using temporary seismometer deployments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douilly, R.; Haase, J. S.; Ellsworth, W. L.; Bouin, M.; Calais, E.; Armbruster, J. G.; Mercier De Lepinay, B. F.; Deschamps, A.; Saint Louis, M.; Meremonte, M. E.; Hough, S. E.

    2011-12-01

    . (2010) model. We use first-motion focal mechanism solutions to clarify the relationship of the fault geometry to the mechanisms of the larger events.

  17. Geodetic imaging of potential seismogenic asperities on the Xianshuihe-Anninghe-Zemuhe fault system, southwest China, with a new 3-D viscoelastic interseismic coupling model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Guoyan; Xu, Xiwei; Chen, Guihua; Liu, Yajing; Fukahata, Yukitoshi; Wang, Hua; Yu, Guihua; Tan, Xibin; Xu, Caijun

    2015-03-01

    We use GPS and interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) measurements to image the spatial variation of interseismic coupling on the Xianshuihe-Anninghe-Zemuhe (XAZ) fault system. A new 3-D viscoelastic interseismic deformation model is developed to infer the rotation and strain rates of blocks, postseismic viscoelastic relaxation, and interseismic slip deficit on the fault surface discretized with triangular dislocation patches. The inversions of synthetic data show that the optimal weight ratio and smoothing factor are both 1. The successive joint inversions of geodetic data with different viscosities reveal six potential fully coupled asperities on the XAZ fault system. Among them, the potential asperity between Shimian and Mianning, which does not exist in the case of 1019 Pa s, is confirmed by the published microearthquake depth profile. Besides, there is another potential partially coupled asperity between Daofu and Kangding with a length scale up to 140 km. All these asperity sizes are larger than the minimum resolvable wavelength. The minimum and maximum slip deficit rates near the Moxi town are 7.0 and 12.7 mm/yr, respectively. Different viscosities have little influence on the roughness of the slip deficit rate distribution and the fitting residuals, which probably suggests that our observations cannot provide a good constraint on the viscosity of the middle lower crust. The calculation of seismic moment accumulation on each segment indicates that the Songlinkou-Selaha (S4), Shimian-Mianning (S7), and Mianning-Xichang (S8) segments are very close to the rupture of characteristic earthquakes. However, the confidence level is confined by sparse near-fault observations.

  18. Constraining Basin Geometry and Fault Kinematics on the Santo Tomas Segment of the Agua Blanca Fault Through a Combined Geophysical and Structural Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springer, A.; Wetmore, P.; Fletcher, J.; Connor, C. B.; Callihan, S.; Beeson, J.; Wilson, J.

    2008-12-01

    The Santo Tomas basin, located in northern Baja California, formed at a right step in the dextral Agua Blanca fault (ABF). The ABF extends for more than 120km east from Punta Banda, with an east-west strike, and represents the southernmost fault in the San Andreas system of faulting. The basin is located roughly 40km south of Ensenada where the Agua Blanca fault intersects the Maximos fault. A detailed geophysical analysis defines the basin geometry, and helps to constrain the distribution and offset of mapped and concealed faults. Geophysical and structural data sets are combined to constrain the kinematic evolution of the Santo Tomas basin, including determining the relative amount of dip-slip and strike-slip motion on basin-bounding faults. Gravity data was collected over seven transects across and along the axis of the basin at 500 meter intervals, with 200 meter intervals at locations of known or inferred faults. Magnetic data were taken over the same lines, and are used in conjunction with gravity data to constrain the locations, geometries and displacements of intrabasinal faults. The combined gravity and magnetic data are modeled using Geosoft Oasis montaj software to create 2 3/4D models along profiles across the study area. Modeling of the geophysical data combined with structural mapping indicates that the Santo Tomas basin is bound by two major strike-slip faults, the ABF on the northeastern side and the Maximos fault on south, Based on offset markers, most of the strike-slip motion appears to be concentrated on the ABF on the north side of the basin. The ABF fault is characterized by multiple subparallel fault strands that appear to coalesce into single strands to the northwest and southeast of the basin. The Maximos is characterized by a single strand throughout the basin and it exhibits a minor dip-slip component. Basin sediments thicken slightly against the Maximos fault to as much as 1km. A third fault, cutting across the basin southeast of the

  19. Pushing the Limits of Geological Mapping Outside the Earth: 3D Modeling of Strike-Slip and Extensional Fault Systems in Meridiani Planum Region, Mars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal Royo, O.

    2014-12-01

    GIS and geological modeling software have radically changed the means by which geological mapping is produced, published and visualized. This type of software environment normally requires a spatially aware reference system to position data and interpretation, often referred as georeferenced data (i.e. geographic data referenced on the Earth). However, for this study we coin the term areoreferenced data (i.e. Mars-referenced "geographic" data). Thanks to the wealth of areoreferenced data made available by the NASA and the HiRise at University of Arizona it is now possible to carry out 3D areographic and areologic (i.e. related to the topography and geology of Mars, respectively) reconstructions in great detail. The present work benefits from the availability of software and areographic data, and presents the results of an areologic map and 3D model of the fault systems in the Meridiani Planum of Mars. The work has been carried out in Move™ (developed by Midland Valley Exploration), a geological modeling toolkit that allows for easy data loading in a wide range of formats as well as straightforward 2D/3D model building tools of geological bodies. Initial data consisted of Digital Terrain Model and orthoimages (NASA/JPL/University of Arizona/USGS). From these we have interpreted several structural domains: right-lateral strike-slip systems with associated releasing bends, which gave room to an extensional event causing a horizontal-axis rotation of the bedding. Bedding ranges from subhorizontal in the southern domain where strike-slip prevails to nearly 40º in the central and northern domains, where a more complex interaction between strike-slip and extensional faults is described. The stratigraphic sequence is mainly composed by moderately rounded well laminated basaltic sandstones (Squyres et al., 2004) in which a high component of sulfurs (e.g. sulfate anhydrate, hexahydrite, epsomite, gypsum) and salts (e.g. halite) has been described (Squyres et al., 2004

  20. 3D model of fault and fissures structure of the Kovdor Baddeleyite-Apatite-Magnetite Deposit (NE of the Fennoscandian Shield)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhirov, Dmitry; Klimov, Sergey

    2015-04-01

    The Kovdor baddeleyite-apatite-magnetite deposit (KBAMD) is represented by a large vertical ore body and is located in the southwestern part of the Kovdor ultramafic-alkaline central-type intrusion. The intrusion represents a concentrically zoned complex of rocks with an oval shape in plan, and straight zoning, which complies with the injection and displacement of each of further magma phases from the center towards the periphery. The operation of the deposit in open pits started in 1962, and nowadays, it has produced over 500,000,000 tons of ore. This is one of the largest open pits in the Kola region, which is ca. 2 km long, 1.8 km wide, and over 400 m deep. Regular structural studies has been carried out since late 1970. A unique massif of spatial data has been accumulated so far to include over 25,000 measurements of fissures and faults from the surface, ca. 20,000 measurements of fissures in the oriented drill core (over 18 km) etc. Using this data base the 3D model of fault and fissures structure was designed. The analysis of one has resulted in the identification of a series of laws and features, which are necessary to be taken into account when designing a deep open pit and mining is carried out. These are mainly aspects concerning the origin, kinematics, mechanics and ratio of spatial extension of various fault systems, variation of their parameters at deep horizons, features of a modern stress field in the country rocks, etc. The 3D model has allowed to divide the whole fracture / fissure systems of the massif rocks into 2 large groups: prototectonic system of joints, including cracks of 'liquid magmatic (carbonatite stage) contraction genesis', and newly formed faults due to the superimposed tectonic stages. With regard to the deposit scale, these are characterized as intraformational and transformational, respectively. Each group shows a set (an assemblage) of fault systems with unique features and signs, as well as regular interconnections. The

  1. Size Dependent Fracture Energy; A Derivation from Hierarchical Fault Zone Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuki, K.

    2006-12-01

    The observations that the ratio of seismic radiation energy to seismic moment is nearly constant with about four orders deviations over the very wide range of seismic moment suggests that fracture energy G is nearly constant if stress drop also is constant. The values of fracture energy estimated from observations of earthquakes are the averaged one over the rupture surface concerned. However, fault zones are very heterogeneous and as well known, fault zones are composed of fault segments and fault jogs. Smaller segment-jog structures are nested in larger segment-jog structures, forming a hierarchical self-similar geometry (e.g. Otsuki and Dilov, 2005). We assume heare that a seismic rupture breaks a fault segment of a hierarchical rank in which segment-jog structures of lower ranks are nested, and that the fracture energy at jogs is much larger than the segments at a given hierarchical rank. Based on the geometrical relationships among the length, width and number of segments, and the length, width, thickness (step over distance) and number of jogs of a given hierarchical rank, we can formulate the fracture energy Gjog of a jog of a given hierarchical rank, as well as a mean fracture energy Gmean averaged over the rupture surface, as a function of these geometrical parameters and surface energy of rocks. A key point for estimation of G is the information on the microfracture distribution inside of jogs. I measured it for fault jogs formed during a rockburst in a South Africa gold mine (Gay and Ortlepp, 1979) and for small faults developed in the Jurassic Navajo Sandstone (Ahlgren, 2001; Katz et al., 2004). Microfractures of these fault jogs show a clear nature of fractal with fractal dimension D close to 1.56 (2-D measurements). It is likely to be a universal constant for shock wave fracturing under the constrained boundary conditions. As a result, we obtained some conclusions that both Gmean and Gjog are proportional to the rupture length to the power of D-1, and

  2. Imaging the Fault Geometry From the Multi-Channel Seismic Reflection Data in the Marmara Sea, Tekirdag Basin, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanbur, Z.; Alptekin, O.

    2002-05-01

    Determination of the fault geometry in the Marmara Sea has been a major problem for the researchers after the occurence of 17 August 1999 ?zmit (M=7.4) and 12 Novenber 1999 D\\x81zce (M=7.2) earthquakes. We used Pre-Stack Kirchhoff Depth Migration Technique to ivestigate the fault geometry in the Tekirda? Basin in western Marmara Sea by using the multi-channel seismic reflection data collected by Mineral Research Institute of Turkey ( MTA). Our results show that using the Kirchhoff technique the geometry of the fault plane can be imaged better comparing to the convensional technique. Our image of the Ganos fault indicates transpressive character in the west and transtensional character in the south margin of the Tekirda? basin. Imaging technique make the trust component visible in the migration section and show that the Ganos fault has multiple fault plane. These fault planes are imaged through the depth of 2750 m in the west of Tekirda? Basin. The major plane of Ganos fault dips 33 degrees toward south at 1750 m depth. The dip of the fault gradually decreases to 18 degrees till 2750 m. Another image cutting the basin in NS direction shows that the character of the Ganos fault is changed to transtensional and the whole section is like a flower structure. The fault plane dips 70 degrees toward north . The images obtained in this study not only confirm the preliminary results determined from conventional processing techniques but also provides significant additional information on the faults in the Marmara Sea.

  3. Experimental study on the 3D image reconstruction in a truncated Archimedean-like spiral geometry with a long-rectangular detector and its image characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Daeki; Cho, Heemoon; Cho, Hyosung; Choi, Sungil; Je, Uikyu; Park, Yeonok; Park, Chulkyu; Lim, Hyunwoo; Park, Soyoung; Woo, Taeho

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we performed a feasibility study on the three-dimensional (3D) image reconstruction in a truncated Archimedean-like spiral geometry with a long-rectangular detector for application to high-accurate, cost-effective dental x-ray imaging. Here an x-ray tube and a detector rotate together around the rotational axis several times and, concurrently, the detector moves horizontally in the detector coordinate at a constant speed to cover the whole imaging volume during the projection data acquisition. We established a table-top setup which mainly consists of an x-ray tube (60 kVp, 5 mA), a narrow CMOS-type detector (198-μm pixel resolution, 184 (W)×1176 (H) pixel dimension), and a rotational stage for sample mounting and performed a systematic experiment to demonstrate the viability of the proposed approach to volumetric dental imaging. For the image reconstruction, we employed a compressed-sensing (CS)-based algorithm, rather than a common filtered-backprojection (FBP) one, for more accurate reconstruction. We successfully reconstructed 3D images of considerably high quality and investigated the image characteristics in terms of the image value profile, the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and the spatial resolution.

  4. Fault Geometry's and High Resolution Velocity Structure of The Colfiorito 1997 Earthquake Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiaraluce, L.; Chiarabba, C.; Ellsworth, W. L.

    The Colfiorito region was struck by a series of moderate magnitude (5Mw6) n ormal faulting earthquakes in 1997 monitored in great detail by a dense, temporary, three componen t seismic network. We applied the double difference earthquake loca- tion met hod to travel time picks and waveform cross-correlation measurements, ob- taining high-resolution images of the seismicity (ý1600 hypocenters with errors less than 20 m) and peculiarity of the geometry of normal faults. In this study, we tried to better constrain velocity models by using the DD locations as reference location, kept fixed during the tomographic inversion. The three-dimensional Vp and Vp/Vs struc ture was computed inverting P-wave and S-P arrival times, revealing strong later al heterogeneity and details of the complex tectonic setting. We show the compar ison between results obtained by this new inversion and those found by previous studies, underlying the strong influence of improved starting locations in simpl ifying the in- version process and in obtaining more detailed velocity images. Fro m our results, we observe that the previously proposed geometrical discontinuiti es and lateral steps due to the inherited structures, that control the lateral e xtension and consequently fault segmentation, are better defined. All the princi pal shocks nucleated near the base of the seismogenic layer (6 km) and in regio ns of high Vp. Strong high Vp patches are delineated along the fault segments in dicating the main asperities ruptured during the main shocks. Moreover, the posi tion of the relatively young normal faults mostly on the back limb of the old thrust is also evident.

  5. 3D seismic imaging of an active, normal fault zone in southern Apennines (Italy): Clues on fluid-driven microearthquake fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoroso, O.; Zollo, A.; Virieux, J.

    2012-12-01

    We have reconstructed a 3D detailed image of the crustal volume embedding the active normal fault system in southern Apennines (Italy). It is obtained by the inversion of P and S first arrival times from microearthquakes recorded in the area. The issues of data quality and the implementation of robust tomographic inversion strategy have been addressed to improve the resolution of the seismic image. The arrival times measurements are enhanced by applying techniques based on polarization filtering and refined re-picking. Data inversion has been performed by using a delay-time 3D tomographic method for the joint determination of source locations and velocity model. The dataset consists of 1311 events with magnitude ranging between [0.1, 3.2], recorded from August 2005 to April 2011 by 42 stations operated by the consortium AMRA scarl and INGV. We used a multi-scale inversion approach, in order to first estimate the large wavelength components of the velocity model and then to progressively introduce smaller scale components. P- and S-wave velocity models show a strong lateral variation along a direction orthogonal to the Apeninic chain, between 0-15 km depth. This variation defines two geological formations which are characterized by relatively low and high P-wave velocities. The sharpest lateral transition occurs in the NE direction: it is well correlated with the location of the NW-SE oriented, primary normal fault associated with the 1980, Ms 6.9 earthquake, which cuts at SW the outcrops of the carbonatic Campanian platform, and separates at NE the older Mesozoic limestone formations from the younger Pliocene-Quaternary basin deposits. The main lithological formations, as identified in the referenced active seismic CROP04 profile, can be recognized in the inferred velocity model. In particular, the structural feature associated with the uplift of the Apulian Platform is well detected by the high P-velocity anomaly ranging between 6.0-6.8 km/s. The thickening of the

  6. Geometry and late Pleistocene slip rates of the Liangdang-Jiangluo fault in the western Qinling mountains, NW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen-jun, Zheng; Xing-wang, Liu; Jing-xing, Yu; Dao-yang, Yuan; Pei-zhen, Zhang; Wei-peng, Ge; Jian-zhang, Pang; Bai-yun, Liu

    2016-09-01

    Two groups of faults striking in different direction (NWW-trending and NEE-trending) within the western Qinling mountains play important roles in the tectonic deformation and the transference slip along the east end of the east Kunlun fault. We investigated the fault geometry and kinematics properties in the area. Based on the displacements of landforms and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating techniques, the late Pleistocene slip rates along the Liangdang-Jiangluo fault were determined to be 0.43 ± 0.13 mm/a (thrust) and 0.71 ± 0.18 mm/a (left-lateral strike-slip). We also investigated some other faults, and obtained characteristically low slip rates. These slip rates are consistent with decadal GPS observations. Despite previous studies that point to a systematic decrease in the left-lateral slip rates from > 10 mm/a to < 2 mm/a along the eastern end of the Kunlun fault, there has been relatively little discussion about the role of the faults, that lie between the east Kunlun and west Qinling faults in accommodating the regional tectonic deformation. From the activity, geometry, and kinematics of the regional faults in the western Qinling Mountains, we concluded that the main driving force that arises from the NE-thrusting and strike slip along the east Kunlun fault dominated the deformation in the area. Our results suggest that the < 2 mm/a slip rate at the tip of the east Kunlun fault is absorbed by low slip rate faults, crustal shortening, basin formation and mountain uplift in the western Qinling mountains, and the slip is not transferred to the west Qinling fault or further north.

  7. Location and moment tensor inversion of small earthquakes using 3D Green's functions in models with rugged topography: application to the Longmenshan fault zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Li; Zhang, Wei; Shen, Yang; Chen, Xiaofei; Zhang, Jie

    2016-06-01

    With dense seismic arrays and advanced imaging methods, regional three-dimensional (3D) Earth models have become more accurate. It is now increasingly feasible and advantageous to use a 3D Earth model to better locate earthquakes and invert their source mechanisms by fitting synthetics to observed waveforms. In this study, we develop an approach to determine both the earthquake location and source mechanism from waveform information. The observed waveforms are filtered in different frequency bands and separated into windows for the individual phases. Instead of picking the arrival times, the traveltime differences are measured by cross-correlation between synthetic waveforms based on the 3D Earth model and observed waveforms. The earthquake location is determined by minimizing the cross-correlation traveltime differences. We then fix the horizontal location of the earthquake and perform a grid search in depth to determine the source mechanism at each point by fitting the synthetic and observed waveforms. This new method is verified by a synthetic test with noise added to the synthetic waveforms and a realistic station distribution. We apply this method to a series of M W3.4-5.6 earthquakes in the Longmenshan fault (LMSF) zone, a region with rugged topography between the eastern margin of the Tibetan plateau and the western part of the Sichuan basin. The results show that our solutions result in improved waveform fits compared to the source parameters from the catalogs we used and the location can be better constrained than the amplitude-only approach. Furthermore, the source solutions with realistic topography provide a better fit to the observed waveforms than those without the topography, indicating the need to take the topography into account in regions with rugged topography.

  8. 3D Geomodeling of the Venezuelan Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monod, B.; Dhont, D.; Hervouet, Y.; Backé, G.; Klarica, S.; Choy, J. E.

    2010-12-01

    The crustal structure of the Venezuelan Andes is investigated thanks to a geomodel. The method integrates surface structural data, remote sensing imagery, crustal scale balanced cross-sections, earthquake locations and focal mechanism solutions to reconstruct fault surfaces at the scale of the mountain belt into a 3D environment. The model proves to be essential for understanding the basic processes of both the orogenic float and the tectonic escape involved in the Plio-Quaternary evolution of the orogen. The reconstruction of the Bocono and Valera faults reveals the 3D shape of the Trujillo block whose geometry can be compared to a boat bow floating over a mid-crustal detachment horizon emerging at the Bocono-Valera triple junction. Motion of the Trujillo block is accompanied by a generalized extension in the upper crust accommodated by normal faults with listric geometries such as for the Motatan, Momboy and Tuñame faults. Extension may be related to the lateral spreading of the upper crust, suggesting that gravity forces play an important role in the escape process.

  9. Real-time inversions for finite fault slip models and rupture geometry based on high-rate GPS data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Minson, Sarah E.; Murray, Jessica R.; Langbein, John O.; Gomberg, Joan S.

    2015-01-01

    We present an inversion strategy capable of using real-time high-rate GPS data to simultaneously solve for a distributed slip model and fault geometry in real time as a rupture unfolds. We employ Bayesian inference to find the optimal fault geometry and the distribution of possible slip models for that geometry using a simple analytical solution. By adopting an analytical Bayesian approach, we can solve this complex inversion problem (including calculating the uncertainties on our results) in real time. Furthermore, since the joint inversion for distributed slip and fault geometry can be computed in real time, the time required to obtain a source model of the earthquake does not depend on the computational cost. Instead, the time required is controlled by the duration of the rupture and the time required for information to propagate from the source to the receivers. We apply our modeling approach, called Bayesian Evidence-based Fault Orientation and Real-time Earthquake Slip, to the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake, 2003 Tokachi-oki earthquake, and a simulated Hayward fault earthquake. In all three cases, the inversion recovers the magnitude, spatial distribution of slip, and fault geometry in real time. Since our inversion relies on static offsets estimated from real-time high-rate GPS data, we also present performance tests of various approaches to estimating quasi-static offsets in real time. We find that the raw high-rate time series are the best data to use for determining the moment magnitude of the event, but slightly smoothing the raw time series helps stabilize the inversion for fault geometry.

  10. Structure Segmentation and Transfer Faults in the Marcellus Shale, Clearfield County, Pennsylvania: Implications for Gas Recovery Efficiency and Risk Assessment Using 3D Seismic Attribute Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Emily D.

    The Marcellus Shale has become an important unconventional gas reservoir in the oil and gas industry. Fractures within this organic-rich black shale serve as an important component of porosity and permeability useful in enhancing production. Horizontal drilling is the primary approach for extracting hydrocarbons in the Marcellus Shale. Typically, wells are drilled perpendicular to natural fractures in an attempt to intersect fractures for effective hydraulic stimulation. If the fractures are contained within the shale, then hydraulic fracturing can enhance permeability by further breaking the already weakened rock. However, natural fractures can affect hydraulic stimulations by absorbing and/or redirecting the energy away from the wellbore, causing a decreased efficiency in gas recovery, as has been the case for the Clearfield County, Pennsylvania study area. Estimating appropriate distances away from faults and fractures, which may limit hydrocarbon recovery, is essential to reducing the risk of injection fluid migration along these faults. In an attempt to mitigate the negative influences of natural fractures on hydrocarbon extraction within the Marcellus Shale, fractures were analyzed through the aid of both traditional and advanced seismic attributes including variance, curvature, ant tracking, and waveform model regression. Through the integration of well log interpretations and seismic data, a detailed assessment of structural discontinuities that may decrease the recovery efficiency of hydrocarbons was conducted. High-quality 3D seismic data in Central Pennsylvania show regional folds and thrusts above the major detachment interval of the Salina Salt. In addition to the regional detachment folds and thrusts, cross-regional, northwest-trending lineaments were mapped. These lineaments may pose a threat to hydrocarbon productivity and recovery efficiency due to faults and fractures acting as paths of least resistance for induced hydraulic stimulation fluids

  11. Constraints on recent earthquake source parameters, fault geometry and aftershock characteristics in Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, D. E.; Benz, H.; Herrmann, R. B.; Bergman, E. A.; McMahon, N. D.; Aster, R. C.

    2014-12-01

    In late 2009, the seismicity of Oklahoma increased dramatically. The largest of these earthquakes was a series of three damaging events (Mw 4.8, 5.6, 4.8) that occurred over a span of four days in November 2011 near the town of Prague in central Oklahoma. Studies suggest that these earthquakes were induced by reactivation of the Wilzetta fault due to the disposal of waste water from hydraulic fracturing ("fracking") and other oil and gas activities. The Wilzetta fault is a northeast trending vertical strike-slip fault that is a well known structural trap for oil and gas. Since the November 2011 Prague sequence, thousands of small to moderate (M2-M4) earthquakes have occurred throughout central Oklahoma. The most active regions are located near the towns of Stillwater and Medford in north-central Oklahoma, and Guthrie, Langston and Jones near Oklahoma City. The USGS, in collaboration with the Oklahoma Geological Survey and the University of Oklahoma, has responded by deploying numerous temporary seismic stations in the region in order to record the vigorous aftershock sequences. In this study we use data from the temporary seismic stations to re-locate all Oklahoma earthquakes in the USGS National Earthquake Information Center catalog using a multiple-event approach known as hypo-centroidal decomposition that locates earthquakes with decreased uncertainty relative to one another. Modeling from this study allows us to constrain the detailed geometry of the reactivated faults, as well as source parameters (focal mechanisms, stress drop, rupture length) for the larger earthquakes. Preliminary results from the November 2011 Prague sequence suggest that subsurface rupture lengths of the largest earthquakes are anomalously long with very low stress drop. We also observe very high Q (~1000 at 1 Hz) that explains the large felt areas and we find relatively low b-value and a rapid decay of aftershocks.

  12. Along-strike variations of geometry and kinematics on the border fault of Nanpu sag, Bohai Bay Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Ren, J.; Liu, X.; Sun, Z.; Su, M.

    2010-12-01

    Nanpu sag is located in the north-eastern portion of the Huanghua depression, covering an area of approximately 1900km2, and comprises one of the most important petroliferous basins of the Bohai Bay Basin. The Nanpu sag is bordered by two master faults with long-term activity: the Xi’nanzhuang (XNZ) and Bogezhuang (BGZ) fault. By analysis of horizontal slices, gravity anomaly map and seismic reflection sections, we found there is no cutting relationship, and thus considered the XNZ and BGZ fault as a same one. However it showed striking differences between the XNZ and BGZ segment in fault occurrence, fault throw and residual formation thickness and so on. The BGZ fault was NW trending fault with a steep inclination. Taken section across the northern region in Nanpu sag for example, its controlling depocenter is located in eastern subsag (Fig.1); the XNZ fault was a NE fault and displayed a Shovel-shaped to plate-like geometry, with its controlling depocenter located in western subsag. We qualitify the fault throw, showing that the XNZ fault strongly acted during the sedimentary period of Es3-Es2, while the BGZ fault presented weak activity, and especially during Es31 submember-Es2 member, the XNZ fault acted so strongly that the hanging wall of BGZ fault was tilt-lifted and suffered erosion (Fig.1), which created Es1 uncomformity; The BGZ fault acted strongly during the sedimentary period of Es1-Ed, which led the hanging wall of XNZ fault to be tilt-lifted. Controlled by such segmented activity of the whole border fault, which we suggested a "seesaw" model for its evolution, the northern part in the Nanpu sag experienced an alternative variation between a deposition center and an erosion region after tilt-lifting. Combination of the sediment stacking patterns, we further classified the history of "seesaw" activities into four stages: 1) Early double-break stage (Es35-Es31), both of the XNZ and BGZ fault acted; 2) Middle the XNZ segment throw and the BGZ tilting

  13. Delineation of faulting and basin geometry along a seismic reflection transect in urbanized San Bernardino Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stephenson, W.J.; Odum, J.K.; Williams, R.A.; Anderson, M.L.

    2002-01-01

    Fourteen kilometers of continuous, shallow seismic reflection data acquired through the urbanized San Bernardino Valley, California, have revealed numerous faults between the San Jacinto and San Andreas faults as well as a complex pattern of downdropped and uplifted blocks. These data also indicate that the Loma Linda fault continues northeastward at least 4.5 km beyond its last mapped location on the southern edge of the valley and to within at least 2 km of downtown San Bernardino. Previously undetected faults within the valley northeast of the San Jacinto fault are also imaged, including the inferred western extension of the Banning fault and several unnamed faults. The Rialto-Colton fault is interpreted southwest of the San Jacinto fault. The seismic data image the top of the crystalline basement complex across 70% of the profile length and show that the basement has an overall dip of roughly 10?? southwest between Perris Hill and the San Jacinto fault. Gravity and aeromagnetic data corroborate the interpreted location of the San Jacinto fault and better constrain the basin depth along the seismic profile to be as deep as 1.7 km. These data also corroborate other fault locations and the general dip of the basement surface. At least 1.2 km of apparent vertical displacement on the basement is observed across the San Jacinto fault at the profile location. The basin geometry delineated by these data was used to generate modeled ground motions that show peak horizontal amplifications of 2-3.5 above bedrock response in the 0.05- to 1.0-Hz frequency band, which is consistent with recorded earthquake data in the valley.

  14. A free software for pore-scale modelling: solving Stokes equation for velocity fields and permeability values in 3D pore geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerke, Kirill; Vasilyev, Roman; Khirevich, Siarhei; Karsanina, Marina; Collins, Daniel; Korost, Dmitry; Mallants, Dirk

    2015-04-01

    In this contribution we introduce a novel free software which solves the Stokes equation to obtain velocity fields for low Reynolds-number flows within externally generated 3D pore geometries. Provided with velocity fields, one can calculate permeability for known pressure gradient boundary conditions via Darcy's equation. Finite-difference schemes of 2nd and 4th order of accuracy are used together with an artificial compressibility method to iteratively converge to a steady-state solution of Stokes' equation. This numerical approach is much faster and less computationally demanding than the majority of open-source or commercial softwares employing other algorithms (finite elements/volumes, lattice Boltzmann, etc.) The software consists of two parts: 1) a pre and post-processing graphical interface, and 2) a solver. The latter is efficiently parallelized to use any number of available cores (the speedup on 16 threads was up to 10-12 depending on hardware). Due to parallelization and memory optimization our software can be used to obtain solutions for 300x300x300 voxels geometries on modern desktop PCs. The software was successfully verified by testing it against lattice Boltzmann simulations and analytical solutions. To illustrate the software's applicability for numerous problems in Earth Sciences, a number of case studies have been developed: 1) identifying the representative elementary volume for permeability determination within a sandstone sample, 2) derivation of permeability/hydraulic conductivity values for rock and soil samples and comparing those with experimentally obtained values, 3) revealing the influence of the amount of fine-textured material such as clay on filtration properties of sandy soil. This work was partially supported by RSF grant 14-17-00658 (pore-scale modelling) and RFBR grants 13-04-00409-a and 13-05-01176-a.

  15. 3D Reconstruction of Chick Embryo Vascular Geometries Using Non-invasive High-Frequency Ultrasound for Computational Fluid Dynamics Studies.

    PubMed

    Tan, Germaine Xin Yi; Jamil, Muhammad; Tee, Nicole Gui Zhen; Zhong, Liang; Yap, Choon Hwai

    2015-11-01

    Recent animal studies have provided evidence that prenatal blood flow fluid mechanics may play a role in the pathogenesis of congenital cardiovascular malformations. To further these researches, it is important to have an imaging technique for small animal embryos with sufficient resolution to support computational fluid dynamics studies, and that is also non-invasive and non-destructive to allow for subject-specific, longitudinal studies. In the current study, we developed such a technique, based on ultrasound biomicroscopy scans on chick embryos. Our technique included a motion cancelation algorithm to negate embryonic body motion, a temporal averaging algorithm to differentiate blood spaces from tissue spaces, and 3D reconstruction of blood volumes in the embryo. The accuracy of the reconstructed models was validated with direct stereoscopic measurements. A computational fluid dynamics simulation was performed to model fluid flow in the generated construct of a Hamburger-Hamilton (HH) stage 27 embryo. Simulation results showed that there were divergent streamlines and a low shear region at the carotid duct, which may be linked to the carotid duct's eventual regression and disappearance by HH stage 34. We show that our technique has sufficient resolution to produce accurate geometries for computational fluid dynamics simulations to quantify embryonic cardiovascular fluid mechanics.

  16. Understanding the thermal history, exhumation patterns, and role of fault systems on Goodenough Island, Papua New Guinea: Insights from 3D thermo-kinematic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermudez, M. A.; Baldwin, S.; Fitzgerald, P. G.; Braun, J.

    2012-12-01

    The world's youngest eclogites, exhumed from depths of ca. 90 km since 8 Ma, are located in the D'Entrecasteaux Islands in the active Woodlark rift of southeastern Papua New Guinea. These (U)HP rocks formed during/following subduction of Australian margin-derived volcaniclastic sediments, and were exhumed during rifting within the larger, obliquely convergent Australian-Pacific plate boundary zone. Several (U)HP exhumation mechanisms have been proposed including diapiric rise of buoyant crust from mantle to crustal depths, and rifting of heterogeneous crust ahead of the east-to-west propagating Woodlark seafloor spreading center. In order to constrain the relative importance of different exhumation mechanisms through time (i.e., timing and rates of diapirism vs crustal faulting), we apply 3D thermo-kinematic modeling (Pecube) to constrain cooling and exhumation histories derived from thermochronologic data from Goodenough Island, the western-most of the D'Entrecasteaux Islands. More than 500,000 Pecube inverse models were run to evaluate scenarios involving vertical exhumation velocities (i.e., simulating simple buoyancy due to diapirism), low-angle normal faulting and combinations of both processes. These preliminary models assume steady-state topography. Preliminary models (starting at 8 Ma) include: (i) continuous exhumation, (ii) two exhumation phases with different exhumation rates (increasing and/or decreasing), and (iii) three exhumation phases with variable exhumation rates. For buoyancy-only models, the first two scenarios (i and ii) result in poor fits between model-derived and observed (experimental) data. Notably, scenarios (i) and (ii) produce indistinguishable ages for all thermochronologic systems, uniformly long apatite fission-track (AFT) lengths, excessive temperatures at the Moho and geological starting parameters (depth, T) that are not consistent with other data. Scenario (iii) with three exhumation phases has the least misfit between model

  17. A case study on pseudo 3-D Chirp sub-bottom profiler (SBP) survey for the detection of a fault trace in shallow sedimentary layers at gas hydrate site in the Ulleung Basin, East Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young-Jun; Koo, Nam-Hyung; Cheong, Snons; Kim, Jung-Ki; Chun, Jong-Hwa; Shin, Sung-Ryul; Riedel, Michael; Lee, Ho-Young

    2016-10-01

    A pseudo 3-D Chirp sub-bottom profiler (SBP) survey was conducted to define the extension of a fault that was previously identified on low-resolution 2-D seismic data with an emphasis on the shallow sedimentary layers and to determine if the fault extends to the seafloor. The geophysical survey was conducted as part of an environmental impact assessment for a proposed gas hydrate production test in the Ulleung Basin, East Sea. The Chirp SBP raw data were acquired over an area of 1 km × 1 km with an average line spacing of 20 m. To produce a 3-D Chirp SBP volume, we developed an optimal processing sequence that was divided into two steps. The first phase of 2-D data processing included a sweep signature estimation, correlation, deconvolution, swell effect correction, and migration. The second phase of 3-D data processing was composed of a bin design, bin gathering of the final processed 2-D data set, amplitude normalization, and residual statics correction. The 3-D Chirp SBP volume provides enhanced imaging especially due to the residual static processing using a moving average method and shows better continuity of the sedimentary layers and consistency of the reflection events than the individual 2-D lines. Deformation of the seafloor as a result of the fault was detected, and the fault offset increases in the deeper sedimentary layers. We also determined that the fault strikes northwest-southeast. However, the shallow sub-seafloor sediments have high porosities and therefore do not exhibit brittle fault-behavior but rather deform continuously due to fault movement.

  18. Full source tensor inversions of San Jacinto fault zone earthquakes using 3D Green's functions with the gCAP method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Z.; Ben-Zion, Y.; Zhu, L.; Graves, R. W.

    2015-12-01

    We perform a full source tensor inversion of several M > 4 earthquakes that occurred in the San Jacinto fault zone in southern California, with an emphasis on resolving signatures of volumetric source changes. A previous study on these events with Green's functions based on a 1D velocity model identified statistically significant explosive isotropic components (Ross et al. 2015). Here we use the SCEC 3D Community Velocity Model to derive Green's functions with source-receiver reciprocity and finite-difference calculations based on the code of Graves (1996). About 50 stations are used at epicentral distances of up to 55 km. The inversions are performed using the 'generalized Cut and Paste' method, which includes CLVD and isotropic components (Zhu and Ben-Zion 2013). The derived source tensors are compared to the results of the previous study based on the simplified 1D velocity model. The results are analyzed with bootstrap analysis to estimate uncertainties involved. Additional tests are performed using synthetic waveforms to study the effects of neglecting various features on the source inversions.

  19. Large-scale Geometry of Intra-continental Strike-slip Faults: Example of the Karakorum Fault, Western Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevalier, M. L.; Leloup, P. H.; Li, H.

    2015-12-01

    How large-scale, active strike-slip fault systems are defined can sometimes be ambiguous, especially when viewed at different timescales (geodetic vs longer term measurements). Does every kilometer of the fault system need to be visible in the morphology (offset geomorphic features, fault trace, etc) to be considered as currently active? Does every segment of the fault need to have a unique and consistent kinematics along the entire fault system (normal, strike-slip, reverse)? Does all segments need to be physically connected at the surface to be considered part of the same fault system? To illustrate our arguments against such statements, we use the example of the right-lateral strike-slip Karakorum fault, located in western Tibet, along which lively debates have been taking place in the last ~20 years. These concern its initiation age, total geologic offsets, slip-rates, and more recently, even the location and current activity of the northern half of the fault. In particular, whether the active Kongur Shan extensional system, located in the Chinese Pamir, belongs to the Karakorum fault system remains controversial. Here, we argue that both systems are connected and that they both play a significant role in accommodating deformation at the western Himalayan syntaxis, under the form of extensional displacement in the Chinese Pamir.

  20. Fast Domain Partitioning Method for dynamic boundary integral equations applicable to non-planar faults dipping in 3-D elastic half-space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Ryosuke

    2016-11-01

    The elastodynamic boundary integral equation method (BIEM) in real space and in the temporal domain is an accurate semi-analytical tool to investigate the earthquake rupture dynamics on non-planar faults. However, its heavy computational demand for a historic integral generally increases with a time complexity of O(MN3)for the number of time steps N and elements M due to volume integration in the causality cone. In this study, we introduce an efficient BIEM, termed the `Fast Domain Partitioning Method' (FDPM), which enables us to reduce the computation time to the order of the surface integral, O(MN2), without degrading the accuracy. The memory requirement is also reduced to O(M2) from O(M2N). FDPM uses the physical nature of Green's function for stress to partition the causality cone into the domains of the P and S wave fronts, the domain in-between the P and S wave fronts, and the domain of the static equilibrium, where the latter two domains exhibit simpler dependences on time and/or space. The scalability of this method is demonstrated on the large-scale parallel computing environments of distributed memory systems. It is also shown that FDPM enables an efficient use of memory storage, which makes it possible to reduce computation times to a previously unprecedented level. We thus present FDPM as a powerful tool to break through the current fundamental difficulties in running dynamic simulations of coseismic ruptures and earthquake cycles under realistic conditions of fault geometries.

  1. Adhesion and growth of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on precise-geometry 3D organic-inorganic composite scaffolds for bone repair.

    PubMed

    Chatzinikolaidou, Maria; Rekstyte, Sima; Danilevicius, Paulius; Pontikoglou, Charalampos; Papadaki, Helen; Farsari, Maria; Vamvakaki, Maria

    2015-03-01

    Engineering biomaterial scaffolds that promote attachment and growth of mesenchymal stem cells in three dimensions is a crucial parameter for successful bone tissue engineering. Towards this direction, a lot of research effort has focused recently into the development of three-dimensional porous scaffolds, aiming to elicit positive cellular behavior. However, the fabrication of three-dimensional tissue scaffolds with a precise geometry and complex micro- and nano-features, supporting cell in-growth remains a challenge. In this study we report on a positive cellular response of human bone marrow-derived (BM) mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) onto hybrid material scaffolds consisting of methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane, zirconium propoxide, and 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA). First, we use Direct fs Laser Writing, a 3D scaffolding technology to fabricate the complex structures. Subsequently, we investigate the morphology, viability and proliferation of BM-MSCs onto the hybrid scaffolds and examine the cellular response from different donors. Finally, we explore the effect of the materials' chemical composition on cell proliferation, employing three different material surfaces: (i) a hybrid consisting of methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane, zirconium propoxide and 50mol% DMAEMA, (ii) a hybrid material comprising methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane and zirconium propoxide, and (iii) a purely organic polyDMAEMA. Our results show a strong adhesion of BM-MSCs onto the hybrid material containing 50% DMAEMA from the first 2h after seeding, and up to several days, and a proliferation increase after 14 and 21days, similar to the polystyrene control, independent of cell donor. These findings support the potential use of our proposed cell-material combination in bone tissue engineering.

  2. 3D Modeling By Consolidation Of Independent Geometries Extracted From Point Clouds - The Case Of The Modeling Of The Turckheim's Chapel (Alsace, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehl, M.; Fabre, Ph.; Schlussel, B.

    2014-06-01

    Turckheim is a small town located in Alsace, north-east of France. In the heart of the Alsatian vineyard, this city has many historical monuments including its old church. To understand the effectiveness of the project described in this paper, it is important to have a look at the history of this church. Indeed there are many historical events that explain its renovation and even its partial reconstruction. The first mention of a christian sanctuary in Turckheim dates back to 898. It will be replaced in the 12th century by a roman church (chapel), which subsists today as the bell tower. Touched by a lightning in 1661, the tower then was enhanced. In 1736, it was repaired following damage sustained in a tornado. In 1791, the town installs an organ to the church. Last milestone, the church is destroyed by fire in 1978. The organ, like the heart of the church will then have to be again restored (1983) with a simplified architecture. From this heavy and rich past, it unfortunately and as it is often the case, remains only very few documents and information available apart from facts stated in some sporadic writings. And with regard to the geometry, the positioning, the physical characteristics of the initial building, there are very little indication. Some assumptions of positions and right-of-way were well issued by different historians or archaeologists. The acquisition and 3D modeling project must therefore provide the current state of the edifice to serve as the basis of new investigations and for the generation of new hypotheses on the locations and historical shapes of this church and its original chapel (Fig. 1)

  3. 2D and 3D Visualizations of the Fault Areas, Initial Heights and Tsunami Simulations of Five Largest Historical Earthquakes in Mediterrenean Region.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gürleme, Beran; Tarık Meriç, Hakan; Ulutaş, Ergin; Anunziato, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study is the simulation and visualization of the initial and maximum tsunami wave heights in 2D and 3D along the Mediterranean coasts inferred from the five largest earthquakes in history in this region. The earthquakes considered in the study are 21 July 365 Crete, 8 August 1303 Crete, 3 May 1481 Rhodes, 28 December Messina and 21 May 2003 Algeria. All these earthquakes spawned tsunamis and inflicted damage in coastal regions. The study was conducted to explain which could be the potential Tsunami consequences caused by similar earthquakes occurring in the region in the future. The methodology used for the calculation of tsunami wave heights from the earthquakes includes the determination of earthquake parameters, modeling of the initial wave height, simulation of the wave propagation and calculation of the maximum wave heights near coastal areas. The parameters of the earthquakes are based on previously published fault mechanism solutions and known tectonic features of the regions. Static dislocation algorithm for the initial wave height is used from the parameters of focal mechanism solutions. The study was conducted also to understand the reliability of the previously published focal mechanism solutions for the earthquakes by using the principal stress axis in the regions. The 2D and 3D visualized models of tsunamis from the earthquakes include isometric grid representing the sea surface for the purpose of a better understanding of the initial tsunami mechanism compared to 1D visualizations. In many studies, the earthquake locations, tectonic features of the regions, initial heights and tsunami simulations are shown on maps as bird's eye in 1D visualization. However these kinds of features are related in depths and bathymetric features. For that reason, our approaches will contribute to have better understanding where the uplift- subsidence of initial heights and crests-troughs of simulated wave heights and thus provide a better insight of the

  4. Coseismic and postseismic Coulomb stress changes on intra-continental dip-slip faults and the role of viscoelastic relaxation in the lower crust: insights from 3D finite-element models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagge, Meike; Hampel, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Investigating the stress interaction of faults plays a crucial role for assessing seismic hazard of a region. The calculation of Coulomb stress changes allows quantifying stress changes on so-called receiver faults in the surrounding of a source fault that was ruptured during an earthquake. Positive Coulomb stress changes bring receiver faults closer to failure, while a negative value indicates a delay of the next earthquake. Besides the coseismic ('static') stress changes, postseismic ('transient') stress changes induced by postseismic viscoelastic relaxation occur. Here we use 3D finite-element models with arrays of normal or thrust faults to study the coseismic stress changes and the stress changes arising from postseismic relaxation in the lower crust. The lithosphere is divided into an elastic upper crust, a viscoelastic lower crust and a viscoelastic lithospheric mantle. Gravity is included in the models. Driven by extension or shortening of the model, slip on the fault planes develops in a self-consistent way. We modelled an earthquake on a 40-km-long source fault with a coseismic slip of 2 m and calculated the displacement fields and Coulomb stress changes during the coseismic and postseismic phases. The results for the coseismic phase (Bagge and Hampel, Tectonophysics in press) show that synthetic receiver faults in the hanging wall and footwall of the source fault exhibit a symmetric distribution of the coseismic Coulomb stress changes on each fault, with large areas of negative stress changes but also some smaller areas of positive values. In contrast, faults positioned in along-strike prolongation of the source fault and outside of its hanging wall and footwall undergo mostly positive stress changes. Postseismic stress changes caused by viscous flow modify the static stress changes in a way that the net Coulomb stress changes on the receiver faults change significantly through space and time. Our models allow deciphering the combined effect of stress

  5. New constraints on the geometry and evolution of the Southern San Andreas Fault and Salton Pull-apart basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahakian, V. J.; Holmes, J. J.; Kell, A. M.; Harding, A. J.; Driscoll, N. W.; Kent, G.

    2013-12-01

    In the recent geologic past, the Salton pull-apart basin, northern Imperial Fault (IF) and Southern San Andreas Fault (SSAF) have been part of an evolving tectonic regime, subject to strain partitioning. This part of the North American/Pacific plate boundary has the potential for generating a large earthquake. Several lines of active-source seismic reflection and refraction data in the Salton Sea were analyzed to better understand the fault interactions and evolution in this region by investigating the SSAF geometry, stratigraphy, and velocity structure. These data, collected in conjunction with the Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP) include two fault-perpendicular lines: one adjacent to the southern terminus of the SSAF (Line 7), and one just south of the terminus (Line 8). We present results from Multi Channel Seismic (MCS) data along Line 7, and refraction data along Lines 7 and 8. Velocity models along these lines were constructed from the refraction data. Included in the Line 7 model is an interface representing a strong reflector observed in the MCS data, which helps to constrain the raypaths and velocities in the model. Line 7 MCS data image stratigraphic layers thickening to and dipping down to the east towards the SSAF, indicative of a westward-dipping, oblique strike-slip fault. The refraction data along this line are consistent with a westward dipping SSAF and a down the west normal component. We present velocity models for Line 7 and 8, as well as resolution tests supporting the fault's geometry. The results from these two lines and a fault parallel line suggest that the SSAF is dipping to the west and is in transtension. We propose that the SSAF has migrated northward through time, partitioning its strain onto the IF. As the IF migrates northwards it forms the Salton pull-apart basin.

  6. The inverted Triassic rift of the Marrakech High Atlas: A reappraisal of basin geometries and faulting histories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domènech, Mireia; Teixell, Antonio; Babault, Julien; Arboleya, Maria-Luisa

    2015-11-01

    The High Atlas of Morocco is an aborted rift developed during the Triassic-Jurassic and moderately inverted during the Cenozoic. The Marrakech High Atlas, with large exposures of basement and Triassic early syn-rift deposits, is ideal to investigate the geometries of the deepest parts of a rift, constituting a good analogue for pre-salt domains. It allows unraveling geometries and kinematics of the extensional and compressional structures and the influence that they exert over one another. A detailed structural study of the main Triassic basins and basin-margin faults of the Marrakech High Atlas shows that only a few rift faults were reactivated during the Cenozoic compressional stage in contrast to previous interpretations, and emphasizes that fault reactivation cannot be taken for granted in inverted rift systems. Preserved extensional features demonstrate a dominant dip-slip opening kinematics with strike-slip playing a minor role, at variance to models proposing a major strike-slip component along the main basin-bounding faults, including faults belonging to the Tizi n'Test fault zone. A new Middle Triassic paleogeographic reconstruction shows that the Marrakech High Atlas was a narrow and segmented orthogonal rift (sub-perpendicular to the main regional extension direction which was ~ NW-SE), in contrast to the central and eastern segments of the Atlas rift which developed obliquely. This difference in orientation is attributed to the indented Ouzellarh Precambrian salient, part of the West African Craton, which deflected the general rift trend in the area evidencing the major role of inherited lithospheric anisotropies in rift direction and evolution. As for the Cenozoic inversion, total orogenic shortening is moderate (~ 16%) and appears accommodated by basement-involved large-scale folding, and by newly formed shortcut and by-pass thrusting, with rare left-lateral strike-slip indicators. Triassic faults commonly acted as buttresses.

  7. A study to constrain the geometry of an active fault in southern Italy through borehole breakouts and downhole logs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierdominici, Simona; Mariucci, Maria Teresa; Montone, Paola

    2011-10-01

    Identification of an active fault and the local versus regional present-day stress field in the Irpinia region (southern Apennines) have been performed along a 5900 m deep well (San Gregorio Magno 1) by a detailed breakout and geophysical log analysis. The selected area is characterized by diffuse low magnitude seismicity, although in historical times moderate to large earthquakes have repeatedly struck it. On 23rd November 1980 a strong earthquake ( M = 6.9) nucleated on a 38-km long normal fault, named Irpinia fault, producing the first unequivocal historical surface faulting ever documented in Italy. The analysis of stress-induced wellbore breakouts shows a direction of minimum horizontal stress N18°±24°, fairly consistent with the regional stress trend (N44°±20°). The small discrepancy between our result and the regional stress orientation might be related to the influence of local stress sources such as variations of the Irpinia fault plane orientation and the presence of differently oriented active shear zones. This paper shows for the first time a detailed analysis on the present-day stress along a well to identify the Irpinia fault at depth and constrain its geometry.

  8. Fault Geometry based on Coseismic Ground Displacements from Satellite Images for the 2008 Wenchuan Earthquake, Sichuan, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Y.; Chen, Y.; Huang, M.; Suppe, J.; Avouac, J.; Leprince, S.; Ayoub, F.; Kuo, Y.

    2009-12-01

    On 12th May 2008, a Mw 7.9 earthquake occurred on the Longmenshan fault in the mountains to the west of Sichuan province, which shook many Asian cities and killed at least 69,000 people. The surface ruptures strike NE and extend up to 270 km along the boundary between the eastern Tibetan Plateau and the Sichuan basin. It was difficult to complete the detailed mapping of surface ruptures and to measure fault slip in the field because well-defined features to correlate across the fault were rare in mountainous area. Near surface deformation is in fact composed of contributions from internal faulting and folding. Using the COSI-Corr software, we obtain coseismic ground displacements deduced from sub-pixel correlation of SPOT5 and ENVISAT and also from D-InSAR on ENVISAT. The results can provide continuous surface displacements. In the south, the results show significant shortening, generally <10 meters, and two parallel ruptures, while in the north, they show strike slip dominant and only a single rupture. Based on our results, we simulate the fault geometry in different locations. To realize the long-term fault kinematics a comparison is further needed between coseismic deformation and long-term geomorphic deformation recorded in the landforms.

  9. Focal mechanisms of earthquake multiplets in the western part of the Corinth Rift (Greece): influence of the velocity model and constraints on the geometry of the active faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godano, Maxime; Deschamps, Anne; Lambotte, Sophie; Lyon-Caen, Hélène; Bernard, Pascal; Pacchiani, Francesco

    2014-06-01

    The composite fault plane solutions for 24 large multiplets recorded in the western part of the Corinth Rift between 2000 and 2007 are computed by jointly inverting P polarities and Sv/P, Sh/P, Sv/Sh amplitude ratios of the direct waves. The fault plane solutions are determined using 1-D and 3-D velocity models. Solutions computed with the 3-D velocity model are preferred to the ones computed with the 1-D model because overall, 3-D solutions have a better score function. They correspond essentially to E-NE/W-SW and W-NW/E-SE striking normal faults, which is consistent with the N-S extensional/vertical shortening tectonic regime of the area. For 15 multiplets, one of the nodal planes is similar to the plane delineated by the earthquakes. It is then possible to determine which nodal plane is the fault plane. The analysis of the fault plane solutions highlights a clear decrease of their dip with depth and towards the north. Several multiplets with steeply dipping fault planes (50°-60°) located at depths of 7-8 km are clearly located at the base of onshore and offshore faults that crop out close to the south border of the Corinth Gulf, indicating that these faults are steep down to 7-8 km depth. To the north, multiplets underline a low angle north-dipping structure (20°-30°) on which steep north-dipping faults could take root.

  10. Modelling of 3D fractured geological systems - technique and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cacace, M.; Scheck-Wenderoth, M.; Cherubini, Y.; Kaiser, B. O.; Bloecher, G.

    2011-12-01

    All rocks in the earth's crust are fractured to some extent. Faults and fractures are important in different scientific and industry fields comprising engineering, geotechnical and hydrogeological applications. Many petroleum, gas and geothermal and water supply reservoirs form in faulted and fractured geological systems. Additionally, faults and fractures may control the transport of chemical contaminants into and through the subsurface. Depending on their origin and orientation with respect to the recent and palaeo stress field as well as on the overall kinematics of chemical processes occurring within them, faults and fractures can act either as hydraulic conductors providing preferential pathways for fluid to flow or as barriers preventing flow across them. The main challenge in modelling processes occurring in fractured rocks is related to the way of describing the heterogeneities of such geological systems. Flow paths are controlled by the geometry of faults and their open void space. To correctly simulate these processes an adequate 3D mesh is a basic requirement. Unfortunately, the representation of realistic 3D geological environments is limited by the complexity of embedded fracture networks often resulting in oversimplified models of the natural system. A technical description of an improved method to integrate generic dipping structures (representing faults and fractures) into a 3D porous medium is out forward. The automated mesh generation algorithm is composed of various existing routines from computational geometry (e.g. 2D-3D projection, interpolation, intersection, convex hull calculation) and meshing (e.g. triangulation in 2D and tetrahedralization in 3D). All routines have been combined in an automated software framework and the robustness of the approach has been tested and verified. These techniques and methods can be applied for fractured porous media including fault systems and therefore found wide applications in different geo-energy related

  11. Initiation of deformation of the Eastern California Shear Zone: Constraints from Garlock fault geometry and GPS observations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gan, Weijun; Zhang, P.; Shen, Z.-K.; Prescott, W.H.; Svarc, J.L.

    2003-01-01

    We suggest a 2-stage deformation model for the Eastern California Shear Zone (ECSZ) to explain the geometry of the Garlock fault trace. We assume the Garlock fault was originally straight and then was gradually curved by right-lateral shear deformation across the ECSZ. In our 2-stage deformation model, the first stage involves uniform shear deformation across the eastern part of the shear zone, and the second stage involves uniform shear deformation across the entire shear zone. In addition to the current shape of the Garlock fault, our model incorporates constraints on contemporary deformation rates provided by GPS observations. We find that the best fitting age for initiation of shear in eastern part of the ECSZ is about 5.0 ?? 0.4 Ma, and that deformation of the western part started about 1.6 Myr later.

  12. Palacios field: A 3-D case history

    SciTech Connect

    McWhorter, R.; Torguson, B.

    1994-12-31

    In late 1992, Mitchell Energy Corporation acquired a 7.75 sq mi (20.0 km{sup 2}) 3-D seismic survey over Palacios field. Matagorda County, Texas. The company shot the survey to help evaluate the field for further development by delineating the fault pattern of the producing Middle Oligocene Frio interval. They compare the mapping of the field before and after the 3-D survey. This comparison shows that the 3-D volume yields superior fault imaging and interpretability compared to the dense 2-D data set. The problems with the 2-D data set are improper imaging of small and oblique faults and insufficient coverage over a complex fault pattern. Whereas the 2-D data set validated a simple fault model, the 3-D volume revealed a more complex history of faulting that includes three different fault systems. This discovery enabled them to reconstruct the depositional and structural history of Palacios field.

  13. Seismogenic Fault Geometry of 2010 Mw 7.1 Solomon Islands Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Y.; Ku, C.; Taylor, F. W.; Huang, B.; Chen, Y.; Chao, W.; Huang, H.; Kuo, Y.; Wu, Y.; Suppe, J.

    2010-12-01

    The Solomon Islands is located in southwestern Pacific, where the Indo-Australian Plate is subducting northeastward beneath the Pacific Plate. Due to subduction of rugged seafloor topography, including seamounts, the seismic activity and tectonic behavior may be complicated. Seismicity in this region was anomalously low until 2007 when a megathrust rupture (Mw 8.1) occurred. More recently, on 3 January 2010, a Mw7.1 earthquake occurred beneath the extreme outer forearc next to the trench. It came with one foreshock (Mw 6.6, 50 minutes ahead) and two large aftershocks (Mw 6.8 and 6.0) greater than magnitude 6 within a week. It is interesting to note that these four focal mechanisms are very much similar and appear to have occurred along the interplate thrust zone between the Indo-Australian plate and Solomon Islands forearc. This Earthquake nucleated approximately 50 km to the southeast of the M8.1 Earthquake occurring in April of 2007, which is located to the other side of Rendova Island. Because a tsunami followed the 2010 earthquake, it is likely that submarine surface deformation accompanied the event. By the results of D-InSAR on ALOS and ERS, plus limited points of ground displacement from GPS and strong motion seismometers, the continuous ground displacement field is constructed and normalized. Our preliminary result shows the ground movement in the Rendova Island can reach tens of centimeters, implying shallow earthquake source consistent with the suggestion by triggering tsunami. Besides, the earthquake sequence retrieved from our local seismometer observation network allows us to further define underground fault geometry. The spatial distribution of the epicenter also concludes the seamount located in the middle divides two seismogenic asperities which generate 2007 and 2010 earthquakes respectively.

  14. Self-calibration of cone-beam CT geometry using 3D-2D image registration: development and application to tasked-based imaging with a robotic C-arm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouadah, S.; Stayman, J. W.; Gang, G.; Uneri, A.; Ehtiati, T.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: Robotic C-arm systems are capable of general noncircular orbits whose trajectories can be driven by the particular imaging task. However obtaining accurate calibrations for reconstruction in such geometries can be a challenging problem. This work proposes a method to perform a unique geometric calibration of an arbitrary C-arm orbit by registering 2D projections to a previously acquired 3D image to determine the transformation parameters representing the system geometry. Methods: Experiments involved a cone-beam CT (CBCT) bench system, a robotic C-arm, and three phantoms. A robust 3D-2D registration process was used to compute the 9 degree of freedom (DOF) transformation between each projection and an existing 3D image by maximizing normalized gradient information with a digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) of the 3D volume. The quality of the resulting "self-calibration" was evaluated in terms of the agreement with an established calibration method using a BB phantom as well as image quality in the resulting CBCT reconstruction. Results: The self-calibration yielded CBCT images without significant difference in spatial resolution from the standard ("true") calibration methods (p-value >0.05 for all three phantoms), and the differences between CBCT images reconstructed using the "self" and "true" calibration methods were on the order of 10-3 mm-1. Maximum error in magnification was 3.2%, and back-projection ray placement was within 0.5 mm. Conclusion: The proposed geometric "self" calibration provides a means for 3D imaging on general noncircular orbits in CBCT systems for which a geometric calibration is either not available or not reproducible. The method forms the basis of advanced "task-based" 3D imaging methods now in development for robotic C-arms.

  15. Radon concentrations in soil gas, considering radioactive equilibrium conditions with application to estimating fault-zone geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, Katsuaki; Yoshinaga, Tohru; Asaue, Hisafumi

    2009-02-01

    A calculation method for determining the amount of Rn isotopes and daughter products at the start of measurement (CRAS) is proposed as a more accurate means of estimating the initial Rn concentration in soil gas. The CRAS utilizes the decay law between 222Rn and 220Rn isotopes and the daughter products 218Po and 216Po, and is applicable to α-scintillation counter measurements. As Rn is both inert and chemically stable, it is useful for fault investigation based on the soil gas geochemistry. However, the total number of α particles emitted by the decay of Rn has generally been considered to be proportional to the initial Rn concentration, without considering the gas condition with respect to radioactive equilibrium. The CRAS method is shown to be effective to derive Rn concentration for soil gases under both nonequilibrium conditions, in which the total number of decays increases with time, and equilibrium conditions, which are typical of normal soil under low gas flux. The CRAS method in conjunction with finite difference method simulation is applied to the analysis of two active fault areas in Japan, and it is demonstrated that this combination could detect the sharp rises in 222Rn concentrations associated with faults. The method also allows the determination of fault geometry near the surface based on the asymmetry variation of the Rn concentration distribution when coupled with a numerical simulation of 222Rn transport. The results for the new method as applied to the two case studies are consistent with the data collected from the geological survey. It implies that the CRAS method is suitable for investigating the fault system and interstitial gas mobility through fractures. The present analyses have also demonstrated that high Rn concentrations require the recent and repeated accumulation of 222Rn parents (230Th and 226Ra) in fault gouges through deep gas release during fault movement.

  16. Subsurface geometry of the San Andreas-Calaveras fault junction: influence of the Coast Range Ophiolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt, J. T.; Ponce, D. A.; Graymer, R. W.; Jachens, R. C.; Simpson, R. W.

    2013-12-01

    Potential-field modeling, surface geologic mapping, and relocated seismicity are used to investigate the three-dimensional structure of the San Andreas-Calaveras fault junction to gain insight into regional tectonics, fault kinematics, and seismic hazard. South of the San Francisco Bay area, the San Andreas and Hayward-Calaveras fault zones join to become a single San Andreas Fault. The fault junction, as defined in this study, represents a three-dimensional volume of crust extending from San Juan Bautista in the north to Bitterwater Valley in the south, bounded by the San Andreas Fault on the southwest and the Calaveras fault zone on the northeast. South of Hollister, the Calaveras fault zone includes the Paicines, San Benito, and Pine Rock faults. Within the junction, the San Andreas and Calaveras faults are both creeping at the surface, and strike parallel to each other for about 50 km, separated by only 2 to 6 km, but never actually merge at the surface. Geophysical evidence suggests that the San Andreas and Calaveras faults dip away from each other within the northern portion of the fault junction, bounding a triangular wedge of crust. This wedge changes shape to the south as the dips of both the San Andreas and Calaveras faults vary along strike. The main trace of the San Andreas Fault is clearly visible in cross-sections of relocated seismicity as a vertical to steeply southwest-dipping structure between 5 and 10 km depth throughout the junction. The Calaveras fault dips steeply to the northeast in the northern part of the junction. Near the intersection with the Vallecitos syncline, the dip of the Calaveras fault, as identified in relocated seismicity, shallows to 60 degrees. Northeast of the Calaveras fault, we identify a laterally extensive magnetic body 1 to 8 km below the surface that we interpret as a folded 1 to 3 km-thick tabular body of Coast Range Ophiolite at the base of the Vallecitos syncline. Potential-field modeling and relocated seismicity

  17. Near-surface location, geometry, and velocities of the Santa Monica Fault Zone, Los Angeles, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Catchings, R.D.; Gandhok, G.; Goldman, M.R.; Okaya, D.; Rymer, M.J.; Bawden, G.W.

    2008-01-01

    High-resolution seismic-reflection and seismic-refraction imaging, combined with existing borehole, earthquake, and paleoseismic trenching data, suggest that the Santa Monica fault zone in Los Angeles consists of multiple strands from several kilometers depth to the near surface. We interpret our seismic data as showing two shallow-depth low-angle fault strands and multiple near-vertical (???85??) faults in the upper 100 m. One of the low-angle faults dips northward at about 28?? and approaches the surface at the base of a topographic scarp on the grounds of the Wadsworth VA Hospital (WVAH). The other principal low-angle fault dips northward at about 20?? and projects toward the surface about 200 m south of the topographic scarp, near the northernmost areas of the Los Angeles Basin that experienced strong shaking during the 1994 Northridge earthquake. The 20?? north-dipping low-angle fault is also apparent on a previously published seismic-reflection image by Pratt et al. (1998) and appears to extend northward to at least Wilshire Boulevard, where the fault may be about 450 m below the surface. Slip rates determined at the WVAH site could be significantly underestimated if it is assumed that slip occurs only on a single strand of the Santa Monica fault or if it is assumed that the near-surface faults dip at angles greater than 20-28??. At the WVAH, tomographic velocity modeling shows a significant decrease in velocity across near-surface strands of the Santa Monica fault. P-wave velocities range from about 500 m/sec at the surface to about 4500 m/sec within the upper 50 m on the north side of the fault zone at WVAH, but maximum measured velocities on the south side of the low-angle fault zone at WVAH are about 3500 m/sec. These refraction velocities compare favorably with velocities measured in nearby boreholes by Gibbs et al. (2000). This study illustrates the utility of com- bined seismic-reflection and seismic-refraction methods, which allow more accurate

  18. Geometry, kinematics and slip rate along the Mosha active fault, Central Alborz, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritz, J.-F.; Pics Geological Team

    2003-04-01

    The Mosha fault is one of the major active fault in Central Alborz as shown by its strong historical seismicity and its clear morphological signature. Situated at the vicinity of Tehran city, this ~150 km long ~N100°E trending fault represents an important potential seismic source that threatens the Iranian metropolis. In the framework of an Iranian-French joint research program (PICS) devoted to seismic hazard assessment in the Tehran region, we undertook a morphotectonic (determination of the cumulative displacements and the ages of offset morphologic markers) and paleoseismic (determination of the ages and magnitudes of ancient events) study along the Mosha fault. Our objectives are the estimation of the long-term slip rate (Upper Pleistocene-Holocene) and the mean recurrence interval of earthquakes along the different segments of the fault. Our investigations within the Tar Lake valley, along the eastern part of the fault potentially the site of the 1665 (VII, 6.5) historical earthquake - allows us to calculate a preliminary 2 ± 0.1 mm/yr minimum left lateral slip rate. If we assume a characteristic coseismic average displacement comprised between 0.35 m (Mw 6.5) and 1.2 m (Mw 7.1) calculated from Wells &Coppersmith’s functions (1994) and taking the moment magnitudes attributed to the 1665 and 1830 earthquakes (e.g. Berberian &Yeats, 2001) the mean maximum recurrence intervals along this segment of the Mosha fault are comprised between 160 and 620 yrs.

  19. The first systematic analysis of 3D rapid prototyped poly(ε-caprolactone) scaffolds manufactured through BioCell printing: the effect of pore size and geometry on compressive mechanical behaviour and in vitro hMSC viability.

    PubMed

    Domingos, M; Intranuovo, F; Russo, T; De Santis, R; Gloria, A; Ambrosio, L; Ciurana, J; Bartolo, P

    2013-12-01

    Novel additive manufacturing processes are increasingly recognized as ideal techniques to produce 3D biodegradable structures with optimal pore size and spatial distribution, providing an adequate mechanical support for tissue regeneration while shaping in-growing tissues. With regard to the mechanical and biological performances of 3D scaffolds, pore size and geometry play a crucial role. In this study, a novel integrated automated system for the production and in vitro culture of 3D constructs, known as BioCell Printing, was used only to manufacture poly(ε-caprolactone) scaffolds for tissue engineering; the influence of pore size and shape on their mechanical and biological performances was investigated. Imposing a single lay-down pattern of 0°/90° and varying the filament distance, it was possible to produce scaffolds with square interconnected pores with channel sizes falling in the range of 245-433 µm, porosity 49-57% and a constant road width. Three different lay-down patterns were also adopted (0°/90°, 0°/60/120° and 0°/45°/90°/135°), thus resulting in scaffolds with quadrangular, triangular and complex internal geometries, respectively. Mechanical compression tests revealed a decrease of scaffold stiffness with the increasing porosity and number of deposition angles (from 0°/90° to 0°/45°/90°/135°). Results from biological analysis, carried out using human mesenchymal stem cells, suggest a strong influence of pore size and geometry on cell viability. On the other hand, after 21 days of in vitro static culture, it was not possible to detect any significant variation in terms of cell morphology promoted by scaffold topology. As a first systematic analysis, the obtained results clearly demonstrate the potential of the BioCell Printing process to produce 3D scaffolds with reproducible well organized architectures and tailored mechanical properties.

  20. Active faulting within a megacity: the geometry and slip rate of the Pardisan thrust in central Tehran, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talebian, M.; Copley, A. C.; Fattahi, M.; Ghoraishi, M.; Jackson, J. A.; Nazari, H.; Sloan, R. A.; Walker, R. T.

    2016-09-01

    Tehran, the capital city of Iran with a population of over 12 million, is one of the largest urban centres within the seismically active Alpine-Himalayan orogenic belt. Although several historic earthquakes have affected Tehran, their relation to individual faults is ambiguous for most. This ambiguity is partly due to a lack of knowledge about the locations, geometries, and seismic potential of structures that have been obscured by dramatic urban growth over the past three decades, and which have covered most of the young geomorphic markers and natural exposures. Here we use aerial photographs from 1956, combined with an ˜1 m DEM derived from stereo Pleiades satellite imagery, to investigate the geomorphology of a growing anticline above a thrust fault - the Pardisan thrust - within central Tehran. The topography across the ridge is consistent with a steep ramp extending from close to the surface to a depth of ˜2 km, where it presumably connects with a shallow-dipping detachment. No primary fault is visible at the surface, and it is possible that the faulting dissipates in the near surface as distributed shearing. We use optically-stimulated luminescence to date remnants of uplifted and warped alluvial deposits that are offset vertically across the Pardisan fault, providing minimum uplift and slip-rates of at least 1 mm/yr. Our study shows that the faults within the Tehran urban region have relatively rapid rates of slip, are important in the regional tectonics, and have a great impact on earthquake hazard assessment of the city and surrounding region.

  1. Intra-event and Inter-event Ground Motion Variability from 3-D Broadband (0-8 Hz) Ensemble Simulations of Mw 6.7 Thrust Events Including Rough Fault Descriptions, Small-Scale Heterogeneities and Q(f)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Withers, K.; Olsen, K. B.; Shi, Z.; Day, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    We model blind thrust scenario earthquakes matching the fault geometry of 1994 Mw 6.7 Northridge earthquake up to 8 Hz by first performing dynamic rupture propagation using a support operator method (SORD). We extend the ground motion by converting the slip-rate data to a kinematic source for the finite difference wave propagation code AWP-ODC, which incorporates an improved frequency-dependent attenuation approach. This technique has high accuracy for Q values down to 15. The desired Q function is fit to the 'effective' Q over the coarse grained-cell for low Q, and a simple interpolation formula is used to interpolate the weights for arbitrary Q. Here, we use a power-law model Q above a reference frequency in the form Q 0 f^n with exponents ranging from 0.0-0.9. We find envelope and phase misfits only slightly larger than that of the elastic case when compared with that of the frequency-wavenumber solution for both a homogenous and a layered model with a large-velocity contrast. We also include small-scale medium complexity in both a 1D layered model and a 3D medium extracted from SCEC CVM-S4 including a surface geotechnical layer (GTL). We model additional realizations of the scenario by varying the hypocenter location, and find that similar moment magnitudes are generated. We observe that while the ground motion pattern changes, the median ground motion is not affected significantly, when binned as a function of distance, and is within 1 interevent standard deviation from the median GMPEs. We find that intra-event variability for the layered model simulations is similar to observed values of single-station standard deviation. We show that small-scale heterogeneity can significantly affect the intra-event variability at frequencies greater than ~1 Hz, becoming increasingly important at larger distances from the source. We perform a parameter space study by varying statistical parameters and find that the variability is fairly independent of the correlation length

  2. Finite-Source Modeling to Constrain Complex Fault Geometry of the South Napa Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooddell, K. E.; Dreger, D. S.; Huang, M. H.

    2015-12-01

    The August 24, 2014 South Napa Mw6.0 earthquake ruptured to the north along the West Napa fault, producing strong shaking in the deep sediments (~1000 m) of the Napa Valley. Aftershock locations define the roughly north-northwest striking fault plane, but details regarding the dip of the fault and the strike of the northernmost section of the fault remain less certain. Preliminary inversions based on the inversion of broadband data from the BDSN, PBO GPS, and InSAR observations show a 13 km long rupture initiating at a depth of 11 km and propagating unilaterally to the northwest and up-dip (Dreger et al., 2015), however this kinematic finite-source model assumes a single planar fault. Field reconnaissance and LiDAR imaging reveals a complex system of sub-parallel faults at the surface. The main western branch, which had the largest surface offsets, shows a marked change in strike approximately 9 km north of the epicenter (Bray et al., 2014). In addition, there is evidence of surface offsets on eastern branches of the West Napa fault system (Bray et al., 2014). Whether this complexity persists, or how the faults may link at depth, is an open question. However, based on the limited preliminary dataset of Dreger et al (2015), we conclude that the fault dip is nearly vertical. In this study we investigate complex fault models that account for changing strike, and en echelon west dipping faults that may join at hypocentral depth by means of finite-source inversion of regional broadband, local strong-motion and GPS and InSAR geodetic data sets. We build on the data set used in the prelimary model of Dreger et al, (2015) by incorporating local strong motion waveform data as well as the static displacement dataset of Funning (2015). For the strong motion data, we incorporate stations located on "rock" (Vs30 > 700 m/s). Green's functions for the "rock" stations are computed with a modified Gil7 model to account for the lower velocity in the upper 30 meters. Preliminary

  3. The role of small-scale extensional faulting in the evolution of basin geometries. An example from the late Palaeozoic Petrel Sub-basin, northwest Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, K.

    1998-03-01

    During continental extension, the kinematic collapse of the hangingwall of major normal faults and the subsequent isostatic response imposes a strong control on the evolving basin geometry. The interaction of the flexural wavelength. and the magnitude and location of faults may allow the development of basin geometries which deviate from a classic half-graben style, particularly if some of this deformation is below the scale of observation (commonly seismic reflection data). In particular the development of a lateral partitioning between large- and small-scale faults within a basin may exert a significant control on the resulting basin geometry. Using the Petrel Sub-basin in northwest Australia as an example, it is demonstrated that an extensional basin geometry consisting of a classic half-graben can be overprinted by a significant 'sag' geometry which can be related to the lateral offset of sub-resolution faulting. This lateral partitioning and resulting basin geometry may also have an application to other extensional basins, particularly if a mechanism is present to allow this partitioning of fault styles to develop. In the Petrel Sub-basin this has been related to the presence of older basement features of the Halls Creek Mobile Zone beneath the axis of the basin. However, a comparison with physical models also suggests that this may be applicable to basins formed by oblique rifting (a component of which may also be present within the Petrel Sub-basin), particularly if this is imposed upon a weak zone or suture within the upper mantle.

  4. Advancements in 3D Structural Analysis of Geothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Siler, Drew L; Faulds, James E; Mayhew, Brett; McNamara, David

    2013-06-23

    Robust geothermal activity in the Great Basin, USA is a product of both anomalously high regional heat flow and active fault-controlled extension. Elevated permeability associated with some fault systems provides pathways for circulation of geothermal fluids. Constraining the local-scale 3D geometry of these structures and their roles as fluid flow conduits is crucial in order to mitigate both the costs and risks of geothermal exploration and to identify blind (no surface expression) geothermal resources. Ongoing studies have indicated that much of the robust geothermal activity in the Great Basin is associated with high density faulting at structurally complex fault intersection/interaction areas, such as accommodation/transfer zones between discrete fault systems, step-overs or relay ramps in fault systems, intersection zones between faults with different strikes or different senses of slip, and horse-tailing fault terminations. These conceptualized models are crucial for locating and characterizing geothermal systems in a regional context. At the local scale, however, pinpointing drilling targets and characterizing resource potential within known or probable geothermal areas requires precise 3D characterization of the system. Employing a variety of surface and subsurface data sets, we have conducted detailed 3D geologic analyses of two Great Basin geothermal systems. Using EarthVision (Dynamic Graphics Inc., Alameda, CA) we constructed 3D geologic models of both the actively producing Brady’s geothermal system and a ‘greenfield’ geothermal prospect at Astor Pass, NV. These 3D models allow spatial comparison of disparate data sets in 3D and are the basis for quantitative structural analyses that can aid geothermal resource assessment and be used to pinpoint discrete drilling targets. The relatively abundant data set at Brady’s, ~80 km NE of Reno, NV, includes 24 wells with lithologies interpreted from careful analysis of cuttings and core, a 1

  5. Extrapolating subsurface geometry by surface expressions in transpressional strike slip fault, deduced from analogue experiments with settings of rheology and convergence angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Shang Yu; Neubauer, Franz

    2015-04-01

    The internal structure of major strike-slip faults is still poorly understood, particularly how to extrapolate subsurface structures by surface expressions. Series of brittle analogue experiments by Leever et al., 2011 resulted the convergence angle is the most influential factor for surface structures. Further analogue models with different ductile settings allow a better understanding in extrapolating surface structures to the subsurface geometry of strike-slip faults. Fifteen analogue experiments were constructed to represent strike-slip faults in nature in different geological settings. As key parameters investigated in this study include: (a) the angle of convergence, (b) the thickness of brittle layer, (c) the influence of a rheological weak layer within the crust, and (d) influence of a thick and rheologically weak layer at the base of the crust. The experiments are aimed to explain first order structures along major transcurrent strike-slip faults such as the Altyn, Kunlun, San Andrea and Greendale (Darfield earthquake 2010) faults. The preliminary results show that convergence angle significantly influences the overall geometry of the transpressional system with greater convergence angles resulting in wider fault zones and higher elevation. Different positions, densities and viscosities of weak rheological layers have not only different surface expressions but also affect the fault geometry in the subsurface. For instance, rheological weak material in the bottom layer results in stretching when experiment reaches a certain displacement and a buildup of a less segmented, wide positive flower structure. At the surface, a wide fault valley in the middle of the fault zone is the reflection of stretching along the velocity discontinuity at depth. In models with a thin and rheologically weaker layer in the middle of the brittle layer, deformation is distributed over more faults and the geometry of the fault zone below and above the weak zone shows significant

  6. 3D fluid-structure modelling and vibration analysis for fault diagnosis of Francis turbine using multiple ANN and multiple ANFIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeed, R. A.; Galybin, A. N.; Popov, V.

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses condition monitoring and fault diagnosis in Francis turbine based on integration of numerical modelling with several different artificial intelligence (AI) techniques. In this study, a numerical approach for fluid-structure (turbine runner) analysis is presented. The results of numerical analysis provide frequency response functions (FRFs) data sets along x-, y- and z-directions under different operating load and different position and size of faults in the structure. To extract features and reduce the dimensionality of the obtained FRF data, the principal component analysis (PCA) has been applied. Subsequently, the extracted features are formulated and fed into multiple artificial neural networks (ANN) and multiple adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference systems (ANFIS) in order to identify the size and position of the damage in the runner and estimate the turbine operating conditions. The results demonstrated the effectiveness of this approach and provide satisfactory accuracy even when the input data are corrupted with certain level of noise.

  7. Using strain parameters from 3D restoration modelling to estimate distant off-fault gold potentials, Mount Pleasant Area, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakurina, M.; Mejia-Herrera, P.; Royer, J. J.

    2015-12-01

    Gold deposits are used to be related to fault systems that control metals' transport and accumulation through relatively high permeable discontinuous structures. However, some coeval gold deposits occur at locations far from the main faults. In this case, the permeability of the rock mass is caused by internal damage developed during a deformation event. It is possible to model such development using restoration tools and, consequently, to estimate the strain tensor that measures the deformation. This contribution may provide an explanation of such off-fault gold deposits and certain deformation parameters may be used for a new targeting in exploration surveys. In the present research two SKUA-GOCAD restoration methods were applied to the golden-rich Mount Pleasant area in Western Australia and compared afterwards. One of the restoration methods, provided by the RestorationLab plugin, is based on the Finite Element method and requires a geomechanical model of the area. Another method, GeoChron, is based on the transformation of the coordinates of the present time to a new curvilinear coordinate system of the depositional time. The resulting strain tensors of both methods were used to calculate deformation attributes which together with dilation were studied to estimate their correlation with known gold occurrences using logistic regression function. Therefore, some of the attributes obtained by the RestorationLab approach show higher probability to observe the gold deposit, however, the highest correlation with the gold occurrences was achieved with the gradient of the deformation attribute, obtained by the GeoChron.

  8. Exact geometry solid-shell element based on a sampling surfaces technique for 3D stress analysis of doubly-curved composite shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulikov, G. M.; Mamontov, A. A.; Plotnikova, S. V.; Mamontov, S. A.

    2015-11-01

    A hybrid-mixed ANS four-node shell element by using the sampling surfaces (SaS) technique is developed. The SaS formulation is based on choosing inside the nth layer In not equally spaced SaS parallel to the middle surface of the shell in order to introduce the displacements of these surfaces as basic shell variables. Such choice of unknowns with the consequent use of Lagrange polynomials of degree In - 1 in the thickness direction for each layer permits the presentation of the layered shell formulation in a very compact form. The SaS are located inside each layer at Chebyshev polynomial nodes that allows one to minimize uniformly the error due to the Lagrange interpolation. To implement the efficient analytical integration throughout the element, the enhanced ANS method is employed. The proposed hybrid-mixed four-node shell element is based on the Hu-Washizu variational equation and exhibits a superior performance in the case of coarse meshes. It could be useful for the 3D stress analysis of thick and thin doubly-curved shells since the SaS formulation gives the possibility to obtain numerical solutions with a prescribed accuracy, which asymptotically approach the exact solutions of elasticity as the number of SaS tends to infinity.

  9. New Constraints on the Geometry and Kinematics of Active Faults in the Hinterland of the Northwest Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morell, K. D.; Sandiford, M.; Rajendran, C. C. P.; Fink, D.; Kohn, B. P.

    2014-12-01

    The geometry and kinematics of the active, and potentially seismogenic, fault structures within the hinterland of the Himalaya have proven challenging to constrain in the past, primarily because active faults in this region tend to be buried beneath the subsurface and active seismicity often does not align with surficially mapped fault traces. Here we present a series of complementary datasets, including results from low temperature thermochronology, basin-wide erosion rates from 10Be concentrations, and topographic and longitudinal profile analyses, that place constraints on the spatial distribution of fault-related rock uplift and erosion across a ~400-km long region of the lower and high Himalaya of northwest India. Results from our analyses reveal that hillslope morphology and channel steepness are relatively invariant parallel to strike but vary significantly across strike, with the most prominent and abrupt variations occurring at the physiographic transition between the lower and high Himalaya (PT2), near the axial trace of the ramp-flat transition in the Main Himalayan Thrust (MHT). The cross-strike changes in geomorphology observed across the PT2 correlate with an order of magnitude northward increase in basin-wide erosion rates (~0.06-0.8 mm/a) and a corresponding decrease in apatite (~5-2 Ma) and zircon (U-Th)/He (~10-2 Ma) cooling ages. Combined with published geophysical and seismicity data, we interpret these results to reflect spatial variations in rock uplift and exhumation induced by a segment of the MHT ramp-flat system that is at least ~400 km long and ~125 km wide. The relatively young (U-Th)/He ages (<10 Ma) greater than 20 km south of the MHT ramp-flat transition preliminarily suggest that the kinematics of this system are best explained by a model which incorporates an accreting duplex on the MHT ramp but additional forthcoming analyses, including thermal modeling, will confirm if this hypothesis is robust.

  10. Direct Measurement of Dust Attenuation in z approx. 1.5 Star-Forming Galaxies from 3D-HST: Implications for Dust Geometry and Star Formation Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, Sedona H.; Kriek, Mariska; Brammer, Gabriel B; Conroy, Charlie; Schreiber, Natascha M. Foerster; Franx, Marijn; Fumagalli, Mattia; Lundren, Britt; Momcheva, Ivelina; Nelson, Erica J.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Skelton, Rosalind E.; VanDokkum, Pieter G.; Tease, Katherine Whitaker; Wuyts, Stijn

    2013-01-01

    The nature of dust in distant galaxies is not well understood, and until recently few direct dust measurements have been possible. We investigate dust in distant star-forming galaxies using near-infrared grism spectra of the 3D-HST survey combined with archival multi-wavelength photometry. These data allow us to make a direct comparison between dust towards star-forming regions (measured using Balmer decrements) and the integrated dust properties (derived by comparing spectral energy distributions [SEDs] with stellar population and dust models) for a statistically significant sample of distant galaxies. We select a sample of 163 galaxies between 1.36< or = z< or = 1.5 with H(alpha) SNR > or = 5 and measure Balmer decrements from stacked spectra. First, we stack spectra in bins of integrated stellar dust attenuation, and find that there is extra dust extinction towards star-forming regions (AV,HII is 1.81 times the integrated AV, star), though slightly lower than found for low-redshift starburst galaxies. Next, we stack spectra in bins of specific star formation rate (log sSFR), star formation rate (log SFR), and stellar mass (logM*). We find that on average AV,HII increases with SFR and mass, but decreases with increasing sSFR. The amount of extra extinction also decreases with increasing sSFR and decreasing stellar mass. Our results are consistent with the two-phase dust model - in which galaxies contain both a diffuse and a stellar birth cloud dust component - as the extra extinction will increase once older stars outside the star-forming regions become more dominant. Finally, using our Balmer decrements we derive dust-corrected H(alpha) SFRs, and find evidence that SED fitting produces incorrect SFRs if very rapidly declining SFHs are included in the explored parameter space. Subject headings: dust, extinction- galaxies: evolution- galaxies: high-redshift

  11. Direct measurements of dust attenuation in z ∼ 1.5 star-forming galaxies from 3D-HST: Implications for dust geometry and star formation rates

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Sedona H.; Kriek, Mariska; Brammer, Gabriel B.; Conroy, Charlie; Schreiber, Natascha M. Förster; Wuyts, Stijn; Franx, Marijn; Fumagalli, Mattia; Lundgren, Britt; Momcheva, Ivelina; Nelson, Erica J.; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Whitaker, Katherine E.

    2014-06-10

    The nature of dust in distant galaxies is not well understood, and until recently few direct dust measurements have been possible. We investigate dust in distant star-forming galaxies using near-infrared grism spectra of the 3D-HST survey combined with archival multi-wavelength photometry. These data allow us to make a direct comparison between dust around star-forming regions (A {sub V,} {sub H} {sub II}) and the integrated dust content (A {sub V,} {sub star}). We select a sample of 163 galaxies between 1.36 ≤ z ≤ 1.5 with Hα signal-to-noise ratio ≥5 and measure Balmer decrements from stacked spectra to calculate A {sub V,} {sub H} {sub II}. First, we stack spectra in bins of A {sub V,} {sub star}, and find that A {sub V,} {sub H} {sub II} = 1.86 A {sub V,} {sub star}, with a significance of σ = 1.7. Our result is consistent with the two-component dust model, in which galaxies contain both diffuse and stellar birth cloud dust. Next, we stack spectra in bins of specific star formation rate (log SSFR), star formation rate (log SFR), and stellar mass (log M {sub *}). We find that on average A {sub V,} {sub H} {sub II} increases with SFR and mass, but decreases with increasing SSFR. Interestingly, the data hint that the amount of extra attenuation decreases with increasing SSFR. This trend is expected from the two-component model, as the extra attenuation will increase once older stars outside the star-forming regions become more dominant in the galaxy spectrum. Finally, using Balmer decrements we derive dust-corrected Hα SFRs, and find that stellar population modeling produces incorrect SFRs if rapidly declining star formation histories are included in the explored parameter space.

  12. Enigmatic structures within salt walls of the Santos Basin-Part 1: Geometry and kinematics from 3D seismic reflection and well data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Christopher A.-L.; Jackson, Martin P. A.; Hudec, Michael R.; Rodriguez, Clara R.

    2015-06-01

    Understanding intrasalt structure may elucidate the fundamental kinematics and, ultimately, the mechanics of diapir growth. However, there have been relatively few studies of the internal structure of salt diapirs outside the mining industry because their cores are only partly exposed in the field and poorly imaged on seismic reflection data. This study uses 3D seismic reflection and borehole data from the São Paulo Plateau, Santos Basin, offshore Brazil to document the variability in intrasalt structural style in natural salt diapirs. We document a range of intrasalt structures that record: (i) initial diapir rise; (ii) rise of lower mobile halite through an arched and thinned roof of denser, layered evaporites, and emplacement of an intrasalt sheet or canopy; (iii) formation of synclinal flaps kinematically linked to emplacement of the intrasalt allochthonous bodies; and (iv) diapir squeezing. Most salt walls contain simple internal anticlines. Only a few salt walls contain allochthonous bodies and breakout-related flaps. The latter occur in an area having a density inversion within the autochthonous salt layer, such that upper, anhydrite-rich, layered evaporites are denser than lower, more halite-rich evaporites. We thus interpret that most diapirs rose through simple fold amplification of internal salt stratigraphy but that locally, where a density inversion existed in the autochthonous salt, Rayleigh-Taylor overturn within the growing diapir resulted in the ascent of less dense evaporites into the diapir crest by breaching of the internal anticline. This resulted in the formation of steep salt-ascension zones or feeders and the emplacement of high-level intrasalt allocthonous sheets underlain by breakout-related flaps. Although regional shortening undoubtedly occurred on the São Paulo Plateau during the Late Cretaceous, we suggest this was only partly responsible for the complex intrasalt deformation. We suggest that, although based on the Santos Basin, our

  13. SU-E-T-342: Use of Patient Geometry Measurements to Predict Dosimetric Gain with VMAT Over 3D for Chestwall and Regional Nodal Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Dumane, V; Knoll, M; Green, S; Bakst, R; Hunt, M; Steinberger, E

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To predict the dosimetric gain of VMAT over 3D for the treatment ofchestwall/IMN/supraclavicular nodes using geometric parameters acquired during simulation Methods: CT scans for 20 left and 20 right sided patients were retrospectively analyzed toobtain percent ipsilateral lung volume included in the PWT and supraclavicular fields, central lung depth (CLD), maximum lung depth (MLD), separation, chestwall concavity (defined here as the product of CLD and separation) and the maximum heart depth (MHD). VMAT, PWT and P/E plans were done for each case. The ipsilateral lung V20 Gy and mean, total lung V20 Gy and mean, heart V25 Gy and mean were noted for each plan. Correlation coefficients were obtained and linear regression models were built using data from the above training set of patients and then tested on 4 new patients. Results: The decrease in ipsilateral lung V20 Gy, total lung V20 Gy, ipsilateral lung mean and total lung mean with VMAT over PWT significantly (p<0.05) correlated with the percent volume of ipsilateral lung included in the PWT and supraclavicular fields with correlation coefficient values of r = 0.83, r = 0.77, r = 0.78 and r = 0.75 respectively. Significant correlations were also found between MHD and the decrease in heart V25 Gy and mean of r = 0.77 and r = 0.67 respectively. Dosimetric improvement with VMAT over P/E plans showed no correlation to any of the geometric parameters investigated in this study. The dosimetric gain predicted for the 4 test cases by the linear regression models given their respective percent ipsilateral lung volumes fell within the 95% confidence intervals around the best regression fit. Conclusion: The percent ipsilateral lung volume appears to be a strong predictor of the dosimetric gain on using VMAT over PWT apriori.

  14. Exploring the 3D geometry of the diffusion kurtosis tensor--impact on the development of robust tractography procedures and novel biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Neto Henriques, Rafael; Correia, Marta Morgado; Nunes, Rita Gouveia; Ferreira, Hugo Alexandre

    2015-05-01

    Diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) is a diffusion-weighted technique which overcomes limitations of the commonly used diffusion tensor imaging approach. This technique models non-Gaussian behaviour of water diffusion by the diffusion kurtosis tensor (KT), which can be used to provide indices of tissue heterogeneity and a better characterisation of the spatial architecture of tissue microstructure. In this study, the geometry of the KT is elucidated using synthetic data generated from multi-compartmental models, where diffusion heterogeneity between intra- and extra-cellular media is taken into account, as well as the sensitivity of the results to each model parameter and to synthetic noise. Furthermore, based on the assumption that the maxima of the KT are distributed perpendicularly to the direction of well-aligned fibres, a novel algorithm for estimating fibre direction directly from the KT is proposed and compared to the fibre directions extracted from DKI-based orientation distribution function (ODF) estimates previously proposed in the literature. Synthetic data results showed that, for fibres crossing at high intersection angles, direction estimates extracted directly from the KT have smaller errors than the DKI-based ODF estimation approaches (DKI-ODF). Nevertheless, the proposed method showed smaller angular resolution and lower stability to changes of the simulation parameters. On real data, tractography performed on these KT fibre estimates suggests a higher sensitivity than the DKI-based ODF in resolving lateral corpus callosum fibres reaching the pre-central cortex when diffusion acquisition is performed with five b-values. Using faster acquisition schemes, KT-based tractography did not show improved performance over the DKI-ODF procedures. Nevertheless, it is shown that direct KT fibre estimates are more adequate for computing a generalised version of radial kurtosis maps. PMID:25676915

  15. Fault geometry and slip distribution of the 1891 Nobi great earthquake (M = 8.0) with the oldest survey data sets in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, K.; Kimata, F.

    2010-12-01

    This study reexamines the ground deformation and fault slip model of the 1891 Nobi great earthquake (M = 8.0), central Japan. At the earthquake, three faults of Nukumi, Neodani and Umehara ruptured the ground surface with maximum of 8 m in the horizontal direction and 6 m in the vertical direction along the 80 km length [Koto, 1893; Matsuda, 1974]. Additionally, the Gifu-Ichinomiya line stretching toward south from Gifu is discussed as the buried fault of the Nobi earthquake, because of the vertical deformation and the high collapse rates along the line and wave propagation [Mikumo and Ando, 1976; Nakano et al., 2007]. We reevaluate two geodetic data sets of triangulation and leveling around the Umehara fault in 1885-1890 and 1894-1908 that were obtained from the Japanese Imperial Land Survey in the General Staff Office of the Imperial Army (the present Geospatial Information Authority of Japan); these data sets consist of displacements calculated from the net adjustment of triangulation and leveling surveys carried out before and after the Nobi earthquake. Co-seismic displacements are detected as southeastward displacements and uplifts are detected in the southwest block the Umehara fault. The maximum displacements and uplifts are up to 1.7 m and 0.74 m, respectively. We estimated the coseismic slip distribution of the faults by analyzing our data set. The geometry of the fault planes was adopted from the earthquake fault of this area. The remaining parameters are determined using a quasi-Newton nonlinear optimization algorithm. The best fit to the data is obtained from seven segments of the faults along the sections running Nukumi, Neodani and Umehara faults. The estimated uniform-slip elastic dislocation model consists of seven adjacent planes. The fault slips are up to 3.8 m. Because it can suitably explain the coseismic deformation due to seven earthquake source faults, the earthquake source fault is not admitted under the Gifu-Ichinomiya line.

  16. Oceanic transform earthquakes with unusual mechanisms or locations - Relation to fault geometry and state of stress in the adjacent lithosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, Cecily J.; Bergman, Eric A.; Solomon, Sean C.

    1993-01-01

    Results are presented of a search for transform earthquakes departing from the pattern whereby they occur on the principal transform displacement zone (PTDZ) and have strike-slip mechanisms consistent with transform-parallel motion. The search was conducted on the basis of source mechanisms and locations taken from the Harvard centroid moment tensor catalog and the bulletin of the International Seismological Center. The source mechanisms and centroid depths of 10 such earthquakes on the St. Paul's, Marathon, Owen, Heezen, Tharp, Menard, and Rivera transforms are determined from inversions of long-period body waveforms. Much of the anomalous earthquake activity on oceanic transforms is associated with complexities in the geometry of the PTDZ or the presence of large structural features that may influence slip on the fault.

  17. Neotectonic reactivation of shear zones and implications for faulting style and geometry in the continental margin of NE Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezerra, F. H. R.; Rossetti, D. F.; Oliveira, R. G.; Medeiros, W. E.; Neves, B. B. Brito; Balsamo, F.; Nogueira, F. C. C.; Dantas, E. L.; Andrades Filho, C.; Góes, A. M.

    2014-02-01

    The eastern continental margin of South America comprises a series of rift basins developed during the breakup of Pangea in the Jurassic-Cretaceous. We integrated high resolution aeromagnetic, structural and stratigraphic data in order to evaluate the role of reactivation of ductile, Neoproterozoic shear zones in the deposition and deformation of post-rift sedimentary deposits in one of these basins, the Paraíba Basin in northeastern Brazil. This basin corresponds to the last part of the South American continent to be separated from Africa during the Pangea breakup. Sediment deposition in this basin occurred in the Albian-Maastrichtian, Eocene-Miocene, and in the late Quaternary. However, our investigation concentrates on the Miocene-Quaternary, which we consider the neotectonic period because it encompasses the last stress field. This consisted of an E-W-oriented compression and a N-S-oriented extension. The basement of the basin forms a slightly seaward-tilted ramp capped by a late Cretaceous to Quaternary sedimentary cover ~ 100-400 m thick. Aeromagnetic lineaments mark the major steeply-dipping, ductile E-W- to NE-striking shear zones in this basement. The ductile shear zones mainly reactivated as strike-slip, normal and oblique-slip faults, resulting in a series of Miocene-Quaternary depocenters controlled by NE-, E-W-, and a few NW-striking faults. Faulting produced subsidence and uplift that are largely responsible for the present-day morphology of the valleys and tablelands in this margin. We conclude that Precambrian shear zone reactivation controlled geometry and orientation, as well as deformation of sedimentary deposits, until the Neogene-Quaternary.

  18. Estimate of the post-Last Glacial Maximum tectonic subsidence and attempt to elucidate the subsurface geometry of the active Shanchiao Fault in the Taipei metropolis, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.; Lee, J.; Chan, Y.; Lu, C.; Teng, L. S.

    2011-12-01

    The Taipei Metropolis, home to some 10 million people, is subject to seismic hazard originated from not only ground shaking in thick alluvial deposits due to distant faults or sources scattered throughout the Taiwan region, but also active faulting directly underneath. Northern Taiwan including the Taipei region is currently affected by post-orogenic (Plio-Pleistocene arc-continent collision) processes related to backarc extension of the Ryukyu subduction system. The Shanchiao Fault, an active normal fault outcropping along the western boundary of the Taipei Basin and dipping to the east, is investigated here for the areal extent and magnitude of its recent activity. Based on the growth faulting analysis in the Wuku profile in the central portion of the fault, one key horizon - the top of the Jingmei Conglomerate which was an alluvial fan formed rapidly when a major drainage reorganization occurred during the Last Glacial Maximum - serves to be the marker of tectonic subsidence since its inception around 23 ka. A determination and compilation of the depths of the Jingmei Conglomerate top horizon from nearly 500 borehole records within the Taipei Basin demonstrates that the hanging-wall deforms in a roll-over fashion and the offset is largest in the Wuku-Luzhou area in the central portion of the fault and decreases toward the southern tip of the fault. A geologic profile across the fault zone in the Luzhou area reveals the similar main-branch fault half-negative flower structural pattern observed in the Wuku profile, a phenomenon we interpreted to be originated from the geometry of the basin basement and the strong rheological contrast between unconsolidated basin sediments and basement rocks. We also attempt to resolve the poorly-known subsurface geometry of the Shanchiao Fault by simple elastic dislocation models. The surface deformation recorded by the above compilation is representative of the latest Quaternary period as it spans probably more than 10 earthquake

  19. The analysis of historical earthquakes of the North Anatolian Fault in the Marmara Region, Turkey for the last 15 centuries based on intensity and continuous Coulomb scenarios: Implications for the fault geometry and the interaction of individual earthqua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaltırak, Cenk; Şahin, Murat

    2016-04-01

    In this study we evaluated the historical earthquakes of the Marmara Region totally in three-stages. In first stage, historical earthquakes were compiled from the available catalogues and classified according to their spatial distribution, whereas only the ones, related with the active northern branch of the North Anatolian Fault (NAF) were selected. Then, the next phase of classification was made to relate historical data to the ancient and historical settlements, for which a kind of shake map was produced for each event. In the second stage, three different fault models, suggested for the geometry of the NAF in the Marmara Region, were integrated into a GIS database. Mw magnitudes were calculated for each fault segment by using lengths, seismogenic depths, and slip-rates of fault segments. In the third stage, the revised digital geological map of the Marmara Region were compiled based on 1:500k conventional maps and were used to estimate the Vs30 distribution within a grid of 750x750 m. Modified Mercalli Intensity (MMI) maps were produced for each earthquake scenario, depending on the geometry of different fault models, calculated model magnitudes and intensity distributions. Moreover, we tested the surface ruptures of each earthquake scenarios by using the Coulomb stress change model for historical data covering a time era between AD 478 and 2016 in assumption with a constant horizontal slip rate of 19 mma-1 for all fault segments. As conclusion, the horsetail-fault geometry (Yaltırak, 2002) among all 3 fault models yielded the best fit to the distribution of intensities and coulomb models.

  20. Crustal Structure and Moho Geometry around the Alto Tiberina Fault (Northern Apennines) from Receiver Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licciardi, A.; Chiaraluce, L.; Piana Agostinetti, N.; Amato, A.

    2013-12-01

    The Alto Tiberina Fault (ATF) is an unique example of active low angle normal fault (dip ≈ 15°), detected in the Northern Apennines from the interpretation of passive and active seismic data. This NW-SE striking structure has been mapped for a about 50 km along dip and is thought to have accumulated a total of 2 km of displacement in the last 2 Ma. In the last years, a dense, high resolution seismic network has been deployed in the area surrounding the ATF, with the aim of better understanding the physical mechanisms of earthquakes nucleation of such geological feature and assessing the potentially associated seismic hazard. In this context, a good knowledge of the elastic properties of rocks at depth is the starting points for building accurate and consistent physical models of ATF's style of deformation. We carried out a teleseismic receiver functions (RF) study on the 42 broadband seismic stations, using about 800 events from teleseismic distances, recorded from January 2010 to December 2011. We selected an average of about 70 high S/N ratio RFs per station, achieving a good azimuthal coverage for most of the stations. We separated the isotropic and the anisotropic component of the RF data-set through the harmonic decomposition. For each station, we performed a Monte Carlo inversion (using a reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm) of the isotropic component of the RF data-set, obtaining 1-D Vs profiles from the surface to 60km depth. This kind of inversion does not suffer of the problems related to the choice of a particular starting model, and has the advantage of inferring the degree of complexity (i.e. the number of layers) of the resulting model, directly from the data themselves. Preliminary results show an increasing level of structural complexity moving from west to east across the target area. A clear and shallow (~25 km) Moho is observed from the velocity profiles in the westernmost part of the region. Along the easternmost part, crustal

  1. Unassisted 3D camera calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanassov, Kalin; Ramachandra, Vikas; Nash, James; Goma, Sergio R.

    2012-03-01

    With the rapid growth of 3D technology, 3D image capture has become a critical part of the 3D feature set on mobile phones. 3D image quality is affected by the scene geometry as well as on-the-device processing. An automatic 3D system usually assumes known camera poses accomplished by factory calibration using a special chart. In real life settings, pose parameters estimated by factory calibration can be negatively impacted by movements of the lens barrel due to shaking, focusing, or camera drop. If any of these factors displaces the optical axes of either or both cameras, vertical disparity might exceed the maximum tolerable margin and the 3D user may experience eye strain or headaches. To make 3D capture more practical, one needs to consider unassisted (on arbitrary scenes) calibration. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that relies on detection and matching of keypoints between left and right images. Frames containing erroneous matches, along with frames with insufficiently rich keypoint constellations, are detected and discarded. Roll, pitch yaw , and scale differences between left and right frames are then estimated. The algorithm performance is evaluated in terms of the remaining vertical disparity as compared to the maximum tolerable vertical disparity.

  2. Fault geometry and cumulative offsets in the central Coast Ranges, California: Evidence for northward increasing slip along the San Gregorio-San Simeon-Hosgri fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langenheim, V.E.; Jachens, R.C.; Graymer, R.W.; Colgan, J.P.; Wentworth, C.M.; Stanley, R.G.

    2012-01-01

    Estimates of the dip, depth extent, and amount of cumulative displacement along the major faults in the central California Coast Ranges are controversial. We use detailed aeromagnetic data to estimate these parameters for the San Gregorio–San Simeon–Hosgri and other faults. The recently acquired aeromagnetic data provide an areally consistent data set that crosses the onshore-offshore transition without disruption, which is particularly important for the mostly offshore San Gregorio–San Simeon–Hosgri fault. Our modeling, constrained by exposed geology and in some cases, drill-hole and seismic-reflection data, indicates that the San Gregorio–San Simeon–Hosgri and Reliz-Rinconada faults dip steeply throughout the seismogenic crust. Deviations from steep dips may result from local fault interactions, transfer of slip between faults, or overprinting by transpression since the late Miocene. Given that such faults are consistent with predominantly strike-slip displacement, we correlate geophysical anomalies offset by these faults to estimate cumulative displacements. We find a northward increase in right-lateral displacement along the San Gregorio–San Simeon–Hosgri fault that is mimicked by Quaternary slip rates. Although overall slip rates have decreased over the lifetime of the fault, the pattern of slip has not changed. Northward increase in right-lateral displacement is balanced in part by slip added by faults, such as the Reliz-Rinconada, Oceanic–West Huasna, and (speculatively) Santa Ynez River faults to the east.

  3. Future earthquake source faults on deep sea-floor around the Boso triple plate junction revealed by tectonic geomorphology using 3D images produced from 150 meter grid DEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, H.; Nakata, T.; Watanabe, M.; Suzuki, Y.; Izumi, N.; Nishizawa, A.; Horiuchi, D.; Kido, Y. N.

    2013-12-01

    that is tilted to the west, indicating up-growing of Taito spur. Northeastern part of Izu bar on Philippine Sea plate is characterized by rather smooth extensive convex slope between 1500m-7500m for over 200km long along the trench. On the lower part of the slope below 6000m, several gullies such as Mikura canyon and Kita-Hachijo canyon dissecting the slope forms rapids, probably due to continuous up-warping by subsurface thrusting dipping to the west under the slope. It is noteworthy that we can identify prominent active tectonic features on even very deep sea-floor along the plate boundaries, by using 3D images produced from 150 meter grid DEM.

  4. Geometry Of The San Andreas Fault In The Salton Trough And Its Effect On Simulated Shaking For A Rupture Similar To That Of The Great California Shakeout Of 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuis, G. S.; Bauer, K.; Graves, R. W.; Aagaard, B.; Catchings, R.; Goldman, M.; Hole, J. A.; Langenheim, V. E.; Ryberg, T.; Rymer, M. J.; Scheirer, D. S.; Stock, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    The southernmost San Andreas fault (SAF) zone, in the northern Salton Trough, is considered likely to produce a large-magnitude, damaging earthquake in the near future (Jones et al., 2008, USGS OFR). The geometry of the SAF and adjacent sedimentary basins will strongly influence energy radiation and strong ground motion during a future rupture. The Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP) was undertaken, in part, to provide more accurate information on SAF and basin geometry in this region. We report interpretations of seismic profiles in the Salton Trough (Lines 4-7). Lines 4 through 6 are SW-NE fault-perpendicular profiles that cross the Coachella Valley and extend into the mountain ranges on either side. Line 7 crosses the Salton Sea and sedimentary basin deposits similar to those of the Coachella Valley to the north. On three lines (4, 6, 7), seismic imaging, potential-field studies, and (or) earthquake hypocentral relocations provide evidence that active strands of the SAF dip moderately NE. Importantly, on Line 4, we have obtained a reflection image of the SAF zone, in the depth range of 5-10 km, that coincides with the microearthquake pattern here (Hauksson et al., 2012, BSSA). We interpret a moderate northeast dip (~60 deg.) for the SAF, as previously reported by Fuis et al. (2012, BSSA). We used a 3D finite-difference wave propagation method to model shaking in southern California expected from rupture on the SAF with the propeller-shaped geometry reported by Fuis et al. (2012), and we have compared this shaking to that modeled from the generally vertical geometry used in the Great California ShakeOut (Jones et al., 2008). Our results were obtained by projecting the kinematic 2008 ShakeOut rupture onto the newly characterized, dipping SAF geometry. We estimate higher levels of shaking on the hanging wall of the SAF (to the NE) and lower levels on the footwall (to the SW), as compared to the 2008 estimates. The change in ground motion level for most shaking

  5. San Andreas fault geometry at Desert Hot Springs, California, and its effects on earthquake hazards and groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Catchings, R.D.; Rymer, M.J.; Goldman, M.R.; Gandhok, G.

    2009-01-01

    The Mission Creek and Banning faults are two of the principal strands of the San Andreas fault zone in the northern Coachella Valley of southern California. Structural characteristics of the faults affect both regional earthquake hazards and local groundwater resources. We use seismic, gravity, and geological data to characterize the San Andreas fault zone in the vicinity of Desert Hot Springs. Seismic images of the upper 500 m of the Mission Creek fault at Desert Hot Springs show multiple fault strands distributed over a 500 m wide zone, with concentrated faulting within a central 200 m wide area of the fault zone. High-velocity (up to 5000 m=sec) rocks on the northeast side of the fault are juxtaposed against a low-velocity (6.0) earthquakes in the area (in 1948 and 1986) occurred at or near the depths (~10 to 12 km) of the merged (San Andreas) fault. Large-magnitude earthquakes that nucleate at or below the merged fault will likely generate strong shaking from guided waves along both fault zones and from amplified seismic waves in the low-velocity basin between the two fault zones. The Mission Creek fault zone is a groundwater barrier with the top of the water table varying by 60 m in depth and the aquifer varying by about 50 m in thickness across a 200 m wide zone of concentrated faulting.

  6. Integrated analysis of seismological, gravimetric and structural data for identification of active faults geometries in Abruzzo and Molise areas (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudiosi, Germana; Nappi, Rosa; Alessio, Giuliana; Porfido, Sabina; Cella, Federico; Fedi, Maurizio; Florio, Giovanni

    2015-04-01

    This paper deals with an interdisciplinary research that has been carried out for more constraining the active faults and their geometry of Abruzzo - Molise areas (Central-Southern Apennines), two of the most active areas from a geodynamic point of view of the Italian Apennines, characterized by the occurrence of intense and widely spread seismic activity. An integrated analysis of structural, seismic and gravimetric (Gaudiosi et al., 2012) data of the area has been carried out through the Geographic Information System (GIS) which has provided the capability for storing and managing large amount of spatial data from different sources. In particular, the analysis has consisted of these main steps: (a) collection and acquisition of aerial photos, numeric cartography, Digital Terrain Model (DTM) data, geophysical data; (b) generation of the vector cartographic database and alpha-numerical data; c) image processing and features classification; d) cartographic restitution and multi-layers representation. In detail three thematic data sets have been generated "fault", "earthquake" and "gravimetric" data sets. The fault Dataset has been compiled by examining and merging the available structural maps, and many recent geological and geophysical papers of literature. The earthquake Dataset has been implemented collecting seismic data by the available historical and instrumental Catalogues and new precise earthquake locations for better constraining existence and activity of some outcropping and buried tectonic structures. Seismic data have been standardized in the same format into the GIS and merged in a final catalogue. For the gravimetric Dataset, the Multiscale Derivative Analysis (MDA) of the gravity field of the area has been performed, relying on the good resolution properties of the Enhanced Horizontal Derivative (EHD) (Fedi et al., 2005). MDA of gravity data has allowed localization of several trends identifying anomaly sources whose presence was not previously

  7. A three-dimensional mechanical analysis of normal fault evolution and joint development in perturbed stress fields around normal faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kattenhorn, Simon Allen

    1998-09-01

    This thesis investigates the role of three dimensionality in the evolution of normal fault systems and joint development in perturbed stress fields induced by slipping normal faults. This is accomplished using: (1) 3D numerical models; (2) field observations of fault and joint characteristics; and (3) seismic data interpretations of 3D normal fault geometries. Numerical models that incorporate the contribution of an increasing lithostatic load with increasing depth on fault slip behavior indicate that normal faults are more prone to slip near the top than the bottom. Energy release rates are maximized at the upper tip, suggesting that faults should grow preferentially in an up-dip direction. For the case of laterally segmented faults, mechanical interaction promotes propagation of segments towards each other, which may result in composite fault surfaces that are longer than they are tall, in agreement with documented natural examples. Slipping faults perturb the surrounding stress field. Field relationships in Arches National Park, Utah, suggest that joints grew in the perturbed stress field around the faults. Numerical analyses indicate that joint orientations depend on the location along the fault tipline in 3D, and may range from fault-parallel to fault-perpendicular. In addition, as the ratio of fault-parallel to fault-perpendicular remote stress increases, so too does the distance away from the fault affected by the perturbed field. In relay zones, joints forming at high angles to fault strike are likely to continue propagating away from the fault if the fault-parallel stress approaches, or slightly exceeds, the fault-perpendicular remote stress during fault slip. Multiple slip maxima at the same stratigraphic level on apparently continuous fault surfaces in 3D seismic data attest to initial lateral segmentation. Mechanical interaction and lateral propagation led to linkage of fault segments and the formation of composite faults that are longer than they are

  8. Europeana and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletinckx, D.

    2011-09-01

    The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  9. Crustal Deformation Analysis Using a 3D FE High-fidelity Model with a Fast Computation Method and Its Application to Inversion Analysis of Fault Slip in the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agata, R.; Ichimura, T.; Hori, T.; Hirahara, K.; Hori, M.

    2012-12-01

    Crustal deformation analysis is important in order to understand the interplate coupling and coseismic fault slips. To perform it more accurately, we need a high-fidelity crustal structure model. However, in spite of accumulated crustal data, models with simplified flat shapes or relatively low resolution have been used, because the computation cost using high-fidelity models with a large degree-of-freedom (DOF) could be significantly high. Especially, estimation of the interplate coupling and coseismic fault slip requires the calculation of Green's function (the response displacement due to unit fault slip). To execute this computation in a realistic time, we need to reduce the computation cost. The objectives of our research is following: (1)To develop a method to generate 3D Finite Element (FE) models which represent heterogeneous crustal layers with the complex shape of crustal structure; (2)To develop a fast FE analysis method to perform crustal deformation analysis many times using single computation node, supposing the use of a small-scale computation environment. We developed an automatic FE model generation method using background grids with high quality meshes in a large area by extending the method of (Ichimura et al, 2009). We used Finite Element Method (FEM) because it has an advantage in representing the shape. Hybrid meshes consisting of tetrahedral and voxel elements are generated; the former is used when the interface surfaces and the grids intersect so that the shape of the crust is represented well, while the latter is used in the homogeneous areas. Also, we developed a method for crustal deformation analysis due to fault slip, which solves the FEM equation Ku=f assuming that the crust is an elastic body. To compute it fast, firstly we solved the problem by CG method with a simple preconditioning, parallelizing it by OpenMP. However, this computation took a long time, so we improved the method by introducing Multigrid Method (Saam, 2003) to the

  10. Geometry, slip distribution, and kinematics of surface rupture on the Sakarya fault segment during the 17 August 1999 İzmit, Turkey, earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langridge, R.M.; Stenner, H.D.; Fumal, T.E.; Christofferson, S.A.; Rockwell, T.K.; Hartleb, R.D.; Bachhuber, J.; Barka, A.A.

    2002-01-01

    The Mw 7.4 17 August 1999 İzmit earthquake ruptured five major fault segments of the dextral North Anatolian Fault Zone. The 26-km-long, N86°W-trending Sakarya fault segment (SFS) extends from the Sapanca releasing step-over in the west to near the town of Akyazi in the east. The SFS emerges from Lake Sapanca as two distinct fault traces that rejoin to traverse the Adapazari Plain to Akyazi. Offsets were measured across 88 cultural and natural features that cross the fault, such as roads, cornfield rows, rows of trees, walls, rails, field margins, ditches, vehicle ruts, a dike, and ground cracks. The maximum displacement observed for the İzmit earthquake (∼5.1 m) was encountered on this segment. Dextral displacement for the SFS rises from less than 1 m at Lake Sapanca to greater than 5 m near Arifiye, only 3 km away. Average slip decreases uniformly to the east from Arifiye until the fault steps left from Sagir to Kazanci to the N75°W, 6-km-long Akyazi strand, where slip drops to less than 1 m. The Akyazi strand passes eastward into the Akyazi Bend, which consists of a high-angle bend (18°-29°) between the Sakarya and Karadere fault segments, a 6-km gap in surface rupture, and high aftershock energy release. Complex structural geometries exist between the İzmit, Düzce, and 1967 Mudurnu fault segments that have arrested surface ruptures on timescales ranging from 30 sec to 88 days to 32 yr. The largest of these step-overs may have acted as a rupture segmentation boundary in previous earthquake cycles.

  11. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Hee-Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d {N}=2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. We also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  12. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chung, Hee -Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-04-21

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d N = 2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. As a result, we also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  13. "Intelligent design" of a 3D reflection survey for the SAFOD drill-hole site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, G.; Hole, J. A.; Klemperer, S. L.; Biondi, B.; Imhof, M.

    2003-12-01

    SAFOD seeks to better understand the earthquake process by drilling though the San Andreas fault (SAF) to sample an earthquake in situ. To capitalize fully on the opportunities presented by the 1D drill-hole into a complex fault zone we must characterize the surrounding 3D geology at a scale commensurate with the drilling observations, to provide the structural context to extrapolate 1D drilling results along the fault plane and into the surrounding 3D volume. Excellent active-2D and passive-3D seismic observations completed and underway lack the detailed 3D resolution required. Only an industry-quality 3D reflection survey can provide c. 25 m subsurface sample-spacing horizontally and vertically. A 3D reflection survey will provide subsurface structural and stratigraphic control at the 100-m level, mapping major geologic units, structural boundaries, and subsurface relationships between the many faults that make up the SAF fault system. A principal objective should be a reflection-image (horizon-slice through the 3D volume) of the near-vertical fault plane(s) to show variations in physical properties around the drill-hole. Without a 3D reflection image of the fault zone, we risk interpreting drilled anomalies as ubiquitous properties of the fault, or risk missing important anomalies altogether. Such a survey cannot be properly costed or technically designed without major planning. "Intelligent survey design" can minimize source and receiver effort without compromising data-quality at the fault target. Such optimization can in principal reduce the cost of a 3D seismic survey by a factor of two or three, utilizing the known surface logistic constraints, partially-known sub-surface velocity field, and the suite of scientific targets at SAFOD. Our methodology poses the selection of the survey parameters as an optimization process that allows the parameters to vary spatially in response to changes in the subsurface. The acquisition geometry is locally optimized for

  14. Fault geometry and distribution of asperities of the 1997 Manyi, China (Mw = 7.5), earthquake: Integrated analysis from seismological and InSAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Yi-Ying; Ma, Kuo-Fong

    2010-03-01

    The integration of seismic and InSAR interferogram data allows us to have a comprehensive understanding of the earthquake fault geometry and distribution of asperities for a remote event, namely the 1997 Manyi, China earthquake. We first obtained the slip distribution from teleseismic stations for several fault models, and then made synthetic interferograms in order to determine the optimum fault geometry. Our results show that the 1997 Manyi earthquake ruptured bilaterally with two segments dipping north and south for the western and eastern segments, respectively. The south dip of the eastern segment is essential for a better interpretation of the stations near the nodal plane, and a reversal of dip between the west and east segment is necessary to explain the pattern of observed InSAR interferograms due to the broader distribution of asperities. The fault rupture extended 170 km with maximum displacement of 6.1 m, and a total seismic moment of 2.24*1020 Nm (Mw = 7.5).

  15. Testing long-period ground-motion simulations of scenario earthquakes using the Mw 7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah mainshock: Evaluation of finite-fault rupture characterization and 3D seismic velocity models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graves, Robert W.; Aagaard, Brad T.

    2011-01-01

    Using a suite of five hypothetical finite-fault rupture models, we test the ability of long-period (T>2.0 s) ground-motion simulations of scenario earthquakes to produce waveforms throughout southern California consistent with those recorded during the 4 April 2010 Mw 7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake. The hypothetical ruptures are generated using the methodology proposed by Graves and Pitarka (2010) and require, as inputs, only a general description of the fault location and geometry, event magnitude, and hypocenter, as would be done for a scenario event. For each rupture model, two Southern California Earthquake Center three-dimensional community seismic velocity models (CVM-4m and CVM-H62) are used, resulting in a total of 10 ground-motion simulations, which we compare with recorded ground motions. While the details of the motions vary across the simulations, the median levels match the observed peak ground velocities reasonably well, with the standard deviation of the residuals generally within 50% of the median. Simulations with the CVM-4m model yield somewhat lower variance than those with the CVM-H62 model. Both models tend to overpredict motions in the San Diego region and underpredict motions in the Mojave desert. Within the greater Los Angeles basin, the CVM-4m model generally matches the level of observed motions, whereas the CVM-H62 model tends to overpredict the motions, particularly in the southern portion of the basin. The variance in the peak velocity residuals is lowest for a rupture that has significant shallow slip (<5 km depth), whereas the variance in the residuals is greatest for ruptures with large asperities below 10 km depth. Overall, these results are encouraging and provide confidence in the predictive capabilities of the simulation methodology, while also suggesting some regions in which the seismic velocity models may need improvement.

  16. 3D and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulien Ohlmann, Odile

    2013-02-01

    Today the industry offers a chain of 3D products. Learning to "read" and to "create in 3D" becomes an issue of education of primary importance. 25 years professional experience in France, the United States and Germany, Odile Meulien set up a personal method of initiation to 3D creation that entails the spatial/temporal experience of the holographic visual. She will present some different tools and techniques used for this learning, their advantages and disadvantages, programs and issues of educational policies, constraints and expectations related to the development of new techniques for 3D imaging. Although the creation of display holograms is very much reduced compared to the creation of the 90ies, the holographic concept is spreading in all scientific, social, and artistic activities of our present time. She will also raise many questions: What means 3D? Is it communication? Is it perception? How the seeing and none seeing is interferes? What else has to be taken in consideration to communicate in 3D? How to handle the non visible relations of moving objects with subjects? Does this transform our model of exchange with others? What kind of interaction this has with our everyday life? Then come more practical questions: How to learn creating 3D visualization, to learn 3D grammar, 3D language, 3D thinking? What for? At what level? In which matter? for whom?

  17. Implications for Fault and Basin Geometry in the Central California Coast Ranges from Preliminary Gravity and Magnetic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langenheim, V. E.; Jachens, R. C.; Graymer, R. W.; Wentworth, C. M.

    2008-12-01

    Preliminary aeromagnetic and newly processed gravity data help define block-bounding faults and deep sedimentary basins in the central California Coast Ranges, ranging from the Hosgri fault east to the San Andreas fault and from Monterey Bay south to Pt. Conception. Interpretation of these data results in an improved framework for seismic hazard and groundwater studies. Aeromagnetic data include a new survey with a flight-line spacing of 800 m at a nominal 300 m above ground and covering 15,000 km2. More than 11,500 gravity measurements, reprocessed with terrain corrections calculated from 30-m DEMs, form a roughly 2-km grid over most of the study area. Combined potential-field data and existing geologic mapping, delineate major fault-bounded blocks in the central California Coast Ranges. Main block-bounding faults from west to east include the San Gregorio- Hosgri, San Luis-Willmar-Santa Maria River-Little Pine, Oceanic-West Huasna, Nacimiento, Rinconada-South Cuyama, San Juan-Chimineas-Morales, and San Andreas faults. Most of these faults have evidence of Quaternary activity. Gravity gradients indicate that the reach of the San Andreas fault bounding the Gabilan Range and the northern extension of the Rinconada fault bounding the Santa Lucia Range dip steeply southwestward and have a reverse component of slip. Magnetic and microseismicity data suggest that the northern reach of the Hosgri fault dips eastward. The potential-field data also delineate several deep sedimentary basins, such as the 3-4 km deep Cuyama basin, the Santa Maria basin, and several basins along and possibly offset by the Rinconada fault. Gravity data show that the main west-northwest-striking faults bounding the Cuyama basin dip away from the basin, indicating compression adjacent to the big bend in the San Andreas fault. Prominent gravity and magnetic highs northeast of the San Andreas fault immediately east of Cuyama Valley suggest that there the San Andreas fault dips southwest. Such dip

  18. Geometry of the Nojima fault at Nojima-Hirabayashi, Japan - I. A simple damage structure inferred from borehole core permeability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lockner, D.A.; Tanaka, H.; Ito, H.; Ikeda, R.; Omura, K.; Naka, H.

    2009-01-01

    The 1995 Kobe (Hyogo-ken Nanbu) earthquake, M = 7.2, ruptured the Nojima fault in southwest Japan. We have studied core samples taken from two scientific drillholes that crossed the fault zone SW of the epicentral region on Awaji Island. The shallower hole, drilled by the Geological Survey of Japan (GSJ), was started 75 m to the SE of the surface trace of the Nojima fault and crossed the fault at a depth of 624 m. A deeper hole, drilled by the National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED) was started 302 m to the SE of the fault and crossed fault strands below a depth of 1140 m. We have measured strength and matrix permeability of core samples taken from these two drillholes. We find a strong correlation between permeability and proximity to the fault zone shear axes. The half-width of the high permeability zone (approximately 15 to 25 m) is in good agreement with the fault zone width inferred from trapped seismic wave analysis and other evidence. The fault zone core or shear axis contains clays with permeabilities of approximately 0.1 to 1 microdarcy at 50 MPa effective confining pressure (10 to 30 microdarcy at in situ pressures). Within a few meters of the fault zone core, the rock is highly fractured but has sustained little net shear. Matrix permeability of this zone is approximately 30 to 60 microdarcy at 50 MPa effective confining pressure (300 to 1000 microdarcy at in situ pressures). Outside this damage zone, matrix permeability drops below 0.01 microdarcy. The clay-rich core material has the lowest strength with a coefficient of friction of approximately 0.55. Shear strength increases with distance from the shear axis. These permeability and strength observations reveal a simple fault zone structure with a relatively weak fine-grained core surrounded by a damage zone of fractured rock. In this case, the damage zone will act as a high-permeability conduit for vertical and horizontal flow in the plane of the fault. The fine

  19. 3D Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, S. K.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses 3 D imaging as it relates to digital representations in virtual library collections. Highlights include X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT); the National Science Foundation (NSF) Digital Library Initiatives; output peripherals; image retrieval systems, including metadata; and applications of 3 D imaging for libraries and museums. (LRW)

  20. 3D Strucutural Geological Model of the Alpi Mt. Area (Southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Bruna, Vincenzo; Lamarche, Juliette; Viseur, Sophie; Agosta, Fabrizio; Prosser, Giacomo

    2016-04-01

    The study area is located in the inner portion of the southern Apennines fold-and-thrust belt. The Alpi Mt. is the only portion of the Apulian domain cropping in this sector. In fact, it is considered as a structural analogue of the Val d'Agri and Tempa Rossa reservoirs (Basilicata). The Alpi Mt. tectonic unit is composed of two main cronostratigraphic intervals, represented by a 2000m-thick Mesozoic carbonate succession and a Messinian mixed carbonate-terrigenous succession. The Messinian interval is made up of a Lower Messinian sedimentary cycle, wich form a paraconformity with the underlying Mesozoic carbonates, and an Upper Messinian cycle characterized by a marked unconformity at the bottom. This study aims to better understand the role exerted by the precontractional tectonic structures during the Messinian interval, wich are responsible for the development of the sedimentary angular unconformity. To reach this goal, a 3D structural geological model was build up by using the Gocad(R) software. The construction of the 3D model was gained through the integration of several results related to geological field mapping, well log analysis and seismic reflection data. Focusing on the Upper Messinian sedimentary horizon, in order to achieve the true geometry and kinematics of the high-angle extensional faults that bound the sedimentary depocenters, the model was restored through vertical line methodology. This process allows to obtain more information about location, geometry, and sedimentary depocenter orientations. Furthermore, the 3D structural model brings some important results from the 3D fault analysis that are represented by attitude, geometry and dimensional parameters of the fault network that affect the study area.

  1. Seismic reflection geometry of the Newark basin margin in Eastern Pennsylvania. Evidence for extensional reactivation of Paleozoic thrust faults

    SciTech Connect

    Ratcliffe, N.M.; Burton, W.C.; D'Angelo, R.M.; Costain, J.K.

    1986-07-01

    Low-angle 25/sup 0/ to 35/sup 0/ dips have been determined for the border fault of the Newark basin near Riegelsville, Pennsylvania, based on a VIBROSEIS profile and two continuously-cored drill holes across faults at the basin margin. A group of moderately strong planar reflections in a zone 0.5 km thick in gneiss and carbonate rocks of the footwall block coincide with the updip projection of imbricate fault slices and mylonites associated with the Musconetcong thrust system of Drake and others (1967). Contrasts in acoustic impedance among mylonitic dolostone and mylonitic gneiss and their protoliths, determined from measurements on core samples, are sufficiently large to account for reflections seen in the footwall block. Analysis of drill core and surface outcrops supports the conclusion that low-angle extensional faulting in the Early Mesozoic was localized by reactivation of Paleozoic imbricate thrust faults in the basement rocks. Extension in the NW-SE quadrant was approximately perpendicular to the strike of the ancient thrust faults in Eastern Pennsylvania and a passive origin of the Newark basin here is suggested. The data presented here represent some of the most explicit three-dimensional information obtained thus far, in the Eastern United States, in support of the concept of fault reactivation in controlling formation of Early Mesozoic extensional basins.

  2. Low-angle extensional faulting, reactivated mylonites, and seismic reflection geometry of the Newark basin margin in eastern Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect

    Ratcliffe, N.M.; Burton, W.C.; D'Angelo, R.M.; Costain, J.K.

    1986-09-01

    Low-angle 25/sup 0/ to 35/sup 0/ dips have been determined for the border fault of the Newark basin near Riegelsville, Pennsylvania, on the basis of a Vibroseis profile and two continuously cored drill holes across faults at the basin margin. A group of moderately strong planar reflections in a zone 0.5 km thick in gneiss and carbonate rocks of the footwall block coincides with the updip projection of imbricate fault slices and mylonites associated with the Musconetcong thrust system of Drake et al. (1967). Contrasts in acoustic impedance among mylonitic dolostone and mylonitic gneiss and their protoliths, determined from measurements on samples from a third cored hole, are sufficiently large to account for reflections seen in the footwall block. Analysis of drill core and surface outcrops supports the conclusion that low-angle extensional faulting in the early Mesozoic was localized by reactivation of Paleozoic imbricate thrust faults in the basement rocks. Extension in the northwest-southeast quadrant was approximately perpendicular to the strike of the ancient thrust faults in eastern Pennsylvania. The data presented here are the most explicit three-dimensional information obtained thus far in the eastern US in support of the concept of fault reactivation in controlling formation of early Mesozoic extensional basins.

  3. Constraining the slip distribution and fault geometry of the Mw 7.9, 3 November 2002, Denali fault earthquake with Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar and Global Positioning System data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Tim J.; Lu, Zhiming; Wicks, C.

    2004-01-01

    The Mw 7.9, Denali fault earthquake (DFE) is the largest continental strike-slip earthquake to occur since the development of Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR). We use five interferograms, constructed using radar images from the Canadian Radarsat-1 satellite, to map the surface deformation at the western end of the fault rupture. Additional geodetic data are provided by displacements observed at 40 campaign and continuous Global Positioning System (GPS) sites. We use the data to determine the geometry of the Susitna Glacier fault, thrusting on which initiated the DFE, and to determine a slip model for the entire event that is consistent with both the InSAR and GPS data. We find there was an average of 7.3 ± 0.4 m slip on the Susitna Glacier fault, between 1 and 9.5 km depth on a 29 km long fault that dips north at 41 ± 0.7° and has a surface projection close to the mapped rupture. On the Denali fault, a simple model with large slip patches finds a maximum of 8.7 ± 0.7 m of slip between the surface and 14.3 ± 0.2 km depth. A more complex distributed slip model finds a peak of 12.5 ± 0.8 m in the upper 4 km, significantly higher than the observed surface slip. We estimate a geodetic moment of 670 ± 10 × 1018 N m (Mw 7.9), consistent with seismic estimates. Lack of preseismic data resulted in an absence of InSAR coverage for the eastern half of the DFE rupture. A dedicated geodetic InSAR mission could obviate coverage problems in the future.

  4. 3D whiteboard: collaborative sketching with 3D-tracked smart phones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lue, James; Schulze, Jürgen P.

    2014-02-01

    We present the results of our investigation of the feasibility of a new approach for collaborative drawing in 3D, based on Android smart phones. Our approach utilizes a number of fiduciary markers, placed in the working area where they can be seen by the smart phones' cameras, in order to estimate the pose of each phone in the room. Our prototype allows two users to draw 3D objects with their smart phones by moving their phones around in 3D space. For example, 3D lines are drawn by recording the path of the phone as it is moved around in 3D space, drawing line segments on the screen along the way. Each user can see the virtual drawing space on their smart phones' displays, as if the display was a window into this space. Besides lines, our prototype application also supports 3D geometry creation, geometry transformation operations, and it shows the location of the other user's phone.

  5. 3-D seismic improves structural mapping of a gas storage reservoir (Paris basin)

    SciTech Connect

    Huguet, F. ); Pinson, C. )

    1993-09-01

    In the Paris basin, anticlinal structures with closure of no more than 80 m and surface area of a few km[sup 2] are used for underground gas storage. At Soings-en-Sologne, a three-dimensional (3-D) survey (13 km[sup 2]) was carried out over such a structure to establish its exact geometry and to detail its fault network. Various reflectors were picked automatically on the migrated data: the top of the Kimmeridgian, the top of the Bathoinian and the base of the Hettangian close to the top of the reservoir. The isochron maps were converted into depth using data from 12 wells. Horizon attributes (amplitude, dip, and azimuth) were used to reconstruct the fault's pattern with much greater accuracy than that supplied by interpretation from previous two-dimensional seismic. The Triassic and the Jurassic are affected by two systems of conjugate faults (N10-N110, inherited from the Hercynian basement and N30-N120). Alternating clay and limestone are the cause of numerous structural disharmonies, particularly on both sides of the Bathonian. Ridges associated with N30-N120 faults suggest compressive movements contemporaneous with the tertiary events. The northern structure in Soings-en-Sologne thus appear to be the result of polyphased tectonics. Its closure (25 m), which is associated either with dips or faults, is described in detail by 3-D seismic, permitting more accurate forecast of the volume available for gas storage.

  6. A 3-D Model of Stacked Thrusts in the Sevier Thrust Belt, Eastern Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, R. W.; Clayton, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    Using published and new geologic map data and two exploratory wells for control, we constructed a three-dimensional geological model of the Pine Creek area in the Big Hole Mountains of eastern Idaho, where stacked Sevier thrust sheets are exposed at the surface. In this area, Cretaceous crustal shortening displaced and folded strata from Cambrian to Cretaceous in age. Using geologic map data as a primary input to a 3-D model presents a number of challenges, especially representing fault geometries at depth and maintaining strata thicknesses. The highly variable attitudes measured at the surface are also difficult to represent in a subsurface model because they require extensive extrapolation to depth. To overcome these challenges we EarthVision software, which has tools for model construction with minimal data inputs and uses a minimum tension algorithm to create geologically realistic surfaces. We also constructed two primary cross-sections to constrain strata and fault geometries according to structural principles, and used these to guide construction of fault and horizon surfaces. We then designated horizons with the best control as reference horizons to constrain strata geometries, and built the remaining horizons using isochores to add or subtract from those surfaces. The model shows classic flat-ramp thrust geometries as seen farther southeast in the Wyoming section of the thrust belt. The model also shows uniform southwestward tilting of faults and strata in the north end above younger thrusts, but strong effects from a duplex on a younger thrust fault encountered in the southern well, which rotated the strata and older faults above it.

  7. FEM-based linear inverse modeling using a 3D source array to image magma chambers with free geometry. Application to InSAR data from Rabaul Caldera (PNG).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronchin, Erika; Masterlark, Timothy; Dawson, John; Saunders, Steve; Martí Molist, Joan

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we present a method to fully integrate a family of finite element models (FEMs) into the regularized linear inversion of InSAR data collected at Rabaul caldera (PNG) between February 2007 and December 2010. During this period the caldera experienced a long-term steady subsidence that characterized surface movement both inside the caldera and outside, on its western side. The inversion is based on an array of FEM sources in the sense that the Green's function matrix is a library of forward numerical displacement solutions generated by the sources of an array common to all FEMs. Each entry of the library is the LOS surface displacement generated by injecting a unity mass of fluid, of known density and bulk modulus, into a different source cavity of the array for each FEM. By using FEMs, we are taking advantage of their capability of including topography and heterogeneous distribution of elastic material properties. All FEMs of the family share the same mesh in which only one source is activated at the time by removing the corresponding elements and applying the unity fluid flux. The domain therefore only needs to be discretized once. This precludes remeshing for each activated source, thus reducing computational requirements, often a downside of FEM-based inversions. Without imposing an a-priori source, the method allows us to identify, from a least-squares standpoint, a complex distribution of fluid flux (or change in pressure) with a 3D free geometry within the source array, as dictated by the data. The results of applying the proposed inversion to Rabaul InSAR data show a shallow magmatic system under the caldera made of two interconnected lobes located at the two opposite sides of the caldera. These lobes could be consistent with feeding reservoirs of the ongoing Tavuvur volcano eruption of andesitic products, on the eastern side, and of the past Vulcan volcano eruptions of more evolved materials, on the western side. The interconnection and

  8. 3-D Evolutionary model of the oblique rift basins-the study of Central African Rifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, I. W.; Yang, K. M.; Wu, J. C.; Hsiuan, T. H.

    2015-12-01

    Because of their tectonostratigraphically high potentials to yield oil and gas, oblique rift basins are a noteworthy type of global petroleum basins. The main purpose of this study is to investigate characteristics of the structural style and basin evolution of the Central Africa rift subsystem (CAS). Establishing the evolutionary model of CAS by the analyses of tectonostratigraphy, geometry, kinematics of structural features and Particle Flow Code 3-Dimensions (PFC 3D). The results can be references for petroleum basin exploration. The study areas are in the CAS, including the Doba, Doseo and Salamat Basins. Basins are separated by a large-scale strike-slip fault zone (Borogop fault zone) across the CAS. The results showed that the Borogop fault zone pass through the CAS until the Late Cretaceous compression and then became a big-scaled strike-slip fault. The structural geometry of oblique rift is changed with the α angle between the rift trend and trend of tensile stress. PFC-3D indicated that 1) The α of the Doba, Doseo and Salamat Basins are 60°, 60° and 75°, respectively; 2) When the α got close to 45°, the density of the echelon faults alone the basin center decreased gradually; 3) The Doba Basin is wide and shallow which should be affected by meso-scaled stresses. The Doseo and Salamat Basins are narrow and deeper which should be affected by mega-scaled stresses. According to the abovementioned results, we suggest that 1) The Borogop fault zone had less influence on basin architecture of CAS, therefore the basins of CAS are not the pull-apart basins but the extensional basins, and 2) Doba and Doseo-Salamat Basins should probably belong to different type of petroleum systems, which have different scales of stress.

  9. Geometry of the Nojima fault at Nojima-Hirabayashi, Japan - II. Microstructures and their implications for permeability and strength

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, Diane E.; Lockner, D.A.; Ito, H.; Ikeda, R.; Tanaka, H.; Omura, K.

    2009-01-01

    Samples of damage-zone granodiorite and fault core from two drillholes into the active, strike-slip Nojima fault zone display microstructures and alteration features that explain their measured present-day strengths and permeabilities and provide insight on the evolution of these properties in the fault zone. The least deformed damage-zone rocks contain two sets of nearly perpendicular (60-90?? angles), roughly vertical fractures that are concentrated in quartz-rich areas, with one set typically dominating over the other. With increasing intensity of deformation, which corresponds generally to increasing proximity to the core, zones of heavily fragmented rock, termed microbreccia zones, develop between prominent fractures of both sets. Granodiorite adjoining intersecting microbreccia zones in the active fault strands has been repeatedly fractured and locally brecciated, accompanied by the generation of millimeter-scale voids that are partly filled with secondary minerals. Minor shear bands overprint some of the heavily deformed areas, and small-scale shear zones form from the pairing of closely spaced shear bands. Strength and permeability measurements were made on core collected from the fault within a year after a major (Kobe) earthquake. Measured strengths of the samples decrease regularly with increasing fracturing and fragmentation, such that the gouge of the fault core and completely brecciated samples from the damage zone are the weakest. Permeability increases with increasing disruption, generally reaching a peak in heavily fractured but still more or less cohesive rock at the scale of the laboratory samples. Complete loss of cohesion, as in the gouge or the interiors of large microbreccia zones, is accompanied by a reduction of permeability by 1-2 orders of magnitude below the peak values. The core samples show abundant evidence of hydrothermal alteration and mineral precipitation. Permeability is thus expected to decrease and strength to increase somewhat

  10. JAR3D Webserver: Scoring and aligning RNA loop sequences to known 3D motifs

    PubMed Central

    Roll, James; Zirbel, Craig L.; Sweeney, Blake; Petrov, Anton I.; Leontis, Neocles

    2016-01-01

    Many non-coding RNAs have been identified and may function by forming 2D and 3D structures. RNA hairpin and internal loops are often represented as unstructured on secondary structure diagrams, but RNA 3D structures show that most such loops are structured by non-Watson–Crick basepairs and base stacking. Moreover, different RNA sequences can form the same RNA 3D motif. JAR3D finds possible 3D geometries for hairpin and internal loops by matching loop sequences to motif groups from the RNA 3D Motif Atlas, by exact sequence match when possible, and by probabilistic scoring and edit distance for novel sequences. The scoring gauges the ability of the sequences to form the same pattern of interactions observed in 3D structures of the motif. The JAR3D webserver at http://rna.bgsu.edu/jar3d/ takes one or many sequences of a single loop as input, or else one or many sequences of longer RNAs with multiple loops. Each sequence is scored against all current motif groups. The output shows the ten best-matching motif groups. Users can align input sequences to each of the motif groups found by JAR3D. JAR3D will be updated with every release of the RNA 3D Motif Atlas, and so its performance is expected to improve over time. PMID:27235417

  11. [3D reconstructions in radiotherapy planning].

    PubMed

    Schlegel, W

    1991-10-01

    3D Reconstructions from tomographic images are used in the planning of radiation therapy to study important anatomical structures such as the body surface, target volumes, and organs at risk. The reconstructed anatomical models are used to define the geometry of the radiation beams. In addition, 3D voxel models are used for the calculation of the 3D dose distributions with an accuracy, previously impossible to achieve. Further uses of 3D reconstructions are in the display and evaluation of 3D therapy plans, and in the transfer of treatment planning parameters to the irradiation situation with the help of digitally reconstructed radiographs. 3D tomographic imaging with subsequent 3D reconstruction must be regarded as a completely new basis for the planning of radiation therapy, enabling tumor-tailored radiation therapy of localized target volumes with increased radiation doses and improved sparing of organs at risk. 3D treatment planning is currently being evaluated in clinical trials in connection with the new treatment techniques of conformation radiotherapy. Early experience with 3D treatment planning shows that its clinical importance in radiotherapy is growing, but will only become a standard radiotherapy tool when volumetric CT scanning, reliable and user-friendly treatment planning software, and faster and cheaper PACS-integrated medical work stations are accessible to radiotherapists.

  12. An Improved Version of TOPAZ 3D

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnykh, Anatoly

    2003-07-29

    An improved version of the TOPAZ 3D gun code is presented as a powerful tool for beam optics simulation. In contrast to the previous version of TOPAZ 3D, the geometry of the device under test is introduced into TOPAZ 3D directly from a CAD program, such as Solid Edge or AutoCAD. In order to have this new feature, an interface was developed, using the GiD software package as a meshing code. The article describes this method with two models to illustrate the results.

  13. Gravity and magnetic expression of the San Leandro gabbro with implications for the geometry and evolution of the Hayward Fault zone, northern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ponce, D.A.; Hildenbrand, T.G.; Jachens, R.C.

    2003-01-01

    The Hayward Fault, one of the most hazardous faults in northern California, trends north-northwest and extends for about 90 km along the eastern San Francisco Bay region. At numerous locations along its length, distinct and elongate gravity and magnetic anomalies correlate with mapped mafic and ultramafic rocks. The most prominent of these anomalies reflects the 16-km-long San Leandro gabbroic block. Inversion of magnetic and gravity data constrained with physical property measurements is used to define the subsurface extent of the San Leandro gabbro body and to speculate on its origin and relationship to the Hayward Fault Zone. Modeling indicates that the San Leandro gabbro body is about 3 km wide, dips about 75??-80?? northeast, and extends to a depth of at least 6 km. One of the most striking results of the modeling, which was performed independently of seismicity data, is that accurately relocated seismicity is concentrated along the western edge or stratigraphically lower bounding surface of the San Leandro gabbro. The western boundary of the San Leandro gabbro block is the base of an incomplete ophiolite sequence and represented at one time, a low-angle roof thrust related to the tectonic wedging of the Franciscan Complex. After repeated episodes of extension and attenuation, the roof thrust of this tectonic wedge was rotated to near vertical, and in places, the strike-slip Hayward Fault probably reactivated or preferentially followed this pre-existing feature. Because earthquakes concentrate near the edge of the San Leandro gabbro but tend to avoid its interior, we qualitatively explore mechanical models to explain how this massive igneous block may influence the distribution of stress. The microseismicity cluster along the western flank of the San Leandro gabbro leads us to suggest that this stressed volume may be the site of future moderate to large earthquakes. Improved understanding of the three-dimensional geometry and physical properties along the

  14. Radiochromic 3D Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Radiochromic materials exhibit a colour change when exposed to ionising radiation. Radiochromic film has been used for clinical dosimetry for many years and increasingly so recently, as films of higher sensitivities have become available. The two principle advantages of radiochromic dosimetry include greater tissue equivalence (radiologically) and the lack of requirement for development of the colour change. In a radiochromic material, the colour change arises direct from ionising interactions affecting dye molecules, without requiring any latent chemical, optical or thermal development, with important implications for increased accuracy and convenience. It is only relatively recently however, that 3D radiochromic dosimetry has become possible. In this article we review recent developments and the current state-of-the-art of 3D radiochromic dosimetry, and the potential for a more comprehensive solution for the verification of complex radiation therapy treatments, and 3D dose measurement in general.

  15. 3-D Seismic Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Gregory F.

    2009-05-01

    This volume is a brief introduction aimed at those who wish to gain a basic and relatively quick understanding of the interpretation of three-dimensional (3-D) seismic reflection data. The book is well written, clearly illustrated, and easy to follow. Enough elementary mathematics are presented for a basic understanding of seismic methods, but more complex mathematical derivations are avoided. References are listed for readers interested in more advanced explanations. After a brief introduction, the book logically begins with a succinct chapter on modern 3-D seismic data acquisition and processing. Standard 3-D acquisition methods are presented, and an appendix expands on more recent acquisition techniques, such as multiple-azimuth and wide-azimuth acquisition. Although this chapter covers the basics of standard time processing quite well, there is only a single sentence about prestack depth imaging, and anisotropic processing is not mentioned at all, even though both techniques are now becoming standard.

  16. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; Pufu, Silviu S.; Simmons-Duffin, David; Yacoby, Ran

    2016-03-17

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions <ψψψψ> in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge CT. We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N. Finally, we also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  17. Moderately-dipping California Strike-slip Faults With Bends in map View and Cross-section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cormier, M. H.; Sorlien, C. C.; Nicholson, C.; Legg, M.; Behl, R. J.; Seeber, L.

    2015-12-01

    New faults in a strike-slip stress field are expected to be sub-vertical. However, continental strike-slip faults commonly reactivate arrays of pre-existing non-vertical faults with non-optimal strike. The systems of strike-slip faults that dissect the Inner California Continental Borderland , Santa Monica Bay, and south-Central California are imaged with multiple grids of closely spaced 2D multichannel seismic reflection profiles. From these and stratigraphic information, we constructed multiple digital 3D fault and fold interpretations. Quaternary strike-slip faults that dip moderately in their upper few km include the southern Hosgri fault, part of the Carlsbad fault, and the Santa Monica-Dume fault. These faults reactivate structures that developed in pre-19 Ma subduction and subsequent Miocene extension and transtension. Seismic reflection imaging reveal that they dip 40° to 55°. 3D seismic data image the Hosgri fault to locally dip less than 30° below 1 km depth. Where Pliocene-Quaternary sediment accumulated in basins, these faults tend to propagate upwards as sub-vertical faults, as expected. Thus, cross sectional fault geometry can be used together with other information to infer strike-slip motion. Imaged gently-dipping faults underlie and/or interact with the Santa Monica-Dume and Carlsbad faults. Seismicity and tectonic models suggest that the southern Hosgri fault and faults to its west do not affect the subducted oceanic lower crust. Thus, strike-slip motion there may occur on the former subduction megathrust. These moderately-dipping faults also describe bends and stepovers in map view, resulting in significant vertical deformation. Northwest of San Diego, the Carlsbad fault bends sharply as part of a 15 km right-stepover to the Descanso and Coronado Bank fault system. N-striking fault strands, a releasing orientation for the Pliocene to present strain orientation, connect between the Newport-Inglewood and Carlsbad faults and also between the Rose

  18. April 7, 2009, Mw 5.5 aftershock of the L'Aquila earthquake: seismogenic fault geometry and its implication for the central Apennines active extensional tectonics (Italy).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adinolfi, Guido Maria; Lavecchia, Giusy; De Matteis, Raffaella; Nardis Rita, De; Francesco, Brozzetti; Federica, Ferrarini; Zollo, Aldo

    2015-04-01

    On April 6, 2009 (at 01:32 UTC) a Mw 6.3 earthquake hit the town of L'Aquila (central Italy) and surrounding villages causing fatalities and severe damage in the area. After few days, a nearly 40-km-long extensional fault system was activated generating both northward and southward seismicity migration along the NW-SE trending sector of central Apennines. During the intense aftershocks sequence, different sesmogenic sources with a distinct geometry, size and the degree of involvement were reactivated. Among the relevant aftershocks with Mw 5.0 to 5.5, the largest one occurred on April 7 (at 17:47 UTC), 9 km SE-ward of the mainshock involving a source seated at much greater depths (~14 km). Despite the enormous number of studies of the 2009 L'Aquila earthquake, mainly focused on the various geological and seismological aspects of the main Paganica source, the April 7 strongest aftershock (Mw 5.5) has not yet been deeply investigated. Consistent geometric and kinematic correlations between the geological and seismological data about this seismogenic source are missing. There are still open questions concerning its unresolved geometry and the unknown style of the central Apennines structure activated at greater depths during the 2009 L'Aquila seismic sequence. Furthermore, some authors (Lavecchia et al., 2012) have supposed that the April 7, 2009 aftershock (Mw 5.5) occurred onto an high dip segment (~50°) of an east-dipping extensional basal detachment with a potential surface expression outcropping in the area of the eastern Sabina-Simbruini Mts. In this work we propose a seismological analysis of the April 7, 2009 aftershock (Mw 5.5) rupture process. In order to define the unresolved source geometry, we computed the focal mechanism through the time domain, moment tensor full waveform inversion (Dreger and Helmberger, 1993). Also, we estimated the apparent source time functions (ASTFs) by deconvolution of the impulse response of the medium from the recorded data

  19. Integrating 3D seismic curvature and curvature gradient attributes for fracture characterization: Methodologies and interpretational implications

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Dengliang

    2013-03-01

    In 3D seismic interpretation, curvature is a popular attribute that depicts the geometry of seismic reflectors and has been widely used to detect faults in the subsurface; however, it provides only part of the solutions to subsurface structure analysis. This study extends the curvature algorithm to a new curvature gradient algorithm, and integrates both algorithms for fracture detection using a 3D seismic test data set over Teapot Dome (Wyoming). In fractured reservoirs at Teapot Dome known to be formed by tectonic folding and faulting, curvature helps define the crestal portion of the reservoirs that is associated with strong seismic amplitude and high oil productivity. In contrast, curvature gradient helps better define the regional northwest-trending and the cross-regional northeast-trending lineaments that are associated with weak seismic amplitude and low oil productivity. In concert with previous reports from image logs, cores, and outcrops, the current study based on an integrated seismic curvature and curvature gradient analysis suggests that curvature might help define areas of enhanced potential to form tensile fractures, whereas curvature gradient might help define zones of enhanced potential to develop shear fractures. In certain fractured reservoirs such as at Teapot Dome where faulting and fault-related folding contribute dominantly to the formation and evolution of fractures, curvature and curvature gradient attributes can be potentially applied to differentiate fracture mode, to predict fracture intensity and orientation, to detect fracture volume and connectivity, and to model fracture networks.

  20. Venus in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaut, J. J.

    1993-08-01

    Stereographic images of the surface of Venus which enable geologists to reconstruct the details of the planet's evolution are discussed. The 120-meter resolution of these 3D images make it possible to construct digital topographic maps from which precise measurements can be made of the heights, depths, slopes, and volumes of geologic structures.

  1. 3D reservoir visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Van, B.T.; Pajon, J.L.; Joseph, P. )

    1991-11-01

    This paper shows how some simple 3D computer graphics tools can be combined to provide efficient software for visualizing and analyzing data obtained from reservoir simulators and geological simulations. The animation and interactive capabilities of the software quickly provide a deep understanding of the fluid-flow behavior and an accurate idea of the internal architecture of a reservoir.

  2. Magnetic Properties of 3D Printed Toroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollig, Lindsey; Otto, Austin; Hilpisch, Peter; Mowry, Greg; Nelson-Cheeseman, Brittany; Renewable Energy; Alternatives Lab (REAL) Team

    Transformers are ubiquitous in electronics today. Although toroidal geometries perform most efficiently, transformers are traditionally made with rectangular cross-sections due to the lower manufacturing costs. Additive manufacturing techniques (3D printing) can easily achieve toroidal geometries by building up a part through a series of 2D layers. To get strong magnetic properties in a 3D printed transformer, a composite filament is used containing Fe dispersed in a polymer matrix. How the resulting 3D printed toroid responds to a magnetic field depends on two structural factors of the printed 2D layers: fill factor (planar density) and fill pattern. In this work, we investigate how the fill factor and fill pattern affect the magnetic properties of 3D printed toroids. The magnetic properties of the printed toroids are measured by a custom circuit that produces a hysteresis loop for each toroid. Toroids with various fill factors and fill patterns are compared to determine how these two factors can affect the magnetic field the toroid can produce. These 3D printed toroids can be used for numerous applications in order to increase the efficiency of transformers by making it possible for manufacturers to make a toroidal geometry.

  3. Magmatic Systems in 3-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, G. M.; Harding, A. J.; Babcock, J. M.; Orcutt, J. A.; Bazin, S.; Singh, S.; Detrick, R. S.; Canales, J. P.; Carbotte, S. M.; Diebold, J.

    2002-12-01

    Multichannel seismic (MCS) images of crustal magma chambers are ideal targets for advanced visualization techniques. In the mid-ocean ridge environment, reflections originating at the melt-lens are well separated from other reflection boundaries, such as the seafloor, layer 2A and Moho, which enables the effective use of transparency filters. 3-D visualization of seismic reflectivity falls into two broad categories: volume and surface rendering. Volumetric-based visualization is an extremely powerful approach for the rapid exploration of very dense 3-D datasets. These 3-D datasets are divided into volume elements or voxels, which are individually color coded depending on the assigned datum value; the user can define an opacity filter to reject plotting certain voxels. This transparency allows the user to peer into the data volume, enabling an easy identification of patterns or relationships that might have geologic merit. Multiple image volumes can be co-registered to look at correlations between two different data types (e.g., amplitude variation with offsets studies), in a manner analogous to draping attributes onto a surface. In contrast, surface visualization of seismic reflectivity usually involves producing "fence" diagrams of 2-D seismic profiles that are complemented with seafloor topography, along with point class data, draped lines and vectors (e.g. fault scarps, earthquake locations and plate-motions). The overlying seafloor can be made partially transparent or see-through, enabling 3-D correlations between seafloor structure and seismic reflectivity. Exploration of 3-D datasets requires additional thought when constructing and manipulating these complex objects. As numbers of visual objects grow in a particular scene, there is a tendency to mask overlapping objects; this clutter can be managed through the effective use of total or partial transparency (i.e., alpha-channel). In this way, the co-variation between different datasets can be investigated

  4. Control of preexisting faults on geometry and kinematics in the northernmost part of the Jura fold-and-thrust belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustaszewski, Kamil; Schmid, Stefan M.

    2006-10-01

    This study investigates the formation of the northernmost anticlines of the late Miocene to early Pliocene thin-skinned Jura fold-and-thrust belt and provides evidence that a transition to thick-skinned tectonics did occur in this particular area during the late Pliocene. The northernmost anticlines of the Jura fold-and-thrust belt are characterized by pronounced along-strike asymmetries that were predetermined by a fault pattern inherited from Paleogene Upper Rhine Graben rifting. This fault pattern had disrupted the Triassic basal décollement of the Jura Mountains and controlled the nucleation of thrusts and folds, as well as transfer zones during the generally (N)NW directed transport of the detached sedimentary cover. Sinistral, transpressive oblique ramps nucleated along Paleogene, NNE trending basement normal faults and led to a northward protrusion of the Jura front, encroaching onto the southernmost Upper Rhine Graben. Shortening across the frontal anticlines is greatest along the oblique ramps and decreases along strike toward the east, necessitating a gentle clockwise rotation of the detached sediments. Despite the fact that the stress field in the sedimentary cover remained unchanged, thin-skinned folding and thrusting came to a halt in the early Pliocene, giving way to thick-skinned tectonics, very probably governing neotectonic activity in the area. This transition might represent a geodynamic reorganization of the northwestern Alpine foreland.

  5. 3D printed bionic ears.

    PubMed

    Mannoor, Manu S; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A; Soboyejo, Winston O; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H; McAlpine, Michael C

    2013-06-12

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing.

  6. 3D printed bionic ears.

    PubMed

    Mannoor, Manu S; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A; Soboyejo, Winston O; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H; McAlpine, Michael C

    2013-06-12

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing. PMID:23635097

  7. The Mw 5.8 Mineral, Virginia, earthquake of August 2011 and aftershock sequence: constraints on earthquake source parameters and fault geometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McNamara, Daniel E.; Benz, H.M.; Herrmann, Robert B.; Bergman, Eric A.; Earle, Paul; Meltzer, Anne; Withers, Mitch; Chapman, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The Mw 5.8 earthquake of 23 August 2011 (17:51:04 UTC) (moment, M0 5.7×1017  N·m) occurred near Mineral, Virginia, within the central Virginia seismic zone and was felt by more people than any other earthquake in United States history. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) received 148,638 felt reports from 31 states and 4 Canadian provinces. The USGS PAGER system estimates as many as 120,000 people were exposed to shaking intensity levels of IV and greater, with approximately 10,000 exposed to shaking as high as intensity VIII. Both regional and teleseismic moment tensor solutions characterize the earthquake as a northeast‐striking reverse fault that nucleated at a depth of approximately 7±2  km. The distribution of reported macroseismic intensities is roughly ten times the area of a similarly sized earthquake in the western United States (Horton and Williams, 2012). Near‐source and far‐field damage reports, which extend as far away as Washington, D.C., (135 km away) and Baltimore, Maryland, (200 km away) are consistent with an earthquake of this size and depth in the eastern United States (EUS). Within the first few days following the earthquake, several government and academic institutions installed 36 portable seismograph stations in the epicentral region, making this among the best‐recorded aftershock sequences in the EUS. Based on modeling of these data, we provide a detailed description of the source parameters of the mainshock and analysis of the subsequent aftershock sequence for defining the fault geometry, area of rupture, and observations of the aftershock sequence magnitude–frequency and temporal distribution. The observed slope of the magnitude–frequency curve or b‐value for the aftershock sequence is consistent with previous EUS studies (b=0.75), suggesting that most of the accumulated strain was released by the mainshock. The aftershocks define a rupture that extends between approximately 2–8 km in depth and 8–10 km along

  8. 3D rapid mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaksson, Folke; Borg, Johan; Haglund, Leif

    2008-04-01

    In this paper the performance of passive range measurement imaging using stereo technique in real time applications is described. Stereo vision uses multiple images to get depth resolution in a similar way as Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) uses multiple measurements to obtain better spatial resolution. This technique has been used in photogrammetry for a long time but it will be shown that it is now possible to do the calculations, with carefully designed image processing algorithms, in e.g. a PC in real time. In order to get high resolution and quantitative data in the stereo estimation a mathematical camera model is used. The parameters to the camera model are settled in a calibration rig or in the case of a moving camera the scene itself can be used for calibration of most of the parameters. After calibration an ordinary TV camera has an angular resolution like a theodolite, but to a much lower price. The paper will present results from high resolution 3D imagery from air to ground. The 3D-results from stereo calculation of image pairs are stitched together into a large database to form a 3D-model of the area covered.

  9. Self-Discovery of Structural Geology Concepts using Interactive 3D Visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billen, M. I.; Saunders, J.

    2010-12-01

    Mastering structural geology concepts that depend on understanding three-dimensional (3D) geometries and imagining relationships among unseen subsurface structures are fundamental skills for geologists. Traditionally these skills are developed first, through use of 2D drawings of 3D structures that can be difficult to decipher or 3D physical block models that show only a limited set of relationships on the surfaces of the blocks, followed by application and testing of concepts in field settings. We hypothesize that this learning process can be improved by providing repeated opportunities to evaluate and explore synthetic 3D structures using interactive 3D visualization software. We present laboratory modules designed for undergraduate structural geology curriculum using a self-discovery approach to teach concepts such as: the Rule of V’s, structure separation versus fault slip, and the more general dependence of structural exposure on surface topography. The laboratory modules are structured to allow students to discover and articulate each concept from observations of synthetic data both on traditional maps and using the volume visualization software 3DVisualizer. Modules lead students through exploration of data (e.g., a dipping layered structure exposed in ridge-valley topography or obliquely offset across a fault) by allowing them to interactively view (rotate, pan, zoom) the exposure of structures on topographic surfaces and to toggle on/off the full 3D structure as a transparent colored volume. This tool allows student to easily visually understand the relationships between, for example a dipping structure and its exposure on valley walls, as well as how the structure extends beneath the surface. Using this method gives students more opportunities to build a mental library of previously-seen relationships from which to draw-on when applying concepts in the field setting. These laboratory modules, the data and software are freely available from KeckCAVES.

  10. How do normal faults grow?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Christopher; Bell, Rebecca; Rotevatn, Atle; Tvedt, Anette

    2016-04-01

    Normal faulting accommodates stretching of the Earth's crust, and it is arguably the most fundamental tectonic process leading to continent rupture and oceanic crust emplacement. Furthermore, the incremental and finite geometries associated with normal faulting dictate landscape evolution, sediment dispersal and hydrocarbon systems development in rifts. Displacement-length scaling relationships compiled from global datasets suggest normal faults grow via a sympathetic increase in these two parameters (the 'isolated fault model'). This model has dominated the structural geology literature for >20 years and underpins the structural and tectono-stratigraphic models developed for active rifts. However, relatively recent analysis of high-quality 3D seismic reflection data suggests faults may grow by rapid establishment of their near-final length prior to significant displacement accumulation (the 'coherent fault model'). The isolated and coherent fault models make very different predictions regarding the tectono-stratigraphic evolution of rift basin, thus assessing their applicability is important. To-date, however, very few studies have explicitly set out to critically test the coherent fault model thus, it may be argued, it has yet to be widely accepted in the structural geology community. Displacement backstripping is a simple graphical technique typically used to determine how faults lengthen and accumulate displacement; this technique should therefore allow us to test the competing fault models. However, in this talk we use several subsurface case studies to show that the most commonly used backstripping methods (the 'original' and 'modified' methods) are, however, of limited value, because application of one over the other requires an a priori assumption of the model most applicable to any given fault; we argue this is illogical given that the style of growth is exactly what the analysis is attempting to determine. We then revisit our case studies and demonstrate

  11. The Galicia 3D experiment: an Introduction.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reston, Timothy; Martinez Loriente, Sara; Holroyd, Luke; Merry, Tobias; Sawyer, Dale; Morgan, Julia; Jordan, Brian; Tesi Sanjurjo, Mari; Alexanian, Ara; Shillington, Donna; Gibson, James; Minshull, Tim; Karplus, Marianne; Bayracki, Gaye; Davy, Richard; Klaeschen, Dirk; Papenberg, Cord; Ranero, Cesar; Perez-Gussinye, Marta; Martinez, Miguel

    2014-05-01

    In June and July 2013, scientists from 8 institutions took part in the Galicia 3D seismic experiment, the first ever crustal -scale academic 3D MCS survey over a rifted margin. The aim was to determine the 3D structure of a critical portion of the west Galicia rifted margin. At this margin, well-defined tilted fault blocks, bound by west-dipping faults and capped by synrift sediments are underlain by a bright reflection, undulating on time sections, termed the S reflector and thought to represent a major detachment fault of some kind. Moving west, the crust thins to zero thickness and mantle is unroofed, as evidence by the "Peridotite Ridge" first reported at this margin, but since observed at many other magma-poor margins. By imaging such a margin in detail, the experiment aimed to resolve the processes controlling crustal thinning and mantle unroofing at a type example magma poor margin. The experiment set out to collect several key datasets: a 3D seismic reflection volume measuring ~20x64km and extending down to ~14s TWT, a 3D ocean bottom seismometer dataset suitable for full wavefield inversion (the recording of the complete 3D seismic shots by 70 ocean bottom instruments), the "mirror imaging" of the crust using the same grid of OBS, a single 2D combined reflection/refraction profile extending to the west to determine the transition from unroofed mantle to true oceanic crust, and the seismic imaging of the water column, calibrated by regular deployment of XBTs to measure the temperature structure of the water column. We collected 1280 km2 of seismic reflection data, consisting of 136533 shots recorded on 1920 channels, producing 260 million seismic traces, each ~ 14s long. This adds up to ~ 8 terabytes of data, representing, we believe, the largest ever academic 3D MCS survey in terms of both the area covered and the volume of data. The OBS deployment was the largest ever within an academic 3D survey.

  12. 3-D Color Wheels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuBois, Ann

    2010-01-01

    The blending of information from an academic class with projects from art class can do nothing but strengthen the learning power of the student. Creating three-dimensional color wheels provides the perfect opportunity to combine basic geometry knowledge with color theory. In this article, the author describes how her seventh-grade painting…

  13. 3D characterization of a Great Basin geothermal system: Astor Pass, NV

    SciTech Connect

    Siler, Drew L; Brett, Mayhew; Faulds, James E

    2012-12-03

    -dimensional geologic model of the Astor Pass blind geothermal system was constructed. The 3D structural framework indicates that the Pleistocene tufa is associated with three discrete fault zones whose intersections plunge moderately to steeply NW-NNW. These critically stressed fault intersections act as conduits for upwelling geothermal fluids.

  14. iBem3D, a three-dimensional iterative boundary element method using angular dislocations for modeling geologic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maerten, F.; Maerten, L.; Pollard, D. D.

    2014-11-01

    Most analytical solutions to engineering or geological problems are limited to simple geometries. For example, analytical solutions have been found to solve for stresses around a circular hole in a plate. To solve more complex problems, mathematicians and engineers have developed powerful computer-aided numerical methods, which can be categorized into two main types: differential methods and integral methods. The finite element method (FEM) is a differential method that was developed in the 1950s and is one of the most commonly used numerical methods today. Since its development, other differential methods, including the boundary element method (BEM), have been developed to solve different types of problems. The purpose of this paper is to describe iBem3D, formally called Poly3D, a C++ and modular 3D boundary element computer program based on the theory of angular dislocations for modeling three-dimensional (3D) discontinuities in an elastic, heterogeneous, isotropic whole- or half-space. After 20 years and more than 150 scientific publications, we present in detail the formulation behind this method, its enhancements over the years as well as some important applications in several domains of the geosciences. The main advantage of using this formulation, for describing geological objects such as faults, resides in the possibility of modeling complex geometries without gaps and overlaps between adjacent triangular dislocation elements, which is a significant shortcoming for models using rectangular dislocation elements. Reliability, speed, simplicity, and accuracy are enhanced in the latest version of the computer code. Industrial applications include subseismic fault modeling, fractured reservoir modeling, interpretation and validation of fault connectivity and reservoir compartmentalization, depleted area and fault reactivation, and pressurized wellbore stability. Academic applications include earthquake and volcano monitoring, hazard mitigation, and slope

  15. Taming supersymmetric defects in 3d-3d correspondence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gang, Dongmin; Kim, Nakwoo; Romo, Mauricio; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2016-07-01

    We study knots in 3d Chern-Simons theory with complex gauge group {SL}(N,{{C}}), in the context of its relation with 3d { N }=2 theory (the so-called 3d-3d correspondence). The defect has either co-dimension 2 or co-dimension 4 inside the 6d (2,0) theory, which is compactified on a 3-manifold \\hat{M}. We identify such defects in various corners of the 3d-3d correspondence, namely in 3d {SL}(N,{{C}}) CS theory, in 3d { N }=2 theory, in 5d { N }=2 super Yang-Mills theory, and in the M-theory holographic dual. We can make quantitative checks of the 3d-3d correspondence by computing partition functions at each of these theories. This Letter is a companion to a longer paper [1], which contains more details and more results.

  16. 3D Audio System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Ames Research Center research into virtual reality led to the development of the Convolvotron, a high speed digital audio processing system that delivers three-dimensional sound over headphones. It consists of a two-card set designed for use with a personal computer. The Convolvotron's primary application is presentation of 3D audio signals over headphones. Four independent sound sources are filtered with large time-varying filters that compensate for motion. The perceived location of the sound remains constant. Possible applications are in air traffic control towers or airplane cockpits, hearing and perception research and virtual reality development.

  17. The Rossiter-McLaughlin effect reloaded: Probing the 3D spin-orbit geometry, differential stellar rotation, and the spatially-resolved stellar spectrum of star-planet systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cegla, H. M.; Lovis, C.; Bourrier, V.; Beeck, B.; Watson, C. A.; Pepe, F.

    2016-04-01

    When a planet transits its host star, it blocks regions of the stellar surface from view; this causes a distortion of the spectral lines and a change in the line-of-sight (LOS) velocities, known as the Rossiter-McLaughlin (RM) effect. Since the LOS velocities depend, in part, on the stellar rotation, the RM waveform is sensitive to the star-planet alignment (which provides information on the system's dynamical history). We present a new RM modelling technique that directly measures the spatially-resolved stellar spectrum behind the planet. This is done by scaling the continuum flux of the (HARPS) spectra by the transit light curve, and then subtracting the in- from the out-of-transit spectra to isolate the starlight behind the planet. This technique does not assume any shape for the intrinsic local profiles. In it, we also allow for differential stellar rotation and centre-to-limb variations in the convective blueshift. We apply this technique to HD 189733 and compare to 3D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. We reject rigid body rotation with high confidence (>99% probability), which allows us to determine the occulted stellar latitudes and measure the stellar inclination. In turn, we determine both the sky-projected (λ ≈ -0.4 ± 0.2°) and true 3D obliquity (ψ ≈ 7+12-4°). We also find good agreement with the MHD simulations, with no significant centre-to-limb variations detectable in the local profiles. Hence, this technique provides a new powerful tool that can probe stellar photospheres, differential rotation, determine 3D obliquities, and remove sky-projection biases in planet migration theories. This technique can be implemented with existing instrumentation, but will become even more powerful with the next generation of high-precision radial velocity spectrographs.

  18. Active Fault Characterization in the Urban Area of Vienna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, Kurt; Grupe, Sabine; Hintersberger, Esther

    2016-04-01

    The identification of active faults that lie beneath a city is of key importance for seismic hazard assessment. Fault mapping and characterization in built-up areas with strong anthropogenic overprint is, however, a challenging task. Our study of Quaternary faults in the city of Vienna starts from the re-assessment of a borehole database of the municipality containing several tens of thousands of shallow boreholes. Data provide tight constraints on the geometry of Quaternary deposits and highlight several locations with fault-delimited Middle to Late Pleistocene terrace sediments of the Danube River. Additional information is obtained from geological descriptions of historical outcrops which partly date back to about 1900. The latter were found to be particularly valuable by providing unprejudiced descriptions of Quaternary faults, sometimes with stunning detail. The along-strike continuations of some of the identified faults are further imaged by industrial 2D/3D seismic acquired outside the city limits. The interpretation and the assessment of faults identified within the city benefit from a very well constrained tectonic model of the active Vienna Basin fault system which derived from data obtained outside the city limits. This data suggests that the urban faults are part of a system of normal faults compensating fault-normal extension at a releasing bend of the sinistral Vienna Basin Transfer Fault. Slip rates estimated for the faults in the city are in the range of several hundredths of millimetres per year and match the slip rates of normal faults that were trenched outside the city. The lengths/areas of individual faults estimated from maps and seismic reach up to almost 700 km² suggesting that all of the identified faults are capable of producing earthquakes with magnitudes M>6, some with magnitudes up to M~6.7.

  19. Parallel CARLOS-3D code development

    SciTech Connect

    Putnam, J.M.; Kotulski, J.D.

    1996-02-01

    CARLOS-3D is a three-dimensional scattering code which was developed under the sponsorship of the Electromagnetic Code Consortium, and is currently used by over 80 aerospace companies and government agencies. The code has been extensively validated and runs on both serial workstations and parallel super computers such as the Intel Paragon. CARLOS-3D is a three-dimensional surface integral equation scattering code based on a Galerkin method of moments formulation employing Rao- Wilton-Glisson roof-top basis for triangular faceted surfaces. Fully arbitrary 3D geometries composed of multiple conducting and homogeneous bulk dielectric materials can be modeled. This presentation describes some of the extensions to the CARLOS-3D code, and how the operator structure of the code facilitated these improvements. Body of revolution (BOR) and two-dimensional geometries were incorporated by simply including new input routines, and the appropriate Galerkin matrix operator routines. Some additional modifications were required in the combined field integral equation matrix generation routine due to the symmetric nature of the BOR and 2D operators. Quadrilateral patched surfaces with linear roof-top basis functions were also implemented in the same manner. Quadrilateral facets and triangular facets can be used in combination to more efficiently model geometries with both large smooth surfaces and surfaces with fine detail such as gaps and cracks. Since the parallel implementation in CARLOS-3D is at high level, these changes were independent of the computer platform being used. This approach minimizes code maintenance, while providing capabilities with little additional effort. Results are presented showing the performance and accuracy of the code for some large scattering problems. Comparisons between triangular faceted and quadrilateral faceted geometry representations will be shown for some complex scatterers.

  20. Design of 3D-Printed Titanium Compliant Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merriam, Ezekiel G.; Jones, Jonathan E.; Howell, Larry L.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes 3D-printed titanium compliant mechanisms for aerospace applications. It is meant as a primer to help engineers design compliant, multi-axis, printed parts that exhibit high performance. Topics covered include brief introductions to both compliant mechanism design and 3D printing in titanium, material and geometry considerations for 3D printing, modeling techniques, and case studies of both successful and unsuccessful part geometries. Key findings include recommended flexure geometries, minimum thicknesses, and general design guidelines for compliant printed parts that may not be obvious to the first time designer.

  1. Extra Dimensions: 3D in PDF Documentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Norman A.

    2012-12-01

    Experimental science is replete with multi-dimensional information which is often poorly represented by the two dimensions of presentation slides and print media. Past efforts to disseminate such information to a wider audience have failed for a number of reasons, including a lack of standards which are easy to implement and have broad support. Adobe's Portable Document Format (PDF) has in recent years become the de facto standard for secure, dependable electronic information exchange. It has done so by creating an open format, providing support for multiple platforms and being reliable and extensible. By providing support for the ECMA standard Universal 3D (U3D) and the ISO PRC file format in its free Adobe Reader software, Adobe has made it easy to distribute and interact with 3D content. Until recently, Adobe's Acrobat software was also capable of incorporating 3D content into PDF files from a variety of 3D file formats, including proprietary CAD formats. However, this functionality is no longer available in Acrobat X, having been spun off to a separate company. Incorporating 3D content now requires the additional purchase of a separate plug-in. In this talk we present alternatives based on open source libraries which allow the programmatic creation of 3D content in PDF format. While not providing the same level of access to CAD files as the commercial software, it does provide physicists with an alternative path to incorporate 3D content into PDF files from such disparate applications as detector geometries from Geant4, 3D data sets, mathematical surfaces or tesselated volumes.

  2. A workflow for 3D model building in fold-thrust belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, Hannah; Bond, Clare; Butler, Rob

    2016-04-01

    3D geological models can be used in fold-thrust belts for many purposes such as analysing geometric variation in folds, kinematic modelling to restore fold surfaces, generating strain distribution maps and predicting fracture network distribution. We present a workflow for 3D model building using outcrop bedding data, geological maps, Digital Terrain Models (DTM's), air photos and field photographs. We discuss the challenges of software limitations for 3D kinematic restoration and forward modelling in fold-thrust belt settings. We then discuss the sensitivity of model building approaches to the application of 3D geological models in fold-thrust belts for further analysis e.g. changes in along strike fold geometry, restoration using kinematic and geomechanical modelling, strain prediction and Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) modelling. To create 3D models geological maps and bedding data are digitised using Move software; digitised maps and data are then draped onto DTM's. A series of closely spaced cross section lines are selected; the orientation of these is calculated by determining the average orientation of bedding dip direction. Fault and horizon line intersections, along with bedding data from within a narrow margin of the section lines are projected onto each cross section. Field photographs and sketches are integrated into the cross sections to determine thrust angles at the surface. Horizon lines are then constructed using bedding data. Displacement profiles for thrusts are plotted to ensure thrust displacements are valid with respect to neighbouring cross section interpretations; any discrepancies are alleviated by making minor adjustments to horizon and thrust lines, while ensuring that resultant cross section geometries still adhere to bedding data and other field observations. Once the cross sections have been finalised, 3D surfaces are created using the horizon and thrust line interpretations on each cross section. The simple curvature of 3D surfaces

  3. Quasi 3D dosimetry (EPID, conventional 2D/3D detector matrices)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bäck, A.

    2015-01-01

    Patient specific pretreatment measurement for IMRT and VMAT QA should preferably give information with a high resolution in 3D. The ability to distinguish complex treatment plans, i.e. treatment plans with a difference between measured and calculated dose distributions that exceeds a specified tolerance, puts high demands on the dosimetry system used for the pretreatment measurements and the results of the measurement evaluation needs a clinical interpretation. There are a number of commercial dosimetry systems designed for pretreatment IMRT QA measurements. 2D arrays such as MapCHECK® (Sun Nuclear), MatriXXEvolution (IBA Dosimetry) and OCTAVIOUS® 1500 (PTW), 3D phantoms such as OCTAVIUS® 4D (PTW), ArcCHECK® (Sun Nuclear) and Delta4 (ScandiDos) and software for EPID dosimetry and 3D reconstruction of the dose in the patient geometry such as EPIDoseTM (Sun Nuclear) and Dosimetry CheckTM (Math Resolutions) are available. None of those dosimetry systems can measure the 3D dose distribution with a high resolution (full 3D dose distribution). Those systems can be called quasi 3D dosimetry systems. To be able to estimate the delivered dose in full 3D the user is dependent on a calculation algorithm in the software of the dosimetry system. All the vendors of the dosimetry systems mentioned above provide calculation algorithms to reconstruct a full 3D dose in the patient geometry. This enables analyzes of the difference between measured and calculated dose distributions in DVHs of the structures of clinical interest which facilitates the clinical interpretation and is a promising tool to be used for pretreatment IMRT QA measurements. However, independent validation studies on the accuracy of those algorithms are scarce. Pretreatment IMRT QA using the quasi 3D dosimetry systems mentioned above rely on both measurement uncertainty and accuracy of calculation algorithms. In this article, these quasi 3D dosimetry systems and their use in patient specific pretreatment IMRT

  4. 3-D numerical modelling of the influence of reactivated pre-existing faults on the distribution of deformation: example of North-Western Ghana around 2.15-2.00 Ga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    FENG, Xiaojun; Gerbault, Muriel; Martin, Roland; Ganne, Jérôme; Jessell, Mark

    2015-04-01

    High strain zones appear to play a significant role in feeding the upper crust with fluids and partially molten material from lower crust sources. The Bole-Bulenga terrain (North-Western Ghana) is located in between two subvertical shear zones, and mainly consists of high-grade orthogneisses, paragneisses and metabasites intruded by partially molten lower crustal material with monzogranites and orthogneisses (Eburnean orogeny, around 2.1 Ga). In order to understand the location of these high grade rocks at the edges and in between these two shear zones, a three dimensional numerical model was built to test the influence of different orientations of a system of branched strike-slip faults on visco-plastic deformation, under compressional and simple shear boundary conditions. Our models indicate domains of tensile vs. compressional strain as well as shear zones, and show that not only internal fault zones but also the host rock in between the faults behave relatively softer than external regions. Under both applied compressive and simple shear boundary conditions, these softened domains constitute preferential zones of tensile strain accommodation (dilation) in the upper crust, which may favor infilling by deeper partially molten rocks. Our modeled pre-existing faults zones are assumed to have formed during an early D1 stage of deformation, and they are shown to passively migrate and rotate together with the solid matrix under applied external boundary conditions (corresponding to a post D1 - early D2 phase of deformation). We suggest that in the Bole-Bulenga terrain, fluids or partially molten material stored in deeper crustal domains, preferentially intruded the upper crust within these highly (shear and tensile) strained domains, thanks to this D2 shearing deformation phase. Building relief at the surface is primarily controlled by fault orientations, together with mechanical parameters and external boundary conditions. In particular, greatest magnitudes of relief

  5. Basement structure of the Hontomín CO2 storage site (Spain) determined by integration of microgravity and 3-D seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrés, Juvenal; Alcalde, Juan; Ayarza, Puy; Saura, Eduard; Marzán, Ignacio; Martí, David; Ramón Martínez Catalán, José; Carbonell, Ramón; Pérez-Estaún, Andrés; García-Lobón, José Luis; Rubio, Félix Manuel

    2016-05-01

    A multidisciplinary study has been carried out in Hontomín (Spain) to determine the basement structural setting, its geometry and the geometry of the sedimentary succession of an area aimed to be the first Spanish pilot plant for CO2 storage. An integration of coincident 3-D seismic results, borehole data and unpublished microgravity data were used to reproduce the deep structure and topography of the basement and to quantify the thickness of the Triassic Keuper evaporites. The subsurface structure is characterized by a half-graben setting filled with Keuper evaporites (up to 2000 m thick), forming an extensional forced fold. All data sets clearly identify two main fault systems, compartmentalizing the main structural domain into three differentiated blocks. These faults have been interpreted to be reactivated normal faults that have led to the formation of the Hontomín dome.

  6. 3D Model of the Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area

    DOE Data Explorer

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31

    The Neal Hot Springs geothermal system lies in a left-step in a north-striking, west-dipping normal fault system, consisting of the Neal Fault to the south and the Sugarloaf Butte Fault to the north (Edwards, 2013). The Neal Hot Springs 3D geologic model consists of 104 faults and 13 stratigraphic units. The stratigraphy is sub-horizontal to dipping <10 degrees and there is no predominant dip-direction. Geothermal production is exclusively from the Neal Fault south of, and within the step-over, while geothermal injection is into both the Neal Fault to the south of the step-over and faults within the step-over.

  7. Urbanisation and 3d Spatial - a Geometric Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, E. E.; Rahman, A. Abdul

    2013-09-01

    Urbanisation creates immense competition for space, this may be attributed to an increase in population owing to domestic and external tourism. Most cities are constantly exploring all avenues in maximising its limited space. Hence, urban or city authorities need to plan, expand and use such three dimensional (3D) space above, on and below the city space. Thus, difficulties in property ownership and the geometric representation of the 3D city space is a major challenge. This research, investigates the concept of representing a geometric topological 3D spatial model capable of representing 3D volume parcels for man-made constructions above and below the 3D surface volume parcel. A review of spatial data models suggests that the 3D TIN (TEN) model is significant and can be used as a unified model. The concepts, logical and physical models of 3D TIN for 3D volumes using tetrahedrons as the base geometry is presented and implemented to show man-made constructions above and below the surface parcel within a user friendly graphical interface. Concepts for 3D topology and 3D analysis are discussed. Simulations of this model for 3D cadastre are implemented. This model can be adopted by most countries to enhance and streamline geometric 3D property ownership for urban centres. 3D TIN concept for spatial modelling can be adopted for the LA_Spatial part of the Land Administration Domain Model (LADM) (ISO/TC211, 2012), this satisfies the concept of 3D volumes.

  8. Three-dimensional characterization of a crustal-scale fault zone: The Pusteria and Sprechenstein fault system (Eastern Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bistacchi, Andrea; Massironi, Matteo; Menegon, Luca

    2010-12-01

    The characterization and representation of fault zones is of paramount importance for studies of fault and earthquake mechanics, since their rheological and geometric complexity controls seismic/aseismic behaviour and fluid circulation at depth. We present a 3D geological model of a fault system, created by integrating borehole and surface structural data, which allows us to bridge the gap between outcrop-scale descriptions and large-scale geophysical models. The model integrates (i) fault geometry and topology, (ii) fault-rock distribution, and (iii) characterization of fracturing in damage zones at the km scale. The dextral-reverse Pusteria and Sprechenstein-Mules Faults (Italian Eastern Alps) provide an opportunity to study fault rocks and damage distribution as a function of host-rock lithology and fabric, and of fault geometry. A first-order control is exerted by the composition of protoliths (quartzo-feldspathic vs. phyllosilicate-rich) and/or by the presence of an inherited anisotropic fabric (massive vs. foliated), resulting in a marked asymmetry of damage zones. Interestingly, the pervasive foliation typical of some protoliths may explain both this asymmetry and the relative weakness of one of the faults. The importance of geometrical factors is highlighted when the damage zone thickness increases five times in proximity to a km-scale contractional jog. On the other hand, the type of fault rock present within the fault core does not show a direct relationship with damage intensity. In addition, the thickness of damage zones along planar fault segments does not appear to grow indefinitely with displacement, as might be envisaged from some scaling laws. We interpret both of these observations as reflecting the maturity of these large-displacement faults.

  9. Impact of pre- and/or syn-tectonic salt layers in the hangingwall geometry of a kinked-planar extensional fault: insights from analogue modelling and comparison with the Parentis basin (bay of Biscay)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer, O.; Vendeville, B. C.; Roca, E.

    2012-04-01

    Using sandbox analogue modelling we determine the role played by a pre-kinematic or a syn-kinematic viscous salt layer during rollover folding of the hangingwall of a normal fault with a variable kinked-planar geometry, as well as understand the origin and the mechanisms that control the formation, kinematic evolution and geometry of salt structures developed in the hangingwall of this fault. The experiments we conducted consisted of nine models made of dry quartz-sand (35μm average grain size) simulating brittle rocks and a viscous silicone polymer (SMG 36 from Dow Corning) simulating salt in nature. The models were constructed between two end walls, one of which was fixed, whereas the other was moved by a motor-driven worm screw. The fixed wall was part of the rigid footwall of the model's master border fault. This fault was simulated using three different wood block configurations, which was overlain by a flexible (but not stretchable) sheet that was attached to the mobile endwall of the model. We applied three different infill hangingwall configurations to each fault geometry: (1) without silicone (sand only), (2) sand overlain by a pre-kinematic silicone layer deposited above the entire hanginwall, and (3) sand partly overlain by a syn-kinematic silicone layer that overlain only parts of the hangingwall. All models were subjected to a 14 cm of basement extension in a direction orthogonal to that of the border fault. Results show that the presence of a viscous layer (silicone) clearly controls the deformation pattern of the hangingwall. Thus, regardless of the silicone layer's geometry (either pre- or syn-extensional) or the geometry of the extensional fault, the silicone layer acts as a very efficient detachment level separating two different structural styles in each unit. In particular, the silicone layer acts as an extensional ductile shear zone inhibiting upward propagation of normal faults and/or shears bands from the sub-silicone layers. Whereas the

  10. Cadomian tectonics in northern Brittany: a contribution of 3-D crustal-scale modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brun, J.-P.; Guennoc, P.; Truffert, C.; Vairon, J.; Armor Working Group Of The Geofrance 3-D Program

    2001-02-01

    Both available and newly acquired geological and geophysical data processed in the framework of the ARMOR project have been used to construct a 3-D geometric and geological model of the Cadomian domain of northern Brittany. The major results of the data processing are presented and discussed relative to a composite profile transecting the studied domain and constructed from the surface geology, reflection seismics, magnetotelluric soundings and gravimetric data. They are then extrapolated at regional scale through a series of cross-sections compiled from the surface geology and gravimetric data and calibrated onto the composite profile. The 3-D crustal-scale models were computed according to two procedures. The first, using a STRIM Matra Datavision modeler, defines various interfaces through correlation between adjacent cross-sections and is well adapted to the 3-D representation of geological structures. The second, based on Voronoı̈ diagrams, leads to a volumetric model of the geological units and is a powerful tool for calculating 3-D geophysical responses of the model when the physical properties of the rock units are known. The tectonic implications of the computed 3-D crustal-scale geometry of the Cadomian domain are then discussed in terms of volcanic-arc thrusting, with special emphasis being placed on the obliquity of the shortening direction by reference to the thrust fault trend. Finally, the data are used to demonstrate the reactivation of some Cadomian faults during the deposition of Ordovician sandstones and following the emplacement of the Paleozoic dolerite dyke swarm of northern Brittany.

  11. Deep structure of the Argentine margin inferred from 3D gravity and temperature modelling, Colorado Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Autin, J.; Scheck-Wenderoth, M.; Götze, H.-J.; Reichert, C.; Marchal, D.

    2016-04-01

    Following previous work on the Colorado Basin using a 3D crustal structural model, we now investigate the presence of lower crustal bodies at the base of the crust using 3D lithospheric gravity modelling and calculations of the conductive thermal field. Our first study highlighted two fault directions and depocentres associated with thinned crust (NW-SE in the West and NE-SW at the distal margin). Fault relative chronology argues for two periods of extension: (1) NW-SE faulting and thinning in the western Colorado Basin and (2) NE-SW faulting and thinning related to the continental breakup and formation of the NE-SW-striking volcanic margins of the Atlantic Ocean. In this study, the geometry of modelled high-density Lower Crustal Bodies (LCBs) enables the reproduction of the gravimetric field as well as of the temperature measured in wells down to 4500 m. The modelled LCBs correlate with geological observations: (1) NW-SE LCBs below the deepest depocentres in the West, (2) NE-SW LCBs below the distal margin faults and the seaward dipping reflectors. Thus the proposed poly-phased evolution of the margin could as well correspond to two emplacement phases of the LCBs. The calculated conductive thermal field fits the measured temperatures best if the thermal properties (thermal conductivity and radiogenic heat production) assigned to the LCBs correspond to either high-grade metamorphic rocks or to mafic magmatic intrusions. To explain the possible lithology of the LCBs, we propose that the two successive phases of extension are accompanied by magma supply, emplaced (1) in the thinnest crust below the older NW-SE depocentres, then (2) along the NE-SW continentward boundary of the distal margin and below the volcanic seaward dipping reflectors. The South African conjugate margin records only the second NE-SW event and we discuss hypotheses which could explain these differences between the conjugate margins.

  12. Faster Aerodynamic Simulation With Cart3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    A NASA-developed aerodynamic simulation tool is ensuring the safety of future space operations while providing designers and engineers with an automated, highly accurate computer simulation suite. Cart3D, co-winner of NASA's 2002 Software of the Year award, is the result of over 10 years of research and software development conducted by Michael Aftosmis and Dr. John Melton of Ames Research Center and Professor Marsha Berger of the Courant Institute at New York University. Cart3D offers a revolutionary approach to computational fluid dynamics (CFD), the computer simulation of how fluids and gases flow around an object of a particular design. By fusing technological advancements in diverse fields such as mineralogy, computer graphics, computational geometry, and fluid dynamics, the software provides a new industrial geometry processing and fluid analysis capability with unsurpassed automation and efficiency.

  13. 3D Printed Multimaterial Microfluidic Valve.

    PubMed

    Keating, Steven J; Gariboldi, Maria Isabella; Patrick, William G; Sharma, Sunanda; Kong, David S; Oxman, Neri

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel 3D printed multimaterial microfluidic proportional valve. The microfluidic valve is a fundamental primitive that enables the development of programmable, automated devices for controlling fluids in a precise manner. We discuss valve characterization results, as well as exploratory design variations in channel width, membrane thickness, and membrane stiffness. Compared to previous single material 3D printed valves that are stiff, these printed valves constrain fluidic deformation spatially, through combinations of stiff and flexible materials, to enable intricate geometries in an actuated, functionally graded device. Research presented marks a shift towards 3D printing multi-property programmable fluidic devices in a single step, in which integrated multimaterial valves can be used to control complex fluidic reactions for a variety of applications, including DNA assembly and analysis, continuous sampling and sensing, and soft robotics.

  14. 3D Printed Multimaterial Microfluidic Valve

    PubMed Central

    Patrick, William G.; Sharma, Sunanda; Kong, David S.; Oxman, Neri

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel 3D printed multimaterial microfluidic proportional valve. The microfluidic valve is a fundamental primitive that enables the development of programmable, automated devices for controlling fluids in a precise manner. We discuss valve characterization results, as well as exploratory design variations in channel width, membrane thickness, and membrane stiffness. Compared to previous single material 3D printed valves that are stiff, these printed valves constrain fluidic deformation spatially, through combinations of stiff and flexible materials, to enable intricate geometries in an actuated, functionally graded device. Research presented marks a shift towards 3D printing multi-property programmable fluidic devices in a single step, in which integrated multimaterial valves can be used to control complex fluidic reactions for a variety of applications, including DNA assembly and analysis, continuous sampling and sensing, and soft robotics. PMID:27525809

  15. 3D Printed Multimaterial Microfluidic Valve.

    PubMed

    Keating, Steven J; Gariboldi, Maria Isabella; Patrick, William G; Sharma, Sunanda; Kong, David S; Oxman, Neri

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel 3D printed multimaterial microfluidic proportional valve. The microfluidic valve is a fundamental primitive that enables the development of programmable, automated devices for controlling fluids in a precise manner. We discuss valve characterization results, as well as exploratory design variations in channel width, membrane thickness, and membrane stiffness. Compared to previous single material 3D printed valves that are stiff, these printed valves constrain fluidic deformation spatially, through combinations of stiff and flexible materials, to enable intricate geometries in an actuated, functionally graded device. Research presented marks a shift towards 3D printing multi-property programmable fluidic devices in a single step, in which integrated multimaterial valves can be used to control complex fluidic reactions for a variety of applications, including DNA assembly and analysis, continuous sampling and sensing, and soft robotics. PMID:27525809

  16. 3-D Mesh Generation Nonlinear Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Christon, M. A.; Dovey, D.; Stillman, D. W.; Hallquist, J. O.; Rainsberger, R. B

    1994-04-07

    INGRID is a general-purpose, three-dimensional mesh generator developed for use with finite element, nonlinear, structural dynamics codes. INGRID generates the large and complex input data files for DYNA3D, NIKE3D, FACET, and TOPAZ3D. One of the greatest advantages of INGRID is that virtually any shape can be described without resorting to wedge elements, tetrahedrons, triangular elements or highly distorted quadrilateral or hexahedral elements. Other capabilities available are in the areas of geometry and graphics. Exact surface equations and surface intersections considerably improve the ability to deal with accurate models, and a hidden line graphics algorithm is included which is efficient on the most complicated meshes. The primary new capability is associated with the boundary conditions, loads, and material properties required by nonlinear mechanics programs. Commands have been designed for each case to minimize user effort. This is particularly important since special processing is almost always required for each load or boundary condition.

  17. 3-D Finite Element Heat Transfer

    1992-02-01

    TOPAZ3D is a three-dimensional implicit finite element computer code for heat transfer analysis. TOPAZ3D can be used to solve for the steady-state or transient temperature field on three-dimensional geometries. Material properties may be temperature-dependent and either isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time-dependent and temperature-dependent boundary conditions can be specified including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation. By implementing the user subroutine feature, users can model chemical reaction kinetics and allow for any type of functionalmore » representation of boundary conditions and internal heat generation. TOPAZ3D can solve problems of diffuse and specular band radiation in an enclosure coupled with conduction in the material surrounding the enclosure. Additional features include thermal contact resistance across an interface, bulk fluids, phase change, and energy balances.« less

  18. Prominent rocks - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Many prominent rocks near the Sagan Memorial Station are featured in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. Wedge is at lower left; Shark, Half-Dome, and Pumpkin are at center. Flat Top, about four inches high, is at lower right. The horizon in the distance is one to two kilometers away.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  19. 'Diamond' in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D, microscopic imager mosaic of a target area on a rock called 'Diamond Jenness' was taken after NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity ground into the surface with its rock abrasion tool for a second time.

    Opportunity has bored nearly a dozen holes into the inner walls of 'Endurance Crater.' On sols 177 and 178 (July 23 and July 24, 2004), the rover worked double-duty on Diamond Jenness. Surface debris and the bumpy shape of the rock resulted in a shallow and irregular hole, only about 2 millimeters (0.08 inch) deep. The final depth was not enough to remove all the bumps and leave a neat hole with a smooth floor. This extremely shallow depression was then examined by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

    On Sol 178, Opportunity's 'robotic rodent' dined on Diamond Jenness once again, grinding almost an additional 5 millimeters (about 0.2 inch). The rover then applied its Moessbauer spectrometer to the deepened hole. This double dose of Diamond Jenness enabled the science team to examine the rock at varying layers. Results from those grindings are currently being analyzed.

    The image mosaic is about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across.

  20. Martian terrain - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This area of terrain near the Sagan Memorial Station was taken on Sol 3 by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP). 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail.

    The IMP is a stereo imaging system with color capability provided by 24 selectable filters -- twelve filters per 'eye.' It stands 1.8 meters above the Martian surface, and has a resolution of two millimeters at a range of two meters.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  1. Fault connectivity, distributed shortening, and impacts on geologic- geodetic slip rate discrepancies in the central Mojave Desert, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selander, J.; Oskin, M. E.; Cooke, M. L.; Grette, K.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding off-fault deformation and distribution of displacement rates associated with disconnected strike-slip faults requires a three-dimensional view of fault geometries. We address problems associated with distributed faulting by studying the Mojave segment of the East California Shear Zone (ECSZ), a region dominated by northwest-directed dextral shear along disconnected northwest- southeast striking faults. We use a combination of cross-sectional interpretations, 3D Boundary Element Method (BEM) models, and slip-rate measurements to test new hypothesized fault connections. We find that reverse faulting acts as an important means of slip transfer between strike-slip faults, and show that the impacts of these structural connections on shortening, uplift, strike-slip rates, and off-fault deformation, help to reconcile the overall strain budget across this portion of the ECSZ. In detail, we focus on the Calico and Blackwater faults, which are hypothesized to together represent the longest linked fault system in the Mojave ECSZ, connected by a restraining step at 35°N. Across this restraining step the system displays a pronounced displacement gradient, where dextral offset decreases from ~11.5 to <2 km from south to north. Cross-section interpretations show that ~40% of this displacement is transferred from the Calico fault to the Harper Lake and Blackwater faults via a set of north-dipping thrust ramps. Late Quaternary dextral slip rates follow a similar pattern, where 1.4 +0.8/-0.4 mm/yr of slip along the Calico fault south of 35°N is distributed to the Harper Lake, Blackwater, and Tin Can Alley faults. BEM model results using revised fault geometries for the Mojave ECSZ show areas of uplift consistent with contractional structures, and fault slip-rates that more closely match geologic data. Overall, revised fault connections and addition of off-fault deformation greatly reduces the discrepancy between geodetic and geologic slip rates.

  2. High precision locations of microseismicity on south-eastern flank of Mt. Etna: reconstruction of fault planes geometry and related dynamic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvatore, A.; Savatore, G.; Vincenza, M.

    2006-12-01

    Since the beginning of 2001 Mt. Etna seismic activity revealed a change in the dynamic conditions acting on the volcano revealed by moderate-high levels of seismicity mainly restricted to the eastern flank of the edifice. The 2001-2006 period has been characterized by the 2001, 2002-2003 and 2004-2005 eruptive episodes and by a marked eastward displacement of the eastern flank. Hypocenters of eastern flank seismicity have been relocated applying two different techniques: the double- difference approach of Waldhauser and Ellsworth (2000) and a multiplets technique that use a cross-spectrum method based on that discussed by Fremont and Malone (1987). For the last technique we also investigated the presence of possible multiplet events measuring the waveform similarity with a cross-correlation function. The two approach give as very similar results furnishing high-precision locations of ca. 90 earthquakes distributed along some structure oriented ca. NE-SW and NW-SE; these alignments are in agreement with fault plane solutions (FPSs) calculated for all the events. This approach has allowed us to define: a) geometry of some depth structures of the eastern flank that have no surface evidences. b) the complex dynamic of these structure that may give new elements to the scientific debate about the causes of the large deformative effects measured on the eastern flank of the edifice. Frèmont, M.J., Malone, S.D., 1987. High precision relative locations of earthquake at Mount St. Helens, Washington. J. Geophy. Res., 92, 10223-10236. Waldhauser F. and W.L. Ellsworth, 2000 A double-difference earthquake location algorithm: Method and application to the northern Hayward fault, Bull. Seism. Soc. Am., 90, 1353-1368.

  3. GEN3D Ver. 1.37

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-04

    GEN3D is a three-dimensional mesh generation program. The three-dimensional mesh is generated by mapping a two-dimensional mesh into threedimensions according to one of four types of transformations: translating, rotating, mapping onto a spherical surface, and mapping onto a cylindrical surface. The generated three-dimensional mesh can then be reoriented by offsetting, reflecting about an axis, and revolving about an axis. GEN3D can be used to mesh geometries that are axisymmetric or planar, but, due to three-dimensional loading or boundary conditions, require a three-dimensional finite element mesh and analysis. More importantly, it can be used to mesh complex three-dimensional geometries composed of several sections when the sections can be defined in terms of transformations of two dimensional geometries. The code GJOIN is then used to join the separate sections into a single body. GEN3D reads and writes twodimensional and threedimensional mesh databases in the GENESIS database format; therefore, it is compatible with the preprocessing, postprocessing, and analysis codes used by the Engineering Analysis Department at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM.

  4. GEN3D Ver. 1.37

    2012-01-04

    GEN3D is a three-dimensional mesh generation program. The three-dimensional mesh is generated by mapping a two-dimensional mesh into threedimensions according to one of four types of transformations: translating, rotating, mapping onto a spherical surface, and mapping onto a cylindrical surface. The generated three-dimensional mesh can then be reoriented by offsetting, reflecting about an axis, and revolving about an axis. GEN3D can be used to mesh geometries that are axisymmetric or planar, but, due to three-dimensionalmore » loading or boundary conditions, require a three-dimensional finite element mesh and analysis. More importantly, it can be used to mesh complex three-dimensional geometries composed of several sections when the sections can be defined in terms of transformations of two dimensional geometries. The code GJOIN is then used to join the separate sections into a single body. GEN3D reads and writes twodimensional and threedimensional mesh databases in the GENESIS database format; therefore, it is compatible with the preprocessing, postprocessing, and analysis codes used by the Engineering Analysis Department at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM.« less

  5. Migrating from 2D to 3D in "Autograph"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Douglas

    2006-01-01

    With both "Cabri" and "Autograph" now venturing into 3D, the dimension that previously was only demonstrated in the classroom with a lot of arm waving and crude wire cages can now be explored dynamically on screen. "Cabri 3D" concentrates on constructions, using the principles of Euclidian geometry, whereas "Autograph" creates objects using a…

  6. Multi-view and 3D deformable part models.

    PubMed

    Pepik, Bojan; Stark, Michael; Gehler, Peter; Schiele, Bernt

    2015-11-01

    As objects are inherently 3D, they have been modeled in 3D in the early days of computer vision. Due to the ambiguities arising from mapping 2D features to 3D models, 3D object representations have been neglected and 2D feature-based models are the predominant paradigm in object detection nowadays. While such models have achieved outstanding bounding box detection performance, they come with limited expressiveness, as they are clearly limited in their capability of reasoning about 3D shape or viewpoints. In this work, we bring the worlds of 3D and 2D object representations closer, by building an object detector which leverages the expressive power of 3D object representations while at the same time can be robustly matched to image evidence. To that end, we gradually extend the successful deformable part model [1] to include viewpoint information and part-level 3D geometry information, resulting in several different models with different level of expressiveness. We end up with a 3D object model, consisting of multiple object parts represented in 3D and a continuous appearance model. We experimentally verify that our models, while providing richer object hypotheses than the 2D object models, provide consistently better joint object localization and viewpoint estimation than the state-of-the-art multi-view and 3D object detectors on various benchmarks (KITTI [2] , 3D object classes [3] , Pascal3D+ [4] , Pascal VOC 2007 [5] , EPFL multi-view cars[6] ). PMID:26440264

  7. Earthquake rupture process recreated from a natural fault surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Tom; Minasian, Diane L.

    2015-11-01

    What exactly happens on the rupture surface as an earthquake nucleates, spreads, and stops? We cannot observe this directly, and models depend on assumptions about physical conditions and geometry at depth. We thus measure a natural fault surface and use its 3-D coordinates to construct a replica at 0.1 m resolution to obviate geometry uncertainty. We can recreate stick-slip behavior on the resulting finite element model that depends solely on observed fault geometry. We clamp the fault together and apply steady state tectonic stress until seismic slip initiates and terminates. Our recreated M ~ 1 earthquake initiates at contact points where there are steep surface gradients because infinitesimal lateral displacements reduce clamping stress most efficiently there. Unclamping enables accelerating slip to spread across the surface, but the fault soon jams up because its uneven, anisotropic shape begins to juxtapose new high-relief sticking points. These contacts would ultimately need to be sheared off or strongly deformed before another similar earthquake could occur. Our model shows that an important role is played by fault-wall geometry, although we do not include effects of varying fluid pressure or exotic rheologies on the fault surfaces. We extrapolate our results to large fault systems using observed self-similarity properties and suggest that larger ruptures might begin and end in a similar way, although the scale of geometrical variation in fault shape that can arrest a rupture necessarily scales with magnitude. In other words, fault segmentation may be a magnitude-dependent phenomenon and could vary with each subsequent rupture.

  8. Earthquake rupture process recreated from a natural fault surface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, Thomas E.; Minasian, Diane L.

    2015-01-01

    What exactly happens on the rupture surface as an earthquake nucleates, spreads, and stops? We cannot observe this directly, and models depend on assumptions about physical conditions and geometry at depth. We thus measure a natural fault surface and use its 3D coordinates to construct a replica at 0.1 m resolution to obviate geometry uncertainty. We can recreate stick-slip behavior on the resulting finite element model that depends solely on observed fault geometry. We clamp the fault together and apply steady state tectonic stress until seismic slip initiates and terminates. Our recreated M~1 earthquake initiates at contact points where there are steep surface gradients because infinitesimal lateral displacements reduce clamping stress most efficiently there. Unclamping enables accelerating slip to spread across the surface, but the fault soon jams up because its uneven, anisotropic shape begins to juxtapose new high-relief sticking points. These contacts would ultimately need to be sheared off or strongly deformed before another similar earthquake could occur. Our model shows that an important role is played by fault-wall geometry, though we do not include effects of varying fluid pressure or exotic rheologies on the fault surfaces. We extrapolate our results to large fault systems using observed self-similarity properties, and suggest that larger ruptures might begin and end in a similar way, though the scale of geometrical variation in fault shape that can arrest a rupture necessarily scales with magnitude. In other words, fault segmentation may be a magnitude dependent phenomenon and could vary with each subsequent rupture.

  9. 3D geometrical modelling of post-foliation deformations in metamorphic terrains (Syros, Cyclades, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philippon, Mélody; Le Carlier de Veslud, Christian; Gueydan, Frédéric; Brun, Jean-Pierre; Caumon, Guillaume

    2015-09-01

    Superposed to ductile syn-metamorphic deformations, post-foliation deformations affect metamorphic units during their exhumation. Understanding the role of such deformations in the structuration of metamorphic units is key for understanding the tectonic evolution of convergence zones. We characterize post-foliations deformations using 3D modelling which is a first-order tool to describe complex geological structures, but a challenging task where based only on surface data. We propose a modelling procedure that combines fast draft models (interpolation of orientation data), with more complex ones where the structural context is better understood (implicit modelling), allowing us to build a 3D geometrical model of Syros Island blueschists (Cyclades), based on field data. With our approach, the 3D model is able to capture the complex present-day geometry of the island, mainly controlled by the superposition of three types of post-metamorphic deformations affecting the original metamorphic pile: i) a top-to-South ramp-flat extensional system that dominates the overall island structure, ii) large-scale folding of the metamorphic units associated with ramp-flat extensional system, and iii) steeply-dipping normal faults trending dominantly NNW-SSE and EW. The 3D surfaces produced by this method match outcrop data, are geologically consistent, and provide reasonable estimates of geological structures in poorly constrained areas.

  10. 3D dynamic roadmapping for abdominal catheterizations.

    PubMed

    Bender, Frederik; Groher, Martin; Khamene, Ali; Wein, Wolfgang; Heibel, Tim Hauke; Navab, Nassir

    2008-01-01

    Despite rapid advances in interventional imaging, the navigation of a guide wire through abdominal vasculature remains, not only for novice radiologists, a difficult task. Since this navigation is mostly based on 2D fluoroscopic image sequences from one view, the process is slowed down significantly due to missing depth information and patient motion. We propose a novel approach for 3D dynamic roadmapping in deformable regions by predicting the location of the guide wire tip in a 3D vessel model from the tip's 2D location, respiratory motion analysis, and view geometry. In a first step, the method compensates for the apparent respiratory motion in 2D space before backprojecting the 2D guide wire tip into three dimensional space, using a given projection matrix. To countervail the error connected to the projection parameters and the motion compensation, as well as the ambiguity caused by vessel deformation, we establish a statistical framework, which computes a reliable estimate of the guide wire tip location within the 3D vessel model. With this 2D-to-3D transfer, the navigation can be performed from arbitrary viewing angles, disconnected from the static perspective view of the fluoroscopic sequence. Tests on a realistic breathing phantom and on synthetic data with a known ground truth clearly reveal the superiority of our approach compared to naive methods for 3D roadmapping. The concepts and information presented in this paper are based on research and are not commercially available. PMID:18982662

  11. Combination of photogrammetric and geoelectric methods to assess 3d structures associated to natural hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System